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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 03.13.2018 • $2.00

ABOUT-FACE ON GUN ISSUE PRESIDENT’S STRONG WORDS GIVE WAY TO POLITICAL REALITY

Schools plan different approaches to walkouts BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

At least 15 public schools in the St. Louis area will be joining in Wednesday’s national school walkout, organized to demand gun control legislation. But students and school leaders across the region have different opinions of what the walkouts should be about. Many school administrators and students are shying away from calling for gun control, instead calling for general “school safety” or simply to honor the 17 victims killed in last month’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which sparked a call for Wednesday’s walkouts. “We’re kind of trying to keep it as apolitical See WALKOUT • Page A5

MARCH 12 Trump tweet: ‘On 18 to 21 Age Limits, watching court cases and rulings before acting. States are making this decision. Things are moving rapidly on this, but not much political support (to put it mildly).’

FEB. 28 Trump mocks GOP Sen. Pat Toomey for being ‘afraid of the NRA’ because Toomey’s bipartisan gun control proposal didn’t include a provision to raise the age for certain types of guns from 18 to 21.

AP

Limited plan sends age issue to a commission BY CATHERINE LUCEY AND JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Not two weeks ago, President

Donald Trump wagged his finger at a Republican senator and scolded him for being “afraid of the NRA,” declaring that he would stand up to the powerful gun lobby and finally get results on quelling gun violence following last month’s Florida school shooting. On Monday, Trump struck a very different tone as he backpedaled from his earlier demands for sweeping reforms and bowed to Washington reality. The president, who recently advocated increasing the minimum age to purchase an assault weapon to 21, tweeted that he’s “watching court

See TRUMP • Page A5

HOPE RISES FROM DONATED FLAT

EPA chief hints at expanded plan for West Lake cleanup BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said Monday that he believes he has proposed a “sound, solid” solution to clean up the West Lake Landfill Superfund site — but that a final decision could include excavating more than the 67 percent of the site the EPA says will be sufficient to protect the health of neighboring residents. “What is really exciting about St. Louis is at this point, in five years the uranium will be removed,” Pruitt said, in reference to the radioactive material left over from World War II’s atomic bomb creation. “Which I think is amazing in light of taking 28 years to just make a decision.” In a briefing with five reporters, Pruitt touted his first year as administrator, arguing that his See EPA • Page A4

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

LadyAshley Gregory (left) and Molly Pearson tape off windows and doors this month before painting an upstairs room of the Metro Trans Umbrella Group’s new headquarters in the Benton Park West neighborhood of St. Louis.

New headquarters will let transgender agency expand its presence, reach in St. Louis area BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The death threats are

a concern but no security cameras will be going up on this 19th century house in Benton Park West. Mounting cameras would run contrary to the mission of providing a private, comfortable space for people

to socialize and tap into support services, said Sayer Johnson, executive director and co-founder of Metro Trans Umbrella Group. The twostory on a corner lot will officially open next month as the headquarters of MTUG, formed five years ago to advocate for those who don’t fit into society’s typical gender boxes. The house was given as a gift, its value more than double the nonprofit’s annual budget of about $50,000. “It’s 100 percent joy and celebration,” Johnson said. The new headquarters replaces a leased space in an office building basement and will allow for the type of growth the nonprofit has longed for. The Wood River

Greitens’ phone records turned over • A3

MU’s Porter Sr. gives rare interview • B1 Confidence is key for Cards’ Mayers • B1

couple who donated the house has a daughter who is transgender. The new headquarters sits about two miles north of a two-family residence in the Dutchtown neighborhood. Johnson bought that place in 2016 when his own relationship hit a rough spot. His plan was to live on the second floor and rent the downstairs, which would cover the $500-amonth mortgage. But two things happened he was not expecting. Johnson, 45, was inundated with requests from trans people to rent a room. Meanwhile, he and his partner, Sharona, patched

WASHINGTON • House Intelligence Committee Republicans say they have found no evidence that President Trump and his affiliates colluded with Russian officials to sway the 2016 election or that the Kremlin sought to help him, a conclusion at odds with Democrats’ takeaways from the congressional panel’s year-long probe and the apparent trajectory of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The findings are part of a 150-page draft report that Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, who oversees the committee’s Russia probe, announced on Monday. It will likely be weeks before the

See TRANS • Page A4

See COLLUSION • Page A4

‘It came from Russia’: Ex-spy’s poisoning worries Tillerson

Ex-Webster U. director gets probation • A6

Package bombs in Texas appear to be linked

House GOP finds no evidence Trump colluded with Russia BY KAROUN DEMIRJIAN Washington Post

TODAY

MU women on the road for NCAA tourney

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Students have their say

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TOMORROW

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SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

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M 1 TUESDAY • 03.13.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM ASK IAN ABOUT THE STL100

UPCOMING CHATS

Whether it’s how often he eats out, how he keeps those meals straight or the entrees at one of your top eateries, restaurant critic Ian Froeb answers your questions about the annual restaurant rankings — just ahead of Wednesday’s Great Taste event. Join him at noon Wednesday to talk turkey, tacos and more. stltoday.com/chats

Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday: Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz, 1 p.m. Thursday: MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

West Lake cleanup advocates Just Moms get noticed for fight JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WHISTLE WORK • People and issues in the news will dominate the 2018 Whistle Blowers Awards, set to be handed out next month. The main award this year will go to Dawn Chapman and Karen Nickel, cofounders of Just Moms STL, a group campaigning for the cleanup of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton. Environmental activist Kay Drey will present the award. Officials with the Environmental Protection McClellan Agency attended a community meeting in Bridgeton last week to hear comments about its proposed $236 million cleanup that would excavate about two-thirds of the hazardous waste site created during efforts in World War II to create an atomic bomb. Tom Harvey and Arch City Defenders will receive the “Freedom Fighter Award,” to be presented by former Missouri Supreme Court Justice Mike Wolff. Also, the P-D’s own Bill McClellan will receive the lifetime achievement award at the soiree, hosted by the Gateway Journalism Review. Honors and hors d’oeuvres start at 6 p.m. April 12 at the Edward Jones headquarters, 12045 Manchester Road in Des Peres. For more information, go to gatewayjr.org.

WAVELENGTHS • One local radio station is

in the running next month for the Crystal Radio Award from the National Association of Broadcasters. Conservative talk radio KFTK (97.1 FM) is one of 50 dial spots nominated for the organization’s top prize. Ten stations will win the award, which goes to stations to honor their commitment to community service. Also nominated was country music station KTTS (94.7 FM) in Springfield, Mo. The winners will be announced at an NAB event April 10 in Las Vegas. KFTK recently changed hands in a four-station sale last in January. Indianapolis-based Emmis Communications unloaded KFTK and adult-hits station KNOU (96.3 FM) to Entercom Communications, and also sold KSHE (94.7 FM) and alternative-rock KPNT (105.7 FM) to Hubbard Radio. POLO • Stephen A. “Steve” Orthwein, a renowned polo player and a member of the Busch brewing family, died Sunday (March 11, 2018) at his home in Florida. He was 72. According to a biography from the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame, Mr. Orthwein was an international-level polo player who was captain of the Yale University team that Orthwein won back-to-back college titles in the 1960s. In the 1970s, Mr. Orthwein was elected captain of the St. Louis Polo Club, a post he held for 30 years. He was president of the U.S. Polo Association from 1988 to 1991 and chairman from 1991 to 1995. In 2011, Mr. Orthwein was elected into the U.S. Polo Hall of Fame. He was involved in an accident while

Times subject to change

playing polo in May 2016, sustaining neck and spinal injuries that required him to use a wheelchair. Mr. Orthwein was a great-greatgrandson of brewery founder Adolphus Busch, and his grandmother, Clara Busch Orthwein, was a sister of August A. “Gussie” Busch Jr. SANS GLEE • Was it the Cardinals missing the playoffs — again — in 2017 that caused the drop? Whatever the reason, our fair burg sunk in the “Happiest Cities in the U.S.” rankings from personal finance website WalletHub. St. Louis is submerged at No. 168, a ranking made worse by the fact that the list only looked at the 182 biggest cities. Admittedly, we were not pulling cartwheels last year, when we were No. 137. With rankings in the bottom 20 percent out of the three main categories — emotional/physical health; income and employment; and community/environment — our morose municipality finished well behind Missouri colleagues Kansas City (No. 97) and Springfield (No. 118). Our best showing was in community/ environment, where we were No. 146. In emotional/physical health, we were at No. 151. Our worst showing was in income/employment, where we checked in at No. 178. California had four of the top 10 cities, with Fremont, Calif., repeating at the top of the heap. Indicating that some things don’t change, Detroit, which finished at the bottom in 2016, pulled a repeat in 2017. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE 10 million tune in for ‘Idol’

The revamped “American Idol” had a strong debut on ABC, reaching more than 10 million viewers and shrugging off Fox’s attempt to blunt the premiere’s impact with its special on O.J. Simpson. The Nielsen company said that the 10.34 million who watched the return of “American Idol” represented ABC’s biggest Sunday night audience with regular series programming since 2012. There was bad blood when Fox ended “American Idol” two years ago, and the Simpson interview was seen as Fox’s attempt to prevent a fast start for ABC. Bernice King meets pope • The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s surviving daughter had a private audience with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Monday. The Rev. Bernice King presented the pontiff with the sixth volume of the civil rights leader’s published papers, subtitled “Advocate of the Social Gospel, September 1948-March 1963.” A video of the meeting provided by the Vatican showed a smiling King greeting the pontiff, then speaking briefly through a translator, but no audio was provided. She tweeted after that the meeting was “#lifechanging.” King was in Italy to receive an international prize recognizing women involved in nonviolence and peace initiatives. Markle attends service with queen • Prince Harry’s bride-to-be has made her first public appearance with Queen Elizabeth II. Meghan Markle joined the queen and other senior royals Monday at the Commonwealth Day service at London’s Westminster Abbey. The American actress is set to marry Harry on the grounds of Windsor Castle on May 19.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Singer-songwriter Neil Sedaka is 79. Actor William H. Macy is 68. Jazz trumpeter Terence Blanchard is 56. Actress Annabeth Gish is 47. Actress Tracy Wells Rapper Common is 46. Actor Emile Hirsch is 33. From news services

Man who shot sleeping couple had done contract work for them

Two suspects in Brentwood Metro garage attack turn themselves in

BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHESTERFIELD • An Oakville man who fired into a Ches-

BRENTWOOD • For nearly three months, police here kept the

terfield home last week, injuring a man and a woman inside, was a contractor who had done work for the couple, according to court documents. The records reveal the connection between the couple and Phillip Stroisch, who then fled to Arkansas and shot himself in the head as police closed in. The documents also say Stroisch, who survived the self-inflicted gunshot, was angry with the couple, but don’t say why. Stroisch, armed with a pistol, told his wife Stroisch Tuesday morning that he was going to kill the couple, according to the charging documents. He then drove to the couple’s home on Forest Crest Drive about 5 a.m., walked to an exterior door to the master bedroom and shot at them multiple times through the door as they slept, according to the documents. The man was struck by gunfire in the thigh, and his wife in the foot, according to the documents. Both have been released from the hospital, said Chesterfield police Sgt. Keith Rider. Rider did not know the nature of the work Stroisch, 42, performed for the victims. Police in Arkansas captured Stroisch on Thursday after he led them on a chase and shot himself in the head. He is expected to survive his wounds. St. Louis County police plan to extradite him, Rider said. St. Louis County police investigated a domestic incident involving Stroisch and his wife on the same morning at their home in the 500 block of Susan Road in the Oakville. Police were called to that home at 5:06 a.m. St. Louis County police spokesman Sgt. Shawn McGuire said his department would not comment on the nature of the domestic incident because charges had not yet been issued in the case. But it was during that encounter that Stroisch allegedly threatened to kill the Chesterfield couple. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

MULTISTATE GAMES

attack of a woman in a parking garage during a carjacking attempt quiet, hoping not to spook three suspects into fleeing the area. But they didn’t have any luck finding them until they went public with the crime. Two of the three suspects turned themselves in after their images were circulated last week among local media outlets, according to court documents filed Monday. Christopher Mitchell, 23, and Alexis Jones, 21, have been charged with second-degree attempted robbery. Mitchell lives in the 3400 block of Oregon Mitchell Avenue in St. Louis. Court records did not have an address for Jones. Police said they have identified a third suspect, who has not been charged. Authorities have not released any details about the person. In a press release Monday, Brentwood police released details about the crime for the first time. They said the victim had just parked her vehicle Jones at the Brentwood Metro garage about 7:45 p.m. on Dec. 17 when three people approached her. Surveillance video showed one of them grab her and lift her off the ground. He then forced the woman back toward the car and assaulted her. A witness saw the commotion and came closer, giving the victim time to run. The attackers then boarded a Metro train. Clayton police gave Brentwood police information that helped identify one of the suspects, later identified as Mitchell. The victim identified Mitchell from a photo lineup. The Brentwood press release said the department chose not to inform the public about the crime until recently because investigators feared Mitchell would flee before they could arrest him. Brentwood detectives made several attempts to take him into custody but could not find him. Brentwood police gave information about the incident to CrimeStoppers for dissemination to reporters Friday. Former St. Louis police Maj. Joseph Spiess started as Brentwood’s new chief Monday. He said the department will try to boost security at the garage through technology and more patrols. The garage is near Hanley Road just south of Highway 40 (Interstate 64).

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LUCKY DAY LOTTO Monday Midday: 02-13-17-24-35 Evening: 15-25-35-42-43 LOTTO Monday: 07-08-11-21-22-34 Extra shot: 07 Estimated jackpot: $7.25 million PICK-3 Monday Midday: 095 FB: 0 Evening: 909 FB: 7 PICK-4 Monday Midday: 4600 FB: 0 Evening: 9683 FB: 7

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY

Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • An editorial Monday provided an incomplete name of a Missouri nonprofit that provides reproductive health education and services. It is the Missouri Family Health Council Inc.

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03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

LOCAL

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Greitens’ phone records are turned over Prosecutors have also given defense team the testimony of his ex-lover BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Prosecutors have obtained

and turned over the grand jury testimony of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ former lover, as well as one month of his phone records, the Post-Dispatch has learned. Documents listing evidence that has been turned over to defense lawyers were filed late Friday and Monday. The letters say that the defense team now has 131 pages of grand jury transcripts of the former lover and a friend, according

to a source close to the investigation, as well as transcripts of testimony from the woman’s ex-husband and his lawyer, Al Watkins. Watkins has already confirmed publicly that he and his client were subpoenaed by the grand jury. Last week, he said he and his client spoke with a legislative panel investigating Greitens. He declined to comment Monday on matters involving the grand jury. The defense has also received the last known addresses of the lover, her ex-husband and other witnesses, and 18 pages of Verizon phone records for Greitens from March 2015, the source said. Also turned over were photos of the Central West End home Greitens and his family occupied at the time. Greitens was indicted last month on an

invasion of privacy charge that claimed Greitens took a nude picture of his former lover without her consent and threatened to release it if she ever mentioned his name. Greitens admitted the affair but denied blackmail. The accusations have also spawned a legislative inquiry. While the St. Louis-based Dowd Bennett law firm continues to represent Greitens in the criminal case, it said Monday it is no longer serving as the governor’s counsel in a civil case involving the use of the Confide text-destroying cellphone app. The firm had been representing Greitens on a pro bono basis. The change in the Confide lawsuit came after Attorney General Josh Hawley issued a report saying that Greitens and his staff did not violate state records laws while us-

DUCKING OUT AFTER A WET WEEKEND

ing the secretive app. Employees in the office admitted using the app but said they didn’t send any documents that needed to be saved under the state’s open records laws. In a statement, Greitens spokesman Parker Briden said: “Now that the attorney general has concluded that the governor’s office follows state Sunshine and records retention laws, Dowd Bennett has withdrawn from the matter.” The governor’s office has retained the Bryan Cave law firm to handle the remainder of the litigation. Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

Governor earns low marks in latest job performance poll BY KEVIN McDERMOTT st. Louis Post-dispatch

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Artist Justin King dismantles Monday the remains of Carl the Duck after the weekend’s snow and rain finished off his cardboard sculpture in Ritz Park on South Grand Boulevard. “He took a boot to the head the first night, so I came out and repaired him,” said King, who knew the sculpture’s life would be short.

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim is identified • Authorities have identified a man found shot to death early Saturday in the city’s Dutchtown neighborhood. Officers called to a reported of a shooting in the 4000 block of California Avenue about 1:10 a.m. found Skip Fowler, 32, with multiple gunshot wounds. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Fowler had lived in the 5600 block of Enright Avenue, according to police. Investigators gave no information about a suspect. Anyone with information regarding Fowler’s killing is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. ST. LOUIS > Two found dead in home identified • Police identified two men Monday who were found shot to death inside their home in St. Louis Friday night. William Kemper, 43, and Cedric Hair, 40, were both found with apparent gunshot wounds about 6:15 p.m. in their home in the 900 Block of Pendelton Avenue, police said. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. Police have not yet identified a suspect. MORGAN COUNTY, MO. > Motorcyclist killed in crash • A Wentzville motorcyclist was killed Friday in a three-vehicle crash in Morgan County, Mo. The Missouri Highway Patrol identified the victim as Michael L. Benton, 51. Police say he died at the scene along Highway 5, north of Valley Road, in Morgan County.

About noon Friday, Benton was on a 2015 Harley-Davidson motorcycle headed north on the highway when a southbound car crossed the center line and hit two vehicles. The car, a 2006 Hyundai Elantra, hit the back of a northbound 1991 Mazda BSE, then hit Benton’s motorcycle. Benton’s motorcycle hit a northbound 2000 Ford Escort. Benton was thrown off the motorcycle. He was wearing a helmet, the patrol said. Three other people were injured. Morgan County is about 170 miles west of St. Louis. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Suspect charged in stabbing • A Mehlville man has been charged with stabbing an acquaintance in the face last week. Police say Michael Jerome Scott, 27, stabbed the man Thursday in the 1000 block of Adworth Drive. Scott, who lives at that address, was charged with first-degree assault and armed criminal action. Bail for Scott is set at $150,000. St. Louis County police Scott Officer Benjamin Granda said officers were called to the scene, near Lemay Ferry Road and Interstate 255, at 6:34 p.m. Thursday. Granda said the victim’s injuries were not life-threatening. EAST ST. LOUIS > Contractor admits fraud • A contractor from Belleville pleaded guilty to a federal wire fraud charge and admitted defrauding St. Louis area homeowners, the

U.S. attorney’s office said Monday. Andrew Kirchhoefer, 42, did business as Liberty International Operations Group and Gateway Construction Solutions , prosecutors said. Prosecutors said that an investigation by the Missouri attorney general’s office and the IRS Criminal Investigation division found that from October 2014 through February 2016, Kirchhoefer took large down payments from homeowners in Missouri and Illinois and did little or no remodeling work in return. Kirchhoefer also pleaded guilty to failure to file a corporate federal income tax return. He could face 12-18 months in prison under recommended sentencing guidelines at his June 15 sentencing, but both sides will recommend probation, defense lawyer Justin Gelfand said. He will also be ordered to repay nearly $87,000 to fraud victims, his plea says. ST. LOUIS > Woman found dead in burning car • Police believe a woman found dead inside a burning car in St. Louis Monday morning likely died accidentally after a hot plate she was using to keep warm inside the car overnight caught fire. She was found just after 7 a.m. in the 5000 block of Enright Avenue, just west of Kingshighway, behind a home. Police say the woman, in her 30s, had plugged a hot plate into a nearby garage. The cause of death remains under investigation. ST. LOUIS > BJC reports security breach • A security breach at BJC HealthCare left the personal information for 33,420 hospital patients potentially available to the public, a company spokeswoman said Monday. The patients’ medical records, names, addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, medical and insurance information were accessible through the Internet from May 9, 2017, to Jan. 23, 2018, because of a “data server configuration error, discovered during an internal security scan,” said Kimberly Kitson, the company’s director of communications. The documents came from hospital visits from 2003 to 2009. There is no indication that personal information was accessed or stolen by an outside party, Kitson said. The patients were sent letters explaining the situation and offered free identity theft protection. The company improved its information systems after discovering the error, Kitson said. Patients with questions can call 1-844-4166281. ST. LOUIS > Dispute leads to gunfire • A man was in critical condition after he was shot during a domestic dispute that erupted early Saturday morning in St. Louis. The man, 34, and woman, 31, argued about 1 a.m. Saturday at an address in the 6100 block of North Broadway, police said. The woman said the man assaulted her as the fight escalated, according to police. The man ended up shot in the side during the altercation, thought police did not immediately say how. He was taken to a hospital and was in critical condition. The woman was arrested, but both are listed as “victim/suspect” in a police summary. Police say the investigation is ongoing.

ST. LOUIS • Only about one-third of Missourians give Gov. Eric Greitens positive job-performance marks three weeks after his indictment in a sex scandal — and slightly more than a third think he should resign. The new poll out Monday from the national firm Gravis Marketing contained better news for U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., who is seeking her third term in a nationally watched race. The poll found her slightly ahead of likely Republican challenger Josh Hawley, which breaks with other polls that have shown her behind, one as recently as last week. The portion of the poll on Greitens found that Missourians are evenly split on whether he should resign, with 37 percent of respondents saying yes, another 37 percent saying no and 25 percent “uncertain.” The poll also found that Greitens’ overall job performance rating is dismal: Only 34 percent approve of his performance, while 50 percentage disapprove. That includes 36 percent who list their view as “strongly disapprove,” fully twice the number who say they “strongly approve.” Greitens, a Republican, did better among Republican poll respondents than among Democrats and independents, but still drew significant fire from his own party. The poll found that 33 percent of Republican respondents disapprove of his job performance, including more than 19 percent who said they “strongly disapprove.” Almost 16 percent of Republicans say he should resign — as some GOP legislators have called for. Greitens was indicted by a St. Louis grand jury and arrested Feb. 22 on allegations that, during a consensual sexual encounter in 2015, before he was governor, he snapped a nonconsensual photo of his bound, blindfolded and partly undressed lover and threatened to publicize it if she exposed their relationship. He faces a charge of felony invasion of privacy. In polling in Missouri’s U.S. Senate race this year, McCaskill held a 2-percentage-point lead, 42-40, over Hawley, who is currently the state’s attorney general. That comes less than a week after an Axios/Survey Monkey poll showed Hawley with an 8-point lead. “This will be a very close race,” Gravis Managing Partner Doug Kaplan said in comments released with the poll. Missouri this year has the potential to baffle pollsters, because it’s a former swing state that has become strongly Republican but with a populist edge that doesn’t work well for some GOP candidates. Republican President Donald Trump, riding a populist wave, won the state by almost 20 percentage points 2016. But on the same ballot, incumbent Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., a top establishment Republican in Washington, held onto his seat by less than 3 points — an indication that many Missouri voters cast their votes for Trump in the presidential race, then voted for Democrat Jason Kander in the Senate race. Within the details of the new poll are some concerning numbers for both McCaskill and Hawley. McCaskill’s job approval rating is slightly underwater, 42-43 percent. Hawley is less known but better liked, at 37-34 percent. But McCaskill has a 10-point lead among independents, who often are the deciding factor in close races. Also possibly working in McCaskill’s favor is that Trump’s approval rating in Missouri has dropped after his first year in office, to a current 46-50 margin in the state. Hawley isn’t yet the GOP nominee in Missouri, which holds its primaries Aug. 7, but he has been leading a group of lesser known Republican candidates in money and endorsements. Trump is scheduled to attend a St. Louis-area fundraiser for Hawley Wednesday. The poll of 931 registered Missouri voters chosen randomly was conducted March 5-7 and has a sampling error of plus or minus 3.2 percentage points. Gravis is a nonpartisan national polling firm. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Five people live in ‘the Trans Queer Flat’ TRANS • FROM A1

things up. He no longer needed a separate residence. By the time late summer rolled around that year and Johnson was back with his family, the word had spread: The Dutchtown property was now known as the Trans Queer Flat, where five people currently live and pay rent. “I’m grateful for this place and the role it plays in the community, but it’s emotionally draining,” Johnson said. “It’s a reminder of a bittersweet time in my life, with my partner and I having trouble that we overcame.” Less than two years after purchasing the Dutchtown two-family, Johnson finds himself overseeing two buildings to make St. Louis a more enriching place for transgender people. Life has a way of offering up surprises and Johnson is doing his best to embrace them, leaning on the generous spirit of others, including his family. He and Sharona, together for 22 years and the parents of three children, were married in February 2017.

‘IT WAS A NO-BRAINER’

On a recent Sunday, Johnson was among those cleaning and organizing what will soon be the new MTUG headquarters. Until a few months ago, the house belonged to Vickie and Tom Maxwell. They became familiar with the nonprofit after their oldest child came out as transgender about three years ago. The Maxwells were not sure what to do with the house their daughter had lived in while going to college. They no longer needed it and were talking about doing some repairs before putting it on the market. Then Vickie Maxwell saw on social media that MTUG was ramping up for a 24-hour telethon to be broadcast on Facebook, a fundraiser that would bring in $12,000. “It was a no-brainer. We knew we were going to give it to them and hope it could bring some love to the people who come there,” Vickie Maxwell said. Ideally, she said, the house would symbolically say to those facing challenges: “Maybe other people wrote you off, but there are people who care about you and want the best for you.” Larrissa Mooy, who worked up a sweat cleaning the basement, said the new headquarters “is a great way to build our community, help us evolve as an organization and gain more legitimacy.” The basement will serve as a laundry, food pantry and place to store personal items for those who are transient. The roomy house will provide ample space for meetings, social gatherings and the organization’s growing number of support groups, which includes Expression Spectrum. It is for those who identify as nonbinary, gender fluid, androgynous and genderqueer. Another group is Locker Room, for those on the masculine end of the spectrum who embrace various identities such as a tomboy, butch or FTM (female to male). The support group known as QTPOC is for people of color who identify as either lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or asexual. LadyAshley Gregory runs that support group. She describes herself as a queer bisexual woman of color and an ally to transgender people. She serves on the MTUG board, facilitates racial bias training and helps run a workshop the or-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Travis Frost (in striped coat), 31, looks for the right colors to paint a picture this month with his girlfriend, Jennifer Flores (left), 35, at her home in Granite City. Frost said that he and Flores have been together for about five months. Flores’ sons, Seth Flores (standing), 14, and Gage Nunn, 9, were also with the couple.

ganization offers to the public called Trans 101. She suspects her activism is genetic. Her uncle was Dick Gregory, a comedian and civil rights leaders who died last year. “He placed that fire in me that you need to stand up for the marginalized in the community,” Gregory said. “He’s the foundation for everything I learned and do.” As volunteers pulled weeds, repaired a fence and picked up trash outside the new headquarters, Rin Henderson helped set up an office on the second floor. Like many among the MTUG cleaning crew, Henderson goes by the pronouns “they” and “them.” It’s a pushback against traditional norms and assigning gender. Henderson said the house “feels integrated into a larger community but is a space unto us. That’s what’s exciting to me about it.”

‘LIFT UP ONE ANOTHER’

Three years ago, Travis Frost lost his job at an auto factory while living in Mexico, Mo. His house was foreclosed on, and he came to St. Louis to stay with friends. For several years, he had been grappling with identity and had not yet come out as transgender. “I knew something was going on before getting pregnant with my daughter,” who is now 6, Frost said. Living for nearly three decades as a straight woman, he knew very little about the LGBT community. Looking online for help, Frost discovered the Locker Room support group offered by MTUG and heard about the Trans Queer Flat run by

Johnson. It was during his yearlong stay at the flat that Frost came out, surrounded by others who he knew would understand his struggles. “Just to know I wasn’t the only one who had done this before,” said Frost, 31. It’s where he completed a 12-step program to curb his drinking. Alcohol “had become my problem solver for everything,” he said. Now out as a trans man for a year, Frost lives on his own. He has a girlfriend. Life is better. But challenges remain. “I’m working on getting my daughter back,” Frost said. “When I came out, my ex took her.” One of Frost’s flat mates was Beth Gombos, who has taken on the role of “super handy human,” doing many of the home repairs. “I dabble in electrical, plumbing and carpentry,” said Gombos, who was first introduced to MTUG in 2013 while working on a senior project at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville on transgender health care. Three years later, “I no longer felt safe where I was living, and I had to leave in a hurry. I needed a place right then and there.” Gombos contacted Johnson. Today, Gombos works as an in-home caregiver and has purchased a 20-foot camper for conversion into a tiny house. The flat remains home for now, when Gombos is not using the camper. “We’ve all been struggling, but we’re all in this together and that’s the intent of the flat — to get better and lift up one another.”

Being supportive parents of their transgender daughter, 23, the Maxwells began reading all they could to better understand transitioning and the circumstances that often follow. They learned that about onethird of people who identify as transgender experience homelessness at least once due to rejection by family, loss of job or both. “It just tears at my heart that anybody could shut the door on their own child just because they decide to represent themselves in a different way,” Vickie Maxwell said. She and her husband initially thought the donated house would be a great second flat. But for Johnson, who runs the Trans Queer Flat independently from MTUG, the idea of taking on two residential projects was more than he could imagine. He proposed making the Maxwell house the new MTUG headquarters. The donors were on board. “This is what we were meant to do — give to this organization,” Vickie Maxwell said. “It’s wonderful to think about the kids who come in there. Their hopes and dreams are exactly the same. Like everybody else, they just want to be accepted for who they are.” The house that was once home to their daughter during her transition is now home to an organization helping others find their way. “Funny how things work out,” Vickie Maxwell said. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

House Republicans on panel find ‘bad judgment,’ no collusion COLLUSION • FROM A1

document is made public. “We’ve found no evidence of collusion,” Conaway said. He noted that the worst they had uncovered was “perhaps some bad judgment, inappropriate meetings, inappropriate judgment at taking meetings” — such as a June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer in Trump Tower, which Conaway said “shouldn’t have happened, no doubt about that.” “But only Tom Clancy or Vince Flynn or someone else like that could take this series of inadvertent contacts with each other, meetings, whatever and weave that into some sort of a fiction, page turner spy thriller,” Conaway said. House Intelligence Committee Republicans completed the draft report without any input from Democrats, who will

be able to see and weigh in on the document starting Tuesday, Conaway said. In a statement Monday night, the panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Adam Schiff of California, said the sight-unseen report was a “tragic milestone” and a “capitulation to the executive branch.” Schiff argued last month that there was “ample evidence” of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign, and in recent weeks, Mueller’s probe has been gathering evidence that an early 2017 meeting in Seychelles was an effort to establish a back channel between the incoming administration and the Kremlin. Brian Hale, spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said Monday that the intelligence community stands by its assessment that the Kremlin’s interference was meant to help Trump and hurt Democrat Hillary Clinton. Hale was referring to the conclusion

the FBI, CIA and NSA made public in a January 2017 report. Democrats and Republicans on the committee have interviewed the same 73 witnesses and viewed the same 300,000plus documents, according to the tally Conaway gave reporters on Monday. But Democrats say there are thousands more pages of documents the committee never procured, and dozens more witnesses they need to call in to interview. Democrats have also asked for the panel to issue subpoenas for witnesses who either have ignored requests to appear or given incomplete answers during their interviews. Democrats have warned Republicans against shutting down the panel investigation before Mueller’s investigation is completed. The Senate Intelligence Committee has its own ongoing probe. But Conaway dismissed the idea of

keeping the investigation open any longer, telling reporters that if Democrats expected him to “sit around and wait with the expectation that something might happen,” his answer was “no.” He argued against using subpoenas or stronger measures — such as contempt citations — to compel any more testimony from witnesses who have appeared before the panel but refused to answer questions related to their time in the administration, arguing that Trump might eventually want to invoke executive privilege. “You use subpoenas when you think you can actually get something from them, and we’re not particularly confident that the subpoena process will get us any more information that we had,” Conaway said. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

EPA officials attended meeting in Bridgeton last week EPA • FROM A1

agency has sped up dormant decisionmaking on issues like West Lake, and that it has contributed to billions of dollars in savings to companies from regulatory relief. He said the EPA would have a final rule on redoing the controversial “Waters of the United States” initiative of former President Barack Obama, which environmentalists heralded as a boon for water quality. Critics, including many Missouri Republicans, attacked it as government overreach. Pruitt’s stormy first year on the job was marked in part by his decision on West Lake. He called it a “poster child” of previous administrations’ inability to clean up the 1,340 Superfund sites he said he inherited. EPA officials, including Pruitt’s top Su-

perfund adviser, attended a community meeting in Bridgeton last week in which many speakers advocated a more extensive cleanup than Pruitt proposed in his Feb. 1 announcement. Many advocated for “Alternative 7,” which would cost an estimated $455 million and be shared by public and private entities considered liable for the cleanup. The current proposal would cost about $236 million. EPA is taking comments on its proposal. Pruitt said an “extraction vs. cap” remedy debate is too simplistic. “As I challenge my team I ask them, ‘What do we need to do to ensure protection of health?’” Pruitt said. “And that is the reason that we came to the conclusion that we are getting after the radioactive material that I have been told poses a risk to health. “As you know, it approaches 70 percent (removal) with the current proposal, and

I think through this comment period it might actually increase,” Pruitt said. “But the charge was (to) get all the radioactive material that poses a risk to health, and I have been told and assured that that is taking place. That is the most important. Asked whether the comment period could drive the EPA to adopt “Alternative 7,” Pruitt said: “I don’t want to prejudge it. It is not wise to do that. What is wise is to take comments and evaluate, I think. The proposal is a sound proposal.” Pruitt said when he took office he found a lack of urgency for getting things done and having accountability. His first year also has been marked by controversy over everything ranging from his public doubts about climate change to his expensive travel tastes. On his office wall is a framed copy of a note of Pruitt’s remarks at the Rose Garden announcement that the U.S. would

withdraw from the Paris Climate accord. It was signed by Trump. The withdrawal drew widespread criticism from environmentalists, and it raised questions about U.S. commitment to global environmental issue. Pruitt also has been entangled in the Renewable Fuel Standards debate, which has pitted corn farmers against oil refiners. Trump delayed enactment of the “Waters of the United States” to 2020 while EPA reviews the policy. Former EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy had pushed it as vital for health and water quality protection; critics said it put unnecessary regulatory crimps on farmers and others. Pruitt also said he is pushing for the Trump administration to have a goal of eliminating lead from drinking water in 10 years, a water-infrastructure program that could cost over $40 billion.


NEWS

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

Question of arming teachers would be left to states under plan TRUMP • FROM A1

cases and rulings” on the issue, adding that there is “not much political support (to put it mildly).” Over the weekend, the White House released a limited plan to combat school shootings that leaves the question of arming teachers to states and local communities and sends the age issue to a commission for review. Just two days earlier, Trump had mocked commissions as something of a dead end while talking about the opioid epidemic. “We can’t just keep setting up blue-ribbon committees,” he said, adding that all they do is “talk, talk, talk.” Seventeen people were killed in last month’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., prompting a national conversation about gun laws, fierce advocacy for stronger gun control from surviving students and, initially, a move from Trump to buck his allies at the National Rifle Association. In a televised meeting with lawmakers on Feb. 28, Trump praised members of the gun lobby as “great patriots” but declared “that doesn’t mean we have to agree on everything. It doesn’t make sense that I have to wait until I’m 21 to get a handgun, but I can get this weapon at 18.” He then turned toward Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., and questioned why previous gun control legislation did not include that provision. “You know why?” said Trump, answering his own question. “Because you’re afraid of the NRA, right? Ha ha.” His words rattled some Republicans in Congress and sparked hope among some gun control advocates that, unlike after so many previous mass shootings, meaningful regulations would be enacted. But Trump appeared to foreshadow his change of heart with a tweet the very next night. “Good (Great) meeting in the Oval Office tonight with the NRA!” the president wrote. White House aides said Monday the president was focusing on achievable options, after facing significant opposition from lawmakers on a more comprehensive approach. Trump will back two modest pieces of legislation, and the administration pledged to help states pay for firearms training for teachers. Seemingly on the defensive after his about-face, Trump tweeted Monday of the age limit that “States are making this decision. Things are moving rapidly on this, but not much political support (to

put it mildly).” The White House insisted that Trump remained committed to more significant changes even if they are delayed. “We can’t just write things down and make them law. We actually have to follow a process,” said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “Right now the president’s primary focus is pushing through things we know that have broad bipartisan support.” She placed blame for the inaction on Capitol Hill. But Trump has made little effort to marshal the support of congressional Republicans or use his popularity with NRA voters to provide cover for his party during a contentious vote. Democrats and gun control advocates were quick to pounce on the president’s retreat from previous demands, with Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., tweeting that Trump “couldn’t even summon the political courage to propose raising the age limit on firearm purchases — despite repeated promises to support such a step at a meeting with lawmakers.” Television personality Geraldo Rivera — who had urged the president to consider tougher age limits during a dinner at Trump’s Florida club — tweeted that Trump had “blinked in face of ferocious opposition from #NRA.” Still, Trump argued that this was progress. “Very strong improvement and strengthening of background checks will be fully backed by White House,” he tweeted. He added that an effort to bar bump stock devices was coming and that “Highly trained expert teachers will be allowed to conceal carry, subject to State Law. Armed guards OK, deterrent!” Without strong advocacy from the White House, an ambitious gun package was unlikely to even get off the ground, given most Republicans’ opposition to any new restrictions. The two measures backed by Trump — an effort to strengthen the federal background check system and an anti-school violence grant program — both enjoy bipartisan support, though some Republicans object and many Democrats say they are insufficient. Trump drew some Republican backing, with Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, who wrote the school safety bill, tweeting he was “grateful” for the White House backing and calling the measure “the best first step we can take” to make students safer. No deadline was set for recommendations from Trump’s planned commission, but officials expected them within a year.

Some school leaders are steering students away from walking out WALKOUT • FROM A1

as possible and really kind of framing this as a student safety discussion in support for the victims of Parkland, as opposed to saying this is about gun control,” said Susan Downing, spokeswoman for the Ladue School District. “Whatever the solutions are is something we all feel different about, so … it’s not our place to take a position necessarily, but to facilitate the conversation with students.” Some school leaders steered students away from walking out, instead opting for in-class or in-school assemblies or activities such as holding moments of silence. Few, if any schools will hold off-campus walkouts or marches. That’s partly for safety reasons and partly because 17 minutes doesn’t allow much time for students to walk off campus. “A walkout is not a narrative that we are embracing. We’re advocating for safety. We want our students to know how to appropriately protest, but we also have to maintain a safe and orderly environment,” said Hazelwood Superintendent Nettie Collins-Hart. “I just think the walkout connotation carries with it some things that make it negative in that it’s not safe and orderly.” When school leaders know a walkout is coming, they must not only consider student safety, but also students’ rights to free expression and the possibility that some students could use the walkout to play hooky. Unlike past school walkouts that have happened more spontaneously, Wednesday’s walkouts for most schools have been highly organized, up to weeks ahead of time, by students in collaboration with administrators. Some schools, including Triad High School, Highland High School and Maplewood-Richmond Heights schools are requiring signed permission slips so that staff know ahead of time how large the walkouts will be and can ensure that enough staff remain inside to supervise students who choose not to walk out. The permission slips also serve as a vehicle for students to have meaningful discussion about the issues surrounding the walkout, school leaders of Triad High and Highland High wrote in similar letters. Students at a few schools will be doing

more than just walking out. For example, Clayton High School students will be registering voters and writing letters to legislators in the cafeteria during lunch in addition to holding a walkout, said Mitali Sharma, a Clayton High School senior who helped organize a student press conference last month against gun violence. “We didn’t want to end it with just the statement. We actually wanted to do something more tangible that will actually contact the representatives and politicians directly,” Mitali said. Mitali said she thinks it’s important for Wednesday to be specifically about calling for gun control, rather than just school safety or remembering the Parkland shooting victims. “Just talking about drills and things like that, or I think just standing up for the issue of school safety is a very broad one. But it’s really gun violence in particular that is affecting schools,” she said. “If you’re really trying to do something for school safety, then you should be trying to attack the problem.” While unexcused absences, detentions, parent conferences or suspensions are among the possible consequences for walking out at various schools, administrators at other schools said they do not plan to discipline students for walking out on Wednesday. Those include Ladue, St. Louis Public Schools and Parkway. Hazelwood Superintendent CollinsHart said in a letter that any students who walk out will be disciplined according to district guidelines. Webster Groves High School students who walk out will have to prove that they did it for a reason. Those students will receive unexcused absences unless they provide the school a written or verbal explanation for why they walked out and what they learned from the experience, wrote Superintendent John Simpson in a letter to families. Webster Groves staff will give middle and high school students a chance to donate to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School GoFundMe account, wear the high school’s colors in support and pledge to keep their schools safe. Kristen Taketa @Kristen_Taketa on Twitter ktaketa@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Woman gets journal assignment for embezzling BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The former director of a Webster University institute who embezzled $375,000 was s e n te n c e d in U.S. District Court on Monday to probation and ordered to fill out a 65-page Pierce journal. Deborah Pierce, 62, of St. Louis, will also have to repay the money. U.S. District Judge Henry Autrey blasted Deborah Pierce’s “reprehensible” theft and said there was no rational basis for a woman from a good background, with no history of daily abuse or drug problems and ample income to have committed this crime. Autrey said it looked like Pierce was “having fun and needed some extra cash.” Autrey then asked her how much prison time was enough: the 12 months asked for by her lawyer, the 18 months asked for by prosecutors or the two

years she could have faced under the sentencing guidelines. She struggled to respond, as she was crying and holding on to her lawyer, Adam Fein, for support. Autrey then pointed out that Pierce had no money to repay the school immediately, and said “This is an unfortunate day for you.” It looked like Pierce would be spending two years in prison. Instead, Autrey gave her probation, and said he would expect her to complete a 65-page journal within 60 days. Autrey ordered Pierce to explain why she did what she did, what she learned along the way and what she learned that will assist others in not committing crimes. Autrey said he would read and approve it, and would show it to his gang court participants — people with “significant” criminal backgrounds that include drug offenses and violent crimes that strive to be like Pierce was, Autrey said. “I think it’s important for those people to know

about people like you,” Autrey said, as they think the only people who commit crimes are “poor, from the ’hood and black.” In the beginning of the hearing, Webster University Secretary Jeanelle Wiley said that the real losses from Pierce’s theft could not be repaid, citing the damage to the school’s reputation, the loss of trust and the loss of confidence

to July 1, 2015. In September 2013, she established the unauthorized bank account. She withdrew large amounts of cash and paid personal expenses of herself, her plea says. The institute promotes academic research, community outreach and cultural exchange, her plea says.

perpetrate the fraud, and $160,000 was found and recovered from that account, meaning it didn’t count toward the total fraud amount. Pierce pleaded guilty in September to a federal felony charge of transporting stolen property across state lines. Pierce was the director of the Confucius Institute at the university from 2007

of the broader community. Fein cited Pierce’s lack of a criminal record and her “exemplary life,” and pointed out that 40 percent of all female fraud offenders receive no prison time, regardless of their past crimes. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tom Albus said Pierce’s crime wasn’t a simple mistake. She had to set up a separate account to

Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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Man was robbed, hit with golf club in fatal attack, charges say BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • A

man from the Lemay area was forced to withdraw money from an ATM for several robbers before being beaten with a golf club and stabbed inside his home this month. Jeffrey Breitenfeld, 51, was found dead in his home in the 600 Kinchen block of Bayless Avenue on the a f te r n o o n o f M a rc h 5, two days after the attack. Cartwright T h o s e details come from charges against two people police say were involved in the fatal attack. St. Louis County prosecutors have charged Sherman Kinchen, 27, with second-degree murder. Police allege he stole from Breitenfeld, beat him with a golf club and stabbed him. K inchen also faces charges of first-degree burglary, kidnapping and second-degree robbery, the same counts filed against an alleged accomplice, Kimberly Cartwright, 24. The kidnapping charge includes the allegation the crime took place while facilitating a felony or for the purpose of injuring or terrorizing the

victim. Cartwright and Kinchen both live in the 3900 block of 22nd Street in St. Louis, according to charges. C a r tw r i g h t a d m i t ted that she was at Breitenfeld’s home sometime around March 3, police said. She texted Kinchen and told him to come beat up Breitenfeld, court papers allege. Kinchen arrived at the Bayless Avenue home with another man, who was not identified in court papers. They went inside and assaulted Breitenfeld, authorities allege. Cartwright, Kinchen and the other man then forced Breitenfeld to withdraw money from an ATM. They went back into the home and the two men attacked Breitenfeld again, police say. Cartwright told police she left and disposed of evidence. Breitenfeld was found dead two days later. St. Louis County police Officer Benjamin Granda said authorities haven’t determined how long he survived after the attack. The investigation is ongoing, and additional charges against the pair, and against an additional defendant, are possible. Authorities asked anyone with information about the attack to call the police department at 636529-8210 or CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

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Erin Heffernan of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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LAW & ORDER MADISON COUNTY > Driver charged in fatal crash • A Godfrey woman involved in a fatal wrong-way crash on Interstate 255 near Humbert Road has been charged with reckless homicide in the death of a Roxana man, the Madison County state’s attorney’s office announced Monday. Amanda Runtz, 22, was southbound in the northbound lane of I-255 just after 10 p.m. Jan. 17 when she struck a vehicle driven by Marlon Buford, and then struck another car, the attorney’s office said in a press release. Buford, 30, was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the second car Runtz struck was taken to Barnes-Jewish Hospital Runtz with serious injuries. Runtz was taken to Barnes-Jewish by helicopter with life-threatening injuries. Witnesses reported seeing Runtz’s vehicle making a U-turn on Interstate 255 before the collision, according to the press release. Toxicology reports indicated that Runtz had benzodiazepines, a prescription sedative, in her system at the time of the collision, the press release states. Runtz is charged with aggravated driving under the influence causing death, reckless homicide, aggravated reckless driving and aggravated driving while under the influence. She is being held in the Madison County Jail with bail set at $250,000. ST. LOUIS > Gunman shoots driver who had run over two women • A man opened fire on a driver after she hit two women with her vehicle on the parking lot of a fast food restaurant early Monday. Police got a call about a hit-and-run about 1 a.m. Monday. A woman driving a silver vehicle hit two women on the parking lot of the Church’s Chicken at 805 North Kingshighway, police said. A man, 47, told police the driver had intentionally hit the two women. He pulled a gun and fired shots at the car, police said. The two women who were hit by the vehicle were taken to a hospital. One of the women, 21, was unconscious but breathing when police arrived. She suffered a broken pelvis and was in critical condition. The other, 46, had a broken leg, police said. Meanwhile, the woman police believe was behind the wheel showed up at a hospital with a gunshot wound to the thigh. The gunman was arrested.

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NATION

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Bombings in Texas tied to earlier blast In separate attacks Monday, teen is killed, 2 women hurt in Austin BY WILL WEISSERT AND PAUL J. WEBER associated Press

AUSTIN, TEXAS • Two package bomb blasts a few miles apart killed a teenager and wounded two women in Austin on Monday, less than two weeks after a similar attack left a man dead in another part of the Texas capital. Investigators said the bombings are probably connected, and they are looking into whether race was a factor because all of the victims were minorities. The blasts unfolded just as the city was swelling with visitors to the South By Southwest music festival. The first of Monday’s attacks killed a 17-year-old boy and wounded a 40-yearold woman, both of them black. As Police Chief Brian Manley held a news conference to discuss that attack, authorities were called to the scene of another explosion that injured a 75-year-old Hispanic woman. She was taken to a hospital with life-threatening wounds. Authorities suspect that both of Monday’s explosions were linked to a March 2 attack that killed a 39-year-old black man. All three blasts happened as the packages were opened, and officials urged the public to call police if they receive any unexpected packages. “This is the third in what we believe to be related incidents over the past 10 days,” Manley said while briefing reporters near the site of Monday’s second explosion. He at first suggested that the blasts could constitute a hate crime, but later amended that to say authorities had not settled on a motive and could not rule anything out. “We are not ruling anything out at this

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN VIA AP

Officials speak to reporters Monday after two package bombs exploded in Austin, Texas. Police believe the blasts may be related to a third deadly event earlier this month. The packages appear to have been left on doorsteps; all of the victims have been minorities.

point,” said Manley, who said the intended targets were not clear since multiple people live in the homes where explosives were placed. “We are willing to investigate any avenue that may be involved.” The police chief refused to provide many details about the explosives, citing the ongoing investigation. But he said they were an “average size letter box” and “not particularly large.” In all three cases, he said, the packages did not appear to have gone through the U.S. Postal Service or private carriers such as UPS but were left on doorsteps without a knock or ringing of doorbells. The explosions happened far from the main events of the wildly popular festival known as SXSW, which brings about 400,000 visitors to Austin each year. The

police chief urged visitors to “be aware of what’s going on.” “Enjoy yourself. Have a good time,” he said. “There’s no reason to believe that you are at any greater risk other than be aware, look for things that are suspicious.” In a tweet, organizers of the festival said “SXSW is heartbroken by the explosions in Austin,” and they urged visitors to stay safe. Gov. Greg Abbott offered a $15,000 reward for information leading to an arrest. Four years ago, a driver plowed through a barricade and into festivalgoers, killing four people and injuring many others. Extra security measures were taken, including additional policing, tougher security checks and brighter street lighting. The three explosions occurred in dif-

Bag may have hit fuel cutoff switch in crash

BY JENNIFER PELTZ AND MICHAEL BALSAMO associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A helicopter is hoisted by crane from the East River onto a barge Monday in New York. The pilot was the only survivor after the craft flipped upside down. Five were killed.

him in Danbury, Conn., wasn’t working. A floating crane slowly raised the submerged helicopter to the surface Monday and towed it off to be examined as Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said federal regulators should suspend flights by the helicopter’s owner until the facts of the crash are known. The owner, Liberty Helicopters, referred all inquiries to federal authorities. The Federal Aviation Administration said it was investigating whether the company had been complying with regulations. A tour and charter helicopter company, Liberty has been involved in at least five accidents or other incidents in the last 10 years, according to FAA data. “Incidents” can include events that end in safe landings, but an August 2009 collision over the Hudson River between a Liberty chopper and a small, private

plane killed nine people, including a group of Italian tourists. Witnesses to Sunday’s crash said the helicopter was flying noisily, then suddenly dropped and quickly submerged. A bystander’s video showed the helicopter land hard and then capsize in water about 50 feet deep. Emergency divers had to get the passengers out of tight safety harnesses while they were upside down, Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro said. The passengers who died included Dallas Fire-Rescue Officer Brian McDaniel, 26, his high school friend Trevor Cadigan, 26, a journalist who hailed from Dallas but had recently moved to New York; and Carla Vallejos Blanco, 29, a tourist from Argentina, according to its consulate. The other victims were Daniel Thompson, 34, and Tristian Hill, 29, according to police.

U.S. government sets record for withholding files Under Trump, fewer Freedom of Information requests are successful BY TED BRIDIS associated Press

WASHINGTON • The federal government censored, withheld or said it couldn’t find records sought by citizens, journalists and others more often last year than at any point in the past decade, according to an Associated Press analysis of new data. The calculations cover eight months under President Donald Trump, the first hints about how his administration complies with the Freedom of Information Act. The surge of people who sought records but ended up empty-handed was driven by the government saying more than ever it could not find a single page of requested files and asserting in other cases that it would be illegal under U.S. laws to release the information. People who asked for records under the Freedom of Information Act received censored files or nothing in 78 percent of 823,222 requests, a record over the past decade. When it provided no records, the government said it could find no infor-

DIGEST Video of shooting site expected

The media should be allowed to obtain the security video from outside last month’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Broward County Circuit Judge Jeffrey R. Levenson ruled Monday. He signed an order Monday afternoon authorizing the video’s release, but immediately placed a stay on the order until Thursday to give the Broward sheriff’s office and the school board a chance to appeal. A host of media organizations, sued the sheriff’s office last month for access to the video, which reportedly does not show accused shooter Nikolas Cruz or any of the victims of the Feb. 14 shooting that killed 17 and injured another 17.

Floats also didn’t deploy during copter wreck in New York’s East River

NEW YORK • The pilot who survived a helicopter crash that killed his five passengers told investigators he believed a passenger’s bag might have hit an emergency fuel shutoff switch in the moments before the chopper went down, a federal official said Monday. The official said the National Transportation Safety Board also is scrutinizing why an emergency flotation device apparently didn’t deploy properly when the tour helicopter went down in the East River. The floats are supposed keep a helicopter upright; the Eurocopter AS350 that crashed Sunday overturned and submerged. The official was briefed on the investigation but not authorized to speak publicly about it and spoke on condition of anonymity. National Transportation Safety Board investigators began working Monday to determine what caused the crash, which killed a Texas firefighter, an Argentine woman, a young videojournalist and two others on what authorities said was a charter flight to take photos. Pilot Richard Vance, who managed to free himself from the rapidly sinking chopper, was the only survivor. “Mayday, mayday, mayday,” he said in an emergency radio call as the aircraft foundered. “East River — engine failure.” No one answered an email Monday to Vance, 33, a licensed commercial pilot for seven years who’s also licensed as a flight instructor. A possible phone number for

ferent parts of east Austin. Monday’s first blast happened at a home in Springdale Hills, a leafy neighborhood of houses mostly from the 1960s and 1970s. After the attack, officials in hazardous materials suits came and went regularly. That was about 12 miles from the home where the March 2 package bomb killed Anthony Stephan House. House’s death is now viewed as a homicide. The day’s second explosion occurred around the Montopolis neighborhood, about 5 miles south of the day’s first blast. Joanna Samarripa, who lives nearby, said she saw a woman slumped in the doorway of the home after the explosion. “The cops were running and telling everyone ‘Get out of the house! Get out of the house!’” Samarripa said. “I’m still scared. I’m still shaking. I don’t even want to leave my daughter no more.” Neighbor Keith Reynolds heard what sounded to him like a propane explosion. He rushed outside and saw a cloud of hazy smoke and others on his street running to help. “There was a horrible screaming. You knew that something terrible was happening,” Reynolds said, adding that the victim’s body was riddled with holes as emergency responders took her out of the house and into an ambulance. “It’s just a regular family neighborhood,” he said. “It’s just a grandmother, you know what I mean? Like, why?” FBI teams from Austin, San Antonio and Dallas were investigating, as was the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Manley said anyone receiving a package they were not expecting should call 911. “Under no circumstances should you touch them, move them or handle them in any way,” he said. The victims in Monday’s blasts were not immediately identified.

mation related to the request in a little over half those cases. It turned over everything requested in roughly one of every five FOIA requests, according to the AP analysis. Records requests can take months — even years — to get fulfilled. Even then, the government censored documents in nearly two-thirds of cases when it turned over anything. The federal government also spent $40.6 million last year in legal fees defending its decisions to withhold federal files, also a record. That included the time when a U.S. judge ruled against the AP and other news organizations asking for details about who and how much the FBI paid to unlock the iPhone used by a gunman in a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif. When the government loses in court, it sometimes must pay the winner’s attorney’s fees. For example, the New York Times was awarded $51,910 from the CIA in May in a fight over records about chemical weapons in Iraq. It was impossible, based on the government’s own accounting, to determine whether researchers, journalists and others asked for records that did not actually exist or whether federal employees did not search hard enough before giving up. The government said it found nothing 180,924 times, an 18 percent increase over the previous year.

“Federal agencies are failing to take advantage of modern technology to store, locate and produce records in response to FOIA requests, and the public is losing out as a result,” said Adam A. Marshall, the Knight Foundation litigation attorney at the Washington-based Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. He said citizens and others should try to precisely describe how they want filings cabinets, hard drives or email accounts searched, but “you shouldn’t have to be an expert in records management just to submit a FOIA.” In other cases, the times the government said it would be illegal under other U.S. laws to release requested information nearly doubled to 63,749. Those laws include broad prohibitions against revealing details about U.S. intelligence activities or foreign governments, trade secrets, individual banking or tax records and more. Many of those requests probably involved files related to the U.S. investigation into how Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election or the related grand jury investigations or about Trump’s personal or business tax returns, said Kel McClanahan, a Washington lawyer who frequently sues the U.S. government for records. “How many people do you think asked for Trump’s tax returns?” he asked.

Iowa senator resigns • The majority leader of the Iowa Senate resigned Monday after a website published video showing the married state lawmaker kissing a lobbyist. State Sen. Bill Dix submitted a onesentence resignation several hours after the liberal website Iowa Starting Line published its report about the Shell Rock Republican. Daniels offers to pay back Trump • An adult film actress who said she had sex with President Donald Trump offered Monday to return the $130,000 she was paid for agreeing not to discuss the alleged relationship. Stormy Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, is willing to repay the money she received as part of a 2016 agreement, as long as she can speak openly about the relationship, according to a copy of a letter from Clifford’s attorney obtained by The Associated Press. The letter sent to Trump’s attorney said the nondisclosure agreement would be “null and void” after she returned the money. Tuskegee Airman dies • Floyd Carter Sr., a Tuskegee Airman who was awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, has died at the age of 95, according to the New York Police Department. In addition to his service with the fabled airmen, Carter spent 27 years with the NYPD, where his duties included guarding visiting heads of state, including Cuban leader Fidel Castro and Soviet head Nikita Khrushchev, the Daily News reports. Kansas fraternities freeze activities • Bad behavior among some Greek groups at the University of Kansas has led to a halt on social activities for most fraternities at the Lawrence campus. The Interfraternity Council at KU on Monday announced a self-imposed temporary freeze on all activities for the 24 fraternities that it governs. Only chapter meetings, philanthropic events and service events will be allowed under this pause in activity. Battle over Manson’s body decided • A grandson of cult leader Charles Manson won the bizarre California court battle Monday over the killer’s body. Kern County Superior Court Commissioner Alisa Knight ruled that Jason Freeman can retrieve the remains of Manson that have been on ice in the Bakersfield morgue since he died in November. Manson, 83, had been hospitalized in Bakersfield while serving a life sentence for orchestrating the 1969 killings of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and eight others. The fight over his corpse devolved into a circus of sorts with friends filing competing wills purportedly signed by the infamous inmate while kin also staked a claim to the killer’s body and an estate that could include lucrative rights to songs Manson wrote or to license his image and other material. From news services


M 1 Tuesday • 03.13.2018 • a8

Senate measure would curtail Amazon plans mortgage disclosures by banks to woo small

businesses with credit cards

By MaRCy GORdON Associated Press

Buried within new Senate legislation to roll back restraints on banks is a provision that would exempt an estimated 85 percent of all U.S. banks and credit unions from public reporting requirements, raising fears that discriminatory practices by lenders could go undetected. The data that would be exempt from reporting includes the financial information of borrowers and loan applicants, along with their race and sex. Some Democratic lawmakers, community activists and low-income-housing advocates have raised the alarm over the prospect of diminished mortgage disclosures by banks. Removing the spotlight, they say, could allow lenders to unfairly deny loans or charge excessive interest and escape notice. The legislation “would once again place low-income and borrowers of color at risk of falling prey to the same unscrupulous lending practices that helped cause the Great Recession,” Marc Morial, president of the National Urban League, wrote in an open letter to the Senate. “We must preserve and strengthen these important protections and continue collecting the data that exposes disparities in the industry.” The overall bill would alter key elements of the Dodd-Frank law enacted to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis 10 years ago that brought the U.S. economy to the brink of collapse. Buttressed by support from a number of Democrats, it has a strong chance of passage in the Republicanled Senate. A vote is expected this week. At the Senate bill’s core is a fivefold increase, to $250 billion, in the level of assets at which banks are deemed so big and plugged into the financial system that their failure could bring severe disruption. The change would ease rules and oversight on more than two dozen large financial companies, including BB&T Corp., Fifth Third Bankcorp, SunTrust Banks and American Express. They’re not as big as the Wall Street mega-banks, but

By HuGH sON, sPeNCeR sOPeR aNd JeNNy suRaNe Bloomberg

Amazon plans to offer a credit card to U.S. small-business customers, furthering its push to supply companies with everything from paper to factory parts, according to people with knowledge of the matter. The e-commerce giant has been in talks with banks including JPMorgan Chase on a co-branded credit card for small-business owners who shop on its website, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing private negotiations. An Amazon spokesman declined to comment. Seattle-based Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer, has been looking for a way to replicate in the workplace the success that’s made it a go-to shopping destination for households. In October, the company launched a Prime membership program offering fast free delivery for businesses, which was seen as a way to grab market share from factory-equipment providers such as WW Grainger and Fastenal and office-supply stores like Staples and Office Depot. Amazon is hoping the new credit card, which will feature rewards points for purchases, will also let it eventually add offerings such as business insurance through a portal designed for its small-business customers, according to one of the people familiar with the matter. Amazon could use customers’ transaction data to help tailor the rewards, this person said. The retailer has already lent $3 billion to more than 20,000 small businesses that sell via its marketplace in the U.S., Britain and Japan, Amazon said last year. The battle for small businesses’ spending has also been heating up among U.S. card issuers such as JPMorgan and American Express. Over the past few years, those lenders have debuted retooled proprietary small-business cards as well as new co-branded offerings for such customers. A representative for JPMorgan declined to comment. AmEx says it is the top card issuer for U.S. small businesses and that its portfolio is larger than its five nearest competitors combined, according to a presentation last week. The New York-based company doesn’t disclose total purchase volume for the category. In 2016, small businesses spent about $72.9 billion a year on JPMorgan’s credit cards, $46.7 billion on Capital One Financial’s and $15.6 billion on Citigroup’s, according to the Nilson Report. Amazon already offers two credit cards for consumers with JPMorgan and Synchrony Financial. The retailer is also in talks with JPMorgan and Capital One about a product similar to a checking account that could help it lower the amount it spends on card fees.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, talks to reporters this month at the Capitol in Washington, as the Senate moves closer to passing legislation to roll back some of the safeguards Congress put in place to prevent a repeat of the 2008 financial crisis.

they also got taxpayer bailouts during the 2008-09 financial meltdown fueled by the housing foreclosure crisis. Less central to the bill is the data provision. It would exempt banks and credit unions from reporting requirements if they issue fewer than 500 home mortgage loans a year. That’s an estimated 85 percent of U.S. banks, according to data from the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The reporting rules come from the Home Mortgage and Disclosure Act, or HMDA. Established in 1975, the law has become a key tool for government regulators to monitor mortgage lending practices, and for community activists and low-income housing advocates. Low-income and minority consumers and people in distressed communities are key among the groups that Democrats are looking to champion as they challenge President Donald Trump’s policies and the Republicans in elections this year. Hefty support among Senate Democrats — including several from states won by Trump in 2016 — helped lift the banking bill toward passage in a rare show of bipartisanship.

In fact, all five Democrats up for re-election from those red states — Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Jon Tester of Montana — are among the co-sponsors of the banking bill, whose primary author is Republican Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. What do those Democrats stress? They say Dodd-Frank requirements need to be eased for beleaguered community banks, credit unions and rural banks that had no part in the reckless Wall Street practices that ignited the crisis — but are being hampered from lending freely to local businesses. When it comes to balancing those interests against traditional Democratic constituencies, some Democrats may bend toward local bankers. Going into their home districts as candidates, “you’re listening to the local community leaders who are on those (bank) boards,” said James Thurber, professor and founder of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University.

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03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks were split Monday as technology companies continued to climb, but Boeing and other industrial companies gave back some of the ground they won on Friday. The market was coming off its biggest gain in a month following the strong February jobs report.

Broadcom

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

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HIGH 25449.15 10759.60 676.02 12961.56 7609.10 2796.95 1956.48 28976.59 1603.79

LOW 25152.02 10677.19 671.71 12881.17 7563.44 2779.26 1944.80 28809.63 1594.11

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CLOSE 25178.61 10706.93 675.34 12898.40 7588.32 2783.02 1951.24 28863.88 1601.06

CHG. -157.13 -32.98 +3.06 -20.42 +27.51 -3.55 +2.18 +4.33 +3.92

%CHG. WK -0.62% s -0.31% s +0.46% t -0.16% s +0.36% s -0.13% s +0.11% s +0.01% s +0.25% s

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NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18

61.36 1.8940 186.47 2.778

-.68 -.0103 -2.19 +.046

M

Cotton

YTD +1.86% +0.89% -6.64% +0.70% +9.92% +4.09% +2.67% +3.85% +4.27%

Sugar

F

CHG

142.17 121.55 67.67 14.18 310.40

Copper J

CLOSE

DATE

ICE

D

DATE

Mar 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

Hogs

N

Coffee

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

52-WK LO HI

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

42.70 37.36 +.31 +0.8

-3.9

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 23.10

-.40 -1.7

-9.2 +3.5 18

-.09 -0.1

+5.3 +14.3 19 1.00f Huttig Building Prod HBP

4.89

9.24

5.91

-7.8 +3.0 19

1.83 Lee Ent

1.75

3.10

2.35

-6.8 +3.8

1.60 Lowes

Amdocs

DOX

60.30

71.37 68.94

AEE

51.89

64.89 54.41 +.42 +0.8

34.29

44.20 38.81 +.01

American Railcar

ARII

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

...

101.21 126.50 115.60 +.41 +0.4

5

... Home Depot

+0.1 +43.5

9 1.60f MasterCard

7.45 +.16 +2.2

-9.1 -28.2

5

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

6.92

Bank of America

BAC

22.07

32.85 32.84 +.12 +0.4 +11.2 +30.8 21

0.48 Monsanto Co

64.60

87.15 78.05 +.31 +0.4

0.20 Olin

Belden Inc

BDC

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

+1.1 +12.5 15

LEE

... McDonald’s

7.25

11.90

8.75

-.20 -2.2

-4.9 +5.3 18

CAL

22.39

34.34 28.40 +.10 +0.4 -15.2

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

65.00 61.92

-.19 -0.3

+6.4 +10.6 32

Centene Corp.

CNC

65.03 112.42 100.30 -2.36 -2.3

-0.6 +47.6 19

Charter

CHTR 308.30 408.83 359.22+11.63 +3.3

+6.9 +7.6 cc

Citigroup

C

56.55

80.70 76.02

+2.2 +25.5 14

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

61.07 61.26 +.27 +0.4

Edgewell

EPC

46.83

78.04 52.09

-.79 -1.5 -12.3 -29.4 13

Emerson

EMR

56.77

74.45 71.42

-.85 -1.2

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

-.09 -0.1

-4.5 14

... Peak Resorts 0.28 Perficient 0.96 Post Holdings ... Reliv

49.12 16.27

-7.7 +6.9 dd

...

...

...

-6.0

110.33 183.33 182.54

MCD

128.18 178.70 157.74 +.50 +0.3

-5.7 +9.5 20

1.64 ...

-.70 -0.4 +20.6 +66.2 42 -.36 -0.3

-8.4 +25.8 27

4.04 2.16

OLN

27.79

38.84 33.14 +.13 +0.4

-6.9 +7.1 10

22.58

41.98 38.41

-.10 -0.3

-2.4 -999.0

-.10 -1.9

-5.6

5.10

1.00

+5.5 +10.4 22

BTU

6.10

...

0.80

4.00

-7.9 dd

0.28

PRFT

16.20

24.01 24.12 +.21 +0.9 +26.5 +34.9 46

...

71.06

89.04 81.10 +.26 +0.3

...

121.93 165.12 159.20 -1.26 -0.8 3.72 60.09

13.77

SF

41.93

68.76 67.67

48.56

78.70 70.67 +.18 +0.3

62.86 55.30 +.81 +1.5 +15.3 +2.2 19

1.16 US Bancorp

USB

58.50 55.01

-.27 -0.5

+8.3 +32.2 13

-8.6 +7.4 18 3.64f +2.7 +2.7 16

1.20

36.65

49.70 49.60

...

+9.9 +15.7 20

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

47.64 43.57

-.12 -0.3 +23.8 +22.6 25

0.20

ESE

50.30

66.80 62.35 +.80 +1.3

+3.5 +15.4 21

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.77 48.80

-.21 -0.4

2.36

85.07 78.25 -2.50 -3.1

+4.8 +20.8 10

ESRX

55.80

FELP

3.53

FutureFuel

FF

11.82

6.84

3.82

-.09 -2.2 -12.7 -40.2 dd

16.39 13.47 +.12 +0.9

... WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

-4.4 +4.9 16 0.24a Wells Fargo

-7.8 +4.2

7

WMT

69.33 109.98 88.07

-.65 -0.7 -10.8 +29.9 20 2.08f

WBA

63.82

87.79 70.15

-.45 -0.6

-3.4 -15.4 14

1.60

WFC

49.27

66.31 58.02

-.21 -0.4

-4.4 +1.8 14

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Fresh Thyme opening sixth local store • The growing Fresh Thyme grocery chain is opening its sixth local store in St. Peters on Wednesday. The store at 3600 South St. Peters Parkway will open at 7 a.m. The first 250 shoppers ages 18 and older will receive a free bag of groceries. The St. Peters store, which has more than 100 employees, is the Chicago-based chain’s 70th U.S. location. Fresh Thyme opened its first St. Louis area store in Fairview Heights in 2014, followed by stores in Kirkwood, Ballwin, O’Fallon, Mo., and south St. Louis County. Asked whether the chain plans to expand with more stores in St. Louis area, a spokesman said the chain “is always actively looking for new locations to potentially expand their store footprint.” Ag Department kills animal welfare rule • The Trump administration is withdrawing a federal rule that would have required organic meat and egg producers to abide by stricter animal welfare standards. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Monday it withdrew the Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices final rule published in January 2017 by former President Barack Obama’s administration. The regulation was to ensure that organically grown livestock had enough space to lie down, turn around, stand up, fully stretch and had access to fresh air and proper ventilation. The USDA says the rule exceeds the department’s statutory authority and could increase food costs. Goldman Sachs’ Schwartz retires • Goldman Sachs Group Inc. said on Monday that Harvey Schwartz will retire from the bank, leaving David Solomon as sole president and chief operating officer and the most obvious successor to Chief Executive Lloyd Blankfein. The bank did not say why Schwartz was retiring. He was seen as one of two contenders along with Co-Chief Operating

Officer Solomon to take over the top spot at what is viewed as the most powerful U.S. investment bank. Schwartz, 53, has served in his current role since January 2017. He will retire on April 20. The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday that Blankfein was expected to retire as soon as this year and the bank was not looking beyond Schwartz and Solomon to replace him. Goldman did not comment on the report. Commerce secretary to talk tariffs with EU • President Donald Trump said Monday that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross will talk to the European Union about tariffs Trump argues have been unfair to the United States. Trump wrote on Twitter: “Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross will be speaking with representatives of the European Union about eliminating the large Tariffs and Barriers they use against the U.S.A. Not fair to our farmers and manufacturers.” The president announced last week that the United States would impose heavy tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, with some countries potentially exempted. Amid fears of a global trade war, the 28-member European Union is among those seeking exemptions. Asked about Trump’s tweet, the EU in a statement said that “no further meetings as such are planned at the moment.” U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer met Saturday with European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstroem to discuss the tariffs and exemption. Malmstroem said she got “no immediate clarity on the exact U.S. procedure.” Over the weekend, Trump argued that the U.S. has been abused economically by the EU, saying they were “wonderful countries who treat the U.S. very badly on trade.” According to an EU statement, the average EU tariff is 3 percent, not much more than the United States’ average 2.4 percent. The EU imposes a 10 percent tariff on cars, versus America’s 2.5 percent. From staff and wire reports

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.67 1.87 2.02 2.26 2.63 2.79 2.87 3.13

+0.01 ... ... ... -0.02 -0.02 -0.03 -0.03

.74 .88 1.03 1.35 2.10 2.40 2.58 3.16

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

1.38 1.13 .63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.89 3.18 6.14 3.90 3.76 .75

+0.02 +0.01 -0.03 +0.02 +0.01 -0.02

1.75 2.78 5.98 4.11 3.49 .56

0.40

GlobalMarkets

2.48

Enterprise Financial EFSC Express Scripts

4.50 4.25 3.75

-3.00 -.08 -1.30

...

Esco Technologies Foresight Energy

Silver

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

CHG

CLOSE

1319.40 16.47 962.90

Gold

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.87 percent on Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.0494 .7848 .3076 1.3848 .7792 .1580 1.2313 .0154 .2905 .009366 .053670 .0177 .0846 .000938 1.0515

-9.0 +9.5 19 2.25f

-.04 -0.1 +13.6 +26.5 21

102.12 135.53 108.91 -1.47 -1.3 49.54

-3.8 cc

+2.1 +27.4 14 2.00f

5.46 +.00 +0.1 +14.5 +5.3 dd

82.85 68.35 +.55 +0.8

TGT UPS

+2.4

PREV

PreciousMetals

0.12p

SKIS

$10.93

PE: 12.2 Yield: ...

.0495 .7877 .3069 1.3906 .7793 .1579 1.2336 .0154 .2903 .009403 .053750 .0176 .0846 .000939 1.0564

NEW YORK

1.52

...

-.18 -1.1 -27.9 -66.8

MA

RELV

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

5

M

ExchangeRates

-5.2 +26.8 25 4.12f

-.06 -1.0 -11.1 -20.8 dd

70.76 108.98 87.68 +.40 +0.5

SR

... Target Corp.

...

15.27

RGA

1.28 Spire Inc

-.01

LOW

1.94 UPS B

...

46.76 37.83

MNK

POST

... ReinsGrp

+9.7 +12.3 22 0.94f Stifel Financial +2.5 +25.2 27

31.92

144.25 207.61 179.71 -2.45 -1.3

MON 112.41 124.20 123.15

173.75 371.60 344.19 -10.33 -2.9 +16.7 +99.6 36 6.84f Peabody Energy

Caleres Inc.

GM HD

+3.6 +11.6 29 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

-.50 -0.5

60.13 101.84 93.21 11.93

-7.0 14 2.00f General Motors

J F 52-week range

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

TKR

Ameren Corp

TKR

$5.61

Interestrates Interestrates

NAME

D

Vol.: 80.0m (17.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.7 b

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest 52-WK LO HI

$77.08

Feeder cattle

Milk

O

0

M

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

S

J F 52-week range

Futures

Corn

10 DAYS

D

Vol.: 6.9m (0.8x avg.) PE: 45.4 Mkt. Cap: $166.2 b Yield: 2.1%

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,783.02 Change: -3.55 (-0.1%)

2,640

27,000

J F 52-week range

75 65

OCLR

Close: $10.01 2.16 or 27.5% The optical components company agreed to be bought by Lumentum Holdings for $9.99 a share, or $1.69 billion. $15

$80

Vol.: 3.1m (0.9x avg.) PE: 31.7 Mkt. Cap: $103.9 b Yield: 1.1%

2,720

10 DAYS

D

$209.62

$285.68

2,800

Close: 25,178.61 Change: -157.13 (-0.6%)

24,200

M

Vol.: 5.3m (1.6x avg.) PE: 63.9 Mkt. Cap: $107.2 b Yield: 2.7%

Dow Jones industrials

25,020

240

Oclaro

DWDP

Close: $71.34 -0.89 or -1.2% The chemicals company said CEO Andrew Liveris will retire in July.

260

240

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

DowDuPont

GS

Close: $273.38 2.61 or 1.0% The investment bank said one of its co-presidents will retire, paving the way for David Solomon to become its next CEO. $280

$280

$208.44

25,840

Goldman Sachs

AVGO

Close: $262.84 9.06 or 3.6% The Wall Street Journal reported that Intel might make an offer for Broadcom.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2783.02 12418.39 7214.76 31594.33 5276.71 48671.29 21824.03 86900.43 15604.79 8970.74

CHG

CHG

YTD

-3.55 +71.71 -9.75 +598.12 +2.31 +114.84 +354.83 +529.02 +26.98 +38.89

-0.13% +0.58% -0.14% +1.93% +0.04% +0.24% +1.65% +0.61% +0.17% +0.44%

+4.09% -3.86% -6.15% +5.60% -0.67% -1.38% -4.13% +13.74% -3.73% -4.38%

Drugmakers try a rare tactic to boost sales: Cutting prices BY REBECCA SPALDING AND MICHELLE FAY CORTEZ Bloomberg

Drugmakers tried just about every move under the sun to nurture sales of their products — pharmacy coupons for patients, exclusive deals with insurers, even selling a medicine’s patent to a Native American tribe to shield it from a legal challenge. What’s far rarer is the step two drugmakers announced Saturday: a price cut. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi said they would deeply discount their $14,000-ayear cholesterol treatment to $4,500 to $8,000 for some patients in order to loosen insurer restrictions on the drugs, which so far have sold poorly. The announcement “will set an important precedent in the ongoing drug pricing debate here in the U.S.,” said Spencer Perlman, an analyst with the Bethesda, Md.-based investment advisory firm Veda Partners. “This will send a ripple effect across the industry and crowded therapeutic categories will likely face additional pressure.” Sanofi and Regeneron’s treatment, Praluent, belongs to a relatively new class of drugs known as PCSK-9 inhibitors that were thought to be potential blockbuster successors to Lipitor, Crestor and other statins taken by millions of Americans. The PCSK-9 drugs mimic a genetic variant found in less than 3 percent of the population that stops the accumulation of “bad” LDL cholesterol. Sanofi and Regeneron, along with Amgen, brought their new drugs to market with the hope that their powerful effect on bad cholesterol would reduce the world’s leading cause of death, and warrant the higher price. But a key trial of Praluent released over the weekend showed that the injections reduced cardiovascular complications in-

SANOFI VIA AP

cluding heart attacks and strokes by 15 percent, less than the 20 percent benefit that Wall Street analysts predicted would force wider insurance coverage for the drugs. So far, they’ve sold far below the billion-dollar blockbuster mark. Amgen’s drug Repatha sold $319 million worldwide last year, and Praluent sold $195 million, according to a Regeneron securities filing. In the Praluent trial, a far narrower group of high-risk patients showed much more benefit, and Regeneron and Sanofi said the price would be offered to insurers who agree to more readily pay for the treatment in those patients. There are about 300,000 to 400,000 Americans each year who enter the high risk category, and another 3.5 million to 4.5 million already vulnerable, said Umer Raffat, an analyst at Evercore ISI. If the companies get coverage for just 10 percent of the patients at a $6,000 price tag, the market will hit about $2.5 billion in the U.S., he estimated. Drugmakers have blamed insurers and pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs, for shutting off access. They’ve also said that insurers and drug plans benefit from high list prices, since they keep a slice of the deep rebates they negotiate. “The payers are hiding behind the bad behavior of some biopharma companies to do even worse things,” said Yancopoulos. Regeneron says it has never

This image provided by Sanofi shows Praluent 150 mg, a drug sold by Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. It’s one of a new class of cholesterol medicines.

raised the price of a drug. “You don’t have a big, bad biopharma company here.” This month, a study from Amgen found that only 35 percent of patients prescribed the new cholesterol drugs were able to get them. Amgen said in an email that it’s “delighted” that another long-term study showed the benefits of the class of drugs and has talked with insurers about discounts in return for access. Neither company discloses how much it currently discounts the drugs. A spokeswoman for St. Louis County-based Express Scripts Holding, one of the U.S.’s largest PBMs, said the company would review the new data and re-evaluate its coverage policies if needed, but was encouraged by the move. Officials from CVS Health and UnitedHealth Group, which run the U.S.’s two other major PBMs, weren’t immediately available to comment. Regeneron decided on the new price by working with the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review. ICER says it provides independent analysis of the cost effectiveness of medical care, and in the past has been a thorn in the side of drugmakers. “The drug pricing landscape and companies’ approaches to it is very different than it was a few years ago,” said Steven Pearson, founder and president of ICER. “They think true strategic success for the pharmaceutical industry is going to mean that they will have to master value-based pricing.”


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAy • 03.13.2018 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Expensive black eye A bad discrimination law prompts federal repercussions for Missouri.

Missouri’s terrible, and expensive, new discrimination law may have been inspired by state Sen. Gary Romine’s small business.

A

new law in Missouri makes it nearly impossible for victims to win discrimination cases and removes legal protections for whistleblowers. It has embarrassed the state and posed problems for the travel industry and other businesses. Now the federal government is withholding housing funds and threatening St. Louis’ participation in the federal fair housing program. Lawmakers had ample warning of repercussions last year when they considered Senate Bill 43. Gov. Eric Greitens knew before signing it that the law could be an expensive black eye for Missouri. Even the Trump administration raised concerns. Greitens signed it anyway. Estimates are that SB 43 could cost the state up to $1.2 million a year in federal money. As state Sen. Jacob Hummel, D-St. Louis, said recently, “If it’s too extreme for the Trump administration, it’s too extreme anywhere.” The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development says the law is too extreme and is penalizing Missouri by withholding $600,000 in housing funds. Losing the money isn’t the law’s worst effect, but it provides more justification to overturn it. The law raised the standard for plaintiffs from merely showing that ethnicity, sex, national origin, religion, age or disability was a contributing factor in discrimination cases to showing that it was a motivating factor. Proving motivation in discrimination cases is close to impossible.

Under the new law, if a black employee is fired for being late to work while white employees are not, that employee would have to prove that racial bias explicitly motivated the termination. The previous “contributing” standard for proving discrimination, which is still applicable in federal law, gives plaintiffs a fighting chance. At least seven bills have been filed this year in Missouri to repeal all or parts of SB 43. Six would restore the contributing standard for proving discrimination. One would restore protections for whistleblowers. It’s time for state lawmakers to put this terrible law to rest. SB 43 was hailed as a major win for Republicans in last year’s legislative session despite the heavy criticism it drew. Its sponsor, Sen. Gary Romine, R-Farmington, was facing a racial discrimination case involving his rentto-own business as he pushed the bill through. He denied the case was his motivation and said the law was not retroactive, so it wouldn’t apply to his case. Human rights organizations testified against the bill vigorously and sometimes emotionally. HUD notified the Missouri Commission on Human Rights in July that the law was out of compliance with the Fair Housing Assistance Act. Sen. Ryan Silvey, R-Kansas City, tweeted,“This is terrible. We were told SB 43 mirrored Fed rules, not violated them. We need to fix this ASAP.” It’s too late for Silvey, who left the Senate in January, to fix this, but not for other lawmakers.

Common sense be damned

A

Americans demand gun control. The NRA couldn’t care less.

merica has a gun problem. It’s called the National Rifle Association. Whenever a mass shooting event awakens the nation anew to the horrific dangers of unbridled gun ownership, the NRA steps in to defend an indefensible status quo. Whenever legislators try to enact common-sense laws to prevent future mass killings, the NRA stops them cold. The Republican-dominated Florida Legislature last week approved a fairly tepid package of gun control measures in response to the Feb. 14 high school massacre in Parkland, Fla., in which a 19-year-old used an assault rifle to kill 17 people. The law, signed Friday by Republican Gov. Rick Scott, was largely designed to show Florida voters that lawmakers would not allow the killings to go unanswered. The NRA immediately filed a lawsuit to block the law, common sense be damned. The bill raises Florida’s minimum age to purchase firearms from 18 to 21. Federal law already forbids federal gun licensees from selling handguns to buyers under age 21. But the deadliest guns on the market aren’t included in the restriction, meaning younger people can still buy military-style assault rifles that accommodate high-capacity magazines for maximum human-killing power. And, yes, these semiautomatic weapons are designed for killing humans, just like the fully automatic versions issued by the U.S. military for combat. The civilian versions can be modified using so-called bump stocks to make them function nearly the same as the military

versions, as was the case in the Oct. 1 slaughter of 58 people in Las Vegas by gunman Stephen Paddock. Which brings us back to America’s gun problem. Congress immediately began discussing a ban on bump stocks after the Las Vegas massacre. President Donald Trump supported it. But the NRA opposed it, and nothing has happened since. Congress tried to respond after the 2012 massacre of young schoolchildren in Connecticut with dozens of gunsafety bills, but the NRA stood in the way, blocking all of them. In Florida, the NRA’s lawsuit argues that the new age limits violate Second and 14th Amendment rights. It used the same argument in 2013 when it sought U.S. Supreme Court intervention to block the federal ban on handgun sales to people under 21. The court rejected the appeal. Would an age ban have stopped Paddock? No, but a bump-stock ban might have limited the damage. It makes perfect sense to prevent people under 21 from purchasing guns just as it does to ban them from drinking alcohol. Even if such a ban prevented only one or two mass shootings, that would be a start. A Harvard CAPS-Harris poll last month indicated that 84 percent of Americans favor such a ban. Sixty-one percent favor banning assault rifles altogether. Even some NRA members have favored such actions. Sadly, the organization’s leadership simply cannot countenance anything smacking of common sense.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Express Scripts proud of its legacy, excited about the future

Missouri gun bill is irresponsible, poorly crafted

Contrary to the editorial “Health care hyperactivity syndrome” (March 11), the reason Express Scripts grew from an idea to a Fortune 22 company in 32 years is because we do one thing extremely well: put medicine within reach of people who need it. Every day, our 27,000 employees care for patients, make the use of prescription drugs more affordable and accessible, and create novel solutions in our lab here in St. Louis that help around 100 million people live better. Last year alone, we saved employers and health plans $32 billion on their prescription drug Miller bill. We negotiate with drug makers and drug stores, aligned with the best interests of those who hire us and create savings that come back to patients and families in the form of lower premiums and more robust benefits. We make sure people get the right medicine at the right time at the right cost. St. Louis is our home. We were born and grew up here. We have donated millions to support deserving education and health care causes. We have generated thousands of jobs. And, our annual local economic impact is around $1 billion. We are proud of our legacy and excited about our future. There is no doubt that the health care industry has become more complex over the past three decades, but the value of our ability to make health care simpler, more affordable and more accessible is no symptom. In reality, it is our attempt to cure the system. Steven Miller • St. Louis County Senior vice president and chief medical officer, Express Scripts

Missouri House Bill 1936, which is currently moving through committee, would allow people the right to carry hidden, loaded weapons in bars throughout the state. We need to shine a light on this poorly crafted and irresponsible bill. Allowing concealed weapons in bars will make us all less safe. This bill allows people the opportunity to become intoxicated while carrying a firearm — a dangerous mix as evidenced by multiple studies and common sense. Just last month, the Post-Dispatch reported the story of a shooting at a Florissant bar that stemmed from, as the paper wrote it, “barroom banter.” The article quoted the St. Louis County prosecutor stating that this “wouldn’t have happened if carrying a concealed weapon was against the law as it used to be.” This shooting occurred despite the allegation that the shooter broke the law by bringing his weapon into the bar. Actively allowing guns in bars will only make it easier for deadly incidents like this one to occur. Gun advocates claim that carrying a firearm provides protection. However, we hear so many incidents of highly trained police officers being gunned down. Thus, carrying and being trained in the use of firearms does not necessarily protect oneself against a firearm. Allowing more guns in bars will not protect people, as this bill claims; it will only put people at greater risk. Rhonda Simner • Wildwood

What we should do to protect children in schools Once again the left wants the law-abiding to bend to the non-law-abiding. To protect our children, we must stop listening to liberals and apply common sense. We’ve given liberals everything they have asked for and nothing has been solved. People were bullied into creating gun-free zones at schools and public places. Now these are known to attract those who plan to commit violent crimes. Liberals bullied mental institutions nearly out of business, claiming people have rights too and should not be held against their will, even when their erratic behavior warrants it. Now they are not given the help they need, until it is too late, and commit heinous crimes. Now the liberals are turning their nearhysterical rage on an unrelated entity, the National Rifle Association. Where is the rage against the shooter? Instead of going after the millions of law-abiding citizens, why don’t they go after the handful of those who pour out their sick minds on social media advertising that they want to shoot up a school? It is learned now that the police were called to the home of Nikolas Cruz more than 30 times, yet nothing was done. Anyone see a pattern here? They were probably afraid of being labeled as profilers. Everything on the mainstream media the past few weeks has been a shameless exploitation of the high school children to push a political agenda. Put one uniformed police officer in each school and leave the teachers out of it. Future criminals won’t venture where there is a hint of resistance. Steve Sullivan • St. Charles

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at a press conference March 23, 1964, at the YMCA on Locust Street.

Presidents ignore what King really stood for Leonard Pitts thinks it’s inappropriate for President Donald Trump to honor Martin Luther King (“Best thing Trump can do is ignore April 4th,” March 9). He says either Bill Clinton or George W. Bush “would certainly do a fine job” and he gushes over how wonderful Barack Obama was. Rev. King believed in nonviolence and was a fierce critic of the Vietnam War. Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump are all believers in war. Never-ending war. They will all say nice things on the 50th anniversary of his death, but they will all ignore what he really stood for. Mark Clarke • St. Louis County

List the restaurants that have stood the test of time Regarding Ian Froeb’s list of 100 best restaurants: While I appreciate the diversity of the list, my issue is the omission of restaurants of longevity, which attests to their success. While trendy restaurants are popular, they often don’t stand the test of time. I suggest an article of the restaurants that have lasted more than 20 years, while consistently providing a great product to their customers. David Timney • Frontenac Executive chef, Kreis’ Restaurant Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

03.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

100 YEARS AGO KING CHEESE • Cheese is the one article of food which patriotic Americans can enjoy without sting under the regulations of the new ration card of the U.S. TODAY ON THE Food Administration. Meat, butter, sugar and wheat products are restricted. But only cheese bears the generous and gladdening notation, “As much as deEDITORIAL PAGE sired.” Still, we must go easy on the crackers. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Ballpark Village challenging downtown businesses Restaurants, bars near Busch Stadium are losing customers and feeling the strain. BY CHELSEA NEULING

It’s a Saturday afternoon in downtown St. Louis. You are with your father and you stop at your favorite restaurant before a Cardinals game. It’s a family tradition that you don’t mind waiting two hours outside for. When it’s time to be seated, you are greeted by none other than the owner himself. The walls are covered with photos of him with celebrities who have visited. You have the house special, chicken Parmesan. It is 20 years later and there you are with your own child carrying on the same tradition. This is what Charlie Gitto’s downtown is all about. There is one thing that you can’t help but notice. What happened to the

two-hour wait? The food and service are as phenomenal as ever but what has changed? As you walk to Busch Stadium, it hits you like a home run. You walk past a huge corporate building filled with hundreds of people who are eating, drinking and waiting for the game to start. Their view of the stadium is so good, they don’t need tickets to watch the game. It is Ballpark Village. Is this why there was no two-hour wait at Charlie Gitto’s? Most likely. Cardinals’ fans come to Ballpark Village before the game because of its convenience. There are multiple restaurants and bars in one building that is only feet away from Busch Stadium. If only these people knew

that they were missing out on all that St. Louis has to offer: from Italian food at Charlie Gitto’s to Caleco’s pizza. Unfortunately, because of this, many longtime St. Louis bars and restaurants have been going out of business since the opening of Ballpark Village in 2013. For example, Mike Shannon’s Bar and Grill used to be flooded with customers for 30 years, but closed its doors in 2016. I sat down with Charlie Gitto to discuss his business and the matter. I asked him who was the most famous celebrity to come into his restaurant. “Besides me?” Gitto joked. He named off celebrities such as Vincent Price, Joe DiMaggio, Tommy Lasorda, Susan Strasberg and the list went on and on. Gitto said that in the 1980s, Tommy Lasorda made Charlie Gitto’s famous by talking it up on national radio.

I asked Gitto what was the longest wait time ever to be seated. He said that back in 2005 when the Final Four men’s basketball tournament was in St. Louis, there was a two- to three-hour wait for five days straight. Gitto said, “We’ve been open since 1974 and I’d never seen anything like it.” In regard to Ballpark Village affecting business, he said, “You can’t compare the two. People come here for quality and tradition.” I also interviewed Victoria Laut, a server at Charlie Gitto’s. She said, “Before Ballpark Village opened, the servers would easily each come home with no less than $200 a night. It still happens, just not nearly as much. Some nights I leave here with only $20 in tips. It usually depends on the events downtown. It just isn’t the same.” I walked two blocks over to

Caleco’s Bar and Grill, which is also a St. Louis favorite. An employee who preferred to remain anonymous told me nearly exactly the same thing that I heard at Charlie Gitto’s. The employee said, “There used to be a line out the door before Ballpark took over. It used to be hard to walk through here. They’re hurting us all.” It is clear here that this is a serious problem. I am in no way telling you not to go to Ballpark Village. I am only suggesting that you don’t make it the only place you go. I encourage you all to explore the next time you decide to eat in St. Louis. This is a beautiful city full of great food and hospitality. Do your part to keep your city alive. You won’t regret it. Chelsea Neuling is a major in media studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

How do we handle the facts-challenged among us? The issue is America’s vanishing ability to reason. LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald

CHRIS PIZZELLO

Frances McDormand accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a leading role for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” at the Oscars on March 4 at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Accept McDormand’s inclusion-rider dare Here’s Hollywood’s chance to put its money where its biggest mouths are.

JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

Go for it, Hollywood. You probably didn’t watch the Academy Awards — most people didn’t — but you might have caught a bit of Frances McDormand’s acceptance speech for her Best Actress award. At the end of a stirring speech about women in post-Weinstein Hollywood, she said, “I have two words to leave with you tonight, ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider.” Don’t feel bad if you don’t know what an inclusion rider is. McDormand didn’t either until recently. She told the press backstage that she had learned about inclusion riders only the previous week. So what are they? Simply put, an inclusion rider is like any other rider in a contract for a big-name Hollywood star, except instead of demanding that you have an all-beige dressing room or an infinite supply of green M&Ms in your trailer, you demand that the cast and/or crew be diverse according to some formula. Usually, that formula is based on the demographic makeup of the larger society. Tom Hanks, Oprah Winfrey or any other A-lister can simply say: If you want me, you’re going to need to hire X many blacks, Asians, women, gays, etc. And again, I say: Go for it, Hollywood. I’m against racial or ethnic quotas

for anything remotely smacking of a government position or anything that relies on government money. Just as government shouldn’t give preference to certain religions, it shouldn’t give preference to certain races or sexual orientations, either. In principle, I think people should be able to hire whomever they want. Of course, that principle runs up against various civil rights laws banning racial discrimination in public accommodations. And given the historical circumstances that gave rise to those laws — i.e. the Jim Crow South — I think those laws are warranted, at least when they stay faithful to their original purpose. But that’s not the situation in Hollywood. Big shots already demand all sorts of jobs and perks for their entourages and personal production companies. So if they can get away with insisting that Disney hire more gay actors or Asian makeup artists, they should give it a try, if that’s what they really care about. Let’s be honest about what we’re talking about though. An inclusion rider is just a “woke” way of demanding the ability to discriminate on the basis of race, gender, ethnicity, etc. The theory and motivation behind it might not be as evil as Jim Crow, but it’s still discrimination at work. And it is remarkably illiberal, at least when it comes to film crews. What you see on the screen is a matter of artistic vision. If you think a role calls for a black actor, then you’re not being unfair to Russell Crowe by casting Denzel Washington. But if you tell a lighting director that he can’t have the job he’s qualified for because he’s not

gay or a woman, that’s a bit different. Hollywood’s various powerful unions will likely be quick to point this out. As Christine Rosen of the Weekly Standard notes, the Costume Designers Guild is 80 percent female. So if we’re to take this idea seriously, a lot of qualified women are going to lose jobs to less qualified men. It would work in reverse for the Art Directors Guild, which is 73 percent male. So why do I want Hollywood to go for it? Because Hollywood rarely practices what it preaches. We get lots of nice award ceremony speeches about the superior values of Hollywood and how evil big business and Republicans are. We get lots of movies indicting capitalism and glorifying organized labor. The upshot of much of this stuff is that it’s easy to do the right thing, so when society does the wrong thing, it must be because evil people wish it so. Well, here’s Hollywood’s chance to put its money where its biggest mouths are. And not just the amorphous entity called Hollywood, but the individual actors and directors who just love to preen about their enlightened views. Let’s see them prove they have the courage of their convictions. Rosen is probably right that inclusion riders are ultimately an “unworkable quota system” that will eventually prove to be “another piece of empty Hollywood posturing.” But let’s see Hollywood try (and the media hold it accountable). Maybe we’ll all learn something from the effort. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency

So what should we say to Robert Ussery? He’s an antagonist in a story of breathtaking emotional cruelty that unfolded last week. It seems Pastor Frank Pomeroy was sitting in his car near his church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, just east of San Antonio, when, he says, a man and woman approached the building. He says the woman, later identified as 56-year-old Jodi Mann, began defacing a poster left for well-wishers to sign. Pomeroy intervened. He says it took a moment for Mann and her partner Ussery, 54, to recognize him as the pastor of First Baptist Church, where a Nov. 5 gun massacre left 26 people, including Annabelle Pomeroy’s 14-year-old daughter, Pomeroy, Annabelle, dead. But he says killed in that when they did, they began church to harangue him that the tragedy shooting never happened. Pomeroy told the San Antonio Express-News that Ussery yelled at him.“He said: ‘Your daughter never even existed. Show me her birth certificate. Show me anything to say she was here.’” Sutherland Springs is not the only massacre Ussery denies. His website, whose name you won’t read here, also describes as “drills using crisis actors” dozens of other mass casualty events, including the shootings in Parkland, Las Vegas, Charleston, Orlando and Newtown, the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris and the concert bombing in Manchester. “NO DEAD, NO WOUNDED,” the website crows. Actually, 219 people died in the attacks listed above. But how do we get Robert Ussery to see that? The question arises from a recent online discussion with readers after a study reported that 42 percent of Republicans and 17 percent of Democrats regard as “fake news” information they know to be accurate if they don’t like what it says. In a column on media distrust, I wrote that I have no interest in being trusted by that large cohort of us for whom facts command no respect and for whom truth is just a speed bump on the road to crazy town. The issue is not ideology. Rather, it is America’s vanishing ability — and willingness — to reason. And that raises a question: What is the obligation of thinking, moral people in a nation and news cycle increasingly dominated by the demented and controlled by the conspiracist? How do you reason with those who can’t or won’t? Should you even try? One reader, Paul N. Calmes Jr., responded sharply on Twitter: “Serious people have to stop worrying about appearing fair to those who aren’t interested in facts.” I tend to agree, but even that’s problematic. It is, after all, a short hop from dismissing people because they are facts-challenged to dismissing them just because they disagree with you. “Facts-challenged” can too easily become an excuse for shutting down a challenging debate. If Calmes’ “serious people” are not careful, they might become what they abhor. On the other hand, what’s the alternative? What I call the stupidification of America crept upon us over the course of a generation. The road back will be at least as long. In the meantime, our only option is to endure this unraveling of the American mind and try to minimize its damage. What else can we do? How do you reason with the person who thinks nobody died at Parkland? Or that Barack Obama was born in Kenya? Or that the U.S. government blew up the World Trade Center? And really, now, what should we say to Robert Ussery? How do you talk to a man who allegedly stood before the grieving father of a murdered girl and screamed at him that his daughter was not real? Sorry, but there are no words. He’s not listening, anyway. Leonard Pitts Jr. lpitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Budget deficit jumps to $215.2 billion Trump’s December tax cuts are already having an effect as U.S. spending sets record BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The federal government recorded a budget deficit of $215.2 billion in February, up significantly from a year ago as the impact of the GOP tax cuts passed in December begin to surface. The Treasury Department said Monday that the February deficit was 12.1 percent higher than a year ago, reflecting in part a drop of $5 billion in individual withholding taxes paid last month compared to a year ago. In February, employers started

using tax tables that withheld less from paychecks based on the new law. For the first five months of this budget year, the deficit totals $391 billion, an increase of 11.5 percent from the same period a year ago. President Donald Trump’s new budget projects this year’s deficit will hit $873 billion, up a sharp 31.3 percent from last year’s imbalance of $665.8 billion. Over the next decade, Trump’s budget projects deficits will total $7.1 trillion. That is more than double the $3.2 trillion in deficits over the coming decade that Trump had envisioned in the budget he

OBITUARIES

Bechtold, Barbara A. - St. Louis Brenner, Jeff - Grover, MO Dierkes, Darlene Sally - St. Louis Hensley, George Lewis - Ladue Jedrzykowski, Lambert A. - St. Louis Klevorn - see Sorbello Kopp, Kerry J. - St. Louis

Bechtold, Barbara A.

(nee Taylor) Passed peacefully at home, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, March 11, 2018, at the age of 80. Beloved wife of the late William J. Bechtold; mother of Donna (Dave) Peters, Cheryl (Dave) Ryan, Bill (Cindy) Bechtold, and Betty (Robert) Spicer; sister of the late Betty Ann Taylor; dear friend of the late Frank Vaughan and family; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, cousin, and friend to many. Barbara was an active member of the Parish and White House Retreat. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to White House Retreat or Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Services: Thursday (March 15), 10:30 a.m., from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Ave (63116) to Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church for 11:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION: WEDNESDAY (MARCH 14), 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Brenner, Jeff

age 55, passed away Sunday, March 11, 2018. Memorial service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

sent Congress last year. The deficit picture has darkened in part because of the $1.5 trillion in tax cuts Trump pushed through Congress in December. The administration argues that the tax cuts will pay for themselves over time by boosting growth. But critics contend that this is an overly optimistic view. They argue that deficits will be much worse than Trump is forecasting because his budget is using overly optimistic economic forecasts and does not take into account increased government spending which was approved in a January budget deal. Many private forecasters believe an-

Celebrations of Life

Kopp, Thomas W. Sr. - Ballwin Laudel, Louis W.E. - St. Louis Olendorff, Marlene A. - O'Fallon, MO Rospierski - see Seevers Seevers, Dave Michael - St. Louis Shapiro, Paul Bernard - St. Louis Sorbello, James S. Sr. - St. Louis

Jedrzykowski, Lambert A.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Strickfaden, Harold P. - Edwardsville, IL Tucker, Kathleen Ann - St. Louis Urbanek, Barbara C. - St. Louis Wardlaw, Nancy Wright - Detroit, MI Whistler, Norma J. - St. Louis

Kopp, Kerry J.

Sorbello, James S. Sr.

Laudel, Louis W. E.

90, of Edwardsville, IL, March 12, 2018. Visit Thurs. 4-7 p.m. Weber & Rodney F.H., 304 North Main, Edwardsville, IL. Service Fri. 11 a.m. Annunciation Catholic Church, California, MO

(nee Thornton), on Sunday, March 11, 2018. Beloved wife of Thomas Kopp, Jr.; dear mother of Clinton (Stephanie) Kopp and Thomas C. (Alisha) Kopp; loving grandmother of Alyssa, Brendon and T.J. Kopp; our dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, great-aunt, niece, cousin and friend. Service: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, on Friday, March 16, 1:00 p.m. Interment private. Visitation Thursday, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, March 11, 2018. Beloved husband of Catherine Sorbello (nee Rupi); dear father of Angie (Larry) Klevorn and Jim (Carmen) Sorbello Jr.; dear grandfather of Zachary, Jacob, Kiley and Blake; dear brother-in-law of Trudy Eck and Betty (John) Heine; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. The Sorbello family would like Kopp, Thomas W. Sr. to thank the staff of D el ma r asleep in Jesus, Saturday, March 10, 2018. Beloved Gardens South for their loving husband of the late Roberta C. Kopp and Janice Kopp; care. dear father of Thomas W. (the late Kerry) Kopp Jr., Services: Funeral from KUTIS Keith Allen (Rick Shepard) Kopp, James W. (Patti) Kopp, Karen AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 16, 9:00 a.m. to (Jim) Crews, Terri (Steven) Swartz, Cheryl Blattner and the late St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church for 10:00 a.m. service. InLisa (survived by Mark) McClane; loving grandfather of 16; terment St. Matthew Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions great-grandfather of 18; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great- to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church or the American Heart uncle, cousin and friend. Association appreciated. Trisagion service Thursday, 5:00 Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 p.m. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m. Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, March 15, 11 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Sun., Mar. 11, 2018. Dear husband of Rhoda Laudel Dierkes, Darlene Sally (nee Rodenbeck); dear father of David (Lin), Louis (nee Wilshusen), passed away on (Mary Kogut) and Ruth Laudel; dear grandfather of Sunday, March 11, 2018 at the Mackenzie Laudel; dear brother of the late William Laudel, age of 75. Dear daughter of the Bernadine Kuhn, the late Herbert Laudel, the late Albert late Edward G. Wilshusen and Laudel; dear uncle, cousin, brother-in-law and friend. Evelyn C. Wilshusen; beloved wife Mr. Laudel was a Chartered Financial Consultant and of Barry Dierkes; loving mother Chartered Life Underwriter and President of Life Underwriters of Dana Waganer (nee Dierkes) Assoc. of St. Louis. He was involved in numerous civic and and Tracy Sullivan (nee Dierkes) charitable organizations including Shriners, Kiwanis, the and husband John; dear grand- Literacy Council and active in his church. He served in the Army mother to Hannah Sullivan and Air Corps during WW II. He was an avid sailor. William Edward Sullivan, Jack Services: Visitation Thurs., 4-8 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Waganer and Lauren Evelyn Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Memorial Service Fri., 11 a.m. at St. Waganer and friend to many. Lucas United Church of Christ, 11735 Denny Rd. Donations Darlene graduated from Jen- may be made to Shriners Hospital or the Literacy Council. nings High School in 1960 and went on to attend the University www.boppchapel.com of MO - Columbia. She was very involved with her church, Bethel UCC (1942-2015), and Church of the Master (2015-2018) Olendorff, Marlene A. where she served as a Sunday School teacher, usher, and morn(nee Boschert) of O'Fallon, MO, passed away on Friday, March 9, ing greeter. Darlene loved spending time with her family and friends, trav- 2018, after a short illness at the age of 78. Marlene was eling, golfing, playing cards and board games, reading biogra- preceded in death by her husband Bob in 2014. They were phies, Cardinal baseball, listening to Johnny Mathis, and Christ- married for 56 wonderful years. She was the devoted mother of mas shopping at the Osage Beach outlet mall with her daugh- Robyn (Marc) Hulsey, Lynn Olendorff, Jay (Leigh) Olendorff and Jill (Bill) Forbes; and loving grandmother of 6 and great-grandters every October. Services: A visitation for Darlene will be held Friday, March 16, mother of 4. Marlene was a lifelong parishioner of All Saints Catholic 2018, 4-8 p.m at the STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Florissant. A funeral Church. Mom loved spending time with her family and friends, service will be held Saturday, March 17, 2018, 10:00 a.m. at being poolside, playing cards, and dancing. We are certain she Church of the Master in Florissant. Visitation 1 hour prior to and dad are enjoying a good Manhattan together. Marlene was service at the Church. Burial will follow the funeral at Memorial dearly loved and will be missed by all who knew her. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Park Cemetery. Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation Fri. Mar. 16, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Funeral Hensley, George Lewis Mass Sat., Mar. 17, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at All Saints Catholic Church, 7 McMenamy Rd, St Peters, MO 63376. passed away on Sunday, Memorials to SSM Hospice or American Lung Association. March 11, 2018. Beloved Visit Baue.com husband for 56 years of Marjorie McLain Hensley; dear father of Patrick W. Hensley (Sue), Seevers, Dave Michael and the late George L. Hensley, Jr. Monday, March 12, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Valerie A. (Cindy surviving); dear grandSeevers (nee Greenlee); dear father of Rebecca Rospierski and father of Patrick, Jr. "PJ", Grace, David (Emina) Seevers; dear grandfather of Kaitlyn, Bobby, Zayn and Jack; Haley, George III, and and Chace; dear son of Doris and the late Kenneth Seevers; Cecelia; dear brother of James dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Hensley (Nyla), Ann "Muffy" Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, McPheeters (Hugh), and the late Friday, March 16, 10 a.m. Interment St. Trinity Cemetery. Robert T. Hensley, Jr. George was Member of Our Savior Lutheran Church (Fenton, MO). the grandson of the late US Congressman, Walter Hensley. Dear uncle, cousin, and friend to Memorials to the American Cancer Society. Visitation Thursday, 4-7:30 p.m. many. Loyal companion to his black labrador, Tiki. George was a graduate of St. Louis Country Day School (Class of 1953) and was Captain of its first undefeated, untied Varsity Shapiro, Paul Bernard Football Team. He attended Dartmouth, Washington University 86, Passed away peacefully, March 7, 2018. Beloved husband of and University of Missouri-Columbia and still graduated in 4 Valerie Shapiro; dear father of Suzy (Kevin) Callahan and Bruce years. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. (Amy) Shapiro; loving grandfather of Stephanie (Jeremy) He started his career with McDonald Construction where he Levinson, Sarah (Ben) Minkoff, Brian Callahan, Hannah, Kate, was a Project Manager for building of the first Titan I Missile and Sam Shapiro; dear brother of Bill (Fran) Shapiro. He will be Base in Washington State. In 1977, George started Hensley forever in our hearts. Construction. He served on the Ladue City Council for eighteen Services: A private celebration of life was held. Memorial years and was a member of the Board of Directors of Mark contributions can be made to The Alzheimer's Association (St. Twain Bank. Louis Chapter). George spent nearly every summer at Epworth Heights in Ludington, Michigan, where he loved to play golf and had many friends. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Road, Ladue, on Thursday, March 15 at 3 pm. Private interment Sandy Baptist Church Cemetery, Pevely, MO. In lieu of flowers, Memorials appreciated to Epworth Church Association, 1161 N. Lakeshore Drive, Ludington, MI, 49431, Ladue Chapel, or to the charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Visitation 4-8 p.m. Thursday, March 15, at Hutchens Mortuary. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, March 16, at St Charles Borromeo. Burial at J.B. National Cemetery.

nual deficits will top $1 trillion beginning next year and remain at that level in coming years. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget released a report this month projecting that $1 trillion deficits will return next year with the annual deficit hitting $2.4 trillion in 10 years. For the current budget year, which began Oct. 1, the Treasury report said revenues totaled $1.29 trillion, up 2.4 percent from a year ago, while outlays totaled $1.34 trillion, up 4.2 percent from the same period a year ago. Both the revenues and spending totals are records for the first five months of a budget year.

Strickfaden, Harold P.

Tucker, Kathleen Ann

(nee Fiala) wife of Richard Tucker; mother of Kevin Tucker, Julie (Eric) Clifton, Beth (Joe) Bess. Loving Meemaw to Austin Markowski, Brenden Tucker, Tyler Clifton, Madison Clifton, Audrey Bess, and BB2. Daughter of Lloyd & Gloria Fiala. Sister to P eggy (Jim L a mp e) Fiala, Tom (Carol) Fiala and Tim (Stephanie) Fiala. Relative and friend to many others. She touched all of us with her loving and caring heart. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Funeral Home (5255 Lemay Ferry), Wednesday 3/14 from 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass at Assumption Catholic Church, Mattis Road on Thursday 3/15 at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to your favorite charity. The family would like to thank the staff of St. Anthony's Hospital for the care they provided to Kathy and the family.

Urbanek, Barbara C.

(nee Petri), Friday, March 9, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Raymond F. Urbanek; dear mother of Donald (Elisabeth) and Robert Urbanek; dear grandmother of John and Mark Urbanek; dear sister of Dorothy Palucci, Joan Haefner and the late Frank Petri; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SO. CO. Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, March 15, 10:00 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Wardlaw, Nancy Wright

Passed on to our Lord, March 11, 2018. Born August 21, 1936. Nancy is survived by her loving husband of 61 years Bud G. Wardlaw, her daughters: Kelly Wardlaw Hawes (Richard), Stacy Wardlaw Rother (Michael), and her three grandchildren: Richard Bartow Hawes (Audrey Block Hawes), Smith Nicholas Hawes, and Piper Madeline Rother. Nancy was outgoing and fun loving person who had good, true friendships throughout her life. An avid golfer and bridge player, she also had a deep love for animals of all kinds. We would like to especially thank her caregiver, Cassie. She will be sorely missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing her. A private service and burial was held by the family honoring Nancy's life. www.baue.com

Whistler, Norma J.

Mon, March 12, 2018. Visit Wed., March 14, 4-8 p.m. & service Thurs., March 15, 10 a.m. at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh (St. Ann). www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


LOCAL

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

U. City approves $28 million expansion for arts center BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

UNIVERSITY CITY • Officials here approved a $28 million expansion and renovation to the city’s historic Center of Creative Arts on Monday. The project will renovate the center’s main building at 524 Trinity Avenue and add an east wing that will include a state-ofthe-art 450-seat theater, more than 8,000 square feet of new studio space, a commons area, and a designated area for families to drop off and pick up students, according to a COCA press release. Renovations to the main building, already underway, will in-

COURTESY OF COCA

An artist’s rendering of the exterior of a planned expansion to the Center of Creative Arts in University City.

clude two new dance studios, renovated art and design studio and a teaching kitchen. COCA’s current theater will be converted into a sky-lit performance lab. The campus will remain open during construction, which is expected to be completed by early 2020, but some perfor-

mances will be moved off-site. The expansion is expected to break ground this summer. The project will also replace COCA’s parking lot with a secured, covered parking lot the center will share with a Washington University music school building.

OBITUARIES

Bechtold, Barbara A. - St. Louis Brenner, Jeff - Grover, MO Dierkes, Darlene Sally - St. Louis Hensley, George Lewis - Ladue Jedrzykowski, Lambert A. - St. Louis Klevorn - see Sorbello Kopp, Kerry J. - St. Louis

Bechtold, Barbara A.

(nee Taylor) Passed peacefully at home, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, March 11, 2018, at the age of 80. Beloved wife of the late William J. Bechtold; mother of Donna (Dave) Peters, Cheryl (Dave) Ryan, Bill (Cindy) Bechtold, and Betty (Robert) Spicer; sister of the late Betty Ann Taylor; dear friend of the late Frank Vaughan and family; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, cousin, and friend to many. Barbara was an active member of the Parish and White House Retreat. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to White House Retreat or Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Services: Thursday (March 15), 10:30 a.m., from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Ave (63116) to Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church for 11:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION: WEDNESDAY (MARCH 14), 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Brenner, Jeff

age 55, passed away Sunday, March 11, 2018. Memorial service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

The expansion is the second phase of a construction project funded by more than $36 million raised in private donations since 2015, according the community arts organization. The fundraising campaign aims to raise $40 million for the construction project and for $12 million toward endowment and reserves. The east wing and its theater will be named after two families who each donated $5 million to the campaign. “This expansion will allow COCA to serve more students from throughout the St. Louis community and ensure that we remain a part of what makes St. Louis a great place to work, live, and raise a family, for years

Celebrations of Life

Kopp, Thomas W. Sr. - Ballwin Laudel, Louis W.E. - St. Louis Olendorff, Marlene A. - O'Fallon, MO Rospierski - see Seevers Seevers, Dave Michael - St. Louis Shapiro, Paul Bernard - St. Louis Sorbello, James S. Sr. - St. Louis

Jedrzykowski, Lambert A.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Strickfaden, Harold P. - Edwardsville, IL Tucker, Kathleen Ann - St. Louis Urbanek, Barbara C. - St. Louis Wardlaw, Nancy Wright - Detroit, MI Whistler, Norma J. - St. Louis

Kopp, Kerry J.

Sorbello, James S. Sr.

Laudel, Louis W. E.

90, of Edwardsville, IL, March 12, 2018. Visit Thurs. 4-7 p.m. Weber & Rodney F.H., 304 North Main, Edwardsville, IL. Service Fri. 11 a.m. Annunciation Catholic Church, California, MO

(nee Thornton), on Sunday, March 11, 2018. Beloved wife of Thomas Kopp, Jr.; dear mother of Clinton (Stephanie) Kopp and Thomas C. (Alisha) Kopp; loving grandmother of Alyssa, Brendon and T.J. Kopp; our dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, great-aunt, niece, cousin and friend. Service: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road, on Friday, March 16, 1:00 p.m. Interment private. Visitation Thursday, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, March 11, 2018. Beloved husband of Catherine Sorbello (nee Rupi); dear father of Angie (Larry) Klevorn and Jim (Carmen) Sorbello Jr.; dear grandfather of Zachary, Jacob, Kiley and Blake; dear brother-in-law of Trudy Eck and Betty (John) Heine; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. The Sorbello family would like Kopp, Thomas W. Sr. to thank the staff of D el ma r asleep in Jesus, Saturday, March 10, 2018. Beloved Gardens South for their loving husband of the late Roberta C. Kopp and Janice Kopp; care. dear father of Thomas W. (the late Kerry) Kopp Jr., Services: Funeral from KUTIS Keith Allen (Rick Shepard) Kopp, James W. (Patti) Kopp, Karen AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 16, 9:00 a.m. to (Jim) Crews, Terri (Steven) Swartz, Cheryl Blattner and the late St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church for 10:00 a.m. service. InLisa (survived by Mark) McClane; loving grandfather of 16; terment St. Matthew Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions great-grandfather of 18; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great- to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church or the American Heart uncle, cousin and friend. Association appreciated. Trisagion service Thursday, 5:00 Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 p.m. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m. Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, March 15, 11 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Sun., Mar. 11, 2018. Dear husband of Rhoda Laudel Dierkes, Darlene Sally (nee Rodenbeck); dear father of David (Lin), Louis (nee Wilshusen), passed away on (Mary Kogut) and Ruth Laudel; dear grandfather of Sunday, March 11, 2018 at the Mackenzie Laudel; dear brother of the late William Laudel, age of 75. Dear daughter of the Bernadine Kuhn, the late Herbert Laudel, the late Albert late Edward G. Wilshusen and Laudel; dear uncle, cousin, brother-in-law and friend. Evelyn C. Wilshusen; beloved wife Mr. Laudel was a Chartered Financial Consultant and of Barry Dierkes; loving mother Chartered Life Underwriter and President of Life Underwriters of Dana Waganer (nee Dierkes) Assoc. of St. Louis. He was involved in numerous civic and and Tracy Sullivan (nee Dierkes) charitable organizations including Shriners, Kiwanis, the and husband John; dear grand- Literacy Council and active in his church. He served in the Army mother to Hannah Sullivan and Air Corps during WW II. He was an avid sailor. William Edward Sullivan, Jack Services: Visitation Thurs., 4-8 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Waganer and Lauren Evelyn Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Memorial Service Fri., 11 a.m. at St. Waganer and friend to many. Lucas United Church of Christ, 11735 Denny Rd. Donations Darlene graduated from Jen- may be made to Shriners Hospital or the Literacy Council. nings High School in 1960 and went on to attend the University www.boppchapel.com of MO - Columbia. She was very involved with her church, Bethel UCC (1942-2015), and Church of the Master (2015-2018) Olendorff, Marlene A. where she served as a Sunday School teacher, usher, and morn(nee Boschert) of O'Fallon, MO, passed away on Friday, March 9, ing greeter. Darlene loved spending time with her family and friends, trav- 2018, after a short illness at the age of 78. Marlene was eling, golfing, playing cards and board games, reading biogra- preceded in death by her husband Bob in 2014. They were phies, Cardinal baseball, listening to Johnny Mathis, and Christ- married for 56 wonderful years. She was the devoted mother of mas shopping at the Osage Beach outlet mall with her daugh- Robyn (Marc) Hulsey, Lynn Olendorff, Jay (Leigh) Olendorff and Jill (Bill) Forbes; and loving grandmother of 6 and great-grandters every October. Services: A visitation for Darlene will be held Friday, March 16, mother of 4. Marlene was a lifelong parishioner of All Saints Catholic 2018, 4-8 p.m at the STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. Florissant. A funeral Church. Mom loved spending time with her family and friends, service will be held Saturday, March 17, 2018, 10:00 a.m. at being poolside, playing cards, and dancing. We are certain she Church of the Master in Florissant. Visitation 1 hour prior to and dad are enjoying a good Manhattan together. Marlene was service at the Church. Burial will follow the funeral at Memorial dearly loved and will be missed by all who knew her. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Park Cemetery. Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation Fri. Mar. 16, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Funeral Hensley, George Lewis Mass Sat., Mar. 17, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at All Saints Catholic Church, 7 McMenamy Rd, St Peters, MO 63376. passed away on Sunday, Memorials to SSM Hospice or American Lung Association. March 11, 2018. Beloved Visit Baue.com husband for 56 years of Marjorie McLain Hensley; dear father of Patrick W. Hensley (Sue), Seevers, Dave Michael and the late George L. Hensley, Jr. Monday, March 12, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Valerie A. (Cindy surviving); dear grandSeevers (nee Greenlee); dear father of Rebecca Rospierski and father of Patrick, Jr. "PJ", Grace, David (Emina) Seevers; dear grandfather of Kaitlyn, Bobby, Zayn and Jack; Haley, George III, and and Chace; dear son of Doris and the late Kenneth Seevers; Cecelia; dear brother of James dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Hensley (Nyla), Ann "Muffy" Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, McPheeters (Hugh), and the late Friday, March 16, 10 a.m. Interment St. Trinity Cemetery. Robert T. Hensley, Jr. George was Member of Our Savior Lutheran Church (Fenton, MO). the grandson of the late US Congressman, Walter Hensley. Dear uncle, cousin, and friend to Memorials to the American Cancer Society. Visitation Thursday, 4-7:30 p.m. many. Loyal companion to his black labrador, Tiki. George was a graduate of St. Louis Country Day School (Class of 1953) and was Captain of its first undefeated, untied Varsity Shapiro, Paul Bernard Football Team. He attended Dartmouth, Washington University 86, Passed away peacefully, March 7, 2018. Beloved husband of and University of Missouri-Columbia and still graduated in 4 Valerie Shapiro; dear father of Suzy (Kevin) Callahan and Bruce years. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. (Amy) Shapiro; loving grandfather of Stephanie (Jeremy) He started his career with McDonald Construction where he Levinson, Sarah (Ben) Minkoff, Brian Callahan, Hannah, Kate, was a Project Manager for building of the first Titan I Missile and Sam Shapiro; dear brother of Bill (Fran) Shapiro. He will be Base in Washington State. In 1977, George started Hensley forever in our hearts. Construction. He served on the Ladue City Council for eighteen Services: A private celebration of life was held. Memorial years and was a member of the Board of Directors of Mark contributions can be made to The Alzheimer's Association (St. Twain Bank. Louis Chapter). George spent nearly every summer at Epworth Heights in Ludington, Michigan, where he loved to play golf and had many friends. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Road, Ladue, on Thursday, March 15 at 3 pm. Private interment Sandy Baptist Church Cemetery, Pevely, MO. In lieu of flowers, Memorials appreciated to Epworth Church Association, 1161 N. Lakeshore Drive, Ludington, MI, 49431, Ladue Chapel, or to the charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Visitation 4-8 p.m. Thursday, March 15, at Hutchens Mortuary. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, March 16, at St Charles Borromeo. Burial at J.B. National Cemetery.

to come,” Jesse Hunter, COCA president, said in the press release. COCA was founded in 1986. Its main building, designed by architect Erich Mendelsohn, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The organization, the fourthlargest multidisciplinary community arts center in the U.S., serves more than 50,000 students of all ages from more than 200 ZIP codes each year, according to COCA. The organization has a $5 million annual budget, employs more than 250 teaching artists and provides nearly $1 million annually in scholarships and support services to its students.

Strickfaden, Harold P.

Tucker, Kathleen Ann

(nee Fiala) wife of Richard Tucker; mother of Kevin Tucker, Julie (Eric) Clifton, Beth (Joe) Bess. Loving Meemaw to Austin Markowski, Brenden Tucker, Tyler Clifton, Madison Clifton, Audrey Bess, and BB2. Daughter of Lloyd & Gloria Fiala. Sister to P eggy (Jim L a mp e) Fiala, Tom (Carol) Fiala and Tim (Stephanie) Fiala. Relative and friend to many others. She touched all of us with her loving and caring heart. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Funeral Home (5255 Lemay Ferry), Wednesday 3/14 from 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass at Assumption Catholic Church, Mattis Road on Thursday 3/15 at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to your favorite charity. The family would like to thank the staff of St. Anthony's Hospital for the care they provided to Kathy and the family.

Urbanek, Barbara C.

(nee Petri), Friday, March 9, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Raymond F. Urbanek; dear mother of Donald (Elisabeth) and Robert Urbanek; dear grandmother of John and Mark Urbanek; dear sister of Dorothy Palucci, Joan Haefner and the late Frank Petri; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SO. CO. Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, March 15, 10:00 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Wardlaw, Nancy Wright

Passed on to our Lord, March 11, 2018. Born August 21, 1936. Nancy is survived by her loving husband of 61 years Bud G. Wardlaw, her daughters: Kelly Wardlaw Hawes (Richard), Stacy Wardlaw Rother (Michael), and her three grandchildren: Richard Bartow Hawes (Audrey Block Hawes), Smith Nicholas Hawes, and Piper Madeline Rother. Nancy was outgoing and fun loving person who had good, true friendships throughout her life. An avid golfer and bridge player, she also had a deep love for animals of all kinds. We would like to especially thank her caregiver, Cassie. She will be sorely missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing her. A private service and burial was held by the family honoring Nancy's life. www.baue.com

Whistler, Norma J.

Mon, March 12, 2018. Visit Wed., March 14, 4-8 p.m. & service Thurs., March 15, 10 a.m. at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh (St. Ann). www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


NEWS

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Tillerson casts poisoning as ominous Secretary of state says attack on ex-spy part of ‘unleashing of activity’ by Russia BY JOSH LEDERMAN associated Press

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson cast the poisoning of an ex-spy in Britain as part of a “certain unleashing of activity” by Russia that the United States is struggling to understand. He warned that the poisoning would “certainly trigger a response.” Tillerson, echoing the British government’s finger-pointing toward Moscow, said he didn’t yet know whether Russia’s government knew of the attack with a military-grade nerve agent, but that one way or another, “it came from Russia.” He said it was “almost beyond comprehension” why a state actor would deploy such a dangerous substance in a public place in a foreign country where others could be exposed. “I cannot understand why anyone would take such an action. But this is a substance that is known to us and does not

exist widely,” Tillerson told reporters as he flew on government aircraft from Nigeria to Washington. “It is only in the hands of a very, very limited number of parties.” British Prime Minister Theresa May said that Novichock, the nerve agent used March 4 against ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, was developed by the Soviet Union near the end of the Cold War. Skripal, 66, was a Russian military intelligence officer before flipping to the British side in the 1990s, going to jail in Russia in 2006 and being freed in an exchange of spies in 2010. May said on Monday that Russia either engaged in a direct attack against Britain or lost control of the nerve agent it developed. Britain will not tolerate such a “brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil,” she warned. As she addressed the House of Commons, the British leader stopped short of announcing retaliatory actions, saying she would return to Parliament on Wednesday

with a plan for specific action. May strongly signaled that the already frosty relations between Britain and Russia were headed toward lows perhaps not seen since the Cold War. Lawmakers in Parliament called for sanctions and condemnations of Russia from the United Nations, European Union and United States. Immediately after May’s remarks, the Russian government denounced her speech as a spectacle designed to mislead. “It is a circus show in the British Parliament,” the Tass news agency quoted Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova as saying. At a news briefing in Washington, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called the attack “an outrage” and said that “right now we are standing with our U.K. ally.” But she declined to say whether the United States shared the British assessment implicating Russia, and she did not mention Russia in her replies to questions about the attack. Tillerson, who spoke Monday by phone with British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, said he’s grown “extremely concerned” about Russia, noting that he spent most of the first year of the Trump

Citing free speech, artist pushes forward on Rosa Parks house University pulls support after home-turned-art travels from Berlin BY MICHELLE R. SMITH associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. • The artist who turned a house in Detroit where Rosa Parks once lived into an art piece says he’s working to ensure the home is displayed in Rhode Island even after Brown University pulled its support. Ryan Mendoza says he has a First Amendment right to show the house. The Ivy League institution told a donor who helped pay for the project that it was threatened with legal action by an institute that claims to own the rights to Parks’ name. Mendoza is working with a local arts group for legal help and to find the money and other support they need to move forward. He said in an interview Sunday he has a right to continue. “It’s a bit presumptuous on the part of Brown that they would consider themselves as having the possibility of canceling the show. This show cannot be canceled,” Mendoza said in an interview next to the house that has been partially reassembled in an arts center in Providence. The house was owned by Parks’ brother, and people including relatives, neighbors and others have said she lived there for a time after she fled the South amid death threats for refusing to give up her bus seat. Her brother later lost the home to foreclosure, and it ended up on a demolition list. Parks’ niece, Rhea McCauley, bought it for $500 and connected with Mendoza, who had worked with abandoned homes in Detroit. She gave it to Mendoza, who took it apart piece by piece and shipped it to Germany, were he reassembled it in his yard in Berlin. There, it drew a steady stream of visitors and gained a higher profile. Mendoza eventually said he received requests from multiple venues to bring the house there and selected Brown because in recent years it had publicly grappled with its historical ties to the slave trade. Mendoza spent the last few months disassembling the house, sending parts across the Atlantic Ocean by ship and reassembling it at the WaterFire Arts Center, a few miles from Brown’s campus, which the Ivy League university brought in as a venue. There, it was to open to the public next month with free admission. Plans were in the works for Brown to display a civil rights exhibit alongside

WASHINGTON • National Geographic

acknowledged on Monday that it covered the world through a racist lens for generations, with its magazine portrayals of bare-breasted women and naive brownskinned tribesmen as savage, unsophisticated and unintelligent. “We had to own our story to move beyond it,” editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg told The Associated Press in an interview about the yellow-bordered magazine’s April issue, which is devoted to race. National Geographic first published its magazine in 1888. An investigation conducted last fall by University of Virginia photography historian John Edwin Mason showed that until the 1970s, it virtually ignored people of color in the United States who were not domestics or laborers, and it reinforced repeatedly the idea that people of color from foreign lands were “exotics, famously and frequently unclothed, happy hunters, noble savages—every type of cliché.” For example, in a 1916 article about Australia, the caption on a photo of two Aboriginal people read: “South Austra-

WORLD DIGEST 49 killed in plane crash in Nepal

Forty-nine people have died and 22 others were injured after a US-Bangla Airlines passenger plane crashed at Kathmandu’s international airport in Nepal on Monday. The plane was carrying 71 people — 67 passengers and four crew members — when it skidded off the runway during landing and crashed onto a field. The Bombardier Dash 8 turboprop plane had departed from the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka. “We found 40 dead bodies in the plane,” Nepal Police spokesman Manoj Neupane said. Nine other people died at the hospital. Neupane said authorities had completed the search for bodies at the site. US-Bangla Airlines chief executive Bimran Asif said a misunderstanding between the control tower at Kathmandu airport and the pilot might have caused the accident. Trump blocks Broadcom • President Donald Trump is blocking Singapore-based Broadcom’s takeover of U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm on national security grounds. The White House says Trump is taking the action on the recommendation of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which reviews foreign purchases of U.S. entities. Broadcom made an unsolicited bid last year to take over Qualcomm, which has been met by shareholder skepticism and regulatory scrutiny. Broadcom is in the process of moving its legal headquarters from Singapore to the U.S., with the company planning on finishing the move by April 3.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Artist Ryan Mendoza and his wife, Fabia, stand Sunday inside the partially assembled house in the WaterFire Arts Center in Providence, R.I. Civil rights icon Rosa Parks once lived in the house in Detroit. Her niece had given the house to Mendoza.

the house, with school children visiting and Brown students acting as docents, according to Barnaby Evans, WaterFire’s executive artistic director. The house was about 80 percent assembled when Brown announced on Thursday that the display was canceled. It cited an unspecified dispute involving the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development, which Parks cofounded but which has feuded with relatives for years. A board member for the Wisconsin-

based Nash Family Foundation, which donated $45,000 to Brown to be used to pay for the project, said a Brown professor called him last week to tell him the institute sent the university a cease-anddesist order. Member Jim Nash said he was told it was “based on their view that they owned the rights to the Rosa Parks name because of something that Rosa Parks evidently signed in her dotage,” Nash said. A Brown spokesman said Monday that it did not breach any agreements.

National Geographic acknowledges past racist coverage BY JESSE J. HOLLAND associated Press

administration trying to solve problems and narrow differences with the Kremlin. He said after a year of trying, “we didn’t get very far.” “Instead what we’ve seen is a pivot on their part to be more aggressive,” Tillerson said. “And this is very, very concerning to me and others that there seems to be a certain unleashing of activity that we don’t fully understand what the objective behind that is.” He said if the poisoning turned out to be the work of Russia’s government, “this is a pretty serious action.” “It certainly will trigger a response. I’ll leave it at that,” Tillerson said. Tillerson, whose relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin dates back to his days as Exxon Mobil’s CEO, has sought to work with Russia on narrow areas where the two countries could find common ground, such as a cease-fire in southwestern Syria that has largely held since last year. But those efforts have had diminishing results. Tillerson’s efforts to persuade Moscow to stop propping up Syrian President Bashar Assad and to pull out of Crimea have yielded little to no progress.

lian Blackfellows: These savages rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings.” In addition, National Geographic perpetuated the cliche of native people fascinated by technology and overloaded the magazine with pictures of beautiful Pacific island women. “I think National Geographic was a product of its time,” Goldberg said. “It started at the height of colonialism, and that is the lens through which it covered the world.” This examination comes as other media organizations are also casting a critical eye on their past. The New York Times recently admitted that most of its obituaries chronicled the lives of white men, and began publishing obituaries of famous women in its “Overlooked” section. In National Geographic’s April issue, Goldberg, who identified herself as National Geographic’s first woman and first Jewish editor, wrote a letter titled “For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist. To Rise Above Our Past, We Must Acknowledge It.” “I knew when we looked back there would be some storytelling that we obviously would never do today, that we don’t do and we’re not proud of,” she told the

AP. “But it seemed to me if we want to credibly talk about race, we better look and see how we talked about race.” National Geographic, which now reaches 30 million people around the world, was the way that many Americans first learned about the rest of the world, said professor Samir Husni, who heads the Magazine Innovation Center at the University of Mississippi’s journalism school. Making sure that kind of coverage never happens again should be paramount, Husni said. “Trying to integrate the magazine media with more hiring of diverse writers and minorities in the magazine field is how we apologize for the past,” Husni said. Goldberg said she is doing just that, adding that in the past, the magazine has done a better job at gender diversity than racial and ethnic diversity. “The coverage wasn’t right before because it was told from an elite, white American point of view, and I think it speaks to exactly why we needed a diversity of storytellers,” Goldberg said. “So we need photographers who are AfricanAmerican and Native American because they are going to capture a different truth and maybe a more accurate story.”

Slovak protests continue • Antigovernment protesters in Slovakia are planning to hold more rallies over the slaying of an investigative journalist even though the country’s interior minister has resigned. Interior Minister Robert Kalinak resigned Monday after tens of thousands of protesters across Slovakia demanded a thorough investigation into the shooting deaths of Jan Kuciak and Martina Kusnirova. The protests on Friday included calls for Slovakia’s whole government to step down. The organizers of the protests said the interior minister stepping down “must be only a beginning.” Kuciak’s last, unfinished story was about the activities of the Italian mafia in Slovakia and alleged ties to people close to Prime Minister Robert Fico. Official urges help for Colombia • A senior U.N. official says Colombia needs international help as it struggles with a humanitarian catastrophe along its border from Venezuelans driven from their homes by hunger. David Beasley, director of the World Food Program, said he would work with Colombia on a plan to feed the 50,000 Venezuelans entering the country each day to eat, and solicit funding from the U.S. and other nations to assist the relief effort. Designer Givenchy dies at 91 • French couturier Hubert de Givenchy, a pioneer of ready-to-wear who designed Audrey Hepburn’s little black dress in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” has died at 91. The house of Givenchy, which announced the Saturday death on Monday, paid homage to its founder in a statement as “a major personality of the world of French haute couture and a gentleman who symbolized Parisian chic and elegance for more than half a century.” Along with Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent and mentor Cristobal Balenciaga, Givenchy was part of the elite cadre of Parisbased designers who redefined fashion after World War II. U.S. scientists rescued in Antarctic • A group of American scientists who were stranded on an icebound island off the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula were rescued Sunday by an Argentine icebreaker, U.S. and Argentine authorities said Monday. The four scientists and a support staff member, who were conducting research at Joinville Island, were airlifted by helicopter to the Almirante Irizar icebreaker. Argentina’s armed forces said the five were in good health and would be transferred to the U.S. vessel when weather conditions improve. From news services


WORLD

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Chaos in 2 towns as Turkish Adviser says Trump is optimistic about progress with North Korea and Syrian forces close in U.S. seeks order for cease-fire to get aid to wounded BY BASSEM MROUE AND PHILIP ISSA Associated Press

BEIRUT • Parallel offen-

sives waged by Turkey and the Syrian government on two separate towns in Syria on Monday pushed residents into overcrowded shelters for safety as others tried to flee the advancing forces by road. Residents and displaced families in the besieged town of Douma in the rebel-held Damascus suburbs of eastern Ghouta were sleeping in shops and in the streets as basements in the town filled up beyond capacity, said Haitham Bakkar, a local resident. “We are afraid of the assault,” Bakkar said of the government’s efforts to take the town amid a ferocious campaign of shelling and airstrikes. Blasts could be heard as he spoke to The Associated Press via a messaging service. Thousands of people were fleeing the northwestern town of Afrin as Turkish troops and Turkey-backed opposition fighters moved closer to completely encircling it. Meanwhile, at the United Nations, the United States circulated a draft resolution on Monday urging the Security Council to order a 30-day cease-fire in the Syrian capital and eastern Ghouta, expressing “outrage” at the lack of implementation of a resolution adopted Feb. 24 calling for a cease-fire throughout Syria to deliver humanitarian aid and evacuate the wounded and critically ill. The U.S. draft would eliminate what U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley called a “loophole” in the Feb. 24 resolution that allows military operations

against al-Qaida and Islamist State extremist groups. Haley also warned Syria that the United States was prepared to take military action for alleged chemical attacks that are killing and wounding Syrian civilians. Noting that since the resolution was passed there have been three allegations of chlorine gas attacks during a stepped up military campaign against rebels, Haley told the council: “This is no cease-fire. The cease-fire has failed.” Ebrahim Ebrahim, a Europe-based spokesman for the largest Kurdish group in Syria, the Democratic Union Party, or PYD, said those fleeing were heading toward governmentcontrolled areas, fearful that Turkish troops and Turkey-backed Syrian opposition fighters might commit atrocities against the Kurds and minority Christians, Alawites and Yazidis in the town. Turkish troops have destroyed water and power stations that supply Afrin, making it difficult for people to stay there. “Water has been cut from Afrin for a week now. Everyone is very scared of what’s coming now that

the Turkish occupying forces are getting closer to the town’s center,” said resident Serbest Hassan. He said 800,000 civilians in Afrin were facing a humanitarian “catastrophe” amid food shortages and relentless Turkish airstrikes. There is real fear, he said, of massacres once Turkish troops and their allies reach the town. Turkey launched the military offensive against the U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish militia known as YPG, to clear its fighters from the enclave of Afrin. Ankara considers the YPG a terrorist organization linked to its own Kurdish insurgency. Near the Syrian capital, meanwhile, a small group of civilians managed to flee eastern Ghouta for government-held areas, while the area’s largest armed rebel group said it had reached an agreement with Russian forces to evacuate the wounded from the besieged territory. The council of Douma said Saturday that burials had been halted because of airstrikes on the cemetery. It called the humanitarian situation “catastrophic.”

proved the maximum pressure strategy about a year ago and wanted him to thank council members “for their unity and resolve” in adopting tough sanctions against North Korea. McMaster said “it has us now to a point where we may be able to pursue a diplomatic solution to the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.” Last week, South Korean officials said Kim had offered to meet with Trump, who immediately agreed. But as of Monday, there had been no official report on the North’s offer of a summit. The lack of confirmation from Pyongyang has

FROM NEWS SERVICES

UNITED NATIONS • The

U.S. national security adviser says President Donald Trump is optimistic about the opportunity for a diplomatic solution in North Korea — but will keep up maximum pressure until there is “real progress” toward denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. H.R. McMaster told reporters after briefing the U.N. Security Council on Monday that members also agreed on pursuing diplomacy and maintaining maximum pressure until Kim Jong Un’s words are “matched with deeds.” He said Trump ap-

generated skepticism about how accurately Seoul and Washington are depicting Kim’s intentions. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and other senior officials were with Trump when he met Thursday with South Korean national security adviser Chung Eui-yong, who relayed an invitation to Trump to meet. Chung said it came with a promise that Kim would temporarily stop his ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programs and an acknowledgment that the South Korean and U.S. militaries would continue to carry out exercises together.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 03.13.2018 • B

Missouri’s Martin set to face mentor Florida State’s Hamilton has provided insight for years BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • When

Missouri plays Florida State in the NCAA Tournament’s first round Friday night in Nashville, Tenn., Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin will look down the sideline at Bridgestone Arena and see a man he considers a mentor in the coaching industry. He’ll also see someone with history against Mizzou. It was 30 years ago when Leonard Hamilton unleashed an epic tirade at

Hearnes Center, a scene he remembered vividly in an interview Monday. It was Feb. 21, 1988, and H a m i l to n ’s O k l a h o m a State Cowboys were playing coach Norm Stewart’s Tigers. Hamilton picked up two technical fouls in the first half then got ejected when a young assistant coach named Bill Self — yes, that Bill Self — was slapped with another technical, meaning Hamilton had to leave the court. See FSU • Page B4

Porter Sr. talks about sons, who are ‘almost like twins’ BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

MU assistant coach Michael Porter Sr. checks on son Michael Porter Jr. during a recent practice session. NCAA TOURNAMENT

8. Mizzou vs. 9. Florida State 8:50 p.m. Friday in Nashville, TBS

MAKE YOUR PICKS with the P-D All-Stars. Register now to compete for $1,000,000 in Bracketball. stltoday.com/contests

COLUMBIA, MO. • He one day could become basketball’s Archie Manning. For now, anyway, he’s an anti-LaVar Ball, a thoughtful sports dad who stays out of the spotlight. Even so, Michael Porter Sr. changed the course of Mizzou basketball history. When he agreed to be

a Cuonzo Martin assistant coach, his star sons — Michael Jr. and Jontay — soon joined the Tigers, too. Michael Jr., then the No. 1 freshman recruit in the nation, inspired the transfer of center Jeremiah Tilmon to Mizzou. Now the Tigers are in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2013. In a rare interview, Porter Sr. talked to the Post-Dispatch and discussed a variety of topics, from regrets on how Michael Jr. handled See HOCHMAN • Page B4

MIZZOU HITS THE ROAD

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Members of the Missouri women’s basketball team celebrate after defeating South Carolina earlier this season. The Tigers will open NCAA Tournament play in Stanford, Calif.

Women earn No. 5 seed, open against Florida Gulf Coast on Saturday BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The Missouri women’s basketball team is headed back to the NCAA Tournament for a third straight season but fell short of the goal it chased all season: hosting the first two rounds. The top 16 seeded teams in the 64-team bracket host the opening two rounds,

but after losing two of their last three games, the Tigers (24-7) were seeded fifth and headed to Stanford’s campus in California to play Saturday against No. 12 seed Florida Gulf Coast (30-4), the Atlantic Sun Conference champion. The game will tip off at 2:30 p.m. (St. Louis time) on ESPN2. The winner of that game faces the winner of No. 4 Stanford (22-10) against See MIZZOU • Page B1

Mayers is at his best going with his best BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • When

Chris Carpenter, the Cardinals’ ace turned mentor, saw the young righthander in the PNC Park visitors’ clubhouse this past summer, Mike Mayers had his head bowed, his ERA distended and his mind reeling from another unsettling outing in the majors. In the span of 12 hours he had been promoted, thumped for five runs in two-thirds of an inning and told to return to the minors. It was the third time

5. Mizzou vs. 12. Florida Gulf Coast 2:30 p.m. Saturday in Stanford, Calif. TV: ESPN2 > Connecticut on top in tournament. B5 > The women’s bracket. B5

LATE GAME MONDAY Monday’s Blues game against Anaheim was not finished in time for this edition. For coverage visit stltoday.com/blues > UP NEXT: 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Avalanche, FSM

> 12:05 p.m. Tuesday at Marlins

in seven big-league appearances he had allowed at least that many runs in an inning or less, and he was left to wonder, as he huddled in his locker: If this is all he had, what could he give? Carpenter pulled up a chair, leaned close to the rookie and offered Mayers something he lacked. Confidence. “I just went over and gave him a reminder of who he is, what he is, and the stuff that he has,” Carpenter recalled See CARDINALS • B2

No. 13 Gonzaga (27-5), the earlier game Saturday. The winner of Monday’s second-round game advances to the round of 16 in Lexington, Ky. For the bulk of the season, the Tigers were positioned to earn one of the bracket’s top 16 seeds and serve as hosts at Mizzou Arena and possibly land in the Kansas City Region for the regional semifinals. But after her

ASSOCIATED PRESS

See MIZZOU • Page B5

Youngest Blues still have much to prove JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Robert Bortuzzo (center) celebrates his goal with Nikita Soshnikov (left) and Alex Pietrangelo during the first period against the Ducks Monday in Anaheim.

team was eliminated from the Southeastern Conference tournament on March 2, coach Robin Pingeton cautioned her players to measure their expectations for the bracket. After three days away from practice, the team got back together last Wednesday, when Pingeton all but burst the Tigers’ bubble. Bracket projections

Fans watching the Blues roll in Los Angeles Saturday afternoon had to rub their eyes and refocus on their television. Was this really happening? For one game, anyway, the Blues regained their earlier form (and then some) while winning 7-2. “They had playoff fight on the puck, we didn’t,” Kings coach John Stevens told reporters after

the game. “I thought they were tougher on pucks all over the ice.” Can the Blues repeat that effort and rally into the playoffs? The Blues must win most of their remaining 13 games, so skepticism remains. The bigger picture is this: How those final games play out will help determine general manager Doug Armstrong’s summer priorities. He already decided that this group wasn’t good enough. Armstrong signaled that by trading center Paul See GORDON • Page B3

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 03.13.2018 • B

Missouri’s Martin set to face mentor Florida State’s Hamilton has provided insight for years BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • When

Missouri plays Florida State in the NCAA Tournament’s first round Friday night in Nashville, Tenn., Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin will look down the sideline at Bridgestone Arena and see a man he considers a mentor in the coaching industry. He’ll also see someone with history against Mizzou. It was 30 years ago when Leonard Hamilton unleashed an epic tirade at

Hearnes Center, a scene he remembered vividly in an interview Monday. It was Feb. 21, 1988, and H a m i l to n ’s O k l a h o m a State Cowboys were playing coach Norm Stewart’s Tigers. Hamilton picked up two technical fouls in the first half then got ejected when a young assistant coach named Bill Self — yes, that Bill Self — was slapped with another technical, meaning Hamilton had to leave the court. See FSU • Page B4

Porter Sr. talks about sons, who are ‘almost like twins’ BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

MU assistant coach Michael Porter Sr. checks on son Michael Porter Jr. during a recent practice session. NCAA TOURNAMENT

8. Mizzou vs. 9. Florida State 8:50 p.m. Friday in Nashville, TBS

MAKE YOUR PICKS with the P-D All-Stars. Register now to compete for $1,000,000 in Bracketball. stltoday.com/contests

COLUMBIA, MO. • He one day could become basketball’s Archie Manning. For now, anyway, he’s an anti-LaVar Ball, a thoughtful sports dad who stays out of the spotlight. Even so, Michael Porter Sr. changed the course of Mizzou basketball history. When he agreed to be

a Cuonzo Martin assistant coach, his star sons — Michael Jr. and Jontay — soon joined the Tigers, too. Michael Jr., then the No. 1 freshman recruit in the nation, inspired the transfer of center Jeremiah Tilmon to Mizzou. Now the Tigers are in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2013. In a rare interview, Porter Sr. talked to the Post-Dispatch and discussed a variety of topics, from regrets on how Michael Jr. handled See HOCHMAN • Page B4

MIZZOU HITS THE ROAD

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Members of the Missouri women’s basketball team celebrate after defeating South Carolina earlier this season. The Tigers will open NCAA Tournament play in Stanford, Calif.

Women earn No. 5 seed, open against Florida Gulf Coast on Saturday BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The Missouri women’s basketball team is headed back to the NCAA Tournament for a third straight season but fell short of the goal it chased all season: hosting the first two rounds. The top 16 seeded teams in the 64-team bracket host the opening two rounds,

but after losing two of their last three games, the Tigers (24-7) were seeded fifth and headed to Stanford’s campus in California to play Saturday against No. 12 seed Florida Gulf Coast (30-4), the Atlantic Sun Conference champion. The game will tip off at 2:30 p.m. (St. Louis time) on ESPN2. The winner of that game faces the winner of No. 4 Stanford (22-10) against See MIZZOU • Page B1

Mayers is at his best going with his best BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • When

Chris Carpenter, the Cardinals’ ace turned mentor, saw the young righthander in the PNC Park visitors’ clubhouse this past summer, Mike Mayers had his head bowed, his ERA distended and his mind reeling from another unsettling outing in the majors. In the span of 12 hours he had been promoted, thumped for five runs in two-thirds of an inning and told to return to the minors. It was the third time

5. Mizzou vs. 12. Florida Gulf Coast 2:30 p.m. Saturday in Stanford, Calif. TV: ESPN2 > Connecticut on top in tournament. B5 > The women’s bracket. B5

BLUES OUTLAST DUCKS INSIDE • B3 > UP NEXT: 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Avalanche, FSM

> 12:05 p.m. Tuesday at Marlins

in seven big-league appearances he had allowed at least that many runs in an inning or less, and he was left to wonder, as he huddled in his locker: If this is all he had, what could he give? Carpenter pulled up a chair, leaned close to the rookie and offered Mayers something he lacked. Confidence. “I just went over and gave him a reminder of who he is, what he is, and the stuff that he has,” Carpenter recalled See CARDINALS • B2

No. 13 Gonzaga (27-5), the earlier game Saturday. The winner of Monday’s second-round game advances to the round of 16 in Lexington, Ky. For the bulk of the season, the Tigers were positioned to earn one of the bracket’s top 16 seeds and serve as hosts at Mizzou Arena and possibly land in the Kansas City Region for the regional semifinals. But after her

ASSOCIATED PRESS

See MIZZOU • Page B5

Youngest Blues still have much to prove JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Robert Bortuzzo (center) celebrates his goal with Nikita Soshnikov (left) and Alex Pietrangelo during the first period against the Ducks Monday in Anaheim.

team was eliminated from the Southeastern Conference tournament on March 2, coach Robin Pingeton cautioned her players to measure their expectations for the bracket. After three days away from practice, the team got back together last Wednesday, when Pingeton all but burst the Tigers’ bubble. Bracket projections

Fans watching the Blues roll in Los Angeles Saturday afternoon had to rub their eyes and refocus on their television. Was this really happening? For one game, anyway, the Blues regained their earlier form (and then some) while winning 7-2. “They had playoff fight on the puck, we didn’t,” Kings coach John Stevens told reporters after

the game. “I thought they were tougher on pucks all over the ice.” Can the Blues repeat that effort and rally into the playoffs? The Blues must win most of their remaining 13 games, so skepticism remains. The bigger picture is this: How those final games play out will help determine general manager Doug Armstrong’s summer priorities. He already decided that this group wasn’t good enough. Armstrong signaled that by trading center Paul See GORDON • Page B3

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 3/15 vs. Avalanche 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/17 vs. Rangers 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 3/18 at Blackhawks 6:30 p.m. NBCSN

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Tuesday 3/13 at Marlins* 12:05 p.m.

Wednesday 3/14 Thursday 3/15 vs. Orioles* at Astros* 12:05 p.m. 12:05 p.m.

Wednesday 3/21 vs. Bruins 7 p.m. NBCSN

*Exhibition game Friday 3/16 vs. Marlins (SS)* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Friday 3/16 NCAA (Nashville) vs. Florida State 8:50 p.m., TBS

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Friday 3/16 at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 3/24 at San Antonio 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 3/31 vs. Colorado Springs 4 p.m.

Saturday 4/7 vs. Fresno 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals at Marlins, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Rays at Phillies, MLB Network 3 p.m. Exhibition: Cubs at Padres, MLB Network 6 p.m. Exhibition: Mets at Nationals, MLB Network 7 p.m. College: Arkansas vs. Texas, SEC Network BASKETBALL 5:40 p.m. NCAA Tournament: LIU Brooklyn vs. Radford, Trutv TruTV channels: Charter Spectrum 63, 772; DirectTV 246; Dish Network 149 or 242; AT&T U-verse 164, 165, 1164 or 1165; Cable America-Maryland Heights 57 NIT: Northern Kentucky at Louisville, ESPN 6 p.m. 6 p.m. NIT: Wagner at Baylor, ESPN2 6 p.m. NBA: Pacers at 76ers, FSM Plus 6 p.m. NBA: Timberwolves at Wizards, NBA 7 p.m. NIT: Vermont at Middle Tennessee, ESPNU 8 p.m. NIT: Hampton at Notre Dame, ESPN 8 p.m. NIT: Florida Gulf Coast at Oklahoma State, ESPN2 8:10 p.m. NCAA Tournament: St. Bonaventure vs. UCLA, Trutv Trutv channels listed above 9 p.m. NIT: Southeast Louisiana at St. Mary’s, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Nuggets at Lakers, NBA 10 p.m. NIT: UNC Asheville at Southern California, ESPN2 HOCKEY 6 p.m. Wickenheiser Cup: Westminster Christian Academy vs. Marquette, FSM 7:30 p.m. Avalanche at Wild, NBCSN 8 p.m. Challenge Cup: DeSmet vs. St. Louis University High, FSM OLYMPICS 11 p.m. Winter Paralympics: Alpine Skiing, cross-country skiing, curling, NBCSN SOCCER 2:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Manchester United vs. Sevilla, FS1 SOFTBALL 5 p.m. College: Texas at South Carolina, SEC Network TENNIS 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 3rd round, WTA round of 16, Tennis Channel 9 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 3rd round, WTA round of 16, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Dolphins cut Timmons; Suh also reportedly out

The Miami Dolphins released linebacker Lawrence Timmons on Monday, making a move that has been expected all offseason. And according to a league source, Miami is also expected to release tight end Julius Thomas before the start of free agency Wednesday. Cutting Timmons and Thomas, two underperforming veterans added to the team last year, will clear nearly $12.1 million in salary-cap space. Miami also plans to cut Ndamukong Suh, says a league source according to the Sun Sentinel, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The release of the defensive tackle who has been named to five Pro Bowls would clear $17 million in salary-cap space. Suh, who had 48 tackles, 4½ sacks and two forced fumbles last season while playing on an injured knee for the final two months of the season, will have earned $60 million in the three years he’s played for the Dolphins. His departure would give the club $14 million in cap space once the franchise finalizes a trade for former Los Angeles Rams defensive end Robert Quinn, and sends receiver Jarvis Landry to Cleveland on Wednesday. Suh, 31, will become one of the top free agents available. Elsewhere in the NFL • The Raiders released cornerback Sean Smith and right tackle Marshall Newhouse and signed defensive tackle Justin Ellis and receiver Griff Whalen. The Los Angeles Times reported Smith will plead guilty this week to a felony count of assault relating to an altercation last year in Pasadena, Calif., and will be sentenced to one year in jail and three years probation. • The Chiefs cut linebacker Tamba Hali, the Kansas City Star reported. The release of Hali, 34, will clear approximately $7.7 million in cap room. Hali is second all-time in franchise history in sacks (89½), behind Hall of Famer Derrick Thomas. • Cowboys cornerback Orlando Scandrick, 31, told the Fort Worth (Texas) Star Telegram that he has requested his release. • The Ravens cut safety Lardarius Webb, saving $1.75 million in cap space, and Saints right tackle Zach Strief announced his retirement. • Broncos defensive end Adam Gotsis was charged with rape in Atlanta. The team says it takes accusations of this nature very seriously and will monitor the legal proceedings. Federer advances in tennis event • Top men’s seed Roger Federer rolled past Filip Krajinovic 6-2, 6-1 in pursuit of a record sixth BNP Paribas Open title, in Indian Wells, Calif. On the women’s side of the tennis tourney, reigning U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens lost to Daria Kasatkina 6-4, 6-3, and fell to 2-4 in matches this year. No. 2 seed Caroline Wozniacki beat Aliaksandra Sasnovich 6-4, 2-6, 6-3. In a battle of the Williams sisters, Venus beat Serena 6-3, 6-4. Venus is seeded eighth, Serena is unranked.

Iditarod lead changes hands • Norwegian Joar Ulsom took the lead in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race, being the first to arrive at the checkpoint in Koyuk in the nearly 1,000 mile trek across Alaska. He overtook Nic Petit while crossing the Bering Sea ice between the Shaktoolik and Koyuk checkpoints. Defending champion Mitch Seavey was third. Koyuk is about 170 miles from the finish line in Nome. Aliy Zirkle, a 1988 Parkway West High graduate, was in 14th. Rodman gets probation • Former NBA star Dennis Rodman, 56, was sentenced to three years’ probation after pleading guilty to two misdemeanors stemming from a January DUI arrest in Orange County, Calif. The Los Angeles Times said he was ordered to complete a nine-month alcohol program and pay $390 in fines. From news services

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M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Lynn set to pitch Tuesday for Twins ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patiently monitoring baseball’s slow-moving market, the Minnesota Twins made several significant improvements to the team that made a surprise run last season to the AL wild-card game. Former Cardinals pitcher Lance Lynn became the latest addition when the Twins finalized a $12 million, one-year contract on Monday, another low-risk move to strengthen a pitching staff that ranked 19th in the major leagues last year with a 4.59 ERA. “I think there was at least, my take on it, a real interest of the player to make this a marriage and I think that helped our cause,” Twins manager Paul Molitor said. The Twins don’t plan to waste any time to get Lynn going. Lynn, who joined his new teammates Monday on the field for an workout in Fort Myers, Fla., is expected pitch Tuesday against Baltimore. And Molitor thinks there’s a chance Lynn could be ready to pitch the first time through the regular-season rotation. “I told him this is different circumstances, if you’re not ready to throw 100 pitches when the season starts, let’s go slow and do it right rather than try to force the issue just because we’re in a little of a time box,” he said. “We’ll probably get a feel for where he’s at.” After missing the 2016 season while recovering from Tommy John surgery, Lynn went 11-8 with a 3.43 ERA in 33 starts for the Cardinals last year. The 6-foot-5, 280-pound Lynn was an All-Star in 2012, his first full season in the majors. He was the 39th overall draft pick in 2008 by the Cardinals out of Mississippi. “Has a really good idea how to pitch,” Molitor said. With the Twins, Lynn will join fellow newcomer Jake Odorizzi, acquired in a trade with Tampa Bay, in the rotation. He is from Highland, Ill. Jose Berrios probably will take

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Minnesota Twins are counting on former Cardinal Lance Lynn to be a key member of their pitching rotation this season.

the mound on opening day, on March 29, against the Orioles. Ervin Santana is expected to join the group in late April or early May once he’s recovered from surgery on his middle finger. Kyle Gibson is expected to round out the starting five. Odorizzi had his scheduled start Tuesday pushed back to a minor-league game Sunday. To make room on the 40-man roster, the Twins released pitcher Anibal Sanchez after a threeweek stint with the club. Yankees get Walker • Free agent Neil Walker and the Yankees agreed to a one-year contract worth about $5 million, giving New York a veteran infielder who figures to allow prospects Gleyber Torres and Miguel Andujar more time to mature in the minors. Walker probably will start at second base and Brandon Drury, acquired from Arizona last month, will play third. Walker, like Lynn, is among the victims of a historically slow free agent market and will take a huge cut from the $17.2 million he earned last season. He hit .265 with 14 homers and 49 RBIs last year for the Mets and Milwaukee,

who acquired him Aug. 12. Lucroy joins Athletics • The Oakland Athletics landed a new starting catcher, finalizing a $6.5 million, one-year deal with free agent Jonathan Lucroy. He is a two-time All-Star who hit .265 with six homers and 40 RBIs in 123 games last season for Texas and Colorado, which acquired him on July 30. Bruce Maxwell, the first major leaguer to kneel for the national anthem last year following NFL players’ leads, had been the projected starter before the acquisition of Lucroy. Elsewhere • The Brewers picked Chase Anderson to be their opening-day starting pitcher, on March 29 in San Diego. Anderson, 30, had the best season of his four-year career in 2017, going 12-4 with a 2.74 ERA in 25 starts. He would be the fifth different opening-day starter for the team in the last five seasons. Junior Guerra got the honor last year, and was preceded by Wily Peralta, Kyle Lohse and Yovani Gallardo. • The Rockies finalized a $5 million, one-year contract for threetime All-Star outfielder Carlos Gonzalez to return to the team after a down season.

Mayers is having an outstanding spring CARDINALS • FROM B1

this past week. “He was not going to have success with what he was doing, so he had to make an adjustment. He has the ability. He has the stuff. He had to make a change, and it looks like he has. His presence on the mound — looks like he wants to be there and looks like he belongs there. And he does.” A revelation of spring, Mayers has ridden an assignment to the bullpen and a shift in mentality to leapfrog other power prospects and force the Cardinals to consider him for the big-league bullpen. If not now, soon. The 26-year-old righthander has yet to walk a batter or allow a run in seven innings this spring, and he’s struck out nine. On Friday, against Houston, Mayers struck out the side in his first inning, pitched two suffocating innings and left manager Mike Matheny to offer a one-word evaluation: “Phenomenal.” Gone is the pitcher who fiddled with a sinker because he thought he needed to. Gone is the pitcher who overplayed his changeup because he thought that’s what major-league pitchers did. In his place is a reliever with a fastball clocked at 98 mph last season, able to reach 99 mph. He’s eager to reintroduce himself, but first he had to find himself. “Unfortunately it took me longer than I’d like to figure that out,” Mayers said. “What is really holding me back? I don’t have a problem in (Class AAA) Memphis. So the gap isn’t that big. You see all these young guys up there — especially last year — and have success. Why am I so different? I think a lot of it had to do with what was between the ears. … I’ve taken a mental beating, but I think it’s helped me. That adversity helped me really figure out who I want to be. It’s about understanding your identity.” “This is what I’ve got. This is what you’re going to get,” he concluded. “That’s my mentality this spring.” Despite heavy churn on the 40-man roster and Mayers’ 19.80 ERA in seven big-league games, the Cardinals had kept the righthander on the roster and brought him to Winter Warm-Up. Mayers attended Matheny’s Catch-22 Foundation charity event at Annie Gunn’s steakhouse, and there the manager talked about him. Matheny recognized some skepticism, and at the dinner and all winter praised Mayers and the potential he had to anyone who would listen. He wanted one person to hear: Mayers. A third-round pick from Ole Miss in 2013, Mayers made his

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals reliever Mike Mayers pitches Friday against Houston.

big-league debut on July 24, 2016, against LA when a doubleheader forced the Cardinals to get an available starter. On Sunday Night Baseball, he did not get an out until he had already allowed a grand slam. Of the 14 Dodgers he faced that night, 10 reached base. He became the first pitcher in history to allow at least nine runs and record fewer than six outs in his debut. After 1 1/3 innings, his ERA steamed at 60.75 until a September call-up that included another six-run outing. Mayers admitted he felt like he was always pitching against that evening, trying to undo what the Dodgers had done. In 2017, he had a similar abbreviated start against the Pirates, and no September call-up came to help clean up the ERA. Searching, Mayers went to winter ball in the Dominican Republic. There he met Willie Blair. There, he abandoned his sinker and found relief. Blair, a minor-league pitching coach for Detroit, knew Mayers’ numbers and watched Mayers’ bullpen session and couldn’t reconcile the two. He approached him at the hotel one day with a slight mechanical fix — stressing full extension at his release point — and helped lead Mayers to a mental one. During an interview this past week, Mayers repeated the phrase, or something similar four times: “This is what I’ve got. This is what you’re going to get.” “That’s a big thing,” Blair said. “I’m not trying to make you into something you’re not. What I do know is they don’t get on his fastball. They don’t take good swings against it. There’s something there. It might be spin rate. It might be extension. It could be deception. There is something that makes it play up, and whatever that is, he should let it go. He’s got more talent than his numbers show.” Mayers emphasized his fastball and slider as a starter in the Dominican. With teams quick to go to the bullpen, he pitched more aggressively. In the majors, he averaged 93.1

mph on his fastball in 2016 and felt his sinker could go anywhere from 89 mph to 93 mph. He threw almost as many changeups as sliders, and now isn’t sure why. The move to the bullpen at Class AAA last year and affirmation in the Dominican reconnected Mayers with his higher-voltage stuff: upper-90s fastball and hard slider. This is what he’s got. This is what they were going to get. “Subconsciously I was trying to make up for the struggles in the past,” Mayers said. “That’s not realistic. I was trying to do too much. On the slider, if you try to make it extra nasty all of sudden it pops up or it stays up or you yank it and it’s a noncompetitive pitch. I don’t have to make up for what happened, I just have to get the out now.” This Mayers is more familiar to his longtime teammates. And not the one they saw in the majors, not the one Carpenter approached. “He’s just stressing his stuff, and letting it rip,” starter Luke Weaver said. “He’s a very intimidating person and gets — I don’t want to say angry — but he has that presence that he’s not going to mess around. He’s coming right after you.” This past Friday, in relief of Miles Mikolas, Mayers buzzed through the Astros’ order. He delighted the radar guns with the 97-98 mph fastball, got strikeouts on his wasp-quick slider, and the only things unsettled about his outing were the hitters. This is what he’s got. The Cardinals have a good idea of where he’ll get. After the appearance, Mayers’ phone buzzed with a text message from Adam Wainwright. The note praised him for his dominant turn. Mayers replied with an approach that he’s had to learn, from bad to worse to good, now excellent. Moving on. “Thanks,” Mayers said he texted. “Back to work tomorrow.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

BLUES NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues center Kyle Brodziak (left) scores a goal in the third period Saturday against the Los Angeles Kings.

Brodziak always finds a way to help the Blues, Yeo says BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ANAHEIM, CALIF. • Amid the flurry of goals the Blues scored Saturday against the Kings was one by Kyle Brodziak that made the score 6-1. That goal was the 10th of the season for Brodziak, giving him a milestone he hadn’t reached in a while. The last time he was in double figures in goals was 201112, when he scored 22 for Minnesota. Since then, his season totals had been eight, eight, nine, seven and eight. Brodziak has been one of the most consistent players on the Blues this season, first as the anchor of the team’s fourth line, and, in the post-Stastny world, as the center on the team’s second line, playing between Alexander Steen and Patrik Berglund. “Physically I feel this is the best I’ve felt in a long time,”

Brodziak said. “Getting an opportunity now with the way things went down, there’s a chance for some guys to get a bigger role and just trying to make the most of it. “I’m just trying to help out and chip in. Obviously with a little bigger role lately, that’s what’s needed. Hopefully our line can continue to do that.” “He’s obviously a veteran presence that understands his game and he’s a competitor,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “He’s going to find a way to go out there and be effective in games, whether he scores, whether he doesn’t. He’s going to find a way to contribute. It could be faceoffs, it could be penalty-killing, it could be momentum as far as getting to the offensive zone and being on the body. He does little things right, and that’s why as coaches you like those guys.”

HUSSO IS BACK The Blues sent goalie Ville Husso back to the minors Saturday so he could get in a game for San Antonio just down the road in Ontario, Calif., on Sunday, then called him back Monday so he could back up Jake Allen while Carter Hutton continues to recover from a sore neck. (Hutton skated with the team Monday for the first time since Thursday.) Playing in front of GM Doug Armstrong, Yeo and goalie coach David Alexander, Husso made 21 saves in posting a shutout. “I didn’t know that they came to the game,” Husso said. “After the game, David texted me and said, ‘Good game.’ It was a good thing.” Though San Antonio has struggled at times, Husso has put up good numbers. He’s third in the AHL with a .928 save percentage and is tied for sixth with a 2.31 goals-against average.

Since the start of 2018, he’s best in the league at .934 and 2.11. “He played well yesterday,” Yeo said. “Had a good shutout, wasn’t tested a ton in the game but looked solid, looked in good position. It seems like as the year has gone on he’s earned more and more opportunities to start games and to win games and that’s what you want. You want to develop the skills as much as anything else, you want to develop a mindset that you can be counted on, that you can prepare, that you can go in and win night after night, and that’s why it’s important for young guys to get those opportunities.” Forward Sammy Blais, getting in his first game since suffering a concussion Feb. 20, had his first professional hat trick in the game. “I thought as the game went on you could tell he’d been out for a little bit,” Yeo said. “He

started to get a little bit tired as the game wore on, but still finds a way to make plays. His play with the puck is very, very strong. We still would like to see certain areas that he’s got to continue to work on, but he’s making a lot of progress and he’s having a really solid year down there. There are certain times where he gets the puck and there’s not a player that’s smoother on the ice than him.”

BLUENOTES

Joel Edmundson is still skating with the team but isn’t back in the lineup yet. Next up for the Blues, and the next chance for Edmundson, is Thursday against Colorado at Scottrade Center. … Oskar Sundqvist was the only healthy scratch. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Many Blues face uncertainty; several shined in LA game GORDON • FROM B1

Stastny and his expiring contract to the rival Winnipeg Jets to add a first-round pick and prospect Erik Foley to his rebuilding blocks. More change is likely. Everybody is under management scrutiny — players, assistant coaches, head coach Mike Yeo — so these final weeks will matter even if the Blues miss the playoffs. This franchise’s larger goal is to build a Stanley Cup contender. Armstrong is still assessing who should and shouldn’t be part of that process. Some of these guys still have time to make their case. That is why Saturday’s game was so illuminating. Player after player suddenly looked like the performer Armstrong hoped to see all season. Let’s start with the most beleaguered of all Blues, Jake Allen. He was at his acrobatic best in goal against the Kings while stopping 38 of 40 shots. He was particularly good in the first period, making 17 saves while the game was in doubt. Carter Hutton’s neck injury gave Allen another chance to play and he did fine at San Jose and Los Angeles. But who is this guy really? His season has unfolded in stages. Allen was terrific when the team rolled back in October. He wasn’t as sharp the next month, but he won some high-scoring games. He was much better in December, but his losses mounted as the Blues offense sputtered. Then came Allen’s back-toback nightmare games, the Carter Hutton “hot goaltender” interlude and Allen’s struggles after briefly regaining the keys to the net.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kings left wing Tanner Pearson (center) tries to get a shot past Blues goaltender Jake Allen and defenseman Robert Bortuzzo during the first period on Saturday in Los Angeles. The Blues won, 7-2

Had Hutton remained healthy, it’s tough to say how many more chances Yeo would have given Allen. That raised obvious questions about next season and beyond. He is not the only Blue facing uncertainty. Many Blues do, and several of them woke up at once in Los Angeles. In a play that defined “depth scoring,” defenseman Robert Bortuzzo hammered a pass from Ivan Barbashev past Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick to get the Blues started. That was Bortuzzo’s second goal all season and just Barbashev’s fifth assist in 39 games. Later, Barbashev, 22, scored his sixth goal with a burst down the middle, split-

ting the Kings’ defense. Yeo has given him chance after chance after chance this season, hoping to see such plays. Barbashev has flashed potential but failed to sustain his performance during parts of two NHL seasons. Is he just a placeholder? Could he become a trade chip? Or might he earn a spot in the team nucleus? We’re all still wondering. Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo charged the net and scored as an extra attacker, just as he did earlier this season. He looked like a Norris Trophy candidate in LA while registering a plus-5 rating. As captain of a sinking team, Pietran-

gelo is taking heat in the message boards and chat rooms. Fans are putting this team’s late-season collapse on him. While he may never offer up fiery, fanpleasing quotes to reporters, he can certainly lead by example at both ends of the ice. That is what this team needs from him. Forward Patrik Berglund made a nifty cross-crease move on Quick, drawing him out of the net, before feeding defenseman Colton Parayko for the open-net goal. That was just Berglund’s seventh assist in 43 games. Surely he can make such plays more often, right? Forward Vladimir Sobotka turned back the clock to his more combative days, banging along the walls and in front of the net. Even wiry rookie Blues forward Tage Thompson joined the fun by delivering a reverse shoulder check with some oomph! Yeo reunited Vladimir Tarasenko with Brayden Schenn and Jaden Schwartz, and that line became a buzzsaw, generating 13 shot attempts. Tarasenko and Schwartz kept firing until each scored. But when these three forwards play together, the other three forward units are loaded with third- and fourth-line types. That alignment worked during one offensive outburst in Los Angeles, but it is not a recipe for Cup contention. So Armstrong keeps watching, assessing and plotting his next steps. While he waits for the promising young talent to come, he must decide who in the current group must go. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 2

Blues back in wild-card race California trip ends with solid win over Ducks BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

BLUES 4, DUCKS 2 Blues

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ANAHEIM, C ALIF. • The problem for the Blues is apparently they were looking for goals in all the wrong places. Like finding coins in the sofa cushions, the Blues got goals from people who aren’t supposed to score goals, or in some cases, are supposed to score goals but haven’t been doing it. Who needs goals from Vladimir Tarasenko when you can get them from Robert Bortuzzo? The Blues finished out their three-game California swing with a second win, beating the Anaheim Ducks, one of the teams they are chasing in the Western Conference wild-card race, 4-2 at the Honda Center on Monday. After starting the trip with a 2-0 loss to San Jose in which you couldn’t find the Blues’ offense with radar, they woke up and had a 7-2 romp over Los Angeles and a fourgoal game against Anaheim. Talk about a spa weekend. The Blues got goals from Bortuzzo, Ivan Barbashev, Vladimir Sobotka and Patrik Berglund, and twice when the Ducks cut their lead to a goal, they answered with one to push it back to two. It was the first time the Blues had won back-to-back games since Feb. 8 and 9 — which was the last time it looked like the Blues had something good going — and gave Jake Allen consecutive wins for the first time since Dec. 9 and 10. After losing seven straight, the Blues have gone 3-1-1 and are back in the thick of a Western Conference wild-card race that looks exceedingly open. The Blues are one point behind Colorado for the second wildcard spot and play the Avalanche on Thursday. Allen didn’t face a lot of shots, but he still had to deal

Anaheim

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First period B: Bortuzzo 3 (Schenn, Pietrangelo), 17:30. Penalties: None. Second period B: Barbashev 7 (Soshnikov, Pietrangelo), 3:00. A: Perry 15 (Montour, Getzlaf), 4:17. B: Sobotka 10 (Barbashev, Schmaltz), 16:50. Penalties: Jaskin, STL, (hooking), 4:53; Beauchemin, ANA, (tripping), 12:43. Third period A: Grant 9 (Kelly, Lindholm), 6:15. B: Berglund 9 (Brodziak), 11:28. Penalties: None. Shots on goal 9 4 10 Blues Anaheim 7 7 8 Power-plays Blues 0 of 1; Anaheim 0 of 1. Goaltenders Blues, Allen 21-20-2 (22 shots-20 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 25-17-6 (23-19). A: 16,312. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Dave Jackson. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Mark Wheler.

23 22

with some quality chances for the Ducks. Bortuzzo scored his third goal of the season, matching his career high when he had two for Pittsburgh and one for the Blues in 2014-15. Bortuzzo has two goals in three days, which made him the leading scorer for the Blues on this trip. The goal came right after Allen made a save on a three-ontwo break by the Ducks. The Blues got the puck back, with Brayden Schenn dropping the puck for Alex Pietrangelo. He fed a trailing Bortuzzo, who flicked it in from the high slot. Coming into this weekend, Bortuzzo had nine career NHL goals in 261 games. Then he had two in two games. The Blues outshot the Ducks 10-7 in the period and Allen continued his first-period mastery. In three games from Feb. 23 to Feb. 27, when the Blues were trying to jumpstart Allen’s game, he allowed eight goals on 35 first-period shots. In three games since then, he’s allowed zero goals on 33 shots in the first period. In the past two games, that gave the Blues a chance to take

a lead. And then in another of deja vu, Barbashev scored for his second game in a row and for the seventh time this season. This time, Chris Thorburn dug the puck out of the corner and got it to Pietrangelo at the blue line, whose shot hit the stick of Nikita Soshnikov in front of the net and came to Barbashev, who put it in. It was the second goal in as many games for Barbashev since he was moved from the top line alongside Vladimir Tarasenko to the fourth line, and his third goal in four games. The Ducks cut the lead to 2-1 with 15:43 to go in the second when Ryan Getzlaf threaded a puck past Berglund and Pietrangelo to Corey Perry, who was alone at the far post for the easy goal. The Blues were able to extend the lead back to two before the period ended. They scored with 3:10 to go in the period on a goal by Sobotka, whose most recent goal had come on Jan. 23, 18 games ago. Barbashev got his second point of the night by passing to Jordan Schmaltz, who got his first point of the season by getting the puck to Sobotka, who spun around and put the puck in off of goalie John Gibson’s left pad. The Ducks cut the lead to 3-2 with13:45 to go in the third on a shot by Chris Kelly that went between Carl Gunnarsson’s legs and glanced in off of Derek Grant after a turnover in the Anaheim zone. But then Berglund responded. Anaheim’s Kevin Bieksa played the puck behind his goal toward Cam Fowler, but he couldn’t stop it and the puck went to Kyle Brodziak. He sent it to Berglund, who beat Gibson to the short side with 8:32 to go. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Ivan Barbashev is defended by Anaheim’s Kevin Bieksa during the first period Monday night. Barbashev later scored his third goal in four games.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Brodziak always finds a way to help the Blues, Yeo says

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues center Kyle Brodziak (left) scores a goal in the third period Saturday against the Los Angeles Kings. It was Brodziak’s 10th goal of the season.

flurry of goals the Blues scored Saturday against the Kings was one by Kyle Brodziak that made the score 6-1. That goal was the 10th of the season for Brodziak, giving him a milestone he hadn’t reached in a while. The last time he was in double figures in goals was 2011-12, when he scored 22 for Minnesota. Since then, his season totals had been eight, eight, nine, seven and eight. Brodziak has been one of the most consistent players on the Blues this season, first as the anchor of the team’s fourth line, and, in the post-Stastny world, as the center on the team’s second line, playing between Alexander Steen and Patrik Berglund. “Physically I feel this is the best I’ve felt in a long time,” Brodziak said. “Getting an opportunity now with the way things went down, there’s a chance for some guys to get a bigger role and just trying to make the most of it. “I’m just trying to help out and chip in. Obviously with a little bigger role lately, that’s what’s needed. Hopefully our line can continue to do that.” “He’s obviously a veteran presence that understands his game and he’s a competitor,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “He’s going to find a way to go out there and be effective in games, whether he scores, whether he doesn’t. He’s going to find a way to contribute. It could be faceoffs, it could be penaltykilling, it could be momentum as far as getting to the offensive zone and being on the body. He does little things right, and that’s why as coaches you like those guys.”

Playing in front of GM Doug Armstrong, Yeo and goalie coach David Alexander, Husso made 21 saves in posting a shutout. “I didn’t know that they came to the game,” Husso said. “After the game, David texted me and said, ‘Good game.’ It was a good thing.” Though San Antonio has struggled at times, Husso has put up good numbers. He’s third in the AHL with a .928 save percentage and is tied for sixth with a 2.31 goals-against average. Since the start of 2018, he’s best in the league at .934 and 2.11. “He played well yesterday,” Yeo said. “Had a good shutout, wasn’t tested a ton in the game but looked solid, looked in good position. It seems like as the year has gone on he’s earned more and more opportunities to start games and to win games and that’s what you want. You want to develop the skills as much as anything else, you want to develop a mindset that you can be counted on, that you can prepare, that you can go in and win night after night, and that’s why it’s important for young guys to get those opportunities.” Forward Sammy Blais, getting in his first game since suffering a concussion Feb. 20, had his first professional hat trick in the game. “I thought as the game went on you could tell he’d been out for a little bit,” Yeo said. “He started to get a little bit tired as the game wore on, but still finds a way to make plays. His play with the puck is very, very strong. We still would like to see certain areas that he’s got to continue to work on, but he’s making a lot of progress and he’s having a really solid year down there. There are certain times where he gets the puck and there’s not a player that’s smoother on the ice than him.”

HUSSO IS BACK

BLUENOTES

BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ANAHEIM, CALIF. • Amid the

The Blues sent goalie Ville Husso back to the minors Saturday so he could get in a game for San Antonio just down the road in Ontario, Calif., on Sunday, then called him back Monday so he could back up Jake Allen while Carter Hutton continues to recover from a sore neck. (Hutton skated with the team Monday for the first time since Thursday.)

Joel Edmundson is still skating with the team but isn’t back in the lineup yet. Next up for the Blues, and the next chance for Edmundson, is Thursday against Colorado at Scottrade Center. … Oskar Sundqvist was the only healthy scratch. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Many Blues face uncertainty; several shined in LA game GORDON • FROM B1

Stastny and his expiring contract to the rival Winnipeg Jets to add a first-round pick and prospect Erik Foley to his rebuilding blocks. More change is likely. Everybody is under management scrutiny — players, assistant coaches, head coach Mike Yeo — so these final weeks will matter even if the Blues miss the playoffs. This franchise’s larger goal is to build a Stanley Cup contender. Armstrong is still assessing who should and shouldn’t be part of that process. Some of these guys still have time to make their case. That is why Saturday’s game was so illuminating. Player after player suddenly looked like the performer Armstrong hoped to see all season. Let’s start with the most beleaguered of all Blues, Jake Allen. He was at his acrobatic best in goal against the Kings while stopping 38 of 40 shots. He was particularly good in the first period, making 17 saves while the game was in doubt. Carter Hutton’s neck injury gave Allen another chance to play and he did fine at San Jose and Los Angeles. But who is this guy really? His season has unfolded in stages. Allen was terrific when the team rolled back in October. He wasn’t as sharp the next month, but he won some high-scoring games. He was much better in December, but his losses mounted as the Blues offense sputtered. Then came Allen’s back-toback nightmare games, the Carter Hutton “hot goaltender” interlude and Allen’s struggles after briefly regaining the keys to the net.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kings left wing Tanner Pearson (center) tries to get a shot past Blues goaltender Jake Allen and defenseman Robert Bortuzzo during the first period on Saturday in Los Angeles. The Blues won, 7-2

Had Hutton remained healthy, it’s tough to say how many more chances Yeo would have given Allen. That raised obvious questions about next season and beyond. He is not the only Blue facing uncertainty. Many Blues do, and several of them woke up at once in Los Angeles. In a play that defined “depth scoring,” defenseman Robert Bortuzzo hammered a pass from Ivan Barbashev past Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick to get the Blues started. That was Bortuzzo’s second goal all season and just Barbashev’s fifth assist in 39 games. Later, Barbashev, 22, scored his sixth goal with a burst down the middle, split-

ting the Kings’ defense. Yeo has given him chance after chance after chance this season, hoping to see such plays. Barbashev has flashed potential but failed to sustain his performance during parts of two NHL seasons. Is he just a placeholder? Could he become a trade chip? Or might he earn a spot in the team nucleus? We’re all still wondering. Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo charged the net and scored as an extra attacker, just as he did earlier this season. He looked like a Norris Trophy candidate in LA while registering a plus-5 rating. As captain of a sinking team, Pietran-

gelo is taking heat in the message boards and chat rooms. Fans are putting this team’s late-season collapse on him. While he may never offer up fiery, fanpleasing quotes to reporters, he can certainly lead by example at both ends of the ice. That is what this team needs from him. Forward Patrik Berglund made a nifty cross-crease move on Quick, drawing him out of the net, before feeding defenseman Colton Parayko for the open-net goal. That was just Berglund’s seventh assist in 43 games. Surely he can make such plays more often, right? Forward Vladimir Sobotka turned back the clock to his more combative days, banging along the walls and in front of the net. Even wiry rookie Blues forward Tage Thompson joined the fun by delivering a reverse shoulder check with some oomph! Yeo reunited Vladimir Tarasenko with Brayden Schenn and Jaden Schwartz, and that line became a buzzsaw, generating 13 shot attempts. Tarasenko and Schwartz kept firing until each scored. But when these three forwards play together, the other three forward units are loaded with third- and fourth-line types. That alignment worked during one offensive outburst in Los Angeles, but it is not a recipe for Cup contention. So Armstrong keeps watching, assessing and plotting his next steps. While he waits for the promising young talent to come, he must decide who in the current group must go. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


MEN’S BASKETBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

COLLEGE BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK

Gators are finally home from St. Louis Florida team spends two extra days here after its plane leaves ASSOCIATED PRESS

At least Florida coach Mike White could joke about his team’s predicament: getting stranded about 900 miles from home after the Southeastern Conference Tournament because the team’s chartered airplane was on a military mission. This was Arch Madness. “Had a nice spring break up in St. Louis, fighting the cold weather,” White said Monday. “It’s crazy. We spent four nights in a hotel to play one game. If our guys aren’t rested for practice, I don’t know if we’ll ever be rested.” The 23rd-ranked Gators found themselves stuck in Missouri following an 80-72 setback against Arkansas on Friday in the SEC quarterfinals. Then the waiting began. Florida’s charter plane was called to the Middle East to assist troops, leaving players, coaches, staff, cheerleaders and band members stuck in a hotel for two extra days. Given how Florida (20-12) per-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arkansas’ Jaylen Barford shoots as Florida’s Kevarrius Hayes (13), Keith Stone (25) and KeVaughn Allen defend during a Southeastern Conference Tournament game Friday at Scottrade Center.

formed defensively against the Razorbacks, maybe the biggest surprise is that White didn’t find a way to get his team to a gym for extra work. The Gators finally got on a plane Sunday afternoon — about 40 hours after the game ended — but only after a few more delays. They had to wait for a rested flight crew, a mechanical repair and finally some de-icing. They were still on the tarmac when the NCAA Tournament

selection show started, learning via social media they were a No. 6 seed in the East Region. On Thursday night, Florida will play the winner of St. Bonaventure (25-7) vs. UCLA (21-11) in Dallas. “I would rather know who we’re playing and be able to spend three or four days prepping for that team,” White said. “That’s the (difference) between being 20th and 21st (in seeding).” Florida has advanced to the Elite Eight in five straight NCAA

Tournament appearances (2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2017), including last year’s run, which ended one win shy of the Final Four. But this team is different from all those others, and not just because of its dozen losses and upand-down ways. “These guys aren’t really animated. Really, really nice guys. Too nice of a group, really,” White said. “I’d like to see this group one day tear up a locker room after we lose, but that’s not happening.” White’s mostly introverted team has struggled to communicate on the court throughout the season. Even though the Gators improved on defense late in the season, their deficiencies were exposed against Arkansas. That, coupled with having lost seven of 12 league games down the stretch, has few outsiders giving the Gators much of a chance to get past the opening weekend of the tournament. Georgia talking to Matta • Georgia officials interviewed former Ohio State coach Thad Matta on Monday, launching their coach search only two days after the school fired Mark Fox. Matta’s visit to Athens, Ga., was closely monitored by his older brother, Greg Matta, who is

the coach at North Cobb Christian School in Kennesaw, Ga., about a 90-minute drive away. Thad Matta, 50, led Ohio State to nine NCAA Tournaments, including two Final Four appearances, and five Big Ten regular season championships in 13 years. He also led Xavier to the NCAA Tournament in each of his three years at the school and had another NCAA appearance in his only season as Butler’s coach. He was fired by Ohio State following a 17-15 finish in the 201617 season. Matta’s overall record is 439154. Romar back to Pepperdine • Lorenzo Romar is returning to Pepperdine for a second stint as men’s basketball coach. Athletics director Steve Potts said that Romar will be back in Malibu, Calif., as soon as Arizona’s season ends. Romar is currently in his first season as associate head coach at Arizona, and the Wildcats are in the NCAA Tournament. The 59-year-old coach previously guided the Waves from 1996-99, going 42-44 in his first head coaching job. He went from there to St. Louis U. and later spent 15 seasons at Washington.

Porter Sr.’s goal for sons is that they follow the Golden Rule HOCHMAN • FROM B1

his back injury to the inspiration for his return. The famous father also talked about building an on-the-fly relationship with Martin and raising kids in a social-media world. Post-Dispatch: In the SEC Tournament, we saw Jontay feed Michael Jr. a perfect pass for a layup. How can their relationship help Mizzou in the NCAA Tournament (Friday night against Florida State)? Michael Porter Sr.: Just offensively, they do have a chemistry, a unique chemistry. So as Michael rounds back into shape and gets back to — or close to back to who he was before — what happens is, he passes to Jontay, and it’s like Jontay knows exactly what he’s going to do (after the pass). They’re almost like twins in that respect. Twins share an unspoken communication.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Leonard Hamilton, who has been Florida State’s coach since 2002, earlier was at Oklahoma State and had a memorable encounter at Mizzou when he was ejected after picking up two technical fouls.

Seminoles have been inconsistent FSU • FROM B1

With The Antlers taunting him from the student section, Hamilton took his sweet time to leave. “I thought I was going to get arrested because I didn’t want to leave the floor,” he said Monday, cackling at the memory. “It took me about 15 minutes to get from my bench to the locker room. Every time I would take a step, I’d stop and the fans would boo me. I’d look around and take another step and stop and the fans would boo me. “I always thought that Missouri had some of the best college basketball fans in the country. Norm had built such a following. He was like a legend there. The atmosphere there with the, I think the group is called The Antlers, and they were boisterous and enthusiastic and created a lot of excitement when you came up there. “I have a lot of fond memories of Norm and the atmosphere in Columbia and how passionate their fans were and how they supported their program.” Hamilton’s thoughts weren’t so fond that day, when he later accused Stewart of giving game tickets to one of the referees. Time since has soothed any wounds and when Mizzou and Florida State landed on the same line in the NCAA bracket, Hamilton’s thoughts quickly shifted to his new Mizzou counterpart. “I’ve known Cuonzo for a long time,” Hamilton said. “I know his program is already solid. He’s been successful everywhere he’s been. He gets his kids to play hard and they buy in to this system. He has the ability to relate to his kids and get them to believe.”

Hamilton, 69, has 524 Division I head-coaching victories in 30 seasons spread over stops at Oklahoma State, Miami and Florida State, where he’s been since 2002. Martin was just 15 years old when Hamilton began his first season as a D-I coach. He’s since grown close to the head Seminole. “If there’s such a thing as a mentor in this profession, he’d be one for me,” Martin, 46, said. “I’ve talked to Leonard for years. A lot of respect for him and the way he goes about his business.” The feeling is mutual. “I always try to make myself available to coaches who I admire and respect,” Hamilton said. “Cuonzo is one of those guys. He’s a true gentleman in the truest sense of the word. He’s a disciplinarian. I like people like him, who really take a personal interest in not only winning basketball games but more than anything else helping young people. He has that ability to relate, hold kids accountable and mentor them from teenagers to young adults. Missouri is going to be very pleased that he’s a part of their program.” Especially if he can lead the No. 8 seed Tigers (20-12) past Hamilton’s No. 9 seed Seminoles (20-11) in Friday’s 8:50 p.m. tip-off in Nashville. The winner advances to Sunday’s second-round game, probably against top seed Xavier (28-5). When the season began, FSU faced the challenge of replacing three players now in the NBA. That includes Orlando Magic lottery pick Jonathan Isaac, the No. 6 selection last summer. Coming off a 26-win season that ended with a loss to Xavier in the NCAA Tournament, the Seminoles peaked at No. 19 in The Associated Press

poll this season after collecting wins over Florida and North Carolina. But they struggled to string together wins against the best teams in the Atlantic Coast Conference and finished tied for eighth place, at 9-9, in the league. Florida State is 6-4 against teams in the NCAA field with wins over Florida, North Carolina, Syracuse, Virginia Tech, Miami and Clemson. But it dropped three of its final four games before the bracket was seeded, most recently to Louisville in the ACC Tournament. “Our identity is that we’ve been inconsistent, unfortunately,” Hamilton said. The Seminoles are the seventh-tallest team in the NCAA field by KenPom.com’s average height metric — led by 7-foot-4 center Christ Koumadje, FSU’s most frequent lineup averages 6 feet, 8 inches. But the Seminoles also play fast, ranked No. 31 nationally in adjusted tempo. Three players average double-figure scoring, led by 6-5 junior forward Terence Mann (13.2), also the team’s top rebounder (5.7). The ’Noles don’t protect the 3-point arc — ACC opponents blistered them for 40.4 percent behind the arc — or shoot free throws very well, just 68.2 percent, despite leading the ACC in attempts. But Hamilton’s team is efficient inside the arc on offense and defense and blocks shots at a high rate. “Like most young teams with a lot of freshmen and sophomores, we’re still trying to find our way,” he said. “But I like our team. I love our attitude. I like our potential. I think we’re very capable of playing very good basketball.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

PD: Do you have regrets with how everything went down with Michael Jr.’s injury — with him playing just two minutes in the first game? MPS: I just wish that maybe as it was getting worse (in the preseason), that he would’ve communicated it a little bit better, because it felt like it came out of the blue. So I could see why people feel it was that way. That’s why he even played (two minutes against Iowa State), because it was too late to take him out of the starting lineup by the time it had been communicated to coach. P-D: Did you think he’d play again this season? MPS: He’s young, so younger people heal faster. So I thought there was a chance. But, you know, the way the (news) release was worded left the door open for him to come back if he could. So my thing was — never would I want him to play if he wasn’t 100 percent healthy, and he’s 100 percent healthy right now. (He’s getting back) his explosion, even the timing. (Against Georgia) there wasn’t a shot he took that he can’t make. He makes those shots. It’s one of those things, man, where it just takes some time. P-D: How and when did you find out that he would return? MPS: It was last (Tuesday) night. He’s in a Bible study with Jontay, (sisters) Bri and Cierra, Bri’s fiance, (as well as Mizzou women’s basketball players) Kayla Michel and Jordan Frericks. The particular part of the Bible they were talking about that night touched on the fact that God gives us gifts to serve others — and not necessarily just for ourselves. I guess in their conversations, Michael took it as — Man, Cullen (VanLeer) just tore his ACL … and he just felt like he was supposed to play. Try to play, even though he wasn’t 100 percent. He’s really competitive, and it drives him crazy when he loses. And he knows if he’s who he is (Porter’s voice drifted off) ... But anyway, he ... shared it with (my wife) Lisa and me. Our kitchen and living room is kind of like one big room. ... And we were just kind of in there talking and he shared that with us. And I was like, ‘OK man, if you do this, there’s no going back, there’s no second-guessing. You’ve got to be all in.’ And he felt really, really sure. He wanted to do it, he wanted to help the team. That’s what he said.

P-D: Before you were hired, you didn’t know Martin very well. How has that relationship developed? MPS: I understand his sense of humor — and how he communicates — a whole lot more than I did coming in. One thing that hasn’t changed is that going in I knew he was a really good man. And my opinion in that regard has only risen. None of us are perfect, but Cuonzo’s pretty much what-yousee-is-what-you-get. P-D: Do Michael and Jontay live with you or on their own? MPS: They have an apartment, but Jontay’s pretty much moved back home though, for a couple different reasons. Michael still is in his apartment. (His roommates were) Blake Harris and Jontay. That apartment he’s in, I’ve never been over there. I’m sure there are guys there all the time. P-D: Is it tricky being both coach and dad? MPS: It’s not tricky for me, because honestly, I love all of those guys and I want to help them. So I’m not so fixated on my sons that I don’t try to coach the other guys, too. Sometimes, (coaching sons) makes it a little harder, because they’ve heard my voice their whole lives. So when I’m telling J, ‘You’ve got to go in there and jump stop!’ He’ll hear me but I can tell he’s kind of doing that inner-eye-roll thing. P-D: Jontay or Michael? MPS: Both of them! Sometimes I get that sense, that vibe from them. By and large they take it pretty well, but there are those moments. P-D: Is there anything you want the fans to know about you or the family that hasn’t been expressed? Or something taken the wrong way? MPS: I can’t think of anything taken the wrong way. You know, I think people find it hard to believe, but I mean it from the bottom of my heart — I am much more excited about my children developing into good human beings who love their neighbor as they love themselves, treat people the way they want to be treated. That, for me, is gold. All the rest is just gravy, man. If my sons make the NBA, I’m excited for them because it means the realization of dreams for them. And a validation of their hard work and what God’s put inside of them. But they could be university professors, coaches, whatever, I don’t care — as long as they truly learn how to treat people the way they want to be treated. That’s the big thing. P-D: Are they doing well so far on that journey? MPS: (Laughs) Well, we’re talking about teenagers here, so it’s an upand-down experience. Sometimes the nature of teenagers is they become very self-absorbed. And we live in a time where — think about how many selfies a day kids take? Hundreds maybe? ... That’s a hard spell to break when you grow up in that, and all your friends are about that. So I think by and large they’ve done well, but there are times where you have to say, ‘Wait a minute, man. Come on now.’ I’m proud of them. But they’re not perfect. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

03.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

UConn back in familiar place No. 1 overall seed in NCAA Tournament is lone unbeaten team ASSOCIATED PRESS

UConn is back in a familiar place — the No. 1 overall seed in the women’s basketball NCAA Tournament. Joining the Huskies as top seeds are Notre Dame, Louisville and Mississippi State. The Huskies enter as the lone unbeaten team and will be vying for their 12th national championship. It’s the ninth time that UConn has entered the NCAAs undefeated, including last year when the Huskies went in as the overwhelming favorite before their 111-game winning streak ended with a loss to Mississippi State in the Final Four. This year’s Final Four is in Columbus, Ohio, on March 30. The national championship game is on Sunday, April 1. Defending national champion South Carolina and A’ja Wilson await as a possible Elite Eight matchup for UConn in the Albany Regional. The Gamecocks are the two-seed. The Gamecocks lost by 25 at home against UConn on Feb. 1. Florida State and Georgia are the other top seeds in the Huskies’ part of the bracket. “Brackets are brackets. There are good teams in every bracket,” UConn coach Geno Auriemma said. “There are great matchups in every bracket and it doesn’t really matter at this stage where you’re placed, what region, you’re going to have to beat some really good teams.” UConn, which has been a No. 1 seed every year since 2007, opens up against 16-seed Saint Francis (Pennsylvania) on Saturday morning. The top four teams in each region host the opening two rounds at home. Like the Huskies, the Irish are a No. 1 seed again. Notre Dame has been a top seed the last seven years. This might be one of coach Muffet McGraw’s finest accomplishments as Notre Dame lost four pivotal players to injury, but only three games on the season. Two of those losses came to Louisville. “A great reward for this team for what they’ve been through,” McGraw said. “I’m so proud of this group and what they have accomplished.” The Irish are in the Spokane Regional and open up against Cal State Northridge on Friday. If Notre Dame advances, the Irish would head out west to po-

tentially face No. 2 seed Oregon. “We’ve never been in the West bracket. I love playing Friday at 5. That’s awesome,” McGraw said. The Ducks could stay out west and play in Spokane, where coach Kelly Graves spent many years as Gonzaga’s coach. Ohio State and Texas A&M are the three and four seeds in that region. Louisville won the Atlantic Coast Conference for the first time this season. The Cardinals open up against Boise State and are one of eight ACC teams in the field. The Southeastern Conference has seven teams in the tournament, while the Pac12 and the Big Ten have six. “We’re really excited about the opportunity,” Louisville coach Jeff Walz said. “We’re excited to host the first two at home against two very good basketball teams. If we’re fortunate enough to advance, we get the opportunity to play in Lexington, which would be great for our fans.” The Lexington Regional is stacked with former NCAA Tournament winners with Baylor the two-seed, Tennessee the three and Stanford the four. While the Lady Vols have been in the NCAA Tournament every year since it began in 1982, Nicholls State, Northern Colorado, Mercer and Seattle will be

making their first appearances. Stanford potentially is headed to Lexington for the third straight year if it can advance. Mississippi State is a No. 1 seed for the first time in school history. The Bulldogs won their first 32 games this season before losing to South Carolina in the SEC title game. With most of their players back from last season’s runner-up finish, the Bulldogs hope to make another deep NCAA run. The NCAA revealed Sunday night the final eight teams under consideration for the last four spots in the tournament. Buffalo, Creighton, Minnesota and Oklahoma got in. Purdue, Rutgers, Southern Cal and West Virginia were the first four teams out. Oklahoma got in with a 1614 record — the fewest wins for an at-large team since 2005 — a day after the Oklahoma men got an at-large berth with an 18-13 record and losses in 11 of their final 15 games. “We spent almost seven hours on that decision of who those last four teams in and first four out were,” NCAA women’s basketball committee chair Rhonda Bennett said. Bennett said Oklahoma’s strength of schedule, which was second-best in the country, was a key to its selection.

Harchitatur? Qui odit vollam MIZZOU • FROM B1

had dropped Mizzou to a fifth seed, meaning the Tigers could open tournament play on the road. “We were holding out hope we’d have a chance to host,” Pingeton said Monday. “I felt like we were probably on the bubble, on the outside looking in. … Obviously disappointed but at the same time I think we tried to expect for this scenario that we’d be traveling. It’s a great feeling how far we’ve come as a program. A few years ago we were on the edge of our seats trying to figure out if we’d even make the tournament. Now the expectations are we’re in a position to host. I guess in perspective it’s very positive. We’re moving the needle as a program.” Missouri, No. 17 in the Associated Press poll and No. 24 in the most recent Ratings Percentage Index standings, lost two of their final three games, both by double digits to NCAA Tournament teams Texas A&M and Georgia. The Tigers were in position to finish as high as third in the SEC late in the season but fell to the sixth seed in the SEC tournament, then followed a tourney win over Ole Miss with a 55-41 loss to Georgia. Even harder to swallow for the Tigers, Georgia and Texas A&M were among the five SEC teams picked to host opening-round games. Georgia is the 4 seed in the Albany Regional, while Texas A&M is the 4 in the Spokane Regional. Also hosting from the SEC are Mississippi State (No. 1 in the Kansas City Regional), South Carolina (No. 2 in Albany) and Tennessee (No. 3 in Lexington). While the Tigers have fewer losses than host Stanford, the Cardinal own the superior RPI rating (No. 13) thanks to a brutal nonconference schedule that included five games against teams currently in the AP top 12. If the Tigers were deflated by the bracket, they didn’t show it Monday while watching the ESPN selection show at Mizzou Arena. “We would have provided a really good crowd here, maybe break the (attendance) record again,” junior All-SEC guard Sophie Cunningham said. “But that’s a what-if. I’m really excited to go out to California. I’m not just saying that.” “Hosting doesn’t define it for us,” junior guard Lauren Aldridge added. “While it would have been awesome for this community — and we love this community so much and wanted to give

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri head coach Robin Pingeton talks with guard Lauren Aldridge in the final minutes of their 55-41 loss to Georgia on March 2 in Nashville, Tenn.

them that experience and give us a homecourt advantage — but we’re in a great position.” Each of the last two years the Tigers won their first-round NCAA game and lost to the host team in the second round, Texas in 2016 and Florida State in 2017. At home or on the road, Cunningham plans to snap that trend this week. “We’re getting to that Sweet 16,” she said. “Whatever it takes, we have to get there. Out goal was to host this year. It didn’t work out. You’ve got to set the bar a little higher.” The Tigers haven’t played in the tournament’s second week since reaching the Sweet 16 in 2001. The veteran core of this team, though, is unbeaten in California’s Bay Area. The Tigers won two games in Moraga to start the 2015-16 season, then earlier this year swept two games in Berkeley. A trip back west was a satisfying consolation but hardly intimidating. “It’s just another arena,” Cunningham said. “Another two baskets, a ball. Let’s go play. It doesn’t bother me. It would have been nice to have some of our fans here. Maybe a few will come (to Stanford), but probably not. That’s fun. It’s like playing in the backyard, so I’m ready for it.”

ELSEWHERE

SLU women headed to NIT • St. Louis University earned a berth in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament for the third consecutive season, extending the season for the team’s six seniors. The opponent, date and site of a first-round game were to be announced late Monday night. SLU (17-15) lost in the semifinals of the Atlantic 10 tournament after finishing seventh during the regular season. The Billikens advance to the third round of the WNIT in 2016 and second round in ‘17. (Stu Durando)

32-0

Miss. St.

10 a.m. Saturday

16 St. Fran. (Pa.)24-9

Nicholls St. 19-13 16 Monday

Monday

8 Miami (Fla.) 21-10

Syracuse

12:30 p.m. Saturday

9 Quinnipiac

Mar. 24

5 Duke

Okla. St.

20-10 9

Maryland

25-7 5

Mar. 23

22-8

ATHENS, GA.

11 a.m. Friday

12 Belmont

31-3

Princeton

24-5 12

NC State

24-8 4

Sunday

Monday

25-6

12:30 p.m. Saturday

30-2

6 S. Florida

ALBANY, N.Y.

26-7

Mar. 26

Mar. 25

11 Buffalo

Creighton

25-6

UCLA

10 a.m. Saturday

23-9

American

Arizona St. 21-12 7

Sunday

26-6

6:30 p.m. Friday

23-8

1ST ROUND

SOUTH BEND, IND.

Marquette

23-9 8

Dayton

23-6 9

Missouri

24-7 5

2:30 p.m. Saturday

16-14

4 Texas A&M

24-9

1:30 p.m. Friday

13 Drake

SPOKANE, WASH.

19-9

Mar. 26

Mar. 25

LEXINGTON, KY.

Stanford

22-10 4

Gonzaga

27-5 13

Oregon St.

23-7 6

11 a.m. Friday

11 Central Mich. 28-4

Western Ky. 24-8 11

Games televised on ESPN or ESPN2

Monday

27-6

12:30 p.m. Saturday

14 Geo. Wash. 19-13 Mar. 24

Sunday

Tennessee

24-7 3

1:30 p.m. Friday

Liberty

24-9 14

Michigan

22-9 7

KNOXVILLE, TENN.

10 a.m. Saturday

7 Green Bay

30-4 12

5 p.m. Saturday

26-7

3 Ohio St.

Florida GC Monday

Sunday

STANFORD, CALIF.

COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS

26-7

6 LSU COLUMBUS, OHIO

23-9 16

Mar. 23

11 a.m. Friday

Mar. 23

29-3

4 p.m. Friday

4 p.m. Friday

23-8

North'n Colo. 26-6 10 Sunday

2 Oregon

30-4

6:30 p.m. Friday

18-14

Sunday

Baylor

31-1 2

6:30 p.m. Friday

Grambling

19-13 15

WACO, TEXAS

10 Minnesota

15 Seattle

Boise State

1:30 p.m. Friday

Mar. 24

12 Oklahoma

32-2 1

Sunday

22-8

5 DePaul

1ST ROUND

LOUISVILLE, KY.

6:30 p.m. Friday

23-9 15

11 a.m. Friday

Sunday, April 1, 5 p.m. Nationwide Arena Columbus, Ohio

8 S. Dakota St. 26-6

26-6 2

Louisville

CHAMPIONSHIP

Sunday

Texas Maine

SEMIFINALS

16 Northridge 19-15

21-10 10

5 p.m. Saturday

Friday, March 30, 6 and 8:30 p.m.

4 p.m. Friday

Nebraska Monday

SWEET 16 REGIONALS 2ND ROUND

2ND ROUND SWEET 16 REGIONALS

1 Notre Dame 29-3

9 Villanova

2:30 p.m. Saturday

NCAA BASKETBALL DIVISION I WOMEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP

18-13

AUSTIN, TEXAS

COLUMBIA, S.C.

21-10

15 N.C. A&T

26-6 14

Mar. 23

4 p.m. Friday

2 S. Carolina

24-7 3

2:30 p.m. Saturday Mar. 24

10 Virginia

18-12 11

Monday

Monday

7 California

24-7 6

5 p.m. Saturday

27-5

3 Florida St.

25-7 13

Iowa

12:30 p.m. Saturday

14 Little Rock

EUGENE, ORE.

Elon

KANSAS CITY, MO.

LOS ANGELES

TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

1:30 p.m. Friday

RALEIGH, N.C.

10 a.m. Saturday

13 Mercer

22-8 8

2:30 p.m. Saturday

27-5

4 Georgia

32-1 1

5 p.m. Saturday

STARKVILLE, MISS.

STORRS, CONN.

1 UConn

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Connecticut’s Crystal Dangerfield (right) pushes teammate Azura Stevens out to collect the Most Outstanding Player award after UConn defeated South Florida in the AAC tournament March 6.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Minnesota Dallas Colorado Blues Chicago Pacific Vegas San Jose Anaheim Los Angeles Calgary Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 68 69 69 69 68 68 70 GP 69 68 69 68 70 68 69 68

W 44 41 39 38 36 36 30 W 45 36 34 37 34 30 25 22

L OT 14 10 18 10 23 7 25 6 24 8 27 5 32 8 L OT 19 5 23 9 23 12 26 5 26 10 34 4 35 9 35 11

Pts 98 92 85 82 80 77 68 Pts 95 81 80 79 78 64 59 55

Monday Blues at Anaheim, late Vegas 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Winnipeg 2, OT Columbus 5, Montreal 2 NY Rangers 6, Carolina 3 Ottawa 5, Florida 3 Detroit at San Jose, late Vancouver at Los Angeles, late

GF GA Home Away Div 222 173 24-7-4 20-7-6 15-4-2 229 182 24-7-2 17-11-8 11-7-2 216 198 24-5-6 15-18-1 11-10-0 198 180 24-10-3 14-15-3 11-12-0 215 202 24-8-2 12-16-6 8-9-3 187 180 20-14-0 16-13-5 9-9-3 199 207 17-15-3 13-17-5 7-9-2 GF GA Home Away Div 235 187 24-7-2 21-12-3 16-3-2 198 186 20-11-3 16-12-6 16-4-3 193 189 19-9-5 15-14-7 10-6-7 197 173 17-13-3 20-13-2 10-10-3 197 206 14-16-4 20-10-6 9-7-3 193 221 16-17-2 14-17-2 13-8-0 183 225 12-17-6 13-18-3 6-13-1 163 219 13-18-4 9-17-7 6-10-6

Sunday Chicago 3, Boston 1 NY Islanders 5, Calgary 2 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 1 Arizona 1, Vancouver 0 Tuesday Boston at Carolina, 6 p.m. Dallas at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Nashville, 7 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Montreal Ottawa Buffalo Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh Philadelphia Columbus New Jersey Carolina NY Islanders NY Rangers

GP 69 67 69 67 68 69 68 69 GP 69 70 70 70 69 69 69 70

W 48 43 40 34 26 25 24 22 W 39 40 35 37 35 30 30 31

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 4 100 253 191 25-6-2 23-11-2 15-5-2 16 8 94 226 172 25-7-4 18-9-4 14-4-2 22 7 87 228 197 23-8-2 17-14-5 11-6-3 26 7 75 205 212 21-10-3 13-16-4 11-6-2 31 11 63 177 206 13-14-8 13-17-3 6-13-4 32 12 62 175 219 16-10-8 9-22-4 10-7-5 33 11 59 186 236 14-14-6 10-19-5 7-11-4 35 12 56 165 224 10-19-5 12-16-7 10-7-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 7 85 209 202 24-9-2 15-14-5 11-6-3 26 4 84 229 211 26-8-1 14-18-3 15-6-0 24 11 81 205 205 17-12-6 18-12-5 9-6-5 28 5 79 193 195 23-11-2 14-17-3 12-10-3 26 8 78 204 208 18-14-3 17-12-5 12-9-1 28 11 71 184 212 16-12-6 14-16-5 8-9-5 29 10 70 222 245 16-12-4 14-17-6 10-9-2 32 7 69 201 224 19-13-4 12-19-3 8-8-3

Wednesday Dallas at Toronto, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. New Jersey at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Thursday Washington at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Colorado at Blues, 7 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Nashville at Arizona, 9 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-Houston 53 14 New Orleans 38 28 San Antonio 37 30 Dallas 21 46 Memphis 18 49 Northwest W L Portland 40 26 Oklahoma City 40 29 Minnesota 39 29 Denver 37 30 Utah 37 30 Pacific W L x-Golden State 51 16 LA Clippers 36 29 LA Lakers 30 36 Sacramento 21 47 Phoenix 19 49

Pct .791 .576 .552 .313 .269 Pct .606 .580 .574 .552 .552 Pct .761 .554 .455 .309 .279

GB — 14½ 16 32 35 GB — 1½ 2 3½ 3½ GB — 14 20½ 30½ 32½

L10 9-1 8-2 2-8 3-7 0-10 L10 9-1 7-3 5-5 6-4 8-2 L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 3-7 1-9

Str W-2 L-2 L-3 L-1 L-18 Str W-9 W-3 W-1 W-2 W-6 Str L-2 W-2 W-1 L-2 L-5

Home 26-6 17-14 23-8 14-22 13-22 Home 22-11 24-11 26-8 26-10 21-11 Home 26-7 20-14 17-15 11-22 9-24

Away 27-8 21-14 14-22 7-24 5-27 Away 18-15 16-18 13-21 11-20 16-19 Away 25-9 16-15 13-21 10-25 10-25

Conf 33-8 20-20 21-20 12-33 15-27 Conf 25-15 24-20 29-13 24-21 24-16 Conf 28-13 22-19 14-26 10-33 13-30

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 49 17 x-Boston 46 21 Philadelphia 36 29 New York 24 43 21 46 Brooklyn Southeast W L Washington 38 29 Miami 36 31 Charlotte 29 38 20 47 Orlando Atlanta 20 47 Central W L Indiana 39 28 Cleveland 38 28 Milwaukee 36 31 Detroit 30 36 23 43 Chicago

Pct .742 .687 .554 .358 .313 Pct .567 .537 .433 .299 .299 Pct .582 .576 .537 .455 .348

GB — 3½ 12½ 25½ 28½ GB — 2 9 18 18 GB — ½ 3 8½ 15½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 1-9 2-8 L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 4-6 3-7 3-7

Str W-8 L-1 W-1 L-7 L-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-1 L-4 L-3 Str W-2 L-2 W-2 W-1 W-1

Home 28-5 23-12 20-10 16-15 12-22 Home 19-14 20-13 19-17 13-18 15-20 Home 23-12 22-11 21-14 21-14 15-18

Away 21-12 23-9 16-19 8-28 9-24 Away 19-15 16-18 10-21 7-29 5-27 Away 16-16 16-17 15-17 9-22 8-25

Conf 32-8 29-14 22-17 12-27 14-25 Conf 24-18 25-18 17-23 12-28 9-34 Conf 29-16 27-14 22-21 19-26 18-22

Monday Houston 109, San Antonio 93 Milwaukee 121, Memphis 103 Oklahoma City 106, Sacramento 101 Miami at Portland, late Sunday Toronto 132, New York 106 Chicago 129, Atlanta 122 Minnesota 109, Golden State 103 Utah 116, New Orleans 99 Denver 130, Sacramento 104 Houston 105, Dallas 82 Indiana 99, Boston 97 Philadelphia 120, Brooklyn 97 LA Lakers 127, Cleveland 113 Tuesday Indiana at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at New York, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at New Orleans, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Chicago, 7 p.m. Orlando at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 8 p.m. Cleveland at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Denver at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Boston, 7 p.m. Miami at Sacramento, 9 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

x-clinched playoff spot

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin celebrates his 600th career goal in the second period against the Winnipeg Jets Monday.

Caps’ Ovechkin logs 600th goal ASSOCIATED PRESS Associated Press

Alex Ovechkin scored twice to reach 600 goals and Evgeny Kuznetsov had the overtime winner as the Washington Capitals returned to first place by beating the Winnipeg Jets 3-2 on Monday. Ovechkin scored in each of the first two periods to get to 42 this season. The Russian winger became the 20th player and fourth-fastest in NHL history to 600 goals and is on pace to lead the league in goals for the seventh time. Kuznetsov made it a night of celebration for Washington by scoring on a breakaway 4:11 into overtime. Jets winger Patrik Laine scored his 16th in the past 12 games to get to 41 goals this season. Nikolaj Ehlers also scored a 4-on-4 goal for Winnipeg, which got 40 saves from Connor Hellebuyck.

Capitals goaltender Philipp Grubauer stopped 26 shots in his third consecutive start. Fleury wins 400th, Golden Knights beat Flyers • Marc-Andre Fleury made 38 saves to become the 13th goalie in NHL history with 400 career victories, and Ryan Carpenter scored the winning goal with 2:40 left to lead the Vegas Golden Knights over the Philadelphia Flyers 3-2. Erik Haula and William Karlsson also scored for the Pacific Division leaders, who completed a 4-1 road trip. Fleury, who earned his first NHL win on Oct. 18, 2003, became the third active goalie to reach the milestone, joining Roberto Luongo and Henrik Lundqvist. Claude Giroux and Wayne Simmonds scored for the Flyers, who have lost six of seven.

Carolina 1 1 1 — NY Rangers 1 2 3 — First period: 1, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 13 (Zibanejad, Pionk), 9:06. 2, Carolina, Teravainen 20 (Pesce, Aho), 14:32. Penalties: van Riemsdyk, CAR, (tripping), 6:14; Rask, CAR, (hooking), 18:08. Second period: 3, NY Rangers, Vesey 13 (Buchnevich), 1:52. 4, Carolina, Stempniak 2 (Skinner, Ryan), 7:48. 5, NY Rangers, Namestnikov 22 (Zibanejad, Buchnevich), 11:51 (pp). Penalties: Desharnais, NYR, (holding), 8:35; Hanifin, CAR, (slashing), 11:45; Kreider, NYR, (holding), 15:29. Third period: 6, Carolina, Rask 13, 8:23 (pp). 7, NY Rangers, Vesey 14 (Buchnevich), 12:15. 8, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 14 (Spooner), 17:23. 9, NY Rangers, Vesey 15 (Zibanejad, Fast), 19:36. Penalties: Zuccarello, NYR, (hooking), 6:55. Shots: Carolina 10-18-16: 44. NY Rangers 9-6-8: 23. Power-plays: Carolina 1 of 3; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 11-17-7 (21 shots-17 saves). NY Rangers, Georgiev 2-2-0 (44-41). A: 17,679.

Senators 5, Panthers 3 3 6

Vegas 1 0 2 — Philadelphia 0 1 1 — First period: 1, Vegas, Haula 25 (Schmidt, Perron), 6:17 (pp). Penalties: Philadelphia bench, served by Konecny (too many men on the ice), 4:27; Theodore, VGK, (hooking), 9:30. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 25 (Konecny, Couturier), 1:27. Penalties: Marchessault, VGK, (high sticking), 6:55. Third period: 3, Vegas, Karlsson 36 (Theodore, Hyka), 6:00 (pp). 4, Philadelphia, Simmonds 21 (Gostisbehere, Voracek), 7:06 (pp). 5, Vegas, Carpenter 8 (Bellemare, Eakin), 17:20. Penalties: Sanheim, PHI, (high sticking), 4:30; McNabb, VGK, (hooking), 6:31; Karlsson, VGK, (tripping), 8:35. Shots: Vegas 9-8-12: 29. Philadelphia 9-16-15: 40. Power-plays: Vegas 2 of 2; Philadelphia 1 of 4. Goalies: Vegas, Fleury 25-9-3 (40 shots-38 saves). Philadelphia, Mrazek 12-11-4 (29-26). A: 19,723.

Ottawa 2 0 3 — 5 Florida 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Duchene 20 (Hoffman, Karlsson), 0:57. 2, Ottawa, Paajarvi 5 (Pyatt, Claesson), 15:16. Penalties: Borowiecki, OTT, (kneeing), 9:43; McCann, FLA, (interference), 17:46. Second period: 3, Florida, Dadonov 22 (Barkov, Bjugstad), 12:36. 4, Florida, Matheson 10 (Huberdeau, Trocheck), 17:28. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Paajarvi 6 (Chabot), 0:43. 6, Florida, Huberdeau 23 (Weegar, Trocheck), 4:23. 7, Ottawa, Duchene 21 (Hoffman), 17:00. 8, Ottawa, Pageau 12 (Karlsson, Burrows), 18:15. Penalties: McGinn, FLA, (delay of game), 12:47; Yandle, FLA, (roughing), 13:08; Pageau, OTT, (roughing), 13:08. Shots: Ottawa 12-2-11: 25. Florida 8-17-13: 38. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 2; Florida 0 of 1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 20-20-6 (38 shots-35 saves). Florida, Luongo 14-8-2 (25-20). A: 11,585.

NHL SCORING LEADERS

Golden Knights 3, Flyers 2 3 2

Blue Jackets 5, Canadiens 2 Montreal 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 3 1 1 — 5 First period: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 25 (Petry), 0:34. 2, Columbus, Foligno 15, 4:17. 3, Columbus, Jones 14 (Atkinson, Panarin), 7:51 (pp). 4, Columbus, Jones 15 (Panarin, Wennberg), 14:03 (pp). Penalties: Petry, MTL, (tripping), 7:11; Deslauriers, MTL, (tripping), 13:30; Johnson, CBJ, (slashing), 17:59. Second period: 5, Columbus, Jenner 8 (Wennberg, Cole), 2:34. 6, Montreal, Drouin 11 (Byron), 15:46. Penalties: Carr, MTL, (slashing), 17:16. Third period: 7, Columbus, Cole 5 (Wennberg), 17:41. Penalties: Columbus bench, served by Panarin (too many men on the ice), 8:34. Shots: Montreal 10-6-24: 40. Columbus 11-9-5: 25. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 2; Columbus 2 of 3. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 4-7-2 (25 shots-20 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-21-5 (40-38). A: 15,864.

Capitals 3, Jets 2, OT Winnipeg 1 0 1 0 — 2 Washington 1 1 0 1 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 41 (Backstrom, Carlson), 4:35 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Ehlers 27, 5:33. Penalties: Little, WPG, (hooking), 3:18; Hendricks, WPG, (tripping), 3:53; Oshie, WSH, (slashing), 5:10; Oshie, WSH, (hooking), 14:44; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 16:59. Second period: 3, Washington, Ovechkin 42 (Wilson, Kuznetsov), 3:53. Penalties: Beagle, WSH, (slashing), 12:24. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Laine 41 (Stastny, Byfuglien), 5:02. Penalties: None. Overtime: 5, Washington, Kuznetsov 21 (Stephenson), 4:11. Penalties: Little, WPG, (slashing), 0:19. Shots: Winnipeg 8-10-10: 28. Washington 14-13-9-7: 43. Power-plays: Winnipeg 0 of 3; Washington 1 of 4. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 35-11-9 (43 shots-40 saves). Washington, Grubauer 10-8-3 (28-26). A: 18,506. Referees: Jean Hebert, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Kory Nagy, Derek Nansen.

Thunder’s Westbrook posts 20th triple-double ASSOCIATED PRESS

NHL SUMMARIES Rangers 6, Hurricanes 3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thunder guard Russell Westbrook dunks over Sacramento Kings center Willie CauleyStein in Oklahoma City on Monday. The Thunder won, 106-101.

THROUGH SUNDAY’S GAMES Name, Team Nikita Kucherov, TB Evgeni Malkin, PIT Connor McDavid, EDM Nathan MacKinnon, COL Claude Giroux, PHI Steven Stamkos, TB Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Phil Kessel, PIT Sidney Crosby, PIT Blake Wheeler, WPG Taylor Hall, NJ Anze Kopitar, LA Jakub Voracek, PHI Alex Ovechkin, WAS 4 tied with 69 pts.

GP 67 66 68 60 69 69 70 70 70 68 64 68 69 68

G 34 39 33 32 24 27 21 28 23 18 30 27 16 40

A 54 48 51 49 57 52 58 50 53 58 44 47 58 32

PTS 88 87 84 81 81 79 79 78 76 76 74 74 74 72

GOALTENDING LEADERS WINS Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Pekka Rinne, NSH Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Frederik Andersen, TOR Devan Dubnyk, MIN Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Braden Holtby, WSH Tuukka Rask, BOS Ben Bishop, DAL Jonathan Quick, LAK John Gibson, ANA Henrik Lundqvist, NYR Cam Talbot, EDM Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK Matt Murray, PIT Mike Smith, CGY Martin Jones, SJS Brian Elliott, PHI Jake Allen, STL SHUTOUTS Pekka Rinne, NSH Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Frederik Andersen, TOR Ben Bishop, DAL Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Devan Dubnyk, MIN Martin Jones, SJS Darcy Kuemper, ARI Petr Mrazek, PHI Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK Carter Hutton, STL Robin Lehner, BUF Ryan Miller, ANA Jonathan Quick, LAK Juuse Saros, NSH

GPI 56 50 56 57 50 55 48 44 51 53 50 58 55 36 41 48 48 41 46 GPI 50 56 56 57 51 55 50 48 24 30 36 30 50 24 53 19

MINS 3312 2973 3299 3385 2842 3309 2708 2572 2813 3013 2864 3204 3086 2170 2253 2811 2712 2402 2574 MINS 2973 3312 3299 3385 2813 3309 2842 2712 1298 1672 2170 1513 2726 1131 3013 1154

W 40 37 35 33 30 29 29 28 26 26 25 25 25 24 23 23 22 21 20 SO 7 7 6 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

W 37 40 35 33 26 29 30 22 12 12 24 16 14 8 26 7

L 12 9 11 18 13 21 15 11 17 25 16 23 26 9 13 17 18 11 20 L 9 12 11 18 17 21 13 18 3 10 9 7 24 6 25 5

OT 3 4 8 5 5 5 4 4 4 2 6 6 2 3 2 6 6 7 2 OT 4 3 8 5 4 5 5 6 4 4 3 3 9 6 2 6

Russell Westbrook scored 17 points and notched his 20th triple-double of the season to help the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the visiting Sacramento Kings 106-101 on Monday night. Westbrook had 10 rebounds and 11 assists in his 99th career triple-double. Paul George and Carmelo Anthony each scored 21 points for the Thunder, who moved into fourth place in the Western Conference standings. Harden, Rockets beat Spurs • James Harden scored 16 of his 28 points in the third quarter to allow the hosting Houston Rockets to build a huge lead and sail to an easy 109-93 victory over the San Antonio Spurs. The NBA’s leading scorer had just 12 points at halftime. The Spurs, who were without lead-

ing scorer LaMarcus Aldridge, got 14 points each from Bryn Forbes and Derrick White. They lost for the fifth time in six games as they fight for a playoff spot.

NOTEBOOK

Celtics’ Theis out for season • Celtics rookie Daniel Theis is likely out for the rest of the season with a torn meniscus in his left knee. Theis got hurt during the final minute of Boston’s 99-97 loss to the Pacers Sunday. He is averaging 5.3 points and 4.3 rebounds per game this season. Mavs’ Matthews has broken leg • Mavericks guard Wesley Matthews has a broken bone in his lower right leg and is likely to miss the rest of the season. The team says the 31-year-old Matthews was injured in the first quarter against Memphis on Saturday. Despite the injury, the nine-year veteran played into the fourth quarter.

NBA SUMMARIES Rockets 109, Spurs 93

Bucks 121, Grizzlies 103

San Antonio: K.Anderson 2-6 2-4 6, Gay 6-15 0-0 13, Gasol 1-5 2-2 4, Murray 3-7 1-2 7, Mills 1-3 0-0 3, Bertans 4-8 0-0 11, Lauvergne 1-4 0-0 2, Costello 1-1 0-0 2, White 4-8 2-2 14, Forbes 4-8 5-5 14, Parker 5-6 2-2 12, B.Paul 0-5 1-4 1, D.Green 1-5 1-2 4. Totals 33-81 16-23 93. Houston: Ariza 5-9 2-2 15, Tucker 2-4 0-0 5, Capela 6-7 1-3 13, C.Paul 8-11 0-0 18, Harden 6-17 14-14 28, Black 0-0 0-0 0, Mbah a Moute 4-4 0-2 9, Nene 3-4 0-0 6, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Gordon 0-7 1-2 1, G.Green 5-14 0-0 14. Totals 39-80 18-23 109. San Antonio 21 22 24 26 — 93 Houston 25 29 34 21 — 109 3-point goals: San Antonio 11-28 (White 4-5, Bertans 3-6, Mills 1-2, Gay 1-3, D.Green 1-4, Forbes 1-4, B.Paul 0-2, K.Anderson 0-2), Houston 13-44 (G.Green 4-11, Ariza 3-7, C.Paul 2-4, Harden 2-11, Mbah a Moute 1-1, Tucker 1-3, Johnson 0-1, Gordon 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 36 (Lauvergne 6), Houston 50 (Capela, G.Green 9). Assists: San Antonio 20 (Murray, Forbes, Parker 3), Houston 24 (C.Paul 9). Total fouls: San Antonio 17, Houston 24. A: 18,092 (18,055).

Milwaukee: Middleton 9-14 4-4 24, Antetokounmpo 7-14 5-7 20, Henson 5-8 1-4 11, Bledsoe 6-13 0-1 14, Snell 4-7 0-0 12, Parker 3-6 0-0 6, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Maker 0-0 0-0 0, Zeller 3-3 2-3 8, Terry 0-1 0-0 0, Jennings 5-9 3-3 16, Brown 5-6 0-0 10. Totals 47-81 15-22 121. Memphis: Martin 6-11 3-4 16, Green 4-8 3-6 11, Gasol 8-17 1-3 17, Simmons 4-8 0-0 9, Brooks 7-13 0-0 16, Parsons 1-4 0-0 3, Rabb 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 5-7 0-0 10, Rathan-Mayes 0-5 2-4 2, Selden 1-7 0-0 3, McLemore 6-9 1-2 16. Totals 42-89 10-19 103. Milwaukee 32 32 26 31 — 121 Memphis 24 26 23 30 — 103 3-point goals: Milwaukee 12-25 (Snell 4-6, Jennings 3-6, Middleton 2-3, Bledsoe 2-4, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Terry 0-1, Parker 0-2), Memphis 9-27 (McLemore 3-4, Brooks 2-5, Simmons 1-1, Martin 1-2, Parsons 1-4, Selden 1-5, Green 0-1, Rathan-Mayes 0-2, Gasol 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 47 (Jennings 8), Memphis 31 (Davis, Green, Gasol 7). Assists: Milwaukee 33 (Jennings 12), Memphis 27 (Rathan-Mayes, Simmons, Martin 5). Total fouls: Milwaukee 22, Memphis 23. A: 14,112 (18,119).

Thunder 106, Kings 101

NBA LEADERS

Sacramento: Jackson 6-10 0-0 15, Randolph 5-18 0-0 10, Koufos 3-8 0-0 6, Fox 4-12 2-3 11, Bogdanovic 6-11 4-5 19, Cauley-Stein 4-7 1-2 9, Mason 2-6 4-4 8, Carter 2-6 0-0 5, Hield 1-6 0-0 3, Temple 5-9 2-2 15. Totals 38-93 13-16 101. Oklahoma City: George 7-18 3-4 21, Anthony 7-14 2-2 21, Adams 3-5 0-0 6, Westbrook 7-19 1-3 17, Brewer 4-8 7-7 16, Huestis 0-1 0-0 0, Grant 3-5 1-2 7, Patterson 1-5 0-0 2, Felton 3-5 0-0 7, Ferguson 1-2 0-0 3, Abrines 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 38-84 14-18 106. 16 24 39 22 — 101 Sacramento Oklahoma City 19 27 32 28 — 106 3-point goals: Sacramento 12-33 (Temple 3-5, Jackson 3-6, Bogdanovic 3-7, Carter 1-3, Fox 1-3, Hield 1-4, Mason 0-1, Randolph 0-4), Oklahoma City 16-36 (Anthony 5-7, George 4-9, Abrines 2-2, Westbrook 2-3, Ferguson 1-2, Felton 1-3, Brewer 1-4, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-1, Patterson 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 49 (Koufos 10), Oklahoma City 43 (Westbrook 10). Assists: Sacramento 21 (Fox 10), Oklahoma City 21 (Westbrook 11). Total fouls: Sacramento 22, Oklahoma City 15. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second). A: 18,203 (18,203).

Through Sunday’s games Scoring Harden, HOU Davis, NOR Antetokounmpo, MIL James, CLE Lillard, POR Durant, GOL Curry, GOL Westbrook, OKC Booker, PHX Cousins, NOR Irving, BOS Oladipo, IND DeRozan, TOR Embiid, PHL Beal, WAS Williams, LAC Walker, CHA

G 58 59 62 66 59 59 50 66 52 48 60 61 66 54 67 64 65

FG 536 608 618 682 506 552 418 626 445 406 534 532 549 448 571 479 493

FT 501 389 420 289 381 308 272 341 281 294 232 252 392 310 250 350 301

PTS 1803 1653 1688 1774 1581 1568 1317 1672 1317 1210 1466 1450 1566 1263 1557 1477 1478

AVG 31.1 28.0 27.2 26.9 26.8 26.6 26.3 25.3 25.3 25.2 24.4 23.8 23.7 23.4 23.2 23.1 22.7


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018 NBA STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 53 14 New Orleans 38 28 37 30 San Antonio Dallas 21 46 Memphis 18 49 W L Northwest Portland 41 26 Oklahoma City 40 29 39 29 Minnesota Denver 37 30 Utah 37 30 W L Pacific Golden State 51 16 LA Clippers 36 29 30 36 LA Lakers Sacramento 21 47 Phoenix 19 49

Pct .791 .576 .552 .313 .269 Pct .612 .580 .574 .552 .552 Pct .761 .554 .455 .309 .279

GB — 14½ 16 32 35 GB — 2 2½ 4 4 GB — 14 20½ 30½ 32½

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 49 17 x-Boston 46 21 Philadelphia 36 29 New York 24 43 Brooklyn 21 46 Southeast W L Washington 38 29 Miami 36 32 Charlotte 29 38 Orlando 20 47 Atlanta 20 47 Central W L Indiana 39 28 Cleveland 38 28 Milwaukee 36 31 Detroit 30 36 Chicago 23 43

Pct .742 .687 .554 .358 .313 Pct .567 .529 .433 .299 .299 Pct .582 .576 .537 .455 .348

GB — 3½ 12½ 25½ 28½ GB — 2½ 9 18 18 GB — ½ 3 8½ 15½

L10 Str 9-1 W-2 8-2 L-2 2-8 L-3 3-7 L-1 0-10 L-18 L10 Str 10-0 W-10 7-3 W-3 5-5 W-1 6-4 W-2 8-2 W-6 L10 Str 7-3 L-2 7-3 W-2 7-3 W-1 3-7 L-2 1-9 L-5 L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 1-9 2-8 L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 4-6 3-7 3-7

Str W-8 L-1 W-1 L-7 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 L-4 L-3 Str W-2 L-2 W-2 W-1 W-1

Home 26-6 17-14 23-8 14-22 13-22 Home 23-11 24-11 26-8 26-10 21-11 Home 26-7 20-14 17-15 11-22 9-24

Away 27-8 21-14 14-22 7-24 5-27 Away 18-15 16-18 13-21 11-20 16-19 Away 25-9 16-15 13-21 10-25 10-25

Conf 33-8 20-20 21-20 12-33 15-27 Conf 25-15 24-20 29-13 24-21 24-16 Conf 28-13 22-19 14-26 10-33 13-30

Home 28-5 23-12 20-10 16-15 12-22 Home 19-14 20-13 19-17 13-18 15-20 Home 23-12 22-11 21-14 21-14 15-18

Away 21-12 23-9 16-19 8-28 9-24 Away 19-15 16-19 10-21 7-29 5-27 Away 16-16 16-17 15-17 9-22 8-25

Conf 32-8 29-14 22-17 12-27 14-25 Conf 24-18 25-18 17-23 12-28 9-34 Conf 29-16 27-14 22-21 19-26 18-22

x-clinched playoff spot Monday Houston 109, San Antonio 93 Milwaukee 121, Memphis 103 Oklahoma City 106, Sacramento 101 Portland 115, Miami 99

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin celebrates his 600th career goal in the second period against the Jets Monday.

Caps’ Ovechkin logs 600th goal

Tuesday Indiana at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at New York, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at New Orleans, 7 p.m.

LA Clippers at Chicago, 7 p.m. Orlando at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 8 p.m. Cleveland at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Denver at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Boston, 7 p.m. Miami at Sacramento, 9 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

NHL STANDINGS

ASSOCIATED PRESS Associated Press

Alex Ovechkin scored twice to reach 600 goals and Evgeny Kuznetsov had the overtime winner as the Washington Capitals returned to first place by beating the Winnipeg Jets 3-2 on Monday. Ovechkin scored in each of the first two periods to get to 42 this season. The Russian winger became the 20th player and fourth-fastest in NHL history to 600 goals and is on pace to lead the league in goals for the seventh time. Kuznetsov made it a night of celebration for Washington by scoring on a breakaway 4:11 into overtime. Jets winger Patrik Laine scored his 16th in the past 12 games to get to 41 goals this season. Nikolaj Ehlers also scored a 4-on-4 goal for Winnipeg, which got 40 saves from Connor Hellebuyck. Capitals goaltender Philipp Grubauer stopped 26 shots in his third consecutive start. Fleury wins 400th, Golden Knights beat Flyers • Marc-Andre Fleury made 38 saves to become the 13th goalie in NHL history with 400 career victories, and Ryan Carpenter scored the winning goal with 2:40 left to lead the Vegas Golden Knights over the Philadelphia Flyers 3-2. Erik Haula and William Karlsson also scored for the Pacific Division leaders, who completed a 4-1 road trip. Fleury, who earned his first NHL win on Oct. 18, 2003, became the third active goalie to reach the milestone, joining Roberto Luongo and Henrik Lundqvist. Claude Giroux and Wayne Simmonds scored for the Flyers, who have lost six of seven.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Nashville 68 44 69 41 Winnipeg 69 39 Minnesota 69 38 Dallas 68 36 Colorado 69 37 Blues 70 30 Chicago GP W Pacific 69 45 Vegas 69 37 San Jose 69 38 Los Angeles 70 34 Anaheim 70 34 Calgary 68 30 Edmonton 70 25 Vancouver 68 22 Arizona EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W 69 48 Tampa Bay 67 43 Boston 69 40 Toronto 67 34 Florida 69 26 Detroit 69 25 Montreal 68 24 Ottawa 69 22 Buffalo Metropolitan GP W 69 39 Washington 70 40 Pittsburgh 70 35 Philadelphia 70 37 Columbus 69 35 New Jersey 69 30 Carolina 69 30 NY Islanders 70 31 NY Rangers

L OT 14 10 18 10 23 7 25 6 8 24 27 5 32 8 L OT 19 5 23 9 26 5 24 12 26 10 4 34 9 36 35 11

Pts GF GA Home 98 222 173 24-7-4 92 229 182 24-7-2 85 216 198 24-5-6 82 198 180 24-10-3 80 215 202 24-8-2 79 191 182 20-14-0 68 199 207 17-15-3 Pts GF GA Home 95 235 187 24-7-2 83 203 189 21-11-3 81 200 173 18-13-3 80 195 193 19-10-5 78 197 206 14-16-4 64 193 221 16-17-2 59 183 228 12-17-6 55 163 219 13-18-4

Away Div 20-7-6 15-4-2 17-11-8 11-7-2 15-18-1 11-10-0 14-15-3 11-12-0 12-16-6 8-9-3 17-13-5 9-9-3 13-17-5 7-9-2 Away Div 21-12-3 16-3-2 16-12-6 16-4-3 20-13-2 11-10-3 15-14-7 10-6-7 9-7-3 20-10-6 14-17-2 13-8-0 13-19-3 6-14-1 9-17-7 6-10-6

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 4 100 253 191 25-6-2 23-11-2 15-5-2 8 94 226 172 25-7-4 18-9-4 14-4-2 16 22 7 87 228 197 23-8-2 17-14-5 11-6-3 26 7 75 205 212 21-10-3 13-16-4 11-6-2 32 11 63 180 211 13-14-8 13-18-3 6-13-4 32 12 62 175 219 16-10-8 9-22-4 10-7-5 33 11 59 186 236 14-14-6 10-19-5 7-11-4 35 12 56 165 224 10-19-5 12-16-7 10-7-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 23 7 85 209 202 24-9-2 15-14-5 11-6-3 26 4 84 229 211 26-8-1 14-18-3 15-6-0 81 205 205 17-12-6 18-12-5 9-6-5 24 11 28 5 79 193 195 23-11-2 14-17-3 12-10-3 26 8 78 204 208 18-14-3 17-12-5 12-9-1 71 184 212 16-12-6 14-16-5 8-9-5 28 11 29 10 70 222 245 16-12-4 14-17-6 10-9-2 32 7 69 201 224 19-13-4 12-19-3 8-8-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Monday Blues 4, Anaheim 2 Vegas 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Winnipeg 2, OT Columbus 5, Montreal 2 NY Rangers 6, Carolina 3 Ottawa 5, Florida 3 San Jose 5, Detroit 3 Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 0 Sunday Chicago 3, Boston 1 NY Islanders 5, Calgary 2 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 1 Arizona 1, Vancouver 0

Tuesday Boston at Carolina, 6 p.m. Dallas at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Nashville, 7 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 9 p.m. Wednesday Dallas at Toronto, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. New Jersey at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Thursday Washington at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Colorado at Blues, 7 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Nashville at Arizona, 9 p.m.

NHL SUMMARIES Rangers 6, Hurricanes 3

Capitals 3, Jets 2, OT

Kings 3, Canucks 0

Carolina 1 1 1 — 3 NY Rangers 1 2 3 — 6 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 13 (Zibanejad, Pionk), 9:06. 2, Carolina, Teravainen 20 (Pesce, Aho), 14:32. Penalties: van Riemsdyk, CAR, (tripping), 6:14; Rask, CAR, (hooking), 18:08. Second period: 3, NY Rangers, Vesey 13 (Buchnevich), 1:52. 4, Carolina, Stempniak 2 (Skinner, Ryan), 7:48. 5, NY Rangers, Namestnikov 22 (Zibanejad, Buchnevich), 11:51 (pp). Penalties: Desharnais, NYR, (holding), 8:35; Hanifin, CAR, (slashing), 11:45; Kreider, NYR, (holding), 15:29. Third period: 6, Carolina, Rask 13, 8:23 (pp). 7, NY Rangers, Vesey 14 (Buchnevich), 12:15. 8, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 14 (Spooner), 17:23. 9, NY Rangers, Vesey 15 (Zibanejad, Fast), 19:36. Penalties: Zuccarello, NYR, (hooking), 6:55. Shots: Carolina 10-18-16: 44. NY Rangers 9-6-8: 23. Power-plays: Carolina 1 of 3; NY Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 11-17-7 (21 shots-17 saves). NY Rangers, Georgiev 2-2-0 (44-41). A: 17,679.

Winnipeg 1 0 1 0 — 2 Washington 1 1 0 1 — 3 First period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 41 (Backstrom, Carlson), 4:35 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Ehlers 27, 5:33. Penalties: Little, WPG, (hooking), 3:18; Hendricks, WPG, (tripping), 3:53; Oshie, WSH, (slashing), 5:10; Oshie, WSH, (hooking), 14:44; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 16:59. Second period: 3, Washington, Ovechkin 42 (Wilson, Kuznetsov), 3:53. Penalties: Beagle, WSH, (slashing), 12:24. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Laine 41 (Stastny, Byfuglien), 5:02. Penalties: None. Overtime: 5, Washington, Kuznetsov 21 (Stephenson), 4:11. Penalties: Little, WPG, (slashing), 0:19. Shots: Winnipeg 8-10-10: 28. Washington 14-13-9-7: 43. Power-plays: Winnipeg 0 of 3; Washington 1 of 4. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 35-11-9 (43 shots-40 saves). Washington, Grubauer 10-8-3 (28-26). A: 18,506.

Vancouver 0 0 0 — 0 Los Angeles 0 2 1 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Forbort, LA, (high sticking), 6:37; Muzzin, LA, (interference), 8:23; Gagner, VAN, (holding), 9:14; Hutton, VAN, (hooking), 14:07. Second period: 1, Los Angeles, Toffoli 22 (Muzzin, Kempe), 1:57. 2, Los Angeles, Kopitar 28 (Forbort, Doughty), 14:54. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Los Angeles, Pearson 13 (Toffoli, Kempe), 10:53. Penalties: Iafallo, LA, (interference), 1:40; Dowd, VAN, (roughing), 15:32; Phaneuf, LA, (roughing), 15:32; H.Sedin, VAN, (hooking), 16:19. Shots: Vancouver 5-13-17: 35. Los Angeles 8-10-15: 33. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 3; Los Angeles 0 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 7-13-3 (33 shots-30 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 27-25-2 (35-35). A: 18,230.

Senators 5, Panthers 3

THROUGH SUNDAY’S GAMES Name, Team GP Nikita Kucherov, TB 67 Evgeni Malkin, PIT 66 Connor McDavid, EDM 68 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 60 Claude Giroux, PHI 69 Steven Stamkos, TB 69 Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 70 Phil Kessel, PIT 70 Sidney Crosby, PIT 70 Blake Wheeler, WPG 68 Taylor Hall, NJ 64 68 Anze Kopitar, LA Jakub Voracek, PHI 69 Alex Ovechkin, WAS 68 4 tied with 69 pts.

Golden Knights 3, Flyers 2 Vegas 1 0 2 — Philadelphia 0 1 1 — First period: 1, Vegas, Haula 25 (Schmidt, Perron), 6:17 (pp). Penalties: Philadelphia bench, served by Konecny (too many men on the ice), 4:27; Theodore, VGK, (hooking), 9:30. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 25 (Konecny, Couturier), 1:27. Penalties: Marchessault, VGK, (high sticking), 6:55. Third period: 3, Vegas, Karlsson 36 (Theodore, Hyka), 6:00 (pp). 4, Philadelphia, Simmonds 21 (Gostisbehere, Voracek), 7:06 (pp). 5, Vegas, Carpenter 8 (Bellemare, Eakin), 17:20. Penalties: Sanheim, PHI, (high sticking), 4:30; McNabb, VGK, (hooking), 6:31; Karlsson, VGK, (tripping), 8:35. Shots: Vegas 9-8-12: 29. Philadelphia 9-16-15: 40. Power-plays: Vegas 2 of 2; Philadelphia 1 of 4. Goalies: Vegas, Fleury 25-9-3 (40 shots-38 saves). Philadelphia, Mrazek 12-11-4 (29-26). A: 19,723.

Sunday Toronto 132, New York 106 Chicago 129, Atlanta 122 Minnesota 109, Golden State 103 Utah 116, New Orleans 99 Denver 130, Sacramento 104

Houston 105, Dallas 82 Indiana 99, Boston 97 Philadelphia 120, Brooklyn 97 LA Lakers 127, Cleveland 113

3 2

Blue Jackets 5, Canadiens 2 Montreal 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 3 1 1 — 5 First period: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 25 (Petry), 0:34. 2, Columbus, Foligno 15, 4:17. 3, Columbus, Jones 14 (Atkinson, Panarin), 7:51 (pp). 4, Columbus, Jones 15 (Panarin, Wennberg), 14:03 (pp). Penalties: Petry, MTL, (tripping), 7:11; Deslauriers, MTL, (tripping), 13:30; Johnson, CBJ, (slashing), 17:59. Second period: 5, Columbus, Jenner 8 (Wennberg, Cole), 2:34. 6, Montreal, Drouin 11 (Byron), 15:46. Penalties: Carr, MTL, (slashing), 17:16. Third period: 7, Columbus, Cole 5 (Wennberg), 17:41. Penalties: Columbus bench, served by Panarin (too many men on the ice), 8:34. Shots: Montreal 10-6-24: 40. Columbus 11-9-5: 25. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 2; Columbus 2 of 3. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 4-7-2 (25 shots-20 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-21-5 (40-38). A: 15,864.

Ottawa 2 0 3 — Florida 0 2 1 — First period: 1, Ottawa, Duchene 20 (Hoffman, Karlsson), 0:57. 2, Ottawa, Paajarvi 5 (Pyatt, Claesson), 15:16. Penalties: Borowiecki, OTT, (kneeing), 9:43; McCann, FLA, (interference), 17:46. Second period: 3, Florida, Dadonov 22 (Barkov, Bjugstad), 12:36. 4, Florida, Matheson 10 (Huberdeau, Trocheck), 17:28. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Paajarvi 6 (Chabot), 0:43. 6, Florida, Huberdeau 23 (Weegar, Trocheck), 4:23. 7, Ottawa, Duchene 21 (Hoffman), 17:00. 8, Ottawa, Pageau 12 (Karlsson, Burrows), 18:15. Penalties: McGinn, FLA, (delay of game), 12:47; Yandle, FLA, (roughing), 13:08; Pageau, OTT, (roughing), 13:08. Shots: Ottawa 12-2-11: 25. Florida 8-17-13: 38. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 2; Florida 0 of 1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 20-20-6 (38 shots-35 saves). Florida, Luongo 14-8-2 (25-20). A: 11,585.

5 3

Sharks 5, Red Wings 3 Detroit 1 1 1 — 3 San Jose 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, Detroit, Daley 9 (Zetterberg, Bertuzzi), 5:01. 2, San Jose, Donskoi 13 (Kane, Pavelski), 10:55. 3, San Jose, Fehr 1 (DeMelo, Dillon), 12:39. Penalties: Goodrow, SJ, (tripping), 6:31. Second period: 4, San Jose, Labanc 9 (Meier, Tierney), 1:39. 5, Detroit, Nyquist 17 (Bertuzzi, Daley), 5:05. Penalties: Kane, SJ, (tripping), 13:20; Green, DET, (slashing), 17:02. Third period: 6, San Jose, Meier 18 (Boedker, DeMelo), 5:12 (pp). 7, Detroit, Zetterberg 10 (Bertuzzi, Nyquist), 5:53. 8, San Jose, Tierney 17 (Braun, Pavelski), 18:26. Penalties: DeKeyser, DET, (hooking), 3:55; Daley, DET, (tripping), 9:02. Shots: Detroit 9-11-6: 26. San Jose 12-9-13: 34. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 2; San Jose 1 of 3. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 18-24-8 (33 shots-29 saves). San Jose, Jones 23-18-6 (26-23). A: 17,199.

NHL SCORING LEADERS G 34 39 33 32 24 27 21 28 23 18 30 27 16 40

A 54 48 51 49 57 52 58 50 53 58 44 47 58 32

PTS 88 87 84 81 81 79 79 78 76 76 74 74 74 72

GOALTENDING LEADERS WINS GPI MINS W L OT Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL 56 3312 40 12 3 Pekka Rinne, NSH 50 2973 37 9 4 8 Connor Hellebuyck, WPG 56 3299 35 11 Frederik Andersen, TOR 57 3385 33 18 5 Devan Dubnyk, MIN 50 2842 30 13 5 55 3309 29 21 5 Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Braden Holtby, WSH 48 2708 29 15 4 Tuukka Rask, BOS 44 2572 28 11 4 51 2813 26 17 4 Ben Bishop, DAL Jonathan Quick, LAK 53 3013 26 25 2 John Gibson, ANA 50 2864 25 16 6 Henrik Lundqvist, NYR 58 3204 25 23 6 Cam Talbot, EDM 55 3086 25 26 2 Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK 36 2170 24 9 3 Matt Murray, PIT 41 2253 23 13 2 Mike Smith, CGY 48 2811 23 17 6 Martin Jones, SJS 48 2712 22 18 6 Brian Elliott, PHI 41 2402 21 11 7 Jake Allen, STL 46 2574 20 20 2

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thunder guard Russell Westbrook dunks over Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein in Oklahoma City on Monday. The Thunder won, 106-101.

Thunder’s Westbrook posts 20th triple-double ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russell Westbrook scored 17 points and notched his 20th triple-double of the season to help the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the visiting Sacramento Kings 106-101 on Monday night. Westbrook had 10 rebounds and 11 assists in his 99th career triple-double. Paul George and Carmelo Anthony each scored 21 points for the Thunder, who moved into fourth place in the Western Conference standings. Harden, Rockets beat Spurs • James Harden scored 16 of his 28 points in the third quarter to allow the hosting Houston Rockets to build a huge lead and sail to an easy 109-93 victory over the San Antonio Spurs. The NBA’s leading scorer had just 12 points at halftime. The Spurs, who were without leading scorer LaMarcus Al-

dridge, got 14 points each from Bryn Forbes and Derrick White. They lost for the fifth time in six games as they fight for a playoff spot.

NOTEBOOK

Celtics’ Theis out for season • Celtics rookie Daniel Theis is likely out for the rest of the season with a torn meniscus in his left knee. Theis got hurt during the final minute of Boston’s 99-97 loss to the Pacers Sunday. He is averaging 5.3 points and 4.3 rebounds per game this season. Mavs’ Matthews has broken leg • Mavericks guard Wesley Matthews has a broken bone in his lower right leg and is likely to miss the rest of the season. The team says the 31-year-old Matthews was injured in the first quarter against Memphis on Saturday. Despite the injury, the nine-year veteran played into the fourth quarter.

NBA SUMMARIES Rockets 109, Spurs 93

Bucks 121, Grizzlies 103

San Antonio: K.Anderson 2-6 2-4 6, Gay 6-15 0-0 13, Gasol 1-5 2-2 4, Murray 3-7 1-2 7, Mills 1-3 0-0 3, Bertans 4-8 0-0 11, Lauvergne 1-4 0-0 2, Costello 1-1 0-0 2, White 4-8 2-2 14, Forbes 4-8 5-5 14, Parker 5-6 2-2 12, B.Paul 0-5 1-4 1, D.Green 1-5 1-2 4. Totals 33-81 16-23 93. Houston: Ariza 5-9 2-2 15, Tucker 2-4 0-0 5, Capela 6-7 1-3 13, C.Paul 8-11 0-0 18, Harden 6-17 14-14 28, Black 0-0 0-0 0, Mbah a Moute 4-4 0-2 9, Nene 3-4 0-0 6, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Gordon 0-7 1-2 1, G.Green 5-14 0-0 14. Totals 39-80 18-23 109. 21 22 24 26 — 93 San Antonio Houston 25 29 34 21 — 109 3-point goals: San Antonio 11-28 (White 4-5, Bertans 3-6, Mills 1-2, Gay 1-3, D.Green 1-4, Forbes 1-4, B.Paul 0-2, K.Anderson 0-2), Houston 13-44 (G.Green 4-11, Ariza 3-7, C.Paul 2-4, Harden 2-11, Mbah a Moute 1-1, Tucker 1-3, Johnson 0-1, Gordon 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 36 (Lauvergne 6), Houston 50 (Capela, G.Green 9). Assists: San Antonio 20 (Murray, Forbes, Parker 3), Houston 24 (C.Paul 9). Total fouls: San Antonio 17, Houston 24. A: 18,092 (18,055).

Milwaukee: Middleton 9-14 4-4 24, Antetokounmpo 7-14 5-7 20, Henson 5-8 1-4 11, Bledsoe 6-13 0-1 14, Snell 4-7 0-0 12, Parker 3-6 0-0 6, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Maker 0-0 0-0 0, Zeller 3-3 2-3 8, Terry 0-1 0-0 0, Jennings 5-9 3-3 16, Brown 5-6 0-0 10. Totals 47-81 15-22 121. Memphis: Martin 6-11 3-4 16, Green 4-8 3-6 11, Gasol 8-17 1-3 17, Simmons 4-8 0-0 9, Brooks 7-13 0-0 16, Parsons 1-4 0-0 3, Rabb 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 5-7 0-0 10, Rathan-Mayes 0-5 2-4 2, Selden 1-7 0-0 3, McLemore 6-9 1-2 16. Totals 42-89 10-19 103. Milwaukee 26 — 32 32 31 121 26 30 — 103 Memphis 24 23 3-point goals: Milwaukee 12-25 (Snell 4-6, Jennings 3-6, Middleton 2-3, Bledsoe 2-4, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Terry 0-1, Parker 0-2), Memphis 9-27 (McLemore 3-4, Brooks 2-5, Simmons 1-1, Martin 1-2, Parsons 1-4, Selden 1-5, Green 0-1, Rathan-Mayes 0-2, Gasol 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 47 (Jennings 8), Memphis 31 (Davis, Green, Gasol 7). Assists: Milwaukee 33 (Jennings 12), Memphis 27 (Rathan-Mayes, Simmons, Martin 5). Total fouls: Milwaukee 22, Memphis 23. A: 14,112 (18,119).

Thunder 106, Kings 101 Sacramento: Jackson 6-10 0-0 15, Randolph 5-18 0-0 10, Koufos 3-8 0-0 6, Fox 4-12 2-3 11, Bogdanovic 6-11 4-5 19, Cauley-Stein 4-7 1-2 9, Mason 2-6 4-4 8, Carter 2-6 0-0 5, Hield 1-6 0-0 3, Temple 5-9 2-2 15. Totals 38-93 13-16 101. Oklahoma City: George 7-18 3-4 21, Anthony 7-14 2-2 21, Adams 3-5 0-0 6, Westbrook 7-19 1-3 17, Brewer 4-8 7-7 16, Huestis 0-1 0-0 0, Grant 3-5 1-2 7, Patterson 1-5 0-0 2, Felton 3-5 0-0 7, Ferguson 1-2 0-0 3, Abrines 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 38-84 14-18 106. 16 24 39 22 — 101 Sacramento Oklahoma City 19 27 32 28 — 106 3-point goals: Sacramento 12-33 (Temple 3-5, Jackson 3-6, Bogdanovic 3-7, Carter 1-3, Fox 1-3, Hield 1-4, Mason 0-1, Randolph 0-4), Oklahoma City 16-36 (Anthony 5-7, George 4-9, Abrines 2-2, Westbrook 2-3, Ferguson 1-2, Felton 1-3, Brewer 1-4, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-1, Patterson 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 49 (Koufos 10), Oklahoma City 43 (Westbrook 10). Assists: Sacramento 21 (Fox 10), Oklahoma City 21 (Westbrook 11). Total fouls: Sacramento 22, Oklahoma City 15. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second). A: 18,203 (18,203).

Trail Blazers 115, Heat 99 Miami: Richardson 2-6 0-0 4, J.Johnson 3-5 2-4 8, Adebayo 1-10 2-2 4, Dragic 10-17 3-3 23, T.Johnson 6-15 1-2 17, Winslow 6-11 1-3 15, Olynyk 3-7 2-2 9, McGruder 4-8 0-0 8, Ellington 4-12 0-0 11. Totals 39-91 11-16 99. Portland: Harkless 0-2 3-4 3, Aminu 2-9 0-0 5, Nurkic 12-18 3-5 27, Lillard 8-19 9-10 32, McCollum 5-11 5-6 17, Davis 1-1 1-1 3, Collins 3-5 2-2 10, Napier 1-6 0-0 2, Turner 5-11 2-2 13, Connaughton 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 38-83 25-30 115. Miami 25 22 25 27 — 99 Portland 34 25 29 27 — 115 3-point goals: Miami 10-31 (T.Johnson 4-7, Ellington 3-10, Winslow 2-3, Olynyk 1-4, J.Johnson 0-1, Richardson 0-1, McGruder 0-2, Dragic 0-3), Portland 14-36 (Lillard 7-14, Collins 2-3, McCollum 2-5, Connaughton 1-1, Turner 1-3, Aminu 1-6, Harkless 0-1, Napier 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 46 (Winslow 13), Portland 50 (Nurkic 16). Assists: Miami 24 (Olynyk 7), Portland 23 (Lillard 10). Total fouls: Miami 24, Portland 15. A: 19,786 (19,393).


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

ICE HOCKEY • MID-STATES CHALLENGE CUP SPOTLIGHT

SCHOOL SPIRIT

Class president hopes to help lift De Smet to first title since 2010 BY STEVE OVERBEY sTLhighschoolsports.com

Nick Thorpe thoroughly enjoyed his first two years at De Smet Jesuit High School. He helped the Spartans hockey team to a successful 15-10-4 campaign. He shined in the classroom and made friends all across the sprawling campus. But something was missing. “I just felt like I should be doing more, contributing around the school in a different way besides hockey,” Thorpe recalled. “I didn’t want to have regrets and leave not doing everything I could to make this a better place.” So Thorpe decided to give up playing junior-level hockey with the St. Louis Jr. Blues. For him, it became all about De Smet. “How many people would quit junior hockey just to help make a difference at their school,” De Smet senior winger Stephen Randazzo said. “That tells you all you need to know about Nick.” Now a senior, Thorpe is enjoying the best of both worlds. At the start of his junior year, Thorpe decided to get involved in student government in an effort to “give back.” He quickly climbed up the political ranks and currently holds the prestigious honor of class president. Thorpe is one of the most respected students on campus. On the ice, the 5-foot-8 winger is shining just as brightly. Thorpe helped the Spartans

MONDAY’S RESULTS GIRLS SOCCER

— METRO CUP-NIKE BRACKET Pool A Waterloo 1, Rochester 0 W: Sydney Luedeman Also Edwardsville 5, Belleville East 0 (no scoring information reported) Pool B Triad 3, Springfield 0 T: Jody Ellis 2, Chelsea Riden; shutout by Mercedes King Also Belleville West 2, Alton 0 (no scoring information reported) — METRO CUP-PUMA BRACKET Pool A Mater Dei 1, Highland 1 H: Ashlyn Deluca M: Faith Rackers Also Mount Vernon 5, Jerseyville 1 (no scoring information reported) — METRO CUP-ADIDAS BRACKET Pool A Althoff 6, Mascoutah 0 (no scoring information reported) O’Fallon 0, Roxana 0

BOYS LACROSSE

SLUH 11, John Burroughs 3 JB: Turner Carlson, Jimmy Johnson, Hutson Williams

WATER POLO

Parkway West 10, Lindbergh 9 L: Will Doyle 3, Sam Unter 2, Mason White 2, Brendan Bavlsik 1, Bettenn Wright 1 CBC 15, John Burroughs 8 C: Brooks Cosman 7, Carter Philipp 3, Siler Wehrmann 2, Aaron Conway 1, Luke Conway 1, Joe Reddan 1 Also Parkway Central 9, Parkway South 8

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE ICE HOCKEY

At Scottrade Center — MID-STATES WICKENHEISER CUP FINAL Marquette (18-8-2) vs. Westminster (14-9-4), 5:30 p.m. — MID-STATES CHALLENGE CUP FINAL De Smet (19-6-4) vs. St. Louis U. High (27-1), 8 p.m.

BASEBALL

Dupo at Lebanon, 4:30 p.m. Greenville at Wood River, 4:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Red Bud, 4:30 p.m. Mount Vernon at Salem, 4:30 p.m. Belleville West at ME Lutheran, 4:30 p.m. Brown County at Hardin Calhoun, 4:30 p.m.

SOFTBALL

Mater Dei at O’Fallon, 4 p.m. Greenville at Wood River, 4:30 p.m. Marissa at Steeleville, 4:30 p.m. West Frankford at Carbondale, 4:30 p.m. Dupo at Lebanon, 4:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Red bud, 4:30 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

— METRO CUP-ADIDAS BRACKET Pool B Gibault vs. Alton Marquette at Althoff, 5:30 p.m. Wesclin at Columbia, 5:30 p.m. — METRO CUP-NIKE BRACKET Pool B Triad at Belleville West, 5:30 p.m. — METRO CUP-PUMA BRACKET Pool B Marion at Freeburg, 5:30 p.m. Pool A Jerseyville vs. Mater Dei at Althoff, 7:30 p.m. Mount Vernon vs. Highland at Bellville West, 7:30 p.m. — OTHER GAMES Murphysboro at ME Lutheran, 4:30 p.m. Greenville at Breese Central, 4:30 p.m.

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

De Smet senior Nick Thorpe (88) has balanced a starring role on the ice with duties as class president.

dethrone four-time defending Mid-States Club Hockey Association champion CBC in a twogame semifinal series that ended March 3. De Smet, which lost the first game of the two-game set 5-1, rallied to take the second game 5-2, necessitating a 10-minute mini-game to decide which team would advance. The Spartans won the tiebreaker 2-0 and sent shockwaves throughout the league. For the first time since 2000, CBC will not be playing for the title, thanks to De Smet’s rally. And Thorpe, the team captain, helped trigger the shocker with two goals in Game 2 and the

clincher in the mini-game. “The best feeling I’ve ever had playing hockey,” Thorpe said. Thorpe has led the Spartans in scoring each of the last two seasons and has 52 goals and 44 assists over his career. De Smet (19-6-4) is hoping to cap off a dream season when it faces SLUH (27-1) in the Mid-States Club Hockey Association Challenge Cup Final at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Scottrade Center. The Spartans are looking for their 14th Mid-States crown but first since 2010 when they knocked off CBC 5-4 in the championship. Thorpe is in position to claim

the top two honors in his respective fields. He already nailed down the first feat when he won the presidential election at the start of the school year. And he is just as proud of his on-ice skills as he is of his political career. “To be truly honest, I don’t have a favorite,” he said. “I’m proud of both things I’ve accomplished and I’ve seen myself grow in both (positions).” Thorpe, who began playing hockey at the age of 3, is just as comfortable speaking in front 800 fellow students as he is scoring goals. “He’s got the support of the whole school,” Randazzo said.

“Everyone loves him.” Thrope burst onto the scene by scoring 10 goals as a freshman. He missed most of an injuryplagued sophomore campaign but charged back with 38 goals over the last two seasons. “He’s just one of a kind,” firstyear De Smet coach Christopher Durso said. “He goes about things the right way, on and off the ice.” The Spartans will have their work cut out against red-hot SLUH, which has won its last 18 games. The Junior Billikens beat De Smet 8-0, 9-1 and 3-0 during the regular season. But the Spartans also have a ton of a momentum after dispatching CBC. “(SLUH) is still the team to beat,” Durso said. “But I like the way our guys are playing.” De Smet sports a balanced attack led by Thorpe (20 goals) and Randazzo (10). Owen Benben has scored 11 goals, including two game-winning tallies. Goaltender Will Oliver is 144-2 with five shutouts and a 1.92 goals against average. SLUH has outscored its opponents 186-20 this season. Joe Winkelmann (25 goals) and Henry Wagner (23) lead the way. Westminster (14-9-4) faces Marquette (18-8-2) in the second-tier Wickenheiser Cup final at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Scottrade Center. Westminster is the defending champion. Marquette won the title in 2016.

BOYS BASKETBALL • CLASS 4A SUPER-SECTIONAL SPOTLIGHT

ANOTHER GEAR

Brazil kicks game up a notch to help Belleville West into super-sectional showdown BY PAUL HALFACRE sTLhighschoolsports.com

Belleville West junior Lawrence Brazil III didn’t feel any different late last month when he stepped onto the court for the Maroons’ first postseason game against rival Belleville East. But something in the back of Brazil’s mind told him it was time to find another gear. “The biggest thing in the playoffs was I was going to have to become more confident,” Brazil said. Brazil found that confidence, which has helped the Maroons move one step away from reaching the Class 4A state tournament. The 5-foot-11 spark plug has scored 45 points in his last three games to help continue West’s magical run. “He’s played well all season long, but in the postseason he’s really played well, both offensively and defensively,” Belleville West coach Joe Muniz said. Belleville West (29-2) squares off against West Aurora (25-4) at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Redbird Arena in the Class 4A Normal SuperSectional. The winner advances to the state tournament against Elgin Larkin (23-8) or Benet Academy (27-4) at 5:30 p.m. Friday at Carver Arena in Peoria. The Maroons, who reached the quarterfinals in 2003 under coach Bill Schmidt, are looking to get to the final four for the first time since 1966. West Aurora, which defeated Bolingbrook 82-67 in the Romeoville Sectional final on Friday, has reached the super-sectional round four times in the last seven seasons. Brazil has averaged 15.2 points in postseason play — five points

higher than his regular-season average. In the only game in which he didn’t hit double figures, he still led the Maroons with six assists. “It helps me not being in a hurry all the time,” Brazil said. “(My teammates) help me know when to go and when to do things basically.” Brazil said teammates like fellow juniors EJ Liddell and Keith Randolph and seniors Malachi Smith and Curtis Williams have been particularly influential. “They’re amazing,” Brazil said. “They’re impressive and they really talk you into your game. They’re so patient and confident. Even if we mess up, they’re there to pick us up.” In the sectional semifinals, when Moline sagged into a zone to try to deny the inside presence of Liddell and Randolph, Brazil became the zone buster. He hit a 3-pointer at the end of the first half to soften the zone and then scored seven of his game-high 19 points in the third period. “He made some big-time shots to get us some momentum going into the second half,” Muniz said. “He made some big plays in the second half to really extend the lead.” Brazil said he loves it when his teammates give him the green light. “As soon as my guys tell me to shoot or if I give it to my big men and they toss it back to me, I know when to shoot it,” Brazil said. “I know what that means.” Muniz said Brazil has improved his all-around game the past few months. “I think he’s grown more on the defensive end this year and his overall toughness,” Muniz said. “I

PAUL HALFACRE • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Belleville West’s Lawrence Brazil (10) goes up for a layup during a Class 4A sectional championship at Pekin High School on Friday.

think he’s gotten a lot better as the season has gone on.” Against Quincy in the sectional semifinal, Brazil held Jaeden Smith to six points. Against Moline, Brazil kept Brody Harding out of the lane and limited him to just two points.

Brazil and Maroons will have a tall task against traditional toughie West Aurora. But the Maroons are clicking on all cylinders. “Everybody has to be confident and aggressive and listen to (Muniz) and stick with the game plan,” Brazil said.

BOYS LACROSSE

CBC (2-0) at MICDS (2-0), 4:30 p.m. Lindbergh (0-1) at Westminster (0-1), 5:30 p.m. Holt at Clayton, 7 p.m. Francis Howell (1-1) at Fox (1-1), 7:15 p.m.

HOW TO SUBMIT SPRING SPORTS STATS Direct entry • Via datacenter.statsonline.com with username and password supplied to each coach at each school. Phone • To call in scores and stats, call 314-830-5400. Fax • 314-830-5454 Email • stats@stltoday.com

HOW TO SUBMIT ALL-CONFERENCE Coaches and athletics directors, please send all-conference selections to chollway@postdispatch.com in a digital format, spreadsheet or word document. No faxes or PDFs, please. In order to expedite publication, please send as soon as they are selected and indicate a publication date if they are not to be released immediately. Please submit in this style: Position, John Brown, sr. (or jr., so., fr.), school

BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON UPDATE MISSOURI BOYS

— CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals Chaminade 79, Hazelwood Central 72 Rock Bridge 60, Parkview 51 Webster Groves 78, Fort Zumwalt South 45 Liberty-KC 52, Rockhurst 46 At Missouri State’s JQH Arena Semifinals, Thursday Chaminade (24-4) vs. Rock Bridge (27-1), 6:50 p.m. Webster Groves (20-9) vs. Liberty-KC (22-7), 8:30 p.m. Placing games Third place: 12:45 p.m. Friday Championship: 4:30 p.m. Saturday — CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals Sikeston 76, St. Mary’s 50 Grandview-KC 81, Logan-Rogersville 46 Jennings 77, Parkway Central 74 (OT) Raytown South 61, Kearney 47 At Missouri State’s JQH Arena Semifinals, Friday Sikeston (27-2) vs. Grandview-KC (26-3), 6 p.m. Jennings (27-3) vs. Raytown South (24-5), 7:45 p.m.

Placing games Third place: 12:45 p.m. Saturday Championship: 8:10 p.m. Saturday

MISSOURI GIRLS

— CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals St. Joseph’s 79, Hazelwood Central 67 Kickapoo 85, Camdenton 65 Kirkwood 52, Francis Howell Central 39 Liberty-KC 44, Lee’s Summit North 41 At Missouri State’s JQH Arena Semifinals, Thursday St. Joseph’s (23-6) vs. Kickapoo (27-3), 3:30 p.m. Kirkwood (26-3) vs. Liberty-KC (22-7), 5:10 p.m. Placing games Third place: 11 a.m. Friday Championship: 2:40 p.m. Saturday — CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals Miller Career 63, Dexter 44 Carl Junction 55, Osage 41 Incarnate Word 58, MICDS 43 Kearney 55, Lincoln College Prep 43 At Missouri State’s JQH Arena Semifinals, Friday Miller Career (18-9) vs. Carl Junction (25-3), 2:30 p.m.

Incarnate Word (25-5) vs. Kearney (26-3), 4:15 p.m. Placing games Third place: 11 a.m. Saturday Championship: 6:20 p.m. Saturday

ILLINOIS BOYS

— CLASS 4A SUPER-SECTIONALS (All Tuesday) At Illinois State’s Redbird Arena, Normal Belleville West (29-2) vs. West Aurora (25-4), 7 p.m. At Northern Illinois University Elgin Larkin (23-8) vs. Benet Academy (27-4), 7:30 p.m. At Sears Centre Arena Lake Zurich (26-7) vs. Evanston (25-5), 8 p.m. At Chicago State University Chicago Simeon (29-3) vs. Chicago Whitney Young (25-7), 7 p.m. — CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT At Peoria Civic Center Semifinals, Friday Belleville West-West Aurora winner vs. Larkin-Benet winner, 5:30 p.m. Lake Zurich-Evanston winner vs. SimeonWhitney Young winner, 7:15 p.m.

Placing games Third place: 5:30 p.m. Saturday Championship: 7:15 p.m. Saturday — CLASS 3A SUPER-SECTIONALS (All Tuesday) At Bank of Springfield Center Marion (22-11) vs. Springfield Southeast (27-3), 7 p.m. At Northern Illinois University Metamora (20-11) vs. Chicago Heights Marian (24-5), 6 p.m. At Sears Centre Arena North Chicago (21-8) vs. Boylan Catholic (22-10), 6 p.m. At Joliet Central Chicago Morgan Park (22-9) vs. Chicago North Lawndale (18-10), 7 p.m. — CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT At Peoria Civic Center Semifinals, Friday Morgan Park-North Lawndale winner vs. Metamora-Marian winner, 11:15 a.m. Marion-Southeast winner vs. North ChicagoBoylan winner, 1 p.m. Placing games Third place: 11:15 a.m. Saturday Championship: 1 p.m. Saturday


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NBA Favorite Points Underdog WIZARDS 4.5 T’Wolves 76ERS 5.5 Pacers Raptors 9.5 NETS KNICKS PK Mavericks Thunder 6.5 HAWKS Clippers 5.5 BULLS PELICANS 3.5 Hornets SPURS 10 Magic JAZZ 8 Pistons Cavaliers 7 SUNS Nuggets 2 LAKERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament — First Four Radford 4.5 LIU-Brooklyn Ucla 3.5 St. Bona NIT Tournament LOUISVILLE 9 No Kentucky BAYLOR 16.5 Wagner MIDDLE TENN ST 6 Vermont W KENTUCKY 4.5 Boston College OKLAHOMA ST 11 Fla Gulf Coast NOTRE DAME 22 Hampton ST. MARY’S-CA 15 SE Louisiana OREGON 11 Rider USC 18 NC-Asheville CBI Tournament UTAH VALLEY 7 E Washington > Wednesday NCAA Tournament — First Four Tx Southern 5 NC Central Arizona St 1.5 Syracuse > Thursday NCAA Tournament Rhode Island 1.5 Oklahoma Duke 20 Iona Villanova NL Radford or Villanova NL LIU-Brooklyn Virginia Tech 2 Alabama Kansas 14.5 Penn Seton Hall 2 NC State Houston 4 San Diego St Michigan 11.5 Montana Tennessee 13 Wright St Miami-Florida 2 Loyola-Chi Texas Tech 11.5 Stephen Austin Florida NL Ucla or Florida NL St. Bona Gonzaga 12.5 NC-Greensboro Ohio St 8.5 S Dakota St Kentucky 6 Davidson Arizona 9 Buffalo > Friday Texas A&M 3.5 Providence N Carolina 19.5 Lipscomb Creighton 1 Kansas St Virginia 22.5 MD-Balt Co Purdue 20.5 CS-Fullerton Butler 1.5 Arkansas Michigan St 14 Bucknell Tcu NL Arizona St or Tcu NL Syracuse Cincinnati 14.5 Georgia St Nevada PK Texas Xavier NL Tx Southern or Xavier NL NC Central Missouri PK Florida St Wichita St 12 Marshall W Virginia 10.5 Murray St Auburn 10 Charleston Clemson 5 New Mexico St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Bruins -$120/even HURRICANES LIGHTNING -$300/+$240 Senators Stars -$155/+$135 CANADIENS PREDATORS -$135/+$115 Jets WILD -$170/+$150 Avalanche FLAMES -$155/+$135 Oilers Kings -$140/+$120 COYOTES Grand Salami: Over/under 40.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL National League CARDINALS — Optioned LHP Austin Gomber, INF Edmundo Sosa and OF Tyler O’Neill to Memphis (PCL) and RHPs Derian Gonzalez and Conner Greene to Springfield (Texas). Reassigned RHPs Ryan Helsley, Dakota Hudson and Arturo Reyes and INF Tommy Edman to their minor league camp. COLORADO — Agreed to terms on a one-year contract with OF Carlos Gonzalez. Placed RHP Rayan Gonzalez on the 60-day DL. LA DODGERS — Optioned INF-OF Tim Locastro, LHP Henry Owens, and RHPs Dennis Santana and Brock Stewart to minor league camp. Reassigned Cs Keibert Ruiz and Shawn Zarraga; INFs Matt Beaty, Drew Jackson and Edwin Rios; OFs Yusniel Diaz, DJ Peters, Henry Ramos and Travis Taijeron; RHPs Zach Neal, Yaisel Sierra, Joe Broussard, Daniel Corcino, Brian Schlitter and CC Lee; and LHP Brian Moran to minor league camp. PHILADELPHIA — Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Arrieta on a three-year contract. Designated 1B Tommy Joseph for assignment. PITTSBURGH — Optioned OF Austin Meadows, RHP Clay Holmes and LHP Jack Leathersich were to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned SS Cole Tucker, OFs Bryan Reynolds and Jason Martin, RHP Damien Magnifico and C Christian Kelley to minor league. American League CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RHPs Cody Anderson, Mike Clevinger, Nick Goody, Julian Merryweather, Ben Taylor and Adama Plutko; OFs Greg Allen, Bradley Zimmer and Tyler Naquin; INFs Willi Castro, Yu Chang, Yandy Diaz and Erik Gonzalez; Cs Eric Haase and Francisco Mejia; LHPs Ryan Merritt, Shawn Morimando and Tyler Olson; SS Francisco Lindor; UTL Rob Refsnyder; and INFs Eric Stamets and Gio Urshela on one-year contracts. Optioned OF Abraham Almonte, C Francisco Mejia, LHP Shawn Morimando and RHPs Julian Merryweather and Adam Plutko to Columbus (IL). Reassigned RHPs Louis Head and Josh Martin; LHP Adam Wilk and INF Bobby Bradley to minors. HOUSTON — Reassigned RHPs Rogelio Armenteros, Brendan McCurry and Trent Thornton to minors. MINNESOTA — Agreed to terms with RHP Lance Lynn on a one-year contract. NY YANKEES — Agreed to terms with 2B Neil Walker on a one-year contract. Released INF Danny Espinosa. Reassigned INF Kyle Holder to minors. OAKLAND — Agreed to terms with C Jonathan Lucroy on a one-year contract. Reassigned RHPs Grant Holmes and Logan Shore to minors. SEATTLE — Agreed to terms with RHPs Dan Altavilla, Chasen Bradford, Chase De Jong, Edwin Diaz, Andrew Moore, Max Povse, Nick Rumbelow and Rob Whalen; INFs Mike Ford, Ryon Healy, Taylor Motter and Daniel Vogelbach; Cs David Freitas and Mike Marjama; OFs Ben Gamel, Mitch Haniger, Guillermo Heredia and Cameron Perkins; and LHPs Marco Gonzales, Ariel Miranda, Sam Moll and James Pazos on one-year contracts. Reassigned RHP Johendi Jiminian to minors. FOOTBALL | NFL ATLANTA — Placed second-round tenders on S Ricardo Allen and G Ben Garland. BALTIMORE — Signed OL James Hurst to a four-year contract. Released CB Lardarius Webb. BUFFALO — Traded OT Cordy Glenn and 2018 first- (No. 21) and fifth-round (No. 158) draft picks to Cincinnati for a 2018 first- (No. 12) and sixth-round (No. 187) draft picks. CHICAGO — Agreed to terms with OL Bradley Sowell on a two-year contact. DALLAS — Re-signed DT Brian Price. KANSAS CITY — Released LB Tamba Hali. LA CHARGERS — Re-signed LB Nick Dzubnar to a two-year contract and WR Geremy Davis to a one-year contract. NEW ORLEANS — Announced the retirement of OT Zach Strief. NEW YORK GIANTS — Re-signed LB Mark Herzlich and G Jon Halapio. OAKLAND — Released CB Sean Smith and OT Marshall Newhouse. Signed DT Justin Ellis to a three-year contract and WR Griff Whalen to a one-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO — Signed P Jeff Locke to a one-year contract and RB Raheem Mostert to his one-year exclusive rights tender. WASHINGTON — Re-signed K Dustin Hopkins. Placed a second-round tender on OT Ty Nsekhe. HOCKEY | NHL BLUES — Recalled G Ville Husso from San Antonio (AHL). ARIZONA — Coach Rick Tocchet granted leave of absence. Named John MacLean interim coach.

Area scores

BASEBALL Spring training Monday Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 5, Detroit 4 Boston 6, Toronto 4 Kansas City (ss) 4, San Diego 0 Milwaukee 7, LA Dodgers 6 San Francisco 6, Oakland 5 Cleveland 4, Texas (ss) 2 LA Angels 4, Cincinnati 3 Colorado 4, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 0 Minnesota 2, NY Yankees 1 Texas (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., late Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., late Tuesday Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Detroit vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. NY Mets (ss) at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 12:10 p.m. Oakland vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Seattle vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. NY Mets (ss) vs. Washington at West Palm Beach, Fla., 6:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.

Remaining free agents NATIONAL LEAGUE ATLANTA (1) — R.A. Dickey, rhp. CHICAGO (1) — John Lackey, rhp. CINCINNATI (3) — Bronson Arroyo, rhp; Scott Feldman, rhp; Drew Storen, rhp. COLORADO (2) —Greg Holland, rhp; Mark Reynolds, 1b. LOS ANGELES (2) — Andre Ethier, of; Franklin Gutierrez, of. MIAMI (1) — Mike Aviles, inf. MILWAUKEE (1) — Matt Garza, rhp. PHILADELPHIA (1) — Clay Buchholz, rhp. PITTSBURGH (1) — John Jaso, 1b. SAN FRANCISCO (2) — Matt Cain, rhp; Michael Morse, ib-of. WASHINGTON (3) — Joe Blanton, rhp; Stephen Drew, 2b; Jayson Werth, of. AMERICAN LEAGUE BALTIMORE (4) — J.J. Hardy, ss; Jeremy Hellickson, rhp; Ubaldo Jimenez, rhp; Seth Smith, of. CHICAGO (2) — Mike Pelfrey, rhp; Geovany Soto c. HOUSTON (1) — Carlos Beltran, dh. KANSAS CITY (2) — Melky Cabrera, of; Trevor Cahill, rhp. LOS ANGELES (4) — Andrew Bailey, rhp; Yunel Escobar, 3b; Brandon Phillips, 2b; Huston Street, rhp. MINNESOTA (1) — Glen Perkins, lhp. NEW YORK (1) — Matt Holliday, dh. SEATTLE (1) — Carlos Ruiz, c. TAMPA BAY (1) —Alex Cobb, rhp. TEXAS (1) — Jason Grilli, rhp. TORONTO (2) — Brett Anderson, lhp; Jose Bautista, of.

GOLF LPGA Money Leaders Through March 4 Golfer 1. Jin Young Ko 2. Michelle Wie 3. Jessica Korda 4. Brittany Lincicome 5. Minjee Lee 6. Lexi Thompson 7. Danielle Kang 8. Moriya Jutanugarn 9. Brooke M. Henderson 10. Nelly Korda 11. Shanshan Feng 12. Wei-Ling Hsu 13. Amy Yang 14. Ariya Jutanugarn 15. Hannah Green

'04 Acura MDX: 4WD, Navigation, Very Sharp $9,990 #B8880A

'09 Acura TSX: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors & Front Seats, Power Moonroof $8,990 #V17721A

Audi '16 Audi S5 3.0T: Cabriolet, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $43,963 #28074A

Money $282,641 $277,480 $269,845 $253,962 $181,101 $179,951 $174,562 $168,673 $168,204 $167,430 $156,271 $135,766 $134,599 $114,072 $107,908

PGA | FedEx Cup leaders Through Sunday Golfer 1. Justin Thomas 2. Patton Kizzire 3. Phil Mickelson 4. Dustin Johnson 5. Jon Rahm 6. Brendan Steele 7. Tony Finau 8. Paul Casey 9. Pat Perez 10. Jason Day 11. Chez Reavie 12. Patrick Cantlay 13. Gary Woodland 14. Brian Harman 15. Justin Rose

Points 1,573 1,314 1,149 1,044 982 866 850 842 837 814 800 784 767 757 750

Money $4,491,800 $3,112,488 $3,159,197 $2,779,417 $2,205,484 $1,936,341 $1,992,356 $1,997,718 $2,136,527 $2,073,900 $1,978,673 $1,898,913 $1,857,288 $1,892,537 $2,173,200

Baseball Washington U. 15, Oswego 2 Webster U. 8, Southern Maine 5

COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament > FIRST FOUR Tuesday | Dayton, Ohio LIU Brooklyn (18-16) vs. Radford (22-12), 5:40 p.m. St. Bonaventure (25-7) vs. UCLA (21-11), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday | Dayton, Ohio N.C. Central (19-15) vs. Texas Southern (15-19), 5:40 p.m. Arizona State (20-11) vs. Syracuse (20-13), 8:10 p.m.

> WEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Wichita, Kan. Houston (26-7) vs. San Diego State (22-10), 6:20 p.m. Michigan (28-7) vs. Montana (26-7), 8:50 p.m. Boise, Idaho Gonzaga (30-4) vs. UNC Greensboro (27-7), 12:30 p.m. Ohio State (24-8) vs. S.D. State (28-6), 3 p.m. Friday Charlotte, N.C. Texas A&M (20-12) vs. Providence (21-13), 11:15 a.m. North Carolina (25-10) vs. Lipscomb (23-9), 1:45 p.m. Nashville, Tenn. Xavier (28-5) vs. N.C. Central-Texas Southern winner, 6:20 p.m. Missouri (20-12) vs. FSU (20-11), 8:50 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 22 Regional Championship • March 24

> EAST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Pittsburgh Villanova (30-4) vs. LIU BrooklynRadford winner, 5:50 p.m. Va. Tech (21-11) vs. Alabama (19-15), 8:20 p.m. Dallas Texas Tech (24-9) vs. Stephen F. Austin (28-6), 6:27 p.m. Florida (20-12) vs. St. BonaventureUCLA winner, 8:57 p.m. Friday Detroit Purdue (28-6) vs. Cal State Fullerton (20-11), 11:40 a.m. Arkansas (23-11) vs. Butler (20-13), 2:10 p.m. San Diego Wichita State (25-7) vs. Marshall (24-10), 12:30 p.m. West Va. (24-10) vs. Murray St. (26-5), 3 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 23 Regional Championship • March 25

Women’s NIT

CIT

Champions League

First round matchups Times and bracket TBA Wednesday Southern at Alabama Jacksonville at UCF St. Joseph’s at Seton Hall Thursday Western Illinois at South Dakota Houston at Colorado State Cincinnati at Michigan State Saint Mary’s at New Mexico Texas State at Rice Lamar at TCU Missouri State at Louisiana Tech Purdue at IUPUI Middle Tennessee at Ball State UT Martin at Indiana Milwaukee at Northern Iowa New Mexico State at Wyoming Idaho at UC Davis Saint Louis at Kansas State UNLV at Utah Bucknell at West Virginia Radford at Penn State ETSU at JMU Marist at St. John’s Duquesne at Miami (OH) Bethune-Cookman at Georgia Tech Chattanooga at UAB Friday Wright State at Toledo Albany at Penn Delaware at Georgetown Harvard at Fordham Robert Morris at Drexel Stephen F. Austin at George Mason Navy at Virginia Tech

First Round • Monday Central Michigan 94, Fort Wayne 89 Drake 80, Abilene Christian 73, OT Liberty 65, NC A&T 52 Hartford (19-13) at San Diego (18-13), late Second Round Tuesday, TBA 1st-Round winner vs. Wofford (21-12) 1st-Round winner vs. N. Colorado (22-12) 1st-Round winner vs. Portland State (20-13) 1st-Round winner vs. Sam Houston St. (19-14) Wednesday Niagara (19-13) at E. Michigan (21-12), 6 p.m. St. Francis (Pa.) (18-12) at Illinois-Chicago (17-15), 7 p.m. UTSA (19-14) at Lamar (19-13), 7 p.m. Thursday Louisiana-Monroe (16-15) at Austin Peay (18-14), 7 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 22-25 Semifinals • March 29 Championship • March 30

QUARTERFINALS Second leg Tuesday NY Red Bulls (US) vs. Tijuana (Mexico), 7 p.m. Tigres (Mexico) vs. Toronto (Canada), 9 p.m. Wednesday Tauro (Panama) vs. America (Mexico), 7 p.m. Guadalajara (Mexico) vs. Seattle (US), 9 p.m.

CBI First Round Tuesday Eastern Washington (20-14) at Utah Valley (22-10), 8 p.m. Wednesday Miami (Ohio) (16-17) at Campbell (16-15), 6 p.m. Jacksonville St. (21-12) at Canisius (21-11), 6 Texas RGV (15-17) at New Orleans (15-16), 7 North Texas (15-17) at S. Dakota (26-8), 7 p.m. Colgate (19-13) at San Francisco (18-15), 9 p.m. Mercer (18-14) at Grand Canyon (22-11), 9 p.m. Central Arkansas (17-16) at Seattle (20-13), 9 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 19 Semifinals • March 21 Championship Series • March 26, 28, 30

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Man City 30 26 3 1 85 20 Man United 30 20 5 5 58 23 Tottenham 30 18 7 5 59 25 Liverpool 30 17 9 4 68 34 Chelsea 30 17 5 8 52 27 Arsenal 30 14 6 10 55 41 Burnley 30 11 10 9 27 26 Leicester 30 10 10 10 45 43 Everton 30 10 7 13 35 49 Watford 30 10 6 14 39 50 Brighton 30 8 10 12 28 40 Bournemouth 30 8 9 13 35 48 Newcastle 30 8 8 14 30 40 Swansea 30 8 7 15 25 42 Huddersfield 30 8 7 15 25 50 West Ham 30 7 9 14 36 57 Southampton 30 5 13 12 29 44 Crystal Palace 30 6 9 15 28 48 Stoke 30 6 9 15 28 56 West Brom 30 3 11 16 23 47 Monday • Stoke 0, Man City 2 Friday • Tottenham vs. Newcastle ppd. Saturday Bournemouth vs. West Brom, 9 a.m. Stoke vs. Everton, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Crystal Palace, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. Watford, 11:30 a.m. Swansea vs. Southampton ppd. Leicester vs. Arsenal ppd. Burnley vs. Chelsea ppd.

Pts 81 65 61 60 56 48 43 40 37 36 34 33 32 31 31 30 28 27 27 20

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 2 0 0 6 5 2 New York City FC 2 0 0 6 4 1 New York 1 0 0 3 4 0 Philadelphia 1 0 0 3 2 0 New England 1 1 0 3 2 3 Atlanta United FC 1 1 0 3 3 5 Orlando City 0 1 1 1 2 3 D.C. United 0 1 1 1 2 4 Chicago 0 1 0 0 3 4 Montreal 0 2 0 0 3 5 Toronto FC 0 1 0 0 0 2 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 2 0 0 6 6 1 Vancouver 2 0 0 6 4 2 Houston 1 1 0 3 5 2 San Jose 1 0 0 3 3 2 Minnesota United 1 1 0 3 4 4 LA Galaxy 1 1 0 3 3 3 Sporting K.C. 1 1 0 3 4 5 FC Dallas 0 0 1 1 1 1 Real Salt Lake 0 1 1 1 2 6 Colorado 0 1 0 0 1 2 Seattle 0 1 0 0 0 1 Portland 0 2 0 0 1 6 Saturday Houston at D.C. United, 12:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota United, 1 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Orlando City at New York City FC, 2:30 p.m. Vancouver at Atlanta United FC, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. New York at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.

> SOUTH REGIONAL First Round Thursday Dallas Tennessee (25-8) vs. Wright State (25-9), 11:40 a.m. Miami (22-9) vs. Loyola (28-5), 2:10 p.m. Boise, Idaho Kentucky (24-10) vs. Davidson (21-11), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (27-7) vs. Buffalo (26-8), 8:40 p.m. Friday Charlotte, N.C. Creighton (21-11) vs. Kansas State (22-11), 5:50 p.m. Virginia (31-2) vs. UMBC (24-10), 8:20 p.m. Nashville, Tenn. Cincinnati (30-4) vs. Georgia State (24-10), 1 p.m. Nevada (27-7) vs. Texas (19-14), 3:30 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 22 Regional Championship • March 24

> MIDWEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Pittsburgh Rhode Island (25-7) vs. Okla. (18-13), 11:15 a.m. Duke (26-7) vs. Iona (20-13), 1:45 p.m. Wichita, Kan. Kansas (27-7) vs. Pennsylvania (24-8), 1 p.m. Seton Hall (21-11) vs. N.C. St. (21-11), 3:30 p.m. Friday Detroit Michigan State (29-4) vs. Bucknell (25-9), 6:10 p.m. TCU (21-11) vs. Arizona StateSyracuse winner, 8:40 p.m. San Diego Auburn (25-7) vs. Charleston (26-7), 6:27 p.m. Clemson (23-9) vs. N.M. St. (28-5), 8:57 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 23 Regional Championship • March 25

> FINAL FOUR March 31 | San Antonio

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP April 2 | San Antonio

NIT First Round Tuesday Wagner (23-9) at Baylor (18-14), 6 p.m. N. Kentucky (22-9) at Louisville (20-13), 6 p.m. Vermont (27-7) at Middle Tenn. (24-7), 7 p.m. Boston C. (19-15) at W. Kentucky (24-10), 7 p.m. Florida GC (23-11) at Oklahoma St. (19-14), 8 Hampton (19-15) at Notre Dame (20-14), 8. Rider (22-9) at Oregon (22-12), 9 p.m. SE Louisiana (22-11) at Saint Mary’s (28-5), 9 UNC Asheville (21-12) at USC (23-11), 10 p.m. Wednesday Harvard (18-13) at Marquette (19-13), 6 p.m. La.-Lafayette (27-6) at LSU (17-14), 6 p.m. Temple (17-15) at Penn State (21-13), 7 p.m. Nebraska (22-10) at Miss. State (22-11), 8 p.m. UC Davis (22-10) at Utah (19-11), 8 p.m. BYU (24-10) at Stanford (18-15), 9 p.m. Boise St. (23-8) at Washington (20-12), 9 p.m. Second Round • March 16-19 Quarterfinals • March 20-21 Semifinals • March 27 Championship • March 29

GUN SHOW March 17-18, 2018

St. Charles, MO St. Charles Convention Center Saturday 9AM - 5PM, Sunday 9AM - 3PM

1 Convention Center Plaza

www.macshows.com

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Acura

Trn 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 3 4 2

Softball Cortland 12, Washington U. 6 Susquehanna 9, Washington U. 4

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Audi

Audi

BMW

Buick

Cadillac

'15 Audi A5 2.0T: Convertible, Cuvee Silver Metallic / Brown Roof, 2.0L TFSI 4-cyl, $31,147 #28449A

'12 Audi TT RS: 2.5 TFSI Coupe, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $36,963 #P9044

'17 BMW X3 xDrive28i: Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Heated Front Seats, Panorama Sunroof, $33,500 #P9084

'16 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, 19K, Black, Nav & Bose $25,490 #C172208A

'91 Cadillac Allante: Coupe, Heated Front Seats $9,490 #C17020R2

'17 Audi A6: 2.0T Premium Plus, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $38,963 #27540L

'15 Audi A6: Brilliant Black, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro $31,333 #28423A

'15 BMW 435i xDrive: Coupe, One Owner, Local Trade, Good Maintenance History, $34,147 #28481A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: 22K Leather, Red, 1 owner $21,490 #C17445A

'14 Cadillac CTS: Luxury, Certified, 31K, Loaded $27,990 #C17284A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: $16,499 Stock # P06581 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Buick LaCrosse: $21,707 Stock # P06576 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '06 Buick Luce rne CXL: Only 47xxx Mile s , Cle a n Carfax $8990 #P6415

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'14 Audi A7 Hatchback: Daytona Gray Pearl, 3.0T, 38K Miles $39,333 #P9157

'15 Audi A8: 4.0T Tiptronic, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, $37,963 #27112A

'15 BMW M3: Sakhir Orange Metallic, 3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, $49,333 #P9154

'15 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, $46,147 #P9093

'15 Audi Allroad Wa gon: 38K Mile s , Panoroof, $28,490 #B8777

'11 Chevy Impala: LT, FWD, Flex Fuel, Remote Start, $6,990 #V180209A

'17 Audi A4 Premium: Mythos Black Metallic, 2.0L TFSI 4Cyl Quattro $39,333 #28465A

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'15 J e e p P a triot S port: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax $12,940 #42572A

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FOR THE RECORD

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

COLLEGES

NBA Favorite Points Underdog 4.5 T’Wolves WIZARDS 76ERS 5.5 Pacers 9.5 NETS Raptors KNICKS PK Mavericks 6.5 HAWKS Thunder Clippers 5.5 BULLS 3.5 Hornets PELICANS SPURS 10 Magic 8 Pistons JAZZ Cavaliers 7 SUNS Nuggets 2 LAKERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament — First Four 4.5 LIU-Brooklyn Radford Ucla 3.5 St. Bona NIT Tournament LOUISVILLE 9 No Kentucky BAYLOR 16.5 Wagner MIDDLE TENN ST 6 Vermont W KENTUCKY 4.5 Boston College OKLAHOMA ST 11 Fla Gulf Coast 22 Hampton NOTRE DAME ST. MARY’S-CA 15 SE Louisiana 11 Rider OREGON USC 18 NC-Asheville CBI Tournament 7 E Washington UTAH VALLEY > Wednesday NCAA Tournament — First Four 5 NC Central Tx Southern Arizona St 1.5 Syracuse > Thursday NCAA Tournament 1.5 Oklahoma Rhode Island 20 Iona Duke Villanova NL Radford or Villanova NL LIU-Brooklyn 2 Alabama Virginia Tech Kansas 14.5 Penn 2 NC State Seton Hall Houston 4 San Diego St 11.5 Montana Michigan Tennessee 13 Wright St Miami-Florida 2 Loyola-Chi Texas Tech 11.5 Stephen Austin Florida NL Ucla or NL St. Bona Florida Gonzaga 12.5 NC-Greensboro 8.5 S Dakota St Ohio St Kentucky 6 Davidson 9 Buffalo Arizona > Friday Texas A&M 3.5 Providence N Carolina 19.5 Lipscomb Creighton 1 Kansas St Virginia 22.5 MD-Balt Co Purdue 20.5 CS-Fullerton Butler 1.5 Arkansas Michigan St 14 Bucknell NL Arizona St Tcu or NL Syracuse Tcu Cincinnati 14.5 Georgia St Nevada PK Texas Xavier NL Tx Southern or NL NC Central Xavier Missouri PK Florida St Wichita St 12 Marshall 10.5 Murray St W Virginia Auburn 10 Charleston 5 New Mexico St Clemson NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Bruins -$120/even HURRICANES LIGHTNING -$300/+$240 Senators -$155/+$135 CANADIENS Stars PREDATORS -$135/+$115 Jets -$170/+$150 Avalanche WILD FLAMES -$155/+$135 Oilers Kings -$140/+$120 COYOTES Grand Salami: Over/under 40.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL National League CARDINALS — Optioned LHP Austin Gomber, INF Edmundo Sosa and OF Tyler O’Neill to Memphis (PCL) and RHPs Derian Gonzalez and Conner Greene to Springfield (Texas). Reassigned RHPs Ryan Helsley, Dakota Hudson and Arturo Reyes and INF Tommy Edman to their minor league camp. COLORADO — Agreed to terms on a one-year contract with OF Carlos Gonzalez. Placed RHP Rayan Gonzalez on the 60-day DL. LA DODGERS — Optioned INF-OF Tim Locastro, LHP Henry Owens, and RHPs Dennis Santana and Brock Stewart to minor league camp. Reassigned Cs Keibert Ruiz and Shawn Zarraga; INFs Matt Beaty, Drew Jackson and Edwin Rios; OFs Yusniel Diaz, DJ Peters, Henry Ramos and Travis Taijeron; RHPs Zach Neal, Yaisel Sierra, Joe Broussard, Daniel Corcino, Brian Schlitter and CC Lee; and LHP Brian Moran to minor league camp. PHILADELPHIA — Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Arrieta on a three-year contract. Designated 1B Tommy Joseph for assignment. PITTSBURGH — Optioned OF Austin Meadows, RHP Clay Holmes and LHP Jack Leathersich were to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned SS Cole Tucker, OFs Bryan Reynolds and Jason Martin, RHP Damien Magnifico and C Christian Kelley to minor league. American League CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RHPs Cody Anderson, Mike Clevinger, Nick Goody, Julian Merryweather, Ben Taylor and Adama Plutko; OFs Greg Allen, Bradley Zimmer and Tyler Naquin; INFs Willi Castro, Yu Chang, Yandy Diaz and Erik Gonzalez; Cs Eric Haase and Francisco Mejia; LHPs Ryan Merritt, Shawn Morimando and Tyler Olson; SS Francisco Lindor; UTL Rob Refsnyder; and INFs Eric Stamets and Gio Urshela on one-year contracts. Optioned OF Abraham Almonte, C Francisco Mejia, LHP Shawn Morimando and RHPs Julian Merryweather and Adam Plutko to Columbus (IL). Reassigned RHPs Louis Head and Josh Martin; LHP Adam Wilk and INF Bobby Bradley to minors. HOUSTON — Reassigned RHPs Rogelio Armenteros, Brendan McCurry and Trent Thornton to minors. MINNESOTA — Agreed to terms with RHP Lance Lynn on a one-year contract. NY YANKEES — Agreed to terms with 2B Neil Walker on a one-year contract. Released INF Danny Espinosa. Reassigned INF Kyle Holder to minors. OAKLAND — Agreed to terms with C Jonathan Lucroy on a one-year contract. Reassigned RHPs Grant Holmes and Logan Shore to minors. SEATTLE — Agreed to terms with RHPs Dan Altavilla, Chasen Bradford, Chase De Jong, Edwin Diaz, Andrew Moore, Max Povse, Nick Rumbelow and Rob Whalen; INFs Mike Ford, Ryon Healy, Taylor Motter and Daniel Vogelbach; Cs David Freitas and Mike Marjama; OFs Ben Gamel, Mitch Haniger, Guillermo Heredia and Cameron Perkins; and LHPs Marco Gonzales, Ariel Miranda, Sam Moll and James Pazos on one-year contracts. Reassigned RHP Johendi Jiminian to minors. FOOTBALL | NFL ATLANTA — Placed second-round tenders on S Ricardo Allen and G Ben Garland. BALTIMORE — Signed OL James Hurst to a four-year contract. Released CB Lardarius Webb. BUFFALO — Traded OT Cordy Glenn and 2018 first- (No. 21) and fifth-round (No. 158) draft picks to Cincinnati for a 2018 first- (No. 12) and sixth-round (No. 187) draft picks. CHICAGO — Agreed to terms with OL Bradley Sowell on a two-year contact. DALLAS — Re-signed DT Brian Price. KANSAS CITY — Released LB Tamba Hali. LA CHARGERS — Re-signed LB Nick Dzubnar to a two-year contract and WR Geremy Davis to a one-year contract. NEW ORLEANS — Announced the retirement of OT Zach Strief. NEW YORK GIANTS — Re-signed LB Mark Herzlich and G Jon Halapio. OAKLAND — Released CB Sean Smith and OT Marshall Newhouse. Signed DT Justin Ellis to a three-year contract and WR Griff Whalen to a one-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO — Signed P Jeff Locke to a one-year contract and RB Raheem Mostert to his one-year exclusive rights tender. WASHINGTON — Re-signed K Dustin Hopkins. Placed a second-round tender on OT Ty Nsekhe. HOCKEY | NHL BLUES — Recalled G Ville Husso from San Antonio (AHL). ARIZONA — Coach Rick Tocchet granted leave of absence. Named John MacLean interim coach.

Area scores

BASEBALL Spring training Monday Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 5, Detroit 4 Boston 6, Toronto 4 Kansas City (ss) 4, San Diego 0 Milwaukee 7, LA Dodgers 6 San Francisco 6, Oakland 5 Cleveland 4, Texas (ss) 2 LA Angels 4, Cincinnati 3 Colorado 4, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 0 Minnesota 2, NY Yankees 1 Texas (ss) 5, Kansas City 1 Chicago White Sox 4, Seattle 4 Tuesday Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Detroit vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. NY Mets (ss) at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 12:10 p.m. Oakland vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Seattle vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. NY Mets (ss) vs. Washington at West Palm Beach, Fla., 6:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.

GOLF LPGA Money Leaders Through March 4 Golfer 1. Jin Young Ko 2. Michelle Wie 3. Jessica Korda 4. Brittany Lincicome 5. Minjee Lee 6. Lexi Thompson 7. Danielle Kang 8. Moriya Jutanugarn 9. Brooke M. Henderson 10. Nelly Korda 11. Shanshan Feng 12. Wei-Ling Hsu 13. Amy Yang 14. Ariya Jutanugarn 15. Hannah Green

Trn 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 3 4 2

Money $282,641 $277,480 $269,845 $253,962 $181,101 $179,951 $174,562 $168,673 $168,204 $167,430 $156,271 $135,766 $134,599 $114,072 $107,908

Remaining free agents

PGA | FedEx Cup leaders

NATIONAL LEAGUE ATLANTA (1) — R.A. Dickey, rhp. CHICAGO (1) — John Lackey, rhp. CINCINNATI (3) — Bronson Arroyo, rhp; Scott Feldman, rhp; Drew Storen, rhp. COLORADO (2) —Greg Holland, rhp; Mark Reynolds, 1b. LOS ANGELES (2) — Andre Ethier, of; Franklin Gutierrez, of. MIAMI (1) — Mike Aviles, inf. MILWAUKEE (1) — Matt Garza, rhp. PHILADELPHIA (1) — Clay Buchholz, rhp. PITTSBURGH (1) — John Jaso, 1b. SAN FRANCISCO (2) — Matt Cain, rhp; Michael Morse, ib-of. WASHINGTON (3) — Joe Blanton, rhp; Stephen Drew, 2b; Jayson Werth, of. AMERICAN LEAGUE BALTIMORE (4) — J.J. Hardy, ss; Jeremy Hellickson, rhp; Ubaldo Jimenez, rhp; Seth Smith, of. CHICAGO (2) — Mike Pelfrey, rhp; Geovany Soto c. HOUSTON (1) — Carlos Beltran, dh. KANSAS CITY (2) — Melky Cabrera, of; Trevor Cahill, rhp. LOS ANGELES (4) — Andrew Bailey, rhp; Yunel Escobar, 3b; Brandon Phillips, 2b; Huston Street, rhp. MINNESOTA (1) — Glen Perkins, lhp. NEW YORK (1) — Matt Holliday, dh. SEATTLE (1) — Carlos Ruiz, c. TAMPA BAY (1) —Alex Cobb, rhp. TEXAS (1) — Jason Grilli, rhp. TORONTO (2) — Brett Anderson, lhp; Jose Bautista, of.

Through Sunday Golfer 1. Justin Thomas 2. Patton Kizzire 3. Phil Mickelson 4. Dustin Johnson 5. Jon Rahm 6. Brendan Steele 7. Tony Finau 8. Paul Casey 9. Pat Perez 10. Jason Day 11. Chez Reavie 12. Patrick Cantlay 13. Gary Woodland 14. Brian Harman 15. Justin Rose

'04 Acura MDX: 4WD, Navigation, Very Sharp $9,990 #B8880A

'09 Acura TSX: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors & Front Seats, Power Moonroof $8,990 #V17721A

Audi '16 Audi S5 3.0T: Cabriolet, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $43,963 #28074A

Money $4,491,800 $3,112,488 $3,159,197 $2,779,417 $2,205,484 $1,936,341 $1,992,356 $1,997,718 $2,136,527 $2,073,900 $1,978,673 $1,898,913 $1,857,288 $1,892,537 $2,173,200

Baseball Washington U. 15, Oswego 2 Webster U. 8, Southern Maine 5

COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament > FIRST FOUR Tuesday | Dayton, Ohio LIU Brooklyn (18-16) vs. Radford (22-12), 5:40 p.m. St. Bonaventure (25-7) vs. UCLA (21-11), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday | Dayton, Ohio N.C. Central (19-15) vs. Texas Southern (15-19), 5:40 p.m. Arizona State (20-11) vs. Syracuse (20-13), 8:10 p.m.

> WEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Wichita, Kan. Houston (26-7) vs. San Diego State (22-10), 6:20 p.m. Michigan (28-7) vs. Montana (26-7), 8:50 p.m. Boise, Idaho Gonzaga (30-4) vs. UNC Greensboro (27-7), 12:30 p.m. Ohio State (24-8) vs. S.D. State (28-6), 3 p.m. Friday Charlotte, N.C. Texas A&M (20-12) vs. Providence (21-13), 11:15 a.m. North Carolina (25-10) vs. Lipscomb (23-9), 1:45 p.m. Nashville, Tenn. Xavier (28-5) vs. N.C. Central-Texas Southern winner, 6:20 p.m. Missouri (20-12) vs. FSU (20-11), 8:50 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 22 Regional Championship • March 24

> EAST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Pittsburgh Villanova (30-4) vs. LIU BrooklynRadford winner, 5:50 p.m. Va. Tech (21-11) vs. Alabama (19-15), 8:20 p.m. Dallas Texas Tech (24-9) vs. Stephen F. Austin (28-6), 6:27 p.m. Florida (20-12) vs. St. BonaventureUCLA winner, 8:57 p.m. Friday Detroit Purdue (28-6) vs. Cal State Fullerton (20-11), 11:40 a.m. Arkansas (23-11) vs. Butler (20-13), 2:10 p.m. San Diego Wichita State (25-7) vs. Marshall (24-10), 12:30 p.m. West Va. (24-10) vs. Murray St. (26-5), 3 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 23 Regional Championship • March 25

Women’s NIT

CIT

Champions League

First round matchups Times and bracket TBA Wednesday Southern at Alabama Jacksonville at UCF St. Joseph’s at Seton Hall Thursday Western Illinois at South Dakota Houston at Colorado State Cincinnati at Michigan State Saint Mary’s at New Mexico Texas State at Rice Lamar at TCU Missouri State at Louisiana Tech Purdue at IUPUI Middle Tennessee at Ball State UT Martin at Indiana Milwaukee at Northern Iowa New Mexico State at Wyoming Idaho at UC Davis Saint Louis at Kansas State UNLV at Utah Bucknell at West Virginia Radford at Penn State ETSU at JMU Marist at St. John’s Duquesne at Miami (OH) Bethune-Cookman at Georgia Tech Chattanooga at UAB Friday Wright State at Toledo Albany at Penn Delaware at Georgetown Harvard at Fordham Robert Morris at Drexel Stephen F. Austin at George Mason Navy at Virginia Tech

First Round • Monday Central Michigan 94, Fort Wayne 89 Drake 80, Abilene Christian 73, OT Liberty 65, NC A&T 52 San Diego 88, Hartford 72 Second Round Tuesday, TBA 1st-Round winner vs. Wofford (21-12) 1st-Round winner vs. N. Colorado (22-12) 1st-Round winner vs. Portland State (20-13) 1st-Round winner vs. Sam Houston St. (19-14) Wednesday Niagara (19-13) at E. Michigan (21-12), 6 p.m. St. Francis (Pa.) (18-12) at Illinois-Chicago (17-15), 7 p.m. UTSA (19-14) at Lamar (19-13), 7 p.m. Thursday Louisiana-Monroe (16-15) at Austin Peay (18-14), 7 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 22-25 Semifinals • March 29 Championship • March 30

QUARTERFINALS Second leg Tuesday NY Red Bulls (US) vs. Tijuana (Mexico), 7 p.m. Tigres (Mexico) vs. Toronto (Canada), 9 p.m. Wednesday Tauro (Panama) vs. America (Mexico), 7 p.m. Guadalajara (Mexico) vs. Seattle (US), 9 p.m.

CBI First Round Tuesday Eastern Washington (20-14) at Utah Valley (22-10), 8 p.m. Wednesday Miami (Ohio) (16-17) at Campbell (16-15), 6 p.m. Jacksonville St. (21-12) at Canisius (21-11), 6 Texas RGV (15-17) at New Orleans (15-16), 7 North Texas (15-17) at S. Dakota (26-8), 7 p.m. Colgate (19-13) at San Francisco (18-15), 9 p.m. Mercer (18-14) at Grand Canyon (22-11), 9 p.m. Central Arkansas (17-16) at Seattle (20-13), 9 p.m. Quarterfinals • March 19 Semifinals • March 21 Championship Series • March 26, 28, 30

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Man City 30 26 3 1 85 20 Man United 30 20 5 5 58 23 Tottenham 30 18 7 5 59 25 Liverpool 30 17 9 4 68 34 Chelsea 30 17 5 8 52 27 Arsenal 30 14 6 10 55 41 Burnley 30 11 10 9 27 26 Leicester 30 10 10 10 45 43 Everton 30 10 7 13 35 49 Watford 30 10 6 14 39 50 Brighton 30 8 10 12 28 40 Bournemouth 30 8 9 13 35 48 Newcastle 30 8 8 14 30 40 Swansea 30 8 7 15 25 42 Huddersfield 30 8 7 15 25 50 West Ham 30 7 9 14 36 57 Southampton 30 5 13 12 29 44 Crystal Palace 30 6 9 15 28 48 Stoke 30 6 9 15 28 56 West Brom 30 3 11 16 23 47 Monday • Stoke 0, Man City 2 Friday • Tottenham vs. Newcastle ppd. Saturday Bournemouth vs. West Brom, 9 a.m. Stoke vs. Everton, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Crystal Palace, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. Watford, 11:30 a.m. Swansea vs. Southampton ppd. Leicester vs. Arsenal ppd. Burnley vs. Chelsea ppd.

Pts 81 65 61 60 56 48 43 40 37 36 34 33 32 31 31 30 28 27 27 20

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 2 0 0 6 5 2 New York City FC 2 0 0 6 4 1 New York 1 0 0 3 4 0 Philadelphia 1 0 0 3 2 0 New England 1 1 0 3 2 3 Atlanta United FC 1 1 0 3 3 5 Orlando City 0 1 1 1 2 3 D.C. United 0 1 1 1 2 4 Chicago 0 1 0 0 3 4 Montreal 0 2 0 0 3 5 Toronto FC 0 1 0 0 0 2 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 2 0 0 6 6 1 Vancouver 2 0 0 6 4 2 Houston 1 1 0 3 5 2 San Jose 1 0 0 3 3 2 Minnesota United 1 1 0 3 4 4 LA Galaxy 1 1 0 3 3 3 Sporting K.C. 1 1 0 3 4 5 FC Dallas 0 0 1 1 1 1 Real Salt Lake 0 1 1 1 2 6 Colorado 0 1 0 0 1 2 Seattle 0 1 0 0 0 1 Portland 0 2 0 0 1 6 Saturday Houston at D.C. United, 12:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota United, 1 p.m. Columbus at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Toronto FC at Montreal, 2 p.m. Orlando City at New York City FC, 2:30 p.m. Vancouver at Atlanta United FC, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. New York at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.

> SOUTH REGIONAL First Round Thursday Dallas Tennessee (25-8) vs. Wright State (25-9), 11:40 a.m. Miami (22-9) vs. Loyola (28-5), 2:10 p.m. Boise, Idaho Kentucky (24-10) vs. Davidson (21-11), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (27-7) vs. Buffalo (26-8), 8:40 p.m. Friday Charlotte, N.C. Creighton (21-11) vs. Kansas State (22-11), 5:50 p.m. Virginia (31-2) vs. UMBC (24-10), 8:20 p.m. Nashville, Tenn. Cincinnati (30-4) vs. Georgia State (24-10), 1 p.m. Nevada (27-7) vs. Texas (19-14), 3:30 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 22 Regional Championship • March 24

> MIDWEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday Pittsburgh Rhode Island (25-7) vs. Okla. (18-13), 11:15 a.m. Duke (26-7) vs. Iona (20-13), 1:45 p.m. Wichita, Kan. Kansas (27-7) vs. Pennsylvania (24-8), 1 p.m. Seton Hall (21-11) vs. N.C. St. (21-11), 3:30 p.m. Friday Detroit Michigan State (29-4) vs. Bucknell (25-9), 6:10 p.m. TCU (21-11) vs. Arizona StateSyracuse winner, 8:40 p.m. San Diego Auburn (25-7) vs. Charleston (26-7), 6:27 p.m. Clemson (23-9) vs. N.M. St. (28-5), 8:57 p.m. Second Round • March 17-18 Regional Semifinals • March 23 Regional Championship • March 25

> FINAL FOUR March 31 | San Antonio

> NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP April 2 | San Antonio

NIT First Round Tuesday Wagner (23-9) at Baylor (18-14), 6 p.m. N. Kentucky (22-9) at Louisville (20-13), 6 p.m. Vermont (27-7) at Middle Tenn. (24-7), 7 p.m. Boston C. (19-15) at W. Kentucky (24-10), 7 p.m. Florida GC (23-11) at Oklahoma St. (19-14), 8 Hampton (19-15) at Notre Dame (20-14), 8. Rider (22-9) at Oregon (22-12), 9 p.m. SE Louisiana (22-11) at Saint Mary’s (28-5), 9 UNC Asheville (21-12) at USC (23-11), 10 p.m. Wednesday Harvard (18-13) at Marquette (19-13), 6 p.m. La.-Lafayette (27-6) at LSU (17-14), 6 p.m. Temple (17-15) at Penn State (21-13), 7 p.m. Nebraska (22-10) at Miss. State (22-11), 8 p.m. UC Davis (22-10) at Utah (19-11), 8 p.m. BYU (24-10) at Stanford (18-15), 9 p.m. Boise St. (23-8) at Washington (20-12), 9 p.m. Second Round • March 16-19 Quarterfinals • March 20-21 Semifinals • March 27 Championship • March 29

GUN SHOW March 17-18, 2018

St. Charles, MO St. Charles Convention Center Saturday 9AM - 5PM, Sunday 9AM - 3PM

1 Convention Center Plaza

www.macshows.com

RIDES BUY ˜ SELL ˜ TRADE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Acura

Points 1,573 1,314 1,149 1,044 982 866 850 842 837 814 800 784 767 757 750

Softball Cortland 12, Washington U. 6 Susquehanna 9, Washington U. 4

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

Audi

Audi

BMW

Buick

Cadillac

'15 Audi A5 2.0T: Convertible, Cuvee Silver Metallic / Brown Roof, 2.0L TFSI 4-cyl, $31,147 #28449A

'12 Audi TT RS: 2.5 TFSI Coupe, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $36,963 #P9044

'17 BMW X3 xDrive28i: Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Heated Front Seats, Panorama Sunroof, $33,500 #P9084

'16 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, 19K, Black, Nav & Bose $25,490 #C172208A

'91 Cadillac Allante: Coupe, Heated Front Seats $9,490 #C17020R2

'17 Audi A6: 2.0T Premium Plus, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $38,963 #27540L

'15 Audi A6: Brilliant Black, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro $31,333 #28423A

'15 BMW 435i xDrive: Coupe, One Owner, Local Trade, Good Maintenance History, $34,147 #28481A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: 22K Leather, Red, 1 owner $21,490 #C17445A

'14 Cadillac CTS: Luxury, Certified, 31K, Loaded $27,990 #C17284A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: $16,499 Stock # P06581 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Buick LaCrosse: $21,707 Stock # P06576 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '06 Buick Luce rne CXL: Only 47xxx Mile s , Cle a n Carfax $8990 #P6415

'17 Cadillac XTS: $19,131 Stock #P06610 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Cadillac XTS P la tinum: AWD, Certifie d, Bla ck Ra ve n $26,990 #C17216A

'14 Audi A7 Hatchback: Daytona Gray Pearl, 3.0T, 38K Miles $39,333 #P9157

'15 Audi A8: 4.0T Tiptronic, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, $37,963 #27112A

'15 BMW M3: Sakhir Orange Metallic, 3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, $49,333 #P9154

'15 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, $46,147 #P9093

'15 Audi Allroad Wa gon: 38K Mile s , Panoroof, $28,490 #B8777

'11 Chevy Impala: LT, FWD, Flex Fuel, Remote Start, $6,990 #V180209A

'17 Audi A4 Premium: Mythos Black Metallic, 2.0L TFSI 4Cyl Quattro $39,333 #28465A

'16 Cadillac CTS : 3K, Like Ne w, Save!! $32,990 #C16150R

'15 J e e p P a triot S port: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax $12,940 #42572A

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03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

Chevrolet

Lexus

Nissan/Datsun

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'12 Chevy Impala: LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Summit White $7,990 #400067A

'07 Lexus RX350 AWD, S unroof, Loca l Tra de , $8,490 #B8792A

'15 Nissan Sentra: SL, Auto, 36K Miles, Backup Camera $12,490 #C8495A

'15 Acura MDX: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera $29,963 #78750A

'13 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, Black, Loaded $21,990 #P6199A

Lincoln

Porsche

'15 Lincoln MKC: Select, Local Trade, Save!! $20,490 #M17359A

''13 Porsche Boxster S: Cabriolet, Emerald Green Metallic, RWD $48,200 #P9145

'16 Acura MDX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $33,963 #96589A

'15 GMC Terrain: GMCertified, Only 21K Miles $17,770 #P6335

'14 Chevy Cruze: 1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax $11,742 #P6362

'13 Chevy Sonic LT White, Clean Carfax $8,490 #35289A

'13 Chevy Cruze: LT, Clean Carfax, Auto $8,554 #33589B

'12 Chevy Cruze: One Owner, $6,990 #40475A

Mazda '12 Mazda Mazda3i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $9,990 #33759A

'10 Mazda Miata: Sport, 75K, Automatic $9,990 #M17519A

'17 Chevy Cruze: LS, Only 3K Miles $13,998

'06 Mazda Mazda3 s: Copper Red Mica, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #M18022A

'12 Chevy Impala: LTZ, Auto, Sunroof, V6, Leather $9,990 #C8884A

'16 Mazda 3 Gra nd Touring: Auto, Nav, Te ch Pkg $18,990 #M8949

'16 Chevy Malibu: 1LT $16,190 Stock# P06552 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Spark: 1LT $8,987 Stock #P06606 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Cruze: LTZ $12,804 Stock #170455A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Camaro: 1LT $19,000 #P06584 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala 2LT: $17,600 Stock # P06522 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Captiva Sport LT: Cle a n, Carfax, GMC Ce rtifie d! $11,990 #42109B

'14 Chevy Cruze 1LT: $12,264 #P 06613 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Equinox LT: Ve ry Cle a n, Mus t S e e ! $9990 #400123A

'15 Chevy Equinox LS : $13,293 #P 06631 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '03 Lexus SC430: Clean Carfax, $13,971 #400303A

'07 Mazda 3 S Touring: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax $6936 #35444A

Mercedes Benz '17 Mercedes-Benz AMG C43: 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, $54,200 #P9060

'14 Mercedes-Benz CLS550: 4matic, 18K Miles, 4.7L V-8 AWD $42,333 #P9136

Mini Cooper '14 Mini Cooper: Loaded $13,990 #40339A

'15 Mini Cooper: White, Automatic, 23K $14,990 #B8882

'14 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Pano Roof, Auto, 66K $15,990 #B9020

'15 Porsche Panamera 2: Hatchback, AWS, Navigation, Sunroof, Sport Chrono Package $51,200 #28180A

'12 Porsche 911 Carrera : 4S, Cabriolet, White, 3.8L H-6 Cyl, AWD, $69,200 #79457A

Subaru '15 Subaru Impreza: Hatchback, Sunroof, Automatic, Black $18,990 #M17558A

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

Fiat

1-866-244-9085

'16 Fia t 500X: $14,990 #P 06642 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Fiat 500 Sport: Hatchback, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #B8799B

VOLKSWAGEN'S

Ford '05 Ford Mustang: Coupe, RWD, Legend Lime Clearcoat Metallic $7,990 #V18049B

'15 Ford Taurus: Lmtd, $18,458 #P06594 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Ford Fus ion S E: Auto, Loa de d $8969 #42588

'14 Passat: 31K, Black, Automatic, VW Certified $12,990 '14 Passat: 39K, Automatic, Power Sunroof, VW Certified $13,990 '14 Passat: 44K, Automatic, White w/Tan, VW Certified $13,990

'17 Audi Q7: 2.0T Premium, Glacier White Metallic, $52,333 #P9110

'13 Volkswagen Passat: Diesel!! Diesel!! Automatic, $16,490 #V8683

'17 Audi SQ5 3.0T Premium Plus, Audi Certified Pre-Owned, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, $49,147 #P9095

'14 VW Beetle: 2.5L, Leather, M/R, $11,990 #35351A

'17 VW Golf SEL: 4 Door, 8K Miles, Automatic $18,990 #V17398A

'17 VW Jetta 12xxx Mile s , Auto, One Owne r, $13,490 #V8583

'13 VW Passat SEL: $15,032 #P 06630 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Chevy Silverado: LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K $37,990 #B8861

'13 Hyundai Sonata: SE, Loaded $10,790 #42545A

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Manual, Sunroof, 36K $10,990 #B8775

'11 Hyundai Elantra: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors, $6,490 #B8987A

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 30K Miles, Auto, Black $16,490 #M17233A

'14 Hyundai Elantra: Limited, 30K, Sunroof, Red $12,990 #M17332A

'16 Hyundai Sonata: $22,799 #P06598 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Hyunda i Veloster: 53xxx Mile s , Auto, Roof, $12,490 #B8943

Jeep '16 Jeep Patriot Latitude: 4x4, Loaded, $14,990 #P6295

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, 4WD, Loaded!! Black, $29,990 #B8786A

'15 J e ep P a triot La titude , 4WD, Auto, Bla ck, $13,990 #C8744A

Kia

'17 Chevy Colorado LT: $31,388 Stock #P06578 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Silverado: 1500 LT, $28,387 Stock #180380A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Silverado LTZ: 4WD, 39xxx Mile s , Z71 Pkg $30,490 #V17159A

'17 Jetta: 1.4 Turbo, Auto, White, 7K, Touch Screen Radio $13,490

Dodge Plymouth Trucks

'13 Jetta: TDI, Diesel, Diesel, 52K, Sunroof, Automatic $15,490 '15 Jetta SE: Auto, Red, Certified, $12,490

Hyundai

'17 Chevy Colorado: 7K, Local Trade, Crew Cab $29,990 #M9021A

'17 Passat: 1.8 Turbo, Blue, Alloys, Auto, 8K, Save Save $14,490 '17 Golf: SEL, 8K, Autmatic, Sunroof, Certified $18,990 '17 Passat: 1.8 Turbo, 5K, Roof, Heated Seats $16,990 '16 CC: Sport, 6K, White, Auto, $21,990

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '16 SRX: Luxury Colle ction, 19K, Re d, AWD, One Owne r $31,390

'14 Dodge Ra m 1500 SLT: 4WD, Hemi, 43xxx Mile s , $25,990 #B8946

'16 Dodge Ra m 1500 SLT: 4WD, 26xxx Mile s , Ce rtifie d $26,990 #B8961

Ford Trucks '16 Ford F-150: Super Crew, 22K, Auto $29,990 #V17738A

GMC Trucks '16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab GM Certified PreOwned, 18K Miles, $36,963 #78795A

'13 GMC Sierra 2500HD: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Remote Start, GM Certified Pre-Owned $38,963 #79118A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab, GM Certified PreOwned, 4WD $36,963 #79121A

'13 XTS: P la tinum, AWD, 10K, Bla ck $33,490 '17 XTS: P ha ntom Gra y, Na viga tion, He a te d & Coole d S e a ts , $29,490 '15 SRX: P la tinum Ice , AWD, 26K, Pano Roof $30,990 '15 SRX: Luxury Colle ction, 26K, White , AWD $30,990 '17 XTS: Bla ck Ra ve n, Bla ck Le a the r, 13K, AWD, Na viga tion $33,990 '17 CTS : Luxury, AWD, Crys ta l White , Na viga tion $36,490 '17 CTS : Luxury, AWD, Bla ck Ra ve n, Na viga tion $37,990 '15 Escalade: P la tinum, AWD, Eve ry Option Imaginable!! $58,990 '17 Escalade: ESV, 11K, DVD, Qua d S e a ts , Na viga tion $66,490

Mitsubishi 03 Mitsubishi Eclipse: FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Sportronic 2.4L 4-Cyl, $5,990 #B8914

Nissan/Datsun

'13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $9,490 #C8795B

'06 Nissan Altima S: 2.5L, Loaded $7,997 #42290A

'14 Kia Cadenza: $18,065 Stock #P06607 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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'14 GMC Sierra: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Leather, Bose, White $32,490 #V18081A

'07 GMC Yukon 1500 SLE: Bla ck, 4WD, 4 Door $13,990 #46473B

Misc Trucks '15 Ram 1500 Laramie: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, $33,200 #96270C

STLtoday.com/classifieds

Toyota Trucks '12 Toyota Ta coma : 4WD, Cre w Ca b, Auto, 43xxx Mile s , $25,490, #B8945

'15 GMC Yukon XL 1500: Denali, 6.2L V-8 Cyl, 4X4, Onyx Black $52,333 #P9127

'17 GMC Yukon: XL Denali, Onyx Black, 6.2L V-8 $60,924 #78688

'14 GMC Yukon XL 1500: Denali, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats $32,500 #79254A

'17 GMC Acadia: SLT-1, Crimson Red Tintcoat, 3K Miles, FWD $31,965 #78212

'15 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onyx Black, 5.3L V-8 $41,950 #P9066

'15 Audi Q5: 2.0T Premium Tiptronic, Ibis White, 28K Miles, $30,333 #P9075A

'17 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, Panorama Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $48,500 #P9081

'17 Audi Q7 3.0T Prestige: Quattro, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Audi Certified Pre-Owned, $53,500 #28388A

'16 GMC Acadia Denali: Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth $30,963 #39297A

'12 Hyundai Tuscon: LTD, Loaded! $10,969 #42189AA

'17 BMW X3: xDrive28i SAV, 2.0L I-4 cyl, AWD, 22K Miles $33,333 #P9114

'15 Infiniti QX60 3.5: Liquid Platinum 3.5L V-6 , AWD $31,333 #28227B

'16 Infiniti QX80: 5.6L V-8, Navigation, Moonroof, Majestic White $44,333 #97267A

'12 Chevrolet Equinox: 1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Backup Camera $9,990 #42079A

'14 Infiniti QX80: Theater Package, Carfax One Owner, Heated Front Seats $29,500 #95544A

'17 Chevrolet Tahoe: LT, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, 3rd Row, $42,963 #P9027

'17 Jaguar F-Pace S: British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl $57,333 #P9109

'17 Chevrolet Suburban: Premier, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Backup Camera, Remote Start, $48,963 #P9026

'16 Chevrolet Tahoe: LTZ, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified Pre-Owned, 4WD, Remote Start $47,963 #95505A

'15 Chevy Traverse: AWD, Loaded, GM Certified $20,969 #42439A

'13 Chevy Avalanche: One Owner, Loaded $27,769 #42280A

'15 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, Loaded $33,990 #P6303

'16 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited Sahara, 4x4, One Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Bluetooth, Low Miles $32,200 #P9020A

'16 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, 4x4, Clean Carfax one Owner, Firecracker Red, 4WD, $32,200 #79310C

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, 4x4, Hardtop, One Owner Clean Carfax, $32,200 #78667A

'17 Chevy Equinox: Black, Black, Wheels, 7K, Sunroof $23,990 #V18245A

'16 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Limited, 4WD, White, Sunroof $28,990 #B9042

'15 Chevy Tahoe: $30,000 Stock #099A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox LT: $18,000 Stock #P06603 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox LT: Loa de d, Full P owe r $13,974 #42512A

'14 Land Rover Range Rover: 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, $55,200 #P9120

'09 Ford Edge: Very Clean, Loaded $10,969 #42597A

'16 Ford Expedition: 3.5L V-6, White Platinum, $48,333 #79411A

'16 Ford Explorer: XLT, FWD, Black, 18K $28,490 #B8557A

'16 Mazda CX-5: Touring, AWD, Certified $18,990 #M8894

'13 Mercedes-Benz G 63: AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles $92,200 #P9126

'11 Mercedes-Benz ML350: $16,889 Stock #P06184A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Nissan Rogue: One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Magnetic Black $15,990 #P6256

'14 Nissan Murano: LE, AWD, Nav, Power Roof $19,990 #B8835

'15 Nis s a n Rogue S e le ct: $12,709 #P 06615 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Pontiac Torrent: Heated Front Seats, Remote Start $7,490 #V17749A

15 Porsche Macan: Turbo, 3.6L V-6 Cyl, AWD, Black, 12K Miles $63,200 #P9116

'15 GMC Terrain: SLT, Chromes, Sunroof, $19,990 #B8801

'16 Infiniti QX80: 5.6L V-8, AWD, Majestic White, 9K Miles $56,333 #P9140

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'15 Mazda CX-9: AWD, Nav, Roof, White $26,990 #M8790

'08 Subaru Tribeca LTD: 7 Passenger, Very Clean $8,769 #33083AA

'15 Honda P ilot EX-L S unroof, 4WD, 44xxx Mile s , $26,490 #V18180A

'16 Buick Encore: Sport Touring, Roof, Nav, 17K $18,490 #V17674A

'08 Mazda CX-9: Sport, White, Local Trade, Priced to Sell Fast! $10,990 #V17565B

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 28K, Every Option $57,490 #B8560

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl Quattro, Mythos Black Metallic, $43,147 #28082L

'14 Subaru WRX: STI, Certified, Well Cared For $24,490 #B8860

'16 Toyota Highlander LTD: One Owner, Clean Carfax $31,320 #400216A

'15 Toyota Rav-4: AWD, XLE, One Owner $20,769 #P6331A

'13 Toyota 4Runner: One Owner Clean Carfax, Limited, Motor Trend Certified $32,200 #78806A

'15 Toyota 4Runner: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 4WD, $31,200 #96394A

'15 Toyota Highlander: Limited, V6, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Panorama Sunroof, Backup Cam $31,200 #28374A

'14 Toyota FJ Cruiser AT: Black, 4.0L V-6 4x4 $36,333 #P9155

'15 Toyota Rav-4: LE $15,582 #P06385A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Toyota Rav-4: Bla ck, Loa de d $10,776 #P6319A

'17 Volkswagen Tiguan: SEL, Nav, Pano Roof, Fender Audio, 10K $23,990 $V18043A

'16 Volvo XC60 T6: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Backup Camera, Sunroof $33,200 #96733A

'16 Volvo XC90 T6: Inscription, One Owner, Heated Front Seats, Backup Camera $45,200 #28185A

'14 Volvo XC60: AWD, Loaded, Black, $20,990 #B8851

Mini vans \'11 Land Rover LR4 HSE: Black w/ Black Leather, Roof, Nav, DVD $20,990 #B8855

'16 Lexus NX 200t: \Eminent White Pearl , 2.0L I-4 Cyl, AWD $33,200 #28480B

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, 28K $31,490 #B8879

'07 Chrys Town & Country Won't Last!! $6,469 #P6334A '16 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, Allows, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $15,490 #B8839

'13 Dodge Journey: SE, Automatic, Black w/Black Cloth $7,490 #C8575B

'10 Dodge Gra nd Ca ra va n SE: Ve ry Cle a n $7990 #42581A

'13 Lincoln MKX: Loaded, Very Clean $17,277 #P6270A '13 Toyota Sequoia: 4WD Limited, 5.7L V-8, Black, $34,200 #95572A

'17 Lincoln Navigator: Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating, $44,200 #P9025

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '17 Nissan Titan XD: Crew Cab, Magnetic Black, 1K Miles, 5.0L V-8, $48,200 #96719A

'07 GMC Yukon: SLT, M/R, $12,967 #40473B

'17 GMC Acadia: SLT-1, Summit White, 3K Miles, 3.6L V-6, $37,636 #78208

'17 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8Turbo, 12K, White $15,490 #V8390

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: $20,972 Stock #P06593 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Atlas: SE, 4motion, 3K, White, Save $$ $31,990

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T: Premium, One Owner, Orca Black Metallic, Motor Trend Certified, $32,147 #28363A

'16 Audi Q5: Scuba Blue Metallic, 3.0L TDI Clean Diesel V6, 32K Miles, $37,147 #P9106

'13 Passat: 2.5, Automatic, Gray, VW Certified, 53K $11,490

'13 Passat: TDI, SE, Diesel Diesel, Roof, Nav, Automatic $16,490

'16 Audi Q5: Mythos Black Metallic, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro, $33,147 #28454A

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #V18123A

Dodge '14 Dodge Dart: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start $13,469 #33541A

'17 Audi Q5 2.0T : 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Panorama Sunroof, Backup Camera $33,500 #P9080

Volkswagen

Chevrolet Trucks '11 Mini Cooper "S": Pano Roof, White, Manual $7,990 #V17651A

'17 Audi Q5: 3.0T Premium Plus, V-6, Glacier White Metallic, $39,333 #79292A

Sport Utility '17 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Low Miles, $34,963 #11116

'14 Ford Escape: SE, FWD, 51K Miles, Red $14,490 #B8788

'10 Ford Escape: XLT, FWD, Flex Fuel, New Arrival $6,990 #M8911A

'17 Ford Escape SE: $19,185 Stock #P06600 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

STLtoday.com/homes

'16 Lincoln MKX: Reserve, Black, AWD, Nav, Loaded $39,990 #B8906

'16 Toyota Sequoia: Platinum, 5.7L V8, One Owner Clean Carfax, DVD, 4WD $47,200 #28439A

Vans '17 Maserati Levante: 7K Miles, 3.0L V-6, AWD $66,200 #P9149

'16 Chevy Express LT: 15 Passenger Van, Unlimited, 32K Miles, $23,969 #P6406

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WEATHER

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

ADVERTORIAL

ST. LOUIS ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION CLINIC

Local Doctors Restore

Men’s Sex Life

ST. LOUIS • A local group of physicians in St. Louis specialize in only one unique, niche area – men’s sexual performance, treating men for ED who cannot take Viagra®, Levitra® and Cialis® due to medical conditions and adverse side effects. These local St. Louis doctors offer the latest state-of-the-art European technology for in-office treatment of erectile dysfunction without the use of medication, surgery or injections. The SwissWave Protocol is a medical breakthrough using painless acoustic energy waves to improve a man’s sexual performance and produce an erection. This protocol eliminates the need for medications by regenerating blood vessels and erectile tissue. SwissWave can treat almost any man – regardless of his age or medical history, including men well into their nineties with diabetes, heart conditions, prostate cancer and high blood pressure. Developed in Switzerland, the medical device used in this extremely effective approach has been cleared by the FDA for the repair of soft tissue and improved blood circulation and is being used throughout the world. Patients see a state licensed physician. Individual results may vary.

ACTUAL PATIENTS ARE TALKING: “I’m 79 years old and visiting your clinic was the best choice I’ve ever made! I only wish I had known about it years ago. I never expected such fast results.” Jack B. “It’s been eleven years since I was able to get and maintain an erection. No pill or pump ever worked for me. Your treatment worked on the first visit!” Larry K. Signed statements are kept on file and at patient’s request, only first names and initials are used. Appointments are booked far in advance, but occasionally someone can be accommodated quickly. Patients are assured of utmost privacy and professionalism with private waiting rooms and an all-male staff. Further information is available by calling:

(314) 347-0200 STL Medical Solutions 605 Old Ballas Road, Ste 100 St. Louis, MO 63141 www.STLMedicalSolutions.com

© All rights reserved.

WEATHER • Low 29, High 44 • Winds NW 8-17 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 89° Thermal, California

Low: -4° Dunkirk, Montana

Partly cloudy, breezy, and cold

110s

Partly cloudy skies along with breezy northwest winds and colder than average temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will only be in the low-to-mid 40s. Temperatures will moderate over the next couple of days. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

34°

DRIVE

41°

45°

BEDTIME

Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

35°

Mostly clear

100s 90s 70s

4-DAY FORECAST

50 46 43 44 45 50 48 42 44 47 47 43 48

W

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s 20s

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

27°/53° Sunny

FRIDAY

H

26 29 26 26 26 25 26 26 25 25 26 26

38 42 34 38 38 40 41 38 41 34 40 37

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Kansas City 30 / 48

Kirksville 26 / 42

Joplin 30 / 50

Springfield 26 / 40

St. Louis 29 / 44 Poplar Bluff 31 / 47

Carbondale 29 / 42

Flood Stage

Current Level

- 0.09 + 0.12 - 0.05 - 0.31 - 0.27 + 0.10 - 0.17 - 0.36 - 0.15 - 0.36

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Monday, Mar 12th Tree - 25 (moderate), Mold - 3,378 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 26 Month (Total) 288 Season 3759 Year Ago 2928 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 20.35 18 19.93 Peoria 14 19.97 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.34 Sullivan 16 0.16 Valley Park 24 12.87 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.44 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 53.03 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.25 - 0.44 - 0.32 - 0.01 - 0.20 - 0.21 - 0.06 - 0.58

SUN & MOON

New Mar 17 Sunrise

First Mar 24

Full Mar 31

7:15 AM Sunset

Last Apr 8 7:06 PM

Moonrise 5:09 AM Moonset 3:30 PM

William Herschel discovered the planet Uranus on this date in 1781. Originally, Herschel wanted to call this planet George’s Star in honor of England’s King George III.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

360.37 - 0.77 361.15 - 0.68 509.47 - 1.32 655.00 + 0.11 707.71 0.00 659.41 - 0.18 915.14 - 0.02 841.06 - 0.33 600.47 - 0.45 409.22 - 0.08 604.73 + 0.06 446.58 - 0.32

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Lower 48 temps only

Albany, N.Y. 30 Albuquerque 39 Anchorage 22 Atlanta 34 Atlantic City 32 Baltimore 31 Billings 23 Biloxi, Ms. 41 Birmingham 33 Bismarck 9 Boise 45 Boston 32 Buffalo 26 Burlington, Vt. 31 Charleston, S.C. 36 Charleston, W.V. 30 Charlotte 32 Cheyenne 22 Chicago 26 Cincinnati 28 Cleveland 27 Colorado Spgs. 27 Concord, N.H. 28 Dallas 41 Daytona Beach 42 Denver 25 Des Moines 24 44 Destin, Fl. 25 Detroit 43 El Paso 26 Evansville 2 Fairbanks 8 Fargo 30 Flagstaff 47 Fort Myers 20 Great Falls 22 Green Bay 31 Hartford 68 Honolulu 45 Houston 26 Indianapolis 36 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 62 Key West 57 Las Vegas 36 Little Rock 59 Los Angeles 30 Louisville

34 64 33 53 43 45 46 63 56 34 69 33 33 33 59 38 51 49 34 38 34 51 31 64 63 56 41 62 35 70 41 32 31 59 69 55 30 33 78 68 36 61 51 68 78 58 65 40

W

Tomorrow L H W

snow partly cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow snow showers snow sunny snow showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers sunny snow partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny snow showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy snow showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny rain mostly cloudy

27 43 25 31 27 28 27 39 30 16 45 30 26 30 37 25 30 27 22 24 24 28 30 38 40 32 24 43 22 49 25 14 18 36 48 28 15 29 69 44 21 32 36 60 57 33 55 25

36 65 34 50 43 42 53 62 55 39 51 41 32 34 54 37 45 66 45 39 34 66 37 68 64 72 60 62 37 72 45 31 36 54 69 55 42 38 79 69 41 60 43 70 69 58 64 43

snow showers partly cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny showers snow showers snow snow sunny snow showers sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers sunny rain and snow sunny sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow partly cloudy windy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers showers sunny partly cloudy sunny rain sunny windy sunny mostly cloudy sunny

City

Today L H

34 Macon 55 McAllen, Tx. 35 Memphis 52 Miami 26 Milwaukee Minneapolis 20 Missoula, Mt. 25 36 Mobile Montgomery 35 33 Nashville New Orleans 44 New York City 34 Norfolk, Va. 33 Oklahoma City 33 Omaha 23 Orlando 45 Palm Springs 63 Philadelphia 31 Phoenix 59 Pittsburgh 25 Portland, Me. 29 Portland, Or. 47 Providence 32 Raleigh 31 Rapid City 19 Reno 44 Richmond, Va. 30 Sacramento 56 St. Petersburg 51 Salt Lake City 41 San Antonio 44 San Diego 58 San Francisco 56 Santa Fe 30 Savannah 35 Seattle 51 40 Shreveport 18 Sioux Falls 27 Syracuse 37 Tallahassee 46 Tampa 53 Tucson 30 Tulsa 32 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 51 28 Wichita Wilmington, De. 31 64 Yuma

59 73 53 71 35 36 58 64 60 48 63 40 49 57 44 68 81 43 82 35 32 55 33 47 52 58 49 59 65 72 68 70 60 59 62 54 61 35 36 66 65 83 57 46 70 55 43 85

W

sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny rain and snow sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy sunny snow snow rain snow sunny sunny rain sunny rain sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain sunny sunny rain partly cloudy sunny snow sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

32 56 32 53 21 19 29 36 33 29 44 30 32 33 25 43 58 30 62 23 30 41 29 29 28 36 28 44 52 51 44 59 49 31 36 41 37 21 28 36 48 55 30 30 52 27 28 63

55 72 53 71 43 43 49 63 59 47 63 41 47 65 63 68 71 42 81 33 39 54 41 44 60 49 46 56 66 69 70 65 56 63 57 50 65 49 31 63 65 83 64 43 69 67 42 80

sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny sunny sunny snow showers partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers snow showers snow showers partly cloudy sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy showers sunny showers partly cloudy rain showers partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny snow showers sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

70 40 48 53 77 76 36 45 41 65 54 14 69 63 34 45

86 43 72 80 88 84 63 51 58 81 79 43 77 90 50 48

sunny showers partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

39 66 51 79 43 56 42 42 40 65 51 30 28 66 60 64

46 75 59 88 67 75 56 51 57 93 81 32 34 75 73 95

rain sunny showers mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

0.00 - 0.48 - 0.96 - 0.96 - 0.93

Very unhealthy

Good

Today L H

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 11.21 23 7.36 Jefferson City 21 8.92 Hermann 20 6.68 Washington 25 13.52 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.81 Louisiana 15 11.98 Dam 24 25 18.45 Dam 25 26 18.17 Grafton 18 15.09 M.Price, Pool 419 414.80 M.Price, Tail. 21 11.69 St Louis 30 15.24 Chester 27 18.90 Cape Girardeau 32 27.51

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

-10s

Hawaii High: 84°

Significant amounts of accumulating snow are expected across coastal sections of New England as a strong area of low pressure offshore moves northeastward. Scattered snow showers will persist across parts of the Great Lakes. A frontal system will move onshore and bring wet weather to the Pacific Northwest and much of California. The central United States will see dry conditions. City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.06” 1.20” 1.11” 7.69” 5.75”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

47° 30° 54° 35° 84° 1° 44° 30°

-0s Alaska Low: -11°

Chicago 26 / 34

Wintry Mix

0s

Partly cloudy, Showers likely Partly cloudy showers late

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (5:38 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2012) Record Low (1948) High Last Year Low Last Year

10s

SATURDAY

40°/63° 44°/50° 36°/56°

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

31 28 26 27 26 30 30 26 26 28 26 27 29

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

33 46 41 77 48 73 52 43 31 67 63 43 28 46 45 45

39 53 51 87 60 87 82 63 34 70 77 64 37 51 56 54

cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Tuesday • 03.13.2018 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠A K Q 9 5 3 ♥Q 9 7 ♦7 3 ♣7 5 WEST EAST ♠J 7 ♠10 6 2 ♥A 6 ♥J 10 5 4 ♦K J 6 5 2 ♦10 9 4 ♣K J 10 2 ♣A 9 4 SOUTH ♠8 4 ♥K 8 3 2 ♦A Q 8 ♣Q 8 6 3 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♥* Pass 1NT 2♦ 2♠ Pass 3NT All pass *At least 4 spades, 9-14 points Opening lead: Two of ♣ The first Commonwealth Nations Bridge Championships were contested in Manchester, England, in 2002. Today’s deal is from a match in that event between teams from Australia and South Africa. South, for Australia, was Ishmael Del’Monte, who today is a well-regarded professional player in the USA. He and his partner were playing the Moscito System, developed by Paul Marston and popular in Australia. The one no trump response was natural, not forcing, with up to 11 points.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD East won the opening club lead with the ace and shifted reasonably to the 10 of diamonds. A club return, instead, might have defeated the contract. Del’Monte rose with his ace and led a low heart to dummy’s queen, which West had to duck. Five rounds of spades followed, leaving this position: NORTH ♠3 ♥9 7 ♦7 ♣7 WEST EAST ♠Void ♠Void ♥A ♥J 10 5 ♦K J ♦9 ♣K J ♣9 SOUTH ♠Void ♥K ♦Q 8 ♣Q 8 An ending of remarkable symmetry. Declarer discarded the king of hearts on the last spade and West was helpless. West chose to shed his ace of hearts, but Del’Monte could now lead either minor and force West to give him the queen of the other minor for his ninth trick. Nicely played! (03/13/18)

Across

1 Loud commotion 4 Yeshiva leader 9 Films on a grand scale 14 Year, in Spain 15 If a > b and b > c, then a > c, e.g. 16 Kind of lily 17 Winter solstice mo. 18 Lowest point for Americans? 20 Crow 22 Like nylon stockings 23 Audi rival 24 Like the architecture of many cathedrals 27 Visibly blushing 29 Americanmade sports car with a V-10 engine 32 Plains Indian

33 Posted announcement at a theater entrance 34 Andean capital 35 Southernmost of the Ivies 36 Bass, e.g. 40 Storage tower 43 Mount that has an insurance company named after it 44 Commotion 47 Solvers’ cries 48 Film character who says “Give yourself to the dark side” 51 Poll worker’s request 53 From the beginning: Lat. 54 Prefix with center 55 Nosy sort 58 ___ room (postdebate

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME March 13 WORD — BAYONET (BAYONET: bay-uh-NET: A steel blade attached to the end of a shoulder arm.) Average mark 19 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 26 or more words in BAYONET? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — DAMSEL sale dale same dame seal deal seam alms slam made sled male lade mead lame meal lase medal lead meld mesa

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

area) 59 Prototype, maybe 63 Item in Santa’s bag 64 Exhaust 65 Dim with tears 66 Closemouthed 67 Blog entries 68 More or less, informally 69 Letter before tee

Down

1 Some schlumpy male physiques 2 Mistakenly 3 “Sorry, Charlie!” 4 Wicked cool 5 Dismiss abruptly 6 Favoritism 7 Not just one or the other 8 Arriver’s cry 9 Online greeting 10 Bud 11 “OK, tell me more” 12 The Tigers of the ACC 13 Pourer’s instruction 19 Zig or zag 21 [This tastes awful!] 25 Prefix with commute 26 ___ Wilcox, daughter in E.M. Forster’s “Howards End” 28 Amazing, in slang

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

If March 13 is your birthday • This year you find positive solutions to difficult challenges. Others might be envious of your resourcefulness. If you are single, you don’t need to stress out about meeting people — encounters happen naturally. If you are attached, the two of you might debate the pros and cons of various issues and situations. Aquarius is a natural healer for you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Continue to be as discreet as possible about a money matter. Know that everything will work out, even if you have misjudged the situation. Refuse to stand on ceremony. Tonight: Share more. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Your take-charge attitude emerges at work and when dealing with key people in your life. Note what is going on with a child or loved one. How you see a situation could radically change because of your interactions. Tonight: Respond to an invitation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You could greet a new beginning, but only if you let go of any preconceived ideas. Be aware of a tendency to be negative or upset. Tonight: Share important news with a loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Financial matters that involve you and another person come to your attention. You might have to negotiate a bit in order to reach an agreement. Tonight: Happiest close to home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH To achieve your goal, you might need to defer to others. You could resent having to take a step back, but later you will find that this was the right call. Tonight: Follow through on a request, and you’ll like what happens. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Pace yourself in order

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Bruce Haight

30 Rapscallion 31 Road worker 36 Rx detail 37 Mel who was the first NL’er to hit 500 home runs 38 How many TV shows are shown nowadays 39 Give in 40 Put some money away 41 “Fingers crossed!”

42 SoCal daily 44 Sign on a real or virtual pet 45 Tricky ... or a tricky description of 18-, 29-, 36-, 48- and 59-Across 46 Words and phrases that sound approximately alike, like “ice scream” and “I scream” 48 Eat stylishly

49 Cute, in modern slang 50 Reply to a ques. 52 Replies to an invitation 56 ___ Accords (1990s peace agreements) 57 Common fishing spot 60 Openly gay 61 ___ bran 62 Org. that sticks to its guns?

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0206

WORD SCRIMMAGE

to complete everything that is needed. Keep smiling with confidence, even if someone questions your motives. Your ability to communicate is enhanced. Tonight: Out late. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could be at the point where you can’t seem to contain yourself. Listen to news, and decide how you feel about what you are hearing. Tonight: Express your childlike side. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Pressure builds around your home life. You could feel as if you don’t have enough funds to deal with the issue behind the pressure. Stop, and do something else for now. Tonight: Go with a suggestion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Keep your distance, and be aware of the ramifications of what has happened. Get to the bottom of a problem. A conversation easily could clear up the issue. Tonight: Keep to your budget.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Follow your convictions. You might want to do the unexpected to help move a cause forward. Listen to news, especially before you make a financial decision. Tonight: Say “yes.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH The Moon in your sign highlights your capabilities. Recognize your limits when dealing with a long-term desire. Your ability to understand your choices helps strengthen your position at work. An authority figure actually might be lucky for you. Tonight: A must appearance.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Listen to your inner voice, and you will get past a problem with ease if you do. Your ability to detach and see the big picture helps you gain a fresh perspective, no matter what goes down. You express the ability to get around difficult situations. Tonight: Relax to a movie. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Woman irked as co-worker mimics her but she seems to think she’s invincible even after having proof she’s not. What should I do to make her understand she’s putting herself in danger again, not to mention those who ride with her? — CONCERNED DAUGHTER

Dear One Of A Kind • I’ll try, but it may not be the kind of help you’re asking for. Have you never heard the saying, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”? It’s a principle the fashion industry is based upon. Instead of being offended and angry, why not help the woman by offering to assist her in making distinctive fashion choices of her own? I’m sure she’d welcome it, and I’m also sure it would lighten and brighten the atmosphere in your workplace.

Dear Abby • I have been trying to get healthy for years and recently lost a lot of weight. Every job I have, I work with grossly obese women. At my present job, one of them keeps coming to work dressed like me. It has happened before and I am sick of it. You have no idea how insulting it is to come to work, ready to do my job and find myself in this embarrassing situation. I just started working here and I need the job. To me, this is a form of harassment, and I don’t understand where she’s coming from. It’s not my problem if she is unhappy with her self-image. I like myself; I mind my own business and do my work. Also, I worked in fashion for years. If she wants my fashion expertise, she should pay me for it. Copying the way I dress is not a compliment. It’s identity theft. She is not me. I do not appreciate her imitating me. Please help! — ONE OF A KIND IN ILLINOIS

Dear Concerned • Because your mother didn’t learn after the accident she caused by not turning off her cellphone, it’s time to accept that nothing you say will change her. Continue to refrain from riding with her or allowing your child to. And pray that if she causes another collision, she doesn’t kill herself or someone else.

Dear Abby • My mom was involved in a serious car accident a while back that required multiple surgeries and hospital stays. She’s still dealing with the repercussions. The problem is that she doesn’t seem to have learned from it. She still texts and looks at her phone while driving. It has reached the point where I refuse to ride with her or allow her to drive my child in her car. I’ve asked her repeatedly to not use her phone while driving,

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Table leg is moved. 2. TV screen is smaller. 3. Foot is moved. 4. Wheel is missing. 5. Watch is missing. 6. Magazine is different.

TV TUESDAY

MISS MANNERS

Buses are ‘entertain yourself’ zones Dear Miss Manners • Several years ago, I suffered a significant injury to my left arm that has left me with limited dexterity in my left hand and wrist. This is not outwardly noticeable to others in most circumstances, and has not presented me with social problems until recently. Last year, I accepted a job with a multinational firm that has me rubbing elbows with many foreigners, especially Europeans, who exhibit much more refined table manners than most Americans are accustomed to using. However, I’m finding it incredibly difficult to hold and use a fork in my left hand. I tried switching the fork to my right hand and using the knife in my left hand, but I have similar difficulties. I continue to practice nevertheless, but I do not feel I

Gentle Reader • The person who would have sympathized with your problem most was Miss Manners’ own dear mother. She claimed that her own mother had so impressed upon her the need to entertain others that if no one on the city bus was talking, she felt she ought to get them started. You will be relieved to hear that she did not act on this, and that you carry this responsibility no more than she did. On public

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Lethal Weapon Teens LA to Vegas The Mick: Fox 2 News at 9:00pm The Night (N) (cc) 2 get involved with forged (N) Off. (N) money. CBS NCIS An antique 4 weapon is seen on TV. (N) (cc)

Gentle Reader • If you want snazzy table manners, you should continue to use the ones you have. Mind you, etiquette is not heartless, and allows some leeway to people with genuine difficulties. But that is not necessary in this case, because using the fork in the right hand was the older European method — before things sped up there, with the fork kept in the left hand after being used with the knife to cut.

Bull Bull agrees to help NCIS: New Orleans A Chunk’s daughter. (N) Navy captain is mur(cc) dered. (N)

This Is Us (N) (cc) NBC The Voice Vocalists 5 compete to be selected. (N) (cc) PBS Pavlo Live in Kastoria Pavlo per9 forms old and new music. News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

CW 11

The Andy Griffith Show

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

ABC The Middle Fresh Off 30 (N) the Boat (N)

Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

SEE WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT BROIL KING

7:00

3/13/18

am able to make much progress. I also feel it isn’t proper to announce my physical limitation just for appearance’s sake. What should a person such as myself do in this situation?

transportation, it is polite to allow people to amuse themselves.

Dear Miss Manners • I have an “airport boredom-relief kit,” consisting of crossword puzzles and an iPod loaded with novels, for use when I am traveling alone. When I arrive at my destination’s airport, I take public transportation to my final stop. Is it considered rude for me to listen to a book, using headphones, during the ride from the airport?

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Rise: Pilot. Lou tries to become theater director. (9:01) (N)

ÍRhythm, Love & Soul (My Music) Love songs of the 1960s and 1970s. (cc)

The Flash Iris acciden- Black Lightning Black tally gets Barry’s speed. Lightning must clear his name. (N) (N) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

blackish: blackish R-E-S-P-E- (N) (cc) C-T. (N)

ION Criminal Minds: ... And Criminal Minds Killer 46 Back. Border-crossing targets an emergency serial killer. room doctor.

For the People Six young lawyers are put to the test. (N) Criminal Minds: Haunted. Murders at a pharmacy. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.13.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

MRI finds herniated disc and arthritis in back FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I am 44 years old and female. Nine months ago, I suddenly experienced severe low backache without any associated physical activities. I was bedridden for five days, though during that time I experienced severe spasmodic lower backache just in my back. My bowel and bladder function were normal. I had pain on lifting my right leg. With treatment, including a muscle relaxant, analgesic and physiotherapy, I was painless within five to six days. Seven months after my first pain attack, I again experienced similar pain while I was trying to take a step in staircase. I had no history of trauma or severe physical activity. It has already been 15 days, and I still feel discomfort and feeling of pressure in my back. But I was able to walk after three days with the same medication I took previously. My MRI report says “focal central disc protrusion with posterior annular tear at L4 L5 level without any neural or spinal canal stenosis.” I also have tuft of hair at my sacrum area. What is my diagnosis and treatment? I feel as if I have slipped vertebrae in my back with each attempt to bend. Still now, I cannot bend my body. — R.K.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • After going over your entire MRI report, let’s first review the problem with your disc. The intervertebral discs act as shock absorbers and spacers between the bones of the back. The spacing allows the nerve roots the room they need to come off of the spinal cord. These discs consist of a gelatinous center, the nucleus pulposus, which is held in place by the tough annulus fibrosis. A herniated disc (sometimes still called a “slipped disc,” which is a misnomer) is when the center part pushes out through a tear in the annulus fibrosis. Sometimes, the disc material presses on the spinal cord or on the nerve root, causing pain, numbness or weakness in the areas supplied by that nerve. You have a herniated disc, although the disc material was not pressing on the cord or nerves at the time of the MRI. The report also found multiple areas of degeneration and bony abnormalities, and these are consistent with the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the spine. You have symptoms that are a combination of both herniated disc and spine arthritis. Medicines and physical therapy are the right treatment. Surgery is occasionally necessary, but I see no need for it in your case.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

3.13.18  

3.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

3.13.18  

3.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch