Page 1

SEC TOURNAMENT

MICHAEL PORTER JR. RETURNS

> Elite freshman to play Thursday after months of recovery > Hochman: Adding MPJ makes Mizzou a real wild card TODAY IN SPORTS > MISSOURI VS. GEORGIA, 2:30 P.M. THURSDAY, SEC NETWORK CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

THURSDAY • 03.08.2018 • $2.00

GREITENS INVESTIGATION

Panel meets behind door, black plastic

2,000 JOBS ON WAY ST. PETERS: Amazon facility will add 1,500 jobs BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Secrecy will be kept up, committee pledges

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Automatic sensors on a conveyor belt scan shipping labels on packages to divert them into the correct outbound delivery truck in August at the Amazon Edwardsville fulfillment center.

BY JACK SUNTRUP • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ered around freezing Wednesday morning, and mild wind gusts stirred the cold air. About 10 journalists shuffled around outside the Jefferson City Police Department. The evening before, state Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, who is chairing a committee that could lead to the impeachment of Gov. Eric Greitens, told reporters that it would be “wasting your time” to try to get details on forthcoming secret committee hearings. The first of those closed hearings was

Truman Parkway

370

Size: 855,000 square feet St. Peters payroll: $42 million

See AMAZON • Page A4

“This is a situation that will bring a lot of new jobs, and all in the region will profit.” St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann

Incentives: $10 million+

70

JEFFERSON CITY • Temperatures hov-

PROPOSED AMAZON FULFILLMENT CENTER Number of new jobs: 1,500

Ro ad Sp en ce r

CRISTINA M. FLETES • P-D

Black plastic covers the door at the Jefferson City Police Station on Wednesday during lawmakers’ closed hearings.

370 Business Park

370 Lakeside Park

ST. PETERS • After opening dozens of massive distribution facilities across the country to support growing online sales, Amazon will open its first Missouri fulfillment center in St. Peters, the company announced Wednesday. The building, which will employ 1,500 full-time workers when it opens in May 2019, will be equipped with Amazon’s signature robotic technology and bring many Amazon Prime customers in the St. Louis area next-day, and possibly same-day, delivery for thousands of products. Once the 855,080-squarefoot facility opens, Amazon will have more than 4,000 employees in the St. Louis area spread among the new St. Peters building, two

Opening: May 2019

Mexico Road POST-DISPATCH

SOURCE: Economic development officials estimate

GRANITE CITY: Steel mill to recall 500 workers BY BRIAN FELDT AND JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

U.S. health Insurer Cigna Corp. is close to buying St. Louis County-based pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts Holding Co., the Wall Street Journal reported late Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter. The terms of the potential deal were not known, but a deal could be announced as soon as Thursday, the newspaper said. Express Scripts had a market value of $41.43 billion as of Wednesday’s close,

> TRUMP ON TRADE: In targeting China with more tariffs, Trump opens new front in trade war. A7

Citing President Donald Trump’s plans to impose tariffs on imported steel, United States Steel Corp. has said it will put roughly 500 workers back on the job by restarting one of two idled blast furnaces and associated steelmaking facilities at its Granite City factory. “Immediately, I’ve seen some of the biggest smiles on their faces,” said Dan Simmons, President of United Steelworkers Local 1899 in Granite City. “It’s just so much relief for them and their families.” The P ittsburgh-based steelmaker attributed the move to an expected rise in demand for domestic steel after Trump’s decision last week to impose tariffs of 25 percent on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Workers should start

See CIGNA • Page A4

> EDITORIAL: As steel mill recalls 500, Missouri farmers worry about markets for soybeans, corn. A12

See STEEL • Page A4

See GREITENS • Page A6

Health insurer Cigna set to buy Express Scripts REUTERS

TODAY

27°/41°

Labor day

PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

28°/48° CHANCE OF RAIN

WEATHER B10

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

U.S. Steel plans bring 500 workers back to its Granite City plant (background) after President Donald Trump’s announcement that the United States will place tariffs on imported steel.

Duck, duck, glue

St. Louis radio host seeks public office

Sculpture appears on South Grand

Nerve agent poisons Russian ex-spy

NEWS • A3

Wainwright shows reinvented pitches

• A2

Officer dies responding to wrong house

• A5

• A15 • B1

1 M Vol. 140, No. 67 ©2018


SEC TOURNAMENT

MICHAEL PORTER JR. RETURNS

> Elite freshman to play Thursday after months of recovery > Hochman: Adding MPJ makes Mizzou a real wild card TODAY IN SPORTS > MISSOURI VS. GEORGIA, 2:30 P.M. THURSDAY, SEC NETWORK CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

THURSDAY • 03.08.2018 • $2.00

Health insurer Cigna set to buy Express Scripts FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

2,000 JOBS ON WAY ST. PETERS: Amazon facility will add 1,500 jobs

U.S. health insurer Cigna Corp. is close to buying St. Louis County-based pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts Holding Co., the Wall Street Journal reported late Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter. The terms of the potential deal were not known, but a deal could be announced as soon as Thursday, the newspaper said. Express Scripts had a market value of $41.43 billion as of Wednesday’s close, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon data. Express Scripts spokesman Phil Blando

BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See CIGNA • Page A4

GREITENS INVESTIGATION

Panel meets behind door, black plastic

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

370 Business Park

370 Lakeside Park

Truman Parkway

Sp en ce r

PROPOSED AMAZON FULFILLMENT CENTER Number of new jobs: 1,500

Ro ad

Secrecy will be kept up, committee pledges

Automatic sensors on a conveyor belt scan shipping labels on packages to divert them into the correct outbound delivery truck in August at the Amazon Edwardsville fulfillment center.

370

Size: 855,000 square feet St. Peters payroll: $42 million

ST. PETERS • After opening dozens of massive distribution facilities across the country to support growing online sales, Amazon will open its first Missouri fulfillment center in St. Peters, the company announced Wednesday. The building, which will employ 1,500 full-time workers when it opens in May 2019, will be equipped with Amazon’s signature robotic technology and bring many Amazon Prime customers in the St. Louis area next-day, and possibly same-day, delivery for thousands of products. Once the 855,080-squarefoot facility opens, Amazon will have more than 4,000 employees in the St. Louis area spread among the new St. Peters building, two See AMAZON • Page A4

“This is a situation that will bring a lot of new jobs, and all in the region will profit.” St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann

Incentives: $10 million+

70

Opening: May 2019

Mexico Road POST-DISPATCH

SOURCE: Economic development officials estimate

GRANITE CITY: Steel mill to recall 500 workers BY BRIAN FELDT AND JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Temperatures hovered around freezing Wednesday morning, and mild wind gusts stirred the cold air. About 10 journalists shuffled around outside the Jefferson City Police Department. The evening before, state Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, who is chairing a committee that could lead to the impeachment of Gov. Eric Greitens, told reporters that it would be “wasting your time” to try to get details on forthcoming secret committee hearings. The first of those closed hearings was

> TRUMP ON TRADE: In targeting China with more tariffs, Trump opens new front in trade war. A7

Citing President Donald Trump’s plans to impose tariffs on imported steel, United States Steel Corp. has said it will put roughly 500 workers back on the job by restarting one of two idled blast furnaces and associated steelmaking facilities at its Granite City factory. “Immediately, I’ve seen some of the biggest smiles on their faces,” said Dan Simmons, President of United Steelworkers Local 1899 in Granite City. “It’s just so much relief for them and their families.” The P ittsburgh-based steelmaker attributed the move to an expected rise in demand for domestic steel after Trump’s decision last week to impose tariffs of 25 percent on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Workers should start

See GREITENS • Page A6

> EDITORIAL: As steel mill recalls 500, Missouri farmers worry about markets for soybeans, corn. A12

See STEEL • Page A4

CRISTINA M. FLETES • P-D

Black plastic covers the door at the Jefferson City Police Station on Wednesday during lawmakers’ closed hearings. BY JACK SUNTRUP • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TODAY

27°/41°

Labor day

PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

28°/48° CHANCE OF RAIN

WEATHER B10

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

U.S. Steel plans bring 500 workers back to its Granite City plant (background) after President Donald Trump’s announcement that the United States will place tariffs on imported steel.

Duck, duck, glue

St. Louis radio host seeks public office

Sculpture appears on South Grand

Nerve agent poisons Russian ex-spy

NEWS • A3

Wainwright shows reinvented pitches

• A2

Officer dies responding to wrong house

• A5

• A15 • B1

2 M Vol. 140, No. 67 ©2018


M 1 THURSDAY • 03.08.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM CARTOONISTS’ VIEWS From the border wall to school shootings and the Russia probe, see how U.S. editorial cartoonists view current events. stltoday.com/opinion

PRIME PODCASTS

UPCOMING CHATS

The SEC comes to town and Mizzou is in the hunt, so hear the latest from Dave Matter and Ben Frederickson. stltoday.com/ podcasts

Thursday: Talk SEC tourney with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday: Blues hockey talk with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Monday: Cardinals baseball from spring training, 11 a.m Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

Sports voice seeks office; McFly template calls it a life JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CAT, HAT, RING • Sportscaster Jim Hayes plans to add some color commentary to a Crystal Lake Park aldermanic race in April. The 55-year-old Fox Sports Midwest reporter — best known for his dispatches during Cardinals baseball games — is running for First Ward alderman in the small west St. Louis County municipality, according to information filed with Jim Hayes the Post-Dispatch voters guide. Crystal Lake Park is between Frontenac, Town and County and Des Peres and has about 470 residents. In April, Hayes will face Carol Ann Giovando, who won a write-in campaign in April 2016. No surprise those two are squaring off at the ballot box, as they already have locked horns in the legal arena. One year ago, Hayes and his wife, Erin, sued Giovando, her husband, Robert, and the city over an addition the Giovandos started building onto their house next door to the Hayes’ property. The project consists of a new four-car garage, family room and master suite. In his lawsuit, Hayes contends that he never received due notice of a variance hearing on the project; that the variance granted violates several city ordinances; and that it is a “dramatic impairment” on

light available to the Hayes property. In court filings, the Giovandos and the city deny the allegations and seek dismissal of the lawsuit. Attempts at mediation last month failed and the case is set to come up again March 14 in St. Louis County Circuit Court. GOODBYE, McFLY • Mark Russell Gale, who died Friday at the age of 95, was many things: husband, patriarch, lawyer, Army officer, World War II veteran, city councilman, school board member. But film fans may not know he inspired the 1985 hit movie “Back To The Future,” a now-classic film written by his son, Bob Gale. As the story goes, Bob Gale happened across his father’s University City High yearbook and wondered if he and his father would have been friends if they had attended school at the same time. Bob Gale wrote the script along with director Robert Zemeckis. It was nominated for an Acad- Mark Gale emy Award for best original screenplay. The movie stars Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly, who travels in time by using a souped-up DeLorean. Mark Gale was born and reared in University City, enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after World War II broke out, served in the European theater and attained the rank of captain. On his return home, he earned a law degree from Washington University and joined what became the Greensfelder Hemker Gale firm. In 1948, Mr. Gale married violinist

Maxine Kippel, who died in 2010. Aside from the screenwriter, the couple had two other sons, Charles Gale and Randy Gale. Mr. Gale served one term as a University City councilman. Then starting in 1959, to ensure his children got a quality education, he served 12 years on the University City School Board. He also served for years on the board at United Hebrew Temple. Known for his bow tie and quick wit, Mr. Gale, when asked if he knew of any good lawyers, would invariably respond, “No such thing.” Instead of funeral services, Mr. Gale asked that his friends simply gather together, swap anecdotes and eat Ted Drewes Oreo concretes. GREEN, GREENER, GREENEST • Things keep getting better for St. Louis, at least when it comes to St. Patrick’s Day. Our fair o’burg is ranked No. 11 in the U.S. for “Best Cities for St. Patrick’s Day Celebrations” by personal finance website WalletHub. (Just two years ago, we only managed a No. 16 ranking.) We excel when it comes to available parades, easy access to pubs, reasonable prices for parties and cheap drinks and meals at bars and restaurants. But we take a big shillelagh swat when it comes to crime and safety: No. 196 out of the 200 cities. The 10 best St. Pat’s party cities: Chicago; Boston; Philadelphia; Buffalo; New York; San Francisco; Fort Collins, Colo.; Tampa; Madison, Wis.; and Pittsburgh. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

EAST ST. LOUIS • A private security firm

employee who lost an inmate in East St. Louis after falling asleep at a casino hotel has been fired. The missing inmate, however, remained on the loose. East St. Louis police were searching for the inmate, Brian Jordan, 33. He was not considered to be armed and dangerous, but police broadcast a description of him to surrounding cities. He escaped after a driver for Texas-based Guard Force International stopped at the Casino Jordan Queen hotel Sunday night with Jordan and another suspect he was transporting. He fell asleep, and woke up less than an hour later to find Jordan gone, along with $5,200 of his own cash, police said. The second inmate apparently slept through Jordan’s escape, too. The driver, identified as Lamont Hen-

derson, was transporting the two men from Oklahoma City to a city in Texas, East St. Louis Police Chief Jerry Simon said. Though East St. Louis is hundreds of miles from either place, an official with Guard Force said Henderson was supposed to be in the St. Louis area to meet up with another team. Guard Force CEO Gordon Brooks told a Post-Dispatch reporter Wednesday that he had fired the driver “for not following protocol.” Brooks said he doesn’t know if Henderson had been gambling at the casino. He said the driver and inmates were supposed to be in the St. Louis area to meet up with another team. “That was fine, they were going where they were supposed to be,” Brooks said. “But he made an unauthorized stop and everything transpired from there. We don’t go into public places. Common sense, you know.” Surveillance cameras caught Jordan walking out to the security firm’s van in the hotel parking lot shortly after

PEOPLE Oprah rejects sign from God

Of course it’s come to this. After Oprah left the door open for a potential presidential bid guided by God himself, someone was bound to get Oprah and the man upstairs in a room together. Stephen Colbert did it on Tuesday. In a sit-down with the talk-show queen, “The Late Show” host couldn’t resist bringing up the possibility of Oprah’s running for president — a job the media mogul has repeatedly stated she wants no part of. That is, unless God gives her a sign. “Have you had any signs at all?” Colbert asked. “Not one,” Oprah answered. “I guess that settles it,” Colbert said. But guess who decided to fly by then? The Almighty himself — or, more specifically, a big-screen, animated projection of God. “’I hear thou seekest a sign,” God tells Oprah before holding up an actual sign that says “Run!” But she’s still not persuaded. In the end, Oprah comforts the Lord by reassuring Him that He’ll “find someone that you are just inspired by in 2020.” Oscar thief is charged • A man was charged Tuesday with stealing Frances McDormand’s Academy Award at an Oscars after-party. Los Angeles County prosecutors said that Terry Bryant, 47, was charged with one felony count of grand theft for stealing the statuette McDormand won Sunday for best actress for her performance in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” Bryant faces up to three years in prison if convicted.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Sue AneLangdon is 82. Songwriter Carole Bayer Sager is 74. Actor-directormusician Micky Dolenz is 73. NBC News anchor Lester Holt is 59. Actor Aidan Quinn is 59. Actress Camryn Manheim is 57. Actor Freddie Prinze Jr. is 42. Singer Kristinia DeBarge is 28. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

Guard fired after losing inmate in East St. Louis FROM STAFF REPORTS

Times subject to change

1:30 a.m. Monday, removing a cellphone and clothing and then walking west toward the Eads Bridge, Simon said. Henderson didn’t call police until about five hours after he realized Jordan was gone, telling detectives he was out looking for Jordan himself during that time. Police were unaware of the three until the driver called police about 6:40 a.m. Monday, Simon said. East St. Louis police immediately alerted surrounding cities and broadcast Jordan’s description. Henderson told police Jordan vanished along with $5,200 cash the guard had in a satchel. It was unknown why Henderson had the cash. Jordan is described as about 6 feet tall with a medium build. He was caught in a stolen car in Oklahoma City and was being taken to Texas for a parole violation in a drug case, police said. Anyone with information about his whereabouts is asked to call East St. Louis police at 618-482-6700.

POWERBALL Wednesday: 06-13-19-36-51 Powerball: 18 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $348 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 01-04-26-35-39 Mega ball: 22 Megaplier: 5 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $290 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 03-07-12-13-27-32 Estimated jackpot: $1.1 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 03-12-15-32-36 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $289,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 984 Evening: 650 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 4620 Evening: 6013

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 11-24-26-31-41 Evening: 11-13-18-20-38 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $6.5 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 976 FB: 0 Evening: 265 FB: 9 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 3814 FB: 2 Evening: 5679 FB: 0

LAW & ORDER O’FALLON, ILL. > Teen charged in school threat • A 15-year-old boy is facing charges of making and attempting to make a terrorist threat after he allegedly wrote on a school window, “I’m going to shoot this (expletive) up.” The charges against the teen were announced by officials on Wednesday, two days after the message was found scrawled on a window at Hinchcliffe Elementary School. The boy is also being charged with disorderly conduct and criminal defacement of property. He appeared in St. Clair County Juvenile

Court for a reading of the charges and was then sent to the St. Clair County Juvenile Detention Center, police said. St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly called the message left at the school a serious threat, even though the teen has said he meant it as a joke. Officials said the teen, who wasn’t identified because he is a juvenile, was undergoing a mental evaluation. Kelly wouldn’t rule out adult charges being brought against him, depending on what the evaluation finds.

ST. LOUIS > Telemarketers get prison time for scam • Two leaders of a Phoenixbased telemarketing fraud that targeted St. Louis-area residents and others have been sentenced to prison, the U.S. Attorney’s office said Tuesday. Michael McNeill, 48, of Phoenix, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, and Joshua Flynn, 36, of Chandler, Ariz., got seven years, the U.S. Attorney’s office said. McNeill and Flynn and others sold false and fictitious business opportunities to U.S. and Canadian residents using a series of

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A10 Chuck Raasch ........ A6 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A12 Obituaries ........... A14

business names, including Smart Business Pros LLC of Warson Woods, prosecutors said. In all, about 4,000 victims lost $20 million, including 91 Missouri residents who lost about $1 million, prosecutors said. McNeill, who also went by “Mr. White” and “Todd Lockwood,” and Flynn, also known as “Mr. Pink” and “Jeff Thomas,” pleaded guilty in November to one count of wire fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Pat Gauen ............. A6 Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks .................. A11 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. B10

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LOCAL

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A3

Giant cardboard duck sculpture lands in St. Louis park off S. Grand BY ERIN HEFFERNAN st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • It looks like a duck, it might even fly like a duck, and it’s sitting right now in a small park on South Grand Boulevard. St. Louis artist Justin King said he didn’t quite know why he created the giant cardboard duck sculpture the size of a car, but on Wednesday morning it went on full display in St. Louis. The enormous duck can be spotted in Ritz Park, amid a row of restaurants on South Grand. The duck is about 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall. Its name, King decided, is Carl. King got permission to place Carl the Duck in Ritz Park from the South Grand Community Improvement District. He completed Carl the Duck in December, but waited to release the bird until weather improved. “I’m still a little afraid a high wind could make it fly,” he said. “But I’m OK with that. To me it’s akin to a sidewalk chalk piece. If the elements get to it, then so be it.” The sculpture was made with simple materials and equipment: recycled cardboard, a utility knife, a glue gun and a little polyurethane for a sealant, King said. The artist hopes people in the neighborhood will get to see and take photos with the recycled duck before

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

“It’s really cool!” Eleanor Cook, 4, said as Carl the cardboard duck stops her in her tracks in Ritz Park on South Grand Boulevard on Wednesday as Eleanor was walking with her family. Area artist Justin King made the duck as a temporary decoration. “It’ll last until it’s vandalized, stolen or the weather gets it.”

wind, rain or vandals end its stay. “I just wanted to make something big and fun for the neighborhood,” King said. “And, especially for kids, I wanted to show you don’t need expensive materials to make art.” King has more cardboard creations he plans to show at The Sheldon gallery this summer.

“I’ve created a cardboard chimpanzee, too,” he said. “That’s probably my best so far.” To find out more about King’s artwork, visit www.justinkingdesigns. com. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

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DIGEST ST. LOUIS > Highway stretch to close for repairs • Drivers heading downtown will encounter a shutdown this weekend of a stretch of eastbound Interstate 44/ northbound Interstate 55 south of the Poplar Street Bridge. Northbound I-55 will close at 8 p.m. Friday at where the highway merges with eastbound I-44. Also beginning at 8 p.m., eastbound I-44 drivers will have to exit at Seventh Street/Park Avenue and Broadway. The closure will allow work crews to repair pavement and deal with drainage issues on the bridge over Third Street, the Missouri Department of Transportation said. The highway is expected to reopen by 5 a.m. Monday. Four ramps will close at 7 p.m. Friday for the weekend work: From eastbound I-44/northbound I-55 to Walnut Street; from Eighth and Marion streets to eastbound I-44/ northbound I-55; from northbound I-55 to Gravois Avenue and from eastbound I-44/northbound I-55 to the PSB. ROCK HILL > Rezoning request for small subdivision • The Board of Aldermen here advanced on Tuesday a bill to rezone a site in the north central part of the city where McKelvey Homes plans to build 10 new homes. It would be the municipality’s first private residential subdivision and would be called Hudson Heights. A final vote on the measure is expected at the board’s next meeting on March 20. McKelvey is asking for a zoning change for the 2.44 acre parcel at Hudson and Gilbert avenue that would allow the builder to use smaller lots. ST. JOHN > Sewer line repair program is being scaled back • Residents using this city’s sewer lateral program may no longer get as much of their pipeline replaced as they did in the past. The City Council voted Monday night to reduce the extent of replacement due to increasing costs. “The fund was starting to get depleted and so we had to cut back on the extent of the repairs,” Public Works Director James Phillips said in an interview after the meeting. Police Chief/City Manager J. R. “Rusty” Morris in an interview said historically the city has tried to keep the fund balance at $150,000 to $175,000. The program brings in $75,000 annually from the $28-a-year fee residents pay but with increasing costs, the city has been spending about $75,000 or $80,000 a year, he added. To preserve the fund for future use, the council changed the parameters of the type of repairs that are covered, he said. “We would replace as much as possible between the main and the house (previously),” he said. “What we’re doing now to try to cut back on some of those costs and get the fund balance back up, we’re going to go back to more of a spot repair.” ARNOLD > City to set up registry, fees for vacant buildings • In an effort to rid the city of vacant and abandoned buildings, the Arnold City Council approved new regulations last week. Owners will have to register their property with the city within 30 days of it becoming vacant and pay a fee of $200. Another $200 will be charged again after three months for residential and six months for commercial or industrial properties that remain vacant or abandoned. Fees must be paid prior to the issuance of an occupancy permit or the transfer of ownership. The council also decided to reject all the bids received for pavement marking and striping services after one of the bidders complained about the selection process. The work will be let out for bid again. From staff and correspondent reports

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Advocates call for new sales tax to be spent on housing BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A group of advocates are lobbying city officials to use half of the new use tax revenue from a recent voter-approved sales tax increase to bolster St. Louis’ consistently underfunded Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The fund, administered by the city’s Affordable Housing Commission, awards loans and grants to develop affordable housing projects and assist some of the most vulnerable residents with repairs and rent, mortgage or utility payments. Last year, St. Louis voters supported a half-cent sales tax increase intended in part to help plan and engineer an 8-mile northsouth Metrolink expansion. Some $12 million annually in proceeds from the increase would be used for that purpose. The rest of the anticipated $20 million generated each year would be earmarked for public safety, neighborhood revitalization, workforce development and infrastructure upgrades. An attempt to use the approximately $4 million in revenue from the corresponding business use tax increase for a 22,000-seat soccer stadium downtown was rejected by voters, leaving plans for that money open as the city prepares to craft the next fiscal year’s budget. The business use tax on out-of-state purchases over $2,000 is the funding source for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund. With

that source now growing, activists are urging the city to once again put a minimum of $5 million toward the fund, as they argue voters intended when they approved its creation in 2002. “As the use tax has grown, money that should have gone into the (Affordable Housing Trust Fund) has been diverted to other programs and services,” reads a statement from the newly formed coalition. Using the unassigned use tax revenue to increase the fund “is a smart, strategic use of taxpayer money with a payoff that will benefit the city of St. Louis for generations to come.” Supporters of the move say it could boost affordable housing funding from roughly $2 million to $7 million annually, which would help make up for recent declines in federal contributions. Groups signing on to a letter sent to Mayor Lyda Krewson, Comptroller Darlene Green and the St. Louis Board of Aldermen include Beyond Housing, Forward through Ferguson and the Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council. Krewson told the Post-Dispatch in May that officials want to put more money into affordable housing, but often find themselves with tough choices to make given the city’s financial struggles. “It’s just a matter of what would we cut in order to do that. We’ve got a whole city to run and not necessarily enough money,” she said. Gary Newcomer, a community develop-

ment specialist at the Community Builders Network of Metro St. Louis, said greater investment in the fund could help tackle some of the city’s biggest problems, including crime and and the need for economic growth in areas that don’t typically entice developers. “We definitely understand there are a lot of other needs in the city, but this really does get at a lot of the priorities that have been stated,” Newcomer said. “It isn’t going to solve homelessness or crime. But it’s a really good tool working right now to address some of these issues.” On Wednesday, a committee at the Board of Aldermen moved to recommend Krewson’s nominations to the Economic Development Tax Board, which under state law, will help determine how Proposition 1’s sales tax revenue will be spent. The mayor appoints five members of the nine-member board, with the consent of a majority of city aldermen. Two members are appointed by the Board of Aldermen, with the other two appointed by St. Louis Public Schools. The full Board of Aldermen held off on approving the appointees at one of its weekly meetings last month, opting to send the nominees to a committee for more thorough vetting, given that they will ultimately influence how roughly $20 million is spent. Director of Operations Todd Waelterman said Wednesday that a little more than half a year’s worth of revenue already has been

collected and is waiting to be appropriated, pending the creation of the Economic Development Tax Board. Around $12 million was appropriated in the FY 2018 budget passed last year, he said: about $7 million for MetroLink and a little more than $1 million in each of the other categories outlined in Proposition 1. Amid concerns that incoming revenue intended for transit could be diverted to other priorities, Waelterman said the measure left little room for interpretation as to where the money should go. “I’m in my 29th year with the city and I’ve never seen something so detailed that outlines specific categories that these pots of money need to be spent in,” he said. The mayor’s office will prepare proposals to fit within those guidelines, Waelterman said, then work with the tax board to produce something together to present to the Board of Aldermen for final approval. The Economic Development Tax Board does not determine how to spend the money generated from the triggered use tax increase. Plans for that revenue will go through the city’s normal budget process, but it will only be appropriated for initiatives that fit the categories laid out in the proposition, Krewson spokesman Koran Addo said. “We’re going to follow the letter of the law,” he said. Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

Amazon’s St. Peters payroll will top $42 million AMAZON • FROM A1

similar distribution centers in Edwardsville and two smaller sortation centers in Hazelwood. Duke Realty will develop the new building at 4000 Premier Parkway in its Premier 370 business park, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and Missouri Route 370. The park already includes tenants such as Best Buy, Reckitt Benckiser and SAIA. The Post-Dispatch reported this week that Grove Collaborative, a San Francisco-based online retailer, will soon add more than 100 e-commerce jobs in the the park, too. With Amazon, the 300-acre district will have more than 2,000 employees. According to the St. Louis Regional Chamber, which worked closely on the deal, Amazon will have a St. Peters payroll exceeding $42 million. State economic development officials said the e-commerce company was investing $175 million in the facility. Matt Hrubes, Duke’s vice president of leasing and development, said construction of the building should begin in a few weeks. Amazon is in line to receive up to $7.95 million in local and state sales tax exemptions, a state spokeswoman said. St. Charles County is also contributing approximately $3 million to help build out infrastructure in the area. The company will also be eligible to receive up to $100,000 from the Skilled Workforce Missouri program. Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens called the deal a win for the region. Rob Dixon, Greitens’ director of economic development, said Amazon chose St. Peters for its proximity to a skilled workforce and central lo-

NIKOS FRAZIER • nfrazier@post-dispatch.com

St. Peters Mayor Len Pagano speaks Wednesday at a press conference announcing the St. Peters Amazon fulfillment center.

cation near highways and the airport. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. said in a statement that Amazon’s investment shows Missouri continues to be at the center of innovation and job creation. “Another global company is recognizing what we in Missouri already know — this is a great place for business and home to a skilled and talented workforce,” McCaskill said. “We’re excited to continue growing our team with our first, state-of-the-art fulfillment center in Missouri,” Sanjay Shah, Amazon’s Vice President of North America Customer Fulfillment, said in a statement. “Our ability to expand in Missouri is the result of two things: incredible customers and an outstanding workforce. Amazon is committed to providing great opportunities for employment and creating a positive economic impact for the region.” Ameren Corp., meanwhile, will invest $10 million to build a new substation just south of the Premier 370 business park to

power Amazon, the Premier 370’s other tenants and FedEx, which will soon move into a 496,209-square-foot distribution facility being built by Indianapolis-based Scannell Properties nearby. The FedEx project is expected to add nearly 300 jobs. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann said that area of St. Peters was close to the region’s epicenter in terms of jobs, which he said, “is probably somewhere in West County.” “This is a situation that will bring a lot of new jobs, and all in the region will profit,” he said. The new St. Peters facility will be Amazon’s first fulfillment center in the state. The company opened two fulfillment centers in Edwardsville that combined employ more than 2,200 workers. One of those, an Amazon spokeswoman said, handles large bulk items such as TVs, furniture or other big products. The St. Peters facility will process smaller items such as books, DVDs and household items such as soaps or cleaning supplies. Once the St. Peters building opens, the second Edwardsville facility will serve as a flex building to handle items as needed, the spokeswoman said. The two Hazelwood facilities Amazon operates, which employ nearly 400 people, provide Amazon with “last mile” logistics — a term that refers to the final portion of the delivery process to the consumer’s front doorstep. More information about applying for Amazon jobs is available on the company’s website, http://www.amazondelivers. jobs/. An Amazon spokeswoman said those jobs should be filled by late 2018 or early 2019. With Amazon, Duke’s Premier 370 will

Mill was major supplier of steel for oil industry STEEL • FROM A1

being recalled later in March and the restart process could take up to four months, ending more than two years during which the plant’s raw steel-making blast furnaces sat cold. “The president’s strong leadership is needed to begin to level the playing field so companies like ours can compete, win and create jobs that support our employees and the communities in which we operate as well as strengthen our national and economic security,” said U. S. Steel President and CEO David Burritt in a statement. “We will continue to support our customers with the high-quality products they have come to expect from U.S. Steel.” U.S. Steel’s Granite City Works blast furnaces and steelmaking facilities were idled in December 2015, and the plant’s hot strip mill was idled in January 2016. More than 1,500 workers lost their jobs in a plant that employed 2,000

prior to the blast furnace shutdowns. The hot strip mill was restarted in February 2017, bringing back about 200 workers. The plant never totally idled. Worker counts went as low as about 100 people. But for the last year, between 700 and 800 workers were employed at the plant, Granite City Economic Development Director James Amos said, mainly finishing raw steel made elsewhere. Only in the depths of the Great Recession, from December 2008 to mid 2009, was the plant completely idled. The company had always maintained the Granite City blast furnaces that can produce about 2.8 million tons of steel annually would resume when steel prices rose. Still, logistics companies, suppliers and those who bought steel from the plant all suffered during the last two years as the Metro East community of 29,000 residents waited for its largest employer to reopen, Amos said.

Express Scripts employs 6,000 area workers CIGNA • FROM A1

according to Thomson Reuters Eikon data.

Express Scripts declined to comment on the report, while Cigna could not be immediately reached for

employ more than 2,000 workers, most of them tied to the e-commerce industry. When the Premier 370 project was proposed under the name Lakeside 370 Business Park in 2000, the city of St. Peters was to act as developer. In 2006, the city sold the Premier 370 site to Duke Realty, which has since developed four buildings, not including Amazon’s planned facility, that total approximately 2 million square feet. Hrubes said momentum started to pick up for Premier 370 in 2016 after Reckitt Benckiser moved into a 715,000-squarefoot, $31.5 million build-to-suit facility developed by Duke. Now with Amazon on board, Hrubes said more deals could be on the horizon. The park has six lots available, and Hrubes said a couple of prospective users are already inquiring about those. St. Peters City Administrator Russ Batzel said Duke was also considering another speculative building on the northeast portion of the development. St. Louis is coming off one of its strongest years for industrial real estate thanks to the rise of e-commerce and massive buildings taken up by companies such as Amazon. Approximately 4 million square feet of industrial space was completed last year, on top of the 6 million square feet delivered in 2016. Almost all of it has been leased, a promising sign for local developers. At least another 2 million square feet is expected to be developed this year. In St. Charles County, more than 1.5 million square feet of industrial space was leased over the course of 2017. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

“There’s a symbiotic relationship of all our ancillary companies in the area, all built around our primary steel manufacturer,” Amos said. “When you take the hub out, it really affects things and it makes the relationships work not nearly as well.” When the raw steel production furnaces were idled, U.S. Steel cited depressed oil prices in addition to low steel prices from a glut of imported steel. Granite City Works has been a major supplier of steel to make pipes and tubes for the oil industry at U.S. Steel’s Lone Star tube plant in Texas. That plant,

too, was idled from April 2016 to April 2017. But now, U.S. oil futures are at their highest price since mid-2015, according to CME Group. Oil prices had begun a precipitous drop in late 2014 and wouldn’t bottom out until early 2016, leading to steep losses and production cuts in what had been a booming domestic oil drilling market. “With energy extraction at high levels, we could see the (oil country tubular goods) market demand continue with its steady recovery, which, of course, is good for the tubular segment as well as our North

American flat-rolled business via the hot-rolled coil sales to customers,” Burritt told analysts on a Feb. 1 conference call. The company also announced then that it had turned its first annual profit since 2014, with Morningstar writing in a report that day that U.S. Steel “rebounded in a big way in 2017.” In 2016, the Commerce Department slapped duties on imported steel from China, Italy and other Asian nations after complaints over selling steel at below-market prices. That slowed the import flow from China, but other nations filled some of the gap and a glut of imported steel was still available within the U.S. Between previous antidumping efforts, rising energy prices and a stronger U.S. Steel balance sheet, Simmons, the local Steelworkers union leader, had been expecting the plant to resume raw steel production soon. “This is somewhat just icing on the cake,” he said of the Trump administration’s planned tariffs. “This was just enough to tip the scale.”

comment. Express Scripts, a pharmacy-benefit manager, employs 6,000 people in the St. Louis area. Such companies serve as middlemen that help negotiate discounts with drug makers. The combination would

be the latest in a flurry of proposed tie-ups in the rapidly changing health care services business. Late last year, CVS Health Corp. inked a nearly $70 billion deal to buy Aetna Inc. In 2015, Aetna agreed to buy fellow health insurer Humana Inc. in a

$37 billion deal that was later terminated after regulatory scrutiny. That same year, Cigna agreed to combine with Anthem Inc., a deal that was also blocked by regulators. Late last year, Anthem said it would launch its own PBM, dealing a blow

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Granite City Steel’s Cogeneration Facility, photographed Wednesday, is part of the mill. Workers will begin returning to the mill later this month as production is expected to resume.

Many Republicans have broken with Trump over the steel tariffs, which they say could lead to retaliatory measures from other countries or raise prices for other manufacturers buying raw commodities. But Rep. Mike Bost, the Republican Congressman who represents Granite City and other Metro East communities, has been a vocal proponent of the tariffs. The co-chair of the U.S. House steel caucus called the decision to reopen the plant “a big victory for the hardworking steel families in Granite City and the entire Metro East economy.” Still, the United Steelworkers Union last weekend endorsed Brendan Kelly, Bost’s November opponent and the state’s attorney for St. Clair County. The union’s District 7 director, Mike Millsap, said that Bost “has been all talk, no action, and votes how he’s told.” Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

to Express Scripts, which is a partner of the health insurer. Express Scripts began in 1986 as result of a joint venture between Medicare Glaser Inc. and Sanus Corp. Health Systems. It became a publicly traded company in 1992.


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Advocates call for new sales tax to be spent on housing BY CELESTE BOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A group of

advocates are lobbying city officials to use half of the new use tax revenue from a recent voter-approved sales tax increase to bolster St. Louis’ consistently underfunded Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The fund,administered by the city’s Affordable Housing Commission, awards loans and grants to develop affordable housing projects and assist some of the most vulnerable residents with repairs and rent, mortgage or utility payments. Last year, St. Louis voters supported a half-cent sales tax increase intended in part to help plan and engineer an 8-mile north-south Metrolink expansion. Some $12 million annually in proceeds from the increase would be used for that purpose. The rest of the anticipated $20 million generated each year would be earmarked for public safety, neighborhood revitalization, workforce development and infrastruc-

ture upgrades. An attempt to use the approximately $4 million in revenue from the corresponding business use tax increase for a 22,000-seat soccer stadium downtown was rejected by voters, leaving plans for that money open as the city prepares to craft the next fiscal year’s budget. The business use tax on out-of-state purchases over $2,000 is the funding source for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund. With that source now growing, activists are urging the city to once again put a minimum of $5 million toward the fund, as they argue voters intended when they approved its creation in 2002. “As the use tax has grown, money that should have gone into the (Affordable Housing Trust Fund) has been diverted to other programs and services,” reads a statement from the newly formed coalition. Using the unassigned use tax revenue to increase the fund “is a smart, strategic use of taxpayer money with a payoff

that will benefit the city of St. Louis for generations to come.” Supporters of the move say it could boost affordable housing funding from roughly $2 million to $7 million annually, which would help make up for recent declines in federal contributions. Groups signing on to a letter sent to Mayor Lyda Krewson, Comptroller Darlene Green and the St. Louis Board of Aldermen include Beyond Housing, Forward through Ferguson and the Metropolitan St.Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council. Krewson told the PostDispatch in May that officials want to put more money into affordable housing, but often find themselves with tough choices to make given the city’s financial struggles. “It’s just a matter of what would we cut in order to do that. We’ve got a whole city to run and not necessarily enough money,” she said. Gary Newcomer, a community development spe-

cialist at the Community Builders Network of Metro St. Louis, said greater investment in the fund could help tackle some of the city’s biggest problems, including crime and and the need for economic growth in areas that don’t typically entice developers. “We definitely understand there are a lot of other needs in the city, but this really does get at a lot of the priorities that have been stated,” Newcomer said. “It isn’t going to solve homelessness or crime. But it’s a really good tool working right now to address some of these issues.” On Wednesday, a committee at the Board of Aldermen moved to recommend Krewson’s nominations to the Economic Development Tax Board, which under state law, will help determine how Proposition 1’s sales tax revenue will be spent. The mayor appoints five members of the nine-member board, with the consent of a majority of city aldermen. Two members are ap-

Amazon’s St. Peters payroll will top $42 million AMAZON • FROM A1

similar distribution centers in Edwardsville and two smaller sortation centers in Hazelwood. Duke Realty will develop the new building at 4000 Premier Parkway in its Premier 370 business park, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and Missouri Route 370. The park already includes tenants such as Best Buy, Reckitt Benckiser and SAIA. The Post-Dispatch reported this week that Grove Collaborative, a San Franciscobased online retailer, will soon add more than 100 e-commerce jobs in the the park, too. With Amazon, the 300-acre district will have more than 2,000 employees. According to the St. Louis Regional Chamber, which worked closely on the deal, Amazon will have a St. Peters payroll exceeding $42 million. State economic development officials said the e-commerce company was investing $175 million in the facility. Matt Hrubes, Duke’s vice president of leasing and development, said construction of the building should

begin in a few weeks. Amazon is in line to receive up to $7.95 million in local and state sales tax exemptions, a state spokeswoman said. St. Charles County is also contributing approximately $3 million to help build out infrastructure in the area. The company will also be eligible to receive up to $100,000 from the Skilled Workforce Missouri program. Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens called the deal a win for the region. Rob Dixon, Greitens’ director of economic development, said Amazon chose St. Peters for its proximity to a skilled workforce and central location near highways and the airport. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. said in a statement that Amazon’s investment shows Missouri continues to be at the center of innovation and job creation. “Another global company is recognizing what we in Missouri already know — this is a great place for business and home to a skilled and talented workforce,” McCaskill said. “We’re excited to continue growing our team with our first, state-of-

NIKOS FRAZIER • nfrazier@post-dispatch.com

St. Peters Mayor Len Pagano speaks Wednesday at a press conference announcing the St. Peters Amazon fulfillment center.

the-art fulfillment center in Missouri,” Sanjay Shah, Amazon’s Vice President of North America Customer Fulfillment, said in a statement. “Our ability to expand in Missouri is the result of two things: incredible customers and an outstanding workforce. Amazon is committed to providing great opportunities for employment and creating a positive economic impact for the region.” Ameren Corp., meanwhile, will invest $10 million to build a new substation just south of the Premier 370 business park to power Amazon, the Premier 370’s other tenants and FedEx, which will soon move into a 496,209-square-foot distribution facility being built by Indianapolis-based Scannell Properties nearby. The FedEx project is ex-

pected to add nearly 300 jobs. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann said that area of St. Peters was close to the region’s epicenter in terms of jobs, which he said, “is probably somewhere in West County.” “This is a situation that will bring a lot of new jobs, and all in the region will profit,” he said. The new St. Peters facility will be Amazon’s first fulfillment center in the state. The company opened two fulfillment centers in Edwardsville that combined employ more than 2,200 workers. One of those, an Amazon spokeswoman said, handles large bulk items such as TVs, furniture or other big products. The St. Peters facility will process smaller items such as books, DVDs and household items such as

Mill was major supplier of steel for oil industry STEEL • FROM A1

being recalled later in March and the restart process could take up to four months, ending more than two years during which the plant’s raw steel-making blast furnaces sat cold. “The president’s strong leadership is needed to begin to level the playing field so companies like ours can compete,win and create jobs that support our employees and the communities in which we operate as well as strengthen our national and economic security,” said U. S. Steel President and CEO David Burritt in a statement. “We will continue to support our customers with the high-quality products they have come to expect from U.S.Steel.” U.S. Steel’s Granite City Works blast furnaces and steelmaking facilities were idled in December 2015, and the plant’s hot strip mill was idled in January 2016. More than 1,500 workers lost their jobs in a plant that employed

2,000 prior to the blast furnace shutdowns. The hot strip mill was restarted in February 2017, bringing back about 200 workers. The plant never totally idled. Worker counts went as low as about 100 people. But for the last year, between 700 and 800 workers were employed at the plant, Granite City Economic Development Director James Amos said, mainly finishing raw steel made elsewhere. Only in the depths of the Great Recession, from December 2008 to mid 2009, was the plant completely idled. The company had always maintained the Granite City blast furnaces that can produce about 2.8 million tons of steel annually would resume when steel prices rose. Still, logistics companies, suppliers and those who bought steel from the plant all suffered during the last two years as the Metro East community of 29,000 residents waited for its largest employer to reopen, Amos

Express Scripts employs 6,000 area workers CIGNA • FROM A1

declined to comment on the report Wednesday night, while Cigna could not be immediately reached for comment. As of last spring, Express Scripts employed 6,000 people in the St. Louis area and 26,000 worldwide. Its headquarters has been on

the campus of the University of Missouri-St. Louis since 2007. Pharmacy benefit managers such as Express Scripts serve as middlemen that help negotiate discounts with drug makers. Brian Tanquilut, an analyst with Jefferies, cautioned that the deal was speculative.

pointed by the Board of Aldermen, with the other two appointed by St. Louis Public Schools. The full Board of Aldermen held off on approving the appointees at one of its weekly meetings last month, opting to send the nominees to a committee for more thorough vetting, given that they will ultimately influence how roughly $20 million is spent. Director of Operations Todd Waelterman said Wednesday that a little more than half a year’s worth of revenue already has been collected and is waiting to be appropriated, pending the creation of the Economic Development Tax Board. Around $12 million was appropriated in the FY 2018 budget passed last year, he said: about $7 million for MetroLink and a little more than $1 million in each of the other categories outlined in Proposition 1. Amid concerns that incoming revenue intended for transit could be diverted to other priorities, Waelterman said the measure left little

room for interpretation as to where the money should go. “I’m in my 29th year with the city and I’ve never seen something so detailed that outlines specific categories that these pots of money need to be spent in,” he said. The mayor’s office will prepare proposals to fit within those guidelines, Waelterman said, then work with the tax board to produce something together to present to the Board of Aldermen for final approval. The Economic Development Tax Board does not determine how to spend the money generated from the triggered use tax increase. Plans for that revenue will go through the city’s normal budget process, but it will only be appropriated for initiatives that fit the categories laid out in the proposition, Krewson spokesman Koran Addo said. “We’re going to follow the letter of the law,” he said.

soaps or cleaning supplies. Once the St. Peters building opens, the second Edwardsville facility will serve as a flex building to handle items as needed, the spokeswoman said. The two Hazelwood facilities Amazon operates, which employ nearly 400 people, provide Amazon with “last mile” logistics — a term that refers to the final portion of the delivery process to the consumer’s front doorstep. More information about applying for Amazon jobs is available on the company’s website, http://www. amazondelivers.jobs/. An Amazon spokeswoman said those jobs should be filled by late 2018 or early 2019. With Amazon, Duke’s Premier 370 will employ more than 2,000 workers, most of them tied to the ecommerce industry. When the Premier 370 project was proposed under the name Lakeside 370 Business Park in 2000, the city of St. Peters was to act as developer. In 2006, the city sold the Premier 370 site to Duke Realty, which has since developed four buildings, not including Amazon’s planned facility, that total approximately 2 million square feet. Hrubes said momentum started to pick up for Pre-

mier 370 in 2016 after Reckitt Benckiser moved into a 715,000-square-foot, $31.5 million build-to-suit facility developed by Duke. Now with Amazon on board, Hrubes said more deals could be on the horizon. The park has six lots available, and Hrubes said a couple of prospective users are already inquiring about those. St. Peters City Administrator Russ Batzel said Duke was also considering another speculative building on the northeast portion of the development. St. Louis is coming off one of its strongest years for industrial real estate thanks to the rise of e-commerce and massive buildings taken up by companies such as Amazon. Approximately 4 million square feet of industrial space was completed last year, on top of the 6 million square feet delivered in 2016. Almost all of it has been leased, a promising sign for local developers. At least another 2 million square feet is expected to be developed this year. In St. Charles County, more than 1.5 million square feet of industrial space was leased over the course of 2017.

said. “There’s a symbiotic relationship of all our ancillary companies in the area, all built around our primary steel manufacturer,” Amos said. “When you take the hub out, it really affects things and it makes the relationships work not nearly as well.” When the raw steel production furnaces were idled, U.S. Steel cited depressed oil prices in addition to low steel prices from a glut of imported steel. Granite City Works has been a major supplier of steel to make pipes and tubes for the oil industry

at U.S. Steel’s Lone Star tube plant in Texas. That plant, too, was idled from April 2016 to April 2017. But now, U.S. oil futures are at their highest price since mid-2015,according to CME Group. Oil prices had begun a precipitous drop in late 2014 and wouldn’t bottom out until early 2016, leading to steep losses and production cuts in what had been a booming domestic oil drilling market. “With energy extraction at high levels, we could see the (oil country tubular goods) market demand continue with its steady recov-

ery, which, of course, is good for the tubular segment as well as our North American flat-rolled business via the hot-rolled coil sales to customers,” Burritt told analysts on a Feb.1 conference call. The company also announced then that it had turned its first annual profit since 2014, with Morningstar writing in a report that day that U.S. Steel “rebounded in a big way in 2017.” In 2016, the Commerce Department slapped duties on imported steel from China, Italy and other Asian nations after complaints over selling steel at belowmarket prices. That slowed the import flow from China, but other nations filled some of the gap and a glut of imported steel was still available within the U.S. Between previous antidumping efforts, rising energy prices and a stronger U.S. Steel balance sheet, Simmons, the local Steelworkers union leader, had been expecting the plant to resume raw steel production soon. “This is somewhat just icing on the cake,” he said of the Trump administration’s

He said the tax overhaul had been giving companies more cash on hand to potentially use for deals such as this one. “PBMs add value, and that’s why they are getting bought. This news, if true, could get other potentially interested parties to the table as well,” he said, citing Amazon and Walgreens. The combination would be the latest in a flurry of proposed link-ups in the rapidly changing health care services business.

Late last year, CVS Health Corp. inked a nearly $70 billion deal to buy Aetna Inc. In 2015, Aetna agreed to buy fellow health insurer Humana Inc. in a $37 billion deal that was later terminated after regulatory scrutiny. That same year, Cigna agreed to combine with health insurer Anthem Inc., a deal that was also blocked by regulators. Late last year, Anthem said it would launch its own pharmacy benefit man-

agement service, dealing a blow to Express Scripts. Anthem is one of the nation’s largest insurers and has been Express Scripts’ biggest client. Their contract goes through 2019. Shares of Express Scripts are up 8.6 percent over the last year, while Cigna is up 27.6 percent. Since the beginning of the year, Express Scripts stock is down 1.6 percent, while Cigna is down 4.4 percent. Express Scripts began in 1986 as result of a joint

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Granite City Steel’s Cogeneration Facility, photographed Wednesday, is part of the mill. Workers will begin returning to the mill later this month as production is expected to resume.

Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

planned tariffs. “This was just enough to tip the scale.” Many Republicans have broken with Trump over the steel tariffs, which they say could lead to retaliatory measures from other countries or raise prices for other manufacturers buying raw commodities. But Rep. Mike Bost, the Republican Congressman who represents Granite City and other Metro East communities, has been a vocal proponent of the tariffs. The co-chair of the U.S. House steel caucus called the decision to reopen the plant “a big victory for the hardworking steel families in Granite City and the entire Metro East economy.” Still, the United Steelworkers Union last weekend endorsed Brendan Kelly, Bost’s November opponent and the state’s attorney for St.Clair County.The union’s District 7 director, Mike Millsap, said that Bost “has been all talk, no action, and votes how he’s told.” Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

venture between Medicare Glaser Inc. and Sanus Corp. Health Systems. It became a publicly traded company in 1992. Just a few months ago, Express Scripts bought EviCore Healthcare, a medical benefit management company, for $3.6 billion. That company, based in Bluffton, S.C., has about 4,000 employees. Reuters news service and Samantha Liss of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.


LOCAL

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

Officer slain after being dispatched to wrong house BY HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH AND MARGARET STAFFORD associated Press

KANSAS CITY • A Missouri police officer who was shot and killed and two others who were wo u n d e d h a d been sent to the wrong house after a 911 call, authorities said Wednesday. Missouri Highway Patrol Sgt. Officer Bill Lowe said no Christopher one spoke when Ryan the 911 call came Morton in Tuesday night but two women could be heard arguing in the background. For reasons that authorities still are trying to determine, the James officers were sent Waters to the address in Clinton where they were shot. The home that officers should

KEITH MYERS • Kansas City Star via AP) Authorities respond Tuesday to a shooting where officer Christopher Ryan Morton was killed and two other officers were wounded in Clinton, Mo.

have responded to was in Windsor, about 15 miles away. The three Clinton officers went inside the home to determine if criminal activity was taking place, and James Waters shot them, Lowe said. Waters, 37, was in the home. It’s not clear if he

was living there. Officer Christopher Ryan Morton, 30, died. Officer Nathan Bettencourt was in stable condition Wednesday. The third officer, Nicholas Kasper, was treated for gunshot wounds and released Wednesday.

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in the act of committing crimes within that house. When (the officers) entered that house they were doing what they needed to ensure no one was hurt and there wasn’t any other problems.” The two women heard arguing in the 911 call were not connected to the Clinton home, Lowe said. Shields said officers had been searching for Waters in connection with a rape case. Court records show Waters had convictions for drugs and resisting arrest. He served stints in prison from October 2000 through November 2002, May 2003 through April 2008, July 2008 through October 2012, and May 2014 through last July, according to Missouri Department of Corrections spokesman Garry Brix. Waters was charged in November in Cass County with unlawful possession of a firearm and drug possession, court records show. He pleaded not guilty, and the case was pending when he died. Clinton is about 70 miles east of Kansas City.

Preschooler spared in her family’s murder-suicide asks for slain mother

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After the officers were shot, a SWAT team entered the house and found Waters dead. Investigators have not determined if he shot himself or was killed by the officers, Lowe said. A woman who lived at the home, Tammy Widger, 37, was charged Wednesday with possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver and maintaining a public nuisance, Henry County Prosecuting Attorney Richard Shields said. Her bail was set at $25,000. Widger had sold drugs out of the home previously. Widger met the officers outside the home and said nothing was going on at the residence. The officers decided to check inside the home anyway to make sure no one was in danger, Lowe said. Waters was the only person in the home. His relationship to Widger was not immediately clear. “It is a coincidence they were called to that specific address,” Lowe said. “It is tragic that happened. But the fact is they were

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BY KIM BELL st. Louis Post-dispatch

BELLEFONTAINE NEIGHBORS • A preschooler whose father spared her as he killed her mother, brother and himself last month is now living with her maternal grandmother. “I’m ready to go home, I’m ready to see my mommy,” the girl, 4, has told relatives. Her great-aunt, Tracy Finney of Creve Coeur, said it was unimaginably painful to watch the child cope, and hopes a counselor can help. “How do you explain to a 4-year-old your mommy, your daddy, your brother are never coming home?” Finney asked. “She was only one in the house with all these dead bodies.” The girl’s mother, Katrina Banks, 31, and brother, Kevin Johnson, 15, were slain Feb. 22 at their home on Hoyt Drive in Bellefontaine Neighbors. Police say the killer was Banks’ fiancé, Dornubari Dugbor, 31. When the little girl heard the gunfire, she emerged from her bedroom to find her mother on the floor, police say. Her father, Dugbor, told her to go back to her room, and she obliged. Dugbor called 911 to report the murders, then shot himself, police say. Officers found the girl hiding in the home, pretending to be asleep. Finney said the family was struggling to pay the $8,000 cost for the funerals for Kevin and Banks. Misty McElligott, a friend of Banks, is raising money through an online site. McElligott said she met Banks last year as the two attended evening classes at Washington University. Banks was administrative coordinator for the Office of Undergraduate Research and a student in University College in Arts & Sciences, according to an online obituary from Washington University. Finney said she was working on a second master’s degree.

Katrina Banks and her son, Kevin Johnson, in a photo from a GoFundMe account

“She worked like a boss, she took care of two children, worked full time, went to evening classes,” McElligott said. “She was outgoing, extremely intelligent. She was a beautiful soul. Beautiful on inside and out.” Banks and Dugbor were parents of the 4-year-old girl. They became engaged to be married in January. “Everything seemed to be going great and (then) this happened,” McElligott said. “The whole community is in shock.” Finney said she had since learned from relatives that Dugbor was a controlling person who even was checking Banks’ text messages. Finney said Banks initially agreed to marry him, and posted photos of the ring on her Facebook page, but then changed her mind. “She said, ‘I don’t think we’re ready for this.’ It was a lot of things they’re not in (agreement) with, and they needed to work on it a little more.” Finney added: “She was a thinker. She thought through everything she did.” Dugbor moved out of the home on Hoyt and returned to his native Nigeria, Finney said. “He spent two weeks in Nigeria and came back acting really weird and strange, wasn’t acting like himself. A week later this happened.” Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Suspect in fatal stabbing is sent to mental hospital • A man from St. Louis has been committed to a state mental hospital in the fatal stabbing of a man last year in a Tower Grove South apartment. Tramell C. Nolan, 30, was deemed mentally unfit to stand trial last month; St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison ordered on Feb. 9 Nolan committed to the Fulton State Hospital and that his competency be re-evaluated in six months. Nolan was charged with second-degree murder and armed criminal action in the killing of Casey Logan. Logan was stabbed as the two were staying at an apartment July 24

in the 3500 block of Morganford Road. Logan was stabbed multiple times and died of his injuries. Nolan told police he stabbed Logan after Logan poured hot water on him. In a Feb. 18 letter to Burlison, Nolan said the killing was self-defense. “It was my life or his,” Nolan wrote. He also sent the judge another letter in January saying Logan had stabbed him in the shoulder and neck. Nolan’s injuries included a cut to his shoulder and burns to his face, police said. Nolan’s criminal history includes 2008 convictions of unlawful use of a weapon and drug possession in St. Louis. He has assault convictions from 2016 in Vernon County, Mo.

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NEWS

03.08.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1

A welcome to Southern Illinois’ newest Americans PAT GAUEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Five dozen new Americans living in Southern Illinois raised their hands for the citizenship oath last week at Alton High School, then waited for me, of all people, to greet them with thoughtful words. I humbly share them here, edited for brevity: In 1804, nine miles from this spot, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set off to explore the Louisiana Purchase. In 1837, 3½ miles from here, Elijah P. Lovejoy, whose newspaper supported the dignity of all, was murdered defending his press against a pro-slavery mob. In 1858, about two blocks from there, Abraham Lincoln debated Stephen Douglas in a campaign for the U.S. Senate over issues that would be heard again two years later when Lincoln won the presidency. In the 1860s, a few blocks from that podium, almost 12,000 Confederate soldiers were confined, over time, as prisoners of the Civil War under harsh conditions that saw many die. And, despite their defense of the abhorrent practice of slavery, 1,354 of them lie in a tranquil and respectful national cemetery 2½ miles from here. Oh, I almost forgot to mention. On this very spot, in 2018, about 60 people from 25 counties on five continents — supported by their loved ones — came together to complete the final step to give their skills and hearts to enrich a nation we all love. You already have acted as good Americans — at least one as a member of our military. I thank you for your service, and all of you for your commitment to a country that is as much an ideal and experiment as it is a place. Citizenship required work. Commitment. Study. Testing. That does not end with the oath. For being a good American is no easier than becoming one. Your preparation means you understand our government and principles better than many who regard the term “American” as a birthright to take for granted. Your vote will not count more than anyone else’s, but it should be among the best informed. When Chief U.S. District Judge Michael Reagan invited me to speak here, I was honored. But it would have been an easier job at some other time in U.S. history. The hallmark of democracy is described in Lincoln’s Gettysburg address as “government of the people, for the

people, by the people.” But the people have none of those without a trusted, independent press to provide reliable facts on which to base their opinions, life decisions and votes. You join the American family in what I am afraid is its worst turmoil since that Civil War. There are people who want you to suddenly stop believing the legitimate media that have provided the key underpinning of our democracy since its beginning. “Discount the watchdogs,” cry those who seem very nervous about being watched. A foreign power is waging war on our way of life by using the internet to stir lazy thinkers into surrendering real news for propaganda. Trying to get as many of us as possible to disavow a press that stands for truth. To rupture a thin membrane separating freedom from dictatorship, and independence from manipulation by a foreign elite. I am sorry it is necessary to steer you briefly down this dark path on such a bright day in your lives. Do not be discouraged. Be inspired to realize that the ecstasy of living free has always come with a price. For our military and first responders, that price may be paid in blood and lives. For we ordinary citizens, it is investing time and study and trips to the polls with the knowledge that what you think does matter and how you vote does matter and that by its free nature this country has always had — and always will have — dark paths to avoid. You become citizens at an awkward time for immigration. Some Americans feel threatened by different skin tones and accents and religions and modes of dress. Sure, many are wary of terrorism. But too many are selfish small thinkers who fear that more opportunity for someone else means less for themselves. They are, of course, entitled to their opinions. Constructive discourse is more than encouraged here — it is expected. But we also find ourselves having to tolerate destructive discourse that encourages bigotry and attacks democracy. That has never been America’s ideal. Our strength is in diversity, using different cultural threads to weave the finest fabric of humanity. We may never fully succeed, but the best among us never stop trying. I leave you with one more fact about Alton. It was home to Robert Wadlow, the tallest documented human at 8 feet and 11.1 inches. He died young, but would have been 100 years old last month. For what you have done to be Americans — and what I think you will do as Americans — I hope you leave here this morning feeling even taller than that. pgauen.post.dispatch@gmail.com

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A6

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Trump declares, ‘I like chaos,’ and it ensues on live TV CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The president was joking. Maybe. In a speech Saturday night at the Gridiron Dinner, an annual show in which for 132 years Washington journalists have spoofed newsmakers and themselves in a musical performance, Donald Trump declared: “I like chaos.” He should have reveled in the hours that ensued. The president declared a trade war easy and winnable, and congressional Republicans recoiled. His top economic adviser resigned, and he was sued by a porn star with whom he allegedly had an affair. Also, there was the bizarre ritual of Sam Nunberg, a one-time Trump campaign worker turned Trump hater, who declared that he had received a subpoena from special counsel Robert Mueller and was about to defy it. That was news. What sometimes followed was pure spectacle. Nunberg embarked on an unsteady parade of a dozen or so contradictory and confusing interviews, some of them on live TV, culminating with a CNN host asking him if he had been drinking and declaring she smelled alcohol on his breath. “He seemed to revel in the show he was starring in,” CNN media critic Brian Stelter wrote. Somewhere, Walter Cronkite — who did news and not “shows” — is not laughing. The lights on Nunberg were bright, but they illuminated little beyond the fact that he had been subpoenaed and that he provided unsubstantiated documentation of what Mueller may want from him. In a parade of escalating strangeness, Nunberg from interview to interview claimed Mueller “may” have something on Trump, but he didn’t know what, and then he said he may be wrong on that claim. Nunberg said he would defy Mueller and not show up at a grand jury. Then he said he would. Then he went dark, didn’t show up for a Tuesday morning CNN shot and the denizens of Talk Land wondered if the show would go on. It will, of course — if not with Nunberg, with someone else. Setting aside the ethics of interviewing on live television a guest who may have been under the influence of alcohol — Nunberg denied that he was — it was great TV. On a cable network where a prime-time news host annually imbibes to a happy place live on New Year’s Eve,

Panel investigates Greitens in secret GREITENS • FROM A1

set for 8 a.m. Wednesday inside the police department. About 12:15 p.m., Barnes and the other committee members left the building. Asked who had testified and whether the testimony would be released publicly, Barnes would not say. “I love your doggedness,” he said before driving away. “I think you’re wasting your time asking questions. You’re wasting my time asking questions. There will be a point in time at which you will know what you need to know.” A St. Louis grand jury last month handed up an indictment on a felony invasion of privacy charge against Greitens, a Republican. He is accused of taking and transmitting a compromising, non-consensual picture of his lover in March 2015. Mainstream news media have not named the woman at the center of the story, who has never agreed to an interview and may be the victim of a crime. Her ex-husband released in January audio he said he secretly recorded of his then-wife in 2015 in which she accuses Greitens of snapping the photograph. She said he threatened to release it if she spoke of their relationship. On Wednesday, Clayton lawyer Albert S. Watkins, who represents the exhusband, said that one of his clients had been asked to testify before the House committee, though he declined to give more details. “All I can tell you is a client has been asked,” he told the Post-Dispatch. In addition to the ex-husband, Watkins also represents a former male stripper who is seeking a pardon from Greitens for his invasion of privacy conviction dating back two decades. Watkins said he no longer represented Eli Karabell, who said he volunteered for Greitens’ inauguration festivities and had spoken with the FBI.

WASTE OF TIME?

Outside the police station, Bob Watson, a 29-year veteran of the Jefferson City News Tribune, stood near the police department. He wore a sweater, a blazer and an overcoat. “It seems like a waste of time,” Watson said, “and yet there’s always a possibility that somebody will come out and say something.” There were no indications that would be the case. The police department’s blinds were drawn. Black plastic covered the glass doors on the side of the building. The police snipped out peek holes so

there is no TV like tipsy TV. And nothing like pathos for profit. Think of it: A loose-cannon guest is put on live TV to make unproven and conflicting statements about a topic that threatens a presidency, culminating with a host asking if he is sober, and then predatory websites poach that sound bite to feed their perpetual click-profit machine. This is what it’s come to. Virus, indeed. So is it a surprise that the president, even jokingly, declares, “I like chaos?” A confession. Your author is a member of the Gridiron Club and participated in this year’s show. There is criticism of this and other Washington dinners where press and politician sit down together. We’re told that they are relics and help fill the “swamp” Trump wants to drain. They are legitimate points of debate. The flip side is, as de Tocqueville observed, because we don’t have kings or queens or dictators to gather around, we invent our own enduring institutions — such as the Gridiron. Through them, we prove that in democratic self-rule, traditions like political opposites breaking bread and deflating their egos with selfdeprecation will always precede and outlast all of us, no matter who the president is or who is asking the questions. That we are here, renting a space in time on a great experiment toward a stronger and better union. Trump came to the Gridiron’s no-TV sanctum with some funny lines, even rapprochement toward a Fourth Estate he has labeled enemies of the American people. “Nobody does self-deprecating humor better than I do,” the president said. Trump opened the speech with this declaration: “It’s been really another calm week at the White House. We finally have it running like a fine-tuned machine. …” This came at the end of a week that started with the resignation of his communications director, Hope Hicks, and ended with the denial of permanent security clearance for Trump’s son-inlaw Jared Kushner, a top administration adviser and one-time point man on Trump’s Mideast peace initiatives. “We were late tonight because Jared could not get through security,” Trump joked. He ended with a tradition, doing something many had bet he wouldn’t do. “I want to thank the press for all you do to support and sustain our democracy,” Trump said. “I mean that. I mean that. Some incredible people in the press. Brilliant, powerful, smart, and fair people in the press.” Except when they’re not carnival barkers.

Prosecutor wants independent unit to investigate St. Louis police shootings BY CELESTE BOTT • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Rep. Gina Mitten, D-Richmond Heights, leaves the Jefferson City Police Station after lawmakers met Wednesday for the closed committee meeting into Gov. Eric Greitens.

they could see the frozen spectacle. Will Schmitt, a Capitol reporter for the Springfield News-Leader, stood facing the side entrance. He wore a blazer. “Should’ve brought a coat,” he said. “It’s understandable, I guess, given the circumstances,” he said when asked what he thought of the closed meeting. “Obviously my inclination is to want to know as much as possible so I can tell people what’s going on back in Springfield. But like you said, it is what it is.” The circumstances Schmitt referenced are unprecedented. Greitens could be the first Missouri governor to be impeached. The woman at the center of the story may be the victim of a crime, giving investigators and media reason to conceal her identity unless she chooses to come forward. It was unclear Wednesday whether Greitens, the ex-husband or the woman appeared or will appear before the committee. St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner may be interested in other matters, including whether Greitens violated any laws stemming from his relationship with his former charity, The Mission Continues. Attorney General Josh Hawley, a Republican, also is investigating the veterans charity. The House investigative committee could also be investigating matters beyond Greitens’ extramarital affair. On Wednesday morning, after state Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, tweeted that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman was investigating Greitens, a spokeswoman in the New York office would not divulge any information. “We’re going to decline comment,” Amy Spitalnick told the Post-Dispatch in an email.

DEFENSE ADDS NOTED LAWYER Meanwhile, noted defense attorney Scott Rosenblum said Wednesday that he was joining the team of lawyers defending Greitens in the criminal case. Greitens’ defense team already includes Jim Bennett, Ed Dowd, Jack Garvey, Jim Martin and Michelle Nasser. In a statement Wednesday, Rosenblum said: “I was asked to join the trial team on behalf of the governor and I was honored to accept. It is an opportunity to work with outstanding lawyers on a great team and join in the effort to establish our governor’s innocence, which we profoundly believe he is.” Rosenblum has defended some heavy hitters, including rapper Nelly on a rape allegation, former Rams player Leonard Little in a manslaughter case, and other athletes. The rape case against Nelly was dropped, and Little was sentenced to 90 nights of shock time in jail after pleading guilty of involuntary manslaughter for a traffic crash that killed a woman from Oakville. Rosenblum said politicians he had represented or was representing include St. Peters Mayor Shawn Brown, Northwoods Alderman John Bowman and St. Clair County Judge Ron Duebbert. Rosenblum’s Clayton-based firm is Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry. His website says the firm “exclusively concentrates on the areas of Federal and State criminal law representing individuals and businesses charged with business crimes, white collar, murder, sex and drug offenses.” Sky Chadde and Joel Currier of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS • The Board of Aldermen’s public safety committee didn’t take a vote Wednesday on a measure allowing an independent unit in the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s office to lead investigations into officer-involved shootings, probably killing it for now. With two full board meetings left, and just one before the aldermen go on spring break, this is the last week bills can pass out of their assigned committees with enough time to be read a second time, perfected, read a third time and finally passed by a majority of city aldermen this session. Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner proposed in October launching a team in her office to investigate police shootings, whose purpose would be to provide unbiased investigations that promote “confidence in the criminal justice system when so many people — especially people of color — feel the system is rigged against them.” The bill would have tasked Gardner with investigating criminal conduct surrounding an officer’s use of force resulting in death or grave bodily injury, something she said Thursday would promote transparency. It could also speed up investigations into such incidents, she said, which currently take an estimated minimum of three to four months. Officer-involved shootings are increasing in part due to the proliferation of guns, Gardner told aldermen. “Police officers need to be accountable. Police should be held to higher standard. Such statements have been mischaracterized to somehow say that I am biased against the dedicated men and women of the St. Louis city police department. And that’s simply not true,” she said. The proposal had 13 co-sponsors, but concerns were raised over its cost and sustainability. The budget for the unit would equal 1 percent of the annual police budget. It was also met with fierce opposition from the St. Louis Police Officers Association, which represents rank-and-file officers, calling the idea “utterly insane and a colossal waste of tax dollars that we should be using to put murderers behind bars.” After the meeting, Gardner told reporters that she had hoped the measure would make it through the current board session but that she would continue to push for its passage. The full board is expected to soon take up a measure granting subpoena power to the Civilian Oversight Board, which investigates citizen complaints against police officers.


NATION

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A7

Sessions aggressively attacks California’s sanctuary actions

U.S. considers more curbs on Chinese goods

BY MATT ZAPOTOSKY Washington Post

Speaking before a crowd of law enforcement officials in a state he had just accused of violating the Constitution, Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday excoriated California and some of its state and local leaders for passing laws and taking actions that he said obstruct immigration enforcement and put officers in danger. In an unusually strident speech that emphasized the supremacy of the federal government by referencing Abraham Lincoln and secession, Sessions said California’s actions “directly and adversely impact the work of our federal officers” and “undermine the duly-established immigration law in America.” He took particular aim at Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, a Democrat, for warning constituents last month about an impending raid by Immigration and Customs Enforcement — alleging her comments prevented authorities from making 800 arrests. And he said he planned to use the full might of the federal government to bring her state in line. “California, absolutely, appears to me, is using every power it has — powers it doesn’t have — to frustrate federal law enforcement,” Sessions said. “So you can be sure I’m going to use every power I have to stop them.” The comments at the

BY ANDREW MAYEDA AND JENNIFER JACOBS Bloomberg

The administration of President Donald Trump is considering clamping down on Chinese investments in the U.S. and imposing tariffs on a broad range of its imports to punish Beijing for its alleged theft of intellectual property, according to people familiar with the matter. An announcement following an investigation by the U.S. trade representative’s office into China’s intellectual property practices is expected in the coming weeks, potentially handing Trump further cause to impose trade restrictions. His announcement last week of tariffs on steel and aluminum imports has already ratcheted up global trade tension — and led to the resignation Tuesday of his chief economic adviser Gary Cohn, who opposes such measures. The president is now fighting trade offensives on multiple fronts, from targeting strategic rival China to angering allies such as Canada and the European Union with threats to erect fresh barriers. While his counterparts have threatened retaliation, concrete action that would herald the start of an all-out trade war has yet to come. Liu He, President Xi Jinping’s top economic adviser who met with Cohn

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Demonstrators block traffic Wednesday at the hotel where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was speaking at the California Peace Officers Association.

California Peace Officers Association’s annual gathering in Sacramento came a day after Sessions’ Justice Department sued the state of California, alleging that three recently passed laws that benefit undocumented immigrants are unconstitutional. The suit, which seeks to block the laws, is a remarkable escalation of the attorney general’s crackdown on sanctuary jurisdictions. California state leaders girded for battle — noting that when Sessions’ Justice Department has come to court before to defend policies such as the travel ban or the wind down of the Deferred Action for Early Childhood Arrivals program, it has often lost. In fiery remarks after Sessions’ speech, Cali-

fornia Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat said, “The Trump administration is full of liars,” and called on Sessions to apologize for “bringing the mendacity of Washington to California.” He called the Justice Department’s lawsuit a “political stunt,” and noted the irony of Sessions, who is from Alabama, talking about secession. “It really demeans the high office to which he has been appointed,” Brown said, adding later that Sessions was “initiating a reign of terror.” Sessions’ speech touched on themes familiar to those who have followed his career, both in the Senate and as attorney general: rising violent crime, respect for law

enforcement and illegal immigration. He said the United States “must have a lawful system of immigration,” but insisted he was not trying to “wall off America from all immigrants.” Sessions’ remarks were notable for their aggressiveness. At one point, after referencing the “wide variety of political opinions out there on immigration” and the law already on the books, he remarked: “There is no nullification. There is no secession. Federal law is the supreme law of the land. I would invite any doubters to go to Gettysburg, or to the tombstones of John C. Calhoun and Abraham Lincoln. This matter has been settled.”

in Washington last week, told delegates at the National People’s Congress in Beijing that both sides had expressed a desire to avoid a trade war, according to the Beijing Youth Daily. Chinese officials — who have been studying curbs on U.S. products such as soybeans according to past reports — were otherwise largely quiet on the tariff question Wednesday. Under the most severe scenario being weighed, the U.S. could impose tariffs on a wide range of Chinese imports, from shoes and clothing to consumer electronics, according to two people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity. The Trump administration could combine the tariffs with restrictions on Chinese investments in the U.S., the people said. “Gumming up the flow of trade, coming at a time of close to full employment for the U.S., tariffs are more likely to result in higher inflation than higher output,” Tom Orlik, chief Asia economist for Bloomberg Economics, wrote in a note. “For the U.S., there are plenty of reasons to avoid tipping relations with China into an all-out trade war. The damage that would inflict on U.S. firms’ supply chains, sticker shock for U.S. shoppers at Walmart and Target, and the risk of higher inflation suggest cooler minds would eventually prevail.”

School shooting suspect indicted on 17 counts of murder BY CURT ANDERSON, BRENDAN FARRINGTON AND JOSH REPLOGLE associated Press

F O R T L A U D E R DA L E , F L A . • Florida school

shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz was formally charged Wednesday with 17 counts of first-degree murder, which could mean a death sentence if he is convicted. The indictment returned by a grand jury in Fort Lauderdale also charges the 19-year-old with 17 counts of attempted murder for the Valentine’s Day massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland in which 17 people died and more than a dozen others were

DIGEST Court finds for transgender worker A federal appeals court has ruled in favor of a woman who said she was illegally fired by a Detroit-area funeral home after disclosing she was transitioning from male to female and dressed as a woman. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Home in Garden City discriminated against director Aimee Stephens by firing her in 2013. The decision returns the case to a federal judge who had dismissed the lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Time ran out on Social Security commissioner • The Social Security Administration’s acting commissioner had no authority to act after midNovember because the agency is in violation of a federal law regarding vacant positions, according to a report to the president. In a letter to President Donald Trump Tuesday, the Government Accountability Office said the Federal Vacancies Reform Act limits the time a position can be filled by an acting official. “Specifically, we are reporting that the service of Nancy A. Berryhill as Acting Commissioner at SSA

wounded. Cruz’s public defender has said he will plead guilty if prosecutors take the death penalty off the table, which would mean a life prison sentence. The Broward County state attorney has not announced a decision on the death penalty. Cruz told investigators he took an AR-15 rifle to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland on Valentine’s Day and started shooting into classrooms. Jail records released by the Broward Sheriff’s Office show Cruz was being held in solitary confinement. Officers described Cruz as being cooperative.

after November 17, 2017, is in violation of the Act,” the letter said. “We have previously determined that using the acting title of a position during the period in which the position should be vacant violates the time limitations in the Vacancies Reform Act,” GAO wrote. “Therefore Ms. Berryhill was not authorized to continue serving using the title of Acting Commissioner after November 16.” Florida moves to ‘protect sunshine’ • Florida is a step closer to living up to its nickname as “The Sunshine State.” A bill to let Florida remain on daylight saving time year-round is headed to Gov. Rick Scott’s desk after the state Senate approved it 33-2 on Tuesday. While the rest of the East would set their clocks back in the fall, Florida wouldn’t, leaving it with more sunshine in the evening during the winter. Northwest Florida is currently in the Central time zone. If Scott signs the “Sunshine Protection Act,” Congress would need to amend existing federal law to allow the change. The governor has not given any indication of whether he’ll sign it. Hawaii, most of Arizona, and a handful of U.S. territories do not observe daylight saving time.

LAWMAKERS OK BILL In Tallahassee, the Florida House The Florida House passed a school safety bill Wednesday that includes new restrictions on rifle sales and a program to arm some teachers, sending the measure to the governor for his signature. The vote of 67-50 reflected a mix of Republicans and Democrats in support and opposition. The measure, a response to the shootings at a Parkland high school that left 17 dead, is supported by the victims’ families. After visiting the Parkland school Wednesday, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said she wants to hear suggestions to im-

South Carolina may require use of electric chair • After years without the drugs to do lethal injections, the South Carolina Senate has agreed to require condemned inmates go to the electric chair instead. South Carolina law has empowered residents of death row to make a choice between lethal injection and the electric chair since 1995, so the lack of drugs enabled them to stay alive by choosing injections. Capital punishment essentially ended in 2011 in South Carolina. The proposal passed 26-12 on Tuesday and faces a last procedural vote Wednesday before being sent to the House, where it is expected to face even less opposition. South Carolina is one of only nine states that allow electrocutions. State Supreme Courts in Georgia and Nebraska have ruled that electrocution is unconstitutionally cruel. The U.S. Supreme Court hasn’t taken up the issue. Physician-assisted suicide advances in Hawaii • The Hawaii House has approved a bill that would allow physicians to prescribe life-ending medication to terminally ill patients. The House’s action on Tuesday sends the measure to the Senate, which last year overwhelmingly approved a similar bill. From news services

prove school safety from students who survived the shooting. DeVos told reporters that arming some teachers should be considered an option but not a requirement. As a model, she cited a program in Florida’s Polk County where teachers or other employees at two private universities have trained with the sheriff’s office so they can carry concealed weapons on campus. DeVos held a number of “listening sessions” at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, but some students weren’t happy with the visit, reported the Florida Sun Sentinel. “We’re committed not only to listening but to ac-

tion,” she told reporters afterward, although she never gave specifics during a nine-minute briefing at a Coral Springs hotel. Reporters were not allowed to come on campus during her visit, but many students used social media to say they were unimpressed. “Betsy DeVos came to my school, talked to three people, and pet a dog,” tweeted one student named Alanna. “This is in case the press tries to say something else later.” The Sun Sentinel reported a second student injured in the shooting has filed a letter of intent to sue the Broward Sheriff’s Office, the school system and

others. Doctors said one bullet tore through 15-yearold Kyle Laman’s ankle and foot, according to a statement from The Berman Law Group, which is representing the teenager. “Kyle is still dealing with memories of the terror he felt when his classroom was locked and he was stuck in the hallway during the shooting,” the statement said. “The teacher couldn’t get the door open fast enough. Everyone was running scared. Kyle looked at the gunman staring right back at him, and instinctively jumped for cover.” The Sun Sentinel contributed to this report.

Democrats, women chalk up big wins in Texas primaries BY WILL WEISSERT AND PAUL J. WEBER associated Press

AUSTIN,

TEXAS

Women running for Congress surged to big wins and Democrats smashed recent turnout levels in Texas’ first-in-the-nation 2018 primary elections, giving Republicans a glimpse of what may be ahead in the midterms under President Donald Trump. Energized and angry Democrats in Texas, where the GOP has dominated for decades, came out in force to surpass 1 million voters Tuesday and eclipse midterm primary participation totals unseen since 1994, when the party was in full slide toward wilderness after long being the top political dog. Equally striking was the showing by women on the ballot: Of the nearly 50 women running for Congress in Texas, more than half won their primaries outright or advanced to runoffs. What’s more, at least three of those runoffs in May will feature women going head-tohead, including a key race for Democrats in their bid to take control of the U.S. House this fall.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supporters of U.S. Senate hopeful Beto O’Rourke cheer during a Democratic watch party after the Texas primary election Tuesday in Austin, Texas.

“ I t ’s T r u m p . I t ’s Trump,” said Veronica Escobar, who won her Democratic primary and is now poised to become one of the first Latino women to represent Texas in Congress. “I’ve spoken to innumerable senior citizens, retirees, parents of disabled children, people who understand what this administration means to their families. And they’re afraid.” For all the talk of renewed Democratic energy heading into 2018, Texas Republicans also set a new benchmark for turnout in a midterm election. More than 1.5 million people voted Tuesday in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, won by incumbent

Ted Cruz. That beats the previous record of 1.48 million in 2010. Democratic turnout for Texas’ primary Senate race exceed 1.03 million voters, which was higher than any nonpresidential year primary in 24 years. Democrats haven’t won a statewide office in Texas since 1994. Still, Democrats showed up despite the long odds this November of ousting Republicans such as Cruz — who released a radio ad after clinching the GOP nomination Tuesday night, telling voters that Democratic opponent Beto O’Rourke “wants to take our guns.”


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NATION

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

Businessman with ties to UAE talking to special counsel

‘Kind of awful’: Another snow storm clobbers the Northeast

He was presented subpoena in January BY DEVLIN BARRETT, SARI HORWITZ AND ROSALIND S. HELDERMAN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • A Lebanese

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man clears snow off of his car in Danbury, Conn., during Wednesday’s snow storm. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has signed an order banning tractor-trailers and tandem trailers on Connecticut highways. BY KAREN MATTHEWS AND DAVID PORTER associated Press

NEW YORK • For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter. The nor’easter knocked out electricity to tens of thousands of customers and produced “thundersnow” as it made its way up the coast, with flashes of lightning and booming thunder from the Philadelphia area to New York City. A middle school teacher in New Jersey was struck by lightning but survived. Officials urged people to stay off the roads. “It’s kind of awful,” said New York University student Alessa Raiford, who put two layers of clothing on a pug named Jengo before taking him for a walk in slushy, sloppy Manhattan, where rain gave way to wet snow in the afternoon. “I’d rather that it be full-on snowing than rain and slush. It just makes it dif-

ficult.” The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning into Thursday morning from the Philadelphia area through most of New England. More than 2,600 flights across the region — about 1,900 in the New York area alone — were canceled. It wasn’t much better on the ground, with Pennsylvania and New York banning big rigs from some major highways and transit agencies reducing or canceling service on trains and buses. The storm wasn’t predicted to be as severe as the nor’easter that toppled trees, inundated coastal towns and caused more than 2 million power outages from Virginia to Maine last Friday. But it still proved to be a headache for the tens of thousands of customers still in the dark from the earlier storm — and for the crews trying to restore power to them. The storm unloaded snow at a rate of 2 or 3 inches an hour, with some places in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut getting up to 16 inches by evening. Gusts up to 60 mph were forecast on Cape Cod, 45 mph at the Jersey shore and 30 mph around

suburban Philadelphia. Across Philadelphia and New York, power lines and tree branches sagged precariously under the weight of the wet show. Suburban streets were littered with downed trees and branches. “I don’t think I’m ready for this to happen again,” Caprice Dantzler said as she walked through Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square. She said many trees that crashed into cars and homes and blocked streets during the last storm had yet to be removed. Ten people were taken to hospitals with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning after running a generator inside a home in North White Plains, N.Y., police said. All were expected to survive. A teacher was struck by lightning while holding an umbrella on bus duty outside a school in Manchester Township, N.J., police said. The woman felt a tingling sensation but didn’t lose consciousness. She was taken to a hospital with minor injuries. Amtrak canceled some train service, and commuter trains in Philadelphia and New Jersey were put on an abbreviated schedule.

American businessman who has acted as an adviser to the United Arab Emirates has been cooperating with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, after he was hit with a subpoena upon arriving in the United States in mid-January, according to people familiar with the matter. The businessman, George Nader, was served with a grand jury subpoena shortly after landing at Dulles International Airport, these people said. Investigators are interested in Nader’s role at a January 2017 meeting in the Seychelles between Erik Prince, a supporter of President Donald Trump, and a Russian official close to President Vladimir Putin, according to the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive matters. Nader — and the Seychelles meeting — are of interest to Mueller’s team as it examines whether any foreign money or assistance fueled the Trump campaign, and how Trump officials during the transition and early days of the administration communicated with foreign officials. One person described Nader as an important witness in Mueller’s efforts — one who has spoken repeatedly to investigators since his arrival in the United States. His cooperation was first reported by The New York Times. The Post has previously reported that the Seychelles meeting, which took place about a week before Trump’s inauguration, was described by U.S., European and Arab officials as part of an apparent effort to establish a back-channel line of communication between Moscow and the incoming administration. The UAE agreed to broker

the meeting in part to explore whether Russia could be persuaded to curtail its relationship with Iran, including in Syria, a Trump administration objective that would be likely to require major concessions to Moscow on U.S. sanctions, those officials said. Prince, the founder of the former Blackwater contracting firm, had no formal role with the Trump campaign or transition. However, according to officials familiar with the meeting, he presented himself as an unofficial envoy for Trump to high-ranking Emiratis involved in setting up his meeting with the Russian official. Prince has sharply disputed that account, saying he did not present himself as a representative of the incoming administration. He told congressional investigators that his meeting with Kirill Dmitriev, the head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, was a passing encounter over a drink at the bar of the Four Seasons in the Seychelles, an island nation in the Indian Ocean. Prince said his meeting with Dmitriev came up at the last minute and at the suggestion of the crown prince of Abu Dhabi, Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, who Prince said invited him to the Seychelles — although he told congressional investigators he could not remember when or who from Zayed’s staff extended the invitation. The crown prince is widely known as MBZ. Prince also told congressional investigators he did not remember when or where he had a conversation with Steve Bannon, then a senior Trump adviser, during which Bannon told Prince he had met MBZ in New York in December, just weeks before Prince traveled to the Seychelles. Prince said Bannon vouched for MBZ during the conversation, calling him “a great guy.”

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Metro to add electric buses in St. Louis By 2020, transit system will add two electric buses to the fleet; U.S. grant includes battery chargers By BryCE Gray St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Metro Transit announced Wednesday that, by late 2020, it will begin to incorporate electric buses into its vehicle fleet. The St. Louis-area transit system will add two electric buses that year, thanks to a $1.45 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration’s Low or No Emission Vehicle Program. Metro said that it “is currently seeking additional funding” to further expand its electric bus total, in a statement. “We are always evaluating new technology and are constantly looking for new opportunities to provide better transit service for our customers while

improving air quality,” said Ray Friem, Metro Transit’s executive director. “With the help of our partners, we are making an investment that will add reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly electric buses to the MetroBus fleet, and help shape the future of public transit in the St. Louis region.” Metro has been evaluating the adoption of electric buses for a while, even conducting a one-week test run in April 2017 of a model made by the company, Proterra. At that time, Metro representatives said that although electric buses can cost about twice as much as diesel alternatives upfront, they have lower maintenance costs and would save

METRO

A rendering of a Metro Transit electric bus.

money over time. The two extended-range battery electric buses announced Wednesday will be made by the California company, GILLIG, and will undergo testing to ensure that they can at least match the performance of

Metro’s 400 diesel buses, which log an average of 200 miles per day. The costs of two battery chargers for the buses are also covered by the grant. Additionally, electric utility Ameren Missouri has pledged about $1 million

for corresponding power supply equipment at the Brentwood Metro Bus Facility, where the vehicles will be stationed and charged. Ameren Missouri, itself, has been eyeing opportunities related to electric

vehicles, proposing an effort last month to provide incentives for hundreds of charging stations to be installed across its service territory. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

‘Rigged’ system blocks use of lower-cost drugs, FDA chief says By aNNa EdNEy, Bloomberg

A “ r i g ge d p ay m e n t scheme” among drug plans, insurers and pharmaceutical companies blocks access to cheaper versions of some of the most costly drugs in the U.S., the head of the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb aimed particular criticism at giant pharmacy benefit managers that contract with health plans to administer coverage of drugs, saying the industry’s contracting tactics have stymied cheaper copies of expensive biotechnology drugs. Known as PBMs, the companies include St. Louis County-based Express Scripts, CVS Health and UnitedHealth Group’s OptumRx unit. “Consolidated firms — the PBMs, the distributors, and the drug stores; team up with payors,” Gottlieb said in prepared remarks at a major conference of health insurers in Washington. “They use their individual market power to effectively split monopoly rents with large manufacturers and other intermediaries; rather than passing on the saving garnered from competition to patients and employers.” The speech is some of the Trump administration’s broadest criticism yet of the health-care industry. While the FDA has little or no power over PBMs, Gottlieb’s remarks make clear that administration health officials place the blame for high drug costs not just on

biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, but also on other parts of the complex medical supply chain. Gottlieb said the arra n ge m e n ts b e twe e n PBMs, drugmakers, insurers and distributors threaten the new market for what are known as biosimilars, cheaper versions of complex biotechnology drugs. Unlike pills, biotechnology drugs are made from living cells and have advanced the treatment of many diseases. They’ve also come with record prices. Biosimilars were meant to be a less costly alternative to the products, and Gottlieb called them necessary for a competitive market that works for patients. A 2010 law created a way for the FDA to approve the drugs and help doctors and patients decide how to use them. Their uptake has been stymied by what Gottlieb said were opaque contracts that favor the older, more costly drugs. He described a system by which makers of the biotech drugs make exclusive arrangements with PBMs and insurers, who agree to cover only the old drug in return for rebates or discounts. “The rigged payment scheme might quite literally scare competition out of the market altogether,” Gottlieb said. “I fear that’s already happening.” Drug plans have said that rebates make their way back to patients in the form of lower monthly insurance premiums, and have called the opaque contracts a necessary

trade secret. On Tuesday, UnitedHealth said it would start passing a portion of them directly back to patients, which could lower out-of-pocket costs for people on particularly costly treatments. The move was praised by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. The federal government has proposed a similar policy for drug plans that serve people in Medicare, which the PBM industry opposes and has said will raise premiums for everyone. Few of the new, lessexpensive biosimilars have gained a foothold. Of the nine biosimilars the FDA has approved since 2015, only three are available for sale. Often that gap is blamed on disagreements over patents on the original drugs.

But Gottlieb said the payment arrangements “raise another, perhaps even more insidious barrier to biosimilars taking root in the U.S., and gaining appropriate market share.” Pfizer Inc., which sells Inflectra, a biosimilar of Johnson & Johnson’s $6.3 billion arthritis drug Remicade, sued J&J last year for using exclusionary contracts to block its product. As President Donald Trump’s administration looks to tackle high drug prices, Gottlieb has taken the lead particularly by pushing for ways to speed low-cost generic drugs to market. Those efforts haven’t just focused on drugmakers. A White House report on drug pricing last month called out PBMs as

well and steered clear of Trump’s previous threat to have the government negotiate prices directly. Unlike typical generics, which can be 80 percent cheaper than a brandname drug, biosimilars require more research, an expense that typically makes them about 15 percent to 20 percent cheaper than the drug they’re copying. This means the brandname rebates continue to be attractive to PBMs and insurers who also get some of the cut.

“Payors are going to have to decide what they want: The short-term profit goose that comes with the rebates, or in the long run, a system that functions better for patients, providers, and those who pay for care,” Gottlieb said. He urged PBMs and insurers to instead make biosimilars the default option for newly diagnosed patients and help the FDA educate doctors about the safety and value of the products.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb during an interview with the Associated Press.

With more companies in need of coding expertise, efforts are under way to teach kids younger than ever how to code. We take a look at efforts underway to start offering coding earlier as demand heats up in the workforce for these skills, including a program at the St. Louis County Library.

BUSINESS

MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR SPRING

“Hamilton,” Willie Nelson, David Sedaris, “Destination Moon,” and more things to see and do in our spring arts preview.

A&E

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After their son was sent by air ambulance Whether you just want to walk through to St. Louis from rural Missouri, a family a cave on a tour or dig deeper into a caving adventure, we have tips and was on the hook for $33,000. places to visit.

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MARKET WATCH

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stock trading was once again driven by signals emanating from Washington over which way U.S. trade policy would go. Gary Cohn had opposed the administration’s planned tariffs on steel and aluminum. Industrial companies like Caterpillar whipsawed on the news.

Dollar Tree

100 80

D

J 52-week range

Vol.: 21.9m (9.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $21.2 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Close: 24,801.36 Change: -82.76 (-0.3%)

24,200 10 DAYS

27,000

2,900

26,000

2,800

25,000

$116.65

J 52-week range

F

$173.24

S&P 500

S

O

N

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,170 2,097 1763 1048 160 24

3,356 3,358 1501 1377 94 47

D

J

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

F

2,400

M

HIGH 24849.68 10431.39 670.27 12724.84 7403.79 2730.60 1924.34 28323.04 1576.73

LOW 24535.12 10331.45 662.04 12603.50 7311.73 2701.74 1902.46 28026.81 1550.47

Futures

Corn Wheat

CLOSE 24801.36 10408.88 664.80 12707.01 7396.65 2726.80 1920.42 28285.72 1574.53

CHG. -82.76 -26.64 -4.88 -13.76 +24.64 -1.32 +3.43 +1.11 +12.33

%CHG. WK -0.33% t -0.26% s -0.73% t -0.11% s +0.33% s -0.05% s +0.18% s ...% s +0.79% s

F

MO QTR t s t s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

379.25 1055 493

-.50 -9.50 -9 CHG

-.53 +.15 -.40 -.04 -2.30

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 18 Mar 18 May 18

84.20 119.30 24.87

+.36 -.65 -.06

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18

61.15 1.9103 187.46 2.777

-1.45 -.0228 -2.87 +.028

Coffee

YTD +0.33% -1.92% -8.10% -0.80% +7.15% +1.99% +1.04% +1.77% +2.54%

CHG

CLOSE

Cotton

M

CLOSE

143.77 122.97 67.80 14.13 311.40

Copper J

DATE

DATE

ICE

D

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

42.70 36.91 +.04 +0.1

-5.1

-7.4 14 2.00f General Motors

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 23.59 +.48 +2.1

-7.2

-0.6 19

Amdocs

DOX

60.30

71.37 67.24 +.06 +0.1

+2.7 +11.5 18 1.00f Huttig Building Prod HBP

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 53.58

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

44.20 38.01 +.31 +0.8

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

-.36 -0.7

101.21 126.50 112.81 +.05 60.13 100.82 99.73

8.19 +.12 +1.5

GM HD

-9.2 +1.5 19

1.83 Lee Ent

LEE

-8.7

1.60 Lowes

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MA

110.13 180.09 179.21 +1.68 +0.9 +18.4 +60.2 42

1.00

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127.35 178.70 152.38 +1.18 +0.8 -11.5 +21.1 26

4.04

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15.27

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49.95 16.15 -1.42 -8.1 -28.4 -65.7

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AVDL

7.52

Bank of America

BAC

22.07

32.85 32.18 +.07 +0.2

+9.0 +28.9 21

0.48 Monsanto Co

MON 111.92 124.20 122.95

-.42 -0.3

+5.3 +9.5 22

2.16

Belden Inc

BDC

64.60

87.15 75.64 +.73 +1.0

-2.0 +6.0 14

0.20 Olin

OLN

27.79

38.84 32.85

-.11 -0.3

-7.7 +5.5 10

0.80

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BA

BTU

22.58

41.98 40.99

-.11 -0.3

+4.1 -999.0

SKIS

4.00

173.75 371.60 347.04 -1.88 -0.5 +17.7 +96.2 36 6.84f Peabody Energy 7.25

11.90

9.20 +.10 +1.1

... +2.8 19

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.39

34.34 28.78

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

65.00 62.29 +.13 +0.2

+7.0 +7.5 32

-.27 -0.9 -14.0

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... Peak Resorts

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23.21 23.58 +.40 +1.7 +23.6 +29.7 45

...

71.06

89.04 80.52

...

65.03 112.42 101.71 +.68 +0.7

+0.8 +42.4 19

... ReinsGrp

RGA

CHTR 308.30 408.83 338.67 +.71 +0.2

+0.8 +4.4 cc

... Reliv

RELV

Citigroup

C

56.55

80.70 73.92

-0.7 +24.7 14

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

60.35 60.60 +.33 +0.5

Edgewell

EPC

46.83

78.04 53.28 +.03 +0.1 -10.3 -30.5 13

Emerson

EMR

56.77

74.45 69.59

-.88 -1.2

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

62.86 54.53

-.17 -0.3 +13.7 +0.7 19

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.65

49.68 49.00 +.10 +0.2

Esco Technologies

ESE

50.30

Express Scripts

ESRX

55.80

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

3.53 11.82

0.28

1.28 Spire Inc

+8.5 +8.9 21 0.94f Stifel Financial ... Target Corp.

-.28 -0.3

121.93 165.12 157.38 +1.09 +0.7 3.72

SR

60.09

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5.69 +.45 +8.6 +19.3

82.85 67.75

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41.93

68.76 65.05 +.14 +0.2

+9.2 +21.7 20

0.40

TGT

48.56

78.70 71.43

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+9.5 +32.4 13

2.48

102.12 135.53 109.21

-.59 -0.5

-8.3 +6.7 18 3.64f

-.51 -0.9

1.16 US Bancorp

USB

49.54

58.50 53.66

+0.1 +0.1 15

1.20

+8.5 +11.8 20

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

47.64 45.69 +1.16 +2.6 +29.8 +19.3 27

0.20

66.80 61.45 +.30 +0.5

+2.0 +11.9 20

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.77 48.84

2.36

83.49 73.42 -1.16 -1.6

-1.6 +6.5

WMT

69.33 109.98 87.74 -1.32 -1.5 -11.1 +30.4 20 2.08f

7.00

3.80

-.02 -0.5 -13.0 -42.8 dd

16.39 12.87 +.16 +1.3

-8.7

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-1.5 16 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.05 -0.1

-7.7 +2.4

7

WBA

63.82

87.79 69.50

-.29 -0.4

-4.3 -16.9 14

1.60

WFC

49.27

66.31 56.60

-.47 -0.8

-6.7 +0.0 13

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Amazon offers discount membership • Amazon.com Inc. said on Wednesday it was expanding its discounted Prime membership offer to Medicaid members, the U.S. government’s health insurance program for the poor. The move from the e-commerce giant comes nine months after it said it would offer a discount on its popular Prime subscription service for shoppers who receive U.S. government aid. To qualify for the discounted $5.99 monthly Prime membership, customers must have a valid Electronic Benefits Transfer or Medicaid card and can renew it annually for up to four years, the company said. The $12.99-per month or $99-per-year prime service offers users added perks such as low prices and faster delivery for certain purchases and shipped more than 5 billion items worldwide last year. Any push by Amazon into poorer demographics comes at a time when traditional brick-and-mortar suppliers including Walmart Inc. have been fighting the online shopping giant’s arrival by seeking to attract more high-spending shoppers. The Medicaid connection may also stir more nerves among health care companies worried about tentative moves by Amazon to sell and distribute some medical supplies and drugs. Bayer in talks to sell vegetable seeds business • Bayer has entered exclusive talks with BASF on the sale of its Nunhems vegetable seeds unit to address antitrust regulators’ concerns over its planned merger with Creve Coeur-based Monsanto, the two companies said. Any deal is subject to a successful closing of the proposed $62.5 billion acquisition of Monsanto, which Bayer hopes to wrap up in the second quarter, the German group said Wednesday. Reuters recently reported that BASF was in advanced talks to buy the vegetable seeds business for roughly $1.85 billion, including assumed debt. Bayer said last week that once it was sure enough that regulators will give it the green light, it would raise fresh equity capital to fund the Monsanto deal, which would make it the world’s largest maker of seeds and pesticides. People familiar with the matter told Reuters last week that Bayer was on track to win conditional European Union antitrust approval for the Monsanto takeover. Bayer has said the U.S. review was not as far advanced as in the EU, but it was confident it would make progress there over the next few weeks. Foresight Energy posts 2017 loss • St. Louis-based Foresight Energy LP, a leading coal producer in the Illinois Basin, reported a $215 million loss in 2017, according to its most recent quarterly report. The loss was mostly attributable to a $95.5 million expense related to debt restructuring and a $42.7 million setback associated with permanently sealing part of its inactive Deer Run mine near Hillsboro, Ill., which was plagued by a smoldering underground fire and carbon monoxide since 2014. The loss was wider than the $178.8 million loss the company reported in 2016. Revenue for 2017 came in at $954.5 million, up from $875.8 million in 2016. Coal sales for the company jumped about 9 percent. That increase, the company said, was driven by an improved export market. From staff and wire reports

-7.60 -.29 -17.40

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.68 1.87 2.04 2.25 2.65 2.81 2.88 3.15

+0.01 +0.01 ... ... ... -0.01 -0.01 ...

.73 .80 1.00 1.33 2.05 2.52 2.52 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.88 3.17 6.16 3.88 3.75 .74

+0.01 ... -0.04 -0.03 ... -0.01

1.68 2.68 5.63 3.98 3.35 .48

...

UPS

... WalMart

Silver

1.38 1.13 .63

CHG

CLOSE

-9.8 +6.3 19 2.25f

1.94 UPS B

9

.0492 .7819 .3115 1.3890 .7752 .1584 1.2405 .0154 .2886 .009415 .053380 .0177 .0849 .000941 1.0634

1326.00 16.43 953.20

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 4.50 4.25 3.75

PREV

PreciousMetals

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.88 percent on Wednesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

$66.94

.0490 .7815 .3083 1.3895 .7733 .1581 1.2403 .0154 .2893 .009428 .053370 .0176 .0844 .000936 1.0597

NEW YORK

0.12p

-5.6 -10.4 dd

POST

CNC

-0.1 +20.0 27

5.10 +.05 +1.0

0.28 Perficient

Centene Corp.

-.14 -0.2

6.10

0.96 Post Holdings

Charter

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

1.52 ...

M

ExchangeRates

-5.8 +25.9 25 4.12f

4.89

F

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

144.25 207.61 178.58 -2.03 -1.1

J 52-week range

Platinum

Avadel Pharma

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

12.30

...

-.98 -1.0

... Home Depot

$49.60

Interestrates Interestrates

TKR

D

Vol.: 7.5m (3.0x avg.) PE: 10.7 Mkt. Cap: $22.7 b Yield: 3.5%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$31.80

Mar 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

Hogs

N

50

M

Feeder cattle

Milk

O

F

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

S

J 52-week range

Vol.: 9.3m (2.8x avg.) PE: 23.8 Mkt. Cap: $6.0 b Yield: 3.3%

Soybeans

10 DAYS

2,500

22,000

D

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,726.80 Change: -1.32 (flat)

2,600

23,000

60

$22.16

Vol.: 5.1m (0.9x avg.) PE: 120.8 Mkt. Cap: $90.6 b Yield: 2.1%

PE: ... Yield: ...

$70

24

M

2,700

24,000

21,000

26

$90.34

2,720 2,640

140

IP

Close: $55.00 -2.70 or -4.7% The paper and packaging company offered to buy European competitor Smurfit Kappa Group.

$30 28

D

International Paper

HRB

Close: $28.73 2.96 or 11.5% The tax preparer did better in the third quarter than analysts had anticipated.

160 120

M

2,800

Dow Jones industrials

25,020

F

H&R Block

CAT

Close: $151.51 -2.24 or -1.5% Industrial companies slumped as Trump adviser Gary Cohn’s resignation suggested more protectionist trade policies are coming. $180

$120

$65.63

25,840

Caterpillar

DLTR

Close: $89.25 -15.11 or -14.5% The discount retailer had a weak fourth quarter and its forecasts for 2018 disappointed investors.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2726.80 12245.36 7157.84 30196.92 5187.83 47662.12 21252.72 85483.55 15472.61 8784.84

CHG

CHG

YTD

-1.32 +131.49 +11.09 -313.81 +17.61 -222.51 -165.04 -169.47 -72.58 +18.96

-0.05% +1.09% +0.16% -1.03% +0.34% -0.46% -0.77% -0.20% -0.47% +0.22%

+1.99% -5.20% -6.89% +0.93% -2.35% -3.43% -6.64% +11.89% -4.54% -6.36%

Deadline is Friday to apply to be an Arch Park vendor BY LEAH THORSEN st. Louis Post-dispatch

The deadline is Friday to apply to be a vendor on the Gateway Arch riverfront. The Arch, which is undergoing a $380 million renovation, is set to reopen its grounds, the museum and visitor center on July 3 in time for Fair St. Louis, which returns to the Arch grounds after four years in Forest Park. Vendors of food, drink and merchandise are being sought for what’s known as the St. Louis Wharf Vending District, and will be chosen by the Riverfront Vending Committee. Detailed information

GATEWAY ARCH PARK FOUNDATION

A rendering of the museum entry to the museum expansion design for the Arch.

on becoming a vendor and bid proposals forms are available online at http:// bit.ly/STLVend. Vendors are required to operate at least seven hours a day, six days a week from May through September, weather per-

mitting, according to a request for proposals. Vendors can operate when they wish, as long it’s between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., during other times of the year with some exceptions. All food, beverages and

U.S. businesses added 235,000 jobs in February, report says BY CHRISTOPHER RUGABER aP Economics Writer

U.S. companies added a healthy 235,000 jobs last month, led by solid gains in construction, hotels and restaurants, and education and health care, according to a private survey. The report Wednesday on February hiring from payroll provider ADP comes after businesses added 244,000 people in January and 249,000 in December. Those gains should be enough to reduce the unemployment rate, currently a low 4.1 percent, over time. With unemployment

already so low, strong hiring should force employers to offer much higher pay to find the workers they need. Target, one of the world’s biggest retailers, raised its minimum starting pay for workers for the second time in less than a year this week after seeing a bigger and better pool of candidates. If pay hikes continue to broaden, companies may have to raise prices to cover at least some of the cost of higher wages, which would lift inflation. That, in turn, could push the Federal Reserve to increase interest rates more quickly, which over time could slow growth.

“The risks of an overheating economy are rising,” Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said. Moody’s helps compile the ADP data. ADP compiles hiring data from millions of companies that are clients of its payroll services. Its report and government figures frequently diverge from month to month. Last month, the government said 200,000 jobs were added, below ADP’s initial estimate of 234,000. That figure has since been revised higher. A FactSet survey shows that economists believe the U.S. jobs report for February, to be released

other items for sale, and their prices, are subject to the approval of the vending committee. Prices must be competitive with those charged for similar items by other vendors, and the list of items and prices to be charged must be submitted with bids, the request for proposals says. Proposals will be accepted at the city’s street department office at 1900 Hampton Avenue until 4 p.m. Friday, when they will publicly be opened and read. The cost to submit a bid is $100. Vendor permits expire at the end of the year. Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

Friday, will show a gain of 200,000 jobs. They also project the unemployment rate will tick down to 4 percent. Growth should accelerate in the coming months, Zandi said, boosted by the tax cuts and recent increases in government spending enacted by Congress. The unemployment rate could fall to below 3.5 percent by the middle of next year, Zandi projects. The new tariffs proposed by the administration of President Donald Trump on steel and aluminum imports are likely to cost the United States 50,000 to 60,000 jobs, Zandi said, as companies that use the metals as input to other products will have to cut back. Yet those losses aren’t enough to knock the U.S. economy off course, he said.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 03.08.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Catastrophe on North Grand

T

A ‘perfect storm’ of misery. Shame on all of us for accepting it.

2501 North Grand, are easily converted he phrase “perfect storm” means into crack or meth pipes. The used syringes a catastrophe brought on by on the store’s back lot testify to the high a convergence of disastrous nuisance value posed by the store’s mere conditions. When a St. Louis existence, even though it temporarily neighborhood earns that label from a poclosed recently. lice commander, the time has come to do On any given day, street scenes bear all something more than shrug our collective the markings of open-air drug markets, shoulders. barely four blocks from Vashon High The storm in question is located along School. Students walk by abandoned North Grand Boulevard near Montgomery buildings housing vagrants and drug users. Street. It’s a place where prostitutes, drug Look in any direction, and you’ll see dealers, drug addicts and violent criminals remnants of burned-out buildings where converge — along with children and their parents. Last month, a 9-yearold boy was shot and wounded there on a Sunday afternoon while waiting at a bus stop with his mother and two siblings, ages 1 and 3. These may be symptoms of the larger problem of concentrated poverty, but St. Louis residents and leaders should find them unacceptable anywhere in our city. But such scenes are now so common, we’ve all become desensitized to the horror. A report by the Post-Dispatch’s Kim Bell last week should be a wake-up call for the city’s busiROBERT COHEN •rcohen@post-dispatch.com ness and political leaders. These The front doors are chained shut at the Grand-Uconditions cannot go unchalBuy on Feb. 28 after owner Bajes Dugom decided lenged. to close it for safety reasons and until surveillance If a little boy being shot while cameras are installed. waiting for a bus isn’t enough to vagrants and drug users have camped provoke outrage, where is their threshold? out. The supply is particularly plentiful in Where’s yours? this area, thanks to the multiple nuisance Legitimate businesses fled the neighproperties left abandoned by real estate borhood long ago, leaving behind a smatinvestor Paul McKee, who is waiting to tering of profiteers whose shops find ways make a killing when the National Geospato exploit the lawlessness. They don’t sell tial-Intelligence Agency moves in down fresh produce and nourishing food that the street. residents need. They sell junk food, booze Opportunists, big and small, abound, and drug paraphernalia. just waiting for their moment to exploit Who but drug users buy the synthetic North Grand’s misery. All of them have the drugs known as “bath salts”? How many romantics need single roses in glass tubes? blood of that little boy on their hands. And we, the rest of St. Louis’ citizenry, share Someone with a cold or flu might need the blame for accepting the unacceptable Nyquil, but more often it’s a drug user and allowing our elected leaders to do the looking for a cheap high. The glass tubes same. for the roses on sale at Grand-U-Buy, at

That ‘loving’ trade war

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS ONLINE GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Never vote for a Democrat or tax hike in the county Thanks to the Post-Dispatch and the efforts of Tony Messenger (“Questions over Stenger’s deals pile up like money from friends,” March 4), my consistent practices of several years have been further validated: never voting for a Democrat for St. Louis County office and never voting for a tax increase to transfer more of my income to the county coffers. The rationale behind these practices is simple: • The county courthouse expansion boondoggle (2012-13), about a $30 million overrun from the original proposal. • Collected but unspent millions of taxpayer dollars for the county children’s fund (2015). • A 2016 county audit identifying a variety of wasteful practices. • The Prop P sales tax increase (2017) that informed voters knew would be a blank check for practically anything. Having just seen the 40-year-old building that housed the Mid-County (Clayton) Branch of the county library system demolished instead of being renovated, I have had second thoughts about that use of my tax money, as well. Finally, to the issue at hand, we have the Crossings at Northwest debacle, a tangle of political contributions and apparent payoffs that has put county taxpayers on the hook for about $70 million over two decades. I learned my lesson over six years ago. When will other voters wise up? David O. Berger • Olivette

Way more losers than winners in Trump’s tariff decision.

T

Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Sen. Mitch McCorade policy, like health care nnell, R-Ky., weren’t so sanguine. Among policy, is more complicated the business interests who make up the than President Donald Trump GOP donor class, far more are steel users imagined. His pledge last week than steel manufacturers, and they’re not to raise tariffs on steel and aluminum happy. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, warned and his casual disregard for the harmful that tariffs would “undermine” the taxeffects of a trade war have done the folcut bill passed in December. lowing: In large part that’s because, as the • Alarmed Republicans in Congress, who conservative Heritage Foundation has think he’s undoing the benefits of the tax reported, the U.S. steel and aluminum cuts they passed; industries employ 200,000 workers, while • Cost him the services of his chief ecocompanies that make things from steel nomic adviser; employ 6.5 million people. • Concerned his secretaries of state and defense, who think a trade war will make the world less safe; • Angered some of America’s closest allies; • Cast a pall on hopes that the threat of a nuclear North Korea can be forestalled. Not bad for an impulsive decision made last Thursday without consulting Gary D. Cohn, the director of Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers. Cohn, the former No. 2 ASSOCIATED PRESS executive at Goldman Sachs, Making steel at an Indiana mill in 2006. is among the few in the And should the tariffs trigger a larger administration who understand global trade war, not only will Midwest corn and economics. The Dow Jones Industrial soybean growers suffer, but so will importAverage dropped by more than 300 points dependent companies in the Midwest that after Cohn’s plan to resign became public are part of international manufacturing Tuesday, and stocks stayed deeply in the chains for things like auto parts. negative for most of Wednesday. Allies, including South Korea, are apoBut Trump has long believed that global plectic about Trump’s plans, warning that trade agreements work against U.S. interthey could imperil nascent security negoests and pledged during his campaign to restore balance. He believes that America- tiations with North Korea. The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Defense first protectionism will benefit him politiSecretary Jim Mattis and Secretary of State cally in the industrial Midwest. On that, Rex Tillerson have warned trade officials he’s probably correct. that Trump’s tariffs could endanger U.S. A 25 percent tariff on imported steel will national security. be popular among the 500 steelworkers Trump still hasn’t made his plans offirecalled Wednesday by U.S. Steel’s Granite cial but has pledged to do so “in a loving City works. Rust Belt Democratic Sens. way,” whatever that means. The country Bob Casey of Pennsylvania and Sherrod would be better off if, as often happens, he Brown of Ohio praised Trump’s plan. changed his mind. But GOP leaders like House Speaker

KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/ KOREA NEWS SERVICE VIA AP

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (right) meets South Korean National Security Director Chung Eui-yong on Monday.

U.S. taking a risk with policy toward North Korea People in their late 60s or more probably remember fall 1962, when President John F. Kennedy announced a quarantine designed to cut off ships from bringing Russian weapons to Cuba. It was a very scary time, raising the prospects of war between two nuclear powers. Recently, President Donald Trump came close to a similar policy. Additional sanctions targeting 28 ships, many Chinese, were imposed, with the hint that the U.S. might stop these ships coming from or going to North Korea in order to inspect their cargo. If this fails to cause North Korea to change its ICBM missile testing, Trump stated “we’ll have to go to Phase 2,” which would be a “rough thing ... very, very unfortunate for the world.” Few believe that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is going to attack the United States, or, as long as we maintain our alliance, attack South Korea. Most analysts believe that like dictators everywhere, he simply wants to ensure the survival of his regime. Conceivably, under major pressure from the United States, Kim will abandon his nuclear program. But, given his behavior, is that a risk we want to take? He is said to have thousands of rockets/missiles aimed at the 24 million residents of the Seoul metropolitan area. Better to join South Ko-

rea talks with the North, offering the carrot not the stick. In 2003 this nation went to war with Iraq. Given thousands of deaths, trillions of dollars and the Middle East still in disarray, who will argue that was smart policy? With a blockade of North Korea, possibly followed by “Phase 2,” the Trump administration runs the risk of a much worse catastrophe. Corliss Burton • St. Louis Member, Peace Economy Project

Editorial cartoon hateful toward NRA members The editorial cartoon Tuesday by Bill Day is pure demagoguery. It shows the Statue of Liberty tied on the hood of a Jeep that reads NRA. The implication is that the National Rifle Association has killed American liberties. What makes this image so hateful is the fact that current and past NRA members have served in the military and as police and other first responders. Many have given their lives to defend the values the cartoon claims they have destroyed. They died to preserve not just the Second Amendment but also the First. So, yes, the editors of the Post-Dispatch have the freedom to publish this image, but they have no decency. Charles Freeman • Festus

Private companies take significant stand on guns I spent my Sunday morning watching the talking heads weighing in on the week’s political activities. It seems there is a lot of fatigue building for the relentless blah, blah, blah concerning the gun control issues in our society. I’m afraid that, yet again, there will be no serious action taken to significantly curb the carnage visited upon our children. The talk seems to last about 10 days or two weeks then it reverts to business as usual. Maybe these committed, eloquent teenagers can make a difference. I sincerely hope so. In the meantime, congratulations are in order for the corporations that have taken a stand: Dick’s Sporting Goods, for one, and our own Enterprise Holdings. They have an international footprint and with the commitment to eliminate discounts for National Rifle Association members have shown themselves to be responsible citizens of the world. I congratulate these private companies for taking a significant stand where they are able. Congress and state legislatures should learn from this. Dianne Ross • Chesterfield

Pitts forgets significant accusations that were false In his diatribe on race and sexual assault (“Hierarchy of violence,” March 2), Leonard Pitts seems to forget significant accusations against white men that later turned out to be false, namely Tawana Brawley (1987-1989), the Duke lacrosse team (2006) and the story in the Rolling Stone magazine “A Rape on Campus” (2014). All of these incidents gathered national attention, involved hundreds of people, and dragged on for years. It is significant that the first two incidents involved black women making the accusations. Second, research indicates that 2 percent to 10 percent of rape allegations are false. Third, if Pitts is so concerned about rape and minorities, perhaps he should focus on Native American women (including Alaskan natives), as they are sexually assaulted at a rate 2.5 times higher than any other ethnic minority in the U.S. W. Lind • Bellefontaine Neighbors Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

03.08.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

POLICE SUPPRESSION • One hundred and thirteen strikers of both sexes, mostly girls, were arrested for parading without a permit. The charges against

these persons were disorderly conduct. The disorder consisted of marching in groups on the sidewalk from store to store, which is a legal right. The worst possible policy is that of suppressing orderly demonstrations and interfering with personal rights. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Before you report sexual misconduct Run the allegation through some filters first. BY ELIZABETH POWELL

Fueled by revenge suppressed for centuries, #MeToo accusers are naming their perpetrators. But other men are uneasy. Will they be blindsided over a forgotten incident? Will the slightest gesture provoke an accusation? Note how your brain instantly tries to label my position. Pro or con? I am descended from the rape of my 14-year-old great grandmother as she escaped the flames of the Civil War. Then there was the day when it took all my strength to pry the professor’s hands off my body. Must I target all men in revenge? I admit to a rush of triumph watching today’s serious predators bite the dust. I also recall how my heart sank when a woman was stalking my young adult son. We have millions of “good” men, basically well-intentioned, in our confusing culture. We must safeguard them.

Every day our boys learn sexist attitudes — mostly from digital images — and later, from male “locker room talk.” These scenarios mislead our youth by trivializing sexual misconduct. In 2013 the Parents Television Council analyzed 238 episodes of primetime TV for sexual exploitation, including harassment, prostitution, pornography and stripping. They found that 37 percent of all sexual exploitation was intended to be funny. Families laugh together, unaware that these programs normalize distorted views about sex and gender. Would a sitcom play laugh tracks after the N-word? Locker room talk is a secret apprenticeship for learning disrespect — no females allowed. When I directed role play in community college classes, none of the men needed a script. I assigned one guy to return from a date and resist all peer pressure to boast. His “friends” fell right into line with their cleaned-up language: “Did

you get any?”“Did you score?”“I bet you couldn’t do it.” The target refused to play: “I like her,” he said.“We had a good time.” Every teenage boy should learn to deflect peer pressure in acceptable ways. Otherwise well-intentioned men learn to treat women like objects, and everyone suffers from the resulting mistakes. And what about the accusers? Are all their allegations valid? Much sexual misconduct is blatantly criminal. But publicly accusing someone requires rational thinking and, often, professional advice. It can be helpful to run the allegation through the following filters: First, try to pinpoint your emotions surrounding each incident. Terrified, furious, ashamed? Revenge triggers strong reactions. You still have a right to all your feelings; it’s what you do about them that you are weighing. Second, have there been others — including family — who abused

you in any way? If so, parse out your anger to those who deserve it. Is this really the time to get back at the co-worker who stole a long kiss at the new year’s party? With that self-knowledge, look online at the sexual offense statutes, which vary by state. If your incident involves school, check out Title IX, which protects from discrimination in education. Or Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, protecting from discrimination in employment. Now draw a straight line across a page. Mark the left end zero and the right end a 10. This represents the continuum of sexual intrusion. Zero means no pressure. Forcible rape qualifies for a 10. Words, touch, and intentions matter, ranging from annoyance to force. Consider where your incident might fall. If some habitually flirtatious person hugged you when you were grieving, could that person have been sympathetic as well? Finally, run it through one more

filter: This person you might accuse is a human being. There’s a thrill to justice-at-last. Your reporting could result in serious consequences to this person, who may well deserve it. Discuss any remaining doubts with trusted and knowledgeable people. Critical thinking can help clarify your decision. Then, if you report valid sexual misconduct, I thank you for my granny and all victims, male or female. Meanwhile, for every Hollywood predator there are admired actors who should man up and get onto the media together. Not to preach — but to role play locker room talk for all our boys to see, using real words to defend us, like: “Dude, I don’t like to talk that way about a woman.” What American man has ever seen such a role model? Elizabeth Powell is the author of a sexual assertiveness training manual called “Talking Back to Sexual Pressure” and was a professor of psychology at St. Louis Community College.

Trumpism is a psychology, not an ideology The ‘ideas’ that he has championed consistently are grounded not in arguments but in instincts. JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with steel and aluminum executives on March 1.

Tariffs will force Trump to break key campaign promises Higher costs for aluminum, steel will hurt more of the forgotten Americans than it helps. MARC A. THIESSEN Washington Post

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he will impose stiff tariffs on American companies that purchase imported steel and aluminum should have come as no surprise. From moving our embassy to Jerusalem to pulling out of the Paris climate agreement, Trump is a president who does what he promises. Unfortunately, his proposed tariffs undermine his ability to deliver on many other important promises he made in the 2016 campaign. Trump promised to champion forgotten Americans, but imposing a 25 percent tariff on steel and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum will hurt more of the forgotten Americans than it helps. The American steel industry employs about 140,000 people, while steel-consuming industries employ 6.5 million. This means Trump is imposing a tax — tariffs are taxes — that will hurt the 6.5 million in order to help the 140,000. During the campaign, Trump promised to make the auto industry in states such as Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania “bigger and better and stronger than ever before.” But raising taxes, and thus prices, on steel and aluminum will hurt those states’ automobile workers, whose jobs depend on steel and aluminum. According to one independent study, the 2002 steel tariffs imposed by President George W. Bush cost 200,000 jobs because of higher steel prices, including 10,553 jobs lost in Ohio, 9,829 lost in Michigan and 8,400 in Pennsylvania. Total lost wages were about $5.5 billion in

today’s dollars. The same group now estimates that Trump’s proposed tariffs will cost 179,334 jobs — which is more people than the total number of people working in the steel industry today — and will result in a loss of five jobs for every job gained. The losses will hit auto manufacturers, but other industries as well. One of the largest manufacturing employers in Ohio is GE Aviation, which produces jet engines for commercial aircraft. Tariffs will increase their costs compared with those of European rivals such as Rolls-Royce, leading to lost business and lost jobs. Another promise Trump made in 2016 was to discourage American manufacturers from moving abroad. But in states such as Wisconsin and Michigan, Trump’s actions will have the opposite effect, creating incentives for manufacturers to move across the border to Canada in order to avoid the tariffs. Trump also pledged to help create jobs for American workers with new investments to “rebuild our crumbling infrastructure.” But the tariffs will drive up the cost of virtually every infrastructure project, reducing both the number of new projects and the number of jobs created, while making the state, local and privatesector investments he wants to leverage far less likely. Trump also guaranteed a new era of American energy independence. Since steel and aluminum are used in virtually every oil and gas project, though, including drilling, export terminals and the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines Trump approved, the tariffs could lead to delays and even the cancellation of energy projects America needs. Finally, Trump vowed to rebuild the military. Raising the price of steel and aluminum will increase the cost

of new ships, planes and other military hardware — which means we can afford to procure fewer of them, harming our national security. And all this does not take into account the costs when our trading partners retaliate. Last year, Trump hosted Harley-Davidson executives at the White House and thanked them “for building things in America.” Now the European Union is threatening to impose 25 percent retaliatory tariffs on HarleyDavidson motorcycles and other American-made products. Other industries, such as agriculture, in critical swing states could be targeted for retaliation as well. There is no doubt that China is dumping aluminum and steel into the U.S. market and that American workers are not competing on a level playing field. But Trump’s own Commerce Department gave him other, more targeted countryspecific options to address these anticompetitive practices. Imposing massive tariffs is not the answer. Yes, Trump assured voters he would protect the steel and aluminum industries. But he also promised to revive our automobile industry, keep manufacturing jobs from leaving America, rebuild our crumbling infrastructure, unleash a new era of energy independence and restore our military strength. His proposed tariffs undermine all of those promises. They will hurt many of the very people Trump came to Washington to help. Fortunately, the president can still decide not to go ahead with the tariffs. For the sake of the forgotten Americans, let’s hope he chooses wisely. Marc A. Thiessen Twitter: @marcthiessen Copyright The Washington Post

For the last couple of years I’ve been banging my spoon on my high chair about how Trumpism isn’t a political or ideological movement so much as a psychological phenomenon. This was once a controversial position on the right and the left. Former White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon devoted considerable resources to promoting Trumpist candidates who supposedly shared President Donald Trump’s worldview and parroted his rhetoric, including anti-globalism, economic nationalism and crude insults of “establishment” politicians. Those schemes largely came to naught. The intellectual effort to craft or divine a coherent Trumpist ideology didn’t fare much better. Just over a year ago, Julius Krein launched a new journal called American Affairs to “give the Trump movement some intellectual heft,” as Politico put it. As I wrote at the time, American Affairs’ dilemma was that by associating itself with Trump, it would be forced to either defend the incoherence of his behavior or break with him to defend its own consistency. Six months later, after the debacle of Trump’s response to the neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Va., Krein recanted his support for the president. On the left, there’s an enormous investment in the idea that Trump isn’t a break with conservatism but the apotheosis of it. This is a defensible, or at least understandable, claim if you believe conservatism has always been an intellectually vacuous bundle of racial and cultural resentments. But if that were the case, Commentary magazine’s Noah Rothman recently noted, you would not see so many mainstream and consistent conservatives objecting to Trump’s behavior. Intellectuals and ideologically committed journalists on the left and right have a natural tendency to see events through the prism of ideas. Trump presents an insurmountable challenge to such approaches because, by his own admission, he doesn’t consult any serious and coherent body of ideas for his decisions. He trusts his instincts. Trump has said countless times that he thinks his gut is a better guide than the brains of his advisers. He routinely argues that the presidents and policymakers who came before him were all fools and weaklings. That’s narcissism, not ideology, talking. Even the “ideas” that he

has championed consistently — despite countervailing evidence and expertise — are grounded not in arguments but in instincts. He dislikes regulations because, as a businessman, they got in his way. He dislikes trade because he has a childish, narrow understanding of what “winning” means. Foreigners are ripping us off. Other countries are laughing at us. He doesn’t actually care about, let alone understand, the arguments suggesting that protectionism can work. Indeed, he reportedly issued his recent diktat on steel tariffs in a fit of pique over negative media coverage and the investigation into Russian election interference. His administration was wholly unprepared for the announcement. News emanating from the White House is always more understandable once you accept that Trumpist policy is downstream of Trump’s personality. The president’s attack on his attorney general’s conduct as “disgraceful” makes no political, legal or ideological sense, but it is utterly predictable as an expression of Trump’s view that loyalty to Trump should trump everything else. Likewise, his blather about skipping due process to “take the guns” was politically bizarre but perfectly consistent with his poor impulse control and well-established tendency to tell people in the room with him what they want to hear. And, of course, his decision to promote and protect his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is purely psychological. Giving Kushner the responsibility to settle the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for all time seems like the premise of a sitcom — yet is wholly congruent with Trump’s management style. Still, many of Trump’s biggest fans stick by him, mirroring Trump’s mode of thinking and discovering ever more extravagant ways to explain or rationalize the president’s behavior. (Krein’s abandonment of Trump was an exception to the rule.) When Trump attacked Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Jerry Falwell Jr. of Liberty University tweeted his support, floating the idea that Sessions was an anti-Trump deep cover operative who endorsed Trump to undermine his presidency from within. It seems Trumpism is infectious. If this infection becomes a pandemic — a cult of personality — one could fairly call Trumpism a movement. But psychology would still be the best way to understand it. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

OBITUARIES

Barton, John J. - St. Louis Bollinger, Jr, Leo Franklin - Kirkwood Bolte, Jean Frances - St. Louis Breitenfeld, Jeffrey J. "Spiff" - St. Louis Brockman, Louise - St. Louis Campbell, Bonita Keeney - St. Louis Frazier, James C. - St. Louis Hayek, MD, Deborah A. - St. Louis Hennemann, Carol L. - formerly St. Louis

Barton, John J.

On Feb. 27, 2018. Memorial Visitation: Sat. (Mar. 10), 9:00 a.m. until time of service, 11:00 a.m. JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Ave. (63116)

Bollinger, Jr, Leo Franklin

Born on April 23, 1949 to the late Helen (nee Turnbeau) and Leo Bollinger. He passed away March 2, 2018. Survived by his wife, Jennifer (nee Hale); two stepsons, Douglas Wright (Kimberly) of Holmes, NY and Jeffrey Wright (Heather) of Fenton, MO; brother, Rick Bollinger (Linda) of Festus, MO, sister, Nancy Buenniger of Imperial, MO; grandchildren, Tyler Wright and Ryan Wright of Holmes, NY. Frank grew up in Festus, MO and most recently lived in Kirkwood, MO. He will be greatly missed. Services: A memorial will be held at Kirkwood United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 21 at 11:00 A.M. followed by a gathering at Duffy's in Kirkwood. ST LOUIS CREMATION

Bolte, Jean Frances

(Leifield) (9/29/1942) on Saturday, March 3, 2018 in St. Louis. Beloved wife of the late Ronald Bolte Sr; daughter of the late Raymond and Rose Leifield; sister of the late Ray Leifield Jr, mother of Terri Borowiak (Matt) and Ronald Jr.; grandmother of Andrew and Flora Borowiak. A life-long resident of St. Louis, Jean's hobbies included sewing, gardening and enjoying time with her grandchildren. Services: Memorial Mass at St. Raphael the Archangel, 6000 Jamieson Ave, St. Louis, MO 63109, Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m. Reception to follow in the parish hall until 12 p.m. The family requests donations to be made to Project, Inc, 2828 Brannon St. Louis, MO 63139 projectinc.org. in lieu of flowers.

Breitenfeld, Jeffrey J. "Spiff"

Celebrations of Life

Heuer, Craig A. - St. Louis Heumann Daniels, Christine - Clarksville, MO Logan, Rosemary E. - St. Louis Marshall, Elizabeth A. - St. Louis Mauhar, Lillian B. - St. Louis Noss, Harold G. - St. Louis O'Connor, Kevin Patrick - St. Louis Perry, Helen C. - St. Louis Reynolds, Vida M. - St. Louis

Hennemann, Carol L.

(nee Walker). Please say a prayer for her tonight. On Tuesday, March 6, 2018, Carol took her last breath, slipping away from the bonds of this earth and joining her little Angel, Kyle, and all of the others who have gone before us. She battled for a very long time, all the while living her life to the very fullest. She leaves behind her devoted husband, Glenn; two amazing daughters, Casey & Ashley; and their loving husbands Seth Brownsberger & Justin Vaughan; a rambunctious group of angelic grandchildren (Jon Grahm, Isla, Ellie, Adelynn & Noah), family and a ton of great friends. She never met a stranger; loved her family with all of her heart and had a smile that could always light up the room. We all know, she never missed a chance to laugh with her family and friends, a sale at the mall or even an opportunity to watch the Hallmark Channel. She leaves us with the promise that she won't be cooking in Heaven either-vowing there better be a McDonald's. To all of us, it's not goodbye, but rather see you later. Love you Honey... tricycle serious. Please say a prayer for her tonight. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road Sunday, March 11 from 3-8 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 4556 Telegraph Road Monday, March 12 at 11 a.m. Interment immediately following at Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Carol's honor may be made to The Children's Heart Foundation (PO Box 244 Lincolnshire, IL 60069), appreciated.

Heuer, Craig A.

Memorial Mass March 9, at 12:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth in Crestwood. Donations can be made to Lindbergh High School Marching Band. LHSBandstanders.org

Campbell, Bonita Keeney

age 66, reached the end of her life in the p red a w n hours of March 1, 2018. She waged a ferocious fight against cancer for nearly 2 years. She is survived by her husband, Bryan Franks, children Ariel, David, and Theodore; brother Ted Hayek; aunt Boonie Spadaro; and several cousins and close friends. Deborah was born in New York, NY. She received an undergraduate degree from Swarthmore College. She received her medical degree from Albany Medical College and completed her residency training in Internal Medicine at Thomas Jefferson, Philadelphia, PA. She moved to St. Louis with her partner Bryan in the middle '80's to pursue fellowship training in Critical Care at St. John's. Her most cherished asset was her family and she was a devoted mother to her children. Services: All her friends and colleagues are invited to attend a memorial service that will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 10th, at KUTIS CITY Chapel, 2906 Gravois Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63118. In lieu of flowers, we believe Debbie would greatly appreciate donations to one of the following organizations: Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: www.pancan.org Southern Poverty Law Center: www.splcenter.org Save the Children: www.savethechildren.org “It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

Seim, Sue Carol - St. Louis SIGLER, SISTER LORETTA C.PP.S. - St. Louis

Stevens, Gregory Phillip - St. Louis Veselsky, Keith W. - St. Louis Watton, Christine M. - St. Louis Zambo, Joann C. - St. Louis

Schrader, William A.

asleep in Jesus, Monday, March 5, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Barbara L. Schrader (nee Moissner). Dear father of William R. and Marjorie L. Schrader; grandfather of William C. and James J. Schrader; brother of Rosemary Schrader, the late Walter C. and Paul F. Schrader, and Trudy Ogle; brother-in-law of Loretta Schrader. Survived by many "FAVORITE" nieces and nephews. Services: Funeral service at Salem in Ballwin United Methodist Church Saturday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Salem United Methodist Cemetery. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday 4-8 p.m., and at the church Saturday 10 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Seim, Sue Carol

(nee Goff) on March 5, 2018. Wife of the late Richard F. Seim; Beloved mom of Terri (Mike) Starkey, Rick (Paula) & David (Tracy) Seim; Loving grandma of Hannah, Madeline, Gabi and Gracie; Sister of Joe Goff; Our sister-in-law, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial service will be held at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS South County on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Memorial visitation Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until time of service. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Humane Society of Missouri or the First Congregational Church of Dupo.

Heumann Daniels, Christine

Marshall, Elizabeth A.

(nee Wood) was born October 1, 1937 in Sparta, IL. and passed away peacefully at home Tuesday, March 6, 2018, after a lengthy struggle with cancer. Dear mother of Douglas (Sarah) of Amherst, MA., David (Hyejong) of Ft. Lauderdale, FL., and Rev. Fr. Daniel (Anya) of Cincinnati, OH.; dear grandmother of Rebecca, James, Alexandra, Leo and Alexander; sister of Helen (William) Stairwalt of Godfrey, IL and brother of Howard (Pat) Wood of Sparta, IL.; aunt to three nieces and two nephews, sister-in-law, cousin and friend to many. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of 47 years, Alexander Marshall. Mrs. Marshall was a 1955 graduate of Sparta High School, Sparta, IL and received an Associate's degree from SIU Carbondale. Later in life she earned a Bachelor's degree in Healthcare Management from Maryville University. She met Alexander while working at McDonnell Aircraft Corporation and married him in 1960. The young couple spent several years in Frazier, James C. Passed away on Tuesday, March 6, 2018. Dearest Ottawa, Canada and then returned to St. Louis, purchasing the husband of 45 years to Karen Frazier (nee Harrison); house in which she passed away 52 years later. Mrs. Marshall was a longtime member of Salem-in-Ladue loving father of Timothy Frazier. Preceded in death by his parents James and Adelaide Frazier; loving son-in-law, United Methodist Church where she was extremely active, particularly in the United Methodist Women. She served as brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. James was the Block Captain of the 7000 block of Oleatha. He director of Meals on Wheels of Greater St. Louis for several was a longtime member of the Carondolet Pinochle Club. James years. She loved musical theater and a meal out with friends. worked as a pressman for 25 years with the St. Louis Post-Dis- Services: Visitation Friday, March 9, 2018 from 4 to 8 p.m. at patch. He served in the Navy for 4 years during the Vietnam KRIEGSHAUSER WEST Mortuary, 9450 Olive, St. Louis, MO 63132. Funeral Saturday, March 10, 2018, 10:30 a.m. at SalemWar. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10105 Gravois Rd., in-Ladue United Methodist Church, 1200 South Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO. 63131, followed by burial in Caledonia Cemetery, Saturday, March 10, 12 p.m. Interment Sunset Cemetery. In Sp a rt a , IL . In l ieu of fl ow ers , memoria l contributions lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Paralyzed appreciated to Meals on Wheels of Greater St. Louis, P.O. Box Veterans. Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. 410395, St. Louis, MO 63141 or Kingdom House, 1321 South 11th Street, St. Louis, MO 63104.

Hayek, MD, Deborah A.

Schnell, Robert "Bob" Karl - Kirkwood Schrader, William A. - Ballwin, MO

SIGLER, SISTER LORETTA C.PP.S. Dear Mother of Matthew Cherry (Beth Lauer), Brian Michael Saturday, March 3, 2018, Cherry (Heather Choate), and Jennifer Cherry McCormick (Kris); baptized into the hope of Christ's Devoted Grandmother of Gracie, Bryce, Maddie, Hayden, Resurrection, beloved daughter Brantley, Kade, Hudson, Reece, Lily, Dalton; Loving sister of of the late Earl and Agn es Lynn, Jeanne, Jan, Mary, Sue, Paul. (Bishoff) Sigler. Survived by her Chris was born and raised in St. Louis county, and raised her two sisters, Mary Cable and family there but she yearned for the small town life. She Teresa Dickson and her four enjoyed living in Clarksville where she loved the people, river brothers, Francis, John, Anthony, sites, seasons and keeping up with her grands. She had a great a n d Crispin Sigler, nieces, wit and could leave you laughing for hours. Chris was a talented nephews, cousins, dear friends seamstress and quilter and an incredible baker. Chris was a and Sisters in Christ. giver with a heart of gold and she always had just the right Services: Funeral Mass Friday, words when you were down. March 9, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., St. Services: Visitation Saturday, March 10, 12:00-1:00 p.m. followed by service at Clarksville United Methodist Church. Joseph Chapel, 204 North Main, Celebration of life immediately following at the Clarksville Boat O'Fallon, MO. Interment convent cemetery. Wake Thursday, Club. March 8, 2018 from 3:30 - 8:00 p.m. and a Prayer Service of Thanksgiving at 7:00 pm. Wake continues Friday, March 9 from ST. LOUIS CREMATION 9:00-10:45 a.m. in St. Joseph Chapel, 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO. Contributions to the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO 63366-2299.

On Monday, March 5, 2018. Beloved son of Richard and Judith Breitenfeld; loving husband of Tracy Breitenfeld (nee Dilport); adoring father to Kimberly Breitenfeld and Kelsie Breitenfeld; dearest brother of Randy, James, David, and Rebecca Szukalski; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Jeff knew everybody by the name "Tim". Every Fourth of July, J eff w ou l d h a ve t h e b igges t fireworks d is p l a y in the neighborhood. As an avid poolplayer, he would challenge anyone that was willing to take his bet. His greatest passions were cars and the farm. Services: Memorial Visitation at Hope Lutheran Church, 5218 Logan, Rosemary E. Neosho Street, Saturday, March 10 from 1 p.m. until the funeral service at 3 p.m. Private inurnment. In lieu of flowers, (nee Gildehaus), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother contributions to the charity of your choice. Church, Tuesday, March 6, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Henry A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE. A. Logan; dear mother of Bruce Logan and Diana (Michael) Messina; dear grandmother of Andrew Messina; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Brockman, Louise Services: Visitation at Our Lady of Providence Catholic Church St. Charles, 09/23/1946-03/06/2018. Services: Visitation Friday, March 9, 12 noon until funeral Mass at 1 p.m. 3/9, 10 a.m. until Service at 12:30 p.m. at Paul Funeral Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Contributions to the Home. Interment Memorial Park. www.paulfuneral.com American Heart Association appreciated. KUTIS AFFTON Service. age 77, passed away on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Beloved mother of Shanda Cash and Heather Love; loving grandmother of Lee Cash and Alex Love. Bonita was a proud alumna of the University of Missouri at Columbia. She dedicated her 37-year career to public education. When she retired in 2007, she was Dean of Business, Math and Technology at St. Louis Community College-Forest Park. Since retirement, she has volunteered at the Kirkwood Public Library gift shop and served three terms on the City of Kirkwood Finance Committee. Services: Memorial visitation Sat., Mar. 10, 2018 from 1-4 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Friends of the Kirkwood Public Library Tribute Fund. www.boppchapel.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Mauhar, Lillian B.

Monday, March 5, 2018. Service at a later date. www.colliersfuneralhome.com.

Stevens, Gregory Phillip

72, passed away on Friday, March 2, 2018. He was a dear father, grandfather, brother, Jesuit, and friend. He had an enormous heart which was directed at his friends, family and for those who were less fortunate than himself. He kept his passion for peace, and he was a true humanitarian. Services: The family will receive friends in the Great Hall of Ambruster Chapel, 6633 Clayton Rd., 63117, Friday, March 9, 2018, from 1-3 p.m. with service following at 3:00. Memorials may be made to Peace Economy Project and Bread and Roses, MO. Online condolences at www.ambrusterchapel.com

Veselsky, Keith W.

52, Nov. 1, 1965 - Mar. 6, 2018. Went home to Heaven. See jaybsmith.com for details

Watton, Christine M.

Beloved mother, sister, aunt and grandmother to many. Survived by sons Zachery, Richard (Colleen), Jason (Heidi), daughter Dyanna brothers Dennis (Jamie), Danny (Kelly) and sister Lori (Terry), grandmother of seven, great grandmother of two and loved by many more. Services: Dittmer Community of Christ Church, 7517 MO-30 (Gravois Rd.), Dittmer, MO. 63023, March 18th, 2018. 2pm-6pm CYPRESS POINTE CREMATION

Zambo, Joann C.

(nee Winkler) Sunday, February 25, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Robert M. Zambo, Sr.; loving mother of Pamela (Mike) Donatt and Robert, Jr. (Linda); our dear sister, grandma, greatgrandma, cousin and friend to many. Services: Memorial Service at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd., Sat., March 10, 2-4 p.m. Interment Private. Donations to Backstoppers, appreciated.

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Noss, Harold G.

Wed., March 7, 2018. Vis. 4-8 Mon. at Hutchens. Mass 10:30 Tues. at St. Ferdinand. Interment Jefferson Barracks. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com for details.

O'Connor, Kevin Patrick

(5-20-58) entered into eternal rest on Friday, March 2, 2018. Loving father of Shannon Marie O'Connor; brother of Patricia O'Connor Gogel, Margaret O'Connor-Villa, and Andrew J. O'Connor, Jr. May his soul rest in peace. Mr. O'Connor donated his body and requested no services.

Perry, Helen C.

(nee Roesch), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wed., March 7, 2018 at the age of 98. Beloved wife for 76 years of the late Arthur M. Perry; dear mother of Lynn (Connie), Wayne and Dale (Alice) Perry, Rita (Ricky) Meyer, Stephen (Deborah) and David (Lisa) Perry; dear grandmother of 7; great-grandmother of 8; great-great-grandmother of 2; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Sat., March 10, 10 a.m. with Mass celebrated at St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church 10:30 a.m. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery (Imperial, MO). Masses preferred. Visitation Fri., 4-8 p.m.

Reynolds, Vida M.

(nee Riney) Mon., March 5, 2018. Beloved wife of Robert Reynolds. Visitation KUTIS So. County, 5255 Lemay Ferry Fri., March 9, 10 a.m. until service 12 Noon. Burial National Cem.

Schnell, Robert "Bob" Karl

entered into rest Feb. 28, 2018. 74, of Kirkwood, MO Visitation Sat., March 10 at 2 p.m. until Service 3 p.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary Kirkwood WRITE YOUR LOVED ONE’S LIFE STORY STLtoday.com/obit

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WORLD

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A15

Russian ex-spy attacked with nerve agent His daughter, police officer also injured BY DANICA KIRKA AND JILL LAWLESS associated Press

LONDON • A Russian exspy and his daughter fighting for their lives in an English hospital were attacked with a nerve agent in a targeted murder attempt, British police said Wednesday.

Sergei Skripal, 66, and his daughter Yulia, 33, were found unconscious on a bench in the southwestern England city of Salisbury on Sunday, triggering a police investigation led by counterterrorism detectives. Baffled police initially said the pair had come into contact with an unknown substance. “Having established that a nerve agent is the cause of the symptoms leading us to treat this as attempted murder, I can also confirm that we believe that the

China’s space lab will soon crash to Earth, but where? BY AMY B. WANG Washington Post

Heads up, Spain and Portugal. And France. Maybe you, too, Greece. China’s 9½-ton space station, Tiangong-1, will come falling from space soon, and it’s predicted to head in that general direction. For the uninitiated, Tiangong-1 launched in 2011 as China’s first space laboratory, a prototype for what the country hoped would eventually be a permanent space station. For about five years, it did just that, orbiting the Earth and acting as a base for three missions (two staffed, one unstaffed) for the Chinese National Space Administration. In September 2016, however, Chinese officials announced that they had lost control of the station, meaning Tiangong-1 (literally, “heavenly palace”) would eventually defy its name and come hurtling back to Earth. Exactly when or where it would do so was a mystery. At first, Chinese scientists ventured that the “uncontrolled re-entry” would take place sometime in the latter half of 2017. That window was later pushed back to sometime between October 2017 and April 2018. In January, the California-based nonprofit Aerospace Corp. predicted that Tiangong-1 would re-enter in midMarch, give or take two weeks. This week, the European Space Agency gave a more specific time frame — between March 29 and

April 9 — and narrowed the re-entry locations to “anywhere between 43ºN and 43ºS (e.g. Spain, France, Portugal, Greece, etc.).” It is worth noting that the new predictions come with enough caveats (see: “etc.”) to make an appointment for cable TV service seem exacting. The current estimated window is “highly variable,” the European Space Agency cautioned. Areas outside the given latitudes could be excluded — but the forecast is still being updated weekly, it added. “At no time will a precise time/location prediction from ESA be possible,” the agency said. Popular Mechanics notes that, given the station’s path of orbit, it could also re-enter the atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere near 43 degrees latitude. “Parts of the United States, the Iberian Peninsula, China, the Middle East, South America, Australia, and New Zealand are all potential re-entry locations,” the magazine reported. Still, there are several reasons not to panic. First and foremost, much, if not all, of the roughly 19,000-pound laboratory is expected to disintegrate upon reentry. “In the history of spaceflight, no known person has ever been harmed by re-entering space debris,” the Aerospace Corp. stated in January. “Only one person has ever been recorded as being hit by a piece of space debris and, fortunately, she was not injured.”

two people who became unwell were targeted specifically,” Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley said. Rowley said a police officer who treated the pair at the scene was in serious condition. Rowley didn’t say what nerve agent was suspected in the attack on Skripal, a former Russian agent who served jail time in his homeland for spying for Britain. Sally Davies, the chief medical officer for Eng-

land, said there was a low risk to the public. Police and forensics officers continued to scour several sites in and around the cathedral city on Wednesday, three days after the attack. Home Secretary Amber Rudd chaired a meeting of the government’s emergency committee, known as Cobra, to discuss the investigation, which is now in the hands of counterterrorism police. “We need to keep a cool head and make sure we collect all the evidence we

can,” Rudd said. “And then we need to decide what action to take.” Moscow accused Britain of using the case to fuel an “anti-Russian campaign” and further strain ties with Britain. “What happened to Skripal has been immediately used to further incite an anti-Russian campaign in Western media,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said. Skripal, a former colonel in Russia’s GRU mili-

tary intelligence service, was convicted in 2006 of spying for Britain and imprisoned. He was freed in 2010 as part of a widely publicized spy swap in which the U.S. agreed to hand over 10 members of a Russian sleeper cell found operating in America in return for four Russians convicted of spying for the West. While police say they are keeping an open mind about the case, it has reminded Britain of the 2006 poisoning of former spy Alexander Litvinenko.

Syrian troops split rebel-held enclave; many civilians trapped

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This photo released by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets shows a member of the Syrian Civil Defense group helping a man who was wounded after airstrikes near Damascus, Syria, on Wednesday.

Government wants to reclaim all territory in order to end 7-year-old war BY PHILIP ISSA associated Press

BEIRUT • Syrian government forces seized on Wednesday vast swathes of territory including farmland from rebels in the opposition-held suburbs of Damascus, in effect dividing the besieged enclave in two and further squeezing rebels and tens of thousands of civilians trapped inside, state media and a war monitor reported. The government, determined to wrest the suburbs from the control of rebels after seven years of war, has resorted to extreme levels of shelling and bombardment to clear the way for its troops to advance on the ground. Hundreds have been killed in the past two weeks. The state-affiliated alIkhbariya TV station on

Wednesday broadcast live shots from the region, showing dense columns of smoke rising above the town as explosions and rockets could be heard flying overhead. Syria’s Central Military Media said troops took control of the town of Beit Sawa and most of Misraba, both rebel-held towns in the heart of the enclave. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said that by nightfall, Syrian government troops and allied militias had seized half of the territory held by rebels in eastern Ghouta and split the enclave in two halves — a north and southern part. In Geneva, U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad alHussein denounced what he said were attempts by Syria’s government to justify indiscriminate, brutal attacks on hundreds of

thousands of civilians by the need to combat a few hundred fighters in eastern Ghouta, calling it “legally and morally unsustainable.” “When you are prepared to kill your own people, lying is easy too. Claims by the government of Syria that it is taking every measure to protect its civilian population are frankly ridiculous,” he said. At least 800 civilians have been killed since the offensive started Feb. 18, according to the Syrian Observatory of Human Rights monitoring group. Russia’s military by its own admission is playing a key role supporting the assault. Meanwhile, Turkey called on the United States to prevent U.S.-backed Kurdish forces from sending fighters deployed against the Islamic State

group to shore up Kurdish forces battling a Turkish offensive in an enclave in northwestern Syria. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s spokesman said Turkey wants the United States to “step in and prevent” the redeployment. A spokesman for Arab militias within the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces said Tuesday that as many as 1,700 fighters would be redeployed. Turkey sent troops into the Afrin enclave on Jan. 20 to drive out Syrian Kurdish fighters it considers to be terrorists. U.S. officials have warned that Turkey’s offensive could undermine the fight against the IS. Erdogan spokesman Ibrahim Kalin rejected that, saying the aim was to clear Syria of all terrorist groups.

Holocaust Museum cites Rohingya genocide to revoke Suu Kyi’s prize BY ASHRAF KHALIL associated Press

WA S H I N G T O N • The United States Holocaust Museum is revoking a major human rights award given to Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the civilian leader of Myanmar, saying she has failed to respond adequately to the mass killings of Myanmar’s Muslim Rohingya minority.

The museum announced Wednesday that the Elie Wiesel Award given to Suu Kyi in 2012 would be rescinded. The move is just the latest in a series of blows to Suu Kyi’s international reputation, which has plummeted over the Rohingya massacres. Suu Kyi was a Mandelalike figure in Myanmar who spent years under house arrest for opposing

the country’s military dictatorship. She became an international rallying point and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991. Her party won a landslide victory in 2015 and she assumed the newly created post of state counselor, although the military still retains significant political and economic power. Hopes had been high for Suu Kyi to make the tran-

sition from revered opposition figure to reformist political leader, given her long campaign for democracy. Instead, human rights advocates consider her a disappointment, particularly in her response to the Rohingya killings. The Holocaust Museum has embraced the plight of the Rohingya people in recent years, and published a report in Novem-

ber that concluded there was “mounting evidence of genocide” committed by both the military and armed Buddhist extremists. In a letter to Suu Kyi released Wednesday, the museum accused her government of obstructing United Nations investigators and promoting “hateful rhetoric” against the Rohingya community. The museum had hoped

Suu Kyi “would have done something to condemn and stop the military’s brutal campaign and to express solidarity with the targeted Rohingya population,” the letter stated. “The severity of the atrocities in recent months demand that you use your moral authority to address this situation.”

DIGEST

news agency on Wednesday quoted prosecutor Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi as saying the unidentified woman took off her headscarf in Tehran’s Enghelab Street to “encourage corruption through the removal of the hijab in public.” Women showing their hair in public in Iran are usually sentenced to far shorter terms.

intercession on Tuesday, the same day he approved a miracle for another important figure for the 20th-century Catholic Church, Pope Paul VI, the Vatican said Wednesday. No date was set for either canonization.

The foundation called the 90-year-old’s work “poetic and functional,” and noted his ability to create works that both respect eastern culture and enhance quality of life in India.

Yellow fever worsens in Brazil; 260 dead

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Brazil’s yellow fever outbreak has now infected more people than the previous one, which had been the largest in decades. The Health Ministry said Wednesday that officials had confirmed 846 cases of the mosquito-borne disease. Of those, 260 have died. In the 2016-2017 outbreak, Latin America’s largest nation saw 777 cases and 261 deaths. Iranian woman sentenced for removing headscarf • A Tehran prosecutor says a woman who removed her obligatory Islamic headscarf in public in late December has been sentenced to 24 months in prison. Iran’s semi-official Tasnim

Salvadoran archbishop moves toward sainthood • Pope Francis has cleared the way for Archbishop Oscar Romero to be made a saint, declaring that the churchman murdered by El Salvador’s right-wing death squads in 1980 for standing up for the poor and oppressed should be a model for today’s church. Francis signed a decree confirming a miracle attributed to Romero’s

Pritzker Prize awarded to Indian • Architect and educator Balkrishna Doshi, best-known for his innovative work designing low-cost housing, has been awarded the 2018 Pritzker Architecture Prize, the first Indian to win architecture’s highest honor in its 40-year history. The award was announced Wednesday by Tom Pritzker of the Chicago-based Hyatt Foundation. Doshi has been an architect, urban planner, and educator for 70 years.

Arab ministers tout Jerusalem as Palestinian capital • Arab foreign ministers insisted on Wednesday that Jerusalem must be the capital of a future Palestinian state, even as the U.S. prepares to move its embassy there in a step that has angered the Arab world. A ministerial meeting held in the Egyptian capital Cairo came amid a wave of anger at U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision in December to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. From news services


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THURSDAY • 03.08.2018 • B

SEC TOURNAMENT

PORTER JR. GOOD TO GO

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri forward Michael Porter Jr. goes up for a dunk Wednesday during a practice session for the SEC Tournament at Scottrade Center. He has played in just one game this season.

Freshman will return as Tigers face Georgia

Adding MPJ will make Mizzou a real wild card BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A voice queried the coach from the back. “Do you buy into bracket projections that have you as an 8-9 seed?” “Not at all,” Mizzou’s Cuonzo Martin bluntly said Wednesday. Wait. Did he mean the Tigers are still on the bubble … or that the Tigers are not only in the

NCAA Tournament, but also are better than an eight seed? “Do you believe that you’re safely in?” “Oh, I believe we’re safely in,” Mizzou’s coach said. “But I don’t buy all of those numbers, I don’t, I don’t.” Cuonzo’s confidence doesn’t come off like a blow horn or blowhard; on the contrary, Cuonzo speaks in a quiet monotone, though coated with calculation. After all, when Mizzou beat Arkansas on Saturday, See HOCHMAN • Page B7

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

GEORGIA, S. CAROLINA WIN OPENERS. B6 MIZZOU VS. GEORGIA 2:30 p.m. Thursday, SEC Network

OTHER GAMES

(all games on SEC Network) • Noon: Texas A&M vs. Alabama • 6 p.m.: Miss. St. vs. LSU • 8:30 p.m.: So. Carolina vs. Ark.

Michael Porter Jr.won’t start and probably won’t play more than 25 minutes, but at some point Thursday in the Southeastern Conference Tournament, the freshman will jog to the scorer’s table and check into the Tigers’ game against Georgia. What unfolds next could change the outlook of the entire tournament and, perhaps, college basketball’s postseason if Porter is close to the player Mizzou expected when he

joined the team last summer. After missing all but the opening three minutes of Mizzou’s first game on Nov. 10, Porter told Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin at Tuesday’s practice he was ready to make his much-anticipated return. Porter had lower back surgery Nov. 21 and was cleared to practice late last month. All along, Martin insisted Porter wouldn’t play until he told the coach he was ready to return. See MIZZOU • Page B7

EYE ON THE TIGER PODCAST • Mizzou beat writer Dave Matter and columnist Ben Frederickson break down every angle of the SEC Tournament. stltoday.com/podcasts

Blues have a lot on line as they go to California

Wainwright has a few more tricks up his sleeve

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It has come down to this for the 2017-18 edition of Blues hockey: Of the 16 games remaining in the regular season, the Blues play six of them against teams they’re in direct competition with for a playoff berth — most likely a wild card at this point. In San Jose, Los Angeles and Anaheim, they see three of those six teams between Thursday and Monday. “These are teams that we’re chasing,” coach Mike Yeo said. “They’re gonna want to keep their spot. They’re gonna want to build on that. We’ll face intensity. We’ll face their best games. “We have to get excited about this. This is what you love to do, is go into another team’s building when the season is pretty much on the line and find a way to come out with a win. That’s why you play the game.” If the Blues conclude their stay at the Hotel California with three losses, it won’t officially be over. But it’ll be time for last rites. “Everyone’s chasing everyone, but especially us,” defenseman Vince Dunn said.

JUPITER, FLA. • With a mix of pitches all funneling toward his curveball and a willingness to throw them at various heights, Adam Wainwright had enough at his fingertips Wednesday to get Washington’s uber-hitter Bryce Harper out three different times. All in the same at-bat. During their nine-pitch duel in the first inning, Harper chopped a curveball down the first-base line for what appeared to be a routine groundout. It was called foul. With a full count, Wainwright appeared to get strike three against Harper, but umpire Angel Hernandez had called time. The third time, Wainwright went to the charm — the curveball. Harper swung and missed for an out that couldn’t be taken away. “I left a few tricks in the cupboard,” Wainwright said. “I threw a few different looks at him. With those good guys, I’m not just ever going to give them one look. I’m trying out a few things, so I wanted to see those good hitters’ reaction to them.” In his second start of spring training,

See BLUES • Page B3 > 9:30 p.m. Thursday at Sharks, FSM

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher John Gant throws a bullpen session Feb. 14 in Jupiter, Fla.

DO IT RIGHT

Righthander Gant was taught early how to look at life and could be big plus for Cards JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • Whether his

young son was close to attaining his black belt in taekwondo, playing the right or left wings in soccer or guard in basketball, John Charles Gant had

one request that still resonates with his son. No matter what the younger John Michael Gant was doing, whether in sports, school or daily life, the advice was consistent. “He always used to tell me, ‘If you’re going to do something, do it right,’” said Cardinals righthander John Gant. “No matter what it is, if See ORTIZ • Page B4

See CARDINALS • Page B4 > 12:05 p.m. Thursday vs. Marlins

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

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Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 3/8 at Sharks 9:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/10 at Kings 3 p.m. FSM

Monday 3/12 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Thursday 3/8 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m.

Friday 3/9 at Astros* 5:05 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/10 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/15 vs. Avalanche 7 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Sunday 3/11 at Nationals* 12:05 p.m. FSM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Instead of PSLs, Rams set to sell refundable plans

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 TBA Thursday 3/8 Postseason TBA A-10 tourn. vs. Geo. Washington, 7:30 p.m., NBCSN

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Thursday 3/8 SEC tourn. vs. Georgia, 2:30, SEC Net

TBA Postseason TBA

OTHER EVENTS

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Exhibition: Tigers at Pirates, MLB Network Noon 7:30 p.m. Exhibition: Giants at Mariners, MLB Network BASKETBALL ACC tournament: Virginia vs. Louisville, ESPN 11 a.m. Big East tournament: Xavier vs. St. John’s, FS1 11 a.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: Virginia Commonwealth vs. Dayton, NBCSN 11 a.m. AAC tournament: Southern Methodist vs. Connecticut, ESPNU 11 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Big 12 tournament: Kansas State vs. Texas Christian, ESPN2 Noon SEC tournament: Alabama vs. Texas A&M, SEC Network 1:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Clemson vs. Boston College, ESPN 1:30 p.m. Big East tournament: Providence vs. Creighton, FS1 1:30 p.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: George Mason vs. Massachusetts, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. AAC tournament: South Florida vs. Memphis, ESPNU Big 12 tournament: Kansas vs. Oklahoma State, ESPN2 2 p.m. Mountain West tournament: Nevada vs. Nevada-Las Vegas, CBSSN 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. SEC tournament: Missouri vs. Georgia, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 4:30 p.m. Mountain West tournament: Fresno State vs. San Diego State, CBSSN Atlantic 10 tournament: Richmond vs. Duquesne, NBCSN 5 p.m. ACC tournament: Duke vs. Notre Dame, ESPN 6 p.m. Big 12 tournament: Texas Tech vs. Texas or Iowa State, ESPN2 6 p.m. 6 p.m. Big East tournament: Villanova vs. Marquette or DePaul, FS1 SEC tournament: Louisiana State vs. Mississippi State, SEC Network 6 p.m. AAC tournament: Temple vs. Tulane, ESPNU 6 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Timberwolves, TNT 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: St. Louis U. vs. George Washington, NBCSN, WXOS (101.1 FM) Mountain West tournament: Boise State vs. Utah State, CBSSN 8 p.m. 8:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Miami vs. Syracuse or North Carolina, ESPN 8:30 p.m. Big 12 tournament: West Virginia vs. Baylor, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. SEC tournament: Arkansas vs. South Carolina or Mississippi, SEC Network 8:30 p.m. AAC tournament: Central Florida vs. East Carolina, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. Big East tournament: Seton Hall vs. Butler, FS1 9:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Warriors, TNT 10:30 p.m. Pac-12 tournament: Utah vs. Oregon or Washington State, FS1 10:30 p.m. Mountain West tournament: New Mexico vs. Wyoming, CBSSN GOLF PGA: Valspar Championship, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. 11:30 p.m. European PGA: Hero Indian Open, second round, GOLF HOCKEY Flyers at Bruins, NHL Network 6 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Blues at Sharks, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) OLYMPICS (Fri.) Winter Paralympics Opening Ceremony, NBCSN 5 a.m. SOCCER UEFA Europa League: AC Milan vs. Arsenal, FS2 Noon UEFA Europa League: Leipzig vs. FC Zenit St. Petersburg, FS2 2 p.m. TENNIS ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 1st round, WTA 1st round, Tennis Channel 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 1st round, WTA 1st round, Tennis Channel 9 p.m.

DIGEST S. Williams’ comeback is set for Thursday night

Serena Williams makes her return to the pro tour after a 14-month absence with a first-round match at the BNP Paribas Open on Thursday in Indian Wells, Calif. She will play Zarina Diyas of Kazakhstan in a night match. Williams has played just one Fed Cup doubles match while away from the WTA Tour. The former topranked women’s tennis player is unseeded and therefore didn’t receive a first-round bye. Williams, who gave birth to a daughter in September, will try to become the first woman to win three singles titles in the desert. (AP) U.S. women win tournament • The U.S. women’s national soccer team beat England 1-0 on Wednesday night to win the SheBelieves Cup tournament in Orlando, Fla. The U.S. team scored on an own goal that came off of a cross from Megan Rapinoe in the 60th minute. The United States finished atop the table at 2-0-1 while England was 1-1-1, France 1-1-1 and Germany 0-2-1. (AP) Manchester City loses, but moves on • Manchester City lost 2-1 to Basel for its first home defeat in 15 months, but still advanced to the quarterfinals of the Champions League. Qualification was a formality for the English club after its 4-0 win in Switzerland in the first leg. City advanced 5-2 on aggregate. City’s progress took the number of English teams in the quarterfinals to two, after Liverpool advanced on Tuesday. Tottenham couldn’t make it three, though, losing 2-1 to Juventus at Wembley Stadium as the Italian side clinched a 4-3 aggregate victory. (AP) Controversy at Iditarod • The head of the Iditarod’s drug testing program, who is challenging his termination from Oregon State University over allegations of bullying, has been accused of threatening a musher just before the start of this year’s race. Musher Wade Marrs said Dr. Morrie Craig threatened to reveal his dogs tested positive for a banned substance. Iditarod officials are reviewing the allegations. The Iditarod says Marrs’ dogs did have a small amount of lidocaine in their system but not enough to trigger a positive test. In the race, Norwegian musher Joar Leifseth Ulsom had the lead at the Ophir checkpoint, 352 miles from the start of the 1,000-mile trek across Alaska. Aliy Zirkle, a 1988 Parkway West High graduate, was 14th. (AP)

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LA STADIUM AT HOLLYWOOD PARK VIA AP

This architectural rendering provided by LA Stadium at Hollywood Park shows the south aerial perspective of the future home of the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers.

But buyers can’t get their money back for 50 years ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • The massive football stadium complex at Hollywood Park currently is a bustling construction site. The $2.6 billion project won’t welcome fans through its doors for another two years. But the Rams and the Chargers are eager to show you to your seat. Los Angeles’ two NFL teams will begin selling season-ticket memberships for their new stadium for the first time next week. Both will start with only their premium seating, offering an array of privileges and amenities befitting the sizable price tags for the best 13,000-odd seats in what could be the most expensive arena in the world. With relocation from St. Louis (Rams) and San Diego (Chargers) fading into memory after a pair of winning seasons in LA, both franchises are eager to move into the bright future promised by the palatial project rising in Inglewood, Calif. The 70,240-seat arena will also host the Super Bowl, the College Football Playoff title game and Olympic events in its first decade of existence after it opens in 2020. “This has been a long time coming,” said A.G. Spanos, the Chargers’ president of business operations. “When I was at USC, we were talking about a new stadium in LA back then. This has been a slow pot to boil in Los Angeles, but the future is here. This venue is incredibly exciting.” In an office building in coastal Playa Vista, the teams were to begin showing off the project to their fans on Tuesday, starting with visits from many current seasonticket holders for both clubs. The sleek LA Stadium Premiere Center features detailed scale models, video hype reels and a staff with

carefully curated sales pitches for the privately financed project spearheaded by Rams owner Stan Kroenke. “It’s exciting when you fly in and you see the steel coming out of the ground, or when you drive up and you see the stadium starting to take shape,” Rams chief operating officer Kevin Demoff said. “And now this is the first chance the fans really get to participate in being part of the stadium and seeing Stan’s vision come to life.” The Rams and Chargers have also unveiled the first prices for tickets — and the prices for the stadium seat licenses (SSLs) that provide the opportunity to buy tickets. Instead of selling the nowubiquitous personal seat licenses, with which fans pay a sometimeshefty fee for the opportunity to buy their tickets, the Chargers and Rams are selling a similar concept with a similar name, but one big difference: For the first time in NFL stadium history, that money will be returned to the fans — albeit in 50 years. Instead of the naked cash grab of a PSL, the SSL is essentially an interest-free loan to finance the stadium construction. The structure also allows both the teams and the fans to avoid paying taxes on the licenses. “We really feel like they are making an investment, and they’re a shareholder in the team and the stadium project,” Demoff said. “For us, rather than fan money going to taxes, it can go directly to the construction of the building. It builds a better building, and it requires no taxpayer money to do so. It’s a unique concept that we expect will be replicated from here on out.” The Rams’ stadium seat licenses will begin at $100,000 for

the stadium’s 500 “all-access” seats, located in two sections on either end of the 50-yard line. The Chargers’ SSLs will be $75,000 for the same seats, which include food and beverages, access to clubs, special parking and the guaranteed opportunity to buy tickets to the Super Bowl and every other event controlled by the stadium owners. Those prices are higher than the most top PSLs for many recent NFL stadiums, but significantly lower than the reported $150,000 charged by the Dallas Cowboys for their top seats at AT&T Stadium, which opened in 2009. The 49ers charged $80,000 for the PSLs for the top 1,000 seats at Levis Stadium, which opened in 2014. The Rams’ remaining SSLs for the premium seats range from $80,000 to $15,000, with most falling in the lower category for club seats. The Chargers’ other SSLs range from $50,000 to $10,000. The Rams and Chargers are confident the structure will help as they persuade fans to pay for the licenses while knowing they’ll get all the money back in 2068 — or at least their heirs will. Once the SSL is purchased, the Rams’ tickets for those premium seats are $375 per game, and the Chargers’ are $350. Both teams obviously will sell the other three-quarters of the stadium at much lower prices, and the ticket prices won’t change during the stadium’s first three years. “It’s very hard to compete at the highest level if you don’t have a first-class facility, and that’s something that our family has been working toward for a long time,” said John Spanos, the Chargers’ president of football operations. “We’re excited that it’s here soon.”

on Monday. That came a few days after Goodell assessed the financial penalties for Jones’ lawsuit to overturn the suspension of Cowboys star running back Ezekiel Elliott, and for a lawsuit Jones threatened to stop Goodell’s newly approved contract. Many owners were consulted on seeking restitution, including members of the finance committee. Some finance committee members are on the compensation committee that was at the center of what became a legal back-and-forth over Goodell’s deal. The restitution is rooted in a 1997 resolution that states owners can seek repayment for legal fees if a fellow owner is responsible for getting them involved in legal action. Jones’ attempt to derail Goodell’s extension, which came after Elliott was suspended over domestic violence allegations, led to a volley of threatening letters from lawyers for both sides. After eventually relenting, Jones said after the owners’ meetings in December that he got what he wanted with an agreement to consider changes to the power of the commissioner’s role through the league’s constitution.

Pats cut Bennett • The Patriots released tight end Martellus Bennett, who was due a $2 million roster bonus next week. His release will save New England about $6 million in salary-cap space. Bennett joined New England in November of last season after being released by Green Bay for “failing to disclose a physical condition.” He started seven games for the Packers in 2017 after signing a three-year, $21 million contract as a free agent. Following his release, Bennett appeared in two games for the Patriots before being placed on injured reserve because of hamstring and shoulder problems. In 2016, Bennett caught 55 passes for 701 yards and a career-high seven touchdowns on his way to earning a Super Bowl ring with the Patriots.

NFL NOTEBOOK Report: Ogletree to Giants

The Los Angeles Rams continued their flurry of offseason moves Wednesday, trading linebacker Alec Ogletree to the New York Giants, the Los Angeles Times reported. The deal, the Rams’ third in the last few weeks, will not become official until the new league year begins March 14. One source said the trade was for draft picks. Ogletree, 26, was the starting middle linebacker in 2016, when the Rams played a 4-3 scheme under then-coach Jeff Fisher. He was a starting inside linebacker last season under new coordinator Wade Phillips, who installed a 3-4. Ogletree, a first-round draft pick in 2013, when the team was based in St. Louis, signed a four-year, $42 million extension last October. The trade comes after the Rams agreed last month to a deal with the Kansas City Chiefs for cornerback Marcus Peters. Last week, the Rams traded veteran linebacker/edge rusher Robert Quinn to Miami. Ogletree, like Quinn, was regarded as a locker room leader. Cornerback Trumaine Johnson, who played under the franchise tag last season, is a pending free agent. The Rams put the franchise tag on safety Lamarcus Joyner on Tuesday. Jones reportedly settles with NFL • Jerry Jones has agreed to pay the NFL more than $2 million in legal fees resulting from two disputes the Dallas Cowboys’ owner had with the league, a person with direct knowledge of the settlement tells The Associated Press. Commissioner Roger Goodell held an appeal hearing with Jones

Cowboys release Mayowa • Dallas released defensive end Benson Mayowa in a move to save $2.8 million against the cap as it tries to absorb a big raise for 2017 team sacks leader DeMarcus Lawrence. Mayowa led the team with six sacks in 2016, his first season after signing an offer sheet that Oakland declined to match. But the 26-yearold had just one sack last season.

’Skins to honor fill-ins • The Washington Redskins will present replacement players from 1987 with Super Bowl rings. The team announced it will honor the work of the fill-in players who went 3-0 during a strike. Washington went on to finish 11-4, win the NFC East and beat the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl. Owner Dan Snyder said the replacement players’ “contributions are part of Redskins history and represent an integral reason why a Lombardi Trophy from the 1987 campaign resides in our facility.” The Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution Tuesday commending the replacement players on the 1987 team. From news services


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 3/8 at Sharks 9:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/10 at Kings 3 p.m. FSM

Monday 3/12 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Thursday 3/8 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m.

Friday 3/9 at Astros* 5:05 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/10 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Thursday 3/15 vs. Avalanche 7 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Sunday 3/11 at Nationals* 12:05 p.m. FSM

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Instead of PSLs, Rams set to sell refundable plans

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 TBA Thursday 3/8 Postseason TBA A-10 tourn. vs. Geo. Washington, 7:30 p.m., NBCSN

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Thursday 3/8 SEC tourn. vs. Georgia, 2:30, SEC Net

TBA Postseason TBA

OTHER EVENTS

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Exhibition: Tigers at Pirates, MLB Network Noon 7:30 p.m. Exhibition: Giants at Mariners, MLB Network BASKETBALL ACC tournament: Virginia vs. Louisville, ESPN 11 a.m. Big East tournament: Xavier vs. St. John’s, FS1 11 a.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: Virginia Commonwealth vs. Dayton, NBCSN 11 a.m. AAC tournament: Southern Methodist vs. Connecticut, ESPNU 11 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Big 12 tournament: Kansas State vs. Texas Christian, ESPN2 Noon SEC tournament: Alabama vs. Texas A&M, SEC Network 1:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Clemson vs. Boston College, ESPN 1:30 p.m. Big East tournament: Providence vs. Creighton, FS1 1:30 p.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: George Mason vs. Massachusetts, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. AAC tournament: South Florida vs. Memphis, ESPNU Big 12 tournament: Kansas vs. Oklahoma State, ESPN2 2 p.m. Mountain West tournament: Nevada vs. Nevada-Las Vegas, CBSSN 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. SEC tournament: Missouri vs. Georgia, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 4:30 p.m. Mountain West tournament: Fresno State vs. San Diego State, CBSSN Atlantic 10 tournament: Richmond vs. Duquesne, NBCSN 5 p.m. ACC tournament: Duke vs. Notre Dame, ESPN 6 p.m. Big 12 tournament: Texas Tech vs. Texas, ESPN2 6 p.m. 6 p.m. Big East tournament: Villanova vs. Marquette or DePaul, FS1 SEC tournament: Louisiana State vs. Mississippi State, SEC Network 6 p.m. AAC tournament: Temple vs. Tulane, ESPNU 6 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Timberwolves, TNT 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Atlantic 10 tournament: St. Louis U. vs. George Washington, NBCSN, WXOS (101.1 FM) Mountain West tournament: Boise State vs. Utah State, CBSSN 8 p.m. 8:30 p.m. ACC tournament: Miami vs. North Carolina, ESPN 8:30 p.m. Big 12 tournament: West Virginia vs. Baylor, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. SEC tournament: Arkansas vs. South Carolina, SEC Network 8:30 p.m. AAC tournament: Central Florida vs. East Carolina, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. Big East tournament: Seton Hall vs. Butler, FS1 9:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Warriors, TNT 10:30 p.m. Pac-12 tournament: Utah vs. Oregon or Washington State, FS1 10:30 p.m. Mountain West tournament: New Mexico vs. Wyoming, CBSSN GOLF PGA: Valspar Championship, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. 11:30 p.m. European PGA: Hero Indian Open, second round, GOLF HOCKEY Flyers at Bruins, NHL Network 6 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Blues at Sharks, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) OLYMPICS (Fri.) Winter Paralympics Opening Ceremony, NBCSN 5 a.m. SOCCER UEFA Europa League: AC Milan vs. Arsenal, FS2 Noon UEFA Europa League: Leipzig vs. FC Zenit St. Petersburg, FS2 2 p.m. TENNIS ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 1st round, WTA 1st round, Tennis Channel 1 p.m. ATP: BNP Paribas Open: ATP 1st round, WTA 1st round, Tennis Channel 9 p.m.

DIGEST S. Williams’ comeback is set for Thursday night

Serena Williams makes her return to the pro tour after a 14-month absence with a first-round match at the BNP Paribas Open on Thursday in Indian Wells, Calif. She will play Zarina Diyas of Kazakhstan in a night match. Williams has played just one Fed Cup doubles match while away from the WTA Tour. The former topranked women’s tennis player is unseeded and therefore didn’t receive a first-round bye. Williams, who gave birth to a daughter in September, will try to become the first woman to win three singles titles in the desert. (AP) U.S. women win tournament • The U.S. women’s national soccer team beat England 1-0 on Wednesday night to win the SheBelieves Cup tournament in Orlando, Fla. The U.S. team scored on an own goal that came off of a cross from Megan Rapinoe in the 60th minute. The United States finished atop the table at 2-0-1 while England was 1-1-1, France 1-1-1 and Germany 0-2-1. (AP) Manchester City loses, but moves on • Manchester City lost 2-1 to Basel for its first home defeat in 15 months, but still advanced to the quarterfinals of the Champions League. Qualification was a formality for the English club after its 4-0 win in Switzerland in the first leg. City advanced 5-2 on aggregate. City’s progress took the number of English teams in the quarterfinals to two, after Liverpool advanced on Tuesday. Tottenham couldn’t make it three, though, losing 2-1 to Juventus at Wembley Stadium as the Italian side clinched a 4-3 aggregate victory. (AP) Controversy at Iditarod • The head of the Iditarod’s drug testing program, who is challenging his termination from Oregon State University over allegations of bullying, has been accused of threatening a musher just before the start of this year’s race. Musher Wade Marrs said Dr. Morrie Craig threatened to reveal his dogs tested positive for a banned substance. Iditarod officials are reviewing the allegations. The Iditarod says Marrs’ dogs did have a small amount of lidocaine in their system but not enough to trigger a positive test. In the race, Norwegian musher Joar Leifseth Ulsom had the lead at the Ophir checkpoint, 352 miles from the start of the 1,000-mile trek across Alaska. Aliy Zirkle, a 1988 Parkway West High graduate, was 14th. (AP)

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LA STADIUM AT HOLLYWOOD PARK VIA AP

This architectural rendering provided by LA Stadium at Hollywood Park shows the south aerial perspective of the future home of the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers.

But buyers can’t get their money back for 50 years ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • The massive football stadium complex at Hollywood Park currently is a bustling construction site. The $2.6 billion project won’t welcome fans through its doors for another two years. But the Rams and the Chargers are eager to show you to your seat. Los Angeles’ two NFL teams will begin selling season-ticket memberships for their new stadium for the first time next week. Both will start with only their premium seating, offering an array of privileges and amenities befitting the sizable price tags for the best 13,000-odd seats in what could be the most expensive arena in the world. With relocation from St. Louis (Rams) and San Diego (Chargers) fading into memory after a pair of winning seasons in LA, both franchises are eager to move into the bright future promised by the palatial project rising in Inglewood, Calif. The 70,240-seat arena will also host the Super Bowl, the College Football Playoff title game and Olympic events in its first decade of existence after it opens in 2020. “This has been a long time coming,” said A.G. Spanos, the Chargers’ president of business operations. “When I was at USC, we were talking about a new stadium in LA back then. This has been a slow pot to boil in Los Angeles, but the future is here. This venue is incredibly exciting.” In an office building in coastal Playa Vista, the teams were to begin showing off the project to their fans on Tuesday, starting with visits from many current seasonticket holders for both clubs. The sleek LA Stadium Premiere Center features detailed scale models, video hype reels and a staff with

carefully curated sales pitches for the privately financed project spearheaded by Rams owner Stan Kroenke. “It’s exciting when you fly in and you see the steel coming out of the ground, or when you drive up and you see the stadium starting to take shape,” Rams chief operating officer Kevin Demoff said. “And now this is the first chance the fans really get to participate in being part of the stadium and seeing Stan’s vision come to life.” The Rams and Chargers have also unveiled the first prices for tickets — and the prices for the stadium seat licenses (SSLs) that provide the opportunity to buy tickets. Instead of selling the nowubiquitous personal seat licenses, with which fans pay a sometimeshefty fee for the opportunity to buy their tickets, the Chargers and Rams are selling a similar concept with a similar name, but one big difference: For the first time in NFL stadium history, that money will be returned to the fans — albeit in 50 years. Instead of the naked cash grab of a PSL, the SSL is essentially an interest-free loan to finance the stadium construction. The structure also allows both the teams and the fans to avoid paying taxes on the licenses. “We really feel like they are making an investment, and they’re a shareholder in the team and the stadium project,” Demoff said. “For us, rather than fan money going to taxes, it can go directly to the construction of the building. It builds a better building, and it requires no taxpayer money to do so. It’s a unique concept that we expect will be replicated from here on out.” The Rams’ stadium seat licenses will begin at $100,000 for

the stadium’s 500 “all-access” seats, located in two sections on either end of the 50-yard line. The Chargers’ SSLs will be $75,000 for the same seats, which include food and beverages, access to clubs, special parking and the guaranteed opportunity to buy tickets to the Super Bowl and every other event controlled by the stadium owners. Those prices are higher than the most top PSLs for many recent NFL stadiums, but significantly lower than the reported $150,000 charged by the Dallas Cowboys for their top seats at AT&T Stadium, which opened in 2009. The 49ers charged $80,000 for the PSLs for the top 1,000 seats at Levis Stadium, which opened in 2014. The Rams’ remaining SSLs for the premium seats range from $80,000 to $15,000, with most falling in the lower category for club seats. The Chargers’ other SSLs range from $50,000 to $10,000. The Rams and Chargers are confident the structure will help as they persuade fans to pay for the licenses while knowing they’ll get all the money back in 2068 — or at least their heirs will. Once the SSL is purchased, the Rams’ tickets for those premium seats are $375 per game, and the Chargers’ are $350. Both teams obviously will sell the other three-quarters of the stadium at much lower prices, and the ticket prices won’t change during the stadium’s first three years. “It’s very hard to compete at the highest level if you don’t have a first-class facility, and that’s something that our family has been working toward for a long time,” said John Spanos, the Chargers’ president of football operations. “We’re excited that it’s here soon.”

on Monday. That came a few days after Goodell assessed the financial penalties for Jones’ lawsuit to overturn the suspension of Cowboys star running back Ezekiel Elliott, and for a lawsuit Jones threatened to stop Goodell’s newly approved contract. Many owners were consulted on seeking restitution, including members of the finance committee. Some finance committee members are on the compensation committee that was at the center of what became a legal back-and-forth over Goodell’s deal. The restitution is rooted in a 1997 resolution that states owners can seek repayment for legal fees if a fellow owner is responsible for getting them involved in legal action. Jones’ attempt to derail Goodell’s extension, which came after Elliott was suspended over domestic violence allegations, led to a volley of threatening letters from lawyers for both sides. After eventually relenting, Jones said after the owners’ meetings in December that he got what he wanted with an agreement to consider changes to the power of the commissioner’s role through the league’s constitution.

Pats cut Bennett • The Patriots released tight end Martellus Bennett, who was due a $2 million roster bonus next week. His release will save New England about $6 million in salary-cap space. Bennett joined New England in November of last season after being released by Green Bay for “failing to disclose a physical condition.” He started seven games for the Packers in 2017 after signing a three-year, $21 million contract as a free agent. Following his release, Bennett appeared in two games for the Patriots before being placed on injured reserve because of hamstring and shoulder problems. In 2016, Bennett caught 55 passes for 701 yards and a career-high seven touchdowns on his way to earning a Super Bowl ring with the Patriots.

NFL NOTEBOOK Report: Ogletree to Giants

The Los Angeles Rams continued their flurry of offseason moves Wednesday, trading linebacker Alec Ogletree to the New York Giants, the Los Angeles Times reported. The deal, the Rams’ third in the last few weeks, will not become official until the new league year begins March 14. One source said the trade was for draft picks. Ogletree, 26, was the starting middle linebacker in 2016, when the Rams played a 4-3 scheme under then-coach Jeff Fisher. He was a starting inside linebacker last season under new coordinator Wade Phillips, who installed a 3-4. Ogletree, a first-round draft pick in 2013, when the team was based in St. Louis, signed a four-year, $42 million extension last October. The trade comes after the Rams agreed last month to a deal with the Kansas City Chiefs for cornerback Marcus Peters. Last week, the Rams traded veteran linebacker/edge rusher Robert Quinn to Miami. Ogletree, like Quinn, was regarded as a locker room leader. Cornerback Trumaine Johnson, who played under the franchise tag last season, is a pending free agent. The Rams put the franchise tag on safety Lamarcus Joyner on Tuesday. Jones reportedly settles with NFL • Jerry Jones has agreed to pay the NFL more than $2 million in legal fees resulting from two disputes the Dallas Cowboys’ owner had with the league, a person with direct knowledge of the settlement tells The Associated Press. Commissioner Roger Goodell held an appeal hearing with Jones

Cowboys release Mayowa • Dallas released defensive end Benson Mayowa in a move to save $2.8 million against the cap as it tries to absorb a big raise for 2017 team sacks leader DeMarcus Lawrence. Mayowa led the team with six sacks in 2016, his first season after signing an offer sheet that Oakland declined to match. But the 26-yearold had just one sack last season.

’Skins to honor fill-ins • The Washington Redskins will present replacement players from 1987 with Super Bowl rings. The team announced it will honor the work of the fill-in players who went 3-0 during a strike. Washington went on to finish 11-4, win the NFC East and beat the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl. Owner Dan Snyder said the replacement players’ “contributions are part of Redskins history and represent an integral reason why a Lombardi Trophy from the 1987 campaign resides in our facility.” The Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution Tuesday commending the replacement players on the 1987 team. From news services


BLUES

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

NOTEBOOK

Dunn takes on bigger role on defense Injuries move him up to 2nd unit BY JIM THOMAS st. Louis Post-dispatch

It has been an event-filled rookie year for defenseman Vince Dunn, from winning a job out of camp in a mild upset, to his overtime goal to beat the Maple Leafs in his hometown of Toronto. And he’s had to deal with the death of his grandfather, Chris Paylor, who was in many ways a father figure. Dunn, 21, couldn’t legally buy a drink in the U.S. until Oct. 29. As the Blues head west for a three-game trip to San Jose, Los Angeles and Anaheim, he’s still seeing a lot of cities and rinks for the first time. “Until the last probably 20 games, every team I was playing was a new team,” Dunn said. “So it’s kinda cool to see the players that you grew up watching. Now you’re playing against them. And to get around all the cities and be able to play in their rinks, that’s pretty cool, too. “You don’t really think about that when you’re 15 years old — going to play in California in the NHL.” But here he is. And with Jay Bouwmeester’s seasonending hip injury, Dunn has another challenge and opportunity on his plate. Until Joel Edmundson (broken forearm) comes back, and

that may be very soon, it looks like Dunn will move up to the Blues’ second defensive pairing with Colton Parayko. “Guys have been in and out of the lineup all year,” Dunn said. “Guys have been going down. Guys have been getting called up. So there’s been a lot of change throughout the whole year, and I think it’s just being able to adapt, you know, take on the role that you’re given next. “So I’m ready for it and excited to be playing with ‘Pary’ — not that there was anything wrong with the third pairing. But I’m sure I’ll be seeing a little bit more ice time. And if that’s the case, I’m ready for it.” Dunn and Robert Bortuzzo have formed the Blues’ third defensive pairing in 42 games this season, easily the most among any pairing — or any forward line, for that matter — on the team this season. But with three days of practice time to reset the defensive corps following Bouwmeester’s injury, it looks like coach Mike Yeo has settled on pairings of Carl Gunnarsson-Alex Pietrangelo, Dunn-Parayko, and Jordan Schmaltz-Bortuzzo. Thursday’s game in San Jose will mark only the third

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Vince Dunn races the Red Wings’ Martin Frk to the puck in the first period of a game Feb. 28 at Scottrade Center. The Blues won 2-1.

BLUES AT SHARKS When, where • 9:30 p.m. Thursday, SAP Center, San Jose TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Sharks • They are 2-3-1 since defeating the Blues 3-2 on Feb. 20 at Scottrade Center. Thursday’s contest marks Game 4 of a six-game homestand for the Sharks — and like the Blues, they are well-rested, having not played since Sunday’s 4-2 loss to Columbus. Joe Thornton remains sidelined with a knee injury, but the arrival of Evander Kane via a trade with Buffalo has provided a spark. Kane has one goal and four assists and is plus-4 in three games since joining the team. San Jose boasts the league’s top penalty-killing unit (84.7 percent) and is ninth-best in goals allowed (2.74 a game). Jim Thomas

time all season Dunn has been paired with Parayko. For Schmaltz, who has played in only seven games with the Blues this season, it’s his second game with Bortuzzo.

Huge road trip coming up for Blues BLUES • FROM B1

“We’re not in the position we want to be, but there’s still time to prove to the rest of the teams that we’re a playoff contender and we’re a better team than we’ve been in the last 15 games.” Especially in the last nine games, in which

they’ve gone 1-6-2. Despite that freefall, the Blues (75 points) are only two points behind the Kings, four points behind the Sharks and five points behind the Ducks as they embark on this trip. “We’re in the mix,” Brayden Schenn said. “We’re in the mix. All the teams that we’re play-

ing, we’re only a couple points (from them). So big road trip for us. A chance for us to try and make up some ground. We’ll be reenergized, re-focused after these couple days off.” The Blues haven’t played since Saturday’s 3-2 overtime loss in Dallas. They’ve had three days of practice to work on their game, re-

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Gunnarrson has plenty of experience paired with captain Alex Pietrangelo. This will be their 24th game together. Edmundson has accompanied the team to Califor-

nia but isn’t expected to play against the Sharks. “I don’t anticipate him being in the lineup,” Yeo said Wednesday. “Now, if he came knocking on my hotel room door tonight and said,

group and reset after losing Jay Bouwmeester (hip) for the season and Scottie Upshall (knee) for four weeks with an injury. “It’s a good time to get together as a group,” said Oskar Sundqvist, who as part of that reset is in line for some rare playing time in San Jose. “If we get that first win in San Jose, it could be a whole different story with the confidence in all the guys.” After this trip, the Blues have only three games remaining against their direct playoff competitors: two against Colorado (March 15 and April 7) and one more against San Jose (March 27). All four-point games, just like they’ll see over the next five days in California. “Obviously, we know the implications of the California trip,” Chris Thorburn said. “We just need a couple (wins) to get us rolling here and hopefully it’ll be like a big snowball and roll into something big.” Based on what happened earlier this season at Scottrade Center, there doesn’t seem to be much reason for California dreaming. The Blues went 1-4 against San Jose, LA and Anaheim in St. Louis, losing twice to the Ducks, once to the Sharks and splitting two games with the Kings. At least the Blues now know exactly what they face. For much of the season, a front-loaded sched-

ule had them playing two, four, even six games more than much of the Western Conference at any particular point. But with a lighter schedule over the second half of February and early March, the rest of the conference has caught up and in some cases passed the Blues in games played. Entering Thursday’s games, Calgary (68 games) has played two more contests than St. Louis; Chicago, Dallas, Minnesota and Vancouver have played one more game; the other nine Western teams have played the same number of games (66) as the Blues. “I’m kind of happy about that,” Yeo said. “That means that they’ve been having some busy stretches and ours hasn’t been so busy. I think we’ve been able to work on our game here (in practice). “It’s quite clear what we’re up against now. Every day, it gets posted up as far as what other teams have remaining in terms of their schedule and whatnot. So big picture for me is, let’s make sure we stay focused on ourselves. “Getting caught up in whether someone else wins or loses, or who they’re playing, that stuff’s fine if you’re taking care of your own business. But if we’re not getting wins, if we’re not getting points, that’s going to be irrelevant anyway.” It seems crystal clear

‘I’d like to play tomorrow’ — then that might change things. “But I don’t think he’ll be in tomorrow. But certainly he’s getting closer and hopefully we’ll see if there’s potential on this trip (for Edmundson to play).” Any Dunn-Parayko pairing is intriguing because they might be the Blues’ best puck-movers on the back end. “Hopefully be a little bit more dynamic,” Dunn said. “We haven’t been scoring a lot of goals all season, so if we can help that, try to contribute into that a little bit, I think that can work out in our favor.”

BLUENOTES

• Nikita Soshnikov was on the fourth line Wednesday with Oskar Sundqvist and Tage Thompson. Sundqvist has played only once with the Blues since Jan. 9, and that was the last time the Blues played San Jose (Feb. 20). • The Blues spent a lot of time on the power play this week and tweaked their personnel. Dunn has been moved from the first unit to the second, and Thompson has been removed from the second unit. • Brayden Schenn will play in his 500th NHL game Thursday. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

right now that Carter Hutton should be the goalie of choice down the stretch. There’s no time to worry about getting Jake Allen out of his funk. Hutton gives the Blues the best chance to win at this point. Hutton is 4-1-1 against the Sharks, with two shutouts, a 1.32 goals-against average and a .955 save percentage in six career starts. As for what else ails the Blues, it’s not all that complicated. They need to score more goals. One statistic in particular is telling: In the first 30 games of the season, or before Jaden Schwartz was lost with a broken ankle, the Blues scored four or more goals 15 times — or in half of those games. In the 36 games since Schwartz’s injury Dec. 9 in Detroit, including the 16 games since he’s returned, they have scored four or more goals only four times — or once every nine games. It’ll take nothing more than the Blues’ top goalscorers to get hot down the stretch to get the Blues in the postseason for the seventh consecutive season. Over the team’s current 1-6-2 stretch, Schenn has only one goal, Schwartz has two goals and Vladimir Tarasenko has three. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

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CARDINALS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NOTEBOOK

Gregerson on shelf for now

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Scherzer takes note of how Wainwright is working on hitters CARDINALS • FROM B1

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitching coach Mike Maddux shows Matt Bowman a grip. Bowman hasn’t given up a run in four outings.

Tightness in his side keeps veteran reliever from pitching Tuesday BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • On a team with-

out a designated closer, the Cardinals have had a flock of righthanded relievers come to the forefront this spring. For example, Matt Bowman is scoreless in four outings, as are John Brebbia, Josh Lucas and young Derian Gonzalez. Sam Tuivailala is unscored on in three games. Mike Mayers has given up two hits and no runs in five innings. Dominic Leone has allowed one run in three games and John Gant has an earned run average of 2.16. Bud Norris, who had 19 saves for the Los Angeles Angels last year, could turn up late, too. Luke Gregerson, the presumptive ninth-inning man, has pitched once, striking out two in a perfect inning. But Gregerson doesn’t figure to be pitching for a while. Manager Mike Matheny, however, believes it will be a short while. Matheny and pitching coach Mike Maddux had Gregerson on the sheet to pitch Tuesday, but he didn’t, and on Wednesday he didn’t work either, with Matheny saying after the Cardinals’ 4-3 win over Washington that Gregerson had some “tightness” in an oblique muscle. The words “strained oblique” have taken on a connotation not quite as daunting as “torn rotator cuff” or “Tommy John surgery,” but they have sent shivers down the spines of club executives and staffs. “It’s a little setback,” said Ma-

theny. “But it didn’t seem very bad. It’s amazing how quick (players are) coming back from them.” Matheny said Gregerson was examined by trainers and doctors and “it came back relatively clean. But it’s something still to be cautious about. The training staff, said Matheny, will call the tune on the schedule now. “We share schedules,” he said. “But theirs overrides mine, 100 percent. They’ve got to get through their schedule for my schedule to be relevant.” The Cardinals have 17 spring games remaining.

GARCIA HAS NUMBERS AGAINST SCHERZER

Of all the pitchers Cardinals utilityman Greg Garcia has faced in his 295 big-league games, the one he has drawn the most walks against is three-time Cy Young award winner Max Scherzer of the Nationals. Garcia has coaxed three walks in 10 regular-season plate appearances against Scherzer. Coupled with his two hits in seven official at-bats, that adds up to a .500 on-base percentage against perhaps the best in the game. So, perhaps it was not a surprise when Garcia reached base yet again off Scherzer in the second inning. What was a jolt, though, was how Garcia did it. The lefthanded hitter, capping a seven-pitch at-bat, drilled a solo homer off Scherzer, marking the only hit the Mizzou and Parkway Central product gave up over four innings. “That’s the best at-bat of the spring,” said Matheny. “Scherzer wasn’t (just) working on things today. He was trying to get guys

out. He threw (Garcia) the kitchen sink. That was a great at-bat if he’d struck out.”

CHIP OFF OLD BLOCK

Backup catcher Francisco Pena, son of former Cardinals catcher Tony Pena, saved the potential go-ahead run in the top of the eighth when he scrambled to recover Bowman’s pitch in the dirt with the bases loaded and, sliding in front of the screen like a shortstop, then threw to Bowman covering the plate for the final out. “I’m sure (Pena) would tell you he wanted to block that ball,” said Matheny. “It balances out.” Then Pena, who had been just one for seven this spring, singled in the winning run in the home eighth. Conner Greene walked home the tying run before Pena made his quick recovery of a Bowman delivery in the dirt that got away from him. “It was a pretty bad pitch,” said Bowman. Like other clubs, the Cardinals work on defending such an instance in the spring, but the manager, a former catcher, and pitching coach Mike Maddux have different interpretations of what kind of play it is they’re defending. “This is where Maddux and I have a huge disagreement,” joked Matheny. “He calls it the ‘passed ball’ play. I call it the ‘wild pitch ball.’ We’ve kind of agreed to disagree. “’Wild pitch’ isn’t as dirty a phrase as ‘passed ball,’ to a catcher,” said Matheny. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Gant gives Cards some flexibility on pitching staff ORTIZ • FROM B1

you’re going to do, it just do it right.” That request has stuck with Gant, who could help the Cardinals as a starter or out of the bullpen as a long reliever. With a fastball that sits around 93 mph and a solid changeup and curveball, Gant is an important insurance policy for the Cardinals this spring because of his versatility and professionalism. If one of the five starters is injured or too ineffective to remain in the rotation, especially before May, Gant could be the next man up if top prospect Jack Flaherty needs more seasoning at Class AAA Memphis. “You always have to have those pitchers that can fill that potential starting role and can also have the big enough arm to come and help you in the ’pen,” manager Mike Matheny said. “He’s coming out here and competing.” Gant is 1-0 with a 2.16 ERA with an impressive 10 strikeouts and only one walk in 8 1/3 innings over three outings this spring. He held the Orioles to one run while striking out seven over three innings of relief on Feb. 28. Gant returned to the mound Wednesday in relief of Adam Wainwright at Roger Dean Stadium, where he held the Nationals to one run on five hits with one strikeout in 3 1/3 innings. Gant, who was acquired from the Braves along with two other minorleaguers on Dec. 1, 2016, in exchange for Jaime Garcia, is taking full advantage of his second big league camp with the Cardinals. He is building on a solid 2017 at Memphis, where he was 6-5 with a 3.83 ERA over 18 starts and 103 1/3 innings. He was also 0-1 with a 4.67

ERA over seven games (two starts) and 17 1/3 innings during a brief period in the majors with the Cardinals. He is 1-5 with a 4.81 ERA in 27 big league appearances over parts of two seasons in the majors with the Braves and the Cardinals. He isn’t working on any specific pitch this spring as much as he’s trying to improve his four-seam fastball, changeup and curveball. “I just want to be fine with each one,” he said. “I want to home in on everything.” Gant struck out 99 and walked only 25 last season at Memphis, but he issued 10 walks while striking out only 11 during his brief time in the majors with the Cardinals. He must lower his walks and hits per nine innings (WHIP) in the majors from 1.558 to closer to the 1.297 WHIP he posted at Memphis. The 6-foot-4, 195-pound Gant essentially averaged four strikeouts for every walk at Memphis. He could take the next step in his development if he can duplicate that command in the majors because he cannot afford to average 5.2 walks per nine innings, as he did last season with the Cardinals. He has had an impressive strikeout-to-walk ratio over his first three appearances this spring so far. Now it’s just a matter of building on this camp and proving that he can succeed consistently in the majors. “I think he’s proven everything he’s needed to prove at the Triple-A level,” Matheny said. “It’s just (about determining) how is he going to be able to fit here. He’s having a real nice spring so far. He’s definitely opened our eyes. Not that we needed to see more, but it’s just good to see he’s making some progressions.” You can never have too many pitchers like Gant. He may even be

more valuable to the Cardinals this spring as Miles Mikolas is off to a rough Grapefruit League start. If the Cardinals decide that Flaherty still needs more innings at Memphis, they can use Gant as the first starter called up if a member of the five-man rotation falters or is injured before May. He could also play an important role as a long reliever while Mikolas settles back into the major leagues after three years pitching in Japan. It’s important to remember that he was in line to earn a spot on the opening day roster last year if he had not been injured in camp. It shouldn’t surprise anyone if he earns a spot on the opening day roster this month. “I feel comfortable in any role,” he said. “I’ve been a starter my whole life, so I guess I like to be a starter best, but I think the ’pen suits me. I just want to play, man.” Beyond his pitching repertoire, Gant draws praise from Matheny and president of baseball operations John Mozeliak for the way he goes about his business. Management never has to worry about Gant. He’s dependable and a true professional. He was disciplined enough to earn his black belt by the time he was 11 or 12. He cannot remember the exact age. It doesn’t matter. That accomplishment is impressive at any age, but even more so at such an early age. He was blessed to have his father as his coach in several sports as a kid. Even now at big league camp, Gant carries his father’s advice with him daily. “I do things right,” he said. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

Wainwright struck out four in 3 2/3 innings, allowed one run on three hits, and showed some of the ways he is reinventing his use of pitches and where he puts them. Washington starter Max Scherzer, Wainwright’s opposite number Wednesday at Roger Dean Stadium, took notice. Scherzer, the most dominant and decorated righthander pitcher in the league, has been a longtime friend of Wainwright, and the two are kindred spirits when it comes to tinkering with new pitches and making old pitches do new tricks. A year ago, Scherzer had a finger injury that forced him to toy with a three-finger fastball. On Wednesday, as he struck out four and allowed a homer in four innings against the Cardinals, he threw more curveballs to see how it behaved. And between his innings, he spied Wainwright. “Only so I could trash talk on him,” Scherzer said. He texted Wainwright earlier Wednesday a gif that had Laurence Fishburne’s character in “Matrix” striking a martial arts pose and gesturing with his hand, “Come get me.” Scherzer, the reigning Cy Young Award winner, admitted some curiosity about how Wainwright was pitching after last Cardinals 4, Nationals 3 Washington ab r h bi St. Louis ab r h bi year’s bloated ERA T.Trner ss 3 1 2 0 Ko.Wong 2b 2 0 0 0 Brignac ss 1 0 1 1 B.Vlera 2b 1 0 1 2 and bruised elbow. Wieters c 2 0 0 0 To.Pham cf 3 0 0 0 “There are dif- Ju.Soto rf 1 0 0 0 A.Grcia cf 1 0 0 0 B.Hrper dh 4 0 1 0 P.DJong ss 3 0 0 0 ferent little things I Mrmljos ph 1 0 0 0 W.Tovar ss 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 C.Kelly c 3 0 0 0 can see in his game,” V.Rbles cf Butista cf 2 0 0 0 Lu.Voit 1b 1 0 1 0 said Scherzer, a Miz- M.Adams 1b 2 0 0 0 Arzrena pr 0 1 0 0 1b 2 2 2 0 P.Wsdom 1b 4 1 1 0 zou alum and Park- Dmnguez R.Rburn lf 2 0 0 0 G.Grcia 3b 3 1 2 1 way Central grad. “I Johnson cf 1 0 0 0 O’Neill pr 0 1 0 0 rf 3 0 2 1 Fr.Pena c 1 0 1 1 think I know what M.Serra Sanchez 3b 1 0 0 0 H.Bader rf 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Knizner dh 3 0 1 0 he’s working on. Of Gterrez 3b Kieboom c 1 0 1 0 Mercado lf 2 0 0 0 course it could be Rynolds 2b 3 0 0 0 2b 0 00 0 effective. If you do O.Abreu Totals 35 310 3 Totals 32 4 7 4 100 001 010: 3 something different Washington Louis 010 000 21x: 4 and you’re able to St. E: DeJong (2). DP: Washington 2, St. Louis 0. LOB: Washington 10, St. Louis 6. 2B: Harper (2), command the base- Robles (3), Dominguez (2), Sierra (1), Wisdom ball, you can always (2). HR: Garcia (1). SB: Wong (6), O’Neill (2). IP H R ER BB SO keep hitters off bal- Washington Scherzer 4 1 1 1 1 4 0 0 1 2 0 2 ance. They never Doolittle Kelley 1 0 0 0 0 1 know what’s com- Kintzler BS, 0-1 1 2 2 2 1 ing. Especially for 2Solis L, 0-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 him with his curve- St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO 3/ 3 1 1 2 4 ball. That’s a game- Wainwright Gant 3/ 5 1 1 0 1 / Greene BS, 0-2 2 1 1 2 changer.” 0 It was a game- Bowman W, 1-0 1/ 0 0 0 1 1 WP: Solis. shaper Wednesday. Umpires: Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Jerry Meals; His 63rd and final Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Ben May. T: 2:55. A: 5,109 pitch of the game was an out on the curveball, and three of his final four outs came on the curveball. He struck out Harper with the curve, and then finished his second inning with back-to-back strikeouts on curveballs. Pitching coach Mike Maddux called Wainwright “pretty thrifty.” “I thought he was creative with it,” manager Mike Matheny said after his team’s 4-3 victory. “He got outs with them, but he used fastballs and changeups and cutters and sinkers to get there. We’ve seen him before where we see a heavy curveball usage, and he’s getting lots and lots of outs. I think he used everything pretty well, and was still able to get outs with a breaking ball.” With that pitch in his hand, Wainwright was able to use others to set up hitters for it — or get them with something else when they were waiting for it. In the first inning, former teammate Matt Adams hit with a run in and a runner at second. Wainwright got to 2-2 against him, but instead of a curve, Adams saw a cutter and only nicked it for a strikeout. In the third inning, Adams got ahead in the count 1-0, and Wainwright went back to a similar spot that he got the strikeout. This time with a sinker, at 87 mph. The ball didn’t come back over the plate like before, so Adams got the end of the bat on it and flied out easily to right field. Into that mix, Wainwright also elevated his fastball and got a couple of pop-ups from that same angle that he brings the curveball. That’s the area he wants to be — able to work low like he did Adams and up high, top shelf, to accentuate the curve. “I’m fine admitting this part to you as far as a scouting report goes,” Wainwright said. “I want to be able to work top and bottom effectively to where they can’t just always look down. They can’t always look up. They don’t know where it’s going to come and at what angle it’s going to be at, and what spin it’s going to have and the way it’s going to dive or duck.” Several hours before the game, Matheny talked about how he enjoys watching Scherzer pitch because the intensity and focus on the mound is palpable. It’s also instructional. He has urged some of the younger pitchers to watch Scherzer like, say, Wainwright would have watched Chris Carpenter, or Chris Carpenter would have watched Pat Hentgen. The manager said it’s enough for a young pitcher “to mimic it, fake it for a while, until you actually feel it and then you can actually do it.” Like Wainwright, Scherzer improvises often. He’ll alter angles, he dig into the data to determine new or different ways to throw or use pitches, and he suggested Wednesday that 2018 will just be more evolution. He buzzed the Cardinals with a 96 mph fastball early, then downshifted to offspeed stuff. Because he could. “You always have to reinvent yourself and keep evolving as a pitcher,” Scherzer said. “Every single year you have to come up with new ways to get guys out because everybody game-plans against you, every little pattern that you throw. With the data they have now the line between good and bad is shrinking every single year.” When he’s been at his healthiest, at his strongest, and at his most masterful on the mound, Wainwright will shift his delivery or even the speed of his pitches during at-bats. Against Harper, Wainwright has moved where he stands on the rubber — in the same at-bat — just to give Harper a different look or angle on what might be the same pitch. Or might not. As Wainwright looks to assert his spot in the rotation after a year that ended with elbow trouble and sagging velocity, he feels his pitches are more familiar, but that he could use them in unfamiliar ways. That could mean pitching backward, playing off the curve, not the fastball. That could be wrinkles like he tried to show Harper. After getting the groundout from Harper that wasn’t and seeing the former MVP “spoil” some good pitches, Wainwright altered his timing. He froze on the mound to hold the runner, but also to see if he could get Harper antsy in the box. Wainwright said later if he had thrown the pitch a beat sooner, neither Harper nor the ump would have had a chance to call time, but would have wanted it. That didn’t work. He always has the curve to turn to. “We’re trying to do different things that maybe we may or maybe we don’t do during the season,” Wainwright said. “Let the hitters do the talking. (They’ll) let us know what works and what doesn’t work. I’m always trying to find new ways to work everything.” 2

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Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

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SPORTS

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5

St. Louis Browns live again in television documentary

GOLF

Young stars still want that pairing with Woods Spieth gets his shot this week in Valspar event

Tiger Woods

Jordan Spieth

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM HARBOR, FLA. • Jordan Spieth

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

The 1944 World Series between the Cardinals and the Browns marked the only time the championship featured two St. Louis teams. BY DAN CAESAR st. Louis Post-dispatch

It has been a lifetime, 65 years, since St. Louis had two big-league baseball teams. But the Browns, the lovable losers who led to the coining of a memorable phrase about the city, “First in shoes, first in booze and last in the American League,” are set to surge back to life in an interesting television documentary. “The Saint Louis Browns: The Team Baseball Forgot” is to make its debut at 8 p.m. Thursday on KETC (Channel 9), leading the city to declare it “St. Louis Browns Day.” The film is narrated by actor and native St. Louisan Jon Hamm, and is a labor of love by key members of the St. Louis Browns Historical Society. The documentary, which is to be repeated at 11 a.m. Sunday, was produced by the Historical Society, the station and local marketing and advertising company HLK and is a companion to a nifty coffee table book, “St. Louis Browns: The Story of a Beloved Team,” that was released in September. The film brings viewers back to an era in which life was simpler, St. Louis was a major U.S. market and the Browns often provided zany entertainment. Sometimes that was the intended result, with circus-style promotions, although often it simply was a byproduct of their massively losing ways. But everything came together in 1944, when the Browns won the AL pennant and faced the Cardinals in an allSt. Louis World Series. Of course, the Browns lost. Also chronicled is the team’s fast demise after that, leading to the Browns being sold to Baltimore interests as they became the Orioles a decade after being in the Series. For some St. Louisans, the Browns are a distant, fond memory. For most, the team was gone before they were born and the Cardinals are the only local link to the big leagues. Hamm sets the scene early in the film. “When discussing the history of baseball in St. Louis, it can be tempting to focus only on the team still around to add to that history,” he says. “... The history of the St. Louis Browns, on the other hand, has nearly been erased. ... But just because the Browns’ story is not well known doesn’t mean it’s not worth telling. It’s the story of the perpetual underdog, ceaselessly working to improve both

their success on the field and the standing in the town they called home.” The documentary tells of St. Louis being a thriving place when the Browns arrived from Milwaukee in 1902, the fourth-largest city in the country. The 1904 World’s Fair and Olympics were awarded to the town in the same period. The Browns were better than the Cardinals early in the 20th century, and both teams had their distinct fan bases. “I don’t know any other sport that has rivalries of two teams that don’t play each other,” says local attorney Emmett McAuliffe, a member of the board of the Browns Historical Society. “But it was a fierce rivalry, It was a rivalry of the heart.”

TURNING POINT

The teams began sharing Sportsman’s Park in 1920, when the Cards sold their old stadium and used the money to start a farm system and became the Browns’ tenant. That farm system, a novelty at the time, was started by Branch Rickey — who had moved from the Browns to the Cardinals. “It’s the single most important turning point in Browns history,” McAuliffe says. “... The Browns got not much rent from the Cardinals, but the Cardinals got freed from that responsibility and were able to focus on baseball. And focus on baseball they did.” The Cardinals went to the World Series seven times from 1926-1943, a span in which the Browns never finished better than third in the AL. “It really comes back to this critical man (Rickey) and his actions and how they turned the tide as he switched sides from the Browns to the Cardinals,” says Ed Wheatley of the Browns Historical Society. The show meshes a fine array of still photos and video clips in telling the story, along with commentary from some former Browns players. There also are interviews with key figures who no longer are alive, such as onetime owner Bill Veeck. There are segments on George Sisler, “the greatest Brown of them all,” who hit .420 in 1922; the team’s terrible attendance (a game in 1933 drew 33 fans); and their ineptitude on the field (a 43-111 record in 1939, when they finished 64½ games out of first place). But then there was the 1944 season, when World War II was raging and many

teams’ rosters took key hits because players were serving in the military. But not the Browns. “The war was the great leveler,” McAuliffe says. “... That was their one opportunity, and they did it.” But that American League pennant wasn’t clinched until the last day of the season. “They only have bad luck and all of a sudden they are in the winner’s circle?” McAuliffe says. “... I think those final four innings when the Browns wrapped up that game to be American League champions, I think that’s the finest moment in St. Louis baseball history.”

A MERE BLIP

The Browns’ success was short-lived. After finishing third in 1945, the best they could manage in their final eight seasons in town was sixth place. “It was in the Browns’ DNA to be losing,” McAuliffe says. “So the DNA took hold by 1946.” Players wanted out. “Everybody busted their ass to have a good year with the Browns so you’d get sold to a contender,” first baseman Chuck Stevens says. “That’s the truth.” By 1951, with Veeck running the show, the Browns had become just that — a show. There were publicity stunts galore, topped by 3-foot-7 pinch hitter Eddie Gaedel drawing a walk in his only bigleague plate appearance. Gussie Busch and the AnheuserBusch brewery bought the Cardinals and Sportsman’s Park in 1953. That spelled the end of the Browns. They were gone before the first pitch was thrown in 1954. “When the club first took to the field as the newly named Orioles, only the familiar color scheme remained,” Hamm says. “The name, logo and team history would remain behind.” Adds Cardinals historian Brian Finch: “Unfortunately, the Baltimore Orioles feel as though their franchise begins in 1954 and do not track or trace their history as the Browns prior to 1954. “The Browns were buried and died in St. Louis,” Wheatley adds. But not forgotten. “You can’t make up a story like we have for the Browns,” McAuliffe says. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Suzuki returns to Mariners

Ichiro is a Mariner again. One of the iconic players in franchise history before being traded to the Yankees in July 2012, Ichiro Suzuki has agreed to terms on a one-year major-league contract with the Seattle ballclub. The acquisition, which has been rumored since Monday, was announced Wednesday. “The addition of Ichiro gives our team another versatile and athletic outfielder,” general manager Jerry Dipoto said in a statement. “His incredible work ethic, preparation and focus will enhance our environment in many ways. He’s truly one of the great players in the history of the game and his unquestionable presence is a valuable addition, both on the field and in the clubhouse. We’re very glad to bring him back home.” The 44-year-old outfielder has played the past three seasons with Miami but was not re-signed by them and became a free agent. “Even in the offseason when I would go back to Japan, I always came back to Seattle,” Suzuki said. “This was my home ... has always been my home,” he said through a translator after finalizing a $750,000, one-year contract. “Somewhere deep inside, I wanted to return and wear this uniform again.” The Mariners had an outfield need Monday when their regular left fielder, Ben Gamel, was diagnosed with an abdominal strain that

is expected to sideline him four to six weeks. They turned to Suzuki, who electrified the baseball world when he moved from Japan to Seattle in 2001. Joining a Mariners team that would set an American League record with 116 victories, he earned the American League Most Valuable Player award after winning the first of his two batting titles with a .350 average. Dubbed “the Sultan of Slap” for his unique hitting style, Suzuki would accumulate more than 200 hits in 10 consecutive seasons, including a major league-record 262 in 2004. He made the All-Star team and won a Gold Glove in each of those 10 years as well. But with the Mariners in a period of transition and Suzuki’s skills in decline, he asked for a trade in 2012, which was consummated July 23. The Mariners received pitchers Danny Farquhar and D.J. Mitchell from the Yankees. This will be Suzuki’s 18th major league season. He has a career .312 average and 3,080 hits, which ranks 22nd on the career list and makes him one of just 31 players with 3,000 hits. “I still have things that I want to do and I want to accomplish,” Suzuki said. “I’m really thinking about this year and what the Seattle Mariners need, what I can do to help. Everything that I’ve gained, everything that I’ve done in my career, I want to just give it all right here in Seattle.”

Braun tries transition • The Brewers’ Ryan Braun is a work in progress at first base, three Cactus League starts into a transition to try a new position. The veteran outfielder hasn’t spoken much about his time at first. He made two strong plays in the opening innings of his first game. He had an error and a few other struggles in his third infield outing. Manager Craig Counsell has taken a wait-and-see approach. “We’re evaluating 14 innings of baseball,” Counsell said. “Let’s let him play first base.” Normally a left fielder, Braun has been open to giving first a try. The move, if it works out, allows Milwaukee to help relieve an outfield logjam created by the offseason signing of Lorenzo Cain and trade for Christian Yelich. Incumbent right fielder Domingo Santana had career highs of .278 with 30 homers and 85 RBIs last year. “If I can be more versatile, it’s something that should be help our team in a lot of different ways,” Braun said early in spring training. Should Braun feel comfortable at first base, he could split time there with the Eric Thames, while also splitting left with Yelich. Nolasco gets chance with KC • The Kansas City Royals agreed to a minor-league contract with pitcher Ricky Nolasco that includes an invitation to their major-league camp. From news services

is among the young stars in golf with only a glimpse — if even that — of how Tiger Woods could take over a tournament with his game and appeal. That moment for Spieth came in a practice round at Muirfield Village, with Woods as his teammate. Spieth was a 20-year-old in the 2013 Presidents Cup, playing with Steve Stricker against Woods and Matt Kuchar in a modified alternate shot. They were taken by cart to start on the par-5 seventh hole. “I stood on that tee,” Spieth said Wednesday. “We were trying to get off quickly in front of the groups, and I remember being unbelievably nervous on that shot, and for most of the shots I hit in the round — even though it’s a practice round, and he was my teammate. They went eagle-birdie-birdie or something like that to start. I thought, ‘Man, this must be what it’s been like for the last 20 years for guys.’” Spieth made a hole-in-one that day on the 11th hole. He has played with Woods seven times since, including the third round of the British Open at Hoylake, and Woods has never had the lower score in those occasions. They play again Thursday in the opening round of the Valspar Championship. “I’ll feel probably more nervous on the first tee tomorrow than I do on the first tee normally, just given the setting,” Spieth said. The setting is Woods continuing his return to golf, and while it is nothing new at this point, it is no less the attraction. He has never played the Valspar Championship, and the last time he was at Innisbrook was in 1996 for a mixed-team event during the silly season that no longer exists. Woods was nine tournaments (and two victories) into his pro career at that point. In some respects, he is starting over. This is his fourth PGA Tour event since returning from a fourth back surgery, and it was only six months ago that Woods wasn’t even certain he would be able to play again at a high level. He is making progress. He finished seven shots behind at Torrey Pines (a tie for 23rd) and eight shots behind at the Honda Classic (12th). In between, he missed the cut at Riviera, which is one reason he is at Innisbrook for the first time. “I only got two rounds in LA. I missed the cut there,” Woods said. “I felt really strong afterward. After playing Honda and really feeling good about it, I wanted to push myself in my practice sessions, which I did; push myself in the gym a little bit. And I can handle two weeks in a row.” He also will play next week at Bay Hill, meaning four tournaments in five weeks as he prepares for the Masters. There is a tendency to judge Woods’ progress by each shot, each round, each week. He is a little more patient, and that much was true when he checked on his statistics for the year. Woods said he couldn’t find any because he hasn’t played enough to be listed. “I’ve only played 10 rounds,” he said. “I know people are saying that I’ve been erratic, a little inconsistent. But 10 rounds, it’s not that many. ... That’s basically how my comeback has been so far this year. I haven’t played a lot.” The tournament in the Florida swing suddenly has some serious star power. The field includes Rory McIlroy for the first time, along with Henrik Stenson and Justin Rose, Adam Scott and Masters champion Sergio Garcia. Stenson will join Woods and Spieth for the opening two rounds. Spieth isn’t one to get intimidated. One exception was playing with former President George W. Bush, but that tee shot and subsequent round of golf was easy. “Anybody else outside of golf, you’re still doing what you know you’re better at than them,” he said. “When you’re on the tee with someone like Tiger who you have grown up watching him dominate the sport ... it’s something that you just kind of get used to, I guess. Am I totally used to it? No.” The last time they played was at the Phoenix Open in 2015, when Woods was a mess with his short game. Spieth shot 68 in the second round to get into weekend condition. Woods shot 82 and missed the cut. But this is a different Tiger. “I haven’t seen a whole lot of him the last few years since he’s been hurt and trying to come back,” Spieth said. “But we all hope for that Sunday afternoon pairing alongside all us young guys. We want that chance to be able to battle it out with him on Sunday. I know he wants that, too, to show us what he’s done to other people. “Even if it’s not 2000 Tiger, it’s still Tiger on a Sunday,” he said. “And that’s something that would be an experience we haven’t had before.”


SEC TOURNAMENT

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Georgia defense stifles Vandy

NOTEBOOK

MU might need walk-on Rau to play in opener BY DAVE MATTER AND STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When Missouri ran through a few plays with its first unit on the floor during Wednesday’s walk-through, usual starters Kassius Robertson, Jordan Barnett, Kevin Puryear and Jeremiah Tilmon were on the court. The fifth starter? Brett Rau. With usual starter Cullen VanLeer out for the rest of the season with a knee injury and Jordan Geist fighting flulike symptoms, Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin turned to his senior walk-on to fill the void. Martin won’t hesitate to play Rau when it counts Thursday. “I don’t know how many (minutes) he’ll play, if he’ll play, but I have no problem playing Rau,” Martin said.“I have no problem at all.” Rau, a 6-4 junior college transfer from Burlington, Ill., found his way onto the court in three of Mizzou’s final five regular-season games, playing nine combined minutes in the backcourt. The Tigers didn’t rely on points from VanLeer, who gave the Tigers a reliable facilitator, ball-handler and perimeter defender, and Rau figures to play the same role should he get action Thursday and beyond. Even with Michael Porter Jr.’s return to the rotation, Martin has only eight available scholarship players. Martin said he hopes Geist will be healthy enough to play Thursday, but should the Tigers win the secondround game, they’ll be back on the court in less than 24 hours to face Kentucky, a difficult matchup for any team, much less a limited rotation with tired legs. Foul trouble or another injury could further deplete Martin’s backcourt and give Rau his most extensive minutes since coming to MU last year from Elgin Community College. Rau was sidelined for a few games midway through the season with a torn groin and has appeared in nine games overall. “Brett’s very sneaky,” Puryear said. “When we practice against him he has a pretty good skill set. He can play basketball. We have the full amount of trust in him. He’s capable of making plays, distributing the ball, initiating offense, making open shots. I think it’s really just his time to shine at this point. Cullen’s injury of course sets us back. We’re down one man and now it’s time for someone to step up.”

BULLDOGS BRACED FOR MPJ

Like every coach who watched Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. in high school and during the AAU summer circuit, Georgia coach Mark Fox is well aware of the freshman’s talents. That doesn’t mean he knows what to expect when the Bulldogs face the 6-10 forward Thursday in the second round. “The challenge is I’m not even sure what position they’ll play him at,” Fox said. “He’s a very versatile player. I’m thankful the kid’s gotten healthy because he’s a terrific talent. He could be a highly picked kid one day when he goes to the draft. He’ll be a top-five selection. I remember watching him in high school and he was as complete a player as there was at that level. Our preparation will have to be somewhat generic. Until we see what they’re doing with him, we really don’t know.”

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Georgia’s Yante Maten drives to the basket with pressure from Vanderbilt’s Clevon Brown in the second half Wednesday night at Scottrade Center. Maten led the Bulldogs with 25 points.

Bulldogs build big lead early, cruise to victory BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Georgia’s defense was no match for Vanderbilt’s shooters the first time the teams met, but at the time, the Bulldogs were not doing much to stop most of their opponents. The result was a stretch of eight losses in 10 games. One month later, Vanderbilt joined a list of teams that have struggled to shoot straight against Georgia, which won the rematch 78-62 in a play-in game at the Southeastern Conference Tournament at Scottrade Center on Wednesday. A team that ranks first in the SEC and sixth nationally in field goal percentage defense limited the Commodores to 28 percent in the first half. That was more than enough to render the Bulldogs’ second-half letdown meaningless. “Our team was in a bad place when we went to Vanderbilt,” Georgia coach Mark Fox said. “We had a stretch that we didn’t guard anybody. We weren’t playing well at the time. We’ve grown up a lot since then. We’re just a little more seasoned and we understand our roles a little better. Certainly we executed the plan better because really it was the exact same thing we tried to do in the first

game.” Georgia (17-14) hopes to get a similar defensive effort when it faces Mizzou on Thursday at 2:30. The Tigers shot 41 percent when they beat the Bulldogs in Columbia in January. That was pretty good considering what Georgia’s opponents have done lately. After Auburn burned the Bulldogs on Feb. 10, shooting 51 percent, Fox’s team found its defensive stride. The next six teams that Georgia played shot a cumulative 37.6 percent, and the Bulldogs were able to finish with some good wins, including at Florida and at home against Tennessee. They were sharp against Vanderbilt from the start, building a 10-0 lead while the Commodores missed their first seven shots. A 14-0 run later in the first half coincided with a stretch that saw Vandy (12-20) miss eight consecutive shots. “After that start, things didn’t look great for us and we were battling up hill,” Vanderbilt coach Bryce Drew said. “We didn’t make shots and they came out really aggressive. We knew how they were going to guard us. They were just a little quicker tonight, and we were a little tentative, especially after we missed shots early.” Associated Press SEC player of the year Yante Maten led Georgia with 25 points on nine-for-12 shooting.

Equally important was the play of freshmen Rayshaun Hammonds, Teshaun Hightower and Nicolas Claxton. They combined to score 31 points and grab 16 rebounds. “Those three have played significant minutes,” Fox said. “They’re talented young players and they’ve made real costly errors throughout the season, which has allowed them to grow. They’re playing the game a little more maturely than maybe two weeks ago, but certainly than a month ago. All three were very impactful throughout the game.” Georgia took control of the game in the opening minutes, holding Vanderbilt scoreless until there were 14 minutes, 45 seconds left in the first half. The Bulldogs made five of their six 3-pointers in the early portion of the game. However, they also blasted Vanderbilt around the basket, scoring 20 points in the first half on layups, tip-ins and dunks. Maten scored in all of those ways but also was smart with the ball. Georgia had eight players score in the first 12 minutes while Vanderbilt was struggling to reach double digits. “The game gets easier when everyone makes shots because they’re not sure who to lock on,” Maten said. “The freshmen did a great job. Everyone was really locked in and that helped me a lot.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NEXT MAN UP FOR HOGS

Arkansas lost some depth on its front line when it was announced that forward Dustin Thomas had been dismissed from the team just as the Razorbacks were preparing to head to St. Louis. That could create more opportunities for players such as St. Louis native Arlando Cook, among others. “Next man up,” coach Mike Anderson said. “It’s been like that all year long. When I put guys in those positions it was for times like this. They have to step up to the plate.” Thomas, a 6-foot-7 forward, was averaging five points and 4.1 rebounds in his 19 minutes a game. There was some fear that the team might lose another player when guard C.J. Jones hit the floor with an apparent knee injury at Mizzou on Saturday. He returned to practice this week without any signs of a problem. “When he took that spill we thought it was serious, but it was probably a sprain or a bruise,” Anderson said. “He showed a little mental toughness coming back and practicing hard.” As for Cook, the senior from Madison Prep, he could get a chance to improve on his averages of 9.8 minutes and 1.7 points when Arkansas plays Thursday. He’s been talking up his city to teammates. “He’s been talking about it all week,” guard Jaylen Barford said. “I think he’s a little too giddy. But I’m glad he’s home. It would be good to win for him in his city.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

South Carolina holds off Mississippi Rebels rally to take lead before Gamecocks surge BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A year removed from playing in the Final Four, South Carolina found itself far removed from college basketball’s biggest stage in Wednesday’s late game in the play-in round of the Southeastern Conference Tournament. Glory is fleeting in the 11-14 game, but the Gamecocks did enough to extend their stay in St. Louis, beating last-place Ole Miss 85-84 at Scottrade Center. South Carolina returns for Thursday’s late game against sixth-seeded Arkansas, set for an 8:30 p.m. tipoff. After a mostly listless regular season, the Rebels showed some life under interim coach Tony Madlock, but not enough to see another day in St. Louis. Madlock replaced longtime Ole Miss coach Andy Kennedy in late February when the dean of SEC coaches stepped down during one of the worst stretches in his 12 seasons in Oxford. The Rebels’ season came to an end

GEORGIA 78, VANDERBILT 62

THE BRACKET THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

1 Auburn (25-6) 8 Texas A&M (20-11)

Noon, ESPN

Noon, SEC Network

9 Alabama (17-14)

Noon, ESPN

4 Kentucky (21-10) 5 Mizzou (20-11) 12 Georgia

78

2:30 p.m., ESPN

2:30 p.m., SEC Network

TITLE GAME Noon ESPN

12 Georgia (17-14) 13 Vandy

Wednesday with Kennedy watching just off the court while working as an analyst for SEC Network. Soon enough, Ole Miss athletics director Ross Bjork will bring in a new coach to lead his program in an increasingly competitive SEC. South Carolina’s Frank Martin isn’t going anywhere but the second round. The Gamecocks coach watched his team erupt from 3-point range in the second half as Frank Booker and Justin Minaya combined for seven 3s in the final 20 minutes to gain just enough ground on the Rebels. Booker and teammate Chris Silva both scored 21 points for the Gamecocks (17-15). Minaya added 16. Breein Tyree led the Rebels (12-20) with 18 points. South Carolina’s Maik Kotsar led all scorers with 13 first-half points but came off the floor late in the half after taking a shot to the face. The Rebels raced back from a nine-point deficit, and Terrence Davis’ baseline jumper beat the buzzer and got the Rebels within two at the break, down 38-36. The Gamecocks’ strategy in the second half wasn’t complex: Give the ball to Silva down low and get out of the way. Four times in the half’s first five min-

62 2 Tennessee (23-7) 7 Miss. St. (21-10)

6 p.m., SEC Network

6 p.m., SEC Network

10 LSU (17-13) 11 So. Carolina

85

14 Ole Miss

84

2:30 p.m., ESPN

3 Florida (20-11) 11 So. Carolina (17-15) 8:30 p.m., SEC Network

6 Arkansas (21-10)

8:30 p.m., SEC Network

FG FT Reb VANDERBILT Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Roberson 39 6-15 2-2 1-5 1 4 16 Obinna 10 0-1 0-0 0-2 1 1 0 Evans 10 1-4 0-0 0-3 0 0 3 LaChance 39 6-13 2-2 0-5 3 3 17 Lee 31 4-9 4-5 1-7 3 2 12 Brown 24 4-7 0-0 0-1 0 3 9 23 1-5 0-1 1-2 1 0 2 Toye Willis 18 1-3 0-0 0-0 2 2 3 Austin 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Baptiste Totals 200 23-57 8-10 3-25 11 16 62 Percentages: FG.404, FT.800. 3-point goals: 8-23, .348. Team rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb GEORGIA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hammonds 30 4-9 2-4 3-8 1 2 10 Maten 29 9-12 5-6 2-4 1 0 25 Ogbeide 21 3-6 1-2 4-10 2 3 7 1 Jackson 27 1-5 1-1 0-2 2 4 13 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Parker 1 Claxton 22 3-8 2-4 4-7 2 8 Hightower 21 4-6 3-3 0-1 6 1 13 19 2-9 0-0 0-2 3 0 4 Crump Wilridge 10 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 2 Edwards 4 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Diatta 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Kante 2 0-3 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 Harrison -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 O’Neill -0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Totals 200 29-64 14-20 14-39 15 12 78 Percentages: FG.453, FT.700. 3-point goals: 6-20, .300. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 5. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 5. Steals: 4. Technical fouls: None. Vanderbilt 22 40 — 62 Georgia 43 35 — 78

utes, the 6-9 forward was rewarded with free throws for attacking the lane and drawing contact. South Carolina’s first five points of the half came on Silva free throws. The Gamecocks’ first field goal didn’t come until Wesley Myers’ jumper 4:39 into the half. Ole Miss didn’t back down. Deandre Burnett drilled back-to-back 3-pointers, one off a teammate’s missed free throw, to push the Rebels in front 53-48. South Carolina stormed back with three straight corner 3-pointers in front of its own bench, two by Minaya, as part of a 14-4 run. Two more Booker 3s restored order after another Rebels surge, but Ole Miss kept things interesting late. Devontae Shuler’s 3-pointer with 37 seconds left got the Rebels within four points, and a couple of Burnett free throws made it a three-point game with 13 seconds left. The rally stalled when Booker split his free throws on the other end to all but secure the victory. Bruce Stevens’ 3-pointer beat the buzzer but only to get the Rebels within a point. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

SOUTH CAROLINA 85, MISSISSIPPI 84

FG FT Reb MISSISSIPPI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hymon 12 1-1 0-0 1-5 0 4 2 Stevens 29 4-10 4-4 7-13 1 4 15 Crawford 34 1-5 2-2 1-3 3 2 4 T.Davis 33 6-15 4-5 1-7 2 4 16 Tyree 26 7-15 0-1 1-3 3 5 18 Burnett 24 4-11 2-4 0-1 4 2 13 15 3-5 1-3 4-4 0 0 7 Furmanavicius Olejniczak 15 2-5 0-0 1-2 0 5 4 Shuler 12 1-5 2-2 0-3 2 0 5 200 29-72 15-21 16-41 15 26 84 Totals Percentages: FG.403, FT.714. 3-point goals: 11-31, .355. Team rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb SOUTH CAROLINA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Kotsar 33 6-12 2-3 2-5 1 0 14 Minaya 27 6-9 0-1 2-4 3 1 16 Silva 38 4-14 13-20 4-11 3 3 21 Gravett 31 1-3 1-4 0-7 7 3 3 Hinson 8 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 2 0 31 7-13 1-2 2-5 0 3 21 Booker Myers 19 3-5 2-4 0-3 1 4 10 Haase 7 0-1 0-0 0-1 2 3 0 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Cudd Beatty 2 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 0 0 Totals 200 27-58 19-34 11-39 17 19 85 Percentages: FG.466, FT.559. 3-point goals: 12-21, .571. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. Mississippi 36 48 — 84 South Carolina 38 47 — 85


SEC TOURNAMENT

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

Georgia defense stifles Vandy

NOTEBOOK

MU might need walk-on Rau to play in opener BY DAVE MATTER AND STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When Missouri ran through a few plays with its first unit on the floor during Wednesday’s walk-through, usual starters Kassius Robertson, Jordan Barnett, Kevin Puryear and Jeremiah Tilmon were on the court. The fifth starter? Brett Rau. With usual starter Cullen VanLeer out for the rest of the season with a knee injury and Jordan Geist fighting flulike symptoms, Tigers coach Cuonzo Martin turned to his senior walk-on to fill the void. Martin won’t hesitate to play Rau when it counts Thursday. “I don’t know how many (minutes) he’ll play, if he’ll play, but I have no problem playing Rau,” Martin said.“I have no problem at all.” Rau, a 6-4 junior college transfer from Burlington, Ill., found his way onto the court in three of Mizzou’s final five regular-season games, playing nine combined minutes in the backcourt. The Tigers didn’t rely on points from VanLeer, who gave the Tigers a reliable facilitator, ball-handler and perimeter defender, and Rau figures to play the same role should he get action Thursday and beyond. Even with Michael Porter Jr.’s return to the rotation, Martin has only eight available scholarship players. Martin said he hopes Geist will be healthy enough to play Thursday, but should the Tigers win the secondround game, they’ll be back on the court in less than 24 hours to face Kentucky, a difficult matchup for any team, much less a limited rotation with tired legs. Foul trouble or another injury could further deplete Martin’s backcourt and give Rau his most extensive minutes since coming to MU last year from Elgin Community College. Rau was sidelined for a few games midway through the season with a torn groin and has appeared in nine games overall. “Brett’s very sneaky,” Puryear said. “When we practice against him he has a pretty good skill set. He can play basketball. We have the full amount of trust in him. He’s capable of making plays, distributing the ball, initiating offense, making open shots. I think it’s really just his time to shine at this point. Cullen’s injury of course sets us back. We’re down one man and now it’s time for someone to step up.”

BULLDOGS BRACED FOR MPJ

Like every coach who watched Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. in high school and during the AAU summer circuit, Georgia coach Mark Fox is well aware of the freshman’s talents. That doesn’t mean he knows what to expect when the Bulldogs face the 6-10 forward Thursday in the second round. “The challenge is I’m not even sure what position they’ll play him at,” Fox said. “He’s a very versatile player. I’m thankful the kid’s gotten healthy because he’s a terrific talent. He could be a highly picked kid one day when he goes to the draft. He’ll be a top-five selection. I remember watching him in high school and he was as complete a player as there was at that level. Our preparation will have to be somewhat generic. Until we see what they’re doing with him, we really don’t know.”

NEXT MAN UP FOR HOGS

Arkansas lost some depth on its front line when it was announced that forward Dustin Thomas had been dismissed from the team just as the Razorbacks were preparing to head to St. Louis. That could create more opportunities for players such as St. Louis native Arlando Cook, among others. “Next man up,” coach Mike Anderson said. “It’s been like that all year long. When I put guys in those positions it was for times like this. They have to step up to the plate.” Thomas, a 6-foot-7 forward, was averaging five points and 4.1 rebounds in his 19 minutes a game. There was some fear that the team might lose another player when guard C.J. Jones hit the floor with an apparent knee injury at Mizzou on Saturday. He returned to practice this week without any signs of a problem. “When he took that spill we thought it was serious, but it was probably a sprain or a bruise,” Anderson said. “He showed a little mental toughness coming back and practicing hard.” As for Cook, the senior from Madison Prep, he could get a chance to improve on his averages of 9.8 minutes and 1.7 points when Arkansas plays Thursday. He’s been talking up his city to teammates. “He’s been talking about it all week,” guard Jaylen Barford said. “I think he’s a little too giddy. But I’m glad he’s home. It would be good to win for him in his city.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Georgia’s Yante Maten drives to the basket with pressure from Vanderbilt’s Clevon Brown in the second half Wednesday night at Scottrade Center. Maten led the Bulldogs with 25 points.

Bulldogs build big lead early, cruise to victory BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Georgia’s defense was no match for Vanderbilt’s shooters the first time the teams met, but at the time, the Bulldogs were not doing much to stop most of their opponents. The result was a stretch of eight losses in 10 games. One month later, Vanderbilt joined a list of teams that have struggled to shoot straight against Georgia, which won the rematch 78-62 in a play-in game at the Southeastern Conference Tournament at Scottrade Center on Wednesday. A team that ranks first in the SEC and sixth nationally in field goal percentage defense limited the Commodores to 28 percent in the first half. That was more than enough to render the Bulldogs’ second-half letdown meaningless. “Our team was in a bad place when we went to Vanderbilt,” Georgia coach Mark Fox said. “We had a stretch that we didn’t guard anybody. We weren’t playing well at the time. We’ve grown up a lot since then. We’re just a little more seasoned and we understand our roles a little better. Certainly we executed the plan better because really it was the exact same thing we tried to do in the first

Rebels rally to take lead before Gamecocks surge BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It’s been a month since South Carolina coach Frank Martin watched his team lose Feb. 6 at Arkansas, which is why he planned ahead when he arrived in St. Louis for the Southeastern Conference Tournament. “I took a nap today. I never take naps,” Martin said late Wednesday. “I was hoping it would be a late night.” Thanks to an 85-84 victory over Ole Miss, the well-rested Martin had a reason to stay up late and study his team’s loss to the Razorbacks. With another strong game from forward Chris Silva, the Gamecocks lived to see another day in St. Louis and will face sixth-seeded Arkansas in Thursday’s second round. Martin was disgusted with his team’s defense and watched the Rebels nearly rally in the final minute, but this late in the season, there was no sense to nitpick at Scottrade Center. “It’s that time of year whether I’m happy or sad, good mood or bad mod it’s irrelevant,” Martin said. “It’s all about surviving.” A year removed from playing in the

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

1 Auburn (25-6) 8 Texas A&M (20-11)

Noon, ESPN

Noon, SEC Network

9 Alabama (17-14)

Noon, ESPN

4 Kentucky (21-10) 5 Mizzou (20-11) 78

2:30 p.m., ESPN

2:30 p.m., SEC Network

TITLE GAME Noon ESPN

12 Georgia (17-14) 13 Vandy

Final Four, South Carolina found itself far removed from college basketball’s biggest stage in Wednesday’s late game in the play-in round of the SEC Tournament. Glory is fleeting in the 11-14 game, but the Gamecocks did enough to extend their stay behind Silva’s doubledouble (21 points, 11 rebounds) and eight second-half 3-pointers. South Carolina (17-15) tips off against Arkansas (2110) at 8:30 p.m. Thursday. In the first matchup, the Razorbacks turned a close game into a 16-point win last month in Fayetteville, Ark. After a mostly listless regular season, the Rebels (12-20) showed some life under interim coach Tony Madlock, but not enough to advance in the bracket. Ole Miss lost 11 of its final 12 games. Madlock replaced longtime Ole Miss coach Andy Kennedy in late February when the dean of SEC coaches stepped down during one of the worst stretches in his 12 seasons in Oxford. The Rebels’ season came to an end Wednesday under odd circumstances: Kennedy watched the game just off the court while working as an analyst for SEC Network. “I didn’t notice him,” Rebels guard Breein Tyree said after scoring a teamhigh 18 points. “We’re used to seeing him every day during practice. There’s no animosity toward AK. Hopefully he was rooting for us.”

GEORGIA 78, VANDERBILT 62

WEDNESDAY

62 2 Tennessee (23-7) 7 Miss. St. (21-10)

6 p.m., SEC Network

6 p.m., SEC Network

10 LSU (17-13) 11 So. Carolina

85

14 Ole Miss

84

2:30 p.m., ESPN

3 Florida (20-11) 11 So. Carolina (17-15) 8:30 p.m., SEC Network

6 Arkansas (21-10)

Equally important was the play of freshmen Rayshaun Hammonds, Teshaun Hightower and Nicolas Claxton. They combined to score 31 points and grab 16 rebounds. “Those three have played significant minutes,” Fox said. “They’re talented young players and they’ve made real costly errors throughout the season, which has allowed them to grow. They’re playing the game a little more maturely than maybe two weeks ago, but certainly than a month ago. All three were very impactful throughout the game.” Georgia took control of the game in the opening minutes, holding Vanderbilt scoreless until there were 14 minutes, 45 seconds left in the first half. The Bulldogs made five of their six 3-pointers in the early portion of the game. However, they also blasted Vanderbilt around the basket, scoring 20 points in the first half on layups, tip-ins and dunks. Maten scored in all of those ways but also was smart with the ball. Georgia had eight players score in the first 12 minutes while Vanderbilt was struggling to reach double digits. “The game gets easier when everyone makes shots because they’re not sure who to lock on,” Maten said. “The freshmen did a great job. Everyone was really locked in and that helped me a lot.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

South Carolina holds off Mississippi

THE BRACKET

12 Georgia

game.” Georgia (17-14) hopes to get a similar defensive effort when it faces Mizzou on Thursday at 2:30. The Tigers shot 41 percent when they beat the Bulldogs in Columbia in January. That was pretty good considering what Georgia’s opponents have done lately. After Auburn burned the Bulldogs on Feb. 10, shooting 51 percent, Fox’s team found its defensive stride. The next six teams that Georgia played shot a cumulative 37.6 percent, and the Bulldogs were able to finish with some good wins, including at Florida and at home against Tennessee. They were sharp against Vanderbilt from the start, building a 10-0 lead while the Commodores missed their first seven shots. A 14-0 run later in the first half coincided with a stretch that saw Vandy (12-20) miss eight consecutive shots. “After that start, things didn’t look great for us and we were battling up hill,” Vanderbilt coach Bryce Drew said. “We didn’t make shots and they came out really aggressive. We knew how they were going to guard us. They were just a little quicker tonight, and we were a little tentative, especially after we missed shots early.” Associated Press SEC player of the year Yante Maten led Georgia with 25 points on nine-for-12 shooting.

8:30 p.m., SEC Network

FG FT Reb VANDERBILT Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Roberson 39 6-15 2-2 1-5 1 4 16 Obinna 10 0-1 0-0 0-2 1 1 0 Evans 10 1-4 0-0 0-3 0 0 3 LaChance 39 6-13 2-2 0-5 3 3 17 Lee 31 4-9 4-5 1-7 3 2 12 Brown 24 4-7 0-0 0-1 0 3 9 23 1-5 0-1 1-2 1 0 2 Toye Willis 18 1-3 0-0 0-0 2 2 3 Austin 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Baptiste Totals 200 23-57 8-10 3-25 11 16 62 Percentages: FG.404, FT.800. 3-point goals: 8-23, .348. Team rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb GEORGIA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hammonds 30 4-9 2-4 3-8 1 2 10 Maten 29 9-12 5-6 2-4 1 0 25 Ogbeide 21 3-6 1-2 4-10 2 3 7 1 Jackson 27 1-5 1-1 0-2 2 4 13 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 1 5 Parker 1 Claxton 22 3-8 2-4 4-7 2 8 Hightower 21 4-6 3-3 0-1 6 1 13 19 2-9 0-0 0-2 3 0 4 Crump Wilridge 10 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 2 Edwards 4 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Diatta 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Kante 2 0-3 0-0 1-1 0 0 0 Harrison -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 O’Neill -0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Totals 200 29-64 14-20 14-39 15 12 78 Percentages: FG.453, FT.700. 3-point goals: 6-20, .300. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 5. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 5. Steals: 4. Technical fouls: None. Vanderbilt 22 40 — 62 Georgia 43 35 — 78

Soon enough, Ole Miss athletics director Ross Bjork will bring in a new coach to lead his program in an increasingly competitive SEC. South Carolina’s Martin isn’t going anywhere but the second round. The Gamecocks coach watched his team erupt from 3-point range in the second half as Frank Booker and Justin Minaya combined for seven 3s in the final 20 minutes to gain just enough ground on the Rebels. Booker matched Silva’s 21 points, while Minaya added 16 for the Gamecocks. South Carolina’s Maik Kotsar led all scorers with 13 first-half points but came off the floor late in the half after taking a shot to the face. The Rebels raced back from a nine-point deficit, and Terrence Davis’ baseline jumper beat the buzzer and got the Rebels within two at the break, down 38-36. Ole Miss didn’t back down in the second half, either. Midway through the half, Deandre Burnett drilled back-toback 3-pointers, one off a teammate’s missed free throw, to push the Rebels in front 53-48. South Carolina stormed back with three straight corner 3-pointers in front its own bench, two by Minaya, as part of a 14-4 run. Two more Booker 3s restored order after another Rebels surge, but Ole Miss kept things interesting late.

SOUTH CAROLINA 85, MISSISSIPPI 84

FG FT Reb MISSISSIPPI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hymon 12 1-1 0-0 1-5 0 4 2 Stevens 29 4-10 4-4 7-13 1 4 15 Crawford 34 1-5 2-2 1-3 3 2 4 T.Davis 33 6-15 4-5 1-7 2 4 16 Tyree 26 7-15 0-1 1-3 3 5 18 Burnett 24 4-11 2-4 0-1 4 2 13 15 3-5 1-3 4-4 0 0 7 Furmanavicius Olejniczak 15 2-5 0-0 1-2 0 5 4 Shuler 12 1-5 2-2 0-3 2 0 5 200 29-72 15-21 16-41 15 26 84 Totals Percentages: FG.403, FT.714. 3-point goals: 11-31, .355. Team rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 7. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb SOUTH CAROLINA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Kotsar 33 6-12 2-3 2-5 1 0 14 Minaya 27 6-9 0-1 2-4 3 1 16 Silva 38 4-14 13-20 4-11 3 3 21 Gravett 31 1-3 1-4 0-7 7 3 3 Hinson 8 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 2 0 31 7-13 1-2 2-5 0 3 21 Booker Myers 19 3-5 2-4 0-3 1 4 10 Haase 7 0-1 0-0 0-1 2 3 0 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Cudd Beatty 2 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 0 0 Totals 200 27-58 19-34 11-39 17 19 85 Percentages: FG.466, FT.559. 3-point goals: 12-21, .571. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 13. Blocked shots: 4. Turnovers: 13. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. Mississippi 36 48 — 84 South Carolina 38 47 — 85


03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

SEC TOURNAMENT

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

Coach Cuonzo Martin watches the Tigers practice at Scottrade Center on Wednesday as they prepare for Thursday’s game against Georgia, which beat Vanderbilt on Wednesday night.

Porter Jr. tells Martin that he’s ready MISSOURI VS. GEORGIA

MIZZOU • FROM B1

“If he would have never said it all season I would have been fine with that, too,” Martin said Wednesday after MU’s 45-minute shootaround at Scottrade. “It had to be completely up to him, to say, ‘Coach, I’m completely ready to go. I feel good about it.’ “Because I didn’t want him to feel any pressure of playing in the game. I know you hear a lot of stuff from the outside and he probably hears a lot of stuff, ‘The team needs you, wants you to play.’ Of course we’d love to have him on the floor, but I wanted it to be about him feeling good about that. The great thing about him is he said, ‘Coach, I want to help the team.’” Asked to elaborate on his conversation with Porter, Martin said, “I just did like this,” bumping his fists, “and said, ‘Let’s roll.’” Porter took part in Wednesday’s workout at Scottrade but wasn’t among the three players Mizzou made available for interviews. The Tigers (20-11), the fifth seed here this week, play No. 12 seed Georgia (17-14) at 2:30 p.m. Thursday. The winner advances to play No. 4 seed Kentucky (21-10) in Friday’s quarterfinal. When he met with reporters Wednesday, Martin hadn’t told the rest of the team that Porter would play Thursday but assumed Porter had shared the news. “We’ll talk about what we need to talk about,” he said. “It won’t be anything big. I’ll just say, ‘Guys, we’re rolling.’ It doesn’t stop what we’re doing.” Porter was the nation’s topranked recruit in the 2017 class when he backed out of his commitment to Washington last spring and chose to play for Martin at Mizzou, but heading into the postseason, his freshman year has only produced two points and a rebound in 127 seconds of action in MU’s opener against Iowa State. When Porter opted for surgery two weeks later, MU initially said he’d face

When • 2:30 p.m. Thursday Where • Scottrade Center Series • Georgia leads 6-5. Last meeting, MU 68, Georgia 56, on Jan. 10 TV, radio • SEC Net., KTRS (550 AM) Records • MU is 20-11, Georgia 17-14. About Mizzou • The Tigers come into the tournament with recent wins over Vanderbilt and Arkansas. … Earlier this week, graduate senior Kassius Robertson was named to the coaches’ All-SEC first team and the media’s All-SEC second team after leading the Tigers with 16.5 points a game during the regular season. About Georgia • Senior forward Yante Maten was voted AP SEC player of the year after leading the conference with 19.4 points a game. … UGA lost six of its final nine games during the regular season but swept No. 3 seed Florida and handed co-champion Tennessee one of its five losses in SEC play. … Point guard William “Turtle” Jackson II averaged a team-best 3.8 assists during the regular season. PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri forward Michael Porter Jr. (13) enters the arena with teammates for a practice session Wednesday before the SEC Tournament at Scottrade Center.

a three- to four-month recovery process and would probably miss the rest of the season. At the time and for weeks to come, Martin never thought Porter would return this season. Instead, Martin focused on a roster that churned through turnover all season. “I just looked at it that he wasn’t coming back,” Martin said. “It’s not something he said. You’ve got to respect the space of a player going through something like that. My focus at the time was the players on the floor. I’ve always been a guy if a guy’s hurt, he’s hurt and that’s between you and the trainer.” The Tigers were good enough without Porter to win 20 regularseason games and finish tied for fourth in a much-improved conference, but now the conversation shifts to Mizzou’s potential

Adding Porter Jr. a huge deal HOCHMAN • FROM B1

Martin said, “We have enough to be as good as anybody” … and that was before news that Michael Porter Jr. will play in the Southeastern Conference Tournament. “I still say that,” Cuonzo confirmed Wednesday. This journey was once about just getting there. Getting to the NCAA Tournament. Getting back to relevancy. And even if Mizzou loses Thursday, both of those things will probably happen. But now? The return (or “second debut”) of Porter Jr. makes Mizzou a team no one wants to play in March. They’re a “wild card” in the true postseason sense — not by denotation, but by palpable unpredictability. It’s the perfect confluence of confidence — a clicking Missouri team playing in the SEC Tourna-

Dave Matter

ment in Missouri, and the prodigal Porter is back from his back injury. The journey was once about getting there, but now it’s about getting past “there.” Suddenly, some can take for granted the strides Mizzou has made (an eight-win season to 20 wins), because now, with Porter, this is a team that can win much in March. They say to take it one game at a time, but I’m taking it two games at a time. The litmus test for Mizzou will be Friday against Kentucky, assuming Mizzou beats a double-digit SEC seed Thursday. Porter will have a game under his belt, Mizzou will have crazy momentum and Porter will face his contemporaries on the court, including Kentucky’s Kevin Knox, who visited Mizzou after Porter signed. The reports on a practicing Porter show a star player ready

with the five-star, 6-10 forward in the rotation. What can Mizzou fans expect to see from Porter? Martin said he’ll play both on the perimeter and inside at power forward but will also bring the ball up the floor and direct the offense. Martin said Porter won’t start and guessed he’ll play no more than 20 or 25 minutes. Porter launched shots with ease during Wednesday’s non-contact workout, making 15 consecutive 3-pointers during one stretch. Porter’s addition gives the Tigers a prolific scoring threat, but that’s not all, Martin said. “I think he doesn’t get enough credit in my opinion as a defender,” Martin said. “Like most young guys coming out of high school there are things to work on defensively. With his length and athleticism, his ability to

cover ground defensively … he’s 6-10 and he’s long … that is hard to go against when you’ve got multiple guys to go against with size and length. I think he can cover a lot of ground defensively. He can score the ball. He can go inside. He can go outside. He can make shots. He can put the ball on the floor. He brings a lot of dimensions to the game. But he’s a presence on the floor. So you have to identify him.” If there’s any team in the field that needs some reinforcements, it’s Missouri. For weeks the Tigers have played with just eight scholarship players, and that number dropped to seven in the second half of Saturday’s win over Arkansas when junior guard Cullen VanLeer suffered a season-ending knee injury. Even with Porter back in the rotation for Wednesday’s workout, that

to go but still getting his legs under him. I texted an NBA executive Wednesday, who said scouts “will want to see how he’s moving and if he has bounce off the floor. Outside of that, it’s more or less just to lay eyes on him in a setting outside a high school event.” Porter will probably play 20 to 25 minutes, Martin gauged, and will come off the bench, and that’s fine. Because, honestly, I went into Wednesday telling myself I’d be content if Porter said he’d only play sparingly — like, Cullen VanLeer’s minutes, a few possessions here and there — as long as Porter at least gave it a go. Now we’re getting Porter nearly in full. On Wednesday, he made 15 uncontested 3-pointers in a row during practice. And he’d been part of 5-on-5 scrimmages in the past week. Again, he’s playing 20 to 25 minutes, not 40. But his presence can change a game. Can change a late-ingame possession, too. And for me, and I’ve written

this before, a key to Porter will be, simply, dribbling. The Tigers are a turnover-prone team, and here’s a guy who can confidently break a full-court press. Martin smiled wide when asked about this: “Yes, he can, he can — he’s another guy who can bring up the ball and make a decision.” Mizzou athletics have become infamous for bad luck. The Tigers lost football games on a fifth down and the “flea-kicker.” And in basketball, there have been four times Mizzou entered the NCAA Tournament as a 2 to 4 seed and didn’t make the Sweet Sixteen. That includes the Norfolk State year and Northern Iowa. It doesn’t include the Tyus Edney year, when No. 8 Mizzou had No. 1 UCLA beat … for 39 minutes and 55.2 seconds. So of course Mizzou would get Porter, the No. 1 senior in the country, and he’d get injured. Thus, it’s very un-Mizzou-like for Porter to be back and healthy.

number stayed at seven because junior guard Jordan Geist was held out of practice while recovering from flu-like symptoms, a team spokesman confirmed. Martin was hopeful Geist would play Thursday. Otherwise, Martin isn’t worried about Porter’s addition to the rotation disrupting team chemistry. “No problem at all, because he’s part of the team,” he said. “You owe it to him. You just roll from there. Whatever happens, I’m OK with it. You guys, if it doesn’t work out, it worked out in my book. I made the decision and we’re rolling.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

It’s weird territory, having all this optimism. And it’s rare air in the history of hoops — it’s hard to anecdotally find a time when a superstar suddenly joined a college team for tourney time. Duke’s Kyrie Irving might be the closest example, and at least he’d played in 11 regular-season games. But it’s as simple as this. The season has been a success. Now, you can acknowledge that and get greedy and hope that Mizzou doesn’t “Mizzou” this once-ina-lifetime situation. And on this day, I hear the voice of Stephen Curry in my head. The NBA superstar knows Porter from camps. So, back in November, the Post-Dispatch asked Curry his expectations for Porter at Mizzou. “I expect nothing but greatness,” he said. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SLU rested, ready for tourney Bess will lead Billikens in their opening game of the Atlantic 10 event BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If anyone on the St. Louis University roster knows the surprises that March can deliver, it’s Javon Bess, whose two seasons at Michigan State were proof of the unexpected. When he was a freshman, the Spartans were a No. 7 seed for the NCAA Tournament when they beat the Nos. 2, 3 and 4 seeds to reach the Final Four. His sophomore season, the Spartans were a No. 2 seed but became one of the biggest upset victims in tournament history when they lost to No. 15 Middle Tennessee State at Scottrade Center. “I’ve been on the good end and the bad end, so I know anything can happen,” Bess said. “My freshman year we weren’t supposed to go to the Final Four. It was supposed to be one of (Tom Izzo’s) worst teams.” SLU isn’t focused on a March miracle, but that’s what the Billikens would need to win the Atlantic 10 Tournament in Washington, where they will start Thursday night against No. 11 George Washington, which beat No. 14 Fordham 78-72 in a first-round game Wednesday. The Billikens actually have two players who have played beyond their conference tournaments. Graduate transfer Rashed Anthony participated in two NCAA Tournaments with Seton Hall. They also have players remaining from the last two A-10 tournaments, where they won one game each year. But it is Bess who can deliver the most wisdom with impact. It’s a role he has filled all season. “I’ve talked to him about making sure he relays his prior experiences to his teammates,” coach Travis Ford said. “He’s been through what it means to succeed this time of year, and that’s important.

SLU VS. GEORGE WASHINGTON

When • 7:30 p.m. Where • Capital One Arena, Washington, D.C. All-time series • George Washington leads 8-7 TV/radio • NBCSN; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU 16-15, 9-9 in Atlantic 10; George Washington 15-17, 7-11 About the Billikens • SLU won the regular-season meeting 62-53 at Chaifetz Arena by holding the Colonials to 34 percent shooting. ... The Billikens have won their first A-10 tournament game the last two years only to be eliminated by George Washington. ... Hasahn French was named to the A-10 all-rookie team and Javon Bess to the all-defensive team but SLU did not have an all-conference selection. ... Bess has averaged 16 points over the last three games. About the Colonials • Yuta Watanabe was named the A-10’s defensive player of the year. He led the team in blocked shots and was second in steals. ... The Colonials have won two of their 14 games away from their home floor. ... However, when they played Temple at Capital One Arena in December, they shot 60 percent and made 56 percent of their 3-pointers. ... GW has a 26-37 alltime record in the A-10 tournament and won the championship in 2005 and ‘07. — Stu Durando

I’m sure he will. He’s that type of guy.” Although Ford said he’s not focused on SLU’s small roster, he did build the week around rest and recuperation after SLU played the final three weeks of the regular season with essentially a six-man rotation. Players have been asked to take on even bigger loads than previously since the loss of Jordan Goodwin. Ford continues to stick with a six-man rotation, with Anthony picking up a few minutes each game. In the closing weeks of the season, the aches and pains accumulated to the point

that Ford was fully immersed in methods that would work best to get his players ready to play multiple games if needed. The Billikens were off Sunday after playing Saturday night. They went through a light workout Monday with a DJ playing music in the practice gym to keep the mood light. “Everyone goes into the postseason with a different mindset as to where they are at,” Ford said. “Our team needed a couple of days to get as healthy as possible and to have fresh legs so we could go into D.C. ready to go physically as well as mentally. “It’s a challenge for any team, no matter how many players you’re playing. I don’t think how many we play is going to become that big a factor. We have to figure out a way to get past the first game.” SLU enters the tournament as the No. 6 seed but was having to prepare for the possibility of facing either Fordham or George Washington, which won Wednesday. The Billikens beat George Washington 62-53 in St. Louis during the regular season. The Billikens lost their last two games and were unable to hold on to the fourth spot in the standings, which would have given them a double-bye and no game until Friday. They are guaranteed of a non-losing record for the first time since the 2013-14 season, and one win in the tournament would allow them to finish with a winning record. To do that, Ford wants his team focused on the handful of things that defined its best wins this season: defense and rebounding. It would also help if SLU can keep turnovers to a reasonable number and shoot free throws better. “No matter what happened before, when you head into postseason you need to focus on what makes your team great and have success,” he said. “You’ve hopefully learned from everything and use all of that to play to your identity.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

ROUNDUP

Bucknell romps to lock up NCAA bid NCAA AUTOMATIC BERTHS Awarded Wednesday Bucknell (Patriot) Saturday America East: 10 a.m., ESPN2 MEAC: noon, ESPN2 SWAC: 4, ESPN2 Mtn. West: 5, KMOV-4 Big 12: 5, ESPN Big East: 5:30, KTVI-2 MAC: 6, ESPN2 Big Sky: 7, ESPNU ACC: 7:30, ESPN C-USA: 7:30, CBSSN Southland: 8, ESPN2 Pac-12: 9, FS1 WAC: 9, ESPNU Big West: 11, ESPN2 Sunday Ivy: 11 a.m., ESPN2 A-10: noon, KMOV-4 SEC: noon, ESPN Sun Belt: 1, ESPN2 American: 2:30, KMOV-4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucknell’s Nana Foulland dunks in the second half for two of his 12 points against Colgate during the Patriot League championship game in Lewisburg, Pa. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stephen Brown scored 22 points and reserve Nate Sestina added 16 as Bucknell won its second straight Patriot League Tournament championship with an 8354 victory over Colgate on Wednesday night at home in Lewisburg, Pa. The top-seeded Bison (25-9) head to the NCAA Tournament for the eighth time in program history and sixth time as the Patriot League representative. Four of those six titles have come in the last eight years. The second-seeded Raiders (19-13) lost to Bucknell for the third time this season. Colgate was playing in the league championship game for the first time in 10 years and gunning for its first league championship since 1996. The Bison finish the year with a 15-1 record at home. They have won 18 of 19 entering the NCAA Tournament. Brown, who made five 3-pointers, was named tournament MVP. Bucknell shot 46 percent from beyond the arc (13-for28). Will Rayman, Colgate’s leading scorer coming in and a second-team all-Patriot League pick, scored 17 points. Jordan Burns added 12 for the Raiders. Nana Foulland had 12 points for the Bison.

ATLANTIC 10 TOURNAMENT

George Washington advances • Jair Bolden scored 22 points and George Washington beat Fordham 78-72 in the first round of the Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament in Washington. No. 11 seed George Washington advances to the second round to meet sixth-seeded St. Louis University Louis on Thursday night. Bo Zeigler added 16 points and seven rebounds for the Colonials (15-17). Joseph Chartouny led No. 14 seed Fordham (9-22) with 18 points, eight assists and four steals. Prokop Slanina and Ivan Raut added 15 points apiece. UMass edges La Salle • C.J. Anderson scored 21 points and Massachusetts held off La Salle 69-67 in the first round of the Atlantic 10 tournament. No. 13 seed UMass (13-19) will face

fifth-seeded George Mason (15-16) in a Thursday quarterfinal. Tony Washington scored 20 points to lead No. 12 seed La Salle (13-19).

BIG 12 TOURNAMENT

Oklahoma State beats OU • Cameron McGriff scored 18 points, Jeffrey Carroll added 13 points and 13 rebounds, and Oklahoma State pulled away from Oklahoma after squandering most of a 16-point lead for a 71-60 victory in the opening round of the Big 12 Tournament in Kansas City, MO. Kendall Smith had 11 points for the eighth-seeded Cowboys (19-13) to set up a quarterfinal matchup with No. 1 seed Kansas. Oklahoma State swept the ninthranked Jayhawks during the regular season. Trae Young had 22 points on 7-for-21 shooting to lead the Sooners (18-13). Texas (19-13) beat Iowa State 68-64 in Wednesday’s other Big 12 game. Kansas loses Azubuike • Kansas forward Udoka Azubuike suffered sprained left knee during a scrimmage this week, has been ruled out of the Big 12 Tournament and his availability for the NCAA Tournament is in question. Azubuike, who is averaging 13.7 points and 7.1 rebounds, missed most of last season because of a wrist injury. Jayhawks coach Bill Self said after a scrimmage Wednesday that Azubuike sprained his medial collateral ligament near the end of Tuesday’s practice. Azubuike was going for a rebound and a collision occurred under the basket, leaving the 7-footer with a “Grade 1” sprain. “We did an MRI as soon as practice was over,” Self said. “It’s similar to an ankle or whatnot, there’s obviously a ligament that’s sprained or stretched and right now it’s too loose to put him out there, but these are injuries, I’ve been told, the healing process begins quickly.” The ninth-ranked Jayhawks (24-7) open the Big 12 Tournament, in Kansas City, on Thursday against Oklahoma State, and Self said his sophomore big man won’t be examined by doctors until Sunday.

PREVIOUSLY AWARDED Lipscomb (A-Sun) Radford (Big South) Michigan (Big Ten) Iona (MAAC) Loyola (MVC) Murray St. (OVC) UNC G’boro (SoCon) Wright St. (Horizon) LIU Brooklyn (Northeast) Charleston (Colonial) Gonzaga (West Coast) S. Dakota St. (Summit)

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Virginia (28-2) idle. Next: vs. Florida State or Louisville, Thursday. 2. Villanova (27-4) idle. Next: vs. Marquette or DePaul, Thursday. 3. Xavier (27-4) idle. Next: vs. Georgetown or St. John’s, Thursday. 4. Michigan State (29-4) idle. Next: TBA. 5. Duke (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech or Notre Dame, Thursday. 6. Gonzaga (30-4) beat BYU 74-54. Next: NCAA Tournament. 7. Michigan (28-7) idle. Next: NCAA Tournament. 8. Cincinnati (27-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn or SMU, Friday. 9. Kansas (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State or Oklahoma, Thursday. 10. Purdue (28-6) idle. Next: TBA. 11. Wichita State (24-6) idle. Next: vs. Temple or Tulane, Friday. 12. North Carolina (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Syracuse, Wednesday. 13. Tennessee (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi State or LSU, Friday. 14. Texas Tech (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Texas or Iowa State, Thursday. 15. Arizona (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Colorado or Arizona State, Thursday. 16. Auburn (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Texas A&M or Alabama, Friday. 17. Ohio State (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 18. West Virginia (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Baylor, Thursday. 19. Clemson (22-8) idle. Next: vs. N.C. State or Boston College, Thursday. 20. Saint Mary’s (28-5) idle. Next: TBA. 21. Houston (24-6) idle. Next: vs. UCF or East Carolina, Friday. 22. Nevada (26-6) idle. Next: vs. UNLV or Air Force, Thursday. 23. Florida (20-11) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas, South Carolina or Mississippi, Friday. 24. Miami (22-8) idle. Next: vs. North Carolina or Syracuse, Thursday. 25. Rhode Island (23-6) idle. Next: vs. VCU or Dayton, Friday.

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

COMMENTARY

Very hard to say who will come, go with Illini BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • I challenged Illini bas-

ketball fans Wednesday on Twitter to produce the 2018-19 men’s roster as it will look Sept. 1. A full roster of scholarship players. No walkons. I said something about a prize for anyone who could nail it precisely. I might have promised a dinner and some booze. I think it’s a safe gamble, because I’m not sure any of us could write out the Illini basketball roster as it will look one week from now. The thing is that fluid, with the program seemingly trapped in a period of additions and subtractions that might or might not give coach Brad Underwood a competitive group when next November rolls around. Here’s what we know for sure: Mark Alstork,a graduate transfer who arrived from Wright State, completed his final year of eligibility and will be gone. Mark Smith, the freshman from Edwardsville, said this week he intends to transfer and will be gone. Ayo Dosunmu, the high school senior at Chicago Morgan Park, has signed a letter of intent and plans to be on board this summer as an Illini freshman. And just last week Underwood received an oral commitment from 6-5 shooter Alan Griffin, who intends to join Ayo as a freshman next season. Two leaving. Two arriving. Oh, if only it were so simple. What we don’t know is what will happen with current Illini players Leron Black, Te’Jon Lucas, Matic Vesel or Michael Finke. We believe Kipper Nichols, Da’’Monte Williams and Greg Eboigbodin will be back and Aaron Jordan’s father bristled when it was suggested that his son would transfer, so for the time being let’s assume A.J. sticks around, too. Leron Black becomes the player that will make fans hold their breath. Unlike Mark Smith, who said he was not a good fit in Underwood’s system, Black was a splendid fit. He improved markedly and enjoyed by far the best season of his career. In fact, he improved so much and showed so much versatility that he has a chance to play professionally. Right now, forgoing his senior season. Black’s motivation to leave would be strictly financial. He’s getting married (remember his proposal immediately after the Braggin’ Rights victory?). He has no income and he could make pretty decent money in Europe, jump-starting his pro career without waiting. On the other hand, he could earn his master’s degree, be a part of a team that showcases him as the focal point of its offense and maybe improve his stock to a point where he’d get an NBA tryout. Illinois can replace Mark Smith. And will. But there is no replacement for Leron Black in the pipeline. Then there’s Te’Jon Lucas. Don’t know what he’ll do. But he’s a undersized guard without a jump shot and with Trent Frazier already locked into the starting lineup, with five-star Ayo arriving, with Da’Monte Williams improving and with Illinois pushing hard on guard Courtney Ramey from Webster Groves, Lucas may see his playing time shrinking. Regarding Michael Finke, his dad, Jeff Finke, tells me the family is definitely not relocating to Arizona, where younger son Tim Finke will play next season at Grand Canyon University. They’ll remain in Champaign and continue to run their real estate venture. But that doesn’t indicate what Michael will do and he could have the option of relocating as a fifth-year grad transfer. I hope he doesn’t leave because in addition to being a good kid with interesting hair,he’s 6-10, experienced and has already done the heavy lifting while learning the nuances of how Underwood plays. Vesel may simply be too thin to make a mark at this level. He played a few minutes late in the year when foul trouble demanded help. But no one should be shocked if he decided to try college hoops elsewhere. Those are all potential departures. But there is a long list of potential additions, as well. On campus this week are two players who, in theory, could be of great help. Tevian Jones, a four-star, 6-foot-6 wing player from Culver City, Calif., is visiting campus, as is a late discovery big man, 6-11 Samba Kane, who hails from Senegal but who is playing at a prep school in Florida. Jones is more ready to contribute now. Kane could help quickly as an interior defensive presence, something this program needs. But he’d be more of a project offensively. Illinois has an offer out to 6-10 Valdir Manuel from Elizabeth, N.J., as well as a couple of other offers to prep players out East. Courtney Ramey would be a huge get. A quick, play-making point guard, a backcourt pairing with Ramey, Frazier and Ayo, and the basketball would spray from player to player, just the way Underwood’s system demands. It’s too early to know who will be available in the grad transfer market, but one name already out there is Wyatt Walker, a 6-9, 240-pounder who is transferring from Samford. He had a terrific sophomore season, then missed most of last year with a knee injury. Assuming he is healthy, he’s attractive because he averaged nearly 10 rebounds a game and because he has two years of eligibility remaining. Illinois is also looking at Jordan Caroline of Nevada. The 6-7, 230-pounder is the grandson of Illini football great J.C. Caroline and the son of Illini pass rushing sensation, Simeon Rice. More transfers will come on the market as seasons end, coaches are fired and players make late decisions. However this shakes out, it’s an undeniably bumpy period of uncertainty. Black’s decision is the big one. Add Jones or Ramey and a big man and whatever else happens doesn’t sting quite as much. We’re just getting started.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SLU rested, ready for tourney Bess will lead Billikens in their opening game of the Atlantic 10 event BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If anyone on the St. Louis University roster knows the surprises that March can deliver, it’s Javon Bess, whose two seasons at Michigan State were proof of the unexpected. When he was a freshman, the Spartans were a No. 7 seed for the NCAA Tournament when they beat the Nos. 2, 3 and 4 seeds to reach the Final Four. His sophomore season, the Spartans were a No. 2 seed but became one of the biggest upset victims in tournament history when they lost to No. 15 Middle Tennessee State at Scottrade Center. “I’ve been on the good end and the bad end, so I know anything can happen,” Bess said. “My freshman year we weren’t supposed to go to the Final Four. It was supposed to be one of (Tom Izzo’s) worst teams.” SLU isn’t focused on a March miracle, but that’s what the Billikens would need to win the Atlantic 10 Tournament in Washington, where they will start Thursday night against No. 11 George Washington, which beat No. 14 Fordham 78-72 in a first-round game Wednesday. The Billikens actually have two players who have played beyond their conference tournaments. Graduate transfer Rashed Anthony participated in two NCAA Tournaments with Seton Hall. They also have players remaining from the last two A-10 tournaments, where they won one game each year. But it is Bess who can deliver the most wisdom with impact. It’s a role he has filled all season. “I’ve talked to him about making sure he relays his prior experiences to his teammates,” coach Travis Ford said. “He’s been through what it means to succeed this time of year, and that’s important.

SLU VS. GEORGE WASHINGTON

When • 7:30 p.m. Where • Capital One Arena, Washington, D.C. All-time series • George Washington leads 8-7 TV/radio • NBCSN; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU 16-15, 9-9 in Atlantic 10; George Washington 15-17, 7-11 About the Billikens • SLU won the regular-season meeting 62-53 at Chaifetz Arena by holding the Colonials to 34 percent shooting. ... The Billikens have won their first A-10 tournament game the last two years only to be eliminated by George Washington. ... Hasahn French was named to the A-10 all-rookie team and Javon Bess to the all-defensive team but SLU did not have an all-conference selection. ... Bess has averaged 16 points over the last three games. About the Colonials • Yuta Watanabe was named the A-10’s defensive player of the year. He led the team in blocked shots and was second in steals. ... The Colonials have won two of their 14 games away from their home floor. ... However, when they played Temple at Capital One Arena in December, they shot 60 percent and made 56 percent of their 3-pointers. ... GW has a 26-37 alltime record in the A-10 tournament and won the championship in 2005 and ‘07. — Stu Durando

I’m sure he will. He’s that type of guy.” Although Ford said he’s not focused on SLU’s small roster, he did build the week around rest and recuperation after SLU played the final three weeks of the regular season with essentially a six-man rotation. Players have been asked to take on even bigger loads than previously since the loss of Jordan Goodwin. Ford continues to stick with a six-man rotation, with Anthony picking up a few minutes each game. In the closing weeks of the season, the aches and pains accumulated to the point

that Ford was fully immersed in methods that would work best to get his players ready to play multiple games if needed. The Billikens were off Sunday after playing Saturday night. They went through a light workout Monday with a DJ playing music in the practice gym to keep the mood light. “Everyone goes into the postseason with a different mindset as to where they are at,” Ford said. “Our team needed a couple of days to get as healthy as possible and to have fresh legs so we could go into D.C. ready to go physically as well as mentally. “It’s a challenge for any team, no matter how many players you’re playing. I don’t think how many we play is going to become that big a factor. We have to figure out a way to get past the first game.” SLU enters the tournament as the No. 6 seed but was having to prepare for the possibility of facing either Fordham or George Washington, which won Wednesday. The Billikens beat George Washington 62-53 in St. Louis during the regular season. The Billikens lost their last two games and were unable to hold on to the fourth spot in the standings, which would have given them a double-bye and no game until Friday. They are guaranteed of a non-losing record for the first time since the 2013-14 season, and one win in the tournament would allow them to finish with a winning record. To do that, Ford wants his team focused on the handful of things that defined its best wins this season: defense and rebounding. It would also help if SLU can keep turnovers to a reasonable number and shoot free throws better. “No matter what happened before, when you head into postseason you need to focus on what makes your team great and have success,” he said. “You’ve hopefully learned from everything and use all of that to play to your identity.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

ROUNDUP

Bucknell romps to lock up NCAA bid NCAA AUTOMATIC BERTHS Awarded Wednesday Bucknell (Patriot) Saturday America East: 10 a.m., ESPN2 MEAC: noon, ESPN2 SWAC: 4, ESPN2 Mtn. West: 5, KMOV-4 Big 12: 5, ESPN Big East: 5:30, KTVI-2 MAC: 6, ESPN2 Big Sky: 7, ESPNU ACC: 7:30, ESPN C-USA: 7:30, CBSSN Southland: 8, ESPN2 Pac-12: 9, FS1 WAC: 9, ESPNU Big West: 11, ESPN2 Sunday Ivy: 11 a.m., ESPN2 A-10: noon, KMOV-4 SEC: noon, ESPN Sun Belt: 1, ESPN2 American: 2:30, KMOV-4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucknell’s Nana Foulland dunks in the second half for two of his 12 points against Colgate during the Patriot League championship game in Lewisburg, Pa. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stephen Brown scored 22 points and reserve Nate Sestina added 16 as Bucknell won its second straight Patriot League Tournament championship with an 8354 victory over Colgate on Wednesday night at home in Lewisburg, Pa. The top-seeded Bison (25-9) head to the NCAA Tournament for the eighth time in program history and sixth time as the Patriot League representative. Four of those six titles have come in the last eight years. The second-seeded Raiders (19-13) lost to Bucknell for the third time this season. Colgate was playing in the league championship game for the first time in 10 years and gunning for its first league championship since 1996. The Bison finish the year with a 15-1 record at home. They have won 18 of 19 entering the NCAA Tournament. Brown, who made five 3-pointers, was named tournament MVP. Bucknell shot 46 percent from beyond the arc (13-for28). Will Rayman, Colgate’s leading scorer coming in and a second-team all-Patriot League pick, scored 17 points. Jordan Burns added 12 for the Raiders. Nana Foulland had 12 points for the Bison.

ATLANTIC 10 TOURNAMENT

George Washington advances • Jair Bolden scored 22 points and George Washington beat Fordham 78-72 in the first round of the Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament in Washington. No. 11 seed George Washington advances to the second round to meet sixth-seeded St. Louis University Louis on Thursday night. Bo Zeigler added 16 points and seven rebounds for the Colonials (15-17). Joseph Chartouny led No. 14 seed Fordham (9-22) with 18 points, eight assists and four steals. Prokop Slanina and Ivan Raut added 15 points apiece. UMass edges La Salle • C.J. Anderson scored 21 points and Massachusetts held off La Salle 69-67 in the first round of the Atlantic 10 tournament. No. 13 seed UMass (13-19) will face

fifth-seeded George Mason (15-16) in a Thursday quarterfinal. Tony Washington scored 20 points to lead No. 12 seed La Salle (13-19).

BIG 12 TOURNAMENT

Oklahoma State beats OU • Cameron McGriff scored 18 points, Jeffrey Carroll added 13 points and 13 rebounds, and Oklahoma State pulled away from Oklahoma after squandering most of a 16-point lead for a 71-60 victory in the opening round of the Big 12 Tournament in Kansas City, MO. Kendall Smith had 11 points for the eighth-seeded Cowboys (19-13) to set up a quarterfinal matchup with No. 1 seed Kansas. Oklahoma State swept the ninthranked Jayhawks during the regular season. Trae Young had 22 points on 7-for-21 shooting to lead the Sooners (18-13). Texas advances • Dylan Osetkowski scored 20 points, Matt Coleman knocked down a crucial jumper in the final minute and Texas beat Iowa State 68-64 in the opening round of the Big 12 Tournament. Jase Febres added 12 points and Jericho Sims pulled down 15 rebounds for the No. 7 seed Longhorns (19-13), who advanced to play second-seeded Texas Tech in Thursday’s quarterfinals. Freshman Lindell Wigginton scored 20 points and had eight rebounds for Iowa State (13-18), but he also committed nine turnovers against two assists. Kansas loses Azubuike • Kansas forward Udoka Azubuike suffered sprained left knee during a scrimmage this week and has been ruled out of the Big 12 Tournament, with his availability for the NCAA Tournament in question. Azubuike, who is averaging 13.7 points and 7.1 rebounds, missed most of last season because of a wrist injury. Jayhawks coach Bill Self said after a scrimmage Wednesday that Azubuike sprained his medial collateral ligament near the end of Tuesday’s practice. Azubuike was going for a rebound and a collision occurred under the basket, leaving the 7-footer with a “Grade 1” sprain.

PREVIOUSLY AWARDED Lipscomb (A-Sun) Radford (Big South) Michigan (Big Ten) Iona (MAAC) Loyola (MVC) Murray St. (OVC) UNC G’boro (SoCon) Wright St. (Horizon) LIU Brooklyn (Northeast) Charleston (Colonial) Gonzaga (West Coast) S. Dakota St. (Summit)

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Virginia (28-2) idle. Next: vs. Louisville, Thursday. 2. Villanova (27-4) idle. Next: vs. Marquette, Thursday. 3. Xavier (27-4) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Thursday. 4. Michigan State (29-4) idle. Next: TBA. 5. Duke (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Notre Dame, Thursday. 6. Gonzaga (30-4) idle. Next: NCAA Tournament. 7. Michigan (28-7) idle. Next: NCAA Tournament. 8. Cincinnati (27-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn or SMU, Friday. 9. Kansas (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Thursday. 10. Purdue (28-6) idle. Next: TBA. 11. Wichita State (24-6) idle. Next: vs. Temple or Tulane, Friday. 12. North Carolina (23-9) beat Syracuse 78-59. Next: vs. No. 24 Miami, Thursday. 13. Tennessee (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi State or LSU, Friday. 14. Texas Tech (23-8) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Thursday. 15. Arizona (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Colorado, Thursday. 16. Auburn (25-6) idle. Next: vs. Texas A&M or Alabama, Friday. 17. Ohio State (24-8) idle. Next: TBA. 18. West Virginia (22-9) idle. Next: vs. Baylor, Thursday. 19. Clemson (22-8) idle. Next: vs. Boston College, Thursday. 20. Saint Mary’s (28-5) idle. Next: TBA. 21. Houston (24-6) idle. Next: vs. UCF or East Carolina, Friday. 22. Nevada (26-6) idle. Next: vs. UNLV, Thursday. 23. Florida (20-11) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas, South Carolina or Mississippi, Friday. 24. Miami (22-8) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 North Carolina, Thursday. 25. Rhode Island (23-6) idle. Next: vs. VCU or Dayton, Friday.

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

COMMENTARY

Very hard to say who will come, go with Illini BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • I challenged Illini bas-

ketball fans Wednesday on Twitter to produce the 2018-19 men’s roster as it will look Sept. 1. A full roster of scholarship players. No walkons. I said something about a prize for anyone who could nail it precisely. I might have promised a dinner and some booze. I think it’s a safe gamble, because I’m not sure any of us could write out the Illini basketball roster as it will look one week from now. The thing is that fluid, with the program seemingly trapped in a period of additions and subtractions that might or might not give coach Brad Underwood a competitive group when next November rolls around. Here’s what we know for sure: Mark Alstork,a graduate transfer who arrived from Wright State, completed his final year of eligibility and will be gone. Mark Smith, the freshman from Edwardsville, said this week he intends to transfer and will be gone. Ayo Dosunmu, the high school senior at Chicago Morgan Park, has signed a letter of intent and plans to be on board this summer as an Illini freshman. And just last week Underwood received an oral commitment from 6-5 shooter Alan Griffin, who intends to join Ayo as a freshman next season. Two leaving. Two arriving. Oh, if only it were so simple. What we don’t know is what will happen with current Illini players Leron Black, Te’Jon Lucas, Matic Vesel or Michael Finke. We believe Kipper Nichols, Da’’Monte Williams and Greg Eboigbodin will be back and Aaron Jordan’s father bristled when it was suggested that his son would transfer, so for the time being let’s assume A.J. sticks around, too. Leron Black becomes the player that will make fans hold their breath. Unlike Mark Smith, who said he was not a good fit in Underwood’s system, Black was a splendid fit. He improved markedly and enjoyed by far the best season of his career. In fact, he improved so much and showed so much versatility that he has a chance to play professionally. Right now, forgoing his senior season. Black’s motivation to leave would be strictly financial. He’s getting married (remember his proposal immediately after the Braggin’ Rights victory?). He has no income and he could make pretty decent money in Europe, jump-starting his pro career without waiting. On the other hand, he could earn his master’s degree, be a part of a team that showcases him as the focal point of its offense and maybe improve his stock to a point where he’d get an NBA tryout. Illinois can replace Mark Smith. And will. But there is no replacement for Leron Black in the pipeline. Then there’s Te’Jon Lucas. Don’t know what he’ll do. But he’s a undersized guard without a jump shot and with Trent Frazier already locked into the starting lineup, with five-star Ayo arriving, with Da’Monte Williams improving and with Illinois pushing hard on guard Courtney Ramey from Webster Groves, Lucas may see his playing time shrinking. Regarding Michael Finke, his dad, Jeff Finke, tells me the family is definitely not relocating to Arizona, where younger son Tim Finke will play next season at Grand Canyon University. They’ll remain in Champaign and continue to run their real estate venture. But that doesn’t indicate what Michael will do and he could have the option of relocating as a fifth-year grad transfer. I hope he doesn’t leave because in addition to being a good kid with interesting hair,he’s 6-10, experienced and has already done the heavy lifting while learning the nuances of how Underwood plays. Vesel may simply be too thin to make a mark at this level. He played a few minutes late in the year when foul trouble demanded help. But no one should be shocked if he decided to try college hoops elsewhere. Those are all potential departures. But there is a long list of potential additions, as well. On campus this week are two players who, in theory, could be of great help. Tevian Jones, a four-star, 6-foot-6 wing player from Culver City, Calif., is visiting campus, as is a late discovery big man, 6-11 Samba Kane, who hails from Senegal but who is playing at a prep school in Florida. Jones is more ready to contribute now. Kane could help quickly as an interior defensive presence, something this program needs. But he’d be more of a project offensively. Illinois has an offer out to 6-10 Valdir Manuel from Elizabeth, N.J., as well as a couple of other offers to prep players out East. Courtney Ramey would be a huge get. A quick, play-making point guard, a backcourt pairing with Ramey, Frazier and Ayo, and the basketball would spray from player to player, just the way Underwood’s system demands. It’s too early to know who will be available in the grad transfer market, but one name already out there is Wyatt Walker, a 6-9, 240-pounder who is transferring from Samford. He had a terrific sophomore season, then missed most of last year with a knee injury. Assuming he is healthy, he’s attractive because he averaged nearly 10 rebounds a game and because he has two years of eligibility remaining. Illinois is also looking at Jordan Caroline of Nevada. The 6-7, 230-pounder is the grandson of Illini football great J.C. Caroline and the son of Illini pass rushing sensation, Simeon Rice. More transfers will come on the market as seasons end, coaches are fired and players make late decisions. However this shakes out, it’s an undeniably bumpy period of uncertainty. Black’s decision is the big one. Add Jones or Ramey and a big man and whatever else happens doesn’t sting quite as much. We’re just getting started.


SPORTS

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1 NHL STANDINGS

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B9

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L Tampa Bay 67 46 17 64 41 15 Boston Toronto 68 39 22 Florida 64 32 25 Detroit 66 26 29 Montreal 66 25 30 Ottawa 65 23 32 Buffalo 67 21 35 Metropolitan GP W L Pittsburgh 68 39 25 Washington 66 37 22 Philadelphia 67 34 22 New Jersey 67 34 25 Columbus 67 34 28 Carolina 67 29 27 NY Islanders 67 29 29 NY Rangers 67 30 31

OT 4 8 7 7 11 11 10 11 OT 4 7 11 8 5 11 9 6

Pts 96 90 85 71 63 61 56 53 Pts 82 81 79 76 73 69 67 66

GF 245 215 223 193 175 171 177 160 GF 224 203 199 199 180 178 216 189

GA 186 163 195 204 199 206 227 219 GA 205 197 198 203 187 204 241 212

Home 23-6-2 23-7-4 22-8-2 19-9-3 13-13-8 16-10-8 14-13-5 10-19-4 Home 25-8-1 23-9-2 16-11-6 18-13-3 20-11-2 16-12-6 16-12-4 18-13-4

Away Div 23-11-2 14-5-2 18-8-4 14-4-2 17-14-5 11-6-3 13-16-4 10-5-2 13-16-3 6-13-4 9-20-3 10-6-4 9-19-5 6-11-3 11-16-7 9-7-3 Away Div 14-17-3 15-6-0 14-13-5 11-6-3 18-11-5 9-6-5 16-12-5 12-9-1 14-17-3 12-10-3 13-15-5 8-8-5 13-17-5 10-9-2 12-18-2 7-8-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L Nashville 66 43 14 Winnipeg 66 40 17 Minnesota 67 38 22 Dallas 67 37 24 Colorado 66 35 24 66 35 26 Blues Chicago 67 29 30 Pacific GP W L Vegas 66 42 19 Anaheim 67 34 21 San Jose 66 35 22 Los Angeles 66 36 25 68 33 25 Calgary Edmonton 66 28 34 Vancouver 66 25 32 Arizona 65 20 34

OT 9 9 7 6 7 5 8 OT 5 12 9 5 10 4 9 11

Pts 95 89 83 80 77 75 66 Pts 89 80 79 77 76 60 59 51

GF 216 223 210 195 206 180 190 GF 226 190 196 192 193 187 180 158

GA 168 175 192 176 195 176 196 GA 184 183 184 165 200 219 217 213

Home 23-7-3 24-7-2 24-5-6 23-10-3 23-8-2 20-14-0 16-14-3 Home 24-7-2 19-9-5 19-10-3 16-12-3 14-15-4 14-17-2 12-15-6 12-18-4

Away Div 20-7-6 15-4-2 16-10-7 11-7-2 14-17-1 11-10-0 14-14-3 11-12-0 12-16-5 8-9-3 15-12-5 9-9-3 13-16-5 7-9-2 Away Div 18-12-3 16-3-2 15-12-7 10-6-7 16-12-6 16-4-3 20-13-2 10-10-3 19-10-6 9-7-3 14-17-2 13-8-0 13-17-3 6-11-1 8-16-7 4-10-6

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Wednesday Calgary 5, Buffalo 1 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 2 Arizona at Vancouver, late Tuesday Winnipeg 3, NY Rangers 0 Columbus 4, Vegas 1 New Jersey 6, Montreal 4 Boston 6, Detroit 5, OT Tampa Bay 5, Florida 4, OT Minnesota 6, Carolina 2 Nashville 2, Dallas 0 Chicago 2, Colorado 1, OT Anaheim 4, Washington 0 Thursday Colorado at Columbus, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at N. Jersey, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Montreal at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Vegas at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. NY Rangers at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Nashville, 7 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Washington at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Detroit at Columbus, 6 p.m. Calgary at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Saturday Winnipeg at Philadelphia, noon Montreal at T. Bay, noon Vegas at Buffalo, noon Chicago at Boston, noon Arizona at Colorado, 2 p.m. Washington at San Jose, 3 p.m. Blues at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. NY Rangers at Florida, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Toronto, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m.

Flames snap losing skid with win against Sabres

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Chicago

W 47 45 35 24 20 W 37 34 28 20 20 W 37 37 34 29 22

L 17 20 28 41 45 L 28 31 37 44 45 L 26 28 31 36 42

Pct .734 .692 .556 .369 .308 Pct .569 .523 .431 .313 .308 Pct .587 .569 .523 .446 .344

GB — 2½ 11½ 23½ 27½ GB — 3 9 16½ 17 GB — 1 4 9 15½

L10 9-1 6-4 7-3 1-9 1-9 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 2-8 3-7

Str W-6 W-1 W-1 L-5 L-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-4 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-1 L-2 L-4 W-1

Home 27-5 23-11 20-10 16-14 12-21 Home 19-14 18-13 18-16 13-18 15-19 Home 22-11 22-12 20-14 20-14 15-18

Away 20-12 22-9 15-18 8-27 8-24 Away 18-14 16-18 10-21 7-26 5-26 Away 15-15 15-16 14-17 9-22 7-24

Conf 31-8 29-13 21-16 12-25 13-24 Conf 24-17 23-18 17-22 12-28 9-32 Conf 27-14 27-16 21-21 18-26 17-21

L10 10-0 9-1 3-7 3-7 0-10 L10 9-1 4-6 6-4 6-4 8-2 L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 3-7 1-9

Str W-17 W-9 W-1 W-1 L-15 Str W-8 L-2 L-2 L-1 W-4 Str W-6 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-3

Home 25-6 17-12 23-8 13-21 13-20 Home 21-11 25-7 21-11 24-9 21-11 Home 25-7 18-14 15-15 10-21 9-24

Away 26-7 20-14 14-19 7-24 5-26 Away 18-15 13-21 16-18 11-20 14-19 Away 25-7 16-15 13-20 10-23 10-23

Conf 31-8 19-19 21-17 11-32 15-25 Conf 24-15 28-13 21-20 22-21 22-16 Conf 27-11 22-19 14-25 10-30 13-29

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston New Orleans San Antonio Dallas Memphis Northwest Portland Minnesota Oklahoma City Denver Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 51 37 37 20 18 W 39 38 37 35 35 W 50 34 28 20 19

L 13 26 27 45 46 L 26 28 29 29 30 L 14 29 35 44 47

Pct .797 .587 .578 .308 .281 Pct .600 .576 .561 .547 .538 Pct .781 .540 .444 .313 .288

GB — 13½ 14 31½ 33 GB — 1½ 2½ 3½ 4 GB — 15½ 21½ 30 32

NBA SUMMARIES Jazz 104, Pacers 84 Utah: Ingles 4-8 1-2 11, Favors 3-6 0-0 7, Gobert 10-14 3-4 23, Rubio 8-18 1-2 18, Mitchell 6-15 4-5 20, Crowder 7-13 0-0 16, O’Neale 1-2 2-3 4, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 5, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0, Bradley 0-0 0-0 0, Neto 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-80 11-16 104. Indiana: Bogdanovic 4-10 5-6 13, T.Young 3-9 1-1 7, Turner 10-14 3-4 24, Joseph 4-11 3-4 12, Oladipo 6-19 1-2 13, Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2, Booker 1-2 0-0 2, Leaf 0-1 0-0 0, Poythress 1-2 0-0 3, Sabonis 4-10 0-0 8, J.Young 0-3 0-0 0, Stephenson 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 34-88 13-17 84. Utah 32 22 25 25 — 104 Indiana 20 24 25 15 — 84 3-point goals: Utah 11-31 (Mitchell 4-10, Ingles 2-5, Crowder 2-6, Jerebko 1-3, Favors 1-3, Rubio 1-4), Indiana 3-23 (Poythress 1-2, Joseph 1-3, Turner 1-4, Leaf 0-1, J.Young 0-1, Stephenson 0-2, Oladipo 0-3, T.Young 0-3, Bogdanovic 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 42 (Gobert 14), Indiana 45 (Sabonis 9). Assists: Utah 30 (Ingles 10), Indiana 12 (Oladipo 7). Total fouls: Utah 18, Indiana 17. Technicals: Gobert, Stephenson. A: 16,432 (18,500).

Wednesday Utah 104, Indiana 84 Chicago 119, Memphis 110 Houston 110, Milwaukee 99 Toronto 121, Detroit 119, OT New Orleans at Sacramento, late Cleveland at Denver, late Orlando at LA Lakers, late Tuesday Philadelphia 128, Charlotte 114 Toronto 106, Atlanta 90 Washington 117, Miami 113, OT Houston 122, Oklahoma City 112 Dallas 118, Denver 107 Portland 111, New York 87 Golden State 114, Brooklyn 101 New Orleans 121, LA Clippers 116 Thursday Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Atlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 6 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 7 p.m. Washington at New Orleans, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Cleveland at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Washington at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Rockets win 17th in a row with big effort in Milwaukee

Bulls 119, Grizzlies 110

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sabres goalie Robin Lehner makes a save on Flames forward Matt Stajan during the second period Wednesdya night in Buffalo, N.Y. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sam Bennett and Mark Jankowski scored three minutes apart in the first period and the Calgary Flames snapped a four-game skid with a 5-1 win over the host Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday night. Calgary improved to 1-3-1 in its last five games to gain ground in the tightly contested Western Conference playoff race. With 76 points, the Flames jumped into 10th place, a point ahead of the idle Blues, and within one of Los Angeles and Colorado. Mark Giordano also had a goal and assist, while Sean Monahan and Dougie Hamilton also scored. Rookie David Rittich stopped 25 shots before having his first career shutout bid spoiled when Casey Nelson scored with 18 seconds remaining.

NOTEBOOK

Backes suspended three games • Boston Bruins forward David Backes has been suspended for three games for a shoulder to the head of Detroit’s Frans Nielsen. The decision was announced by the league Wednesday, a day after Backes knocked Nielsen from Boston’s 6-5 overtime victory. Nielsen had already unloaded the puck when Backes drove his shoulder into the Red Wings forward, who fell to the ice, left the game and did not return. The suspension without pay will cost Backes $96,774. Crosby at top in player poll • Pittsburgh Penguins captain Sidney Crosby is the most admired and appreciated player in the NHL, judging from the 2017-18 NHLPA Player Poll. A survey of more than 500 players resulted in Crosby being voted the most difficult to play against, best role model, best team player, the player you’d want to

win one game, and the player who would be a great coach upon retirement. Crosby finished second to Connor McDavid for which player to start a franchise with, and to Wayne Gretzky to the question of picking anyone all-time as a teammate. Players were asked more than 20 questions, with the NHL Players’ Association choosing which to publish. This is in addition to regular conversations with players on topics of importance that include feedback kept internally at the NHLPA. Among the most interesting responses was that 77.3 percent of players are fine with the way points are decided: two for any win and one for an overtime or shootout loss. But several suggested the international point system of three for a win in regulation, two for a win in overtime or a shootout, and one for an overtime or shootout loss. The Montreal Canadiens’ Bell Centre was voted the best rink to play in and the home of the best ice, while the Florida Panthers’ BB&T Center has the worst ice, according to players surveyed. Joel Quenneville of the Chicago Blackhawks, who like Crosby has won the Stanley Cup three times, was voted the coach players would most like to play for. McDavid not surprisingly was voted the fastest skater, and Washington Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom was voted the most underrated player. Francis out as Hurricanes GM • Hall of Fame player Ron Francis is out as general manager of the Carolina Hurricanes after four years but will remain with the team in another front-office position, new owner Tom Dundon said Wednesday night. Dundon says the team will begin a search for a new GM who will report directly to the new owner, while Francis will move into a new role as the team’s president of hockey operations.

NHL SUMMARIES Flames 5, Sabres 1

Penguins 5, Flyers 2

LATE TUESDAY

Calgary 2 3 0 — 5 Buffalo 0 — 0 1 1 First period: 1, Calgary, Bennett 10 (Hamonic, Jankowski), 5:35. 2, Calgary, Jankowski 12 (Brodie, Bennett), 8:35. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Calgary, Giordano 12 (Ferland), 5:00. 4, Calgary, Monahan 30 (Gaudreau, Brodie), 6:01. 5, Calgary, Hamilton 15 (Gaudreau, Giordano), 18:39 (pp). Penalties: Hamilton, CGY, (high sticking), 2:21; Backlund, CGY, (delay of game), 6:38; Lazar, CGY, (roughing), 15:20; Lazar, CGY, served by Tkachuk, (roughing), 15:20; Baptiste, BUF, (roughing), 15:20; Lehner, BUF, served by Nolan, (roughing), 17:50. Third period: 6, Buffalo, Nelson 2 (Wilson, Pominville), 19:42. Penalties: Josefson, BUF, (slashing), 9:04. Shots: Calgary 17-14-10: 41. Buffalo 6-11-9: 26. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 3. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 7-5-3 (26 shots-25 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 7-11-3 (22-18), Lehner 13-24-8 (19-18). A: 17,773. Referees: Dave Jackson, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Scott Cherrey.

Pittsburgh 1 3 1 — 5 Philadelphia 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Kessel 28 (Crosby, Malkin), 18:35 (pp). Penalties: Lehtera, PHI, (holding), 4:14; Hagg, PHI, (boarding), 8:28; Kessel, PIT, (tripping), 9:39; MacDonald, PHI, (interference), 12:29; Schultz, PIT, (high sticking), 14:01; Lindblom, PHI, (high sticking), 17:46. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Voracek 15 (Patrick), 2:07. 3, Philadelphia, Konecny 18 (MacDonald, Giroux), 5:59. 4, Pittsburgh, Oleksiak 4 (Schultz, Guentzel), 9:24. 5, Pittsburgh, Sheary 13 (Crosby, Oleksiak), 14:25. 6, Pittsburgh, Sheary 14 (Crosby, Guentzel), 19:20. Penalties: Sheahan, PIT, (interference), 11:29; Oleksiak, PIT, (tripping), 16:33. Third period: 7, Pittsburgh, Malkin 38 (Hagelin, Sheahan), 18:19. Penalties: Malkin, PIT, (tripping), 11:03. Shots: Pittsburgh 11-10-7: 28. Philadelphia 8-11-9: 28. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 4; Philadelphia 0 of 5. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Jarry 12-5-2 (28 shots-26 saves). Philadelphia, Mrazek 11-9-4 (27-23).

Washington 0 0 0 — 0 Anaheim 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Anaheim, Henrique 20 (Rakell, Getzlaf), 1:24 (pp). 2, Anaheim, Lindholm 10 (Manson, Silfverberg), 13:15. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (interference), 0:36; Bieksa, ANA, (interference), 5:04; Ritchie, ANA, (slashing), 17:24. Second period: 3, Anaheim, Rakell 28 (Getzlaf, Manson), 5:37. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (cross checking), 7:05; Perry, ANA, (roughing), 7:05. Third period: 4, Anaheim, Ritchie 6 (Bieksa, Henrique), 18:34. Penalties: Getzlaf, ANA, (hooking), 1:41. Shots: Washington 7-14-15: 36. Anaheim 7-7-4: 18. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 3; Anaheim 1 of 1. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 29-15-4 (9 shots-6 saves), Grubauer 8-7-3 (8-8). Anaheim, Gibson 25-15-6 (36-36). A: 15,910. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Kiel Murchison.

Ducks 4, Capitals 0

Memphis: Brooks 10-18 4-4 29, Green 5-6 1-2 11, Gasol 4-11 8-10 17, Simmons 5-10 1-1 11, McLemore 5-11 4-5 17, Henry 2-6 1-1 5, Rabb 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 2-2 0-0 4, Rathan-Mayes 4-12 1-2 9, Selden 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 40-82 20-25 110. Chicago: Holiday 5-5 0-0 14, Markkanen 8-14 4-4 22, Portis 6-12 2-2 15, Dunn 6-11 8-10 21, LaVine 8-14 4-6 21, Valentine 0-8 1-1 1, Vonleh 3-5 1-2 9, Felicio 0-0 1-2 1, Payne 3-6 1-2 7, Nwaba 3-4 2-3 8. Totals 42-79 24-32 119. 22 29 24 35 — 110 Memphis Chicago 30 34 26 29 — 119 3-point goals: Memphis 10-29 (Brooks 5-9, McLemore 3-7, Selden 1-2, Gasol 1-4, Simmons 0-1, Henry 0-2, Rathan-Mayes 0-4), Chicago 11-29 (Holiday 4-4, Vonleh 2-3, Markkanen 2-6, Dunn 1-3, Portis 1-4, LaVine 1-4, Payne 0-1, Valentine 0-4). Fouled out: Simmons. Rebounds: Memphis 33 (Green 8), Chicago 41 (Portis 10). Assists: Memphis 24 (Rathan-Mayes, Gasol 7), Chicago 25 (Dunn 9). Total fouls: Memphis 26, Chicago 22. Technicals: Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second), Chicago coach Bulls (Defensive three second). A: 20,210 (20,917).

Rockets 110, Bucks 99 Houston: Ariza 4-9 1-1 9, Tucker 3-3 0-0 9, Capela 4-7 2-10 10, Harden 8-20 7-7 26, Paul 5-12 5-5 16, Black 2-3 0-0 4, Mbah a Moute 4-6 1-2 11, Gordon 6-12 2-2 18, Green 3-10 0-0 7. Totals 39-82 18-27 110. Milwaukee: Middleton 6-13 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 12-20 6-9 30, Henson 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 4-11 5-6 15, Snell 1-4 0-0 3, Parker 5-12 0-0 10, Terry 1-6 0-0 2, S.Brown 6-12 0-0 15. Totals 38-83 14-19 99. 34 23 — 110 24 29 Houston Milwaukee 22 24 30 23 — 99 3-point goals: Houston 14-40 (Gordon 4-8, Tucker 3-3, Harden 3-10, Mbah a Moute 2-4, Green 1-5, Paul 1-6, Ariza 0-4), Milwaukee 9-28 (S.Brown 3-6, Middleton 3-7, Bledsoe 2-6, Snell 1-4, Parker 0-1, Terry 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 47 (Capela 8), Milwaukee 38 (Middleton 12). Assists: Houston 22 (Paul 11), Milwaukee 21 (Middleton, Terry 5). Total fouls: Houston 21, Milwaukee 22. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second). A: 17,195 (18,717).

Raptors 121, Pistons 119 Toronto: Powell 7-12 0-0 17, Ibaka 2-8 0-0 4, Valanciunas 6-13 1-1 14, Lowry 4-8 4-5 15, DeRozan 16-28 8-8 42, Miles 2-8 2-2 8, Miller 1-2 0-0 2, Siakam 3-5 1-1 8, Poeltl 2-5 0-0 4, Nogueira 0-0 1-2 1, Wright 0-1 0-0 0, VanVleet 2-10 2-2 6. Totals 45-100 19-21 121. Detroit: Kennard 3-8 1-2 9, Griffin 12-21 4-8 31, Drummond 5-14 0-0 10, Smith 6-10 0-0 14, Bullock 7-13 4-4 21, Ennis III 4-6 6-6 14, Moreland 3-4 0-0 6, Tolliver 2-4 1-1 7, Buycks 2-9 2-2 7. Totals 44-89 18-23 119. 27 18 40 29 7 — 121 Toronto Detroit 23 36 25 30 5 — 119 3-point goals: Toronto 12-40 (Powell 3-5, Lowry 3-7, DeRozan 2-6, Miles 2-7, Siakam 1-2, Valanciunas 1-4, Miller 0-1, Ibaka 0-4, VanVleet 0-4), Detroit 13-26 (Bullock 3-6, Griffin 3-6, Smith 2-2, Kennard 2-3, Tolliver 2-4, Buycks 1-3, Ennis III 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 47 (Valanciunas 11), Detroit 50 (Drummond 21). Assists: Toronto 33 (Lowry 15), Detroit 27 (Smith 7). Total fouls: Toronto 20, Detroit 23. Technicals: Ibaka, Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second). Ejected: Ibaka. A: 17,769 (21,000).

LATE TUESDAY

Pelicans 121, Clippers 116

New Orleans: Moore 4-8 2-3 10, Davis 17-31 3-3 41, Okafor 4-6 1-2 9, Rondo 5-10 0-0 13, Holiday 7-22 3-3 19, Miller 2-5 0-0 5, Mirotic 4-12 2-2 13, Diallo 1-2 0-0 2, Clark 2-7 5-5 9. Totals 46-103 16-18 121. L.A. Clippers: Harris 11-24 2-2 27, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Jordan 4-9 2-3 10, Rivers 5-14 0-0 11, Teodosic 4-9 0-0 9, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Harrell 11-17 4-6 26, Kilpatrick 1-2 0-0 2, L.Williams 9-20 7-13 27, Thornwell 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 46-98 17-26 116. New Orleans 35 32 30 24 — 121 L.A. Clippers 27 25 30 34 — 116 3-point goals: New Orleans 13-30 (Davis 4-7, Rondo 3-5, Mirotic 3-9, Holiday 2-3, Miller 1-3, Moore 0-1, Clark 0-2), L.A. Clippers 7-27 (Harris 3-10, L.Williams 2-7, Rivers 1-4, Teodosic 1-5, Harrell 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 51 (Davis 13), L.A. Clippers 57 (Jordan 20). Assists: New Orleans 39 (Holiday 17), L.A. Clippers 25 (L.Williams 11). Total fouls: New Orleans 20, L.A. Clippers 18. Technicals: Rivers. A: 16,412 (19,060).

Warriors 114, Nets 101 Brooklyn: Crabbe 3-10 3-3 9, Carroll 7-19 3-4 19, Allen 3-4 0-0 6, Dinwiddie 4-7 3-3 13, Russell 8-14 1-2 20, Hollis-Jefferson 2-9 5-6 9, Cunningham 3-4 0-0 7, Acy 1-2 0-0 2, Harris 1-5 4-5 6, LeVert 4-11 1-2 10. Totals 36-85 20-25 101. Golden State: Durant 7-16 3-4 19, Green 7-10 1-1 16, McGee 6-7 0-0 12, Curry 12-20 4-5 34, Thompson 8-15 0-0 18, Looney 0-2 0-0 0, Bell 2-2 1-1 5, Cook 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 2-5 0-0 4, Iguodala 3-4 0-0 6, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 47-83 9-11 114. Brooklyn 19 34 27 21 — 101 Golden State 35 13 38 28 — 114 3-point goals: Brooklyn 9-34 (Russell 3-6, Dinwiddie 2-4, Carroll 2-10, Cunningham 1-1, LeVert 1-5, Acy 0-1, Harris 0-2, Crabbe 0-5), Golden State 11-23 (Curry 6-12, Durant 2-2, Thompson 2-5, Green 1-2, Cook 0-1, Young 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 38 (Carroll 7), Golden State 41 (Curry, Iguodala, Durant 6). Assists: Brooklyn 24 (Russell 8), Golden State 30 (Green 9). Total fouls: Brooklyn 18, Golden State 18. Technicals: Golden State coach Warriors (Defensive three second). A: 19,596 (19,596).

Trail Blazers 111, Knicks 87 New York: Hardaway Jr. 8-18 0-0 19, Thomas 2-2 0-0 6, Kanter 6-9 6-6 18, Ntilikina 2-7 2-2 6, Mudiay 1-9 1-1 3, Williams 3-5 1-2 8, Hicks 0-1 0-0 0, Beasley 8-13 0-0 16, Kornet 1-2 0-0 3, O’Quinn 1-3 0-0 2, Burke 2-12 0-4 4, Dotson 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-83 10-15 87. Portland: Turner 3-7 2-2 8, Aminu 2-3 0-0 6, Nurkic 5-8 1-1 11, Lillard 10-18 9-11 37, McCollum 7-18 0-0 19, Layman 0-1 0-0 0, Swanigan 1-1 0-0 2, Davis 1-5 0-0 2, Collins 1-7 2-2 5, Napier 2-5 6-6 12, Connaughton 3-8 0-0 8, Baldwin IV 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 35-81 21-24 111. 19 16 87 28 24 — New York Portland 35 22 30 24 — 111 3-point goals: New York 7-19 (Hardaway Jr. 3-6, Thomas 2-2, Williams 1-2, Kornet 1-2, Beasley 0-1, Ntilikina 0-1, Mudiay 0-2, Burke 0-3), Portland 20-33 (Lillard 8-11, McCollum 5-7, Aminu 2-2, Napier 2-3, Connaughton 2-6, Collins 1-3, Turner 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 39 (Kanter 11), Portland 51 (Davis 14). Assists: New York 21 (Burke 7), Portland 22 (Napier, Nurkic, Turner, McCollum 4). Total fouls: New York 19, Portland 15. A: 19,393 (19,393).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rockets’ Luc Mbah a Moute (left) shoots past the Bucks’ Jabari Parker during the first half Wednesday night game in Milwaukee. The Rockets won 110-99. ASSOCIATED PRESS

James Harden scored 26 points, Eric Gordon had 18 points and two momentum-swinging 3-pointers in the third quarter, and the Houston Rockets beat the host Milwaukee Bucks 110-99 on Wednesday night for their 17th straight win. The Rockets passed the Boston Celtics for the longest winning streak in the NBA this season. Houston hasn’t lost since Jan. 26 at New Orleans. The latest victory came on the second of a tough back-to-back stretch of road games that started with a 10-point victory at Oklahoma City. Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 30 points for the Bucks. Khris Middleton added 18 points, while Sterling Brown had 15. Chris Paul added 16 points and 11 assists for Houston.

NOTEBOOK

Leonard hopes to return soon • San Antonio star Kawhi Leonard plans on returning “soon” from a leg injury, after missing all but nine games so far this season. Leonard held an impromptu, four-minute press conference Wednesday following Spurs practice. He won’t travel with the team on their upcoming three-game road trip to Golden State, Oklahoma City and Houston. But the 26-year-old Leonard says his return is imminent. “Soon. I don’t have a set date right now,” he said. “But I’ve just got to keep doing what I’m doing. The progress that I’m making has been great.” NBA reviews allegations against Cuban • The NBA said it is reviewing 2011 allegations of sexual assault against Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and the decision by prosecutors not to pursue the case. League spokesman Mike Bass said Wednesday the NBA was looking into the matter after a weekly alternative newspaper in Portland, Ore., reported a woman’s claim that Cuban put his hands down her pants and touched her inappropriately while they were taking a photo at a Portland nightclub. The report Tuesday in the Willamette Week came about a week and half after a Sports Illustrated account that portrayed a hostile work environment for women in the front office of the Mavericks. While Cuban wasn’t implicated, the SI report raised questions about what he knew and when. Cuban flatly denied the woman’s allegations and provided a prosecutors’ report detailing the decision not to file charges.


SPORTS

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 2 NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W Tampa Bay 67 46 64 41 Boston Toronto 68 39 Florida 64 32 Detroit 66 26 Montreal 66 25 Ottawa 65 23 Buffalo 67 21 Metropolitan GP W Pittsburgh 68 39 Washington 66 37 Philadelphia 67 34 67 34 New Jersey Columbus 67 34 Carolina 67 29 NY Islanders 67 29 NY Rangers 67 30 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W 66 43 Nashville Winnipeg 66 40 Minnesota 67 38 Dallas 67 37 Colorado 66 35 66 35 Blues Chicago 67 29 Pacific GP W Vegas 66 42 Anaheim 67 34 San Jose 66 35 Los Angeles 66 36 68 33 Calgary Edmonton 66 28 Vancouver 67 25 Arizona 66 21

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B9

NBA STANDINGS L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 4 96 245 186 23-6-2 23-11-2 14-5-2 15 8 90 215 163 23-7-4 18-8-4 14-4-2 22 7 85 223 195 22-8-2 17-14-5 11-6-3 25 7 71 193 204 19-9-3 13-16-4 10-5-2 29 11 63 175 199 13-13-8 13-16-3 6-13-4 30 11 61 171 206 16-10-8 9-20-3 10-6-4 32 10 56 177 227 14-13-5 9-19-5 6-11-3 35 11 53 160 219 10-19-4 11-16-7 9-7-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 25 4 82 224 205 25-8-1 14-17-3 15-6-0 22 7 81 203 197 23-9-2 14-13-5 11-6-3 22 11 79 199 198 16-11-6 18-11-5 9-6-5 25 8 76 199 203 18-13-3 16-12-5 12-9-1 28 5 73 180 187 20-11-2 14-17-3 12-10-3 27 11 69 178 204 16-12-6 13-15-5 8-8-5 29 9 67 216 241 16-12-4 13-17-5 10-9-2 31 6 66 189 212 18-13-4 12-18-2 7-8-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 14 9 95 216 168 23-7-3 20-7-6 15-4-2 17 9 89 223 175 24-7-2 16-10-7 11-7-2 22 7 83 210 192 24-5-6 14-17-1 11-10-0 24 6 80 195 176 23-10-3 14-14-3 11-12-0 24 7 77 206 195 23-8-2 12-16-5 8-9-3 26 5 75 180 176 20-14-0 15-12-5 9-9-3 30 8 66 190 196 16-14-3 13-16-5 7-9-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 19 5 89 226 184 24-7-2 18-12-3 16-3-2 21 12 80 190 183 19-9-5 15-12-7 10-6-7 22 9 79 196 184 19-10-3 16-12-6 16-4-3 25 5 77 192 165 16-12-3 20-13-2 10-10-3 25 10 76 193 200 14-15-4 19-10-6 9-7-3 34 4 60 187 219 14-17-2 14-17-2 13-8-0 33 9 59 181 219 12-16-6 13-17-3 6-12-1 34 11 53 160 214 12-18-4 9-16-7 5-10-6

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Wednesday Calgary 5, Buffalo 1 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 2 Arizona 2, Vancouver 1 Tuesday Winnipeg 3, NY Rangers 0 Columbus 4, Vegas 1 New Jersey 6, Montreal 4 Boston 6, Detroit 5, OT Tampa Bay 5, Florida 4, OT Minnesota 6, Carolina 2 Nashville 2, Dallas 0 Chicago 2, Colorado 1, OT Anaheim 4, Washington 0 Thursday Colorado at Columbus, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at N. Jersey, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Montreal at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Vegas at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. NY Rangers at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Nashville, 7 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Washington at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Detroit at Columbus, 6 p.m. Calgary at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Saturday Winnipeg at Philadelphia, noon Montreal at T. Bay, noon Vegas at Buffalo, noon Chicago at Boston, noon Arizona at Colorado, 2 p.m. Washington at San Jose, 3 p.m. Blues at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. NY Rangers at Florida, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Toronto, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m.

Flames snap losing skid with win against Sabres

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 47 17 Boston 45 20 Philadelphia 35 28 New York 24 41 Brooklyn 20 45 W L Southeast 37 28 Washington Miami 34 31 Charlotte 28 37 Orlando 20 45 Atlanta 20 45 Central W L Cleveland 38 26 Indiana 37 28 Milwaukee 34 31 Detroit 29 36 Chicago 22 42 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 51 13 New Orleans 38 26 San Antonio 37 27 Dallas 20 45 Memphis 18 46 W L Northwest 39 26 Portland Minnesota 38 28 Oklahoma City 37 29 Denver 35 30 Utah 35 30 Pacific W L Golden State 50 14 34 29 LA Clippers LA Lakers 29 35 Sacramento 20 45 Phoenix 19 47 x-clinched playoff spot

Pct .734 .692 .556 .369 .308 Pct .569 .523 .431 .308 .308 Pct .594 .569 .523 .446 .344

GB — 2½ 11½ 23½ 27½ GB — 3 9 17 17 GB — 1½ 4½ 9½ 16

Pct GB .797 — .594 13 .578 14 .308 31½ .281 33 Pct GB .600 — .576 1½ .561 2½ .538 4 .538 4 Pct GB .781 — .540 15½ .453 21 .308 30½ .288 32

NBA SUMMARIES Jazz 104, Pacers 84 Utah: Ingles 4-8 1-2 11, Favors 3-6 0-0 7, Gobert 10-14 3-4 23, Rubio 8-18 1-2 18, Mitchell 6-15 4-5 20, Crowder 7-13 0-0 16, O’Neale 1-2 2-3 4, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 5, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0, Bradley 0-0 0-0 0, Neto 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-80 11-16 104. Indiana: Bogdanovic 4-10 5-6 13, T.Young 3-9 1-1 7, Turner 10-14 3-4 24, Joseph 4-11 3-4 12, Oladipo 6-19 1-2 13, Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2, Booker 1-2 0-0 2, Leaf 0-1 0-0 0, Poythress 1-2 0-0 3, Sabonis 4-10 0-0 8, J.Young 0-3 0-0 0, Stephenson 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 34-88 13-17 84. Utah 25 25 — 104 32 22 Indiana 20 24 25 15 — 84 3-point goals: Utah 11-31 (Mitchell 4-10, Ingles 2-5, Crowder 2-6, Jerebko 1-3, Favors 1-3, Rubio 1-4), Indiana 3-23 (Poythress 1-2, Joseph 1-3, Turner 1-4, Leaf 0-1, J.Young 0-1, Stephenson 0-2, Oladipo 0-3, T.Young 0-3, Bogdanovic 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 42 (Gobert 14), Indiana 45 (Sabonis 9). Assists: Utah 30 (Ingles 10), Indiana 12 (Oladipo 7). Total fouls: Utah 18, Indiana 17. Technicals: Gobert, Stephenson. A: 16,432 (18,500).

L10 9-1 6-4 7-3 1-9 1-9 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 2-8 3-7 L10 10-0 10-0 3-7 3-7 0-10 L10 9-1 4-6 6-4 6-4 8-2 L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 3-7 1-9

Str W-6 W-1 W-1 L-5 L-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-4 L-2 L-1 Str W-2 L-1 L-2 L-4 W-1

Home 27-5 23-11 20-10 16-14 12-21 Home 19-14 18-13 18-16 13-18 15-19 Home 22-11 22-12 20-14 20-14 15-18

Away 20-12 22-9 15-18 8-27 8-24 Away 18-14 16-18 10-21 7-27 5-26 Away 16-15 15-16 14-17 9-22 7-24

Conf 31-8 29-13 21-16 12-25 13-24 Conf 24-17 23-18 17-22 12-28 9-32 Conf 27-14 27-16 21-21 18-26 17-21

Str W-17 W-10 W-1 W-1 L-15 Str W-8 L-2 L-2 L-2 W-4 Str W-6 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-3

Home 25-6 17-12 23-8 13-21 13-20 Home 21-11 25-7 21-11 24-10 21-11 Home 25-7 18-14 16-15 10-22 9-24

Away 26-7 21-14 14-19 7-24 5-26 Away 18-15 13-21 16-18 11-20 14-19 Away 25-7 16-15 13-20 10-23 10-23

Conf 31-8 20-19 21-17 11-32 15-25 Conf 24-15 28-13 21-20 22-21 22-16 Conf 27-11 22-19 14-25 10-31 13-29

Wednesday Utah 104, Indiana 84 Chicago 119, Memphis 110 Houston 110, Milwaukee 99 Toronto 121, Detroit 119, OT New Orleans 114, Sacramento 101 Cleveland 113, Denver 108 LA Lakers 108, Orlando 107 Tuesday Philadelphia 128, Charlotte 114 Toronto 106, Atlanta 90 Washington 117, Miami 113, OT Houston 122, Oklahoma City 112 Dallas 118, Denver 107 Portland 111, New York 87 Golden State 114, Brooklyn 101 New Orleans 121, LA Clippers 116 Thursday Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Atlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 6 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 7 p.m. Washington at New Orleans, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Cleveland at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Washington at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

Rockets win 17th in a row with big effort in Milwaukee

Bulls 119, Grizzlies 110

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sabres goalie Robin Lehner makes a save on Flames forward Matt Stajan during the second period Wednesday night in Buffalo, N.Y. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sam Bennett and Mark Jankowski scored three minutes apart in the first period and the Calgary Flames snapped a four-game skid with a 5-1 win over the host Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday night. Calgary improved to 1-3-1 in its last five games to gain ground in the tightly contested Western Conference playoff race. With 76 points, the Flames jumped into 10th place, a point ahead of the idle Blues, and within one of Los Angeles and Colorado. Mark Giordano also had a goal and assist, while Sean Monahan and Dougie Hamilton also scored. Rookie David Rittich stopped 25 shots before having his first career shutout bid spoiled when Casey Nelson scored with 18 seconds remaining.

NOTEBOOK

Backes suspended three games • Boston Bruins forward David Backes has been suspended for three games for a shoulder to the head of Detroit’s Frans Nielsen. The decision was announced by the league Wednesday, a day after Backes knocked Nielsen from Boston’s 6-5 overtime victory. Nielsen had already unloaded the puck when Backes drove his shoulder into the Red Wings forward, who fell to the ice, left the game and did not return. The suspension without pay will cost Backes $96,774. Crosby at top in player poll • Pittsburgh Penguins captain Sidney Crosby is the most admired and appreciated player in the NHL, judging from the 2017-18 NHLPA Player Poll. A survey of more than 500 players resulted in Crosby being voted the most difficult to play against, best role model, best team player, the player you’d want to

win one game, and the player who would be a great coach upon retirement. Crosby finished second to Connor McDavid for which player to start a franchise with, and to Wayne Gretzky to the question of picking anyone all-time as a teammate. Players were asked more than 20 questions, with the NHL Players’ Association choosing which to publish. This is in addition to regular conversations with players on topics of importance that include feedback kept internally at the NHLPA. Among the most interesting responses was that 77.3 percent of players are fine with the way points are decided: two for any win and one for an overtime or shootout loss. But several suggested the international point system of three for a win in regulation, two for a win in overtime or a shootout, and one for an overtime or shootout loss. The Montreal Canadiens’ Bell Centre was voted the best rink to play in and the home of the best ice, while the Florida Panthers’ BB&T Center has the worst ice, according to players surveyed. Joel Quenneville of the Chicago Blackhawks, who like Crosby has won the Stanley Cup three times, was voted the coach players would most like to play for. McDavid not surprisingly was voted the fastest skater, and Washington Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom was voted the most underrated player. Francis out as Hurricanes GM • Hall of Fame player Ron Francis is out as general manager of the Carolina Hurricanes after four years but will remain with the team in another front-office position, new owner Tom Dundon said Wednesday night. Dundon says the team will begin a search for a new GM who will report directly to the new owner, while Francis will move into a new role as the team’s president of hockey operations.

NHL SUMMARIES Flames 5, Sabres 1

Penguins 5, Flyers 2

Coyotes 2, Canucks 1

Calgary 2 3 0 — 5 Buffalo 0 — 0 1 1 First period: 1, Calgary, Bennett 10 (Hamonic, Jankowski), 5:35. 2, Calgary, Jankowski 12 (Brodie, Bennett), 8:35. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Calgary, Giordano 12 (Ferland), 5:00. 4, Calgary, Monahan 30 (Gaudreau, Brodie), 6:01. 5, Calgary, Hamilton 15 (Gaudreau, Giordano), 18:39 (pp). Penalties: Hamilton, CGY, (high sticking), 2:21; Backlund, CGY, (delay of game), 6:38; Lazar, CGY, (roughing), 15:20; Lazar, CGY, served by Tkachuk, (roughing), 15:20; Baptiste, BUF, (roughing), 15:20; Lehner, BUF, served by Nolan, (roughing), 17:50. Third period: 6, Buffalo, Nelson 2 (Wilson, Pominville), 19:42. Penalties: Josefson, BUF, (slashing), 9:04. Shots: Calgary 17-14-10: 41. Buffalo 6-11-9: 26. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 3. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 7-5-3 (26 shots-25 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 7-11-3 (22-18), Lehner 13-24-8 (19-18). A: 17,773. Referees: Dave Jackson, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Scott Cherrey.

Pittsburgh 1 3 1 — 5 Philadelphia 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Kessel 28 (Crosby, Malkin), 18:35 (pp). Penalties: Lehtera, PHI, (holding), 4:14; Hagg, PHI, (boarding), 8:28; Kessel, PIT, (tripping), 9:39; MacDonald, PHI, (interference), 12:29; Schultz, PIT, (high sticking), 14:01; Lindblom, PHI, (high sticking), 17:46. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Voracek 15 (Patrick), 2:07. 3, Philadelphia, Konecny 18 (MacDonald, Giroux), 5:59. 4, Pittsburgh, Oleksiak 4 (Schultz, Guentzel), 9:24. 5, Pittsburgh, Sheary 13 (Crosby, Oleksiak), 14:25. 6, Pittsburgh, Sheary 14 (Crosby, Guentzel), 19:20. Penalties: Sheahan, PIT, (interference), 11:29; Oleksiak, PIT, (tripping), 16:33. Third period: 7, Pittsburgh, Malkin 38 (Hagelin, Sheahan), 18:19. Penalties: Malkin, PIT, (tripping), 11:03. Shots: Pittsburgh 11-10-7: 28. Philadelphia 8-11-9: 28. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 4; Philadelphia 0 of 5. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Jarry 12-5-2 (28 shots-26 saves). Philadelphia, Mrazek 11-9-4 (27-23).

Arizona 1 0 1 — 2 1 Vancouver 1 0 0 — First period: 1, Arizona, Keller 18 (Stepan, Perlini), 18:20 (pp). 2, Vancouver, Jokinen 2 (Leipsic, Gagner), 19:44. Penalties: D.Sedin, VAN, (hooking), 16:12; D.Archibald, VAN, (tripping), 16:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Cousins, ARI, (high sticking), 18:56; H.Sedin, VAN, (hooking), 19:34. Third period: 3, Arizona, Stepan 12 (Perlini, Keller), 19:02. Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 16-8-10: 34. Vancouver 7-4-6: 17. Power-plays: Arizona 1 of 3; Vancouver 0 of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 11-2-4 (17 shots-16 saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 18-22-6 (34-32). A: 17,742. Referees: Tom Kowal, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Shane Heyer.

Memphis: Brooks 10-18 4-4 29, Green 5-6 1-2 11, Gasol 4-11 8-10 17, Simmons 5-10 1-1 11, McLemore 5-11 4-5 17, Henry 2-6 1-1 5, Rabb 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 2-2 0-0 4, Rathan-Mayes 4-12 1-2 9, Selden 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 40-82 20-25 110. Chicago: Holiday 5-5 0-0 14, Markkanen 8-14 4-4 22, Portis 6-12 2-2 15, Dunn 6-11 8-10 21, LaVine 8-14 4-6 21, Valentine 0-8 1-1 1, Vonleh 3-5 1-2 9, Felicio 0-0 1-2 1, Payne 3-6 1-2 7, Nwaba 3-4 2-3 8. Totals 42-79 24-32 119. Memphis 24 — 110 22 29 35 Chicago 30 34 26 29 — 119 3-point goals: Memphis 10-29 (Brooks 5-9, McLemore 3-7, Selden 1-2, Gasol 1-4, Simmons 0-1, Henry 0-2, Rathan-Mayes 0-4), Chicago 11-29 (Holiday 4-4, Vonleh 2-3, Markkanen 2-6, Dunn 1-3, Portis 1-4, LaVine 1-4, Payne 0-1, Valentine 0-4). Fouled out: Simmons. Rebounds: Memphis 33 (Green 8), Chicago 41 (Portis 10). Assists: Memphis 24 (Rathan-Mayes, Gasol 7), Chicago 25 (Dunn 9). Total fouls: Memphis 26, Chicago 22. Technicals: Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second), Chicago coach Bulls (Defensive three second). A: 20,210 (20,917).

Rockets 110, Bucks 99 Houston: Ariza 4-9 1-1 9, Tucker 3-3 0-0 9, Capela 4-7 2-10 10, Harden 8-20 7-7 26, Paul 5-12 5-5 16, Black 2-3 0-0 4, Mbah a Moute 4-6 1-2 11, Gordon 6-12 2-2 18, Green 3-10 0-0 7. Totals 39-82 18-27 110. Milwaukee: Middleton 6-13 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 12-20 6-9 30, Henson 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 4-11 5-6 15, Snell 1-4 0-0 3, Parker 5-12 0-0 10, Terry 1-6 0-0 2, S.Brown 6-12 0-0 15. Totals 38-83 14-19 99. Houston 24 34 29 23 — 110 Milwaukee 22 24 30 23 — 99 3-point goals: Houston 14-40 (Gordon 4-8, Tucker 3-3, Harden 3-10, Mbah a Moute 2-4, Green 1-5, Paul 1-6, Ariza 0-4), Milwaukee 9-28 (S.Brown 3-6, Middleton 3-7, Bledsoe 2-6, Snell 1-4, Parker 0-1, Terry 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 47 (Capela 8), Milwaukee 38 (Middleton 12). Assists: Houston 22 (Paul 11), Milwaukee 21 (Middleton, Terry 5). Total fouls: Houston 21, Milwaukee 22. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second). A: 17,195 (18,717).

Raptors 121, Pistons 119 Toronto: Powell 7-12 0-0 17, Ibaka 2-8 0-0 4, Valanciunas 6-13 1-1 14, Lowry 4-8 4-5 15, DeRozan 16-28 8-8 42, Miles 2-8 2-2 8, Miller 1-2 0-0 2, Siakam 3-5 1-1 8, Poeltl 2-5 0-0 4, Nogueira 0-0 1-2 1, Wright 0-1 0-0 0, VanVleet 2-10 2-2 6. Totals 45-100 19-21 121. Detroit: Kennard 3-8 1-2 9, Griffin 12-21 4-8 31, Drummond 5-14 0-0 10, Smith 6-10 0-0 14, Bullock 7-13 4-4 21, Ennis III 4-6 6-6 14, Moreland 3-4 0-0 6, Tolliver 2-4 1-1 7, Buycks 2-9 2-2 7. Totals 44-89 18-23 119. Toronto 27 18 40 29 7 — 121 Detroit 23 36 25 30 5 — 119 3-point goals: Toronto 12-40 (Powell 3-5, Lowry 3-7, DeRozan 2-6, Miles 2-7, Siakam 1-2, Valanciunas 1-4, Miller 0-1, Ibaka 0-4, VanVleet 0-4), Detroit 13-26 (Bullock 3-6, Griffin 3-6, Smith 2-2, Kennard 2-3, Tolliver 2-4, Buycks 1-3, Ennis III 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 47 (Valanciunas 11), Detroit 50 (Drummond 21). Assists: Toronto 33 (Lowry 15), Detroit 27 (Smith 7). Total fouls: Toronto 20, Detroit 23. Technicals: Ibaka, Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second). Ejected: Ibaka. A: 17,769 (21,000).

Pelicans 114, Kings 101 New Orleans: Moore 7-14 0-0 15, Davis 7-11 1-1 17, Okafor 2-2 1-1 5, Rondo 3-6 0-0 6, Holiday 9-17 3-3 23, Miller 1-4 0-0 3, Diallo 2-5 2-2 6, Mirotic 10-12 2-2 26, Liggins 1-1 0-0 2, Clark 5-11 0-0 11. Totals 47-83 9-9 114. Sacramento: J.Jackson 5-9 2-2 14, Randolph 8-17 2-2 19, Koufos 3-8 0-2 6, Fox 1-3 0-0 2, Bogdanovic 0-6 0-0 0, Sampson 2-3 1-1 6, Caboclo 1-3 0-0 2, Labissiere 6-12 2-2 14, Mason 5-10 5-6 16, Hield 7-18 2-2 20, Temple 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-93 14-17 101. New Orleans 32 30 23 29 — 114 Sacramento 21 23 23 34 — 101 3-point goals: New Orleans 11-26 (Mirotic 4-6, Davis 2-3, Holiday 2-5, Clark 1-3, Moore 1-3, Miller 1-4, Rondo 0-2), Sacramento 9-28 (Hield 4-11, J.Jackson 2-5, Sampson 1-1, Randolph 1-2, Mason 1-2, Labissiere 0-1, Caboclo 0-1, Temple 0-2, Bogdanovic 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 40 (Mirotic 10), Sacramento 39 (Koufos 10). Assists: New Orleans 26 (Holiday 8), Sacramento 20 (Mason 6). Total fouls: New Orleans 22, Sacramento 16. A: 17,583 (17,608).

Lakers 108, Magic 107 Orlando: Simmons 2-6 4-6 9, Gordon 11-20 2-7 28, Vucevic 11-18 1-1 24, Augustin 3-10 2-2 9, Fournier 5-6 0-0 11, Isaac 1-1 0-0 2, Iwundu 1-2 0-0 2, Biyombo 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 3-7 0-0 9, Afflalo 1-1 0-0 2, Hezonja 3-10 2-3 9. Totals 42-83 11-19 107. L.A. Lakers: Kuzma 9-16 1-1 20, Randle 6-11 0-1 12, Lopez 12-18 2-2 27, Ball 6-16 0-0 16, Caldwell-Pope 3-7 2-2 10, Wear 0-2 0-0 0, Zubac 1-4 4-4 6, Bryant 0-0 0-0 0, Caruso 1-2 2-2 4, Thomas 5-12 0-0 13. Totals 43-88 11-12 108. 32 19 107 Orlando 28 28 — 25 27 L.A. Lakers 23 33 — 108 3-point goals: Orlando 12-28 (Gordon 4-6, Mack 3-4, Fournier 1-1, Simmons 1-2, Augustin 1-4, Vucevic 1-4, Hezonja 1-7), L.A. Lakers 11-33 (Ball 4-13, Thomas 3-6, Caldwell-Pope 2-5, Kuzma 1-4, Lopez 1-4, Caruso 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 43 (Gordon 14), L.A. Lakers 39 (Randle 11). Assists: Orlando 31 (Augustin 8), L.A. Lakers 27 (Thomas 9). Total fouls: Orlando 22, L.A. Lakers 16. Technicals: L.A. Lakers coach Lakers (Defensive three second). A: 18,997 (19,060).

Cavaliers 113, Nuggets 108 Cleveland: Hood 6-13 2-2 15, James 15-25 4-8 39, Nance Jr. 6-10 1-1 13, Hill 3-6 0-0 7, Smith 2-5 0-0 6, Osman 1-4 1-1 3, Green 4-7 1-2 10, Zizic 2-3 1-1 5, Clarkson 3-8 1-2 8, Korver 2-6 1-1 7. Totals 44-87 12-18 113. Denver: Chandler 1-8 1-2 3, Millsap 4-8 2-2 12, Jokic 12-14 10-11 36, Murray 5-10 1-1 11, G.Harris 7-18 0-0 18, Jefferson 0-1 0-0 0, Lyles 1-5 0-0 2, Plumlee 6-6 0-1 12, D.Harris 3-5 0-0 7, Barton 2-7 0-1 4, Beasley 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 42-86 14-18 108. 19 113 Cleveland 38 32 24 — Denver 23 35 29 21 — 108 3-point goals: Cleveland 13-29 (James 5-8, Korver 2-3, Smith 2-5, Hood 1-2, Clarkson 1-3, Green 1-3, Hill 1-3, Osman 0-2), Denver 10-27 (G.Harris 4-6, Millsap 2-3, Jokic 2-3, D.Harris 1-3, Beasley 1-3, Lyles 0-1, Barton 0-2, Murray 0-3, Chandler 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 35 (Nance Jr. 13), Denver 51 (Jokic 13). Assists: Cleveland 25 (James 10), Denver 22 (Jokic 6). Total fouls: Cleveland 19, Denver 16. Technicals: Cleveland coach Cavaliers (Defensive three second), D.Harris. A: 20,062 (19,155).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rockets’ Luc Mbah a Moute (left) shoots past the Bucks’ Jabari Parker during the first half Wednesday night in Milwaukee. The Rockets won 110-99. ASSOCIATED PRESS

James Harden scored 26 points, Eric Gordon had 18 points and two momentum-swinging 3-pointers in the third quarter, and the Houston Rockets beat the host Milwaukee Bucks 110-99 on Wednesday night for their 17th straight win. The Rockets passed the Boston Celtics for the longest winning streak in the NBA this season. Houston hasn’t lost since Jan. 26 at New Orleans. The latest victory came on the second of a tough back-to-back stretch of road games that started with a 10-point victory at Oklahoma City. Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 30 points for the Bucks. Khris Middleton added 18 points, while Sterling Brown had 15. Chris Paul added 16 points and 11 assists for Houston.

NOTEBOOK

Leonard hopes to return soon • San Antonio star Kawhi Leonard plans on returning “soon” from a leg injury, after missing all but nine games so far this season. Leonard held an impromptu, four-minute press conference Wednesday following Spurs practice. He won’t travel with the team on their upcoming three-game road trip to Golden State, Oklahoma City and Houston. But the 26-year-old Leonard says his return is imminent. “Soon. I don’t have a set date right now,” he said. “But I’ve just got to keep doing what I’m doing. The progress that I’m making has been great.” NBA reviews allegations against Cuban • The NBA said it is reviewing 2011 allegations of sexual assault against Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and the decision by prosecutors not to pursue the case. League spokesman Mike Bass said Wednesday the NBA was looking into the matter after a weekly alternative newspaper in Portland, Ore., reported a woman’s claim that Cuban put his hands down her pants and touched her inappropriately while they were taking a photo at a Portland nightclub. The report Tuesday in the Willamette Week came about a week and half after a Sports Illustrated account that portrayed a hostile work environment for women in the front office of the Mavericks. While Cuban wasn’t implicated, the SI report raised questions about what he knew and when. Cuban flatly denied the woman’s allegations and provided a prosecutors’ report detailing the decision not to file charges.


WEATHER

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WEATHER • Low 27, High 41 • Winds NW 5-15 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 86° Marathon, Florida

Low: -13° Lake Yellowstone, Wyoming

Partly cloudy and still cold

Partly cloudy skies along with light northwest winds and colder than average temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today. Highs will be in the low 40s. Some light precipitation is possible over the next few days as a storm system passes mainly to the south. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

30°

DRIVE

36°

40°

BEDTIME

Partly cloudy Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

33°

Partly cloudy

51 44 41 42 42 50 46 38 42 47 44 41 47

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

H

21 26 23 22 22 20 24 20 21 20 22 21

36 44 35 36 35 36 41 36 39 34 37 35

70s

FRIDAY

28°/48°

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

35°/53°

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.12 - 0.03 - 0.02 + 0.06 + 0.15 - 0.60 + 0.42 + 0.84 + 0.19 - 0.38

40s

70s

Wintry Mix

Slight chance of Slight chance Slight chance Mostly sunny light rain of rain of rain

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Kansas City 23 / 46

Kirksville 20 / 38

Joplin 23 / 50

Springfield 22 / 37

St. Louis 27 / 41 Poplar Bluff 28 / 46

Carbondale 26 / 44

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Mar 7th Tree - 25 (moderate), Mold - 2,840 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 29 Month (Total) 155 Season 3626 Year Ago 2828 Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 23.29 18 22.64 Peoria 14 21.44 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 5.42 Sullivan 16 1.88 Valley Park 24 14.88 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.75 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 54.32 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.71 - 0.37 - 0.02 + 0.04 + 0.82 + 0.70 - 0.03 - 0.16

SUN & MOON

Last Mar 9 Sunrise

New Mar 17

First Mar 24

6:23 AM Sunset

Full Mar 31 6:01 PM

Moonrise 12:04 AM Moonset 10:32 AM

Earth is the only planet we know that can support liquid water on its surface. There are also two moons thought to have liquid water under their frozen surface. These are Europa and Enceladus. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

364.54 + 0.17 364.80 - 0.65 517.02 - 1.34 655.47 - 0.14 708.53 - 0.41 661.39 - 0.39 915.49 - 0.14 843.44 - 0.64 602.51 - 0.25 409.37 + 0.01 604.29 + 0.28 448.22 - 0.13

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 83°

Jet Stream

An area of low pressure will continue to lift northeastward and bring accumulating snowfall to New England. Some rain may mix in with the snow at times in some locations. Lake-effect snow showers are likely across parts of the Great Lakes. Another frontal system will bring wet weather to the northern Rockies, Pacific Northwest, and northern California. Dry conditions will be in place throughout the central United States with high pressure in control. City

W

Flood Stage

70s Alaska Low: -17°

Chicago 23 / 35

Snow

60s

60s

36°/45° 32°/47°

T-storms

50s

50s

MONDAY

40s

30s

Today L H

30 Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque 37 Anchorage 20 Atlanta 33 Atlantic City 30 Baltimore 31 Billings 22 Biloxi, Ms. 39 Birmingham 32 Bismarck 3 Boise 36 Boston 32 Buffalo 26 Burlington, Vt. 29 Charleston, S.C. 37 Charleston, W.V. 27 Charlotte 31 Cheyenne 22 Chicago 23 Cincinnati 25 Cleveland 26 Colorado Spgs. 24 Concord, N.H. 30 Dallas 40 Daytona Beach 43 Denver 25 Des Moines 19 Destin, Fl. 44 Detroit 21 44 El Paso 25 Evansville 7 Fairbanks 10 Fargo 26 Flagstaff 52 Fort Myers 16 Great Falls 15 Green Bay 32 Hartford 65 Honolulu 41 Houston 25 Indianapolis 35 Jackson, Ms. 29 Juneau 65 Key West 47 Las Vegas 33 Little Rock 52 Los Angeles 28 Louisville

36 67 30 50 44 43 42 64 52 28 52 40 32 33 56 37 50 59 35 35 33 61 37 66 66 66 34 61 34 76 41 28 25 60 68 37 34 41 79 67 34 59 38 74 73 57 73 38

W

Tomorrow L H W

snow showers partly cloudy snow partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy showers rain and snow snow showers snow sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers sunny snow mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy

25 39 22 30 26 29 27 38 31 15 41 30 27 28 36 26 28 32 21 23 28 31 26 48 39 33 22 43 26 52 24 12 8 30 48 25 17 27 64 50 25 34 34 60 53 40 53 26

37 70 28 58 43 45 46 66 63 33 53 40 34 36 60 43 54 60 37 41 36 64 39 70 63 69 42 63 36 79 46 28 30 59 70 49 34 39 79 72 43 69 37 69 76 64 71 46

rain and snow partly cloudy snow showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy showers rain snow rain and snow sunny partly cloudy sunny windy partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy windy mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

33 Macon 54 McAllen, Tx. 31 Memphis 57 Miami 20 Milwaukee 11 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 29 35 Mobile Montgomery 33 30 Nashville New Orleans 44 New York City 32 Norfolk, Va. 35 Oklahoma City 32 Omaha 18 Orlando 45 Palm Springs 58 Philadelphia 30 Phoenix 57 Pittsburgh 24 Portland, Me. 30 Portland, Or. 42 Providence 32 Raleigh 31 Rapid City 16 Reno 34 Richmond, Va. 32 Sacramento 47 St. Petersburg 55 Salt Lake City 33 San Antonio 41 San Diego 54 San Francisco 51 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 35 Seattle 42 Shreveport 36 10 Sioux Falls 29 Syracuse 37 Tallahassee 49 Tampa 50 Tucson 25 Tulsa 32 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 53 21 Wichita Wilmington, De. 29 56 Yuma

55 74 51 74 34 31 47 62 56 46 64 44 48 62 37 69 83 43 83 32 36 55 43 50 46 61 47 67 64 59 67 69 64 64 59 52 63 29 34 62 64 81 57 44 71 57 42 83

W

sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers snow rain mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy partly cloudy snow showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

31 63 36 52 20 10 33 34 31 29 45 29 33 45 23 43 61 28 55 27 28 43 30 28 23 39 28 47 51 40 53 55 50 29 36 43 43 16 27 35 48 49 44 30 47 35 27 54

62 79 63 73 35 33 46 65 65 54 70 42 51 70 49 69 80 42 82 36 40 53 40 50 52 58 51 66 68 57 72 67 63 67 63 50 69 35 36 67 67 81 72 46 70 73 43 84

sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny sunny rain sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny rain and snow partly cloudy snow showers rain and snow showers rain sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

72 34 54 57 81 77 28 32 32 66 68 8 70 66 33 34

84 44 72 80 95 85 46 48 49 82 90 32 78 79 48 52

sunny rain mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly sunny showers showers mostly sunny mostly sunny cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

32 59 51 77 56 61 38 39 34 74 47 30 10 69 58 57

50 61 55 86 80 71 61 50 52 98 75 32 26 76 82 88

partly cloudy showers rain showers mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny sunny partly cloudy snow partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 1.98 - 0.33 - 0.30 + 0.02 + 0.36

60s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.96 23 6.65 Jefferson City 21 9.61 Hermann 20 7.21 Washington 25 13.62 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 13.13 Louisiana 15 12.08 Dam 24 25 21.27 Dam 25 26 21.11 Grafton 18 16.55 M.Price, Pool 419 413.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 13.60 St Louis 30 17.48 Chester 27 20.58 Cape Girardeau 32 29.01

24-Hr Change

30s

40s

60s

80s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.03” 0.93” 0.62” 7.41” 5.26”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

40° 34° 52° 34° 85° 2° 71° 46°

40s

60s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:18 p.m.) Low (8:59 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1974) Record Low (1943) High Last Year Low Last Year

20s

50s

50s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

30s

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

26 27 23 25 23 23 23 20 23 22 19 24 24

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

50s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

40s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

27 39 33 70 41 72 54 36 25 68 59 37 29 42 38 22

30 51 47 87 61 86 81 45 31 75 60 45 36 47 50 32

snow showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers snow partly cloudy showers rain cloudy rain partly cloudy cloudy


03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES

Chevrolet

Mini Cooper

Volkswagen

'15 Chevy Equinox LS : $13,293 #P 06631 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '03 Lexus SC430: Clean Carfax, $13,971 #400303A

'14 Mini Cooper: Loaded $13,990 #40339A

'14 VW Beetle: 2.5L, Leather, M/R, $11,990 #35351A

'15 Mini Cooper: White, Automatic, 23K $14,990 #B8882

'17 VW Golf SEL: 4 Door, 8K Miles, Automatic $18,990 #V17398A

Dodge '14 Dodge Dart: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start $13,469 #33541A

'14 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Pano Roof, Auto, 66K $15,990 #B9020

Fiat

'11 Mini Cooper "S": Pano Roof, White, Manual $7,990 #V17651A

'16 Fia t 500X: $14,990 #P 06642 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Fiat 500 Sport: Hatchback, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #B8799B

Ford '05 Ford Mustang: Coupe, RWD, Legend Lime Clearcoat Metallic $7,990 #V18049B

'15 Ford Taurus: Lmtd, $18,458 #P06594 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Ford Fus ion S E: Auto, Loa de d $8969 #42588

Hyundai '13 Hyundai Sonata: SE, Loaded $10,790 #42545A

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Manual, Sunroof, 36K $10,990 #B8775

'11 Hyundai Elantra: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors, $6,490 #B8987A

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 30K Miles, Auto, Black $16,490 #M17233A

'14 Hyundai Elantra: Limited, 30K, Sunroof, Red $12,990 #M17332A

'16 Hyundai Sonata: $22,799 #P06598 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Hyunda i Veloster: 53xxx Mile s , Auto, Roof, $12,490 #B8943

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS 1-866-244-9085 VOLKSWAGEN'S '14 Passat: 31K, Black, Automatic, VW Certified $12,990 '14 Passat: 39K, Automatic, Power Sunroof, VW Certified $13,990 '14 Passat: 44K, Automatic, White w/Tan, VW Certified $13,990 '13 Passat: 2.5, Automatic, Gray, VW Certified, 53K $11,490 '17 Jetta: 1.4 Turbo, Auto, White, 7K, Touch Screen Radio $13,490 '13 Passat: TDI, SE, Diesel Diesel, Roof, Nav, Automatic $16,490

Jeep

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, 4WD, Loaded!! Black, $29,990 #B8786A

'15 J e ep P a triot La titude , 4WD, Auto, Bla ck, $13,990 #C8744A

'13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $9,490 #C8795B

Lexus '07 Lexus RX350 AWD, S unroof, Loca l Tra de , $8,490 #B8792A

Lincoln

'17 Passat: 1.8 Turbo, Blue, Alloys, Auto, 8K, Save Save $14,490

'16 Mazda 3 Gra nd Touring: Auto, Nav, Te ch Pkg $18,990 #M8949

'07 Mazda 3 S Touring: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax $6936 #35444A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: $20,972 Stock #P06593 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Dodge Ra m 1500 SLT: 4WD, 26xxx Mile s , Ce rtifie d $26,990 #B8961

'17 Golf: SEL, 8K, Autmatic, Sunroof, Certified $18,990 '17 Passat: 1.8 Turbo, 5K, Roof, Heated Seats $16,990

Ford Trucks

'16 CC: Sport, 6K, White, Auto, $21,990

'16 Ford F-150: Super Crew, 22K, Auto $29,990 #V17738A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '16 SRX: Luxury Colle ction, 19K, Re d, AWD, One Owne r $31,390

'17 XTS: P ha ntom Gra y, Na viga tion, He a te d & Coole d S e a ts , $29,490 '15 SRX: P la tinum Ice , AWD, 26K, Pano Roof $30,990 '15 SRX: Luxury Colle ction, 26K, White , AWD $30,990 '17 XTS: Bla ck Ra ve n, Bla ck Le a the r, 13K, AWD, Na viga tion $33,990

GMC Trucks '14 GMC Sierra 2500HD: Denali, Crew Cab, GM Certified Pre-Owned, 4WD, Backup Camera $38,963 #78738A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab GM Certified PreOwned, 18K Miles, $36,963 #78795A

'13 GMC Sierra 2500HD: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Remote Start, GM Certified Pre-Owned $38,963 #79118A

'16 GMC Sierra 3500HD: SLE Truck Double Cab, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, $36,963 #P8860A

'17 CTS : Luxury, AWD, Crys ta l White , Na viga tion $36,490 '17 CTS : Luxury, AWD, Bla ck Ra ve n, Na viga tion $37,990

'17 Escalade: ESV, 11K, DVD, Qua d S e a ts , Na viga tion $66,490

Mitsubishi

'06 Nissan Altima S: 2.5L, Loaded $7,997 #42290A

'14 GMC Sierra: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Leather, Bose, White $32,490 #V18081A

'07 GMC Yukon 1500 SLE: Bla ck, 4WD, 4 Door $13,990 #46473B

Misc Trucks '15 Ram 1500 Laramie: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, $30,963 #96270C

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '17 Nissan Titan XD: Crew Cab, Magnetic Black, 1K Miles, 5.0L V-8, $49,147 #96719A

''13 Porsche Boxster S: Cabriolet, Emerald Green Metallic, RWD $47,599 #P9145

Toyota Trucks

Subaru '15 Subaru Impreza: Hatchback, Sunroof, Automatic, Black $18,990 #M17558A

Volkswagen

'12 Toyota Ta coma : 4WD, Cre w Ca b, Auto, 43xxx Mile s , $25,490, #B8945

Sport Utility '15 Acura MDX: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera $29,963 #78750A

'16 Acura MDX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $33,963 #96589A

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #V18123A '17 Audi Q5: 3.0T Premium Plus, V-6, Glacier White Metallic, $39,333 #79292A

'17 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8Turbo, 12K, White $15,490 #V8390

STLtoday.com/jobs

Mercedes Benz

'13 Volkswagen Passat: Diesel!! Diesel!! Automatic, $16,490 #V8683

'17 Mercedes-Benz AMG C43: 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, $52,963 #P9060

'17 Audi Q5 2.0T : 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Panorama Sunroof, Backup Camera $33,500 #P9080

'16 Audi Q5: Mythos Black Metallic, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro, $33,147 #28454A

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'16 Audi Q5: Scuba Blue Metallic, 3.0L TDI Clean Diesel V6, 32K Miles, $37,147 #P9106

'17 Audi Q7: 2.0T Premium, Glacier White Metallic, $52,333 #P9110

'17 Audi SQ5 3.0T Premium Plus, Audi Certified Pre-Owned, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, $49,147 #P9095

'15 Audi Q5: 2.0T Premium Tiptronic, Ibis White, 28K Miles, $30,333 #P9075A

'17 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, Panorama Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $48,500 #P9081

'17 Audi Q7 3.0T Prestige: Quattro, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Audi Certified Pre-Owned, $53,500 #28388A

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'15 GMC Yukon XL 1500: Denali, 6.2L V-8 Cyl, 4X4, Onyx Black $52,333 #P9127

'08 Mazda CX-9: Sport, White, Local Trade, Priced to Sell Fast! $10,990 #V17565B

'17 GMC Yukon: XL Denali, Onyx Black, 6.2L V-8 $60,924 #78688

'15 Mazda CX-9: AWD, Nav, Roof, White $26,990 #M8790

'14 GMC Yukon XL 1500: Denali, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats $32,500 #79254A

'16 Mazda CX-5: Touring, AWD, Certified $18,990 #M8894

'17 GMC Acadia: SLT-1, Summit White, 3K Miles, 3.6L V-6, $37,636 #78208

'17 GMC Acadia: SLT-1, Crimson Red Tintcoat, 3K Miles, FWD $31,965 #78212

'15 GMC Yukon: SLT, Onyx Black, 5.3L V-8 $41,950 #P9066

'16 GMC Acadia Denali: Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth $30,963 #39297A

'13 Mercedes-Benz G 63: AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles $92,333 #P9126

'11 Mercedes-Benz ML350: $16,889 Stock #P06184A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Nissan Rogue: One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Magnetic Black $15,990 #P6256

'17 Nissan Pathfinder: Magnetic Black Metallic, 12K Miles, 3.5L V-6, $35,147 #28299B

'14 Nissan Murano: LE, AWD, Nav, Power Roof $19,990 #B8835

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 28K, Every Option $57,490 #B8560 '18 Audi Q5: 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl Quattro, Mythos Black Metallic, $43,147 #28082L

'17 BMW X3: xDrive28i SAV, 2.0L I-4 cyl, AWD, 22K Miles $33,333 #P9114

'15 GMC Terrain: SLT, Chromes, Sunroof, $19,990 #B8801

'12 Hyundai Tuscon: LTD, Loaded! $10,969 #42189AA '16 Buick Encore: Sport Touring, Roof, Nav, 17K $18,490 #V17674A

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'12 Chevrolet Equinox: 1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Backup Camera $9,990 #42079A

'17 Chevrolet Tahoe: LT, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, 3rd Row, $42,963 #P9027

'17 Chevrolet Suburban: Premier, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Backup Camera, Remote Start, $48,963 #P9026

'16 Chevrolet Tahoe: LTZ, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified Pre-Owned, 4WD, Remote Start $47,963 #95505A

'15 Chevy Traverse: AWD, Loaded, GM Certified $20,969 #42439A

'13 Chevy Avalanche: One Owner, Loaded $27,769 #42280A

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LT, 66k Miles, 5.3L V-8, $36,333 #P9096A

'15 Nissan Sentra: SL, Auto, 36K Miles, Backup Camera $12,490 #C8495A

'15 Porsche Panamera 2: Hatchback, AWS, Navigation, Sunroof, Sport Chrono Package $49,963 #28180A

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T: Premium, One Owner, Orca Black Metallic, Motor Trend Certified, $32,147 #28363A

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, Crew Cab, GM Certified PreOwned, 4WD $36,963 #79121A

Nissan/Datsun

'12 Mazda Mazda3i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $9,990 #33759A

'06 Mazda Mazda3 s: Copper Red Mica, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #M18022A

'17 Chevy Colorado LT: $31,388 Stock #P06578 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Silverado: 1500 LT, $28,387 Stock #180380A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Silverado LTZ: 4WD, 39xxx Mile s , Z71 Pkg $30,490 #V17159A

'15 Jetta SE: Auto, Red, Certified, $12,490

Porsche

'10 Mazda Miata: Sport, 75K, Automatic $9,990 #M17519A

'17 Chevy Colorado: 7K, Local Trade, Crew Cab $29,990 #M9021A

'14 Dodge Ra m 1500 SLT: 4WD, Hemi, 43xxx Mile s , $25,990 #B8946

'15 Lincoln MKC: Select, Local Trade, Save!! $20,490 #M17359A

Mazda

'15 Chevy Silverado: LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K $37,990 #B8861

Dodge Plymouth Trucks

03 Mitsubishi Eclipse: FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Sportronic 2.4L 4-Cyl, $5,990 #B8914 '14 Kia Cadenza: $18,065 Stock #P06607 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chevrolet Trucks

'13 Jetta: TDI, Diesel, Diesel, 52K, Sunroof, Automatic $15,490

'15 Escalade: P la tinum, AWD, Eve ry Option Imaginable!! $58,990

Kia

'13 VW Passat SEL: $15,032 #P 06630 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Atlas: SE, 4motion, 3K, White, Save $$ $31,990

'13 XTS: P la tinum, AWD, 10K, Bla ck $33,490

'16 Jeep Patriot Latitude: 4x4, Loaded, $14,990 #P6295

'17 VW Jetta 12xxx Mile s , Auto, One Owne r, $13,490 #V8583

Sport Utility

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B11

'17 Chevy Equinox: Black, Black, Wheels, 7K, Sunroof $23,990 #V18245A

'15 Chevy Tahoe: $30,000 Stock #099A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox LT: $18,000 Stock #P06603 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox LT: Loa de d, Full P owe r $13,974 #42512A

'09 Ford Edge: Very Clean, Loaded $10,969 #42597A

'16 Ford Expedition: 3.5L V-6, White Platinum, $48,599 #79411A

'16 Ford Explorer: XLT, FWD, Black, 18K $28,490 #B8557A

'14 Ford Escape: SE, FWD, 51K Miles, Red $14,490 #B8788

'10 Ford Escape: XLT, FWD, Flex Fuel, New Arrival $6,990 #M8911A

'17 Ford Escape SE: $19,185 Stock #P06600 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, Black, Loaded $21,990 #P6199A

'15 GMC Terrain: GMCertified, Only 21K Miles $17,770 #P6335

'07 GMC Yukon: SLT, M/R, $12,967 #40473B

'15 Honda P ilot EX-L S unroof, 4WD, 44xxx Mile s , $26,490 #V18180A

'16 Infiniti QX80: 5.6L V-8, AWD, Majestic White, 9K Miles $56,599 #P9140

'15 Infiniti QX60 3.5: Liquid Platinum 3.5L V-6 , AWD $31,333 #28227B

'16 Infiniti QX80: 5.6L V-8, Navigation, Moonroof, Majestic White $44,599 #97267A

'14 Infiniti QX80: Theater Package, Carfax One Owner, Heated Front Seats $29,500 #95544A

'17 Jaguar F-Pace S: British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl $57,333 #P9109

'15 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, Loaded $33,990 #P6303

'16 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited Sahara, 4x4, One Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Bluetooth, Low Miles $29,963 #P9020A

'16 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, 4x4, Clean Carfax one Owner, Firecracker Red, 4WD, $32,147 #79310C

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Rubicon, 4x4, Hardtop, One Owner Clean Carfax, $31,963 #78667A

'16 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Limited, 4WD, White, Sunroof $28,990 #B9042

'14 Land Rover Range Rover: 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, $56,333 #P9120

\'11 Land Rover LR4 HSE: Black w/ Black Leather, Roof, Nav, DVD $20,990 #B8855

'16 Lexus NX 200t: \Eminent White Pearl , 2.0L I-4 Cyl, AWD $33,333 #28480B

'16 Lexus NX 200t: Clean Carfax, Obsidian, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, $32,500 #79345A

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, 28K $31,490 #B8879

'15 Nis s a n Rogue S e le ct: $12,709 #P 06615 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Pontiac Torrent: Heated Front Seats, Remote Start $7,490 #V17749A

15 Porsche Macan: Turbo, 3.6L V-6 Cyl, AWD, Black, 12K Miles $62,333 #P9116

'08 Subaru Tribeca LTD: 7 Passenger, Very Clean $8,769 #33083AA

'14 Subaru WRX: STI, Certified, Well Cared For $24,490 #B8860

'16 Toyota Highlander LTD: One Owner, Clean Carfax $31,320 #400216A

'15 Toyota Rav-4: AWD, XLE, One Owner $20,769 #P6331A

'13 Toyota 4Runner: One Owner Clean Carfax, Limited, Motor Trend Certified $28,963 #78806A

'15 Toyota 4Runner: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 4WD, $29,963 #96394A

'15 Toyota Highlander: Limited, V6, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Panorama Sunroof, Backup Cam $28,500 #28374A

'15 Toyota Rav-4: LE $15,582 #P06385A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Toyota Rav-4: Bla ck, Loa de d $10,776 #P6319A

'17 Volkswagen Tiguan: SEL, Nav, Pano Roof, Fender Audio, 10K $23,990 $V18043A

'16 Volvo XC60 T6: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, GPS, Backup Camera, Sunroof $30,963 #96733A

'16 Volvo XC90 T6: Inscription, One Owner, Heated Front Seats, Backup Camera $42,963 #28185A

'14 Volvo XC60: AWD, Loaded, Black, $20,990 #B8851

Mini vans '07 Chrys Town & Country Won't Last!! $6,469 #P6334A '16 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, Allows, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $15,490 #B8839

'13 Dodge Journey: SE, Automatic, Black w/Black Cloth $7,490 #C8575B

'10 Dodge Gra nd Ca ra va n SE: Ve ry Cle a n $7990 #42581A '13 Lincoln MKX: Loaded, Very Clean $17,277 #P6270A

'17 Lincoln Navigator: Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating, $42,963 #P9025

'16 Lincoln MKX: Reserve, Black, AWD, Nav, Loaded $39,990 #B8906

'17 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Low Miles, $34,963 #11116

'13 Toyota Sequoia: 4WD Limited, 5.7L V-8, Black, $34,333 #95572A

'16 Toyota Sequoia: Platinum, 5.7L V8, One Owner Clean Carfax, DVD, 4WD $46,147 #28439A

Vans '16 Chevy Express LT: 15 Passenger Van, Unlimited, 32K Miles, $23,969 #P6406


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Jayce Catchings Liberty basketball A 6-foot-2 sophomore guard, Catchings led the Eagles to their second consecutive district title. In the championship against Fulton in Hannibal, he had 23 points and six rebounds as the Eagles came out winners, 65-50. He also led the way in the semifinals with a doubledouble (18 points, 10 rebounds) in a 62-57 win over Warrenton. Catchings, who started every game this season, averaged 16.7 points, 4.2 rebounds and 2.1 assists. He was named to alltournament teams at Warrenton and Parkway West and first-team all-conference in the GAC Central. Yani Curry Francis Howell Central basketball A 5-foot-9 junior forward, Curry led the Spartans to their first district title since 2012. In the semifinals against Timberland, she had a game-high 21 points to go along with six rebounds in a 37-20 win. She had a double-double with 16 points and 10 rebounds to lift the Spartans to a 53-40 win over Fort Zumwalt West in the championship. A three-year starter, Curry was an all-tournament selection at Lutheran St. Charles, St. Dominic and Union. She was an all-conference and all-district pick as a sophomore and is averaging a team-high 12.8 points to go along with 5.3 rebounds and 2.7 steals. Curry also runs track. Jordan Holmes Columbia basketball A 6-foot senior point guard, Holmes led the Eagles to a regional championship, culminating in an upset with over previously undefeated Alton Marquette in the title game. Against Marquette, Holmes poured in a game-high 31 points and grabbed 10 rebounds as the Eagles slipped by the Explorers 55-53. He also led the way in the regional semifinals with 20 points, eight rebounds, four assists and five steals in a 55-39 win over Civic Memorial. A four-year starter and two-time all-Cahokia Conference Mississippi Division honoree, Holmes has committed to University of Illinois as a preferred walk-on to play football. Tionne Taylor Francis Howell basketball A 5-foot-5 senior guard, Taylor led the Vikings to a district title. In the championship against Lafayette, she scored a game-high 23 points and made five steals in a 52-41 win. Taylor scored 15 of her points in the first half as the Vikings built a 30-15 lead. She was coming off a monster game in the semifinals against Marquette as she netted 33 points and grabbed seven rebounds to help the Vikings to a 58-46 win. A three-year starter, Taylor is averaging a team-best 17.2 points and 3.1 steals to go along with 4.9 rebounds. She was named first team-all-conference in the GAC South and has committed to McKendree University. Nick Thorpe De Smet hockey A 5-foot-8, 160-pound senior forward, Thorpe came up big to help the Spartans top fourtime defending Mid-States Challenge Cup champion in the semifinals. With the Spartans down one game to none in the best-of-3 series, they broke out to a 3-0 lead in Game 2 and Thorpe scored a pair of even-strength goals in the midway through second period to make it 5-1 and give his team some breathing room en route to a 5-2 win. Thorpe then sealed the series win with an empty-net goal in a 2-0 win in the decisive mini-game. Thorpe leads the Spartans in scoring with 20 goals and 16 assists. Cameron VanLeer Pacific basketball A 6-foot-4 senior guard, VanLeer led the Indians to their first district championship since 1982. VanLeer scored a game-high 25 points in the championship against Borgia and came up with a key block on a Jacob Unnerstall jumper in the final minute that turned the tide. Borgia had gone on an 11-0 run and trailed by one point when VanLeer made the play and finished with a basket on other end. The player of the year in the Four Rivers conference, VanLeer averaged 20 points a game this season. Torrence Watson Whitfield basketball A 6-foot-4 senior guard and Mizzou signee, Watson finished his high school career with a flourish. He burned the nets for 51 points in a 78-68 loss to Charleston in a Class 3 state quarterfinal. That effort came on the heels of two other big games. He had 44 points and nine rebounds in a sectional win over Park Hills Central and put up 33 points and eight rebounds in a districtchampionship victory over Hancock. A threetime Missouri Basketball Coaches Association all-state selection, Watson averaged 31.2 points to lead the area in scoring this season and finished with 2,755 career points. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 5 SECTIONAL

SECOND CHANCE

Ebert’s 3-pointers help Howell Central to second quarterfinal in program history BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

TOWN AND COUNTRY •

Lauren Ebert learned a valuable — yet painful — lesson in January. The Francis Howell Central junior guard was temporarily benched by coach Hayley Leake during an uninspiring effort. “I wasn’t doing the right things,” Ebert said. “So, I didn’t play.” In the middle of a 28-point loss to Jefferson City, Leake banished Ebert, a key cog in the attack. Leake also kept Ebert on the bench for the next game against Borgia. “I just didn’t like the way she responded to certain things,” Leake said. Ebert made up for her midseason mistakes in a big way Wednesday. The 5-foot-8 sharpshooter hit a pair of huge 3-pointers during crunch time to lift the Spartans to a 35-34 win over Jefferson City in a Class 5 girls basketball sectional at Maryville University. Central (23-5) will face Kirkwood (25-3) in a quarterfinal game at 6 p.m. Saturday at Lindenwood University. Howell Central reached the quarterfinal round for only the second time in the history of the school, which opened in 1997. The Spartans made the elite eight in 2012 before losing to Fort Zumwalt West. “It feels good because we worked so hard for this,” Ebert said. Jefferson City beat Howell Central 53-28 on Jan. 12 in the semifinal round of the Union Tournament. The Jays (20-7) came into Wednesday’s contest riding a 14-game winning streak. But the Spartans were determined to erase the memory

BENJAMEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Francis Howell Central’s Lauren Ebert (15) helped key a victory against Jefferson City in a Missouri Class 5 girls basketball sectional Wednesday at Moloney Arena in the Simon Athletics Center on the campus of Maryville University in Town and Country.

of the blowout loss from 54 days earlier. Ebert helped make it happen with a pair of 3-point bombs in a span of 56 seconds late in the game. Her second triple, with 2:32 remaining, put her team up for good 31-29. “I haven’t been hitting them before today,” Ebert said. “But, I felt good. Got started with a couple and tried to keep going.” Ebert finished with a teamhigh 12 points, all on 3-pointers. She connected on four of seven from long range. Sophomore Azaria Hulbert added nine points for the winners. Makenzie Schierding canned a pair of foul shots down the stretch and Yani Curry added seven rebounds. Hannah Currant chipped in to the strong team effort with four points over the second and third quarters when the

offense was stuck in neutral. “These girls did as good a job as we could ask for given the time we had to prepare,” Leake said. “It came down to execution of game plan and they did that so well.” Howell Central made an early statement by bolting to a 16-8 lead in the first half. “I think we wanted to show them that this wasn’t going to be like last time,” Hulbert said. “We were ready and we wanted it.” The taller Jays slowly chipped away at the lead as Howell Central went cold from the field, missing 13 of 14 shots at one point. The Spartans led 21-17 midway through the third quarter despite not making a field goal since the final seconds of the first period. Jefferson City took its first lead of the night midway

BOYS BASKETBALL • CLASS 5 SECTIONAL

Hazelwood Central holds off charge by Poplar Bluff to reach quarterfinals BY JOE HARRIS | Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

HILLSBORO, MO. • Hazelwood Central boys basketball coach Brandon Gilmore could only sit in his chair and hold his head in his hands. The congratulations from the Hawks’ faithful seemed distant as he tried to wrap his head around Central’s 66-64 win over Poplar Bluff in a Class 5 sectional game at Jefferson College on Wednesday night. “I’m cool now,” Gilmore said. “I had to calm down. I had to sit down and gather my thoughts.” Central overcame a sloppy start and a double-digit deficit to take a 10-point lead in the fourth quarter, only to face a fierce comeback by Poplar Bluff, who had two chances at the buzzer that would have sent the game to overtime. Central (27-2) will play No. 4 Chaminade (25-2) in the quarterfinals at Lindenwood University on Saturday at 2:45 p.m. Shaun Williams led the Hawks with 18 points. Cameron Williams scored 14, Telly Wright scored 13 and Xavier Ball added 10 points. Wright sank a pair of free throws with 12.6 seconds left to break a 64-64 tie. “I thought back to just being on the practice court where nobody’s around me, it’s just me, and I made them,” Wright said. Then the drama escalated quickly. Poplar Bluff’s Dominique Hardimon was fouled with 3.6 seconds left. After missing the first free throw, Hardimon intentionally missed the second and teammate Carlton McDonald-Jordan came down with it. McDonald-Jordan’s put-back attempt was off the mark and so was another desperation tip by the Mules as the buzzer sounded. “My team boxed out, but the ball bounced right into their hands so once they went up with the first shot I had a heart attack, I was like, ‘ohhh,’ and once they get another rebound I almost had another heart attack, but it bounced right out so I was happy,” Wright said. “But we

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Hazelwood Central’s Cameron Williams (23) shoots over Poplar Bluff’s Rodney Houston (5) and Carlton McDonald-Jordan during a Class 5 boys basketball sectional Wednesday at Jefferson College in Hillsboro.

can’t let it get to that point next time.” Poplar Bluff (18-9) took advantage of a sloppy start by Central. Hardimon, who scored a game-high 28, had a pair of buckets and Tyler Cline added a trey to give the Mules a 15-5 lead at the end of the first quarter. Central shot just 15 percent (2-for-13) in the opening frame, including several missed layups. Another Cline 3-ball extended Poplar Bluff’s lead to 12 points midway through the second quarter. “We were too hyped and we weren’t following our game plan,” Gilmore said. “We were too fast and we weren’t playing to our defensive principals. We played a ‘D’ game and we still pulled it out.” Central finally found its rhythm by turning up the defensive intensity as the Hawks forced three straight Mules turnovers, each of which turned into easy buckets. Cameron Williams hit a 3-pointer and Shaun Williams had a pair of layups during the turnover spurt as Central cut the

Poplar Bluff lead to 29-24 at halftime. “When we got back to the locker room at halftime, Cameron Williams, Shaun (Williams), we just told everybody to stay calm,” Wright said. “We’re good. We’re going to face adversity, it’s just how you attack it.” The Hawks kept their momentum going after the break. Cameron Williams got a dunk off of a steal and Wright followed with a trey to tie it 39-39. Cameron Williams’ 3-pointer with 1:39 left in the third gave Central its first lead of the game and Ball’s third basket of the quarter helped give the Hawks a 4642 lead heading into the fourth quarter. Another Wright 3-pointer and a Shaun Williams put-back extended Central’s lead to 54-44 early in the fourth. But Poplar Bluff answered with two McDonald-Jordan treys and a Hardimon 3-point play to pull even at 64-64. “It was a tough ‘W,’” Shaun Williams said. “I’ll take an ugly ‘W’ over anything.”

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through the final period behind the one-two punch of Micah Linthacum and Caitlin Anderson. Linthacum pushed the lead to 28-25 on a short jumper with 4:33 left. But the Spartans regrouped behind Ebert’s two 3-pointers. Her first one tied the game 2828. After the Jays went up by a point, Ebert answered with a dagger from the baseline. Schierding then added two free throws to pump the lead to 33-29. Jefferson City fought back to within one on a 3-pointer by Marshi Baird. The Jays then forced a turnover with 22 ticks on the clock. But Howell Central dug in on defense down the stretch. I’m sure a lot of people didn’t think we could do this,” Ebert said. “But we believed, and to us, that’s all that mattered.”

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SPORTS

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM BOYS BASKETBALL • CLASS 3A CENTRALIA SECTIONAL

IN YOUR FACE

East St. Louis clamps down on defense to oust Centralia BY BUCKY DENT | For sTLhighschoolsports.com

CENTRALIA, ILL. • Just inside the entrance to Trout Arena, there is a sign with the number of Centralia High basketball wins in LED lights. It read 2,245 as fans walked in for Wednesday night’s Class 3A sectional semifinal. East St. Louis will keep it frozen on that number until November. Putting the defensive clamps on the Orphans after a disastrous ending to the first half, the Flyers limited them to just 20 second-half points on the way to a 62-50 victory. Terrance Hargrove scored a team-high 18 points for the Flyers (1610), who will play Marion at 7 p.m. Friday for the sectional title and a berth in the Springield SuperSectional on Tuesday night. Joe Reece chipped in with 16 points and 11 rebounds for the winners. “We knew we had to come in here and play hard,” Hargrove said. “We fixed our mistakes from the first half and stayed focused in the second half.” The Flyers appeared to be headed for trouble at the break. Ahead 30-25 and holding for the last shot with less than 30 seconds left, they somehow managed to go into the locker room tied at 30. Consecutive steals by Javon Williams led to a 3-point play and a layup, respectively, to energize the large home crowd.

But East St. Louis coach Mark Chambers displayed no signs of panic to his team. “I just told them to keep their composure,” Chambers said. “It was a tie game going to the half in Centralia. I’ll take that.” The Flyers put their heads down and battled their way through a physical second half that had rock fight written all over it for about 10 minutes. East St. Louis survived serious foul trouble – the Orphans (24-5) were shooting the bonus by the 2:41 mark of the third quarter – and yielded only seven third-quarter points. Hargrove provided the turning point when he followed a missed shot and threw down an emphatic dunk for a 44-37 lead. “That turned the game around,” Hargrove said. “That picked up the intensity.” Seconds later, Williams, the only Centralia player who could create his shot and score against the long Flyers, drew his fourth foul on an illegal screen with 5:55 left. While he didn’t foul out, he was subbed out on some defensive possessions, meaning the Orphans were shorthanded at the worst possible time. Then came critical help off the bench. Sophomore guard Jashawn Anderson delivered a couple of bold drives to the hoop after Williams’ 3-point play drew Centralia within 4643 at the 4:33 mark. That started a 7-0 spurt that put East St. Louis ahead

by 10 with less than three minutes left. Forced into a fouling game, the Orphans couldn’t possibly catch up. The Flyers did just enough at the line to make their way across the finish line. Williams did everything in his power to head off the end of his high school career. The 6-2 senior, who will play college football at SIU Carbondale, threw in a gamehigh 32 points, including all 15 of the Orphans’ points in the second quarter. “He does a lot of things for us, and in doing a lot of things, he sometimes tries to do too much,” Orphans coach Lee Bennett said. “It was high-volume, I understand that. Beating them wouldn’t have been impossible, but we didn’t have a big margin of error.” Few teams have much margin of error against East St. Louis. Since falling to 8-9 after a Jan. 19 loss to O’Fallon, it has won eight of nine games. With one Division I signee – Reece inked with Old Dominion in the fall – and one (Hargrove) who will win a scholarship next fall, the Flyers have enough talent to win anywhere. Chambers said they figured it out after a lateseason victory at Belleville East. “We’ve been able to carry that defensive effort over,” Chambers said. “We gained the momentum and carried it on. They believe in the system and they believe in me.”

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

E. St. Louis 18 12 12 20 62 Centralia IL 15 15 7 13 50 E (16-10): Hargrove Jr. 18, Reece 16, Anderson 9, Leflore 8, Jones 5, Rodgers 4, McClendon 2. FG 24 (3), FT 11-17. C (24-5): No statistics reported Howell 16 16 9 23 64 Chaminade 15 19 19 26 79 H (25-4): Schark 17, M. Simmons 14, Schulte 11, Dalton 10, Thompson 8, M. Simmons 4. FG 25 (4), FT 10-17. C (23-4): Batchman 21, Hellems 21, Kasubke 18, White 10, Vickers 6, Dunn 3. FG 28 (8), FT 15-23.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Howell 7 11 15 13 46 St. Joseph’s 21 14 8 13 56 H (20-9): T. Taylor 21, S. Russell 8, Pellegrini 7, T. Russell 7, Thompson 3. FG 10 (5), FT 21-26. S (22-6): Kerr 26, Lally 17, Sakamoto 6, Pudlowski 4, Tyson 3. FG 18 (6), FT 14-20. SLUH 11, Lafayette 3 Francis Howell 9, Ladue 5 MICDS 22, John Burroughs 0 Eureka 19, Seckman 0

Wednesday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University.

BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCOREBOARD MISSOURI BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Hazelwood Central 66, Poplar Bluff 64 Chaminade 79, Francis Howell 64 Rock Bridge 66, Willard 43 Parkview 63, Joplin 55 Webster Groves 93, CBC 79 Fort Zumwalt South 77, Battle 70 Rockhurst 64, Lee’s Summit West 59 Liberty-KC 61, Park Hill 53 Quarterfinals, Saturday Hazelwood Central (27-2) vs. Chaminade (23-4) at Lindenwood University, 2:45 p.m. Rock Bridge vs. Parkview at Southwest Baptist, 7:45 p.m. Webster Groves (19-9) vs. Fort Zumwalt South(24-4) at Lindenwood University, 7:45 p.m. Rockhurst (22-5) vs. Liberty-KC (21-7) at Independence Events Center, 2:45 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Sikeston 57, Hillsboro 56 St. Mary’s 83, Vashon 70 Logan-Rogersville 44, Carl Junction 43 Grandview-KC 62, Rolla 39 Parkway Central 70, Pacific 60 Jennings 43, Liberty 38 Raytown South 69, Kansas City Center 61 Kearney 70, St. Joseph Lafayette 65 Quarterfinals, Saturday St. Mary’s (27-3) vs. Sikeston (26-2) at Jefferson College, 2:45 p.m. Logan-Rogersville (24-3) vs. Grandview-KC (25-3) at Southwest Baptist, 2:45 p.m. Parkway Central (24-5) vs. Jennings (26-3) at Washington, 2:45 p.m. Raytown South (23-5) vs. Kearney (16-12) at Independence Events Ctr., 7:45 p.m. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -6:20 p.m. Friday Mountain Grove (30-1) vs Charleston (24-8) -8:10 p.m. Friday Hogan Prep (24-4) vs Northwest Academy (22-6) Third place at JQH Arena 12:50 p.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 8:10 p.m. Saturday CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -6:50 p.m. Thursday Hayti (22-5) vs Purdy (24-6) -8:30 p.m. Thursday Van-Far (27-3) vs. Mid-Buchanan (26-4) Third place at Hammons Student Center 12:50 p.m. Friday Championship at JQH Arena 4:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at JQH Arena -6:20 p.m. Friday Eminence (30-1) vs. Chamois (21-9) -8:10 p.m. Friday Walnut Grove (21-10) vs. North Andrew (28-0) Third place at Hammons Student Center 12:50 p.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 4:30 p.m. Saturday

ILLINOIS BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 4A PEKIN SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Belleville West 66, Quincy 33 Moline 55, Rock Island 43 Championship, at Pekin HS Belleville West (28-2) vs. Moline (24-7), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4A ROMEOVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Bolingbrook 94, Joliet Central 91 (2OT) Semifinal, Wednesday West Aurora 70, Lincoln-Way East 58 Championship Bolingbrook (22-6) vs. West Aurora (24-4), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 3A CENTRALIA SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Marion 49, Columbia 41

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

SOCCER

COLLEGES

NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 7 Nets 1 HEAT 76ers Celtics 8.5 T’WOLVES THUNDER 10 Suns WARRIORS 11.5 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Points Underdog Favorite Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament Virginia 7.5 Louisville Clemson 4 Boston College American Athletic Conference Tournament 2 Connecticut Smu 7 S Florida Memphis Temple 5.5 Tulane C FLORIDA 13.5 E Carolina Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament 2 Dayton Virginia Comm 2 Duquesne Richmond Mid American Conference Tournament Buffalo 8.5 C Michigan Ball St 3 Kent St Toledo 5.5 Miami-Ohio 5.5 Akron E Michigan Big East Conference Tournament Creighton 4 Providence Butler 1 Seton Hall Big 12 Conference Tournament 2.5 Kansas St Tcu W Virginia 4.5 Baylor Southeastern Conference Tournament Texas A&M 1.5 Alabama Mississippi St 1.5 Lsu Mountain West Conference Tournament Nevada 5 UNLV San Diego St 3 Fresno St Pac 12 Conference Tournament Arizona 10 Colorado Big West Conference Tournament 7 Cal-Riverside Cal-Davis CS-Fullerton 1.5 Long Beach St Cal-Irvine 4.5 Hawaii Cal-Santa Barb 11.5 Cal-Poly SLO Added Games Big Sky Conference Tournament 11 N Dakota Montana No Colorado 2 Weber St Idaho 8 Southern Utah E Washington 3 Portland St NHL Odds Underdog Favorite BLUE JACKETS -$155/+$135 Avalanche BRUINS -$170/+$150 Flyers DEVILS -$110/-$110 Jets SENATORS -$145/+$125 Sabres -$260/+$220 Rangers LIGHTNING PANTHERS -$200/+$170 Canadiens Vegas Knights -$140/+$120 RED WINGS PREDATORS -$150/+$130 Ducks BLACKHAWKS -$125/+$105 Hurricanes -$145/+$125 Islanders OILERS KINGS -$135/+$115 Capitals SHARKS -$145/+$125 Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 70.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Champions League

Area results

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS: Agreed to a minor league contract with RHP Ricky Nolasco. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Felix Jorge and LHP Dietrich Enns to Rochester (IL) and RHP Zack Littell and LHP Lewis Thorpe to Chattanooga (SL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Named Rollie Fingers special assistant to the president. SEATTLE MARINERS: Agreed to terms with OF Ichiro Suzuki on a one-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS: Designated C Brett Nicholas for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Agreed to terms with RHP Tyler Clippard on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS: Re-signed LS Aaron Brewer to a four-year contract. DETROIT LIONS: Named Steve Gregory defensive assistant coach. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Released TE Martellus Bennett and WR Bernard Reedy. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS: Exercised 2018 contract options on S Chris Conte, OT Demar Dotson and DB Josh Robinson. HOCKEY • NHL National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS: Recalled F Dylan Sadowy from Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW: Loaned G Ben Lundgaard to Indy (USL). D.C. UNITED: Acquired D Joseph Mora from Deportivo Saprissa (Primera Division-Costa Rica) on permanent transfer. COLLEGE EVANGEL: Announced the contract of women’s basketball coach Leon Neal will not be renewed. NYU: Announced the retirement of men’s basketball coach Joe Nesci.

SPRING TRAINING

BOYS LACROSSE

Semifinal, Wednesday East St. Louis 62, Centralia 50 Championship Marion (21-11) vs. East St. Louis (16-10), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 3A DECATUR EISENHOWER SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Springfield Lanphier 71, Champaign Central 69 (2OT) Semifinal, Wednesday Springfield Southeast 59, Mahomet-Seymour 45 Championship Springfield Lanphier (26-3) vs. Springfield Southeast (26-3), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 1A STATE TOURNAMENT At Peoria Civic Center Semifinals, Friday Newman Central Catholic (28-4) vs. Annawan (30-3), 11 a.m. Okawville (25-8) vs. Goreville (23-11), 12:45 p.m. Saturday’s games Third place, 11 a.m. Championship, 12:45 p.m.

MISSOURI GIRLS BASKETBALL

CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Hazelwood Central 58, Jackson 47 St. Joseph’s 56, Francis Howell 46 Camdenton 56, Blue Springs 49 Kickapoo 71, Nixa 58 Kirkwood 49, Oakville 40 Francis Howell Central 35, Jefferson City 34 Lee’s Summit North 47, North Kansas City 46 Liberty-KC 40, Staley 28 Quarterfinals, Saturday Hazelwood Central (21-6) vs. St. Joseph’s (22-6) at Lindenwood University, 1 p.m. Camdenton (20-7) vs. Kickapoo (26-3) at Southwest Baptist University, 6 p.m. Kirkwood (25-3) vs. Francis Howell Central (23-5) at Lindenwood University, 6 p.m. Lee’s Summit North (21-5) vs. Liberty-KC (21-7) at Independence Events Ctr., 1 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Dexter 61, North County 23 Miller Career 63, Gateway STEM 61 (OT) Carl Junction 27, Logan-Rogersville 24 Osage 48, Nevada 45 MICDS 70, Sullivan 68 ((2OT) Incarnate Word 65, St. Dominic 44 Lincoln College Prep 78, Marshall 59 Kearney 48, St. Joseph benton 43 Quarterfinals, Saturday Miller Career (17-9) vs. Dexter (23-5) at Jefferson College, 1 p.m. Carl Junction (24-3) vs. Osage (22-6) at Southwest Baptist, 1 p.m. MICDS (24-4) vs. Incarnate Word (24-5) at Washington HS, 1 p.m. Lincoln College Prep (21-3) vs. Kearney (25-3) at Ind.Events Center, 6 p.m. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -2:40 p.m. Friday Strafford (31-0) vs. Whitfield (22-6) -4:30 p.m. Friday California (25-4) vs. Clark County (28-1) Third place at JQH Arena 11 a.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 6:20 p.m. Saturday CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -3:30 p.m. Thursday Skyline (29-2) vs Neelyville (24-4) -5:10 p.m. Thursday Mid-Buchanan (28-2) vs Northeast Cairo (24-6) Third place at Hammons Student Center 11 a.m. Friday. Championship at JQH Arena 2:40 p.m. Friday CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at JQH Arena -11 a.m. Friday Bradleyville (25-5) vs. Glasgow (22-7) -12:50 p.m. Friday Mound City (27-3) vs. Wheatland (24-5) Third place at Hammons Student Center 11 a.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 2:40 p.m. Saturday

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B13

AMERICAN W L Pct. 10 2 0.833 New York 9 5 0.643 Houston Kansas City 6 4 0.600 7 6 0.583 Cleveland Chicago 7 5 0.583 Boston 8 6 0.571 7 7 0.500 Los Angeles Minnesota 6 6 0.500 6 6 Baltimore 0.500 6 7 0.462 Tampa Bay Detroit 6 7 0.462 5 6 0.455 Seattle Oakland 4 5 0.444 5 8 Toronto 0.385 3 8 0.273 Texas NATIONAL W L Pct. 9 2 0.800 Chicago Milwaukee 8 4 0.667 Miami 7 4 0.636 7 5 0.583 San Diego Los Angeles 7 6 0.538 6 6 Atlanta 0.500 6 7 0.462 Washington Arizona 6 7 0.462 5 6 Cardinals 0.455 5 7 0.417 Colorado Philadelphia 5 8 0.385 5 8 0.385 New York San Francisco 4 7 0.364 3 7 Pittsburgh 0.300 4 10 0.286 Cincinnati Wednesday Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 2 Philadelphia 2, Boston (ss) 1 Miami 7, Houston 6 Toronto (ss) 6, Detroit 5 Cardinals 4, Washington 3 Minnesota 8, Boston (ss) 1 Toronto (ss) 13, Pittsburgh 4 NY Yankees 11, NY Mets 4 Chicago White Sox 14, Cincinnati 12 Milwaukee 10, Kansas City 6 San Diego 4, San Francisco 4, 10 innings LA Dodgers 4, LA Angels 2 Colorado 5, Texas 4 Chicago Cubs 11, Cleveland 6 Oakland vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., late Thursday Detroit vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Miami vs. Cardinals at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Washington at West Palm Beach, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 7:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 7:40 p.m. Friday Boston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 12:07 p.m. Arizona vs. Kansas City (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 2:05 p.m. Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) vs. LA Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. NY Yankees vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 5:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Houston at West Palm Beach, Fla., 5:05 p.m. Texas vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 7:05 p.m.

(Home teams listed first) Second Leg Tuesday Liverpool (England) 0, Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool advanced 5-0 aggregate Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1, Real Madrid (Spain) 2, Real Madrid advanced on 5-2 aggregate Wednesday Manchester City (England) 1, Basel (Switzerland) 2, Manchester City advanced on 5-2 aggregate Tottenham (England) 1, Juventus (Italy) 2, Juventus advanced on 4-3 aggregate March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

BOXING March 9 At Costa Mesa, Calif. (ESPN2), Ronny Rios vs. Azat Hovhannisyan, 10, junior featherweights. At Deadwood (S.D.) Mountain Grand (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Julius Indongo, 12, for vacant interim WBC super lightweight title; Ivan Baranchyk vs. Anthony Yigit, 12, junior welterweight eliminator. March 10 At Struer, Denmark, Dina Thorslund vs. Alicia Ashley, 10, for vacant WBC interim women’s junior featherweight title; Dennis Ceylan vs. Jesus Sanchez, 10, featherweights. At Alamodome, San Antonio (SHO), Sergey Lipinets vs. Mikey Garcia, 12, for Lipinets’s IBF junior welterweight title; Rances Barthelemy vs. Kiryl Relikh, 12, for the vacant WBA World super lightweight title; Richard Commey vs. Alejandro Luna, 12, lightweights; Mario Barrios vs. Eudy Bernardo, 10, junior welterweights. At Carson, Calif. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Andy Vences vs. Erick DeLeon, 10, junior lightweights. March 17 At Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York (ESPN), Jose Ramirez vs. Amir Imam, 12, for the vacant WBC World super lightweight title; Oleksandr Gvozdyk vs. Mehdi Amar, 12, for vacant WBC interim light heavyweight title; Felix Verdejo vs Antonio Lozada Jr., 10, lightweights; Christopher Diaz vs. Miguel Beltran Jr., 10, super featherweights. At Villa Dolores, Cordoba, Argentina, Javier Aristule vs. Alberto Melian, 10, bantamweights. March 18 At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Moises Calleros, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title. At Marseille, France Ryad Merhy vs. Arsen Goulamirian, 12, for vacant WBA World cruiserweight title. At Cardiff, Wales (SHO), Anthony Joshua vs. Joseph Parker, 12, IBF-WBA-WBO heavyweight titles; Alexander Povetkin vs. David Price, 12, heavyweights. April 7 At TBA (SHO), Jarrett Hurd vs. Erislandy Lara, 12, IBF-WBA junior middleweight titles. At San Juan, Puerto Rico, Angel Acosta vs. Ryuji Hara, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title. At Gray Eagle Resort & Casino, Calgary, Michael Farenas vs. Guadalupe Rosales, lightweights. April 14 At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Martin Murray, 12, for Saunders’ WBO middleweight title; Terry Flanagan vs. Maurice Hooker, 12, for the vacant WBO super lightweight title. April 15 At Yokohama, Japan, Ryota Murata vs. Felice Blandamura, 12, for Murata’s WBA World middleweight title. April 21 At TBA (SHO), Adrien Broner vs. Omar Figueroa, 12, junior welterweights. May 5 At TBA (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s IBF-WBA-WBC middleweight titles. May 11 At Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for IBF-WBA-WBC cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final).

GOLF PGA Champions tour March 9-11 • Toshiba Classic, Newport Beach CC, Newport Beach, Calif. March 23-25 • Rapiscan Systems Classic, Fallen Oak, Biloxi, Miss. April 13-15 • Mitsubishi Electric Classic, TPC Sugarloaf, Duluth, Ga. April 20-22 • Bass Pro Shops Legends of Golf at Big Cedar Lodge, Top of the Rock, Ridgedale, Mo. May 4-6 • Insperity Invitational, The Woodlands CC, The Woodlands, Texas May 17-20 • Regions Tradition, Greystone Golf & CC, Birmingham, Ala. May 24-27 • Senior PGA Championship, The Golf Club at Harbor Shores, Benton Harbor, Mich. June 8-10 • Principal Charity Classic, Wakonda Club, Des Moines, Iowa June 22-24 • American Family Insurance Championship, University Ridge GC, Madison, Wis. June 28-July 1 • U.S. Senior Open, The Broadmoor GC, Colorado Springs, Colo. July 12-15 • Constellation Senior Players Championship, Exmoor CC, Highland Park, Ill. July 26-29 • Senior British Open, St. Andrews (Old Course), St. Andrews, Scotland Aug. 3-5 • 3M Championship, TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn. Aug. 17-19 • Dicks Sporting Goods Open, En-Joie GC, Endicott, N.Y. Aug. 24-26 • Boeing Classic, The Club at Snoqualmie Ridge, Snoqualmie, Wash. Aug. 31-Sept. 2 • Shaw Charity Classic, Canyon Meadows G&CC, Calgary, Alberta Sept. 14-16 • The Ally Challenge, Warwick Hills G&CC, Grand Blanc, Mich. Sept. 21-23 • Sanford International, Minnehaha CC, Sioux Falls, S.D. Sept. 28-30 • Pure Insurance Championship, Pebble Beach GL, Pebble Beach, Calif. Oct. 12-14 • SAS Championship, Prestonwood CC, Cary, N.C. Oct. 19-21 • Dominion Energy Charity Classic, The Country Club of Virginia, Richmond, Va. Oct. 26-28 • PowerShares QQQ Championship, Sherwood CC, Thousand Oaks, Calif. Nov. 9-11 • Charles Schwab Cup Championship, Phoenix CC, Phoenix Dec. 14-16 • PNC Father-Son Challenge, Ritz Carlton GC, Orlando, Fla.

LPGA Tour March 15-18 • Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25 • Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1 • ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif. April 11-14 • LOTTE Championship, Ko Olina GC, Kapolei, Hawaii April 19-22 • HUGEL-JTBC Championship, Wilshire CC, Los Angeles April 26-29 • Event name TBA, Lake Merced GC, San Francisco May 3-6 • Volunteers of America LPGA Texas Classic, Old American GC, The Colony, Texas May 17-20 • Kingsmill Championship, Kingsmill Resort, Williamsburg, Va. May 24-27 • LPGA Volvik Championship, Travis Pointe CC, Ann Arbor, Mich. May 31-June 3 • U.S. Women’s Open, Shoal Creek (Ala.) G&CC June 8-10 • ShopRite LPGA Classic, Stockton Seaview Hotel and GC, Galloway, N.J. June 14-17 • Meijer LPGA Classic, Blythefield CC, Grand Rapids, Mich. June 22-24 • Walmart NW Arkansas Championship, Pinnacle CC, Rogers, Ark. June 28-July 1 • KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, Kemper Lakes GC, Olympia Fields, Ill. July 5-8 • Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, Thornberry Creek at Oneida (Wis.) July 12-15 • Marathon Classic, Highland Meadows GC, Sylvania, Ohio July 26-29 • Aberdeen Standard Investments Ladies Scottish Open, Gullane GC, East Lothian, Scotland Aug. 2-5 • Ricoh Women’s British Open, Royal Lytham & St Annes, Lancashire, England Aug. 16-19 • Indy Women in Tech Championship, Brickyard Crossing GC, Indianapolis Aug. 23-26 • CP Women’s Open, Wascana CC, Regina, Saskatchewan Aug. 30-Sept. 2 • Cambia Portland (Ore.) Classic, Columbia Edgewater CC Sept. 13-16 • The Evian Championship, Evian Resort, Evian-les-Bains, France Sept. 27-30 • Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia, TPC Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Oct. 4-7 • UL International Crown, Jack Nicklaus GC Korea, Incheon Oct. 11-14 • LPGA KEB-Hana Bank Championship, Incheon, South Korea. Oct. 18-21 • Event name TBA, course TBA, Shanghai Oct. 25-28 • Swinging Skirts LPGA Taiwan Championship, Miramar G&CC, New Taipai City Nov. 2-4 • TOTO Japan Classic, Seta GC, Shiga, Japan Nov. 7-10 • Blue Bay LPGA, Jian Lake Blue Bay GC, Hainan Island, China Nov. 15-18 • CME Group Tour Championship, Tiburon GC, Naples, Fla.

Baseball

Grand Valley State 8, UMSL 6 Grand Valley State 7, UMSL 3

Conference tournaments AMERICA EAST CONFERENCE Semifinals | Tuesday Vermont 70, Stony Brook 51 UMBC 75, Hartford 60 Championship | Saturday Vermont vs. UMBC, 10 a.m. AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday UConn vs. SMU, 11 a.m. Memphis vs. South Florida, 1:30 p.m. Temple vs. Tulane, 7 p.m UCF vs. East Carolina, 8:30 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 2:30 p.m. ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE Second Round | Wednesday Louisville 82, Florida State 74 Boston College 91, N.C. State 87 Notre Dame 71, Virginia Tech 65 North Carolina vs. Syracuse, late Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. ATLANTIC SUN CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Lipscomb 108, Florida G.C. 96 ATLANTIC 10 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday UMass 69, La Salle 67 G. Wash. 78, Fordham 72 Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, Noon BIG EAST CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday St. John’s 88, Georgetown 77 Marquette vs. DePaul, late Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m. BIG SKY CONFERENCE First Round | Tuesday North Dakota 76, Montana State 74 Northern Colorado 82, Northern Arizona 59 Southern Utah 76, Idaho State 68 Portland State 71, Sacramento State 67 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:05 p.m. BIG SOUTH CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Radford 55, Liberty 52 BIG TEN CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Michigan 75, Purdue 66 BIG 12 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Oklahoma State 71, Oklahoma 60 Texas 68, Iowa State 64 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. BIG WEST CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday UC Davis vs. UC Riverside, 2 p.m. Cal State Fullerton vs. Long Beach State, 4:30 p.m. UC Irvine vs. Hawaii, 8 p.m. UC Santa Barbara vs. Cal Poly, 10:30 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 10:30 p.m. COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Championship | Tuesday College of Charleston 83, Northeastern 76, OT CONFERENCE USA First Round | Wednesday Southern Miss 69, FIU 68 UTSA 71, UTEP 58 North Texas vs. Louisiana Tech, late UAB vs. FAU, late Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. HORIZON LEAGUE Championship | Tuesday Wright State 74, Cleveland State 57 IVY LEAGUE First Round | Saturday Harvard vs. Cornell, 11:30 a.m. Pennsylvania vs. Yale, 2 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE Championship | Monday Iona 83, Fairfield 71 MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE Quarterfinals | Thursday Buffalo vs. Central Michigan, 11 a.m. Ball State vs. Kent State, 1:30 p.m. Toledo vs. Miami (Ohio), 5:30 p.m. Eastern Michigan vs. Akron, 8 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE Quarterfinals | Wednesday Hampton 75, Florida A&M 71 Morgan State 78, Beth.-Cook. 77 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, Noon MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Loyola (Chi.) 65, Illinois State 49 MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday UNLV 97, Air Force 90, OT Utah State 76, Colorado State 65 Wyoming 74, San Jose State 61 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. NORTHEAST CONFERENCE Championship | Tuesday LIU Brooklyn 71, Wagner 61 OHIO VALLEY CONFERENCE Championship | Saturday Murray State 68, Belmont 51 PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Colorado 97, Arizona State 85 Stanford 76, California 58 Oregon State 69, Washington 66 (OT) Oregon vs. Washington State, late Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 9 p.m. PATRIOT LEAGUE Championship | Wednesday Bucknell 83, Colgate 54 SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Georgia vs. Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. South Carolina vs. Mississippi, 8:30 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, Noon SOUTHERN CONFERENCE Championship | Monday UNC-Greensboro 62, ETSU 47 SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday New Orleans 83, Texas A&M-Corpus 76 Central Arkansas 67, Lamar 57 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 8 p.m. SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Tuesday Arkansas-Pine Bluff 77, MVSU 73 Southern 62, Jackson State 60 Texas South. 90, Alabama State 76 Prairie View A&M 87, Alcorn State 71 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 4 p.m. SUMMIT LEAGUE Championship | Tuesday South Dakota State 97, South Dakota 87 SUN BELT CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Texas State 73, Coast. Carolina 66 Appalachian State 93, Little Rock 64 Troy 68, South Alabama 63 La.-Monroe 76, Arkansas State 54 Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 1 p.m. WEST COAST CONFERENCE Championship Gonzaga 74, BYU 54 WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday Grand Canyon vs. UMKC, 2 p.m. Utah Valley vs. CSU Bakersfield, 4:30 p.m. New Mexico State vs. Chicago State, 8 p.m. Seattle vs. UT Rio Grande Valley, 10:30 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.


SPORTS

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 2

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM BOYS BASKETBALL • CLASS 3A CENTRALIA SECTIONAL

IN YOUR FACE

East St. Louis clamps down on defense to oust Centralia BY BUCKY DENT For sTLhighschoolsports.com

CENTRALIA, ILL. • Just

inside the entrance to Trout Arena, there is a sign with the number of Centralia High basketball wins in LED lights. It read 2,245 as fans walked in for Wednesday night’s Class 3A sectional semifinal. East St. Louis will keep it frozen on that number until November. Putting the defensive clamps on the Orphans after a disastrous ending to the first half, the Flyers limited them to just 20 second-half points on the way to a 62-50 victory. Terrance Hargrove scored a team-high 18 points for the Flyers (1610), who will play Marion at 7 p.m. Friday for the sectional title and a berth in the Springield SuperSectional on Tuesday . Joe Reece chipped in with 16 points and 11 rebounds for the winners. “We knew we had to come in here and play hard,” Hargrove said. “We fixed our mistakes from the first half and stayed focused.” The Flyers appeared to be headed for trouble at the break. Ahead 30-25 and holding for the last shot with less than 30 seconds left, they ended up tied 30-30 at the half. But East St. Louis coach Mark Chambers displayed no signs of panic to his team. “I just told them to keep their composure,” Chambers said. “It was a tie game going to the half in Centralia. I’ll take that.” The Flyers put their heads down and battled

PAUL BAILLARGEON • special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

Travion Jones of East St. Louis puts up a shot against Centralia in the Class 3A Central Sectional semifinal against host Centralia on Wednesday.

their way through a physical second half that had rock fight written all over it for about 10 minutes. East St. Louis survived serious foul trouble – the Orphans (24-5) were shooting the bonus by the 2:41 mark of the third quarter – and yielded only seven thirdquarter points. Hargrove provided the turning point when he followed a missed shot and threw down a dunk for a 44-37 lead. “That turned the game around,” Hargrove said. “That picked up the intensity.” Seconds later, Javon Williams drew his fourth foul on an illegal screen with 5:55 left. While he didn’t foul out, he was subbed out on some defensive possessions, meaning the Orphans were shorthanded at the worst possible time. Then came critical help off the bench. S o p h o m o re g u a rd Jashawn Anderson delivered a couple of bold drives to the hoop after Williams’ 3-point play drew Centralia within 46-43 at the 4:33 mark.

That started a 7-0 spurt that put East St. Louis ahead by 10 with less than three minutes left. The Flyers did just enough at the line to make their way across the finish line. Williams, a 6-2 senior who will play college football at SIU Carbondale, threw in a game-high 32 points, including all 15 of the Orphans’ points in the second quarter. Few teams have much margin of error against East St. Louis. Since falling to 8-9 after a Jan. 19 loss to O’Fallon, it has won eight of nine games. With one Division I signee – Reece inked with Old Dominion in the fall – and one (Hargrove) who will win a scholarship next fall, the Flyers have enough talent to win anywhere. Chambers said they figured it out after a lateseason victory at Belleville East. “We’ve been able to carry that defensive effort over,” Chambers said. “We gained the momentum and carried it on. They believe in the system and they believe in me.”

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

E. St. Louis 18 12 12 20 62 Centralia IL 15 15 7 13 50 E (16-10): Hargrove Jr. 18, Reece 16, Anderson 9, Leflore 8, Jones 5, Rodgers 4, McClendon 2. FG 24 (3), FT 11-17. C (24-5): No statistics reported Howell 16 16 9 23 64 Chaminade 15 19 19 26 79 H (25-4): Schark 17, M. Simmons 14, Schulte 11, Dalton 10, Thompson 8, M. Simmons 4. FG 25 (4), FT 10-17. C (23-4): Batchman 21, Hellems 21, Kasubke 18, White 10, Vickers 6, Dunn 3. FG 28 (8), FT 15-23. Haz. Central 5 19 22 20 66 Poplar Bluff 15 14 13 22 64 H (27-2): C. Williams 17, Wright 14, S. Williams 13, Ball 10, Craddieth 5, CovingtonBerry 4, Heard 2. FG 22 (4), FT 17-25.

Battle 13 20 16 21 70 FZ South 17 18 18 24 77 F (24-4): Schwepker 21, Bellinger 20, Thomas 12, Patton 8, Bekebrede 7, Carter 6, Stephens 3. FG 25 (8), FT 19-26. Howell 7 11 15 13 46 St. Joseph’s 21 14 8 13 56 H (20-9): T. Taylor 21, S. Russell 8, Pellegrini 7, T. Russell 7, Thompson 3. FG 10 (5), FT 21-26. S (22-6): Kerr 26, Lally 17, Sakamoto 6, Pudlowski 4, Tyson 3. FG 18 (6), FT 14-20.

BOYS LACROSSE

SLUH 11, Lafayette 3 Francis Howell 9, Ladue 5 MICDS 22, John Burroughs 0 Eureka 19, Seckman 0

Wednesday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University.

BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCOREBOARD MISSOURI BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Hazelwood Central 66, Poplar Bluff 64 Chaminade 79, Francis Howell 64 Rock Bridge 66, Willard 43 Parkview 63, Joplin 55 Webster Groves 93, CBC 79 Fort Zumwalt South 77, Battle 70 Rockhurst 64, Lee’s Summit West 59 Liberty-KC 61, Park Hill 53 Quarterfinals, Saturday Hazelwood Central (27-2) vs. Chaminade (23-4) at Lindenwood University, 2:45 p.m. Rock Bridge vs. Parkview at Southwest Baptist, 7:45 p.m. Webster Groves (19-9) vs. Fort Zumwalt South(24-4) at Lindenwood University, 7:45 p.m. Rockhurst (22-5) vs. Liberty-KC (21-7) at Independence Events Center, 2:45 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Sikeston 57, Hillsboro 56 St. Mary’s 83, Vashon 70 Logan-Rogersville 44, Carl Junction 43 Grandview-KC 62, Rolla 39 Parkway Central 70, Pacific 60 Jennings 43, Liberty 38 Raytown South 69, Kansas City Center 61 Kearney 70, St. Joseph Lafayette 65 Quarterfinals, Saturday St. Mary’s (27-3) vs. Sikeston (26-2) at Jefferson College, 2:45 p.m. Logan-Rogersville (24-3) vs. Grandview-KC (25-3) at Southwest Baptist, 2:45 p.m. Parkway Central (24-5) vs. Jennings (26-3) at Washington, 2:45 p.m. Raytown South (23-5) vs. Kearney (16-12) at Independence Events Ctr., 7:45 p.m. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -6:20 p.m. Friday Mountain Grove (30-1) vs Charleston (24-8) -8:10 p.m. Friday Hogan Prep (24-4) vs Northwest Academy (22-6) Third place at JQH Arena 12:50 p.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 8:10 p.m. Saturday CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -6:50 p.m. Thursday Hayti (22-5) vs Purdy (24-6) -8:30 p.m. Thursday Van-Far (27-3) vs. Mid-Buchanan (26-4) Third place at Hammons Student Center 12:50 p.m. Friday Championship at JQH Arena 4:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at JQH Arena -6:20 p.m. Friday Eminence (30-1) vs. Chamois (21-9) -8:10 p.m. Friday Walnut Grove (21-10) vs. North Andrew (28-0) Third place at Hammons Student Center 12:50 p.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 4:30 p.m. Saturday

ILLINOIS BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 4A PEKIN SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Belleville West 66, Quincy 33 Moline 55, Rock Island 43 Championship, at Pekin HS Belleville West (28-2) vs. Moline (24-7), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4A ROMEOVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Bolingbrook 94, Joliet Central 91 (2OT) Semifinal, Wednesday West Aurora 70, Lincoln-Way East 58 Championship Bolingbrook (22-6) vs. West Aurora (24-4), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 3A CENTRALIA SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Marion 49, Columbia 41

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE

SOCCER

COLLEGES

NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 7 Nets 1 HEAT 76ers Celtics 8.5 T’WOLVES THUNDER 10 Suns WARRIORS 11.5 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Points Underdog Favorite Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament Virginia 7.5 Louisville Clemson 4 Boston College American Athletic Conference Tournament 2 Connecticut Smu 7 S Florida Memphis Temple 5.5 Tulane C FLORIDA 13.5 E Carolina Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament 2 Dayton Virginia Comm 2 Duquesne Richmond Mid American Conference Tournament Buffalo 8.5 C Michigan Ball St 3 Kent St Toledo 5.5 Miami-Ohio 5.5 Akron E Michigan Big East Conference Tournament Creighton 4 Providence Butler 1 Seton Hall Big 12 Conference Tournament 2.5 Kansas St Tcu W Virginia 4.5 Baylor Southeastern Conference Tournament Texas A&M 1.5 Alabama Mississippi St 1.5 Lsu Mountain West Conference Tournament Nevada 5 UNLV San Diego St 3 Fresno St Pac 12 Conference Tournament Arizona 10 Colorado Big West Conference Tournament 7 Cal-Riverside Cal-Davis CS-Fullerton 1.5 Long Beach St Cal-Irvine 4.5 Hawaii Cal-Santa Barb 11.5 Cal-Poly SLO Added Games Big Sky Conference Tournament 11 N Dakota Montana No Colorado 2 Weber St Idaho 8 Southern Utah E Washington 3 Portland St NHL Odds Underdog Favorite BLUE JACKETS -$155/+$135 Avalanche BRUINS -$170/+$150 Flyers DEVILS -$110/-$110 Jets SENATORS -$145/+$125 Sabres -$260/+$220 Rangers LIGHTNING PANTHERS -$200/+$170 Canadiens Vegas Knights -$140/+$120 RED WINGS PREDATORS -$150/+$130 Ducks BLACKHAWKS -$125/+$105 Hurricanes -$145/+$125 Islanders OILERS KINGS -$135/+$115 Capitals SHARKS -$145/+$125 Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 70.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Champions League

Area results

(Home teams listed first) Second Leg Tuesday Liverpool (England) 0, Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool advanced 5-0 aggregate Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1, Real Madrid (Spain) 2, Real Madrid advanced on 5-2 aggregate Wednesday Manchester City (England) 1, Basel (Switzerland) 2, Manchester City advanced on 5-2 aggregate Tottenham (England) 1, Juventus (Italy) 2, Juventus advanced on 4-3 aggregate March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

Baseball

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS: Agreed to a minor league contract with RHP Ricky Nolasco. MINNESOTA TWINS: Optioned RHP Felix Jorge and LHP Dietrich Enns to Rochester (IL) and RHP Zack Littell and LHP Lewis Thorpe to Chattanooga (SL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Named Rollie Fingers special assistant to the president. SEATTLE MARINERS: Agreed to terms with OF Ichiro Suzuki on a one-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS: Designated C Brett Nicholas for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Agreed to terms with RHP Tyler Clippard on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS: Re-signed LS Aaron Brewer to a four-year contract. DETROIT LIONS: Named Steve Gregory defensive assistant coach. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Released TE Martellus Bennett and WR Bernard Reedy. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS: Exercised 2018 contract options on S Chris Conte, OT Demar Dotson and DB Josh Robinson. HOCKEY • NHL National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS: Recalled F Dylan Sadowy from Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW: Loaned G Ben Lundgaard to Indy (USL). D.C. UNITED: Acquired D Joseph Mora from Deportivo Saprissa (Primera Division-Costa Rica) on permanent transfer. COLLEGE EVANGEL: Announced the contract of women’s basketball coach Leon Neal will not be renewed. NYU: Announced the retirement of men’s basketball coach Joe Nesci.

SPRING TRAINING

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Semifinal, Wednesday East St. Louis 62, Centralia 50 Championship Marion (21-11) vs. East St. Louis (16-10), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 3A DECATUR EISENHOWER SECTIONAL Semifinal, Tuesday Springfield Lanphier 71, Champaign Central 69 (2OT) Semifinal, Wednesday Springfield Southeast 59, Mahomet-Seymour 45 Championship Springfield Lanphier (26-3) vs. Springfield Southeast (26-3), 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 1A STATE TOURNAMENT At Peoria Civic Center Semifinals, Friday Newman Central Catholic (28-4) vs. Annawan (30-3), 11 a.m. Okawville (25-8) vs. Goreville (23-11), 12:45 p.m. Saturday’s games Third place, 11 a.m. Championship, 12:45 p.m.

MISSOURI GIRLS BASKETBALL

CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Hazelwood Central 58, Jackson 47 St. Joseph’s 56, Francis Howell 46 Camdenton 56, Blue Springs 49 Kickapoo 71, Nixa 58 Kirkwood 49, Oakville 40 Francis Howell Central 35, Jefferson City 34 Lee’s Summit North 47, North Kansas City 46 Liberty-KC 40, Staley 28 Quarterfinals, Saturday Hazelwood Central (21-6) vs. St. Joseph’s (22-6) at Lindenwood University, 1 p.m. Camdenton (20-7) vs. Kickapoo (26-3) at Southwest Baptist University, 6 p.m. Kirkwood (25-3) vs. Francis Howell Central (23-5) at Lindenwood University, 6 p.m. Lee’s Summit North (21-5) vs. Liberty-KC (21-7) at Independence Events Ctr., 1 p.m. CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Dexter 61, North County 23 Miller Career 63, Gateway STEM 61 (OT) Carl Junction 27, Logan-Rogersville 24 Osage 48, Nevada 45 MICDS 70, Sullivan 68 ((2OT) Incarnate Word 65, St. Dominic 44 Lincoln College Prep 78, Marshall 59 Kearney 48, St. Joseph benton 43 Quarterfinals, Saturday Miller Career (17-9) vs. Dexter (23-5) at Jefferson College, 1 p.m. Carl Junction (24-3) vs. Osage (22-6) at Southwest Baptist, 1 p.m. MICDS (24-4) vs. Incarnate Word (24-5) at Washington HS, 1 p.m. Lincoln College Prep (21-3) vs. Kearney (25-3) at Ind.Events Center, 6 p.m. CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -2:40 p.m. Friday Strafford (31-0) vs. Whitfield (22-6) -4:30 p.m. Friday California (25-4) vs. Clark County (28-1) Third place at JQH Arena 11 a.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 6:20 p.m. Saturday CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at Hammons Student Center -3:30 p.m. Thursday Skyline (29-2) vs Neelyville (24-4) -5:10 p.m. Thursday Mid-Buchanan (28-2) vs Northeast Cairo (24-6) Third place at Hammons Student Center 11 a.m. Friday. Championship at JQH Arena 2:40 p.m. Friday CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, at JQH Arena -11 a.m. Friday Bradleyville (25-5) vs. Glasgow (22-7) -12:50 p.m. Friday Mound City (27-3) vs. Wheatland (24-5) Third place at Hammons Student Center 11 a.m. Saturday Championship at JQH Arena 2:40 p.m. Saturday

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B13

AMERICAN W L Pct. 10 2 0.833 New York 9 5 0.643 Houston Kansas City 6 4 0.600 7 5 0.583 Chicago Boston 8 6 0.571 Cleveland 7 6 0.538 7 7 0.500 Los Angeles Minnesota 6 6 0.500 6 6 Baltimore 0.500 5 5 0.500 Oakland Tampa Bay 6 7 0.462 6 7 0.462 Detroit Seattle 5 7 0.417 5 8 Toronto 0.385 3 8 0.273 Texas NATIONAL W L Pct. 9 2 0.818 Chicago Milwaukee 8 4 0.667 Miami 7 4 0.636 7 5 0.583 San Diego Los Angeles 7 6 0.538 6 6 Atlanta 0.500 6 7 0.462 Washington Arizona 6 7 0.462 5 6 Cardinals 0.455 5 7 0.417 Colorado Philadelphia 5 8 0.385 5 8 0.385 New York San Francisco 4 7 0.364 3 7 Pittsburgh 0.300 4 10 0.286 Cincinnati Wednesday Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 2 Philadelphia 2, Boston (ss) 1 Miami 7, Houston 6 Toronto (ss) 6, Detroit 5 Cardinals 4, Washington 3 Minnesota 8, Boston (ss) 1 Toronto (ss) 13, Pittsburgh 4 NY Yankees 11, NY Mets 4 Chicago White Sox 14, Cincinnati 12 Milwaukee 10, Kansas City 6 San Diego 4, San Francisco 4, 10 innings LA Dodgers 4, LA Angels 2 Colorado 5, Texas 4 Chicago Cubs 11, Cleveland 6 Oakland 7, Seattle 3 Thursday Detroit vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Miami vs. Cardinals at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Washington at West Palm Beach, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. NY Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. LA Dodgers vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 7:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 7:40 p.m. Friday Boston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. NY Mets vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 12:07 p.m. Arizona vs. Kansas City (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. LA Angels vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 2:05 p.m. Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) vs. LA Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. NY Yankees vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 5:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Houston at West Palm Beach, Fla., 5:05 p.m. Texas vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 7:05 p.m.

BOXING March 9 At Costa Mesa, Calif. (ESPN2), Ronny Rios vs. Azat Hovhannisyan, 10, junior featherweights. At Deadwood (S.D.) Mountain Grand (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Julius Indongo, 12, for vacant interim WBC super lightweight title; Ivan Baranchyk vs. Anthony Yigit, 12, junior welterweight eliminator. March 10 At Struer, Denmark, Dina Thorslund vs. Alicia Ashley, 10, for vacant WBC interim women’s junior featherweight title; Dennis Ceylan vs. Jesus Sanchez, 10, featherweights. At Alamodome, San Antonio (SHO), Sergey Lipinets vs. Mikey Garcia, 12, for Lipinets’s IBF junior welterweight title; Rances Barthelemy vs. Kiryl Relikh, 12, for the vacant WBA World super lightweight title; Richard Commey vs. Alejandro Luna, 12, lightweights; Mario Barrios vs. Eudy Bernardo, 10, junior welterweights. At Carson, Calif. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Andy Vences vs. Erick DeLeon, 10, junior lightweights. March 17 At Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York (ESPN), Jose Ramirez vs. Amir Imam, 12, for the vacant WBC World super lightweight title; Oleksandr Gvozdyk vs. Mehdi Amar, 12, for vacant WBC interim light heavyweight title; Felix Verdejo vs Antonio Lozada Jr., 10, lightweights; Christopher Diaz vs. Miguel Beltran Jr., 10, super featherweights. At Villa Dolores, Cordoba, Argentina, Javier Aristule vs. Alberto Melian, 10, bantamweights. March 18 At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Moises Calleros, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title. At Marseille, France Ryad Merhy vs. Arsen Goulamirian, 12, for vacant WBA World cruiserweight title. At Cardiff, Wales (SHO), Anthony Joshua vs. Joseph Parker, 12, IBF-WBA-WBO heavyweight titles; Alexander Povetkin vs. David Price, 12, heavyweights. April 7 At TBA (SHO), Jarrett Hurd vs. Erislandy Lara, 12, IBF-WBA junior middleweight titles. At San Juan, Puerto Rico, Angel Acosta vs. Ryuji Hara, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title. At Gray Eagle Resort & Casino, Calgary, Michael Farenas vs. Guadalupe Rosales, lightweights. April 14 At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Martin Murray, 12, for Saunders’ WBO middleweight title; Terry Flanagan vs. Maurice Hooker, 12, for the vacant WBO super lightweight title. April 15 At Yokohama, Japan, Ryota Murata vs. Felice Blandamura, 12, for Murata’s WBA World middleweight title. April 21 At TBA (SHO), Adrien Broner vs. Omar Figueroa, 12, junior welterweights. May 5 At TBA (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s IBF-WBA-WBC middleweight titles. May 11 At Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for IBF-WBA-WBC cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final).

GOLF PGA Champions tour March 9-11 • Toshiba Classic, Newport Beach CC, Newport Beach, Calif. March 23-25 • Rapiscan Systems Classic, Fallen Oak, Biloxi, Miss. April 13-15 • Mitsubishi Electric Classic, TPC Sugarloaf, Duluth, Ga. April 20-22 • Bass Pro Shops Legends of Golf at Big Cedar Lodge, Top of the Rock, Ridgedale, Mo. May 4-6 • Insperity Invitational, The Woodlands CC, The Woodlands, Texas May 17-20 • Regions Tradition, Greystone Golf & CC, Birmingham, Ala. May 24-27 • Senior PGA Championship, The Golf Club at Harbor Shores, Benton Harbor, Mich. June 8-10 • Principal Charity Classic, Wakonda Club, Des Moines, Iowa June 22-24 • American Family Insurance Championship, University Ridge GC, Madison, Wis. June 28-July 1 • U.S. Senior Open, The Broadmoor GC, Colorado Springs, Colo. July 12-15 • Constellation Senior Players Championship, Exmoor CC, Highland Park, Ill. July 26-29 • Senior British Open, St. Andrews (Old Course), St. Andrews, Scotland Aug. 3-5 • 3M Championship, TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn. Aug. 17-19 • Dicks Sporting Goods Open, En-Joie GC, Endicott, N.Y. Aug. 24-26 • Boeing Classic, The Club at Snoqualmie Ridge, Snoqualmie, Wash. Aug. 31-Sept. 2 • Shaw Charity Classic, Canyon Meadows G&CC, Calgary, Alberta Sept. 14-16 • The Ally Challenge, Warwick Hills G&CC, Grand Blanc, Mich. Sept. 21-23 • Sanford International, Minnehaha CC, Sioux Falls, S.D. Sept. 28-30 • Pure Insurance Championship, Pebble Beach GL, Pebble Beach, Calif. Oct. 12-14 • SAS Championship, Prestonwood CC, Cary, N.C. Oct. 19-21 • Dominion Energy Charity Classic, The Country Club of Virginia, Richmond, Va. Oct. 26-28 • PowerShares QQQ Championship, Sherwood CC, Thousand Oaks, Calif. Nov. 9-11 • Charles Schwab Cup Championship, Phoenix CC, Phoenix Dec. 14-16 • PNC Father-Son Challenge, Ritz Carlton GC, Orlando, Fla.

LPGA Tour March 15-18 • Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25 • Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1 • ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif. April 11-14 • LOTTE Championship, Ko Olina GC, Kapolei, Hawaii April 19-22 • HUGEL-JTBC Championship, Wilshire CC, Los Angeles April 26-29 • Event name TBA, Lake Merced GC, San Francisco May 3-6 • Volunteers of America LPGA Texas Classic, Old American GC, The Colony, Texas May 17-20 • Kingsmill Championship, Kingsmill Resort, Williamsburg, Va. May 24-27 • LPGA Volvik Championship, Travis Pointe CC, Ann Arbor, Mich. May 31-June 3 • U.S. Women’s Open, Shoal Creek (Ala.) G&CC June 8-10 • ShopRite LPGA Classic, Stockton Seaview Hotel and GC, Galloway, N.J. June 14-17 • Meijer LPGA Classic, Blythefield CC, Grand Rapids, Mich. June 22-24 • Walmart NW Arkansas Championship, Pinnacle CC, Rogers, Ark. June 28-July 1 • KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, Kemper Lakes GC, Olympia Fields, Ill. July 5-8 • Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, Thornberry Creek at Oneida (Wis.) July 12-15 • Marathon Classic, Highland Meadows GC, Sylvania, Ohio July 26-29 • Aberdeen Standard Investments Ladies Scottish Open, Gullane GC, East Lothian, Scotland Aug. 2-5 • Ricoh Women’s British Open, Royal Lytham & St Annes, Lancashire, England Aug. 16-19 • Indy Women in Tech Championship, Brickyard Crossing GC, Indianapolis Aug. 23-26 • CP Women’s Open, Wascana CC, Regina, Saskatchewan Aug. 30-Sept. 2 • Cambia Portland (Ore.) Classic, Columbia Edgewater CC Sept. 13-16 • The Evian Championship, Evian Resort, Evian-les-Bains, France Sept. 27-30 • Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia, TPC Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Oct. 4-7 • UL International Crown, Jack Nicklaus GC Korea, Incheon Oct. 11-14 • LPGA KEB-Hana Bank Championship, Incheon, South Korea. Oct. 18-21 • Event name TBA, course TBA, Shanghai Oct. 25-28 • Swinging Skirts LPGA Taiwan Championship, Miramar G&CC, New Taipai City Nov. 2-4 • TOTO Japan Classic, Seta GC, Shiga, Japan Nov. 7-10 • Blue Bay LPGA, Jian Lake Blue Bay GC, Hainan Island, China Nov. 15-18 • CME Group Tour Championship, Tiburon GC, Naples, Fla.

Grand Valley State 8, UMSL 6 Grand Valley State 7, UMSL 3

Conference tournaments AMERICA EAST CONFERENCE Semifinals | Tuesday Vermont 70, Stony Brook 51 UMBC 75, Hartford 60 Championship | Saturday Vermont vs. UMBC, 10 a.m. AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday UConn vs. SMU, 11 a.m. Memphis vs. South Florida, 1:30 p.m. Temple vs. Tulane, 7 p.m UCF vs. East Carolina, 8:30 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 2:30 p.m. ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE Second Round | Wednesday Louisville 82, Florida State 74 Boston College 91, N.C. State 87 Notre Dame 71, Virginia Tech 65 North Carolina 78, Syracuse 59 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. ATLANTIC SUN CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Lipscomb 108, Florida G.C. 96 ATLANTIC 10 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday UMass 69, La Salle 67 G. Wash. 78, Fordham 72 Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, Noon BIG EAST CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday St. John’s 88, Georgetown 77 Marquette 72, DePaul 69 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m. BIG SKY CONFERENCE First Round | Tuesday North Dakota 76, Montana State 74 Northern Colorado 82, Northern Arizona 59 Southern Utah 76, Idaho State 68 Portland State 71, Sacramento State 67 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:05 p.m. BIG SOUTH CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Radford 55, Liberty 52 BIG TEN CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Michigan 75, Purdue 66 BIG 12 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Oklahoma State 71, Oklahoma 60 Texas 68, Iowa State 64 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. BIG WEST CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday UC Davis vs. UC Riverside, 2 p.m. Cal State Fullerton vs. Long Beach State, 4:30 p.m. UC Irvine vs. Hawaii, 8 p.m. UC Santa Barbara vs. Cal Poly, 10:30 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 10:30 p.m. COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Championship | Tuesday College of Charleston 83, Northeastern 76, OT CONFERENCE USA First Round | Wednesday Southern Miss 69, FIU 68 UTSA 71, UTEP 58 Louisiana Tech 68, North Texas 62 UAB 83, FAU 72 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. HORIZON LEAGUE Championship | Tuesday Wright State 74, Cleveland State 57 IVY LEAGUE First Round | Saturday Harvard vs. Cornell, 11:30 a.m. Pennsylvania vs. Yale, 2 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE Championship | Monday Iona 83, Fairfield 71 MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE Quarterfinals | Thursday Buffalo vs. Central Michigan, 11 a.m. Ball State vs. Kent State, 1:30 p.m. Toledo vs. Miami (Ohio), 5:30 p.m. Eastern Michigan vs. Akron, 8 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE Quarterfinals | Wednesday Hampton 75, Florida A&M 71 Morgan State 78, Beth.-Cook. 77 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, Noon MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE Championship | Sunday Loyola (Chi.) 65, Illinois State 49 MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday UNLV 97, Air Force 90, OT Utah State 76, Colorado State 65 Wyoming 74, San Jose State 61 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. NORTHEAST CONFERENCE Championship | Tuesday LIU Brooklyn 71, Wagner 61 OHIO VALLEY CONFERENCE Championship | Saturday Murray State 68, Belmont 51 PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Colorado 97, Arizona State 85 Stanford 76, California 58 Oregon State 69, Washington 66 (OT) Oregon vs. Washington State, late Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 9 p.m. PATRIOT LEAGUE Championship | Wednesday Bucknell 83, Colgate 54 SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Georgia vs. Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. South Carolina vs. Mississippi, 8:30 p.m. Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, Noon SOUTHERN CONFERENCE Championship | Monday UNC-Greensboro 62, ETSU 47 SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday New Orleans 83, Texas A&M-Corpus 76 Central Arkansas 67, Lamar 57 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 8 p.m. SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Tuesday Arkansas-Pine Bluff 77, MVSU 73 Southern 62, Jackson State 60 Texas South. 90, Alabama State 76 Prairie View A&M 87, Alcorn State 71 Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 4 p.m. SUMMIT LEAGUE Championship | Tuesday South Dakota State 97, South Dakota 87 SUN BELT CONFERENCE First Round | Wednesday Texas State 73, Coast. Carolina 66 Appalachian State 93, Little Rock 64 Troy 68, South Alabama 63 La.-Monroe 76, Arkansas State 54 Championship | Sunday Semifinal winners, 1 p.m. WEST COAST CONFERENCE Championship Gonzaga 74, BYU 54 WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE First Round | Thursday Grand Canyon vs. UMKC, 2 p.m. Utah Valley vs. CSU Bakersfield, 4:30 p.m. New Mexico State vs. Chicago State, 8 p.m. Seattle vs. UT Rio Grande Valley, 10:30 p.m. Championship | Saturday Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.


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Thursday • 03.08.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, East deals NORTH ♠A J 8 4 ♥A 7 5 ♦J ♣A K 7 6 4 WEST EAST ♠K 10 9 7 6 5 ♠Q 2 ♥J ♥10 2 ♦9 5 ♦A K 10 8 7 4 3 2 ♣Q 10 9 2 ♣8 SOUTH ♠3 ♥K Q 9 8 6 4 3 ♦Q 6 ♣J 5 3 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 4♦ 4♥ Pass 6♥ All pass Opening lead: Nine of ♦ This is another deal from the ladies match between teams from England and Austria some years ago. South was the late Michelle Brunner, playing for England. Brunner’s four-heart bid did not include robust values, but we don’t think we could find an expert who would disagree with the bid. North’s blast to slam is completely reasonable. East won the opening diamond lead with the king and shifted to a trump. Brunner won this in hand with the king and ruffed her remaining diamond on the table. She cashed

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD the ace of hearts, drawing the last trump, and then cashed the ace of spades and ruffed a spade. She crossed to dummy with the ace of clubs and ruffed another spade. The hand was now an open book. East had started with two spades, two hearts, and seven or eight diamonds. She could have no more than two clubs. Brunner started running her trumps knowing West would not be able to defend the position. When she cashed her last trump, she still had the jackfive of clubs remaining in her hand, dummy had the jack of spades and the king seven of clubs, and West the king of spades and the queen-10 of clubs. West was helpless. She chose to discard the 10 of clubs, so Brunner shed dummy’s jack of spades and claimed the last two tricks with dummy’s clubs. Well bid, well played! (03/08/18)

Across

1 Tough person to tolerate 5 Qatar’s capital 9 Decide to join 14 Literary matchmaker 15 Clinches 16 One joining a union? 17 *Roman of Hollywood? 19 Pretend 20 Shoe company based in Southern California 21 Basketball sportscaster Dick 22 Paradise in “On the Road” 24 *Legal acting in a 1980s prime-time soap opera? 26 Seven-time Cy Young Award win-

ner of the 1980s-2000s 28 Operating system developed at Bell Labs 29 Frost 30 “The Simpsons” bus driver 31 Barfly 34 *Malady of French history? 39 Really binges, in brief 40 No. crunchers 41 No longer serving: abbr. 42 “Uh, excuse me” 43 Like rock stars among fans 46 *Regent of film criticism? 49 Get blubbery 50 In the worst way 51 Maryland

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME March 8 WORD — CONCEDES (CONCEDES: kun-SEEDS: Acknowledges, often reluctantly, as being true or right.) Average mark 19 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 27 or more words in CONCEDES? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ROUGHAGE rage gear hour rhea gore huge rogue gorge hugger roue gouge ager rouge gouger agog rough grog ague ogre hare argue urea hear auger urge hero ergo gage hoar euro gauge hoer gaur hora RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

state symbol 53 Student of Socrates 54 At the start ... or how the first two letters of each starred clue relate to the answer? 57 In many cases 58 James with a posthumous Pulitzer 59 Award for Agency of the Year, e.g. 60 Frigid temps 61 Velvety growth 62 FiveThirtyEight. com owner

Down

1 According to 2 “Arrival” actress Adams 3 “Talk away” 4 Mom’s mom 5 Have a date night at home, say 6 Vast amounts 7 “Have you ___?” 8 Digital communication, for short? 9 The void 10 Like one line on a sales receipt 11 Magnate 12 Subjects of the Second Commandment 13 Endangered

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Your inclination to overindulge a child or loved one emerges. Of course, you probably will note the result of catering to him or her as much as you do. Tonight: Dinner at a favorite spot.

If March 8 is your birthday • This year you experience an innate desire to be known for your professional stature and the quality of your work. If you are single, you will have several potential suitors who would like to get to know you better. If you are attached, the two of you focus on creating more couple time together. Sagittarius encourages you to take risks.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Once more, your ability to communicate your essence could change radically. In any case, others get your message and are more than ready to adapt to your new style. Tonight: All smiles.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You feel strongly about a key matter, which seems to be surrounded by confusion. You would like to see it move forward, but that could be an issue considering the chaos involved. Tonight: Out and about. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You sense some tension in a key relationship. Though you might think the existence of this stress is bad, it likely isn’t. You’ll stay on top of the issues at hand, and will work hard to resolve any differences. Tonight: Honor your budget. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Note the differences between you and someone else. Getting a certain issue to the forefront takes considerable talent, but you know that you must handle it now. Tonight: Happy to be with a dear loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You could be overwhelmed by everything that heads down your path. At first, you might not have a good response to a changeable situation, but know that you will. If you are single, a relationship could suddenly evolve. Tonight: Live it up. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might be more captivated by a partner than you care to mention. It is as if you just met this person and have fallen madly in love all over again. This person has a way of drawing you in closer. Tonight: Make special plans for the weekend.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You always seem to land on your feet, no matter what is going on. Don’t worry so much about why this happens, just try to maximize this period. Talk about your priorities. Tonight: Out late.

Puzzle by Damon Gulczynski

state bird 18 Beach look? 21 Starbucks specification 22 Average guy 23 Tons 25 A camera may be set on it 27 Something a doc might order 30 They may follow buzzers, for short 31 Subject of

some biomedical research 32 Den : bear :: holt : ___ 33 Child’s bear 35 Ranks 36 Impressionism? 37 Handle 38 Goof 42 When many kids start fifth grade 43 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 ..., e.g. 44 Pens

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0201

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You are focusing your energy much more on sharing your ideas with your friends than actually getting into your work. You will feel more prepared to speak with a boss later in the day. Tonight: Be present in the moment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You have a strong sense of direction, and you know what you want. You might want to use today to do some reflection. Understand what is going on around you. Tonight: Get some R and R. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You need to listen to some advice from a friend. This person obviously cares a lot about you. Note the importance of the feedback you get. You seem to be lucky right now. Tonight: Play it low-key.

45 Yours, in Tours 46 John of colonial Jamestown 47 Give an address 48 Beat it! 50 Difficult situation 52 Castigate, with “into” 54 Cartesian conclusion 55 Sass 56 Over there

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Pressure builds. You might feel as if you have too much to do. Know that this stress is coming from a judgment that you are making about yourself. Be less self-critical. A friend would be delighted to have you more relaxed during your visits together. Tonight: Join friends. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.08.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Husband wants to have a second wife

Dear Ready • You and your husband are already living on separate planets as far as your values are concerned. Unless you are

willing to have an open marriage and another woman sharing your husband, I “think” it’s time to talk to a lawyer! Dear Abby • While flying across country with my toddler son, he started screaming hysterically as the plane began its descent. Nothing I could do would calm him. I tried giving him a bottle, a knuckle, a pacifier, even the corner of my shirt, but he continued to howl. All of a sudden, a hand holding a lollipop appeared in the space between our seats and with it came a soft voice that said, “It’s the change in air pressure. Try this.” I took what turned out to be a sugar-free lollipop, and sure enough, the moment I unwrapped the generally frowned-upon treat, my son began sucking enthusiastically, calmed down and sat quietly until the plane came to a stop. Ever since then I travel with sugar-free lollipops in my purse in the event a child near me is undone by the change in cabin

pressure during landing. Some parents are skeptical at first, but when I use the tone and the words once spoken to me, they usually accept the treat, calm their child and sigh in relief. I encourage parents of children old enough to handle a lollipop to do the same just in case there is no lollipop angel on their flight. — TIP FROM UP HIGH Dear Tip • Hmmm. Perhaps airlines should stock an emergency supply of lollipops on their planes for parents in that situation. It would be easier than handing out earplugs and tranquilizers to all the other passengers on the flight. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Tie is different. 2. Rung is added to chair legs. 3. Book is missing. 4. Diploma is different. 5. Cabinet is shorter. 6. Arm of chair is not showing.

Dear Abby • I have been married for seven months, and my husband wants a second wife, something I do not agree with. He says he likes helping people and has decided he wants a former lover to be a part of our marriage. Unfortunately, she is more than willing to sleep with him. Now he’s talking about helping her move even though he knows I’m against him having anything to do with her. She says she’s going to tell her daughter he is her boyfriend and not let her know he is married. She wants to be my friend, but I want nothing to do with her. I sold my house, so I have nowhere to go. He refuses to go to marriage counseling because he says I am the problem. I am just about ready to cut my losses and move on. What do you think? — READY TO MOVE ON

TV THURSDAY

DR. FOX

More canine family discord Dear Dr. Fox • I saw your comments on the rescue husky barking at the grandpa. I have a similar issue with my 3-year-old white German shepherd, Missy, a female rescue we adopted three months ago. She was very nervous initially; it took four days before I could get near her. And then she became my ‘‘Velcro” dog. She is with me all the time. Initially, she was scared of everyone but has grown bolder. She barks when the doorbell rings, but when the visitor enters, she usually quiets down quickly as long as I am with her. However, she seemed to take an instant dislike to my husband and adult son (who lives with us), and barks wildly at them all the time. When my husband settles in his recliner, she settles down near me, but if my hubby even raises his arm, she barks madly. As time goes on, she has grown bolder: Sometimes her hackles rise and

she runs at my hubby as though she is going to bite him. Same with our son. They have both tried, and continue to try, to make friends with her, but unsuccessfully. I’d welcome any ideas you have. I can only suspect her behavior is reflective of some occurrence(s) in her past. — K.H., St. Louis Dear K.H. • Clearly your dog had a traumatic earlier life, and your detailed description of her gradual recovery will interest many readers. Over time, she may well become desensitized to some aspects of the behavior of the males in your family that currently upset her. It is best that they ignore her reactions and not try to force her to change her behavior, or try to show affection toward her. It may help if you all wear the same scent — a few dabs of essential oil of lavender being a

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

good choice — and put a couple of drops on a bandanna around the dog’s neck in the morning and evening, as well. Have the two men in the house take turns putting the dog’s food out with you standing beside them. Ignore her when and if she barks at them — this is another conditioned reaction, which should abate with time if not reinforced by any reaction. Refrain from telling her to be quiet, and simply pretend not to hear her. It may also help if you sit down with one of the men next to you on the sofa and have the dog sit or stand next to you as you brush her. Get her used to a regular grooming and additional stroking and massage, passing the brush to whomever is sitting next to you to continue. Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxVet.net. Send mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

3/8/18

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FOX Gotham Jerome be2 comes obsessed with Penguin. (N)

Showtime at the Apol- Fox 2 News at 9:00pm lo: Week 2. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

Young Sheldon (7:31) (N)

Mom (8:01) Life in S.W.A.T.: Ghosts. The (N) (cc) Pieces (N) team hunts for a serial (cc) killer. (N) (cc)

CBS The Big 4 Bang Theory

NBC Superstore A.P. Bio (N) Will & 5 (N) (cc) Grace (N) PBS Donnybrook 9 CW 11

24

St. Louis Browns

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy MeTV Griffith Show

ChampiChicago Fire Cruz ons: Pilot. struggles to express his (N) (cc) feelings. (N)

The Andy Griffith Show

ÍEveningLucia

Supernatural Sam and Arrow Black Siren Dean track an ingredi- makes a shocking decient. (N) (cc) sion. (N) (cc) Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

ABC Grey’s Anatomy Maggie Scandal: Air Force Two. How to Get Away With 30 invites Clive to a game (N) (cc) Murder (N) (cc) night. (N) MYTV Blue Bloods Teenagers Blue Bloods A dose of Blue Bloods A college 46 punch unsuspecting lidocaine kills a woman. professor is murdered. people. (cc) (cc) (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 03.08.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

MAI causes serious damage to lung FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a 65-year-old woman in relatively good health. I’ve been diagnosed with a nontuberculous mycobacterial lung infection (mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, or MAI) leading to bronchiectasis. I’m taking three antibiotics (rifampin, azithromycin and ethambutol). I’ve been referred to specialists in both infectious diseases and pulmonary medicine. After several CT scans, the doctors have determined that I have significant damage to the middle lobe of my right lung and to the top of the upper lobe of the right lung. The infectious disease doctor recommends surgery to remove the middle lobe and the damaged area of the upper lobe, because the damage is so great that the antibiotics cannot reach it and therefore cannot cure the disease (because there is insufficient blood flow). It looks like my choice is to either have the surgery or stay on antibiotics for the rest of my life. The surgery gives me a chance of a cure, but no guarantee. Obviously, this surgery is not to be taken lightly and is frightening to me. Your opinion would be very much appreciated. — L.B.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • The mycobacteria are a class of infectious organisms, the most medically important of which is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, several others can cause diseases that somewhat resemble tuberculosis. The one you have, MAI, seen most in women in their 60s and 70s. In fact, the specific entity of right middle lobe disease with bronchiectasis and scarring, usually from MAI, is called Lady Windermere’s syndrome. It’s named after a character in an Oscar Wilde play. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, which may take years to clear up the infection. I spoke with an infectious disease specialist with more experience than I have (my patients with this entity all had done well on the same antibiotics you are taking), who said that surgical treatment is not unusual. I can’t provide a medical opinion about your specific case: Only your doctors can do so, and only after a thorough review of both you and your scans. I agree with you that surgery is never to be taken lightly, and in a 65-year-old, it’s important to think twice before any surgery. However, I certainly would get a surgical referral from your doctors and discuss with the surgeon the risks and benefits. If you already have been on treatment for six months without clear bacteriological improvement, that alone is an indication for surgical referral, as is extensive localized disease, which it sounds like you have.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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3.8.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

3.8.18  

3.8.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch