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WORLD

Bin Laden wanted his fortune used ‘on jihad’ In will, he claimed assets of $29 million BY DEB RIECHMANN AND ROBERT BURNS Associated Press

WASHINGTON • In his

handwritten will, alQaida leader Osama bin Laden claimed he had about $29 million in personal wealth — the bulk of which he wanted to be used “on jihad, for the sake of Allah.” The will was released Tuesday in a batch of more than 100 documents seized in a May 2011 raid that killed bin Laden at his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The al-Qaida leader planned to divide his fortune among his relatives, but wanted most of it spent to conduct the work of the Islamic extremist terrorist network behind the Sept. 11 attacks. The will did not disclose much detail about where he amassed his wealth, but bin Laden’s father ran a successful construction company in Saudi Arabia for years, and the will noted that $12 million was from his brother on behalf of the Bin Laden Co. The threat of sudden death also worried other family members. “If I am to be killed,” one of bin Laden’s sons wrote to his father in a 2008 letter, “pray for me a lot and give continuous charities in my name, as I will be in great need for support to reach the permanent home.” The letter was signed, “Your son, Sa’ad Bin Usama,” according to the U.S. translation from Arabic. The letters were included in a batch of documents released by the U.S. Oice of the Director

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan in an undated photo. U.S. oicials on Tuesday released documents seized after he was killed in Pakistan in 2011.

of National Intelligence. They address a range of topics, including fractures between al-Qaida and al-Qaida in Iraq, which eventually splintered off into what is now known as Islamic State. In a letter to one of his wives who had been living in Iran, bin Laden expressed worry that her visit to a dentist could have given the Iranians an opportunity to implant a small chip under her skin, apparently as a tracking device. “My dear wife,” he began. “I was told that you went to a dentist in Iran, and you were concerned about a filling she put in for you. Please let me know in detail ... any suspicions that any of the brothers may have about chips planted in any way.” The Iranian dentist might have used a slightly enlarged syringe to make such an implant, bin Laden wrote in the letter. The U.S. translation is undated. “The size of the chip is about the length of a grain of wheat and the width of a fine piece of vermicelli,” bin Laden said. He asked her to recall the exact date of her dental work, “also about any surgery you had, even if it was only a

quick pinch.” In another letter, addressed to “The Islamic Community in General,” bin Laden ofered an upbeat assessment of progress in his holy war since 9/11 and of U.S. failings in Afghanistan. The letter is undated but appears to have been written in 2010. “Here we are in the tenth year of the war, and America and its allies are still chasing a mirage, lost at sea without a beach,” he wrote. “They thought that the war would be easy and that they would accomplish their objectives in a few days or a few weeks, and they did not prepare for it financially, and there is no popular support that would enable it to carry on a war for a decade or more. The sons of Islam have opposed them and stood between them and their plans and objectives.” Bin Laden sought to portray the U.S. as hopelessly mired in an unwinnable war in Afghanistan. In an undated letter that appears to have been written in the 2009-2010 period, he compared the American combat position to that of the Soviet Union in the final years of its occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s.

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

DIGEST U.N. will vote on N. Korea sanctions A U.N. Security Council vote on the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades has been postponed until Wednesday morning at Russia’s request, the United States and France said Tuesday. The U.S. and North Korea’s traditional ally China spent seven weeks negotiating the new sanctions — which include mandatory inspections of cargo leaving and entering North Korea by sea or air — in response to Pyongyang’s latest nuclear test and rocket launch. Both are in deiance of previous council resolutions. But Russia, which received the new draft Thursday along with other council members, asked for time to study the lengthy text, and suggested changes. Jordan attacks ‘outlaws’ in fatal raids • Jordanian troops exchanged ire with armed men during arrest raids in the northern city of Irbid on Tuesday, security oicials said. Jordan’s Public Security Directorate referred to those being targeted in the raids as “outlaws” but did not elaborate. The directorate reported there were deaths among the gunmen but did not say how many, and that three members of the security forces were hurt. The statement said clashes began earlier Tuesday and continued in the evening. The daily al-Ghad said more than 20 suspected militants were arrested in the operation. Pakistanis gather for funeral of executed police oicer • Tens of thousands of Pakistanis chanting anti-government slogans on Tuesday attended the funeral of a police oicer executed the day before for assassinating a secular governor in 2011 over accusations of blasphemy. As a precaution against violence, authorities closed all schools and stepped up security in Islamabad and the adjacent city of Rawalpindi, where the funeral of Mumtaz Qadri was held. Roads around key government buildings and diplomatic compounds were also closed of, said police oicial Ashfaq Tarar.

Aid groups criticize France for evictions • More than a dozen humanitarian organizations accused French authorities on Tuesday of brutally evicting migrants from their makeshift dwellings in a sprawling camp in northern France, as iery protests of the demolition continued. Thousands of migrants leeing war and misery in their homelands use the port city of Calais as a springboard to try to get to Britain on the other side of the English Channel. However, authorities are moving to close a large swath of the slum camp in Calais. Brazil arrests Facebook executive • Police in Sao Paulo, Brazil, have arrested Facebook’s most senior executive in Latin America in the latest clash between Brazilian authorities and the social media company over its refusal to provide private information about its users to law enforcement. A news release Tuesday says that Facebook’s vice president for Latin America, Diego Dzodan, was arrested on an order from a judge in the northeastern state of Sergipe. Dzodan is accused of ignoring a judicial order in a secret investigation involving organized crime and drug traicking. U.N. chief blasts refugee restrictions • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says border restrictions being imposed in Europe to stem the low of migrants “are not in line with international law or with common human decency.” Ban made the comments Tuesday in Madrid after Greek police said up to 10,000 refugees, most of them Syrians and Iraqis, were stuck at the country’s Idomeni border crossing in deteriorating conditions. Several nations led by Austria have imposed refugee caps and border restrictions over the past 10 days, creating a huge backlog of migrants in Greece. Tunisia may OK German training of Libyans • Tunisia’s defense minister says his country is talking to Berlin about allowing German forces to train Libyan soldiers on Tunisian

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Pipeline work turns up bones at Nazi site, cemetery • Polish prosecutors are investigating if workers have violated laws protecting buried human remains when they apparently dug up bones at the site of a former Nazi concentration camp and a Jewish cemetery. Police say they found bones at the site of the World War II Plaszow concentration camp after a company did gas pipeline maintenance work there. Krakow police spokesman Mariusz Ciarka said Tuesday the bones have been sent for forensic examination to determine whether they are human. Poland honors anticommunists • Poland honored on Tuesday thousands of anticommunist ighters persecuted and killed during the early years of the Sovietimposed regime, which ignored their existence in history books for decades. The nationwide observances, led by President Andrzej Duda, are part of democratic Poland’s eforts to recognize the sacriice of men and women who actively opposed the communist regime, which seized power in 1944 as the Red Army was defeating German troops at the end of World War II. Camp for Syrian refugees tallies 5,000 births • The U.N. Population Fund said Tuesday that its clinic in Jordan’s largest camp for Syrian refugees had safely delivered more than 5,000 babies since opening in 2013. Daniel Baker, the fund’s regional humanitarian coordinator, said that the clinic also ofered family planning, but that the pace of deliveries had been steady. 376 nominees for Nobel Peace Prize • A record 376 nominations have been submitted for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize as the Norwegian jury is set to start selecting this year’s winner. The committee keeps candidates secret for 50 years, but those submitting the nominations sometimes reveal their suggestions to the public. An Islamic State group rape victim, Pope Francis and the Afghan women’s cycling team are among the known candidates this year. Zuma survives challenge in S. Africa • South Africa’s ruling party defeated a no-conidence vote Tuesday against President Jacob Zuma, who also faced a court challenge from an opposition party that wants corruption charges reinstated against the president. The motion against Zuma followed criticism on a range of issues, including a scandal over millions of dollars in state spending on his private home.

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soil. Farhat Horchani said Tuesday that Tunisia “agrees in principle” with such an arrangement. It would allow Tunisia to help with Libya’s reconstruction under a ledgling unity government.

From news services

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