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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 03.12.2019 • $2.00

$4.7 TRILLION BUDGET

Request includes funding for NGA headquarters here BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • President

Donald Trump’s 2020 budget request, one which is already mired in controversy over funding of a border wall with Mexico, will include $218.8 million to continue construction of a new National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency campus in north St. Louis, an NGA spokeswoman said Monday. The spokeswoman, Nancy Repavi, also said the agency has not received any notification that current funds for the NGA’s new western headquarters will be shifted to fund

See NGA • Page A9

Boeing faces scrutiny after deadly crash of popular jet in Ethiopia

TRUMP PROPOSES INCREASE IN MILITARY SPENDING, SHARP CUTS TO DOMESTIC PROGRAMS

TRUMP’S 2020 BUDGET

Most domestic spending would be reduced under a 2020 fiscal year budget proposed by President Donald Trump. -31.2% -31.0% -23.3% -21.5% -16.4% -14.8% -12.0% -11.9% -10.9% -10.8% -10.0% -9.7% -9.0% -5.1% -3.5% -2.3% Commerce NASA Treasury Defense Homeland Security Veterans Affairs

EPA Corps of Engineers State/International programs Transportation Housing/Urban Development Agriculture Education Health and Human Services Interior Energy Other agencies Labor National Science Foundation Small Business Administration Social Security Administration Justice

President’s blueprint unlikely to advance, but it indicates his re-election priorities BY DAMIAN PALETTA, ERICA WERNER AND JEFF STEIN Washington Post

• President Donald Trump proposed a $4.7 trillion budget plan Monday that stands as a sharp challenge to Congress and the Democrats trying to unseat him in 2020, the first act in a multi-front struggle over the role of government that threatens to consume Washington for the next 18 months. The plan would dramatically expand spending on

WA S H I N G T O N

0.4% 1.4% 1.5% 4.9% 7.4% 7.5%

SOURCE: White House Office of Management and Budget | AP

INTEREST IS HIGH AT CANNABIS TRADE SHOW

programs and initiatives popular with Republicans, such as $750 billion in new defense spending and $8.6 billion for barriers on the Mexico border. At the same time, it would slash spending on Medicaid, food stamps, environmental protection and a range of other programs that Democratic presidential candidates vowed to protect and expand. The budget proposal ran into an immediate buzzsaw on Capitol Hill, where many Democrats flatly rejected See BUDGET • Page A9

In visit, MLS chief praises support for soccer, wants sponsorships

BY ELIAS MESERET AND YIDNEK KIRUBEL Associated Press

BY DAVID HUNN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HEJERE, ETHIOPIA • Air-

sioner of Major League Soccer, in St. Louis on Monday to meet with regional business leaders, said a local ownership group is just steps away from securing an expansion team. Commissioner Don Garber lunched with more than two dozen chief executives and business owners from some Garber of the largest companies in St. Louis, and called the show of support for a local franchise “fantastic and remarkable.” “I think it’s fair to say that it was among the largest or, certainly, the most prominent group of ‘C-level’ leaders in any visit that I’ve had,” Garber told the Post-Dispatch, speaking of the chief executives. Still, he said, proposed owners Jim Kavanaugh, chief executive of World Wide Technology, and Enterprise Holdings’ Taylor family must nail down corporate sponsorships, and quickly, to prove to the league’s other 27 owners that the St. Louis market can support a team. “It would really help their bid if they had stadium naming rights and a jersey sponsor in place,” Garber said. “So there is a specific level of financial corporate support.” Garber’s visit on Monday was part sales meeting, insiders say, to help Kavanaugh and the Taylors sell sponsorships, and part status check. The commissioner will report to league owners on progress in St. Louis. The stopover — Garber flew in for breakfast

lines in Ethiopia, China, Indonesia and elsewhere grounded the Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliner Monday after the second devastating crash of one of the planes in five months. But Boeing said it had no reason to pull the popular aircraft from the skies. As the East African country mourned the 157 victims of the Ethiopian Airlines plane that went down in clear weather shortly after takeoff Sunday, investigators found the jetliner’s two flight recorders at the crash site outside the capital of Addis Ababa. An airline official, however, said one of the recorders was partially damaged and “we will see what we can retrieve from it.” The official spoke on condition of anonymity for lack of authorization to speak to the media. A witness to the crash said that smoke was coming from the back of the plane before it hit the ground. “Before falling down, the plane rotated two times in the air, and it had some smoke coming from the back then, it hit the ground and exploded,” Tamrat Abera said. “When the villagers and I arrived at the site, there was nothing except some burning and flesh.” Ethiopian authorities are leading the investigation into the crash, assisted by the U.S., Kenya and others. The crash was similar to that of a Lion Air jet of the same model in Indonesian seas last year, killing 189 people. The crash was likely to renew questions about the 737 Max 8, the newest version of

See BOEING • Page A4

TODAY

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ST. LOUIS • The commis-

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Zachery Post, of Florissant, shows one of the strains of marijuana that he developed at the Missouri Cannabis Trade Association’s conference Monday. “There is a lot of stigma about marijuana, and I’m trying to educate people about the benefits,” he said. Post runs the Elite Home Growers Academy.

Station for the Missouri Cann a b i s T ra d e A sso c i a t i o n ’s two-day conferST. LOUIS • A few ence, which also tamper-resistant included panel glass displays in discussions and Union Station on presentations Monday were filled on everything with cotton balls medical cannapainted green. Next bis. The conferto them were bags ence drew about full of gummy bears 1,500 people on with a label that Monday. said “0 percent An estimated crowd of almost 1,500 people attended The conferTHC.” the Missouri Cannabis Trade Association’s conference ence exhibitors The display own- Monday at Union Station. included sellers ers, Jahabow Reof cannabis-intail, were there to show what they could build for sellers of medical fused candies for people and their pets, greenmarijuana and infused products. The small retail house designers, makers of cannabis capsules, company out of Owensville, Mo., builds secured mobile devices to test cannabis potency, sellers cases for retailers including jewelry and firearms of special weighing scales certified by the Misstores. They started selling cases to cannabis souri Department of Agriculture and developers dispensaries in Colorado and other states about of a planned 45-acre facility in Wellston for cannabis growers and product manufacturers. four years ago. The facility, called Wellston Canna Park, got a “It’s nice to do business in Missouri now,” said lot of attention, said Corey Christanell, a former Tom Grzywa, vice president. Theirs was one of dozens of businesses exhibits that lined the halls of a crowded Union See SHOW • Page A4 BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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M 1 TUESDAY • 03.12.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM PICKING THE STL100

WHO’S ON FIRST?

UPCOMING CHATS

In this week’s Inside the Post-Dispatch, listen to critic Ian Froeb talk about what goes into choosing the top 100 restaurants around St. Louis. stltoday.com/podcasts

When Paul Goldschmidt takes the field, he’ll be going up against a legion of great first basemen. See how Rick Hummel ranks the Cards greats over the years. stltoday.com/cardinals

Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

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Democrats sue attorney general’s office over denial of public records BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee on Monday filed a lawsuit against the Missouri attorney general’s office, alleging the office violated the Sunshine Law by denying Democrats public documents when then-Attorney General Josh Hawley was running for U.S. Senate. The lawsuit, filed in Cole County Circuit Court, asks the court to order the release of records the Democrats requested. The Democrats asked in September 2017 and March 2018 for emails between staffers in Hawley’s office and paid campaign operatives, the lawsuit says. They did not receive any documents. Hawley’s office told the DSCC there were no responsive records. But, in the closing days of the November 2018 election, the Kansas City Star reported that political consultants Gail Gitcho and Timmy Teepell directed taxpayer-paid staff in Hawley’s office. The article confirmed that there were, in fact, records of communications between political consultants and the attorney general’s office. The attorney general’s office also produced documents to Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft’s office in December that prove there were responsive records, the lawsuit says. “It is now clear that the AG’s Office not only possessed the requested documents, but it purposely and knowingly withheld them from DSCC, and it has advanced no argument — nor could it — that the documents are properly closed under the Sunshine Law,” the lawsuit says. The Democrats ask the court to assess civil penalties against the attorney general’s office for “purposely and knowingly” violating the Sunshine Law. Hawley, a Republican, defeated incumbent U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., in the November 2018 election. Kelli Ford, spokeswoman for Hawley, said in an email the lawsuit was a “joke” and “yet another frivolous political suit” but she did not directly refute any points made in the lawsuit. The lawsuit names attorney general’s office special counsel Michael Martinich-Sauter and the attorney general’s office, which is now led by Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican. Mark Pedroli, a St. Louis County attorney who previously sued former Gov. Eric Greitens over his Sunshine Law compliance, is also representing the Democrats in the case, along with attorneys from the

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Republican Josh Hawley is shown in March 2018. Democrats have sued to have documents released from when the then-attorney general was running for U.S. Senate.

Washington office of the Perkins Coie law firm. Ford noted that one of the attorneys suing Hawley’s former office is Perkins Coie attorney Marc Elias, who has worked for McCaskill. “The Democrat Senatorial Campaign Committee has teamed up with Claire McCaskill’s personal lawyer to file yet another frivolous political suit,” she said. “Democrats lost the 2018 election. Accept it.” Daniel Hartman, who was Hawley’s custodian of records, previously said the office acted in “good faith” when processing Sunshine Law requests. Hartman, who also worked on Hawley’s 2016 campaign for attorney general, now works in Hawley’s Senate office as state director. “For every request, the Office engaged in a diligent search of its records to determine responsiveness, and conducted a rigorous analysis of whether any of the numerous factors set out in Chapter 610 applied,” Hartman told the Star. “Each determination under the Sunshine Law was made carefully and in good faith.”

FESTUS > Festus OKs bonds for new hotel, new taxing district • The City Council, at a recent meeting, voted to authorize up to $10 million in revenue bonds for Festus Hospitality LLC to build a four-story, 94-room Hampton Inn hotel on two acres located on Shapiro Drive. The funds will provide for the costs of acquiring and constructing the facility. In a separate action at the Feb. 27 meeting, the council voted to establish the Festus Commons Community Improvement District for a 24-acre parcel on American Legion Drive being developed by Tammy Fadler of Signature Realtors. The CID will be allowed to assess a tax of up to 1 percent on retail sales to pay for improvements. The council determined that the area was blighted due to inadequate street layout and unsanitary conditions.

Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE

DIGEST KIRKWOOD > Kirkwood approves plans for new office building • Kirkwood has given a local developer the green light to build a new office building near the intersection of South Kirkwood and Big Bend roads, replacing several existing structures. Mayor Tim Griffin and the Kirkwood City Council last week unanimously approved a final site plan for the 14,500-squarefoot, one-story building known as Kirkwork. Plans include 54 parking spaces around the perimeter of the one-acre site, as well as landscaping. A shared work space, of just under 2,500 square feet, will be provided for tenants in the center of the new building, city officials said. The site now includes four commercial buildings at 10727 through 10741 Big Bend and also 126 Prospect Avenue. Those buildings, which have housed a chiropractor’s practice and a hair removal service, among other businesses, will be demolished. Kirkwork is a project of Steve Meskill’s West Jefferson Properties LLC.

Schmitt has not commented on the open records dispute, declining to say whether his office has launched an investigation into Hawley’s Sunshine Law compliance. “We have nothing further to add at this time,” Schmitt spokesman Chris Nuelle said on Monday. But, he said, “Attorney General Eric Schmitt is dedicated to preserving, protecting, and enforcing the Missouri Sunshine Law, and we work every day to ensure that Sunshine Law requests are handled properly and efficiently.” As attorney general, Hawley was charged with enforcing the state’s Sunshine Law. He often complained that his office did not have subpoena power in such matters and pushed lawmakers to give him a broader reach. Hawley backed legislation that would have created a new division in the attorney general’s office whose sole focus would be investigating violations of the Sunshine Law.

CAIRO, ILL. > Key Ohio River bridge reopens • After more than two weeks, a bridge connecting Illinois and Kentucky has reopened over the Ohio River. The U.S. Highway 51 bridge closed on Feb. 22 due to high water on the Wickliffe, Ky., side. Kentucky officials say 4,700 vehicles cross the bridge each day; trucks make up 35 percent of the traffic. The bridge reopened late Monday morning. Drivers must make an 80-mile detour when the bridge is closed. PIOPOLIS, ILL. > County down to one Catholic church • Roman Catholics in a Southern Illinois county, about 100 miles southeast of St. Louis, are down to one church for weekend Mass. A decision to close two of Hamilton County’s three Catholic churches took effect over the weekend. There were no Masses at St. John Nepomucene in Dahlgren or St. Clement of Rome in McLeansboro. They’re now designated as chapels. The area’s “mother church” now is St. John the Baptist in Piopolis. Bishop Edward Braxton made the announcement in February. He called it a “challenging process” with no “winners or losers.” The bishop says the Belleville Diocese has slightly more than 100 parishes but only 48 active diocesan priests. Braxton says priests from abroad are helping to keep some churches open. EUREKA, ILL. > Judge says county violated solar company’s rights • A judge has cleared the way for a solar energy project in central Illinois. Judge Charles Feeney says Woodford County’s permit denial was “arbitrary” and “unreasonable” and violated the rights of SolAmerica Energy. Property owners and the city of Eureka opposed the permit; the County Board voted against the permit last year, a step that led to the lawsuit. The proposed site is on land near the Eureka city limits, 20 miles east of Peoria.

Beyoncé, Jay-Z to be honored

Beyoncé and Jay-Z are getting recognized for achievements outside of music: The power couple will be honored for accelerating LGBTQ acceptance. GLAAD announced Monday that the couple will receive its Vanguard Award at its 30th annual awards on March 28 in Beverly Hills, Calif. The award, previously given to Cher, Janet Jackson, Elizabeth Taylor and Antonio Banderas, honors “allies who have made a significant difference in promoting acceptance of LGBTQ people,” GLAAD said. Slip or shorthand? • President Donald Trump says he didn’t slip up when he referred to Apple CEO Tim Cook as “Tim Apple” at a White House meeting last week. Trump tweeted Monday: “I quickly referred to Tim + Apple as Tim/Apple as an easy way to save time & words. The Fake News was disparagingly all over this, & it became yet another bad Trump story!” ‘Marvel’ is marvelous • Like its heroine, Disney’s “Captain Marvel” is defying expectations. The film with Brie Larson debuted above predictions, with $153 million in North America, according to estimates from measurement firm Comscore.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Barbara Feldon is 86. Actress-singer Liza Minnelli is 73. Singer-songwriter James Taylor is 71. Actress Lesley Manville is 63. Actor Courtney B. Vance is 59. Actress Kendall Applegate is 20. From news services

JOE HOLLEMAN Is out of the office


LOCAL

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Man charged in fatal stabbing of woman after dispute along I-70

Missouri owes $118 million in back pay to prison guards

BY KIM BELL st. Louis Post-dispatch

BY JACK SUNTRUP AND KURT ERICKSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

JENNINGS • A woman was stabbed during an argument in a car on or near Interstate 70 early Monday before fleeing to a nearby home, where she collapsed and pleaded for help. She was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. Meanwhile, the man who attacked her Sanders showed up at a different hospital in a bloody car with cuts to his hands, police say. The man, Derrick Sanders, 23, admitted stabbing the woman during a dispute in the car, according to charging documents. He told police he had met the woman just hours earlier, according to court documents. Sanders was charged later Monday with first-degree murder and armed criminal action in the death of the woman, whose name had not been released. Their relationship was not clear. He was ordered held without bail. Sanders lives in the 7000 block of Florence Place in Jennings, about half a mile from the home were the victim collapsed on a porch about 3:40 a.m., seeking aid.

CRIES FOR HELP

Erica Wheeler was home asleep in the predawn hours Monday when someone banged on her front door. Wheeler heard agonized cries. “Help,” the voice moaned. “Help me.” In a daze, Wheeler looked through the peephole and saw a small, young woman bleeding from stab wounds. The woman was on her knees, leaning between the screen door and front door of Wheeler’s home. Wheeler, 41, works as a nursing assistant and said her first instinct was to open the door and help. But Wheeler’s

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Khamaron and Erica Wheeler leave their home Monday after Erica tried to help a dying woman who knocked on their door early Monday. The woman had been stabbed on Interstate 70.

husband shouted at her to keep it locked. He worried an attacker had followed the victim and might force his way inside. “I was in her ear, ‘Don’t do it,’” Khamaron Wheeler, 44, said. “‘We don’t know what’s behind this yet.’” The Wheelers can hear the highway traffic zoom by at all hours from the small brick home where they have lived for four years. They live on a corner, and Khamaron Wheeler said they often see drug activity and police cars nearby. That’s what made Khamaron Wheeler skittish about opening the door for the woman, he said. As her husband watched the porch from the bedroom window, Erica Wheeler called police from her cellphone and tried to soothe the woman through the door. “Just hold on,” she told the injured woman. “I’m going to open up the door.” After several minutes, Erica Wheeler said she did open the door, despite her husband’s warnings, just as officers were getting to the porch. The woman had collapsed, and the Wheelers found blood everywhere — on the door, the porch and in a trail leading to the interstate nearby. The events of the morning left the Wheelers shaken.

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“It was just so real, watching the girl,” Khamaron Wheeler said. The victim had been tentatively identified and is in her early 20s, but authorities were not releasing her name until her identity was confirmed and relatives could be notified. She apparently hopped a fence along Interstate 70, crossed a narrow access road and made it 20 or 30 feet more to the Wheelers’ front porch in the 5200 block of College Avenue before collapsing. Westbound lanes of Interstate 70 were closed for nearly four hours as police and evidence technicians searched the shoulder of the interstate and one westbound lane. Traffic was diverted onto Jennings Station Road for several hours. Detectives from the St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons were investigating the homicide. Sanders admitted pulling a knife from his pocket during an argument and stabbing the woman, charges say. He told investigators he had met her the night before. Joel Currier of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

House Budget Committee on Monday was still processing news that the state would need to pay $118 million in back pay to employees of the Department of Corrections. House Budget Committee Chairman Cody Smith, R-Carthage, said it was too early to comment on the Thursday order from Cole County Circuit Judge Patricia Joyce. Joyce ordered the garnishment of $118 million from the state after officials failed to pay the amount, which stemmed from a lawsuit brought by guards for unpaid overtime. But Treasurer Scott Fitzpatrick said the money could not be paid because there is no appropriation for legal costs large enough to cover the payment — setting up a dispute between a Legislature and an executive branch that have not budgeted the money, and the courts. In August, a jury awarded corrections officers more than $113.7 million after they claimed the Department of Corrections had not paid them overtime. The verdict included a provision for an interest charge if the state didn’t pay immediately. That has added nearly $5 million to the state’s cost. Attorney Gary Burger, who represents the officers, has filed a motion to hold the department in contempt. A hearing has been set for April 1. Burger told the Post-Dispatch that the state has not responded to attempts to determine why the money hasn’t been paid. “There have been no discussions with the state,” Burger said. In addition to paying the guards, the state also was required to install a timekeeping system to better track hours worked by the officers. That has not occurred. Rep. Kip Kendrick, of Columbia, the ranking Democrat on the budget panel, said he expected the state would appeal the $113.7 million ruling. He said that it was possible the state would have to pay out the money next fiscal year, however. “The process and the payment is far from being resolved at this point,” Kendrick said. Gov. Mike Parson, in his budget plan, set aside $117 million for “future budget emergencies.” Kendrick

said that line item would likely be used if the state fails to meet revenue estimates. He said at least part of it could be used for the Department of Corrections settlement. “I imagine that some of that money is in preparation for a payment that will likely — that could very well likely happen sometime in fiscal year ’20,” Kendrick said. House Minority Leader Crystal Quade, D-Springfield, said it might be too early to pay the money because the state could still appeal the case. “We generally agree with the treasurer,” Quade said. But, she said the state eventually would have to pay the bill. “The reality is we owe this money to our employees,” Quade said. The House Budget Committee on Monday was also putting the finishing touches on its blueprint for the state’s $30 billion budget for next fiscal year, which starts July 1. Smith said last week he would earmark $100 million in general revenue for road and bridge projects next fiscal year, instead of going along with Parson’s plan to borrow $350 million for bridge projects. Kendrick and Democrats said they were skeptical of both proposals. Kendrick said he would like voters to approve a higher gasoline tax, but Republicans, who control the Legislature, have expressed little enthusiasm for putting a tax increase proposal before voters. The committee on Monday voted down several Democratic amendments that would have diverted money from an $18 million appropriation for Parson’s Fast Track scholarship program. A House subcommittee had already skimmed about $4 million from the program for other priorities. Parson had originally requested $22 million for the scholarships. The House voted down an amendment that would move $500,000 from the governor’s proposed Fast Track program to Harris-Stowe State University. They also voted down a Democratic-backed amendment to move $2.5 million from Fast Track to Parents as Teachers. Once the House Budget Committee approves the spending plan, it will move to the full House, and then the Senate, for consideration. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

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Long-haul truck drivers like Wayne J. rely on Men’s Liberty between rest stops.

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

U.S. winter was the wettest on record BY JASON SAMENOW Washington Post

Boosted by February’s relentless low-elevation rains and blockbuster mountain snows, the United States notched its wettest winter on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The average precipitation, including rain and melted snow, was 9.01 inches during meteorological winter, which spans December, January and February. That amount was 2.22 inches above normal and broke the record of 8.99 inches set during the winter of 1997-98. Both the winters of 1997-98 and the present featured El Niño

events, which tend to increase the flow of Pacific moisture into the Lower 48 states. Of the three winter months this year, the finale was particularly soggy, ranking second-wettest on record. Nineteen states posted one of their 10 wettest Februaries. Tennessee registered its wettest February, while the month ranked second-wettest in Kentucky and Wisconsin. Missouri had the 12th wettest February since 1895, with 3.61 inches of precipitation. The record for the month, 4.89 inches, was set in 2018. Illinois had the 15th wettest February since 1895, with 3.15 inches of precipitation. The record for the month in Illinois,

4.88 inches, was also set last year. Melissa Byrd, meteorologist for the National Weather Service, said there was 3.56 inches of liquid precipitation at St. LouisLambert International Airport in February. There was 2.4 inches of snowfall at Lambert in February. As for the three months of winter, Illinois had its sixth wettest with 9.67 inches of precipitation. The record, set in 194950, was 14.86 inches. Missouri had its fifth wettest winter with 10.35 inches of precipitation. The record, set in 1949-50, was 11.09 inches. February deluges in the Tennessee Valley spurred flooding along the Mississippi River

and mudslides in Tennessee and North Carolina. From the mid-South to the Tennessee Valley, record February rainfall was logged in numerous population centers, including Knoxville, Tenn. (13.08 inches); Nashville, Tenn. (13.47 inches); and Tupelo, Miss. (15.61 inches). That area is still struggling, with officials preparing for more rainfall this week that could add water to overflowing rivers. River levels remain high in parts of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, with more rain expected Friday and Saturday. Heavy precipitation has visited the northern tier, as well.

One MLS expansion slot is up for grabs

The zone from the Pacific Northwest to the Great Lakes was hit repeatedly by winter storms that unloaded historic amounts of snow. Record February snowfall was observed in Seattle (20.2 inches); Pendleton, Ore. (32.5 inches); Great Falls, Mont. (31.3 inches); Rochester, Minn. (40.0 inches); Minneapolis (39.0 inches); and Eau Claire, Wis. (53.7 inches). In addition, numerous California ski areas in the Sierra Nevada witnessed record snowfall in February. Mammoth Mountain and Squaw Valley reported record snowfall over 200 inches. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Crash in Ethiopia is second in 5 months for Boeing jetliner BOEING • FROM A1

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Major League Soccer commissioner Don Garber stands next to Carolyn Kindle Betz, of the Enterprise Holdings Foundation, who is part of the ownership group seeking to bring an MLS team to St. Louis. Garber had lunch at the Four Seasons on Monday with four Taylor family members. MLS league owners will meet in April and could make a decision on which city gets a soccer team. SOCCER • FROM A1

with four of the Taylors on Monday morning before lunch at the Four Seasons — signals a deepening interest in St. Louis as the league looks to pick its next expansion city. The league owners meet in April in Los Angeles for their spring meeting, and could make a decision that soon. Both sides see some urgency: Garber’s visit suggests concerns that the St. Louis owners haven’t announced the big-dollar deals. And Carolyn Kindle Betz, one of Jack Taylor’s granddaughters and a face of the local effort, said outright on Monday that, if this effort failed, her family would not try again. “We’re going to do it now,” Kindle Betz said. “We will probably not be here in a year.” The league is looking to expand to 28 teams from 24 this year. Three of the slots are taken: New teams are set to kick off in Miami and Nashville, Tenn., in 2020 and in Austin, Texas, in 2021. At least eight cities — Charlotte, N.C.; Detroit; Las Vegas; Phoenix; Raleigh, N.C.; Sacramento, Calif.; San Diego; and St. Louis — have expressed interest in the last spot. Sacramento has recently emerged as St. Louis’ biggest threat. In January, Beverly Hills billionaire Ron Burkle

bought into the city’s bid. League officials called Sacramento “a strong expansion candidate.” And, as with the addition of the Taylors to St. Louis’ bid, Burkle’s associates said that the billionaire grocerystore magnate wouldn’t have gotten involved if the Sacramento effort was speculation. Garber called the competition good for the league. “Life is good when you have options,” he said. “I believe that there are many cities in our country today that can support an MLS team. We’ve got to get this last one over the finish line and then sit down and figure out what happens to those cities that were not part of the 28 that we set out to finalize a couple of years ago.” This is the third time Garber has visited St. Louis in connection with an expansion bid. The first came as the region fought to keep the National Football League’s Rams in St. Louis. The effort failed, but the idea to build a stadium that could be used by a soccer team started the conversation with MLS. Almost two years ago, a second attempt, headed by Kavanaugh and current Schnuck Markets President Dave Peacock, skidded to a stop when St. Louis city voters turned down a request for $60 million in public stadium financing. Garber said on Monday that he does

not feel burned by any of the past attempts. Instead, he said he believed they set the groundwork for this one. “We were missing a handful of things that have really changed in the last year or so,” Garber said on Monday, Kindle Betz sitting to his left. “The first is the involvement of the Taylor family. The second was a real confirmation on the stadium project.” The league is confident that fans here will support a team. And the corporate showing at Monday’s lunch impressed him, Garber said. It included executives from the natural gas company Spire, electrical supplier Graybar, shoe company Caleres, financial powerhouses Edward Jones, Wells Fargo Advisors and Stifel Financial Corp., plus some of the region’s largest employers, such as BJC Healthcare and SSM Health. But the last leg of the stool — corporate dollars — is key, Garber said. “That’s why I’m here today,” he said. “We very much need to see the corporate community get behind this team and show their financial support.” Kindle Betz said the league has not asked her team to present at the April meetings. But she said they’re ready. David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

Cannabis trade show at Union Station draws hundreds SHOW • FROM A1

Anheuser-Busch executive. “We’re excited for the opportunity to bring jobs to the area,” he said. Near the Canna Park booth was Hummert International, a familyowned business in Earth City that designs and equips greenhouses. The company started designing medical marijuana facilities in other states about six years ago. It regularly costs more than $1 million to build and fully equip a greenhouse, but the company will also work with businesses with smaller budgets, said Jason Hummert, director of marketing and a fourth-generation family member in the business. “It’s great to see it come back to our home state,” Hummert said. “We view it as a crop. And as a medicine.” On display at the booth were different irrigation tools, fans, trays for growing plants and LED lighting fixtures. A medical marijuana growing facility needs a quality system to control temperature, humidity and other variables, Hummert said. “You don’t want to take short cuts because the crop is just too valuable,” he said. Arnold City Councilman Jason Fulbright was at the conference as an elected official and as a businessman. Fulbright and his team hope to open a

marijuana vertical with a growing facility, manufacturing facility and three dispensaries spread across Jefferson County. His group, Bright Green Pharms, paid about $30,000 to prefile paperwork for license applications. “I’m kind of wearing two hats today,” said Fulbright, a Realtor and property manager. He said he was also learning how local governments can better plan and regulate local cannabis facilities. “The people voted for this, and we just have to do our due diligence to make sure it’s done the right way.” Fulbright and his brother, a licensed medical marijuana caregiver in Portland, Ore., since 2013, had been talking about forming a medical marijuana business for years. Their father was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and had to undergo more than 100 chemotherapy treatments. “Watching him go through that was frustrating knowing that there was something out there that could help,” he said. “I was on the phone with my brother the night of the election and I told him, ‘It’s going to happen this time. If (medical marijuana) helps and doesn’t harm, I don’t see why we can’t do it.’” Access to the hall of exhibitions costs $199; full access to the conference, $399. Most of the attendees were business people from Missouri or other states that have legalized medical or

recreational marijuana. Exhibitors also included advocacy groups that helped push for legalization, or Minorities for Medical Marijuana, which helped lead a panel on racial equity in the cannabis industry, or Ayden’s Alliance, a nonprofit group based in Springfield, Mo., pushing for greater access to medical cannabis for children with serious or chronic illnesses. The group is named after Ashley Markum’s 6-year-old son, who was diagnosed with intractable epilepsy. He went through countless seizure treatments and medications that failed to control his condition. The family applied for and won a hemp card four years ago, which allowed them to buy CBD-infused products from the two dispensaries in St. Louis. “It definitely helped, but it’s not enough,” Markum said. The group is selling T-shirts to fund patient cards for other families. Many doctors and clinics will not prescribe CBD or medical marijuana for children, she said. “We know several children in legal states who are alive because of THC,” she said. “Their quality of life matters right now. We can’t wait. If THC will help him enjoy life, why stand in the way?” Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

Boeing’s single-aisle airliner, which was first introduced in 1967 and has become the world’s most common passenger jet. Safety experts cautioned against drawing too many comparisons between the two crashes until more is known. The Federal Aviation Administration said it expects Boeing will soon complete improvements to an automated anti-stall system that is suspected of contributing to the Lion Air crash in October. The FAA said Monday that Boeing will also update training requirements and flight crew manuals related to the system. The system automatically points the plane’s nose down if sensors indicate the plane could be in danger of losing lift, or stalling. Sensors on the plane operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air gave out faulty readings on its last four flights. On the fatal October flight, pilots apparently struggled in vain to fight against the automated nose-down commands. “External reports are drawing similarities between (the Ethiopian) accident and the Lion Air Flight 610 accident,” the FAA said. “However, this investigation has just begun and to date we have not been provided data to draw any conclusions or take any actions.” Besides the groundings by airlines in Ethiopia, China and Indonesia, Aeromexico, Caribbean carrier Cayman Airways, Comair in South Africa and Royal Air Maroc in Morocco temporarily grounded their Max 8s. Ethiopian Airlines decided to ground its remaining four 737 Max 8s until further notice as “an extra safety precaution,” spokesman Asrat Begashaw said. The carrier had been using five of the planes and awaiting delivery of 25 more. But Chicago-based Boeing said it did not intend to issue any new recommendations about the aircraft to its customers. It plans to send a technical team to the crash site to help investigators and issued a statement saying it was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of the passengers and crew” on the jetliner. Among the airlines still using the plane are Southwest, American and Air Canada. In Washington, Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao said passenger safety was the first priority for the administration. “I want travelers to be assured and that we are taking this seriously and monitoring latest developments,” she said. It’s unusual for authorities to take the step of grounding planes, and it’s up to each country to set standards on which planes can fly and how those planes are maintained, said Todd Curtis, an aviation safety analyst who directs the Airsafe.com Foundation. “If there is a suspicion ... that there’s not only something inherently wrong with 737 Max 8 aircraft, but there are no procedures in place to cure the problem, then yes, they should either ground the plane, or there are several levels of things they could do,” Curtis said. “Safety is our No. 1 priority and we are taking every measure to fully understand all aspects of this accident, working closely with the investigating team and all regulatory authorities involved,” Boeing said in a statement. Boeing’s stock fell 7 percent to $391.80 in afternoon trading. People from 35 countries died in the crash six minutes after takeoff from Ethiopia’s capital for Nairobi. Ethiopian Airlines said the senior pilot issued a distress call and was told to return but all contact was lost shortly afterward. The plane plowed into the ground at Hejere near Bishoftu, scattering debris. Kenya lost 32 people, more than any country. Relatives of 25 of the victims had been contacted, Transport Minister James Macharia said, and taking care of their welfare was of utmost importance. “Some of them, as you know, they are very distressed,” he said. “They are in shock like we are. They are grieving.” In Addis Ababa, members of an association of Ethiopian airline pilots wept uncontrollably for their dead colleagues. Framed photos of seven crew members sat in chairs at the front of a crowded room. The flight’s main pilot, Yared Getachew, issued a distress call shortly after takeoff and was told to return, but all contact was lost. Canada, Ethiopia, the U.S., China, Italy, France, Britain, Egypt, Germany, India and Slovakia all lost four or more citizens. At least 21 staff members from the United Nations were killed in the crash, said U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who led a moment of silence at a meeting where he said “a global tragedy has hit close to home.” Both Addis Ababa and Nairobi are major hubs for humanitarian workers, and some had been on their way to a large U.N. environmental conference set to begin Monday in Nairobi. The U.N. flag at the event flew at half-staff.


03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

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M 1 TUESDAY • 03.12.2019 • A6

When CEOs show optimism, their shares rebel DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Everyone likes a confident CEO, but an overconfident one can be dangerous. Consider Kraft Heinz’ conference call last May, which Chief Executive Bernardo Hees began by saying he was “feeling more confident about our outlook.” Nine months later, Kraft would slash its dividend and write down its brands’ value by $15 billion. Or go back to January 2018, when CEO John Flannery declared that General Electric was “beginning to show progress against each of our key initiatives.” After slashing GE’s dividend in July, Flannery would be out of a job by October.

If only someone would warn investors to take such pronouncements with a grain of salt. Actually, two Washington University professors have co-authored a paper that looks at manager sentiment, as measured by the words executives use in conference calls and annual reports, and tracks it against stock prices. The paper, which will be published in the Journal of Financial Economics, finds that manager sentiment is “a strong negative predictor” of future returns. CEOs who use a lot of upbeat words wind up disappointing investors. They aren’t necessarily trying to mislead anyone. Xiumin Martin, an accounting professor at Washington University’s Olin Business School, says the bosses appear to believe what their rosecolored glasses are telling them. “Managers believe what they say and act on it in terms of guid-

ing their investment decisions,” says Martin, who conducted the study with Olin colleague Guofu Zhou and co-authors from the University of Georgia and Central University in China. The most optimistic CEOs overspend on capital projects, research and acquisitions. It’s when those investments don’t pan out that the stock price starts sinking. The professors studied company disclosures from 2003 to 2014. Their sentiment index was a strong predictor both for individual firms and for the market as a whole, which may indicate some herd behavior on the part of executives. When one company makes a big acquisition or builds a new plant, a competing CEO feels pressure to do the same. Then when there’s a slowdown in the economy, or some adverse

event affects the industry, both companies deliver results that don’t live up to the earlier hype. At one level, these results are puzzling. If managers know the most about what’s going on inside a company, shouldn’t their words — if truthful — be a reliable guide for investors? A couple of professional investors told me they weren’t surprised by the research. Joe Williams, chief investment strategist at Commerce Trust Co., has seen the herd mentality in action. “We price all the good news into the stock, and it’s rare that three years later, the good news hasn’t been interrupted by something in the economy or the industry,” he said. Joe Terril, president of Terril & Co. in Sunset Hills, says managers “are just like everybody else. When everything’s going great, they get too optimistic.”

Executives also face pressure from various quarters. Analysts will often put a “buy” recommendation on a company whose CEO is saying positive things, and investment bankers use rosy projections to make a merger look attractive. For Terril’s part, he becomes suspicious when a conference call gets too one-sided. “If they’re extremely optimistic it makes me nervous,” he says. “I would rather have them be a little pessimistic or at least a little skeptical.” That’s not a bad investment strategy. Who knows? Maybe once the hedge-fund industry reads this research, we’ll see a batch of new contrarian funds betting against the words of optimistic CEOs. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Tesla reverses course on showroom closures BY TOM KRISHER Associated Press

Tesla is walking back plans to close most of its showrooms worldwide and announced price hikes for most of its electric vehicles. Tesla announced last month that it would shutter most of its stores to cut costs so it could sell its lower-priced Model 3 for $35,000. The company continues its shift toward online-only sales, but now says it won’t close as many stores as originally thought. In Missouri, Tesla has stores in University City and the Kansas City area. The $35,000 base Model 3 will still be available, but the company is raising prices by 3 percent on all other models. In a Monday filing with government regulators, Tesla now says it closed 10 percent of its stores, but a few of those will now remain open. An additional 20 percent are being evaluated, and some could remain open. The company gave no numbers, but said it would close only about half the stores that it had intended to. It has 378 stores and service centers worldwide and about 100 stores in the U.S. If the company closes 30 percent of the stores, that would equal about 110. “As a result of keeping significantly more stores open, Tesla will need to raise vehicle prices by

POST-DISPATCH

Mohammed Khezri, 23, a customer experience specialist at the Tesla store in University City, wipes down a car at the dealership last year.

about 3 percent on average worldwide,” a company statement said. “We will only close about half as many stores, but the cost savings are therefore only about half.” Remaining stores could have fewer workers but will have vehicles available for test drives and a small inventory in case people want to buy immediately, the statement said. Also Monday, a New York attorney announced that Tesla’s former chief of security has filed a whistleblower complaint with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Attorney Andrew Meissner said in a statement that Sean Gouthro provided information about Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s Aug. 7 tweet that he had the financing to take the company private at $420 per share. As

it turned out, Musk didn’t have the funding secured. The SEC filed a securities fraud complaint, and Musk and Tesla agreed to each pay $20 million and to governance changes including a Twitter monitor for Musk. The SEC submission says the go-private plan was discussed internally at Tesla many days before Musk’s tweet “and that many were suspect of the purported deal’s legiti-

macy,” Meissner’s statement said. Tesla also announced Monday that it has purchased car-hauling trucks and trailers from a California company in a stock deal worth about $14.2 million. Tesla paid for the purchase with about 50,000 previously authorized shares. Tesla wants to increase its vehicle transportation capacity and cut delivery times. The moves come on the day that lawyers for Musk have to file a legal brief explaining to a New York federal judge why he shouldn’t be held in contempt of court for an inaccurate Feb. 19 tweet that could have influenced the company’s stock price. On Feb. 19 Musk tweeted that Tesla would produce around 500,000 vehicles this year — a tweet that wasn’t blessed by the person in charge of baby-sitting Musk’s Twitter account as required by the fraud settlement. The tweet was later corrected. The judge has ordered Musk to file a brief by

Monday explaining why he isn’t in contempt for violating the court-approved settlement. The store-closing reversal shows that Tesla had second thoughts about shuttering the stores and whether buyers would make such a large purchase without a test drive. The company says it still plans to offer buyers the ability to return purchased vehicles at no cost after a seven-day or 1,000-mile test drive. Gartner analyst Michael Ramsey called the move “startling” and said it undermines the credibility of Musk and Tesla’s management. “How else can you view it except to see it as a remarkable example of lack of foresight or planning?” Ramsey asked. “It’s almost as if the decision was announced and made without any analysis of what the outcome would be.” The move made no sense to begin with because Tesla had spent millions fighting in courts and state legislatures trying to change laws that prevented companies

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 19-C John E. Heidbreder requests a variance for a reduction in the size of livable floor space in the S-D Old Town District. The property is located on Lot 15 and Part Lot 2 of Deppe and Reinecke’s Addition to St. Peters as recorded in Book 2 Page 19 at the St. Charles County Recorder’s Office – 102 Second Street.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the SHUTTLE STOP CANOPY REFINISHING, BEAR PARK NORTH will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on MARCH 26, 2019 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder’s expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans.missouristate.edu/. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

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MARKET WATCH

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS The S&P 500 had its best day since January and snapped a five-day losing streak on Monday. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index had an even better day, as chipmakers jumped on Nvidia’s $6.9 billion deal to buy Mellanox.

Boeing

50

8

140

40

200

7

120

J F M 52-week range $446.01

J F M 52-week range $16.16

S&P 500

26,000 25,000

Futures

Soybeans Wheat

3,000

22,000 S

O

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StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,127 2,144 2248 647 61 35

3,605 3,327 2230 549 97 23

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

F HIGH 25661.63 10315.39 771.40 12563.97 7558.23 2784.00 1885.30 28830.52 1548.93

CHG

Mar 19 Mar 19 Mar 19

352.50 877.75 422.25

-2.50 -6.25 -10.75

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

2,600

Hogs

2,400

Copper

Mar 19 Apr 19 Apr 19 Mar 19 Mar 19

142.30 129.00 62.85 14.93 290.00

-1.62 -.67 +2.30 -.04 +.60

ICE

2,200

M

CLOSE

CHICAGO MERC

Milk

23,000

DATE

2,800

Live cattle

24,000

LOW 25208.00 10094.49 757.88 12429.89 7442.40 2747.61 1864.68 28435.67 1522.80

S CLOSE 25650.88 10312.92 771.11 12561.26 7558.06 2783.30 1885.29 28828.74 1548.88

O CHG. +200.64 +196.06 +5.81 +146.13 +149.92 +40.23 +25.01 +426.55 +27.00

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May 19 Mar 19 May 19

73.20 94.00 25.93

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NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Apr 19 Apr 19 Apr 19 Apr 19

56.79 1.8260 199.42 2.772

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M

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YTD +9.96% +12.46% +8.16% +10.43% +13.91% +11.03% +13.36% +11.96% +14.85%

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71.72 54.93 +.36 +0.7

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Bank of America

BAC

22.66

33.05 28.94 +.29 +1.0 +17.5

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BDC

37.79

78.81 57.99 +.43 +0.7 +38.8 -23.8 11

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65.57 45.23 +.06 +0.1

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36.09

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17.08

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46.09

1.48

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0.20

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+2.4 +20.2

2.41

7

0.32 WalMart

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81.78 106.21 98.48 +.89 +0.9

WBA

59.07

86.31 60.68 +.78 +1.3 -11.2 -10.7 11

WFC

43.02

59.53 49.76

-.04 -0.1

+5.7 +12.8 57 2.12f +8.0

1.76

-9.2 12 1.80f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Ronnoco Coffee acquires Tennessee company • Ronnoco Coffee of St. Louis has acquired Tennessee-based Beverage Solutions Group, which sells coffee equipment and supplies to distributors that service convenience stores and foodservice accounts across the country. Financial terms of the deal announced Monday were not disclosed. It’s Ronnoco’s eighth acquisition in the past six years. “This purchase supports Ronnoco’s overall strategy of being a single-source supplier for the beverage category, continuing to expand nationally and furthering our acquisition investment within high-growth beverage categories,” Ronnoco CEO Terry McDaniel said in a statement. SEC settles with investment advisers on mutual fund sales • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced on Monday it had reached a settlement with 79 investment advisers on charges of the improper sale of mutual fund shares, returning more than $125 million to clients. The settlements are the result of an SEC initiative, created in February, encouraging advisers to self-report violations in cases where they did not adequately disclose conflicts of interest on certain mutual fund investments. Specifically, the SEC said the advisers charged had sold clients on higher-cost mutual funds when lower-cost options of the same fund were available, while receiving fees from those funds. “An adviser’s failure to disclose these types of financial conflicts of interest harms retail investors by unfairly exposing them to fees that chip away at the value of their investments,” Stephanie Avakian, co-director of the SEC’s enforcement division, said in a statement. None of the firms involved in the settlements admitted or denied the SEC’s findings. Under the terms of the initiative, the firms avoided financial penalties by self-reporting, so long as they agreed to compensate harmed clients and fixed their disclosures. Z Gallerie enters bankruptcy, closing St. Louis area store • Z Gallerie, the upscale retailer known for its eclectic home decor, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on Monday. The company blames the

filing on self-imposed problems — namely a failure to invest enough in e-commerce, the addition of a costly distribution center and an expansion that didn’t meet performance targets. The latest victim of the so-called retail apocalypse says trends in brick-and-mortar sales worsened the missteps that led Z Gallerie to bankruptcy, according to court papers. The filings emphasize a need for fast proceedings to avoid the fate of retailers who sought to reorganize but were forced to liquidate. Los Angeles-based Z Gallerie has more than 1,000 employees, operates 76 stores and generated over $200 million in sales last year. It will close 17 underperforming stores, including its store at the St. Louis Galleria in Richmond Heights, according to court documents. The company plans to continue operating during bankruptcy and aims to emerge within 120 days as a result of a sale to a third party or a debt-for-equity swap. Wells Fargo CEO to tout risk management, remediation • Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan will tout the scandal-plagued bank’s progress in repaying wrongly charged customers and highlight changes to its risk management in testimony to U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday, according to prepared remarks. Since 2016, Wells Fargo has reviewed 165 million accounts, contacted more than 40 million customers and paid out millions in compensation stemming from sales practices issues, Sloan said in an opening statement to the House Financial Services Committee that was posted on the bank’s website on Monday. The San Francisco-based bank has improved risk management controls by centralizing oversight and restructuring its board in order to prevent new problems from developing, the remarks said. Last year, the Federal Reserve imposed a consent order on the bank, preventing it from growing its balance sheet until it proves it has improved its risk management controls. This year, the bank said it expects to operate under the asset cap until the end of 2019, pushing back prior guidance by six months. From staff reports

5.50 5.00 4.50

.0243 .7049 .2584 1.3014 .7456 .1488 1.1242 .0143 .2755 .009003 .051295 .0151 .0693 .000882 .9927

PreciousMetals Silver

-8.20 -.07 -.80

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

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2.38 2.50 2.52 2.46 2.46 2.53 2.64 3.03

-0.06 -0.02 ... +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02

1.66 1.87 2.02 2.26 2.65 2.81 2.90 3.16

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

2.38 1.88 1.38

CHG

CLOSE

1288.80 15.20 816.80

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0242 .7062 .2604 1.3152 .7458 .1487 1.1240 .0143 .2760 .008992 .051581 .0152 .0698 .000883 .9889

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.64 percent Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

2.56

-3.2 12

0.13 Walgreen Boots

19.31 17.89 +.35 +2.0 +12.8 +36.9 22 0.24a Wells Fargo

1.92

MA

PRFT

CHTR 250.10 369.51 341.08 +3.54 +1.0 +19.7 -9.0

+8.7 +17.4 22

36.65 21.40 +.22 +1.0 +35.4 +31.2

POST

Charter

162.42 226.61 163.63 +.49 +0.3

81.16 117.70 100.40 +1.07 +1.1 11.65

Perficient

74.49 57.45 +.89 +1.6

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LOW MNK

Post Holdings

50.00

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47.84 x28.95 +.15 +0.5

CNC

... +12.8 16

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3.49 +.15 +4.5 +65.4 +42.1

4.10

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-2.3 15 1.04b

2.79 +.36 +14.8 +55.0 -58.2 dd

3.49

29.08

62.08 50.27 +.62 +1.2

-5.0

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BTU

47.74

+.72 +.0243 -.56 -.093

1.52

1.57

SKIS

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Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Platinum

1.84

Peabody Energy

Cass Info. Systems

ExchangeRates

+6.2 +3.6 20 5.44f

Peak Resorts

41.09 27.41

0.28

45.00 38.62 +.63 +1.7 +15.5 +4.4 dd

34.42 24.23 +.26 +1.1 +20.5 -23.6

26.63

-1.5 +0.4 13

LEE

30.56

158.09 215.43 182.44 +1.21 +0.7

J F M 52-week range $82.28

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

17.87

CAL

-.08 -0.3

GM HD

52-WK LO HI

OLN

Caleres Inc.

$30.90

Interestrates Interestrates

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D

PE: ... Vol.: 455.8k (0.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.9 b Yield: 1.2%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

30

J F M 52-week range $292.76

Vol.: 21.3m (1.3x avg.) PE: 24.3 Mkt. Cap: $97.7 b Yield: 0.4%

Corn

10 DAYS

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$124.46

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,783.30 Change: 40.23 (1.5%)

2,720

27,000

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Vol.: 8.8m (1.5x avg.) PE: 57.4 Mkt. Cap: $18.9 b Yield: 1.4%

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25,200

$60

300 D

PLT

Close: $48.14 0.29 or 0.6% The communications technology company is replacing its chief financial officer.

160

Close: 25,650.88 Change: 200.64 (0.8%)

25,680

Plantronics

NVDA

Close: $161.14 10.50 or 7.0% The chipmaker will buy network and data transmission company Mellanox for $6.9 billion in an all-cash deal. $180

9

Vol.: 34.6m (8.1x avg.) PE: 22.4 Mkt. Cap: $226.0 b Yield: 2.1%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Nvidia

DB

Close: $9.12 0.48 or 5.6% The German bank is considering holding merger talks with rival Commerzbank, according to media reports. $10

400

$292.47

26,160

Deutsche Bank

BA

Close: $400.01 -22.53 or -5.3% The airplane maker’s 737 Max 8 model was involved in a crash in Ethiopia, the second deadly crash of the model in six months. $500

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.91 ... 1.87 3.14 -0.01 3.17 6.74 +0.07 6.17 3.82 ... 3.88 3.86 ... 3.75 .69 ... .77

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2783.30 11543.48 7130.62 28503.30 5265.96 41876.17 21125.09 98026.63 16106.24 9341.35

CHG

CHG

YTD

+40.23 +85.64 +26.31 +274.88 +34.75 +289.47 +99.53 +2661.75 +110.03 +72.99

+1.47% +0.75% +0.37% +0.97% +0.66% +0.70% +0.47% +2.79% +0.69% +0.79%

+11.03% +9.32% +5.98% +10.40% +11.31% +0.57% +5.55% +11.54% +12.45% +10.82%

Auto Workers chief raises strike pay, warns carmakers BY MIKE HOUSEHOLDER associated Press

DETROIT • The president of the United Auto Workers union warned automakers that the union is prepared to strike if it doesn’t get its way in upcoming contract talks. Gary Jones told delegates at the union’s bargaining convention in Detroit that it would raise weekly strike pay from $200 to $250 per week this month and $275 in January of next year. The new union president says no one expects a strike but the UAW is prepared to walk out. He said raising the payments is a symbol to members that the union has their backs. The not-so-veiled warning likely is directed more at General Motors than Ford and Fiat Chrysler, the other two Detroit automakers. All three have a total of 154,000 workers represented by the UAW. GM has proposed closing five factories in the U.S. and Canada by early next year as it grapples with falling demand for sedans. The move would eliminate about 6,000 jobs in the two countries, although GM says many workers will retire and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gary Jones, president of the United Auto Workers union, addresses delegates Monday.

that it has about 2,700 factory jobs open at other plants. But the workers would have to transfer. The company already has idled its small-car assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, and plans to close car factories in Oshawa, Ontario, and DetroitHamtramck, Mich., by January 2020. Also scheduled to close this year are transmission factories in Warren, Mich., and near Baltimore. GM, which operates a van and pickup assembly plant in Wentzville, has said the futures of the U.S. factories will be decided in the upcoming contract talks. It has said the plants aren’t getting new products due to the shift from cars to SUVs and trucks and

because GM needs to cut excess factory capacity to generate money to develop electric and autonomous vehicles. Jones has promised to fight the plant closures in the courts and at the bargaining table. The UAW already has sued GM over plant closures, which it says violates the current contract. The threat to strike is a different stance from contract talks that occurred since the automakers got into financial trouble in 2008. Since then, the union has pledged to be business partner rather than an adversary. Talks with Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler begin this summer. The four-year contracts with all three expire on Sept. 15. Jones told members in a speech Monday at the opening of the convention that the union’s strike fund now has over $721 million. The union increased dues in 2011 until the fund reaches $850 million. “We are solid heading into the next four years of bargaining,” Jones said in his speech. “And this extra security for UAW families carries us to the bargaining table united in our goals.”

Community college, LaunchCode to offer coding program for adults FROM STAFF REPORTS

St. Louis Community College will offer a free, 14-week coding program for adults starting next month. The college is teaming with LaunchCode on a program that will let students learn about technology and some of the skills needed to work in the

field. The Immersive CodeCamp will begin April 1 at the community college’s William J. Harrison Education Center, 3140 Cass Avenue, in St. Louis. Classes will meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The college expects that students who complete the pro-

gram will be qualified to enter LaunchCode’s apprenticeship program. St. Louis Community College will lend participants laptops if needed to participate. Prospective students should apply by March 15. College leaders say the school is spending $100,000 on the coding program.


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

Kairos charter school to open in publishing office BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Kairos Academies, the only charter middle school expected to open in St. Louis this year, has signed a lease for a portion of Concordia Publishing House’s building in the Marine Villa neighborhood. Kairos plans to open in the

143-year-old building at the corner of Miami Street and Jefferson Avenue by mid-August for an initial sixth-grade class of 115 students. Co-founder and CEO Gavin Schiffres said the former office layout of the new space meshes with the school’s mission: to teach kids in environments similar to the openoffice spaces where they will

one day work. “People work in open-office co-working spaces,” he said. “We are trying to create a space where students can self-manage and work productively.” Lease terms will allow Kairos to secure additional space on other floors as the charter school grows, Schiffres said.

It has renewal options that will give it access to the building for 20-plus years. In addition to Schiffres, Kairos was co-founded by Jack Krewson, son of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson. He said the effort has no involvement from City Hall. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Andy Orahood, of Maplewood, has his dog Sam leap through the rings to catch a stick Monday at the Maplewood Dog Park, while Sam’s buddies look on. Temperatures reached 50 degrees on the first weeknight evening of daylight saving time, giving pups and their owners extra incentive to linger outdoors.

LAW & ORDER

RIVERVIEW > Police seek two suspects in fatal shooting • A man in his late teens was found fatally shot in the 100 block of Chambers Road on Monday afternoon, police said. Investigators are searching for two suspects who fled the scene on foot. Riverview police were called to the scene about 2:50 p.m. and found the man suffering from at least one gunshot wound. He was taken to a hospital, where

he was pronounced dead. The investigation was being handled by the St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons. CALVERTON PARK > Woman found fatally shot at home; man charged • A woman with multiple gunshot wounds was found dead in her home on Grether Avenue on Sunday morning, officials with the Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis said. Calverton Park police responded to a welfare check at the home of Demetria Howard, 23, Green about 12:55 a.m. Sunday and found her dead inside. The Major Case Squad was called in to lead the homicide investigation and eventually arrested Perry Green, 24, of Ferguson, in connection with Howard’s murder. Green has been charged by the St. Louis County prosecuting attorney’s office with firstdegree murder and armed criminal action. Green was being held in lieu of $500,000 bail, cash only. ST. LOUIS > Man is carjacked as he tries to untangle tree

branch from vehicle • A man got out of his car to remove a tree branch lodged underneath it Saturday and was carjacked at gunpoint in the Central West End, police say. The man, 53, was robbed of his vehicle between 12:30 and 1 p.m. Saturday in the 100 block of North Taylor Avenue, near West Pine Boulevard. He was not hurt. The man showed up at the North Patrol police station on Union Boulevard about 2:45 p.m. Saturday to report the crime. The man told police he had pulled along the curb at North Taylor and West Pine after he heard a loud scraping sound. He realized there was a tree branch lodged under his vehicle. He tried to remove it, police say. When he stood up, the man was approached by robbers. They took his vehicle at gunpoint, police say. NEW BLOOMFIELD, MO. > Man admits to killing two at RV park • A Rolla, Mo., man has pleaded guilty to killing two people who had evicted him from a central Missouri campground. Gary Sweet pleaded guilty Friday to two counts of seconddegree murder and two counts of assault in the deaths of Jim and Sheri Parker in November 2017. Authorities said the Parkers managed the Riverview RV Park

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A crying mother offered

STICK WITH IT !

LINCOLN COUNTY > Woman arrested in killing of boyfriend • A woman has been charged with first-degree murder after she shot her boyfriend early Monday, telling police he had assaulted her earlier that same morning. Police responded to a call for a domestic dispute about 3 a.m. on Lakota Acres and found Keith Medici Sweetin, 63, dead inside the home. He had a single gunshot wound to his head. Sweetin’s girlfriend, Angela Medici, 49, told investigators that she’d shot Sweetin with a handgun after he assaulted her. Medici is charged with murder in the first degree and armed criminal action and is being held in lieu of $300,000 bail.

Mother of boy killed on bike forgives teen driver in court

and Campground along the Osage Beach River in Lake Ozark, about 130 miles southwest of St. Louis. The Parkers were found dead from gunshot wounds in the living quarters of the park’s office. Prosecutors said the Parkers had evicted Sweet from the campground about a month before they were killed. ST. LOUIS > Man is carjacked, shot at after giving the shooter a ride • A man told police he gave an acquaintance a ride and then was shot at and carjacked Monday afternoon in the Tower Grove East neighborhood. Police responded to a call for a carjacking just after 4 p.m. and met with the 35-year-old male victim, who told police he drove an acquaintance of his to the 3300 block of Wyoming Street. When they arrived, the acquaintance suddenly took the man’s gun and fired at him. The bullet missed and then the suspect hit the man in the forehead with the gun. The victim fled and the suspect fired another shot at him as he ran. The suspect then drove off in the victim’s 2017 Kia Soul. The victim suffered a minor injury to his forehead but refused medical treatment. Police were investigating.

forgiveness Monday to the driver who hit and killed her son as he rode his bike in a St. Louis neighborhood two years ago. As she cried and held a placard with pictures of 7-year-old Demond Moorhead, she said she just wanted Jamaica Jackson, the teenage driver who hit her son, Demond to be held accountable in the April 23, 2017, crash. “She’s a mother, too, and I forgive her,” Johnika Davis said, sobbing. “I just ask God to give me peace. I Jackson can’t change what took place.” Jackson, 19, was crying, too, as she pleaded guilty to second-degree involuntary manslaughter and awaited the judge’s sentence in the case. Authorities say Jackson did not have a valid license, ran a stop sign and was speeding when she struck Demond with her SUV as the boy rode out of an alley in the city’s Patch neighborhood. Jackson, who was 17 at the time, was only able to form a few words in front of the judge. “I’ve been wanting to say sorry to his mother for a long time, but I didn’t know how she was going to react to me,” Jackson said. Circuit Judge Michael Noble looked at the photos of young Demond and said finding justice was a difficult balancing act before giving Jackson a suspended sentence. He ordered her to serve five years’ probation in the case. “This is a horrible case,” Noble said. “This is a tragic case. You have a loss of life that’s irreplaceable. “And you,” he said, addressing Jackson, “have forever the weight of knowing your actions led to this loss of life.” Prosecutors did not recommend a sentence in the case; her lawyer asked for probation. She was driving with her boyfriend in the passenger seat and her two young boys in the back of the Jeep Commander SUV. Surveillance video caught Jackson rolling through a stop sign at Minnesota Avenue and Schirmer Street, and her SUV did not slow down before hitting Demond, charging documents say. She was driving 36 mph in a 25 mph zone. She was negligent but hit Demond as the boy came “flying” out of an alley on his bike about 6:30 p.m. that night, according to her attorney, Terry Niehoff. She had no criminal record, and stayed at the scene to cooperate with authorities after hitting Demond. “It was an accident,” Niehoff said. “A terrible accident.” Demond lived about a mile away in the 6300 block of Alabama Avenue. He was pronounced dead at a hospital. Demond’s mother said she was taking medication and seeing a psychiatrist to deal with her son’s death. “It’s been a long two years,” Davis said. “My life has been miserable. ... I have nightmares every day. ... I never thought in a million years I would have to bury him.” Despite the forgiveness Davis offered Jackson, Demond’s family seemed unhappy with the sentence. The boy’s father, Jimmie Moorhead, stormed out of the courtroom when it became clear Jackson would not get jail time. Other family members trailed out after him.

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NATION

03.12.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

Highlights of $4.7 trillion budget request BY MATTHEW DALY • Associated Press

President Donald Trump’s $4.7 trillion budget request proposes steep cuts to domestic spending, a funding boost for the Pentagon and $8.6 billion for his signature wall along the border with Mexico. Leading Democrats immediately rejected the plan. A look at the highlights from the White House proposal: BORDER WALL FIGHT RENEWED

REPEALING OBAMACARE — AGAIN

Trump’s proposal for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 includes $8.6 billion to build the U.S.-Mexico border wall. The proposal shows Trump is eager to renew his confrontation with Congress over the wall, a centerpiece of his agenda that congressional Democrats have staunchly resisted. The budget request for more than 300 miles of new border wall would more than double the $8.1 billion potentially available to the president for the wall after Trump declared a national emergency at the border last month. The politically contentious declaration would circumvent Congress, though there’s no guarantee Trump will be able to use the money in the face of a legal challenge from California and other states. Lawmakers from both parties oppose the emergency declaration, but Congress appears to lack a veto-proof margin to block Trump. The budget asks Congress to set up a fund of up to $2 billion to pay for sheltering migrant children who arrive with their families or alone at the U.S. border.

The budget request would reopen two health care battles Trump already lost in his first year in office: repealing “Obamacare” and limiting future federal spending on Medicaid for low-income people. Under the budget, major sections of both the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid would be turned over to the states starting in 2021. With Democrats in charge of the House, Trump’s grand plan has no chance of being enacted. And few Republican lawmakers want to be dragged into another health care fight.

BIG BOOST FOR DEFENSE, CUTS IN DOMESTIC SPENDING

Trump’s budget proposes increasing defense spending to $750 billion — and building the new Space Force as a military branch — while reducing nondefense accounts by 5 percent. The $2.7 trillion in proposed domestic spending cuts over the next decade is higher than any administration in history. Proposed cuts to economic safety-net programs used by millions of Americans include $845 billion over the next 10 years from Medicare; $241 billion over a decade from Medicaid as part of an overhaul that shifts more power to states; and slashes $220 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program over the next decade. The budget also reduces to the federal student loan

AP

Acting White House Budget Director Russ Vought

programs $207 billion in the next 10 years, plus eliminating Public Service Loan Forgiveness and subsidized student loans.

RED INK FLOWS

Under Trump’s proposal, the budget deficit is projected to hit $1.1 trillion next year — the highest in a decade. The administration is counting on robust economic growth, including from the 2017 Republican tax cuts, to push down the red ink. Some economists say the economic bump from the tax cuts is waning, and they project slower growth in coming years. The national debt is $22 trillion.

ENVIRONMENTAL SPENDING SLASHED

Trump again is asking Congress to slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by about a third, a request that Congress has previously rejected. The budget request seeks $6.1 billion for the EPA, down 31 percent from current spending. The budget would kill the federal tax credit for electric vehicles among a range of energy-related tax changes.

EDUCATION CUT, SCHOOL CHOICE EXPANDED

The budget request would cut Education Department funding by 10 percent while expanding money for school choice, school safety and apprenticeship programs. The $64 billion proposal would eliminate 29 programs, including a $2 billion program meant to help schools improve instruction and a $1.2 billion program to create community centers. Meanwhile, it would add $60 million for charter schools and $200 million for school safety initiatives.

MORE CHOICE FOR VETERANS

The White House is seeking just over $93 billion for the Department of Veterans Affairs, an increase of $6.5 billion from current spending. The request would support implementation of a law Trump signed last year to give veterans more freedom to see doctors outside the troubled VA system, a major shift aimed at reducing wait times and improving care by steering more patients to the private sector. The plan again targets reducing veteran suicides as a top priority and sets aside $4.3 billion to improve the department’s computer system and website. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

Proposed budget includes $8.6 billion in wall funding BUDGET • FROM A1

it and even some Republicans sought to distance themselves from key details. And the demand for $8.6 billion for a border wall, less than two months after a 35-day shutdown paralyzed much of Washington, raised the possibility that there could be an even more dramatic impasse if a spending deal isn’t reached by the end of September. The budget plan sets up a contrast with Trump’s 2020 Democratic rivals for the White House, proposing to shrink spending on social programs at a time when many of his challengers are promising to expand it. Top White House officials acknowledged that lawmakers routinely dismiss these budget proposals, but they signaled a willingness on Monday to fight harder this year than they have in the past. “We need to continue to secure the country,” said White House Office of Management and Budget Acting Director Russell Vought. “We need to continue to secure the border. We’re not going to be bashful about that. But at the same time, we’re also going to say that we have many, many programs that are wasteful and inefficient that we can no longer afford.” Trump’s “Budget for a Better America” features dozens of spending cuts and policy overhauls. Total spending on Medicare, the popular health care program for the elderly that in the past he had largely said he would protect, would be reduced by roughly $845 billion over 10 years. Some of those savings would be redirected to other health programs, but most would be completely cut from the budget. His budget would also propose a major overhaul of Medicaid, the health care program for lowincome Americans run jointly with states, by turning more power over to states and cutting spending by $241 billion over 10 years. “The cruel and shortsighted cuts in President Trump’s budget request are a road map to a sicker, weaker America,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., effectively dooming the budget by promising the House would reject it.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Staff members from the Office of Management and Budget deliver President Donald Trump’s 2020 budget Monday to the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill. The plan includes dozens of spending cuts and policy overhauls.

Even with the cuts in Trump’s budget, the spending plan predicts annual deficits to top $1 trillion from 2019 through 2022, a threshold that has caused consternation within GOP ranks for weeks and only came into sharp focus on Monday. A number of agencies, particularly the Environmental Protection Agency, State Department, Transportation Department, Education Department and Interior Department, would see their budgets severely reduced. The Commerce Department budget would increase in preparation for the 2020 Census — but Democrats said the Census money was insufficient. Trump’s GOP allies, meanwhile, received the budget plan with a lukewarm embrace. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., said the proposal was “the first step in the federal budget process and will allow us to consider how his priorities align with the priorities of Congress.” The budget was full of provisions that Republicans have long embraced but had not been put forward on such a scale. It would impose mandatory work requirements for millions of people who receive welfare as-

sistance, including for food and housing, while dramatically increasing the defense budget to $750 billion next year, a 5 percent increase from 2019. Trump and other Republicans have said the federal budget is full of waste and bloat, arguing many federal agencies could still function with less taxpayer money. Still, according to Trump’s budget, the spending cuts would do little to reduce what is shaping up to be a colossal deficit in the next several years. The deficit is the annual gap between spending and tax revenue. The budget foresees a $1.1 trillion deficit in 2019, 2020, and 2021, and a $1 trillion deficit in 2022. Asked about this, Vought said, “We do have large deficits. That’s why we are here transparently saying we have a problem as a country.” White House officials believe the budget proposal would eventually eliminate the deficit in 2035, but Democrats accused the plan of relying on rosy estimates of future economic growth in order to count large increases in future tax revenue. These deficits will add to the existing $22 trillion debt and have a real impact on govern-

ment spending. For example, the White House now projects the government will spend $482 billion on interest payments for the debt next year, more than the entire budget for Medicaid. Republicans have long called for taking steps that shrink — or even eliminate — the deficit, and putting forward a plan that would create $4.3 trillion in new debt over four years could give Democrats fresh targets on the campaign trail. There is a crowded field of Democrats seeking the nomination to challenge Trump in November, and at a time when Trump is trying to pull the country to the right, the Democratic Party has moved left. Several Democratic senators running for president have backed Sen. Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare-for-all” health legislation, which would expand federal spending on the health program by as much as $30 trillion — just as the Trump administration is looking to decrease the program’s costs. Trump’s budget also calls for maintaining existing federal funding for child care programs, hoping to generate additional spending at the state level. Democratic candidates have called

for the federal government to massively increase its spending on child care, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., recently unveiling a plan that would ensure free, government-subsidized child care for every American earning less than roughly $50,000 annually. The administration’s budget also revives its push for an infrastructure bill, asking for $200 billion in federal dollars over 10 years, which it says will lead to $1 trillion in federal, state, and private spending on roads, housing, ports, and other investments. Some Democratic candidates have called for programs on a much bigger scale, with Sanders recently calling for the federal government to rescind the 2017 GOP tax cut, estimated to cost about $1.5 trillion, and spend $1 trillion in new federal dollars on the nation’s roads, bridges and highways, among other things. House Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., said the White House spending blueprint would give Democratic presidential candidates plenty of material to show how their agenda is different. “If I were running against him I would sure use it against him,” he said.

Budget broadly addresses Boeing’s Super Hornets, built here NGA • FROM A1

the border wall. The new headquarters is expected to cost about $1.7 billion, and its appropriations are being spread over several budget years. Trump said last month he would seek to shift money from other areas of the budget, including military construction, to accelerate the building of a wall

on the Mexican border. This year’s budget includes $219 million for the new NGA facility. Missouri congressional delegation members have said they hope the NGA project will not be tapped to fund border-wall construction. NGA officials said last month they had no indication that was happening with the St. Louis facility, and Repavi repeated that Monday.

Trump’s record $4.75 trillion budget is a broad blueprint, and includes a record $750 billion for defense. The government has been running deficits approaching $1 trillion under his presidency. Democrats have already declared the budget inoperable in part because Trump is requesting $8.5 billion for border-wall construction. The request comes just weeks

after the government shutdown that resulted in an impasse between Trump and Democrats over border-wall funding in the current-year budget. Line-item details aren’t expected to be released until next week, but Trump’s overall budget request broadly addresses the F/A-18E/F Super Hornets built by Boeing in St. Louis. Current-year funding covers the construction of 24 new Super

Hornets. Trump’s budget document released Monday calls for “the continued modernization of (the Department of Defense’s) aircraft fleets,” including continuing efforts by the Navy, which is buying the St. Louis-made fighters, to “modernize their current F/A18E/F fighters.” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAy • 03.12.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Smokescreens and stink

State’s secrecy behind medical marijuana licensing opens door for abuses.

T

this would be anything but a fully abovehat stink in the air and hazy board operation subject to all the transsmokescreen surrounding Misparency requirements applied to other souri’s nascent effort to license businesses in the state. medical marijuana has nothNot so. The state Department of ing to do with the pot itself. Lobbyists, Health and Senior Services has taken the deep-pocketed investors, entrepreneurs strictest possible interpretation of wordand some possible scam artists are ing in November’s Amendment 2 refermaneuvering to seize their cut of this endum supporting medical marijuana potentially lucrative market. It’s a situlegalization. The amendment contained ation ripe for abuse, made worse by the boilerplate language state’s own decision designed to ensure to sidestep publicthe state would information laws protect license about would-be applicants’ sensitive licensees. information, such Without stricter as Social Security adherence to the numbers and finanstate’s Sunshine cial records. Law, Missouri risks The state must venturing into this safeguard “the uncharted territory confidentialwith little or no ability of reports or ity for the public to other information scrutinize the major obtained from actors involved. an applicant or Last month, about licensee containing 75 entrepreneurs any individualized gathered in St. Louis data, information, for a workshop by Colorado-based DAVID CARSON • P-D or records related to the licensee or consulting firm Diane Czarkowski and her husband, Canna Advisors to Jay Czarkowski, introduce themselves its operation,” the amendment says. learn how to break to attendees at the Canna Advisors The state health into the tightly business workshop at the University department mainregulated business. of Missouri St. Louis on Feb. 19. About tains, absurdly, that Canna’s owners, 75 people attended the event. this wording preJay and Diane Czarvents releasing even kowski, claimed a high level of expertise that helped secure the names of the applicants. The Post-Dispatch argues in a lawsuit licenses for dozens of companies in filed in January that the health depart29 states, the Post-Dispatch’s Nassim ment is violating the state’s Sunshine Benchaabane reported. Law by refusing to provide any informaWhat they didn’t divulge is that their tion about the identities of those seeking own cultivation and dispensary license licenses for the testing, growth, sale and in Colorado was revoked in 2012 after dispensing of medical marijuana. As of being cited for numerous serious violaJan. 10, more than 250 applications had tions. The Czarkowskis were hardly the been received and more than $2 million kind of people Missouri entrepreneurs in application fees collected. should be paying for guidance on how to Adherence to the Sunshine Law traverse this complicated new terrain. That’s just a taste of the problems that won’t necessarily protect the public and would-be investors from exploitative await this industry if Missouri allows practices, but it would certainly ensure potential operators to hide behind a the public’s right to know the names cloak of secrecy when they apply for and investigate the backgrounds of the licenses. Voters overwhelmingly suppeople behind these new enterprises. ported legalizing medical marijuana in November, having no reason to believe

Hold abusers accountable

F

Intimidation tactics targeted advocates and journalists at the border.

ederal U.S. border agents have compiled a list of activists, legal advocates and journalists to be targeted for questioning when they’re encountered at the border with Mexico, according to new reporting. Some have already been detained and interrogated. The revelation raises serious First Amendment issues. It also underscores how skewed the Trump administration’s priorities have become on immigration. The administration appears again to care more about manipulating public opinion regarding issues at the border than actually addressing them. According to KNSD-TV in San Diego and NBC News, Customs and Border Protection compiled a list of 59 people — mostly Americans — who border agents believe were present when violence broke out at the Tijuana section of the border in November. Some migrants, frustrated at the long wait for processing, ran through checkpoints and clashed with immigration officers, who responded with tear gas. The watch list includes one U.S.-based attorney and 10 journalists, seven of them Americans. Another 31 Americans were labeled as “instigators.” The border patrol says the list was needed to “collect evidence” about the Tijuana incident. But Americans who were there to protest, to provide legal representation or to cover the conflict as journalists weren’t the issue; the migrants were. The only reasons for intimidation tactics like these against Americans are to silence protests, hinder legal action and thwart legitimate reporting of the issue. Some of those on the list who’d been

detained told NBC News they were interrogated for personal details and were asked to turn over their cellphones. Though the border patrol says it’s all part of the review of the Tijuana unrest, many of the interviewees told the network they weren’t even asked about that. They were, however, asked about their work with migrants seeking asylum — a legitimate process that migrants have a right to do and that advocates have a right to help them with. The American Civil Liberties Union rightly calls the listing and detentions “an outrageous violation of the First Amendment” and is contemplating legal action. “The government cannot use the pretext of the border to target activists critical of its policies, lawyers providing legal representation, or journalists simply doing their jobs,” the ACLU said in a statement. The House Homeland Security Committee is investigating, as is the inspector general for the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees the border patrol. Investigators need to identify who ultimately ordered this. Did it come from the White House? That’s not an unthinkable scenario, given the administration’s demonstrated hostility toward constitutional freedoms of the press, protest and legal advocacy. Those freedoms are more important than ever, considering the growing public scrutiny and misinformation regarding immigration issues. Orders were issued to violate Americans’ basic civil rights. Whether it’s the courts, internal investigators or Congress, someone needs to hold accountable the officials who abused their powers.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS few densely populated areas. Ask residents of the 23 wards if they now understand the need for an Electoral College. Joe Nenninger • Catawissa

Using popular vote method would make Missouri matter

POST-DISPATCH

This 2004 photo shows a 1944 Piper Cub J3 aircraft at Creve Coeur Airport. A decision by the Maryland Heights City Council will affect a local vintage aircraft community that uses the airport.

Proposed warehouse will harm vintage aircraft community Regarding “Maryland Heights council approves mixed-use project by Creve Coeur Airport” (March 9): Maryland Heights recently decided to allow a large developer to take advantage of an error that a member of the city staff uncovered, and quite possibly sounded the death knell for a piece of American history. The City Council’s staff reached the conclusion that a 35-foot height restriction put in place by a previous council was meant to apply to a parcel of land adjacent to the grass runway at Creve Coeur Airport. But due to a clerical error, documents show the height restriction as being applied to a different parcel of land. Now, KBG Inc. is going to build a 55-foot warehouse next to the grass runway, effectively closing it to safe use by the vintage aircraft community that has been at the airport since 1949. The City Council had the opportunity to correct the error, and in the process preserve a piece of aviation history. But instead, they chose to line city coffers and turn this cultural gem into a generic piece of concrete with some featureless metal buildings next to it. This region has plenty of land next to the highway to build another hollow industrial park that will be empty in a few years’ time. It is a shame that Maryland Heights has decided to sacrifice an institution of American heritage so that it can reap a few years of tax benefits only to be home to empty warehouses and become just the same as countless other communities across the country. Christopher Blanc • Bel-Nor

City election shows why the Electoral College is smart Regarding “Lewis Reed won just 5 wards, but high turnout there pushed him to victory” (March 7): Any opponents of the Electoral College need only look at the voting map on the Post-Dispatch front page to understand why the Founding Fathers chose this concept. Lewis Reed won only five wards (two with less than 50 percent of the vote) in the election for president of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed won 13 wards (two with less than 50 percent). Look at the geography. Reed won a tiny slice of south St. Louis while Nasheed and Alderman Megan Ellyia Green dominated the area. Ask the voters in the 23 wards if they feel represented. Look at Reed as having taken New York, California, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan; Nasheed as having taken the entire Midwest (so-called “flyover country”), and Green having taken the South and you can see how a national election can be totally swayed by just a

I believe that the Electoral College, as it stands now, is an outdated system. There is absolutely no reason we shouldn’t be electing our presidents by a nationwide popular vote. The candidate with the most votes should win. This kind of change would make Missouri matter in elections. We don’t count now. Kelley Keisch • Troy, Mo.

Democrats should serve their districts, drop investigations

In my daily activities I come in contact with people from all walks of life and ages. I listen to them express their views on a variety of subjects, from when winter is going to end to the atmosphere in Washington. The majority have had enough of the investigations into President Donald Trump. It is understood that the Democrats and the media hate the president. Now the Democrats threaten another investigation against anyone who knows or who has ever worked with Trump. The representatives are elected to represent and serve the interest of the citizens in their district. Their duties include proposing bills and voting on bills in a manner that would be beneficial to those in their district. Nowhere is it described that the primary focus should be on supporting their party with constant attack on the opposition. At one time, the Democratic Party truly represented the interest of the mainstream of the population. The Democratic platform today has moved so far away that President John F. Kennedy would not recognize it. Len Poli • Cedar Hill

Non-compete clauses play a key role for business owners In Kenneth Ciszewski’s March 6 letter to the editor (“Non-compete clauses are unfair, should be outlawed”), he argued for non-compete agreements to be outlawed at the federal level. I disagree based on my experience. I owned three small stores in St. Louis County for 21 years and had all my employees sign a short non-compete agreement as a condition of employment. I had partners with less than 50 percent ownership in two of my three stores, and my two partners each signed more complicated legal agreements. One partner violated her employment agreement by getting paid to help another person start a store in Kansas City using proprietary trade information. I caught her in the violation, and she and I severed her employment on terms quite favorable to her. She then went into business in the St. Louis County area, taking with her a manager who also violated her noncompete agreement to go to work for her. I decided not to pursue them legally, although I believe I would have won my case in court. I was just through with them both, and left them to their ultimately failing businesses. Ann Ross • Ballwin Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

03.12.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

BILLBOARDS AND OTHER BILLS • State Rep. Nancy Farmer wants to give St. Louis control over its billboards — a worthy goal every city in Missouri

should have. However, Ms. Farmer faces tough foes: the well-heeled billboard lobby. Her bill was defeated. When the measure is offered again, her colleagues, who routinely give lip service to local control, should practice what they preach. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Democratic socialism in U.S. has yet to be defined To really make it work, Americans must drop the screens, get involved. last year. Around the same time, one of the website’s staff writers said in an Democratic socialism is article for Vox that social having something of a moment. It isn’t just Bernie democracy’s ultimate goal is to “end capitalism.” Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Since Pres- Jacobin has pointed the way in various articles: ident Donald Trump was nationalize vast swaths of elected, the membership the economy, abolof the Democratic ish wage-slavery Socialists of Amerand turn every ica has grown nearly workplace into a tenfold. Admittedly, miniature democthat amounts to racy. only 56,000 memIt’s a radical bers, so it remains vision not simply a fringe movement. McArdle of redistributing But now it’s a full, the fruits of our labor, but luxuriant fringe, rather fundamentally altering than threads fluttering at how that work is organized, the political periphery. to something less like the And what exactly is army and more like the democratic socialism? prom committee. On the Democratic socialists are left, this seems to be gainstill arguing about that. ing on Sanders’ “Norway, For Sanders, democratic but bigger” model of socialism is Scandinavia. democratic socialism. Not good enough, retorts But if democratic socialthe website Jacobin, which ism is truly going to be declared “Democratic democratic, we have to ask: Socialism Isn’t Social Do people actually want Democracy” in a headline BY MEGAN MCARDLE

more democracy in their lives? Not just a higher minimum wage and better workplace protections, but actual day-to-day worker control over operations? True workplace democracy would replace the power of the boss with the power of your peers — a power that, as innumerable “small town” novels attest, can be at least as oppressive as the capitalist kind. In small towns, the best counterweight to that tyranny is civic participation: Protect yourself from minority rule by yourself becoming a pillar of the churches, civic groups and clubs that shape the community. America has a long tradition of such engagement; as far back as 1835, Alexis de Tocqueville remarked on our propensity for forming community groups. But as Timothy P. Carney shows in his new book, “Alienated America,” those community bonds have begun to fray. And you can’t simply blame capitalism, or a “neoliberal order” that

suppresses labor unions. We’re not joining unions, yes, but we’re also not joining churches or bowling leagues or literary societies, things we did with abandon a century ago, when capitalism was much less fettered than it is now, and long working hours left much less time for group activities. Instead of an explosion of personal and community development once predicted for our comparatively newfound leisure, we’re mostly at home, staring at screens. Those developments may not be unconnected. Until roughly 100 years ago, the only source of entertainment most people had was their neighbors. Today, ubiquitous cheap entertainment provides wittier dialogue and zippier plots than the Rotary Club, and higher performance quality than the church organist. You can argue — as Carney and I both would — that we’d be better off going to a PTA meeting

or, for that matter, the union hall, than passively entertaining ourselves. But engaging with people in real time means stretches of tedium and some interpersonal friction; the considerable rewards of long fellowship only materialize later. No wonder that at any given moment, the screen wins. Yet democratic socialism somehow presumes a large body of workers eager to rush into the time-consuming and often tedious work of what social scientists call “thick civic engagement”: doing things not one-on-one, but as a group, with all the politicking, boring meetings and inconvenient obligations that implies. Unless most American workers are prepared to be active participants in their union local or work council, the radical new system would look a lot like the old one, except with the power resting in the hands of a government bureaucrat or union leader just as unaccountable and pettifogging as the hated

“boss.” Unfortunately, America seems to be running in the opposite direction, avoiding as much as possible any direct interaction with other people: ordering from an online site rather than going to the store, texting or emailing rather than making a phone call. Which leaves democratic socialists with something of a dilemma: selling a system that can only work as promised in tandem with a culture of civic engagement we no longer have. Can democratic socialists persuade a majority of voters that they’ll really prefer a three-hour work council meeting to binge-watching Netflix? Or will democratic socialism require a democratically unpopular state action to curtail those alluring temptations — or, perhaps, simply an economy too hobbled to produce them? Megan McArdle @asymmetricinfo Copyright The Washington Post

Accusers and accused deserve due process Existing campus rules are biased, do not honor #MeToo movement. what has happened in states with similar laws and campus policies since In 2017, in the middle these were enacted by the of the systemic sexual Obama administration. assault revelations in the Finally, as a mother of entertainment industry, a son in one of our state’s I wrote about and was colleges, I fear what this interviewed on my own process could do to the life #MeToo story. I did this of an innocent student. because I realized the I have now read several significant effect these cases of lost semesters, brave women were having on others simply by telling scholarships being revoked, escalating legal their story. fees incurred by the family I also knew an imporof the accused, and many tant part was being left other negative outcomes out of the discussion: — even when the sexual abuse of student is cleared children. I was of wrongdoing. assaulted at age I understand the 11. I come from a victim’s perspective family that knows and want people this evil well. My prosecuted when sister was about they have harmed this same age Rehder someone. Sexual when she was assault should be dealt first sexually abused, and with through our judicial my mother was much younger. My daughter was system, not through a partial process that only also sexually assaulted as a young teenager. We filed seeks to find if the accused is seemingly guilty. We do charges and pushed for a not live in a perfect world conviction. and I’ve known both men It is because of these and women who have lied. personal experiences that I truly understand the I have become a vocal gravity of sexual assault. proponent for campus I truly understand the due-process reform in strength that it takes to Missouri. Under current speak up. Even when campus policies, students you are young. But, I accused of sexual assault simply cannot agree that are brought into Title IX investigations, supposedly we need to remove the designed to determine the constitutional rights of truth in such highly sensi- one student to give more protections to another. tive matters. With that The #MeToo movebeing said, the process is ment has been tremenwoefully lacking, dangerdously important. New ously biased and, quite norms have been created. simply, unconstitutional. These investigations fail Women are now speaking out and refusing to to preserve due process be silent when they have protections for students. been treated inappropriIn these hearings, the ately or assaulted. accused do not have a Are we where we need right to know what they to be? No, we are not. But have been accused of or we are leaps and bounds to see evidence against further than we were just them. Let that sink in a two years ago. I know this moment. They also are movement will continue not allowed to have a to grow and empower lawyer advocate for them women and men to no or to cross-examine witlonger be silent. nesses testifying against I thank the many brave them. To me, this is just women who came forward unbelievable. These to expose the entertainfundamental, Constitument industry. Silence is tional rights that we are what holds this great evil all afforded as Americans and allows it to grow. The are being ignored by Mismany victims lit the room souri’s colleges. with their honesty and As a victim, I recognize strength. When the norm our colleges’ interest becomes speaking up, we in believing women, will see fewer and fewer protecting victims and assaults. I am confident keeping our campuses we can seek justice withsafe. But a process that out removing someone fails to preserve justice else’s rights in the process. and due process is unfair We must preserve the to both the accused and rights of all Missourians. the accuser. As a Missouri It’s time to preserve due lawmaker, I am deeply process on our campuses. concerned about the cost taxpayers will incur State Rep. Holly Rehder is a when students begin Republican who represents Sikeston successfully suing our and surrounding areas in the Missouri Legislature. institutions for infringing on their rights, just like BY HOLLY REHDER

SALWAN GEORGES • Washington Post

Rep. Ilhan Omar (center), D-Minn., is shown at the Capitol on Jan. 4, the day after she was sworn in. Omar is a Somali immigrant who moved to the U.S. as a teenager.

Let’s stay united against bigotry Anti-Semitism is utterly antithetical to anything that deserves to be called liberal or progressive. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

The polling is imperfect, but it’s fair to say that more than 70 percent of American Jews and Muslims vote Democratic. They do so, in part, because Democrats have spoken out strongly against both anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. And now, both groups are horrified by Trumpism’s embrace of discrimination against Muslims and its trafficking in anti-Semitism. Just watch the Trump campaign ad attacking what it claims is “a global power structure that is responsible for economic decisions that have robbed our working class,” while flashing images of prominent Jews. And you can’t help but cheer the fact that Jews and Muslims across the country have stood in solidarity when the local institutions of either group were defaced or attacked. Bigotry is bigotry. It must always be opposed. This is why the dangerously careless use of language by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., about Jews and Israel — she spoke of people who “push for allegiance to a foreign country” — has been cause for both heartbreak and anger. I get that some readers will see my use of the word “careless” as too soft because the dual-loyalty charge has historically been so poisonous. But in refraining from stronger language I’m putting my bet on hope. I’m wagering that Omar’s personal history ought to mean that she understands the dangers of prejudice better than most. Last fall, many of us celebrated

her breakthrough election. She won strong backing from the Jewish community in her district. Maybe I’m also giving her a break because she’s progressive. Anti-Semitism is utterly antithetical to anything that deserves to be called liberal or progressive. Surely Omar doesn’t want the Democrats ensnared in the sort of left-wing anti-Semitism now haunting the British Labour Party. Opposing anti-Semitism should be axiomatic for everyone. And for me, it’s also personal. My observant Catholic parents moved to our city’s most Jewish neighborhood shortly after I was born, and my sister and I were raised to see anti-Semitism as sinful. My very first friends in the world were Jewish, and my late mom regularly sat down with our next-door neighbor to compare notes on Catholic and Jewish views about the nature of God. As I’ve written before, my informal second father was Jewish. A dear man named Bert Yaffe informally took me into his family after my dad died when I was a teenager, and his kids welcomed me as a brother. Partly because of this history, but also in common with almost all liberals and social democrats of a certain age, I have always — and will always — support the existence of Israel as a democratic Jewish state. I spent a month in Israel in the spring of 1974, as the country experienced searing existential anxiety after its close call in the Yom Kippur War, and I visited Kiryat Shmona, a development town in the north that suffered under regular Palestinian attacks. It was an enduring lesson in the constant fear that haunts Israelis over the prospects of their country’s survival. But Israel’s commitment to

democracy is also an important reason for my admiration, which is why I support a two-state solution and oppose continued settlements in Palestinian areas. Israel will not remain democratic if it continues to occupy the West Bank and Gaza, and justice requires Palestinian selfdetermination. When I covered the war in Lebanon in the 1980s, a Palestinian friend underscored for me the cost of being stateless. All he wanted, he would say, was the legitimacy that citizenship and a passport confer. It did not seem too much to ask. Thus, my sympathies have always been with the beleaguered peace camps on both the Israeli and Palestinian sides. This has led to deep frustration with Palestinian rejectionists, but also with the politics of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu has done enormous damage to Israel’s standing with young Americans who did not grow up with my gut commitment to Israel’s survival.His appearance before Congress in 2015 to trash President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran greatly aggravated this problem. His alliance with a virtual fascist party leading into next month’s elections is unconscionable and a gift to antiIsrael propagandists. So, yes, I know full well that you can love Israel, be critical of its current government, and truly despise antiSemitism, all at the same time. What you cannot do is play fast and loose with language that cannot help but be seen as anti-Semitic. I pray Omar now realizes this. At this moment, opponents of bigotry must be able to rely on each other. E.J. Dionne @EJDionne. Copyright The Washington Post


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

Blacks, Hispanics breathe more pollution than they make Study finds opposite for whites, who on average create more than they take in BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

WA S H I N G T O N • AfricanAmericans and H ispanics breathe in far more deadly air pollution than they are responsible for making, a new study said. A study looked at who is exposed to fine particle pollution — responsible for about 100,000 American deaths a year — and how much different races are responsible for the pollution based on their buying, driving and living habits. Scientists calculate that Hispanics on average breathe in 63 percent more of the pollution that leads to heart and breathing deaths than they make. For African-Americans the figure is 56 percent, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. On the other hand, non-Hispanic whites on average are exposed to 17 percent less air pollution than they make.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Smog covers downtown Los Angeles in April 2009. Of 103,000 particle pollution deaths a year, 83,000 can be traced to the activities of people in the United States, a new study found.

“Even though minorities are contributing less to the overall problem of air pollution, they are affected by it more,” said study co-author Jason Hill, a biosystems engineering professor at the University of Minnesota, who is white. “Is it fair (that) I create more pollution and somebody else is disproportionately affected by it?” This pollution comes from gases from smokestacks, tail-

pipes and other places that then solidify into fine invisible particles small enough to pass through lungs and into bloodstreams. These particles, more than 25 times smaller than the width of a human hair, pose the greatest risk to people’s health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says. While other studies have shown minorities living with

OBITUARIES

Avery, Beatrice Lorene - Elsberry, MO Bell, Patricia Ann - St. Louis Boyer, Tammy - Arnold, MO Caputa - see Smith Eschbacher - see Linsin Gibbs, David Randall - St. Charles

Avery, Beatrice Lorene

91, of Elsberry, passed Friday, March 8, 2019. Visitation from 4 p.m. until the time of Memorial Services at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 14, 2019, at Carter-Ricks Funeral Home in Elsberry.

Bell, Patricia Ann

passed on Tues., Mar. 5, 2019. Viewing Thurs., Mar. 14, at 9 a.m. with funeral service following at 10 a.m., at St. Mary Magdalen Catholic Church, 2618 S. Brentwood Blvd., St. Louis, 63144.

Boyer, Tammy

54, of Arnold. Visitation Wednesday, 3/13/19 from 4-8 p.m. at Alexander White Mullen Funeral Home. Service Thursday, 3/14 at 11 a.m. www.alexanderstlouis.com.

Gibbs, David Randall

March 10, 2019, age 76. Services: Vis. Wed., Mar. 13, 4 - 8pm. Svc: Thur., Mar. 14, 9:30 am, Baue Cave Springs, 3950 W. Clay. Contact 636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com.

Hurtt, Clyde

December 2, 1921-March 9, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Jean Ellen Hurtt (nee Spurling) for 71 years; dear father of Susan (Ron) Jackson, Julie Hurtt, the late Mark Hurtt and the late Karen Reed. He was the much loved grandfather of Leslie Chamberlin, Maren Wilker and Brady Wilker; greatgrandfather of Elizabeth, Piper and Graysen; great-great-grandfather of Alayna. Clyde was born and raised in the Baltimore, Maryland area. He served his country honorably from 1939-1944 on active duty in the US Army, and later joined the Army Air Force Reserves where he was a First Lieutenant until the late 1950's. He attended Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, where he met Jean, then later received degrees from the University of Missouri in Columbia. He was a high school history teacher and became superintendent of schools of a northern Missouri community. He went on to be a successful businessman, starting a school and public library book business with nationwide distribution, which he and Jean operated until their retirement in the mid 1990's. He will be very sadly missed. Services: Graveside service and interment at Oak Hill Cemetery Kirkwood, Missouri on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 2:30 p.m. with military honors. Family and friends can review and share stories, photos and condolences online at www.stlfuneral.com

Kellogg, Alice Joy

(nee Bradbury) was born to Jack and Katie Bradbury on July 17, 1926, in Nashville Tennessee. Joy, as she was known to family and friends, married Frank Kellogg on August 27, 1944. Joy went to be with the Lord March 9, 2019. Joy is survived by three children, Linda Hostetter (Jack), David K e l l o g g , J a me s K e l l o g g (M a rs h a M a n w a r r i n g ) ; n in e grandchildren and nineteen great-grandchildren. Memorials may be made to the Kellogg Health Sciences Scholarship Fund at Missouri Baptist University. Services: Visitation Thursday, March 14, 4 to 7 p.m. at the JAY B. SMITH MAPLEWOOD CHAPEL, 7456 Manchester, with a Funeral Service at 7 p.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Licavoli, Frank P.

age 91, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, March 11, 2019. Beloved husband of Billie Jean Licavoli (nee Johnson) and the late Betty Sue Licavoli (nee Flayer); dearest father of Francis and Michael Licavoli and Bobby (Justine) Gamblin; loving grandfather of Matthew, Zack, Michael and Hunter; great-grandfather of Benson; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Member of St. Louis Soccer Hall of Fame. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 15 at 10 a.m. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

more pollution, this study is one of the first to combine buying habits and exposure into one calculation of inequity, Hill said. Hill and colleagues looked at pollution from highways, coalfired power plants, hog farms and other sources. They then looked in a large scale at who is driving more, buying more goods and food, spending more on property and using more electricity, then

Celebrations of Life

Hacker - see Schuchardt Hurtt, Clyde - St. Louis Kellogg, Alice Joy - Lake of the Ozarks Licavoli, Frank P. - St. Louis Linsin, Virginia C. - St. Louis Michael, June Evelyn - Town & Country

Linsin, Virginia C.

(nee Schroeder), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Sunday, March 10, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Russell J. Linsin; dear mother of Russell S. Linsin, Carol (Bernard) Eschbacher and Lawrence (Cathy) Linsin; dear grandmother of 6; and greatgrandmother of 4; our dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 15, 1 p.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Michael, June Evelyn

(nee Quaglia), born March 11, 1921 in Herrin, IL and passed away, Saturday, March 9, 2019 in St. Louis, MO. Preceded in death by her parents James and Ruby Quaglia (nee Hampton), her husband Vernon E. Michael, stepson Harvey Michael, uncle Rufus Hampton and aunt Ruth Chitty (nee Hampton). She is survived by cousins Shirley Aldag, Tod (Susie) Hampton, Brad Hampton, Tim Hampton and Neoma Chitty. Services: Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday, from 9:00 a.m. until time of service 9:45 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Lutheran Cemetery, Collinsville, IL. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

traced those purchases to end users. “On average whites tend to consume more than minorities. It’s because of wealth,” Hill said. “It’s largely how much you buy, not buying different things.” Of 103,000 particle pollution deaths a year, 83,000 can be traced to the activities of people in the United States — not government and not goods exported elsewhere, the study said. Several outside experts praised the research. “These findings confirm what most grassroots environmental justice leaders have known for decades, ‘whites are dumping their pollution on poor people and people of color’,” said Texas Southern University public affairs professor Robert Bullard, who was not part of the research. Bullard, often called the father of environmental justice, is African-American. Bullard said his and other past research shows that AfricanAmericans are 79 percent more likely than whites to live where industrial pollution is highest, with people of color overrepresented near Superfund sites and oil refineries. He said there are far more mostly minority schools within 500 feet of major highways than mostly white schools.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Roitman, Irwin M. - Perryville Schmitz, Dina T. - St. Louis Schuchardt, Dorothy C. - St. Louis Smith, Yolanda M. - St. Louis Wagner - see Schuchardt Wingbermuehle - see Smith

Schuchardt, Dorothy C.

(Voelkel), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, March 9, 2019. Loving wife of the late Gene Schuchardt; beloved mother of Lynn (Kevin) Hacker and Beth Wagner; dearest grandmother of Matthew and Brian Hacker, Kimberly (James) Hansen and Molly (fiancé Cameron Marino) Wagner; special great-grandmother of Cooper and Mack Hansen; dear sister of the late Lois (Mickey) Wissehr and the late Ruth (Warren) Wissehr; beloved sister-in-law to Henrietta Frederick and the late Oliver, Ray, Will, Ed and Don Schuchardt, Gen Smith and Elise Leber; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from HOFFMEISTER COLONIAL MORTUARY, 6464 Chippewa, at Watson, on Thursday, March 14th at 9:30 a.m. to St. Mary Magdalen Catholic Church for Mass of Christian Burial at 10:00 a.m. Interment at Calvary Cemetery. If desired, please make expression of sympathy in Dorothy's memory to a charity of your choice. Visitation will be held at Hoffmeister Colonial on Wednesday from 4-8 pm. Please send condolences to www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

Smith, Yolanda M.

(nee Caputa) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Monday, March 11, 2019. Beloved wife of Zachary S. Smith; dear daughter of Tom and Debbie Caputa; dear sister of Maria (Matt) Passanise, Michelle (Michael) Westerfield, Francine (Andrew) Kreigshauser and Nina (Greg) McArthur; dear daughter-in-law of Steve (Phoebe) Smith and the late Diane Smith; our dear niece, aunt, sister-in-law, cousin, Godmother and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS CITY CHAPEL (not Affton), 2906 Gravois, Thursday, March 14, 9:15 a.m. to Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Siteman Roitman, Irwin M. Cancer Center or St. Louis University School of Medicine Ra76, of Perryville, died February 25, 2019 at his resi- diation Oncology Development Fund appreciated. Visitation dence. Burial was at Jefferson Barracks National Ceme- Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. tery on Monday, March 4, 2019. Young & Sons Funeral Home provided arrangements.

Florists

Schmitz, Dina T.

(nee Cucchi), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on March 8, 2019 at the age of 93. Loving wife of Paul Schmitz; beloved mother of Paulette (Klep) Turnbough, Rick (Sally) Schmitz, Denise (Frank) Vinciguerra, and Renee (Dave) Basile; dear grandmother of Christy (Andrew), Crystal (Justin), Jennifer (Dan), Holly (Kevin), Mary (Bill), Harry, and Jessica (Bill); dear great-grandmother to Jonny, Gabriella, Kacie, Dominic, Collin, Jessie, and Emma; beloved aunt of John (Sharon) Cucchi. Friend to many. Dina is preceded in death by her parents John Cucchi and Theresa (nee Restelli) Cucchi, brother Fred Cucchi and grandsons Brian and Richard. Services: Visitation Thursday, March 14, 2019 at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Avenue 63110, 9-11 a.m. until time of Mass at 11 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions appreciated to The Sick and Elderly Program of The Hill or Alzheimer's Association. ARRANGEMENTS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MICHEL FUNERAL HOME.

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03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

NATION

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Pelosi says impeaching Trump ‘just not worth it’ Thinking has shifted since Russia report may be inconclusive BY MARY CLARE JALONICK AND LISA MASCARO associated Press

WA S H I N G T O N • Ho u se Speaker Nancy Pelosi is setting a high bar for impeachment of President Donald Trump, saying he is “just not worth it” even as some on her left flank clamor to start proceedings. Pelosi said in an interview with The Washington Post that “I’m not for impeachment” of Trump. “Unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,” she said. While she has made similar comments before, Pelosi is making clear to her caucus and to voters that Democrats will not move forward quickly with trying to remove Trump from office. And it’s a departure from her previous comments that Democrats are waiting on special counsel Robert Mueller to lay out findings from his Russia investigation before considering impeachment. That thinking among Democrats has shifted, in part because of expectations that Mueller’s report will not be decisive. Instead, House Democrats are pursuing their own broad, highprofile investigations that will

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks this month in Washington. The Democrat has set a high bar for impeachment of the president.

keep the focus on Trump’s business dealings and relationship with Russia, exerting congressional oversight without having to broach the I-word. Still, Pelosi’s comments are certain to stoke a stubborn tension with those who believe impeachment proceedings should have begun on day one of the new Congress. Some freshman Democrats who hail from solidly liberal districts haven’t shied away from the subject — Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib used a vulgarity in calling for Trump’s impeachment the day she was sworn in. Billionaire activist Tom Steyer, who is bankrolling a campaign pushing for Trump’s impeachment, shot back at Pelosi on Monday: “Speaker Pe-

losi thinks ‘he’s just not worth it?’ Well, is defending our legal system ‘worth it?’ Is holding the president accountable for his crimes and cover-ups ‘worth it?’ Is doing what’s right ‘worth it?’ Or shall America just stop fighting for our principles and do what’s politically convenient?” Neil Sroka of the liberal advocacy group Democracy for America said Pelosi’s comments were “a little like an oncologist taking chemotherapy off the table before she’s even got your test results back.” Other lawmakers who have called for impeachment looked at Pelosi’s comments more practically. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif., who filed articles of impeachment against Trump on

the first day of the new Congress in January, acknowledged that there is not yet public support for impeachment, but noted that Pelosi “didn’t say ‘I am against it if the public is clamoring for it.’” Sherman said that the multiple Democratic investigations of Trump might be a substitute for impeachment, “it’s also possible it will be a prelude.” White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said “I agree” in response to Pelosi’s words. Sanders added of impeachment, “I don’t think it should have ever been on the table.” Pelosi has long resisted calls to impeach the president, saying it’s a “divisive” issue that should only be broached with “great care.” She refused calls when she first held the speaker’s gavel, in 2007, to start impeachment proceedings against George W. Bush. Having been a member of Congress during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, she saw the way the public turned on Republicans and helped Clinton win a second term. Heading into the midterm elections, she discouraged candidates from talking up impeachment, preferring to stick to the kitchen table issues that she believes most resonate with voters. Pelosi often said the House should not pursue impeachment for political reasons, but it shouldn’t not pursue for political reasons. Rather, she says, the investigations need to take their course and impeachment, if warranted, will be clear.

Body of girl found in duffel bag is ID’d BY AMANDA LEE MYERS AND REED SAXON associated Press

LOS ANGELES • Investigators have identified a Los Angelesarea girl found dead in a duffel bag along a suburban equestrian trail, and two people have been detained in connection with the case. The coroner’s office determined t h e g i rl wa s 9-year-old Trinity Love Jones and ruled her death a homicide, the Los Trinity Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said late Sunday. The department has declined to say how Trinity was killed and a department spokeswoman on Monday declined to identify the people who have been detained. They’re considered persons of interest. The department plans to release additional details later in the week. On March 5, a park worker found Trinity’s body partially protruding from a duffel bag at the bottom of an embankment in Hacienda Heights, just southeast of Los Angeles. Investigators believe her body was there less than 48 hours. A police sketch of Trinity released to help identify who she was showed her wearing what she had on when her body was found: a pink shirt that read, “Future Princess Hero.” “It’s a sad day for the depart-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dozens of tributes are seen Monday at a large memorial to Trinity Love Jones, a 9-year-old girl whose body was found in a duffel bag along a suburban Los Angeles equestrian trail.

ment, for the community, and we’re going to do our best” to solve the case, Sheriff Alex Villanueva said last week. A man who identified himself as Trinity’s father told KTLA-TV at a memorial for his daughter that she was full of life and joy and that he’s in shock over her death. “Words can’t explain what I’m feeling right now,” Antonio Jones said. “I just want answers. I just want justice.” He declined to discuss details

about the case or Trinity’s living situation. A GoFundMe page created by Trinity’s uncle describes her as “a very loving and caring little girl.” “She had a great imagination ... so much so whenever she would wear a pretty dress, she would call herself a princess,” according to the post. “She didn’t deserve to be tossed out like trash.” Meanwhile a large memorial near where Trinity’s body was

found continued to grow Monday, with people stopping by to add Disney balloons, teddy bears, flowers and photos of the bright-eyed girl. Signs read, “Justice for Trinity,” and “Rest in Heaven, Princess.” Cherie Kiyomura, of Whittier, visited the memorial with her son Bishop, 3, on Monday to pay her respects, though she didn’t know Trinity or her family. “This has really hit home,” she said. “No child should ever be left this way.”

Democrats see symbolism in Milwaukee, their convention pick BY BILL BARROW, SCOTT BAUER AND IVAN MORENO associated Press

MILWAUKEE • Milwaukee will

host the 2020 Democratic National Convention, party leaders announced Monday, highlighting the battleground state of Wisconsin that helped elect President Donald Trump and now will launch an opponent who could oust him. Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez chose Milwaukee over Houston and Miami after deliberations lingered longer than party leaders or officials from the three finalist cities had expected. “Where you hold our convention is a very strong statement of your values and who and what we are fighting for,” Perez said Monday surrounded by state and local officials. Perez praised Milwaukee’s diversity and its labor unions,

along with Wisconsin’s working-class identity. He called it an ideal backdrop for Democrats to launch a fall campaign to reclaim the White House four years after Trump stunningly outpaced Hillary Clinton across the old industrial belt of the upper Midwest and Great Lakes. “The Democratic Party has again become an every ZIP code party,” Perez said. “We’re listening to people in every corner of the country.” The convention is scheduled for July 13-16, 2020. It will be the first time in over a century that Democrats will nominate their presidential candidate in a Midwestern city other than Chicago. Instead, the spotlight will shine for a week on a metro area of about 1.6 million people. Once dubbed as “The Machine Shop of the World,” the city is the birthplace of HarleyDavidson motorcycles and is

known for its enduring love affair with beer — a trait displayed Monday as Perez and surrounding dignitaries closed their celebratory news conference with a toast. Republicans are set to gather in Charlotte, the largest city in battleground North Carolina, on Aug. 24-27, 2020. Perez noted that the convention site doesn’t determine the November outcome, but Democrats see plenty of symbolism in Milwaukee after a bitter 2016 election defined by Clinton being nearly swept in what her campaign aides had confidently called a Midwestern “Blue Wall.” That band of states twice sided with President Barack Obama, but Clinton held only Minnesota, ceding Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania — a combined 64 of the necessary 270 electoral votes — as white working-class voters flocked to Trump.

It was the first time since 1984 that Republicans claimed Wisconsin in a presidential election. Afterward, Clinton took withering criticism for not once visiting Wisconsin as a general election candidate. Since then, Wisconsinites reelected Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin and ousted Republican Gov. Scott Walker in favor of Democrat Tony Evers and the state’s first black lieutenant governor, Mandela Barnes. Evers and Barnes beamed Monday as they welcomed Perez. Wisconsin Democrats pointed to those midterm election results as they lobbied Perez and DNC officials. “We plan to carry that momentum into 2020 and beyond,” Barnes said Monday. “The path to the presidency goes right through Wisconsin as we learned in 2016,” Baldwin, who won re-election in 2018, told The Associated Press.

DIGEST Ex-VP Cheney criticizes Trump’s foreign policy Former Vice President Dick Cheney criticized President Donald Trump’s foreign policy, even comparing it with that of former President Barack Obama, in a striking rebuke of the president by a member of his own party. Speaking with Vice President Mike Pence this weekend at a closed-door retreat hosted by the American Enterprise Institute in Sea Island, Ga., Cheney warned that American allies were questioning the dependability of the U.S. as a result of Trump’s public statements. Cheney highlighted Trump’s public complaints about the role of NATO and the surprise announcement of the withdrawal of troops from Syria. Cheney’s remarks were first reported Monday by The Washington Post. DeVos allows controversial payments to religious schools • Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said Monday she would no longer enforce a rule that bars religious institutions from providing certain taxpayer-funded services in private schools, saying the restriction ran afoul of a court decision involving a Missouri case. Under federal education law, private schools are entitled to many of the federally funded services that public schools receive, particularly if they educate children from low-income households or English-language learners. The rules mean that public schools pay for professional development for private school teachers, or send a member of their own staff to provide reading help to a struggling child who is eligible for extra help. Often, school districts contract with third parties, but the rules barred school districts from contracting with religious institutions. DeVos said the prohibition was no longer enforceable because of a 2017 Supreme Court decision that ruled religious organizations could not be excluded from state programs if the organizations have secular intent. The court sided with Trinity Lutheran, a Missouri Synod church in Columbia, Mo., that sought to participate in a state program to resurface its playground for preschoolers. Sanders won’t clarify remark on Democrats and Jews • White House press secretary Sarah Sanders declined to say Monday whether President Donald Trump believes Democrats “hate Jewish people,” arguing that reporters should pose that question to Democratic lawmakers. According to an attendee, Trump said Friday at a Republican National Committee fundraiser at his Mar-a-Lago Club that “the Democrats hate Jewish people.” News of Trump’s remarks was first reported by Axios. Sanders said she would not “comment on a potentially leaked document,” and took aim at Democrats for a House resolution last week that broadly condemned hate, arguing that the measure — which overwhelmingly passed with bipartisan support — did not specifically reference alleged antiSemitic comments made by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. Honda recall expected • Honda is likely to recall around 1 million older vehicles in the U.S. and Canada because the Takata driver’s side air bag inflators that were installed during previous recalls could be dangerous. Documents posted Monday by Canadian safety regulators show Honda is recalling many of its most popular models for a second time. The models are from as far back as 2001 and as recent as 2010. Honda spokesman Chris Martin said the company plans to issue a public statement Tuesday. Fake Uber driver charged with kidnapping • An Alabama man is charged with kidnapping by pretending to be an Uber driver to pick up a university student who was found unconscious in the back seat of his car, police said Monday. Investigators found images on the driver’s cellphone of at least one other college-aged woman who appeared unconscious in the vehicle, said Capt. Gary Hood, commander of the Tuscaloosa Violent Crimes Unit. Tommy Beard, 61, was released on bond Friday on a first-degree kidnapping charge, court records show. “He had a fake Uber sign that he bought online, and he admitted that he wasn’t an Uber driver,” Hood added. CEO of migrant camp provider to resign • The nation’s largest provider of facilities for detaining migrant children said Monday that its founder and CEO is stepping down after months of criticism. Southwest Key Programs said in a statement that Juan Sanchez will retire. Southwest Key received $523 million in government funding from January to September. From news services


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

2019 SPELLING BEE FINALISTS Congratulations to these 39 student-spellers who will compete in the 33 Annual St. Louis Post-Dispatch Spelling Bee Finals on Saturday, March 16, at McKendree University. RD

In the opening rounds, more than 15,000 students from charter, home, private and public schools in Missouri and Illinois competed in their school-level spelling bees. Approximately 270 students competed in the semi-finals of this year’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch Spelling Bee.

The winner of the St. Louis area finals will advance to the national finals at the 92ND annual Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.

THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS SPELLED AT LEAST 23 OUT OF 25 WORDS CORRECTLY DURING THE SEMI-FINAL ROUND. STUDENTS ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY FIRST NAME.

ABHINAV DUKKIPATI

FRANCIS HOWELL MIDDLE SCHOOL

ABHIRAM MADALA

CROSSROADS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ADRIAN NGUYEN

LAKSHMI MADALA FRONTIER MIDDLE SCHOOL

MARCUS KING

THE GOVERNOR FRENCH ACADEMY

MARGARET BURCH

WORD OF LIFE LUTHERAN SCHOOL

WEST COUNTY CHRISTIAN HOME EDUCATORS

AKSHAJ VARIATH

NEWMAN SHEN

PARKWAY CENTRAL MIDDLE SCHOOL

P.E.G.S. SOUTH-KENNERLY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ALICE LIU

RUSSELL HAYNES

CRESTVIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL

PRAIRIE VIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

AMELIA ZHANG

RYAN MERZ

ALBERT CASSENS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ARJAV JAIN

ABIDING SAVIOR LUTHERAN SCHOOL

RYAN NORRIS

LADUE FIFTH GRADE CENTER

SAINTS JOACHIM & ANN CATHOLIC SCHOOL

BROOKLYN HARVEY

RYAN SMITH

HOLLENBECK MIDDLE SCHOOL

CHIDUBEM IGBO

M.I.C.D.S.

RYAN YANG

CENTRAL JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

WABASH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

CLAIRE MOYLAN

SAM LIPSUTZ

MAPLEWOOD-RICHMOND HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

NORTHEAST MIDDLE SCHOOL

COLETTE GIEZENTANNER

SEAN WARD

ROBERT H. SPERRENG MIDDLE SCHOOL

VALLEY PARK MIDDLE SCHOOL

DHRUV LAHOTI

SEBASTIAN SCHULTZ

ANDREWS ACADEMY

DHYANESH BHATT

INDEPENDENCE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

SIENNA STATEN

HARVEST RIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

TILLMAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

EDDIE FENG

SOPHIA "SASSY" SALEEBY

WILD HORSE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ETHAN GEORGE

LADUE MIDDLE SCHOOL

SUPRATIK GANTI

WOERTHER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PROGRESS SOUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

HARINI GOTTUMUKKALA

WILLA REITH

FORT ZUMWALT SOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL

LONG ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

HAWA-LARAI HARRUNA

WILLIAM BUYSKE

MASON RIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ST. GABRIEL THE ARCHANGEL SCHOOL

JOSHUA ROODHOUSE HALE

YASH SHELAR

DR. BERNARD J. DUBRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL

KENAN STRAHM

MARYVILLE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

KHADIJA KHAN

NORTH KIRKWOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

PRESENTED BY:

ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART

YUKTHA RAYANI

ELLISVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

WORLD

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Last-minute Brexit talks break deadlock But Parliament still may not be satisfied with changes to plan to leave the EU BY JILL LAWLESS AND RAF CASERT associated Press

LONDON • The British government said Monday that frenzied last-minute diplomacy had won “legally binding changes” to overcome a roadblock in its divorce deal with the European Union, hours before Parliament was due to decide the fate of Prime Minister Theresa May’s hard-won agreement — and of Britain’s departure from the EU. On the eve of Tuesday’s vote, May flew to the French city of

Strasbourg, where EU legislators were meeting, for nighttime talks with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. The prime minister was seeking revisions, guarantees or other changes to persuade reluctant British legislators to back her withdrawal agreement with the EU, which they resoundingly rejected in January. At a joint news conference, May and Juncker claimed to have succeeded. May said new documents to be added to the deal provided “legally binding changes” to the part relating to the Irish border. The legal 585-page withdrawal agreement itself though was left intact. “In politics, sometimes you get a second chance. It is what you do with this second chance that counts. Because there will

be no third chance,” Juncker warned the legislators who will vote late Tuesday. “Let’s be crystal clear about the choice: it is this deal or Brexit might not happen at all,” he said. May said the changes should overcome lawmakers’ qualms about a mechanism in the deal designed to keep an open border between Britain’s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland. The mechanism, known as the backstop, is a safeguard that would keep the U.K. in a customs union with the EU until a permanent new trading relationship is in place. Brexit-supporters in Britain fear the backstop could be used to bind the country to EU regulations indefinitely. May said the new wording “will guarantee that the EU can-

not act with the intent of applying the backstop indefinitely.” But the changes appear to fall well short of Brexiteers’ demands for a unilateral British exit mechanism from the backstop. Pro-Brexit lawmakers said they would read the fine print before deciding how to vote on Tuesday. Announcing the breakthrough in Britain’s House of Commons, Cabinet Office Minister David Lidington said lawmakers faced “a fundamental choice ... to vote for the improved deal or to plunge this country into a political crisis.” Earlier, Juncker kissed May twice on the cheeks when she arrived at the commission’s headquarters in the European Parliament building. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier kissed

Chaos spreads in Venezuela Scattered protests are held in cities after days without power

her hand before they went inside for talks. When negotiations between the EU and the British government were at a low ebb, Juncker shook the British leader’s hand before a similar meeting. Britain is due to pull out of the EU on March 29, but the government has not been able to win parliamentary approval for its agreement with the bloc on withdrawal terms and future relations. The impasse has raised fears of a chaotic “no-deal” Brexit that could mean major disruption for businesses and people in Britain and the 27 remaining EU countries. “This is a government in chaos, with a country in chaos because of this mess,” Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said.

Inventor laments web’s coming-of-age problems BY JAMEY KEATEN associated Press

GENEVA • The inventor of the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People collect water Monday from a broken pipe that belongs to the city water service, during rolling blackouts that have kept people without running water in their homes in Caracas, Venezuela. The blackout has intensified the toxic political climate, with accusations of sabotage. BY FABIOLA SANCHEZ AND SCOTT SMITH associated Press

CARACAS, VENEZUELA • Ven-

ezuelans on Monday converged on a polluted river in Caracas to fill water bottles and held scattered protests in several cities as a growing sense of chaos took hold in a country where people have had little power, water and communications for days. A 3-year-old girl with a brain tumor languished in a Caracas hospital, awaiting treatment after doctors started surgery but then suspended the operation when nationwide power outages first hit on Thursday, said the girl’s fearful mother, who only gave her first name, Yalimar. “The doctors told me that there are no miracles,” said Yalimar, who hopes her daughter can be transferred Tuesday to one of the few hospitals in Venezuela that would be able to finish the complex procedure. The girl’s story highlighted an unfolding horror in Venezuela, where years of hardship for millions of people got abruptly worse after the power grid collapsed, intensifying the country’s long-running misery. On Monday, schools and businesses were closed, long lines of cars

waited at the few gasoline stations with electricity and hospitals cared for many patients without power. Generators have alleviated conditions for some of the critically ill. The widespread blackouts have brought oil exports to a halt, and financial experts say that is costing the cashstrapped country millions of dollars a day. Russ Dallen, a Miami-based partner at the brokerage firm Caracas Capital Markets Dallen, said Monday that Venezuela hasn’t shipped $358 million in oil since the nationwide power failures hit Thursday evening. He said that “the whole system is grinding to a halt.” There were also acts of kindness: people whose food would rot in fridges without power donated it to a restaurant, which cooked it for distribution to charitable foundations and hospitals. Information about developments across the country was difficult to gather because communications were unreliable. Engineers restored power in some areas, but it often went again. There have been a few protests in the Venezuelan capital, and reports of similar shows of anti-government an-

ger in the cities of Maracaibo and Maturin. Opposition leader Juan Guaido tweeted about reports of looting in some cities, but the reports were difficult to confirm. In Caracas, some people reported more sightings of “colectivos,” a term for armed groups allegedly operating on behalf of the state to intimidate opponents. While President Nicolas Maduro and other government officials said they were working hard to restore power and provide basic necessities, the mood in Caracas was desperate. Marian Morales, a nurse working for a Catholic youth group, and several colleagues handed out diapers and food from their car, parked near a hospital. Police and men in civilian clothing ordered them to leave, saying they didn’t have permission. Morales said the needy are cautious about approaching to collect the handouts because of the presence of security forces. The opposition-controlled National Assembly debated the power cuts and declared that the situation was an emergency, a largely symbolic move aimed at pressuring Maduro. Guaido criticized the government’s

handling of the outages and called it a “sadistic regime.” Early Monday, an explosion rocked a power station in Caracas. Flames rose overnight from the electrical facility in the Baruta area of Caracas. Residents gathered to look at the charred, smoldering transformers and electrical equipment. Guaido said three of four electricity transformers servicing the area were knocked out and that state engineers were unable to fix them. He has blamed the blackouts on alleged government corruption and mismanagement. Winston Cabas, the head of Venezuela’s electrical engineers union, which opposes the government, disputed government allegations that the dam was the target of sabotage. He blamed a lack of maintenance as well as the departure of skilled workers from the troubled country over the years. “The system is vulnerable, fragile and unstable,” he said. Maduro had accused Guaido and the United States of staging a “cyberattack” on the hydroelectric station at the Guri Dam, the cornerstone of Venezuela’s electrical grid. The U.S. dismisses the allegation.

Suspect in Kim Jong Nam assassination freed by Malaysia BY SHIBANI MAHTANI Washington Post

HONG KONG • One of the

women suspected of killing Kim Jong Nam, the half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was freed Monday in Malaysia after prosecutors unexpectedly dropped charges against her. Siti Aisyah, 26, returned home to Indonesia on Monday evening. She and the second suspect in the murder, Doan Thi Huong, 30, from Vietnam, appeared in court Monday, but charges were dropped only against Aisyah. “I feel very happy,” she said at a news conference, thanking

everyone who worked for her release after more than two years in Malaysian custody. “I didn’t expect that today will be the day of my freedom.” The two women, who maintain their innocence, were accused of delivering the potent VX nerve agent that killed Kim Jong Nam in an airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in February 2017. Both Aisyah and Huong have said they thought they were taking part in a prank for a television show and were applying lotion on the man’s face. U.S. officials have said the orders came from Pyongyang. The pair were the only ones held by Malaysian authorities,

after four North Korean suspects fled the country the day of Kim’s murder. He was the eldest son of former North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and had lived abroad since 2003. Kim Jong Il died in 2011 and was succeeded by Kim Jong Un, who then set about consolidating power. In a statement, Malaysian Attorney General Tommy Thomas said Aisyah’s release came after intervention from the Indonesian government, which repeatedly lobbied for the charges against her to be dropped and for her to be allowed to return home. The decision was made “taking into account the good relations” between Indonesia and Malaysia, Thomas wrote in

a letter to Indonesia’s minister of law and human rights. The woman’s case was raised at every meeting between Indonesia and Malaysia, Indonesian officials said, including when Indonesian President Joko Widodo met with Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad in July. Both Indonesia and Malaysia are Muslim-majority nations, with closely related languages and deep ties. “We are grateful the public prosecutor has come to this conclusion because we truly believe she is merely a scapegoat and she is innocent,” said Gooi Soon Seng, Aisyah’s attorney. The trial against Huong, however, will continue Thursday.

World Wide Web knows his revolutionary innovation is coming of age, and doesn’t always like what he sees: state-sponsored hacking, online harassment, hate speech and misinformation among the ills of its “digital adolescence.” Tim Berners-Lee issued a cride-coeur letter and spoke to a few reporters Monday on the eve of the 30-year anniversary of his first paper with an outline of what would become the web — a first step toward transforming countless lives and the global economy. The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, plans to host BernersLee and other web aficionados on Tuesday. “We’re celebrating, but we’re also very concerned,” BernersLee said. Late last year, a key threshold was crossed — roughly half the world has gotten online. Today some 2 billion websites exist. The anniversary offers “an opportunity to reflect on how far we have yet to go,” BernersLee said, calling the “fight” for the web “one of the most important causes of our time.” He is convinced the online population will continue to grow, but says accessibility issues continue to beset much of the world. “Look at the 50 percent who are on the web, and it’s not so pretty for them,” he said. “They are all stepping back suddenly horrified after the Trump and Brexit elections realizing that this web thing that they thought was so cool has actually not necessarily been serving humanity very well.” The anniversary is also a nod to the innovative, collaborative and open-source mindset at the Geneva-based CERN, where physicists smash particles together to unlock secrets of science and the universe. As a young English software engineer, Berners-Lee came up with the idea for hypertexttransfer protocol — the “http” that adorns web addresses — and other building blocks for the web while working at CERN in March 1989. Some trace the actual start of the web to 1990, when he released the first web browser. Berners-Lee reminisced about how he was really out to get disparate computer systems to talk to one another, and resolve the “burning frustration” over a “lack of interoperability” of documentation from disparate computing systems used at CERN in the late 1980s. Now, the hope of his World Wide Web Foundation is to enlist governments, companies, and citizens to take a greater role in shaping the web for good under principles laid out in its “Contract for the Web.” Under the contract’s sweeping, broad ambition, governments are supposed to make sure everyone can connect to the internet, to keep it available and to respect privacy. Companies are to make the internet affordable, respect privacy and develop technology that will put people — and the “public good” — first. Citizens are to create and to cooperate and respect “civil discourse,” among other things. To Berners-Lee, the web is a “mirror of humanity” where “you will see good and bad.”


03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 2

WORLD

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Last-minute Brexit talks break deadlock But Parliament still may not be satisfied with changes to plan to leave the EU BY JILL LAWLESS AND RAF CASERT associated Press

LONDON • The British government said Monday that frenzied last-minute diplomacy had won “legally binding changes” to overcome a roadblock in its divorce deal with the European Union, hours before Parliament was due to decide the fate of Prime Minister Theresa May’s hard-won agreement — and of Britain’s departure from the EU. On the eve of Tuesday’s vote, May flew to the French city of

Strasbourg, where EU legislators were meeting, for nighttime talks with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. The prime minister was seeking revisions, guarantees or other changes to persuade reluctant British legislators to back her withdrawal agreement with the EU, which they resoundingly rejected in January. At a joint news conference, May and Juncker claimed to have succeeded. May said new documents to be added to the deal provided “legally binding changes” to the part relating to the Irish border. The legal 585-page withdrawal agreement itself though was left intact. “In politics, sometimes you get a second chance. It is what you do with this second chance that counts. Because there will

be no third chance,” Juncker warned the legislators who will vote late Tuesday. “Let’s be crystal clear about the choice: it is this deal or Brexit might not happen at all,” he said. May said the changes should overcome lawmakers’ qualms about a mechanism in the deal designed to keep an open border between Britain’s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland. The mechanism, known as the backstop, is a safeguard that would keep the U.K. in a customs union with the EU until a permanent new trading relationship is in place. Brexit-supporters in Britain fear the backstop could be used to bind the country to EU regulations indefinitely. May said the new wording “will guarantee that the EU can-

not act with the intent of applying the backstop indefinitely.” But the changes appear to fall well short of Brexiteers’ demands for a unilateral British exit mechanism from the backstop. Pro-Brexit lawmakers said they would read the fine print before deciding how to vote on Tuesday. Announcing the breakthrough in Britain’s House of Commons, Cabinet Office Minister David Lidington said lawmakers faced “a fundamental choice ... to vote for the improved deal or to plunge this country into a political crisis.” Earlier, Juncker kissed May twice on the cheeks when she arrived at the commission’s headquarters in the European Parliament building. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier kissed

Chaos spreads in Venezuela U.S. announces it is pulling out last of Caracas embassy staff

her hand before they went inside for talks. When negotiations between the EU and the British government were at a low ebb, Juncker shook the British leader’s hand before a similar meeting. Britain is due to pull out of the EU on March 29, but the government has not been able to win parliamentary approval for its agreement with the bloc on withdrawal terms and future relations. The impasse has raised fears of a chaotic “no-deal” Brexit that could mean major disruption for businesses and people in Britain and the 27 remaining EU countries. “This is a government in chaos, with a country in chaos because of this mess,” Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said.

Inventor laments web’s coming-of-age problems BY JAMEY KEATEN associated Press

GENEVA • The inventor of the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People collect water Monday from a broken pipe that belongs to the city water service, during rolling blackouts that have kept people without running water in their homes in Caracas, Venezuela. The blackout has intensified the toxic political climate, with accusations of sabotage. ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARACAS, VENEZUELA • U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said late Monday that the United States is withdrawing the last of its staff from its embassy in Venezuela, citing the deteriorating situation. Pompeo announced the decision as Venezuela struggles to restore electricity following four days of blackouts around the country and a deepening political crisis. The U.S. has led an international effort to oust socialist President Nicolas Maduro and replace him with opposition leader Juan Guaido, who vows to hold new a presidential election. Guaido is backed by some 50 countries, while Maduro maintains support from countries such as China, Russia and Cuba. Maduro ordered U.S. diplomats to leave in late January but then backed off. Pompeo says the remaining diplomats in Venezuela will be removed by the end of the week. Earlier Monday, Venezuelans converged on a polluted river in Caracas to fill water bottles and held scattered protests in several cities as a growing sense

of chaos took hold in a country where people have had little power, water and communications for days. A 3-year-old girl with a brain tumor languished in a Caracas hospital, awaiting treatment after doctors started surgery but then suspended the operation when nationwide power outages first hit on Thursday, said the girl’s fearful mother, who only gave her first name, Yalimar. “The doctors told me that there are no miracles,” said Yalimar, who hopes her daughter can be transferred Tuesday to one of the few hospitals in Venezuela that would be able to finish the complex procedure. The girl’s story highlighted an unfolding horror in Venezuela, where years of hardship for millions of people got abruptly worse after the power grid collapsed, intensifying the country’s long-running misery. On Monday, schools and businesses were closed, long lines of cars waited at the few gasoline stations with electricity and hospitals cared for many patients without power. Generators have alleviated conditions for some of the critically ill. The widespread black-

outs have brought oil exports to a halt, and financial experts say that is costing the cashstrapped country millions of dollars a day. Russ Dallen, a Miami-based partner at the brokerage firm Caracas Capital Markets Dallen, said Monday that Venezuela hasn’t shipped $358 million in oil since the nationwide power failures hit Thursday evening. He said that “the whole system is grinding to a halt.” There were also acts of kindness: people whose food would rot in fridges without power donated it to a restaurant, which cooked it for distribution to charitable foundations and hospitals. Information about developments across the country was difficult to gather because communications were unreliable. Engineers restored power in some areas, but it often went again. There have been a few protests in the Venezuelan capital, and reports of similar shows of anti-government anger in the cities of Maracaibo and Maturin. Opposition leader Juan Guaido tweeted about reports of looting in some cities, but the reports were difficult to

confirm. In Caracas, some people reported more sightings of “colectivos,” a term for armed groups allegedly operating on behalf of the state to intimidate opponents. While President Nicolas Maduro and other government officials said they were working hard to restore power and provide basic necessities, the mood in Caracas was desperate. Marian Morales, a nurse working for a Catholic youth group, and several colleagues handed out diapers and food from their car, parked near a hospital. Police and men in civilian clothing ordered them to leave, saying they didn’t have permission. Morales said the needy are cautious about approaching to collect the handouts because of the presence of security forces. The opposition-controlled National Assembly debated the power cuts and declared that the situation was an emergency, a largely symbolic move aimed at pressuring Maduro. Guaido criticized the government’s handling of the outages and called it a “sadistic regime.”

Suspect in Kim Jong Nam assassination freed by Malaysia BY SHIBANI MAHTANI Washington Post

HONG KONG • One of the

women suspected of killing Kim Jong Nam, the half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was freed Monday in Malaysia after prosecutors unexpectedly dropped charges against her. Siti Aisyah, 26, returned home to Indonesia on Monday evening. She and the second suspect in the murder, Doan Thi Huong, 30, from Vietnam, appeared in court Monday, but charges were dropped only against Aisyah. “I feel very happy,” she said at a news conference, thanking

everyone who worked for her release after more than two years in Malaysian custody. “I didn’t expect that today will be the day of my freedom.” The two women, who maintain their innocence, were accused of delivering the potent VX nerve agent that killed Kim Jong Nam in an airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in February 2017. Both Aisyah and Huong have said they thought they were taking part in a prank for a television show and were applying lotion on the man’s face. U.S. officials have said the orders came from Pyongyang. The pair were the only ones held by Malaysian authorities,

after four North Korean suspects fled the country the day of Kim’s murder. He was the eldest son of former North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and had lived abroad since 2003. Kim Jong Il died in 2011 and was succeeded by Kim Jong Un, who then set about consolidating power. In a statement, Malaysian Attorney General Tommy Thomas said Aisyah’s release came after intervention from the Indonesian government, which repeatedly lobbied for the charges against her to be dropped and for her to be allowed to return home. The decision was made “taking into account the good relations” between Indonesia and Malaysia, Thomas wrote in

a letter to Indonesia’s minister of law and human rights. The woman’s case was raised at every meeting between Indonesia and Malaysia, Indonesian officials said, including when Indonesian President Joko Widodo met with Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad in July. Both Indonesia and Malaysia are Muslim-majority nations, with closely related languages and deep ties. “We are grateful the public prosecutor has come to this conclusion because we truly believe she is merely a scapegoat and she is innocent,” said Gooi Soon Seng, Aisyah’s attorney. The trial against Huong, however, will continue Thursday.

World Wide Web knows his revolutionary innovation is coming of age, and doesn’t always like what he sees: state-sponsored hacking, online harassment, hate speech and misinformation among the ills of its “digital adolescence.” Tim Berners-Lee issued a cride-coeur letter and spoke to a few reporters Monday on the eve of the 30-year anniversary of his first paper with an outline of what would become the web — a first step toward transforming countless lives and the global economy. The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, plans to host BernersLee and other web aficionados on Tuesday. “We’re celebrating, but we’re also very concerned,” BernersLee said. Late last year, a key threshold was crossed — roughly half the world has gotten online. Today some 2 billion websites exist. The anniversary offers “an opportunity to reflect on how far we have yet to go,” BernersLee said, calling the “fight” for the web “one of the most important causes of our time.” He is convinced the online population will continue to grow, but says accessibility issues continue to beset much of the world. “Look at the 50 percent who are on the web, and it’s not so pretty for them,” he said. “They are all stepping back suddenly horrified after the Trump and Brexit elections realizing that this web thing that they thought was so cool has actually not necessarily been serving humanity very well.” The anniversary is also a nod to the innovative, collaborative and open-source mindset at the Geneva-based CERN, where physicists smash particles together to unlock secrets of science and the universe. As a young English software engineer, Berners-Lee came up with the idea for hypertexttransfer protocol — the “http” that adorns web addresses — and other building blocks for the web while working at CERN in March 1989. Some trace the actual start of the web to 1990, when he released the first web browser. Berners-Lee reminisced about how he was really out to get disparate computer systems to talk to one another, and resolve the “burning frustration” over a “lack of interoperability” of documentation from disparate computing systems used at CERN in the late 1980s. Now, the hope of his World Wide Web Foundation is to enlist governments, companies, and citizens to take a greater role in shaping the web for good under principles laid out in its “Contract for the Web.” Under the contract’s sweeping, broad ambition, governments are supposed to make sure everyone can connect to the internet, to keep it available and to respect privacy. Companies are to make the internet affordable, respect privacy and develop technology that will put people — and the “public good” — first. Citizens are to create and to cooperate and respect “civil discourse,” among other things. To Berners-Lee, the web is a “mirror of humanity” where “you will see good and bad.”


WORLD

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

Sen. Graham to seek U.S. recognition of Israeli rule in Golan JERUSALEM • U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham on Monday vowed to push for U.S. recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, in what would represent a new contentious political gift to Israel from President Donald Trump’s administration.

The South Carolina Republican said he aimed to change the current U.S.designation of the Golan, which Israel captured from Syria in 1967, as disputed territory. He spoke during a tour of the frontier with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. “The Golan is not disputed. It is in the hands of Israel and will always

Algeria’s president of two decades abandoned his bid for a fifth term Monday following unprecedented protests over his fitness for office, but his simultaneous postponement of an election set for next month had critics worried he intends to hold on to power. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who has rarely been seen in public since he had a stroke in 2013 and just returned from two weeks in a Geneva hospital, promised to establish a panel to plan a rescheduled vote and to put an interim government in place. In a letter to the nation released by state news agency APS on Monday, Bouteflika, 82, stressed the importance of including Algeria’s disillusioned youths in the reform process and putting the country “in the hands of new generations.” But for many of the protesters the most important sentence in the president’s letter read, “There will be no fifth term.” Celebrations popped up instead of protests on the streets of the capital, Algiers, at the news. Car horns rang out while people waved flags, jumped up and down, and sang the national anthem. North Macedonia honors those lost to Nazis • North Macedonia is commemorating the deportation of almost the country’s entire Jewish community to the Nazi death camp of Treblinka with a ceremony in the capital, Skopje. The Holocaust Memorial Center in Skopje unveiled its permanent exhibit Monday, 76 years since 98 percent of the Jewish population of what was then a province of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia was rounded up and transported to Treblinka, in occupied Poland. A 500-year-old Torah scroll, smuggled from Spain when the Jews fled the Inquisition to settle in the Balkans, is part of the exhibit. U.N. leader supports fight for women’s rights • Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Monday that there is a “deep, pervasive and relentless” resistance to women’s rights and called for a fight to “push back against the pushback.” Guterres spoke at the opening of the annual meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women, which since its establishment in 1947 has been committed to achieving “equality with men in all fields of human enterprise.” While advocates for gender equality are mobilizing as never before, Guterres said, “around the world, there is a pushback on women’s rights.” He pointed to increased violence against women, especially defenders of human rights and women running for political office. He cited “online abuse of women who speak out,” women 26 percent less likely to be employed than men, and “an ongoing uphill battle for reproductive rights.” U.S. warns Germany over 5G security risks • The United States is warning Germany that allowing untrustworthy companies to supply equipment for its 5G networks could jeopardize sharing of sensitive information among allies. The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that the U.S. ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, sent a letter to German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier specifically naming Chinese tech firm Huawei.

concern over Iranian entrenchment in neighboring Syria. Israel has admitted to carrying out scores of airstrikes in Syria against Iranian targets in recent years. A beaming Netanyahu applauded Graham’s remarks and asserted that Israel would never give up the land. “I think it’s very impor-

tant that the international community recognize this fact, and accept it, and most especially our great friend, the United States of America,” Netanyahu said, thanking Graham for his “unbelievable support.” Israel annexed the Golan Heights in 1981, a move not recognized by most of the international community.

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DIGEST Algerians celebrate prospect of change

withdrawal from the Golan as part of any peace deal. With Syria ravaged by a nearly eight-year-old civil war, peace talks with Israel seem unlikely anytime soon. Graham called the prospect of Israeli withdrawal from the Golan “a strategic nightmare” and political “suicide,” citing shared Israeli and American

remain in the hands of Israel,” Graham said from a cliff overlooking Syria, where Syrian flags could be seen fluttering in the distance on buildings damaged in the country’s civil war. “My goal is to try to explain this to the administration,” he said. In past negotiations, Syria has demanded a

Washington has been trying to dissuade its allies from allowing Huawei to provide equipment for fifthgeneration cell networks, claiming it could facilitate digital espionage by the Chinese government. Mexican leader proud of U.S. ties • Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador celebrated what he called his administration’s “cordial” relations with the United States on Monday as he marked his first 100 days in office. When Lopez Obrador took office Dec. 1, many feared the leftist was headed for a certain clash with conservative U.S. President Donald Trump. But the two have maintained civil relations, without the frequent insults and name-calling Trump had once subjected Mexico to. Mexico has quietly cooperated with the United States by allowing asylum applicants to be sent back to Mexico while they await resolution of their cases. Corruption inquiry material on hold in Israel • Israel’s attorney general says he will only release material from the corruption investigations into Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after the country’s April 9 election. The Justice Ministry said in a statement Monday that Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit agreed to delay handing Netanyahu’s attorneys evidence in the corruption cases until after the elections out of concern over media leaks. Mandelblit recommended criminal charges against Netanyahu in three corruption cases last month, shaking up re-election prospects for the longserving Israeli leader. Charges can only be filed after a hearing. The Justice Ministry said that would take place by July 10. The charges include allegations that he accepted gifts from billionaire friends, and promoted beneficial regulations for a telecom magnate in exchange for positive coverage on a news site. Netanyahu denies any wrongdoing. Syrian forces advance on militants • U.S.-backed Syrian forces pounded the last village held by the Islamic State group with artillery and heavy weapons from multiple sides Monday and made slow advances on its edges, battling militants holed up in underground tunnels. The fighters of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces moved toward a tent encampment in the village of Baghouz and at one point encircled a group of Islamic State militants, killing a number of them in an hourlong battle, an SDF spokesman said. After weeks of besieging Baghouz, the operation launched Sunday night aims at finally taking the last tiny patch of land held by the militants, a pocket on the banks of the Euphrates River in eastern Syria near the border with Iraq. Operations against Islamic State “will continue until we totally wipe them out,” the SDF vowed in a statement Monday, saying SDF fighters had made “tangible progress” since Sunday, with 37 militants killed and five SDF fighters wounded. Some 500 Islamic State fighters are believed to be still in the territory, along with possibly 3,000 to 4,000 civilians, mainly family members who remained after thousands of civilians streamed out of Baghouz in past week during pauses in the fighting. From news services

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MLS commissioner: Support for soccer in St. Louis is ‘remarkable’ • A1 J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 03.12.2019 • B

FEELING LIKE

FOWLER

Cards outfielder is showing signs of what he can do BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • Striding to the plate

with none of the trepidation and hesitation and frustration that clung “He’s back to who he is, to him at bat last summer because what kind of player he is. of things he did Playing the game, seeing not do, Cardinals right fielder Dex- the game, doing those ter Fowler took a little things.” look at what he definitely could do MIKE SHILDT Monday . With ace Max Scherzer, the dean of National League righthanders, on the mound and Washington’s defense positioned so invitingly, Fowler landed a bunt to snatch a single. “They gave it to me,” Fowler said. “If you’re going to give it to me, I’m going to take it. I’m going to show you I can take it. It’s there all day. I see it all the time.” The bunt was the first of Fowler’s two hits off Scherzer and the start of a buoyant ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO

See CARDINALS • Page B3

P-D PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

> 12:05 p.m. Tuesday at Braves > Ozuna shows progress with arm. B3

Tanking is right target in baseball

Thomas moves to top line Rookie will take injured Tarasenko’s spot

Blues need everyone to produce Scoring can’t come from just one line

Players should fight it with fans’ support

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baseball union executive Tony Clark is on his annual tour.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • The man in

black sat at a picnic table between two poles. To Tony Clark’s left was the spring training home of a Cardinals organization that, while painstakingly prudent, prioritizes annual relevance. To the right of the executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association was the spring training home of the Marlins, a belly-up fish that floats while swearing it swims. “There is an interest in the competitive nature of the industry being the backbone of the industry that moves us forward,” Clark said behind his impenetrable sunglasses while wearing the union logo on his black polo shirt. “For us,” Clark added, “it simply comes down to a fundamental fairness, and a commitment to what we believe is important for our industry to be able

See FREDERICKSON • Page B2

Robert Thomas scores against Anaheim Ducks goaltender John Gibson last Wednesday. BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There was no grand announcement or poignant moment in Craig Berube’s office Monday morning. Robert Thomas was stretching in the weight room before practice at the IceZone in Hazelwood when he learned of his promo-

tion. “I think it was Bozy (Tyler Bozak) and (Pat) Maroon came up to me and started joking about me not being on their line anymore,” Thomas said. Once he learned he was “replacing” Vladimir Tarasenko on the Blues’ No. 1 line, he met

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrick Maroon is one of several Blues who could score more.

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See BLUES • Page B4

COLUMBIA, MO. • Cornerbacks coach David Gibbs is new to Missouri’s football program but no stranger to Mizzou history. Gibbs was a fifth-year senior defensive back at Colorado in 1990, which means he appeared in one of the most famous games ever played on Faurot Field — or any field in college football. The Fifth Down Game.

Sure, yes, the Robert Thomas news is fun. The likable rookie had been linemates with seemingly every Blue except the Cavallini brothers, yet he’d never cracked the top line. And Monday, the 19-year-old was named as Vladimir Tarasenko’s replacement on the top line, with Tarasenko out for (at least) the next four games. Thomas’ gap-toothed smile is a welcoming glisten amid some gloom. And there is much giddiness about the giddy-up he’s got. But the next four games — heck, four weeks — aren’t about Thomas. Or even Tarasenko. It’s about these other three lines. It’s about the underacheivers who can get under your skin. Jaden Schwartz and his paltry sextet of goals this season. Patrick Maroon. Alexander Steen. Zach Sanford. The Blues should survive four games without Tarasenko,

See MU • Page B6

See HOCHMAN • Page B4

> 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Coyotes, FSM > Binnington to start Tuesday after a pair of so-so outings. B4

Gibbs brings veteran voice to Mizzou Played for Colorado in infamous game BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

David Gibbs is coming from the Big 12 Conference to coach cornerbacks at Missouri.

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Tuesday 3/12 at Braves* 12:05 p.m.

*Exhibition game

Wednesday 3/13 Thursday 3/14 vs. Mets* at Marlins* 12:05 p.m. 12:05 p.m.

Friday 3/15 SS at/vs. Astros* 5:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 3/12 vs. Coyotes 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/14 at Senators 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/16 at Penguins 12 p.m. FSM

Sunday 3/17 at Sabres 4 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Thursday 3/14 A-10 tourn. vs. Rich./Fordham, 7:30, NBCSN

Friday 3/15 A-10 tourn. vs. Dayton (if nec.) 7:30, NBCSN

Saturday 3/16 A-10 tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.) noon, CBSSN

Sunday 3/17 A-10 tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.) noon, KMOV-4

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Wednesday 3/13 SEC tourn. vs. Georgia, 6 p.m., SEC Network

Women’s basketball TBA Thursday 3/14 Postseason game SEC tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.), 2:30 TBA p.m., SEC Net.

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 3/13 Big Ten tourn. vs. Northwestern, 8 p.m., BTN

Thursday 3/14 Big Ten tourn. vs. Iowa (if nec.), 8:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 3/15 Big Ten tourn. vs. Mich. (if nec.), 8:30 p.m., BTN

Saturday 3/16 Big Ten semifinal (if nec.), 2:30 p.m., KMOV-4

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/16 at Nashville 7 p.m.

Saturday 3/23 vs. Tampa Bay 1 p.m.

Saturday 3/30 vs. Charlotte 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/6 at Atlanta 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 3/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Twins at Pirates, MLB Network 5:30 p.m. College: Florida State at Florida, SEC Network 5:35 p.m. Exhibition: Astros at Nationals, MLB Network BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ACC tournament: Miami vs. Wake Forest, ESPN 11 a.m. Women’s Horizon final: Wright State vs. Green Bay, ESPNU Women’s Summit final: South Dakota St. vs. South Dakota, ESPNU 1 p.m. 1:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Georgia Tech vs. Notre Dame, ESPN 3 p.m. Women’s WCC final: Gonzaga vs. BYU, ESPNU 6 p.m. Horizon final: Wright State vs. Northern Kentucky, ESPN Northeast final: Fairleigh Dickinson at St. Francis (Pa.), ESPN2 6 p.m. 6 p.m. NBA: Knicks at Pacers, FSM Plus 6 p.m. CAA final: Hofstra vs. Northeastern, CBSSN ACC tournament: Boston College vs. Pittsburgh, ESPNU 6 p.m. Women’s Big East final: Marquette vs. DePaul, FS1 7 p.m. 7 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Mavericks, TNT 8 p.m. WCC final: Gonzaga vs. St. Mary’s or San Diego, ESPN 8 p.m. Summit League final: North Dakota State vs. Omaha, ESPN2 9:40 p.m. NBA: Timberwolves at Nuggets, TNT HOCKEY Capitals at Penguins, NBCSN 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Blues vs. Coyotes, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) LACROSSE College: Lehigh at Rutgers, BTN 6 p.m. SOCCER UEFA Champions League: Juventus vs. Atletico Madrid, TNT 3 p.m. TENNIS ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP third rd., WTA rd. of 16, Tennis Ch. 1 p.m. 9 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP third rd., WTA rd. of 16, Tennis Ch.

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

MLB NOTEBOOK

Lorenzen pitches, plays field Reds might try move in the regular season ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reliever Michael Lorenzen has begun Cincinnati’s mound-tooutfield experiment, pitching one inning and then moving to center field Monday in a spring-training game against Cleveland in Goodyear, Ariz. It didn’t take long for the ball to find him. Lorenzen chased Jose Ramirez’s leadoff double in the bottom of the sixth inning of a 5-5 tie, his biggest test in his first time in the outfield. “It was fun,” Lorenzen said. “I didn’t necessarily get any fly balls, but I had a couple hit to me. Hopefully next time I get to run one down.” The Reds are exploring options for replacing center fielder Billy Hamilton, who signed with the Royals. Lorenzen was a center fielder at Cal State Fullerton who also occasionally was on the mound to close games. The Reds drafted him as a pitcher in 2013, and he has lobbied for a dual role in the majors. He finally got his chance Monday. Lorenzen pitched the bottom of the fifth inning and retired all three Indians he faced, two by strikeout. Then at the plate he fanned against Mike Clevinger before replacing Nick Senzel in center field. He started shading Ramirez, the first batter, toward right field, then moved the other way. Ramirez hit the ball to the gap in right for a double. In the seventh inning, Cleveland’s Eric Stamets went from first to third on a single to center. Lorenzen fielded the ball and threw to third base too late. Lorenzen left after his two innings in the outfield. His success as a hitter in the majors has inspired Bell to try the unusual, two-position arrangement. Last season, he went 4-2 with a 3.11 earned-run average and one save in 42 relief appearances and three starts. He also batted .290 and led major-league pitchers with four homers — including one grand slam — and 10 RBIs in 31 at-bats. As a pinch-hitter, he went three for 13 with two homers. Manager David Bell likes the option of using Lorenzen in center and might do so in the regular season. “I’ve never been close to a pitcher who can do these things,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cincinnati’s Michael Lorenzen moves to center field Monday afternoon after pitching an inning of an exhibition contest in Goodyear, Ariz.

Arizona signs Jones • Free-agent outfielder Adam Jones and the Arizona Diamondbacks finalized a $3 million, one-year contract. He is likely to start in center field, between Steven Souza Jr. in right and David Peralta in left, pushing Ketel Marte into a utility role. Jones, 33, is a five-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glove winner who spent the last 11 big-league seasons with Baltimore after making his debut with Seattle in 2006. He was an All-Star annually from 2012-15 and hit .265 with 29 homers and 83 RBIs in 2016. He dropped to .281 with 15 homers and 63 RBIs last year. Seattle’s Seager sidelined • Mariners third baseman Kyle Seager is scheduled to have surgery Tuesday on the middle finger of his left hand and will be out at least through April, manager Scott Servais said. Seager is coming off the worst season of his career, in which he hit .221. The Mariners are expected to use Ryon Healy at third base, at which he made 103 starts combined in 2016 and 2017 with Oakland. For openers • Washington manager Dave Martinez made official what most already assumed —

ace Max Scherzer will get the ball opening day for the Nationals. That sets up a marquee matchup March 28 at Nationals Park: Scherzer vs. Jacob deGrom of the Mets. Between them, they own four Cy Young awards, including the three most recent in the National League. Last year, the duo finished 1-2 in the voting, with deGrom claiming his first trophy. • The Dodgers are not sure whether Clayton Kershaw will be available for their opener March 28, against Arizona. On Monday he threw his first bullpen session since Feb. 20, an all-fastball session of 20 pitches. The threetime NL Cy Young Award winner has been slowed by discomfort in his left (pitching) shoulder. “Good day, good step forward, for sure,” he said. • Mike Foltynewicz, bothered by a sore elbow, will not be ready to pitch for the Braves on opening day — March 28 in Philadelphia. The Braves could go with Julio Teheran (9-9, 3.94 ERA in 2018) or Sean Newcomb (12-9, 3.90). • Mike Minor has been tabbed the opening-day starting pitcher for the Rangers, at home March 28 against the Cubs. He was 12-8 with a 4.18 ERA last season.

DIGEST Meyer to join Fox’s football pregame show

Urban Meyer is headed back to television. Fox announced Monday that it has hired the former Ohio State coach as one of the analysts for its retooled college football pregame show. Meyer, who won national championships at Florida and Ohio State, retired last season after eight years in charge of the Buckeyes. He worked for ESPN as an analyst in 2010 after leaving Florida and before going to Ohio State. Meanwhile, new Ohio State coach Ryan Day’s 10 assistant coaches will be paid a total of more than $7.4 million this year, according to contracts released by the university. Co-defensive coordinator Greg Mattison will be the highest paid with a $1.1 million base salary, more than double what he made as defensive line coach at Michigan last season. Al Washington, the linebackers coach Day also hired away from Michigan, got a bump from $375,000 to $500,000. (AP) Nebraska player surrenders • Nebraska running back Maurice Washington surrendered to California authorities to face felony and misdemeanor charges related to possession and distribution of a video of his former girlfriend allegedly being sexually assaulted by two other people in 2016. (AP) Venus Williams advances • Venus Williams is turning back her own clock at the BNP Paribas Open, moving into the fourth round with a 6-2, 7-5 victory over qualifier Christina McHale in Indian Wells, Calif. Williams is seeking her 50th career WTA Tour title in the desert, where she has never won the event. And at 38, she’s showing vintage form. Younger sister Serena, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, retired from her match Sunday because of a viral illness. (AP) McGregor arrested • Mixed martial artist and boxer Conor McGregor has been arrested in Florida, accused of stealing the cellphone of someone who was trying to take his photo, authorities said. According to a Miami Beach police report, the 30-year-old McGregor was arrested Monday afternoon and charged with robbery and criminal mischief. An attorney for McGregor called the altercation “minor” and said the popular fighter would cooperate with authorities. (AP) Horses run at Santa Anita • Training resumed on Santa Anita’s main dirt track, with horses limited to jogging and galloping while the surface is monitored for any irregularities that may have caused the deaths of 21 horses since December. Track consultant Dennis Moore said “everything went well” and that all the testing data supports the decision to allow limited training while racing remains suspended indefinitely. (AP) George Foreman’s daughter dies • Freeda George Foreman, the daughter of former heavyweight champion George Foreman and briefly a boxer herself, has died at a suburban Houston home. She was 42. The Harris County sheriff’s office said Monday that emergency crews found her Friday. The sheriff’s office says its investigators also responded and preliminary indications were that her death was a suicide, but the medical examiner’s office will make the final determination. (AP) Iditarod leader’s dogs quit • There’s a new leader in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race after the dogs on musher Nicolas Petit’s team quit on him. Alaska musher Pete Kaiser passed Petit and was the first musher to reach the checkpoint in Koyuk. Koyuk is 827 miles into the 1,000mile race across Alaska. Petit held a five-hour advantage after Sunday. He told the Iditarod Insider that he yelled at two dogs who were fighting, and the team wouldn’t move after that. (AP)

Baseball is facing some tough issues FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

to reflect, and that is a level of competition and hope across the board that affords every club, or as many as possible, the ability to suggest that they are positioning themselves to be the last team standing. All the other things fall in place with those two things. That’s where our focus is.” I know what you’re thinking. Great, more words about the business of baseball. When is this discussion going to die down? The season is about to start, after all. But what if it wasn’t? Because that’s where this could wind up, if owners and players don’t take steps toward one another as they sprint toward the end of a collective bargaining agreement that expires after the 2021 season. Three seasons of ball, then strike? Hope not. Hope doesn’t help much at the negotiating table, though. Here’s something that would: some common-sense reform when it comes to tanking. Clark’s Monday morning meeting with the Cardinals was part of union leadership’s annual tour, but this one was described as somewhat different by those in attendance. That’s not unique to this camp. Players have shared an increased interest in understanding the current collective bargaining agreement and the changes they would like to see made in the next one. Back-to-back years of frigid free agency for players who are not 26-year-old superstars has alerted the once-oblivious. “Woke,” one observer described. “Engaged,” Clark preferred. Clark selects his words like a good jeweler eyes diamonds. He was asked directly by Post-Dispatch colleague Derrick Goold if the tone of his recent meetings

with players has shifted, from players showing interest to players pushing activism. Seven seconds of silence passed. “Good question,” Clark said. Six more seconds of silence passed. “In some ways, I would say that,” Clark said, sifting jewels. What Clark was more forthcoming about during an extended conversation with a small group of reporters was that increased competitiveness in the game will be a primary focus for players moving forward. Hard to blame them. If you think (not) watching an intentionally terrible team is bad, try playing for one. And that tentacle of tanking is just the most obvious turn-off. More teams trying to win increases the chances of Manny Machado and Bryce Harper signing before spring training. It means Dallas Keuchel would have thrown more spring training innings than you. It means there would be fewer reasons to wonder what baseball front offices are doing with their money in a world where 26-year-old Blake Snell receives just a $15,500 raise from the league minimum after winning the Cy Young Award, and 30-year-old seven-time All-Star closer Craig Kimbrel nears midMarch without work. Players crying out against the agreement they agreed to does not sell. Neither does players pushing for contracts that ignore the aging curve. Players pointing out to fans that the game’s growing revenue in too many cases seems to be going toward not improving teams, well, that makes sense. “As we have gone through camp, yes, a lot of the dialogue has been pointed, and has been

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direct,” Clark said. “But I see that as an example of the passion and commitment that our players have to making sure our best players are on the field at all times, that we have a system in place that suggests the level of competition that everyone is coming out to see is commensurate with the passion and commitment of the players that are on the field delivering it.” MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred’s claim that every team is trying to win is an insult to both players and fans. As constructed, baseball’s draft rewards the biggest losers. You are better off being the last team in the standings than the one that missed the wild card by a game. Word is out. Teams are taking advantage. They want to win, but when? Fans and players suffer during the process, and not every team executes planned flops like the Cubs and Astros. Manfred wants to make pace-of-play changes now. The same urgency could be taken with tanking deterrents, like tweaking the draft. Just as veteran players should push for increased compensation and faster-arriving free agency for their younger constituents, owners should acknowledge that their tanking peers are doing a disservice to the sport. Common ground awaits, if Manfred can see beyond his rule-change minutiae. Clark and Manfred say they are willing to begin a dialogue that could get out in front of formal negotiations. When, where and what happens from there is as cloudy as baseball’s future. Stopping the tank would help keep baseball from going in it. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

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SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Tuesday 3/12 at Braves* 12:05 p.m.

*Exhibition game

Wednesday 3/13 Thursday 3/14 vs. Mets* at Marlins* 12:05 p.m. 12:05 p.m.

Friday 3/15 SS at/vs. Astros* 5:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 3/12 vs. Coyotes 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/14 at Senators 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/16 at Penguins 12 p.m. FSM

Sunday 3/17 at Sabres 4 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Thursday 3/14 A-10 tourn. vs. Rich./Fordham, 7:30, NBCSN

Friday 3/15 A-10 tourn. vs. Dayton (if nec.) 7:30, NBCSN

Saturday 3/16 A-10 tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.) noon, CBSSN

Sunday 3/17 A-10 tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.) noon, KMOV-4

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Wednesday 3/13 SEC tourn. vs. Georgia, 6 p.m., SEC Network

Women’s basketball TBA Thursday 3/14 Postseason game SEC tourn. vs. TBA (if nec.), 2:30 TBA p.m., SEC Net.

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 3/13 Big Ten tourn. vs. Northwestern, 8 p.m., BTN

Thursday 3/14 Big Ten tourn. vs. Iowa (if nec.), 8:30 p.m., BTN

Friday 3/15 Big Ten tourn. vs. Mich. (if nec.), 8:30 p.m., BTN

Saturday 3/16 Big Ten semifinal (if nec.), 2:30 p.m., KMOV-4

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/16 at Nashville 7 p.m.

Saturday 3/23 vs. Tampa Bay 1 p.m.

Saturday 3/30 vs. Charlotte 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/6 at Atlanta 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 3/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Twins at Pirates, MLB Network 5:30 p.m. College: Florida State at Florida, SEC Network 5:35 p.m. Exhibition: Astros at Nationals, MLB Network BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ACC tournament: Miami vs. Wake Forest, ESPN 11 a.m. Women’s Horizon final: Wright State vs. Green Bay, ESPNU Women’s Summit final: South Dakota St. vs. South Dakota, ESPNU 1 p.m. 1:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Georgia Tech vs. Notre Dame, ESPN 3 p.m. Women’s WCC final: Gonzaga vs. BYU, ESPNU 6 p.m. Horizon final: Wright State vs. Northern Kentucky, ESPN Northeast final: Fairleigh Dickinson at St. Francis (Pa.), ESPN2 6 p.m. 6 p.m. NBA: Knicks at Pacers, FSM Plus 6 p.m. CAA final: Hofstra vs. Northeastern, CBSSN ACC tournament: Boston College vs. Pittsburgh, ESPNU 6 p.m. Women’s Big East final: Marquette vs. DePaul, FS1 7 p.m. 7 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Mavericks, TNT 8 p.m. WCC final: Gonzaga vs. St. Mary’s, ESPN 8 p.m. Summit League final: North Dakota State vs. Omaha, ESPN2 9:40 p.m. NBA: Timberwolves at Nuggets, TNT HOCKEY Capitals at Penguins, NBCSN 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Blues vs. Coyotes, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) LACROSSE College: Lehigh at Rutgers, BTN 6 p.m. SOCCER UEFA Champions League: Juventus vs. Atletico Madrid, TNT 3 p.m. TENNIS BNP Paribas Open: Tennis Channel 1 p.m. 9 p.m. BNP Paribas Open: Tennis Channel

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

MLB NOTEBOOK

Lorenzen pitches, plays field Reds might try move in the regular season ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reliever Michael Lorenzen has begun Cincinnati’s mound-tooutfield experiment, pitching one inning and then moving to center field Monday in a spring-training game against Cleveland in Goodyear, Ariz. It didn’t take long for the ball to find him. Lorenzen chased Jose Ramirez’s leadoff double in the bottom of the sixth inning of a 5-5 tie, his biggest test in his first time in the outfield. “It was fun,” Lorenzen said. “I didn’t necessarily get any fly balls, but I had a couple hit to me. Hopefully next time I get to run one down.” The Reds are exploring options for replacing center fielder Billy Hamilton, who signed with the Royals. Lorenzen was a center fielder at Cal State Fullerton who also occasionally was on the mound to close games. The Reds drafted him as a pitcher in 2013, and he has lobbied for a dual role in the majors. He finally got his chance Monday. Lorenzen pitched the bottom of the fifth inning and retired all three Indians he faced, two by strikeout. Then at the plate he fanned against Mike Clevinger before replacing Nick Senzel in center field. He started shading Ramirez, the first batter, toward right field, then moved the other way. Ramirez hit the ball to the gap in right for a double. In the seventh inning, Cleveland’s Eric Stamets went from first to third on a single to center. Lorenzen fielded the ball and threw to third base too late. Lorenzen left after his two innings in the outfield. His success as a hitter in the majors has inspired Bell to try the unusual, two-position arrangement. Last season, he went 4-2 with a 3.11 earned-run average and one save in 42 relief appearances and three starts. He also batted .290 and led major-league pitchers with four homers — including one grand slam — and 10 RBIs in 31 at-bats. As a pinch-hitter, he went three for 13 with two homers. Manager David Bell likes the option of using Lorenzen in center and might do so in the regular season. “I’ve never been close to a pitcher who can do these things,” he said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cincinnati’s Michael Lorenzen moves to center field Monday afternoon after pitching an inning of an exhibition contest in Goodyear, Ariz.

Arizona signs Jones • Free-agent outfielder Adam Jones and the Arizona Diamondbacks finalized a $3 million, one-year contract. He is likely to start in center field, between Steven Souza Jr. in right and David Peralta in left, pushing Ketel Marte into a utility role. Jones, 33, is a five-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glove winner who spent the last 11 big-league seasons with Baltimore after making his debut with Seattle in 2006. He was an All-Star annually from 2012-15 and hit .265 with 29 homers and 83 RBIs in 2016. He dropped to .281 with 15 homers and 63 RBIs last year. Seattle’s Seager sidelined • Mariners third baseman Kyle Seager is scheduled to have surgery Tuesday on the middle finger of his left hand and will be out at least through April, manager Scott Servais said. Seager is coming off the worst season of his career, in which he hit .221. The Mariners are expected to use Ryon Healy at third base, at which he made 103 starts combined in 2016 and 2017 with Oakland. For openers • Washington manager Dave Martinez made official what most already assumed —

ace Max Scherzer will get the ball opening day for the Nationals. That sets up a marquee matchup March 28 at Nationals Park: Scherzer vs. Jacob deGrom of the Mets. Between them, they own four Cy Young awards, including the three most recent in the National League. Last year, the duo finished 1-2 in the voting, with deGrom claiming his first trophy. • The Dodgers are not sure whether Clayton Kershaw will be available for their opener March 28, against Arizona. On Monday he threw his first bullpen session since Feb. 20, an all-fastball session of 20 pitches. The threetime NL Cy Young Award winner has been slowed by discomfort in his left (pitching) shoulder. “Good day, good step forward, for sure,” he said. • Mike Foltynewicz, bothered by a sore elbow, will not be ready to pitch for the Braves on opening day — March 28 in Philadelphia. The Braves could go with Julio Teheran (9-9, 3.94 ERA in 2018) or Sean Newcomb (12-9, 3.90). • Mike Minor has been tabbed the opening-day starting pitcher for the Rangers, at home March 28 against the Cubs. He was 12-8 with a 4.18 ERA last season.

DIGEST Meyer to join Fox’s football pregame show

Urban Meyer is headed back to television. Fox announced Monday that it has hired the former Ohio State coach as one of the analysts for its retooled college football pregame show. Meyer, who won national championships at Florida and Ohio State, retired last season after eight years in charge of the Buckeyes. He worked for ESPN as an analyst in 2010 after leaving Florida and before going to Ohio State. Meanwhile, new Ohio State coach Ryan Day’s 10 assistant coaches will be paid a total of more than $7.4 million this year, according to contracts released by the university. Co-defensive coordinator Greg Mattison will be the highest paid with a $1.1 million base salary, more than double what he made as defensive line coach at Michigan last season. Al Washington, the linebackers coach Day also hired away from Michigan, got a bump from $375,000 to $500,000. (AP) Nebraska player surrenders • Nebraska running back Maurice Washington surrendered to California authorities to face felony and misdemeanor charges related to possession and distribution of a video of his former girlfriend allegedly being sexually assaulted by two other people in 2016. (AP) Venus Williams advances • Venus Williams is turning back her own clock at the BNP Paribas Open, moving into the fourth round with a 6-2, 7-5 victory over qualifier Christina McHale in Indian Wells, Calif. Williams is seeking her 50th career WTA Tour title in the desert, where she has never won the event. And at 38, she’s showing vintage form. Younger sister Serena, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, retired from her match Sunday because of a viral illness. Also, Naomi Osaka rolled past Danielle Collins 6-4, 6-2 in the third round, keeping the world’s No. 1 female player on track to defend her title. Novak Djokovic, the top-ranked men’s player, held serve to win his opening game against Philipp Kohlschreiber before the match was suspended for the night because of rain. (AP) McGregor arrested • Mixed martial artist and boxer Conor McGregor has been arrested in Florida, accused of stealing the cellphone of someone who was trying to take his photo, authorities said. According to a Miami Beach police report, the 30-year-old McGregor was arrested Monday afternoon and charged with robbery and criminal mischief. An attorney for McGregor called the altercation “minor” and said the popular fighter would cooperate with authorities. (AP) Horses run at Santa Anita • Training resumed on Santa Anita’s main dirt track, with horses limited to jogging and galloping while the surface is monitored for any irregularities that may have caused the deaths of 21 horses since December. Track consultant Dennis Moore said “everything went well” and that all the testing data supports the decision to allow limited training while racing remains suspended indefinitely. Santa Anita officials say a return to live racing is expected “in the near future.” (AP) George Foreman’s daughter dies • Freeda George Foreman, the daughter of former heavyweight champion George Foreman and briefly a boxer herself, has died at a suburban Houston home. She was 42. The Harris County sheriff’s office said Monday that emergency crews found her Friday. The sheriff’s office says its investigators also responded and preliminary indications were that her death was a suicide, but the medical examiner’s office will make the final determination. (AP) Iditarod leader’s dogs quit; Zirkle third • There’s a new leader in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race after the dogs on musher Nicolas Petit’s team quit on him. Alaska musher Pete Kaiser passed Petit and was the first musher to reach the checkpoint in Koyuk, 827 miles into the 1,000-mile race across Alaska. Aliy Zirkle, a 1988 Parkway West graduate, was third. Petit held a five-hour advantage after Sunday. He told the Iditarod Insider that he yelled at two dogs who were fighting, and the team wouldn’t move after that. (AP)

Baseball is facing some tough issues FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

to reflect, and that is a level of competition and hope across the board that affords every club, or as many as possible, the ability to suggest that they are positioning themselves to be the last team standing. All the other things fall in place with those two things. That’s where our focus is.” I know what you’re thinking. Great, more words about the business of baseball. When is this discussion going to die down? The season is about to start, after all. But what if it wasn’t? Because that’s where this could wind up, if owners and players don’t take steps toward one another as they sprint toward the end of a collective bargaining agreement that expires after the 2021 season. Three seasons of ball, then strike? Hope not. Hope doesn’t help much at the negotiating table, though. Here’s something that would: some common-sense reform when it comes to tanking. Clark’s Monday morning meeting with the Cardinals was part of union leadership’s annual tour, but this one was described as somewhat different by those in attendance. That’s not unique to this camp. Players have shared an increased interest in understanding the current collective bargaining agreement and the changes they would like to see made in the next one. Back-to-back years of frigid free agency for players who are not 26-year-old superstars has alerted the once-oblivious. “Woke,” one observer described. “Engaged,” Clark preferred. Clark selects his words like a good jeweler eyes diamonds. He was asked directly by Post-Dispatch colleague Derrick Goold if the tone of his recent meetings

with players has shifted, from players showing interest to players pushing activism. Seven seconds of silence passed. “Good question,” Clark said. Six more seconds of silence passed. “In some ways, I would say that,” Clark said, sifting jewels. What Clark was more forthcoming about during an extended conversation with a small group of reporters was that increased competitiveness in the game will be a primary focus for players moving forward. Hard to blame them. If you think (not) watching an intentionally terrible team is bad, try playing for one. And that tentacle of tanking is just the most obvious turn-off. More teams trying to win increases the chances of Manny Machado and Bryce Harper signing before spring training. It means Dallas Keuchel would have thrown more spring training innings than you. It means there would be fewer reasons to wonder what baseball front offices are doing with their money in a world where 26-year-old Blake Snell receives just a $15,500 raise from the league minimum after winning the Cy Young Award, and 30-year-old seven-time All-Star closer Craig Kimbrel nears midMarch without work. Players crying out against the agreement they agreed to does not sell. Neither does players pushing for contracts that ignore the aging curve. Players pointing out to fans that the game’s growing revenue in too many cases seems to be going toward not improving teams, well, that makes sense. “As we have gone through camp, yes, a lot of the dialogue has been pointed, and has been

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direct,” Clark said. “But I see that as an example of the passion and commitment that our players have to making sure our best players are on the field at all times, that we have a system in place that suggests the level of competition that everyone is coming out to see is commensurate with the passion and commitment of the players that are on the field delivering it.” MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred’s claim that every team is trying to win is an insult to both players and fans. As constructed, baseball’s draft rewards the biggest losers. You are better off being the last team in the standings than the one that missed the wild card by a game. Word is out. Teams are taking advantage. They want to win, but when? Fans and players suffer during the process, and not every team executes planned flops like the Cubs and Astros. Manfred wants to make pace-of-play changes now. The same urgency could be taken with tanking deterrents, like tweaking the draft. Just as veteran players should push for increased compensation and faster-arriving free agency for their younger constituents, owners should acknowledge that their tanking peers are doing a disservice to the sport. Common ground awaits, if Manfred can see beyond his rule-change minutiae. Clark and Manfred say they are willing to begin a dialogue that could get out in front of formal negotiations. When, where and what happens from there is as cloudy as baseball’s future. Stopping the tank would help keep baseball from going in it. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

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BASEBALL

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Ozuna shows progress with arm Outfielder has test as runner goes for double

Cardinals 3, Nationals 2 Washington ab r h bi Cardinals ab r h bi A.Eaton rf 2 0 0 0 Crpnter 3b 3 1 0 0 Wi.Difo ss 1 0 0 0 D.Fwler rf 3 1 2 1 T.Trner ss 3 1 1 0 Carlson rf 1 0 0 0 Ja.Noll 1b 1 0 0 0 Gldhmdt 1b 3 0 1 2 Ju.Soto lf 3 0 2 1 R.Rvelo 1b 1 0 1 0 Sanchez 2b 1 0 0 0 M.Ozuna lf 3 0 0 0 A.Rndon 3b 3 0 1 0 Schrock 3b 1 0 0 0 Rynolds pr 1 1 1 0 Mrtinez dh 4 0 1 0 Zmmrman 1b 2 0 0 0 Y.Mlina c 3 0 0 0 J.Hover rp 1 0 0 0 Ko.Wong 2b 3 0 1 0 Sverino c 1 0 1 0 Rbinson ss 3 0 0 0 B.Dzier 2b 3 0 0 0 H.Bader cf 3 1 1 0 H.Jones rf 1 00 0 K.Szuki c 3 0 1 1 M.Tylor cf 3 00 0 Schrzer sp 2 00 0 V.Rbles cf 1 00 0 Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals 31 3 7 3 Washington 100 000 100 — 2 Cardinals 003 000 00x — 3 E: Zimmerman (1). LOB: Washington 4, Cardinals 5. 2B: Turner (3), Rendon (1), Severino (4), Goldschmidt (2). CS: Reynolds (2). Washington IP H R ER BB SO Scherzer L, 0-2 5 1/3 6 3 3 1 2 2/ Hoover 0 0 0 0 1 3 Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 1 Suero 1 1 0 0 0 0 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO Flaherty W, 1-1 5 3 1 1 1 5 Miller 1 0 0 0 0 2 Brebbia 1 2 1 1 0 1 Woodford S, 1-1 2 2 0 0 0 1 WP: Suero. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 2:34. A: 5,991.

BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • It didn’t take

long for the ball to find Marcell Ozuna on Monday during the Cardinals’ exhibition game against Washington. The second hitter, speedy Trea Turner, sent a hit to left field and tried to take second. Ozuna, making his first start in left field after offseason shoulder surgery, made a one-hop, marginally strong throw to second, but Turner slid in safely with a double and later scored on a single by Juan Soto. And then Ozuna didn’t have another chance for the rest of his seven innings. But manager Mike Shildt, forced to deduce what he could from a small sample size, was pleased by what he saw. “I thought he was fine. He’s got even more in him than he showed,” Shildt said. “But, already that throw is more representative than a lot of the throws last year. “We expect him to come through with flying colors.” Ozuna has more than two weeks to try to improve his arm. He will not travel more than two hours one way Tuesday to Lake Buena Vista for a game, but Shildt said Ozuna would be playing regularly the rest of the Grapefruit League schedule. Ozuna, who receives daily treatment and massage for his arm, said, “I feel my arm’s better than before. I’m going to work hard every day and don’t miss any treatment because that helps.” On his throw Monday, Ozuna, a Gold Glover in 2017 with Miami, said he hadn’t his used his body properly to help his arm. “It was a good throw,” he said. “What I like about the throw was that it was strong. And there was no pain. “After that, I said, ‘One more. Give me one more chance.’ I didn’t get it.” It had been three years or more since his arm had been painfree. “After 2014, in the winter I started throwing and I felt something in my arm pop,” said Ozuna. “I didn’t stop, no treatment, and I just kept playing like that. Year by year, it got worse.” Ozuna, who had 23 homers, 88 runs batted in and a .280 average in an “off” season last year, is one for 20 (.050) at the plate this spring. But he said he had been feeling better at the plate and was

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Cardinals starting pitcher Jack Flaherty delivers in the first inning Monday against Washington.

Center fielder Harrison Bader (48) celebrates with first baseman Paul Goldschmidt after scoring a run.

getting closer to his 2017 feeling when he had 37 homers, 124 RBIs and hit .312 with Miami. “I’ve got to keep working and figure out how to get out of the hole,” said Ozuna, 28. Discussing the difficulties he had in his shoulder in his first year with the Cardinals, he said, “It’s bad when you have pain, especially on your right side. You can’t make an extension when you (are swinging) with just one arm. Right now, I feel I can get there. It’s just timing.” Shildt said that Ozuna’s swing was “more on plane. He looks a lot better. The games tell me that. The (batting practice) tells me that. And the balls (he hits) tell me that.

So, one for 20 doesn’t bother Ozuna? “No,” said Ozuna. “It’s spring training. When the lights are on, we’ll see.”

FLAHERTY IN LINE FOR HOME OPENER

After striking out nine Philadelphia Phillies in four innings this past Tuesday, Jack Flaherty whiffed five Nationals in five innings in a 3-2 win Monday. Shildt wouldn’t come out and say Flaherty will pitch the second game of the season, behind Miles Mikolas in Milwaukee and subsequently the home opener, but he didn’t deter that suggestion. “You are on a great path,” he mirthfully told a reporter. “Fol-

low the Yellow Brick Road. But I haven’t declared.” Flaherty outdueled three-time Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer, the former Mizzou star, allowing one run in five innings while Scherzer gave up three in 5 1/3. Scherzer hit against Flaherty, as the Nationals eschewed the designated hitter available to them, per Scherzer’s request. Flaherty wanted to bat against Scherzer, but Shildt determined that Jose Martinez should be the DH. But Scherzer didn’t really enjoy batting against Flaherty, who threw a couple of up and in pitches during Scherzer’s second at-bat. The second one Scherzer fouled off accidentally before he struck out. “The 0-2 fastball up at my head, I didn’t really like,” Scherzer told Washington reporters afterward. “The second one was kind of up and in. Thankfully it hit the knob and it just glanced (off) my finger. I kind of dodged a bullet there.” Scherzer cast a look in Flaherty’s direction and Shildt said, “I can understand that.” Flaherty credited much of his success Monday to Yadier Molina, who caught him for the first time this spring. “It’s always good to have him back there,” said Flaherty. Backup catcher Matt Wieters helped the Cardinals, too, by throwing out a runner in the ninth. “I’ve been pleased with Matt since the very first day (he was in camp),” said Shildt. Wiet-

Cards like what they’re seeing from Fowler CARDINALS • FROM B1

game for the switch-hitter the Cardinals want to seize the No. 2 spot in the lineup. Fowler also singled up the middle, and he aided starter Jack Flaherty by throwing a runner out at the plate in a Grapefruit League game the Cardinals would win 3-2. The two hits gave Fowler five in his past 18 at-bats. For weeks, the Cardinals have found reassurance for Fowler and themselves in advanced metrics and the health and bounce he’s showed throughout camp. The sneak bunt and hard-shot single against Scherzer were indicators of this shared optimism starting to leak into the box score. It was a good day that gave the Cardinals flashes of the Fowler they hope to see speeding toward a good start. A Fowler who looks — familiar. “He’s back to who he is, what kind of player he is,” manager Mike Shildt said. “Playing the game, seeing the game, doing those little things. Dexter is an experienced guy with a high baseball IQ that knows how to play the game and he’s enjoying playing the game. And he’s seeing the game and taking advantage of situations that you would expect (from) a guy who understands how to play and to play to win.” With Monday’s game the Cardinals have passed the

halfway point of spring and have played more games (17) than they have remaining before opening day (15). The regulars will begin to play deeper into games, play in back-to-back games, and face pitchers still being considered for big-league staffs. Fowler was on deck for a fourth at-bat Monday before leaving the game; Matt Carpenter did get a fourth plate appearance. Spring statistics can be misleading, varying from arid Arizona to sticky Florida and based on the competition. But in the coming week veteran hitters, like Fowler, will look for timing, and teams look for results. On Monday, Shildt took his weekly tour of the team’s statistics for trends and clues. Players can dismiss their individual numbers as small sample sizes. Teams, less so. The Cardinals began their back half of the Grapefruit League schedule as the lowest-scoring team in baseball, with 71 runs. Eleven of those came in their first game. At .398, the Cardinals were one of three teams in the majors with a slugging percentage less than .400. Some context is key. The only other Florida team with a sub-.400 slugging percentage and the other lowest-scoring team in baseball is the Marlins, the Cardinals’ Roger Dean Stadium roommates. “The Dean is not a hitter’s favorite. The Dean can be unkind to the hitters,” said Shildt, who had two players

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ers, a spring training acquisition as a non-roster player, has been in camp only two weeks. After Wieters caught a runner, backup first baseman Rangel Ravelo made a leaping and tumbling catch of a liner to end the game.

STARTERS TO BACK OFF

There are 14 exhibition games remaining for the Cardinals after Monday, but not all of them will be started by members of the projected rotation. Shildt said all his starters would take some starts on the back fields against minor leaguers to better control the workload of the pitchers, including their hitting and bunting. “We’re making sure we can get them into a controlled setting — 85 to 100 (pitches).” And maybe to throw off the scouts. “Make them work a little bit,” joked Shildt. “Not a lot of video back there. Not that anybody’s paying attention to video these days. It’s not a tool anybody uses for anything.”

EXTRA BASES

Righthander Carlos Martinez, out most of the spring as he strengthens his right shoulder, will begin playing catch in two days or so. “Everything’s been positive,” said Shildt. “Day by day. Brick by brick. He’s been diligent with his program.” • Jake Woodford got the save in Monday’s win — and then he got a trip down the hall to the minor league complex. Woodford, who has caught the eyes of president of baseball operation John Mozeliak, Shildt and the coaching staff, was among six players sent to the minor leagues after the game. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

who saw potential home runs wilt into outs Monday. The manager added, “We now have a bigger sample size. Let’s look at it. There are areas where it’s like, ‘Yeah, I can see we’re moving the needle in this area from the previous week.’ And there are areas where you go, well, we’re still working, we need to work a little more, or that’s coming.” The Cardinals’ planned starting outfield — Marcell Ozuna, Harrison Bader and Fowler, left to right — has gone 10 for 70 (.143) this spring. Ozuna, who started in left for the first time, is still looking for his second hit and his first out of the infield. Bader went one for three Monday. At some point, even in spring, trends have to manifest as production. Fowler has as many hits in the Grapefruit League as Matt Carpenter, but context is required. Three of Carpenter’s five have been homers. He had extra bases taken from him Monday. Rather than look to the box scores and stats for evidence of Fowler’s swing, the Cardinals have provided him with advanced metrics. Hitting coach Jeff Albert shows Fowler his exit velocity on his contact, and this spring he’s hit the ball with greater velocity than he did at any point in 2018. (“It’s awesome,” Fowler said.) His average exit velocity has spiked, the team contends. When he lined to center recently the Cardinals didn’t want him to look at the out, just the 101 mph on ball off the bat. “It’s coming right along, coming right along,” Fowler said. “It’s like I said: I feel it’s coming. I feel right. Get some ABs and get some consistent ABs and let the rest take care of itself.” Fowler said there have been a few times when he’s spied the chance to bunt for a hit, as he did against Scherzer, and passed up on it because it’s spring. The focus is on his swing. His quest is for timing. At-bats have been scarce against lefty pitchers, so he’s looking to get them when possible, and it’s also clear that he’s going to the plate to hit, to take his cuts. Fowler has worked counts like he would during the season, but not worked walks. He’s yet to walk once this spring. Only Drew Robinson has more plate appearances than Fowler this spring without a walk. He has seven strikeouts. Only one teammate, Paul Goldschmidt, has fewer atbats than Fowler and has put the ball in play more often. At the start of spring training, the Cardinals had a checklist that included health and mobility for Fowler. They wanted to see an exuberance that allowed him to put distance between this month, this spring and this season from last year’s career lows. He’s moving the needle. As spring closes, trends become truths, or give way to them. “I hope I answered all of the questions,” Fowler said. “I’m trying to take good at-bats, get my timing back, get back into the swing of things, you know, and getting back in that baseball shape. At the end of the day, if I’m swinging the bat well, then it’s all you can keep doing. You keep going.” Derrick Goold • @dgoold on Twitter • dgoold@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Binnington to start Tuesday Goalie is coming off pair of games below usual performance BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jake Allen pitched a shutout Thursday in Los Angeles and helped the Blues steal a point Saturday in San Jose. But interim coach Craig Berube hasn’t forgotten about Jordan Binnington. In fact, Binnington will be in goal Tuesday when the Blues play host to the Arizona Coyotes at Enterprise Center. “Like I said, we’re gonna need both goalies,” Berube said. “And for me, it’s Binnington tomorrow.” Berube made those comments early Monday afternoon, following the team’s practice at the IceZone in Hazelwood. It’s unheard of for Berube to announce his goalie the day before a game. Perhaps he wanted to end any speculation. Perhaps he wanted to show public support for Binnington. Perhaps he just felt like it. Binnington is coming off a pair of so-so outings, allowing seven goals on 47 shots combined in a 5-4 win over Anaheim last Wednesday and a 4-1 loss to Dallas on March 2. (Dallas had an empty-net goal.) But Binnington still leads the NHL with a 1.80 goals-against average. His save percentage of .929 ranks third among goalies with at least 20 starts, and his record is a sparkling 16-3-1.

The fact that Allen’s home numbers are much worse than his road numbers may have factored into the decision as well. Allen has a 3.65 GAA and an .878 save percentage in 21 appearances at Enterprise. Following the Arizona game, the Blues play their next three on the road, where Allen has excelled, including a back-toback Saturday in Pittsburgh and Sunday in Buffalo. So it’s highly unlikely he gets placed in mothballs by Berube. Also, to be considered: March traditionally has been Allen’s strongest month. He’s 30-8-6 over his career in March with a 2.14 goals against average, .924 save percentage and six shutouts. What gives with those March numbers? “Beats me,” Allen said. “I think it’s just a fun time of year. The whole season’s great, but this is when it kicks into gear. February, March, early April and hopefully in the postseason. “So I think the games just mean that much more individually and collectively. Everyone’s playing desperate hockey. ... Everyone’s dying for something. Guys are either playing for contracts or they’re playing for their team to get into the playoffs.”

MAROON SCARE

During practice Monday, forward Pat Maroon went down hard, crashing into the end boards, and had to be helped off the ice while favoring his lower right leg. After practice, Berube said it was just a scare and he thought Maroon would be OK. “It was nothing,” Berube said. “He should be fine. Just a scare, unless tomor-

row he wakes up (and something’s wrong). But I think he’s fine.” Maroon was on a line with Tyler Bozak and Jaden Schwartz in practice before the injury. He scored the Blues’ first goal Saturday in San Jose, his fifth of the season. “Obviously, he went down hard for a big man,” Allen said. “He’s a pretty tough customer. You never want to see a guy go down like that in practice, but hopefully he’s up and running here in a couple days.”

PERRON’S STATUS

Once again, David Perron practiced with the team Monday, something he has been doing regularly for the past couple of weeks when the Blues are in St. Louis. He even took a line rush or two with the fourth line, with Ivan Barbashev and Mackenzie MacEachern. Perron is widely believed to be dealing with concussion-related symptoms. He was in the locker room during the media access period Monday but apparently wants to withhold comment until he returns to the lineup. “He’s skating. He’s fine out there,” Berube said. “So like I said (before), when he decides he wants to play, we’ve got a spot for him.” Berube said he didn’t think Perron needed any additional testing to be cleared for game action. “I think that’s all done with,” Berube said. “So it’s just a matter of when he thinks he’s ready to get into a game.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues forward Robert Thomas has picked up his scoring pace with two goals and three assists in his past five games.

Thomas has big skates to fill on Blues’ top line BLUES • FROM B1

with new linemates Ryan O’Reilly and Brayden Schenn and got some, uh, instructions from Schenn. “He was kinda joking that if I liked points, to get him the puck,” Thomas said, with that 19-year-old chuckle of his. “And he’ll get it back to me.” Of course when you’re both an NHL rookie and 19, you’re going to get your share of razzing from the vets. Thomas gets it. He also realizes there are few players on this planet who can adequately replace Tarasenko, who will miss at least four more games with what’s believed to be an elbow injury. “He’s an elite world-class player,” defenseman Colton Parayko said. “So we’re just gonna have to come together a team. Not necessarily one guy is going to be able to fill that role. It’s gonna be a team thing. We have to work towards that together and get through it.” The Blues must get through it, because they’re almost as close to being out of playoff position as they are to taking over first place in the Central Division. One horrible week minus Tarasenko could put them below the playoff line. “Every game’s crucial for us,” goalie Jake Allen said. “We’re in a playoff spot right now, but that doesn’t really mean anything. We’re still fighting to move up and to solidify that spot and go from there.” Doing so without their leading scorer, even in the short term, contemplates that task. Even Thomas had to chuckle (again) at the thought that he can pick up the slack for Tarasenko, who since the start of the 2014-15 season has more goals than anyone in the NHL not named Alex Ovechkin. So when asked about replacing Tarasenko’s firepower, including a team-high 28 goals this season, Thomas said, “I don’t think I’ve got Vladi’s shot, so I’m not gonna try and do that. “But I think for me, it’s just about keep playing the way I am. They’ve obviously liked the way I’ve played last couple games to give me this opportunity. So I think for me it’s just keep playing my game and try and complement them as much as I can.” Berube has liked Thomas’ recent play well enough to opt for him over veteran Jaden Schwartz, who got the top line as-

BLUES VS. COYOTES

When, where • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Enterprise Center TV, radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Coyotes • With a young, fast team, the Coyotes are making a playoff push thanks to a hot streak over the past month. Entering Monday’s game in Chicago, they had won 11 of their past 14 games. One of those three losses was 4-0 against the visiting Blues on Feb. 14. The Blues got two goals by Vladimir Tarasenko in that game. He’s out with an apparent elbow injury this time. Defensemen Joel Edmundson and Robert Bortuzzo also scored against goalie Darcy Kuemper, while Jordan Binnington stopped all 21 shots he faced. Kuemper got Monday’s start against the Blackhawks, so presumably the Blues see Calvin Pickard, who began the year with Philadelphia and is 0-3 with a 3.41 GAA and .902 save percentage with Arizona. Jim Thomas

signment in place of Tarasenko in Saturday’s 3-2 overtime loss in San Jose. Thomas has two goals and three assists over his last five games, with the two goals coming Wednesday in Anaheim and one of those assists coming Thursday against the Los Angeles Kings. All told, he has seven goals and 18 assists in 56 games this season. He missed four games in October as a healthy scratch under Mike Yeo, a fifth as a healthy scratch under Berube on Nov. 30, and then seven more in January with a shoulder injury. “I really like the way he’s playing,” Berube said. “I think he had a great road trip. His vision with the puck. Making plays. “As a kid coming into the league, it takes a while to get adjusted to the league and how fast it is and how competitive you have to be. And just the all-around game. It’s a lot different than junior hockey. “He’s a smart guy, a hard-working guy and I think the coaching staff’s done a really good job with him, bringing him along.” Thomas’ improvement has been steady and noticeable. Occasionally a step back, but almost always followed by two or three forward.

Take it from Schenn, an NHL All-Star last season, Thomas just hasn’t gotten better ... “He’s gotten extremely better throughout the year,” Schenn said. “You can just tell. He’s stronger in the battles. Better with the puck. Making way more plays now. Has the puck way more.” He’s not there yet; the adjustment and learning process continues. But Thomas seemingly has gotten about three years experience rolled into one as a rookie. He has played all over the lineup, with just about every line combination imaginable. Earlier in the season he witnessed the tension and frustration of being part of an underachieving team. Lately, he’s seen the exhilaration of an 11-game winning streak and the growing confidence that comes with a team making a playoff push and moving up the standings. But when it comes to playing on the first line, he’s had only a couple of bites on that apple previously. “Great opportunity,” Thomas said. “Kinda makes you feel good that all the work you’ve done ... allows you to get this opportunity. It’s just another step in the right direction.” Around Thanksgiving, Thomas was playing on a second line with Schenn and Robby Fabbri. He even got two games with O’Reilly in early December during a period in which both Schwartz and Alexander Steen were both out injured. Additionally, Schenn, O’Reilly and Thomas have had some power play time together in the new year. But this is different. The stakes are higher. The season’s on the line. Thomas is more of a proven commodity, but he is replacing a great player. “Especially over the past month, (Tarasenko’s) been playing some of the best hockey that I’ve seen,” defenseman Joel Edmundson said. “So it’s definitely a big blow to our team.” No pressure, kid. Right? “Every game I feel like I get better.” Thomas said. “It’s just another step up for me, and I just gotta keep building off of it.” And make sure Schenn gets lots of touches. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

M 1 • TUESDAY • 03.12.2019

One line can’t carry the load for the Blues HOCHMAN • FROM B1

especially with how the goaltending is going. But the other lines must create more scoring chances, or the Blues will be a one-trick pony in the postseason. Coach Craig Berube said it himself Monday, when asked about production: “We need scoring from everybody. We need 200-foot hockey from every player. That means you have to be responsible defensively but also have the ability to put the puck in the net, to try to score. That’s what we need. We need all our lines to produce.” Even amid the recent winning, the Blues’ “expected goal shares” have dropped in recent weeks. The same advance stats that, you might recall, predicted the Blues would go on their torrid run have lately been underwhelming. Per Sean Tierney on Hockey-Graphs.com, the Blues have been hovering around league average, meaning the Blues’ choices of shot location haven’t been great, compared to data of previous years of shots. Or you can just see it on the scoresheet. Who’s scoring these days for the Blues? Thomas, defensemen and the three stars on the top line: Tarasenko, Brayden Schenn and Ryan O’Reilly. “I think we can create more fiveon-five (production),” O’Reilly said Monday after practice, as the Blues prepared for Tuesday’s home game against the Coyotes, another team in the playoff hunt. “And the jumbling of the lines and having injuries, yeah, it’s tough. We’re having to find some new chemistry quick. But when we play our game and do our things away from the puck — defensively, if we do that, we have a chance of winning every game. And that’s more important.” When David Perron ever returns, that should supply some scoring and send a Sanford or someone packing. Perron had played so well under Berube for much of December and January. He’s been skating at practice but isn’t yet ready to return. As for the others, the reality is we’re 68 games into this season. It’s hard to believe someone from the second or third line is going to go on a hot streak. But there are other ways to win hockey games, and numerous Blues forwards talked the talk Monday about playing grinding, defensive hockey. Can the forwards, if you will, skate the skate? “This time of year especially, you have to find ways to keep pucks out of your net and play tight defense,” Schenn said. “Yeah, everyone wants to score goals and stuff like that, but this team has always been known as a team that’s hard to play against, and we have to get even more stingier when you lose one of your top goal scorers. … We have to create chemistry with whoever is on that line.” He meant his offensive line, but he could’ve meant chemistry with the blue line players, too. Tight defense that forces turnovers. Tight defense that eliminates time and space. Tight defense that deflates opponents. When the Blues are at their best, it’s not just the defensemen doing this. The 19-year-old Thomas has actually showed a high acumen for playing this game. Listen to the veteran Jay Bouwmeester: “He’s a real smart player. He’s not the tallest guy, but he’s pretty sturdy out there, you could say. The No. 1 thing is – he’s adapted so well because he can think. He can play in a lot of different situations, and nothing has really overwhelmed him, I don’t think. Now he’ll get to play higher up in the lineup and sometimes you’re a little more free to use some of your skills and things like that. He’s earned a lot of trust and rightfully so. He’s a good kid and has real (bright) future.” Not having Tarasenko, on a team without many “Tarasenkos,” is burdensome. But that’s the thing – even having Tarasenko can only mean so much, if your other lines are just gliding out there. And there is, at least, one silver lining with Thomas on the top line with Schenn and O’Reilly. He’s a righty. “It’s nice to have a righthanded shot. Offensively that gives us some different looks that we haven’t really had,” said O’Reilly, who has 66 points in the 68 games, many of the points via the lefty Tarasenko. “Should be a good fit. … It’s a small thing, and we have to do a lot of things great first, and get the puck deep, but hopefully we can be creative.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues have missed David Perron’s scoring touch.


SPORTS

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W x-Tampa Bay 70 53 69 42 Boston Toronto 69 42 Montreal 69 36 Florida 69 30 68 30 Buffalo 69 24 Detroit Ottawa 70 23 Metropolitan GP W Washington 69 41 69 40 NY Islanders Carolina 69 38 Pittsburgh 69 37 Columbus 69 38 Philadelphia 69 34 NY Rangers 69 28 New Jersey 69 25

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 13 4 110 272 183 29-6-2 24-7-2 18 9 93 207 173 27-7-3 15-11-6 22 5 89 246 199 21-13-1 21-9-4 26 7 79 208 207 19-11-4 17-15-3 27 12 72 224 234 18-12-6 12-15-6 29 9 69 194 219 19-10-4 11-19-5 35 10 58 188 238 13-17-5 11-18-5 41 6 52 205 261 14-16-4 9-25-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 21 7 89 237 212 21-9-5 20-12-2 22 7 87 200 168 21-11-4 19-11-3 24 7 83 208 191 18-11-4 20-13-3 23 9 83 237 210 20-12-2 17-11-7 28 3 79 209 204 18-16-2 20-12-1 27 8 76 212 228 18-13-4 16-14-4 28 13 69 198 227 17-11-8 11-17-5 35 9 59 191 232 17-12-6 8-23-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W 68 40 Winnipeg Nashville 70 39 Blues 68 36 Dallas 68 35 Minnesota 70 33 70 30 Colorado Chicago 69 30 Pacific GP W San Jose 69 42 Calgary 69 42 70 38 Vegas Arizona 69 34 Edmonton 69 31 Vancouver 69 28 70 27 Anaheim 69 25 Los Angeles

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 24 4 84 233 202 22-8-4 18-16-0 11-10-0 26 5 83 210 189 22-13-1 17-13-4 12-10-1 25 7 79 198 188 17-14-2 19-11-5 11-9-4 28 5 75 172 172 21-11-2 14-17-3 11-8-2 29 8 74 191 205 14-14-6 19-15-2 11-6-4 28 12 72 223 218 15-13-6 15-15-6 8-9-3 30 9 69 234 256 16-13-6 14-17-3 11-6-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 19 8 92 249 210 23-5-5 19-14-3 15-4-3 20 7 91 241 199 21-7-5 21-13-2 12-8-2 27 5 81 212 196 21-10-4 17-17-1 15-6-2 30 5 73 184 195 17-15-3 17-15-2 14-9-2 31 7 69 195 223 16-16-2 15-15-5 9-11-2 32 9 65 187 217 15-13-4 13-19-5 9-12-4 9 63 161 214 14-13-8 13-21-1 7-11-3 34 36 8 58 164 220 13-17-3 12-19-5 9-9-2

Div 18-4-0 15-6-2 12-7-3 10-8-5 12-8-3 9-9-4 7-12-4 7-13-2 Div 14-5-2 16-8-1 9-9-2 12-8-2 15-9-1 9-10-2 8-10-5 8-14-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot

Monday Philadelphia 3, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 2 NY Islanders 2, Columbus 0 San Jose 3, Minnesota 0 Chicago 7, Arizona 1 Carolina 3, Colorado 0 Edmonton 3, Rangers 2, OT Sunday Florida 6, Detroit 1 Washington 3, Winnipeg 1 Pittsburgh 4, Boston 2 Calgary 6, Vegas 3 Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2 Tuesday Dallas at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Boston at Columbus, 6 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Detroit at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Arizona at Blues, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Calgary, 8 p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Wednesday Chicago at Toronto, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. NY Rangers at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Thursday Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Montreal at Islanders, 6 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Blues at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 9 p.m. Nashville at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Florida at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Wild fall, fail to gain ground on Blues

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 48 20 Philadelphia 42 25 Boston 41 26 Brooklyn 36 33 New York 13 54 Southeast W L Miami 31 35 Orlando 31 37 Charlotte 30 37 Washington 28 39 Atlanta 23 45 Central W L x-Milwaukee 50 17 Indiana 42 25 Detroit 34 32 Chicago 19 49 Cleveland 17 50

Pct .706 .627 .612 .522 .194 Pct .470 .456 .448 .418 .338 Pct .746 .627 .515 .279 .254

GB — 5½ 6½ 12½ 34½ GB — 1 1½ 3½ 9 GB — 8 15½ 31½ 33

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB Houston 42 25 .627 — San Antonio 38 29 .567 4 New Orleans 30 39 .435 13 Memphis 28 40 .412 14½ Dallas 27 39 .409 14½ Northwest W L Pct GB Denver 43 22 .662 — Oklahoma City 41 26 .612 3 Portland 40 26 .606 3½ Utah 37 29 .561 6½ Minnesota 32 35 .478 12 Pacific W L Pct GB Golden State 45 21 .682 — LA Clippers 38 29 .567 7½ Sacramento 33 33 .500 12 LA Lakers 30 36 .455 15 Phoenix 16 52 .235 30

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 4-6 8-2 5-5 5-5 L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 5-5 1-9 L10 6-4 4-6 7-3 5-5 5-5 L10 4-6 7-3 3-7 2-8 5-5

Str L-1 W-1 W-3 W-4 L-6 Str L-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-9 W-5 L-3 W-3 L-5 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-2 W-2 Str L-1 W-4 L-1 L-5 W-1

Home 27-7 26-9 24-10 21-16 6-26 Home 15-19 18-16 21-14 20-12 12-21 Home 27-5 25-9 21-13 8-26 11-24

Away 21-13 16-16 17-16 15-17 7-28 Away 16-16 13-21 9-23 8-27 11-24 Away 23-12 17-16 13-19 11-23 6-26

Conf 29-13 24-16 28-13 25-20 8-35 Conf 18-22 21-19 23-20 18-27 13-31 Conf 34-8 29-15 24-20 14-30 13-32

Home 24-9 26-7 18-14 18-17 21-12 Home 27-6 22-9 25-9 21-12 23-10 Home 24-10 19-12 20-14 18-16 10-23

Away 18-16 12-22 12-25 10-23 6-27 Away 16-16 19-17 15-17 16-17 9-25 Away 21-11 19-17 13-19 12-20 6-29

Conf 23-17 26-19 20-23 19-23 14-25 Conf 28-14 25-20 21-21 23-20 19-22 Conf 27-13 25-20 17-24 21-23 9-33

x-clinched playoff spot

Monday Cleveland 126, Toronto 101 Washington 121, Sacramento 115 Brooklyn 103, Detroit 75 Houston 118, Charlotte 106 Oklahoma City 98, Utah 89 Boston at LA Clippers, late Sunday Detroit 131, Chicago 108 Philadelphia 106, Indiana 89 Toronto 125, Miami 104 Atlanta 128, New Orleans 116 Memphis 105, Orlando 97 Houston 94, Dallas 93 Minnesota 103, New York 92 San Antonio 121, Milwaukee 114 Phoenix 115, Golden St. 111 Tuesday Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New York at Indiana, 6 p.m. LA Lakers at Chicago, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at New Orleans, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 9:30 p.m. Portland at Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Thursday Cleveland at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Indiana, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Toronto, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 8 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 9:30 p.m.

Rockets beat Hornets, run streak to 9

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Martin Jones made 24 saves to continue his hot streak and lead San Jose to a 3-0 victory on the road over Minnesota on Monday night, taking over the top spot in the Western Conference. They now have 92 points, one more than Calgary, which was idle. Barclay Goodrow, Tomas Hertl and Logan Couture scored for the Sharks, who won their fifth straight. Devan Dubnyk made 26 saves for the Wild, who squandered a chance to gain on the Blues, who were idle, and remain five points behind them in the playoff chase in the Central Division. For Jones, it was his third shutout and 34th win of the season. Twenty-five of those wins have come since the start of December, the best total in the league over that span. Flyers 3, Senators 2 • Oskar Lindblom, Michael Raffl and Scott Laughton scored in the second period to lead hard-charging Philadelphia to victory at home. The Flyers were 16-23-6 on Jan. 12 and seemingly had lost hope for a playoff appearance. But they are 6-1-1 over their last eight and close to a wild-card spot.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NOTEBOOK

Tkachuk enjoys milestone • Matthew Tkachuk refused to take all the credit after recording the first hat trick of his NHL career. The Calgary left winger scored three goals and added an assist to lead the Flames to a 6-3 victory over visiting Vegas on Sunday night. Linemates Mikael Backlund and Michael Frolik “were awesome,” Tkachuk said. “Gave me a couple tap-in birdies there, a couple open nets. They were awesome tonight to play with.” Tkachuk extended Calgary’s lead to 3-1 late in the opening period when he tapped a cross-crease feed from Frolik past goalie Malcolm Subban. Then he one-timed a pass from Backlund into the net 15:43 of the third period before adding an empty-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Jose’s Tomas Hertl is greeted by teammate Timo Meier after scoring.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

net goal. Afterward, he had the puck with which he scored his third goal. “I don’t even know that I should be the one to have it,” he told the Calgary Herald. “I should probably cut it in half and give it to ‘Backs’ and ‘Fro’ for the job they did.” Boychuk sidelined • Islanders defenseman Johnny Boychuk did not play after being injured on an illegal check from Flyers forward Jakub Voracek on Saturday, and is out indefinitely.

NHL SUMMARIES Sharks 3, Wild 0

Lightning 6, Maple Leafs 2

Oilers 3, Rangers 2, OT

San Jose 0 1 2 — 3 Minnesota 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Fehr, MIN, (tripping), 11:05; Rask, MIN, (hooking), 16:39. Second period: 1, San Jose, Goodrow 6 (Vlasic, Heed), 14:06. Penalties: Nyquist, SJ, (holding), 1:30; Dillon, SJ, (holding), 17:37. Third period: 2, San Jose, Hertl 31 (Meier, Nyquist), 4:37. 3, San Jose, Couture 24, 10:01. Penalties: Bitetto, MIN, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 10:01; Haley, SJ, (tripping), 12:07. Shots: San Jose 11-8-10: 29. Minnesota 11-6-7: 24. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 2; Minnesota 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 34-13-5 (24 shots-24 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 27-23-6 (29-26). A: 18,907. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

Tampa Bay 2 3 1 — 6 Toronto 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Johnson 23 (McDonagh, Kucherov), 10:07. 2, Tampa Bay, Cirelli 14 (Killorn, Sergachev), 18:38. Penalties: Muzzin, TOR, (interference), 5:56. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Johnson 24 (Point, McDonagh), 4:20. 4, Tampa Bay, Palat 8 (Rutta, Coburn), 4:50. 5, Toronto, Matthews 31 (Johnsson, Zaitsev), 11:49. 6, Tampa Bay, Paquette 11 (Gourde, Hedman), 18:16 (sh). Penalties: Cernak, TB, (interference), 17:03. Third period: 7, Tampa Bay, Paquette 12 (Rutta, Gourde), 5:59. 8, Toronto, Brown 6 (Kadri, Marleau), 19:55. Penalties: Joseph, TB, (tripping), 13:27. Shots: Tampa Bay 14-13-15: 42. Toronto 9-10-9: 28. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 1; Toronto 0 of 2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 32-8-4 (28 shots-26 saves). Toronto, Sparks 7-5-1 (23-21), Andersen 33-14-4 (19-15). A: 19,491. Referees: Brad Meier, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Brad Kovachik.

NY Rangers 0 1 1 0 — 2 Edmonton 2 0 0 1 — 3 First Period: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 34 (Draisaitl, Chiasson), 6:08 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Benning 3 (Kassian, Draisaitl), 8:02. Penalties: Smith, NYR, (cross checking), 6:01. Second Period: 3, NY Rangers, Lemieux 11 (Shattenkirk), 11:29. Penalties: Khaira, EDM, Major (fighting), 4:31; Lemieux, NYR, Major (fighting), 4:31. Third Period: 4, NY Rangers, Howden 5 (Lemieux), 1:33. Penalties: Brickley, NYR, (illegal check to head), 1:41; Brickley, NYR, Major (fighting), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, (instigator), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, Misconduct (misconduct), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, Major (fighting), 1:41; Shattenkirk, NYR, (slashing), 5:20; Gagner, EDM, (slashing), 8:14; Skjei, NYR, (tripping), 17:03. Overtime: 5, Edmonton, Draisaitl 42 (Nurse, McDavid), 0:35. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 8-11-11: 30. Edmonton 8-14-10-1: 33. Power-plays: NY Rangers 0 of 1; Edmonton 1 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 10-11-3 (33 shots-30 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 21-15-4 (30-28). A: 18,347 (18,641). Referees: Kyle Rehman, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Matt MacPherson.

Islanders 2, Blue Jackets 0 Columbus 0 0 0 — NY Islanders 1 0 1 — First period: 1, NY Islanders, Pulock 8 (Clutterbuck, Pelech), 6:11. Penalties: Dubinsky, CBJ, (tripping), 7:44; Toews, NYI, (hooking), 13:31; Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 15:20. Second period: None. Penalties: Cizikas, NYI, (roughing), 5:11; Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 5:11. Third period: 2, NY Islanders, Lee 24 (Filppula), 18:30. Penalties: None. Shots: Columbus 8-12-11: 31. NY Islanders 8-8-4: 20. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 29-22-1 (19 shots-18 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 20-11-2 (31-31). A: 11,827. Referees: Jake Brenk, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Ryan Gibbons.

0 2

Flyers 3, Senators 2 Ottawa 1 0 1 — 2 Philadelphia 0 3 0 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Tierney 8 (Harpur, Balcers), 9:48. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Lindblom 13 (Gostisbehere, Couturier), 2:02. 3, Philadelphia, Raffl 6 (Patrick), 6:02. 4, Philadelphia, Laughton 11 (Konecny, Raffl), 19:23. Penalties: Hartman, PHI, (delay of game), 9:26; Borowiecki, OTT, (holding), 12:29; Ryan, OTT, (hooking), 16:13. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Chlapik 1 (Chabot, Smith), 17:03. Penalties: Gudas, PHI, (holding), 1:19; Chlapik, OTT, (interference), 2:56; Smith, OTT, (tripping), 17:59. Shots: Ottawa 6-5-11: 22. Philadelphia 10-15-11: 36. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 2; Philadelphia 0 of 4. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 14-24-4 (36 shots33 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 11-8-1 (22-20). A: 18,193. Referees: Reid Anderson, Francis Charron. Linesmen: Bevan Mills, Andrew Smith.

Blackhawks 7, Coyotes 1 Arizona 1 0 0 — 1 Chicago 2 4 1 — 7 First period: 1, Arizona, Panik 12 (Dvorak), 4:27. 2, Chicago, Perlini 9 (Seabrook, DeBrincat), 6:38. 3, Chicago, Saad 22 (Gustafsson, Toews), 8:09. Penalties: None. Second period: 4, Chicago, Perlini 10 (Kahun, Strome), 3:16. 5, Chicago, Kunitz 3 (Kampf, Kruger), 6:26. 6, Chicago, Kane 41 (Anisimov, Kahun), 8:50. 7, Chicago, Toews 30, 14:08. Penalties: Chychrun, ARI, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 14:08; Gustafsson, CHI, (slashing), 15:03; Chychrun, ARI, (slashing), 17:11. Third period: 8, Chicago, Perlini 11 (Murphy, DeBrincat), 19:56. Penalties: Forsling, CHI, (holding), 6:44. Shots: Arizona 6-9-10: 25. Chicago 11-16-7: 34. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Pickard 4-5-2 (18 shots-15 saves), Kuemper 22-16-5 (16-12). Chicago, Crawford 10-15-2 (25-24). A: 21,574. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Corey Syvret. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Tony Sericolo.

Points leaders Last Name Kucherov Kane McDavid Draisaitl Crosby MacKinnon Rantanen Gaudreau Point Wheeler Marchand Marner Stamkos Ovechkin Barkov Aho Tavares Scheifele Huberdeau Panarin Giroux Burns Monahan Lindholm Eichel Toews Landeskog DeBrincat Kessel Malkin

Team TBL CHI EDM EDM PIT COL COL CGY TBL WPG BOS TOR TBL WSH FLA CAR TOR WPG FLA CBJ PHI SJS CGY CGY BUF CHI COL CHI PIT PIT

G 33 41 34 42 31 35 30 30 37 19 28 24 34 46 30 30 38 32 22 25 20 13 30 26 25 30 33 37 22 21

A 78 57 64 47 57 52 56 54 46 64 54 58 45 31 47 47 38 43 52 48 53 60 42 46 47 41 36 31 46 47

The Rockets’ Kenneth Faried dunks during the second half Monday in Houston. The Rockets won 118-106.

P 111 98 98 89 88 87 86 84 83 83 82 82 79 77 77 77 76 75 74 73 73 73 72 72 72 71 69 68 68 68

James Harden scored 28 points and Eric Gordon added 22 as the Houston Rockets cruised to their season-high ninth straight win, 118-106 over the Charlotte Hornets on Monday night. A night after Gordon ended a streak of 43 straight games where Harden led the team in scoring, the Beard was Houston’s top scorer again. But Gordon had another strong outing, making five 3-pointers for the third straight game and the fourth in five games. The Rockets won despite a big performance by Kemba Walker, who finished with 40 points, 10 rebounds and seven assists as the Hornets lost their second in a row. Nets rout Pistons • Spencer Dinwiddie scored 19 points and Brooklyn routed Detroit 103-75 to move into sixth place in the Eastern Conference. Allen Crabbe finished with 14 points and 10 rebounds, Rodions Kurucs scored 13 points, and Joe Harris and Caris LeVert

each added 12 as the Nets took control early in the game and never let up. The Nets (36-33) won their fourth straight and leapfrogged Detroit (34-32) into the No. 6 spot in their final game before leaving for a seven-game road trip. Andre Drummond led the Pistons with 13 points and 20 rebounds. The Pistons had their five-game winning streak snapped. Sexton leads Cavs past Raptors • Collin Sexton scored 28 points, Kevin Love had 16 points and 18 rebounds, and Cleveland routed Toronto 126-101. Toronto’s Serge Ibaka and Cleveland’s Marquese Chriss were ejected for fighting late in the third quarter. Ibaka went to the floor after the two were battling for position under Cleveland’s basket as the Raptors attempted a full-court pass that sailed out of bounds. Kawhi Leonard scored 25 points after sitting out Sunday’s victory in Miami, but his return didn’t help the Raptors, who have the league’s second-best record.

NBA SUMMARIES Thunder 98, Jazz 89

Nets 103, Pistons 75

Cavaliers 126, Raptors 101

Oklahoma City: George 2-8 10-12 14, Grant 4-11 3-4 12, Adams 6-10 0-0 12, Westbrook 9-19 3-6 23, Ferguson 2-5 0-0 5, Grantham 0-0 0-0 0, Nader 1-1 0-0 3, Noel 2-3 1-2 5, Patterson 0-0 0-0 0, Morris 0-4 0-0 0, Schroder 10-18 2-3 24, Burton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 19-27 98. Utah: Ingles 2-9 0-0 5, Favors 2-5 1-2 5, Gobert 5-8 5-7 15, Mitchell 8-22 6-8 25, O’Neale 6-13 0-0 17, Crowder 5-15 0-0 12, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 3, Niang 0-1 0-0 0, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Exum 0-5 0-0 0, Allen 1-1 0-0 3, Korver 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 32-88 12-17 89. Oklahoma City 22 28 27 21 — 98 Utah 21 16 26 26 — 89 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-22 (Westbrook 2-4, Schroder 2-5, Nader 1-1, Grant 1-4, Ferguson 1-4, Morris 0-1, George 0-3), Utah 13-43 (O’Neale 5-10, Mitchell 3-8, Crowder 2-8, Allen 1-1, Sefolosha 1-3, Ingles 1-7, Favors 0-1, Exum 0-2, Korver 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 48 (George, Westbrook 11), Utah 48 (Gobert 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook 8), Utah 22 (Ingles 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Utah 25. Technicals: Utah coach Jazz (Defensive three second) 2. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Detroit: Brown 2-4 0-0 5, Griffin 1-10 7-8 10, Drummond 5-14 3-4 13, Jackson 3-8 0-0 6, Ellington 2-7 0-0 6, Leuer 0-3 0-0 0, Maker 2-6 0-0 5, Pachulia 1-4 0-0 2, Galloway 3-11 0-0 9, Smith 4-12 1-2 9, Kennard 1-7 0-0 2, Robinson III 3-7 2-2 8, Thomas 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 27-97 13-16 75. Brooklyn: Harris 3-6 5-6 12, Kurucs 6-8 0-0 13, Allen 5-6 1-2 11, Russell 5-13 0-2 11, Crabbe 5-8 0-1 14, Hollis-Jefferson 0-2 0-2 0, Dudley 0-2 0-0 0, Carroll 2-4 0-0 5, Davis 1-4 1-2 3, Napier 0-0 0-0 0, Dinwiddie 5-11 7-7 19, Pinson 1-2 0-0 3, LeVert 6-13 0-0 12. Totals 39-79 14-22 103. Detroit 19 16 27 13 — 75 Brooklyn 27 34 27 15 — 103 3-point goals: Detroit 8-34 (Galloway 3-7, Ellington 2-6, Brown 1-3, Maker 1-4, Griffin 1-5, Jackson 0-1, Smith 0-1, Robinson III 0-2, Thomas 0-2, Kennard 0-3), Brooklyn 11-31 (Crabbe 4-6, Dinwiddie 2-7, Pinson 1-1, Kurucs 1-2, Carroll 1-2, Harris 1-3, Russell 1-6, Dudley 0-2, LeVert 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 49 (Drummond 20), Brooklyn 53 (Crabbe 10). Assists: Detroit 16 (Griffin 6), Brooklyn 21 (Russell 7). Total fouls: Detroit 22, Brooklyn 18. Technicals: Griffin. A: 17,732 (17,732).

Toronto: Leonard 11-19 0-3 25, Siakam 6-13 3-3 15, Gasol 1-6 0-1 2, Lowry 5-8 0-0 14, Green 2-5 0-0 5, Powell 4-8 1-1 9, Anunoby 3-6 1-2 8, Miller 1-1 0-0 3, Boucher 0-1 2-2 2, Ibaka 3-6 2-3 8, Lin 3-9 1-2 8, McCaw 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 40-84 10-17 101. Cleveland: Osman 6-16 5-5 19, Love 4-11 5-6 16, Zizic 8-12 1-1 17, Sexton 10-18 4-4 28, Knight 4-9 2-2 12, Adel 0-0 0-0 0, Frye 1-1 0-0 3, Chriss 0-3 0-0 0, Clarkson 5-11 1-1 14, Nwaba 4-6 0-0 9, Stauskas 2-7 2-2 8. Totals 44-94 20-21 126. Toronto 24 31 22 24 — 101 Cleveland 25 34 32 35 — 126 3-point goals: Toronto 11-39 (Lowry 4-7, Leonard 3-8, Miller 1-1, Green 1-3, Anunoby 1-3, Lin 1-5, McCaw 0-1, Ibaka 0-2, Gasol 0-2, Powell 0-3, Siakam 0-4), Cleveland 18-41 (Sexton 4-7, Clarkson 3-7, Love 3-7, Stauskas 2-5, Knight 2-5, Osman 2-6, Frye 1-1, Nwaba 1-2, Chriss 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 43 (Leonard 9), Cleveland 51 (Love 18). Assists: Toronto 20 (Lowry 6), Cleveland 27 (Osman 7). Total fouls: Toronto 24, Cleveland 19. Technicals: Toronto coach Raptors (Defensive three second), Ibaka, Chriss, Nwaba. Ejected: Ibaka, Chriss. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Rockets 118, Hornets 106

Wizards 121, Kings 115

Charlotte: Bacon 5-11 2-2 13, Bridges 5-12 1-1 12, Hernangomez 1-3 0-0 2, Walker 14-20 6-7 40, Lamb 3-12 0-0 8, Kaminsky 5-12 3-3 15, Biyombo 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 2-6 0-0 6, Monk 3-12 2-2 10. Totals 38-89 14-15 106. Houston: Gordon 7-14 3-4 22, Tucker 1-4 0-0 3, Capela 8-12 3-3 19, Paul 3-8 2-2 10, Harden 7-21 11-12 28, Clark 0-0 0-0 0, Faried 5-10 6-6 16, Shumpert 2-6 0-0 6, Green 2-9 0-0 6, Rivers 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 38-91 25-27 118. Charlotte 19 25 36 26 — 106 Houston 38 33 22 25 — 118 3-point goals: Charlotte 16-41 (Walker 6-6, Graham 2-5, Lamb 2-6, Kaminsky 2-6, Monk 2-9, Bacon 1-4, Bridges 1-5), Houston 17-43 (Gordon 5-12, Harden 3-9, Shumpert 2-3, Paul 2-4, Rivers 2-4, Green 2-6, Tucker 1-4, Faried 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 39 (Walker 10), Houston 55 (Capela 15). Assists: Charlotte 23 (Walker 7), Houston 25 (Harden 10). Total fouls: Charlotte 20, Houston 17. Technicals: Charlotte coach Hornets (Defensive three second), Lamb. A: 18,055 (18,500).

Sacramento: Hield 6-21 2-3 15, Barnes 6-12 2-2 15, Cauley-Stein 5-9 0-2 10, Fox 8-16 5-8 23, Bogdanovic 2-7 8-8 13, Brewer 2-2 3-4 8, Giles III 5-10 2-3 12, Bjelica 5-10 2-2 15, Ferrell 0-1 0-0 0, Burks 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 41-91 24-32 115. Washington: Ariza 5-14 0-0 11, Green 3-7 5-5 11, Portis 6-12 4-5 17, Satoransky 5-9 4-5 17, Beal 9-20 6-8 27, Parker 7-13 1-2 18, Brown Jr. 1-3 3-4 6, Bryant 0-2 2-2 2, Randle 4-6 2-2 12. Totals 40-86 27-33 121. Sacramento 20 40 21 34 — 115 Washington 28 31 31 31 — 121 3-point goals: Sacramento 9-27 (Bjelica 3-5, Fox 2-3, Brewer 1-1, Bogdanovic 1-3, Barnes 1-5, Hield 1-9, Giles III 0-1), Washington 14-37 (Parker 3-5, Satoransky 3-6, Beal 3-9, Randle 2-4, Brown Jr. 1-1, Portis 1-2, Ariza 1-7, Green 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 47 (Bjelica 12), Washington 47 (Portis 13). Assists: Sacramento 28 (Fox 8), Washington 29 (Beal 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 25, Washington 25. Technicals: Satoransky. A: 15,012 (20,356).

Scoring leaders Player Team HOU James Harden OKC Paul George GSW Stephen Curry GSW Kevin Durant Joel Embiid PHI LAL LeBron James TOR Kawhi Leonard MIL Giannis Antetokounmpo Anthony Davis NOP POR Damian Lillard WAS Bradley Beal Blake Griffin DET CHA Kemba Walker Devin Booker PHX Karl-Anthony Towns MIN Zach LaVine CHI Kyrie Irving BOS UTA Donovan Mitchell Russell Westbrook OKC Klay Thompson GSW SAS DeMar DeRozan LaMarcus Aldridge SAS Jrue Holiday NOP CJ McCollum POR

GP 63 63 55 65 55 48 49 62 52 65 67 64 67 53 64 60 55 62 59 63 62 66 67 65

PTS 36.2 28.2 27.9 27.4 27.4 27.1 27 27 26.6 26.1 25.8 25.1 25.1 25.1 24.5 23.8 23.5 23.5 23.1 22.4 21.5 21.2 21.2 21.2


SPORTS

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W x-Tampa Bay 70 53 69 42 Boston Toronto 69 42 Montreal 69 36 Florida 69 30 68 30 Buffalo 69 24 Detroit Ottawa 70 23 Metropolitan GP W Washington 69 41 69 40 NY Islanders Carolina 69 38 Pittsburgh 69 37 Columbus 69 38 Philadelphia 69 34 NY Rangers 69 28 New Jersey 69 25

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 13 4 110 272 183 29-6-2 24-7-2 18 9 93 207 173 27-7-3 15-11-6 22 5 89 246 199 21-13-1 21-9-4 26 7 79 208 207 19-11-4 17-15-3 27 12 72 224 234 18-12-6 12-15-6 29 9 69 194 219 19-10-4 11-19-5 35 10 58 188 238 13-17-5 11-18-5 41 6 52 205 261 14-16-4 9-25-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 21 7 89 237 212 21-9-5 20-12-2 22 7 87 200 168 21-11-4 19-11-3 24 7 83 208 191 18-11-4 20-13-3 23 9 83 237 210 20-12-2 17-11-7 28 3 79 209 204 18-16-2 20-12-1 27 8 76 212 228 18-13-4 16-14-4 28 13 69 198 227 17-11-8 11-17-5 35 9 59 191 232 17-12-6 8-23-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W 68 40 Winnipeg Nashville 70 39 Blues 68 36 Dallas 68 35 Minnesota 70 33 70 30 Colorado Chicago 69 30 Pacific GP W San Jose 69 42 Calgary 69 42 70 38 Vegas Arizona 69 34 Edmonton 69 31 Vancouver 69 28 70 27 Anaheim 69 25 Los Angeles

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 24 4 84 233 202 22-8-4 18-16-0 11-10-0 26 5 83 210 189 22-13-1 17-13-4 12-10-1 25 7 79 198 188 17-14-2 19-11-5 11-9-4 28 5 75 172 172 21-11-2 14-17-3 11-8-2 29 8 74 191 205 14-14-6 19-15-2 11-6-4 28 12 72 223 218 15-13-6 15-15-6 8-9-3 30 9 69 234 256 16-13-6 14-17-3 11-6-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 19 8 92 249 210 23-5-5 19-14-3 15-4-3 20 7 91 241 199 21-7-5 21-13-2 12-8-2 27 5 81 212 196 21-10-4 17-17-1 15-6-2 30 5 73 184 195 17-15-3 17-15-2 14-9-2 31 7 69 195 223 16-16-2 15-15-5 9-11-2 32 9 65 187 217 15-13-4 13-19-5 9-12-4 9 63 161 214 14-13-8 13-21-1 7-11-3 34 36 8 58 164 220 13-17-3 12-19-5 9-9-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot

Div 18-4-0 15-6-2 12-7-3 10-8-5 12-8-3 9-9-4 7-12-4 7-13-2 Div 14-5-2 16-8-1 9-9-2 12-8-2 15-9-1 9-10-2 8-10-5 8-14-3

Monday Philadelphia 3, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 2 NY Islanders 2, Columbus 0 San Jose 3, Minnesota 0 Chicago 7, Arizona 1 Carolina 3, Colorado 0 Edmonton 3, Rangers 2, OT Sunday Florida 6, Detroit 1 Washington 3, Winnipeg 1 Pittsburgh 4, Boston 2 Calgary 6, Vegas 3 Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2 Tuesday Dallas at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Boston at Columbus, 6 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Detroit at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Arizona at Blues, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Calgary, 8 p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Wednesday Chicago at Toronto, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. NY Rangers at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Thursday Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Montreal at Islanders, 6 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Blues at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 9 p.m. Nashville at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Florida at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Wild fall, fail to gain ground on Blues

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 48 20 Philadelphia 42 25 Boston 41 27 Brooklyn 36 33 New York 13 54 Southeast W L Miami 31 35 Orlando 31 37 Charlotte 30 37 Washington 28 39 Atlanta 23 45 Central W L x-Milwaukee 50 17 Indiana 42 25 Detroit 34 32 Chicago 19 49 Cleveland 17 50

Pct .706 .627 .603 .522 .194 Pct .470 .456 .448 .418 .338 Pct .746 .627 .515 .279 .254

GB — 5½ 7 12½ 34½ GB — 1 1½ 3½ 9 GB — 8 15½ 31½ 33

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB Houston 42 25 .627 — San Antonio 38 29 .567 4 New Orleans 30 39 .435 13 Memphis 28 40 .412 14½ Dallas 27 39 .409 14½ Northwest W L Pct GB Denver 43 22 .662 — Oklahoma City 41 26 .612 3 Portland 40 26 .606 3½ Utah 37 29 .561 6½ Minnesota 32 35 .478 12 Pacific W L Pct GB Golden State 45 21 .682 — LA Clippers 39 29 .574 7 Sacramento 33 33 .500 12 LA Lakers 30 36 .455 15 Phoenix 16 52 .235 30

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 6-4 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 4-6 8-2 5-5 5-5 L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 5-5 1-9 L10 6-4 4-6 7-3 5-5 5-5 L10 4-6 8-2 3-7 2-8 5-5

Str L-1 W-1 L-1 W-4 L-6 Str L-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 W-1

Home 27-7 26-9 24-10 21-16 6-26 Home 15-19 18-16 21-14 20-12 12-21 Home 27-5 25-9 21-13 8-26 11-24

Away 21-13 16-16 17-17 15-17 7-28 Away 16-16 13-21 9-23 8-27 11-24 Away 23-12 17-16 13-19 11-23 6-26

Conf 29-13 24-16 28-13 25-20 8-35 Conf 18-22 21-19 23-20 18-27 13-31 Conf 34-8 29-15 24-20 14-30 13-32

Str W-9 W-5 L-3 W-3 L-5 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-2 W-2 Str L-1 W-5 L-1 L-5 W-1

Home 24-9 26-7 18-14 18-17 21-12 Home 27-6 22-9 25-9 21-12 23-10 Home 24-10 20-12 20-14 18-16 10-23

Away 18-16 12-22 12-25 10-23 6-27 Away 16-16 19-17 15-17 16-17 9-25 Away 21-11 19-17 13-19 12-20 6-29

Conf 23-17 26-19 20-23 19-23 14-25 Conf 28-14 25-20 21-21 23-20 19-22 Conf 27-13 25-20 17-24 21-23 9-33

x-clinched playoff spot

Monday Cleveland 126, Toronto 101 Washington 121, Sacramento 115 Brooklyn 103, Detroit 75 Houston 118, Charlotte 106 Oklahoma City 98, Utah 89 LA Clippers 140, Boston 115 Sunday Detroit 131, Chicago 108 Philadelphia 106, Indiana 89 Toronto 125, Miami 104 Atlanta 128, New Orleans 116 Memphis 105, Orlando 97 Houston 94, Dallas 93 Minnesota 103, New York 92 San Antonio 121, Milwaukee 114 Phoenix 115, Golden St. 111 Tuesday Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New York at Indiana, 6 p.m. LA Lakers at Chicago, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at New Orleans, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 9:30 p.m. Portland at Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Thursday Cleveland at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Indiana, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Toronto, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 8 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 9:30 p.m.

Rockets beat Hornets, run streak to 9

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Martin Jones made 24 saves to continue his hot streak and lead San Jose to a 3-0 victory on the road over Minnesota on Monday night, taking over the top spot in the Western Conference. They now have 92 points, one more than Calgary, which was idle. Barclay Goodrow, Tomas Hertl and Logan Couture scored for the Sharks, who won their fifth straight. Devan Dubnyk made 26 saves for the Wild, who squandered a chance to gain on the Blues, who were idle, and remain five points behind them in the playoff chase in the Central Division. For Jones, it was his third shutout and 34th win of the season. Twenty-five of those wins have come since the start of December, the best total in the league over that span. Flyers 3, Senators 2 • Oskar Lindblom, Michael Raffl and Scott Laughton scored in the second period to lead hard-charging Philadelphia to victory at home. The Flyers were 16-23-6 on Jan. 12 and seemingly had lost hope for a playoff appearance. But they are 6-1-1 over their last eight and close to a wild-card spot.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NOTEBOOK

Tkachuk enjoys milestone • Matthew Tkachuk refused to take all the credit after recording the first hat trick of his NHL career. The Calgary left winger scored three goals and added an assist to lead the Flames to a 6-3 victory over visiting Vegas on Sunday night. Linemates Mikael Backlund and Michael Frolik “were awesome,” Tkachuk said. “Gave me a couple tap-in birdies there, a couple open nets. They were awesome tonight to play with.” Tkachuk extended Calgary’s lead to 3-1 late in the opening period when he tapped a cross-crease feed from Frolik past goalie Malcolm Subban. Then he one-timed a pass from Backlund into the net 15:43 of the third period before adding an empty-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Jose’s Tomas Hertl is greeted by teammate Timo Meier after scoring.

net goal. Afterward, he had the puck with which he scored his third goal. “I don’t even know that I should be the one to have it,” he told the Calgary Herald. “I should probably cut it in half and give it to ‘Backs’ and ‘Fro’ for the job they did.” Boychuk sidelined • Islanders defenseman Johnny Boychuk did not play after being injured on an illegal check from Flyers forward Jakub Voracek on Saturday, and is out indefinitely.

NHL SUMMARIES Sharks 3, Wild 0

Lightning 6, Maple Leafs 2

Oilers 3, Rangers 2, OT

San Jose 0 1 2 — 3 Minnesota 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Fehr, MIN, (tripping), 11:05; Rask, MIN, (hooking), 16:39. Second period: 1, San Jose, Goodrow 6 (Vlasic, Heed), 14:06. Penalties: Nyquist, SJ, (holding), 1:30; Dillon, SJ, (holding), 17:37. Third period: 2, San Jose, Hertl 31 (Meier, Nyquist), 4:37. 3, San Jose, Couture 24, 10:01. Penalties: Bitetto, MIN, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 10:01; Haley, SJ, (tripping), 12:07. Shots: San Jose 11-8-10: 29. Minnesota 11-6-7: 24. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 2; Minnesota 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 34-13-5 (24 shots-24 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 27-23-6 (29-26). A: 18,907. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

Tampa Bay 2 3 1 — 6 Toronto 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Johnson 23 (McDonagh, Kucherov), 10:07. 2, Tampa Bay, Cirelli 14 (Killorn, Sergachev), 18:38. Penalties: Muzzin, TOR, (interference), 5:56. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Johnson 24 (Point, McDonagh), 4:20. 4, Tampa Bay, Palat 8 (Rutta, Coburn), 4:50. 5, Toronto, Matthews 31 (Johnsson, Zaitsev), 11:49. 6, Tampa Bay, Paquette 11 (Gourde, Hedman), 18:16 (sh). Penalties: Cernak, TB, (interference), 17:03. Third period: 7, Tampa Bay, Paquette 12 (Rutta, Gourde), 5:59. 8, Toronto, Brown 6 (Kadri, Marleau), 19:55. Penalties: Joseph, TB, (tripping), 13:27. Shots: Tampa Bay 14-13-15: 42. Toronto 9-10-9: 28. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 1; Toronto 0 of 2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 32-8-4 (28 shots-26 saves). Toronto, Sparks 7-5-1 (23-21), Andersen 33-14-4 (19-15). A: 19,491. Referees: Brad Meier, Chris Schlenker. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Brad Kovachik.

NY Rangers 0 1 1 0 — 2 Edmonton 2 0 0 1 — 3 First Period: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 34 (Draisaitl, Chiasson), 6:08 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Benning 3 (Kassian, Draisaitl), 8:02. Penalties: Smith, NYR, (cross checking), 6:01. Second Period: 3, NY Rangers, Lemieux 11 (Shattenkirk), 11:29. Penalties: Khaira, EDM, Major (fighting), 4:31; Lemieux, NYR, Major (fighting), 4:31. Third Period: 4, NY Rangers, Howden 5 (Lemieux), 1:33. Penalties: Brickley, NYR, (illegal check to head), 1:41; Brickley, NYR, Major (fighting), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, (instigator), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, Misconduct (misconduct), 1:41; Brodziak, EDM, Major (fighting), 1:41; Shattenkirk, NYR, (slashing), 5:20; Gagner, EDM, (slashing), 8:14; Skjei, NYR, (tripping), 17:03. Overtime: 5, Edmonton, Draisaitl 42 (Nurse, McDavid), 0:35. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 8-11-11: 30. Edmonton 8-14-10-1: 33. Power-plays: NY Rangers 0 of 1; Edmonton 1 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 10-11-3 (33 shots-30 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 21-15-4 (30-28). A: 18,347 (18,641). Referees: Kyle Rehman, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Matt MacPherson.

Islanders 2, Blue Jackets 0 Columbus 0 0 0 — NY Islanders 1 0 1 — First period: 1, NY Islanders, Pulock 8 (Clutterbuck, Pelech), 6:11. Penalties: Dubinsky, CBJ, (tripping), 7:44; Toews, NYI, (hooking), 13:31; Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 15:20. Second period: None. Penalties: Cizikas, NYI, (roughing), 5:11; Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 5:11. Third period: 2, NY Islanders, Lee 24 (Filppula), 18:30. Penalties: None. Shots: Columbus 8-12-11: 31. NY Islanders 8-8-4: 20. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 29-22-1 (19 shots-18 saves). NY Islanders, Greiss 20-11-2 (31-31). A: 11,827. Referees: Jake Brenk, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Ryan Gibbons.

0 2

Flyers 3, Senators 2 Ottawa 1 0 1 — 2 Philadelphia 0 3 0 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Tierney 8 (Harpur, Balcers), 9:48. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Lindblom 13 (Gostisbehere, Couturier), 2:02. 3, Philadelphia, Raffl 6 (Patrick), 6:02. 4, Philadelphia, Laughton 11 (Konecny, Raffl), 19:23. Penalties: Hartman, PHI, (delay of game), 9:26; Borowiecki, OTT, (holding), 12:29; Ryan, OTT, (hooking), 16:13. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Chlapik 1 (Chabot, Smith), 17:03. Penalties: Gudas, PHI, (holding), 1:19; Chlapik, OTT, (interference), 2:56; Smith, OTT, (tripping), 17:59. Shots: Ottawa 6-5-11: 22. Philadelphia 10-15-11: 36. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 2; Philadelphia 0 of 4. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 14-24-4 (36 shots33 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 11-8-1 (22-20). A: 18,193. Referees: Reid Anderson, Francis Charron. Linesmen: Bevan Mills, Andrew Smith.

Blackhawks 7, Coyotes 1 Arizona 1 0 0 — 1 Chicago 2 4 1 — 7 First period: 1, Arizona, Panik 12 (Dvorak), 4:27. 2, Chicago, Perlini 9 (Seabrook, DeBrincat), 6:38. 3, Chicago, Saad 22 (Gustafsson, Toews), 8:09. Penalties: None. Second period: 4, Chicago, Perlini 10 (Kahun, Strome), 3:16. 5, Chicago, Kunitz 3 (Kampf, Kruger), 6:26. 6, Chicago, Kane 41 (Anisimov, Kahun), 8:50. 7, Chicago, Toews 30, 14:08. Penalties: Chychrun, ARI, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 14:08; Gustafsson, CHI, (slashing), 15:03; Chychrun, ARI, (slashing), 17:11. Third period: 8, Chicago, Perlini 11 (Murphy, DeBrincat), 19:56. Penalties: Forsling, CHI, (holding), 6:44. Shots: Arizona 6-9-10: 25. Chicago 11-16-7: 34. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Pickard 4-5-2 (18 shots-15 saves), Kuemper 22-16-5 (16-12). Chicago, Crawford 10-15-2 (25-24). A: 21,574. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Corey Syvret. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Tony Sericolo.

Hurricanes 3, Avalanche 0 Carolina 0 1 2 — 3 Colorado 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: McGinn, CAR, (hooking), 4:28; de Haan, CAR, (delay of game), 8:30. Second period: 1, Carolina, Hamilton 13 (Svechnikov, Williams), 10:07. Penalties: Kerfoot, COL, (tripping), 2:03; Aho, CAR, (slashing), 14:55. Third period: 2, Carolina, Svechnikov 16 (Teravainen, Faulk), 7:08. 3, Carolina, Svechnikov 17 (Pesce, Teravainen), 17:33. Penalties: None. Shots: Carolina 9-14-10: 33. Colorado 14-11-13: 38. Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 1; Colorado 0 of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Mrazek 18-12-3 (38 shots38 saves). Colorado, Grubauer 11-9-3 (32-30). A: 16,711. Referees: Pierre Lambert, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Jonny Murray.

The Rockets’ Kenneth Faried dunks during the second half Monday in Houston. The Rockets won 118-106. ASSOCIATED PRESS

posted to Twitter by a reporter for the Deseret News. “You think I’m playing,” Westbrook says. “I swear to God. I swear to God. I’ll (hurt) you ...; you and your wife.”

James Harden scored 28 points and Eric Gordon added 22 as the Houston Rockets cruised to their season-high ninth straight win, 118-106 over the Charlotte Hornets on Monday night. A night after Gordon ended a streak of 43 straight games where Harden led the team in scoring, the Beard was Houston’s top scorer again. But Gordon had another strong outing, making five 3-pointers for the third straight game. The Rockets won despite a big performance by Kemba Walker,who finished with 40 points, 10 rebounds and seven assists as the Hornets lost their second in a row.

Nets rout Pistons • Spencer Dinwiddie scored 19 points and Brooklyn routed Detroit 103-75 to move into sixth place in the Eastern Conference. The Nets (36-33) won their fourth straight and leapfrogged Detroit (34-32) into the No. 6 spot in their final game before leaving for a sevengame trip. Andre Drummond led the Pistons with 13 points and 20 rebounds. The Pistons had their five-game winning streak snapped.

Westbrook has run-in with fan • Dennis Schroder scored 24 points, Russell Westbrook added 23 points, 11 rebounds, and eight assists as visiting Oklahoma City beat Utah 98-89. Westbrook had a profanity-laced argument with a fan near the court. He said the fan “told me to ‘Get down on my knees like you used to.’” A video of the incident was

Sexton leads Cavs past Raptors • Collin Sexton scored 28 points, Kevin Love had 16 points and Cleveland routed Toronto 126101. Toronto’s Serge Ibaka and Cleveland’s Marquese Chriss were ejected for fighting late in the third quarter. Kawhi Leonard scored 25 points after sitting out Sunday’s victory in Miami, but his return didn’t help the Raptors.

NBA SUMMARIES Thunder 98, Jazz 89

Nets 103, Pistons 75

Wizards 121, Kings 115

Oklahoma City: George 2-8 10-12 14, Grant 4-11 3-4 12, Adams 6-10 0-0 12, Westbrook 9-19 3-6 23, Ferguson 2-5 0-0 5, Grantham 0-0 0-0 0, Nader 1-1 0-0 3, Noel 2-3 1-2 5, Patterson 0-0 0-0 0, Morris 0-4 0-0 0, Schroder 10-18 2-3 24, Burton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 19-27 98. Utah: Ingles 2-9 0-0 5, Favors 2-5 1-2 5, Gobert 5-8 5-7 15, Mitchell 8-22 6-8 25, O’Neale 6-13 0-0 17, Crowder 5-15 0-0 12, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 3, Niang 0-1 0-0 0, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Exum 0-5 0-0 0, Allen 1-1 0-0 3, Korver 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 32-88 12-17 89. Oklahoma City 22 28 27 21 — 98 Utah 21 16 26 26 — 89 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-22 (Westbrook 2-4, Schroder 2-5, Nader 1-1, Grant 1-4, Ferguson 1-4, Morris 0-1, George 0-3), Utah 13-43 (O’Neale 5-10, Mitchell 3-8, Crowder 2-8, Allen 1-1, Sefolosha 1-3, Ingles 1-7, Favors 0-1, Exum 0-2, Korver 0-3). Rebounds: Oklahoma City 48 (George, Westbrook 11), Utah 48 (Gobert 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook 8), Utah 22 (Ingles 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Utah 25. Technicals: Utah coach Jazz (Def. three sec.) 2. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Detroit: Brown 2-4 0-0 5, Griffin 1-10 7-8 10, Drummond 5-14 3-4 13, Jackson 3-8 0-0 6, Ellington 2-7 0-0 6, Leuer 0-3 0-0 0, Maker 2-6 0-0 5, Pachulia 1-4 0-0 2, Galloway 3-11 0-0 9, Smith 4-12 1-2 9, Kennard 1-7 0-0 2, Robinson III 3-7 2-2 8, Thomas 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 27-97 13-16 75. Brooklyn: Harris 3-6 5-6 12, Kurucs 6-8 0-0 13, Allen 5-6 1-2 11, Russell 5-13 0-2 11, Crabbe 5-8 0-1 14, Hollis-Jefferson 0-2 0-2 0, Dudley 0-2 0-0 0, Carroll 2-4 0-0 5, Davis 1-4 1-2 3, Napier 0-0 0-0 0, Dinwiddie 5-11 7-7 19, Pinson 1-2 0-0 3, LeVert 6-13 0-0 12. Totals 39-79 14-22 103. Detroit 19 16 27 13 — 75 Brooklyn 27 34 27 15 — 103 3-point goals: Detroit 8-34 (Galloway 3-7, Ellington 2-6, Brown 1-3, Maker 1-4, Griffin 1-5, Jackson 0-1, Smith 0-1, Robinson III 0-2, Thomas 0-2, Kennard 0-3), Brooklyn 11-31 (Crabbe 4-6, Dinwiddie 2-7, Pinson 1-1, Kurucs 1-2, Carroll 1-2, Harris 1-3, Russell 1-6, Dudley 0-2, LeVert 0-2). Rebounds: Detroit 49 (Drummond 20), Brooklyn 53 (Crabbe 10). Assists: Detroit 16 (Griffin 6), Brooklyn 21 (Russell 7). Total fouls: Detroit 22, Brooklyn 18. Technicals: Griffin. A: 17,732

Sacramento: Hield 6-21 2-3 15, Barnes 6-12 2-2 15, Cauley-Stein 5-9 0-2 10, Fox 8-16 5-8 23, Bogdanovic 2-7 8-8 13, Brewer 2-2 3-4 8, Giles III 5-10 2-3 12, Bjelica 5-10 2-2 15, Ferrell 0-1 0-0 0, Burks 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 41-91 24-32 115. Washington: Ariza 5-14 0-0 11, Green 3-7 5-5 11, Portis 6-12 4-5 17, Satoransky 5-9 4-5 17, Beal 9-20 6-8 27, Parker 7-13 1-2 18, Brown Jr. 1-3 3-4 6, Bryant 0-2 2-2 2, Randle 4-6 2-2 12. Totals 40-86 27-33 121. Sacramento 20 40 21 34 — 115 Washington 28 31 31 31 — 121 3-point goals: Sacramento 9-27 (Bjelica 3-5, Fox 2-3, Brewer 1-1, Bogdanovic 1-3, Barnes 1-5, Hield 1-9, Giles III 0-1), Washington 14-37 (Parker 3-5, Satoransky 3-6, Beal 3-9, Randle 2-4, Brown Jr. 1-1, Portis 1-2, Ariza 1-7, Green 0-3). Rebounds: Sacramento 47 (Bjelica 12), Washington 47 (Portis 13). Assists: Sacramento 28 (Fox 8), Washington 29 (Beal 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 25, Washington 25. Technicals: Satoransky. A: 15,012 (20,356).

Rockets 118, Hornets 106

Toronto: Leonard 11-19 0-3 25, Siakam 6-13 3-3 15, Gasol 1-6 0-1 2, Lowry 5-8 0-0 14, Green 2-5 0-0 5, Powell 4-8 1-1 9, Anunoby 3-6 1-2 8, Miller 1-1 0-0 3, Boucher 0-1 2-2 2, Ibaka 3-6 2-3 8, Lin 3-9 1-2 8, McCaw 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 40-84 10-17 101. Cleveland: Osman 6-16 5-5 19, Love 4-11 5-6 16, Zizic 8-12 1-1 17, Sexton 10-18 4-4 28, Knight 4-9 2-2 12, Adel 0-0 0-0 0, Frye 1-1 0-0 3, Chriss 0-3 0-0 0, Clarkson 5-11 1-1 14, Nwaba 4-6 0-0 9, Stauskas 2-7 2-2 8. Totals 44-94 20-21 126. 24 31 22 24 — 101 Toronto Cleveland 25 34 32 35 — 126 3-point goals: TOR 11-39 (Lowry 4-7, Leonard 3-8, Miller 1-1, Green 1-3, Anunoby 1-3, Lin 1-5, McCaw 0-1, Ibaka 0-2, Gasol 0-2, Powell 0-3, Siakam 0-4), CLE 18-41 (Sexton 4-7, Clarkson 3-7, Love 3-7, Stauskas 2-5, Knight 2-5, Osman 2-6, Frye 1-1, Nwaba 1-2, Chriss 0-1). Rebounds: TOR 43 (Leonard 9), CLE 51 (Love 18). Assists: TOR 20 (Lowry 6), CLE 27 (Osman 7). Total fouls: TOR 24, CLE 19. Technicals: TOR (Def. three sec.), Ibaka, Chriss, Nwaba. Ejected: Ibaka, Chriss. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Charlotte: Bacon 5-11 2-2 13, Bridges 5-12 1-1 12, Hernangomez 1-3 0-0 2, Walker 14-20 6-7 40, Lamb 3-12 0-0 8, Kaminsky 5-12 3-3 15, Biyombo 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 2-6 0-0 6, Monk 3-12 2-2 10. Totals 38-89 14-15 106. Houston: Gordon 7-14 3-4 22, Tucker 1-4 0-0 3, Capela 8-12 3-3 19, Paul 3-8 2-2 10, Harden 7-21 11-12 28, Clark 0-0 0-0 0, Faried 5-10 6-6 16, Shumpert 2-6 0-0 6, Green 2-9 0-0 6, Rivers 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 38-91 25-27 118. Charlotte 19 25 36 26 — 106 Houston 38 33 22 25 — 118 3-point goals: Charlotte 16-41 (Walker 6-6, Graham 2-5, Lamb 2-6, Kaminsky 2-6, Monk 2-9, Bacon 1-4, Bridges 1-5), Houston 17-43 (Gordon 5-12, Harden 3-9, Shumpert 2-3, Paul 2-4, Rivers 2-4, Green 2-6, Tucker 1-4, Faried 0-1). Rebounds: Charlotte 39 (Walker 10), Houston 55 (Capela 15). Assists: Charlotte 23 (Walker 7), Houston 25 (Harden 10). Total fouls: Charlotte 20, Houston 17. Technicals: Charlotte coach Hornets (Def. three sec.), Lamb. A: 18,055 (18,500).

Cavaliers 126, Raptors 101

Clippers 140, Celtics 115 Boston: Brown 9-13 1-2 22, Morris 3-9 4-4 11, Horford 5-12 0-0 10, Irving 8-17 0-0 18, Smart 3-5 1-1 8, Ojeleye 1-3 2-4 4, Hayward 3-7 1-2 8, Yabusele 0-2 1-2 1, Theis 1-2 0-0 2, Baynes 1-4 0-0 2, Williams III 0-0 1-2 1, Rozier 10-14 0-0 26, Wanamaker 0-3 2-2 2. Totals 44-91 13-19 115. LA Clippers: Shamet 4-6 0-0 11, Gallinari 9-12 3-3 25, Zubac 6-7 2-2 14, GilgeousAlexander 4-7 3-3 12, Beverley 4-8 1-1 11, Harrell 8-12 4-5 20, Green 2-6 0-0 4, Chandler 1-2 0-0 2, Temple 0-4 2-4 2, Williams 14-20 4-4 34, Wallace 0-1 0-0 0, Thornwell 1-1 2-3 5. Totals 53-86 21-25 140. 19 30 36 30 — 115 Boston 25 37 39 39 — 140 LA Clippers 3-point goals: Boston 14-36 (Rozier 6-9, Brown 3-5, Irving 2-7, Hayward 1-1, Smart 1-3, Morris 1-4, Baynes 0-1, Ojeleye 0-1, Yabusele 0-1, Wanamaker 0-1, Horford 0-3), LA Clippers 13-28 (Gallinari 4-5, Shamet 3-5, Beverley 2-3, Williams 2-6, Gilgeous-Alexander 1-1, Thornwell 1-1, Chandler 0-1, Temple 0-3, Green 0-3). Rebounds: Boston 29 (Brown 7), LA Clippers 47 (Zubac, Green 7). Assists: Boston 27 (Irving 11), LA Clippers 29 (Beverley 6). Total fouls: Boston 24, LA Clippers 26. Technicals: Morris. A: 19,068 (18,997).


COLLEGE SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MEN’S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019 AUTOMATIC NCAA BIDS

Gonzaga advances

Awarded Monday • Wofford (Southern); Iona (MAAC)

Bulldogs are seeking seventh WCC title in a row

Tuesday • Horizon: (Wright State vs. Northern Kentucky), 6 p.m., ESPN; Northeast (Fairleigh Dickinson at St. Francis, Pa.), 6 p.m., ESPN2; Colonial (Hofstra vs. Northeastern), 6 p.m., CBSSN; West Coast (Gonzaga vs. San Diego or St. Mary’s), 8 p.m., ESPN; Summit (North Dakota State vs. Omaha), 8 p.m., ESPN2

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Previously awarded • Bradley (MVC); Gardner-Webb (Big South); Liberty (Atlantic Sun); Murray State (OVC) UPCOMING

Wednesday • Patriot (Bucknell at Colgate), 6:30 p.m., CBSSN Saturday • America East, 10 a.m., ESPN2; MEAC, 12 p.m., ESPN2; Mountain West, 5 p.m., KMOV-4; Big 12, 5 p.m., ESPN; SWAC, 5 p.m., ESPNU; Big East, 5:30 p.m., KTVI-2; MAC, 6:30 p.m., ESPN2; Big Sky, 7 p.m., ESPNU; ACC, 7:30 p.m., ESPN; C-USA, 7:30 p.m., CBSSN; Southland, 8:30 p.m., ESPN2; Pac-12, 9:30 p.m., ESPN; WAC, 9:30 p.m., ESPNU; Big West, 11 p.m., ESPN2 March 17 • Ivy, 11 a.m., ESPN2; Atlantic 10, 12 p.m., KMOV-4; SEC, 12 p.m., ESPN; Sun Belt, 1 p.m., ESPN2; American, 2:15 p.m., ESPN; Big Ten, 2:30 p.m., KMOV-4

AP TOP 25 POLL

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pepperdine’s Darnell Dunn (bottom) fouls Gonzaga’s Killian Tillie during the second half on Monday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jade Smith had 14.

Zach Norvell Jr. scored 18 points to lead five players in double figures, and No. 1 Gonzaga beat Pepperdine 100-74 on Monday night in the semifinals of the West Coast Conference tournament. Gonzaga (30-2), which has won six consecutive WCC titles, will look for its seventh straight Tuesday, when it will face the winner of Monday’s late semifinal between San Diego and St. Mary’s. Rui Hachimura scored 16 points, Brandon Clarke added 15 and Josh Perkins and Corey Kispert each scored 11 for Gonzaga. The Bulldogs — who came into the game ranked first in the nation in field-goal percentage (53.4 percent), first in scoring margin (24.9 points per game) and first in scoring offense (89.8) — went 39 for 62 (59.7 percent) from the field en route to their 21st straight victory by double digits. Gonzaga has won those games by an average margin of 30.1 points. The Bulldogs have won 37 straight against Pepperdine, including a 92-64 blowout in Spokane this season. The Waves (16-18) were led by Colbey Ross, who scored a game-high 20 points. Eric Cooper Jr. added 16 points, while

Southern Conference • Nathan Hoover is the guy who never stops competing in Wofford practices regardless of the situation. That feistiness carried over to the Southern Conference Tournament championship game. The junior guard scored all 20 of his points in the second half on five-of-six shooting from the field and went eight of eight from the foul line as No. 20 Wofford battled back to defeat UNC Greensboro 70-58 to win the conference tournament title and earn an automatic berth in the NCAA Tournament. “That’s the way I grew up — whatever you do, you do with all you got,” Hoover said. Tournament MVP Fletcher Magee also scored 20 points and Cameron Jackson had 15 points and seven rebounds as Wofford (29-4) completed a perfect season against conference foes, going 18-0 in the regular season and winning three games in three days in the tournament. It’s the fifth time in 10 seasons that Wofford will play in the NCAA Tournament — and coach Mike Young knows this is his most talented team. Francis Alonso scored 21 points and Isaiah Miller had 19 for UNC Greensboro. MAAC • Asante Gist had 22

points, Tajuan Agee added 18 and top-seeded Iona defeated Monmouth 81-60 to win the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference title for the fourth straight time. Iona (17-15) is the first men’s team to win four straight league titles and has won 10 straight games heading into the NCAA Tournament. The Gaels were the top seed for the 10th time and have won four of their 12 conference titles as the No. 1 seed. The top seed had not won the tournament since Siena in 2010, the longest drought of any conference in the country. E.J. Crawford had 15 points, Ben Perez 14, and Rickey McGill 10 for Iona. McGill, the only player to be on four conference champions in league history, was named tournament MVP.

NOTEBOOK

Jon Harris is out as coach at SIUEdwardsville • Southern Illinois-Edwardsville says it won’t renew the contract of basketball coach Jon Harris. Harris was 31-88 over four seasons. The Cougars were defeated last week in the first round of the Ohio Valley Conference tournament. Athletics director Brad Hewitt says the school will search for a coach who has led a program and has Division I experience under “high-quality mentors.”

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Gonzaga (41) Virginia (23) North Carolina Kentucky Duke Michigan St. Texas Tech Tennessee LSU Michigan Houston Florida St. Purdue Nevada Kansas St. Virginia Tech Kansas Buffalo Wisconsin Wofford Maryland Auburn Marquette Cincinnati Villanova

Rec. 29-2 28-2 26-5 26-5 26-5 25-6 26-5 27-4 26-5 26-5 29-2 25-6 23-8 28-3 24-7 23-7 23-8 28-3 22-9 28-4 22-9 22-9 23-8 25-6 22-9

Pts Pvs 1572 1 1559 2 1474 3 1373 6 1298 4 1226 9 1211 8 1200 5 1089 10 1041 7 963 12 856 14 831 11 684 17 680 18 625 15 602 13 539 19 466 21 387 22 319 24 268 — 109 16 108 20 80 23

Others: UCF 62, VCU 53, Mississippi St. 37, Utah St. 34, New Mexico St. 16, Louisville 11, Murray St. 11, Iowa St. 8, Temple 4, Clemson 3, Liberty 1.

COACHES TOP 25 POLL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Gonzaga (28) Virginia (4) North Carolina Kentucky Duke Texas Tech Michigan St. Tennessee LSU Houston Michigan Purdue Florida St. Kansas St. Virginia Tech Buffalo Nevada Kansas Wisconsin Wofford Maryland Marquette Cincinnati Auburn Villanova

Rec. 29-2 28-2 26-5 26-5 26-5 26-5 25-6 27-4 26-5 29-2 26-5 23-8 25-6 24-7 23-7 28-3 28-3 23-8 22-9 28-4 22-9 23-8 25-6 22-9 22-9

Pts Pvs 796 1 772 2 735 3 684 6 632 4 610 8 590 11 557 4 515 10 496 12 494 7 471 9 426 13 406 17 304 16 289 20 277 18 267 14 246 21 191 22 136 24 105 15 104 19 76 — 65 23

Others: UCF 27, Mississippi State 26, VCU 21, Utah State 19, Hofstra 13, Arizona State 11, Washington 11, Murray State 10, Iowa State 8, Louisville 3, Seton Hall 3, Liberty 2, Baylor 1, UC Irvine 1.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Connecticut’s Napheesa Collier basks in confetti after the Huskies won the AAC tournament.

Collier leads Connecticut to AAC title, named MVP Napheesa Collier scored 25 points and pulled down 14 rebounds as No. 2 Connecticut beat Central Florida 66-45 Monday in Uncasville, Conn., to win its sixth straight American Athletic Conference tourney championship and the league’s bid to the NCAA Tournament. Collier, who went to Incarnate Word Academy, set an AAC record by scoring 85 points during the Huskies’ three games and was named tournament MVP. The double-double Monday was her 20th this season and the 44th of her UConn career. Christyn Williams had 13 points and Crystal Dangerfield added 12 for the Huskies (31-2), who are 120-0 against AAC foes since the league was formed in 2013. Olivia Nelson-Ododa, who started her fourth straight game in place of injured Katie Lou Samuelson, had seven points and 11 rebounds. “Having Lou out is really hard, but it gave Olivia a chance to prove herself to us and I think she did that this weekend,” Collier said. “She did everything we needed her to and Christyn did the same. As hard as it is, it gave them good minutes and when Lou’s back it will have them even more ready.” Lawriell Wilson scored 12 points for UCF (26-6). Other league tourney title games: Big 12 • Kalani Brown had 17 points and seven rebounds to help No. 1 Baylor defeat No. 13 Iowa State 67-49 in Oklahoma City for an NCAA tourney bid. Brown, a 6-foot-7 senior center, was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. Chloe Jackson scored 16 points and Lauren Cox added 14 for the Lady Bears (31-1), who outscored the Cyclones 19-5 in the fourth quarter en route to winning their ninth league tourney title in the 11 years. Alexa Middleton’s 18 points led the Cyclones (25-8). Bridget Carleton, the Big 12 player of the year, was held to 13 points. She made only six of her 16 shots. Metro Atlantic Athletic • Jen Fay had 25 points and 13 rebounds, Aryn McClure added 18 points, and top-seeded Quinnipiac beat Marist 81-51 in Albany, N.Y to gain an NCAA Tournament berth. Quinnipiac (26-6) has won 21 straight games, second in the nation behind No. 1 Baylor. Grace Vander Weide led Marist (23-10) with 25 points. Associated Press

New Tigers defensive assistant Gibbs emphasizes takeaways MU • FROM B1

“I don’t know if I want to say that too loud around here,” Gibbs said last week after a spring practice. That day, Oct. 6, 1990, Gibbs’ Buffaloes scored the game-winning touchdown on a play that never should have happened, after officials mistakenly lost track of the downs as the Buffs neared the goal line. Colorado not only ran the deciding play on play on fifth down, but the touchdown, quarterback Charles Johnson’s 1-yard keeper, probably wouldn’t have held up under current instant replay rules — Johnson rolled on his back short of the goal line. Nearly 30 years later, Gibbs treads those waters carefully, knowing where he collects his paycheck. Now that he wears Mizzou’s black and gold, he’s obligated to reshape his view of history. “Of course, Missouri got screwed that game. There’s no doubt about it,” he said, laughing. “But I still have my national championship ring.” Jokes aside, Tigers coach Barry Odom is thrilled with Gibbs’ addition. Odom needed to fill a spot on his staff when his younger brother Brian left for Oklahoma, where he’ll coach the Sooners’ linebackers in the Odoms’ home state. Rather than hire someone to replace Brian’s specific duties — he coached the strongside linebacker position — Odom reshuffled staff assignments when he landed Gibbs, a far more experienced secondary coach with coordinator experience. Ryan Walters will continue to serve as

ASSOCIATED PRESS

“You achieve what you emphasize,” new Mizzou assistant coach David Gibbs says.

coordinator but rather than coach both safeties and cornerbacks, he’ll manage the players at Mizzou’s three safety positions (strong, free, boundary) while Gibbs takes on the cornerbacks. Gibbs was Texas Tech’s coordinator the last four years, after a two-year stint as coordinator at the University of Houston. He’s worked at five other major college programs, including a one-year stop as coordinator at Auburn in 2005, and coached on three NFL staffs — in Kansas City, Denver and Houston. Texas Tech isn’t known as the vanguard

program of defensive football — Gibbs wasn’t retained after coach Kliff Kingsbury was fired following a 5-7 season — but his defenses were known for creating extra possessions. From 2015-18, Gibbs’ defenses ranked between Nos. 77-126 in yards allowed per play and were among the nation’s worst measured by pass defense efficiency, ranging from No. 90 to 121. But more often than not, his defenses excelled at forcing turnovers. In his six years as a coordinator at Houston and Texas Tech, Gibbs’ defenses ranked No. 1 (2013), No. 6 (2017), No. 11 (2014) and No. 24 (2015) in takeaways. “I guess he carries around a lucky charm,” Odom said, “because he’s always able to create turnovers.” The charm is working at Mizzou. On what Gibbs called Takeaway Tuesday, the Tigers snatched several interceptions during live drills last week, a trend Mizzou players insist wasn’t by coincidence. “I don’t know if there’s a magic formula, but he’s got a certain technique he uses that he’s had a lot of success with,” cornerback Christian Holmes said. “He’s going to keep using it until it fails.” “It’s all emphasis,” Gibbs said. “You achieve what you emphasize.” Tasked with facing some of nation’s most explosive offenses the last four years, Gibbs sounded relieved to leave the Big 12 when the subject came up last week. There might be no more sobering experience than coaching defense in the Big 12. “I got my butt kicked a lot,” said Gibbs, son of longtime NFL offensive assistant Alex Gibbs, whose best years were spent

coaching the Broncos’ offensive line. “We weren’t very good, but it made me a better coach. … Coaching defense in college football is hard. Unless your defensive players are as good or better than the offense, you’re in for a long Saturday. The truth is ... when you line up most Saturdays you’re not as good as the offense you’re playing against. “It comes from peewee football to middle school to high school, all the better players, all the good athletes are playing on offense. That’s just what they do. When you get to college, there’s a lot more offensive players than defense.” For now, he’s happy to have what might be the best returning tandem of cornerbacks in the Southeastern Conference. DeMarkus Acy was a second-team AllSEC selection last year, when he ranked fourth in the league with 13 passes defended (three interceptions, 10 breakups). At times, Holmes was even better and finished second in the SEC with 12 breakups to go along with two interceptions. Gibbs helped recruit both cornerbacks at Texas Tech and paid an in-home visit to Acy during his senior year of high school in Dallas. “To take some slack off (Walters) and let him worry about his game plan, Coach Gibbs is a great guy to fill that void in my opinion,” Acy said. “He’s been there and coached a lot of DBs and seen a lot of players come in and out. I couldn’t ask for anything more.” Not even some extra downs. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MEN’S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019 AUTOMATIC NCAA BIDS

Gonzaga advances

Awarded Monday • Wofford (Southern); Iona (MAAC)

Bulldogs are seeking seventh WCC title in a row

Tuesday • Horizon: (Wright State vs. Northern Kentucky), 6 p.m., ESPN; Northeast (Fairleigh Dickinson at St. Francis, Pa.), 6 p.m., ESPN2; Colonial (Hofstra vs. Northeastern), 6 p.m., CBSSN; West Coast (Gonzaga vs. St. Mary’s), 8 p.m., ESPN; Summit (North Dakota State vs. Omaha), 8 p.m., ESPN2

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Previously awarded • Bradley (MVC); Gardner-Webb (Big South); Liberty (Atlantic Sun); Murray State (OVC) UPCOMING

Wednesday • Patriot (Bucknell at Colgate), 6:30 p.m., CBSSN Saturday • America East, 10 a.m., ESPN2; MEAC, 12 p.m., ESPN2; Mountain West, 5 p.m., KMOV-4; Big 12, 5 p.m., ESPN; SWAC, 5 p.m., ESPNU; Big East, 5:30 p.m., KTVI-2; MAC, 6:30 p.m., ESPN2; Big Sky, 7 p.m., ESPNU; ACC, 7:30 p.m., ESPN; C-USA, 7:30 p.m., CBSSN; Southland, 8:30 p.m., ESPN2; Pac-12, 9:30 p.m., ESPN; WAC, 9:30 p.m., ESPNU; Big West, 11 p.m., ESPN2 March 17 • Ivy, 11 a.m., ESPN2; Atlantic 10, 12 p.m., KMOV-4; SEC, 12 p.m., ESPN; Sun Belt, 1 p.m., ESPN2; American, 2:15 p.m., ESPN; Big Ten, 2:30 p.m., KMOV-4

AP TOP 25 POLL

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pepperdine’s Darnell Dunn (bottom) fouls Gonzaga’s Killian Tillie during the second half on Monday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Zach Norvell Jr. scored 18 points to lead five players in double figures, and No. 1 Gonzaga beat Pepperdine 100-74 on Monday night in the semifinals of the West Coast Conference tournament. Gonzaga (30-2), which has won six consecutive WCC titles, will look for its seventh straight Tuesday, when it will face St. Mary’s, which held off San Diego late Monday, 69-62. Rui Hachimura scored 16 points, Brandon Clarke added 15 and Josh Perkins and Corey Kispert each scored 11 for Gonzaga. The Bulldogs — who came into the game ranked first in the nation in field-goal percentage (53.4 percent), first in scoring margin (24.9 points per game) and first in scoring offense (89.8) — went 39 for 62 (59.7 percent) from the field en route to their 21st straight victory by double digits. Gonzaga has won those games by an average margin of 30.1 points. The Bulldogs have won 37 straight against Pepperdine, including a 92-64 blowout in Spokane this season. The Waves (16-18) were led by Colbey Ross, who scored a game-high 20 points. Eric Cooper Jr. added 16 points, while Jade Smith had 14.

Southern Conference • Nathan Hoover is the guy who never stops competing in Wofford practices regardless of the situation. That feistiness carried over to the Southern Conference Tournament championship game. The junior guard scored all 20 of his points in the second half on five-of-six shooting from the field and went eight of eight from the foul line as No. 20 Wofford battled back to defeat UNC Greensboro 70-58 to win the conference tournament title and earn an automatic berth in the NCAA Tournament. “That’s the way I grew up — whatever you do, you do with all you got,” Hoover said. Tournament MVP Fletcher Magee also scored 20 points and Cameron Jackson had 15 points and seven rebounds as Wofford (29-4) completed a perfect season against conference foes, going 18-0 in the regular season and winning three games in three days in the tournament. It’s the fifth time in 10 seasons that Wofford will play in the NCAA Tournament — and coach Mike Young knows this is his most talented team. Francis Alonso scored 21 points and Isaiah Miller had 19 for UNC Greensboro. MAAC • Asante Gist had 22 points, Tajuan Agee added 18

and top-seeded Iona defeated Monmouth 81-60 to win the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference title for the fourth straight time. Iona (17-15) is the first men’s team to win four straight league titles and has won 10 straight games heading into the NCAA Tournament. The Gaels were the top seed for the 10th time and have won four of their 12 conference titles as the No. 1 seed. The top seed had not won the tournament since Siena in 2010, the longest drought of any conference in the country. E.J. Crawford had 15 points, Ben Perez 14, and Rickey McGill 10 for Iona. McGill, the only player to be on four conference champions in league history, was named tournament MVP.

NOTEBOOK

Jon Harris is out as coach at SIUEdwardsville • Southern Illinois-Edwardsville says it won’t renew the contract of basketball coach Jon Harris. Harris was 31-88 over four seasons. The Cougars were defeated last week in the first round of the Ohio Valley Conference tournament. Athletics director Brad Hewitt says the school will search for a coach who has led a program and has Division I experience under “high-quality mentors.”

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Gonzaga (41) Virginia (23) North Carolina Kentucky Duke Michigan St. Texas Tech Tennessee LSU Michigan Houston Florida St. Purdue Nevada Kansas St. Virginia Tech Kansas Buffalo Wisconsin Wofford Maryland Auburn Marquette Cincinnati Villanova

Rec. 29-2 28-2 26-5 26-5 26-5 25-6 26-5 27-4 26-5 26-5 29-2 25-6 23-8 28-3 24-7 23-7 23-8 28-3 22-9 28-4 22-9 22-9 23-8 25-6 22-9

Pts Pvs 1572 1 1559 2 1474 3 1373 6 1298 4 1226 9 1211 8 1200 5 1089 10 1041 7 963 12 856 14 831 11 684 17 680 18 625 15 602 13 539 19 466 21 387 22 319 24 268 — 109 16 108 20 80 23

Others: UCF 62, VCU 53, Mississippi St. 37, Utah St. 34, New Mexico St. 16, Louisville 11, Murray St. 11, Iowa St. 8, Temple 4, Clemson 3, Liberty 1.

COACHES TOP 25 POLL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Gonzaga (28) Virginia (4) North Carolina Kentucky Duke Texas Tech Michigan St. Tennessee LSU Houston Michigan Purdue Florida St. Kansas St. Virginia Tech Buffalo Nevada Kansas Wisconsin Wofford Maryland Marquette Cincinnati Auburn Villanova

Rec. 29-2 28-2 26-5 26-5 26-5 26-5 25-6 27-4 26-5 29-2 26-5 23-8 25-6 24-7 23-7 28-3 28-3 23-8 22-9 28-4 22-9 23-8 25-6 22-9 22-9

Pts Pvs 796 1 772 2 735 3 684 6 632 4 610 8 590 11 557 4 515 10 496 12 494 7 471 9 426 13 406 17 304 16 289 20 277 18 267 14 246 21 191 22 136 24 105 15 104 19 76 — 65 23

Others: UCF 27, Mississippi State 26, VCU 21, Utah State 19, Hofstra 13, Arizona State 11, Washington 11, Murray State 10, Iowa State 8, Louisville 3, Seton Hall 3, Liberty 2, Baylor 1, UC Irvine 1.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Connecticut’s Napheesa Collier basks in confetti after the Huskies won the AAC tournament.

Collier leads Connecticut to AAC title, named MVP Napheesa Collier scored 25 points and pulled down 14 rebounds as No. 2 Connecticut beat Central Florida 66-45 Monday in Uncasville, Conn., to win its sixth straight American Athletic Conference tourney championship and the league’s bid to the NCAA Tournament. Collier, who went to Incarnate Word Academy, set an AAC record by scoring 85 points during the Huskies’ three games and was named tournament MVP. The double-double Monday was her 20th this season and the 44th of her UConn career. Christyn Williams had 13 points and Crystal Dangerfield added 12 for the Huskies (31-2), who are 120-0 against AAC foes since the league was formed in 2013. Olivia Nelson-Ododa, who started her fourth straight game in place of injured Katie Lou Samuelson, had seven points and 11 rebounds. “Having Lou out is really hard, but it gave Olivia a chance to prove herself to us and I think she did that this weekend,” Collier said. “She did everything we needed her to and Christyn did the same. As hard as it is, it gave them good minutes and when Lou’s back it will have them even more ready.” Lawriell Wilson scored 12 points for UCF (26-6). Other league tourney title games: Big 12 • Kalani Brown had 17 points and seven rebounds to help No. 1 Baylor defeat No. 13 Iowa State 67-49 in Oklahoma City for an NCAA tourney bid. Brown, a 6-foot-7 senior center, was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. Chloe Jackson scored 16 points and Lauren Cox added 14 for the Lady Bears (31-1), who outscored the Cyclones 19-5 in the fourth quarter en route to winning their ninth league tourney title in the 11 years. Alexa Middleton’s 18 points led the Cyclones (25-8). Bridget Carleton, the Big 12 player of the year, was held to 13 points. She made only six of her 16 shots. Metro Atlantic Athletic • Jen Fay had 25 points and 13 rebounds, Aryn McClure added 18 points, and top-seeded Quinnipiac beat Marist 81-51 in Albany, N.Y to gain an NCAA Tournament berth. Quinnipiac (26-6) has won 21 straight games, second in the nation behind No. 1 Baylor. Grace Vander Weide led Marist (23-10) with 25 points. Associated Press

New Tigers defensive assistant Gibbs emphasizes takeaways MU • FROM B1

“I don’t know if I want to say that too loud around here,” Gibbs said last week after a spring practice. That day, Oct. 6, 1990, Gibbs’ Buffaloes scored the game-winning touchdown on a play that never should have happened, after officials mistakenly lost track of the downs as the Buffs neared the goal line. Colorado not only ran the deciding play on play on fifth down, but the touchdown, quarterback Charles Johnson’s 1-yard keeper, probably wouldn’t have held up under current instant replay rules — Johnson rolled on his back short of the goal line. Nearly 30 years later, Gibbs treads those waters carefully, knowing where he collects his paycheck. Now that he wears Mizzou’s black and gold, he’s obligated to reshape his view of history. “Of course, Missouri got screwed that game. There’s no doubt about it,” he said, laughing. “But I still have my national championship ring.” Jokes aside, Tigers coach Barry Odom is thrilled with Gibbs’ addition. Odom needed to fill a spot on his staff when his younger brother Brian left for Oklahoma, where he’ll coach the Sooners’ linebackers in the Odoms’ home state. Rather than hire someone to replace Brian’s specific duties — he coached the strongside linebacker position — Odom reshuffled staff assignments when he landed Gibbs, a far more experienced secondary coach with coordinator experience. Ryan Walters will continue to serve as

ASSOCIATED PRESS

“You achieve what you emphasize,” new Mizzou assistant coach David Gibbs says.

coordinator but rather than coach both safeties and cornerbacks, he’ll manage the players at Mizzou’s three safety positions (strong, free, boundary) while Gibbs takes on the cornerbacks. Gibbs was Texas Tech’s coordinator the last four years, after a two-year stint as coordinator at the University of Houston. He’s worked at five other major college programs, including a one-year stop as coordinator at Auburn in 2005, and coached on three NFL staffs — in Kansas City, Denver and Houston. Texas Tech isn’t known as the vanguard

program of defensive football — Gibbs wasn’t retained after coach Kliff Kingsbury was fired following a 5-7 season — but his defenses were known for creating extra possessions. From 2015-18, Gibbs’ defenses ranked between Nos. 77-126 in yards allowed per play and were among the nation’s worst measured by pass defense efficiency, ranging from No. 90 to 121. But more often than not, his defenses excelled at forcing turnovers. In his six years as a coordinator at Houston and Texas Tech, Gibbs’ defenses ranked No. 1 (2013), No. 6 (2017), No. 11 (2014) and No. 24 (2015) in takeaways. “I guess he carries around a lucky charm,” Odom said, “because he’s always able to create turnovers.” The charm is working at Mizzou. On what Gibbs called Takeaway Tuesday, the Tigers snatched several interceptions during live drills last week, a trend Mizzou players insist wasn’t by coincidence. “I don’t know if there’s a magic formula, but he’s got a certain technique he uses that he’s had a lot of success with,” cornerback Christian Holmes said. “He’s going to keep using it until it fails.” “It’s all emphasis,” Gibbs said. “You achieve what you emphasize.” Tasked with facing some of nation’s most explosive offenses the last four years, Gibbs sounded relieved to leave the Big 12 when the subject came up last week. There might be no more sobering experience than coaching defense in the Big 12. “I got my butt kicked a lot,” said Gibbs, son of longtime NFL offensive assistant Alex Gibbs, whose best years were spent

coaching the Broncos’ offensive line. “We weren’t very good, but it made me a better coach. … Coaching defense in college football is hard. Unless your defensive players are as good or better than the offense, you’re in for a long Saturday. The truth is ... when you line up most Saturdays you’re not as good as the offense you’re playing against. “It comes from peewee football to middle school to high school, all the better players, all the good athletes are playing on offense. That’s just what they do. When you get to college, there’s a lot more offensive players than defense.” For now, he’s happy to have what might be the best returning tandem of cornerbacks in the Southeastern Conference. DeMarkus Acy was a second-team AllSEC selection last year, when he ranked fourth in the league with 13 passes defended (three interceptions, 10 breakups). At times, Holmes was even better and finished second in the SEC with 12 breakups to go along with two interceptions. Gibbs helped recruit both cornerbacks at Texas Tech and paid an in-home visit to Acy during his senior year of high school in Dallas. “To take some slack off (Walters) and let him worry about his game plan, Coach Gibbs is a great guy to fill that void in my opinion,” Acy said. “He’s been there and coached a lot of DBs and seen a lot of players come in and out. I couldn’t ask for anything more.” Not even some extra downs. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

ILLINOIS BOYS BASKETBALL • SUPER-SECTIONAL PREVIEW CLASS 4A PREVIEW CAPSULE BELLEVILLE WEST MAROONS vs. BOLINGBROOK RAIDERS What: Class 4A Super-Sectional When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at Redbird Arena at Illinois State University Records: Belleville West 31-4; Bolingbrook 23-7 Up next: State semifinal vs. winner of Currie-Simeon at 7:15 p.m. Friday at Carver Arena in Peoria On Belleville West: Defending 4A champion won ninth sectional title with 95-83 win over Danville. The 95 points scored is a season high and the most the Maroons have scored since they reached 100 against Granite City last February. ...Senior power forward and reigning Illinois Mr. Basketball EJ Liddell scored 25 points, nine rebounds, seven assists and five blocks against Danville. Senior forward Will Shumpert scored 21 points and hit three 3-pointers in the win. It was just the second time this season Shumpert scored 20 or more and hit three or more from

SPOTLIGHT

beyond the arc. Sophomore guard Tommie Williams chipped in 10 points to break into double digit scoring for the fourth time this season. Senior guard Lawrence Brazil III had 22 points and seven assists. ...Have not played Bolingbrook since at least 1999. On Bolingbrook: Record is deceiving. Raiders played a strong schedule that pitted them against some of the best teams in Iowa, Wisconsin and Florida. Took loses to Illinois powers Morgan Park and Simeon. ..Held off Oswego East 66-64 in the sectional championship after losing in the same round a season ago. ...Senior point guard Joseph Yesufu hit five 3-pointers and scored 16 points in the sectional final. Senior forward Tyler Cochran scored 15 points and junior guard Darius Buford finished with 16 points. ...This will be the Raiders third supersectional appearance since 2015. They won both of their previous appearances in 2015 and 2017 and went on to finish third both times.

TOURNAMENT UPDATE, RESULTS MISSOURI BOYS BASKETBALL

— CLASS 5 STATE CHAMPIONSHIP At Missouri State University, Springfield Semifinals, Friday CBC vs. Francis Howell, 3:30 p.m. Rock Bridge vs. Lee’s Summit North, 5:15 p.m. Saturday’s games Third place, 11 a.m. Championship, 6:20 p.m. — CLASS 4 STATE CHAMPIONSHIP At Missouri State University, Springfield Semifinals, Friday St. Mary’s vs. Ladue, noon Logan-Rogersville vs. Grandview K.C, 1:45 p.m. Saturday’s Games Third place, 11 a.m. Championship, 2:40 p.m.

MISSOURI GIRLS BASKETBALL

— CLASS 5 STATE CHAMPIONSHIP At Missouri State University, Springfield Semifinals, Friday Parkway Central vs. Jefferson City, noon Republic vs. Noth KC, 1:45 p.m. Saturday’s games Third place, 12:50 p.m. Championship, 8:10 p.m. — CLASS 4 STATE CHAMPIONSHIP At Missouri State University, Springfield Semifinals, Friday Miller Career vs. Incarnate Word, 3:30 p.m. Logan-Rogersville vs. Lincoln Prep, 5:15 p.m. Saturday’s games Third place, 12:50 p.m. Championship, 4:30 p.m.

ILLINOIS BOYS BASKETBALL

— CLASS 4A SUPER-SECTIONAL At Normal Bolingbrook vs. Belleville West, 7 p.m. Tuesday — CLASS 3A SUPER-SECTIONAL At Bank of Springfield Center East St. Louis vs. Springfield Southeast, 7 p.m. Tuesday

NON-BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

TUESDAY’S GAMES — BASEBALL Red Bud at Valmeyer, 4:30 p.m. Steeleville at Marissa, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis Patriots vs. Alton Marquette, at Gordon Moore, 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Belleville West, 4:30 p.m. Carbondale at West Frankfort, 4:30 p.m. — SOFTBALL Triad at Nashville, 4:15 p.m. Bunker Hill at Piasa Southwestern, 4:30 p.m. Steeleville at Marissa, 4:30 p.m. Red Bud at Valmeyer, 4:30 p.m. Wood River at Greenville, 4:30 p.m. Carbondale at West Frankfort, 4:30 p.m. — GIRLS SOCCER Breese Central at Greenville, 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Murphysboro, 4:30 p.m. Granite City vs. Collinsville, at McKendree Uni, 6:30 p.m. METRO CUP Civic Memorial vs. Harrisburg, at Althoff, 5:30 p.m. Jerseyville vs. Wesclin, at Edwardsville, 5:30 p.m.

Waterloo at Belleville West, 5:30 p.m. Carbondale vs. Mater Dei, at Bellvl. East, 5:30 p.m. Highland vs. Gibault, at Freeburg, 5:30 p.m. Father McGivney vs. Mount Vernon, at Bellvl. West, 7:30 p.m. Alton Marquette at Althoff, 7:30 p.m. Triad at Edwardsville, 7:30 p.m. Mascoutah vs. Roxana, at Bellvl. East, 7:30 p.m. Marion at Freeburg, 7:30 p.m. — BOYS LACROSSE Francis Howell (0-1) vs. Parkway South, at Park.So.MS, 4:30 p.m. St. Mary’s (0-1) at MICDS (1-0), 4:30 p.m. Eureka (2-0) at De Smet, 7 p.m. Webster Groves (0-2) at Summit (0-1), 7 p.m. — WATER POLO Ladue at Kirkwood, 5:30 p.m. Eureka at Summit, 5:30 p.m.

MONDAY’S RESULTS

— BASEBALL St. Louis Pat 010 600 0 7 0 0 003 010 0 4 7 0 Valmeyer L-Jacob Kempfer. 6 6 2 Southwestern010 100 4 North Mac 100 200 4 7 0 0 L-John Watts. — GIRLS SOCCER METRO CUP Nike Bracket - Pool A Althoff 2, Waterloo 0 Bellvl. West 5, A. Marquette 0 B: Sarah Foley 2, Gabby Holtrop, Baleigh Good, Katelyn Grandcolas; shutout by Jessica Brown, Kameryn Cortese. O’Fallon 10, Mater Dei 0 O: Sidney Christopher 3, Aubrey Mister 3, Anna Chor 2, Makayla Best, Avery Christopher; shutout by Sarah Cooley, Grace Vincent. Nike Bracket - Pool B Edwardsville 3, Springfield 0 E: Peyton Federmann, Macy Hockett, Rileigh Kuhns ; shutout by Rachel Hensley Columbia 3, Triad 1 C: Haley Glover 2, Chloe Graff T: Katie Rogers Adidas Bracket - Pool B Belleville East 4, Roxana 0 Adidas Bracket - Pool C Alton 4, Freeburg 0 Adidas Bracket - Pool D Rochester 1, Gibault 0 Puma Bracket Wesclin 10, Harrisburg 0 Jerseyville 2, Father McGivney 0 Civic Memorial 5, Mount Vernon 0 — BOYS LACROSSE MICDS 18, JohnBurroughs 2 ( J: Turner Carlson, Teddy Dunaway — WATER POLO Lindbergh 20, Ladue 6 Li: Sam Hunter 5, Will Doyle 4, Brendan Bavlsik 2, Sam Deeter 2, Preston Pinkston 2, Madigan White, Patrick Akins, Matt Deutschmann, Gretchen Hof, Caleb Huttenmeyer La: Daniel Volobuev 3, Brandon Yan 2, Devon Bierman Pky. West 7, De Smet 6 P: Clark Griffin 5, Ryan Mendonsa 2

PLAYERS TO WATCH Chase Baker, senior, Eureka The midfielder is a two-time all-state first-teamer. He was an All-American first-teamer last season after leading all Missouri players in goals scored with 97 while powering Eureka to a 16-5 overall record and MSLA semifinal finish. Baker has scored eight goals in Eureka’s first two games this season. Graham Bundy Jr., senior, MICDS The Rams midfielder signed with Georgetown and last season was the Post-Dispatch All-Metro player of the year. He is a twotime, first-team all-state honoree since then. Bundy set a new state record in points (146) with 91 goals and 55 assists last season. He had five goals and three assists in MICDS’ season opener last week. Jordon Celeslie, junior, Vianney The midfielder has verbally committed to NCAA Division I program Cleveland State. As a sophomore, Celeslie amassed 63 points and helped lead the Golden Griffins to an 11-6 record, the best in program history. The U.S. Box Lacrosse team member also plays on Project Midwest and recently was selected to the Under Armour All-American Underclass Midwest team. Thomas Niedringhaus, senior, MICDS As a junior, Niedringhaus scored 65 goals and dished 40 assists for the 20-2 Rams as they won their fifth consecutive state title. The senior attackman will continue his lacrosse career at Division I Boston University next year. Niedringhaus had five goals and four assists in the Rams’ 26-1 season-opening win over Fox. Dylan Radke, senior, De Smet The Spartans goalkeeper stopped 160 shots his junior season while claiming every career record for goalies in De Smet’s storied history. His goals-against average of 7.57 was the fifth-best in the area, as was his save percentage of .595. His presence in the net helped De Smet reach the MSLA state semifinals and finish 10-7 last year.

FLYING HIGH

East St. Louis players enjoying success with Chambers at the helm BY DAVID WILHELM special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

EAST ST. LOUIS • A year ago, the foundation was shaky for the East St. Louis High boys basketball team. The Flyers already had been eliminated from the postseason and the jury was still out on a troublesome coaching situation. But happy times have returned. The Flyers (27-6), under coach Mark Chambers, reached the elite eight Friday with a 77-60 victory over Mascoutah in the title game of the Class 3A Mascoutah Sectional. Next up is a state tournamentcaliber matchup against Springfield Southeast (30-2) in the Class 3A Springfield Super-Sectional at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Bank of Springfield Center. The Spartans placed second in the 3A state tournament last year. “We’re battle-tested and we know if we come in and play our brand of basketball, we’re hard to beat,” Chambers said. “We play tough defense, and a lot of teams we’re facing now haven’t seen our style of defense. “We’re looking forward to that matchup. We’ll be ready.” Chambers, an assistant for 12plus years at Cahokia High, replaced Fernando Stevenson as the Flyers’ coach on Jan. 3, 2018, one day after Stevenson resigned. Stevenson had replaced Stetson Hairston in November 2017, before Hairston even coached a game. Hairston had been hired to replace Phillip Gilbert, who was dismissed after two years. Gilbert had replaced interim coach Hank Harris, who had stepped in for Tony Young when Young was placed on administrative leave in January 2015. The confusion at the top is a distant memory now. That’s a blessing for 6-foot-7 senior Terrence Hargrove Jr., the St. Louis University signee who has played under five coaches in his career. “We’re in a good position now,” Hargrove said. “We’re on to the super-sectional and we’ll take it one game at a time.” Chambers, said Hargrove, has been the difference-maker on a team of solid players that also features seniors Richard Robinson, Elijah Rice, Traeveion Jones and Cornelius Leflore along with juniors Jashawn Anderson, Jabril Olivaria and Armond Williams. “We’ve all bonded with him,” Hargrove said. “He’s one of the best coaches I’ve played for all my life. For the last couple of years, there were teams we couldn’t beat and

RANDY KEMP • special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

East St. Louis’ Terrance Hargrove Jr. (34) and the Flyers are on a roll under coach Mark Chambers after a bevy of coaching changes in four seasons.

didn’t know how to beat. When he stepped in, he changed all that and we beat teams we never beat before. He’s a smart coach. “He’s like a father figure to me, too. He teaches life and basketball. We all love him to death. He’s like a father to all of us. He gives us major confidence. He always stays positive, no matter what situation we’re in.” Robinson posted career-highs in points (24) and rebounds (16) against Mascoutah. Robinson and Rice transferred to East Side from Cahokia after last season so they could play for Chambers. “Coach sets the tone,” Robinson said. “He gives us our confidence. For me, this is very fun. I’ve never gotten this close (to state).” Confidence is the key word. Chambers said it was a missing ingredient when he arrived on the scene. There was a disturbing 71-68 loss to Marion in the championship game of the Centralia Sectional last year, but Chambers knew it was a process. “When I came here a little bit more than a year ago, with everything that happened before I got here, one of the things I really tried to do was instill confidence in these guys, make them believe,” Chambers said. “They weren’t believing anymore. “So throughout the summer and this season, we’ve worked on their confidence, worked on them being a team, being one. We changed the identity, changed the culture. Being positive and being confident are things that are big parts of our culture. That’s part of the reason we’re being successful right now. These guys have believed and they’ve bought in to everything.” Hargrove, finally, is able to appre-

ciate stability. “It was rough. We kept getting coach after coach after coach,” Hargrove said. “This year, we knew from the summer that we were going to be good as a team. We knew we could do it, and look where we’re at. We’re doing it.” Anderson said it wouldn’t be happening without Chambers. “He means a lot to us,” Anderson said. “We’ve been through a lot of coaches. Chambers didn’t come in just to be our coach. He changed the culture around. He’s like a father. He made sure everybody around us is doing what they’re supposed to do. “When he came, we became closer together, like brothers, as one. We needed a good coach that we knew was going to stay and make us better, make us bond together as one. He’s the coach we needed. We hope he stays for a while.” Hargrove still had his senior year to play, but he remembered Friday about how he cried after last season’s loss to Marion. “That was a horrible feeling,” Hargrove said. Hargrove made a vow after the loss. If the Flyers were to reach the sectional championship game again, then they would not lose. Mascoutah, indeed, paid the price. “I’m passionate about the game,” Hargrove said. “I told my team, ‘We’re not losing this game. We’re not going to end our season here like we did last year. We’re going to get this win.’ “I’m enjoying the moment before I go off to college. I’m cherishing every moment. It’s been a long four years, but hey, East Side hasn’t done this in (a while). We’re cherishing all of this.”

BOYS LACROSSE • SEASON PREVIEW

MICDS takes aim on sixth consecutive title BY BRIAN WEBSTER sTLhighschoolsports.com

LADUE • How dominant is a program when the words “defending state champion” are too small to fit? Missouri boys lacrosse teams know. For the past few years every boy in the St. Louis area has toiled knowing their team, no matter who else it beat, faced a tough task competing against MICDS. The MICDS boys lacrosse program under head coach Andy Kay has achieved overlord status. The Rams have captured five consecutive Missouri Scholastic Lacrosse Association championships — an MSLA record — and are an overwhelming favorite to make it six in a row in late May. “We have a tremendous amount of skill and people have to deal with that,” Kay said on the eve of his team’s season-opening, 26-1 victory at Fox last week. “We play on the edge and our guys carry themselves with a little bit of swagger. We’re proud of that confidence.” It is well-earned. The Rams tore through 2018 with a 20-2 overall record while stretching their consecutive win streak over instate teams to 76. Three Division I signees return to lead MICDS this year. Senior midfielder Graham Bundy Jr., who has signed with Georgetown after commiting as a freshman, set a new state record for points last year (146) with 91 goals and 55 assists. He is not ready to see the string end. “It’s a mentality of, ‘Don’t mess it up,’ ” said Bundy, the reigning All-Metro PostDispatch player of the year.

MICHAEL GULLEDGE • special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

The MICDS lacrosse program has captured five successive championships and is looking for its sixth this spring.

“It’s a lot of pressure. You can always do better as an individual or as a program, and there’s nothing better than going out there and giving your all.” Senior attackman Thomas Niedringhaus (65 goals, 40 assists last year) has signed with Boston University and wants to make his last season with his MICDS teammates truly special. Rams senior midfielder Henry Carpenter will suit up at Penn State after his high school days are over. The Rams also return veteran goalie Joe McGwire, who led the area last season in goals allowed average (4.3 per game) and solo shutouts (4), as well as faceoff specialist Nico Feldman. Of the 17 Missouri teams MICDS defeated last year, only De Smet came within 10 goals, that a 10-4 loss to the Rams in the MSLA semis. “MICDS is far and away the team to beat,” De Smet coach Joe Douglas said. “They’re going to be really tough. With their faceoffs and the amount of posses-

sions they’re going to win, a team will have to play a full 48 minutes to have a chance to beat them.” De Smet has been a lacrosse power in its own right. The Spartans’ trophy case has six MSLA titles, including a run of four in a row during the late 1990s. Only MICDS, with seven, has won more MSLA championships. The Spartans are one of three area teams, together with Eureka and St. Louis University High, who could threaten the Rams’ in-state winning streak this spring. All three teams return key players after reaching the MSLA final four a year ago, making this spring’s race that much more compelling. De Smet, 10-7 last year, returns 23 players, including a four-year starter at goalie in senior Dylan Radke, as well as a pair of 30-plus goal scorers in seniors Luke Wetzel (34 goals, 17 assists) and Dan Kinzel (33 goals, 15 assists). Eureka has the offensive firepower to go toe-to-toe with mighty MICDS. The Wildcats, 16-5 last

year, return senior midfielder Chase Baker, who led the state in total goals (97) last year on his way to earning first-team all-state honors for a second consecutive year. Baker is part of a senior class that has had nearly six years to jell. The 2019 Wildcats have the most talent and experience of any Eureka squad. So coach Tim Ganey toughened up the schedule to give his squad the one piece they lacked a year ago. “Last year we were a little bit nervous to play MICDS,” Ganey said. “We’re hoping a tougher schedule will get the kids more ready to go.” SLUH went 14-6 last year and played MICDS for the state title despite playing under its third head coach in four years. The Junior Billikens return 14 players, including senior attackman Charlie Carse (39 goals, 19 assists) and junior midfielder Brendan Hannah (26 goals, 13 assists), both of whom were second-team all-staters in 2018. MICDS’ last defeat against a Missouri team came in April of 2014 in an 11-10 loss against CBC. The Rams went on to avenge it by beating the Cadets 11-10 in that season’s state championship game. The state titles and the winning streak are points of pride in the MICDS locker room, though the players and coaches know it puts one giant, glowing target on their backs. That’s fine with them, because there’s one thing the Rams are even prouder of, and it’s their work ethic, driven by the fact that this year’s MICDS team hasn’t won anything yet. Who is going to stop them?


FOR THE RECORD

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog PACERS...................... 12........................ Knicks 76ERS.......................13.5................... Cavaliers Bucks.......................... 9....................PELICANS Lakers ........................ 1..........................BULLS MAVERICKS...............NL..........................Spurs NUGGETS...................NL.................... T’Wolves Blazers ......................2.5 .................. CLIPPERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament Miami-Florida...........7.5...............Wake Forest Notre Dame ............... 2...............Georgia Tech Boston College..........PK..................Pittsburgh Sun Belt Conference Tournament S ALABAMA................ 5.................Arkansas St UL-MONROE............... 8........... Appalachian St NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog Stars.................. -$135/+$115..............SABRES BLUE JACKETS...-$125/+$105.................Bruins PENGUINS......... -$135/+$115..............Capitals CANADIENS...... -$200/+$170.........Red Wings JETS....................-$120/even.................Sharks BLUES................-$180/+$160 ............. Coyotes FLAMES............-$400/+$320................ Devils Predators..........-$160/+$140 ...............DUCKS Grand Salami: Over/under 49.5 goals. SOCCER • UEFA Champions League JUVENTUS................................................-$150 Atletico Madrid...................................... +$440 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY.................................-$800 Schalke 04............................................+$1900 Draw: +$750 | Over/under: 3.5 goals UEFA Champions League Wednesday BAYERN MUNICH .....................................+$110 Liverpool.................................................+$230 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals BARCELONA............................................ -$450 Lyon...................................................... +$1000 Draw: +$575 | Over/under: 3.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League CHICAGO — Placed RHP Michael Kopech on the 60-day DL. Claimed LHP Josh Osich off waivers from Baltimore. CLEVELAND — Optioned SS Yu Chang and RHPs Jefry Rodriguez and Ben Taylor to Columbus (IL). DETROIT — Optioned SS Willie Castro to Toledo (IL) and SS Sergio Alcantara to Erie (EL). KANSAS CITY — Agreed to terms with C Martin Maldonado on a one-year contract. Placed C Salvador Perez on the 60-day injured list. Optioned RHPs Conner Greene and Josh Staumont to Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES — Signed RHPs Miguel Almonte, Jake Jewell, Justin Anderson, Luis Madero, Jaime Barria, Keynan Middleton, Ty Buttrey, Felix Pena, Jesus Castillo, Taylor Cole, Noe Ramirez and John Curtiss; INFs Luis Rengifo, David Fletcher and Taylor Ward; Cs Jose Briceno and Kevan Smith; OF Michael Hermosillo; LHPs Dillon Peters, Jose Suarez and Williams Jerez; and RHP/ OF Shohei Ohtani to one-year contracts. OAKLAND — Optioned RHP Daniel Mengden to Las Vegas (PCL). SEATTLE — Optioned RHP Erik Swanson, LHP Justus Sheffield and INF Shed Long to Tacoma (PCL). Reassigned INF Evan White, OF Kyle Lewis and C Joe DeCarlo to their minor league camp. National League ARIZONA — Signed OF Adam Jones to a one-year contract. Placed RHP Silvino Bracho on the 60-day IL. CINCINNATI — Reassigned OF Jose Siri and RHPs Jimmy Herget, Felix Jorge, Keury Mella, Alex Powers and Jackson Stephens to minor league camp. Signed INF Yonathan Mendoza to a minor league contract. COLORADO — Optioned OFs Yonathan Daza and Sam Hilliard, INF Josh Fuentes and RHPs Ryan Castellani, Rayan Gonzalez and Jesus Tinoco to Albuquerque (PCL) and RHP Justin Lawrence to Hartford (EL). Reassigned INFs Tyler Nevin and Colton Welker, RHP Rico Garcia, LHP Evan Grills and C Brian Serven to minor league camp. LOS ANGELES — Released RHP Josh Fields. Optioned RHPs Dennis Santana and Brock Stewart, C Keibert Ruiz and INF Edwin Rios to their minor league camp. Reassigned OFs Kyle Garlick and Shane Peterson and C Will Smith to their minor league camp. NEW YORK — Optioned RHPs Walker Lockett and Corey Oswalt to minor league camp. PHILADELPHIA — Optioned SS Arquimedes Gamboa to Reading (EL). CARDINALS — Optioned LHP Genesis Cabrera, RHP Giovanny Gallegos, RF Adolis Garcia and SS Edmundo Sosa to Memphis (PCL). Optioned INF Ramon Urias and OF Lane Thomas to Memphis (PCL). Reassigned RHPs Connor Jones and Jake Woodford and Cs Jose Godoy and Brian O’Keefe to their minor league camp.

SAN FRANCISCO — Optioned RHP Sam Coonrod, OF Chris Shaw, INFs Abiatal Avelino, Ryder Jones and Breyvic Valera to minor league camp. Reassigned RHPs Shaun Anderson, Enderson Franco and Keyvius Sampson to minor league camp.

East Hofstra 78, Delaware 74, OT Iona 81, Monmouth (NJ) 60 Northeastern 70, Coll. Charles. 67 South Delaware St. 71, Savannah St. 67 Wofford 70, UNC-Greensboro 58 N. Kentucky 64, Oakland 63 Midwest Akron 80, Miami (Ohio) 51 Ball St. 61, E. Michigan 43 Cent. Michigan 81, W. Michigan 67 N. Illinois 80, Ohio 61 N. Dakota St. 76, W. Illinois 73 Nebraska-Omaha 61, Purdue Fort Wayne 60 Wright St. 66, Green Bay 54 Far West Gonzaga 100, Pepperdine 74

MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Gonzaga (30-2) beat Pepperdine 100-74. Next: vs. Saint Mary’s or San Diego, Tuesday. 2. Virginia (28-2) idle. Next: vs. N.C. State or Clemson, Thursday. 3. North Carolina (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Louisville, Georgia Tech or Notre Dame, Thursday. 4. Kentucky (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi or Alabama, Friday. 5. Duke (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Syracuse, Boston College or Pittsburgh, Thursday. 6. Michigan State (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State or Indiana, Friday. 7. Texas Tech (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma or West Virginia, Thursday. 8. Tennessee (27-4) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Texas A&M or Vanderbilt, Friday. 9. LSU (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Florida or Arkansas, Friday. 10. Michigan (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Illinois or Northwestern, Friday. 11. Houston (29-2) idle. Next: vs. South Florida or UConn, Friday. 12. Florida State (25-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Virginia Tech, Miami or Wake Forest, Thursday. 13. Purdue (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Minnesota or Penn State, Friday. 14. Nevada (28-3) idle. Next: vs. Boise State or Colorado State, Thursday. 15. Kansas State (24-7) idle. Next: vs. TCU or Oklahoma State, Thursday. 16. Virginia Tech (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Miami or Wake Forest, Wednesday. 17. Kansas (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Thursday. 18. Buffalo (28-3) idle. Next: vs. Akron or Miami, Thursday. 19. Wisconsin (22-9) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Maryland, Rutgers or Nebraska, Friday. 20. Wofford (29-4) beat UNC Greensboro 70-58. Next: NCAA Tournament. 21. Maryland (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers or Nebraska, Thursday. 22. Auburn (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi or Georgia, Thursday. 23. Marquette (23-8) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s or DePaul, Thursday. 24. Cincinnati (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Tulsa or SMU, Friday. 25. Villanova (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Providence or Butler, Thursday.

HOCKEY | National Hockey League CALGARY — Recalled D Michael Stone from a conditioning assignment with Stockton (AHL). NEW JERSEY — Recalled D Colton White from Binghamton (AHL). NY RANGERS — Reassigned G Chris Nell from Hartford (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). SOCCER | Major League Soccer SPORTING KC — Signed M Gedion Zelalem from Arsenal (Premier League-England). COLLEGE FAIRFIELD — Fired men’s basketball coach Sydney Johnson. NIAGARA — Fired men’s basketball coach Chris Casey. OHIO STATE — Reinstated C Kaleb Wesson to the men’s basketball team. TEXAS — Reinstated men’s senior basketball G Kerwin Roach II.

COLLEGES Conference tournaments Atlantic 10 men

At The Barclays Center | New York First Round | Wednesday G1: G. Wash. vs. UMass, Noon G2: Richmond vs. Fordham, 2:30 p.m. Second Round | Thursday G3: Rhode Island vs. La Salle, 11 a.m. G4: George Mason vs. G1 winner, 1:30 p.m. G5: Duquesne vs. Saint Joseph’s, 5 p.m. G6: St. Louis U. vs. G2 winner, 7:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: VCU vs. G3 winner, 11 a.m. G8: St. Bon. vs. G4 winner, 1:30 p.m. G9: Davidson vs. G5 winner, 5 p.m. G10: Dayton vs. G6 winner, 7:30 p.m. Semifinals | Saturday G7 winner vs. G8 winner, Noon G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, noon

Area results Baseball Webster 12, Rhode Island College 5 UMSL 5, Lewis 4 Softball UMass-Dartmouth 2, Webster 1 Keene State 13, Webster 11 (11 inn.)

BASEBALL Spring training NATIONAL W L Pct. San Diego 10 5 .667 11 7 .611 Chicago Atlanta 10 7 .588 Los Angeles 9 7 .563 Philadelphia 9 7 .563 Milwaukee 10 8 .556 Arizona 8 8 .500 Washington 8 8 .500 New York 8 9 .471 7 8 .467 Cardinals 7 10 .412 Pittsburgh 7 10 .412 Miami Colorado 7 10 .412 San Francisco 6 10 .375 Cincinnati 4 10 .286 AMERICAN W L Pct. Toronto 9 6 .600 10 7 .588 Kansas City New York 8 6 .571 Cleveland 9 7 .563 Houston 9 7 .563 Baltimore 9 7 .563 Los Angeles 10 8 .556 Oakland 10 8 .556 Minnesota 8 8 .500 7 7 .500 Seattle Tampa Bay 8 9 .471 8 9 .471 Detroit Chicago 6 10 .375 Boston 6 10 .375 Texas 5 10 .333 Monday Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 2 Detroit 3, Minnesota 0 Houston 6, NY Mets 3 Cardinals 3, Washington 2 Tampa Bay 8, Philadelphia 2 Cincinnati 5, Cleveland 5 LA Angels 12, Texas (ss) 11 San Francisco 4, LA Dodgers 1 Milwaukee 8, Chicago White Sox 5 Colorado 6, Oakland 3 Kansas City (ss) vs. Seattle, late Kansas City (ss) vs. Texas (ss), late Tuesday Detroit vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Seattle vs. Chicago White Sox (ss), 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Houston vs. Washington, 5:35 p.m. Baltimore vs. NY Yankees, 5:35 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss), 8:05 p.m. Oakland vs. San Diego (ss), 8:40 p.m. Texas vs. Arizona, 8:40 p.m. Milwaukee vs. San Francisco, 9:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs, 9:05 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. Baylor (31-1) beat No. 13 Iowa State 67-49. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 2. UConn (31-2) beat UCF 66-45. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 3. Notre Dame (30-3) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 4. Mississippi State (30-2) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 5. Louisville (29-3) idle. Next: TBA. 6. Stanford (28-4) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 7. Oregon (29-4) idle. Next: TBA. 8. Iowa (26-6) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 9. Maryland (28-4) idle. Next: TBA. 10. N.C. State (26-5) idle. Next: TBA. 11. Oregon State (24-7) idle. Next: vs. TBA. 12. Gonzaga (28-3) beat Saint Mary’s 78-77, 2OT. Next: vs. BYU, Tuesday. 13. Iowa State (25-8) lost to No. 1 Baylor 67-49. Next: TBA. 13. Marquette (26-6) beat Georgetown 75-62. Next: vs. DePaul, Tuesday. 15. Syracuse (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 16. South Carolina (21-9) idle. Next: TBA. 17. Texas A&M (24-7) idle. Next: TBA. 18. Kentucky (24-7) idle. Next: TBA. 19. Miami (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 20. UCLA (20-12) idle. Next: TBA. 21. Drake (25-5) idle. Next: vs. Indiana State or Valparaiso, Friday. 22. Texas (23-9) idle. Next: TBA. 23. Arizona State (20-10) idle. Next: TBA. 24. Rice (25-3) idle. Next: vs. Southern Miss. or North Texas, Thursday. 25. Florida State (23-8) idle. Next: TBA.

Big Ten men

At United Center | Chicago First round | Wednesday G1: Rutgers vs. Nebraska, 5:30 p.m. G2: Illinois vs. Northwestern, 8 p.m. Second round | Thursday G3: Ohio State vs. Indiana, 11:30 a.m. G4: Maryland vs. G1 winner, 2 p.m. G5: Minnesota vs. Penn State, 6 p.m. G6: Iowa vs. G2 winner, 8:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: Michigan State vs. G3 winner, 11:30 a.m. G8: Wisconsin vs. G4 winner, 2 p.m. G9: Purdue vs. G5 winner, 6 p.m. G10: Michigan vs. G6 winner, 8:30 p.m. Semifinals | Saturday G11: G7 winner vs. G8 winner, 12 p.m. G12: G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, 2:30 p.m.

Southeastern men

At Nashville, Tenn. First Round | Wednesday G1: Missouri vs. Georgia, 6 p.m. G2: Texas A&M vs. Vanderbilt, 8:30 p.m. Second Round | Thursday G3: Florida vs. Arkansas, Noon G4: Auburn vs. G1 winner, 2:30 p.m. G5: Mississippi vs. Alabama, 6 p.m. G6: Mississippi State vs. G2 winner, 8:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: LSU vs. G3 winner, Noon G8: South Carolina vs. G4 winner, 2:30 p.m. G9: Kentucky vs. G5 winner, 6 p.m. G10: Tennessee vs. G6 winner, 8:30 p.m.

Champions League (Home teams listed first)

ROUND OF 16

First Leg Feb. 12 Manchester United (England) 0, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 2 Roma (Italy) 2, Porto (Portugal) 1 Feb. 13 Ajax Amsterdam (Netherlands) 1, Real Madrid (Spain) 2 Tottenham (England) 3, Borussia Dortmund (Germany) 0 Feb. 19 Liverpool (England) 0, Bayern Munich (Germany) 0 Lyon (France) 0, Barcelona (Spain) 0 Feb. 20

Women’s NCAA auto bids Baylor, Big 12 Conference Belmont, Ohio Valley Conference Fordham, Atlantic 10 Conference Iowa, Big Ten Conference Mercer, Southern Conference Mississippi State, Southeastern Conference Notre Dame, Atlantic Coast Conference Quinnipiac, Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Stanford, Pac-12 Conference UConn, American Athletic Conference

TONIGHT

Mostly cloudy

Cloudy with a little rain WIND SSE 8-16 mph

WIND SE 8-16 mph

54°

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 50/43 51/44 Bloomington Urbana 51/41 53/42

Kirksville 48/44

Quincy 49/44

Decatur 51/43 Springfield 57 51/44 Effingham 70 55 55/45

35

Columbia 70 51/47 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 54/46 City 54/47 55 53/49 Union 55/48 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 52/47 54/48 Farmington 51/46 Cape Girardeau 55/48 Springfield 51/50 Poplar Bluff West Plains 54/49 55 50/47

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

16 14.41 +0.81 15 12.81 +0.73 25 22.55 +0.48 26 22.82 +3.42 18 17.18 +0.76 419 413.46 -4.05 21 15.13 +3.84 30 19.46 +5.23 27 20.28 +2.87 32 27.63 +0.89 19.12 +3.38 15.84 +0.83 17.18 +0.92

Forecast Temperature

70

36 25

20 10

66

63

60

30

11 T

13 W

8.26 +3.05 6.89 +2.48 16.69 +4.73

15

11.26 +6.56

40

53.08

-0.42

359.16 356.59 495.44 654.02 708.67 664.66 915.09 842.09 595.79 409.65 608.85 445.08

-0.74 +0.35 +0.33 +0.02 +0.19 -0.30 +0.19 +0.01 +0.67 +0.08 +1.94 +0.32

Average High

80

40

15 16 24

TEMPERATURE TRENDS

Daily Temperature

50

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

18.22 +7.42 12.95 +3.93 14.81 +3.11 11.69 +1.90 17.30 +3.39

20 18 14

41

48

47

29

32

T

F

39

S

Pitching Beck Cecil Hicks Kruczynski Leone Mikolas Meisinger Webb Wainwright Cervenka Hudson Shreve Flaherty Wacha Woodford Mayers Gant Hauschild Perez Reyes Brebbia Helsley Layne Miller Ponce de Leon Jones Gallegos Gomber Elledge Cabrera Team

W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

WIND NW 6-12 mph

52

54

35

S

M

T

64

57

46 34

38

W

Average Low

T

56

45

48

29

31

33

F

S

S

54 39

M

ALMANAC

Statistics through 5 p.m. Monday

Pollen Yesterday

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 7 Absent Absent Low - 384

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Monday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

21 362 248 4116 3842

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

49° 4 p.m.

41° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

GS 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 2 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 17

2B 0 2 1 1 1 2 0 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 30

3B 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SV 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

IP 5.2 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 5.0 9.0 4.0 7.2 3.1 13.0 9.0 6.0 4.2 8.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.2 4.2 5.1 3.2 7.2 4.1 3.2 7.0 2.0 3.0 150.2

HR 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15

RBI 2 7 3 5 1 2 2 1 4 2 3 6 2 2 4 4 3 3 5 1 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 70

H 3 1 0 1 4 5 6 2 7 5 6 1 10 7 4 3 9 3 1 1 4 4 7 3 7 5 3 11 3 10 139

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 3 2 1 4 3 3 2 4 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 7 4 4 8 4 8 82

BB 3 2 0 3 1 6 2 1 0 1 1 6 1 0 0 5 2 2 4 0 3 3 3 0 1 3 3 59

SO 3 4 4 4 2 3 4 2 7 6 6 8 3 0 11 4 3 8 4 7 7 5 6 1 2 6 6 133

ER 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 4 3 2 2 4 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 7 4 4 8 3 7 76

HR 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 5 0 2 18

SB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 9 BB 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 0 3 3 2 3 4 3 1 2 4 1 4 3 1 7 4 1 3 3 4 71

E 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 12 SO 5 1 7 2 2 1 5 7 6 6 6 0 19 7 4 3 4 2 0 1 6 4 8 5 6 4 9 3 2 2 138

Vancouver at Houston, 2 p.m. San Jose at New York, 2:30 p.m. Montreal at Orlando City, 3 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Minnesota United at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Los Angeles FC at New York City FC, 2 p.m. Portland at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 6 p.m. New England at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Colorado, 8 p.m.

English Premier League Saturday, March 16 Man United vs. Man City ppd. Bournemouth vs. Newcastle , 10 a.m. Watford vs. Southampton ppd. West Ham vs. Huddersfield , 10 a.m. Burnley vs. Leicester , 10 a.m. Wolverhampton vs. Arsenal ppd. Brighton vs. Cardiff ppd. Sunday, March 17 Tottenham vs. Crystal Palace ppd. Fulham vs. Liverpool, 9:15 a.m. Everton vs. Chelsea, 11:30 a.m.

HOLE IN ONE

Gateway National • Mike O’Neill, hole No. 12, 109 yards, gap wedge.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

Winnipeg 32/18

Seattle 49/39

Montreal 32/18 Billings 41/22

airnow.gov

Skywatch Rise

Set

7:18 a.m. 10:44 a.m.

7:05 p.m. 12:03 a.m.

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

Mar 14

Mar 20

Mar 27

Apr 5

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Detroit 44/32

Denver 61/35

New York 45/31

Chihuahua 79/42

Warm front

City

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

High: 92 McAllen, Texas

Miami 86/72

Monterrey 86/61

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

National Extremes

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

Houston 79/68

Stationary front

38/19/pc 63/36/t 39/28/c 70/51/pc 76/63/sh 49/30/s 71/57/c 46/27/r 43/28/s 69/45/s 52/32/s 63/39/pc 51/41/pc 51/38/s 41/29/s 65/58/c 73/59/pc 61/35/c 44/41/r 71/63/pc 44/32/s 42/22/pc 81/70/sh 79/68/c 51/39/pc 53/50/r 66/47/s 62/55/c

Washington 51/34

Atlanta 70/51

El Paso 72/46

Cold front

Toronto 38/24

Kansas City 53/50

Los Angeles 71/51

City

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Minneapolis 41/36

Chicago 51/41

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Sun Moon

G 5 2 2 1 4 2 6 5 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 1 2 4 4 5 4 3 5 3 3 2 4 17

Saturday Seattle at Chicago, Noon FC Dallas at Columbus, 1 p.m.

San Francisco 58/46

Temperature High/low 52°/35° Normal high/low 54°/35° Last year high/low 45°/31° Record high 85° (1972) Record low 8° (1948) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Mon. Trace Month to date (normal) 1.50” (1.01”) Year to date (normal) 7.99” (5.65”) Record for this date 2.26” (1977)

0

ERA 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.50 1.80 2.00 2.25 2.35 2.70 2.77 3.00 3.00 3.86 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 5.79 5.79 6.75 7.36 8.22 8.31 9.82 10.29 13.50 21.00 4.54

H 3 12 5 7 7 8 6 5 7 7 3 7 5 1 7 5 3 6 6 5 5 4 4 1 1 1 1 140

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Sunny and chilly

40° noon

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 8

R 0 2 0 4 0 3 4 3 4 3 2 7 3 1 2 5 0 4 3 3 2 3 2 1 0 1 3 71

Much of the eastern half of the nation will be dry and seasonable today. A major storm will spread showers and thunderstorms over the Southwest and central Plains with severe weather over the southern Plains. A blizzard will evolve over the central Rockies tonight. Coastal rain and inland snow are in store for the Northwest.

SATURDAY

30° 8 a.m.

AB 7 32 14 20 20 23 18 17 24 24 11 27 20 4 29 21 13 27 27 25 27 22 25 7 11 20 21 561

Major League Soccer

66° 57° 64° 38° 45° 29° 48° 31°

A massive storm is building in the western states, and we get a piece of it today... with a larger piece tomorrow. Spots of rain late today with temperatures in the 50s this afternoon. Storms tomorrow.

Joplin 54/52

AVG .429 .375 .357 .350 .350 .348 .333 .294 .292 .292 .273 .259 .250 .250 .241 .238 .231 .222 .222 .200 .185 .182 .160 .143 .091 .050 .048 .250

.com

Cloudy and windy Mostly sunny and Cloudy, breezy and cooler windy WIND WIND WIND WNW 12-25 mph SSE 12-25 mph SW 20-30 mph

46°

Kansas City 53/50

Batting Gyorko Ravelo Pena Edman Munoz Goldschmidt Arozarena Sosa Urias Wong Hurst O’Neill Knizner J. Martinez Robinson Carpenter Wieters Carlson Schrock Fowler J. Martinez DeJong Bader Molina Hudson Ozuna Garcia Team

Atletico Madrid (Spain) 2, Juventus (Italy) 0 Schalke (Germany) 2, Manchester City (England) 3 Second leg March 5 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) 0, Tottenham (England) 1, Tottenham advanced on 4-0 aggregate Real Madrid (Spain) 1, Ajax Amsterdam (Netherlands) 4, Ajax advanced on 5-3 aggregate March 6 Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1, Manchester United (England) 3, 3-3 aggregate; Manchester United advanced 3-2 away goals Porto (Portugal) 3, Roma (Italy) 1, Porto advanced on 4-3 aggregate Tuesday Juventus (Italy) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 3 p.m. Manchester City (England) vs. Schalke (Germany), 3 p.m. Wednesday Barcelona (Spain) vs. Lyon (France), 3 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Liverpool (England), 3 p.m.

SOCCER

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

CARDINALS SPRING AVERAGES

Men’s national scores

Semifinals | Saturday G7 winner vs. G8 winner, Noon G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, noon

FOOTBALL | National Football League CAROLINA — Signed S Colin Jones to a two-year contract. CHICAGO — Re-signed TE Ben Braunecker to a two-year contract. CINCINNATI — Re-signed S Brandon Wilson to a one-year contract. CLEVELAND — Terminated the contract of TE Darren Fells. DETROIT — Signed WR Danny Amendola. Released CB Nevin Lawson. HOUSTON — Re-signed DE Angelo Blackson, WR DeAndre Cater and DE Joel Heath. MINNESOTA — Terminated the contract of OL Mike Remmers. Declined the 2019 option on S Andrew Sendejo. Tendered contracts to S Anthony Harris and OT Rashod Hill. NEW ORLEANS — Agreed to terms with LB Craig Robertson on a two-year contract extension and S Chris Banjo on a three-year contract extension NY GIANTS — Re-signed C Spencer Pulley. PHILADELPHIA — Re-signed OL Jason Peters. TENNESSEE — Agreed to terms with S Kenny Vaccaro on a multiyear contract and RB David Fluellen on a one-year contract.

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

44/33/s 52/29/sh 40/29/sn 69/57/pc 79/50/r 55/40/pc 73/63/c 45/25/pc 46/35/pc 69/54/s 66/49/pc 63/50/c 56/52/sh 63/54/c 52/46/sh 72/50/r 76/61/pc 39/22/sn 58/45/r 70/66/c 48/43/r 46/33/s 82/69/pc 75/63/t 60/54/c 60/39/r 60/42/s 66/56/t

Showers

T-storms

City

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

71/51/s 56/44/pc 65/56/c 86/72/pc 45/40/s 41/36/c 77/58/pc 63/49/s 73/64/c 45/31/s 56/50/t 47/44/r 78/62/pc 47/30/s 63/52/t 42/27/s 40/19/s 50/38/sh 64/43/pc 49/30/pc 77/65/c 66/56/pc 58/46/pc 49/39/sh 82/66/pc 60/46/t 51/34/s 56/53/t

68/48/s 69/57/c 72/62/t 81/72/pc 47/45/r 44/37/r 77/65/c 72/62/c 79/68/c 47/39/pc 64/40/r 58/41/r 80/61/pc 51/39/s 66/44/pc 53/43/c 41/29/pc 51/35/pc 62/38/s 38/30/sn 80/54/t 65/51/s 61/45/s 52/38/pc 83/66/pc 61/37/pc 57/45/s 66/37/r

Monday in the 48 contiguous states Low: -27 West Yellowstone, Mont.

WORLD FORECAST

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

48/42/r 63/47/r 77/53/s 100/77/s 52/32/pc 46/38/r 69/56/r 77/61/s 86/75/s 47/41/sh 72/66/s 67/49/pc 78/57/pc 50/40/r 71/42/pc 99/68/pc

48/43/t 53/43/sh 80/58/c 98/79/pc 61/34/pc 48/39/sh 74/57/c 72/56/pc 85/75/s 49/43/sh 73/65/sh 67/44/s 83/60/s 53/45/sh 59/34/pc 97/71/s

City

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

83/50/pc 32/18/pc 32/20/sf 82/71/pc 86/56/pc 81/59/pc 56/39/r 87/77/pc 59/37/s 82/70/pc 89/57/s 47/32/pc 91/68/s 59/48/s 38/24/pc 46/32/pc

83/51/pc 38/28/c 30/19/sn 80/68/pc 85/59/s 78/58/pc 52/43/sh 93/79/t 59/42/sh 84/71/s 88/56/s 45/28/s 74/70/c 61/42/s 40/35/c 47/34/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


FOR THE RECORD

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog PACERS...................... 12........................ Knicks 76ERS.......................13.5................... Cavaliers Bucks.......................... 9....................PELICANS Lakers ........................ 1..........................BULLS MAVERICKS...............NL..........................Spurs NUGGETS...................NL.................... T’Wolves Blazers ......................2.5 .................. CLIPPERS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament Miami-Florida...........7.5...............Wake Forest Notre Dame ............... 2...............Georgia Tech Boston College..........PK..................Pittsburgh Sun Belt Conference Tournament S ALABAMA................ 5.................Arkansas St UL-MONROE............... 8........... Appalachian St NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog Stars.................. -$135/+$115..............SABRES BLUE JACKETS...-$125/+$105.................Bruins PENGUINS......... -$135/+$115..............Capitals CANADIENS...... -$200/+$170.........Red Wings JETS....................-$120/even.................Sharks BLUES................-$180/+$160 ............. Coyotes FLAMES............-$400/+$320................ Devils Predators..........-$160/+$140 ...............DUCKS Grand Salami: Over/under 49.5 goals. SOCCER • UEFA Champions League JUVENTUS................................................-$150 Atletico Madrid...................................... +$440 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals MANCHESTER CITY.................................-$800 Schalke 04............................................+$1900 Draw: +$750 | Over/under: 3.5 goals UEFA Champions League Wednesday BAYERN MUNICH .....................................+$110 Liverpool.................................................+$230 Draw: +$260 | Over/under: 2.5 goals BARCELONA............................................ -$450 Lyon...................................................... +$1000 Draw: +$575 | Over/under: 3.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League CHICAGO — Placed RHP Michael Kopech on the 60-day DL. Claimed LHP Josh Osich off waivers from Baltimore. CLEVELAND — Optioned SS Yu Chang and RHPs Jefry Rodriguez and Ben Taylor to Columbus (IL). DETROIT — Optioned SS Willie Castro to Toledo (IL) and SS Sergio Alcantara to Erie (EL). KANSAS CITY — Agreed to terms with C Martin Maldonado on a one-year contract. Placed C Salvador Perez on the 60-day injured list. Optioned RHPs Conner Greene and Josh Staumont to Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES — Signed RHPs Miguel Almonte, Jake Jewell, Justin Anderson, Luis Madero, Jaime Barria, Keynan Middleton, Ty Buttrey, Felix Pena, Jesus Castillo, Taylor Cole, Noe Ramirez and John Curtiss; INFs Luis Rengifo, David Fletcher and Taylor Ward; Cs Jose Briceno and Kevan Smith; OF Michael Hermosillo; LHPs Dillon Peters, Jose Suarez and Williams Jerez; and RHP/ OF Shohei Ohtani to one-year contracts. OAKLAND — Optioned RHP Daniel Mengden to Las Vegas (PCL). SEATTLE — Optioned RHP Erik Swanson, LHP Justus Sheffield and INF Shed Long to Tacoma (PCL). Reassigned INF Evan White, OF Kyle Lewis and C Joe DeCarlo to their minor league camp. National League ARIZONA — Signed OF Adam Jones to a one-year contract. Placed RHP Silvino Bracho on the 60-day IL. CINCINNATI — Reassigned OF Jose Siri and RHPs Jimmy Herget, Felix Jorge, Keury Mella, Alex Powers and Jackson Stephens to minor league camp. Signed INF Yonathan Mendoza to a minor league contract. COLORADO — Optioned OFs Yonathan Daza and Sam Hilliard, INF Josh Fuentes and RHPs Ryan Castellani, Rayan Gonzalez and Jesus Tinoco to Albuquerque (PCL) and RHP Justin Lawrence to Hartford (EL). Reassigned INFs Tyler Nevin and Colton Welker, RHP Rico Garcia, LHP Evan Grills and C Brian Serven to minor league camp. LOS ANGELES — Released RHP Josh Fields. Optioned RHPs Dennis Santana and Brock Stewart, C Keibert Ruiz and INF Edwin Rios to their minor league camp. Reassigned OFs Kyle Garlick and Shane Peterson and C Will Smith to their minor league camp. NEW YORK — Optioned RHPs Walker Lockett and Corey Oswalt to minor league camp. PHILADELPHIA — Optioned SS Arquimedes Gamboa to Reading (EL). CARDINALS — Optioned LHP Genesis Cabrera, RHP Giovanny Gallegos, RF Adolis Garcia and SS Edmundo Sosa to Memphis (PCL). Optioned INF Ramon Urias and OF Lane Thomas to Memphis (PCL). Reassigned RHPs Connor Jones and Jake Woodford and Cs Jose Godoy and Brian O’Keefe to their minor league camp.

SAN FRANCISCO — Optioned RHP Sam Coonrod, OF Chris Shaw, INFs Abiatal Avelino, Ryder Jones and Breyvic Valera to minor league camp. Reassigned RHPs Shaun Anderson, Enderson Franco and Keyvius Sampson to minor league camp.

East Hofstra 78, Delaware 74, OT Iona 81, Monmouth (NJ) 60 Northeastern 70, Coll. Charles. 67 South Delaware St. 71, Savannah St. 67 Wofford 70, UNC-Greensboro 58 N. Kentucky 64, Oakland 63 Midwest Akron 80, Miami (Ohio) 51 Ball St. 61, E. Michigan 43 Cent. Michigan 81, W. Michigan 67 N. Illinois 80, Ohio 61 N. Dakota St. 76, W. Illinois 73 Nebraska-Omaha 61, Purdue Fort Wayne 60 Wright St. 66, Green Bay 54 Far West Gonzaga 100, Pepperdine 74 St. Mary’s 69, San Diego 62

MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Gonzaga (30-2) beat Pepperdine 100-74. Next: vs. Saint Mary’s or San Diego, Tuesday. 2. Virginia (28-2) idle. Next: vs. N.C. State or Clemson, Thursday. 3. North Carolina (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Louisville, Georgia Tech or Notre Dame, Thursday. 4. Kentucky (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi or Alabama, Friday. 5. Duke (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Syracuse, Boston College or Pittsburgh, Thursday. 6. Michigan State (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State or Indiana, Friday. 7. Texas Tech (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma or West Virginia, Thursday. 8. Tennessee (27-4) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Texas A&M or Vanderbilt, Friday. 9. LSU (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Florida or Arkansas, Friday. 10. Michigan (26-5) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Illinois or Northwestern, Friday. 11. Houston (29-2) idle. Next: vs. South Florida or UConn, Friday. 12. Florida State (25-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Virginia Tech, Miami or Wake Forest, Thursday. 13. Purdue (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Minnesota or Penn State, Friday. 14. Nevada (28-3) idle. Next: vs. Boise State or Colorado State, Thursday. 15. Kansas State (24-7) idle. Next: vs. TCU or Oklahoma State, Thursday. 16. Virginia Tech (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Miami or Wake Forest, Wednesday. 17. Kansas (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Thursday. 18. Buffalo (28-3) idle. Next: vs. Akron or Miami, Thursday. 19. Wisconsin (22-9) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Maryland, Rutgers or Nebraska, Friday. 20. Wofford (29-4) beat UNC Greensboro 70-58. Next: NCAA Tournament. 21. Maryland (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers or Nebraska, Thursday. 22. Auburn (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi or Georgia, Thursday. 23. Marquette (23-8) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s or DePaul, Thursday. 24. Cincinnati (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Tulsa or SMU, Friday. 25. Villanova (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Providence or Butler, Thursday.

HOCKEY | National Hockey League CALGARY — Recalled D Michael Stone from a conditioning assignment with Stockton (AHL). NEW JERSEY — Recalled D Colton White from Binghamton (AHL). NY RANGERS — Reassigned G Chris Nell from Hartford (AHL) to Maine (ECHL). SOCCER | Major League Soccer SPORTING KC — Signed M Gedion Zelalem from Arsenal (Premier League-England). COLLEGE FAIRFIELD — Fired men’s basketball coach Sydney Johnson. NIAGARA — Fired men’s basketball coach Chris Casey. OHIO STATE — Reinstated C Kaleb Wesson to the men’s basketball team. TEXAS — Reinstated men’s senior basketball G Kerwin Roach II.

COLLEGES Conference tournaments Atlantic 10 men

At The Barclays Center | New York First Round | Wednesday G1: G. Wash. vs. UMass, Noon G2: Richmond vs. Fordham, 2:30 p.m. Second Round | Thursday G3: Rhode Island vs. La Salle, 11 a.m. G4: George Mason vs. G1 winner, 1:30 p.m. G5: Duquesne vs. Saint Joseph’s, 5 p.m. G6: St. Louis U. vs. G2 winner, 7:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: VCU vs. G3 winner, 11 a.m. G8: St. Bon. vs. G4 winner, 1:30 p.m. G9: Davidson vs. G5 winner, 5 p.m. G10: Dayton vs. G6 winner, 7:30 p.m. Semifinals | Saturday G7 winner vs. G8 winner, Noon G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, noon

Area results Baseball Webster 12, Rhode Island College 5 UMSL 5, Lewis 4 Softball UMass-Dartmouth 2, Webster 1 Keene State 13, Webster 11 (11 inn.)

BASEBALL Spring training NATIONAL W L Pct. San Diego 10 5 .667 Chicago 11 7 .611 10 7 .588 Atlanta Los Angeles 9 7 .563 Philadelphia 9 7 .563 Milwaukee 10 8 .556 Arizona 8 8 .500 Washington 8 8 .500 New York 8 9 .471 Cardinals 7 8 .467 7 10 .412 Pittsburgh 7 10 .412 Miami Colorado 7 10 .412 San Francisco 6 10 .375 Cincinnati 4 10 .286 AMERICAN W L Pct. Toronto 9 6 .600 Kansas City 10 7 .588 8 6 .571 New York Cleveland 9 7 .563 Houston 9 7 .563 Baltimore 9 7 .563 Los Angeles 10 8 .556 Oakland 10 8 .556 Minnesota 8 8 .500 Seattle 7 7 .500 8 9 .471 Tampa Bay 8 9 .471 Detroit Chicago 6 10 .375 Boston 6 10 .375 Texas 5 10 .333 Monday Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 2 Detroit 3, Minnesota 0 Houston 6, NY Mets 3 Cardinals 3, Washington 2 Tampa Bay 8, Philadelphia 2 Cincinnati 5, Cleveland 5 LA Angels 12, Texas (ss) 11 San Francisco 4, LA Dodgers 1 Milwaukee 8, Chicago White Sox 5 Colorado 6, Oakland 3 Kansas City (ss) vs. Seattle, late Kansas City (ss) vs. Texas (ss), late Tuesday Detroit vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Seattle vs. Chicago White Sox (ss), 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Houston vs. Washington, 5:35 p.m. Baltimore vs. NY Yankees, 5:35 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss), 8:05 p.m. Oakland vs. San Diego (ss), 8:40 p.m. Texas vs. Arizona, 8:40 p.m. Milwaukee vs. San Francisco, 9:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs, 9:05 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. Baylor (31-1) beat No. 13 Iowa State 67-49. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 2. UConn (31-2) beat UCF 66-45. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 3. Notre Dame (30-3) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 4. Mississippi State (30-2) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 5. Louisville (29-3) idle. Next: TBA. 6. Stanford (28-4) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 7. Oregon (29-4) idle. Next: TBA. 8. Iowa (26-6) idle. Next: NCAA Tourn.. 9. Maryland (28-4) idle. Next: TBA. 10. N.C. State (26-5) idle. Next: TBA. 11. Oregon State (24-7) idle. Next: vs. TBA. 12. Gonzaga (28-3) beat Saint Mary’s 78-77, 2OT. Next: vs. BYU, Tuesday. 13. Iowa State (25-8) lost to No. 1 Baylor 67-49. Next: TBA. 13. Marquette (26-6) beat Georgetown 75-62. Next: vs. DePaul, Tuesday. 15. Syracuse (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 16. South Carolina (21-9) idle. Next: TBA. 17. Texas A&M (24-7) idle. Next: TBA. 18. Kentucky (24-7) idle. Next: TBA. 19. Miami (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 20. UCLA (20-12) idle. Next: TBA. 21. Drake (25-5) idle. Next: vs. Indiana State or Valparaiso, Friday. 22. Texas (23-9) idle. Next: TBA. 23. Arizona State (20-10) idle. Next: TBA. 24. Rice (25-3) idle. Next: vs. Southern Miss. or North Texas, Thursday. 25. Florida State (23-8) idle. Next: TBA.

Big Ten men

At United Center | Chicago First round | Wednesday G1: Rutgers vs. Nebraska, 5:30 p.m. G2: Illinois vs. Northwestern, 8 p.m. Second round | Thursday G3: Ohio State vs. Indiana, 11:30 a.m. G4: Maryland vs. G1 winner, 2 p.m. G5: Minnesota vs. Penn State, 6 p.m. G6: Iowa vs. G2 winner, 8:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: Michigan State vs. G3 winner, 11:30 a.m. G8: Wisconsin vs. G4 winner, 2 p.m. G9: Purdue vs. G5 winner, 6 p.m. G10: Michigan vs. G6 winner, 8:30 p.m. Semifinals | Saturday G11: G7 winner vs. G8 winner, 12 p.m. G12: G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, 2:30 p.m.

Southeastern men

At Nashville, Tenn. First Round | Wednesday G1: Missouri vs. Georgia, 6 p.m. G2: Texas A&M vs. Vanderbilt, 8:30 p.m. Second Round | Thursday G3: Florida vs. Arkansas, Noon G4: Auburn vs. G1 winner, 2:30 p.m. G5: Mississippi vs. Alabama, 6 p.m. G6: Mississippi State vs. G2 winner, 8:30 p.m. Quarterfinals | Friday G7: LSU vs. G3 winner, Noon G8: South Carolina vs. G4 winner, 2:30 p.m. G9: Kentucky vs. G5 winner, 6 p.m. G10: Tennessee vs. G6 winner, 8:30 p.m.

Champions League (Home teams listed first)

ROUND OF 16

First Leg Feb. 12 Manchester United (England) 0, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 2 Roma (Italy) 2, Porto (Portugal) 1 Feb. 13 Ajax Amsterdam (Netherlands) 1, Real Madrid (Spain) 2 Tottenham (England) 3, Borussia Dortmund (Germany) 0 Feb. 19 Liverpool (England) 0, Bayern Munich (Germany) 0 Lyon (France) 0, Barcelona (Spain) 0

Women’s NCAA auto bids Baylor, Big 12 Conference Belmont, Ohio Valley Conference Fordham, Atlantic 10 Conference Iowa, Big Ten Conference Mercer, Southern Conference Mississippi State, Southeastern Conference Notre Dame, Atlantic Coast Conference Quinnipiac, Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Stanford, Pac-12 Conference UConn, American Athletic Conference

TONIGHT

Mostly cloudy

Cloudy with a little rain WIND SSE 8-16 mph

WIND SE 8-16 mph

54°

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 50/43 51/44 Bloomington Urbana 51/41 53/42

Kirksville 48/44

Quincy 49/44

Decatur 51/43 Springfield 57 51/44 Effingham 70 55 55/45

35

Columbia 70 51/47 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 54/46 City 54/47 55 53/49 Union 55/48 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 52/47 54/48 Farmington 51/46 Cape Girardeau 55/48 Springfield 51/50 Poplar Bluff West Plains 54/49 55 50/47

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

16 14.41 +0.81 15 12.81 +0.73 25 22.55 +0.48 26 22.82 +3.42 18 17.18 +0.76 419 413.46 -4.05 21 15.13 +3.84 30 19.46 +5.23 27 20.28 +2.87 32 27.63 +0.89 19.12 +3.38 15.84 +0.83 17.18 +0.92

Forecast Temperature

70

36 25

20 10

66

63

60

30

11 T

13 W

8.26 +3.05 6.89 +2.48 16.69 +4.73

15

11.26 +6.56

40

53.08

-0.42

359.16 356.59 495.44 654.02 708.67 664.66 915.09 842.09 595.79 409.65 608.85 445.08

-0.74 +0.35 +0.33 +0.02 +0.19 -0.30 +0.19 +0.01 +0.67 +0.08 +1.94 +0.32

Average High

80

40

15 16 24

TEMPERATURE TRENDS

Daily Temperature

50

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

18.22 +7.42 12.95 +3.93 14.81 +3.11 11.69 +1.90 17.30 +3.39

20 18 14

41

48

47

29

32

T

F

39

S

Pitching Beck Cecil Hicks Kruczynski Leone Mikolas Meisinger Webb Wainwright Cervenka Hudson Shreve Flaherty Wacha Woodford Mayers Gant Hauschild Perez Reyes Brebbia Helsley Layne Miller Ponce de Leon Jones Gallegos Gomber Elledge Cabrera Team

W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

WIND NW 6-12 mph

52

54

35

S

M

T

64

57

46 34

38

W

Average Low

T

56

45

48

29

31

33

F

S

S

54 39

M

ALMANAC

Statistics through 5 p.m. Monday

Pollen Yesterday

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 7 Absent Absent Low - 384

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Monday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

21 362 248 4116 3842

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

49° 4 p.m.

41° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

GS 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 2 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 17

2B 0 2 1 1 1 2 0 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 30

3B 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SV 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

IP 5.2 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 5.0 9.0 4.0 7.2 3.1 13.0 9.0 6.0 4.2 8.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.2 4.2 5.1 3.2 7.2 4.1 3.2 7.0 2.0 3.0 150.2

HR 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15

RBI 2 7 3 5 1 2 2 1 4 2 3 6 2 2 4 4 3 3 5 1 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 70

H 3 1 0 1 4 5 6 2 7 5 6 1 10 7 4 3 9 3 1 1 4 4 7 3 7 5 3 11 3 10 139

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 3 2 1 4 3 3 2 4 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 7 4 4 8 4 8 82

BB 3 2 0 3 1 6 2 1 0 1 1 6 1 0 0 5 2 2 4 0 3 3 3 0 1 3 3 59

SO 3 4 4 4 2 3 4 2 7 6 6 8 3 0 11 4 3 8 4 7 7 5 6 1 2 6 6 133

ER 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 4 3 2 2 4 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 7 4 4 8 3 7 76

HR 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 5 0 2 18

SB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 9 BB 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 0 3 3 2 3 4 3 1 2 4 1 4 3 1 7 4 1 3 3 4 71

E 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 12 SO 5 1 7 2 2 1 5 7 6 6 6 0 19 7 4 3 4 2 0 1 6 4 8 5 6 4 9 3 2 2 138

FC Dallas at Columbus, 1 p.m. Vancouver at Houston, 2 p.m. San Jose at New York, 2:30 p.m. Montreal at Orlando City, 3 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Minnesota United at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Los Angeles FC at New York City FC, 2 p.m. Portland at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 6 p.m. New England at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Colorado, 8 p.m.

English Premier League Saturday, March 16 Man United vs. Man City ppd. Bournemouth vs. Newcastle , 10 a.m. Watford vs. Southampton ppd. West Ham vs. Huddersfield , 10 a.m. Burnley vs. Leicester , 10 a.m. Wolverhampton vs. Arsenal ppd. Brighton vs. Cardiff ppd. Sunday, March 17 Tottenham vs. Crystal Palace ppd. Fulham vs. Liverpool, 9:15 a.m. Everton vs. Chelsea, 11:30 a.m.

HOLE IN ONE

Gateway National • Mike O’Neill, hole No. 12, 109 yards, gap wedge.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

Winnipeg 32/18

Seattle 49/39

Montreal 32/18 Billings 41/22

airnow.gov

Skywatch Rise

Set

7:18 a.m. 10:44 a.m.

7:05 p.m. 12:03 a.m.

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

Mar 14

Mar 20

Mar 27

Apr 5

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Detroit 44/32

Denver 61/35

New York 45/31

Chihuahua 79/42

Warm front

City

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

High: 92 McAllen, Texas

Miami 86/72

Monterrey 86/61

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

National Extremes

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

Houston 79/68

Stationary front

38/19/pc 63/36/t 39/28/c 70/51/pc 76/63/sh 49/30/s 71/57/c 46/27/r 43/28/s 69/45/s 52/32/s 63/39/pc 51/41/pc 51/38/s 41/29/s 65/58/c 73/59/pc 61/35/c 44/41/r 71/63/pc 44/32/s 42/22/pc 81/70/sh 79/68/c 51/39/pc 53/50/r 66/47/s 62/55/c

Washington 51/34

Atlanta 70/51

El Paso 72/46

Cold front

Toronto 38/24

Kansas City 53/50

Los Angeles 71/51

City

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Minneapolis 41/36

Chicago 51/41

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Sun Moon

G 5 2 2 1 4 2 6 5 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 1 2 4 4 5 4 3 5 3 3 2 4 17

Saturday Seattle at Chicago, Noon

San Francisco 58/46

Temperature High/low 52°/35° Normal high/low 54°/35° Last year high/low 45°/31° Record high 85° (1972) Record low 8° (1948) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Mon. Trace Month to date (normal) 1.50” (1.01”) Year to date (normal) 7.99” (5.65”) Record for this date 2.26” (1977)

0

ERA 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.50 1.80 2.00 2.25 2.35 2.70 2.77 3.00 3.00 3.86 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 5.79 5.79 6.75 7.36 8.22 8.31 9.82 10.29 13.50 21.00 4.54

H 3 12 5 7 7 8 6 5 7 7 3 7 5 1 7 5 3 6 6 5 5 4 4 1 1 1 1 140

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Sunny and chilly

40° noon

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 8

R 0 2 0 4 0 3 4 3 4 3 2 7 3 1 2 5 0 4 3 3 2 3 2 1 0 1 3 71

Much of the eastern half of the nation will be dry and seasonable today. A major storm will spread showers and thunderstorms over the Southwest and central Plains with severe weather over the southern Plains. A blizzard will evolve over the central Rockies tonight. Coastal rain and inland snow are in store for the Northwest.

SATURDAY

30° 8 a.m.

AB 7 32 14 20 20 23 18 17 24 24 11 27 20 4 29 21 13 27 27 25 27 22 25 7 11 20 21 561

Major League Soccer

66° 57° 64° 38° 45° 29° 48° 31°

A massive storm is building in the western states, and we get a piece of it today... with a larger piece tomorrow. Spots of rain late today with temperatures in the 50s this afternoon. Storms tomorrow.

Joplin 54/52

AVG .429 .375 .357 .350 .350 .348 .333 .294 .292 .292 .273 .259 .250 .250 .241 .238 .231 .222 .222 .200 .185 .182 .160 .143 .091 .050 .048 .250

.com

Cloudy and windy Mostly sunny and Cloudy, breezy and cooler windy WIND WIND WIND WNW 12-25 mph SSE 12-25 mph SW 20-30 mph

46°

Kansas City 53/50

Batting Gyorko Ravelo Pena Edman Munoz Goldschmidt Arozarena Sosa Urias Wong Hurst O’Neill Knizner J. Martinez Robinson Carpenter Wieters Carlson Schrock Fowler J. Martinez DeJong Bader Molina Hudson Ozuna Garcia Team

Feb. 20 Atletico Madrid (Spain) 2, Juventus (Italy) 0 Schalke (Germany) 2, Manchester City (England) 3 Second leg March 5 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) 0, Tottenham (England) 1, Tottenham advanced on 4-0 aggregate Real Madrid (Spain) 1, Ajax Amsterdam (Netherlands) 4, Ajax advanced on 5-3 aggregate March 6 Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1, Manchester United (England) 3, 3-3 aggregate; Manchester United advanced 3-2 away goals Porto (Portugal) 3, Roma (Italy) 1, Porto advanced on 4-3 aggregate Tuesday Juventus (Italy) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 3 p.m. Manchester City (England) vs. Schalke (Germany), 3 p.m. Wednesday Barcelona (Spain) vs. Lyon (France), 3 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Liverpool (England), 3 p.m.

SOCCER

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

CARDINALS SPRING AVERAGES

Men’s national scores

Semifinals | Saturday G7 winner vs. G8 winner, Noon G9 winner vs. G10 winner, 2:30 p.m. • Championship | Sunday, noon

FOOTBALL | National Football League CAROLINA — Signed S Colin Jones to a two-year contract. CHICAGO — Re-signed TE Ben Braunecker to a two-year contract. CINCINNATI — Re-signed S Brandon Wilson to a one-year contract. CLEVELAND — Terminated the contract of TE Darren Fells. DETROIT — Signed WR Danny Amendola. Released CB Nevin Lawson. HOUSTON — Re-signed DE Angelo Blackson, WR DeAndre Cater and DE Joel Heath. MINNESOTA — Terminated the contract of OL Mike Remmers. Declined the 2019 option on S Andrew Sendejo. Tendered contracts to S Anthony Harris and OT Rashod Hill. NEW ORLEANS — Agreed to terms with LB Craig Robertson on a two-year contract extension and S Chris Banjo on a three-year contract extension NY GIANTS — Re-signed C Spencer Pulley. PHILADELPHIA — Re-signed OL Jason Peters. TENNESSEE — Agreed to terms with S Kenny Vaccaro on a multiyear contract and RB David Fluellen on a one-year contract.

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

44/33/s 52/29/sh 40/29/sn 69/57/pc 79/50/r 55/40/pc 73/63/c 45/25/pc 46/35/pc 69/54/s 66/49/pc 63/50/c 56/52/sh 63/54/c 52/46/sh 72/50/r 76/61/pc 39/22/sn 58/45/r 70/66/c 48/43/r 46/33/s 82/69/pc 75/63/t 60/54/c 60/39/r 60/42/s 66/56/t

Showers

T-storms

City

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

71/51/s 56/44/pc 65/56/c 86/72/pc 45/40/s 41/36/c 77/58/pc 63/49/s 73/64/c 45/31/s 56/50/t 47/44/r 78/62/pc 47/30/s 63/52/t 42/27/s 40/19/s 50/38/sh 64/43/pc 49/30/pc 77/65/c 66/56/pc 58/46/pc 49/39/sh 82/66/pc 60/46/t 51/34/s 56/53/t

68/48/s 69/57/c 72/62/t 81/72/pc 47/45/r 44/37/r 77/65/c 72/62/c 79/68/c 47/39/pc 64/40/r 58/41/r 80/61/pc 51/39/s 66/44/pc 53/43/c 41/29/pc 51/35/pc 62/38/s 38/30/sn 80/54/t 65/51/s 61/45/s 52/38/pc 83/66/pc 61/37/pc 57/45/s 66/37/r

Monday in the 48 contiguous states Low: -27 West Yellowstone, Mont.

WORLD FORECAST

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

48/42/r 63/47/r 77/53/s 100/77/s 52/32/pc 46/38/r 69/56/r 77/61/s 86/75/s 47/41/sh 72/66/s 67/49/pc 78/57/pc 50/40/r 71/42/pc 99/68/pc

48/43/t 53/43/sh 80/58/c 98/79/pc 61/34/pc 48/39/sh 74/57/c 72/56/pc 85/75/s 49/43/sh 73/65/sh 67/44/s 83/60/s 53/45/sh 59/34/pc 97/71/s

City

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

83/50/pc 32/18/pc 32/20/sf 82/71/pc 86/56/pc 81/59/pc 56/39/r 87/77/pc 59/37/s 82/70/pc 89/57/s 47/32/pc 91/68/s 59/48/s 38/24/pc 46/32/pc

83/51/pc 38/28/c 30/19/sn 80/68/pc 85/59/s 78/58/pc 52/43/sh 93/79/t 59/42/sh 84/71/s 88/56/s 45/28/s 74/70/c 61/42/s 40/35/c 47/34/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


FOOTBALL

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

Foles’ Jags deal has $50 million guaranteed NFL NOTEBOOK

FROM NEWS SERVICES

It previously was reported that quarterback Nick Foles would be headed from Philadelphia to Jacksonville after the new NFL year starts Wednesday. Now details of the deal have emerged. Foles, MVP of the Super Bowl two seasons ago, has agreed to sign a four-year, $88 million contract with the Jaguars. The pact includes $50.1 million guaranteed and could be worth up to $102 million with incentives as he replaces Blake Bortles, who threw 103 touchdown passes in five seasons but was known more for inaccuracy and inconsistency that led to Jacksonville’s offensive instability. Bortles is expected to be released this week before a $1 million roster bonus comes due Sunday. It also emerged Monday that two other big-name players will be on the move, Landon Collins to Washington and Trent Brown to Oakland. The big-money offers for NFL free agents began Monday, two days before they can sign contracts. Brown has a championship ring with the Patriots as he moves to the Raiders’ offensive line at left tackle. Safety Collins heads a few hours south from the New York Giants. The Redskins agreed to sign Collins to a six-year, $84 million deal with $45 million guaranteed. He led the Giants with 96

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Audi '18 Q5 Premium: 21xxx Miles, AWD, Turbocharged $35,362, #P9675

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Running back Frank Gore (left) reportedly is headed from the Dolphins to the Bills.

tackles last season, and his 437 since entering the NFL in 2015 are the most among safeties in that time, but the Giants opted not to give him the franchise tag. Collins fills one of Washington’s biggest needs on a defense that ranked 17th in the league last season. Brown was a real find for New England before last season, and his payday will come with the Raiders after he agreed to

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'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $39,600 #28140L

'16 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Sport, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $47,600 #P9681

'18 Audi A6 2.0T: Premium Plus, FrontTrak, 2K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax $37,600 #P9686

Chevrolet Trucks

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'15 BMW M3: 4 Door Sedan, 29K Miles, RWD, Manual $45,220 #P9684

'17 F-PACE 35t R-Sport: 20xxx Miles, AWD, Auto, 3.0L $47,499, #P9789

'08 Chevy Silverado Reg Cab, Long Bed, Auto, Very Clean, $10,969 #42776B

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Premium Plus, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, 6K Miles $42,391 #28649L

'18 GMC Acadia SLT FWD, 29k Miles, Auto $27,990 #P6741

'16 BMW 4: Series 435i xDrive, 26K Miles, AWD, Coupe, $31,963 #P9722

Jeep

'18 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 8cyl. 5.3L, 6k Miles $33,919 #80319B

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $41,880 #28658L

'16 GMC Yukon: XL Denali, 47K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $47,700, #80333A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 8K Miles $41,863 #28758L

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Quicks ilve r Me ta llic $47,762 P 9606

'15 Jeep Wrangler Manual, Black $29,750 #37069A '16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29K Mile s , AWD, Se da n, $32,963#12382A

Kia Cadillac '16 XT3 PLATINUM: Loaded, Clean Carfax, Only 13xxx Miles! $34,991, #44255A

'13 Escalade Platinum: AWD, 85xxx Miles, DVD, Leather, 3rd Row, $39,496, #P9760

'17 Chevy Cruze LT, FWD, Auto, 16K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $14,990 #P6694

'07 Chevy Impala LT one owner, clean carfax, $5,990 #44194B

'11 Chevy Impala: Clean Carfax, FWD, 97K Miles, $8,950 #P6677A

'16 Chevy Malibu: LT, 29K Miles, FWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $16,120 #P6624

'15 SOUL EXCLAIM: Loaded, Full Power, $12,990 #P6633A

'17 SORENTO: Loaded, Full Power, $14,369 #35588A

Lexus '16 RC 300 Coupe: 16xxx Miles, Auto, AWD, Keyless Start, $31,496, #P9644

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $34,258 #P9588

'14 Audi RS 7: Prestige, 49K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax #P9510 $59,707

Lincoln '16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $20,767 #44323A

Mazda Corvette

'17 Mazda6 Grand Touring FWD, Auto Call for Price, #11575L

'06 Chevy Corvette X066 Sp: Manual, RWD, Nav, $32,718, #P9723

'07 Ford Mustang: GT, Red, M/T, Loaded, Very Clean $8,500 #P6648

'16 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L, Auto, 38k Miles $28,300 #P6753

'16 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L, Auto, 35K Miles $28,990 #P6752

'15 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500, LT, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, $29,650 #P6662

'15 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L $26,550 P6634

'15 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, Auto, 42K Miles $26,720 #P6579

'18 Suburban LT: 4WD, 38k Miles $41,550 P6591

Ford Trucks '16 F-150 XLT Super Crew 4WD, Auto, 48k Miles $30,990 44427A

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Certified, AWD $39,989 #98000L

Honda '15 Honda Accord EX-L, one owner, loaded, clean carfax $15,969, #44443A

Infiniti '16 QX80 SUV: 48xxx Miles, Auto, AWD, 8 Cyl, $39,969, #29059A

'18 Q60: 3.0 Luxe, AWD, 18xxx Miles, 6 Cyl $33,988, #P9733

GMC Trucks '18 CX-9 Signature: 2xxx Miles, AWD, Auto $37,987, #12129L

'12 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, Loaded, Full Power $8,850 #35054A

'19 Infiniti QX50: AWD, 5 k Miles $42,410 #9805IL

'18 Infiniti Q60 3.0t Luxe: RWD, 6 cyl., 30K Miles $31,744 #P9784

'16 x6 xDrive 351i: AWD, 4 Cyl, 29xxx Miles, $43,076, #P9759

'09 AMG: RWD, Auto, 6.0L, V12, 81xxx Miles, $34,530, #79807A

Crossovers '17 RX350: Cle a n Carfax, One Owne r, AWD $41,674, #P 9626

Sport Utility '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $42,033 #28175L

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owne r, RWD, S e da n, $35,795 #P 9651

Nissan/Datsun '11 Sentra SR, Auto, Loaded, $8,469 #44404

Chevrolet Trucks '16 Silverao 1500 LT 27k Miles, 4WD, Auto, 4.3L $29,676 #P6756

'14 Chevy Silverado: 3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax $42,623 #79281A

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'17 GMC Sierra SLT Crew Cab, 4x4, leather, loaded, one owner, $38,990, #44386A

2018 Audi Q7: Prestige, 8K Miles, AWD, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $57,955 #28823L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $43,250 #28849L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $43,250 #28888L

'17 Audi Q7 Pre mium Plus : 30K Mile s , Cle a n Carfax 1 Owne r, AWD $43,913 #29075A

'18 Audi Q5 P re mium: Cle a n Carfax, 1 Owne r, 21k Mile s , $33,066 #P 9607

'18 Audi Q7: P re mium P lus , Cle a n Carfax, 1 Owne r, AWD, $47,479 #P 9619

'18 Audi Q5 P re mium: 22K Mile s , Quattro, Ce rtifie d, Cle a n Carfax 1 Owne r $32,732 #P 9625

'18 Audi Q7: Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $50,463 #28207L

'18 Audi Q3 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $33,000 #28209L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $42,900 #28326L

'18 Audi Q7: P re mium P lus , 11K Mile s , AWD, Cle a n Carfax, 1 Owne r $50,650 #28602L

'17 GMC Acadia Denali: 18xxx Miles, Auto, FWD $35,000, #29129A

'17 HONDA PILOT EX-L: with Navigation, One Owner, Clean Carfax $28,750, #35187A

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $42,442 #98023L

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $42,527 #98056L

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'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $43,468 #79760A

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Mercedes Benz

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'14 SILVERADO 2500 HARLEY: Crew Cab, 4x4, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $27,990, #44012A

'18 CX-9 Grand Touring: FWD, 6xxx Miles, 2.0L $35,999, #12112L

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BMW

Other reported pending moves • The Chiefs agreed to a deal with safety Tyrann Mathieu, who was with the Texans last year. • The Titans struck a deal with former Buccaneers receiver Adam Humphries. • The Saints have agreed with linebacker Craig Robinson on a two-year extension. • The Browns cut tight end Darren Fells.

Jaguar

Ford '18 Audi A6 P re mium P lus : 6K Mile s , Ce rtifie d, Cle a n Carfax 1 Owne r, $40,000 #P 9238

Amendola goes to Lions • The Lions signed wide receiver Danny Amendola, a former St. Louis Ram who was cut by the Dolphins last week. They also reportedly agreed to sign former Steelers tight end Jesse James and defensive end Trey Flowers (from New England) and cornerback Justin Coleman (from Seattle).

BMW

Chevrolet

'18 A4 Premium Plus: AWD, 8xxx Miles, Auto $36,963, #28704L

Gore headed to Bills • Frank Gore’s accomplished NFL career will continue for at least one more season. Gore, who played his 14th year last season with Miami, agreed to a one-year, $2 million deal with Buffalo, according to multiple reports. Gore, the NFL’s fourth leading career rusher, started all 14 games he played for Miami last season, finishing with 722 yards rushing despite no rushing touchdowns. He also caught 12 receptions for 124 yards, and had a receiving touchdown. He has 14,748 career rushing yards, trailing only Emmitt Smith (18,355), Walter Payton (16,726) and Barry Sanders (15,269). The Associated Press reported that the Bills also are set to sign cornerback Kevin Johnson, who had been with the Texans, and tight end Tyler Kroft, who had been with the Bengals.

Jackson, Suggs on the move • The Associated Press reported that the Eagles agreed to acquire receiver DeSean Jackson from Tampa Bay, along with a 2020 seventhround draft pick for a sixth-round pick this year. The deal is contingent upon Jackson agreeing to a new contract. He’s set to return to Philadelphia five years after being cut. The Eagles also reached a deal to keep left tackle Jason Peters, a likely Hall of Famer. • Linebacker Terrell Suggs, a staple of the Ravens’ defense for 16 years, is expected to sign with the Cardinals, according to reports. He leads the Ravens in career sacks (132½) and games played (229).

RIDES

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a four-year deal for $66 million. He will receive $36.75 million guaranteed in the richest contract ever for an offensive lineman. The biggest name in free agency remains running back Le’Veon Bell, who sat out the 2018 season with Pittsburgh. Some of the standouts on defense received franchise tags: edge rushers Demarcus Lawrence, Jadeveon Clowney, Frank Clark and Dee Ford, and tackle Grady Jarrett.

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'18 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring AWD, 2.5L, 24k Miles $27,763 #P6742

'17 Nis s an Arma da P la tinum: 23xxx Miles , Auto, RWD, 8 Cyl $37,332, #41137A

'14 Nissan Pathfinder: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Auto, Heated Seats, $16,469 #44111A

Mini vans '17 Chevy Equinox LT: Auto, FWD, Bluetooth, 44xxx Miles, $15,805, P9788

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Sport Vans. Conversions

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Vans

15 Ford Explorer: Limited, FWD, Bronze Fire Metallic $21,550 #44385A

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'15 FORD EXPLORER LTD: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $21,550, #44385A

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SOCCER

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

‘Recharged’ Zidane back to coach for Real Madrid He replaces Santiago Solari through 2022

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Newly appointed Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane smiles during a news conference in Madrid on Monday. “I’m very happy to be back home,” he said. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Real Madrid picked one of its most successful figures to try to end one of its worst crises. Zinedine Zidane is returning to coach Madrid, the club he led to three straight Champions League titles before quitting while on top nine months ago. Madrid announced Monday that Zidane accepted an offer to replace Santiago Solari and signed a contract until June 2022 to try to get the club back on track after a disastrous season. The coaching change came less than a week after two losses to Barcelona and another to Ajax — results that eliminated the club from the Champions League and the Copa del Rey and virtually ended its hopes of winning the Spanish league. “I’m very happy to be back home. I’ve recharged my batteries and now I’m ready again for the experience of being Real Madrid’s coach. I’m motivated to be coaching again,” Zidane said. “What I want to do now is return to work and put the club back where it belongs.” Spanish television channel La Sexta was the first to report Zidane’s return. The announcement came after the board of directors met Monday in Madrid. “You have an incredible history with the club, both as a player and as a coach,” Madrid president Florentino Perez told Zidane. “We are proud to have you with us again. You represent the grandiosity of this club. Thank you for your loyalty.” Zidane, who won the 2002 Champions

League while playing for Madrid, said he was never in doubt after receiving the offer from Perez. “I love this club, and when the president called me, I couldn’t say no,” Zidane said. “I’ll give everything I have to make this club better.” Zidane quit not long after Madrid won the Champions League title last season, saying that he and the club needed a change in command to keep succeeding. He won nine titles in his first stint with Madrid. Zidane will be in charge of Tuesday’s practice session, and his first game back will be Saturday at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium against Celta Vigo. Madrid trails leader Barcelona by 12 points with 11 matches left and is five points behind second-place Atletico Madrid. “I’ve been watching the season closely and I’m also not happy with how things have gone,” Zidane said. “We have to see what we can (do) to improve and make sure things can be different going forward.” Solari led the team to a 4-1 win at Valladolid on Sunday and was in charge of practice on Monday. The club said it offered him an opportunity to remain in a different position. The former Argentina and Madrid player had been the “B’’ team’s coach before taking over the main squad in October. Solari led Madrid to 22 wins, eight losses and two draws in all competitions, and helped the team win the Club World Cup in December.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Tuesday • 03.12.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠Void ♥K Q 3 ♦7 6 4 2 ♣Q J 9 8 7 5 WEST EAST ♠A 7 ♠9 8 5 3 2 ♥A 8 7 6 2 ♥J 10 9 5 4 ♦A Q 8 5 3 ♦10 9 ♣10 ♣A SOUTH ♠K Q J 10 6 4 ♥Void ♦K J ♣K 6 4 3 2 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ 2♠* Pass 3♥ 4♣ 4♥ 5♣ 5♥ 5♠ Dbl 6♣ Dbl All pass *Hearts and a minor, at least 5-5 ? Opening lead: Today’s deal was reportedly played in a rubber bridge game at the Istanbul Bridge Center in 1989. Bridge is quite popular in Turkey and there are many fine Turkish players. Imagine things from West’s point of view. His opponents had bid a slam and he was the proud owner of three aces. Not only that — his partner had doubled, not him! What a blood bath this was going to be. West only had to decide which ace to lead. He chose the ace of hearts. OOPS!

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD South ruffed the ace of hearts lead and led the king of spades. West covered and dummy ruffed. Both of South’s diamonds went on the king and queen of hearts. A trick was conceded to the ace of trumps and South scored up his doubled slam. West, we are told, wandered aimlessly around the bridge club for quite a while, muttering to himself all the time. He asked several friends if they thought it was possible to find a trump lead from his hand. A trump lead, in fact, is the only lead to defeat the contract two tricks. The ace of diamonds, instead, will lead to down one. The ace of spades lead would fare no better than the ace of hearts, as declarer would have been able to discard all four of dummy’s diamonds on his spades. What would you have led? tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

Across

1 Leg muscle, in sports slang 6 Beach lotion letters 9 Grease, informally 13 Tough HS science course 14 “If I Could Turn Back Time” singer, 1989 15 Per item 16 “I’m game — just give me the signal” 19 Iowa senator Ernst 20 Kind of cord for a daredevil 21 Emmynominated Lucy 23 ___-ray Disc 25 Costa ___ 26 Celtics playerturned-executive

March 12 WORD — PELAGIC (PELAGIC: puh-LAJ-ik: Of, relating to, or living in the open sea; oceanic.) Average mark 19 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 25 or more words in PELAGIC? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — EDIFYING dine edgy ding edify dingy eying dyeing defy dying defying feign deify fend deifying fiend deign find deny fine dignify RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

58 “Let’s do it!” ... or comment on the last words of 16-, 26- and 47-Across, when said together out loud 64 Laundry basketful 65 Horrible person 66 Oreo filler 67 The first “O” in YOLO 68 Scot’s “not” 69 Lift up

Down

1 Sarcastic laugh syllable 2 Human’s closest relative 3 Many a CFO’s degree 4 When the abolition of slavery is commemorated 5 Toy on a string 6 “Thar ___ blows!” 7 Calligraphy tool 8 Naan-like Native American food 9 Cape Canaveral event 10 In quite a spot 11 Yawner 12 Sword’s name with two accents 14 “Four-alarm” food

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR

If March 12 is your birthday • This year, you could be stoic and determined, manifesting unusual endurance, yet you also could become flaky and silly in a New York minute. GEMINI is always full of news and chatter.

WORD GAME

29 Snake warning 32 On the open ocean 33 Stitch line 35 Something a pedant picks 36 Cambridge sch. 37 Come before 40 Dallas sch. 41 Prefix with brow 42 Fly majestically 43 Suppress 45 Pots’ partners 47 Something to take after a garlicky meal 50 Cinnamony tea 52 1914-18 conflict, for short 53 Broke a fast 54 Get hold of 56 1960s British PM ___ Douglas-Home

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Handle major concerns, such as finances, in the a.m. You will get new information if you are open to discussion. By afternoon, communication activates. You can scarcely get a free moment. Tonight: Be open in discussions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You beam in the a.m. Where others cannot turn a situation around, you can by midafternoon. Be willing to take steps to improve your situation. Remain responsive. Tonight: Spend a little on you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Your sixth sense kicks in during the morning. A question you might ask and subsequent information you are given forces thought. Once you start discussions, communication flourishes. Bright ideas will stem from these talks. Tonight: Paint the town red. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Feelings run high in the morning when you want to communicate an idea. If someone is defensive, you need to give him or her the space to work through this mood. Maintain a low profile. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Others eye your ability to bring people together and take the lead. You might need to bring up a fragile topic with one specific person. Remain caring. Your openness melts another person’s resistance. Tonight: Take a suggestion seriously. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Look past the obvious and think carefully. News from a distance could give you a lot

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Erik Agard

17 Org. for the Indiana Fever and the Atlanta Dream 18 “Yes, Pierre” 21 Sonia Sotomayor, e.g. 22 Like a gut feeling 24 Remove, as a light bulb 26 Block, as a stream 27 Pups’ protests 28 “___ whiz!”

30 Biles of the 2016 Olympics 31 Publicitygrabbing move, maybe 34 Go together well 38 Smokey of R&B 39 Body part that might be “sympathetic” 44 Pricey Apple computer 46 Beer-and-lemonade drink 48 Slumbering no more

49 Piece of a mosaic 51 Assistance 54 Flight hub for Norwegian 55 Godsend 57 Per item 59 Airport code hidden in FUEL GAUGE 60 Ticked-off feeling 61 Island garland 62 Mornings, for short 63 Court divider

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0205

WORD SCRIMMAGE

to think about. Midday, you take charge of a project. Others admire your efficiency. Do not nitpick. Tonight: A must appearance. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH One-on-one relating in the earlier part of the day draws you closer to the other party. By afternoon, you eye a conceptual interaction. Understand what someone is saying, although you might need to stop and walk in this person’s footsteps. Tonight: Let your imagination lead. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You might not believe how sensitive you feel now. You could want to clear the air with someone you care about. Allow greater give-and-take. Realize that this might be intense. Tonight: One-on-one relating.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Getting going could be difficult, but you will do so by afternoon. Your interactions become more dynamic as a result. You make an impression. You could find that this person intellectualizes a lot. Tonight: Say “yes.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your creativity soars, and you feel more in touch with your feelings than you have. Touch base with a child or someone who stimulates your creativity. You will want to apply one of your ideas in the near future. Tonight: Doing your thing. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Allow your playfulness to emerge. Try to remain centered. Communication flourishes between you and a loved one. If single, you could meet someone out of the blue who might be very enticing. Tonight: Put on your dancing shoes.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You could be direct and say what you want. Others want to put in their two cents, too. As a result you might want to close your office door or take some much-needed personal time at home in the later day. You need to keep it together, if possible. Tonight: Stay anchored. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.12.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Has this marriage gone to the dogs?

Dear Living • Didn’t you know about your wife’s love of animals while you were engaged? Explain to her that when you married her, you didn’t realize you would be just another occupant in her doghouse. The conditions you describe are not only stressful,

but could also be a health hazard. Contact the city or county and find out whether there are restrictions on the number of animals that homeowners are allowed. (I hope they have all been spayed or neutered!) As her partner, your wishes should be taken into consideration and a compromise reached. Dear Abby • I’m a gay man. My sister and I are best friends. I love her dearly. Long story short, she has now taken her religious beliefs much more seriously (Christianity). She’s married, with three children (6, 4 and 2 years old) who my partner and I adore. They attend church every weekend, rehearse Bible verses with their children every night and are active in their community. My partner and I visit as often as we can to spend time with her and the kids. They live 200 miles away, and the drive is a long one, so we stay overnight. On our last visit, she pulled me aside and expressed how uncomfortable she

and her husband have been feeling with the sleeping arrangement. They don’t agree with us sleeping in the same room because we are “not married.” I know it’s more than that — it is because we are not a straight couple. They said they prefer we sleep in different rooms when we visit them. My partner and I feel devastated. Can you help? — Second-Class Citizen Dear Second Class • From your description, it’s unlikely that your sister and her husband will become more accepting than they are. As I see it, you have no choice but to “turn the other cheek” and spend your nights in a nearby hotel or motel. That may be the sacrifice you have to make to maintain your close relationship with the kids. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

TV TUESDAY

MISS MANNERS

Baked Alaska fan on quest for a utensil Dear Miss Manners • Baked Alaska is vexing me ... it seems to want every sort of utensil because of all its textures. Would the older way have been ice cream forks and perhaps dessert knives? Surely there were not baked Alaska spoons. What might a hostess use instead? Gentle Reader • Baked Alaska spoons! What a good idea. And how curious that they were not invented, as that dessert was first made in the 19th century. Fortunately, it can be eaten anyway. You presumably have forks and oval spoons, which are the standard dessert service for treats that involve something crumbly that can be cut with a fork, and something gooey. Dear Miss Manners • A dear friend of my family wanted to have a baby shower for me (I’m the pregnant one) and my wife. I

like the idea of celebrating with a small group of friends and family, but we are absolutely opposed to registries or events where gifts are expected. We don’t want anybody to feel obligated to bring anything. If some bring gifts and others don’t, I’m worried that those without gifts will feel embarrassed. What should I tell the friend who would like to throw us the party? Also, what does one do at such a party? The shower activities we’ve read about seem silly. Gentle Reader • That Miss Manners shares your feeling does not change the fact that presents and silly games are the chief characteristics of baby showers. Therefore, what you should tell your friend is how much you appreciate the offer, but that you would truly rather not have a shower.

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • I run a health care office, and I’ve just been solicited by a former patient to fund her further education on GoFundMe. I know this is now a “thing” to ask for money, but I am uncomfortable with this. What would be a good response? Gentle Reader • Is your in-box not overflowing with letters from people from all over the world, who announce that they hope they find you well and then ask for money? Miss Manners assures you that there are only two acceptable responses to solicitations for money: 1. Ignore. Or 2. Give. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

Differences: 1. Curtain is not as long. 2. Arm is moved. 3. Shirt is different. 4. Letters on window are different. 5. Building is wider. 6. Line in sidewalk is missing.

Dear Abby • I’m recently married, and in my opinion, my wife has too many pets — seven inside dogs. She also feeds neighborhood cats, so at any given time, there are 10 to 18 cats in our yard. The dogs inside have no boundaries. They have taken over the main living space. The family room sofas are filthy and destroyed, so we can’t use that space. The carpet is gone, and there is dog hair everywhere. I’m at my wits’ end. I feel I have no say in this matter, and I’m constantly stressed over these living conditions. I hate going home. I have dogs with me when I eat, sleep and make love. I don’t know how to approach her on this. — Living Like an Animal in Phoenix

3/12/19

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FOX 2 News at 9:00pm FOX MasterChef: Junior Edition: New Kids on the 2 Block; Junior Edition: Going Bananas. The junior (N) (cc) cooks are put to the test. (N) CBS NCIS Jimmy is asked to FBI: Invisible. Kidnap- NCIS: New Orleans An 4 tamper with evidence. pers try to become elusive terrorist resur(N) (cc) famous. (N) faces. (N) NBC Ellen’s Game of Games: This Is Us The family 5 Beauty and the Boots. awaits news on Kate. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

New Amsterdam: King of Swords. (9:01) (N) (cc)

PBS Moments to Remember (My Music) 1950s and ’60s hits. (cc) ÍWoody 9 Guthrie CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

The Flash The metaRoswell, New Mexico: human cure is ready to Barely Breathing. (N) use. (N) (cc) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

ABC The Bachelor: After the Final Rose. (N) (cc) 30

Videos After Dark Home videos with an edgy twist. (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds: True ION Criminal Minds: Lucky. Criminal Minds: Pe46 Cannibalistic serial nelope. Serial killer may Night. Search for a sekiller. (cc) target Garcia. rial killer. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 03.12.2019

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Arthritis pain is hard to define by numbers FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • Why is pain measured by numbers? I have severe pain, and doctors do not know what to do when I say it is an 11 on a scale of 1-10. My pain can’t be measured by numbers. It depends on the time of day, what I have done during the day and the weather. I have arthritis in most of my joints, specifically my spine and hips. Having had five spine surgeries, epidurals and hip shots, I have pain every day. There is not much more that can be done but to take opioids. There is no chronic pain support group in my area, and no one can understand how I feel unless they have gone through it. Why is there not another way the doctor can measure your pain? I have given up everything I love to do in life because of pain. — M.L.D.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • I am very sorry to hear your story, as it is similar to those I have heard before from people with chronic pain. It is disappointing to hear that you haven’t found a specialist in your area who seems to care about helping you. Although the 1-10 pain scale is entrenched, it has its flaws. The biggest one is that what one person might consider a two, another person might consider a nine. Because pain is subjective, there is no way of standardizing what a person means with their rating. However, a 10 on a scale of 1-10 is supposed to be the worst pain imaginable.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • A recent visit to the doctor included blood tests. I was concerned that the eGFR reading decreased by 23 points (from 93 to 69) in a year’s time. Both my cardiologist and my preferred care provider advised that since the reading of 69 was still in the safe zone, there is no reason to be concerned. My concern is that the rate of decrease indicates to me something is going on with my kidneys. My creatinine level has risen steadily from 0.8 in January 2018 to 0.9 in March; 0.95 in August, and 1.1 in January 2019. Is my concern warranted? — D.L.L.

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Answer • That’s a steady increase in creatinine, meaning a steady decrease in kidney function. I certainly would recommend you ask your doctor about seeing a kidney specialist, a nephrologist. Your primary care doctor is right that the creatinine is still in the normal range, but the trend shows a 30 percent loss of kidney function in a year. That deserves an evaluation. It is also appropriate to review any medications or supplements you might be taking.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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