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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEdnEsday • 03.15.2017 • $1.50

SLU MEDICAL SCHOOL PLACED ON

PROBATION School given two years to ix about 20 issues Accreditation agency • Cites multiple gaps in curriculum and inadequate policies St. Louis University • Review took place in middle of phasing in a new curriculum

Downtown STL drops guides, adds security patrols By MIKE FaULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Downtown STL Inc. is replacing its tourist guides with eight security patrol oicers starting this week. Downtown STL President & CEO Missy Kelley said other cities’ downtown organizations had made similar moves. Tuesday’s decision followed months of research into how the group could more effectively serve downtown, Kelley said. “When we started the guide program almost 20 years ago there weren’t smartphones to tell us where to go or provide more information,” Kelley said in a telephone interview. “When we talked to the community, they really wanted a more defined law enforcement presence.” Kelley said the 11 workers in the guide program were immediately let go as a result of Tuesday’s vote but were being provided with severance. Cutting the program frees up about $500,000 annually to put toward the new security program. “Obviously they were hopeful see PaTROLs • Page a8

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

“Caduceus,” by James Muir, stands on the St. Louis University campus. The caduceus — a staf entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings — is a symbol of health care. The SLU School of Medicine has been put on probation by an accreditation agency.

PREsCRIPTIOn FOR CHanGE

By asHLEy JOsT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

sT. LOUIs • Multiple gaps in curriculum and inadequate policies have placed St. Louis University’s School of Medicine on probation by an accrediting agency. The school remains accredited but has two years to fix about 20 action items identified as noncompliant during a recent reaccreditation process by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. SLU is the only medical school in the United States currently on probation, though other schools, such as Baylor and George Washington universities, have been

Liaison Committee on Medical Education says St. Louis University Medical School needs to: Improve documentation and coordination with hospital ailiates on educating students Better evaluate and measure students’ proiciency in stated learning objectives Improve oversight of curriculum and identify gaps Recruit and retain low-income and irst-generation college students

on probation in recent years. In a letter dated Feb. 21 to SLU President Fred Pestello, the accrediting group cited a “constellation of standards with which the school is out of compliance, which has compromised the quality of the medical education program.” “If there is not suicient progress toward compliance with the cited accreditation standards within 24 months, the LCME may choose to withdraw accreditation.” SLU leaders are confident that won’t happen. Medical school dean Dr. Kevin Behrns,

it comes to large, complex programs. For example, the agency in 2010 overstated the number of people expected to buy insurance under the Afordable Care Act, misjudging how many would join because of the threat of tax penalties. Yet CBO’s neutrality has been valued by both parties — though not always at the same time. It depends whose ox is being gored. see HEaLTH • Page a8

see MOnsanTO • Page a9

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TODAY

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Both sides play loose with the facts in health debate Trump paid $38 million in taxes in 2005 > A10

WasHInGTOn • The Congressional Bud-

get Office report on a Republican health care bill set of an intense reaction in Washington, and some on both sides of the debate are playing loose with the facts. Republicans are overlooking President Donald Trump’s promise to deliver “insurance for everybody,” which the CBO makes

clear will not happen if the legislation becomes law. Democrats are assailing Republicans for “attacking the messenger,” seeming to forget all the times they assailed the budget oice themselves. The Congressional Budget Office is respected for nonpartisan rigor in its estimates of the costs and impacts of legislation. But no projection is infallible, particularly when

Leadership changes underway in embattled state prison system By KURT ERICKsOn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERsOn CITy • Amid a sexual ha-

rassment scandal that has cost Missouri taxpayers millions of dollars in legal fees, Gov. Eric Greitens’ administration is moving to shake up the state’s embattled prison system. Greitens and Missouri Department of Corrections Director Anne Precythe have replaced a number of top administrators in the state’s central oice, as well as in some of the state’s 21 prisons,

according to documents obtained by the Post-Dispatch. Kenneth Jones has been elevated to be the chairman of the Board of Parole and Probation after five years on the panel. Jones, a Republican from Clarksburg, replaces Ellis McSwain, a Democrat from Jefferson City who has served as chairman for the past seven years. McSwain will continue as a member of the seven-member board, which rules on whether offenders should be see PRIsOn • Page a5

By JOEL ROsEnBLaTT Bloomberg

The Environmental Protection Agency oicial who was in charge of evaluating the cancer risk of Monsanto’s Roundup allegedly bragged to a company executive that he deserved a medal if he could kill another agency’s investigation into one of the herbicide’s key chemicals. The boast was made in an April 2015 phone conversation, according to farmers and others who say they’ve been sickened by the weedkiller. The EPA manager, who left the agency’s pesticide division last year, has become a central figure in more than 20 lawsuits in the U.S. accusing the company of failing to warn consumers and regulators of the risk that its glyphosate-based herbicide can cause non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. “If I can kill this I should get a medal,” said the EPA deputy division director, Jess Rowland, according to a court filing made

HEALTH CARE DEBATE FACT CHECK

By CaLVIn WOOdWaRd and RICaRdO aLOnsO-ZaLdIVaR Associated Press

EPA deputy accused of working with Monsanto to kill study

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Banana tweet ofers lesson in the press and democracy TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Sitting next to the newsroom snack table has its advantages. When a generous colleague decides it’s doughnut day, or when a reporter has OD’d on Thin Mints and decides to share her leftovers, I get first crack at the goodies. But the other day, a different sort of snack table event took place. Next to a bag of chocolatecovered pretzels and a box of Girl Scout cookies (they were s’mores flavor, so they lasted a bit), somebody left a banana. I snapped a picture and posted it to Twitter and wondered which item would last the longest. The tale of the #newsroombanana was born. It started as a joke. I had just left a newsroom meeting in which editors were encouraging us to try new things in the digital world that is shaping journalism today. Soon the banana was the only thing left on the table, and I tweeted out another photo of it. The community I live in on

the social media world gathered. They took bets on how long it would last. They shared banana bread recipes. Reporters and editors stopped by my desk to see the banana in person and talk about it. We laughed together. It was a great distraction on an otherwise busy day. And then I went for the Holy Grail, a retweet by Jack Dorsey (@jack), the St. Louis native who founded Twitter. I didn’t get it. A social media sensation in my tiny pond of a social media existence would not quite go viral. But it taught me a lesson just the same. A couple of months ago I attended the annual St. Louis Press Club Media Persons of the Year gala. I was there to see Weatherbird artist Dan Martin win a 2016 Media Person of the Year award and semi-retired Post-Dispatch columnist Bill McClellan win a Lifetime Achievement Award. Dorsey, and fellow high-tech entrepreneur Jim McKelvey, cofounder of Square, were also being honored. Dorsey’s parents accepted on his behalf. McKelvey recorded a video. In it, he talked about how important newspapers were — and are — to him,

and the nation’s democracy. “I think we need reporting more than ever,” McKelvey said. “It’s one of my great concerns, we’re starting to endanger the culture that gave us great reporting … great investigations … it is my hope that that tide will turn around. It is a problem I am fascinated with right now.” It was a light bulb moment in a year in which the newspaper business has been under attack like never before. The nation had just elected a president in Donald Trump who campaigned on a platform that much of what appears in the nation’s newspapers and mainstream media outlets is “fake news.” Meanwhile, a few less-than-ethical entrepreneurs found out how easy it is to distribute the fake news that now goes viral on social media platforms and contributes to a lesseducated populace. Just last week, PolitiFact.com reported on a Florida native who lives in Costa Rica who created a fake news site as a joke just to see how gullible Trump supporters — to whom he marketed — really are. Within a month, the fake news site had more than 1 million page views. Our democracy depends on

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people like Dorsey and McKelvey to put their heads together and find a technical solution to help restore mainstream newspapers as the place for real discussions. Knowing that McKelvey cares deeply about the future of newspapers warms my soul, much as the banana bread Post-Dispatch reporter Valerie Schremp Hahn eventually made with the discarded banana warmed my rumbling tummy. My #newsroombanana experiment was mostly a joke, but it told me something about where the solution might lie. There was a time when newspapers were America’s gathering place. The other night I was watching the Tom Hanks movie “Bridge of Spies,” and there are a couple of scenes on the commuter train where everybody is holding a copy of the daily newspaper. Some came for the news, others the classifieds or sports, but, in the not too distant past, this was a much more common scene than it is today. Finding a way to elevate mainstream newspapers once again as the daily gathering place is directly related to fixing the fake news problem. The magic of the #newsroom-

banana is that it served as a call to gather. We joked and talked on Twitter, like we were at the coffee shop talking about the day’s news. We gathered in person around the snack table and had conversations that otherwise might not have been had. We were connected to the #newsroombanana because the snack table experience was one we had in common. Perhaps just one of those conversations — in person or online — led to the sharing of other information. A click on a news story perhaps, or a discussion about what a colleague was working on. The #newsroombanana convened us for a brief distraction that had the potential to lead to the furthering of knowledge and relationships. In my youth, this is what the newspaper did every day. A return to those days, in some capacity dreamed up by the next generation’s entrepreneurs, would benefit a nation long dependent on a vibrant, and relevant, free press. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

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CORRECTIONS A headline in Tuesday’s edition of Joe’s St. Louis incorrectly identified the St. Louis Art Museum.

Two charged in shooting at Denny’s in Fenton Pair may have attacked others, police say BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FENTON • She was waiting for a friend in the parking lot of a Denny’s restaurant in Fenton. He demanded her purse. She refused to give it to him. He shot her in the chest. Police asked for the public’s help in solving this chilling crime on Nov. 11. On Tuesday, they announced that prosecutors had filed criminal charges against a man accused in the shooting and said the attack might have been part of a crime spree in west St. Louis County and Fenton that day. Vastine Davontay Vastine, 23, of the 3900 block of Dunnica Avenue in St. Louis, was charged on March 8 with one count of first-degree robbery, one count of first-degree assault and two counts of armed criminal Williams action. Police said a witness to the crime identified him as the shooter. He was being held on a $250,000 cashonly bail. Vastine already was being held on charges of first-degree murder and armed criminal action stemming from an incident in the Skinker-Debaliviere neighborhood in St. Louis on Dec. 3. Police said Vastine fatally shot Rolando Bolden Jr., 23, during a fight. Bolden was pronounced dead at the scene. A woman who witnessed the shooting then opened fire and struck Vastine in the arm, hand, shoulder and face. He was taken to a hospital for treatment. A woman also has been charged in con-

nection with the Denny’s case and others. Monika Williams, 25, of the 4700 block of Fletcher Street in St. Louis, was charged with two counts of first-degree robbery, two counts of armed criminal action and one count of fraudulent use of a credit or debit device. She is being held on a $250,000 cashonly bail. Police said a robbery took place earlier that day at Walgreens, 13997 Manchester Road. A victim was robbed at gunpoint of her purse after she left the store. Video surveillance captured the robbery, and captured a black Pontiac at the scene. The Denny’s robbery happened within the same hour. Minutes later, that victim’s credit card was used at a Shell station on Manchester Road. A woman was trying to use it to buy a gift card. Police said Wednesday that woman was Williams. Her black Pontiac was seen on video leaving the scene. Police said that Williams, under questioning, admitted going to Walgreens and using the shooting victim’s stolen credit card and said she was the only one driving her car that night. But a witness told police that Williams had spoken about being with the people who shot the woman at Denny’s. The victim at Denny’s was hospitalized for a few weeks and continues to recover. Police said they thought Vastine and Williams might have victimized other people in the area that day. Anyone with information can reach the lead investigator at 314-615-8694. Additionally, police previously distributed a photo of a young man who was a person of interest in the case, but they said he had been questioned and released without charges.

PEOPLE Disney pulls ‘Beauty’ from Malaysia after scene cut Walt Disney has shelved the release of its new movie “Beauty and the Beast” in mainly Muslim Malaysia, even though film censors said Tuesday it had been approved with a minor cut involving a “gay moment.” The studio said Tuesday that the movie has not and will not be edited for release in Malaysia. Screenings of the live-action retelling of the animated classic were scheduled to begin on Thursday. Film Censorship Board chairman Abdul Halim Abdul Hamid said he did not know why the movie was postponed as it was approved by the board after a minor gay scene was axed. The movie’s characters include manservant LeFou, who plays the sidekick to the story’s villain Gaston, and, according to director Bill Condon, “is confused about his sexuality.” Condon has described a brief scene as a “gay moment.” Russia approved the movie last week but banned children under 16 from watching it without the accompaniment of someone over 16. Malaysia’s censors loosened in 2010 decades of restrictions on sexual and religious content in movies, but still kept a tight leash on tiny bikinis, kisses and passionate hugs. The new rules allowed depiction of gay characters, but only if they show repentance or are portrayed in a negative light.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Elvis Presley drummer DJ Fontana is 86. Actor Judd Hirsch is 82. Jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd is 79. Bassist Phil Lesh is 77. Singer Mike Love is 76. Singer-keyboardist Sly Stone is 74. Model Fabio is 56. Actress Eva Longoria is 42. Musician will.i.am is 42. From wire services

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The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.48, Sunday-Friday $8.66, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $6.65, Sat-Mon $5.72, Fri-Sun $5.72, Sun-Mon $5.18, Sat-Sun Only $5.18, Sunday Only $3.65. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 03/26/17, 04/16/17, 07/16/17, 08/27/17, 09/10/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17 12/25/17, 01/14/18, 03/25/18, 04/15/18 and timing of these charges may afect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

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03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

LOCAL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Lab results due soon on Kinloch remains Body found after Berkeley woman had gone missing; person of interest in custody BY JEREMY KOHLER st. Louis Post-dispatch

BERKELEY • The acting chief of this suburban police department said Tuesday that lab results on human remains found during a search in February should be available to investigators soon. If they are found to be those of missing Berkeley woman Monica Elaine Sykes, police are likely to ask prosecutors to pursue criminal charges against a man already in custody, Capt. Art Jackson said. The remains were discovered on Feb. 4 in an area of Kinloch where police suspected Sykes, 25, might be found. The police had searched the area first

and did not initially find anything, but a volunteer search party led by a national search group revisited the area that day and found remains. Sykes disappeared Oct. 28 from the home in Berkeley she shared with her sister and three nephews. Berkeley police say she had spent the night with a married Berkeley police officer, who dropped her off at home at 6:48 a.m., according to the security system at her home. Monica Sykes left the house 13 minutes later, telling her nephews she was coming back with candy. One of her nephews, 6, told detectives he remembered looking out the window and seeing her step-

ping into a white car. She was never seen again. Another man she was dating has been in custody for several weeks on a probation violation. Police have called him a person of interest. His white car was found on fire after Sykes was reported missing. The oicer is not a suspect, Jackson said on Tuesday. But the officer

is no longer working for Berkeley police after the department “came to a decision” last week on his employment, Jackson said. During the Sykes investigation, the City Council was made aware of an unspecified concern about the oicer and realized that the city had not checked his background before hiring him.

He was placed on administrative leave during the background check, the result of which led to his separation, Jackson said. The officer, reached by phone, said he was fired without explanation. He said he heard on the news it was because he didn’t pass the background check. “There is nothing in my background,” he said. And

he said he had nothing to do with Sykes’ disappearance. “I wish the media would put the focus on the family and what they are going through,” he said. Sykes’ family has been upset about the city’s handling of the case, and the revelation that the department had not checked the background of the officer dating her.

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LAW AND ORDER WASHINGTON PARK > ID of woman found in ditch released • Nortisha Ball, 27, was the woman found dead in a ditch Saturday evening, according to the St. Clair County Coroner’s Oice. An autopsy found no physical trauma. Investigators were awaiting the results of toxicology tests before making a ruling on the cause of death. Police said children who had gone to a store in the area found the body on 38th Street and Bunkhum Road. Ball, who lived in Washington Park, was fully clothed and her body appeared to have been in the ditch for several days, police said. Illinois State Police are involved in the investigation. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Driver dies in crash • A driver is dead after being struck Tuesday afternoon by another driver who police suspect was intoxicated on westbound Highway 40 (Interstate 64) in St. Charles County. About 4 p.m. the driver of a black Dodge vehicle sped past a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the interstate before striking a Nissan SUV west of Highway 94, Highway Patrol spokesman Sgt. Al Nothum said. The collision caused the SUV to lip. The SUV’s driver was pronounced dead at the scene, Nothum said. A passenger in that vehicle was transported to a hospital with injuries. The Dodge’s driver was taken into police custody on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, Nothum said. The crash remains under investigation. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Students hurt in bus accident • At least two middle school students were transported to a hospital after sufering minor injuries from an accident involving a Hazelwood school bus on Interstate 270 at Lindbergh Boulevard on Tuesday afternoon. Kimberly McKenzie, Hazelwood School District communications director, said two other students complained of injuries to their parents and later visited the hospital for care. It is unclear how the accident happened. The Missouri Highway Patrol had no information about it immediately afterward. Fewer than 50 students were on the bus, McKenzie said. She said school administrators went to the scene, boarded the bus and continued the ride with the unhurt students to ensure they arrived home safely.

DIGEST JEFFERSON CITY > House gives initial OK to raising marriage age • The Missouri House gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a bill that would raise the minimum age threshold for marriage to 17 from 15 years old. The move is among a handful across the nation aimed at addressing sex traicking and forced marriage. Missouri has one of the loosest requirements for marriage in the country. It is among 27 states where technically there is no age limit because parents have the power to sign of on marriages of their children. The proposal, sponsored by Rep. Jean Evans, R-Manchester, limits the use of parental consent to 17-year-olds seeking a marriage license. At age 18, emancipated adults are free to marry on their own in Missouri and all other states. Evans, who has made human traicking a priority, earlier cited a case from 2016 in which a father brought his pregnant daughter, 14, from Idaho to marry a 24-year-old man in Kansas City. The measure needs inal approval in the House before moving to the Senate. (Kurt Erickson)

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State Supreme Court sidesteps decision on water surcharge • The Missouri Supreme Court, in a decision released Tuesday, said a dispute over a Missouri American Water Co. surcharge in St. Louis County customers is moot, but the court left it to the Legislature to determine how similar disputes are handled in the future. The debate in question arose from the water utility’s bid to apply an “infrastructure system reinvestment surcharge” to county residents. The fee is authorized by a statute that applies only to counties where the population exceeds one million residents. But because St. Louis County’s population dipped to 998,954 people in the 2010 U.S. Census, the state Oice of Public Counsel contested the surcharge in court, arguing that it was no longer justiied as written by the law. On Tuesday, the court ruled that the challenge to the special surcharge is moot, because the company is now recovering costs through new rates granted by the Missouri Public Service Commission. Missouri American stopped applying the charge in February 2016 and new rates kicked in last July, according to company spokesman, Brian Russell. But the court left it to the Legislature to clarify an answer to the core question of whether areas can fall out of eligibility for population-based statutes, or if “once in, always in.” (Bryce Gray) KANSAS CITY > Bald eagle hurt in tornado dies of injuries • The Missouri Department of Conservation says eforts to save a bald eagle injured during a tornado this month near Kansas City have failed. The department said in a news release Tuesday that the eagle found with a wing damaged in the March 6 tornado near Smithville Lake died of the injuries Sunday. A passer-by found the injured eagle along a road. The bird later was taken by a conservation agent to a wildlife rehabilitation expert, then on to the University of Missouri Veterinary Health Center in Columbia. That’s where the eagle died. The department says Smithville Lake typically has three or four active eagle nests, meaning eagles still will be in that area this spring. (AP)

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03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

LOCAL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Lab results due soon on Kinloch remains Body found after Berkeley woman had gone missing; person of interest in custody BY JEREMY KOHLER st. Louis Post-dispatch

BERKELEY • The acting chief of this suburban police department said Tuesday that lab results on human remains found during a search in February should be available to investigators soon. If they are found to be those of missing Berkeley woman Monica Elaine Sykes, police are likely to ask prosecutors to pursue criminal charges against a man already in custody, Capt. Art Jackson said. The remains were discovered on Feb. 4 in an area of Kinloch where police suspected Sykes, 25, might be found. The police had searched the area first

and did not initially find anything, but a volunteer search party led by a national search group revisited the area that day and found remains. Sykes disappeared Oct. 28 from the home in Berkeley she shared with her sister and three nephews. Berkeley police say she had spent the night with a married Berkeley police officer, who dropped her off at home at 6:48 a.m., according to the security system at her home. Monica Sykes left the house 13 minutes later, telling her nephews she was coming back with candy. One of her nephews, 6, told detectives he remembered looking out the window and seeing her step-

ping into a white car. She was never seen again. Another man she was dating has been in custody for several weeks on a probation violation. Police have called him a person of interest. His white car was found on fire after Sykes was reported missing. The oicer is not a suspect, Jackson said on Tuesday. But the officer

is no longer working for Berkeley police after the department “came to a decision” last week on his employment, Jackson said. During the Sykes investigation, the City Council was made aware of an unspecified concern about the oicer and realized that the city had not checked his background before hiring him.

He was placed on administrative leave during the background check, the result of which led to his separation, Jackson said. The officer, reached by phone, said he was fired without explanation. He said he heard on the news it was because he didn’t pass the background check. “There is nothing in my background,” he said. And

he said he had nothing to do with Sykes’ disappearance. “I wish the media would put the focus on the family and what they are going through,” he said. Sykes’ family has been upset about the city’s handling of the case, and the revelation that the department had not checked the background of the officer dating her.

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LAW AND ORDER WASHINGTON PARK > ID of woman found in ditch released • Nortisha Ball, 27, was the woman found dead in a ditch Saturday evening, according to the St. Clair County Coroner’s Oice. An autopsy found no physical trauma. Investigators were awaiting the results of toxicology tests before making a ruling on the cause of death. Police said children who had gone to a store in the area found the body on 38th Street and Bunkhum Road. Ball, who lived in Washington Park, was fully clothed and her body appeared to have been in the ditch for several days, police said. Illinois State Police are involved in the investigation. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Driver dies in crash • A driver is dead after being struck Tuesday afternoon by another driver who police suspect was intoxicated on westbound Highway 40 (Interstate 64) in St. Charles County. About 4 p.m. the driver of a black Dodge vehicle sped past a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the interstate before striking a Nissan SUV west of Highway 94, Highway Patrol spokesman Sgt. Al Nothum said. The collision caused the SUV to lip. The SUV’s driver was pronounced dead at the scene, Nothum said. A passenger in that vehicle was transported to a hospital with injuries. The Dodge’s driver was taken into police custody on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, Nothum said. The crash remains under investigation. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Students hurt in bus accident • Four middle school students sufered minor injuries on Tuesday when a driver lost control of his vehicle on an Interstate 270 entrance ramp and the school bus the students were in struck the car, police and a Hazelwood schools oicial said. The accident involving the school bus happened at I-270 and Lindbergh Boulevard at 3:30 p.m., the Missouri Highway Patrol said in a report. The patrol said Paul Knittel, 45, of Florissant was driving a Ford Tauras and “looking at a cellular device” when he lost control on the ramp. Knittel’s car spun out of control and the school bus rammed it, the patrol’s report says. The Highway Patrol said four students were taken to hospitals after the crash with minor injuries.

DIGEST JEFFERSON CITY > House gives initial OK to raising marriage age • The Missouri House gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a bill that would raise the minimum age threshold for marriage to 17 from 15 years old. The move is among a handful across the nation aimed at addressing sex traicking and forced marriage. Missouri has one of the loosest requirements for marriage in the country. It is among 27 states where technically there is no age limit because parents have the power to sign of on marriages of their children. The proposal, sponsored by Rep. Jean Evans, R-Manchester, limits the use of parental consent to 17-year-olds seeking a marriage license. At age 18, emancipated adults are free to marry on their own in Missouri and all other states. Evans, who has made human traicking a priority, earlier cited a case from 2016 in which a father brought his pregnant daughter, 14, from Idaho to marry a 24-year-old man in Kansas City. The measure needs inal approval in the House before moving to the Senate. (Kurt Erickson) State Supreme Court sidesteps decision on water surcharge • The Missouri Supreme Court, in a decision released Tuesday, said a dispute over a Missouri American Water Co. surcharge in St. Louis County customers is moot, but the court left it to the Legislature to determine how similar disputes are handled in the future. The debate in question arose from the water utility’s bid to apply an “infrastructure system reinvestment surcharge” to county residents. The fee is authorized by a statute that applies only to counties where the population exceeds one million residents. But because St. Louis County’s population dipped to 998,954 people in the 2010 U.S. Census, the state Oice of Public Counsel contested the surcharge in court, arguing that it was no longer justiied as written by the law. On Tuesday, the court ruled that the challenge to the special surcharge is moot, because the company is now recovering costs through new rates granted by the Missouri Public Service Commission. Missouri American stopped applying the charge in February 2016 and new rates kicked in last July, according to company spokesman, Brian Russell. But the court left it to the Legislature to clarify an answer to the core question of whether areas can fall out of eligibility for population-based statutes, or if “once in, always in.” (Bryce Gray) KANSAS CITY > Bald eagle hurt in tornado dies of injuries • The Missouri Department of Conservation says eforts to save a bald eagle injured during a tornado this month near Kansas City have failed. The department said in a news release Tuesday that the eagle found with a wing damaged in the March 6 tornado near Smithville Lake died of the injuries Sunday. A passer-by found the injured eagle along a road. The bird later was taken by a conservation agent to a wildlife rehabilitation expert, then on to the University of Missouri Veterinary Health Center in Columbia. That’s where the eagle died. The department says Smithville Lake typically has three or four active eagle nests, meaning eagles still will be in that area this spring. (AP)

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

Some suggest closing Ferguson Market Residents cite unsavory activities, but mayor notes need for proper procedures BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FERGUSON • Residents challenged

the Ferguson City Council on Tuesday night about whether Ferguson Market & Liquor should remain open because many deem it an unwanted attraction for unseemly behavior. Some people at the council meeting said they wanted to see steps taken to close the market and replace it with something more beneficial to the community. “People go there because they have no other options,” resident Francesca Love said. She suggested the store be replaced with a bank or a grocery store for fresh foods. The request comes days after a new video was released as part of a documentary about the 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown, 18. The video shows Brown in the market hours before he was killed by a Ferguson police officer. Surveillance video released shortly after Brown’s death had shown him having a runin inside the market and shoving its owner as he leaves. The maker of the documentary maintains that the new video sheds new light on the circumstances surrounding Brown’s death. But officials have dismissed that claim. The release of the documentary led to protests outside of the market on Sunday and Monday nights. Mayor James Knowles III said Tuesday that the store’s owners deserved proper procedural treatment and that their business couldn’t be simply shut down at the behest of residents. Police Chief Delrish Moss said his department had received calls about “activity in front of the store, activity that goes on around the store, but a lot of that doesn’t have anything to do with the store.” Moss said it was imperative for people to call police with more specific information about what they know is going on at the market for police to investigate. Knowles said his oice would look into police call volumes concerning the store and investigate culpability. Knowles added that his oice had made an efort to limit by-the-drink liquor establishments by halting liquor store applications.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

ABOVE • Ferguson Police Chief Delrish Moss addresses the Ferguson City Council regarding his hiring process for adding additional police oicers, at a Ferguson City Council meeting on Tuesday. LEFT • Ferguson police oicers guide resident Emily Davis away from the microphone after she used up her allotted two minutes of speaking time during the open comment portion of a Ferguson City Council meeting on Tuesday.

Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

Maplewood sued over housing law City’s nuisance ordinance said to target disabled, women, African-Americans, costing them occupancy permits

Downtown interstate lane, ramp closures are set for Saturday BY LEAH THORSEN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MAPLEWOOD • The city of Maplewood is violating the Fair Housing Act by disproportionately revoking the occupancy permits of African-Americans, women and disabled residents, in efect banishing them, a federal lawsuit filed Monday says. Two or more police calls can put someone on the list of “chronic nuisances,” the suit says, without a conviction or even when that person is the victim of the crime that triggered the police call. The Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council, which filed the suit in U.S. District Court in St. Louis, said Maplewood’s nuisance ordinance was “one of the country’s most onerous.” In a study of the use of the ordinance from 2010 to 2015, the council found that the majority of enforcement actions had been taken against African-Americans, the suit says. It also says that a large percentage of actions have been taken against victims of domestic violence and those struggling with mental illness who seek police or medical help. The council is a nonprofit that says it seeks to ensure equal access to housing and other public accommodations in the region. Sasha Samberg-Champion, one of the lawyers who filed the suit, said in a telephone interview Tuesday that hundreds of similar ordinances had been enacted around the country in recent years. He called Maplewood’s “perhaps one of the most

egregious” because it can result in eviction and exile and “explicitly provides that [being the victim of] domestic violence can be the basis for enforcement.” Samberg-Champion works for a Washington civil rights law firm that has been investigating similar ordinances around the country. City Manager Marty Corcoran said, “I obviously would deny that we’ve ever done anything based on race, religion, age, gender. ... I just don’t believe that’s taken place.” Corcoran said cases were not initiated by the city. Someone else, typically neighbors, starts the process with a complaint, he said. The housing council says that the ordinance defines “nuisance” so broadly that it can “potentially include virtually any act that city officials do not like.” A nuisance can include more than two instances within a 180-day period of “peace disturbance or domestic violence resulting in calls to police,” the suit claims. The ordinance has only one way to abate the nuisance: revocation of the occupancy permit for up to six months, the suit says. The council looked at details of 43 enforcement hearings from March 2010 to August 2015. In more than 55 percent of the hearings where race could be determined, the household was AfricanAmerican, the suit says, or three times the percentage of African-American residents in the city. Sixteen of the enforcement actions, or more than 37 percent, involved “at least in part” incidents of domestic violence.

Six involved women — all black — who had been attacked by a rebuffed suitor or current or former male partner, the suit says. All six were deemed a “nuisance subject to occupancy permit revocation,” the suit says, although in two cases action was suspended, “effectively putting the survivor on probation.” That probation “effectively forbids” the women from calling police for fear of being “exiled from town,” the suit says. Eleven of the cases “involved residents whose ‘misconduct’ was the manifestation of mental illness or other disabilities,” the suit says. The ordinance makes residents afraid to call for police or ambulance services, the suit says. One family called a cab rather than an ambulance “because apparently the ambulance is a crime for us,” the suit says.

The suit says the city’s actions violate the federal Fair Housing Act by discriminating against residents based on race, sex and disability. It says that many jurisdictions have recently enacted chronic nuisance ordinances and that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has warned cities against discriminatory enforcement of the ordinances. The suit asks a federal judge to find that the city’s practices violate the Fair Housing Act and the Missouri Human Rights Act, and ban the city from enforcing the ordinance. It also seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

All but one lane of Interstate 44/Interstate 55 between Broadway and Park Avenue will close on Saturday, as will some downtown ramps — and expect more lane changes to stick around through the coming months, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation. Crews are set to restripe westbound Interstate 44/ southbound Interstate 55 with work beginning at 5 a.m. Here’s what MoDOT has planned: • Keeping one lane open on westbound Interstate 44 between Broadway and Park. • Closing the ramp from southbound Memorial Drive to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55. • Closing the ramp from the westbound Poplar Street Bridge to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55. The ramp from westbound Poplar Street Bridge to Walnut also will close. To detour, take eastbound Interstate 44 to Washington Avenue, make a U-turn under the interstate and get back on westbound Interstate 44/ southbound Interstate 55. • Closing the ramp from westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 to Seventh Street. Take the 12th Street/Gravois exit to detour. The restriping is scheduled to be done by 8 a.m. Sunday. When the lanes and ramps reopen, drivers only will have one lane open on the ramp from the westbound Poplar Street Bridge to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55, and three 10-foot lanes on westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 between the bridge and the Interstate 44/Interstate 55 interchange. MoDOT said the lanes would remain that way until bridge work on westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 was done in July.

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

Some suggest closing Ferguson Market Residents cite unsavory activities, but mayor notes need for proper procedures BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FERGUSON • Residents challenged the Ferguson City Council on Tuesday night about whether Ferguson Market & Liquor should remain open because many deem it an unwanted attraction for unseemly behavior. Some people at the council meeting said they wanted to see steps taken to close the market and replace it with something more beneficial to the community. “People go there because they have no other options,” resident Francesca Love said. She suggested the store be replaced with a bank or a grocery store for fresh foods. The request comes days after a new video was released as part of a documentary about the 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown, 18. The video shows Brown in the market hours before he was killed by a Ferguson police oicer. Surveillance video released shortly after Brown’s death had shown him having a run-in inside the market and shoving its owner as he leaves. The maker of the documentary maintains that the new video sheds new light on the circumstances surrounding Brown’s death. But officials have dismissed that claim. The release of the documentary led to protests outside of the market on Sunday and Monday nights. Mayor James Knowles III said Tuesday that the store’s owners deserved proper procedural treatment and that their business couldn’t be simply shut down at the behest of residents. Police Chief Delrish Moss said his department had received calls about “ac-

LAW & ORDER FRANKLIN COUNTY > Mexican court inds man not guilty in death of Union woman • A lawyer from Franklin County has been acquitted in the death of his girlfriend at a resort in Mexico, the family of the woman said Tuesday. John Loveless, a lawyer who practices in the St. Louis area, was on trial for allegedly killing Tamra Turpin. Turpin, 36, of Union was found dead in March 2016 in a condo the couple had rented in the coastal city of Playa del Carmen. A forensic examination concluded she had been strangled. Loveless, 59, was arrested at the Cancun airport on his way back from Mexico and ordered to stand trial in connection with her death. Loveless had told her sister that Turpin

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Ferguson Police Chief Delrish Moss addresses the Ferguson City Council regarding his hiring process for adding additional police oicers, at a Ferguson City Council meeting on Tuesday.

tivity in front of the store, activity that goes on around the store, but a lot of that doesn’t have anything to do with the store.” Moss said it was imperative for people to call police with more specific information

overdosed on prescription medications during a suicide attempt after an argument. He was acquitted after the Mexican tribunal ruled that they did not have evidence to ind him guilty beyond reasonable doubt, Turpin’s sister Jodi Mills said. Mills, another of Turpin’s sisters, her mother and stepfather are in Mexico for the trial, which began March 6. Neither Loveless nor members of his family could be immediately reached for comment Tuesday night. ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Man gets 36 years in fatal shooting • A man from Belleville has been sentenced to 36 years in prison for the murder of a man in St. Clair County. Luigi E. Moore, 33, was sentenced to prison last week for irst-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Darian Massey in October 2014. Moore was found to be guilty but mentally ill,

about what they know is going on at the market for police to investigate. Knowles said his oice would look into police call volumes concerning the store and investigate culpability. Knowles added that his oice had made

Moore

according to court records. Massey, 30, was found inside a Toyota sedan that had run of the road in the 4200 block of Bond Avenue in Alorton, police said. Massey had been shot in the head and pronounced dead at the

scene. Police charged Moore six days after the shooting. PARK HILLS, MO. > City council member accused of drug traicking • A Park Hills council member is facing a drug traicking charge after police say they found almost a pound of methamphetamine in a car he was in during a traic stop. The Park Hills Daily Journal reported on the charges against Steven Sutton, 51, on Tuesday.

Maplewood sued over housing law City’s nuisance ordinance said to target disabled, women, African-Americans, costing them occupancy permits

an efort to limit by-the-drink liquor establishments by halting liquor store applications. Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

According to a probable cause statement, a Ste. Genevieve County Sherif’s Department deputy stopped a car with Sutton and two others on March 3. The deputy found a large clear Sutton plastic bag with 404 grams of a substance that tested positive for methamphetamine. The two other people in the car were also arrested, but it is unclear if they were also later charged. Sutton was free Tuesday after posting bond on bail set at $250,000. Park Hills is about 60 miles south of St. Louis in St. Francois County.

Downtown interstate lane, ramp closures are set for Saturday BY LEAH THORSEN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MAPLEWOOD • The city of Maplewood is violating the Fair Housing Act by disproportionately revoking the occupancy permits of African-Americans, women and disabled residents, in efect banishing them, a federal lawsuit filed Monday says. Two or more police calls can put someone on the list of “chronic nuisances,” the suit says, without a conviction or even when that person is the victim of the crime that triggered the police call. The Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council, which filed the suit in U.S. District Court in St. Louis, said Maplewood’s nuisance ordinance was “one of the country’s most onerous.” In a study of the use of the ordinance from 2010 to 2015, the council found that the majority of enforcement actions had been taken against African-Americans, the suit says. It also says that a large percentage of actions have been taken against victims of domestic violence and those struggling with mental illness who seek police or medical help. The council is a nonprofit that says it seeks to ensure equal access to housing and other public accommodations in the region. Sasha Samberg-Champion, one of the lawyers who filed the suit, said in a telephone interview Tuesday that hundreds of similar ordinances had been enacted around the country in recent years. He called Maplewood’s “perhaps one of the most

egregious” because it can result in eviction and exile and “explicitly provides that [being the victim of] domestic violence can be the basis for enforcement.” Samberg-Champion works for a Washington civil rights law firm that has been investigating similar ordinances around the country. City Manager Marty Corcoran said, “I obviously would deny that we’ve ever done anything based on race, religion, age, gender. ... I just don’t believe that’s taken place.” Corcoran said cases were not initiated by the city. Someone else, typically neighbors, starts the process with a complaint, he said. The housing council says that the ordinance defines “nuisance” so broadly that it can “potentially include virtually any act that city officials do not like.” A nuisance can include more than two instances within a 180-day period of “peace disturbance or domestic violence resulting in calls to police,” the suit claims. The ordinance has only one way to abate the nuisance: revocation of the occupancy permit for up to six months, the suit says. The council looked at details of 43 enforcement hearings from March 2010 to August 2015. In more than 55 percent of the hearings where race could be determined, the household was AfricanAmerican, the suit says, or three times the percentage of African-American residents in the city. Sixteen of the enforcement actions, or more than 37 percent, involved “at least in part” incidents of domestic violence.

Six involved women — all black — who had been attacked by a rebuffed suitor or current or former male partner, the suit says. All six were deemed a “nuisance subject to occupancy permit revocation,” the suit says, although in two cases action was suspended, “effectively putting the survivor on probation.” That probation “effectively forbids” the women from calling police for fear of being “exiled from town,” the suit says. Eleven of the cases “involved residents whose ‘misconduct’ was the manifestation of mental illness or other disabilities,” the suit says. The ordinance makes residents afraid to call for police or ambulance services, the suit says. One family called a cab rather than an ambulance “because apparently the ambulance is a crime for us,” the suit says.

The suit says the city’s actions violate the federal Fair Housing Act by discriminating against residents based on race, sex and disability. It says that many jurisdictions have recently enacted chronic nuisance ordinances and that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has warned cities against discriminatory enforcement of the ordinances. The suit asks a federal judge to find that the city’s practices violate the Fair Housing Act and the Missouri Human Rights Act, and ban the city from enforcing the ordinance. It also seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

All but one lane of Interstate 44/Interstate 55 between Broadway and Park Avenue will close on Saturday, as will some downtown ramps — and expect more lane changes to stick around through the coming months, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation. Crews are set to restripe westbound Interstate 44/ southbound Interstate 55 with work beginning at 5 a.m. Here’s what MoDOT has planned: • Keeping one lane open on westbound Interstate 44 between Broadway and Park. • Closing the ramp from southbound Memorial Drive to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55. • Closing the ramp from the westbound Poplar Street Bridge to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55. The ramp from westbound Poplar Street Bridge to Walnut also will close. To detour, take eastbound Interstate 44 to Washington Avenue, make a U-turn under the interstate and get back on westbound Interstate 44/ southbound Interstate 55. • Closing the ramp from westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 to Seventh Street. Take the 12th Street/Gravois exit to detour. The restriping is scheduled to be done by 8 a.m. Sunday. When the lanes and ramps reopen, drivers only will have one lane open on the ramp from the westbound Poplar Street Bridge to westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55, and three 10-foot lanes on westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 between the bridge and the Interstate 44/Interstate 55 interchange. MoDOT said the lanes would remain that way until bridge work on westbound Interstate 44/southbound Interstate 55 was done in July.

WOODY HARRELSON IS

‘ WILSON ’ DANIEL CLOWES

BASED UPON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL WRITTEN BY

SCREENPLAY BY DIRECTED BY

YOU AND A GUEST ARE INVITED TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF

DANIEL CLOWES

CRAIG JOHNSON

He’s a People Person.

Monday, March 20th • 7:00PM FOR YOUR CHANCE TO RECEIVE A PASS FOR TWO, EMAIL: CONTESTSTLOUIS@ALLIEDIM.COM Rated R. No Purchase Necessary. Supplies are limited. One pass per winner. Each pass admits two. &#-'42! 4* 20' !$-.-2'##% -2% 4* 02 - 1.*',(03#/ 1.*',*#."#% +-*4*)

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IN SELECT THEATRES MARCH 24


LOCAL

03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

SLU medical school put on probation SLU • FROM A1

who joined SLU Jan. 1, told the Post-Dispatch that he was ready to launch a remediation plan to address all of the issues brought to light by the accrediting group. He plans to involve students and faculty in a total evaluation of the medical school’s operations and curriculum. Deficiencies were found in about 20 percent of 93 measures judged by the accrediting body. Behrns said the review, which comes around every eight years, happened in the middle of phasing in a new curriculum, “which probably created some gaps,” he said. Evaluators visited campus in October and made the decision to put SLU on probation mid-February. SLU notified students, employees and alumni Tuesday morning of the probationary status and the remediation plan. The deficiencies vary, but multiple items highlight concerns about the way the curriculum is managed. For example, the letter cites a failure to link the school’s learning objectives to students’ progress in “developing those competencies that the profession and the public expect of a physician.” “If it says the student must know how to do a physical exam of the abdomen then the student needs to show us that,” Behrns said. A few of the concerns also involve the school’s affiliation agreements, which aren’t specifically named. SLU has a partnership with SSM Health, which in 2015 acquired St. Louis University Hospital. Top leaders from SSM are aware of the probation. Specifically, the accrediting group says SLU and its ailiates “do not share responsibility for the learning environment.” There are no periodic evaluations to better understand how well the learning environment is helping students understand professional standards. Evaluators also criticized the fact that students in clinical settings may be super-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Dr. L. James Willmore (left), associate dean of admissions for St. Louis University’s School of Medicine, talks with Dr. Kevin Behrns, dean of the medical school, on Tuesday in his oice about the news that the school has been put on probation by an accreditation agency.

vised by physicians who are not medical school faculty members. One needed fix is improving documentation, Behrns said. If a medical student is on rotation at an ailiate hospital such as St. Mary’s, and isstuck with a needle while trying to administer an IV, there needs to be documentation of the process or next steps that are to follow. “That process is not hard wired; we need to have that hard wired,” Behrns said. The medical school also needs to improve central oversight to identify potential gaps in education, Behrns said. “Say our students don’t perform in a topic area very well on

Missouri prison system’s leadership is changing PRISON • FROM A1

released from prison. Jones, a former sheriff and Republican state representative, is the father of Greitens’ deputy chief of staf, Caleb Jones. In the central oice, Precythe has filled the deputy director post vacated in December by David Rost with Matt Sturm, who will serve as her top deputy. Sturm was director of the Division of Ofender Rehabilitative Services and has been at the agency since 1996. Also, as was previously reported, Dave Dormire is leaving as director of the Division of Adult Institutions at the end of the month. There has been no formal announcement of changes at the St. Louis Community Release Center, which was the site of a recent parolee suicide, along with a death in January possibly due to an overdose. Precythe was picked by Greitens to oversee the agency after serving in a top administrative position with the North Carolina prison system. She replaced former agency head George Lombardi. Her first two months on the job have been dominated by reports of widespread sexual harassment of female prison guards, which have resulted in millions of dollars in legal payouts by the state. The scandal was first reported by the Pitch.com, a Kansas City newspaper, which found a pattern of harassment among male workers toward their female counterparts. A Post-Dispatch review of records found the state had paid out more than $4 million in the first six months of 2016 alone. And that number could grow. Attorney General Josh Hawley told a Senate panel last week that the state was challenging another $28 million in payouts, although not all of those are from the Department of Corrections. In response to the initial reports, the House has

formed a special investigative committee that has been taking testimony about problems within the agency. At the halfway point of the 2017 legislative session, the chairman of the committee said he thought the panel was on track to make some recommendations about how the agency can improve the working conditions for rank-and-file employees. “Nobody should have to work in a hostile environment,” said Rep. Jim Hansen, R-Frankford. Hansen said his conversations with prison workers in his district had found them believing conditions had been improving since the investigation began, which coincides with the start of Precythe’s tenure. “You’re not going to turn this aircraft carrier around overnight,” Hansen said. “But they can see things changing.” Precythe also has won kudos from the chairman of the House Corrections and Public Institutions Committee. “She’s made an immediate impact,” said Rep. Paul Fitzwater, R-Potosi. Precythe’s changes haven’t been limited to the main oice in Jeferson City. At the Kansas City Community Release Center, Precythe has replaced Warden Lilly Angelo with retired former Warden Sonny Collins. She also has moved two deputy wardens out of the facility and brought in retired wardens to replace them. The facility was converted last year from a release center like the one in downtown St. Louis to a minimum-security institution that houses inmates who are about to be released but not yet on parole. Lawmakers don’t think Precythe’s shake-up is complete. “I see some more changes coming. Stay tuned,” Fitzwater said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

a national exam, we need to go back and look at that topic area,” he said. Recruiting and retaining lowincome and first-generation college students were other issues the school faces. Mizzou’s medical school battled a similar issue recently after diversity concerns were raised. “We didn’t measure up,” Behrns said. Both Behrns and Pestello underscored that the school was still accredited, so current and prospective students continued to be eligible to take the national board exams and apply for residency positions. “We’re still accredited, and we

will own the issues and fix them,” Behrns said, when asked about how this situation could affect the perception of SLU. The accrediting group offers schools the opportunity to refute probationary status, but Behrns doesn’t plan to do that. Instead, he hopes that a few advisory committees and schoolwide input will put the school in a position to be taken off probation within a year. “I have full and complete confidence that he will aggressively address every issue that’s been raised,” Pestello said of Behrns. “The reason it’s a big deal is that we didn’t exercise the discipline we needed to exercise to

make sure that we remain fully accredited,” Behrns said. “When you’re talking about medicine and taking care of patients, it’s all about the details.” The Liaison Committee on Medical Education is co-funded by the American Medical Association and the Association of American Medical Colleges. The organization reviews more than 150 medical schools in the U.S. and Canada, including four in Missouri: SLU, Washington University and both the Columbia and Kansas City campuses of the University of Missouri. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

JOIN STLTODAY ON FACEBOOK Become a fan of STLtoday on Facebook and get the early word on news scoops • facebook.com/STLPD

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Missouri company and worker charged with adulterating pet food

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

FOLLOW THE NEWS ON YOUR PHONE Download the Post-Dispatch news app, where you’ll get the most up-to-date news, and alerts when there’s breaking news. Go to stltoday.com/apps to download.

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

APARTMENT COMMUNITY

ST. LOUIS • A Missouri company and an employee have

been criminally charged as part of a federal case that claims lower-quality ingredients were misbranded and then used in premium pet food. Diversified Ingredients Inc., of Ballwin, and employee Collin McAtee, 39, were charged by information Monday on a total of four misdemeanor counts each: two counts of introduction of misbranded food into interstate commerce and two counts of introduction of adulterated food into interstate commerce. A California company, Wilbur-Ellis, and Henry R. Rychlik, a feed division employee who was responsible for the animal protein products from a facility in Rosser, Texas, were charged with a total of eight counts each. They were charged by complaint with the same eight counts last week. The charges claim that the Rosser facility used chicken byproduct meal, B-grade “chicken bone byproduct meal,” turkey byproduct meal, “hydrolyzed poultry feathers” or “feather meal” instead of chicken and turkey meal, and blended those cheaper meals with other ingredients to make it “appear better and of greater value than the product was.” Diversified, a commodities broker and distributor, sold the Wilbur-Ellis products to pet food companies, the charges say. “Mr. McAtee and his company, Diversified, are disappointed by the U.S. Attorney’s decision to file the case against them,” said McAtee’s attorney, Paul D’Agrosa. “They have cooperated in the investigation ... and they believe they were ... honest merchandisers and were misled by Wilbur-Ellis ... as much as anybody else was.” The accusation was first lodged against Wilbur-Ellis in a lawsuit filed by over the contents of premium pet food brands. The company blamed middlemen, saying they were aware of the meal blends.

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NEWS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

White House tries to salvage GOP health proposal

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

Fact-checking the health care debate HEALTH • FROM A1

A look at statements in the debate and how they compare with the CBO’s estimates and the underlying facts: TRUMP • “We’re going to have insurance for everybody. There was a philosophy in some circles

that if you can’t pay for it, you don’t get it. That’s not going to happen with us.” — To The Washington Post, Jan. 15. CBO • It estimates the bill would leave 14 million fewer people insured in the first year, 24 million fewer by 2026. THE FACTS • In the first year, the biggest reason more people are uninsured would be repeal of

penalties the Afordable Care Act imposes on those deemed able to aford insurance but who don’t buy it. Still others would decide to forgo coverage because of higher premiums or do without Medicaid. In following years the main reason for a drop in the number of insured would be that the Republican bill scales back Medicaid for low-income Americans. Altogether, CBO estimates 52 million people would be uninsured by 2026, a vast distance from “insurance for everybody.” ••••• SEAN SPICER, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY, TUESDAY • “Having a card and having

coverage that when you walk into a doctor’s oice has a deductible of $15,000, $20,000 a year isn’t coverage. That’s a car. That doesn’t get you the care you need.” THE FACTS • He’s wrong about deductibles under the ACA.

Out-of-pocket expenses for consumers are limited. Deductibles, copayments and coinsurance together can’t exceed $7,150 this year for an individual plan sold through HealthCare.gov or similar state markets. For a family plan it’s $14,300. After that, the insurance plan pays the full cost of covered benefits. In addition, more than half of customers in these plans get subsidies to help with their out-ofpocket costs. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (center), R-Ky., speaks Tuesday about the GOP health care bill. With him are (from left) Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas.

BY ALAN FRAM Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Undaunted by fellow Republicans’ defiance, GOP leaders and the White House redoubled their eforts Tuesday to muscle legislation overhauling America’s health care system through Congress after a sobering report about millions being shoved of insurance coverage. President Donald Trump, whose strong Election Day showing in GOP regions makes him the party’s ultimate Capitol Hill vote wrangler, discussed the legislation by phone with Congress’ two top Republicans. He also dispatched Vice President Mike Pence and health secretary Tom Price to hear GOP senators’ concerns. With a crucial House committee voted slated for Thursday, Trump’s spokesman acknowledged they were open to making changes to win support. “This has never been a take it or leave it,” Press Secretary Sean Spicer said.

GOP PROMISE The GOP bill is the party’s response to seven years of promising to repeal the 2010 health care overhaul, the Afordable Care Act, enacted under then-President Barack Obama. The bill would undo that law’s individual mandate, which requires most people to have coverage, by ending the tax penalty on those who don’t. It would also provide age-based tax credits instead of the subsidies geared to income in the ACA, end that law’s expansion of Medicaid and curb its future spending, and let insurers boost rates for seniors. On Monday, the Congressional Budget Office said the Republican legislation would reduce the ranks of the insured by 24 million in a decade, largely by cutting Medicaid recipients and people buying individual policies. That would be more than the 20 million who’ve gained coverage under the ACA — and attach a big number to a problem haunting GOP governors and members of Congress whose states have benefited from “Obamacare.” “I plan to vote NO” on the GOP bill, Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, RFla., tweeted Tuesday. “As written the plan leaves too many from my #SoFla district uninsured.”

DEFICITS The budget office report also said the measure would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the next decade, largely by cutting Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor, and eliminating the ACA’s

subsidies for low- and middle-income people. The report said the bill’s changes would result in federal subsidies that would fall to half their current size in a decade and that older, lower-earning people would be hit especially hard. Those findings further energized Democrats, who already were unanimously opposing the GOP repeal effort and showing no sign of relenting. “Of course you can have savings if you cut of millions of people from access to health care,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California said. She said the measure’s shift of billions of dollars from lower- to higher-earning families would in efect transfer money from GOP to Democratic regions, and, seemingly taunting Republicans, she added, “Explain that to your constituents.” Pence and Price discussed the legislation over lunch with GOP senators at the Capitol. Participants said senators suggested targeting the bill’s new tax credits more at lower-earning people, improving benefits for seniors and protecting the expansion of Medicaid, the federal-state program that helps lower-income people aford care. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., all but acknowledged the widespread assumption that the measure will be reshaped, saying, “It will be open to amendment in the Senate.”

••••• SEN. CHUCK SCHUMER, SENATE DEMOCRATIC LEADER • “CBO is virtually unassailable. Everyone, Democrats and Republicans, whether it be George Bush, Barack Obama or anyone else has gone along with CBO. ...CBO speaks the truth. They’ve been speaking the truth for decades, and to try to attack CBO is simply attacking the messenger.” — Comments to reporters Monday. REP. NANCY PELOSI, HOUSE DEMOCRATIC LEADER, ON REPUBLICAN REACTION TO THE CBO • “Some of them are trying to pin a rose on this report and make it sound like it’s a good

thing and the others of them are trying to discredit the CBO, but it’s completely wrong, completely wrong. ... Numbers are quite elegant things, you know. They speak very clearly.” — Comments to reporters Monday. THE FACTS • Democrats have not hesitated to attack this messenger when its conclusions have not suited them. “The Congressional Budget Oice never gives us any credit,” President Obama said in 2009 when the CBO pointed to the expense of Democratic health overhaul proposals. Pelosi complained at the time:“The CBO will always give you the worst-case scenario.” Again in 2014, Pelosi did not consider CBO’s numbers “elegant,” or correct, when they forecast job losses from a Democratic efort to raise the minimum wage. She accused the CBO of making arguments that “contradict the consensus among hundreds of America’s top economists” and said it “ignored new perspectives in the wide array of analysis on the minimum wage.”

••••• TRUMP • People covered under the law “can expect to have great health care. It will be in a much simplified form. Much less expensive and much better … lower numbers, much lower deductibles.” CBO • It says cost-sharing payments in the individual market, including deductibles, “would tend to be higher than those anticipated under current law.” Cost-sharing subsidies would be repealed in 2020, “significantly increasing out-of-pocket costs for nongroup (private) insurance for many lower-income enrollees.”

••••• TRUMP, AT A CABINET MEETING MONDAY • “Obamacare, all of a sudden, the last couple of weeks, is getting a false rep that maybe it’s OK. It’s not OK, it’s a disaster and people understand that it’s failed and it’s imploding. And if we let it go for another year, it’ll totally implode.” CBO • Not in the view of the budget experts. They described the market for individual policies under Obama’s health care law as “stable.” They said it was likely to remain stable under the proposed GOP replacement legislation, too.

••••• MICK MULVANEY, TRUMP’S BUDGET DIRECTOR • “If you have coverage that doesn’t allow you to go to the doctor, what good is it in the first place? … Democrats took all of this credit for giving people coverage, but ignored the fact that they had created this large group of people that still could not go to the doctor.” — Tuesday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

CRITICS

THE FACTS • Republicans gloss over reality when they make this argument. While deductibles

Even so, criticism cascaded from both ends of the GOP political continuum, suggesting leaders face a festering problem. Freshman Rep. John Faso, RN.Y., from a closely divided district in the Catskill Mountains, said he was concerned the bill would hurt hospitals and was undecided about supporting it. He’s a member of the House Budget Committee, where Thursday’s vote could be close. Citing the bill’s projected increase in uninsured people, Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., from another close district, said he opposed the bill. Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev., said he was leaning no because of people losing coverage.” Conservatives continued complaining that the Republican measure wouldn’t fully repeal the ACA, as they and Trump promised in last fall’s election campaigns. Their demands include voiding the law’s requirement that policies cover 10 specified benefits such as mental health services, which they say drives up consumers’ costs.

are high for the Afordable Care Act’s private insurance plans (averaging $3,000 last year for a standard silver plan), the law requires preventive care to be covered at no charge. And more than half of the people enrolled in the health law’s insurance markets get an extra subsidy when they go to seek care. It can reduce a deductible from several thousand dollars to a few hundred. The GOP bill would repeal those subsidies. Other evidence points to tangible benefits from the ACA’s coverage expansion. For example, government researchers have found fewer Americans struggling to pay medical bills. A 2015 report found that problems with medical bills had declined for the fourth year in a row. Most of the improvement was among low-income people and those with government coverage, and it coincided with the ACA’s big coverage expansion. ••••• TOM PRICE, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SECRETARY • “I firmly believe that nobody will be worse of financially in the process that we’re going through.” — NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Sunday. CBO • There are losers as well as winners, the analysts found. Generally, older people are bound to face higher costs because the legislation would let insurance companies charge them up to five times more for premiums than they charge young people. They can be charged only three times more now. The bottom line, the analysts say, would be “substantially reducing premiums for young adults and substantially raising premiums for older people.”

••••• MULVANEY • “Actually I don’t think the costs will go up at all.” — ABC’s “This Week,” Sunday. CBO • It estimates that some costs indeed will go up, at least for a few years. The analysts say av-

erage premiums in the private insurance market would rise in 2018 and 2019 by 15 percent to 20 percent, compared with current law, then start to come down. By 2026, average premiums could be 10 percent lower, compared with the current law. One reason: Insurers could eliminate a current requirement to ofer plans that cover a set percentage of the cost of certain benefits.

Downtown is losing tourist guides, gaining security patrols PATROLS • FROM A1

for a different outcome,” Kelley said. “We certainly were disappointed in having to choose between hospitality and the security challenge.” The decision was made Tuesday morning in a joint meeting of Downtown STL and the Downtown Community Improvement District. The new security patrols will begin Wednesday. The eight patrol officers are current city police oicers who will be working offduty. They will carry firearms and have the authority to arrest people, Kelley said. They’ll patrol in pairs in various parts of downtown that see high foot traffic. The areas they patrol may change depending on the season and what events

are happening downtown, Kelley said. She said four of the eight would be replaced by licensed security guards later this year, once Downtown STL chooses a security contractor. The security guards would not have firearms nor the authority to arrest. The patrols will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The officers will provide escorts to vehicles and buildings upon request, a service that was ofered by the downtown guides, Kelley said. Kelley said the decision was not related to the announcement in February by the law firm Brown and Crouppen that downtown crime could push the firm to find offices elsewhere. She said her group began researching the change in

August. There were about 2,300 crimes reported in Downtown and Downtown West combined last year, and slightly more in 2015, according to St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department statistics. About 75 percent of the incidents were property crimes. Kelley said she hoped the city would eventually be able to assign more police oicers downtown. The city police department, which has roughly 1,350 officers, has struggled for years with filling jobs once they open. In 2015, Police Chief Sam Dotson said the department lost about 65 oicers a year, on average. Mike Faulk • 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

POST-DISPATCH

Downtown guide Michelle M. Cheli provides information to a tourist (who preferred not to give his name) on Washington Avenue in downtown St. Louis in 2011. The guides are being replaced by security patrols beginning Wednesday.


LOCAL

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Monsanto doesn’t address glyphosate allegations MONSANTO • FROM A1

public Tuesday that says the Monsanto regulatory afairs manager recounted the conversation in an email to his colleagues. The company was seeking Rowland’s help stopping an investigation of glyphosate by a separate office, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, that is part of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department, according to the filing. A federal judge overseeing the glyphosate litigation in San Francisco said last month that he was inclined to order Rowland to submit to questioning by lawyers for the plaintiffs, who contend he had a “highly suspicious” relationship with Monsanto. Rowland oversaw a committee that found insufficient evidence to conclude glyphosate causes cancer and left his job last year after his report was leaked to the press. Monsanto issued a statement defending its use of glyphosate without directly addressing the allegations about Rowland. The retired oicial couldn’t immediately be reached for comment about the multiple documents concerning his role at the agency that were ordered unsealed Tuesday by the judge. “Glyphosate is not a carcinogen,” the company said. “The allegation that glyphosate can cause cancer in humans is inconsistent with decades of comprehensive safety reviews by the leading regulatory authorities around the world.” Monsanto also said the documents submitted by plaintiffs’ lawyers “are taken out of context.” “Plucking a single email out of context doesn’t change the fact that the U.S. EPA and regulators

around the world ... have concluded that glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans,” the company said in the statement. The company lost on March 10 a court bid to keep glyphosate off California’s public list of cancer-causing chemicals. A state judge rejected Monsanto’s arguments that the chemical shouldn’t be added to a list created by a voter-approved ballot initiative that requires explicit warnings for consumer products containing substances that may cause cancer or birth defects.

The plaintiffs’ lawyers say Rowland’s communications with Monsanto employees show the regulator who was supposed to be policing the company was actually working on its behalf. The unsealing of the court documents “represents a huge development in public health,” said Tim Litzenburg, one of the lawyers suing Monsanto in the case. Regulatory agencies, scientists, consumers and physicians “can see some of what Monsanto was actually engaging in behind the scenes, and how they have manipulated the sci-

entific literature to date. That’s important to their decision-making, not just our lawsuits.” After the phone conversation with Rowland, the Monsanto head of U.S. regulatory affairs, Dan Jenkins, cautioned his colleagues not to “get your hopes up,” according to an email cited in the court filing. “I doubt EPA and Jess can kill this,” Jenkins wrote. Plaintifs’ lawyers said in another filing made public Tuesday that Monsanto’s toxicology manager and his boss were ghostwriters for two of the reports,

classified glyphosate as a probable carcinogen. “A less expensive/more palatable approach” is to rely on experts only for some areas of contention, while “we ghost-write the Exposure Tox & Genetox sections,” one Monsanto employee wrote to another. The names of outside scientists could be listed on the publication, “but we would be keeping the cost down by us doing the writing and they would just edit & sign their names so to speak,” according to the email, which goes to on say that’s how Monsanto handled the 2000 study.

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A new stamp featuring a digitized view of the Gateway Arch towering over the St. Louis riverfront goes on the market later this month but, be warned, at $23.75 it won’t come cheap. The stamp is for Priority Mail Express, or overnight, service. It will officially be unveiled March 21 in a ceremony at the Old Courthouse, which like the Arch is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. The courthouse is visible on the stamp between the legs of the Arch. Behind and on both sides of the courthouse is the St. Louis skyline. In front of the Arch, a barge cruises down the Mississippi River. Credit for the design goes to an art director named Greg Breeding, who used a digital illustration created by Dan Cosgrove, the Postal Service says. The stamp will be the third with a depiction of the Arch, said Mike Cooke, who is in corporate communications with the Postal Service. But this is by far the priciest stamp the monument has graced. The St. Louis icon was on a 34-cent stamp called “Greetings from Missouri” and a 39-cent one called “Tallest Manmade Monument.” Cooke said both of those stamps were out of circulation and likely to be found only in the hands of collectors. The new stamp doesn’t feature any orange cones or cranes that hint at the construction project still underway on the Arch grounds. By the time that work wraps up, most of it by later this year, the new stamp will probably be on its way out. The stamp will be sold nationwide. But the lifespan for such stamps is short, Cooke said. After about a year, a new design will get the nod and, like so many others, this stamp will become a collector’s item.

including one from 2000, that Rowland’s committee relied on in part to reach its conclusion that glyphosate shouldn’t be classified as carcinogenic. The EPA “may be unaware of Monsanto’s deceptive authorship practice,” the lawyers said. Among the documents unsealed was a February 2015 internal email exchange at the company about how to contain costs for a research paper. The plaintif lawyers cited it to support their claim that the EPA report is unreliable, unlike a report by an international agency that

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NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Gorsuch’s environmental record somewhat murky BY HOLBROOK MOHR AND MITCH WEISS Associated Press

Many conservation groups say U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch is too conservative and too much like the man he would replace, the late Justice Antonin Scalia, to be considered a friend of the environment. But when it comes to Gorsuch’s judicial record on issues such as pollution and environmental regulation, he can’t be painted as someone who always finds in favor of businesses, according to an Associated Press review of his rulings. “I’m willing to, for now, stipulate, as we like to say, that he’s going to come at these things neutral and if he doesn’t think an agency’s interpretation is credible he’s going to say so,” said Pat Parenteau, a professor at Vermont Law School. “Sometimes that’s going to cut in favor of the environment and sometimes it’s going to cut against the environment, and I don’t know how much of that concern actually weighs into his decision making.” As a judge for the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Gorsuch has ruled both for and against causes that environmentalists hold dear. He voted in 2015 to uphold a Colorado law that requires 20 percent of electricity sold to consumers in the state come from renewable sources. In 2010, Gorsuch sided with the Environmental Protection Agency when a magnesium company challenged the EPA’s new interpretation of a rule regulating byproducts created by mining in Utah. The company said the byproducts were exempt under a previous interpretation, but Gorsuch said that interpretation was “at best” tentative, so the agency was free to issue a new one. But Gorsuch has also ruled against the

EPA, as in a 2010 case in which the court found that the agency was wrong to classify land in New Mexico as Indian country when a company sought to obtain a mining permit. If the land, which was not on a reservation, were classified as Indian country, the company would have needed to obtain a permit from the EPA rather than the state. In another case, which reached his court in 2015, he showed frustration at the pace of an environmental case. The lawsuit was filed in 1990 by landowners near the federally owned Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant northwest of Denver. The plant was originally operated under a government contract by Dow Chemical Company and later Rockwell International Corp. Federal authorities raided the facility in 1989, finding years of haphazard handling of plutonium waste in the manufacture of triggers for atomic bombs. Property values crashed, and nearby landowners sued. Gorsuch wrote that after the “titanic fifteen years” it took to reach a trial, the landowners had won more than $900 million in damages and interest based on a federal law, a verdict that was thrown out on appeal. The landowners then argued that once the federal law was out of consideration, the companies were liable under Colorado state law. “This long lingering litigation deserves to find resolution soon,” Gorsuch wrote for his panel that sent the case back to a lower court to be handled “promptly” in favor of the landowners. The plant contractors settled for $375 million, to be split among thousands of property owners.

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

Trump’s 2005 federal tax was $38 million, data show BY PHILIP RUCKER AND DREW HARWELL Washington Post

President Donald Trump paid $38 million in federal income tax in 2005 on more than $150 million, for an efective rate of 25 percent, and reported a $105 million write-down, according to a copy of his federal tax return revealed on MSNBC Tuesday night. Two pages of the tax document were obtained by David Cay Johnston, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist. He first reported about it Tuesday evening on MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show.” The revelation provides the most recent glimpse at Trump’s income. Last fall, the New York Times reported that Trump reported a massive $916 million loss in 1995, which enabled him to avoid paying income taxes for decades. Trump repeatedly has refused to release his income tax returns, breaking with four decades of tradition for presidential nominees, claiming that he has been under audit. The Washington Post could not independently verify the 2005 return, but a statement from the White House indicated that it is authentic. The statement, issued to reporters anonymously to be attributed to a White House spokesperson, accused MSNBC of unlawfully releasing Trump’s tax returns. “You know you are desperate for ratings when you are willing to violate the law to push a story about two pages of

tax returns from over a decade ago,” the statement said. It added that Trump, as “one of the most successful businessmen in the world,” paid “no more tax than legally required.” The statement went on to say: “Mr. Trump paid $38 million dollars even after taking into account large scale depreciation for construction, on an income of more than $150 million dollars, as well as paying tens of millions of dollars in other taxes such as sales and excise taxes and employment taxes and this illegally published return proves just that. Despite this substantial income figure and tax paid, it is totally illegal to steal and publish tax returns. The dishonest media can continue to make this part of their agenda, while the President will focus on his, which includes tax reform that will benefit all Americans.” The return obtained by Johnston shows Trump and his wife, Melania, paid about $5.3 million in regular federal income taxes and another $31 million in “alternative minimum tax,” a supplemental tax designed to cut down on filers with excessive deductions. Trump’s current finances are set to face a new test with the coming April 15 tax deadline. He has steadfastly refused to release his returns, pointing both to ongoing audits and to his belief that Americans do not care to see them. However, a Pew Research Center survey in January found that 60 percent of Americans believe Trump has a responsibility to release his returns.

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03.15.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11 ADVERTISEMENT

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LETTER FROM WASHINGTON Advertisement

Snowstorm follows form for crisis predictions CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The crisis mindset

prevails. If the terrorists ever get hold of a snow-making machine, watch out. Once again, Washington and East Coast politicians and media that are epicentered here and in New York overhyped, overpredicted and overreacted. Winter Storm Stella was a big March huf and puf, for sure, but not nearly as bad as the breathless, continuous, scarethe-snowpants-of-you megacrisis that elected oicials and national and international cable networks said it would be all day Monday. One scrolling headline on the cable network HLN Tuesday morning predicted “20 feet” of snow in some Northeastern environs. Obviously, the scroll-writer meant inches. But that headline was a Freudian snow slip that provided a subtly powerful insight into the crisis mode that your governing and thought leaders can’t seem to live without. The point was made: Be afraid — be very, very afraid. When we warn, we warn big. Inches or feet, what’s it matter? The snow is coming! Healthcare is failing! The terrorists are among us! The Russians tapped us! Disagreeable speech hurts us! Trump is an existential threat to journalism! To quote Marlon Brando: “Stella!!!” So what, you say? When’s the last time St. Louis or Chicago or Denver snowstorms were treated this way, with round-the-clock national coverage and doomsday predictions of what would happen if you didn’t duck and cover under the sheets at home? When have you seen reporters standing in snowbound Midwestern plane terminals and proclaiming, “Nothing is happening here?” When’s the last time you saw live national coverage of a TV reporter driving through a modest snowstorm in St. Louis? Or Kansas City? And being congratulated by an anchor

in a warm New York studio for doing something you probably just did to get to work? As a tweeter from South Dakota said of Stella: “Here, we would call that storm Tuesday.” Here is the New York Post, one of President Donald Trump’s favorite newspapers, in predicting up to 18 inches of snow on Monday: “Get out now while you still have the chance!” Here is that same newspaper less than 24 hours later, sounding disappointed when reality had shrunk those predictions to eight inches: “It’s not exactly the snowpocalypse.” Well, no kidding. The reality is that average Americans, prepare, cope, persevere and move on, through storms of every kind. They do not lurch from crisis to crisis; they do not require that perpetual apocalyptic cycle to survive. They live trying to avoid and abate crises, not capitalize on them or exploit them for advantage over their neighbors. Their government and their talky media often do the opposite. They thrive on crisis. They often do not reassure, or seek coping commonality; they see conflict as crises, as sharpeners of political wedges and drivers of ratings. Lesson learned? Doubtful. Once Stella passed and the faux snowstorm blew over, the crises of the moment returned in officialdom and to talky TV. Was Trump really wiretapped by thenPresident Barack Obama or did he make it up, and is it a crisis for a president to lie or accuse his predecessor of a felony? Will you be thrown of health care because Republicans want to replace a plan they say is in a “death spiral” with something the Democrats say is callous and inhumane? Will you be stuck with an Obamacare that Republicans say sentences you to unaffordable deductibles and premiums? Will President Trump’s new travel ban – itself based on an unproven immigration crisis from Muslim majority countries — survive? Be afraid, be very afraid. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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Pill Used in Germany For 53 Years Relieves Joint Pain In 7 Days Without Side Effects Approved by top doctors nationwide. Active ingredient numbs nerves that trigger pain. Relieves joint stiffness. Increases joint mobility and freedom. By J.K. Roberts Interactive News Media INM — A pill that relieves joint pain and stiffness in 7 days without side effects has been used safely in Germany for 53 years. It is now available in the United States. This pill contains an active ingredient that not only relieves pain quickly, but also works to rebuild damaged cartilage between bones for greater range of motion. It can cut your pain relief costs up to 82% less than using pain relief drugs and pain relief cream and heat products. An improved version of this pill is now being offered in the United States under the brand name FlexJointPlus. FlexJointPlus relieves joint pain, back pain, neck pain, carpal tunnel, sprains, strains, sports injuries, and more. With daily use, users can expect to feel 24-hour relief. The active ingredient in FlexJointPlus comes from a natural source. It is both safe and healthy. In 53 years of recorded medical use, there have been no reported harmful side effects. “Relief in pain and stiffness is felt in as quickly as 7 days,” said Roger Lewis, Chief Researcher for FlexJointPlus. “And with regular use, you can expect even more reduction in the following 30-60 days,” added Lewis.

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DIGEST 2 fined $31,000 for poaching elk on TV hunting show Two Kentucky men who appeared on a cable television hunting show have been fined nearly $31,000 and have lost their hunting privileges for 15 years after poaching two bull elk in southeastern Wyoming in 2014. The case emerged when a Wyoming resident watching “Hunting in the Sticks” on the Pursuit Channel reported that the men appeared to have killed elk in the wrong hunting district during an episode titled “Western Redemption.” “I believe the two defendants were driven to get kill-shot footage for the television show and that resulted in their making bad decisions,” said Mike Ehlebracht, an investigator with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Ricky J. Mills and Jimmy G. Duncan, both of Bedford, Ky., have pleaded guilty to several poaching violations. Duncan, 25, was ordered to pay $17,500 in fines and restitution, including $6,000 in restitution for a bull elk and $4,000 for an antelope he killed in 2013. Mills, 37, was ordered to pay $13,460. The Game and Fish Department said they also had to forfeit their elk mounts. The loss of hunting and trapping privileges extends to 44 states, including Kentucky, that are part of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact. Advocates call for paper ballots in Georgia amid FBI review • A group of technology experts wants Georgia’s elections oicials to stop using electronic voting machines as the FBI reviews a suspected data breach. Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Kennesaw State University confirmed this month that a federal investigation was focused on the school’s Center for Election Systems. The center has certified Georgia’s voting machines and other elections equipment since 2002. The center is not part of Kemp’s oice or connected to its networks. In a letter to Kemp on Tuesday, 20 professors ailiated with the national Verified Voting organization said paper ballots would preserve voters’ confidence in an upcoming special election to fill Georgia’s 6th District congressional seat. Trump order will reduce government decisions on climate change • President Donald Trump is set to sign an order to greatly reduce the role climate change plays in decision making across the U.S. government, Bloomberg reports.

The order aims to reverse the broad approach by then-President Barack Obama, a Democrat, for addressing climate change, the report said. The directive will urge the Environmental Protection Agency to undo the Clean Power Plan. The Clean Power Plan is Obama’s centerpiece initiative to combat climate change, requiring states to slash emissions of carbon dioxide, but it was never implemented because of legal challenges launched by several Republican states. According to the report, the measure would direct U.S. regulators to rescind Obama-era regulations limiting oil industry emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Trump has long signaled his intention to reverse Obama’s climate-change initiatives, but the Republican president has vowed his planned overhaul of green regulation would not jeopardize America’s water and air quality. City alleges drugmaker let OxyContin flood black market • As deaths from painkillers and heroin abuse spiked and street crimes increased, the mayor of Everett, Wash., took major steps to tackle the opioid epidemic devastating this working-class city north of Seattle. Mayor Ray Stephanson stepped up patrols, hired social workers to ride with oicers and pushed for more permanent housing for chronically homeless people. The city says it has spent millions combating OxyContin and heroin abuse — and expects the tab to rise. So Everett is suing Purdue Pharma, maker of the opioid pain medication OxyContin, in an unusual case that alleges the drugmaker knowingly allowed pills to be funneled into the black market and the city of about 108,000. Everett alleges the drugmaker did nothing to stop it and must pay for damages caused to the community. Everett’s lawsuit, now in federal court in Seattle, accuses Purdue Pharma of gross negligence and nuisance. The city seeks to hold the company accountable, the lawsuit alleges, for “supplying OxyContin to obviously suspicious pharmacies and physicians and enabling the illegal diversion of OxyContin into the black market” and into Everett, despite a company program to track suspicious flows. Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma says the lawsuit paints a flawed and inaccurate picture of the events that led to the crisis in Everett. “We look forward to presenting the facts in court,” the company said in a statement. From news services

FlexJointPlus contains an amazing compound with a known ability to rebuild damaged cartilage and ligaments associated with joint pain. This compound is not a drug. It is the active ingredient in FlexJointPlus. Studies show it naturally reduces inflammation while repairing bone and cartilage in the joint. Many joint pain sufferers see an increase in flexibility and mobility. Others are able to get back to doing the things they love. “My left hip joint was so stiff and painful I could barely get to sleep at night,” says Amanda Johnson of Chatham, ON. “but since using FlexJointPlus my pain and stiffness has been relieved, and I am now able to get a good night’s rest again.” With so much positive feedback, it’s easy to see why sales for this newly approved joint pain pill continue to climb every day.

IMPRESSIVE BENEFITS FOR JOINT PAIN SUFFERERS The 8 week clinical study was carried out by scientists across six

Approved by U.S. Doctors: U.S. medical doctors are now recommending the powerful new pill FlexJointPlus. Participants in clinical studies reported noticeable results in just days.

different clinic sites in Germany. The results were published in the Journal of Arthritis in July 2014.

ligaments,” explains Dr. Sarah Brewer, renowned Author and graduate from Cambridge University.

The study involved patients with a variety of joint pain conditions associated with osteoarthritis. They were not instructed to change their daily routines. They were only told to take FlexJointPlus’ active ingredient every day.

There also have been no adverse side effects reported with the use of NEM®.

The results incredible.

were

Taking FlexJointPlus’ active ingredient just once daily significantly reduced both joint pain and stiffness compared to placebo at 7, 30, and 60 days. In fact, many patients experienced greater than 50% reduction in pain and stiffness at 60 days. They also enjoyed an improvement in stiffness when first getting out of the bed in the morning, and an improvement in pain when doing light household chores. With these studies medical doctors and researchers have now proven FlexJointPlus to be a clinically effective treatment for reducing pain and stiffness associated with joint and connective tissue disorders, especially osteoarthritis. The findings are impressive, no doubt, but results will vary. But with results like these it’s easy to see why thousands of callers are jamming the phone lines trying to get their hands on FlexJointPlus.

HOW IT REBUILDS DAMAGED JOINTS Scientists have discovered that after the age of 40 the body is no longer able to efficiently repair bone and cartilage in the joint. This results in deterioration and inflammation in the joint, leading to pain. The natural compound found in FlexJointPlus contains the necessary ingredients needed for the body to rebuild damaged bone and cartilage. This compound is known as ‘NEM’®. “Essentially, it contains the same elements found in your joints, which are needed to repair and rebuild cartilage and

This is a bonus for arthritis sufferers who have been taking prescription and over the counter medications that can cause severe gastric irritation over time, like NSAIDs. This seems to be another reason why FlexJointPlus’ release has triggered such a frenzy of sales.

RECOMMENDED BY U.S. MEDICAL DOCTORS “Based on my 20 years of experience treating people with osteoarthritis, FlexJointPlus receives my highest recommendation to any person suffering from joint pain and stiffness,” said Dr. David Vallance, Rheumatologist from Ann Arbor, MI. “One of my patients taking FlexJointPlus has reported a significant decrease in pain when going up or down stairs, sitting with legs bent for an extended period of time, and even getting up from a seated position,” said Dr. Richard Gibson, chiropractor from Windsor, ON. “I use FlexJointPlus everyday for my stiff and aching joints. I also have my wife and daughter taking it regularly as well,” said Dr. Oozer, G.P. from Lasalle, CA.

ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH READERS GET SPECIAL DISCOUNT SUPPLY This is the official release of FlexJointPlus in Missouri. And so, the company is offering a special discount supply to any person who calls within the next 48 hours. A Regional Order Hotline has been set up for local readers to call. This gives everyone an equal chance to try FlexJointPlus. Starting at 7:00 am today, the order hotline will be open for 48-hours. All you have to do is call TOLL FREE 1-800-594-4787. The company will do the rest IMPORTANT: Due to FlexJointPlus’ recent media exposure, phone lines are often busy. If you call, and do not immediately get through, please be patient and call back. Current supplies of FlexJointPlus are limited. So consumers that don’t get through to the order hotline within the next 48-hours will have to wait until more inventory is produced. This could take as long as six weeks.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. NEM® is a registered trademark of ESM Technologies.


M 1 WedneSday • 03.15.2017 • a12

Struggling Neiman Marcus is on the market Hudson’s Bay, owner of Saks, in talks with upscale retailer BLOOMBeRG

Neiman Marcus Group Ltd., the struggling department-store chain that scrapped plans in January for an initial public ofering, is considering a sale of the company instead. Neiman Marcus is in talks with Hudson’s Bay Co., the owner of Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor, about a buyout of the upscale retailer, according to the Wall Street Journal. The deal would exclude Neiman Marcus’s nearly $5 billion in debt, the newspaper reported. The takeover speculation follows Neiman Marcus’ announcement Tuesday that it is work-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sales manager Alysa Stefani demonstrates the Memory Mirror at the Neiman Marcus store in San Francisco’s Union Square in 2015.

ing with financial advisers on a review of its strategic options, which may include selling part or all of its business. The company also wrote down its brand and other assets by $153.8 million last quarter and rejiggered its corpo-

Optimism among CEOs showing big increase BLOOMBeRG

Optimism among chief executive oicers of some of the largest U.S. companies jumped in the first quarter by the most since the economy started to emerge from the last recession, as the outlook for sales, the labor market and investment brightened considerably. The Business Roundtable’s CEO Economic Outlook Index — a measure of expectations for revenue, capital spending and employment — jumped 19.1 points to 93.3, according to the group’s survey released Tuesday. The increase was the biggest since the final three months of 2009. Readings above 50 indicate economic expansion. The survey is yet another in a series of confidence measures that have shown

sizable upswings among businesses and consumers after Donald Trump’s victory in the November presidential election. Though companies have said they’re encouraged by his plans to cut corporate taxes, reduce regulations and invest in infrastructure, the real test for the economy is whether they follow through with more capital spending and hiring. “I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to enact a meaningful pro-growth agenda that will benefit all Americans,” Jamie Dimon, chairman of Business Roundtable and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., said in a statement. “As these results confirm, business confidence and optimism have increased dramatically.”

rate structure to give it more financial flexibility. Hudson’s Bay has also held talks about acquiring Macy’s Inc., people familiar with matter said earlier this year. With Neiman Marcus now available, the

suitor has redirected its attention, according to the Journal. The chain is reeling from slower mall traffic and a broader consumer shift away from department stores. Sales at stores open for at least a year fell 6.8 percent in the second fiscal quarter, which ended Jan. 28. The company posted a net loss of $117.1 million in the period, dragging lower the writedown of its brand. It had reported a profit of $7.9 million in the year-earlier quarter. Neiman Marcus’ credit rating was cut deeper into junk territory last month by S&P Global Ratings. The company has about $4.9 billion of debt outstanding, some of it tied to its $6 billion acquisition in 2013 led by Ares Management LLC and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. They bought the chain from TPG Capital and Warburg Pin-

cus LLC, which acquired Neiman Marcus for about $5 billion in a 2005 leveraged buyout. Neiman Marcus’ customer base is aging, with many younger shoppers making more of their purchases online. Millennials currently account for 15 percent of Neiman Marcus’ shoppers, with 36 percent coming from Generation Xers. That means it’s still highly reliant on baby boomers for sales. The company also has been hit by a decline in tourism spending. Neiman Marcus, based in Dallas, also owns the Bergdorf Goodman luxury stores and the off-price Last Call clearance centers. If a deal is reached, Hudson’s Bay would own the two anchor stores — the Saks and the Neiman Marcus — at Plaza Frontenac, the upscale mall on Lindbergh Boulevard.

Student loan defaults are rising 4.2 million Federal Direct Loan borrowers in default at end of 2016 aSSOCIaTed PReSS

The stock market is up and unemployment is down, but things aren’t rosy for all Americans. A new analysis of government data by the Consumer Federation of America found that the number of Americans in default on their student loans jumped by nearly 17 percent last year. As of the end of 2016, there were 4.2 million Federal Direct Loan borrowers in default, meaning they’ve not made a payment in more than 270 days. That’s up from 3.6 million at the end of 2015. “Despite all improvements in the economy, student loan borrowers are still struggling,” said Rohit Chopra, senior fellow at the Consumer Federation of America and formerly the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Student Loan Ombudsman. As of the end of 2016, 42.4 million Americans owed $1.3 trillion in

federal student loans, according to the U.S. Department of Education data. This doesn’t include borrowing through private student loans, credit cards, and home equity loans to finance the growing costs of college. The Federal Reserve System puts the measure slightly higher at $1.4 trillion, as it includes private loans as well. Defaulting on a federal student loan can be a financial disaster for the borrower. Unlike other types of debts, most federal student loans cannot be discharged in bankruptcy. Those who go into default face serious repercussions including wage garnishment, damaged credit scores and potentially added costs in fees, interest and legal fees. Student debt has risen along with the cost of education, which makes repayment difficult. The average amount owed per borrower rose to $30,650 in 2016, after rising steadily for years. In 2013, borrowers on average owed $26,300.

The good news is that the number of people who are defaulting for the first time is down. But the number of people defaulting for the second time or more is up. And that worries the CFA, an association of more than 250 nonprofit consumer groups. “We thought in an improving labor market, default rates would improve, but we simply are not seeing that,” Chopra said. The New York Federal Reserve, which looks at slightly different data, reported last month that total household debt in America in 2016 began nearing its previous peak from 2008, driven largely by student debt and auto debt. It found that student loan defaults jumped sharply in 2012 and the default rate has held fairly steady since. But the New York Fed also warned that the true number of people unable to pay is much higher because about half of loans are in forbearance, deferment or a grace period so are not at risk of default.

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MARKET WATCH

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stock indexes sank Tuesday after yet another drop in the price of oil dragged down shares across the energy industry. Other areas of the market saw losses as investors wait to hear from the Federal Reserve, which began a two-day policy meeting.

MGI

Valeant Pharmaceuticals VRX

Marathon Oil

Close: $15.77 3.11 or 24.6% Euronet Worldwide offered to buy the money transfer services company for $15.20 a share, or about $807 million. $16

Close: $10.89 -1.22 or -10.1% Investor Bill Ackman said his Pershing Square fund will sell the rest of its stake in the struggling drugmaker. $20

Close: $15.32 -0.52 or -3.3% Energy companies continued to plunge as the price of oil fell further.

MoneyGram

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HIGH 20874.00 9231.21 692.75 11479.03 5860.50 2368.55 1709.42 24582.93 1369.16

LOW 20786.31 9097.98 688.67 11428.73 5831.88 2358.18 1697.89 24479.88 1353.46

CLOSE 20837.37 9123.06 690.95 11459.30 5856.82 2365.45 1707.12 24564.78 1362.38

CHG. -44.11 -128.62 -0.68 -60.14 -18.96 -8.02 -6.68 -85.42 -7.90

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YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod Isle of Capri LMI Aerospace Lee Ent

T 36.10 43.89 42.09 -.28 -0.7 -1.0 +15.5 16 AEGN 17.18 26.68 22.58 -.41 -1.8 -4.7 +14.1 25 DOX 54.12 61.98 61.52 +.22 +0.4 +5.6 +7.1 17 AEE 46.29 55.51 54.02 -.17 -0.3 +3.0 +16.0 20 ARII 35.43 51.10 39.11 +.29 +0.7 -13.6 -3.3 10 BUD 98.28 136.08 107.24 -.69 -0.6 +1.7 -4.9 ARCH 59.05 86.47 65.64 -1.25 -1.9 -15.9 ... dd BAC 12.05 25.80 25.32 +.02 +0.1 +14.6 +85.5 20 BDC 54.97 81.33 69.20 -.87 -1.2 -7.4 +22.9 13 BA 122.35 185.71 178.73 -.32 -0.2 +14.8 +47.4 21 BBW 8.05 15.85 8.85 +.10 +1.1 -35.6 -36.6 29 CAL 21.27 36.61 30.67 +.47 +1.6 -6.6 +4.1 16 CASS 45.05 74.83 63.16 -.38 -0.6 -14.1 +29.2 29 CNC 50.00 75.57 67.50 -1.93 -2.8 +19.4 +14.4 16 CHTR 214.06 341.50 324.64 +.30 +0.1 +12.8 +56.3 20 C 38.31 62.53 61.44 -.09 -0.1 +3.4 +44.4 13 CBSH 40.93 60.61 57.99 -.04 -0.1 +0.3 +37.4 21 EPC 72.79 88.00 73.69 -.72 -1.0 +1.0 -7.2 28 EMR 48.45 64.36 58.97 -1.16 -1.9 +5.8 +21.0 23 ENR 38.56 56.37 55.31 -.09 -0.2 +24.0 +41.9 21 EFSC 25.04 46.25 43.75 -.05 -0.1 +1.7 +56.4 19 ESE 37.19 58.95 54.70 +.30 +0.6 -3.4 +48.1 33 ESRX 64.46 80.02 66.84 -.63 -0.9 -2.8 -4.0 11 FELP 1.07 8.33 6.60 -.36 -5.2 +2.0+200.0 dd FF 9.77 16.58 13.05 -.09 -0.7 -6.1 +21.4 8 GM 27.34 38.55 36.96 +.09 +0.2 +6.1 +22.8 6 HD 119.20 148.26 147.16 -.27 -0.2 +9.8 +17.1 23 HBP 3.56 7.77 7.73 +.01 +0.1 +16.9+108.6 6 ISLE 11.38 26.20 26.33 +.25 +1.0 +6.6+118.6 16 LMIA 7.01 13.94 13.81 -.05 -0.4 +60.2 +54.7 dd LEE 1.69 3.92 2.75 -.15 -5.2 -5.2 +51.8 8

1.96 ... 0.88f 1.76f 1.60 3.19e ... 0.30f 0.20 5.68f ... 0.28 0.92 ... ... 0.64 0.90b ... 1.92 1.10 0.44 0.32 ... 0.68m 0.24a 1.52 3.56f ... ... ... ...

TKR

52-WK LO HI

LOW

64.87

83.65 81.94 +.36 +0.4 +15.2 +15.0 20

42.67

85.83 47.98 -1.26 -2.6

MasterCard

MA

86.65 112.92 110.49 -1.04 -0.9

+7.0 +26.8 31

0.88

McDonald’s

MCD

110.33 131.96 127.80 +.19 +0.1

+5.0 +8.0 24

3.76

Monsanto Co

MON

84.79 116.04 113.97

Olin

OLN

15.79

-.17 -0.1

-3.7 -28.6

+8.3 +27.9 23

2.16 0.80

Panera Bread

PNRA 185.69 238.24 234.27

-.20 -0.1 +14.2 +12.3 38

...

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

6.20

5.90

...

...

+6.3 +69.6 dd 0.07e

Perficient

PRFT

14.15

22.66 17.78

-.46 -2.5

+1.7

-7.0 25

...

Post Holdings

POST

67.29

89.00 83.08

-.52 -0.6

+3.3 +19.6 45

...

ReinsGrp

RGA

90.17 132.79 128.43 +.25 +0.2

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

59.54

71.21 64.80 +.20 +0.3

+0.4

Stifel Financial

SF

27.33

56.62 53.44

+7.0 +67.5 20

Supervalu Inc.

SVU

US Bancorp

USB

US Steel

X

3.84

3.28 54.41

55.37

6.02

5.11 +.07 +1.4 +10.1 -15.3

3.26

84.14 54.75

100.05 120.44 106.83

-.07 -0.1

-0.5 19

-.03 -0.9 -30.2 -41.5

2.10 ...

6

...

-.44 -0.8 -24.2 -29.7 11

2.40

-.66 -0.6

-6.8 +9.8 19 3.32f

38.48

56.61 55.00 +.08 +0.1

+7.1 +38.4 17 1.12f

12.77

41.83 35.72

+8.2+147.6 dd

-.06 -0.2 -.11 -0.2

Wholesale prices rose just 0.3 percent in February • Inlation at the wholesale level rose at just half the rate in February as the previous month, as a surge in energy prices slowed. The Labor Department said Tuesday that its producer price index, which measures inlation pressures before they reach consumers, increased 0.3 percent in February after a 0.6 percent rise in January. Over the past 12 months, wholesale prices are up 2.2 percent, relecting a steady rise in inlation as energy prices have increased. Just six months ago, the year-over-year increase stood at zero.

2.31

46.01

56.95 49.36

62.72

75.19 70.72 +.77 +1.1

+2.3 +7.1 16 2.04f

Walgreen Boots

WBA

75.74

88.00 85.40

-.21 -0.2

+3.2 +7.0 18

1.50

Wells Fargo

WFC

43.55

59.99 58.76 +.06 +0.1

+6.6 +20.3 15

1.52

World Point Term.

WPT

13.00

17.90 16.54

-0.1 +28.8 16

1.20

-.44 -2.6

Walgreens to sell more stores to Fred’s • Walgreens is trying to sweeten its proposal to win Federal Trade Commission approval to buy rival pharmacy chain Rite Aid, people familiar with the talks said Tuesday. Walgreens is nearing an agreement to sell more assets to Memphis, Tenn.-based discount chain Fred’s — boosting the number of stores and adding distribution centers, software and personnel, according to one of the people. The merger, which would combine the No. 2 and No. 3 drugstore chains, has also raised concerns among state attorneys general, at least a dozen of whom are said to scrutinizing the deal. From staf and wire reports

-.50 -.04 -2.30

-1.5 12

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.75 .92 1.04 1.38 2.13 2.60 3.18

... +0.02 -0.01 ... -0.01 -0.03 -0.03

.32 .51 .68 .96 1.48 1.96 2.73

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

.63 .38 .38

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.80 +0.02

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.76

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.79 +0.02 2.40

...

Barclays US High Yield 6.05 +0.06 8.31 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

4.13 +0.02 3.89

Barclays US Corp

3.50 +0.02 3.54

10-Yr. TIPS

.61 -0.04

.42

LAST 2365.45 11988.79 7357.85 23827.95 4974.26 47087.97 19609.50 64699.47 15379.61 8663.54

CHG

CHG

YTD

-8.02 -1.24 -9.23 -1.72 -25.34 -13.17 -24.25 -834.84 -165.21 -19.51

-0.34% -0.01% -0.13% -0.01% -0.51% -0.03% -0.12% -1.27% -1.06% -0.22%

+5.66% +4.42% +3.01% +8.31% +2.30% +3.17% +2.59% +7.43% +0.60% +5.40%

Another drop in oil prices pulls stock indexes lower ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Stock indexes

sank Tuesday after yet another drop in the price of oil dragged down shares across the energy industry. Other areas of the market saw modest losses as investors wait to hear from the Federal Reserve, which began a two-day policy meeting on interest rates. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 8.02 points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,365.45. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 44.11, or 0.2 percent, to 20,837.37. The Nasdaq composite fell 18.97, or 0.3 percent, to 5,856.82. Two stocks fell on the New York Stock Exchange for every one that rose. The price of oil has been slipping on concerns that supplies will outweigh demand. It’s dropped from nearly $55 per barrel in late February to $47.72

on Tuesday, down 68 cents, or 1.4 percent. Brent crude, which is used to price international oils, fell 43 cents to $50.92 per barrel in London. It’s the seventh straight decline in the price of oil. Energy stocks in the S&P 500 fell 1.1 percent, the largest loss among the 11 sectors that make up the index. Lower oil prices help to curb inflation, and bond yields sank in tandem. Stocks of smaller companies sank more than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 of small-cap stocks lost 0.6 percent, double the decline of the S&P 500 index of the largest stocks. When the Fed finishes its meeting on Wednesday, most economists expect it to raise interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point. It would be the third increase since the

Fed slashed rates to a record of nearly zero in 2008 during the financial crisis. What investors are likely more interested to hear is what Fed Chair Janet Yellen says about the pace of future increases. The job market, stock prices and other economic indicators have picked up momentum in recent months, which raises expectations for more increases. In the past, expectations for higher rates may have spooked stock investors, because moreexpensive borrowing can slow the economy. That’s not happening this time. “We’re in an environment now where the market is no longer afraid of Fed hikes because the perception now is the Fed is hiking for the right reasons,” said Jon Adams, senior investment strategist at BMO Global Asset Management.

Fed rate increase probably won’t boost your savings account anytime soon WASHINGTON POST

Euronet makes bid for MoneyGram • U.S. electronics payments company Euronet Worldwide Inc. ofered on Tuesday to buy money-transfer company MoneyGram International Inc. for more than $1 billion. The ofer appeared to trump a bid by Ant Financial Services Group, the inancial services ailiate of China’s Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. Ant Financial’s bid, which would require clearance by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, has attracted opposition from 20 primarily conservative groups that warned against allowing a foreign-owned company dominate the global payments business. Ant Financial is controlled by Chinese billionaire Jack Ma.

Silver

GlobalMarkets S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

VZ

Cabela’s plans call center, HQ layofs • Cabela’s has laid of several dozen people as part of the outdoor gear seller’s eforts to reduce its expenses. Cabela’s spokesman Nathan Borowski said Tuesday that the exact number of layofs would be determined after afected workers decided whether to apply for other jobs within the company. Cabela’s plans to close its call center in Sidney, Neb., and consolidate operations at its North Platte call center within 30 days. The other layofs were at Cabela’s corporate headquarters in Sidney. Borowski says the layofs aren’t related to Bass Pro’s pending $4.5 billion deal to buy Cabela’s.

CHG

CLOSE

1201.90 16.89 938.90

Gold

3.75 3.50 3.50

INDEX

WMT

-7.5

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

0.20

Verizon

Toshiba delays earnings, mulls selling Westinghouse • Troubled Japanese nuclear and electronics company Toshiba Corp. said Tuesday it was considering selling its money-losing Westinghouse operations in the U.S. President Satoshi Tsunakawa said the company was looking at selling its majority stake in Westinghouse and making a priority trying to get the energy giant’s battered results of its books. Toshiba had been scheduled to report earnings Tuesday, after delaying the report due in February because of auditing problems. It now has until April 11 to produce the report.

.0643 .7580 .3169 1.2231 .7439 .1447 1.0660 .0151 .2731 .008713 .051088 .0170 .0763 .000871 .9930

PreciousMetals

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

...

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

Air Methods agrees to $2.5 billion sale • Air Methods Corp., which has been under pressure from activist investor Voce Capital to sell itself, agreed Tuesday to be acquired by private equity irm American Securities LLC in a $2.5 billion deal, including debt. The Englewood, Colo.-based company is the largest U.S. air medical transport provider in the $5 billion air medical market. It acquired ARCH Air Medical Service, which provides air ambulance service in Missouri and Illinois, in 2000. The company also has a complementary air tourism business. The transaction is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of 2017, the company said.

PREV

.0644 .7565 .3160 1.2161 .7414 .1446 1.0611 .0152 .2727 .008716 .050757 .0169 .0760 .000870 .9902

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.60 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+2.1 +35.7 14 1.64f

WalMart

BUSINESS DIGEST

-.68 +.0028 -.87 -.105

...

-.25 -0.8 +25.5+106.5 49

TGT

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

1.40

32.50 32.13

UPS

PE: ... Yield: ...

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

MNK

M $21.38

Interestrates Interestrates

Lowes

Target Corp.

$4.15

Platinum

Mallinckrodt plc

UPS B

J F 52-week range

Vol.: 3.1m (0.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.05 b

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

D

ExchangeRates

DATE

Feeder cattle Hogs

2,200 19,000

O

$19.28

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

S

4

M

Vol.: 24.7m (2.1x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $12.98 b Yield: 1.3%

CHICAGO BOT

20,000

17,000

J F 52-week range

Futures

2,440

2,300

18,000

D

$9.65

PE: ... Yield: ...

2,400

22,000

18 14

$53.90

Vol.: 77.7m (4.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $3.72 b

PE: 87.6 Yield: ...

2,320

10 DAYS

M $16.41

Vol.: 10.3m (13.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $832.14 m

21,200

10

CYH

Close: $9.18 -0.21 or -2.2% Hospital operators fell after government accountants said the health care bill would leave fewer people covered by insurance and Medicaid. $10

$20

12 10

CHS

MRO

The Federal Reserve is widely expected to raise its benchmark interest rate by 0.25 percentage points on Wednesday, the third such rate increase since the end of the financial crisis. Whereas the increases have translated into higher interest rates for credit cards, home equity lines of credit and other loans, they haven’t made a difference for most savers — at least not yet. “People need to get used to the idea of [saving account] rates being low,” said Alan MacEachin, a corporate economist at Navy Federal Credit Union. In the past, Fed rate increases have meant better yields on savings accounts. The higher rates make it possible for banks and

credit unions to charge more for loans, leaving them with more revenue that can be passed on to consumers in the form of higher yields on savings accounts. But after the financial crisis, which made many consumers more nervous about investing or spending money, many financial institutions are already so flush with cash that they don’t have much of a motivation to bump up the yields on savings accounts, said Sean McQuay, a credit and banking expert with the personal finance website NerdWallet. Although some firms have started to pass those higher rates on to savers, the Fed may have to raise rates a few more times before better yields on savings accounts become the norm, McQuay said.

Yields on savings vehicles, such as money market accounts, CDs and traditional savings accounts, have stayed relatively flat since December 2015, when the Fed first began raising interest rates after the crisis. In contrast, consumers are being squeezed by higher rates on credit and other variable loans, which are affected directly by a Fed rate increase. Even after more banks start to ofer higher savings rates, consumers are “light years” away from seeing the generous yields of 5, 6 or 7 percent on five-year CDs that were common during the 1980s and 1990s, said Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate.com. “It’s going to be a long, tough slog,” he said, adding that the Fed is expected to move slowly.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

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03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NATION

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

‘A REAL KICK IN THE REAR’ Blustery late-season storm plasters Northeast with sleet and snow BY COLLEEN LONG AND DENISE LAVOIE associated Press

NEW YORK • A blustery late-season storm plastered the Northeast with sleet and snow Tuesday, paralyzing much of the Washington-to-Boston corridor after a stretch of unusually mild winter weather that had people thinking spring was already here. The powerful nor’easter fell well short of the predicted snow totals in New York and Philadelphia but unloaded 1 to 2 feet in many places inland, grounded more than 6,000 flights and knocked out power to nearly a quarter-million customers from Virginia northward. By the time it reached Massachusetts, it had turned into a blizzard, with near hurricaneforce wind gusting over 70 mph along the coast and waves crashing over the seawalls. Up to a foot of snow was expected in the Boston area. It was easily the biggest storm in a merciful winter that had mostly spared the Northeast, and many weren’t happy about it. “It’s horrible,” said retired gumball-machine technician Don Zimmerman, of Lemoyne, Pennsylvania, using a snowblower to clear the sidewalk along his block. “I thought winter was out of here. ... It’s a real kick in the rear.” While people mostly heeded dire warnings to stay home and off the roads, police said a girl, 16, was killed when she lost control of her car on a snowy road and struck a tree in Gilford, N.H. The storm closed schools in cities big and small, Amtrak suspended service and the post office halted mail delivery. Philadelphia and New York City got anywhere from a few inches of snow to about half a foot before the storm switched over mostly to sleet; forecasters had predicted a foot or more. In New Jersey, which saw rain or just a little snow in many areas, Gov. Chris Christie called the storm an “underperformer.” But oicials warned of dangerous ice.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A person stands in the wind-driven snow during a winter storm Tuesday in Boston.

Inland areas, meanwhile, got hit hard. Harrisburg, Pa., and Worcester, Mass., received a foot or more of snow. The Binghamton, N.Y., area got over 2 feet, while Vernon, N.J., had at least 19 inches. The storm came just days after the region saw temperatures climb into the 60s, and less than a week before the official start of spring. February, too, was remarkably warm. “The winters seem to be upside down now,” said Bob Clifford, who ventured out on an early morning grocery run for his family in Altamont, near Albany, N.Y. “January and February are nice and then March and April seem to be more wintry than they were in the past.” His advice: “Just hide inside. Hibernate.” In the nation’s capital, nonessential federal employees were

given the option of reporting three hours late, taking the day off or working from home. The city got less than 2 inches of snow. A few days ago, workers on Washington’s National Mall were making plans to turn on the fountains. “Obviously all that has to come to an abrupt stop until we get all the snow cleared,” said Jef Gowen, the acting facility manager for the National Mall and Memorial Parks. “The cherry blossoms, they’re right on the cusp of going into bloom here. I had a feeling this was going to happen.” Kelly Erskine, 28, a cofee shop manager from Whitman, Mass., about 25 miles south of Boston, made it almost all the way through the winter without a shovel. She went to Walmart on

Tuesday morning to get one. “I live in an apartment complex and they usually take care of the shoveling, but they sent a letter to us and said, ‘Expect a lot of snow.’ I knew from the letter that I’d have to go out and buy a shovel,” she said. As the storm closed in, the National Weather Service used terms such as “life-threatening” and urged people to “shelter in place,” language that has come to be associated with mass shootings. In the end, the line between snow and rain shifted slightly to the west, sparing some of the Northeast’s big cities. Government meteorologists realized by late Monday afternoon that there was a good chance the storm wasn’t going to produce the giant big-city snow totals predicted. But they didn’t change their forecast for

fear people would mistakenly think the storm was no longer dangerous, said Greg Carbin, chief of forecast operations at the Weather Prediction Center. In Pennsylvania, Gov. Tom Wolf said a 23-month-old child on an 80-mile trek to heart transplant surgery made it safely with the help of an escort of snowplows and state troopers. In Narragansett, R.I., high wind buckled a state-owned wind turbine. In New York City, two homes under construction collapsed near the waterfront in Far Rockaway. No injuries were reported. The flight cancellations included nearly 3,300 in the New York City area alone. Hundreds of passengers were stranded at airports.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 03.15.2017 • A16 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Defendingthe indefensible CBO conirms the disaster that is Republicare.

W

• On NBC’s “Today” show, Health and hat’s most astonishing Human Services Secretary Tom Price about the Congressional stood by President Donald Trump’s promBudget Oice analysis of ise of insurance for everybody as “absothe House Republicans’ lutely right.” But when asked if the House health care plan is not the estimate that plan met that goal, Price veered off into a it would increase the ranks of the uninsured by 24 million over the next decade. criticism of Obamacare. Ryan was happy to point out that the Nor is it the savage price increases the CBO estimated that the bill would cut the bill would impose on low-income older deficit by $337 billion over Americans seeking to buy 10 years. He neglected the insurance. Nor is it the big reason: Eliminating casual cruelty of cutting What’s most $883 billion in Obamacare Medicaid services to 14 astonishing taxes. This hugely benefit million Americans after households with incomes 2020. is the blatant of $1 million a year or more. What’s most astonishing dishonesty of And Ryan wants more tax is the blatant dishonesty Republican cuts for them. of Republican leaders who No one is arguing that Tuesday either denied that leaders who Obamacare is perfect. any of this would occur, or Tuesday People are sicker than blithely skated past it. either denied insurance companies in • House Speaker Paul the individual marketplace Ryan, R-Wis., said that the that any of anticipated. Congress report “actually exceeded this would could fix that by creating a my expectations.” He told occur, or public option to drive comFox News that the reason petition in underserved many of the 14 million blithely markets. Americans who would lose skated past it. But that would have to coverage when the bill takes be paid for with tax dollars, effect in 2018 is not because just as Obamacare is, just as they won’t be able to afford a “Medicaid for Everyone” it, but because the mandate single-payer plan would. And because requiring people to be insured will go away. Americans will have more choice, he people at the top of the income ladder have reaped a disproportionate share of said. For example, a 64-year-old making economic gains since 1980, they’d pay a $26,500 could choose between paying $14,600 for insurance or eating and paying disproportionate share of the cost. These people, not working-class rent. Some choice. Americans, are the people whom Ryan and • “I don’t believe the facts are corthe House Republicans are working for and rect,” White House Budget Director Mick dissembling for. They are the GOP donor Mulvaney told MSNBC on Tuesday. He base. That’s what the dissatisfaction with said this even though the Office of ManObamacare is all about. It’s never been agement and Budget that he heads had predicted the number would be even worse about who’s covered. It’s about who pays. — 26 million instead of 24 million.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS GOP should stick to its orthodoxy on health care What Republicans should do is stick to their religion and advocate for not only the repeal of Obamacare but for a complete and total absence of government involvement in health care. That is GOP orthodoxy: Get medical insurance from your employer, buy it on the open market, get it from the man in the moon, don’t get it all; just keep the government out of it. You’re on your own. Republicans should step up to that, own it, advocate openly for it, and accept the electoral consequences. But they won’t do that because they know what those consequences would look like. It’s not what the American people want. What they want is help — help from the government, which is to say help from each other — in dealing with the incredibly burdensome cost of health care in this country. So, the GOP is left with cobbling together something that purportedly does what people want but which they can say is not Obamacare. The result: a thing that is architecturally the same as Obamacare but with provisions whose consequences help no one and return millions to the tender mercies of the insurance companies. The party’s problem from the beginning: They didn’t know or care if the ACA was a good thing, a bad thing, or a thing in between. Their antipathy for Obamacare was never really about Obamacare. It was about their antipathy for Obama. John Terry • Kirkwood

Disillusioned by amount of money going to Greitens ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Paul Ryan rolled up his sleeves to defend the tax cut for the rich disguised as the Republican health care plan.

Proiting from bankruptcy Judge will decide if Peabody’s exit plan is fair.

B

eginning Thursday, a novel concept will be tested in federal bankruptcy court in St. Louis: Will a judge approve a reorganization plan tailored by a company’s executives, in league with hedge funds that own most of its debt, that greatly benefits the executives and hedge funds while leaving smaller, non-institutional creditors holding the bag? The company in question is Peabody Energy, the largest coal company in the United States, and one of the largest employers left in downtown St. Louis. While the long-term future of the coal industry is shaky, its near-term prospects are looking up, one reason some creditors have major objections to Peabody’s reorganization plan. If U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Barry Schermer approves, the new Peabody will emerge from bankruptcy next month with a market capitalization of $3.1 billion. Some disgruntled creditors claim the company is worth far more than that, particularly with President Donald Trump promising to make the industry boom again. If the company was valued higher, there would be money left over for holders of “old” Peabody shares and debt, who get none of the value of the “new” Peabody. Ten percent of the new shares will be distributed to Peabody’s 7,000 employees. Shares worth between $30 million and $45 million will go to the six top executives who worked on the bankruptcy plan. The biggest slice, about $15 million, will go to

CEO Glenn Kellow, an Australian who joined the company in 2013. In addition to stock, the reorganization plan calls for paying the six top executives $11.9 million in cash bonuses. Executives who don’t flee bankrupt companies and stay around to help reorganize them generally get bonuses for taking the risk. But by granting themselves millions in new Peabody shares, the Peabody executives appear to be doing extra well for themselves. Critics of the deal say it rewards “vulture capitalists” whose hedge funds invest in distressed companies, advocate bankruptcy and then use their combined clout to tilt the reorganization plan in their favor. The hedge funds, led by Peter Singer’s Elliott Management and Mark Brodsky’s Aurelius Capital, jointly hold the bulk of Peabody’s $8 billion in debt. They’ll be first in line for repayment and get three seats on the new company’s board of directors. The reorganization plan obliges Peabody to continue paying retiree benefits. In the past, Peabody has wriggled off from those obligations by offloading them onto a spinoff company. The plan also calls for Peabody to continue making payments to states for reclamation of land ravaged by decades of mining. As for those holding the “old” Peabody’s shares and unsecured debt, they’ll get no part of the mine but the shaft. Executives who go no nearer a coal mine than the Gateway Mall will find bankruptcy very profitable.

After the election, I was open to antiestablishment politician Eric Greitens and what he could do for the state of Missouri. When I see the amounts of money (“Nonprofit to advocate for Greitens and his agenda,” March 9) available to support him, I am disillusioned. We might ask, what are his motives for serving as governor and, more importantly, what are the motives of backers who support him? If it is morals and ethics, I would be surprised. Most Missourians do not have that kind of money, and yet that money is making its voice heard. Lois Bundschuh • Mehlville

uninsured and believing that there are problems with Medicaid does not translate to counting out help for the poor with government or tax-based programs. Horrigan’s statement that Christians feel like it can be worked out individually through good works and charitable giving is most inflammatory and largely incorrect as well. Even though government assistance is needed, charitable giving for the poor by Christians is not something to disdain or marginalize. Millions of dollars are donated to the poor by Christian organizations, as well as numerous hours volunteered to help the poor and displaced. Why speak negatively of this? Just wondering if there are any Jews or Muslims who might also believe that some of our government assistance programs would be improved to help the poor, or is this just an attack on Christians? Alice Snell • Imperial

Churches raise funds to support their mission I found it difficult to understand what point Anne Harter was trying to make in her letter “Bishops keep St. Patrick’s Day profitable for parishes” (March 7). St. Patrick’s Day is only one day out of a year but an important one to the Irish. I can’t see where allowing them to eat meat on this day could make or break the Roman Catholic Church. It is a sacrifice for me and many others to abstain from meat, but that’s not all we do. Our pastor stated that giving up something for Lent is good but doing special good works during this time is a far better way to spend the Lenten season. You might not see any bishops preparing and serving meals in soup kitchens because they are few and have many duties. However, at my parish, St. Ambrose on the Hill, Monsignor Vince Bommarito cooks, serves and does whatever is needed even when the profits are going to another local charity. I am sure you could find that same spirit at almost any parish. A nonprofit organization’s job is to raise needed funds to support its mission statement. Whether it be corned beef and cabbage, Polish pierogi or an Italian pasta dinner, it brings cohesiveness to the members and helps keep the organization solvent. There is nothing wrong with that. Marianne Peri-Sack • Ballwin

Cartoon wrongly lampoons the Irish

SPRINGFIELD NEWS-LEADER VIA AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens delivers an outline of his state budget last month.

Do not disdain Christians’ charitable giving for the poor So now Kevin Horrigan (“Is greed biblical,” March 12) is an expert on how conservative Christians feel? To assume that the Bible is a conundrum for Christians, or to say that Christians don’t believe that caring for the poor is a societal problem, is both wrong and insulting. Obamacare, while good intentions may have led to creating it, is a flawed program that did not have the intended result for thousands of Americans. Wanting something better than Obamacare to help the

Now that racial jokes and stereotyping are politically incorrect, not to mention morally wrong, it must be tough for a cartoonist like Dan Martin to think up a new category of people to offend. Thankfully, he took a day off from lambasting President Donald Trump and other Republicans and on Saturday fell back on an old standby: the drunken Irishman. In his latest attack cartoon, a nicely dressed man with a cup of cofee addresses an unshaven, weirdly dressed man having a drink and says “Man, you must really be Irish ... All beaded out and drinking early on parade day ...” So I guess the concepts of political correctness and being morally wrong don’t apply to the Irish. The liberal PostDispatch would never lampoon an ethnic group for being lazy, or less intelligent, or even their alcohol use, but I guess the Irish are still fair game. Isn’t it time to stop the Paddy-whacking? Isn’t it time to send Dan Martin to sensitivity training? Patrick W. Maloney • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


03.15.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

GIVE MISSOURI WOMEN VOTES • Despite fiscal problems that have absorbed much time and energy, the House has surprised and gratified liberal sentiment by its 84 to 37 vote giving Missouri women the right to vote for presidential electors. Is it too much to hope that the Senate will show similar breadth and progressiveness? Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

The current poaching crisis is attributed to the growing demand in Asia for rhino horn.

ST. LOUIS ZOO

A critical time for saving rhino species St. Louis Zoo collaborates with others to address conservation challenges.

Republicans are deining lunacy down GOP is corrupted as it tolerates, excuses and absorbs Trump’s conspiratorial thinking.

BY ERIC MILLER DAN MARTIN • P-D

At the St. Louis Zoo, we always say that animals are “safe” in zoos but not “saved” in zoos, so we work in vulnerable regions around the world to save species that are endangered. For that reason, we were shocked last week by the news that a white rhinoceros was killed when poachers entered Thoiry Zoo, 30 miles west of Paris. They came in the night, shot the rhino and hacked off its horns. As a zoo veterinarian, I was deeply saddened, since, beginning in the 1980s, I have been a veterinary adviser for rhinoceroses and have visited Kenya to research diseases affecting rhinoceroses. Condemned by conservation organizations around the world, this tragic event received significant media attention. However, it is only one incident in a massive wave of poaching that has killed more than 1,000 African rhinos each year and at least 96 African elephants each day. The current poaching crisis is attributed to the growing demand in Asia for rhino horn. Although rhino horn has no scientific medical benefits, consumers use it to treat a wide range of medical conditions. The high price fetched for the horn attracts criminal syndicates who use high-tech equipment to track and kill rhinos. The estimated black market value of the horn taken at Thoiry Zoo was between $31,700 and $42,300. Unfortunately, this is only one example of what has been dubbed the sixth mass extinction — a widespread and rapid decrease in the biodiversity on Earth marked by the loss of 41 percent of all amphibian species, 26 percent of all mammals and 50 percent of the world’s primates. The death of this rhino was especially disastrous because it happened in a place where animals are supposed to be safe. Since 1938, the St. Louis Zoo has been home to rhinos — with two 14-year-old black rhinos — Ajabu, a male, and a female Kati Rain living here now. In those 80 years, we have had nine rhino births, most recently in 2011. In the wild, large-scale poaching of the now critically endangered black rhino has resulted in a dramatic 96 percent decline from 65,000 individuals in 1970 to just 2,300 in 1993. The rhino poached in France was a southern white rhino. The majority (98.8 percent) of white rhinos live in just four African countries. The northern subspecies of white rhino that in 1960 numbered more than 2,000 is now extinct in the wild (this species lived at the St. Louis Zoo from 1957 to 1972). What is the St. Louis Zoo doing about the massive loss of rhinos and other animals? Since 2014, the Zoo’s WildCare Institute Center for Conservation in the Horn of Africa has provided significant funding to Northern Rangelands Trust and its Sera Rhino Sanctuary in Kenya to install new waterholes for the rhinos and solarpowered generators that pump the waters. We also support anti-poaching teams and rhino monitoring rangers. In 2015, 10 black rhinos were reintroduced to the sanctuary, and there have been two highly celebrated births there. St. Louis Zoo keepers have done their part, too. Since 2003, they have generated more than $92,000 through the American Association of Zoo Keepers annual Bowling for Rhinos fundraiser. Although these may seem like small measures when compared to the magnitude of the problem, they are not. Because the St. Louis Zoo collaborates with zoos from around the world and nation to address conservation challenges, our impact is great. It is a critical time for saving many species, and we are on the verge of losing rhinos forever. The loss of a species was summarized by William Beebe,“When we lose the last individual of a race of living things, another heaven and another earth come to pass before they can be again.” All of us can help by donating to conserve rhinoceroses for future generations and by visiting them at the St. Louis Zoo. Eric Miller is executive director of the WildCare Institute at the St. Louis Zoo.

MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

The role of conspiracy theories has been consistently underestimated in the rise and appeal of President Trump. Trump came to the political attention of most Republicans by alleging a conspiracy to cover up Barack Obama’s supposedly foreign birth.“How amazing,” Trump tweeted in 2013,“the State Health Director who verified copies of Obama’s ‘birth certificate’ died in plane crash today. All others lived.” In conspiracy thinking, implausibility is merely the sign of the enemy’s subtlety. Children sitting in professor Trump’s history class would learn that Obama was America’s first Muslim president; that his co-religionists celebrated in the streets following the 9/11 attacks; that their vaccination schedule is the dangerous scam of greedy doctors; that Ted Cruz’s father might have been involved in the death of John F. Kennedy; that Hillary Clinton might have been involved in the death of Vince Foster; that unnamed liberals might have been involved in the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. More recently, President Trump has claimed — based, so far, on nothing — that Obama ordered the bugging of Trump Tower. And Trump’s allies, with the White House’s blessing, have alleged the existence of a “deep state,” conducting what talk radio host Mark Levin calls a “silent coup.” If the “deep state” refers to a cadre of federal employees who are unhappy serving an ethno-nationalist president who apparently hates them, then many would gladly

claim such citizenship. But this is not what Trump’s most loyal supporters are talking about. The de facto coup is allegedly being conducted by a conspiracy of national security professionals who wish to overturn the results of the 2016 election. Radio host Rush Limbaugh recently claimed that the latest WikiLeaks dump showed “the CIA has the ability to mimic Russian hackers.” He went on to claim that “there isn’t any evidence” of Russian involvement in the Democratic National Committee breach. “But we have all kinds of supposition that the American deep state is deeply involved in whatever sabotage is being conducted on the Trump administration.” This accusation is made by a disturbing collection of overlapping interests and voices: Vladimir Putin, Julian Assange, Nigel Farage, Breitbart News, a variety of talk radio hosts and much of Trump’s inner circle of advisers. They share the goal of defanging American intelligence services and having America accept a shrunken global role. Leaking from the CIA is the context in which Trump once asked,“Are we living in Nazi Germany?” Does Trump himself believe the conspiracy theories he so effectively employs? It is the wrong question. In these cases, Trump does not support things because they are true; they are true because he supports them. And he expects everyone who works for him to publicly and vocally embrace his version of reality. What is the harm in all this? First, we are seeing the corruption of the Republican Party, as it tolerates, excuses and absorbs Trump’s conspiratorial thinking. Consider the most recent WikiLeaks hack. The data breach caused serious damage to American security. And some conservatives cheered. It is a funhouse mirror reflection of the New Left in the 1960s — led by ideology to root

against the interests of their own country. Second, these attacks on the intelligence community continue Trump’s campaign to delegitimize institutions that offer a view of reality different from his own. To maintain his version of daily events, the mainstream media must be discredited as “fake news.” On economic policy, the Congressional Budget Office must be discredited as biased. To tilt foreign policy toward Russia and away from traditional friends, the intelligence community must be discredited. Third, talk of a “silent coup” encourages frightening, extra-constitutional thinking. If this is more than a metaphor, an existential threat to democracy has been raised. And an administration actually believing this might go beyond leak investigations and feel justified in scarier, Nixonian remedies. Trump does not face a coup, just a government he has attacked and refused to lead. It is one challenge for Trump nominees to run departments they think should not exist. It is another for a president to declare that America’s intelligence community is plotting against him and comparable to the Nazis. You can’t declare war on people you should be providing inspiration and direction. This is the only effective, long-term answer to leaks. Day by day, Republicans are lowering their standards of sanity to defend an administration seized by conspiracy thinking. If they do not stand up to this trend, they will be defining lunacy down.

Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

One congressman’s unbounded racism Rep. King’s comments deserve a loud chorus of condemnation. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

White supremacism was never banished from American political thought, just shoved to the fringe and hushed to a whisper. Now, in the Age of Trump, it’s back in the mainstream and ready to roar. Witness the words of Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, on the subject of immigration: “Culture and demographics are our destiny. We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” King offered these sentiments Sunday in a tweet expressing solidarity with Geert Wilders, an openly racist and Islamophobic Dutch politician who has a chance of becoming prime minister in elections this week. Wilders is someone who “understands,” King wrote. And we understand just what King meant. Former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke certainly got the message, using his vile Twitter account to proclaim, “GOD BLESS STEVE KING!!!” Just so there’s no confusion, King went on CNN Monday to say that “I meant exactly what I said.” He added: “I’ve been to Europe and I’ve spoken on this issue and I’ve said the same thing as far as 10 years ago to the German people and to any population of people that is a declining population that ... isn’t willing to have enough babies to reproduce themselves. I’ve said to them,‘You cannot rebuild your civilization with somebody else’s babies. You’ve got to keep your birth rate up and that you need to teach your children your values.’” Why am I hearing faint strains of “Deutschland uber alles”? And why am I not hearing a loud chorus of condemnation from King’s Republican colleagues? King told CNN he is merely “a champion

for Western civilization,” which he called “a superior civilization.” Which means, of course, that he considers other civilizations inferior. But we knew that. After all, King has a history of inflammatory immigrant-bashing. In 2013, he said that for every undocumented immigrant who becomes a valedictorian,“there’s another hundred out there that — they weigh 130 pounds, and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.” And as for race, a guy from Iowa who keeps a Confederate flag on his desk is definitely sending some kind of message. He tried unsuccessfully to block the federal government’s plans to remove Andrew Jackson’s image from the $20 bill and replace it with that of Harriet Tubman. King says he King is proud that some of his ancestors were abolitionists. One wonders if he knows what the word means. We should pay attention to his lexicon, however, because today’s white supremacism tends to shy away from overtly racial terminology. Listen instead for words such as “culture” and “civilization.” The idea is that the United States is the land of the free and the home of the brave because its “civilization” is “European” or “Western” — euphemisms, basically, for “white.” According to this view, immigrants have been assets to the country only to the extent that they have fully assimilated into

the dominant culture. And while previous waves of immigrants may have become part of the fabric of our society, recent Latino immigrants are not blending in. And as for Muslims, well, forget about it; the Constitution may forbid the establishment of any official religion, but our civilization is resolutely Christian. African-Americans are OK so long as they accept the foregoing as true — and do not assert any sort of distinct African-American identity. I think that’s a fair reading of modern white-supremacist doctrine. Of course, it’s a bunch of racist, ahistorical claptrap. Immigrants — both voluntary and involuntary — have shaped this nation since long before its founding. The first Africans were brought here in bondage in 1619, one year before the Mayflower. Americans have never been a single ethnicity, speaking a single language, bound by the centuries to a single patch of land. We have always been diverse, polyglot and restless, and our greatness has come from our openness to new people and new ideas. King’s distress about birth rates can only be read as modern-day eugenics. If he is worried about the coming day when there is no white majority in the United States, he has remarkably little faith in our remarkable society — or in the Constitution that he, as a member of Congress, is sworn to support and defend. President Trump played footsie with the white supremacist movement during his campaign. His chief strategist, Stephen Bannon, waged civilizational war when he ran the Breitbart News site. Trump could definitively denounce King’s racism with a statement or a tweet, but so far his silence is deafening. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Knoll, Virginia L. - St. Louis Lancaster, John "Bud" J. - St. Louis Loftus, Michael P. - Ballwin Nielsen, Neal "David" - St. Louis Nisbet - see Schlingman Pardeck, Pat - Barnhart Paule - see Zielinski Peppes, Gus A. - St. Louis Perry, Richard "Kent" - Kirkwood Rice - see Voelker Rieken, Donald E. - St. Louis Rothermich, James P. - Old Monroe, MO

Altman - see Zielinski Amir-Fazli - see Voelker Burkhart, Neil H. - St. Charles Cyr, Gilbert "Gil" J., Sr. - St. Louis Dalton, Dorothy J. - St. Louis Elswick, James Lee - St. Louis Elswick, Jane Louise - St. Louis Garnholz, Scott - St. Louis Graue, Ivonne M. - Wright City Hageman, Lorraine F. - St. Louis Hall, Shirley Jean - Glen Carbon, IL Hinsley, Mary Julia - St. Charles

Hageman, Lorraine F.

Smith, Geraldine Sanders Geraldine (or Jellybean or just Bean as she was known by her family because of her fondness for jellybeans) passed away in her home of 55 years in Huntliegh, Missouri. Bean was a proud Army Veteran who served during WWII in the European Theatre and in Occupied Berlin, where she met her husband Dutee Smith who had fought his way across Europe. One of her favorite stories was how she knocked General Eisenhower over a s t h ey b ot h ca me rushing a rou n d a corner in Allied Headquarters. She was a genealogist, a historian and a writer of 6 books about the history and genealogy of both Revolutionary and Civil War ancestors, particularly those in Madison County, Missouri where she was born. She belonged to the DAR, the Dames of the Magna Carta, and the Republican Party (of course!). She traveled the world and made many friends in her wanderings. She is survived by all 7 of her daughters, by 8 grandchildren and by 3 great grandchildren. Bean was the matriarch of our clan and we are going to miss her terribly. Services: Public farewells will be at the Follis Funeral Home in Fredericktown, Missouri on March 18, 2017 between 10-12:00. Thereafter Bean will travel south 22 miles to our family graveyard, Mt. Pisgah Cemetery, where her son-in-law Pastor Gibbs Peterson will conduct a graveside service at 1:00.

(nee Cowgill), 82, March 9, 2017. Visitation Sat., March 18, 11 a.m. until Service at 12:30 p.m., Irwin Chapel, 591 Glen Crossing Rd., Glen Carbon, IL 62034. Memorials to Shriner's Hospital.

67, of St. Charles, MO, died on Saturday, March 11, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Hinsley, Mary Julia

Cyr, Gilbert "Gil" J., Sr. 89, passed away March 13, 2017. He leaves his wife of 63 years Rosaria (nee Maida) Cyr; Sons, Joseph Cyr, Sr. and Gilbert J. (Laura) Cyr, Jr. and daughter, Doreen Cyr; 15 grandchildren and 38 greatgrandchildren. U.S. Navy Veteran and member of TESA. Services: Visitation Thursday, March 16, 2017 from 9:15-10am with a Funeral Mass at 10am St. Rose Philippine Catholic Church. In lieu of flowers donation to The TSC (Sarah Community) Foundation or Holy Spirit Adoration Sisters "Pink Sisters" would be appreciated. Interment: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Dalton, Dorothy J. (nee Caffey) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, March 13, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Thomas M. Dalton; dear mother of Diane (Rick) Maynard, Nancy, Thomas (Shirley), Carol and the late James Dalton; our dear grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 L ema y Ferry Rd., Fri., Mar. 17, 9 :3 0 a m to Immaculate Conception Church (Arnold) for 10 am mass. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Vis. Thur., 4-8 pm.

Elswick, James Lee James Lee Elswick , 83, passed away 02/24/2017 in the peace of his home. He is survived by his children Graham Elswick, Dawn Elswick & Erin Elswick. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Donations are requested in place of flowers to the American Cancer Society Bark for Life. Services: Celebration of Life Service: Ethical Society of St. Louis on Thursday March 16, 2017 at 6:30 - 8:30 pm. Location: 9001 Clayton Rd, St. Louis, MO 63117 ST. LOUIS CREMATION Services

Elswick, Jane Louise Jane Louise Elswick , 81, passed away Friday March 10, 2017 in the peace of her home. Jane Elswick, daughter of Elmer & Emma Nooter, She is survived by her children Graham Elswick, Dawn Elswick & Erin Elswick. Jane was a truly unique and beautiful person. She will be greatly missed by her family and friends. Donations are requested in place of flowers, to the American Cancer Society Bark for Life. Services: Celebration of Life Service to be held at the Ethical Society of St. Louis on Thursday March 16, 2017 at 6:00 - 8:00 pm. Location: 9001 Clayton Rd, St. Louis, MO 63117 ST. LOUIS CREMATION Services

(nee: Strong), age 94, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Saturday, March 11, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Graue, Ivonne M.

REDISCOVER YOUR PAST IN OUR ARCHIVES | STLtoday.com/archives

FOLLIS FUNERAL HOME

Stadler, Audrey F.

(nee Yowell), asleep in Jesus, Friday, March 10, 2017. Preceded in death by her parents Leonard D. and Ella F. (nee Wurst) Knoll, Virginia L. Yowell; beloved wife of the late Robert E. Stadler Sr.; loving (nee Bauer), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Friday, March 10, 2017. Beloved sister of Barbara mother of Robert E. (Patricia) Stadler Jr. and David A. (Jamie) (Tom) Purdy and David Bauer; our dear sister-in-law, aunt. cous- Stadler; dearest grandmother of Kristin (Nathan) Butler, Kalli (Corey) Zavorka, Matt Stadler and Caitlin Stadler; dear sister-inin and friend. law of Richard and Marjorie Stadler; our dear great-grandmothServices: Visitation at Mary Queen of Peace Catholic Church, er, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Audrey was a member of 676 W. Lockwood Ave. 63119, on Thursday, March 16, 10:00 Christ Community Church, Friendship Village-Sunset Hills Coma.m. until Mass at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials munity, Daughters of the American Revolution and an honorary may be made to The American Cancer Society. Interment life member of St. Louis Genealogical Society. Sunset Memorial Park. A service of KUTIS AFFTON Chapel. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Thursday, March 16, 5-8 p.m. Memorial service will be held at Christ Community Church on Friday, March 17 at 10 Lancaster, John "Bud" J. a.m. Private interment at J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowSadly taken on Saturday, ers, memorials to St. Anthony's at de Greeff Hospice House or March 11, 2017, at the age of 76. Christ Community Church would be appreciated. Beloved husband of Christy (nee Tyler) for 55 years; father of Jocelyn, Michael, and Samantha; brother of Shirley Storm, Wilma Elberta and Donald; dear grandfather, great(nee Frantz), 89 years, of St. grandfather, uncle, cousin, and friend. Peters, MO., passed away peaceJohn was a retired firefighter for the city of St. Louis and an fully in her sleep on Sunday, avid fisherman and hunter. March 12, 2017. Loving wife of In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Disabled the late Dr. Clifford N. Storm; beAmerican Veterans or the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital loved daughter of Elbert and are appreciated. Anna Frantz; devoted mother of Services: Monday, 10:00 a.m., at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Dr. B. Ray (Jan, nee Hollis) Storm FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Avenue (63116). Interment and C. Todd (Jeanne, nee Sachs) Mount Hope Cemetery. Storm; cherished grandmother of VISITATION: SUNDAY, 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. D r. Su s a n n a Storm, Kathryn Storm, Chad (Jennifer) Storm, and Brad Storm; treasured greatLoftus, Michael P. grandmother of Andrew and Edie 91, March 12, 2017. Services: Visitation at Schrader Storm. She is preceded in death by two sons, Mark and Jerry Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thursday, 11:30 am until the time Storm, and 5 siblings. of the service at 1pm. For more info see Schrader.com. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 620 Jefferson St., St. Charles MO. Visitation will be held SaturNielsen, Neal "David" day, March 18, 2017 12:00-2:00 pm with a Funeral Service fol54, went to be with the Lord Saturday March 11, 2017 at Barnes lowing at 2:00 pm in our chapel. Interment St. Charles Memorial Hospital. A private family service will be held with a memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions may be made to Give Kids service at Compton Heights Christian Church at a later date. A Smile, 340 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Peters, MO. 63376. Visit Baue.com

Pardeck, Pat Monday, March 13, 2017. Loving wife for 57 years to Jerry Pardeck; loving mother to Craig and David Pardeck. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Peppes, Gus A.

age 84, on Monday, March 13, 2017. Dear father of Georgia (Randy) Gillam and Michael (Julie) Peppes; dear grandfather of Erin, Jessie Garnholz, Scott (Samantha), Kelly (Cory) and Tyler; dear great-grandfather of died peacefully on March 5, 2017. Beloved husband of Laura, Scott died courageously after a Alexa and Henry; dear, dear friend of Maryloy Suess; brother, long battle with cancer. In his life, and as he slipped away, Scott brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 was generous, loving, compassionate and brave. Services: A celebration of his life will be held at Second Gravois, Friday, March 17, 1 pm. Interment St. Matthew Presbyterian Church, on Saturday, March 18, at 10:00 a.m., Cemetery. Visitation Thursday 4-9 p.m. 4501 Westminster Place, St. Louis, MO 63108. Visiting to follow at the church until 12:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, feel free to Perry, Richard "Kent" donate to National Public Radio and Places for People. 82, of Kirkwood, MO. Memorial Service Sat., April 8, 2017 at 10 "No one we hold in our hearts and let shine a.m. at Kirkwood United Methodist Church. CREMATION SOCIETY though our lives, ever dies." Pastor Mary Gene Boteler OF ST. LOUIS. Kirkwood, MO

77, of Wright City, March 10, 2017. Visitation: 3/17 from 5-8 p.m. at Carter-Ricks F.H. Winfield. Service 3/18 at 10 a.m. at Funeral Home. Burial in Whispering Winds Cemetery, Winfield.

Schlingman, Donald Alvin - St. Louis Schmitz, Lester "Les" Ray - Saint Louis Smith, Geraldine Sanders - Huntliegh Stadler, Audrey - St. Louis Storm, Wilma Elberta - St. Peters Tierney, Margaret "Peggy" Weston - St. Louis Voelker, Rose Marie - St. Louis Welch, Doris G. - St. Louis Wentzel - see Zielinski Wilner, Frances B. - St. Louis Zielinski, Jeanne F. - St. Louis

(nee Roth), passed away on Saturday, March 12, 2017 at the age of 92. Loving mother of Tom (Sue) Howat, Jeff Howat, Joanne (Thomas) Noble; cherished grandmother of Jason, Matthew, Jared and Mallory and great-grandmother of 4. Lorraine was preceded in death by her husband Russell Eickhoff, her son David Arnold Howat, her parents Frank and Marie Roth and her siblings, Kenneth, Anita, Donald, Frank and Robert. Our loving aunt, cousin and friend. Lorraine was a long time member of St. Paul's Evangelical Church, an officer of the Golden club, a member of the American Legion Post 338 and an Oasis Tutor. Services: A funeral service will be held at ALEXANDER-WHITEMULLEN Funeral Home on Sunday, March 19th at 2:00 p.m. Visitation on Saturday, March 18th from 4-8 p.m. Interment at Mount Lebanon Cemetery.

Hall, Shirley Jean

Burkhart, Neil H.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Rieken, Donald E. on Saturday, March 11, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Norma KelleyRieken; loving father of Debbie (Mark Mallett) Rieken, Colleen Martin, Cathy Carter, David (David F o r b e s ) R i e k e n , Ch ris (D on ) McNabb, Maureen (Dale) Chavez, Dianne (David) Brewer, Deneen (Nathan) LaNasa, Donna (Tom) N a p p i e r a n d t h e l a t e Daniel Rieken; dearest grandfather of 20 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren; dear brother of Joe (Dorothy) Rieken and brother-in-law of Jerry (Pat) Kelley and Jim (the late Helen) Metz; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., on Saturday, March 18 from 1 p.m. until time of memorial service at 3 p.m. Services conclude at the funeral home.

Tierney, Margaret "Peggy" Weston (nee Barry), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, passed away peacefully on March 11, 2017, at the age of 98. She is survived by her beloved husband of 70 years William (Bill) Tierney; children Anne Tierney of Clayton, MO, Bob (Ann) Tierney of Quincy, IL, Bill (Barb) Tierney, Jr. of Chicago, IL, Michael (Carolyn) Tierney of Mercer Island, WA, Maureen (Perry) D'Angelo of Reisterstown, MD, Peter (Annabel) Tierney of Princeton Junction, NJ, Tricia (Dan) Costello of Seattle, WA, and Eileen Tierney of New York, NY; 16 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Peggy was born and raised in Boston, MA where she attended the academically rigorous Boston Latin School. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Notre Dame of Maryland University. During World War II, LTJG Peggy Barry served in the U.S. Navy WAVES as a Celestial Navigation instructor of Naval and Marine Aviators. She met her future husband and lifelong treasure, USMC Lt. Bill Tierney, who was a Marine pilot, when both were stationed at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL. Peggy and Bill called many locations home, including Massachusetts, Alabama, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri and Connecticut. Wherever they lived, they enjoyed spending time with family and entertaining friends and neighbors, old and new. Peggy was known for her keen intellect, fabulous sense of humor and compassionate soul. She enjoyed the love and admiration of many, who affectionately referred to her as their "second mom". Peggy was a lifelong learner, who in later years tackled a variety of subjects ranging from real estate and computer programming, to theology and foreign cultures. She was a devotee and supporter of the arts, particularly the St. Louis Symphony, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City Opera and New York City Ballet. Throughout her life she was sustained by her strong religious faith. Peggy donated her body to St. Louis University School of Medicine. A memorial service celebrating her life will be held in the coming months. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to Catholic Charities.

Rothermich, James P. 83, on March 13, 2017. Services: VISITATION: 3/15 from 3-8 p.m. at Carter-Ricks F.H. Winfield; FUNERAL MASS 3/16 at 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception Church, Old Monroe, MO.

Schlingman, Donald Alvin 67, Mar. 13, 2017. Vis. 4-8 pm., Thur., 3/16, Hoffmeister So. Co. Chapel. Funeral 11:30 am Fri., 3/17 at the funeral home. Burial Sunset Memorial Pk. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Schmitz, Lester "Les" Ray 60, of Saint Louis, MO, passed in peace surrounded by family on March 12, 2017. Les was a loving and dedicated father to (daughter) Jenny, (son) Jared, and (son) Jordan. He was a brother, uncle, Dad, Grandpa, and a great friend to so many. Of his many titles Grandpa was his most cherished. He was a Papa (aka Gramps) to Hunter, Alex, Jordyn, Jack and Benson. Services: A Memorial Service will be held at Kirkwood Road Christian Church at 2 p.m. on March 18, 2017. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting donations be made in his memory to St. Anthony's De Greef Hospice House, 10024 Kennerly Road, St. Louis, MO, 63128.

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NEWS

03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

EPA delays chemical storage rule after industry protests

DAVID SINDELAR

St. Anthony’s CEO, longtime board leader dies at 59 BY SAMANTHA LISS st. Louis Post-dispatch

David Sindelar, leader of St. Anthony’s Medical Center in South County, died on Saturday (March 11, 2017) of esophageal cancer. He was 59. Mr. Sindelar had been at the helm of area businesses for decades. Prior to his role at St. Anthony’s, he was CEO of an electronics manufacturing Sindelar company based in Clayton. With an accounting degree from St. Louis University, Mr. Sindelar served as chief financial oicer for various manufacturing companies with operations all over the world, said Kelly Wetzler, a longtime colleague of Mr. Sindelar’s. As a native of south St. Louis County, Mr. Sindelar had close ties to the hospital he would lead later in life. “He grew up riding his bike around the site of St. Anthony’s,” Winthrop Reed, vice chair of the hospital’s board, said of Mr. Sindelar’s long ties and loyalty to the area and hospital. Most recently, Mr. Sindelar had served as CEO of St. Anthony’s for 18 months before his death. He was tapped to lead one of the last remaining independent hospitals after a

Regulation grew out of 2013 blast in Texas that killed 15 people

tumultuous few years that included numerous leadership changes and budget and stafing cuts. “St. Anthony’s took its greatest strides as an organization under his leadership,” Reed said. News of Mr. Sindelar’s death comes just weeks after St. Anthony’s agreed to become part of Chesterfield-based Mercy, the area’s third-largest health care provider. Mr. Sindelar’s role in the deal was one of his “greatest works,” Reed said. “I’m very saddened by the passing of Mr. Sindelar. He has done so much for South County and St. Anthony’s. I’m proud to have known him,” Donn Sorensen, an executive with Mercy, told the Post-Dispatch on Tuesday. “His mark and legacy at St. Anthony’s is deep,” Sorensen said. Mr. Sindelar had served on St. Anthony’s board since 2002. He was elevated to board chair in 2010 and was named CEO in 2015. Mr. Sindelar grew up in south St. Louis County and graduated from Lindbergh High School. He is survived by his wife, Sara, and their two children, Lauren Sheehan and James Sindelar. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Jack Harris • The man who cemented his place in Hollywood history by producing the 1958 horror movie “The Blob,” has died. His daughter, Lynda Resnick, says Mr. Harris died of natural causes Tuesday (March 14, 2017) at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 98. Mr. Harris was a decorated WWII veteran before getting into the movie business. He worked in marketing, publicity, distribution and production across his long career.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

His irst movie, the B-movie “The Blob” starring Steve McQueen, became an enormous hit, grossing more than $3 million on a $110,000 budget and spawning a sequel and a remake. Mr. Harris’ other producing credits include John Carpenter’s “Dark Star,” John Landis’ “Schlock” and the Irvin Kershner thriller “Eyes of Laura Mars,” starring Faye Dunaway and Tommy Lee Jones. Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The remains of a nursing home, apartment complex and fertilizer plant after an explosion in West, Texas, in 2015. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has delayed a rule regulating such facilities.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • The admin-

istration of President Donald Trump is delaying a new rule tightening safety requirements for companies that store large quantities of dangerous chemicals. The rule was imposed after a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, exploded in 2013, killing 15 people. Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, delayed the efective date of the rule until June. Pruitt’s action late Monday came in response to complaints by the chemical industry and other business groups that the rule could make it easier for terrorists and other criminals to target refineries, chemical plants and other facilities by requiring companies to make public the types and quantities of chemicals stored on site. The EPA issued a final rule in January, seven days before President Barack Obama left oice. The EPA said at the time that the rule would help prevent accidents and improve emergency preparedness by allowing first responders better data on chemical storage. A coalition of business groups opposed the rule, saying in a let-

OBITUARIES

ter to Pruitt that it would do “irreparable harm” to companies that store chemicals and put public safety at risk. Chet Thompson, president and CEO of the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, an industry group, praised Pruitt’s delay of the EPA rule. “The midnight rulemaking in the final days of the Obama administration would not enhance safety, create security vulnerabilities and divert resources from further enhancing existing safety programs,” Thompson said. Environmental groups questioned industry claims as “selfinterested” and misleading. Hazardous chemical incidents such as the explosion in West, Texas, are “frighteningly common,” according to the Environmental Justice Health Alliance, an advocacy group. More than 1,500 chemical releases or explosions were reported from 2004 to 2013, causing 58 deaths and more than 17,000 injuries, the group said. Instead of bowing to industry complaints, the EPA should “stand with the first responders, at-risk communities, safety experts, workers, small businesses and others who live at daily risk of a catastrophic chemical release

Celebrations of Life

Wilner, Frances B.

(nee Saner) Fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church, peacefully on Monday, March 13, 2017. Beloved wife of the late John Lewis Voelker; loving mother of Joan Rice (the late John), Christopher (Judy Koen), Steve (Doris), Carol Amir-Fazli (Andy), Mike (Rachel), the late John S. and Paul (survived by Jeannie); beloved grandmother of Elizabeth, Carrie, Kate, Jack, Christie, M a t t h e w , M ich a el , Violet, Oliver and Margaret; dear great-grandmother of Ian, Elliot, Lillian, Oscar and Eve; sister of Reginald Saner of Boulder, CO, Dorothy Matern of Beverly, IL, and Paul Saner of Hillside, IL; our dear mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt, friend to all and inspiration to many. Born Dec. 6, 1927, Rose Marie graduated from Webster College (Speech 1949) and married John in 1950, in her hometown Jacksonville, IL. A marriage which spanned 61 years, Rose Marie was devoted to her husband, children, extended family and community. A life-long learner, extraordinary communicator and advocate of social justice; RM's beautiful perspective, practiced faith and unconditional love will be her legacy. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 106 N. Meramec Ave., at Maryland Ave., Clayton, on Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. Immediately following the Mass a reception for friends and family will be held in St. Joseph's Parish Hall. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions appreciated to St. Vincent De Paul Society or Muscular Dystrophy Association. The family will receive friends at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Friday, March 17, 2017 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Online condolences www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

(nee Marczewski), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Sidney "Allen" Wilner; loving mother of Pat (Thomas) Wiltsch, Carole (Craig) Cassoutt, Jayne (Andrew) K a g a n , K a t h l e e n ( N o r ma n ) Gierer, Marianne (Ian) Jamie, Lisa Wilner and the late John Wilner; d e a r gra n d mot h er of B et h , Susan, Corinne, Melissa, John, Nate, Nick, Douglas, Elizabeth; d ea res t grea t grandmother, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at St. Agnes Home, 10341 Manchester Rd., Thur., Mar. 16, 9 am until the funeral Mass at 10 a.m. Private interment. Contributions to St. Agnes Home or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE.

(nee Orf) Passed away Saturday, March 11, 2017. Beloved wife of Jim Welch; dear mother of Greg Welch; dear sister and sister-in-law of Dallas (Ruth) Orf, Gene (Shirley) Orf, Carol (Jim) McEwen and Judy Bowlsby; our dear aunt and friend. Doris was a wonderful loving and positive person and will be greatly missed. Services: Visitation for family and friends at the O r t ma n n Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive, Blvd,. Creve Coeur(1/2 mile west of I-270), Thurs., March 16, from 3-5:00 p.m. With Service to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to Siteman Cancer Center, 7425 Forsyth Blvd., Ste 2200, St. Louis, MO 63105. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com “A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

In Memoriam

Voelker, Rose Marie

Welch, Doris G.

or explosion,” the group wrote in a letter last month to members of Congress. The rule came after a threeyear process that included eight public hearings and more than 44,000 public comments. The Obama administration said the rule would help prevent chemical incidents such as the 2013 explosion in Texas, while enhancing emergency preparedness requirements, improving management of data on chemical storage and modernizing policies. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., said the rule gave “a blueprint to those who would like to do us harm,” adding that current regulations would remain in place to continue ensuring the safety of such facilities. Environmental groups lamented the delay, which they said showed Pruitt’s bias in favor of industry. “This gesture by Administrator Pruitt is hardly a surprise. Nonetheless, it is still profoundly disappointing that he has found a new way to marginalize public health and safety protection in favor of refinery industry profits,” said Dr. Brian Moench, president of Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment.

Zielinski, Jeanne F. (nee Altman), faithfully departed on Friday, March 10, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Frank C. Zielinski, married for 52 wonderful years; beloved mother of Steve (the late Jackie), Linda (John) Paule, Stan Zielinski and Nancy (Perry) Wentzel; loving grandmother of 11, Angie and Lexie Zielinski, Leslie (Justin) Hill, Ryan (Katy) Paule, Brett Paule, Alex, Paige and Amanda Zielinski, Kailey, Keri and Blake Wentzel; great-grans of 2, Callie Hill and Willa Paule; dear sister of the late Kay Dyer and Marian Dean; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: A celebration of life was private for family and friends. Contributions to St. Jude Children's Hospital appreciated. Service of KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois. Dream along with me, I'm on my way to a star. We can wink at the moon as we hold each other tight and if we go in the right direction, Heaven can't be very far.

Fraternal Notices

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. John L. Gambaro Plant Maintenance, Member 61 Years, Retired. March 11, 2017. Visitation and Mass, Wednesday, March 15, 10-11 a.m., Mass following visitation. St. Joan of Arc, 5800 Oleatha Frank D. Jacobs, B.M.J James C. Douglas, F.S. Please be advised of the death of Robert Laske Gold Card Member Deceased March 12, 2017 Services March 15, at noon from KUTIS AFFTON

Larry I. Blair & or GP & GGP Gone From Us and Not Forgotten Today marks 10 years Dad since you left us for Heaven on March 15th, 2007 We think of you and our loving Mother daily. Your love lives deep within our hearts and your memory will never be forgotten. You and Mom are our guardian angels forever. Always loved, Your Loving Children, Grandchildren & Great-Grandchildren

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NEWS

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

More than 250 bodies found Retired admiral among in mass burial in Mexico 9 indicted in bribery case BY MARK STEVENSON Associated Press

MEXICO CITY • More than 250 skulls have been found over the last several months in what appears to be a drug cartel mass burial ground on the outskirts of the city of Veracruz, prosecutors said Tuesday. Veracruz state’s top prosecutor, Jorge Winckler, said the clandestine pits appeared to contain remains of cartel victims killed years ago. The news came as no surprise to Lucia Diaz, one of the mothers of people who have disappeared whose group is known as Colectivo Solecito. The mothers pushed authorities to investigate the fields where the skulls were found because they suspected more than a year ago that the wooded area known as Colinas

de Santa Fe was a secret burial ground. In the face of official inaction, the activists themselves went to the fields starting in August 2016, sinking rods into the ground to detect the telltale odor of decomposition, and then digging. When they find what they believe are burial pits, they alert authorities, who carry out the final excavations. “We dig holes, but we try not to touch the remains,” Diaz said, because DNA may be the only hope of identifying the dead and touching the bones might contaminate them. So far, Diaz said, searchers have found about 125 pits that contain about 253 bodies. Nobody knows when the burials began, but Diaz said some were quite recent. “Some of the bodies had a lot of connective tissue.

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You could see an ear, or recognize part of a face,” she said. Winckler, in the first official recognition, seemed to say the burials occurred before the new state administration took oice in December. “For many years, the drug cartels disappeared people and the authorities were complacent,” Winckler said in an interview with the Televisa network, in apparent reference to the administration of fugitive former Gov. Javier Duarte and his predecessors. Duarte resigned as governor two months before his term ended last year and disappeared. He faces charges that include money laundering and organized crime and oicials have accused him of thoroughly looting state coffers. Winckler said that resources needed for DNA tests in criminal investigation had vanished, leaving oicials to depend on help from the federal government and groups such as the Red Cross.

BY ELLIOT SPAGAT AND JULIE WATSON Associated Press

SAN DIEGO • A retired

Navy admiral was among nine high-ranking military officers arrested Tuesday across the country in a burgeoning bribery scandal involving a Malaysian defense contractor nicknamed “Fat Leonard.” The indictment unsealed in federal court in San Diego alleged that retired Adm. Bruce Loveless and the other officers acLoveless cepted the services of prostitutes, lavish meals and fancy trips from Leonard Francis in exchange for classified information that helped his company, Glenn Defense Marine Asia. It was the latest indictment in the three-yearold case that has charged more than 20 former or current Navy officials so far and marks one of the Navy’s worst corruption

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carried out by the Navy’s highest-ranking officers,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Alana W. Robinson. She added that “the alleged conduct amounts to a staggering degree of corruption by the most prominent leaders of the Seventh Fleet — the largest fleet in the U.S. Navy — actively worked together as a team to trade secrets for sex, serving the interests of a greedy foreign defense contractor, and not those of their own country.” Francis has pleaded guilty to fraud and is awaiting sentencing. Twenty of the defendants are current or former Navy oicials and five are company executives of the Singapore-based company. To date, 13 have pleaded guilty, including another admiral who was sentenced in June. The indictment unsealed Tuesday says the defendants worked in concert to recruit others. Prosecutors said they used fake names and foreign email service providers to cover their tracks.

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scandals in history. Loveless is the second admiral charged in the case. Prosecutors say Francis, whose nickname comes from his wide girth, bilked the Navy out of nearly $35 million — largely by overcharging for his company’s services supplying Navy ships in the Pacific with food, water, fuel and other necessities. Navy officers provided classified information to Francis that helped him beat out the competition, and in some instances commanders steered ships to ports in the Pacific where his company could charge fake tariffs and fees, prosecutors said. The new indictment also charged a former Marine colonel. The defendants were arrested Tuesday in California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida, Colorado and Virginia. Loveless was arrested at his home in Coronado across the bay from San Diego. “This is a fleecing and betrayal of the United States Navy in epic proportions, and it was allegedly

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NEWS

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21 National Extremes High: 98° Thermal, California

WEATHER • Low 18, High 39• Winds VAR/NW 3-7 mph TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: -11° Crane Lake, Minnesota

Mostly sunny and cold today Mostly sunny skies along with light winds and continued colder than average temperatures are expected across the St. Louis area today as a ridge of high pressure will be in control. Highs will be in the upper 30s. Milder temperatures are forecast over the next few days. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

22°

34°

38°

31°

Mostly sunny Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Partly cloudy

50s 40s 60s

23 20 14 16 15 24 21 14 16 20 20 16 19

44 41 40 39 41 46 40 38 40 43 39 39 42

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partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

4-DAY FORECAST

Flood Stage

Current Level

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

27°/50°

43°/65°

SATURDAY

70s

50s

Mostly sunny

70s

Chicago 16 / 27

H

W

14 18 16 16 15 10 17 13 15 13 15 15

33 38 27 32 33 33 36 33 38 29 35 33

sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

Kirksville 14 / 38 Kansas City 21 / 40

Joplin 24 / 46

Springfield 15 / 35

St. Louis 18 / 39 Carbondale 18 / 38 Poplar Bluff 22 / 42

Very unhealthy

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Mar. 14th Tree - 4 (low), Mold - 230 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 35 Month (Total) 258 Season 2991 Year Ago 3013 Flood Stage

Current Level

- 0.05 - 0.06 - 0.09 - 0.04 - 0.06 - 0.17 - 0.06

Last Mar 20 Sunrise

New Mar 27

First Apr 3

7:12 AM Sunset

Full Apr 11 7:08 PM

Moonrise 10:17 PM Moonset 8:59 AM

Looking to the west around 8 p.m. tonight you will see Mars. There are five orbiters and two rovers currently exploring the red planet.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.64 - 0.33 357.40 - 0.18 496.59 - 0.35 654.25 - 0.15 705.98 - 0.14 651.63 - 0.03 907.04 + 0.02 840.49 - 0.01 594.43 + 0.02 406.62 - 0.05 601.34 + 0.04 443.03 - 0.02

- 0.54

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 84°

Jet Stream

Scattered snow showers along with gusty winds can be expected across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic as an area of low pressure continues to lift northeastward away from the region. Another frontal boundary will bring wet weather to the Pacific Northwest. Cold and mainly dry conditions will be in place throughout the Midwest, Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, and Tennessee Valley. Parts of the Desert Southwest will continue to see warmer than average temperatures. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 17 Albuquerque 44 Anchorage 13 Atlanta 25 Atlantic City 21 Baltimore 20 Billings 39 Biloxi, Ms. 42 Birmingham 25 Bismarck 19 Boise 49 Boston 22 Buffalo 13 Burlington, Vt. 16 Charleston, S.C. 33 Charleston, W.V. 16 Charlotte 23 Cheyenne 38 Chicago 16 Cincinnati 17 Cleveland 17 Colorado Spgs. 37 Concord, N.H. 19 Dallas 45 Daytona Beach 41 Denver 38 Des Moines 9 40 Destin, Fl. 12 Detroit 55 El Paso 19 Evansville -24 Fairbanks 10 Fargo 34 Flagstaff 51 Fort Myers 43 Great Falls 9 Green Bay 18 Hartford 70 Honolulu 47 Houston 17 Indianapolis 33 Jackson, Ms. 26 Juneau 64 Key West 61 Las Vegas 31 Little Rock 54 Los Angeles 20 Louisville

25 76 20 43 31 29 66 58 45 37 66 31 21 26 49 31 42 69 27 32 26 73 28 64 57 74 35 56 28 85 37 5 34 68 69 61 31 27 83 71 32 50 35 70 87 47 82 38

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snow showers 14 27 mostly cloudy 46 77 sunny sunny mostly cloudy 11 23 mostly cloudy 26 52 sunny sunny 19 37 partly cloudy windy mostly cloudy 20 37 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 41 60 mostly cloudy 39 61 sunny sunny 27 55 partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy 30 45 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 49 60 showers mostly cloudy 17 30 mostly cloudy snow showers 15 29 partly cloudy 15 25 cloudy snow 26 53 sunny sunny 19 41 partly cloudy partly cloudy 21 50 sunny sunny 41 68 windy sunny 14 38 partly cloudy partly cloudy 19 42 sunny partly cloudy snow showers 20 33 partly cloudy 41 74 partly cloudy sunny 15 30 mostly cloudy snow 53 73 mostly cloudy sunny 35 61 sunny sunny 41 76 partly cloudy sunny 26 53 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 40 58 sunny sunny 18 38 sunny partly cloudy 55 86 partly cloudy sunny 20 46 partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy -22 5 partly cloudy 26 45 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 34 67 sunny partly cloudy 45 70 sunny sunny mostly cloudy 42 54 windy 12 39 partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy 14 30 mostly cloudy 69 83 partly cloudy sunny 54 72 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 18 41 sunny partly cloudy 32 62 partly cloudy sunny rain and snow 30 38 snow showers 60 69 sunny sunny 60 85 sunny sunny 33 56 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 56 83 partly cloudy partly cloudy 21 46 sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

30 Macon 60 McAllen, Tx. 26 Memphis 54 Miami 13 Milwaukee 11 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 38 35 Mobile Montgomery 30 22 Nashville New Orleans 44 New York City 17 Norfolk, Va. 27 Oklahoma City 34 Omaha 17 Orlando 44 Palm Springs 67 Philadelphia 21 Phoenix 62 Pittsburgh 16 Portland, Me. 22 Portland, Or. 49 Providence 20 Raleigh 24 Rapid City 30 Reno 41 Richmond, Va. 21 Sacramento 52 St. Petersburg 51 Salt Lake City 46 San Antonio 49 San Diego 55 San Francisco 52 Santa Fe 36 Savannah 33 Seattle 48 41 Shreveport 5 Sioux Falls 16 Syracuse 36 Tallahassee 47 Tampa 56 Tucson 28 Tulsa 21 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 51 30 Wichita Wilmington, De. 20 62 Yuma

City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

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70 39 41 51 80 75 34 45 33 68 56 32 66 64 42 42

86 55 59 79 93 83 61 54 56 72 75 52 78 77 61 59

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

Kenya’s doctors will end fatal strike

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a photo from February, a doctor holds his stethoscope in the air as he and other medical staf protest the detention of their union leaders, outside an appeal court in Nairobi, Kenya.

Mexican magnate wants workshops on U.S. citizenship • Mexican telecom magnate Carlos Slim has joined forces with Mexico’s largest university and the country’s human rights agency to hold workshops for Latinos in the United States on how to obtain U.S. citizenship. The National Autonomous University of Mexico, known as UNAM, says the Carlos

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Slim Foundation and the National Human Rights Commission signed the agreement Tuesday. UNAM will train 50 instructors who will give 10 workshops at its satellite facilities in San Antonio, Chicago, Seattle, Los Angeles and Tucson, Arizona. The Slim foundation will publicize the efort through its Acceso Latino web platform. The workshops will focus on an estimated 2 million to 3 million Mexican migrants who might be eligible for U.S. citizenship but haven’t completed the process. Migrants will also be taught how to defend their rights. Cameroon reports 5,000 people freed from Boko Haram since January • More than 5,000 people, including women and children, have been freed from extremist captivity and at least 60 Boko Haram ighters have been killed by Cameroonian and Nigerian soldiers in operations since the end of January, Cameroon’s minister of communication said Tuesday. Thousands of Cameroonian soldiers, supported by Nigerian troops, have been launching raids on Boko Haram strongholds in the Mandara mountains that straddle the two countries since Jan. 26,

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Investigating judges iled the charges Tuesday, Celine Clement-Petremann of the national inancial prosecutor’s oice said. Fillon is accused of misusing public funds, receiving money from the misuse of public funds, complicity in misusing public funds and improper declaration of assets, among other charges, the prosecutor’s oice said. Fillon has denied wrongdoing and vowed to continue his campaign.

at all times. Kenya’s public doctors, who train for six years at universities, earn a basic salary of $400-$850. That’s similar to that of some police oicers who train for just six months. Doctors now are expected to get an increase of $700 to $1,000 based on their seniority, Oluga said.

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the minister and government spokesman Issa Tchiroma Bakary said. “At least 60 terrorists were killed, 21 suspects were arrested and are helping Cameroon and Nigerian military in their investigations,” Bakary said. “A refuge center for the insurgents is entirely destroyed on the Mandara highlands, a petroleum depot destroyed and an explosive factory destroyed.” French presidential candidate Fillon charged in jobs probe • French presidential candidate Francois Fillon was given preliminary charges Tuesday in an investigation of taxpayer-funded jobs his wife and children received but allegedly never performed. A top contender in a French presidential election has never reached such a critical step in a criminal investigation, yet Fillon has vowed to keep campaigning less than six weeks before the contest’s irst round. The charges further damage the image of the former prime minister, who used to tout his reputation for probity. And it further reduces his chances of winning the two-round April 23-May 7 presidential election in which he once was viewed as the leading contender.

OAS head urges bloc suspend Venezuela over elections • The head of the Organization of American States wants regional governments to suspend Venezuela from the Washington-based group unless general elections are held soon to break a political impasse that he said Tuesday was destroying the country’s democracy. OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro made the request in a 75-page report on Venezuela’s political crisis, in which he accused President Nicolas Maduro’s socialist government of systematically violating human rights and standards of democracy enshrined in the Inter-American Democratic Charter, to which Venezuela is a signatory. Maduro’s government had no immediate comment, but in the past it has accused Almagro of doing the bidding of the U.S. government and trying to isolate Venezuela. Almagro asked the OAS’s 34 member states to intervene in Venezuela’s crisis almost a year ago after Maduro’s government disavowed a landslide loss to the opposition in legislative election and then suspended a constitutionally allowed recall campaign seeking to force him from oice before the 2018 election. Somali pirates demand ransom for oil tanker • Armed men are demanding a ransom for the release of an oil tanker they have seized of the coast of Somalia and the crew is being held captive, the European Union anti-piracy operation in the region announced late

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Thousands of doctors at Kenya’s public hospitals have agreed to end a 100-day strike that saw people dying from lack of care, an oicial with the doctors’ union said Tuesday. The strike was blamed for dozens of deaths, as the majority of Kenyans cannot aford private health care. Deputy Minority leader Jakoyo Midiwo said in a TV interview that 24 of his constituents had died because of lack of care during the period. The government and union oicials signed a deal to address pay and other issues in dispute, said Dr. Ouma Oluga, the secretarygeneral of the Kenya Medical Practitioners, Pharmacists and Dentists Union. Doctors will resume work Friday even though the agreement says they should resume immediately, he said. President Uhuru Kenyatta threatened last week to ire the 5,000 doctors if they didn’t return to work, but doctors deied him. Earlier, seven union oicials were jailed for a month for contempt of court for not ending the strike. Oluga said the biggest achievement in the agreement was that doctors now will work just 40 hours a week and will be compensated for extra hours. Previously, doctors in public hospitals were on call

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Tuesday. An EU Naval Force statement said the operation had inally made contact with the ship’s master, who conirmed that armed men were aboard the Comoroslagged tanker Aris 13. Monday’s hijacking was the irst such seizure of a large commercial vessel of Somalia since 2012. It came as a surprise to the global shipping industry as patrols by the navies of NATO countries, as well as China, India and Iran, had suppressed Somali pirate hijackings for several years. However, the United Nations warned in October that the situation was fragile and that Somali pirates “possess the intent and capability to resume attacks.” A Somali pirate who said he was in touch with the armed men aboard the tanker said the amount of ransom to demand had not yet been decided. Besieged areas in Syria get aid for the irst time in months • Trucks carrying food and other aid began entering four besieged areas in Syria on Tuesday for the irst time in months, ofering hope to tens of thousands of residents. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said at least two trucks carrying food baskets and baby formula entered the northwestern villages of Foua and Kfarya, which are besieged by insurgents, while other trucks entered the Damascus suburbs of Madaya and Zabadani, which are besieged by government forces and Lebanese Hezbollah ighters. Dozens of trucks were supposed to enter the besieged areas, but it was not immediately clear if all would make it in. The governmentcontrolled Syrian Central Military Media released a video showing a convoy of SUVs from the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent escorting at least two trucks into Madaya. It gave no further details. From news services


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WEDNESDAY • 03.15.2017 • B

Allen leaves slump far behind Goaltender was the diference-maker as Blues posted an important victory over Los Angeles BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ANAHEIM, CALIF. • When last the Blues were in California, goalie Jake Allen was in the depths of his season. When the Blues faced the Kings on Jan. 12, Allen had been pulled after one period of his previous game, and he would be pulled again that night at Staples Center after giving up

three goals on 15 shots. It was the fourth time he was pulled in six starts. He sat the next three games while Carter Hutton got the nod, caught another quick hook against Washington and then was left behind when the Blues took a trip to Winnipeg. Fast forward to Monday night at Staples Center, where Allen stopped almost everything he faced, saving 38 of 39 shots, including 21 shots in

the second period alone, on his way to his fourth win in a row. With a 3-1 victory over the Kings, the Blues extended their lead over Los Angeles for the final playoff spot to five points with 14 games to play and kept pace with third-place Nashville in the Central Division. “Early in the second period there was a couple real good See BLUES • Page B6

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jake Allen stretches before the start of a recent game.

UP NEXT > 9 p.m. Wednesday at Anaheim, FSM INSIDE > Jaskin will miss time with injury. B6

REQUIEM FOR A SEASON Poor 3-point shooting tops list of problems that befell Anderson era

Wacha’s early form something to behold He’s one of several Cardinals trending up

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starting pitcher Michael Wacha throws in a spring training game against the Washington Nationals on March 8.

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • March 14 is unoicially “St. Louis Day” — though Nov. 2 makes a heck of a case, since it’s the birthday of both Nelly and Willie McGee. But sure enough, 3-14 was the first day St. Louis didn’t have a spring training game. So with some time Tuesday away from the ballpark, I regrouped and gathered some thoughts about the Cardinals

— who hope to host a parade on the other candidate for “St. Louis Day.” • To me, the biggest story of camp has been that of Michael Wacha. Now, I preface everything you read with the following — beware, it’s March 15. That being said, a few weeks into camp, the guy has looked 2013-sharp. When Alex Reyes went down for the season, Vegas knocked down the Cards’ win total a few for 2017. It was fair to wonder if Wacha would ever be the same, but he’s frozen all doubters this spring, See HOCHMAN • Page B3

> UP NEXT: 12:05 p.m. Wednesday at Twins, FSM

MU’s Mayes eyes big goal in NCAA meet at Scottrade

MIZZOU ATHLETICS

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The two most joyous moments of the Missouri men’s basketball season, and perhaps the entire Kim Anderson era, rolled of the fingertips of 3-point shots in the final five minutes last Wednesday in Nashville. The Tigers’ improbable comeback in the first round of the Southeastern Conference tournament headed to overtime on Frankie Hughes’ game-tying buzzer beater in regulation. Kevin Puryear clinched the 86-83 win with a 3-pointer on the final play of the extra session. When the Tigers needed a basket from 3-point range to preserve the season another day, they got two, both times setting off an eruption on the Mizzou bench and a rare cascade of smiles from Anderson all the way down to the walk-ons and student managers at the other end. It was Mizzou’s edition of “One Shining Moment,” albeit in a sparsely populated Bridgestone Arena past 10:30 p.m. in the See MIZZOU • Page B4

Lavion Mayes is in the NCAA Championships for the fourth time.

BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AP

Missouri guard Frankie Hughes hits a tying 3-point shot against Auburn at the end of the second half March 8 at the SEC tourney.

In 2015, the last time the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships were held at Scottrade Center, University of Missouri senior and Fort Zumwalt West High product Drake Houdashelt capped of his career by winning the title at 149 pounds. “It’d definitely be nice to bring ’49 back to Colum-

bia with us,” Tigers senior 149-pounder Lavion Mayes of Mascoutah said recently. “Drake winning was the epitome of Tiger Style; he believed it and he lived it. He was just so confident in what he needed to do and then he just went out and took the title. And I really feel like I’m in a similar position. “Drake never let us see him See WRESTLING • Page B4

COLLEGE BASKETBALL • B5-B6 > Illinois rolls past Valparaiso in NIT opener. > Mount St. Mary’s, K-State win “First Four” games. > Maryland women’s team upset by unusual seeding.

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 3/15 at Anaheim 9 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/16 at San Jose 9:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/18 at Arizona 8 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 3/15 12:05 p.m. at Twins* FSM

Thursday 3/16 12:05 p.m. vs. Twins* FSM

Friday 3/17 12:10 p.m. at Mets*

Tuesday 3/21 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Saturday 3/18 12:05 p.m. vs. Mets* FSM

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 03.15.2017

Burger’s power surge energizes Missouri St. CBC grad drawing comparisons to Ryan Howard

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 TBA NIT vs. Utah or Boisie State, TBA, TBA

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/25 at Louisville 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/1 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/8 vs. New York 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 4/12 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon Exhibition: Orioles at Pirates, MLB 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals at Twins, FSM 3 p.m. Exhibition: Angels at Giants, MLB 6:30 p.m. College: Chicago State vs. Missouri, SEC Network 8 p.m. World Baseball Classic: U.S. vs. Venezuela, MLB BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: North Carolina Central vs. UC Davis. TruTV, WXOS (101.1 FM) TruTV channels: Charter cable 63 or 772; DirectTV 246; Dish Net 242; U-verse 164, 165, 1164 or 1165; Cable America of Maryland Heights 57 6 p.m. NIT: UNC-Greensboro at Syracuse, ESPN2 6 p.m. NBA: Hornets at Pacers, FSM Plus 6:30 p.m. NIT: Akron at Houston, ESPNU 7 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Spurs, ESPN 8 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Providence vs. Southern California, TRUTV, WXOS (101.1 FM) TruTV channels: Charter cable 63 or 772; DirectTV 246; Dish Net 242; U-verse 164, 165, 1164 or 1165; Cable America of Maryland Heights 57 8 p.m. NIT: UT Arlington at Brigham Young, ESPN2 8 p.m. NIT: South Dakota at Iowa, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. NIT: UC Irvine at Illinois State, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Bucks at Clippers, ESPN HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. Penguins at Flyers, NBCSN 9 p.m. Blues at Ducks, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 9 p.m. Red Wings at Avalanche, NBCSN SOCCER 2:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: AS Monaco FC vs. Manchester City, FS1 2:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Atletico Madrid vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS2 TENNIS 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP round of 16/WTA quarterfinals, Tennis Channel 9 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP round of 16/WTA quarterfinals, Tennis Channel WINTER SPORTS 11 a.m. FIS Alpine Skiing: Audi World Cup, Downhill, NBCSN

DIGEST Illini also fire women’s basketball coach Bollant Three days after firing men’s basketball coach John Groce, University of Illinois AD Josh Whitman has dismissed his women’s basketball coach. Matt Bollant, who had a 61-94 record in five seasons, was fired Tuesday. Whitman said he’ll conduct a national search for a replacement. That means Whitman is simultaneously looking for two head basketball coaches. Bollant was just 22-62 in Big Ten play and in 2015 his program was the subject of an independent investigation after players brought charges of racial discrimination. Those charges were not supported by the investigation, but assistant coach Mike Divilbiss was fired and recommendations were made to clarify roles and expectations within the program. Bollant has one year left on his contract and will be paid the $450,000 due. Bollant came to Illinois in 2012 after a highly successful career at Wisconsin-Green Bay. But he had numerous players transfer after coming to Illinois including his top player, center Chatrice White, who transferred last year to Florida State. Gone are all of the major coaching hires made by Mike Thomas after he became athletics director in 2011. Thomas hired and later fired Tim Beckman as football coach. Thomas also hired Groce and Bollant. (Mark Tupper) Federer, Nadal advance • Roger Federer edged Steve Johnson 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4) in a hard-serving duel at the BNP Paribas Open on Tuesday, setting up a fourth-round match against Rafael Nadal in Indian Wells, Calif. Nadal advanced with a 6-3, 7-5 win against 26th-seeded Fernando Verdasco for his 50th career victory at the desert tournament, where he’s won three titles but none since 2013. In other matches, No. 4 seed Kei Nishikori routed 25th-seeded Gilles Muller 6-2, 6-2, and American Donald Young defeated 14th-seeded Lucas Pouille 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. Venus Williams advanced to the quarterfinals for the first time since 2001 with a 3-6, 6-1, 6-3 victory over Shuai Peng, the last remaining qualifier in the draw. In other women’s matches, No. 3 seed Karolina Pliskova advanced when 15th-seeded Timea Bacsinszky retired trailing 5-1 in the first set; No. 19 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova outlasted No. 5 Dominika Cibulkova 6-4, 3-6, 6-3; and No. 8 Svetlana Kuznetsova beat 21st-seeded Caroline Garcia. (AP) Mitch Seavey oldest to win Iditarod • Mitch Seavey won his third Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Tuesday, becoming the fastest and oldest champion at age 57 and helping cement his family’s position as mushing royalty. The Seward, Alaska, musher brought his dogs of the frozen Bering Sea and onto Front Street in the Gold Rush town of Nome after crossing nearly 1,000 miles of Alaska wilderness. He outran his son, defending champion Dallas Seavey, and lapped the oldest musher record that he set at age 53 in 2013. He previously won the race in 2013 and 2004. Seavey set a new time record for the race, which the Iditarod said was 8 days, 3 hours, 40 minutes and 13 seconds. That shaved hours of the previous record set by Dallas Seavey last year at 8 days, 11 hours, 20 minutes and 16 seconds. Seavey picked up $75,000 and the keys to a new pickup for winning the world’s most famous sled dog race. (AP)

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Battling spotty phone service and blaring background noise thanks to a team viewing of “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”, Jake Burger retold a Ryan Howard tale that has been passed down by Missouri State baseball players for years. It was Tuesday afternoon and the Bears’ bus was bouncing along the 4 1/2-hour drive to Cape Girardeau, where the Bears are scheduled to play Southeast Missouri State on Wednesday afternoon. Springfield’s hottest hitter spoke over the commotion to share a story about another barrel-chested Bear who set the bar when it came to punishing pitchers. Howard liked to play some pickup football on the side during his days at Missouri State. Especially when it snowed. And while Burger bleeds baseball, he has not lost his passion for hockey. Blame it on the Chesterfield native’s CBC roots. It should come as no surprise that Missouri State baseball coach Keith Guttin prefers to keep his premier players on dirt instead of snow and ice. “Howard showed up to practice and Coach Guttin had a football there,” Burger said. “He said, ‘Start running.’ Howard ran the rest of practice with that football, because he got caught playing another sport.” Tuesday’s winter weather here kept Burger’s family and friends from watching him slug at St. Louis University. The game will be rescheduled. If you are a fan of up-and-comers, get a ticket. Burger, a junior, could be the one who surpasses Howard, a three-time all-star and 2006 National League MVP with the Philadelphia Phillies, for the title of best-known Bear. Some draftniks believe the 2017 preseason AllAmerican (Baseball America) will be selected within the first two rounds come June. He was named the best defensive third baseman in Division I baseball last season. But his swing is the thing. “If you look at the guys who have come out of here and gone on to have successful professional careers on the position player side, you’ve got guys like Bill Mueller, who is coaching with the Cardinals, and Ryan (Howard), and Matt Cepicky,” Guttin said. “All I can do is make comparisons to when those guys were here, and what Jake is while he is here. He has a lot of those attributes and qualities that they had when they were here.” Burger on Monday was named Missouri Valley Conference player of the week for the fourth time in

KARA BROWER • MISSOURI STATE

Missouri State junior Jake Burger (CBC High) could be a first-round pick in the 2017 Major League Baseball draft.

his career. The 6-2, 210-pounder hit three home runs and totaled four RBIs in his last four games, proving to Oklahoma State and Minnesota that his power plays in any conference. He went five for 14 (.357) for the week, notched the third multihomer game of his college career and set a record for longest home run in the young history of Minneapolis’ U.S. Bank Stadium: 421 feet. Burger now has 13 hits in the Bears’ 15 games. He’s been on base at least once in every game. His seven homers lead the MVC. “I don’t really keep up with that stuf,” said Burger when given the chance to boast about his righthanded swing. Pass the phone to Coach, kid. “Powerful,” Guttin said. “It just comes of his bat diferently than other guys. There is a lot of force, a lot of bat speed.” Guttin first became fascinated by the swing when he saw Burger, then a high school junior, playing on a prospects team with standouts from the St. Louis area. He watched two games. “The bat stood out,” Guttin said. And that was before it evolved. Burger averaged .440 but hit just four home runs as a CBC senior. As a Missouri State freshman in 2015, he set a freshman record for doubles (22) and led the team in average (.342) and slugging percentage (.518), but again hit just four home runs. Last season he — wait, these stats can’t be right ... During his sophomore season Burger averaged .349 with a .420 on-base percentage and .746

slugging percentage. He hit 21 home runs. “You have to learn how to hit home runs,” Burger said. “It’s an art. It’s not something that just happens.” Here’s how it happened. Burger huddled with Guttin and Bears hitting coach Nate Thompson to discuss how his blistering line drives could turn into towering homers. He turned to hitting drills acquired from Cubs hitting coach John Mallee. One called for him to target the top of a net while striking balls off a tee. Another asked him to hack away at fastballs thrown at him hard from a distance of just 30 feet. His launch angle shifted. Things clicked. His bat, always solid, started to boom. “I hit four home runs my freshman year,” Burger said. “I hit three in the first weekend last year. OK, I think I’m on to something. It’s one of those things where, once you feel it for the first time in a game, you keep it going.” Could he be the next Howard? Could he be better? Guttin knows Burger’s adjusted flight path has raised his pro potential. There might be time for predictions down the road. For now, he wants to keep his third baseman grounded — and out of hockey skates. “We will probably have a discussion after this call,” Guttin said. ”In 1986, we had a guy break his ankle playing pickup basketball. I did not find out about it until 15 years later. And I’m still mad.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

NFL NOTEBOOK Seahawks reach deal with Lacy for one year Can running back Eddie Lacy return to the form that made him the NFL’s ofensive rookie of the year in 2013? That’s the hope of the Seattle Seahawks, who agreed to terms with Lacy on a one-year “prove-it” deal Tuesday. Lacy gives Seattle a big body for a run game that was once the best in football but lagged last season following the retirement of Marshawn Lynch. “I like that we’re bringing in a big, tough guy that’s going to send a message the way he plays the game,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said on KIRO-AM, the Seahawks’ flagship radio station. Lacy topped 1,100 yards rushing in each of his first two NFL seasons in Green Bay, but has been slowed by injuries and weight issues since then, losing favor at times with Packers coach Mike McCarthy. Lacy played in only five games last season, sufering a season-ending ankle injury that required surgery. According to the Milwaukee JournalSentinel, his weight ballooned up to 267 pounds during his recent round of free-agent visits. Carroll wants him to play in the range of 240-250 pounds. “He’s a big guy. There is nothing wrong with that,” Carroll said. “There will be a real concerted efort to make sure he’s at his very best. This is a hard time for him because he’s working some rehab right now, but he is well aware of our expectations and the standards that we are setting.” Seattle’s running back situation

in the same 2013 draft that brought Lacy to Green Bay. A disappointment with the Packers, Jones had only nine sacks in 59 regular-season games, starting just seven games.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Running back Eddie Lacy, shown last season playing for Green Bay, has agreed to terms on a freeagent contract with Seattle.

was filled with instability from the start of last season. Thomas Rawls and C.J. Prosise were both limited by injuries. Christine Michael was cut midseason due to inefectiveness, yet still led the Seahawks in rushing during the regular season. Seattle brought in Adrian Peterson for a visit over the weekend before turning to Lacy. According to ESPN, Lacy’s deal is worth $5.5 million with $3 million guaranteed. Vikings sign Datone Jones • Defensive end Datone Jones, a former first-round pick of rival Green Bay, has signed a one-year, $3.75 million contract with Minnesota. The deal includes incentives that could push its value to $5 million according to multiple reports. Jones was selected No. 26 overall

Burkhead to Patriots • New England continued its active ways in free agency, agreeing to terms with running back Rex Burkhead. Burkhead spent his previous four NFL seasons with Cincinnati, playing mainly special teams until last season. He had only 13 carries for 31 yards over his first three seasons. But pressed into service because of injuries, he rushed for 344 yards and two touchdowns and also caught 17 passes for 145 yards this past season. Elsewhere • Kansas City signed defensive tackle Bennie Logan to a one-year contract, replacing free agent Dontari Poe. Logan started 51 games over four seasons in Philadelphia. ... Cornerback Davon House was on a free-agent visit to Pittsburgh when he agreed to terms on a one-year deal with Green Bay worth $3.5 million according to the NFL Network. Drafted by Green Bay in 2011, House spent his last two season with Jacksonville. ... The Los Angeles Rams signed center Ryan Groy to a two-year ofer sheet as a restricted free agent. Bufalo has until Monday to match, otherwise Groy becomes a Ram. ...Linebacker Jarvis Jones, who lost his starting job last year in Pittsburgh, has signed with Arizona. ... Chicago is re-signing kicker Connor Barth to a one-year deal. Associated Press


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 3/15 at Anaheim 9 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/16 at San Jose 9:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/18 at Arizona 8 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 3/15 12:05 p.m. at Twins* FSM

Thursday 3/16 12:05 p.m. vs. Twins* FSM

Friday 3/17 12:10 p.m. at Mets*

Tuesday 3/21 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Saturday 3/18 12:05 p.m. vs. Mets* FSM

M 2 • WEDNESDAY • 03.15.2017

Burger’s power surge energizes Missouri St. CBC grad drawing comparisons to Ryan Howard

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 NIT vs. Boisie State Day and time TBA

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/25 at Louisville 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/1 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/8 vs. New York 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 4/12 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon Exhibition: Orioles at Pirates, MLB 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals at Twins, FSM 3 p.m. Exhibition: Angels at Giants, MLB 6:30 p.m. College: Chicago State vs. Missouri, SEC Network 8 p.m. World Baseball Classic: U.S. vs. Venezuela, MLB BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: North Carolina Central vs. UC Davis. TruTV, WXOS (101.1 FM) TruTV channels: Charter cable 63 or 772; DirectTV 246; Dish Net 242; U-verse 164, 165, 1164 or 1165; Cable America of Maryland Heights 57 6 p.m. NIT: UNC-Greensboro at Syracuse, ESPN2 6 p.m. NBA: Hornets at Pacers, FSM Plus 6:30 p.m. NIT: Akron at Houston, ESPNU 7 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Spurs, ESPN 8 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Providence vs. Southern California, TRUTV, WXOS (101.1 FM) TruTV channels: Charter cable 63 or 772; DirectTV 246; Dish Net 242; U-verse 164, 165, 1164 or 1165; Cable America of Maryland Heights 57 8 p.m. NIT: UT Arlington at Brigham Young, ESPN2 8 p.m. NIT: South Dakota at Iowa, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. NIT: UC Irvine at Illinois State, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Bucks at Clippers, ESPN HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. Penguins at Flyers, NBCSN 9 p.m. Blues at Ducks, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 9 p.m. Red Wings at Avalanche, NBCSN SOCCER 2:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: AS Monaco FC vs. Manchester City, FS1 2:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Atletico Madrid vs. Bayer Leverkusen, FS2 TENNIS 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP round of 16/WTA quarterfinals, Tennis Channel 9 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open, ATP round of 16/WTA quarterfinals, Tennis Channel WINTER SPORTS 11 a.m. FIS Alpine Skiing: Audi World Cup, Downhill, NBCSN

DIGEST Illini also fire women’s basketball coach Bollant Three days after firing men’s basketball coach John Groce, University of Illinois AD Josh Whitman has dismissed his women’s basketball coach. Matt Bollant, who had a 61-94 record in five seasons, was fired Tuesday. Whitman said he’ll conduct a national search for a replacement. That means Whitman is simultaneously looking for two head basketball coaches. Bollant was just 22-62 in Big Ten play and in 2015 his program was the subject of an independent investigation after players brought charges of racial discrimination. Those charges were not supported by the investigation, but assistant coach Mike Divilbiss was fired and recommendations were made to clarify roles and expectations within the program. Bollant has one year left on his contract and will be paid the $450,000 due. Bollant came to Illinois in 2012 after a highly successful career at Wisconsin-Green Bay. But he had numerous players transfer after coming to Illinois including his top player, center Chatrice White, who transferred last year to Florida State. Gone are all of the major coaching hires made by Mike Thomas after he became athletics director in 2011. Thomas hired and later fired Tim Beckman as football coach. Thomas also hired Groce and Bollant. (Mark Tupper) Federer, Nadal advance • Roger Federer edged Steve Johnson 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4) in a hard-serving duel at the BNP Paribas Open on Tuesday, setting up a fourth-round match against Rafael Nadal in Indian Wells, Calif. Nadal advanced with a 6-3, 7-5 win against 26th-seeded Fernando Verdasco for his 50th career victory at the desert tournament, where he’s won three titles but none since 2013. In other matches, No. 4 seed Kei Nishikori routed 25th-seeded Gilles Muller 6-2, 6-2, and American Donald Young defeated 14th-seeded Lucas Pouille 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. Venus Williams advanced to the quarterfinals for the first time since 2001 with a 3-6, 6-1, 6-3 victory over Shuai Peng, the last remaining qualifier in the draw. In other women’s matches, No. 3 seed Karolina Pliskova advanced when 15th-seeded Timea Bacsinszky retired trailing 5-1 in the first set; No. 19 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova outlasted No. 5 Dominika Cibulkova 6-4, 3-6, 6-3; and No. 8 Svetlana Kuznetsova beat 21st-seeded Caroline Garcia. (AP) Mitch Seavey oldest to win Iditarod • Mitch Seavey won his third Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Tuesday, becoming the fastest and oldest champion at age 57 and helping cement his family’s position as mushing royalty. The Seward, Alaska, musher brought his dogs of the frozen Bering Sea and onto Front Street in the Gold Rush town of Nome after crossing nearly 1,000 miles of Alaska wilderness. He outran his son, defending champion Dallas Seavey, and lapped the oldest musher record that he set at age 53 in 2013. He previously won the race in 2013 and 2004. Seavey set a new time record for the race, which the Iditarod said was 8 days, 3 hours, 40 minutes and 13 seconds. That shaved hours of the previous record set by Dallas Seavey last year at 8 days, 11 hours, 20 minutes and 16 seconds. Seavey picked up $75,000 and the keys to a new pickup for winning the world’s most famous sled dog race. (AP)

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Battling spotty phone service and blaring background noise thanks to a team viewing of “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”, Jake Burger retold a Ryan Howard tale that has been passed down by Missouri State baseball players for years. It was Tuesday afternoon and the Bears’ bus was bouncing along the 4 1/2-hour drive to Cape Girardeau, where the Bears are scheduled to play Southeast Missouri State on Wednesday afternoon. Springfield’s hottest hitter spoke over the commotion to share a story about another barrel-chested Bear who set the bar when it came to punishing pitchers. Howard liked to play some pickup football on the side during his days at Missouri State. Especially when it snowed. And while Burger bleeds baseball, he has not lost his passion for hockey. Blame it on the Chesterfield native’s CBC roots. It should come as no surprise that Missouri State baseball coach Keith Guttin prefers to keep his premier players on dirt instead of snow and ice. “Howard showed up to practice and Coach Guttin had a football there,” Burger said. “He said, ‘Start running.’ Howard ran the rest of practice with that football, because he got caught playing another sport.” Tuesday’s winter weather here kept Burger’s family and friends from watching him slug at St. Louis University. The game will be rescheduled. If you are a fan of up-and-comers, get a ticket. Burger, a junior, could be the one who surpasses Howard, a three-time all-star and 2006 National League MVP with the Philadelphia Phillies, for the title of best-known Bear. Some draftniks believe the 2017 preseason AllAmerican (Baseball America) will be selected within the first two rounds come June. He was named the best defensive third baseman in Division I baseball last season. But his swing is the thing. “If you look at the guys who have come out of here and gone on to have successful professional careers on the position player side, you’ve got guys like Bill Mueller, who is coaching with the Cardinals, and Ryan (Howard), and Matt Cepicky,” Guttin said. “All I can do is make comparisons to when those guys were here, and what Jake is while he is here. He has a lot of those attributes and qualities that they had when they were here.” Burger on Monday was named Missouri Valley Conference player of the week for the fourth time in

KARA BROWER • MISSOURI STATE

Missouri State junior Jake Burger (CBC High) could be a first-round pick in the 2017 Major League Baseball draft.

his career. The 6-2, 210-pounder hit three home runs and totaled four RBIs in his last four games, proving to Oklahoma State and Minnesota that his power plays in any conference. He went five for 14 (.357) for the week, notched the third multihomer game of his college career and set a record for longest home run in the young history of Minneapolis’ U.S. Bank Stadium: 421 feet. Burger now has 13 hits in the Bears’ 15 games. He’s been on base at least once in every game. His seven homers lead the MVC. “I don’t really keep up with that stuf,” said Burger when given the chance to boast about his righthanded swing. Pass the phone to Coach, kid. “Powerful,” Guttin said. “It just comes of his bat diferently than other guys. There is a lot of force, a lot of bat speed.” Guttin first became fascinated by the swing when he saw Burger, then a high school junior, playing on a prospects team with standouts from the St. Louis area. He watched two games. “The bat stood out,” Guttin said. And that was before it evolved. Burger averaged .440 but hit just four home runs as a CBC senior. As a Missouri State freshman in 2015, he set a freshman record for doubles (22) and led the team in average (.342) and slugging percentage (.518), but again hit just four home runs. Last season he — wait, these stats can’t be right ... During his sophomore season Burger averaged .349 with a .420 on-base percentage and .746

slugging percentage. He hit 21 home runs. “You have to learn how to hit home runs,” Burger said. “It’s an art. It’s not something that just happens.” Here’s how it happened. Burger huddled with Guttin and Bears hitting coach Nate Thompson to discuss how his blistering line drives could turn into towering homers. He turned to hitting drills acquired from Cubs hitting coach John Mallee. One called for him to target the top of a net while striking balls off a tee. Another asked him to hack away at fastballs thrown at him hard from a distance of just 30 feet. His launch angle shifted. Things clicked. His bat, always solid, started to boom. “I hit four home runs my freshman year,” Burger said. “I hit three in the first weekend last year. OK, I think I’m on to something. It’s one of those things where, once you feel it for the first time in a game, you keep it going.” Could he be the next Howard? Could he be better? Guttin knows Burger’s adjusted flight path has raised his pro potential. There might be time for predictions down the road. For now, he wants to keep his third baseman grounded — and out of hockey skates. “We will probably have a discussion after this call,” Guttin said. ”In 1986, we had a guy break his ankle playing pickup basketball. I did not find out about it until 15 years later. And I’m still mad.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

NFL NOTEBOOK Seahawks reach deal with Lacy for one year Can running back Eddie Lacy return to the form that made him the NFL’s ofensive rookie of the year in 2013? That’s the hope of the Seattle Seahawks, who agreed to terms with Lacy on a one-year “prove-it” deal Tuesday. Lacy gives Seattle a big body for a run game that was once the best in football but lagged last season following the retirement of Marshawn Lynch. “I like that we’re bringing in a big, tough guy that’s going to send a message the way he plays the game,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said on KIRO-AM, the Seahawks’ flagship radio station. Lacy topped 1,100 yards rushing in each of his first two NFL seasons in Green Bay, but has been slowed by injuries and weight issues since then, losing favor at times with Packers coach Mike McCarthy. Lacy played in only five games last season, sufering a season-ending ankle injury that required surgery. According to the Milwaukee JournalSentinel, his weight ballooned up to 267 pounds during his recent round of free-agent visits. Carroll wants him to play in the range of 240-250 pounds. “He’s a big guy. There is nothing wrong with that,” Carroll said. “There will be a real concerted efort to make sure he’s at his very best. This is a hard time for him because he’s working some rehab right now, but he is well aware of our expectations and the standards that we are setting.” Seattle’s running back situation

in the same 2013 draft that brought Lacy to Green Bay. A disappointment with the Packers, Jones had only nine sacks in 59 regular-season games, starting just seven games.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Running back Eddie Lacy, shown last season playing for Green Bay, has agreed to terms on a freeagent contract with Seattle.

was filled with instability from the start of last season. Thomas Rawls and C.J. Prosise were both limited by injuries. Christine Michael was cut midseason due to inefectiveness, yet still led the Seahawks in rushing during the regular season. Seattle brought in Adrian Peterson for a visit over the weekend before turning to Lacy. According to ESPN, Lacy’s deal is worth $5.5 million with $3 million guaranteed. Vikings sign Datone Jones • Defensive end Datone Jones, a former first-round pick of rival Green Bay, has signed a one-year, $3.75 million contract with Minnesota. The deal includes incentives that could push its value to $5 million according to multiple reports. Jones was selected No. 26 overall

Burkhead to Patriots • New England continued its active ways in free agency, agreeing to terms with running back Rex Burkhead. Burkhead spent his previous four NFL seasons with Cincinnati, playing mainly special teams until last season. He had only 13 carries for 31 yards over his first three seasons. But pressed into service because of injuries, he rushed for 344 yards and two touchdowns and also caught 17 passes for 145 yards this past season. Elsewhere • Kansas City signed defensive tackle Bennie Logan to a one-year contract, replacing free agent Dontari Poe. Logan started 51 games over four seasons in Philadelphia. ... Cornerback Davon House was on a free-agent visit to Pittsburgh when he agreed to terms on a one-year deal with Green Bay worth $3.5 million according to the NFL Network. Drafted by Green Bay in 2011, House spent his last two season with Jacksonville. ... The Los Angeles Rams signed center Ryan Groy to a two-year ofer sheet as a restricted free agent. Bufalo has until Monday to match, otherwise Groy becomes a Ram. ...Linebacker Jarvis Jones, who lost his starting job last year in Pittsburgh, has signed with Arizona. ... Chicago is re-signing kicker Connor Barth to a one-year deal. Associated Press


03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

BASEBALL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Surgery will end Schafer’s season that was clear Tuesday against the Class A hitters. “That’s something that I’ve been doing all spring, if you’ve been paying attention,” Lynn said. “I was out there touching and feeling, able to work on stuf that I needed to work on.”

Elbow injury hits player trying to be both pitcher and outielder BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • After weeks of busily trying to prove himself as both a lefty reliever and an outfielder this spring, Jordan Schafer has one mission as of Tuesday. He must heal. Schafer will have surgery Friday on his left elbow to address a tear in the ligament, and the recovery will cost him this season. The damage was discovered late Monday during an MRI, and after consulting with the team’s physicians Schafer decided Tuesday to take a surgical approach. At the time of surgery, Dr. George Paletta will determine if Schafer requires a complete reconstruction of the ligament or if he’s a candidate for “primary repair.” Schafer, 30, signed a minorleague contract with the Cardinals this past winter and came to spring training as a non-roster invitee trying to pull off an unusual bit of multitasking. The Cardinals were willing to consider him as both a lefthanded pitcher and a fourth or fifth outfielder, or the “25.5 man” on the 25-man roster, as general manager John Mozeliak said. The concern the team had was how much that would tax the former top prospect’s body. The lefty began feeling some

discomfort and tightening in his left forearm during his previous two appearances. He also, in those same starts, felt the command of his offspeed pitches come undone. He pushed through the soreness in his appearance Sunday, suggesting afterward that he was “out there to compete.” He insisted it wasn’t “anything serious.” “I haven’t had any arm problems at all,” Schafer said. “I just think I’ve been kind of pushing myself and I did a lot here early on. I think I just need to let it cool down.” Schafer appeared in five games for the Cardinals and allowed four runs in 3 2/3 innings. He struck out five, three of them in one of his first appearances. If Schafer needs a complete reconstruction of the ligament — or Tommy John surgery – then his rehab will take at least 12 months, less if he attempts to return as a position player. Once inside his elbow, the surgeon can determine if Schafer is a candidate for “primary repair,” an alternative that has not been done often. The ligament must be in good condition and the tear located at the bone for a “primary repair” to be done, but if it’s possible, the recovery time is shorter. Royals reliever Seth Maness and Cardinals reliever Mitch

SHERRIFF HAS NO REGRETS

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Jordan Schafer throws during spring training before he began to experience the discomfort that is leading to surgery.

Harris are two of the three pro pitchers to have had primary repair. Both are pitching this spring, less than a year after surgery.

LYNN ‘GETS WORK’ While his teammates enjoyed the first off day of their Grapefruit League schedule Tuesday, Lance Lynn remained on schedule and sped through a simulated game against minor-league hitters. He

“got in my work” and upped “my pitch count” during a 60-pitch outing on a backfield. He threw four simulated innings, but there were times he faced and retired five batters in one of the innings to increase the pitch count. Lynn has three exhibition starts remaining, and he’ll push his pitch count toward 100 before the start of the regular season. Within that pitch count, he’s using more ofspeed pitches, and

HOCHMAN • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price throws a live batting session last month in Fort Myers, Fla., but has yet to appear in a spring training game because of soreness in his pitching elbow.

Price likely to begin year on DL Former Cy Young winner has been sidelined by elbow soreness Boston Red Sox lefthander David Price is expected to start the season on the disabled list because of his sore pitching elbow. Starting the second season of a $217 million, seven-year contract, Price has not yet appeared in an exhibition game. “I think at this point, yeah, it would be hard to see him ready to go at the start of the season,” manager John Farrell said Tuesday. “We really won’t have any kind of idea until he gets on the mound the first time, and right now I don’t know when that’s going to be.” Boston hopes to have a formidable rotation headed by Price, Cy Young Award winner Rick Porcello and Chris Sale, acquired in December from the Chicago White Sox. Price, the 2012 AL Cy Young winner with Tampa Bay, was 17-9 with a 3.99 ERA last year. He felt discomfort in his left elbow following a two-inning simulated game Feb. 28. Doctors James Andrews and Neal ElAttrache said Price would not need surgery, or an injection, but should take anti-inflammatory medication and rest his arm. Price started throwing Saturday, making 25 tosses into a net, and has thrown each day since. “Played catch again today as he’s been the last three days,” Farrell said. “And everyone’s going to want to know what’s the next step, what’s the next phase. I will tell you, this is going to be dependent upon how David goes through the morning rehab, and the exercises that he goes

Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Wacha is giving Cards plenty to smile about

MLB NOTEBOOK

FROM NEWS SERVICES

Most days Team Israel has played in the World Baseball Classic, Cardinals lefty Ryan Sherriff wears the polo shirt he has for the team – from when he played for the team. Sherriff bowed out of the WBC earlier this spring, preferring to chase his major-league dream vs. a chance to play abroad in Asia in baseball’s international tournament. Israel breezed through the first round of pool play with a 3-0 record, and Sherrif woke up early each morning to check on the scores. He has also remained active in a social-media chat with other members of the team. He has done so out of fondness for the team. He said it wasn’t regret. “I wake up in the middle of the night and think, ‘What’s going on with Israel?’” Sherriff said. “I don’t have any regrets about the decisions but it does eat me up a lot that I’m not there to help them out. It does. I wish the best for them. I’m glad I’m here.”

through, what he feels he’s capable of that day within reason. “So we’re at a 60-foot phase right now. But we don’t have (a plan where) there needs to be ‘X’ number of sessions at 60 feet, then we’re going to progress. It was at the doctors’ recommendation: do not put him on a structured throwing program, because it may be either too quick or too slow depending on how he feels. And a lot of what’s driving this on daily throwing schedule is how David feels.” Rockies catcher has broken arm • Colorado catcher Tom Murphy will miss four to six weeks with a hairline fracture in his right forearm. Manager Bud Black said Murphy broke his arm Saturday in a game against the Chicago Cubs when he was hit by Anthony Rizzo’s bat while throwing to second base on a steal attempt. The ball sailed into center field and Rizzo was called for interference. Murphy stayed in the game until the seventh, as planned. His injury wasn’t discovered until later. Murphy is in a splint but won’t need surgery, Black said. Murphy joins a long list of Rockies sidelined during spring training. First baseman Ian Desmond is set for surgery on his broken left hand this week and will miss several weeks. Righthander Chad Bettis is undergoing chemotherapy and is out indefinitely after discovering a recurrence of his testicular cancer during a routine follow-up. Lefthander Chris Rusin has an oblique injury and outfielder David Dahl has injured ribs. With Murphy out, the Rock-

ies will turn to Tony Wolters and Dustin Garneau at catcher although Black said he’d consider other options. WBC crowds have Latin flavor • The passionate crowds at Marlins Park for the opening round of the World Baseball Classic last weekend provided animated evidence that what was once our national pastime is now Latin America’s game. Team USA managed to win two of three games to advance to the second round, but they felt like visitors in a home venue. Every time the Dominican Republic and the Colombia teams played their fans took over the ballpark. It was fun. It was festive. But it left some of the American players feeling a bit wistful about the size and volume of support for the opposition. Dominican fans had everything to do with the two sold-out games at Marlins Park in Miami. In San Diego, the Americans will be up against three formidable Latino opponents, with Venezuela on Wednesday followed by Puerto Rico and the Dominicans. Can a U.S. team well stocked with all-stars and World Series champions inspire American fans to rally behind their cause? “I don’t see why not. I think the way we have been playing baseball lately, I think that’s going to set the tone for people to come out and watch us play,” third baseman Nolan Arenado said. But we’ve got to win. ... If we keep playing our game and keep doing our thing, I think we’re going to start drawing some crowds.”

change-up after change-up. • Will Jose Martinez ever get out again? The outfielder is also enticing because he’s a righthanded hitter who can play some first base. What can Martinez do to crack the Cards’ 25-man roster? “Well, I would recommend he keeps doing what he’s doing,” general manager John Mozeliak said. “That would be a good strategy.” The 6-foot-6 Martinez wields this tree trunk of a bat and swats line drives, accumulating a spring batting average of .424 (and an on-base percentage of .500). He is still learning first base. He’s made a few conspicuous mistakes there during spring. But if he’s serviceable, this could mean Tommy Pham (who has an option to the minors remaining), could be in Memphis. Pham has struck out 10 times in 31 atbats. • Kolten Wong isn’t hitting and he isn’t walking. But his glove can be a game-changer. We haven’t even had Game 1 of 162, but his plate approach leads to the looming Kolten question: How long will Mike Matheny stick with Wong because of the glove, even if Wong isn’t hitting? Mozeliak talked often about this team needing defense and athletic ability. We talk about it seemingly every day on these pages. But how much lack of production will the game manager stomach? • I’ve always been bullish on Randal Grichuk, and he’s had some sturdy swings this spring that have stuck with me. And there has been talk about smart plate discipline. No, he’s not going to have an outrageous batting average, but if he can create runs, he will be worthy of some All-Star talk come summer. • Reliever Miguel Socolovich could very well make the Cardinals — he’s out of options, and he’s been consistent out of the bullpen. Heck of a changeup. John Gant, acquired in the Jaime Garcia trade, has also caught my eye and others, especially when wedged into spot starts. • For Cardinals fans this spring, the Fowler family has become as popular as a reality-TV family, thanks to all the social media posts from Dexter and his wife, Aliya (and their daughter, Naya, has been dubbed “Best Sports Baby” by Deadspin). But I wish we could’ve gotten a glimpse into their home this winter when, as a house guest, they had the Home Run King. Yep, Barry Bonds spent a week and a half at the Fowler home in Las Vegas. Would’ve loved to be a fly on the wall, lis-

tening to tales of flies over the wall. “And I’ve been to his house. … That’s my boy, that’s my boy — he’s my mentor,” said Fowler from his locker at spring training. “So I talk to him a lot, twice a week. Phone. FaceTime. “He’s a good dude, man. He’s loyal, he puts his heart into things, and that’s tough to find these days. He really cares. And that’s why he’s a little misunderstood, because he cares so much and then when people let him down, it’s heartbreaking to him. He respects me, and I respect him — and I listen to him. And I’m a loyal dude, too. So that’s where the loyalty (factor) comes in.” • Svelte Jhonny can belt. Third baseman Jhonny Peralta has put together some strong swings with his recovered hand, reassuring during this small spring sample size. And he seems active and confident manning the hot corner. Look, the guy basically lost two seasons. Is age just a number, in regard to Jhonny’s numbers? We’ll have to see when the games matter. • For batters with 400 or more at-bats last season, Aledmys Diaz was 14th in the whole National League in walk-tostrikeout ratio (Matt Carpenter was seventh and the Cubs’ Dexter Fowler was 18th). And in strikeout rate, Diaz had the 13th-best in the NL. Pretty good plate discipline for a fellow in his first big-league season. His ability to have productive at-bats, and we’ve seen some here in Jupiter, makes his sophomore season much-anticipated. OK, so how about that defensive range? We’ll have to see if improvements, freedom in play and coaching tips translate to regular-season production. • Lastly, Carlos. This should be his season. Whether he starts Game 1 or 2 (usually, both pitchers end up with the same amount of starts on a season), Carlos Martinez is expected to have the best numbers on the staff. Talking to people here, they gush over his ability to preserve himself, pitching smart and fast, not just fast and faster (in the World Baseball Classic, well, that’s another story). And I love this stuf on his stuff from fellow hurler Luke Weaver: “The best way to describe him? He’s special. And he does a lot of things not a lot of guys can do, at least consistently. He’s just an unbelievable pitcher. Some stuf he does out there, you can’t even wrap your head around. “He’s got a lot of flair out there when he strikes guys out — but also ground balls are a big part of his game.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

BASEBALL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Surgery will end Schafer’s season that was clear Tuesday against the Class A hitters. “That’s something that I’ve been doing all spring, if you’ve been paying attention,” Lynn said. “I was out there touching and feeling, able to work on stuf that I needed to work on.”

Elbow injury hits player trying to be both pitcher and outielder BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • After weeks of busily trying to prove himself as both a lefty reliever and an outfielder this spring, Jordan Schafer has one mission as of Tuesday. He must heal. Schafer will have surgery Friday on his left elbow to address a tear in the ligament, and the recovery will cost him this season. The damage was discovered late Monday during an MRI, and after consulting with the team’s physicians Schafer decided Tuesday to take a surgical approach. At the time of surgery, Dr. George Paletta will determine if Schafer requires a complete reconstruction of the ligament or if he’s a candidate for “primary repair.” Schafer, 30, signed a minorleague contract with the Cardinals this past winter and came to spring training as a non-roster invitee trying to pull off an unusual bit of multitasking. The Cardinals were willing to consider him as both a lefthanded pitcher and a fourth or fifth outfielder, or the “25.5 man” on the 25-man roster, as general manager John Mozeliak said. The concern the team had was how much that would tax the former top prospect’s body. The lefty began feeling some

discomfort and tightening in his left forearm during his previous two appearances. He also, in those same starts, felt the command of his offspeed pitches come undone. He pushed through the soreness in his appearance Sunday, suggesting afterward that he was “out there to compete.” He insisted it wasn’t “anything serious.” “I haven’t had any arm problems at all,” Schafer said. “I just think I’ve been kind of pushing myself and I did a lot here early on. I think I just need to let it cool down.” Schafer appeared in five games for the Cardinals and allowed four runs in 3 2/3 innings. He struck out five, three of them in one of his first appearances. If Schafer needs a complete reconstruction of the ligament — or Tommy John surgery – then his rehab will take at least 12 months, less if he attempts to return as a position player. Once inside his elbow, the surgeon can determine if Schafer is a candidate for “primary repair,” an alternative that has not been done often. The ligament must be in good condition and the tear located at the bone for a “primary repair” to be done, but if it’s possible, the recovery time is shorter. Royals reliever Seth Maness and Cardinals reliever Mitch

SHERRIFF HAS NO REGRETS

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Jordan Schafer throws during spring training before he began to experience the discomfort that is leading to surgery.

Harris are two of the three pro pitchers to have had primary repair. Both are pitching this spring, less than a year after surgery.

LYNN ‘GETS WORK’ While his teammates enjoyed the first off day of their Grapefruit League schedule Tuesday, Lance Lynn remained on schedule and sped through a simulated game against minor-league hitters. He

“got in my work” and upped “my pitch count” during a 60-pitch outing on a backfield. He threw four simulated innings, but there were times he faced and retired five batters in one of the innings to increase the pitch count. Lynn has three exhibition starts remaining, and he’ll push his pitch count toward 100 before the start of the regular season. Within that pitch count, he’s using more ofspeed pitches, and

HOCHMAN • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price throws a live batting session last month in Fort Myers, Fla., but has yet to appear in a spring training game because of soreness in his pitching elbow.

Price likely to begin year on DL Former Cy Young winner has been sidelined by elbow soreness Boston Red Sox lefthander David Price is expected to start the season on the disabled list because of his sore pitching elbow. Starting the second season of a $217 million, seven-year contract, Price has not yet appeared in an exhibition game. “I think at this point, yeah, it would be hard to see him ready to go at the start of the season,” manager John Farrell said Tuesday. “We really won’t have any kind of idea until he gets on the mound the first time, and right now I don’t know when that’s going to be.” Boston hopes to have a formidable rotation headed by Price, Cy Young Award winner Rick Porcello and Chris Sale, acquired in December from the Chicago White Sox. Price, the 2012 AL Cy Young winner with Tampa Bay, was 17-9 with a 3.99 ERA last year. He felt discomfort in his left elbow following a two-inning simulated game Feb. 28. Doctors James Andrews and Neal ElAttrache said Price would not need surgery, or an injection, but should take anti-inflammatory medication and rest his arm. Price started throwing Saturday, making 25 tosses into a net, and has thrown each day since. “Played catch again today as he’s been the last three days,” Farrell said. “And everyone’s going to want to know what’s the next step, what’s the next phase. I will tell you, this is going to be dependent upon how David goes through the morning rehab, and the exercises that he goes

Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Wacha is giving Cards plenty to smile about

MLB NOTEBOOK

FROM NEWS SERVICES

Most days Team Israel has played in the World Baseball Classic, Cardinals lefty Ryan Sherriff wears the polo shirt he has for the team – from when he played for the team. Sherriff bowed out of the WBC earlier this spring, preferring to chase his major-league dream vs. a chance to play abroad in Asia in baseball’s international tournament. Israel breezed through the first round of pool play with a 3-0 record, and Sherrif woke up early each morning to check on the scores. He has also remained active in a social-media chat with other members of the team. He has done so out of fondness for the team. He said it wasn’t regret. “I wake up in the middle of the night and think, ‘What’s going on with Israel?’” Sherriff said. “I don’t have any regrets about the decisions but it does eat me up a lot that I’m not there to help them out. It does. I wish the best for them. I’m glad I’m here.”

through, what he feels he’s capable of that day within reason. “So we’re at a 60-foot phase right now. But we don’t have (a plan where) there needs to be ‘X’ number of sessions at 60 feet, then we’re going to progress. It was at the doctors’ recommendation: do not put him on a structured throwing program, because it may be either too quick or too slow depending on how he feels. And a lot of what’s driving this on daily throwing schedule is how David feels.” Molina sparks Puerto Rico victory • Yadier Molina homered and hit an RBI single to lead exuberant Puerto Rico to a 3-1 victory against the Dominican Republic in the second round of the World Baseball Classic on Tuesday night in San Diego. Eddie Rosario doubled in the go-ahead run in the fourth and also threw out a runner at the plate for Puerto Rico, which snapped the Dominicans’ 11game WBC winning streak. It was a rematch of the 2013 WBC title game, which the Dominicans won 3-0 at San Francisco’s AT&T Park. The small but peppy crowd at Petco Park chanted, clapped, waved flags and banged cowbells throughout the game. The Puerto Ricans responded with the joy of Little Leaguers. After right fielder Rosario threw out Jean Segura at the plate with a one-hopper to catcher Molina to end the top of the first, pitcher Orlando Roman jumped in the air while Molina punched the air in celebration. Teammates converged on Rosario and

chest-bumped him so hard he fell down. After Molina threw out Nelson Cruz trying to steal second to end the eighth, the catcher again jumped for joy and the infielders practically skipped of the field. Second baseman Javier Baez threw the ball all the way into the third deck at Petco Park. Rockies catcher has broken arm • Colorado catcher Tom Murphy will miss four to six weeks with a hairline fracture in his right forearm. Manager Bud Black said Murphy broke his arm Saturday in a game against the Chicago Cubs when he was hit by Anthony Rizzo’s bat while throwing to second base on a steal attempt. The ball sailed into center field and Rizzo was called for interference. Murphy stayed in the game until the seventh, as planned. His injury wasn’t discovered until later. Murphy is in a splint but won’t need surgery, Black said. Murphy joins a long list of Rockies sidelined during spring training. First baseman Ian Desmond is set for surgery on his broken left hand this week and will miss several weeks. Righthander Chad Bettis is undergoing chemotherapy and is out indefinitely after discovering a recurrence of his testicular cancer during a routine follow-up. Lefthander Chris Rusin has an oblique injury and outfielder David Dahl has injured ribs. With Murphy out, the Rockies will turn to Tony Wolters and Dustin Garneau at catcher although Black said he’d consider other options.

change-up after change-up. • Will Jose Martinez ever get out again? The outfielder is also enticing because he’s a righthanded hitter who can play some first base. What can Martinez do to crack the Cards’ 25-man roster? “Well, I would recommend he keeps doing what he’s doing,” general manager John Mozeliak said. “That would be a good strategy.” The 6-foot-6 Martinez wields this tree trunk of a bat and swats line drives, accumulating a spring batting average of .424 (and an on-base percentage of .500). He is still learning first base. He’s made a few conspicuous mistakes there during spring. But if he’s serviceable, this could mean Tommy Pham (who has an option to the minors remaining), could be in Memphis. Pham has struck out 10 times in 31 atbats. • Kolten Wong isn’t hitting and he isn’t walking. But his glove can be a game-changer. We haven’t even had Game 1 of 162, but his plate approach leads to the looming Kolten question: How long will Mike Matheny stick with Wong because of the glove, even if Wong isn’t hitting? Mozeliak talked often about this team needing defense and athletic ability. We talk about it seemingly every day on these pages. But how much lack of production will the game manager stomach? • I’ve always been bullish on Randal Grichuk, and he’s had some sturdy swings this spring that have stuck with me. And there has been talk about smart plate discipline. No, he’s not going to have an outrageous batting average, but if he can create runs, he will be worthy of some All-Star talk come summer. • Reliever Miguel Socolovich could very well make the Cardinals — he’s out of options, and he’s been consistent out of the bullpen. Heck of a changeup. John Gant, acquired in the Jaime Garcia trade, has also caught my eye and others, especially when wedged into spot starts. • For Cardinals fans this spring, the Fowler family has become as popular as a reality-TV family, thanks to all the social media posts from Dexter and his wife, Aliya (and their daughter, Naya, has been dubbed “Best Sports Baby” by Deadspin). But I wish we could’ve gotten a glimpse into their home this winter when, as a house guest, they had the Home Run King. Yep, Barry Bonds spent a week and a half at the Fowler home in Las Vegas. Would’ve loved to be a fly on the wall, lis-

tening to tales of flies over the wall. “And I’ve been to his house. … That’s my boy, that’s my boy — he’s my mentor,” said Fowler from his locker at spring training. “So I talk to him a lot, twice a week. Phone. FaceTime. “He’s a good dude, man. He’s loyal, he puts his heart into things, and that’s tough to find these days. He really cares. And that’s why he’s a little misunderstood, because he cares so much and then when people let him down, it’s heartbreaking to him. He respects me, and I respect him — and I listen to him. And I’m a loyal dude, too. So that’s where the loyalty (factor) comes in.” • Svelte Jhonny can belt. Third baseman Jhonny Peralta has put together some strong swings with his recovered hand, reassuring during this small spring sample size. And he seems active and confident manning the hot corner. Look, the guy basically lost two seasons. Is age just a number, in regard to Jhonny’s numbers? We’ll have to see when the games matter. • For batters with 400 or more at-bats last season, Aledmys Diaz was 14th in the whole National League in walk-tostrikeout ratio (Matt Carpenter was seventh and the Cubs’ Dexter Fowler was 18th). And in strikeout rate, Diaz had the 13th-best in the NL. Pretty good plate discipline for a fellow in his first big-league season. His ability to have productive at-bats, and we’ve seen some here in Jupiter, makes his sophomore season much-anticipated. OK, so how about that defensive range? We’ll have to see if improvements, freedom in play and coaching tips translate to regular-season production. • Lastly, Carlos. This should be his season. Whether he starts Game 1 or 2 (usually, both pitchers end up with the same amount of starts on a season), Carlos Martinez is expected to have the best numbers on the staff. Talking to people here, they gush over his ability to preserve himself, pitching smart and fast, not just fast and faster (in the World Baseball Classic, well, that’s another story). And I love this stuf on his stuff from fellow hurler Luke Weaver: “The best way to describe him? He’s special. And he does a lot of things not a lot of guys can do, at least consistently. He’s just an unbelievable pitcher. Some stuf he does out there, you can’t even wrap your head around. “He’s got a lot of flair out there when he strikes guys out — but also ground balls are a big part of his game.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE SPORTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

MU’s Crockett fueled by arrest, suspension He still set freshman mark with 1,062 yards BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The break-

out star of Missouri’s 2016 football season was nowhere near Memorial Stadium in the game that was supposed to be his biggest platform. Freshman running back Damarea Crockett, already past the 1,000-yard milestone by last fall’s finale, had to watch Mizzou’s comeback win over Arkansas from home as part of his onegame suspension last Nov. 25. Earlier that week, Crockett was arrested for possession of marijuana in a parked car on Mizzou’s campus. Four months later, in his first interview since the arrest and suspension, Crockett said Tuesday his late-night mistake has fueled his ofseason. “It made me a completely different person,” he said after Mizzou’s fourth spring practice. “It’s changed me for the good and made me a way better person and a football player. It made my fo-

cus that much stronger and will make my comeback that much stronger, too.” Just hours after Crockett returned to Columbia from his Nov. 19 record-breaking performance at Tennessee he was arrested for misdemeanor marijuana possession in a vehicle on a campus parking lot past 4 a.m. He had just rushed for a Mizzou freshman record 225 yards in the Tigers’ loss in Knoxville, Tenn., and was less than a week away from playing his home-state school in the final game of the season. Crockett, a native of Little Rock, Ark., was eager to play Arkansas, a school that didn’t gave him a scholarship offer in high school. The Tigers rallied without their leading rusher, showing some late-season resolve with a 28-24 win. “It was rough seeing my team out there and I’m not out there,” Crockett said. “It was a mistake, and I let my team down. I’ve apologized to them and Mizzou as a whole. We’ve moved past

that.” At the time coach Barry Odom was visibly frustrated with the freshman’s mistake but has since been impressed with Crockett’s preparation for his sophomore season. “He’s a driven kid anyway, very, very motivated,” Odom said. “He’s attacked the offseason like I hoped he would. He wants to have a better sophomore year than he did freshman season. He’s determined to do that in all walks of his life.” Crockett rushed for a Mizzou freshman record 1,062 yards last season despite not playing in the final game and getting only two touches in MU’s season-opening loss at West Virginia. He had two more games with singledigit carries, against Georgia and Florida. Otherwise, he was among the SEC’s most efficient rushers. His 6.9 yards per carry was third among SEC running backs with at least 50 carries. Among SEC backs, Crockett was second with 7.3 yards per carry in conference play. That’s not good enough for what Crockett expects this season, when he’ll likely continue

to trade carries with senior Ish Witter and, possibly, junior Nate Strong, who’s currently suspended for violating team rules. “Honestly, just to top my freshman year there’s nothing I can do but put in more work,” Crockett said. “The way I put it in my head is there’s no steps backward. You can only go forward. You only put more weight on the bar. You only get faster. You only get heavier. You only get stronger. Crockett’s playing weight last season drifted between 220-225 pounds, he said, but he believes he can push 230 without losing his speed and agility. With Witter resting a surgically repaired shoulder and Strong still suspended, Crockett is clearly the No. 1 backfield option this spring but figures to see limited reps with the depth thin for spring scrimmages. Missouri is the nation’s only team with a returning 3,000yard passer in quarterback Drew Lock, a 1,000-yard receiver in J’Mon Moore and a 1,000-yard rusher in Crockett. This spring, coaches want Crockett to have a better understanding of MU’s

WRESTLING • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri coach Kim Anderson (right) gets a hug as forward Kevin Puryear (24) walks across the court after Puryear hit a 3-point shot to give Missouri a win on March 8.

MIZZOU 2016-17 STATISTICS

tourney’s second game matching the field’s Nos. 11 and 14 seeds. In other words, way too little, way too late. If the Tigers could have duplicated those kinds of shots the last three years, Missouri athletics director Jim Sterk might not be searching for a new coach. There’s more than one candidate for the ugliest statistic that defined Anderson’s doomed three-year run in charge of Mizzou’s program, starting with the team’s overall record of 27-68. There was the 0-35 record in road games, the 8-46 record in SEC regular-season games and 0-15 record against nationally ranked teams. There was also the pair of team-record 13-game losing streaks. But nothing might define Mizzou’s woes under Anderson in the context of today’s game more than this sequence: 32.9, 31.0 and 30.4 Those are the team’s 3-point shooting percentages from the last three seasons, which rank among three of the five worst in team history. This is the 31st season that Division I has used the 3-point shot and the Tigers have never been worse letting fly from deep a shot that’s never been more important in the game. Mizzou had just two players shoot better than 33 percent in a season where 30.4 of the average Division I teams’ points came from behind the 3-point line, according to Ken Pomeroy’s advanced metrics. Teams have never relied on the 3 more in the last 16 years that he’s tracked the statistic. For Anderson’s third and final team, a group short on height and depth inside couldn’t shoot straight from outside, a toxic combination for any team. Last Thursday’s second-round loss to Ole Miss put Mizzou’s season out of its misery, complete with a 8-24 record. Anderson was fired two weeks earlier but allowed to finish out the season. “We went down fighting,” guard Terrence Phillips said after the loss. “That’s how we’ve been all year. This is a team that just never gives up no matter how much we’re down, whether we’re down 30, 40, we just never give up.” Perhaps, but the Tigers didn’t have much to show for their resolve. The Anderson era will go down as the program’s worst threeyear stretch during the shot clock era, which began in 1985-86. On most nights under Anderson, the Tigers couldn’t win because they couldn’t score and they couldn’t score because they couldn’t shoot from 3. This year’s team field goal percentage (39.3) was MU’s worst since 1965-66, when the Tigers shot 37.3 percent. With shooting that bad, that’s how you manage losses to nonconference opponents North Carolina Central, Eastern Illinois and Lipscomb, the trifecta of terror that might have quietly sounded the death knell of Anderson’s regime. North Carolina Central proved to be an NCAA Tournament team, but Eastern Illinois and Lipscomb combined to finish just 34-28. Aside from freshman Willie Jackson’s midyear transfer, the Tigers didn’t experience the of-court turbulence that spoiled the last two seasons, lending some credence to Anderson’s belief that he stabilized the roster with solid citizens who would im-

Scoring Points per game Scoring margin

Mizzou 2213 69.2 -3.7

OPP 2333 72.9 -

Field goals att/cmp 744-1893 779-1821 Field goals percentage .393 .428 Field goals made per game 23.3 24.3 3-point ield goal att/cmp 3-point percentages 3-point per game

225-739 247-719 .304 .344 7.0 7.7

Free throws att/cmp Free throw percentage Free throws per game

500-732 528-775 .683 .681 15.6 16.5

Rebounds Rebounds per game Rebounding margin

1168 36.5 -2.9

1260 39.4 -

Assists Assists per game

386 12.1

397 12.4

Turnovers Turnovers per game Turnover margin Assist/turnover ratio Points of turnovers

384 12.0 1.7 1.0 14.0

437 13.7 0.9 13.1

Steals Steals per game

200 6.3

168 5.3

Blocks Blocks per game

68 2.1

145 4.5

Winning streak Home win streak

0 0

-

Attendance Home games-avg/game

142931 124812 17-8,408 9-10,036

prove the program’s image. But that formula didn’t help the measure that counts most. “We didn’t win enough games for me to keep my job, but (the players) were great,” he said in Nashville. “I think these guys, if they’ll stick together, I know they’ll get a good coach (and) I think they can continue to improve and be a good basketball team. They grew a lot this year.” Barring offseason attrition, Sterk’s next coach will inherit the core of Anderson’s roster rebuild as every scholarship player but senior forward Russell Woods has remaining eligibility. That includes forward Jordan Barnett, the transfer from Texas who became eligible at midseason and led the Tigers with 12.2 points a game. Puryear (11.8), the 6-7 sophomore, added a 3-point shot to his game but is still undersized by SEC power forward standards. Phillips (10.4) improved his 3-point accuracy from 32.2 percent as a freshman to a team-best 35.6, but his production was erratic on both ends of the floor. The next coaching staff will have to add size to a recruiting class that, for now, is a party of one, November signee C.J. Roberts, a combination guard from Dallas. Otherwise, the makeup of next year’s roster should look familiar — and inexperience shouldn’t be a valid excuse. “I think a lot of games we lost was due to being young and not having to make shots down the stretch,” Phillips said. “With a great ofseason and more bonding, adding a player or two, who knows what the future can really hold for this program.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

DEFENSIVE END OUT Sophomore defensive end Franklin Agbasimere will miss the rest of spring practices while recovering from foot surgery, Odom said. Agbasimere was working on the move from linebacker to defensive end this spring. He should be cleared from the injury in early June, Odom said. Also sitting out drills Tuesday were two returning starters on the offensive line, guard Kevin Pendleton (sprained foot) and center Samson Bailey (concussion protocol). Odom expected both back by Saturday’s practice if not Thursday. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Mayes seeks title at 149 pounds

Poor 3-point shooting dooms Mizzou

MIZZOU • FROM B1

offense when the season begins in the fall and sharpen his pass protection, a requirement in Mizzou’s system and a big reason Witter saw the field on third downs last year. “I don’t expect anything less than being great,” Crockett said. “That’s what I’m holding myself accountable to. If you’re not trying to be the best, why are you playing?”

worried about anything that season. Before we faced Northern Iowa, one of the younger guys asked me how I could be so calm, so peaceful. I explained that, win or lose, I’d be back in the practice room the next day training hard and working to get better because we’re not at the finish line yet.” But the finish line is clearly in sight. Mayes, a two-time All-American, makes his fourth NCAA Championships appearance later this week at Scottrade Center. The event runs Thursday though Saturday. “I know what I need to do; it’s just a matter of going out and doing it,” said Mayes, who is 19-2 and seeded third at 149 pounds. “It’s just a matter of making sure my mind is right. My goal is to come off the mat breathing heavy, knowing that I wrestled hard and gave everything I had.” After placing third as a junior and winning a state title as a senior at Mascoutah, Mayes redshirted in 2012-13 and quickly became a force in the Tigers’ lineup. He enters his final college tournament with a career mark of 11823. “This is going to be my last tournament in a Missouri singlet,” said Mayes, who placed seventh as a 141-pounder in 2015 at Scottrade and finished third at 149 a year ago at Madison Square Garden. “If I lose, I could be done. But that’s OK because I’ve put in so much time and effort that I’m not going to have an issue whether I win my last match or lose my last match ... “I’m prepared to go out and wrestle.” Missouri coach Brian Smith expects a strong finish from Mayes. “Lavion is a very mature, bright young man,” the coach said. “He knows what he has to do. When Lavion’s firing and taking shots, he’s winning. Now, he hasn’t lost very often here, but when he stands around and lets the match slow down, that’s when opponents are able to stay with him. “But he’s ready. He’s going to go out and hit his doubles and run through his singles and good things are going to happen.” Mayes, who’s just seven credit hours short of a degree in electrical engineering, is excited about finishing his career close to home but more excited about wrestling for the Mizzou fans. “It’s a great environment because the home fans are front and center,” he said. “I love our fans and having that sea of black and gold right there, I think it helps give all our guys a lift.” Mayes isn’t sure what the future holds — he talks about getting a “real” job in engineering, pursuing international wrestling or maybe coaching — but those options will be weighed later. “I’ve been working toward this for the last four or five years, putting my body in extremely uncomfortable positions and training to near-exhaustion,” he said. “I’ve been in all sorts of situations and hopefully I’ve learned from

those experiences. At this point, it’s about finding ways to win, and that’s where my focus needs to be.”

MU’S COX SHOOTS FOR NO. 3 Missouri’s J’den Cox, an Olympic bronze medalist in Rio, is 23-0, seeded No. 1 and attempting to become the Tigers’ first three-time champion. The Columbia, Mo., native took fifth the last time the event was in St. Louis. The Tigers’ other returning AllAmerican is sophomore Daniel Lewis (24-3), a No. 6 seed who placed fourth at 165 a year ago. Joey Lavallee (25-1) is seeded third at 157. Other Mizzou qualifiers are Barlow McGhee (19-11) at 125, John Erneste (23-6) at 133, Jaydin Eierman (24-5) at 141 and heavyweight Austin Myers (1513).

MARTINEZ PACES ILLINI A two-time champion at 157, Illinois’ Isaiah Martinez is 27-0 and seeded first after making the step up to 165. The junior from Lemoore, Calif., is 94-1 in his college career. Carbondale native Zane Richards (25-4) is seeded eighth at 133; he’s a four-time qualifier who earned AllAmerica honors with a fourth-place finish in 2016. Also qualifying for the Illini are Travis Piotrowski (18-13) at 125, Eric Barone (10-9) at 149, Kyle Langenderfer (23-8) at 157, Zac Brunson (28-8) at 174 and Emery Parker (28-8) at 184.

SIUE SENDS TRIO Southern Illinois University Edwardsville will be represented by Southern Conference champs Freddie Rodriguez (21-6) at 125, Jake Residori (19-11) at 174 and Triad High product Jake Tindle (19-10) at 197. Rodriguez, a former junior college champion who won a pair of matches in last year’s NCAAs at Madison Square Garden, is seeded 14th.

TWO FROM HOLT COME HOME Former teammates at Holt High in Wentzville, Clayton Ream of North Dakota State and Colby Smith of Appalachian State, are also in the field of 330. This marks the third straight trip for Ream (24-4), who’s seeded sixth at 157. A year ago, he was honored with the Elite 90 Award as the top studentathlete in the tournament. He has a 4.0 GPA in biochemistry and molecular biology. Last year’s Post-Dispatch All-Metro wrestler of the year, Smith had accepted a scholarship to Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, but the school dropped its wrestling program last March. The three-time state champ accepted a scholarship to Appalachian State in West Virginia. As a true freshman, he enjoyed a solid season, going 26-9 and being ranked as high as No. 21 at 133 pounds. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

NCAA DIVISION I WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS At Scottrade Center. Co-hosted by the University of Missouri and the St. Louis Sports Commission > SCHEDULE Thursday Session I • First round, 11 a.m. Session II • Second round, plus wrestlebacks, 6 p.m. Friday Session III • Quarterinals, plus wrestlebacks, 10 a.m. Session IV • Semiinals, plus wrestlebacks, 7 p.m. Saturday Session V • Wrestleback semiinals, followed by third-, ifth- and seventhplace matches, 10 a.m. Grand March Parade of All-Americans, 6:35 p.m.

Session VI • Championship matches, 7 p.m. > TICKETS All-session tickets are sold out, but a limited number of tickets are available for the Saturday morning and evening sessions. Tickets may be purchased through NCAA.com/Wrestling, by phone at 800-745-3000 or at the Scottrade Center box oice. > FAN FESTIVAL A Fan Festival at Union Station featuring exhibitions, displays, memorabilia, autograph sessions, discussions, clinics and interactive games will run throughout the tournament. There is no admission fee.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NIT

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NCAA TOURNAMENT

Illini show motivation by beating Valparaiso BY MARK TUPPER decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • If advancing in the NIT is about want-to, Illinois wanted to Tuesday night. Wanted to play, wanted to win and wanted to show that playing in the postseason — regardless of how or where it happens — is a privilege that should not be taken for granted. The motivation to do well showed from the start and carried Illinois to an 82-57 victory over Valparaiso in an openinground game of the National Invitation Tournament at the State Farm Center. Malcolm Hill led Illinois with 25 points and pulled to within eight of Dee Brown for the No. 3 spot on the school’s career scoring list. “We were grateful to play again,” Hill said. “Not everyone can have a postseason, so we’re grateful we could play in front of our fans. We just wanted to make the most out of it.” With the victory, Illinois (1914) advances and will host either Utah or Boise State in the second round. Those teams met late Tuesday night. The time and date of the second-round game won’t be announced until the opponent is known, although officials say there’s a wide range of possibilities. The game could be Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday or Monday. After Groce was fired Saturday, assistant coach Jamall Walker was elevated to interim head coach, and he directed the team against Valpo (24-9). Walker became emotional when talking about how proud of was of the way his team responded after a diicult week. “We wanted to put them in position to have fun and leave a lasting memory of playing together again,” Walker said. “I’m really proud of these guys. They showed the resiliency and fight we always knew they had in them. They’ve been through a lot. The way they came out, the way they practiced, the energy they brought, I’m really excited and happy for them.” Hill said Walker’s message was simple. “The main thing with him, he just tells us to have fun, be ourselves. It’s OK to make mistakes as long as we’re playing hard and giving great efort.” Leron Black, who had 13 points and 12 rebounds, said Walker’s approach works for him. “That makes the game easier,” he said. Illinois was in charge from the start and it was clear how much Valparaiso missed its best player, Horizon League Player of the Year Alec Peters. A 6-9 forward with inside-outside skills, Peters had been averaging 23 points and 10.1 rebounds. Illinois was a bit shorthanded, too. Walker learned at 10 a.m. that he would be without sophomore forward Michael Finke, who sufered a foot injury. Walker said Finke is day to day. Valpo coach Matt Lottich said his team was uncharacteristically overmatched on the boards, where Illinois had a 43-26 edge. “It was a tough game for us,” Lottich said. “We’ve been pretty dominant on the rebounds and pretty dominant defensively, but we just couldn’t do it tonight. “Their size and athleticism really bothered us. At the first media timeout they were up 7-1 on the glass and that was pretty indicative of the game. We’re used to doubling people up on the boards and they did that to us tonight.” ILLINOIS 82, VALPARAISO 57 FG FT Reb VALPARAISO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hammink 19 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Sorolla 22 0-5 2-2 1-1 0 2 2 Joseph 32 4-11 0-0 0-5 1 2 9 Walker 31 9-14 7-9 0-8 1 5 25 L.Williams 21 1-5 0-0 1-4 2 2 3 Kiser 24 4-6 0-0 1-1 1 3 8 Bradford 18 1-6 0-0 1-2 0 1 3 Smits 18 2-5 0-0 1-1 1 3 4 Davidson 15 0-2 3-4 0-2 2 0 3 Karys -- 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 21-57 12-15 5-24 8 19 57 Percentages: FG.368, FT.800. 3-point goals: 3-18, .167. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Black 27 6-9 0-0 6-12 0 2 13 Morgan 20 4-8 0-1 2-6 1 3 8 Abrams 29 4-7 0-0 0-8 5 1 9 Hill 27 7-12 7-8 1-3 1 0 25 Lucas 25 0-4 0-0 1-1 6 2 0 Thorne 18 3-8 1-3 2-3 1 3 7 Coleman-Lands 18 2-4 3-3 0-1 1 2 8 Nichols 14 2-6 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Tate 5 0-0 1-2 0-1 2 0 1 D.Williams 5 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Austin 4 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 2 0 Jordan 4 1-1 0-1 0-2 0 3 2 Jones 2 1-1 1-1 0-0 0 0 4 Olademeji 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 30-62 13-19 12-39 18 19 82 Percentages: FG.484, FT.684. 3-point goals: 9-21, .429. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. Valparaiso 24 33 — 57 Illinois 41 41 — 82 A: 4,719.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Middle Tennessee players celebrate an 83-72 victory Saturday over Marshall in title game of the Conference USA tournament.

SUSTAINING SUCCESS Middle Tennessee is latest mid-major making noise ASSOCIATED PRESS

MURFREESBORO, TENN. •

The Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders have gotten downright greedy when it comes to March. They are trying to build Middle Tennessee into a powerhouse basketball program, rising from the ranks of mid-majors to join the Gonzagas and Wichita States on the NCAA landscape. The Blue Raiders are back in the tournament for second straight year with a gaudy 30-4 record featuring wins over two Southeastern Conference teams after upsetting Michigan State in the tourney a year ago. “But the hardest part is the sustainability, and that’s what Gonzaga and those teams have done,” Blue Raiders coach Kermit Davis said. “So we still have a lot of hard work ahead of us.” The Blue Raiders will try to take another step Thursday against Minnesota in Milwaukee as a popular pick to be the latest No. 12 seed to upset a five seed. Middle Tennessee has a chance to even reach the Sweet 16 in a loaded South Region. Their biggest success to

date came a year ago, stunning Michigan State as a No. 15 seed. Texts and messages poured in celebrating the shocking win, then the bottom fell out in a loss to Syracuse by 25 in the second round. Even though they were blown out by the Orange, the big win against the Spartans lingered to the point that Davis had to sit his team down in July and remind everyone they could not fast-forward to March. “Nick Saban’s the best at it where they go through that same process all the time, so we got back to the basics of what really makes you good,” Davis said. It also helps to have talent, and Davis’ team has that. JaCorey Williams, a 6-foot-8 and 220-pound forward, paid his own way to St. Louis to watch that upset of Michigan State while sitting out his transfer year from Arkansas. Now he is Middle Tennessee’s leading scorer, averaging 17.3 points and 7.3 rebounds a game. Tyrik Dixon has started 32 of 34 games at point guard as a freshman. Davis still had senior Reggie

Upshaw and junior guard Giddy Potts along with a deeper bench. “It makes us a tough team to beat,” Upshaw said. The Blue Raiders have lost only once in 2017, 57-54 at UTEP, which they avenged in the league tournament last week by 26 points. They beat a pair of NCAA Tournament teams in UNC Wilmington, the No. 12 seed in the East; and Vanderbilt, the ninth seed in the West. They also beat a second SEC team, downing Mississippi by 15 in Oxford. After fighting for respect a season ago, Davis said Middle Tennessee has gotten every team’s best shot. That has helped build the Blue Raiders’ confidence. “I talk to them all the time about being a national program, and I think they carry themselves like they think they belong in the elite of college basketball,” Davis said. Middle Tennessee’s No. 12 seed is three spots better than a year ago. But Davis still worries where his team would’ve been if they hadn’t won the league’s automatic bid with the tourna-

ment title even with a nonconference strength of schedule of 18, a 35 RPI, the first team receiving votes in the final AP college basketball rankings. Conference USA last sent two teams to the tournament in 2012 when Memphis, now in the American Athletic Conference, was still a member. “That was my only thought process,” Davis said. “Where do we go from here?” For now, the Blue Raiders must prove they aren’t a one-year wonder even though they’ve already made school history simply by qualifying for the NCAA Tournament in consecutive years. “To kind of cement ourselves up there with those mid-major teams that are known nationally, it’s all about being consistent year in and year out,” Upshaw said. That’s where Davis believes experience will be a huge benefit. “Boy, that feeling that our players had last year,” Davis said. “I mean, you want to be back in the worst way.”

NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP

Robinson lifts Mount St. Mary’s to victory ASSOCIATED PRESS

Diminutive point guard Junior Robinson fearlessly dribbled into the heart of New Orleans’ defense, pulled up and hit yet another of his oh-so-soft jumpers. This one decided a frenetic opening game for the NCAA Tournament. The smallest player in Division I scored 23 points Tuesday night, including that go-ahead jumper with 1:27 to play, and Mount St. Mary’s held on for a 67-66 victory over New Orleans in the First Four in Dayton, Ohio. In the second game, Kansas State beat Wake Forest 95-88. Robinson, 5-foot-5, carried the Mountaineers (20-15) to only their second NCAA Tournament win, making jumpers with so much arc they appeared to tease the ceiling. “The way he plays out there — his speed, his athleticism — it’s just so special,” coach Jamion Christian said. “When you’re a smaller guy, you’re naturally going to have a chip on your shoulder and you want to go out there and show the world the things you can do.” The Mountaineers will head to Bufalo to play defending national champion and top overall seed Villanova in the East Regional on Thursday. They had a charter flight waiting after the game. “It’s a dream come true,” guard Elijah Long said. “But this is March Madness, and this is part of the madness.” Mount St. Mary’s led most of the way, but New Orleans (2012) pulled of a comeback befitting its resurgent season. The Privateers had a chance for a fi-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mount St. Mary’s point guard Junior Robinson shoots against New Orleans’ Nate Frye (right) in the second half of Tuesday night’s NCAA Tournament game in Dayton, Ohio. Mount St. Mary’s won 67-66.

nal shot, but Erik Thomas’ inbound pass with 2.6 seconds left was of target and stolen by the Mountaineers’ Chris Wray.

NOTEBOOK Keene, Yurtseven eye NBA • A person familiar with the decision tells The Associated Press that the nation’s leading scorer, Marcus Keene, is entering the NBA draft. The 5-foot-9 point guard scored 30 points a game as a redshirt junior at Central Michi-

gan this season, the highest scoring average by a Division I player in 20 years. Also, North Carolina State big man Omer Yurtseven is declaring for the draft but will not hire an agent, to preserve his eligibility should he decide to return to school for his sophomore year. South Florida hires Gregory • Former Dayton and Georgia Tech coach Brian Gregory has accepted the challenge of rebuilding South Florida’s strug-

gling basketball program. Gregory was hired Tuesday as the school’s new coach, inheriting a team that stumbled to a 7-23 record and last-place finish in the American Athletic Conference this season. Syracuse game postponed • The NIT game Tuesday night between UNC-Greensboro and host Syracuse was postponed because of weather and rescheduled for Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

NIT

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NCAA TOURNAMENT

Illini show motivation by beating Valparaiso BY MARK TUPPER decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • If advancing in the NIT is about want-to, Illinois wanted to Tuesday night. Wanted to play, wanted to win and wanted to show that playing in the postseason — regardless of how or where it happens — is a privilege that should not be taken for granted. The motivation to do well showed from the start and carried Illinois to an 82-57 victory over Valparaiso in an openinground game of the National Invitation Tournament at the State Farm Center. Malcolm Hill led Illinois with 25 points and pulled to within eight of Dee Brown for the No. 3 spot on the school’s career scoring list. “We were grateful to play again,” Hill said. “Not everyone can have a postseason, so we’re grateful we could play in front of our fans. We just wanted to make the most out of it.” With the victory, Illinois (1914) advances and will host Boise State, which beat Utah 73-68, in the second round. The time and date of the second-round game wasn’t set, although oicials say there’s a wide range of possibilities. The game could be Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday or Monday. After Groce was fired Saturday, assistant coach Jamall Walker was elevated to interim head coach, and he directed the team against Valpo (24-9). Walker became emotional when talking about how proud of was of the way his team responded after a diicult week. “We wanted to put them in position to have fun and leave a lasting memory of playing together again,” Walker said. “I’m really proud of these guys. They showed the resiliency and fight we always knew they had in them. They’ve been through a lot. The way they came out, the way they practiced, the energy they brought, I’m really excited and happy for them.” Hill said Walker’s message was simple. “The main thing with him, he just tells us to have fun, be ourselves. It’s OK to make mistakes as long as we’re playing hard and giving great efort.” Leron Black, who had 13 points and 12 rebounds, said Walker’s approach works for him. “That makes the game easier,” he said. Illinois was in charge from the start and it was clear how much Valparaiso missed its best player, Horizon League Player of the Year Alec Peters. A 6-9 forward with inside-outside skills, Peters had been averaging 23 points and 10.1 rebounds. Illinois was a bit shorthanded, too. Walker learned at 10 a.m. that he would be without sophomore forward Michael Finke, who sufered a foot injury. Walker said Finke is day to day. Valpo coach Matt Lottich said his team was uncharacteristically overmatched on the boards, where Illinois had a 43-26 edge. “It was a tough game for us,” Lottich said. “We’ve been pretty dominant on the rebounds and pretty dominant defensively, but we just couldn’t do it tonight. “Their size and athleticism really bothered us. At the first media timeout they were up 7-1 on the glass and that was pretty indicative of the game. We’re used to doubling people up on the boards and they did that to us tonight.” ILLINOIS 82, VALPARAISO 57 FG FT Reb VALPARAISO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hammink 19 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Sorolla 22 0-5 2-2 1-1 0 2 2 Joseph 32 4-11 0-0 0-5 1 2 9 Walker 31 9-14 7-9 0-8 1 5 25 L.Williams 21 1-5 0-0 1-4 2 2 3 Kiser 24 4-6 0-0 1-1 1 3 8 Bradford 18 1-6 0-0 1-2 0 1 3 Smits 18 2-5 0-0 1-1 1 3 4 Davidson 15 0-2 3-4 0-2 2 0 3 Karys -- 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 21-57 12-15 5-24 8 19 57 Percentages: FG.368, FT.800. 3-point goals: 3-18, .167. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Black 27 6-9 0-0 6-12 0 2 13 Morgan 20 4-8 0-1 2-6 1 3 8 Abrams 29 4-7 0-0 0-8 5 1 9 Hill 27 7-12 7-8 1-3 1 0 25 Lucas 25 0-4 0-0 1-1 6 2 0 Thorne 18 3-8 1-3 2-3 1 3 7 Coleman-Lands 18 2-4 3-3 0-1 1 2 8 Nichols 14 2-6 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Tate 5 0-0 1-2 0-1 2 0 1 D.Williams 5 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Austin 4 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 2 0 Jordan 4 1-1 0-1 0-2 0 3 2 Jones 2 1-1 1-1 0-0 0 0 4 Olademeji 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 30-62 13-19 12-39 18 19 82 Percentages: FG.484, FT.684. 3-point goals: 9-21, .429. Team rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. Valparaiso 24 33 — 57 Illinois 41 41 — 82 A: 4,719.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Middle Tennessee players celebrate an 83-72 victory Saturday over Marshall in title game of the Conference USA tournament.

SUSTAINING SUCCESS Middle Tennessee is latest mid-major making noise ASSOCIATED PRESS

MURFREESBORO, TENN. •

The Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders have gotten downright greedy when it comes to March. They are trying to build Middle Tennessee into a powerhouse basketball program, rising from the ranks of mid-majors to join the Gonzagas and Wichita States on the NCAA landscape. The Blue Raiders are back in the tournament for second straight year with a gaudy 30-4 record featuring wins over two Southeastern Conference teams after upsetting Michigan State in the tourney a year ago. “But the hardest part is the sustainability, and that’s what Gonzaga and those teams have done,” Blue Raiders coach Kermit Davis said. “So we still have a lot of hard work ahead of us.” The Blue Raiders will try to take another step Thursday against Minnesota in Milwaukee as a popular pick to be the latest No. 12 seed to upset a five seed. Middle Tennessee has a chance to even reach the Sweet 16 in a loaded South Region. Their biggest success to

date came a year ago, stunning Michigan State as a No. 15 seed. Texts and messages poured in celebrating the shocking win, then the bottom fell out in a loss to Syracuse by 25 in the second round. Even though they were blown out by the Orange, the big win against the Spartans lingered to the point that Davis had to sit his team down in July and remind everyone they could not fast-forward to March. “Nick Saban’s the best at it where they go through that same process all the time, so we got back to the basics of what really makes you good,” Davis said. It also helps to have talent, and Davis’ team has that. JaCorey Williams, a 6-foot-8 and 220-pound forward, paid his own way to St. Louis to watch that upset of Michigan State while sitting out his transfer year from Arkansas. Now he is Middle Tennessee’s leading scorer, averaging 17.3 points and 7.3 rebounds a game. Tyrik Dixon has started 32 of 34 games at point guard as a freshman. Davis still had senior Reggie

Upshaw and junior guard Giddy Potts along with a deeper bench. “It makes us a tough team to beat,” Upshaw said. The Blue Raiders have lost only once in 2017, 57-54 at UTEP, which they avenged in the league tournament last week by 26 points. They beat a pair of NCAA Tournament teams in UNC Wilmington, the No. 12 seed in the East; and Vanderbilt, the ninth seed in the West. They also beat a second SEC team, downing Mississippi by 15 in Oxford. After fighting for respect a season ago, Davis said Middle Tennessee has gotten every team’s best shot. That has helped build the Blue Raiders’ confidence. “I talk to them all the time about being a national program, and I think they carry themselves like they think they belong in the elite of college basketball,” Davis said. Middle Tennessee’s No. 12 seed is three spots better than a year ago. But Davis still worries where his team would’ve been if they hadn’t won the league’s automatic bid with the tourna-

ment title even with a nonconference strength of schedule of 18, a 35 RPI, the first team receiving votes in the final AP college basketball rankings. Conference USA last sent two teams to the tournament in 2012 when Memphis, now in the American Athletic Conference, was still a member. “That was my only thought process,” Davis said. “Where do we go from here?” For now, the Blue Raiders must prove they aren’t a one-year wonder even though they’ve already made school history simply by qualifying for the NCAA Tournament in consecutive years. “To kind of cement ourselves up there with those mid-major teams that are known nationally, it’s all about being consistent year in and year out,” Upshaw said. That’s where Davis believes experience will be a huge benefit. “Boy, that feeling that our players had last year,” Davis said. “I mean, you want to be back in the worst way.”

NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP

Robinson lifts Mount St. Mary’s to victory ASSOCIATED PRESS

Diminutive point guard Junior Robinson fearlessly dribbled into the heart of New Orleans’ defense, pulled up and hit yet another of his oh-so-soft jumpers. This one decided a frenetic opening game for the NCAA Tournament. The smallest player in Division I scored 23 points Tuesday night, including that go-ahead jumper with 1:27 to play, and Mount St. Mary’s held on for a 67-66 victory over New Orleans in the First Four in Dayton, Ohio. Robinson, 5-foot-5, carried the Mountaineers (20-15) to only their second NCAA Tournament win, making jumpers with so much arc they appeared to tease the ceiling. “The way he plays out there — his speed, his athleticism — it’s just so special,” coach Jamion Christian said. “When you’re a smaller guy, you’re naturally going to have a chip on your shoulder and you want to go out there and show the world the things you can do.” The Mountaineers will head to Bufalo to play defending national champion and top overall seed Villanova in the East Regional on Thursday. New Orleans (20-12) had a chance for a final shot, but Erik Thomas’ inbound pass with 2.6 seconds left was off target and stolen by the Mountaineers’ Chris Wray. Kansas State 95, Wake Forest 88 • Kamau Stokes scored 19 of his 22 points in the second half of a wide-open game, and Kansas State’s balance was the dif-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mount St. Mary’s point guard Junior Robinson shoots against New Orleans’ Nate Frye (right) in the second half of Tuesday night’s NCAA Tournament game in Dayton, Ohio. Mount St. Mary’s won 67-66.

ference as the Wildcats pulled away against Wake Forest in the First Four in Dayton, Ohio. Eleventh-seeded K-State (21-13) got its first NCAA Tournament win in five years and a trip to play No. 6 Cincinnati on Friday in Sacramento, Calif., as part of the South Regional. Wesley Iwundu added 24 points, and D.J. Johnson scored 18 for K-State. John Collins led Wake Forest with 26 points and nine rebounds.

NOTEBOOK Keene, Yurtseven eye NBA • Central Michigan guard Marcus Keene, who scored 30 points a game to lead Division I in scoring, is entering the NBA draft. Also, North Carolina State big man Omer Yurtseven is declaring for the draft but will not hire an agent, to preserve his eligibility should he decide to return to school for his sophomore year. South Florida hires Gregory • Former Dayton and Georgia

Tech coach Brian Gregory was hired Tuesday as South Florida’s new coach, inheriting a team that stumbled to a 7-23 record and last-place finish in the American Athletic Conference this season. Syracuse game postponed • The NIT game Tuesday night between UNC-Greensboro and host Syracuse was postponed because of weather and rescheduled for Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome.


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Jaskin is out with injury Sanford or Yakupov likely to take his place in lineup

recent development. He’s played 30 games against the Kings in his career with seven goals, so in his first eight seasons, he had just two goals.

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

THIRD WHEEL?

ANAHEIM, CALIF. • Forward Dmitrij

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Maryland coach Brenda Frese cheers on her team last month against Indiana. The Terrapins inished 30-2 and shared the Big Ten title.

Maryland mifed by tourney seed Fourth-ranked Terps get No. 3 in tough region ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ranked No. 4 in the country after going 30-2 and being crowned Big Ten champions for a third consecutive year, Maryland was stunned and disappointed to receive a No. 3 seed in the NCAA Tournament. As if that wasn’t insulting enough, the Terrapins’ path the Final Four is impeded by potential matchups with Big 12 champion West Virginia, still-hated No. 2 seed Duke and yes, unbeaten and top-seeded UConn. That’s a pretty harsh sentence for a team that swept through the schedule with only a couple of missteps: an 87-81 loss to Connecticut and a defeat on the road against Ohio State, which ended up sharing the regular season Big Ten title with Maryland. Terps coach Brenda Frese, her players, friends, family and fans gathered at the team’s home arena Monday night to watch the selection show. Upon learning of Maryland’s fate, Frese forced a smile and shrugged her shoulders. “I’m not sure I’ve ever seen from the men’s or the women’s side, a team ranked top 4 in the country receive a 3 seed,” Frese said. “You know what? It’s not going to help you win or lose a game. We’ve got to go out and put our best foot forward.” Frese has led the Terrapins to seven Sweet 16 appearances, three Final Fours and the 2006 national championship. Past performances evidently meant nothing to the selection committee, which weighed far more heavily Maryland’s soft nonconference schedule. With the exception of December matchups against UConn and Louisville (now ranked 13th), the Terrapins’ slate before Big Ten play included the likes of Towson, UMass Lowell, Niagara and Saint Peter’s. “I understand nonconference compo-

nent, but it’s never been weighted 100 percent,” Frese said. “We had no bad losses, we had 30 wins, we won the (Big Ten) regular season, we won the tournament. I know the committee has a difficult job, but I think that three seed kind of took a life of its own during the season and kind of played out as such. “It’s disappointing because we felt like we controlled our destiny, and what we did was win.” The Terrapins are seeded behind Duke, their former rival in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Blue Devils (27-5) are coming of a 23-point loss to Notre Dame in the ACC title game. “You can only control what you can control,” Maryland center Brionna Jones said. “We did what we came to do, win the Big Ten, and now we’re just focused on winning the national championship. We’re fired up, no matter who we play.” Maryland opens the tournament at home Friday against Patriot League champion Bucknell. If the Terps prevail, they will next face the winner of the Elon-West Virginia game. WVU enters the tournament coming of an upset of Baylor, ending the Bears’ run of six consecutive Big 12 championships. That loss didn’t prevent Baylor from receiving the top seed in the Oklahoma City Regional. If Maryland advances, a potential Sweet 16 matchup with Duke follows. Then UConn. “It’s a very difficult bracket,” Frese said. “You can’t sugarcoat what it is.”

SOUTH CAROLINA’S COATES OUT South Carolina forward Alaina Coates will miss the NCAA Tournament with an ankle injury. Gamecocks coach Dawn Staley said Coates won’t play in the tourney because of continued problems from a sprained right ankle. The 6-foot-4 Coates was an all-Southeastern Conference first-team selection who led the league with 10.7 rebounds a game this year. Coates also averaged 12.9 points a game. The Gamecocks (27-4) open play Friday against 16th-seeded UNC Asheville (19-14).

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Jaskin, who suffered an upper-body injury Monday night against the Kings when he collided with a teammate, will miss Wednesday night’s game with the Ducks. “He’s feeling better, but he’ll be out tomorrow,” coach Mike Yeo said. “I thought that he was playing well. He was scratched for a couple when he injured his ankle, but I felt like his game over the last five or six games has been coming along nicely.” Yeo wouldn’t say who would go in, and the Blues didn’t hold a full practice. Ivan Barbashev is already in, playing in place of Jori Lehtera, who is home in St. Louis after taking a puck to the head Saturday, so the options are Zach Sanford and Nail Yakupov. Jaskin was playing on the left wing, which would make Sanford a likely choice, but Yeo wouldn’t go there. “We have options because Magnus (Paajarvi) can play left wing,” he said. “Yak’s a left shot, so we have options there.” Jaskin was injured in the second period when he collided with teammate Robert Bortuzzo after the Kings’ Trevor Lewis sidestepped Bortuzzo and Jaskin, chasing the play, hit Bortuzzo. In the case of both Jaskin and Lehtera, their injuries were caused by teammates. The puck that hit Lehtera was a pass from defenseman Joel Edmundson.

FAVORITE TARGETS David Perron’s goal against the Kings on Monday extended a run of success against the team. Last season, he played the Kings six times (because of a trade) and scored four goals against them. He added another Monday night, the key goal that put the Blues up 1-0 in their pivotal game with the Kings. “My other eight years before last year,” Perron said, “I don’t know how many I scored on (Jonathan) Quick and last year I got four against LA and then scored again this year.” Indeed, Perron scoring on the Kings is a

On Saturday and again Monday, the Blues had a chance to move into a tie for third in the Central Division with a win and a loss by Nashville. But both times, the Predators won. That won’t happen Wednesday, when the Blues play the Ducks but the Predators are of. A win over the Ducks would put the Blues even with the Predators, but with the tiebreaker of wins in regulation and overtime. “The amazing thing is we’ve won five in a row,” Yeo said, “and it seems like everyone else is winning along the way. Good things are going to happen if we keep winning hockey games, and that has to be our focus. We’ve been doing a pretty good job of that, making sure our focus is on ourselves, we’re not wrapped up on everybody else, but absolutely that should be a goal of ours, to catch them, to be as high in the standings as we can, and in order to do that have to be prepared.”

STREAKING The Blues have cancelled out their recent five-game losing streak with a five-game winning streak. “I like this one better,” Perron said. “At the end of our last (winning streak), I felt like last two or three games we could see a little bit of slip in our play and we were finding ways to win, and even in the losing streak we had games we felt we could win, weren’t getting it done. Now we see the importance of every game and it started with a big win in Colorado. “I think we felt, we had lost five games in a row, but didn’t feel we deserved to lose five games in a row. Every one of them was a one-goal game and we weren’t able to find a way to put pucks in the net despite opportunities. We knew that our game wasn’t quite good enough but also knew we weren’t that far of. We’ve been building a game, now go into games with a clearer picture of what to expect from each other and what’s needed from each individual, and with that comes confidence.”

Allen’s play wins praise from Blues BLUES • FROM B1

opportunities that he stood in real strong for,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said, “and I just can’t say enough about how important it is to grab a lead in a game like this, so he gave us that chance.” “I think I’ve had a really solid year,” Allen said Monday night, “but a really terrible three weeks.” Exactly how long Allen’s struggles lasted depends on when you think they started, but in any case, they’re long since over and he’s now playing the way the Blues expected and the way that led them to make him the No. 1 goalie and trade Brian Elliott to Calgary in the ofseason. Since Yeo took over as coach Feb. 1, Allen has a .941 save percentage and a 1.80 goals-against average, the best in the league over that span for goalies who have played more than seven games. He has a 9-5 record, mostly because of the Blues’ lack of ofensive production. Allen hasn’t allowed more than three goals in any of his 14 games. That’s a far cry from the period from Dec. 30, the first time he was lifted for performance reasons, to the coaching change. In that stretch, he had an .835 save percentage, a 4.12 GAA and a 1-5 record. “I would say that part of the season that wasn’t so good is forgotten, by me at least,” Yeo said Tuesday. “When I’m looking him at right now, I thought he was playing this way at the beginning of the season, giving us great goaltending. There was a stretch in between that wasn’t very good, but I also thought we weren’t really helping him out the best we could either. I think he’s on top of it right now, and coming into every game, that’s what I’m expecting of him.” “Those three weeks were probably the worst I’ve ever had,” Allen said. “They were really tough for me to go through, personally, on and of the ice. I wanted to work my way out of it and I’ve felt since I got out of that slump I’ve gotten better, so hopefully I can carry it into the playofs.” In his past four starts, Allen has one shutout and came close to two more. He gave up a goal from center ice with 11 seconds left against Minnesota and lost his shutout to the Kings with 2:55 to go in the third. “I think Jake’s been Jake all year,” forward David Perron said. “Everyone goes through streaks where it’s tougher and when you’re the goalie, you’re the last option to save a goal. A lot of time it shows in our team play that we weren’t doing enough for him. “I think we’ve always had the same confidence in him the whole year, throughout the ups and downs of his game, of our team play. When a goalie’s not doing well, a lot of time there’s holes in the game and for us and obviously we want him to play like that every night.” “He went through a lot in that little stretch but we knew he was going to be huge for us down the stretch,” defenseman Joel Edmundson said. “Right now, it’s crunch time and he’s really standing on his head for us. Last night he was a big reason why we won.” When the Blues made their coaching change, they also fired goalie coach Jim Corsi and made assistant general manager

BLUES AT DUCKS When • 9 p.m. Wednesday Where • Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif. TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues will look to extend their winning streak to six games, matching a season high. ... The club hosted the Ducks last Friday at Scottrade Center and won 4-3 on game-winning goal by Joel Edmundson with 20 seconds remaining in regulation. ... The Blues have won three straight games on the road, allowing a combined two goals and both have come in the inal three minutes of regulation. ... Mike Yeo has not named a starting goaltender for the game. Jake Allen is 9-5 with a 1.80 goals-against average and a .941 save-percentage since Yeo took over. Ducks • Anaheim rebounded from last week’s loss to the Blues with a 5-2 win Sunday over Washington. Corey Perry had two of the Ducks’ goals and Jonathan Bernier made 25 saves in the win. ... Perry has averaged 39 goals in each of his last ive full seasons in the NHL, but after two on Sunday against the Capitals he’s on pace for just 16 this season. ... Bernier was named the NHL’s second star of the week, after posting a record of 3-0 with a 1.62 goals-against average and a .948 save percentage. Injuries • Blues — LW Dmitrij Jaskin (upper body), C Jori Lehtera (upper body) and LW Robby Fabbri (knee), out; Ducks — G John Gibson (lower body), questionable; D Clayton Stone (lower body) and D Simon Depres (concussion symptoms), out. Jeremy Rutherford

Martin Brodeur the goalie coach. (Technically, he shares the duties with Ty Conklin, but Conklin has spent only a few days with the team.) It’s hard to say there isn’t a link between the events. “I didn’t know what to expect,” Yeo said. “What I did know is, he’s a Hall of Famer, one of, if not the best, goalie to play the game. You know there are some things he can add, some ways he can help. I would say it’s exceeded what my expectations were.” Yeo has handed most of the goalie responsibilities to Brodeur, and he said he lets Brodeur set the game schedule for the goalies. (With back-to-back games on Wednesday and Thursday, Carter Hutton is likely to get one of them.) When Brodeur talks, Yeo listens and on Monday morning, Brodeur told Yeo that Allen was dialed in for the game with the Kings. “Marty said right from the morning skate he was ready to go,” Yeo said. “I listen to Marty. He seems to get it. But he was on it: (Allen’s) been sharp lately and he gives us a lot of confidence coming into the game that he’ll pick up where he left of.” And is Brodeur usually right? “He is,” Yeo said. “He’s done a great job preparing those guys and they’ve been great for us for an awful long time. He’s been right every time.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 1 NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Nashville Blues Winnipeg Dallas Colorado Paciic San Jose Calgary Anaheim Edmonton Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 69 68 69 68 70 68 68 GP 68 69 69 68 68 69 68

W 44 43 34 36 30 27 19 W 41 39 36 35 33 28 25

L OT Pts 20 5 93 19 6 92 24 11 79 27 5 77 33 7 67 31 10 64 46 3 41 L OT Pts 20 7 89 26 4 82 23 10 82 24 9 79 29 6 72 32 9 65 35 8 58

GF 208 225 205 189 208 189 131 GF 190 191 181 191 169 159 165

GA Home Away Div 173 23-9-4 21-11-1 17-8-1 167 23-9-1 20-10-5 15-7-3 196 20-8-7 14-16-4 14-10-1 190 20-11-4 16-16-1 11-11-2 224 16-18-1 14-15-6 16-8-2 221 18-12-6 9-19-4 8-14-4 222 10-22-2 9-24-1 6-16-0 GA Home Away Div 158 22-8-4 19-12-3 13-7-3 185 20-14-0 19-12-4 10-9-3 174 22-8-3 14-15-7 12-6-4 181 16-12-4 19-12-5 12-4-3 171 19-13-1 14-16-5 9-9-1 201 18-12-6 10-20-3 11-9-1 217 16-15-4 9-20-4 9-12-5

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Florida Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh Columbus NY Rangers NY Islanders Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey

GP 70 68 69 69 68 68 69 67 GP 69 68 68 70 69 68 67 68

W 39 39 37 34 31 30 28 26 W 45 43 44 44 33 31 28 25

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 8 86 191 176 20-10-4 19-13-4 12-3-5 22 7 85 183 175 19-10-7 20-12-0 11-10-2 26 6 80 196 179 19-14-0 18-12-6 16-7-1 26 9 77 191 187 19-11-3 15-15-6 13-5-3 23 14 76 206 206 17-10-6 14-13-8 13-7-3 27 11 71 175 195 16-16-3 14-11-8 10-9-5 29 12 68 177 203 17-12-6 11-17-6 9-10-4 30 11 63 166 202 13-15-5 13-15-6 6-11-5 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 7 97 222 154 28-6-1 17-11-6 15-7-5 16 9 95 239 190 27-4-3 16-12-6 15-5-1 18 6 94 219 160 25-9-1 19-9-5 15-6-1 24 2 90 225 183 19-15-2 25-9-0 13-11-0 25 11 77 206 211 20-9-6 13-16-5 10-9-4 29 8 70 176 204 19-11-4 12-18-4 6-11-2 27 12 68 172 196 19-10-4 9-17-8 8-13-3 31 12 62 153 197 13-13-6 12-18-6 8-9-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Washington 4, Minnesota 2 NY Islanders 3, Carolina 2, OT Tampa Bay 2, Ottawa 1, OT Florida 7, Toronto 2 Chicago 4, Montreal 2 Winnipeg at New Jersey, ppd. Dallas at Edmonton, late Buffalo at San Jose, late Arizona at Los Angeles, late Monday Blues 3, Los Angeles 1 Columbus 5, Philadelphia 3 Tampa Bay 3, NY Rangers 2 Carolina 8, NY Islanders 4 Nashville 5, Winnipeg 4, OT Calgary 4, Pittsburgh 3, SO Arizona 1, Colorado 0 Boston 6, Vancouver 3 Wednesday Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. Blues at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Thursday Minnesota at Carolina, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Nashville at Washington, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Columbus, 6 p.m. Chicago at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Detroit at Arizona, 9 p.m. Dallas at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Buffalo at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Florida at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Dallas at Calgary, 8 p.m. Buffalo at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 42 25 Toronto 39 28 New York 27 41 Philadelphia 24 42 Brooklyn 12 54 Southeast W L Washington 41 25 Atlanta 37 30 Miami 32 35 Charlotte 29 38 Orlando 24 44 Central W L Cleveland 44 22 Indiana 34 33 Detroit 33 34 Milwaukee 32 34 Chicago 32 35

Pct .627 .582 .397 .364 .182 Pct .621 .552 .478 .433 .353 Pct .667 .507 .493 .485 .478

GB — 3 15½ 17½ 29½ GB — 4½ 9½ 12½ 18 GB — 10½ 11½ 12 12½

L10 5-5 6-4 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 5-5 3-7 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 7-3 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 L-3 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1

Home 22-9 22-11 16-17 15-19 8-25 Home 26-9 19-15 18-14 18-15 12-22 Home 27-7 23-10 22-12 20-16 19-14

Away 20-16 17-17 11-24 9-23 4-29 Away 15-16 18-15 14-21 11-23 12-22 Away 17-15 11-23 11-22 12-18 13-21

Conf 27-12 23-16 18-25 16-23 4-34 Conf 25-16 25-15 21-21 18-22 16-25 Conf 30-11 19-22 20-21 21-22 21-19

Pct .788 .687 .552 .424 .403 Pct .627 .567 .478 .439 .424 Pct .788 .597 .388 .328 .299

GB — 6½ 15½ 24 25½ GB — 4 10 12½ 13½ GB — 12½ 26½ 30½ 32½

L10 9-1 6-4 3-7 6-4 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 6-4 7-3 L10 5-5 5-5 2-8 4-6 1-9

Str W-2 W-2 W-1 L-2 W-2 Str W-1 W-3 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str L-3 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 25-6 24-9 20-14 20-15 16-18 Home 23-12 25-9 19-16 17-14 18-18 Home 26-4 21-10 14-21 13-21 12-19

Away 27-8 22-12 17-16 8-23 11-22 Away 19-13 13-20 13-19 12-23 10-20 Away 26-10 19-17 12-20 9-24 8-28

Conf 29-9 27-11 26-16 17-24 13-26 Conf 25-18 24-18 19-22 19-21 16-23 Conf 31-9 23-18 15-23 9-35 10-30

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-San Antonio 52 14 Houston 46 21 Memphis 37 30 Dallas 28 38 New Orleans 27 40 Northwest W L Utah 42 25 Oklahoma City 38 29 Denver 32 35 Portland 29 37 Minnesota 28 38 Paciic W L x-Golden State 52 14 LA Clippers 40 27 Sacramento 26 41 Phoenix 22 45 LA Lakers 20 47 x-clinched playoff spot

Tuesday Cleveland 128, Detroit 96 New York 87, Indiana 81 Oklahoma City 122, Brooklyn 104 New Orleans 100, Portland 77 Philadelphia at Golden State, late Monday Chicago 115, Charlotte 109 Toronto 100, Dallas 78 Memphis 113, Milwaukee 93 Minnesota 119, Washington 104 San Antonio 107, Atlanta 99 Utah 114, LA Clippers 108 Denver 129, LA Lakers 101 Sacramento 120, Orlando 115 Wednesday Charlotte at Indiana, 6 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Houston, 7 p.m. Memphis at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Oklahoma City at Toronto, 6 p.m. Utah at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Denver, 8 p.m. Orlando at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 6 Boston at Brooklyn, 6:30 Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 Houston at New Orleans, 7 Minnesota at Miami, 7 p.m. Orlando at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Drought over for Ovechkin Caps star hadn’t scored in previous 10 games ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin ended the longest goalscoring drought of his career as the host Washington Capitals held on to beat Minnesota 4-2 Tuesday, snapping a season-worst four-game losing streak. Ovechkin hadn’t scored in 10 games, or had an even-strength goal in 18, before firing a one-timer by league save percentage leader Devan Dubnyk in the second period. Ovechkin’s 28th goal of the season came one second after a power play expired. Nate Schmidt, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Jay Beagle also scored for the NHL-leading Capitals, who recaptured sole possession of first ahead of Pittsburgh in the Metropolitan Division with 97 points. Goaltender Braden Holtby put on a show, stopping 32 of 34 shots as the Capitals won for the first time since March 4. Minnesota lost for the fifth time in seven games despite goals from Matt Dumba and Eric Staal and 36 saves by Dubnyk. Trailing 3-0 entering the third period, the Wild made things interesting with two goals in the first 5 minutes. When Washington’s three-goal lead shrunk to one, it was Beagle to the rescue. The fourth-line center sniped a wrist shot past Dubnyk with 5:41 left, his first goal in 16 games. Capitals defenseman and former Blues player Kevin Shattenkirk served the second of his two-game suspension for charging. Schmidt was in the lineup because Shattenkirk was out.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin (8) slams Minnesota Wild defenseman Nate Prosser into the boards during Tuesday’s game.

NOTEBOOK Anisimov injured • Center Artem Anisimov left the Chicago Blackhawks’ game against Montreal after suffering an apparent left leg injury late in the first period. The ‘Hawks won the game, 4-2, thanks to goals from Patrick Kane, his 31st of the season, Johnny Oduya, Artemi Panarin, and an empty-netter from Jonathan Toews, but sufered a potentially big loss in Anisimov. He was injured late in the first period after Canadiens winger Alexander Radulov crunched him into the boards. Anisimov remained on the ice until the Hawks’ medical staf was able to attend to him. He could not exit the ice under his own power and did not put any weight on his left leg as he left. Earlier in the period, Anisimov assisted on Kane’s goal, giving him a career-high 45 points.

NHL SUMMARIES Capitals 4, Wild 2

Panthers 7, Maple Leafs 2

Minnesota 0 0 2 — 2 Washington 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Washington, Schmidt 2 (Backstrom, Ovechkin), 19:48. Penalties: Dumba, MIN, (tripping), 0:20; Schmidt, WSH, (holding), 5:48. Second period: 2, Washington, Ovechkin 28 (Backstrom, Carlson), 14:52. 3, Washington, Kuznetsov 16 (Backstrom, Carlson), 17:08 (pp). Penalties: Dumba, MIN, (hooking), 1:17; Orpik, WSH, (holding), 5:31; Staal, MIN, (hooking), 8:45; Alzner, WSH, (tripping), 11:39; Granlund, MIN, (high sticking), 12:51; Suter, MIN, (slashing), 16:46; Wilson, WSH, Major (fighting), 17:37; White, MIN, Major (fighting), 17:37; Wilson, WSH, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:37; Wilson, WSH, served by Ovechkin, (instigator), 17:37. Third period: 4, Minnesota, Dumba 8 (Granlund), 0:37. 5, Minnesota, Staal 23 (Suter, Koivu), 4:37 (pp). 6, Washington, Beagle 12 (Orlov), 14:19. Penalties: Connolly, WSH, (interference), 2:32; Backstrom, WSH, (holding), 3:43; Williams, WSH, (hooking), 4:51. Shots: Minnesota 14-11-7: 32. Washington 15-14-11: 40. Power-plays: Minnesota 1 of 7; Washington 1 of 5. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 36-15-3 (40 shots-36 saves). Washington, Holtby 35-11-5 (32-30). A: 18,506.

Toronto 1 1 0 — 2 Florida 3 3 1 — 7 First period: 1, Florida, Barkov 18 (Huberdeau), 0:18. 2, Florida, Sceviour 9 (Mackenzie, Matheson), 10:33 (sh). 3, Toronto, Komarov 11 (Nylander), 13:36 (pp). 4, Florida, Marchessault 21 (Vanek), 14:21. Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Marner (too many men on the ice), 2:09; Bjugstad, FLA, (high sticking), 10:12; Jagr, FLA, (holding), 12:58; Kindl, FLA, (kneeing), 15:21. Second period: 5, Florida, Marchessault 22 (Vanek, Barkov), 4:38. 6, Florida, Smith 11 (Yandle), 16:22. 7, Toronto, Soshnikov 5 (Boyle, Martin), 18:19. 8, Florida, Jokinen 10 (Vanek, Trocheck), 19:33 (pp). Penalties: Soshnikov, TOR, (holding), 19:08. Third period: 9, Florida, Yandle 4 (Vanek, Trocheck), 2:17. Penalties: Polak, TOR, (high sticking), 2:49; Nylander, TOR, (hooking), 6:15; Mackenzie, FLA, (holding stick), 12:31; Martin, TOR, (cross checking), 15:17; Petrovic, FLA, (roughing), 15:17; Van riemsdyk, TOR, (high sticking), 16:23; Van riemsdyk, TOR, served by Marner, (high sticking), 16:23; Marchessault, FLA, (roughing), 16:23. Shots: Toronto 9-12-9: 30. Florida 8-12-12: 32. Power-plays: Toronto 1 of 4; Florida 1 of 6. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 27-15-13 (8 shots-5 saves), Mcelhinney 5-5-2 (24-20). Florida, Reimer 13-12-5 (30-28). A: 17,552. Referees: Steve Kozari, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Tony Sericolo, Mark Shewchyk.

Islanders 3, Hurricanes 2, OT Lightning 2, Senators 1, OT

NY Islanders 0 2 0 1 — 3 Carolina 1 1 0 0 — 2 First period: 1, Carolina, Nordstrom 5 (Stempniak, Wallmark), 12:30. Penalties: Hamonic, NYI, (interference), 17:59. Second period: 2, Carolina, Lindholm 7, 0:40. 3, NY Islanders, Ho-sang 3 (Kulemin), 18:55. 4, NY Islanders, Chimera 17 (De haan, Clutterbuck), 19:20. Penalties: Clutterbuck, NYI, (cross checking), 8:26; Tavares, NYI, (hooking), 11:34; Aho, CAR, (hooking), 16:42. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Overtime: 5, NY Islanders, Tavares 26 (Leddy, Ho-sang), 0:34. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 7-13-13-1: 34. Carolina 9-11-12: 32. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 3. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 24-15-4 (32 shots-30 saves). Carolina, Ward 23-20-10 (34-31). A: 8,707.

Blackhawks 4, Canadiens 2 Chicago 1 1 2 — 4 Montreal 0 0 2 — 2 First period: 1, Chicago, Kane 31 (Anisimov, Hjalmarsson), 12:23. Penalties: Shaw, MTL, (tripping), 7:29. Second period: 2, Chicago, Oduya 2, 10:49. Penalties: Kero, CHI, (tripping), 5:17; Kane, CHI, (hooking), 14:00. Third period: 3, Chicago, Panarin 23 (Kane, Schmaltz), 0:47. 4, Montreal, Byron 19 (Gallagher, Davidson), 12:42. 5, Montreal, Weber 16 (Radulov, Galchenyuk), 16:32. 6, Chicago, Toews 18 (Keith, Kane), 18:38. Penalties: None. Shots: Chicago 4-12-8: 24. Montreal 11-13-18: 42. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 1; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 28-15-3 (42 shots40 saves). Montreal, Price 31-17-5 (23-20). A: 21,288.

Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1 — 2 Ottawa 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Point 12 (Coburn, Dotchin), 3:05. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Ottawa, Wingels 7, 2:35. Penalties: Smith, OTT, (holding), 16:47. Third period: None. Penalties: Hedman, TB, (cross checking), 3:37; Tampa Bay bench, served by Drouin (too many men on the ice), 18:02. Overtime: 3, Tampa Bay, Hedman 14 (Palat), 4:05. Penalties: None. Shots: Tampa Bay 11-11-12-3: 37. Ottawa 14-6-9-3: 32. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 1; Ottawa 0 of 2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 17-13-6 (32 shots-31 saves). Ottawa, Condon 18-11-6 (37-35). A: 16,894.

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

Goal Scoring Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Patrik Laine Winnipeg Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Max Pacioretty Montreal Cam Atkinson Columbus Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis Jeff Carter Los Angeles Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Auston Matthews Toronto Patrick Kane Chicago Rickard Rakell Anaheim Filip Forsberg Nashville Nazem Kadri Toronto David Pastrnak Boston Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Brent Burns San Jose Michael Grabner NY Rangers Alex Ovechkin Washington

GP 62 69 62 61 69 68 68 68 61 67 68 58 69 67 62 67 68 68 64 68

G 35 35 33 33 33 32 32 31 31 31 30 29 28 28 28 28 28 27 27 27

Assists GP A Connor McDavid Edmonton 68 52 Erik Karlsson Ottawa 67 48 Nicklas Backstrom Washington 68 47 Victor Hedman Tampa Bay 65 45 Tyler Seguin Dallas 68 44 Brent Burns San Jose 68 43 Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim 62 43 Patrick Kane Chicago 68 43 Ryan Johansen Nashville 69 42 Duncan Keith Chicago 68 41 Mark Scheifele Winnipeg 67 41 Alexander Wennberg Columbus 68 41 Henrik Zetterberg Detroit 67 41 Mikael Granlund Minnesota 67 40 Phil Kessel Pittsburgh 68 40 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh 62 39 Torey Krug Boston 69 39 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh 61 39 Brad Marchand Boston 69 39 Artemi Panarin Chicago 68 39 Power Play Goals GP PP Brayden Schenn Philadelphia 65 15 Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay 61 14 Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia 68 14 Mike Hoffman Ottawa 60 12 Alex Ovechkin Washington 68 12 Jamie Benn Dallas 64 11 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh 62 11 Patrick Eaves Dallas 66 11 Nick Foligno Columbus 65 11 Nazem Kadri Toronto 67 11 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh 61 11 Shea Weber Montreal 69 11 Cam Atkinson Columbus 68 10 Jeff Carter Los Angeles 68 10 Logan Couture San Jose 66 10 Leon Draisaitl Edmonton 68 10 Matt Moulson Buffalo 69 10 William Nylander Toronto 66 9 Sam Reinhart Buffalo 67 9 Tyler Seguin Dallas 68 9 Game Winning Goals GP GWG Jeff Carter Los Angeles 68 9 Rickard Rakell Anaheim 58 9 Filip Forsberg Nashville 69 8 Brad Marchand Boston 69 7 Max Pacioretty Montreal 69 7 Alex Ovechkin Washington 68 7 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh 61 6 Cam Atkinson Columbus 68 6 Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis 68 6 Auston Matthews Toronto 67 6 Nazem Kadri Toronto 67 6 David Pastrnak Boston 62 6 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh 62 5 Patrik Laine Winnipeg 62 5 Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay 61 5 Patrick Kane Chicago 68 5 Brent Burns San Jose 68 5 Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia 68 4 Plus/Minus GP +/Ryan Suter Minnesota 67 34 Jason Zucker Minnesota 67 33 Jared Spurgeon Minnesota 63 32 Mikko Koivu Minnesota 66 31 Brooks Orpik Washington 65 31 Justin Schultz Pittsburgh 65 30 Michael Grabner NY Rangers 64 29 Mikael Granlund Minnesota 67 28 Dmitry Orlov Washington 68 27 Brent Burns San Jose 68 25 Ian Cole Pittsburgh 68 25 Jake Gardiner Toronto 67 25 David Savard Columbus 60 25 Dennis Seidenberg NY Islanders 61 24 T.J. Oshie Washington 55 23 Karl Alzner Washington 68 22 Brandon Saad Columbus 68 22 Conor Sheary Pittsburgh 48 22 Brett Connolly Washington 54 20 Zachary Werenski Columbus 68 20

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook gestures in the second half of Tuesday’s game against Brooklyn. He had 25 points, 19 assists and 12 rebounds.

NBA SUMMARIES Knicks 87, Pacers 81 Indiana: George 9-22 1-1 22, Miles 2-9 0-0 6, T.Young 2-4 0-0 4, Turner 8-17 1-2 17, Teague 4-15 0-1 9, Robinson 1-2 1-2 4, Seraphin 1-1 0-0 2, Christmas 0-1 2-2 2, Stuckey 1-6 3-6 6, Ellis 4-10 1-1 9. Totals 32-87 9-15 81. New York: Anthony 8-17 3-5 22, Thomas 3-9 0-0 9, Porzingis 5-17 0-0 11, Rose 7-12 2-2 16, Lee 2-9 0-0 5, Hernangomez 6-12 1-4 13, Randle 0-1 2-2 2, Baker 1-1 0-0 2, Holiday 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 35-83 8-13 87. Indiana 24 28 12 17 — 81 New York 18 24 20 25 — 87 3-point goals: Indiana 8-29 (George 3-8, Miles 2-8, Robinson 1-2, Stuckey 1-3, Teague 1-6, T.Young 0-1, Ellis 0-1), New York 9-28 (Anthony 3-6, Thomas 3-7, Holiday 1-2, Lee 1-5, Porzingis 1-6, Randle 0-1, Rose 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 53 (Turner 12), New York 52 (Hernangomez 16). Assists: Indiana 16 (Teague 6), New York 21 (Hernangomez, Rose 4). Total fouls: Indiana 14, New York 15. Technicals: New York defensive three second, New York team. A: 18,261 (19,812).

Thunder 122, Nets 104 Oklahoma City: Gibson 8-17 1-3 17, Adams 4-5 3-4 11, Westbrook 6-18 11-13 25, Oladipo 9-15 0-0 21, Roberson 2-4 2-4 7, McDermott 1-4 2-2 5, Grant 0-0 0-0 0, Sabonis 2-6 0-2 4, Kanter 6-10 5-6 17, Christon 1-1 0-0 2, Abrines 5-7 0-0 13. Totals 44-87 24-34 122. Brooklyn: Lopez 9-15 4-4 25, Lin 8-15 6-6 24, Foye 4-6 2-2 13, Hollis-Jefferson 1-2 4-4 6, LeVert 4-6 7-8 16, Acy 0-4 0-0 0, Nicholson 1-2 0-0 2, Booker 3-8 0-0 8, Hamilton 0-0 0-0 0, Whitehead 2-7 0-2 5, Dinwiddie 0-4 3-4 3, Kilpatrick 1-2 0-0 2, McDaniels 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-71 26-30 104. Oklahoma City 32 30 29 31 — 122 Brooklyn 32 30 21 21 — 104 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 10-22 (Oladipo 3-4, Abrines 3-5, Westbrook 2-7, McDermott 1-2, Roberson 1-3, Kanter 0-1), Brooklyn 12-24 (Foye 3-3, Lopez 3-6, Booker 2-2, Lin 2-4, Whitehead 1-2, LeVert 1-2, Nicholson 0-1, Dinwiddie 0-1, Acy 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 44 (Westbrook 12), Brooklyn 30 (Lopez 6). Assists: Oklahoma City 30 (Westbrook 19), Brooklyn 20 (Lin 5). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 27, Brooklyn 23. A: 13,911 (17,732).

Cavaliers 128, Pistons 96 Detroit: Harris 6-11 4-5 17, Morris 5-9 2-2 13, Drummond 4-12 0-0 8, Jackson 3-13 0-0 6, Caldwell-Pope 3-10 5-5 11, Johnson 1-10 2-2 5, Hilliard 1-2 0-0 2, Bullock 2-6 1-1 6, Baynes 2-6 0-0 4, Leuer 3-6 2-2 8, Marjanovic 1-2 2-2 4, I.Smith 6-12 0-0 12. Totals 37-99 18-19 96. Cleveland: James 6-12 4-5 16, Jefferson 5-9 2-3 16, Thompson 2-4 0-0 4, Irving 9-14 4-4 26, Shumpert 8-13 0-0 18, Frye 2-4 0-0 6, Derr.Williams 4-8 2-4 13, Sanders 0-1 0-0 0, Dero.Williams 6-6 0-0 13, J.Smith 4-5 1-2 12, Liggins 0-0 2-2 2, Jones 0-1 2-3 2. Totals 46-77 17-23 128. Detroit 26 22 22 26 — 96 Cleveland 44 30 30 24 — 128 3-point goals: Detroit 4-19 (Morris 1-2, Johnson 1-4, Harris 1-4, Bullock 1-4, Jackson 0-1, Drummond 0-1, Hilliard 0-1, Caldwell-Pope 0-2), Cleveland 19-30 (Irving 4-4, Jefferson 4-7, J.Smith 3-4, Derr.Williams 3-5, Shumpert 2-3, Frye 2-3, Dero.Williams 1-1, Jones 0-1, James 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 45 (Drummond 14), Cleveland 41 (James 11). Assists: Detroit 20 (Jackson 6), Cleveland 29 (James 12). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Cleveland 18. A: 20,562 (20,562).

Pelicans 100, Trail Blazers 77 Portland: Harkless 1-3 2-2 4, Vonleh 0-2 3-6 3, Nurkic 1-8 0-0 2, Lillard 8-18 9-9 29, McCollum 4-12 0-0 8, Layman 0-3 2-2 2, Aminu 0-3 1-2 1, Leonard 3-8 0-0 9, Napier 3-7 2-3 10, Crabbe 1-8 1-2 4, Connaughton 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 23-76 20-26 77. New Orleans: Hill 4-5 2-2 12, A.Davis 5-15 5-6 15, Cousins 9-22 4-10 22, Holiday 4-6 1-2 10, Selden 0-1 2-4 2, Cunningham 3-4 0-0 6, Motiejunas 0-0 0-0 0, Ajinca 1-1 0-0 2, Frazier 2-6 2-2 7, Crawford 5-11 1-2 13, Moore 5-9 1-2 11. Totals 38-80 18-30 100. Portland 16 20 18 23 — 77 New Orleans 23 27 27 23 — 100 3-point goals: Portland 11-32 (Lillard 4-7, Leonard 3-5, Napier 2-4, Connaughton 1-1, Crabbe 1-6, Layman 0-1, Harkless 0-2, McCollum 0-3, Aminu 0-3), New Orleans 6-21 (Hill 2-3, Crawford 2-5, Frazier 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Cunningham 0-1, Moore 0-1, Selden 0-1, Cousins 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Portland 48 (Aminu, Vonleh 10), New Orleans 49 (A.Davis 15). Assists: Portland 13 (Napier, Leonard 3), New Orleans 19 (Frazier 7). Total fouls: Portland 20, New Orleans 18. Technicals: New Orleans defensive three second, New Orleans team. A: 15,530 (16,867).

LEADERS Scoring Westbrook, OKC Thomas, BOS Harden, HOU Davis, NOR DeRozan, TOR Cousins, NOR Leonard, SAN Lillard, POR James, CLE Durant, GOL Irving, CLE Curry, GOL Towns, MIN McCollum, POR Butler, CHI

Through Monday’s games G 66 63 67 62 60 63 59 60 60 59 58 64 66 65 61

FG 677 571 555 633 582 560 516 520 585 528 541 538 632 573 439

FT 603 494 621 440 439 467 401 381 287 326 238 268 273 222 475

PTS 2108 1839 1947 1741 1629 1694 1550 1576 1566 1494 1460 1593 1614 1528 1425

AVG 31.9 29.2 29.1 28.1 27.2 26.9 26.3 26.3 26.1 25.3 25.2 24.9 24.5 23.5 23.4

Westbrook chalks up 33rd triple-double ASSOCIATED PRESS

On a night when LeBron James recorded his fifth triple-double in nine games in Cleveland’s victory over Detroit, the triple-double “crown” belonged to — who else? — Russell Westbrook. Westbrook had 25 points, 19 assists and 12 rebounds for his 33rd triple-double of the season as the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the host Brooklyn Nets 122-104 on Tuesday. Westbrook shot just six of 18 from the field after scoring 40 or more points in five of his previous eight games. But as usual he was the dominant player on the floor even when his shots didn’t fall. He was loudly cheered throughout the night by a full and lively crowd despite a winter storm that pounded New York. The fans roared when he grabbed his 10th rebound with just under five minutes to play for the 70th triple-double of his career. Victor Oladipo added 21 points for the Thunder, who won their third straight game. Enes Kanter had 17 points and Brooklyn native Taj Gibson finished with 17 points and eight rebounds. Brook Lopez scored 25 points and Jeremy Lin had 24 for the Nets. In Cleveland, James had 16 points, 11 rebounds and 12 assists in just 28 minutes of action in a 128-96 rout of the Pistons.

NOTEBOOK Love closer to return • Cleveland general manager David Griin anticipates forward Kevin Love will return during the team’s trip that begins Saturday. Love had surgery on his left knee Feb. 14. The defending NBA champions are 7-6 since he was injured and have been plagued by defensive and rebounding issues without the four-time All-Star. Love is having his best season since joining the Cavaliers in 2014, averaging 20 points and 11.1 rebounds. Cleveland was outrebounded 52-38 in Sunday’s loss to Houston. Griin said Love participated in 3-on-3 drills Tuesday and the team will monitor how he responds before deciding on the next step. Cleveland begins a four-game trip Saturday against the Los Angeles Clippers. The Cavaliers lead Boston by two games in the Eastern Conference.


SPORTS

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 2 NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Nashville Blues Winnipeg Dallas Colorado Paciic San Jose Calgary Anaheim Edmonton Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 69 68 69 68 70 69 68 GP 69 69 69 69 68 69 68

W 44 43 34 36 30 27 19 W 42 39 36 36 33 28 25

L OT Pts 20 5 93 19 6 92 24 11 79 27 5 77 33 7 67 32 10 64 46 3 41 L OT Pts 20 7 91 26 4 82 23 10 82 24 9 81 29 6 72 32 9 65 35 8 58

GF 208 225 205 189 208 190 131 GF 194 191 181 198 169 159 165

GA Home Away Div 173 23-9-4 21-11-1 17-8-1 167 23-9-1 20-10-5 15-7-3 196 20-8-7 14-16-4 14-10-1 190 20-11-4 16-16-1 11-11-2 224 16-18-1 14-15-6 16-8-2 228 18-12-6 9-20-4 8-14-4 222 10-22-2 9-24-1 6-16-0 GA Home Away Div 159 23-8-4 19-12-3 13-7-3 185 20-14-0 19-12-4 10-9-3 174 22-8-3 14-15-7 12-6-4 182 17-12-4 19-12-5 12-4-3 171 19-13-1 14-16-5 9-9-1 201 18-12-6 10-20-3 11-9-1 217 16-15-4 9-20-4 9-12-5

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Florida Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh Columbus NY Rangers NY Islanders Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey

GP 70 68 69 69 68 68 70 67 GP 69 68 68 70 69 68 67 68

W 39 39 37 34 31 30 28 26 W 45 43 44 44 33 31 28 25

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 8 86 191 176 20-10-4 19-13-4 12-3-5 22 7 85 183 175 19-10-7 20-12-0 11-10-2 26 6 80 196 179 19-14-0 18-12-6 16-7-1 26 9 77 191 187 19-11-3 15-15-6 13-5-3 23 14 76 206 206 17-10-6 14-13-8 13-7-3 27 11 71 175 195 16-16-3 14-11-8 10-9-5 30 12 68 178 207 17-12-6 11-18-6 9-10-4 30 11 63 166 202 13-15-5 13-15-6 6-11-5 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 7 97 222 154 28-6-1 17-11-6 15-7-5 16 9 95 239 190 27-4-3 16-12-6 15-5-1 18 6 94 219 160 25-9-1 19-9-5 15-6-1 24 2 90 225 183 19-15-2 25-9-0 13-11-0 25 11 77 206 211 20-9-6 13-16-5 10-9-4 29 8 70 176 204 19-11-4 12-18-4 6-11-2 27 12 68 172 196 19-10-4 9-17-8 8-13-3 31 12 62 153 197 13-13-6 12-18-6 8-9-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Washington 4, Minnesota 2 NY Islanders 3, Carolina 2, OT Tampa Bay 2, Ottawa 1, OT Florida 7, Toronto 2 Chicago 4, Montreal 2 Edmonton 7, Dallas 1 San Jose 4, Buffalo 1 Winnipeg at New Jersey, ppd. Arizona at Los Angeles, late Monday Blues 3, Los Angeles 1 Columbus 5, Philadelphia 3 Tampa Bay 3, NY Rangers 2 Carolina 8, NY Islanders 4 Nashville 5, Winnipeg 4, OT Calgary 4, Pittsburgh 3, SO Arizona 1, Colorado 0 Boston 6, Vancouver 3 Wednesday Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. Blues at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Thursday Minnesota at Carolina, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Nashville at Washington, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Columbus, 6 p.m. Chicago at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Detroit at Arizona, 9 p.m. Dallas at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Buffalo at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Florida at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Dallas at Calgary, 8 p.m. Buffalo at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Boston 42 25 Toronto 39 28 New York 27 41 Philadelphia 24 43 Brooklyn 12 54 Southeast W L Washington 41 25 Atlanta 37 30 Miami 32 35 Charlotte 29 38 Orlando 24 44 Central W L Cleveland 44 22 Indiana 34 33 Detroit 33 34 Milwaukee 32 34 Chicago 32 35

Pct .627 .582 .397 .358 .182 Pct .621 .552 .478 .433 .353 Pct .667 .507 .493 .485 .478

GB — 3 15½ 18 29½ GB — 4½ 9½ 12½ 18 GB — 10½ 11½ 12 12½

L10 5-5 6-4 4-6 2-8 3-7 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 5-5 3-7 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 7-3 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 L-3 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1

Home 22-9 22-11 16-17 15-19 8-25 Home 26-9 19-15 18-14 18-15 12-22 Home 27-7 23-10 22-12 20-16 19-14

Away 20-16 17-17 11-24 9-24 4-29 Away 15-16 18-15 14-21 11-23 12-22 Away 17-15 11-23 11-22 12-18 13-21

Conf 27-12 23-16 18-25 16-23 4-34 Conf 25-16 25-15 21-21 18-22 16-25 Conf 30-11 19-22 20-21 21-22 21-19

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-San Antonio 52 14 Houston 46 21 Memphis 37 30 Dallas 28 38 New Orleans 27 40 Northwest W L Utah 42 25 Oklahoma City 38 29 Denver 32 35 Portland 29 37 Minnesota 28 38 Paciic W L x-Golden State 53 14 LA Clippers 40 27 Sacramento 26 41 Phoenix 22 45 LA Lakers 20 47

Pct GB .788 — .687 6½ .552 15½ .424 24 .403 25½ Pct GB .627 — .567 4 .478 10 .439 12½ .424 13½ Pct GB .791 — .597 13 .388 27 .328 31 .299 33

L10 9-1 6-4 3-7 6-4 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 6-4 7-3 L10 5-5 5-5 2-8 4-6 1-9

Str W-2 W-2 W-1 L-2 W-2 Str W-1 W-3 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 25-6 24-9 20-14 20-15 16-18 Home 23-12 25-9 19-16 17-14 18-18 Home 27-4 21-10 14-21 13-21 12-19

Away 27-8 22-12 17-16 8-23 11-22 Away 19-13 13-20 13-19 12-23 10-20 Away 26-10 19-17 12-20 9-24 8-28

Conf 29-9 27-11 26-16 17-24 13-26 Conf 25-18 24-18 19-22 19-21 16-23 Conf 31-9 23-18 15-23 9-35 10-30

x-clinched playoff spot

Tuesday Cleveland 128, Detroit 96 New York 87, Indiana 81 Oklahoma City 122, Brooklyn 104 New Orleans 100, Portland 77 Golden State 106, Philadelphia 104 Monday Chicago 115, Charlotte 109 Toronto 100, Dallas 78 Memphis 113, Milwaukee 93 Minnesota 119, Washington 104 San Antonio 107, Atlanta 99 Utah 114, LA Clippers 108 Denver 129, LA Lakers 101 Sacramento 120, Orlando 115 Wednesday Charlotte at Indiana, 6 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Houston, 7 p.m. Memphis at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Oklahoma City at Toronto, 6 p.m. Utah at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Denver, 8 p.m. Orlando at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 6 Boston at Brooklyn, 6:30 Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 Houston at New Orleans, 7 Minnesota at Miami, 7 p.m. Orlando at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Drought over for Ovechkin Caps star hadn’t scored in previous 10 games ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin ended the longest goal-scoring drought of his career as the host Washington Capitals held on to beat Minnesota 4-2 Tuesday, snapping a season-worst fourgame losing streak. Ovechkin hadn’t scored in 10 games, or had an even-strength goal in 18, before firing a one-timer by league save percentage leader Devan Dubnyk in the second period. Ovechkin’s 28th goal of the season came one second after a power play expired. Nate Schmidt, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Jay Beagle also scored for the NHLleading Capitals, who recaptured sole possession of first ahead of Pittsburgh in the Metropolitan Division with 97 points. Goaltender Braden Holtby put on a show, stopping 32 of 34 shots as the Capitals won for the first time since March 4. Minnesota lost for the fifth time in seven games despite goals from Matt Dumba and Eric Staal and 36 saves by Dubnyk. Trailing 3-0 entering the third period, the Wild made things interesting with two goals in the first 5 minutes. When Washington’s three-goal lead shrunk to one, it was

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin (8) slams Minnesota Wild defenseman Nate Prosser into the boards during Tuesday’s game.

Beagle to the rescue. The fourth-line center sniped a wrist shot past Dubnyk with 5:41 left, his first goal in 16 games. C a p i ta l s d e fe n s e man and former Blues player Kevin Shattenkirk served the second of his two-game suspension for charging. Schmidt was in the lineup because Shattenkirk was out.

NOTEBOOK Anisimov injured • Center Artem Anisimov left the Chicago Blackhawks’ game against Montreal after suffering an apparent left leg injury late in the first period. The ‘Hawks won the game, 4-2, thanks to goals

from Patrick Kane, his 31st of the season, Johnny Oduya, Artemi Panarin, and an empty-netter from Jonathan Toews, but suffered a potentially big loss in Anisimov. He was injured late in the first period after Canadiens winger Alexander Radulov crunched him into the boards. Anisimov remained on the ice until the Hawks’ medical staff was able to attend to him. He could not exit the ice under his own power and did not put any weight on his left leg as he left. Earlier in the period, Anisimov assisted on Kane’s goal, giving him a career-high 45 points.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook gestures in the second half of Tuesday’s game against Brooklyn. He had 25 points, 19 assists and 12 rebounds.

NBA SUMMARIES Knicks 87, Pacers 81 Indiana: George 9-22 1-1 22, Miles 2-9 0-0 6, T.Young 2-4 0-0 4, Turner 8-17 1-2 17, Teague 4-15 0-1 9, Robinson 1-2 1-2 4, Seraphin 1-1 0-0 2, Christmas 0-1 2-2 2, Stuckey 1-6 3-6 6, Ellis 4-10 1-1 9. Totals 32-87 9-15 81. New York: Anthony 8-17 3-5 22, Thomas 3-9 0-0 9, Porzingis 5-17 0-0 11, Rose 7-12 2-2 16, Lee 2-9 0-0 5, Hernangomez 6-12 1-4 13, Randle 0-1 2-2 2, Baker 1-1 0-0 2, Holiday 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 35-83 8-13 87. Indiana 24 28 12 17 — 81 New York 18 24 20 25 — 87 3-point goals: Indiana 8-29 (George 3-8, Miles 2-8, Robinson 1-2, Stuckey 1-3, Teague 1-6, T.Young 0-1, Ellis 0-1), New York 9-28 (Anthony 3-6, Thomas 3-7, Holiday 1-2, Lee 1-5, Porzingis 1-6, Randle 0-1, Rose 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 53 (Turner 12), New York 52 (Hernangomez 16). Assists: Indiana 16 (Teague 6), New York 21 (Hernangomez, Rose 4). Total fouls: Indiana 14, New York 15. Technicals: New York defensive three second, New York team. A: 18,261 (19,812).

Thunder 122, Nets 104

NHL SUMMARIES Sharks 4, Sabres 1

Panthers 7, Maple Leafs 2

Capitals 4, Wild 2

Buffalo 1 0 0 — 1 San Jose 0 2 2 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 20 (Moulson, Gorges), 1:10. Penalties: Ennis, BUF, (tripping), 7:56. Second period: 2, San Jose, Pavelski 27 (Thornton, Couture), 11:47 (pp). 3, San Jose, Haley 2, 19:10. Penalties: Franson, BUF, (holding), 4:52; Falk, BUF, (holding), 10:57; Braun, SJ, (holding), 13:14. Third period: 4, San Jose, Pavelski 28 (Demelo, Thornton), 5:28. 5, San Jose, Couture 24 (Ward, Marleau), 14:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Buffalo 9-5-9: 23. San Jose 20-17-5: 42. Power-plays: Buffalo 0 of 1; San Jose 1 of 3. Goalies: Buffalo, Lehner 19-21-8 (41 shots-37 saves). San Jose, Jones 32-17-6 (23-22). A: 17,386. Referees: Tom Kowal, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Kiel Murchison.

Toronto 1 1 0 — 2 Florida 3 3 1 — 7 First period: 1, Florida, Barkov 18 (Huberdeau), 0:18. 2, Florida, Sceviour 9 (Mackenzie, Matheson), 10:33 (sh). 3, Toronto, Komarov 11 (Nylander), 13:36 (pp). 4, Florida, Marchessault 21 (Vanek), 14:21. Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Marner (too many men on the ice), 2:09; Bjugstad, FLA, (high sticking), 10:12; Jagr, FLA, (holding), 12:58; Kindl, FLA, (kneeing), 15:21. Second period: 5, Florida, Marchessault 22 (Vanek, Barkov), 4:38. 6, Florida, Smith 11 (Yandle), 16:22. 7, Toronto, Soshnikov 5 (Boyle, Martin), 18:19. 8, Florida, Jokinen 10 (Vanek, Trocheck), 19:33 (pp). Penalties: Soshnikov, TOR, (holding), 19:08. Third period: 9, Florida, Yandle 4 (Vanek, Trocheck), 2:17. Penalties: Polak, TOR, (high sticking), 2:49; Nylander, TOR, (hooking), 6:15; Mackenzie, FLA, (holding stick), 12:31; Martin, TOR, (cross checking), 15:17; Petrovic, FLA, (roughing), 15:17; Van riemsdyk, TOR, (high sticking), 16:23; Van riemsdyk, TOR, served by Marner, (high sticking), 16:23; Marchessault, FLA, (roughing), 16:23. Shots: Toronto 9-12-9: 30. Florida 8-12-12: 32. Power-plays: Toronto 1 of 4; Florida 1 of 6. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 27-15-13 (8 shots-5 saves), Mcelhinney 5-5-2 (24-20). Florida, Reimer 13-12-5 (30-28). A: 17,552.

Minnesota 0 0 2 — 2 Washington 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Washington, Schmidt 2 (Backstrom, Ovechkin), 19:48. Penalties: Dumba, MIN, (tripping), 0:20; Schmidt, WSH, (holding), 5:48. Second period: 2, Washington, Ovechkin 28 (Backstrom, Carlson), 14:52. 3, Washington, Kuznetsov 16 (Backstrom, Carlson), 17:08 (pp). Penalties: Dumba, MIN, (hooking), 1:17; Orpik, WSH, (holding), 5:31; Staal, MIN, (hooking), 8:45; Alzner, WSH, (tripping), 11:39; Granlund, MIN, (high sticking), 12:51; Suter, MIN, (slashing), 16:46; Wilson, WSH, Major (fighting), 17:37; White, MIN, Major (fighting), 17:37; Wilson, WSH, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:37; Wilson, WSH, served by Ovechkin, (instigator), 17:37. Third period: 4, Minnesota, Dumba 8 (Granlund), 0:37. 5, Minnesota, Staal 23 (Suter, Koivu), 4:37 (pp). 6, Washington, Beagle 12 (Orlov), 14:19. Penalties: Connolly, WSH, (interference), 2:32; Backstrom, WSH, (holding), 3:43; Williams, WSH, (hooking), 4:51. Shots: Minnesota 14-11-7: 32. Washington 15-14-11: 40. Power-plays: Minnesota 1 of 7; Washington 1 of 5. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 36-15-3 (40 shots-36 saves). Washington, Holtby 35-11-5 (32-30). A: 18,506.

Islanders 3, Hurricanes 2, OT NY Islanders 0 2 0 1 — 3 Carolina 1 1 0 0 — 2 First period: 1, Carolina, Nordstrom 5 (Stempniak, Wallmark), 12:30. Penalties: Hamonic, NYI, (interference), 17:59. Second period: 2, Carolina, Lindholm 7, 0:40. 3, NY Islanders, Ho-sang 3 (Kulemin), 18:55. 4, NY Islanders, Chimera 17 (De haan, Clutterbuck), 19:20. Penalties: Clutterbuck, NYI, (cross checking), 8:26; Tavares, NYI, (hooking), 11:34; Aho, CAR, (hooking), 16:42. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Overtime: 5, NY Islanders, Tavares 26 (Leddy, Ho-sang), 0:34. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 7-13-13-1: 34. Carolina 9-11-12: 32. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 3. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 24-15-4 (32 shots-30 saves). Carolina, Ward 23-20-10 (34-31). A: 8,707.

Oilers 7, Stars 1 Dallas 0 1 0 — 1 Edmonton 2 3 2 — 7 First period: 1, Edmonton, Pouliot 6 (Kassian), 12:12. 2, Edmonton, Klefbom 12 (Lucic, Draisaitl), 18:01 (pp). Penalties: Hamhuis, DAL, (delay of game), 6:15; Klingberg, DAL, (hooking), 17:03. Second period: 3, Edmonton, Nurse 4, 2:06. 4, Dallas, Ritchie 12 (Cracknell, Mckenzie), 5:42. 5, Edmonton, Desharnais 6 (Sekera, Slepyshev), 9:30. 6, Edmonton, Maroon 22 (Draisaitl), 11:29. Penalties: None. Third period: 7, Edmonton, Nugenthopkins 14 (Lucic, Eberle), 12:17. 8, Edmonton, Mcdavid 24 (Maroon, Kassian), 14:00. Penalties: Draisaitl, EDM, (interference), 7:45. Shots: DAL 5-12-6: 23. Edmonton 13-10-6: 29. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 1; Edmonton 1 of 2. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 16-21-6 (9 shots-7 saves), Niemi 11-11-4 (20-15). Edmonton, Talbot 34-20-8 (23-22). A: 18,347.

Lightning 2, Senators 1, OT Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1 — 2 Ottawa 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Point 12 (Coburn, Dotchin), 3:05. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Ottawa, Wingels 7, 2:35. Penalties: Smith, OTT, (holding), 16:47. Third period: None. Penalties: Hedman, TB, (cross checking), 3:37; Tampa Bay bench, served by Drouin (too many men on the ice), 18:02. Overtime: 3, Tampa Bay, Hedman 14 (Palat), 4:05. Penalties: None. Shots: TB 11-11-12-3: 37. Ottawa 14-6-9-3: 32. Power-plays: TB 0 of 1; Ottawa 0 of 2. Goalies: TB, Vasilevskiy 17-13-6 (32 shots-31 saves). OTT, Condon 18-11-6 (37-35). A: 16,894.

Blackhawks 4, Canadiens 2 Chicago 1 1 2 — 4 Montreal 0 0 2 — 2 First period: 1, Chicago, Kane 31 (Anisimov, Hjalmarsson), 12:23. Penalties: Shaw, MTL, (tripping), 7:29. Second period: 2, Chicago, Oduya 2, 10:49. Penalties: Kero, CHI, (tripping), 5:17; Kane, CHI, (hooking), 14:00. Third period: 3, Chicago, Panarin 23 (Kane, Schmaltz), 0:47. 4, Montreal, Byron 19 (Gallagher, Davidson), 12:42. 5, Montreal, Weber 16 (Radulov, Galchenyuk), 16:32. 6, Chicago, Toews 18 (Keith, Kane), 18:38. Penalties: None. Shots: Chicago 4-12-8: 24. Montreal 11-13-18: 42. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 1; Montreal 0 of 2. Goalies: CHI, Crawford 28-15-3 (42 shots-40 saves). MTL, Price 31-17-5 (23-20). A: 21,288.

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

Goal Scoring Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Patrik Laine Winnipeg Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Max Pacioretty Montreal Cam Atkinson Columbus Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis Jeff Carter Los Angeles Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Auston Matthews Toronto Patrick Kane Chicago Rickard Rakell Anaheim Filip Forsberg Nashville Nazem Kadri Toronto David Pastrnak Boston Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Brent Burns San Jose Michael Grabner NY Rangers Alex Ovechkin Washington Assists Connor McDavid Edmonton Erik Karlsson Ottawa Nicklas Backstrom Washington Victor Hedman Tampa Bay Tyler Seguin Dallas Brent Burns San Jose Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Patrick Kane Chicago Ryan Johansen Nashville Plus/Minus Ryan Suter Minnesota Jason Zucker Minnesota Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Mikko Koivu Minnesota Brooks Orpik Washington Justin Schultz Pittsburgh Michael Grabner NY Rangers Mikael Granlund Minnesota Dmitry Orlov Washington

GP 62 69 62 61 69 68 68 68 61 67 68 58 69 67 62 67 68 68 64 68 GP 68 67 68 65 68 68 62 68 69 GP 67 67 63 66 65 65 64 67 68

G 35 35 33 33 33 32 32 31 31 31 30 29 28 28 28 28 28 27 27 27 A 52 48 47 45 44 43 43 43 42 +/34 33 32 31 31 30 29 28 27

Oklahoma City: Gibson 8-17 1-3 17, Adams 4-5 3-4 11, Westbrook 6-18 11-13 25, Oladipo 9-15 0-0 21, Roberson 2-4 2-4 7, McDermott 1-4 2-2 5, Grant 0-0 0-0 0, Sabonis 2-6 0-2 4, Kanter 6-10 5-6 17, Christon 1-1 0-0 2, Abrines 5-7 0-0 13. Totals 44-87 24-34 122. Brooklyn: Lopez 9-15 4-4 25, Lin 8-15 6-6 24, Foye 4-6 2-2 13, Hollis-Jefferson 1-2 4-4 6, LeVert 4-6 7-8 16, Acy 0-4 0-0 0, Nicholson 1-2 0-0 2, Booker 3-8 0-0 8, Hamilton 0-0 0-0 0, Whitehead 2-7 0-2 5, Dinwiddie 0-4 3-4 3, Kilpatrick 1-2 0-0 2, McDaniels 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-71 26-30 104. Oklahoma City 32 30 29 31 — 122 Brooklyn 32 30 21 21 — 104 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 10-22 (Oladipo 3-4, Abrines 3-5, Westbrook 2-7, McDermott 1-2, Roberson 1-3, Kanter 0-1), Brooklyn 12-24 (Foye 3-3, Lopez 3-6, Booker 2-2, Lin 2-4, Whitehead 1-2, LeVert 1-2, Nicholson 0-1, Dinwiddie 0-1, Acy 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 44 (Westbrook 12), Brooklyn 30 (Lopez 6). Assists: Oklahoma City 30 (Westbrook 19), Brooklyn 20 (Lin 5). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 27, Brooklyn 23. A: 13,911 (17,732).

Cavaliers 128, Pistons 96 Detroit: Harris 6-11 4-5 17, Morris 5-9 2-2 13, Drummond 4-12 0-0 8, Jackson 3-13 0-0 6, Caldwell-Pope 3-10 5-5 11, Johnson 1-10 2-2 5, Hilliard 1-2 0-0 2, Bullock 2-6 1-1 6, Baynes 2-6 0-0 4, Leuer 3-6 2-2 8, Marjanovic 1-2 2-2 4, I.Smith 6-12 0-0 12. Totals 37-99 18-19 96. Cleveland: James 6-12 4-5 16, Jefferson 5-9 2-3 16, Thompson 2-4 0-0 4, Irving 9-14 4-4 26, Shumpert 8-13 0-0 18, Frye 2-4 0-0 6, Derr.Williams 4-8 2-4 13, Sanders 0-1 0-0 0, Dero.Williams 6-6 0-0 13, J.Smith 4-5 1-2 12, Liggins 0-0 2-2 2, Jones 0-1 2-3 2. Totals 46-77 17-23 128. Detroit 26 22 22 26 — 96 Cleveland 44 30 30 24 — 128 3-point goals: Detroit 4-19 (Morris 1-2, Johnson 1-4, Harris 1-4, Bullock 1-4, Jackson 0-1, Drummond 0-1, Hilliard 0-1, Caldwell-Pope 0-2), Cleveland 19-30 (Irving 4-4, Jefferson 4-7, J.Smith 3-4, Derr.Williams 3-5, Shumpert 2-3, Frye 2-3, Dero.Williams 1-1, Jones 0-1, James 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 45 (Drummond 14), Cleveland 41 (James 11). Assists: Detroit 20 (Jackson 6), Cleveland 29 (James 12). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Cleveland 18. A: 20,562 (20,562).

Pelicans 100, Trail Blazers 77 Portland: Harkless 1-3 2-2 4, Vonleh 0-2 3-6 3, Nurkic 1-8 0-0 2, Lillard 8-18 9-9 29, McCollum 4-12 0-0 8, Layman 0-3 2-2 2, Aminu 0-3 1-2 1, Leonard 3-8 0-0 9, Napier 3-7 2-3 10, Crabbe 1-8 1-2 4, Connaughton 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 23-76 20-26 77. New Orleans: Hill 4-5 2-2 12, A.Davis 5-15 5-6 15, Cousins 9-22 4-10 22, Holiday 4-6 1-2 10, Selden 0-1 2-4 2, Cunningham 3-4 0-0 6, Motiejunas 0-0 0-0 0, Ajinca 1-1 0-0 2, Frazier 2-6 2-2 7, Crawford 5-11 1-2 13, Moore 5-9 1-2 11. Totals 38-80 18-30 100. Portland 16 20 18 23 — 77 New Orleans 23 27 27 23 — 100 3-point goals: Portland 11-32 (Lillard 4-7, Leonard 3-5, Napier 2-4, Connaughton 1-1, Crabbe 1-6, Layman 0-1, Harkless 0-2, McCollum 0-3, Aminu 0-3), New Orleans 6-21 (Hill 2-3, Crawford 2-5, Frazier 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Cunningham 0-1, Moore 0-1, Selden 0-1, Cousins 0-5). Rebounds: Portland 48 (Aminu, Vonleh 10), New Orleans 49 (A.Davis 15). Assists: Portland 13 (Napier, Leonard 3), New Orleans 19 (Frazier 7). Total fouls: Portland 20, New Orleans 18. Technicals: New Orleans defensive three second, New Orleans team. A: 15,530 (16,867).

Golden State 106, Philadelphia 104 Philadelphia: Covington 1-8 4-4 7, Saric 11-20 1-2 25, Okafor 8-15 6-7 22, McConnell 3-7 1-2 7, Luwawu-Cabarrot 4-7 1-2 10, Long 0-1 0-2 0, Holmes 6-9 1-1 14, Rodriguez 1-7 0-0 3, Henderson 3-7 2-5 9, Stauskas 2-6 2-2 7, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-87 18-27 104. Golden State: Green 4-12 11-14 20, Pachulia 0-5 2-2 2, Curry 8-23 8-8 29, Thompson 10-22 3-3 28, McCaw 1-2 0-0 2, Barnes 3-7 2-2 10, McAdoo 0-2 0-2 0, West 1-1 0-0 2, McGee 1-1 0-2 2, Livingston 1-1 2-2 4, Iguodala 3-8 0-0 7, Clark 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 32-87 28-35 106. Philadelphia 34 25 31 14 — 104 Golden State 35 23 20 28 — 106 3-Point Goals: Philadelphia 8-27 (Saric 2-6, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-2, Holmes 1-2, Henderson 1-3, Covington 1-4, Stauskas 1-4, Rodriguez 1-6), Golden State 14-32 (Thompson 5-9, Curry 5-13, Barnes 2-4, Iguodala 1-1, Green 1-4, Clark 0-1). Rebounds: Philadelphia 49 (Covington 9), Golden State 42 (Barnes 9). Assists: Philadelphia 28 (McConnell 10), Golden State 24 (Green 8). Total Fouls: Philadelphia 26, Golden State 24. Technicals: West. A: 19,596 (19,596).

Westbrook chalks up 33rd triple-double ASSOCIATED PRESS

On a night when LeBron James recorded his fifth triple-double in nine games in Cleveland’s victory over Detroit, the triple-double “crown” belonged to — who else? — Russell Westbrook. Westbrook had 25 points, 19 assists and 12 rebounds for his 33rd triple-double of the season as the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the host Brooklyn Nets 122-104 on Tuesday. Westbrook shot just six of 18 from the field after scoring 40 or more points in five of his previous eight games. But as usual he was the dominant player on the floor even when his shots didn’t fall. He was loudly cheered throughout the night by a full and lively crowd despite a winter storm that pounded New York. The fans roared when he grabbed his 10th rebound with just under five minutes to play for the 70th triple-double of his career. Victor Oladipo added 21 points for the Thunder, who won their third straight game. Enes Kanter had 17 points and Brooklyn native Taj Gibson finished with 17 points and eight rebounds. Brook Lopez scored 25 points and Jeremy Lin had 24 for the Nets. In Cleveland, James had 16 points, 11 rebounds and 12 assists in just 28 minutes of action in a 128-96 rout of the Pistons.

NOTEBOOK Love closer to return • Cleveland general manager David Griin anticipates forward Kevin Love will return during the team’s trip that begins Saturday. Love had surgery on his left knee Feb. 14. The defending NBA champions are 7-6 since he was injured and have been plagued by defensive and rebounding issues without the four-time All-Star. Love is having his best season since joining the Cavaliers in 2014, averaging 20 points and 11.1 rebounds. Cleveland was outrebounded 52-38 in Sunday’s loss to Houston. Griin said Love participated in 3-on-3 drills Tuesday and the team will monitor how he responds before deciding on the next step. Cleveland begins a four-game trip Saturday against the Los Angeles Clippers. The Cavaliers lead Boston by two games in the Eastern Conference.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

Scotland’s Muirield votes to allow women Action follows British Open snub After 273 years, Muirfield, the venerable Scottish golf club that has 16 times hosted the British Open, will allow women to become members. The decision, approved by just more than 80 percent of the club’s members, comes a little less than a year after they voted to continue to restrict membership to men. That

vote carried a significant repercussion: it was taken out of rotation for hosting the Open. It was a decision that Scotland First Minister Nicola Sturgeon called “indefensible.” “Well done, Muirfield — decision to admit women members emphatic and the right one,” Sturgeon tweeted Tuesday. “Look forward to seeing you host the Open again in future.” The club last hosted the

AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

BOXING REPORT • In the WBC/WBA/IBF/ IBO middleweight title fight Saturday in New York, Gennady Golovkin is -$850 vs. Daniel “The Miracle Man” Jacobs at +$550. NBA Favorite Points Underdog PACERS 3.5 Hornets WIZARDS 6.5 Mavericks CELTICS 6 T’Wolves HEAT 6 Pelicans Jazz 3 PISTONS Grizzlies 1.5 BULLS SPURS 10.5 Blazers ROCKETS 17.5 Lakers SUNS 6 Kings CLIPPERS 8 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog NCAA Tournament, First Four | Dayton, OH NC Central 3.5 Cal-Davis Usc 3 Providence Thursday NCAA Tournament | Buffalo, NY Notre Dame 7 Princeton W Virginia 14 Bucknell Villanova NL New Orleans or Villanova NL Mt. St. Mary’s Wisconsin 5.5 Virginia Tech Thursday NCAA Tournament | Orlando, FL Virginia 7.5 NC-Wilmington Florida 10 E Tennessee St Maryland 2 Xavier Florida St 12 Fla-Gulf Coast Thursday NCAA Tournament | Milwaukee, WI Butler 11 Winthrop Minnesota PK Middle Tenn St Purdue 8.5 Vermont Iowa St 6 Nevada Thursday NCAA Tournament | Salt Lake City, UT Gonzaga 22.5 S Dakota St Vanderbilt 1 Northwestern St. Mary’s-CA 4.5 Virginia Comm Arizona 17 N Dakota Friday NCAA Tournament | Greenville, SC Arkansas 1 Seton Hall N Carolina 26.5 Texas Southern Duke 19 Troy S Carolina 1.5 Marquette NCAA Tournament | Indianapolis, IN Michigan 2 Oklahoma St Louisville 20 Jack’ville St Wichita St 6 Dayton Kentucky 20 No Kentucky NCAA Tournament | Tulsa, OK Baylor 12 New Mexico St Smu NL Usc or Smu NL Providence Kansas NL Cal-Davis or Kansas NL NC Central Miami-Florida 2 Michigan St NCAA Tournament | Sacramento, CA Oregon 15 Iona Creighton 1 Rhode Island Cincinnati NL Kansas St or Cincinnati NL Wake Forest Ucla 18 Kent St NIT Tournament SYRACUSE 13 NC-Greensboro GEORGIA 6.5 Belmont BYU 5 UT-Arlington HOUSTON 8.5 Akron IOWA 11.5 S Dakota TCU 10 Fresno St ILLINOIS ST 11 Cal-Irvine C FLORIDA 2.5 Colorado CBI Tournament GEORGE MASON 12 Loyola-MD COASTAL CARO 11 Hampton GEORGE WASH 5.5 Toledo WYOMING 6.5 E Washington UMKC 1 Wisc-Green Bay RICE 2 San Francisco GA SOUTHERN 4.5 Utah Valley College Insider Tournament IPFW 4.5 Ball St MARY-BALT CO. 3 Fairfield Georgia St 3 TEXAS A&M-CC IDAHO 5 Stephen Austin Thursday College Insider Tournament ALBANY 1.5 St. Peter’s Furman 5 SC UPSTATE NC-Asheville 3 TENN-MARTIN TEXAS ST 8.5 Lamar CS-FULLERTON PK Weber St Thursday CBI Tournament ILLINOIS-CHI 1 Stony Brook Odds to win the NCAA Tournament Team Odds Duke 6/1 North Carolina 6/1 Villanova 7/1 Kansas 7/1 Gonzaga 8/1 Arizona 8/1 Kentucky 10/1 Ucla 12/1 Louisville 15/1 Oregon 20/1 Purdue 20/1 W Virginia 25/1 Michigan 25/1 Baylor 30/1 Florida 30/1 Florida State 30/1 SMU 40/1 Iowa State 40/1 Virginia 40/1 Notre Dame 40/1 Butler 50/1 Wichita State 50/1 Wisconsin 50/1 St. Mary’s-CA 75/1 Minnesota 100/1 Cincinnati 100/1 Maryland 100/1 Michigan State 100/1 Oklahoma State 100/1 Creighton 150/1 South Carolina 150/1 Rhode Island 200/1 Northwestern 200/1 Virginia Tech 200/1 Middle Tennessee State 250/1 Arkansas 250/1 Kansas State 250/1 Miami-Florida 250/1 Providence 250/1 Seton Hall 250/1 Virginia Commonwealth 250/1 Usc 250/1 Vanderbilt 250/1 Wake Forest 250/1 Xavier 250/1 Marquette 300/1 Dayton 300/1 Nevada 500/1 Princeton 500/1 Florida Gulf Coast 1000/1 South Dakota State 1000/1 NC-Wilmington 1000/1 East Tennessee State 1000/1 New Mexico State 1000/1 North Dakota 1000/1 New Orleans 1000/1 Mt. St. Mary’s 1000/1 NC Central 1000/1 Cal-Davis 1000/1 Vermont 1000/1 Troy 1000/1 Iona 1000/1 Jacksonville State 1000/1 Winthrop 1000/1 Kent State 1000/1 Northern Kentucky 1000/1 Bucknell 1000/1 Texas Southern 1000/1 NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Penguins -$140/+$120 FLYERS FLAMES -$110/-$110 Bruins DUCKS -$135/+$115 Blues Red Wings -$160/+$140 AVALANCHE Grand Salami: Over/under 21.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

AREA SCORES

WASHINGTON POST

Softball Washington 14, Emory & Henry 5 Webster 10, UM-Morris 3 Webster 7, North Park 0 Baseball Washington 5, Centenary 0 Webster 4, UW-La Crosse 0 Women’s tennis Webster 6, Concordia 3 Men’s tennis Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 6, Washington U. 3 Men’s basketball DII tournament NW Missouri State

MEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament Glance > FIRST FOUR At UD Arena | Dayton, Ohio Tuesday Mount St. Mary’s 67, New Orleans 66 Kansas State 95, Wake Forest 88 Wednesday N.C. Central (25-8) vs. UC Davis (22-12), 5:40 Providence (20-12) vs. So. Cal (24-9), 8:10

> EAST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday At KeyBank Center | Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova (31-3) vs. Mount St. Mary’sNew Orleans winner, 6:10 p.m. Wisconsin (25-9) vs. Virginia Tech (22-10), 8:40 p.m. At Amway Center | Orlando, Fla. Virginia (22-10) vs. UNC Wilm. (29-5), 11:40 a.m. Florida (24-8) vs. ETSU (27-7), 2:10 p.m. Friday At Bon Secours Arena | Greenville, S.C. Duke (27-8) vs. Troy (22-14), 6:20 p.m. South Carolina (22-10) vs. Marquette (19-12), 8:50 p.m. At BOK Center | Tulsa, Okla. Baylor (25-7) vs. New Mexico State (28-5), 11:40 a.m. SMU (29-4) vs. Providence-Southern Cal winner, 2:10 p.m.

> SOUTH REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday BMO Harris Bradley Center | Milwaukee Butler (23-8) vs. Winthrop (26-6), 12:30 p.m. Minnesota (24-9) vs. Mid. Tennessee (30-4), 3 p.m. Friday At Bon Secours Arena | Greenville, S.C. Arkansas (25-9) vs. Seton Hall (21-11), 12:30 p.m. North Carolina (27-7) vs. Texas South. (23-11), 3 p.m. At Bankers Life Fieldhouse | Indianapolis Dayton (24-7) vs. Wichita State (30-4), 6:10 p.m. Kentucky (29-5) vs. Northern Kentucky (24-10), 8:40 p.m. At Golden 1 Center | Sacramento, Calif. Cincinnati (29-5) vs. Kansas StateWake Forest winner, 6:27 p.m. UCLA (29-4) vs. Kent State (22-13), 8:57 p.m.

> MIDWEST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday BMO Harris Bradley Center | Milwaukee Purdue (25-7) vs. Vermont (29-5), 6:27 p.m. Iowa State (23-10) vs. Nevada (28-6), 8:57 p.m. Friday At Bankers Life Fieldhouse | Indianapolis Michigan (24-11) vs. Oklahoma State (20-12), 11:15 a.m. Louisville (24-8) vs. Jacksonville State (20-14), 1:45 p.m. At BOK Center | Tulsa, Okla. Kansas (28-4) vs. N.C. Central-UC Davis winner, 5:50 p.m. Miami (21-11) vs. Michigan State (19-14), 8:20 p.m. At Golden 1 Center | Sacramento, Calif. Oregon (29-5) vs. Iona (22-12), 1 p.m. Creighton (25-9) vs. Rhode Island (24-9), 3:30 p.m.

> WEST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday At KeyBank Center | Buffalo, N.Y. Notre Dame (25-9) vs. Princeton (23-6), 11:15 a.m. West Virginia (26-8) vs. Bucknell (26-8), 1:45 p.m. At Amway Center | Orlando, Fla. Maryland (24-8) vs. Xavier (21-13), 5:50 p.m. Florida State (25-8) vs. Florida G.C. (26-7), 8:20 p.m. At Vivint Arena | Salt Lake City Gonzaga (32-1) vs. South Dakota State (18-16), 1 p.m. Northwestern (23-11) vs. Vanderbilt (19-15), 3:30 p.m. Saint Mary’s (28-4) vs. VCU (26-8), 6:20 p.m. Arizona (30-4) vs. North Dakota (22-9), 8:50 p.m.

> FINAL FOUR Glendale, Ariz. | April 1

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Glendale, Ariz. | April 3

NIT First Round Tuesday Illinois 82, Valparaiso 57 Mississippi 91, Monmouth 83 Oakland 74, Clemson 69 Georgia Tech 75, Indiana 63 Colorado State 81, College of Charleston 74 Richmond 71, Alabama 64 Boise St. (19-11) at Utah (20-11), late CS Bakersfield (22-9) at California (21-12), late Wednesday South Dakota (22-11) at Iowa (18-14), 6 p.m. UNC-Greensboro (25-9) at Syracuse (18-14), 6 p.m. Belmont (22-6) at Georgia (19-14), 6 p.m. Colorado (19-14) at UCF (21-11), 6 p.m. Akron (26-8) at Houston (21-10), 6:30 p.m. Fresno St. (20-12) at TCU (19-15), 7 p.m. Texas-Arlington (25-8) at BYU (22-11), 8 p.m. UC Irvine (21-14) at Illinois State (27-6), 8:30 p.m. Second Round • March 16-20 Quarterfinals • March 21-22 Semifinals • Tuesday, March 28 Championship • Thursday, March 29

CBI First Round • Wednesday Utah Valley (15-16) at Ga. Southern (18-14), 6 p.m. Loyola (Md.) (15-16) at George Mason (20-13), 6 p.m. Hampton (14-16) at Coast. Carolina (16-17), 6 p.m. Toledo (17-16) at G. Wash. (19-14), 6 p.m. San Francisco (20-12) at Rice (22-11), 7 p.m. Stony Brook (18-13) at UIC (15-18), 7 p.m. Green Bay (18-13) at UMKC (17-16), 7:05 p.m. Eastern Washington (22-11) at Wyoming (18-14), 8 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 20 Semifinals • March 22 Championship Series (Best-of-3) March 27, 29, 31

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENT BRIDGEPORT REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At College Park, Md. Maryland (30-2) vs. Bucknell (27-5), 11 a.m. West Virginia (23-10) vs. Elon (27-6), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Storrs, Conn. UConn (32-0) vs. Albany (NY) (21-10), 10 a.m. Syracuse (21-1) vs. Iowa St. (18-12), 12:30 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA (23-8) vs. Boise State (25-7), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (21-11) vs. Penn (22-7), 8 p.m. At Durham, N.C. Temple (24-7) vs. Oregon (20-13), 5:30 p.m. Duke (27-5) vs. Hampton (20-12), 8 p.m.

Open in 2013. The earliest it can host is 2022. “We look forward to welcoming women as members who will enjoy, and benefit, from the great traditions and friendly spirit of this remarkable club,” said Henry Fairweather, captain of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers that owns and operates Muirfield. The historic decision came by a 498-123 vote on the second ballot. The R&A, which orga-

nizes the Open, quickly restored Muirfield’s eligibility as a tournament host. “It is extremely important for us in staging one of the world’s great sporting events that women can become members at all of our host clubs,” Martin Slumbers, the group’s chief executive, said in a statement. “Muirfield is a truly outstanding Open venue and we very much look forward to taking the Championship back there in the future.” Women will not im-

mediately become members, though. “The current waiting list for membership at Muirfield suggests that new candidates for membership, women and men, can expect to wait two to three years, or longer, to become a member of the club,” the HGEC said in a statement. Last year, the Telegraph reported that 33 Muirfield traditionalists sent a letter to other members that said lifting the 272-year ban on female members would have an adverse effect on

the club: “Our special nature — ‘a gentleman’s club where golf is played’ — is quite unique with its fraternity built inter alia on foursomes play with a round taking only the same time as lunch and leaving enough time for a further round after lunch (even in mid winter).” The letter also expressed concern about the club’s lunch arrangements and said that any female member is “bound to feel uncomfortable.”

At Louisville, Ky. Louisville (27-7) vs. Chattanooga (21-10), 12:30 Tennessee (19-11) vs. Dayton (22-9), 3 p.m. At Seattle Oklahoma (22-9) vs. Gonzaga (26-6), 5:30 Washington (27-5) vs. Montana St. (25-6), 8 p.m.

Villanova at Princeton, 5 p.m. Harvard at New Hampshire, 6 p.m. Sacred Heart at St. John’s, 6 p.m. Ohio at Penn State, 6 p.m. Fordham at Georgetown, 6 p.m. Navy at George Washington, 6 p.m. Rider at Virginia Tech, 6 p.m. Duquesne at Drexel, 6 p.m. Radford at James Madison, 6 p.m. Virginia at Saint Joseph’s, 6 p.m. Louisiana Tech at SMU, 7 p.m. UC Davis at Utah, 7 p.m. Round 2 • March 18-21 Round 3 • March 22-24 Round 4 • March 25-27 Semifinals • March 29-30 Championship • Saturday, April 1, 2 p.m.

MLB spring training

TRANSACTIONS

NL W L Pct. Cardinals 11 4 0.733 Pittsburgh 12 5 0.706 Los Angeles 11 8 0.579 Milwaukee 10 8 0.556 Philadelphia 9 8 0.529 Arizona 9 8 0.529 Colorado 9 8 0.529 New York 10 9 0.526 Washington 7 7 0.500 Chicago 6 8 0.429 San Francisco 8 11 0.421 Cincinnati 8 12 0.400 San Diego 6 10 0.375 Atlanta 6 11 0.353 Miami 4 10 0.286 AL W L Pct. New York 13 5 0.722 Oakland 10 6 0.625 Seattle 11 7 0.611 Minnesota 9 6 0.600 Baltimore 10 7 0.588 Los Angeles 10 7 0.588 Chicago 10 8 0.556 Tampa Bay 9 8 0.529 Kansas City 9 8 0.529 Cleveland 8 9 0.471 Boston 8 10 0.444 Houston 5 10 0.333 Toronto 5 11 0.313 Texas 5 12 0.294 Detroit 5 12 0.294 Tuesday Philadelphia 9, Atlanta 0 Detroit 7, Miami 1 NY Mets 2, Houston 1 Tampa Bay (ss) 10, NY Yankees 6 Tampa Bay (ss) 9, Baltimore 6 Boston 5, Toronto 4 LA Dodgers 6, Cincinnati 5 Colorado 4, Oakland 3 Kansas City 8, LA Angels 4 Milwaukee 7, Chicago Cubs 7 San Francisco 6, Cleveland 5 Seattle 7, Chicago White Sox 6 Arizona 12, Texas 0 Wednesday Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 Washington vs. Houston at West Palm Beach, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 5:35 p.m. Arizona vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned LHPS Brian Johnson and Henry Owens and RHP Brandon Workman to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned 3B Rafael Devers, OF Junior Lake and C Jordan Procyshen were reassigned to their minor league camp. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Optioned LHPs Nate Smith and Greg Mahle to Salt Lake (PCL) and RHP Eduardo Paredes to Mobile (SL). Reassigned C Jose Briceno and RHP Drew Gagnon to their minor league camp. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Claimed LHP Kevin Chapman off waivers from Houston. NEW YORK METS — Optioned OF Wuilmer Becerra, RHPs Chris Flexen and Marcos Molina and INF Amed Rosario to their minor league camp. Reassigned RHP Chase Bradford and LHP Adam Wilk to their minor league camp. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Re-signed S Kemal Ishmael. Signed WR-KR Andre Roberts. BUFFALO BILLS — Agreed to terms with DE Ryan Davis. CHICAGO BEARS — Agreed to terms with K Connor Barth on a one-year contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Claimed WR James Wright off waivers from Cincinnati. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed DT Bennie Logan to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed LS Garrison Sanborn. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with DL Sylvester Williams. HOCKEY • NHL NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned G Magnus Hellberg to Hartford (AHL). Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW — Signed M Wil Trapp to a multiyear contract extension. PARALYMPICS USADA — Announced sitting volleyball athlete Roderick Green accepted a ninemonth sanction for an anti-doping rule violation after testing positive for a prohibited substance from a contaminated supplement. COLLEGE CHARLESTON SOUTHERN — Named Bryant Foster cornerbacks coach. GEORGIA — Announced QB-P Brice Ramsey and DB Reggie Wilkerson will complete their degrees in May and then transfer for their final seasons of eligibility. ILLINOIS — Fired women’s basketball coach Matt Bollant. OMAHA — Announced the resignation of men’s hockey coach Dean Blais. WOFFORD — Named Mark Line deputy athletic director and Ryan Price assistant athletic director for business and finance.

> LEXINGTON REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At South Bend, Ind. Green Bay (27-5) vs. Purdue (22-12), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (30-3) vs. R. Morris (22-10), 6:30 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky (21-10) vs. Belmont (27-5), 11 a.m. Ohio State (26-6) vs. W. Kentucky (27-6), 1:30 At Austin, Texas NC State (22-8) vs. Auburn (17-14), 11 a.m. Texas (23-8) vs. C. Arkansas (26-4), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford (28-5) vs. N.M. State (24-6), 12:30 p.m. Kansas State (22-10) vs. Drake (28-4), 3 p.m.

> STOCKTON REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At Columbia, S.C. S.Carolina (27-4) vs. UNC-Asheville (19-14), 4 Arizona St. (19-12) vs. Michigan St.(21-11), 6:30 At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri (21-10) vs. S. Florida (24-8), 4 p.m. Florida State (25-6) vs. W. Illinois (26-6), 6:30 Corvallis, Ore. Ore. St. (29-4) vs. Long Beach St. (23-10), 4 Creighton (23-7) vs. Toledo (25-8), 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette (25-7) vs. Quinnipiac (27-6), 12:30 Miami (23-8) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (26-8), 3

> FINAL FOUR At Dallas | Friday, March 31

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP At Dallas | Sunday, April 2

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NIT First round Wednesday Little Rock at Southern Miss, 6 p.m. Thursday Ball State at Indiana, 6 p.m. Bethune-Cookman at Wake Forest, 6 p.m. Central Michigan at Wright State, 6 p.m. Grambling State at Ole Miss, 6 p.m. Jacksonville at Georgia Tech, 6 p.m. Kent State at Michigan, 6 p.m. Stetson at UCF, 6 p.m. Abilene Christian at Oklahoma State, 7 p.m. IUPUI at Saint Louis, 7 p.m. Mercer at Alabama, 7 p.m. Missouri State at Iowa, 7 p.m. North Dakota at South Dakota, 7 p.m. Northern Illinois at South Dakota State, 7 p.m. UT Arlington at Tulane, 7 p.m. Seattle at Wyoming, 7:30 p.m. Saint Mary’s at Colorado State, 8 p.m. UNLV at Colorado, 8 p.m. Washington State at BYU, 8 p.m. Morehead State at Middle Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. Friday

BASEBALL World Baseball Classic SECOND ROUND Round Robin Pool E | Tokyo W L Pct GB Japan 2 0 1.000 — Netherlands 1 1 .500 1 Israel 1 1 .500 1 Cuba 0 2 .000 2 Sunday Israel 4, Cuba 1 Japan 8, Netherlands 6, 11 innings Monday Netherlands 12, Israel 2, 8 innings Tuesday Japan 8, Cuba 5 Netherlands vs. Cuba, late Wednesday Israel vs. Japan, 5 a.m. Thursday Tiebreaker game, 5 a.m., if necessary Pool F | San Diego W L Pct GB Dominican Republic 0 0 0.000 — Puerto Rico 0 0 0.000 — United States 0 0 0.000 — Venezuela 0 0 0.000 — Tuesday Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, late Wednesday United States vs. Venezuela, 8 p.m. Thursday Dominican Republic vs. Venezuela, 9 p.m. Friday United States vs. Puerto Rico, 9 p.m. Saturday Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, 2:30 p.m. Dominican Republic vs. United States, 9 p.m. Sunday Tiebreaker game, 5 p.m., if necessary

CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND Los Angeles Semifinals Monday, March 20 Pool E runner-up vs. Pool F winner, 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 21 Pool E winner vs. Pool F runner-up, 8 p.m. Championship, Wednesday, March 22 Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.

NEWS LITERACY Journalists strive for truth and accuracy, fairness and balance, accountability, independence and to serve humanity.

Pew Research Center indicates most American adults feel they are conident in their ability to identify fake news. Research shows

23% say they have shared fake news, 81% of American adults whether knowingly or unknowingly.*

feel that they are at least somewhat conident in their ability to identify fake news.

Take the time to educate yourself so you can recognize real versus fake news. To fully evaluate a story’s validity, one must follow ive steps to analyze the story.

STEP THREE

3

Identify the lifestyles, values and points of view which are represented in or omitted from this article. Look for quotes from multiple sources and understand their connection to the story. Identify if various sides were asked for comment. For example, review “A mass killer: St. Louis heroin deaths hit new high,” on STLtoday.com on Monday, February 20, 2017. 1. What lifestyles, values and points of view are represented in or omitted from this article? The article gives a hard hitting view of the life of heroin addicts, using quotes from addicts to paint the picture. Family members, neighbors, Drug Enforcement Administration oficials, police oficers and other irst responders were interviewed to explain what they see, how the problem has expanded in a very short time and the implications. All points of view about heroin use were covered. The reporter, Jesse Bogan, kept any biases or views out of the feature. 2. Were multiple sources quoted and what is their connection to the story? Were various sides asked for comment? As noted above, many people were interviewed for this story and all were very open in their comments. Information on who they are and the role they have in story was clearly explained. This feature achieved the journalistic standard of presenting all sides, without bias or judgement.

FEATURE 3 OF 5

> OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At Starkville, Miss. DePaul (26-7) vs. No. Iowa (24-8), 11 a.m. Mississippi (29-4) vs. Troy (22-10), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Waco, Texas Baylor (30-3) vs. Texas So. (23-9), 5:30 p.m. LSU (20-11) vs. California (19-13), 8 p.m.

But for all of this conidence,

Visit STLtoday.com/Truth to access this article. * PEW RESEARCH CENTER DEC. 2016


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

Scotland’s Muirield votes to allow women Action follows British Open snub After 273 years, Muirfield, the venerable Scottish golf club that has 16 times hosted the British Open, will allow women to become members. The decision, approved by just more than 80 percent of the club’s members, comes a little less than a year after they voted to continue to restrict membership to men. That

vote carried a significant repercussion: it was taken out of rotation for hosting the Open. It was a decision that Scotland First Minister Nicola Sturgeon called “indefensible.” “Well done, Muirfield — decision to admit women members emphatic and the right one,” Sturgeon tweeted Tuesday. “Look forward to seeing you host the Open again in future.” The club last hosted the

AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

BOXING REPORT • In the WBC/WBA/IBF/ IBO middleweight title fight Saturday in New York, Gennady Golovkin is -$850 vs. Daniel “The Miracle Man” Jacobs at +$550. NBA Favorite Points Underdog PACERS 3.5 Hornets WIZARDS 6.5 Mavericks CELTICS 6 T’Wolves HEAT 6 Pelicans Jazz 3 PISTONS Grizzlies 1.5 BULLS SPURS 10.5 Blazers ROCKETS 17.5 Lakers SUNS 6 Kings CLIPPERS 8 Bucks COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog NCAA Tournament, First Four | Dayton, OH NC Central 3.5 Cal-Davis Usc 3 Providence Thursday NCAA Tournament | Buffalo, NY Notre Dame 7 Princeton W Virginia 14 Bucknell Villanova NL New Orleans or Villanova NL Mt. St. Mary’s Wisconsin 5.5 Virginia Tech Thursday NCAA Tournament | Orlando, FL Virginia 7.5 NC-Wilmington Florida 10 E Tennessee St Maryland 2 Xavier Florida St 12 Fla-Gulf Coast Thursday NCAA Tournament | Milwaukee, WI Butler 11 Winthrop Minnesota PK Middle Tenn St Purdue 8.5 Vermont Iowa St 6 Nevada Thursday NCAA Tournament | Salt Lake City, UT Gonzaga 22.5 S Dakota St Vanderbilt 1 Northwestern St. Mary’s-CA 4.5 Virginia Comm Arizona 17 N Dakota Friday NCAA Tournament | Greenville, SC Arkansas 1 Seton Hall N Carolina 26.5 Texas Southern Duke 19 Troy S Carolina 1.5 Marquette NCAA Tournament | Indianapolis, IN Michigan 2 Oklahoma St Louisville 20 Jack’ville St Wichita St 6 Dayton Kentucky 20 No Kentucky NCAA Tournament | Tulsa, OK Baylor 12 New Mexico St Smu NL Usc or Smu NL Providence Kansas NL Cal-Davis or Kansas NL NC Central Miami-Florida 2 Michigan St NCAA Tournament | Sacramento, CA Oregon 15 Iona Creighton 1 Rhode Island Cincinnati NL Kansas St or Cincinnati NL Wake Forest Ucla 18 Kent St NIT Tournament SYRACUSE 13 NC-Greensboro GEORGIA 6.5 Belmont BYU 5 UT-Arlington HOUSTON 8.5 Akron IOWA 11.5 S Dakota TCU 10 Fresno St ILLINOIS ST 11 Cal-Irvine C FLORIDA 2.5 Colorado CBI Tournament GEORGE MASON 12 Loyola-MD COASTAL CARO 11 Hampton GEORGE WASH 5.5 Toledo WYOMING 6.5 E Washington UMKC 1 Wisc-Green Bay RICE 2 San Francisco GA SOUTHERN 4.5 Utah Valley College Insider Tournament IPFW 4.5 Ball St MARY-BALT CO. 3 Fairfield Georgia St 3 TEXAS A&M-CC IDAHO 5 Stephen Austin Thursday College Insider Tournament ALBANY 1.5 St. Peter’s Furman 5 SC UPSTATE NC-Asheville 3 TENN-MARTIN TEXAS ST 8.5 Lamar CS-FULLERTON PK Weber St Thursday CBI Tournament ILLINOIS-CHI 1 Stony Brook Odds to win the NCAA Tournament Team Odds Duke 6/1 North Carolina 6/1 Villanova 7/1 Kansas 7/1 Gonzaga 8/1 Arizona 8/1 Kentucky 10/1 Ucla 12/1 Louisville 15/1 Oregon 20/1 Purdue 20/1 W Virginia 25/1 Michigan 25/1 Baylor 30/1 Florida 30/1 Florida State 30/1 SMU 40/1 Iowa State 40/1 Virginia 40/1 Notre Dame 40/1 Butler 50/1 Wichita State 50/1 Wisconsin 50/1 St. Mary’s-CA 75/1 Minnesota 100/1 Cincinnati 100/1 Maryland 100/1 Michigan State 100/1 Oklahoma State 100/1 Creighton 150/1 South Carolina 150/1 Rhode Island 200/1 Northwestern 200/1 Virginia Tech 200/1 Middle Tennessee State 250/1 Arkansas 250/1 Kansas State 250/1 Miami-Florida 250/1 Providence 250/1 Seton Hall 250/1 Virginia Commonwealth 250/1 Usc 250/1 Vanderbilt 250/1 Wake Forest 250/1 Xavier 250/1 Marquette 300/1 Dayton 300/1 Nevada 500/1 Princeton 500/1 Florida Gulf Coast 1000/1 South Dakota State 1000/1 NC-Wilmington 1000/1 East Tennessee State 1000/1 New Mexico State 1000/1 North Dakota 1000/1 New Orleans 1000/1 Mt. St. Mary’s 1000/1 NC Central 1000/1 Cal-Davis 1000/1 Vermont 1000/1 Troy 1000/1 Iona 1000/1 Jacksonville State 1000/1 Winthrop 1000/1 Kent State 1000/1 Northern Kentucky 1000/1 Bucknell 1000/1 Texas Southern 1000/1 NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Penguins -$140/+$120 FLYERS FLAMES -$110/-$110 Bruins DUCKS -$135/+$115 Blues Red Wings -$160/+$140 AVALANCHE Grand Salami: Over/under 21.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

AREA SCORES

WASHINGTON POST

Softball Washington 14, Emory & Henry 5 Webster 10, UM-Morris 3 Webster 7, North Park 0 Baseball Washington 5, Centenary 0 Webster 4, UW-La Crosse 0 Women’s tennis Webster 6, Concordia 3 Men’s tennis Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 6, Washington U. 3 Men’s basketball DII tournament NW Missouri State

MEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament Glance > FIRST FOUR At UD Arena | Dayton, Ohio Tuesday Mount St. Mary’s 67, New Orleans 66 Kansas State 95, Wake Forest 88 Wednesday N.C. Central (25-8) vs. UC Davis (22-12), 5:40 Providence (20-12) vs. So. Cal (24-9), 8:10

> EAST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday At KeyBank Center | Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova (31-3) vs. Mount St. Mary’sNew Orleans winner, 6:10 p.m. Wisconsin (25-9) vs. Virginia Tech (22-10), 8:40 p.m. At Amway Center | Orlando, Fla. Virginia (22-10) vs. UNC Wilm. (29-5), 11:40 a.m. Florida (24-8) vs. ETSU (27-7), 2:10 p.m. Friday At Bon Secours Arena | Greenville, S.C. Duke (27-8) vs. Troy (22-14), 6:20 p.m. South Carolina (22-10) vs. Marquette (19-12), 8:50 p.m. At BOK Center | Tulsa, Okla. Baylor (25-7) vs. New Mexico State (28-5), 11:40 a.m. SMU (29-4) vs. Providence-Southern Cal winner, 2:10 p.m.

> SOUTH REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday BMO Harris Bradley Center | Milwaukee Butler (23-8) vs. Winthrop (26-6), 12:30 p.m. Minnesota (24-9) vs. Mid. Tennessee (30-4), 3 p.m. Friday At Bon Secours Arena | Greenville, S.C. Arkansas (25-9) vs. Seton Hall (21-11), 12:30 p.m. North Carolina (27-7) vs. Texas South. (23-11), 3 p.m. At Bankers Life Fieldhouse | Indianapolis Dayton (24-7) vs. Wichita State (30-4), 6:10 p.m. Kentucky (29-5) vs. Northern Kentucky (24-10), 8:40 p.m. At Golden 1 Center | Sacramento, Calif. Cincinnati (29-5) vs. Kansas StateWake Forest winner, 6:27 p.m. UCLA (29-4) vs. Kent State (22-13), 8:57 p.m.

> MIDWEST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday BMO Harris Bradley Center | Milwaukee Purdue (25-7) vs. Vermont (29-5), 6:27 p.m. Iowa State (23-10) vs. Nevada (28-6), 8:57 p.m. Friday At Bankers Life Fieldhouse | Indianapolis Michigan (24-11) vs. Oklahoma State (20-12), 11:15 a.m. Louisville (24-8) vs. Jacksonville State (20-14), 1:45 p.m. At BOK Center | Tulsa, Okla. Kansas (28-4) vs. N.C. Central-UC Davis winner, 5:50 p.m. Miami (21-11) vs. Michigan State (19-14), 8:20 p.m. At Golden 1 Center | Sacramento, Calif. Oregon (29-5) vs. Iona (22-12), 1 p.m. Creighton (25-9) vs. Rhode Island (24-9), 3:30 p.m.

> WEST REGIONAL, FIRST ROUND Thursday At KeyBank Center | Buffalo, N.Y. Notre Dame (25-9) vs. Princeton (23-6), 11:15 a.m. West Virginia (26-8) vs. Bucknell (26-8), 1:45 p.m. At Amway Center | Orlando, Fla. Maryland (24-8) vs. Xavier (21-13), 5:50 p.m. Florida State (25-8) vs. Florida G.C. (26-7), 8:20 p.m. At Vivint Arena | Salt Lake City Gonzaga (32-1) vs. South Dakota State (18-16), 1 p.m. Northwestern (23-11) vs. Vanderbilt (19-15), 3:30 p.m. Saint Mary’s (28-4) vs. VCU (26-8), 6:20 p.m. Arizona (30-4) vs. North Dakota (22-9), 8:50 p.m.

> FINAL FOUR Glendale, Ariz. | April 1

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Glendale, Ariz. | April 3

NIT First Round Tuesday Illinois 82, Valparaiso 57 Mississippi 91, Monmouth 83 Oakland 74, Clemson 69 Georgia Tech 75, Indiana 63 Colorado State 81, College of Charleston 74 Richmond 71, Alabama 64 Boise State 73, Utah 68 CS Bakersfield 73, California 66 Wednesday South Dakota (22-11) at Iowa (18-14), 6 p.m. UNC-Greensboro (25-9) at Syracuse (18-14), 6 p.m. Belmont (22-6) at Georgia (19-14), 6 p.m. Colorado (19-14) at UCF (21-11), 6 p.m. Akron (26-8) at Houston (21-10), 6:30 p.m. Fresno St. (20-12) at TCU (19-15), 7 p.m. Texas-Arlington (25-8) at BYU (22-11), 8 p.m. UC Irvine (21-14) at Illinois State (27-6), 8:30 p.m. Second Round • March 16-20 Quarterfinals • March 21-22 Semifinals • Tuesday, March 28 Championship • Thursday, March 29

CBI First Round • Wednesday Utah Valley (15-16) at Ga. Southern (18-14), 6 p.m. Loyola (Md.) (15-16) at George Mason (20-13), 6 p.m. Hampton (14-16) at Coast. Carolina (16-17), 6 p.m. Toledo (17-16) at G. Wash. (19-14), 6 p.m. San Francisco (20-12) at Rice (22-11), 7 p.m. Stony Brook (18-13) at UIC (15-18), 7 p.m. Green Bay (18-13) at UMKC (17-16), 7:05 p.m. Eastern Washington (22-11) at Wyoming (18-14), 8 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 20 Semifinals • March 22 Championship Series (Best-of-3) March 27, 29, 31

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENT BRIDGEPORT REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At College Park, Md. Maryland (30-2) vs. Bucknell (27-5), 11 a.m. West Virginia (23-10) vs. Elon (27-6), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Storrs, Conn. UConn (32-0) vs. Albany (NY) (21-10), 10 a.m. Syracuse (21-1) vs. Iowa St. (18-12), 12:30 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA (23-8) vs. Boise State (25-7), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (21-11) vs. Penn (22-7), 8 p.m. At Durham, N.C. Temple (24-7) vs. Oregon (20-13), 5:30 p.m. Duke (27-5) vs. Hampton (20-12), 8 p.m.

Open in 2013. The earliest it can host is 2022. “We look forward to welcoming women as members who will enjoy, and benefit, from the great traditions and friendly spirit of this remarkable club,” said Henry Fairweather, captain of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers that owns and operates Muirfield. The historic decision came by a 498-123 vote on the second ballot. The R&A, which orga-

nizes the Open, quickly restored Muirfield’s eligibility as a tournament host. “It is extremely important for us in staging one of the world’s great sporting events that women can become members at all of our host clubs,” Martin Slumbers, the group’s chief executive, said in a statement. “Muirfield is a truly outstanding Open venue and we very much look forward to taking the Championship back there in the future.” Women will not im-

mediately become members, though. “The current waiting list for membership at Muirfield suggests that new candidates for membership, women and men, can expect to wait two to three years, or longer, to become a member of the club,” the HGEC said in a statement. Last year, the Telegraph reported that 33 Muirfield traditionalists sent a letter to other members that said lifting the 272-year ban on female members would have an adverse effect on

the club: “Our special nature — ‘a gentleman’s club where golf is played’ — is quite unique with its fraternity built inter alia on foursomes play with a round taking only the same time as lunch and leaving enough time for a further round after lunch (even in mid winter).” The letter also expressed concern about the club’s lunch arrangements and said that any female member is “bound to feel uncomfortable.”

At Louisville, Ky. Louisville (27-7) vs. Chattanooga (21-10), 12:30 Tennessee (19-11) vs. Dayton (22-9), 3 p.m. At Seattle Oklahoma (22-9) vs. Gonzaga (26-6), 5:30 Washington (27-5) vs. Montana St. (25-6), 8 p.m.

Villanova at Princeton, 5 p.m. Harvard at New Hampshire, 6 p.m. Sacred Heart at St. John’s, 6 p.m. Ohio at Penn State, 6 p.m. Fordham at Georgetown, 6 p.m. Navy at George Washington, 6 p.m. Rider at Virginia Tech, 6 p.m. Duquesne at Drexel, 6 p.m. Radford at James Madison, 6 p.m. Virginia at Saint Joseph’s, 6 p.m. Louisiana Tech at SMU, 7 p.m. UC Davis at Utah, 7 p.m. Round 2 • March 18-21 Round 3 • March 22-24 Round 4 • March 25-27 Semifinals • March 29-30 Championship • Saturday, April 1, 2 p.m.

MLB spring training

TRANSACTIONS

NL W L Pct. Cardinals 11 4 0.733 Pittsburgh 12 5 0.706 Los Angeles 11 8 0.579 Milwaukee 10 8 0.556 Philadelphia 9 8 0.529 Arizona 9 8 0.529 Colorado 9 8 0.529 New York 10 9 0.526 Washington 7 7 0.500 Chicago 6 8 0.429 San Francisco 8 11 0.421 Cincinnati 8 12 0.400 San Diego 6 10 0.375 Atlanta 6 11 0.353 Miami 4 10 0.286 AL W L Pct. New York 13 5 0.722 Oakland 10 6 0.625 Seattle 11 7 0.611 Minnesota 9 6 0.600 Baltimore 10 7 0.588 Los Angeles 10 7 0.588 Chicago 10 8 0.556 Tampa Bay 9 8 0.529 Kansas City 9 8 0.529 Cleveland 8 9 0.471 Boston 8 10 0.444 Houston 5 10 0.333 Toronto 5 11 0.313 Texas 5 12 0.294 Detroit 5 12 0.294 Tuesday Philadelphia 9, Atlanta 0 Detroit 7, Miami 1 NY Mets 2, Houston 1 Tampa Bay (ss) 10, NY Yankees 6 Tampa Bay (ss) 9, Baltimore 6 Boston 5, Toronto 4 LA Dodgers 6, Cincinnati 5 Colorado 4, Oakland 3 Kansas City 8, LA Angels 4 Milwaukee 7, Chicago Cubs 7 San Francisco 6, Cleveland 5 Seattle 7, Chicago White Sox 6 Arizona 12, Texas 0 Wednesday Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 Washington vs. Houston at West Palm Beach, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 5:35 p.m. Arizona vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned LHPS Brian Johnson and Henry Owens and RHP Brandon Workman to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned 3B Rafael Devers, OF Junior Lake and C Jordan Procyshen were reassigned to their minor league camp. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Optioned LHPs Nate Smith and Greg Mahle to Salt Lake (PCL) and RHP Eduardo Paredes to Mobile (SL). Reassigned C Jose Briceno and RHP Drew Gagnon to their minor league camp. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Claimed LHP Kevin Chapman off waivers from Houston. NEW YORK METS — Optioned OF Wuilmer Becerra, RHPs Chris Flexen and Marcos Molina and INF Amed Rosario to their minor league camp. Reassigned RHP Chase Bradford and LHP Adam Wilk to their minor league camp. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Re-signed S Kemal Ishmael. Signed WR-KR Andre Roberts. BUFFALO BILLS — Agreed to terms with DE Ryan Davis. CHICAGO BEARS — Agreed to terms with K Connor Barth on a one-year contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Claimed WR James Wright off waivers from Cincinnati. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed DT Bennie Logan to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed LS Garrison Sanborn. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with DL Sylvester Williams. HOCKEY • NHL NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned G Magnus Hellberg to Hartford (AHL). Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW — Signed M Wil Trapp to a multiyear contract extension. PARALYMPICS USADA — Announced sitting volleyball athlete Roderick Green accepted a ninemonth sanction for an anti-doping rule violation after testing positive for a prohibited substance from a contaminated supplement. COLLEGE CHARLESTON SOUTHERN — Named Bryant Foster cornerbacks coach. GEORGIA — Announced QB-P Brice Ramsey and DB Reggie Wilkerson will complete their degrees in May and then transfer for their final seasons of eligibility. ILLINOIS — Fired women’s basketball coach Matt Bollant. OMAHA — Announced the resignation of men’s hockey coach Dean Blais. WOFFORD — Named Mark Line deputy athletic director and Ryan Price assistant athletic director for business and finance.

> LEXINGTON REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At South Bend, Ind. Green Bay (27-5) vs. Purdue (22-12), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (30-3) vs. R. Morris (22-10), 6:30 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky (21-10) vs. Belmont (27-5), 11 a.m. Ohio State (26-6) vs. W. Kentucky (27-6), 1:30 At Austin, Texas NC State (22-8) vs. Auburn (17-14), 11 a.m. Texas (23-8) vs. C. Arkansas (26-4), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Manhattan, Kan. Stanford (28-5) vs. N.M. State (24-6), 12:30 p.m. Kansas State (22-10) vs. Drake (28-4), 3 p.m.

> STOCKTON REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At Columbia, S.C. S.Carolina (27-4) vs. UNC-Asheville (19-14), 4 Arizona St. (19-12) vs. Michigan St.(21-11), 6:30 At Tallahassee, Fla. Missouri (21-10) vs. S. Florida (24-8), 4 p.m. Florida State (25-6) vs. W. Illinois (26-6), 6:30 Corvallis, Ore. Ore. St. (29-4) vs. Long Beach St. (23-10), 4 Creighton (23-7) vs. Toledo (25-8), 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Coral Gables, Fla. Marquette (25-7) vs. Quinnipiac (27-6), 12:30 Miami (23-8) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (26-8), 3

> FINAL FOUR At Dallas | Friday, March 31

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP At Dallas | Sunday, April 2

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL NIT First round Wednesday Little Rock at Southern Miss, 6 p.m. Thursday Ball State at Indiana, 6 p.m. Bethune-Cookman at Wake Forest, 6 p.m. Central Michigan at Wright State, 6 p.m. Grambling State at Ole Miss, 6 p.m. Jacksonville at Georgia Tech, 6 p.m. Kent State at Michigan, 6 p.m. Stetson at UCF, 6 p.m. Abilene Christian at Oklahoma State, 7 p.m. IUPUI at Saint Louis, 7 p.m. Mercer at Alabama, 7 p.m. Missouri State at Iowa, 7 p.m. North Dakota at South Dakota, 7 p.m. Northern Illinois at South Dakota State, 7 p.m. UT Arlington at Tulane, 7 p.m. Seattle at Wyoming, 7:30 p.m. Saint Mary’s at Colorado State, 8 p.m. UNLV at Colorado, 8 p.m. Washington State at BYU, 8 p.m. Morehead State at Middle Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. Friday

BASEBALL World Baseball Classic SECOND ROUND Round Robin Pool E | Tokyo W L Pct GB Japan 2 0 1.000 — Netherlands 1 1 .500 1 Israel 1 1 .500 1 Cuba 0 2 .000 2 Sunday Israel 4, Cuba 1 Japan 8, Netherlands 6, 11 innings Monday Netherlands 12, Israel 2, 8 innings Tuesday Japan 8, Cuba 5 Netherlands vs. Cuba, late Wednesday Israel vs. Japan, 5 a.m. Thursday Tiebreaker game, 5 a.m., if necessary Pool F | San Diego W L Pct GB Puerto Rico 1 0 1.000 — ½ United States 0 0 .000 Venezuela 0 0 .000 ½ Dominican Republic 0 1 .000 1 Tuesday Puerto Rico 3, Dominican Republic 1 Wednesday United States vs. Venezuela, 8 p.m. Thursday Dominican Republic vs. Venezuela, 9 p.m. Friday United States vs. Puerto Rico, 9 p.m. Saturday Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela, 2:30 p.m. Dominican Republic vs. United States, 9 p.m. Sunday Tiebreaker game, 5 p.m., if necessary

CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND Los Angeles Semifinals Monday, March 20 Pool E runner-up vs. Pool F winner, 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 21 Pool E winner vs. Pool F runner-up, 8 p.m. Championship, Wednesday, March 22 Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.

NEWS LITERACY Journalists strive for truth and accuracy, fairness and balance, accountability, independence and to serve humanity.

Pew Research Center indicates most American adults feel they are conident in their ability to identify fake news. Research shows

23% say they have shared fake news, 81% of American adults whether knowingly or unknowingly.*

feel that they are at least somewhat conident in their ability to identify fake news.

Take the time to educate yourself so you can recognize real versus fake news. To fully evaluate a story’s validity, one must follow ive steps to analyze the story.

STEP THREE

3

Identify the lifestyles, values and points of view which are represented in or omitted from this article. Look for quotes from multiple sources and understand their connection to the story. Identify if various sides were asked for comment. For example, review “A mass killer: St. Louis heroin deaths hit new high,” on STLtoday.com on Monday, February 20, 2017. 1. What lifestyles, values and points of view are represented in or omitted from this article? The article gives a hard hitting view of the life of heroin addicts, using quotes from addicts to paint the picture. Family members, neighbors, Drug Enforcement Administration oficials, police oficers and other irst responders were interviewed to explain what they see, how the problem has expanded in a very short time and the implications. All points of view about heroin use were covered. The reporter, Jesse Bogan, kept any biases or views out of the feature. 2. Were multiple sources quoted and what is their connection to the story? Were various sides asked for comment? As noted above, many people were interviewed for this story and all were very open in their comments. Information on who they are and the role they have in story was clearly explained. This feature achieved the journalistic standard of presenting all sides, without bias or judgement.

FEATURE 3 OF 5

> OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL First Round Friday, March 17 At Starkville, Miss. DePaul (26-7) vs. No. Iowa (24-8), 11 a.m. Mississippi (29-4) vs. Troy (22-10), 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18 At Waco, Texas Baylor (30-3) vs. Texas So. (23-9), 5:30 p.m. LSU (20-11) vs. California (19-13), 8 p.m.

But for all of this conidence,

Visit STLtoday.com/Truth to access this article. * PEW RESEARCH CENTER DEC. 2016


03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

BOYS BASKETBALL • CLASS 4A SUPER-SECTIONAL

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

GIRLS SOCCER

Edwardsville 15 12 16 21 64 Simeon 21 23 12 20 76 E (30-2): Epenesa 16, Stephen 16, Marinko 13, Smith 12, Strohmeier 7. FG 22 (8), FT 12-16. S: Gilyard 30, Clements 16, Jones 16, HortonTucker 12, Lowery 2. FG 25 (6), FT 20-23.

Metro Cup-Columbia Bracket O’Fallon 5, Highland 0 (O: Sam Stutsman 3, Gabby Goerke, Lauren Kalteis ; shutout by Bri Honma) Murphysboro 7, ME Lutheran 0

WATER POLO

Lindbergh 10, Wentzville 8

BOYS LACROSSE

Lindbergh 15, Oakville 1 (L: Casey Natsch 4, Mason White 4, Ethan Schneider, Brendan Bavlsik, Bennett Wright, Nathan Collins, Sam Deeter, Will Doyle, Phillip Harter)

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL

GIRLS SOCCER

Triad at Eingham, 4:15 p.m. O’Fallon at Alton Marquette, 4:30 p.m. Gillespie at Jerseyville, 4:30 p.m. Althof at Belleville West, 4:30 p.m. Gibault at Valmeyer, 4:30 p.m.

Alton vs. Marion, at Columbia, 5:30 p.m. Rochester at Edwardsville, 6 p.m. Triad at Belleville West, 6 p.m. Gibault vs. Mascoutah, at Columbia, 7:30 p.m. Belleville East vs. Alton Marquette, at Edwardsville, 8 p.m. Springield vs. Waterloo, at Bellvl. West, 8 p.m.

SOFTBALL New Athens at Roxana, 4 p.m. Waterloo at Wood River, 4:15 p.m. Highland at O’Fallon, 4:15 p.m. Civic Memorial at Althof, 4:15 p.m. Granite City at Alton Marquette, 4:30 p.m. Centralia, Illinoi at Okawville, 4:30 p.m.

BOYS LACROSSE MICDS at Fort Zumwalt West, 4:30 p.m. Eureka at Crown Point, 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell at Vianney, 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon at Belleville Twsp., 7:30 p.m.

WATER POLO

PAUL HALFACRE • sTLhighschoolsports.com

John Burroughs at Pattonville, 4:30 p.m. MICDS at Lindbergh, 5 p.m.

Edwardsville’s Nathan Kolesa (10), Caleb Strohmeier (34) and AJ Epenesa (33) sit on the bench after the game against Simeon at Redbird Arena during the Class 4A Super-Sectional game on Tuesday.

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENTS MISSOURI BOYS CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT at Mizzou Arena at Mizzou Arena Lee’s Summit West vs Chaminade, 2:30 p.m. Kickapoo vs Webster Groves, 4:15 p.m. Third place 11 a.m. Saturday. Championship 6:20 p.m. Saturday. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT at Mizzou Arena Semiinals, Thursday Kearney vs Vashon, 3:30 p.m. Bolivar vs Parkway Central, 5:10 p.m. Third place 11 a.m. Friday. Championship 2:40 p.m. Saturday. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Third place Hogan Prep 86, Mountain Grove 76 Championship Northwest Academy 78, Whitield 68 CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Third place Harrisburg, 70, Sacred Heart 63 Championship Oran 70, Crane 63 CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Third place North Andrew 60, Glasgow 56 Championship Walnut Grove 65, Advance 62

ILLINOIS BOYS CLASS 4A SUPER-SECTIONALS (All Tuesday) At Illinois State Edwardsville vs. Chicago Simeon, 7 p.m. At Northern Illinois Bolingbrook vs. Naperville North, 7:30 p.m. At Hofman Estates Sears Centre Arena Palatine Fremd vs. Algonquin Jacobs, 7:30 p.m. At Chicago State

Chicago Whitney Young vs. Evanston, 7 p.m. CLASS 3A SUPER-SECTIONALS (All Tuesday) At Joliet Central Morgan Park vs. Hillcrest, 7 p.m. At Northern Illinois Marengo vs. Bloomington, 6 p.m. At Hofman Estates Sears Centre Arena St. Viator vs. Fenwick, 6 p.m. At Springield Convention Center Centralia vs. Lanphier, 7 p.m. CLASS 1A STATE TOURNAMENT Championship Eingham St. Anthony 49, Okawville 46

MISSOURI GIRLS CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT at Mizzou Arena Semiinals, Friday Lee’s Summit vs St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. Rock Bridge vs Kirkwood, 7:45 p.m. Third place 12:50 p.m. Saturday. Championship 8:10 p.m. Saturday. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT at Mizzou Arena Semiinals, Thursday St. Pius X (KC) vs Dexter, 6:50 p.m. Carl Junction vs Incarnate Word, 8:30 p.m. Third place 10:45 a.m. Friday. Championship 4:30 p.m. Saturday. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Third place Lutheran North 61, Trenton 56 Championship Straford 80, Whitield 39 CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Championship Skyline 69, Adrian 42 CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Championship Mercer 43, Walnut Grove 34

HOW TO SUBMIT ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS Coaches and athletic directors, send all-conference selections to chollway@post-dispatch.com, in a digital format, spreadsheet or word document. No faxes or PDFs, please. In order to expedite publication, please send as soon as they are selected and indicate a publication date if they are not to be released immediately. Please submit in this style: Pos., John Brown, sr. (or jr., so., fr.), School

SEEKING AREA COLLEGE SIGNINGS Submissions to the lists will be accepted from the university or from the high school coach or athletics director via email to chollway@post-dispatch.com. Include irst and last name, high school, sport and university. No faxes or phone calls, please.

BITTER DISAPPOINTMENT Simeon proves too much for Tigers in super-sectional BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

NORMAL • Mark Smith, Oliver Stephen and AJ Epenesa stood shoulderto-shoulder. Young and skinny, the trio were freshmen in the last row of the team picture the last time the Edwardsville boys basketball team advanced to the state semifinals. Now seniors, Smith, Stephen and Epenesa sat next to one another at the end of the bench. Their time together, once measured in years, was in its final seconds. There will be no return trip to state. No fairy tale ending. No joy for their orange and black-clad fans. Simeon led wire-to-wire as it dominated Edwardsville 76-64 in the Class 4A Normal Super-Sectional on Tuesday at Redbird Arena on the campus of Illinois State University. The top team in Chicago and No. 3 in the Associated Press poll, Simeon (28-3) advanced to the state semifinals for the second consecutive season. The Wolverines will play Bolingbrook (29-1) at 7:15 p.m. Friday at Carver Arena in Peoria. Edwardsville (30-2) had its 26game win streak broken. It’s only other loss this season came on Dec. 6 to Belleville West. The Tigers’ season ended because Simeon decided Smith wasn’t going to beat it. One of the nation’s top unsigned senior prospects, Smith was unable to show his magnificent penetration off the dribble or his eye-popping range as a shooter. The Wolverines buckled down as sophomore guard Kejuan Clements spent the night on Smith’s hip. He couldn’t get a drink of water from the bench without Clements breathing down his neck. And when he did, someone else was waiting. “Every time I got passed my guy

there was always another person there. I tried to find the open man,” Smith said. “I tried to do everything I could to help my team and make plays. They did a phenomenal job guarding me.” Smith finished with 12 points, 10 short of his season average. He had four assists, five rebounds and hit four of his 13 field goal attempts. “We knew if we contained him we’d probably be good and make those other guys do some stuf those other guys aren’t used to doing,” Simeon coach Robert Smith said. “We know he likes to put up shots and he controls everything. We just stayed focused on him.” Without Smith’s scoring, Edwardsville’s other four players found themselves in positions to make plays. But in a first half where Simeon couldn’t miss, the Tigers had too many empty possessions. Simeon’s active hands and rangy arms made it hard for Epenesa to catch and finish in the post. The Wolverines closed out on Stephen. They made junior guard Jack Marinko shoot over outstretched hands. Every miss magnified Simeon’s scorching start. The Wolverines hit six of their 12 3-point attempts in the first half. Clements hit all three of his shots from behind the arc and scored 16 points. Junior guard Talen HortonTucker hit two of his four attempts from deep and scored 12 points. Those were the guys Edwardsville coach Mike Waldo was willing to let shoot to defend the rest of Simeon’s arsenal. It backfired. “It’s pretty hard in basketball to guard everybody,” Waldo said. “I think sometimes you just have to pick what you give a team and hope they miss. Tonight they didn’t miss them.”

When the Tigers tried to guard the perimeter, the Wolverines attacked them at the rim. Senior guard Evan Gilyard was sensational as he routinely found his way through the Tigers’ defense for layups. The UTEP-bound standout finished with a game-high 32 points. He hit 15 of his 16 free throws and played all 32 minutes. “It was amazing. We came out and played hard,” Gilyard said. “We took what was given to us.” Gilyard couldn’t hide his surprise that the Tigers were willing to give up open shots. It played right into Simeon’s hands. “We can shoot the ball. It was kind of surprising they were backing up of us like that,” Gilyard said. “I don’t know what scouting report they were looking at but shoot,it worked in our favor.” Simeon led 44-27 at half. Edwardsville made a charge in the third quarter to cut the lead to 56-43. Stephen drained a 3-pointer to open the fourth quarter to make it 56-46. The Tigers were energized. Simeon never wavered. Edwardsville trimmed the lead to eight twice but never got closer. Gilyard and Wolverines finished off the victory at the freethrow line. “We didn’t panic. We didn’t shoot as many jump shots,” Gilyard said. “We got to the rim, got fouled and got to the free throw line. We made our free throws and played smart.” Epenesa had 16 points and 12 rebounds. Stephen scored 16 points and hit four of his 12 3-pointers. Marinko finished with 13 points. “It’s like a brotherhood. They’re like family. I’ve been with them since fourth grade,” Smith said. “We’ve developed our basketball games together. We wanted to go far. To see it end, you realize all the memories you had together. It’s stings.”

WINTER ALL-CONFERENCE BOYS BASKETBALL -AAA LARGE Player of the year: G Tony Burks, jr., St. Mary’s Ofensive players of the year F Alex Movila, sr., Borgia G Yuri Collins, so., St. Mary’s Defensive player of the year: C Yahuza Rasas, jr., St. Mary’s Newcomer of the year: G Hunter Mehler, jr., Borgia Coach of the year: Kelvin Lee, St. Mary’s FIRST TEAM G Mitch Fairless, jr., Duchesne F Luke Loewenstein, jr., Duchesne F Alex Movila, sr., Borgia G Yuri Collins, so., St. Mary’s C Yahuza Rasas, jr., St. Mary’s SECOND TEAM G Gus Kleekamp, sr., Borgia G Hunter Mehler, jr., Borgia F Adam Moore, jr., Duchesne G Jared North, sr., St. Dominic F Miles Jones, jr., St. Mary’s -AAA SMALL Player of the year: G Jared Phillips, jr., Cardinal Ritter Ofensive player of the year: G David Jones, sr., Lutheran St. Charles Defensive player of the year: F Xavier Womack, sr., Cardinal Ritter Newcomer of the year: F Ryan Kalkbrenner, sr., Trinity Coach of the year: Randy Reed, Cardinal Ritter FIRST TEAM G David Jones, sr., Lutheran St. Charles G Ryan McAleenan, sr., Kennedy G Malek Davis, so., Cardinal Ritter F Zach Harding, jr., O’Fallon Christian SECOND TEAM G Rashuad Johnson, so., Trinity G Isaiah Williams, so., Trinity F Xavier Womack, sr., Cardinal Ritter G Zach Niemeyer, jr., O’Fallon Christian G Drew Ritter, so., Lutheran St. Charles -JEFFERSON COUNTY LARGE Player of the year: Gaven Pinkley, jr., Hillsboro Coach of the year: Dan Johnson, Hillsboro FIRST TEAM Josh Robinson, sr., Perryville Craig Theiss, sr., De Soto Joseph Woods, sr., Festus Michael Brewer, so., Hillsboro SECOND TEAM Sam Haight, sr., Windsor Daniel Portell, jr., Festus Austin West, jr., De Soto Garrett Lampkins, sr., Hillsboro Michael Schmidt, jr., Windsor HONORABLE MENTION Elijah Richeson, sr., Festus Jef Reisenbichler, so., Perryville Jordan Anderson, sr., De Soto Isaiah Martin, jr., Hillsboro Tyler Isaacson, jr., Hillsboro -JEFFERSON COUNTY SMALL Player of the year: G Easton Null, so., Jeferson Coach of the year: Bruce Valleroy, St. Vincent FIRST TEAM F Brady DeGeare, jr., Crystal City F Matt Cofman, sr., Herculaneum G Trevor Lukefahr, jr., St. Vincent G Evan Clifton, jr., St. Vincent SECOND TEAM G Jalen Thornton, so., St. Pius X F Sam Huskey, sr., Grandview F Luke Klahs, so., St. Pius X F Dakota Jakoubek, jr., Jeferson G Tyler Monier, sr., St. Vincent HONORABLE MENTION F Luke Wibbenmeyer, sr., St. Vincent G L.J. Nelson, sr., Herculaneum G Camren Krodinger, so., St. Pius X F Zachary Morlock, sr., St. Pius X G Colton McAnally, so., Grandview G Campbell Ebersoldt, sr., Jeferson G Anthony Dolde, jr., Grandview

-SOUTH CENTRAL FIRST TEAM Collin Baumgartner, sr., Piasa SW Zach Golenor, sr., Roxana Kyle Lynch, sr., Pana Drake Paden, jr., Hillsboro Nick Price, sr., Gillespie Richie Well, sr., Vandalia SECOND TEAM Justin Bailey, jr., Piasa SW Nathan Casey, jr., Vandalia Steven Fenske, sr., Hillsboro Adam Miller, sr., Pana Brady Simpson, sr., Greenville THIRD TEAM Kaleb Ephron, so., Greenville Brady Jamieson, sr., Carlinville Ben Lowis, jr., Piasa SW Nick McMillen, sr., Pana Tate Wargo, sr., Gillespie -SUBURBAN XII NORTH Player of the year: Cameron Lockett, sr., McCluer North Coach of the year: Brent Rueter, McCluer FIRST TEAM Shaun Williams, jr., Hazelwood Central Anthony Harris, sr., McCluer Cameron Williams, jr., Hazelwood Central A’Tavian Butler, so., McCluer North Darrian McBride, jr., Hazelwood East SECOND TEAM Jihad Thornton, jr., Hazelwood West Emmitt Gordon, so., Riverview Gardens Damond Gathing, sr., McCluer Telly Wright, jr., Hazelwood Central Tony McClellon, sr., Hazelwood West -SUBURBAN CENTRAL NATIONAL FIRST TEAM Wyatt Yess, sr., Parkway West DeAndre Campbell, jr., Parkway Central TJ Crockett, sr., University City River Rhoads, sr., Ladue Nick Almond, sr., Clayton SECOND TEAM Tate Hotz, sr., Ladue Art Green, jr., Parkway Central Ben Litteken, sr., Clayton Nate Hughes, sr., Parkway West Zach Bush, sr., Ladue HONORABLE MENTION Jack Swiney, jr., Parkway West Jake Silvestri, jr., Parkway Central Gerald Lenoir, jr., Parkway Central Jack Lucier, sr., Ladue Trent Stiebler, jr., Ladue Armon Watkins, sr., Clayton Caleb Heusel, jr., Clayton Nick Moore, sr., University City -MISSISSIPPI VALLEY CONFERENCE FIRST TEAM Jaquan Adams, jr., Civic Memorial David Lane, sr., Civic Memorial Sam LaPorta, so., Highland Noah Moss, sr., Triad Beau Barbour, jr., Triad Ross Schrader, jr., Waterloo SECOND TEAM Caden Clark, jr., Civic Memorial Stephen Schniers, jr., Highland Brady Feldman, so., Highland Jake Redenour, sr., Jerseyville Malik Greene, so., Mascoutah Kyle Cox, jr., Triad Griin Lenhardt, sr., Waterloo HONORABLE MENTION Jaxsen Helmkamp, sr., Civic Memorial Blake Wittman, jr., Jerseyville Blake Weiss, jr., Mascoutah Glenn Gibbons, sr., Mascoutah Jake O’Dell, sr., Traid Kyle Rood, sr., Triad Dylan Hunt, sr., Waterloo Ben Huels, sr., Waterloo

GIRLS BASKETBALL -SOUTH CENTRAL FIRST TEAM Abby Brockmeyer, sr., Litchield Ally Cantrill, so., Greenville Sammi Matoush, so., Hillsboro

Amanda Schmidt, sr., Gillespie Grace Zachary, sr., Carlinville SECOND TEAM Daylee Denton, sr., Pana Nancy Fritzsche, so., Greenville Paige Niemeyer, jr., Gillespie Olivia Marquadt, jr., Vandalia Denzelle Moore, sr., Hillsboro THIRD TEAM Karli Carr, jr., Gillespie Jenna Dudra, sr., Pana Rachel Olroyd, so., Carlinville Taylor Snow, sr., Greenville Jade Taylor, sr., Litchield -SUBURBAN XII NORTH Player of the year: Lakeita Chappel, sr., Hazelwood West Coach of the year: Patrick Doughtry, McCluer North FIRST TEAM Mallory Meeks, jr., Hazelwood West Kelsie Williams, jr., Hazelwood Central Ukari McKinney, sr., Hazelwood Central Kortni Collins, sr., McCluer North Anasha Hurst, sr., McCluer North SECOND TEAM Brene Upchurch, sr., Hazelwood West Nijah Moore, fr., Riverview Gardens Mar’Kiya Davis, sr., McCluer Raniesha Cason, sr., Hazelwood East Eriyana Simmons, sr., McCluer North -JEFFERSON COUNTY LARGE Player of the year: Jordan Oetting, sr., Festus Coaches of the year Ron Rhodes, Festus Sam Rauls, De Soto FIRST TEAM Lexi Close, sr., Hillsboro Madalyn Bone, jr., De Soto Ally Frazier, sr., Festus Kendall Boyer, so., De Soto SECOND TEAM Carlie Sanders, jr., Hillsboro Calli Robertson, sr., Windsor Kirstin Jannin, so., Perryville Sarah Peoples, jr., De Soto Alex Tinnin, sr., Festus Shaina Kmetz, sr., Windsor HONORABLE MENTION Ashley Fallert, sr., Festus Jenna Oetting, so., Festus Kelsey Boyd, so., Hillsboro Maci Hotop, jr., Perryville -JEFFERSON COUNTY SMALL Player of the year: Macy Ketcherside, jr., Grandview Coach of the year: Ronda Hubbard, Grandview FIRST TEAM Kirstin Sparks, sr., Grandview Ashley Lodike, jr., Herculaneum Machela Cook, sr., St. Pius X Jackie Verseman, jr., St. Vincent SECOND TEAM Sammy Linderer, sr., St. Pius X Jenna Winkler, jr., St. Vincent Rae Ann Fuller, jr., Herculaneum Sydney Weik, sr., Jeferson Katelyn McGlaughlin, jr., Grandview HONORABLE MENTION Lauren Partney, jr., Herculaneum Kailey Krieg, so., Crystal City Maebry Jones, jr., Crystal City Hanna Floyd, jr., Jeferson Emily Fischer, jr., Herculaneum Corin Carroll, jr., St. Vincent -PUBLIC HIGH LEAGUE Player of the year: Brooke Flowers, jr., Metro Coach of the year: Gary Glasscock, Metro Newcomers of the year Amori Dampier-McCloud, fr., Gateway STEM Taylor Thomas, jr., Soldan Sixth player of the year: Mariama Brown, jr., Miller Career FIRST TEAM Dasia Batteast, sr., McKinley Stephenee Huggans, sr., Soldan Mikenzie Burt, so., Metro Kiya Washington, so., Roosevelt

SECOND TEAM Chaadah Hodges, jr., Miller Career Taylor Thomas, jr., Soldan Micah Goldman, so., Metro Daisha Seltzer, so., Miller Career Breyanna Howard, so., Miller Career HONORABLE MENTION Amori Dampier-McCloud, fr., Gateway Danielle Holman, jr., Gateway Zuri Jackson, so., Soldan Fairah Jefries, sr., McKinley Brianna Johnson, so., Carnahan Amonne Jones, fr., Vashon Linh Pho, jr., Cleveland Shanay Sanders, so., Northwest Tech Kaitlyn Simms, fr., Gateway Kemara Smith, sr., McKinley Alisha Stidmon, jr., Vashon Diamond Sullivan, so., Soldan Tifany Williams, sr., Carnahan -AAA LARGE Player of the year: F Ella Kasubke, jr., St. Dominic Ofensive player of the year: G Cassidy Moss, jr., Borgia Defensive player of the year: C Natalie Schroeder, sr., Duchesne Newcomer of the year: G Grace Gettemeier, so., Borgia Coach of the year: Jef Menke, St. Dominic FIRST TEAM G Madison Miller, jr., St. Dominic G Raegan Bruce, sr., Rosati-Kain C Natalie Schroeder, sr., Duchesne G Cassidy Moss, jr., Borgia C Danielle Boemer, jr., Notre Dame SECOND TEAM G Abby Hermann, sr., St. Dominic G Maddie Bauer, sr., St. Dominic F Marissa Jones, jr., Rosati-Kain G Amy Edmondson, jr., Duchesne G Mallory Campbell, jr., Notre Dame -AAA SMALL Player of the year: G Kourtney Markham, jr., O’Fallon Christian Ofensive player of the year: G Christina Droege, sr., DuBourg Defensive Player of the year: F Abby King, jr., O’Fallon Christian Newcomer of the year: G Jada Lindesmith, fr., Lutheran St. Charles Coach of the year: Darren Wade, Cardinal Ritter FIRST TEAM G Christina Droege, sr., DuBourg G Emily Hall, sr., Lutheran St. Charles G Kori Tomlin, so., Cardinal Ritter F Deanna Wilson, so., Cardinal Ritter SECOND TEAM G Casey Sowell, sr., Kennedy F Abby King, jr., O’Fallon Christian G Kelsi Durkee, sr., Lutheran St. Charles F Lauren Smith, jr., Trinity G Kayleigh Fite, sr., Trinity

WRESTLING -SUBURBAN XII SOUTH (Grade classiications not submitted) Wrestler of the year: 132 Sam Frankowski, Summit Newcomer of the year: 182 Evan Brooks, Summit Coach of the year: Irshaad Ameer, Webster Groves FIRST TEAM 106 Alex Rosenbloom, Parkway North 113 Mark Mackenzie, Kirkwood 120 JT Hale, Summit 126 Austin Cornell, Ritenour 138 Sourya Mogallapu, Summit 145 Dalton Rawlins, Kirkwood 152 Jacob Hibbard, Kirkwood 160 Ryan Howerton, Ritenour 170 Noah Perkins, Webster Groves 182 Evan Brooks, Summit 195 Marcell Jones, Webster Groves 220 Temitayo Sobamowo, Webster Groves 285 Omar Daoud, Pattonville SECOND TEAM 106 Imran Alvi, Pattonville

113 Dez McSellers, Summit 126 JT Snow, Summit 132 Charlie Getz, Webster Groves 138 Brian Chrun, Ritenour 145 Ryan Mueller, Summit 152 Emmett Coleman, Summit 160 Tyler Stabler, Kirkwood 170 Daniel Carroll, Ritenour 182 Tre’shon Wagner, Webster Groves 220 Dakari Streeter, Pattonville 285 Robert Lee, Kirkwood -SUBURBAN WEST (Grade classiications not submitted) Wrestlers of the year 152 Alec Hagan, Eureka 113 Kai Orine, Seckman Newcomer of the year: Chase Stegall, Northwest Coach of the year: Jon Sumner, Lafayette FIRST TEAM 106 Jayden Carson, Lafayette 106 Jack Wrocklage, Seckman 113 Jaylen Carson, Lafayette 113 Jack Lenox, Marquette 120 Cam Fusco, Seckman 126 Garret Kloeppel, Parkway South 132 Cameron Wegener, Lafayette 132 Dakota Theval, Northwest 138 Tyler Stegall, Northwest 145 Anthony Michaels, Lafayette 145 Kyran Hagan, Eureka 145 David Marlow, Parkway South 170 Austin Stofer, Lafayette 170 Chase Stegall, Northwest 182 Kyle Dickhaus, Eureka 182 Dustin Jones, Lindbergh 195 Jack Marak, Parkway South 220 Cortez Woods, Lafayette 220 Logan Wells, Lindbergh 285 Jacob Vogel, Seckman SECOND TEAM 106 Dylan Looney, Fox 120 Gavin Newhouse, Northwest 120 Ryan Lester, Eureka 126 Andrew Javier, Lindbergh 132 Josh Galmiche, Marquette 138 Dawson Javier, Lindbergh 138 Bryce Raphael, Parkway South 145 James Hummel, Seckman 152 Caleb Covert, Lafayette 160 Blake Fritz, Seckman 160 Jalen Gayield, Marquette 160 Matt Gentry, Eureka 182 Austin Wegener, Lafayette 182 Timothy Ghormley, Mehlville 195 Brendan Carter, Eureka 220 Shane Wiegand, Fox 285 Joey Johnson, Fox -SUBURBAN XII NORTH FIRST TEAM 106 Fredrick Johnson, sr., Hazelwood East 113 Isaac Roberson, fr., McCluer North 120 Jacob Roberson, jr., McCluer North 126 Paul Merriweather, so., McCluer North 132 Micah Dennis, so., McCluer North 138 Cameron Sharp, sr., Hazelwood Central 145 Pierre Snodgrass, jr., Hazelwood East 152 Jalynn Jenkins, jr., Hazelwood East 160 Anthony Dawson, sr., Haz. Central 170 Cameron Young, sr., McCluer North 182 Christian Brinkley, jr., Hazelwood West 195 Lyndel Owens, sr., McCluer 220 Robert Greco, jr., Hazelwood Central 285 Matt Wilke, sr., McCluer North SECOND TEAM 106 David Vance, so., McCluer North 113 Levi Buerk, jr., Hazelwood West 120 Ronald Cobb, jr., McCluer 126 Jaylon Whitted, so., McCluer 132 De’Marco Poole, so., McCluer 138 Julian Hays, so., McCluer North 145 Lejon Paynes, sr., McCluer North 152 Aert Brown, jr., McCluer 160 Ahmir Anderson, jr., Hazelwood East 170 Dylan Crawford, sr., Hazelwood West 182 Ethan Simpson, sr., McCluer North 195 Jared Brammeier, sr., McCluer North 220 Austin Francis, sr., McCluer North 285 Norman Deverse, jr., Haz. Central

-JEFFERSON COUNTY FIRST TEAM 106 James Short, Hillsboro 113 Nick Short, Hillsboro 120 Dylan Owens, Hillsboro 126 Zachary Nash, De Soto 132 Ethan Ladyman, De Soto 138 Grant Pauli, Windsor 145 Jacob Warren, Windsor 152 Logan Zimmermann, De Soto 160 Drake Byers, Herculaneum 170 Michael Manning, De Soto 182 Ryan Yarnell, Windsor 195 John Williamson, De Soto 220 Paul Stewart, Hillsboro 285 Landon Porter, De Soto SECOND TEAM 106 Kenneth Coats, De Soto 113 Michael Whitt, De Soto 120 Christian Homeier, Windsor 126 Isaiah Beck, Hillsboro 132 Jordon Sanders, Hillsboro 138 Dominic DeMarco, De Soto 145 James Todaro, Herculaneum 152 Justin Harris, Festus 170 Eli Allison, Festus 182 Logan Smith, De Soto 195 Tyler Sexton, Festus 220 Andrew Marler, Windsor 285 Joe Becker, Hillsboro THIRD TEAM 106 Dillon French, Festus 113 Andrew Kinder Windsor 120 Connor Zimmermann, De Soto 126 Connor Meynell, Windsor 138 Braden Clark, Festus 145 Tanner Weberling, Hillsboro 152 Joe Garner, Hillsboro 170 Justin Montgomery, Herculaneum 182 Zach Bodway, Hillsboro 220 Trevor Struemph, De Soto 285 Dason Boyer, Festus -SUBURBAN CENTRAL Wrestler of the year: 160 Jacob Orsay, jr., Ladue Newcomer of the year: Samuel Yeom, Clayton Coach of the year: Kevin Clawson, Ladue FIRST TEAM 106 Eric Prager, jr., Ladue 113 Josh McCallister, N/A, Parkway West 120 Atajio Ivy, jr., Parkway West 126 Benn Herrmann, sr., Parkway West 132 Kyle Cody, sr., Ladue 138 Luke Voeller, jr., Parkway Central 138 Samuel Yeom, fr., Clayton 145 Savion Douglas, jr., University City 152 Kendall Whited, sr., Ladue 170 Aidan Morley, jr., Ladue 170 Tramel Harrell, sr., University City 182 Leor Goldfarb, sr., Ladue 195 Carrington Reed, jr., Ladue 220 Kevon James, so., MS-Berkeley HWT Jonathan York, jr., University City SECOND TEAM 106 Luke Strand, fr., Clayton 113 Gabriel Sekou, jr., University City 120 Steven Shaw, fr., Clayton 126 Robert Givens, jr., MS-Berkeley 132 John Kim, jr., Parkway Central 145 Adam Sieber, so., Clayton 152 Lee Little, jr., University City 160 Michael Moran, jr., Afton 182 Kevin Yn, sr., Parkway Central 195 Alexza Jelks, jr., MS-Berkeley HWT Kemon Murray, sr., MS-Berkeley HONORABLE MENTION 106 Owen Bevesidge, fr., Parkway West 113 Kordan Johnson, sr., Ladue 126 Liam Hipp, fr., Parkway West 126 Andrew Heller, fr., Afton 132 Trenton Dickens, jr., Clayton 132 Donald Griin, fr., Parkway West 138 Callen Morley, fr., Ladue 145 A.J. Bryant, sr., Ladue 145 Aaron Ginsparg, jr., Parkway Central 145 Jacob Kelmendi, fr., Afton 152 Luke Ward, fr., Parkway West 160 Pablo Espindola, jr., Parkway Central 170 Jadon Harrison, jr., Afton 182 Drewan Carter, sr., Afton HWT Anthony Simms, jr., Normandy


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Audi isn’t playing semantic games with its all-new A4 Allroad. Some automakers might take a station wagon, slap on some body cladding, raise the suspension a bit, install more aggressive tires and provide standard four-corner traction and call it a crossover SUV. Not Audi. Audi took its European A4 wagon, slapped on some body cladding, raised the suspension a bit, installed more aggressive tires and provided standard four-corner traction — and called it the A4 Allroad wagon. Thanks for your candor, Audi! Easy call, really. Audi already has a family of crossovers it sells stateside in its Q3, 5 and 7, so Allroad is unabashedly a wagon. The upside is this all-new A4 Allroad, based on the same platform as the equally new, fifthgeneration 2017 A4 sedan, handles, rides and accelerates like the sporty car it is. The other upside is Allroad makes one more change from its source material — it adds to the Quattro sedan’s drive modes of Auto, Comfort, Dynamic and Individual a fifth choice: Offroad. That mode reduces steering effort, locks in torque to all four wheels, tailors suspension damping to the situation and gives the afternoon off to safety nannies like forward-collision warning and impact intervention, all helping make Allroad a fine wagon on all roads. It’s not

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'12 Chevrolet Sonic LT Power Windows, On-Star, $5,490 #B8256

'14 Chevy Cruze LT Automatic, GM Certified Warranty, $12,489 #C11015P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox LS FWD, 36K Miles, GM Certified Warranty $14,796 #C11004P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866 -602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox LS FWD, 2.4L, 34K Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $14,498 #C10978P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox LS FWD, 24k Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $15,409 #C10982P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox LS FWD, 14k Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $15,959 #C171263A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LT $21,351 #KTE52682 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Chevy Impala: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, $7,990 #78261A

Dodge '11 Dodge Charger: RT, Max, $14,880 #185371 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Dodge Charger: 4 Door, RWD, SXT, 54K Miles, Gray $20,000 Stk# P06018 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Dodge Dart $13,490 #KE29418 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Dodge Challenger: 2 Door Coupe, Gray, SXT, 39K Miles, $20,830 Stk# P06017 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Dodge Dart $13,578 #P8813 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '07 Dodge Durango SLT Cloth Seats, Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry, $8,990 #W4466A

'09 Dodge Journey Heated Seats, One Owner, $7,995 #DL1418

'16 Ford Mustang ECO $23,616 #E47233 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '09 Ford Mustang $11,537 #45384A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '15 Ford Taurus SEL: 35K Miles, $17,900 #24090-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Ford Edge $28,182 #KT2048E 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Ford Escape XLS Keyless Entry, CD Player, Cloth Seats, $5,500 #X3113A

'03 Ford Expedition 3rd Row Seating, A/C, $5,995 #DL1501

Fiat '14 Chevy Malibu LT GM Certified Warranty, 27k Miles, Sedan, $13,835 #C10984P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LT 2.5 LT, 34k Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $13,991 #C10972P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '15 Chevy Malibu LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, Bluetooth $14,990 #8984C

'14 Chevy Malibu LS 2.5LT, 19k Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $13,991 #C11007P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Silverado 2500 Crew Cab, 4X4 $28,690 #C171400A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '13 Chevy Silverado 2500 4WD, Crew Cab, 6.6L Duramax Turbodiesel, $35,479 #C160279A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 GMC Terrain SLE FWD, GM Certified Warranty, $16,566 #C11001P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

Chrysler '07 Chrysler 300C: Leather, Chrome $10,900 #P3592-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'15 Fiat 500L: Only 9K Miles $14,777 #P3577-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

Ford '12 Ford Edge: LTD, Ecoboost, 80K Miles $15,875 #P40681 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Ford Fiesta SE $12,066 #L95892 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '12 Ford Focus SEL: Red, 72K Miles, Call Today, $9,200 #DL1440

'09 Ford Focus SES: 1 Owner, 46K Miles, Heated Leather Seats $8,990 #T16711A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '14 Ford Focus SE: 22K Miles, $11,500 #P3557 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Ford Focus: $6,397 #47517-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Ford Focus: Titanium, Hatchback, Leather, Sunroof, #16,490

'13 Ford Focus $8,453 #G310147A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'05 Ford F150 Super Cab Lumbar Support, FWD, $7,995 #DL1523

'10 Taurus SEL Stk #45592A, $9,220 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

Search “stltoday” in your App Store

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Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C3

RIDES

2017 AUDI A4 ALLROAD

NO POSER: IT’S A WAGON AND PROUD OF IT

DRIVING WITH DAN By Dan Wiese - Automotive Writer

continued from the front

springs and dampers. Our Allroad boasted a $7,400 (yowza!) Prestige Pkg., with its Bang & Olufsen audio upgrade and Audi’s ever fascinating Virtual Cockpit instrumentation. With VC, the driver can enlarge or shrink the tachometer and speedometer. Shrinkage enables a full, 12.3-inch view, directly in front of the driver, of the navigation map, trip data or audio information. Under the hood, Allroad features a 2.0-liter turbo four that makes 252 hp and 273 lb.-ft. of torque. With all that twist fully onboard at just 1,600 rpm, a zero-to-60 sprint of 5.9 seconds is doable. Despite that lively performance, we managed to register 26 mpg in 120 miles. That blend of acceleration and frugality will make your crossover envious! Allroad’s cabin room is fine up front and head room good in back. However, left-side rear passengers wanting leg room will hope for a vertically challenged driver. The new A4 Allroad wagon is an inspired

2017 AUDI A4 ALLROAD DRIVE FORMAT: All-wheel drive BASE PRICE: $44,950 PRICE AS DRIVEN: $55,575; includes $350 Burl Walnut trim; $575 metallic paint upgrade; and these packages: $7,400 Prestige (Audi Virtual Cockpit, navigation, Bang & Olufsen audio, more), $1,800 Driver Assistance (adaptive cruise control, active lane assist, more), $500 Cold Weather ENGINE: 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 HORSEPOWER: 252 at 5,000 rpm TORQUE: 273 lb.-ft. at 1,600 rpm

choice for those who want the cargo room and tenacious traction of a crossover with the civility and performance of a car.

RECOMMENDED FUEL: Premium TRANSMISSION: Seven-speed automatic EPA MPG: 23 city/28 hwy/25 combined WHERE BUILT: Ingolstadt, Germany

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. He is a regular contributor to the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can email him at drivingwithdan@gmail.com

WHEELBASE: 110.9 inches LENGTH: 187.0 inches

OLIVER C JOSEPH 4th Generation Family Business 2016 DODGE

2016 CHRYSLER

DART SXT

200

Stk.: D391

Stk.: A455

MSRP $22,561

MSRP $35,735

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$17,826 SAVINGS

$4,735 OFF

$27,045

SAVINGS

2016 JEEP

$8,690 OFF

2017 CHRYSLER

GRAND CHEROKEE

PACIFICA

Stk: K496

Stk.: 120

MSRP $47,150

MSRP $37,280

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

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$7,408 OFF

$30,146

SAVINGS

$7,134 OFF

Chrysler Location

877-215-4650 3795 West State Route 15, Belleville, IL 62226 DON’T JUST LIVE WITH IT

GLASS CRACKS AND CHIPS continued from the front

sculpture. The talent of the craftsman will have an impact on how the repair will look. Request to see examples of a company’s prior work. Understand the company’s limitations. If a crack or chip is a certain size, depth or diameter, the repair will not work. They will likely recommend replacing the full windshield. The longevity of their repair is also a factor. The company’s work must withstand time and usage. The harshness of road conditions may cause the crack to reappear even after it’s been repaired. Reach out to friends and family who have cars. Ask who they use when they get windshield cracks. If they are satisfied with the repair, contact the auto glass repair shop for more details about their services.

REPAIR CRACKS EARLY Inevitably, some drivers will try to live with their cracked windshields, ignoring the damage and hoping it won’t get worse. That’s a big mistake. A cracked windshield can distract you or obscure your vision. It can easily cause you to have an accident. Even a minor crack should be treated early to keep it from growing. The vibration of the car will cause cracks to lengthen and grow if they’re not repaired. It can happen quickly or slowly. Hairline cracks are especially prone to splitting. When you repair cracks early, you prevent further damage. In turn, it saves you money. The choice is crystal clear. Get your windshield fixed by a highquality auto glass company. It is smart, affordable and safe.

Content and Photos provided by Green Shoot Media


Classified

C4

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SIGN AND DRIVE! QX30

NEW 2017 INFINITI

299

$

OR CHOOSE 0% FOR 60 MONTHS 2 or More At This Price

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A MONTH - $0 DOWN

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QX60

Q50

299

$

*

NEW 2017 INFINITI

STLTODAY.COM

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

*

2 or More At This Price

Q60

MARCH 15, 2017

QX50

NEW 2017 INFINITI

249

$

WEDNESDAY

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2014 INFINITI Q50 P8838, Black Obsidian......... $24,990 2014 INFINITI Q50 P8844, Liquid Plantinum..... $24,990 2015 INFINITI Q50 P8847, Liquid Plantinum ....... $25,990 2014 INFINITI Q50 P8781, Liquid Platinum..........$27,990 2011 INFINITI QX56 96404B, Black Obsidian .... $29,990

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2015 INFINITI QX60 P8726, Black Obsidian ...... $34,990 2015 INFINITI QX60 P8824, Hermosa Blue ....... $35,490 2015 INFINITI QX60 95383A, Grey........................$36,990 2014 INFINITI QX60 96398A, Moonlight White $36,990 2014 INFINITI QX80 P8845, Smoky Quartz...... $42,990

*39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 miles available. $995 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit. 0% for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed. For qualified buyers. †Q70L and QX30 $0 Down. See dealer for details. Offers expire 3/31/17.

MISSOURI'S #1 INFINITI RETAILER Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

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Buick LaCrosse #39050A, Carbon Black ..................................... $15,490 Buick Verano #38092, Quicksilver Metallic......................................... $16,990 Buick LaCrosse #38074A, White Diamond Tricoat White.............. $18,990 GMC Acadia Denalli #96045A, Red Jewel Tintcoat............. $19,990 Buick Verano #38210, Quicksilver Metallic......................................... $19,990 GMC Terrain SLT-1 #78042, Slate Blue ................................... $20,990 GMC Terrain SLT-1 #77468, Jet Black..................................... $21,990 GMC Terrain Denali #95404B, Crystal Red Tintcoat............. $23,490 Buick LaCrosse #38066, Quicksilver Metallic............................... $23,990

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2015 2012 2013 2017 2013 2012 2013 2014 2016

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Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C5

RIDES

2017 TOYOTA PRIUS PRIME

NEW ELECTRIC CAR MIGHT ANGER OIL BARONS BY WEANING DRIVERS OFF GASOLINE continued from the front

Cargazing by Derek Price

Keeping with its futuristic theme, it’s packed with more Style: 8 digital real estate than most cars. It has acres of LCD Performance: 7 screens on the inside, including Price: 9 a gigantic, vertical, iPad-style Handling: 5 touchscreen that dominates the Ride: 6 center stack. While it’s certainly flashy, the Comfort: 6 digital interface doesn’t quite Quality: 8 The Toyota Prius Prime’s futuristic style reflects the radical match the industry’s best work Overall: 7 engineering beneath it. — currently a crown shared by Tesla and Volvo, in my view — families who occasionally need to haul a fifth but still may be the best I’ve seen at this price person around. And while the styling is more stunning, I don’t point. As a whole, the Prius Prime is an incredible think it drives quite as well as the new Chevrolet piece of engineering for people who want to burn Volt, which has both a longer electric range and less fuel and drive something futuristic. It looks a more solid, substantial feel over the road. and drives like a cutting-edge vehicle, because The Toyota’s body, though, is much more that’s exactly what it is. appealing to me. I just feel sorry about Toyota’s unfortunate The Prius Prime and the Volt are both aiming timing. If they had a crystal ball, they’d release a to be “cars of the future,” but only one of them looks the part in my eyes. The Prius Prime, even new Prius whenever gas prices are expensive and more so than the ordinary Prius, has an exagger- a new Tundra pickup when gas is cheap. With many years of lead time required and no way ated sense of futurism in its otherworldly lines. I’m a particularly big fan of how the back end to reliably prophesy the direction of oil prices, it’s very possible Toyota will end up getting that looks, too, with a dip in the middle of the tail order backward. that’s distinctive and unusual. I wish every car Pricing starts at $27,100 for the Prius Prime was designed so creatively. and ranges up to $33,100 for the more luxuryInside, it’s just as eye-popping. filled Advanced trim level.

RATINGS

affordable gas prices make huge pickup trucks, crossovers and SUVs sell like caffeine-soaked hotcakes — the Prius Prime draws interest from a relatively small niche of eco-conscious buyers. Why is it so special? Because it makes gasoline completely unnecessary for around-town trips and very inexpensive for long ones. A 25-mile range under battery power means the Prius Prime won’t burn a drop of fuel for most people’s daily errands. And after that 25-mile range is used up, you’ve still got a gasoline engine that gets 55 mpg in the city and 53 on the highway, according to EPA ratings. That means if King Salman decides to jack up our fuel prices, it’s no problem in the long term. We’ll all eventually buy Prius Primes and go about our lives in comfortable, if smaller, normalcy. Yes, the comfort in this car was a pleasant surprise in my weeklong test. It’s comfortable from the driver’s standpoint, with strong, silent acceleration typical of the best electric cars so you never feel frightened on highway on-ramps. It’s also impressively quiet, smooth riding and reasonably roomy for passengers, even in the back seat. One glaring downside, though, is the lack of a middle seat in back. The Prius Prime only has two seats back there, which is good for roominess but not very practical for some

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C6

Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Honda

Honda

Jeep

Lexus

Misc. Autos

Nissan/Datsun

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

'12 Honda Civic EX: $8,995 #47200-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '02 Honda Accord 2.4LX: Low Miles, Fuel Efficient, 1 Owner, $6,990 #27174A

'11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Laredo, Black, Leather, $14,880 #187961 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'07 Lexus RX350: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, Auto, $11,990 #C8355A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'10 Altima 3.5 SR: $8,995 #47425-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra: 25K Miles, Power Windows & Locks, Bluetooth, Clean Carfax $13,390 #R1553A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '08 Nissan 350Z: Convertible, Navigation, 34K Miles #T17270A $18,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '11 Nissan Altima 2.5: $7,397 #67614-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '07 Nissan Sentra: $6,397 #46632-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Sentra 2.0: $9,397 #47394-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra: $10,997 #94682 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '17 Nissan Versa: $9,268 #47306 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '10 Nissan Versa: $6,997 #46634-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Nissan Sentra: $7,995 #66775-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '17 Nissan Versa: $11,995 #94637SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Nissan Versa: $6,797 #46496-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Sentra: $9,995 #47270-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Delay-off Headlights, Remote Keyless Entry, $6,990 #27289A

MARCH MANIA SALE! LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '13 Civic LX: White, Camera Bluetooth, 32K Miles, $13,500 #X3153 '15 Odyssey EXL: Silver, Heated Power Leather, Power Doors & Lift Gate, Rear DVD, Only $27,000 #H162418A '14 Accord EXL: Navigation, Heated Power Leather, Moonroof, 2 Cameras, Bluetooth, Silver $17,800 #X3098 '14 Civic LX: (7) to Choose From, White, Bluetooth, Camera, 39K Miles, Starting at $13,800 #TH100 '14 Accord LX-S: Coupe, Bluetooth, Camera, Black, $15,000 #TH011 '14 CRV LX: AWD, (7) to Choose From, Urban Titanium Metallic, Bluetooth, Camera, Starting at $17,700 #X3099 '14 Pilot EX: 4WD, Black, 19K Miles, 3rd Row 8 Passenger, $27,000 #H170736A '14 Honda Accord LX: (4) to Choose From, Champagne Frost, Bluetooth, Camera, Starting at $15,000 #X3062 '16 Pilot EXL: Pearl White, 29K Miles, New Body Style, Dual Power Htd Leather, Moonroof, (2) Cameras!Loaded! $34,000 #H170100A '14 Civic EX: Monroof, Wheels, White, Bluetooth, Camera Now $16,000 #X3158

'14 Honda Civic EX: White, 20K Miles, Alloys, Moonroof, State/Emissions Tested, $16,000 #X3158

'14 Honda Accord LX's: Last 4 To Choose, 37K Mi, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, Alloys, Honda Cert, Starts at $15,000 #X3062

'15 Honda Accord:Sport, 16K Miles, #23933-1 $18,990 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC (877) 262-8426

'10 Honda Fit: $10,995 #46462-3 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Honda Civic EX: $8,995 #47692-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '99 Honda Civic LX: $3,995 #47694-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085

'08 Lexus IS250: Auto, Leather, Sunroof, Just Arrived, $11,990 #B8251A

'16 ATS Coupe: AWD, Navigation, Just Arrived!! '06 Honda Accord LX $6,500 #45927A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '13 Honda CRV: AWD, 42K Miles, Auto, Black, #B8167A $19,490

'05 Honda Pilot EX-L Heated Front Seats, Moonroof, Steering Wheel Stereo Controls $7,990 #V17318A

Hyundai '15 Elantra GT $11,989 #KE43308 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Hyundai Accent SE: 4 Door, Auto, Tan, $11,500 Stk# P06022 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Hyundai Accent GS: $11,995 #94799 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Hyundai Elantra: $8,397 #47499-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Hyundai Sonata: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Brake Assist $8,990 #26565N

'15 Jeep Cherokee Latitude FWD $16,443 #TE94624 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Auto, 2-Tops, Lift Kit, Wheels, $38,990 #B8391

'16 Hyundai Sonata SE $14,249 #P8810 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'15 Kia Optima EX $14,011 #45842A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '13 Kia Sportage $15,398 #45978A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'09 Infiniti G35x: Advanced Technology Package, Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Sunroof $9,990 #94701M

Mazda

'14 SRX: Performance, Chrome Whls, AWD, 30K Miles, $31,990

'11 Mazda3 S: Grand Touring, Hatchback, $11,990

'15 Cadillac CTS-V: 10K Miles, Auto, Every Option, Black, Call! '07 Cadillac Escalade EXT: AWD, White Diamond, Loaded, Call For Details

'16 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Touring, Gray, 29K Miles, Loaded! Only $21,500 #H170166A

'11 Mazda RX-8: 13K Miles, Grand Touring, Rare!! $18,990 #M16763B

'14 CTS: Performance: AWD, Black, Certified, $31,990 '13 Cadillac XTS: Premium, white Diamond, AWD, 24K Miles, $32,990 '16 XTS: Black on Black, AWD, Navigation, 18K Miles '16 Escalade ESV: Platinum, AWD, Black, Local Trade, $81,990

'14 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, White, Auto, Certified, $19,990

'14 Kia Optima S: 3 to Choose From, Black, 35K Miles, Starting at $13,800 #X3139

'14 Kia Forte LX: Silver, 24K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $11,500 #X3107

'08 Infiniti EX35: Black, Loaded, $11,990 #P3568-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K Miles, Loaded $31,990 #C17045RA

'13 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Navigation, White Diamond, Certified, $23,490

Kia

'11 Kia Sorento EX: V6, Silver, Only 34K Miles, Call Now!$15,000 #H170632A

'15 Escalade ESV Premium: AWD, 22" Chromes, 18K, Just Arrived

'15 Lincoln MKS: Silver, 23K Miles, Call Today Only $23,200 X3119

'12 Jeep Compass Carfax One Owner, Sunroof, $9,444 #AT1537A

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Lmtd, Sunroof, 4x4, Navigation, $29,490 #B8399

CTS: Coupe, Performance, 55K Miles, Auto, $18,990

Lincoln

'15 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk $24,844 #ET86199 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'16 Hyundai Accent SE $10,986 #KE67832 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '12 Hyundai Elantra: Auto, Power Group Pkg, Certified, $10,490

Infiniti '10 Honda Civic LX: 4 Door, Red, Only 113K Miles, State & Emissions Test Included, Call Now, $7,500 #DL1477

'16 Jeep Patriot Sport: Premium Sound, Cruise Control, Cloth Seats $15,990 #B8304

'14 SRX: Premium Collection, AWD, Chrome Wheels, Black Raven, $32,990

'14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles $15,990 #P8747A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS NEW ARRIVALS!! 1-866-244-9085

'13 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Navigation $12,490 #9025A

'17 Mazda3 Sport Power Windows, Cruise Control $19,680 #M17072

'17 Porsche Macan S: 8K Miles, Black, Navigation, Panoramic Roof, Call! '15 Escalade ESV Premium: 18K Miles, Chrome Wheels, DVD '14 Audi R8: 11K Miles, Audi Exclusive Orange, Call Today '16 Lincoln Navigator: White Platinum, DVD, Sunroof, $47,990

Mercury '10 Mercury Milan Leather Seats, Bluetooth, $8,220 #M16777A

Lexus

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD: Panoramic Roof, 4x4, Black, $29,990 '14 Chevy Suburban LTZ: White Diamond, 32K Miles, 4x4, Loaded

'15 Lexus CT 200H: Hybrid, 17" Alloys, Leather, Loaded, Only 21K Miles, $22,500 '07 Mercury Milan Power Windows, CD Player, Heated Side Mirrors $5,990 #M16736A '15 Lexus IS 350: AWD, 1 Owner, Navigation, Sunroof $33,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '04 Lexus RX 330: 303L V6, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today, $7,490 #95427A

'14 Ford Explorer XLT: Leathr, Roof, 4x4, Quad Seats, Call For Details '15 Yukon Denali: 22" Wheels, Navigation, Sunroof, DVD

Mini Cooper '12 Mini Cooper: Countryman, 62K Miles, Panoramic Roof, $14,690

Mitsubishi '13 Mini Cooper: Bayswater , 32K Miles, Black, Call #B8416

'08 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles $8,990 #38285A

'13 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Bluetooth, Leather Seats, Premium Sound, $15,990 #8854A

'09 Mitsubishi Lancer Sport Trim, CD Player, Security System, $9,890 #W2793A

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

vacation hold

'14 Nissan Maxima 3.5: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GPS, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $17,490 #95413A

'15 VW Beetle: Convertible, 37K Miles, Auto, White, Local Trade, $17,990

'09 Infiniti G37x: Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Sunroof, Backup Camera $12,990 #94677M '07 Lexus IS 250: One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $12,990 #39052A

'12 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty, $15,990 #P8717

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Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

C7

STLTODAY.COM

RIDES Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW CHEVROLET PURCHASE

3 YEAR MAINTENANCE INCLUDED WITH EVERY NEW CHEVROLET PURCHASE 2017 SILVERADO CREW CAB

2017 TRAVERSE LS

259

$

10,000 0% 60 $

OFF MSRP

AND

APR FOR

MO.* LEASE

Includes Missouri Sales Tax

OR BUY FOR

MONTHS

2017 TRAX $ MO.*

129

AUTOMATIC

LEASE

2017 CRUZE LS $ MO.*

2017 EQUINOX LS $ MO.*

2017 MALIBU LS $ MO.*

Includes Missouri Sales Tax

Includes Missouri Sales Tax

Includes Missouri Sales Tax

159

Includes Missouri Sales Tax

14,997

OR $ BUY FOR

OR $ BUY FOR

169

LEASE

13,997

OR $ BUY FOR

199

LEASE

17,997

OR $ BUY FOR

HURRY, OFFER ENDS 3/31/17 Shop Online At: Bommaritochevysouth.com

23,997

$

LEASE

17,997 Artwork for illustration only.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP-THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE #1 MIS

Bommarito

SOUTH COUNTY 6127 SOUTH LINDBERGH

1-800-334-9462 (314)-487-9800

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

TOLL FREE

*24 month lease for 2017 Equinox LS and Trax, 36 month lease for 2017 Traverse LS,, 2017 Malibu LS and Cruze LS 10k miles per year, more miles available, with $2,000 down cash or trade. Missouri taxes and license included, with qualifying rebates and incentives and approved credit. Take delivery by 3/31/17. 0% apr for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed. See dealer for details.

F L O L R A D H . S C L O L O R R A D H M A S C R O M MA 5 year/100,000 mile

Ford Retail Powertrain Care

NO CHARGE with the purchase of any new 2016/2017 F150

In stock only Stock# T7418

2017 FORD F-150

2017 FORD F-250 AND F-350 CREW CAB

SUPERCAB XLT 4X4

$

LARIAT 4X4

39936PERMO.RCL MO.

*Capitalized Cost $40,800 less $300 Ford Ecoboost Bonus Customer Cash, $1500 Ford Bonus Customer Cash ,$250 Ford RCL Customer Cash and $4000 cash or trade. $0 security deposit. 10,500 miles per year. $.20 mile for every mile over 31,500. Term 36 months. Residual is $26,168.70. Includes taxes( may vary based on address), title and license. $4,713.82 due at lease inception. See dealer for details. Expires 3/15/17

$

6,000 OFF MSRP*

In stock only

*Includes $1000 Ford Retail Customer Cash in lieu of any special financing through Ford Motor Credit Company for qualified buyers. Expires 3/15/17

2017 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW 4X4 XLT $ 8,000 OFF MSRP*

*Savings include $2000 Ford Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash (requires financing through Ford Motor Credit Company for qualified buyers) and $1500 Ford Bonus Customer Cash. All Ford Customer Cash in lieu of any special APRs through Ford Motor Credit Company. Expires 3/15/17

636-272-FORD (3673) • 636-978-FORD (3673) 1075 WEST TERRA LANE, HWY 70 & BRYAN RD. (NORTH SERVICE RD.) O’FALLON, MO

Certiied Pre-Owned

SERVICE & PARTS HOURS: M-F 7am-6pm • SAT 7am-5pm • BODY SHOP HOURS: M-F 8am-5pm

Marshall Ford Bryan Rd.

70

Hwy. K

www.marshall-ford.com

40/61

Nissan/Datsun

Nissan/Datsun

Scion

Toyota

Toyota

Volkswagen

'15 Nissan Sentra S $13,367 #KE49480 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'16 Versa Note S: $11,997 #94470SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'13 Scion T/C: White, Auto, Sunroof, $11,990

'12 Toyota Yaris: $8,397 #47047-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'12 VW Passat 2.5L SEL: 1 Owner Clean CARFAX, Navigation, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $11,490 #26552M

'12 Nissan Altima SL: Sedan, Leather, Sunroof, 101K Miles, Safety & Emissions Passed, Priced at $10,000 #H170639A

Pontiac

'15 Scion XB $15,527 #46132B WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'08 Toyota Solara: Blue, $9,750 #180921 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 Toyota Camry LE: Blue/Gray, 110K Miles, $9,880 #185511 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 Nissan Altima $14,837 #P8762 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '13 Nissan Cube: 66K Miles, Auto, Certified, Power Package, $10,990 #V16442B

'10 Pontiac G6: $6,997 #94452-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'08 Pontiac Torrrent: $8,397 #47411-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

Range Rover/Land Rover '16 Land Rover LR4: Black, 4WD, 10K, Local Trade $60,990 #C1636R

'14 Scion tC Stk #P8794 $15,699 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

Subaru '12 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Carfax One Owner, Low Miles, $14,409 #X2836P LOU FUSZ SUBARU 888-347-0701

Toyota '13 Nissan Cube: Keyless Entry, CD Player, Cruise Control, $10,490 #V16442B

'09 Nissan Altima Cloth Seats, Cruise Control, $8,995 #V170299A

Saturn

'15 Camry SE: Stk #P8768 $17,108 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'08 Saturn Sky: Auto, Black, 31K Miles, #C17338A $13,490

'07 Toyota Carmy LE: Beige, Safety & Emissions Included, #DL1441 $5,800

Scion '16 Versa Note S: $11,997 #94471SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'13 Scion iQ: $8,397 #46083-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'14 Toyota Camry LE: Black, Only 14K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, $14,600 #X3121

'13 Toyota Scion XD: Hatchback, White, 33K Miles, High Quality, Low Price! $11,000 #X3169

'07 Toyota Corolla: $5,995 #94426-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'12 Volkswagen Beetle Low Miles, CarFax One Owner, $10,990 #V17253A

'07 Toyota Camry LE: Clean CARFAX, Gas Saver $9,490 #78200B

Volvo '15 Toyota Corolla LE: (2) to Choose from, White, #X3123, Starting at $12,500

'05 Toyota Corolla LE: Only 106K Miles, Hurry In, Call Today, $6,500 #H170594A

'09 Toyota Camry: $7,595 #67224-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '09 Toyota Yaris: $5,397 #47278-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

STLtoday.com/advertise

'12 Toyota Corolla CarFax One Owner, Bluetooth, Keyless Entry, $10,495 #V170183B

Volkswagen '06 Volkswagen Passat 2.0T Turbo, Heated Front Seats, $5,490 #V80424

'15 Volkswagen Jetta $13,493 #P8730A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'11 VW Jetta: $6,995 #66849-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'17 Volvo XC60 T5: Inscription, 9K Miles $34,000 #L1235 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '13 Volvo S60T5: White/Beige 51K Miles $17,933 #183781 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Volvo XC60T6: Black/Black, $11,855 #185061 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo XC60 3.2: AWD, Certified, Grey/Beige $28,990 #L1250 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Volvo S40: T5, R-Design, 55K Miles, Very Sharp, $12,990 #V17331A

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C8

Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

MONSTER AND THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH ARE HERE TO HELP YOU BE YOUR BEST. With interview Q&A, resume tips and cover-leter guidance, we’ll help you transform your hard work into opportunity. Because we’re more than a job board. We’re a proud sponsor of your unstoppable, bulletproof, job-crushing machine. Visit STLtoday.com/monster and start your search today.

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M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

Chevrolet Trucks

Sport Utilitiy

Sport Utilitiy

Mini vans

'12 Chevy Silverato 3500: Crew Cab, LTZ, Black, 26K Miles, $42,800 Stk# P06005 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Silverado: 4WD, Crew Cab, 59K Miles, White $43,680 Stk# P06002 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Avalanche LTZ: White Diamond, Sunroof, DVD, $26,990 #C6194RA

'08 Chrysler PT Cruiser LX CD Player, Keyless Entry, $4,895 #DL1428

'11 Kia Sportage: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Call Today, $13,490 #75452A

'13 Toyota Sienna SE: 6 Cyl, 24K Miles, $26,990 #T16323A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '15 Toyota Sienna XLE: 18K Miles, Time To Save Some Cash, $31,990 #C8311A

'07 Cadillac Edcalade EXT: White Diamond, $21,990 #C8332A

'13 Cadillac Escalade: 34K Miles, Auto, Certified, Black, $45,490 '16 Chevy Colorado LT: Extended Cab, 3.6L V6, Auto, 9K Miles, $26,989 #C10915Q LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '16 Ram 1500: 4WD, Quad Cab, Silver, 25K Miles $28,000 #X3151

'12 Ram 1500: Big Horn, 71K, C/C $23,900 #48499-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '14 Ram 1500: Crew Cab, White, 4WD, Big Box $25,990 Stk# P06008 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Ram 1500 SXT Quad Cab, No Accidents, A/C, CD Player $10,790 #W4133B

'15 Ram1500 $27,049 #ET61517 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'16 Chevy Trax 1LT: Keyless Entry, Alloys, Power Windows, Sat Radio $17,290 #W4122A

'13 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: 4WD, Sunroof, DVD, $39,990 #B8330A

'16 Dodge Durango: Limited, 4x4, 18K Miles, Navigation, Leather, DVD, $31,900 #P3578 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '07 Dodge Nitro SLT: $8,397 #94657-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Ford Explorer LTD: $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Ford Edge SEL: White, Only 22K Miles, Call Today, $21,800 #H170507A

Ford Trucks '16 Ford F-150: 4WD, Super Crew, 23K Miles, Hurry In, Starting At $29,500 #X3118

'14 Ford F-150: 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost, 57K Miles, $27,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '13 Ford F150 SVT Raptor: 4x4, 6.2L 8 Cyl, Heated Lthr Seats, 32K Miles $47,990 #P7440A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '10 Ford F-150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, 111K Miles $19,990 #R1648A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '10 Ford F-150: Crew Cab, Lariat, 4x4, #T16241B $17,990 SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '05 Ford Ranger: Super Cab, FX4, 4.0 V6, 106K Miles, $10,890 #T17138B SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '15 Ford F-250 Lariat $37,499 #T3786E 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

GMC Trucks '13 GMC Sierra 1500: Work Truck, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certifed Pre-owned $16,990 #77642A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '05 Nissan Frontier CarFax One Owner, Alloy Wheels, $10,990 #W4776A

'12 Ford Explorer LTD: AWD, Navigation, Leather, 68K Miles, $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Ford Escape: Titanium, $22,901 #P3580-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Ford Edge SE: $9,995 #47106-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Ford Explorer $29,789 #ET10660 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Ford Explorer Ltd $32,484 #TE45305 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Ford Edge Sport $14,994 #KT2049EA 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Ford Escape $10,902 #KTC3502A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Ford Edge #P8357 $19,317 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '11 Ford Edge: Sunroof, V6, Auto, Silver, $11,990 #M16717A

'14 Ford Edge Limited: White, Chromes Wheels, $26,490 #C8333A

'14 Ford Explorer: Limited, 4x4, Quad Seats, Navigation, $31,990 #B8424

'16 Kia Sorento $21,071 #KTL6599 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Kia Soul: 6-Speed Manual Transmission, Black, Only 23K miles, Reduced to $11,400 Great Price!

'15 Lincoln MKS $23,823 #E02195 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Lincoln MKX $32,236 #E24459 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '06 Madza MX-5: Grand Touring: $8,995 #46581-5 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, White, Roof DVD, $20,490

'09 Toyota Tacoma: Regular Cab, 5 Speed, Only 53K Miles, White $10,300 #H170586A

'14 Toyota Tundra Stk #45331B, $27,878 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '12 Tundra Stk #43499B $29,327 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

STLtoday.com/classiieds

Sport Utilitiy '03 Hummer H2: One Owner, Local Trade, Sunroof, $17,990 #B8313A

'07 BMW X5: $11,597 #67464-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Buick Enclave: Leather, $16,990 #48453-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Buick Enclave CX: $9,397 #67071-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Buick Enclave $35,327 #4V14526 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Cadillac Escalade: AWD, Black, 103K Miles, 22" Chromes, Navigation, $25,000 #H161170B

'16 Chevy Trax $16,140 #TE41239 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'14 GMC Terrain Denali: Navigation, Sunroof, Silver $24,990 #C17297A

'15 GMC Terrain $23,899 #TE57015 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 GMC Acadia SLT Stk #45198B $14,035 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Leather, Quad Seats, Sunroof, $27,490

'12 GMC Yukon XL Denali: Nav, Sunroof, AWD, $28,990

Vans

'14 Honda CR-V EX: Local Trade, AWD, Certified, $17,990

'08 Hummer H3: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, $15,990 #27273A

'12 Hyundai Veracruz: $11,597 #46164-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '07 Hyundai Santa Fe: $8,397 #47361-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '10 Honda CR-V EX-L: 58K Miles, AWD, One Owner, $15,490 #C17250A

'13 Honda Pilot EXL: Sunroof, AWD, Black, $28,490

'08 Infiniti QX56: 4WD, Pearl White, Local Trade, $17,990

'09 Jeep Wrangler: Sahara $19,990 #48553-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

STLtoday.com/homes

Lien Sale to be held at A-1 Locker Rental, 4427 Meramec Bottom Rd, St Louis , MO 6 3 1 2 9 , 3 1 4 -8 9 2 2002, Saturday March 25th , 2016 at 1 1 .0 0 A.M. For the payment of rent on the following lockers consisting of household goods and miscellaneous items.

MEHLVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT ACCEPTING BIDS/PROPOSALS

2923: C Radcliff 1205: K Quante 1225: S Maxson 1115: M Kurrus 1011: R Ernst 1018: G Branch

'06 Ford E-350 Cutaway: $8,997 #66644-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

Utility Trailers/Trucks 2000 John Deere Gator 6x4. Price is $2100. It only has 595 hours.Contact: (314) 252-0458

Travel Trailers/Campers '17 Hartland Wilderness, 3250BS, 2 Slides, Dual AC, Used Twice, $30,000 Must Sell. (636)485-7139

Dogs 1st Wheaton Terriers, Husky, Mini Schnauzers, Maltese, Yorkiepoos, Cockapoos, Teddy Bears, Others Poos & Cuties !

lovencarepets.org '11 Mazda CX-9: Sport, Clean Carfax, $12,990 #8836A

AKC Silver Biege Standard Pood le s , R a is e d in my h o me Ve t checked, 4 males 1 female Ready 3/20/17 $800 217-430-0267

'14 Nissan Rogue: AWD, Silver, $17,990 #18260-2 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '09 Nissan Pathfinder: $9,995 #47280-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Murano SL: AWD, 47K Miles, Panoramic Roof, $20,490 #B8407

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

CASH ONLY - Sale subject to tenant satisfying lien.

Bids/Proposals Construction Bid Notice: Ne w C o n s tru c tio n , 9 , 5 0 0 s f gymnasium, 4 month schedule. April 1- July 31 '17. Contact Marshall Cohen, Lift for Life A c a d e m y a t mcohen@liftforlifeacademy. org, for 3 1 4 .4 3 6 -2 3 3 7 ext 203 info. Bid day is March 2 4 , 2 0 1 7, 1pm.

'10 Nissan Murano SL: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, AWD $15,990 #77560B

Puppies Ready Now

GOLDENDOODLES & LABRADOODLES GOLDADORS, GOLDENS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder sieversretrievers.com German Shepherd pups Home protect trainable Euro bloodlines H/E nrml ltd AKC Reg $1650 (573)7477555 Hunting Golden Retrievers, Health Guarantee, $1100/ea. orionskennel.com (772)643-1340

LABRADOODLES '15 Nissan Pathfinder $22,731 #KTE34632 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Nissan Frontier: 4 WD, Crew Cab, Silver, Only 12K Miles, $25,000 #X3138

Shots, Wormed. Health Guarantee. Prices Staring at $400 & Up. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494

sieversretrievers.com

Merchandise Wanted '08 Nissan Pathfinder: 4x4, Leather, Roof, Navigation, 3rd Row, $14,490 #B8411

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Misc. Merchandise For Sale '08 Saturn Vue XE: White, Only 92K Miles, Hurry In! Will Sell Fast at $7,500 #DL1513

'08 Saturn Outlook: #47260-1 $8,995 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Saturn VUE Cruise Control, Remote Entry, $7,500 #DL1513

'16 Subaru WRX: STI Performance, $29,990 #T17221A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '16 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Bluetooth, Leather Seats $26,431 #X2833XP LOU FUSZ SUBARU 888-347-0701 '08 Toyota Highlander: Black/Black Leather, $13,550 #164762 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Toyota Rav 4: V6, LTD, 4WD, Coco Metalic Brown, Loaded, Only 88K Miles, $15,200

Bed-Queen PillowTop Mattress Set, NEW, in plastic, $150 Financing Available. $40 down take home today. (618) 772-2710 Can Deliver

Belleville Flea Market March 18th & 19th, 2017 Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm at the BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

Bargain Box '15 Toyota Highlander: AWD, V6, LTD, Dark Blue, 21K Miles, Super Nice!$36,000 #H170366A

'01 Toyota Highlander: $7,397 #66692-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Toyota RAV4 LE #P8612 $17,906 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'14 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, 28k Miles Vacation Time! $16,500 #H162428A

'15 Dodge Grand Caravan: Only 8K Miles, Backup Camera, $18,990 #17326A SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '16 Dodge Journey SXT: $17,900 #P3625 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '16 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT:$19,990 #P3593 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Dodge Journey: $10,397 #47316-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Dodge Grand Caravan: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Rear DVD, 3rd Row Seating, $12,990 #27015N

'15 Honda Odyssey EXL: 8 Passenger, 2 To Choose, Pwr Doors, Navigation, Lthr, $29,200 #X3084

St. Louis County Department of Planning Early Notice and Public Review of Proposed Activities in a 100-Year Floodplain To: All interested Agencies Groups and Individuals

618.396.2494

Mini vans '06 Honda CR-V EXL: AWD $6,980 #L12311 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Honda CRV LX: AWD, 6 To Choose, Largest Selection, All Colors, Starting at $17,700 #X3099

Bids/Proposals

C9

Notice to Contractors, Mehlville School District is accepting sealed bids /propos als fo r S t . Johns Kitche n Upgrade s . For more details, please visit our website at www. mehlvilleschooldistrict.com

Aquarium 75 gal. Complete w/ fish & decor. Moving, must sell. $275 obo. 314-843-0566.

Public Notices To all persons interested in the estate of M I L T O N G E R L A N D , dec edent. The unders igned, David Gerland is acting as Trustee under a trust, the terms of which provide that the debts of the decedent m ay be paid by the Trus tee(s) upon receipt of proper proof thereof. The address of the Trustee is: 4697 Bridlewood Terrace, St. Louis, MO 63128. All creditors of the decedent are noticed to present their claims to the undersigned within six (6) months from the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. David Gerland; Trustee

This is to give notice that St. Louis County under 24 CFR Part 58 has determined that the following proposed actions under the Community Development Block Grant Program and HUD grant B-16-UC29-0001 are located in the 100y e a r floodplain, and St . Louis C ounty will be identifying and evaluating practicable alternatives to locating the action in the floodplain and the potential impacts on the floodplain from the proposed action, as required by Executive Order 11988 in accordance with HUD regulations at 24 CFR 55.20 Subpart C Procedures for Making Determinations on Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands. ïThe City of Ferguson is proposing to use $120,300 in CDBG funds for street improvements to the 2 0 0 and 3 0 0 blocks of following streets: Rand Drive, Ward Drive, and Gage Drive. These streets are locate d in the 1 0 0 - y e a r floodplain. There are no adverse impacts anticipated. ïSt. Louis County is proposing to use CDBG funds in the amount of $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 for cle arance and demolition of 2 0 0 0 Bella Clare Drive, 10059 Viscount Drive, and 2 7 5 5 Grants Parkway. These properties are located in the 100year floodplain. There are no adverse impacts anticipated. ï T h e La n d C le a ra n c e fo r Redevelopment Authority for St. Louis County is proposing to use CDBG funds in the amount of approximately $30,000 to cut, clear, and remove trees, vegetation and other debris along the bank and in the bed of Engleholm Creek adjacent to the MET Center, located at 6 3 4 7 Plymouth Avenue in Wellston. This activity is located in the 100-year floodplain. There are no adverse impacts anticipated.

PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BIDDERS

TWG Construction, LLC (“TWG”), an equal opportunity employer, is seeking bidders for the following project located at 917 Locust St Lofts, St. Louis, MO. Opportunities are available on the rehabilitation of two existing buildings totaling 88 new units; consisting of a mix of studio, one, and two bedroom apartments. A l l b i d d o c u me n t s a r e f r e e o f charge electronically at the links below. Links live on 3-14-17 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/pyvx6j qdmmwzedi/AABLh_yTjgAcopxn0If wYXBka?dl=0 https://www.mediafire.com/folder/y2 zagcla41px7/LOCUST_ST_LOFTS _-_PUBLIC_BID_ PACKAGE_FOLDER Hard copies will be available for purchase at the following locations. County Blue Reprographics, 1449 Strassner Dr., Saint Louis, MO 63144, 314-961-3800. Cross Rhodes Print & Te c h n o lo g ie s , 1 7 1 2 M a c klin d Ave., Saint Louis, MO 63110, 314678-0087 TWG is expressively encouraging MBE’s/WBE’s to quote this project. TWG is also following the guidelines per the St. Louis Mayor’s Executive Order #28, as amended #47 to meet the following M/WBE subcontractor’s participation goals below: • A goal of 25% participation by MBE firms and 5% goal participation by WBE firms. Requests for clarification shall be submitted in writing no later than 5 : 0 0 p m o n F r id a y M arch 3 1 , 2017. Bids are due to TWG by 5 p.m., April 6, 2017, via e-mail rfitzpatrick@ t w g d e v.c o m or FAX (317) 245-2522. TWG reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive, to the extent permitt e d b y l a w , a n y i n f o r m a l i t y, irregularity or omission, and to accept any bid that is in the best interest of the project.

Saint Louis Zoo: Primate House Basement AC RFP SCOPE OF WORK: Contractor will be required to provide all labor and materials to successfully complete the installation of air conditioning in the basement of the Primate House, as outlined in the drawings and specifications provided for this project. M AN DATORY PRE-BID MEETING & SITE INSPECTION : On March 28, 2017 at 1 0 :0 0 a m in The Living World building lower level. at 1 Governm e n t D r i v e , S a i n t L o u is, M o . 63110 in Forest Park, Bid Documents, drawings, and specs will be available on March 15 at: https://www.stlzoo.org/about/conta ct/vendoropportunities/

These activities are all located in St. Louis County. There are three primary purposes for this notice. First, people who may be affected by activities in floodplains and those who have an interest in the protection of the natural environment should be given an opportunity to express their concerns and provide information about these areas. Commenters are encouraged to offer alternative sites outside of the floodplain, alternative methods to serve the same project purpose, and methods to minimize and mitigate impacts. Second, an adequate public notice program can be an important public educational tool. The dissemination of information and request for public comment about floodplains can facilitate and enhance Federal efforts to reduce the risks and impacts associated with th e o c c u p a n c y a n d modification of the s e s pe cial areas. Third, as a matter of fairn e s s , w h e n t h e F e d e ra l government determines it will participate in actions taking place in floodplains, it must inform those who may be put at greater or continued risk. Comments must be received by St. Louis County Department of Planning at the following address or phone number on or before March 31, 2017: St. Louis County Department of Planning, 4 1 S . Central Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63105 and (314) 615-2520 or (314) 6155 4 6 7 (TTY), Atte ntion: Jim H o l t z m a n , Dire ctor. A full description of the project may also be reviewed from 8 am - 5 pm at address listed above. Comments may also be submitted via email at jholtzman2@stlouisco.com. Date: March 15, 2017

Vertical Realty Advisors, LLC is seeking bids for asbestos (200K+SF) and lead (200k+SF) abatement, general demo, and a subsurface investigation in St . Louis, MO. For bid documents email Adam with L&A at AJKAISER @ lafser.com Bids due April 2016

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Sealed bids for STATEWIDE JOB ORDER CONTRACT, Project No. ZASIDIQ-7001 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 3/30/17. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

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C

'14 Chevy Traverse LTZ: Nav, Sunroof, Lthr, $28,900 #P3645 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '14 Chevy Equinox: Blue, 29K Miles, $16,361 Stk# P06003 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala 2LZ: Black, 4 Door, 38K Miles, $22,000 Stk# P06013 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox 1LT: Gray, 72K Miles, $14,497 Stk# 170760A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Equinox: Black, 26K Miles, $17,891 Stk# P06004 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox: $10,397 #67323-3 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Chevy Traverse: $9,995 #47067-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: AWD, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $15,990 #78245A

'16 GMC Acadia SLT: Heated Leather, 2nd Row Buckets, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, #T16545B Please Call for Pricing SUNTRUP FORD KIRKWOOD 314-956-6111 '13 GMC Terrain: AWD, SLT, 41K Miles, Gray $18,990 Stk# P06023 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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'06 Nissan Murano S Alloy Wheels, CD Player $8,500 DL1546

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The following items will be released for sale:

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Classified

C10

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 15, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito AT THE THE BIG CORNER OF I-270 & LINDBERGH AND A SECOND NISSAN LOCATION IN WEST COUNTY MISSOURI’S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP-THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE #1

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10 YEAR/200,000 MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY

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OVER 10,000 VEHICLES RO TO CHOOSE FROM $25,145 MSRP -5,146 OFF MSRP

Nissan

SALE ABSOLUTELY ENDS MARCH 31ST

2 Locations

Hazelwood & Ballwin

661 Dunn Rd.

$

2017 NISSAN ROGUE

ATTENTION: ALL AMEREN CUSTOMERS

314-731-2228

19,999 Bommarito

$

14747 Manchester Rd. 2017 NISSAN LEAF 636-394-0330 ONLY 6 LEFT!

Nissan.com

OFF $17,500 MSRP

14,435

Rogue Model #22117, Vin. #5N1AT2MT5HC744324 Leaf Model #17017, Vin. #1N4BZ0CP2HC301778. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. Tax, title, destination & license not included in sale prices. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/31/17.

Honda 330 Brookes Drive

314-731-9777

159

$

2017 Honda CIVIC LX Automatic

BommaritoHonda.com 2016 Honda

36 Month Lease

189

$

CR-V SE

Automatic, FWD

36 Month Lease

36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, 2017 Civic LX total cost of lease $7,224 with $1,500 down cash or trade. 2016 CR-V SE total cost of lease $8,304 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra. Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. See dealer for details. Bommarito Honda Superstore. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/31/17.

Volkswagen Hazelwood

400 Brookes Drive

314-731-7777

Bommaritovwhazelwood.com

89

$

2017 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA S

119

$

2017 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT S

36 Month Lease

36 Month Lease

36 month lease, 10K miles per year, more miles available, 2017 Jetta S total cost of lease $5,704 with $2,500 down cash or trade. 2017 Passat S total cost of lease $6,784 with $2,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra. Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. Available w/approved credit. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/31/17.

Ford 675 Dunn Road

$

2016 FORD F-150 XL SuperCrew

25,977

314-731-1222

$

BommaritoFord.com 2017 FORD ESCAPE S

18,977

Available with approved credit. 2016 F-150 XL SuperCrew price includes $2,250 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Cash, $1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. 2017 Escape S price includes $3,500 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. See Dealer For Details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/31/17.

Toyota 9095 Dunn Road

149

$

2017 TOYOTA COROLLA L

314-731-0911

199

BommaritoToyota.net 2017 TOYOTA

36 Month Lease

$

RAV 4 LE FWD

36 Month Lease

270

Nissan

Ballwin

Sulphur Spring Rd.

Ellisville

I70 64

r Rd. ancheste

M

44 55

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Nissan, Honda, VW, Ford, Toyota In Hazelwood

*Bommarito advantage offer with every new vehicle purchase. Excludes Nissan Leaf & Nissan GT-R. See dealer for details. †Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

Ford

270

270

ber

Toyota Nissan

ind

N. Lindbergh

Clarkson

40

370

N. L

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

270

gh

Lease example for a new 2017 Toyota Corolla L model. Security deposit waived. Plus tax, title and license and $199 administrative fee. Lease is for 36 months, 12,000 miles a year at $149 a month with $2,500 due at signing with approved credit. Due at signing does not include first payment. Includes $1,000 lease subvention cash provided by TFS. Payment may vary depending on model and equipment choice. Lease example for a new 2017 Toyota RAV 4 LE FWD model. Security deposit waived. Plus tax, title and license and $199 administrative fee. Lease is for 36 months, 12,000 miles a year at $198 a month with $2,779 due at signing with approved credit. Due at signing does not include first payment. new car stock by 3-31-17. **Sale price includes all rebates. See dealer for details. Expires 3-31-17.

Honda

255

VW

I70 40

64 44

55


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 03.15.2017 • L

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

A ROMAN FEAST FOR THE IDES OF MARCH BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Julius Caesar was hanging out with his pals, getting ready to watch a race. Suddenly, from the crowd, a soothsayer called out to him: “Beware the ides of March.” Caesar chose to ignore him — on the whole, maybe not one of his better

decisions — and went back to casting dice or whatever he did in his spare time. Then, mid-month (the ides), he went to a political meeting at a hall next to the Theatre of Pompey, where he was stabbed to death by more than 40 conspirators, sort of like what happens in “Murder on the Orient Express.” Wednesday, March 15, is the ides of

March, the 2060th anniversary of the death of Caesar. We thought we would celebrate by re-creating the dishes of ancient Rome. This, however, is easier said than done. Although plenty of ancient Roman recipes can be found, including those in Apicius’ seminal cookbook, “De Re Coquinaria,” it is less easy (or perhaps just undesirable) to come

up with some of the ingredients the Romans were so fond of. Sow’s udders stuffed with salted sea urchins was a popular appetizer, flamingos were sometimes boiled with dates, ostriches were cooked whole, and if you weren’t too hungry you could always nibble on a stuffed See ROMAN • Page L4

Recipes • Boiled Eggs With Pine Nut Sauce (above), Posca, Beans a la Vitellius, Another Lamb Stew and Pear Patina. PAGE L4

Cookie dough: How long would you wait in line for it?

2 new Irish single-malt whiskeys to toast on St. Patrick’s Day BY JIM BRUCKER Chicago Tribune

DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Last month, two young friends of mine stood in line for nearly two hours to buy cookie dough. It was in New York. Of course it was New York. New York is where people apparently have so little else to do that they will gladly stand in line for hours to sample the newest, latest treat. Yesterday it was cronuts. Today it is cookie dough. Tomorrow … Saltines? And it was snowing. Of course it was

Within the whiskey world, Irish whiskey might be the friendliest. Smooth and easy-drinking, it can be mild-mannered to a fault. Traditional Irish whiskey includes triple-distilled unmalted grain, resulting in a fruity, gentle spirit that misses some of the complexity of a single-malt. Only a handful of large-scale distilleries produce the majority of Irish whiskey, and the new wave of craft distilleries is still quite young. So it’s up to these larger distilleries to innovate into a maturing single-malt market. Hyde Irish Whiskey, created by brothers

See NEMAN • Page L4

See WHISKEY • Page L5

WINE FINDS: TOSCANA RED BLENDS PAIR WELL WITH PASTA AND PIZZA. PAGE L2

SPECIAL REQUEST: BONEFISH GRILL’S MANGO SALSA IS GRILLED ALONG WITH FISH. PAGE L3 LET’S EAT

1 M


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

Toscana red blends for pasta, pizza BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

If you see Toscana Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT) on an Italian wine label, it means the wine comes from Tuscany and is expressive of the region rather than containing specific grapes or made a certain way. The IGT classification was introduced in 1992 to free winemakers from the requirements to obtain Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) status. However, IGT does not imply that the wine is of lesser quality but that it contains grapes that were not originally from the region, including merlot and cabernet sauvignon. The following Toscana IGT wines are perfect with pasta and pizza.

MONTE ANTICO 2011 TOSCANA IGT Bought • Friar Tuck, 9053 Watson Road, in February for $12.99 Description • Monte Antico consistently earns high marks from critics, including the 2011 vintage that received 90 points from James Suckling. A blend of 85 percent sangiovese, 10 percent merlot,and 5 percent cabernet sauvignon, this rich and fruity red was aged in oak for one year. A silky medium-bodied red with soft tannins, its juicy dark cherries and plum lavors are well-balanced with acidity.

FRESCOBALDI 2012 RÈMOLE TOSCANA IGT Bought • Friar Tuck, 9053 Watson Road, in February for $10.99 Description • This easy-todrink red comes from the famous Frescobaldi family, whose history dates to the year 1000. Frescobaldi wines were even served at the English Court of Henry VIII. A blend of 85 percent sangiovese and 15 percent cabernet sauvignon, this medium-bodied, smooth red tastes of raspberries and dark fruits with hints of black pepper. It’s a bit drier than the Monte Antico and less complex.

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

BEST BITES: KEEBLER CEREAL We stand in awe of this brilliance: The folks at Keebler have come out with a cereal that tastes — wait for it — like chocolate chip cookies dunked in milk. How has civilization lasted this long without it? Can we even, in truth, call it civilization? Only one problem: It needs the milk. This cereal isn’t nearly as good the way God meant cereal to be eaten — dry and out of the box. Size • 11.2 ounces Price • $3.99 Available • Grocery stores everywhere — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Make unforgettable meatballs Want to make meatballs that are simply unforgettable? Daniel Neman shows how in an unforgettably delicious new Prep School video.

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Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

WHAT’S COOKING

DINNER IN MINUTES

Kirkwood dad makes cooking a family afair BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-Dispatch

At the Donnelly household, food and cooking provide not only solid nourishment but also entertainment as well. Brice Donnelly developed a serious interest in cooking early. He cooked his first Thanksgiving dinner at 18 with frequent phone consultations from his mom. He worked in restaurants that ran the gamut from fast food to upscale grills for pocket money during high school and college, so he’s no stranger to the kitchen. “Jenny (his wife) and I even worked together at a Dairy Queen in Highland, Ill., during high school,” he said. When the family recently moved to a new home, they put in four well-planned garden beds to supply fresh vegetables, especially tomatoes, throughout the growing season. Two young apple trees and one tart cherry tree will first bear fruit in three years. “I’ll be putting in a blackberry bramble this year. We grow tons of herbs for cooking, too,” Donnelly says. You’ve got two active boys, and both you and your wife work. How do you manage time to cook? We keep a good pantry of staples, plus we use our freezer to our advantage, stocking locally raised meats from Mac’s Local Buys. We also subscribe to Mac’s community supported agriculture program for seasonal and local produce, breads and artisan food products. Jenny beats me home, so she decides on the protein and preps the dinner. When I get home, I finish it. Sometimes, the boys help. Oscar is just 4 years old. What tasks can he do in the kitchen? We roll a standing tower up to the counter and the boys

PHOTOS BY PAT EBY

BRICE DONNELLY Age • 36 Family • Wife Jenny; two sons Oscar, 4, and Everett, 1 Occupation • Missouri state public defender Neighborhood • Kirkwood

climb on. With rails on four sides, it’s safer than a stool. Oscar helps make coffee by running the grinder. He loves to roll and cut biscuits, plus he helps with salads, slaws and dressings. Everett watches. You’ve organized your kitchen expertly. How did you choose what tools and equipment to buy? I like to figure out which brands Julia Child used before chefs put their

names on everything, then I check them out. I buy restaurant quality when I can. A good selection of cast iron is a must, as are good knives — we get ours from Bertarelli cutlery. For pans we use Calphalon and Le Creuset. You mentioned you and your wife Jenny divide cooking duties. Are there things you don’t share? I don’t bake. Jenny does the baking. She likes precise recipes and the structure of the process. She also roasts a lot of potatoes, so many we’re buying a countermounted French fry/ potato cutter soon. You and Jenny both eat adventurously and cook healthy. Is it difficult to get the boys to follow what you eat? Well, when he was just a year old, Oscar was eating Rick Lewis’ pickled beets at Quincy Street Bistro. They do eat a lot of vegetables. We avoid excess sugar. We potty trained our boys with cornichons, little pickles, rather than M & M candies.

WANT TO BE IN WHAT’S COOKING? Send your favorite recipe (or nominate a friend or relative), plus your name, address, email and telephone number to: abertrand@post-dispatch.com or What’s Cooking, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 North Tucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

DONNELLY HOUSE STEAK AU POIVRE Yield: 8 servings 28-ounce bone-in ribeye steak 1/3 cup whole black peppercorns 2 ½ luid ounces olive oil ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, divided 1 luid ounce cognac 4 luid ounces prepared demi-glacé Notes: Donnelly uses prepared demi-glacé from Bolyard’s Meat and Provisions in Maplewood. • Donnelly sometimes uses his sous-vide/ circulator to cook the steaks at 133 degrees for an hour as opposed to cooking them in the oven. When he uses the circulator, he dredges the steaks after they are removed from the circulator, then sears and inishes them as per directions 5 through 13 below. 1. Remove steak from the refrigerator and allow to come to room temperature, about 30 minutes. Pat steak dry. 2. Preheat the oven to 225 degrees. 3. Lightly crush peppercorns in a mortar and pestle or pound with a cast-iron skillet or mallet between clean dishtowels to break the peppercorns into a coarse pieces, about 5 to 7 pieces per each peppercorn. Do not crush to ine. 4. Brush a light coating of olive oil (about ½ luid ounce) on each side of the steak. Dredge the steak on both sides in crushed peppercorns. Place on a wire rack set on a sheet pan and place both in the oven. Watch steaks closely and cook to an internal temperature of 130 degrees using a meat thermometer. The thickness of the steak determines how long it will cook. 5. While the steak is in the oven, heat a cast iron skillet large enough to hold it over high heat on the stovetop. Add remaining olive oil to the hot skillet, then stir in ½-stick butter. The mixture will sizzle. 6. Place the steak in the hot pan and allow it to set for 30 seconds. At the end of 30 seconds, spin the steak around the hot skillet. This will help get an even char. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, then lip it and repeat — set in pan for 30 seconds, spin the steak around the pan and then cook for 2 to 3 minutes. 7. Remove cooked steak to the wire rack over the sheet pan and place in warm oven while preparing the sauce. 8. Pre-warm a small thermos to hold the inished sauce by adding hot water, covering, and allowing it to stand while the sauce is made. 9. For the sauce, take the cast iron skillet of the lame, then add the cognac. Place the skillet over high heat until the liquid reduces by half. Scrape and de-glaze the pan, dislodging bits from the bottom. 10. Add 4 ounces of demi-glacé and keep stirring as it heats. Reduce the sauce until it thickens enough to lightly coat the back of a spoon. 11. Remove the skillet from heat, add remaining ½ stick of butter to the skillet and whisk thoroughly. Place in prewarmed thermos. 12. Take steaks from the oven and place on a large cutting board. Cut out the bone and slice against the grain into thin slices, fanning them out as you cut. 13. Plate the meat, then add sauce and enjoy. Per serving: 412 calories; 25g fat; 15g saturated fat; 95mg cholesterol; 21g protein; 5g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; no iber; 245mg sodium; 3mg calcium Nutritional analysis used unsalted butter.

FOOD FEEDBACK We love hearing from our readers. Here are a few of your latest helpful comments and questions. »» STEPHANIE DALE BOSCH, on our story about vegan food: Thank you for writing about this! I am a vegan cook, and I can tell you that vegan food is delicious and deeply satisfying. My advice to anyone wanting to become vegan or eat more plants: Buy a good vegan cookbook, or ind a vegan food blogger, and they will lead you to the promised land. »» MATT PULLEN, on Daniel Neman’s column about the hidden nitrates in uncured bacon: Cured … uncured … who cares? It’s still delicious bacon. »» LAURA HOHNSTRATER: But it’s bacon …

Crispy, elegant tomato tart is easy to make BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Here’s a recipe that will remind you to keep a stash of puff pastry in your freezer. Homemade is lovely, but there’s also no shame in using store-bought. This rustic tart has a topping I plan to use on several other dishes. It comes together like the crumbly stuff you would find on a baked fruit dish, but no sugar’s involved — just finely grated Parm, herbes de Provence, flour, oats and a bit of cold butter. If you’d rather not ruin your manicure, toss the crumble ingredients into a zip-top bag, seal and massage the mix into those craggy pieces. Juicy small tomatoes nestle into a thin layer of mascarpone cheese, so the result is lighter and more elegant than your average thin-crust pizza. The crispness, crunch and contrasting soft elements even hold up a day later, so you might be getting two meals for the price of one.

TOMATO GALETTE WITH SAVORY OAT CRUMBLE Yield: 6 to 8 servings 1 sheet frozen puf pastry ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons old-fashioned rolled oats (do not use instant or quickcooking oats) ¼ cup all-purpose lour ½ teaspoon dried herbes de Provence ¼ cup freshly grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons cold unsalted butter About 4 ounces (½ cup) mascarpone cheese 12 to 16 ounces small-variety tomatoes, preferably a mix of colors Note: If you buy the puf pastry a day in advance, you can let it defrost in the refrigerator. 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut or have at hand a piece of parchment paper measuring about 12 by 17 inches. Unwrap the frozen puf pastry dough and let it rest on the counter near the preheating oven. 2. Meanwhile, combine the oats, lour, herbes de Provence, Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl. Cut the butter into small pieces and add to the bowl; work them into the dry ingredients to form a crumbly mixture that clumps together when you gently squeeze it. 3. Gently unfold and roll out the puf pastry dough directly on the parchment paper to the size of the paper, using your clean ingers to smooth over any cracks. Spread the mascarpone over the dough, leaving a 1-inch margin all around. 4. Cut some of the tomatoes in half and leave some whole (amount to taste), then scatter them over the mascarpone. Sprinkle the oat crumble mixture evenly over the tomatoes, then crimp up the edges of the dough to create a kind of free-form tart (or simply use a sharp knife to score around the edges of the galette topping). Bake (middle rack) for 25 to 30 minutes, so the crust is browned and the tomatoes have softened. 5. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving warm or at room temperature. Per serving (based on 8): 360 calories; 5g protein; 21g carbohydrates; 28g fat; 15g saturated fat; 80mg cholesterol; 290mg sodium; no iber; 1g sugar Adapted from “One Pan and Done: Hassle-Free Meals From the Oven to Your Table,” by Molly Gilbert


LET’S EAT

03.15.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

BONEFISH GRILLED FISH WITH MANGO SALSA

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUEST

Boneish Grill grills its mango salsa, too

Yield: 2 servings ½ cup diced red onion, peeled, cut in a ¼-inch dice ½ cup diced ripe mango, seeded, peeled and cut in a ¼-inch dice ¼ cup diced red bell peppers, seeded and cut in a 1/8-inch dice) 2 tablespoons Thai sweet chili sauce 2 (8-ounce) ish illets (salmon, mahi, trout or tilapia) 1 to 2 tablespoons oil your choice, divided Salt and pepper to taste Notes: If the ish is particularly delicate, try grilling it on a piece of heavy-duty aluminum foil placed directly on the grill or in an oiled ish basket. Consider using a ish spatula. It has a very thin leading edge and a wider body to make turning illets easier. 1. If using charcoal, set the briquettes for direct grilling. Allow the grill to come to high heat. 2. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the diced onion, mango and bell pepper and Thai sweet chili sauce. Stir to blend. 3. Use 2 pieces of aluminum foil, approximately 14 inches pulled of the roll. Fold each piece in half crosswise for a 7-inch packet. Spray the inside lightly with cooking spray. 4. Spoon ½ of the mixed salsa onto one half of each sheet of foil. Fold over, then fold and crimp the long edges irst and the short edge second to make a secure packet. 5. To prepare the illets, pat dry with paper towels. Using 1 tablespoon oil, lightly coat each side of the illets. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. 6. Use the remaining oil to oil the grill grate. Fold a paper towel into a small swab, dip in the oil, place in a longhandled tongs and rub over the grill. 7. Place the ish in the center on the oiled grill grate to grill. Place the salsa packets on the edges of the illets. 8. Turn the ish and the packets once halfway through the cook time. Grill until the ish is done. The rule of thumb for grilling over high heat is 6 to 8 minutes for ½-inch thick illets, 8 to 10 minutes for ¾-inch illets and 10 minutes for 1-inch thick illets. 9. Remove the ish to plates. Open mango packets carefully with the open edge away from you to prevent a steam burn. Ladle salsa over ish and serve. Per serving: 398 calories; 18g fat; 3g saturated fat; 132mg cholesterol; 44g protein; 17g carbohydrate; 11g sugar; 2g iber; 150mg sodium; 39mg calcium Nutrition analysis used tilapia and 2 tablespoons of canola oil.

BONEFISH GRILL

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

Q • I was recently at the Bonefish Grill in Brentwood and loved their grilled fish with mango salsa. That dish is awesome, and I wanted to see if they had a recipe that my wife could re-create at home for me. —David Acosta, Maplewood

A • It’s not too early to fire up the grill and re-create this popular — and versatile — Bonefish Grill classic. Choose the fish that works for you — salmon, trout, mahi mahi or tilapia — and top it with sweet and spicy

BONEFISH GRILL 8780 Eager Road; Brentwood 314-918-1649; boneishgrill.com

warm mango salsa, which is also grilled and served warm. The sweet and piquant mango salsa complements the flavors of each fish a little differently. The fresh tastes combined with well-thoughtout presentations are hallmarks of the food at all Bonefish Grills nationwide. “We eat with our eyes first,” Brian Willett, managing partner at the restaurant’s St. Louis location, says. “As for taste, everything we do

here is fresh.” Bonefish brings in fresh seafood every day to each of its restaurants. Seasonality and sustainability dictate which fish appears on the menus at the restaurants. The company only works with suppliers who practice responsible fishing practices. “For example, we have different scallops at varying times of the year. Right now, we’re featuring Georges Bank sea scallops. You may recognize the name from ‘The Perfect Storm.’ In summer, we’ll sell Divers Scallops because they’ll be in season — and they are picked by

divers,” Willett says. Bonefish cooks its fish fillets over an oak wood fire, but this recipe works well on a gas grill or over charcoal briquettes. While cooking fish on the grill takes practice, the great taste is worth the learning curve. The foil packet method of cooking the salsa, a home-cooking adaptation, makes for easy cleanup as well. For more info on which fish is available, check the Bonefish Grill website for the Brentwood location under “Grilled Fish.” The warm mango salsa is one of six signature sauces available to top the fillets.

TO REQUEST A RECIPE Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ post-dispatch.com.

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he secret to a better pasta? Bake it, don’t cook it BY SARA MOULTON associated Press

If there’s anything more comforting than boiled pasta in a sauce, it’s got to be baked pasta in a sauce. The baking adds a crispy crust that is such a delicious contrast to the tender goodness of the dish. The challenge is how to get the pasta to turn out just right. Most baked pasta recipes instruct you to boil the noodles until cooked halfway before baking them. This allows the pasta to finish cooking in the oven as it bathes in the sauce. But this method has challenges. If you boil the noodles more than halfway, they’ll be overcooked by the time you pull the finished dish out of the oven. I find it hard to get the precooking time right. And precooking the pasta, even halfway, takes work and dirties a large pot and colander. Then again, if you don’t precook the pasta and instead add it dry to the sauce for baking, it will take much longer to become tender in the oven, even as it absorbs all the liquid in the sauce. Dry pasta needs to hydrate. So what’s a home cook to do? Use my simple no-cook method of precooking the pasta. Just soak the pasta in warm salted water before adding it to the other ingredients and sliding the mixture into the oven. Presoaking is a way to begin hydrating the pasta and washing away some of its starch, even as the salt in the water pre-seasons the pasta. Yes, you’ll dirty a bowl, but given that that’s the same vessel in which you’ll combine all the dish’s ingredients, it’s the only bowl you’ll need. The soak requires 45 minutes, but it’s hands-off time, freeing you to prep the rest of the ingredients. Then it takes no time at all to assemble the dish and pop it into the oven. Just 20 or so minutes later you can collect your reward: deeply flavored baked pasta, creamy on the bottom and crispy on top.

BAKED PENNE WITH PROSCIUTTO AND FONTINA Yield: 6 servings 1 pound penne pasta Kosher salt Butter, for coating the baking pan 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1 cup heavy cream 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 cup crushed tomatoes 1 to 2 teaspoons red pepper lakes, to taste (optional) 1 ½ ounces inely grated Parmesan cheese 4 ounces coarsely grated fontina cheese 4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, chopped 1. In a large bowl, combine the pasta with enough lukewarm, well-salted water to cover. Let stand for 45 minutes. 2. Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Lightly butter a shallow baking dish (12-cup capacity with 2 to 2 ½-inch sides). 3. Drain the pasta and set aside. In the same bowl, combine all remaining ingredients, stirring well. Add the pasta, toss to combine, then season with a pinch of salt. Transfer the mixture to the prepared baking dish, pressing it down evenly. Bake on the oven’s middle shelf until bubbly and browned, 20 to 22 minutes. Per serving: 590 calories; 27g fat; 100mg cholesterol; 1,060mg sodium; 63g carbohydrate; 3g iber; 5g sugar; 24g protein.

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L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.15.2017

Taking a guess at modern versions of recipes ROMAN • FROM L1

dormouse. The Romans also used to take snails out of their shells, put them in a dish of milk so that was all they could eat and, when the snails had become so fat they could no longer fit back in their shells, they would fry them in oil and serve them with a wine sauce. I’ll admit that sounds pretty good. But it’s so cruel. The other problem with making Roman dishes is that their recipes can be infuriatingly vague. Typically, they just list the ingredients, without ever giving the amount of each, an idea of how to combine them or a hint for how long to cook them. Our modern versions of these recipes are therefore just a guess of what they might have been like. But it’s the ides of March, so it’s worth a try. I began with a posca, a drink so popular in Rome that apparently everyone knew how to make it and no one thought to write down the recipe. What we know for certain is that it is a little vinegar diluted in a lot of water. Because many Roman recipes pair vinegar with honey, some modern efforts to make posca add honey, so I did, too. The result is a drink that is a little sweet, a little tart and surprisingly refreshing. Vinegar and honey are part of the next dish I made, too, Beans a la Vitellius, which is named for the man credited with inventing it, Vitellius, the ninth emperor of Rome. A drunkard and a glutton, he reigned for only eight months, when he was assassinated before he had the chance to resign. Beans a la Vitellius is a dish of mashed beans blended with a mixture of ginger, broth, vinegar, honey and hard-cooked egg yolks. More flavor comes from lovage, an herb that tastes sort of like celery. Lovage is used in many Roman dishes, which can be a problem

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Beans a la Vitellius uses lovage, an herb that tastes sort of like celery and is used in many Roman dishes.

Pear Patina uses pears poached in sweet wine.

Vinegar and honey pair up in posca, a popular Roman drink.

people who assassinated that emperor felt the same way. For an entree, I made a lamb stew that would not be out of place on many tables today. Although the Apicius cook book gives it the uninspired name Another Lamb Stew, it is actually a hearty and delicious mix of lamb, onions, lovage or celery leaves, cilantro, cumin, broth

because, while you can grow it yourself, it is impossible to find in grocery stores. In its place, I used celery leaves; if you can’t find leaves on your celery, you could also mince celery, which would create the right flavor if not the right texture. At any rate, I’ll have to admit that I am not a fan of Beans a la Vitellius. One wonders if the

PEAR PATINA

ANOTHER LAMB STEW

Yield: 9 servings

Yield: 4 servings

1 bottle Moscato wine, divided, see note 4 pears, peeled 2 tablespoons honey ½ teaspoon cumin

Freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 eggs, beaten 1½ cups milk, optional

Note: Ancient Romans used a sweet wine called passum to make this dish. A closer modern substitute would be Vin Santo, but it is expensive. 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour out and reserve ½ cup Moscato wine. 2. Place the rest of the wine in a pot big enough to snugly it all the pears. Bring to a light boil over medium-high heat, and add the pears. Add a little water as needed to bring the level of liquid just over the top of the pears, and bring to a simmer. Simmer until a fork or knife inserted into the pears meets little or no resistance. 3. Remove the pears and discard the poaching liquid (drinking it would be an acceptable way to discard it). Remove the cores, and place the rest of the pears into a blender. Puree until smooth. 4. Pour pear puree into a large bowl and stir in the reserved ½ cup of wine, honey, cumin, pepper to taste and olive oil. Mix together thoroughly, then add eggs and milk, if using. Mix together thoroughly again, then pour into a 2-quart or larger casserole. 5. Bake until custard is mostly set and the center jiggles only a little, around 35 minutes. Cook on a wire rack before serving or refrigerating. Per serving: 181 calories; 4g fat; 1g saturated fat; 185mg cholesterol; 4g protein; 19g carbohydrate; 14g sugar; 2g iber; 48mg sodium; 72mg calcium Adapted from a PBS adaptation of Apicius’ “De Re Coquinaria.”

1½ pounds lamb stew meat ½ teaspoon salt 2½ tablespoons olive oil, divided ½ large onion, chopped ½ cup red wine ½ cup chicken broth

POSCA Yield: 1 serving

1 can white beans, rinsed and drained ½ cup chicken or vegetable broth 2 tablespoons white wine 1½ teaspoons honey ½ cup celery leaves

2 teaspoons red wine vinegar 2 hard-cooked egg yolks, passed through a sieve 1 teaspoon olive oil Freshly ground pepper

Heat the beans in a small pot over medium heat. Mash with a fork. Stir in the broth, wine, honey, celery leaves, vinegar, egg yolks, oil and pepper to taste. Heat to serve. Per serving: 182 calories; 4g fat; 1g saturated fat; 104mg cholesterol; 10g protein; 26g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 5g iber; 335mg sodium; 73mg calcium

½ cup chopped celery leaves or 1 rib celery, minced ¼ cup chopped cilantro ¾ teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon all-purpose lour

Adapted from “De Re Coquinaria” by Apicius, from the translation by Joseph Dommers Vehling.

BEANS A LA VITELLIUS

Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

BOILED EGGS WITH PINE NUT SAUCE

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pat lamb pieces dry with paper towels and season with the salt. 2. Pour 1½ tablespoons of the oil into a Dutch oven or oven-proof pot with a lid and heat over medium-high heat. Brown lamb pieces on all sides in the oil. Remove meat with a slotted spoon and set aside. 3. Add onions and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and translucent, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in wine and chicken broth, scraping up brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in celery leaves, cilantro, cumin and black pepper. Return meat pieces to pan, cover and bring to a simmer. Place pot in oven, and cook until meat is tender, about 1 hour. 4. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a small pan over medium heat and whisk in the lour. Stir constantly for 5 minutes, until it turns the color of light caramel. 5. When the stew is ready, add this mixture and simmer, stirring, until the sauce thickens. Per serving: 392 calories; 24g fat; 8g saturated fat; 88mg cholesterol; 25g protein; 7g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 1g iber; 465mg sodium; 27mg calcium

Yield: 4 servings

and wine, thickened with a roux (apparently, the Romans knew how to do that). It’s a great stew, even though today we would probably add the cilantro at the very end. The only problem is, it simply cries out to be served on rice or noodles or maybe potatoes. But none of these was known in Rome at the time, so for the sake of historical accuracy, I refrained. If you want to, go ahead. The Romans won’t care. For an appetizer, I made Boiled Eggs With Pine Nut Sauce, which, of course, includes honey, vinegar and lovage or celery leaves. The other main ingredient in the sauce is pine nuts, which were also quite common in Roman dishes. There isn’t much honey, so the vinegar flavor comes through — which turns out to be to the dish’s favor. The acidity of the vinegar brings out the essence of the egg, much as salt would. What is unexpected is the way the pine nuts’ earthiness harmonizes so well with the other flavors. Finally, I made dessert, a Pear Patina. This is basically a pear custard, especially if you add milk as I did (it’s not in the Roman recipe, but a new version suggests it). You begin by poaching the pears in sweet wine; originally it was a raisin wine called passum, but a good modern substitute would be Vin Santo. Or so I am told. Vin Santo costs $58 a bottle for the good stuff, and $48 a bottle for the lessgood stuff, and I am on a budget. So I used Moscato, which is also sweet but more affordable. You puree the poached eggs and mix them with honey, eggs, milk, a touch of cumin and more of the wine. When baked in the oven, it is light and refreshing, with a satisfying pear flavor. It’s a dessert for the ages.

8 ounces water 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar Stir together the water and honey until the honey dissolves. Stir in the vinegar. Serve over ice, if desired. Per serving: 14 calories; no fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; no protein; 3g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; no iber; 4mg sodium; 4mg calcium

Yield: 4 servings 2 ounces pine nuts 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon honey 1 tablespoon ish sauce, see note ¼ cup chopped celery leaves or lovage 4 eggs Note: The Romans made nearconstant use of a ish sauce called garum, which was made from fermented ish guts. An acceptable substitute is the Thai ish sauce nam pla, which is available in the international aisle of most grocery stores. 1. Soak the pine nuts in the vinegar for 3 to 4 hours. 2. In a blender, blend the soaked pine nuts, honey, ish sauce and celery leaves to form a sauce. 3. Fill a bowl with ice water and set aside. Fill a pot with enough water to cover the eggs, and bring to a boil. Lower the cold eggs into the water and gently boil for 7 minutes. Remove eggs from the boiling water and plunge into the ice water until they are chilled. 4. Carefully peel the mediumboiled eggs and slice in half; the yolks will be deep yellow and just slightly runny. Serve with the sauce on the side. Per serving: 195 calories; 16g fat; 2g saturated fat; 185mg cholesterol; 9g protein; 4g carbohydrate; 3g sugar; 1g iber; 398mg sodium; 36mg calcium Adapted from a PBS adaptation of Apicius’ “De Re Coquinaria.”

Adapted from “De Re Coquinaria” by Apicius, translated by Joseph Dommers Vehling.

When cookie dough is cool NEMAN • FROM L1

snowing. What’s the point of standing in line for an hour or two if it isn’t snowing? Though in my friends’ defense, I should point out that they are newly married and it must have seemed marvelously romantic to stand in line together in the snow. At least it did for a while, because it was freezing cold. Hannah’s toes became numb, and Joe made her jump up and down to keep warm. Romance is nice and all, but it will only get you so far in the winter. “We kept saying to each other we were crazy for waiting so long in the cold, but by then we were so close that we had to wait it out,” Hannah Carroll said in a message. For the record, she also said, “Was it worth it? Yes. It was

amazing.” Good. I’m glad. I’m delighted the story had a happy ending. But still: They stood in line for nearly two hours, in the snow, to buy cookie dough. And they weren’t even planning to make cookies. The beauty of this product, which is created, produced and sold by former St. Louisan Kristen Tomlan, is that it is made to be eaten raw. The eggs are pasteurized, the flour is treated with heat to eliminate food-borne diseases. You can eat it fresh out of the tub. You could also use it to bake cookies, but let’s be frank — no one would spend $10 for a half-pound of cookie dough if they were just going to use it to make cookies. And here’s the thing: Hannah makes her own cookies, at least sometimes. She also makes her own cookie dough. It might take

a total of 10 minutes to make her own cookie dough, and that’s only if she has to rummage through her pantry to look for chocolate chips. If she actually wanted to bake them, that wouldn’t take much longer. So why travel from Brooklyn to Greenwich Village and stand in the snow — in the snow! — for nearly two hours just for something she can make in her nice, cozy kitchen for a lot less money and in literally one-tenth the time? Granted, the dough at DŌ must taste great. It comes in a bunch of flavors (chocolate chip, sugar, brownie batter, oatmeal M&M, plus various combinations), and, after all, something has to explain the two-hour lines. But it is still just cookie dough: flour, eggs, butter, sugar, salt and vanilla, plus chocolate chips or M&Ms or oatmeal or whatever. All cookie dough tastes great;

how much more exceptional can DŌ dough be? So, something besides flavor has to explain the two-hour lines. And I think it is a sense of community, along with a desire to be in the know, to think of oneself as better informed than one’s peers. That is what hipsterism is all about, though I must quickly add that my young friends, with just one tattoo between them, are by no means hipsters. The people who stand in line for cookie dough, or cronuts or Saltines, do so because it is the thing to do, the place to be. It makes them feel like part of the cultural elite, even if that means standing for two hours in the snow. It’s cool to be cold. Of course, people being what they are, especially New Yorkers, some wanted the cachet of cool without having to pay the price — at least not the physical price. When my friends neared

the front of the store, they were approached by at least two different groups offering to pay them to cut in line. One guy offered them $20. Two girls promised to pay for my friends’ cookie dough. The folks in front of my friends accepted the offer to buy the dough. That so angered Hannah’s husband, Joe, that he told them off. Sort of. Joe is English and very polite and would never raise his voice in public. But he did tell the people who made the offer that he was very disappointed in them. And then he told the people who accepted the offer that he was even more disappointed in them for letting the others in. Everyone standing around them cheered and applauded. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com


LET’S EAT

03.15.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • L5

Brothers make big debut with single-malt whiskey Banana oat muins make a quick, healthful breakfast or snack integrated sherry of Hyde No. 1, the rum components of Hyde No. 2 exist in parallel — as the base whiskey elements develop, the rum flavor is linear from start to finish. While Hyde spotlights cask finishes, Tullamore D.E.W. has expanded into the single-malt category with a 14-year-old that is easily as nuanced as any major single-malt scotch. “The delicate nature of the spirit calls for a light touch in maturation,” says Brian Kinsman, master blender at Tullamore D.E.W. “You need to be careful not to dominate the original notes.”

WHISKEY • FROM L1

Conor and Alan Hyde, sources its whiskey from Hibernia Distillers. “We are focusing on giving the modern whiskey drinker what they want and not just what has always traditionally been made,” Conor Hyde says. He made a big debut with Hyde No. 1, a 10-year-old singlemalt finished in sherry casks. The follow-up Hyde No. 2 is finished in Caribbean dark-rum casks. Hyde No. 2 has aromas of massive rum, dark sugar and cola, giving it a cocktail aspect. At 46 percent alcohol, a teaspoon of water tames the spicy bite, opening a nose of vanilla and coffee cake. Citrus rind and peach skin develop into a slightly savory finish of grass, green tea and soy sauce. Compared to the

ASSOCIATED PRESS BY MELISSA D’ARABIAN Associated Press

Like many families, we try to minimize the amount of processed sugar we eat. But, it is lurking everywhere, and we are eating far more processed sugar than our grandparents did. How to combat this trend that seems to have sneaked up on us? A few ideas: First, let’s read the ingredient list and nutritional information on labels of every single food item we put in our carts. That sounds like a lot of work, but as we get familiar with our favorite foods, the task will become less daunting. But we need to know exactly what is in our food, and you might be surprised by what “healthy-sounding” foods have processed sugar or other weird ingredients and chemicals hiding in them. Second, buy more foods without labels. When we buy whole foods and then cook them ourselves, we know exactly what is going into them. Third, favor sugar from natural, unprocessed, whole sources. While fruitsweetened foods still have sugar, it’s not a highly processed derivative, and it brings with its sweetness a full set of other nutrients. Bananas, apples and dates bring vitamins, minerals and fiber along with their sugars. Try recipes using them as sweeteners. My banana oat morning mini-muffins don’t use any white processed sugar and yet are just sweet enough to scratch the sweet-tooth itch. I usually bake a batch or two and freeze them for a quick breakfast or snack, or to add a treat to their lunchbox or to a family Sunday brunch. They’re small so they thaw in minutes. As a bonus for our family, I can easily make these little guys gluten-friendly for my intolerant daughter since there’s no wheat flour in the recipe — I just use gluten-free oats.

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1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the dates in a small bowl and pour ½ cup boiling water on them and let them sit for 5 minutes to soften. 2. Once soft, pour of the excess water (do not drain; leave them very wet), and use a fork to smash the dates gently into a loose paste. In a stand mixer using the whisk attachment (or hand mixer), mix the date paste, coconut oil and bananas on medium high speed until soft and creamy, about 2 minutes. 3. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing after each one, and add the vanilla. Prepare the dry ingredients: Place the oats in a dry blender or food processor and pulse until oats become a coarse powder. 4. Pour into a bowl and add almond flour, baking powder and soda, cinnamon, and salt and whisk to mix. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients half at a time, mixing after each addition. If the dough becomes too thick for the whisk attachment, fold in using a rubber spatula. 5. Use a small ice-cream scoop or a tablespoon to scoop dough into a minimuin pan fitted with paper liners. 6. Bake until muins spring back to the touch, about 17 to 20 minutes. Per muin: 68 calories; 3g fat; 17mg cholesterol; 55mg sodium; 8g carbohydrate; 1g fiber; 3g sugar; 2g protein.

Finally, this winner finishes into celery, cereal, cantaloupe and, again, that fennel, persisting and pleasant. The complex feast of the Tullamore D.E.W. 14-yearold single malt is like a long-simmering vegetable soup, showcasing superb, subtle cask management. Hyde No. 2 President’s Cask Single Malt Irish Whiskey and Tullamore D.E.W. 14-year-old Single Malt Irish Whiskey retail for $70 each. They are as friendly as any Irish, only these friendships are a bit more complex.

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

100 Years In Business

Yield: 26 muins ½ cup (gently packed) pitted dates 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or other oil or butter) 2 medium bananas, ripe, roughly chopped 2 eggs, room temperature 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 ¼ cups rolled oats (gluten-free, if making gluten-free) ¾ cup almond flour 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon kosher salt

The sherry, port and Madeira finishing casks guide the flavor but don’t define it. Instead, the base malt shines through in all of its complexity. Vegetation and herbs wind through the experience, launching a nose filled with mead, melon rind, cardamom and crab apple. At 41.3 percent alcohol, it takes only a drop or two of water to release raw apricot and a fennel that will carry into the finish. The flavor becomes a stroll through an autumn meadow, picnicking with dandelions, cognac and cucumber sandwiches.

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L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

TOTAL WINE & MORE HAS A SLEW OF IRISH FAVORITES TO CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY WRITTEN BY Daniel Puma

St. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner. Prepare for the Irish holiday at Total Wine & More; choose from a huge selection of Irish whiskeys and beers that will keep the party going all night.

JAMESON IRISH WHISKEY

CALLAGHAR’S BLENDED IRISH WHISKEY

The quintessential Irish whiskey, Jameson is blended with light and medium whiskeys and matured in both bourbon and sherry casks to produce its unmistakable flavor.

Callaghar’s is a great introduction to Irish whiskey. Approachable without sacrificing complexity, it has gentle layers of honey and vanilla leading to an oaky finish.

1.75L, $31.99

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BUSHMILLS IRISH WHISKEY

MALLOYE IRISH WHISKEY

Bushmills' distillery is the oldest in Ireland and the only to triple distill. Ultrasmooth with a hint of sweetness, this Irish whiskey will put the pep in your step this St. Patrick’s Day.

This single-pot still whiskey is sweet with hints of spice, wood, cherries and nuts. The barrel aging lends a delicate vanilla undertone throughout.

750mL, $16.99

750mL, $19.99

IRISH LATTE Serves | 1 | 1 oz Fennelly's Irish Cream 3 oz brewed cofee sugar, to taste

FENNELLY’S IRISH CREAM Not too sweet, not too boozy, this Irish cream is an ideal balance between the two. Turn your cofee into a decadent treat with this delicious potable.

| Preparation | In a cofee mug, add Fennelly’s, and then add prepared cofee. Add sugar to taste.

1.75L, $27.99

GUINNESS BLACK LAGER

BOULEVARD IRISH ALE

GUINNESS EXTRA STOUT

SMITHWICK’S IRISH ALE

6 11-oz btls, $5.99

6 12-oz btls, $6.89

6 11-oz btls, $6.99

6 11.2-oz btls, $6.99

KILLIAN’S IRISH RED LAGER

GUINNESS DRAUGHT

MURPHY’S IRISH STOUT DRAUGHT

MAGNERS IRISH CIDER

6 12-oz btls, $6.49

6 11-oz btls, $6.99

4 15-oz btls, $6.99

6 12-oz btls, $8.79

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online, and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

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Prices valid thru 4/1/2017 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2017 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


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Wednesday • 03.15.2017 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠8 5 ♥A 9 3 ♦A Q 10 8 2 ♣9 8 4 WEST EAST ♠K Q 9 6 ♠A 10 4 3 2 ♥Q 6 5 4 ♥K 10 8 ♦3 ♦J 4 ♣Q J 6 3 ♣10 7 2 SOUTH ♠J 7 ♥J 7 2 ♦K 9 7 6 5 ♣A K 5 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♦ Pass 3♦* All pass *Invitational Opening lead: King of ♠ West might have ventured a takeout double over the onediamond opening, allowing East-West to compete successfully to three spades. The West hand is quite soft and the pass is reasonable at this vulnerability. North-South had eight top tricks available in no trump, but playing in their 10-card fit was normal. There appear to be five sure losers in this contract, but getting them would be quite a challenge for the defense. West continued with a spade to partner’s ace at trick two, and East shifted to a low club. Declarer won with

the ace, drew trumps in two rounds, then cashed the king of clubs and exited with a club. Note the many problems for the defense. It was imperative for West to unblock one of his club honors. Should he win the third club, he would have to break hearts or yield a rufsluff. A low heart would be ducked to East’s king, and East would have to yield a ruffsluff or lead a heart from the 10. It would be easy for South to guess right on the second heart. Even if West does unblock in clubs allowing East to win the third club, the problems for the defense are not over. A low heart from East would go to the queen and ace, and a heart back toward the jack would get South a ninth trick. East must shift to the 10 of hearts! This would “surround” dummy’s nine and let the defense get their two heart tricks. (03/15/17)

Across 1 Bottom topper? 5 “Oh, ___!” 9 Terminal info 13 [Oh, well] 14 Attempts 15 Tirade 16 *Great Plains plaints? 18 Late hours, in ads 19 “Better safe than sorry” and others 20 Café lightener 21 Did home work? 24 *“Get Silverstein on the phone now!” 26 Caterpillar’s Illinois home 28 As per schedule 29 *Command like “Let me be direct: Get lost!”?

33 Chin-wag 34 City destroyed by Godzilla 35 “You’re oversharing!” 38 *Cramps from posing too long? 42 California wine valley 45 Supreme Court action 46 *Teach Dick and Jane’s dog new tricks? 50 “I kid you not!” 51 Martini & ___ 52 Like refrigerators, at times 54 “Are not!” rejoinder 55 Opening at the post office … or, when read as three words, a hint to the answers to the starred clues 59 Withdraw slowly

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME March 15 WORD — AUDIBLE (AUDIBLE: AW-dih-bul: Able to be heard.) Average mark 26 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 36 or more words in AUDIBLE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — IRONIES noise iris noisier iron nose rein nosier resin senior rinse senor rise sine risen sire rose siren rosin snore osier sone nisei sore noes RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

60 Leaps on the ice 61 Commercial lead-in to pass 62 ___-chef 63 Where Kellogg’s is “K” 64 Visa concern

Down 1 1/48 of a cup: abbr. 2 Part of many carrier names 3 New York hub for Delta, briefly 4 Fire-breathing monster of myth 5 Shrek creator William 6 Watts of “The Impossible” 7 Bottomless pit 8 Often-overlooked email parts, briefly 9 Auto designer Maserati 10 Meditative exercises 11 “La Marseillaise,” for France 12 TV’s “Remington ___” 14 Eighty-___ (toss) 17 Pie chart lines 20 Longtime host who wrote “Leading With My Chin” 21 “___-daisy!” 22 Like thinking about thinking 23 Bill fatteners

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Take care of important inancial matters in the morning. You could discover a potential error before it becomes a problem. Communication lourishes later in the day. Tonight: Chat up a storm.

If March 15 is your birthday • This year you can be charming, lighthearted and fun, yet at times you also could be deep, intense and somewhat distant. If you are single, make sure any potential suitors like both sides. If you are attached, the two of you open up to many more feelings and create more depth between you. Scorpio opens your mind to new mental vistas.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Act as if you feel empowered in the morning. You might ind that the results are not what you had anticipated. Try the power of positive thinking more often. Tonight: Celebrations do not need to be expensive.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ The mood of the day could change rapidly around midday. Though an associate or partner might be charming in the morning, his or her innate fears are likely to emerge in the evening. Tonight: Go with the low. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ You need to muster all the energy you can get to move a project of the ground. Your perspective will help, but getting a second opinion never hurts. Tonight: Express your feelings. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ Use the morning for anything of immediate importance. Your way of handling a problem could afect you directly. Honor a need to move through a hassle. Tonight: Not to be found. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ You’ll move out of your cocoon midday, only to walk into a heated situation. A friend could be angry and might have been holding it in for a while. The amount of vitriol you witness will tell you how long he or she has held back from saying anything. Tonight: Be gracious. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Complete calls and answer emails early in the day. You could be disappointed with what is happening, and it might trigger some angry feelings. How you handle an ongoing situation that seems to hit home could deine what happens. Tonight: Open up to a roommate or loved one.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ Make it OK to break from your routine in the morning. You might feel a lot diferent and clearer about the possibilities that are likely to arise at any moment. Tonight: Be near good music.

Puzzle by Ned White

25 Material for a warm sweater 27 Ancient markets 30 FDR’s last veep 31 La Brea goo 32 Reggae grew from it 35 Meaty lobster part 36 iPad ___ 37 “Picnic” Pulitzer winner William

38 Bottles marked with a skull and crossbones 39 Former Dodge 40 Stereo component 41 Trudged 42 Attachments to juice boxes 43 Call from Juliet 44 Bahamian capital

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0208

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ Use the morning for meetings, conversations and/ or any matter of high priority. In the afternoon, you could be triggered by a comment. Opt to take some time to think through your response. Tonight: Vanish while you can. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Others look to you for guidance and direction. You could be quite tired and might need to take a break from the immediate issues. Tonight: Where the action is. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ A take-charge stance could make all the diference in what goes down. Your ability to move into a new realm of thinking and then act on it quickly marks your success. Tonight: At home.

47 College honcho 48 Hall’s partner in pop 49 Dr. or Mr. 53 Some, along the Somme 55 Office PC connection 56 Paris’ ___ de Rivoli 57 Heavenly object 58 Collection of bets

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★★ You could be at a point where you would prefer to take your time and consider your options. You might not have the good fortune to do that, though, as someone’s anger could lare up at the last minute. Tonight: Time for a talk. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.15.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Here’s one way to measure success

Dear Marie • I’m glad to oblige, and I hope your son and daughter-in-law will enjoy it. It was penned by Martin Buxbaum, a noted poet from Maryland who passed away in 1991. It’s included in my “Keepers” booklet, which is a collection of often-requested gems that have appeared in this column. Because so many readers asked for copies of them, they were turned into a booklet. Read on: SUCCESS You can use any measure When you’re speaking of success. You can measure it in fancy home,

Expensive car or dress. But the measure of your real success Is the one you cannot spend. It’s the way your kids describe you When they’re talking to a friend. “Keepers” covers subjects ranging from temptation to forgiveness, animals, children and human nature. It can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 in U.S. funds to: Dear Abby Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Dear Abby • My husband wants to be with other women. He has spent the last 12 years asking for a threesome. I love him and don’t want to share him with the world, but he doesn’t love me the same. We have been together more than 29 years. He says he just wants to have fun. Since I’m not interested in swinging with him and others, should I just get a divorce? I believe he won’t be com-

plete until he gets to enjoy his life the way he wants, and I’m tired of having my feelings hurt each time he meets someone he wants to be with. I’m a 51-year-old woman who is still very sexually active, yet I am not enough for him. I have tried everything. I’m tired. Dear Abby, please help. — DOESN’T WANT TO SHARE HIM Dear Doesn’t Want To Share Him • Because your husband wants an open marriage and you don’t, it appears the two of you have reached an impasse. Your husband craves the one thing no one woman can give him — variety. It has nothing to do with your not being “enough.” For this reason you should consult an attorney about your options. I am truly sorry for your pain. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Ball is missing. 2. Handle of putter is shorter. 3. Tree limb is missing. 4. Nose is diferent. 5. Tree is missing. 6. Bush is missing in distance.

Dear Abby • My son and his wife just gave us the news that they are expecting their first child. They have waited five years for this wonderful milestone, and I am delighted. I know they will be excellent parents. I remember seeing a short poem in your column called “Success.” Could you reprint it? I’d like to clip it and give it to the parents-to-be. — MARIE IN DAYTON, OHIO

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Keep in contact with abused friend

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Hi, Carolyn • We have a friend, “Allen,” who has recently lost touch with us and who we believe is being manipulated and emotionally abused by his significant other. Over the course of their relationship, his now-wife: has joined herself to Allen’s hip in that he can’t make plans with others that don’t include her; occupies about 90 percent of his social interactions when they do attend events and parties together; has drastically changed his diet (former meat-lover to hard-core vegan); has rushed him into their life events, including moving in together, proposing, getting married, buying a house, and has even named their future children. I do respect that every couple is diferent and proceeds with such life events at their own pace, but it is known that she actually forced him to propose to her, throwing a tantrum at a mutual friend’s wedding a while back as they “still”

weren’t engaged by then! Since they got married in September, he has stopped speaking to me and a few of our other mutual friends where he was previously very close to us. I feel this is her doing, and she’s trying to control who he talks to now. The thing is, Allen avoids confrontation like the plague, so he just lets this all happen, and refuses to respond if anyone tries to reach out to him. Is there anything else we can do for Allen? Or are we forced to watch this horror from afar? — T. Answer • That’s the short answer, yes. When someone chooses to stay away from you, even if that choice is coerced, it’s hard even to make an argument for parachuting into his life, much less to pull it of. But. You know red flags when you see them, good for you, and there are a lot here for sure: her

possessiveness, isolation, publictantrum volatility, pressure to commit, plus his natural reluctance to stand up for himself. And, friends look after friends, even — especially — when it’s difficult to do so. And, the best hope you can give someone in a relationship with an abuser is to serve as an “I’m here, no questions asked” lifeline (said explicitly if the opportunity arises) for whenever that person is ready to get out. Add all these up and you have the one thing you can do here: Remain as present in Allen’s life as his circumstances allow. Do not stop calling, do not stop texting, do not stop engaging. Obviously you don’t want to make a nuisance of yourself, but you can enlist other mutual friends to be part of a circle of readily available support. tellme@washpost.com

3/15/17

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Lethal Weapon: Com2 mencement. (N) (cc)

Star Star deals with Hunter’s past actions. (8:01) (N)

CBS Survivor: Survivor 4 Jackpot. (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds A moth- Criminal Minds: Beyond er has valuable intel for Borders: Il Mostro. the BAU. (N) (N) (cc)

NBC The Voice: Best of the Blind Auditions. High5 lights of the blind auditions. (N) (cc)

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Chicago P.D.: You Wish. A sex offender is found mutilated.

PBS John Denver: Country Boy Life and Simon & Garfunkel: The Concert 9 legacy of singer John Denver. (cc) in Central Park Simon & Garfunkel perform in New York. CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Arrow: Checkmate. The 100 Clarke and Helix seeks a favor from Roan must work toFelicity. (N) gether. (N) (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

The Andy Griffith Show

blackish ABC The Gold- Speechless: Modern 30 bergs (N) D-I-- DING. Family (N) (8:31) (N) (N)

The Lone Ranger

Designated Survivor: The End of the Beginning. (N) (cc)

MYTV Law & Order Woman is Law & Order: City Hall. Law & Order: Veteran’s 46 pushed off a balcony. A gunman storms City Day. A peace activist is (cc) Hall. strangled.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.15.2017

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

TIA is a warning sign; pay attention Dear Dr. Roach • In the past year, I have had numerous TIAs. I also have an abdominal aortic aneurism and blockages in my carotids. Could a dislodged plaque be the cause of my TIAs? — D.G.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • A transient ischemic attack is a temporary loss of brain (or sometimes spinal cord or retina) function. It is similar to a stroke, except that a stroke represents permanent death of the cells, while a TIA means the cells were able to recover. TIAs, like strokes, can be caused by blood clots of small blood vessels, by cholesterol plaque or a clot dislodging and blocking blood vessels in the brain, and by other less-common causes. You are known to have blockages in your large blood vessels (the carotids are the major arteries to the brain); in someone like you, the doctor should be using multiple strategies to prevent further TIAs and especially a stroke, which can be devastating. Lifestyle modification remains the first important step. This means a healthy diet, regular moderate exercise (at a level appropriate for your health situation) and tobacco cessation if appropriate. Blood pressure control (especially given your abdominal aortic aneurism) is critical, and may mean that you need medication to get the blood pressure down to levels below what we used to aim for. Most people with TIAs will benefit from statin treatment and antiplatelet treatment, such as aspirin. A TIA is a warning sign: Take it seriously.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • I am 70 years old, retired, with no prior major health issues, and I have never had heart issues. My primary care physician referred me to a cardiologist to follow up on concerns regarding my heart health. The cardiologist has recommended a chemically induced stress test. I am concerned about the safety and effectiveness of this test method as compared with a treadmill stress test. — G.M.

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

Answer • A stress test is most commonly done to evaluate for coronary artery disease, blockages in the arteries of the heart, in people with symptoms that might be heart disease. The “stress” part involves increasing heart blood flow, because blockages in the arteries lead to reduced flow to areas of the heart, and these can be evaluated by EKG, a nuclear dye study, or by echocardiogram. The heart rate can be increased by exercise or by medication. I always use exercise when possible. The medications usually are safe, but very rarely something goes wrong and the medicine needs to be stopped, and it takes a few seconds to wear of.

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics