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WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • L

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

DRESSED-UP SANDWICHES BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The story goes that John Montagu was such an inveterate gambler that he did not want to leave the gaming tables even to eat. So he called for meat to be brought to him between two slices of bread; that way, he could eat at the table and keep his fingers clean, thus saving the cards. Montagu was more than just a dedicated gambler. He was also the 4th Earl of Sandwich. Two hundred and fifty years later, we still gobble up the gustatory creation that he created and that bears his name. Where would we be without the sandwich? How would culture be different? If nothing else, McDonald’s would never Recipes • Grilled Cheese With Apple and Walnuts (top), LGBT (above), Hot Roast Boeuf Sandwich and Shrimp Cocktail Salad Sandwich. PAGE L4

he beef about the beef — why the price is high DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I apologized to my editor. I was writing a story about stews, and after all I am on a budget. I picked up a couple of pounds of chuck roast, a pound and a half of veal stew meat and three pounds of lamb stew meat. The bill came to $65.20. Plus tax. And stews are supposed to be cheap. That is sort of the point of stew — it makes the most out of an inexpensive cut of meat. At least, theoretically inexpensive. As I thought about it, I realized that these tougher and less desirable cuts — chuck, round and shank, for instance — now cost what a couple of years ago you would spend for steak. I called an expert to find out why. T. Dean Pringle is an associate

professor of animal and dairy science at the University of Georgia. He agreed that “the price of all beef products has gone up very significantly in the last couple of years,” the result of what he called “a perfect storm” of conditions. Condition No. 1 was a drought across some of the biggest beefproducing states in the country, from Texas throughout the southeast. Condition No. 2 was a sharp increase in the cost of feed, which is to say corn, largely because of the demand to make the gasoline-substitute ethanol. “Those were the things that led farmers to market their cows, even though they may have been very productive cows,” he said. That’s productive cows, as in cows that produce more cows. A cow will typically have its first calf at the age of 2 and will then have six or eight more calves before it is slaughtered. But farmers were See NEMAN • Page L4

SEEDS OF HOPE WORKER SHARES RECIPE FOR TOSCANO KALE SALAD. PAGE L2

See SANDWICHES • Page L4

Mastering homemade teriyaki sauce BY J.M. HIRSCH Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Some ingredients for teriyaki sauce (from back left): Sesame oil, ground ginger, garlic powder, rice vinegar and Sriracha hot sauce.

If you’re still using teriyaki sauce from a bottle, you’re doing it all wrong. And you’re depriving yourself of the awesomeness that is homemade teriyaki. I didn’t set out to master DIY teriyaki sauce, but my 11-year-old suddenly started craving the stuff. Not even sure where he ate it that it was so good to inspire almost nightly requests for it. But knowing how simple this potent sweet-savory sauce is to make, I refused to buy it. It took a few attempts, but eventually I nailed an incredibly versatile and delicious version. And by versatile, I mean I slather it on whatever protein I have on hand — chicken, steak, pork or salmon.

Two recipes • The sauce with four ways to use it. Then, just for fun, a slow cooker version of the chicken. Because the only thing better than a delicious chicken teriyaki is a delicious chicken teriyaki that practically cooks itself. PAGE L5

CHARCOAL HOUSE’S GREEK-STYLE SLAW USES OIL FROM FAMILY’S GROVE. PAGE L3 LET’S EAT

We went to southern Italy to bring back authentic pasta, sauces, olive oil, breadsticks, limoncello, wine and more.

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