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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 03.18.2017 • $1.50

HIGHLAND’S HEROIC PARAMEDIC

‘EVERYTHING ALIGNEDPERFECTLY’ BY WALKER MOSKOP AND CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HIGHLAND • Todd Zobrist and Ty

Barr were entering the 23rd hour of a 24-hour shift when they received a call that a driver had plunged into Silver Lake around 5:30 a.m. Thursday morning. The Highland, Ill., paramedics were already in their ambulance, so they rushed to the scene. It was still dark outside, and they arrived to see a mostly submerged

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Highland paramedic Todd Zobrist (center) pulled a 3-month-old from a submerged vehicle in Silver Lake on Thursday morning.

Nissan Armada SUV resting 75 feet or so out into the lake with its lights still on and the doors closed. Zobrist, a lanky distance runner, stripped down to his pants and ran into the lake. After the shock of the frigid water, he briefly secondguessed himself. “When I got halfway there, I was thoroughly thinking to myself, ‘This is a really terrible decision,” he said, “and I really just need to turn myself around and go back to the dock because I’m going

Trump, Merkel try to sidestep diferences First White House meeting includes awkward moments

See HERO • Page A4

Father in burning house was fatally shot

ASSOCIATED PRESS

German Chancellor Angela Merkel listens to President Donald Trump at a news conference.

BY KEN THOMAS AND JILL COLVIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Though pre-

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com FROM STAFF REPORTS

The ex-husband of a woman whose body was found in Silver Lake in Highland died of a gunshot wound to the head in the couple’s burning house in Glen Carbon, the Madison County coroner said Friday. The body found inside the house was identified as that of Justin Campbell, 37. The body of Campbell’s ex-wife, Cristy Campbell, 32, was recovered from the lake Thursday afternoon. The

Justin Campbell

Cristy Campbell

preliminary cause of death was exposure and drowning. A 3-month-old was rescued from a submerged SUV that police say was Cristy Campbell’s. The baby had been expected to be released from the hospital Friday. Police found a gun in the SUV in the lake. Coroner Stephen Nonn said in a press release that it won’t be possible to determine whether the gun recovered from the SUV was used in the killing of See HIGHLAND • Page A4

Hannah (right) and Emily Kramer sort and box donated clothing with several other volunteers Friday. A donation drive was held at Edwardsville High School for the seven Campbell children, who lost their parents and home Thursday.

senting a study in contrasts, President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel took a similar tack Friday in sidestepping diferences after their first meeting at the White House. Trump asserted with a smile that they had at least one thing in common: being wiretapped by the Obama administration. Trump repeated his contention that former President Barack Obama may have tapped his phones in Trump Tower. He sought to turn the explosive charge into a light joke when asked about concerns raised by the British government that the White House is now citing a debunked claim that U.K. spies snooped on Trump. “At least we have something in common, perhaps,” Trump said casually, referring to 2014 reports that the U.S. was monitoring Merkel’s cellphone conversations. As for the most recent report, Trump said he shouldn’t be blamed for quoting a Fox News analyst who had accused British intelligence of helping Obama spy on him. The German chancellor maintained her composure during the awkward diplomatic moment. When a German reporter See TRUMP • Page A6

Hidden murals peek out during botanical garden restoration

Florissant woman celebrates after son is freed from prison

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • German-American botanist George Engelmann probably would approve of the restoration of a historic building at the Missouri Botanical Garden. When a contractor recently knocked out part of a dropped plaster ceiling in a side room of the garden’s Museum Building, a studious-looking portrait of Engelmann on a revealed barrel-vaulted ceiling above stared back at him. The discovery is among the first workers have made as they’ve started restoration

A 96-year-old Florissant woman is eager to reconnect with the son who was released this week after the conviction that had kept him imprisoned in California for 32 years was thrown out. “I’m just elated he’s out,” Margie Davis said Friday. The Los Angeles Times reports Davis’ son Andrew Leander Wilson, 62, was jailed on robbery and murder convictions in the stabbing death of 21-year-old Christopher Hansen in 1984.

See MURALS • Page A4

TODAY

High art

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CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com The likeness of George Engelmann, a friend of Missouri Botanical Garden founder Henry Shaw, is seen peering from an entombed ceiling in the old library building at the Missouri Botanical Garden.

See FREE • Page A6

Mizzou rallies to oust South Florida

Funds approved for Blues facility

SPORTS

Final set for Women’s Frozen Four

• A3

Greitens to sell one state airplane Wainwright has rough outing

• A5

• B1

1 M • B1

Vol. 139, No. 77 ©2017

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M 1 SATURDAY • 03.18.2017 • A2

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First home of St. Louis-born Maya Angelou is up for sale

Gorsuch has written against assisted suicide, euthanasia Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch makes it clear in a book and other writings that he is not a fan of assisted suicide and euthanasia. His reasoning stems from his investigation of the subject stretching from ancient Greece to modern times. His book, titled “The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia,” was published in 2006. In it, he concludes that “the intentional taking of human life by private persons is always wrong.” Gorsuch was appointed to the Denver federal appeals court the same year. He has never ruled on an assisted suicide case.

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MARKET ACTION • The first home of St. Louis-born poet Maya Angelou has hit the local real estate market. Built in 1888, the two-story, threebedroom home is at 3130 Hickory Street, just east of Compton Avenue. It has 1,300 square feet and 2.5 baths. Real estate agent Tyler Olsen said the asking price is $159,000. Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson in 1928 and lived in the Hickory home of her maternal grandparents, Thomas and Marguerite Baxter. She lived there for three years and then was sent to live with her paternal grandmother in Arkansas. She returned five years later and was living at another home near the Hickory address when she was raped by her mother’s boyfriend, a pivotal incident that she relates in her most famous work: “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” published in 1969. After she told her family members, the man was murdered and the young Marguerite blamed herself. She remained mute for several years. After the rape, Angelou was returned to her Arkansas grandmother. Angelou received a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame in 1992. She died in 2014. CIVIL ACTION • This week, the Washington University School of Law has been celebrating its 150th anniversary with special events for alumni and friends. On Wednesday, U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts presided over “The Case of Tom Sawyer” as part of an evening event in Washington. The “case” is a fictional fight based on Mark Twain’s famous story about Tom Sawyer and the whitewashed fence, wherein Tom convinces his friends to pay him to do his work. The friends later decide to file suit against Sawyer. Roberts served as head judge, while St. Louisan Raymond Gruender, a federal judge with the Eighth Circuit Court

HANDOUT PHOTO

Chief Justice John Roberts (center) hears “The Case of Tom Sawyer” on Wednesday with St. Louisan and WU graduate Raymond Gruender and federal Judge Nina Pillard.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Gruender

of Appeals, was one of the assistant judges on the “Supreme Court of the State of Twain.” Also in attendance from the university was Chancellor Mark Wrighton and law school dean Nancy Staudt.

CLASS ACTION • Tickets now are on sale for the St. Louis Media History Foundation Hall of Fame induction — which will include Rick Hummel, the Cardinals beat writer for the Post-Dispatch and National Baseball Hall of Fame member. The other 2017 inductees are: John Beck, senior vice president of Emmis Radio-St. Louis; former television news director Jim Brady; Peggy Cohill, a producer at KMOX Radio; Twitter founder Jack Dorsey; former NBC correspondent Bob Dotson; KWMU-FM 90.7 senior

producer Mary Edwards; public relations executive David Erich; Monsanto PR executive Dan Forrestal; television engineer Don Francois; Margaret Freivogel, former P-D and St. Louis Beacon journalist; Pulitzer Prize-winning P-D reporter Roy Harris; advertising executive Sid Savan; former P-D gardening columnist Clarissa Start; Jack Thorwegan, co-founder of Zipatoni marketing; and Dennis Clancy, Art Dwyer, Ron Edwards, John McHenry and Tom “Papa” Ray, longtime producers at KDHX radio. The ceremony will begin at 5:30 p.m. April 15 at the St. Louis City Center Hotel in downtown St. Louis. Dinner tickets are $55 and can be purchased at the door, or in advance through Eventbrite. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

FERGUSON • Jeffrey Williams, found

guilty in December of shooting and wounding two police officers at a 2015 Ferguson protest, was sentenced Friday to 25 years in prison. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Gloria Reno handed down the sentence. The state had sought at least 30 years for Williams. His lawyer, Jerryl Christmas, asked for 15 years. A jury found Williams guilty of two counts of first-degree assault, three counts of armed criminal action and one count of unlawful use of a weapon, for shooting from a vehicle and striking the oicers on March 12, 2015. St. Louis County Oicer Scott Brown, then 41, was hit in the shoulder, and Webster Groves Oicer Cameron McKay, then 32, was hit in the cheek on a security line outside the Ferguson police station on South Florissant Road.

Brown has returned to duty and is a member of the tactical team. McKay has not returned to duty. Neither officer attended Friday’s hearing. Williams made no statement Williams in court. Williams lived in the 10700 block of Hallwood Drive in an unincorporated area of north St. Louis County. Protesters had gathered upon the announcement that police Chief Thomas Jackson, who was in charge of the department at the time of the Michael Brown shooting, was resigning. The crowd was starting to break up when shots rang out. Three shots were believed to have been fired from about 125 yards away, on Tiin Avenue. Police said that Williams, 22, admitted firing the shots and that a .40-caliber pistol recovered from his home was matched to shell casings at the scene. In a recording of jail phone calls ob-

tained by the Associated Press, Williams is heard telling someone that he fired at people with whom he was having trouble — not the oicers. “Nobody aiming at no police,” he says, “I ran up the hill and he (an unidentified person) shot at the car. … I shot back.” Christmas said at the hearing that Williams insists he was not the one shooting from the car but that two others in the car told police he was the one who opened fire. He said, “It was really just a fluke that these oicers were shot. “It’s just unfortunate all the way around,” Christmas said after the verdict. The gunfire, he said, “was totally unrelated to the protest going on.” At the time the two oicers were shot, Williams was on probation for a 2013 crime of receiving stolen property. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

From wire services

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CORRECTIONS The first names of Normandy City Council members Kimberly Knox and Walter Moss were incorrect in a report in the local Digest on Friday.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Joe’s St. Louis ........ A2 Editorial ............... A11 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor ... A11 Obituaries ........... A12

Composer John Kander is 90. Country singer Charley Pride is 83. Actor Brad Dourif is 67. Singer Irene Cara is 58. Singer-actress Vanessa Williams is 54. Rapper-actress Queen Latifah is 47. Actor Adam Pally is 35. Actor Blake Garrett Rosenthal is 13.

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

Man gets 25 years for shooting two oicers in Ferguson BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Hannity disputes gunplay report • Sean Hannity and Juan Williams are rejecting the context of a CNN report saying the Fox News host “once pulled a gun” on his colleague and pointed it at him while the two were ofcamera. “While discussing the issue of firearms, I showed my good friend Juan Williams my unloaded firearm in a professional and safe manner for educational purposes only,” Hannity said in a statement to the Los Angeles Times. “I’ve had a conceal carry permit in five states for all of my adult life. Any other interpretation of this is outright false reporting.” The gun anecdote was touted Thursday in the headline on a CNN article that characterized the Trump-supporting host as “spoiling for a fight” in the name of entertainment.

Puzzles ................ EV2 Religion ............... A10 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................... A9 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A13

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03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

LOCAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

Maryland Heights OKs $6 million for Blues facility

DOGTOWN ROLLS IN THE GREEN

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-dispatch

PHOTOS BY JON GITCHOFF

TOP • Timothy Simone of St. Louis pulls Elisha Simone, 3, in a wagon while walking in the Ancient Order of Hibernians St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the Dogtown neighborhood Friday. RIGHT • Mark Tate (from left), 11, Nolan Taylor, 11, and Nydia Tate, 13, attend the Ancient Order of Hibernians parade. BOTTOM RIGHT • Pro Football Hall of Fame member Jackie Smith gives Landen Huggins, 11, of St. Louis, some beads during the parade. Smith was a longtime tight end for the St. Louis Cardinals. BOTTOM LEFT • Members of the Dougherty clan walk in the parade. The parade includes mostly family clans.

MARYLAND HEIGHTS • The city will provide up to $6 million in public money for site preparation, road improvements and other construction for the St. Louis Blues practice facility to be built here. In exchange, Maryland Heights City Administrator Jim Krischke said the city would look for commitments such as public programming and special community events at the facility. Krischke said those details would be part of the agreement, estimates for which range from $3 million to $6 million. The City Council on Thursday authorized negotiations with the Blues. “There’s going to be a lot of work in how we structure that and make sure we get the proper value for our investment,” Krischke said. The total project cost is estimated at $40 million. The 250,000-square-foot facility would hold four ice rinks, including one outdoors, and would be on land owned by St. Louis County on the north side of Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park. Maryland Heights’ contribution would help pay for preparing the site for development with utility and road improvements, the installation of parking lots, and trail and walkway extensions connecting the facility to the park, according to a city news release. The project, announced in 2015 and to be open by mid- to late 2018, is being led by the St. Louis Legacy Ice Foundation, a nonprofit ailiated with the Blues hockey team. Foundation chairman Patrick Quinn said the Blues would use “less than 5 percent of the total available space and a smaller percentage of available ice time.” Quinn said the Blues would be an important tenant but emphasized the other potential public uses for the building. Representatives of the foundation and the county previously said such a facility might host local and regional hockey tournaments for men and women, as well as serve local figure skaters, speed skaters and curling enthusiasts. “The Ice Center will serve our full regional community of youth and adults who participate in ice sports,” Quinn said in an email. County oicials did not immediately respond to requests for comment. In December, the St. Louis County Council gave County Executive Steve Stenger authority to negotiate the proposed facility with the Legacy Ice Foundation. The Blues currently practice at a facility in the St. Louis Outlet Mall in Hazelwood. The practice facility project comes at the same time that the Blues are soliciting St. Louis and the state for millions in renovations to Scottrade Center. In February, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved $64.5 million for improvements to the building, opened in 1994. Mike Faulk • 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Woman’s body is found on I-55 ramp • The body of a woman was discovered just of the roadway on a ramp at Interstate 55 and Lafayette Avenue on Friday, St. Louis Police said. Police would only say that the discovery was made about noon. It is not known if the woman was a pedestrian or involved in a vehicle accident. The investigation closed the ramp Friday afternoon. ST. LOUIS > Pedestrian struck by car • A man, 69, was taken to a hospital after he was hit by a car in downtown St. Louis Friday morning. The accident happened about 7:30 a.m. at 14th and Market streets. Police said the man was in critical condition and unstable when they took him to the hospital. The driver of the vehicle, 38, stayed on the scene. Police said a Chevrolet Cavalier was northbound on 14th Street crossing Market Street with a green light when it struck the pedestrian, who was running east in the north crosswalk of Market Street. EAST ST. LOUIS > ‘Bad Santa’ gets 10-month prison sentence • An Illinois man who was dressed as Santa Claus when he was arrested in a mail theft case was sentenced Friday to 10 months in federal prison and three months of house arrest, the U.S. attorney’s oice said. Cody J. Alexander, 26, will also have to pay back victims of his crime. Alexander, of Cofeen in Montgomery County northeast of St. Louis, stole more than 19 packages and other items from the mail in December 2015, while working for a U.S. Postal Service contractor hired to deliver holiday packages, court records show. Alexander He opened the packages and pawned some of the contents, including a plastic cellphone case, headphones and jewelry, Assistant U.S. Attorney Ranley Killian wrote in a court iling. Killian said Alexander also tried to sell two adult-sized North Face jackets, a child’s North Face jacket and a pair of Nike tennis shoes. Alexander was indicted in June 2016 and released on bond but failed to show up for his guilty plea Dec. 15. He was arrested four days later in Waterloo, dressed as Santa, prosecutors said. Alexander pleaded guilty Dec. 23 to one count of mail theft. Prosecutors referred to Alexander in a statement announcing his sentence as “Bad Santa.”

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EAST ST. LOUIS > Man gets 10 years in child porn case • A registered sex ofender from Collinsville was sentenced to 10 years in prison after being caught trying to download child pornography, the U.S. Attorney’s oice said Friday. Jeremy T. Blair, 41, was caught after investigators learned an IP address later linked to him was sharing child porn online, prosecutors said. Blair had 26 child porn videos in the recycle bin of his computer in July 2015, prosecutors said. Most of the videos involved prepubescent children. Blair Blair pleaded guilty to a felony charge of access with intent to view prepubescent child pornography on Dec. 8. The 10-year federal prison term is the mandatory minimum for the crime and was triggered by a prior state ofense, prosecutors said. Illinois’ sex ofender registry says that Blair is listed there because of prior child porn-related convictions.

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Conservators will re-create paintings MURALS • FROM A1

and construction efforts at the red brick building, which was constructed in 1859 and often referred to as the old library and museum. “It isn’t every day you find such things,” said garden president Peter Wyse Jackson. The building, which sits at the Tower Grove Avenue end of the garden, is considered one of the most historically significant buildings in the Midwest. Still, it’s been closed to the public for more than three decades, and visitors to the garden may have strolled by without noticing it. But it caught the eye of Wyse Jackson when he arrived in 2010. The garden has since raised the $3 million needed to restore the building and add a small addition, which will include bathrooms, a stairwell and an elevator. This week, scafolding will go up in the two-story atrium so conservators can re-create the botanical paintings on the ceiling. Officials hope to have the building open to the public late this year or early next year and will use it for special exhibits and events. But back to botanist Engelmann — and the eye he’s keeping on the restoration. Engelmann was born in 1809 and lived in St. Louis and near Belleville for a time. He and businessman philanthropist Henry Shaw were good friends. In fact, as Shaw decided to create a botanical garden that the public could enjoy on the grounds of his country home, Engelmann encouraged him to make it a place for scientific research as well. The garden, along with the Museum Building, opened in 1859. Shaw had hired architect George Barnett to design his home on the estate, known as

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com Missouri Botanical Garden President Peter Wyse Jackson (right) and Paul Brockmann, senior vice president of general services, get a look Thursday at the recently uncovered murals that had been hidden by a dropped plaster ceiling in a side room of the garden’s Museum Building.

Tower Grove House, and he also hired him to design the 7,000-square-foot Museum Building . The building is modeled after one at the Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in England. When Shaw died in 1889, his body lay in state inside the Museum Building. Barnett designed Shaw’s mausoleum near the building as well. Engelmann’s face isn’t the only one workers recently discovered on the ceiling. As they knocked out more plaster, they found a portrait of Carl Linnaeus, a Swedish researcher who lived in the 1700s and is known as the father of modern taxonomy, or the system of classifying and naming organisms. The garden’s brick

Linnean House, the oldest continually open public greenhouse west of the Mississippi River, is named after him. Barnett designed that building as well. Workers also found what they believe is a third ceiling portrait that has since crumbled away. They have left it alone for now and will have conservators take a closer look. They don’t believe there are more portraits under the ceiling — they’ve craned their necks and peeked with flashlights. Still, their plan to hide ductwork, wiring and lights in the dropped ceiling will no longer work. Brian Micklewright, construction manager for the garden, was among a team of architects, engi-

Paramedic gives credit to all irst responders

neers and consultants who gathered under the ceiling the day after the discovery to gawk and murmur. “This plan we’ve been working with — we had to throw it out the window,” said Micklewright. He and Paul Brockmann, the garden’s senior vice president of general services, were on hand Thursday when Wyse Jackson got his first in-person look at the portraits. Wyse Jackson was on a business trip to Haiti when he got news of the discovery the week before. “Splendid. Splendid,” Wyse Jackson breathed in his Irish accent as he gazed up. “Gosh. ” Wyse Jackson guessed Shaw had the portraits painted after

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

HERO • FROM A1

to get myself into a lot of trouble.’” But he kept going. When he got to the car, he found that the driver-side window was either open or broken, but no one was in the front seats. He saw a child’s seat in the second row, but it was empty. Farther into the back, he saw feet and hands. At first, he said, he thought it was a doll. He reached back as far as he could go, and from between the second and third rows, pulled out a 3-month-old who was floating in the narrow space. Zobrist took the baby to the roof of the vehicle and began performing CPR. Other first responders that had cold water suits and a life raft were delayed by a train, Barr told him from a nearby dock. So Zobrist decided he had to get moving. He held the baby above water and performed a one-arm backstroke. Barr took over CPR once Zobrist got back to the dock. Seven minutes after arriving on the scene, Zobrist said, the baby was in an ambulance be-

DIGEST KIRKWOOD > Council delays vote on added parking at Magic House • The Kirkwood City Council decided Thursday night to delay a inal vote on letting the Magic House expand its parking lot and enclose a walkway. Some neighbors of the children’s museum hadn’t received proper notiication of the proposal, Mayor Tim Griin said.

ing rushed to a St. Louis hospital and is expected to make a full recovery. “Everything aligned perfectly,” he said. “Unbelievable. Miracle,” Barr said. “Those are the words that come to mind.” The men didn’t know that the SUV was connected to a house fire and shooting death in Glen Carbon, or that the body of the child’s mother was in the lake. Zobrist’s wife, Jessica Zobrist, said her husband works out regularly to stay in top physical condition so that he can attempt rescues such as the one he performed Thursday. Todd Zobrist knows that he will not help anyone if he becomes a victim himself while attempting a rescue, she said. “There is not an ounce of hesitation in him,” she said, “plus he’s that selfless to not hesitate and at the same time strong enough and committed enough to not become a victim himself.” Todd Zobrist was treated for hypothermia at the emergency room. Jessica Zobrist is very proud

of him. “He puts 100 percent into his career and serving the community,” she said. “He never asked for recognition for any of that.” The couple has two sons, Trent, 5, and Tyson, 3, and Zobrist “hugged them very tight” Thursday, Jessica Zobrist said. The fact that the baby “is doing great means everything was more than worth it,” she said. The fire department, in a statement, also credited Sgt. Aric Steinbeck, who helped at the scene; police Officers Heather Kunz and Shawn Bland who helped in the back of the ambulance, and Oicer Chris Clewis who drove the ambulance to the hospital. Zobrist and Barr said they do not do their jobs for accolades or media attention. “It’s nice to give credit to all fire, EMS and law enforcement,” Zobrist said. “People that around the clock do this job and protect other people.”

“Some homes were missed on the public hearing notiication, and we just sent letters to them — we want to ensure these people can express their opinions,” Griin said. The decision pushes the vote to the council’s meeting April 20. The 38-year-old, nonproit museum on the southeast corner of South Kirkwood and East Woodbine is on 4.55 acres, with a 26,800-square-foot building on the property.

Magic House oicials had originally asked for about 5,198 square feet in building additions, mainly on the east side. The proposed parking lot expansion to the east would add 40 spaces on the site of vacant or demolished homes at 206 and 208 East Woodbine. It would bring the total number of parking spaces to 282. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

Walker Moskop • 314-340-8349 @walkermoskop on Twitter wmoskop@post-dispatch.com

Valerie Schremp Hahn • 314-340-8246 @valeriehahn on Twitter vhahn@post-dispatch.com

Father died of gunshot wound to the head in burning house HIGHLAND • FROM A1

Highland paramedic Todd Zobrist greets his sons Trent, 5, and Tyson (right), 3, as he arrives at ire department headquarters on Friday for a press conference about his rescue of a baby from Silver Lake.

Engelmann died in 1884. Undoubtedly, the connection between the two is significant. Shaw endowed a professorship of botany at Washington University called the George Engelmann Professor of Botany. “And I’m that,” Wyse Jackson explained. “I am the George Engelmann Professor of Botany. You can see how I was excited.” The portraits are just a small part of the restoration work. Visitors will notice a section of the stone garden wall between the Museum Building and Tower Grove Avenue has been taken away. That’s so contractors can reach the building, Brockmann explained. The wall will be rebuilt as the work on the building wraps up. Workers will restore the building’s tile floor, strip the white paint of the bookshelves and recreate the botanical paintings on the ceiling. The paintings were re-created in the 1930s, but the eforts were not as detailed as the originals. The plaster is too delicate to restore the original paintings, so artists will re-create them on canvas and cover the old paintings. They’ll restore windows, install insulated glass, insulate walls and install air conditioning. The museum will be named for brothers Stephen and Peter Sachs, in honor of the family’s support for the restoration. Stephen Sachs was a garden board member who died last year. Wyse Jackson is excited the museum will ofer even more for today’s visitors. “When it was first opened, it had 60,000 specimens Engelmann had acquired for Shaw,” he said, smiling. “The number of specimens we have now is 7 million.”

Justin Campbell because the bullet that struck Justin Campbell went through his body and was not recovered in the house. Authorities do not yet know if Justin Campbell was still alive when the fire began. Carbon monoxide testing will be done to determine whether he inhaled smoke. Authorities were not available Friday to discuss what they believed happened in the house or what caused the fire. But the positive identification of the bodies answered some of the questions that arose since the fire began and the SUV was found. The events began about 4:50 a.m. Thursday when an SUV pulled out of the driveway of the home on Dogwood Lane where Cristy Campbell lived with her seven children — four boys and two girls from 4 to 14, plus the baby boy, Julian, born in December. A neighbor told the PostDispatch that she believed Justin Campbell also was living at the house. The couple were divorced in 2012. Shortly after the SUV pulled away, a reflection of flames could be seen on a neighbor’s house through a surveillance video. The surveillance video showed some of the couple’s children running from the house. Several ran to a nearby Walmart to call 911; others went to a neighbor’s house. The 911 call came in about 5:15 a.m. About 5:30 a.m., a 911 caller notified Highland emergency services personnel that a vehicle was in Silver Lake. A paramedic swam out to the SUV and saved the baby, who was floating in water with a small air pocket. The baby boy was revived and taken to a hospital, where he was doing well, Madison County Sherif John Lakin said at a news conference Thursday afternoon. “Fortunately there is something good that can come of this,” Lakin said of the child’s survival. Cristy Campbell’s body was found around 11:15 a.m. about 400 feet from where the vehicle went into the water, Lakin said. It was pulled from the lake around 1:15 p.m. Cristy Campbell was divorced in Madison County in 2012 from Justin Campbell, according to court records. She identifies Justin Campbell on Facebook as being the father of her children. The divorce was granted by default when he failed to appear in court. Cristy Campbell was awarded custody of the children. Cristy Campbell alleged that Justin Campbell was abusing her in 2005 and 2012. In 2014, Cristy Campbell asked that Justin Camp-

bell’s visits with the children be supervised, telling the court that one of the children said Justin had pinched and punched him and another child said Justin had choked him. Authorities said Thursday that they had answered about 50 calls at the Campbell home since 2010, including hang-up 911 calls, barking dog complaints and domestic calls. Madison County Sheriff ’s Capt. T. Mike Dixon told the Belleville News-Democrat that what sparked the tragedy might never be fully known. “There are a lot of questions, including the ‘why,’” he told the newspaper. “That might be something that we always have to speculate on — we may never know the answer as to why. Homicide never makes sense, if that’s what this is.” Funeral arrangements for Cristy and Justin Campbell are pending, the coroner’s oice said. Meanwhile, the response to a donation drive for the Campbells’ children on Friday evening was described as “unbelievable” by one volunteer. Piles of clothes, shoes, toys and diapers quickly stacked up at the event at Edwardsville High School that was arranged by Little Tigers Football and the Edwardsville Wrestling Club. Sean McMeen, a coach with Little Tigers, watched the goods stack up. “It’s unbelievable, but I’m not surprised,” he said. “That’s why I live in Glen Carbon, because people support you.” McMeen said he didn’t know the Campbell family but he felt a personal connection to the children because as a child, his own home burned to the ground in a fire sparked by lightning. “It’s a terrible thing to have happen,” said McMeen, a father of three. Alicia Smith, a mother of three who is on the Little Tigers board of directors, said volunteers were unloading donations from a stream of cars that lined up at 5:30 p.m. and was still flowing two hours later. She said the goods already filled a garage, a box car, an upstairs storage area, an oice and a courtyard. The organizers planned to store them until arrangements could be made to deliver them to family. The groups were also collecting monetary gifts and hoped to have not just enough to help with the children’s immediate needs but to set up college funds. Like McMeen, Smith said that while the outpouring had been overwhelming, she wasn’t surprised. “It makes you feel like this is a really great community to raise your kids,” she said.


LOCAL

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

Missouri governor to sell one state airplane BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Gov. Eric Greitens’ administration is taking a page from his counterparts in Illinois when it comes to the state’s fleet of aircraft. Just as former Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, a Democrat, and current Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican, moved to jettison state-owned airplanes in the Land of Lincoln, Greitens is planning on selling one of the state’s two passenger planes used by his predecessor, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon. Word of the grounding and potential sale of the state’s 1999 Beechcraft King Air C90 is con-

tained in the latest budget proposal being mulled in the Missouri House of Representatives. In the Department of Public Safety spending proposal, it calls for a $37,000 reduction in aircraft maintenance costs due to the sale of the twin-engine, sixpassenger plane. Rep. Kathie Conway, R-St. Charles, said the agency’s new director, Col. Sandy Karsten, gave the green light for the budget maneuver soon after she was sworn in this month. “She said we really did not have the need for the plane,” Conway told the Post-Dispatch on Friday. The decision comes after Greitens, a Republican who took of-

fice on Jan. 9, has said he is not planning to use the state plane. That practice is a switch from the Nixon era, when the chief executive was routinely rapped by Republican lawmakers for his regular use of a taxpayer-funded state airplane to traverse the state. However, now Democrats are complaining about Greitens’ use of private airplanes because the governor is not disclosing who is financing his flights. In early March, the Post-Dispatch reported that the private plane that ferried Greitens from Jefferson City to Springfield to Las Vegas and to Washington was owned by a company that operates newspapers and television

stations from Missouri to California. The governor’s office and top officials with the St. Josephbased News-Press & Gazette Co. said the plane was leased by a third party because the company was not using it at the time. Although taxpayers are not being billed for Greitens’ air travel, aides have not disclosed who is paying for the trips. In Illinois, Quinn first announced the sale of nine of the state’s airplanes in 2014. Rauner inherited four unsold planes and one helicopter when he took over in 2015. In the end, Illinois received $2.5 million for the aircraft and the reduction of an estimated $1

million in inspections and maintenance costs. It was unclear Friday how Missouri might go about selling the airplane and how much it might bring into state cofers. When Illinois sold its 2000 King Air in 2015, the selling price was $1.7 million. Conway said the remaining planes in Missouri’s fleet are not being eyed for grounding. The Department of Public Safety aircraft fleet consists of four helicopters, eight single-engine Cessnas and the King Airs. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Hazelwood student killed in crash Patient kills himself had dreamed of being an engineer at controversial state BY ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-dispatch

MOLINE ACRE S • Family and

friends are mourning the loss of a 17-year-old who died after a fiery car crash last weekend in Moline Acres. Darion Trust was a junior at Hazelwood West High School, with big plans of going to college to be an engineer, his family says. Darion was a front-seat passenger in a car driven by his cousin when they were struck head-on by a car in the southbound lanes of Lewis and Clark Boulevard on Sunday afternoon, according to his uncle, Carlos Smith. The crash happened just before 5 p.m. near the intersection of Marquis Court in Moline Acres. Police did not respond to a reporter’s messages seeking information about the crash, and the family is still waiting for the oicial police report, according to Smith, who is a police oicer for St. Louis County. Smith said the people in the car that hit the one Darion was in appeared to have been fighting before the crash. The aftermath of the crash was captured in two dramatic Facebook Live videos. The videos show a man pull Darion out of the passenger-side window and carry him yards away from the car, which was partly in flames. Others helped pull his cousin out through the same window. Pass-

FAMILY PHOTO

Darion Trust, 17, a junior at Hazelwood West High School, ran track and loved football.

ersby also rescued a third male — a friend of Darion’s and his cousin. Darion died Sunday night from internal injuries at a hospital, Smith said. His cousin, the driver, is still in critical condition with internal injuries, damage to his spine, a punctured lung and a broken leg. The family is devastated, Smith said. “(Darion) was just a loving child. He felt like he could learn or do anything — and he could.” Smith said Darion used to run track at Hazelwood West and loved football. “He meant the world to us,” Dar-

ion’s cousin Denise Irvin-Spencer said. “He was just full of life. The typical teenager with a big outlook.” A GoFundMe page set up by Irvin-Spencer for funeral costs had brought in $4,300 by Friday evening. Irvin-Spencer described Darion as determined and a dedicated student, with his sights set on becoming an engineer. She said the family recently talked about going on a college tour focused on historically black colleges and universities. A moment of silence in Darion’s honor was held Monday at his high school. A Hazelwood School District spokeswoman said grief counselors and a crisis support team were in the school all week for support. “Darion was a nice young man,” Hazelwood West Principal Dennis Newell said in a statement. “He was extremely quiet but he had a number of friends. We were all devastated and shocked when we received the news of his passing. In fact, we are still going through the grieving process of this terrible loss.” A wake is scheduled for 10 a.m. March 24 at Second Missionary Baptist Church in Kinloch. A ceremonial balloon release organized by friends and family is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday at Hazelwood West High School. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

St. Ann rental company owner admits to child porn BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A man from St. Ann

who owned a business that rents bungee trampolines and other amusements to churches and schools admitted in federal court Friday that he made a video of himself with an underage girl. Joseph Masters, 51, pleaded guilty to a child porn possession charge and admitted making a video of himself masturbating “very close to the face of a minor female child,” his plea agreement says. He also had a video of an underage girl using the bathroom, and a video of himself watching that video, his plea says. Police last year said Masters had surveillance cameras in the living room, bedroom, bathroom and computer room of his home. As part of the plea, both pros-

ecutors and defense agreed to a sentence of 14 months in prison, followed by 10 years of supervised release, but the ultimate decision on Masters whether to accept the deal belongs to U.S. District Judge John Ross. Masters will also have to register as a sex ofender and will have restrictions on his use of computers and access to children, among other things. Masters could have faced years in prison under federal sentencing guidelines. Asked about the agreement, prosecutors said that it had been negotiated by both sides “based on their assessments of the legal issues in the case,” and the agreement cites the “unique facts and circumstances of this matter.” Masters’ lawyer, Dan Juengel, had

challenged the evidence obtained by a police search of Masters’ home and computers and recording devices, as well as statements Masters made to police. That challenge was withdrawn late last month on the condition that a judge accepted the plea agreement. Juengel declined to comment. Masters told court staf last year that he is self-employed at a company that rents trampolines, portable zip lines, “giant human hamster balls” and other items for events at schools, churches, carnivals, conventions, company picnics and sporting events. That company’s website was not working Friday. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

sex ofender facility BY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

A mental health patient killed himself Thursday at a controversial state facility for sexually violent predators. William G. Bradford, 46, hanged himself at the Department of Mental Health’s Sex Ofender Rehabilitation and Treatment Services, or SORTS, facility in Farmington. St. Francois County Coroner James Coplin said emergency dispatchers contacted his office at 6:23 a.m. He said Bradford was pronounced dead at the scene. “He went into a closet and hung himself,” Coplin said. The Department of Mental Health said the case is under review. SORTS is a secure mental health facility situated next to a prison. It’s reserved for some of Missouri’s most troubled residents. They are held in SORTS indefinitely as patients, out of fear of what they might do and for treatment. According to a news report, Bradford pleaded guilty to three counts of forcible sodomy involving a 3-year-old girl in 1995. At the end of his prison term, he was flagged as a possible predator. At his civil commitment trial in 2008 in Boone County, Ted Bruce, of the state attorney general’s oice, said the goal of Missouri’s sexually violent predator law was to keep sex crimes from happening again, not to punish patients. “This is a chance to break the cycle,” Bruce said then, according to the Columbia Missourian. “He needs treatment.” SORTS, which also has a facility in Fulton, came under fire in recent years because nobody was being released. After a six-year legal fight spurred by SORTS patients, St. Louis-based U.S. District Court Judge Audrey Fleissig ruled in 2015 that Missouri’s application of treatment of civilly committed sexually violent predators was not constitutional. The state, plaintiffs and attorneys have since been trying to come up with reasonable solutions to improve SORTS treatment. But that has been delayed by disagreements. A trial on how to best move forward is scheduled to begin June 12. Bradford had also been frustrated by the delay. In a 10page letter to Fleissig in September, he wrote about many “objections and concerns” regarding the lingering court case, including the status of several SORTS patients “who are in the final stages of their lives.” “Any settlement agreement that does not address these most vulnerable members of the SORTS community is inadequate,” Bradford wrote, according to court records. “How many more people need to die here?” Bradford told the judge that he was “blessed to be nearing the end of my confinement.” He said he’d completed core therapy goals and was working on goals to integrate into the community. He said an annual review of his case found that he was no longer “more likely than not” to re-ofend if released from SORTS. Bradford said court approval of his conditional release was pending. Apparently, the hearing wasn’t held. In July, SORTS patient Timothy S. Donaldson, 52, hanged himself at Fulton State Hospital. He’d been one of the first SORTS patients to be conditionally released back into the community. But he was accused of violating the terms of his release agreement in St. Charles and was being returned to indefinite treatment. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

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NEWS

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Prosecutors do not intend to try man again FREE • FROM A1

Prosecutors said Wednesday that Wilson did not receive a fair trial amid “cumulative errors,” the Times reports. On Thursday, he walked free. While the district’s attorney’s office believes Wilson was involved in the murder, lawyers with the Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent say evidence in the case absolves Wilson. Davis said while her son was jailed she wrote him at least two or three times a month. “It’s wonderful. I’m glad he’s free. We’ve been working on it all these years,” she said. Davis said her son left St. Louis for Los Angeles in 1978 to live and work and never returned. Wilson attended the now-shuttered Beaumont High School in St. Louis. Davis has a stack of papers documenting the times she reached out to lawyers on behalf of her son. She shared a few of them with the Post-Dispatch. “He (Wilson) learned from persons on the street that the police were looking for him. He called me and said he had done nothing so he was turning himself in. He turned himself in at the home of a friend while I listened on the telephone. He was not informed of his rights, just taken in,” Davis penned in a letter outlining her account of her son’s case and different people involved.

BILL GREENBLATT • UPI

Margie Davis, 96, at her home in Florissant on Thursday holds a photo of herself with her son. A Los Angeles judge ordered the release of Andrew Leander Wilson, now 62, on Wednesday from the Los Angeles County’s Central Jail after he spent more than thirty years in prison for a murder he claims he did not commit.

“My son was not permitted to call home before he was railroaded into prison for life without parole.” Davis said she spent several years investigating her son’s case on her own. Her efforts to get justice for Wilson were sometimes ignored, Davis said. The private investigator she hired didn’t seem to help, she said, and eforts to get media to investigate the case were disregarded, she said. In a letter from the Los

Angeles public defender’s oice dated May 27, 2008, the office told Davis it could not assist Wilson in “seeking post-conviction relief” because the lawyer who represented him was not a public defender, but appointed and paid for by the court. That oice suggested she reach out the Post Conviction Assistance Center. An attempt to get answers from the district attorney’s oice in 2011 were also futile.

“The Justice System Integrity Division will not initiate a criminal investigation regarding your allegations. We our [sic] closing our file and will take no further action in this matter,” a letter from the oice read. That oice suggested she reach out the Post Conviction Assistance Center or the California Innocence Project. Wilson’s younger sister, Gwen Wilson, was present when her brother was released.

Cuts in cleanup of Great Lakes draw bispartisan opposition

“It’s an amazing feeling to touch him and walk around with him,” she said. Gwen Wilson, who lives in California, said she visited her brother in prison often to talk about good times, not the challenging ones. Gwen Wilson said she remembers following the brother who is 13 years older than her everywhere and always wanting to be with him. She said she became very involved in her brother’s case when the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY JOHN FLESHER Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, MICH. • It

sounds like an idea that would warm a conservative Republican’s heart: Kill funding of a regional environmental cleanup that has lasted seven years and cost the federal government more than $2 billion, with no end in sight. If states want to keep the program going, let them pick up the tab. That is what President Donald Trump’s 2018 budget plan proposes for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, an ambitious push to fix problems that have long bedeviled the world’s largest surface freshwater system — from invasive species to algal blooms and toxic sludge fouling tributary rivers. During the Obama administration, the program generally got about $300 million a year. Trump’s ofer is zero. His spending plan released Thursday says it “returns the responsibility for funding local environmental efforts and programs to state and local entities, allowing EPA to focus on its highest national priorities.” The response from Republicans in Great Lakes states: No, thanks. “I think it makes sense for us to continue to make prudent investments in protecting and improving the Great Lakes,” Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker told The Associated Press, adding that he would lobby the Trump administration and congressional leaders to put the money back. Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan

considers Great Lakes funding “very important to Michiganders, therefore we know there is strong support among Michigan’s congressional delegation and we will work with them to preserve the funding,” spokeswoman Anna Heaton said. GOP lawmakers from the region also rushed out statements defending the program. It “helps protect both our environment and our economy,” U.S. Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio said. The reaction illustrates a political fact of life: Whether you consider something in the budget valuable or wasteful can depend a lot on where you’re from. And it underscores the resistance Trump may encounter to some spending cuts he is proposing for the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Interior and other agencies that draw frequent attacks from congressional Republicans yet fund projects and services with support back home. The president’s spending blueprint also targets a Chesapeake Bay cleanup begun in 1983 that received $73 million last year, plus other “geographic programs.” It doesn’t identify them, but a proposal by the Office of Management and Budget this month called for cutting all or most funding for San Francisco Bay, Puget Sound and the Gulf of Mexico. Asked for more details, EPA released a statement saying the plan “reflects the president’s priorities” and that Administrator Scott Pruitt “is committed to leading the EPA in a more effective, more focused, less costly way as we partner with states to

fulfill the agency’s core mission.” Before his confirmation as EPA chief, Pruitt told the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee he would “continue EPA’s support” of the initiative. In a written response to questions, Pruitt made no promises about funding but said he would consider what the program received previously when making budget recommendations. The Great Lakes region includes swing states crucial to Trump’s election — Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. There’s also New York, Minnesota and Illinois. And there’s Indiana, whose former governor, Mike Pence, is now Trump’s vice president. Coincidentally, the budget plan was released as about 100 Great Lakes advocates paid a yearly visit to Washington in support of the restoration initiative. They flocked to the offices of home-state lawmakers, reminding them that Congress voted only last year to extend the program another five years. “We are going to turn once again to our bipartisan congressional champions,” said Todd Ambs, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. The Great Lakes initiative has funded nearly 3,000 projects across the eight states. Among them: efforts to prevent Asian carp from invading the lakes, prevent nutrient runoff that feeds harmful algal blooms, rebuild wetlands where fish spawn and remove sediments laced with PCBs and other toxins.

Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

Trump refutes isolationist claim in meeting with Merkel TRUMP • FROM A1

Lake Michigan is viewed from the Mackinac Bridge in 2005. President Donald Trump’s budget plan eliminates funds for cleaning up the most pressing environmental threats to the Great Lakes.

Loyola Project for the Innocent stepped in. Program Director Adam Grant said Friday the group discovered Wilson’s case through a lawyer with the Federal Public Defender for the Central District of California who was investigating a habeas case involving a detective Wilson had filed a complaint about decades ago. “So he went and talked to Andrew. And when he heard Andrew’s story, he called us and said we should take his case,” Grant said in an email Friday. He said Wilson also wrote the Project for the Innocent. A hearing to decide Wilson’s factual innocence is scheduled for May 3. The hearing will determine whether he will be compensated by the state for the time he spent in prison, according to the Project for the Innocent. The group reports the district attorney’s oice has announced it does not intend to reprosecute Wilson. Davis hopes to be reunited with her son soon. Despite obstacles along the way, Davis said she didn’t lose hope for seeing him again. She said she had never known Wilson to be a dishonest person and was confident he had been framed. “You never give up on your children,” she said.

asked Trump if he regrets any of his commentary on Twitter, Trump said, “Very seldom.” On another subject, Trump also pushed back against the notion in Europe that his “America First” agenda means he’s an isolationist, responding firmly, “I don’t believe in an isolationist policy.” The president appeared to bristle at the suggestion from a German reporter, adding, “I don’t know what newspaper you’re reading, but I guess that would be another example of, as you say, fake news.” Merkel often attempted to project a more conciliatory approach, saying she and Trump had not yet had much time to discuss economic issues. She said the “success of Germans has always been one where the German success is one side of the coin and the other side of the coin has been European unity and European integration. That’s something of which I’m deeply convinced.” T h o s e c o m m e n ts a p peared aimed at making a case to Trump on the benefits of the European Union. Trump backed Britain’s departure from the EU and has expressed skepticism of multilateral trade agreements. The two leaders tried to express their common bonds but showed minimal rapport in their first encounter, a departure from Merkel’s warm relations with Obama during his eight years as president.

NO HANDSHAKE During a photo op in the Oval Office, the two did not shake hands before reporters. Trump told photographers to “send a good picture back to Germany, please.” He said the leaders had had “very good” talks so far, while Merkel praised the “friendly reception.” Photographers then shouted, “Handshake!” Merkel quietly asked Trump, “Do you want to have a handshake?” There was no response from the president, who looked ahead with his hands clasped. German weekly Der Spiegel commented that “the overall impression of this meeting was rather cool.” German daily Bild wrote on its website: “Trump didn’t want to give Merkel his hand in his oice!” Trump had earlier welcomed Merkel with a handshake. The two leaders later held a news conference. At the start of the news conference, Merkel sought to break the ice, saying that it was “much better to talk to one an-

other than about one another.” Merkel said delicately that while she represents German interests, Trump “stands up for, as is right, American interests. That is our task respectively.” The meetings at the White House included discussions on strengthening NATO, fighting the Islamic State group, the conflict in Afghanistan and resolving Ukraine’s conflict, all matters that require close cooperation between the U.S. and Germany. The talks, postponed from Tuesday because of a snowstorm, aimed to represent a restart of a relationship complicated by Trump’s rhetoric on the campaign trail. As a candidate, Trump frequently accused the chancellor of “ruining” Germany for allowing an influx of refugees and other migrants from Syria and accused his campaign rival, Hillary Clinton, of wanting to be “America’s Angela Merkel.” The new president reairmed the United States’ “strong support” for NATO but reiterated his stance that NATO allies need to “pay their fair share” for the cost of defense. Trump said many countries owe “vast sums of money” but he declined to identify Germany as one of the nations. Prior to his inauguration, Trump declared NATO “obsolete” but has since modified his stance, telling European leaders the alliance remains of strategic importance. Only the U.S. and four other members currently reach the benchmark of spending 2 percent of GDP on defense. Germany currently spends 1.23 percent of its GDP on defense, but it is being increased. Both leaders pointed to their work on the conflict in Afghanistan and eforts to combat terrorism. When the topic moved to trade, Trump said the U.S. would do “fantastically well” in its trade relations with Germany. The president has been deeply critical of foreign trade and national security agreements but suggested he was only trying to revise trade deals to better serve U.S. interests, rather than pull back from the world entirely. Trump said trade agreements have led to greater trade deficits. The U.S. trade deficit with Germany was $64.9 billion last year, the lowest since 2009, according to the Commerce Department.


NEWS

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Prosecutors do not intend to try man again FREE • FROM A1

Prosecutors said Wednesday that Wilson did not receive a fair trial amid “cumulative errors,” the Times reports. On Thursday, he walked free. While the district’s attorney’s office believes Wilson was involved in the murder, lawyers with the Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent say evidence in the case absolves Wilson. Davis said while her son was jailed she wrote him at least two or three times a month. “It’s wonderful. I’m glad he’s free. We’ve been working on it all these years,” she said. Davis said her son left St. Louis for Los Angeles in 1978 to live and work and never returned. Wilson attended the now-shuttered Beaumont High School in St. Louis. Davis has a stack of papers documenting the times she reached out to lawyers on behalf of her son. She shared a few of them with the Post-Dispatch. “He (Wilson) learned from persons on the street that the police were looking for him. He called me and said he had done nothing so he was turning himself in. He turned himself in at the home of a friend while I listened on the telephone. He was not informed of his rights, just taken in,” Davis penned in a letter outlining her account of her son’s case and different people involved. “My son was not permitted to call home before he was railroaded into prison for life without parole.” Davis said she spent several

BILL GREENBLATT • UPI

Margie Davis, 96, at her home in Florissant on Thursday holds a photo of herself with her son. A Los Angeles judge ordered the release of Andrew Leander Wilson, now 62, on Wednesday from the Los Angeles County’s Central Jail after he spent more than thirty years in prison for a murder he claims he did not commit.

years investigating her son’s case on her own. Her efforts to get justice for Wilson were sometimes ignored, Davis said. The private investigator she hired didn’t seem to help, she said, and eforts to get media to investigate the case were disregarded, she said. In a letter from the Los Angeles public defender’s oice dated May 27, 2008, the office told Davis it could not assist Wilson in “seeking post-conviction relief” because the lawyer who

represented him was not a public defender, but appointed and paid for by the court. That oice suggested she reach out the Post Conviction Assistance Center. An attempt to get answers from the district attorney’s oice in 2011 were also futile. “The Justice System Integrity Division will not initiate a criminal investigation regarding your allegations. We our [sic] closing our file and will take no further action in this matter,” a letter from the oice read. That oice

suggested she reach out the Post Conviction Assistance Center or the California Innocence Project. Wilson’s younger sister, Gwen Wilson, was present when her brother was released. “It’s an amazing feeling to touch him and walk around with him,” she said. Gwen Wilson, who lives in California, said she visited her brother in prison often to talk about good times, not the challenging ones. Gwen Wilson said she remem-

Cuts in cleanup of Great Lakes draw bispartisan opposition

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lake Michigan is viewed from the Mackinac Bridge in 2005. President Donald Trump’s budget plan eliminates funds for cleaning up the most pressing environmental threats to the Great Lakes.

BY JOHN FLESHER Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, MICH. • It

sounds like an idea that would warm a conservative Republican’s heart: Kill funding of a regional environmental cleanup that has lasted seven years and cost the federal government more than $2 billion, with no end in sight. If states want to keep the program going, let them pick up the tab. That is what President Donald Trump’s 2018 budget plan proposes for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, an ambitious push to fix problems that have long bedeviled the world’s largest surface freshwater system — from invasive species to algal blooms and toxic sludge fouling tributary rivers. During the Obama administration, the program generally got about $300 million a year. Trump’s ofer is zero. His spending plan released Thursday says it “returns the responsibility for funding local environmental efforts and programs to state and local entities, allowing EPA to focus on its highest national priorities.” The response from Republicans in Great Lakes states: No, thanks. “I think it makes sense for us to continue to make prudent investments in protecting and improving the Great Lakes,” Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker told The Associated Press, adding that he would lobby the Trump administration and congressional leaders to put the money back. Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Restaurant damaged by ire • Soulard’s restaurant in the neighborhood of the same name was heavily damaged by a ire Friday night. The restaurant at 1731 South Seventh Street has been open for 40 years. Fireighters began battling the blaze

considers Great Lakes funding “very important to Michiganders, therefore we know there is strong support among Michigan’s congressional delegation and we will work with them to preserve the funding,” spokeswoman Anna Heaton said. GOP lawmakers from the region also rushed out statements defending the program. It “helps protect both our environment and our economy,” U.S. Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio said. The reaction illustrates a political fact of life: Whether you consider something in the budget valuable or wasteful can depend a lot on where you’re from. And it underscores the resistance Trump may encounter to some spending cuts he is proposing for the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Interior and other agencies that draw frequent attacks from congressional Republicans yet fund projects and services with support back home. The president’s spending blueprint also targets a Chesapeake Bay cleanup begun in 1983 that received $73 million last year, plus other “geographic programs.” It doesn’t identify them, but a proposal by the Oice of Management and Budget this month called for cutting all or most funding for San Francisco Bay, Puget Sound and the Gulf of Mexico. Asked for more details, EPA released a statement saying the plan “reflects the president’s priorities” and that Administrator Scott Pruitt “is committed to leading the EPA in a more efective, more focused, less

costly way as we partner with states to fulfill the agency’s core mission.” Before his confirmation as EPA chief, Pruitt told the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee he would “continue EPA’s support” of the initiative. In a written response to questions, Pruitt made no promises about funding but said he would consider what the program received previously when making budget recommendations. The Great Lakes region includes swing states crucial to Trump’s election — Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. There’s also New York, Minnesota and Illinois. And there’s Indiana, whose former governor, Mike Pence, is now Trump’s vice president. Coincidentally, the budget plan was released as about 100 Great Lakes advocates paid a yearly visit to Washington in support of the restoration initiative. They flocked to the oices of home-state lawmakers, reminding them that Congress voted only last year to extend the program another five years. “We are going to turn once again to our bipartisan congressional champions,” said Todd Ambs, director of the Healing Our WatersGreat Lakes Coalition. The Great Lakes initiative has funded nearly 3,000 projects across the eight states. Among them: efforts to prevent Asian carp from invading the lakes, prevent nutrient runof that feeds harmful algal blooms, rebuild wetlands where fish spawn and remove sediments laced with PCBs and other toxins.

about 6 p.m. and had it under control in an hour. No one was hurt. Tim Badock has owned Soulard’s for nearly 35 years. His parents opened the restaurant in 1977. Badock said the ire started in the kitchen and was quick to spread, but employees and a handful of customers inside were able to get out safely. The restaurant was damaged in a ire

once before several years ago, Badock said. He said he wants patrons to know he’ll do what he can to reopen. “It’s a tough loss,” he said. “We’re going to be closed for a while, but I’m hopeful we’ll bounce back again.” Badock said his family also owns the Lewis and Clark restaurant in St. Charles that was damaged by a ire last week.

bers following the brother who is 13 years older than her everywhere and always wanting to be with him. She said she became very involved in her brother’s case when the Loyola Project for the Innocent stepped in. Program Director Adam Grant said Friday the group discovered Wilson’s case through a lawyer with the Federal Public Defender for the Central District of California who was investigating a habeas case involving a detective Wilson had filed a complaint about decades ago. “So he went and talked to Andrew. And when he heard Andrew’s story, he called us and said we should take his case,” Grant said in an email Friday. He said Wilson also wrote the Project for the Innocent. A hearing to decide Wilson’s factual innocence is scheduled for May 3. The hearing will determine whether he will be compensated by the state for the time he spent in prison, according to the Project for the Innocent. The group reports the district attorney’s oice has announced it does not intend to re-prosecute Wilson. Davis hopes to be reunited with her son soon. Despite obstacles along the way, Davis said she didn’t lose hope for seeing him again. She said she had never known Wilson to be a dishonest person and was confident he had been framed. “You never give up on your children,” she said. Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

Trump refutes isolationist claim in meeting with Merkel TRUMP • FROM A1

asked Trump if he regrets any of his commentary on Twitter, Trump said, “Very seldom.” On another subject, Trump also pushed back against the notion in Europe that his “America First” agenda means he’s an isolationist, responding firmly, “I don’t believe in an isolationist policy.” The president appeared to bristle at the suggestion from a German reporter, adding, “I don’t know what newspaper you’re reading, but I guess that would be another example of, as you say, fake news.” Merkel often attempted to project a more conciliatory approach, saying she and Trump had not yet had much time to discuss economic issues. She said the “success of Germans has always been one where the German success is one side of the coin and the other side of the coin has been European unity and European integration. That’s something of which I’m deeply convinced.” Those comments appeared aimed at making a case to Trump on the benefits of the European Union. Trump backed Britain’s departure from the EU and has expressed skepticism of multilateral trade agreements. The two leaders tried to express their common bonds but showed minimal rapport in their first encounter, a departure from Merkel’s warm relations with Obama during his eight years as president.

NO HANDSHAKE During a photo op in the Oval Oice, the two did not shake hands before reporters. Trump told photographers to “send a good picture back to Germany, please.” He said the leaders had had “very good” talks so far, while Merkel praised the “friendly reception.” P h o to g ra p h e rs t h e n shouted, “Handshake!” Merkel quietly asked Trump, “Do you want to have a handshake?” There was no response from the president, who looked ahead with his hands clasped. German weekly Der Spiegel commented that “the overall impression of this meeting was rather cool.” German daily Bild wrote on its website: “Trump didn’t want to give Merkel his hand in his oice!” Trump had earlier welcomed Merkel with a handshake. The two leaders later held a news conference. At the start of the news conference, Merkel sought to break the ice, saying that it

was “much better to talk to one another than about one another.” Merkel said delicately that while she represents German interests, Trump “stands up for, as is right, American interests. That is our task respectively.” The meetings at the White House included discussions on strengthening NATO, fighting the Islamic State group, the conflict in Afghanistan and resolving Ukraine’s conflict, all matters that require close cooperation between the U.S. and Germany. The talks, postponed from Tuesday because of a snowstorm, aimed to represent a restart of a relationship complicated by Trump’s rhetoric on the campaign trail. As a candidate, Trump frequently accused the chancellor of “ruining” Germany for allowing an influx of refugees and other migrants from Syria and accused his campaign rival, Hillary Clinton, of wanting to be “America’s Angela Merkel.” The new president reaffirmed the United States’ “strong support” for NATO but reiterated his stance that NATO allies need to “pay their fair share” for the cost of defense. Trump said many countries owe “vast sums of money” but he declined to identify Germany as one of the nations. Prior to his inauguration, Trump declared NATO “obsolete” but has since modified his stance, telling European leaders the alliance remains of strategic importance. Only the U.S. and four other members currently reach the benchmark of spending 2 percent of GDP on defense. Germany currently spends 1.23 percent of its GDP on defense, but it is being increased. Both leaders pointed to their work on the conflict in Afghanistan and efforts to combat terrorism. When the topic moved to trade, Trump said the U.S. would do “fantastically well” in its trade relations with Germany. The president has been deeply critical of foreign trade and national security agreements but suggested he was only trying to revise trade deals to better serve U.S. interests, rather than pull back from the world entirely. Trump said trade agreements have led to greater trade deficits. The U.S. trade deficit with Germany was $64.9 billion last year, the lowest since 2009, according to the Commerce Department.


03.18.2017 • SaturDay • M 1

NEWS

St. LOuIS POSt-DISPatCH • A7

PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS

States push for tax return mandate BY CATHY BUSSEWITZ associated Press

HONOLULU • Lawmakers in nearly half the states want to add a requirement for presidential candidates: Show us your tax returns. The issue has dogged President Donald Trump, who refused to make his returns public. It flared anew this week after MSNBC said it had obtained two pages of Trump’s 2005 federal return, prompting the administration to release the documents preemptively. State lawmakers around the country, mostly Democrats, want to ensure transparency in future presidential campaigns so voters can evaluate candidates’ sources of income and any possible conflicts of interest. Most of the bills would require presidential contenders to release copies of their returns as a condition for appearing on that state’s ballot, although it’s unclear whether the legislation could pass constitutional muster. The aim is to find out about potential conflicts that candidates might have before they take office, said Hawaii Rep. Chris Lee, a Democrat who introduced one of the Hawaii bills. “With what we’ve seen so far with this administration, there are clear conflicts with respect to whether or not parts of the president’s business empire are directly benefiting from federal contracts to house Secret Service at his own hotels, for example, or pressuring foreign dignitaries or other corporations indirectly to patronize the businesses that the president or his children run,” Lee said. “And the real question is, ‘What else don’t we know?’” Hawaii was the first state to have votes on the bills before the full Legislature. The Democratically controlled House and Senate recently passed separate but largely similar measures, which would prevent the state’s delegates to the Electoral College from voting for candidates who withheld their tax forms. Lawmakers are likely to send just one of those to Hawaii Gov. David Ige, a Democrat who expressed concerns about whether the proposed changes are constitutional. He said he does not think the state can place limits on the presidential election that are inconsistent with how the election is conducted around the country. Some legal experts raised similar flags, saying states do not have the power to create additional qualifications for the office of the president. That’s up to the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Supreme Court has held that states and the federal government cannot add to the qualifications of senators and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The New Jersey Legislature listens Thursday as assemblyman John McKeon, D-Madison, speaks about a bill requiring presidential candidates to disclose ive years of federal tax returns in order to appear on ballots in the state.

congressional representatives outlined in the Constitution. Some legal experts said that guidance likely would extend to the oice of the president. “I think a requirement of revealing one’s tax returns would be regarded as an additional qualification,” said Michael McConnell, a professor at Stanford Law School. “And then there’s the tax law problem, because federal law guarantees the confidentiality of tax returns. And I think that law would pre-empt any state law requiring someone to divulge their returns.” But Richard Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, said the Constitution has conflicting provisions. “The question is whether a law that would deprive a presidential candidate of ballot access on the basis of a failure to provide a tax return would be creating an unconstitutional additional qualification, or whether it would be permissible within the state’s power to set the rules for presidential elections,” Hasen said. “Nobody’s

Pre-emptive force an option with N. Korea, Tillerson says

tried it before.” Trump has refused to make his tax returns public, breaking a decades-long tradition among presidential candidates. He initially promised to do so but then claimed he was under audit by the Internal Revenue Service and said his attorneys had advised against it. Experts and IRS officials said such audits do not prohibit taxpayers from releasing their own returns. Trump’s full tax returns would contain key information, including his sources of income, how much he earned from his assets and what strategies he used to reduce his tax bill. Presidential tax return legislation has been introduced in at least 24 states, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Most were introduced by Democrats, although bills in Kansas and Minnesota were introduced by Republicans. New Jersey’s Democratic legislature approved a presidential tax return bill on Thursday. Its prospects are uncertain once

it lands on the desk of Republican Gov. Chris Christie, a Trump supporter. New Jersey Republicans criticized the measure as a stunt. “This is a doozy,” GOP Assemblyman Jay Webber said. “This is both transparently political and blatantly unconstitutional.” While bills in Democratic-leaning states such as Maryland and Vermont have had legislative hearings, those introduced in Republican-controlled statehouses such as Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania are stalling. “I suspect that these bills will be very similar to the birth certificate legislation introduced after President Obama’s election — political statement bills that likely aren’t constitutionally sound or likely to be signed into law,” said Daniel Diorio, senior policy specialist at the National Conference of State Legislatures. “If one were to become law, I’m sure it would be challenged immediately.”

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A North Korean soldier tries to take a photo as U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson visits the U.N. Command Military Armistice Commission in Panmunjom on Friday.

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BY MATTHEW PENNINGTON associated Press

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA • The United States signaled a tougher strategy toward North Korea on Friday that leaves open the possibility of preemptive military action and rejects talks with the communist nation until it gives up its weapons of mass destruction. “Let me be very clear: The policy of strategic patience has ended,” said Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. “We are exploring a new range of diplomatic, security and economic measures. All options are on the table.” Tillerson was speaking after visiting the heavily militarized border between the rival Koreas. His comments are likely to displease Beijing, where he travels this weekend. China has been advocating diplomacy to avoid a conflict on the divided peninsula. Also Friday, President Donald Trump tweeted: “North Korea is behaving very badly. They have been ‘playing’ the United States for years. China has done little to help!” Past U.S. administrations have considered military options against North Korea and have publicly said that an attack on the U.S. or its allies would prompt a devastating response. Tillerson’s comments were unusual, however, as he appeared to be implying, in public, that the U.S. would consider military force as a way of preventing an attack by Pyongyang and not just as a means of retaliation. It also comes amid a greater sense of urgency about the threat because of North Korea’s rapid progress

toward developing the means to strike the U.S. with a nuclear-tipped missile. Risks of military action are high as North Korea could unleash a massive artillery barrage on Seoul in retaliation. The Trump administration says it is conducting a review of North Korea policy. At a news conference in Seoul, alongside his South Korean counterpart Yun Byung-se, Tillerson said the U.S. was exploring “a new range of diplomatic, security and economic measures.” He said the Obama administration’s policy of “strategic patience”— that saw tightening of sanctions to try to get North Korea back to negotiations aimed at denuclearization — had ended. Asked about the possibility of using military force against North Korea, he said, “all of the options are on the table.” Former members of the Clinton administration have said that Washington and Pyongyang struck a diplomatic deal in 1994 to avert conflict over North Korea’s nuclear program. Since then, North Korea has violated multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions and has been undeterred by tough international sanctions. Last week, after the U.S. and South Korea began annual military drills that the North views as rehearsal for invasion, it test-fired four missiles into seas of Japan. Central to the U.S. review is China and its role in any bid to persuade Pyongyang to change course. China remains North Korea’s most powerful ally and dominant trading partner. China recently announced it was suspending coal imports that are an important source of revenue for North Korea for the rest of the year in adherence with U.N. sanctions.

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M 1 Saturday • 03.18.2017 • a8

Amgen drug cuts heart attack and stroke risk, but cost remains issue A study released Friday showed Repatha cut the chances of having a heart attack and some other serious problems by 15 to 20 percent. The study involved people at high risk for those problems.

rEutErS

Amgen sells its cholesterol-lowering drug Repatha at a discount of about 30 percent to its U.S. list price of $14,000 a year, but the largest pharmacy benefit managers say they want lower prices after new data suggested more patients should be treated with the drug. Amgen, which on Friday presented data showing for the first time that Repatha cuts the risk of heart attack and stroke, said in a presentation for investors that it is netting from $7,700 to $11,200 per annual treatment after discounts and rebates and believes those prices represent good value. Sean Harper, head of research and development at Amgen, told Reuters current discounts average 30 percent to 35 percent. Troyen Brennan, chief medical oicer at CVS Health Corp., said as more patients use the drug, prices should come down. “I think responsibly, if the number you are treating goes up and you are trying to recoup the cost of (developing) the drug ... one would hope that the price would go down,” Brennan said. CVS Health is the No. 2 manager of drug benefit plans for U.S. employers and insurers. Brennan said he expects the new data to widen eligibility for the treatment from roughly one million to at least four million Americans.

AMGEN PHOTO

Steve Miller, chief medical officer at Express Scripts, the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit manager, said he is “really focused on value-based pricing” and is “hopeful for additional improvements” in contract terms. Amgen said it plans to offer additional contracting options, including refunding the cost of the drug for patients who sufer a heart attack or stroke but emphasized that it believes current prices are fair. Repatha, approved by regulators in 2015, belongs to a class of injected antibody drugs that target PCSK9, a protein that maintains “bad” LDL cholesterol in the blood and is aimed at the millions of people who don’t benefit from statins. Statin pills, like Pfizer’s Lipitor, work differently, blocking the liver’s production of LDL cholesterol, and cost only about $100 per year. Around one in four Americans age 45 and older is taking a statin. Wall Street analysts have forecast

that annual sales of Repatha and Praluent, a competing drug sold by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi, could reach into the billions, but sales so far have been underwhelming as health providers and payers awaited evidence of improvement in cardiovascular risk. Sales of Repatha totaled $141 million last year. Amgen executives said the new trial results will clear the way for more patients to get access to Repatha. “Access restrictions have been a real challenge for patients and their providers,” said Ofman. He added that groups such as the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology are beginning to play a larger role in working with payers to make sure drug utilization criteria are appropriate. Brennan said he would be waiting to hear from these groups about which patients should get the drug.

Stocks stagger to winning week; S&P near high aSSOCIatEd PrESS

NEW yOrK • U.S. stocks limped to the finish line in another winning week, with indexes turning in a mixed performance on Friday. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index slipped 3.13 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,378.25 on Friday. Gains a couple days earlier fueled by the Federal Reserve meant the index rose 0.2 percent for the week. It’s the seventh weekly gain for the S&P 500 in the last eight, and the index is within 1 percent of its re-

cord high. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 19.93 points, or 0.1 percent, to 20,914.62. The Nasdaq composite rose 0.24 points, or 0.004 percent, to 5,901.00. The midweek rally came after the Federal Reserve gave a more measured forecast for interest-rate increases than some investors expected. While raising rates by a quarter of a percentage point, the central bank said that it’s still planning a total of three increases this year. That came as a sur-

prise for some investors, who thought four hikes were possible given the pickup in the economy and inflation. Not only did stocks rise following the announcement, but bond yields fell sharply. “The big focal point for the week was the Fed,” said Brian Jacobsen, chief portfolio strategist at Wells Fargo Funds Management. “Now that we have that behind us, the rest is window dressing.”

U.S. investigates four insurers over Medicare payments rEutErS

The Justice Department has disclosed an investigation into four health insurers after a lawsuit accused them of defrauding Medicare. The probe of Health Net, Aetna, Cigna’s Bravo Health and Humana was revealed in papers filed on Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles in a lawsuit the government recently joined against UnitedHealth Group. The department last month partially intervened in the False Claims Act lawsuit brought by a former UnitedHealth executive, Benjamin Poehling, whose whistleblower case against the company and other insurers was filed under seal in 2011. Under the False Claims Act, whistleblowers can sue companies on the government’s behalf to recover taxpayer money paid out based on fraudulent claims. If successful, whistleblowers receive a percentage of the recovery. A government decision to intervene is typically a major boost to such cases. When it initially intervened in the case in February, the Justice Department said it was declining to pursue claims against other insurers named in the lawsuit besides UnitedHealth. But the Justice Department this week filed a “corrected notice” of intervention, saying that, due to an ongoing investigations of Health Net, Aetna, Bravo and Humana, it could not make a decision as to whether to proceed against them. Humana spokesman Tom Noland said in an email that the company had previously disclosed the investigation in filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Humana has said it would cooperate with authorities. UnitedHealth has said it rejects the allegations. A spokesman had no immediate comment on Friday. Aetna and Health Net declined to comment. Representatives for Cigna did not respond to a request for comment on Friday, nor did the Justice Department. A lawyer for Poehling had no immediate comment. Poehling’s lawsuit accused UnitedHealth, Health Net, Aetna, Bravo Health, Humana and other insurers of defrauding the United States of hundreds of millions — and likely billions — of dollars through claims for payments from the Medicare health care program for the elderly. The lawsuit centered on “risk adjustment” payments that Medicare makes to managed-care plans to ofset the increased costs associated with treating patients with multiple or serious health conditions. The lawsuit claimed that, in seeking those payments, the insurers falsely claimed that patients were treated for diagnoses they did not have or were not treated for.

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MARKET WATCH

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Wall Street turned in a muted day of trading for the second day in a row Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed slightly lower. The Nasdaq composite ended flat. Even so, the three indexes eked out gains for the week.

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LOW 20911.07 9129.54 693.42 11582.47 5890.42 2377.64 1725.55 24743.17 1380.68

CLOSE 20914.62 9145.50 696.64 11589.01 5901.00 2378.25 1731.14 24761.64 1391.52

CHG. -19.93 -35.58 +3.63 -11.22 +0.24 -3.13 +2.92 -16.75 +5.49

%CHG. WK -0.10% s -0.39% t +0.52% s -0.10% s ...% s -0.13% s +0.17% s -0.07% s +0.40% s

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AT&T Inc

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36.10

43.89 42.61 +.17 +0.4

+0.2 +14.4 16

Aegion Corp

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17.18

26.68 22.89 +.10 +0.4

-3.4 +13.3 25

Amdocs

DOX

54.12

61.98 61.83 +.04 +0.1

Ameren Corp

AEE

46.29

55.51 55.05 +.70 +1.3

American Railcar

ARII

35.43

ABInBev

BUD

98.28 136.08 111.75 +.90 +0.8

Arch Coal

ARCH

59.05

86.47 67.05

-.86 -1.3 -14.1

Bank of America

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12.05

25.80 24.86

Belden Inc

BDC

54.97

81.33 70.11

-.36 -1.4 +12.5 +91.5 20 0.30f Monsanto Co -.34 -0.5 -6.2 +26.0 13 0.20 Olin

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW Caleres Inc.

CAL

1.96 Isle of Capri

... LMI Aerospace +6.1 +6.2 17 0.88f Lee Ent

+4.9 +15.8 20 1.76f Lowes 51.10 39.87 +.48 +1.2 -12.0 +0.4 11 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc +6.0

21.27

-.10 -1.1 -36.7 -29.5 28

...

36.61 27.95 -3.70 -11.7 -14.8 +19.4 14

0.28 0.92

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Cass Info. Systems

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45.05

74.83 65.69 +.73 +1.1 -10.7 +33.3 31

Centene Corp.

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50.00

75.57 68.59

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Commerce Banc.

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40.93

60.61 58.24

-.05 -0.1

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Edgewell

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72.79

88.00 74.84

-.70 -0.9

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Emerson

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48.45

64.36 60.60 +.37 +0.6

Energizer Holdings

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56.37 55.53 +.08 +0.1 +24.5 +38.9 21

-6.5 29

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+8.7 +20.8 24

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Enterprise Financial EFSC

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46.25 43.75

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+1.7 +61.5 19

Esco Technologies

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37.19

58.95 58.20 +1.45 +2.6

+2.7 +55.4 35

Express Scripts

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64.45

80.02 65.09 +.26 +0.4

-5.4

Foresight Energy

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1.07

FutureFuel

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9.77

General Motors

GM

27.34

Home Depot

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0.64

-7.5 11

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84.00 83.53 +.31 +0.4 +17.4 +14.6 21

1.40

85.83 46.90 -1.05 -2.2

+5.7 +6.6 24

3.76

84.79 116.04 112.76 +.25 +0.2

+7.2 +26.4 23

2.16

OLN

15.79

... +29.1+113.2 51

0.80

Panera Bread

PNRA 185.69 238.24 238.39 +2.66 +1.1 +16.2 +11.1 38

...

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

Perficient

PRFT

14.15

22.66 18.15

Post Holdings

POST

67.29

89.00 85.45 +.87 +1.0

ReinsGrp

RGA

90.17 132.79 129.91

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

59.54

71.21 67.25 +1.05 +1.6

+4.2 +2.1 20

Stifel Financial

SF

27.33

56.62 52.90 -1.10 -2.0

+5.9 +81.3 20

Supervalu Inc.

SVU TGT

0.32 US Bancorp ... US Steel

1.52 Walgreen Boots ... World Point Term.

3.84

3.20 54.12

33.35 33.07 6.20

55.37

6.02

...

5.75 +.05 +0.9

5.08

-.31 -1.7 -.02

...

-.04 -0.8

-5.9 -13.9

St. Louis area Penney stores not on closure list • J.C. Penney, which announced last month that it would shutter as many as 140 stores, on Friday released a list of 138 that will be closed. None of the seven St. Louis area stores is included on the list, but Missouri will lose a store in Maryville, north of Kansas City. Illinois also will lose seven, in Bloomington, Canton, Eingham, Macomb, Peru, Sterling and Woodridge. Closing some stores will help J.C. Penney “raise the overall brand standard,” Chairman and CEO Marvin Ellison said in a news release announcing the closings. The store closings, which begin on April 17, will afect 5,000 jobs; the retailer says it’s identifying relocation opportunities for displaced workers. Disney subsidiaries to pay $3.8 million in back wages • Two Florida subsidiaries of Walt Disney Co. have agreed to provide $3.8 million in back wages to comply with federal law, the U.S. Labor Department said in a statement on Friday. The wages will be paid to 16,339 employees at the two units — Disney Vacation Club Management Corp. and Walt Disney Parks and Resorts U.S. Inc. — after U.S. oicials found violations regarding minimum wage, overtime and record-keeping, the department said. 4 Chipotle board members to depart • Chipotle Mexican Grill said four board members will leave in May after their terms expire, including three longtime members who were on the board before Chipotle became a public company more than a decade ago. The Denver-based burrito chain, under pressure from activist investor Bill Ackman to speed up its recovery, expanded its board to 12 members in December after four new directors were added. Ackman’s hedge fund, Pershing Square Capital, is one of Chipotle’s largest shareholders, owning a more than 10 percent stake in the chain. In a iling Friday, Chipotle said the four members who won’t seek re-election in May are John

Charlesworth, Patrick Flynn, Darlene Friedman and Stephen Gillett. “These departures are the product of individual decisions, and are in no way part of our agreement with Pershing Capital and Mr. Ackman,” said Chipotle spokesman Chris Arnold.

Caterpillar hires former U.S. AG • Caterpillar Inc. has hired former U.S. Attorney General William P. Barr to help it sort out matters that sparked a federal raid on its headquarters in central Illinois. Barr, who will serve as outside counsel to the Peoria, Ill.-based manufacturer, will help Caterpillar review and address issues relating to the company’s Swiss parts subsidiary and related tax matters. Barr served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush. He currently works at Chicagobased law irm Kirkland & Ellis. Budvar hit production record in 2016 • Production of Budvar beer, which has been embroiled in a lengthy legal dispute with U.S. giant Anheuser-Busch over the use of the “Budweiser” brand, reached a record in 2016. Budejovicky Budvar NP, a Czech state-owned brewery, said Friday that its output rose 0.8 percent to 42.66 million gallons of beer, the highest volume in its 120-year history. From staf and wire reports

.0644 .7670 .3219 1.2358 .7499 .1450 1.0749 .0153 .2757 .008829 .052171 .0173 .0783 .000886 1.0035

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1229.80 17.38 963.00

Gold Silver

+3.30 +.08 +4.60

56.61 54.69

-.34 -0.6

X

12.77

41.83 37.29

VZ

46.01

56.95 50.39 +.35 +0.7

...

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.72 .85 .98 1.32 2.02 2.50 3.11

... -0.02 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.04 -0.04

.28 .47 .63 .87 1.37 1.90 2.69

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

...

...

...

+3.8

Barclays USAggregate

2.71

... 2.33

-5.8 26

...

+6.3 +19.5 46

...

+3.2 +38.4 14 1.64f +9.5 -15.0

... 2.10

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

-1.7 12

Barclays US High Yield 5.94 -0.12 8.36 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

4.08 +0.01 3.81

Barclays US Corp

3.43 +0.01 3.44

10-Yr. TIPS

.48 -0.03

.29

...

+6.5 +38.4 17 1.12f -5.6

.88 .38 .38

4.00 3.50 3.50

GlobalMarkets

-5.7 +9.1 19 3.32f

... +13.0+142.7 dd

-.55 -0.8

1YR AGO

1.71

2.40

38.48

NET CHG

2.73 -0.05

-.30 -0.5 -24.8 -30.9 11

USB

LAST

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

...

100.05 120.44 108.15 +.35 +0.3

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.50 percent Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

AP Muni Bond Idx

6

0.20 2.31

WMT

62.72

75.19 69.89

WBA

75.74

88.00 85.91 +.24 +0.3

+3.8 +6.2 18

1.50

WFC

43.55

59.99 58.67

-.65 -1.1

+6.5 +22.8 14

1.52

WPT

13.00

17.90 16.33 +.09 +0.6

-1.3 +22.9 16

1.20

+1.1 +6.6 16 2.04f

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2378.25 12095.24 7424.96 24309.93 5029.24 48593.44 19521.59 64209.95 15490.49 8698.53

CHG

CHG

YTD

-3.13 +12.06 +9.01 +21.65 +15.86 +536.88 -68.55 -1572.94 -71.92 +31.05

-0.13% +0.10% +0.12% +0.09% +0.32% +1.12% -0.35% -2.39% -0.46% +0.36%

+6.23% +5.35% +3.95% +10.50% +3.43% +6.46% +2.13% +6.61% +1.33% +5.82%

Safeguards for student loan defaults revoked by Trump Obama guidance had barred collectors from charging high fees WASHINGTON POST

Factory production rose in February • U.S. factories cranked out more autos, steel and computers in February, the sixth straight monthly increase in manufacturing output. Factory production rose a seasonally adjusted 0.5 percent last month from January, the Federal Reserve said Friday. That followed another 0.5 percent gain the previous month. Factories are beneiting from greater consumer and business optimism since last fall’s presidential election. Companies are spending more on big-ticket items such as industrial machinery, and Americans are buying cars at near-record levels. Overseas growth has spurred more exports.

PREV

.0643 .7709 .3229 1.2396 .7496 .1447 1.0743 .0153 .2753 .008874 .052434 .0175 .0786 .000885 1.0023

+3.6 +86.7 dd 0.07e

3.48 +.01 +0.3 -25.5 -39.8

84.14 54.29

...

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST

+.03 +.0047 +.42 +.046

...

8

110.33 131.96 128.64 +.66 +0.5

UPS

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

...

MON

119.20 149.19 149.60 +.87 +0.6 +11.6 +16.3 23 3.56f Wells Fargo 3.56

LEE

26.89 26.22 +.26 +1.0

MCD

+4.3 +21.8

-.75 -2.0

7.01

0.88

16.58 14.16 +.90 +6.8

-.39 -5.9

11.38

LMIA

+9.3 +26.1 32

38.55 36.33

6.27

ISLE

42.67

1.10 Target Corp. 0.44 UPS B

$8.65

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

86.65 112.97 112.83 +.16 +0.1

-3.1+316.3 dd 0.68m Verizon +1.9 +32.7 11 0.24a WalMart

8.33

52-WK LO HI

M

PE: 32.7 Yield: ...

Interestrates Interestrates

MNK

3.19e MasterCard ... dd ... McDonald’s

$2.43

Platinum

MA

-2.0

122.35 185.71 180.10 +1.91 +1.1 +15.7 +43.4 21 5.68f 8.05

TKR

J F 52-week range

Vol.: 3.6m (5.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $183.32 m

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

D

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Mar 17 Apr 17 Apr 17 Mar 17 Mar 17

Milk

2,100

S

$94.00

Feeder cattle Hogs

2,200 19,000

17,000

4

M

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

20,000

18,000

J F 52-week range

Vol.: 6.3m (3.3x avg.) PE: 26.0 Mkt. Cap: $11.5 b Yield: 1.9%

CHICAGO BOT

2,400

22,000

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Futures

S&P 500

AXTI

Close: $5.55 -1.05 or -15.9% The chip components supplier said a fire at its Beijing factory will reduce first-quarter revenue by more than $1 million. $8 6

$56.99

PE: 54.8 Yield: ...

2,400

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10 DAYS

D

$90.35

$184.21

Close: 20,914.62 Change: -19.93 (-0.1%)

20,760

100

M

Vol.: 23.9m (6.3x avg.) PE: 16.5 Mkt. Cap: $124.17 b Yield: 2.7%

Dow Jones industrials

20,900

$130 110

D

AXT

TIF

Close: $92.42 2.44 or 2.7% The jewelry retailer did better than expected in the latest quarter thanks to strong sales in China and Japan. $100

120

140

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Tiffany & Co.

ADBE

Close: $127.01 4.66 or 3.8% The software company’s first-quarter profit and revenue were stronger than Wall Street expected.

180

$133.64

21,040

Adobe Systems

AMGN

Close: $168.61 -11.50 or -6.4% Investors were disappointed by results from a study of the biotech drugmaker’s costly cholesterol medication Repatha. $200

Days after a report on federal student loans revealed a double-digit rise in defaults, President Donald Trump’s administration has revoked federal guidance that barred student debt collectors from charging high fees on past-due loans. The Education Department is ordering guarantee agencies that collect on defaulted debt to disregard a memo former President Barack Obama’s administration issued on the old bankbased federal lending program, known as the Federal Family Education Loan, or FFEL, Program. That memo forbids the agencies from charging up to 16 percent of the principal and accrued interest owed on the loans, if the borrower entered the government’s loan rehabilitation program within 60 days of default. The Obama administration

issued the memo after a circuit court of appeals asked for guidance in a case against United Student Aid Funds challenging the assessment of collection costs. Bryana Bible took the company to court after being charged $4,547 in collection costs on a loan she defaulted on in 2012. Though she had signed a “rehabilitation agreement” with USA Funds to set a reduced payment schedule to resolve her debt, the company assessed the fees. Education oicials sided with Bible, prompting USA Funds to sue the department in 2015. This year, the company agreed to pay $23 million to settle a class-action lawsuit born out of the Bible case, though it did not admit any wrongdoing. The two-page “Dear colleague” letter, sent Thursday by the Trump administration, walks back the department’s previous stance on the grounds

that there should have been public input on the issue. “The department will not require compliance with the interpretations set forth” in the previous memo “without providing prior notice and an opportunity for public comment on the issues,” the letter said. The action does not afect any borrowers whose loans are held by the Education Department, according to the department. It could, however, affect nearly 7 million people with $162 billion in FFEL loans held by guarantee agencies. Nearly half of the total outstanding student debt in default comes from the FFEL program. There has been a fairly steady increase in the total amount of past-due debt in the program, even as the number of borrowers has declined, suggesting that interest charges and other fees are being tacked on to balances.

Wal-Mart buys online clothing seller ModCloth ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Wal-Mart has bought trendy clothing seller ModCloth, part of a big push to pick up smaller online brands as it tries to make headway against Amazon. The company declined to specify the price on the deal that closed Friday, saying only that it was in the same range as its previous two purchases of online businesses. Those were $51 million and $70 million. Wal-Mart is working hard to attract younger and more aluent shoppers, but winning over ModCloth’s devoted customers, fans of its vintage-inspired patterned dresses, inclusive sizing

and community feel, may be a challenge. Many expressed their disappointment on social media when they heard talk of a deal with Wal-Mart. Bentonville, Ark.-based WalMart said ModCloth will continue to operate as a stand-alone and complementary brand to its other e-commerce sites, and will bring experience and talent to strengthening the company’s fashion business aimed at millennials. Independent designers who sell on ModCloth’s site, it said, will gain the opportunity to expand their reach. ModCloth CEO Matthew Kaness, his executive team and the company’s 300-plus employees will stay based in San

Francisco, Los Angeles and Pittsburgh, and will join WalMart’s U.S. e-commerce retail organization. Wal-Mart spent more than $3 billion for upstart Jet.com last year and since then has bought other smaller companies, including online footwear retailer ShoeBuy.com and the outdoor gear seller Moosejaw. Marc Lore, the founder of Jet.com who is now CEO of Walmart. com, said last month that the company was still looking for new startups to buy. ModCloth, founded in 2002, has one physical store in Austin, Texas.


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 Saturday • 03.18.2017 • a10

Lawmakers ask Trump to keep envoy to combat anti-Semitism By LaurEN MarKOE Religion News Service

Following a report that President Donald Trump is thinking of scrapping the ambassador position assigned to combat global anti-Semitism, a bipartisan group of 167 U.S. House members sent a letter asking him to appoint one soon. The letter, released Monday, asks Trump to “maintain and prioritize” the appointment in a time of rising anti-Semitism. “During previous administrations, this office was crucial in documenting human rights abuses against Jewish communities abroad as well as developing and implementing policies designed to combat anti-Semitism,” the letter states. The efort to defend the oice of the special envoy to monitor and combat anti-Semitism comes after a Bloomberg news report that the position and others at the State Department — including an envoy to the Muslim world — were on the chopping block. A former special envoy, Ira Forman, has been speaking out on the necessity of the job he once held, noting the oice’s relatively tiny budget, and also predicting that it would be retained. Hannah Rosenthal, who also held the job, wrote in The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle that without the special envoy, combating anti-Semitism will no longer be a priority in the State Department. “Now we will turn a blind eye. And at a time when we are seeing such an increase in acts of antiSemitism in our country, it is unconscionable that such a tool in the U.S. foreign policy arsenal will be gone,” she wrote. An array of Jewish groups, from the Anti-Defamation League to the Zionist Organization of America, also called on Trump to maintain the special envoy position, which was created by Congress in 2004. Among the lead signatories of the letter were Reps. Eliot Engel of New York, the ranking Democrat on the House Foreign Afairs Committee; and Christopher Smith, R-N.J., who chairs its subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations.

Debate over Southern Baptist leader exposes racial division Russell Moore speaks at the Evangelicals for Life Conference in Washington in January.

ADELLE M. BANKS • RNS

By adELLE M. BaNKS Religion News Service

Embattled Southern Baptist ethicist Russell Moore, the public face of the nation’s largest Protestant group, has at least one group of vocal supporters: African-American Southern Baptist leaders. From the head of the SBC’s black fellowship to former Southern Baptist Convention President Fred Luter, these officials have made it clear that, as one of their statements said, “We are pulling for Dr. Moore.” On Monday, Moore met with Frank Page, president of the SBC’s Executive Committee, as news swirled that Moore’s job as president of the denomination’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission might be on the line. Moore was a sharp critic of presidential candidate Donald Trump at a time when the overwhelming number of white evangelicals supported him. But after the meeting, the two noted in a joint statement that “racial reconciliation” was among the topics they discussed as they “developed mutual understanding on ways we believe will move us forward as a network of churches.” A total of 81 percent of white evangelicals voted for Trump. But the nation’s largest evangelical denomination is also striving to improve its race relations — especially given its Civil War-era history of defending slavery — and Moore has been one of the SBC’s most vocal champions of that efort. Alan Cross, a Southern Baptist minister who authored a book on racism and Southern evangelicals, said the declarations by black Southern Baptists “were very strong and I do believe were key in moving this in a healthy direction.” “Seeing the SBC led by African-American

pastors in calling for reconciliation in this divide is significant,” he said. Two of three recent statements featuring black leaders’ support of Moore compare him to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., a leader whose messages about justice were rejected by some of his generation, including some Southern Baptists. In an open letter published last week in Baptist outlets, Byron Day, president of the National African American Fellowship of the SBC, called for unity within the denomination. “There are some who have suggested withholding cooperative dollars until Dr. Moore is either disciplined or fired. However, Russell Moore has done nothing worthy of discipline or firing,” he wrote. “He has represented all Southern Baptists, contending for the highly visible ethical issues of abortion and biblical marriage; but he has also addressed social injustices such as racism which have been long overlooked.” Roger Oldham, spokesman for the SBC Executive Committee, confirmed that some churches have threatened to siphon donations away from the SBC but said those considerations do not relate to Moore alone. A study committee will investigate the reasons for those requests and determine how to resolve them. “Over the past several months, we have received numerous phone calls from pastors and other individuals saying their churches were considering withholding or escrowing funds from the convention over a number of issues,” he told RNS.

‘PrOPHEtIC VOICE’ Other statements of support were issued after Moore wrote a column apologizing to Southern Baptists who thought he was crit-

ical of anyone who voted for Trump and after national and state Baptist organizations decided to consider investigations related to his agency. Luter’s was the first name on a letter posted on the New Orleans Baptist Association website responding to a request received by the Louisiana Baptist Convention to study recent actions by the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. “Dr. Moore speaks with a prophetic voice to this generation,” said Luther and other signatories, including black, white and Hispanic Baptists. “We may not like everything that he says, but we fear what our faith community may become if we lose his voice.” Moore has told RNS that he is confident he will remain in his post. Ken Barbic, who chairs the ERLC board, has described Moore as “a Gospel-centered and faithful voice for Southern Baptists.” A third endorsement came from Arlington, Texas, pastor Dwight McKissic, who suggested that predominantly minority churches may want to determine their future contributions to the Southern Baptist Convention based on the final decision on Moore’s status in the denomination. “The implications of the Executive Committee’s investigative report is staggering and could be tantamount to an earthquake in the Convention,” McKissic predicted. “If Moore is marginalized or fired, 80-90 percent of Southern Baptist Black Churches who share Moore’s views on President Trump would also simultaneously feel as if their political convictions regarding the current President of the United States would also be oicially reprimanded, rejected and rebuked by the Southern Baptist Convention.”

NEWS

Both parties decry possible cuts to Meals on Wheels he popular service that provides food to elderly people may be slashed under president’s budget proposal By MattHEW daLy Associated Press

Wa S H I N GtO N • Meals on

Wheels, the popular service that provides food to the elderly, faces a sharp funding cut under President Donald Trump’s budget proposal, drawing protests from congressional Republicans and Democrats. The exact size of the cut is unknown, but White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said the government “can’t spend money on programs just because they sound good — and great. “Meals on Wheels sounds great. Again, that’s a state decision to fund that particular portion, to take the federal money and give it to the states, and say look, we want to give you money for programs that don’t work,” Mulvaney said. Mulvaney’s comments Thursday caused consternation at the Capitol and beyond as lawmakers from both parties vowed to protect the program, which serves nearly a million meals per day nationwide through a network of more than 5,000 local programs. More than 2.4 million older Americans are served each year, including more than 500,000 veterans. Rep. Gus Bilirakis, R-Fla., said Friday that he’s “been a fan of Meals on Wheels forever” and even delivered food to the elderly. Rep. Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., said Trump’s plan was “literally taking food away from seniors.” Trump’s budget proposal would cut hundreds of millions of dollars for the Department of Health and Human Services,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bob Gill, a volunteer driver with Meals on Wheels, delivers lunch to Thelma Pense at her home in Citrus Heights, Calif., in 2015. The program could face major cuts under the current federal budget proposal.

as well as eliminate Community Development Block Grants provided by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Both agencies provide funding for Meals on Wheels, although the program’s main source of funding is the Older Ameri-

cans Act overseen by the Health and Human Services Department. Trump’s budget cuts HHS spending by about 16.2 percent but does not include a line item for the Older Americans Act or Meals on Wheels. The budget also eliminates the $3 billion community block grant

program, which some communities use to supplement Meals on Wheels and provide safety checks for the elderly. It was not clear how much of the blockgrant funding goes to Meals on Wheels, since decisions are made by states and local governments. “The problem with a ‘skinny

budget’ is that it is lean on details,” said Ellie Hollander, president and CEO of Meals on Wheels America, referring to a term commonly used on Capitol Hill to describe Trump’s barebones budget document. Still, “cuts of any kind to these highly successful and leveraged programs would be a devastating blow to our ability to provide much-needed care for millions of vulnerable seniors in America,” Hollander said in a statement. Jenny Bertolette, a spokeswoman for Meals on Wheels, said the group gets about 35 percent of its funding through the Older Americans Act, with the rest provided by state and local governments and private donations. The act’s 2016 budget was about $834 million, with nearly $849 million proposed for 2017. Some programs will be hit hard by Trump’s budget and some might not be severely affected, Bertolette said. A provider in Ypsilanti, Mich. — where Trump traveled Wednesday to focus on fuel-economy standards — faces a possible 30 percent funding cut, she said. That means the program in the Detroit suburb could serve one meal a day instead of two, she said. “The Trump budget will make Americans less safe, deny them access to justice and fund discriminatory immigration policies at the expense of hardworking Americans who need vital federal services such as Meals on Wheels,” said Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich.


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 2 Saturday • 03.18.2017 • a10

Lawmakers ask Trump to keep envoy to combat anti-Semitism By LaurEN MarKOE Religion News Service

Following a report that President Donald Trump is thinking of scrapping the ambassador position assigned to combat global anti-Semitism, a bipartisan group of 167 U.S. House members sent a letter asking him to appoint one soon. The letter, released Monday, asks Trump to “maintain and prioritize” the appointment in a time of rising anti-Semitism. “During previous administrations, this office was crucial in documenting human rights abuses against Jewish communities abroad as well as developing and implementing policies designed to combat anti-Semitism,” the letter states. The efort to defend the oice of the special envoy to monitor and combat anti-Semitism comes after a Bloomberg news report that the position and others at the State Department — including an envoy to the Muslim world — were on the chopping block. A former special envoy, Ira Forman, has been speaking out on the necessity of the job he once held, noting the oice’s relatively tiny budget, and also predicting that it would be retained. Hannah Rosenthal, who also held the job, wrote in The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle that without the special envoy, combating anti-Semitism will no longer be a priority in the State Department. “Now we will turn a blind eye. And at a time when we are seeing such an increase in acts of antiSemitism in our country, it is unconscionable that such a tool in the U.S. foreign policy arsenal will be gone,” she wrote. An array of Jewish groups, from the Anti-Defamation League to the Zionist Organization of America, also called on Trump to maintain the special envoy position, which was created by Congress in 2004. Among the lead signatories of the letter were Reps. Eliot Engel of New York, the ranking Democrat on the House Foreign Afairs Committee; and Christopher Smith, R-N.J., who chairs its subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations.

Debate over Southern Baptist leader exposes racial division Russell Moore speaks at the Evangelicals for Life Conference in Washington in January.

ADELLE M. BANKS • RNS

By adELLE M. BaNKS Religion News Service

Embattled Southern Baptist ethicist Russell Moore, the public face of the nation’s largest Protestant group, has at least one group of vocal supporters: African-American Southern Baptist leaders. From the head of the SBC’s black fellowship to former Southern Baptist Convention President Fred Luter, these officials have made it clear that, as one of their statements said, “We are pulling for Dr. Moore.” On Monday, Moore met with Frank Page, president of the SBC’s Executive Committee, as news swirled that Moore’s job as president of the denomination’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission might be on the line. Moore was a sharp critic of presidential candidate Donald Trump at a time when the overwhelming number of white evangelicals supported him. But after the meeting, the two noted in a joint statement that “racial reconciliation” was among the topics they discussed as they “developed mutual understanding on ways we believe will move us forward as a network of churches.” A total of 81 percent of white evangelicals voted for Trump. But the nation’s largest evangelical denomination is also striving to improve its race relations — especially given its Civil War-era history of defending slavery — and Moore has been one of the SBC’s most vocal champions of that efort. Alan Cross, a Southern Baptist minister who authored a book on racism and Southern evangelicals, said the declarations by black Southern Baptists “were very strong and I do believe were key in moving this in a healthy direction.” “Seeing the SBC led by African-American

pastors in calling for reconciliation in this divide is significant,” he said. Two of three recent statements featuring black leaders’ support of Moore compare him to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., a leader whose messages about justice were rejected by some of his generation, including some Southern Baptists. In an open letter published last week in Baptist outlets, Byron Day, president of the National African American Fellowship of the SBC, called for unity within the denomination. “There are some who have suggested withholding cooperative dollars until Dr. Moore is either disciplined or fired. However, Russell Moore has done nothing worthy of discipline or firing,” he wrote. “He has represented all Southern Baptists, contending for the highly visible ethical issues of abortion and biblical marriage; but he has also addressed social injustices such as racism which have been long overlooked.” Roger Oldham, spokesman for the SBC Executive Committee, confirmed that some churches have threatened to siphon donations away from the SBC but said those considerations do not relate to Moore alone. A study committee will investigate the reasons for those requests and determine how to resolve them. “Over the past several months, we have received numerous phone calls from pastors and other individuals saying their churches were considering withholding or escrowing funds from the convention over a number of issues,” he told RNS.

‘PrOPHEtIC VOICE’ Other statements of support were issued after Moore wrote a column apologizing to Southern Baptists who thought he was crit-

ical of anyone who voted for Trump and after national and state Baptist organizations decided to consider investigations related to his agency. Luter’s was the first name on a letter posted on the New Orleans Baptist Association website responding to a request received by the Louisiana Baptist Convention to study recent actions by the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. “Dr. Moore speaks with a prophetic voice to this generation,” said Luther and other signatories, including black, white and Hispanic Baptists. “We may not like everything that he says, but we fear what our faith community may become if we lose his voice.” Moore has told RNS that he is confident he will remain in his post. Ken Barbic, who chairs the ERLC board, has described Moore as “a Gospel-centered and faithful voice for Southern Baptists.” A third endorsement came from Arlington, Texas, pastor Dwight McKissic, who suggested that predominantly minority churches may want to determine their future contributions to the Southern Baptist Convention based on the final decision on Moore’s status in the denomination. “The implications of the Executive Committee’s investigative report is staggering and could be tantamount to an earthquake in the Convention,” McKissic predicted. “If Moore is marginalized or fired, 80-90 percent of Southern Baptist Black Churches who share Moore’s views on President Trump would also simultaneously feel as if their political convictions regarding the current President of the United States would also be oicially reprimanded, rejected and rebuked by the Southern Baptist Convention.”

LOCAL

‘ONE OF GOD’S ANGELS’

Family, friends honor child killed in gun mishap By NaSSIM BENCHaaBaNE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Dozens of friends and strangers lined up at a vigil Friday night to hug the family of a 12-year-old boy who was fatally shot while playing with a gun. The vigil for Damien Holmes brought together more than 100 of his extended family, friends, teachers and others from across St. Louis. The group gathered at 6 p.m. at Love Bank Park to celebrate Damien’s life and mourn other children lost to gun violence in the St. Louis area. “Damien was just one of God’s angels,” said his aunt, Cassandra Thompson. “So full of life and love. Someone you shouldn’t take for Damien granted.” She said she appreciated the community coming together to show their support for Damien and other children killed by gunfire. “It feels good to know you’re not the only person to be hurt by this,” Thompson said. The park is at Cherokee Street and Nebraska Avenue, a few blocks from the home in the 3300 block of Michigan Avenue where police say Damien and his 9-year-old brother were alone Tuesday night when they found a gun and started playing with it. A round struck Damien in the head about 10:35 p.m.; police are not saying who fired the shot. The boys’ father came home and took the 12-year-old to

NASSIM BENCHAABANE • nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

Debra Dobbins, great-aunt of Damien Holmes, bows her head during a moment of silence Friday night for Damien at Love Bank Park. Damien, 12, was fatally shot while playing with a gun with his younger brother.

the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Damien’s parents were charged Wednesday with involuntary manslaughter. At the memorial Friday evening, candles were arranged on a table to spell “Love.” Posters were set up for friends and attendees to write messages to Damien. Attendees shook hands and shared memories before gathering to release balloons and light candles. “We’re gathered here today to uplift, honor and celebrate the life of not only Damien Holmes, but all the children whose lives have been lost to a similar fate,”

said Pacia Anderson, with Cherokee Street Reach. The community group set up the vigil with help from Alderman Cara Spencer and Alderman-elect Dan Guenther, Anderson said. Attendees included dozens of students, parents and teachers from Monroe Elementary School in St. Louis, where Damien attended sixth grade. They wore school T-shirts that said “Once a dragon, always a dragon.” Damien was an honor roll student and captain of the school’s step team, said Monroe Principal Felicia Miller. He was a bright,

energetic student who dreamed of owning his own business. “He was a leader in the school,” she said. Damien was well-known and well-liked among the school’s 330 students and among teachers, Miller said. The school brought counselors in this week to support students and staf. “We’ve all embraced each other,” Miller said. “We decided to remember all of the good times with Damien, and share our good memories with him.” Several people lined up to share memories of how Damien affected their lives, speaking from a microphone to everyone in attendance. “I really thank you all for coming out to support our family,” Debra Dobbins, a great-aunt of Damien’s, told the attendees. “I’m asking you, please don’t judge our family. None of us are perfect. It was a careless but honest mistake. We just ask for your prayers.” State Rep. Bruce Franks Jr., who is from the Benton Park West neighborhood, spoke briefly at the memorial. “I want to give my heart to the family, to the youth and to everyone Damien’s presence touched,” he said. “Our community is judged enough without us judging each other. This is a time for us to come together.” A fund was set up by a South City church to help pay for Damien’s funeral service. The Rev. David Godbout of Novation Church said contributions can be made to the church or to Serenity Funeral Home at 1905 Union

Boulevard. Dobbins said after the vigil that Damien came from a happy home. His parents were good, loving parents, she said. She added that gun owners should be cautious. “If you do have guns, put them in a lockbox,” she said. “If you don’t have a lockbox — get one. And don’t leave guns loaded.” Damien’s death marks the second fatal shooting of a child who was playing with a gun in just more than a month in St. Louis. On Feb. 13, Mi’Kenzie Bostic, 6, was shot and killed by one of her three siblings in their apartment in Walnut Park West while her parents slept in the next room. Mi’Kenzie’s parents were later charged with involuntary manslaughter. “These kinds of deaths are 100 percent preventable,” said Barbara Finch, co-founder of Women’s Voices Raised for Social Justice. Damien’s death was a “tragedy that didn’t need to happen,” she said. Finch’s group has handed out about 1,500 free gun locks in the St. Louis area over the past year. She said the group hands them out “no questions asked.” Mary Clemmons, also with Women’s Voices, said the group tries to raise awareness about gun violence, particularly as it afects children in St. Louis. “We have to remember all of these kids,” Clemmons said. “Their names and faces. We cannot forget.” Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SATURDAy • 03.18.2017 • A11 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

Short takes

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITy • By DAN MARTIN

‘Somebody else’s babies’ We suppose Rep. Steve King could have dug himself a deeper hole this week. He could have overtly called for racial purity laws and the preservation of the Aryan race. Instead he just sort of hinted at it Sunday in a tweet heard ’round the world: “Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” His intention was to support nationalist Geert Wilders’ party in Wednesday’s parliamentary elections in The Netherlands. Alas, Wilders’ “Party for Freedom” picked up a few seats, but fell far short of taking control of the government. King In the U.S., King was being blasted by Democrats and Republicans alike for his “other people’s babies” comment. Iowa’s influential Des Moines Register newspaper, noting King’s history of crude and racist remarks, called for Iowa’s Republican Party to stop enabling him. The paper said a member of Congress should not be treated as “your average, garden-variety bigot … standing on a street corner while spouting his nonsense to passers-by.” King is truly an embarrassment to the Hawkeye State and the Republican Party. As long as they tolerate him, his odor will rub of on them.

dmartin@post-dispatch.com

Move over, Wayne Newton Last week in this space we noted that singer Jimmy Bufett was opening a chain of “Margaritaville” retirement homes. This week we learned that The Who, one of the seminal bands in rock history, is making plans for a “residency” in Las Vegas. The Who, which still features Pete Townshend, 71, and Roger Daltrey, 73, from the original band that formed in 1964, will play six shows at Caesar’s Palace from July 29 to Aug. 11. It’s said to be a trial run for a permanent Vegas gig, sort of like Celine Dion and Wayne Newton. Wait. Not like Celine Dion and Wayne Newton. If Branson could attract aging acts like Andy Williams and Tony Orlando, then why not Vegas for the aging rock fans? It’s just a shame that Keith Moon, the Who’s original drummer, died in 1978. The Vegas strip has 62,000 hotel rooms that he could have destroyed.

Really long odds As if the odds of winning the lottery weren’t already stacked against players, a lawsuit filed in federal court in Southern Illinois this week alleges a company that formerly managed the state lottery misrepresented the odds, cheating players and vendors. Northstar Lottery Group printed more scratch-of tickets than it intended to sell, and then locked in profits by discontinuing games before grand prizes were awarded, according to the lawsuit. A Chicago Tribune investigation in December found that the state’s biggest scratch-of games awarded only 60 percent of the grand prizes they were designed to pay out. The lawsuit says that prior to Northstar’s management, Illinois awarded about 88 percent of grand prizes, comparable to other state lotteries. Northstar began managing the Illinois Lottery in 2011 and was removed this year. Lead plaintifs are Raqqa Inc., operator of the Fairview Lounge in Fairview Heights, and Michael Cairo, a Chicagoarea resident.

All in the family Kisses and hisses to Gov. Eric Greitens for following the advice of state Auditor Nicole Galloway and granting paid parental leave for executive branch employees. The Republican governor failed to give the Democratic auditor any credit for his decision, but as the sign on Ronald Reagan’s desk used to read, “There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he does not mind who gets the credit.” Galloway urged Greitens last month to approve the new leave policy, recommended by former Gov. Jay Nixon. Greitens’ administration informed the state’s Personnel Advisory Board on Valentine’s Day that it was not going to approve the changes. But this week, Greitens reversed himself (on Facebook, of course), issuing an executive order granting primary caregivers six weeks of paid parental leave after a birth or adoption, and three weeks for secondary caregivers. The parental leave is in addition to sick leave and vacation.

All-Righta-Rita With names like Lime-A-Rita and Straw-Ber-Rita on its fruity alcoholic beverages, Anheuser-Busch InBev could not have been too surprised to find that 65 percent of the customers for the beer-like substance were women, many of whom say they don’t like the taste of regular beer. Seeking to reinvigorate the 5-year-old flavored malt beverage brand, the company is going full women for the line, with a woman senior director overseeing a staf of women creative personnel, including advertising team, commercial director and brewmasters. As Selena Kalvaria, tops at Lime-A-Rita noted, women are 51 percent of the population and make 85 percent of consumer buying decisions, especially when “A-Rita” is in the product line. And there is a wide array to choose from, including Raz-Ber-Rita, MangO-Rita, Cran-Ber-Rita, Lemon-Ade-Rita and Kumquat-A-Rita. No, we just made that last one up. Upcoming commercials highlight dancing on a roof top, hanging a disco ball in the kitchen, and the “Romantic Face,” rated PG-13, according to the Post-Dispatch’s Debra D. Bass. The latter is said to have overtones of “Sex and the City.” It’s a long way from “Gimme a Bud.”

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS ‘There’s no free lunch,’ and no free health care in America, either The old saying “There’s no free lunch” simply means that everything that has a value has a cost. That’s true of health care in America or anywhere else in the world. The question that is attracting a great deal of attention in our country today is, how do we pay for it? If you are one of the many who has a good health care plan that is paid for by your employer, in part or in whole, you may feel that those without health insurance should figure that out for themselves. But if you feel that health care is a right rather than a privilege, you probably already have an idea as to how health care should be obtained. For all of our history, we have depended on hospitals and doctors to provide health care, without payment, for those who can’t aford to pay, but that really isn’t what has happened. In reality, doctors and hospitals charge those who can pay more to compensate for those who can’t pay. So in the long run, we, the people, pay for those who can’t. There is more to that story. Those who can’t pay often go without care until a small problem has become a big one, which requires more care and expense in the long run. The other side of that coin is that many die before their time for lack of care. So, you see there is no free lunch. We pay one way or the other. Obamacare is obviously not working the way we had hoped. We either need to fix it or replace it with something that will work better. The current GOP proposal would leave untold millions uninsured. That isn’t acceptable in a country like ours that can do better, and it isn’t smart. John Blalock • Franklin County

Messenger tries to project new political landscape in St. Louis Tony Messenger’s column “Changing voting patterns point to a new St. Louis” (March 13) left me perplexed. The intent seemed to project a new political landscape in St. Louis that positions the Old Guard against the Young Progressives. As I recall from a previous Post-Dispatch article, the older Hill residents were not objecting to new construction to replace an abandoned factory, but to a six-story building that would negatively afect the character of its surroundings. A compromise of a four-to-five-story structure was reached, which probably left all sides semi-happy. The fact that Lyda Krewson did not approach Mayor Francis Slay’s last victory margin is quite irrelevant, as he is the champion vote-getter and did not have a baker’s dozen of competitors. While in a perfect world it would be good to replace the black and white division, a look at the ward vote breakdown makes it clear that did not occur. The success of the city is of vital importance to the region, and Messenger succumbing to fabricating actual results into his desired vision of the future does not serve a worthwhile purpose. Larry Marten • Lake Saint Louis

Horrigan ofers an excellent interpretation of Bible’s message Thank you so much for featuring in Sunday’s paper the column by Kevin Horrigan, “Is greed biblical?” Horrigan ofered an excellent interpretation of Matthew 26:11, along with Deuteronomy 15:11, to which Jesus alludes in the Gospel of Matthew. As Horrigan concludes, taken in context, Jesus’ words about the poor (“For you always have the poor with you”) should never be taken as an excuse for not helping those in need. Rather, these words are an invitation to “Open your hand to the poor,” in

the words of Deuteronomy 15:11. I am a professional scholar and teacher of the Bible, and I give Horrigan an A-plus. As for Alice Snell’s letter in response (“Do not disdain Christians’ charitable giving for the poor,” March 15), Horrigan did not in any way disparage charitable giving by Christians or anyone else. He simply pointed out, quite correctly, that all the charitable giving in the world will not do what needs to be done. I hope Republicans are happy with the new plan that will leave 24 million fewer people uninsured by 2026. Who will benefit from this plan? It will be primarily the health insurers and the wealthy, whose taxes will be cut. Horrigan was right: This is pure greed and callousness on the part of President Donald Trump and apparently the 81 percent of white, evangelical Christians who voted for him. Clint McCann • Webster Groves Eden Theological Seminary

ST. LOUIS ZOO

Greed among biggest enemies to saving the rhino and our planet Thanks to Eric Miller for his commentary “A critical time for saving rhino species” (March 15) on the tragic plight of the rhino and to the St. Louis Zoo for it efforts to save this magnificent animal. It keeps my faith in humanity alive knowing that so many people in zoos, conservation societies and animal-welfare organizations around the world are working together to save the rhino and other endangered species. However, it seems to me that most of their work is directed primarily at conservation, anti-poaching eforts and anti-traicking laws. Banning the hunting of endangered species, as well as the export, import and transport of such “trophies” on commercial ships and airlines, also have been of some help. But I’m wondering what can be done to stem the demand for these items, which is part of the problem. It occurred to me — perhaps because I had just read a comment in Tony Messenger’s column about a Florida man in Costa Rica who set up a fake news site to see how gullible President Donald Trump’s supporters were — that perhaps fake news could be used to inform buyers of endangered animal parts that studies have shown that rhino horns cause cancer, pastes made from elephants’ feet enlarge prostates, tigers’ teeth cause impotence and pangolin parts are cursed. We could try so-called real facts: that those animal parts serve no medicinal purpose. But fear can be more motivating than truth. And education may take too long. Sadly, I fear that greed and government corruption are the biggest enemies we face in our efforts to save not just the rhino, the elephant and the other endangered species, but our country, our planet and perhaps even ourselves. Sarah Newman • Lake Saint Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


NEWS

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

Trump backs adding new Medicaid limits to health bill

Derek Walcott • The Nobel-prize winning poet known for capturing the essence of his native Caribbean has died on the island of St. Lucia. He was 87. Mr. Walcott’s death in the eastern Caribbean nation was conirmed early Friday (March 17, 2017) by his son, Peter. The statement said the funeral would be in St. Lucia. The proliic and versatile poet received the Nobel Prize in literature in 1992 after being shortlisted for the honor for many years. In selecting Mr. Walcott, the academy cited the great “luminosity” of his writings, including the 1990 “Omeros,” a 64-chapter Caribbean epic it praised as “majestic.” “In him, West Indian culture has found its great poet,” said the Swedish academy in awarding the $1.2 million prize to Mr. Walcott. St. Lucia Prime Minister Allen Chastanet said lags throughout the island would be lowered to half-staf to honor Mr. Walcott, one of the most renowned igures to emerge from the small country. “It is a great loss to Saint Lucia,” he said. “It is a great loss to the world.”

Change is aimed at drawing more Republican support for lailing legislation BY ALAN FRAM AND ERICA WERNER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump agreed to add fresh Medicaid curbs to the House Republican health care bill Friday, bolstering the measure with support from some conservative lawmakers but leaving its prospects wobbly. House leaders discussed other amendments calibrated to round up votes and scheduled a showdown vote Thursday. “I just want to let the world know I am 100 percent in favor” of the measure, Trump said at the White House after meeting with around a dozen House lawmakers and shaking hands on revisions. “We’re going to have a health care plan that’s going to be second to none.” While the rapid-fire events seemed to build momentum for the pivotal GOP legislation, its fate remained clouded. One leading House conservative said the alterations were insuicient and claimed enough allies to sink the measure. Support among moderates remained uncertain. “My whip count indicates that there are 40 no’s,” enough to defeat the bill, said Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., who leads the hard-line House Freedom Caucus. He said the change “doesn’t move the ball more than a couple yards on a very long playing field.” Across the Capitol, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., facing reelection next year, became the fourth Republican senator to announce his opposition. That left Senate GOP leaders at least two votes shy of what they’d need to prevail. Congressional Democrats remain solidly opposed to the GOP efort. Thursday will mark the seventh anniversary of when Obama signed his health overhaul into law, one of his milestone domestic achievements enacted over unanimous GOP opposition. Beyond that symbolism, Republican leaders hope to allow time for Congress to complete the measure before an early April recess exposes

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump listens to Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., at a meeting with several House lawmakers Friday in the Oval Oice about the Republican health care bill.

lawmakers to two weeks of lobbying and town hall pressure tactics by activists, doctors, hospitals and other opponents. The Republican bill would kill much of former President Barack Obama’s health care law, including tax penalties for people who don’t buy insurance and its expansion of Medicaid, the federal-state health program for the poor. It would create new tax credits that would be less generous than current federal subsidies for many consumers and would repeal levies on the wealthy and medical firms that helped finance Obama’s expansion of coverage to 20 million Americans. Trump’s deal with lawmakers would let states impose work requirements on some of Medicaid’s roughly 60 million recipients. The condition would apply to healthy people with no dependents, a White House oicial said. The agreement would let states accept lump-sum federal payments for Medicaid instead of an amount that would grow with the number of beneficiaries. The program currently costs the federal government around $370 billion annually

and covers costs no matter the amounts. Also, any additional states that expand Medicaid would not receive the additional federal money Obama’s law provided them for doing so. Thirty-one states have enlarged their Medicaid rolls under the law. “These changes definitely strengthen our numbers,” said the House GOP’s top vote counter, Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, among Trump’s guests Friday. “But they also show that President Trump is all-in now” to help win converts. Those accepting the agreement included Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., leader of the Republican Study Committee, a large group of House conservatives. It seemed clear that GOP leaders remained short of the 216 votes they’ll need, and additional changes were in the works. Rep. Tom McClintock, RCalif., said he’d been assured by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., that the bill’s tax credit would be adjusted to focus more benefits on lower-income people. Rep. Robert Aderholt,

OBITUARIES Bronke, JoAnn Elizabeth (Mertl) - Liberty, MO Drury, Ralph V. - Bloomsdale, MO

Bronke, JoAnn Elizabeth (Mertl) JoAnn Elizabeth (Meatl) Bronke, 82, of Liberty, MO passed on March 15, 2017 at Northcare Hospice House surrounded by her family. Joann was born September 25, 1934 in St. Louis, MO to Anthony and Blanche (Hunt) Mertl. She was a graduate of St. Mark High School. Services: A Visitation is scheduled for March 22, 2017 from 12-1 at St. James Catholic Church, Liberty MO with Mass at 1:00 p.m. NEPTUNE SOCIETY

R-Ala., among those who met with Trump, said the president “told his people” to work on changes making the measure more generous for lower-earning and older Americans. “Everything has to be a change that would increase the vote count,” Scalise said. Conservatives seemed unlikely to achieve their demands that the GOP bill’s phase-out of Obama’s Medicaid expansion — now 2020 — be accelerated to next year and that the credit be denied people with little or no tax liability. Centrists remained wary of yanking constituents from coverage. Many represent states where voters have gained Medicaid and other insurance under the 2010 statute. “We’ll see what changes they’re going to make,” said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa. In a report this week that prompted many GOP lawmakers to emerge as opponents, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Oice said the legislation would leave 24 million people uninsured in a decade, including 14 million next year, and boost out-of-pocket costs for many.

Celebrations of Life

Engelbach, Marie T. - Pevely Frohock, Henry Eugene - St. Louis

George Braziller • An independent and self-taught publisher for more than 50 years who supported early novels by Norman Mailer and Arthur Miller and released iction by Nobel laureates Orhan Pamuk and Claude Simon has died. He was 101. A spokesman for his publishing house, George Braziller Inc., told the Associated Press that Mr. Braziller died Thursday (March 16, 2017) at the Mary Manning Walsh Home in Manhattan after a brief illness. Mr. Braziller helped found the publisher in 1955. Over the following decades, he acquired works from all over the world, from Turkey’s Pamuk to Irish author-director Neil Jordan to New Zealand’s Janet Frame. He also had an eye for American literature and chose early works by Mailer and Miller for a book club he started in his 20s. James Cotton • A Grammy Awardwinning blues harmonica master whose full-throated sound backed such blues legends as Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson II and Howlin’ Wolf has died at age 81. A statement from Alligator Records, Mr. Cotton’s label, says he died Thursday (March 16, 2017) of pneumonia at St. David’s Medical Center in Austin. The Mississippi Delta native had performed professionally since age 9. Mr. Cotton backed Muddy Waters in his landmark album “At Newport” on Chess Records. After going solo in the 1960s, Mr. Cotton released almost 30 albums, including his 1996 Grammy Awardwinning Verve album, “Deep In The Blues.” His most recent album, “Cotton Mouth Man” for Alligator Records in 2013, was nominated for a Grammy. From news services

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Hasamear, Clifford Edward - St. Louis Horwitz, Eugene Steven - St. Louis

Drury, Ralph V.

Frohock, Henry Eugene

fortified with the sacrament of Holy Mother Church on March 16, 2017. Dear husband of Lucille (nee Ritter), Dear father of Linda (John) Lurk, Barb (Jim) Brace, Terry (Willa) Drury, Nancy (Gene) Basler & M a r k (Tra cy) D r u r y. D ea r brother of Marvin (Ethlyn) Drury and the late Elmer & Eddis Drury. O u r d ea r gra n d fa t h er, grea t grandfather, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral Monday March 20 from BASLER Funeral Home 685 Center Dr., Ste. Genevieve, MO at 9:30 AM to St. Agnes Church, Bloomsdale, MO for 10 AM mass. Visitation Sunday 4-8 PM. For more information and memorials visit baslerfuneralhome.com U.S. AirForce Veteran

March 15, 2017, age 82, of Florissant. Visitation Sunday, March 19, 2:00 p.m. until service at 6:00 p.m. at Archway Memorial Chapel. www.archwaychapel.com

Engelbach, Marie T. 97, of Pevely. March 17, 2017. Beloved mother of Cecelia (Dennis) Portlock and the late Raymond (Carol survives) Engelbach, dear sister of Hilda Schilling, grandmother of four, great-grandmother of ten. Services: Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday at VINYARDS, Pevely. Mass 11 a.m. Monday at St. Joseph Catholic Church. For more information see www.vinyardfuneralhomes.com

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Hasamear, Clifford Edward Cliff Hasamear was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He was the founder of a successful small manufacturing company. He enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was preceded in death by his wife, Nancy. Surviving are his daughter, Robin, son, Todd, and grandchildren, Taylor, Samantha, Kinley, Allie, and Easton. He was beloved by friends and admired by colleagues. Services: Services shall be private. In lieu of flowers, please donate to St. Judes @ www.stjude.org/Donate ST.LOUIS CREMATION

Horwitz, Eugene Steven Passed away peacefully on March 16, 2017. Eugene is survived by his high school sweetheart and wife of 44 years Debbie and their three children Jeff (Teresa) Horwitz, Laura Horwitz (Guy Friedman), and Ben Horwitz (Ellie Streiffer) and six grandchildren, Lily, Ezra, Jonah, Etta, Orli, and Meital. Eugene was the son of Phillip Horwitz and the late Zelma Horwitz; brother of Martin (Donna) Horwitz, Louis (Sharon Weisman) Horwitz, and Steven Horwitz. Eugene and Debbie grew up in a suburb of Detroit, Michigan and met as teenagers. Eugene attended the University of Michigan and was a lifelong Michigan Wolverine fan. He came with his family to St. Louis to work for Bunzl Distribution as the manager of information systems for over 10 years. He later started his own consulting business and finished his career with Sportsman's Supply. He was a sports fan, loving the St. Louis Cardinals, playing golf and attending major sporting events including the Rose Bowl, World Cup Soccer, the Atlanta Olympics, and golf tournaments. He loved to travel with his family and later with his wife on her many professional travels. He will be missed by his family, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Services: Graveside service Sunday March 19th, 2:00 p.m. at Beth Hamedrosh Hagadol Cemetery 9125 Ladue Road. Contributions in his memory to the Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry in St. Louis, Mazon, or We Stories would be appreciated. Visit Bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

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NEWS

03.18.2017 • SaturDay • M 1

WEATHER • Low 40, High 57• Winds NW 5-12 mph

St. LOuIS POSt-DISPatCH • A13 National Extremes High: 96° Death Valley, California Low: -8° Mt. Washington, New Hampshire

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Mostly sunny and seasonable Mostly sunny skies along with light northwest winds and near seasonable temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will be in the upper 50s. Sunday will see increasing clouds with a high around 60. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

43°

52°

56°

42°

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Mostly clear

44 41 37 38 36 43 38 32 39 41 35 36 42

71 61 59 60 60 69 63 56 60 67 60 58 66

W

sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

60s 70s

Flood Stage

Current Level

MONDAY

TUESDAY

34°/60°

52°/73°

42°/55° 35°/53°

Increasing clouds

W

34 40 35 36 35 32 38 33 36 33 35 34

46 57 44 47 47 49 53 47 53 45 49 45

partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 35 / 44

Kirksville 32 / 56 Kansas City 38 / 63

Springfield 35 / 49

St. Louis 40 / 57 Carbondale 40 / 57

Joplin 43 / 69

Very unhealthy

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Mar. 17th Tree - 41 (moderate), Mold - 1,894 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 6 Month (Total) 332 Season 3065 Year Ago 3029 Flood Stage

Current Level

Poplar Bluff 44 / 64

24-Hr Change

+ 0.17 + 0.27 + 0.05 - 0.03 - 0.08 - 0.37 - 0.02

SUN & MOON

Last Mar 20 Sunrise

New Mar 27

First Apr 3

7:07 AM Sunset

Full Apr 11 7:11 PM

Moonrise 12:08 AM Moonset 10:43 AM

On this date in 1965, cosmonaut Alexei Leonov became the first human to walk in space. On June 3rd of 1965, Ed White became the first American to spacewalk.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.53 356.53 494.57 654.37 705.71 651.71 906.93 840.51 594.30 406.62 601.36 443.03

- 0.15 - 0.31 - 0.42 - 0.05 - 0.04 + 0.06 + 0.03 - 0.01 - 0.04 - 0.02 + 0.02 - 0.01

- 1.87

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 85°

Jet Stream

A low pressure system will continue to move eastward and bring rain and snow showers to portions of the eastern Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast. An associated frontal boundary will trigger a few showers across parts of the Southeast and Deep South. Another front will bring more wet weather to the Pacific Northwest and northern California. Dry conditions will be in place throughout the central United States. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 15 Albuquerque 47 Anchorage 5 Atlanta 52 Atlantic City 35 Baltimore 37 Billings 38 Biloxi, Ms. 56 Birmingham 54 Bismarck 18 Boise 50 Boston 24 Buffalo 32 Burlington, Vt. 8 Charleston, S.C. 47 Charleston, W.V. 40 Charlotte 48 Cheyenne 38 Chicago 35 Cincinnati 38 Cleveland 35 Colorado Spgs. 39 Concord, N.H. 9 Dallas 62 Daytona Beach 48 Denver 39 Des Moines 31 58 Destin, Fl. 32 Detroit 51 El Paso 39 Evansville -21 Fairbanks 21 Fargo 33 Flagstaff 54 Fort Myers 44 Great Falls 32 Green Bay 17 Hartford 69 Honolulu 64 Houston 35 Indianapolis 58 Jackson, Ms. 24 Juneau 64 Key West 61 Las Vegas 57 Little Rock 57 Los Angeles 41 Louisville

37 80 21 67 45 49 77 75 72 44 68 38 39 36 72 52 69 74 44 44 42 77 35 82 76 81 52 71 45 88 52 9 41 68 80 70 42 39 83 82 43 75 33 77 89 75 76 51

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers rain showers mostly cloudy mostly sunny showers mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy rain sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny rain and snow sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny windy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy

24 49 10 40 34 35 44 55 40 32 44 30 29 18 46 35 38 45 30 31 32 43 20 62 55 48 35 57 30 59 32 -16 33 35 57 37 25 29 68 61 31 49 22 65 61 49 56 32

39 81 26 62 44 50 58 74 67 53 60 35 37 35 63 48 60 71 51 51 40 80 35 83 71 81 65 71 45 89 57 11 56 68 80 50 47 38 83 84 52 76 37 75 85 71 75 56

partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny windy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

City

Today L H

47 Macon 69 McAllen, Tx. 55 Memphis 62 Miami 33 Milwaukee 27 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 37 52 Mobile Montgomery 51 50 Nashville New Orleans 60 New York City 32 Norfolk, Va. 42 Oklahoma City 55 Omaha 29 Orlando 51 Palm Springs 66 Philadelphia 32 Phoenix 62 Pittsburgh 34 Portland, Me. 10 Portland, Or. 47 Providence 22 Raleigh 45 Rapid City 30 Reno 44 Richmond, Va. 40 Sacramento 54 St. Petersburg 59 Salt Lake City 51 San Antonio 63 San Diego 54 San Francisco 53 Santa Fe 39 Savannah 46 Seattle 45 61 Shreveport 23 Sioux Falls 20 Syracuse 43 Tallahassee 54 Tampa 59 Tucson 48 Tulsa 37 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 59 42 Wichita Wilmington, De. 33 62 Yuma

70 87 72 76 43 43 53 76 72 64 78 41 56 75 56 78 91 42 96 43 33 53 42 65 75 68 63 68 74 79 82 67 66 76 75 49 78 51 36 78 74 95 75 53 75 71 44 97

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny rain sunny rain and snow sunny showers mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow sunny sunny sunny sunny showers partly cloudy sunny rain sunny

42 67 45 61 29 30 29 53 44 34 59 29 42 57 42 56 64 32 63 31 21 33 29 38 51 41 38 52 63 51 63 54 54 40 48 37 58 37 27 50 60 61 57 37 58 56 33 62

66 88 67 80 42 57 46 76 71 59 76 40 48 83 73 77 91 45 95 43 35 57 37 58 70 66 53 71 74 69 81 69 66 77 66 49 80 70 38 75 76 94 82 50 78 87 45 96

sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy windy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow sunny windy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny windy mostly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

71 46 46 56 79 75 41 41 43 60 55 30 69 59 50 41

85 53 66 84 93 84 68 48 53 71 75 58 80 73 55 55

sunny cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny rain showers sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny cloudy cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

44 65 35 77 49 57 38 50 43 71 50 7 32 66 58 57

52 70 51 91 66 81 62 59 68 95 74 31 48 79 84 88

cloudy mostly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.73 18 12.40 Peoria 14 10.22 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.26 Sullivan 16 - 1.65 Valley Park 24 11.75 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.31 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 30.68

Wintry Mix

80s

City

H

Good

- 0.05 - 0.33 - 0.29 - 0.22 - 0.17 - 0.10 - 0.65 - 0.55 - 0.37 - 0.29

70s

Showers/ Slight chance Partly cloudy isolated storms of rain

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

- 0.29 + 0.29 - 0.32 - 0.23 - 0.25

70s

WEDNESDAY

Alaska Low: -32°

L

Snow

60s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 9.17 23 6.22 Jefferson City 21 5.85 Hermann 20 3.53 Washington 25 9.88 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 14.59 Louisiana 15 13.24 Dam 24 25 23.59 Dam 25 26 23.44 Grafton 18 15.67 M.Price, Pool 419 413.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 11.34 St Louis 30 14.44 Chester 27 17.17 Cape Girardeau 32 22.40

50s

80s

80s SUNDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

24-Hr Change

60s

50s

80s

T-storms

50s

40s

90s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.08” 1.43” 1.64” 3.72” 6.28”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

72° 46° 56° 37° 83° 10° 66° 43°

70s

40s

50s

60s

4-DAY FORECAST

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:45 p.m.) Low (6:33 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2011) Record Low (1900) High Last Year Low Last Year

30s

40s 70s

50s

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L

Rain

30s

50s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

60s

50s 60s

City

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

29 44 40 75 43 74 54 39 30 65 64 39 32 42 45 35

42 57 49 82 66 82 86 59 43 73 75 61 35 47 53 45

partly cloudy cloudy showers thunderstorms partly sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers cloudy showers

El Nino looding pushes death toll in Peru to 67 BY FRANKLIN BRICENO associated Press

LIMA, PERU • The num-

ber of people killed in Peru following intense rains and mudslides wreaking havoc around the Andean nation climbed to 67 Friday, with thousands more displaced from destroyed homes and others waiting on rooftops for rescue. Across the country overflowing rivers caused by El Nino rains damaged 115,000 homes, collapsed 117 bridges and paralyzed countless roadways. “We are confronting a serious climatic problem,” President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said in a statement broadcast live Friday afternoon. “There hasn’t been an incident of this strength along the coast of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man is pulled to safety Friday in a zipline harness in Lima, Peru. Intense rain and mudslides wreaked havoc around the Andean nation, displacing thousands.

Peru since 1998.” The highly unusual rains follow a series of storms

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that have struck especially hard along Peru’s northern coast, with voracious

waters inundating hospitals and cemeteries, and leaving some small vil-

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Tuesday, 22 on Wednesday and 24 on Thursday. Park Service spokesman Mike Litterst had warned before the cold snap that 24 degree temperatures could kill as much as 90 percent of the blossoms. Peak bloom is deined as the day when 70 percent of the Yoshino cherry trees around the city’s Tidal Basin are blossoming.

Cold kills Washington’s cherry blossoms • Cold weather has killed half the blossoms on Washington’s famous cherry trees just as they were getting to the peak of their bloom. National Park Service oicials held a news conference on Friday to describe the damage. National Weather Service meteorologist Kevin Witt said temperatures in the area dipped to 26 on

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Rare monk seal dies in ish farm apparatus • An endangered Hawaiian monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a ish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii. Oicials with NOAA said Thursday that the death of the 10-year-old monk seal happened at Blue Ocean Mariculture, the same ish farm that NOAA’s National Marine Fishery Service has been using for research in conjunction with a plan to expand aquaculture into federal waters around the Paciic. Ann Garrett, the service’s assistant regional administrator for protected

lages entirely isolated. On Thursday, the National Police rescued eight people who had been trapped for three days in Cachipampa and removed the body of an man, 88, killed in the floods. In the highlands along the department of La Libertad, dramatic video showed crashing water inundating several buses and trucks, killing at least five people. Rescuers were searching Friday for survivors. Even Peru’s capital city of Lima, where a desert climate seldom leads to rain, police had to help hundreds of residents in an outskirt neighborhood cross a flooded road by sending them one-by-one along a rope. The muddy water channeled down the street after a major river

overflowed. Some residents left their homes with just a single plastic bag carrying their belongings. More than 65,000 people in nearby Huachipa were unable to either go to work or return home. “There’s no way to cross,” said Henry Obando, who was rescued after leaving the factory where he works and making his way toward a rooftop where officers created a zipline to cross. “Many people are trying to get to their homes.” The storms are being caused by a warms of the surface waters in the Pacific Ocean and are expected to continue for another two weeks. Kuczynski declared Peru’s Central Highway in a state of emergency Friday.

resources, conirmed the farm was the same one used for the NOAA-funded research. NOAA oicials said at a news conference that they believe the seal drowned after the farm operators opened one panel of a net pen to release a shark that had gotten inside. The seal died on March 5.

members of the church — had helped undermine abuse investigations. The prosecutors resigned their posts and are under investigation by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

Social worker accused of hiding religious sect abuse resigns • A veteran social worker accused of coaching congregants and their children on what to say during a 2015 child abuse investigation of her secretive religious sect has resigned, an attorney for a North Carolina child welfare agency said Friday. Andrea Leslie-Fite said Lori Cornelius left her position at the Cleveland County Department of Social Services. The development came less than two weeks after The Associated Press published a report that quoted former members of the Word of Faith Fellowship sect saying that Cornelius and two assistant district attorneys — all

Pilot program puts homeless in backyards • Faced with an intractable homeless problem, oicials in Portland, Ore., are thinking inside the box. A handful of homeless families will soon move into tiny, governmentconstructed modular units in the backyards of willing homeowners. Under the pilot program taking efect this summer, the homeowners will take over the heated, fully plumbed tiny houses in ive years and can use them for rental income. The project, called A Place for You, is believed to be the irst in the nation to recruit stable residents to address a homeless crisis that’s gotten so bad the city last year declared a state of emergency and made it legal to sleep on the street. From news services


WORLD

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

DIGEST Syria ires missiles at Israeli jets after airstrikes Syria ired missiles at Israeli warplanes on a mission to destroy a weapons convoy destined for the Iranian-backed Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, prompting it to deploy its missile defense system, Israeli oicials said Friday, in a rare military exchange between the hostile neighbors. The Israeli military said its aircraft struck several targets in Syria and were back in Israelicontrolled airspace when several anti-aircraft missiles were launched from Syria toward the Israeli jets. Israeli aerial defense systems intercepted one of the missiles, the army said, without elaborating. It would not say whether any other missiles struck Israeli-held territory but said the safety of Israeli civilians and Israeli aircraft was “not compromised.” Israel is widely believed to have carried out several airstrikes in recent years on advanced weapons systems in Syria — including Russian-made anti-aircraft missiles

and Iranian-made missiles — as well as Hezbollah positions. Military attack kills 42 Somali refugees of Yemen’s coast • The boat packed with dozens of Somali refugees was more than 30 miles of war-torn Yemen’s coast when a military vessel and a helicopter gunship swooped in, opening ire in the dead of night Friday, killing at least 42 people. The attack, which Yemen’s Shiite rebels blamed on a Saudi-led coalition, highlighted the perils of a heavily used migration route running from the Horn of Africa to the oil-rich Gulf, right through Yemen’s civil war. A Yemeni traicker who survived the attack said the boat was illed with Somali refugees, including women and children, who were trying to reach Sudan from Yemen, which has been racked by conlict for more than two years. U.S. denies striking mosque in Syria • The United States struck an al-Qaida gathering in northern Syria, killing dozens of militants, U.S. oicials said Friday. They said they found no basis for reports that civilians were killed. Syrian opposition activists said

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

around 40 people, mostly civilians, were killed in a mosque in the area, accusing the U.S.-led coalition of carrying out the airstrike Thursday evening. U.S. Army Maj. Josh Jacques, a U.S. Central Command spokesman, said the U.S. did not target or strike a mosque. Later, a Pentagon spokesman, Eric Pahon, said U.S. surveillance of the target area indicated evening prayers already had concluded before the attack. He said the building that was struck was used “as a place to educate and indoctrinate al-Qaida ighters.” For the Kremlin, boosting turnout is key task for 2018 vote • With a year to go before Russia’s presidential election, there’s little room for intrigue. President Vladimir Putin is set to glide easily to another term against a familiar pack of torpid leftover rivals from past races. But the Kremlin is searching for ways to overcome public apathy and draw more people to the polls in March 2018 to make his expected victory as impressive as possible. “The Kremlin is trying to encourage people, various population groups, to turn out

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for vote,” said Gleb Pavlovsky, a former political consultant for the Kremlin. “It’s a nervous moment for both Putin and his entourage.” The date of the vote hasn’t been oicially set, but pro-Kremlin lawmakers have proposed March 18, the day in 2014 when Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula oicially was declared part of Russia in a move that bolstered Putin’s popularity. New Zealand says U.S. invokes immunity for embassy stafer • New Zealand authorities say they’re unable to investigate an incident involving a U.S. Embassy stafer based in Wellington after the U.S. government elected to shield him by invoking diplomatic immunity. Police said Saturday they responded to an incident in Lower Hutt near Wellington early on March 12. The statement said the American left the scene before police arrived, and no arrests were made. Police declined to release further details of the incident. The following day, police asked New Zealand’s Ministry of Foreign Afairs and Trade to seek a waiver of immunity from the U.S. so they could investigate the incident,

according to the ministry. But the U.S. declined that request Friday. The statement from the ministry says it’s now asked the U.S. Embassy to remove the man from New Zealand. There was no word on the nature of the incident that caused the conlict. Rebels turn in irst 140 weapons in Colombia peace deal • Colombia’s largest rebel group has handed over 140 weapons to United Nations observers as part of a historic peace agreement. Under the accord, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia agreed to turn over 30 percent of its arsenal by March 1. But delays in setting up the 26 rural camps where nearly 7,000 rebels are now gathered meant not all the containers designed to hold the weapons were ready. Instead, rebels began registering their individual arms while authorities prepared an inventory of the arsenal. The U.N. peacekeeping mission in Colombia announced Friday that the irst arms had oicially been surrendered. From news services

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 03.18.2017 • B

PLAYING IT SMART

NOT WORRIED

Carpenter inally kicks the urge to do too much

Wainwright shrugs of pounding by Mets BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PORT ST. LUCIE, FLA. • If this had

erly explain the change, Mike Matheny dusted off an example from four years ago. The Cardinals’ manager remembers watching a 26-year-old infielder swinging himself ragged toward the tail end of his first full season in the majors. Matt Carpenter ignored Matheny’s requests — they eventually turned into demands — to cut back on excessive practice cuts. One of the two had to give. “He kept trying to sneak in for live batting practice,” Matheny recalled Friday. “It got to the point where I told him I was going to take his entire paycheck if he walks in there and takes a swing.” It wasn’t a joke. “It was going to charity or somewhere if he was going to test me,” Matheny

Cardinals infielder Matt Carpenter has missed time this spring with a back issue but was back in action Friday and showed no ill efects.

Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright winces after giving up a run in the first inning Friday during an exhibition game against the New York Mets.

been a regular-season game, the folks back home might have been calling for Adam Wainwright’s head on a platter. Heck, they may be doing that anyway after he got only five outs while allowing 10 runs Friday in a 16-2 Cardinals shellacking by the New York Mets. Wainwright himself, asked what he took from the game, responded, “A beating.” But while he was quick to say he wasn’t going to discard anything that happened during his seven-hit, threewalk, 71-pitch performance in 12/3 innings, he wasn’t apoplectic about it nor was anybody else. “I pitched great the last few times out,” said Wainwright. “Today the ball was going a little more horizontal. There was good run on the ball, but it wasn’t sinking like I wanted it to. It’s probably a hand placement thing. I haven’t watched the film to know.

See FREDERICKSON • Page B3

Mozeliak says door is open to Molina. B3

UP NEXT • 12:05 p.m. Saturday vs. Mets, FSM

See CARDINALS • Page B3

PORT ST. LUCIE, FLA. • To prop-

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NCAA TOURNAMENT

MILD SHOCKER SOUTH REGION > No. 10 seed Wichita State upsets No. 7 seed Dayton. B7 | Bracket. B8 EAST REGION > USC knocks of SMU. B7 | MIDWEST REGION > Rhode Island advances. B8 Wichita State’s Rashard Kelly dives for the ball against Dayton’s Kyle Davis in the Shockers’ 64-58 victory.

By luck or design, MU wins in NCAAs Tigers top S. Florida on last-second shot MIZZOU

66 So. FLA.

64

BY JORDAN CULVER Special to the Post-Dispatch

TALLAHASSEE, FLA. • Sierra

WOMEN’S FROZEN FOUR

TITLE GAME SET Wisconsin beats Boston College and Clarkson tops Minnesota in the NCAA hockey semifinals. B4

Wisconsin players surround Mellissa Channell after she scored with 16 seconds remaining to beat Boston College 1-0 at Family Arena.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Michaelis wasn’t quite ready for her NCAA Tournament to end. The senior guard scored 13 of her team-high 16 points in the second half — including the game-winning putback — to lead Mizzou back from a 13-point halftime deficit for a 66-64 victory over South Florida on Friday in the first round of the tournament at Tallahassee’s Tucker Civic Center. By Michaelis’ own admission, it was the first game-winning shot she’s hit since her junior year in high school, when she was playing AAU basketball. She got it after snagging an ofensive rebound off a miss from guard Amber Smith. “I think I was just in the right place at the right time,” Michaelis said with a laugh, insisting Smith’s miss was a pass. “I don’t really remember. We executed the play just like Coach drew it up.” Friday’s win gets Mizzou (2210) through to the second round of the tournament and marks the first time the Tigers have won NCAA Tournament games in consecutive years in program history. It was the program’s sixth NCAA Tournament win overall. Michaelis — who sat for most of the first half with two fouls — was one of four Tigers with double-digit points. The Cunningham sisters combined for 25 points (12 for Sophie, 13 for Lindsey), and sophomore forward See MIZZOU • Page B9

Up next: Sunday vs. Florida State, time TBD.

MU has three wrestlers in inals Tigers up to fourth in team standings BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Missouri’s J’den Cox will have a little bit of company Saturday night in the finals of the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships at Scottrade Center. Looking to become the first Tiger wrestler to capture three national titles, the 197-pound Cox (27-0) will be joined in the championship matches by

149-pound senior Lavion Mayes (23-2) of Mascoutah and junior Joey Lavallee (29-1) at 157. It’s the first time Missouri has had more than one finalist in a single year. With the three semifinal wins and some similarly strong efforts in wrestlebacks, Missouri has 81.5 points and has moved into fourth place behind Penn State (121), Ohio State (89.5) and Oklahoma State (86) and ahead of Iowa (74). Illinois is 10th with 41.5 points. Saturday’s finals, which begin at 7 p.m., will also include

Illinois’ Isaiah Martinez (31-0), who’s looking to become the Fighting Illini’s first three-time winner. Cox, an Olympic bronze medalist in Rio, won 6-2 against fourth-seeded Jared Vaught of Virginia Tech to earn a spot in the finals against second-seeded Brett Pfarr (31-2) of Minnesota. Cox becomes Mizzou’s second four-time All-American, joining four-time finalist and two-time champ Ben Askren. In 2015, Cox finished fifth. See WRESTLING • Page B5

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Joey Lavalee (bottom) wrestles Cornell’s Dylan Palacio in a 157-pound semifinal match Friday at Scottrade Center. Lavalee won 8-5.

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 3/18 at Arizona 8 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 3/21 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/23 vs. Vancouver 7 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 3/18 12:05 p.m. vs. Mets* FSM

Sunday 3/19 12:05 p.m. at Braves* FSM

Monday 3/20 5:05 p.m. at Astros*

Saturday 3/25 vs. Calgary 6 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Wednesday 3/22 12:05 p.m. vs. Nationals*

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Monday 3/20 NIT vs. Boise State 8 p.m., ESPN

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/25 at Louisville 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/1 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/8 vs. New York 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 4/12 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 11 a.m. NASCAR: Camping World 500, practice, FS2 11:30 a.m. IMSA Sportscar Championship: Sebring International Raceway, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR Xinity: DC Solar 200, qualifying, FS2 1 p.m. Pirelli World Challenge: GT Firestone Grand Prix, CBSSN 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Camping World 500, inal practice, FS2 3 p.m. NASCAR Xinity: DC Solar 200, KTVI (2) BASEBALL 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals vs. Mets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 1 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Alabama, SEC Network 2:30 p.m. World Baseball Classic: Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, MLB 6 p.m. Exhibition: Netherlands at Diamondbacks, MLB 7 p.m. College: Mississippi State vs. Arkansas, SEC Network 9 p.m. World Baseball Classic: United States vs. Dominican Republic, MLB BASKETBALL 10 a.m. NIT: Mississippi at Syracuse, ESPN 10 a.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Albany (N.Y.) vs. Connecticut, ESPN2 11:10 a.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Notre Dame vs. West Virginia, KMOV (4), WXOS (101.1 FM) 12:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Iowa State-Syracuse; Chattanooga-Louisville; New Mexico State-Stanford, Quinnipiac-Marquette, ESPN2 1:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Villanova vs. Wisconsin, KMOV (4), WXOS (101.1 FM) 3 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Dayton-Tennessee; Drake-Kansas State; Florida Gulf Coast-Miami, ESPN2 4:15 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Gonzaga vs. Northwestern, KMOV (4) 5 p.m. Men’s Division III championship: Babson vs. Augustana (Ill.), CBSSN 5:10 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Florida State vs. Xavier, TNT, WXOS (101.1 FM) 5:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Texas Southern-Baylor; Gonzaga-Oklahoma; Boise State-UCLA; Oregon-Temple, ESPN2 6:10 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Butler vs. Middle Tennessee State, TBS 6:45 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Arizona vs. St. Mary’s, KMOV (4) 7:30 p.m. NBA: Cavaliers at Clippers, KDNL (30) 7:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Florida vs. Virginia, TNT 8 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, California-Louisiana State; Montana State-Washington Pennslyvania-Texas A&M; Hampton-Duke, ESPN2 8 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Grizzlies, KFNS (590 AM) 8:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Purdue vs. Iowa State, TBS, WXOS (101.1 FM) NOTE: NCAA Tournament radio coverage subject to switching to other games. GOLF 11:30 a.m. PGA: Arnold Palmer Invitational, Golf Channel 1:30 p.m. PGA: Arnold Palmer Invitational, KSDK (5) 3:30 p.m. Champions: Tucson Conquistadores Classic, Golf Channel 6 p.m. LPGA: Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Golf Channel GYMNASTICS 11 a.m. College women: Big Ten Championships, irst session, BTN 1 p.m. College women: SEC championship, afternoon session, ESPNU 1:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Penn State, BTN 4 p.m. College women: Big 10 championships, second session, BTN 5 p.m. College women: SEC championship, evening session, SEC Network 7 p.m. College: Illinois at Oklahoma, FSM Plus HOCKEY 12 p.m. Avalanche at Red Wings, NHL Network 6 p.m. Rangers at Wild, NHL Network 7 p.m. College: Big Ten tournament championship, Wisconsin vs. Penn State or Minnesota, BTN 7:30 p.m. College: National Collegiate Hockey Conference tournament championship, Minnesota-Duluth vs. North Dakota, CBSSN 8 p.m. Blues at Coyotes, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) LACROSSE 3 p.m. College: Villanova at Maryland, ESPNU 5 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Virginia, ESPNU MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 10 p.m. World Series of Fighting 35, NBCSN MOTORCYCLE RACING 6 p.m. Monster Energy Supercross: Indianapolis, KTVI (2) SOCCER 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: West Bromwich Albion vs. Arsenal, NBCSN 9:30 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hofenheim vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Stoke City vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 10 a.m. English Premier League: Everton vs. Hull City AFC, CNBC 12:25 p.m. English Premier League: AFC Bournemouth vs. Swansea City, NBCSN SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: Kentucky vs. Georgia, SEC Network SPECIAL OLYMPICS 1 p.m. World Games: Austria opening ceremony, KDNL (30) SPECIAL OLYMPICS 1 p.m. World Games: Austria opening ceremony, KDNL (30) TENNIS 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, semiinals, ESPN 6 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP Doubles inal/WTA Doubles inal, Tennis Channel WINTER SPORTS 11:30 a.m. FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup inals: Women’s slalom, KSDK (5) WRESTLING 10 a.m. College: NCAA championship: medal round, ESPNU 7 p.m. College: NCAA championships, inal, ESPN

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M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Hofman leads by one after 66 in Palmer event Grillo is in second; defending champ Day is seven behind ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, FLA. • Charley

Hoffman wasn’t expecting to be at Bay Hill until he failed to qualify for a World Golf Championship next week. The change in plans has worked out nicely so far. In only his fourth appearance in the Arnold Palmer Invitational over the last decade, Hofman made seven birdies in slightly warmer conditions Friday for a 6-under 66 that gave him a one-shot lead over Emiliano Grillo of Argentina. Hoffman was at 10-under 134. Grillo made two eagles on his opening nine, holing a 35-yard bunker shot on the par-5 12th and chipping in from just of the green on the par-5 16th. He then made birdies on the two par 5s on the front nine that carried him to a 68. Matt Fitzpatrick of England had four birdies on the back nine for a 69 and was two shots behind. Sam Saunders, the 29-yearold grandson of Palmer, had three straight bogeys around the turn and never caught up. He wound up with another 74 and missed the cut by one shot in the first Arnold Palmer Invitational since the death of the beloved tournament host last September. “I don’t know, I’ve got a monkey on my back there where I just always seem to work my way toward that cut number and think about it too much,” Saunders said. “It’s all part of the learning experience, and just got to get better.” The cut was 3-over 147. Two players who missed the cut at least provided some entertain-

ment. Hoffman knows all about missing the cut at Bay Hill. He has left early three times in four previous trips to Bay Hill. The exception was in 2012, when he tied for 59th. He had only one sub-70 round, a 69 on the first day in 2013. He shot 79 the next day and missed the cut. That was four years ago, the last time he played. Hoffman only had to finish 41st at the Valspar Championship last week to get one of the 64 available spots through the world ranking for the Dell Technologies Match Play next week in Austin, Texas. Instead, he missed the cut and will be the second alternate, unlikely to get in. So he added Bay Hill, a decision that was even easier because it was the first one without Palmer. “I played halfway decent the first round last time I was here,” he said. “In the schedule, it hasn’t fallen where I would like in the past. I wasn’t in Match Play, and then obviously honoring Arnie is not a hard thing to come here and play.” Saunders played with Rory McIlroy, who had another mixed bag and shot 71 to finish at 1-over 145, leaving him 11 shots out of the lead. Defending champion Jason Day was 1 over for his round until he hit a 340-yard drive on the par-5 16th, hit a short iron to 8 feet and made the eagle putt. He saved par on the final hole with a 5-foot putt for a 71 and was at 3-under 141, still in range with 36 holes to play with hopes of extending a peculiar streak at Bay Hill. Tiger Woods won back to back and then Matt Every won back to back over the last four years. Every shot a 70 to make the cut, ending a streak of 18 consecutive PGA Tour starts where he failed to make the cut.

GOLF ROUNDUP Couples leads after 65 in Champions tourney Fred Couples shot an 8-under 65 on Friday in the Tucson Conquistadores Classic, leaving playing partner Steve Stricker two strokes back in his PGA Tour Champions debut. Coming of a victory last month in the Chubb Classic, the 57-yearold Couples birdied ive of the irst seven holes in hot conditions and added four more on the back nine before bogeying the par-4 18th. Stricker birdied his irst three holes in his bogey-free round on Omni Tucson National’s Catalina Course. The 12-time PGA Tour winner turned 50 on Feb. 23. He will captain the U.S. Presidents Cup team in September. Tom Lehman and Jef Maggert shot 66, and Stephen Ames, Billy Mayfair and John Cook matched Stricker at 67. Stricker missed the cut last week in the PGA Tour’s Valspar Championship and will make his next start in the PGA Tour’s Shell Houston Open.

Bernhard Langer had a 71 for his 30th straight round under par. Gil Morgan set the PGA Tour Champions record of 31 in 2000. Colin Montgomerie also is at 30, but he is not playing this week. Wie one behind in Phoenix • Michelle Wie is healthy and conident again. She’s in contention in the Bank of Hope Founders Cup, too. Wie shot a 5-under 67 on another hot and low-scoring day at Desert Ridge in Phoenix to enter the weekend a stroke behind leaders Stacy Lewis and Ariya Jutanugarn. Winless in 62 events since the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open, Wie is coming of a fourth-place tie two weeks ago in Singapore. Lewis and Jutanugarn played together, each following an opening 64 with a 67 to reach 13 under. Jeong Eun Lee shot a 64 to join Wie, Mi Jung Hur (66) and Vicky Hurst (67) at 12 under. Associated Press

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Dominicans win in WBC Nelson Cruz hit his third home run of the tournament and Gregory Polanco also homered, leading defending World Baseball Classic champion Dominican Republic to a 3-0 victory over Venezuela, which moved to the brink of elimination. The game, in San Diego, ended early Friday morning (St. Louis time). The Dominican Republic had won 11 straight WBC games until losing to Puerto Rico in the Pool F opener on Tuesday. The United States was playing Puerto Rico on Friday night in San Diego in a game that was not over at press time for this edition. On Saturday, Puerto Rico is to face Venezuela and the Dominican Republic is set to meet the United States. The top two teams from that group of four advance to the semiinals at Dodger Stadium. Entering Friday’s play, Venezuela was 0-2 and the other three teams were 1-1. The Pool F winner plays the Netherlands on Monday night at Dodger Stadium, in Los Angeles, while the Pool F runner-up plays Japan on Tuesday. The championship game is at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday night. Prado’s status uncertain • The Marlins are waiting to learn the extent of third baseman Martin Prado’s hamstring injury, including whether he’ll be available for opening day. Prado, playing for Venezuela, was injured while running out a grounder in a World Baseball Classic game Wednesday. “Hopefully it’s minor, Grade I (strain), and that we’re able to kind of continue and have him ready, but we’ll just have to wait and see,” Marlins manager Don Mattingly said Friday. A career .293 hitter over 10 major league seasons, Prado hit .305 and drove in 75 runs for the Marlins last season. Fulmer improving • American League rookie of the year Michael Fulmer said his injured right ankle is 100 percent and that he’s on track to be ready for the start of the regular season. Fulmer, making his second start since spraining the ankle March 4, gave up three runs and four hits in 3 1/3 innings in a 3-0 loss Friday to the New York Yankees, who threw a no-hitter in a game started by Masahiro Tanaka and then followed by two relievers. Fulmer threw 59 pitches. The Tigers had targeted him for 55-60. Elsewhere • Pitcher Logan Ondrusek, due to have his sore elbow examined next week, was released by the Orioles. He is entitled to 30 days’ termination pay, $106,557. In six bigleague seasons, with the Reds and Orioles, he is 21-11 with a 4.03 ERA. • Waymon Roberts, father of Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, died on Friday at age 68. No details were announced. Bench coach Bob Geren and Triple-A Oklahoma City manager Bill Haselman will ill in while Dave Robert is gone from spring training to be with family. • The Royals optioned three of their top prospects — inielder Hunter Dozier and outielders Jorge Bonifacio and Bubba Starling — to Triple-A Omaha as they begin paring their roster. • Athletics outielder Jake Smolinski had surgery on his right shoulder and will be in a sling for about four weeks. He hit .238 with seven home runs and 27 RBIs in 99 games last year. • Rangers pitching prospect Chi Chi Gonzalez probably will miss at least the irst half of the season because of a partial tear of a ligament in his right elbow. From news services

DIGEST Wage dispute continues in women’s hockey event USA Hockey says it is contacting representatives of the women’s team, which threatened to boycott the upcoming world championships over a wage dispute. Executive director Dave Ogrean says the organization remains committed to having the players selected for the tournament play in it when it begins March 31 in Plymouth, Mich. The United States is the defending champion and has won six of the past eight International Ice Hockey Federation women’s gold medals. Players announced Wednesday they wouldn’t play in the world championships unless signiicant progress was made toward a labor deal. As of Friday evening, players lawyer John Langel said he had not yet been contacted. Players let a Thursday deadline to commit to playing pass without changing their minds. U.S. men’s team loses Johnson • American midielder Fabian Johnson will miss World Cup qualiiers against Honduras and Panama because of a right hamstring injury. Sporting Kansas City’s Graham Zusi was picked by coach Bruce

Arena to replace Johnson on his 24-man roster. Johnson, who igured to start in left midield, was hurt Thursday in Borussia Moenchengladbach’s Europa League match against Schalke. The Americans are trying to overcome an 0-2 start in the inal round of World Cup qualifying in the North and Central American and Caribbean region. Breakthrough for Sock • Jack Sock is getting quite the workout at the BNP Paribas Open, with all four of his matches stretching to three sets on his way to the semiinals. The 24-year-old American notched his biggest singles victory yet with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 quarterinal win over Kei Nishikori on Friday in Indian Wells, Calif. Sock inally broke through against a top-ive ranked opponent after losing his irst seven matches against such competition. “The doubters in the past can’t really say much anymore,” he said. “I actually feel almost stronger as the tournament has gone on.” Sock will need to keep up his strength for his semiinal against four-time Indian Wells champion Roger Federer. He lost to Federer in straight sets in the fourth round of the 2015 tournament.

Federer got an unexpected day of after Nick Kyrgios withdrew from their quarterinal because of what he suspected was food poisoning. Less than two hours before they were to take the court, Kyrgios tweeted that he “had a restless night of being sick.” He said “to play a great champion like Roger, I need to be at my best to have a chance.” Schifrin to be champion • Mikaela Shifrin will clinch the overall World Cup title before even racing during World Cup Finals after Ilka Stuhec and her coach said the Slovenian skier won’t compete in the slalom. The 22-year-old Shifrin will join Phil Mahre, Tamara McKinney, Bode Miller and Lindsey Vonn as the only American overall World Cup champions. Citing exhaustion, Stuhec said at the team event that she will skip the slalom race to prepare for the giant slalom on Sunday. Her private coach, Grega Kostomaj, conirmed Stuhec’s decision. Shifrin already held a nearly insurmountable 198-point lead over Stuhec with two races left — Shifrin’s specialties at that. Associated Press


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 3/18 at Arizona 8 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 3/21 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/23 vs. Vancouver 7 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 3/18 12:05 p.m. vs. Mets* FSM

Sunday 3/19 12:05 p.m. at Braves* FSM

Monday 3/20 5:05 p.m. at Astros*

Saturday 3/25 vs. Calgary 6 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Wednesday 3/22 12:05 p.m. vs. Nationals*

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Monday 3/20 NIT vs. Boise State 8 p.m., ESPN

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/25 at Louisville 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/1 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/8 vs. New York 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 4/12 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 11 a.m. NASCAR: Camping World 500, practice, FS2 11:30 a.m. IMSA Sportscar Championship: Sebring International Raceway, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR Xinity: DC Solar 200, qualifying, FS2 1 p.m. Pirelli World Challenge: GT Firestone Grand Prix, CBSSN 1:30 p.m. NASCAR: Camping World 500, inal practice, FS2 3 p.m. NASCAR Xinity: DC Solar 200, KTVI (2) BASEBALL 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals vs. Mets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 1 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Alabama, SEC Network 2:30 p.m. World Baseball Classic: Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, MLB 6 p.m. Exhibition: Netherlands at Diamondbacks, MLB 7 p.m. College: Mississippi State vs. Arkansas, SEC Network 9 p.m. World Baseball Classic: United States vs. Dominican Republic, MLB BASKETBALL 10 a.m. NIT: Mississippi at Syracuse, ESPN 10 a.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Albany (N.Y.) vs. Connecticut, ESPN2 11:10 a.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Notre Dame vs. West Virginia, KMOV (4), WXOS (101.1 FM) 12:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Iowa State-Syracuse; Chattanooga-Louisville; New Mexico State-Stanford, Quinnipiac-Marquette, ESPN2 1:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Villanova vs. Wisconsin, KMOV (4), WXOS (101.1 FM) 3 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Dayton-Tennessee; Drake-Kansas State; Florida Gulf Coast-Miami, ESPN2 4:15 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Gonzaga vs. Northwestern, KMOV (4) 5 p.m. Men’s Division III championship: Babson vs. Augustana (Ill.), CBSSN 5:10 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Florida State vs. Xavier, TNT, WXOS (101.1 FM) 5:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, Texas Southern-Baylor; Gonzaga-Oklahoma; Boise State-UCLA; Oregon-Temple, ESPN2 6:10 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Butler vs. Middle Tennessee State, TBS 6:45 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Arizona vs. St. Mary’s, KMOV (4) 7:30 p.m. NBA: Cavaliers at Clippers, KDNL (30) 7:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Florida vs. Virginia, TNT 8 p.m. Women’s NCAA Tournament: Alternating coverage, California-Louisiana State; Montana State-Washington Pennslyvania-Texas A&M; Hampton-Duke, ESPN2 8 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Grizzlies, KFNS (590 AM) 8:40 p.m. Men’s NCAA Tournament: Purdue vs. Iowa State, TBS, WXOS (101.1 FM) NOTE: NCAA Tournament radio coverage subject to switching to other games. GOLF 11:30 a.m. PGA: Arnold Palmer Invitational, Golf Channel 1:30 p.m. PGA: Arnold Palmer Invitational, KSDK (5) 3:30 p.m. Champions: Tucson Conquistadores Classic, Golf Channel 6 p.m. LPGA: Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Golf Channel GYMNASTICS 11 a.m. College women: Big Ten Championships, irst session, BTN 1 p.m. College women: SEC championship, afternoon session, ESPNU 1:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Penn State, BTN 4 p.m. College women: Big 10 championships, second session, BTN 5 p.m. College women: SEC championship, evening session, SEC Network 7 p.m. College: Illinois at Oklahoma, FSM Plus HOCKEY 12 p.m. Avalanche at Red Wings, NHL Network 6 p.m. Rangers at Wild, NHL Network 7 p.m. College: Big Ten tournament championship, Wisconsin vs. Penn State, BTN 7:30 p.m. College: National Collegiate Hockey Conference tournament championship, Minnesota-Duluth vs. North Dakota, CBSSN 8 p.m. Blues at Coyotes, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) LACROSSE 3 p.m. College: Villanova at Maryland, ESPNU 5 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Virginia, ESPNU MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 10 p.m. World Series of Fighting 35, NBCSN MOTORCYCLE RACING 6 p.m. Monster Energy Supercross: Indianapolis, KTVI (2) SOCCER 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: West Bromwich Albion vs. Arsenal, NBCSN 9:30 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hofenheim vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Stoke City vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 10 a.m. English Premier League: Everton vs. Hull City AFC, CNBC 12:25 p.m. English Premier League: AFC Bournemouth vs. Swansea City, NBCSN SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: Kentucky vs. Georgia, SEC Network SPECIAL OLYMPICS 1 p.m. World Games: Austria opening ceremony, KDNL (30) SPECIAL OLYMPICS 1 p.m. World Games: Austria opening ceremony, KDNL (30) TENNIS 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, semiinals, ESPN 6 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP Doubles inal/WTA Doubles inal, Tennis Channel WINTER SPORTS 11:30 a.m. FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup inals: Women’s slalom, KSDK (5) WRESTLING 10 a.m. College: NCAA championship: medal round, ESPNU 7 p.m. College: NCAA championships, inal, ESPN

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

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Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Hofman leads by one after 66 in Palmer event Grillo is in second; defending champ Day is seven behind ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, FLA. • Charley

Hoffman wasn’t expecting to be at Bay Hill until he failed to qualify for a World Golf Championship next week. The change in plans has worked out nicely so far. In only his fourth appearance in the Arnold Palmer Invitational over the last decade, Hofman made seven birdies in slightly warmer conditions Friday for a 6-under 66 that gave him a one-shot lead over Emiliano Grillo of Argentina. Hoffman was at 10-under 134. Grillo made two eagles on his opening nine, holing a 35-yard bunker shot on the par-5 12th and chipping in from just of the green on the par-5 16th. He then made birdies on the two par 5s on the front nine that carried him to a 68. Matt Fitzpatrick of England had four birdies on the back nine for a 69 and was two shots behind. Sam Saunders, the 29-yearold grandson of Palmer, had three straight bogeys around the turn and never caught up. He wound up with another 74 and missed the cut by one shot in the first Arnold Palmer Invitational since the death of the beloved tournament host last September. “I don’t know, I’ve got a monkey on my back there where I just always seem to work my way toward that cut number and think about it too much,” Saunders said. “It’s all part of the learning experience, and just got to get better.” The cut was 3-over 147. Two players who missed the cut at least provided some entertain-

ment. Hoffman knows all about missing the cut at Bay Hill. He has left early three times in four previous trips to Bay Hill. The exception was in 2012, when he tied for 59th. He had only one sub-70 round, a 69 on the first day in 2013. He shot 79 the next day and missed the cut. That was four years ago, the last time he played. Hoffman only had to finish 41st at the Valspar Championship last week to get one of the 64 available spots through the world ranking for the Dell Technologies Match Play next week in Austin, Texas. Instead, he missed the cut and will be the second alternate, unlikely to get in. So he added Bay Hill, a decision that was even easier because it was the first one without Palmer. “I played halfway decent the first round last time I was here,” he said. “In the schedule, it hasn’t fallen where I would like in the past. I wasn’t in Match Play, and then obviously honoring Arnie is not a hard thing to come here and play.” Saunders played with Rory McIlroy, who had another mixed bag and shot 71 to finish at 1-over 145, leaving him 11 shots out of the lead. Defending champion Jason Day was 1 over for his round until he hit a 340-yard drive on the par-5 16th, hit a short iron to 8 feet and made the eagle putt. He saved par on the final hole with a 5-foot putt for a 71 and was at 3-under 141, still in range with 36 holes to play with hopes of extending a peculiar streak at Bay Hill. Tiger Woods won back to back and then Matt Every won back to back over the last four years. Every shot a 70 to make the cut, ending a streak of 18 consecutive PGA Tour starts where he failed to make the cut.

GOLF ROUNDUP Couples leads after 65 in Champions tourney Fred Couples shot an 8-under 65 on Friday in the Tucson Conquistadores Classic, leaving playing partner Steve Stricker two strokes back in his PGA Tour Champions debut. Coming of a victory last month in the Chubb Classic, the 57-yearold Couples birdied ive of the irst seven holes in hot conditions and added four more on the back nine before bogeying the par-4 18th. Stricker birdied his irst three holes in his bogey-free round on Omni Tucson National’s Catalina Course. The 12-time PGA Tour winner turned 50 on Feb. 23. He will captain the U.S. Presidents Cup team in September. Tom Lehman and Jef Maggert shot 66, and Stephen Ames, Billy Mayfair and John Cook matched Stricker at 67. Stricker missed the cut last week in the PGA Tour’s Valspar Championship and will make his next start in the PGA Tour’s Shell Houston Open.

Bernhard Langer had a 71 for his 30th straight round under par. Gil Morgan set the PGA Tour Champions record of 31 in 2000. Colin Montgomerie also is at 30, but he is not playing this week. Wie one behind in Phoenix • Michelle Wie is healthy and conident again. She’s in contention in the Bank of Hope Founders Cup, too. Wie shot a 5-under 67 on another hot and low-scoring day at Desert Ridge in Phoenix to enter the weekend a stroke behind leaders Stacy Lewis and Ariya Jutanugarn. Winless in 62 events since the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open, Wie is coming of a fourth-place tie two weeks ago in Singapore. Lewis and Jutanugarn played together, each following an opening 64 with a 67 to reach 13 under. Jeong Eun Lee shot a 64 to join Wie, Mi Jung Hur (66) and Vicky Hurst (67) at 12 under. Associated Press

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Puerto Rico defeats U.S. Yadier Molina and Puerto Rico are moving on to the World Baseball Classic semiinals after scoring four runs in the irst inning and then holding on for a wild 6-5 win against the United States on Friday night in San Diego. By clinching Pool F with a day to go, Puerto Rico (2-0) will play the Netherlands on Monday night at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The other semiinal spot from Pool F will go to the winner of Saturday night’s game between the United States (1-1) and the Dominican Republic (1-1) in San Diego. That team will play Japan on Tuesday night. With most of the 32,463 fans on their feet and chanting in the top of the ninth, a U.S rally fell just short. Brandon Crawford hit a two-run triple to the left-center gap of Edwin Diaz with two outs to pull the Americans within a run. Diaz then struck out Josh Harrison to end it and send the Puerto Ricans into a wild celebration on the inield. Molina singled in run in Puerto Rico’s big irst inning. The Americans got homers from Adam Jones and Posey. Prado’s status uncertain • The Marlins are waiting to learn the extent of third baseman Martin Prado’s hamstring injury, including whether he’ll be available for opening day. Prado, playing for Venezuela, was injured while running out a grounder in a World Baseball Classic game Wednesday. “Hopefully it’s minor, Grade I (strain), and that we’re able to kind of continue and have him ready, but we’ll just have to wait and see,” Marlins manager Don Mattingly said Friday. A career .293 hitter over 10 major league seasons, Prado hit .305 and drove in 75 runs for the Marlins last season. Fulmer improving • American League rookie of the year Michael Fulmer said his injured right ankle is 100 percent and that he’s on track to be ready for the start of the regular season. Fulmer, making his second start since spraining the ankle March 4, gave up three runs and four hits in 3 1/3 innings in a 3-0 loss Friday to the New York Yankees, who threw a no-hitter in a game started by Masahiro Tanaka and then followed by two relievers. Fulmer threw 59 pitches. The Tigers had targeted him for 55-60. Elsewhere • Pitcher Logan Ondrusek, due to have his sore elbow examined next week, was released by the Orioles. He is entitled to 30 days’ termination pay, $106,557. In six bigleague seasons, with the Reds and Orioles, he is 21-11 with a 4.03 ERA. • Waymon Roberts, father of Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, died on Friday at age 68. No details were announced. Bench coach Bob Geren and Triple-A Oklahoma City manager Bill Haselman will ill in while Dave Robert is gone from spring training to be with family. • The Royals optioned three of their top prospects — inielder Hunter Dozier and outielders Jorge Bonifacio and Bubba Starling — to Triple-A Omaha as they begin paring their roster. • Athletics outielder Jake Smolinski had surgery on his right shoulder and will be in a sling for about four weeks. He hit .238 with seven home runs and 27 RBIs in 99 games last year. • Rangers pitching prospect Chi Chi Gonzalez probably will miss at least the irst half of the season because of a partial tear of a ligament in his right elbow. From news services

DIGEST Wage dispute continues in women’s hockey event USA Hockey says it is contacting representatives of the women’s team, which threatened to boycott the upcoming world championships over a wage dispute. Executive director Dave Ogrean says the organization remains committed to having the players selected for the tournament play in it when it begins March 31 in Plymouth, Mich. The United States is the defending champion and has won six of the past eight International Ice Hockey Federation women’s gold medals. Players announced Wednesday they wouldn’t play in the world championships unless signiicant progress was made toward a labor deal. As of Friday evening, players lawyer John Langel said he had not yet been contacted. Players let a Thursday deadline to commit to playing pass without changing their minds. U.S. men’s team loses Johnson • American midielder Fabian Johnson will miss World Cup qualiiers against Honduras and Panama because of a right hamstring injury. Sporting Kansas City’s Graham Zusi was picked by coach Bruce

Arena to replace Johnson on his 24-man roster. Johnson, who igured to start in left midield, was hurt Thursday in Borussia Moenchengladbach’s Europa League match against Schalke. The Americans are trying to overcome an 0-2 start in the inal round of World Cup qualifying in the North and Central American and Caribbean region. Breakthrough for Sock • Jack Sock is getting quite the workout at the BNP Paribas Open, with all four of his matches stretching to three sets on his way to the semiinals. The 24-year-old American notched his biggest singles victory yet with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 quarterinal win over Kei Nishikori on Friday in Indian Wells, Calif. Sock inally broke through against a top-ive ranked opponent after losing his irst seven matches against such competition. “The doubters in the past can’t really say much anymore,” he said. “I actually feel almost stronger as the tournament has gone on.” Sock will need to keep up his strength for his semiinal against four-time Indian Wells champion Roger Federer. He lost to Federer in straight sets in the fourth round of the 2015 tournament.

Federer got an unexpected day of after Nick Kyrgios withdrew from their quarterinal because of what he suspected was food poisoning. Less than two hours before they were to take the court, Kyrgios tweeted that he “had a restless night of being sick.” He said “to play a great champion like Roger, I need to be at my best to have a chance.” Schifrin to be champion • Mikaela Shifrin will clinch the overall World Cup title before even racing during World Cup Finals after Ilka Stuhec and her coach said the Slovenian skier won’t compete in the slalom. The 22-year-old Shifrin will join Phil Mahre, Tamara McKinney, Bode Miller and Lindsey Vonn as the only American overall World Cup champions. Citing exhaustion, Stuhec said at the team event that she will skip the slalom race to prepare for the giant slalom on Sunday. Her private coach, Grega Kostomaj, conirmed Stuhec’s decision. Shifrin already held a nearly insurmountable 198-point lead over Stuhec with two races left — Shifrin’s specialties at that. Associated Press


BASEBALL

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Mozeliak is open to Molina talks General manager says extension during the season is a possibility BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

PORT ST. LUCIE, FLA. • On

the heels of statements by Bengie Molina, older brother of Cardinals star Yadier Molina that Yadier Molina wouldn’t hesitate to enter free agency next ofseason if he didn’t have an extension, Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak responded Friday, “Can’t you say that about every player? I don’t know what’s so weird about that. “I have always said that we’re always open for business,” said Mozeliak. “We are not a deadline organization, historically. So, as far as timing. ... I’m not drawing any lines in the sand.” That’s even to the point of an in-season extension. “I’ve done extensions during the season,” Mozeliak said. “(Matt) Carpenter. (Lance) Berkman. It’s not unusual for us to do that, but I certainly know some players just don’t want to, and I respect that as well.”

Mozeliak said the process basically was that “you are trying to do what’s best for your organization. There is always a shortterm approach and a long-term approach. Yadi has meant a lot to this organization for a very long time. We want to make sure that however the outcome of this is, we definitely tried to do the best for everyone.” Yadier Molina, who is playing for Puerto Rico in the World Baseball Classic in San Diego, has a mutual 2018 option with the Cardinals at $15 million.

CUBAN GARCIA DEBUTS The Cardinals had three Garcias in uniform Friday for their exhibition with the New York Mets. Infielder Greg Garcia and outfielder Anthony Garcia have been around all spring. Cuban outfielder Jose Adolis Garcia, with his work visa in hand after having returned to Haiti, also was on the Cardinals’ bench and manager Mike Matheny didn’t hesitate getting him into a blowout game.

Garcia, after fouling off several pitches, struck out in his first at-bat but hit a sacrifice fly and grounded out in his other plate appearances. Having seen Garcia take batting practice for some time, Matheny said, “He looks strong. He looks fit. You can tell he’s got a more mature approach how he’s going about it. You can tell he’s just not a kid. “He wouldn’t be comparable to a kid just coming out of college. He’s more advanced than that.” Matheny compared Garcia’s game of prime prospect Magneuris Sierra, relative to speed, outfield defense and power. Mozeliak said Garcia, whose visa became oicial on Thursday, likely would open up at Class AA Springfield this year but could be at Class AAA Memphis. He will play in some bigleague games, for the moment, though. “The most important thing now is getting him into a routine and playing every day. Whether that’s Springfield or Memphis is still to be determined but we can be patient,” said Mozeliak. “We’ve got two weeks. I want

to give him at least some look up here with the major-league staf.” Garcia, 24, received a $2.5 million bonus from the Cardinals after he was named the Most Valuable Player in Cuba’s top professional league last year and after he had briefly with the Yomiuri Giants in Japan.

SCHAFER HAS SURGERY Lefthander Jordan Schafer had elbow surgery done by the Cardinals’ medical chief, Dr. George Paletta, Friday morning in Jupiter, Fla.., and the news was relatively good. The outfielder and lefthanded reliever had the new form of “primary repair” surgery rather than a ligament transplant and will be out seven months, rather than a year or more, said Mozeliak. Schafer felt discomfort in his last two pitching outings, retiring none of four hitters he faced in one of them and allowing a homer in the other.

NOT PHAM-TANTASTIC Tommy Pham, caught off first when the Cardinals were down 10-1, was out as he tried a head-

first slide into second base. In the process, he sufered a threestitch laceration to his upper lip, in unusual fashion. “My helmet was coming off my head. (The Mets defender) caught the ball and slapped me on the helmet,” Pham said . “My helmet came back and hit my lip. That’s what cut me. “If my helmet would have stayed on — which, I don’t know — I thought it would fit tighter because I have more hair right now. That’s why I thought I was safe. Because he hit my helmet. And my hand was in there. I guess I’ll just get a tighter helmet. “I’m getting uglier by the day,” Pham cracked. “When I was a kid, I thought I was a big-time skateboarder. I was trying to do a big-time trick, and I fell and cut my lip. It’s not a good look. When you are single and you keep getting stitches on your face, it’s not helping my case at all.” Ben Frederickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Carpenter at long last is listening to his body FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

confirmed. “I would have got it until the union told me I couldn’t.” Matheny won this battle in 2012, but the Cardinals’ victory in the war against Carpenter’s propensity to push his body beyond its physical limits did not come until this spring. At least they hope. The Cardinals lost to the Mets by two touchdowns Friday, but they left with one important plus: a positive report on their starting first baseman and No. 3 hitter. Carpenter was cleared to swing away in a game for the first time in 16 days. Four innings and two at-bats (a groundout and a flyout) raised no red flags related to the lower back tightness that has slowed Carpenter’s spring and unnerved fans back in St. Louis since Carpenter was scratched from the lineup before a Grapefruit League game March 2. “Knocking some of the rust of, but I felt like I saw the ball well,” Carpenter said. “I was in a good position to hit. I feel like I’m right there. I should be building on it every day.” Carpenter described swinging “without hesitation or fear.” Matheny looked for winces during checked swings and found none. It appears an injury threat to one of the Cardinals’ most important players has been dodged. It might have played out diferently in the past. The Cardinals’ praise of how Carpenter has handled this spring’s setback is not lip service. Matheny and GM John Mozeliak have cited it as a milestone in his maturation, one that will be used as a lesson for others in the organization. If the team’s hardest-charging star realizes it can be smart — not soft — to press pause, then others should accept that message. “As players age, they have a better sense of their own bodies,” Mozeliak said. “Clearly, he has a history with dealing with an oblique. As much as we can test you and push from a training and medical standpoint, you really have to gauge where you’re at. I do appreciate him sort of taking ownership of this.” It was Carpenter who alerted the club early in camp that he was dealing with some discomfort. Things didn’t feel right, and the lower back pain was familiar. Carpenter experienced a similar sensation last season, before an oblique strain stalled the best start of his career, robbed him of an All-Star game appearance and altered the Cardinals’ postseason chances by removing Carpenter from the equation for a month. The old Carpenter ignores spring stifness. Lies and says he’s fine. Makes Matheny or someone else intervene. Sneaks into the batting cages until his manager gives an ultimatum. Stubborn? You bet. But it’s the same reason he’s great. Every day of is a day someone else got better. Sit out and someone might take your spot. “Fifth-year senior in the draft,” Matheny said. “Never on anybody’s prospect list. Nothing comes easy. You never want to back of that kind of philosophy. That’s admirable.” To a point. Carpenter is a three-time All-Star with a Silver Slugger award and a top-five National League MVP finish. He will always have the work ethic of a 13throunder, but if it leads to him missing time in October so he can play in March, who does that help? “It’s just being smart,” Carpenter said. “He’s realizing now he’s in a different spot,” Matheny added. “It’s about the longevity of the season and his health long-term. He actually has a voice (in the discussion) now, where before, I couldn’t even listen to him, because I was going to get straight nonsense.” Carpenter grew restless as Friday neared. He had felt fine for a week. Meanwhile, the World Baseball Classic is unavoidable, and each game is a reminder of an opportunity he missed. He had always wanted to know the thrill of wearing Team USA across his chest. This was the year he was supposed to feel that thrill. But Carpenter withdrew himself from the roster because he knew better. His back was not at 100 percent. His efort in the international tournament would have been. Now the two are matching once again. Carpenter’s head-turning, home-run bashing batting practice Thursday at Roger Dean Stadium was a message to his manager. Earlier that day, he had lobbied Matheny for insertion into the lineup. Matheny listened, then said one more day. Carpenter wasn’t happy, but he accepted it before his paycheck was threatened. “I was ready to go,” he said. These days, there is more reason to believe it’s the truth.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York’s Yoenis Cespedes drives in a run with a sacriice ly Friday as Cardinals catcher Eric Fryer looks on.

Wainwright unconcerned after very rough start CARDINALS • FROM B1

“My body feels great. My pitches are there. A lot of foul balls today, a lot of pitches in the middle of the plate. And I usually don’t do too much of those. They usually hit it off the bottom of the bat to somewhere, swing and miss it, or mis-hit it somewhere. That’s what I’m trying to accomplish. “This is what spring training is for. Obviously, you don’t want to go out there and give up 10 runs. But that’s what we’re here for.” Manager Mike Matheny, asked his level of concern about the Cardinals’ 35-year-old, longtime ace, said, “I think Adam has been looking good all spring. Today was just one of those days.” Wainwright couldn’t throw his fastball for strikes, and his secondary pitches weren’t there, either. “Everything builds of the fastball,” said Wainwright. “So when you’re behind 1-0, 2-0 a lot ... I probably threw 15 changeups and only one of them got swung at today. And that’s a pitch that has been good for me all spring. The ones I threw had good action, but they were just balls out of the hand. I didn’t give them a chance to swing at them because I wasn’t setting up with my fastball well. They didn’t have to honor it.” Wainwright threw 33 pitches in the first inning and compounded that by throwing 38 in the second before he was lifted. Reliever Luke Weaver, wasn’t any better, allowing four runs in the third when he walked three hitters. “The first three innings, it’s 120 pitches,” said Matheny. “I don’t know if I’ve ever seen that before. After that, it wasn’t that bad. Just a rough start.” Matheny, hearkening to one of Weaver’s issues as a rookie, noted that the former first-round pick needed to more aggressive. “Working behind. Tough counts, and then have to get too much of the

Mets 16, Cardinals 2 St. Louis ab r h bi New York ab r h bi To.Pham cf 0 0 0 0 Grndrsn cf 1 3 1 0 J.Grcia cf 2 0 0 1 I.Strom ph 2 0 0 1 Al.Diaz ss 2 0 0 0 Cabrera ss 2 3 2 0 W.Tovar ph 3 0 0 0 Rynolds ph 3 0 0 0 Crpnter 1b 2 0 0 0 Cspedes lf 1 2 1 2 Huffman 1b 1 0 0 0 Cnforto ph 3 0 2 0 Pscotty rf 2 0 0 0 N.Wlker 2b 2 2 1 2 Cnnnghm rf 1 0 0 0 Ccchini ph 3 1 1 0 Peralta 3b 2 1 1 0 J.Bruce rf 2 1 1 2 P.Wsdom 3b 2 0 0 0 Tijeron rf 2 0 1 0 J.Gyrko 2b 2 0 0 0 Lu.Duda 1b 2 2 1 0 B.Vlera 2b 2 0 1 0 P.Alnso 1b 2 0 0 0 Mrtinez lf 0 0 0 0 W.Flres 3b 2 1 2 6 H.Bader ph 3 0 2 0 T.Kelly 3b 2 0 1 1 E.Fryer c 2 0 1 1 d’Arnud c 2 0 1 2 Ga.Lino c 2 1 1 0 Crrillo c 2 1 1 0 Wnwrght sp 1 0 0 0 St.Matz sp 3 0 0 0 G.Grcia ph 0 0 0 0 Lagares ph 1 0 1 0 P.DJong ph 1 0 1 0 Plwecki ph 1 0 0 0 C.Kelly ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 38 16 17 16 St. Louis 010 000 100 — 2 New York 464 001 10x — 16 E: Alonso (1). DP: St. Louis 1, New York 1. LOB: St. Louis 9, New York 9. 2B: Peralta (4), DeJong (1), Granderson (3), Conforto (4), Duda (5), Flores (1), Carrillo (1). HR: Flores (2). CS: Pham (1). SF: Garcia (1), Cespedes (1), Bruce (1). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wainwright L, 1-1 1 2/3 7 10 10 4 0 Weaver 1 1/3 3 4 4 4 0 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 2 Socolovich 2 3 1 1 0 0 Phillips 1 2 1 1 0 1 Sherriff 1 1 0 0 0 3 New York IP H R ER BB SO Matz W, 1-1 3 2/3 2 1 1 3 3 Sewald 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 Smoker 1 1 0 0 0 1 Goeddel 1 2 1 1 0 2 Blevins 1 1 0 0 1 1 Reed 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP: by: Sherriff (Strom), Smoker (Huffman). WP: Wainwright. Umpires: Home, John Libka; First, Carlos Torres; Third, Angel Hernandez. T: 3:31. A: 7,462

plate. Walks,” said Matheny by review. “We’ve had that conversation with him. It’s a tough way to pitch in this league. Last year, it seemed like he was always running those deeper counts and getting into tough spots. “His stuff’s plenty good. Sometimes you’ve got to trust it more. He’s got to learn.” Wainwright will have two more starts before the season begins, although it seems hard to believe he would be starting the opener ahead of Carlos Martinez, who is at the World Baseball Classic. Addressing his own situation, Wainwright said, “I’m very confident. It’s hard to look you in the eyes and say that after a 10-run game, but I’m very confident that things will be good.” Eric Fryer had a rare chance to catch Wainwright as longtime Wain-

wright batterymate Yadier Molina also is involved in the WBC. “I looked at Eric today and said, ‘Next time. That was my fault,’” said Wainwright. “There were just so many pitches, that maybe if you give your catcher a chance, he can frame the ball and make something look like a strike.” Fryer, as most catchers would, took himself to some task for a game such as this one. “For sure,” he said. “You want to get the best out of all your pitchers. We tried everything pretty much. We just couldn’t get the ball on the ground like our game plan always has been.” Most of Wainwright’s pitches were over the middle of the plate, said Fryer, “and to the Mets’credit, they didn’t miss them.” Pitching coach Derek Lilliquist said Wainwright was “behind in the count all day. When you’ve got to come into the strike zone to good hitters, it gets hit.” The final blow was Wilmer Flores’ grand slam to cap the six-run second. “(Wainwright) has got some work to do — which is a good thing,” Lilliquist said. “Everybody can have a clunker in spring training. He’s got two starts left? He’ll be on track.” So, again, should anybody be worried about Wainwright? “Absolutely not,” said Fryer. “He’s not worried about it. I’m not worried about it. It’s the cliché — it’s good to have these out of the way in spring training.” Having seen some wild games in Florida, Matheny said, “It’s always pretty goofy here. When it was 10-1, I was pretty certain we were going to come back.” And at 14-1? “I didn’t have a good feel,” admitted Matheny. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES

M 1 • SATURDAY • 03.18.2017

WOMEN’S FROZEN FOUR

Soft schedule aids the Blues in playof push hey’re coming of a big win at San Jose BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The past five weeks of the Blues’ season has been marked by one kind of streak or another. A six-game winning streak led to a five-game losing streak, which then became a five-game winning streak. In the Blues’ case, one thing has, indeed, led to another. After the Blues lost in Anaheim on Wednesday night, the chance was there for another streak to start, especially with a game against Pacific Division-leading San Jose coming up, but the Blues rewrote the script with a 4-1 win Thursday that, while never dominant, was certainly effective for a team playing its fifth game in seven nights. In doing so, they stopped a losing streak before it could get started. “We’re about wins right now,” forward Scottie Upshall said. The Blues rounded one corner with the San Jose win, entering a point in the season where their schedule goes from easy to incredibly easy. The Blues have 12 games remaining, and only two of them – games with Nashville and Calgary, both at Scottrade Center — are against teams that would be in the playofs if the season ended right now. Three of them are against a woeful Colorado team and three more are against Arizona, the second-worst team in the Western Conference. Add in games with Vancouver and Carolina and the Blues have a lot of games that they will be expected to win. The Blues’ remaining opponents have won just 39 percent of their games this season. That, of course, is the risk. This Blues have seemed to play better when the desperation factor is high and, with a fourpoint margin on the Kings with 12 games to play and a game Saturday night against Arizona, followed by one Tuesday against the Avalanche, the dial has been set to easy. Which, for the Blues, should be scary. “We knew it would be a hard game (against San Jose), and that brings out the best in us,” coach Mike Yeo said. “Our challenge is to make sure we understand the next game will be diicult as well. It’s a diferent opponent, but I don’t care where they’re at in the standings, I look at them playing right now, look at the players they have on the ice, I know we’re going to have to be ready to be sharp, and that’s a good test for us.” “Definitely, you can’t let up,” goalie Carter Hutton said. “It’s still the NHL. Every team can win. There’s still a lot of good players on those teams that aren’t playoff contenders. We know (Arizona) is a team that can beat anybody; they just beat L.A. in a shootout. They’ve got good players, good goalies, and we’re going to have to bring our game to beat them.” Upshall, who scored the goal that put the Blues up 1-0 against San Jose, is more familiar with the other side of these games in his career. In his 11 seasons in the league, he’s gone to the playofs just four times. “Speaking from experience,

Late Thursday

Blues 4, Sharks 1 St. Louis 1 1 2 — San Jose 1 0 0 — First Period: 1, St. Louis, Upshall 8, 16:40. 2, San Jose, Vlasic 5 (Demelo, Couture), 17:45. Second Period: 3, St. Louis, Sanford 3 (Barbashev, Bouwmeester), 5:49. Third Period: 4, St. Louis, Tarasenko 33 (Pietrangelo, Steen), 8:34 (pp). 5, St. Louis, Tarasenko 34 (Parayko, Schwartz), 18:10. Shots on Goal: St. Louis 11-9-16: 36. San Jose 6-5-9: 20. Power-play opportunities: St. Louis 1 of 1; San Jose 0 of 2. Goalies: St. Louis, Hutton 11-8-2 (20 shots-19 saves). San Jose, Dell 10-4-1 (35-32). A: 17,402 (17,562). T: 2:28. Referees: Dean Morton, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Michel Cormier.

4 1

I know what it’s like to be in an organization and team down the stretch that’s not really fighting for its playof life,” Upshall said, “but they’re fighting for jobs and you expect them to play hard and give you their best. In our position, you can’t take anything lightly. You’re fighting for two points every night. The competition only gets harder as the year goes on.” The Blues are in as comfortable playof position as they’ve been in a while, though one losing streak coupled with a Kings win streak could flip the picture in a few games. With their edge on the Kings and 12 games to go, the Blues are in full control of their destiny. If they don’t make the playoffs with the schedule they have left, it’s going to be all on them. The Blues reached one milestone Thursday that they haven’t seen in a long time. Vladimir Tarasenko’s two third-period goals — one on a power play to give the Blues breathing room, one an emptynet goal to clinch the win — gave him 34 on the season, and put the Blues in positive numbers in goal difference for the season for the first time since Dec. 9. The Blues will turn another corner after the Arizona game. It marks their sixth in nine nights, the most hectic stretch of their season. After the game with the Coyotes, the Blues will have two consecutive days of — they’ll spend them in Arizona rather than heading directly to Denver — the last time this season they’ll have that long a break. From there, it will be a game every other day, with a set of back-to-backs to close the season. There’s a decent chance that going forward, the Blues will use Zach Sanford, part of the return on the Kevin Shattenkirk trade, more often. He got his first goal with the Blues, which turned out to be the game-winner, in the second period and Yeo liked his game, with the exception of being on the ice for San Jose’s only goal. The Blues had been hesitant, preferring to go with either the more experienced Dmitrij Jaskin or Nail Yakupov in a playoff race. But with Jaskin injured and Yakupov inefective, Sanford got his chance and seized it. “He was making plays and looked confident,” Yeo said. “The most impressive part for me was, obviously he was on the ice for the first goal against. We brought them in, showed then what it was, and said go respond. Mistakes happen. I thought the aggressiveness he came out with in the second period shows a lot for a young player. Sometimes guys make a mistake and go into a shell. He went out and made up for it.”

BLUES AT COYOTES When • 8 p.m. Saturday Where • Gila River Arena TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues are 2-1 on their five-game road trip, which continues in Arizona. This will be the club’s sixth game in the last nine days. ... The Blues have yet to face Arizona but will get familiar quickly, seeing them three times in their next six games. ... Vladimir Tarasenko scored twice in Thursday’s 4-1 win over San Jose, climbing to No. 3 in the NHL with 34 goals. He has six goals in his last six games. ... The Blues have yet to name a starting goalie, but after Carter Hutton got the nod Thursday, it will presumably be Jake Allen. In Hutton’s last 10 road games, he has a 1.56 goals-against average and a .945 save percentage. Coyotes • Arizona is second-to-last in the NHL standings with just 61 points, but the Coyotes have a point in their last five games (3-0-2). That run includes a 3-2 shootout win over Los Angeles last Tuesday. ... The Coyotes’ last two games have ended in shootouts, and after splitting those decisions, they are 6-2 in the overtime format this season. ... Radim Vrbata is Arizona’s leading scoring with 17 goals and 51 points. He has two goals in his last nine games. Injuries • Blues — LW Dmitrij Jaskin (upper body), C Jori Lehtera (upper body) and LW Robby Fabbri (knee), out. Coyotes — RW Brad Richardson (leg), out. Jeremy Rutherford

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Wisconsin defenseman Melissa Channell (left) celebrates with teammates Annie Pankowski (center) and Sarah Nurse after scoring the lone goal during the NCAA Division I Frozen Four semifinal game Friday.

Badgers defenseman scores big Lone goal of game in inal minute takes team to brink of title BY JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Wisconsin de-

fenseman Melissa Channell was an unlikely candidate to propel the Badgers into another national title game. When was the last time the senior scored such a big goal? “Oh, I don’t score much,” she said with a chuckle. “I couldn’t tell you. I think I scored a goal in my sophomore year, WCHA championship game. I think. Maybe.” Channell threw the puck at the net as the clock was winding down in the NCAA Women’s Frozen Four semifinal game Friday night at Family Arena. Her shot from the right point navigated through heavy traffic and into the net with 16.2 seconds left for a 1-0 victory over Boston College. The Badgers advance to the championship game here Sunday at 2 p.m., seeking their fifth national title and their first since 2011. The game-winning goal came of an ofensive zone faceof victory by freshman Abby Roque and a nice pass from Annie Pankowski back to Channell. “I wasn’t really aiming,” Channell said. “I was just trying to hit the net, try to get a rebound or

something, but it hit the perfect corner, the bottom corner.” Boston College goaltender Katie Burt was brilliant for the first 59 minutes and 43 seconds, stopping everything she saw. But the last shot she did not detect. This game featured wild momentum swings. Boston College dictated play early, building a 12-1 shots advantage in the first 12 minutes. Senior forward Kristyn Capizzano was a buzzsaw, repeatedly attacking to create zone time for the Eagles. “BC played its best hockey at the beginning of the first. They came out super fast at us,” Wisconsin goaltender Ann-Renee Desbiens said. “But we were fortunate they didn’t get the bounces they wanted.” Boston College applied early power play pressure, but Wisconsin finished strong on the penalty kill and finally started tilting the ice against the Eagles. “We were fortunate to get out of that section of the game with the score 0-0, especially with their power play early on,” said Wisconsin coach Mark Johnson. “After we settled in 10, 12 minutes of the game, the next 48 to 50 minutes we played pretty well.” Badgers forward Presley Norby drew a penalty on Boston College defenseman Megan Keller — for making a crunching hit along the back wall as Norby tried to circle around — and Wisconsin finally generated some ofense with the advantage. Wisconsin had a 62-second

power play early in the second period and turned an Eagles neutral zone turnover into Grade A scoring chances. The pressure continued at even strength with the Badgers pinning in the Eagles with an extended flurry. Desbiens nearly handed the Eagles a goal when she fired a diagonal clearing pass of her own goalpost. Shortly thereafter, she made the best save of the game, denying Kaitrin Lonergran cutting across the crease on her forehand. She also stopped Kenzie Kent on a 2-on-1 break and Makenna Newkirk from the slot as Boston College surged back to life. Then the game turned back Wisconsin’s way for good. Burt hung tough, finishing the second period with 19 saves to keep the game scoreless. She continued to shine in the third period, mostly notably about 10 minutes when Wisconsin’s top line of Emily Clark, Pankowski and Sarah Nurse executed a beautiful break-in. Pankowski, Nurse, Sam Cogan, Mekenzie Steffan ... the shots kept coming from the swarming Badgers, who outshot the Eagles 36-22 overall. Finally, the last one got through. “The team is excited, I know our seniors are excited. They got over the (semifinal) hurdle and put ourselves in position to play for the national title,” Johnson said. Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

Clarkson surges into title contest McGill scores late in game to break tie, sink Minnesota BY JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Back in 2014 Clarkson won the women’s national hockey championship at Minnesota’s expense, taking the title game 5-4. The Golden Gophers won the previous two championships, in 2012 and 2013. They won the next two, too, in 2015 and 2016. And look who was in their path at the NCAA Women’s Final Four Friday night at Family Arena: Clarkson. Uh-oh! The Golden Knights spoiled Minnesota’s title dreams again, edging the Golden Gophers 4-3 in a semifinal game. They advance to play Wisconsin for the national title here at 2 p.m. Sunday. Clarkson winger Rhyen McGill scored the game winner, with 1 minute, 31 seconds left to play, jumping on the top line with Cayley Mercer and Genevieve Bannon to finish the decisive rush. Unlike Wisconsin and Boston College in the other semifinal game — won by the Badgers 1-0 on a last-minute goal — Clarkson and Minnesota wasted little time trading and converting scoring chances. Clarkson connected first with senior center Bannon driving down the middle to punch home a goal just over seven minutes into the game. Puck-moving defensemen Savannah Harmon stepped up to create the scoring opportunity. “I think it adds a good dynamic to our game when we are producing from the blue line,” Harmon observed before the game. “It’s a big key to the forwards winning battles down low, tipping in our

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Clarkson’s Loren Gabel celebrates after scoring in the second period in her team’s semifinal win over Minnesota.

shots and screening the goalie.” Clarkson’s top forward line — Bannon centering right winger Loren Gabel and left winger Mercer — just kept coming for the Golden Knights, generating all seven of their first-period shots. This offensive activity was not surprising. Gabel scored a hat trick in Clarkson’s quarterfinal victory over Cornell. Mercer is Clarkson’s career leading goal scorer and Bannon is the fifthleading scorer in school history. Minnesota tied the game 1-1 about 5 minutes later with Kate Shipper converting at the right post. That finished just one of its many early ofensive flurries. The Golden Gophers established territorial edge while outshooting Clarkson 14-7 in the first period. Minnesota center Cara Piazza shook of a nasty first-period collision in front of her net to help create offensive pressure in the second-period. Clarkson goaltender Shea Tiley had to make a variety of saves, including one with her mask. Then the top Clarkson line struck again, at 11:21 of the second

period, this time with Gabel ripping a point-blank shot past goaltender Sidney Peters from right on the doorstep. Mercer and Bannon earned the assists for their tenacious work around the goal. The Golden Gophers just missed on several outstanding chances to tie the score again. Finally their top line came through, with Sarah Potomak converting a roof shot coming down the middle with 1 minutes left in the second period. But back came Clarkson in the third period, with Harmon busting up the ice to score an unassisted goal to put the Golden Knights up 3-2. The relentless Gabel nearly made it 4-2, but Peters slid to her right to rob her on a two-onone break-in shortly after Harmon’s goal. That save resonated when third-line winger Sophie Skarzynski scored with 5:03 left, driving the net to convert a follow shot that tied the score 3-3. But then McGill converted the game-winner and Clarkson sent Minnesota home again. Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES

M 2 • SATURDAY • 03.18.2017

WOMEN’S FROZEN FOUR

Soft schedule aids the Blues in playof push hey’re coming of a big win at San Jose BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The past five weeks of the Blues’ season has been marked by one kind of streak or another. A six-game winning streak led to a five-game losing streak, which then became a five-game winning streak. In the Blues’ case, one thing has, indeed, led to another. After the Blues lost in Anaheim on Wednesday night, the chance was there for another streak to start, especially with a game against Pacific Division-leading San Jose coming up, but the Blues rewrote the script with a 4-1 win Thursday that, while never dominant, was certainly effective for a team playing its fifth game in seven nights. In doing so, they stopped a losing streak before it could get started. “We’re about wins right now,” forward Scottie Upshall said. The Blues rounded one corner with the San Jose win, entering a point in the season where their schedule goes from easy to incredibly easy. The Blues have 12 games remaining, and only two of them – games with Nashville and Calgary, both at Scottrade Center — are against teams that would be in the playofs if the season ended right now. Three of them are against a woeful Colorado team and three more are against Arizona, the second-worst team in the Western Conference. Add in games with Vancouver and Carolina and the Blues have a lot of games that they will be expected to win. The Blues’ remaining opponents have won just 39 percent of their games this season. That, of course, is the risk. This Blues have seemed to play better when the desperation factor is high and, with a fourpoint margin on the Kings with 12 games to play and a game Saturday night against Arizona, followed by one Tuesday against the Avalanche, the dial has been set to easy. Which, for the Blues, should be scary. “We knew it would be a hard game (against San Jose), and that brings out the best in us,” coach Mike Yeo said. “Our challenge is to make sure we understand the next game will be diicult as well. It’s a diferent opponent, but I don’t care where they’re at in the standings, I look at them playing right now, look at the players they have on the ice, I know we’re going to have to be ready to be sharp, and that’s a good test for us.” “Definitely, you can’t let up,” goalie Carter Hutton said. “It’s still the NHL. Every team can win. There’s still a lot of good players on those teams that aren’t playoff contenders. We know (Arizona) is a team that can beat anybody; they just beat L.A. in a shootout. They’ve got good players, good goalies, and we’re going to have to bring our game to beat them.” Upshall, who scored the goal that put the Blues up 1-0 against San Jose, is more familiar with the other side of these games in his career. In his 11 seasons in the league, he’s gone to the playofs just four times. “Speaking from experience,

Late Thursday

Blues 4, Sharks 1 St. Louis 1 1 2 — San Jose 1 0 0 — First Period: 1, St. Louis, Upshall 8, 16:40. 2, San Jose, Vlasic 5 (Demelo, Couture), 17:45. Second Period: 3, St. Louis, Sanford 3 (Barbashev, Bouwmeester), 5:49. Third Period: 4, St. Louis, Tarasenko 33 (Pietrangelo, Steen), 8:34 (pp). 5, St. Louis, Tarasenko 34 (Parayko, Schwartz), 18:10. Shots on Goal: St. Louis 11-9-16: 36. San Jose 6-5-9: 20. Power-play opportunities: St. Louis 1 of 1; San Jose 0 of 2. Goalies: St. Louis, Hutton 11-8-2 (20 shots-19 saves). San Jose, Dell 10-4-1 (35-32). A: 17,402 (17,562). T: 2:28. Referees: Dean Morton, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Michel Cormier.

4 1

I know what it’s like to be in an organization and team down the stretch that’s not really fighting for its playof life,” Upshall said, “but they’re fighting for jobs and you expect them to play hard and give you their best. In our position, you can’t take anything lightly. You’re fighting for two points every night. The competition only gets harder as the year goes on.” The Blues are in as comfortable playof position as they’ve been in a while, though one losing streak coupled with a Kings win streak could flip the picture in a few games. With their edge on the Kings and 12 games to go, the Blues are in full control of their destiny. If they don’t make the playoffs with the schedule they have left, it’s going to be all on them. The Blues reached one milestone Thursday that they haven’t seen in a long time. Vladimir Tarasenko’s two third-period goals — one on a power play to give the Blues breathing room, one an emptynet goal to clinch the win — gave him 34 on the season, and put the Blues in positive numbers in goal difference for the season for the first time since Dec. 9. The Blues will turn another corner after the Arizona game. It marks their sixth in nine nights, the most hectic stretch of their season. After the game with the Coyotes, the Blues will have two consecutive days of — they’ll spend them in Arizona rather than heading directly to Denver — the last time this season they’ll have that long a break. From there, it will be a game every other day, with a set of back-to-backs to close the season. There’s a decent chance that going forward, the Blues will use Zach Sanford, part of the return on the Kevin Shattenkirk trade, more often. He got his first goal with the Blues, which turned out to be the game-winner, in the second period and Yeo liked his game, with the exception of being on the ice for San Jose’s only goal. The Blues had been hesitant, preferring to go with either the more experienced Dmitrij Jaskin or Nail Yakupov in a playoff race. But with Jaskin injured and Yakupov inefective, Sanford got his chance and seized it. “He was making plays and looked confident,” Yeo said. “The most impressive part for me was, obviously he was on the ice for the first goal against. We brought them in, showed then what it was, and said go respond. Mistakes happen. I thought the aggressiveness he came out with in the second period shows a lot for a young player. Sometimes guys make a mistake and go into a shell. He went out and made up for it.”

BLUES AT COYOTES When • 8 p.m. Saturday Where • Gila River Arena TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues are 2-1 on their five-game road trip, which continues in Arizona. This will be the club’s sixth game in the last nine days. ... The Blues have yet to face Arizona but will get familiar quickly, seeing them three times in their next six games. ... Vladimir Tarasenko scored twice in Thursday’s 4-1 win over San Jose, climbing to No. 3 in the NHL with 34 goals. He has six goals in his last six games. ... The Blues have yet to name a starting goalie, but after Carter Hutton got the nod Thursday, it will presumably be Jake Allen. In Hutton’s last 10 road games, he has a 1.56 goals-against average and a .945 save percentage. Coyotes • Arizona is second-to-last in the NHL standings with just 61 points, but the Coyotes have a point in their last five games (3-0-2). That run includes a 3-2 shootout win over Los Angeles last Tuesday. ... The Coyotes’ last two games have ended in shootouts, and after splitting those decisions, they are 6-2 in the overtime format this season. ... Radim Vrbata is Arizona’s leading scorer with 17 goals and 51 points. He has two goals in his last nine games. Injuries • Blues — LW Dmitrij Jaskin (upper body), C Jori Lehtera (upper body) and LW Robby Fabbri (knee), out. Coyotes — RW Brad Richardson (leg), out. Jeremy Rutherford

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Wisconsin defenseman Melissa Channell (left) celebrates with teammates Annie Pankowski (center) and Sarah Nurse after scoring the lone goal during the NCAA Division I Frozen Four semifinal game Friday.

Badgers defenseman scores big Lone goal of game in inal minute takes team to brink of title BY JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Wisconsin de-

fenseman Melissa Channell was an unlikely candidate to propel the Badgers into another national title game. When was the last time the senior scored such a big goal? “Oh, I don’t score much,” she said with a chuckle. “I couldn’t tell you. I think I scored a goal in my sophomore year, WCHA championship game. I think. Maybe.” Channell threw the puck at the net as the clock was winding down in the NCAA Women’s Frozen Four semifinal game Friday night at Family Arena. Her shot from the right point navigated through heavy traffic and into the net with 16.2 seconds left for a 1-0 victory over Boston College. The Badgers advance to the championship game here Sunday at 2 p.m., seeking their fifth national title and their first since 2011. The game-winning goal came of an ofensive zone faceof victory by freshman Abby Roque and a nice pass from Annie Pankowski back to Channell. “I wasn’t really aiming,” Channell said. “I was just trying to hit the net, try to get a rebound or

something, but it hit the perfect corner, the bottom corner.” Boston College goaltender Katie Burt was brilliant for the first 59 minutes and 43 seconds, stopping everything she saw. But the last shot she did not detect. This game featured wild momentum swings. Boston College dictated play early, building a 12-1 shots advantage in the first 12 minutes. Senior forward Kristyn Capizzano was a buzzsaw, repeatedly attacking to create zone time for the Eagles. “BC played its best hockey at the beginning of the first. They came out super fast at us,” Wisconsin goaltender Ann-Renee Desbiens said. “But we were fortunate they didn’t get the bounces they wanted.” Boston College applied early power play pressure, but Wisconsin finished strong on the penalty kill and finally started tilting the ice against the Eagles. “We were fortunate to get out of that section of the game with the score 0-0, especially with their power play early on,” said Wisconsin coach Mark Johnson. “After we settled in 10, 12 minutes of the game, the next 48 to 50 minutes we played pretty well.” Badgers forward Presley Norby drew a penalty on Boston College defenseman Megan Keller — for making a crunching hit along the back wall as Norby tried to circle around — and Wisconsin finally generated some ofense with the advantage. Wisconsin had a 62-second

power play early in the second period and turned an Eagles neutral zone turnover into Grade A scoring chances. The pressure continued at even strength with the Badgers pinning in the Eagles with an extended flurry. Desbiens nearly handed the Eagles a goal when she fired a diagonal clearing pass of her own goalpost. Shortly thereafter, she made the best save of the game, denying Kaitrin Lonergran cutting across the crease on her forehand. She also stopped Kenzie Kent on a 2-on-1 break and Makenna Newkirk from the slot as Boston College surged back to life. Then the game turned back Wisconsin’s way for good. Burt hung tough, finishing the second period with 19 saves to keep the game scoreless. She continued to shine in the third period, mostly notably about 10 minutes when Wisconsin’s top line of Emily Clark, Pankowski and Sarah Nurse executed a beautiful break-in. Pankowski, Nurse, Sam Cogan, Mekenzie Steffan ... the shots kept coming from the swarming Badgers, who outshot the Eagles 36-22 overall. Finally, the last one got through. “The team is excited, I know our seniors are excited. They got over the (semifinal) hurdle and put ourselves in position to play for the national title,” Johnson said. Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

Clarkson surges into title contest McGill scores late in game to break tie, sink Minnesota BY JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Back in 2014 Clarkson won the women’s national hockey championship at Minnesota’s expense, winning the title game 5-4. The Golden Gophers won the previous two championships, in 2012 and 2013. They won the next two, too, in 2015 and 2016. And look who was in their path at the NCAA Women’s Final Four on Friday night at Family Arena: Clarkson. Uh-oh! The Golden Knights spoiled Minnesota’s title dreams again, edging the Golden Gophers 4-3 in their semifinal game. They advance to play Wisconsin for the national title here at 2 p.m. Sunday. “I didn’t really focus on that (2014) game,” Clarkson senior Genevieve Bannon said. “I think it’s a new year, it’s a different team. It’s been three years already, so we just stuck with our system, played with the depth that we have. Just kept working the entire game.” Clarkson winger Rhyen McGill scored the game-winner with 1 minute, 31 seconds left, jumping on with the top line with Bannon and Cayley Mercer to finish the decisive rush. “I saw Bannon have the puck and I saw her make the great pass over to (Mercer),” McGill said. “I knew (Mercer) is a great player, so I know that shot was either going in or there was going to be a rebound right close. I just went to the net hard and tried to get it in.” Unlike Wisconsin and Boston College in the other semifinal game — won by the Badgers 1-0

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Clarkson’s Loren Gabel celebrates after scoring in the second period in her team’s semifinal win Friday night over Minnesota.

on a last-minute goal — Clarkson and Minnesota played a backand-forth ofensive game. Clarkson’s top forward line — Bannon centering right winger Loren Gabel and left winger Mercer — just kept coming for the Golden Knights, generating all seven of their first-period shots. Bannon scored the game’s first goal, with help from puck-moving defenseman Savannah Harmon . “That’s just kind of how our team rolls,” Harmon said. “We really produce all throughout the entire team. In the ofensive zone, when all five are moving the puck and contributing, that’s when our team is rolling best.” Minnesota tied the score 1-1 about 5 minutes later with Kate Schipper converting at the right post. That finished just one of its many early ofensive flurries. The Golden Gophers established the territorial edge while outshooting Clarkson 14-7 in the first period. Then the top Clarkson line struck again at 11:21 of the second period, this time with Gabel ripping a point-blank shot past Minnesota goaltender Sidney Peters from right on the door-

step. The Golden Gophers just missed on several outstanding chances to tie the score again. Finally their top line came through, with Sarah Potomak converting a roof shot coming down the middle with 1 minute left in the second period. But back came Clarkson in the third period, with Harmon busting up the ice to score an unassisted goal to put the Golden Knights up 3-2. The relentless Gabel nearly made it 4-2, but Peters slid to her right to rob her on a two-on-one break-in shortly after Harmon’s goal. That save resonated when third-line winger Sophie Skarzynski scored with 5:03 left to play in the third period, driving the net to convert a follow shot that tied the score 3-3. But then McGill converted the game-winner and Clarkson sent Minnesota home again. “I’m just proud of the way the players just kept pushing,” Clarkson coach Matt Desrosiers said. Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

NCAA WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS NOTEBOOK

NFL NOTEBOOK

SIUE’s Residori is All-American

Geno Smith to join Giants, report says

Cougar will wrestle for 7th on Saturday BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville senior Jake Residori made Cougars history Friday night in the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships at Scotttrade Center. With an 8-3 victory over fourth-seeded Zach Epperly of Virginia Tech in consolation action at 174 pounds, Residori (2412) became his school’s first AllAmerican since Francis Howell grad Zach Stephens placed fourth at the D-II tournament in 2003. In addition, Residori is the first Cougar to earn D-I All-American honors since Tim Wright in 1987. “It feels great, really great,” Residori said. “Senior year, my first shot and my last shot and I

did it.” Residori, who lost in a later match Friday, will wrestle for seventh place Saturday morning. Residori was among the tournament’s busiest wrestlers after opening up with a pig-tail match before Thursday’s opening round. After winning 7-6 in the pigtail, he beat No. 7 seed and 2015 All-American Kyle Crutchmer of Oklahoma State 6-5 and then capped of his busy Thursday with a 6-2 loss to Illinois’ Zac Brunson, the bracket’s No. 10 seed. In Friday’s early session, he beat Edinboro’s Ty Schofftstall 4-1, followed up with a first-period pin of 15th-seeded Trace Engelkes of Northern Illinois and then knocked of two-time All-American Epperly. “When I saw the bracket, I knew it was going to be tough,” he said. “But, you know, it just feels so much better now, knowing how hard I had to work to get to this

point. I just needed to wrestle; I’ve been going out there and just focusing on having fun. Knowing this is the end, I just want to make sure to give it everything I’ve got.” The Cougars’ Freddie Rodriguez (23-8) bowed out one match short of earning All-America honors at 125, losing 4-1 in consolation-bracket action Friday night.

ROUGH HOMECOMING Appalachian State’s Colby Smith, the 2016 Post-Dispatch AllMetro wrestler of the year, bowed out of the tournament Friday afternoon with a 13-3 loss to Missouri’s John Erneste in the consolation bracket at 133 pounds. A product of Holt High in Wentzville, Smith (27-11) also fell by major decision to ninth-seeded Scotty Parker of Lehigh in the opening round Thursday. In between, he advanced due to a medical forfeit.

“I just want to come back next year even hungrier,” Smith said after a heart-to-heart with Mountaineers coach Johnmark Bentley in the bowels of Scottrade Friday morning. “All I can do is keep working hard and try to fix the right things and focus on doing better next time. “Obviously, things didn’t work out the way I wanted. Had a lot of family and friends here to support me; I appreciate it a lot and love them all. I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them. I just wish I could’ve competed better.”

BALDWIN IN THE HOUSE Actor William “Billy” Baldwin, who wrestled at Binghamton University and who has been tremendously supportive of the sport over the years, has been on hand throughout the tournament and has served as a guest analyst for ESPN.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma State’s Dean Heil (right) grapples with Rutger’s Anthony Ashnault in a 141-pound match in the semiinal round Friday night.

Illini’s Martinez goes for third national title WRESTLING • FROM B1

A three-time All-American, Mayes came up with a lastsecond takedown to beat Northern Iowa’s Max Thomsen in the semifinals Friday night. Mayes is 3-1 this season against his Mid-American Conference rival. “No score for the first six or so minutes of the match,” Mayes said. “I was closer than he was and at that moment I said that if I wanted to wrestle another minute (in overtime), I can just not shoot. If I want to be done now, I can shoot, so I chose to shoot. He blocked it of pretty well and I was able to hit a drag that I’ve been working on all week. “Almost got it on him earlier in the match, but it didn’t work out so well. But I stuck with the process and did what I’ve been training to do.” Mayes, a No. 3 seed, will face defending champion Zain Retherford (27-0) of Penn State for the title. With another dramatic finish, the third-seeded Lavallee came up with a late takedown and went on to a 8-5 decision over seventh-seeded Dylan Palacio of Cornell. After two NCAA appearances, Lavallee elected to take a redshirt last season. “The last three years I would say were a rough time for me because my attitude in the room was wrong,” he said. “I felt like I had everything and knew everything. It was tough sitting on the sideline last year — I wanted to be out there — but for me, it was the right thing. I had to learn to trust my coaches and not be a big head. After every dual, I ask my coaches what I need to do to improve; all three tell me and that gives me more options. It’s definitely helped make me a better wrestler.” Lavallee will meet top-seeded Jason Nolf (26-0) of Penn State in the finals. Cox was in control from start to finish against Vaught. The Columbia, Mo., native will wrestle in his final college match Saturday night. Missouri also has a pair of competitors — Jaydin Eierman at 141 and Daniel Lewis at 165 — who’ve earned AllAmerican honors and will wrestle in Saturday morning’s consolation bracket. Martinez, the Illinois junior who won his previous two titles at 157, beat Wisconsin’s Isaac Jordan 2-1 on the strength of his riding time Friday night. He’ll face thirdseeded Vincenzo Joseph (21-4) of Penn State for the title. The Illini also have two All-American seniors — Carbondale’s Zane Richards at 133 and Zac Brunson at 174 — set to compete in Saturday morning’s medal matches.

TOP SEEDS UPENDED In the semifinals at 125, Lehigh’s Darian Cruz (30-2) came up with a takedown late in regulation and another early in overtime for a 4-2 win over previously unbeaten Thomas Gilman of Iowa. Gilman was the first No. 1 seed and the first of the 10 undefeated wrestlers to lose in the tournament. The same happened at 133, as Iowa’s Cory Clark (19-3) earned his third straight title-match appearance with a 7-4 win over Ohio State’s Nathan Tomasello (22-1), the No. 1 seed and the 2016 champion at 125. At 174, Penn State’s Mark Hall (30-3) won 4-3 over previously unbeaten Zahid Valencia (36-1) of Arizona State. The other undefeated top seeds — Oklahoma State’s Dean Heil at 141, Retherford at 149, Nolf at 157, Martinez at 165, Cornell’s Gabe Dean at 184 and Ohio State heavyweight Kyle Snyder — all made it through to the finals. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

WRESTLING RESULTS TEAM RESULTS

QUARTERFINAL RESULTS

1. Penn St. 74.0 2. Ohio St. 59.0 3. Iowa 58.0 4. Oklahoma St. 47.5 5. Cornell 47.0 6. Missouri 43.5 7. Minn. 39.0 8. Virginia Tech 35.0 9. Wis. 29.0 10. Nebraska 27.0 11. Lehigh 25.5 12. Virginia 22.5 13. Illinois 22.0 14. Arizona St. 21.0 15. Northern Iowa 20.0 16. Central Michigan 19.5 17. Rutgers 18.0 18. Michigan 17.0 18. South Dakota St. 17.0 20. Wyoming 16.5 21. Edinboro 16.0 22. NC St. 12.5 22. Oregon St. 12.5 24. Northern Illinois 11.5 25. Rider 11.0 26. Stanford 10.5 27. Navy 10.0 27. Old Dominion 10.0 27. Princeton 10.0 30. Duke 9.5 30. Oklahoma 9.5 30. Pittsburgh 9.5 33. Appalachian St. 9.0 34. Maryland 8.5 34. SIU Edwardsville 8.5 36. Pennsylvania 8.0 37. Bufalo 5.5 38. Bucknell 5.0 38. Indiana 5.0 40. American 4.5 40. Michigan St. 4.5 40. North Carolina 4.5 43. Cleveland St. 4.0 43. Lock Haven 4.0 45. Northwestern 3.5 46. Campbell 3.0 46. Gardner-Webb 3.0 46. North Dakota St. 3.0 46. Northern Colorado 3.0 50. Purdue 2.5 51. Eastern Michigan 2.0 51. Ohio 2.0 53. Army 1.5 53. CSU Bakersield 1.5 53. Drexel 1.5 53. Utah Valley University 1.5 57. Binghamton U. 1.0 57. Clarion 1.0 57. Columbia 1.0 57. Iowa St. 1.0 57. West Virginia 1.0 62. Cal Poly 0.5 62. George Mason 0.5 62. Harvard 0.5 62. Kent St. 0.5 66. Boise St. 0.0 66. Brown 0.0 66. The Citadel 0.0 69. Chattanooga -0.5

Friday

125 • Thomas Gilman (Iowa) 30-0 won by fall over Nicholas Piccininni (Oklahoma St.) 24-7 (Fall 6:04) • Darian Cruz (Lehigh) 29-2 won by decision over Sean Fausz (NC St.) 27-7 (Dec 5-2) • Ethan Lizak (Minn.) 29-6 won by tech fall over Freddie Rodriguez (SIUE) 23-7 (TF-1.5 6:54 (15-0)) • Jack Mueller (Virginia) 27-4 won in sudden victory - 1 over Joey Dance (Virginia Tech) 27-2 (SV-1 4-2)

133 • Nathan Tomasello (Ohio St.) 22-0 won by decision over Zane Richards (Illinois) 27-5 (Dec 3-1) • Cory Clark (Iowa) 18-3 won by decision over Stevan Micic (Michigan) 26-6 (Dec 6-4) • Kaid Brock (Oklahoma St.) 28-2 won by decision over Bryan Lantry (Buffalo) 22-6 (Dec 7-3) • Seth Gross (South Dakota St.) 33-1 won by major decision over Eric Montoya (Nebraska) 28-5 (MD 11-1)

141 • Dean Heil (Oklahoma St.) 30-0 won by decision over Jaydin Eierman (Missouri) 26-6 (Dec 6-5) • Anthony Ashnault (Rutgers) 30-3 won by decision over Matthew Kolodzik (Princeton) 28-3 (Dec 6-2) • George DiCamillo (Virginia) 23-4 won by decision over Thomas Thorn (Minn.) 19-8 (Dec 5-2) • Bryce Meredith (Wyoming) 31-6 won by decision over Kevin Jack (NC St.) 31-2 (Dec 6-5)

149 • Zain Retherford (Penn St.) 26-0 won by tech fall over Alex Kocer (South Dakota St.) 29-9 (TF-1.5 5:14 (19-2)) • Brandon Sorensen (Iowa) 29-4 won by decision over Micah Jordan (Ohio St.) 30-4 (Dec 3-0) • Lavion Mayes (Missouri) 22-2 won by decision over Solomon Chishko (Virginia Tech) 23-4 (Dec 4-2) • Max Thomsen (Northern Iowa) 30-5 won by decision over Kenny Theobold (Rutgers) 24-10 (Dec 5-1)

157 • Jason Nolf (Penn St.) 25-0 won by fall over Bryant Clagon (Rider) 25-6 (Fall 4:07) • Tyler Berger (Nebraska) 35-4 won in sudden victory - 1 over Joseph Smith (Oklahoma St.) 13-5 (SV-1 3-1) • Joey Lavallee (Missouri) 28-1 won by decision over Paul Fox (Stanford) 27-14 (Dec 6-2) • Dylan Palacio (Cornell) 11-1 won by fall over Michael Kemerer (Iowa) 29-3 (Fall 3:28)

165 • Isaiah Martinez (Illinois) 30-0 won by decision over Chandler Rogers (Oklahoma St.) 22-7 (Dec 10-5) • Isaac Jordan (Wis.) 27-4 won by decision over Chad Walsh (Rider) 31-3 (Dec 7-3) • Vincenzo Joseph (Penn St.) 20-4 won by decision over Daniel Lewis (Missouri) 26-4 (Dec 6-5) • Logan Massa (Michigan) 30-2 won by major decision over Anthony Valencia (Arizona St.) 34-6 (MD 9-0)

• Sammy Brooks (Iowa) 27-2 won by fall over Emery Parker (Illinois) 30-9 (Fall 6:01) • Bo Nickal (Penn St.) 24-1 won by fall over TJ Dudley (Nebraska) 29-5 (Fall 4:33)

197 • J’den Cox (Missouri) 26-0 won by major decision over Ryan Wolfe (Rider) 22-5 (MD 10-1) • Jared Haught (Virginia Tech) 27-2 won by decision over Matt McCutcheon (Penn St.) 20-5 (Dec 7-3) • Kollin Moore (Ohio St.) 31-3 won by major decision over Preston Weigel (Oklahoma St.) 20-6 (MD 13-5) • Brett Pfarr (Minn.) 30-2 won by decision over Kevin Beazley (Old Dominion) 24-6 (Dec 6-0)

285 • Kyle Snyder (Ohio St.) 15-0 won by decision over Michael Kroells (Minn.) 29-10 (Dec 13-7) • Jacob Kasper (Duke) 30-3 won by decision over Nick Nevills (Penn St.) 22-4 (Dec 3-1) • Ty Walz (Virginia Tech) 25-2 won by major decision over Conan Jennings (Northwestern) 19-15 (MD 15-4) • Connor Medbery (Wis.) 28-1 won by decision over Tanner Hall (Arizona St.) 31-6 (Dec 5-3)

SEMIFINAL RESULTS 125 • Darian Cruz (Lehigh) 30-2 won in sudden victory - 1 over Thomas Gilman (Iowa) 30-1 (SV-1 4-2) • Ethan Lizak (Minn.) 30-6 won by decision over Jack Mueller (Virginia) 27-5 (Dec 7-0)

133 • Cory Clark (Iowa) 19-3 won by decision over Nathan Tomasello (Ohio St.) 22-1 (Dec 7-4) • Seth Gross (South Dakota St.) 34-1 won by major decision over Kaid Brock (Oklahoma St.) 28-3 (MD 12-3)

141 • Dean Heil (Oklahoma St.) 31-0 won by decision over Anthony Ashnault (Rutgers) 30-4 (Dec 4-2) • George DiCamillo (Virginia) 24-4 won by decision over Bryce Meredith (Wyoming) 31-7 (Dec 10-7)

Quarterback Geno Smith has agreed to terms with the New York Giants, The Associated Press reported Friday. The deal is pending Smith passing a physical examination, which could take place this weekend. Like receiver Brandon Marshall last week, Smith is leaving the New York Jets but remaining in the same stadium. Smith will be a backup to Eli Manning, of course, and considering that Manning doesn’t miss games, his role might not include much playing time. Smith, 26, was a secondround draft choice by the Jets in 2013. But his stint with them was marred by injuries and inconsistency. He also lost his starting job in 2015 after a teammate broke Smith’s jaw with a punch during training camp. When Smith did get onto the ield last season, it was brief. After Ryan Fitzpatrick was benched, Smith took over but sufered a torn knee ligament in his irst game and was done for the season. Smith might be replaced on the Jets’ roster by Josh McCown. The free agent QB is meeting with the team this weekend, according to the AP. The only quarterbacks the Jets have — Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg — are relatively inexperienced. McCown, who’ll turn 38 on July 4, played the last two seasons with Cleveland. He appeared in 13 games for the Browns, throwing for 3,209 yards, 18 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. But McCown was 1-10 as a starter with the Browns, including 0-3 last season, and was released last month. Lynch to Raiders? • After sitting out a year, ostensibly because he’s retired, is running back Marshawn Lynch considering a comeback? ESPN reported that it is possible. Lynch is said to be trying to decide if he wants to come back to the NFL. There’s one sticking point in the Raiders’ possible pursuit of Lynch: He’s still on the Seahawks’ reserve/ retired list, meaning Seattle holds his rights. So Oakland would have to give something up to get him (which seems more likely) or hope that the Seahawks give up their claim to him via release. In any case, Lynch turns 31 next month, so he’s past the age when NFL running backs usually start showing a decline. But the ive-time Pro Bowler also hails from Oakland and played college ball at Cal, so the Raiders would seem to be something of a natural it. Oakland averaged 120.1 rushing yards per game to rank sixth in the NFL last season, but leading rusher Latavius Murray signed a free-agent deal with the Vikings this week. With only 5-foot-8 changeof-pace running backs Jalen Richard and DeAndre Washington on their roster, the Raiders almost certainly will be going after a running back at some point between now and training camp. ESPN suggests that running back also could be the still-available free agent Adrian Peterson, should he accept an incentive-laden contract.

149 • Zain Retherford (Penn St.) 27-0 won by fall over Brandon Sorensen (Iowa) 29-5 (Fall 2:37) • Lavion Mayes (Missouri) 23-2 won by decision over Max Thomsen (Northern Iowa) 30-6 (Dec 4-2)

157 • Jason Nolf (Penn St.) 26-0 won by major decision over Tyler Berger (Nebraska) 35-5 (MD 13-5) • Joey Lavallee (Missouri) 29-1 won by decision over Dylan Palacio (Cornell) 11-2 (Dec 8-5)

165 • Isaiah Martinez (Illinois) 31-0 won by decision over Isaac Jordan (Wis.) 27-5 (Dec 2-1) • Vincenzo Joseph (Penn St.) 21-4 won by decision over Logan Massa (Michigan) 30-3 (Dec 5-4)

174 • Mark Hall (Penn St.) 30-3 won by decision over Zahid Valencia (Arizona St.) 36-1 (Dec 4-3) • Bo Jordan (Ohio St.) 18-1 won by decision over Brian Realbuto (Cornell) 26-2 (Dec 11-7)

174

184

• Zahid Valencia (Arizona St.) 36-0 won by decision over Myles Amine (Michigan) 28-6 (Dec 14-8) • Mark Hall (Penn St.) 29-3 won by major decision over Zach Epperly (Virginia Tech) 21-2 (MD 10-2) • Bo Jordan (Ohio St.) 17-1 won by decision over Alex Meyer (Iowa) 26-8 (Dec 4-3) • Brian Realbuto (Cornell) 26-1 won by fall over Zac Brunson (Illinois) 30-9 (Fall 1:12)

• Gabe Dean (Cornell) 34-0 won by decision over Nolan Boyd (Oklahoma St.) 24-5 (Dec 9-3) • Bo Nickal (Penn St.) 25-1 won by fall over Sammy Brooks (Iowa) 27-3 (Fall 1:02)

184

285

• Gabe Dean (Cornell) 33-0 won in tie breaker - 1 over Jack Dechow (Old Dominion) 30-4 (TB-1 4-3) • Nolan Boyd (Oklahoma St.) 24-4 won by decision over Drew Foster (Northern Iowa) 24-5 (Dec 11-7)

Kyle Snyder (Ohio St.) 16-0 won by major decision over Jacob Kasper (Duke) 30-4 (MD 19-6) Connor Medbery (Wis.) 29-1 won by decision over Ty Walz (Virginia Tech) 25-3 (Dec 4-3)

197 J’den Cox (Missouri) 27-0 won by decision over Jared Haught (Virginia Tech) 27-3 (Dec 6-2) Brett Pfarr (Minn.) 31-2 won by decision over Kollin Moore (Ohio St.) 31-4 (Dec 13-9)

Elsewhere • The Giants are convinced defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul is fully healed from a ireworks accident that severely damaged his right hand nearly two years ago, giving him a four-year contract worth about $68 million. • The Bills signed freeagent cornerback Leonard Johnson, who last year played for new Bufalo coach Sean McDermott in Carolina. The Bills also signed running back Joe Banyard and receiver Corey Washington. • The Cardinals re-signed tackle Frostee Rucker, retaining a veteran presence on the defensive line after losing Calais Campbell in free agency. • The Seahawks are bringing back two of their free agents, agreeing to terms with tight end Luke Willson and cornerback DeShawn Shead. • The Vikings re-signed cornerback Terence Newman for his 15th NFL season. From news services


SPORTS

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

NCAA WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS NOTEBOOK

NFL NOTEBOOK

SIUE’s Residori is All-American

Geno Smith to join Giants, report says

Cougar will wrestle for 7th on Saturday BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville senior Jake Residori made Cougars history Friday night in the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships at Scotttrade Center. With an 8-3 victory over fourth-seeded Zach Epperly of Virginia Tech in consolation action at 174 pounds, Residori (2412) became his school’s first AllAmerican since Francis Howell grad Zach Stephens placed fourth at the D-II tournament in 2003. In addition, Residori is the first Cougar to earn D-I All-American honors since Tim Wright in 1987. “It feels great, really great,” Residori said. “Senior year, my first shot and my last shot and I

did it.” Residori, who lost in a later match Friday, will wrestle for seventh place Saturday morning. Residori was among the tournament’s busiest wrestlers after opening up with a pig-tail match before Thursday’s opening round. After winning 7-6 in the pigtail, he beat No. 7 seed and 2015 All-American Kyle Crutchmer of Oklahoma State 6-5 and then capped of his busy Thursday with a 6-2 loss to Illinois’ Zac Brunson, the bracket’s No. 10 seed. In Friday’s early session, he beat Edinboro’s Ty Schofftstall 4-1, followed up with a first-period pin of 15th-seeded Trace Engelkes of Northern Illinois and then knocked of two-time All-American Epperly. “When I saw the bracket, I knew it was going to be tough,” he said. “But, you know, it just feels so much better now, knowing how hard I had to work to get to this

point. I just needed to wrestle; I’ve been going out there and just focusing on having fun. Knowing this is the end, I just want to make sure to give it everything I’ve got.” The Cougars’ Freddie Rodriguez (23-8) bowed out one match short of earning All-America honors at 125, losing 4-1 in consolation-bracket action Friday night.

ROUGH HOMECOMING Appalachian State’s Colby Smith, the 2016 Post-Dispatch AllMetro wrestler of the year, bowed out of the tournament Friday afternoon with a 13-3 loss to Missouri’s John Erneste in the consolation bracket at 133 pounds. A product of Holt High in Wentzville, Smith (27-11) also fell by major decision to ninth-seeded Scotty Parker of Lehigh in the opening round Thursday. In between, he advanced due to a medical forfeit.

“I just want to come back next year even hungrier,” Smith said after a heart-to-heart with Mountaineers coach Johnmark Bentley in the bowels of Scottrade Friday morning. “All I can do is keep working hard and try to fix the right things and focus on doing better next time. “Obviously, things didn’t work out the way I wanted. Had a lot of family and friends here to support me; I appreciate it a lot and love them all. I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them. I just wish I could’ve competed better.”

BALDWIN IN THE HOUSE Actor William “Billy” Baldwin, who wrestled at Binghamton University and who has been tremendously supportive of the sport over the years, has been on hand throughout the tournament and has served as a guest analyst for ESPN.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma State’s Dean Heil (right) grapples with Rutger’s Anthony Ashnault in a 141-pound match in the semiinal round Friday night.

Illini’s Martinez goes for third national title WRESTLING • FROM B1

A three-time All-American, Mayes came up with a lastsecond takedown to beat Northern Iowa’s Max Thomsen in the semifinals Friday night. Mayes is 3-1 this season against his Mid-American Conference rival. “No score for the first six or so minutes of the match,” Mayes said. “I was closer than he was and at that moment I said that if I wanted to wrestle another minute (in overtime), I can just not shoot. If I want to be done now, I can shoot, so I chose to shoot. He blocked it of pretty well and I was able to hit a drag that I’ve been working on all week. “Almost got it on him earlier in the match, but it didn’t work out so well. But I stuck with the process and did what I’ve been training to do.” Mayes, a No. 3 seed, will face defending champion Zain Retherford (27-0) of Penn State for the title. With another dramatic finish, the third-seeded Lavallee came up with a late takedown and went on to a 8-5 decision over seventh-seeded Dylan Palacio of Cornell. After two NCAA appearances, Lavallee elected to take a redshirt last season. “The last three years I would say were a rough time for me because my attitude in the room was wrong,” he said. “I felt like I had everything and knew everything. It was tough sitting on the sideline last year — I wanted to be out there — but for me, it was the right thing. I had to learn to trust my coaches and not be a big head. After every dual, I ask my coaches what I need to do to improve; all three tell me and that gives me more options. It’s definitely helped make me a better wrestler.” Lavallee will meet top-seeded Jason Nolf (26-0) of Penn State in the finals. Cox was in control from start to finish against Vaught. The Columbia, Mo., native will wrestle in his final college match Saturday night. Missouri also has a pair of competitors — Jaydin Eierman at 141 and Daniel Lewis at 165 — who’ve earned AllAmerican honors and will wrestle in Saturday morning’s consolation bracket. Martinez, the Illinois junior who won his previous two titles at 157, beat Wisconsin’s Isaac Jordan 2-1 on the strength of his riding time Friday night. He’ll face thirdseeded Vincenzo Joseph (21-4) of Penn State for the title. The Illini also have two All-American seniors — Carbondale’s Zane Richards at 133 and Zac Brunson at 174 — set to compete in Saturday morning’s medal matches.

TOP SEEDS UPENDED In the semifinals at 125, Lehigh’s Darian Cruz (30-2) came up with a takedown late in regulation and another early in overtime for a 4-2 win over previously unbeaten Thomas Gilman of Iowa. Gilman was the first No. 1 seed and the first of the 10 undefeated wrestlers to lose in the tournament. The same happened at 133, as Iowa’s Cory Clark (19-3) earned his third straight title-match appearance with a 7-4 win over Ohio State’s Nathan Tomasello (22-1), the No. 1 seed and the 2016 champion at 125. At 174, Penn State’s Mark Hall (30-3) won 4-3 over previously unbeaten Zahid Valencia (36-1) of Arizona State. The other undefeated top seeds — Oklahoma State’s Dean Heil at 141, Retherford at 149, Nolf at 157, Martinez at 165, Cornell’s Gabe Dean at 184 and Ohio State heavyweight Kyle Snyder — all made it through to the finals. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

WRESTLING RESULTS TEAM RESULTS 1. Penn State 2. Ohio State 3. Oklahoma State 4. Missouri 5. Iowa 6. Minnesota 7. Cornell 8. Virginia Tech 9. Nebraska 10. Illinois 11. Lehigh 11. Wisconsin 13. Michigan 14. Arizona State 15. Virginia 16. South Dakota State 17. Northern Iowa 18. Rutgers 19. Central Michigan 19. Edinboro 19. NC State 22. Rider 23. Wyoming 24. Princeton 25. Appalachian State 25. Old Dominion 27. Stanford 28. Oregon State 29. SIUE 30. Northern Illinois 31. Navy 32. Duke 32. Oklahoma 32. Pittsburgh 35. Indiana 35. Maryland 37. Pennsylvania 38. Campbell 39. Bufalo 40. Bucknell 41. American 41. Michigan State 41. North Carolina 44. Cleveland State 44. Lock Haven 46. Northwestern 47. Gardner-Webb 47. North Dakota State 47. Northern Colorado 50. Purdue 51. Eastern Michigan 51. Ohio 53. Army 53. CSU Bakersield 53. Drexel 53. Utah Valley U. 57. Binghamton U. 57. Clarion 57. Columbia 57. Iowa State 57. West Virginia 62. Cal Poly 62. George Mason 62. Harvard 62. Kent State 66. Boise State 66. Brown 66. The Citadel 69. Chattanooga

121.0 89.5 86.0 81.5 74.0 60.0 57.5 53.5 50.0 41.5 36.0 36.0 33.0 30.0 29.5 28.5 23.5 21.5 19.5 19.5 19.5 18.0 16.5 14.5 13.5 13.5 13.0 12.5 12.0 11.5 10.0 9.5 9.5 9.5 8.5 8.5 8.0 6.5 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.0 4.0 3.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.5 2.0 2.0 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.5

QUARTERFINAL RESULTS

197

Friday

• J’den Cox (Missouri) 26-0 won by major decision over Ryan Wolfe (Rider) 22-5 (MD 10-1) • Jared Haught (Virginia Tech) 27-2 won by decision over Matt McCutcheon (Penn St.) 20-5 (Dec 7-3) • Kollin Moore (Ohio St.) 31-3 won by major decision over Preston Weigel (Oklahoma St.) 20-6 (MD 13-5) • Brett Pfarr (Minn.) 30-2 won by decision over Kevin Beazley (Old Dominion) 24-6 (Dec 6-0)

125 • Thomas Gilman (Iowa) 30-0 won by fall over Nicholas Piccininni (Oklahoma St.) 24-7 (Fall 6:04) • Darian Cruz (Lehigh) 29-2 won by decision over Sean Fausz (NC St.) 27-7 (Dec 5-2) • Ethan Lizak (Minn.) 29-6 won by tech fall over Freddie Rodriguez (SIUE) 23-7 (TF-1.5 6:54 (15-0)) • Jack Mueller (Virginia) 27-4 won in sudden victory - 1 over Joey Dance (Virginia Tech) 27-2 (SV-1 4-2)

133 • Nathan Tomasello (Ohio St.) 22-0 won by decision over Zane Richards (Illinois) 27-5 (Dec 3-1) • Cory Clark (Iowa) 18-3 won by decision over Stevan Micic (Michigan) 26-6 (Dec 6-4) • Kaid Brock (Oklahoma St.) 28-2 won by decision over Bryan Lantry (Buffalo) 22-6 (Dec 7-3) • Seth Gross (South Dakota St.) 33-1 won by major decision over Eric Montoya (Nebraska) 28-5 (MD 11-1)

141 • Dean Heil (Oklahoma St.) 30-0 won by decision over Jaydin Eierman (Missouri) 26-6 (Dec 6-5) • Anthony Ashnault (Rutgers) 30-3 won by decision over Matthew Kolodzik (Princeton) 28-3 (Dec 6-2) • George DiCamillo (Virginia) 23-4 won by decision over Thomas Thorn (Minn.) 19-8 (Dec 5-2) • Bryce Meredith (Wyoming) 31-6 won by decision over Kevin Jack (NC St.) 31-2 (Dec 6-5)

149 • Zain Retherford (Penn St.) 26-0 won by tech fall over Alex Kocer (South Dakota St.) 29-9 (TF-1.5 5:14 (19-2)) • Brandon Sorensen (Iowa) 29-4 won by decision over Micah Jordan (Ohio St.) 30-4 (Dec 3-0) • Lavion Mayes (Missouri) 22-2 won by decision over Solomon Chishko (Virginia Tech) 23-4 (Dec 4-2) • Max Thomsen (Northern Iowa) 30-5 won by decision over Kenny Theobold (Rutgers) 24-10 (Dec 5-1)

157 • Jason Nolf (Penn St.) 25-0 won by fall over Bryant Clagon (Rider) 25-6 (Fall 4:07) • Tyler Berger (Nebraska) 35-4 won in sudden victory - 1 over Joseph Smith (Oklahoma St.) 13-5 (SV-1 3-1) • Joey Lavallee (Missouri) 28-1 won by decision over Paul Fox (Stanford) 27-14 (Dec 6-2) • Dylan Palacio (Cornell) 11-1 won by fall over Michael Kemerer (Iowa) 29-3 (Fall 3:28)

285 • Kyle Snyder (Ohio St.) 15-0 won by decision over Michael Kroells (Minn.) 29-10 (Dec 13-7) • Jacob Kasper (Duke) 30-3 won by decision over Nick Nevills (Penn St.) 22-4 (Dec 3-1) • Ty Walz (Virginia Tech) 25-2 won by major decision over Conan Jennings (Northwestern) 19-15 (MD 15-4) • Connor Medbery (Wis.) 28-1 won by decision over Tanner Hall (Arizona St.) 31-6 (Dec 5-3)

SEMIFINAL RESULTS 125 • Darian Cruz (Lehigh) 30-2 won in sudden victory - 1 over Thomas Gilman (Iowa) 30-1 (SV-1 4-2) • Ethan Lizak (Minn.) 30-6 won by decision over Jack Mueller (Virginia) 27-5 (Dec 7-0)

133 • Cory Clark (Iowa) 19-3 won by decision over Nathan Tomasello (Ohio St.) 22-1 (Dec 7-4) • Seth Gross (South Dakota St.) 34-1 won by major decision over Kaid Brock (Oklahoma St.) 28-3 (MD 12-3)

141 • Dean Heil (Oklahoma St.) 31-0 won by decision over Anthony Ashnault (Rutgers) 30-4 (Dec 4-2) • George DiCamillo (Virginia) 24-4 won by decision over Bryce Meredith (Wyoming) 31-7 (Dec 10-7)

149 • Zain Retherford (Penn St.) 27-0 won by fall over Brandon Sorensen (Iowa) 29-5 (Fall 2:37) • Lavion Mayes (Missouri) 23-2 won by decision over Max Thomsen (Northern Iowa) 30-6 (Dec 4-2)

157 • Jason Nolf (Penn St.) 26-0 won by major decision over Tyler Berger (Nebraska) 35-5 (MD 13-5) • Joey Lavallee (Missouri) 29-1 won by decision over Dylan Palacio (Cornell) 11-2 (Dec 8-5)

165

165

• Isaiah Martinez (Illinois) 30-0 won by decision over Chandler Rogers (Oklahoma St.) 22-7 (Dec 10-5) • Isaac Jordan (Wis.) 27-4 won by decision over Chad Walsh (Rider) 31-3 (Dec 7-3) • Vincenzo Joseph (Penn St.) 20-4 won by decision over Daniel Lewis (Missouri) 26-4 (Dec 6-5) • Logan Massa (Michigan) 30-2 won by major decision over Anthony Valencia (Arizona St.) 34-6 (MD 9-0)

• Isaiah Martinez (Illinois) 31-0 won by decision over Isaac Jordan (Wis.) 27-5 (Dec 2-1) • Vincenzo Joseph (Penn St.) 21-4 won by decision over Logan Massa (Michigan) 30-3 (Dec 5-4)

174 • Zahid Valencia (Arizona St.) 36-0 won by decision over Myles Amine (Michigan) 28-6 (Dec 14-8) • Mark Hall (Penn St.) 29-3 won by major decision over Zach Epperly (Virginia Tech) 21-2 (MD 10-2) • Bo Jordan (Ohio St.) 17-1 won by decision over Alex Meyer (Iowa) 26-8 (Dec 4-3) • Brian Realbuto (Cornell) 26-1 won by fall over Zac Brunson (Illinois) 30-9 (Fall 1:12)

184 • Gabe Dean (Cornell) 33-0 won in tie breaker - 1 over Jack Dechow (Old Dominion) 30-4 (TB-1 4-3) • Nolan Boyd (Oklahoma St.) 24-4 won by decision over Drew Foster (Northern Iowa) 24-5 (Dec 11-7) • Sammy Brooks (Iowa) 27-2 won by fall over Emery Parker (Illinois) 30-9 (Fall 6:01) • Bo Nickal (Penn St.) 24-1 won by fall over TJ Dudley (Nebraska) 29-5 (Fall 4:33)

174 • Mark Hall (Penn St.) 30-3 won by decision over Zahid Valencia (Arizona St.) 36-1 (Dec 4-3) • Bo Jordan (Ohio St.) 18-1 won by decision over Brian Realbuto (Cornell) 26-2 (Dec 11-7)

184 • Gabe Dean (Cornell) 34-0 won by decision over Nolan Boyd (Oklahoma St.) 24-5 (Dec 9-3) • Bo Nickal (Penn St.) 25-1 won by fall over Sammy Brooks (Iowa) 27-3 (Fall 1:02)

197 J’den Cox (Missouri) 27-0 won by decision over Jared Haught (Virginia Tech) 27-3 (Dec 6-2) Brett Pfarr (Minn.) 31-2 won by decision over Kollin Moore (Ohio St.) 31-4 (Dec 13-9)

285 Kyle Snyder (Ohio St.) 16-0 won by major decision over Jacob Kasper (Duke) 30-4 (MD 19-6) Connor Medbery (Wis.) 29-1 won by decision over Ty Walz (Virginia Tech) 25-3 (Dec 4-3)

Quarterback Geno Smith has agreed to terms with the New York Giants, The Associated Press reported Friday. The deal is pending Smith passing a physical examination, which could take place this weekend. Like receiver Brandon Marshall last week, Smith is leaving the New York Jets but remaining in the same stadium. Smith will be a backup to Eli Manning, of course, and considering that Manning doesn’t miss games, his role might not include much playing time. Smith, 26, was a secondround draft choice by the Jets in 2013. But his stint with them was marred by injuries and inconsistency. He also lost his starting job in 2015 after a teammate broke Smith’s jaw with a punch during training camp. When Smith did get onto the ield last season, it was brief. After Ryan Fitzpatrick was benched, Smith took over but sufered a torn knee ligament in his irst game and was done for the season. Smith might be replaced on the Jets’ roster by Josh McCown. The free agent QB is meeting with the team this weekend, according to the AP. The only quarterbacks the Jets have — Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg — are relatively inexperienced. McCown, who’ll turn 38 on July 4, played the last two seasons with Cleveland. He appeared in 13 games for the Browns, throwing for 3,209 yards, 18 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. But McCown was 1-10 as a starter with the Browns, including 0-3 last season, and was released last month. Lynch to Raiders? • After sitting out a year, ostensibly because he’s retired, is running back Marshawn Lynch considering a comeback? ESPN reported that it is possible. Lynch is said to be trying to decide if he wants to come back to the NFL. There’s one sticking point in the Raiders’ possible pursuit of Lynch: He’s still on the Seahawks’ reserve/ retired list, meaning Seattle holds his rights. So Oakland would have to give something up to get him (which seems more likely) or hope that the Seahawks give up their claim to him via release. In any case, Lynch turns 31 next month, so he’s past the age when NFL running backs usually start showing a decline. But the ive-time Pro Bowler also hails from Oakland and played college ball at Cal, so the Raiders would seem to be something of a natural it. Oakland averaged 120.1 rushing yards per game to rank sixth in the NFL last season, but leading rusher Latavius Murray signed a free-agent deal with the Vikings this week. With only 5-foot-8 changeof-pace running backs Jalen Richard and DeAndre Washington on their roster, the Raiders almost certainly will be going after a running back at some point between now and training camp. ESPN suggests that running back also could be the still-available free agent Adrian Peterson, should he accept an incentive-laden contract. Elsewhere • The Giants are convinced defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul is fully healed from a ireworks accident that severely damaged his right hand nearly two years ago, giving him a four-year contract worth about $68 million. • The Bills signed freeagent cornerback Leonard Johnson, who last year played for new Bufalo coach Sean McDermott in Carolina. The Bills also signed running back Joe Banyard and receiver Corey Washington. • The Cardinals re-signed tackle Frostee Rucker, retaining a veteran presence on the defensive line after losing Calais Campbell in free agency. • The Seahawks are bringing back two of their free agents, agreeing to terms with tight end Luke Willson and cornerback DeShawn Shead. • The Vikings re-signed cornerback Terence Newman for his 15th NFL season. From news services


COLLEGES

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AREA COLLEGES ATHLETES

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

MIZZOU FOOTBALL

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pennsylvania’s Sydney Stipanovich (left) celebrates with Michelle Nwokedi after beating Princeton in the Ivy League title game, 57-48, on Sunday in Philadelphia.

Stipanovich leading Penn into NCAAs BY STEVE EIGHINGER Special to the Post-Dispatch

Sydney Stipanovich is putting the finishing touches on what has been a storied Ivy League basketball career at Penn. Stipanovich, who prepped at St. Joseph’s, leads the 12th-seeded Quakers (22-7) into their third NCAA Tournament in four years when they meet 5-seed Texas A&M (21-11) at 8 p.m. Saturday in Los Angeles. The game will be televised. The 6-foot-3 Stipanovich is a former Ivy League player of the year and a three-time defensive player of the year in the conference. She began her four-year run as the league’s rookie of the year and will graduate as the conference’s career leader in blocks. “I thought she was gonna do really good things here, but I was wrong. She’s done special things here,” Penn coach Mike McLaughlin told the Daily Pennsylvanian. Despite all of her success, Stipanovich, who is averaging 10.6 points and 8.7 rebounds, has kept a level head. “You don’t really think about it when you’re out there playing ... but I think when I’m all done with basketball and I look back, (the accomplishments) will be something that I cherish,” Stipanovich said.

WASHINGTON U. WINS TRACK TITLE Washington University won the NCAA Division III women’s indoor track championship last weekend at North Central College in Naperville, Ill. It’s the first title in program history. Washington U. edged Ithaca (N.Y.) College for the title 44-41.25. The distance medley relay team highlighted the Bears’ run, taking first place when Audrey Western, Kelli Hancock, Ashley Knudsen and Alison Lindsay combined for a season-best time of 11 minutes 48.43 seconds. The WU men finished 17th but produced an individual national champion in Deko Ricketts, who won the 800 meters with a season-best 1:51.07.

STLCC SWEEPS REGION The St. Louis Community College men’s and women’s basketball teams won district titles and qualified for the junior college Division II national tournament last Saturday. The men’s team captured the District XIII title by beating Arkansas State Mid-South 86-69 in West Memphis, Ark. Sophomore guard Sean Rigmaiden (North Tech) finished with 26 points, a total that included 17 free throws. Miles Nettles (Madison Prep), another sophomore guard, had 15 points. STLCC (21-12) next opens play at the national tournament in Danville, Ill., at 11 a.m. Tuesday against Louisburg. The women’s team also qualified by beating MidSouth, 77-56, behind Chrishana Wilson’s huge game. A 5-10 freshman from Gateway STEM, Wilson had 25 rebounds and 15 points. Shamara Glover and Erika Harvey (Belleville West) also scored 15, while Ellisha Davis (Belleville East) and Shamiah Oliver had 14 and 10. The women will take on Guilford Tech at 11 a.m. Tuesday in Harrison, Ark.

AROUND THE AREA Luke Schroepfer (Washington) has played a big role in helping Colorado School of Mines (30-4) reach the Elite Eight of the NCAA Division II men’s basketball tournament. It’s the deepest the school has advanced in the NCAA postseason. A 6-2 junior, Schroepfer ranks third in the nation in 3-point field goal accuracy, making 50 percent (94 of 188) while averaging 14.5 points for the Orediggers. Schroepfer scored a team-high 23 points in an 88-63 win over West Texas A&M in the regional championship. Mines plays No. 2 Bellarmine at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday in Sioux Falls, S.D. • Austin Peay junior guard Josh Robinson (St. Mary’s), the third-leading scorer in the Ohio Valley Conference, has been suspended indefinitely following a March 7 arrest for the manufacture, delivery and possession of marijuana in Montgomery County, Tenn. • SIU Edwardsville softball coach Sandy Montgomery recently reached the 1,000-victory mark. Montgomery is the 32nd coach in all NCAA divisions to eclipse the milestone, and one of 13 at the Division I level. Montgomery is in her 29th season at SIUE. • The Webster University softball team (12-4) began the season 10-0, its best start since 2000. Abby Burroughs (Triad) boasts a .389 batting average. Chelsey Thornley tops the pitching staf with a 6-1 record. • Junior righthander Ryan Netemeyer (Mascoutah) has four saves in nine innings of work for the SIU Carbondale baseball team (8-7). • A pair of former Highland baseball players are two of the few bright spots at Eastern Illinois. Joseph Duncan, a junior outfielder, is hitting .316 with a pair of home runs. Jake Haberer, a junior righthander, has a 1.80 ERA in his first five appearances for the Panthers, who are 1-14. • Outfielder-pitcher Matt Vierling (CBC), a freshman AllAmerican a year ago at Notre Dame, is showing no signs of a sophomore slump. He is hitting .321 and has an 0.00 ERA over his first three appearances for the Irish (3-11). • Jordan McFarland (Waterloo), who won the Mississippi Valley Conference batting title (.500) in 2016, is hitting .241 in part-time duty as a freshman utility player at Arkansas. • SIUC senior golfer Brooke Cusumano (Westminster) tied for fourth in the Bradley Spring Break Invitational in Dallas. • SIUE freshman Emily Ingles is the Ohio Valley Conference pitcher of the week. Ingles posted a 4-0 record with a 0.62 earned-run average and 35 strikeouts, helping SIUE to an 8-0 record last week during the Under Armour Showcase in Clearwater, Fla. Other athletes of the week include Missouri-St. Louis junior Patricia Maya, Great Lakes Valley tennis; and Southwest Baptist senior Sean Murley (Eureka), Mid America baseball.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Missouri Tigers quarterback Drew Lock improved both his completion rate and eiciency rating during last season.

Lock readies for encore Junior QB is settling into system, ine-tuning plays BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • A year ago Mis-

souri quarterback Drew Lock had just started a new foreign language that would test his wits throughout his sophomore year. He was just getting to know his new instructor, Josh Heupel, the team’s first-year offensive coordinator who overhauled Mizzou’s offense with new plays, new formations and new terminology. When spring practices began, Lock was still swimming in verbiage. The faster Lock understood the new terms for plays, routes, defenses and everything else in the playbook that needs a name, the faster he could apply them on the field. Lock’s previous experience — eight starts as a freshman in 2015 — hardly mattered with all this new material to absorb. Like his freshman year, he was still a quarterback in a no-huddle spread ofense, but that’s about all that remained the same under Heupel’s system. “We’ve always talked about speaking the same language in the room,” Lock said Thursday after Mizzou’s fifth practice of the spring, the ofense’s second year under Heupel’s direction. “If not there has to be more explanation time, and that takes away from time you can be learning.” For Lock and an ofense that returns 10 starters and nine players who caught at least five passes last year, the challenge this spring goes beyond learning the nuances of Heupel’s ofense. The Tigers won only four games last season but showed promise on ofense, improving from worst to first in the Southeastern Conference in yards per game, from 280.9 in 2015 to 500.5 last fall. Some of the progress was directly tied to a higher volume of plays, 948 com-

pared to 770 in 2015, thanks to Heupel’s preferred breakneck pace plus major progress on third downs. The Tigers converted 43 percent of their third downs last year, good for third in the SEC and up from a league-low 30.3 percent in 2015. Lock made significant strides, too. He improved his completion rate from 49 percent as a freshman to 54.6, while his efficiency rating climbed from 90.5 to 133.3. Now in his second year in Heupel’s system, Lock has shifted his attention this spring from concepts of the overall scheme to fine-tuning his play within the plays he learned last year. “Instead of focusing on the grand scheme of things you can focus on certain small things, whether that’s a blitz to a certain play or a certain coverage on a certain play rather than worrying about the play,” he said. “We can learn how to combat and throw different things at different defenses instead of worrying about the scheme.” In the team’s postseason analysis of Lock’s body of work, Mizzou discovered he was more accurate throwing to his left than to his right, a trend Heupel attributed to a flaw in Lock’s mechanics. Lock had a tendency to leave his throwing shoulder too wide open on throws to his right, which caused his elbow to drop and produced what he described as “fluttery balls.” Otherwise, he’s worked on polishing the most essential element to delivering accurate passes from the pocket: footwork. “I know I’m confident in my arm,” said Lock, whose 23 touchdown passes ranked third in the SEC last year. “I know I can make big-time throws down the field. I have to be in the right place with my feet, and if I am, there’s not much that should be able to stop us.” “I feel like (Lock’s) experience

level has taken over a little bit on some of his reads,” second-year coach Barry Odom said. “We’re trying to throw as many things defensively as we can (at him). He’s handled it pretty well. I like what he’s doing.” Mizzou flirted with a quarterback rotation early last season between Lock and Marvin Zanders, but the idea sounded better than it looked. By midseason, Lock rarely left the field. Zanders left the team after the season and will transfer to Virginia after earning his undergraduate degree this semester. That leaves Lock as the unquestioned starter as the Tigers have untested sophomore Jack Lowary and redshirt freshman Micah Wilson as the backup options. Lock should benefit from a seasoned cast of receivers, tight ends and tailbacks, plus the return of wideout Nate Brown, the team’s leading receiver in 2015 who missed all of last season with an ankle injury that required surgery. “I’ve never seen anyone work as hard as he did in the training room,” Lock said. “His cuts are really sharp. He doesn’t fade away from things. He comes downhill. He’s passed my expectations for what he can do.” After the ofense’s strong finish to 2016 and the glut of experience back on campus, expectations for Lock and his playmakers figures to soar heading into the fall. The optimism comes from MU’s prolific games against Tennessee, Vanderbilt and others down the stretch. Lock hasn’t forgotten about midseason struggles against Louisiana State and Florida. “I think we put up a decent amount of points last year,” he said, “but we know we left a lot out there hanging.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Tigers win their 17th game in a row Houck pitches well in shutout of Alabama BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Missouri’s Tanner Houck was masterful on the mound in the Tigers’ conference opener Friday as the Tigers blanked Alabama 3-0 in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and extended the nation’s longest winning streak to 17 games. Under the direction of first-year coach Steve Bieser, Mizzou (17-1) is ranked No. 23 and of to the best start in team history. In Friday’s SEC opener for both teams, the Tigers got seven scoreless innings from Houck (3-1), who allowed only a double and three walks while striking out a season-high nine batters at Sewell-Thomas Stadium. The junior from Collinsville has won his last three starts since dropping the Tigers’ season opener to Eastern Michigan on Feb. 17. Freshman reliever T.J. Sikkema relieved Houck in the eighth and pitched two scoreless innings for his second save, yielding just a single mixed with five strikeouts. Sikkema has allowed just one earned run in 24 innings this season. The Tigers did their damage in the first inning of Alabama starter Jake Walters (3-2) with Brett Bond’s bases-loaded walk and Brian Sharp’s sacrifice fly. Trey Harris added to MU’s lead in the ninth with

his third home run of the season. Alabama dropped to 10-8. The three-game series continues with Saturday’s 2 p.m. start. Sophomore lefthander Michael Plassmeyer (3-0) gets the start for the Tigers on the mound.

MU GYMNASTS AT SEC MEET For weeks the Missouri gymnastics team has produced historic scores while competing against elite programs in the SEC. On Saturday, the 14th-ranked Tigers share the mats with the rest of their league peers at the SEC championships at Veteran’s Memorial Arena in Jacksonville, Fla. Mizzou competes in the afternoon session at 1 p.m. on ESPNU against No. 12 Kentucky, No. 21 Auburn and Arkansas. The league’s top-ranked teams highlight the evening session at 5 p.m. on SEC Network: No. 4 Florida, No. 6 Alabama and No. 8 Georgia. Under fourth-year coach Shannon Welker, the Tigers have challenged their record book in several meets this season. Last week against Kentucky, Mizzou posted the fourth-best score in team history (197.15), including the program’s highest score on the balance beam (49.5). Sophomore Britney Ward earned the program’s third-best score (9.975) on the apparatus. The Tigers have enjoyed their breakthrough season without their most accomplished gymnast, sophomore Morgan Porter (Ritenour), who suffered a season-ending Achilles ten-

don injury in January.

BIG FINISH FOR SWIMMERS Five Mizzou swimmers and a relay team earned first-team All-American honors at Friday’s session of the NCAA women’s championships, led by junior Hannah Stevens’ thirdplace finish in the 100-meter backstroke. On the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis, Stevens became just the second Mizzou women’s swimmer to earn a top-three finish at the NCAA meet. The Tigers ended the day in 11th place with one more session Saturday. “That was our best day ever, with all the top-eight swims,” MU coach Greg Rhodenbaugh said. “We had more finalists than any other team except Stanford tonight, so we really moved up.” Stevens finished her race in a personal-best time 50.57 seconds. Teammate Nadine Laemmler took seventh in the same race. Also earning All-American honors for Mizzou were Katharine Ross (eighth place, 100 breaststroke) and Sharli Brady (seventh, 400 individual medley) and the 200 medley relay team of Laemmler, Ross, Maddie Gehrke and Stevens, which finished eighth with a school-record time of 1:35.88. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

COLLEGE BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK Alford stays focused on UCLA, not Indiana UCLA coach Steve Alford says he’s focused on the NCAA Tournament, not the job opening at his alma mater Indiana. Alford played four seasons in Bloomington and led the Hoosiers to the 1987 NCAA title under coach Bobby Knight. His name was among the irst to come up when Indiana coach Tom Crean was ired Thursday. “That was 30 years ago,” Alford said at a news conference before his thirdseeded Bruins faced No. 14 seed Kent State on Friday night. “I was part of that. I stood on stage with a great group of guys and won a national championship. It’s my home state. I played there. So obviously, all that comes up.” He’s coached at Southwest Missouri State, Iowa and New Mexico before joining UCLA in 2013. “I love UCLA. I love Los Angeles,” he said. “You’re talking about arguably the greatest ‘brand’ anywhere on the planet, and we got things going at a very high level now and we’re very excited about it.” Northwestern takes on Gonzaga • Northwestern is playing with house money as it prepares to take on Gonzaga, the No. 1 seed in the West Region. The eighth-seeded Wildcats (24-11) advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the irst time and even won a game, beating Vanderbilt 68-66 on Thursday. Gonzaga (33-1), on the other hand, was expected to be in and expects to go much further. Northwestern will have to overcome Gonzaga’s signiicant size advantage. Gonzaga is prepared for the arena to feel like a road game after Northwestern fans took over Vivint Arena in Salt Lake City on Thursday. But Gonzaga features the one-two punch of point guard Nigel Williams-Goss and center Przemek Karnowski. Williams-Goss is a inalist for the Bob Cousy Point Guard of the Year award and is averaging 19 points per game in the last ive games. The 7-foot-1, 300-pound Karnowski averages 12.5 points and is an adept passer out of the post. Northwestern will need guards Bryant McIntosh and Scottie Lindsey to continue to lead, especially being at such a size disadvantage. McIntosh scored 25 in the opening-round victory and Lindsey added 14. N.C. State hires Keatts • North Carolina State has hired UNC Wilmington’s Kevin Keatts to take over as head basketball coach. The school announced Keatts’ hiring in a news release Friday night, one day after his Seahawks lost to Virginia in the irst round of the NCAA Tournament. Keatts is a former assistant to Rick Pitino at Louisville and two-time Colonial Athletic Association coach of the year who led UNC Wilmington to a 72-28 record and two NCAA Tournaments in three seasons there. The 44-year-old Keatts replaces Mark Gottfried, who was ired after the Wolfpack’s season. In a statement, Keatts said he has “incredible respect” for the program’s tradition and said there’s an “unbelievable commitment to basketball in Raleigh.” Samuels out at Florida A&M • Florida A&M University is searching for a new men’s basketball coach after deciding not to renew Byron Samuels’ contract. Athletics director Milton Overton said Friday that Lamont Franklin will serve as the interim coach while a search for Samuels’ replacement takes place. Samuels was 17-71 in three years, including 7-23 this season. He was hired from the University of Georgia, where he had served as the basketball operations coordinator. Florida A&M was eligible for postseason play this past season after being ineligible the past two years under Academic Progress Rate sanctions. Associated Press

NCAA TOURNAMENT

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

SOUTH REGION

Wichita State upends Dayton Tournament rematch with Kentucky could loom next for Shockers FROM NEWS SERVICES

Wichita State’s accomplishments continue to exceed its résumé. It’s a March routine. The Shockers are a tournament darling again, the hero of all who enjoy taking shots at the NCAA selection committee. The 10th-seeded Shockers defeated seventh-seeded Dayton 64-58 on Friday in Indianapolis. They are 7-3 against equal or higher seeds in the past five tournaments and won an NCAA tourney game for the fifth straight season. Wichita State (31-4) next plays Sunday, against the winner of the late Friday matchup between No. 2 seed Kentucky and No. 15 Northern Kentucky. If the foe is Kentucky, it would be a rematch of a scintillating second-round game in 2014 that the Wildcats won 78-76 in St. Louis. On Friday the Shockers won their 16th game in a row — the second-longest streak in school history — after rolling through the Missouri Valley Conference tournament two weeks earlier. But most of the teams in the Valley are far from the caliber of Dayton, which gave the Shockers a physical battle. “It was definitely something a little brand new to us from how we’ve seen in the Missouri Valley,” said Zach Brown, who made all three of his 3-point tries and scored 12 points for the Shockers. “We just grinded it out. It was a tough game.” And they were the tougher team. Dayton (24-8) came in with a wealth of experience, playing in its school-record fourth straight NCAA Tournament. The Flyers start three seniors and have five overall, with a lot of shared tournament moments. This one ranks at the bottom. The seventh-seeded Flyers were held to a season low in points and shot a season-low 31 percent from the field. They also got rebounded 48-29 and had eight shots swatted away. “Of course you’ve got to give them credit because they’re the ones defending, but I think it’s more about us,” said point guard Scoochie Smith, who had 25 points. “We just had to step up and make shots, and a lot of people on our team couldn’t get their shots to fall, couldn’t get a flow.” Brown’s 3-pointer put Wichita State up 51-45 with 5:38 left, the biggest lead by either team to that point, and Dayton never threatened again. Landry Shamet led the Shockers with 13 points. Shamet, fouled as the shot clock ticked down, made two of three foul shots for a 60-53 led with 36 seconds to

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wichita State’s Landry Shamet (top) shoots over Dayton’s Josh Cunningham in the irst half Friday night.

play and the Shockers were on their way to another victory. “They’re a team that can beat anybody on a neutral court at any time,” Dayton coach Archie Miller said. “And I wouldn’t be surprised if they weren’t pushing towards another second weekend. They’re a great team, and they’re really well coached, maybe as fun of a team to prepare for as we’ve had. “Actually, it was a lot of fun to be in the game playing against them because you kind of want to stack yourself up against sort of how they do things to see how your stuf works. We battled. We battled really hard. We were right there.” The Shockers haven’t lost a since Jan. 14, going two months with nothing but postgame highfives. They have relied on their offense to carry them, averaging 82.1 points per game. Feeling slighted by their tournament

seed, they showed they’re more than a one-trick team. “All in all, it was a big grind,” Brown said. “And I’m proud, proud of everybody.” The Shockers scored 80 points a school-record 23 times this season. Their 64 points on Friday matched their second-lowest total of the season, but they won anyway. North Carolina 103, Texas Southern 64 • Justin Jackson broke out of a shooting slump to score 21 points, helping top-seeded North Carolina romp in Greenville, S.C. He had 19 points by halftime, helping the Tar Heels (28-7) quickly eliminate any chance of an unprecedented upset by a No. 16 seed. “It was a good feeling,” Jackson said. “I haven’t shot the ball the way I’ve wanted to the past four games, so I got back in the gym as much as I possibly could, trying to get back to where I was. My team-

mates found me; they set a bunch of screens for me, and they just fell for me tonight.” Isaiah Hicks added 17 points for the Tar Heels, who play Arkansas on Sunday. Kevin Scott’s 19 points led the 16th-seeded Tigers (23-12). “North Carolina is just at a totally diferent level than where we are as a basketball team,” Texas Southern coach Mike Davis said. Arkansas 77, Seton Hall 71 • Jaylen Barford hit the go-ahead layup with 57.8 seconds left to help the Razorbacks prevail in Greenville. He had 12 of his 20 points after halftime for Arkansas (26-9), the No. 8 seed. That included his layup off Khadeen Carrington’s turnover at the other end, pushing Arkansas ahead for good as the Razorbacks scored the game’s final seven points. The ninth-seeded Pirates finished at 21-12.

EAST REGION

USC pulls of another rally to defeat SMU wasn’t us.” Ian Baker and Braxton Huggins each scored 19 points for New Mexico State (28-6). In the end, Baylor’s athletic ability, length and depth were too much for the Aggies to handle. Baylor blocked seven shots . “We beat a lot of teams this year that we weren’t supposed to beat, we beat a lot of teams that were flat-out better than us,” New Mexico State coach Paul Weir said. “We were trying to do it against one more team tonight, and we were trying to do that with what I think we showed for 20 minutes, which is a team that just plays really hard, a team that plays together.” It looked like Baylor might be headed for another disappointing early exit. Huggins hit a 3-pointer at the buzzer to give New Mexico State a 40-38 lead at the half. The Aggies made six of 14 3-pointers before the break to counter Baylor’s 55 percent shooting.

Trojans trail by 10 before coming back, will play Baylor next ASSOCIATED PRESS

For the second straight NCAA Tournament game, Southern California overcame a double-digit deficit in the second half to win. Elijah Stewart hit a late 3-pointer for No. 11 seed USC as the Trojans upset sixth-seeded Southern Methodist 66-65 on Friday in the first round of the NCAA Tournament in Tulsa, Okla. USC trailed SMU by 10 in the second half. The Trojans trailed Providence by 17 in the second half of their First Four game on Wednesday night before winning 75-71. Apparently, they don’t know how to quit. “We just had to keep fighting back,” Stewart said. “We’ve been in those positions before. So we’re kind of seasoned to it. And you just can’t stop. You just got to keep going.” Stewart had 22 points for the Trojans (26-9), including the game-deciding 3 with 37 seconds to play. “We ran the play previously before, and I was open,” Stewart said. “And then we had the media timeout. We discussed it. We ran the same play again, and I was open, and I just let muscle memory take place.” Bennie Boatright and Chimezie Metu each added 14 points for USC, which advanced to play third-seeded Baylor in the second round of the East region on Sunday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Southern California guard Elijah Stewart dunks in the second half of a irst-round game against SMU on Friday.

SMU’s Shake Milton missed a floater at the buzzer that would have won it for the Mustangs. Baylor 91, New Mexico State 73 • After two years of surprise early NCAA Tournament exits, Baylor finally broke through. Al Freeman came of the bench to score 21 points, and the thirdseeded Bears defeated No. 14 seed New Mexico State in Tulsa. Reserve forward Terry Maston scored 19 points, Jo Lual-Acuil scored 16 and Johnathan Motley added 15 points and 10 rebounds for Baylor (26-7), which sufered

upset losses to Georgia State and Yale in the first round the previous two years. The Bears advanced to play Southern California on Sunday. Motley said the previous losses served as motivation. “No one wants to leave the tournament early,” he said. “Our ultimate goal was to come in and just win it, so we want to just take every game for what it is and make sure we come in and just play our hardest, play desperate, because after this, you lose, you go home. So we knew one team was going home today, and we made sure it

Duke 87, Troy 65 • Grayson Allen had 21 points of five 3-pointers, Jayson Tatum had 18 points and 12 rebounds, and second-seeded Duke continued its perfect postseason with a victory over Troy in Greenville, S.C. The Blue Devils (29-7) became the first team to win four games on the way to the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament crown last week. They kept up that pace in blowing past the 15th-seeded Trojans (22-15). The Blue Devils improved to 34-7 all-time in openers and put this one out of reach early with their 3-point shooting. Jordon Varnado had 18 points to lead Troy, which made its first NCAA appearance since 2003.


03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

COLLEGE BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK Alford stays focused on UCLA, not Indiana UCLA coach Steve Alford says he’s focused on the NCAA Tournament, not the job opening at his alma mater Indiana. Alford played four seasons in Bloomington and led the Hoosiers to the 1987 NCAA title under coach Bobby Knight. His name was among the irst to come up when Indiana coach Tom Crean was ired Thursday. “That was 30 years ago,” Alford said at a news conference before his thirdseeded Bruins faced No. 14 seed Kent State on Friday night. “I was part of that. I stood on stage with a great group of guys and won a national championship. It’s my home state. I played there. So obviously, all that comes up.” He’s coached at Southwest Missouri State, Iowa and New Mexico before joining UCLA in 2013. “I love UCLA. I love Los Angeles,” he said. “You’re talking about arguably the greatest ‘brand’ anywhere on the planet, and we got things going at a very high level now and we’re very excited about it.” Northwestern takes on Gonzaga • Northwestern is playing with house money as it prepares to take on Gonzaga, the No. 1 seed in the West Region. The eighth-seeded Wildcats (24-11) advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the irst time and even won a game, beating Vanderbilt 68-66 on Thursday. Gonzaga (33-1), on the other hand, was expected to be in and expects to go much further. Northwestern will have to overcome Gonzaga’s signiicant size advantage. Gonzaga is prepared for the arena to feel like a road game after Northwestern fans took over Vivint Arena in Salt Lake City on Thursday. But Gonzaga features the one-two punch of point guard Nigel Williams-Goss and center Przemek Karnowski. Williams-Goss is a inalist for the Bob Cousy Point Guard of the Year award and is averaging 19 points per game in the last ive games. The 7-foot-1, 300-pound Karnowski averages 12.5 points and is an adept passer out of the post. Northwestern will need guards Bryant McIntosh and Scottie Lindsey to continue to lead, especially being at such a size disadvantage. McIntosh scored 25 in the opening-round victory and Lindsey added 14. N.C. State hires Keatts • North Carolina State has hired UNC Wilmington’s Kevin Keatts to take over as head basketball coach. The school announced Keatts’ hiring in a news release Friday night, one day after his Seahawks lost to Virginia in the irst round of the NCAA Tournament. Keatts is a former assistant to Rick Pitino at Louisville and two-time Colonial Athletic Association coach of the year who led UNC Wilmington to a 72-28 record and two NCAA Tournaments in three seasons there. The 44-year-old Keatts replaces Mark Gottfried, who was ired after the Wolfpack’s season. In a statement, Keatts said he has “incredible respect” for the program’s tradition and said there’s an “unbelievable commitment to basketball in Raleigh.” Samuels out at Florida A&M • Florida A&M University is searching for a new men’s basketball coach after deciding not to renew Byron Samuels’ contract. Athletics director Milton Overton said Friday that Lamont Franklin will serve as the interim coach while a search for Samuels’ replacement takes place. Samuels was 17-71 in three years, including 7-23 this season. He was hired from the University of Georgia, where he had served as the basketball operations coordinator. Florida A&M was eligible for postseason play this past season after being ineligible the past two years under Academic Progress Rate sanctions. Associated Press

NCAA TOURNAMENT

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

SOUTH REGION

Wichita State does it again Shockers post their customary win over a higher-seeded opponent FROM NEWS SERVICES

Wichita State’s accomplishments continue to exceed its résumé. It’s a March routine. The Shockers are a tournament darling again, the hero of all who enjoy taking shots at the NCAA selection committee. The 10th-seeded Shockers defeated seventh-seeded Dayton 6458 on Friday in Indianapolis. They are 7-3 against equal or higher seeds in the past five tournaments and won an NCAA tourney game for the fifth straight season. Wichita State (31-4) next plays Sunday, against No. 2 seed Kentucky. It will be a rematch of a scintillating second-round game in 2014 that the Wildcats won 78-76 in St. Louis. On Friday the Shockers won their 16th game in a row — the second-longest streak in school history — after rolling through the Missouri Valley Conference tournament two weeks earlier. But most of the teams in the Valley are far from the caliber of Dayton, which gave the Shockers a physical battle. “It was definitely something a little brand new to us from how we’ve seen in the Missouri Valley,” said Zach Brown, who made all three of his 3-point tries and scored 12 points for the Shockers. “We just grinded it out. It was a tough game.” And they were the tougher team. Dayton (24-8) came in with a wealth of experience, playing in its school-record fourth straight NCAA Tournament. The Flyers start three seniors and have five overall, with a lot of shared tournament moments. This one ranks at the bottom. The seventh-seeded Flyers were held to a season low in points and shot a season-low 31 percent from the field. They also got rebounded 48-29 and had eight shots swatted away. “Of course you’ve got to give them credit because they’re the ones defending, but I think it’s more about us,” said point guard Scoochie Smith, who had 25 points. “We just had to step up and make shots, and a lot of people on our team couldn’t get their shots to fall, couldn’t get a flow.” Brown’s 3-pointer put Wichita State up 51-45 with 5:38 left, the biggest lead by either team to that point, and Dayton never threatened again. Landry Shamet led the Shockers with 13 points. Shamet, fouled as the shot clock ticked down, made two of three foul shots for a 60-53 led with 36 seconds to play and the Shockers were on their way to another victory. “They’re a team that can beat anybody on a neutral court at any time,” Dayton coach Archie Miller

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wichita State’s Landry Shamet (top) shoots over Dayton’s Josh Cunningham in the irst half Friday night.

said. “And I wouldn’t be surprised if they weren’t pushing towards another second weekend. They’re a great team, and they’re really well coached, maybe as fun of a team to prepare for as we’ve had. “Actually, it was a lot of fun to be in the game playing against them because you kind of want to stack yourself up against sort of how they do things to see how your stuf works. We battled. We battled really hard. We were right there.” Kentucky 79, Northern Kentucky 70 • Bam Adebayo had 15 points and 18 rebounds to help the Wildcats win a closer-thanexpected game in Indianapolis. The second-seeded Wildcats (30-5) won their 12th straight and got their first-game jitters out of the way. The Norse (24-11) closed within 75-68 on Drew McDonald’s 3-pointer with 35 seconds left, but Malik Monk made four free throws to close it out.

North Carolina 103, Texas Southern 64 • Justin Jackson broke out of a shooting slump to score 21 points, helping top-seeded North Carolina romp in Greenville, S.C. He had 19 points by halftime, helping the Tar Heels (28-7) quickly eliminate any chance of an unprecedented upset by a No. 16 seed. Isaiah Hicks added 17 points for the Tar Heels, who play Arkansas on Sunday. Kevin Scott’s 19 points led the 16th-seeded Tigers (23-12). “North Carolina is just at a totally diferent level than where we are as a basketball team,” Texas Southern coach Mike Davis said. Arkansas 77, Seton Hall 71 • Jaylen Barford hit the go-ahead layup with 57.8 seconds left to help the Razorbacks prevail in Greenville. He had 12 of his 20 points after halftime for Arkansas (26-9), the No. 8 seed. That included his layup of Khadeen Carrington’s turnover at the other end, pushing Arkan-

sas ahead for good as the Razorbacks scored the game’s final seven points. The ninth-seeded Pirates finished at 21-12. Cincinnati 75, Kansas State 61 • Troy Caupain scored 23 points to spark the Bearcats in Sacramento, Calif. No. 6 seeds were 0-3 this year before the Bearcats (30-5) took the court, with Maryland, Creighton and Southern Methodist losing to No. 11 seeds. Troy Caupain scored 23 points for the Bearcats, who play No. 3 seed UCLA on Sunday. Wesley Iwundu’s 19 points led Kansas State (21-14). UCLA 97, Kent State 80 • TJ Leaf scored 23 points and the Bruins pulled away late to win in Sacramento. Lonzo Ball and Aaron Holiday each had 15 points for third-seeded UCLA (30-4). Jaylin Walker had 23 points for Kent State (22-14).

EAST REGION

USC pulls of another rally to defeat SMU Baylor’s athletic ability, length and depth were too much for the Aggies to handle. Baylor blocked seven shots .

Trojans trail by 10 before coming back, will play Baylor next

South Carolina 93, Marquette 73 • Sindarius Thornwell had 29 points and 11 rebounds to help seventh-seeded South Carolina win its first NCAA Tournament game in 44 years, a victory over Marquette to close first-round play in the East Region in Greenville, S.C. South Carolina last won a game in the NCAAs when it topped Southwestern Louisiana 90-85 in a regional consolation game on March 17, 1973. Exactly 44 years later, the drought — the Gamecocks were one-and-done in their next five appearances — finally came to an end in front of a boisterous, South Carolina crowd that traveled the two hours north from Columbia to witness the end of an ugly run they couldn’t have imagined would last this long.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

For the second straight NCAA Tournament game, Southern California overcame a double-digit deficit in the second half to win. Elijah Stewart hit a late 3-pointer for No. 11 seed USC as the Trojans upset sixth-seeded Southern Methodist 66-65 on Friday in the first round of the NCAA Tournament in Tulsa, Okla. USC trailed SMU by 10 in the second half. The Trojans trailed Providence by 17 in the second half of their First Four game on Wednesday night before winning 75-71. Apparently, they don’t know how to quit. “We just had to keep fighting back,” Stewart said. “We’ve been in those positions before. So we’re kind of seasoned to it. And you just can’t stop. You just got to keep going.” Stewart had 22 points for the Trojans (26-9), including the game-deciding 3 with 37 seconds to play. “We ran the play previously before, and I was open,” Stewart said. “And then we had the media timeout. We discussed it. We ran the same play again, and I was open, and I just let muscle memory take place.” Bennie Boatright and Chimezie Metu each added 14 points for USC, which advanced to play third-seeded Baylor in the second round of the East region on Sunday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Southern California guard Elijah Stewart dunks in the second half of a irst-round game against SMU on Friday.

Baylor 91, New Mexico State 73 • After two years of surprise early NCAA Tournament exits, Baylor finally broke through. Al Freeman came of the bench to score 21 points, and the thirdseeded Bears defeated No. 14 seed New Mexico State in Tulsa. Reserve forward Terry Maston scored 19 points, Jo Lual-Acuil scored 16 and Johnathan Motley added 15 points and 10 rebounds for Baylor (26-7), which sufered upset losses to Georgia State and Yale in the first round the previous two years. The Bears advanced to play Southern California on Sun-

day. Motley said the previous losses served as motivation. “No one wants to leave the tournament early,” he said. “Our ultimate goal was to come in and just win it, so we want to just take every game for what it is and make sure we come in and just play our hardest, play desperate, because after this, you lose, you go home. So we knew one team was going home today, and we made sure it wasn’t us.” Ian Baker and Braxton Huggins each scored 19 points for New Mexico State (28-6). In the end,

Duke 87, Troy 65 • Grayson Allen had 21 points of five 3-pointers, Jayson Tatum had 18 points and 12 rebounds, and second-seeded Duke continued its perfect postseason with a victory over Troy in Greenville. The Blue Devils (29-7) became the first team to win four games on the way to the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament crown last week. They kept up that pace in blowing past the 15th-seeded Trojans (22-15). The Blue Devils improved to 34-7 all-time in openers and put this one out of reach early with their 3-point shooting. Jordon Varnado had 18 points to lead Troy, which made its first NCAA appearance since 2003.


NCAA TOURNAMENT

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PLAY BRACKETBALL 2017 • STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS

1 Villanova

Villanova 16 M.St.Mary’s

32-3

Kansas

Saturday 1:40 p.m., KMOV (4)

9 Va. Tech

26-9

23-10

Iowa State

Saturday 7:40 p.m., TNT

25-8

Purdue

13 East Tenn. St. 65 6 SMU

New York Madison Square Garden

11 USC

Mar. 26

Mar. 25

Kansas City Sprint Center

26-9

91 26-7

Oregon

70 13

Creighton

72 6

Late

Michigan

NCAA BASKETBALL DIVISION I MEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP

19-12 Sunday

87 Duke

Oregon

93 3

Iona

77 14

Michigan

92 7

Okla. St.

91 10

28-8

Louisville

78 2

65

J'ville St.

63 15

25-11

Sunday

Louisville

25-8

SWEET 16 REGIONALS 2ND ROUND

2ND ROUND SWEET 16 REGIONALS

INDIANAPOLIS

GREENVILLE, S.C.

7 S. Carolina 22-10

1ST ROUND

Vermont

Thursday

Friday

15 Troy

80 4

30-5

73

2 Duke

Purdue

Rhode Island 84 11

Baylor

10 Marquette

73 12

Sunday

Sunday

14 N. Mexico St.

Nevada

Rhode Island 25-9

66

3 Baylor

84 5

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

USC

Iowa State

26-7

MIDWEST

EAST

65

78 9

Saturday 8:40 p.m., TBS

80 Florida

Michigan St.

24-10

71

4 Florida

58 8

MILWAUKEE

ORLANDO, FLA.

76

12 UNC Wilm.

Miami (Fla.)

Thursday

Friday

Virginia

62 16

Michigan St. 20-14

74

5 Virginia

UC Davis Sunday

84 Wisconsin

TULSA, OKLA.

29-4

56

8 Wisconsin

100 1

Kansas

76

TULSA, OKLA.

BUFFALO, N.Y.

M 1 • SATURDAY • 03.18.2017

1ST ROUND

SEMIFINALS 66 Gonzaga 16 S. Dakota St.

33-1

46

9 Vanderbilt

24-11

Arkansas

13 Bucknell 6 Maryland

71 9

Minnesota

72 5

Mid. Tenn.

81 12

Butler

76 4

Winthrop

64 13

Cincinnati

75 6

Kansas St.

61 11

Saturday 6:10 p.m., TBS

27-8

Butler

80

WEST

65

San Jose, Calif. SAP Center

24-8

SOUTH Mar. 25

Mar. 26

Memphis Fedex Forum

22-13

Cincinnati

30-5

76 Sunday

Saturday 5:10 p.m., TNT

3 Florida State

Seton Hall

Florida State 26-8 14 FGCU

Late

Kent State

80

10 VCU

29-4

Wichita St.

77 Saturday 6:45 p.m., KMOV (4)

2 Arizona

Dayton

58 7

Wichita St.

64 10

31-4

Sunday

100

Kentucky Arizona

31-4

15 N. Dakota

82

16 M.St.Mary’s

67 16 New Orleans

29-5 2

INDIANAPOLIS

SALT LAKE CITY

85 St. Mary’s

22-13 14

Friday

Thursday

7 St. Mary’s

29-4 3

UCLA

86

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

11 Xavier

77 8

31-4

86

Xavier ORLANDO

Mid. Tenn.

58

W. Virginia

Arkansas

MILWAUKEE

BUFFALO, N.Y.

60

Saturday 11:10 a.m., KMOV (4)

4 W. Virginia

64 16

Friday

Notre Dame 26-9 12 Princeton

Texas So.

26-9

66 Thursday

5 Notre Dame

103 1

28-7

Sunday

Monday, April 3, 8:20 p.m., KMOV (Ch. 4) University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale, Ariz.

68 N'western

N. Carolina

CHAMPIONSHIP

Saturday 4:15 p.m., KMOV (4)

8 N'western

N. Carolina

Saturday, April 1, 5:10 and 7:50 p.m., KMOV (Ch. 4)

GREENVILLE, S.C.

SALT LAKE CITY

1 Gonzaga

Late

No. Kentucky24-10 15

66

11 Kansas St.

95 11 Wake Forest

88

FIRST FOUR

16 N.C. Central

63 16 UC Davis

67

11 Providence

71 11 USC

75

DAYTON, OHIO

MIDWEST REGION

Rhode Island knocks of Creighton Top-seeded Kansas romps; Michigan stays on a roll by defeating Oklahoma State Juwan Evans scored 23 points to lead the 10th-seeded Cowboys (20-13), who finished the season with four consecutive losses. It looked like that streak might end Friday after Oklahoma State opened the second half on a 12-5 run to take a 52-46 lead. But Michigan charged back with a relentless 3-point barrage, taking a 62-61 lead on Walton’s 3 with 12:26 left making three more 3s in a 14-4 run that made it 76-68. The Cowboys never led again, though they closed to within two twice in the final eight seconds.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rhode Island coach Dan Hurley stole an occasional glance at his team’s raucous fans and realized just how much this NCAA Tournament means to his program, and to an entire state that loves its basketball. Back in the tournament for the first time in 18 years, these Rams are on a roll they hope lasts a little longer. Jeff Dowtin scored a career-high 23 points with a perfect day at the free-throw line, upstart Rhode Island answered every threat and the Rams ran right into the next round by stunning cold-shooting No. 6 seed Creighton 84-72 on Friday in an opener of the Midwest Region. “The emotion from them, it almost felt like 18 years’ worth of excitement, and they really inspired the guys,” Hurley said. Kuran Iverson scored 17 points and Hassan Martin had 12 points and eight rebounds as 11th-seeded Rhode Island (259) earned its ninth straight victory. The program won an NCAA Tournament game for the first time since advancing to the Elite Eight and losing to Stanford in 1998. Ronnie Harrell Jr. scored a career-high 15 points in Creighton’s 40 percent shooting day when little went right — like many missed layups. “Obviously we didn’t have our ‘A’ game, and to win today we were going to need that,” Creighton coach Greg McDermott said. Rhode Island hit the court for loose balls, crashed the boards with energy and found a way to withstand every spurt by the Bluejays (25-10). The Rams made a lot of free throws, too. E.C. Matthews coolly converted two chances from the line with 2:32 left and made all 10 of his free throws on his way to 16 points. Dowtin also hit all 10 from the line as URI went an impressive 28 of 31 on free throws in all. And what fun for all those blue-clad Rams fans who traveled cross-country from Kingston through a major Northeast snowstorm to the California capital of Sacramento to witness the program’s milestone moment. “Across the bench, it was amazing that they were there and we could see ’em and they were loud,” Hurley said. Kansas 100, UC Davis 62 • Frank Mason III scored 22 points and had eight assists as top-seeded Kansas won its opening game for an 11th straight year with a victory over UC Davis in Tulsa, Okla. Freshman Josh Jackson, making his

Oregon 93, Iona 77 • With star big man Chris Boucher cheering in a bulky knee brace from the sidelines, Tyler Dorsey scored 24 points to lead four players in double figures, and No. 3 seed Oregon beat 14th-seeded Iona in Sacramento. The Ducks (30-5) showed they have the depth to make a special March run, just as coach Dana Altman hoped this week when he challenged role players to make larger contributions in shot-blocker Boucher’s absence. Iona star Jordan Washington gave his team a huge scare when he went down hard under Oregon’s basket, screaming in pain and grabbing his lower left leg with 1:12 to go before halftime. But the senior forward returned to start the second half and finished with 22 points on 10-for-16 shooting and 11 rebounds in his final college game for the Gaels (22-13). Boucher was relegated to a cheerleading role for the Ducks, who shared the Pac12 regular-season crown with Arizona, then lost by three points to the Wildcats in the conference tournament final after Boucher tore his left ACL in the semifinals.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rhode Island guard Jef Dowtin drives against Creighton guard Isaiah Zierden during the first half of Friday’s game in Sacramento, Calif. Rhode Island won 84-72.

return after a one-game suspension for an accumulation of incidents, added 17 points on eight-of-12 shooting for the Jayhawks (29-5). The win ensures top seeds will remain perfect since the tournament expanded, with the schools now 132-0 against No. 16 seeds. Five players finished in double figures for Kansas, with Svi Mykhailiuk and Devonte’ Graham adding 16 points each and Landen Lucas 13. Chima Moneke scored 20 points to lead the 16th-seeded Aggies (23-13), who were

in their first NCAA Tournament. Brynton Lemar added 17 and Siler Schneider 10 in the loss. Michigan 92, Oklahoma State 91 • Derrick Walton Jr. scored 26 points and Michigan made 16 3-pointers to hold of Oklahoma State in the first round in Indianapolis. The seventh-seeded Wolverines (2511) set a school record for 3s in an NCAA Tournament game. They have won six straight — five since a frightening plane mishap on the way to last week’s Big Ten tournament.

Louisville 78, Jacksonville State 63 • Mangok Mathiang scored 18 points and Deng Adel added 16 to help second-seeded Louisville pull away from Jacksonville State in Indianapolis. The Cardinals (25-8) have won five straight opening games. Louisville was making its first postseason appearance since 2015 after sitting out last year because of a one-year, school-imposed postseason ban for recruiting violations. Norbertas Giga scored 30 points for 15th-seeded Jacksonville State (20-15), which was one of a record five teams making their first tourney appearance. After trailing for the first 13 minutes, Louisville took the lead with an 8-2 run late in the first half. The Cardinals opened the second half on 10-2 run to make it 48-33.


NCAA TOURNAMENT

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PLAY BRACKETBALL 2017 • STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS Kansas

76 Villanova

16 M.St.Mary’s

32-3

Kansas

56 Saturday 1:40 p.m., KMOV (4)

8 Wisconsin 9 Va. Tech

26-9

74

ORLANDO, FLA.

23-10

Iowa State

25-8

Purdue

13 East Tenn. St. 65

New York Madison Square Garden

USC 11 USC

Mar. 26

Mar. 25

Kansas City Sprint Center

26-9

91 26-7

Oregon

23-10

Michigan

NCAA BASKETBALL DIVISION I MEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP

73 87 28-8

65

1ST ROUND

70 13

Creighton

72 6

Oregon

93 3

Iona

77 14

Michigan

92 7

Okla. St.

91 10

Louisville

78 2

J'ville St.

63 15

25-11

Sunday 11:10 a.m., KMOV (4)

Louisville

25-8

SWEET 16 REGIONALS 2ND ROUND

2ND ROUND SWEET 16 REGIONALS

INDIANAPOLIS

GREENVILLE, S.C.

93

Duke 15 Troy

Vermont

Thursday

Sunday 7:40 p.m., TNT

2 Duke

80 4

30-5

73

S. Carolina 10 Marquette

Purdue

Sunday 6:10 p.m., TBS

Friday

7 S. Carolina

73 12

Rhode Island 84 11

66

Baylor 14 N. Mexico St.

Nevada

Rhode Island 25-9

Sunday 6:45 p.m., truTV

3 Baylor

84 5

26-7

MIDWEST

EAST

65

Iowa State

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

TULSA, OKLA.

6 SMU

78 9

Saturday 8:40 p.m., TBS

80 Florida

Michigan St.

24-10

71 Saturday 7:40 p.m., TNT

4 Florida

58 8

MILWAUKEE

12 UNC Wilm.

Miami (Fla.)

Thursday

76 Virginia

62 16

Michigan St. 20-14 Friday

5 Virginia

UC Davis Sunday 4:15 p.m., KMOV (4)

84 Wisconsin

100 1

29-4

TULSA, OKLA.

BUFFALO, N.Y.

1 Villanova

M 2 • SATURDAY • 03.18.2017

1ST ROUND

SEMIFINALS 66 Gonzaga 16 S. Dakota St.

33-1

46

9 Vanderbilt

24-11

Arkansas

13 Bucknell 6 Maryland

27-8

Butler

80

WEST

65

San Jose, Calif. SAP Center

Mar. 26

Memphis Fedex Forum

22-13

Cincinnati

UCLA

SALT LAKE CITY

29-4

Wichita St.

31-4

16 M.St.Mary’s

67 16 New Orleans

64 13

Cincinnati

75 6

Kansas St.

61 11

UCLA

97 3

Kent State

80 14

Dayton

58 7

Wichita St.

64 10

Kentucky

79 2

Sunday 1:40 p.m., KMOV (4)

100 82

Winthrop

31-4

77

15 N. Dakota

76 4

Friday

85

Arizona

Butler

30-4

80

Saturday 6:45 p.m., KMOV (4)

2 Arizona

81 12

Kentucky

30-5

INDIANAPOLIS

10 VCU

Mid. Tenn.

Sunday 8:40 p.m., TBS

86

St. Mary’s

72 5

30-5

76

Thursday

7 St. Mary’s

Minnesota

24-8

SOUTH Mar. 25

Florida State 26-8 14 FGCU

71 9

Saturday 6:10 p.m., TBS

Saturday 5:10 p.m., TNT

3 Florida State

Seton Hall

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

11 Xavier

77 8

31-4

86

Xavier ORLANDO

Mid. Tenn.

58

W. Virginia

Arkansas

MILWAUKEE

BUFFALO, N.Y.

60

Saturday 11:10 a.m., KMOV (4)

4 W. Virginia

64 16

Friday

Notre Dame 26-9 12 Princeton

Texas So.

26-9

66 Thursday

5 Notre Dame

103 1

28-7

Sunday 5:10 p.m., TNT

Monday, April 3, 8:20 p.m., KMOV (Ch. 4) University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale, Ariz.

68 N'western

N. Carolina

CHAMPIONSHIP

Saturday 4:15 p.m., KMOV (4)

8 N'western

N. Carolina

Saturday, April 1, 5:10 and 7:50 p.m., KMOV (Ch. 4)

GREENVILLE, S.C.

SALT LAKE CITY

1 Gonzaga

No. Kentucky 70 15

66

11 Kansas St.

95 11 Wake Forest

88

FIRST FOUR

16 N.C. Central

63 16 UC Davis

67

11 Providence

71 11 USC

75

DAYTON, OHIO

MIDWEST REGION

Rhode Island knocks of Creighton Top-seeded Kansas romps; Michigan stays on a roll by defeating Oklahoma State the 10th-seeded Cowboys (20-13), who finished the season with four consecutive losses. It looked like that streak might end Friday after Oklahoma State opened the second half on a 12-5 run to take a 52-46 lead. But Michigan charged back with a relentless 3-point barrage, taking a 62-61 lead on Walton’s 3 with 12:26 left making three more 3s in a 14-4 run that made it 76-68. The Cowboys never led again, though they closed to within two twice in the final eight seconds.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rhode Island coach Dan Hurley stole an occasional glance at his team’s raucous fans and realized just how much this NCAA Tournament means to his program, and to an entire state that loves its basketball. Back in the tournament for the first time in 18 years, these Rams are on a roll they hope lasts a little longer. Jeff Dowtin scored a career-high 23 points with a perfect day at the free-throw line, upstart Rhode Island answered every threat and the Rams ran right into the next round by stunning cold-shooting No. 6 seed Creighton 84-72 on Friday in an opener of the Midwest Region. “The emotion from them, it almost felt like 18 years’ worth of excitement, and they really inspired the guys,” Hurley said. Kuran Iverson scored 17 points and Hassan Martin had 12 points and eight rebounds as 11th-seeded Rhode Island (259) earned its ninth straight victory. The program won an NCAA Tournament game for the first time since advancing to the Elite Eight and losing to Stanford in 1998. Ronnie Harrell Jr. scored a career-high 15 points in Creighton’s 40 percent shooting day when little went right — like many missed layups. “Obviously we didn’t have our ‘A’ game, and to win today we were going to need that,” Creighton coach Greg McDermott said. Rhode Island hit the court for loose balls, crashed the boards with energy and found a way to withstand every spurt by the Bluejays (25-10). The Rams made a lot of free throws, too. E.C. Matthews coolly converted two chances from the line with 2:32 left and made all 10 of his free throws on his way to 16 points. Dowtin also hit all 10 from the line as URI went an impressive 28 of 31 on free throws in all. And what fun for all those blue-clad Rams fans who traveled cross-country from Kingston through a major Northeast snowstorm to the California capital of Sacramento to witness the program’s milestone moment. “Across the bench, it was amazing that they were there and we could see ’em and they were loud,” Hurley said. Kansas 100, UC Davis 62 • Frank Mason III scored 22 points and had eight assists as top-seeded Kansas won its opening game for an 11th straight year with a victory over UC Davis in Tulsa, Okla. Freshman Josh Jackson, making his

Oregon 93, Iona 77 • Tyler Dorsey scored 24 points to lead four players in double figures and No. 3 seed Oregon beat 14thseeded Iona in Sacramento. The Ducks (30-5) showed they have the depth to make a special March run, just as coach Dana Altman hoped this week when he challenged role players to make larger contributions after the team lost big man Chris Boucher to a torn ACL in the Pac-12 tournament. Iona star Jordan Washington went down screaming in pain and grabbing his lower left leg with 1:12 to go before halftime. But the senior forward returned to start the second half and finished with 22 points in his final game for the Gaels (22-13).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rhode Island guard Jef Dowtin drives against Creighton guard Isaiah Zierden during the first half of Friday’s game in Sacramento, Calif. Rhode Island won 84-72.

return after a one-game suspension for an accumulation of incidents, added 17 points on eight-of-12 shooting for the Jayhawks (29-5). The win ensures top seeds will remain perfect since the tournament expanded, with the schools now 132-0 against No. 16 seeds. Five players finished in double figures for Kansas, with Svi Mykhailiuk and Devonte’ Graham adding 16 points each and Landen Lucas 13. Chima Moneke scored 20 points to lead the 16th-seeded Aggies (23-13), who were

in their first NCAA Tournament. Brynton Lemar added 17 and Siler Schneider 10. Michigan 92, Oklahoma State 91 • Derrick Walton Jr. scored 26 points and Michigan made 16 3-pointers to hold of Oklahoma State in the first round in Indianapolis. The seventh-seeded Wolverines (2511) set a school record for 3s in an NCAA Tournament game. They have won six straight — five since a frightening plane mishap on the way to last week’s Big Ten tournament. Juwan Evans scored 23 points to lead

Louisville 78, Jacksonville State 63 • Mangok Mathiang scored 18 points and Deng Adel added 16 to help second-seeded Louisville pull away from Jacksonville State in Indianapolis. The Cardinals (25-8) have won five straight opening games. Louisville was making its first postseason appearance since 2015 after sitting out last year because of a one-year, school-imposed postseason ban for recruiting violations. Norbertas Giga scored 30 points for 15th-seeded Jacksonville State (20-15), which was one of a record five teams making their first tourney appearance. Michigan State 78, Miami 58 • Nick Ward scored 19 points to help Michigan State atone for last season’s early NCAA Tournament disappointment with a victory over Miami in Tulsa. The ninth-seeded Spartans (20-14) trailed by as many 12 points in the first half before blitzing past the stunned Hurricanes (21-12) the rest of the way, using a 20-2 first-half run to take control for good. Ja’Quan Newton scored 16 points to lead Miami, which had won at least one tournament game in each of its previous three trips.


SPORTS

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP

Kentucky avoids loss to Belmont scoring by missing two free throws with 53 seconds left, but Morris came through to help the Wildcats win their 10th straight tournament opener dating back to 1999.

Morris free throws lift fourth-seeded Wildcats to victory ASSOCIATED PRESS

Just when it seemed Kentucky’s veterans would have to carry the load against Belmont, Maci Morris stepped up to provide one of her strengths. The Wildcats’ sophomore guard wasn’t perfect from the foul line, but she was good enough to earn the Wildcats a tough victory. Morris made seven of eight free throws in the final 37 seconds, including two with 3.2 seconds remaining, to help fourthseeded Kentucky edge No. 13 Belmont 7370 on Friday in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament in Lexington, Ky. “Free-throw wise, I didn’t want to miss,” said Morris, a perimeter threat who also leads Kentucky at the line (88 percent). “In the past I have missed some big free throws. I didn’t want to miss. (Makayla) Epps told me after I missed one that I would make the next two.” Wildcats seniors Epps and Evelyn Akhator did their parts before that to get Kentucky (22-10) ahead with 52 combined points that were needed to hold off the determined Bruins. Belmont (27-6) got within 69-68 on two Sally McCabe free throws with 13 seconds remaining. Morris had already made three of four at the line by then and sealed the victory with four more in the final seconds for 15 points and an edge that proved critical

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kentucky’s Evelyn Akhator (left) is pressured by Belmont’s Lauren Thompson during their irst-round game Friday in Lexington, Ky. The Wildcats won 73-70.

against Belmont’s last chance to tie. Darby Maggard was defended well and shot an off-balance 3 that missed as the horn sounded to end Belmont’s schoolrecord 21-game winning streak. “That was fun,” said coach Cameron Newbauer, whose team shot 46 percent. “Unfortunately, not the outcome we wanted but that was incredible to watch what our team just did. Kentucky is a great team.” Epps scored 30 with a career-high five 3-pointers while Akhator added 22. Epps lost a chance to reach a season high in

Oregon State 56, Long Beach State 55 • Breanna Brown scored 12 points and second-seeded Oregon State held off feisty No. 15 seed Long Beach State in the final minute to eke out a victory in Corvallis, Ore. Mikayla Pivec and Marie Gulich each added 10 points for Oregon State (30-4), which was also seeded second last season when it made a run to the Final Four. Raven Benton had 17 points for Long Beach State (23-11), which was trying to become the first 15 seed to ever win a game in the tournament. The 49ers took over the lead on Jessica Gertz’s 3-pointer with 2:48 left, but Sydney Wiese hit two free throws to put Oregon State back in front 56-55 with 1:07 to go. Long Beach State tried to manage the clock, but Benton missed a long jumper with 5 seconds left and Anna Kim’s 3-pointer at the buzzer bounced off the backboard and missed. South Carolina 90, UNC Asheville 50 • Allisha Gray scored 22 points and had 12 rebounds to lead top-seeded South Carolina to a win over No. 16 seed UNC Asheville in Columbia, S.C. The Gamecocks (28-4) were missing Alania Coates, their best rebounder and half of their twin-tower frontcourt. But Gray, a 6-foot guard and transfer from North Carolina, scored 20 of her points in the lane and tied her best rebounding night of her career with eight by halftime.

A’ja Wilson added 18 points in a game where she was expected to shoulder the burden of replacing Coates’ 10.7 rebounds a game. Coates will miss the rest of the NCAA Tournament with an ankle injury. Khalia Webb led UNC Asheville (19-15) with 12 points, while Chatori Major added 10 points before fouling out of the final game of her career. Mississippi State 110, Troy 69 • Blair Schaefer scored a career-high 21 points, Ameshya Williams added 15 and Mississippi State beat Troy in Starkville, Miss. Mississippi State (30-4) used a 29-6 run in the second quarter to erase any doubt about the outcome. Troy (22-11) was led by Claresa Banks, who scored 15 points. The 15th-seeded Trojans shot just 25 of 80 (31.3 percent) from the field. Florida State 87, Western Illinois 66 • Shakayla Thomas scored 23 points and third-seeded Florida State beat No. 14 Western Illinois in Tallahassee, Fla. Thomas, picked by coaches as Atlantic Coast Conference player of the year, had 10 points in the third quarter as the Seminoles broke open a close game. Florida State (26-6) led 36-34 at halftime but went on a 14-5 run at the beginning of the third quarter to take control. Thomas also had 14 rebounds. Chatrice White came off the bench to score 19 points and grab 14 rebounds while Imani Wright scored 14. Taylor Higginbotham had 20 points for Western Illinois (26-7) and Morgan Blumer had 12. The Leathernecks led for most of the first half.

Missouri 66, South Florida 64 FG FT Reb South Florida Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Henshaw 33 2-3 1-2 1-3 1 3 5 Jespersen 40 2-10 5-6 9-17 1 3 9 Laksa 39 6-18 5-7 0-1 0 4 19 Pujol 40 6-12 5-7 2-5 1 4 20 Flores 40 4-9 0-0 0-4 8 3 11 Nagy 8 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 20-53 16-22 14-33 11 17 64 Percentages: FG.377, FT.727. 3-point goals: 8-17, .471 Blocked shots: 2 Turnovers: 11 Steals: 5 Technical fouls: 1 FG FT Reb Missouri Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Porter 28 5-10 0-0 5-12 2 5 11 Cunningham 39 3-7 6-7 1-4 3 4 12 Cunningham 39 4-9 1-2 0-3 1 2 13 Michaelis 30 7-14 0-0 4-9 2 3 16 Smith 24 4-11 1-1 2-2 1 0 9 McDowell 7 0-1 0-0 0-3 0 0 0 Schuchts 5 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 0 Chavis 8 1-3 2-2 0-1 0 3 5 Doty 20 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 3 0 Totals 200 24-55 10-12 13-36 10 21 66 Percentages: FG.436, FT.833. 3-point goals: 8-24, .333 Blocked shots: 5 Turnovers: 14 Steals: 3 Technical fouls: None. South Florida 19 19 8 18 — 64 Missouri 14 11 18 23 — 66 A: 0. Officials: Mark Zentz, Laura Morris, Jeffrey Smith.

Missouri advances to the second round MIZZOU • FROM B1

Cierra Porter scored 11. “This year, I think it’s been three times that’s kind of happened,” Sophie Cunningham said. “We’re tied or we need a big stop or we need a bucket. I think we were excited because we knew we had possession, but there was a calm factor because we’ve been there. “We all have faith in every player and Sierra was the one who got it done tonight.” Michaelis’ buzzer beater was needed after USF guard Kitija Laksa hit a gametying 3-pointer with 3.3 seconds remaining. That shot tied the game after Sophie Cunningham split a pair of free throws to give Missouri a 3-point advantage. Mizzou head coach Robin Pingeton said she was proud of the team’s grittiness and toughness. In front of a small crowd of about 50 Missouri fans — most of whom were standing throughout the game – the Tigers withstood every punch the Bulls threw. “We bent, but we didn’t break,” she said. “The message came at halftime, just the sense of urgency we needed to play with.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri forward Cierra Porter (4) and the bench erupt after Porter hit a 3-point shot late in the second half against South Florida.

I felt like Sierra was going to have a good game tonight. She has the ability to hit tough, contested jumpers.” USF coach Jose Fernandez said the third quarter was the difference in the game. The Tigers outscored the Bulls 18-8 in the third, opening the quarter on a 7-0 run. “Those shots started to fall and they crawled back into the game,” he said. “I told our guys the first five minutes of the third quarter were going to be crucial. Well, we didn’t score in those first five minutes.”

South Florida looked dominant in the first half, shooting 44 percent from the field and hitting six of 12 shots from beyond the arc en route to a 38-25 advantage. The Tigers were the opposite, shooting just 37.5 percent from the field and getting outrebounded 20-12. The Tigers surged out to a 9-0 lead in the first quarter, but USF’s ofense started clicking thanks to Ariandna Pujol, who scored five quick points to start a 12-0 USF run. Mizzou went three minutes without a basket, and the Bulls ended the first quar-

ter up 19-14. Things got tougher in the second quarter for Mizzou. The Bulls outscored Mizzou 19-11 and finished the quarter by hitting their final six shots to build a 38-25 lead. Pujol was the star of the half with 16 points on five-of-10 shooting. Pujol led all scorers with 20 points and was three of five from 3-point range. Next, the Tigers (22-10) play Florida State, which beat Western Illinois in the first round.

MOTOR SPORTS

Logano wins pole after a meeting with Kyle Busch ASSOCIATED PRESS

AVONDALE, ARIZ. • Joey

Logano capped a day in the spotlight with a fast late lap Friday to claim the pole for the NASCAR Camping World 500. With the temperature in the low 90s and the sun beginning to set, Ryan

Blaney qualified second to give Ford the top two spots to start Sunday’s race. Logano and Blaney bumped Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s Chevrolet out of the top spot he had held through most of the final five-minute qualifying round. The day began for Lo-

gano with a meeting with Kyle Busch and NASCAR officials about the crash and subsequent scule late in last Sunday’s race in Las Vegas. Logano won with a top speed of 137.321 mph on the Phoenix International Raceway track made slick by the heat.

Busch qualified ninth. Drivers waited as late as possible in all three rounds to hope for slightly cooler weather to boost their speed. But all were prepared for a long, hot day on Sunday, when the high is predicted to hit 96 degrees. Logano won his 18th

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career pole but first in 17 races in Phoenix. He won the Can-Am Sprint Cup Series race on the same track last Nov. 13, the nextto-last race of the season. Logano and Busch were summoned to a 15-minute session Friday with NASCAR officials as everyone involved tried to put the pit road brawl to bed. Busch attempted to turn the attention to this weekend’s racing at Phoenix, saying almost nothing as he emerged from the meeting. He answered every question by repeating, “Everything’s great.” Logano initiated a phone conversation with Busch on Tuesday. He said after Friday’s meeting it was good to sit with his former teammate and explain the on-track incident at Las Vegas was “an honest mistake.” Are the two OK? “I guess time will tell. We’ll see,” Logano said.

NASCAR CUP SERIES Phoenix lineup Friday’s qualifying; race Sunday | Phoenix 1. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 137.321 mph. 2. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 136.877 mph. 3. (88) D. Earnhardt Jr., Chev., 136.783 mph. 4. (42) Kyle Larson, Chev., 136.654 mph. 5. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chev., 136.302 mph. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 136.193 mph. 7. (24) Chase Elliott, Chev., 136.152 mph. 8. (77) Erik Jones, Toyota, 136.137 mph. 9. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.926 mph. 10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chev., 135.859 mph. 11. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 135.839 mph. 12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 135.695 mph. 13. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 135.731 mph. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chev., 135.624 mph. 15. (13) Ty Dillon, Chev., 135.603 mph. 16. (78) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 135.532 mph. 17. (3) Austin Dillon, Chev., 135.405 mph. 18. (27) Paul Menard, Chev., 135.349 mph. 19. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 135.166 mph. 20. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chev., 135.019 mph. 21. (17) R.Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 134.973 mph. 22. (31) Ryan Newman, Chev., 134.821 mph. 23. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 134.469 mph. 24. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 134.394 mph. 25. (95) M. McDowell, Chev., 133.889 mph. 26. (10) Danica Patrick, Ford, 133.789 mph. 27. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 133.764 mph. 28. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 133.467 mph. 29. (34) Landon Cassill, Ford, 133.309 mph. 30. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 133.195 mph. 31. (83) Corey LaJoie, Toyota, 133.062 mph. 32. (72) Cole Whitt, Chev., 133.033 mph. 33. (37) Chris Buescher, Chev., 133.013 mph. 34. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 132.935 mph. 35. (15) Reed Sorenson, Chev., 132.052 mph. 36. (23) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 131.488 mph. 37. (55) Derrike Cope, Chev., 129.218 mph. 38. (33) J. Earnhardt, Chev., 128.032 mph. 39. (51) Timmy Hill, Chev., 126.596 mph.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

BASKETBALL • MISSOURI CHAMPIONSHIPS CLASS 5 BOYS SEMIFINAL • WEBSTER GROVES 58, KICKAPOO 57

MARCHING ON

CLASS 5 BOYS SEMIFINAL • LEE’S SUMMIT WEST 74, CHAMINADE 69

Title defense ends for Red Devils with loss in semiinals BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA,

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Webster Groves’ Isaiah Ford celebrates with fans Friday as he and his Statesmen teammates exit the Mizzou Arena court after beating Kickapoo 58-57 in a Missouri Class 5 boys basketball semiinal.

Ramey’s 3-point play lifts Statesmen into championship game BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, MO. • Courtney Ramey

promised the moment would not be too big for him this weekend. He kept that promise Friday. The star junior point guard for the Webster Groves boys basketball team, Ramey scored a runner and hit the ensuing free throw with seven seconds to play to lift Webster Groves to a heart-stopping 58-57 victory over Kickapoo in a Class 5 semifinal at Mizzou Arena. The No. 2 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Webster Groves (28-2) advanced to play Lee’s Summit West (26-2) in the championship game at 6:20 p.m. Saturday. The Statesmen have won 22 consecutive games. Kickapoo (25-5) plays Chaminade (26-6) at 11 a.m. in the consolation game. It’s a rematch of last year’s state final. Lee’s Summit West is in a state final for the first time. Webster Groves makes its fourth championship game and first since it won it all in 2008. It only gets to do so because Ramey earned a new nickname. “Mr. Clutch,” Webster Groves coach Jay Blossom said. The 6-foot-4 Louisville recruit had his hand in everything as Webster Groves withstood one Kickapoo haymaker after another. Ramey scored 25 points, had four rebounds, three assists and three steals. He knocked down a 3-pointer just before the third quarter ended that tied the game at 45. He made a steal that led to a transition dunk by Carte’Are Gordon that gave Webster Groves a 53-51 lead with 1 minute and 35 seconds to play. Ramey even felt at fault for letting the Chiefs pull ahead in the last half minute. Kickapoo senior guard Cameron Davis burned the house down in the second half from long range. He hit 4-of-6 from 3-point land, including a pair in the last minute. Davis’ last long-distance bucket gave the Chiefs a 57-55 lead with 18 seconds to play. He did so with Ramey checking him. “I went underneath the screen, which I wasn’t supposed to do, and he hit the shot,” Ramey said. “So I knew I had to make up for it.” Kickapoo’s defense didn’t make

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Webster Groves’ Courtney Ramey (13) shoots over Kickapoo’s Jared Ridder (34) in a Missouri Class 5 boys basketball semiinal Friday at Mizzou Arena.

it easy. The Chiefs double-teamed Gordon at every opportunity. Gordon still managed 18 points, 10 rebounds and three blocks. But Kickapoo locked up the rest of the Statesmen. Senior forward Isaiah Ford had five points and five rebounds. Senior guard Cam Potts had three points. Senior guard Kevin Butler had four points on a pair of putbacks. The 5-foot-8 Butler grabbed six rebounds. Senior guard Donovan Daniels scored three points and grabbed five rebounds. “Those other kids are great players,” Kickapoo coach Dick Rippee said. “Sometimes you have pick your poison when you go against great teams, and they’re a great team.” The state runner-up last season, Kickapoo trailed by as many as eight in the first half. Webster Groves led 26-22 at halftime. Kickapoo’s star senior forward and Xavier signee Jared Ridder was sensational in the second half. The 6-foot-7 Ridder scored 24 points and grabbed eight rebounds. He gave his team its first lead of the second half when he went on personal 8-0 run late in the third quarter. Ridder gave the Chiefs a 38-36 edge with 1:28 to play in the third and set of an incredible back-and-forth. Ford answered on the next possession with a 3-pointer from the left wing to make it 39-38. Then it was Davis who knocked down a 3-pointer to put the Chiefs ahead, 41-39. Ramey converted a

3-point play, 42-41. Ridder canned a 3-pointer and was fouled. He hit the free throw, 45-42. Ramey had the last shot and the last word. He buried his only 3-pointer of the game to make it 45all headed into the final frame. It was an incredible 90 seconds that showcased the quality of both programs. “We’ve all seen some teams that are really, really good but the bigtime players don’t play as well as they’re capable,” Rippee said. “That was not the case tonight.” As has been the case since he made his debut with Webster Groves on Jan. 25, there were no answers for Gordon. The 6-foot-9 and 255-pound St. Louis U. recruit hit 6 of 8 field goals and 6 of 7 free throws. He swatted away Kickapoo senior guard Isaac Blakesiee’s 3-pointer in the corner just before the final horn to seal the victory. “It’s been a great ride, but we have one more to go,” Gordon said. “I’m excited for it.” Kickapoo spent the season charging back to the state championship game. A season after battling Chaminade into the final moments, the Chiefs were mere seconds from making a return trip. It wasn’t meant to be. “They made some runs and our guys always had an answer,” Rippee said. “They had one more answer than we did.”

MO.

Chaminade’s shovel wasn’t big enough. The Lee’s Summit West boys basketball team used a 23-2 run in the first half to bury Chaminade and then held of its late rally to score a 74-69 victory in a Class 5 semifinal Friday at Mizzou Arena. Lee’s Summit West (262) advanced to play Webster Groves (28-2) for the state championship at 6:20 p.m. Saturday. The No. 4 large school in the STLhighschoolsports. com rankings, Chaminade (24-6) plays Kickapoo (255) at 11 a.m. in the consolation game. It’s a rematch of last year’s state championship. The Red Devils’ reign as champion ended two days shy of a year and two games short of a repeat. Chaminade was undone by Lee’s Summit West’s eyepopping offensive explosion. Chaminade led 7-4 with 4 minutes and 15 seconds to play in the first quarter. Over the next seven-plus minutes Lee’s Summit West carved up the Red Devils. The Titans got to the rim, cashed in their midrange shots and knocked down their 3-pointers. Before the Red Devils knew which was was up, the Titans’ lead ballooned to 3311 with 4:52 in the first half. “I thought in the first half we were able to attack their press, move the basketball and get it to the middle of the floor and attack them,” Lee’s Summit West coach Michael Schieber said. Senior forward Elijah Childs made a monster impact despite playing with two fouls. A 6-foot-8 forward who’s signed with Bradley, Childs picked up his second with 3:51 in the first. Instead of sitting Childs, Schieber let him run in the second quarter and he scored eight points. He finished with 24 points and 11 rebounds. Junior forward Christian Bishop went for 17 points, 10 rebounds, four assists, three steals and blocked four shots. Senior guard CJ May got his licks in, too. He scored 15 points and hit three 3-pointers, including one just before the first-quarter buzzer. May had one field goal in the second half. Lee’s Summit West led 39-22 at halftime. Chaminade coach Frank Bennett had some things he wanted to see after the break. “Defensively taking the fight to them. There were times in the first half we were a little bit passive,” Bennett said. “(We were) just kind of out there and

allowing them to do what they’re good at and at this point in the year that’s not a good thing.” Chaminade’s comeback attempt had its fits and starts. Nothing came easy for the Red Devils. Shots that fell all season found iron and rattled out. Layups, putbacks, point-blank chances just would not go down. Chaminade kept plugging away. “Despite the score not once did I doubt my guys and that we wouldn’t fight back and cut the deficit,” senior guard Reggie Crawford said. “We just kept fighting. I’m proud of my guys. They have the most heart.” Junior forward Jericole Hellems scored a layup at the end of the third quarter to cut the lead to 5141. Crawford and junior point guard Jadis White hit back-to-back 3-pointers to bring the Red Devils within 57-52 with 5:31 to play. Hellems converted a 3-point play with 54 seconds that made it 68-67. Lee’s Summit West senior guard Hayden Diebold hit one of two free throws to give the Titans a 69-67 lead with 38 seconds. On the ensuing play Hellems and Davis tried to work a give and go on the right wing. Lee’s Summit West junior guard Phil Brooks slipped between them and stole the pass. He was fouled, hit both free throws and all but sealed Lee’s Summit West’s victory with 21 seconds to go. The 5-foot-9 Brooks scored seven points and had one steal but every little contribution mattered, especially as Chaminade’s momentum grew. “You don’t have to score to impact the game. There are so many opportunities to be huge,” Schieber said. “Everybody likes to look at the guys who score but Phil was big tonight. He was big defensively.” Hellems led the Red Devils with 27 points, 13 rebounds and four steals. Crawford scored six points and had four rebounds. Junior forward Karrington Davis scored 21 points and grabbed eight ofensive rebounds. It was Davis who kept the Red Devils around in the first half when no one else could score. As a team Chaminade had 24 offensive rebounds as it doubled up Lee’s Summit West. “You have to find a way to score somehow,” Bennett said. “It’s one of those nights you have to go to the glass. You have to scrounge, scrap, fight, claw do everything you have to do to get back in the game. I’m proud of every one of our guys for giving it their all tonight.”

CLASS 5 GIRLS SEMIFINAL • LEE’S SUMMIT 48, ST. JOSEPH’S 44

Angels stay close but can’t get over hump against Tigers BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, MO. • St. Joseph’s appeared to play uphill during its entire Class 5 girls basketball state semifinal Friday against Lee’s Summit. The Angels couldn’t quite reach the top of their climb, falling 48-44 to the Tigers at Mizzou Arena. Angels coach Julie Matheny credited Lee’s Summit (16-13) for doing what it has done throughout its postseason run. “They are sneaky fast and they have that shortstop mentality,” Matheny said. “They bait you into thinking you can make that pass and then they take it away from you.” The Tigers, who hadn’t

reached the semifinals since 2005, advanced to play in the Class 5 championship game at 8:10 p.m. Saturday against Kirkwood (27-3). St. Joseph’s (20-9, No. 6 in the STLhighschoolsports.com large-schools rankings), which will play for third at 12:50 p.m. Saturday against Rock Bridge (25-6), led Lee’s Summit for only 2 minutes and 24 seconds. The Tigers made it increasingly diicult for the Angels to get the ball inside to 6-foot-3 senior Kelly McLaughlin and 6-2 junior Alex Kerr. “They were huge and the game plan was to stop their post down low,” Lee’s Summit coach Jessica Crawford said.

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

St. Joseph’s Kelly McLaughlin (54) puts up a shot Friday against Brooke Benton (55) of Lee’s Summit at Mizzou Arena in a Missouri Class 5 girls basketball state semiinal.

“We also wanted to be patient but push when we could on offense to wear them down.”

Lee’s Summit outrebounded the taller Angels 33-28. Senior guard Paige

Elston led Lee’s Summit with 21 points while junior guard Claire Lock added 15. “We knew we wanted to stay tight on defense all game and that we can’t let up,” Elston said. “We did give up the lead but there was no doubt. They got the lead for a little bit but there was no doubt. We knew we were going to come back and we did.” Kerr led the Angels with 15 points while McLaughlin added 12 as St. Joseph’s made 34.1 percent of its field goals. St. Joseph’s was seeking its seventh state championship, with the most recent coming in 2004. “You’d make one little misstep and they were right there,” McLaughlin said. “They would capital-

ize on everything.” The lone prolonged bright spot for the Angels came in the third quarter as a run of 10 consecutive points turned a 26-19 Lee’s Summit lead into a 29-26 St. Joseph’s edge. That was short-lived, however. Lee’s Summit is shooting for its third championship to go along with titles from 1978 and 1990. “Our quote at the beginning of the year was, ‘Start unknown and finish unforgettable,’ ” Crawford said. “We lived up to that. We haven’t been a stateranked team, obviously. These girls, when it came to district time, there has just been a totally different look in their eyes. They have decided they are going to do whatever it takes.”


03.18.2017 • SaTurday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

BASKETBALL • MISSOURI CHAMPIONSHIPS GIRLS CLASS 5 SEMIFINAL • KIRKWOOD 60, ROCK BRIDGE 56 (2OT)

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Kirkwood’s Natalie Bruns celebrates with teammates after a double-overtime victory against Rock Bridge in a Class 5 girls basketball state semiinal Friday at Mizzou Arena.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

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1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

DOUBLE THE PLEASURE Pioneers survive against Bruins to make return to state title game BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, MO. • Kirkwood High freshman forward Natalie Bruns didn’t look much like a freshman on Friday night. B r u n s h i t a h u ge 3-pointer in the first overtime and then came up big in the second extra session as well to help Kirkwood outlast Rock Bridge 60-56 in a Class 5 semifinal contest at Mizzou Arena. The Pioneers (27-3) will take on Lee’s Summit (1613) in the state championship game at 8:10 p.m. on Saturday. “I was in shock,” said Bruns of her 3-pointer at the end of the first overtime. “Being the freshman, I didn’t expect to make that shot. I just knew I had to get back and play defense.” Bruns was even bigger, perhaps, in the final seconds of the second OT. With Kirkwood up two, senior forward Lauryn Miller missed a pair of free throws with five seconds left only to have Bruns

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Webster Groves’ Isabel Burke (6) leaps over the back of Union’s Karlie Peth to head the ball during a girls soccer game Friday at Webster Groves’ Selma Field.

SOCCER • SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Kirkwood’s Jayla Everett (4) tries to control the ball Friday against Rock Bridge in the Class 5 girls basketball state semiinal at Mizzou Arena.

shoot through the lane and pick up the loose ball. She got fouled and made both free throws to ice the win. “I think they thought she was going to make them,” Bruns said. “I had to keep playing. I just wanted

to give it everything to try and get to the ball.” The game was tied at 44 after four quarters and 50 at the end of the first overtime. Bruns’ hit a triple with 1 minute, 9 seconds left in the initial overtime.

“Our little freshman, who I will say, I’m pretty hard on all the time, came through,” Kirkwood coach Monica Tritz said. “I am hard on her because, quite honestly, I forget she’s a freshman.”

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARD MISSOURI BOYS At Mizzou Arena CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Lee’s Summit West 74, Chaminade 69 Webster Groves 58, Kickapoo 57 Saturday’s games Third place Chaminade (24-6) vs. Kickapoo (25-5), 11 a.m. Championship Lee’s Summit West (26-2) vs. Webster Groves (28-2), 6:20 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Semiinals, Thursday Vashon 58, Kearney 42 Bolivar 63, Parkway Central 41 Third place, Friday Kearney 50, Parkway Central 40 Championship, Saturday Vashon (26-3) vs. Bolivar (27-4), 2:40 p.m.

ILLINOIS BOYS CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT At Carver Arena, Peoria Semiinals, Friday Whitney Young 53, Fremd 47 Simeon 60, Bolingbrook 50 Saturday’s games

Third place Fremd (30-1) vs. Bolingbrook (29-2), 5:30 p.m. Championship Whitney Young (26-5) vs. Simeon (29-3), 7:15 p.m. CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT At Carver Arena, Peoria Semiinals, Friday Fenwick 67, Bloomington 52 Morgan Park 60, Lanphier 53 Saturday’s games Third place Bloomington (26-5) vs. Lanphier (28-4), 11 a.m. Championship Fenwick (30-4) vs. Morgan Park (25-6), 12:45 p.m.

MISSOURI GIRLS At Mizzou Arena CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Lee’s Summit 48, St. Joseph’s 44 Kirkwood 60, Rock Bridge 56 (2OT) Saturday’s games Third place St. Joseph’s (20-9) vs. Rock Bridge (25-6), 12:50 p.m.

Championship Lee’s Summit (16-13) vs. Kirkwood (27-3), 8:10 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Thursday’s semiinals St. Pius X-KC 59, Dexter 34 Incarnate Word 47, Carl Junction 24 Third place, Friday Dexter 47, Carl Junction 38 Championship, Saturday Incarnate Word (27-4) vs. St. Pius X-Kansas City (26-3), 4:30 p.m.

5, Butler 4, Daniels 3, Potts 3. FG 20 (3), FT 15-20. CLASS 4 THIRD-PLACE GAME Parkway Central 8 6 7 19 40 Kearney 10 16 6 18 50 PC (22-10): Campbell 16, Green 9, Silvestri 8, Harris 4, Ntimba 2. FG 15 (3), FT 7-15. K (22-8): C. Ritz 20, D. Ritz 11, Pritzel 7, Frizzell 5, Hofman 5, Doan 2. FG 15 (3), FT 17-21.

FRIDAY’S BOX SCORES

GIRLS CLASS 5 SEMIFINALS Lee’s Summit 10 12 14 12 48 St. Joseph’s 7 12 14 11 44 LS (16-13): Elston 21, Lock 15, Burch 7, May 5. FG 14 (3), FT 17-22. SJ (20-9): Kerr 15, McLaughlin 12, LaBelle 6, Pudlowski 6, Stock 3, Lally 2. FG 15 (2), FT 12-13. Rock Bridge 13 13 7 11 56 Kirkwood 7 11 16 10 60 RB: Klucking 20, McCallister 12, Treece 12, Brown 10, Peterson 2. FG 19 (5), FT 13-16. K (27-3): Miller 18, Wallace 14, Bruns 10, Everett 10, Bracy 8. FG 21 (9), FT 9-16.

BOYS CLASS 5 SEMIFINALS Lee’s Summit 20 19 12 23 74 Chaminade 9 13 19 28 69 LSW (26-2): Childs 24, Bishop 17, May 15, Brooks 7, Goodrich 6, Doolin 4. FG 24 (4), FT 22-31. C (24-6): Hellems 27, Davis 21, Crawford 6, White 6, Vrucinic 5, Batchman 2, Gladson 2. FG 27 (5), FT 10-19. Kickapoo 14 8 23 12 57 Webster Groves 17 9 19 13 58 K (25-5): Ridder 24, Davis 21, Blakeslee 8, Closser 2, Vokolek 2. FG 21 (9), FT 6-8. WG (28-2): Ramey 25, Gordon 18, Ford

METRO CUP — Edwardsville Bracket Seventh place Alton Marquette vs. Waterloo at Edwardsville, noon Saturday Consolation final Belleville East vs. Springfield at Edwardsville, 2 p.m. Saturday Third place Rochester at Belleville West, 4 p.m. Saturday Championship Triad at Edwardsville vs. Triad, 10 a.m. Saturday — Columbia Bracket Championship semifinals At Columbia Althoff 2, O’Fallon 0 Alton 2, Columbia 1 Guaranteed games Highland 1, Wesclin 0 Marion 2, Wesclin 1 (OT)

Gibault 1, Mater Dei 0 Saturday’s games At Columbia Guaranateed game Marion vs. Highland at Columbia, noon Saturday Consolation final Mascoutah vs. Freeburg, 2 p.m. Third place O’Fallon vs. Columbia, 4 p.m. Championship Althoff vs. Alton, 6 p.m. ROLLA CLASSIC (Round robin) Borgia vs Springfield Catholic, 10 a.m. Saturday Northwest Cedar Hill vs Rolla, 10 a.m. Saturday

BASEBALL • TOURNAMENTS METRO EAST KICKOFF CLASSIC Saturday Marquette vs Plainfield South at Blazier Field, 9 a.m. Oak Forest vs Niles Notre Dame at GCS Ballpark, 9 a.m. SLUH vs Harrisburg at GCS Ballpark, 11 a.m. Normal Community West vs Niles Notre Dame at Blazier Field, 2 p.m. Marquette vs Moline at GCS Ballpark, 2 p.m. Oak Forest vs Normal Community West at Blazier Field, 4 p.m. Joliet Catholic vs O’Fallon at GCS Ballpark, 4 p.m. 47TH LINDBERGH-MEHLVILLE TOURNAMENT Pool A St. Mary’s at Lindbergh, 1 p.m. Saturday Webster Groves at Vianney, 1 p.m. Saturday Pool B Pattonville at Mehlville, 3 p.m. Saturday Hazelwood West at Oakville, 1 p.m. Saturday TROY BASEBALL CLASSIC Pool A Francis Howell North at Francis Howell, 9 a.m. Saturday Hillsboro vs Howell North at Francis Howell, 11:30 a.m. Saturday Fort Zumwalt North at Francis Howell, 2 p.m. Saturday Hillsboro vs Fort Zumwalt North at Francis Howell, 4:30 p.m. Saturday Pool B CBC vs Timberland, 11:30 a.m. Saturday CBC vs Fort Zumwalt East at Timberland, 2 p.m. Saturday Pool C

Battle vs Holt at Troy, 9 a.m. Saturday. Battle vs Seckman at Troy, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Holt at Troy, 2 p.m. Saturday. Seckman at Troy, 4:30 p.m. Saturday. Pool D Summit vs Fort Zumwalt West, 9 a.m. Saturday. Summit vs Windsor at Fort Zumwalt West, 11:30 a.m. Saturday Fort Zumwalt South vs Fort Zumwalt West, 2 p.m. Saturday Fort Zumwalt South vs Windsor at Zumwalt West, 4:30 p.m. Saturday ST. CHARLES WEST TOURNAMENT Maroon Pool Ritenour at St. Charles West, 11 a.m. Saturday Eureka at St. Charles West, 1:30 p.m. Saturday White Pool Warrenton vs. Liberty at St. Dominic, 11 a.m. Saturday Northwest-Cedar Hill at St. Dominic, 1:30 p.m. Saturday HANCOCK TOURNAMENT Saturday’s games Affton vs. Hancock at Heine Meine, 11 a.m. Maplewood-RH at Bayless, 11 a.m. DuBourg at Valley Park, 11 a.m. Maplewood-RH vs. Hancock at Heine Meine, 2 p.m. DuBourgh at Bayless, 2 p.m. Affton at Valley Park, 2 p.m.

BASEBALL • TROY CLASSIC

Warren delivers Hillsboro past Howell in opener BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

WELDON SPRING • Hillsboro High senior pitcher Nick Warren’s curveball was working well. So he figured, why not use it to pick up the three biggest outs of the game. Warren struck out the side in the bottom of the seventh to help Hillsboro knock of defending Class 5 champion Francis Howell 1-0 in the Troy Baseball Classic at Francis Howell High on Friday. “I thought we did pretty well,” Hillsboro coach Kevin Lucas said. “It’s been rough on us because we haven’t been outside all that much. First day we’ve seen live pitching, so I’m pretty happy with the outcome.” Warren came on in relief of Brandon Whitehead and went three innings. He struck out three and did not allow a hit. After Whitehead pitched four shutout innings, Warren wasn’t about to let his

starter down. “It was nerve wracking,” Warren said. “Especially for the first game of the season. But you’ve got to keep your composure and do what you can. I was just doing everything for him because he does everything for us.” Whitehead allowed one hit and struck out three. But it was his pickof move that caught Francis Howell flat-footed. “It keeps them honest,” Whitehead said. “They don’t steal a lot of bases (on me). I just want to keep them on their toes. The game plan was to come in and throw strikes and that’s just me as a pitcher, I like throwing over and it’s just what I do.” Whitehead picked off Francis Howell’s first base runner. Then catcher Nick Carter caught another runner taking too big a lead of first. Then, in the bottom of the third, Francis Howell ran into two outs at third base attempting to steal.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Hillsboro’s Nick Warren (12) pitches against Francis Howell on Friday during the Troy Baseball Classic.

“That was the game,” Francis Howell coach Tony Perkins said. “We

just didn’t do a very good job of running the bases. Plus, we didn’t hit. I re-

ally felt like we could have scored at least three runs in this game. But that’s baseball and they’re young and we’ll just roll with the punches and get better as we go.” Francis Howell lost four runners on the bases. “I told the team, if we run the bases like that ,we’re going to experience a lot of losses,” Perkins said. Francis Howell starting pitcher Ben Holsclaw pounded the strike zone picking up five strikeouts. Two passed balls in the third inning accounted for the only run of the game. “Ben did great, he threw a couple balls in the dirt and that’s the reason they scored that run,” Perkins said. “If we could have kept that ball in front of us, we would have gotten out of that inning as well.” Holsclaw limited Hillsboro to only three hits in five innings, but Lucas was still happy with what he saw from his ofense. “We hit the ball pretty well,” Lucas said. “(But) we

hit the ball right at people. They went in with the approach of being relaxed and hit what they could hit and try and drive it right back up the middle.” It was Lucas’ first win as the coach at Hillsboro. The Hawks will play Francis Howell North on Saturday. “It’s a big confidencebuilder for us,” Lucas said. “We’ve got some guys who are stepping into some varsity experience, so that’s a good thing. But we can’t just be satisfied with this. We have to build from here.” Francis Howell will look to rebound as it plays Francis Howell North on Saturday in the second game of the Troy Baseball Classic before playing Fort Zumwalt North later that afternoon. “The only good thing is that we get up at 9 am tomorrow and we can turn it around right away,” Perkins said. “If we come out of this in 24 hours and get 2-1, I’ll take that. But we’ve got to go out there and execute better.”


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

03.18.2017 • SaTurday • M 2

BASKETBALL • MISSOURI CHAMPIONSHIPS GIRLS CLASS 5 SEMIFINAL • KIRKWOOD 60, ROCK BRIDGE 56 (2OT)

BRUNS SINKS BRUINS Pioneers survive semiinal thriller for return to state title game

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

FRIDAY’S RESULTS SOFTBALL Marion 3 7 Bllvl. East 4 10 W-Kristina Bettis. L-Ally Dunaway. HR-B Alexandra, Ale Boze Marion 3 5 Bellvl. East 7 13 W-Tori McKinney. L-Ivy Smart. Mrrisonville 000 000 0 0 1 Gillespie 000 006 0 6 8 W-Addison Bryant. L-Bailey Wilkinson. HR-G Addison Bryant Mascoutah 141 100 1 8 0 Althof 110 110 0 4 9 L-Kennedy Sims.

1 0 0 2 2 1 0 0

WATER POLO Evanston 11, Pky. Central 3 PC: Tanner Walker, Nathan Burlis, Griin Smith Lindbergh 13, Mund.Carmel 5 L: Mason White 7, Casey Natsch 4, Brad Bauer 2 Pky. Central 10, St. Viator 7 P: Kazu Gavin 3, Tanner Walker 3, Nathan Burlis, Pablo Espindola, Griin Smith, Matt Stephens

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Kirkwood’s Natalie Bruns celebrates with teammates after a double-overtime victory against Rock Bridge in a Class 5 girls basketball state semiinal Friday at Mizzou Arena. BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, MO. • Kirkwood High

freshman forward Natalie Bruns didn’t look much like a freshman on Friday night. Bruns hit a huge 3-pointer in the first overtime and then came up big in the second extra session as well to help Kirkwood outlast Rock Bridge 60-56 in a Class 5 semifinal contest at Mizzou Arena. The Pioneers (27-3) will take on Lee’s Summit (16-13) in the state championship game at 8:10 p.m. on Saturday. “I was in shock,” said Bruns of her 3-pointer near the end of the first overtime. “Being the freshman, I didn’t expect to make that shot. I just knew I had to get back and play defense.” Bruns was even bigger, perhaps, in the final seconds of the second OT. With Kirkwood up two, senior forward Lauryn Miller missed a pair of free throws with five seconds left only to have Bruns shoot through the lane and pick up the loose ball. She got fouled and made both free throws

to ice the win. “I think they thought she was going to make them,” Bruns said. “I had to keep playing. I just wanted to give it everything to try and get to the ball.” The contest was tied at 44 after four quarters and 50 at the end of the first overtime. Bruns’ hit a triple with 1 minute, 9 seconds left in the initial OT. “Our little freshman, who I will say, I’m pretty hard on all the time, came through,” Kirkwood coach Monica Tritz said. “I am hard on her because, quite honestly, I forget she’s a freshman.” Bruns, who is averaging just six points a game, hit 3 of 7 shots from the floor and also added six rebounds. At the game’s outset, it appeared as if the Pioneers’ chances of a second successive title-game appearance would be quickly dashed. Rock Bridge (25-6) rolled out to a 13-2 lead after five minutes of play and pumped the advantage to 22-9 midway through the second period. Kirkwood trimmed the deficit to 26-18 by the break and then

used a 13-7 run to get within 33-31 on a short jumper by Miller, who is headed to UCLA. Senior guard Lola Bracy hit a 3-pointer at the third-quarter buzzer to give the Pioneers their first lead 34-33. “We played them three times and we’re 0-3, so we have to tip our hat to them,” Rock Bridge coach Jill Nagel said. “We had time to prepare and I feel like the girls executed our game plan as well as we could.” Miller led four Pioneers in double figures with 18 points. She also grabbed a team-high nine rebounds. Makayla Wallace added 14 points. Everett and Bruns pitched in 10 points each. Kirkwood, which has won nine in a row, connected on 14 of 29 shots in the second half and overtimes. Katey Klucking led Rock Bridge with 20 points. Rock Bridge was looking for its sixth state title. The Bruins previously won championships in 2008 and 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Kirkwood lost to Kickapoo 63-53 in last year’s state title tilt.

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARD MISSOURI BOYS At Mizzou Arena CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Lee’s Summit West 74, Chaminade 69 Webster Groves 58, Kickapoo 57 Saturday’s games Third place Chaminade (24-6) vs. Kickapoo (25-5), 11 a.m. Championship Lee’s Summit West (26-2) vs. Webster Groves (28-2), 6:20 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Semiinals, Thursday Vashon 58, Kearney 42 Bolivar 63, Parkway Central 41 Third place, Friday Kearney 50, Parkway Central 40 Championship, Saturday Vashon (26-3) vs. Bolivar (27-4), 2:40 p.m.

ILLINOIS BOYS CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT At Carver Arena, Peoria Semiinals, Friday Whitney Young 53, Fremd 47 Simeon 60, Bolingbrook 50 Saturday’s games

Third place Fremd (30-1) vs. Bolingbrook (29-2), 5:30 p.m. Championship Whitney Young (26-5) vs. Simeon (29-3), 7:15 p.m. CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT At Carver Arena, Peoria Semiinals, Friday Fenwick 67, Bloomington 52 Morgan Park 60, Lanphier 53 Saturday’s games Third place Bloomington (26-5) vs. Lanphier (28-4), 11 a.m. Championship Fenwick (30-4) vs. Morgan Park (25-6), 12:45 p.m.

MISSOURI GIRLS At Mizzou Arena CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Lee’s Summit 48, St. Joseph’s 44 Kirkwood 60, Rock Bridge 56 (2OT) Saturday’s games Third place St. Joseph’s (20-9) vs. Rock Bridge (25-6), 12:50 p.m.

Championship Lee’s Summit (16-13) vs. Kirkwood (27-3), 8:10 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Thursday’s semiinals St. Pius X-KC 59, Dexter 34 Incarnate Word 47, Carl Junction 24 Third place, Friday Dexter 47, Carl Junction 38 Championship, Saturday Incarnate Word (27-4) vs. St. Pius X-Kansas City (26-3), 4:30 p.m.

5, Butler 4, Daniels 3, Potts 3. FG 20 (3), FT 15-20. CLASS 4 THIRD-PLACE GAME Parkway Central 8 6 7 19 40 Kearney 10 16 6 18 50 PC (22-10): Campbell 16, Green 9, Silvestri 8, Harris 4, Ntimba 2. FG 15 (3), FT 7-15. K (22-8): C. Ritz 20, D. Ritz 11, Pritzel 7, Frizzell 5, Hofman 5, Doan 2. FG 15 (3), FT 17-21.

FRIDAY’S BOX SCORES

GIRLS CLASS 5 SEMIFINALS Lee’s Summit 10 12 14 12 48 St. Joseph’s 7 12 14 11 44 LS (16-13): Elston 21, Lock 15, Burch 7, May 5. FG 14 (3), FT 17-22. SJ (20-9): Kerr 15, McLaughlin 12, LaBelle 6, Pudlowski 6, Stock 3, Lally 2. FG 15 (2), FT 12-13. Rock Bridge 13 13 7 11 56 Kirkwood 7 11 16 10 60 RB: Klucking 20, McCallister 12, Treece 12, Brown 10, Peterson 2. FG 19 (5), FT 13-16. K (27-3): Miller 18, Wallace 14, Bruns 10, Everett 10, Bracy 8. FG 21 (9), FT 9-16.

BOYS CLASS 5 SEMIFINALS Lee’s Summit 20 19 12 23 74 Chaminade 9 13 19 28 69 LSW (26-2): Childs 24, Bishop 17, May 15, Brooks 7, Goodrich 6, Doolin 4. FG 24 (4), FT 22-31. C (24-6): Hellems 27, Davis 21, Crawford 6, White 6, Vrucinic 5, Batchman 2, Gladson 2. FG 27 (5), FT 10-19. Kickapoo 14 8 23 12 57 Webster Groves 17 9 19 13 58 K (25-5): Ridder 24, Davis 21, Blakeslee 8, Closser 2, Vokolek 2. FG 21 (9), FT 6-8. WG (28-2): Ramey 25, Gordon 18, Ford

BASEBALL Westminster 6 7 Cooper, Texas 5 7 W-Jake Mitchell. . Mehlville 000 000 0 0 4 Oakville 420 100 0 7 6 W-Matt Thorsten. L-Cameron Kozeny. HR-O Dylan Mooney St. Louis Pat 000 000 0 0 3 Valle 200 000 0 2 3 L-Ian McClellan. Westminster 6 10 Cooper, Texas 2 6 W-Michael Kolb. . St. Louis Pat 010 003 0 4 7 Central 001 001 3 5 4 L-Joel Ward. Moline 000 000 0 0 3 O’Fallon 000 450 0 9 10 W-Brayden Arnold. L-Adrien Reese. Bellvl. East 000 002 0 2 2 Civic Mem. 100 002 0 3 6 W-Brandon Hampton. L-Ben Cruikshank. HR-C Hayden Sontag Vianney 010 000 103 5 6 Lindbergh 000 000 200 2 5 W-Brendan May. Webster 001 020 5 8 10 St. Mary’s 200 200 5 9 10 L-John Stallcup. HR-W Tim Miles -; Pattonville 010 100 0 2 4 Haz. West 000 001 0 1 1 W-Max Spitzmiller. L-Christian Shelton. HR-P Josh White Hillsboro 010 000 0 1 6 Howell 000 000 0 0 1 W-Brandon Whitehead. L-Ben Holsclaw. FZ North 000 123 6 6 FH North 010 010 2 5 W-Casey Mareschal. L-Sam Grace. Zum. East 000 131 0 5 6 Timberland 074 201 0 14 14 W-Carter Williams. L-Donovan Shanks. Holt 000 061 4 11 13 Seckman 000 000 0 0 1 W-Cody Hacker. L-Jeremy Mossman. Battle 000 422 0 8 11 Troy 000 030 0 3 4

4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 1 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 2

W-Mason Hunter. L-Eric Tipton. HR-B Michael Morris -; Windsor 000 100 0 1 2 0 FZ West 130 030 0 7 9 0 W-Dylan Hansen. . Summit 000 210 0 3 11 0 FZ South 000 000 0 0 1 3 W-Jackson Rutledge. L-Jake Gruszczynski. DuBourg 300 003 11 8 11 1 Hancock 210 003 10 7 8 13 W-Eli Evans. L-Trey Dittrich. Bayless 000 00 0 0 0 Afton 6(15)2 00 23 11 1 W-John Iland. L-Nathan Geiler. HR-A Alex Kelmendi Mplewod-RH 012 100 0 4 5 0 Valley Park 610 500 0 12 13 3 W-Fischer Rausch. . Pncknyvlle 202 101 2 8 7 0 Okawville 000 003 0 3 4 0 L-Payten Harre. Mascoutah 822 02 14 17 0 ME Lutheran 000 00 0 2 0 W-Logan Bibb. . Nrthwest-CH 002 000 1 3 8 0 Liberty 200 201 0 5 7 3 W-Chase Hoeber. Marion 100 223 0 8 7 0 Collinsville 000 101 1 3 8 0 L-Ryan Siverly. Althof 101 120 0 5 9 0 Bellvl. West 021 700 0 10 11 0 W-Jack Lanxon. . Carlyle 000 000 4 4 4 0 Valmeyer 420 001 0 7 13 0 W-Cole Juelfs. L-Conner Humes. Pield South 000 000 0 2 2 0 Edwardsville 000 000 0 4 5 3 W-Andrew Frank. L-Konnor Ash. HR-E Drake Wescott GIRLS SOCCER Webster Groves 6, Union 1 W: Emma Atherton 2, Gretchen Skoglund, Isabel Burke, Zoe Castro, Natalie Hanrahan; U: Karlie Peth Pattonville 4, Luth. South 0 P: Kendall Battle, Amanda Meyer, Kat Stroot, Madison Utley; shutout by Morgan Kaemmerer Breese Central 1, Wood River 0 BC: Molly Detmer; shutout by Amber Strubhart Fort Zumwalt East 5, Lutheran SC 0 FZE: Alyssa Klimkiewicz, Payton Corley, Morgan Weller, Ashlee Raymer, Maggie Weller; shutout by Olivia Moehlman Marion 2, Wesclin 1 (OT) W: Claire Gruenke Winield 1, Mexico 0 W: Elizabeth Scott; shutout by Olivia Jordan Timberland 2, Troy 1 Tr: Anika Kallash St. Charles West 1, MICDS 0 SCW: Courtney Schreiber; shutout by Savannah Giblair FZ North 1, St. Charles 0 FZN: Anna Durnin; shutout by Courtney Croghan Washington 2, Mehlville 0 W: Cassidy Nurnberger 2; shutout by Katie Baer Belleville West 1, Naperville Central 0 BW: Melanie Kulig Alton 2, Columbia 1 C: Blair Wittenbrink

GIRLS SOCCER • TOURNAMENTS METRO CUP — Edwardsville Bracket Seventh place Alton Marquette vs. Waterloo at Edwardsville, noon Saturday Consolation final Belleville East vs. Springfield at Edwardsville, 2 p.m. Saturday Third place Rochester at Belleville West, 4 p.m. Saturday Championship Triad at Edwardsville vs. Triad, 10 a.m. Saturday — Columbia Bracket Championship semifinals At Columbia Althoff 2, O’Fallon 0 Alton 2, Columbia 1 Guaranteed games Highland 1, Wesclin 0 Marion 2, Wesclin 1 (OT)

Gibault 1, Mater Dei 0 Saturday’s games At Columbia Guaranateed game Marion vs. Highland at Columbia, noon Saturday Consolation final Mascoutah vs. Freeburg, 2 p.m. Third place O’Fallon vs. Columbia, 4 p.m. Championship Althoff vs. Alton, 6 p.m. ROLLA CLASSIC Friday’s scores Rolla 3, Borgia 0 Springfield Catholic 4, Northwest Cedar Hill 2 Rolla 0, Springfield Catholic 0 Northwest Cedar Hill 2, Borgia 0 Saturday’s games Borgia vs Springfield Catholic, 10 a.m. Northwest Cedar Hill vs Rolla, 10 a.m.

BASEBALL • TOURNAMENTS METRO EAST KICKOFF CLASSIC Friday’s scores Plainfield South 8, Mount Zion 4 O’Fallon 9, Moline 0 Chatham Glenwood 1, Joliet Catholic 0 Civic Memorial 3, Belleville East 2 Niles Notre Dame 7, Harrisburg, Illinois 0 Normal Community West 7, Joliet Catholic 2 Edwardsville 4, Plainfield South 2 Saturday’s games Marquette vs Plainfield South at Blazier Field, 9 a.m. Oak Forest vs Niles Notre Dame at GCS, 9 a.m. SLUH vs Harrisburg at GCS, 11 a.m. Normal Community West vs Niles Notre Dame at Blazier Field, 2 p.m. Marquette vs Moline at GCS, 2 p.m. Oak Forest vs Normal Community West at Blazier Field, 4 p.m. Joliet Catholic vs O’Fallon at GCS, 4 p.m. LINDBERGH-MEHLVILLE TOURNAMENT Friday’s scores Pool A Vianney 5, Lindbergh 2 St. Mary’s 9, Webster Groves 8 Pool B Oakville 7, Mehlville 0 Pattonville 2, Hazelwood West 1 Saturday’s games Pool A St. Mary’s at Lindbergh, 1 p.m. Webster Groves at Vianney, 1 p.m. Pool B Hazelwood West at Oakville, 1 p.m. Pattonville at Mehlville, 3 p.m. TROY BASEBALL CLASSIC Friday’s scores Pool A Hillsboro 1, Francis Howell 0 Fort Zumwalt North 6, Francis Howell North 2 Pool B Timberland 14, Fort Zumwalt East 5 Pool C Holt 11, Seckman 0 Battle 8, Troy 3 Pool D Fort Zumwalt West 7, Windsor 1 Summit 3, Fort Zumwalt South 0 Saturday’s games Pool A, at Francis Howell Howell North at Francis Howell, 9 a.m. Hillsboro vs Howell North, 11:30 a.m. Zumwalt North at Francis Howell, 2 p.m.

Hillsboro vs Fort Zumwalt North, 4:30 p.m. Pool B, at Timberland CBC vs Timberland, 11:30 a.m. CBC vs Fort Zumwalt East, 2 p.m. Pool C, at Troy Battle vs Holt, 9 a.m. Battle vs Seckman, 11:30 a.m. Holt at Troy, 2 p.m. Seckman at Troy, 4:30 p.m. Pool D, at Fort Zumwalt West Summit vs Fort Zumwalt West, 9 a.m. Summit vs Windsor, 11:30 a.m. Zumwalt South vs Zumwalt West, 2 p.m. Zumwalt South vs Windsor, 4:30 p.m. ST. CHARLES WEST TOURNAMENT Friday’s scores Maroon Pool Duchesne 11, Ritenour 8 White Pool St. Dominic 13, Warrenton 2 Saturday’s games Maroon Pool Ritenour at St. Charles West, 11 a.m. Eureka at St. Charles West, 1:30 p.m. White Pool Warrenton vs. Liberty at St. Dominic, 11 a.m. Northwest-CH at St. Dominic, 1:30 p.m. HANCOCK TOURNAMENT Friday’s scores DuBourg 8, Hancock 7 Affton 23, Bayless 0 Valley Park 12, Maplewood-RH 4 Saturday’s games Affton vs. Hancock at Heine Meine, 11 a.m. Maplewood-RH at Bayless, 11 a.m. DuBourg at Valley Park, 11 a.m. Maplewood vs. Hancock at Heine Meine, 2 p.m. DuBourg at Bayless, 2 p.m. Affton at Valley Park, 2 p.m. OLD SETTLEMENT TOURNAMENT Saturday’s games 9th-place semifinals at North County De Soto vs Farmington, 10 a.m. Park Hills Central vs Scott City, noon 5th-place semifinals at Ste. Genevieve St. Louis Patriots vs Cape Central, 10 a.m. Neelyville vs Chester, noon Championship semifinals at Valle Perryville vs Valle Catholic, 9 a.m. North County vs Ste. Genevieve, 11 a.m.

BASEBALL • TROY CLASSIC

Warren delivers Hillsboro past Howell in opener BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

WELDON SPRING • Hillsboro High senior pitcher Nick Warren’s curveball was working well. So he figured, why not use it to pick up the three biggest outs of the game. Warren struck out the side in the bottom of the seventh to help Hillsboro knock of defending Class 5 champion Francis Howell 1-0 in the Troy Baseball Classic at Francis Howell High on Friday. “I thought we did pretty well,” Hillsboro coach Kevin Lucas said. “It’s been rough on us because we haven’t been outside all that much. First day we’ve seen live pitching, so I’m pretty happy with the outcome.” Warren came on in relief of Brandon Whitehead and went three innings. He struck out three and did not allow a hit. After Whitehead pitched four shutout innings, Warren wasn’t about to let his

starter down. “It was nerve wracking,” Warren said. “Especially for the first game of the season. But you’ve got to keep your composure and do what you can. I was just doing everything for him because he does everything for us.” Whitehead allowed one hit and struck out three. But it was his pickof move that caught Francis Howell flat-footed. “It keeps them honest,” Whitehead said. “They don’t steal a lot of bases (on me). I just want to keep them on their toes. The game plan was to come in and throw strikes and that’s just me as a pitcher, I like throwing over and it’s just what I do.” Whitehead picked off Francis Howell’s first base runner. Then catcher Nick Carter caught another runner taking too big a lead of first. Then, in the bottom of the third, Francis Howell ran into two outs at third base attempting to steal.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Hillsboro’s Nick Warren (12) pitches against Francis Howell on Friday during the Troy Baseball Classic.

“That was the game,” Francis Howell coach Tony Perkins said. “We

just didn’t do a very good job of running the bases. Plus, we didn’t hit. I re-

ally felt like we could have scored at least three runs in this game. But that’s baseball and they’re young and we’ll just roll with the punches and get better as we go.” Francis Howell lost four runners on the bases. “I told the team, if we run the bases like that ,we’re going to experience a lot of losses,” Perkins said. Francis Howell starting pitcher Ben Holsclaw pounded the strike zone picking up five strikeouts. Two passed balls in the third inning accounted for the only run of the game. “Ben did great, he threw a couple balls in the dirt and that’s the reason they scored that run,” Perkins said. “If we could have kept that ball in front of us, we would have gotten out of that inning as well.” Holsclaw limited Hillsboro to only three hits in five innings, but Lucas was still happy with what he saw from his ofense. “We hit the ball pretty well,” Lucas said. “(But) we

hit the ball right at people. They went in with the approach of being relaxed and hit what they could hit and try and drive it right back up the middle.” It was Lucas’ first win as the coach at Hillsboro. The Hawks will play Francis Howell North on Saturday. “It’s a big confidencebuilder for us,” Lucas said. “We’ve got some guys who are stepping into some varsity experience, so that’s a good thing. But we can’t just be satisfied with this. We have to build from here.” Francis Howell will look to rebound as it plays Francis Howell North on Saturday in the second game of the Troy Baseball Classic before playing Fort Zumwalt North later that afternoon. “The only good thing is that we get up at 9 am tomorrow and we can turn it around right away,” Perkins said. “If we come out of this in 24 hours and get 2-1, I’ll take that. But we’ve got to go out there and execute better.”


NBA

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Wizards hold of big rally by Bulls

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 44 25 Toronto 40 29 New York 27 42 Philadelphia 25 43 Brooklyn 13 55 Southeast W L Washington 42 26 Atlanta 37 31 Miami 34 35 Charlotte 29 39 Orlando 24 45 Central W L Cleveland 45 22 Indiana 35 33 Milwaukee 33 34 Detroit 33 36 Chicago 32 37

Pct .638 .580 .391 .368 .191 Pct .618 .544 .493 .426 .348 Pct .672 .515 .493 .478 .464

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-San Antonio 52 15 x-Houston 47 22 Memphis 39 30 Dallas 29 39 New Orleans 28 41 Northwest W L Utah 43 26 Oklahoma City 39 29 Denver 33 35 Portland 30 37 Minnesota 28 40 Paciic W L z-Golden State 54 14 LA Clippers 40 29 Sacramento 27 41 Phoenix 22 46 LA Lakers 20 48

GB — 4 17 18½ 30½ GB — 5 8½ 13 18½ GB — 10½ 12 13 14

L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 4-6 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 4-6 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 7-3 5-5 2-8

Str W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-2 W-2 L-3 L-4 Str W-2 W-1 W-1 L-3 L-2

Home 23-9 22-12 16-18 16-19 8-26 Home 27-10 19-16 20-14 18-15 12-22 Home 28-7 24-10 20-16 22-14 19-15

Away 21-16 18-17 11-24 9-24 5-29 Away 15-16 18-15 14-21 11-24 12-23 Away 17-15 11-23 13-18 11-22 13-22

Conf 28-12 24-16 18-26 16-23 5-35 Conf 26-16 25-15 21-21 18-23 16-25 Conf 30-11 20-22 21-22 20-22 21-20

Pct GB .776 — .681 6 .565 14 .426 23½ .406 25 Pct GB .623 — .574 3½ .485 9½ .448 12 .412 14½ Pct GB .794 — .580 14½ .397 27 .324 32 .294 34

L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 6-4 5-5 L10 5-5 4-6 2-8 4-6 1-9

Str L-1 L-1 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-4 W-4 W-1 L-2 Str W-2 L-3 W-2 L-2 L-3

Home 25-7 25-9 20-14 20-15 17-18 Home 23-12 25-9 20-16 17-14 18-18 Home 28-4 21-11 14-21 13-22 12-19

Away 27-8 22-13 19-16 9-24 11-23 Away 20-14 14-20 13-19 13-23 10-22 Away 26-10 19-18 13-20 9-24 8-29

Conf 29-10 28-12 26-16 17-24 14-26 Conf 25-18 24-18 20-22 20-21 16-23 Conf 31-9 23-19 16-23 9-36 10-31

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Friday Philadelphia 116, Dallas 74 Washington 112, Chicago 107 Boston 98, Brooklyn 95 Toronto 87, Detroit 75 Miami 123, Minnesota 105 New Orleans 128, Houston 112 Orlando at Phoenix, late Milwaukee at LA Lakers, late

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thursday Cleveland 91, Utah 83 Oklahoma City 123, Toronto 102 Brooklyn 121, New York 110 Memphis 103, Atlanta 91 Denver 129, LA Clippers 114 Golden State 122, Orlando 92 Saturday Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 2 p.m. Portland at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Cleveland at LA Clippers, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m. Houston at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Dallas at Brooklyn, 11 a.m. Boston at Philadelphia, noon Phoenix at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 5 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Portland at Miami, 5 p.m. Sacramento at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Cleveland at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m.

Bradley Beal scored 24 points, John Wall dished out a career-high 20 assists to go with 14 points, and the host Washington Wizards held on to defeat the Chicago Bulls 112-107 on Friday night. Playing their first game since Dwyane Wade sufered a fractured elbow that will keep him out for the rest of the regular season, the Bulls rallied from 19 points down and had a chance to tie it, but Jimmy Butler missed a 3-pointer with 3.9 seconds left. Butler finished with 28 points and Robin Lopez added a season-high 25 points and 12 rebounds. Washington’s Jason Smith, starting in place of Markief Morris, who was a late scratch due to illness, tied his season high with 17 points. Wall, playing despite sustaining a sprained left foot, sank two free throws with 1.8 seconds left to ice it. After Nikola Mirotic’s 3-pointer with 1:24 left pulled the Bulls within one at 104-103, Wall’s 20th assist produced Marcin Gortat’s layup. Butler’s dunk made it 106-104, but Wall hit two free throws with 44.5 seconds left. Butler answered with a 3 to pull Chicago to within one before Otto Porter’s two free throws put Washington up 110107 with 18.4 seconds to go.

x-clinched playoff spot | z-clinched division

Pelicans outgun Rockets • Solomon Hill scored a career-high 30 points and the host New Orleans Pelicans overcame the absence of All-Star DeMarcus Cousins in a 128-112 upset of the Houston Rockets. Anthony Davis had 24 points and 15 rebounds for New Orleans, which has won three of four. Jrue Holiday added 19 points despite early foul trouble. James Harden had 41 points, 14 rebounds and 11 assists, but that was not enough to prevent Houston’s first loss in four games. Lou Williams added 14 points and Montrezl Harrell 13. Cousins was sidelined by left knee and rib soreness. New Orleans is now 2-0 without Cousins and 3-7 when he’s played since trading for him Feb. 19. Pelicans rookie guard Wayne Selden scored 11 points in his third career NBA game. Celtics edge Nets • Jae Crowder scored nine of his 24 points late in the fourth quarter, Avery Bradley had 16 overall, and the Boston Celtics edged the host Brooklyn Nets 98-95. Al Horford added 14 points and eight rebounds for the Celtics, who were playing without All-Star Isaiah Thomas. Boston’s point guard sat the first game of a two-game road trip. Thomas, second in the NBA in scoring with 29.2 points a game, bruised his right knee in Wednesday night’s win over the Minnesota Timberwolves on a hard fall.

NBA SUMMARIES Wizards 112, Bulls 107

76ers 116, Mavericks 74

Raptors 87, Pistons 75

Pelicans 128, Rockets 112

Chicago: Zipser 4-11 0-0 8, Portis 1-5 1-2 3, Lopez 12-16 1-1 25, Rondo 3-6 0-0 6, Butler 10-17 6-8 28, Felicio 1-2 0-0 2, Mirotic 6-16 1-2 15, Lauvergne 1-1 0-0 2, Carter-Williams 2-4 2-4 7, Valentine 4-10 1-1 11. Totals 44-88 12-18 107. Washington: Porter 6-14 2-2 14, Smith 6-15 2-3 17, Gortat 4-9 0-0 8, Wall 4-13 5-6 14, Beal 10-18 1-1 24, Oubre 2-5 0-0 4, Mahinmi 8-11 0-0 16, Jennings 1-4 0-0 3, Bogdanovic 5-12 0-0 12. Totals 46-101 10-12 112. CHI 23 17 32 35 — 107 WSH 29 30 25 28 — 112 3-point goals: Chicago 7-27 (Butler 2-3, Valentine 2-7, Mirotic 2-8, Carter-Williams 1-1, Lopez 0-1, Portis 0-2, Rondo 0-2, Zipser 0-3), Washington 10-26 (Beal 3-4, Smith 3-6, Bogdanovic 2-6, Jennings 1-2, Wall 1-3, Oubre 0-2, Porter 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 52 (Lopez 12), Washington 41 (Gortat, Porter 8). Assists: Chicago 28 (Rondo 10), Washington 34 (Wall 20). Total fouls: Chicago 19, Washington 17. Technicals: Wall, Mahinmi. A: 20,356 (20,356).

Dallas: Barnes 2-7 0-0 4, Nowitzki 5-9 0-0 10, Ferrell 2-5 0-0 4, Curry 2-4 2-2 7, Matthews 1-8 1-2 3, Finney-Smith 0-4 1-2 1, Brussino 0-4 1-1 1, Powell 6-12 0-0 14, Noel 4-7 1-2 9, Mejri 2-3 0-2 4, Barea 4-10 1-2 11, D.Harris 0-5 1-2 1, M.Harris 2-9 1-2 5. Totals 30-87 9-17 74. Philadelphia: Covington 4-8 7-8 18, Holmes 8-11 1-2 17, Saric 3-9 4-4 10, McConnell 3-5 0-0 6, Luwawu-Cabarrot 4-8 2-2 12, Long 1-2 0-0 2, Okafor 4-8 2-2 10, Rodriguez 5-5 1-2 13, Anderson 7-11 3-3 19, Henderson 0-3 0-0 0, Stauskas 3-10 0-0 9. Totals 42-80 20-23 116. DAL 23 17 16 18 — 74 PHL 21 30 36 29 — 116 3-point goals: Dallas 5-23 (Barea 2-4, Powell 2-5, Curry 1-2, Finney-Smith 0-1, M.Harris 0-1, Barnes 0-1, D.Harris 0-1, Brussino 0-3, Matthews 0-5), Philadelphia 12-29 (Covington 3-6, Stauskas 3-8, Rodriguez 2-2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-3, Anderson 2-5, Long 0-1, Holmes 0-1, Henderson 0-1, Saric 0-2). Rebounds: Dallas 34 (M.Harris 6), Philadelphia 55 (Covington 9). Assists: Dallas 21 (Barea 4), Philadelphia 32 (McConnell, Rodriguez 6). Total fouls: Dallas 20, Philadelphia 21. Technicals: D.Harris, Anderson. A: 17,642 (20,328).

Toronto: Carroll 4-9 3-4 12, Ibaka 6-14 2-2 17, Valanciunas 5-7 0-0 10, Joseph 3-10 2-2 9, DeRozan 3-9 8-8 14, Tucker 3-6 0-0 8, Patterson 2-5 0-0 6, Poeltl 0-2 0-0 0, VanVleet 0-2 0-0 0, Wright 0-4 0-0 0, Powell 4-10 3-4 11. Totals 30-78 18-20 87. Detroit: Harris 5-10 4-4 14, Morris 1-13 0-0 3, Drummond 4-10 0-4 8, Jackson 6-14 8-10 20, Caldwell-Pope 4-13 0-0 9, Johnson 0-2 1-2 1, Baynes 2-4 0-0 4, Leuer 5-8 1-1 12, Smith 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 29-83 14-21 75. Toronto 16 24 20 27 — 87 Detroit 13 25 28 9 — 75 3-point goals: Toronto 9-27 (Ibaka 3-8, Tucker 2-3, Patterson 2-3, Carroll 1-4, Joseph 1-5, DeRozan 0-1, Powell 0-3), Detroit 3-21 (Leuer 1-3, Morris 1-4, Caldwell-Pope 1-9, Jackson 0-1, Smith 0-2, Harris 0-2). Fouled out: Drummond. Rebounds: Toronto 53 (Tucker, Ibaka 9), Detroit 49 (Drummond 22). Assists: Toronto 19 (DeRozan, Joseph 6), Detroit 13 (Jackson 6). Total fouls: Toronto 21, Detroit 17. A: 16,541 (19,971).

Houston: Ariza 3-8 0-0 8, Anderson 3-9 0-0 8, Capela 3-9 0-2 6, Beverley 2-9 2-2 7, Harden 12-21 13-14 41, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Wiltjer 1-2 0-0 3, Harrell 5-5 3-5 13, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Gordon 4-13 1-1 12, Williams 4-11 6-8 14. Totals 37-88 25-32 112. New Orleans: Cunningham 3-5 1-2 7, Hill 8-13 8-9 30, Davis 10-18 4-5 24, Holiday 9-17 1-2 19, Selden 4-5 0-0 11, Ajinca 3-4 1-1 7, Frazier 6-11 1-2 14, Moore 3-9 2-2 9, Crawford 3-10 0-1 7. Totals 49-92 18-24 128. Houston 23 27 31 31 — 112 New Orleans 36 32 31 29 — 128 3-point goals: Houston 13-40 (Harden 4-10, Gordon 3-7, Ariza 2-7, Anderson 2-7, Wiltjer 1-1, Beverley 1-4, Brown 0-1, Williams 0-3), New Orleans 12-34 (Hill 6-9, Selden 3-4, Moore 1-4, Crawford 1-4, Frazier 1-5, Davis 0-1, Cunningham 0-2, Holiday 0-5). Fouled out: Harrell. Rebounds: Houston 46 (Harden 14), New Orleans 52 (Davis 15). Assists: Houston 18 (Harden 11), New Orleans 29 (Hill 7). Total fouls: Houston 19, New Orleans 20. Technicals: Houston defensive three second, Houston team, Beverley, Anderson.

Celtics 98, Nets 95 Boston: Crowder 7-11 6-7 24, Johnson 3-5 3-4 9, Horford 6-16 1-2 14, Smart 3-14 5-5 12, Bradley 6-13 4-5 16, Brown 0-2 0-0 0, Green 4-8 2-2 11, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 4-6 1-2 9, Zeller 1-1 1-2 3, Rozier 0-8 0-0 0. Totals 34-85 23-29 98. Brooklyn: Lopez 8-18 5-6 23, Lin 3-6 2-2 10, LeVert 1-6 2-2 5, Foye 4-7 3-4 14, Hollis-Jefferson 3-7 4-6 10, Acy 3-11 2-4 10, Nicholson 4-9 2-2 11, Whitehead 0-7 2-2 2, Dinwiddie 1-5 2-2 4, McDaniels 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 30-83 24-30 95. Boston 21 24 26 27 — 98 Brooklyn 16 21 28 30 — 95 3-point goals: Boston 7-29 (Crowder 4-7, Horford 1-2, Green 1-3, Smart 1-5, Olynyk 0-1, Jerebko 0-1, Bradley 0-2, Johnson 0-2, Brown 0-2, Rozier 0-4), Brooklyn 11-35 (Foye 3-5, Lin 2-4, Lopez 2-5, Acy 2-8, Nicholson 1-2, LeVert 1-4, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Whitehead 0-2, Dinwiddie 0-2, McDaniels 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 51 (Crowder 12), Brooklyn 41 (Acy 8). Assists: Boston 20 (Smart 5), Brooklyn 23 (Lin 6). Total fouls: Boston 23, Brooklyn 25. Technicals: Brooklyn defensive three second, Brooklyn team. A: 17,732 (17,732).

NBA LEADERS

Heat 123, T’Wolves 105 Minnesota: Wiggins 10-23 5-6 26, Towns 11-17 8-8 31, Dieng 0-7 0-0 0, Rubio 8-14 4-4 20, Rush 0-2 2-2 2, Muhammad 7-10 1-1 15, Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Aldrich 1-1 1-1 3, Jones 3-6 0-0 6, Dunn 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 41-82 21-22 105. Miami: Babbitt 3-5 0-0 8, Whiteside 10-11 3-3 23, Dragic 7-16 4-5 19, Waiters 3-3 0-0 6, McGruder 3-8 0-0 7, White 0-0 0-0 0, Reed 3-4 2-4 8, J.Johnson 8-13 0-0 17, T.Johnson 9-13 3-3 23, Richardson 1-5 3-4 5, Ellington 3-8 0-0 7. Totals 50-86 15-19 123. Minnesota 23 26 32 24 — 105 Miami 27 37 26 33 — 123 3-point goals: Minnesota 2-12 (Wiggins 1-2, Towns 1-3, Jones 0-2, Rush 0-2, Muhammad 0-3), Miami 8-26 (Babbitt 2-3, T.Johnson 2-5, J.Johnson 1-2, Dragic 1-4, McGruder 1-5, Ellington 1-6, Reed 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 28 (Towns 11), Miami 39 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Minnesota 14 (Rubio 6), Miami 28 (Dragic 9). Total fouls: Minnesota 21, Miami 16. Technicals: Miami defensive three second, Miami team. A: 19,600 (19,600).

Through Thursday’s games Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Westbrook, OKC 68 691 618 2157 31.7 Thomas, BOS 64 579 501 1866 29.2 Harden, HOU 68 561 626 1965 28.9 Davis, NOR 64 645 458 1783 27.9 DeRozan, TOR 61 590 445 1651 27.1 Cousins, NOR 65 577 472 1735 26.7 Lillard, POR 62 540 399 1641 26.5 Leonard, SAN 60 528 407 1584 26.4 James, CLE 62 604 296 1615 26.0 Durant, GOL 59 528 326 1494 25.3 Irving, CLE 60 558 246 1507 25.1 Curry, GOL 66 554 283 1647 25.0 Towns, MIN 67 639 275 1631 24.3 McCollum, POR 67 585 230 1562 23.3 Butler, CHI 62 443 481 1439 23.2 Beal, WAS 63 521 231 1461 23.2 Wall, WAS 65 543 347 1506 23.2 Antetoko..., MIL 66 545 387 1520 23.0 Anthony, NYK 67 556 281 1534 22.9 Walker, CHA 67 542 256 1534 22.9 FG Percentage Jordan, LAC Gobert, UTA Capela, HOU Howard, ATL Jokic, DEN Gortat, WAS Adams, OKC Kanter, OKC Whiteside, MIA Valanciunas, TOR

FG 337 320 290 313 384 333 322 327 438 324

FGA 480 488 450 491 654 577 558 587 787 593

PCT .702 .656 .644 .637 .587 .577 .577 .557 .557 .546

Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT AVG Whiteside, MIA 63 232 666 898 14.3 Drummond, DET 67 282 638 920 13.7 Jordan, LAC 68 240 681 921 13.5 Howard, ATL 62 253 545 798 12.9 Gobert, UTA 68 258 609 867 12.8 Towns, MIN 67 244 580 824 12.3 Davis, NOR 64 145 607 752 11.8 Gortat, WAS 67 204 535 739 11.0 Cousins, NOR 65 136 566 702 10.8 Westbrook, OKC 68 117 600 717 10.5 Assists Harden, HOU Wall, WAS Westbrook, OKC Rubio, MIN James, CLE Teague, IND Holiday, NOR Green, GOL Lowry, TOR Rondo, CHI

G 68 65 68 61 62 68 53 64 56 58

AST 765 698 704 543 549 538 385 457 386 371

AVG 11.2 10.7 10.4 8.9 8.9 7.9 7.3 7.1 6.9 6.4

NBA calendar April 12-15 — Portsmouth (Va.) Invitational Tournament. April 12 — Regular season ends. April 14 — Rosters set for playoffs 2017. April 15 — Playoffs begin. April 23 — Early entry eligibility deadline. May 1 — Conference semifinals begin. May 9-14 — Draft combine, Chicago. May 16 — Draft lottery. June 1 — NBA Finals begin. June 12 — NBA draft early-entry withdrawal deadline. June 18 — NBA Finals latest possible date. June 22 — NBA draft.

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B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 44 25 Toronto 40 29 New York 27 42 Philadelphia 25 43 Brooklyn 13 55 Southeast W L Washington 42 26 Atlanta 37 31 Miami 34 35 Charlotte 29 39 Orlando 25 45 Central W L Cleveland 45 22 Indiana 35 33 Milwaukee 34 34 Detroit 33 36 Chicago 32 37

Pct .638 .580 .391 .368 .191 Pct .618 .544 .493 .426 .357 Pct .672 .515 .500 .478 .464

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-San Antonio 52 15 x-Houston 47 22 Memphis 39 30 Dallas 29 39 New Orleans 28 41 Northwest W L Utah 43 26 Oklahoma City 39 29 Denver 33 35 Portland 30 37 Minnesota 28 40 Paciic W L z-Golden State 54 14 LA Clippers 40 29 Sacramento 27 41 Phoenix 22 47 LA Lakers 20 49

Pct .776 .681 .565 .426 .406 Pct .623 .574 .485 .448 .412 Pct .794 .580 .397 .319 .290

GB — 4 17 18½ 30½ GB — 5 8½ 13 18 GB — 10½ 11½ 13 14

L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 4-6 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 4-6 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 8-2 5-5 2-8

Str W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-2 W-2 L-3 W-1 Str W-2 W-1 W-2 L-3 L-2

Home 23-9 22-12 16-18 16-19 8-26 Home 27-10 19-16 20-14 18-15 12-22 Home 28-7 24-10 20-16 22-14 19-15

Away 21-16 18-17 11-24 9-24 5-29 Away 15-16 18-15 14-21 11-24 13-23 Away 17-15 11-23 14-18 11-22 13-22

Conf 28-12 24-16 18-26 16-23 5-35 Conf 26-16 25-15 21-21 18-23 16-25 Conf 30-11 20-22 21-22 20-22 21-20

GB — 6 14 23½ 25 GB — 3½ 9½ 12 14½ GB — 14½ 27 32½ 34½

L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 6-4 5-5 L10 5-5 4-6 2-8 4-6 1-9

Str L-1 L-1 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-4 W-4 W-1 L-2 Str W-2 L-3 W-2 L-3 L-4

Home 25-7 25-9 20-14 20-15 17-18 Home 23-12 25-9 20-16 17-14 18-18 Home 28-4 21-11 14-21 13-23 12-20

Away 27-8 22-13 19-16 9-24 11-23 Away 20-14 14-20 13-19 13-23 10-22 Away 26-10 19-18 13-20 9-24 8-29

Conf 29-10 28-12 26-16 17-24 14-26 Conf 25-18 24-18 20-22 20-21 16-23 Conf 31-9 23-19 16-23 9-36 10-31

Friday Philadelphia 116, Dallas 74 Washington 112, Chicago 107 Boston 98, Brooklyn 95 Toronto 87, Detroit 75 Miami 123, Minnesota 105 New Orleans 128, Houston 112 Orlando 109, Phoenix 103 Milwaukee 107, LA Lakers 103 Saturday Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 2 p.m. Portland at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Cleveland at LA Clippers, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m. Houston at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Dallas at Brooklyn, 11 a.m. Boston at Philadelphia, noon Phoenix at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 5 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Portland at Miami, 5 p.m. Sacramento at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Cleveland at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday Atlanta at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Utah at Indiana, 6 p.m. Washington at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Denver at Houston, 7 p.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. New York at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday No games scheduled.

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Wizards hold of big rally by Bulls ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bradley Beal scored 24 points, John Wall dished out a career-high 20 assists to go with 14 points, and the host Washington Wizards held on to defeat the Chicago Bulls 112-107 on Friday night. Playing their first game since Dwyane Wade sufered a fractured elbow that will keep him out for the rest of the regular season, the Bulls rallied from 19 points down and had a chance to tie it, but Jimmy Butler missed a 3-pointer with 3.9 seconds left. Butler finished with 28 points and Robin Lopez added a season-high 25 points and 12 rebounds. Washington’s Jason Smith, starting in place of Markief Morris, who was a late scratch due to illness, tied his season high with 17 points. Wall, playing despite sustaining a sprained left foot, sank two free throws with 1.8 seconds left to ice it. After Nikola Mirotic’s 3-pointer with 1:24 left pulled the Bulls within one at 104-103, Wall’s 20th assist produced Marcin Gortat’s layup. Butler’s dunk made it 106-104, but Wall hit two free throws with 44.5 seconds left. Butler answered with a 3 to pull Chicago to within one before Otto Porter’s two free throws put Washington up 110107 with 18.4 seconds to go.

x-clinched playoff spot | z-clinched division

Pelicans outgun Rockets • Solomon Hill scored a career-high 30 points and the host New Orleans Pelicans overcame the absence of All-Star DeMarcus Cousins in a 128-112 upset of the Houston Rockets. Anthony Davis had 24 points and 15 rebounds for New Orleans, which has won three of four. Jrue Holiday added 19 points despite early foul trouble. James Harden had 41 points, 14 rebounds and 11 assists, but that was not enough to prevent Houston’s first loss in four games. Lou Williams added 14 points and Montrezl Harrell 13. Cousins was sidelined by left knee and rib soreness. New Orleans is now 2-0 without Cousins and 3-7 when he’s played since trading for him Feb. 19. Pelicans rookie guard Wayne Selden scored 11 points in his third career NBA game. Celtics edge Nets • Jae Crowder scored nine of his 24 points late in the fourth quarter, Avery Bradley had 16 overall, and the Boston Celtics edged the host Brooklyn Nets 98-95. Al Horford added 14 points and eight rebounds for the Celtics, who were playing without All-Star Isaiah Thomas. Boston’s point guard sat the first game of a two-game road trip. Thomas, second in the NBA in scoring with 29.2 points a game, bruised his right knee in Wednesday night’s win over the Minnesota Timberwolves on a hard fall.

NBA SUMMARIES Wizards 112, Bulls 107

76ers 116, Mavericks 74

Raptors 87, Pistons 75

Pelicans 128, Rockets 112

Celtics 98, Nets 95

Heat 123, T’Wolves 105

Magic 109, Suns 103

Bucks 107, Lakers 103

Chicago: Zipser 4-11 0-0 8, Portis 1-5 1-2 3, Lopez 12-16 1-1 25, Rondo 3-6 0-0 6, Butler 10-17 6-8 28, Felicio 1-2 0-0 2, Mirotic 6-16 1-2 15, Lauvergne 1-1 0-0 2, Carter-Williams 2-4 2-4 7, Valentine 4-10 1-1 11. Totals 44-88 12-18 107. Washington: Porter 6-14 2-2 14, Smith 6-15 2-3 17, Gortat 4-9 0-0 8, Wall 4-13 5-6 14, Beal 10-18 1-1 24, Oubre 2-5 0-0 4, Mahinmi 8-11 0-0 16, Jennings 1-4 0-0 3, Bogdanovic 5-12 0-0 12. Totals 46-101 10-12 112. CHI 23 17 32 35 — 107 WSH 29 30 25 28 — 112 3-point goals: Chicago 7-27 (Butler 2-3, Valentine 2-7, Mirotic 2-8, Carter-Williams 1-1, Lopez 0-1, Portis 0-2, Rondo 0-2, Zipser 0-3), Washington 10-26 (Beal 3-4, Smith 3-6, Bogdanovic 2-6, Jennings 1-2, Wall 1-3, Oubre 0-2, Porter 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 52 (Lopez 12), Washington 41 (Gortat, Porter 8). Assists: Chicago 28 (Rondo 10), Washington 34 (Wall 20). Total fouls: Chicago 19, Washington 17. Technicals: Wall, Mahinmi. A: 20,356 (20,356).

Dallas: Barnes 2-7 0-0 4, Nowitzki 5-9 0-0 10, Ferrell 2-5 0-0 4, Curry 2-4 2-2 7, Matthews 1-8 1-2 3, Finney-Smith 0-4 1-2 1, Brussino 0-4 1-1 1, Powell 6-12 0-0 14, Noel 4-7 1-2 9, Mejri 2-3 0-2 4, Barea 4-10 1-2 11, D.Harris 0-5 1-2 1, M.Harris 2-9 1-2 5. Totals 30-87 9-17 74. Philadelphia: Covington 4-8 7-8 18, Holmes 8-11 1-2 17, Saric 3-9 4-4 10, McConnell 3-5 0-0 6, Luwawu-Cabarrot 4-8 2-2 12, Long 1-2 0-0 2, Okafor 4-8 2-2 10, Rodriguez 5-5 1-2 13, Anderson 7-11 3-3 19, Henderson 0-3 0-0 0, Stauskas 3-10 0-0 9. Totals 42-80 20-23 116. DAL 23 17 16 18 — 74 PHL 21 30 36 29 — 116 3-point goals: Dallas 5-23 (Barea 2-4, Powell 2-5, Curry 1-2, Finney-Smith 0-1, M.Harris 0-1, Barnes 0-1, D.Harris 0-1, Brussino 0-3, Matthews 0-5), Philadelphia 12-29 (Covington 3-6, Stauskas 3-8, Rodriguez 2-2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-3, Anderson 2-5, Long 0-1, Holmes 0-1, Henderson 0-1, Saric 0-2). Rebounds: Dallas 34 (M.Harris 6), Philadelphia 55 (Covington 9). Assists: Dallas 21 (Barea 4), Philadelphia 32 (McConnell, Rodriguez 6). Total fouls: Dallas 20, Philadelphia 21. Technicals: D.Harris, Anderson. A: 17,642 (20,328).

Toronto: Carroll 4-9 3-4 12, Ibaka 6-14 2-2 17, Valanciunas 5-7 0-0 10, Joseph 3-10 2-2 9, DeRozan 3-9 8-8 14, Tucker 3-6 0-0 8, Patterson 2-5 0-0 6, Poeltl 0-2 0-0 0, VanVleet 0-2 0-0 0, Wright 0-4 0-0 0, Powell 4-10 3-4 11. Totals 30-78 18-20 87. Detroit: Harris 5-10 4-4 14, Morris 1-13 0-0 3, Drummond 4-10 0-4 8, Jackson 6-14 8-10 20, Caldwell-Pope 4-13 0-0 9, Johnson 0-2 1-2 1, Baynes 2-4 0-0 4, Leuer 5-8 1-1 12, Smith 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 29-83 14-21 75. Toronto 16 24 20 27 — 87 Detroit 13 25 28 9 — 75 3-point goals: Toronto 9-27 (Ibaka 3-8, Tucker 2-3, Patterson 2-3, Carroll 1-4, Joseph 1-5, DeRozan 0-1, Powell 0-3), Detroit 3-21 (Leuer 1-3, Morris 1-4, Caldwell-Pope 1-9, Jackson 0-1, Smith 0-2, Harris 0-2). Fouled out: Drummond. Rebounds: Toronto 53 (Tucker, Ibaka 9), Detroit 49 (Drummond 22). Assists: Toronto 19 (DeRozan, Joseph 6), Detroit 13 (Jackson 6). Total fouls: Toronto 21, Detroit 17. A: 16,541 (19,971).

Houston: Ariza 3-8 0-0 8, Anderson 3-9 0-0 8, Capela 3-9 0-2 6, Beverley 2-9 2-2 7, Harden 12-21 13-14 41, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Wiltjer 1-2 0-0 3, Harrell 5-5 3-5 13, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Gordon 4-13 1-1 12, Williams 4-11 6-8 14. Totals 37-88 25-32 112. New Orleans: Cunningham 3-5 1-2 7, Hill 8-13 8-9 30, Davis 10-18 4-5 24, Holiday 9-17 1-2 19, Selden 4-5 0-0 11, Ajinca 3-4 1-1 7, Frazier 6-11 1-2 14, Moore 3-9 2-2 9, Crawford 3-10 0-1 7. Totals 49-92 18-24 128. Houston 23 27 31 31 — 112 New Orleans 36 32 31 29 — 128 3-point goals: Houston 13-40 (Harden 4-10, Gordon 3-7, Ariza 2-7, Anderson 2-7, Wiltjer 1-1, Beverley 1-4, Brown 0-1, Williams 0-3), New Orleans 12-34 (Hill 6-9, Selden 3-4, Moore 1-4, Crawford 1-4, Frazier 1-5, Davis 0-1, Cunningham 0-2, Holiday 0-5). Fouled out: Harrell. Rebounds: Houston 46 (Harden 14), New Orleans 52 (Davis 15). Assists: Houston 18 (Harden 11), New Orleans 29 (Hill 7). Total fouls: Houston 19, New Orleans 20. Technicals: Houston defensive three second, Houston team, Beverley, Anderson.

Boston: Crowder 7-11 6-7 24, Johnson 3-5 3-4 9, Horford 6-16 1-2 14, Smart 3-14 5-5 12, Bradley 6-13 4-5 16, Brown 0-2 0-0 0, Green 4-8 2-2 11, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 4-6 1-2 9, Zeller 1-1 1-2 3, Rozier 0-8 0-0 0. Totals 34-85 23-29 98. Brooklyn: Lopez 8-18 5-6 23, Lin 3-6 2-2 10, LeVert 1-6 2-2 5, Foye 4-7 3-4 14, Hollis-Jefferson 3-7 4-6 10, Acy 3-11 2-4 10, Nicholson 4-9 2-2 11, Whitehead 0-7 2-2 2, Dinwiddie 1-5 2-2 4, McDaniels 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 30-83 24-30 95. Boston 21 24 26 27 — 98 Brooklyn 16 21 28 30 — 95 3-point goals: Boston 7-29 (Crowder 4-7, Horford 1-2, Green 1-3, Smart 1-5, Olynyk 0-1, Jerebko 0-1, Bradley 0-2, Johnson 0-2, Brown 0-2, Rozier 0-4), Brooklyn 11-35 (Foye 3-5, Lin 2-4, Lopez 2-5, Acy 2-8, Nicholson 1-2, LeVert 1-4, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Whitehead 0-2, Dinwiddie 0-2, McDaniels 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 51 (Crowder 12), Brooklyn 41 (Acy 8). Assists: Boston 20 (Smart 5), Brooklyn 23 (Lin 6). Total fouls: Boston 23, Brooklyn 25. Technicals: Brooklyn defensive three second, Brooklyn team. A: 17,732 (17,732).

Minnesota: Wiggins 10-23 5-6 26, Towns 11-17 8-8 31, Dieng 0-7 0-0 0, Rubio 8-14 4-4 20, Rush 0-2 2-2 2, Muhammad 7-10 1-1 15, Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Aldrich 1-1 1-1 3, Jones 3-6 0-0 6, Dunn 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 41-82 21-22 105. Miami: Babbitt 3-5 0-0 8, Whiteside 10-11 3-3 23, Dragic 7-16 4-5 19, Waiters 3-3 0-0 6, McGruder 3-8 0-0 7, White 0-0 0-0 0, Reed 3-4 2-4 8, J.Johnson 8-13 0-0 17, T.Johnson 9-13 3-3 23, Richardson 1-5 3-4 5, Ellington 3-8 0-0 7. Totals 50-86 15-19 123. Minnesota 23 26 32 24 — 105 Miami 27 37 26 33 — 123 3-point goals: Minnesota 2-12 (Wiggins 1-2, Towns 1-3, Jones 0-2, Rush 0-2, Muhammad 0-3), Miami 8-26 (Babbitt 2-3, T.Johnson 2-5, J.Johnson 1-2, Dragic 1-4, McGruder 1-5, Ellington 1-6, Reed 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 28 (Towns 11), Miami 39 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Minnesota 14 (Rubio 6), Miami 28 (Dragic 9). Total fouls: Minnesota 21, Miami 16. Technicals: Miami defensive three second, Miami team. A: 19,600 (19,600).

Orlando: Fournier 8-19 6-7 25, Ross 6-10 0-0 14, Gordon 7-12 2-2 17, Vucevic 8-20 2-2 18, Payton 4-9 2-2 10, Green 1-9 0-0 2, Biyombo 1-1 2-2 4, Augustin 4-8 3-4 12, Watson 2-3 0-0 4, Hezonja 1-5 1-2 3. Totals 42-96 18-21 109. Phoenix: Warren 8-13 10-10 26, Chriss 6-9 0-0 13, Len 3-12 3-4 9, Ulis 8-17 3-4 19, Booker 3-13 4-4 10, Jones 3-6 0-0 6, Dudley 3-9 0-0 7, Williams 4-6 4-6 12, Price 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 38-87 25-30 103. Orlando 30 30 24 25 — 109 Phoenix 22 36 27 18 — 103 3-point goals: Orlando 7-23 (Fournier 3-9, Ross 2-3, Augustin 1-2, Gordon 1-3, Hezonja 0-1, Watson 0-1, Green 0-2, Vucevic 0-2), Phoenix 2-14 (Chriss 1-2, Dudley 1-6, Price 0-1, Warren 0-1, Ulis 0-2, Booker 0-2). Fouled out: Ross. Rebounds: Orlando 43 (Vucevic 17), Phoenix 49 (Len 10). Assists: Orlando 21 (Payton 11), Phoenix 18 (Ulis 8). Total fouls: Orlando 27, Phoenix 22. A: 16,880 (18,422).

Milwaukee: Snell 3-8 3-3 10, Antetokounmpo 11-16 3-6 26, Maker 0-3 0-0 0, Middleton 11-18 8-9 30, Brogdon 2-7 2-2 6, Henson 3-6 2-4 8, Teletovic 2-7 0-1 5, Monroe 6-6 0-0 12, Terry 1-4 2-2 5, Dellavedova 1-7 3-3 5. Totals 40-82 23-30 107. L.A. Lakers: Young 6-11 0-0 16, Ingram 4-11 2-4 11, Randle 1-6 2-4 4, Zubac 9-15 0-0 18, Clarkson 8-20 1-1 21, Brewer 0-1 0-0 0, Nance 3-6 7-7 13, Robinson 0-2 2-4 2, Ennis 0-0 0-0 0, Russell 5-9 2-5 14, Nwaba 2-3 0-1 4. Totals 38-84 16-26 103. Milwaukee 31 30 23 23 — 107 L.A. Lakers 24 22 31 26 — 103 3-point goals: Milwaukee 4-24 (Antetokounmpo 1-1, Terry 1-3, Snell 1-4, Teletovic 1-5, Middleton 0-2, Maker 0-2, Dellavedova 0-3, Brogdon 0-4), L.A. Lakers 11-29 (Young 4-8, Clarkson 4-11, Russell 2-3, Ingram 1-4, Randle 0-1, Nance 0-2). Fouled out: Antetokounmpo. Rebounds: Milwaukee 42 (Henson, Antetokounmpo 8), L.A. Lakers 40 (Randle 12). Assists: Milwaukee 23 (Dellavedova 6), L.A. Lakers 24 (Randle 8). Total fouls: Milwaukee 25, L.A. Lakers 20. Technicals: Monroe, Henson, Young 2, Russell, Randle. Ejected: Monroe, Young, Russell. A: 18,997 (19,060).

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'13 Acura TL: Gray, 31K Miles, Will Sell Fast!Call Now $20,000 #X3152

'03 BMW 525I:$5,500 #183822 SUNTRUP W COUNTYVOLVO 636-200-2822 '01 BMW 324ci: Coupe, Auto, Silver, Well Serviced, $6,490 #B8215A

'14 Chevy Corvette: Convertible, 6K Miles, Loaded, $49,490

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Cadillac '09 Cadillac DTS: Leather Seats, CD Player $9,490 #V17169C

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'15 Chevy Sonic: 5 Door Hatchback, Auto, 39K Miles $13,990 Stk# P06016 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Cruze LT: Red, 29K Miles, Automatic $12,880 Stk# 170794A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy SS: 21K Miles, Blue, LS3 Please Contact for Pricing Stk# 170764A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Malibu LT: Blue, 77K Miles $9,990 Stk# P06027 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Trax LT: AWD, Gray, 32K Miles $18,054 Stk# P06024 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Cruze LS: Blue, 30K Miles, Ecotec 1.8L $20,634 Stk# 170798A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy SS LS: Red, 8K Miles, 6.2L V8 $41,368 Stk# 170763A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Malibu LT1: White, 49K Miles, Moonroof, Power Seats, Honelink, 1 Owner Carfax $13,800 #H162409B

'15 Chevy Malibu LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, Bluetooth $14,990 #8984C

Chevrolet '09 Chevy Cobalt LS: 2 Door Coupe, Red, Only 96K Miles, Will Sell Fast at $5,800 #SC1415A

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Chrysler '07 Chrysler 300C: Leather, Chrome $10,900 #P3592-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Dodge '11 Dodge Charger: RT, Max, $14,880 #185371 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Dodge Charger SE: 4 Door, 38K Miles, Gray, RWD $18,436 Stk# P06026 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST

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Fiat '15 Fiat 500L: Only 9K Miles $14,777 #P3577-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

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'07 Dodge Durango SLT Cloth Seats, Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry, $8,990 #W4466A

Buick '16 Buick Verano: Black, Only 9K Miles, Hurry In!$19,300 #H170168A

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Hyundai 2016 Hyundai Accent SE: 4 Door, Auto, Tan, $12,900 Stk# P06022 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B13

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'14 Hyundai Sonata: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Brake Assist $8,990 #26565N

'13 Mini Cooper: Bayswater , 32K Miles, Black, Call #B8416

'16 Land Rover LR4: Black, 4WD, 10K, Local Trade $60,990 #C1636R

'14 Ford F-150: 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost, 57K Miles, $27,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '13 Ford F150 SVT Raptor: 4x4, 6.2L 8 Cyl, Heated Lthr Seats, 32K Miles $47,990 #P7440A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '10 Ford F-150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, 111K Miles $19,990 #R1648A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '10 Ford F-150: Crew Cab, Lariat, 4x4, #T16241B $17,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '05 Ford Ranger: Super Cab, FX4, 4.0 V6, 106K Miles, $10,890 #T17138B SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '11 Ford Transit Connect XLT Carfax One Owner, Keyless Entry, $6,995 #DL1489

Infiniti '08 Infiniti EX35: Black, Loaded, $11,990 #P3568-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K Miles, Loaded $31,990 #C17045RA

'09 Infiniti G37x: Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Sunroof, Backup Camera $12,990 #94677M

'14 Mini Countryman: Blue, 23K Miles, $17,900 Stk# 160688A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085 '16 ATS Coupe: AWD, Navigation, Just Arrived!!

Jeep '11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Laredo, Black, Leather, $14,880 #187961 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Lmtd, Sunroof, 4x4, Navigation, $29,490 #B8399

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Auto, 2-Tops, Lift Kit, Wheels, $38,990 #B8391

'16 Jeep Patriot Sport: Premium Sound, Cruise Control, Cloth Seats $15,990 #B8304

CTS: Coupe, Performance, 55K Miles, Auto, $18,990

Toyota Trucks

'07 Toyota Carmy LE: Beige, Safety & Emissions Included, #DL1441 $5,800

'09 Toyota Tacoma: Regular Cab, 5 Speed, Only 53K Miles, White $10,300 #H170586A

'14 SRX: Performance, Chrome Whls, AWD, 30K Miles, $31,990 '15 Cadillac CTS-V: 10K Miles, Auto, Every Option, Black, Call! '07 Cadillac Escalade EXT: AWD, White Diamond, Loaded, Call For Details '14 CTS: Performance: AWD, Black, Certified, $31,990 '13 Cadillac XTS: Premium, white Diamond, AWD, 24K Miles, $32,990

'16 Escalade ESV: Platinum, AWD, Black, Local Trade, $81,990 '14 SRX: Premium Collection, AWD, Chrome Wheels, Black Raven, $32,990

Lexus '15 Lexus CT 200H: Hybrid, 17" Alloys, Leather, Loaded, Only 21K Miles, $22,500

'15 Lexus IS 350: AWD, 1 Owner, Navigation, Sunroof $33,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '08 Lexus IS250: Auto, Leather, Sunroof, Just Arrived, $11,990 #B8251A

'07 Lexus RX350: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, Auto, $11,990 #C8355A

'04 Lexus RX 330: 303L V6, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today, $7,490 #95427A

'07 Lexus IS 250: One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $12,990 #39052A

Lincoln '15 Lincoln MKS: Silver, 23K Miles, Call Today Only $23,200 X3119

Mazda

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS NEW ARRIVALS!! 1-866-244-9085 '17 Porsche Macan S: 8K Miles, Black, Navigation, Panoramic Roof, Call! '15 Escalade ESV Premium: 18K Miles, Chrome Wheels, DVD

'16 Lincoln Navigator: White Platinum, DVD, Sunroof, $47,990 '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD: Panoramic Roof, 4x4, Black, $29,990 '14 Chevy Suburban LTZ: White Diamond, 32K Miles, 4x4, Loaded '14 Ford Explorer XLT: Leathr, Roof, 4x4, Quad Seats, Call For Details '15 Yukon Denali: 22" Wheels, Navigation, Sunroof, DVD

'17 Mazda3 Sport Power Windows, Cruise Control $19,680 #M17072

'11 Mazda3 S: Grand Touring, Hatchback, $11,990

'08 Mazda CX-9 Heated Seats, One Owner, $6,990 #M16733A

Mercury '07 Mercury Milan Power Windows, CD Player, Heated Side Mirrors $5,990 #M16736A

'15 Toyota Corolla LE: (2) to Choose from, White, #X3123, Starting at $12,500

'05 Toyota Corolla LE: Only 106K Miles, Hurry In, Call Today, $6,500 #H170594A

'07 Toyota Camry LE: Clean CARFAX, Gas Saver $9,490 #78200B

'05 Toyota Corolla $6,495 #DL1515

'04 Toyota Highlander 3rd Row Seating, Keyless Entry, $6,777 #P6580A

'04 Toyota RAV4 Carfax Certified One Owner, Cruise Control, $6,500 #H170633A

Mitsubishi

'12 VW Passat 2.5L SEL: 1 Owner Clean CARFAX, Navigation, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $11,490 #26552M

'09 Mitsubishi Lancer Sport Trim, CD Player, Security System, $9,890 #W2793A

'12 Volkswagen Beetle Low Miles, CarFax One Owner, $10,990 #V17253A

Sport Utilitiy '12 Buick Enclave: Leather, $16,990 #48453-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Cadillac Escalade: AWD, Black, 103K Miles, 22" Chromes, Navigation, $25,000 #H161170B

'14 Nissan Sentra: 25K Miles, Power Windows & Locks, Bluetooth, Clean Carfax $13,390 #R1553A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '08 Nissan 350Z: Convertible, Navigation, 34K Miles #T17270A $18,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '08 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Delay-off Headlights, Remote Keyless Entry, $6,990 #27289A

'13 Nissan Cube: 66K Miles, Auto, Certified, Power Package, $10,990 #V16442B

'14 Nissan Maxima 3.5: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GPS, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $17,490 #95413A

'13 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Bluetooth, Leather Seats, Premium Sound, $15,990 #8854A

'08 Volkswagen Jetta Low Miles, One Owner, Leather, $6,990 #96274A

Volvo '17 Volvo XC60 T5: Inscription, 9K Miles $34,000 #L1235 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '13 Volvo S60T5: White/Beige 51K Miles $17,933 #183781 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Volvo XC60T6: Black/Black, $11,855 #185061 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo XC60 3.2: AWD, Certified, Grey/Beige $28,990 #L1250 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Volvo S40: T5, R-Design, 55K Miles, Very Sharp, $12,990 #V17331A

'99 Volvo S70 Sunroof, Turbo, Heated Front Seats, $4,777 #N15106A

Chevrolet Trucks

'13 Nissan Cube: Keyless Entry, CD Player, Cruise Control, $10,490 #V16442B

'09 Nissan Altima Cloth Seats, Cruise Control, $8,995 #V170299A

'04 Nissan Quest Carfax Certified One Owner, MultiZone A/C $5,995 #V170407A

Pontiac '09 Pontiac G8 GT: Gray, $19,990 Stk# 170759A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '06 Pontiac G6 GT Alloy Wheels, One Owner, $6,690 #W3069A

'16 Ram 1500: 4WD, Quad Cab, Silver, 25K Miles $28,000 #X3151

'12 Ram 1500: Big Horn, 71K, C/C $23,900 #48499-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Ram 1500 SXT Quad Cab, No Accidents, A/C, CD Player $10,790 #W4133B

'07 Pontiac Vibe Hatchback, No Accidents, $5,990 #W4460A

Please apply online at www.lee.net/careers Choose: Suburban Journals The Madison County Journal is part of the Lee Enterprises’ group of companies. Lee provides local news and information, and a major multi-media advertising platform in its markets, with 46 daily newspapers and a joint interest in four others, rapidly growing digital products and nearly 300 specialty publications in 22 states. Lee’s newspapers have circulation of 1.1 million daily and 1.5 million Sunday, reaching nearly four million readers in print alone. Lee’s websites and mobile and tablet products attract 20 million plus unique visitors monthly. The Madison County Journal is a Drug-Free Employer. Equal Opportunity Employer

'07 Cadillac Edcalade EXT: White Diamond, $21,990 #C8332A

'13 Cadillac Escalade: 34K Miles, Auto, Certified, Black, $45,490

'08 Hummer H3: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, $15,990 #27273A

'14 Chevy Traverse LTZ: Nav, Sunroof, Lthr, $28,900 #P3645 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Chevy Equinox 1LT: Gray, 72K Miles, $14,497 Stk# 170760A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Equinox LS: White, 32K Miles, 2.4L 4-Cyl $15,190 Stk# 170602A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: 4WD, Sunroof, DVD, $39,990 #B8330A

'08 Infiniti QX56: 4WD, Pearl White, Local Trade, $17,990

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: AWD, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $15,990 #78245A

'15 Chevy Suburban LT: 4WD, Red, 24K Miles, V8 $42,549 Stk# P05886 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Trax 1LT: Keyless Entry, Alloys, Power Windows, Sat Radio $17,290 #W4122A

'16 Dodge Durango: Limited, 4x4, 18K Miles, Navigation, Leather, DVD, $31,900 #P3578 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Ford Explorer LTD: $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Ford Edge SEL: White, Only 22K Miles, Call Today, $21,800 #H170507A

'12 Ford Explorer LTD: AWD, Navigation, Leather, 68K Miles, $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Ford Escape: Titanium, $22,901 #P3580-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Ford Edge: Sunroof, V6, Auto, Silver, $11,990 #M16717A

'09 Jeep Wrangler: Sahara $19,990 #48553-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '17 Jeep Wrangler: Black, 1K Miles, Stk# 170619A Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Kia Sportage: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Call Today, $13,490 #75452A

'14 Kia Soul: 6-Speed Manual Transmission, Black, Only 23K miles, Reduced to $11,400 Great Price!

'16 GMC Acadia SLT: Heated Leather, 2nd Row Buckets, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, #T16545B Please Call for Pricing SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '13 GMC Terrain: AWD, SLT, 41K Miles, Gray $18,990 Stk# P06023 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 GMC Yukon XL Denali: Nav, Sunroof, AWD, $28,990

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Leather, Quad Seats, Sunroof, $27,490

'06 Honda CR-V EXL: AWD $6,980 #L12311 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Honda CRV LX: AWD, 6 To Choose, Largest Selection, All Colors, Starting at $17,700 #X3099

'16 Kia Sedona LX: 4 To Choose From, Just Arrived, Graphite Metallic, 24K Miles, Starting at $19,500 X3165

'12 Nissan Quest SL: Quad Seats, Power Doors, DVD, $19,490

'06 Nissan Quest CD Player, Alloy Wheels, $6,795 #AT1821A

'13 Toyota Sienna SE: 6 Cyl, 24K Miles, $26,990 #T16323A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '15 Toyota Sienna XLE: 18K Miles, Time To Save Some Cash, $31,990 #C8311A

Dogs '11 Mazda CX-9: Sport, Clean Carfax, $12,990 #8836A

1st Wheaton Terriers, Husky, Mini Schnauzers, Maltese, Yorkiepoos, Cockapoos, Teddy Bears, Others Poos & Cuties !

'03 Mazda Tribute LX Remote Keyless Entry, Roof Rack, $5,990 #M16688B

lovencarepets.org

636-240-3647

'14 Nissan Rogue: AWD, Silver, $17,990 #18260-2 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 Nissan Pathfinder: 4x4, Leather, Roof, Navigation, 3rd Row, $14,490 #B8411

'12 Nissan Murano SL: AWD, 47K Miles, Panoramic Roof, $20,490 #B8407

AKC Silver Biege Standard Pood le s , R a is e d in my h o me Ve t checked, 4 males 1 female Ready 3/20/17 $800 217-430-0267 Australian Shepherd Puppies, AKC, Reg., Blue Merle & Black Tri. Wormed and puppy shots $500 and up. Req. face to face pickup. Cash Only! Call 314-691-9338 D o b e r ma n Puppies, AKC , Born 1/31/17, 1st Vaccine & Dewormer given, Males & Females. $700. (314)540-5492

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now

'14 Ford Edge Limited: White, Chromes Wheels, $26,490 #C8333A

'14 Ford Explorer: Limited, 4x4, Quad Seats, Navigation, $31,990 #B8424

'15 Honda Odyssey EXL: 8 Passenger, 2 To Choose, Pwr Doors, Navigation, Lthr, $29,200 #X3084

'11 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, White, Roof DVD, $20,490

'06 Nissan Murano S Alloy Wheels, CD Player $8,500 DL1546

GOLDENDOODLES & LABRADOODLES GOLDADORS, GOLDENS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

'10 Nissan Murano SL: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, AWD $15,990 #77560B

'16 Nissan Frontier: 4 WD, Crew Cab, Silver, Only 12K Miles, $25,000 #X3138

'08 Saturn Vue XE: White, Only 92K Miles, Hurry In! Will Sell Fast at $7,500 #DL1513

'08 Saturn VUE Cruise Control, Remote Entry, $7,500 #DL1513

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com English Mastiff Puppies, AKC Registered, 2 Fawn Males left, Current o n Shots/w orming, $ 1 2 5 0 ea ., (217)561-1627 lv msg. GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

LABRADOODLES Shots, Wormed. Health Guarantee. Prices Staring at $400 & Up.

'16 Subaru WRX: STI Performance, $29,990 #T17221A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '08 Toyota Highlander: Black/Black Leather, $13,550 #164762 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Toyota Rav 4: V6, LTD, 4WD, Coco Metalic Brown, Loaded, Only 88K Miles, $15,200

'15 Toyota Highlander: AWD, V6, LTD, Dark Blue, 21K Miles, Super Nice!$36,000 #H170366A

Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494

sieversretrievers.com

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets

Belleville Flea Market March 18th & 19th, 2017 Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

'10 Honda CR-V EX-L: 58K Miles, AWD, One Owner, $15,490 #C17250A

'14 Honda CR-V EX: Local Trade, AWD, Certified, $17,990

STLtoday.com/jobs

Ford Trucks

We ofer a competitive compensation package (base +commission), a variety of medical, dental and vision options and 401(k) option.

Mini vans

STLtoday.com/rides

Dodge Plymouth Trucks

•Bachelor’s degree in Business, Marketing,Advertising, or related area preferred •1-2 years of successful sales experience or equivalent education and experience •Excellent communication skills •Possess an understanding of retail business for efective sales presentations •Ability to efectively present information •Ability to work well with and through people •Ability to sell through needs analysis, efective media strategy & presentation •Ability to make cold calls to generate new business •General knowledge of newspaper operations, social media and online a plus •Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and dependable automobile is required

'11 Dodge Grand Caravan: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Rear DVD, 3rd Row Seating, $12,990 #27015N

'14 GMC Terrain Denali: Navigation, Sunroof, Silver $24,990 #C17297A

'16 Chevy Silverado LT: 4WD, 1500 Crew Cab, Gray, 21K Miles, $32,900 Stk# P06014 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

The ideal candidate will have a proven sales record and the ability to drive new advertising revenue, selling a leading line of marketing products and service to local retail business.

'03 Hummer H2: One Owner, Local Trade, Sunroof, $17,990 #B8313A

'11 Avalanche LTZ: White Diamond, Sunroof, DVD, $26,990 #C6194RA '12 Nissan Altima SL: Sedan, Leather, Sunroof, 101K Miles, Safety & Emissions Passed, Priced at $10,000 #H170639A

Retail Advertising - Sales Consultant Metro East, Illinois

Sport Utilitiy

Nissan/Datsun

Mini Cooper '12 Mini Cooper: Countryman, 62K Miles, Panoramic Roof, $14,690

'13 Toyota Scion XD: Hatchback, White, 33K Miles, High Quality, Low Price! $11,000 #X3169

Volkswagen

'16 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Touring, Gray, 29K Miles, Loaded! Only $21,500 #H170166A

'13 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Navigation $12,490 #9025A

'08 Toyota Solara: Blue, $9,750 #180921 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 Toyota Camry LE: Blue/Gray, 110K Miles, $9,880 #185511 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 VW Beetle: Convertible, 37K Miles, Auto, White, Local Trade, $17,990

'12 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty, $15,990 #P8717

'14 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, White, Auto, Certified, $19,990

'14 Toyota Camry LE: Black, Only 14K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, $14,600 #X3121

'14 Audi R8: 11K Miles, Audi Exclusive Orange, Call Today

'07 Mazda3 iTouring Clean Carfax, Sunroof, $6,990 #11079A

'11 Mazda RX-8: 13K Miles, Grand Touring, Rare!! $18,990 #M16763B

'13 Scion T/C: White, Auto, Sunroof, $11,990

'13 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Navigation, White Diamond, Certified, $23,490

'14 Kia Optima S: 3 to Choose From, Black, 35K Miles, Starting at $13,800 #X3139

'12 Kia Optima: 2.4L Auto Hybrid, White, 93K Miles, $9,885 Stk# 170599A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Kia Optima LX: Brown, 60K Miles, 2.4L $13,800 Stk #P06009 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Scion

Toyota

'16 XTS: Black on Black, AWD, Navigation, 18K Miles

'14 Kia Forte LX: Silver, 24K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $11,500 #X3107

'08 Saturn Astra XR Hatchback, Clean Carfax, $6,490 #36515A

'15 Escalade ESV Premium: AWD, 22" Chromes, 18K, Just Arrived

Kia

'11 Kia Sorento EX: V6, Silver, Only 34K Miles, Call Now!$15,000 #H170632A

Saturn '08 Saturn Sky: Auto, Black, 31K Miles, #C17338A $13,490

Stl Advertising Network

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

'13 Honda Pilot EXL: Sunroof, AWD, Black, $28,490

'16 Ford F-150: 4WD, Super Crew, 23K Miles, Hurry In, Starting At $29,500 #X3118

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

Mini vans '14 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, 28k Miles Vacation Time! $16,500 #H162428A

at the

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

Bids/Proposals '15 Dodge Grand Caravan: Only 8K Miles, Backup Camera, $18,990 #17326A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '16 Dodge Journey SXT: $17,900 #P3625 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '16 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT:$19,990 #P3593 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Construction Bid Notice: Ne w C o n s tru c tio n , 9 , 5 0 0 s f gymnasium, 4 month schedule. April 1- July 31 '17. Contact Marshall Cohen, Lift for Life A c a d e m y a t mcohen@liftforlifeacademy. org, 3 1 4 .4 3 6 -2 3 3 7 ext 203 for info. Bid day is March 2 4 , 2 0 1 7, 1pm.


SPORTS

B14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Penguins overcome injuries, beat Devils

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Nashville Blues Winnipeg Dallas Colorado Paciic San Jose Calgary Anaheim Edmonton Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 70 69 70 70 71 71 69 GP 70 71 70 70 70 70 70

W 45 43 35 37 31 28 20 W 42 40 37 37 34 28 26

L OT Pts GF GA 20 5 95 210 174 20 6 92 226 170 24 11 81 207 197 28 5 79 194 193 33 7 69 212 226 33 10 66 195 233 46 3 43 134 223 L OT Pts GF GA 21 7 91 195 163 27 4 84 196 191 23 10 84 183 175 24 9 83 205 186 29 7 75 173 174 33 9 65 161 205 35 9 61 172 224

Home Away Div 23-9-4 22-11-1 17-8-1 23-9-1 20-11-5 15-7-3 20-8-7 15-16-4 14-10-1 20-11-4 17-17-1 11-11-2 16-18-1 15-15-6 16-8-2 18-12-6 10-21-4 8-14-4 11-22-2 9-24-1 6-16-0 Home Away Div 23-9-4 19-12-3 13-7-3 21-15-0 19-12-4 10-9-3 23-8-3 14-15-7 12-6-4 18-12-4 19-12-5 12-4-3 20-13-2 14-16-5 9-9-2 18-13-6 10-20-3 11-9-1 16-15-5 10-20-4 10-12-5

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Toronto Tampa Bay Florida Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh Columbus NY Rangers NY Islanders Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey

GP 70 69 71 69 70 70 71 69 GP 70 70 69 71 70 70 68 70

W 39 39 38 32 34 31 28 27 W 45 44 45 44 33 32 29 26

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 8 86 191 176 20-10-4 19-13-4 12-3-5 23 7 85 184 177 19-11-7 20-12-0 11-10-2 27 6 82 205 188 19-14-0 19-13-6 16-7-1 23 14 78 211 206 17-10-6 15-13-8 14-7-3 27 9 77 191 192 19-12-3 15-15-6 13-6-3 28 11 73 180 200 16-16-3 15-12-8 10-9-5 31 12 68 178 209 17-12-6 11-19-6 9-10-4 31 11 65 172 209 13-15-5 14-16-6 6-11-5 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 8 98 223 156 28-6-2 17-11-6 15-7-5 17 9 97 245 198 28-4-3 16-13-6 16-6-1 18 6 96 221 161 26-9-1 19-9-5 15-6-1 24 3 91 228 187 19-15-3 25-9-0 13-11-0 26 11 77 208 215 20-10-6 13-16-5 10-9-4 30 8 72 182 210 20-11-4 12-19-4 7-12-2 27 12 70 175 197 20-10-4 9-17-8 8-13-3 32 12 64 163 205 14-13-6 12-19-6 9-10-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday Pittsburgh 6, New Jersey 4 Florida 4, NY Rangers 3, SO Calgary 3, Dallas 1 Buffalo at Anaheim, late Thursday Blues 4, San Jose 1 Carolina 3, Minnesota 1 Winnipeg 4, NY Islanders 2 Nashville 2, Washington 1, OT New Jersey 6, Philadelphia 2 Columbus 2, Florida 1 Chicago 2, Ottawa 1

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 0 Edmonton 7, Boston 4 Detroit 5, Arizona 4, SO Dallas 4, Vancouver 2 Los Angeles 2, Buffalo 0 Saturday Colorado at Detroit, noon Columbus at NY Islanders, noon Washington at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Nashville at Carolina, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 6 p.m.

Blues at Arizona, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Columbus at New Jersey, noon Florida at Pittsburgh, noon Minnesota at Winnipeg, 4 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 6 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 6:30 Ottawa at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sidney Crosby scored twice to move into a tie for the NHL lead with 37, Carter Rowney added the first goal of his NHL career and the short-handed Pittsburgh Penguins beat the visiting New Jersey Devils 6-4 on Friday night. Crosby added an assist to give him 640 in his career and move him into a tie with Jaromir Jagr for the second-most in franchise history. Nick Bonino, Jake Guentzel and Phil Kessel also scored for Pittsburgh as the Penguins leapfrogged Columbus to move into second-place behind Washington in the Metropolitan Division. Matt Murray stopped 32 shots

for Pittsburgh as the Penguins relied on Crosby and some fresh faces to overcome the loss of Evgeni Malkin, who is out with an upper-body injury. Kyle Palmieri matched Crosby with two goals for New Jersey. Stefan Noesen and Beau Bennett also scored for the Devils. Keith Kinkaid finished with 37 saves. Before the game, the depleted Penguins’ defense took another hit. Coach Mike Sullivan said defenseman Ron Hainsey is weekto-week with an upper-body injury. The Penguins acquired the 35-year-old Hainsey just before the trade deadline. Hainsey has one assist in 10 games since

Penguins 6, Devils 4

Panthers 4, Rangers 3, SO

Leaders

New Jersey 2 1 1 — 4 Pittsburgh 3 1 2 — 6 First period: 1, New Jersey, Palmieri 24 (Hall, Moore), 5:35. 2, Pittsburgh, Kessel 22 (Cullen, Hornqvist), 6:37. 3, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 11 (Dumoulin, Crosby), 13:30. 4, New Jersey, Noesen 6 (Quenneville, Zacha), 14:02. 5, Pittsburgh, Crosby 36 (Streit, Schultz), 19:45 (pp). Penalties: Ruhwedel, PIT, (interference), 1:24; Pittsburgh bench, served by Sestito (too many men on the ice), 7:44; New Jersey bench, served by Quenneville (too many men on the ice), 10:00; Prout, NJ, (cross checking), 18:12; Blandisi, NJ, (holding), 18:12. Second period: 6, Pittsburgh, Bonino 14 (Kuhnhackl, Rowney), 15:47. 7, New Jersey, Bennett 5 (Merrill, Henrique), 19:09. Penalties: Cullen, PIT, (tripping), 4:52; Merrill, NJ, (roughing), 10:33; Kunitz, PIT, (roughing), 10:33; Lovejoy, NJ, Penalty Shot (intf. on breakaway (penalty shot)), 19:38; Schultz, PIT, (slashing), 19:58; New Jersey bench, served by Lappin (), 19:58. Third period: 8, Pittsburgh, Rowney 1 (Sestito, Kuhnhackl), 5:17. 9, New Jersey, Palmieri 25 (Blandisi), 16:29 (pp). 10, Pittsburgh, Crosby 37 (Sheary), 19:26. Penalties: Severson, NJ, (hooking), 8:03; Bonino, PIT, (hooking), 16:21. Shots: NJ 13-13-10: 36. PIT 17-15-11: 43. Power-plays: NJ 1 of 4; Pittsburgh 1 of 4. Goalies: NJ, Kinkaid 7-10-2 (42 shots-37 saves). PIT, Murray 27-9-3 (36-32). A: 18,651.

Florida 0 2 1 0 — 4 NY Rangers 2 0 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 13 (Kreider, Stepan), 2:34 (pp). 2, NY Rangers, Miller 20 (B.Smith, Zibanejad), 4:11. Penalties: Kindl, FLA, (hooking), 1:45; Bjugstad, FLA, (hooking), 8:44; Zuccarello, NYR, (tripping), 18:47. Second period: 3, Florida, Huberdeau 6 (Jagr, Petrovic), 1:25. 4, Florida, Jokinen 11 (Vanek, Demers), 6:41 (pp). Penalties: Skjei, NYR, (interference), 5:56; Demers, FLA, (cross checking), 14:00. Third period: 5, Florida, Barkov 19 (Jagr, Huberdeau), 7:23. 6, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 14 (Holden, B.Smith), 11:45. Penalties: Bjugstad, FLA, (roughing), 12:17; Hayes, NYR, (roughing), 12:17; Petrovic, FLA, (roughing), 16:30; Miller, NYR, (roughing), 16:30. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Florida 1 (Trocheck NG, Barkov G), NY Rangers 0 (Zuccarello NG, Zibanejad NG, Grabner NG). Shots: Florida 11-14-10-2: 37. NY Rangers 7-8-15-2: 32. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 2; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 14-13-5 (32 shots-29 saves). NY Rangers, Raanta 14-7-1 (37-34). A: 18,006.

Through Thursday’s games Goal Scoring Brad Marchand Boston Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis Patrik Laine Winnipeg Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Max Pacioretty Montreal Cam Atkinson Columbus Jeff Carter Los Angeles Patrick Kane Chicago Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Auston Matthews Toronto David Pastrnak Boston Rickard Rakell Anaheim Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Filip Forsberg Nashville Nazem Kadri Toronto Alex Ovechkin Washington Joe Pavelski San Jose Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Michael Grabner NY Rangers

GP 71 63 70 63 62 70 69 70 70 63 69 64 59 70 70 69 70 70 68 64

G 37 35 34 33 33 33 32 31 31 31 31 31 30 29 28 28 28 28 28 27

Assists Connor McDavid Edmonton Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Patrick Kane Chicago Victor Hedman Tampa Bay Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Tyler Seguin Dallas Brent Burns San Jose Ryan Johansen Nashville Duncan Keith Chicago Brad Marchand Boston

GP 70 70 69 70 67 63 70 70 70 70 71

A 55 50 50 46 45 44 44 43 43 42 42

World Baseball Classic

GOLF

BOXING REPORT • In the WBC/WBA/ IBF/IBO middleweight title fight on Saturday at Madison Square Garden, Gennady Golovkin is -$700 vs. Daniel “The Miracle Man” Jacobs at +$500. NBA Favorite Points Underdog THUNDER 12.5 Kings HAWKS 3 Blazers HORNETS 1.5 Wizards CLIPPERS 3.5 Cavaliers Jazz 7 BULLS Spurs 4 GRIZZLIES Rockets 2.5 NUGGETS WARRIORS 11.5 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL • NCAA TOURN. Favorite Points Underdog Buffalo, NY W Virginia 2.5 Notre Dame Villanova 6 Wisconsin Orlando, FL Florida St 6 Xavier Florida 1.5 Virginia Milwaukee, WI Butler 4 Middle Tenn St Purdue PK Iowa St Salt Lake City, UT Gonzaga 11 Northwestern Arizona 4 St. Mary’s-CA Sunday Greenville, SC N Carolina 9 Arkansas Sunday Indianapolis, IN Louisville 2 Michigan Sunday Tulsa, OK Baylor 6.5 Usc Sunday Sacramento, CA Oregon NL Creighton or Oregon NL Rhode Island NIT TOURNAMENT SYRACUSE 7 Mississippi NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$180/+$160 Avalanche Blue Jackets -$120/even ISLANDERS Blackhawks -$110/-$110 MAPLE LEAFS HURRICANES -$110/-$110 Predators Capitals -$125/+$105 LIGHTNING WILD -$150/+$130 Rangers Canadiens -$110/-$110 SENATORS Blues -$140/+$120 COYOTES OILERS -$260/+$220 Canucks SHARKS -$240/+$200 Ducks Grand Salami: Over/under 55.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

> SECOND ROUND

PGA Arnold Palmer/Bay Hill

Area college scores

Friday | Orlando, Fla. Purse: $8.7 million | Yardage: 7,419; Par 72 Second Round Charley Hoffman 68-66 — 134 -10 Emiliano Grillo 67-68 — 135 -9 Matthew Fitzpatrick 67-69 — 136 -8 Lucas Glover 68-69 — 137 -7 Kevin Kisner 70-67 — 137 -7 Marc Leishman 71-66 — 137 -7 Francesco Molinari 70-68 — 138 -6 Jeunghun Wang 71-68 — 139 -5 Tony Finau 72-67 — 139 -5 Adam Hadwin 70-70 — 140 -4 Paul Casey 68-72 — 140 -4 Harold Varner III 70-70 — 140 -4 Greg Chalmers 69-72 — 141 -3 Jamie Lovemark 72-69 — 141 -3 Kyle Stanley 73-68 — 141 -3 Justin Rose 71-70 — 141 -3 Jason Day 70-71 — 141 -3 Ryan Moore 72-69 — 141 -3 Tyrrell Hatton 72-69 — 141 -3 Brian Harman 72-70 — 142 -2 Keegan Bradley 71-71 — 142 -2 Luke List 71-71 — 142 -2 Hideki Matsuyama 73-69 — 142 -2 Vaughn Taylor 71-71 — 142 -2 Si Woo Kim 71-71 — 142 -2 David Hearn 70-73 — 143 -1 Ollie Schniederjans 73-70 — 143 -1 Louis Oosthuizen 70-73 — 143 -1 Cameron Smith 74-69 — 143 -1 Russell Henley 72-71 — 143 -1 Graeme McDowell 72-71 — 143 -1 Brandt Snedeker 72-71 — 143 -1 Matt Every 73-70 — 143 -1 Ryan Ruffels 69-74 — 143 -1 J.J. Spaun 70-73 — 143 -1 Charl Schwartzel 72-71 — 143 -1 Michael Kim 72-71 — 143 -1 Charles Howell III 72-72 — 144 E Pat Perez 74-70 — 144 E Alex Noren 70-74 — 144 E James Hahn 73-71 — 144 E Tommy Fleetwood 78-66 — 144 E Bubba Watson 72-72 — 144 E Martin Kaymer 73-71 — 144 E Brandon Hagy 73-71 — 144 E Martin Laird 77-68 — 145 +1 Jim Herman 73-72 — 145 +1 Rory McIlroy 74-71 — 145 +1 Aaron Baddeley 70-75 — 145 +1 Derek Fathauer 74-71 — 145 +1 Ian Poulter 72-73 — 145 +1 Tim Herron 72-73 — 145 +1 Ben Martin 73-72 — 145 +1 Hudson Swafford 73-72 — 145 +1 Billy Horschel 72-73 — 145 +1 Danny Lee 75-70 — 145 +1 Zach Johnson 75-70 — 145 +1 Jason Kokrak 72-74 — 146 +2 John Huh 74-72 — 146 +2 Byeong Hun An 76-70 — 146 +2 Rickie Fowler 74-72 — 146 +2 David Lingmerth 74-72 — 146 +2 Kevin Chappell 72-74 — 146 +2 Kevin Streelman 75-71 — 146 +2 C.T. Pan 75-71 — 146 +2 Fabian Gomez 74-72 — 146 +2 Stewart Cink 70-76 — 146 +2 Steve Wheatcroft 77-69 — 146 +2 Wesley Bryan 77-70 — 147 +3 Boo Weekley 75-72 — 147 +3 Blayne Barber 75-72 — 147 +3 Troy Merritt 76-71 — 147 +3 Note: 48 golfers failed to make the cut

Baseball Missouri Baptist 4, Harris-Stowe 3 (8 innings) McKendree 5, Rockhurst 2 McKendree 5, Rockhurst 1 Northern State 12, William Jewell 5 Wisconsin-Whitewater 10, Webster U. 2 Softball Eastern Illinois 4, Eastern Michigan 2 Mercer 3, Eastern Illinois 1 Ohio State 5, Mizzou 4 Mizzou 9, Rutgers 1 Men’s tennis Washington U. 5, Azusa Pacific 2

BASEBALL MLB spring training AL W L Pct. New York 16 5 0.762 Seattle 13 8 0.619 Minnesota 11 7 0.611 Baltimore 11 8 0.579 Oakland 10 8 0.556 Los Angeles 11 9 0.550 Chicago 11 9 0.550 Kansas City 11 10 0.524 Tampa Bay 9 9 0.500 Cleveland 9 10 0.474 Boston 9 11 0.450 Houston 8 10 0.444 Texas 7 12 0.368 Detroit 7 13 0.350 Toronto 6 12 0.333 NL W L Pct. Cardinals 12 6 0.667 Pittsburgh 13 7 0.650 Los Angeles 12 9 0.571 Colorado 10 9 0.526 Arizona 11 10 0.524 Milwaukee 11 10 0.524 New York 11 11 0.500 Washington 8 8 0.500 Philadelphia 9 10 0.474 Chicago 8 9 0.471 San Francisco 9 11 0.450 Cincinnati 9 12 0.429 Miami 5 10 0.333 San Diego 6 12 0.333 Atlanta 6 14 0.300 Friday NY Mets 16, Cardinals 2 Houston (ss) 5, Atlanta 4 Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 6 Houston (ss) 6, Boston 2 Minnesota 4, Tampa Bay 2 NY Yankees 3, Detroit 0 Toronto 7, Philadelphia 5 Washington 5, Miami 5 Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 3 Arizona (ss) 3, Oakland 2 Kansas City 8, Milwaukee 5 Texas (ss) 6, LA Angels 5 Seattle (ss) 9, Arizona 5 Cleveland (ss) vs. Texas, late Cincinnati vs. Cleveland (ss), late Colorado vs. San Francisco, late Seattle (ss) vs. LA Dodgers, late LA Dodgers (ss) vs. San Diego, late Saturday Cleveland (ss) vs. Texas, TBD Baltimore vs. NY Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota, 12:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. Washington, 12:05 p.m. Miami vs. Detroit (ss), 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Cardinals, 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland (ss) vs. Kansas City , 3:05 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox, 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Oakland, 3:05 p.m. TBD vs. Chicago Cubs, 3:05 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Cincinnati, 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. LA Angels, 3:10 p.m. TBD Pool E vs. Arizona, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco vs. Seattle, 3:10 p.m.

GB — 1 2 3

Pool F | San Diego W L Pct GB Puerto Rico 1 0 1.000 — United States 1 0 1.000 — Dominican Republic 1 1 .500 ½ Venezuela 0 2 .000 1½ Tuesday Puerto Rico 3, Dominican Republic 1 Wednesday United States 4, Venezuela 2 Thursday Dominican Republic 3, Venezuela 0 Friday United States vs. Puerto Rico, late Saturday Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, 2:30 p.m. Dominican Republic vs. United States, 9 p.m. Sunday Tiebreaker game, 5 p.m., if necessary

> CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND At Dodger Stadium | Los Angeles Semifinals March 20 Netherlands vs. Pool F winner, 8 p.m. March 21 Japan vs. Pool F runner-up, 8 p.m. Championship 8 p.m. Wednesday

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 2 0 0 6 3 1 Chicago 1 0 1 4 3 1 Atlanta United FC 1 1 0 3 7 3 New York City FC 1 1 0 3 4 1 Orlando City 1 0 0 3 1 0 Philadelphia 0 0 2 2 2 2 Toronto FC 0 0 2 2 2 2 Montreal 0 1 1 1 2 3 Columbus 0 1 1 1 2 4 D.C. United 0 1 1 1 0 4 New England 0 1 0 0 0 1 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Portland 2 0 0 6 6 1 Houston 2 0 0 6 5 2 San Jose 2 0 0 6 4 2 FC Dallas 1 0 1 4 2 1 Colorado 1 1 0 3 1 1 Sporting K.C. 0 0 2 2 0 0 Seattle 0 1 1 1 3 4 Vancouver 0 1 1 1 2 3 Real Salt Lake 0 1 1 1 0 2 Los Angeles 0 2 0 0 1 3 Minnesota United 0 2 0 0 2 11 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, March 18 Montreal at New York City FC, 1 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta United FC, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. New England at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, March 19 New York at Seattle, 6 p.m. Saturday, March 25 Minnesota United at New England, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New York, 3 p.m. Portland at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA GD PTS Chelsea 27 21 3 3 57 20 37 66 Tottenham 27 16 8 3 53 20 33 56 Man. City 27 17 5 5 53 29 24 56 Liverpool 28 16 7 5 60 35 25 55 Arsenal 26 15 5 6 55 31 24 50 Man United 26 13 10 3 39 22 17 49 Everton 28 13 8 7 47 30 17 47 West Brom 28 11 7 10 36 37 -1 40 Stoke City 28 9 9 10 32 40 -8 36 Southampton 26 9 6 11 32 34 -2 33 West Ham 28 9 6 13 38 49 -11 33 Burnley FC 28 9 4 15 31 42 -11 31 Watford 27 8 7 12 33 47 -14 31 Bournemouth 28 8 6 14 40 54 -14 30 Leicester City 27 7 6 14 30 45 -15 27 Swansea City 28 8 3 17 36 61 -25 27 Crystal Palace 27 7 4 16 35 46 -11 25 Hull City 28 6 6 16 26 54 -28 24 Middlesbrough 27 4 10 13 19 30 -11 22 Sunderland 27 5 4 18 24 50 -26 19 Saturday West Brom vs. Arsenal, 7:30 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Watford, 10 a.m. Everton vs. Hull, 10 a.m. Stoke vs. Chelsea, 10 a.m. Sunderland vs. Burnley, 10 a.m. West Ham vs. Leicester, 10 a.m. Bournemouth vs. Swansea, 12:30 p.m. Sunday Middlesbrough vs. Manchester United, 7 a.m. Tottenham vs. Southampton, 9:15 a.m. Manchester City vs. Liverpool, 11:30 a.m.

Champions League > QUARTERFINALS FIRST LEG Tuesday, April 11 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, 1:45 p.m. Juventus (Italy) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 12 Atletico Madrid (Spain) vs. Leicester (England), 1:45 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. SECOND LEG Tuesday, April 18 Leicester (England) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 19 Barcelona (Spain) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Monaco vs. Borussia Dortmund (Germany), 1:45 p.m.

Milestone for Jagr • Aleksander Barkov scored a third-period goal and added the winner in the shootout as the Florida Panthers beat the New York Rangers 4-3. Jaromir Jagr had two assists and passed Hall of Famer Gordie Howe for the most points after turning 40 with 269.

NHL SUMMARIES

AMERICA’S LINE

Round Robin x-advanced to championship round Pool E | Tokyo W L Pct x-Japan 3 0 1.000 x-Netherlands 2 1 .667 Israel 1 2 .333 Cuba 0 3 .000

joining Pittsburgh. The Penguins called up Derrick Pouliot from their AHL ailiate in Wilkes Barre/Scranton ahead of Friday night’s game. Pittsburgh is already missing injured defensemen Kris Letang, Olli Maatta and Trevor Daley, though all three are expected back by the playofs.

68 69 69 69 70 69 71 70 66

42 42 42 41 41 40 40 40 39

Plus/Minus Jason Zucker Minnesota Brooks Orpik Washington Ryan Suter Minnesota Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Mikko Koivu Minnesota Michael Grabner NY Rangers Mikael Granlund Minnesota Dmitry Orlov Washington Justin Schultz Pittsburgh David Savard Columbus Jake Gardiner Toronto Ian Cole Pittsburgh T.J. Oshie Washington Dennis Seidenberg NY Islanders Brent Burns San Jose Karl Alzner Washington Brett Connolly Washington Brandon Saad Columbus Zachary Werenski Columbus Jay Beagle Washington

GP +/69 33 67 32 69 32 65 31 68 30 64 29 69 28 70 28 66 28 61 26 69 25 69 24 57 24 63 24 70 23 70 21 56 21 69 21 69 21 69 20

COLLEGES

LPGA Founders Cup leaders Friday’s second round | Phoenix, Ariz. Par 72-Yards 6,679 | Purse $1,500,000 1 Ariya Jutanugarn -13 1 Stacy Lewis -13 3 Mi Jung Hur -12 3 Jeong Eun Lee -12 3 Vicky Hurst -12 3 Michelle Wie -12 7 Jessica Korda -11 7 In Gee Chun -11 7 Inbee Park -11 7 Sung Hyun Park -11 7 Karine Icher -11 12 Angel Yin -10 12 Caroline Masson -10 12 Anna Nordqvist -10 12 Jacqui Concolino -10 12 Katie Burnett -10 12 Marina Alex -10 12 So Yeon Ryu -10 12 Chella Choi -10 20 Eight tied at -9

Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Alexander Wennberg Columbus Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Mikael Granlund Minnesota Joe Thornton San Jose Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Torey Krug Boston Artemi Panarin Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas

F F F F F F F F F 17 16 F F F F F F F 16 -

MOTOR SPORTS NHRA • Gainesville Friday qualifying | Gainesville, Fla. Top Fuel • 1. Tony Schumacher, 3.682 seconds, 328.22 mph. 2. Doug Kalitta, 3.698, 328.78. 3. Antron Brown, 3.716, 325.22. 4. Brittany Force, 3.719, 326.79. 5. Steve Torrence, 3.726, 327.51. 6. Troy Coughlin Jr., 3.747, 327.03. 7. Clay Millican, 3.765, 327.11. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.789, 321.50. 9. Scott Palmer, 3.841, 283.97. 10. Shawn Reed, 3.890, 303.03. 11. Pat Dakin, 4.405, 179.16. 12. Larry Dixon, 4.606, 163.18. 13. Leah Pritchett, 4.686, 142.09. 14. Ike Maier, 6.491, 185.95. 15. Chris Karamesines, 8.475, 86.79. Funny Car • 1. John Force, Chevy Camaro, 3.832, 333.25. 2. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.844, 331.77. 3. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.854, 328.70. 4. Courtney Force, Camaro, 3.860, 333.25. 5. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 3.865, 329.83. 6. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.865, 329.58. 7. J.R. Todd, Toyota Camry, 3.871, 332.51. 8. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.883, 321.27. 9. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.920, 309.06. 10. Jonnie Lindberg, Camry, 3.927, 325.37. 11. Alexis DeJoria, Camry, 3.963, 324.75. 12. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.053, 313.88. 13. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.152, 295.72. 14. Dave Richards, Mustang, 4.152, 255.10. 15. Del Worsham, Camry, 4.544, 191.57. 16. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 12.657, 75.79. Pro Stock • 1. Jason Line, Chevy Camaro, 6.476, 213.87. 2. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.477, 214.28. 3. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.490, 214.01. 4. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.491, 214.31. 5. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.491, 214.59. 6. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.493, 214.11. 7. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.517, 212.96. 8. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.526, 213.20. 9. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.531, 213.37. 10. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.562, 211.56. 11. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.584, 211.59. 12. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.609, 211.03. 13. Allen Johnson, Dart, 9.838, 93.04. 14. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 18.742, 42.69. 15. John Gaydosh Jr, Camaro, broke.

MEN’S BASKETBALL NIT > FIRST ROUND Tuesday Illinois 82, Valparaiso 57 Mississippi 91, Monmouth 83 Oakland 74, Clemson 69 Georgia Tech 75, Indiana 63 Colorado State 81, College of Charleston 74 Richmond 71, Alabama 64 Boise State 73, Utah 68 CS Bakersfield 73, California 66 Wednesday Syracuse 90, UNC-Greensboro 77 Belmont 78, Georgia 69 UCF 79, Colorado 74 Akron 78, Houston 75 TCU 66, Fresno State 59 Iowa 87, South Dakota 75 Illinois State 85, UC Irvine 71 Texas-Arlington 105, BYU 89

> SECOND ROUND Saturday Mississippi (21-13) at Syracuse (19-14), 10 a.m. Sunday Belmont (23-6) at Georgia Tech (18-15), 11 a.m. TCU (20-15) at Iowa (19-14), 4 p.m. Oakland (25-8) at Richmond (21-12), 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 20 UCF (22-11) at Illinois State (28-6), 6 p.m. Akron (27-8) at Texas-Arlington (26-8), 7 p.m. Boise State (20-11) at Illinois (19-14), 8 p.m. CS Bakersfield (23-9) at Colorado State (24-11), 10 p.m.

> QUARTERFINALS Tuesday, March 21 Syracuse-Mississippi winner vs. Belmont-Georgia Tech winner, TBA TCU-Iowa winner vs. OaklandRichmond winner, TBA Wednesday, March 22 CS Bakersfield-Colorado State winner vs. Texas-Arlington-Akron winner, TBA UCF-Illinois State winner vs. Boise State-Illinois winner, TBA

> SEMIFINALS March 28 | New York Semifinal, 6 p.m. Semifinal 8:30 p.m.

> CHAMPIONSHIP March 29 | New York Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.

CBI > FIRST ROUND Wednesday Utah Valley 74, Ga. Southern 49 Loyola (Md.) 73, George Mason 58 Coast. Carolina 83, Hampton 67 G. Wash. 73, Toledo 69 Rice 85, San Francisco 76 UMKC 92, Green Bay 82 Wyoming 91, Eastern Washington 81 Thursday UIC 71, Stony Brook 69

> QUARTERFINALS Monday, March 20 Loyola (Md.) (16-16) at Coast. Carolina (17-17), 6 p.m. G. Wash. (20-14) at UIC (16-18), 7 p.m. Utah Valley (16-16) at Rice (23-11), 7 p.m. UMKC (18-16) at Wyoming (19-14), 8 p.m.

> SEMIFINALS Wednesday, March 22 Loyola (Md.)-Coast. Carolina winner vs. UIC-G. Wash. winner, TBA UMKC-Wyoming winner vs. Utah Valley-Rice winner, TBA

> CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-3) Monday, March 27: TBD Wednesday, March 29: TBD Friday, March 31: TBD

At Durham, N.C. Temple (24-7) vs. Oregon (20-13), 5:30 p.m. Duke (27-5) vs. Hampton (20-12), 8 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday At College Park, Md. Maryland (31-2) vs. West Virginia (24-10) Monday At Storrs, Conn. UConn-Albany (NY) winner vs. Syracuse-Iowa State winner At Los Angeles UCLA-Boise State winner vs. Texas A&M-Penn winner At Durham, N.C. Temple-Oregon winner vs. Duke-Hampton winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 25 | At Bridgeport, Conn. UConn-Albany (NY)-Syracuse-Iowa State winner vs. UCLA-Boise State-Texas A&M-Penn winner Maryland-West Virginia winner vs. Temple-Oregon-Duke-Hampton winner REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP March 27 | Semifinal winners

> OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday | At Starkville, Miss. DePaul 88, Northern Iowa 67 Mississippi State 110, Troy 69 Saturday At Waco, Texas Baylor (30-3) vs. Texas Southern (23-9), 5:30 p.m. LSU (20-11) vs. California (19-13), 8 p.m. At Louisville, Ky. Louisville (27-7) vs. Chattanooga (21-10), 12:30 p.m. Tennessee (19-11) vs. Dayton (22-9), 3 p.m. At Seattle Oklahoma (22-9) vs. Gonzaga (26-6), 5:30 p.m. Washington (27-5) vs. Montana State (25-6), 8 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday | At Starkville, Miss. DePaul (27-7) vs. Mississippi State (30-4) Monday At Waco, Texas Baylor-Texas Southern winner vs. LSU-California winner At Louisville, Ky. Louisville-Chattanooga winner vs. Tennessee-Dayton winner At Seattle Oklahoma-Gonzaga winner vs. Washington-Montana State winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 24 | At Oklahoma City Baylor-Texas Southern-LSU-California winner vs. Louisville-ChattanoogaTennessee-Dayton winner DePaul-Mississippi State winner vs. Oklahoma-Gonzaga-WashingtonMontana State winner Regional Championship March 26 | Semifinal winners

> LEXINGTON REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday At South Bend, Ind. Purdue 74, Green Bay 62 Notre Dame 79, Robert Morris 49 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky 73, Belmont 70 Ohio State 70, Western Kentucky 63 At Austin, Texas NC State 62, Auburn 48 Texas 78, Central Arkansas 50 Saturday At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford (28-5) vs. New Mexico State (24-6), 12:30 p.m. Kansas State (22-10) vs. Drake (28-4), 3 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday At South Bend, Ind. Purdue (23-12) vs. Notre Dame (31-3) At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky (22-10) vs. Ohio State (27-6) At Austin, Texas NC State (23-8) vs. Texas (24-8) Monday At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford-New Mexico State winner vs. Kansas State-Drake winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 24 | At Lexington, Ky. Purdue-Notre Dame winner vs. Kentucky-Ohio State winner NC State-Texas winner vs. Stanford-New Mexico State-Kansas State-Drake winner Regional Championship March 26 | Semifinal winners

> STOCKTON REGIONAL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENT > BRIDGEPORT REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday | At College Park, Md. Maryland 103, Bucknell 61 West Virginia 75, Elon 62 Saturday At Storrs, Conn. UConn (32-0) vs. Albany (NY) (21-10), 10 a.m. Syracuse (21-1) vs. Iowa State (18-12), 12:30 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA (23-8) vs. Boise State (25-7), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (21-11) vs. Penn (22-7), 8 p.m.

FIRST ROUND Friday At Columbia, S.C. South Carolina 90, UNC-Asheville 40 Arizona State 73, Michigan State 61 At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri 66, South Florida 64 Florida State 87, Western Illinois 66 Corvallis, Ore. Oregon State 56, Long Beach State 55 Creighton 76, Toledo 49 Saturday At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette (25-7) vs. Quinnipiac (27-6), 12:30 p.m. Miami (23-8) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (26-8), 3 p.m.

SECOND ROUND Sunday At Columbia, S.C. South Carolina (28-4) vs. Arizona State (20-12) At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri (22-10) vs. Florida State (26-6) Corvallis, Ore. Oregon State (30-4) vs. Creighton (24-7) Monday At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette-Quinnipiac winner vs. Miami-Florida Gulf Coast winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 25 | At Stockton, Calif. South Carolina-Arizona State winner vs. Marquette-Quinnipiac-MiamiFlorida Gulf Coast winner Missouri-Florida State winner vs. Oregon State-Creighton winner REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP March 27 Semifinal winners

> FINAL FOUR At Dallas | Friday, March 31

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP At Dallas | Sunday, April 2

WNIT > FIRST ROUND Wednesday Little Rock 72, Southern Miss 62 Thursday Georgia Tech 71, Jacksonville 55 UCF 73, Stetson 53 Michigan 67, Kent State 60 Wright State 66, Central Michigan 64 Wake Forest 71, Bethune-Cookman 42 Indiana 71, Ball State 58 Grambling State 78, Mississippi 75 Iowa 95, Missouri State 74 South Dakota 78, North Dakota 55 Abilene Christian 66, Oklahoma State 56 Saint Louis 62, IUPUI 57 Tulane 62, UT Arlington 53 Alabama 81, Mercer 57 South Dakota State 94, Northern Illinois 84 Wyoming 68, Seattle 52 Colorado 66, UNLV 52 Washington State 72, BYU 64 Colorado State 80, Saint Mary’s 68, OT Middle Tennessee 67, Morehead State 58 Friday Villanova 59, Princeton 53 St. John’s 72, Sacred Heart 43 Penn State 74, Ohio 65 Fordham 60, Georgetown 49 Navy 61, George Washington 51, OT Virginia Tech 76, Rider 62 Drexel 70, Duquesne 47 James Madison 80, Radford 59 Virginia 62, Saint Joseph’s 56 Harvard 69, New Hampshire 56 SMU 75, Louisiana Tech 70, OT UC Davis 72, Utah 62

> SECOND ROUND Saturday Wright State at Michigan, 1 p.m. South Dakota at Iowa, 3 p.m. Washington State at Wyoming, 3 p.m. Sunday Saint Louis at Indiana, 1 p.m. Harvard at St. John’s, 1 p.m. Colorado at South Dakota State, 1 p.m. Villanova at Drexel, 1 p.m. Virginia at James Madison, 1 p.m. Navy at Virginia Tech, 1 p.m. Little Rock at Alabama, 2 p.m. Wake Forest at Middle Tennessee, 2 p.m. UCF at Georgia Tech, 4 p.m. Grambling State at Tulane, 4 p.m. Fordham at Penn State, 1 p.m. TBA Colorado State vs. UC Davis Abilene Christian vs. SMU

> THIRD ROUND March 22-24 Colorado State: UC Davis winner vs. Washington State-Wyoming winner South Dakota-Iowa winner vs. South Dakota State-Colorado winner Tulane-Grambling State winner vs. Alabama: Little Rock winner Middle Tennessee-Wake Forest winner vs. Georgia Tech-UCF winner Michigan-Wright State winner vs. Harvard-St. John’s Penn State-Fordham winner vs. Navy-Virginia Tech winner Villanova-Drexel winner vs. James Madison-Virginia Indiana-Saint Louis winner vs. Abilene Christian-SMU

> QUARTERFINALS March 25-27

> SEMIFINALS March 29-30

> CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, April 1, 2 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE — Released RHP Logan Ondrusek. BOSTON — Optioned LHP Luis Ysla and RHP Kyle Martin to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned RHP Marcus Walden to their minor league camp. KANSAS CITY — Optioned RHP Andrew Edwards, C Cam Gallagher, INFs Hunter Dozier and Ramon Torres and OFs Jorge Bonifacio and Bubba Starling to Omaha (PCL). YANKEES — Optioned INF Jorge Mateo to Tampa (FSL) and reassigned him to their minor league camp. SEATTLE — Optioned RHP Chase De Jong and OF Boog Powell to Tacoma (PCL). National League CUBS — Optioned RHPs Pierce Johnson and Felix Pena, C Victor Caratini and OF Jacob Hannemann to Iowa (PCL). Assigned INF

Chesny Young and OFs Eloy Jimenez and Mark Zagunis to their minor league camp. COLORADO — Optioned RHPs Shane Carle, Rayan Gonzalez and Zach Jemiola to Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI — Optioned INFs JT Riddle and Yefri Perez to New Orleans (PCL), and C Austin Nola and LHP Drew Peters to Jacksonville (SL). Reassigned LHP Kyle Lobstein to their minor league camp. MILWAUKEE — Optioned OFs Lewis Brinson, Ryan Cordell and Brett Phillips to their minor league camp. Reassigned RHP Forrest Snow to their minor league camp. METS — Optioned C Tomas Nido to their minor league camp. PITTSBURGH — Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and INF Chris Bostick to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned OF Barrett Barnes, INF Erich Weiss and C Christian Kelley to their minor league camp. WASHINGTON — Optioned OF Rafael Bautista

and RHP Austin Adams to Syracuse (IL). FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA — Re-signed DT Frostee Rucker to a one-year contract BUFFALO — Signed RB Joe Banyard, CB Leonard Johnson and WR Corey Washington. CHICAGO — Signed DL John Jenkins to a one-year contract. CINCINNATI — Re-signed C T.J. Johnson. INDIANAPOLIS — Signed NT Al Woods. NEW ENGLAND — Signed DB Justin Coleman. NY GIANTS — Signed DE Jason Pierre-Paul to a four-year contract. Re-signed OL John Jerry and QB Josh Johnson. SEATTLE — Agreed to terms with TE Luke Willson and CB DeShawn Shead. HOCKEY • NHL WASHINGTON — Reassigned C Jakub Vrana to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE GEORGETOWN — Named Adam Neugebauer wide receivers and slot receivers coach.


SPORTS

B14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Penguins overcome injuries, beat Devils

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Toronto Tampa Bay Florida Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh Columbus NY Rangers NY Islanders Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey

GP 70 69 71 69 70 70 72 69 GP 70 70 69 71 70 70 68 70

W 39 39 38 32 34 31 29 27 W 45 44 45 44 33 32 29 26

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 8 86 191 176 20-10-4 19-13-4 12-3-5 23 7 85 184 177 19-11-7 20-12-0 11-10-2 27 6 82 205 188 19-14-0 19-13-6 16-7-1 23 14 78 211 206 17-10-6 15-13-8 14-7-3 27 9 77 191 192 19-12-3 15-15-6 13-6-3 28 11 73 180 200 16-16-3 15-12-8 10-9-5 31 12 70 180 210 17-12-6 12-19-6 9-10-4 31 11 65 172 209 13-15-5 14-16-6 6-11-5 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 8 98 223 156 28-6-2 17-11-6 15-7-5 17 9 97 245 198 28-4-3 16-13-6 16-6-1 18 6 96 221 161 26-9-1 19-9-5 15-6-1 24 3 91 228 187 19-15-3 25-9-0 13-11-0 26 11 77 208 215 20-10-6 13-16-5 10-9-4 30 8 72 182 210 20-11-4 12-19-4 7-12-2 27 12 70 175 197 20-10-4 9-17-8 8-13-3 32 12 64 163 205 14-13-6 12-19-6 9-10-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Nashville Blues Winnipeg Dallas Colorado Paciic San Jose Anaheim Calgary Edmonton Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 70 69 70 70 71 71 69 GP 70 71 71 70 70 70 70

W 45 43 35 37 31 28 20 W 42 37 40 37 34 28 26

L 20 20 24 28 33 33 46 L 21 23 27 24 29 33 35

OT 5 6 11 5 7 10 3 OT 7 11 4 9 7 9 9

Pts 95 92 81 79 69 66 43 Pts 91 85 84 83 75 65 61

GF 210 226 207 194 212 195 134 GF 195 184 196 205 173 161 172

GA 174 170 197 193 226 233 223 GA 163 177 191 186 174 205 224

Home Away 23-9-4 22-11-1 23-9-1 20-11-5 20-8-7 15-16-4 20-11-4 17-17-1 16-18-1 15-15-6 18-12-6 10-21-4 11-22-2 9-24-1 Home Away 23-9-4 19-12-3 23-8-4 14-15-7 21-15-0 19-12-4 18-12-4 19-12-5 20-13-2 14-16-5 18-13-6 10-20-3 16-15-5 10-20-4

Div 17-8-1 15-7-3 14-10-1 11-11-2 16-8-2 8-14-4 6-16-0 Div 13-7-3 12-6-4 10-9-3 12-4-3 9-9-2 11-9-1 10-12-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday Pittsburgh 6, New Jersey 4 Florida 4, NY Rangers 3, SO Calgary 3, Dallas 1 Buffalo 2, Anaheim 1, SO Thursday Blues 4, San Jose 1 Carolina 3, Minnesota 1 Winnipeg 4, NY Islanders 2 Nashville 2, Washington 1, OT New Jersey 6, Philadelphia 2 Columbus 2, Florida 1 Chicago 2, Ottawa 1

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 0 Edmonton 7, Boston 4 Detroit 5, Arizona 4, SO Dallas 4, Vancouver 2 Los Angeles 2, Buffalo 0 Saturday Colorado at Detroit, noon Columbus at NY Islanders, noon Washington at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Nashville at Carolina, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 6 p.m.

Blues at Arizona, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Florida at Pittsburgh, noon Columbus at New Jersey, noon Minnesota at Winnipeg, 4 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sidney Crosby scored twice to move into a tie for the NHL lead with 37, Carter Rowney added the first goal of his NHL career and the short-handed Pittsburgh Penguins beat the visiting New Jersey Devils 6-4 on Friday night. Crosby added an assist to give him 640 in his career and move him into a tie with Jaromir Jagr for the second-most in franchise history. Nick Bonino, Jake Guentzel and Phil Kessel also scored for Pittsburgh as the Penguins leapfrogged Columbus to move into second-place behind Washington in the Metropolitan Division. Matt Murray stopped 32 shots

for Pittsburgh as the Penguins relied on Crosby and some fresh faces to overcome the loss of Evgeni Malkin, who is out with an upper-body injury. Kyle Palmieri matched Crosby with two goals for New Jersey. Stefan Noesen and Beau Bennett also scored for the Devils. Keith Kinkaid finished with 37 saves. Before the game, the depleted Penguins’ defense took another hit. Coach Mike Sullivan said defenseman Ron Hainsey is weekto-week with an upper-body injury. The Penguins acquired the 35-year-old Hainsey just before the trade deadline. Hainsey has one assist in 10 games since

Penguins 6, Devils 4

Panthers 4, Rangers 3, SO

Flames 3, Stars 1

Sabres 2, Ducks 1, SO

New Jersey 2 1 1 — 4 Pittsburgh 3 1 2 — 6 First period: 1, New Jersey, Palmieri 24 (Hall, Moore), 5:35. 2, Pittsburgh, Kessel 22 (Cullen, Hornqvist), 6:37. 3, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 11 (Dumoulin, Crosby), 13:30. 4, New Jersey, Noesen 6 (Quenneville, Zacha), 14:02. 5, Pittsburgh, Crosby 36 (Streit, Schultz), 19:45 (pp). Penalties: Ruhwedel, PIT, (interference), 1:24; Pittsburgh bench, served by Sestito (too many men on the ice), 7:44; New Jersey bench, served by Quenneville (too many men on the ice), 10:00; Prout, NJ, (cross checking), 18:12; Blandisi, NJ, (holding), 18:12. Second period: 6, Pittsburgh, Bonino 14 (Kuhnhackl, Rowney), 15:47. 7, New Jersey, Bennett 5 (Merrill, Henrique), 19:09. Penalties: Cullen, PIT, (tripping), 4:52; Merrill, NJ, (roughing), 10:33; Kunitz, PIT, (roughing), 10:33; Lovejoy, NJ, Penalty Shot (intf. on breakaway (penalty shot)), 19:38; Schultz, PIT, (slashing), 19:58; New Jersey bench, served by Lappin (), 19:58. Third period: 8, Pittsburgh, Rowney 1 (Sestito, Kuhnhackl), 5:17. 9, New Jersey, Palmieri 25 (Blandisi), 16:29 (pp). 10, Pittsburgh, Crosby 37 (Sheary), 19:26. Penalties: Severson, NJ, (hooking), 8:03; Bonino, PIT, (hooking), 16:21. Shots: NJ 13-13-10: 36. PIT 17-15-11: 43. Power-plays: NJ 1 of 4; Pittsburgh 1 of 4. Goalies: NJ, Kinkaid 7-10-2 (42 shots-37 saves). PIT, Murray 27-9-3 (36-32). A: 18,651.

Florida 0 2 1 0 — 4 NY Rangers 2 0 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 13 (Kreider, Stepan), 2:34 (pp). 2, NY Rangers, Miller 20 (B.Smith, Zibanejad), 4:11. Penalties: Kindl, FLA, (hooking), 1:45; Bjugstad, FLA, (hooking), 8:44; Zuccarello, NYR, (tripping), 18:47. Second period: 3, Florida, Huberdeau 6 (Jagr, Petrovic), 1:25. 4, Florida, Jokinen 11 (Vanek, Demers), 6:41 (pp). Penalties: Skjei, NYR, (interference), 5:56; Demers, FLA, (cross checking), 14:00. Third period: 5, Florida, Barkov 19 (Jagr, Huberdeau), 7:23. 6, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 14 (Holden, B.Smith), 11:45. Penalties: Bjugstad, FLA, (roughing), 12:17; Hayes, NYR, (roughing), 12:17; Petrovic, FLA, (roughing), 16:30; Miller, NYR, (roughing), 16:30. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Florida 1 (Trocheck NG, Barkov G), NY Rangers 0 (Zuccarello NG, Zibanejad NG, Grabner NG). Shots: Florida 11-14-10-2: 37. NY Rangers 7-8-15-2: 32. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 2; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 14-13-5 (32 shots-29 saves). NY Rangers, Raanta 14-7-1 (37-34). A: 18,006.

Dallas 0 0 1 — 1 Calgary 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Calgary, Frolik 16 (Giordano, Backlund), 16:07. Penalties: Giordano, CGY, (interference), 11:44. Second period: 2, Calgary, Tkachuk 13 (Giordano, Hamilton), 5:20. 3, Calgary, Giordano 11 (Tkachuk), 8:32. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Dallas, Ritchie 13, 13:19. Penalties: Versteeg, CGY, (holding), 17:35. Shots: Dallas 5-13-7: 25. Calgary 6-10-8: 24. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 2; Calgary 0 of 0. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 17-22-6 (24 shots-21 saves). Calgary, Elliott 22-13-3 (25-24). A: 19,227. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Steve Miller.

Buffalo 0 1 0 0 — 2 Anaheim 1 0 0 0 — 1 Buffalo won shootout 3-2. First period: 1, Anaheim, Rakell 31 (Montour, Fowler), 11:48. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Buffalo, O’reilly 17 (Mccabe, Eichel), 15:35. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: Bogosian, BUF, Major (fighting), 3:15; Ritchie, ANA, Major (fighting), 3:15; Bieksa, ANA, (holding), 11:31. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Buffalo 3 (Ennis NG, O’reilly G, Eichel NG, Reinhart NG, Kane NG, Moulson NG, Gionta NG, Rodrigues NG, Ristolainen G, Girgensons G), Anaheim 2 (Silfverberg NG, Getzlaf G, Rakell NG, Perry NG, Eaves NG, Fowler NG, Vermette NG, Kesler NG, Montour G, Ritchie NG). Shots: Buffalo 8-7-15-1: 31. Anaheim 9-17-11-3: 40. Power-plays: Buffalo 0 of 1; Anaheim 0 of 0. Goalies: Buffalo, Nilsson 10-9-4 (40 shots39 saves). Anaheim, Bernier 14-7-3 (31-30). A: 14,556. Referees: Brad Meier, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Brandon Gawryletz.

World Baseball Classic

GOLF

BOXING REPORT • In the WBC/WBA/ IBF/IBO middleweight title fight on Saturday at Madison Square Garden, Gennady Golovkin is -$700 vs. Daniel “The Miracle Man” Jacobs at +$500. NBA Favorite Points Underdog THUNDER 12.5 Kings HAWKS 3 Blazers HORNETS 1.5 Wizards CLIPPERS 3.5 Cavaliers Jazz 7 BULLS Spurs 4 GRIZZLIES Rockets 2.5 NUGGETS WARRIORS 11.5 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL • NCAA TOURN. Favorite Points Underdog Buffalo, NY W Virginia 2.5 Notre Dame Villanova 6 Wisconsin Orlando, FL Florida St 6 Xavier Florida 1.5 Virginia Milwaukee, WI Butler 4 Middle Tenn St Purdue PK Iowa St Salt Lake City, UT Gonzaga 11 Northwestern Arizona 4 St. Mary’s-CA Sunday Greenville, SC N Carolina 9 Arkansas Sunday Indianapolis, IN Louisville 2 Michigan Sunday Tulsa, OK Baylor 6.5 Usc Sunday Sacramento, CA Oregon NL Creighton or Oregon NL Rhode Island NIT TOURNAMENT SYRACUSE 7 Mississippi NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$180/+$160 Avalanche Blue Jackets -$120/even ISLANDERS Blackhawks -$110/-$110 MAPLE LEAFS HURRICANES -$110/-$110 Predators Capitals -$125/+$105 LIGHTNING WILD -$150/+$130 Rangers Canadiens -$110/-$110 SENATORS Blues -$140/+$120 COYOTES OILERS -$260/+$220 Canucks SHARKS -$240/+$200 Ducks Grand Salami: Over/under 55.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

> SECOND ROUND

PGA Arnold Palmer/Bay Hill

Area college scores

Friday | Orlando, Fla. Purse: $8.7 million | Yardage: 7,419; Par 72 Second Round Charley Hoffman 68-66 — 134 -10 Emiliano Grillo 67-68 — 135 -9 Matthew Fitzpatrick 67-69 — 136 -8 Lucas Glover 68-69 — 137 -7 Kevin Kisner 70-67 — 137 -7 Marc Leishman 71-66 — 137 -7 Francesco Molinari 70-68 — 138 -6 Jeunghun Wang 71-68 — 139 -5 Tony Finau 72-67 — 139 -5 Adam Hadwin 70-70 — 140 -4 Paul Casey 68-72 — 140 -4 Harold Varner III 70-70 — 140 -4 Greg Chalmers 69-72 — 141 -3 Jamie Lovemark 72-69 — 141 -3 Kyle Stanley 73-68 — 141 -3 Justin Rose 71-70 — 141 -3 Jason Day 70-71 — 141 -3 Ryan Moore 72-69 — 141 -3 Tyrrell Hatton 72-69 — 141 -3 Brian Harman 72-70 — 142 -2 Keegan Bradley 71-71 — 142 -2 Luke List 71-71 — 142 -2 Hideki Matsuyama 73-69 — 142 -2 Vaughn Taylor 71-71 — 142 -2 Si Woo Kim 71-71 — 142 -2 David Hearn 70-73 — 143 -1 Ollie Schniederjans 73-70 — 143 -1 Louis Oosthuizen 70-73 — 143 -1 Cameron Smith 74-69 — 143 -1 Russell Henley 72-71 — 143 -1 Graeme McDowell 72-71 — 143 -1 Brandt Snedeker 72-71 — 143 -1 Matt Every 73-70 — 143 -1 Ryan Ruffels 69-74 — 143 -1 J.J. Spaun 70-73 — 143 -1 Charl Schwartzel 72-71 — 143 -1 Michael Kim 72-71 — 143 -1 Charles Howell III 72-72 — 144 E Pat Perez 74-70 — 144 E Alex Noren 70-74 — 144 E James Hahn 73-71 — 144 E Tommy Fleetwood 78-66 — 144 E Bubba Watson 72-72 — 144 E Martin Kaymer 73-71 — 144 E Brandon Hagy 73-71 — 144 E Martin Laird 77-68 — 145 +1 Jim Herman 73-72 — 145 +1 Rory McIlroy 74-71 — 145 +1 Aaron Baddeley 70-75 — 145 +1 Derek Fathauer 74-71 — 145 +1 Ian Poulter 72-73 — 145 +1 Tim Herron 72-73 — 145 +1 Ben Martin 73-72 — 145 +1 Hudson Swafford 73-72 — 145 +1 Billy Horschel 72-73 — 145 +1 Danny Lee 75-70 — 145 +1 Zach Johnson 75-70 — 145 +1 Jason Kokrak 72-74 — 146 +2 John Huh 74-72 — 146 +2 Byeong Hun An 76-70 — 146 +2 Rickie Fowler 74-72 — 146 +2 David Lingmerth 74-72 — 146 +2 Kevin Chappell 72-74 — 146 +2 Kevin Streelman 75-71 — 146 +2 C.T. Pan 75-71 — 146 +2 Fabian Gomez 74-72 — 146 +2 Stewart Cink 70-76 — 146 +2 Steve Wheatcroft 77-69 — 146 +2 Wesley Bryan 77-70 — 147 +3 Boo Weekley 75-72 — 147 +3 Blayne Barber 75-72 — 147 +3 Troy Merritt 76-71 — 147 +3 Note: 48 golfers failed to make the cut

Baseball Missouri Baptist 4, Harris-Stowe 3 (8 innings) McKendree 5, Rockhurst 2 McKendree 5, Rockhurst 1 Northern State 12, William Jewell 5 Wisconsin-Whitewater 10, Webster U. 2 Softball Eastern Illinois 4, Eastern Michigan 2 Mercer 3, Eastern Illinois 1 Ohio State 5, Mizzou 4 Mizzou 9, Rutgers 1 Men’s tennis Washington U. 5, Azusa Pacific 2

BASEBALL MLB spring training AL W L Pct. New York 16 5 0.762 Seattle 14 8 0.636 Minnesota 11 7 0.611 Baltimore 11 8 0.579 Oakland 10 8 0.556 Los Angeles 11 9 0.550 Chicago 11 9 0.550 Kansas City 11 10 0.524 Tampa Bay 9 9 0.500 Cleveland 10 11 0.476 Boston 9 11 0.450 Houston 8 10 0.444 Detroit 7 13 0.350 Texas 7 13 0.350 Toronto 6 12 0.333 NL W L Pct. Cardinals 12 6 0.667 Pittsburgh 13 7 0.650 Colorado 11 9 0.550 Milwaukee 11 10 0.524 Arizona 11 10 0.524 Los Angeles 12 11 0.522 New York 11 11 0.500 Washington 8 8 0.500 Philadelphia 9 10 0.474 Chicago 8 9 0.471 Cincinnati 10 12 0.455 San Francisco 9 12 0.429 San Diego 7 12 0.368 Miami 5 10 0.333 Atlanta 6 14 0.300 Friday Houston (ss) 5, Atlanta 4 Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 6 Houston (ss) 6, Boston 2 Minnesota 4, Tampa Bay 2 NY Yankees 3, Detroit 0 Toronto 7, Philadelphia 5 Washington 5, Miami 5 NY Mets 16, Cardinals 2 Chicago Cubs 7, Chicago White Sox 3 Arizona (ss) 3, Oakland 2 Kansas City 8, Milwaukee 5 Texas (ss) 6, LA Angels 5 Seattle (ss) 9, Arizona 5 Cleveland (ss) 3, Texas 2 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland (ss) 3 Colorado 5, San Francisco 1 Seattle (ss) 5, LA Dodgers 2 San Diego 3, LA Dodgers (ss) 2 Saturday Cleveland (ss) vs. Texas, TBD Baltimore vs. NY Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota, 12:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. Washington, 12:05 p.m. Miami vs. Detroit (ss), 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Cardinals, 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland (ss) vs. Kansas City , 3:05 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox, 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Oakland, 3:05 p.m. TBD vs. Chicago Cubs, 3:05 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Cincinnati, 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. LA Angels, 3:10 p.m. TBD Pool E vs. Arizona, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco vs. Seattle, 3:10 p.m.

GB — 1 2 3

Pool F | San Diego W L Pct GB Puerto Rico 2 0 1.000 — United States 1 1 1.000 1 Dominican Republic 1 1 .500 1 Venezuela 0 2 .000 1 Tuesday Puerto Rico 3, Dominican Republic 1 Wednesday United States 4, Venezuela 2 Thursday Dominican Republic 3, Venezuela 0 Friday Puerto Rico 6, United States 5 Saturday Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, 2:30 p.m. Dominican Republic vs. United States, 9 p.m. Sunday Tiebreaker game, 5 p.m., if necessary

> CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND At Dodger Stadium | Los Angeles Semifinals March 20 Netherlands vs. Pool F winner, 8 p.m. March 21 Japan vs. Pool F runner-up, 8 p.m. Championship 8 p.m. Wednesday

SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York 2 0 0 6 3 1 Chicago 1 0 1 4 3 1 Atlanta United FC 1 1 0 3 7 3 New York City FC 1 1 0 3 4 1 Orlando City 1 0 0 3 1 0 Philadelphia 0 0 2 2 2 2 Toronto FC 0 0 2 2 2 2 Montreal 0 1 1 1 2 3 Columbus 0 1 1 1 2 4 D.C. United 0 1 1 1 0 4 New England 0 1 0 0 0 1 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Portland 2 0 0 6 6 1 Houston 2 0 0 6 5 2 San Jose 2 0 0 6 4 2 FC Dallas 1 0 1 4 2 1 Colorado 1 1 0 3 1 1 Sporting K.C. 0 0 2 2 0 0 Seattle 0 1 1 1 3 4 Vancouver 0 1 1 1 2 3 Real Salt Lake 0 1 1 1 0 2 Los Angeles 0 2 0 0 1 3 Minnesota United 0 2 0 0 2 11 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday, March 18 Montreal at New York City FC, 1 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta United FC, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Orlando City, 6:30 p.m. New England at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, March 19 New York at Seattle, 6 p.m. Saturday, March 25 Minnesota United at New England, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New York, 3 p.m. Portland at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA GD PTS Chelsea 27 21 3 3 57 20 37 66 Tottenham 27 16 8 3 53 20 33 56 Man. City 27 17 5 5 53 29 24 56 Liverpool 28 16 7 5 60 35 25 55 Arsenal 26 15 5 6 55 31 24 50 Man United 26 13 10 3 39 22 17 49 Everton 28 13 8 7 47 30 17 47 West Brom 28 11 7 10 36 37 -1 40 Stoke City 28 9 9 10 32 40 -8 36 Southampton 26 9 6 11 32 34 -2 33 West Ham 28 9 6 13 38 49 -11 33 Burnley FC 28 9 4 15 31 42 -11 31 Watford 27 8 7 12 33 47 -14 31 Bournemouth 28 8 6 14 40 54 -14 30 Leicester City 27 7 6 14 30 45 -15 27 Swansea City 28 8 3 17 36 61 -25 27 Crystal Palace 27 7 4 16 35 46 -11 25 Hull City 28 6 6 16 26 54 -28 24 Middlesbrough 27 4 10 13 19 30 -11 22 Sunderland 27 5 4 18 24 50 -26 19 Saturday West Brom vs. Arsenal, 7:30 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Watford, 10 a.m. Everton vs. Hull, 10 a.m. Stoke vs. Chelsea, 10 a.m. Sunderland vs. Burnley, 10 a.m. West Ham vs. Leicester, 10 a.m. Bournemouth vs. Swansea, 12:30 p.m. Sunday Middlesbrough vs. Manchester United, 7 a.m. Tottenham vs. Southampton, 9:15 a.m. Manchester City vs. Liverpool, 11:30 a.m.

Champions League > QUARTERFINALS FIRST LEG Tuesday, April 11 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, 1:45 p.m. Juventus (Italy) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 12 Atletico Madrid (Spain) vs. Leicester (England), 1:45 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. SECOND LEG Tuesday, April 18 Leicester (England) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 19 Barcelona (Spain) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Monaco vs. Borussia Dortmund (Germany), 1:45 p.m.

Milestone for Jagr • Aleksander Barkov scored a third-period goal and added the winner in the shootout as the Florida Panthers beat the New York Rangers 4-3. Jaromir Jagr had two assists and passed Hall of Famer Gordie Howe for the most points after turning 40 with 269.

NHL SUMMARIES

AMERICA’S LINE

Round Robin x-advanced to championship round Pool E | Tokyo W L Pct x-Japan 3 0 1.000 x-Netherlands 2 1 .667 Israel 1 2 .333 Cuba 0 3 .000

joining Pittsburgh. The Penguins called up Derrick Pouliot from their AHL ailiate in Wilkes Barre/Scranton ahead of Friday night’s game. Pittsburgh is already missing injured defensemen Kris Letang, Olli Maatta and Trevor Daley, though all three are expected back by the playofs.

April 9 — End of regular season. April 12 — Playoffs begin. May 28-June 3 — Draft combine, Buffalo, NY June 14 — Last possible day for Stanley Cup finals June 23-24 — NHL draft, Chicago July 1 — Free agency begins.

COLLEGES

LPGA Founders Cup leaders Friday’s second round | Phoenix, Ariz. Par 72-Yards 6,679 | Purse $1,500,000 1 Ariya Jutanugarn -13 1 Stacy Lewis -13 3 Mi Jung Hur -12 3 Jeong Eun Lee -12 3 Vicky Hurst -12 3 Michelle Wie -12 7 Jessica Korda -11 7 In Gee Chun -11 7 Inbee Park -11 7 Sung Hyun Park -11 7 Karine Icher -11 12 Angel Yin -10 12 Caroline Masson -10 12 Anna Nordqvist -10 12 Jacqui Concolino -10 12 Katie Burnett -10 12 Marina Alex -10 12 So Yeon Ryu -10 12 Chella Choi -10 20 Eight tied at -9

NHL calendar

F F F F F F F F F 17 16 F F F F F F F 16 -

MOTOR SPORTS NHRA • Gainesville Friday qualifying | Gainesville, Fla. Top Fuel • 1. Tony Schumacher, 3.682 seconds, 328.22 mph. 2. Doug Kalitta, 3.698, 328.78. 3. Antron Brown, 3.716, 325.22. 4. Brittany Force, 3.719, 326.79. 5. Steve Torrence, 3.726, 327.51. 6. Troy Coughlin Jr., 3.747, 327.03. 7. Clay Millican, 3.765, 327.11. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.789, 321.50. 9. Scott Palmer, 3.841, 283.97. 10. Shawn Reed, 3.890, 303.03. 11. Pat Dakin, 4.405, 179.16. 12. Larry Dixon, 4.606, 163.18. 13. Leah Pritchett, 4.686, 142.09. 14. Ike Maier, 6.491, 185.95. 15. Chris Karamesines, 8.475, 86.79. Funny Car • 1. John Force, Chevy Camaro, 3.832, 333.25. 2. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.844, 331.77. 3. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.854, 328.70. 4. Courtney Force, Camaro, 3.860, 333.25. 5. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 3.865, 329.83. 6. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.865, 329.58. 7. J.R. Todd, Toyota Camry, 3.871, 332.51. 8. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.883, 321.27. 9. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.920, 309.06. 10. Jonnie Lindberg, Camry, 3.927, 325.37. 11. Alexis DeJoria, Camry, 3.963, 324.75. 12. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.053, 313.88. 13. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.152, 295.72. 14. Dave Richards, Mustang, 4.152, 255.10. 15. Del Worsham, Camry, 4.544, 191.57. 16. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 12.657, 75.79. Pro Stock • 1. Jason Line, Chevy Camaro, 6.476, 213.87. 2. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.477, 214.28. 3. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.490, 214.01. 4. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.491, 214.31. 5. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.491, 214.59. 6. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.493, 214.11. 7. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.517, 212.96. 8. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.526, 213.20. 9. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.531, 213.37. 10. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.562, 211.56. 11. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.584, 211.59. 12. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.609, 211.03. 13. Allen Johnson, Dart, 9.838, 93.04. 14. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 18.742, 42.69. 15. John Gaydosh Jr, Camaro, broke.

MEN’S BASKETBALL NIT > FIRST ROUND Tuesday Illinois 82, Valparaiso 57 Mississippi 91, Monmouth 83 Oakland 74, Clemson 69 Georgia Tech 75, Indiana 63 Colorado State 81, College of Charleston 74 Richmond 71, Alabama 64 Boise State 73, Utah 68 CS Bakersfield 73, California 66 Wednesday Syracuse 90, UNC-Greensboro 77 Belmont 78, Georgia 69 UCF 79, Colorado 74 Akron 78, Houston 75 TCU 66, Fresno State 59 Iowa 87, South Dakota 75 Illinois State 85, UC Irvine 71 Texas-Arlington 105, BYU 89

> SECOND ROUND Saturday Mississippi (21-13) at Syracuse (19-14), 10 a.m. Sunday Belmont (23-6) at Georgia Tech (18-15), 11 a.m. TCU (20-15) at Iowa (19-14), 4 p.m. Oakland (25-8) at Richmond (21-12), 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 20 UCF (22-11) at Illinois State (28-6), 6 p.m. Akron (27-8) at Texas-Arlington (26-8), 7 p.m. Boise State (20-11) at Illinois (19-14), 8 p.m. CS Bakersfield (23-9) at Colorado State (24-11), 10 p.m.

> QUARTERFINALS Tuesday, March 21 Syracuse-Mississippi winner vs. Belmont-Georgia Tech winner, TBA TCU-Iowa winner vs. OaklandRichmond winner, TBA Wednesday, March 22 CS Bakersfield-Colorado State winner vs. Texas-Arlington-Akron winner, TBA UCF-Illinois State winner vs. Boise State-Illinois winner, TBA

> SEMIFINALS March 28 | New York Semifinal, 6 p.m. Semifinal 8:30 p.m.

> CHAMPIONSHIP March 29 | New York Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.

CBI > FIRST ROUND Wednesday Utah Valley 74, Ga. Southern 49 Loyola (Md.) 73, George Mason 58 Coast. Carolina 83, Hampton 67 G. Wash. 73, Toledo 69 Rice 85, San Francisco 76 UMKC 92, Green Bay 82 Wyoming 91, Eastern Washington 81 Thursday UIC 71, Stony Brook 69

> QUARTERFINALS Monday, March 20 Loyola (Md.) (16-16) at Coast. Carolina (17-17), 6 p.m. G. Wash. (20-14) at UIC (16-18), 7 p.m. Utah Valley (16-16) at Rice (23-11), 7 p.m. UMKC (18-16) at Wyoming (19-14), 8 p.m.

> SEMIFINALS Wednesday, March 22 Loyola (Md.)-Coast. Carolina winner vs. UIC-G. Wash. winner, TBA UMKC-Wyoming winner vs. Utah Valley-Rice winner, TBA

> CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-3) Monday, March 27: TBD Wednesday, March 29: TBD Friday, March 31: TBD

At Durham, N.C. Temple (24-7) vs. Oregon (20-13), 5:30 p.m. Duke (27-5) vs. Hampton (20-12), 8 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday At College Park, Md. Maryland (31-2) vs. West Virginia (24-10) Monday At Storrs, Conn. UConn-Albany (NY) winner vs. Syracuse-Iowa State winner At Los Angeles UCLA-Boise State winner vs. Texas A&M-Penn winner At Durham, N.C. Temple-Oregon winner vs. Duke-Hampton winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 25 | At Bridgeport, Conn. UConn-Albany (NY)-Syracuse-Iowa State winner vs. UCLA-Boise State-Texas A&M-Penn winner Maryland-West Virginia winner vs. Temple-Oregon-Duke-Hampton winner REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP March 27 | Semifinal winners

> OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday | At Starkville, Miss. DePaul 88, Northern Iowa 67 Mississippi State 110, Troy 69 Saturday At Waco, Texas Baylor (30-3) vs. Texas Southern (23-9), 5:30 p.m. LSU (20-11) vs. California (19-13), 8 p.m. At Louisville, Ky. Louisville (27-7) vs. Chattanooga (21-10), 12:30 p.m. Tennessee (19-11) vs. Dayton (22-9), 3 p.m. At Seattle Oklahoma (22-9) vs. Gonzaga (26-6), 5:30 p.m. Washington (27-5) vs. Montana State (25-6), 8 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday | At Starkville, Miss. DePaul (27-7) vs. Mississippi State (30-4) Monday At Waco, Texas Baylor-Texas Southern winner vs. LSU-California winner At Louisville, Ky. Louisville-Chattanooga winner vs. Tennessee-Dayton winner At Seattle Oklahoma-Gonzaga winner vs. Washington-Montana State winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 24 | At Oklahoma City Baylor-Texas Southern-LSU-California winner vs. Louisville-ChattanoogaTennessee-Dayton winner DePaul-Mississippi State winner vs. Oklahoma-Gonzaga-WashingtonMontana State winner Regional Championship March 26 | Semifinal winners

> LEXINGTON REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday At South Bend, Ind. Purdue 74, Green Bay 62 Notre Dame 79, Robert Morris 49 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky 73, Belmont 70 Ohio State 70, Western Kentucky 63 At Austin, Texas NC State 62, Auburn 48 Texas 78, Central Arkansas 50 Saturday At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford (28-5) vs. New Mexico State (24-6), 12:30 p.m. Kansas State (22-10) vs. Drake (28-4), 3 p.m. SECOND ROUND Sunday At South Bend, Ind. Purdue (23-12) vs. Notre Dame (31-3) At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky (22-10) vs. Ohio State (27-6) At Austin, Texas NC State (23-8) vs. Texas (24-8) Monday At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford-New Mexico State winner vs. Kansas State-Drake winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 24 | At Lexington, Ky. Purdue-Notre Dame winner vs. Kentucky-Ohio State winner NC State-Texas winner vs. Stanford-New Mexico State-Kansas State-Drake winner Regional Championship March 26 | Semifinal winners

> STOCKTON REGIONAL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENT > BRIDGEPORT REGIONAL FIRST ROUND Friday | At College Park, Md. Maryland 103, Bucknell 61 West Virginia 75, Elon 62 Saturday At Storrs, Conn. UConn (32-0) vs. Albany (NY) (21-10), 10 a.m. Syracuse (21-1) vs. Iowa State (18-12), 12:30 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA (23-8) vs. Boise State (25-7), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (21-11) vs. Penn (22-7), 8 p.m.

FIRST ROUND Friday At Columbia, S.C. South Carolina 90, UNC-Asheville 40 Arizona State 73, Michigan State 61 At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri 66, South Florida 64 Florida State 87, Western Illinois 66 Corvallis, Ore. Oregon State 56, Long Beach State 55 Creighton 76, Toledo 49 Saturday At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette (25-7) vs. Quinnipiac (27-6), 12:30 p.m. Miami (23-8) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (26-8), 3 p.m.

SECOND ROUND Sunday At Columbia, S.C. South Carolina (28-4) vs. Arizona State (20-12) At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri (22-10) vs. Florida State (26-6) Corvallis, Ore. Oregon State (30-4) vs. Creighton (24-7) Monday At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette-Quinnipiac winner vs. Miami-Florida Gulf Coast winner REGIONAL SEMIFINALS March 25 | At Stockton, Calif. South Carolina-Arizona State winner vs. Marquette-Quinnipiac-MiamiFlorida Gulf Coast winner Missouri-Florida State winner vs. Oregon State-Creighton winner REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP March 27 Semifinal winners

> FINAL FOUR At Dallas | Friday, March 31

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP At Dallas | Sunday, April 2

WNIT > FIRST ROUND Wednesday Little Rock 72, Southern Miss 62 Thursday Georgia Tech 71, Jacksonville 55 UCF 73, Stetson 53 Michigan 67, Kent State 60 Wright State 66, Central Michigan 64 Wake Forest 71, Bethune-Cookman 42 Indiana 71, Ball State 58 Grambling State 78, Mississippi 75 Iowa 95, Missouri State 74 South Dakota 78, North Dakota 55 Abilene Christian 66, Oklahoma State 56 Saint Louis 62, IUPUI 57 Tulane 62, UT Arlington 53 Alabama 81, Mercer 57 South Dakota State 94, Northern Illinois 84 Wyoming 68, Seattle 52 Colorado 66, UNLV 52 Washington State 72, BYU 64 Colorado State 80, Saint Mary’s 68, OT Middle Tennessee 67, Morehead State 58 Friday Villanova 59, Princeton 53 St. John’s 72, Sacred Heart 43 Penn State 74, Ohio 65 Fordham 60, Georgetown 49 Navy 61, George Washington 51, OT Virginia Tech 76, Rider 62 Drexel 70, Duquesne 47 James Madison 80, Radford 59 Virginia 62, Saint Joseph’s 56 Harvard 69, New Hampshire 56 SMU 75, Louisiana Tech 70, OT UC Davis 72, Utah 62

> SECOND ROUND Saturday Wright State at Michigan, 1 p.m. South Dakota at Iowa, 3 p.m. Washington State at Wyoming, 3 p.m. Sunday Saint Louis at Indiana, 1 p.m. Harvard at St. John’s, 1 p.m. Colorado at South Dakota State, 1 p.m. Villanova at Drexel, 1 p.m. Virginia at James Madison, 1 p.m. Navy at Virginia Tech, 1 p.m. Little Rock at Alabama, 2 p.m. Wake Forest at Middle Tennessee, 2 p.m. UCF at Georgia Tech, 4 p.m. Grambling State at Tulane, 4 p.m. Fordham at Penn State, 1 p.m. TBA Colorado State vs. UC Davis Abilene Christian vs. SMU

> THIRD ROUND March 22-24 Colorado State: UC Davis winner vs. Washington State-Wyoming winner South Dakota-Iowa winner vs. South Dakota State-Colorado winner Tulane-Grambling State winner vs. Alabama: Little Rock winner Middle Tennessee-Wake Forest winner vs. Georgia Tech-UCF winner Michigan-Wright State winner vs. Harvard-St. John’s Penn State-Fordham winner vs. Navy-Virginia Tech winner Villanova-Drexel winner vs. James Madison-Virginia Indiana-Saint Louis winner vs. Abilene Christian-SMU

> QUARTERFINALS March 25-27

> SEMIFINALS March 29-30

> CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, April 1, 2 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE — Released RHP Logan Ondrusek. BOSTON — Optioned LHP Luis Ysla and RHP Kyle Martin to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned RHP Marcus Walden to their minor league camp. KANSAS CITY — Optioned RHP Andrew Edwards, C Cam Gallagher, INFs Hunter Dozier and Ramon Torres and OFs Jorge Bonifacio and Bubba Starling to Omaha (PCL). YANKEES — Optioned INF Jorge Mateo to Tampa (FSL) and reassigned him to their minor league camp. SEATTLE — Optioned RHP Chase De Jong and OF Boog Powell to Tacoma (PCL). National League CUBS — Optioned RHPs Pierce Johnson and Felix Pena, C Victor Caratini and OF Jacob Hannemann to Iowa (PCL). Assigned INF

Chesny Young and OFs Eloy Jimenez and Mark Zagunis to their minor league camp. COLORADO — Optioned RHPs Shane Carle, Rayan Gonzalez and Zach Jemiola to Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI — Optioned INFs JT Riddle and Yefri Perez to New Orleans (PCL), and C Austin Nola and LHP Drew Peters to Jacksonville (SL). Reassigned LHP Kyle Lobstein to their minor league camp. MILWAUKEE — Optioned OFs Lewis Brinson, Ryan Cordell and Brett Phillips to their minor league camp. Reassigned RHP Forrest Snow to their minor league camp. METS — Optioned C Tomas Nido to their minor league camp. PITTSBURGH — Optioned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas and INF Chris Bostick to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned OF Barrett Barnes, INF Erich Weiss and C Christian Kelley to their minor league camp. WASHINGTON — Optioned OF Rafael Bautista

and RHP Austin Adams to Syracuse (IL). FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA — Re-signed DT Frostee Rucker to a one-year contract BUFFALO — Signed RB Joe Banyard, CB Leonard Johnson and WR Corey Washington. CHICAGO — Signed DL John Jenkins to a one-year contract. CINCINNATI — Re-signed C T.J. Johnson. INDIANAPOLIS — Signed NT Al Woods. NEW ENGLAND — Signed DB Justin Coleman. NY GIANTS — Signed DE Jason Pierre-Paul to a four-year contract. Re-signed OL John Jerry and QB Josh Johnson. SEATTLE — Agreed to terms with TE Luke Willson and CB DeShawn Shead. HOCKEY • NHL WASHINGTON — Reassigned C Jakub Vrana to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE GEORGETOWN — Named Adam Neugebauer wide receivers and slot receivers coach.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TAKE US WITH YOU

TUESDAY • 03.01.2016 • B

NO MO MOVES FOR BLUES Team dispels Te spels rumors, mors keeps roster intact

THE BLUES STAND PAT AT THE TRADE DEADLINE ...

“I believe in the group. If we can continue to play well elll

GM declines decli c nes to deal just to make k a deal

get there. We want to get healthy.”

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD h St. Louis Post Post-Dispatch

Doug Armstrong, Blues GM

days leading to the NHL trade In the da ay ay, Blues ge ra manager ge deadline Mo Monday, general Doug Armstrong spoke about needing to be cr tive if he wanted to improve his hi creative club.. He wanted to add a skilled forward, wa forw but with the team’s salary-cap issues, ve would wo making a move take some maneuvering. ve . ’t matter how As it turned out, it didn’t inventive in ntive inve nti Armstrong was. wasn the creativity cr tivi as much as “It wasn’t the asking price to get ge creative, e ve,” he said. s . “We felt by what fe it was wa overextended ov exte wh we ed.” wanted. So the Blues stood pat on what leagueda wide was a rather lackluster deadline day with just 19 trades. But of those deals, 10 volv Central Ce ra Division teams, te s, includinvolved ing Colorado Co ra picking up Arizona forward forw Mikkel Boedker and Dallas fetching CalMi Da fetc gary defenseman Kris Russell. That left a little unrest among the fanbase of the Blues, who sit No. 4 in the NH NHL standings with 81 points to ts and 17 games ga ay but whose whos only ly acquisition near the play

JEFF JE EFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

... WHILE CENTRAL DIVISION FOES MAKE MOVES

Colorado acquired Mikkel Boedker

Dallas picked up Kris Russell

> More trade deadline moves. B4 > 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Ottawa, FSM

See BLUES • Page Pa B4

Monday Mo onday a was no fun f n for fu f r Blues fans fo f craving crav a ing chan nge. change. he NHL trade deadline passed quietly q tly quie l The he Note. There was no excitement this for the arround, no No. 1 goaltender swaps or time around, cornerst stone defenseman defen f seman acquisitions. acquisi q tions. quisi cornerstone As hee underscored last week, Blues general D Armst lacked ge ra A st flexibilit gainst mp the NHL mplicating his math li s m Unlike mstrong came into about to t a out c his resilient t consider “hockey asset, “h ke a , ra for fo co rket contract market t me didn’t see a w time around. ked at potential pote l trades tra s Armstrong looked three ways:: Is thiss a net gain gain for fo or thiss See GORDON • Page Pa e B4

Pena mu must m st learn quickly le n qu uickly l this sp ng spring

ACTIVATE YOUR DIGITAL ACCOUNT AT STLtoday.com/subscribe STLtoday.com/subscribe GET ALL THAT COMES WITH YOUR ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH SUBSCRIPTION

Backup up will do a llot ot of catc hi fo ow catching for now

CHRIS LEE • Post Post-Dispatch h

Veteran catcher Brayan Ve a Pena is in his fi first spring training camp with the Cardinals.. CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Saturday • 03.18.2017 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, West deals NORTH ♠Void ♥10 8 5 4 ♦K J 9 7 4 ♣K J 6 2 WEST EAST ♠K 8 3 ♠J 10 9 7 4 2 ♥2 ♥A K 3 ♦A Q 10 6 3 ♦8 5 ♣A Q 10 7 ♣5 3 SOUTH ♠A Q 6 5 ♥Q J 9 7 6 ♦2 ♣9 8 4 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1♦ Pass 1♠ 2♥ 3♣ 3♠* Dbl 4♥ 4♠ 5♥ Dbl All pass *Good heart raise Opening lead: Three of ♠ We’ve all heard about players who “went to bed with the ace of trumps,” but today’s deal is truly special. It comes to us from Norway, reportedly played on New Year’s Eve at the turn of the century. All four players appear to have gotten a head start on their New Year’s Eve celebrations. Decisions by all four are easy to second-guess, but everything is OK at a party. The opening spade lead went to the nine and queen, and declarer led his diamond

at trick two. West went up with his ace and surely should have shifted to a trump, but he continued with another diamond. It was possible that his partner could ruff this second diamond. Dummy’s jack of diamonds held this trick as declarer discarded a club. The king of diamonds was next, with both East and South shedding clubs. East could not ruf this to his advantage. Declarer crossed to his hand with a diamond ruff and led his remaining club, losing to West’s ace. East must have felt pretty good about things as he still held two trump tricks. West still wouldn’t lead his trump, leading a club instead. Dummy’s jack was rufed low by East and overruffed by South. At this point, declarer cashed the ace of spades and ruffed a spade in dummy. East must have been ordering another cocktail as he overrufed this spade and then led a spade. Oops! This revoke called for a two-trick penalty under the rules in force at that time. East never took a trick with either the ace or the king of trumps! (03/18/17)

Across 1 War game 9 Short write-ups 15 “Time was …” 16 Treat eaten with a spoon 17 2007 NAACP Image Award winner for “Inside Man” 18 Top-notch 19 Baseball’s Martinez 20 They’re on the books 22 Deducts from 23 Like a zebra’s mane 25 Détentes 27 Language traditionally written without spaces between words 28 Cardinal topper 30 Wharf workers’ grp.

31 “Nuts!” 32 “Holy cow!” 34 “Her ___” (“Miss Saigon” song) 35 Resident of the Corn State 39 Challenge for a barber 41 Lovesickness, e.g. 42 1973 Tony nominee for “A Little Night Music” 44 Power-packed engine 45 ___ comparison 46 Contractual problems? 51 The end of Caesar? 52 Barrymore and more 54 Not easily moved 55 E’en if 57 City on Utah Lake

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME

59 Fuss 60 One of two party leaders 62 Browns, in a way 64 Full circuit 65 High-rise pants and hornrimmed glasses, say 66 “Deliciously Different” sloganeer 67 “Sit tight”

Down 1 Satiny quality 2 Be a wannabe 3 Netted, in a way 4 Key figure in saving New York City from bankruptcy 5 GPS generation: abbr. 6 Something needed to raise the bar? 7 Not miss ___ 8 “You don’t say!” 9 Old map abbr. 10 Squats strengthen them 11 “___ a broken heart”: Dickinson 12 “You don’t say!” 13 Just deserts for misconduct 14 Salted away? 21 Part of many a submarine 24 “Rent” actor Diggs

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult. If March 18 is your birthday • This year you opt to move in a new direction and create a more caring environment around you. If you are single, you will meet a substantial amount of new people, thus posing many options. If you are attached, the two of you become more open with each other. Sagittarius has the capacity to step all over your feelings if you let him or her.

March 18 WORD — FLICKERS (FLICKERS: FLIK-ers: Shines or burns unsteadily and fitfully.) Average mark 32 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 48 or more words in FLICKERS? The list will be published Monday. YESTERDAY’S WORD — FIGMENTS signet emit gift feign sine nest gist feint sing time meting feting singe tine metis fine site ting mien finest smite tinge mine fist snit semi mint infest stein sent mist ingest stem sift mite inset sting sign egis item

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Take of for the movies or buy some concert tickets for the near future. You could be surprised by how liberating such an experience could be for your mind as well as others’. Tonight: Read a good novel.

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ You might want to rethink a decision that surrounds a friend. Look at the quality of your interactions and note how much caring exists between the two of you. Know that you don’t need to do anything at the moment. Tonight: Make it OK to be nostalgic.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ You have a way of presenting yourself that draws others to you. Your signiicant other could have a brief moment of wishing you were both alone together. Tonight: Let your mind wander.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Pace yourself, and know that fatigue could be a problem if you keep pushing as hard as you have been lately. Spend time at home napping or doing whatever pleases and relaxes you. Don’t let obligations worry you for at least a day or so. Tonight: Try being a couch potato. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Your imagination knows no limits. Remain sensitive to your options as well as your boundaries. A younger person could help deine your day. Make plans together that you both will enjoy. Tonight: Let the good times roll.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Frederick J. Healy

26 Shouts heard at a rodeo 29 Hot Wheels product 31 “How stupid am I!” 33 Sneak 35 Flip 36 Have no accomplice 37 Response to “Not now,” often 38 Perception

40 Things weighed in pounds? 43 Distinctive features of tamago gohan servings, in Japanese cuisine 47 Clip, say 48 Palliate 49 Like some catches and crashes

50 Keeper of the flame? 52 “Tell me more” 53 Unit of rain or ice 56 Ship or plane part 58 Virginia willow’s genus 61 Covers with some rolls 63 It’s way over your head

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0211

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★ Stay on top of a personal matter. You might decide to stay close to home and wrap up an important project. You could decide at the last minute to throw a party with a funny or ofthe-wall theme. Tonight: Opt for togetherness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★★ You seem to always have the right response in a diicult situation. Many people admire the way in which you handle yourself. Tonight: Hang out with a favorite person. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You might need more downtime to relax and make certain decisions. Some of you seem to have pushed yourself very hard, and you’ll need time to handle some personal responsibilities. Tonight: Do only what you want.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★★ You might feel much more upbeat than you have in a while. A situation inally seems to have worked itself out. Consider your options more carefully, and weigh the pros and cons before making a decision. Tonight: Why not go for it? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★ You could ind it diicult to make perfect plans. Don’t worry; a loved one is likely to ind a solution that pleases you. Avoid playing games, as they don’t serve you well at the moment. Tonight: Don’t push. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ You naturally seem to be surrounded by friends, whether you plan on it or not. Others seek you out. A spontaneous get-together could start when certain friends meet some of your other pals. Tonight: Where the action is.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ Take a much-needed break from your routine, and allow yourself the gift of spontaneity. Just go with the low for the time being. Catch up on an older friend’s news. Tonight: Dinner at a favorite spot. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.18.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Teen’s suicide attempt is signal for action

Dear Needs Answers • You are a caring friend. The one thing you SHOULDN’T do in a misguided efort to “protect” your friend is to remain silent. When someone threatens suicide, it is time to act. You should absolutely tell your parents everything you know so they can inform her parents. If your parents are hesitant to do that, confide in a trusted teacher or counselor at school so your friend can get the help she needs.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s toll-free number is 1-800-273-8255. Dear Abby • I have a 23-year-old stepson who continues to bully my wife into taking care of him. She recently helped him to buy a home, even though she knew his current earnings would not be enough to cover his car, insurance, phone, cable, etc. He continues to make his problems ours. He called yesterday telling his mom he needs brakes. We already pay his insurance on the vehicle and other small, unexpected bills. Oh, and by the way, he has a baby on the way. I have tried repeatedly to talk to my wife about enabling him, but she refuses to see that she is keeping him dependent. — MANCHILD PROBLEMS Dear Problems • Ideally, spouses are supposed to agree before spending large amounts of community assets. Marriage counseling might help you to get through to her. But if it doesn’t, consider

consulting a lawyer about protecting your assets. Dear Abby • We live down the street from my boyfriend’s mother. Our 3-year-old daughter spends a few hours there while I’m at work and her dad is running errands. My daughter loves her grandparents, so I don’t mind her spending time with them. The problem I have is, my boyfriend’s mother repeats everything I say to my daughter right after I say it when I ask her to do something! My boyfriend tells me to say something to her, but I have no idea what to say. — ECHOED IN ALASKA Dear Echoed • Stop complaining. At least your mother-in-law agrees with you and reinforces what you tell your daughter. Consider it a small price you pay for free baby-sitting. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Arm is moved. 2. Glove is missing. 3. Ear is moved. 4. Tail is smaller. 5. Tree trunk is wider. 6. Sleeve is shorter.

Dear Abby • I’m 13, and I’m writing you about my best friend. Her life at home has always sucked, but now it has reached a new level. Her grandmother is no longer paying for her tuition, her parents verbally abuse her and yesterday she attempted suicide. Luckily, she called me and I talked her through it. I don’t know how to help her. I can’t talk to her parents because they’ll be no help, but I don’t know what will happen if I tell my parents. Please help me. — NEEDS ANSWERS IN CALIFORNIA

MISS MANNERS

TV SATURDAY

Wedding doesn’t yield haul of gifts

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • My husband and I were recently married, and about half of our close friends were able to attend. We were touched that they used their vacation time to attend our wedding. Even so, the majority of our close friends who attended did not give us a congratulatory card or note and no gift of any kind. We had an online registry with affordable options, but it was hardly used. We were a little hurt because we didn’t ask them to spend much money on us outside of our wedding (no shower, etc.), and we always spend money on our friends to celebrate their life events (children, and hosting showers/bachelorette parties), so we thought that we would at least receive a card. My friends spend lavishly on themselves, and our wedding cost about $150 per person. I under-

stand if people can’t aford much, but our friends earn about twice as much as us. I feel petty for asking, but should I be insulted? I have never once forgotten to send a gift, even for weddings I can’t attend. Is it now socially acceptable to not give anything to a bride and groom if their wedding is a destination wedding? Is the lack of even a sentimental note a sign that our friendship is not as strong as I thought? Gentle Reader • Little clues in your question are giving Miss Manners pause. Like the fact that it was a destination wedding. How far a destination? That only half of your close friends were able to attend gives her an idea. And tallying the price of the dinner you gave and the amount of money your friends earn and spend on themselves is as irrelevant as it is unseemly.

Yes, a wedding present is generally given and a sentimental note is always thoughtful, although hardly a tradition or necessity from those who attended. But it seems to Miss Manners that after what can now be up to a year or two of celebrations and festivities surrounding a wedding, guests are simply exhausted. And they feel they have shown their sentiment for the couple merely by continuing to show up — and shell out. How much more acknowledgment do you need? Surely it is time to turn your attentions to something else, like the marriage itself. Or as you stated at the outset, feeling grateful that your friends and family were there with you to celebrate it. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

3/18/17

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CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ST. LOUIS BLUES

SABOURIN GOAL Get your Blues gear now for the season! The National League Hockey had been in St. Louis only two seasons, but the success of the Blues — with two West Division championships — made them the talk of the town. Garry Sabourin (11) of the Blues raises his stick in celebration as his shot sails past Los Angeles Kings goalie Gerry Desfjardins at The Arena on June 7, 1969. Photo by Gene Pospheshil of the Post-Dispatch staff.

C H E C K O N LI N E FO R N E W 2 016 M E R C H A N D I S E

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 03.18.2017

CAROLYN HAX

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Why are modern people lonelier than ever? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn • I have read study after study documenting that modern people have fewer friends than in previous eras and that, as time goes on, more and more people report feeling isolated and friendless. I am one of them. You have said that you often get messages from people telling you how hard it is to make friends. Why do you think so many modern people are so lacking in friends? — Anonymous

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • I’d say it’s a combination of: the insane shift from Main Street-type communities to suburban developments, thus putting everyone in their own isolation tanks (i.e., cars) to get virtually anything done, and replacing the lovely, inviting city stoop or front porch with erf-you backyard decks and patios; a demographic shift toward living alone, with U.S. Census data showing a steady decline in household size; and the advances in communications that (ironically) allow people to detach their work from both workplaces and regular working hours. And, of course, we’re only beginning to see the efects of having “friends” at our fingertips. Making plans to meet actual people in an actual place is now so much easier than ever before, but so is keeping people at arm’s length and avoiding eye contact entirely. As a form of proof of our innate craving for excuses to mingle — and of the scarcity of well-planned communities that bring people together instead of stranding them a half-acre lot and an attached garage away from each other — consider for a moment how insanely expensive real estate has become in neighborhoods with a high Walk Score, at least relative to nearby car-dependent alternatives. We want our town squares and we want them now.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

Hi, Carolyn: My adult sister, 3,000 miles away, has been diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder. She hears voices that constantly harass her, and believes they belong to a former boss and/or the mafia. She was in counseling and on medication for a while, but didn’t like the side efects. Now she aggressively asserts that she is not mentally ill. Any family/friend who suggests she get treated for the illness gets the silent treatment from her. I would love to encourage her to go back to counseling, and maybe try different medicines. What can/should I do for her? — Of the Deep End

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Answer • Contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness (nami.org). There are excellent programs for people with a mentalhealth condition, and also for their families. The help line is 1-800-950-6264. tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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