Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • $1.50

SUPER TUESDAY HELPS CLEAR FIELD

TRUMP

CLINTON

Juggernaut sweeps across South, keeps rolling

Sanders ‘revolution’ fails to resonate with voters

AP PHOTOS

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on Super Tuesday primary election night in Palm Beach, Fla., as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie listens.

Cruz, Rubio fall further behind

REPUBLICANS

TRUMP SUPER TUESDAY WINS

AL

BY JULIE PACE AND JILL COLVIN Associated Press

AR GA MA WASHINGTON • Republican Don-

TN

VA

TOTAL DELEGATES .... 221

CRUZ SUPER TUESDAY WINS

OK TX TOTAL DELEGATES ..... 69

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters as she arrives at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami.

ald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton swept through the South on Super Tuesday, claiming victory in their parties’ primaries in delegaterich Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and Virginia. The front-runners appeared ever more likely to end up in a general election showdown. On the Republican side, Ted Cruz won his home state of Texas, the night’s single biggest prize, as well as neighboring Oklahoma. Democrat Bernie Sanders picked up his

home state of Vermont, as well as Oklahoma, Colorado and Minnesota, but failed to broaden his appeal with minority voters, who are crucial to the party in presidential elections. The night belonged to Trump and Clinton, who turned the busiest day of the 2016 primaries into a showcase of their strength with a wide swath of American voters. Signaling her confidence, Clinton set her sights on Trump as she addressed supporters during a victory rally. “It’s clear tonight that the stakes in this election have never been

DEMOCRATS

CLINTON

higher and the rhetoric we’re hearing on the other side has never been lower,” she said. Trump, too, had his eye on a general election matchup with the former secretary of state, casting her as part of a political establishment that has failed Americans. “She’s been there for so long,” Trump said at his swanky Mar-aLago resort in Florida. “If she hasn’t straightened it out by now, she’s not going to straighten it out in the next four years.” Trump’s dominance has rattled

AL AS* AR GA MA TN

TX

VA

TOTAL DELEGATES**..965

SANDERS SUPER TUESDAY WINS

CO MN OK

VT

TOTAL DELEGATES**.. 317 See TUESDAY • Page A9

* American Samoa ** Includes superdelegates

RUBIO SUPER TUESDAY WINS

MN TOTAL DELEGATES ......41

UNDECIDED

GOP gets Super shock with Trump triumph BY DAN BALZ Washington Post

stopping Donald Trump closed almost completely Tuesday night, leaving the demoralized anti-Trump forces with two weeks and no agreed-upon strategy for denying the New York billionaire the Repub-

VT

1,237 delegates are needed to win

2,383 delegates are needed to win

ANALYSIS

WASHINGTON • The window for

SUPER TUESDAY

AK

SUPER TUESDAY WINS

Study: High court limited on reform

lican presidential nomination. Trump was on his way to a series of victories in a majority of the 11 contests that made up the biggest single primary-caucus night of the nominating season. His chief rivals — Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Ohio Gov. John Kasich — and their allies were left to cling to the flimsiest of

hopes that a reversal of his fortunes still lies on the near horizon. For Rubio, the hope of many in the Republican establishment, Super Tuesday turned into a super disappointment. He made a run at Trump in Virginia but overall was in danger of running his win-loss record this

Full coverage A8-9 Late results stltoday.com

See ANALYSIS • Page A9

County votes to monitor opioids

Busch delivers Grant’s Farm plan

BY JENNIFER S. MANN AND JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY STEVE GIEGERICH AND JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch IMAGE COURTESY OF KRÄFTIG

The Missouri Supreme Court does not have the authority to order consolidation of St. Louis County’s myriad municipal courts, a working group assigned to study municipal court reform said Tuesday in a long-awaited report. Consolidating the courts was one of the recommendations from the Ferguson Commission appointed by Gov. See COURTS • Page A4

TODAY

Family business

47°/41°

BY DAVID HUNN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Beer heir Billy Busch has

delivered an inch-thick Grant’s Farm business plan to his brothers and sisters, arguing that, by boosting concessions, corporate sponsorship and big events at his family’s wildlife park, he

FANCY SANDWICHES

PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

52°/31° CHANCE OF RAIN

can produce enough new revenue to make his ownership sustainable. Busch’s persistence has since sparked a new round of back-and-forth with his siblings, as well as an informal lease proposal from the St. Louis Zoo, which had hoped to buy the farm, and a

CLAY TON • St. Louis County on Tuesday became the first jurisdiction in Missouri to enact a program aimed at monitoring the sale of prescription drugs, specifically the opioids experts call the entry point to heroin abuse. The unanimous County Council vote came hours after the Missouri House gave initial approval to a bill that would

See FARM • Page A6

See DRUGS • Page A6

Hazelwood schools audit is sought

• A2

City school oicials meet on tax plan

• A3

Hochman: Keep an eye out for Reyes

• B1

1 M

WEATHER A18

LET’S EAT • L1

Blues top Senators 4-3 in shootout

• B1

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SATURDAY FULL SERVICE AVAILABLE

Vol. 138, No. 62 ©2016

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoBuickGMC.com 7am - 3pm-By Appt.Only


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • $1.50

SUPER TUESDAY HELPS CLEAR FIELD

TRUMP

CLINTON

Juggernaut sweeps across South, keeps rolling

Sanders ‘revolution’ fails to resonate with voters

AP PHOTOS

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on Super Tuesday primary election night in Palm Beach, Fla., as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie listens.

Cruz, Rubio slip further behind

REPUBLICANS

TRUMP SUPER TUESDAY WINS

AL TN

AR GA MA VT

VA

TOTAL DELEGATES ....274

CRUZ SUPER TUESDAY WINS

OK TX TOTAL DELEGATES ....149

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters as she arrives at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI • Donald Trump claimed

seven Republican victories on Super Tuesday as the New York businessman extended his dominance in the 2016 primary. He and Democrat Hillary Clinton swept through the South on Super Tuesday, claiming victory in their parties’ primaries in delegate-rich Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and Virginia. The front-runners appear ever more likely to end up in a general election showdown. The GOP leaders’ search for any viable alternative to Trump sufered

a fresh setback, with both Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio vowing to fight on despite underwhelming performances on the biggest day of voting so far. Cruz avoided disaster by winning his home state of Texas and neighboring Oklahoma, while Rubio scored a lone victory in Minnesota. Shrugging off a racially charged feud from earlier in the week, a confident Trump looked ahead to the general election in a victory speech at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida: “We’re going to be more inclusive,” he declared. “We’re going to be more unified.” Trump scored victories in Geor-

gia, Virginia, Arkansas, Alabama, Tennessee, Massachusetts and Vermont, tightening his grasp on his party’s nomination on a Super Tuesday marked by panic from Republican leaders. He was also leading in the Alaska caucuses. Fearing Trump may build an insurmountable delegate lead, top Republican officials lashed out at the billionaire businessman’s command of the issues and “seeming ambivalence” over white supremacists as voting began. Trump’s aggressive plans for See TUESDAY • Page A9

DEMOCRATS

CLINTON SUPER TUESDAY WINS

AL

AR GA MA

TN

TX

VA

Clinton also won American Samoa TOTAL DELEGATES* 1,001

SANDERS SUPER TUESDAY WINS

CO MN OK

VT

TOTAL DELEGATES* ... 371

RUBIO SUPER TUESDAY WINS

MN TOTAL DELEGATES ..... 82

UNDECIDED

ANALYSIS

GOP gets Super shock with Trump triumph BY DAN BALZ Washington Post

WASHINGTON • The window for

SUPER TUESDAY

stopping Donald Trump closed almost completely Tuesday night, leaving the demoralized anti-Trump forces with two weeks and no agreed-upon strategy for denying the New York billionaire the Repub-

AK 1,237 delegates are needed to win

* Includes superdelegates

Study: High court limited on reform

lican presidential nomination. Trump was on his way to a series of victories in a majority of the 11 contests that made up the biggest single primary-caucus night of the nominating season. His chief rivals — Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Ohio Gov. John Kasich — and their allies were left to cling to the flimsiest of

hopes that a reversal of his fortunes still lies on the near horizon. For Rubio, the hope of many in the Republican establishment, Super Tuesday turned into a super disappointment. He made a run at Trump in Virginia but overall was in danger of running his win-loss record this

2,383 delegates are needed to win

Full coverage A8-9 Late results stltoday.com

See ANALYSIS • Page A9

County votes to monitor opioids

Busch delivers Grant’s Farm plan

BY JENNIFER S. MANN AND JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY STEVE GIEGERICH AND JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch IMAGE COURTESY OF KRÄFTIG

The Missouri Supreme Court does not have the authority to order consolidation of St. Louis County’s myriad municipal courts, a working group assigned to study municipal court reform said Tuesday in a long-awaited report. Consolidating the courts was one of the recommendations from the Ferguson Commission appointed by Gov. See COURTS • Page A4

TODAY

Family business

47°/41°

BY DAVID HUNN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Beer heir Billy Busch has

delivered an inch-thick Grant’s Farm business plan to his brothers and sisters, arguing that, by boosting concessions, corporate sponsorship and big events at his family’s wildlife park, he

FANCY SANDWICHES

PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

52°/31° CHANCE OF RAIN

can produce enough new revenue to make his ownership sustainable. Busch’s persistence has since sparked a new round of back-and-forth with his siblings, as well as an informal lease proposal from the St. Louis Zoo, which had hoped to buy the farm, and a

CLAY TON • St. Louis County on Tuesday became the first jurisdiction in Missouri to enact a program aimed at monitoring the sale of prescription drugs, specifically the opioids experts call the entry point to heroin abuse. The unanimous County Council vote came hours after the Missouri House gave initial approval to a bill that would

See FARM • Page A6

See DRUGS • Page A6

Hazelwood schools audit is sought

• A2

City school oicials meet on tax plan

• A3

Hochman: Keep an eye out for Reyes

• B1

2 M

WEATHER A18

LET’S EAT • L1

Blues top Senators 4-3 in shootout

• B1

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SATURDAY FULL SERVICE AVAILABLE

Vol. 138, No. 62 ©2016

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoBuickGMC.com 7am - 3pm-By Appt.Only


M 1 WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

FIND MORE THAN 100 COMICS AND GAMES

AMERICA, THE POLARIZED

BEHIND THE SUPREME COURT

From Adam @ Home to Zits, check out our collection of interactive comics online.

Did you ever wonder how there could be a political year in which both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders could contend?

There are chance encounters — at a dinner, a baseball game, the opera — that give Washington the rare opportunity to see the justices in a diferent, more interesting light.

Moms stand up for woman who faced toughest choice

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 2012 BASEBALL PLAYOFFS Major League Baseball announces it will add a second wild-card team to the playofs, a move which later in the season pays of for the Cardinals.

HEADS UP

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The question before Associate Circuit Court Judge Theresa Counts Burke was not one of innocence or guilt. That answer will come later. At issue in Burke’s Division 25 courtroom in St. Louis Circuit Court Monday morning was whether Jeannetta Maclin has to stay in jail. Maclin is the 23-yearold mother of two who last month left her two boys — ages 2 and 5 — in the family’s apartment while she went to work a shift at her minimum-wage job at a movie theater. Maclin The decision — the kind of one single mothers living in extreme poverty often struggle with — turned tragic when the boys somehow started a fire in the apartment. By the time firefighters responded to the building at 807 Clara Avenue, the boys were not breathing. They were revived on the way to the hospital. Since that Feb. 11 fire, the boys have recovered, and they are living with their father, Stephon Hughes, in St. Louis County. Maclin, meanwhile, faces felony child endangerment charges. She is being held at the city’s medium security facility, known as the Workhouse, in lieu of a $15,000 cash bond. The bond was the reason for the court hearing Monday. It’s too high, argued Maclin’s attorney, Stephanie Lummus, who works for the nonprofit firm Arch City Defenders.

“If she had $15,000,” Lummus argued before Burke, “she wouldn’t be here. She never would have been charged. We don’t put people in jail because they’re poor.” To be fair, Maclin was put in jail because she’s accused of a terrible crime, one that, if not for the quick response of the fire department, could have ended much worse. But the question of bail strikes at the heart of whether the courts have one set of rules for poor people and another for those with money. Bail exists, Lummus explained, to make sure the defendant shows up in court, and to protect victims and the community, should the accused be considered dangerous. “She’s never been in trouble,” Lummus said of Maclin after the hearing ended. “She’s not a criminal.” Like her mother before her, Maclin was a teen mother, giving birth to her first child at the age of 17. Her mom was 15 when she was born. A native St. Louisan, she was homeless for a time before she ended up with the apartment on Clara Avenue, living on friends’ couches and in her car. Behind almost $2,000 in rent, she made the now-fateful decision to leave her children alone, Lummus told the judge. Then Lummus asked the judge to allow a few people to speak on Maclin’s behalf. There were six who lined up to speak. Pam Ross went first. “Give this poor mom some help,” Ross pleaded with Judge Burke. “Let us adopt the woman and help her out of her problem.” Ross is a grandmother who helped organize other moms to ask the judge to lower Maclin’s bail. The way Ross sees it, single mothers living in poverty make hard-to-imagine decisions every day that most people never face. Food or day care? Roof or car?

Electric bill or child support? When resources are finite, the decisions get more diicult. The dilemma other parents might face with deciding what age is appropriate to leave a child alone comes at earlier for struggling single mothers, and is balanced with other pressures. Judge Burke listened to the people asking her to release Maclin while she awaits her court date, but she let them know that Maclin wasn’t her primary concern. “Ultimately, there are other people I have to keep in mind, mostly, the protection of two children,” she said. Her decision ultimately came down to what another judge decided in a case in the county. There, a family judge on Monday afternoon issued an order of protection that keeps Maclin away from her children until her child endangerment charges are resolved in court. Tuesday morning, with the children protected by a court order, Burke lowered Maclin’s bond to $10,000, with a 10 percent cash option. Lummus believes Maclin’s new support group will be able to raise the $1,000 to get her out of jail. These are the choices people who live in poverty must make, or, in this case, have made for them. Maclin might be forced to stay away from her children, but doing so might also improve her opportunities to provide for them someday in the future, when she hopes to get them back. For now, she’s in jail and jobless. Even without two felonies hanging over her head, poverty is keeping Jeannetta Maclin — and her children — in its cruel grasp.

OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER The St. Charles County Parks and Recreation Department is accepting nominations for its Outstanding Volunteer Awards through March 18. Residents are encouraged to nominate qualified volunteers by submitting a nomination form to the department. The Outstanding Volunteer Awards will be presented to the winners at the Parks Department’s annual Volunteer Appreciation Night held during National Volunteer Appreciation Week, April 10–16. The nomination form can be found at stccparks. org. For more information, contact parks marketing coordinator Nancy Lee Gomer at 636-949-7535. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS EGG HUNT When • 10 a.m. Saturday Where • Logan University, 1851 Schoettler Road, Chesterfield How much • Free More info • logan.edu/ EggHunt or 636-227-2100 The Hare in the Air Egg Hunt features the arrival of the Easter Bunny by helicopter at 11 a.m. The 15,000-egg hunt is divided into age groups of 2, 3, 4-5 and 6 -8. Other activities include balloon artists, a petting zoo and costumed characters. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 01-29-33-34-55 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $135 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $292 million

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

Residents seek audit of Hazelwood School District BY JESSICA BOCK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Upset parents and residents here are beginning to circulate a petition to request that state officials perform an audit of the Hazelwood School District. They will need to gather 5,000 signatures, according to the state auditor’s office. The Hazelwood School Board and administrators have been under fire since making public plans to cut about $6.6 million in the next school year, including elementary band and orchestra, time in physical education by half for elementary students, and 25 percent of the district’s custodial staf. About 300 people attended the board’s second meeting since the cuts were announced, many to bemoan the reductions and wearing red T-shirts that read, “#letusplay.” About 30 people took more than an hour to voice their unhappiness. “Can you please tell my kindergartner why you made that decision and why she doesn’t matter to you anymore?” said Monique Norfolk, a Hazelwood parent, to the board on Tuesday. Residents in other school districts have successfully spurred state audits after questioning practices in their districts. In Rockwood, a School Board member re-

signed and others failed to get re-elected after a state audit concluded he should not have voted on projects that helped the construction company that employed him. “From what I understand, they were very productive,” said Kimberly Gonzalez, who planned to distribute the petition to the large crowd expected at Tuesday’s School Board meeting. The meeting had been moved to the Hazelwood East Early Childhood Center, 12555 Partridge Run Drive in Florissant. District oicials responded by saying a state audit would cost the district $80,000 to $120,000 if the petition is successful. They also linked to an audit completed in 2015 by a firm hired by the district. The state auditor’s oice says that when conducting a performance audit of an entity that has already had a financial audit, investigators will review the independent audit to avoid duplicating eforts. Meanwhile, State Rep. Keith English, an independent from Florissant, asked both leaders of the state House and Senate budget committees on Tuesday to withhold any public funds from the Hazelwood School District until he receives a response to his request for line item expenditures for the proposed 2016-17 budget. “We as taxpayers are not getting information as to why they are not making cuts to administrative salaries,” he said.

In response to a letter from English last week calling for Interim Superintendent Ingrid Clark-Jackson’s dismissal, School Board President Desiree Whitlock replied, saying his request was of base. “The accusations contained in your letter are not based on fact and your very personal attack on Dr. Clark-Jackson is despicable,” she wrote. This is the third year the district has been spending more on operating expenses than it is bringing in, and using its reserve fund to make up the diference. The cuts have totaled $6.6 million, and more are expected for 2017-18. A projected $12.7 million shortfall for 2016-17 prompted leaders to eliminate the positions of 13 elementary school physical education teachers, as well as nine orchestra and band teachers for fourth- and fifth-graders. Three high school physical education positions also were cut. The changes do not take efect until the new school year. Nearly all of the teachers have been placed in other positions for 2016-17 based on planned resignations and retirements, but reductions mean elementary students will have their time in gym class cut in half. Instead of twice a week, they will be in gym once a week.

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 06-19-20-22-39 Evening: 16-29-30-38-40 LOTTO Monday: 05-08-17-34-39-50 Extra shot: 03 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $25.5 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 626 FB: 5 Evening: 380 FB: 3 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5755 FB: 6 Evening: 2402 FB: 3

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

Jessica Bock • 314-340-8228 @jessicabock on Twitter jbock@post-dispatch.com

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CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. Editorial .............. Horoscopes ......... Letters to editor .. Obituaries ........... People .................

LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.1 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 01-14-19-37-38 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 026 Evening: 136 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 9229 Evening: 9707

A10 A14 EV2 A14 A16 A18

Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks .................. A11 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A18

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M 2 WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

FIND MORE THAN 100 COMICS AND GAMES

AMERICA, THE POLARIZED

BEHIND THE SUPREME COURT

From Adam @ Home to Zits, check out our collection of interactive comics online.

Did you ever wonder how there could be a political year in which both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders could contend?

There are chance encounters — at a dinner, a baseball game, the opera — that give Washington the rare opportunity to see the justices in a diferent, more interesting light.

Moms stand up for woman who faced toughest choice

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 2012 BASEBALL PLAYOFFS Major League Baseball announces it will add a second wild-card team to the playofs, a move which later in the season pays of for the Cardinals.

HEADS UP

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The question before Associate Circuit Court Judge Theresa Counts Burke was not one of innocence or guilt. That answer will come later. At issue in Burke’s Division 25 courtroom in St. Louis Circuit Court Monday morning was whether Jeannetta Maclin has to stay in jail. Maclin is the 23-yearold mother of two who last month left her two boys — ages 2 and 5 — in the family’s apartment while she went to work a shift at her minimum-wage job at a movie theater. Maclin The decision — the kind of one single mothers living in extreme poverty often struggle with — turned tragic when the boys somehow started a fire in the apartment. By the time firefighters responded to the building at 807 Clara Avenue, the boys were not breathing. They were revived on the way to the hospital. Since that Feb. 11 fire, the boys have recovered, and they are living with their father, Stephon Hughes, in St. Louis County. Maclin, meanwhile, faces felony child endangerment charges. She is being held at the city’s medium security facility, known as the Workhouse, in lieu of a $15,000 cash bond. The bond was the reason for the court hearing Monday. It’s too high, argued Maclin’s attorney, Stephanie Lummus, who works for the nonprofit firm Arch City Defenders.

“If she had $15,000,” Lummus argued before Burke, “she wouldn’t be here. She never would have been charged. We don’t put people in jail because they’re poor.” To be fair, Maclin was put in jail because she’s accused of a terrible crime, one that, if not for the quick response of the fire department, could have ended much worse. But the question of bail strikes at the heart of whether the courts have one set of rules for poor people and another for those with money. Bail exists, Lummus explained, to make sure the defendant shows up in court, and to protect victims and the community, should the accused be considered dangerous. “She’s never been in trouble,” Lummus said of Maclin after the hearing ended. “She’s not a criminal.” Like her mother before her, Maclin was a teen mother, giving birth to her first child at the age of 17. Her mom was 15 when she was born. A native St. Louisan, she was homeless for a time before she ended up with the apartment on Clara Avenue, living on friends’ couches and in her car. Behind almost $2,000 in rent, she made the now-fateful decision to leave her children alone, Lummus told the judge. Then Lummus asked the judge to allow a few people to speak on Maclin’s behalf. There were six who lined up to speak. Pam Ross went first. “Give this poor mom some help,” Ross pleaded with Judge Burke. “Let us adopt the woman and help her out of her problem.” Ross is a grandmother who helped organize other moms to ask the judge to lower Maclin’s bail. The way Ross sees it, single mothers living in poverty make hard-to-imagine decisions every day that most people never face. Food or day care? Roof or car?

Electric bill or child support? When resources are finite, the decisions get more diicult. The dilemma other parents might face with deciding what age is appropriate to leave a child alone comes at earlier for struggling single mothers, and is balanced with other pressures. Judge Burke listened to the people asking her to release Maclin while she awaits her court date, but she let them know that Maclin wasn’t her primary concern. “Ultimately, there are other people I have to keep in mind, mostly, the protection of two children,” she said. Her decision ultimately came down to what another judge decided in a case in the county. There, a family judge on Monday afternoon issued an order of protection that keeps Maclin away from her children until her child endangerment charges are resolved in court. Tuesday morning, with the children protected by a court order, Burke lowered Maclin’s bond to $10,000, with a 10 percent cash option. Lummus believes Maclin’s new support group will be able to raise the $1,000 to get her out of jail. These are the choices people who live in poverty must make, or, in this case, have made for them. Maclin might be forced to stay away from her children, but doing so might also improve her opportunities to provide for them someday in the future, when she hopes to get them back. For now, she’s in jail and jobless. Even without two felonies hanging over her head, poverty is keeping Jeannetta Maclin — and her children — in its cruel grasp.

OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER The St. Charles County Parks and Recreation Department is accepting nominations for its Outstanding Volunteer Awards through March 18. Residents are encouraged to nominate qualified volunteers by submitting a nomination form to the department. The Outstanding Volunteer Awards will be presented to the winners at the Parks Department’s annual Volunteer Appreciation Night held during National Volunteer Appreciation Week, April 10–16. The nomination form can be found at stccparks. org. For more information, contact parks marketing coordinator Nancy Lee Gomer at 636-949-7535. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS EGG HUNT When • 10 a.m. Saturday Where • Logan University, 1851 Schoettler Road, Chesterfield How much • Free More info • logan.edu/ EggHunt or 636-227-2100 The Hare in the Air Egg Hunt features the arrival of the Easter Bunny by helicopter at 11 a.m. The 15,000-egg hunt is divided into age groups of 2, 3, 4-5 and 6 -8. Other activities include balloon artists, a petting zoo and costumed characters. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 01-29-33-34-55 Mega ball: 06 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $135 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $292 million

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

Residents seek audit of Hazelwood School District BY JESSICA BOCK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Upset parents and residents here are beginning to circulate a petition to request that state officials perform an audit of the Hazelwood School District. They will need to gather 5,000 signatures, according to the state auditor’s office. The Hazelwood School Board and administrators have been under fire since making public plans to cut about $6.6 million in the next school year, including elementary band and orchestra, time in physical education by half for elementary students, and 25 percent of the district’s custodial staf. The protests have exasperated some on the board, whose members say they are trying to make the best of the situation. Board President Desiree Whitlock said she thinks the anger has become outlandish and hostile. A mother of two, she said she’s gotten threats and “every kind of dirty mail you can get.” “This is not Hazelwood. This is totally unbelievable,” she said Tuesday after listening to about 30 people complain about the board’s behavior. “We cannot use bullying as a means to get what we need.” About 300 people attended the board’s second meeting since the cuts were an-

nounced, many to bemoan the reductions and wearing red T-shirts that said “#letusplay.” “Can you please tell my kindergartener why you made that decision and why she doesn’t matter to you anymore?” said Monique Norfolk, one of the Hazelwood parents who voiced unhappiness at the meeting. Residents in other school districts have successfully spurred state audits after questioning practices in their districts. In Rockwood, a School Board member resigned and others lost re-election bids after a state audit concluded he should not have voted on projects that helped the construction company that employed him. District oicials responded by saying a state audit would cost the district $80,000 to $120,000 if the petition is successful. They also linked to an audit completed in 2015 by a firm hired by the district. Meanwhile, State Rep. Keith English, an independent from Florissant, asked both leaders of the state House and Senate budget committees on Tuesday to withhold any public funds from the Hazelwood School District until he receives a response to his request for line item expenditures for the proposed 2016-17 budget. “We as taxpayers are not getting information as to why they are not making cuts to administrative salaries,” he said.

In response to a letter from English last week calling for Interim Superintendent Ingrid Clark-Jackson’s dismissal, Whitlock said the request was of base. “The accusations contained in your letter are not based on fact and your very personal attack on Dr. Clark-Jackson is despicable,” she wrote. This is the third year the district has been spending more on operating expenses than it is bringing in, and using its reserve fund to make up the diference. The cuts have totaled $6.6 million, and more are expected for 2017-18. A projected $12.7 million shortfall for 2016-17 prompted leaders to eliminate the positions of 13 elementary school physical education teachers, as well as nine orchestra and band teachers for fourth- and fifth-graders. Three high school physical education positions also were cut. The changes do not take efect until the new school year. Nearly all of the teachers have been placed in other positions for 2016-17 based on planned resignations and retirements, but reductions mean elementary students will have their time in gym class cut in half.

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STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

Kristen Taketa of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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LOCAL

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

St. Louis’ school boards meet to discuss tax plan BY ELISA CROUCH st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Members of the elected and state-imposed school boards came together Tuesday in a rare meeting to discuss the tax referendum that would bring about $28 million to St. Louis schools. For the first time in more than a year, members of the two governing boards — the one that is in power and the one that is not — shared a table inside the central office of St. Louis Public Schools to discuss what might be needed to sell a 75-cent tax increase called Proposition 1. Superintendent Kelvin Adams sat among them

County dismisses community outreach oicial BY STEVE GIEGERICH st. Louis Post-dispatch

CLAYTON • The lawyer

St. Louis County tapped last year to head its newly formed Oice of Community Empowerment and Diversity was let go Monday following an investigation that found she was conducting private business on county time. Annette Slack was replaced on an interim basis by Ethel Byndom, the coordinator of community empowerment. County Executive Steve Stenger said Tuesday that Slack was “terminated for cause.” Stenger established the office as an outreach program to assist North County residents with housing, social services, public health, education and other issues. Slack did not return a call seeking comment. Betty Thompson, a colleague in the empowerment office, disputed the contention that the county had reason to fire Slack. Thompson, an active supporter of Stenger in his 2014 campaign, charged that Slack’s dismissal was connected to oice politics and racial mistrust. “Slack is a good role model, and to dismiss her like that and not give her an opportunity to defend herself is not fair,” said Thompson, who resigned Tuesday morning. Thompson said Slack chose to be fired rather than accept an invitation from the county to resign. The issue, according to Thompson, was a misunderstanding about legal work Slack performed for a relative, and the grading of papers for a part-time position as an adjunct Missouri Baptist University professor. Internal documents obtained by the Post-Dispatch show that Slack used a county computer to prepare a syllabus and exam questions for a course in “Human Resource Management.” The computer hard drive also revealed graded student papers. The documents, uncovered during the county investigation, included court papers, letters Slack wrote on behalf of law clients and correspondence she drafted for her church — including a contract for artists that performed at a Christmas pageant. Sources said that Slack identified herself on her county telephone extension as an attorney and not the manager of the Community Empowerment Oice. The county adopted a policy last year prohibiting employees from working a secondary job without the express permission of ranking county officials. Byndom is a former St. Louis regional director for the Missouri secretary of state. She also served as an intake oicer and investigator with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights. She currently sits on the executive board of the St. Louis chapter of the NAACP.

and answered questions about how the district would spend proceeds from the tax, one-third of which would go to charter schools after the second year of its collection. The proposal will be on the April 5 ballot. The last time city voters passed a tax increase for schools was 1991. Adams presented an information sheet that showed teacher salaries in city schools to be lower than in any district in the region, resulting in continuous turnover year after year. Millions of dollars stemming from the 1999 settlement of the desegregation case are close to being fully spent, which

means revenue must be found to support preschool for 2,300 children. Many schools don’t have necessary security, Adams added. He also sees a need for character education and programs to keep children on track for graduation. But members of the elected board, removed from power in 2007, asked if Adams could provide more specifics. Bill Haas, an elected board member, said the tax would be an easier sell to voters if district staff would commit to spending a certain percentage on specified areas. Adams took notes. Katie Wessling, another member of the elected

board, asked if a smaller increase might have a greater chance of passing. “For the most part, people are going to say, yes we support it, or no we don’t,” said Rick Sullivan, president of the Special Administrative Board. “We had no way of knowing, will enough people say yes to 40 cents? Would enough people say yes to 50 cents, or 60?” The 75-cent tax increase would raise property taxes an additional $142.50 a year for the owner of a $100,000 home. It needs 51 percent of votes to pass. The meeting was to provide information to the elected board. The seven members continue to meet

most months at various schools around the district. They vote on resolutions, but have no control over district operations. Often times, the communication between the two boards amounts to nothing more than elected board member Bill Monroe assailing the SAB during citizen comments at its monthly meeting. But on Tuesday, Monroe mostly listened. “This dialogue is good,” said Susan Jones, president of the elected board. The elected board on Thursday will discuss whether to endorse the tax question. On March 15, the members will vote and determine to what, if any, extent they’ll

be involved. “I would hope they, like every other citizen we get to tell our story to, will support it,” Sullivan said. Last month, a letter advocating passage of the tax went out to 150 city leaders. District staff made the mistake of putting the letter, signed by Richard Gaines of the SAB, on district letterhead. It was paid for by Friends of St. Louis Public Schools, and a corrected letter was mailed. A complaint was filed with the Missouri Ethics Commission, Adams said. District staf is working to address it, he added. Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com

Two robbers get 60 years in deadly shootout BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Two men who stormed into a St. Louis bar in 2014 and triggered a deadly shootout were sentenced Tuesday morning to 60 years in prison. St. Louis Circuit Judge Elizabeth Hogan followed terms of a plea agreement by sentencing Derreaun Davis, 21, and Corey Wade, 30, both of St. Louis, to two consecutive life sentences — or up to 60 years in prison — with the possibility of parole. D a v i s a n d Wa d e pleaded guilty Monday to second-degree mur-

REWARDS

Davis

Wade

der and 31 other counts of assault, attempted robbery and armed criminal action stemming from a robbery attempt that turned into a shootout at Pooh’s Corner, at 6023 Virginia Avenue in the city’s Carondelet neighborhood. The watering hole is popular with St. Louis police oicers. Police said that Davis, Wade and another man

entered the bar about 10:55 p.m. on Dec. 2, 2014, ordering people to the floor. One of the robbers fired a shot into the ceiling. A retired St. Louis officer who was having a drink at the bar shot a n d wo u n d e d Dav i s and Wade. A third suspect was later arrested but never charged in the crime. During the gunfire, authorities say one of the three robbers shot bar patron Diana Lawrence, 63, in the back of the head. Lawrence, of St. Louis, died the next day. Three other people in the bar, including the retired

officer, were injured in the shootout. In the plea agreement with Davis and Wade, prosecutors dropped f i rs t - d e g re e m u rd e r charges, which could have meant life with no parole. At Tuesday’s sentencing, Lawrence’s relatives and friends spoke of their grief over Lawrence’s death and fear that remains since the shooting. “It destroyed me,” said Billie Wilson, who was in the bar the night of the shooting. “I’m not the same person.” Davis’ uncle, Rayshaun Williams, said more than one person made bad

choices to use guns that night, referring to the former police officer in the bar. Williams said he thinks gun laws need to be stricter to deter people from making poor choices involving guns. “In this case, there are no winners,” Williams said. “We lost my nephew. They lost their family member.” “Pooh” was a nickname for the bar’s original owner, but the name stayed and gave rise to the tavern’s slogan: “Police Oicers Oicial Hiding Spot.” Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Court operations up to residents, report says COURTS • FROM A1

Jay Nixon to study ways to heal rifts in the community after the shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014. It was also urged by activists and lawyers who have driven some of the reform debate. But the working group, appointed in May 2015 to study measures beyond last fall’s sweeping municipal court reform legislation, said consolidation is simply beyond the scope of the top court’s powers. It said recent legal settlements and the new state law may, in fact, have gone too far in meddling with court procedures and local governance. The “ultimate responsibility for the working policies and day-to-day operational practices adopted by any given municipal court must always remain with the voters of that municipality” who can elect or remove officials from office, the group wrote. The report suggested restoring some power to municipalities to help them ensure tickets are paid, which drew praise from a north St. Louis County mayor but scorn from the lawyer who has arguably fought the hardest to limit that power. “What I like about this report is that it creates a mechanism for oversight of the courts” but protected municipalities’ ability to prosecute people who are “openly defiant” about breaking laws and skipping court, said Normandy Mayor Patrick Green. The report said a new state law created confusion about whether someone could be jailed for nonpayment or failure to show in court. Jail should be an option for people who are found to be in contempt, the group said. Cash bail, when used appropriately to ensure someone’s court appearance, is consistent with the state constitution and necessary. Thomas Harvey, cofounder and executive director of ArchCity Defenders, said he hopes the Supreme Court doesn’t place much weight on the report. “It is a political document that I think genuinely expresses a fundamental misunderstanding of the basic issues raised by our pending federal litigation” alleging that several St. Louis County communities run debtors’ prisons, he said. The report took issue with the city of Jennings’ settlement with ArchCity Defenders, saying it “would appear that the municipal court gives up any claim to having the authority to issue warrants in the event of nonpayment and nonappearance ... ” Harvey said the comment was an “astoundingly disconnected statement that could only emanate from a middleclass white guy who has never considered a possibility” that he might not have the money to secure his freedom. The report did seek to dispel any notion that municipal courts in St. Louis County have been unfair targets of criticism. Based on its review, the group wrote, “the most serious concerns, operational deficiencies, and resulting loss of public confidence in Missouri’s municipal court system, are largely limited to certain municipal courts in St. Louis County.” The high court said in a statement it would give the report careful study but offered no timetable for potential changes. Judge Karl DeMarce, an associate court judge in Scotland County and member of the working group, would oversee any reforms. Reforms proposed by the working group that it said were within the court’s power include: • Barring municipal

judges from practicing law in other municipal courts in the same circuit. • Barring attorneys from working as municipal prosecutors and defense attorneys in the same circuit. • Studying the cost of having all municipal court proceedings recorded “to encourage proper behavior by judges, court personnel, attorneys” and others. • Requiring municipal courts to maintain open records and proceedings and minimizing the need for in-court appearances to resolve tickets. • Ensuring that the presiding judge of the state court circuit monitors the municipal courts. • Creating two new positions in St. Louis County to supervise the municipal courts, which could include “frequent scheduled and unannounced visits.” • Requiring municipal courts to dismiss “failure to appear” cases. • Requiring municipalities that exceeded revenue caps set by state law to dismiss cases and warrants that predate January 2014, unless the prosecutor finds the case has merit. • Subjecting judges to retention votes or direct election in courts where revenue limits have been exceeded or other serious problems have been observed. • The area’s municipalities have been under fire for abusive ticketing and court practices that disproportionately penalize low-income and AfricanAmerican people. An ongoing PostDispatch investigation showed the disparity in how people with money and connections are treated compared to poor people unable to hire lawyers, and conflicts of interest in the municipal courts that thrive in an atmosphere of secrecy. The working group held several public hearings, including one that drew about 70 people in St. Louis in November. Most who spoke were familiar faces in the reform movement, urging a massive overhaul of the fragmented system of 80 courts for 90 municipalities. The report said some suggestions may have been “well-intended,” but were “political solutions, not legal ones.” The group acknowledged if it had to design a municipal court system from scratch, it might have done things differently. But it placed much of the reform responsibility on the state Legislature, which it noted, already made significant changes — most prominently, a tighter cap on what can be raised in traic revenue. Lawmakers are studying further measures, such as applying the revenue limits to code violations too. “Our recommendations proceed from the belief that if the economic incentives for courts ... are removed, some of the more farreaching recommendations of the other groups may not be necessary,” the group wrote. Similarly, the report noted, eliminating a judge’s ability to also work as a prosecutor or defense attorney, or be directly hired by the municipality, reduces conflicts of interest and “remove(s) them from the need to respond to a city’s revenue needs.” Working group member Kimberly Norwood, a Washington University law professor, dissented by saying the report doesn’t go nearly far enough to address the problems in St. Louis County. “There are two systems of justice in the county — one for White and middle class residents and the other for poor and mostly Black residents,” she wrote. Jennifer Mann • 314-621-5804 @j_s_mann on Twitter jmann@post-dispatch.com

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

Come rain or shine

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Andy Koziatek, 34, of University City, trains Tuesday morning on the track at Washington University. He’s gearing up for the Boston Marathon in April, and Tuesdays are speed workouts, he said. “I’m lucky it’s not pouring right now,” Koziatek said.

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Suspect charged in fatal hit-and-run • Prosecutors on Tuesday charged a St. Louis man in a fatal hit-and-run crash in a Velda City police chase last week. Mikal M. Hamilton, 24, was charged with irst-degree involuntary manslaughter and leaving the scene of a crash. His bail was set at $100,000 cash, but he was not yet in custody Hamilton Tuesday. Velda City police tried to stop a Chevrolet Monte Carlo late Friday morning a mile south of Natural Bridge and Lucas & Hunt roads. The car sped away from police and ran a red light at the intersection, where it struck Keisha Redding, 23, of St. Louis. Police have launched an internal investigation into the pursuit. Velda City’s police chief told the Post-Dispatch last week that it appeared his oicers followed the department’s chase policy.

Anti-Semitic scrawl at MU investigated

The Monte Carlo was later found abandoned in St. Louis, police said. Hamilton has a prior conviction for unlawful use of weapon. Court records give his address in the 1200 block of Melvin Collins Walk in St. Louis. ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Driver dies in crash • Georgia A. Sauzek, 48, of Freeburg, died after crashing her SUV Monday night in St. Clair County, police said. Sauzek was heading west on Illinois Route 15 shortly after 10 p.m. when she went of the road and crashed into an embankment under the Frank Scott Parkway overpass, police said. Illinois State Police said it appeared she was wearing a seat belt when she crashed. She was alone in the car. It was not clear what caused the crash. Sauzek was pronounced dead at Belleville Memorial Hospital at 11:50 p.m. BELLEVILLE > Woman who faked cancer gets three years in prison •

A Belleville woman who faked having terminal ovarian cancer to raise money from friends for bogus treatments was sentenced Tuesday to three years in prison. Alissa Jackson, 32, a married mother of ive, pleaded guilty in December to two counts of theft of more than $500 (but less than $10,000) by deception. Jackson When Jackson was charged in June 2014, police said her fundraisers seeking donations to a group titled “Alissa’s Army” had “an international reach.” Friends of Jackson planned fundraisers, sold merchandise in her honor and held auctions that raised thousands of dollars, Jackson’s supporters have said. Police began investigating Jackson’s claims when several of Jackson’s supporters grew suspicious of her and contacted authorities.

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University of MissouriColumbia police are investigating a case of antiSemitic vandalism after someone wrote “Hitler Rules” on a notification board inside Gateway Hall sometime Monday night or Tuesday morning. The incident marks the fourth time university officials have investigated anti-Semitic vandalism in the past year at a school that has become a national symbol for strained race relations. “This type of vandalism attacks everyone,” interim Chancellor Hank Foley said. “Our core values — including that of respect — must become more than words on paper or a banner. They are the foundation of who we desire to be as a campus community and the way we all need to conduct ourselves.” This week’s vandalism follows an incident in October in which students found a swastika scrawled in feces on a bathroom wall, also in Gateway Hall. Also in October, student Bradley Becker received a 90-day suspended jail sentence and two years of probation after his guilty plea to misdemeanor property damage related to two swastikas found in April inside the Mark Twain residence hall. Rabbi Avraham Lapine, who’s with a Jewish organization that serves university students called Chabad, said the repeated incidents are concerning. “It’s not that each one is so serious by itself; it’s serious because it keeps happening,” Lapine said. In addition to university police, Mizzou’s newly created Office for Civil Rights is also investigating. The oice was created in December after weeks of protest on campus over several racist incidents.

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LOCAL

03.02.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

DIGEST ST. CHARLES COUNTY > County Council comes out against Maryland Heights plan • The St. Charles County Council is opposing a proposed commercialresidential complex across the Missouri River on 1,800 acres of lood plain in Maryland Heights. The council on Monday voted 6-0 for a resolution against the plan, arguing that it could be expected to cause future looding in St. Charles County. “Maryland Heights should be ashamed of themselves,” said Councilman Joe Brazil, R-Deiance. “This is an insult. This is wrong to your neighbors.” The resolution also attacks the possible use of taxincrement inancing for the project, which is pushed by Alan Bornstein, a business partner of Rams owner Stan Kroenke. Kroenke also would be an investor in the project. “Our friend, Mr. Kroenke, he already kicked us in the crotch once, right?” Brazil said, referring to the Rams’ recent move to Los Angeles. The proposal would “give this guy money for one of his investments to kick us in the crotch twice.” (Mark Schlinkmann) ST. LOUIS > Work will close I-44 lanes until fall • Expect lane closures on Interstate

LAW & ORDER EAST ALTON > Baby’s death is investigated • A 4-monthold girl was pronounced dead after she was found in a bed with a pillow over her face Monday morning in East Alton, authorities said. The Madison County Coroner’s Oice says autopsy results in Kiley K. Burford’s death could be consistent with sufocation, but a cause of death is pending further tests and investigation. Kiley was pronounced dead just after 9 a.m. Monday at Alton Memorial Hospital, Coroner Stephen P. Nonn said in a statement. That was about half an hour after a 911 call was made from the girl’s home. The baby was discovered by her mother in an adult bed with an adult memory foam pillow over her face, Nonn said in the statement. The pillow had been propped up on an edge and appeared to have fallen onto the child, the coroner said. The death remains under investigation by East Alton police, the Southern Illinois Death Investigation Task Force, the Illinois Department of Children and Family Service and the Madison County State’s Attorney’s Oice. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Missing man’s car found with a body inside • Hours after St. Charles County police asked the public to help in the search for a missing 36-year-old man, his car was found Schroeder with a body inside Tuesday afternoon. James M. Schroeder and his red 2007 Nissan 350Z had been missing since Feb. 12. The car was found about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the 3400 block of Illinois Avenue, just south of Cherokee Street. Police said they had not conirmed if the body found inside was Schroeder’s, although they said the remains matched his general description. Police ask anyone with information about Schroeder’s disappearance to call 636-949-7900, Ext. 4465.

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On March 10 and 11, crews will close two lanes of westbound I-44 between Hampton and Arsenal between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. to shift traic before setting a barrier wall. When that work is done, one lane on westbound I-44 will be closed around the clock into early fall. Once the bridge renovations are complete later this year, crews will replace the driving surface of I-44 in both directions between Laclede Station Road and Kingshighway. (Leah Thorsen)

44 between Arsenal Street and Hampton Avenue next week and into the early fall, the Missouri Department of Transportation said. Crews are renovating the Southwest, Hampton and Sublette bridges along the interstate. At 9 a.m. Tuesday, they will shift traic and set a barrier wall along the bridges as part of the work. On Tuesday and March 9, crews will close two lanes of eastbound I-44 between Arsenal and Hampton between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. to shift traic before setting a barrier wall. When the work is done, one lane on eastbound I-44 will be closed around the clock into early fall.

WASHINGTON > St. Louis joins Justice Department network • St. Louis has been added to a federal

Department of Justice Violence Reduction Network that allows cities to draw more aggressively on existing programs within the department to ight violent crime. St. Louis will be joined by New Orleans and Milwaukee as the three cities to be the latest added to the program, the Justice Department announced Tuesday. The department started the program in 2014 in Camden, N.J., Chicago, Detroit, Wilmington, Del., and Oakland and Richmond, Calif. In September, it was expanded to Compton, Calif., Flint, Mich., Little Rock and West Memphis, Ark., and Newark, N.J.

Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates said that the partnerships with the Justice Department have helped reduce crime rates in targeted cities. The agreement “is a comprehensive approach to reducing violent crime that complements the Attorney General’s ‘Smart on Crime’ initiative and leverages existing Justice Department resources in communities around the country,” the department said in announcing the three new cities. The Justice Department said St. Louis’ involvement in the program will allow the city to tap into “customized training and technical assistance; a

strategic site liaison to guide the coordination of Justice Department resources; tools to enhance information sharing, including peer-topeer exchanges; community practice collaboration among existing sites and an annual summit in September.” The program draws on what the Justice Department described as “tactical and operational expertise” from agencies including the FBI; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; the U.S. Marshals Service; the Drug Enforcement Administration; and the Oice on Violence Against Women. (Chuck Raasch)

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

Zoo wants siblings to agree on Grant’s Farm

IMAGE COURTESY OF KRÄFTIG

A rendering shows the Kräftig plan to add a pavilion at Grant’s Farm. It would be available to rent for events.

FARM • FROM A1

declaration from zoo leaders. The zoo, said St. Louis Zoo Association President Matt Geekie, is not interested in any Grant’s Farm proposal unless the six siblings can agree on a plan. “Our attention must be on remaining the world’s best Zoo,” Geekie said Tuesday in an email to the Post-Dispatch. “Until the family resolves its differences, the Zoo will be focused on pursuing its master plan for the Saint Louis Zoo — with or without Grant’s Farm.” The future of the beloved south St. Louis County animal park is stuck in court. Busch has asked his five siblings, the children of beer king August A. “Gussie” Busch and third wife Gertrude “Trudy” Buholzer Busch, to sell their shares to him. Four have adamantly and publicly disagreed, hoping, instead, to sell to the St. Louis Zoo. Billy Busch believes zoo leaders are now taking his potential ownership seriously. He said Geekie called last week to ask whether Busch would consider leasing 160 acres to the zoo for

a wildlife breeding program and wide-open animal range. Geekie, however, said he called more to offer a solution to the siblings’ disagreement. “When the family asked the Zoo Association to save Grant’s Farm, we told them that resolution of their diferences was critical to our involvement in Grant’s Farm,” said Geekie, an executive at Graybar Electric. On Tuesday, Busch said he liked the idea, calling it a “winwin.” At the same time, Adolphus Busch, who supports his younger brother’s interest, said he was recently called by one of his siblings, Andy Busch, who hinted at an interest in settling the suit. “He wanted to know if there was any possible way the six of us could come to some possible agreement,” Adolphus said. The will is clear, Adolphus said. Their father wanted the farm to stay in the family. And Billy’s business plan makes sense, he continued. “I’ve always said I believe Grant’s Farm is an asset that’s been totally and completely underutilized.” The other four siblings have

awaited Billy Busch’s business plan for three months. They said late Tuesday in a statement that they’re working toward consensus, if possible, but maintain that the zoo is the best owner “for generations to come.” In November, the four siblings — Andy Busch, Peter Busch, Trudy Busch Valentine, and Beatrice Von Gontard — sued in St. Louis Circuit Court to force the sale of most of Grant’s Farm to the St. Louis Zoo for $30 million. Billy and Adolphus asked their brothers and sisters to instead sell the 198 acres to Billy for $24 million. Billy said he’d like to build a small brewery onsite and move his Kräftig beer business to the property’s red-roofed Bauernhof. In either scenario, 22 acres, including the Busch mansion, would remain with the family. A few weeks later, Billy and Adolphus asserted publicly that the zoo would change the park’s rustic, family-friendly feel. A new tax, which the zoo said was required in order to fund operations and renovations, wasn’t needed, they said.

Valentine and Andy Busch countered that Billy didn’t have the means to run the farm. Nor had they seen a real business plan, they said then. Last month, Billy delivered a laser-etched, bamboo-bound manuscript to his brothers and sisters. The Post-Dispatch obtained a copy this week. The plan is broken into phases. In the first year, it aims to clean, repair and paint bedraggled farm buildings. It expands operations year-round, introduces “small authentic food shops,” sells sponsorships, adds festivals and events, and markets space for weddings, luncheons and corporate outings. In the second year, the plan would unveil two custom bronze statues, of the Busches’ father with baby elephants and their mother, perhaps on horseback. It would add a few exhibits, including a mini-theater, a Busch family photo gallery and a rotating display of the family’s old carriages and coaches. It would build a children’s playground and a 10,000-square-foot event pavilion. Finally, in years three to five,

the plan aims to build a $4.5 million German-style tasting room and demonstration brewery. Beer samples and park entry would both remain free, Billy said Tuesday. And the farm would still make money, he said. His financial records say Anheuser-Busch InBev, which now runs Grant’s Farm, loses about $3 million a year on operations. But under Billy’s plan, Kräftig would pay $60,000 a year for rent, plus $500,000 a year in marketing costs, and Grant’s Farm profits would grow from $140,000 in the second year to $850,000 in the 10th year. And Kräftig, a business now housed in a Brentwood office building, would get Grant’s Farm as its headquarters. “Grant’s Farm is such a unique place,” Billy said. “There’s no other place like it in the country. “To be part of it would be such a benefit, for Grant’s Farm and the brewery.” David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

Prescription database planned, despite state inaction DRUGS • FROM A1

establish a statewide database to track the dispensing of some prescription painkillers. The state legislation, which still faces a final House vote, is expected to die in the Senate. Missouri is the only state in the nation without a program to monitor distribution of prescription medicine. The lack of a statewide monitoring is “terrible for Missouri,” said County Councilman Sam Page, an anesthesiologist and the sponsor of the local legislation. “We’re the drugstore for America, where drug dealers come to get prescriptions filled because we have nothing in place to monitor them,” he said. The sponsor of the House bill, Rep. Holly Rehder, R-Sikeston, said the absence of a database has turned Missouri into a haven for “doctor-shopping” — patients seeking out multiple doctors for the same prescriptions. Leapfrogging the state, St. Louis County plans to have the pharmacies within its boundar-

ies enrolled in its database within 180 days. The county estimates an initial start-up cost of about $100,000. County Executive Steve Stenger will sign the legislation into law at a ceremony Wednesday morning. Page and Stenger said the county may soon expand the program in partnerships with jurisdictions regionally and across the state. The identity of one the partners is expected to be announced Wednesday. “I believe, but I can’t mention specific jurisdictions at this point, but we have received word from some of the larger jurisdictions surrounding us that they are considering passage of their own bill and will either utilize our database or have their own database,” Stenger said. “But there will certainly be linkage with some of our regional partners.” U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., announced last week that she is sponsoring an amendment to a Senate drug deterrence bill that could support the county effort with federal grant

funds. Denouncing Jefferson City’s inaction on the issue, McCaskill, in a statement, said: “I applaud St. Louis County leaders for working to fill the void, and I’m eager to get them the resources they need to do so.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the use of opioid painkillers such as Vicodin and OxyContin has quadrupled during a 17-year study period that shows a leveling-off of medical conditions causing chronic pain. A 2015 report from the Missouri Hospital Association said that hospital stays due to painkiller misuse have increased 139 percent over the last decade. A National Institute on Drug Abuse analysis found a 2.8-fold increase in deaths attributed to prescription pill abuse from 2001-2014. Heroin overdoses, meanwhile, jumped sixfold over the same time period. Mitch Stenger, 23, became part of the statistical framework when he died of a heroin overdose a month after his uncle was

elected St. Louis County executive in 2014. A bottle of OxyContin, Page said, has a street value of between $5,000-$7,000. Opioids secured from family medicine cabinets additionally get in the hands of teens who share them at “pill parties.” Rep. Cloria Brown, R-south St. Louis County, predicted Rehder’s bill would reduce access to drugs for young people. Brown said when her mother fell ill she took on the task of tracking her mother’s prescriptions. “I was my mother’s database,” Brown said. “I kept track of all her meds. Fortunately I did, because whenever she was in the hospital — and she was there often — when she would leave, they would say these are your meds and I would say, ‘No, she already takes that.’ “Had I not been there, then she might’ve taken multiple drugs, because she was in a lot of pain,” said Brown, an advocate of the legislation. Opponents of the House legislation view a statewide monitoring system as an infringement on

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personal liberty. Still, Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, said Missourians not suspected of any crime shouldn’t have their medical histories tracked. “I think there are two questions,” said Barnes. “One is: Will it work? And two is: Even if it might work, is this the sort of thing that is consistent with our values as a free society?” Unlike the county ordinance, the state bill would exempt children 16 and younger from the database. A state law, if enacted, would supersede the county legislation. Stenger said he would welcome a statewide program. But he sees little inclination on the part of lawmakers to implement a system that studies show has reduced overdose deaths in Florida (50 percent) and New York (55 percent). “I’m not optimistic,” Stenger said. “But this is a huge step for our county, a huge step for our region and the opportunity for a huge step by our state.” Steve Giegerich • 314-725-6758 @stevegiegerich on Twitter sgiegerich@post-dispatch.com

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SUPER TUESDAY

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUPER TUESDAY RESULTS DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES

REPUBLICAN PRIMARIES

ALABAMA 77% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ..........268,353 ............ 79% Bernie Sanders................. 61,233 .............18% Uncommitted...................... 7,708 .............. 2% Martin O’Malley.................. 1,184 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente............... 931 ..............0%

ALABAMA 74% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............. 301,925 ............44% Ted Cruz ...........................141,918 .............21% Marco Rubio ................... 123,624 .............18% Ben Carson....................... 70,036 ............ 10% John Kasich....................... 29,925 .............. 4% Uncommitted......................6,745 ...............1% Jeb Bush..............................3,324 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................2,079 ..............0% Rand Paul............................1,566 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................787 ..............0% Chris Christie .........................754 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................653 ..............0% Lindsey Graham .................... 214 ..............0%

ARKANSAS 54% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ........... 111,736 ............68% Bernie Sanders................ 46,041 ............ 28% Martin O’Malley..................2,148 ...............1% John Wolfe ...........................1,937 ...............1% James Valentine ................. 1,339 ...............1% Rocky De La Fuente............ 1,293 ...............1% GEORGIA 91% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ......... 465,639 .............71% Bernie Sanders...............182,949 ............ 28% Martin O’Malley.................. 1,920 ..............0% Michael Steinberg .............. 1,635 ..............0% MASSACHUSETTS 87% of precincts Hillary Clinton..................523,721 .............51% Bernie Sanders..............498,863 ............48% No Preference.....................6,934 ...............1% Martin O’Malley..................4,129 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente............1,298 ..............0% OKLAHOMA 99% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS ............173,977 ............ 52% Hillary Clinton..................139,252 ............42% Martin O’Malley..................7,668 .............. 2% Keith Judd.......................... 4,384 ...............1% Michael Steinberg ..............4,166 ...............1% Star Locke ...........................3,454 ...............1% Rocky De La Fuente............2,485 ...............1% TENNESSEE 95% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ..........226,863 ............66% Bernie Sanders............... 112,890 ............ 33% Uncommitted...................... 3,327 ...............1% Martin O’Malley..................1,946 ...............1% TEXAS 46% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ......... 575,609 ............ 67% Bernie Sanders.............. 265,003 .............31% Rocky De La Fuente.......... 13,861 .............. 2% Martin O’Malley..................3,628 ..............0% Willie Wilson ....................... 2,210 ..............0% Keith Judd........................... 1,625 ..............0% Calvis Hawes........................1,312 ..............0% Star Locke ............................1,141 ..............0% VIRGINIA 99% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ......... 504,702 ............64% Bernie Sanders............... 276,572 ............ 35% Martin O’Malley................. 4,056 ...............1% VERMONT 81% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS .............93,614 ............86% Hillary Clinton...................14,700 .............14% Martin O’Malley......................221 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente................ 80 ..............0%

DEMOCRATIC CAUCUSES COLORADO 35% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS ............ 20,704 ............ 58% Hillary Clinton................... 14,519 .............41% Uncommitted.........................332 ...............1% Other........................................29 ..............0%

ARKANSAS 54% of precincts DONALD TRUMP.............101,070 ............ 34% Ted Cruz ........................... 88,339 ............30% Marco Rubio ..................... 73,235 ............ 25% Ben Carson.........................16,417 .............. 5% John Kasich....................... 11,450 .............. 4% Mike Huckabee...................3,734 ...............1% Jeb Bush...............................2,141 ...............1% Rand Paul...............................829 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................... 518 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ......................... 309 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................224 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ................... 209 ..............0% Bobby Jindal ...........................118 ..............0% GEORGIA 90% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............ 472,856 ............40% Ted Cruz ..........................284,525 ............ 24% Marco Rubio ...................281,310 ............ 24% Ben Carson.........................75,921 .............. 6% John Kasich.......................63,961 .............. 5% Jeb Bush.............................. 7,220 ...............1% Rand Paul............................2,634 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................2,497 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................1,380 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ........................1,017 ..............0% Rick Santorum...................... 499 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ................... 390 ..............0% George Pataki........................202 ..............0% MASSACHUSETTS 86% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............ 262,540 ............49% John Kasich........................97,517 .............18% Marco Rubio .................... 96,942 .............18% Ted Cruz ............................51,908 ............ 10% Ben Carson.........................13,961 .............. 3% Jeb Bush..............................6,103 ...............1% No Preference.....................2,962 ...............1% Chris Christie ...................... 1,676 ..............0% Rand Paul............................ 1,587 ..............0% Jim Gilmore........................... 999 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................987 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................... 572 ..............0% George Pataki........................502 ..............0% Rick Santorum....................... 255 ..............0% OKLAHOMA 99% of precincts TED CRUZ.........................157,910 ............ 34% Donald Trump..................130,114 ............ 28% Marco Rubio .................... 119,551 ............ 26% Ben Carson........................28,569 .............. 6% John Kasich........................16,515 .............. 4% Jeb Bush............................. 2,089 ..............0% Rand Paul............................1,662 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................1,305 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................610 ..............0% Chris Christie .........................545 ..............0% Rick Santorum....................... 375 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................224 ..............0%

MINNESOTA 43% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS ............ 34,289 ............ 59% Hillary Clinton...................24,100 .............41% Rocky De La Fuente................... 1 ..............0% Uncommitted............................. 1 ..............0% Martin O’Malley.........................0 ..............0% Other..........................................0 ..............0%

TENNESSEE 95% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............ 316,800 ............40% Ted Cruz ..........................196,597 ............ 25% Marco Rubio ...................166,704 .............21% Ben Carson........................ 61,168 .............. 8% John Kasich.......................41,339 .............. 5% Jeb Bush..............................9,396 ...............1% Mike Huckabee....................2,311 ..............0% Rand Paul............................2,228 ..............0% Uncommitted.......................1,777 ..............0% Chris Christie ...................... 1,199 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................692 ..............0% Rick Santorum...................... 684 ..............0% Jim Gilmore............................259 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................249 ..............0% George Pataki........................ 179 ..............0% TEXAS 44% of precincts TED CRUZ.......................740,504 ............43% Donald Trump.................478,614 ............ 28% Marco Rubio ...................301,836 .............17% John Kasich....................... 72,252 .............. 4% Ben Carson........................68,223 .............. 4% Jeb Bush............................29,623 .............. 2% Uncommitted....................22,433 ...............1% Lindsey Graham .................4,983 ..............0% Rand Paul............................ 4,571 ..............0% Mike Huckabee................... 4,123 ..............0% Elizabeth Gray ....................2,903 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................2,524 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ........................2,177 ..............0% Rick Santorum.....................1,227 ..............0% VIRGINIA 99% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............ 356,344 ............ 35% Marco Rubio ....................327,182 ............ 32% Ted Cruz ...........................173,139 .............17% John Kasich....................... 96,917 .............. 9% Ben Carson.......................60,040 .............. 6% Jeb Bush..............................3,587 ..............0% Rand Paul............................ 2,935 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................1,499 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................1,100 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ......................... 905 ..............0% Jim Gilmore........................... 884 ..............0% Rick Santorum...................... 846 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................461 ..............0% VERMONT 80% of precincts Donald Trump...................16,073 ............ 32% John Kasich....................... 15,285 .............31% Marco Rubio .......................9,679 .............19% Ted Cruz ............................. 4,850 ............ 10% Ben Carson..........................2,038 .............. 4% Jeb Bush.................................856 .............. 2% Rand Paul...............................335 ...............1% Chris Christie .........................285 ...............1% Carly Fiorina .......................... 167 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................134 ..............0%

REPUBLICAN CAUCUSES ALASKA 0 of 72 precincts, 0% Ben Carson.................................0 ..............0% Ted Cruz .....................................0 ..............0% John Kasich................................0 ..............0% Marco Rubio ..............................0 ..............0% Donald Trump............................0 ..............0% Uncommitted.............................0 ..............0% MINNESOTA 53% of precincts MARCO RUBIO ...................22,176 ............ 37% Ted Cruz ............................16,630 ............ 28% Donald Trump....................12,552 .............21% Ben Carson..........................4,229 .............. 7% John Kasich.........................3,754 .............. 6% Write-In...................................116 ..............0% NOTE: The names of projected winners are set in all capitals.

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

TO TRUMP OR NOT TO TRUMP? Area delegation starts to draw battle lines; some keep their distance from billionaire BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • To Trump or not to

Trump? The billionaire Donald Trump’s attempted hostile takeover of the Republican Party is forcing elected Republicans to begin taking stands. Some St. Louis-area members of Congress say they’ll support the Republican nominee for president, no matter who it is. They include Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and representatives Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth; John Shimkus, R-Collinsville; Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville; and Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro. All said through spokespeople this week they will support whomever their party nominates. Others, however, while not shutting doors, are not exactly holding them wide open to Trump, either. Rep. Ann Wagner, who previously endorsed ex-Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, issued a statement this week stopping short of saying she would back anyone her party nominates. Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., is not endorsing anyone, and his campaign spokesman, Kevin Arti, said that Kirk would not engage in “crystal ball prognostications given the fluidity of the race.” The question will get more pressing for local Republicans in the next two weeks. Primaries in Illinois, Missouri, Ohio and Florida on March 15 could result in the favored Trump efectively tying up the nomination. Or, a challenger could win enough delegates to prolong the fight to a less predictable conclusion in the weeks that follow. Wagner, R-Ballwin, and Kirk have been among the most publicly critical of Trump among St. Louis-area Republicans. Last year, after Trump called into question the courage of Arizona Sen. John McCain, a former Vietnam POW and the Republicans’ 2008 presidential nominee, Wagner sent to the Ballwin VFW Post 6274 a $1,000 contribution that Trump had donated to her campaign.

“I’ve never met Donald Trump nor solicited him for campaign donations,” Wagner said then. “I have no respect for anyone who uses a national microphone to disparage our vets.” She called the VFW a “sanctuary for war heroes in the heart of Missouri’s 2nd District.” Wagner’s son, Army Capt. Raymond Wagner III, is a 2011 graduate of West Point. Kirk suggested last July that Trump should just “shut up” after he made what many considered to be offensive comments about Mexican immigrants. This week, Wagner stopped short of saying what she’ll do if Trump becomes the GOP nominee. “This is a consequential election and American families deserve a serious, conservative leader who can rebuild our economic and national security, and restore our country’s strength and standing in the world,” Wagner said, in a statement issued by her communications director, Meghan Burris. “I am eager to hear actual policy positions from all candidates in the coming weeks.” That latter plea is becoming harder to obtain given the intensely negative, and personal, nature of the Republican primary campaign. Trump and Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, routinely call one another liars, and Trump and Rubio over the weekend engaged in back-and-forth insults over the size of one or the other’s hands, ears and wrinkles, and their respective propensities to perspire. On Sunday, Sen. Jef Sessions, R-Ala., a hard-liner on immigration, endorsed Trump. But Sen. Ben Sasse, a young Nebraska Republican, denounced Trump and said he would look for a third-party candidate to support should the choice come down to Trump and the Democratic nominee. He accused Trump of “dividing Americans.” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Numbers don’t lie: Candidates add up delegates, odds As dust of Super Tuesday voting settles, what does the presidential playing ield look like? SANDERS’ BRIGHT SPOT • Oklahoma turned out to be a rare bright spot for Sanders beyond his home base of Vermont. He held on to the 30-to-44-yearolds who divided their votes about evenly elsewhere on Super Tuesday. Sanders claimed 8 in 10 voters under age 30, and 7 in 10 of those age 30-44. Clinton got only about half the votes of those 45 and older.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Presidential

candidates will wake up Wednesday morning to the cold, hard truth of delegate math. It might give the front-runners some breathing room, but for the rest of the field, the truth may hurt. What to watch for on the day after Super Tuesday doles out a quarter of all the delegates at stake in the GOP and Democratic nominating contests:

THE TALLY With 12 states awarding delegates, see how the delegate totals stack up when the dust settles. GOP front-runner Donald Trump came into Super Tuesday with 82, Sen. Ted Cruz 18, Sen. Marco Rubio 16, Gov. John Kasich 6 and Ben Carson 4. It takes 1,237 to win the GOP nomination. Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton entered Super Tuesday with 548 delegates — including superdelegates, the party leaders and members of Congress who can support any candidate. Sen. Bernie Sanders had 87. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

GENERALLY SPEAKING Watch how front-runners Clinton and Trump position themselves going forward. Do they focus more on their primary election rivals or pivot toward an anticipated general election matchup? Even before the Super Tuesday votes were in, both seemed to be looking past their primary rivals. Clinton delivered a scolding that seemed aimed at Trump, saying, “You can’t just say whatever pops into your head if you want to be the president of the United States of America.” And Trump said of her: “Hillary Clinton does not have the strength or the stamina to be president. ... She cannot do the job.”

THE B-WORD A strong Trump showing could generate fresh talk about the possibility of a brokered convention from Republicans who just can’t get their arms around the idea of Trump as the eventual GOP nominee.

RUBIO’S ROAD Rubio’s itinerary reflects his priorities. He campaigns Wednesday in Michigan, which votes March 8. And he’s already putting big efort into his home state

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A voter casts his ballot in Georgia’s primary election at a polling site Tuesday in Atlanta.

of Florida, which votes with a number of winner-take-all-delegates states on March 15. Early voting already has started in Florida, and Rubio has been unequivocal about its importance to him, saying: “We’re going to win Florida. Florida is not going to vote for a con artist like Donald Trump.”

active sweat glands. Do the candidates elevate the conversation once Tuesday’s big vote is past?

SANDERS’ STAND Sanders, looking for someplace to shine, campaigns Wednesday in Michigan, hoping his populist message will resonate with the state’s union and blue-collar voters.

CRUZ’S COURSE Cruz, who placed third in the three contests leading up to Super Tuesday, warned this week that the “Trump train” could become unstoppable if the billionaire businessman rolls to big victories on Tuesday. Can Cruz lay out a path for himself to the nomination post-Super Tuesday?

ENTHUSIASM GAP? The first two primary states to vote — New Hampshire and South Carolina — turned out record numbers of Republican, but not Democratic, voters. If that trend continues, it could have implications for the general election.

AIR WARS GOP SOUL-SEARCHING Keep an eye on how the GOP establishment does — or doesn’t — reconcile itself to Trump. In the run-up to Tuesday’s megaround of voting, some establishment figures were vowing they’d never, ever support Trump; others were reluctantly pledging to fall in line behind the eventual nominee, whoever it is.

AM NOT, DID TOO The rhetoric in the GOP race took a turn for the worse before Super Tuesday, featuring a series of taunts between Trump and Rubio about potential pantswetting, bad spray tans and over-

Expect to see lots of Trump thumping in the next two weeks. Ahead of Super Tuesday, antiTrump ads outnumbered proTrump commercials nearly 3-to1. That ratio is likely to grow. Three outside groups, Our Principles, American Future Fund and Club for Growth, have laid plans for millions of dollars in new Trump attack ads. Conservative Solutions, a super political action committee backing Rubio — and blasting Trump — has reserved $6 million of ad time for in the soon-to-vote states of Missouri, Illinois, Michigan and Florida. On the Democratic side, Clinton and Sanders both con-

tinue their campaign advertising. From the looks of the ad reservations, Sanders is betting big on Michigan, spending more than two-thirds of future ad money there,

EXIT POLL HIGHLIGHTS PORTRAIT OF A TRUMP VOTER • Nine in 10 of Trump’s voters are looking for an outsider. Half are angry with the government. Nearly as many want a candidate willing to “tell it like it is.” Four in 10 said they were born again, cutting into Cruz’s efforts to claim the evangelical vote. Trump, who has professed mutual admiration with “poorly educated voters,” was favored by half of voters without a college degree. His followers are nothing if not loyal: Six in 10 of his voters made up their minds more than a month ago. PORTRAIT OF CLINTON VOTER • More than 90 percent of Clinton’s voters want an insider, and nearly half say experience is the quality they are looking for in a candidate. Two-thirds of her voters want to continue President Barack Obama’s policies, rather than shift in a more liberal direction. And, just as with Trump, 60 percent of her backers made up their mind more than a month ago. Two-thirds of her supporters are women, and twothirds are 45 or older.

CRUZ’S CORNER • With victories in his home state of Texas and neighboring Oklahoma, Cruz did well in the two states with voters who were looking for someone who shares their values. More than half of Texas GOP voters who placed importance on shared values, and nearly half of those in Oklahoma, said they voted for Cruz. Cruz also drew support from white born-again Christians, who represented two-thirds of voters in Oklahoma and just over half of Republicans in Texas. In both states, Cruz was backed by at least 4 in 10 of them. THE ELECTORATE • Overall, white voters accounted for half of voters, or less, in three of the nine Democratic primaries where exit polls were conducted on Super Tuesday. Nearly half of Democratic primary voters in Alabama and Georgia were black. In Texas, about 3 in 10 Democratic primary voters were Hispanic and a little less than 2 in 10 were black. In three other states — Virginia, Arkansas and Tennessee — black voters accounted for about a quarter of Democratic primary voters. Hispanics made up less than 15 percent of Democratic voters on Tuesday, except in Texas. And there, nearly two-thirds voted for Clinton. In the Texas Republican primary, 10 percent of voters were Hispanic. They divided their support closely among home state victor Cruz, Rubio and Trump. The surveys were conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research as voters left their polling places at 20 to 40 randomly selected sites in nine states holding primary elections Tuesday. Preliminary results include interviews with 806 to 1,491 Democratic primary voters and 536 to 1,821 Republicans primary voters in each state contest. In Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas, the results also include telephone interviews, early and absentee voters. The results among all those voting in each contest have a margin of sampling error ranging from plus or minus 4 percentage points to plus or minus 5 percentage points.


SUPER TUESDAY

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUPER TUESDAY RESULTS DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES

REPUBLICAN PRIMARIES

ALABAMA 99% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON .......... 307,827 ............ 78% Bernie Sanders................ 76,009 .............19% Uncommitted...................... 9,533 .............. 2% Martin O’Malley..................1,469 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente............... 813 ..............0%

ALABAMA 99% of precincts DONALD TRUMP.............. 371,715 ............43% Ted Cruz ..........................180,601 .............21% Marco Rubio .................... 161,611 .............19% Ben Carson.........................87,516 ............ 10% John Kasich....................... 37,969 .............. 4% Uncommitted....................... 7,921 ...............1% Jeb Bush..............................3,945 ..............0% Mike Huckabee................... 2,525 ..............0% Rand Paul............................ 1,879 ..............0% Chris Christie ........................ 850 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................616 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................543 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................254 ..............0%

ARKANSAS 95% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ........... 141,115 ............66% Bernie Sanders.................63,077 ............30% Martin O’Malley..................2,605 ...............1% John Wolfe ..........................2,395 ...............1% James Valentine .................1,594 ...............1% Rocky De La Fuente............1,548 ...............1% GEORGIA 99% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ..........536,250 .............71% Bernie Sanders...............213,464 ............ 28% Martin O’Malley................. 2,099 ..............0% Michael Steinberg .............. 1,749 ..............0% MASSACHUSETTS 96% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ..........585,492 ............50% Bernie Sanders.............. 564,676 ............49% No Preference..................... 7,799 ...............1% Martin O’Malley..................4,553 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente............1,460 ..............0% OKLAHOMA 100% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS ...........174,054 ............ 52% Hillary Clinton................. 139,338 ............42% Martin O’Malley..................7,669 .............. 2% Keith Judd...........................4,385 ...............1% Michael Steinberg .............. 4,167 ...............1% Star Locke ...........................3,456 ...............1% Rocky De La Fuente............2,485 ...............1% TENNESSEE 99% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ......... 245,304 ............66% Bernie Sanders............... 120,333 ............ 32% Uncommitted......................3,433 ...............1% Martin O’Malley.................. 2,012 ...............1% TEXAS 89% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON ..........858,681 ............ 65% Bernie Sanders...............436,581 ............ 33% Rocky De La Fuente.............7,772 ...............1% Martin O’Malley................. 4,990 ..............0% Willie Wilson ...................... 3,045 ..............0% Keith Judd...........................2,307 ..............0% Calvis Hawes....................... 1,833 ..............0% Star Locke ............................1,611 ..............0% VIRGINIA 100% of precincts HILLARY CLINTON .........504,104 ............64% Bernie Sanders...............275,842 ............ 35% Martin O’Malley.................4,040 ...............1% VERMONT 97% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS ............112,426 ............86% Hillary Clinton....................17,707 .............14% Martin O’Malley.....................266 ..............0% Rocky De La Fuente.................88 ..............0%

DEMOCRATIC CAUCUSES COLORADO 87% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS .............60,762 ............ 58% Hillary Clinton...................42,395 .............41% Uncommitted......................... 767 ...............1% Other....................................... 40 ..............0%

ARKANSAS 95% of precincts DONALD TRUMP..............129,153 ............ 33% Ted Cruz ..........................120,450 ............30% Marco Rubio .....................99,001 ............ 25% Ben Carson........................22,566 .............. 6% John Kasich.......................14,845 .............. 4% Mike Huckabee.................. 4,545 ...............1% Jeb Bush............................. 2,360 ...............1% Rand Paul............................. 1,113 ..............0% Chris Christie ........................ 630 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................398 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................285 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................245 ..............0% Bobby Jindal .......................... 163 ..............0% GEORGIA 99% of precincts DONALD TRUMP.............500,743 ............ 39% Marco Rubio ....................315,514 ............ 24% Ted Cruz .........................304,629 ............ 24% Ben Carson.......................80,396 .............. 6% John Kasich....................... 72,193 .............. 6% Jeb Bush..............................7,648 ...............1% Rand Paul............................2,895 ..............0% Mike Huckabee................... 2,613 ..............0% Chris Christie ...................... 1,481 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ....................... 1,140 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................534 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................422 ..............0% George Pataki........................234 ..............0% MASSACHUSETTS 96% of precincts DONALD TRUMP.............296,535 ............49% John Kasich.....................109,247 .............18% Marco Rubio ...................108,385 .............18% Ted Cruz ............................57,803 ............ 10% Ben Carson........................ 15,627 .............. 3% Jeb Bush..............................6,570 ...............1% No Preference..................... 3,126 ...............1% Chris Christie ...................... 1,841 ..............0% Rand Paul.............................1,782 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ........................ 1,115 ..............0% Jim Gilmore......................... 1,077 ..............0% Mike Huckabee..................... 643 ..............0% George Pataki........................455 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................284 ..............0% OKLAHOMA 100% of precincts TED CRUZ......................... 157,941 ............ 34% Donald Trump..................130,141 ............ 28% Marco Rubio ....................119,562 ............ 26% Ben Carson........................28,572 .............. 6% John Kasich........................16,515 .............. 4% Jeb Bush............................. 2,089 ..............0% Rand Paul............................1,662 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................1,306 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ..........................610 ..............0% Chris Christie .........................545 ..............0% Rick Santorum....................... 375 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................224 ..............0%

MINNESOTA 80% of precincts BERNIE SANDERS .............83,935 ............60% Hillary Clinton...................56,316 ............40% Rocky De La Fuente................... 1 ..............0% Uncommitted............................. 1 ..............0% Martin O’Malley.........................0 ..............0% Other..........................................0 ..............0%

TENNESSEE 99% of precincts DONALD TRUMP.............332,702 ............ 39% Ted Cruz ........................... 211,159 ............ 25% Marco Rubio .................. 180,944 .............21% Ben Carson.......................64,846 .............. 8% John Kasich.......................45,243 .............. 5% Jeb Bush..............................9,543 ...............1% Mike Huckabee.................. 2,404 ..............0% Rand Paul............................2,336 ..............0% Uncommitted...................... 1,837 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................1,249 ..............0% Carly Fiorina .......................... 713 ..............0% Rick Santorum....................... 710 ..............0% Jim Gilmore............................270 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ....................256 ..............0% George Pataki........................188 ..............0% TEXAS 88% of precincts TED CRUZ..................... 1,148,194 ............44% Donald Trump.................707,085 ............ 27% Marco Rubio ...................463,201 .............18% John Kasich......................111,268 .............. 4% Ben Carson......................109,278 .............. 4% Jeb Bush............................34,582 ...............1% Uncommitted....................28,359 ...............1% Rand Paul............................ 7,324 ..............0% Mike Huckabee...................5,936 ..............0% Elizabeth Gray .....................5,122 ..............0% Chris Christie ......................3,339 ..............0% Carly Fiorina .......................3,072 ..............0% Rick Santorum.....................1,923 ..............0% Lindsey Graham .................1,649 ..............0% VIRGINIA 99% of precincts DONALD TRUMP............356,060 ............ 35% Marco Rubio ................... 327,467 ............ 32% Ted Cruz ...........................173,373 .............17% John Kasich.......................96,837 .............. 9% Ben Carson.......................60,098 .............. 6% Jeb Bush..............................3,642 ..............0% Rand Paul............................ 2,937 ..............0% Mike Huckabee................... 1,554 ..............0% Chris Christie .......................1,101 ..............0% Carly Fiorina ......................... 906 ..............0% Jim Gilmore........................... 884 ..............0% Rick Santorum.......................744 ..............0% Lindsey Graham ................... 485 ..............0% VERMONT 97% of precincts DONALD TRUMP...............19,406 ............ 33% John Kasich.......................18,034 ............30% Marco Rubio ..................... 11,468 .............19% Ted Cruz ..............................5,770 ............ 10% Ben Carson......................... 2,469 .............. 4% Jeb Bush..............................1,065 .............. 2% Rand Paul.............................. 403 ...............1% Chris Christie ........................ 344 ...............1% Carly Fiorina ......................... 200 ..............0% Rick Santorum....................... 174 ..............0%

REPUBLICAN CAUCUSES ALASKA 22% of precincts Donald Trump....................... 944 ............ 36% Ted Cruz ................................. 871 ............ 33% Marco Rubio ..........................393 .............15% Ben Carson.............................274 ............ 10% John Kasich............................148 .............. 6% Uncommitted.............................0 ..............0% MINNESOTA 92% of precincts MARCO RUBIO ..................41,073 ............ 37% Ted Cruz ............................32,242 ............ 29% Donald Trump...................23,650 .............21% Ben Carson.........................8,084 .............. 7% John Kasich........................ 6,443 .............. 6% Write-In................................. 206 ..............0% NOTE: The names of projected winners are set in all capitals.

M 2 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

TO TRUMP OR NOT TO TRUMP? Area delegation starts to draw battle lines; some keep their distance from billionaire BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • To Trump or not to

Trump? The billionaire Donald Trump’s attempted hostile takeover of the Republican Party is forcing elected Republicans to begin taking stands. Some St. Louis-area members of Congress say they’ll support the Republican nominee for president, no matter who it is. They include Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and representatives Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth; John Shimkus, R-Collinsville; Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville; and Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro. All said through spokespeople this week they will support whomever their party nominates. Others, however, while not shutting doors, are not exactly holding them wide open to Trump, either. Rep. Ann Wagner, who previously endorsed ex-Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, issued a statement this week stopping short of saying she would back anyone her party nominates. Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., is not endorsing anyone, and his campaign spokesman, Kevin Arti, said that Kirk would not engage in “crystal ball prognostications given the fluidity of the race.” The question will get more pressing for local Republicans in the next two weeks. Primaries in Illinois, Missouri, Ohio and Florida on March 15 could result in the favored Trump efectively tying up the nomination. Or, a challenger could win enough delegates to prolong the fight to a less predictable conclusion in the weeks that follow. Wagner, R-Ballwin, and Kirk have been among the most publicly critical of Trump among St. Louis-area Republicans. Last year, after Trump called into question the courage of Arizona Sen. John McCain, a former Vietnam POW and the Republicans’ 2008 presidential nominee, Wagner sent to the Ballwin VFW Post 6274 a $1,000 contribution that Trump had donated to her campaign.

“I’ve never met Donald Trump nor solicited him for campaign donations,” Wagner said then. “I have no respect for anyone who uses a national microphone to disparage our vets.” She called the VFW a “sanctuary for war heroes in the heart of Missouri’s 2nd District.” Wagner’s son, Army Capt. Raymond Wagner III, is a 2011 graduate of West Point. Kirk suggested last July that Trump should just “shut up” after he made what many considered to be offensive comments about Mexican immigrants. This week, Wagner stopped short of saying what she’ll do if Trump becomes the GOP nominee. “This is a consequential election and American families deserve a serious, conservative leader who can rebuild our economic and national security, and restore our country’s strength and standing in the world,” Wagner said, in a statement issued by her communications director, Meghan Burris. “I am eager to hear actual policy positions from all candidates in the coming weeks.” That latter plea is becoming harder to obtain given the intensely negative, and personal, nature of the Republican primary campaign. Trump and Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, routinely call one another liars, and Trump and Rubio over the weekend engaged in back-and-forth insults over the size of one or the other’s hands, ears and wrinkles, and their respective propensities to perspire. On Sunday, Sen. Jef Sessions, R-Ala., a hard-liner on immigration, endorsed Trump. But Sen. Ben Sasse, a young Nebraska Republican, denounced Trump and said he would look for a third-party candidate to support should the choice come down to Trump and the Democratic nominee. He accused Trump of “dividing Americans.” Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Numbers don’t lie: Candidates add up delegates, odds As dust of Super Tuesday voting settles, what does the presidential playing ield look like? SANDERS’ BRIGHT SPOT • Oklahoma turned out to be a rare bright spot for Sanders beyond his home base of Vermont. He held on to the 30-to-44-yearolds who divided their votes about evenly elsewhere on Super Tuesday. Sanders claimed 8 in 10 voters under age 30, and 7 in 10 of those age 30-44. Clinton got only about half the votes of those 45 and older.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Presidential

candidates will wake up Wednesday morning to the cold, hard truth of delegate math. It might give the front-runners some breathing room, but for the rest of the field, the truth may hurt. What to watch for on the day after Super Tuesday doles out a quarter of all the delegates at stake in the GOP and Democratic nominating contests:

THE TALLY With 12 states awarding delegates, see how the delegate totals stack up when the dust settles. GOP front-runner Donald Trump came into Super Tuesday with 82, Sen. Ted Cruz 18, Sen. Marco Rubio 16, Gov. John Kasich 6 and Ben Carson 4. It takes 1,237 to win the GOP nomination. Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton entered Super Tuesday with 548 delegates — including superdelegates, the party leaders and members of Congress who can support any candidate. Sen. Bernie Sanders had 87. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

GENERALLY SPEAKING Watch how front-runners Clinton and Trump position themselves going forward. Do they focus more on their primary election rivals or pivot toward an anticipated general election matchup? Even before the Super Tuesday votes were in, both seemed to be looking past their primary rivals. Clinton delivered a scolding that seemed aimed at Trump, saying, “You can’t just say whatever pops into your head if you want to be the president of the United States of America.” And Trump said of her: “Hillary Clinton does not have the strength or the stamina to be president. ... She cannot do the job.”

THE B-WORD A strong Trump showing could generate fresh talk about the possibility of a brokered convention from Republicans who just can’t get their arms around the idea of Trump as the eventual GOP nominee.

RUBIO’S ROAD Rubio’s itinerary reflects his priorities. He campaigns Wednesday in Michigan, which votes March 8. And he’s already putting big efort into his home state

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A voter casts his ballot in Georgia’s primary election at a polling site Tuesday in Atlanta.

of Florida, which votes with a number of winner-take-all-delegates states on March 15. Early voting already has started in Florida, and Rubio has been unequivocal about its importance to him, saying: “We’re going to win Florida. Florida is not going to vote for a con artist like Donald Trump.”

active sweat glands. Do the candidates elevate the conversation once Tuesday’s big vote is past?

SANDERS’ STAND Sanders, looking for someplace to shine, campaigns Wednesday in Michigan, hoping his populist message will resonate with the state’s union and blue-collar voters.

CRUZ’S COURSE Cruz, who placed third in the three contests leading up to Super Tuesday, warned this week that the “Trump train” could become unstoppable if the billionaire businessman rolls to big victories on Tuesday. Can Cruz lay out a path for himself to the nomination post-Super Tuesday?

ENTHUSIASM GAP? The first two primary states to vote — New Hampshire and South Carolina — turned out record numbers of Republican, but not Democratic, voters. If that trend continues, it could have implications for the general election.

AIR WARS GOP SOUL-SEARCHING Keep an eye on how the GOP establishment does — or doesn’t — reconcile itself to Trump. In the run-up to Tuesday’s megaround of voting, some establishment figures were vowing they’d never, ever support Trump; others were reluctantly pledging to fall in line behind the eventual nominee, whoever it is.

AM NOT, DID TOO The rhetoric in the GOP race took a turn for the worse before Super Tuesday, featuring a series of taunts between Trump and Rubio about potential pantswetting, bad spray tans and over-

Expect to see lots of Trump thumping in the next two weeks. Ahead of Super Tuesday, antiTrump ads outnumbered proTrump commercials nearly 3-to1. That ratio is likely to grow. Three outside groups, Our Principles, American Future Fund and Club for Growth, have laid plans for millions of dollars in new Trump attack ads. Conservative Solutions, a super political action committee backing Rubio — and blasting Trump — has reserved $6 million of ad time for in the soon-to-vote states of Missouri, Illinois, Michigan and Florida. On the Democratic side, Clinton and Sanders both con-

tinue their campaign advertising. From the looks of the ad reservations, Sanders is betting big on Michigan, spending more than two-thirds of future ad money there,

EXIT POLL HIGHLIGHTS PORTRAIT OF A TRUMP VOTER • Nine in 10 of Trump’s voters are looking for an outsider. Half are angry with the government. Nearly as many want a candidate willing to “tell it like it is.” Four in 10 said they were born again, cutting into Cruz’s efforts to claim the evangelical vote. Trump, who has professed mutual admiration with “poorly educated voters,” was favored by half of voters without a college degree. His followers are nothing if not loyal: Six in 10 of his voters made up their minds more than a month ago. PORTRAIT OF CLINTON VOTER • More than 90 percent of Clinton’s voters want an insider, and nearly half say experience is the quality they are looking for in a candidate. Two-thirds of her voters want to continue President Barack Obama’s policies, rather than shift in a more liberal direction. And, just as with Trump, 60 percent of her backers made up their mind more than a month ago. Two-thirds of her supporters are women, and twothirds are 45 or older.

CRUZ’S CORNER • With victories in his home state of Texas and neighboring Oklahoma, Cruz did well in the two states with voters who were looking for someone who shares their values. More than half of Texas GOP voters who placed importance on shared values, and nearly half of those in Oklahoma, said they voted for Cruz. Cruz also drew support from white born-again Christians, who represented two-thirds of voters in Oklahoma and just over half of Republicans in Texas. In both states, Cruz was backed by at least 4 in 10 of them. THE ELECTORATE • Overall, white voters accounted for half of voters, or less, in three of the nine Democratic primaries where exit polls were conducted on Super Tuesday. Nearly half of Democratic primary voters in Alabama and Georgia were black. In Texas, about 3 in 10 Democratic primary voters were Hispanic and a little less than 2 in 10 were black. In three other states — Virginia, Arkansas and Tennessee — black voters accounted for about a quarter of Democratic primary voters. Hispanics made up less than 15 percent of Democratic voters on Tuesday, except in Texas. And there, nearly two-thirds voted for Clinton. In the Texas Republican primary, 10 percent of voters were Hispanic. They divided their support closely among home state victor Cruz, Rubio and Trump. The surveys were conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research as voters left their polling places at 20 to 40 randomly selected sites in nine states holding primary elections Tuesday. Preliminary results include interviews with 806 to 1,491 Democratic primary voters and 536 to 1,821 Republicans primary voters in each state contest. In Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas, the results also include telephone interviews, early and absentee voters. The results among all those voting in each contest have a margin of sampling error ranging from plus or minus 4 percentage points to plus or minus 5 percentage points.


03.02.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

SUPER TUESDAY

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Clinton, Trump solidify lead

AP PHOTOS

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, addresses the crowd in Staford, Texas, as has family looks on. Cruz won primary contests in Texas and Oklahoma Tuesday night.

TUESDAY • FROM A1

Republican leaders, who fear he’s unelectable against Clinton in November. Even as Trump professed to have good relationships with his party’s elite, he issued a warning to House Speaker Paul Ryan, who declared earlier in the day that “this party does not prey on people’s prejudices.” Trump said that if the two didn’t get along, “he’s going to have to pay a big price.” But all efforts to stop Trump have failed, including an aggressive campaign by Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida to discredit the billionaire businessman. For Rubio, Super Tuesday turned into a bitter disappointment. He emerged with his first victory in Minnesota but failed to live up to the wider hopes of

the numerous Republican oiceholders who have promoted him as the party’s best alternative to Trump. With an eye on Florida’s March 15 primary, Rubio vowed to keep up efforts to “unmask the true nature of the front-runner in this race.” Cruz desperately needed his win in Texas to stay in the race. He’s the only Republican to beat Trump this primary season, a fact he wielded as he called on Rubio and other candidates to step aside. “I ask you to prayerfully consider our coming together, united,” Cruz said. With results still coming in, Trump had won at least 139 Super Tuesday delegates, while Cruz picked up at least 52. Overall, Trump leads the Republican field with 221.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont arrives at a rally in Essex Junction, Vt. Sanders won contests in Vermont, Colorado, Minnesota and Oklahoma.

Sanders’ wins did little to help him make up ground in his delegate race with Clinton. She was assured of winning at least 334 of the 865 at stake on Super Tuesday. That’s compared with Sanders, who had at least 145 delegates. Clinton also picked up wins in Arkansas, Texas and Massachusetts, while Trump carried the GOP contests in Arkansas and Massachusetts. Trump’s wins in the South were a major blow to Cruz, who once saw the region as his opportunity to stake a claim to the nomination. Instead, he has watched Trump, a brash New York real estate mogul, display surprising strength with evangelical Christians and social conservatives. Republicans spent months largely letting Trump go un-

challenged, wrongly assuming his populist appeal would fizzle. Instead, he’s appeared to grow stronger, drawing broad support for some of his most controversial proposals. In six of the states on Tuesday, large majorities of Republican voters said they supported a proposal to temporarily ban all noncitizen Muslims from entering the United States, an idea championed by Trump. Nine in 10 of Trump’s voters were looking for an outsider, and half were angry with the government, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks. In the Democratic race, Clinton has steadied herself after an unexpectedly strong early challenge from Sanders. The Vermont senator did carry his home state decisively, and

told the crowd at a raucous victory party that he was “so proud to bring Vermont values all across this country.” Sanders, who has energized supporters with his calls for a “political revolution,” has struggled to expand his base beyond young people and liberals. His weakness with black voters, a core part of the Democratic constituency, was underscored anew. Clinton was supported by at least 80 percent of black voters in Alabama, Arkansas, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas. She was also bolstered by women and older voters. More than 90 percent of Clinton’s voters wanted an insider, according to exit polls, and nearly half said experience was the top quality they were looking for in a candidate.

GOP looks aghast, helpless as Trump runs away with party ANALYSIS • FROM A1

year to 0-15. His lone victory was in caucuses in Minnesota. In several states where Rubio was running third, his percentage of the vote was low enough that he was in danger of winning few or no delegates in those places. Rubio has been described by many as the future of his party. His performance to date instead has reinforced his image as a politician who has not lived up to that potential. Despite five days of relentless attacks on Trump, which started at last week’s GOP debate in Houston and carried through a raucous weekend of campaigning, Rubio was not able to deliver significant results. He scored well among late-deciding voters; in Virginia they favored him over Trump by about 20 points. But there were not enough of them to overcome the hold Trump has on anti-establishment Republicans who remain in control of the nominating battle. Cruz did more than enough to argue that he should become the main challenger to Trump, carrying his home state of Texas, as he had long predicted, as well as Oklahoma. Coupled with his victory in the Iowa caucuses at the beginning of last month, he remained through much of Tuesday night the only Republican who could say he had defeated the party’s front-runner anywhere. Months ago, Cruz envisioned that Super Tuesday and its Southern flavor would be the day he took command of the GOP nominating contest. Instead, it was the day he managed to preserve his candidacy, although he remains at a distinct disadvantage against Trump, particularly with Rubio and Kasich still in the race. Cruz can now claim, with

VIRGINIAN-PILOT VIA AP

Michele Carter (left) and Cynthia Byler view the televised results at a GOP watch party at Pembroke Pizza in Virginia Beach, Va., on Tuesday. Super Tuesday was the busiest day of the 2016 primaries.

more credibility, the mantle of the true conservative against a front-runner with no clear ideology and views at odds with GOP orthodoxy. But whether he is capable of taking down Trump in Northern states remains in question. Kasich remains a distinct underdog as the campaign heads to Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine on Saturday. None of those states looks hospitable to Kasich’s work-across-theaisles message. He has pinned his hopes on next Tuesday’s Michigan primary and, crucially, the Ohio primary on March 15. For the GOP establishment, Super Tuesday had nightmarish qualities. Not only did Trump

tighten his grip on the nomination, but the only candidate who has been able to beat him is Cruz, the nemesis of Republican congressional leaders and what the Texas senator likes to call the “Washington cartel.” In a choice between Trump and Cruz, many who could be counted as part of that establishment would be hard-pressed to declare a preference. For months, the party elite dismissed Trump, seeing him as a candidate who would burn himself out before the end of 2015. When he proved capable of surviving mistakes and misstatements that hurt most normal candidates, they then assumed that, when the primaries began,

voters would reject him in favor of one of any number of establishment candidates who were then in the race. Today, those desperate to prevent Trump from hijacking the party recognize his strength and his seeming inevitability but seem powerless to stop him. Some believe that the most realistic scenario for stopping Trump begins with victories by Cruz, Kasich and Rubio in their home states. Cruz managed that Tuesday; Rubio and Kasich face those tests March 15. Theoretically, that could lock up enough delegates against Trump to prevent him from winning a majority before the Republican convention and force a battle in

Cleveland in July for the nomination. Another scenario calls for two of the three remaining viable candidates to quit the race, allowing the party to consolidate around a single remaining challenger. When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker quit the race last year, he said others should follow his lead in order to bring the anti-Trump forces together early enough to make a diference. The fallacy of all this talk was underscored by former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt. “There’s this fallacy that some small group can get together and decide the outcome of this,” he said. “That does not exist. This is a marketplace of political ideas. The party is responsible for its structure but cannot dictate the outcome.” Trump’s victories Tuesday seemed an echo of his win in South Carolina 10 days ago. There, he survived a debate in which he accused former president George W. Bush of lying about the existence of weapons of mass destruction as the pretext for invading Iraq and also praised Planned Parenthood for providing health-care services to millions of women. On Tuesday, he survived not only the attacks from both Rubio and Cruz but also managed to win the majority of contests, despite controversy when he declined to denounce the Ku Klux Klan in an interview Sunday on CNN. Trump predicted Tuesday that establishment money will come pouring in against him over the next two weeks as he seeks knockout blows against Rubio in Florida and Kasich in Ohio. Up to now, that opposition has been scattered and inconsistent. They are loading up now for what could be one last efort to prevent something unimaginable to them when this campaign began.


03.02.2016 • WedneSday • M 2

SUPER TUESDAY

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Clinton, Trump solidify leads

AP PHOTOS

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, addresses the crowd in Staford, Texas, as his family looks on. Cruz won primary contests in Texas and Oklahoma Tuesday night.

TUESDAY • FROM A1

Muslims and immigrants resonated with Tuesday’s Republican electorate, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks. Large majorities of Republican primary voters in six states, for example, said they support Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all noncitizen Muslims from entering the United States. The results followed a wild prelude to Super Tuesday that featured extraordinary criticism from several Republican governors and senators who refused to say whether they would support their party’s front-runner should Trump win the nomination. Trump’s strong performance across much of the South was a blow to Cruz, who had long ex-

pected the South to be his firewall. Yet Cruz seized on Rubio’s struggles, calling on the GOP to unify behind his own candidacy, “the only campaign that has beaten, that can beat and that will beat Donald Trump.” With a win in Minnesota, Rubio hoped to stay competitive in the delegate count while eyeing a win in his home state of Florida on March 15. A defiant Rubio told a hometown crowd in Miami that he had only begun to attack Trump: “You see, just five days ago we began to unmask the true nature of the front-runner so far in this race,” he said, calling the GOP front-runner “a con artist.” Ohio Gov. John Kasich and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson remain in the race, but neither has won any of the races since

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont arrives at a rally in Essex Junction, Vt. Sanders won contests in Vermont, Colorado, Minnesota and Oklahoma.

the nominating contest began a month ago and thus neither is expected to be a major factor. Trump won at least 175 delegates in Tuesday’s contests. Cruz collected at least 89 and Rubio picked up at least 51. Kasich won at least 17 delegates and Carson won at least three. Overall, Trump leads with 257 delegates. Cruz has 106, Rubio has 67, Kasich has 23 and Carson has eight. Envisioning a Trump White House, the front-runner said he would get along “great with Congress,” despite criticism on Tuesday from House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. They condemned his refusal Sunday to disavow the backing of a former Ku Klux Klan leader. Trump has since disavowed the nod. “Paul Ryan, I don’t know him

well, but I’m sure I’m going to get along great with him,” Trump said. “And if I don’t, he’s going to have to pay a big price, OK?” Signaling her confidence, Clinton set her sights on Trump as she addressed supporters during a victory rally. “It’s clear tonight that the stakes in this election have never been higher and the rhetoric we’re hearing on the other side has never been lower,” she said. Trump, too, had his eye on a general election matchup with the former secretary of state, casting her as part of a political establishment that has failed Americans. “She’s been there for so long,” Trump said in Florida on Tuesday night. “If she hasn’t straightened it out by now, she’s not going to straighten it out in the next four years.”

Clinton has steadied herself after an unexpectedly strong early challenge from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. Sanders did carry his home state decisively, and told the crowd at a raucous victory party that he was “so proud to bring Vermont values all across this country.” Sanders, who has energized supporters with his calls for a “political revolution,” has struggled to expand his base beyond young people and liberals. His weakness with black voters, a core part of the Democratic constituency, was underscored anew. Clinton was supported by at least 80 percent of black voters in Alabama, Arkansas, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas. She was also bolstered by women and older voters.

GOP looks aghast, helpless as Trump runs away with party ANALYSIS • FROM A1

year to 0-15. His lone victory was in caucuses in Minnesota. In several states where Rubio was running third, his percentage of the vote was low enough that he was in danger of winning few or no delegates in those places. Rubio has been described by many as the future of his party. His performance to date instead has reinforced his image as a politician who has not lived up to that potential. Despite five days of relentless attacks on Trump, which started at last week’s GOP debate in Houston and carried through a raucous weekend of campaigning, Rubio was not able to deliver significant results. He scored well among late-deciding voters; in Virginia they favored him over Trump by about 20 points. But there were not enough of them to overcome the hold Trump has on anti-establishment Republicans who remain in control of the nominating battle. Cruz did more than enough to argue that he should become the main challenger to Trump, carrying his home state of Texas, as he had long predicted, as well as Oklahoma. Coupled with his victory in the Iowa caucuses at the beginning of last month, he remained through much of Tuesday night the only Republican who could say he had defeated the party’s front-runner anywhere. Months ago, Cruz envisioned that Super Tuesday and its Southern flavor would be the day he took command of the GOP nominating contest. Instead, it was the day he managed to preserve his candidacy, although he remains at a distinct disadvantage against Trump, particularly with Rubio and Kasich still in the race. Cruz can now claim, with

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump (bottom center right) has his picture taken with attendees at a campaign stop Tuesday at Port-Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio.

more credibility, the mantle of the true conservative against a front-runner with no clear ideology and views at odds with GOP orthodoxy. But whether he is capable of taking down Trump in Northern states remains in question. Kasich remains a distinct underdog as the campaign heads to Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine on Saturday. None of those states looks hospitable to Kasich’s work-across-theaisles message. He has pinned his hopes on next Tuesday’s Michigan primary and, crucially, the Ohio primary on March 15. For the GOP establishment, Super Tuesday had nightmarish qualities. Not only did Trump

tighten his grip on the nomination, but the only candidate who has been able to beat him is Cruz, the nemesis of Republican congressional leaders and what the Texas senator likes to call the “Washington cartel.” In a choice between Trump and Cruz, many who could be counted as part of that establishment would be hard-pressed to declare a preference. For months, the party elite dismissed Trump, seeing him as a candidate who would burn himself out before the end of 2015. When he proved capable of surviving mistakes and misstatements that hurt most normal candidates, they then assumed that, when the primaries began,

voters would reject him in favor of one of any number of establishment candidates who were then in the race. Today, those desperate to prevent Trump from hijacking the party recognize his strength and his seeming inevitability but seem powerless to stop him. Some believe that the most realistic scenario for stopping Trump begins with victories by Cruz, Kasich and Rubio in their home states. Cruz managed that Tuesday; Rubio and Kasich face those tests March 15. Theoretically, that could lock up enough delegates against Trump to prevent him from winning a majority before the Republican convention and force a battle in

Cleveland in July for the nomination. Another scenario calls for two of the three remaining viable candidates to quit the race, allowing the party to consolidate around a single remaining challenger. When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker quit the race last year, he said others should follow his lead in order to bring the anti-Trump forces together early enough to make a diference. The fallacy of all this talk was underscored by former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt. “There’s this fallacy that some small group can get together and decide the outcome of this,” he said. “That does not exist. This is a marketplace of political ideas. The party is responsible for its structure but cannot dictate the outcome.” Trump’s victories Tuesday seemed an echo of his win in South Carolina 10 days ago. There, he survived a debate in which he accused former president George W. Bush of lying about the existence of weapons of mass destruction as the pretext for invading Iraq and also praised Planned Parenthood for providing health-care services to millions of women. On Tuesday, he survived not only the attacks from both Rubio and Cruz but also managed to win the majority of contests, despite controversy when he declined to denounce the Ku Klux Klan in an interview Sunday on CNN. Trump predicted Tuesday that establishment money will come pouring in against him over the next two weeks as he seeks knockout blows against Rubio in Florida and Kasich in Ohio. Up to now, that opposition has been scattered and inconsistent. They are loading up now for what could be one last efort to prevent something unimaginable to them when this campaign began.


M 1 WedneSday • 03.02.2016 • a10

Some details of Centene project emerge Business is reportedly planning 20-story building By TIM BRyanT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Centene Corp. has yet to divulge its plan for a second oice building in Clayton, but a few details got out Tuesday at a meeting of commercial real estate professionals. Jim Mosby, executive managing director at Cushman & Wakefield in Clayton, told the crowd at the breakfast event that Centene is planning a 20-story building at Forsyth Boulevard and South Hanley Road. Mosby said the 500,000-squarefoot building is expected to be completed in early 2019. Centene, which has bought several properties for the expansion project, recently began demolishing buildings on the site. The Wine Merchant is among several businesses displaced by Centene’s project. The site, at the southeast corner of Hanley and Forsyth, is just east of Centene’s headquarters at 7700 Forsyth. Mosby was among the speakers at the Specialist, Industrial and Oice Real Estate Metro Market Forecast at the RitzCarlton, in Clayton. He said after the meeting that Centene’s building on Hanley might accommodate several tenants. The managed care company opened its 17-story Clayton headquarters on Forsyth in June 2010. The $186 million building’s other main tenant is the law firm Armstrong Teasdale. Centene’s expansion project could be the first new oice building built in downtown Clayton since the company opened its Centene Plaza headquarters nearly six years ago. Also planned for Clayton is a 14-story, $68.5 million oice building at 8125 Forsyth. Apogee Associates has said the oice building, proposed in November, could be the first phase of a project that may include a 230-room hotel, 62 residential units, oices, restaurants and stores near Shaw Park.

Peabody’s survival might hinge on sale of coal mines Deal is on hold while buyer tries to renegotiate terms By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Peabody Energy’s survival looks increasingly tied to its sale of two coal mines in New Mexico and one in Colorado, a transaction announced Nov. 20 that Peabody expects to close by the end of March. Without the $358 million in cash Bowie Resource Partners would put up for the mines and the $105 million it would assume in Peabody liabilities, Peabody “believes there is substantial doubt as to whether the Company can comply with its financial covenants under its 2013 Credit Facility,” the company said in a regulatory filing Monday. “Unless the Transaction is consummated before the issuance of the Company’s audited financial statements for the year ended Dec. 31, 2015, the Company believes its independent registered public accounting firm will be required to issue an audit opinion with a going concern uncertainty paragraph,” Peabody’s disclosure said. If Peabody’s accounting firm says there’s uncertainty about its ability to continue meeting its financial obligations, this would trigger a default under the company’s 2013 credit facility. Those issues have caused “unexpected delays” in the filing of Peabody’s annual financial disclosures with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Last month, Peabody drew down the remainder of a $1.65 billion revolving credit facility. It also had $1.17 billion in principal as of Sept. 30 on a $1.2 billion term loan governed by the 2013 credit agreement. Those secured lenders are concerned that Peabody isn’t pursuing a bankruptcy restructuring, Peabody disclosed in a separate filing Monday. But Peabody wants to negotiate debt swaps with its unsecured bondholders and second lien bondholders. It’s in talks with holders of roughly $5 billion in bonds, who stand to be paid after Peabody’s creditors under the 2013 financing agreement in the event the coal miner

Senate panel votes to block states’ GMO labeling laws Patchwork would end up costing consumers, Roberts says aSSOCIaTed PReSS

WaSHInGTOn • States could no lon-

ger require labeling of genetically modified foods under legislation approved by a Senate panel. The Senate Agriculture Committee voted 14-6 Tuesday to prevent the labeling on packages of foods that include genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Vermont is set to require such labels this summer, and other states are considering similar laws. Senators have said they want to find a compromise on the labeling issue before Vermont’s law kicks in. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., chairman of the panel, said a patchwork of state laws would be a “wrecking ball” that could be costly for agriculture, food companies and ultimately consumers. The bill would block Vermont’s law and create new voluntary labels for companies that want to use them on food packages that contain genetically modified ingredients. The legislation is similar to a bill the House passed last year. The food industry has strongly backed both bills, saying GMOs are safe and a patchwork of state laws isn’t practical. Labeling advocates have been fighting

state by state to enact the labeling, with the eventual goal of a national standard. Passage won’t be as easy in the Senate, where 60 votes will be needed to overcome a certain filibuster. Sens. Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders of Vermont have both strongly opposed efforts to block their state’s law. Roberts and Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan have worked to find a compromise that can pass the Senate. But those negotiations broke down before the committee vote, and Roberts said the panel needed to move quickly ahead of the Vermont law. Stabenow said that for the legislation to receive broad enough support to pass the Senate, “it must contain a pathway to a national system of mandatory disclosure that provides consumers the information they need and want to make informed choices.” Three Democrats voted for Roberts’ bill: Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Sen. Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. Genetically modified seeds are engineered in laboratories to have certain traits, such as resistance to herbicides. The majority of the country’s corn and soybean crop is now genetically modified, with much of that going to animal feed.

EPA orders widely used Bayer insecticide pulled from market aSSOCIaTed PReSS

WaSHInGTOn • Federal regulators on

Tuesday ordered the makers of a widely used insecticide to take it of the market because it harms tiny aquatic animals. The Environmental Protection Agency ordered Bayer CropScience and Nichino America to cancel production of all products containing flubendiamide. The decision comes after studies showed the insecticide harms species at the bottom of aquatic food chains in streams and ponds, impacting the fish that feed on them. Flubendiamide is used on more than 200 crops, including soybeans, tobacco, cotton and numerous varieties of lettuce, fruits and nuts. “EPA concluded that continued use of the product would result in unreasonable adverse efects on the environment,” the

agency said in a statement issued Tuesday. “EPA had issued a time-limited registration to the companies with conditions that were understood and agreed upon. If unreasonable adverse efects on the environment were found by EPA, the companies would submit a request for voluntary cancellation of all flubendiamide registrations within one week of EPA notification.” In January, the EPA asked the companies to voluntarily withdraw products containing the problematic insecticide. After they refused, regulators moved to cancel the government registration required to manufacture the product. Flubendiamide is the active ingredient in Bayer’s Belt pesticide. The German chemical giant says its product is safe to use and has sought an administrative law review of the agency’s decision.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Coal is loaded into a train at Peabody’s North Antelope mine near Wright, Wyo., in 2010. Peabody is trying to sell mines in New Mexico and Colorado.

files for bankruptcy. Without closing the Bowie deal, however, Peabody’s adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization could fall below its net cash interest charges, causing a breach of the 2013 credit agreement. If that happens, Peabody would have to ask those lenders, who want it to go into bankruptcy, to give it a waiver of that provision to avoid a default. The Bowie deal contains a $20 million penalty if the coal miner with operations in Utah and Colorado can’t obtain financing to close the deal. When the deal was announced, Louisville, Ky.-based Bowie said it already had equity financing from an undisclosed partner. Four weeks later, Bowie said it would refinance its existing debt as part of the financing package to acquire Peabody’s mines. Bloomberg reported last month, citing anonymous sources, that the deal was on hold while Bowie tried to renegotiate the terms. This doesn’t bode well for Peabody’s ability to sell other assets in the future. “The hope for monetizing anything

else is a bit weaker if you couldn’t do this,” said Kris Inton, an analyst at Morningstar in Chicago. Peabody, in a statement, said it “continues to take a number of steps to improve the business amid the prolonged industry downturn, including pursuing the best alternatives to achieve our financial objectives.” Peabody shares lost a penny to close Tuesday at $2.43. Peabody’s shaky position comes as its peers in the industry restructure amid a historic downturn in the coal markets. Creve Coeur-based Arch Coal filed for bankruptcy protection in January, and Alpha Natural Resources filed last year. St. Louis-based Illinois coal miner Foresight Energy is working to restructure its debt with lenders, who won a judgment in Delaware Chancery Court in December giving them the right to accelerate loans as a result of Murray Energy’s purchase of a big stake in the company. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


MARKET WATCH

03.02.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed sharply higher Tuesday as investors welcomed some encouraging data on U.S. construction spending, manufacturing and auto sales. Financial stocks, which have been the worst-performing sector of the market so far this year, led the way higher.

Hertz

10

20

5

15

D J 52-week range

F

16,880

Dow Jones industrials

16,520

Close: 16,865.08 Change: 348.58 (2.1%)

$15.10

$23.62

14 12

S&P 500

1,940

Close: 1,978.35 Change: 46.12 (2.4%)

CHICAGO BOT

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

17,500

2,080

Live cattle

17,000

2,000

Milk

16,500

1,920

Cotton

16,000

1,840

CHICAGO MERC

Copper Coffee ICE

O

N

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,021 1,888 2098 681 37 51

4,669 4,286 2578 558 76 24

J

1,760

F

S

O

N

D

J

Sugar

F

Crude oil

StocksRecap NYSE

D

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 16865.56 7512.39 625.89 9771.00 4689.60 1978.35 1363.30 20325.20 1054.49

LOW 16545.67 7368.55 615.25 9613.96 4581.75 1937.09 1339.32 19864.02 1035.51

CLOSE 16865.08 7500.30 618.50 9771.00 4689.60 1978.35 1363.30 20325.20 1054.49

CHG. +348.58 +155.27 -2.20 +211.47 +131.65 +46.12 +29.10 +461.18 +20.59

%CHG. WK +2.11% s +2.11% s -0.35% t +2.21% s +2.89% s +2.39% s +2.18% s +2.32% s +1.99% s

$111.86

MO QTR s t s t t s s t s t s t s t s t s t

YTD -3.21% -0.11% +7.04% -3.67% -6.35% -3.21% -2.52% -3.98% -7.17%

Gas blend

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 16

353.75 850.75 438.50

+.25 -2.25 -6.50

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Apr 16 Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 16

137.10 13.56 214.15 58.25 112.50

+.13 -.18 +1.30 +.24 -.15

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 16 Apr 16 Apr 16

25.56 34.40 1.3035

+.14 +.65 -.0172

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Apr 16 Apr 16

109.95 1.742

+.58 +.031

NAME

TKR

Aegion

AEGN

15.97

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

22.41 19.96 +1.85 +10.2

+3.4 +0.1 15

8.85

... Laclede Group

LG

49.07

Lee Ent

LEE

1.15

Mallinckrodt

MNK

52.01 134.26 65.65 +.62 +1.0 -12.0 -44.3

Monsanto Co

MON

81.22 123.82 92.49 +2.50 +2.8

OLN

12.29

0.67 50.06

61.46 57.60 +.84 +1.5

+5.6 +9.4 20 0.78f

Ameren

AEE

37.26

48.22 46.93

+8.6 +14.6 18

1.70

American Railcar

ARII

33.02

60.42 42.47 +1.20 +2.9

-8.2 -23.7

8

1.60

Belden Inc

BDC

36.51

95.56 56.30 +1.53 +2.8 +18.1 -38.1 28

0.20

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

10.74

21.84 13.84

Caleres

CAL

23.22

33.83 28.35 +.01

CassInfo

CASS

43.78

59.09 50.43 +.57 +1.1

Centene

CNC

47.36

83.00 58.48 +1.52 +2.7 -11.1

1.86

.75 +.03 +4.2 -32.9 -59.6 dd

LMIA

AHPI

-.02

...

-.44 -3.1 +13.1 -34.1 13 ...

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

37.44

Edgewell

EPC

67.94 107.38 77.47 +1.02 +1.3

Emerson

EMR

41.25

Energizer Holdings

ENR

28.86

47.11 43.91 +1.43 +3.4

62.75 49.97 +1.14 +2.3

+5.7

-4.6 15

-2.0 +1.0 25 -7.3 20

... Olin

44.52 39.25 +.31 +0.8 +15.2

0.80

Perficient

PRFT

14.90

Post Holdings

7.73

+8.2 +28.4 36

...

-.01 -0.4 -68.4 -97.9 dd

...

3.68 +.01 +0.3 -38.8 -42.2 dd

0.55

1.00 Pulaski Financial

...

11.67

17.25 15.18 +.15 +1.0

-4.9 +28.1 13

0.38

98.70 92.73 +2.63 +2.9

+8.4 +2.5 11

1.48

RELV

0.37

ESRX

65.55

94.61 71.61 +1.23 +1.7 -18.1 -17.0 20

First Clover Leaf

FCLF

8.50

9.89

Foresight Energy

FELP

1.51

18.73

FutureFuel

FF

9.11

16.08 13.29 +.47 +3.7

-.07 -3.5 -44.8 -82.6

21.43 12.08 +.73 +6.4 -13.3

0.32 Reliv ...

1.40

.95

... +63.8 -12.8

STXS

-.01 -1.7 +17.1 -62.7 dd

...

Stifel Financial

SF

59.93 30.53 +1.57 +5.4 -27.9 -47.1 13

...

SunEdison

SUNE

1.21

33.45

1.50

-.48 -24.2 -70.5 -91.1 dd

...

... SunEdison Semi

SEMI

3.24

27.93

6.69

-.14 -2.0 -14.7 -71.6

...

... WldPntTm

WPT

11.79

2.53

0.24 25.00

3

-9.0 20

0.24

20.67 14.02 +.15 +1.1

+4.6 -24.6 15

1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST A-B InBev to sell Chinese stake • Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s largest brewer, announced late Tuesday that the Belgian company has reached an agreement to sell SABMiller PLC’s stake in a Chinese beer joint venture to partner China Resources Beer (Holdings) Co. Ltd. A-B InBev didn’t disclose the terms of the deal, but Reuters reported that the stake would be sold for $1.6 billion. The agreement is dependent on A-B InBev successfully concluding its purchase of No. 2 SABMiller. The London-based brewer has a 49 percent stake in China Resources Snow Breweries Ltd., which is the biggest brewer in that country; SABMiller’s partner, China Resources Beer, owns the remaining 51 percent. The sale wasn’t a surprise. A-B InBev, which already has a sizable market share in China, could have seen its share rise to nearly 40 percent with the SABMiller takeover. That likely would have alarmed Chinese antitrust regulators. This is A-B InBev’s latest step to complete its pending acquisition of SABMiller, which was announced last year. Antitrust regulators in many countries where the two brewers operate are closely scrutinizing the $108 billion merger. Tough year for billionaires • Billionaires, both globally and locally, have had a tough year, according to the latest ranking by Forbes. This year, there were 1,810 billionaires across the globe, 16 fewer than last year’s rankings. Combined, their net worth totaled $6.48 trillion, down from $7.05 trillion last year. Bill Gates remained on top, with a net worth estimated at $75 billion. Billionaires with St. Louis ties include Jack Taylor, whose wealth largely derives from Clayton-based Enterprise Holdings, the rental car giant. This year, the magazine ranked Taylor No. 248 globally, with an estimated net worth of $5.3 billion, down from $12.5 billion when he was No. 92. Since Enterprise is a privately held business, Forbes uses

The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 1.82 percent Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

the share prices of publicly traded competitors to estimate Enterprise’s value. The share prices of rivals Avis Budget Group Inc. and Hertz Global Holdings Inc. have dropped by more than half in the past 12 months. It was a good year, however, for real estate developer Stan Kroenke. With a net worth estimated at $7.7 billion, the Columbia, Mo., resident continues to climb, taking the No. 148 spot; last year, he was No. 225 with a net worth of $6.3 billion. His wife, Ann Walton Kroenke, a Wal-Mart heiress, was ranked 324, with a net worth estimated at $4.5 billion. Pauline MacMillan Keinath of St. Louis, a Cargill heiress, is 219th, with a fortune estimated at $5.7 billion. Foresight wants to seal smoldering mine • Foresight Energy said it has asked mine safety oicials for permission to seal of its Deer Run mine near Hillsboro, Ill., in an efort to extinguish a mine ire that has smoldered for a year. The St. Louis-based coal miner said it has unsuccessfully tried to ight the ire by sealing speciic areas in the mine and illing them with extinguishing agents. Foresight said it asked the Mine Safety and Health Administration Tuesday for permission to “take the next step” and seal the entire mine to cut of oxygen fueling the ire. The closure would be temporary, Foresight said, but it was unsure when production would resume at the mine an hour northeast of St. Louis. SunEdison tumbles • Shares of SunEdison tumbled 24 percent Tuesday after the Maryland Heights-based renewable power company disclosed an internal probe over its inancial situation. The audit committee of SunEdison’s board of directors is investigating allegations by former company executives concerning the accuracy of its liquidity position and cash needs in the most recent quarterly iling, according a regulatory iling. SunEdison shares dropped 48 cents to close Tuesday at $1.50. From staf and wire reports

-3.60 -.17 +2.40

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.38 .13 .13

3.50 3.25 3.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.32 .48 .67 .84 1.31 1.82 2.69

+0.01 ... +0.09 +0.06 +0.09 +0.08 +0.07

.01 .07 .19 .67 1.60 2.08 2.68

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.47 +0.09 2.56

Bond Buyer Muni Idx

4.09 +0.03 4.27

Barclays USAggregate

2.26 -0.02 2.12

Barclays US High Yield 9.02 -0.17 5.88 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.84 -0.04 3.64

Barclays CompT-BdIdx

1.37 +0.07 1.84

Barclays US Corp

3.55 -0.03 2.93

GlobalMarkets

...

Stereotaxis

0.54

.87

...

...

5 0.68m

-1.6 +6.2 12 -7.6 +12.4

...

PULB

Express Scripts

8

-9.2 28

71.39 69.89 +.43 +0.6 +13.3 +40.4 dd

76.96

+0.3 +5.8

+7.5

41.63

RGA

-6.8 22

21.57 18.40 +.35 +1.9

POST

-0.7 +39.1 17 0.36f ReinsGrp

10.62

...

...

-0.2

ISLE

...

34.34 15.45 +.29 +1.9 -10.5 -43.1 13

3.55

30.73 28.15 +.42 +1.5

Isle of Capri

3

2.16

SKIS

39.98 36.07 +.38 +1.1

3.51 +.07 +2.0

...

-6.1 -23.6 23

Peak Resorts

19.68

4.12

1.37 +.04 +3.0 -18.5 -55.8

2.43

31.50

2.81

3.55

-4.0 -32.9 81

-.10 -0.2 +10.1 +30.2 20 1.96f

2.01 118.20

ESE

Huttig Building Prod HBP

66.43 65.42

BTU

Esco Technologies

1.95

9.67 +.11 +1.2

0.88 PeabdyE rs

Enterprise Financial EFSC

9.32 +.04 +0.4

14.48

PNRA 156.47 208.00 210.74 +3.54 +1.7

+4.5 -12.4 13 1.90f

CHG

CLOSE

1230.30 14.73 936.70

Platinum

+3.2 +9.6 16 0.90b -1.1 -22.5 19

.0633 .7137 .2498 1.3915 .7401 .1526 1.0884 .0147 .2563 .008864 .055251 .0133 .0631 .000807 1.0017

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

0.28 Panera Bread

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PREV

.0633 .7176 .2537 1.3953 .7466 .1526 1.0868 .0148 .2574 .008768 .055903 .0136 .0641 .000815 1.0027

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Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Silver

TKR

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FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Chicago BOT is in cents.

52-WK LO HI

Amdocs

$16.74

Gold

LocalStocks 52-WK LO HI

$10.44

F

ExchangeRates

DATE

Heating oil Natural gas

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 71.5m (1.7x avg.) PE: 7.1 Mkt. Cap: $51.04 b Yield: 4.6%

Futures

2,000

2,160

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10

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Vol.: 8.2m (1.9x avg.) PE: 17.5 Mkt. Cap: $81.45 b Yield: 2.2%

18,000

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$87.00

PE: 32.5 Yield: ...

$16

100 F

F

Close: $13.09 0.58 or 4.6% The automaker said its sales rose almost 20 percent in February, a better gain than analysts expected.

105 95

$35.75

Vol.: 13.2m (4.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.81 b

PE: ... Yield: ...

1,880

10 DAYS

D J 52-week range

Ford

HON

Close: $105.87 4.52 or 4.5% The industrial conglomerate gave up on an effort to buy rival United Technologies. It said the company wasn’t willing to negotiate a deal. $110

$25

Vol.: 17.4m (1.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.24 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Honeywell

KATE

Close: $21.99 2.17 or 10.9% The clothing, handbag and accessories maker gave a strong profit forecast for 2016.

$15

$6.95

16,160

Kate Spade

HTZ

Close: $9.54 1.04 or 12.2% The car rental company climbed after saying it cut costs and improved the management of its fleet.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 1978.35 9717.16 6152.88 19407.46 4406.84 44214.50 16085.51 44124.59 12982.10 7962.22

CHG

CHG

YTD

+46.12 +221.76 +55.79 +295.53 +53.29 +499.57 +58.75 +1358.74 +121.75 +118.59

+2.39% +2.34% +0.92% +1.55% +1.22% +1.14% +0.37% +3.18% +0.95% +1.51%

-3.21% -9.55% -1.43% -11.44% -5.78% +2.88% -15.49% +1.79% -0.21% -9.71%

Stocks surge higher following encouraging signs on economy Construction spending in January hit highest level in 8 years ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Stocks roared to

their best day in more than a month Tuesday as investors hit the “buy” button following some encouraging signs of strength in the U.S. economy. Construction spending reached its highest level in eight years in January. Banks, the worst-performing sector of the market so far this year, led the way higher. Stocks jumped at 10 a.m., when the Commerce Department reported that construction spending continued to rise in January. At the same time, a survey showed some signs of life in the beaten-down manufacturing sector. Those were good

signs for the U.S. economy. Banks rose the most, but big names in consumer and tech stocks also climbed, as did oil prices. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 348.58 points, or 2.1 percent, to 16,865.08. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index surged 46.12 points, or 2.4 percent, to 1,978.35. That was the biggest gain for the S&P 500, a widely used benchmark, since late January. The Nasdaq composite index, which is heavily weighted with technology companies, made its biggest gain since August, adding 131.65 points, or 2.9 percent, to 4,689.60. Stocks have stumbled this year as investors feared for the health of the U.S. economy at

the same time that China, Europe, and Japan are slowing or struggling. Tuesday’s report showed construction spending rose by the most in eight months. A manufacturing index had its best reading in six months, though activity is still declining. In recent months the strong dollar has hurt tech companies, which do a lot of business outside the U.S., because it makes their products more expensive overseas and cuts into their revenue. Those stocks climbed Tuesday, with the biggest gains going to familiar names, including Apple, Alphabet (parent of Google), Microsoft and Facebook.

Automakers post big sales gains in U.S. Super Bowl ads may have helped rev up demand, analysts say ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT • Automakers posted big U.S. sales gains last month as consumers — giddy from Super Bowl ads — returned to showrooms after a snowy January. Sales rose 7 percent over last February to 1.3 million vehicles, according to Autodata Corp. Automakers reported February sales on Tuesday. Ford’s sales rose 20 percent over last February, boosted in part by higher sales to rental car fleets. Honda’s sales were up 13 percent and Fiat Chrysler’s rose 12 percent. Nissan’s sales rose nearly 11 percent and Toyota’s were up 4 percent. Hyundai’s sales rose 1 percent.

General Motors said its sales fell 1.5 percent, partly due to a 39 percent cut in rental sales. Volkswagen, still stinging from its diesel cheating scandal, saw its U.S. sales drop 13 percent. Industry analysts had expected February sales to bounce back after a slight decline in January. One factor: Super Bowl ads. On Super Bowl Sunday, which was Feb. 7, website visits per dealership were four times higher than any other Sunday in all of 2015, according to Michelle Krebs, a senior analyst with Autotrader.com. Credit applications also hit single-day records last month. Ford Chief Economist Emily Kolinski Morris said improving job and income growth, as well

as low gas prices and low interest rates, are outweighing stock market volatility in consumers’ minds. Buyers are confident, which is key for auto sales. Proof of that confidence is everywhere. Sales of the Cadillac Escalade, an SUV that starts at $73,000, were up 22 percent over last February. Sales of Nissan’s $30,000 Murano SUV nearly doubled; so did sales of the $89,000 Lexus LX SUV. Ford said it was the best February for van sales since 1979. LMC is predicting sales of 17.8 million new vehicles this year, up from 17.46 million last year. But the growth rate is slowing from previous years and many are expecting a plateau as U.S. demand peaks.


LOCAL

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Foes sign on to ight what they say is bias Businesses, faith leaders decry move to protect those who refuse to accommodate gay couples BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • More than 185 Missouri businesses, faith leaders and other groups have signed a letter denouncing a Republican proposal barring state penalties for those who refuse to participate in same-sex marriage ceremonies. Sen. Bob Onder, R-Lake Saint Louis, has proposed putting a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would forbid the state from penalizing churches, bakers, wedding planners, florists and others who decline to provide services for the weddings or receptions. It would also add protections against civil suits, he said Tuesday. Opponents say churches and clergy already aren’t required to conduct same-sex weddings, and that the Missouri Human Rights Act already doesn’t protect discrimination based on sexual orientation. PROMO Missouri, an LGBT advocacy group, and the ACLU of Missouri published the letter, saying the proposal resembles a controversial bill signed into law last year in Indiana that opponents said would legalize discrimination against gay people on religious grounds. The Associated Press reported in January on figures from Visit Indy, Indianapolis’ nonprofit tourism group, that the city has lost as many as 12 conventions and up to $60 million in economic impact because of national backlash.

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“We are committed to diversity, inclusion, and above all the Golden Rule,” the letter reads, in part. “These dangerous bills and potential constitutional amendments only succeed in showing people Missouri is not a welcoming state. We should focus on keeping Missouri competitive, not keep people away.” The signees include: Left Bank Books, Liquid Technology, PETCO STL County, Viviano & Sons, Kirkwood Baptist Church, Brentwood Christian Church, Paraquad and the Ethical Society. Sarah Rossi, the director of policy at the ACLU of Missouri, said the ACLU believes churches shouldn’t be required to hold same-sex marriages, but she told a Senate committee that that right is already guaranteed under the First Amendment. “We don’t think that clergy or churches should have to open their doors to lesbian and gay couples who want to get married,” she told the committee. But “denying access to buildings, denying access to bakeries, denying access to catering services — all of this stuf goes too far.” The proposal’s definition of “religious organizations” would include entities such as preschools, colleges, children’s homes, elder care facilities and hospitals as long as they have some religious tie. Rossi said the language could be used in the future to deny service to LGBT people for far more things than their weddings. Onder defended the

proposal, saying Tuesday that the assertion was an “overly broad reading.” “It’s really a matter of people not being commandeered into being forced to participate in a ceremony that violates their religious beliefs,” he said. Another proposal, a bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Kurt Schaefer of Columbia — who is running for state attorney general — would expand the definition of “religious organization” in Missouri’s Human Rights Act to include many of the entities in Onder’s action. The Missouri Human Rights Act doesn’t include sexual orientation now, but bills have been proposed for years to change that. Religious groups have historically been granted some exemptions, so that, for example, the Catholic Church wouldn’t be required to hire female priests. Steph Perkins, executive director of PROMO, said that broader exemptions could mean loopholes to deny service to gay people in the future. Schaefer said last week his bill isn’t anti-LGBT and simply clarifies state statute after a court ruling struck down the old definition of a religious organization. Onder’s bill only needs to pass both the GOPdominated Senate and the House to go on the ballot, and doesn’t require a signature from Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. Onder’s measure is Senate Joint Resolution 39. Schaefer’s is Senate Bill 916. Jack Suntrup • 314-430-8304 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

POLITICAL FIX From our online report on politics and government. STLtoday.com/politicalix Compromise on UM funding proposed • A state senator loated a plan Tuesday that could spare the University of Missouri system from budget cuts this year. After months of heated rhetoric over the behavior of former Mizzou communications instructor Melissa Click amid a series of racially charged student protests, state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, wants to form a special committee to review university system operations. Schaefer said the university’s response to the panel’s recommendation could be considered when the Legislature discusses the UM System budget next year. “This committee allows us to step back, gather information and then make an informed decision as to whether or not there should be funding changes at the University of Missouri,” said Schaefer, who chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee and is a candidate for attorney general. The proposed cooling-of period comes a week after the Board of Curators ired Click for her behavior during last year’s protests. Republican leaders in the House threatened to cut funding to the state’s lagship university as a way to force change. House Budget Leader Tom Flanigan, R-Carthage, proposed cutting $8 million from the school’s budget. (Kurt Erickson)

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016 earlier in Missouri at a Farm Bureau event. Among the senators who also did not vote were Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who are running for president. The vote was for “cloture,” a parliamentary maneuver allowing the debate and a inal vote on the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2015. The Senate is expected to have extensive debate and votes on the bill in coming days. Blunt faces Secretary of State Jason Kander, a Democrat, in the November election. Will Baskin-Gerwitz, a spokesman for the Missouri Democratic Party, said that Blunt “owes an explanation to the Missouri families afected by this epidemic about why a campaign fundraiser is more important than doing his job and showing up to vote.” Burson Snyder, Blunt’s campaign spokeswoman, said the senator “takes very seriously” the “scourge of opioids in Missouri.” She said Blunt, as chairman of a Senate subcommittee overseeing federal health spending, pushed for a 250 percent increase in funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to ight opioid abuse. Blunt “was one of the irst senators to demand a solution for veterans addicted to painkillers as a result of

their service-related injuries,” Snyder said. (Chuck Raasch) Earnings tax opponents launch campaign • A campaign to end St. Louis’ 1 percent earnings tax was announced on Tuesday. The efort is aimed at educating voters on the 1940sera tax. “We believe the earnings tax is a regressive tax that hurts the working poor by taking money directly out of their pockets,” said “Vote No on the E Tax” committee spokeswoman Stephanie Lewis. The group has released a video showcasing a preview of its campaign. City voters will decide on April 5 whether to continue the tax. The tax is levied on city residents and anyone who works in the city. The committee is funded by St. Louis inancier Rex Sinqueield, the Missouri mega-donor who has been sharply critical of the tax. Sinqueield pushed through a legislative measure requiring St. Louis and Kansas City voters to reauthorize the tax every ive years. St. Louis voters reauthorized the tax in 2011 with 88 percent of the vote. If voters fail to pass the tax by a simple majority, it would be phased out over 10 years. (Nicholas J.C. Pistor)

Blunt misses vote to raise campaign money • Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., missed a procedural vote on a bill to ight opioid abuse because he was raising money in Chicago for his re-election. Democrats criticized the senator’s absence from the Monday night vote, saying he was putting politics ahead of important policy debates. The procedural vote passed the Senate, 89-0. Blunt detoured through Chicago on his way back to Washington for the fundraiser after appearing

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03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Obama, leaders in Congress talk about vacancy on court

iPhone encryption: A ‘vicious guard dog’ FBI director testiies before Congress ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. (center) and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, in the White House on Tuesday to discuss the vacancy on the Supreme Court. Senate Republican leaders are vowing to block the president’s nominee with the hope of keeping the seat open for a Republican president next year.

Rebufed Democrats use another weapon: Donald Trump BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY associated Press

WASHINGTON • After an Oval Of-

fice sit-down on Tuesday did nothing to move Republican Senate leaders off their hard line against a Supreme Court nomination, Democrats pulled out another weapon in the heated electionyear fight: Donald Trump. In a White House meeting that lasted less than an hour, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, told President Barack Obama that any confirmation process during a presidential campaign would politicize the court. They ofered up no potential candidates that would win their backing and no route to filling the seat. “This vacancy will not be filled this year,” McConnell said after the meeting. Democrats accused Republicans of trying to hold the seat open so that a Republican president can fill it. That president could be Trump, they noted, hoping to needle a GOP establishment uncomfortable with the prospect of Trump as president. The meeting — which also included Vice President Joe Biden, Senate Mi-

nority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the ranking Democrat on the judiciary committee — was the first time the leaders have met since Justice Antonin Scalia’s death last month set off a high-stakes clash over the Supreme Court vacancy. While the men huddled at the White House, voters in 12 states were preparing to weigh in on a presidential contest that has tanked Obama’s chances of filling the seat — but also given Democrats a new line of attack. As they emerged from the meeting, they quickly linked the GOP strategy to the Republican front-runner poised to pick up significant momentum Tuesday night. “All we want them to do is fulfill their constitutional duty and do their job, and at this stage, they decided not to do that,” Reid said. “They think that they can wait and see what President Trump will do, I guess.” Reid’s comments were aimed at riling up Democrats, as well as moderate and establishment Republicans who cringe at the thought of the unpredictable celebrity candidate controlling the future of the court. It was an early sign that with formalities — such as awkward White House meetings — dispensed

with, the fight over the court was largely a battle for public opinion. “Whether everybody in the meeting today wanted to admit it, we all know that considering a nomination in the middle of a heated presidential campaign is bad for the nominee, bad for the court, bad for the process, and ultimately bad for the nation,” Grassley said in his statement about the meeting. “It’s time for the people to voice their opinion about the role of the Supreme Court in our constitutional system of government.” While the standoff continues, the president has been reading through files on potential nominees and considering his options. The White House says the president has not settled on a short list and could still add names to the mix. For now, the White House is focused on demonstrating that it is making an efort to consult with the Senate — even if there’s not much give and take. “The president certainly has the constitutional authority to nominate a justice in an election year, and he intends to use it,” Grassley wrote in an op-ed in the Des Moines Register published Tuesday. “In the Senate, we have the equal constitutional authority to consent or withhold consent.”

WASHINGTON • The U.S. government calls it a “vicious guard dog” that hurts national security. Apple says it’s critical to protecting consumer privacy against increasingly sophisticated hackers. As the debate over built-in iPhone encryption has deadlocked in the courts, law enforcement and the world’s second-largest cellphone maker agreed on one point Tuesday: It’s now up to Congress to set boundaries in a long-simmering fight over who can legally access your digital life. “We’re asking Apple to take the vicious guard dog away and let us pick the lock,” FBI Director James Comey told a House judiciary panel Tuesday, referring to a locked iPhone tied to the deadly shooting in December in San Bernardino, Calif. “The FBI is asking Apple to weaken the security of our products,” Apple general counsel Bruce Sewell countered. Tuesday’s hearing shifted attention from the courts — where judges in the last month have issued significant but conflicting opinions — to Congress, where both sides say the broader policy debate belongs. It also provided an extraordinary public forum for the Obama administration and Apple Inc. to stake out competing positions that could have sweeping ramifications. Apple’s recent opposition to bypassing security features for the government has pushed that dispute from tech circles into the mainstream. The strong positions articulated Tuesday make clear the deep divide between Silicon Valley and the government, even as the Obama administration advocates open dialogue and resolution. “Is it the right thing to make our society overall less safe in order to solve crime?” Sewell asked. “That’s the issue that we’re wrestling with.” On Monday, a federal judge in Brooklyn said the Obama administration couldn’t force Apple to help it gain access to the phone in a drug case. U.S. Magistrate Judge James Orenstein said Justice Department attorneys were relying on the centuries-old All Writs Act “to produce impermissibly absurd results.” But two weeks ago, a diferent magistrate judge in California, Sheri Pym, directed the company to help the FBI hack into a locked iPhone used by one of the shooters in the December attack in San Bernardino, which killed 14 people. With those two conflicting rulings in mind, Congress needs to get involved to address the broader collision between privacy and public safety, Comey said.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

Wednesday • 03.02.2016 • a14

HEAVY METAL Our view • Eliminate lead-paint contamination now or pay a high price later.

high-crime neighborhoods.“When It costs a lot to remediate the leaded I see the astounding levels of lead paint that is poisoning thousands of poisoning in these communities, it children in older St. Louis housing, makes complete sense that it is part of but nowhere near as much as it could the cycle of deprivation,” he told the eventually cost society if the problem Chicago Tribune. goes unaddressed. Erik Nelson, assistant professor of As the Post-Dispatch’s Blythe epidemiology at St. Louis University Bernhard reports, at least 3,300 kids College for Public Health and Social in St. Louis have toxic levels of lead Justice, says childhood lead exposure in their blood. Contamination — the may be to blame for a high rate of sexresult of exposure in old houses with ually transmitted infections in some lead-based paint — causes permanent St. Louis neighbordamage. hoods. Once lead poisons Scientists say a child’s blood, the lead gives the brain effects are “essena one-two punch, tially irreversible and impairing specific devastating,” said areas responsible for Dr. Andrew White, executive functions professor of pediatas well as the comrics at Washington munication channels University. between those parts Lead paint was of the brain. Even banned in 1978, but minuscule levels 90 percent of St. of lead in blood, Louis’ housing stock well into the range was built before that. considered safe, are Repainting does found to cause attennot eliminate the threat from lead, and ROBERT COHEN • P-D tion-deficit hyperactivity disorder. poorer neighborMaurice Ohuonu of a lead In 2003, St. Louis hoods are the ones abatement team removes lead Mayor Francis Slay most likely to pose paint from a St. Louis home on vowed to eliminate ongoing contamina- Feb. 26. lead poisoning by tion threats. Children 2010. In the 1990s, one in four St. with high exposure levels today are likely the offspring of parents who also Louis children had lead poisoning. By 2011, the rate was one in 50. were exposed. After that, the effort slowed. There A growing body of scientific research was less federal money available, and links lead exposure in young children some local remediation programs with a raft of complications, including ended. Many mistakenly thought lower IQ, hyperactivity and attenthe problem had been eliminated. tion deficit disorder, impulse-control Children, especially in high poverty issues and learning disabilities. Previareas, need to be tested and monitored. ous studies linked exposure to leaded Efforts must be redoubled to remove gasoline and a lower ability to resist lead paint from older homes. risky behaviors, especially those The Environmental Protection related to unsafe sex and crime. Agency estimates the average removal Robert J. Sampson, a Harvard Uniproject costs about $10,000. Conversity researcher who has studied sidering the much higher social costs crime in Chicago for more than two from ignoring the problem, that’s a decades, said last year that lead-paint small price to pay. poisoning is a persistent problem in

hwarting voters’ will Our view • Missourians want better-qualiied home care professionals. he Legislature doesn’t. Department of Health and Senior SerIn November 2008, Missouri voters vices. The Legislature effectively nixed overwhelmingly approved a ballot raising workers’ wages to between measure giving home health care $8.50 and $10.15 an hour. providers, who care for some 12,000 Under Medicaid’s Consumerof the state’s most vulnerable citiDirected Services program, clients are zens, a path to something more than given some power to decide how to minimum wages. The path has led to a dead end. With spend it to improve their care. In November 2008, Missouri their 2008 vote, Missourians declared voters decided 3-to-1 to set up the overwhelmingly that they want Quality Homecare Council to ensure home health care to be provided by a properly trained workforce. Workwell-trained, properly compensated ers unionized and began negotiating professionals. Their resounding voice wages with the council. wasn’t enough, it appears. MissouriThe two sides reached agreement ans now should tell their lawmakers to in 2014 on a wage scale of $8.50 to stop dragging their feet and honor the $10.15 an hour, depending on the people’s will. Tell them to uphold the client’s wishes. This veto of Senate Concurimmediately ran afoul rent Resolution 46. The governor was of the RepublicanFor more than seven right to veto the dominated Legislature, years, red tape and resolution. now which opposes any political gridlock have the Legislature will kind of minimum wage stood in the way. Even attempt to muster increase, to say nothing though the federal two-thirds majorities of unions. government pays an to override the veto. Nixon, a Democrat, hourly wage of $15.56 invited their meddling under the Medicaid by deciding to impleprogram for home ment formal rules rather than amendhealth care workers, the workers’ ing contracts with vendors. He said he union says its members are still being wanted the new rule to have “the force paid about $7.75 an hour, a dime more of law.” than the state minimum wage. Administrative rules aren’t usuThe state decides how that $15.56 ally controversial, but this one dealt will be allocated. In Missouri, the priwith collectively bargained minimum vate vendors who administer the program get almost as much as the people wages. In May, a special legislative committee rejected the rule change, preparing food, checking medical blaming it on Nixon’s executive overequipment, bathing and changing reach. Nixon called that argument diapers and otherwise helping their camouflage for the “true motivation” clients avoid nursing homes. Sometimes the workers are family members, of holding down wages. The governor was right to veto the and Medicaid allows them to stay close resolution. Now the Legislature will to loved ones. attempt to muster two-thirds majoriThe delay is unconscionable. The ties to override the veto. Missourians latest development came last week, who want their will honored should when Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed a legislatell their lawmakers to let the veto tive resolution blocking implementastand. tion of a new rule issued by the state

RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

THE PLATFORM TM sTLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial

yOUR VIeWs • LeTTeRs FROM OUR ReadeRs More parental support helps children stress less Nancy Cambria’s special report “The crisis within” (Feb. 21) has struck a chord with the St. Louis community, as it should. The first three years of life play a critical role in how a child’s brain develops, and the more our state and region understand the effect of stresses on child development, the more we can address those stresses and create solutions. As leaders in implementing evidence-based home visiting programs in Missouri and beyond, we’ve seen first-hand the consequences of stress on children’s development and the diference it can make when trained parent educators work with children and families at home in their natural setting to find personalized solutions to challenges being faced. When parents are provided concrete support in times of need and coached on child development and parenting skills, they become better equipped to support the social and emotional competence of their children. When children receive regular in-home screenings, then health, vision and developmental delays and issues can be detected and addressed early. When families are connected with vital resources to assist their children’s development, they can begin to overcome barriers to important childhood milestones. And when groups of parents facing the same challenges come together, they can help each other. Our goal as a community should be to create a culture of parent resiliency, in which we help families build strong protective factors. Let’s build a two-generation approach that simultaneously addresses the needs of children and their parents and, in the process, creates an opportunity for families to thrive. Scott L. Hippert • Maryland Heights President and CEO, Parents as Teachers

Government request to unlock iPhone is just the beginning In “The terrorist’s iPhone” (Feb. 25), the editorial board argues that Apple CEO Tim Cook is wrong by refusing to help the government unlock potential information into a terrorist attack in California. They have concluded their argument by saying that the government isn’t Tim Cook asking to unlock everyone’s phones, just one. I am arguing that the government isn’t asking to unlock everyone’s phones yet. They also didn’t ask to spy on our calls, texts, GPS and more, but it still happened without us even knowing. This program the government is asking for isn’t even in existence now; it is asking Apple to create a program for this hack to become possible. Once it is possible to do this to just one phone, this recourse will be available to use again and again. It’s like buying a whole box of cookies and promising you will eat only one and none of the others. The temptation will increase as other situations arise, making this program dangerous. Avery Brick • St. Louis

Global warming crowd lies to Paris then preaches to Missourians Ashley Wineland’s commentary “Missourians must act locally to solve climate change in 2016” (Feb. 28) about her two-week sojourn in Paris in December is another indication how the global warming crowd feels perfectly entitled to preach to the rest of us while continuing to do whatever they please. Just how big was Wineland’s carbon footprint and that of her group, not to mention the

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR

diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days. Additional letters are posted online at STLtoday.com/letters.

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Change name of Soldiers Memorial to honor all veterans The article “Restoration and revival” (Feb. 29) regarding the renovation of Soldiers Memorial was very interesting. The article said the complex was originally built in honor of World War I veterans and includes a World War II memorial. I don’t have the history or reasoning as to why its name was changed to Soldiers Memorial, but since it will be out of commission for two years for the renovation, why not return the name to Veterans Memorial when it reopens? I was in the Navy in World War II and consider myself a veteran, so I feel that it should include all veterans. Allan Poe • Kirkwood

Need education, not just emotional appeals, on drug use In his column “Man caught in opioids’ web leaves void of regret, blame” (Feb. 28), Tony Messenger argued that opioids should be monitored and restricted in Missouri. While I agree with the overall sentiment, the appeal to emotion by way of a family story is not enough information to educate or persuade the reader. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, opioid-related deaths increased by more than four times between 1999 and 2013. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s 2015 Drug Threat Assessment, drug-related deaths have surpassed those of firearms and motor vehicle accidents. Furthermore, 70 percent of frequent controlled prescription-drug users report getting their drugs from doctors. It is important for health care specialists to understand the impact prescription drugs can have on the world, and to prescribe with discretion. Unfortunately, this mere advice is not enough to stop pill mills that directly oppose monitoring and regulation. A number of enforced regulatory practices, suggested by the CDC, can help to take charge of this problem in Missouri. While the story of the affected family plays at the heart-strings of readers, it is not enough. Education is the first step to a cure. Melissa King • Lake Saint Louis

Humane Society’s education programs are wonderful The Shelter Buddy Reading Program is one of many innovative, unique programs offered through the Education Department of the Humane Society of Missouri (“Kids reading aloud soothes shelter dogs,” Feb. 28). The three women responsible for Humane Education and their volunteers reached over 25,000 students last year alone. They develop curricula. They teach Scout groups, school groups and church groups. They host birthday parties, volunteer meetings and training. They attend teacher workshops and animal legislative lobby days. The list is endless. Thanks for being such wonderful advocates for all critters. Julie Hundman • St. Louis County

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

PLATFORM • I know that my retirement will make no

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other thousands who traveled to Paris? Why exactly does the climate change industry feel it is necessary to hop on planes and expend tons of carbon to attend meaningless conferences? All the while, they find it perfectly acceptable to lecture the unenlightened how awful we are for not supporting their eforts. It is perfectly OK, in fact laudable, to travel all the way to Paris in order to tell us to act right here in Missouri — how we must switch to expensive and ineicient wind and solar power instead of that awful carbon-based power. It is time for these self-righteous nags to get their own houses in order before telling us what awful people we are for not supporting their fantasies. Jay Kirschbaum • Chesterield

E-MAIL letters@post-dispatch.com FAX 314-340-3139

TOd ROBBeRsOn trobberson@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KeVIn HORRIGan khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRanK ReUsT freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 deBORaH PeTeRsOn dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


OTHER VIEWS

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1 MORE LETTERS ONLINE

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Maggie Quinn of St. Louis says, “While some of the ailiations the Girl Scouts of America holds may be against the values of the Catholic Church, the experience it ofers to youth is priceless and assists to nurture women of change that our society needs, and that should not be overlooked.”

Read and talk about this letter and more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

Mentorship: A solution to ‘he crisis within’ Helping children • We desperately need more adults to perform this essential, heroic act. BY REBECCA J. HATTER

Nancy Cambria’s special report ”The crisis within” (Feb. 21) was a masterful piece of journalism — one that reflects the realities we see every day at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri. The report underscores the fact that mentorship can often be a Hatter matter of life or death for kids in our region. I’m willing to bet this sounds like an exaggeration to you. After all, the word “mentorship” summons rather gauzy, sentimental images for a lot of people. They think about a beloved soccer coach, or an early boss who passed on the tricks of the trade. In other words, most people don’t associate mentorship with saving lives, or with breaking the

cycle of poverty for an entire family. But that’s exactly what we’re talking about when it comes to the mentorship of children and young adults who are growing up amid poverty, violence, shattered homes and failed schools. Over the past 28 years, I have had the privilege of working with Big Brothers Big Sisters organizations in my native Louisiana; in metropolitan Atlanta; and — since 1994 — here at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri, which serves communities from metro St. Louis down to Cape Girardeau. Throughout my career, I have seen the patterns of fear, anger and desolation that “The crisis within” so powerfully describes. As a member of the Ferguson Commission, I have learned about how those patterns can shred the lives of individuals, families and entire communities. Now, through the journalism of Nancy Cambria and the scientific research of Dr. Joan Luby and others, the general public is learning that there’s a name for this chronic

condition: toxic stress. Fortunately, we are also learning that there are ways to counter this phenomenon. One of the most effective is the cultivation of positive, sustaining relationships. As Dr. Luby has found, such relationships can literally aid the healthy development of the brain. This is where the work of mentorship takes on such urgency, particularly for young men and women from low-income families. The renowned Harvard social scientist Robert Putnam has referred to a “mentoring gap” between poor kids and their more affluent peers. Well-educated, economically secure families tend to have stronger, broader social networks than less-educated, economically vulnerable families. This means the children of low-income families have far less access to adult mentors than wealthier kids do. Putnam has written that “nearly two-thirds of affluent kids have some mentoring beyond their extended family, while nearly two-thirds of poor kids do not.”

This gap can contribute to the life-threatening hazards that result from a lack of sustaining relationships. Those hazards may take the form of an increased exposure to violence — or an increased vulnerability to longterm, stress-related health conditions like heart disease, obesity, and depression. At Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri, we’ve long known that mentoring can work wonders in the lives of lowincome children and adolescents. About three-quarters of our Little Brothers and Little Sisters live in households with incomes below $20,000 a year, but with the help of our outstanding Big Brothers and Big Sisters, 95 percent of these kids are graduating from high school — a rate that beats the national average for students of all income levels (87 percent). While we know the power of mentoring, that power is often underestimated or misunderstood. I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters described as “nice.” In a

Populists prey on ignorance. Like vampires, they despise any attempt to shine daylight on their ideas.

very limited sense, that’s an accurate word — of course it’s “nice” to see responsible, caring adults helping children. But as “The crisis within” shows, mentoring a low-income child or adolescent is “nice” sort of the way performing CPR or pulling someone out of a burning building is “nice” — it’s an act of potentially life-saving, life-extending generosity that utterly eclipses what we normally mean by everyday niceness. It’s an essential act, and a heroic one — and we desperately need more adults who are willing to do it. There are 1,000 children currently waiting for a Big Brother or Big Sister in our area. Now that the Post-Dispatch has so powerfully shown the importance of relationships in the lives of our least privileged young people, let us call upon the institutions and individuals of this region to step up to this clear responsibility — and this opportunity to solve “The crisis within.” Rebecca J. Hatter is president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri.

Another proposal that marginalizes women U. City dispute • Feeling sorry for men who go to topless bars, and the girls who work there. BY CHERI HAGNAUER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (right) speaks to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad at a meeting in 2006.

Path to nowhere Politics • Trump and Sanders play the populist game at our peril. BY TOD ROBBERSON

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders have clearly tapped into a segment of the American electorate that believes radical change is necessary to fix what’s wrong with the country. People are angry and have lost patience with establishment candidates offering the same ol’ solutions. The Trump and Sanders alternatives lean heavily toward big ideas and bold talk. Their populist pablum draws support with outsized promises that ignore pesky little questions such as how to pay for it, or how to get Congress to go along. Let someone else sweat the details. Voters who find themselves sitting on the fence and toying with the idea of a Trump or Sanders presidency should take a hard look at what happens when oversized dreams Robberson smash head-on into harsh reality. Two international populist figures from the past decade offer a cautionary tale. First, let’s consider the experience of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela. Chavez was a former army colonel who led a bloody coup attempt in 1992. He wound up in prison, but in a bizarre twist of Venezuelan politics, received a presidential pardon. That set the stage for Chavez — clearly someone minimally tethered to democratic principles — to run for the nation’s highest office. He won in 1998 on a populist platform of socialist reforms, a shocking victory that sent oil-rich Venezuela’s longstanding two-party system into upheaval. Chavez engineered the legislature’s dissolution, replaced the supreme court and trashed the nation’s constitution. He methodically set in motion the legal

foundation for him to remain in power for life. Had he not died of cancer in 2013, he’d probably still be president today. On the streets of Caracas’ hillside slums, Chavez was a huge hit. He kicked out foreign oil companies and threatened to seize “bourgeois” golf courses, ranches and farms to redistribute land to the poor. Price controls and import restrictions put a stranglehold on business and led to widespread consumer-goods shortages. Chavez outlined his half-baked, utopian socialist dreams in broadcast monologues and call-in shows that sometimes lasted for hours on end. All notions of presidential decorum flew out the window. Chavez spoke like a street thug. He once called President George W. Bush a “donkey” and, addressing the U.N. General Assembly right after Bush had spoken, complained that the podium “smells of sulfur,” as if Satan had just been there. The guy refused to control his own mouth, but he once told King Juan Carlos of Spain to “shut up.” Venezuela wound up isolated economically. Its only diplomatic friends were countries like Iran, Libya, Ecuador and Bolivia. Today, under Chavez’s socialist successor, Nicolas Maduro, inflation has reached triple digits amid shortages of basic consumer items, such as toilet paper. The Chavez experiment has been such a disaster, even Cuba is backing away. Beware anyone offering a socialist utopia, including Sanders, if the plan isn’t accompanied by a detailed explanation of how to fund it. And for those attracted by Trump’s crude street language, consider the diplomatic isolation that followed Chavez’s verbal abuse. The international tolerance level for this nonsense is very low and, regardless of what Trump supporters might think, international relations are critical. Let’s look at the opposite end of the political spectrum. In Iran, a heavily engineered vote in 2005 led to the

election of conservative extremist Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as president. He stayed in power until 2013. Like Trump, he was a man who spoke first and used his brain afterward. He spouted lies about the Holocaust. Without concern for the diplomatic consequences, he spoke boldly about attacking Tehran’s enemies and restoring Iran to its former glory as the pre-eminent power in the Persian Gulf region. He promised to make Iran great again. He was a nuclear hawk, refusing to budge even when the international community warned of severe consequences unless Iran curtailed its efforts to enrich uranium to bombgrade quality. Ahmadinejad brought his country to its knees as Western nations, Russia and China reacted with one of the toughest and most unified set of economic-sanctions regimes in world history. Donald Trump is no Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Bernie Sanders is no Hugo Chavez. But all of them took advantage of uncritical, starry-eyed supporters who were far too easily sold on populist promises. Populists prey on ignorance. Like vampires, they despise any attempt to shine daylight on their ideas. Their nightmare is the probing questioner or prying reporter who dares to demand details. When newspapers and broadcast media questioned Chavez, he shut them down and sent their owners into exile. When Fox News’ Megyn Kelly asked Trump a tough question, he attacked her viciously. He mocked New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski’s physical disability. America, be careful about whom you contemplate empowering with the presidency. The crowd-pleasing appeal of big talkers and big dreamers masks the nightmare that almost always accompanies the populist’s rise to power. trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

Living in a household full of males has its moments. I find myself watching sports more often than I would choose, and I eat a lot of steak ... so much steak. Emotional bonding consists of sitting side by side watching sports, talking about sports, and occasionally sharing funny YouTube videos. I believe a son’s development into a respectful man is often created by simply shadowing his father’s behavior. Of course being Mom, and a natural nagger, I often give advice from the female perspective. I hate how our society over-sexualizes and marginalizes women, and I am heartbroken that so many girls think their sexuality and appearance are their worth. I continually tell my boys how important it is to respect all women. The litmus test: “If you wouldn’t want someone doing that to your mother or a sister, don’t do it, and don’t condone it.” Which leads me to breasts. Who wants to see their mother or sister’s breasts? Who wants to see their mother or sister display their breasts to strangers in public, as a part of a job? Raise your hand. A topless sports bar is being proposed for the University City Delmar Loop. I am not an antibreaster. I love breasts. They serve important functions, especially in the baby development arena. If you are a breastfeeding momma, I will defend

your right to feed anytime, anywhere, any way. But breasts are also oversexualized, at least in our society. And much like the word “you” will eventually disintegrate to “u,” I believe that over the next generation, we will become unfamiliar with what an actual breast looks like, due to the proliferation of painfully straining, surgical tennis balls being installed on so many women’s previously normal bodies. I guess women, the natural kind, just aren’t good enough? I feel sorry (a very wee bit) for a man who feels the need to pay to ogle women’s breasts. What type of upbringing must he have had? How sad that shelling out cash to view a young, perkily (fake) breasted woman, who would have nothing to do with him in real life, is how he wants to spend his free time? And how sad for those girls (because, if they choose to do this, they have not, in my opinion, earned the right to use the honorific title “women”) that they think they need to use their breasts to make a living. Here’s a thought, try using your brains, instead. Yes, I feel some compassion for all involved in this sad degeneration into the 1960s Playboy culture, but I don’t really want to mingle with them while strolling the Loop. Truly, if you want to see an excess of unrestrained boobs, don’t go to the Loop, simply visit Jefferson City. Cheri Hagnauer of Kirkwood is a book editor, freelance writer and blogger.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Joe Edwards, president of The Loop Special Business District and longtime owner of Blueberry Hill and other businesses in University City, returns to his seat after addressing the City Council on Feb. 22 to object to owners of Social House in Soulard opening a similar venue at 6655 Delmar Boulevard.


OTHER VIEWS

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1 MORE LETTERS ONLINE

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Maggie Quinn of St. Louis says, “While some of the ailiations the Girl Scouts of America holds may be against the values of the Catholic Church, the experience it ofers to youth is priceless and assists to nurture women of change that our society needs, and that should not be overlooked.”

Read and talk about this letter and more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

Mentorship: A solution to ‘he crisis within’ Helping children • We desperately need more adults to perform this essential, heroic act. BY REBECCA J. HATTER

Nancy Cambria’s special report ”The crisis within” (Feb. 21) was a masterful piece of journalism — one that reflects the realities we see every day at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri. The report underscores the fact that mentorship can often be a Hatter matter of life or death for kids in our region. I’m willing to bet this sounds like an exaggeration to you. After all, the word “mentorship” summons rather gauzy, sentimental images for a lot of people. They think about a beloved soccer coach, or an early boss who passed on the tricks of the trade. In other words, most people don’t associate mentorship with saving lives, or with breaking the

cycle of poverty for an entire family. But that’s exactly what we’re talking about when it comes to the mentorship of children and young adults who are growing up amid poverty, violence, shattered homes and failed schools. Over the past 28 years, I have had the privilege of working with Big Brothers Big Sisters organizations in my native Louisiana; in metropolitan Atlanta; and — since 1994 — here at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri, which serves communities from metro St. Louis down to Cape Girardeau. Throughout my career, I have seen the patterns of fear, anger and desolation that “The crisis within” so powerfully describes. As a member of the Ferguson Commission, I have learned about how those patterns can shred the lives of individuals, families and entire communities. Now, through the journalism of Nancy Cambria and the scientific research of Dr. Joan Luby and others, the general public is learning that there’s a name for this chronic

condition: toxic stress. Fortunately, we are also learning that there are ways to counter this phenomenon. One of the most effective is the cultivation of positive, sustaining relationships. As Dr. Luby has found, such relationships can literally aid the healthy development of the brain. This is where the work of mentorship takes on such urgency, particularly for young men and women from low-income families. The renowned Harvard social scientist Robert Putnam has referred to a “mentoring gap” between poor kids and their more affluent peers. Well-educated, economically secure families tend to have stronger, broader social networks than less-educated, economically vulnerable families. This means the children of low-income families have far less access to adult mentors than wealthier kids do. Putnam has written that “nearly two-thirds of affluent kids have some mentoring beyond their extended family, while nearly two-thirds of poor kids do not.”

This gap can contribute to the life-threatening hazards that result from a lack of sustaining relationships. Those hazards may take the form of an increased exposure to violence — or an increased vulnerability to longterm, stress-related health conditions like heart disease, obesity, and depression. At Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri, we’ve long known that mentoring can work wonders in the lives of lowincome children and adolescents. About three-quarters of our Little Brothers and Little Sisters live in households with incomes below $20,000 a year, but with the help of our outstanding Big Brothers and Big Sisters, 95 percent of these kids are graduating from high school — a rate that beats the national average for students of all income levels (87 percent). While we know the power of mentoring, that power is often underestimated or misunderstood. I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters described as “nice.” In a

Populists prey on ignorance. Like vampires, they despise any attempt to shine daylight on their ideas.

very limited sense, that’s an accurate word — of course it’s “nice” to see responsible, caring adults helping children. But as “The crisis within” shows, mentoring a low-income child or adolescent is “nice” sort of the way performing CPR or pulling someone out of a burning building is “nice” — it’s an act of potentially life-saving, life-extending generosity that utterly eclipses what we normally mean by everyday niceness. It’s an essential act, and a heroic one — and we desperately need more adults who are willing to do it. There are 1,000 children currently waiting for a Big Brother or Big Sister in our area. Now that the Post-Dispatch has so powerfully shown the importance of relationships in the lives of our least privileged young people, let us call upon the institutions and individuals of this region to step up to this clear responsibility — and this opportunity to solve “The crisis within.” Rebecca J. Hatter is president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri.

Another proposal that marginalizes women U. City dispute • Feeling sorry for men who go to topless bars, and the girls who work there. BY CHERI HAGNAUER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venezulan President Hugo Chavez (right) speaks to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad at a meeting in 2006.

Path to nowhere Politics • Trump and Sanders play the populist game at our peril. BY TOD ROBBERSON

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders have clearly tapped into a segment of the American electorate that believes radical change is necessary to fix what’s wrong with the country. People are angry and have lost patience with establishment candidates offering the same ol’ solutions. The Trump and Sanders alternatives lean heavily toward big ideas and bold talk. Their populist pablum draws support with outsized promises that ignore pesky little questions such as how to pay for it, or how to get Congress to go along. Let someone else sweat the details. Voters who find themselves sitting on the fence and toying with the idea of a Trump or Sanders presidency should take a hard look at what happens when oversized dreams Robberson smash head-on into harsh reality. Two international populist figures from the past decade offer a cautionary tale. First, let’s consider the experience of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela. Chavez was a former army colonel who led a bloody coup attempt in 1992. He wound up in prison, but in a bizarre twist of Venezuelan politics, received a presidential pardon. That set the stage for Chavez — clearly someone minimally tethered to democratic principles — to run for the nation’s highest office. He won in 1998 on a populist platform of socialist reforms, a shocking victory that sent oil-rich Venezuela’s longstanding two-party system into upheaval. Chavez engineered the legislature’s dissolution, replaced the supreme court and trashed the nation’s constitution. He methodically set in motion the legal

foundation for him to remain in power for life. Had he not died of cancer in 2013, he’d probably still be president today. On the streets of Caracas’ hillside slums, Chavez was a huge hit. He kicked out foreign oil companies and threatened to seize “bourgeois” golf courses, ranches and farms to redistribute land to the poor. Price controls and import restrictions put a stranglehold on business and led to widespread consumer-goods shortages. Chavez outlined his half-baked, utopian socialist dreams in broadcast monologues and call-in shows that sometimes lasted for hours on end. All notions of presidential decorum flew out the window. Chavez spoke like a street thug. He once called President George W. Bush a “donkey” and, addressing the U.N. General Assembly right after Bush had spoken, complained that the podium “smells of sulfur,” as if Satan had just been there. The guy refused to control his own mouth, but he once told King Juan Carlos of Spain to “shut up.” Venezuela wound up isolated economically. Its only diplomatic friends were countries like Iran, Libya, Ecuador and Bolivia. Today, under Chavez’s socialist successor, Nicolas Maduro, inflation has reached triple digits amid shortages of basic consumer items, such as toilet paper. The Chavez experiment has been such a disaster, even Cuba is backing away. Beware anyone offering a socialist utopia, including Sanders, if the plan isn’t accompanied by a detailed explanation of how to fund it. And for those attracted by Trump’s crude street language, consider the diplomatic isolation that followed Chavez’s verbal abuse. The international tolerance level for this nonsense is very low and, regardless of what Trump supporters might think, international relations are critical. Let’s look at the opposite end of the political spectrum. In Iran, a heavily engineered vote in 2005 led to the

election of conservative extremist Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as president. He stayed in power until 2013. Like Trump, he was a man who spoke first and used his brain afterward. He spouted lies about the Holocaust. Without concern for the diplomatic consequences, he spoke boldly about attacking Tehran’s enemies and restoring Iran to its former glory as the pre-eminent power in the Persian Gulf region. He promised to make Iran great again. He was a nuclear hawk, refusing to budge even when the international community warned of severe consequences unless Iran curtailed its efforts to enrich uranium to bombgrade quality. Ahmadinejad brought his country to its knees as Western nations, Russia and China reacted with one of the toughest and most unified set of economic-sanctions regimes in world history. Donald Trump is no Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Bernie Sanders is no Hugo Chavez. But all of them took advantage of uncritical, starry-eyed supporters who were far too easily sold on populist promises. Populists prey on ignorance. Like vampires, they despise any attempt to shine daylight on their ideas. Their nightmare is the probing questioner or prying reporter who dares to demand details. When newspapers and broadcast media questioned Chavez, he shut them down and sent their owners into exile. When Fox News’ Megyn Kelly asked Trump a tough question, he attacked her viciously. He mocked New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski’s physical disability. America, be careful about whom you contemplate empowering with the presidency. The crowd-pleasing appeal of big talkers and big dreamers masks the nightmare that almost always accompanies the populist’s rise to power. trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

Living in a household full of males has its moments. I find myself watching sports more often than I would choose, and I eat a lot of steak ... so much steak. Emotional bonding consists of sitting side by side watching sports, talking about sports, and occasionally sharing funny YouTube videos. I believe a son’s development into a respectful man is often created by simply shadowing his father’s behavior. Of course being Mom, and a natural nagger, I often give advice from the female perspective. I hate how our society over-sexualizes and marginalizes women, and I am heartbroken that so many girls think their sexuality and appearance are their worth. I continually tell my boys how important it is to respect all women. The litmus test: “If you wouldn’t want someone doing that to your mother or a sister, don’t do it, and don’t condone it.” Which leads me to breasts. Who wants to see their mother or sister’s breasts? Who wants to see their mother or sister display their breasts to strangers in public, as a part of a job? Raise your hand. A topless sports bar is being proposed for the University City Delmar Loop. I am not an antibreaster. I love breasts. They serve important functions, especially in the baby development arena. If you are a breastfeeding momma, I will defend

your right to feed anytime, anywhere, any way. But breasts are also oversexualized, at least in our society. And much like the word “you” will eventually disintegrate to “u,” I believe that over the next generation, we will become unfamiliar with what an actual breast looks like, due to the proliferation of painfully straining, surgical tennis balls being installed on so many women’s previously normal bodies. I guess women, the natural kind, just aren’t good enough? I feel sorry (a very wee bit) for a man who feels the need to pay to ogle women’s breasts. What type of upbringing must he have had? How sad that shelling out cash to view a young, perkily (fake) breasted woman, who would have nothing to do with him in real life, is how he wants to spend his free time? And how sad for those girls (because, if they choose to do this, they have not, in my opinion, earned the right to use the honorific title “women”) that they think they need to use their breasts to make a living. Here’s a thought, try using your brains, instead. Yes, I feel some compassion for all involved in this sad degeneration into the 1960s Playboy culture, but I don’t really want to mingle with them while strolling the Loop. Truly, if you want to see an excess of unrestrained boobs, don’t go to the Loop, simply visit Jefferson City. Cheri Hagnauer of Kirkwood is a book editor, freelance writer and blogger.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Joe Edwards, president of The Loop Special Business District and longtime owner of Blueberry Hill and other businesses in University City, returns to his seat after addressing the City Council on Feb. 22 to object to owners of Social House in Soulard opening a similar venue at 6655 Delmar Boulevard.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

Hall, Brenda J.

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index Beachnau - see Riley Bonzon, Robert L. - St. Louis

Buechler, June M. - Raymore, MO formerly of St. Louis Cannon, Carol Sauer - St. Louis Chitwood - see Mugele Collins - see Tinker Depker, Ruth M. - St. Louis Everett - see Hahn Fandos, Michael George - Webster Groves Freeman - see Mugele Hahn, Barbara Ann - St. Louis Hall, Brenda J. - Wentzville Hearn, Rosemary (Meyer) - St. Louis Higgins, Jacqueline L. - St. Louis Hinze, Charles W. "Carl" - Maryland Heights Hirth, Audrey E. - St. Louis Hubbs, Loretha Ruth - St. Louis Huber, Donald Walter - St. Louis Jasorka, Thomas F. - New York, NY Karius, Clifford Alan - St. Louis Krause, Jacqueline Laverne - St. Louis Krem, Bebe - St. Louis Krumm - see Uptegrove Licari - see Riley

Death Notice Index Lippert - see Steis Lippert - see Steis Martin, Hunter James - St. Louis Maxson, Donald D. - St. Louis Mugele, Erabelle - St. Louis Muich, Daniel M. - St. Louis

Nienhaus, Sr. Helen Therese (aka: Mary Shirley) C.PP.S. - O'Fallon Petrovich, Donald V. - St. Louis Renaudette, Wilfred J. - Frontenac Riley, Ralph W. - St. Louis Russell, Terri A. - St. Louis Schulkin, Hilda - St. Louis Schweiss, Lester Sr. - St. Louis Scott, Joseph P. Jr. - St. Louis Shoemaker, Robert T. - St. Louis Steis, Dorothy L. - St. Louis Struckmann, Eunice H. - O'Fallon Tinker, Dennis D. - St. Louis Townsend, Bobby G. - St. Louis Uptegrove, Delmer "GENE" - St. Louis Warnecke, Jean M. (Lurk) - Perryville, MO Wiegert, Beulah Edith - St. Louis Wood, Susan Theresa - St. Charles Zenner, Vera M. - St. Charles

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully Bonzon, Robert L.

Cannon, Carol Sauer

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sunday, February 28, 2016. Beloved husband of Roberta M. "Margie" Bonzon (nee Kannady); loving father of Stephanie (Jerry) Wightman, Michael, Gary, and Christopher Meinhardt, and the late Antionette Bonzon; dearest grandfather of Jacob, Anthony, Preston, Danielle, Nicholas, Charlotte, Grace, Maddie, and Katie; our dear brotherin-law, uncle, great uncle, and friend. Services: A memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Ambrose Church at 5110 Wilson Ave., St. Louis MO, 63110 on Friday, March 4 at 11 a.m. A retired St. Louis City police officer after 36 years and member of the Bocce Club. Memorials to the Pink Sisters or St. Ambrose appreciated. KUTIS CITY Service

80 years old, formerly of St. Louis, Missouri, died on February 27, 2016 in Springfield, Missouri after a long period of illness. She was born in St. Louis, Missouri on February 12, 1936 to Carolyn Black and Louis Edward Sauer, Sr. She graduated from the University City High School in 1954; she received her bachelor's degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1958; and she received her master's degree in education from Webster University. After working as a teacher, she raised four children while living in Chicago, Illinois; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Manlius, New York; Silver Spring, Maryland; Northridge, California; Houston, Texas; and Clayton, Missouri. She returned to work as an English teacher at Landrum Junior High School in Houston, Texas from 1981 to 1985 and then at Normandy High School in St. Louis, Missouri from 1985 to 2000. She obtained grant funding to establish a computer writing lab at Normandy High School. She is the beloved mother of Barbara Cannon (Andrew Szanton), Gregory Cannon (Coralie Cannon), Thomas Cannon (Michele Cannon) and the late Nancy Yelle. She is the dear grandmother of Benjamin Szanton, Elizabeth Szanton, Wyatt Cannon, and Eliott Cannon. She is the sister of the late Louis Sauer, Jr. (the late Dorothea Fredda Sauer); Robert Sauer (Meredith Sauer); the late Betty Allan (the late Lloyd Allan); and Donald Sauer (Jane Gottlieb Sauer). She is survived by many beloved extended family members. Services: The Funeral Service will be conducted at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City. on Saturday, March 5th at 11:00 a.m. A visitation will begin at 10:00 a.m. Saturday (open casket), 10:30 (closed casket). Interment Bellefontaine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Alzheimer's Association, 9370 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132 A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Buechler, June M. 88, of Raymore, MO formerly of St. Louis, passed away February 21, 2016 at Foxwood Springs Living Center. June was born December 12, 1927 in St. Louis, Missouri, the daughter of Bernard and Josephine Chesnick. June was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Thomas J. Buechler; son, Bruce Buechler; infant granddaughter, Jennifer Buechler; brother, James Chesnick. She is survived by her son, Thomas Buechler (Marsha); sister, Joan Jordan; three granddaughters, Stephanie Wozniak (Greg), Sara Dobbie (Jeff) and Michelle Dobbie (Joe); six great-grandchildren, Thomas, Daniel, Gabi, Jacob, Hanna and Lauren. Services: There will be a private family graveside in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, MO. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Missouri 1201 Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Arrangements: Cullen Funeral Home, Raymore, MO (816)322-5278.

Depker, Ruth M.

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

(nee Schoch) Asleep in Jesus Sunday, February 28, 2016 at the age of 98. Beloved wife of the late Oliver J. Depker; loving mother of Richard (Denise) and the late David Depker; adoring grandmother of Mark, Susan, Ellen, Katie and Maureen; dear sister of the late Helen Schoch; our dearest aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Ruth was as 30 year employee with Famous & Barr. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Thursday March 3, 4-8 p.m.then taken to Hope Lutheran Church (5218 Neosho St. 63109) for visitation on Friday, March 4, from 10:30 a.m. until service time at 11:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Hope Lutheran Church appreciated.

age 71, of Wentzville, MO, died Thursday, February 25, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Fandos, Michael George

of Webster Groves, died on Saturday, February 27, 2016 from complications resulting from a recent stroke. He was born August 16, 1926 in St. Louis. He was 89 years young. Michael, who was known to friends and family as Mike, married the love of his life, Alice Terss Fandos, in East St. Louis, Ill., on February 19, 1956. He spent the rest of his life, and a marriage that lasted 60 years, trying to keep up with her. He always boasted there was never a bad day spent with his "best friend." Her cooking skills surely didn't hurt. Mike was preceded in death by his parents, George M. and Stasa, nee Tsikiris, Fandos, as well as his sister, Helen, nee Fandos, Werner. Loving father to Stacie (Jim) Fryrear of St. Louis, George (Jules) Fandos of Atlanta, Ga., and Charles (Susie) Fandos of St. Louis; Papou (grandfather) to Allison, Rachel, Jennifer, Michael, Nicholas, Natalie, Melissa, Mitch, Maggie and Anna Margaret; dear sister to Mary Lou, nee Fandos, Mastorakos. Mike served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and, with the help of the G.I. bill, graduated from Washington University in June of 1948 as a member of Theta Xi Fraternity. He earned an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago in 1950. Mike had a successful career in the restaurant business in St. Louis from 1951-1993. For 40 years he owned and operated Maryland Kitchens and Fandos' Fourth Street restaurants in downtown St. Louis, as well as a dozen others downtown and in Warson Woods throughout his career. Mike served terms as president of the Missouri Restaurant Association and its St. Louis chapter, leading the latter in 1960 during the integration of the city's restaurants. Mike lived a life filled with love, family and great friendships. His optimism and love of life lifted all those that came in contact with him. His passion for history and books informed them. And his love of Saturday morning breakfasts and ice cream nourished them. He will be missed and his memory carried by all he knew. Services: A visitation will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Thursday, March 3 at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 4967 Forest Park Ave., followed by a funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment at St. Matthew Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, St. Louis, Mo. 63108. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS www.k-brothers.com

Died Dec 11, 2015. Wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Internment Jefferson Barracks Cemetery March 4 at 11:15.

Higgins, Jacqueline L. (nee Ernst) February 28, 2016. Beloved wife of the late James W. Higgins; Loving mother of Timothy (Becky) Higgins, Daniel (Martha) Higgins, Jane (Morton Levy) Higgins, Linda (Greg) Snead and Carol (Michael) Guehring; Cherished grandmother of Shannon, Amy, Bradley, Caitlin, Julia, Taylor, Joshua, Rachel and great-grandmother of 5; Dear sister of the late Betty Ellis and John Ernst; Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Memorial Mass Fri. 11:00 am at St. Catherine Laboure, 9750 Sappington Rd. 63128. Memorials to United Cerebral Palsy, 7228 Weil, 63119. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Hinze, Charles W. "Carl" 2/28/2016. Vis. Thurs., Mar. 3, 10am until service 12 Noon at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd (St. Ann). colliersfuneralhome.com

(nee Kissel), born 1938 and passed away Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Beloved wife of Ron Krause; dear mother of Eric (Pam), Shawn, (Fiona), and Candy (Randy) Gehricke, dear grandmother of Nick, Maddie, Jenna, Sophie, Tessa, and Declan; our dear aunt, great aunt, and friend to many. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thursday March 3, 10 a.m. until funeral service at 12 noon. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery.

Krem, Bebe

91, of St. Louis, wife of Robert. Visit Wed 1-2 p.m. Service 2 p.m. at Evans Funeral Home, Houston, MO.

February 29, 2016 Beloved wife of David N. Krem for 74 years. Dear mother of Neal (Charleen) Krem and the late Barry Z (Christine) Krem. Loving grandmother and great grandmother. Beloved sister and sister-in-law of Sam (the late Helen) Wool, the late Frohman (the late Millie) Wool and the late Marvin (Harlene) Wool. Our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service Wednesday, March 2, 2:00 p.m. at Temple Israel, #1 Rabbi Alvan D. Rubin Drive (Ladue and Spoede Roads) with interment to follow at United Hebrew Cemetery, 7855 Canton Avenue. Visitation for Mrs. Krem 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Temple Israel. Contributions in her memory may be made to the Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry, 10950 Schuetz Road, St. Louis, MO, 63146. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Huber, Donald Walter

Martin, Hunter James

Hirth, Audrey E. Wednesday, February 17, 2016. Beloved daughter of the late Edward and Anna Hirth; dear sister of the late Virginia Bilger; beloved aunt, great-aunt, great-great-aunt. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 4, 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Memorials to Wash. U. Brain Tumor Research, 6060 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8057, St. Louis, MO 63110 appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 3-9 p.m.

asleep in Jesus, Wednesday, February 24, 2016 at the age of 89. Beloved husband of the late Jacqueline Huber (nee McNulty); dear father of Richard Huber, Deborah (Terry) Ellis, Daniel Huber, Andrea (Bob) Marx and the late Matthew Huber; loving grandfather of Laura Baranato, Jennifer Felix, Alexander Huber, Evelyn Huber, the late Joey Ellis, Whitney and Chelsea Ellis, Sam and Phil Huber, Nicolas Huber, Bobby, Sophia, Anthony and Simon Marx; great grandfather of Justin, Evan and Jacob; brother of Marilyn (Reno) Zalunardo and the late William Huber; uncle, great uncle, brother-in-law, cousin and friend. Donald was a WWII Veteran of the U.S. Navy serving in the Pacific. He graduated from Ferguson High School was an Honors graduate of Culver-Stockton College with a degree in chemistry. He had a long career as a plant manager and corporate officer for various pharmaceutical corporations. His lifelong love of baseball began as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals "knot-hole gang". When only 14, Don was recruited into the St. Louis Browns development program designed to identify and develop kids with the potential to play professionally, but his development was cut short when he entered the Navy when he was 18. When he returned from the Navy, Don played basketball for Culver-Stockton College. Don also enjoyed a competitive tennis career for many years. He often donated his time and energy as a baseball and basketball coach for Lutheran school and youth teams. He served on school boards for Lutheran grade schools and high schools, served as a church elder, and more recently, donated time with the AARP organization. Services: Funeral Service at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Des Peres, Saturday, March 5, 10:00 a.m. Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, to reflect his love of reading and countless visits to public libraries everywhere, contributions may be made in Donald's name to your local library. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, Friday 2-9 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until the time of the service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Jasorka, Thomas F. 67, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, in New York, Feb. 10, 2016. Beloved son of the late Frank and Anna May (née Sheehan) Jasorka, dear cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Friday, Mar. 4, 1:00-3:00 p.m., Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa St. Donations in Tom's memory to the charity of one's choice.

Karius, Clifford Alan asleep in Jesus on Friday, February 26, 2016. Loving father of Haley Karius; dear son of Philip and Glenda Karius (nee Miller); dear brother of Catherine (Richard) Schlattweiler and Philip (Cory) Karius; our dear uncle, greatuncle, nephew, cousin and Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS CITY CHAPEL, 2906 Gravois on Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 1 p.m. until service time at 2 p.m. Memorial contributions to Cerebral Palsy, appreciated.

Hahn, Barbara Ann (nee Everett), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Saturday, February 27, 2017. Loving wife of Emmett "Mick" Hahn; dear mother of Ann (Patrick) Buechner, Kate Hahn (David Forgue), Rachael (Peter) Krussel, Lucy Hahn and Matthew Hahn; dearest grandmother of Emma and Ben Buechner, Thomas Forgue, Meg, Gus and Mabel Krussel; beloved sister of John and Elaine Everett. Barbara was an aunt, cousin, sister-in-law and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Wednesday, March 2, 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass will be celebrated at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church (17 Joy Ave.) on Thursday, 11 a.m.

Nienhaus, Sr. Helen Therese (aka: Mary Shirley) C.PP.S.

Hearn, Rosemary (Meyer)

Hubbs, Loretha Ruth

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Krause, Jacqueline Laverne

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Mon., 2/29/16. Son of Justin Bosch and Ashley Mongeon. Vis Fri., 9 a.m until Funeral Mass 10 a.m. Ascension Church (Little Church). Kutis So. Co.

Maxson, Donald D. "Mr. Don" Monday, February 29, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Linda L. Maxson (nee Chitwood); loving step-father of Tracy (Thomas) Wesley and Terry (Phillip) Smith; cherished grandfather of Ryan and Lindsey Smith; dearest brother of Jim (Linda), Dave (Ruth), Doug Maxson and Marsha (Larry) Bruns; our dear uncle, great uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Friday March 4, from 10 a.m. until the time of service 12:30 p.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association.

Mugele, Erabelle

(nee Hughes) age 93, went to be with her Lord on Friday, February 26, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Paul Mugele. Loving daughter of the late Clarence and Myrtle Hughes. Dear sister of Agnes (the late Bill) Chitwood and Erleen (the late Jack) Freeman and the late Francis (the late Imogene) Hughes and Jane (surviving Tom) Weber. Our dear aunt, great aunt, great great aunt, cousin, and helpful and faithful friend to many. Services: Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Friday March 4, 4-7 pm and on Saturday 10 am until funeral service at 11 am. Interment Sunset Cemetery.

Muich, Daniel M. born September 13, 1933, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Sunday, February 28, 2016. Loving brother of Barbara A. Muich; our dear uncle and friends. Dan gave the gift of his body to St. Louis University School of Medicine and he was a member of the Plumbers Union Local #562. The family would like to express their gratitude to de Greeff Hospice House for the care and compassion that Daniel had received. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at a later date. A service of KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY.

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

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Saturday, February 27, 2016, baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection. Beloved daughter of the late Harry A. and Hilda Heinkel Nienhaus. She was preceded in death by her brothers, James A. and Rev. Gerald T. Nienhaus. Survived by her sister Betty Immer, St. Louis, MO and brothers, John J. Nienhaus, Chesterfield, MO, Harry A. Nienhaus, Tampa, FL, William R. Nienhaus, Santa Clara, CA and David (Mike) Nienhaus, Arlington, VA; many cousins, nieces, nephews, dear friends and Sisters in Christ. Services: Funeral Mass Monday, March 7, 2016, at 1:30 p.m., St. Joseph Chapel, 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO. Interment convent cemetery. Wake Sunday, March 6, 2016, 3:30 - 8:00 p.m. and a Prayer Service of Thanksgiving at 7:00 p.m. Wake continues on Monday, March 7, 2016, 10:00 a.m. - 1:15 p.m. in St. Joseph Chapel, 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO. Contributions to the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, 204 North Main, O'Fallon, MO 63366-2299.

Petrovich, Donald V. Beloved husband of Sue Petrovich. Our dear uncle and friend to many. Dr. Petrovich was a WWII combat veteran with a Purple Heart and Bronze Star and worked for Jefferson Barracks Hospital in clinical psychology including teaching psychology students. Memorials to Salvation Army or St. Louis USO. Services: Funeral March 6th, 1:00 PM @ JAY B SMITH FENTON CHAPEL, 777 Oakwood Dr (at 141) visitation 12-1:00 PM.

Renaudette, Wilfred J. Passed away 2/28/2016. Services: 3/4/2016, 11-1 p.m. visitation. 1 p.m. Memorial at St. Louis Cremation, 2135 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, MO 63103.

Riley, Ralph W. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Beloved husband for 65 years of Delores Riley (nee Holmes); loving father of Michael (Jenny) Riley, Patricia (the late Daniel) Licari, Loretta Riley and Edna (Dave) Beachnau; dear grandfather of 7; great-grandfather of 9; dear uncle, brother-in-law, cousin and friend. Mr. Riley was a member of Missouri Order of Purple Heart Chapter 125, VFW Post 6137, DAV Chapter 1, Holy Name Society, White House Retreat and Legion of 1000 Men. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, March 4, 8:30 a.m. to St. Stephen Protomartyr Catholic Church for 9:15 a.m. Mass. Interment National Cemetery. Memorials to Missouri Order of Purple Heart Chapter 125 appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m.

Russell, Terri A. Mon., 2/29/16. A memorial visitation will be held at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel on Saturday, March 5, from 10 am until time of service at 12.

Schulkin, Hilda Age 102, February 29, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Ernest Schulkin; dear mother and motherin-law of Benita (Norton) Beilenson and Bobbie ("Butch") Wilson; dear grandmother of Robyn (Greg) Gladov and Lawrence (Michelle) Beilenson, Rick (fiancee' Kathe Cameron) and Tony (Kiera) Wilson; dear great-grandmother of Elyssa, Devin, Kavan, Kolton and Kiya; dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Bertha (the late Herman) Hollander and the late Sarah (the late Nolan) DeWoskin; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Many thanks to the staff of Delmar Gardens West for all their care and kindness. Services: Graveside service Wednesday, March 2nd, 2:30 PM at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery-White Road. Mrs. Schulkin was a longtime active member of B'nai El Congregation. Memorial contributions preferred to Congregation Shaare Emeth, Congregation B'nai Amoona or the Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry. Please visit www.bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Schweiss, Lester Sr. age 88, Monday, February 29, 2016. Lester was born on March 31, 1927 in St. Louis, MO. He was the second child and first son of Vallery and Lester Schweiss. Mr. Schweiss is survived by his wife of 68 years, Gladys (nee Streckfuss); his brother Robert (Barbara) Schweiss; his son Lester Jr. (Dolores) Schweiss; 2 grandchildren, Lester III "Chip" (Sahra) and Russell (Meghan) Schweiss; 3 great-grandchildren, Gwendolyn, Aidan and Lillian Schweiss; and many nieces, nephews and close friends. He was preceded in death by his father, mother and sister, Arline Milentz. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, March 4, 1:30 p.m. Interment Sunset Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Alzheimer's Assoc. appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Caring Gestures From a beautiful memorial to a prepared dish or tray, every gesture is appreciated. Let us help.

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NEWS

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A17

Reform Jews feel alienated by Israel More-liberal movement has made strides but still sufers ridicule at hands of Orthodoxy BY TIA GOLDENBERG associated Press

JERUSALEM • A recent gathering of American Reform rabbis in Jerusalem was meant to celebrate the small gains the liberal Jewish movement has made in Israel in recent years. But a series of comments by Israeli officials denigrating the group marred the event, reflecting an awkward relationship that many fear is alienating the world’s second-largest Jewish community from Israel. The Reform movement is the largest stream of Judaism in the United States, claiming to represent 1.5 million people, and its members provide a key source of financial support and political advocacy for Israel. But the movement is marginal in Israel, where religious afairs are dominated by the Orthodox rabbinical establishment. Israeli lawmakers, both secular and ultra-Ortho-

Scott, Joseph P. Jr.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

American and Israeli Reform rabbis pray Thursday at the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray in Jerusalem’s Old City. In January, in a nod to Reform Jews, Israel announced that it would create a special mixed-gender prayer area at the Western Wall.

dox, have repeatedly disparaged the Reform movement, questioning their Judaism and accusing them of promoting Jewish assimilation. “How do you ask Jews around the world to sup-

port Israel politically, economically, socially … and at the same time you have these ministers who say to our people, ‘You’re not really Jewish’ or ‘You don’t have a place here in Israel’? That incongruity is

Townsend, Bobby G.

Wiegert, Beulah Edith

Monday, February 29, 2016. Loving father of Dee Dee Scott; beloved son of Joseph P. Sr. and Debbie Scott (nee Tinsley); dear brother of Robert Lasater and Jennifer (Matt) Johnson; uncle of Emma, Madison and Chase; our dear nephew, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation Thursday, March 3, 4-8 p.m. at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh, St. Ann. Service Friday, March 4, 10:00 a.m. at Collier's Funeral Home. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Shoemaker, Robert T. on Monday, February 29, 2016. Loving brother of Russell (Rhonda), Terril (Marie) and the late Milton Shoemaker; dearest father of Kevin (Michelle) Shoemaker; grandfather of Mira, Cale and Abigail Shoemaker; dear uncle of Thomas, Brian, Ryan, Greta, John and Lisa Shoemaker; loving friend and father-figure to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, March 5 at 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Bob dedicated his professional career to the St. Louis City Police Dept. Memorials to Backstoppers or cancer research appreciated. Visitation Friday, 3-8 p.m.

Steis, Dorothy L. (nee Buban), Monday, February 29, 2016. Beloved wife of the late James Steis; loving mother of Michael (Gina) and Donald Steis and Linda (Michael) Lippert; dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt, cousin and friend. Mrs. Steis was a member of "The Canasta Club". Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 4, 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m.

Monday, February 29, 2016. Beloved husband of Rheta E. Townsend (nee Miller); loving father of Bobby (Joni), Michael (Patricia) and Timothy (Paula) Townsend and Cynthia (David) Vinyard; cherished grandfather of Joseph, Jonathan, Sarah, Jessica, Samantha, Hannah and Bethany; great-grandfather of Joseph, Marissa, Mason and Blair; our dear brother, brother-inlaw, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, March 4, 9:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Contributions to deGreeff Hospice appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Tinker, Dennis D.

Asleep in Jesus March 1, 2016. Beloved husband of Kathy Tinker (nee Wright); dear father of Matthew (Laura) Tinker and Stacey (Tom) Collins; loving grandfather of Trevor, Haley and Jordan; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL 10151 Gravois, Friday, March 4, 9:00 a.m. Interment National Cemetery. Contributions to Wounded Warrior Project greatly appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

Wood, Susan Theresa

Uptegrove, Delmer "GENE"

Struckmann, Eunice H. (nee Hackmann), 82, of O'Fallon, MO, died on Sunday, February 28, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

passed away peacefully Feb. 28, 2016. Born in St. Louis, to Anna (Pinkner) and Alfred Wiegert on April 16, 1918. Loving sister of Raymond (Mary); Loving aunt of nine nieces and nephews, and great aunt to 16, and 11 great-greats. Beulah is preceded in death by sisters Carol Paubel and Corinne Koenig. An accomplished seamstress, worked with designers at Lowenbaum's as a sample-maker and pattern-maker in the 50's and 60's. She enjoyed traveling the U.S., Mexico and Europe and was fluent in Spanish. Beulah was a life-long member of her beloved Mt. Tabor United Church of Christ, where she was active in the choir and annual rummage sale. Beulah's singing, stories and lovely smile will be missed by all who knew her. Services: Arrangements by HOFFMEISTER COLONIAL MORTUARY.

Sunday, February 28, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Jeanette Uptegrove (nee Kaufmann); dear father of Michael Uptegrove, Diane (Keith) Krumm and the late Mark Uptegrove; dear grandfather of Gregg, Katie, David, Eric, Suzy, Emily, Jackie, Abby and Ben; our dear great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Friday, March 4, 12 noon. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Contributions to DAV, appreciated. Visitation Thursday 4-8 p.m.

Warnecke, Jean M. (Lurk) 89, of Perryville, MO. Born February 13, 1927, died February 27, 2016. Wife of the late Ralph G. Warnecke; mother of Thomas Warnecke, Mary Jo Owen and Barbara Graf. Services: Visitation 8-11:00 a.m. Saturday, March 5, 2016 at Miller Family Funeral Home in Perryville. Funeral Mass 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 5, St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Perryville. Burial St. Boniface Cemetery.

(nee Clements), of St. Charles, MO, died on Tuesday, February 23, 2016, at the age of 84. Loving wife of 31 years to the late Kenneth L. Wood; beloved daughter of the late Walter and Lucy Clements; devoted mother of Kahnl (Linda) Wood, Rahnl (Sandra) Wood, Maria (John) Morse, Lucia (Philip) Gentry, Shawn (Lynn) Wood, Kelly (Karen) Wood, and Fred (Kerry) Wood II; cherished grandmother of 17; treasured great-grandmother of 15; dear sister of Agnes Hancock, Harold Clements and Walter Clements, Jr. She is preceded in death by her siblings Robert "Bobby" Clements, Gerald Clements, Edward "Eddie" Clements, and Anna Clements. Susan was a director at La Petite Academy for 10 years. She was a long time parishioner of Assumption Catholic Church; she served as a Eucharistic minister and was a member of the World Apostolate of Fatima prayer organization. Services: The family is being served by the BAUE Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held on Friday, March 4, 2016 from 3:00-8:00 p.m. Visitation will also be held at Assumption Catholic Church, 403 North Main St., O'Fallon, MO on Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 11:0012:00 p.m. with a Funeral Mass to follow at 12:00 p.m. Inurnment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery at a later date. Memorials may be made to Catholic Charities or Masses. Visit Baue.com

Zenner, Vera M. (nee: Jung) age 89, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Monday, February 29, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

a real problem for us,” said Rabbi Steven Fox, the chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, which held its septennial convention in Israel last week. The group represents 2,000 rabbis. In the U.S., Reform synagogues are commonplace, characterized by practices such as mixed-gender prayers, services led by female rabbis and members who drive to synagogue on the Sabbath — customs that violate Orthodox norms. In Israel, Reform Judaism is often seen as a curiosity and, in some cases, a threat. This in turn has placed obstacles in the way of the movement’s effort to make inroads in Israel, beaten back by an Orthodox monopoly over Jewish rituals such as marriage, burials and conversions. Reform rabbis have made small gains in Israel, and in January, the movement was jubilant over perhaps its greatest victory — Israel’s announcement that it would create a special mixed-gender prayer area at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. The wall, managed by an ultra-Orthodox rabbi who opposes having Reform customs at the site, is the holiest place where Jews can pray. The new area will also permit women to wear prayer shawls and skullcaps, a rite reserved for men under Orthodox custom. The announcement came after three years of

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Jim Kimsey • The co-founder of Web pioneer AOL died Tuesday (March 1, 2016) of cancer at age 76. His son, Mark Kimsey, said he died at his home in McLean, Va. In the 1980s, Mr. Kimsey, a Vietnam veteran and Washington-area restaurateur, became involved in a video game download company called Control Video. That was

reorganized into a company that later became America Online, famous for its “You’ve got mail” greeting and connecting millions of early Internet users. Mr. Kimsey said he would step down as chairman in 1995, years before AOL’s ill-fated merger with Time Warner. Steve Case succeeded him. Mark Kimsey said that after retiring from AOL,

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he did not put out public statements on all his meetings. It declined to discuss the meeting with the Reform rabbis or say why he had decided to keep silent. For decades, American Jewry — the secondlargest Jewish group in the world after Israel — has served as a bedrock of support for Israel. But there are signs of that support is eroding, particularly among younger and more liberal Jews. Jay Ruderman, president of the Ruderman Family Foundation, a Bostonbased group that teaches Israeli leaders about American Jews, said that at a time when Israel faces so many challenges, it makes no “strategic sense” for Israeli leaders to alienate American Jews. “A smart politician would say, ‘These Jews are diferent than us, but they play a very important strategic role,’” he said. Beyond the Western Wall compromise, the Reform rabbis say they do see progress elsewhere as well. Israel’s Supreme Court ruled last month that the country’s ritual baths must accept all converts to Judaism, even those who have undergone non-Orthodox conversions outside the country. The rabbis also point to the movement’s small but growing base in Israel and their invitation to a parliamentary committee during their convention last week, where lawmakers, most of them from centrist parties, showered them with gratitude and praise. “When I read statements by the Israeli tourism minister about Reform Judaism in the United States, it comes from a denial and a misunderstanding and an ignorance about the importance of the powerful contribution that you make to relations between the two countries,” Nachman Shai, a lawmaker from the centrist Zionist Union, told the packed auditorium, where women and men wore rainbow-colored skullcaps and sang Israel’s national anthem. Reform leaders told the meeting that the harsh reactions from some lawmakers were an unfortunate but expected response to the gains the movement has made.

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painstaking negotiations between Israeli officials and the liberal streams of Judaism and appeared to mark a historic turning point in relations between Israel and diaspora Jews. But right after the plan was approved, Israel’s secular Tourism Minister Yariv Levin said the Reform movement was a “waning world.” He accused it of tolerating intermarriage and encouraging assimilation and predicted that the mixedprayer area would become unnecessary within two or three generations. Under religious law, Jews cannot marry non-Jews. Even after Reform rabbis criticized him, Levin expressed no remorse. “It’s very important that we’ll be aware of the problem of assimilation and do our best eforts in order to solve it,” he said. A chorus of other lawmakers, most of them Orthodox, have publicly lashed out at the Reform movement. As the rabbis’ convention was kicking of, a legislator from an ultra-Orthodox party compared the movement to the “mentally ill.” The rhetoric has put Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a tough spot. Early this month, he rejected “disparaging and divisive remarks” about Reform Jews and called the movement “part and parcel of the Jewish people.” He also met the visiting American rabbis. But, perhaps wary of antagonizing religious factions in his coalition, his office made no announcement of the meeting, as it often does with high-profile visitors. Fox, the rabbi group’s chief executive, said the encounter was “more positive” than past meetings with Netanyahu, though they were surprised by the absence of the public announcement. “The ministers here paint us as if we’re not really Jewish. And the ignorance they display makes my congregants ... think, ‘Is Israel really that backward of a nation?’ It reflects poorly on the state of Israel,” said Rabbi Denise Eger, another leader of the Central Conference of American Rabbis. Netanyahu’s office said

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his father focused on philanthropy. Craig Windham • The man who delivered the news for two decades as a correspondent and anchor of NPR’s hourly newscasts, the ive-minute reports that punctuate the day for millions of listeners in their cars, at their desks and with earbuds in their ears, died Sunday (Feb. 28, 2016) in Winston-Salem, N.C. He was 66. His death was announced by NPR. The cause was a pulmonary embolism, said his brother, Cris Windham, whom Windham was visiting when he died. Windham joined NPR in 1995 and became a mainstay of the newscasts that air at the top of every hour, and more frequently on the highly rated programs “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered,” on 780 stations across the United States. The newscasts have a weekly audience of 24 million, according to executive producer Robert Garcia. Louise Rennison • The British writer, author of the young-adult novel “Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging,” has died. Her agent, Clare Alexander, said Tuesday that Ms. Rennison had died after an illness. She was in her 60s and lived in Brighton on England’s southern coast. Ms. Rennison was best known for the humor-packed series “The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson,” about a teenager grappling with puberty. From news services


NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEATHER • LOW 26, HIGH 47 • WINDS NW/SE 5-10 MPH

PEOPLE

Dry and near seasonable today

Blacks watched Oscars despite boycott calls

Gradually increasing clouds along with light winds and near to slightly above average temperatures can be expected across the region today. Highs will be in the mid-to-upper 40s. Another low pressure system will bring a chance of rain tonight into Thursday morning. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

28°

42°

46°

44°

Partly cloudy

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Cloudy, slight chance of rain

4-DAY FORECAST

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

41°/52°

31°/49°

Chance of rain Partly sunny

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61 48 51 49 52 62 61 45 51 59 60 48 54

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partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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31 28 25 25 26 30 26 21 25 27 25 24 28

SUNDAY

39°/59° 37°/62° Partly cloudy

Increasing clouds

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

SATURDAY

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19 26 14 21 21 20 25 18 20 11 20 19

37 46 30 39 39 39 44 37 44 31 41 37

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Chicago 14 / 30

Kirksville 21 / 45 Kansas City 26 / 61

Springfield 20 / 41

St. Louis 26 / 47 Carbondale 26 / 46

Joplin 30 / 62

Poplar Bluff 30 / 50

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 56° 36° 50° 32° 79° 5° 32° 19°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

Trace Trace 0.08” 1.60” 4.72”

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TEMPERATURES High (7:20 a.m.) Low (3:59 p.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1887) Record Low (1962) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, March 1st Tree - 180 (high), Mold - 1,151 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 19 Month (Total) 19 2849 Season 3841 Year Ago

SUN & MOON

New Mar 8 Sunrise

First Mar 15

Full Mar 23

6:31 AM Sunset

Last Mar 31 5:56 PM

Moonrise 1:19 AM Moonset 11:41 AM

Looking to the southeast around 6:15 a.m. Thursday morning you may be able to see Venus just above the horizon. You may not see Venus again until it returns to the night sky this summer. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.99 23 10.06 Jefferson City 21 10.33 Hermann 20 7.47 Washington 25 14.46 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 13.09 Louisiana 15 12.24 Dam 24 25 21.41 Dam 25 26 20.91 Grafton 18 15.62 M.Price, Pool 419 417.00 M.Price, Tail. 21 10.59 St Louis 30 14.10 Chester 27 17.44 Cape Girardeau 32 24.98

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

24-Hr Change

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.49 18 12.66 Peoria 14 10.49 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.81 Sullivan 16 0.28 Valley Park 24 11.45 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.79 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 43.65

- 0.41 - 0.27 - 0.20 - 0.25 - 0.41 + 0.40 + 0.44 + 0.54 + 0.24 - 0.10 + 0.20 - 0.36 - 0.68 - 1.20 - 0.78

LAKE LEVELS

Current Level

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 0.60 + 0.36 + 0.22 - 0.03 - 0.38 - 0.99 - 0.24

24-Hr Change

355.00 - 0.33 357.09 - 0.10 495.36 - 0.15 654.23 + 0.12 706.91 - 0.11 658.98 + 0.09 915.28 + 0.09 839.28 + 0.02 596.02 - 0.14 409.66 - 0.01 603.74 - 0.26 444.84 - 0.19

+ 0.27

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

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TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 92° Yuma, Arizona

Before the Oscars, hosted by Chris Rock, anger about a lack of minority nominees for the big awards led to the call for black viewers to tune out. It apparently wasn’t heeded, or viewers wanted to hear what Rock had to say about the issue — and it was the central theme of his monologue. But black viewership held up better than overall audience, according to the Nielsen ratings. The Nielsen company said Tuesday that an estimated 3.22 million black viewers watched the Oscars on ABC Sunday, a decline of 2 percent from the 2015 show. The show’s overall viewership of 34.4 million was an eight-year low, and a drop of nearly 8 percent from the year before. Fey on 2016 campaign: Ugly, not funny • Tina Fey is famous for skewering former GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin with a brutally spot-on “Saturday Night Live” impersonation. But the writer/actress doesn’t have a dog in this election. In fact, of the 2016 slate of presidential candidates, Fey is blunt: “I hate them all,” she said in an interview in Town & Country magazine. Asked whether the current crop doesn’t at least ofer comedic fodder, the funnywoman did not seem amused. “It’s funny until it isn’t,” she says. “It’s gotten kind of ugly.” Ferguson protest T-shirt heads for museum • Activist Rahiel Tesfamariam has donated the Hands Up United T-shirt she wore in August when she was arrested during a protest in Ferguson to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. A photo of Tesfamarian, 34, wearing the black T-shirt emblazoned with the phrase “This ain’t yo mama’s Civil Rights Movement” went viral after

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

the protest marking the one-year anniversary of the police shooting of Michael Brown. Tesfamarian lives in New York City. Cosby’s Pennsylvania case is delayed • Bill Cosby’s criminal sex-assault case was temporarily halted days before a key hearing while a Pennsylvania appeals court considers his efort to have the case thrown out before trial. The Pennsylvania Superior Court granted Cosby a postponement Tuesday while the court decides whether to hear Cosby’s pretrial appeal. His preliminary hearing had been set for next week. Cosby, 78, is accused of drugging and sexually assaulting women. Stones will play Havana • The Rolling Stones have gigged in every major city on every continent, as well as any island with a nice beach that would have them. Come March 25, the band will be able to cross another major city of the bucket list after announcing its irst performance in Havana. The Stones will play a free concert at the Ciudad Deportiva de la Habana. The band will travel to Havana after concluding its America Latino Ole Tour in countries including Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Colombia and Mexico. Shepherd responsible for surrogate child • Actress Sherri Shepherd has lost

her appeal of a Pennsylvania court ruling that found her responsible for a child born to a surrogate before she divorced. The state Supreme Court said Tuesday that it wouldn’t hear the case brought by the sitcom actress and former co-host of “The View.” Shepherd, 48, is paying $4,100 in monthly child support to ex-husband Lamar Sally of Los Angeles. His attorney, Tifany Palmer, says Shepherd has not seen the 1-year-old. Shepherd spent more than $100,000 to arrange the surrogacy but tried to void the contract as the couple divorced in New Jersey. Daly will Fight for Air • Tim Daly, co-star of the CBS drama “Madam Secretary,” is set to climb the Presidential Towers in Chicago on Sunday to raise awareness about lung disease. Daly, who turned 60 on Tuesday, is expected to climb multiple towers as part of the American Lung Association’s Fight for Air Climb.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor John Cullum is 86. Actress Laraine Newman is 64. Singer Jay Osmond is 61. Rock singer Jon Bon Jovi is 54. Blues singer-musician Alvin Youngblood Hart is 53. Actor Daniel Craig is 48. Actress Heather McComb is 39. Actress Nathalie Emmanuel is 27. Singerrapper-actress Becky G is 19. From news services

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Low: -20° Crane Lake, Minnesota

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Alaska Low: -12°

Hawaii High: 85°

Parts of the eastern Great Lakes and northern New England will see scattered snow showers. Another clipper system will bring rain and snow to the north-central Plains. More wet weather will also move into the Pacific Northwest. High pressure will be in control from the Midwest down to the Deep South and Gulf Coast. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 32 Albuquerque 39 Anchorage 24 Atlanta 40 Atlantic City 45 Baltimore 42 Billings 37 Biloxi, Ms. 48 Birmingham 38 Bismarck 25 Boise 40 Boston 34 Buffalo 18 Burlington, Vt. 23 Charleston, S.C. 57 Charleston, W.V. 32 Charlotte 43 Cheyenne 34 Chicago 14 Cincinnati 27 Cleveland 23 Colorado Spgs. 33 Concord, N.H. 31 Dallas 44 Daytona Beach 58 Denver 32 Des Moines 18 52 Destin, Fl. 16 Detroit 50 El Paso 27 Evansville 0 Fairbanks 17 Fargo 28 Flagstaff 60 Fort Myers 34 Great Falls 6 Green Bay 35 Hartford 63 Honolulu 50 Houston 23 Indianapolis 40 Jackson, Ms. 29 Juneau 67 Key West 56 Las Vegas 36 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 30 Louisville

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47 Macon 64 McAllen, Tx. 34 Memphis 66 Miami 12 Milwaukee 11 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 30 47 Mobile Montgomery 44 31 Nashville New Orleans 53 New York City 38 Norfolk, Va. 52 Oklahoma City 37 Omaha 23 Orlando 60 Palm Springs 65 Philadelphia 44 Phoenix 59 Pittsburgh 30 Portland, Me. 30 Portland, Or. 44 Providence 36 Raleigh 46 Rapid City 27 Reno 36 Richmond, Va. 49 Sacramento 46 St. Petersburg 63 Salt Lake City 42 San Antonio 49 San Diego 56 San Francisco 52 Santa Fe 34 Savannah 57 Seattle 44 39 Shreveport 12 Sioux Falls 23 Syracuse 55 Tallahassee 62 Tampa 50 Tucson 35 Tulsa 42 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 64 35 Wichita Wilmington, De. 44 58 Yuma

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sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy windy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy rain sunny rain partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain sunny cloudy snow sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy windy windy sunny

35 64 44 67 20 21 30 45 38 37 53 25 33 46 33 55 62 26 59 22 12 44 21 29 29 43 29 48 60 39 61 56 55 33 41 43 53 25 11 40 55 51 45 28 66 42 24 57

64 92 61 82 30 34 49 69 67 57 74 35 42 68 45 80 86 40 91 35 24 59 35 51 53 64 47 66 74 64 83 69 62 67 66 55 71 35 20 71 74 89 66 41 81 59 40 92

partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny snow sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy cloudy flurries sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny

because... me!

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

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City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

30 47 29 74 45 73 55 30 28 70 54 34 17 44 36 31

36 49 45 80 61 82 87 48 34 84 70 52 25 50 53 38

snow rain showers showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy

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NATION

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

DIGEST

2 bishops hid child sex abuse, grand jury says

Ohio teen denies fatal school shooting A 14-year-old boy accused of shooting students in a school cafeteria in Ohio denied charges including attempted murder on Tuesday, while the sherif urged that he be prosecuted as an adult. James Austin Hancock kept his head down during a brief juvenile court hearing. His attorney, Ed Perry, said he wasn’t aware of Butler County Sherif Richard Jones’ contention that Hancock’s case should be moved to adult court, but said “that’s something we will be concerned about.” Classes will resume Wednesday, with extra staf on buses, greeting students outside, and visible throughout the schools, particularly in the cafeteria where the shooting took place Monday. Hancock is charged with attempted murder, felonious assault, inducing panic and making terroristic threats. Perry entered a denial of the charges, the juvenile court equivalent of a not guilty plea, and a magistrate ordered that the suspect remain in juvenile detention pending a hearing April 5. At least two students were shot and two others were injured. Snow, ice cancel O’Hare lights • Snowy conditions at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport on Tuesday led to a small jet sliding of a runway and a commercial jet sliding on a taxiway. No injuries were reported. An FAA spokeswoman said a short time later, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 operated by American Airlines requested to be towed to the terminal after sliding on a taxiway. The city’s Aviation Department said more than 375 lights were canceled at O’Hare. Astronauts head home • Astronaut Scott Kelly is closing the door on an unprecedented year in space for NASA, lying back to the planet he left behind last March. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko were to check out of the International Space Station on Tuesday night. By the time their capsule lands in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, the pair will have traveled 144 million miles through space, circled the world 5,440 times and experienced 10,880 orbital sunrises and sunsets.

Small Pennsylvania diocese covered up crimes by Catholic clergy over 40 years BY JOE MANDAK associated Press

ALTOONA, PA. • Two Roman

DAILY HERALD VIA AP

Vicky Harper shovels snow Tuesday near Chicago. The weather canceled more than 375 lights at O’Hare International Airport.

Oicer fatally shoots man in Florida standof • A police oicer shot and killed a man after a twohour standof at a home in central Florida. Palm Bay police reported in a news release that oicers responded to the home about 9:30 a.m. Tuesday after receiving calls about a man making threats to three construction workers at a neighboring house. A Hispanic man, 39, exited the home several times during the standof but then went back inside. Police said the man inally came out about 11:30 a.m. carrying a irearm. The release said an oicer ired a single shot, killing the suspect.

was a suspect in a hit-and-run earlier Tuesday. He said police located him near an apartment complex, but when they tried to take him into custody, he resisted.

N. Carolina police investigate punching of suspect • Police in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., are investigating allegations of excessive force after a videotape surfaced showing an oicer apparently punching a man repeatedly. Police spokesman Rob Tufano said Tuesday that the department’s internal afairs unit was gathering information, interviewing witnesses and reviewing video footage. Tufano said the man who was punched

Global cyberattacker admits guilt • A Turkish man who led three cyberattacks against global inancial institutions that caused more than $55 million in losses pleaded guilty Tuesday in New York, prosecutors said. Ercan Findikoglu, 34, whose online nicknames included “Segate,” “Predator” and “Oreon,” entered the plea in Brooklyn federal court.

Texas oicer, shootout suspect both die • A police oicer died on the operating table after he was shot in a Tuesday afternoon gunight with an armed suspect in a park near a Dallas-area school. Euless Police Chief Mike Brown said the suspect also died of multiple gunshot wounds in the 3 p.m. shootout at J.A. Carr Park. No names were immediately released.

From news services

Catholic bishops who led a small Pennsylvania diocese helped cover up the sexual abuse of hundreds of children by more than 50 priests and other religious leaders over a 40-year period, according to a grand jury report that portrays the church as holding such sway over law enforcement that it helped select a police chief. The 147-page report issued Tuesday on sexual abuse in the Altoona-Johnstown Diocese, home to nearly 100,000 Catholics, was based partly on evidence from a secret diocesan archive opened through a search warrant over the summer. In announcing the findings, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said the diocese’s two previous bishops had “placed their desire to avoid public scandal over the well-being of children.” No criminal charges are being filed in the case because some abusers have died, the statute of limitations has expired, or victims are too traumatized to testify, she said. Of the victims, Kane said: “Their souls were killed as children.” The report was especially critical of Bishops James Hogan and Joseph Adamec. Hogan, who headed the diocese from 1966 to 1986, died in 2005. Adamec, who succeeded him, retired in 2011. Adamec, 80, cited potential self-incrimination in refusing to testify before the grand jury. But in a court filing, his attorney said the accusations against Adamec were unfounded. He required 14 priests accused under his watch to undergo psychiatric evaluation, the filing said. Nine of them were suspended or removed from

ministry, and the five who were reinstated never re-ofended, his attorney wrote. “Bishop Adamec’s handling of abuse allegations has no similarity to other clergy abuse scandals,” his attorney wrote. The current bishop, Mark Bartchak, is not accused of any wrongdoing. He recently suspended a few priests named as alleged abusers in the report, though the grand jury said it remained “concerned the purge of predators is taking too long.” In a statement, Bartchak said: “I deeply regret any harm that has come to children.” The clergy sex abuse crisis erupted in 2002, when The Boston Globe reported that the Boston Archdiocese had transferred child-molesting priests from parish to parish to protect them. Similar scandals involving hundreds of offenders and victims have since erupted across the U.S. and beyond. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops estimates that American dioceses have paid nearly $4 billion since 1950 to settle claims with victims. The Altoona-Johnstown report said that the abuse had been committed in such places as campsites, confessionals, an orphanage and the cathedral, and that Hogan covered up allegations by transferring offending priests, including one who was sent to a school for boys. One diocesan official under Hogan, Monsignor Philip Saylor, told the grand jury that church officials held such clout in the eight-county diocese that “the police and civil authorities would often defer to the diocese” when priests were accused of abuse, the report said. Saylor told the grand jury that the mayors of Altoona and Johnstown even consulted him on their choices for police chief in the 1980s.

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NATION

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 2

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

DIGEST

U.S. spaceman ends year-long Mars test light

Ohio teen denies fatal school shooting A 14-year-old boy accused of shooting students in a school cafeteria in Ohio denied charges including attempted murder on Tuesday, while the sherif urged that he be prosecuted as an adult. James Austin Hancock kept his head down during a brief juvenile court hearing. His attorney, Ed Perry, said he wasn’t aware of Butler County Sherif Richard Jones’ contention that Hancock’s case should be moved to adult court, but said “that’s something we will be concerned about.” Classes will resume Wednesday, with extra staf on buses, greeting students outside, and visible throughout the schools, particularly in the cafeteria where the shooting took place Monday. Hancock is charged with attempted murder, felonious assault, inducing panic and making terroristic threats. Perry entered a denial of the charges, the juvenile equivalent of a not guilty plea, and a magistrate ordered he remain in juvenile detention pending a hearing April 5. At least two students were shot and two others were injured. Bishops hid sex abuse, grand jury says • Two Roman Catholic bishops who led a small Pennsylvania diocese helped cover up the sexual abuse of hundreds of children by more than 50 priests and other religious leaders over a 40-year period, according to a grand jury report. The 147-page report issued Tuesday on sexual abuse in the Altoona-Johnstown Diocese was based partly on evidence from a secret diocesan archive opened through a search warrant over the summer. In announcing the indings, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said the diocese’s two previous bishops had “placed their desire to avoid public scandal over the well-being of children.” No criminal charges are being iled because some abusers have died, the statute of limitations has expired, or victims are too traumatized to testify, she said. Of the victims, Kane said: “Their souls were killed as children.” Snow, ice cancel O’Hare lights • Snowy conditions at Chicago’s

Astronaut touches down after 340 days in orbit; NASA hungry for physical data BY MARCIA DUNN associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL , FLA. •

DAILY HERALD VIA AP

Vicky Harper shovels snow Tuesday near Chicago. The weather canceled more than 375 lights at O’Hare International Airport.

O’Hare International Airport on Tuesday led to a small jet sliding of a runway and a commercial jet sliding on a taxiway. No injuries were reported. An FAA spokeswoman said a short time later, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 operated by American Airlines requested to be towed to the terminal after sliding on a taxiway. The city’s Aviation Department said more than 375 lights were canceled at O’Hare. Oicer fatally shoots man in Florida standof • A police oicer shot and killed a man after a twohour standof at a home in central Florida. Palm Bay police reported in a news release that oicers responded to the home about 9:30 a.m. Tuesday after receiving calls about a man making threats to three construction workers at a neighboring house. A Hispanic man, 39, exited the home several times during the standof but then went back inside. Police said the man inally came out about 11:30 a.m. carrying a irearm. The release said an oicer ired a single shot, killing the suspect.

North Carolina police investigate punching of suspect • Police in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., are investigating allegations of excessive force after a video surfaced showing an oicer apparently punching a man repeatedly. Police spokesman Rob Tufano said Tuesday that the department’s internal afairs unit was gathering information, interviewing witnesses and reviewing video footage. Tufano said the man who was punched was a suspect in a hit-and-run earlier Tuesday. He said police located him near an apartment complex, but when they tried to take him into custody, he resisted. Global cyberattacker admits guilt • A Turkish man who led three cyberattacks against global inancial institutions that caused more than $55 million in losses pleaded guilty Tuesday in New York, prosecutors said. Ercan Findikoglu, 34, whose online nicknames included “Segate,” “Predator” and “Oreon,” entered the plea in Brooklyn federal court. From news services

Astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth on Wednesday after an unprecedented year in space for NASA, landing in barren Kazakhstan with a Russian cosmonaut who shared his whole space station journey. Their Soyuz capsule parachuted onto the central Asian steppes and ended a sciencerich mission at the International Space Station that began last March and was deemed a steppingstone to Mars. It was a triumphant homecoming for Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko after 340 days in space. They checked out of the space station 3½ hours earlier. As their Soyuz undocked, calls of “Godspeed” filled the Twitterverse. The pair traveled 144 million miles through space, circled the world 5,440 times and experienced 10,880 orbital sunrises and sunsets during the longest single spaceflight by an American. Kelly posted one last batch of sunrise photos Tuesday on Twitter, before quipping, “I gotta go!” His final tweet from orbit came several hours later: “The journey isn’t over. Follow me as I rediscover # Earth!” Piloting the Soyuz capsule home for Kelly, 52, and Kornienko, 55, was the much fresher and decade younger cosmonaut Sergey Volkov, whose space station stint lasted the typical six months. They launched from Kazakhstan on March 27th last year. Before committing to longer Mars missions, NASA wants to know the limits of the human body for a year, minus gravity. As he relinquished command of the space station Monday, Kelly noted that he and Kornienko “have been up here for a really, really long time.”

“A year now seems longer than I thought it would be,” Kelly confided a couple of weeks ago. Not quite a year — 340 days to be precise, based on the Russian launch and landing schedule. But still record-smashing for NASA. Kelly’s closest U.S. contender trails him by 125 days. Russia continues to rule, however, with the world record of 438 days set by a Russian doctor during the mid-1990s. Kelly acknowledged each of the 13 U.S., Russian, European and Japanese space fliers with whom he and Kornienko lived during the past year: “It’s incredibly important that we all work together to make what is seemingly impossible, possible.” Scientists are hoping for more one-year subjects as NASA gears up for expeditions to Mars in the 2030s. Radiation will be a top challenge, along with the body and mind’s durability on what will be a 2½-year round trip. The choice of the pioneering Kelly turned out to be a bonanza. His identical twin, retired astronaut Mark Kelly, ofered himself up as a medical guinea pig so researchers could study the diferences between the genetic doubles, one in space and the other on the ground. Once on the ground, Kelly heads to Houston with two flight surgeons and several other NASA reps, arriving late Wednesday. That’s where he’ll be reunited with his two daughters, ages 21 and 12; his girlfriend, a NASA public affairs representative at Johnson Space Center; and his brother. Kornienko returns to his home in Star City, Russia, near Moscow. Kelly has spent 520 days in space over four missions. Realizing this is likely his last journey, he said it was “a little bittersweet” saying goodbye to his orbiting home.

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WORLD

Bin Laden wanted his fortune used ‘on jihad’ In will, he claimed assets of $29 million BY DEB RIECHMANN AND ROBERT BURNS Associated Press

WASHINGTON • In his

handwritten will, alQaida leader Osama bin Laden claimed he had about $29 million in personal wealth — the bulk of which he wanted to be used “on jihad, for the sake of Allah.” The will was released Tuesday in a batch of more than 100 documents seized in a May 2011 raid that killed bin Laden at his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The al-Qaida leader planned to divide his fortune among his relatives, but wanted most of it spent to conduct the work of the Islamic extremist terrorist network behind the Sept. 11 attacks. The will did not disclose much detail about where he amassed his wealth, but bin Laden’s father ran a successful construction company in Saudi Arabia for years, and the will noted that $12 million was from his brother on behalf of the Bin Laden Co. The threat of sudden death also worried other family members. “If I am to be killed,” one of bin Laden’s sons wrote to his father in a 2008 letter, “pray for me a lot and give continuous charities in my name, as I will be in great need for support to reach the permanent home.” The letter was signed, “Your son, Sa’ad Bin Usama,” according to the U.S. translation from Arabic. The letters were included in a batch of documents released by the U.S. Oice of the Director

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan in an undated photo. U.S. oicials on Tuesday released documents seized after he was killed in Pakistan in 2011.

of National Intelligence. They address a range of topics, including fractures between al-Qaida and al-Qaida in Iraq, which eventually splintered off into what is now known as Islamic State. In a letter to one of his wives who had been living in Iran, bin Laden expressed worry that her visit to a dentist could have given the Iranians an opportunity to implant a small chip under her skin, apparently as a tracking device. “My dear wife,” he began. “I was told that you went to a dentist in Iran, and you were concerned about a filling she put in for you. Please let me know in detail ... any suspicions that any of the brothers may have about chips planted in any way.” The Iranian dentist might have used a slightly enlarged syringe to make such an implant, bin Laden wrote in the letter. The U.S. translation is undated. “The size of the chip is about the length of a grain of wheat and the width of a fine piece of vermicelli,” bin Laden said. He asked her to recall the exact date of her dental work, “also about any surgery you had, even if it was only a

quick pinch.” In another letter, addressed to “The Islamic Community in General,” bin Laden ofered an upbeat assessment of progress in his holy war since 9/11 and of U.S. failings in Afghanistan. The letter is undated but appears to have been written in 2010. “Here we are in the tenth year of the war, and America and its allies are still chasing a mirage, lost at sea without a beach,” he wrote. “They thought that the war would be easy and that they would accomplish their objectives in a few days or a few weeks, and they did not prepare for it financially, and there is no popular support that would enable it to carry on a war for a decade or more. The sons of Islam have opposed them and stood between them and their plans and objectives.” Bin Laden sought to portray the U.S. as hopelessly mired in an unwinnable war in Afghanistan. In an undated letter that appears to have been written in the 2009-2010 period, he compared the American combat position to that of the Soviet Union in the final years of its occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s.

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

DIGEST U.N. will vote on N. Korea sanctions A U.N. Security Council vote on the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades has been postponed until Wednesday morning at Russia’s request, the United States and France said Tuesday. The U.S. and North Korea’s traditional ally China spent seven weeks negotiating the new sanctions — which include mandatory inspections of cargo leaving and entering North Korea by sea or air — in response to Pyongyang’s latest nuclear test and rocket launch. Both are in deiance of previous council resolutions. But Russia, which received the new draft Thursday along with other council members, asked for time to study the lengthy text, and suggested changes. Jordan attacks ‘outlaws’ in fatal raids • Jordanian troops exchanged ire with armed men during arrest raids in the northern city of Irbid on Tuesday, security oicials said. Jordan’s Public Security Directorate referred to those being targeted in the raids as “outlaws” but did not elaborate. The directorate reported there were deaths among the gunmen but did not say how many, and that three members of the security forces were hurt. The statement said clashes began earlier Tuesday and continued in the evening. The daily al-Ghad said more than 20 suspected militants were arrested in the operation. Pakistanis gather for funeral of executed police oicer • Tens of thousands of Pakistanis chanting anti-government slogans on Tuesday attended the funeral of a police oicer executed the day before for assassinating a secular governor in 2011 over accusations of blasphemy. As a precaution against violence, authorities closed all schools and stepped up security in Islamabad and the adjacent city of Rawalpindi, where the funeral of Mumtaz Qadri was held. Roads around key government buildings and diplomatic compounds were also closed of, said police oicial Ashfaq Tarar.

Aid groups criticize France for evictions • More than a dozen humanitarian organizations accused French authorities on Tuesday of brutally evicting migrants from their makeshift dwellings in a sprawling camp in northern France, as iery protests of the demolition continued. Thousands of migrants leeing war and misery in their homelands use the port city of Calais as a springboard to try to get to Britain on the other side of the English Channel. However, authorities are moving to close a large swath of the slum camp in Calais. Brazil arrests Facebook executive • Police in Sao Paulo, Brazil, have arrested Facebook’s most senior executive in Latin America in the latest clash between Brazilian authorities and the social media company over its refusal to provide private information about its users to law enforcement. A news release Tuesday says that Facebook’s vice president for Latin America, Diego Dzodan, was arrested on an order from a judge in the northeastern state of Sergipe. Dzodan is accused of ignoring a judicial order in a secret investigation involving organized crime and drug traicking. U.N. chief blasts refugee restrictions • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says border restrictions being imposed in Europe to stem the low of migrants “are not in line with international law or with common human decency.” Ban made the comments Tuesday in Madrid after Greek police said up to 10,000 refugees, most of them Syrians and Iraqis, were stuck at the country’s Idomeni border crossing in deteriorating conditions. Several nations led by Austria have imposed refugee caps and border restrictions over the past 10 days, creating a huge backlog of migrants in Greece. Tunisia may OK German training of Libyans • Tunisia’s defense minister says his country is talking to Berlin about allowing German forces to train Libyan soldiers on Tunisian

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Pipeline work turns up bones at Nazi site, cemetery • Polish prosecutors are investigating if workers have violated laws protecting buried human remains when they apparently dug up bones at the site of a former Nazi concentration camp and a Jewish cemetery. Police say they found bones at the site of the World War II Plaszow concentration camp after a company did gas pipeline maintenance work there. Krakow police spokesman Mariusz Ciarka said Tuesday the bones have been sent for forensic examination to determine whether they are human. Poland honors anticommunists • Poland honored on Tuesday thousands of anticommunist ighters persecuted and killed during the early years of the Sovietimposed regime, which ignored their existence in history books for decades. The nationwide observances, led by President Andrzej Duda, are part of democratic Poland’s eforts to recognize the sacriice of men and women who actively opposed the communist regime, which seized power in 1944 as the Red Army was defeating German troops at the end of World War II. Camp for Syrian refugees tallies 5,000 births • The U.N. Population Fund said Tuesday that its clinic in Jordan’s largest camp for Syrian refugees had safely delivered more than 5,000 babies since opening in 2013. Daniel Baker, the fund’s regional humanitarian coordinator, said that the clinic also ofered family planning, but that the pace of deliveries had been steady. 376 nominees for Nobel Peace Prize • A record 376 nominations have been submitted for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize as the Norwegian jury is set to start selecting this year’s winner. The committee keeps candidates secret for 50 years, but those submitting the nominations sometimes reveal their suggestions to the public. An Islamic State group rape victim, Pope Francis and the Afghan women’s cycling team are among the known candidates this year. Zuma survives challenge in S. Africa • South Africa’s ruling party defeated a no-conidence vote Tuesday against President Jacob Zuma, who also faced a court challenge from an opposition party that wants corruption charges reinstated against the president. The motion against Zuma followed criticism on a range of issues, including a scandal over millions of dollars in state spending on his private home.

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soil. Farhat Horchani said Tuesday that Tunisia “agrees in principle” with such an arrangement. It would allow Tunisia to help with Libya’s reconstruction under a ledgling unity government.

From news services

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • B

HARD WAY TO WIN

Reyes looks like good bet to move up Promising pitcher could make majors this year BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • This summer, he’ll fire his first major-league pitch, inevitably a fastball that’ll surely singe the commissioner’s signature. But for now, he’s over here, on a back field at the Cardinals’ complex, fielding a bunted baseball that reads: “OFFICIAL BALL – FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE,” with the stamped signature of one Chuck Murphy, the league’s president. Alex Reyes is far from the big league camp but not, I think, that far from the big leagues. He’s participating in the Cardinals’ “Spring Training Early Program” (STEP) camp, but I sense, be it from conversations, stat analysis or my own inclination, that the righthanded pitcher will crack the club’s big-league roster this summer. Ten years ago, it was also a Reyes — in fact, it was also A. Reyes. See HOCHMAN • Page B4

Lefthander Gomber develops curveball he can have faith in Cardinals’ prospect gets start against alma mater PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TANG • The Canadian Press

Patrik Berglund (21) reacts after scoring the winning goal against the Ottawa Senators during a shootout.

Blues surrender lead as time expires, prevail in marathon shootout

BLUES

4 > Reaves returns to lineup. B5

SENATORS

3

> Up next 7 p.m. Sunday at Minnesota, NBCSN

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OTTAWA • Vladimir Tarasenko’s 30th goal of the season gave the Blues a three-goal lead midway through Tuesday’s game in Ottawa. The Blues appeared to cruising to a win that would put them in three-way tie for first place in the Central Division. But there seems to be no such thing as having a game in the bag against Ottawa. Three times in the past two seasons, the Senators have rallied from two goals down against the Blues and won, including earlier this season at Scottrade Center. Ottawa did even up the score — as time expired, no less — but in the 11th round of the shootout, after 21 shooters had missed, Patrik Berglund gave the Blues a 4-3 shootout win at Canadian Tire Centre. In addition to Tarasenko’s 30th, the Blues also picked up goals from Dmitrij Jaskin and Jaden Schwartz on a night they finished with a seasonhigh-48 shots on goal and went two for four on the power play. See BLUES • Page B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Austin Gomber throws from a bullpen mound during spring training.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • When the Cardinals gave bud-

Blues goaltender Jake Allen lets in a goal by Ottawa’s Ryan Dzingel as the Senators’ Mark Stone looks on during the second period Tuesday night.

MVC tourney provides relief for area fans With Mizzou, SLU and Illinois having miserable seasons, Arch Madness is a tonic INSIDE > MVC tournament bracket. B3 > Louisiana State holds of Mizzou rally. B3 Wichita State’s Fred VanVleet >

ding prospect Austin Gomber some homework for the ofseason a little more than a year ago, the lefty took it back to school. The Florida Atlantic University UP NEXT > 12:05 p.m. alum returned to the Boca Raton, Wednesday vs. Fla., campus and showed his for- Florida Atlantic mer pitching coach, Jason Jackson, (exhibition) the curveball the Cardinals wanted him to use. He had a new grip and a new intent — throw it with force and watch the movement happen, don’t force the movement and watch nothing happen — and Jackson had one response. See CARDINALS • Page B4

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Like an unusually warm late winter afternoon prompts the premature opening of windows throughout the city, the start of March has a way of breathing new life into college basketball fans. This year,we need more than sunshine and a nice breeze. A defibrillator might do the trick. After a seasonlong coma caused by the Illini, Billikens and Tigers, a dose of Shockers should do the body wonders.The 26th edition of Missouri Valley Conference tournament as we know it here in St. Louis, a total of nine games played Thursday-Sunday at Scottrade Center, couldn’t come at a better time. If anyone could use a reminder of what college basketball is all about, it’s us. Please save us, Arch Madness. See FREDERICKSON • B3

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • B

HARD WAY TO WIN

Reyes looks like good bet to move up Promising pitcher could make majors this year BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • This summer, he’ll fire his first major-league pitch, inevitably a fastball that’ll surely singe the commissioner’s signature. But for now, he’s over here, on a back field at the Cardinals’ complex, fielding a bunted baseball that reads: “OFFICIAL BALL – FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE,” with the stamped signature of one Chuck Murphy, the league’s president. Alex Reyes is far from the big league camp but not, I think, that far from the big leagues. He’s participating in the Cardinals’ “Spring Training Early Program” (STEP) camp, but I sense, be it from conversations, stat analysis or my own inclination, that the righthanded pitcher will crack the club’s big-league roster this summer. Ten years ago, it was also a Reyes — in fact, it was also A. Reyes. See HOCHMAN • Page B4

Lefthander Gomber develops curveball he can have faith in Cardinals’ prospect gets start against alma mater PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TANG • The Canadian Press

Patrik Berglund (21) reacts after scoring the winning goal against the Ottawa Senators during a shootout.

Blues surrender lead as time expires, prevail in marathon shootout

BLUES

4 > Reaves returns to lineup. B5

SENATORS

3

> Up next 7 p.m. Sunday at Minnesota, NBCSN

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OTTAWA • Vladimir Tarasenko’s 30th goal of the season gave the Blues a three-goal lead midway through Tuesday’s game in Ottawa. The Blues appeared to be cruising to a win that would put them in a three-way tie for first place in the Central Division. But there seems to be no such thing as having a game in the bag against Ottawa. Three times in the past two seasons the Senators have rallied from two goals down against the Blues and won, including earlier this season at Scottrade Center. The Sens did even up the score — as time expired, no less — but in the 11th round of the shootout, after 21 straight shooters had missed, Patrik Berglund ended the longest shootout in Blues history for a 4-3 win at Canadian Tire Centre. “I think we deserved to get these two points,” Berglund said. “We played a good 57 minutes. We faced some tough minutes there and I think we stayed positive, stayed strong and we came out with the two points.” See BLUES • Page B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Austin Gomber throws from a bullpen mound during spring training.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • When the Cardinals gave bud-

Blues goaltender Jake Allen lets in a goal by Ottawa’s Ryan Dzingel as the Senators’ Mark Stone looks on during the second period Tuesday night.

MVC tourney provides relief for area fans With Mizzou, SLU and Illinois having miserable seasons, Arch Madness is a tonic INSIDE > MVC tournament bracket. B3 > Louisiana State holds of Mizzou rally. B3 Wichita State’s Fred VanVleet >

ding prospect Austin Gomber some homework for the ofseason a little more than a year ago, the lefty took it back to school. The Florida Atlantic University UP NEXT > 12:05 p.m. alum returned to the Boca Raton, Wednesday vs. Fla., campus and showed his for- Florida Atlantic mer pitching coach, Jason Jackson, (exhibition) the curveball the Cardinals wanted him to use. He had a new grip and a new intent — throw it with force and watch the movement happen, don’t force the movement and watch nothing happen — and Jackson had one response. See CARDINALS • Page B4

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Like an unusually warm late winter afternoon prompts the premature opening of windows throughout the city, the start of March has a way of breathing new life into college basketball fans. This year,we need more than sunshine and a nice breeze. A defibrillator might do the trick. After a seasonlong coma caused by the Illini, Billikens and Tigers, a dose of Shockers should do the body wonders.The 26th edition of Missouri Valley Conference tournament as we know it here in St. Louis, a total of nine games played Thursday-Sunday at Scottrade Center, couldn’t come at a better time. If anyone could use a reminder of what college basketball is all about, it’s us. Please save us, Arch Madness. See FREDERICKSON • B3

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 3/2 *vs. Fla. Atlantic 12:05 p.m.

Thursday 3/3 *vs. Miami 12:05 p.m.

*Exhibition game

Friday 3/4 *at Houston 12:05 p.m.

Saturday 3/5 *at Miami 12:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 3/6 at Minnesota 7 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 3/9 vs. Chicago 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 3/11 vs. Anaheim 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/12 at Dallas 8 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 3/5 vs. Florida 6:30 p.m. SEC Network

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Thursday 3/3 at Maryland 6 p.m. ESPN

Sunday 3/6 at Penn State 11 a.m. BTN

March 9 or 10 Big Ten tourn. vs. TBA

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 3/2 at La Salle 6 p.m.

Saturday 3/5 vs. St. Bona. 7 p.m. FSM

March 9 or 10 Atlantic 10 tourn. vs. TBA

OTHER EVENTS AMERICAN INDOOR FOOTBALL • RIVER CITY RAIDERS (home games: KFNS) Sunday 3/13: vs. West Michigan, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon Exhibition: Tigers at Yankees, MLB BASKETBALL 10 a.m. College women: SEC tournament, LSU vs. Alabama, SEC Network Noon College women: ACC tournament, N. Carolina vs. Pittsburgh, FSM Noon College women: SEC tournament, Mississippi vs. Vanderbilt, SEC Network 12:30 p.m. College women: Big Ten tournament, Wisconsin vs. Northwestern, Big Ten Network 2:30 p.m. College women: ACC tournament, Clemson vs. Wake Forest, FSM 2:45 p.m. College women: Big Ten tournament, Illinois vs. Penn State, BTN 6 p.m. College: Michigan State at Rutgers, BTN 6 p.m. College: Davidson at VCU, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Miami at Notre Dame, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Tulane at Central Florida, ESPNews 6 p.m. College: Texas Tech at West Virginia, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Mississippi, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: St. Louis U. at La Salle, WXOS (101.1 FM) 7 p.m. NBA: Pistons at Spurs, ESPN 7 p.m. NBA: Kings at Grizzlies, FSM Plus 7 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Bucks, FSM 7:30 p.m. College: Seton Hall at Butler, FS1 8 p.m. College: Wisconsin at Minnesota, BTN 8 p.m. College: Creighton at Providence, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Oregon at UCLA, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: East Carolina at South Florida, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Arkansas at Alabama, SEC Network 9:30 p.m. NBA: Thunder at Clippers, ESPN 10 p.m. College: Colorado State at Fresno State, CBSSN 10 p.m. College: Washington State at Washington, ESPNU 10 p.m. College: Oregon State at USC, FS1 GOLF 9:30 p.m. LPGA: HSBC Champions, irst round, GOLF HOCKEY 7 p.m. NHL: Blackhawks at Red Wings, NBCSN SOCCER 1 p.m. Bundesliga: Bayern Munich vs. Mainz, FS1 1 p.m. Bundesliga: Arsenal vs. Hamburg SV, FS2 2 p.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 7 p.m. CONCACAF Champions League: Club America vs. Seattle, FS2 9 p.m. CONCACAF Champions League: Real Salt Lake vs. Tigres UANL, FS2

DIGEST Ivy League eliminates full contact in practice Ivy League football coaches have decided to eliminate all fullcontact hitting from practices during the regular season, the most aggressive measure yet to combat growing concerns about brain trauma and other injuries in the sport, The New York Times reports. The move could inluence how other football programs, from the youth level to the professionals, try to mitigate the physical toll of football, which has been played on Ivy League campuses since the 19th century. The eight Ivy League coaches unanimously approved the measure last week. Their decision is expected to be adopted formally once it is airmed by league oicials. The new rule would be in addition to the Ivy League’s existing limits on the amount of full contact in practice during the spring and preseason, which are among the most stringent in collegiate football. IOC removes itself from doping cases in Rio • In a major change in the handling of positive drug tests at the Olympics, the IOC agreed Tuesday to remove itself from the process and have a group of independent sports arbitrators rule on doping cases during the games in Rio de Janeiro. The change, approved by the International Olympic Committee’s executive board, is designed to make the prosecution of doping cases more independent by taking it away from the IOC and putting it in the hands of a special panel of the Court of Arbitration for Sport. FIU suspends coach after allegation of sexual advances • FIU women’s basketball coach Marlin Chinn has been suspended after one of his players told The Miami Herald that he pursued her sexually and gave her a $600 loan. The player, Destini Feagin, told the newspaper that she was suspended for four games because she resisted Chinn’s advances. The university announced Tuesday that an internal investigation continues, declining further comment. Andrews ofers tearful testimony • Sportscaster and TV host Erin Andrews testiied Tuesday that her career has thrived since a stalker took nude videos of her and posted them on the Internet, but she doesn’t think she’ll ever get over the emotional fallout. Andrews has been on the witness stand for two days in Nashville, Tenn., often giving tearful testimony about the fear and sufering she has gone through as a result of the stalking and the videos. She has iled a $75 million lawsuit against her stalker and the owner and operator of the Nashville Marriott at Vanderbilt. Lack of snow hampering Iditarod • A lack of snow in Alaska’s largest city is forcing organizers of the famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race to ship tons of it by train for the event’s ceremonial start. The mild winter in Anchorage also could mean a shorter version of the 11-mile route for the fan-friendly event Saturday, when temperatures are expected to climb above freezing. The competitive start of the race to the old gold rush town of Nome will be held Sunday in Willow, 50 miles north of Anchorage, where lower temperatures are expected. There have been other low-snow years afecting parts of the nearly 1,000-mile race. In fact, some might argue that moving the real start of the race last year 225 miles farther north to Fairbanks was far more dramatic because there was a wider section bare of snow last year. This year’s conditions are probably afected by shifting patterns caused by El Niño, National Weather Service meteorologist Sam Albanese said. From news services

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

Rams give Johnson franchise tag Move provides team the right to match any ofers elsewhere BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cornerback Trumaine Johnson has parlayed his breakout 2015 campaign into a big payday — albeit potentially for just one season. The Rams designated Johnson as their franchise player Tuesday, meaning at minimum he will be paid the one-year franchise player tender for his position — $13,952,000. That tender gives the team the right to match any ofers from other teams. If the Rams don’t match, they would receive compensation of two first-round draft picks. “Since we drafted Trumaine in 2012, he has developed into an integral part of our defense,” general manager Les Snead said in a statement. “We look forward to having him with us this season and more to come.” A team source had indicated to the Post-Dispatch several weeks ago that the Rams were considering placing the transition designation on Johnson. While $2 million cheaper, at $11,913,000, the transition tag would give the Rams no draft-pick compensation if Johnson got an ofer the Rams didn’t match. Flush with salary-cap space at $58.57 million, it made sense for the Rams to potentially spend the extra $2 million with the franchise tag to get the protection of two first-round draft picks. The idea, of course, with all franchise players is to work toward a long-term contract and avoid paying the big franchise number. Johnson finished tied for third in the NFL in interceptions last season, with seven, while adding 12 pass breakups and 69 tackles. By placing the franchise designation on Johnson, it means that another pending Rams free agent — cornerback Janoris Jenkins — probably will hit the open market March 9, the start of the NFL’s free agency and trading period. Johnson was among nine NFL players to receive the franchise tag by Tuesday’s deadline. The others: Denver linebacker Von Miller, Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins, Chicago wide receiver Alshon Jefery, Kansas City safety Eric Berry, Carolina cornerback Josh Norman, Bufalo ofensive tackle Cordy Glenn, New York Jets defensive end Muhamad Wilkerson and Baltimore kicker Justin Tucker. Miller was given the “exclusive” franchise tag designation, meaning he can negotiate only with the Broncos. The other franchise players tagged Tuesday are “non-exclusive” — meaning they can negotiate with other teams. As the Super Bowl MVP and a four-time Pro Bowler, Miller easily is the marquee name in this year’s franchise tag group. “Designating Von as our franchise player gives us the time to continue working toward a long-term agreement,” Broncos general manager John Elway said in a statement. But using the tag on Miller means that two other key Broncos who are pending free agents — quarterback Brock Osweiler and defensive end Malik Jackson — could hit the market March 9. Osweiler, espe-

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cornerback Trumaine Johnson will be paid at least $13,952,000 next season under contractual maneuvering done Tuesday by the Rams.

cially in a lean quarterback market, could attract a lot of attention. Non-exclusive franchise players get a one-year tender equal to the average of the top five paid players at their position last year. Exclusive franchise players get the average of the top five paid players at their position this year —potentially a larger number given what happens in free agency and contract extensions in the coming weeks. But whether exclusive or non-exclusive, the franchise designation almost always has the impact of taking a player of the market. In addition to the franchise tag designations, the Miami Dolphins placed the transition tag on defensive end Olivier Vernon. The transition tag gives the player a one-year tender equal to the average of the 10 highest-paid players at that position. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

NFL NOTEBOOK

Bradford gets at least $26 million from Eagles FROM NEWS SERVICES

Sam Bradford is staying in Philadelphia. Bradford agreed to a two-year contract with the Eagles on Tuesday, bypassing an opportunity to test free agency next week. The deal is worth up to $40 million, including incentives, with $26 million guaranteed, according to a person familiar with the deal. Terms weren’t publicly disclosed. He is coming off a six-year, $76 million contract he signed as a rookie with the Rams in 2010. Bradford joined the Eagles last season and compiled some career statistical bests, but the team finished 7-9 and coach Chip Kelly was fired. New coach Doug Pederson praised Bradford’s skills, and those in the team’s front oice decided to keep the injury-prone former No. 1 overall pick without committing to him for the long term. Bradford, 28, was acquired by the Eagles last March in a deal that sent Philadelphia’s incumbent quarterback, Nick Foles, to the Rams along with a secondround draft pick this spring. Bradford started 14 games and threw for a careerhigh 3,725 yards, the fourth-highest yardage total in franchise history. His 346 completions and his careerbest 65.03 completion percentage were single-season team records. He missed two games after spraining a shoulder and receiving a concussion. Bradford was the NFL’s ofensive rookie of the year for the Rams in 2010, but knee injuries curtailed his progress. He missed seven games in 2013 after tearing a knee ligament and sat out the 2014 season after tearing it again. Bradford, who won the Heisman Trophy at Oklahoma in 2008, is 25-37-1 in five seasons and has never played for a winning team. The Eagles have re-signed or extended several contracts so far, and Bradford’s teammates have emphatically endorsed keeping him. Starr in long-ago hazing incident • Quarterback Bart Starr was lucky to have a professional football career at all, let alone a Hall of Fame one. According to a report from AL.com, Starr’s wife, Cherry, revealed a long-held secret that the severe back injury the quarterback always maintained was the result of a punting exercise occurred because of a brutal hazing incident he sufered at the University of Alabama. Cherry Starr told AL.com that he was beaten so badly with a paddle during an initiation into the university’s A-Club for varsity lettermen that he was hospitalized and failed his Air Force medical examination after his rookie season with the Green Bay Packers. “He was ...at one point in traction,” Cherry Starr told the website. “... They lined up with a big paddle with holes drilled in it, and it actually injured his back.” Alabama tight end Nick Germanos, who was a team-

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

FAX • 314-340-3070 E-MAIL • soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE • Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com MAIL • Sports Sound Of, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

ASSOCIATED PRESS

When his new deal ends, Sam Bradford will have been paid at least $102 million total by the Rams and Eagles.

mate of Starr’s and Alabama’s senior captain in 1955, corroborated the report, saying the hazings for the AClub were worse than anything he experienced during his three-plus years in the Marine Corps. “It was hell,” Germanos said. “Lord have mercy it was a rough initiation.” Starr never revealed to the public the cause of his back injury, which derailed his junior season in 1954 and caused him to play in pain until doctors decided he needed to be immobilized. Cherry Starr said that her husband thought that if he revealed the truth it would make him look bad. She said the injury bothered him throughout his professional career. “His back was never right after that,” she said. “... His whole back all the way up to his rib cage looked like a piece of raw meat. The bruising went all the way up his back. ... It was so brutal.” Starr played 16 NFL seasons and led the Packers to five NFL titles. He was a four-time Pro Bowl selection and league MVP in 1966. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977. Starr, 82, has overcome two strokes, a broken hip, a heart attack, a viral bronchial infection and multiple seizures in recent years. He was not quoted in the story AL.com did on the hazing because many of his football memories have faded. Elsewhere • The Bills released high-priced defensive end Mario Williams, freeing nearly $13 million in payroll next season. Williams’ production dropped last season and he had just five sacks. • The Saints released Marques Colston, 32, who holds franchise receiving records for catches (711), yards (9,759) and touchdowns (72). • The Packers agreed to a four-year deal with kicker Mason Crosby, reported to be for $16 million..

CONTACT US To e-mail editors, use irst initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222 Roger Hensley Assistant Managing Editor | Sports 314-340-8301 Cameron Hollway Deputy Sports Editor 314-340-8392 Don Reed Deputy Sports Editor | Nights 314-340-8313 Mike Smith Assistant Sports Editor | Online 314-340-8137 Mike Reilly Assistant Sports Editor | Nights 314-340-8178 Chris Gove High School Sports 314-744-5725


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

03.02.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

SLU AT LA SALLE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

ROUNDUP

Oklahoma escapes collapse against Baylor HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

When • 6 p.m. Wednesday Where • Tom Gola Arena, Philadelphia Radio • WXOS (101.1 FM) All-time series • SLU leads 12-6. Records • SLU is 10-18, 5-11 Atlantic 10; La Salle is 7-20, 3-13. About the Billikens • SLU enters the game in a three-way tie for 10th place with only a game at home against St. Bonaventure to follow. ... Guard Mike Crawford has led the team in rebounds two of the last three games and has averaged 7.3 over that stretch. ... Reggie Agbeko has become more eicient ofensively of late and has shot 73 percent over the last five games. ... SLU remains last in the A-10 in blocked shots, averaging 1.9 per game. About the Explorers • La Salle ranks last in the A-10 in scoring (63.3), field goal percentage (40.3), field goal percentage defense (46.6) and rebounding margin (minus 8.0 per game). ... The Explorers do have home wins over Dayton (61-57) and St. Bonaventure (71-64). In between those two games, they sufered 10 consecutive losses. ... Jordan Price, who transferred from Auburn, is the second-leading scorer in the conference, averaging 18.9 points. Stu Durando

1. Kansas (26-4) idle.

Buddy Hield scored 23 points in his final home game, and No. 6 Oklahoma squandered a 26-point lead before regrouping to defeat No. 19 Baylor 73-71 on Tuesday night. Hield scored 13 points in the game’s first 8 minutes, but the Sooners fell apart in the second half. Seniors Hield, Ryan Spangler and Isaiah Cousins have started 97 consecutive games together, and all three played key roles for the Sooners. Spangler had 15 points and 13 rebounds, and Cousins scored 10 points for Oklahoma (23-6, 11-6 Big 12), which broke a tie with the Bears for third place in the conference and swept the regularseason series. Taurean Prince and King McClure scored 17 points each for Baylor (21-9, 10-7), which outscored the Sooners 46-29 in the second half. Baylor shot 67 percent in the second half and made 6 of 10 3-point attempts. (AP) SLU women capture honors • St. Louis University sophomore guard Jackie Kemph was named the Atlantic 10 co-player of the year and coach Lisa Stone the coach of the year, giving the program two awards never previously won in 41 years of women’s basketball. Guard Jamesia Price and center Sadie Stipanovich were named to the A-10 third team and to the league’s all-defensive team. Kemph leads the Billikens, who are 23-6, in scoring with a 16.4-point average and assists with 7.1. She is fifth in the country in assists and broke the SLU single-season record with 205. She shared the player of the year award with Duquesne senior April Robinson. Stone was named coach of the year in her fourth season at SLU. She took over a program that

Next: vs. No. 21 Iowa State, Saturday. 2. Michigan State (24-5) idle. Next: at Rutgers, Wednesday. 3. Villanova (26-4) beat DePaul 83-62. Next: vs. Georgetown, Saturday. 4. Virginia (23-6) beat Clemson 64-57. Next: vs. No. 11 Louisville, Saturday. 5. Xavier (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Saturday. 6. Oklahoma (23-6) beat No. 19 Baylor 73-71. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 7. Miami (23-5) idle. Next: at Notre Dame, Wednesday. 8. North Carolina (24-6) idle. Next: at No. 17 Duke, Saturday. 9. Oregon (23-6) idle. Next: at UCLA, Wednesday. 10. West Virginia (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 11. Louisville (23-7) beat Georgia Tech 56-53. Next: at No. 4 Virginia, Saturday. 12. Indiana (24-6) beat No. 16 Iowa 81-78. Next: vs. No. 14 Maryland, Sunday. 13. Utah (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday. 14. Maryland (23-6) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Thurs.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oklahoma guard Buddy Hield drives to the basket as Baylor guard Ishmail Wainright defends during the second half Tuesday night.

produced an 11-20 record before she arrived and has improved the team’s winning percentage each season. (Stu Durando) Cunningham top freshman • Mizzou freshman guard Sophie Cunningham, junior forward Jordan Frericks and freshman forward Cierra Porter each earned All-Southeastern Conference recognition following a vote by the league’s head coaches, it was announced Tuesday. Cunningham became the first player in program history to be named SEC freshman of the year and was also named secondteam All-SEC and a member of the All-Freshman team.

Tigers narrow 22-point gap down to three before LSU pulls away in the inal minutes

BATON ROUGE, LA. • Ben Simmons led the Louisiana State fast break down the court after a missed Mizzou 3-point attempt. Freshman Brandon Sampson, averaging just 4.1 points per game, paced ahead and anticipated his teammate’s actions. Simmons underhanded a nolook, cross-court pass. Sampson caught the ball in stride, leapt to the basket and laid it in. Sampson, a seldom-used guard dwarfed by his classmate’s international acclaim, buried a 3-pointer on his team’s next possession — given to LSU by one of Mizzou’s 13 turnovers in the first half. The flurry extended a 12-2 run that was too deep for even Mizzou’s most spirited rally to overcome as LSU won 80-71 on Tuesday night to improve to 8-12, 11-6 in the Southeastern Conference. MU fell to 10-20, 3-14. And it further reairmed a shared theme among Mizzou players this week — they’d be opposed by more than just Simmons’ international fame and NBA prestige in the search for their first road victory in more than two years. Though Simmons led all scorers (22 points) and finished three assists shy of a triple double, Sampson keyed the first-half surge and fellow freshman Antonio Blakeney buried the big dagger to derail Mizzou’s second-half surge Mizzou entered its locker room down 46-24, the result of a sluggish first half in which it shot just 35 percent and two of its three leading scorers in the game — Ryan Rosburg and Kevin Puryear — combined to score just five points. Missouri emerged in the second half to exploit the SEC’s worst defense, scoring 47 points on a blistering 60 percent shooting clip to erase much of a 22-point deficit. Rosburg and Puryear scored the first six points of the second half to force LSU coach Johnny Jones into a quick timeout. Puryear buried his first 3-pointer of the night on Mizzou’s next possession and, after two Simmons foul shots, Namon Wright hit a 3 of his own to slice LSU’s lead to 14 points. MU’s deficit kept shrinking, dwindling to 11 when Terrence Phillips hit a jumper from the

Next: vs. Wisconsin, Sunday. 16. Iowa (20-9) lost to No. 12 Indiana 81-78. Next: at Michigan, Saturday.

MU can’t overcome big halftime deicit BY CHANDLER ROME Special to the Post-Dispatch

15. Purdue (23-7) beat Nebraska 81-62.

LSU 80, MISSOURI 71 FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Puryear 26 4-8 2-2 1-3 1 2 13 Rosburg 30 5-7 3-5 4-5 3 5 13 Phillips 33 5-11 2-2 0-2 4 2 13 Isabell 18 2-8 0-0 2-3 0 1 4 Wright 32 2-6 0-0 0-8 1 1 5 Walton 16 4-6 0-0 0-1 1 1 11 Barton 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Gant 16 3-4 0-0 3-5 0 0 6 Woods 8 1-2 0-0 1-2 0 3 2 VanLeer 18 2-6 0-0 0-1 1 0 4 Totals 200 28-58 7-9 11-32 11 16 71 Percentages: FG.483, FT.778. 3-point goals: 8-23, .348. Team rebounds: 2. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 15. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: Bench. FG FT Reb LSU Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Simmons 37 6-8 10-11 4-14 7 3 22 Victor II 31 5-11 0-2 0-2 1 4 10 Blakeney 37 5-11 6-6 0-2 2 2 18 Gray 15 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 0 4 Patterson 32 1-4 0-0 0-1 1 0 3 Sampson 11 3-5 1-2 0-0 1 0 8 Shortess 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Malone 12 2-3 0-1 0-3 0 3 4 Quarterman 25 4-8 1-2 3-4 6 1 11 Totals 200 28-53 18-24 8-29 20 13 80 Percentages: FG.528, FT.750. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 2. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. Missouri 24 47 — 71 LSU 46 34 — 80 A: 9,652. Officials: Tony Henderson, Jeff Clark, James Breeding.

top of the key and Mizzou drew a charge on Simmons at the other end. Rosburg bullied LSU’s other Aussie — seven-footer Darcy Malone — for a post bucket to bring his Tigers within single digits for the first time since early first in the contest. Walton buried a 3-pointer at the top of the key to cut the lead to six, capping a 7-0 run, with 6:49 left. Rosburg’s putback a minute later pulled MU within four and, after a Simmons layup, Walton hit his third 3-pointer of the second half to get Mizzou within three points – the closest the score had been since it was 4-2. But it was Blakeney, burying a 3 from the wing to reignite a sparse senior night crowd, to push the lead back to six and force Missouri coach Kim Anderson to call a timeout. Phillips banked a driving, uncontested layup out of the huddle before LSU guard Tim Quarterman swished a 3 of his own, pushing LSU’s lead to 71-64. Mizzou thereafter never got to within fewer than five points and its situation was complicated when Rosburg fouled out with 1:57 to go and Simmons hit all six of his final free throws. Rosburg finished with 13 points, as did Puryear and Phillips to lead Mizzou.

For the second straight year, Frericks earned second-team All-SEC recognition, while Porter garnered All-Freshman team honors. (AP)

17. Duke (22-8) beat Wake Forest 79-71. Next: vs. No. 8 North Carolina, Saturday. 18. Arizona (22-7) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 California, Thursday. 19. Baylor (21-9) lost to No. 6 Oklahoma 73-71.

Minnesota suspends three • Minnesota’s season was lost long ago. The Gophers will finish it even more short-handed than they were before. Coach Richard Pitino announced Tuesday that guards Kevin Dorsey, Nate Mason and Dupree McBrayer will be suspended for the remainder of the season, stemming from a sexually explicit video that appeared on Dorsey’s social media accounts. (AP)

Next: vs. No. 10 West Virginia, Saturday. 20. Texas A&M (23-7) beat Auburn 81-63. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Saturday. 21. Iowa State (21-9) idle. Next: at No. 1 Kansas, Saturday. 22. Kentucky (22-8) beat Florida 88-79. Next: vs. LSU, Saturday. 23. Texas (19-11) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Fri. 24. SMU (24-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 25. California (21-8) idle. Next: at No. 18 Arizona, Thursday.

Valley tourney sparks basketball interest FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Foolishly, I made a New Year’s prediction that one of our area’s high major teams would make the NCAA Tournament field. I was banking on Illinois, which promptly dropped 10 of 15 games after the calendar flipped to 2016. Illinois (13-16), SLU (10-18) and Mizzou (10-20) each entered March below .500. That hadn’t happened since 197778. Back then, the Illini were 12-13, the Tigers were 12-15 and the Billikens were 7-19. But enough about them. I’m not here to engage in the increasingly popular debate taking place around printers and cofee machines: Could Chaminade beat Mizzou and/or SLU? And we’re talking about the high school, not the university in Hawaii that upended No. 1 Virginia in 1982 in perhaps college basketball’s biggest upset. I’m not going to make a case that SLU would be better of in the Missouri Valley Conference than its current, ill-suited home in the Atlantic 10. That’s a column for another day. And there will be plenty of time to speculate on the future of area coaches on the hot seat. It’s about the only topic that moves the needle these days. It shouldn’t be. Not this week. The MVC tournament, which will stay in St. Louis through at least 2018, deserves our attention. Turn on the TV. Better yet, buy a ticket. I bet you will be happy you did. The field features star seniors who stuck around long enough to make historic impacts at their schools, colorful coaches such as Barry Hinson of Southern Illinois University Carbondale and three teams with at least 22s wins for the first time. A trip to the NCAA Tournament is on the

line. Mix in an event that has drawn 50,000-plus total fans in each of the last 13 seasons, and voilà. The cure for our college basketball blues. “You take all those teams in the region, and the next thing you know, you look up, and, golly,” Hinson said this week. “When those teams are doing well, those crowds follow extremely well. That’s what makes it, in the truest form, Arch Madness.” The frontrunner, of course, is Wichita State. For the fourth time in five seasons, the Shockers hold the No. 1 seed. Coach Gregg Marshall’s group, led by Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet — the first guard duo to earn firstteam all-conference honors in three consecutive seasons — built an absurd 51-3 conference record the past three seasons, claimed three straight regularseason conference titles and punched tickets to the Sweet 16 (2015) and Final Four (2013). These Shockers (23-7) have won their last five games by an average of 26.4 points. Twentyone of their wins have been by 13-plus points. Their two conference losses came by total of eight points. “Here’s a great example,” Loyola coach Porter Moser said. “We’re up 20 with ... I’m sorry, I wish I was up 20 against Wichita ... We’re down 20 against Wichita last week. And I don’t know how much time is left. Four, five minutes. We were on the free throw line. And VanVleet was yelling at his players. He was (angry) at what just happened. When you have your leaders putting (in) that much emphasis, and taking it to heart, it permeates the team. It spreads through the team. It’s contagious.” Perhaps you prefer to pull for the challenger instead of the

favorite. No. 2 Evansville (23-8) features the one-two punch of senior guard D.J. Balentine, who ranks 20th nationally in scoring with a 20.7 point average, plus senior center Egidijus Mockevicius, a 6-foot-10 Lithuanian who leads the nation with 14 rebounds a game. The Aces had to rely on their RPI to break a tiebreaker with No. 3 Illinois State (18-13). Both were 12-6 in league play. Then there is No. 4 Northern Iowa (19-12), the defending MVC tourney champion and current dark horse looming on the Shockers’ side of the bracket. Coach Ben Jacobson’s Panthers have won nine of their last 10 games. A 53-50 victory at Wichita State on Feb. 13 occurred during the surge. Senior point guard Wes Washpun averages 14.1 points, 5.4 assists and 4.1 rebounds. The 6-foot-1 spark plug might be the best pound-for-pound dunker in the league. If you prefer to pull for a Rudy, how about No. 10 Drake? The Bulldogs (7-23) had a rough go, but they are feeling good after an overtime win at Loyola last week. “We’ve got a young group, and they found a way to finish something,” Drake coach Ray Giacoletti said. “We haven’t done a very good job of that in the conference. So, hopefully we have a little confidence going into St. Louis now.” It’s March. It’s OK to be optimistic. College basketball is supposed to be fun, remember? My next bold prediction is that Arch Madness will be a blast. Hey, it’s got a better chance of panning out than Illinois. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT THURSDAY 1 Loyola (14-16)

FRIDAY 1 Wichita St. (23-7)

SATURDAY

MARCH 6

12:05 p.m. (FSM)

6:05 p.m. (FSM) 2:35 P.M. TV: CBS Sports Net.

1 Bradley (5-26) 4 N. Iowa (19-12) 2:35 p.m. (FSM)

5 SIUC (22-9)

TITLE GAME 1:05 p.m. KMOV (Ch. 4)

2 Evansville (23-8) 7 Missouri State (12-18)

6:05 p.m. (FSM)

8:35 p.m. (FSM) 5:05 p.m. TV: CBS Sports Net.

10 Drake (7-23) 3 Illinois State (18-13) 8:35 p.m. (FSM)

6 Indiana State (14-16)


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

03.02.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

MU can’t overcome big halftime deicit

SLU AT LA SALLE

Tigers narrow 22-point gap to three before LSU pulls away in the inal minutes LSU 80, MISSOURI 71

BY CHANDLER ROME Special to the Post-Dispatch

FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Puryear 26 4-8 2-2 1-3 1 2 13 Rosburg 30 5-7 3-5 4-5 3 5 13 Phillips 33 5-11 2-2 0-2 4 2 13 Isabell 18 2-8 0-0 2-3 0 1 4 Wright 32 2-6 0-0 0-8 1 1 5 Walton 16 4-6 0-0 0-1 1 1 11 Barton 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Gant 16 3-4 0-0 3-5 0 0 6 Woods 8 1-2 0-0 1-2 0 3 2 VanLeer 18 2-6 0-0 0-1 1 0 4 Totals 200 28-58 7-9 11-32 11 16 71 Percentages: FG.483, FT.778. 3-point goals: 8-23, .348. Team rebounds: 2. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 15. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: Bench. FG FT Reb LSU Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Simmons 37 6-8 10-11 4-14 7 3 22 Victor II 31 5-11 0-2 0-2 1 4 10 Blakeney 37 5-11 6-6 0-2 2 2 18 Gray 15 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 0 4 Patterson 32 1-4 0-0 0-1 1 0 3 Sampson 11 3-5 1-2 0-0 1 0 8 Shortess 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Malone 12 2-3 0-1 0-3 0 3 4 Quarterman 25 4-8 1-2 3-4 6 1 11 Totals 200 28-53 18-24 8-29 20 13 80 Percentages: FG.528, FT.750. 3-point goals: 6-16, .375. Team rebounds: 2. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. Missouri 24 47 — 71 LSU 46 34 — 80 A: 9,652. Officials: Tony Henderson, Jeff Clark, James Breeding.

BATON ROUGE, LA. • Ben Sim-

mons led Louisiana State’s fast break down the court after a missed Mizzou 3-point attempt. Freshman Brandon Sampson, averaging just 4.1 points per game, raced ahead and anticipated his teammate’s actions. Simmons underhanded a nolook, cross-court pass. Sampson caught the ball in stride, leapt to the basket and laid it in. “You go in, you try to double him, you try to help and not only is he a good passer, he’s a quick passer,” Mizzou coach Kim Anderson said. “Zips that thing in a hurry.” Sampson, a seldom-used guard dwarfed by his classmate’s international acclaim, buried a 3-pointer on his team’s next possession — given to LSU by one of Mizzou’s 13 turnovers in the first half. The flurry extended a 12-2 firsthalf run that was too deep for even Mizzou’s spirited rally to overcome as LSU won 80-71 to improve to 1812, 11-6 in the Southeastern Conference. Missouri fell to 10-20, 3-14. And it reairmed a shared theme among Mizzou players this week — they’d be opposed by more than just Simmons’ widespread fame and NBA prestige in search of their first road victory in more than two years. Though Simmons led all scorers (22 points) and finished three assists shy of a triple double, Sampson keyed the first-half surge and fellow freshman Antonio Blakeney struck the big shot to derail Mizzou’s second-half surge. K.J. Walton buried a 3-pointer from the top of the key — his third of the second half — to cut what once was a 22-point LSU lead to three with 4:48 left, getting Mizzou into a one-possession game for the first time since the score was 4-2. Simmons brought the ball up court and rifled a pass to Blakeney, who buried a 3 from the wing to reignite a sparse senior night crowd, pushing the lead back to six

HILARY SCHEINUK • The Advocate

Louisiana State’s Antonio Blakeney regains control of the ball after Mizzou’s Terrence Phillips lost his footing during the game Tuesday.

points and forcing Anderson to call a timeout. “(Simmons) makes everybody a lot better, especially guys who are catch-and-shoot guys,” Mizzou guard Terrence Phillips said. “All they have to do is spot up because he draws so much attention when he’s inside 15 feet, everyone has to collapse and he finds the right guy at the right time.” Keyed by a 60 percent shooting clip and just two turnovers, MU emerged from its locker room refreshed after allowing LSU to score 16 points off Mizzou’s 13 first-half turnovers. MU’s Ryan Rosburg and Kevin Puryear combined to score just five points in the first 20 minutes, which left Anderson so incensed he received a technical foul for the second straight game as the seconds ticked down, protesting a

ROUNDUP

Oklahoma escapes collapse against Baylor FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Buddy Hield scored 23 points in his final home game, and No. 6 Oklahoma squandered a 26-point lead before regrouping to defeat No. 19 Baylor 73-71 on Tuesday night. Hield scored 13 points in the first 8 minutes, but the Sooners fell apart in the second half. Seniors Hield, Ryan Spangler and Isaiah Cousins have started 97 consecutive games together, and all three played key roles for the Sooners. Spangler had 15 points and 13 rebounds, and Cousins scored 10 points for Oklahoma (23-6, 11-6 Big 12), which broke a tie with the Bears for third place in the conference and swept the regular-season series. Taurean Prince and King McClure scored 17 points each for Baylor (21-9, 10-7), which outscored the Sooners 46-29 in the second half. (AP) Indiana wins Big 10 • The thought of Indiana winning even a sliver of the Big Ten title seemed far-fetched in January. After two months of inspired play, the Hoosiers have claimed the crown. Yogi Ferrell had 20 points, including a crucial 3 with 37 seconds, and No. 12 Indiana clinched its second outright Big Ten title in four years by holding off No. 16 Iowa 81-78. (AP) SLU women capture honors • St. Louis University sophomore guard Jackie Kemph was named the Atlantic 10 co-player of the year and coach Lisa Stone the coach of the year, giving the program two awards never previously won in 41 years of women’s basketball. Guard Jamesia Price and center Sadie Stipanovich were named to the A-10 third team and the league’s all-defensive team. Kemph leads the Billikens in scoring with a 16.4-point average and assists with 7.1. She is fifth in the country in assists and broke the SLU single-season record with 205. Stone won the coaching honor in her fourth season. The Billikens are 23-6 after finishing at 15-16 last season. (Stu Durand0) Cunningham top freshman • Mizzou freshman guard Sophie Cunningham, junior forward Jordan Frericks and freshman forward Cierra Porter each earned All-Southeastern Conference recognition following a vote by the league’s head coaches, it was announced Tuesday. Cunningham became the first player in program history to be named SEC freshman of the year and was also named second-team AllSEC and a member of the All-Freshman team. For the second straight year, Frericks earned second-team All-SEC recognition, while Porter garnered All-Freshman team honors. (AP) Minnesota suspends three • Minnesota coach Richard Pitino announced Tuesday that guards Kevin Dorsey, Nate Mason and Dupree McBrayer will be suspended for the remainder of the season, stemming from a sexually explicit video that appeared on Dorsey’s social media accounts. (AP)

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Kansas (26-4) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Iowa State, Saturday. 2. Michigan State (24-5) idle. Next: at Rutgers, Wednesday. 3. Villanova (26-4) beat DePaul 83-62. Next: vs. Georgetown, Saturday. 4. Virginia (23-6) beat Clemson 64-57. Next: vs. No. 11 Louisville, Saturday. 5. Xavier (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Saturday. 6. Oklahoma (23-6) beat No. 19 Baylor 73-71. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 7. Miami (23-5) idle. Next: at Notre Dame, Wednesday. 8. North Carolina (24-6) idle. Next: at No. 17 Duke, Saturday. 9. Oregon (23-6) idle. Next: at UCLA, Wednesday. 10. West Virginia (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 11. Louisville (23-7) beat Georgia Tech 56-53. Next: at No. 4 Virginia, Saturday. 12. Indiana (24-6) beat No. 16 Iowa 81-78. Next: vs. No. 14 Maryland, Sunday. 13. Utah (23-7) idle. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday. 14. Maryland (23-6) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Thurs. 15. Purdue (23-7) beat Nebraska 81-62. Next: vs. Wisconsin, Sunday. 16. Iowa (20-9) lost to No. 12 Indiana 81-78. Next: at Michigan, Saturday. 17. Duke (22-8) beat Wake Forest 79-71. Next: vs. No. 8 North Carolina, Saturday. 18. Arizona (22-7) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 California, Thurs. 19. Baylor (21-9) lost to No. 6 Oklahoma 73-71. Next: vs. No. 10 West Virginia, Saturday. 20. Texas A&M (23-7) beat Auburn 81-63. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Saturday.

hard Simmons screen. “We were horrible,” Anderson said. “We had no energy, turned the ball over too much, didn’t get back on defense. We had a good discussion at halftime and I really wasn’t sure how we’d respond, but I thought the real key was that we were able to get some buckets early.” Rosburg and Puryear scored the first six points of the second half to force LSU coach Johnny Jones into a quick timeout, after which Puryear hit his first 3-pointer of the night. Namon Wright then hit a 3 of his own to slice LSU’s lead to 14 points. MU’s deficit kept shrinking, dwindling to 11 points when Phillips hit a jumper from the top of the key with 8:44 to go and Mizzou drew a charge on Simmons at the other end. Rosburg bullied LSU’s other Aussie — 7-footer Darcy Malone

23. Texas (19-11) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Fri. 24. SMU (24-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 25. California (21-8) idle. Next: at No. 18 Arizona, Thursday.

Where • Tom Gola Arena, Philadelphia Radio • WXOS (101.1 FM) All-time series • SLU leads 12-6. Records • SLU is 10-18, 5-11 Atlantic 10; La Salle is 7-20, 3-13. About the Billikens • SLU enters the game in a three-way tie for 10th place with only a game at home against St. Bonaventure to follow. ... Guard Mike Crawford has led the team in rebounds two of the last three games and has averaged 7.3 over that stretch. ... Reggie Agbeko has become more eicient ofensively of late and has shot 73 percent over the last five games. ... SLU remains last in the A-10 in blocked shots, averaging 1.9 per game. About the Explorers • La Salle ranks last in the A-10 in scoring (63.3), field goal percentage (40.3), field goal percentage defense (46.6) and rebounding margin (minus 8.0 per game). ... The Explorers do have home wins over Dayton (61-57) and St. Bonaventure (71-64). In between those two games, they sufered 10 consecutive losses. ... Jordan Price, who transferred from Auburn, is the second-leading scorer in the conference, averaging 18.9 points. Stu Durando

Valley tourney sparks basketball interest FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Foolishly, I made a New Year’s prediction that one of our area’s high major teams would make the NCAA Tournament field. I was banking on Illinois, which promptly dropped 10 of 15 games after the calendar flipped to 2016. Illinois (13-16), SLU (10-18) and Mizzou (10-20) each entered March below .500. That hadn’t happened since 197778. Back then, the Illini were 12-13, the Tigers were 12-15 and the Billikens were 7-19. But enough about them. I’m not here to engage in the increasingly popular debate taking place around printers and cofee machines: Could Chaminade beat Mizzou and/or SLU? And we’re talking about the high school, not the university in Hawaii that upended No. 1 Virginia in 1982 in perhaps college basketball’s biggest upset. I’m not going to make a case that SLU would be better of in the Missouri Valley Conference than its current, ill-suited home in the Atlantic 10. That’s a column for another day. And there will be plenty of time to speculate on the future of area coaches on the hot seat. It’s about the only topic that moves the needle these days. It shouldn’t be. Not this week. The MVC tournament, which will stay in St. Louis through at least 2018, deserves our attention. Turn on the TV. Better yet, buy a ticket. I bet you will be happy you did. The field features star seniors who stuck around long enough to make historic impacts at their schools, colorful coaches such as Barry Hinson of Southern Illinois University Carbondale and three teams with at least 22s wins for the first time. A trip to the NCAA Tournament is on the

line. Mix in an event that has drawn 50,000-plus total fans in each of the last 13 seasons, and voilà. The cure for our college basketball blues. “You take all those teams in the region, and the next thing you know, you look up, and, golly,” Hinson said this week. “When those teams are doing well, those crowds follow extremely well. That’s what makes it, in the truest form, Arch Madness.” The frontrunner, of course, is Wichita State. For the fourth time in five seasons, the Shockers hold the No. 1 seed. Coach Gregg Marshall’s group, led by Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet — the first guard duo to earn firstteam all-conference honors in three consecutive seasons — built an absurd 51-3 conference record the past three seasons, claimed three straight regularseason conference titles and punched tickets to the Sweet 16 (2015) and Final Four (2013). These Shockers (23-7) have won their last five games by an average of 26.4 points. Twentyone of their wins have been by 13-plus points. Their two conference losses came by total of eight points. “Here’s a great example,” Loyola coach Porter Moser said. “We’re up 20 with ... I’m sorry, I wish I was up 20 against Wichita ... We’re down 20 against Wichita last week. And I don’t know how much time is left. Four, five minutes. We were on the free throw line. And VanVleet was yelling at his players. He was (angry) at what just happened. When you have your leaders putting (in) that much emphasis, and taking it to heart, it permeates the team. It spreads through the team. It’s contagious.” Perhaps you prefer to pull for the challenger instead of the

favorite. No. 2 Evansville (23-8) features the one-two punch of senior guard D.J. Balentine, who ranks 20th nationally in scoring with a 20.7 point average, plus senior center Egidijus Mockevicius, a 6-foot-10 Lithuanian who leads the nation with 14 rebounds a game. The Aces had to rely on their RPI to break a tiebreaker with No. 3 Illinois State (18-13). Both were 12-6 in league play. Then there is No. 4 Northern Iowa (19-12), the defending MVC tourney champion and current dark horse looming on the Shockers’ side of the bracket. Coach Ben Jacobson’s Panthers have won nine of their last 10 games. A 53-50 victory at Wichita State on Feb. 13 occurred during the surge. Senior point guard Wes Washpun averages 14.1 points, 5.4 assists and 4.1 rebounds. The 6-foot-1 spark plug might be the best pound-for-pound dunker in the league. If you prefer to pull for a Rudy, how about No. 10 Drake? The Bulldogs (7-23) had a rough go, but they are feeling good after an overtime win at Loyola last week. “We’ve got a young group, and they found a way to finish something,” Drake coach Ray Giacoletti said. “We haven’t done a very good job of that in the conference. So, hopefully we have a little confidence going into St. Louis now.” It’s March. It’s OK to be optimistic. College basketball is supposed to be fun, remember? My next bold prediction is that Arch Madness will be a blast. Hey, it’s got a better chance of panning out than Illinois. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT THURSDAY 1 Loyola (14-16)

FRIDAY 1 Wichita St. (23-7)

SATURDAY

MARCH 6

12:05 p.m. (FSM)

6:05 p.m. (FSM) 2:35 P.M. TV: CBS Sports Net.

1 Bradley (5-26) 4 N. Iowa (19-12) 2:35 p.m. (FSM)

21. Iowa State (21-9) idle. Next: at No. 1 Kansas, Sat. 22. Kentucky (22-8) beat Florida 88-79. Next: vs. LSU, Saturday.

— for a post bucket to bring his Tigers within single digits for the first time since early in the game. “We know we’re better basketball players than what we showed in the first half and we came out in the second half and we played like it,” Puryear said. “We outscored them in the second half, and I think if we put two halves together, we win that game. Carrying over into next season, we have to win those games.” Phillips banked a driving layup out of the huddle before Blakeney’s clutch shot. Mizzou never would get closer than five points and matters were complicated when Rosburg fouled out with 1:57 to go. Simmons hit his final six free throws. “This has been a tough time and our guys, we got one more game left (at home Saturday against Florida),” Anderson said. “I’ve tried to continually tell our guys ‘Hey try to get better.’ … Maybe at the beginning we were just a little bit lethargic, I don’t know, but I thought we came back in the second half and played with a lot more energy.”

When • 6 p.m. Wednesday

5 SIUC (22-9)

TITLE GAME 1:05 p.m. KMOV (Ch. 4)

2 Evansville (23-8) 7 Missouri State (12-18)

6:05 p.m. (FSM)

8:35 p.m. (FSM) 5:05 p.m. TV: CBS Sports Net.

10 Drake (7-23) 3 Illinois State (18-13) 8:35 p.m. (FSM)

6 Indiana State (14-16)


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MLB NOTEBOOK Chapman accepts suspension New York Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman agreed to accept a 30-game suspension under Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy, a penalty stemming from an incident with his girlfriend in October. Under the discipline announced Tuesday, Chapman will serve the penalty from the start of the season in April. He will lose 30 days of pay — $1,856,557 of his $11,325,000 salary — and 30 days of major league service, which will allow him to reach six years of service time after this season, enough to become eligible for free agency. “I found Mr. Chapman’s acknowledged conduct on that day to be inappropriate ... particularly his use of a irearm and the impact of that behavior on his partner,” baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. “I am gratiied that Mr. Chapman has taken responsibility for his conduct.” Chapman became the irst player penalized a inite number of games under the policy, which MLB and the players’ association agreed to in August following several high-proile incidents among NFL players. Colorado shortstop Jose Reyes was given an indeinite paid suspension last week, pending a trial scheduled for April 4, following an alleged altercation with his wife in October. Baseball’s investigation of Chapman stemmed from Oct. 30. Chapman’s girlfriend, Cristina Barnea, 22, told police he pushed and choked her. Chapman said there was an argument but that he was pushed down by Barnea’s brother, eventually getting a handgun and iring eight shots into a wall and window while locked in his garage. Puig not expecting suspension, report says • Los Angeles Dodgers outielder Yasiel Puig is not expected to be suspended for an alleged domestic violence incident involving his sister, ESPN.com reported, citing sources who spoke with ESPN’s Pedro Gomez. Puig, 25, was involved in an incident at a Miami bar in November in which police said he got into a ight with a bouncer. Reports alleged that Puig also shoved his sister. Neither Puig nor the bouncer pressed charges. Perez gets $52 million deal with Royals • Salvador Perez and the Kansas City Royals have agreed to a contract through 2021 guaranteeing the All-Star catcher an additional $52.5 million over ive seasons. Perez’s agreement was announced Tuesday, one day after his mother, Yilda, had her SUV stolen at gunpoint in Venezuela. His mother was unharmed and the vehicle was later recovered by the national police. Perez signed with the Royals as a 16-year-old prospect from Venezuela and shot through the minor league system. He made his big league debut in 2011, became the everyday backstop the following season and has been voted to the All-Star Game each of the past three years. He hit .260 with a career-best 21 homers and 70 RBIs last season, helping the Royals to their second consecutive World Series appearance. They beat the Mets in ive games for their irst title since 1985. Marlins reliever Capps has elbow injury • Miami Marlins rrighthanded reliever Carter Capps was awaiting a second opinion on an MRI of his right elbow, fearing an injury that would end his bid for the closer’s job before spring training games even begin. Capps met with a doctor Tuesday after the test, manager Don Mattingly said. Capps throws a 100 mph fastball, but he missed the inal two months of last season because of right elbow soreness and sat out three months in 2014. Arrieta to start Cubs’ opener • As expected, NL Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta will start the Chicago Cubs’ season opener. Manager Joe Maddon joked that he had “another surprise” in making the announcement Tuesday. The Cubs, coming of a 97-win season and appearance in the NL championship series, open at the Los Angeles Angels on April 4. Arrieta led the majors in wins while going 22-6 and posting a 1.77 ERA last year. His ERA after the All-Star break was 0.75. Rockies raise fences • Swinging for the fences just got a little more challenging at Coors Field, with the Colorado Rockies raising the outield walls in two spots for the coming season. The fence from right-center ield and extending into right will be raised by 8 feet in a park that’s always been regarded as hitter friendly. In addition, a section of the fence near the left-ield foul pole will be elevated 5 feet. The new fencing will be installed this month and be in place for the home opener April 8. It will be made out of a see-through, rubberized chain link. Obama to attend game in Cuba • The Tampa Bay Rays will travel to Cuba to play the Cuban national team in an exhibition game March 22, and President Barack Obama is expected to attend, ESPN.com reports. “Americans and Cubans share a love of baseball, and this is yet another powerful reminder of the kinship between our peoples as well as the progress we can achieve when we leverage those natural ties,” a White House oicial said Tuesday. The game will be televised on ESPN and ESPN Deportes. From news services

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

Gomber is another lefty with promise

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Pitcher Austin Gomber, talking with catcher Carson Kelly and manager Mike Matheny at spring training, is the youngest pitcher in the Cardinals’ camp at 22.

CARDINALS • FROM B1

“That pitch is going to take you to the next level,” Jackson told him. Today it does, oicially. Two years removed from pitching for FAU, Gomber will pitch against the Owls with a major-league logo on his jersey. Gomber, curveball in hand, will start the Cardinals’ first exhibition game, a showcase against the local college that will feature mostly the younger members of the spring training roster. They don’t get much younger than Gomber, the youngest pitcher in camp at 22. Gomber is one of two players in the major-league camp who spent last summer in Class A or lower, and he is the only pitcher. Notably, he’s not the only lefty with promise. As Super Tuesday passes and games arrive on the Cardinals’ spring schedule, an area of the roster that has already shown its depth is on the left. Tyler Lyons and Marco Gonzales are set to receive priority innings to start March, and Lyons is likely to leave Florida as a member of the major-league bullpen. Tim Cooney has had his spring slowed by shoulder soreness but will soon be prepped to lead the Class AAA roster. Dean Kiekhefer is seen as a lefty specialist, if the Cardinals want one, and Jayson Aquino ofers depth as a lefthanded starter. On the non-roster side, Corey Littrell, the minor-leaguer acquired from Boston in 2014’s John Lackey deal, has impressed with improved command and hinted at being a possible reliever. Littrell, who turns 23 this month, will open the year as a starter, though with his improved slider he could move swiftly if repurposed for the bullpen. He’ll probably be one rung head of Gomber, the Cardinals’ best lefty prospect not yet in Class AAA. “When you have a kid who is one of your co-pitchers of the year and we’ve never seen him before, you just watch him throw, watch how he works,” manager Mike Matheny said. “We like that they have the chance to develop and grow a little bit and fill out and get some strength and (see) how they can project. We used to say that about (lefty Kevin) Siegrist. We just didn’t know

what we had there. Now he’s turned into one of the better guys at the back end of the bullpen. We have depth (with) Marco and Cooney and Lyons. We have three guys with legitimate opportunities to help us near-term. “And then some kids on the way.” Gomber was originally invited to the Cardinals’ Spring Training Early Program (STEP) for prospects, but before he filed his paperwork he got a call from the Cardinals. They had reconsidered. He was coming to big-league camp. He earned the earlier invite as the Cardinals’ organization pitcher of the year, sharing the honor with the team’s top overall prospect, Alex Reyes. Gomber won his final 14 decisions and led the Midwest League in a series of significant pitching categories: strikeouts (140), opponent average (.196), and WHIP (0.97). He also led the league in wins, at 15-3. The success came back to the curve. “A game-changer for me,” Gomber said. Despite being 6-foot-5, he was unheralded and, the way he tells it, unnoticed coming out of high school. Young, at 17, and slight, at 160 pounds, he went undrafted and didn’t talk to a single scout his senior year of high school. He received one Division I ofer, from FAU. Gomber joined the Owls and soon his size caught up with his frame. His velocity jumped from around 85 mph in high school, to 88-90 mph as a freshman. He threw a curve back then at about 65 mph, but it lobbed out of his hand – a lollipop breaking ball too sweet to take. Jackson and he decided to abandon it for a harder slider. He became the Owls’ ace, piloted FAU to an NCAA regional, and then went in the third round of the 2014 draft to the Cardinals. At the end of his first season with Class A State College, the Cardinals’ pitching coordinator, Tim Leveque, saw Gomber struggle with the slider. It was a subpar pitch. With Gomber’s arm slot and fastball, a curveball would be more efective if he could get one to come out of the same release point and tumble toward the plate. “I showed him the grip that we used

Reyes could be with the Redbirds by end of season HOCHMAN • FROM B1

A rookie righty filled in for an established starter midseason, and later made a start that helped St. Louis capture the postseason. Anthony Reyes, with that flat-billed hat, sparked the eventual 2006 World Series champions. This is a trend we’ve seen in St. Louis, with the great teams. Rookie pitcher Lance Lynn aided the 2011 champs. And rookie hurlers Carlos Martinez, Michael Wacha, Shelby Miller, Kevin Siegrist and Seth Maness bolstered the 2013 National League champs. Alex Reyes could be the X-factor “this year,” Martinez asserted to me. “This year. I don’t know when. But I think pretty soon. “He’s unbelievable, because when I was his age, I was not like that. When I got to be that age, I couldn’t throw like that.” Wait, what? Yes you could, you’re Carlos Martinez – remember the 2013 playof run? Regardless, the sentiment by Reyes’ mentor was noted. Martinez was 21 years, two months old when he made his debut; Reyes is currently 21 years, one month old. “My ofspeed pitches, I feel they’ve gotten a lot better this ofseason,” Reyes said Tuesday. “I was able to work on my delivery and my command. But mostly commanding the fastball is going to be a key. That’s what I’m looking for in STEP camp and spring training, and hopefully that’s what I’ll leave with. … “If I’m pitching well and doing my job, I think everything will take care of itself.” The pitching well part has never been the problem. But part of the job is also not being stupid. If he hadn’t gotten busted for weed, for a second time, he’d probably

LAURIE SKRIVAN • Post-Dispatch

An earlier A. Reyes, Anthony, pitches the Cardinals to a victory in the irst game of the 2006 World Series against Detroit.

be in big league camp now. But he’s suspended for 40 more games, and he’ll probably start the season at Class AA, possibly Class AAA Memphis. I’m not even that mad about his actual marijuana use — I recently moved from Colorado, where there are numerous pot dispensaries scattered about like bars or gift shops, yet the state still seems to be (reasonably) sane. See, I’m mad that he did the one thing he knew could get him in trouble. It doesn’t matter what the thing was, it was the mindset. I mean, if they told me I’d be suspended from work if I ate pastrami, I’m sorry Protzel’s Deli, I’m not coming in for any pastrami. But talking to Reyes now for the second time, I sense he’s brutally embarrassed by how this went down. He mentioned letting down his family. I think he’s been scared straight.

with a lot of guys,” Leveque said. “He’s able to be aggressive with it and not try and manipulate it to make it move. Guys want to see the movement and make it have that shape. Doesn’t always work like that. This grip locks it in deep in the hand and then just throw it with conviction.” Conviction came first. Confidence came later. Gomber worked on the curve the final months of the 2014 season but didn’t flip it in games. At FAU in the offseason, he threw the curve every day. He “fully soldout on that grip,” he said. He learned the pitch and by the beginning of May believed in it enough to throw it with less than two outs and a runner on third. He often got a strikeout with it. That vaulted him from a peripheral prospect in 2015 to No. 14 in Baseball America’s Top 30 Cardinals this spring. He came to big-league camp with the new pitch, but not looking to learn pitches from the major-league starters. He’s got his eye on something else. “I’m not trying to pick things up on the field because we’re all diferent pitchers,” Gomber said. “I like watching Jaime Garcia, Michael Wacha and Adam Wainwright do their thing, but I realize I’m not them. I’m never going to be Adam Wainwright or Jaime Garcia. I’m a different pitcher. So for me what I wanted to do is see what they do behind the scenes. This is basically premium access to some of the game’s greats for however long I’ll be up here. I can watch what they do on the field. Here I can see what they do of of it.” Gomber will start Wednesday’s afternoon game at Roger Dean Stadium opposite a former teammate, lefty Sean Labsen. He will also see in the other dugout the head coach who gave him a chance no other top program did and the pitching coach who helped him at that level and spotted the pitch that would take him to the next level. “I owe what I have to those guys right there,” Gomber said. “They gave me every opportunity. I hope they don’t lose another game. After this one.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

And there is much to be said about finding the positives in adversity. If you don’t grow from it, that’s a problem in itself. Reyes will be better of for going through this now, for it’ll make him a more mature big leaguer, a virtue, considering he’ll probably make the majors earlier than most kids. Reyes said Martinez taught him the importance of how one handles the daily routine of Major League Baseball. Staying consistent with preparation, never taking shortcuts just because you’re pitching well of late (because the guy in the batter’s box isn’t taking shortcuts in his preparation). And Martinez said Reyes “is not scared” of trying new approaches in practice. “He’s still learning,” said Gary LaRocque, the Cardinals’ director of player development. “Like with most pitchers, innings are important. Last year he put together a solid stretch, and by the end of the season, he ended up earning his way to the Arizona Fall League, which is a great experience, because he had to face more hitters deeper into the lineup, and that’s all part of the growth and the development. He’s handled that well, in terms of his presence on the mound, his demeanor, and his stuf has been solid. It’s just learning how to refine it all. “Bottom line is, as you get past A ball, and you step into Double- and Triple-A, it turns from projection to performance. He’s into that next step now.” They’re all waiting for him to take the toughest step. In the Cards’ clubhouse, there was a sheet of paper showing all the uniform numbers. With retired numbers, and the untouched Nos. 5, 51 and 57, most numbers are spoken for. But on the list, there’s a space between Tommy Pham’s No. 28 and the No. 30 of Jonathan Broxton. Reyes wears No. 29 because it’s his date of birth, Aug. 29, 1994. Here’s thinking he’ll be a St. Louis Cardinal by Aug. 29, 2016. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


BLUES

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Reaves comes back to the Blues’ lineup Rattie scored his fourth goal in his last eight games in Sunday’s 5-2 win over Carolina but was re-assigned to the American Hockey League on Monday.

Suspension won’t afect how he plays and hits, he says

LEHTERA UPDATE Blues center Jori Lehtera missed his third straight game Tuesday after being hit in the face by a puck last week. The Blues have only referred to the situation as an upper-body injury, but it’s believed that the center may have experienced concussion-related symptoms or an issue with his jaw. The club was scheduled to return to St. Louis after Tuesday’s game before departing to Minnesota this weekend. “He’s projected to join us this week,” Hitchcock said.

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD st. Louis Post-dispatch

OTTAWA • The Blues were ready to begin a power-play drill Tuesday morning before their game in Ottawa but didn’t have enough penalty-killers in place. “Reavo!” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock belted out, sending Blues forward Ryan Reaves scurrying into position. “What, are you on holidays?” Reaves had missed the Blues’ last three games, but because of a suspension, not a vacation. He was put through a few days of sweat-inducing practices before making his return to the lineup against the Senators at Canadian Tire Centre. “Yeah, apparently I’ve been on a threeday holiday, waking up at 8 in the morning and getting skated,” Reaves said. “I didn’t know that’s what holidays were all about.” Reaves was back in a playful mood a week after he was involved in an incident that was no joking matter. He was whistled for a five-minute boarding major and a game misconduct in a 6-3 loss to San Jose last Tuesday for hitting the Sharks’ Matt Tennyson from behind into the glass. The NHL’s Department of Player Safety held a hearing with Reaves and, after he had his say, suspended the right winger for three games. “I understand how it looked and I understand how bad it was, but the intent

WORLD CUP ROSTERS

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Ryan Reaves (right) missed three games as punishment for a hit on San Jose’s Matt Tennyson.

Blues general manager Doug Armstrong will be in Toronto on Wednesday, fulfilling his dual role as GM of Team Canada for the World Cup of Hockey. Partial rosters for each of the eight teams participating in the tournament, which will be played in Toronto next September, will be unveiled at staggered times throughout the day. Each club will announce at least 16 players, with the remainder coming at a later date.

BLUENOTES wasn’t there,” Reaves said. “My reputation is, I hit hard and I hit often, but I always stay within the boundaries of the game. I’ve been on the top of this team and top of the league the last couple of years (in hits) and I’ve never had an incident. “So I think my reputation is what I was

trying to convey. I know my game. I know how to hit. I just go back out and I don’t think about that. If I think about that, I’m not going to be playing my game very well.” Reaves returned to his spot on the fourth line Tuesday, replacing Ty Rattie.

The Blues have made Rattie, Dmitrij Jaskin and Joel Edmundson eligible for the American Hockey League playofs. ... The team’s lone healthy scratch Tuesday was defenseman Robert Bortuzzo. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Blues win long shootout after losing big lead BLUES • FROM B1

BLUES 4, SENATORS 3, SO

The Blues pulled in a tie for the top spot with the Chicago Blackhawks and Dallas Stars with 83 points. The Blues could fall behind by the time they are back on the ice. The team returned to St. Louis after the game but won’t resume its four-game road trip until Sunday in Minnesota. A win is a win, but this one took extra work. The Sens trailed 3-1 late in the third period and the Blues had two chances put the game away on breakaways by Tarasenko and Alex Pietrangelo in a span of a minute with about six minutes remaining in regulation. But backup goalie Andrew Hammond, who replaced injured starter Craig Anderson late in the second period, stoned Tarasenko (and Berglund on the rebound) and then watched Pietrangelo shoot wide. Then, the game unraveled before the Blues’ eyes on back-to-back goals by Ottawa’s Jean-Gabriel Pageau. First, he banked an innocent shot off the side of goalie Jake Allen with 2 minutes, 41 seconds left in regulation for a 3-2 deficit. And then after Pietrangeo was called for tripping with 1:47 left, Pageau added his second of the game on the power play as time expired. After a scoreless OT, the

Blues

JUSTIN TANG • The Canadian Press

Ottawa Senators goaltender Craig Anderson guards the net as the Blues’ David Backes tries to delect the puck during the irst period Tuesday night.

teams went to a shootout, which seemed like it would continue well into the night still scoreless until Berglund finally scored. The Blues were of Mon-

day, and after the NHL trading deadline came and went, they claimed to be a confident group before taking on Ottawa, which had won five of its last six

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games and entered the night just four points out of a playoff spot in the Eastern Conference. The Blues played like a confident group in the first period Tuesday, when they put 19 shots on net and opened a 2-0 lead on the Senators. The exits were crisp, the transition was clean and the offensivezone pressure was constant. Jaskin put the Blues on the board just 3 minutes, 36 seconds into the game. Schwartz put the initial shot on net and Jaskin cleaned up the rebound for an even-strength goal, his fourth of the season. The Blues went on their first power play of the game later in the period, when Ottawa’s Nick Paul was whistled for cross-

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checking. Just 33 seconds later, they had the first of their two power-play goals. This time, Kevin Shattenkirk put the shot on net, and the puck hit David Backes in front. It dropped in the slot, where Schwartz shot it into an open net for a 2-0 lead with 7:07 left in the period. At that point, Schwartz had one goal and one assist, giving him eight points (five goals, three assists) in 10 games since returning from a fractured ankle. The Blues went on their second power play of the game when Ottawa’s Zach Smith was ushered off for holding. They answered with their second man-advantage goal of the game, taking advantage of

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2 0 — 3

First period B: Jaskin 4 (Schwartz, Pietrangelo), 3:36. B: Schwartz 5 (Backes, Shattenkirk), 12:53 (pp). Penalties: Paul, Ott (cross-checking), 12:20; C.Wideman, Ott (interference), 19:14. Second period B: Tarasenko 30 (Shattenkirk, Schwartz), 10:38 (pp). O: Dzingel 2 (Phaneuf, Zibanejad), 12:32. Penalties: Backes, StL (high-sticking), 4:19; Smith, Ott (holding), 10:20; Tarasenko, StL (high-sticking), 15:05. Third period O: Pageau 15 (Stone, Karlsson), 17:19. O: Pageau 16 (Ryan, Smith), 19:59 (pp). Penalties: Pageau, Ott (tripping), 2:34; Pietrangelo, StL (roughing), 10:15; Phaneuf, Ott (slashing), 10:15; Reaves, StL (slashing), 14:35; Phaneuf, Ott (slashing), 14:35; Pietrangelo, StL (tripping), 18:13. Overtime None. Penalties: None. Shootout Blues 1 (Tarasenko NG, Fabbri NG, Brouwer NG, Shattenkirk NG, Paajarvi NG, Backes NG, Jaskin NG, Stastny NG, Schwartz NG, Pietrangelo NG, Berglund G), Ottawa 0 (Ryan NG, Zibanejad NG, Karlsson NG, Stone NG, Hoffman NG, Smith NG, Pageau NG, C.Wideman NG, Chiasson NG, Puempel NG, Ceci NG). Shots on goal Blues 19 15 10 4 48 Ottawa 10 12 17 4 43 Power-plays Blues 2 of 4; Ottawa 1 of 3. Goaltenders Blues, Allen 20-13-3 (43 shots-40 saves). Ottawa, Anderson (31-28), Hammond 3-6-3 (13:41 second, 17-17). A: 17,207. Referees: Marc Joannette, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Brian Murphy.

the Senators’ 29th-ranked penalty-killing unit. After needing 33 seconds last time, the Blues’ power play unit used up just 18 seconds this time. Shattenkirk fed Tarasenko, who took a stride to the left faceoff dot and ripped a shot past Anderson, beating the netminder over his left shoulder. Tarasenko’s second-period strike gave him backto-back 30-goal seasons, making him the first Blue to accomplish that feat since Brad Boyes in 200708 and 2008-09. The Blues held a 3-0 lead, but just two minutes after Tarasenko scored, Ottawa’s Ryan Dzingel trimmed the Senators’ deficit to 3-1, beating Allen on a rebound attempt. It stayed that way until the late in the third period, when Allen gave up the first of Pageau’s two goals. He settled down in the overtime, making a 2-on-0 save on Mark Stone with 36 seconds left in OT. He then went toeto-toe with Hammond in the shootout, but after his 11th save, the Blues pulled out the win in the longest shootout in team history. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com


BLUES

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 2

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Reaves comes back to the Blues’ lineup eight games in Sunday’s 5-2 win over Carolina but was re-assigned to the American Hockey League on Monday.

Suspension won’t afect how he plays and hits, he says

LEHTERA UPDATE Blues center Jori Lehtera missed his third straight game Tuesday after being hit in the face by a puck last week. The Blues have only referred to the situation as an upper-body injury, but it’s believed that the center may have experienced concussion-related symptoms or an issue with his jaw. The club was scheduled to return to St. Louis after Tuesday’s game before departing to Minnesota this weekend. “He’s projected to join us this week,” Hitchcock said.

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD st. Louis Post-dispatch

OTTAWA • The Blues were ready to begin a power-play drill Tuesday morning before their game in Ottawa but didn’t have enough penalty-killers in place. “Reavo!” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock belted out, sending Blues forward Ryan Reaves scurrying into position. “What, are you on holidays?” Reaves had missed the Blues’ last three games, but because of a suspension, not a vacation. He was put through a few days of sweat-inducing practices before making his return to the lineup against the Senators at Canadian Tire Centre. “Yeah, apparently I’ve been on a threeday holiday, waking up at 8 in the morning and getting skated,” Reaves said. “I didn’t know that’s what holidays were all about.” Reaves was back in a playful mood a week after he was involved in an incident that was no joking matter. He was whistled for a five-minute boarding major and a game misconduct in a 6-3 loss to San Jose last Tuesday for hitting the Sharks’ Matt Tennyson from behind into the glass. The NHL’s Department of Player Safety held a hearing with Reaves and, after he had his say, suspended the right winger for three games. “I understand how it looked and I un-

WORLD CUP ROSTERS

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Ryan Reaves (right) missed three games as punishment for a hit on San Jose’s Matt Tennyson.

Blues general manager Doug Armstrong will be in Toronto on Wednesday, fulfilling his dual role as GM of Team Canada for the World Cup of Hockey. Partial rosters for each of the eight teams participating in the tournament, which will be played in Toronto next September, will be unveiled at staggered times throughout the day. Each club will announce at least 16 players, with the remainder coming at a later date.

BLUENOTES derstand how bad it was, but the intent wasn’t there,” Reaves said. “My reputation is, I hit hard and I hit often, but I always stay within the boundaries of the game. I’ve been on the top of this team and top of the league the last couple of years (in hits) and I’ve never had an incident. “So I think my reputation is what I was

trying to convey. I know my game. I know how to hit. I just go back out and I don’t think about that. If I think about that, I’m not going to be playing my game very well.” Reaves returned to his spot on the fourth line Tuesday, replacing Ty Rattie. Rattie scored his fourth goal in his last

The Blues have made Rattie, Dmitrij Jaskin and Joel Edmundson eligible for the American Hockey League playofs. ... The team’s lone healthy scratch Tuesday was defenseman Robert Bortuzzo. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Blues win long shootout after losing big lead BLUES • FROM B1

BLUES 4, SENATORS 3, SO

The Blues indeed pulled into a tie for the top spot with the Chicago Blackhawks and Dallas Stars with 83 points, though the Blackhawks have two games in hand and the Stars have one. The Blues could fall back of the pack by the time they are back on the ice. The team returned to St. Louis after Tuesday’s game but won’t resume its fourgame road trip until Sunday in Minnesota. In addition to Tarasenko’s 30th, the Blues also picked up goals from Dmitrij Jaskin and Jaden Schwartz on a night they finished with a seasonhigh-48 shots on goal and went two for four on the power play. A win is a win, but this one took extra work. The Sens trailed 3-1 late in the third period and the Blues had two chances put the game away on breakaways by Tarasenko and Alex Pietrangelo, whose attempt came with about six minutes remaining in regulation. But backup goalie Andrew Hammond, who replaced injured starter Craig Anderson late in the second period, stoned Tarasenko (and Berglund on the rebound) and then watched Pietrangelo shoot wide. “We got stuck in a track meet,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “They play

Blues

JUSTIN TANG • The Canadian Press

Ottawa Senators goaltender Craig Anderson guards the net as the Blues’ David Backes tries to delect the puck during the irst period Tuesday night.

a hybrid game and we got sucked into a hybrid game in the second period. It was anything from there. What can I say?” The game unraveled before the Blues’ eyes on back-to-back goals by Ottawa’s Jean-Gabriel Pageau. First, he banked a

side-angle shot off goaltender Jake Allen’s back with 2 minutes, 41 seconds left in regulation for a 3-2 Senators deficit. And then after Pietrangelo was called for tripping with 1:47, the Sens pulled Hammond for a 6-on-4 advantage and Pageau punched

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in his second of the game with one-tenth of a second remaining. “They got a fluke goal there (on the second one), nothing you can do about it,” Berglund said. “I took a look at it at the replay and there is legit no-angle to even score there, so I don’t know how it went in. Then we get on the PK, six on four, so it’s tough. Score with no seconds left.” In overtime, Ottawa had a 2-on-0 with Mark Stone and Erik Karlsson, but with 36 seconds left, Allen made a game-saving stop on Stone. “If we took liberty of just giving up there at the end, losing those points, that’s not the way to finish the year,” Allen said. “We’ve got 15 games left and each point is so crucial.” The Blues picked up the extra point in the shootout, after Hammond and Allen turned aside every shot

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they had seen through 10 1/2 rounds. “Nothing changes for me,” Allen said. “Try to stay patient, be big and let them make the first move. Sometimes you go into shootouts and you get seven or eight goals on 11 shots, and then this one there’s no goals.” Then Berglund stepped up. “I was hoping someone would score before me, but it was my turn to get up there,” Berglund said. “It was obviously a good feeling to score. I did what I wanted to do.” Te a m m a t e s D a v i d Backes and Ryan Reaves turned their heads as Berglund put a puck in the top corner. “They told me, ‘We still haven’t seen it yet,’” Berglund said. One would have had to see Tuesday’s finish to believe it.

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2 0 — 3

First period B: Jaskin 4 (Schwartz, Pietrangelo), 3:36. B: Schwartz 5 (Backes, Shattenkirk), 12:53 (pp). Penalties: Paul, Ott (cross-checking), 12:20; C.Wideman, Ott (interference), 19:14. Second period B: Tarasenko 30 (Shattenkirk, Schwartz), 10:38 (pp). O: Dzingel 2 (Phaneuf, Zibanejad), 12:32. Penalties: Backes, StL (high-sticking), 4:19; Smith, Ott (holding), 10:20; Tarasenko, StL (high-sticking), 15:05. Third period O: Pageau 15 (Stone, Karlsson), 17:19. O: Pageau 16 (Ryan, Smith), 19:59 (pp). Penalties: Pageau, Ott (tripping), 2:34; Pietrangelo, StL (roughing), 10:15; Phaneuf, Ott (slashing), 10:15; Reaves, StL (slashing), 14:35; Phaneuf, Ott (slashing), 14:35; Pietrangelo, StL (tripping), 18:13. Overtime None. Penalties: None. Shootout Blues 1 (Tarasenko NG, Fabbri NG, Brouwer NG, Shattenkirk NG, Paajarvi NG, Backes NG, Jaskin NG, Stastny NG, Schwartz NG, Pietrangelo NG, Berglund G), Ottawa 0 (Ryan NG, Zibanejad NG, Karlsson NG, Stone NG, Hoffman NG, Smith NG, Pageau NG, C.Wideman NG, Chiasson NG, Puempel NG, Ceci NG). Shots on goal Blues 19 15 10 4 48 Ottawa 10 12 17 4 43 Power-plays Blues 2 of 4; Ottawa 1 of 3. Goaltenders Blues, Allen 20-13-3 (43 shots-40 saves). Ottawa, Anderson (31-28), Hammond 3-6-3 (13:41 second, 17-17). A: 17,207. Referees: Marc Joannette, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Brian Murphy.

The Blues played like a confident group in the first period, when they put 19 shots on net and opened a 2-0 lead on the Senators. The exits were crisp, the transition was clean and the offensive-zone pressure was constant. Jaskin put the Blues on the board just 3:36 into the game, and then Schwartz added a power-play goal for 2-0 lead with 7:07 left in the first period. The Blues’ power-play unit needed 33 seconds before Schwartz got his fifth goal of the season. In the second period, it needed just 18 seconds before Tarasenko scored his manadvantage marker. Tarasenko’s 30th goal of the season, giving the Blues a 3-0 lead, nearly came in a losing cause. Ottawa’s Ryan Dzingel trimmed the Senators’ deficit to 3-1 in the second period, and then Pageau tied it as the clock dripped to nothing. But after a long night, Tarasenko and the Blues were finally able to celebrate. “It felt nice, especially when we win,” Tarasenko said. “Thanks to my teammates to let me do this, two years in a row now. But you know you should always have bigger expectations about you. It’s no time to stop and the most interesting part of the season starts soon.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Florida Tampa Bay Boston Detroit Ottawa Montreal Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey Columbus

GP 63 63 64 63 64 63 64 61 GP 62 63 60 62 62 65 64 64

W 36 37 35 32 30 30 25 21 W 46 37 33 32 29 29 30 26

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 19 8 80 174 148 20-9-4 16-10-4 12-6-0 22 4 78 175 151 20-10-2 17-12-2 12-8-2 23 6 76 197 176 14-16-3 21-7-3 14-8-2 20 11 75 161 163 16-10-6 16-10-5 13-6-3 27 7 67 188 200 17-10-5 13-17-2 11-9-2 28 5 65 173 175 17-11-3 13-17-2 13-6-1 31 8 58 148 172 11-17-4 14-14-4 8-11-4 30 10 52 147 182 9-11-8 12-19-2 1-10-6 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 12 4 96 205 144 25-5-2 21-7-2 17-3-2 20 6 80 180 159 23-6-3 14-14-3 12-6-4 20 7 73 171 149 19-8-4 14-12-3 11-5-3 22 8 72 167 160 19-9-4 13-13-4 7-6-2 22 11 69 157 168 16-8-7 13-14-4 9-8-5 26 10 68 158 174 16-12-6 13-14-4 10-8-4 27 7 67 140 156 15-14-4 15-13-3 9-13-2 30 8 60 167 196 13-12-6 13-18-2 8-9-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Chicago 64 Dallas 65 Blues 66 Nashville 64 Minnesota 64 Colorado 65 Winnipeg 62 Paciic GP Los Angeles62 Anaheim 61 San Jose 62 Vancouver 61 Arizona 63 Calgary 63 Edmonton 65

W 39 38 37 32 29 32 26 W 37 34 34 24 27 26 24

L 20 20 20 21 25 29 32 L 21 19 22 25 30 33 34

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

OT 5 7 9 11 10 4 4 OT 4 8 6 12 6 4 7

Pts 83 83 83 75 68 68 56 Pts 78 76 74 60 60 56 55

GF 180 209 166 172 170 175 161 GF 165 153 188 148 168 170 158

GA 153 189 162 161 162 187 186 GA 143 144 167 175 198 197 194

Home 23-8-2 20-10-1 19-11-4 17-10-5 17-11-4 14-14-4 13-15-1 Home 18-10-1 20-8-4 12-13-3 11-14-5 16-12-4 17-14-1 16-14-2

Away Div 16-12-3 11-9-1 18-10-6 14-7-2 18-9-5 13-7-3 15-11-6 9-11-3 12-14-6 11-8-5 18-15-0 12-6-2 13-17-3 9-14-1 Away Div 19-11-3 13-8-0 14-11-4 15-4-4 22-9-3 9-5-3 13-11-7 7-7-3 11-18-2 12-6-2 9-19-3 7-12-2 8-20-5 6-9-4

Tuesday Blues 4, Ottawa 3, SO Boston 2, Calgary 1 Carolina 3, New Jersey 1 Edmonton 2, Buffalo 1, OT Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2 Nashville 5, Dallas 3 Minnesota 6, Colorado 3 Florida 3, Winnipeg 2 NY Islanders at Vancouver, late Monday NY Rangers 2, Columbus 1 Philadelphia 5, Calgary 3 Pittsburgh 6, Arizona 0 Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 1 Detroit 3, Dallas 2, OT San Jose 6, Montreal 2 Wednesday Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 7 p.m. Montreal at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Thursday Chicago at Boston, 6 p.m. Calgary at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 7 p.m. NY Islanders at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Florida at Colorado, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 8 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Montreal at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 39 19 Boston 36 25 New York 25 37 Brooklyn 17 43 Philadelphia 8 52 Southeast W L Miami 34 26 Atlanta 33 27 Charlotte 31 28 Washington 29 30 Orlando 26 33 Central W L Cleveland 42 17 Indiana 31 29 Detroit 31 29 Chicago 30 29 Milwaukee 25 35 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 50 9 Memphis 35 24 Dallas 33 28 Houston 29 31 New Orleans 23 35 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 42 18 Portland 33 28 Utah 28 31 Denver 23 37 Minnesota 19 41 Paciic W L x-Golden State 53 5 LA Clippers 39 20 Sacramento 24 34 Phoenix 15 45 LA Lakers 11 49 x-clinched playof spot

Pct .672 .590 .403 .283 .133 Pct .567 .550 .525 .492 .441 Pct .712 .517 .517 .508 .417

Pct .847 .593 .541 .483 .397 Pct .700 .541 .475 .383 .317 Pct .914 .661 .414 .250 .183

GB — 4½ 16 23 32 GB — 1 2½ 4½ 7½ GB — 11½ 11½ 12 17½

GB — 15 18 21½ 26½ GB — 9½ 13½ 19 23 GB — 14½ 29 39 43

L10 7-3 7-3 2-8 5-5 1-9 L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 7-3 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5

Str L-1 W-3 L-2 L-1 L-9 Str W-2 W-2 W-1 W-3 L-1 Str W-1 L-3 W-4 L-3 W-1

Home 21-6 20-10 15-18 11-22 5-23 Home 19-12 19-12 20-9 16-16 16-15 Home 25-5 18-11 18-11 19-11 17-10

Away 18-13 16-15 10-19 6-21 3-29 Away 15-14 14-15 11-19 13-14 10-18 Away 17-12 13-18 13-18 11-18 8-25

Conf 26-10 25-16 16-24 9-25 2-34 Conf 21-16 21-17 20-15 21-18 15-21 Conf 25-12 20-15 20-16 18-18 17-19

L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 L10 5-5 9-1 4-6 4-6 5-5 L10 9-1 7-3 3-7 1-9 2-8

Str W-5 W-1 W-3 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-3 L-2 L-1 Str W-5 W-2 L-3 L-1 L-8

Home 28-0 21-9 19-12 16-14 16-13 Home 25-8 19-12 19-12 11-18 10-20 Home 24-0 20-10 14-16 11-21 6-20

Away 22-9 14-15 14-16 13-17 7-22 Away 17-10 14-16 9-19 12-19 9-21 Away 29-5 19-10 10-18 4-24 5-29

Conf 30-5 20-16 21-16 21-19 15-23 Conf 29-7 23-16 15-20 12-27 10-25 Conf 31-3 20-14 12-23 10-27 5-33

Tuesday Charlotte 126, Phoenix 92 Miami 129, Chicago 111 Portland 104, New York 85 Dallas 121, Orlando 108 Atlanta at Golden State, late Brooklyn at LA Lakers, late Monday Cleveland 100, Indiana 96 Washington 116, Philadelphia 108 Boston 100, Utah 95 Milwaukee 128, Houston 121 Memphis 103, Denver 96 Oklahoma City 131, Sacramento 116 LA Clippers 105, Brooklyn 95 Wednesday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Chicago at Orlando, 6 p.m. Utah at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Detroit at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Phoenix at Miami, 6:30 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Bergeron’s late goal gives Boston win ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrice Bergeron scored a tiebreaking goal with 3:24 left in the third period and the host Boston Bruins beat the Calgary Flames 2-1 on Tuesday night. Landon Ferraro also scored for Boston and Tuukka Rask stopped 24 of 25 shots as the Bruins won for the third time in four games. Jakub Nakladal’s first career goal was the only score for the Flames, who lost their sixth straight. Joni Ortio had 23 saves for Calgary but had little chance on the game-winner as Bergeron one-timed a pass from Torey Krug from high in the slot. Ferraro gave Boston the lead on a onetimer from the slot of passes from Brett Connolly and Krug 7:05 into the game. Rask had a shutout going until Nakladal scored 5:35 into the third on a slap shot from the top of the left circle to tie it at 1-all. Jyrki Jokipakka and Michael Frolik assisted. The Flames, who lost in Philadelphia 5-3 on Monday night, kept it close early with defense. Calgary held Boston to five shots in the first and nine in the second as the Flames regained their strength. Nakladal’s goal gave Calgary a lift and the Flames nearly took a lead a few minutes later, but Rask stopped Michael Ferland three times as he attempted to swipe in a rebound from in front of the crease. Nashville signs Salomaki • The Nashville Predators have signed forward Miikka Salomaki (MEE-kah SA-loh-MA-kee) to a two-year, $1.2 million contract. The Predators announced the deal Tuesday. Salomaki, who turns 23 on March 9, will earn $575,000 in 2016-17 and $650,000 in 2017-18. He has seven points (four goals, three assists) in 45 games this

season and has played in 46 career games with the Predators since making his NHL debut Jan. 8, 2015. The 5-foot-11, 208-pound left winger spent most of the past two seasons in the American Hockey League with the Milwaukee Admirals scoring 70 points in 117 games. The native of Raahe, Finland, was the 52nd draft selection overall in the 2011 draft. Boston’s Rinaldo suspended • Boston Bruins forward Zac Rinaldo has been suspended five games without pay for an illegal hit to the head in Sunday’s game against Tampa Bay. Rinaldo took out Lightning forward Cedric Paquette against the boards in the first period of Tampa Bay’s 4-1 victory. Rinaldo was assessed a minor penalty for illegal check to the head. Rinaldo, who was also suspended for eight games last year, was considered a repeat ofender. The suspension will cost him $51,829, which goes to the Players’ Emergency Assistance Fund. Nestrasil done for season • Carolina Hurricanes right winger Andrej Nestrasil will miss the rest of the season with a broken vertebra. General manager Ron Francis said Tuesday that Nestrasil broke the vertebra Feb. 25 in a loss at Toronto but did not provide details of the injury. He fell awkwardly into the boards after a hit. He had nine goals and 14 assists while playing in 55 games this season, his second in the NHL. The injury leaves Carolina further short-handed heading into the final 1½ months of the season. The Hurricanes traded three skaters — including captain Eric Staal and forward Kris Versteeg — before Monday’s trade deadline.

NHL SUMMARIES

Miami has record shooting night ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI • Joe Johnson’s home debut in

Miami was part of the best shooting effort in Heat history. And he’s on his first winning streak in nearly three months. The Heat set a franchise record by shooting 67.5 percent from the floor, established a season high for points and beat the Chicago Bulls 129-111 on Tuesday night. Hassan Whiteside scored a career-high 26 points and had 14 rebounds for the Heat, while Johnson scored 24 points in the first time he had played in back-to-back wins since Dec. 8-10 with Brooklyn. No team had shot better in an NBA game this season than the 61.8 percent posted by San Antonio against Philadelphia on Dec. 7. The Heat topped that easily, with Luol Deng, Whiteside and Johnson combining to shoot 26 for 34. Chicago was within 108-102 with 5:14 left, before Miami finished on a 21-9 run. Wade set up Whiteside with an alley-oop lob with 2:53 left that pushed the lead back to 121-106 after a free throw, and the only question left was how many records Miami would set. Derrick Rose returned from a threegame absence because of injury and scored 17 points for Chicago, which lost for the 17th time in 25 games and fell to the No. 9 spot in the Eastern Conference race. Pau Gasol had 15 points, nine rebounds and six assists, and Taj Gibson added 13 points for Chicago — but left in the third quarter with a right hamstring injury. The Heat improved to 5-2 in seven games since Chris Bosh became inactive because of a blood clot in his leg. Neither Bosh nor the team has ofered any specifics or updates on his condition. The change in Chicago’s defensive numbers over the course of the season is staggering. The Bulls allowed 99.7 points on 41.6 percent shooting in their first 34 games, and in 25 games since have given up more than 106 points on 46 percent shooting.

Miami’s Hassan Whiteside goes to the basket during the second half against Chicago in a game that saw the Heat set a franchise record, shooting 67.5 percent.

Curry’s ankle became worse Sunday and he said it wasn’t worth risking playing on it if it would mean setting himself back further. Curry has three straight 40-point games. He was named Western Conference player of the week Monday for his fourth such honor this season — he’s the first in franchise history to win four in one season. He averaged 43.8 points, 7.3 assists, 5.8 rebounds and 1.5 steals while the Warriors went 4-0. Minnesota plans call-up • Minnesota Timberwolves coach Sam Mitchell spoke frankly about the team’s lack of frontcourt depth after a blowout loss in Dallas on Sunday. Two days later, the Timberwolves gave their coach some help to ease some of the burden on young big men Karl-Anthony Towns and Gorgu Dieng. The Timberwolves plan to call up forward Greg Smith from Raptors 905 of the D-League for a 10-day contract, a person with knowledge of the deal told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the move has not been announced.

Hurricanes 3, Devils 1

Capitals 3, Penguins 2

Panthers 3, Jets 2

Carolina 0 1 2 — 3 New Jersey 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, New Jersey, Henrique 20 (Kennedy, Greene), 10:54. Penalties: Merrill, NJ (interference), 14:02; Hainsey, Car (holding stick), 17:15. Second period: 2, Carolina, Ryan 1 (Slavin), 4:36 (pp). Penalties: Moore, NJ (slashing), 2:40; Skinner, Car (holding), 9:59; New Jersey bench, served by Tootoo (too many men), 9:59. Third period: 3, Carolina, Nordstrom 9 (Lindholm, Slavin), 18:31. 4, Carolina, Gerbe 2, 19:38 (en). Penalties: Pesce, Car (high-sticking), 8:00. Shots: Carolina 5-7-7: 19. New Jersey 9-9-12: 30. Power-plays: Carolina 1 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Lack 11-11-3 (30 shots-29 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 26-22-6 (18-16). A: 14,251. Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Brandon Gawryletz.

Pittsburgh 1 1 0 — 2 Washington 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 24 (Hagelin, Dumoulin), 6:14. Penalties: Kunitz, Pit (tripping), 11:55; Alzner, Was (crosschecking), 16:30; Kessel, Pit (slashing), 17:01. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 16 (Maatta, Crosby), 3:45. 3, Washington, Richards 2 (Schmidt, Chimera), 4:24. 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 20 (Williams, Burakovsky), 16:03. Penalties: Letang, Pit (holding), 5:23; Chimera, Was (embellishment), 5:23; Cole, Pit (hooking), 6:52; Orlov, Was (embellishment), 6:52; Orlov, Was (tripping), 11:50. Third period: 5, Washington, Niskanen 4 (Backstrom), 13:38 (pp). Penalties: Malkin, Pit (high-sticking), 12:45. Shots: Pittsburgh 13-10-7: 30. Washington 10-16-11: 37. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; Washington 1 of 3. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 2-2-1 (37 shots34 saves). Washington, Holtby 40-7-3 (30-28). A: 18,506. Referees: Kelly Sutherland, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Brian Mach.

Florida 1 0 2 — 3 Winnipeg 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Florida, Smith 20 (Trocheck, Kampfer), 13:48. Penalties: Jokinen, Fla (tripping), 3:45. Second period: 2, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 16 (Ehlers, Scheifele), 5:23. 3, Winnipeg, Copp 2 (Burmistrov), 7:58. Penalties: Kulikov, Fla (hooking), :26; Stafford, Wpg (slashing), 5:57; Trocheck, Fla (boarding), 12:27; Armia, Wpg (hooking), 19:38. Third period: 4, Florida, Smith 21 (Trocheck, Purcell), 1:46 (pp). 5, Florida, Jagr 21 (Jokinen, Kulikov), 3:31. Penalties: Copp, Wpg (slashing), :44; Gudbranson, Fla (interference), 18:59. Shots: Florida 5-5-12: 22. Winnipeg 16-9-7: 32. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 3; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 27-15-6 (32 shots-30 saves). Winnipeg, Pavelec 6-9-2 (22-19). A: 15,294. Referees: Tom Kowal, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Shandor Alphonso.

Curry sits against Hawks • Stephen Curry missed Golden State’s game Tuesday night against Atlanta with an injured left ankle. Coach Steve Kerr decided to sit Curry after he hurt his ankle Saturday night at Oklahoma City before returning to hit the long 3-pointer to win it in overtime.

Hornets 126, Suns 92

Heat 129, Bulls 111

Predators 5, Stars 3

Phoenix: Tucker 1-6 1-2 3, Len 5-15 8-10 18, Chandler 4-4 0-1 8, Price 2-10 0-0 4, Booker 4-16 4-5 13, Pressey 1-3 0-0 2, Teletovic 5-12 3-4 17, Goodwin 4-12 2-2 10, Leuer 2-6 2-2 6, Jenkins 5-7 0-1 11. Totals 33-91 20-27 92. Charlotte: Batum 6-10 1-1 15, Williams 2-5 0-0 5, Zeller 4-6 1-1 9, Walker 9-16 5-5 26, Lee 3-5 1-1 8, Jefferson 8-15 3-3 19, Lin 1-7 4-4 6, Lamb 6-10 1-1 15, Kaminsky 3-8 1-2 9, Daniels 2-6 0-0 6, Harrison 0-3 2-4 2, Hansbrough 0-1 1-2 1, Gutierrez 1-1 3-3 5. Totals 45-93 23-27 126. Phoenix 18 24 19 31 — 92 Charlotte 35 33 30 28 — 126 3-point goals: Phoenix 6-27 (Teletovic 4-9, Jenkins 1-1, Booker 1-4, Tucker 0-1, Leuer 0-2, Goodwin 0-3, Price 0-7), Charlotte 13-27 (Walker 3-5, Batum 2-3, Kaminsky 2-3, Daniels 2-4, Lamb 2-4, Lee 1-2, Williams 1-3, Harrison 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 52 (Len 12), Charlotte 65 (Batum 9). Assists: Phoenix 14 (Pressey, Price 3), Charlotte 27 (Walker 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 22, Charlotte 21. A: 16,849 (19,077).

Chicago: Dunleavy 4-7 0-0 10, Gibson 4-6 5-7 13, Gasol 6-13 2-2 15, Rose 6-11 4-7 17, Moore 3-6 0-0 8, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, McDermott 5-12 1-1 11, Portis 5-8 0-0 11, Brooks 5-15 3-5 16, Felicio 0-3 0-0 0, Holiday 2-6 2-2 7, Bairstow 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 41-90 18-26 111. Miami: J.Johnson 10-13 2-2 24, Deng 8-10 1-2 20, Stoudemire 3-3 1-1 7, Dragic 8-14 1-2 17, Wade 7-13 4-6 18, Winslow 4-6 0-0 8, Whiteside 8-11 10-11 26, Richardson 4-7 0-1 9. Totals 52-77 19-25 129. Chicago 30 32 20 29 — 111 Miami 36 29 30 34 — 129 3-point goals: Chicago 11-23 (Brooks 3-5, Dunleavy 2-4, Moore 2-4, Portis 1-1, Rose 1-1, Gasol 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Snell 0-1, McDermott 0-2), Miami 6-12 (Deng 3-3, J.Johnson 2-3, Richardson 1-3, Winslow 0-1, Dragic 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 40 (Gasol 9), Miami 48 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Chicago 20 (Gasol 6), Miami 28 (Dragic 11). Total fouls: Chicago 22, Miami 23. Technicals: Miami defensive three second. A: 19,654 (19,600).

Trail Blazers 104, Knicks 85

Mavericks 121, Magic 108

Portland: Aminu 2-8 0-0 4, Vonleh 2-8 0-0 4, Plumlee 0-3 2-2 2, Lillard 8-18 10-10 30, McCollum 10-19 3-3 25, Leonard 4-8 0-0 11, Crabbe 2-7 0-0 6, Henderson 2-8 2-2 6, Davis 4-4 1-3 9, Harkless 2-3 0-0 5, Roberts 1-1 0-0 2, Connaughton 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-88 18-20 104. New York: Anthony 10-20 3-3 23, Porzingis 4-10 2-3 11, Lopez 4-5 0-0 8, Calderon 2-8 0-0 5, Afflalo 6-9 0-0 13, Williams 2-7 1-3 5, Galloway 0-7 0-0 0, Grant 0-1 0-0 0, O’Quinn 3-10 3-4 11, Thomas 2-10 0-0 5, Vujacic 0-1 0-0 0, Fredette 0-0 4-5 4. Totals 33-88 13-18 85. Portland 27 31 27 19 — 104 New York 25 25 22 13 — 85 3-point goals: Portland 12-30 (Lillard 4-9, Leonard 3-5, McCollum 2-3, Crabbe 2-6, Harkless 1-2, Henderson 0-1, Vonleh 0-2, Aminu 0-2), New York 6-21 (O’Quinn 2-3, Afflalo 1-1, Porzingis 1-2, Thomas 1-3, Calderon 1-5, Vujacic 0-1, Anthony 0-3, Galloway 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Portland 61 (Leonard 14), New York 52 (Anthony 10). Assists: Portland 17 (Lillard 6), New York 11 (Anthony 4). Total fouls: Portland 18, New York 17. Technicals: Lopez. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Orlando: Hezonja 1-6 0-0 2, Gordon 3-5 1-3 7, Vucevic 8-16 2-2 18, Payton 5-8 0-0 12, Oladipo 3-10 0-0 6, Watson 1-4 4-4 7, Ilyasova 7-10 6-7 22, Jennings 5-12 0-0 12, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Napier 0-1 0-0 0, Marble 2-7 2-2 8, Dedmon 5-7 2-2 12. Totals 41-91 17-20 108. Dallas: Parsons 6-12 2-2 17, Nowitzki 7-13 4-5 19, Pachulia 6-8 5-5 17, Williams 2-6 3-4 7, Matthews 8-12 4-5 21, Felton 2-5 2-2 6, Lee 2-3 3-4 7, Barea 6-9 2-2 17, Harris 3-3 0-0 7, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0, Powell 0-2 0-0 0, Mejri 1-1 1-2 3, Villanueva 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 43-77 26-31 121. Orlando 27 34 20 27 — 108 Dallas 35 34 27 25 — 121 3-point goals: Orlando 9-30 (Ilyasova 2-3, Payton 2-4, Marble 2-5, Jennings 2-6, Watson 1-3, Napier 0-1, Gordon 0-2, Hezonja 0-3, Oladipo 0-3), Dallas 9-19 (Barea 3-4, Parsons 3-4, Harris 1-1, Nowitzki 1-3, Matthews 1-4, Villanueva 0-1, Felton 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 49 (Ilyasova 10), Dallas 43 (Pachulia 10). Assists: Orlando 29 (Jennings, Watson 6), Dallas 27 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Orlando 29, Dallas 19. Technicals: Orlando defensive three second. A: 19,546 (19,200).

Bruins 2, Flames 1 Calgary 0 0 1 — 1 Boston 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Boston, Ferraro 5 (Krug, Connolly), 7:05. Penalties: Marchand, Bos (roughing), :38; Colborne, Cal (interference), 1:42; K.Miller, Bos (holding), 15:41. Second period: None. Penalties: Beleskey, Bos (unsportsmanlike conduct), 1:10; Hathaway, Cal (tripping), 8:41; Beleskey, Bos (goaltender interference), 9:53; Frolik, Cal (hooking), 17:31. Third period: 2, Calgary, Nakladal 1 (Jokipakka, Frolik), 5:35. 3, Boston, Bergeron 24 (Spooner, Krejci), 16:36 (pp). Penalties: Frolik, Cal (boarding), 9:09; Calgary bench, served by Bennett (too many men), 15:53. Shots: Calgary 8-8-9: 25. Boston 5-9-11: 25. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 4; Boston 1 of 5. Goalies: Calgary, Ortio 0-6-2 (25 shots-23 saves). Boston, Rask 25-18-5 (25-24). A: 17,565. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Francois St. Laurent. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Tim Nowak.

Oilers 2, Sabres 1 (OT) Edmonton 1 0 0 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 11 (Eberle), :22. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Pakarinen, Edm (interference), 6:17; Eichel, Buf (high-sticking), 10:57. Third period: 2, Buffalo, C.O’Reilly 1 (S.Reinhart, Pysyk), 9:06. Penalties: Girgensons, Buf (tripping), 6:11. Overtime: 3, Edmonton, McDavid 12, 3:48. Penalties: Buffalo bench, served by S.Reinhart (too many men), 1:34. Shots: Edmonton 13-14-8-6: 41. Buffalo 12-12-8-0: 32. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 3; Buffalo 0 of 1. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 14-22-4 (32 shots-31 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 4-7-3 (41-39). A: 19,070. Referees: Wes McCauley, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Tony Sericolo.

Wild 6, Avalanche 3 Colorado 1 2 0 — 3 Minnesota 3 0 3 — 6 First period: 1, Colorado, Iginla 19 (Barrie, Boedker), :33 (pp). 2, Minnesota, Niederreiter 13 (Pominville), 10:37. 3, Minnesota, Pominville 11 (Niederreiter), 11:38. 4, Minnesota, Haula 9 (Dumba, Scandella), 17:48. Penalties: Niederreiter, Min (tripping), :12. Second period: 5, Colorado, Bigras 1 (Duchene, MacKinnon), 3:25. 6, Colorado, McLeod 8 (Skille, J.Mitchell), 12:33. Penalties: Vanek, Min (slashing), 6:57; Matthias, Col (slashing), 12:51; Colorado bench, served by Skille (too many men), 15:22; Haula, Min (holding), 18:20; Comeau, Col (tripping), 19:56. Third period: 7, Minnesota, Coyle 20 (Parise), 5:34. 8, Minnesota, Coyle 21 (Suter, Parise), 18:33 (en). 9, Minnesota, Niederreiter 14 (Pominville), 19:16 (en). Penalties: None. Shots: Colorado 11-14-8: 33. Minnesota 12-8-10: 30. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 3; Minnesota 0 of 3. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov (12 shots-9 saves), Pickard 5-4-1 (0:00 second, 16-15). Minnesota, Dubnyk 23-21-5 (33-30). A: 19,107. Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Steve Kozari. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Lonnie Cameron.

Dallas 1 1 1 — 3 Nashville 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, Nashville, C.Smith 15 (Ribeiro, Weber), 12:38. 2, Dallas, Roussel 10 (Eakin), 12:48. Penalties: C.Smith, Nas (interference), 15:09. Second period: 3, Nashville, Jarnkrok 13 (Neal, Bitetto), 1:35. 4, Nashville, Weber 16 (Josi, C.Smith), 9:17 (pp). 5, Nashville, Ekholm 7 (Wilson, Arvidsson), 9:48. 6, Dallas, Spezza 22 (Ja.Benn, Klingberg), 16:28 (pp). Penalties: Ja.Benn, Dal (interference), 8:28; Roussel, Dal (roughing), 12:42; Bitetto, Nas (roughing), 12:42; Josi, Nas (cross-checking), 15:07; Salomaki, Nas (high-sticking), 16:06; Faksa, Dal (holding), 18:30. Third period: 7, Nashville, Neal 22 (Weber, Johansen), 5:37. 8, Dallas, Fiddler 9 (Goligoski, Roussel), 10:30. Penalties: Demers, Dal (cross-checking), 3:02; Roussel, Dal (roughing), 6:04; Ja.Benn, Dal, major (fighting), 19:47; Gaustad, Nas, major (fighting), 19:47. Shots: Dallas 17-10-11: 38. Nashville 10-14-10: 34. Power-plays: Dallas 1 of 3; Nashville 1 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 22-12-6 (18 shots-14 saves), Lehtonen (9:48 second, 16-15). Nashville, Rinne 25-18-9 (38-35). A: 17,113. Referees: Garrett Rank, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Pierre Racicot, Steve Miller.

NBA SUMMARIES LATE MONDAY

Clippers 105, Nets 95 Brooklyn: Bogdanovic 5-12 7-9 19, Young 4-12 1-1 9, Lopez 9-17 7-8 25, Sloan 2-8 5-6 10, Ellington 5-8 0-0 13, Robinson 2-4 1-2 5, Brown 3-7 1-3 8, McCullough 0-2 0-0 0, Larkin 2-6 1-4 6, Karasev 0-1 0-0 0, Kilpatrick 0-0 0-0 0, Reed 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-77 23-33 95. L.A. Clippers: Pierce 3-5 1-1 8, Mbah a Moute 1-4 0-0 2, Jordan 5-8 0-0 10, Paul 8-15 6-6 23, Redick 6-16 4-4 19, Green 3-9 0-0 7, Johnson 3-6 0-0 6, Crawford 10-17 3-5 26, Prigioni 1-1 0-0 2, Aldrich 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 41-83 14-16 105. Brooklyn 27 19 33 16 — 95 L.A. Clippers 29 23 29 24 — 105 3-point goals: Brooklyn 8-19 (Ellington 3-6, Bogdanovic 2-5, Larkin 1-1, Brown 1-2, Sloan 1-3, McCullough 0-1, Karasev 0-1), L.A. Clippers 9-23 (Crawford 3-4, Redick 3-5, Pierce 1-3, Green 1-3, Paul 1-5, Mbah a Moute 0-1, Johnson 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 50 (Young 11), L.A. Clippers 49 (Jordan 10). Assists: Brooklyn 25 (Larkin 6), L.A. Clippers 22 (Paul 12). Total fouls: Brooklyn 19, L.A. Clippers 22. A: 19,060 (19,060).

Thunder 131, Kings 116 Oklahoma City: Durant 8-17 7-7 27, Ibaka 4-12 4-4 12, Adams 2-4 0-0 4, Westbrook 6-8 6-7 20, Roberson 1-4 2-2 4, Kanter 11-11 1-1 23, Singler 4-6 0-0 11, Waiters 8-11 3-5 22, Foye 2-7 0-0 6, N.Collison 0-0 0-0 0, Payne 0-0 0-0 0, McGary 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 47-82 23-26 131. Sacramento: Anderson 1-5 0-0 3, Acy 5-9 0-0 10, Cousins 14-33 7-11 35, Rondo 5-13 1-2 11, McLemore 5-12 2-2 14, Casspi 7-10 0-0 16, D.Collison 5-10 0-0 12, Cauley-Stein 2-4 2-2 6, Koufos 1-5 1-2 3, Belinelli 3-6 0-0 6. Totals 48-107 13-19 116. Oklahoma City 29 32 33 37 — 131 Sacramento 25 28 31 32 — 116 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 14-34 (Durant 4-9, Singler 3-5, Waiters 3-5, Westbrook 2-3, Foye 2-7, Roberson 0-2, Ibaka 0-3), Sacramento 7-25 (McLemore 2-4, Casspi 2-5, D.Collison 2-5, Anderson 1-2, Acy 0-1, Rondo 0-2, Belinelli 0-2, Cousins 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 52 (Westbrook 13), Sacramento 51 (Cousins 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 15), Sacramento 28 (Rondo 12). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 23, Sacramento 16. Technicals: Acy, Cousins, Sacramento delay of game 3. A: 17,317 (17,317).


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Florida Tampa Bay Boston Detroit Ottawa Montreal Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey Columbus

GP 63 63 64 63 64 63 64 61 GP 62 63 61 62 62 65 64 64

W 36 37 35 32 30 30 25 21 W 46 37 34 32 29 29 30 26

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 19 8 80 174 148 20-9-4 16-10-4 12-6-0 22 4 78 175 151 20-10-2 17-12-2 12-8-2 23 6 76 197 176 14-16-3 21-7-3 14-8-2 20 11 75 161 163 16-10-6 16-10-5 13-6-3 27 7 67 188 200 17-10-5 13-17-2 11-9-2 28 5 65 173 175 17-11-3 13-17-2 13-6-1 31 8 58 148 172 11-17-4 14-14-4 8-11-4 30 10 52 147 182 9-11-8 12-19-2 1-10-6 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 12 4 96 205 144 25-5-2 21-7-2 17-3-2 20 6 80 180 159 23-6-3 14-14-3 12-6-4 20 7 75 174 151 19-8-4 15-12-3 11-5-3 22 8 72 167 160 19-9-4 13-13-4 7-6-2 22 11 69 157 168 16-8-7 13-14-4 9-8-5 26 10 68 158 174 16-12-6 13-14-4 10-8-4 27 7 67 140 156 15-14-4 15-13-3 9-13-2 30 8 60 167 196 13-12-6 13-18-2 8-9-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Chicago 64 Dallas 65 Blues 66 Nashville 64 Minnesota 64 Colorado 65 Winnipeg 62 Paciic GP Los Angeles62 Anaheim 61 San Jose 62 Vancouver 62 Arizona 63 Calgary 63 Edmonton 65

W 39 38 37 32 29 32 26 W 37 34 34 24 27 26 24

L 20 20 20 21 25 29 32 L 21 19 22 26 30 33 34

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

OT 5 7 9 11 10 4 4 OT 4 8 6 12 6 4 7

Pts 83 83 83 75 68 68 56 Pts 78 76 74 60 60 56 55

GF 180 209 166 172 170 175 161 GF 165 153 188 150 168 170 158

GA 153 189 162 161 162 187 186 GA 143 144 167 178 198 197 194

Home 23-8-2 20-10-1 19-11-4 17-10-5 17-11-4 14-14-4 13-15-1 Home 18-10-1 20-8-4 12-13-3 11-15-5 16-12-4 17-14-1 16-14-2

Away Div 16-12-3 11-9-1 18-10-6 14-7-2 18-9-5 13-7-3 15-11-6 9-11-3 12-14-6 11-8-5 18-15-0 12-6-2 13-17-3 9-14-1 Away Div 19-11-3 13-8-0 14-11-4 15-4-4 22-9-3 9-5-3 13-11-7 7-7-3 11-18-2 12-6-2 9-19-3 7-12-2 8-20-5 6-9-4

Tuesday Blues 4, Ottawa 3, SO Boston 2, Calgary 1 Carolina 3, New Jersey 1 Edmonton 2, Buffalo 1, OT Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2 Nashville 5, Dallas 3 Minnesota 6, Colorado 3 Florida 3, Winnipeg 2 NY Islanders 3, Vancouver 2 Monday NY Rangers 2, Columbus 1 Philadelphia 5, Calgary 3 Pittsburgh 6, Arizona 0 Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 1 Detroit 3, Dallas 2, OT San Jose 6, Montreal 2 Wednesday Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 7 p.m. Montreal at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Thursday Chicago at Boston, 6 p.m. Calgary at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 7 p.m. NY Islanders at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Florida at Colorado, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 8 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Montreal at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 39 19 Boston 36 25 New York 25 37 Brooklyn 17 44 Philadelphia 8 52 Southeast W L Miami 34 26 Atlanta 33 28 Charlotte 31 28 Washington 29 30 Orlando 26 33 Central W L Cleveland 42 17 Indiana 31 29 Detroit 31 29 Chicago 30 29 Milwaukee 25 35 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 50 9 Memphis 35 24 Dallas 33 28 Houston 29 31 New Orleans 23 35 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 42 18 Portland 33 28 Utah 28 31 Denver 23 37 Minnesota 19 41 Paciic W L x-Golden State 54 5 LA Clippers 39 20 Sacramento 24 34 Phoenix 15 45 LA Lakers 12 49 x-clinched playof spot

Pct .672 .590 .403 .279 .133 Pct .567 .541 .525 .492 .441 Pct .712 .517 .517 .508 .417

Pct .847 .593 .541 .483 .397 Pct .700 .541 .475 .383 .317 Pct .915 .661 .414 .250 .197

GB — 4½ 16 23½ 32 GB — 1½ 2½ 4½ 7½ GB — 11½ 11½ 12 17½

GB — 15 18 21½ 26½ GB — 9½ 13½ 19 23 GB — 15 29½ 39½ 43

L10 7-3 7-3 2-8 5-5 1-9 L10 6-4 4-6 7-3 7-3 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5

L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 L10 5-5 9-1 4-6 4-6 5-5 L10 9-1 7-3 3-7 1-9 2-8

Str L-1 W-3 L-2 L-2 L-9 Str W-2 L-1 W-1 W-3 L-1 Str W-1 L-3 W-4 L-3 W-1

Str W-5 W-1 W-3 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-3 L-2 L-1 Str W-6 W-2 L-3 L-1 W-1

Home 21-6 20-10 15-18 11-22 5-23 Home 19-12 19-12 20-9 16-16 16-15 Home 25-5 18-11 18-11 19-11 17-10

Away 18-13 16-15 10-19 6-22 3-29 Away 15-14 14-16 11-19 13-14 10-18 Away 17-12 13-18 13-18 11-18 8-25

Conf 26-10 25-16 16-24 9-25 2-34 Conf 21-16 21-17 20-15 21-18 15-21 Conf 25-12 20-15 20-16 18-18 17-19

Home 28-0 21-9 19-12 16-14 16-13 Home 25-8 19-12 19-12 11-18 10-20 Home 25-0 20-10 14-16 11-21 7-20

Away 22-9 14-15 14-16 13-17 7-22 Away 17-10 14-16 9-19 12-19 9-21 Away 29-5 19-10 10-18 4-24 5-29

Conf 30-5 20-16 21-16 21-19 15-23 Conf 29-7 23-16 15-20 12-27 10-25 Conf 31-3 20-14 12-23 10-27 5-33

Tuesday Charlotte 126, Phoenix 92 Miami 129, Chicago 111 Portland 104, New York 85 Dallas 121, Orlando 108 Golden State 109, Atlanta 105, OT LA Lakers 107, Brooklyn 101 Monday Cleveland 100, Indiana 96 Washington 116, Philadelphia 108 Boston 100, Utah 95 Milwaukee 128, Houston 121 Memphis 103, Denver 96 Oklahoma City 131, Sacramento 116 LA Clippers 105, Brooklyn 95 Wednesday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Chicago at Orlando, 6 p.m. Utah at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Detroit at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Phoenix at Miami, 6:30 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Bergeron’s late goal gives Boston win ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrice Bergeron scored a tiebreaking goal with 3:24 left in the third period and the host Boston Bruins beat the Calgary Flames 2-1 on Tuesday night. Landon Ferraro also scored for Boston and Tuukka Rask stopped 24 of 25 shots as the Bruins won for the third time in four games. Jakub Nakladal’s first career goal was the only score for the Flames, who lost their sixth straight. Joni Ortio had 23 saves for Calgary but had little chance on the game-winner as Bergeron one-timed a pass from Torey Krug from high in the slot. Ferraro gave Boston the lead on a onetimer from the slot of passes from Brett Connolly and Krug 7:05 into the game. Rask had a shutout going until Nakladal scored 5:35 into the third on a slap shot from the top of the left circle to tie it at 1-all. Jyrki Jokipakka and Michael Frolik assisted. The Flames, who lost in Philadelphia 5-3 on Monday night, kept it close early with defense. Calgary held Boston to five shots in the first and nine in the second as the Flames regained their strength. Nakladal’s goal gave Calgary a lift and the Flames nearly took a lead a few minutes later, but Rask stopped Michael Ferland three times as he attempted to swipe in a rebound from in front of the crease. Nashville signs Salomaki • The Nashville Predators have signed forward Miikka Salomaki (MEE-kah SA-loh-MA-kee) to a two-year, $1.2 million contract. The Predators announced the deal Tuesday. Salomaki, who turns 23 on March 9, will earn $575,000 in 2016-17 and $650,000 in 2017-18. He has seven points (four goals, three assists) in 45 games this

season and has played in 46 career games with the Predators since making his NHL debut Jan. 8, 2015. The 5-foot-11, 208-pound left winger spent most of the past two seasons in the American Hockey League with the Milwaukee Admirals scoring 70 points in 117 games. The native of Raahe, Finland, was the 52nd draft selection overall in the 2011 draft. Boston’s Rinaldo suspended • Boston Bruins forward Zac Rinaldo has been suspended five games without pay for an illegal hit to the head in Sunday’s game against Tampa Bay. Rinaldo took out Lightning forward Cedric Paquette against the boards in the first period of Tampa Bay’s 4-1 victory. Rinaldo was assessed a minor penalty for illegal check to the head. Rinaldo, who was also suspended for eight games last year, was considered a repeat ofender. The suspension will cost him $51,829, which goes to the Players’ Emergency Assistance Fund. Nestrasil done for season • Carolina Hurricanes right winger Andrej Nestrasil will miss the rest of the season with a broken vertebra. General manager Ron Francis said Tuesday that Nestrasil broke the vertebra Feb. 25 in a loss at Toronto but did not provide details of the injury. He fell awkwardly into the boards after a hit. He had nine goals and 14 assists while playing in 55 games this season, his second in the NHL. The injury leaves Carolina further short-handed heading into the final 1½ months of the season. The Hurricanes traded three skaters — including captain Eric Staal and forward Kris Versteeg — before Monday’s trade deadline.

NHL SUMMARIES Hurricanes 3, Devils 1

Capitals 3, Penguins 2

Panthers 3, Jets 2

Carolina 0 1 2 — 3 New Jersey 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, New Jersey, Henrique 20 (Kennedy, Greene), 10:54. Penalties: Merrill, NJ (interference), 14:02; Hainsey, Car (holding stick), 17:15. Second period: 2, Carolina, Ryan 1 (Slavin), 4:36 (pp). Penalties: Moore, NJ (slashing), 2:40; Skinner, Car (holding), 9:59; New Jersey bench, served by Tootoo (too many men), 9:59. Third period: 3, Carolina, Nordstrom 9 (Lindholm, Slavin), 18:31. 4, Carolina, Gerbe 2, 19:38 (en). Penalties: Pesce, Car (high-sticking), 8:00. Shots: Carolina 5-7-7: 19. New Jersey 9-9-12: 30. Power-plays: Carolina 1 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 2. Goalies: Carolina, Lack 11-11-3 (30 shots-29 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 26-22-6 (18-16). A: 14,251. Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Brandon Gawryletz.

Pittsburgh 1 1 0 — 2 Washington 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 24 (Hagelin, Dumoulin), 6:14. Penalties: Kunitz, Pit (tripping), 11:55; Alzner, Was (crosschecking), 16:30; Kessel, Pit (slashing), 17:01. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 16 (Maatta, Crosby), 3:45. 3, Washington, Richards 2 (Schmidt, Chimera), 4:24. 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 20 (Williams, Burakovsky), 16:03. Penalties: Letang, Pit (holding), 5:23; Chimera, Was (embellishment), 5:23; Cole, Pit (hooking), 6:52; Orlov, Was (embellishment), 6:52; Orlov, Was (tripping), 11:50. Third period: 5, Washington, Niskanen 4 (Backstrom), 13:38 (pp). Penalties: Malkin, Pit (high-sticking), 12:45. Shots: Pittsburgh 13-10-7: 30. Washington 10-16-11: 37. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; Washington 1 of 3. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 2-2-1 (37 shots34 saves). Washington, Holtby 40-7-3 (30-28). A: 18,506. Referees: Kelly Sutherland, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Brian Mach.

Florida 1 0 2 — 3 Winnipeg 0 2 0 — 2 First period: 1, Florida, Smith 20 (Trocheck, Kampfer), 13:48. Penalties: Jokinen, Fla (tripping), 3:45. Second period: 2, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 16 (Ehlers, Scheifele), 5:23. 3, Winnipeg, Copp 2 (Burmistrov), 7:58. Penalties: Kulikov, Fla (hooking), :26; Stafford, Wpg (slashing), 5:57; Trocheck, Fla (boarding), 12:27; Armia, Wpg (hooking), 19:38. Third period: 4, Florida, Smith 21 (Trocheck, Purcell), 1:46 (pp). 5, Florida, Jagr 21 (Jokinen, Kulikov), 3:31. Penalties: Copp, Wpg (slashing), :44; Gudbranson, Fla (interference), 18:59. Shots: Florida 5-5-12: 22. Winnipeg 16-9-7: 32. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 3; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 27-15-6 (32 shots-30 saves). Winnipeg, Pavelec 6-9-2 (22-19). A: 15,294.

Bruins 2, Flames 1 Calgary 0 0 1 — 1 Boston 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Boston, Ferraro 5 (Krug, Connolly), 7:05. Penalties: Marchand, Bos (roughing), :38; Colborne, Cal (interference), 1:42; K.Miller, Bos (holding), 15:41. Second period: None. Penalties: Beleskey, Bos (unsportsmanlike conduct), 1:10; Hathaway, Cal (tripping), 8:41; Beleskey, Bos (goaltender interference), 9:53; Frolik, Cal (hooking), 17:31. Third period: 2, Calgary, Nakladal 1 (Jokipakka, Frolik), 5:35. 3, Boston, Bergeron 24 (Spooner, Krejci), 16:36 (pp). Penalties: Frolik, Cal (boarding), 9:09; Calgary bench, served by Bennett (too many men), 15:53. Shots: Calgary 8-8-9: 25. Boston 5-9-11: 25. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 4; Boston 1 of 5. Goalies: Calgary, Ortio 0-6-2 (25 shots-23 saves). Boston, Rask 25-18-5 (25-24). A: 17,565. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Francois St. Laurent. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Tim Nowak.

Oilers 2, Sabres 1 (OT) Edmonton 1 0 0 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 11 (Eberle), :22. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Pakarinen, Edm (interference), 6:17; Eichel, Buf (high-sticking), 10:57. Third period: 2, Buffalo, C.O’Reilly 1 (S.Reinhart, Pysyk), 9:06. Penalties: Girgensons, Buf (tripping), 6:11. Overtime: 3, Edmonton, McDavid 12, 3:48. Penalties: Buffalo bench, served by S.Reinhart (too many men), 1:34. Shots: Edmonton 13-14-8-6: 41. Buffalo 12-12-8-0: 32. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 3; Buffalo 0 of 1. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 14-22-4 (32 shots-31 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 4-7-3 (41-39). A: 19,070. Referees: Wes McCauley, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Tony Sericolo.

Wild 6, Avalanche 3 Colorado 1 2 0 — 3 Minnesota 3 0 3 — 6 First period: 1, Colorado, Iginla 19 (Barrie, Boedker), :33 (pp). 2, Minnesota, Niederreiter 13 (Pominville), 10:37. 3, Minnesota, Pominville 11 (Niederreiter), 11:38. 4, Minnesota, Haula 9 (Dumba, Scandella), 17:48. Penalties: Niederreiter, Min (tripping), :12. Second period: 5, Colorado, Bigras 1 (Duchene, MacKinnon), 3:25. 6, Colorado, McLeod 8 (Skille, J.Mitchell), 12:33. Penalties: Vanek, Min (slashing), 6:57; Matthias, Col (slashing), 12:51; Colorado bench, served by Skille (too many men), 15:22; Haula, Min (holding), 18:20; Comeau, Col (tripping), 19:56. Third period: 7, Minnesota, Coyle 20 (Parise), 5:34. 8, Minnesota, Coyle 21 (Suter, Parise), 18:33 (en). 9, Minnesota, Niederreiter 14 (Pominville), 19:16 (en). Penalties: None. Shots: Colorado 11-14-8: 33. Minnesota 12-8-10: 30. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 3; Minnesota 0 of 3. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov (12 shots-9 saves), Pickard 5-4-1 (0:00 second, 16-15). Minnesota, Dubnyk 23-21-5 (33-30). A: 19,107. Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Steve Kozari. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Lonnie Cameron.

Miami has record shooting night ASSOCIATED PRESS

All the Miami Heat did was put together the best shooting night in franchise history, an effort that matched the NBA’s top performance from the floor in the last 18 years. This recent signing of Joe Johnson already looks like a winner. The Heat shot 67.5 percent, set a season high for points and beat the Chicago Bulls 129-111 Tuesday night. Hassan Whiteside scored a career-high 26 points and had 14 rebounds, and Johnson had 24 points in his Miami home debut. Miami’s 52-for-77 shooting was the best in the NBA since Utah shot exactly that on Feb. 27, 2010, and no team has done better from the field since the Los Angeles Clippers connected on 69.3 percent of their shots on March 13, 1998. “The game felt effortless offensively,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “We’re not calling specific play calls to say, ‘OK, this is for you, you get your shot.’ It’s fiveman basketball, guys are making the right play and if you see somebody open you follow the fundamental law of basketball and throw it to them.” Heat guard Dwyane Wade was more succinct of how it happened. “I have no idea,” Wade said. Clearly, neither did the Bulls. It was the worst field-goal percentage defense night for Chicago since the stat started being charted by STATS in the 1983-84 season. After the Bulls got within 108-102 with about 5 minutes left they got outscored 21-9 the rest of the way — taking a loss that knocked them out of the top eight in the Eastern Conference. “A terrible defensive efort on our part,” Chicago’s Pau Gasol said. “We knew that this team was a high-scoring team in the paint, we didn’t force them to take 3s, we didn’t force them to take long shots. They pretty much got everything that they wanted.” Derrick Rose returned from a threegame absence because of injury and scored 17 points for Chicago, which lost for the 17th time in 25 games. “I liked how I played,” Rose said. Warriors win without Curry • Stephen Curry missed Golden State’s game, at home against Atlanta, because of an injured left ankle. The Warriors won anyway, 109-105 in overtime behind Klay Thompson’s 26 points. Coach Steve Kerr decided to sit Curry

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miami’s Hassan Whiteside goes to the basket on a night the Heat set a team record by shooting 67.5 percent from the ield.

after he hurt the ankle Saturday night in Oklahoma City before returning to hit a long 3-pointer to win it in overtime. Curry’s ankle became worse Sunday and he said it wasn’t worth risking playing on it if it would mean setting himself back more. Curry has three straight 40-point games. He was named Western Conference player of the week Monday for his fourth such honor this season — he’s the first in franchise history to win four in one season. He averaged 43.8 points, 7.3 assists, 5.8 rebounds and 1.5 steals while the Warriors went 4-0. Minnesota plans call-up • Minnesota Timberwolves coach Sam Mitchell spoke frankly about the team’s lack of frontcourt depth after a blowout loss in Dallas on Sunday. Two days later, the Timberwolves gave their coach some help to ease some of the burden on young big men Karl-Anthony Towns and Gorgu Dieng. The Timberwolves plan to call up forward Greg Smith from Raptors 905 of the D-League on a 10-day contract, a person with knowledge of the deal told The Associated Press. Meanwhile, the Timberwolves and Kevin Martin agreed to a buyout of the veteran guard’s contract.

NBA SUMMARIES

Predators 5, Stars 3

Hornets 126, Suns 92

Heat 129, Bulls 111

Lakers 107, Nets 101

Dallas 1 1 1 — 3 Nashville 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, Nashville, C.Smith 15 (Ribeiro, Weber), 12:38. 2, Dallas, Roussel 10 (Eakin), 12:48. Penalties: C.Smith, Nas (interference), 15:09. Second period: 3, Nashville, Jarnkrok 13 (Neal, Bitetto), 1:35. 4, Nashville, Weber 16 (Josi, C.Smith), 9:17 (pp). 5, Nashville, Ekholm 7 (Wilson, Arvidsson), 9:48. 6, Dallas, Spezza 22 (Ja.Benn, Klingberg), 16:28 (pp). Penalties: Ja.Benn, Dal (interference), 8:28; Roussel, Dal (roughing), 12:42; Bitetto, Nas (roughing), 12:42; Josi, Nas (cross-checking), 15:07; Salomaki, Nas (high-sticking), 16:06; Faksa, Dal (holding), 18:30. Third period: 7, Nashville, Neal 22 (Weber, Johansen), 5:37. 8, Dallas, Fiddler 9 (Goligoski, Roussel), 10:30. Penalties: Demers, Dal (cross-checking), 3:02; Roussel, Dal (roughing), 6:04; Ja.Benn, Dal, major (fighting), 19:47; Gaustad, Nas, major (fighting), 19:47. Shots: Dallas 17-10-11: 38. Nashville 10-14-10: 34. Power-plays: Dallas 1 of 3; Nashville 1 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Niemi 22-12-6 (18 shots-14 saves), Lehtonen (9:48 second, 16-15). Nashville, Rinne 25-18-9 (38-35). A: 17,113.

Phoenix: Tucker 1-6 1-2 3, Len 5-15 8-10 18, Chandler 4-4 0-1 8, Price 2-10 0-0 4, Booker 4-16 4-5 13, Pressey 1-3 0-0 2, Teletovic 5-12 3-4 17, Goodwin 4-12 2-2 10, Leuer 2-6 2-2 6, Jenkins 5-7 0-1 11. Totals 33-91 20-27 92. Charlotte: Batum 6-10 1-1 15, Williams 2-5 0-0 5, Zeller 4-6 1-1 9, Walker 9-16 5-5 26, Lee 3-5 1-1 8, Jefferson 8-15 3-3 19, Lin 1-7 4-4 6, Lamb 6-10 1-1 15, Kaminsky 3-8 1-2 9, Daniels 2-6 0-0 6, Harrison 0-3 2-4 2, Hansbrough 0-1 1-2 1, Gutierrez 1-1 3-3 5. Totals 45-93 23-27 126. Phoenix 18 24 19 31 — 92 Charlotte 35 33 30 28 — 126 3-point goals: Phoenix 6-27 (Teletovic 4-9, Jenkins 1-1, Booker 1-4, Tucker 0-1, Leuer 0-2, Goodwin 0-3, Price 0-7), Charlotte 13-27 (Walker 3-5, Batum 2-3, Kaminsky 2-3, Daniels 2-4, Lamb 2-4, Lee 1-2, Williams 1-3, Harrison 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 52 (Len 12), Charlotte 65 (Batum 9). Assists: Phoenix 14 (Pressey, Price 3), Charlotte 27 (Walker 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 22, Charlotte 21. A: 16,849 (19,077).

Chicago: Dunleavy 4-7 0-0 10, Gibson 4-6 5-7 13, Gasol 6-13 2-2 15, Rose 6-11 4-7 17, Moore 3-6 0-0 8, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, McDermott 5-12 1-1 11, Portis 5-8 0-0 11, Brooks 5-15 3-5 16, Felicio 0-3 0-0 0, Holiday 2-6 2-2 7, Bairstow 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 41-90 18-26 111. Miami: J.Johnson 10-13 2-2 24, Deng 8-10 1-2 20, Stoudemire 3-3 1-1 7, Dragic 8-14 1-2 17, Wade 7-13 4-6 18, Winslow 4-6 0-0 8, Whiteside 8-11 10-11 26, Richardson 4-7 0-1 9. Totals 52-77 19-25 129. Chicago 30 32 20 29 — 111 Miami 36 29 30 34 — 129 3-point goals: Chicago 11-23 (Brooks 3-5, Dunleavy 2-4, Moore 2-4, Portis 1-1, Rose 1-1, Gasol 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Snell 0-1, McDermott 0-2), Miami 6-12 (Deng 3-3, J.Johnson 2-3, Richardson 1-3, Winslow 0-1, Dragic 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 40 (Gasol 9), Miami 48 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Chicago 20 (Gasol 6), Miami 28 (Dragic 11). Total fouls: Chicago 22, Miami 23. Technicals: Miami defensive three second. A: 19,654 (19,600).

Trail Blazers 104, Knicks 85

Mavericks 121, Magic 108

Brooklyn: Bogdanovic 7-12 3-4 18, T.Young 6-14 7-8 19, Lopez 9-18 5-8 23, Sloan 4-11 3-3 11, Ellington 4-6 0-0 10, Larkin 3-8 0-0 6, Reed 2-6 0-4 4, Kilpatrick 3-8 0-0 8, M.Brown 1-3 0-0 2, Robinson 0-2 0-0 0, Karasev 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-89 18-27 101. L.A. Lakers: A.Brown 1-6 0-0 2, Randle 6-13 2-3 14, Hibbert 7-9 0-0 14, Russell 14-21 3-5 39, Clarkson 6-15 3-4 16, Williams 1-2 3-4 6, N.Young 1-5 0-1 3, Nance Jr. 3-4 0-0 6, Bass 1-5 3-4 5, Huertas 1-3 0-0 2, Black 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-83 14-21 107. Brooklyn 19 31 24 27 — 101 L.A. Lakers 24 34 21 28 — 107 3-point goals: Brooklyn 5-18 (Ellington 2-3, Kilpatrick 2-4, Bogdanovic 1-4, Lopez 0-1, Sloan 0-1, Karasev 0-1, M.Brown 0-1, T.Young 0-1, Larkin 0-2), L.A. Lakers 11-26 (Russell 8-12, Williams 1-2, N.Young 1-4, Clarkson 1-5, Nance Jr. 0-1, Huertas 0-1, A.Brown 0-1). Fouled out: Lopez. Rebounds: Brooklyn 57 (T.Young 15), L.A. Lakers 51 (Randle 13). Assists: Brooklyn 28 (Sloan 6), L.A. Lakers 22 (Clarkson 7). Total fouls: Brooklyn 19, L.A. Lakers 22. Technicals: Brooklyn defensive three second. A: 18,997 (18,997).

Portland: Aminu 2-8 0-0 4, Vonleh 2-8 0-0 4, Plumlee 0-3 2-2 2, Lillard 8-18 10-10 30, McCollum 10-19 3-3 25, Leonard 4-8 0-0 11, Crabbe 2-7 0-0 6, Henderson 2-8 2-2 6, Davis 4-4 1-3 9, Harkless 2-3 0-0 5, Roberts 1-1 0-0 2, Connaughton 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-88 18-20 104. New York: Anthony 10-20 3-3 23, Porzingis 4-10 2-3 11, Lopez 4-5 0-0 8, Calderon 2-8 0-0 5, Afflalo 6-9 0-0 13, Williams 2-7 1-3 5, Galloway 0-7 0-0 0, Grant 0-1 0-0 0, O’Quinn 3-10 3-4 11, Thomas 2-10 0-0 5, Vujacic 0-1 0-0 0, Fredette 0-0 4-5 4. Totals 33-88 13-18 85. Portland 27 31 27 19 — 104 New York 25 25 22 13 — 85 3-point goals: Portland 12-30 (Lillard 4-9, Leonard 3-5, McCollum 2-3, Crabbe 2-6, Harkless 1-2, Henderson 0-1, Vonleh 0-2, Aminu 0-2), New York 6-21 (O’Quinn 2-3, Afflalo 1-1, Porzingis 1-2, Thomas 1-3, Calderon 1-5, Vujacic 0-1, Anthony 0-3, Galloway 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Portland 61 (Leonard 14), New York 52 (Anthony 10). Assists: Portland 17 (Lillard 6), New York 11 (Anthony 4). Total fouls: Portland 18, New York 17. Technicals: Lopez. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Orlando: Hezonja 1-6 0-0 2, Gordon 3-5 1-3 7, Vucevic 8-16 2-2 18, Payton 5-8 0-0 12, Oladipo 3-10 0-0 6, Watson 1-4 4-4 7, Ilyasova 7-10 6-7 22, Jennings 5-12 0-0 12, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Napier 0-1 0-0 0, Marble 2-7 2-2 8, Dedmon 5-7 2-2 12. Totals 41-91 17-20 108. Dallas: Parsons 6-12 2-2 17, Nowitzki 7-13 4-5 19, Pachulia 6-8 5-5 17, Williams 2-6 3-4 7, Matthews 8-12 4-5 21, Felton 2-5 2-2 6, Lee 2-3 3-4 7, Barea 6-9 2-2 17, Harris 3-3 0-0 7, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0, Powell 0-2 0-0 0, Mejri 1-1 1-2 3, Villanueva 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 43-77 26-31 121. Orlando 27 34 20 27 — 108 Dallas 35 34 27 25 — 121 3-point goals: Orlando 9-30 (Ilyasova 2-3, Payton 2-4, Marble 2-5, Jennings 2-6, Watson 1-3, Napier 0-1, Gordon 0-2, Hezonja 0-3, Oladipo 0-3), Dallas 9-19 (Barea 3-4, Parsons 3-4, Harris 1-1, Nowitzki 1-3, Matthews 1-4, Villanueva 0-1, Felton 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 49 (Ilyasova 10), Dallas 43 (Pachulia 10). Assists: Orlando 29 (Jennings, Watson 6), Dallas 27 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Orlando 29, Dallas 19. Technicals: Orlando defensive three second. A: 19,546 (19,200).

Islanders 3, Canucks 2 NY Islanders 1 1 1 — 3 Vancouver 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Hamonic 5 (Martin, Cizikas), 4:20. 2, Vancouver, Vey 3 (Hutton), 10:42 (pp). Penalties: New York bench, served by Martin (too many men), 9:32; Bartkowski, Van (boarding), 14:45. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Lee 10 (Hickey, Okposo), 14:29. Penalties: Hamonic, NYI, major (fighting), 7:33; Etem, Van, major (fighting), 7:33; Martin, NYI, major (fighting), 11:43; Dorsett, Van, major (fighting), 11:43. Third period: 4, Vancouver, D.Sedin 24 (H.Sedin), 10:52. 5, NY Islanders, Hickey 4, 12:55. Penalties: Hamonic, NYI (tripping), 3:48. Shots: NY Islanders 2-9-13: 24. Vancouver 6-13-14: 33. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Vancouver 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 17-6-3 (33 shots-31 saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 9-8-4 (24-21). A: 18,264.


SPORTS

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE

Men’s conference standings

NBA LEADERS

NBA Favorite Points Underdog MAGIC 3 Bulls Hornets 7 76ERS CELTICS 5.5 Blazers RAPTORS 6 Jazz GRIZZLIES [5] Kings ROCKETS [6] Pelicans Wizards 4 T’WOLVES Pacers 2 BUCKS SPURS 10.5 Pistons NUGGETS 7 Lakers CLIPPERS 1.5 Thunder []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity of the injury.

THROUGH MONDAY

THROUGH MONDAY SCORING AVERAGE

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog DUQUESNE 4.5 Fordham W VIRGINIA 9 Texas Tech NOTRE DAME 2 Miami-Florida Pittsburgh 2.5 VIRGINIA TECH Michigan St 23.5 RUTGERS LASALLE 1 Saint Louis C FLORIDA 5 Tulane VIRGINIA COMM 9.5 Davidson MISSISSIPPI 3.5 Mississippi St r-St. Joseph’s 4 ST. BONA KANSAS ST 10 Tcu BUTLER 4.5 Seton Hall NC STATE 15 Boston College Wisconsin 10 MINNESOTA S FLORIDA 3.5 E Carolina PROVIDENCE 3 Creighton ALABAMA 3.5 Arkansas Oregon 2 UCLA WYOMING 10 San Jose St BOISE ST 8 Nevada Long Beach St 7 CS-FULLERTON USC 5.5 Oregon St WASHINGTON 12 Washington St FRESNO ST 6 Colorado St Added Games Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Nashville, TN Tennessee Tech 3.5 Austin Peay Murray St 6 E Illinois r- Rochester, NY.

Texas A&M Kentucky South Carolina Vanderbilt LSU Mississippi Alabama Florida Georgia Arkansas Mississippi St. Tennessee Auburn Missouri

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$240/+$200 Maple Leafs Blackhawks -$110/-$110 RED WINGS DUCKS -$210/+$175 Canadiens Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended New York Yankees LHP Aroldis Chapman 30 regular-season games under the league’s domestic violence policy. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with RHP Yordi Rosario on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with C Salvador Perez on a five-year contract through the 2021 season. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OF Guillermo Heredia. Placed C Jesus Sucre on the 60-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with LHPs Alex Claudio and Yohander Mendez and RHP Nick Martinez on one-year contracts. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Agreed to terms with LHP Yuhei Nakaushiro on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned F Sam Dekker to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS — Designated K Justin Tucker as its franchise player. BUFFALO BILLS — Designated OT Cordy Glenn as its franchise player. Released RB Boobie Dixon, G Kraig Urbik and DE Mario Williams. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Designated CB Josh Norman as its franchise player. DENVER BRONCOS — Designated LB Von Miller as its exclusive franchise player. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Designated S Eric Berry as its franchise player. LOS ANGELES RAMS — Designated CB Trumaine Johnson as its franchise player. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Designated DE Olivier Vernon as its transition player. NEW YORK JETS — Designated DE Muhammad Wilkerson as its franchise player. PHILADEPHIA EAGLES — Agreed to terms with QB Sam Bradford on a two-year contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Designated QB Kirk Cousins as its franchise player. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Boston F Zac Rinaldo five games for an illegal check to the head of Tampa Bay F Cedric Paquette during a Feb. 28 game. CALGARY FLAMES — Assigned D Tyler Wotherspoon to Stockton (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled D Ryan Murphy, F Brock McGinn and F Derek Ryan from Charlotte (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed F Miikka Salomaki to a two-year million contract. COLLEGE SUN BELT CONFERENCE — Announced Idaho’s football team will leave the conference after the 2017 season. ARIZONA — Fired women’s basketball coach Niya Butts. COLORADO — Dismissed QB Cade Apsay and S Evan White for violating team rules. FIU — Suspended women’s basketball coach Marlin Chinn after one of his players alleged that he pursued her sexually. FORDHAM — Named Ryan Davis assistant football coach. FRESNO STATE — Announced the addition of wrestling and women’s water polo to its athletic department, beginning with the 2017-18 season. MINNESOTA — Suspended men’s basketball G Kevin Dorsey, Nate Mason and Dupree McBrayer for the remainder of the season, stemming from a sexually explicit video that appeared on Dorsey’s social media accounts. NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the resignation of faculty athletics representative Juan Arroyo. Named Dr. Amy Rady faculty athletics representative. RUTGERS — Named Pat Kelly video coordinator. SUL ROSS STATE — Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Aaron Tavitas, effective at the end of the semester. SYRACUSE — Announced RB Devante McFarlane has left the football program.

BIG TEN

Conference W L PCT. Indiana 13 3 .813 Michigan St. 11 5 .688 Maryland 11 5 .688 Iowa 11 5 .688 Wisconsin 11 5 .688 Ohio St. 11 6 .647 Purdue 10 6 .625 Michigan 10 7 .588 Northwestern 6 10 .375 Penn St. 6 10 .375 Nebraska 6 10 .375 Illinois 5 11 .313 Minnesota 2 14 .125 Rutgers 0 16 .000

Overall W L 23 6 24 5 23 6 20 8 19 10 19 11 22 7 20 10 18 11 15 14 14 15 13 16 8 20 6 23

PCT. .793 .828 .793 .714 .655 .633 .759 .667 .621 .517 .483 .448 .286 .207

SEC

Conference W L PCT. 11 5 .688 11 5 .688 10 6 .625 10 6 .625 10 6 .625 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 6 10 .375 6 10 .375 5 11 .313 3 13 .188

Overall W L 22 7 21 8 23 6 18 11 17 12 18 11 17 11 17 12 15 12 15 14 13 15 13 16 11 17 10 19

PCT. .750 .724 .793 .621 .586 .621 .607 .586 .556 .517 .464 .448 .393 .345

Conference W L PCT. 13 3 .813 13 3 .813 12 4 .750 12 4 .750 10 6 .625 9 7 .563 8 8 .500 7 9 .438 6 10 .375 5 11 .313 5 11 .313 5 11 .313 4 12 .250 3 13 .188

Overall W L 24 5 21 8 23 6 20 7 21 8 17 10 16 13 15 13 15 12 15 14 12 16 10 18 10 19 7 20

PCT. .828 .724 .786 .741 .724 .630 .552 .536 .556 .517 .429 .357 .345 .259

ATLANTIC 10 Saint Joseph’s VCU Dayton St. Bon. G. Wash. Davidson Rhode Island Richmond Fordham Duquesne UMass Saint Louis George Mason La Salle

Division I scores East G. Wash. 74, George Mason 52 Miami (Ohio) 67, Buffalo 59 Villanova 83, DePaul 62 Far West Utah St. 78, Air Force 65 Midwest Akron 91, Ohio 76 Cent. Michigan 65, Ball St. 57 E. Michigan 75, N. Illinois 71 Kent St. 70, Bowling Green 54 Purdue 81, Nebraska 62 W. Michigan 70, Toledo 64 Southwest Oklahoma 73, Baylor 71 Texas-Arlington 75, Texas St. 69 UALR 89, Arkansas St. 80 South Dayton 85, Richmond 84 Duke 79, Wake Forest 71 Kentucky 88, Florida 79 LSU 80, Missouri 71 Louisville 56, Georgia Tech 53 Vanderbilt 86, Tennessee 69 Virginia 64, Clemson 57 TOURNAMENT Atlantic Sun Conference First Round Florida G.C. 74, Kennesaw St. 64 Lipscomb 92, Jacksonville 89, OT North Florida 92, SC-Upstate 69 Stetson 82, NJIT 67 Patriot League First Round Holy Cross 72, Loyola (Md.) 67 Navy 78, Lafayette 70

WOMEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 22.

24.

25.

UConn (29-0) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina or Cincinnati, Saturday. Notre Dame (28-1) idle. Next: vs. Duke or Virginia, Friday. South Carolina (28-1) idle. Next: vs. Auburn or Missouri, Friday. Baylor (30-1) idle. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Maryland (27-3) idle. Next: vs. Michigan or Iowa, Friday. Texas (26-3) idle. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Louisville (24-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. Oregon State (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Southern Cal or Washington State, Friday. Ohio State (23-6) idle. Next: vs. Nebraska or Rutgers, Friday. Arizona State (25-5) idle. Next: vs. Utah or California, Friday. Stanford (24-6) idle. Next: vs. Washington or Colorado, Friday. UCLA (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Oregon or Arizona, Friday. Kentucky (21-6) idle. Next: vs. Alabama or LSU, Thursday. Florida State (23-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. Texas A&M (21-8) idle. Next: vs. Tennessee or Arkansas, Friday. Mississippi State (24-6) idle. Next: SEC quarterfinals, Friday. Syracuse (23-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. DePaul (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Xavier or Butler, Sunday. Michigan State (22-7) idle. Next: Big Ten quarterfinals, Friday. South Florida (21-8) idle. Next: vs. SMU or UCF, Saturday. Miami (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Pittsburgh or North Carolina, Thursday. Colorado State (27-1) beat Fresno State 68-55. Next: at Air Force, Friday. West Virginia (23-8) beat Iowa State 82-57. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Oklahoma (20-9) beat Texas Tech 70-60. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Florida (22-7) idle. Next: SEC quarterfinals, Friday.

BASEBALL

AREA COLLEGES

Cardinals spring schedule

TUESDAY RESULTS Men’s Tennis McKendree 7, Lindenwood 2 Women’s Tennis McKendree 9, Lewis and Clark 0 Baseball Wash U 27, Principia 0 Softball Quincy Univ. 3, Tiffin 0 Men’s basketball MIAA Tournament Lindenwood 77, Pittsburgh St. 68 Central Okla. 94, Central Missouri 74 Missouri Western 70, Washburn 54 Lincoln 73, Emporia St. 71 Men’s volleyball Missouri Bapist 3, Missouri Valley 0 Women’s Lacrosse Missouri Baptist 9, Lindenwood-Belleville 6

Wednesday 3/2 vs. Fla. Atlantic Thursday 3/3 vs. Florida Friday 3/4 at Houston Saturday 3/5 at Florida Sunday 3/6 vs. Washington Monday 3/7 vs. NY Mets Tuesday 3/8 at Minnesota Wednesday 3/9 vs. Florida Thursday 3/10 at NY Mets Friday 3/11 vs. Atlanta Saturday 3/12 SS vs. Houston/at NY Mets Sunday 3/13 at Washington Monday 3/14 vs. Minnesota Wednesday 3/16 at Atlanta Thursday 3/17 at Detroit Friday 3/18 vs. Detroit Saturday 3/19 at Boston Sunday 3/20 vs. Florida Monday 3/21 vs. Boston Wednesday 3/23 vs. Florida Thursday 3/24 at Washington Friday 3/25 at NY Mets Saturday 3/26 vs. Washington Sunday 3/27 at Florida Monday 3/28 vs. NY Mets Tuesday 3/29 vs. Washington Wednesday 3/30 at Florida Thursday 3/31 at NY Yankees

BASKETBALL SEC women’s basketball tournament At Jacksonville, Fla. WEDNESDAY • first round Game 1: No. 12 Alabama vs. No. 13 LSU, 10 a.m., SEC Net. Game 2: No. 11 Vanderbilt vs. No. 14 Ole Miss, 12:30 p.m., SEC Net. THURSDAY • quarterfinals Game 3: No. 9 Auburn vs. No. 8 Missouri, 11 a.m., SEC Net. Game 4: Winner game 1 vs. No. 5 Kentucky, 1:30 p.m., SEC Net. Game 5: No. 10 Arkansas vs. No. 7 Tennessee, 5 p.m., SEC Net. Game 6: Winner game 2 vs. No. 6 Georgia, 7:30 p.m., SEC Net. FRIDAY • semifinals Game 7: Winner game 3 vs. No. 1 South Carolina, 11 a.m., SEC Net. Game 8: Winner game 4 vs. No. 4 Florida, 1:30 p.m., SEC Net. Game 9: Winner game 5 vs. No. 2 Texas A&M, 5 p.m., SEC Net. Game 10: Winner game 6 vs. No. 3 Mississippi State, 7:30 p.m., SEC Net. SATURDAY • quarterfinals Game 11: Games 7 and 8 winners, 4 p.m., ESPNU Game 12: Games 9 and 10 winners, 6:30 p.m., ESPNU SUNDAY • championship Semifinal winners, 1:30 p.m., ESPNU

MEN’S BASKETBALL MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE TEAM Player of the year: Fred VanFleet, sr., Wichita State First team Ron Baker, sr., Wichita State D.J. Balentine, sr., Evansville Anthony Beane, sr., Southern Illinois Egidijus Mockevicius, sr., Evansville Fred VanVleet, sr., Wichita State Second team DeVaughn Akoon-Purcell, sr., Illinois State Devonte Brown, sr., Indiana State Montel James, sr., Loyola Brenton Scott, so., Indiana State Wes Washpun, sr., Northern Iowa Honorable mention Matt Bohannon, sr., Northern Iowa Paris Lee, jr., Illinois State MiKyle McIntosh, so., Illinois State Dequon Miller, jr., Missouri State Jeremy Morgan, jr., Northern Iowa Reed Timmer, so., Drake Newcomer team Dequon Miller, jr., Missouri State Anton Grady, jr., Wichita State Mike Rodriguez. jr., Southern Illinois Markis McDuffie, fr., Wichita State Everett Clemons, jr., Indiana State Freshman team Markis McDuffie, Wichita State Obediah Church, Missouri State Dwayne Lautier-Ogunleye, Bradley Jarred Dixon, Missouri State Luuk van Bree, Bradley Defensive team Ron Baker, sr., Wichita State Egidijus Mockevicius, sr., Evansville Jeremy Morgan, jr., Northern Iowa Fred VanVleet, sr., Wichita State Paris Lee, jr., Illinois State

GOLF Hole in One Four Seasons • Brian Tanner, hole No. 4, 131 yards, 9-iron, Feb. 28.

Curry, GOL Harden, HOU Durant, OKC Cousins, SAC Lillard, POR James, CLE Westbrook, OKC Davis, NOR George, IND DeRozan, TOR Butler, CHI Thompson, GOL Anthony, NYK Thomas, BOS Lowry, TOR McCollum, POR Wiggins, MIN Walker, CHA Lopez, Bro Leonard, SAN Wall, WAS Hayward, UTA Paul, LAC Knight, PHX Gallinari, DEN Jackson, DET Bosh, MIA Wade, MIA Middleton, MIL Gay, SAC Vucevic, ORL Nowitzki, DAL Okafor, PHL Millsap, ATL Towns, MIN Anderson, NOR

G FG FT PTS AVG 56 577 276 1718 30.7 60 505 532 1710 28.5 53 510 322 1479 27.9 49 456 367 1338 27.3 53 453 277 1344 25.4 57 542 272 1418 24.9 60 515 355 1458 24.3 51 469 265 1230 24.1 60 449 343 1402 23.4 58 453 398 1341 23.1 48 357 307 1074 22.4 56 444 153 1220 21.8 54 409 272 1159 21.5 61 427 336 1307 21.4 57 387 291 1221 21.4 58 470 125 1206 20.8 59 429 329 1222 20.7 57 403 251 1170 20.5 60 487 256 1231 20.5 54 398 209 1105 20.5 59 442 212 1185 20.1 59 386 299 1177 19.9 54 386 212 1075 19.9 42 309 122 827 19.7 53 287 375 1036 19.5 59 421 211 1144 19.4 53 358 213 1010 19.1 54 396 230 1029 19.1 60 375 229 1092 18.2 50 350 140 898 18.0 55 440 92 973 17.7 54 344 173 952 17.6 53 397 133 928 17.5 59 368 244 1033 17.5 60 431 161 1043 17.4 56 339 162 956 17.1

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG Jordan, LAC 250 Whiteside, MIA 268 Howard, HOU 269 Kanter, OKC 287 Faried, DEN 281 Gortat, WAS 311 Lopez, NYK 256 Towns, MIN 431 Noel, PHL 235 Monroe, MIL 386 Drummond, DET 419 Favors, UTA 287 Parker, SAN 285 Curry, GOL 577 Leonard, SAN 398 Young, Bro 402 Lopez, Bro 487 Okafor, PHL 397 Griffin, LAC 281 Durant, OKC 510 Horford, ATL 393 James, CLE 542 Antetokounmpo, MIL 355 Vucevic, ORL 440 Warren, PHX 221 Davis, NOR 469 Parker, MIL 285 Aldridge, SAN 373 Parsons, DAL 263 Randolph, MEM 328

FGA 363 436 443 508 499 563 469 801 438 738 808 555 553 1121 779 787 958 781 553 1006 777 1073 704 876 441 936 573 751 534 668

PCT .689 .615 .607 .565 .563 .552 .546 .538 .537 .523 .519 .517 .515 .515 .511 .511 .508 .508 .508 .507 .506 .505 .504 .502 .501 .501 .497 .497 .493 .491

3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA Leonard, SAN 100 205 Redick, LAC 147 305 Curry, GOL 288 615 Dudley, WAS 91 198 Bayless, MIL 77 173 Dellavedova, CLE 75 173 McDermott, CHI 81 190 Casspi, SAC 94 225 G. Hill, IND 94 227 Parsons, DAL 84 203 Thompson, GOL 179 433 Olynyk, BOS 69 167 Calderon, NYK 66 161 Teletovic, PHX 125 306 Teague, ATL 73 179 Smith, CLE 144 356 Mills, SAN 91 225 Fournier, ORL 116 287 Middleton, MIL 113 282 Beverley, HOU 80 200 McCollum, POR 141 353 Green, GOL 70 176 Durant, OKC 137 346 Ross, TOR 93 236 Lowry, TOR 156 400 Nowitzki, DAL 91 234 Thompson, PHL 98 252 Williams, CHA 103 265 Booker, PHX 63 163 Ariza, HOU 138 358

PCT .488 .482 .468 .460 .445 .434 .426 .418 .414 .414 .413 .413 .410 .408 .408 .404 .404 .404 .401 .400 .399 .398 .396 .394 .390 .389 .389 .389 .387 .385

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE FT Crawford, LAC 188 Curry, GOL 276 Durant, OKC 322 Paul, LAC 212 Jack, Bro 100 Nowitzki, DAL 173 Thomas, BOS 336 Williams, DAL 141 Gordon, NOR 109 Irving, CLE 106 Leonard, SAN 209 Martin, MIN 125 Middleton, MIL 229 Hood, UTA 142 Redick, LAC 153 Lillard, POR 277 Anderson, NOR 162 Gallinari, DEN 375 Harden, HOU 532 George, IND 343 Thomas, NYK 102 Lowry, TOR 291 Thompson, GOL 153 Porzingis, NYK 157 J. Johnson, MIA 93 Felton, DAL 109 Batum, CHA 120 Belinelli, SAC 106 Walker, CHA 251 Jackson, DET 211 REBOUNDS PER GAME G OFF 60 297 57 208 49 177 50 161 49 119 55 122 55 198 60 170 51 111 53 163 58 119 59 133 57 99 58 174 59 198 41 133 60 145 55 158 53 184 42 123 59 147 60 141 48 123 55 138 60 174 53 30 58 125 54 78 53 111 54 142

Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Cousins, SAC Gasol, CHI Pachulia, DAL Towns, MIN Davis, NOR Gortat, WAS Love, CLE Randle, LAL Green, GOL Monroe, MIL Thompson, CLE Valanciunas, TOR Young, Bro Vucevic, ORL Faried, DEN Favors, UTA Millsap, ATL Sullinger, BOS Chandler, PHX Aldridge, SAN Lopez, Bro Durant, OKC Biyombo, TOR Anthony, NYK Noel, PHL Randolph, MEM

FTA 206 304 359 237 112 194 378 159 123 120 237 142 261 162 175 318 186 432 614 399 119 340 179 184 109 128 141 125 296 249 DEF 605 590 413 413 436 486 384 445 410 375 464 460 452 376 360 246 399 338 283 241 364 376 284 325 320 400 341 354 310 283

TOT 902 798 590 574 555 608 582 615 521 538 583 593 551 550 558 379 544 496 467 364 511 517 407 463 494 430 466 432 421 425

PCT .913 .908 .897 .895 .893 .892 .889 .887 .886 .883 .882 .880 .877 .877 .874 .871 .871 .868 .866 .860 .857 .856 .855 .853 .853 .852 .851 .848 .848 .847 AVG 15.0 14.0 12.0 11.5 11.3 11.1 10.6 10.3 10.2 10.2 10.1 10.1 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.0 8.0 7.9 7.9

ASSISTS PER GAME Rondo, SAC Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Rubio, MIN Green, GOL Lillard, POR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS Curry, GOL James, CLE Smith, PHL Lowry, TOR Conley, MEM Jackson, DET Payton, ORL Holiday, NOR Mudiay, DEN Teague, ATL Williams, DAL Batum, CHA Dragic, MIA Carter-Williams, MIL Knight, PHX Walker, CHA Parker, SAN Dellavedova, CLE Rose, CHI Wade, MIA Ellis, IND

G 55 60 59 54 54 57 53 60 61 56 57 55 57 53 59 54 52 46 57 51 49 50 54 42 57 54 53 48 54 60

AST 659 619 579 517 475 421 373 417 412 372 376 359 366 329 364 319 304 265 321 281 269 272 281 215 290 274 253 229 254 282

AVG 12.0 10.3 9.8 9.6 8.8 7.4 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.6 6.6 6.5 6.4 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.6 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.1 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.7

G 60 57 54 56 54 59 59 55 54 60 60 61 59 57 48 53 60 60 47 60 52 51 56 56 54 60 54 57 57 49

STL 133 123 115 118 112 121 119 109 99 110 109 109 104 100 81 88 99 99 74 94 81 79 84 84 80 88 79 81 81 68

AVG 2.22 2.16 2.13 2.11 2.07 2.05 2.02 1.98 1.83 1.83 1.82 1.79 1.76 1.75 1.69 1.66 1.65 1.65 1.57 1.57 1.56 1.55 1.50 1.50 1.48 1.47 1.46 1.42 1.42 1.39

STEALS PER GAME Westbrook, OKC Lowry, TOR Paul, LAC Curry, GOL Rubio, MIN Ariza, HOU Wall, WAS Rondo, SAC Leonard, SAN George, IND Ellis, IND Crowder, BOS Millsap, ATL Walker, CHA Butler, CHI Noel, PHL Drummond, DET Harden, HOU Allen, MEM Young, Bro Porter, WAS Covington, PHL Bradley, BOS Caldwell-Pope, DET Carter-Williams, MIL Middleton, MIL Oladipo, ORL James, CLE Green, GOL Cousins, SAC

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

GORDON RADFORD • special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

Vashon junior Darren Huntley lets the ball roll of his fingers against Confluence during a Class 4 District 5 semifinal boys basketball game on Tuesday.

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL FZ North 6 6 9 13 34 FZ South 14 12 4 3 33 FN (14-12): Schwerdt 11. FG 15 (0), FT 4-8. FS (19-7): Whaley 12. FG 11 (6), FT 5-10. Pky. Central 21 5 19 17 62 Marquette 10 22 8 19 59 M (17-10): Bulanda 21, Powers 20. FG 24 (7), FT 4-9. Windsor 13 12 14 13 52 Hillsboro 16 13 15 14 58 W (17-10): Kelley-Wolf 22, Miller 18. FG 15 (4), FT 18-21. H (21-6): Pinkley 18, Schwartz 15, Brewer 13, Besand 12. FG 20 (8), FT 10-14. Oakville 8 9 5 15 37 Webster 17 15 11 18 61 O (9-19): Gillmann 19. FG 13 (4), FT 7-13. W (26-1): Ramey 23, Gordon 16. FG 24 (5), FT 8-10. Fox 19 5 14 13 51 Poplar Bluf 20 16 16 21 73 F (4-22): Turnbough 17. FG 19 (6), FT 7-12. P (6-0): Leech 22, Lucas 16, Bess 14. FG 26 (6), FT 15-18. Waterloo 3 10 10 11 34 Columbia 17 12 14 14 57 W(8-22):Huels16.FG12(1),FT9-13.C(21-6):J.Holmes 17,Farmer13,Gudeman13.FG23(2),FT9-16. Civic Mem. 9 17 11 11 48 Althof 19 19 16 19 73 C (18-12): B. Lane 17, D. Lane 13. FG 17 (6), FT 8-12. A (26-2): J. Goodwin 24, Gooch 19, Ferguson 13. FG 30 (7), FT 6-9. Carrollton 7 7 11 10 35 Gibault 12 12 12 18 54 G (23-9): Davis 21, Deterding 14. FG 18 (5), FT 13-15.

Granite City 8 11 7 9 35 Quincy 17 13 11 23 64 G (14-15): Berry 9. FG 12 (4), FT 7-9. Q (5-1): Bland 15, Gadeke 10. FG 22 (7), FT 13-18. Bellvl. West 4 12 15 13 44 Edwardsville 18 11 23 17 69 B(14-14):Dancy13.FG19(1),FT5-8.E(24-4):Epenesa24,Stephen23,Smith10.FG26(9),FT8-10. Eureka 13 12 13 25 63 Lafayette 15 21 17 18 71 E (12-14): Orso 21, Cleary 15. FG 18 (8), FT 19-28. L (20-7): Flinn 25, Finley 16, Messer 12. FG 26 (3), FT 16-26. Breese C. 9 10 5 14 38 A. Marquette 5 9 4 16 34 B(27-5):Strieker15,Kohrmann13.FG12(4),FT10-14. A(21-10):Boone15,Sebacher13.FG13(5),FT3-7. Festus 19 13 5 26 63 Luth. South 18 16 19 28 81 F (19-8): Kinder 15, Ijames 11. FG 17 (2), FT 3-6. L (20-6): Member-Meneh 43, Yaeger 23. FG 30 (3), FT 18-28. Seckman 16 20 15 10 62 Jackson 18 14 14 15 68 S (8-18): Hurley 22, Kaido 17, Kramer 13. FG 20 (5), FT 9-13. J (5-4): Smith 29, Hester 12. FG 23 (4), FT 18-22. Pky. South 11 4 20 24 59 Kirkwood 15 14 22 23 74 P (16-10): Sommer 19, Weiss 14, Ferrell 10. FG 20 (7), FT 12-19. K (18-8): D. Loyd 18, Telfair 14, Sievers 13, Conner 10. FG 26 (6), FT 16-25.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Timberland 15 6 6 10 37 FZ West 9 14 8 8 39 F (13-14): Poland 17, Pauk 10. FG 14 (2), FT 9-12. Jennings 26 8 12 12 58 MS-Berkeley 4 11 11 18 44 J (11-14): Logan 17, C. Caldwell 12. FG 24 (3), FT 7-19. M (9-11): Curtis 13, Herrion 10. FG 11 (0), FT 5-16. Haz. West 0 7 14 7 28 Haz. Central 26 18 17 8 69 HW (9-15): Lavely 9. FG 10 (6), FT 2-4. HC (20-6): Triplett 15, Meeks 14, Ward 11. FG 27 (8), FT 7-10. Visitation 6 8 5 2 21 MICDS 18 12 12 14 56 V (8-18): Pittenger 6. FG 8 (0), FT 5-7. M (21-4): T. Baur 19, Brooks 12. FG 22 (2), FT 10-18. Pattonville 15 9 16 18 58 Pky. North 18 19 19 16 72 Pa (14-11): T. Brown 15, M. Brown 14, Cradick 14. FG 21 (5), FT 11-19. Pk (23-4): Johnson 17, Belcher 16, Stovall 14. FG 26 (3), FT 17-31. FZ South 7 7 6 15 35 Howell 16 19 17 10 62 F (15-12): Karl 16. FG 14 (4), FT 3-9. H (24-3): Berry 15, Wilborn 14. FG 22 (3), FT 15-22. Liberty 6 2 1 10 19 St. Dominic 19 19 17 9 64 L (8-19): Ingle 11. FG 7 (3), FT 2-3. S (16-9): Kasubke 12, Cook 11, Miller 11. FG 22 (2), FT 18-25.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCHEDULE ILLINOIS — CLASS 4A ILLINOIS WESLEYAN SUPER-SECTIONAL Benet 53, Edwardsville 51 MOTHER MCAULEY SUPER-SECTIONAL Whitney Young 75, Homewood-Flossmoor 74 HOFFMAN ESTATES SUPER-SECTIONAL Trinity 60, Montini 53 (OT) FREMD SUPER-SECTIONAL Fremd 48, Huntley 36 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday, March 4 at Redbird Arena in Normal, Illinois Whitney Young vs. Fremd, 6:30 p.m. Benet vs. Trinity, 8:15 p.m. Third place 6:30 p.m. Saturday Championship 8:15 p.m. Saturday — CLASS 3A SPRINGFIELD SUPER-SECTIONAL Highland 48, Lincoln 40 CONCORDIA SUPER-SECTIONAL North Lawndale 50, Johnsburg 41 BUREAU VALLEY SUPER-SECTIONAL Morton 34, Burlington Central 29 BROOKS SUPER-SECTIONAL Morgan Park 74, Bogan 47 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday, March 4 at Redbird Arena in Normal, Illinois Highland vs. North Lawndale, Noon Morgan Park vs. Morton, 1;45 p.m. Third place Noon Saturday Championship 1:45 p.m. Saturday

MISSOURI

Championship Howell vs. FH Central, 5:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 5 AT HAZELWOOD CENTRAL Semifinals, Tuesday Haz. Central 69, Haz. West 28 Parkway North 72, Pattonville 58 Championship Haz. Central vs. Pkwy North, 5 p.m. Thursday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 6 AT ST. JOSEPH’S Semifinals, Monday St. Joseph’s 65, Hazelwood East 30 McCluer North 41, Ladue 27 Championship St. Joseph’s vs. McCluer North, 6 p.m. Friday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 7 AT MARQUETTE Semifinals, Monday Washington 61, Lafayette 31 Parkway Central 63, Eureka 51 Championship Parkway Central vs. Washington, 7:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 8 AT KIRKWOOD Semifinals, Monday Kirkwood 66, Summit 20 Ursuline 69, Parkway South 60 Championship Ursuline vs. Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 2 AT DE SOTO Semifinals, Monday North County 66, Potosi 57 Fredericktown 60, De Soto 43 Championship Fredericktown vs. North County 5:30 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 1 AT NORTHWEST-CH Semifinals, Monday Jackson 63, Northwest-CH 30 Fox 55, Poplar Bluf 51 Championship Fox vs. Jackson, 6 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 3 AT FESTUS Semifinals, Monday Notre Dame 54, DuBourg 42 Lutheran South 58, Festus 51 Championship Lutheran South vs. Notre Dame, 6 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 2 AT SLUH Semifinals, Monday Cor Jesu 54, Lindbergh 42 Webster Groves 54, Oakville 42 Championship Cor Jesuvs. Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 4 AT WESTMINSTER Semifinals, Tuesday MICDS 56, Visitation 21 Clayton 50, Villa Duchesne 31 Championship MICDS vs. Clayton, 6 p.m. Friday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 3 AT TROY First round, Monday Troy 39, Battle 30 Semifinals, Tuesday Holt 57, Troy 26 FZ West 39, Timberland 37 Championship Holt vs. FZ West, 5:30 p.m. Friday.

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 5 AT VASHON Semifinals, Monday Miller Career 52, Vashon 22 Gateway STEM 52, Rosati-Kain 44 Championship Gateway vs. Miller Career, 5 p.m. Friday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 4 AT ZUMWALT SOUTH First round, Monday FZ South 52, Howell North 49 Semifinals, Tuesday Francis Howell 62, FZ South 35 FH Central 48, FZ North 27

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 6 AT NORMANDY Semifinals Incarnate Word 54, Soldan 18 Riverview Gardens vs MS-Berkeley, 5 p.m. Wednesday Championship Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. Friday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 7 AT ST. DOMINIC First round, Monday FZ East 47, McCluer 38 Liberty 67, St. Charles West 57 Semifinals, Tuesday St. Charles 56, FZ East 31 St. Dominic 64, Liberty 19 Championship St. Charles vs. St. Dominic, 6 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 8 AT HANNIBAL First round, Monday Mexico 48, Moberly 33 Fulton 58, Hannibal 35 Semifinals, Thursday Mexico vs Warrenton, 4:30 p.m. Fulton vs Kirksville, 7:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 9 AT OWENSVILLE First round, Monday Pacific 51, Sullivan 46 St. Clair 52, Union 39 Semifinals, Thursday Pacific vs Borgia, 5:30 p.m. St. Clair vs Owensville, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m., Saturday CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Saxony Lutheran vs Twin Rivers at Dexter, 6 p.m. Whitfield vs Park Hills Central at Northwest Cedar Hill, 6 p.m. Duchesne vs Cardinal Ritter at St. Charles West, 6 p.m. Southern Boone vs Palmyra at Mexico, 6 p.m. Houston vs St. James at Missouri S&T, 6 p.m. El Dorado Springs vs Strafford at Carthage, 6 p.m. Pembroke Hill vs Boonville at SmithCotton, 6 p.m. Chillicothe vs St. Pius X (KC) at Excelsior Springs, 5 p.m. CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Neelyville vs Scott County Cen. at Three Rivers CC, 6 p.m. Clopton vs Viburnum at Jeferson College, 6 p.m. Scotland County vs Monroe City at Macon, 6 p.m. Iberia vs New Franklin at Jeferson City, 6 p.m. Gainesville vs Crocker at Lebanon, 6 p.m. Crane vs Miller at Nixa, 6 p.m. Adrian vs Skyline at Clinton, 6 p.m. North Platte vs Santa Fe at Staley, 6 p.m. CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Naylor 61, Oran 42 Bunker 64, Bradleyville 56 Walnut Grove 66, Wheatland 38 Drexel 47, Otterville 38 Glasgow 45, Prairie Home 34 Community 48, Mercer 42 Norborne 60, Winston 52 Mound City 53, Jeferon-Conc. 42

BOYS BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCHEDULE ILLINOIS — CLASS 4A EAST ST. LOUIS REGIONAL First round, Monday Belleville West 63, O’Fallon 48 Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Edwardsville 69, Belleville West 44 Belleville East vs East St. Louis, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. ALTON REGIONAL First round, Monday Granite City 58, Collinsville 53 (OT) Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Quincy 64, Granite City 35 Chatham Glenwood vs Alton, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3A TRIAD REGIONAL First round, Monday Civic Memorial 51, Mascoutah 49 Jerseyville 65, Triad 41 Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Althof 73, Civic Memorial 48 Jerseyville vs Highland, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. COLUMBIA REGIONAL First round, Monday Waterloo 58, Freeburg 42 Semifinals, Tuesday unless noted Columbia 57, Waterloo 34 Cahokia vs Mater Dei, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 2A PINCKNEYVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Breese Central 38, Alton Marquette 34 Pinckneyville vs Nashville, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 1A WHITE HALL SECTIONAL Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Gibault 54, Carrollton 35 Pawnee vs Okawville, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday.

MISSOURI CLASS 5 DISTRICT 1 AT NORTHWEST-CH Semifinals, Tuesday Poplar Bluf 73, Fox 51 Jackson 68, Seckman 62 (OT) Championship Poplar Bluf vs. Jackson, 7:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 2 AT SLUH Semifinals, Tuesday Webster Groves 61, Oakville 37 SLUH 66, Lindbergh 52 Championship SLUH vs. Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Friday.

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 3 AT TROY First round, Monday Holt 75, Battle 65 Semifinals, Tuesday Troy 59, Holt 36 Timberland 48, FZ West 47 Championship Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 4 AT FORT ZUMALT SOUTH First round, Monday FH Central 69, FH North 59 Semifinals, Tuesday Francis Howell 76, FH Central 61 FZ North 34, FZ South 33 Championship Francis Howell vs. FZ North, 7:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 5 AT HAZELWOOD CENTRAL Semifinals, Monday Haz. Central 75, Haz. West 43 De Smet 72, Pattonville 58 Championship De Smet vs. Haz. Central 6:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 6 AT ST. JOSEPH’S Semifinals, Thursday Ritenour vs Chaminade, 5 p.m. Hazelwood East vs Ladue, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 2 p.m. Saturday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 7 AT MARQUETTE Semifinals, Tuesday Lafayette 71, Eureka 63 Parkway Central 62, Marquette 59 Championship Lafayette vs. Pkwy Central, 6:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 8 AT KIRKWOOD Semifinals, Tuesday CBC 68, Vianney 50 Kirkwood 74, Parkway South 59 Championship CBC vs. Kirkwood, 8 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 3 AT FESTUS Semifinals, Tuesday Hillsboro 58, Windsor 52 Lutheran South 81, Festus 63 Championship, Thursday Lutheran South vs. Hillsboro, 8 p.m. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 4 AT WESTMINSTER First round, Monday MICDS 67, Clayton 53 Univ. City 82, Priory 50 Semifinals, Thursday Univ. City vs Westminster, 6 p.m. MICDS vs Parkway West, 7:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. Saturday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 5 AT VASHON Semifinals, Tuesday Vashon 76, Confluence 34 St. Mary’s 62, Miller Career 55 Championship Vashon vs. St. Mary’s, 7 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 6 AT NORMANDY Semifinals Jennings 55, MS-Berkeley 51 Riverview 76, Soldan 58

Championship Jennings vs. Riverview, 6:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 7 AT ST. DOMINIC First round, Monday St. Dominic 54, FZ East 35 McCluer 71, Liberty 63 Semifinals, Thursday St. Dominic vs St. Charles West, 7 p.m. McCluer vs St. Charles, 5:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 8 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 8 AT HANNIBAL First round, Monday Warrenton 60, Mexico 55 Fulton 65, Hannibal 58 Semifinals, Thursday Warrenton vs Kirksville, 6 p.m. Fulton vs Moberly, 9 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 9 AT OWENSVILLE First round, Wednesday Owensville vs Union, 5:30 p.m. St. Clair vs Pacific, 7 p.m. Semifinal Game 1 winner vs Borgia, 5:30 p.m. Game 2 winner vs Sullivan, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. Saturday CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Charleston vs Caruthersville at Dexter, 7:45 p.m. Park Hills Central vs Whitfield at Northwest CH, 7:45 p.m. North Tech vs Cardinal Ritter at St. Charles West, 7:45 p.m. Tolton vs Clark County at Mexico, 7:45 p.m. Mountain Grove vs Fatima at Missouri S&T, 7:45 p.m. Fair Grove vs East Newton at Carthage, 7:45 p.m. Boonville vs Barstow at Smith-Cotton, 7:45 p.m. Maryville vs Lawson at Excelsior Springs, 7 p.m. CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Thayer vs Bloomfield at Three Rivers CC, 7:45 p.m. Clopton vs Ellington at Jeferson, 7:45 p.m. Knox County vs Canton at Macon, 7:45 p.m. Iberia vs Westran at Jeferson City, 7:45 p.m. Mansfield vs Hartville at Lebanon, 7:45 p.m. Purdy vs Marionville at Nixa, 7:45 p.m. Rich Hill vs Skyline at Clinton, 7:45 p.m. Penney vs Wellington-Napoleon at Staley, 7:45 p.m. CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Gideon 90, Advance 71 School of Ozarks 72, Eminence 52 Walnut Grove 76, Weaubleau 69 Drexel 56, Otterville 40 Glasgow 44, Chamois 27 Mercer 52, Wellsville 50 Winston 54, Hardin 39 Stanberry 60, North Andrew 47


SPORTS

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 2 AMERICA’S LINE

Men’s conference standings

NBA LEADERS

NBA Favorite Points Underdog MAGIC 3 Bulls Hornets 7 76ERS CELTICS 5.5 Blazers RAPTORS 6 Jazz GRIZZLIES [5] Kings ROCKETS [6] Pelicans Wizards 4 T’WOLVES Pacers 2 BUCKS SPURS 10.5 Pistons NUGGETS 7 Lakers CLIPPERS 1.5 Thunder []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity of the injury.

THROUGH MONDAY

THROUGH MONDAY SCORING AVERAGE

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog DUQUESNE 4.5 Fordham W VIRGINIA 9 Texas Tech NOTRE DAME 2 Miami-Florida Pittsburgh 2.5 VIRGINIA TECH Michigan St 23.5 RUTGERS LASALLE 1 Saint Louis C FLORIDA 5 Tulane VIRGINIA COMM 9.5 Davidson MISSISSIPPI 3.5 Mississippi St r-St. Joseph’s 4 ST. BONA KANSAS ST 10 Tcu BUTLER 4.5 Seton Hall NC STATE 15 Boston College Wisconsin 10 MINNESOTA S FLORIDA 3.5 E Carolina PROVIDENCE 3 Creighton ALABAMA 3.5 Arkansas Oregon 2 UCLA WYOMING 10 San Jose St BOISE ST 8 Nevada Long Beach St 7 CS-FULLERTON USC 5.5 Oregon St WASHINGTON 12 Washington St FRESNO ST 6 Colorado St Added Games Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Nashville, TN Tennessee Tech 3.5 Austin Peay Murray St 6 E Illinois r- Rochester, NY.

Texas A&M Kentucky South Carolina Vanderbilt LSU Mississippi Alabama Florida Georgia Arkansas Mississippi St. Tennessee Auburn Missouri

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS -$240/+$200 Maple Leafs Blackhawks -$110/-$110 RED WINGS DUCKS -$210/+$175 Canadiens Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended New York Yankees LHP Aroldis Chapman 30 regular-season games under the league’s domestic violence policy. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with RHP Yordi Rosario on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with C Salvador Perez on a five-year contract through the 2021 season. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OF Guillermo Heredia. Placed C Jesus Sucre on the 60-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with LHPs Alex Claudio and Yohander Mendez and RHP Nick Martinez on one-year contracts. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Agreed to terms with LHP Yuhei Nakaushiro on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned F Sam Dekker to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS — Designated K Justin Tucker as its franchise player. BUFFALO BILLS — Designated OT Cordy Glenn as its franchise player. Released RB Boobie Dixon, G Kraig Urbik and DE Mario Williams. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Designated CB Josh Norman as its franchise player. DENVER BRONCOS — Designated LB Von Miller as its exclusive franchise player. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Designated S Eric Berry as its franchise player. LOS ANGELES RAMS — Designated CB Trumaine Johnson as its franchise player. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Designated DE Olivier Vernon as its transition player. NEW YORK JETS — Designated DE Muhammad Wilkerson as its franchise player. PHILADEPHIA EAGLES — Agreed to terms with QB Sam Bradford on a two-year contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Designated QB Kirk Cousins as its franchise player. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Boston F Zac Rinaldo five games for an illegal check to the head of Tampa Bay F Cedric Paquette during a Feb. 28 game. CALGARY FLAMES — Assigned D Tyler Wotherspoon to Stockton (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled D Ryan Murphy, F Brock McGinn and F Derek Ryan from Charlotte (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed F Miikka Salomaki to a two-year million contract. COLLEGE SUN BELT CONFERENCE — Announced Idaho’s football team will leave the conference after the 2017 season. ARIZONA — Fired women’s basketball coach Niya Butts. COLORADO — Dismissed QB Cade Apsay and S Evan White for violating team rules. FIU — Suspended women’s basketball coach Marlin Chinn after one of his players alleged that he pursued her sexually. FORDHAM — Named Ryan Davis assistant football coach. FRESNO STATE — Announced the addition of wrestling and women’s water polo to its athletic department, beginning with the 2017-18 season. MINNESOTA — Suspended men’s basketball G Kevin Dorsey, Nate Mason and Dupree McBrayer for the remainder of the season, stemming from a sexually explicit video that appeared on Dorsey’s social media accounts. NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the resignation of faculty athletics representative Juan Arroyo. Named Dr. Amy Rady faculty athletics representative. RUTGERS — Named Pat Kelly video coordinator. SUL ROSS STATE — Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Aaron Tavitas, effective at the end of the semester. SYRACUSE — Announced RB Devante McFarlane has left the football program.

BASEBALL Cardinals spring schedule Wednesday 3/2 vs. Fla. Atlantic Thursday 3/3 vs. Florida Friday 3/4 at Houston Saturday 3/5 at Florida Sunday 3/6 vs. Washington Monday 3/7 vs. NY Mets Tuesday 3/8 at Minnesota Wednesday 3/9 vs. Florida Thursday 3/10 at NY Mets Friday 3/11 vs. Atlanta Saturday 3/12 SS vs. Houston/at NY Mets Sunday 3/13 at Washington Monday 3/14 vs. Minnesota Wednesday 3/16 at Atlanta Thursday 3/17 at Detroit Friday 3/18 vs. Detroit Saturday 3/19 at Boston Sunday 3/20 vs. Florida Monday 3/21 vs. Boston Wednesday 3/23 vs. Florida Thursday 3/24 at Washington Friday 3/25 at NY Mets Saturday 3/26 vs. Washington Sunday 3/27 at Florida Monday 3/28 vs. NY Mets Tuesday 3/29 vs. Washington Wednesday 3/30 at Florida Thursday 3/31 at NY Yankees

BASKETBALL SEC women’s basketball tournament At Jacksonville, Fla. WEDNESDAY • first round Game 1: No. 12 Alabama vs. No. 13 LSU, 10 a.m., SEC Net. Game 2: No. 11 Vanderbilt vs. No. 14 Ole Miss, 12:30 p.m., SEC Net. THURSDAY • quarterfinals Game 3: No. 9 Auburn vs. No. 8 Missouri, 11 a.m., SEC Net. Game 4: Winner game 1 vs. No. 5 Kentucky, 1:30 p.m., SEC Net. Game 5: No. 10 Arkansas vs. No. 7 Tennessee, 5 p.m., SEC Net. Game 6: Winner game 2 vs. No. 6 Georgia, 7:30 p.m., SEC Net. FRIDAY • semifinals Game 7: Winner game 3 vs. No. 1 South Carolina, 11 a.m., SEC Net. Game 8: Winner game 4 vs. No. 4 Florida, 1:30 p.m., SEC Net. Game 9: Winner game 5 vs. No. 2 Texas A&M, 5 p.m., SEC Net. Game 10: Winner game 6 vs. No. 3 Mississippi State, 7:30 p.m., SEC Net. SATURDAY • quarterfinals Game 11: Games 7 and 8 winners, 4 p.m., ESPNU Game 12: Games 9 and 10 winners, 6:30 p.m., ESPNU SUNDAY • championship Semifinal winners, 1:30 p.m., ESPNU

BIG TEN

Conference W L PCT. Indiana 13 3 .813 Michigan St. 11 5 .688 Maryland 11 5 .688 Iowa 11 5 .688 Wisconsin 11 5 .688 Ohio St. 11 6 .647 Purdue 10 6 .625 Michigan 10 7 .588 Northwestern 6 10 .375 Penn St. 6 10 .375 Nebraska 6 10 .375 Illinois 5 11 .313 Minnesota 2 14 .125 Rutgers 0 16 .000

Overall W L 23 6 24 5 23 6 20 8 19 10 19 11 22 7 20 10 18 11 15 14 14 15 13 16 8 20 6 23

PCT. .793 .828 .793 .714 .655 .633 .759 .667 .621 .517 .483 .448 .286 .207

SEC

Conference W L PCT. 11 5 .688 11 5 .688 10 6 .625 10 6 .625 10 6 .625 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 8 8 .500 6 10 .375 6 10 .375 5 11 .313 3 13 .188

Overall W L 22 7 21 8 23 6 18 11 17 12 18 11 17 11 17 12 15 12 15 14 13 15 13 16 11 17 10 19

PCT. .750 .724 .793 .621 .586 .621 .607 .586 .556 .517 .464 .448 .393 .345

Conference W L PCT. 13 3 .813 13 3 .813 12 4 .750 12 4 .750 10 6 .625 9 7 .563 8 8 .500 7 9 .438 6 10 .375 5 11 .313 5 11 .313 5 11 .313 4 12 .250 3 13 .188

Overall W L 24 5 21 8 23 6 20 7 21 8 17 10 16 13 15 13 15 12 15 14 12 16 10 18 10 19 7 20

PCT. .828 .724 .786 .741 .724 .630 .552 .536 .556 .517 .429 .357 .345 .259

ATLANTIC 10 Saint Joseph’s VCU Dayton St. Bon. G. Wash. Davidson Rhode Island Richmond Fordham Duquesne UMass Saint Louis George Mason La Salle

Division I scores East G. Wash. 74, George Mason 52 Miami (Ohio) 67, Buffalo 59 Villanova 83, DePaul 62 Midwest Akron 91, Ohio 76 Cent. Michigan 65, Ball St. 57 E. Michigan 75, N. Illinois 71 Indiana 81, Iowa 78 Kent St. 70, Bowling Green 54 Marquette 88, Georgetown 87 Purdue 81, Nebraska 62 W. Michigan 70, Toledo 64 Southwest Oklahoma 73, Baylor 71 Texas-Arlington 75, Texas St. 69 UALR 89, Arkansas St. 80 South Dayton 85, Richmond 84 Duke 79, Wake Forest 71 Kentucky 88, Florida 79 LSU 80, Missouri 71 Louisville 56, Georgia Tech 53 Texas A&M 81, Auburn 63 Vanderbilt 86, Tennessee 69 Virginia 64, Clemson 57 Far West San Diego St. 83, New Mexico 56 Utah St. 78, Air Force 65 TOURNAMENT Atlantic Sun Conference First Round Florida G.C. 74, Kennesaw St. 64 Lipscomb 92, Jacksonville 89, OT North Florida 92, SC-Upstate 69 Stetson 82, NJIT 67 Patriot League First Round Holy Cross 72, Loyola (Md.) 67 Navy 78, Lafayette 70

WOMEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 22.

24.

25.

UConn (29-0) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina or Cincinnati, Saturday. Notre Dame (28-1) idle. Next: vs. Duke or Virginia, Friday. South Carolina (28-1) idle. Next: vs. Auburn or Missouri, Friday. Baylor (30-1) idle. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Maryland (27-3) idle. Next: vs. Michigan or Iowa, Friday. Texas (26-3) idle. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Louisville (24-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. Oregon State (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Southern Cal or Washington State, Friday. Ohio State (23-6) idle. Next: vs. Nebraska or Rutgers, Friday. Arizona State (25-5) idle. Next: vs. Utah or California, Friday. Stanford (24-6) idle. Next: vs. Washington or Colorado, Friday. UCLA (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Oregon or Arizona, Friday. Kentucky (21-6) idle. Next: vs. Alabama or LSU, Thursday. Florida State (23-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. Texas A&M (21-8) idle. Next: vs. Tennessee or Arkansas, Friday. Mississippi State (24-6) idle. Next: SEC quarterfinals, Friday. Syracuse (23-6) idle. Next: ACC quarterfinals, Friday. DePaul (24-7) idle. Next: vs. Xavier or Butler, Sunday. Michigan State (22-7) idle. Next: Big Ten quarterfinals, Friday. South Florida (21-8) idle. Next: vs. SMU or UCF, Saturday. Miami (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Pittsburgh or North Carolina, Thursday. Colorado State (27-1) beat Fresno State 68-55. Next: at Air Force, Friday. West Virginia (23-8) beat Iowa State 82-57. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Oklahoma (20-9) beat Texas Tech 70-60. Next: Big 12 quarterfinals, Saturday. Florida (22-7) idle. Next: SEC quarterfinals, Friday.

Curry, GOL Harden, HOU Durant, OKC Cousins, SAC Lillard, POR James, CLE Westbrook, OKC Davis, NOR George, IND DeRozan, TOR Butler, CHI Thompson, GOL Anthony, NYK Thomas, BOS Lowry, TOR McCollum, POR Wiggins, MIN Walker, CHA Lopez, Bro Leonard, SAN Wall, WAS Hayward, UTA Paul, LAC Knight, PHX Gallinari, DEN Jackson, DET Bosh, MIA Wade, MIA Middleton, MIL Gay, SAC Vucevic, ORL Nowitzki, DAL Okafor, PHL Millsap, ATL Towns, MIN Anderson, NOR

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG Jordan, LAC 250 Whiteside, MIA 268 Howard, HOU 269 Kanter, OKC 287 Faried, DEN 281 Gortat, WAS 311 Lopez, NYK 256 Towns, MIN 431 Noel, PHL 235 Monroe, MIL 386 Drummond, DET 419 Favors, UTA 287 Parker, SAN 285 Curry, GOL 577 Leonard, SAN 398 Young, Bro 402 Lopez, Bro 487 Okafor, PHL 397 Griffin, LAC 281 Durant, OKC 510 Horford, ATL 393 James, CLE 542 Antetokounmpo, MIL 355 Vucevic, ORL 440 Warren, PHX 221 Davis, NOR 469 Parker, MIL 285 Aldridge, SAN 373 Parsons, DAL 263 Randolph, MEM 328

FGA 363 436 443 508 499 563 469 801 438 738 808 555 553 1121 779 787 958 781 553 1006 777 1073 704 876 441 936 573 751 534 668

PCT .689 .615 .607 .565 .563 .552 .546 .538 .537 .523 .519 .517 .515 .515 .511 .511 .508 .508 .508 .507 .506 .505 .504 .502 .501 .501 .497 .497 .493 .491

3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA Leonard, SAN 100 205 Redick, LAC 147 305 Curry, GOL 288 615 Dudley, WAS 91 198 Bayless, MIL 77 173 Dellavedova, CLE 75 173 McDermott, CHI 81 190 Casspi, SAC 94 225 G. Hill, IND 94 227 Parsons, DAL 84 203 Thompson, GOL 179 433 Olynyk, BOS 69 167 Calderon, NYK 66 161 Teletovic, PHX 125 306 Teague, ATL 73 179 Smith, CLE 144 356 Mills, SAN 91 225 Fournier, ORL 116 287 Middleton, MIL 113 282 Beverley, HOU 80 200 McCollum, POR 141 353 Green, GOL 70 176 Durant, OKC 137 346 Ross, TOR 93 236 Lowry, TOR 156 400 Nowitzki, DAL 91 234 Thompson, PHL 98 252 Williams, CHA 103 265 Booker, PHX 63 163 Ariza, HOU 138 358

PCT .488 .482 .468 .460 .445 .434 .426 .418 .414 .414 .413 .413 .410 .408 .408 .404 .404 .404 .401 .400 .399 .398 .396 .394 .390 .389 .389 .389 .387 .385

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE FT Crawford, LAC 188 Curry, GOL 276 Durant, OKC 322 Paul, LAC 212 Jack, Bro 100 Nowitzki, DAL 173 Thomas, BOS 336 Williams, DAL 141 Gordon, NOR 109 Irving, CLE 106 Leonard, SAN 209 Martin, MIN 125 Middleton, MIL 229 Hood, UTA 142 Redick, LAC 153 Lillard, POR 277 Anderson, NOR 162 Gallinari, DEN 375 Harden, HOU 532 George, IND 343 Thomas, NYK 102 Lowry, TOR 291 Thompson, GOL 153 Porzingis, NYK 157 J. Johnson, MIA 93 Felton, DAL 109 Batum, CHA 120 Belinelli, SAC 106 Walker, CHA 251 Jackson, DET 211 REBOUNDS PER GAME G OFF 60 297 57 208 49 177 50 161 49 119 55 122 55 198 60 170 51 111 53 163 58 119 59 133 57 99 58 174 59 198 41 133 60 145 55 158 53 184 42 123 59 147 60 141 48 123 55 138 60 174 53 30 58 125 54 78 53 111 54 142

Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Cousins, SAC Gasol, CHI Pachulia, DAL Towns, MIN Davis, NOR Gortat, WAS Love, CLE Randle, LAL Green, GOL Monroe, MIL Thompson, CLE Valanciunas, TOR Young, Bro Vucevic, ORL Faried, DEN Favors, UTA Millsap, ATL Sullinger, BOS Chandler, PHX Aldridge, SAN Lopez, Bro Durant, OKC Biyombo, TOR Anthony, NYK Noel, PHL Randolph, MEM

AREA COLLEGES

ASSISTS PER GAME

TUESDAY RESULTS Men’s Tennis McKendree 7, Lindenwood 2 Women’s Tennis McKendree 9, Lewis and Clark 0 Baseball Wash U 27, Principia 0 Softball Quincy Univ. 3, Tiffin 0 Men’s basketball MIAA Tournament Lindenwood 77, Pittsburgh St. 68 Central Okla. 94, Central Missouri 74 Missouri Western 70, Washburn 54 Lincoln 73, Emporia St. 71 Men’s volleyball Missouri Bapist 3, Missouri Valley 0

Rondo, SAC Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Rubio, MIN Green, GOL Lillard, POR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS Curry, GOL James, CLE Smith, PHL Lowry, TOR Conley, MEM Jackson, DET Payton, ORL Holiday, NOR Mudiay, DEN Teague, ATL Williams, DAL Batum, CHA Dragic, MIA Carter-Williams, MIL Knight, PHX Walker, CHA Parker, SAN Dellavedova, CLE Rose, CHI Wade, MIA Ellis, IND

MEN’S BASKETBALL MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE TEAM Player of the year: Fred VanFleet, sr., Wichita State First team Ron Baker, sr., Wichita State D.J. Balentine, sr., Evansville Anthony Beane, sr., Southern Illinois Egidijus Mockevicius, sr., Evansville Fred VanVleet, sr., Wichita State Second team DeVaughn Akoon-Purcell, sr., Illinois State Devonte Brown, sr., Indiana State Montel James, sr., Loyola Brenton Scott, so., Indiana State Wes Washpun, sr., Northern Iowa Honorable mention Matt Bohannon, sr., Northern Iowa Paris Lee, jr., Illinois State MiKyle McIntosh, so., Illinois State Dequon Miller, jr., Missouri State Jeremy Morgan, jr., Northern Iowa Reed Timmer, so., Drake Newcomer team Dequon Miller, jr., Missouri State Anton Grady, jr., Wichita State Mike Rodriguez. jr., Southern Illinois Markis McDuffie, fr., Wichita State Everett Clemons, jr., Indiana State Freshman team Markis McDuffie, Wichita State Obediah Church, Missouri State Dwayne Lautier-Ogunleye, Bradley Jarred Dixon, Missouri State Luuk van Bree, Bradley Defensive team Ron Baker, sr., Wichita State Egidijus Mockevicius, sr., Evansville Jeremy Morgan, jr., Northern Iowa Fred VanVleet, sr., Wichita State Paris Lee, jr., Illinois State

GOLF Hole in One Four Seasons • Brian Tanner, hole No. 4, 131 yards, 9-iron, Feb. 28.

G FG FT PTS AVG 56 577 276 1718 30.7 60 505 532 1710 28.5 53 510 322 1479 27.9 49 456 367 1338 27.3 53 453 277 1344 25.4 57 542 272 1418 24.9 60 515 355 1458 24.3 51 469 265 1230 24.1 60 449 343 1402 23.4 58 453 398 1341 23.1 48 357 307 1074 22.4 56 444 153 1220 21.8 54 409 272 1159 21.5 61 427 336 1307 21.4 57 387 291 1221 21.4 58 470 125 1206 20.8 59 429 329 1222 20.7 57 403 251 1170 20.5 60 487 256 1231 20.5 54 398 209 1105 20.5 59 442 212 1185 20.1 59 386 299 1177 19.9 54 386 212 1075 19.9 42 309 122 827 19.7 53 287 375 1036 19.5 59 421 211 1144 19.4 53 358 213 1010 19.1 54 396 230 1029 19.1 60 375 229 1092 18.2 50 350 140 898 18.0 55 440 92 973 17.7 54 344 173 952 17.6 53 397 133 928 17.5 59 368 244 1033 17.5 60 431 161 1043 17.4 56 339 162 956 17.1

FTA 206 304 359 237 112 194 378 159 123 120 237 142 261 162 175 318 186 432 614 399 119 340 179 184 109 128 141 125 296 249 DEF 605 590 413 413 436 486 384 445 410 375 464 460 452 376 360 246 399 338 283 241 364 376 284 325 320 400 341 354 310 283

TOT 902 798 590 574 555 608 582 615 521 538 583 593 551 550 558 379 544 496 467 364 511 517 407 463 494 430 466 432 421 425

PCT .913 .908 .897 .895 .893 .892 .889 .887 .886 .883 .882 .880 .877 .877 .874 .871 .871 .868 .866 .860 .857 .856 .855 .853 .853 .852 .851 .848 .848 .847 AVG 15.0 14.0 12.0 11.5 11.3 11.1 10.6 10.3 10.2 10.2 10.1 10.1 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.0 8.0 7.9 7.9

G 55 60 59 54 54 57 53 60 61 56 57 55 57 53 59 54 52 46 57 51 49 50 54 42 57 54 53 48 54 60

AST 659 619 579 517 475 421 373 417 412 372 376 359 366 329 364 319 304 265 321 281 269 272 281 215 290 274 253 229 254 282

AVG 12.0 10.3 9.8 9.6 8.8 7.4 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.6 6.6 6.5 6.4 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.6 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.1 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.7

G 60 57 54 56 54 59 59 55 54 60 60 61 59 57 48 53 60 60 47 60 52 51 56 56 54 60 54 57 57 49

STL 133 123 115 118 112 121 119 109 99 110 109 109 104 100 81 88 99 99 74 94 81 79 84 84 80 88 79 81 81 68

AVG 2.22 2.16 2.13 2.11 2.07 2.05 2.02 1.98 1.83 1.83 1.82 1.79 1.76 1.75 1.69 1.66 1.65 1.65 1.57 1.57 1.56 1.55 1.50 1.50 1.48 1.47 1.46 1.42 1.42 1.39

STEALS PER GAME Westbrook, OKC Lowry, TOR Paul, LAC Curry, GOL Rubio, MIN Ariza, HOU Wall, WAS Rondo, SAC Leonard, SAN George, IND Ellis, IND Crowder, BOS Millsap, ATL Walker, CHA Butler, CHI Noel, PHL Drummond, DET Harden, HOU Allen, MEM Young, Bro Porter, WAS Covington, PHL Bradley, BOS Caldwell-Pope, DET Carter-Williams, MIL Middleton, MIL Oladipo, ORL James, CLE Green, GOL Cousins, SAC

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

GORDON RADFORD • special to sTLhighschoolsports.com

Vashon junior Darren Huntley lets the ball roll of his fingers against Confluence during a Class 4 District 5 semifinal boys basketball game on Tuesday.

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL FZ North 6 6 9 13 34 FZ South 14 12 4 3 33 FN (14-12): Schwerdt 11. FG 15 (0), FT 4-8. FS (19-7): Whaley 12. FG 11 (6), FT 5-10. Pky. Central 21 5 19 17 62 Marquette 10 22 8 19 59 M (17-10): Bulanda 21, Powers 20. FG 24 (7), FT 4-9. Windsor 13 12 14 13 52 Hillsboro 16 13 15 14 58 W (17-10): Kelley-Wolf 22, Miller 18. FG 15 (4), FT 18-21. H (21-6): Pinkley 18, Schwartz 15, Brewer 13, Besand 12. FG 20 (8), FT 10-14. Oakville 8 9 5 15 37 Webster 17 15 11 18 61 O (9-19): Gillmann 19. FG 13 (4), FT 7-13. W (26-1): Ramey 23, Gordon 16. FG 24 (5), FT 8-10. Fox 19 5 14 13 51 Poplar Bluf 20 16 16 21 73 F (4-22): Turnbough 17. FG 19 (6), FT 7-12. P (6-0): Leech 22, Lucas 16, Bess 14. FG 26 (6), FT 15-18. Waterloo 3 10 10 11 34 Columbia 17 12 14 14 57 W(8-22):Huels16.FG12(1),FT9-13.C(21-6):J.Holmes 17,Farmer13,Gudeman13.FG23(2),FT9-16. Civic Mem. 9 17 11 11 48 Althof 19 19 16 19 73 C (18-12): B. Lane 17, D. Lane 13. FG 17 (6), FT 8-12. A (26-2): J. Goodwin 24, Gooch 19, Ferguson 13. FG 30 (7), FT 6-9. Carrollton 7 7 11 10 35 Gibault 12 12 12 18 54 G (23-9): Davis 21, Deterding 14. FG 18 (5), FT 13-15.

Granite City 8 11 7 9 35 Quincy 17 13 11 23 64 G (14-15): Berry 9. FG 12 (4), FT 7-9. Q (5-1): Bland 15, Gadeke 10. FG 22 (7), FT 13-18. Bellvl. West 4 12 15 13 44 Edwardsville 18 11 23 17 69 B(14-14):Dancy13.FG19(1),FT5-8.E(24-4):Epenesa24,Stephen23,Smith10.FG26(9),FT8-10. Eureka 13 12 13 25 63 Lafayette 15 21 17 18 71 E (12-14): Orso 21, Cleary 15. FG 18 (8), FT 19-28. L (20-7): Flinn 25, Finley 16, Messer 12. FG 26 (3), FT 16-26. Breese C. 9 10 5 14 38 A. Marquette 5 9 4 16 34 B(27-5):Strieker15,Kohrmann13.FG12(4),FT10-14. A(21-10):Boone15,Sebacher13.FG13(5),FT3-7. Festus 19 13 5 26 63 Luth. South 18 16 19 28 81 F (19-8): Kinder 15, Ijames 11. FG 17 (2), FT 3-6. L (20-6): Member-Meneh 43, Yaeger 23. FG 30 (3), FT 18-28. Seckman 16 20 15 10 62 Jackson 18 14 14 15 68 S (8-18): Hurley 22, Kaido 17, Kramer 13. FG 20 (5), FT 9-13. J (5-4): Smith 29, Hester 12. FG 23 (4), FT 18-22. Pky. South 11 4 20 24 59 Kirkwood 15 14 22 23 74 P (16-10): Sommer 19, Weiss 14, Ferrell 10. FG 20 (7), FT 12-19. K (18-8): D. Loyd 18, Telfair 14, Sievers 13, Conner 10. FG 26 (6), FT 16-25.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Timberland 15 6 6 10 37 FZ West 9 14 8 8 39 F (13-14): Poland 17, Pauk 10. FG 14 (2), FT 9-12. Jennings 26 8 12 12 58 MS-Berkeley 4 11 11 18 44 J (11-14): Logan 17, C. Caldwell 12. FG 24 (3), FT 7-19. M (9-11): Curtis 13, Herrion 10. FG 11 (0), FT 5-16. Haz. West 0 7 14 7 28 Haz. Central 26 18 17 8 69 HW (9-15): Lavely 9. FG 10 (6), FT 2-4. HC (20-6): Triplett 15, Meeks 14, Ward 11. FG 27 (8), FT 7-10. Visitation 6 8 5 2 21 MICDS 18 12 12 14 56 V (8-18): Pittenger 6. FG 8 (0), FT 5-7. M (21-4): T. Baur 19, Brooks 12. FG 22 (2), FT 10-18. Pattonville 15 9 16 18 58 Pky. North 18 19 19 16 72 Pa (14-11): T. Brown 15, M. Brown 14, Cradick 14. FG 21 (5), FT 11-19. Pk (23-4): Johnson 17, Belcher 16, Stovall 14. FG 26 (3), FT 17-31. FZ South 7 7 6 15 35 Howell 16 19 17 10 62 F (15-12): Karl 16. FG 14 (4), FT 3-9. H (24-3): Berry 15, Wilborn 14. FG 22 (3), FT 15-22. Liberty 6 2 1 10 19 St. Dominic 19 19 17 9 64 L (8-19): Ingle 11. FG 7 (3), FT 2-3. S (16-9): Kasubke 12, Cook 11, Miller 11. FG 22 (2), FT 18-25.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCHEDULE ILLINOIS — CLASS 4A ILLINOIS WESLEYAN SUPER-SECTIONAL Benet 53, Edwardsville 51 MOTHER MCAULEY SUPER-SECTIONAL Whitney Young 75, Homewood-Flossmoor 74 HOFFMAN ESTATES SUPER-SECTIONAL Trinity 60, Montini 53 (OT) FREMD SUPER-SECTIONAL Fremd 48, Huntley 36 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday, March 4 at Redbird Arena in Normal, Illinois Whitney Young vs. Fremd, 6:30 p.m. Benet vs. Trinity, 8:15 p.m. Third place 6:30 p.m. Saturday Championship 8:15 p.m. Saturday — CLASS 3A SPRINGFIELD SUPER-SECTIONAL Highland 48, Lincoln 40 CONCORDIA SUPER-SECTIONAL North Lawndale 50, Johnsburg 41 BUREAU VALLEY SUPER-SECTIONAL Morton 34, Burlington Central 29 BROOKS SUPER-SECTIONAL Morgan Park 74, Bogan 47 STATE TOURNAMENT Friday, March 4 at Redbird Arena in Normal, Illinois Highland vs. North Lawndale, Noon Morgan Park vs. Morton, 1;45 p.m. Third place Noon Saturday Championship 1:45 p.m. Saturday

MISSOURI

Championship Howell vs. FH Central, 5:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 5 AT HAZELWOOD CENTRAL Semifinals, Tuesday Haz. Central 69, Haz. West 28 Parkway North 72, Pattonville 58 Championship Haz. Central vs. Pkwy North, 5 p.m. Thursday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 6 AT ST. JOSEPH’S Semifinals, Monday St. Joseph’s 65, Hazelwood East 30 McCluer North 41, Ladue 27 Championship St. Joseph’s vs. McCluer North, 6 p.m. Friday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 7 AT MARQUETTE Semifinals, Monday Washington 61, Lafayette 31 Parkway Central 63, Eureka 51 Championship Parkway Central vs. Washington, 7:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 8 AT KIRKWOOD Semifinals, Monday Kirkwood 66, Summit 20 Ursuline 69, Parkway South 60 Championship Ursuline vs. Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 2 AT DE SOTO Semifinals, Monday North County 66, Potosi 57 Fredericktown 60, De Soto 43 Championship Fredericktown vs. North County 5:30 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 1 AT NORTHWEST-CH Semifinals, Monday Jackson 63, Northwest-CH 30 Fox 55, Poplar Bluf 51 Championship Fox vs. Jackson, 6 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 3 AT FESTUS Semifinals, Monday Notre Dame 54, DuBourg 42 Lutheran South 58, Festus 51 Championship Lutheran South vs. Notre Dame, 6 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 2 AT SLUH Semifinals, Monday Cor Jesu 54, Lindbergh 42 Webster Groves 54, Oakville 42 Championship Cor Jesuvs. Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Thursday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 4 AT WESTMINSTER Semifinals, Tuesday MICDS 56, Visitation 21 Clayton 50, Villa Duchesne 31 Championship MICDS vs. Clayton, 6 p.m. Friday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 3 AT TROY First round, Monday Troy 39, Battle 30 Semifinals, Tuesday Holt 57, Troy 26 FZ West 39, Timberland 37 Championship Holt vs. FZ West, 5:30 p.m. Friday.

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 5 AT VASHON Semifinals, Monday Miller Career 52, Vashon 22 Gateway STEM 52, Rosati-Kain 44 Championship Gateway vs. Miller Career, 5 p.m. Friday

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 4 AT ZUMWALT SOUTH First round, Monday FZ South 52, Howell North 49 Semifinals, Tuesday Francis Howell 62, FZ South 35 FH Central 48, FZ North 27

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 6 AT NORMANDY Semifinals Incarnate Word 54, Soldan 18 Riverview Gardens vs MS-Berkeley, 5 p.m. Wednesday Championship Semifinal winners, 5 p.m. Friday

CLASS 4 DISTRICT 7 AT ST. DOMINIC First round, Monday FZ East 47, McCluer 38 Liberty 67, St. Charles West 57 Semifinals, Tuesday St. Charles 56, FZ East 31 St. Dominic 64, Liberty 19 Championship St. Charles vs. St. Dominic, 6 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 8 AT HANNIBAL First round, Monday Mexico 48, Moberly 33 Fulton 58, Hannibal 35 Semifinals, Thursday Mexico vs Warrenton, 4:30 p.m. Fulton vs Kirksville, 7:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 9 AT OWENSVILLE First round, Monday Pacific 51, Sullivan 46 St. Clair 52, Union 39 Semifinals, Thursday Pacific vs Borgia, 5:30 p.m. St. Clair vs Owensville, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m., Saturday CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Saxony Lutheran vs Twin Rivers at Dexter, 6 p.m. Whitfield vs Park Hills Central at Northwest Cedar Hill, 6 p.m. Duchesne vs Cardinal Ritter at St. Charles West, 6 p.m. Southern Boone vs Palmyra at Mexico, 6 p.m. Houston vs St. James at Missouri S&T, 6 p.m. El Dorado Springs vs Strafford at Carthage, 6 p.m. Pembroke Hill vs Boonville at SmithCotton, 6 p.m. Chillicothe vs St. Pius X (KC) at Excelsior Springs, 5 p.m. CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Neelyville vs Scott County Cen. at Three Rivers CC, 6 p.m. Clopton vs Viburnum at Jeferson College, 6 p.m. Scotland County vs Monroe City at Macon, 6 p.m. Iberia vs New Franklin at Jeferson City, 6 p.m. Gainesville vs Crocker at Lebanon, 6 p.m. Crane vs Miller at Nixa, 6 p.m. Adrian vs Skyline at Clinton, 6 p.m. North Platte vs Santa Fe at Staley, 6 p.m. CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Naylor 61, Oran 42 Bunker 64, Bradleyville 56 Walnut Grove 66, Wheatland 38 Drexel 47, Otterville 38 Glasgow 45, Prairie Home 34 Community 48, Mercer 42 Norborne 60, Winston 52 Mound City 53, Jeferon-Conc. 42

BOYS BASKETBALL • POSTSEASON SCHEDULE ILLINOIS — CLASS 4A EAST ST. LOUIS REGIONAL First round, Monday Belleville West 63, O’Fallon 48 Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Edwardsville 69, Belleville West 44 Belleville East vs East St. Louis, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. ALTON REGIONAL First round, Monday Granite City 58, Collinsville 53 (OT) Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Quincy 64, Granite City 35 Chatham Glenwood vs Alton, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 3A TRIAD REGIONAL First round, Monday Civic Memorial 51, Mascoutah 49 Jerseyville 65, Triad 41 Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Althof 73, Civic Memorial 48 Jerseyville vs Highland, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. COLUMBIA REGIONAL First round, Monday Waterloo 58, Freeburg 42 Semifinals, Tuesday unless noted Columbia 57, Waterloo 34 Cahokia vs Mater Dei, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 2A PINCKNEYVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Breese Central 38, Alton Marquette 34 Pinckneyville vs Nashville, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday. -CLASS 1A WHITE HALL SECTIONAL Semifinals (Tuesday unless noted) Gibault 54, Carrollton 35 Pawnee vs Okawville, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Championship 7 p.m. Friday.

MISSOURI CLASS 5 DISTRICT 1 AT NORTHWEST-CH Semifinals, Tuesday Poplar Bluf 73, Fox 51 Jackson 68, Seckman 62 (OT) Championship Poplar Bluf vs. Jackson, 7:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 2 AT SLUH Semifinals, Tuesday Webster Groves 61, Oakville 37 SLUH 66, Lindbergh 52 Championship SLUH vs. Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Friday.

CLASS 5 DISTRICT 3 AT TROY First round, Monday Holt 75, Battle 65 Semifinals, Tuesday Troy 59, Holt 36 Timberland 48, FZ West 47 Championship Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 4 AT FORT ZUMALT SOUTH First round, Monday FH Central 69, FH North 59 Semifinals, Tuesday Francis Howell 76, FH Central 61 FZ North 34, FZ South 33 Championship Francis Howell vs. FZ North, 7:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 5 DISTRICT 5 AT HAZELWOOD CENTRAL Semifinals, Monday Haz. Central 75, Haz. West 43 De Smet 72, Pattonville 58 Championship De Smet vs. Haz. Central 6:30 p.m. Thursday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 6 AT ST. JOSEPH’S Semifinals, Thursday Ritenour vs Chaminade, 5 p.m. Hazelwood East vs Ladue, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 2 p.m. Saturday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 7 AT MARQUETTE Semifinals, Tuesday Lafayette 71, Eureka 63 Parkway Central 62, Marquette 59 Championship Lafayette vs. Pkwy Central, 6:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 5 DISTRICT 8 AT KIRKWOOD Semifinals, Tuesday CBC 68, Vianney 50 Kirkwood 74, Parkway South 59 Championship CBC vs. Kirkwood, 8 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 3 AT FESTUS Semifinals, Tuesday Hillsboro 58, Windsor 52 Lutheran South 81, Festus 63 Championship, Thursday Lutheran South vs. Hillsboro, 8 p.m. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 4 AT WESTMINSTER First round, Monday MICDS 67, Clayton 53 Univ. City 82, Priory 50 Semifinals, Thursday Univ. City vs Westminster, 6 p.m. MICDS vs Parkway West, 7:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 6 p.m. Saturday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 5 AT VASHON Semifinals, Tuesday Vashon 76, Confluence 34 St. Mary’s 62, Miller Career 55 Championship Vashon vs. St. Mary’s, 7 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 6 AT NORMANDY Semifinals Jennings 55, MS-Berkeley 51 Riverview 76, Soldan 58

Championship Jennings vs. Riverview, 6:30 p.m. Friday CLASS 4 DISTRICT 7 AT ST. DOMINIC First round, Monday St. Dominic 54, FZ East 35 McCluer 71, Liberty 63 Semifinals, Thursday St. Dominic vs St. Charles West, 7 p.m. McCluer vs St. Charles, 5:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 8 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 8 AT HANNIBAL First round, Monday Warrenton 60, Mexico 55 Fulton 65, Hannibal 58 Semifinals, Thursday Warrenton vs Kirksville, 6 p.m. Fulton vs Moberly, 9 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m. Friday. CLASS 4 DISTRICT 9 AT OWENSVILLE First round, Wednesday Owensville vs Union, 5:30 p.m. St. Clair vs Pacific, 7 p.m. Semifinal Game 1 winner vs Borgia, 5:30 p.m. Game 2 winner vs Sullivan, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. Saturday CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Charleston vs Caruthersville at Dexter, 7:45 p.m. Park Hills Central vs Whitfield at Northwest CH, 7:45 p.m. North Tech vs Cardinal Ritter at St. Charles West, 7:45 p.m. Tolton vs Clark County at Mexico, 7:45 p.m. Mountain Grove vs Fatima at Missouri S&T, 7:45 p.m. Fair Grove vs East Newton at Carthage, 7:45 p.m. Boonville vs Barstow at Smith-Cotton, 7:45 p.m. Maryville vs Lawson at Excelsior Springs, 7 p.m. CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Wednesday Thayer vs Bloomfield at Three Rivers CC, 7:45 p.m. Clopton vs Ellington at Jeferson, 7:45 p.m. Knox County vs Canton at Macon, 7:45 p.m. Iberia vs Westran at Jeferson City, 7:45 p.m. Mansfield vs Hartville at Lebanon, 7:45 p.m. Purdy vs Marionville at Nixa, 7:45 p.m. Rich Hill vs Skyline at Clinton, 7:45 p.m. Penney vs Wellington-Napoleon at Staley, 7:45 p.m. CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectionals, Tuesday Gideon 90, Advance 71 School of Ozarks 72, Eminence 52 Walnut Grove 76, Weaubleau 69 Drexel 56, Otterville 40 Glasgow 44, Chamois 27 Mercer 52, Wellsville 50 Winston 54, Hardin 39 Stanberry 60, North Andrew 47


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

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WEDNESDAY

03.02.2016

DRIVING WITH DAN:

2017 Chevrolet Trax It just got here and already it’s getting a makeover

2017 CHEVROLET TRAX TYPE: Compact crossover SUV DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or all-wheel drive BASE PRICE: N/A (For reference, the 2016 model starts at $21,195) ENGINE: 1.4-liter turbocharged I-4

It didn’t take Chevrolet’s Trax long to make tracks back to the wardrobe department. Just 18 months after stepping onstage in America’s small-crossover drama, Trax is back in the makeup chair. New for 2017 is “a more expressive” front end, which features a new grille and headlamps — the latter halogen projector beams in upper trims. The entire Dan Wiese exercise brings Trax’s Automotive Writer appearance more in line with other, newer showroom mates Malibu, Cruze and Volt. Out back on Trax are dual stacked taillamps at each side with, on top-of-the-line Premier models, LED illumination. Inside, the changes are more dramatic. Everything ahead of the front seats, save the steering wheel, is new, including a wavy dashboard that emphasizes a dual-cockpit feel while giving the sensation of roomier confines. Of course, modern connectivity is all important in the 21st century and Trax minds that store with a redesigned centerstack housing a new 7-inch MyLink infotainment screen. That interface supports the latest in tech toys, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. And, like virtually every Chevy these days, Trax also is its own Wi-Fi hotspot and is available with 4G LTE connectivity. Another headline is a new top-ofthe-line Premier trim level, which joins LS and LT for the 2017 campaign. Among Premier’s perks are

HORSEPOWER: 138 at 4900 rpm TORQUE: 148 lb.-ft. at 1850 rpm REQUIRED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: Six-speed automatic SUSPENSION : Front: independent Mac strut; rear: torsion beam/coil springs BRAKES: FWD: front disc/rear drum; AWD: four-wheel disc; ABS, traction control, stability control standard on all models

Chevrolet sold more than 63,000 copies of its Trax small crossover in 2015, good enough for second place in the segment.

EPA MPG: N/A (Likely to be identical to 2016 numbers, which are: FWD: 26 city/34 hwy/29 combined; AWD: 24/31/27) WHEELBASE: 100.6 inches LENGTH: 168.5 inches CURB WEIGHT (est.): FWD: 3,100 lbs.; AWD: 3,200 lbs. CARGO (rear seat up/down): 18.7 cu. ft./48.4 cu. ft. WHERE BUILT: Bupyeong, South Korea; San Luis Potosi, Mexico

the aforementioned upgraded exterior lighting, 18-inch wheels and two-tone interior decor. New-for-2017 safety nannies include such available features as lanedeparture warning and blind-spot, rear-cross-traffic and forward-collision alerts, not to mention Trax’s retention of 10 — count ‘em, 10 — standard air bags. Regarding the greasy stuff, Trax figures what it had is what it’ll keep.

the likes of the Kia Soul, Nissan Juke, Jeep Renegade, Honda HR-V, Fiat 500X and Mazda CX-3. It’s done well so far, outselling in 2015 all of the above, save the Kia. Look for the newly coiffed Trax to step on stage in Chevy showrooms this fall. Chevrolet has yet to announce pricing, although we expect it won’t stray far from the $21,195 base price of the current edition.

Carried over is Trax’s 1.4-liter, turbocharged I-4. Although that remains the only engine offered, its 138 hp and 148 lb.-ft. of torque can be channeled to either the front wheels or, if the AWD option is checked, all four wheels via Trax’s standard six-speed automatic transmission. Trax is an important vehicle for Chevrolet, competing as it does in a growing little-ute segment that includes

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. You can e-mail him at: drivingwithdan@gmail.com

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2002 Buick Century Custom Sedan #42389-1 $3,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Buick Lacrosse: 4 Dr, White Diamond Pearl, Only 44K Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty, $16,499 #H160760A

'15 Buick LaCrosse: V6, Leather, 16K Miles, GM Certified, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Buick LaCrosse CX: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles,Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today! $5,990 #38049A

'11 LaCrosse CXS, 3.6L V6, super clean, 1 owner, stk# C160053A $16,812 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Buick Regal: Premium, sunroof, 21K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

2013 Buick Verano #65836-2 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2007 Buick Lucerne CLX Stk #65661-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Cadillac

'08 Cadillac CTS: 53K Miles, 3.6L, Leather, Warranty, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '02 Cadillac Eldorado ETC: Coupe, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $7,990 #P8547

4065 Honda

'08 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Silver, 90K Miles, Bommarito Powertrain Warranty, Call Today, $12,488 #H160158A

'08 Malibu LS: Auto, Full Power, Very Clean, #P5631A $7,112

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, 40K Miles, Honda Certified, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertain Warranty, $21,499 #X2704

'09 Chevy Malibu LT: One Owner Clean Carfax, $9,779 #38054A

'15 Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GMCertified, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '10 Chevy Malibu LTZ: Sedan, Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles, Alloy Whls, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $9,900 #77137A

'12 Malibu LT, 24k mi., 4ci, GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C150310A $13,915 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Malibu LT, 24k mi., 2.5L, 4ci, GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C10390P $15,312 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '04 Monte Carlo SS, FWD, V6, auto, 16" wheels, stk# UH4468EP $6,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '13 Chevy Volt: 5 Door, Premium, Navigation, 32K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '13 Chevy Volt: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Nice, Call Today, $13,990 #26148A

'04 Chevy Classic: Sedan, Auto, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels, $5,990 #8678A

Chrysler

4070

'14 Chrysler 200 LX: FWD, Remote Keyless Entry, Power Windows & Locks, Call Today,

'15 Chevy Impala LT: Limited, Sunroof, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'12 Chevy Sonic 2LT: Loaded, One Ownr Clean Carfx $8,888 #34830A

'15 Chevy Spark LT: 4 Door, Alloys, Yellow, 20K Miles, GM Certified, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Buick Verano: 4 Door, Leather, 4 Cyl, Alloys, 46K Miles, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Door, Black, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Sonic LTZ Turbo, lthr, auto transmission, 20K Mi., stk# C10374P $13,522 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Sonic LTZ Turbo, auto transmission, 16k miles, GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C10387P $14,388 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'12 Camaro SS Inferno Orange, Automatic, Loaded, Stk #B7705 $26,490

'15 Chevy Camaro LT: Convertible, V6, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $25,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Camaro LT Coupe Sunroof, V6, 26K Miles, GM Certified, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Cobalt LS, remote keyless entry, 34 mpg hwy, stk# MS16441A $4,698 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'08 Cobalt LT: Coupe, Yellow, Auto, Very Clean, #38326A $8,111

'08 Chevy Cobalt LT: Coupe, Auto, Yellow, Clean, $9,779 #38054A

'05 Chevy Cobalt LS: Coupe, Auto, Silver, $8,111 #31608A

'06 Chevy Cobalt SS: Supercharged, Leather, $8,990 '07 Chevy Cobalt LT: Coupe, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $7,490 #10508A

'09 Chevy Cobalt LT 33 mpg hwy and 24 mpg city, cd player, stk# UH4459EP $5,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '14 Chevy Cruze LT: 5 Speed, 29K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Leather, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '13 Chevy Cruze LS: Auto, One Owner Clean Carfax, OnStar, Tinted Windows, Call Today! $9,890 #75882A

'11 Cruze Eco-Gas Saver! Ecotec 1.4L, stk# C10342Q $8,495 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

2011 Chevy Cruze LS Stk# 65924-2 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Chevy HHR LT: 4 Cyl, 61K Miles, Warranty, Sharp, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2006 Chevy HHR LT Stk #42418-2 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '15 Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Impala LT: 2.5L, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '07 Chevy Impala LT: 3.9L Sedan, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, Call! $7,990 #P8452A

2015 Chrysler 200 Limited Stk #41431-1 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'04 Chrysler PT Cruiser, CD player with 6 speakers, 29 mpg hwy, stk# UH4296EP $3,999 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

Dodge

4085

'12 Dodge Challenger SXT: V6, 28K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '13 Dodge Cart SXT: Rallye, One owner Clean Carfax, Remote Vehicle Start, Call Today, $13,990 #P8480

Ford

4110

'12 Ford Focus: Titanium, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $13,494 #38056A

'13 Focus ST, Leather, Roof, Nav, Just Arrived, #B7752 $22,490

'14 Ford Focus: 5 Dr Hatchback, Leather, Bluetooth, Camera, Only 32K Miles, Late Model, Low Miles, $12,990 #X2778

'08 Ford Focus SES: Clean Carfax, Leather, FWD, Nice Car, Call Today, $6,990 #75949A

'13 Focus, 1500 miles, stk# T303-1, $16,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2005 Ford Focus Stk #93998-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '89 Mustang LX 5.0 Conv., 31k miles, man. trans, super clean! stk# C151858M $10,912 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '96 Mustang, V6, Auto, CD/Aux input, low miles, stk# U4450Q $4,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2013 Ford Mustang Convertible Stk #42272-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan /Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Taurus Ltd: Black, Loaded, Lthr, Moonroof, $14,588 #360164A

'10 Ford Taurus SHO: Sedan, AWD, Low Miles, Navigation/GPS, heated Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Nice! $15,990 #26493B

2004 Ford Taurus SEL Stk #41920-5 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Honda

4120

'12 Honda Crosstour EX: V6, Polished Metal, 22K Mi, Honda Certified, MRoof, BTooth, Ownr, Lease Turn In, $19,299 #X2818

'12 Honda Crosstour EX: V6, Polished Metal Metallic, 22K Miles, Honda Certified, 7Yr/100K Powertrain, $19,299 #X2818

'11 Honda CR-Z, 35 mpg, cd player (reads mp3 format), stk# UH4369P $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '12 Honda Accord SE: Sedan, Black, Power, Heated Leather, Alloys, Special Edition, Only 95K Miles, $11,799 #H160273B

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 2 Door Coupe, Modern Steel Metallic, Loaded, Nav, Honda Certified, 7Yr/100K Powertrain, $21,499 #X2704

'13 Honda Accord LX: Alabaster Silver, 35K Mi, Alloys, Bluetooth, Certified, 7Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, $17,399 #X2810

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4120 Hyundai

'03 Chevy Malibu: One Owner, Clean Carfax, 77K Miles, $5,544 #38207A

4065

4060

2008 Cadillac DTS Stk# 42556-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Chevrolet

'09 Honda Accord EX-L: Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $12,990 #94784C

'07 Accord SDN EX-L Sharp car! Popular Model! Stk# UH4389EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2011 Honda Accord Crosstour EXL #42485-2 $17,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Honda Civic EX: Nav, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $13,331 #29928A

'13 Civic SI Local Trade, Well Maintained. $17,990

4125 Jeep

2013 Hyundai Elantra SE Stk#94288 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk#66286-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk#66146-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra #65670-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '12 Sonata, new front brakes, popular color, 35 mpg hwy, stk# X16507A $12,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'12 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, Awesome MPG! $15,490

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Hybrid, Heated Power Leather Seats, 32K Mi, Balance of Factory Wrnty, Black Beauty, $14,888 #X2780

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE: 4 Door, Alloys, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '09 Hyundai Sonata: 3.3L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $7,990 #8773A

'12 Honda Civic EX: 35K Mi, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Honda Certified, Silver, X2790 Reduced To $14,299

'02 Civic LX: 2 Door Coupe, Only 111K Miles, High Quality, Low Price! Hurry In, Won't Last! $5,699 #X2799

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Silver, One Owner, Honda Certified, Only 13K Miles, $17,499 #X2745

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Modern Steel, Only 6K Miles, One Owner, Honda Certified, #X2688 Reduced $17,499

$12,990 #P8474

Chevrolet

4055

'15 Buick Verano: Convenience, 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, 20K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

M 1

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202 HONDA CERTIFIED SPRING APR SPECIAL 2/26/16 - 3/14/16 0.9% Up to 36 Mo. 1.9% Up to 60 Mo.

2014 Hyundai Sonata #65416-1 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata Limited #41252-1 $16,597 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #65671-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata #94364 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE #94032 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #94285 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE #94222 $16,497 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #65012-1 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

With Approved Credits

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '13 Accord LX's: 7 To Choose From! Silver, 35K Miles, Bluetooth, Camera, Alloys, #X2810 Starting At $17,399 '15 Odyssey EXL, Silver, 25K Miles Heated Leather, Bluetooth, Camera, $31,999 #H160715A '14 Accord EXL: 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, Modern Steel, 40K Mi, Dual Pwr Htd Lthr, Moonroof, Loaded, $21,499 #X2704 '14 Civic: Hybrid: 3 To Choose From, 4 Dr, Alabaster Silver, Only 13K Mi, 47 MPG, Push Button Start, Rear & Side Cameras, Starting at $17,299 #X2745 '13 Civic LX's: 8 To Choose From, Bluetooth, Black, Rear Camera, $14,599 #H152216A Largest Selection of Certified Civic's in the Midwest!! '13 Odyssey EXL: Smoky Topaz w/Truffle Leather, Sharp, Clean, 42K Mi, $26,999 #H160740A '14 Accord: Sport, Crystal Black Pearl, 35K Miles, $18,699 #H160576A '13 Pilot EX-L: 4WD, Dark Cherry Pearl, 35K Mi, Htd Leather, Rear Camera, Bluetooth, $30,499 #H160422A '12 CIVIC LX: Sedan, Crimson Pearl, 31K Miles, Auto, Cruise, Pwr Pkg, Low Miles, Starting at $13,999 #X2824 '12 Civic EX's: 3 To Choose From! Going Fast, 43K Miles, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Alloy's, 34 MPG, Starting $13,999! #X2786 '13 CRV LX: Black, FWD, Only 22K Miles, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, $18,999 #H152229A '13 Accord EX-L: 4 Cyl, 30K Miles, Champagne Frost, Bluetooth, Camera,, Heatd, Pwr Lthr Seats, $20,599 #X2772 '14 Civic EX-L: Navigation, Crystal Black Pearl, Heated Leathr, Display Audio, Smart Key, 11K Miles, $19,499 #H160596A

'09 Fit Sport, 1.5L, I-4 Cyl., mp3 decoder, 33 mpg hwy, stk# MS16656A $8,653 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Hyundai

4125

2015 Hyundai Veloster Stk #65994-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Veloster #94098 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Stk #65745-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 Nissan LEAF S Stk #42509-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Veloster Stk #66102-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Accent GLS Stk #94351 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Accent Stk# 65502-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #66206-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #65700-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #66491-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #65896-1 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #94344 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #94102 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2012 Sonata Hybrid Stk# 66236-1 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #66455-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata Limited #65966-1 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Ininiti

4145 Mercedes Benz

'14 Jeep Wrangler: 4 Door, Lifted, Light Bar, CALL

Kia

4155

'12 Kia Optima EX: 4 Door, Only 60K Miles, Won't Last Long, Call For Price! #H160689A

'14 Kia Optima, Silver, Stk# T359 $13,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '06 Rio LX, manual 5 spd, 35 mpg hwy, 32 mpg city, stk# U4400P $4,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '12 Kia Soul PLUS: 6 Spd, Red, 52K Miles, Bluetooth, Premium Audio, Clean Carfax, 13 Service Records, $10,299 #H160578A

'11 Kia Soul: Hatchback, 2.0L 4 Cyl, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,990 #75135B

Lexus

4165

'08 Lexus EX 350: Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles, Heated Leathr Seats, Sunroof/ Moonroof, Call Today, $12,490 #10447A

'00 Lexus ES300: Loaded, Clean Carfax, Must See, $6,555 #38296B

Lincoln

4170

'13 Lincoln MKT: AWD, Navigation, White, Sunroof, $30,990

'08 MKX, heated/cooled leather seats, $185 monthly payment, stk# X16478A $11,998 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'08 Lincoln MKX: White, AWD, Nav, Roof, Chromes, $15,990 '97 Town Car - Cartier Edition, cream int. & cream ext., low miles, stk# T374 $3,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Mazda

4185

'10 Mazda3 i: Loaded, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, $9,991 #31123A

2011 Mazda Z Sport #45284-3 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, MnRoof, Loaded, Mazda Certified, $21,778 #31449A

'05 Mazda Mazda6: Sport, Loaded, Auto, Very Clean, $6,817 #31777A

'08 Mazda Mazda3: Sport, Auto, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $6,888 38444B

4130

'08 Infiniti G35x: Navigation, Auto, Sunroof, Leather, $15,990 '06 Infiniti M35x: Clean Carfax, AWD, Navigation, Heated/ Cooled Leather Seats, Call Today, $9,490 #94472A

'05 Infiniti G35: Couple, 3.5L V6, RWD, Heated Leather Seats, Tinted Windows, Call Today! $8,990 #75757A

'14 CX-5 Touring Only 17K Miles, One Owner, Mazda Certified! #31189A $20,771

'06 Mazda Mazda6 S: Auto, Loaded, Full Power, $8,218 #31782A

'12 Mazda 3i Touring Hatchback, 30K Miles, Certified, Stk #M7732 $14,990

'97 I30, stk# T329-1 $3,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Jaguar

4140

'12 Jaguar XF: Portfolio, White, Navigation, Chromes, $33,890

'03 Jaguar S-Type 80K Miles, Green/Tan Interior, $6,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '04 XJ8, only 70k mi., Stk #T346 $9990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Jeep

4145

'12 Jeep Cherokee LTD: 4WD, Roof, Nav, $29,990

'14 Grand Cherokee Limited: 4WD, Leather, 40K Mi, V6, One Owner, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'09 Jeep Liberty: 4x4, 53K Miles, Panoramic Roof, Leather, $16,490 '10 Jeep Liberty: Sport, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Call Today! $9,490 #10294A

2002 Jeep Liberty Sport Stk #66222-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Jeep Patriot: Sport, FWD, Black, 23K Mi, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'11 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4 Door, 4x4, Maroon, $26,996 #360505B

'11 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4 Door, 4x4, Maroon, $27,986 #360505B

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

WEDNESDAY

4190 Nissan/Datsun

'12 Mercedes Benz E350, only 55k miles, sharp! Stk# T338 $23,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '07 Mercedes CLK: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today $13,990 #26118A

2014 SLK 250 Convertible, Black, 5K Miles, 1 Owner, $36,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1866-604-8625

'15 MB SLK 250: Cabrio, 3K Miles, $39,490

Mercury

4195

'06 Mercury Montego: Luxury, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Call Today! $5,990 #P8505A

'00 Grand Marquis, white, 4.6L V8, 23 mpg hwy, stk# T366, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2008 Mercury Sable Stk #42266-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Mini Cooper

4207

'15 Mini Cooper Clubman ALL4, Light White, Stk #V16026A

'06 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sedan, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today! $7,990 #10693A

'14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified, Motortrend Certified, $16,990 #10152A

'08 MAZDA 5, light green, power everything, stk #T325 $7,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '14 Mazda 3 S Touring, Sedan, 4xxx Miles, Local Trade, Stk #V16074B $22,990

'09 Mazda CX-9: Loaded, Very Clean, Power, #31654A $14,841

'06 Mazda Miata: Automatic, Full Power, 53K Miles, $13,490

'13 Mazda Miata Hard Top, 4K Mi., Just Arrived, $23,990

'01 Mazda MX-5 Miata: CONVERTIBLE One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today $6,490 #10560A

Mercedes Benz

4190

'11 Mercedes E350 4MATIC: Loaded, Power, Clean, $23,844 #38105B

2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94050SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 NIssan Versa Note #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 NIssan Versa Note SL Stk# 94042SL $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 NIssan Versa Note #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2012 Nissan Leaf SL #66265-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Pontiac

'07 MINI Cooper S: CONVERTIBLE, FWD, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Leather, Call Today, $8,990 #10357A

Misc. Autos

4210

Bommarito St. Peters NEW ARRIVALS!!

4250

'07 G6 Coupe, Low Miles, White/Black Leather, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '04 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $6,990 #P8505C

'14 Ford Explorer: Quad Seats, 4WD, Lthr '12 Honda Pilot: Touring RES & Navigation, 4WD, $29,990 '14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4x4, Winch, Lift Kit, Light Bar, $35,990 '15 GMC Yukon XL: Denali, 5K Miles, Every Option, $67,990 '13 VW EOS: 17K Miles, Local Trade, VW Certified, $24,490 '13 BMW X5 Premium: 36K Miles, AWD, BMW Certified, $39,490 '08 Ford Mustang: Premium, 57K Miles, Manual, $13,990 '15 Toyota RAV4 XLE: AWD, 15K Miles, Local Trade, $24,990 '07 Saturn Sky: 33K Mi, Local Trade, Certified, $14,490 '09 Nissan Altima: Auto, Leather, Roof, 58K Mi, $13,490

Mitsubishi

4215

2008 Eclipse GS #66399-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Nissan/Datsun

4220

'09 Cube, 1.8s, 4 cyl., 1.8L, 28 mpg, cd player, stk# UH4388EP $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2015 Nissan 370Z S/A 3 Models Left! Stk#94191SL $31,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2010 Nissan Altima2.5S #66392-1 $11,995 St.Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Nissan Altima 2.5S: 2 Door Coupe, Super Sharp, Silver, 122K Miles, Value Priced, Only $8,999 #H160814A

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today,

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified, Call Today, $12,990 #93321B

2011 Nissan Altima 2.5S Stk #42257-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2010 Nissan Altima 3.5 SR #65863-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2009 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV Stk #45066-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 NIssan Rogue Select S Stk#94137SL $17,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Nissan Sentra SV: 4 Door, 4 Cyl, 38K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '10 Sentra 2.0, Carfax 1-owner, fwd, 34 mpg hwy, Sharp Car! Stk# U1553A $8,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2014 Nissan Sentra Stk #93997SL $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Sentra SR Stk #41841-1 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Nissan Sentra SR #66310-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2014 Nissan Sentra Stk #93997SL $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

4310

'13 EOS 17xxx Miles, Local Trade, Salsa Red, Certified, Stk #M16160A $23,990

2009 VW Routan SEL Stk #42164-3 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 VW Golf "R": H/Back, 15K Miles, VW Certified, Rare, $31,490

'07 VW Jetta GLI: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Turbo, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,490 #25668M

'11 VW Jetta SEL: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, Nice, $13,990 #26240A

'14 Jetta 2.0L S: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Call Tdoay, $13,990 #94554A

'15 VW Passat: Sedan, 1.8T Wolfsburg Edition, Dark Gray, 33K Miles, Priced To Sell Fast At $15,488 #AT1077

'06 Pontiac Grand Prix GT: 17" Aluminum Wheels, Supercharged, Call Today,

'01 Grand Prix, stk# T311-2 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Range Rover/Land Rover

4260

'10 Land Rover Range Rover Sport White, Local Trade, $31,990

Volvo

4315

2009 Volvo S40 4i #42068-3 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'08 Volvo XC70 3.2: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Call Today $10,990 #26324A

'08 Volvo XC70 3.2: Wagon, 3.2L 6 Cyl, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $10,990 #26324A

'13 Land Rover, Range Rover, Stk# T322 $69,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Saturn

1-866-2449085

STLTODAY.COM

4220 Volkswagen

2015 Nissan Versa Note SL Stk #94053SL $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

$6,490 #94861B

'12 Mini Cooper, 32xxx Miles, Motor Trend Certified, 4 New Tires, Stk #C7665A $15,490

$12,990 #25755C

'09 Mazda 5 Touring, 47xxx Miles, Auto, Leather, Stk #M7743 $11,990

MARCH 2, 2016

4280

'09 Saturn Aura XR: V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Aunroof/Moonroof, Low Miles, Call Today! $8,990 #95070A

'01 Saturn SC2: Coupe, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, FWD, Call Today, $4,990 #10456A

'07 Saturn Vue: 4 Door, 94K Mi, Alloys, Local Trade, $6,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Scion

4283

'13 FR-S, rear anti-roll bar, speed control, sharp! stk# M16577A $17,571 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '10 TC, cd player, as low as $269 montly payment, stk# M16426A $11,984 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Subaru

4290

'13 XV Crosstrek Limited, leather upholstery, automatic temp control, 33 mpg hwy, stk# 16430A $21,455 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Forester 2.5X Premium, low miles, carfax 1-owner, bluetooth, stk# X2552P $20,998 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Forester 2.5X Premium, low miles, bluetooth, $233 monthly payment, stk# X2553P $21,394 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Impreza Premium, front & rear anti-roll bar, 37 mpg hwy, stk# M412176P $20,330 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '12 Legacy 2.5I, low miles, 31 mpg hwy, $276 monthly payment, stk# X2563P $17,888 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '12 Legacy 2.5I Limited, carfax 1-owner! low miles, 31 mpg hwy, stk# X2537P $19,322 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Legacy 2.5I Premium, heated front seats, carfax 1-owner, bluetooth! Stk# X2457L $21,994 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Legacy 2.5I Premium, split folding rear seat, 36 mpg hwy, stk# MS41298P $24,203 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Outback 2.5I Limited, htd front seats, illuminated entry, 9 speakers, stk# MS16621A $24,763 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

Suzuki

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'15 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, V8, 4x4, 23K Miles, GM Certified, $31,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Chevy 1500 3LZ: Crew Cab, High Country, 4x4, 26K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $39,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Colorado, only 82k mi., Stk# T335 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '01Chevy Silverado 1500: Full Power, Blue, Loaded, $7,882 #P5663A '12 Silverado LT: Crew Cab, 4WD, 44K Mi., $28,900

'11 Silverado LTZ: Crew Cab, 4WD, White Diamond, $31,900

'10 Toyota Prius: Loaded, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, $9,988 #38309A

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335

'06 Dodge Dakota ST: Club Cab, 82K Miles, Clean, $9,444 #38500A

'04 Dodge Ram: 4x4, 51K Miles, Crew Cab, $16,490

'14 Dodge Ram 1500 LT: Quad Cab, 4x4, Hemi, 19K Miles, One Owner, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Ford Trucks

4340

'14 Ford F-150 XLT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 32K Miles, One Owner, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '02 Ford F-150: Super Cab, 4.6L V8, 4x2, LOW MILES, Air Conditioning, Call Today! $6,490 #8483B

4295

2004 Suzuki Frenza LX Stk #65131-2 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Sell your stuff with Classified.

'02 Ford F-150 XL: Super Cab, Low Miles, Air Conditioning, Extended Cab, Call Today! $6,490 #8483B

'15 Ford F150 Lariat, Stk# T372 $42,990

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

Toyota

'13 Volvo XC90: 7 Passenger, Sunroof, Black Metallic, 54K Mi, Clean Carfax, 11 Service Records, $25,488 #H160562A

4300

'10 Toyota Prius: Loaded, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, $9,988 #38309A '11 Toyota Camry LE: Blue, Only 61K Miles, High Quality, Low Price, Powertrain Warranty, Hurry In . . . Won't Last! $12,299 #X2777

2012 Toyota Camry SE Stk #42209-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Toyota Camry LE Stk #65865-2 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Toyota Corolla LE Stk #66496-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 Nissan Titan Crew Cab 7 Models Left! Stk #94168SL $33,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2009 Toyota RAV4 Sport Stk #93911-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Nissan Versa Note: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $10,490 #P8469

'11 Toyota Sienna: 7 Passenger Van, Gray Mica, Only 100K Miles, Powertrain Warranty, Price To Sell Fast! $12,999 #H152226A

2013 Toyota Yaris LE Stk #40486-2 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '01 Ford F-150, 112k mi, low miles for it's age, auto, Red, $5,990 #T316

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2008 Ford F-150 Supercrew #66173-2 $17,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'04 Ford F350: Lariat, 4x4, Diesel, 43K Miles, $22,990

'01 Ranger XLT Off-Rd 4x4, extended cab with tow hitch, stk# UH4460EP $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

GMC Trucks

4345

'05 GMC Canyon SLE: Crew Cab, 4x4, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $11,333 #38384A

'13 GMC Sierra: Z71, Crew Cab, 4WD, Leathr, Chromes, $28,990

2007 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab #42122-3 $17,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020


Classified Crossovers

4387 Sport Utilitiy

'13 VW GTI: Sedan, Manual, Red, Certified, $19,990

Sport Utilitiy

4390

'12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Chromes, Loaded, Mocha, $19,221 #360334A

'12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Chromes, Loaded, Mocha, $21,121 #360334A

'11 Buick Enclave CXL: Sunroof, Rear DVD, Leather, Sharp! $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 11K Miles, 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Captiva 2LS: Sport, 25K Miles, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Buick Encore: Convenience Pkg, AWD, 29K Miles, GM Certified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Equniox LTZ: AWD, V6, Sunroof, Navigation, 11K Miles, GMCertified, $30,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Chevy Captiva LT: Sport, Silver, 32K Miles, Priced Below Market, $15,699 #AT1081

'14 Chevy Captiva LT: Sport, Alloys Wheels, FWD, 4 Cyl, OnStar, Call Today! $16,990 #P8473

'14 Chevy Equinox LS: Black, Loaded, Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $18,221 #38361A

'13 Chevy Equinox LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $16,147 #38277A

'05 Chevy Equinox LS: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Bucket Seats, FWD, Remote Keyless Entry, Call Today! $6,490 #75870A

'05 Chevy Equinox LS: 3.4L V6, Auto, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Spoiler, CALL TODAY! $6,490 #75870A

'05 Chevy Equinox LT: 3.4L V6, Low Miles, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Spoiler, Call Today! $8,990 #10387A

'13 Chevy Equinox LS, FWD, 10k mi., GMCert. Wrnty, stk# C10378P $17,539 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LT Pkg., FWd, 9k mi., GM Cert Wrnty, stk# C160663A $20,996 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

M 1

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'12 Chevy Equinox LT, FWD, 16xxx mi., stk# C10099P $19,311 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '07 Chevy HHR LT: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $7,990 #8785A

'13 Chevy Suburban 4wd, loaded, LTZ, stk# C151959A $19,918 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'08 Ford Escape XLT, roof rack, sunroof, cd player, stk# U4281XP $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

2013 Ford Escape SE #42407-1 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2008 Ford Escape XLT #66158-2 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Hyundai '07 Chevy Tahoe Tucson Ltd: LT: Leather, Moon- Loaded, Power, One roof, Clean Carfax, Owner Clean CarLoaded, fax, $16,728 #360522A $16,884 #31425A

'07 Chevy Tahoe LT: Leather, Moonroof, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $18,522 #360522A

'14 Chevy Tahoe LT: Captains, Leather, Loaded, GM Certified, 39K Miles, $39,882 #38531A

'07 Chevy Tahoe LT: Leather, Moonroof, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $16,728 #360522A

'13 HyundaiTucson Ltd, AWD, Diamond Silver, 43K Mi, Nav, Smart Key Entry, Clean Carfax, B/U Camera, $18,699 #H160670A

'13 GMC Terrain: Denali, Candy Red Prl, 65K Mi, Nav, Htd Pwr Lthr, MRoof, BTooth, 1 Ownr Clean Carfx, $21,999 #H160782A

'14 GMC Acadia: Denali, Carbon Black Metallic, DVD, Moonroof, Loaded,

$22,999 #H160853A '11 Chevy Tahoe LTZ, lthr, 4wd, 5.3 V8, auto, 6 speed transmission, stk# C150317A $24,899 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Chevy Traverse LT: 8 Passenger, Moonroof, Dark Blue Metallic, Only 64K Miles, DVD, Will Sell Fast, $15,899 #X2826

'13 Chevy Traverse LS: FWD, V6, 24K Miles, One Owner, 3rd Row, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Traverse 2LT: AWD, Rear Buckets, 34K Miles, GM Certified, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '13 Chevy Traverse LT, awd, GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C150160M $24,401 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Traverse LTZ fwd, 30k mi., GM Cert. Wrnty, leather, loaded, stk# C151966A $30,980 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'08 Dodge Nitro SLT/RT: 4x4, Heated Side Mirrors, Power, $12,991 #38279B

'14 Dodge Journey SXT: FWD, V6, 27K Mi, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'06 Ford Escape XLS: Very Clean, Must See, $6,927 #P5646

'12 Ford Escape: Limited, 35K Miles, Leather, $18,990

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'12 CR-V EX-L, heated front leather seats, backup camera, bluetooth, stk# MS16655A $20,685 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '13 Honda CRV LX: FWD, Black, Only 22K Miles, Honda Certified, One Owner, Lease Turn In, Call Today, $18,999 #H152229A

'10 Honda Pilot EXL: AWD, One Owner, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $18,881 #P5670

'13 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, Dark Cherry Pearl, Only 35K Miles, One Owner, Honda Certified Used Vehicle, $30,499 #H160422A

'06 Honda Pilot EXL: Rear Entertainment System, One Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Sunroof/Moonroof, $9,990 #8784A

'08 Honda Pilot: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,490 #77045C

$33,299 #H160087A

'12 GMC Acadia SLT: Navigation, DVD, Black Granite, 75K Miles, Loaded,

'05 GMC Envoy XL, carfax one owner, 4.2 liters in-line 6, stk# U1585A $6,595 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

2005 GMC Envoy #42223-1 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Mazda CX-5 Touring #65800-1 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe: Limited White, Leather, $16,920 '15 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, FWD, Silver, Only 33K Miles, 2 To Choose From! #AT1112 Call For Price!

'08 GMC Sierra 1500 Work Truck, 6 cyl 4.3L, vinyl seats, CD player reads mp3, stk# UH4225Q $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'08 Hyundai Santa Fe, traction control system, cd player, sharp! stk# U1605A $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'11 GMC Terrain SLT: AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $17,721 #31381A

2011 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited #66469-1 $17,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 GMC Terrain SLE-1: FWD, White, Only 48K Miles, Priced To Sell, Balance of Factory Warranty, $16,499 #H160419A

'12 GMC Terrain SLE-1: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Call Today, $14,490 #75932A

'13 GMC Terrain SLE, 24k miles, GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C10363P $18,912 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Terrain SLE, FWD, 22k mi., GM Cert. Wrnty, stk# C10383P $19,616 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'08 GMC Yukon SLT: 4x4, Leather, Roof, Quads. $22,990 '14 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, AWD, 31K Miles, V6, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2010 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS Stk #40834-1 $10,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited Stk #42159-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 Infiniti QX56: AWD, Pearl white, Clean Carfax, 15 Service Records, Only 108K Miles, Just Arrived, Call For $$, #H160193A

'13 Infiniti JX35: Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, 3rd Row Seat, Heated Lthr Seats, One Owner Clean Carfax, $32,990 #94386A

2013 Kia Sorento LX Stk# 42365-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '06 Kia Sportage LX, popular black cherry ext. & black cloth int., stk# UH4410EP $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

WEDNESDAY

4390 RV Motor Homes

'12 Mazda CX-9: Grand Touring, AWD, Sunroof, Nav, $25,990

Nissan Armada Platinum 5 Left! Stk #94188SL $46,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 Nissan Murano 15 Left! Stk# 94183SL $26,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Nissan Pathfinder: White, 4x4, 3rd Row, CALL

'12 Nissan Pathfinder: V6, 2WD, Super Black, Metallic, Only 40K Miles, New Tires, 3rd Row Seat $18,699 #H160531B

2015 Nissan Pathfinder 5 Left! #94104SL $24,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '13 Nissan Rogue S, electronic stability, brake assist, awd, stk# MS16471A $16,147 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '10 Nissan Rogue SL: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Call Today,

4445 Legal Notices

RV & CAMPER SHOW March 4- 5 & 6 2016 Big Sale 3 days only Largest Selection • Motorhomes • 5th Wheels • Travel Trailers • Pop-Ups • Special Financing

Belleville, IL www.bcfairgrounds.net

4725

General Earn Extra Money Now! Help deliver the new telephone directories to the St. Louis Area. Must be 18 or older & a licensed, insured driver. Attend a short meeting for more information. Held Mon - Fri - call station for time. You can get started immediately! Delivery station: Warehouse 29 Cassens Court Fenton, MO 63026 630-423-1589 for more information www.deliveryellow. com EOE

$11,990 #75994A

Help Wtd (H2B) 2015 Nissan Rogue 10 To Choose From! #93900SL $18,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 Subaru Forester 2.5XT: Premium, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Mi, Sunroof/Moonroof, $16,990 #10433A

'04 Toyota Sequoia SR5: Auto, White, Just Arrived, $10,990

'05 Toyota Highlander: FWD, 3.3L V6, Spoiler, Leather Seats, Call Today! $10,490 #10425A

2010 Toyota Highlander Stk #66470-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866) 672-4020

'10 Toyota RAV4: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $12,990 #93342C

Mini vans

4727

LANDSCAPE LABORER Temporary, full-time position: mow, cut, water, and edge lawns; rake and blow leaves; dig holes for bushes; pull and chop weeds; prune; haul topsoil and mulch. Must be able to lift up to 50 lbs.; bend/push/stretch. No education or prior work experience required. Dates of Temp. Employment: 4/ 1/ 2016- 12/ 14/ 2016. Areas of Temp. Employment: St. Louis County, St. Charles County, and St. Louis City, MO. Transpor t at ion t o customer worksites provided by employer. 40 positions available. Rate of pay: no less than $13.03/hr, no overtime. 40 hrs/week offered. M-F 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM. Housing placement and uniform services offered and deductible by agreement. Employer will provide all tools, supplies, and equipment required to perform the job at no charge. Inbound transportation/daily subsistence and return transportation/daily subsistence will b e p a i d by employer . Applicant s must have proof of legal authority to work in the United States. Apply at St . Charles County Job Center; 212 Turner Blvd.; St. Peters, MO 63376; 636-255-6060. Job Order #11570408. An employer paid ad. In person pre-employment interview required at employer's main office. Follmer Property Maintenance LLC; 2584 Forst Drive; O'Fallon, M O 63368; 314-568-4696.

4420

'08 Chrysler Town & Cntry, blue, 126k mi, loaded, stk# T361 $8,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '10 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Leather, DVD, Silver, 92K Miles, Ready For Vacation, Won't Last, $10,999 #H160863A

'05 Chrysler Town & Country, low miles, green, loaded, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '05 Dodge Caravan SXT, 3rd row seating, 25 mpg hwy, stk# X16453A $6,156 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '10 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: 7 Passenger, Rear DVD, Deep Red Pearl, 123K Mi, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, $10,499 #H160759A

'15 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: V6, 28K Miles, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Honda Odyssey: Touring, Nav, DVD, Loaded, Smoky Topaz, Timing Belt Replaced, Powertrain Warranty, $20,999 #H160765A

'07 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/ Moonroof, Call Today, $8,900 #94641B

Franchise Opportunities 4865 Snyder's-Lance Equity Route for sale in the Arnold/Festus area. Contact: Tim Handrahan

314-603-7384 Snyder's-Lance Equity Route for sale South County, Columbia/Waterloo, IL area. Contact: Tim Handrahan

314-603-7384 Snyder's-Lance Equity Route for covering Kirkwood, High Ridge & also Wentzville, Troy, Warenton areas. Contact: Tim Handrahan

314-603-7384 Firewood/Fuel

2003 Toyota Dienna XLE Stk #41770-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'05 Dodge Grand Cherokee SXT: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 3rd Row, Dual Climate Control, $7,990 #94880A

6095

Seasoned Oak and Hickory Delivered & Stacked. 23yrs of Service. 573-513-6510

Sporting Equipment

6240

MISSOURI GUN & KNIFE SHOW Cape Girardeau, MO Antique & Modern OVER 450 TABLES March 4th, 5th, & 6th Fri 4-8 Sat 8-5 Sun 8-4 SHOW ME CENTER For more info.: J.D. King 573-2430499 Jody Geiser: 573-204-8888 POOL TABLE, pro quality, 1'' slate, Leather pockets. Exc. cond. Must sell 314921-6357

Legal Notices '08 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $12,990 #95048A

CITY OF ST. LOUIS Public Hearing Notice and Draft 2015 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) Available for Review and Comment

618-233-0052

Help Wanted

9000

9000 Legal Notices

Chiropractic Kids Clinic is closing as of April 13th, 2016. I f you ar e or were a patient of Vanessa King, M S , D C y o u may call 844.544.5437 to pick up copies of your records by March 15th, 2016.

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS

1998 WINNEBAGO 23' CLASS C Motorhome, very good conditon, 55,000 miles, $6000. 314-551-9155 For features email Ian@btapps.co

MARCH 2, 2016

It’s as easy as 314-621-6666.

CASUALTY LOSS REPAIR 6231 LENOX All questions must be submitte d in writing, and emailed to Kenzella Walton, Operations Manager at kwalton@eastlakemgmt.com no later than Friday, March 11, 2016, 1:00 p.m.

'11 Toyota Sienna: 7 Passenger Van, 100K Miles, High Quality,

SITE VISIT: Immediately following PreBid Meeting

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds Bids/Proposals

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for Construction Supervision and Material Testing for the Reconstruction of Taxiway Echo from T a x i w a y Juliet to Runway 30R, LambertSt. Louis International Airport. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 P.M., CT, March 22, 2016 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website www. stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service 314-6223535. 8.18% D B E participation goal.

Garage Sales 4430

2015 Nv200 Cargo Van 3 Left! Stk#94173SL $17,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820 for our Garage Sale Package. Garage Sales -

6325 Auctions, Estate Sales MISSOURI & Antiques 63049 - 2345 Nantucket Ct

To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-8020 ext.6666 Antiques Wanted

moving sale ent. ctr couch & chair much more. 3/33/5 8-5l

6290

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Search St. Louis area jobs and find the one that’s right for you at STLtoday.com/monster

Pets & Stuff To place your ad, call at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. Dogs

5005 Dogs

1st Goldendoodles, Bichonapoos, Teddy Bears, Labs, Dachshunds, Chiweenees, & Other A 636-240-3647 A LoveNCarePets.org

German Shepherd Pups, 11 wks, shots/wormed, A K C R e g ., Pedigreed Parents on Site. $400; Call (618)218-5950

5005 Dogs

Goldendoodles, F1 & F1B series. All colors, & all sizes. Shots wormed, guar., bred for looks, disposition/ hunting ability. Ready now thru Summer. 618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com LAB PUPS-AKC, OFA Black, Choc. & Yellow, see parents, calm. shots, wormed, health guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

9005

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

$12,999 #H152226A

Vans

Public Notice Notice is hereby given that certain applications have been filed with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Central District, One Financial Place, 4 4 0 S . LaSalle S tre e t, S u ite 2 7 0 0 , Chicago, Illinois 6 0 6 0 5 , b y Bo u le va rd Ba n k lo c a te d a t 1 2 8 0 0 Corporate Hill Drive, Des Peres, Missouri 63131, to transfer certain assets to various acquire rs ; to transfer most deposits to othe r financial institutions, and certain deposit accounts will be closed and the funds remitted to the respective de pos itors ; to make liquidating distributions to its p a re n t h o ld in g c o mp a n y, S c o t t r a d e Financial S ervices, Inc., S aint Louis, Missouri 6 3 1 4 1 ; and to s ubs e quently dissolve.

Buy. Sell. Post. Find.

EAST LAKE MANAGEMENT GROUP, INC. INVITES QUALIFIED FIRMS/ ORGANIZATIONS TO SUBMIT SEALED BIDS FOR:

PRE-BID MEETING: Wednesday, March 9, 2016 1:00 p.m. Wellston Housing Authority 6203 Cote Brillante Wellston, MO 63133

9000 Bids/Proposals

9005

"In accordance with the provisions of STATE LAW, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager's lien of the goods stored at the Uncle Bob’s Self Storage location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specif ied in such not ice f or payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s) to the highest bidder for cash or otherwise disposed of on WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16th, 2016 @10:15 AM 8524 Manchester Rd St. Louis, MO 63144 (314) 968-3070

The City of St. Louis is soliciting comments on its draft Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER). The CAPER is an overall review of the housing and community development activities undertaken in 2015 by the City of St . After all of the deposits and liabilities of Boulevard Louis. It is part of the Consolidated Planning Bank are assumed by the other financial institutions Jennings City Hall process, which is a prerequisite to receiving fed- o r a re l i q u i d a t e d , 2120 Hord**Jennings, MO Boulevard Bank will be 63136**314-388-1164 eral HUD funds. c lo s in g its a ffa irs . www. cityofjennings.org Public Hearing Notice/ Pub- Creditors of Boulevard Bank should present their lic Comment Period claims against Boulevard The City of Jennings is Bank by mail or in person seeking to fill the T h e Communit y to the be low addre s s following positions: D e v e l o p m e n t ïCity Attorney Administration will con- through March 31, 2016. After March 3 1 , 2 0 1 6 , ïPublic Safety Director duct a public hearing on ïSeasonal Clerk Thursday, March 17, cre ditors of Boulevard Bank should present their 2016 at 5:00 p.m. in Suite 2000 at 1520 Mar- claims by mail or in per- The City of Jennings is requesting proposals for ket Street. The purpose son to Scottrade Financial Law Enforcement Servof this hearing is to solicit Services, Inc. at the below address. ices until March 23, public comments 2016 at 4:00 pm. pertaining to the 2015 Copies of the RFP are Consolidated Annual Per- A copy of the resolution for available at City Hall or formance and Evaluation voluntary liquidation may be inspected at Bouleon our website Report (CAPER) prior to va rd Ba n k a t 1 2 8 0 0 i t s submission t o t h e The City of Jennings Department of Housing Corporate Hill Drive, Des Peres, Missouri 6 3 1 3 1 , is requesting and Urban Development during regular business proposals for Grass (HUD). hours. Maintenance City own lots until March 11, Available for Review Filings of Claims Until 2016. Copies of the March 31, 2016 RFP are available at The 2015 Consolidated AnMr. Lawrence Connell City Hall or on our webnual Performance and Boulevard Bank site Evaluation Report (CA12800 Corporate Hill PER) will be available in Drive www. draft form for review by Des Peres, cityofjennings.org any interested citizen priMissouri 63131 or to submission to the AN EQUAL U.S. Department of Hous- Telephone: (314) 918-0076 OPPORTUNITY ing and Ur ban Filings of Claims After EMPLOYER Development on March March 31, 2016 7, 2016 at the City of St. Mr. Thaddeus Murphy Louis Central Library loScottrade Financial Servcat ed at 1301 Olive ices, Inc. Street. The draft report, including IDIS reports and 700 Maryville Centre Drive Saint Louis, LETTING #8604 the Financial Summary, Missouri 63141 will also be available for UPGRADE ATHLETIC FIELD review at the offices of the Telephone: (314) 965-1555 LIGHTING IN Community Development CARONDELET PARK Administration located at 1520 Market Street, Suite Sealed proposals will be 2000. Copies of the CAPreceived by the Board of ER report may be downPublic Service in Room loaded from the City of 208 City Hall, 1200 MarS t . L o u i s w e b s i t e at ket Street, St. Louis, Mo. https://www.stlouis-mo.goUnt il 1: 45 PM, CT, on v/government/department MARCH 29, 2016, then s/ communit y- developpublicly opened and read. ment/documents/index.cf Public & Self Storage 9003 Plans and Specifications m. may be examined on the "In accordance with the Board of Public Service Written Comments provisions of STATE websit e http://www.stlThe views of citizens, pub- LAW, there being due bps.org/planroom.aspx lic agencies, and other in- and unpaid charges for ( B P S O n L i n e P l a n which the undersigned Room) and may be purt er est ed par t ies are st r ongly encour aged. is entitled to satisfy an chased directly through owner and/or manag- the BPS website from INW r i t t e n comment s o r DOX Services at cost plus suggestions may be ad- er's lien of the goods s t o r e d a t t h e U n c le shipping. No refunds will dr essed t o Ms. Alana G r e e n , D i r e c t o r o f Bobís Self Storage loca- be made. tion(s) listed below. Administration, A pre-bid conference for Community Development And, due notice having Administration, 1520 Mar- been given, to the own- all contractors bidding on this project will be held on ket, Suite 2000, St. Louis, er of said property and all parties known to M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 6 at MO 63103, or via e-mail claim an interest 10:00 A.M. in Room 208 at G r e e n A @ st louistherein, and the time City Hall. mo.gov. specified in such notice for payment of such Bidders shall comply with Other Information having expired, the all applicable City, State and Federal laws (incluPersons with special needs goods will be sold at ding MBE/WBE policies). or accommodations relat- public auction at the b e l o w s t a t e d ing to handicapped location(s) to the high- All bidders must regard accessibility or foreign Federal Executive Order language should contact est bidder for cash or otherwise disposed of 1 1 2 4 6 , " N o t i c e o f Ms. Green via email at on WEDNESDAY, March R e q u i r e m e n t f o r GreenA@ stlouis-mo.gov 16, 2016 @ 10:45 a.m. Affirmative Action to Enor by phone at (314) 657301 MERAMEC sure Equal Employment 3844 or (314) 589-6000 STATION RD. Opportunity", the "Equal (TDD). Interpreting servBALLWIN, MO 63021 Opportunity Clause" and ices are available upon (636) 207-5934 the "Standard Federal request for persons with h e a r i n g d i s a b i l i t i e s . "In accordance with the Equal Employment SpeciInterested parties should provisions of STATE fications" set forth within contact the Office on the LAW, there being due and referenced at www. Disabled at (314) 622and unpaid charges for s t l - b p s . o r g 3686/voice or (314) 622 which the undersigned (Announcements). 3693/TTY. is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or managC D A is an equal er's lien of the goods opportunity agency s t o r e d a t t h e U n c le (employer). Minority par- Bobís Self Storage locaticipation is encouraged. tion(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to Request For Proposals claim an interest (RFP) therein, and the time DeSoto Public School specified in such notice District No. 73 f o r p a ym e nt of such having expired, the The Board of Education of goods will be sold at the DeSoto Public School public auction at the District No 73 is requestb e l o w s t a t e d ing proposals from insurlocation(s) to the high- ance carrie rs for the est bidder for cash or employee benefits packotherwise disposed of age including Health, on Wednesday, March Dental, Voluntary Vision, 16th, 2016 @ 9:45 am. Life In s u ra n c e a n d 3535 Lemay Ferry Rd. S upplementary Benefits "In accordance with the St. Louis, MO 63125 for the District, beginning provisions of STATE (314) 845-5933 J u l y 1 , 2 0 1 6 . B id LAW, there being due p ro p o s a l s mu s t b e and unpaid charges for received electronically via which the undersigned "In accordance with the email on or before March is entitled to satisfy an p r o v i s i o n s o f S T A T E owner and/or manag- LAW, there being due and 1 5 , 2 0 1 6 . S end all proer's lien of the goods unpaid charges for which posals to our broker of record, Hovis & Associs t o r e d a t t h e U n c le the undersigned is Bobís Self Storage loca- entitled to satisfy an own- ates, using the email of tion(s) listed below. er and/or manager's lien davidhovis@ hovisandasAnd, due notice having of the goods stored at the sociates. c o m . All bid been given, to the own- Uncle Bob’s Self Storage quotations will be considered as final and not suber of said property and location(s) listed below. all parties known to ject to change or correcAnd, due notice having claim an interest been given, to the owner tio n . Th e Bo a rd o f therein, and the time of said property and all Education reserves the specified in such notice parties known to claim an rig h t to w a ive a n y f o r p a ym e nt of such interest therein, and the technicalities, reject any having expired, the or all bids, and accept time specif ied in such goods will be sold at the bid which in its opinion not ice f or payment of public auction at the such having expired, the is most beneficial for the b e l o w s t a t e d goods will be sold at pub- School District and its emlocation(s) to the high- lic auction at the below ployees. est bidder for cash or stated location(s) to the otherwise disposed of highest bidder for cash or o n TUESDAY, Mar ch otherwise disposed of on 15th, 2016 @ 9:30 a.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1600 Woodson Road 16th, 2016 @ 10a.m. St. Louis, MO 63114 6557 Manchester Rd. 314-569-4237 St. Louis, MO 63139 314-646-1107 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Emergency Cache Inventory & Assessment

ATTENTION ALL GENERAL CONTRACTORS

2015 Nissan Quest 4 Left! #94002SL $23,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

C3

STLTODAY.COM

E-bid for St. Louis Community College on Bid Proposal No. B0003521 for a contract for Worker's Compensation Claims Administration & Loss Control Services will be received until 3:00 P.M. (lo c a l t i m e ) on Fr iday, March 25, 2016 at the Dept. of Purchasing, 300 So. Broadway, St. Louis, MO 63102, and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be accessed on our website at www.stlcc. edu/purchasing or call (314) 5395225. EOE/AA Employer.

5005

Lab pups, black, yellow & chocolate: AKC, OFA, blocky, Golden Retriever Pups, AKC, OFA, blocky, Labradoodles & Golden doodles, mini sizes. Shots wormed, guar., bred for looks, disposition/ hunting ability. Ready now & thru Winter. 618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com Labradoodles, F1 & F1B series. All colors, & all sizes. Shots wormed, guar., bred for looks, disposition/ hunting ability. Ready now & thru winter. 618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com

E-bid for St. Louis Community College on Bid No. B0 0 0 3 5 1 2 for a contract for Assorted Food Products for Resale will be received until 3 :0 0 P.M. (local time ) on Tuesday, March 2 2 , 2 0 1 6 at the Dept. of Purchasing, 3 0 0 S o. Broadway, St. Louis, MO 6 3 1 0 2 , and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be accessed on our web sit e at w w w .st lcc. e d u / p u r c h a s i n g or call (31 4 ) 539-5225. EOE/AA Employer

East-West Gateway is seeking submittals from a consultant to conduct an inventory and assessment of emergency response cache equipment and supplies. Submittals are due no later than 1:00 p.m. on March 30, 2016. Submit t al det ails and specifications can be obtained at www. ewgateway.org or by calling 314421-4220 ext. 263.

Webster Groves School District Is seeking a General Contractor for the Webster Groves School District; S t e g e r Elementary A D A Upgrades. Request for Proposal submissions are due at the W e b s t e r G r o v e s School District Administration Building, Attention Mr. Robert Steuber, WGSD C P M no later than 2:00pm on March 24th 2016 at the Central Office Board Room 400 E . L o c k w o o d A v e ., Webster Groves, MO, 63119. The RFP will be a v a ila b le online @ www.webster.k12.mo.us , (under RFP heading) March 7th, 2016. The owner reserves the right to reject any and or all proposals

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT Accepting RFP's for: "Annual Auditing Services" To receive RFP: susandawson @wsdr4.org or posted on http:// wentzville.k12.mo.us Departments/Business/Pu rchasing RFP's due Friday April 1, 2016 3:00 PM CST

Today’s Classified section:

Stuff. Homes. Rides. Jobs. In print and online.

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/ classiieds


Classified

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M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

MARCH 2, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito SUPERSTORE

Convenient Saturday Service

=

% APRFOR 60 MONTHS PLUS $2,000 BONUS CASH 0 ON 2015 FORD F-150 XLT 302A PACKAGE A BOMMARITO EXCLUSIVE

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE =

++

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW FORD PURCHASE! 2016 FORD F-150 REG. CAB XL

2015 FORD EDGE SE

0

%

30**

APR AVAILABLE

$ BUY UY OR FOR

20,977

*

MPG

$ UY BUY OR FOR

2015 F-150 SUPER CAB XL

0%

0

%

APR FOR

APR AVAILABLE

23,977

60 MONTHS

$

*

BUY Y FOR R

23,977

*

*Sale Price Includes $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 F-150 Bonus Cash Cerificate Program, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $1,450 Retail Customer Cash, $750 Edge Bonus Cash Cerificate Program. $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $2,250 Retail Customer Cash, $750 F-150 Bonus Cash Certificate Program, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2015 FORD FIESTA S

2015 FORD FOCUS S

2015 FORD FUSION

0

%

BUY UY FOR OR

11,977

*

0

APR AVAILABLE

$ 37

MPG**

BUY UY FOR OR

12,977

*

37

MPG**

*Sale Price Includes $2,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $1,200 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2016 FORD FUSION S 0% APR FOR

2016 FORD ESCAPE S 0% APR FOR

PLUS $2,000

PLUS $2,000

60 MONTHS

UY BUY OR FOR

17,977

*

37**

MPG

*Sale Price Includes $2,000 - "Get Into The New" Special Retail Trade-In Assistance Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

BommaritoADVANTAGE SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - COLLISION REPAIR Police And Fire Department Discounts - Union Labor Discounts

0%

APR AVAILABLE

6,500

* TOTAL SAVINGS OFF MSRP

$ 30 Available

*Sale Price Includes $2,250 - 2015 Fusion SYC & Sound National Discount Package, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2015 FORD MUSTANG V6

60 MONTHS

TRADE ASSISTANCE

$

MPG**

%

APR AVAILABLE

$

33

AUTOMATIC

TRADE ASSISTANCE

18,977

$ UY BUY OR FOR

*

30**

MPG

*Sale Price Includes $2,000 - "Get Into The New" Special Retail Trade-In Assistance Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

21,977

$ BUY FOR

*

28

MPG**

*Sale Price Includes $900 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

$500 More ForYourTrade If GivenThe Opportunity Saturday Service 2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations (NO EXTRA CHARGE) Nitro InTheTires For LongerTire Life (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ASK YOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE DETAILS. ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE) Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS" We Are

636-346-9640

A Union Shop

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675 Dunn Rd. - AT THE BIG CORNER I-270 & N. LINDBERGH *Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. See dealer for details. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 3/31/16. See dealer for qualifications and complete details. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. 0% APR Financing available in lieu of any other offers or discounts. See dealer for details. **Highway miles. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Ford purchase. =0% apr for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed. Special financing in lieu of any other offers or discounts. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/31/16.

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES

The NISSAN NISS SS Store

www.bommaritoford.com

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito NISSAN

Missouri’s

NISSAN Dealer!

17 Cons Consecutive Years††

SUPERSTORES 0 % APR

0 % APR

72**MOS.

72**MOS.

AVAILABLE FOR

AVAILABLE FOR

ON ALL

ON ALL

NEW NISSANS

NEW NISSANS

ENDS MON., MARCH 7TH AT 9PM

ENDS MON., MARCH 7TH AT 9PM

2015 NISSAN SENTRA SV

2015 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S

BACKUP CAMERA, PUSH TO START, SATELLITE RADIO MSRP $19,335

CRUISE CONTROL, POWER SEATS, BLUETOOTH MSRP $24,125

60 AVAILABLE

65 AVAILABLE

$

ENDS MON., MARCH 7TH AT 9PM

2016 NISSAN ROGUE

2015 NISSAN PATHFINDER

BACKUP CAMERA, CRUISE, SATELLITE RADIO MSRP $24,140

ALLOY WHEELS, PUSH TO START, SEATING FOR 7 MSRP $30,885

30 AVAILABLE

25 AVAILABLE

$ $ $ , , , 15 900 17 900 20 900 24,900 †

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

Sentra Model #12115, Vin. #371912. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

Altima Model #13115, Vin. #480220. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

Rogue Model #22116, Vin. #617267. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

Pathfinder Model #21115, Vin. #708172. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

A

Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

ADVANTAGE

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE 2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations+ (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

Saturday 2 YEAR MAINTENANCE $500 More ForYourTrade If GivenThe Opportunity WITH EVERY NEW Service Service Loaner (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ASK YOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE NISSAN PURCHASE!+ DETAILS.

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2015 NISSAN’S “Award of Excellence”

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Bommarito NISSAN WEST 14747 Manchester Rd. BALLWIN, MISSOURI

BommaritoNissan.com

636-394-0330

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES

†Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. See dealer for details. ††Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration. Nissan North American, ‘98, ‘99, ‘00, ‘01, ‘02, ‘03, ‘04, ‘05, ‘06, ‘07, ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11, ‘12, ‘13, ‘14, ‘15 Calendar Year to Date results for Missouri. **0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. Special financing in lieu of rebates. Deferred payments on finance deals only. See sales consultant for details. *Bommarito advantage offer with every new Nissan purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 3/7/16.


WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016 • L

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

DRESSED-UP SANDWICHES BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The story goes that John Montagu was such an inveterate gambler that he did not want to leave the gaming tables even to eat. So he called for meat to be brought to him between two slices of bread; that way, he could eat at the table and keep his fingers clean, thus saving the cards. Montagu was more than just a dedicated gambler. He was also the 4th Earl of Sandwich. Two hundred and fifty years later, we still gobble up the gustatory creation that he created and that bears his name. Where would we be without the sandwich? How would culture be different? If nothing else, McDonald’s would never Recipes • Grilled Cheese With Apple and Walnuts (top), LGBT (above), Hot Roast Boeuf Sandwich and Shrimp Cocktail Salad Sandwich. PAGE L4

he beef about the beef — why the price is high DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I apologized to my editor. I was writing a story about stews, and after all I am on a budget. I picked up a couple of pounds of chuck roast, a pound and a half of veal stew meat and three pounds of lamb stew meat. The bill came to $65.20. Plus tax. And stews are supposed to be cheap. That is sort of the point of stew — it makes the most out of an inexpensive cut of meat. At least, theoretically inexpensive. As I thought about it, I realized that these tougher and less desirable cuts — chuck, round and shank, for instance — now cost what a couple of years ago you would spend for steak. I called an expert to find out why. T. Dean Pringle is an associate

professor of animal and dairy science at the University of Georgia. He agreed that “the price of all beef products has gone up very significantly in the last couple of years,” the result of what he called “a perfect storm” of conditions. Condition No. 1 was a drought across some of the biggest beefproducing states in the country, from Texas throughout the southeast. Condition No. 2 was a sharp increase in the cost of feed, which is to say corn, largely because of the demand to make the gasoline-substitute ethanol. “Those were the things that led farmers to market their cows, even though they may have been very productive cows,” he said. That’s productive cows, as in cows that produce more cows. A cow will typically have its first calf at the age of 2 and will then have six or eight more calves before it is slaughtered. But farmers were See NEMAN • Page L4

SEEDS OF HOPE WORKER SHARES RECIPE FOR TOSCANO KALE SALAD. PAGE L2

See SANDWICHES • Page L4

Mastering homemade teriyaki sauce BY J.M. HIRSCH Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Some ingredients for teriyaki sauce (from back left): Sesame oil, ground ginger, garlic powder, rice vinegar and Sriracha hot sauce.

If you’re still using teriyaki sauce from a bottle, you’re doing it all wrong. And you’re depriving yourself of the awesomeness that is homemade teriyaki. I didn’t set out to master DIY teriyaki sauce, but my 11-year-old suddenly started craving the stuff. Not even sure where he ate it that it was so good to inspire almost nightly requests for it. But knowing how simple this potent sweet-savory sauce is to make, I refused to buy it. It took a few attempts, but eventually I nailed an incredibly versatile and delicious version. And by versatile, I mean I slather it on whatever protein I have on hand — chicken, steak, pork or salmon.

Two recipes • The sauce with four ways to use it. Then, just for fun, a slow cooker version of the chicken. Because the only thing better than a delicious chicken teriyaki is a delicious chicken teriyaki that practically cooks itself. PAGE L5

CHARCOAL HOUSE’S GREEK-STYLE SLAW USES OIL FROM FAMILY’S GROVE. PAGE L3 LET’S EAT

We went to southern Italy to bring back authentic pasta, sauces, olive oil, breadsticks, limoncello, wine and more.

Mangia! Pick up our new spring magazine for more about Taste of Italy!

1 M

Win a Fiat® or a Trip to Italy Details at

schnucks.com/Italy ©2016 Schnucks


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 03.02.2016

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 JODY MITORI assistant managing editor/features • jmitori@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8240 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Afordable California pinot noir

Welch’s Fruit ’n Yogurt Snacks

BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

Welch’s new Fruit ’n Yogurt Snacks ofer the classic, sweet taste of yogurtcovered raisins in a portion-controlling 80-calorie snack pack. They can’t stop me from eating more than one package, unfortunately. Choosing between cherry, blueberry and strawberry flavors is the only decision you’ll have to make, but I say just buy them all. Size • 6.4 ounces — 8 (0.8-ounce) packs Price • $2 Available • Major drug and grocery stores

It’s very difficult to find good quality pinot noir wines for less than $15. Top-quality pinot noir costs more because these wines are expensive to make. The grapes are hard to grow and require a great deal of hard labor. Since I’m always on the hunt for pinot noir deals, I promptly bought a bottle of the popular Meiomi Pinot Noir, which usually retails for about $20, when it was on sale at Starrs. It’s compared below with another well-regarded California wine, the Sean Minor Four Bears Central Coast Pinot Noir.

MEIOMI 2014 PINOT NOIR FROM CALIFORNIA Bought • Starrs, 1135 South Big Bend Boulevard, in February for $15.07 Description • The winemaker for this pinot noir is Joe Wagner, son of Chuck Wagner of Caymus Vineyards fame. A blend of grapes from vineyards located in Monterey, Sonoma and Santa Barbara counties, the Meiomi is a rich, mediumbodied wine that tastes of sweet red berries and dark fruit. It’s round, soft and spicy with subtle notes of vanilla from oak aging. This pinot noir would pair with white meat and salmon.

SEAN MINOR 2014 FOUR BEARS CENTRAL COAST PINOT NOIR Bought • Starrs, 1135 South Big Bend Boulevard, in February for $13.99 Description • Although much lighter in both body and color than the Meiomi, this 100 percent pinot noir is very true to the grape’s characteristics. An aromatic and flavorful wine, this pinot noir tastes of red berry fruit and spice. It’s an earthy wine that has a refreshing acidity. This pinot noir can be enjoyed as an aperitif wine or with light entrees.

— Alex Siegman

PREP SCHOOL

Crisp, delicious baked bacon We may be a divided country in many ways, but one thing unifies us: bacon. But frying it in a skillet, though delicious, makes it even fattier. Daniel Neman shows how to lose some of those calories and still wind up with crisp, delicious bacon by baking it in your oven. The cleanup is a snap, too.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

WHAT’S COOKING

Seeds of Hope worker touts value of healthy, fresh food

before graduate school when I lived in Berkeley, right in the gourmet ghetto, and I waitressed at a vegan restaurant, Café Gratitude. I learned about fresh foods, nutrition, macrobiotics — it was all raw foods, but I learned a lot.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-Dispatch

When California transplant Deidre Kelly landed her dream job in St. Louis at Seeds of Hope Farm in Spanish Lake, the young social worker combined three things she loves. “I work with kids, plants and nutrition,” she says. The farm is part of the Community Action Agency of St. Louis County, which increases access to affordable fresh food to people of all different economic backgrounds. The kids, teenagers from the Spanish Lake community, work in a job-training program Kelly directs at the farm during the summer. They not only seed, weed and harvest the bounty of the farm, but they also sell the produce at the Schlafly Farmers Market. Each month, they join with teens from Earthdance Farms and gather to cook and eat a community meal. Operation Food Search partners with them to teach nutrition, culinary arts, knife skills, cooking and more. Along with food and cooking knowledge, Kelly and her cohorts at Seeds of Hope teach leadership, job competency, public speaking and building community — life skills that propel teens to succeed far beyond their internships. How did you get involved with food and farming? There isn’t one “aha” moment I can trace it back to, but my decision to attend the University of California at Santa Cruz, home to an amazing farm, definitely set things in motion.

DEIDRE KELLY Age • 28 Family • Parents Dee Ann and Michael Kelly; sister Erin Kelly Occupation • Social worker; director of youth programming at Seeds of Hope Farm Neighborhood • Tower Grove South

How about cooking? I didn’t grow up cooking fresh from scratch. As a freshman, I got into an upper level poetry class. The professor invited my class to his home to cook dinner and read poetry one evening. He handed me some garlic and said “Can you mince this?” I didn’t know where to start, didn’t know the first thing about cooking, but others showed me how to do it. How did you learn? I’m selfeducated. I made recipes from cookbooks. I loved flipping through an actual book where the recipes were tested as opposed to finding recipes on the web. The biggest influence was probably the time just

Do you follow a vegan diet? I’m not vegan or vegetarian, but I don’t eat meat often. I’ll use beans, tempeh and quinoa in combination with vegetables. My friends and I play a game of cooking meals where everything is locally grown — bacon from local sources, eggs from Earthdance, kale, sage and garlic from Seeds of Hope — it’s fun and challenging. What’s your current challenge? We’re currently recruiting partners for our community supported agriculture shares at the farm. We have a tiered pricing system – one for sponsors and one for low-income people in Spanish Lake. Sponsors pay $28 dollars a week, eight dollars over the share cost. Those with less cash pay $12 a week. We accept EBT (electronic balance transfer food assistance, formerly food stamps) from our clients, which allows them to buy fresh, affordable healthy food in what is essentially a food desert with few quality stores and limited access to quality food. We need to find more sponsors. • For more information, contact Seeds of Hope Farm (seedsofhopefarm.org) via email to Gabriel Hahn, farm manager. ghahn@caastlc.org

SEEDS OF HOPE TOSCANO KALE SALAD Yield: 6 servings 1 bunch (approximately ½ pound) Toscano kale (see notes) 8 ounces store-bought prepared polenta ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided ¼ cup toasted sunflower seeds ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt (or mayonnaise) 1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 whole garlic cloves peeled and minced fine 2 teaspoons prepared whole grain Dijon mustard ½ cup coarsely grated Parmesan cheese Salt and pepper to taste Notes: Toscano kale is a mild dark kale also known as Tuscan, dinosaur, lacinato, black or palm tree kale. The color is a very deep green and the texture is often called pebbly. Kelly used baby kale for the salad pictured. 1. To rinse baby kale, fill a clean sink with cool water, submerge leaves and swish. Drain the water and repeat. Dry the greens in a salad spinner or towel. If using mature kale, fold leaves in half and slice along the rib to remove. Tear prepared kale into bite-sized pieces and set aside. 2. Cut the store-bought polenta into cubes the size of croutons, ½- to 5/8-inch square. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat and fry until the outside is crispy and lightly browned. Remove and set aside. 3. Toast the sunflower seeds until lightly browned in a dry, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat or in the oven. 4. To make the dressing, combine remaining ¾ cup olive oil with yogurt, lemon juice, minced garlic and Dijon mustard. Whisk to blend. 5. Place kale in a large bowl and top with Parmesan cheese and toasted seeds. Add dressing and toss. 6. Plate the salads and top with equal portions of polenta cubes. Taste, and if needed, add salt and pepper. Per serving: 358 calories; 36g fat; 10g protein; 6g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 2g fiber; 475mg sodium. Adapted from a recipe in “The Forest Feast” by Erin Gleeson

WANT TO BE IN WHAT’S COOKING? Send your favorite recipe (or nominate a friend or relative), plus your name, address, email and telephone number to: abertrand@post-dispatch.com or What’s Cooking, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 North Tucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

FOOD FEEDBACK We love hearing from our readers. Here are a few of your latest helpful comments and questions. »» MARY ANN MOORE, of Eureka, on our column about the regional explosion of great artisanal bread: My choice would have been Red Guitar Bread. Have you tried his pizza? »» CHRISTOPHER COOK, of O’Fallon, Mo.: ”Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day,” by Jef Hertzberg, is a game changer for home bakers. »» ROBIN GRAY: Why didn’t you include Bridge Bread in this article? Major fail! »» STEVE HENNEMANN, on the recipe for German-style cut green beans served at the Lemp Mansion: Canned green beans?

DINNER IN 25 MINUTES

New take on shrimp seasoned with sumac BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Just when it seems you’ve done shrimp every which way, along comes a recipe that proves otherwise. In this case, you give the shrimp a quick, bright marinade, then skewer them so they cook evenly. We’ve added the elegant, salty punctuation of salmon roe here, but the dish is fine without it. You’ll need medium-length thin metal or bamboo skewers. Ground sumac lends citrusy notes and color here; the spice is available at Mediterranean markets, spice stores such as Penzeys and an ever-growing array of supermarkets. Serve with a salad of thinly sliced fennel.

SHRIMP WITH SUMAC, CILANTRO, LEMON AND GARLIC Yield: 4 servings 2 lemons 5 cloves garlic 1 bunch cilantro 6 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons ground sumac Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 ¾ pounds raw jumbo shrimp, peeled (preferably tail-on) and deveined 1 tablespoon salmon roe, for garnish (optional) 1. Rinse the lemons and pat them dry. Use a Microplane grater to zest 1 of them over a small bowl; this will be for a garnish. Cut both lemons in half and squeeze their juice into a mixing bowl. 2. Peel the garlic cloves, then cut them into slivers; add to the bowl. Finely chop the leaves and tender stems of the cilantro; add to the bowl. Stir in the oil, then add the ground sumac and a generous pinch each of the salt and pepper; stir vigorously until well blended. 3. Add the shrimp and turn to coat; let them sit for 10 to 15 minutes, turning a few times. 4. Heat a large griddle over medium-high heat. Once it’s hot, thread each shrimp onto a bamboo skewer, going through the tail end (right where the meat of the shrimp starts) and through the body, so the shrimp remains straight as it cooks. Cook, in batches as needed, for 1½ to 2 minutes on each side, until lightly charred and just opaque. Discard any remaining marinade. 5. Serve warm or at room temperature, garnished with the lemon zest and the salmon roe, if using. Per serving: 220 calories; 40g protein; no carbohydrates; 6g fat; 1g saturated fat; 320mg cholesterol; 370mg sodium; no fiber; no sugar Adapted from “Persiana: Recipes From the Middle East & Beyond,” by Sabrina Ghayour


LET’S EAT

03.02.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

CHARCOAL HOUSE COLESLAW

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUESTS

Yield: 12 servings 1 small head green cabbage ½ carrot 6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 2 teaspoons salt ½ cup extra-virgin Kalamata olive oil

Charcoal House Coleslaw uses olive oil from family’s own grove

1. Cut cabbage in half, then each half into thirds. Push pieces through a rotary grater (the large holes of a standing grater work, too), including the core but discarding heavy outer leaves. 2. Push carrot through grater, lengthwise not crosswise for longer pieces. 3. Combine grated cabbage and carrot with lemon juice, sugar, salt and olive oil. 4. Can be made ahead of time; the slaw gets better over time. Per serving: 121 calories; 9g fat; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 1g protein; 8g carbohydrate; 6g sugar; 2g iber; 410mg sodium; 43mg calcium. Recipe adapted for home kitchens by the PostDispatch.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

BY ALANNA KELLOGG special to the Post-dispatch

TO REQUEST A RECIPE Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name to reciperequest@postdispatch.com.

Q • My wife is nuts about the slaw at the Charcoal House in Rock Hill. — Alan J. Steinberg, Creve Coeur A • Quick, now. Name the St. Louis restaurant that imports olive oil from its very own olive grove near Kalamata, Greece. The Charcoal House, you say? Good answer. Restaurateurs George and Steve Angelos came to the U.S. from their homeland as young men but remember a time when horse-driven stone mills were employed during the olive crush. Today other family members tend the olive grove while the brothers preside over the restaurant they’ve owned for almost 40 years, a destination for hand-cut char-broiled steaks, fresh seafood and courtly service.

CHARCOAL HOUSE

9855 Manchester Road, Rock Hill 314-968-4842; charcoalhouse.us “It’s real cozy and warm here,” George Angelos says, surveying couples and businesspeople talking quietly over lunch. At night, candles cast light off the white tablecloths. People like that Old World touch, he says. “You don’t find many restaurants like ours anymore.” Maybe it’s the cocktails, which Angelos calls the best drinks in the county, especially the vodka martinis. Think icy cold glasses dipped into crystallized ice. Think free pours. Think jumbo olives hand-stuffed with rouquefort. No wonder guests often snap a photo. Angelos says that the Charcoal House’s Greek-style slaw is popular at lunch, especially during Lent when guests often pair it with a fish

sandwich, fresh sole broiled or fried on toasted rye. Angelos’ sister Olga Salas works in the Charcoal House kitchen and prepares fresh soup every day, ham and bean, chicken noodle and more. “Everything is fresh here,” she says. “No heavy stuff; we are very healthy eaters.” In Greece, Salas says, this coleslaw would be served in the summer. “We make it with the right ingredients, our good olive oil, fresh lemon juice.” She insists on starting with a small head of green cabbage. “Big heads are old,” she says. “We want smaller, fresher.” And she grinds the cabbage by hand, including the heart, in an oldfashioned rotary grater. “It comes out nice, like the snow.” Special Request is written by Town and Country resident Alanna Kellogg, author of the online recipe column KitchenParade.com and “veggie evangelist” at the food blog about vegetables, A Veggie Venture.

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LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

Roast beef sandwich gets a French lair SANDWICHES • FROM L1

have been so popular just selling ground meat patties on a plate. And we would never have known the extraordinary sensation of eating peanut butter and jelly on bread, quite possibly the closest mankind has ever come to achieving perfection. To celebrate the great gift that Montagu gave us, I decided to try new variations on classic sandwiches. Instead of a hot open-faced roast beef sandwich, I gave mine a French flair and made it easy to cook, too. I gussied up a traditional grilled cheese sandwich. I took the concepts of shrimp salad and shrimp cocktail and combined them. And instead of a BLT, I made an LGBT. That is to say a lettuce, guacamole, bacon and tomato sandwich — it’s just a BLT with guacamole and a trendy name. What difference could a little guacamole make? Quite a lot, actually. It entirely changes the sandwich’s complexion, providing a cooling counterpoint to the bacon’s smoky salt. The guacamole also adds more of the creaminess that is typically provided by mayonnaise, only it brings with it that wonderfully rich taste of avocados, the faint

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Wine and Dijon mustard are ingredients in the Roast Boeuf Sandwich.

bite of red onions and just a hint of garlic. It’s that garlic that is the secret to my guacamole, by the way. Usually when you use raw garlic, no matter how finely you mince it you still run the risk of swallowing an overpowering mouthful of garlic. But I was at a great Mexican restaurant in New York many years ago that eliminated that problem by putting garlic powder in their guacamole. I’ve

been using garlic powder ever since. For my next dish, I began with an American classic and then took a detour to France. I’m calling it a Hot Roast Boeuf Sandwich. At heart, it is still a hot, openfaced roast beef sandwich, a dish served at one time in every diner in America. The difference is in the cooking of the beef. Inspired by boeuf

bourguignon, I simmered the meat in red wine, which I mixed with Dijon mustard (after all, Dijon is in the dish’s native region of Burgundy). I added a bit of celery, somewhat more carrots for a touch of sweetness, and quite a lot of onions because I wanted it to be a beef and onion sandwich. The result is a familiar meal with a deliciously unexpected taste.

GRILLED CHEESE WITH APPLE AND WALNUTS

HOT ROAST BOEUF SANDWICH

Yield: 1 serving

Yield: 6 servings

2 slices bread ½ small apple, sliced 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1½ tablespoons chopped walnuts 1 ounce cheddar cheese, sliced or shredded 1 tablespoon butter

3 pounds boneless chuck roast Salt and pepper 1 cup dry red wine 1½ tablespoons Dijon mustard, divided 1 clove 1 rib celery, cut into 2-inch pieces

1. Spread the mustard on both slices of bread. Add cheese, apple and walnuts to one, and top with the other slice of bread. 2. Melt butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Cook the sandwich, turning once, until both sides are golden brown and the cheese has melted. Per serving: 470 calories; 31g fat; 13g saturated fat; 58mg cholesterol; 13g protein; 40g carbohydrate; 12g sugar; 3g iber; 688mg sodium; 261mg calcium. Recipe by Daniel Neman

LGBT Yield: 2 servings 4 slices bacon 1 ripe avocado 1 tablespoon red onion, chopped 2 tablespoons diced tomatoes Pinch garlic powder 1 wedge lime 2 tablespoons mayonnaise, optional 4 pieces bread, toasted 2 pieces lettuce 4 thin slices of tomato

SHRIMP COCKTAIL SALAD SANDWICH Yield: 3 servings ½ pound cooked shrimp, chopped ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon mayonnaise 2 tablespoons chopped celery 1 tablespoon chopped red onion 2½ tablespoons cocktail sauce, see note 6 slices white bread

1. Cook bacon until crispy. Drain on paper towels and set aside. 2. Peel and seed avocado. Mash in a small bowl until as smooth or chunky as you want. Stir in onion, tomatoes, garlic powder and lime juice, and season to taste with salt and pepper; add more garlic powder if desired. 3. Spread mayonnaise on toast. Layer with lettuce, tomatoes, guacamole and bacon, and top with other slice of toast. Per serving (with mayonnaise): 458 calories; 33g fat; 6g saturated fat; 16mg cholesterol; 11g protein; 35g carbohydrate; 5g sugar; 8g iber; 549mg sodium; 47mg calcium.

Note: You can use commercial cocktail sauce, but it will taste better if you make your own by mixing 1 tablespoon ketchup, 1 tablespoon chili sauce, ½ teaspoon prepared horseradish, ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce and ¼ teaspoon lemon juice. 1. In a medium bowl, stir together shrimp, celery and red onion. In a small bowl, mix together mayonnaise and cocktail sauce, and mix this with the shrimp. 2. Use this mixture to make sandwiches, adding lettuce and tomato if desired. Per serving: 408 calories; 23g fat; 3g saturated fat; 168mg cholesterol; 22g protein; 30g carbohydrate; 6g sugar; no iber; 1,200mg sodium; 114mg calcium.

Recipe by Daniel Neman

Recipe by Daniel Neman

Expect beef prices to decline NEMAN • FROM L1

under such financial stress that they were getting rid of cows that could still give them calves for years to come. But shouldn’t more beef on the market actually lead to lower prices, at least temporarily? According to Pringle, the answer is no. Two types of animals are turned into beef, he explained. Younger animals, aged from 16 to 22 months, are what we generally buy at retail stores and in restaurants. Older cows — from three to eight years old — are used for more industrial purposes, such as canned stock and dog food, though some of their meat is sold as ground beef. These grass-fed, older cows tend to be too lean for ground beef, so fat from younger cows is added to the mix to make the grind juicier and more flavorful. For these reasons, the price of beef has increased in the last couple of years, Pringle said. He added that he has not seen the less expensive cuts jump any faster than the more expensive ones, although experts are finding new ways to add value to some of the cheaper cuts. The tender flat iron steak, which was invented in the last several years, is actually cut from the otherwise tough and inexpensive chuck, he said. And now they have come up with something called a chuck eye steak, which is actually part of the rib-eye muscle that extends into the

shoulder, which is the chuck. That explains the high price of beef, even the cheaper cuts. But why was my lamb so expensive? “Lamb in general is going to be very high priced. One of the reasons for that is the domestic supply of lamb products. We don’t have a high demand for it, so as a result it is considered almost a delicacy or specialty product,” Pringle said. If few people want lamb in this country, few farmers want to produce it. That makes sense, even if it means one of my favorite types of meat is always going to be costly. The good news, Pringle said, is that the price of beef is expected to go down in the future. It may continue to rise a little before it peaks, but then “we may see it decline to the kind of prices that we remember from four or five years ago.” In 2015, the number of beef cattle in the country fell below 30 million for the first time since the early 1960s. But the number in 2016 is predicted to rise above that level as farmers keep more of their heifers to produce calves. The more calves there are, the more the price should drop. But don’t expect the change to be sudden, he warned. Except for the occasional twin, cows only have one calf a year. It will take a few years for a substantial difference to be seen at the supermarket. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 dneman@post-dispatch.com

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Devising the grilled cheese recipe was easy. Cheddar cheese goes particularly well with apples. Both apples and cheddar cheese go well with walnuts. I put it all together with bread, smeared on a little more Dijon mustard, which is also a good foil for the apples and cheese, and grilled it in a pan. It’s definitely a winner. I don’t see a reason to make an ordinary, boring grilled cheese sandwich ever again. Finally, I made my version of a shrimp salad sandwich. I chopped up cooked shrimp and stirred in a little mayonnaise (I don’t like too much in my shrimp or chicken salads). Then I made a batch of my own cocktail sauce — you could use a commercially available cocktail sauce if you want, but homemade is better — and stirred in just enough to flavor the mayo. The sandwich was intriguing and irresistible. The cocktail sauce gives it more bite than ordinary shrimp salad, and also more flavor. I am certain that John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, would approve. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces 1 medium onion, sliced thin 4 ounces mushrooms, halved or quartered 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish 6 slices toasted bread

1. Generously season the meat with salt and pepper. 2. Combine the wine with ½ tablespoon (1½ teaspoons) of the Dijon mustard and pour into a large slow cooker. Add the meat, clove, celery, carrots, onions and mushrooms and cook on low power until tender, about 8 hours. 3. While the meat cooks, mix together the mayonnaise, horseradish and remaining 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard. 4. When the meat is done, discard the carrots, celery and clove, if you can ind it. Remove any visible fat and slice the meat against the grain. Spread the horseradish-mustard sauce on the toast and portion out the meat, onions and mushrooms; these are open-faced sandwiches, so there is no top slice of toast. Pour some of the jus over each sandwich and serve. Per serving: 726 calories; 42g fat; 15g saturated fat; 224mg cholesterol; 58g protein; 19g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 1g iber; 369mg sodium; 69mg calcium. Recipe by Daniel Neman. Horseradish-mustard sauce recipe by Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken.

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LET’S EAT

L5 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TERIYAKI SAUCE Yield: 1 cup ¼ cup water ¼ cup low-sodium soy sauce ¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar ¼ cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 teaspoons Sriracha (or other hot sauce) 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground ginger

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 03.02.2016

HONEY-OREGANO PORK LOIN

Transform a dull pork loin with simple ingredients

Yield: 10 servings For the pork 4-pound center cut pork loin Kosher salt and ground black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons unsalted butter ¼ cup honey 3 tablespoon minced fresh oregano ½ teaspoon ground cayenne pepper ½ cup low-sodium chicken broth or stock For the sauce ½ cup sour cream 2 tablespoons harissa paste 1 teaspoon lime juice Kosher salt and ground black pepper

In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients and whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Per tablespoon: 20 calories; 1g fat; no cholesterol; 210mg sodium; 4g carbohydrate; no iber; 3g sugar; no protein. Chicken • Slice boneless, skinless chicken breasts into thin strips. Add them to the sauce, then refrigerate up to 24 hours. When ready to cook, set a wire rack over a rimmed baking sheet. Coat the rack with cooking spray. Arrange the chicken strips in an even layer on the rack, then set under the broiler on the oven’s middle shelf for 3 to 5 minutes, or until just starting to brown. Flip the chicken pieces, then cook for another 3 to 5 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the marinade into a small saucepan over medium-high and boil for 3 minutes. When the chicken comes out of the oven, drizzle the boiled marinade over the pieces. Pork • Substitute pork tenderloin, similarly sliced, for the chicken breasts above and follow the same method. Steak • Cut a 1 ½-pound lank steak against the grain into thin strips. Add to the teriyaki sauce and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. When ready to cook, heat a large skillet over medium-high. Add a couple tablespoons of canola, vegetable or sesame oil. When the oil is hot, use tongs or a fork to remove the steak from the marinade and add to the skillet. Cook for 2 to 4 minutes. You want it barely cooked. Add the marinade to the pan and bring to a simmer. Cook for 1 to 2 more minutes. Serve the steak and sauce over rice or noodles. Salmon • Arrange 4 salmon illets on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Brush each liberally with teriyaki sauce. Broil on the oven’s middle shelf for 1 to 2 minutes, then brush with additional teriyaki. Repeat this process 3 to 4 times, or until the salmon is just cooked and well glazed, a total of about 6 to 8 minutes under the broiler. Garnish with chopped scallions, sesame seeds or both.

SLOW COOKER CHICKEN TERIYAKI WITH CARROTS Yield: 6 servings 3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts ¼ cup all-purpose lour 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 tablespoon butter 1 pound carrots, trimmed and cut into 2-inch chunks 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped ¼ cup water ¼ cup low-sodium soy sauce ¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar ¼ cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 teaspoons Sriracha (or other hot sauce) 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground ginger Cooked white or brown rice 1. One at a time, dredge the chicken breasts through the lour to lightly coat. Shake of any excess. 2. In a large skillet over medium-high, heat the oil and butter until hot. Working in batches, briely sear the chicken breasts on both sides just until lightly browned, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer the chicken to a 4-quart or larger slow cooker. Add the carrots and onion. In a small bowl, mix together the water, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, Sriracha, garlic powder and ginger. Pour over the chicken and carrots, then stir to coat. Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 6 hours. 3. Serve the chicken and carrots over rice. Per serving: 550 calories; 15g fat; 170mg cholesterol; 710mg sodium; 46g carbohydrate; 3g iber; 13g sugar; 56g protein.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

grilled zucchini and onions, or sauteed spinach. Leftovers are very welcome, perfect when thinly sliced in a sandwich or chopped into stir-fried rice. The sauce is a simple blend of sour cream and harissa with a squeeze of lime juice. Harissa paste is a fragrant, spicy chili paste that’s a widely used ingredient and condiment in North African and Middle Eastern cooking. It varies from place to place but always includes hot chili peppers (usually smoked), garlic, olive oil and spices such as cumin, coriander, caraway and sometimes herbs. It also may contain tomatoes. Look for it in the grocer’s international aisle.

BY KATIE WORKMAN Associated Press

This is one of those recipes that makes you feel like a bit of a genius, because it’s so easy, requires so little active time, and tastes like you worked your little fingers to the bone. This is the pleasure of a few ingredients that play interestingly off one another, here providing a balance of sweet (honey), rich (butter), herby (oregano) and spicy (cayenne). Serve this with a salad and rice or another grain or starch of your choice. Other good accompaniments would be roasted tomatoes or peppers,

1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Use paper towels to pat dry the pork loin, then season it generously with salt and pepper. 2. Heat a heavy, oven-safe skillet over high. Add the oil and as soon as it is hot, add the pork and sear on all sides, turning it four times, for about 3 minutes per side, or until the outside is all nicely browned and a bit crusty. 3. Transfer the pork to a plate, pour of the remaining oil in the pan, then return the pan to medium heat. Add the butter, honey, oregano and cayenne. When the mixture starts to bubble (don’t let the honey burn) return the pork loin to the pan, roll the pork in the butter mixture, using tongs, even dipping the ends into the pan sauce. Place the pork in the middle of the pan and add the chicken broth. 4. Transfer to the oven and roast for 1 hour to 1 hour 20 minutes, or until it reaches 145 degrees at the thickest part. Turn the roast after the irst 30 minutes of cooking. 5. While the pork is cooking, in a small bowl mix together the sour cream, harissa, lime juice and salt and pepper, to taste. 6. Remove the pork from the oven and let sit for 10 minutes before thinly slicing. Serve with the sauce. Per serving: 450 calories; 29g fat; 120mg cholesterol; 360mg sodium; 9g carbohydrate; no iber; 8g sugar; 39g protein.

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L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 03.02.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable. West deals. NORTH ♠A K 8 6 4 ♥Void ♦A K 7 ♣A K 6 4 2 WEST EAST ♠J ♠Q 10 5 ♥A K Q 9 2 ♥J 5 3 ♦Q J 2 ♦10 9 6 4 3 ♣Q 10 9 3 ♣J 8 SOUTH ♠9 7 3 2 ♥10 8 7 6 4 ♦8 5 ♣7 5 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1♥ Dbl Pass 1♠ Pass 2♥ Pass 2♠ Pass 6♠ All pass Opening lead: Ace of ♥ North reasoned that East’s failure to raise hearts and West’s failure to rebid his heart suit marked South with at least four, maybe five hearts. Counting on South to also have four or five spades meant that North could cover all of South’s minor suit losers. This thinking led North to leap boldly (wishfully?) to slam. South was unaware of this brilliant reasoning and was nervously awaiting the sight of dummy. “Got anything?” he asked his partner, as West made his opening lead. The wonderful dummy gave South

some reason to hope. He saw that if he could develop dummy’s club suit and ruf a diamond, he’d have a chance. South ruffed the opening heart lead in dummy and cashed the ace of trumps. He then cashed the ace and king of clubs before leading a third club. East discarded a heart rather than ruff in front of South with his natural trump trick. He was worried that South might have a third diamond and would just discard it. South rufed, crossed back to dummy with a diamond to the ace and led another club. Again East discarded a heart as South rufed. Declarer led a diamond to the board’s king and ruffed dummy’s last diamond. South attempted to cross back to dummy with a heart ruff, but East over-ruffed and led a diamond. South ruffed in dummy, drew the last trump and claimed. The established club in dummy was the twelfth trick. Well done! (03/02/16)

Across 1 *Do in, old-style 6 Org. for Janet Yellen, with “the” 9 *Grocery line count 14 Suffix with Obama, once 15 One more than due 16 Judge’s determination 17 SeaWorld frolicker 18 Club selection factor 19 *Tiny biters 20 Phil who sang “Draft Dodger Rag” 21 Overlook, as a fault 23 With 38- and 52-Across, 1964 Bob Dylan song … or a hint to the answers to this puzzle’s starred clues

25 Sine, for example 28 Midtown Manhattan cultural attraction, for short 29 Bigger than big 31 GI address 33 Symbol of penance 36 Nutritional figs. 37 Make a run for it 38 See 23-Across 41 “Need ___ on?” 42 When Brutus struck 44 Make even slicker 45 Some refrigerators 46 Foot-long sandwich option 49 “See ya!” 51 5 for B and 6 for C 52 See 23-Across 56 Affair that led to Scooter Libby’s 2007 conviction, informally

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME March 2 WORD — HAREBELL (HAREBELL: HAIR-bel: A perennial plant with bellshaped blue or white flowers.) Average mark 23 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 37 or more words in HAREBELL? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — INFARCT raft naif rain fact rani faint rant fair rift fiat cairn firn cant franc cart frantic craft frit tarn anti train antic RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

58 Steering wheel option 59 *Gives off 62 You, impersonally 63 Number of strikes in a turkey 64 Lash of old westerns 65 Nabokov heroine 66 Canasta plays 67 *Answer to “Who’s there?” 68 Pro ___ (for now) 69 *“No more, thanks”

Down 1 ___-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 2 One of 20 in a book 3 How Buddhists strive to live 4 Connects with 5 Musical gift 6 N.J. town next to Palisades Park 7 Great Lakes tribesmen 8 How a daring quarterback may throw 9 2001 Sean Penn movie 10 Service with a bird logo 11 The “E” of 12-Down 12 Army fare, for short 13 1960s antiwar org. 21 Flop’s opposite 22 Place for a shot 24 “___ my wit’s end!” 26 “Colorful” folk duo

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ The unexpected occurs when dealing with a partner. This person will be there for you, but he or she tends to be high energy. You can handle it, though. Tonight: A friend goes out of his or her way for you.

If March 2 is your birthday • This year you are willing to change your direction, if need be. You could ind that you are perpetually evaluating your inances. If you are single, you could meet someone at any point this year. If you are attached, the two of you could encounter a certain amount of pressure in your day-to-day relating. Sagittarius can be pushy.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Share more of your feelings, and you will learn more information as a result. You might be jolted by some of what you hear. Tonight: Return calls irst.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Be willing to take a risk and break past a restriction. A nurturing associate or someone you ind to be quite soothing will make a big diference in how you feel. Tonight: Break out of your normal patterns. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★★ Relating to individuals and understanding their reactions could make all the diference. With more insight, you might not be so reactive. Your ingenuity will deine your successes or your failures. Tonight: Accept an invitation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Others seek you out. On one level, you might be overwhelmed, but on another level, you might be lattered. You are coming from a place of security, and you can handle the unexpected. Tonight: Decide who, where and when. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You know what you want to accomplish, and you have every intention of doing just that. An older relative or friend could send you a mixed message. Your determination could be tested. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ You might feel as if you are on cruise control until someone throws you a curveball. You will have to put out ire after another. You have the energy and the wherewithal to handle any problem. Defer to others, if need be. Tonight: Once more, you’ll show of your stuf.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ You can get past a problem if you relax and get past a inancial hassle. Your nerves could be frayed by recent events, which could continue. What you are learning is to expect the unexpected. Tonight: Trust yourself.

Puzzle by Adam G. Perl

27 River to the Missouri 29 Golf’s Aoki 30 Those, in Taxco 31 Touched down 32 “The Taming of the Shrew” setting 34 Rosemary, for one 35 Part of a Masonic symbol

39 40 43 47 48 50 52 53 54

Nouveau ___ Director Kazan Place of privacy “Obviously” 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup champs Reason to take off one’s hat “Hoarders” airer Third-stringers ___-France (region including

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0127

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You will get past a problem quickly because you are resourceful and open to new ideas. No matter which way you turn, you’ll see a situation diferently. Tap into your ingenuity to decide which way to go. Tonight: In the limelight. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Stay anchored, knowing that you have had enough change on the homefront. Though you might not be able to stop someone from being who he or she is, you can choose not to react in a negative way. Tonight: At home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ Reach out to someone you care about. You might be stunned by this person’s reaction, but you already know how unpredictable he or she can be. Know that more is coming down the pike toward you. Tonight: Zero in on what you want.

Paris) 55 Bikini blast, briefly 57 Target of blame 59 “Y”-sporting collegian 60 Antislip protection 61 Recipient of much Apr. mail 63 Texter’s “Didn’t need to know that”

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ You might be pushing too hard to get noticed. You could be in a position where you need to accept more of what is happening around you. Tonight: Burn the candle at both ends. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

03.02.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Woman’s secret past is revealed to let it go. Advice, please! — GUY WHO NEEDS ADVICE Dear Guy • You now see your fiancee clearly — warts and all. The problem with “falling in love” (what I define as infatuation) is that you don’t yet know who the person IS. Regardless of how your fiancee financed her education, she deserves respect for being honest with you. She has done as much as she can to improve her life. You must now ask yourself if you can see past her past, and if she is someone you would be happy spending the rest of your life with. Dear Abby • I met a guy named “Ryan” about 10 weeks ago. We hit it of right away. I admit I had a little crush on him. About a week after we met, he came out to a group of our mutual friends (me included) as gay. I’m very supportive of him, and it didn’t change anything between us at all. Over the last several weeks, we have grown to be best friends and continue to grow

closer and closer. Once I found out Ryan was gay, the rational and practical part of me took over and squashed the crush I had on him in the beginning. But now that feeling is coming back even stronger. I know our relationship can never be anything more than platonic. I guess I’m just asking how I can get over him while still maintaining our close friendship. — FRIEND ONLY, IN WASHINGTON, D.C. Dear Friend Only • It’s not easy to think rationally when emotions are involved. Ryan may have everything you want in a man, but he will not be a romantic partner for you. If spending time around him becomes too painful, you may have to put some distance between the two of you until you regain your emotional balance. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Napkin dispenser is taller. 2. Arm is moved. 3. Hat is larger. 4. Window is not as wide. 5. Counter is larger. 6. Hair bow is larger.

Dear Abby • My fiancee and I have known each other since high school. I was the “good kid” with honors and the right parents. She was considered trouble and didn’t have the best home life. Rumor had it that she moonlighted as a stripper our senior year, but I always blew it of as false. Fast-forward 12 years: I ran into her recently, and we decided to have dinner. I fell in love with her on that date. A few months went by and I mentioned the rumors. She wasn’t upset and matter-offactly explained that she did start stripping in high school and continued through college. It bothered me, but the benefits of being with her far outweighed the negatives. Now that we are engaged, she told me she had to “come clean.” She said there were times in college when she had sex with some of her regular clients. I am floored. She basically admitted she had prostituted herself. I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to blame her for her past indiscretions, but this is a big deal. I don’t know how

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Sister is starting to make own choices

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Carolyn • After being a self-described pushover and the person who gets dumped on in her family, my sister has started therapy and is finally making a noticeable efort to stand up for herself when asked to do things that inconvenience her. I’m really proud of her! However, I notice she often says she “can’t [visit a relative, spend money on our nephew’s fundraiser, etc.]” rather than, “I don’t want to,” or “I’m not interested in doing that.” I have encouraged her to be honest and tell me when she WON’T do something I ask, rather than hiding behind the implication that she wants to but can’t, but I’m not sure that’s working. I find it very passive-aggressive and not a meaningful improvement over what she was doing before. Should I just butt out, or can I somehow help her become more assertive? — Won’t vs. Can’t

Answer • Good for her for working against her old habits to form better ones. Now you need to do the same. You’re used to having say in her choices. Especially given her efforts to reclaim that say from everyone else, it’s only sporting to recognize the boundary between your business and hers in all of your dealings with her. So if she says she can’t do something, then she can’t — even if the longer version of “can’t” is simply, “I can’t say yes to this without risking a return to my old doormatty ways.” Dear Carolyn • For years my husband has not exercised on a regular basis. He now has high cholesterol and we have no sex life. He’s constantly glued to his cellphone and only works, day and evenings. He’s a good father to our kids but seems to have no clue when it

3/2/16

comes to himself, his health and the importance of exercise. I’ve given him articles, tried to set an example by walking places, going to the gym three to four times a week, but he never budges. Any advice? Should I contact his doctor? — S.

CBS 4

7:30

Survivor (N) (cc)

8:00

8:30

Hell’s Kitchen Dishes with limited ingredients. (8:01) (N)

9:00

9:30

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds: Derek. CSI: Cyber Python kidMorgan is abducted. (N) naps Avery’s daughter. (N) (cc)

NBC The Mysteries of Laura Law & Order: Special 5 (N) (cc) Victims Unit (N) (cc)

Answer • Prioritizing work and phone over spouse and health is not something a doctor can fix. While his high cholesterol is unfortunate, that is apparently just one side effect of his choices. (How can he be a good dad, I wonder, with his attention always phoneward?) Please talk to him — not about fitness, but about his center of gravity, which has moved away from his family and the outdoors and his own body. Note his absence, and ask for his presence again.

Chicago P.D. Halstead is faced with a robbery crew. (N)

PBS A Year in Space Inter- NOVA Neil Armstrong’s American Experience 9 national Space Station. achievements. (cc) USAF’s Project Man(N) (cc) high. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM/The Greatest Animal Com- MADtv 20th Annivermercials Countdown sary Reunion (cc) Pulse (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Mablean

Judge Mablean

ABC The Gold- The Real 30 bergs (N) O’Neals: Pilot. (N) (cc)

Murdoch Mysteries: Bloodlust. Murdoch hunts for a vampire.

Larry Rice Forensic Files (cc)

Modern The Real Family (N) O’Neals (cc) (8:31) (N)

American Crime Chris is at a crossroads. (N) (cc)

MYTV Law & Order: Excalibur. Law & Order Stockbro- Law & Order: Chal46 Jack McCoy’s job is ker’s death leads to a lenged. A man reunites threatened. battle. (cc) with his mother.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 03.02.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Vitamin levels don’t have to be checked FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk Dear Dr. Roach • Will a blood test reveal deficiencies in levels of vitamins D and C, magnesium, CoQ10, etc.? — D.S.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

Answer • Vitamin levels can be measured in the blood, but it is seldom necessary to do so. There are some exceptions. Vitamin D remains controversial, with most experts recommending checking vitamin D levels in people at risk for deficiency (including darkskinned individuals, those who seldom get sun exposure and people who take medications that interfere with vitamin D or who do not absorb it properly, such as those with sprue or inflammatory bowel disease). Many experts recommend vitamin D supplementation in healthy older adults, but it is still not clear whether this is necessary. Vitamin C is rarely deficient from diet (scurvy), but it can be seen in cases of severe malabsorption. CoQ10 is almost never measured outside of research settings. Magnesium deficiency is common in people taking diuretics. In general, vitamin blood levels are not necessary to check in healthy people. With the possible exception of vitamin D, most people with a healthy diet do not need vitamin supplementation.

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

Dear Dr. Roach • Why do we not see studies on plant sterols and stanols as a way of reducing cholesterol? I take a pill supplement, CholestOff, and also eat foods with plant sterols and stanols. Plus, I take fish oil and folic acid. My cholesterol decreased by 35 percent, and I no longer have to take a statin. My HDL is about 80. The sterol/stanols seem to work. — D.E.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Answer • Plant sterols and stanols can lower blood cholesterol, although most people will see a drop of about 6 percent to 15 percent rather than the 35 percent you saw. Plant sterols and stanols are better absorbed with fat, so they are often used in margarines, but can be used in pill form with lecithin, which helps absorption. The reasons doctors typically don’t recommend them are that there have not been any long-term safety studies. And although they do lower cholesterol, there isn’t any proof that they reduce risk of heart attack. There have been several medications that lower cholesterol but increase risk of adverse events. Reported side effects of plant sterol and stanol tablets include heartburn, nausea, constipation and erectile dysfunction in men. A statin drug is likely to have more efect on cholesterol, probably at lower cost, and with a similar low risk of side efects, yet has been proven to reduce heart attack in people at high risk for heart disease.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics