2.20.18

Scroll for more

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 02.20.2018 • $2.00

STD BATTLE FALLING SHORT

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CITY SEEKS NEW CONTRACTOR FOR TREATMENT

Dr. Sonny Saggar Critics say patients have complained that Saggar’s clinics are violating a city contract by charging fees and failing to routinely conduct screenings

ST. LOUIS • After four years of failing to improve the country’s highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea, the city is ending its emergency contract for handling the sexually transmitted diseases. Public health experts say the city health department has not done enough to provide free STD testing and treatment since 2013, when safety net provider ConnectCare closed. After the north St. Louis clinic’s closure, Dr. Sonny Saggar was quickly awarded a no-bid contract to provide free STD testing and treatment for people without insurance or who otherwise can’t pay at his Downtown Urgent Care and North See HEALTH • Page A4

The art of chess

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Bored with the usual pieces? Check out the CWE museum Trump offers support for background checks for guns

holds a set of 32 chess pieces. There’s everything from “Star Wars” to GI Joe to ancient Chinese pieces of art and a tournament set used by chess icon Bobby Fischer. The museum has built this diverse chess collection over more than 30 years, adding

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Inside the World Chess Hall of

Fame in the Central West End, there is a small room filled to the brim with more than 775 carefully labeled boxes. Most are plain on the outside, but each

See CHESS • Page A4

A few of the many chess sets on display at the World Chess Hall of Fame collection in St. Louis. These photo illustrations were made with a technique called photo stacking; multiple images were made with small changes in focus and then digitally combined.

Missouri county leads charge to privatize public defender system

EXHIBIT HONORS WWI ARMY HOSPITAL

BY CATHERINE LUCEY AND MARIA DANILOVA Associated Press

BY SKY CHADDE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. •

month, when poor people are charged with crimes in one southern Missouri county, a private attorney will represent them — even if they can’t afford it. That’s because the Missouri State Public Defender has decided to completely privatize Texas County. Starting March 1, if a defendant is deemed indigent, judges there will contract with private lawyers, with the state footing the bill, according to Michael Barrett, director for the public defender office. For years, the office has been underfunded, and its lawyers have dealt with heavy caseloads. The situation has led the ACLU

President Donald Trump offered support Monday for an effort to strengthen the federal gun background check system as he hunkered down at his private Florida golf course just 40 miles from last week’s deadly school shooting. Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the president spoke on Friday to Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican, about a bipartisan bill designed to strengthen the FBI database of prohibited gun buyers. “While discussions are ongoing and revisions are being considered, the President is supSee GUNS • Page A6

TODAY

73°/32°

J E F F E R S O N C I T Y • Next

AUSTIN STEELE • asteele@post-dispatch.com

Philip Skroska, an archivist at the Bernard Becker Medical Library, arranges an American flag Friday for an exhibit on U.S. Army Base Hospital 21. The flag flew at the hospital in France, which was an outpost run by Barnes during World War I, staffed by St. Louis volunteers. STORY • A5

St. Louis officers handing out candy

A knight’s tale

SHOWERS

38°/30° CHANCE OF RAIN

WEATHER B10

Rain brings region some relief

All together now

TOMORROW

2018 S60 T5

2018 XC90 T5

INSCRIpTION Lease for 39 months,

299

WEST COUNTY VOLVO CARS 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com

14410 MANcHESTER ROAD MANcHESTER, MO 63011

519

stk# 19225

1 M Vol. 140, No. 51 ©2018

MOMENTUM Lease for 39 months,

$

per mo*

• B1

2018 XC60 AWD

7 pASSENgER Lease for 39 months,

$

per mo*

• A14

‘Shib Sibs’ take bronze in ice dance

SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

• A2

• A6

Statue-toppling cases dismissed

First full-squad workout for Cards

See DEFEND • Page A4

459

$ stk# 19289

per mo*

stk# 19170

* Total due includes $2350 cap cost reduction, plus customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). Offer includes all Volvo incentives. S60 msrp $41175. Xc60 msrp $45515, Xc90 msrp $52395. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing though VcFS. Expires 2/28/18. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


M 1 TUESDAY • 02.20.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM COLORING CONTEST

GREAT TASTE 2018

UPCOMING CHATS

Is your kiddo an aspiring artist? Have them color our original Dan Martin drawing of Weatherbird and his pal the Schnucks soldier. stltoday.com/contests

Join us March 14 at the St. Louis Science Center for this year’s Great Taste, featuring nearly 50 area restaurants from the 2018 edition of Ian Froeb’s STL100. stltoday.com/ourevents

Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday: Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Wednesday: Sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz, 1 p.m. Thursday: Dave Matter on MU sports, 11 a.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

Retired judge Garvey is added to Greitens’ legal defense roster viding the tasting tunes. The festivities will be from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the American Czech Educational Center, 4690 Lansdowne Avenue.

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BAR TABS • The defense team for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has enlisted another Democratic lawyer to provide legal services. Jack Garvey, a retired St. Louis circuit judge and Democratic alderman, said he was hired last week to assist Greitens in an investigation by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Garvey Gardner. Gardner is looking into whether Greitens broke any laws during the extramarital affair he has admitted to having in 2015. While admitting to the affair, Greitens denied allegations that he took photographs and threatened to blackmail the woman if she talked of the relationship. The woman involved has declined to make any public statements. Garvey said he was hired to represent Greitens “personally,” and is not being paid by the state of Missouri. SHORT STORY • Because there are too many puns possible, let’s stick with the stripped-down version: Porn star Stormy Daniels will bring her club tour to STL in the flesh (just can’t resist) on April 6-7 at Country Rock Cabaret in Sauget. Daniels, who allegedly had an affair in 2006 with Donald Trump, announced additional tour dates Monday on Twitter. Trump’s attorney has acknowledged paying Daniels $130,000 just before Election Day 2016. SPOON FEED • When cultures collide, might as well grab a bowl and dig in. Organizers of the annual Czech Festival in south St. Louis are trying something new this year, on March 3, and it requires people to eat: Goulash vs. Gumbo Fest ’18. There will be three versions of goulash and three types of gumbo for tastings. Of course, slivovitz (plum brandy), becherovka (herbal/ginger liqueur) and Czech beer (beer) will be available for sipping and swigging. There even will be a battle of the bands, of sorts, with both the Zydeco Crawdaddys and the St. Louis Czech Express pro-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In 2007, Stormy Daniels arrives for the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. The porn star will appear in Sauget in April.

JEFFERSON BARRACKS COLLECTION

A metal helmet is embellished with painted images of the owner’s journey from the U.S. to the battlefields of France. The Mauritania, a troop transport ship, is depicted on the front of the helmet, a gift to Jefferson Barracks. A WWI exhibit will open there on March 3. Journalists Eric Mink (top left), Betsey Bruce, Frank Cusumano (bottom left) and John Auble will be honored on Wednesday.

WAR CORRESPONDENCE • History buffs and World War wonks will want to mark March 3 on their calendars to remind them of the opening of “Over There: World War I from Jefferson Barracks.” The exhibit will open its doors at noon at Jefferson Barracks County Park in south St. Louis County. Exhibit curator Mikall Venso said the new program “will take the visitor along the path our doughboys followed from the draft, to training camp, over the Atlantic Ocean to France, through the trenches and into battle.” For the opening weekend, Venso will conduct a special tour of the exhibit, starting at 2 p.m. Before the exhibit opens, local historian Edna Dieterle will speak at 11 a.m. Saturday at the visitors center about the war and its ties to the women’s suffrage movement. The exhibition is free and open to the public and will run until Dec. 20, Wednesdays through Sundays, from noon to 4 p.m. in the Old Ordnance Room Museum, 546 Bagby Road. MEDIA TYPE • The St. Louis Press Club is ready on Wednesday to regale four famous reporters and one legendary radio station. Betsey Bruce, who worked for more than 45 years at KMOV (Channel 4) and KTVI (Channel 2), leads the list. She was the first woman to report news locally on a daily basis and is the longest-serving television journalist in STL history. The reception begins at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Edward Jones Corporate North Campus in Maryland Heights. For information, call 314-449-8029, or go to club website, stlpressclub.org. Other honorees include KSDK (Channel 5) sportscaster Frank Cusumano; critic/editorial writer Eric Mink; late newspaper/television reporter John Auble; and KSHE-FM 94.7, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last year. The main speaker will be public television journalist Jim Lehrer, who will receive the club’s lifetime achievement award. Lehrer earned a journalism degree in 1956 from the University of Missouri. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS • St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards is hoping to sweeten relationships between police officers and the residents they serve by having cops hand out candy to kids while on duty. An anonymous donor is funding the effort, which began Monday, to equip all marked patrol cars and uniformed officers with candy, Edwards said. “For a long time children have perceived our police officers with a lack of respect,” Edwards said. “I’m really trying to close that gap by offering candy. “People ask me, ‘Why candy?’ It’s an opportunity for our officers to have a positive encounter with children.” Police Chief John Hayden announced the initiative in a tweet Sunday, saying “It’s the little things that often do the most good.” A police department spokeswoman

referred all questions to Edwards. Not everyone was tempted by the idea. The Ethical Society of Police, a police officers’ association that represents officers of color, tweeted: “Chief Hayden we know this was Judge Edwards idea to give candy to our kids, but how about SLMPD advocate for social workers in our Public Schools/Police Department, Deescalation Training.” Others tweeted various concerns about the idea. Edwards said he hasn’t seen the negative reaction because he doesn’t have social media accounts, but said he agrees with the need for more social workers and training. He also urged anyone with ideas on how to improve police and community relationships to contact him directly. “We’re not doing this to the exclusion of any of those other things,” he said. Though parents typically tell their children not to take candy from a

stranger, Edwards says he wants children to see uniformed officers not as strangers but someone to go to for help. “It’s a gesture I hope that the children that will receive the candy today will be like I was,” he said. “I would try to outrace all the kids on my block to get to a police car because I knew I would get bubble gum and a baseball card.” Edwards said he sees the candy distribution as an extension of the Operation Polar Cops initiative, in which police officers hand out ice cream from an ice cream truck. “We can’t give out ice cream when it’s 1 degree out,” Edwards said. He added the candy primarily consists of lollipops and other hard candy, and officers will only be handing out a few pieces per child at a time. “I don’t need parents calling me about their dental bills,” he quipped. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

Fergie defends sexy anthem

A slow, bluesy rendition of “The StarSpangled Banner” on Sunday wasn’t well received at Staples Center or on social media before the NBA All-Star Game. A low chuckle rumbled through the California arena after Fergie finished the first line with a throaty growl. Although Fergie was on pitch, her tempo, musical accompaniment and sexy delivery were not typical for a patriotic song. Fergie said in a statement Monday, “I’m a risk taker artistically, but clearly this rendition didn’t strike the intended tone. I love this country and honestly tried my best.” Commentator Charles Barkley joked he “needed a cigarette” after the performance. Gridiron Dinner to save Trump a seat • President Donald Trump plans to attend the annual Gridiron Dinner, a society affair he stayed away from last year. Gridiron President David Lightman said Monday that Trump would attend the 133rd dinner on March 3. Last year, Trump avoided a number of high-wattage staples, including the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. Opera musicians play in wrong key • Michael Fabiano was singing at the Metropolitan Opera when a key mix-up occurred. As the tenor began Rodolfo’s first act aria in Puccini’s “La Boheme” on Friday, it became clear the orchestra was playing in a different key. “ I said, oh, no, they can’t be doing this,” Fabiano said Monday. The Met is presenting Franco Zeffirelli’s production with four different lead tenors. When Russell Thomas sang the role, he opted for a version of “Che gelida manina! (How cold your little hand is!)” that was one half tone down and finished with a top B natural, as opposed to the original key, which ends in a top C, the Met music staff said. Puccini wrote both versions, and Fabiano prefers the higher key. But the orchestra’s sheet music never got changed.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actor Sidney Poitier is 91. Actress Sandy Duncan is 72. Model Cindy Crawford is 52. Actress Lili Taylor is 51. Singer Brian Littrell is 43. Comedian Trevor Noah is 34. Singer Rihanna is 30. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $246 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $185 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Monday: 02-14-41-44-47 Lucky ball: 16 LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1 million SHOW ME CASH Monday: 01-05-11-14-31 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $132,000 PICK-3 Midday: 405 Evening: 333 PICK-4 Midday: 0582 Evening: 5869

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Monday Midday: 09-15-16-32-43 Evening: 05-10-13-15-45 LOTTO Monday: 05-09-12-14-29-50 Extra shot: 07 Estimated jackpot: $5 million PICK-3 Monday Midday: 297 FB: 6 Evening: 668 FB: 9 PICK-4 Monday Midday: 9208 FB: 8 Evening: 3043 FB: 8

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • The name of Midland States Bank was incorrect Sunday in a Business story about inequities in mortgage lending.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Joe Holleman ........ A2 Letters to editor .. A12 People ................... A2

PEOPLE

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

Edwards hopes candy hits sweet spot with kids BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Times subject to change

Obituaries ........... A14 Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports .................... B1 Sports calendar .... B2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. B10

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.92, Sunday-Friday $9.10, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $7.09, Sat-Mon $6.16, Fri-Sun $6.16, Sun-Mon $5.62, Sat-Sun Only $5.62, Sunday Only $4.09. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 7/16/17, 8/27/17, 9/17/17, 9/24/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17, 12/3/17, 12/17/17, 12/24/17, 1/14/18, 2/18/18, 3/18/18, 4/15/18, 5/20/18, 6/24/18, 7/15/18, 8/26/18, 9/09/18, 9/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222 Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

314-340-8664 STLtoday.mycapture.com

Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

PRESIDENTS’ DAY Window Special!

• We are the full-service replacement window division of Andersen, and every window that we custom-build has to live up to their strict quality standards • Our window helps make homes more comfortable because our window material is much, much stronger than vinyl • To lock in this Presidents’ Day Special, call on or before Saturday, February 24th, and schedule your free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis Presidents’ Day Special ENDS Saturday, February 24th

Buy 1 window, get 1 window

40% OFF

1

PLUS

Take an additional

$200 OFF

your project1

PLUS

NO NO Payments

Interest

FOR 1 YEAR1

Call to schedule your appointment. Limited appointments are available.

1-314-720-3402 RbASTL.com

Offer not available in all areas. Discount applied by retailer representative at time of contract execution. Cannot be combined with other offers. Buy one window, get the second window, of equal or lesser value, 40% off. Discount applied to lowest priced window and/or door products in purchase. To qualify for discount offer, initial contact for a free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis must be made and documented on or before 2/24/18 with the appointment then occurring no more than 10 days after the initial contact. No payments and deferred interest for 12 months available to well qualified buyers on approved credit only. Not all customers may qualify. Higher rates apply for customer with lower credit ratings. Financing not valid with other offers or prior purchases. No Finance Charges will be assessed if promo balance is paid in full in 12 months. Renewal by Andersen retailers are independently owned and operated retailers, and are neither brokers nor lenders. Any finance terms advertised are estimates only, and all financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Renewal by Andersen retailers, under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements. Renewal by Andersen retailers do not assist with, counsel or negotiate financing, other than providing customers an introduction to lenders interested in financing.“Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are marks of Andersen Corporation. ©2018 Andersen Corporation.All rights reserved. ©2018 Lead Surge LLC.All rights reserved. 1


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

As far back as the Middle Ages, chess sets were meant to impress

Missouri House legislation would hand over public defender duties DEFEND • FROM A1

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

World Chess Hall of Fame assistant curator Emily Allred (left) and chief curator Shannon Bailey pose with a silver and copper enamel chess set and board from Hungary at the World Chess Hall of Fame this month. “They are all little works of art,” said Bailey. CHESS • FROM A1

considerably since it relocated from Miami to 4652 Maryland Avenue in St. Louis in 2011. “They are all little works of art,” said Shannon Bailey, chief curator at the museum. “And there’s cultural history. Chess sets can tell stories about history, they tell stories about war, about pop culture. It’s all there.” Bailey said as far back as the Middle Ages, chess sets were a staple in homes as decorative items meant to impress. “Chess sets have always been something people showed off,” Bailey said. “You don’t have to be a Grandmaster to appreciate them.”

A WIDE WORLD OF CHESS

The collection at the World Chess Hall of Fame ranges from the goofy to the strange, historic and beautiful. Most major pop culture phenomena are covered. There are sets for Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings with a detailed map of Middle Earth, the Flintstones, the Muppets, Hello Kitty, Babar the Elephant, Batman and “South Park,” just to name a few. Some of the collection’s sets play into chess’s traditional role as a game of war,

while others upend that expectation, said assistant curator Emily Allred. “We have a tea set that is also a chess set,” Allred said. “So you’ve got this game of strategy and war with these dainty, feminine pieces.” Other sets in the collection play into the war strategy of the game, like a Revolutionary War set that pits redcoats against the Minutemen, or a “Star Wars” set featuring the Jedi against the Sith. The sets also show how chess often became a promotional item, particularly throughout the 20th century, Allred said. That trend can be seen in the collection in several Coca-Cola sets, a set made entirely of Avon cologne containers and a large set made of bottles of whiskey. The collection’s sets range from the early 1800s to sets made in just the last few years, including a 3-D printed set, Allred said. Other fun themed sets among the 775 include a marching band set, Halloween and Christmas sets, and chess sets for most sports, including hockey, football and basketball. “We have a lot of really priceless sets,” Allred said. “And then some just make you smile.”

EXPLORING THE COLLECTION Visitors can look through some of the World Chess Hall of Fame’s permanent collection by visiting the museum or going to worldchesshof.org, but there are also a few upcoming shows that will feature pieces from the permanent collection. The museum will open an exhibition on April 17 about the history of the Staunton chess set, the classic set used in tournament play, titled “The Staunton Standard: Evolution of the Modern Chess Set.” The show will feature chess sets from the creation of the set in 1849 to today. The public will also be able to see some of the collection’s lighthearted pop culture sets in a display at St. Louis Lambert International Airport beginning on May 17. The World Chess Hall of Fame also features a different chess set from the community or its permanent collection in the museum and on its website every month. If you have a chess set you would like featured, send a photo and the story of the set to Emily Allred at emily.allred@ worldchesshof.org. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

GO TO STLTODAY.COM/WATCH FOR AN INTERACTIVE PANORAMA FEATURING THE CHESS BOARDS Use the + and - buttons to zoom in for more detail.

City-contracted clinics fell short on STD testing, treatment HEALTH • FROM A1

City Urgent Care clinics. The $200,000 contract has been renewed annually through June 2018. Data show that the clinics have diagnosed less than 1 percent of the city’s chlamydia and gonorrhea cases since 2014. Other STD care providers in the area said patients have complained that Saggar’s clinics are violating the contract by charging fees and failing to routinely conduct STD screenings, which involve physical exams and urine samples or genital swabs. Under the contract, the clinics are supposed to follow Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, which call for screening all women under age 25 and all gay men, among other high-risk groups, for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Dr. Will Ross, chairman of the Joint Boards of Health and Hospitals, which advises the city health department, told director Melba Moore in July 2017 that he was concerned that Saggar’s clinics were not routinely testing for STDs. “If that is true then that would be against the policy established by our contract ... if so I guess you will either sever the contract or rebid,” Ross wrote in an email obtained by the Post-Dispatch. Ross said he never received any followup from Moore about the email, and later recommended the city request proposals for the next contract. “Dr. Saggar received that contract from the city on an urgent need basis,” Ross said in an interview. “If the concerns were documented, or not documented, I thought it would be proper for the city to rebid.” Saggar denied that the clinics require fees and said they do perform regular testing. “We always test whoever comes in,” Saggar said. “We don’t have any mandatory charges. People have given donations in the past, but there’s nothing that’s required.” The sexual health page on Saggar’s website, which was recently taken down, states a $30 fee is required at check-in and STD testing and treatment are “totally free.” The page also states “you will be treated for the vast majority of infections in the community. We will not depend on, or await, testing for many infections

ST. LOUIS STDS The numbers of sexually transmitted diseases in St. Louis since two urgent care centers received city contracts to provide testing and treatment: Chlamydia Gonorrhea Syphilis

2014

2015

2016

3,996 4,042 4,039 1,548 1,964 2,369 82 171 210

2017

3,801 2,036 235

Sources: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

because these can be erroneously negative. Our goal is to reduce these infections in St. Louis to their lowest incidence in decades — and we are already succeeding!” The city’s chlamydia rate in 2016 (1,297 per 100,000 residents) was unchanged from 2013, and the gonorrhea rate over the same period increased from 551 per 100,000 residents to 750 per 100,000. For at least two decades, St. Louis has had the highest rates of the two diseases among U.S. counties and independent cities, according to the CDC. In 2016, Saggar’s clinics diagnosed 31 cases of chlamydia and gonorrhea, or 0.5 percent of the 6,408 cases reported in the city, according to a source who has seen the data but asked to remain anonymous due to not being authorized to share it. The city’s Sunshine Law coordinator said that clinic-specific data is confidential under state law. The nonprofit St. Louis Effort for AIDS reported 211 cases of chlamydia and gonorrhea that year through their free testing that is not funded by the city. “We were testing and treating at a tremendous volume, and to find out that Downtown Urgent Care was seeing a fifth or sixth of what we were, it was really hard to take,” said Carolyn Guild Johnson, who was the group’s director of prevention services from 2003 to 2017. Saggar said he could not discuss the figures because “I think it is a matter of respect for patient privacy that no wellintentioned provider should comment on such data in this way.”

NONCOMPETITIVE CONTRACT

Pamela Walker, who was the city’s health director in 2013, awarded Saggar the original no-bid contract. Walker and Saggar are business partners in an effort

to open a small hospital in downtown. Saggar also holds a $90,000 contract from the city to provide tuberculosis services 12 hours a week in his downtown clinic. “When nobody else would, (Saggar) said, ‘Yes, I’ll help,’” said Moore, who was city health commissioner at the time the contracts were approved. Most STDs are diagnosed in private medical practices or emergency rooms; about 5 percent of cases are diagnosed by publicly funded STD health clinics, according to a national survey. Dr. Hilary Reno, medical director of the St. Louis County STD Clinic, said “it’s important that we test patients as a matter of protocol,” pointing to research that shows patients who know their test results will change their behaviors to prevent future infections. The tests are also important to rule out a more serious condition that could be causing the same symptoms, and to notify sexual partners of their need to get tested and treated, Reno said. A special meeting of the health department’s advisory board was held on Thursday to discuss the STD contract bidding process. The next contract will require the provider to verify STD testing was completed before funds are released. About 10 providers are expected to file bids by the Feb. 26 deadline, according to health department officials. Tricia Walker, a Washington University student, said her boyfriend went to Downtown Urgent Care three times last summer and was prescribed antibiotics each time without being given any STD tests. Her boyfriend eventually went to a urologist who diagnosed him with an inflamed prostate, she said. Although she didn’t have symptoms, Walker said she was also given antibiotics without any tests at the urgent care clinic. When Walker asked why they weren’t tested, “they said they would rather you pay $30 because the testing would have to go through insurance and you have to wait for results,” she said. “The doctor said the tests are faulty and give false negatives.” The tests have a lower than 1 percent false negative rate, according to the CDC. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

of Missouri to sue the state. The office already contracts out some of its caseload, Barrett said, but privatizing more public defender duties has gained some favor in the Missouri House. In more populated areas, “a public defender’s office is necessary,” said Rep. Kathie Conway, R-St. Charles, who said she used to work in the public defender office in St. Louis and also chairs the subcommittee on the budgets for the state’s Public Safety and Corrections Departments. “In some of these outlying (counties), we need to run the numbers. I think we might find we’re going to save a lot of money on (privatization).” Barrett told the House budget committee last week that private attorneys charge defendants anywhere from $200 to $500 an hour to handle cases. The pay for contract work for the public defenders office depends on the severity of the crime: private attorneys get $10,000 for a murder case, $750 for low-level felony drug cases and $375 for misdemeanor cases, according to the office. In 2017, in contrast, it cost the state $325 per case to represent most indigent defendants, according to the office’s annual report. “Our only concern is that people have attorneys, whatever variety they are,” Barrett said. “But is there an availability of private attorneys willing to take contract cases?”

HIGH TURNOVER

About 15 percent of the state public defender system’s budget already goes to contracts with private attorneys. But fewer than half of Missouri’s counties have lawyers available to accept contracts. That means that qualified lawyers must drive long distances for small compensation, Barrett said. And not all are willing or qualified to accept serious felonies, such as robbery or assault. “It’s about as robust as it can be,” Barrett said of the office’s privatization efforts. Rep. Robert Ross, R-Yukon, who represents Texas County, said he believes lawyers will step up. “In many cases, you already have established attorneys who are not only qualified but then would love that opportunity for business,” he said. “They’re in a much better position to perform this function.” Last year, public defenders opened about 530 cases in Texas County, and one was handled by a private attorney, according to the annual report. The county has a population of about 26,000 and is about two hours east of Springfield, Mo. But the public defender office that represents Texas County also represents five other counties. It was assigned about 3,700 cases last year, according to the office’s annual report. That was about a thousand fewer than in St. Louis County, which has a population about five times that of the six counties combined. The office that handles Texas County has suffered lots of turnover recently. Eleven of 13 staff attorneys left in the past 18 months, Barrett said. The office rehired as people left.

A STATE OBLIGATION

Legislation has been introduced over the past few years to privatize some of the public defender duties, but the bills never gained much traction. The proposal introduced in the House this year would hand over about 90 percent of the state’s public defender cases to private lawyers. “My main concern is fulfilling our constitutional obligation of providing defense to the indigent,” said Ross, who is sponsoring the legislation. “Currently, with the way that this is operating, I don’t think anybody would make the contention we are actually making good on that requirement.” Under the proposal, private lawyers would handle all traffic cases, all misdemeanor cases, all probation violation cases and lower level felonies, the longest punishment for which is five years in prison. Last year, those kinds of cases made up about 88 percent of the public defender office’s workload, according to data in the office’s annual report. Public defenders would still handle the most severe felonies, such as first-degree burglary and murder. Those kinds of cases made up about 9 percent of the office’s caseload, according to the report. The public defenders’ office has had a fraught recent history. In 2016, the Legislature approved a $4.5 million boost to the office as it struggled to represent all its clients, but Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, slashed funding by $3.5 million. Soon after, Barrett assigned Nixon a case, citing a provision of state law allowing the director to appoint members of the state bar to represent indigent defendants. The move — which Barrett said wasn’t a “stunt” — gained national attention. But Nixon never had to defend anyone. A Cole County judge ruled Barrett didn’t have the power to appoint the governor to a case. Last year, a group of private lawyers in St. Louis pledged to volunteer their services to help alleviate some of the pressure on public defenders, and Gov. Eric Greitens restored $2.5 million to the office. Then, however, it suffered another hit as the ACLU of Missouri filed its lawsuit. The lawsuit contends the state’s public defender system is failing to meet “the constitutional floor of providing minimally adequate representation to indigent defendants.”


02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

LOCAL

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

During World War I, St. Louis Parson thanks hospital set up French outpost staff, residents

of veterans home

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD st. Louis Post-dispatch

For nearly two years during World War I, a St. Louis hospital set up an outpost near the battlefields in France. Dr. Fred Murphy, head of surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, realized the allies needed help when he volunteered at an American hospital in Paris in 1916 before the U.S. entered the war. When he came back to St. Louis, Murphy recruited dozens of doctors, nurses, medical students and other personnel from the university and thenBarnes Hospital to form their own hospital to relieve British and French medical officers. Soon after the U.S. declared war with Germany, the St. Louis medical team shipped out in May 1917, becoming some of the first Americans to reach the European war zone. U.S. Army Base Hospital 21 was assigned to Rouen in the Normandy region of France as one of several hospitals formed by American medical schools to serve sick and injured soldiers and civilians. The medical unit was segregated, with AfricanAmerican doctors and nurses serving in separate clinics set up by the Army. Some of the volunteers at the hospital were members of St. Louis’ high society, including nurses Rachel Stix Michael, Mary Kennard Wallace and Julia Holmes Francis, daughterin-law of David R. Francis, former St. Louis mayor, Missouri governor and U.S. ambassador to Russia. Julia Stimson, thenchief nurse at Washington University, was promoted to head of nursing for the Red Cross after her service at Base Hospital 21. Back in St. Louis, the 1917 race riots in East St. Louis and the 1918 Spanish flu outbreak strained an already depleted medical community. “Even the people that stayed behind made a lot of sacrifices,” said Philip Skroska, visual and graphic archivist at Wash-

LAW & ORDER EUREKA > Prison escapee caught • An escaped inmate who walked off a work site in southeastern Missouri was arrested in Eureka on Sunday, more than 100 miles away from where he escaped. Jacob Dylan Martin, 22, was taken into custody by Eureka police officers after Martin a short foot chase at Interstate 44 and Six Flags Road near Six Flags St. Louis. Martin had walked away from a Missouri Department of Transportation work site Tuesday morning, approximately 18 miles south of Patton, Mo., while on work release from Potosi Correctional Center, according to the Department of Corrections. Martin is serving a fiveyear sentence for two counts of first-degree tampering with a motor vehicle, second-degree burglary, and stealing in Franklin County as well as a concurrent three-year sentence for attempted first-degree tampering in Marion County. He has previous convictions for driving while intoxicated, shoplifting and resisting arrest. Martin was received by the Missouri Department of Corrections on Sept. 30, 2016, and was transferred to Jefferson City Correctional Center on Feb. 23. He was transferred to a minimum security unit in Potosi Correctional Center for work release Sept. 26. Eureka police said he will be kept in custody awaiting Department of Corrections pickup.

Complaints over neglect led to state probes, new leadership BY KEVIN MCDERMOTT st. Louis Post-dispatch

BELLEFONTAINE NEIGHBORS • With new

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN STEELE • asteele@post-dispatch.com

An identification card for a worker at U.S. Army Base Hospital 21. The hospital was run by Barnes, with St. Louis volunteers, near the battlefields in France during World War I.

TALK ON ST. LOUIS’ WAR HOSPITAL “And We Won’t Come Back Till It’s Over, Over There,” a free lecture on Base Hospital 21, Washington University Medical Center’s response to World War I. Date: Thursday Time: 4:30 p.m. lecture with reception to follow Location: King Center, seventh floor of Becker Medical Library, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis Dog tags from U.S. Army Base Hospital 21 are shown Friday. The hospital treated more than 61,000 patients.

A helmet is prepared Friday for an exhibit on U.S. Army Base Hospital 21, which was open for nearly two years.

ington University’s Becker Medical Library, who will give a talk Thursday at a new exhibit featuring the hospital. The exhibit includes a surgeon’s diary, an American flag donated to the unit by the French, a helmet, hot water bottle and dog tags. Base Hospital 21’s con-

ST. LOUIS > Argument escalates to stabbing, gunfire • A woman stabbed a man in the back and then fired gunshots in the air to scare him off after an argument boiled over into a fight in a St. Louis home late Sunday, authorities said. The man was taken to a hospital, where police said he was stable. His medical condition was not available. The two were in the woman’s home in the 600 block of Holly Hills Avenue in Carondelet when an argument turned into a fight about 9:30 p.m. The woman, 32, told police the man threatened to kill her during the fight, so she grabbed a knife and stabbed him once in his upper back so she could get away. The woman then went to get her gun and fired warning shots in the air to scare the man away, police said. The man, also 32, ran to a neighbor’s house, and police were called. The woman locked herself in her home when police arrived until crisis negotiators convinced her to come out. Police said Monday that the investigation was ongoing. ST. LOUIS > Two stabbed in fight outside bar • Two men were hospitalized after they were stabbed during a fight outside a St. Louis bar early Monday. St. Louis police say three victims — two men, 22 and 23, and a woman, 21 — were leaving a bar near Osceola Street and South Compton Avenue when they got into a fight outside. Crusoe’s Restaurant and the attached Patrick McKeane’s Sports Pub are at that intersection. All of those involved had been drinking in the bar before the attack, police said.

tributions to wartime medicine included a machine that allowed soldiers to receive X-rays on their stretchers upon arrival, Skroska said. The medical staff treated soldiers’ burns and breathing issues caused by mustard gas and other airborne agents. “It made every one of

The victims told police that during the fight, a man they didn’t know stabbed each of the male victims once in the stomach. He punched the female victim in the face, they said. A second man stood near the fight, also armed with a knife, according to police. After the stabbings, the attacker and the second man with him ran away. Police say the stabbing victims were taken to a hospital and were stable. Their medical conditions weren’t available. The attacker who stabbed the victims was described as a white man, about 25 to 30, about 6 feet tall and 170 pounds with short, dark hair. He was wearing a black hooded jacket with white lettering and black pants. The man with him was described as white, about 35, about 5 feet 9 inches and 210 pounds with short hair. He was wearing a white shirt and blue jeans. ST. LOUIS > Man reports stabbing, won’t help investigators • A man reported to security at the Lumiere Place casino that he had been stabbed early Monday, but police have little to go on because he won’t cooperate. The troopers found the car in the casino parking garage, then used the casino surveillance videos to track the man who parked it there. The man, 30, reported the stabbing around 1:40 a.m. Monday. He was wounded in the left shoulder. The victim was taken to a hospital and was being treated. It’s unclear where the stabbing took place as police said the victim has not cooperated with investigators. The casino is on the Landing at 999 North Second Street.

us feel that we wanted to ... get a gun and go out and fight,” Dr. Walter Fischel wrote in a journal about the experience. After the Nov. 11, 1918, armistice, the hospital continued to treat injured soldiers and ex-prisoners of war through January 1919. The hospital treated a total of 61,453 patients over 18 months. The volunteers returned to St. Louis that spring after a two-year deployment. The volunteers did manage some fun, with the Scrap Iron Jazzerinos band, including St. Louisans Arshav Nushan on drums, Edwin Dakin on violin, Syl Horn on banjo and Clarence Koch on trumpet, entertaining the troops. The band continued with gigs in Europe after the war. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS > Tow truck driver shot • A tow truck operator was being treated after someone shot him with a rifle early Sunday. Police say the victim, a 38-year-old man, was in his tow truck in the 4900 block of Goodfellow Boulevard around 5 a.m. Sunday when a man pulled his car in front of the truck, turned the hazard lights on and got out with a rifle. The victim told police the man fired several shots at the tow truck, hitting the victim several times. The shooter then drove off. The victim told police the shooter was driving a white Pontiac Grand Am SE. He was described as black with a light complexion, about 5 feet 6 inches tall and about 140 to 160 pounds. He was wearing dark clothing. After the shooting, the victim drove to a St. Louis County police station and was taken to a hospital in an ambulance. St. Louis police said the victim was stable and the investigation was ongoing. CRESTWOOD > Drugs found in donated clothes • Someone seems to have forgotten their illegal drugs. Staff at Savers Thrift Superstore, at 9618 Watson Road in Crestwood, called police twice last week to report illicit drugs tucked into separate donated clothing, Crestwood police reported Friday. “Savers has made it quite clear to us that they do not want these items,” the police department’s post on social media read. “So in the spirit of good gift giving and charity, please remove your drugs before donating your clothing.” Police did not specify what type of drugs were found. They also didn’t specify the pieces of clothing, though

leadership in place at the St. Louis Veterans Home after stunning reports of physical and medical neglect, Missouri Lt. Gov. Mike Parson on Monday thanked the residents and staff for their help in uncovering and fixing the problems. “What was happening was wrong, and it needed to be corrected,” Parson said during a presentation at the home, drawing applause from a packed room of elderly veterans, many in wheelchairs, who live there. “I had people time and time again telling me, ‘There’s nothing wrong.’ I had commissioners calling me saying, ‘Nothing’s wrong, lieutenant governor, everything’s fine,’” said Parson. “Well, we knew better.” Reports surfaced last year of residents at the 300-bed home in Bellefontaine Neighbors suffering bedsores, dehydration, having medica t i o n a d m i n i s te re d incorrectly or not at all and other lapses under then-administrator Rolando Carter. Complaints also included inadequate staffing, high staff turnover and employee fear of retaliation for reporting problems. The issues came to light largely due to area volunteer Dory Poholsky, who works with veterans and was disturbed at the stories they were telling her about conditions in the veterans home. “The men, they would have to sit in their feces and their urine and they wouldn’t be changed for hours and hours,” said Poholsky, who attended Monday’s event with Parson at the home. “They

some on social media speculated. “Thinking I might head on over and check out some pocketed tiedyed T-shirts,” one Facebook user wrote. Crestwood police did, however, offer a piece of advice to the likely unwitting drug donor. “Since you obviously do not want your drugs

TONY MESSENGER • P-d

Curtis Washington, 80, is a resident of St. Louis Veterans Home. He is pictured in October.

developed terrible sores … and urinary infections. The ambulances were coming all the time to take them to hospitals.” In one instance, she said, a resident was left sitting alone for an extended time in a shower turned too hot and suffered serious burns. Poholsky brought the issues to the attention of state government officials with the help of former state Rep. Rick Stream, a friend of hers. When there still was no action from Jefferson City, Poholsky went public with her findings. Among multiple state probes of the home was an investigation conducted by Parson’s office that concluded the state needed new leadership in both the home and the Missouri Veterans Commission. Gov. Eric Greitens late last year replaced five members of the commission and called for a purge of top leadership in the state’s veteran system. Carter, the St. Louis home’s former administrator, and Veteran Commission Director Larry Kay both were ultimately forced out. Parson said Monday that his office’s investigation relied heavily on staff and residents at the home. “We owe you everything we can for all you’ve done for us,” he told the veterans. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

anymore, we applaud that you have chosen to no longer be an illegal drug user,” the department posted. “While we fully appreciate the spirit of giving, we kindly ask that you destroy your unused drugs instead of trying to give them away.” Representatives of Savers, a for-profit thrift shop chain, declined to comment.

WHERE WAS I GOING Do you or someone you know have mild Alzheimer’s disease? Then you may be interested in the DAYBREAK-ALZ clinical research study. We’re looking for volunteers to help us find out whether an investigational medication will slow the rate of cognition and functional decline. To learn more please visit www.daybreak-alzstudy.com or contact your local study team at 1-877-270-5696 www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT – NCT02783573 EudraCT – 2015-005625-39 Mild Alzheimer’s disease Clinical Research Study DAYBREAK-ALZ Print Advert_V2.1_USA(EN)_08July2016


NEWS

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

Rainfall welcome in region locked in severe drought BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Though the rain may have dampened the start of the week, meteorologists say it’s beneficial to a region that’s currently in a severe drought. The St. Louis area has seen little precipitation since the middle of last summer, affecting farmers and their livestock, and bringing rivers and streams to near-record lows, according to the National Weather Service. The area is 8 to 16 inches below normal precipitation levels since mid-summer, Jayson Gosselin, meteorologist for the National Weather Service, said Monday. But Monday’s rainfall is the start of some very good news, he said. “Within a week, or so, we’re going to be looking at a lot different picture.” Between Monday and Saturday Gosselin said he expects 3 to 5 inches of rainfall, which will quickly fill rivers, streams and ponds. Gosselin said the weather service doesn’t expect major flooding, but there could be minor issues in certain areas depending on how hard it rains and for how long.

School shooting puts pressure on Florida lawmakers to act BY TERRY SPENCER, CURT ANDERSON AND BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press

PARKLAND, FLA. • The deadly shoot-

ing at a Florida high school has put pressure on the state’s Republican-controlled Legislature to consider a sweeping package of gun-control laws in a state that has resisted restrictions on firearms for decades, lawmakers said Monday. The legislative effort coalesced as 100 students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School prepared to ride buses more than 400 miles to the state capital Tuesday to urge lawmakers to act to prevent a repeat of the massacre that killed 17 students and faculty last week. The suspect, 19-year-old former student Nikolas Cruz, made his first appearance in court Monday. Wearing a prison jumpsuit, he kept his head down and didn’t appear to make eye contact with the judge or others in the courtroom, though he responded briefly to someone on the defense team. A previous appearance was by a video connection from jail. His lawyers have said he will plead guilty if prosecutors agree not to pursue the death penalty. No decision has been made on that. Soon after the shooting, several legislative leaders were taken on a tour of the school to see the damage firsthand and appeared shaken afterward. The attack seemed to overcome the resistance of some in the state’s leadership, which has rebuffed gun restrictions since Republicans took control of both the governor’s office and the Legislature in 1999. However, there is still strong resistance

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

A gaggle of Canada geese crosses the street Monday as drivers wait for them to pass at Tower Grove Park. This week, 3 to 5 inches of rain are expected, says National Weather Service meteorologist Jayson Gosselin.

by many in the party to any gun-control measures. Sen. Bill Galvano, a Republican and the incoming state Senate president, said the Senate was preparing a package that would include raising the age to purchase any firearm to 21, creating a waiting period for purchasing any type of firearm, banning bump stocks that can allow semi-automatic guns to spray bullets quickly and creating gun-violence restraining orders. Authorities said Cruz had a string of run-ins with school authorities that ended with his expulsion. Police were also repeatedly called to his house throughout his childhood. Cruz’s lawyers said there were repeated warning signs that he was mentally unstable and potentially violent. Yet he legally purchased a semiautomatic rifle. “We need to make sure everything is working and to learn from the experience,” said Galvano, who was among those who visited the school. The Senate is also considering boosting spending on mental health programs for schools and giving law-enforcement greater power to involuntarily hold someone considered a danger to themselves. The body will also look at a proposal to deputize a teacher or someone else at school so they are authorized to have a gun. The community around the Parkland school has been holding funerals at the grim pace of several per day. And at the school itself, hundreds of mourners came Monday to lay flowers and hang balloons on 17 crosses and Stars of David that now mark a corner of the campus.

Murder charges dropped against 3 men in I-55 drive-by shooting BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • First-degree murder charges

against three men accused of a fatal 2016 drive-by shooting on Interstate 55 have been dropped. Antwone D. Anthony E. Antwuan L. Defense lawyer Robert Taaffe said Stallworth Stallworth Morrow Jr. Monday that witness problems triggered the dismissal of murder charges against Their car pulled alongside another veAntwone D. Stallworth, 20, Anthony E. hicle and Morrow and Antwone StallStallworth, 18, and Antwuan L. Morrow worth opened fire, charging documents claim. Jr., 26. Sigaria Shanklin, a passenger who was Taaffe, who represented Morrow, said that the man police believed was the in- holding a toddler in her lap, was fatally tended target of the shooting could not shot in the head. The driver of the car be located for a pretrial deposition and was wounded but escaped by driving the another alleged witness to the shooting wrong way on the interstate. Ted Gianaris, who represents Anthony refused to cooperate. A spokeswoman for the St. Louis cir- Stallworth, said charges were dropped cuit attorney’s office said witness issues when prosecutors decided they did not required “a re-evaluation of the evi- have a case. “My client was arrested when he was dence,” adding that the case was still un17 years old,” Gianaris said by email. “He der investigation. Charging documents said Mor- spent 15 months in jail on no good evirow and the Stallworths were in a car dence. This was a senseless heartbreaking on southbound Interstate 55 on Aug. 12, murder, but there just wasn’t anything 2016. Anthony Stallworth was driving. linking these young men to the crime.”

BY THIS TIME

TONIGHT

This Could Be Your New Bathroom

TONIGHT 4:00 PM

Shooting survivors, other young folks are pressing for more gun control GUNS • FROM A1

portive of efforts to improve the federal background check system,” Sanders said in a statement. Trump started Presidents Day at his nearby golf club. The White House did not immediately answer questions about whether he was playing golf. The president spent most of the weekend at Mara-Lago, as aides advised against golfing too soon after the shooting at a Parkland high school that left 17 dead. The main action Trump has taken on guns has been to sign a resolution blocking an Obama-era rule designed to keep guns out of the hands of certain mentally disabled people. The president has voiced strong support for gun rights and the National Rifle Association. The bipartisan background check legislation would be aimed at ensuring that federal agencies and states accurately report relevant criminal information to the FBI. It was introduced after the Air Force failed to report the criminal history of the gunman who slaughtered more than two dozen people at a Texas church. The White House statement Monday came as shooting survivors and other young people pressed for more gun control in a rising chorus of grief and activism. Their “March for Our Lives” is planned March 24 in Washington. Ella Fesler, 16-year-old high school student in Alexandria, Va., was among students at a “lie-in” Monday in front of the White House. She said it was time for change, adding: “Every day when I say ‘bye’ to my parents, I do acknowledge the fact that I could never see my parents again.” In Los Angeles, hundreds of sign-carrying, chanting protesters converged on a downtown park, demanding tougher background checks. Many chanted, “Ho, ho, hey, hey, our kids, not the NRA.” Others held signs proclaiming, “Our Children Are Counting On You.” Previous gun tragedies have not produced action in Congress. After the Las Vegas massacre in the fall, Republicans

and Democrats in Congress talked about taking a rare step to tighten the nation’s gun laws. Four months later, the only gun legislation that has moved in the House or Senate instead eases restrictions for gun owners. Kristin Brown, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said the measure Trump discussed with Cornyn would help to enforce existing rules but would not close loopholes permitting loose private sales on the internet and at gun shows. She seeks a ban on assault-type weapons and for laws enabling family members, guardians or police to ask judges to strip gun rights temporarily from people who show warning signs of violence. “We need a comprehensive system,” Brown said. “One of these isn’t enough.” Trump, who visited first responders and some victims Friday, has focused his comments on mental health, a point the medical community disputes. “The concept that mental illness is a precursor to violent behavior is nonsense,” said Dr. Louis Kraus, forensic psychiatry chief at Chicago’s Rush University Medical College. “The vast majority of gun violence is not attributable to mental illness.” Mental health professionals welcome more resources and attention, but they have said the administration is ignoring the real problem — easy access to guns, particularly the kind of highly lethal weapons used in many of the most recent mass shootings. The White House says the president will host a “listening session” with students and teachers this week and will discuss school safety with state and local officials. It offered no details on who will attend those sessions. Trump watched cable television news during the weekend and groused to club members and advisers about the investigation of Russian election meddling. In furious tweets from Mar-a-Lago, Trump vented about Russia, raging at the FBI for what he perceived to be a fixation on the Russia investigation at the cost of failing to deter the attack.

GREAT WAY TO USE YOUR TAX REFUND!

$

50

Gift Card

with appointment

CALL NOW FOR

ONE-DAY No Mess Installation!

FREE

Safety Upgrade* ($599 value)

FitsYour ExistingTub Space TODAY 7:00 AM

• Incredible Financing! • Lifetime Warranty! • Full Senior Discount! Give us A DAY and we’ll give you a new beautiful shower with luxurious new fixtures in your choice of colors and styles - installed by experts at a price you can afford. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call us today! Enjoy your new shower TONIGHT! *with purchase of any complete bath or shower system

These Great Incentives Expire Soon... SO CALL NOW! Sales and installation performed by the licensed or registered (if applicable) Bathwraps dealer in your area

314-230-8122 • 636-203-9877 • 618-206-5946


NATION

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

New congressional New Arthritis Painkiller map in Pennsylvania Works on Contact and could boost Democrats Numbs the Pain in Minutes ADVERTISEMENT

State court overhauls ‘zigging and zagging’ that created old districts, increasing competition BY MARC LEVY associated Press

HARRISBURG, PA. • Pennsylvania’s high

court issued a new congressional district map for the state’s 2018 elections on Monday, potentially giving Democrats a boost in their quest to capture control of the U.S. House unless Republicans are able to stop it in federal court. The map of Pennsylvania’s 18 congressional districts is to be in effect for the May 15 primary and substantially overhauls a congressional map widely viewed as among the nation’s most gerrymandered. The map was approved in a 4-3 decision, with four Democratic justices backing it and one Democratic justice siding with two Republicans against it. Most significantly, the new map likely gives Democrats a better shot at winning seats in Philadelphia’s heavily populated and moderate suburbs, where Republicans had held seats in bizarrely contorted districts, including one labeled “Goofy Kicking Donald Duck.” Democrats quickly cheered the new map, which could dramatically change the predominantly Republican, all-male delegation elected on a six-year-old map. “It remedies the outrageous gerrymander of 2011, and that’s the important thing, that the gerrymander be over,” said David Landau, the Democratic Party chairman of Delaware County, which was ground zero for the “Goofy Kicking Donald Duck” district. “All that zigging and zagging is all gone, and it makes Delaware County a competitive seat now.” Republican lawmakers are expected to quickly challenge the map in federal court, arguing that legislatures and governors, not courts, have the constitutional responsibility to draw congressional maps. Mark Harris, a GOP campaign consultant, echoed the reaction of Republicans

in bashing the new product. “It’s a straight Democratic gerrymander by a Democratic Supreme Court to help Democrats,” Harris said. Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, who had backed the court’s decision to throw out the six-year-old map, praised the “effort to remedy Pennsylvania’s unfair and unequal congressional elections,” and he said his administration would work to update elections systems for congressional races. The Democratic-majority state Supreme Court ruled last month in a party line decision that the district boundaries unconstitutionally put partisan interests above neutral line-drawing criteria, such as keeping districts compact and eliminating municipal and county divisions. The decision is the first time a state court threw out congressional boundaries in a partisan gerrymandering case. Registered Democratic voters and the League of Women Voters originally sued last June. Republicans appear to face an uphill battle in federal court. Michael Morley, a constitutional law professor at Barry University in Florida, said federal courts are normally reluctant to undo a state court decision. “I think it will be major obstacle and a major challenge to get around it,” Morley said. Pennsylvania’s GOP delegation has provided crucial support for Republican control of the U.S. House since 2010. Republicans who controlled the Legislature and the governor’s office after the 2010 census crafted the now-invalidated map to elect Republicans and succeeded in that aim: Republicans won 13 of 18 seats in three straight elections even though Pennsylvania’s statewide elections are often closely divided and registered Democratic voters outnumber Republicans. Meanwhile, sitting congressmen, dozens of would-be candidates and millions of voters were beginning to sort out which district they live in barely a month before the candidates’ deadline to submit paperwork to run. Some races are wide open: Six incumbents elected in 2016 say they will not seek re-election.

What to wear at the polls? High court will have a say Minnesota law banning campaign pins, clothing with political messages at ballot box is challenged BY JESSICA GRESKO associated Press

WASHINGTON • A “Make America

Great Again” hat. A Tea Party T-shirt. A MoveOn.org button. Wear any one of those items to vote in Minnesota, and a poll worker will probably ask you to remove it or cover it up. Like a number of states, Minnesota bars voters from wearing political items to the polls to reduce the potential for confrontations or voter intimidation. But that could change. The Supreme Court on Feb. 28 will consider a challenge to the state’s law, in a case that could affect other states, too. Wen Fa, a lawyer with the Pacific Legal Foundation, the group behind the challenge to Minnesota’s law, says voters wearing political apparel shouldn’t have to hang up their hats, turn their T-shirts inside out or put their buttons in their bags just to cast a ballot. Wearing political clothing is “a passive way to express core political values,” said Fa, who said the case is “about the free speech rights of all Americans.” Minnesota sees it differently. In court papers, it says the law is a “reasonable restriction” that preserves “order and decorum in the polling place” and prevents “voter confusion and intimidation.” “I think what’s important to understand is the purpose of this prohibition is to protect the fundamental right to vote,” said Daniel Rogan, who is arguing the case for the state and said he doesn’t know of anyone being issued a fine of up to $300 allowed under the law. Lower courts have sided with the state. Beyond Minnesota, state laws vary in their fashion policing of the polls. Some states allow voters to wear whatever they want. Others bar campaign clothing directly related to candidates or issues on the ballot. (Missouri does not prohibit voters’ wearing campaign buttons or clothing.) Minnesota has a broad law that also bans “political” attire, including clothing promoting a group with understood political views, such as the Tea Party or MoveOn.org. The sides in the Supreme Court case disagree about which states have laws similar to Minnesota’s, but each side’s number is roughly 10. Elections officials in states with restrictions say it’s not a big issue. Most people who wear prohibited items to the polls just aren’t aware of the law or forget, officials say, and comply with requests to cover up. Will Senning, Vermont’s elections di-

rector since 2013, said he can’t remember any Election Day calls about people refusing to comply with his state’s law. Elaine Manlove, who has headed elections in Delaware since 2007, couldn’t think of a single prosecution under her state’s statute nor could Mark Goins, who has overseen Tennessee elections since 2009. But Goins said he’d be concerned about allowing clothing supporting candidates or political parties at polling places. “I think you run the risk of having political disputes inside the polling location and sometimes these disputes can get pretty loud,” Goins said. The Supreme Court last considered the issue of free speech at polling places in 1992 when the court upheld a Tennessee law prohibiting the display or distribution of campaign materials within 100 feet of a polling place. The case now before the justices began in 2010 when several groups sued after Minnesota officials made clear they wouldn’t permit residents to vote while wearing tea party apparel or buttons that said, “Please I.D. Me.” The buttons referred to legislation then under discussion in the state and ultimately defeated that would have required residents to show photo identification to vote. Two voters who defied elections officials — one who wore a “Please I.D. Me” button and another who wore both a button and Tea Party T-shirt — were asked to cover up or remove the items. Both were ultimately allowed to vote wearing the apparel, though their names were taken down for potential prosecution. Andy Cilek, one of the voters confronted by poll workers, called the policy “absurd.” Now, at the Supreme Court, Cilek’s side has both the support of the libertarian Cato Institute and the liberal American Civil Liberties Union, and his lawyer believes the case is not one that will divide the court along ideological lines. “The American electorate is surely hardy enough to vote their conscience even if they notice their fellow citizens wearing, say, a Black Lives Matter or AFLCIO T-shirt, a Women’s March hat, or a pro-life or peace-sign button,” the ACLU told the court in a brief. Texas resident Brett Mauthe agrees. In 2016, the Donald Trump supporter was arrested outside his polling place after he refused to cover up a black T-shirt he was wearing that said “50% basket of deplorables,” a reference to a comment Hillary Clinton had made about Trump supporters. He argued his shirt was ambiguous in its support. Mauthe, who didn’t know about Texas’ law when he went to vote and whose case was ultimately dismissed, says he’s moved on. He’s passionate about his politics, he said, but if given the opportunity to lawfully wear political clothing to the polls, “I probably would just wear regular street clothes,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

New cream works faster and is more targeted than oral medications. Key ingredients penetrate the skin within minutes to relieve joint arthritis pain. Users report significant immediate relief. Innovus Pharmaceuticals has introduced a new arthritis pain relief treatment that works in minutes. Sold under the brand name Apeaz™, the new pain relief cream numbs the nerves right below the skin. When applied to an arthritic joint, or a painful area on the body, it delivers immediate relief that lasts for hours and hours. The powerful painkilling effect is created by the creams active ingredients, three special medical compounds. Anesthetics are used in hospitals during surgery. They block nerve signals from the brain so that patients don’t feel pain and they work fast. The anesthetic found in Apeaz™ is the strongest available without a prescription. The cream form allows users to directly target their area of pain. It works where it is applied. The company says this is why the product is so effective and fast acting. “Users can expect to start feeling relief immediately after applying,” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj, President of Innovus Pharmaceuticals. “There will be a pleasant warming sensation that is followed by a cool, soothing one. This is how you know that the active ingredients have reached the affected joint and tissue.”

Works In Minutes For arthritis suffers, Apeaz™ offers impressive advantages over traditional medications. The most obvious is how quickly it relieves pain discomfort. The cream contains the maximum approved OTC dose of a top anesthetic, which penetrates the skin in a matter of minutes to numb the area that’s in pain. This relief lasts for several hours. Published preclinical animal studies have shown that the ingredients in Apeaz™ can also prevent further bone and cartilage destruction. There are also no negative side effects like from oral medication. Apeaz™ delivers its ingredients through the skin. Oral medications are absorbed in the digestive tract. Overtime, the chemicals in pills can tear the delicate lining of the stomach, causing ulcers and bleeding. When compared to other arthritis medications, Apeaz™ is a fraction of the cost. At less than $2 a day, the cream quickly is becoming a household name.

Apeaz™: Quick Acting Pain and Arthritis Cream is Now Available Without a Prescription Those with terrible arthritis in their hands and fingers, love how easy Apeaz™ is to open. The jar fits in the palm of the hand, which makes it much easier to use.

Instant Pain Relief Without a Prescription Many Apeaz™ users report significant improvements in daily aches and pain. Many more report increased flexibility and less stiffness. They are moving with less pain for the first time in years, like Henry Esber, an early user of Apeaz™. “I’ve tried more pills than I can count. I’ve also had a handful of cortisone shots. Nothing is as effective as this product. With Apeaz™, I get relief right away. I rub a little on my hands. It keeps the pain away. It also prevents the pain from getting really bad. It’s completely changed my life.”

How It Works

Apeaz™ contains the highest, non-prescription OTC dose of a medical compound that fights pain on contact. When applied to the skin it goes to work within minutes by penetrating right to the source of your pain, numbing the nerve endings. “This is why Apeaz™ is so effective for people with arthritis pain. It reduces pain while adding an additional potential layer of joint support,” explains Damaj.

A New Way to Treat Pain Although Dr. Damaj and his team say that their cream is the fastest and most effective way to relieve arthritis pain, they believe there is still a reason to take joint pills. The most effective are those which help to further lubricate, strengthen and support the joints. That’s why every container of Apeaz™ comes with ArthriVarx™, a breakthrough supplement that’s taking on joint support in an entirely new way. ArthriVarx™ works on your joints, making it the perfect companion to Apeaz™.

Apeaz™ is an FDA drug with approved claims for the pain relief of the following conditions: • Arthritis pain • Simple back pain • Strains • Sprains • Athletic injuries • Muscle stiffness and pain • Wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, foot, muscle or joint pain

“ArthriVarx™ contains special compounds published to lubricate the joints and connective tissues that surrounds them. With daily use, they improve joint health and can give an extra cushion,” explains Dr. Damaj. “When combined with Apeaz™, it becomes the perfect system to tackle arthritis. While the anesthetic component of Apeaz™ is working on the outside, relieving pain on contact, ArthriVarx™ is working on the inside, adding cushioning to the joints”’

A Powerful Combination For Arthritis and Joint Pain With daily use, Apeaz™ plus ArthriVarx™ helps users live a more vital, pain free life without any of the negative side effects or interactions associated with oral drugs. By delivering fast, longlasting, and targeted relief from joint pain and supporting long-term joint health, Apeaz™ and ArthriVarx™ is the newest, most effective way to tackle your arthritis pain. You can now enjoy an entirely new level of comfort that’s both safe and affordable. It is also extremely effective, especially if nothing else has worked well for you.

How to Get Apeaz™ In Missouri This is the official public release of Apeaz™. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to any joint-pain arthritissufferer who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all Missouri residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free hotline number is 1-800-4268135 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of Apeaz™ is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. Experience the guaranteed Apeaz™ relief already enjoyed by thousands of consumers. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-426-8135 today.

APEAZ IS AN FDA OTC COMPLIANT DRUG NDC # 57483-001-04 APPROVED FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN FROM MUSCLES AND JOINTS INCLUDING ARTHRITIS PAIN. ARTHRIVARX STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. ARTHRIVARX IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE AND IS NOT A DRUG. RESULTS MAY VARY.


M 1 Tuesday • 02.20.2018 • a8

BUSINESS DIGEST Dogtown project gets financing • The developers behind the Hibernia Apartments have secured $20 million in construction financing to help complete the Dogtown project that will be anchored by a Fields Foods grocery store. Minneapolis-based NorthMarq Capital, a commercial real estate debt and equity provider, arranged the financing through the Bank of Washington for Indianapolisbased Pearl Companies. The project, which will include 100 apartments and approximately 16,000 square feet of retail on street level, was reported to cost $25 million overall. The city of St. Louis approved $3.8 million in tax-increment financing assistance for the project. The development is expected to be complete by the end of this year. The site, a former lumber yard, is at 6300 Clayton Avenue. Other amenities offered at the new apartment complex include a dog park area, bocce ball court, bike storage and a bicycle mechanic and underground parking. Rents are expected to start at $1,300 for the 89 one-bedroom units and go up to $1,900 for the 11 two-bedroom units. USA Mortgage forms ESOP • USA Mortgage’s sole owner, president and CEO, Douglas Schukar, transferred ownership of the company to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP). Schukar, in a release, said “there is no better way to thank the people who have helped us achieve success as well as reward those who will be leading the charge in the future to enhance our winning customer experience.” The transaction to transfer the St. Louisbased mortgage company, a division of DAS, to its employees was finalized at the end of 2017 following the completion of an independent valuation. It was announced on the company’s Facebook page Monday. To be eligible to receive shares, employees need to complete 160 hours of service and meet other minimal criteria. Employees that participate in the plan are fully vested in the plan after six years of service. Formed in 2001, USA Mortgage has grown to $1.5 billion in total loan volume and about 550 employees, according to Schukar. In Missouri, volume was $1.12

billion during 2017. Schukar will continue to serve as CEO. Baird, Kurtz & Dobson oversaw the ESOP implementation. Biotech startup gets financing • Unleash Immuno Oncolytics, a biotech startup based in the Cortex innovation district in the @4240 building, has raised $3 million from Japanese-based Oncolys BioPharma. The money will be used to advance Unleash’s lead patented programs, which are viral-based biologics developed to attack cancerous tumors. “Oncolys’ solid expertise in manufacturing and clinical development of oncolytic viruses is of great value for advancing our virus-based therapies through clinical trials,” said Unleash CEO Daniel Katzman. Oncolys is a publicly traded company on the Tokyo Stock Exchange that is developing similar therapies. Oncolys also invested $330,000 into an affiliated company of Unleash called Precision Virologics, which is developing vaccines for Zika and Chikungunya. Oncolys had previously invested $500,000 into the company in 2017. Unleash’s other investors include Axia Ventures and Biogenerator, which helped lure the company to St. Louis from Argentina in 2016. Facebook to verify ads with postcards • Facebook will soon rely on centuriesold technology to try to prevent foreign meddling in U.S. elections: the post office. Baffled in 2016 by Russian agents who bought ads to sway the U.S. presidential campaign, Facebook’s global politics and government outreach director, Katie Harbath, told the National Association of Secretaries of State on Saturday that the company would send postcards to potential buyers of political ads to confirm they reside in the U.S. The recipient would then have to enter a code in Facebook to continue buying the ad. The method will first apply to ads that name candidates ahead of the midterm elections in November, says Facebook spokesman Andy Stone. The plan was unveiled a day after special counsel Robert Mueller charged 13 Russians with interfering in the presidential election. From staff and wire reports

ARMSTRONG

Installation starting at

Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Congress aims to make real rules for virtual currencies Regulators worry about risk of money laundering, financing terrorists By daVId MORGaN Reuters

Jolted by the global investment craze over bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, U.S. lawmakers are moving to consider new rules that could impose stricter federal oversight on the emerging asset class, several top lawmakers told Reuters. Bipartisan momentum is growing in the Senate and House of Representatives for action to address the risks posed by virtual currencies to investors and the financial system, they said. Even free-market Republican conservatives, normally wary of government red tape, said regulation could be needed if cryptocurrencies threaten the U.S. economy. “There’s no question about the fact that there is a need for a regulatory framework,” said Republican Senator Mike Rounds, a Senate Banking Committee member. Digital assets currently fall into a jurisdictional gray area between the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission,or CFTC, the Treasury Department, the Federal Reserve and individual states. Much of the concern on Capitol Hill is focused on speculative trading and investing in cryptocurrencies, leading some lawmakers to push for digital assets to be regulated as securities and subject to the SEC’s investor protection rules. Virtual currencies have existed for years but speculation in them has recently ballooned, along with scams promising investors returns of over 1,000 percent in weeks. In a time of volatile markets, hackers are also active in the sector, stealing $530 million of digital currency from Japanese exchange Coincheck last month. Bitcoin, the best known virtual currency, lost over half its value this year after surging more than 1,300 percent. “We have to look carefully at all of the cryptocurrencies and make sure individuals don’t get taken advantage of,” said Representative Tom MacArthur, a House Financial Services Committee Republican. Regulators globally have raised the

$3,58000

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused. Offer Expires on 2-28-2018

CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

SAve $50

OFF the regular price. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires 2-28-2018

alarm over cryptocurrencies, saying they may aid money laundering and terrorist financing, hurt consumers and undermine trust in the global financial system. “I’m a total free-marketer, so I don’t want to regulate,” said Republican Representative Dave Brat, a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. “But if it’s a currency that could destabilize the whole economy, you’re going to have that conversation,” he said. The SEC and CFTC chairmen recently called for greater scrutiny of digital assets before the Senate Banking Committee. Members of the panel said the regulators will return to discuss how to move forward. While many lawmakers agree tighter oversight is needed, there is no consensus yet in Congress on how to proceed. While some lawmakers say speculative investments should be classed as securities, others want digital currency transactions regulated as commodities. The SEC is already cracking down on transactions known as initial coin offerings, while the CFTC has identified digital assets as a commodity subject to its antifraud rules. Senator Rounds told Reuters there was an opportunity to regulate cryptocurrencies as both a security and a commodity. But while lawmakers are keen to mitigate the risks digital assets may pose, they are also mindful of the need to protect innovation, including the underlying distributed ledger technology, said Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen, a member of the Senate Banking Committee. “The goal here is to have rules of the road that protect consumers without trying to squash innovation.”

Fri. Feb. 23rd 11am-8pm Sat. Feb. 24th 10am-8pm Sun. Feb. 25th 11am-5pm

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

Aprilaire Humidifer

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bitcoin logos are displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York in April 2014.

Save Big on a Complete Furnace Maintenance Inspection

$42.00 Off

The regular price of a complete furnace system service. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires 2-28-2018

314-236-3352 Air Purification with “Reme Halo”

SAve $100

ULTIMATE GIRL’S DAYOUT 400 EXHIBIT SPACES

UNIQUE PRODUCTS & SERVICES, SHOPPING, EDUCATION, ENTERTAINMENT, TRAVEL, FOOD SAMPLING, MAKEOVERS & MORE! Attacks viruses, mold spores, bacteria, VOC’s and Dust particles in your home. Ionization Process discovered by Albert Einstein to virtually duplicate Swiss Mountain Air. Expires 2-28-18

Presented by

Where Qualit uality Counts... Since 1977

CELEBRITY SPEAKER

Samantha Harris

“Dancing With The Stars” & “Entertainment Tonight” Feb. 24th Saturday @ 3pm

60% OFF

Installation!

Tickets Available Now Online At:

WWW.WWSSONLINE.COM

St. Charles Convention Center *(days of show only - $1 per ticket service fee)

*

* Savings off retail pricing. Minimums apply, Not valid on previous sales. Cannot be combined with other offers. Financing offer for those who qualify. Call for details. Expires 2/28/2018.

Call Now For Your Free Estimate

314-236-9883

618-215-7381

Dierbergs

SPONSORS


NATION

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

Museum exhibit scrutinizes use of American Indian imagery

Rhode Island senator charged with extorting sex from a page BY MICHELLE R. SMITH associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. • A

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian looks this month at a section of the “Americans” exhibit that explores the historical context of the Trail of Tears. BY FELICIA FONSECA associated Press

F L AG STA F F, A R I Z . •

Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success. The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River. Provocative, yes, says the co-curator of the exhibit “Americans” that opened last month at the National Museum of the American Indian. Bold and visionary in imagining a country free of American Indians. A spectacular success in greatly expanding wealth from cotton fields where millions of blacks worked as slaves. “When you’re in the show, you understand bold and visionary become tongue in cheek,” co-curator Cecile Ganteaume said. The exhibit that runs through 2022 has opened to good reviews and pushes the national de-

bate over American Indian imagery — including sports teams named the Chiefs, Braves and Blackhawks. The NFL’s Washington Redskins logo on one wall prompts visitors to think about why it’s described both as a unifying force in D.C. and offensive. The exhibit falls short, some say, with an accompanying website and its characterization of the Indian Removal Act. The online text is a perplexing way to characterize an effort that spanned multiple presidencies and at one point, consumed one-fifth of the federal budget, said Ben Barnes, second chief of the Shawnee Tribe. The law led to the deaths of thousands of people who were marched from their homes without full compensation for the value of the land they left behind. “It made it seem like it was a trivial matter that turned out best for everyone,” he said. “I cannot imagine an exhibit at the newly established African-American museum that talked

about how economically wonderful slavery was for the South.” Ganteaume said the website isn’t encyclopedic and neither it nor the exhibit is meant to dismiss the experiences of American Indians. Instead, it challenges the depths at which people recognize indigenous people are ingrained in America’s identity and learn how it happened, she said. An opening gallery has hundreds of images of American Indians — often a stoic chief in a Plains-style headdress or a maiden — on alcohol bottles, a sugar bag, motor oil, a missile mounted on the wall and a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle. Dozens of clips expand on how the imagery has permeated American culture in television and film. But when historic or cartoonish images are the only perception people have of what it means to be Native, they can’t imagine American Indians in the modern world, said Julie Reed, a history professor at the University of

Tennessee. “Even when I’m standing in front of students, identified as a Cherokee professor, making the point from Day 1 that I’m still here and other Cherokee people are still here, I still get midterm exams that talk about the complete annihilation of Indian peoples,” she said. Ganteaume said that while Native people have deep histories in other countries, the United States is more often fixated on using images of them. Eden Slone, a graduate student in museum studies in the Washington area, said she was impressed by the exhibit’s design and interactive touch tables. She never realized that Tootsie Pop wrappers featured an image of an American Indian in a headdress, holding a bow and arrow. “I think the exhibition was carried out well and it definitely makes you think of Native American imagery,” she said. “When I see images like that, I’ll think more about where it came from.”

STAY OFF THE LADDER! NO MORE HASSLE!

Clog-Free Gutter System $20.18 $100 $O INSTALL GIFT CARD PLUS

MONEY DOWN INTEREST PAYMENTS FOR 12 MONTHS

PLUS

with purchase.

ENDS FEBRUARY 28TH!

Call NOW! Free In-Home Consultation!

314-666-7126 • 618-744-1733 $100 Bonus VISA gift card with purchase will be mailed after installation and payment in full. New orders only. Loans provided by EnerBank USA (1245 Brickyard Rd. Suite 600, Salt Lake City, UT 84106) on approved credit, for a limited time. Repayment terms vary from 24 to 132 months. Interest waived if repaid in 365 days. 16.73% fixed APR, effective as of 12/1/17, subject to change. Other restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer or previous job. Offer expires 2/28/18.

Biggest Sale of the year!

Free InstallatIon on every window treatment:

Draperies, Valances, upholstered cornices, blinds, shades and shutters.

grand jury indictment unsealed Monday accuses a Republican state senator of extorting sex from a page in the Senate’s page program. The indictment was unsealed as Senate Minority Whip Nicholas Kettle was arraigned on two counts of extortion in Providence Superior Court. Kettle, of Coventry, R.I., is accused of extorting a male page for sex multiple times. He pleaded not guilty and was released on $50,000 personal recognizance. The news prompted Democratic Senate President Dominick Ruggerio to again call for Kettle to resign immediately. He said he was “horrified and disgusted by these allegations.” “We in the Senate are deeply shaken,” he said. If Kettle refuses to step down, the Senate will pursue his expulsion, Ruggerio said. He said he also asked the Senate’s chief legal counsel to conduct a review of the page program. “We have spoken to most of the pages to ensure that they are aware of their rights in the workplace as well as procedures for reporting anything inappropriate,” Ruggerio said. Kettle, 27, was indicted last week, but the details of the extortion counts remained sealed over the weekend. State police separately charged Kettle with video voyeurism on Friday. His lawyer has said he denies any wrongdoing. The indictment says Kettle extorted the page into sex on two occasions in 2011. The indictment

names the page, but The Associated Press does not identify people who may be victims of sex crimes unless they agree to have their names published. The page’s LinkedIn profile says he served as a page from February 2011 to May 2012. Kettle, who is one of five Republicans in the 38-member Senate, did not speak to reporters and did not comment on whether he would resign, but his lawyer described the page as a political rival of Kettle’s. State elections records show the page ran against Kettle as an independent in 2014, three years after the extortion is alleged to have occurred. House Minority Leader Dennis Algiere also has called on Kettle to resign. Senate spokesman Greg Pare said the Senate page program includes 67 pages, all hired at the recommendation of senators. The pages, who usually range in age from 15 through college age, help lawmakers with errands at the Rhode Island Statehouse. Pare said the page Kettle is alleged to have extorted for sex did not lodge any complaints while he was a page. One of the Senate’s 38 seats is open, and a special election is scheduled to fill it. The Rhode Island House runs its own page program. A spokesman for Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello said there have been no complaints about that program. Mattiello last week designated a former longterm page and current General Assembly employee to serve as a liaison to the House pages in case any concerns arise.

Attention WWI & WWII Veterans Wanted - Serious Collector - Historian

WillpaytopdollarforGerman-Japanese-American WWII Military Medals, Badges, Hats, Helmets, Uniforms, Flags, Swords, Daggers, etc. ktookwwii@charter.net

314-249-5369

WWII Leather Flight Jackets Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri *Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (314) 499-1300

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

Improve your Hearing Improve your Health Improve your Happiness, your family will be grateful. “The other guys were in business to sell me hearing aids, you’re in business to help me hear better.” Thankful Patient, St. Louis, MO

Free 30 Day Trial on Hearing Devices serving Missouri and Illinois for almost 50 years

Draperies - Blinds - shades - shutters

Call now for a CoMPlIMentarY In Home Design Consultation! Call Now

314-735-0724 or 618-206-5630 see decorator for details.

314-269-0075


NEWS

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 02.20.2018

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, produced by the Niche Division of the Suburban Journals, LLC

STLmomsanddads.com

READING CORNER

Librarians round up winning books for youths BY KAREN YOUNG SPECIAL TO STL MOMS & DADS

The Academy Awards might be scheduled for March, but in the world of children’s literature, the most anticipated awards of the year were announced on a chilly February morning in Denver, Colo. Every year, youth services librarians read hundreds and hundreds of books on a quest to select the year’s best-of-the-best when it comes to outstanding literature for young people. Divided into committees to accommodate the numbers, they announce their annual selections at the midwinter conference of the American Library Association (ALA). While browsing children’s shelves at a favorite library or bookstore, it is easy to spot books that proudly wear a gold or silver ALA sticker on their cover. Some of those medals commend excellence in writing, while others denote first-rate illustration. Leaving the nitty-gritty of each honor for readers to uncover, these fabulous books will sport shiny new stickers. This year, Missouri native Derrick Barnesone penned one of ALA’s most highly decorated books, winning multiple honors for both illustrations and writing. Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut features a boy’s trip to the barber shop, the myriad community members he finds there and the confidence he exudes under a truly great haircut. Barnes’ lyrical prose begs to be read aloud and perfectly pairs with Gordon C. James’ joyous, expressive paintings. “Crown” is

one of those rare picture books that appeals to kids (and adults) of all ages. Two more picture books honored for outstanding illustrations were A Different Pond, written by Bao Phi with illustrations by Thi Bui, and Wolf in the Snow, which Matthew Cordell both wrote and illustrated. Though they seem to bear little in common at first glance, both stories feature characters dealing with displacement and will evoke empathy from young readers. In A Different Pond, a family of Vietnamese refugees struggles to make ends meet in their new home country. In nearly wordless Wolf in the Snow, a girl – whose red snowsuit lends her a striking resemblance to Little Red Riding Hood – finds herself amidst a pack of wolves following an act of kindness. For middle-grade readers, Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly and The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez were honored for outstanding writing. Hello, Universe follows four middle schoolers as their lives intertwine over the course of a single day. This quiet tale of friendship surely will appeal to a broad section of readers, but young introverts in particular will feel at home in its pages. Readers who prefer a

noisier protagonist will find Malu (aka Maria Luisa) of The First Rule of Punk is anything but quiet. She loves to skateboard, make zines and listen to loud music. When things go awry on her first day at a new school, she works to follow the first rule of punk: Always be yourself. Honors for books written for teen readers went to the bestselling The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and We Are Okay by Nina LaCour. Told in a nonlinear narrative, We Are Okay follows Marin in her first months of college. Though heartbreaking, this emotionally charged story still leaves readers with a sense of hope. After 49 weeks on the New York Times’ Young Adult Best Seller List and its highly anticipated film adaptation in production, The Hate U Give adds ALA honors to help decorate the cement around its rock star status. Readers who have not yet experienced this remarkable novel, with its central character living a segment of the Black Lives Matter movement, may want to pick up the audiobook version, narrated by Bahni Turpin, also an ALA winner for best audiobook production. These new winners are ready to be selected on your next trip to a library or bookstore. A full list of the 2018 award categories and winners can be found on the American Library Association’s website www.ala.org. Karen Young is head of youth services at University City Public Library and former children’s librarian at St. Louis Public Library Central Branch. She loves to talk about great books for kids and teens.

Prep in winter for summer’s happy camper Preparation for summer camp begins in winter, building on family and school experiences of the previous year. If camp is already on a child’s resumé, he or she brings that along, too. If a parent recalls camp as a wondrous and happy time, it is good to share that exuberance, because happiness can be contagious. However, deliver it with an occasional pinch of reality, because that is what camp will be like for the child to experience, too. If the child expresses concerns, calm fears by concentrating on his individual strengths while navigating everyday life.

A top difference in 24-7 camp life is that the person sleeping in the top bunk is not a brother or sister. Emphasize the aspect of new friends and point out a child’s strengths in this area of sociability. There will be times of unbridled success and moments of disappointment and boredom, so knowing how to deal with them makes camp life easier. Sleepovers at home and/or at someone else’s house might familiarize a child with being away from the family. Early at-home trials will have Mom and Dad to help their child with an immediate review, rather than confronting the new experience

alone on the first night away from home. Encouraging a child’s commitment in tasks and hobbies at home also is important to both the parents and the camper who will be there for an extended time. Learning new skills builds character. Daily accomplishments during this school year increase preparation for this new occasion. Presenting a scenario now to help hurdle challenges at camp can help a child grow into better use of his or her achievements. Parents, alongside their child, should learn the rules, particularly about communication, and view the facility in

brochures and online to increase security. Cell phones may not be available, so don’t skip a lesson on how to use a flashlight or write a postcard. A family camping trip or weekend in a rustic cabin may provide the child with a semblance of the summer ahead. Encourage a child to learn to gather possessions together and separate dirty and wet from fresh and dry clothes. Not only will all the preparation provide a comfortable base, but the child will be a welcome guest in social situations and become a sought-after resident of summer camp in 2018.

St. Louis County Library

Black History Celebration 2018

with

NNEDI OKORAFOR MARCH 14 / 7-8 PM CENTRAL LIBRARY’S AUDITORIUM

Engaging the Present to Honor the Past

Teens! Get your free copy of “Akata Witch” at your neighborhood SLPL location while supplies last. Then, be sure to come listen to author Nnedi Okorafor talk about her life and books.

Celebrate Black History Month at SLCL. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.slcl.org/black-history-celebration.

Books available for purchase at the event from Left Bank Books. Support provided by:

All events are FREE and open to the public.

Program sites are accessible. Upon two weeks’ notice, accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities. Call 314-994-3300 or visit www.slcl.org.

1301 Olive St. I 63103 I 314-241-2288 I slpl.org

ENT

ER

TO WIN

VIP Hockey Experience for engaged couples 20 engaged couples will receive special access to a private St. Louis Blues practice on March 15, lunch and additional prizes!

ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL WIN A FUNJET VACATION FOR 2 TO MEXICO, ALL-INCLUSIVE

ENTER THRU MARCH 4: STLtoday.com/contest SPONSORS


NEWS

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, produced by the Niche Division of the Suburban Journals, LLC

Envision fresh, seasonal changes look of bedding.

CONTENT AND PHOTO BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

It isn’t spring yet, but thoughts of winter tend to fall away inch by inch as people appreciate the gradual brightening of the world. Our own version of hibernation with homes shut during winter months seems out of place. This appropriately cozy feeling in past months can induce poor air circulation and accumulate dust and germs. That is why washing and changing out linens is a necessary stage of cleaning when the time finally comes to refresh the winter habitat. Although warm trappings still are needed and snow remains in periodic weather forecasts, it is not too early to dream. Envision the difference so your home will be a brighter, cleaner version of itself. Declutter Use the remaining time indoors to see shelves, counters and floors as open spaces, rather than placeholders for possessions. Any leftover holiday decor should be stored or discarded. Keep links to interesting magazine stories on a computer and recycle the item. Move displaced items where they belong. Living areas Look at every room thoroughly. Be ready to open heavy drapes to the sunshine, dust them thoroughly and select pastel colors now for spring renewal. Check the opera-

tion of blinds, as well as their accumulated dust. Be sure the plan includes laundering winter items before storing. Change up art Stick with what makes you happy, so choose pieces that bring smiles and brighten the space. Change out photos for recent ones or vacation snapshots to introduce quickly a view of a new season. Bedrooms

Changing out bedding for lighter fabrics in an attractive print goes a long way toward freshening a bedroom. Keep lighter quilts ready to replace heavy comforters on their farewell day for the season. The transition to spring holds plenty of nights that still need cozy warmth, but extra blankets draped across the foot of the bed keeps them handy for grabbing during nighttime chill and also attracts your own eye by softening the

ADVERTISEMENT

Entries and the kitchen Door mats and kitchen towels often are forgotten items that impact the freshness and cleanliness of a home. Winter weather can be hard on both indoor and outdoor mats. Even now, before the next winter storm, give them a good shake – outdoors. It cleans their base better than hand devices working on the floor against gravity. In

ADVERTISEMENT

a few short weeks, even during spring showers, frosty-the-doorman can be replaced with a fresh mat that introduces a spring design. Of course, current kitchen towels likely have pulled their weight as entertaining has been held these months in home confines. While they have been washed, choose to refresh rather than replace them. Laundering them with a good dose of bleach can be enhanced by drying

ADVERTISEMENT

them with a few drops of favorite essential oils.

Add blooming beauties A little greenery changes a room’s mood. Whether a fresh bouquet, a blooming orchid, potted fern or mini greenhouse corresponds better with a home’s personality, bring a piece of nature indoors to anticipate future blooms. Encourage a trip to the yard to see if spring greens are poking through the cold soil yet.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF CLAYTON – SUMMERQUEST SummerQuest promises six weeks of fun! With an awesome selection of K-6 activities and programs, plus a two-week arts and science camp for seventh- and eighth-graders, SummerQuest has revolutionized the traditional K-8 day camp experience. The fields and Aquatic Center of Shaw Park, the fabulous air-conditioned facilities at The Center of Clayton and the stateof-the-art science, music, art and theater facilities at Clayton High School are three great reasons to reserve your spot at SummerQuest today!

314-854-6023 * www.summerquest.org

Kid’s Favorite Cookie Recipe Contest is sweet moment at St. Charles Home Show When it comes to cookies, kids – of all ages – know what they like! Share it with the world in the Kid’s Favorite Cookie Recipe Contest. A dozen finalists will be chosen to bring their cookies ready for judges to sample at the 14th Annual Builders St. Charles Home Show. The cookie showdown of the invited dozen will crumble at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 8, at the Saint Charles Convention Center. Finalists will be chosen from two categories – six from A. Anything with Chocolate category, six from B. No-Chocolate division. Enter one recipe online by March 25 with ingredients and directions in either or both categories for a luscious sweet that brings smiles to a child or grandchild (OK to be verified by older relatives) at www.stltoday.com/contests.

SUMMERQUEST We ta ke fu n se rio us ly!

Suggestions for the Anything with Chocolate division include treats with chips, icing, cocoa or other chocolate, whereas the No-Chocolate category features every other flavor in the world. Cookies may vary from baked to not-baked, bars or dropped, from scratch or mix-adapted, iced or sprinkled. Participants in previous recipe contests sponsored by the Home Builders Association of St. Louis and STL Moms & Dads/Suburban Journals during the last 12 months are not eligible to enter. Each participant will receive a gift card from each sponsor. Those judged “Best to Eat,” as well as “Best-Looking and Unique,” in each category will be recognized. The Kid’s Favorite Cookie Recipe Contest, to be held on the Better Living Theater stage, is only one of many attractions at the three-day Home Show from April 6 to 8. Offering spring incentive to dream and draw up plans for home improvements and do-it-yourself products, more than 250 companies guide innovative and inspiring answers to home upgrades and do-it-yourself questions with windows, doors, fencing, decks, kitchen and bath products, pools and spas, home accessories and much more.

SUBMITTED

David Sheinkopf

David Sheinkopf, HGTV alum of “Design on a Dime” and recent master builder on “Ellen’s Design Challenge,” will share design ideas in his seminar, “Reserve the Right to Beautify Your Home,” to detail a home with today’s best products and ideas. In addition, guests attend seminars on floral design, the 12th annual St. Charles Sausage Festival & Wine Tasting spans the weekend, a spa sale initiates the spring season and free afternoon activities include the KIDSZONE, planned by the St. Charles County Parks and Recreation Department, to entice the family.

EXPERIENCE ST. LOUIS’ PREMIER SUMMER DAY CAMP!

New show hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission and parking are free. For information, visit www.STLHomeShow.com.

SUMMERQUESThastheBESTprograms,theBESTfacilities,theBESTcamp counselorsandtheBESTcampers!LocatedatClaytonHighSchool,The Center of Clayton and Shaw Park, SUMMERQUEST offers the BEST K-8 summer camp experience in St. Louis! Session I - June 4 to June 15 Session II - June 18 to June 29 Session III - July 2 to July 13

CALL 854-6023 TO REGISTER OR VISIT WWW.SUMMERQUEST.ORG.

I N FA N T C A R S E AT A N D S L E E P S A F E T Y E D U C AT I O N

T

he SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Safety Program is dedicated to the prevention of childhood injuries through education and awareness, helping to make sure your baby is free from danger when sleeping and traveling on our roadways.

Visit glennon.org/safetyprogram to learn more. SSM Health Cardinal Glennon

Safety Program

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY:


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAy • 02.20.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Let the courts decide Attorney general steps up for workers in harassment arbitration cases.

C

been subjected to sexual harassment in the onservative Missouri Attorney workplace.” General Josh Hawley and the Federal law currently allows employers #MeToo movement couldn’t to require employees, as a condition of be stranger bedfellows, but they employment, to sign agreements manhave come together to fight against unfair, dating that sexual harassment claims be forced arbitration in sexual harassment resolved through arbitration instead of cases. Hawley’s position is an unlikely one judicial proceedings. for a Republican whose party Unfair? Unquestionably. has worked hard to make legal Corporations enjoy overchallenges easier for employwhelming resources to influers to win. ence arbitration decisions in Hawley is joining other their favor. Disputes between brave Republicans in a employers and employees bipartisan coalition of legal should be transparent. An authorities coming to the employee who has experidefense of working citizens enced harassment deserves by urging Congress to end the right to challenge it in the practice of secret, forced court. Judges are elected and arbitration in cases of workface consequences from votplace sexual harassment. ers for their rulings. ArbitraThe group represents 56 Hawley tors do not. states and territories that are Mark Jess, a Kansas City lawyer who members of the National Association of specializes in employee rights, told the Attorneys General. Post-Dispatch that “almost all” arbitrators It’s hard to pinpoint why they would are former defense lawyers who are paid by take a position that seems to contradict employers.“It is literally putting the fox in years of GOP efforts to stack the judicial charge of the henhouse,” he added.“It’s an system in favor of employers, not workers. obvious conflict of interest.” Some, like Hawley, are likely influenced by His assertions could not be confirmed, their campaigns for higher office. Hawley but judges, not arbitrators, should deteris seeking the Republican nomination mine whether claims have merit. The for the U.S. Senate and expects to run coalition’s letter to Congress notes that against Democratic incumbent Sen. Claire employers often bury arbitration agreeMcCaskill, an outspoken women’s-rights ments in lengthy employment contracts activist. and present them in “take-it-or-leave-it” Possibly the #MeToo movement has fashion. Workers often don’t know they helped drive home the point that all are bound by such agreements until they workplace discrimination is wrong, and try to bring forth a lawsuit. laws that help shield sexual harassers from Good employers have nothing to fear judicial scrutiny are even worse. A letter Hawley and the rest of the coali- from discontinuing sexual harassment arbitration requirements. They should tion signed and sent to the congressional seize the opportunity to stop shielding leadership says: “Access to the judicial harassers and give workers a fair chance system, whether federal or state, is a fundamental right of all Americans. That right when they’ve been wronged. should extend fully to persons who have

‘We call B.S.’

Outraged by the Florida shootings? Let your vote do the talking in November.

A

needs this. I will be the change I want to see in this world.” Al Hoffman Jr., a major GOP donor in Florida, declared he would withhold contributions to politicians who continue supporting the sale of assault weapons to civilians.“Enough is enough!” he declared in an email to Republican leaders. Then there was the powerful speech Saturday by Emma Gonzalez, a survivor of last week’s shooting spree. She stated: “Politicians who sit in their gilded House and Senate seats funded by the NRA, telling us nothing could have been done to prevent this, we call B.S. They say tougher guns laws do not decrease gun violence. We call B.S. They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun. We call B.S. … They say no laws could have prevented the hundreds of senseless tragedies that have occurred. We call B.S.” All three are right. But being right isn’t enough. The NRA is not only passionate but persistent, year in and year out, in its gun-rights mesASSOCIATED PRESS sage. Millions of dollars in donations Gun shop owner Tiffany Teasdale-Causer demonstrates a Ruger to politicians such AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, the same model used by the shooter as Sen. Roy Blunt, in Florida as well as in a Texas church massacre in November. R-Mo., help keep lawmakers in line whenever the slaughter Fla., high school on Wednesday. of innocents prompts demand for gun We don’t want to diminish the bravery control. of those who step forward with grand The NRA doesn’t deserve this outsized gestures and words to prompt change. But influence. Its 5 million membership comgestures and words alone cannot match prises only about 7 percent of American the sustained power of the National Rifle gun owners and less than 1 percent of Association, the gun industry’s main lobregistered voters. bying arm. But if the rest of Americans want to take Florida gun owner Ben Dickmann took back their country and restore reasonhis AR-15 variant to the Broward County able gun-control laws, they must sustain sheriff’s office on Friday, declaring on the NRA’s same level of financial power Facebook,“I am a responsible, highly and voting-booth activism. Keep calling trained gun owner. … However I do not B.S. More importantly, keep politicians need this rifle. No one without a law in check when November elections roll enforcement badge needs this rifle.” Other around. gun owners should question their need for such weapons, he suggested.“No person dramatic spurt of political activism always follows mass shootings. Survivors express outrage. Activists vow to stop this madness. Pro-gun politicians offer thoughts and prayers. Then the nation’s attention turns elsewhere. The absence of sustained outrage and political engagement is exactly why the gun lobby always wins, no matter how high the casualty toll. This is not just a mental health issue, as President Donald Trump suggests. The absurd availability of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines is an equal contributor. Nikolas Cruz used a military-style AR-15 rifle to slaughter 17 people at a Broward County,

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS ONLINE GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Children need to learn consequences of actions After reading Eugene Robinson’s letter from The Washington Post and all the general news articles published in our St. Louis Post-Dispatch, I understand the Parkland Florida community wants to place blame. Mr. Robinson states the mental health system worked for Nikolaus Cruz. In the middle of his article, he states,“At the heart of the matter, though, lies the gun.” Other articles from The Associated Press said the FBI was at fault for not acting sooner after Cruz’s Facebook post. Muslims, Jews and Christians all have at the heart of our existence the Ten Commandments. For all of us, including agnostics and atheists, the Golden Rule was repeated almost daily in the public schools I attended in the 1960s and 1970s. Our schools’ policies revolved around respect for others. If we were disciplined by school authorities, the punishment at home was much more severe and long-lasting than what the principals carried out. I wonder how many children and teenagers today even know what the Golden Rule is. Another fact to ponder: At the Ariana Grande concert on May 22 that took away 22 innocent teenagers, there were no guns. Terrorists and what the media calls “lone wolves” will still find a method to harm innocent people and spread fear and pain in the hearts of many. Congress, politicians, the FBI, our president, legislation that protects private gun owners and social services did not cause these heinous crimes. Our children need spiritual guidance, hope, support, and to learn at a young age there are consequences for inhumane actions. Virginia A. Colombatto • St. Charles Retired public high school teacher

Post-Dispatch should practice what it preaches on gun control Your “Never Give In” editorial (Feb. 16) in the wake of the latest school shooting would carry more weight and less hypocrisy if the Post-Dispatch practiced what it preached — by no longer running ads for gun merchants, gun shows and their ilk. Or, at the very least, refusing ads that feature assault weapons such as the ones used in many of the mass shootings. As long as your publisher allows the advertising department to promote the purchase of such weapons, the Post-Dispatch is very much part of the problem, not the solution. John Wharton • Bonita Springs, Fla.

Twisted reasoning on Mueller investigation First there were assertions by President Trump that the Mueller investigation is a “witch hunt,” then the Nunes memo, then the Grassley/Graham “criminal referral.” Now an article by Marc Thiessen furthers the effort to undermine confidence in the Justice Department and its Russian investigation. The article twists or ignores the truth of Christopher Steele, the Steele Dossier, and its use by the FBI: Mr. Steele was not paid to be an advocate for the Clinton campaign, he was paid to investigate Russian ties to the Trump campaign based on his expertise on Russian intelligence programs; while Mr. Thiessen states the dossier depends on “allegations by Russian government officials,” I doubt if he knows the identities of Steele’s sources; Mr. Thiessen implies the FBI relied almost solely on the Steele dossier, but it was just one element in their surveillance case, corroborating information they already had; while the FBI cut its ties to Steele after finding he released information to the press, that in no way “calls into question

his credibility” as claimed by Thiessen. The question is whether rationale used by the FBI to justify surveillance of Carter Page (characterized by Mr. Thiessen as a “marginal former Trump campaign adviser”) was appropriate, and that question will be answered when Mr. Mueller completes his investigation. From my perspective, at this stage of investigating Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion between Russia and Trump, the good guys seem to be Christopher Steele and the FBI. Brent Langley • Edwardsville

Trump parade would be a show of insecurity Let’s compare apples to apples. In his Feb. 13th letter (“Schumer also called for a military parade”) Joseph Elstner decried the Post-Dispatch’s criticism of President Donald Trump’s dream parade. He said that Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio had called for the exact same thing. To be clear, Trump wants a massive display of tanks, rockets, military vehicles and marching troops at the cost of a cool $20 million. The logistics of assembling all this in Washington are mind-boggling. What Schumer called for is “military brass, color guards, military bands and flyovers,” enlisting groups whose main purpose is demonstration, display and entertainment. No mention of tanks and rockets. I’m sure the Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron and the President’s Own military band would be more than delighted to participate in such a parade for the president. That’s what they do. And it may already be in the budget. But that’s not what Trump wants. He wants to show off. As Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., so aptly put it,“I think confidence is silent and insecurity is loud. America is the most powerful country in all of human history; you don’t need to show it off.” And let’s not forget what our 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt said,“Walk softly and carry a big stick.” Debra Larson • Kirkwood

Celebrate Bridgeton landfill victory, remain vigilant On Feb. 1, Bridgeton and St. Louis residents won a big victory. After years of inaction, the EPA admitted it is not safe to keep Manhattan Project radioactive waste in the ground at West Lake/Bridgeton Landfill, and recommended removing the majority of it. (“EPA wants to do partial excavation of contaminants at radioactive West Lake Landfill Superfund site,” 2/1/18) Teamsters have been part of this fight from the very beginning because we understood that our members, neighbors, and livelihoods were in danger and we understood that Republic Services, West Lake’s owner, could not be trusted. Now, our struggle moves on to ensure that Republic Services relocates residents living within 1 mile of the landfill if they want and that the highest health and safety protections are enacted for workers doing the excavating and waste hauling work on and off the landfill. We should not forget that the responsible parties are multibillion-dollar operations and that Republic Services is backed by the second-richest man on the planet, Bill Gates. Republic and the other parties can easily foot the bill to make us safe, healthy and financially whole. This is a time to celebrate, while remaining vigilant as we now shift our attention to achieving the safest and fairest clean-up for families and workers. Marvin Kropp • Overland President, Teamsters Joint Council 13 Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/ letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

02.20.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

THE 1918 AUTO SHOW • The St. Louis automobile show began without the handicap of weather conditions that diminished attendance in cities

farther east. Some day, we are going to have airplane shows to compete with these interesting annual events. Just now, a point of significance is the amount of thought and mechanical ingenuity that still remains at the service of the public. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Pagedale has gotten a bad rap over municipal courts Calls for consolidation are misguided and statistically unsupported; North County residents’ opinions matter BY SAM ALTON

As the city and prosecuting attorney for the city of Pagedale since 2002, I am disappointed in the editorial regarding the city’s agreement to enter into a consent decree. I have served a mayor and board of aldermen who want safe streets and properties for their residents, nothing more. The municipal courts should never be utilized to generate revenue; rather they, like the circuit courts, should be used to enforce laws in a fair and constitutional manner. Pagedale has never received revenue in excess of the allowable limit under the Mack’s Creek law. The mayor of the city and I have previously attempted to respond to various inaccuracies printed by the Post on this topic by way of correspondence dated Jan. 29, 2016. We have repeatedly pointed out that the number of housing citations cited in the editorial are grossly misrepresented. In

fact, the city issued only 235 housing citations during 2014. The exaggerated number of 2,555 represents all citations — from 2014 and before, housing and non-housing alike (such as assault and trespassing) — existing at the time of your article printed in 2015. I told this to the reporter at the time. I sent in an op-ed to clarify and explain the inaccuracies. The Post refused to listen because it does not fit the ill-informed narrative of consolidation. This leads to my next point — the constant drumbeat of outsiders screaming for consolidation. I have attended north St. Louis County board, council and town hall meetings since 2002. How many has the editorial board attended? How many residents — other than the ones relating to this consent decree which, out of respect to the decree, I will not specifically address — has the board spoken with about their

respective board(s) or council(s)? Has the board asked whether residents want to trade the voice they have with their elected officials for the overly stretched bureaucracy of St. Louis County? I have. Overwhelmingly, people I’ve talked with do not. They trust their police and their elected officials. Has the board — or anyone — produced statistics showing St. Louis County has the capacity to oversee all of the municipalities? Or showing the response time of county police to a North County emergency? The cost of consolidation? No. What the Post has done is listen to a sketchy Rex Sinquefield-backed organization, such as the ironically named “Better Together,” that only wants to see North County municipalities vanish so they won’t be what some — like “King Rex” — falsely believe to be a drain on the overall tax pool. Ask unincorporated St. Louis County how they are doing with

crime and property values and let’s revisit the issue. Check the laws at every municipality, city and the county and we will see old, antiquated laws on the books. Laws that are rarely cited and never enforced. Should these laws be removed? Probably. Should they be enforced unless absolutely necessary and in line with the broad police power of a municipality? No. To avoid a protracted and expensive legal battle, the city agreed to certain conditions that are, for the most part, already required by recent Senate bills and Supreme Court rules. The city is paying nothing. We admit zero liability or wrongdoing. We simply don’t think a battle at the expense of the taxpayers is worth it to remove some antiquated laws from the books and make sure all residents and visitors to the city are afforded due process and treated fairly as required by the Missouri Supreme Court.

The calls for consolidation are misguided and statistically unsupported. The powerful cities in the western part of the county will never allow that to occur because they, like the North County municipalities, trust their police and elected officials and want them to stay. A deeper question might be why is the constant drumbeat focused on North County? Why do the opinions of most North County residents not matter? What is the logic in supporting the leap of consolidation without conducting the research to show its true cost and explain how services may, or may not be provided if the county were to take over? These are some of the questions I have before I blindly follow the drum beat of “King Rex” and cast off North County with no plan or support. Sam Alton is the city attorney and prosecutor of Pagedale.

GUN CONTROL

To curb shootings, repeal the Dickey Amendment, tighten background checks Since 1996, the CDC has been stripped of 96 percent of its funding to perform research on gun control loopholes for gun purchases. When it comes to gun control, there seems to be no place Allow me to introduce myself. for a sensible conversation. I am an 18-year-old senior We are only answered with at Kennett High School from thoughts and prayers. We’ve Kennett, Mo. I plan on attendheard it time and time again: ing the University of Missouri. “There’s nothing we can do.” I have two siblings — an older But when I think of Meadow sister and a younger brother — loving parents, and an adorable Pollack and her bright brown eyes that have now been closed dog that despises me. I love to forever, I cannot accept that read, write, listen to and make response. music, run long distance, and Since 1996, the Centers for spend time with my friends. Disease Control and PrevenI’m just a normal girl whose tion has lost 96 percent of its whole life is still ahead of her. funding to perform research on Allow me to introduce gun control, due to the Dickey someone else. Her name was Amendment. As politicians Meadow Pollack. Her name drone on about how they canwas Meadow Pollack. She not support gun control until was an 18-year-old senior at research is provided, they Marjory Stoneman Douglas ignore the fact that they are High School in Parkland, Fla. the reason that research is not She had been accepted to Lynn being performed. This amendUniversity in Boca Raton. She ment must be repealed. had a family. Maybe it looked In addition, background like mine; maybe it was as different as it could be. Maybe she checks should be mandatory for every gun purchase, had a pet, maybe a couple. She and I might’ve shared interests. including at gun shows and for online sales. In implementFrom the picture I’ve seen we ing this type of process, the sorta look alike: dark, thick government could tighten hair tied back; bright brown eyes; a long face sprinkled with loopholes in buying guns. Is it not common sense? To drive freckles. She was just a normal a car legally, you must pass a girl whose whole life was still test; shouldn’t such a standard ahead of her. be the same if not higher for a Was. semi-automatic assault rifle? Meadow Pollack was one While it may be an inconveof seventeen victims who lost their lives and their futures as a nience, we would all be a little result of the Parkland — if not a lot — safer. shooting on Feb. 14, As I’ve pointed 2018. For all of us who out before, I am no are talking and prayexpert. I’m just a ing and advocating student with ideas and ignoring, their she finds important. lives will be in the I can’t stop all tragpast tense, but their edies from occurring. loss will always be But when a terrorist present. drives over a dozen They aren’t here: people or a Hispanic McMullan Alyssa Alhadeff (14), immigrant is conScott Beigel (35), victed of a crime, the Martin Duque Anguiano (14), leaders of our government call Nicholas Dworet (17), Aaron for stricter immigration conFeis (37), Jaime Guttenberg (14), trols, more border protection, Chris Hixon (49), Luke Hoyer and even a wall. But now they (15), Cara Loughran (14), Gina are silent, prayers unanswered, Montalto (14), Joaquin Oliver telling us that there is nothing (17), Alaina Petty (14), Meadow they can do. Pollack (18), Helena Ramsay So much is yet to be done, (17), Alex Schachter (14), Carand those I have written about men Schentrup (16), and Peter have been only some modWang (15). est suggestions. Already, in They aren’t here. I cannot the aftermath of this tragedy, understand how our leaders more and more young people in government can stand idly are speaking up to make sure by as students and faculty of a change begins. It reminds me school not too different from of a David Bowie lyric from the my own are murdered. song “Changes.” I’m not going to pretend to “And these children that you be an expert about guns. I’m spit on as they try to change not a hunter nor am I from a their world are immune to your gun-owning family, but as a consultations; they’re quite member of a rural community, aware of what they’re going I know many people who are. through.” And I don’t want their guns We must change. For our taken away in some massive, families, for our students, for ill-run recall or buy-back. Yet I Meadow and all those whom am determined to see increased we are now without. research on gun control, more Marie McMullan is a senior at Kennett High background checks, and no School in Kennett, Mo.

BY MARIE MCMULLAN

CNN

Student journalist David Hogg on CNN after the shooting.

Going Hogg wild Student journalist could be the change agent many in the reform movement have been waiting for KATHLEEN PARKER Washington Post

It was a profoundly poignant image: Thirty to 40 teens huddled together in a small dark room, their downturned faces illuminated by cellphones as they learned about an active shooter prowling their school. Via news apps, these survivors of Wednesday’s murderous rampage at a Parkland, Fla., high school, where 17 were killed and 15 injured, watched news develop in real time as the horror was occurring just a short walk away. Their virtual distance from the shooter was probably little comfort when the inconceivable might still happen. A locked door is no barrier to a semi-automatic weapon. While brothers, sisters, friends and teachers were out there, possibly being shot, this group stared helplessly, mesmerized by the gruesome reality show playing out on their screens. Nearly every news report mentioned the instant-replay aspect of what transpired. “Thoughts and prayers” fell uselessly upon ears deafened by gunshot and hearts numb to their meaning. The same debates followed the same questions: What will it take? How many children have to die before “they” do something? I’ve written this column before. In a fresh if disconcerting twist, the student survivors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School almost seemed to be performing in their media appearances. Like well-rehearsed actors, they seemed to know their moves, what to say, how to speak to the camera. It was spooky listening to some of them, so articulate and calm in the aftermath of such carnage. Their reactions seemed more studied than real. But then, why wouldn’t students adept at drills and color-coded alerts have a few bullet points in mind for the day just in case a gunman showed up at their school? David Hogg was a standout that day. A 17-year-old senior and school news director, Hogg

Students after the Parkland shooting.

happened to have been among the few dozen students stowed in the dark office earlier mentioned. And somehow, he just happened to detach himself from the ongoing mayhem long enough to interview and record his fellow students about what they were experiencing and, in a scene worthy of a future teen cult movie, record their thoughts about gun policy. When Hogg later appeared on camera, he spoke like a seasoned combat correspondent. Seemingly mature beyond his years, he looked straight into the camera and, speaking concisely, he addressed the sad reality of our nation’s failure to put an end to gun violence. “Ideas are great,” he intoned. “What we really need is action.” Despite sounding more adult than many adults, Hogg was nonetheless keen to remind viewers that he isn’t really a grown-up. “We’re children,” he pleaded to the cameras. “You guys are the adults.” Indeed. This calm, quick-witted kid is almost straight out of a novel. In my telling, he would go on to create and lead a movement that finally spurs serious gun reform in the U.S. and successfully lobbies Congress to designate the NRA as a terrorist organization. He would become the first highschool journalist to receive a Pulitzer Prize in a new category

ASSOCIATED PRESS

— “Making News While Covering Breaking News” — launching him on a TV career. Something like that. Hogg could be the change agent many in the reform movement have been waiting for. He may represent a generational, evolutionary reflex to the paralysis that began 19 years ago when two shooters killed 13 people at Columbine High School. Hogg and his contemporaries have never known a world in which students, even first-graders, weren’t slaughtered at their desks. Sooner or later, someone was going to rise up as counterpoint to such evil. Politicians don’t change or fix things until their constituents demand it — and every successful movement needs a charismatic leader. Might it take a youngster like Hogg to assume such a role? It is altogether fitting, if somehow strange, that a child born into a media culture would think first to turn on his camera, the better to capture the faces of fear. Doubtless, no one trapped in a room while bullets are flying and friends are dying thinks there shouldn’t be enhanced gun control. In the battle for sensible reform, the guy with the camera has the biggest gun of all. Kathleen Parker kathleenparker@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

Confederate statue toppling cases dismissed North Carolina judge is unconvinced that video identifies two of the protesters BY JONATHAN DREW Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C . • Problems identifying protesters on video hindered North Carolina prosecutors on Monday as they sought to hold demonstrators responsible for toppling a Confederate statue last summer. A judge dismissed the criminal cases against the first two defendants to appear in a series of individual trials, and he found a third not guilty. Trials for five others are to be held at a later date.

Prosecutors showed videos of protesters bringing out a ladder, attaching a rope and yanking down the statue in front of a Durham County government building in August. But defense attorneys successfully argued through a series of objections that investigators had failed to meet stringent standards to prove the first two defendants were the people seen on the video. In dropping charges against defendant Peter Gilbert, Durham County District Court Judge Fred Battaglia noted “the court

must dismiss this case now ... because the identification has not been made.” He cited a similar reason for dropping the case against the first defendant of the day, Dante Strobino. While Battaglia declined to dismiss the third case over similar defense arguments, he nonetheless found Raul Jimenez not guilty on all charges. The three had faced misdemeanor counts including defacing a public building or monument and conspiracy. The rest of the defendants face similar charges. The toppling of the statue helped thrust North Carolina into a national debate on Confederate monuments in the aftermath of white supremacist

OBITUARIES

Arnold, Stephen R. - St. Louis Brauer, Joy Ford - Wildwood Dendrinelis, Sophia J. - St. Louis Grgic, Mato - St. Louis Haas, Rita - Belleville, IL Harmon, Norma L. - St. Louis

Arnold, Stephen R.

Service 11:30 a.m., Thursday, February 22, 2018, Hoffmeister South County, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd. Visitation at Funeral Home 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, February 21, 2018.

Brauer, Joy Ford

protests in Charlottesville, Va., which left one counterdemonstrator dead last August. The Virginia demonstrations were triggered by a dispute over another Confederate monument. While statues elsewhere have been vandalized, the Durham case drew widespread attention because protesters succeeded in bringing it down. North Carolina is among Southern states with the most Confederate monuments. It also has a law preventing local officials from removing the statues. Some of the Durham protesters have cited the Virginia violence as the reason they gathered Aug. 14 for the demonstration that led to the statue’s top-

Celebrations of Life

pling. They say removing Confederate monuments is part of a larger fight against racism — an idea echoed by defense attorney Scott Holmes on Monday. Holmes told the judge that the nearly century-old statue benefited “those who would celebrate the traitorous, violent defense of human enslavement.” However, some Southerners argue that the memorials honor fallen ancestors and represent history, not racism. And, prosecutors argued, the defendants broke the law by destroying the county’s property. “This was not a spontaneous event, but a well-orchestrated plan of organized destruction,” said prosecutor Ameshia Cooper.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Harrison, Ruth Margaret - Wildwood Heinrich, Patricia A. - St. Louis

Michniok - see Martin Ring, Roberta "Bobbie" - St. Louis

Kenny, Joseph "J.J." - St. Charles

Sherman, Allan L. - St. Louis

Ketterer, Thomas G. "Tom" - Highland, IL

Smegner, Hildagarde "Hilda" - St. Louis

Martin, Marie - St. Louis

Williams, Alberta Ruth - Florissant

Kenny, Joseph "J.J."

February 16, 2018. Services: Vis. Fri. 2/23 4-8pm, Serv. Sat. 2/24 11:30am, Vis Sat. 10:30-11:30 am. Baue Cave Springs. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Ketterer, Thomas G. "Tom"

Fraternal Notices Please be advised of the death of Frank Hummel on February 15, 2018 Retired 1987. Burial St. Peter & PAul

age 70, of Highland, IL, died February 17, 2018. Son of the late Rest In Peace. Cletus and Elizabeth, nee Schumacher, Ketterer. Dear brother of Dan and John Ketterer of Carlyle. Visitation Tuesday, FebruInMemorials Memoriam ary 20, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Moss Funeral Home, Breese, IL. Funeral Mass of Christian Burial Wednesday, Dendrinelis, Sophia J. February 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Felicitas Catholic Church, Daniel Bryan Greenwood (nee Bouras), Saturday, February 17, 2018. Beloved wife of the Beaver Prairie, IL. Interment in St. Felicitas Cemetery, Beaver beloved son, brother and uncle, late James Dendrinelis; loving mother of John (Susan), Diane Prairie, IL. passed away on August 6, 2017 at the (Tom) Boone and Alex (Janice) Dendrinelis; dear grandmother of age of 58. Lauren (fiance George) and Nicholas; our dear sister-in-law, Dan Greenwood was born in Martin, Marie Milwaukee, Wisconsin on February aunt, cousin and friend. 20, 1959. Dan was the fifth child of Services: Visitation at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church (nee Arena), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Dorothy and Harold Greenwood, Jr. (Kingshighway and Forest Park) Thursday, February 22, 10 a.m. Church, Saturday, February 17, 2018. Beloved wife of the late He grew up in Webster Groves, MisLloyd Martin; devoted mother of Terese (Rick) Michniok; adoring until service time 11 a.m. Interment St. Matthews Cemetery. souri and graduated from Chaminade grandmother of Lauren, Kevin and Erin; dear sister of the late Memorials to Salvation Army or St. Nicholas Church College Preparatory School in 1978. Joseph, John and Pat; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and appreciated. He followed his father's footsteps and friend. pursued a career in sales that inServices: Visitation at St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church, cluded commodities, real estate and Grgic, Mato automobiles. Saturday, February 24, 9:30 a.m. until funeral Mass at 10:30 Feb. 18, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON, 10151 Gravois, Dan was preceded in death by his a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Thurs., 9:15 a.m. to St. Joseph Croatian Church for 10 a.m. parents and brothers, Timothy and Joseph. Dan is survived by five Masses or contributions to Crossroads Hospice appreciated. siblings, Beth (Scott) Robb, Susan Renard, Thomas, Robert (Pam) and Mass. Interment Sts. Peter & Paul Cem. Vis. Wed., 5-9 p.m. A KUTIS AFFTON service. 75, February 17, 2018. Celebration of Life at St. John Church, 15800 Manchester Rd., Ellisville, Saturday, 1:00 p.m. For more info see Schrader.com.

Haas, Rita

Died 2/18/2018. Visitation: 4 to 8 p.m., Tuesday at RENNER Funeral Home, Belleville, IL. Mass 10 a.m., Wednesday at St. Luke Catholic Church, Belleville, IL.

Harmon, Norma L.

(nee Clement), Sunday, February 18, 2018. Memorial visitation will be held at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, February 24 from 2-4 p.m.

Harrison, Ruth Margaret

79, Feb. 16, 2018. Funeral svs. Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, Town & Country, Sat., 11 am. Vis. Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Fri. 4-8 pm. See Schrader.com.

Heinrich, Patricia A.

(nee Hartbauer), passed away peacefully on Friday, February 16, 2018 under the care of de Greeff Hospice House in St. Louis. The daughter of the late Henry a n d L il l ia n H a r t b a u e r ( n e e Brenner). Pat was born on April 5, 1942 in Washington, MO. She h a s 2 you n ger sisters, Jane Garrett and Ina "Cookie" Hays. Shortly after graduating from Washington High School, she moved to St. Louis to work at Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. Not long after moving to St. Louis she married David L. Heinrich and the couple was happily married for 53 years. They are parents to 2 children, Deanna Snyder and Jeffrey Heinrich. Patricia spent 33 years working as a Vice President of Retail Banking for Equality Savings & Loan, Allegiant Bank, National City Bank and PNC. Pat enjoyed cooking, entertaining and traveling. Her family was the joy in her life and she especially enjoyed watching her grandsons, Nolan and Ryan Snyder play sports. She had many friends and was an extremely caring person. She always placed other people's needs before her own. As a woman of strong faith, she often expressed her gratitude for all the blessings in her life. Her husband Dave remembers that she always had a kind word to say about everyone. She and her family were long time members of St. Anthony of Padua Parish and later became members of St. Mark Parish. Pat is the mother-in-law to Robert Snyder and aunt to Steven Crump, Susan (Crump) Ward and Julie (Crump) Daniels, Kirk Garrett, Brad Garrett, Tom Hays and Erin (Hays) Simon. The family requests that memorial donations be sent to de Greeff Hospice House, St. Anthony of Padua Parish or St. Mark Parish in lieu of flowers. Services: Memorial Visitation to be held at St. Mark Catholic Church on Thursday, February 22 from 9 a.m. until Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. Inurnment Resurrection Mausoleum. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE.

Ring, Roberta "Bobbie"

February 18, 2018; beloved wife of the late Frederick Ring; p rou d mother of Ken (Teri) Ring, Cheryl Ring (Monti) Mantinband and Dr. Daniel (Dr. Julie) Ring; extraordinary Bubie of Jacob, Adam and Eli Ring, Zach and Jeremiah Mantinband, Sydney and Jordan Ring; beloved daughter of the late Nelson and the late Lenore Berger; dear daughter-in-law of the late Al and the late Lillian Ring; loving sister of Linda (the late Stevan Newmark) (David) Marcus and Marvin Berger; adoring aunt of Rick (Monica) and Todd (Karen) Newmark, Michael and Natalie Berger; regarded as a sister to her closest friends and many lasting friendships; dear great-aunt and cousin. Bobbie was a past president of St. Louis Chapter Hadassah; co-facilitator of NCJW Wife Widow Woman program; past president of the Parents Group UMKC Medical School, singer with the USO Junior Volunteer Hostesses; board member of the ADL; established Ring CPR Fund at the JCC and was a preschool teacher at Congregation Temple Israel. Services: Visitation Tuesday, February 20, 10:00 am at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd., followed by funeral service at 10:30 am. Interment Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery-White Road. Memorial contributions preferred to the Ring CPR Fund at the JCC, Nusach Hari-B'nai Zion Cong. or Pancreatic Cancer Research. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Sherman, Allan L.

February 18, 2018 Beloved husband of the late Barbara S. Sherman. Dear father of Edward R. (Sharon M.) Sherman. Loving grandfather of Daniel E., Amelia B. and Bennett C. Sherman. Dear brother of Fred (the late Judy) Sherman and Carl (Helene) Sherman. Special friend of Marilyn Reznik. Our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service Wednesday, February 21, 1:00 p.m. at United Hebrew Congregation, 13788 Conway Road, with interment to follow at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Visitation for Mr. Sherman 12:30 p.m. at United Hebrew. Contributions in his memory may be made to United Hebrew Congregation or to the charity of the donor's choice. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

Dierbergs Florist

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SEND FLOWERS AND GIFTS, OR CREATE A MEMORIAL WEBSITE

Smegner, Hildagarde "Hilda"

Williams, Alberta Ruth

(nee Shannon), passed Feb. 18, 2018. Born Jan. 19, 1935 to Emmett and Rena Shannon. Preceded in death by parents and 4 brothers and 4 sisters. Beloved wife of Glynn Williams for 65 years; dear mother of Jackie, Marcie and Pat; grandchildren Tiffani, Megan, Rachel, Shelby, Wyatt, Sophia and Kylie. Services: Feb. 21, 1 to 3 p.m. at Hutchens Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd. 63031.

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W.

At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Florists

age 96, passed away on Sun, Feb. 18, 2018. Beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, great-great-grandmother, and great bingo player. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Fraternal Notices

Beautiful Memorials

Michael (Donna), sister-in-law Tiffany Ellis-Greenwood and 10 nieces and nephews. His family held a private celebration of his life at Resurrection Cemetery on August 12, 2017. Many thanks to family and friends for their support. Donations can be made in Dan Greenwood's name to Saint Patrick Center of St. Louis. www.stpatrickcenter.org

Please be advised of the death of Bro. Harry E. Grupe Journeyman Wireman on Pension Member 67 Years Passed away on February 18, 2018 Visitation Wed., Feb. 21, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Thurs., Feb. 22, 10 a.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary 6300MO-30, Cedar Hill, MO 63016 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

STLtoday.com/obits


NEWS

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Turkey tells Syrian government not to enter Kurdish enclave

Trump Jr. to give foreign policy speech while on ‘unofficial’ trip to India BY ANNIE GOWEN Washington Post

NEW DELHI • The president’s el-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A municipality worker in Ankara, Turkey, fixes a new street sign Monday. Nevzat Tandogan Street, where the U.S. Embassy is located, was renamed “Olive Branch Street” in Turkish, after Turkey’s military operation to drive the Kurdish militia out of an enclave in Syria. BY ZEINA KARAM AND BASSEM MROUE associated Press

• Turkey warned the Syrian government Monday against entering the Kurdish-controlled enclave in northern Syria where a major Turkish military offensive is underway, saying it would hit back at the troops if their goal is to protect the Kurdish fighters. The warning sets up a potential clash between Turkish troops and Syrian government forces backed by Russia and Iran, whose deployment would be a first step toward restoring President Bashar Assad’s presence along the border with Turkey. The warning by the Turkish foreign minister came shortly after Syrian state media said pro-government forces would enter Afrin “within hours” to “bolster” local forces in confronting Turkey’s “aggression” after reaching an agreement with the Kurdish militia known as the People’s

BEIRUT

Protection Units, or YPG, which controls Afrin. Details of the deal were not announced by either side, and Kurdish officials said talks were still underway. By nightfall, no troops had entered Afrin. Assad’s troops have had no presence in Afrin since they pulled out of most of northern Syria in 2012, as nation-wide protests against Assad transformed into a civil war. A return to the area, where a potent mix of regional and international powers have boots on the ground, could further complicate the situation and lead to unwanted confrontations. But depending on the details of the agreement, it may also serve to defuse the situation in Afrin, where Turkey has been struggling to achieve results in its now monthlong offensive to push back YPG fighters from its borders. Ankara considers the YPG a “terrorist group” linked to the Kurdish insurgency

NATION DIGEST Uber food driver accused in shooting Police say an Atlanta food delivery driver accused of fatally shooting a customer is in custody. Atlanta police said they had a warrant charging Robert Bivines, 36, with felony murder. Local media reported that Bivines turned himself in on Monday. Police said Ryan Thornton, 30, ordered delivery from UberEATS late Saturday and went outside his Buckhead apartment complex for his food. Investigators say witnesses told them Thornton and the driver exchanged words before the shooting. The Atlanta JournalConstitution cited an UberEATS statement as saying Bivines passed a background check and had worked only days with the company. Carter ‘deathly afraid’ as wife underwent surgery • Former President Jimmy Carter said Monday he was “deathly afraid” as his 90-year-old wife underwent surgery over the weekend. Rosalynn Carter was recovering at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after surgeons removed scar tissue from a portion of her small intestine early Sunday. Meanwhile, her husband of 71 years kept his scheduled appearance Monday at a Presidents Day event at the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in his hometown of Plains. Jimmy Carter addressed concerns about his wife’s health and surgery in remarks to several hundred people. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Carter said his wife had suffered problems for years that appear to have been caused by scar tissue from an operation she had long ago. “Saturday night they operated and found the scar tissue from the old operation about 50 years ago had strangled almost 2 feet of her small intestine,” Carter said. He said doctors “didn’t give me a lot of hope” until the operation concluded hours later. “I was deathly afraid,” Carter said. “I prayed for three hours.” He said a doctor finally “told me she was going to be OK.” Bone may be from pirate • Researchers say they’re working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel “Black Sam” Bellamy. The Whydah Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Mass., publicly displayed the bone Monday. The

within Turkey’s borders. On Jan. 20, it launched a major air and ground offensive, pounding the enclave with airstrikes and artillery on a daily basis. Turkey’s foreign minister, speaking at a news conference in Amman, Jordan, said Turkey would have no problem if Syrian government forces were entering Afrin to clear the area from YPG fighters, but that it would strike back if it turns out the deployment was meant to shore up the Kurds against Turkey. “If the regime is entering to protect the YPG, then no one can stop us, stop Turkey or the Turkish soldiers,” Mevlut Cavusoglu said. Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag later denied the Syrian state media reports, saying they were “false” and had “not been confirmed by authorities.” He added, however, that any move to protect the Kurdish fighters would be a “disaster” for the region.

WORLD DIGEST bone was found near what is believed to be Bellamy’s pistol. The objects were pulled from the Whydah Gally shipwreck several years ago. The museum has enlisted forensic scientists to extract DNA and compare it with DNA from a living Bellamy descendant. Testing will take about a month once it gets the sample. The Whydah sank in 1717. The wreck was discovered in 1984. Most of its treasure is thought to remain on the ocean floor. Wildfire threatens homes • A wind-driven wildfire in rural central California threatened hundreds of buildings Monday, including a historic railroad station, but officials said they made some gains after the flames exploded in size. The blaze scorched 3½ square miles of chaparral bush and shrub oak in the town of Bishop on the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada that is popular for hiking, climbing and hunting. Officials ended most evacuations that were ordered near the town but warned that strong winds were expected in the area and urged residents to remain vigilant. Trump polls last • He’s the greatest at being the worst, according to a new poll. President Donald Trump came in last in a poll of political scientists that ranked all 44 of the people who have served as chief executive. Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Teddy Roosevelt in order took the top four spots in the Boise State University “Presidential Greatness Survey.” The poll quizzed “current and recent members of the Presidents & Executive Politics Section of the American Political Science Association,” described as “the foremost organization of social science experts in presidential politics.” Out of the 320 political scientists contacted between Dec. 22 and Jan. 16, 170 complete responses were received. They were asked to rate each president on a scale of zero to 100, and then the scores were averaged together for each president. Lincoln got a rating of 95.03, while Washington got a rating of 92.59. Presidents Thomas Jefferson, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, Barack Obama, Ronald Reagan and Lyndon Johnson rounded out the top 10. Trump’s rating? A lowly 12.34 — or last of 44 different presidents. From news services

Puerto Rican power company gets loan A federal judge on Monday approved a $300 million loan for Puerto Rico’s power company that officials say will help keep the troubled agency operating until late March. The ruling comes just days after the judge had rejected a $1 billion loan request made by a federal control board overseeing the U.S. territory’s finances. The judge had said officials did not provide sufficient evidence proving Puerto Rico’s Electric Power Authority needed the money, so the board submitted a revised request for $300 million on Friday. Hours before the judge approved the request, Gov. Ricardo Rossello maintained that the company still needed a $1 billion loan to keep operating in the months ahead. The $300 million would come out of the government’s general fund, but officials needed permission from the court to do so given that the island is undergoing a process like bankruptcy to restructure a portion of its $73 billion public debt amid an 11-year recession. The power company is $9 billion in debt. Britain talks up Brexit • Britain is trying to reassure the European Union that it doesn’t plan to slash regulations and standards in order to boost its economy after Brexit. Brexit Secretary David Davis will use a speech Tuesday in Vienna to promise that Brexit won’t lead to “an Anglo-Saxon race to the bottom, with Britain plunged into a ‘Mad Max’-style world borrowed from dystopian fiction.” Britain’s Brexit department said Monday that Davis will tell Austrian business leaders that maintaining similar standards and regulations will allow trade to continue without barriers after Britain leaves the EU in 2019. Britain wants to retain close economic ties with the EU, while also becoming free to strike new trade deals around the world. EU leaders warn Britain can’t have both freedom from the bloc’s regulations and frictionless trade. Garbage mound kills 17 • Heavy rains triggered the partial collapse of a huge mound of garbage in Mozambique’s capital on Monday, killing 17 people who were buried by debris. Authorities believe more bodies could be buried at the Hulene garbage dump on the outskirts of Maputo, and a search was underway. The garbage in the poor, densely populated area where the

disaster happened rose to the height of a three-story building, according to the Portuguese news agency Lusa. West Bank population grows • An Israeli settler leader says the number of settlers in the West Bank grew at nearly twice the rate of Israel’s overall population last year. Yaakov Katz says the settler population reached over 435,000 people last year, up 3.4 percent from the previous year. In comparison, Israel’s overall population grew 1.8 percent. Katz says he expects even more construction now that President Donald Trump is in office. Trump’s Mideast team is dominated by allies of settlers, and Katz says there is a friendly atmosphere after eight contentious years with the Obama White House. Katz’s “West Bank Jewish Population Stats” is based on official government data and sponsored by Bet-El Institutions, a prominent settler organization. Some KFCs in U.K. reopen • Fried-chicken fans were in a flutter Monday after most of the 900 KFC outlets in the U.K. and Ireland were forced to close because of a shortage of chicken. The company apologized to customers, blaming “teething problems” with its new delivery partner, DHL. KFC first apologized for the problems on Saturday. In an update Monday, it listed almost 300 stores as open but did not say when the rest might join them. Serbia arrests foreigners • Eight foreign citizens, including two Americans and two Ukrainians, have been arrested in Serbia on suspicion that they tried to photograph and enter military facilities without authorization, officials said on Monday. State TV said the U.S. and Ukrainian citizens allegedly tried to take shots of the military security headquarters in downtown Belgrade with a drone. The report did not identify them or give details, saying only that the Ukrainians are women and that they are all in police custody. Announcing the arrest of the foreigners, Serbian Defense Minister Aleksandar Vulin said he does not want to prejudge the case that is under investigation, but added: “It is not a coincidence that such a large number of foreign citizens tried to bust into premises controlled by the Army of Serbia.” From news services

dest son, Donald Trump Jr., is making what’s been dubbed an unofficial visit to India to promote his family’s real estate projects. But he’s also planning to deliver a foreign policy speech on Indo-Pacific relations at an event with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Beginning Tuesday, the junior Trump will have a full schedule of meet-and-greets with investors and business leaders throughout India where the Trump family has real estate projects — Mumbai, the New Delhi suburb of Gurgaon and the eastern city of Kolkata. Indian newspapers have been running full-page, glossy advertisements hyping his arrival and the latest Trump Tower project under the headline: “Trump is here — Are You Invited?” The ads also invited home buyers to plunk down a booking fee (about $38,000) to “join Mr. Donald Trump Jr. for a conversation and dinner.” Public relations executives working with two local developers arranging the Trump dinner declined to give specifics about the event. During the visit, Trump, the executive vice president of the Trump Organization, will take a break from his private promotional tour to give an address on “Reshaping Indo-Pacific Ties: The New Era of Cooperation” at a global business summit on Friday evening, co-sponsored by the Economic Times newspaper. Modi will also speak at the summit on the topic of “Preparing India for the Future.” News that the Trump Organization would be offering buyers in the Trump Tower the chance to meet the president’s son sparked criticism of potential conflict of interest, and the fact that Trump Jr., 40, will be giving a foreign policy speech while on a private business trip complicates the matter further, ethics expert said. The senior Trump did not divest himself of his businesses when he was elected president. Rather, he turned the day-to-day operations over to his older sons, Don Jr. and Eric, to run. Eric Trump said last year that “the company and policy and government are completely separated. We have built an unbelievable wall in between the two.” Watchdog groups disagree. “Trump’s company is literally selling access to the president’s son overseas,” said Jordan Libowitz, the communications director for Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, which is frequently critical of the first family. “For many people wanting to impact American policy in the region, the cost of a condo is a small price to pay to lobby one of the people closest to the president, far away from watchful eyes.” Critics have often complained of the high cost of Secret Service agents accompanying the Trump children on private business trips, straining the agency’s budget. The Trump Organization’s spokesman did not return calls or emails requesting comment. Amit Sharma, a spokesman for the Gurgaon developer, said that they had sold apartments worth nearly $70 million since the Gurgaon towers project launched in early January. The buildings, where flats run from $780,000 to $1.6 million, have private elevator service, in-residence catering and an indoor swimming pool. Along with the Trump Tower Delhi NCR in Gurgaon, projects include two residential towers in the western city of Pune, towers in Mumbai and Kolkata and a planned office tower in Gurgaon, which is also known as Gurugram. The Trump Organization has more business entities in India than in any other foreign country, financial filings show, with licensing bringing in estimated payments of $1.6 million to $11 million since 2014. Later this week, Trump Jr. will travel to Mumbai to open the demo unit at the golden-facade Trump Tower that’s being built by the family development firm of Mangal Prabhat Lodha, a state legislator in Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party. That relationship has also sparked concern about potential conflict of interest. As with most of its foreign deals, the Trump family licenses its name to the projects, collecting hefty royalty fees but avoiding risky investments. “Part of the deal was that Trump would come and do promotions every couple of years,” said an employee of the Lodha Group, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media. The election changed that, he said, meaning the kids now have to step in. “Ideally we’d have preferred Ivanka,” he said, referring to the president’s eldest daughter, who is now an adviser to her father. “She has a better public image. But it makes sense for Donald Trump Jr. to do it.”


WORLD

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

Ex-workers tell of Russian ‘troll factory’ Indictment of 13 for meddling with U.S. presidential election is valid, they say BY NAIRA DAVLASHYAN AND IRINA TITOVA Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA •

While Russian officials scoff at a U.S. indictment charging 13 Russians with meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, several people who worked at the same St. Petersburg “troll factory” say they think the criminal charges are well-founded. Marat Mindiyarov, a former commenter at the innocuously named Internet Research Agency, says the organization’s Facebook department hired people with excellent English skills to sway U.S. public opinion through an elaborate social media campaign. His own experience at the agency makes him trust the U.S. indictment, Mindiyarov said. “I believe that that’s how it was and that it was them,” he said. The federal indictment issued Friday names a businessman linked to President Vladimir Putin and a dozen other Russians. It alleges that Yevgeny Prigozhin — a wealthy restaurateur dubbed “Putin’s chef,” paid for the internet operation that created fictitious social media accounts and used them to spread tendentious messages. The aim of the factory’s work was either to influence voters or to undermine their faith in the U.S. political system, the 37page indictment states. Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Monday that while the indictment focuses on “Russian nationals,” it gives “no indication that the Russian gov-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this 2010 photo, businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin (right) shows Russian President Vladimir Putin his factory outside St. Petersburg, Russia. On Friday, Prigozhin and 12 others were charged by the U.S., accused of trying to sway the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

ernment was involved in this in any way.” Peskov reasserted that Moscow did not interfere in the U.S. election. Mindiyarov said he failed the language exam needed to get a job on the Internet Research Agency’s Facebook desk, where the pay was double than the domestic side of the factory. The sleek operation produced content that looked as if it were written by native English speakers, he said. “These were people with excellent language skills, interpreters, university graduates,” he said, “It’s very hard to tell it’s a foreigner writing because they master the language wonderfully.” The English test he took asked for a writing sample about Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning the U.S. presidential vote, Mindiyarov recalled. “I wrote that her chances

were high and she could become the first female president,” he said. Mindiyarov said he took a job at the troll factory in late 2014 because he was unemployed and curious. At the time, about 400 people occupied four floors of an office building and worked 12-hour shifts, he said. Most of the operation focused on the separatist insurgency in eastern Ukraine and Western sanctions against Russia, not political races in the West, he said. The factory had video and photo departments, Mindiyarov said. The trolls received their wages in cash and operated in teams as they tried to foment public interest with fake discussions, he said. “We worked in a group of three where one played the part of a scoundrel, the other one was a hero, and the third one kept a neutral position,” he said. “For instance, one could write that

Putin was bad, the other one would say it was not so, and the third would confirm the position of the second while inserting some picture.” After only a couple of months, Mindiyarov quit. He said he hated the work. “The world in those comments was divided into black and white: America was bad, Putin was good,” he said. “They praised whatever had to do with Putin and criticized anything related to America, ‘gay’ Europe, and so on. That was the principle of the work.” Another former worker at the St. Petersburg workshop, Lyudmila Savchuk, also described it as an efficient venture that churned out posts around the clock. Like Mindiyarov, Savchuk was employed in the domestic department of the “troll farm,” not the international division. Nevertheless, she said her experience there corresponds with what she knows of the allegations made by American authorities. “The posts and comments are made to form the opinion of Russian citizens regarding certain issues, and as we see it works for other countries, too,” Savchuk said. Paid trolls used carefully crafted fake identities that made them come across like real people, she said. “The most important principle of the work is to have an account like a real person,” Savchuk said. “They create real characters, choosing a gender, a name, a place of living and an occupation. Therefore, it’s hard to tell that the account was made for the propaganda.” Along with producing social media supporting Donald Trump’s candidacy and disparaging Clinton, the Internet Research Agency purchased online advertisements using identities stolen from Americans and

Scandals highlight Israeli leader’s obsession with control over media BY ARON HELLER Associated Press

• Benjamin Netanyahu came to prominence as a star of the media age, an upgrade from older Israeli politicians in his telegenic poise, mastery of message and gift for the sound bite in English and Hebrew. But those skills may have morphed into a darker obsession with controlling the media that now accounts for much of the scandal threatening his rule. Despite unquestioned skill as a communicator, Netanyahu has long had a rocky time with Israel’s mainstream media, which is pugnacious in general and traditionally more liberal than the nationalistic governments he has led. He has accused the media of a politically motivated “witch hunt” against him and his family, members of which have become embroiled in various scandals as well. He has maintained this message even after Israeli police last week recommended Netanyahu be indicted for corruption and bribery in two cases, one of which involved hours of recordings in which he seemed to entertain offering preferential treatment to a newspaper publisher in exchange for favorable coverage.

JERUSALEM

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Acura

This week, details about another investigation have emerged involving suspicions that the prime minister promoted regulation worth hundreds of millions of dollars to Israel’s Bezeq telecom company in return for puff pieces about his family in a highly popular subsidiary news site, Walla. Netanyahu has not yet been named as a suspect in the case. Two close confidants have been arrested in connection with the probe, exjournalists at Walla attested to pressure from above to refrain from negative coverage of Netanyahu and his family, and reports have surfaced of Netanyahu’s wife Sara relaying requests to Bezeq officials. Associates have long attested to the leader’s thin skin and fixation on coverage. “Netanyahu always wanted to control the media,’” former spokesman Aviv Bushinsky told Israel’s Army Radio on Monday. “He said: ‘If you don’t have a media outlet, you can’t operate as prime minister.’” Last week, police said they had enough evidence to indict Netanyahu on bribery and breach of trust charges for accepting nearly $300,000 in gifts from two billionaires — in addition to discussing less critical coverage with Arnon Mozes, the publisher of the Yediot Ahronot daily.

staged political rallies while posing as American political activists, the indictment alleges. The agency also paid people in the U.S. to promote or ridicule the candidates, the document states. Analysts and journalists have found that some of the Russianrun accounts accrued national followings in the United States, while far-right Americans and several members of Trump’s team retweeted posts created in St. Petersburg. It reportedly used doctored videos to spread false reports about a supposed Islamic State attack on a chemical plant in Louisiana and a purported case of Ebola in the state of Georgia. Seeking to sow division and mistrust ahead of the U.S. election, the agency apparently whipped up a fake video of an AfricanAmerican woman being shot dead by a white police officer in Atlanta. “All of the trolls knew that it’s Prigozhin who stands behind this all,” Mindiyarov, the excommenter who left the organization in early 2015, said. “But nobody had any evidence.” He said that the employees disliked Prigozhin, in part because he didn’t set up a cafeteria or canteen in the troll factory building even though he owned a sprawling catering business. While the U.S. indictment mentioned 13 people, many more must have been involved in the effort, according to Savchuk. “Here they laugh about the news that 13 people could influence the elections in the U.S., but there were many more people doing that,” she said. “These technologies are unbelievably effective.” She added that she learned how effective the troll farm’s work was when she saw regular people sharing opinions and information that she knew were planted by trolls.

Creating A Safer Home for LOCALLY & VETERAN OWNED BUSINESS

You and Your Loved Ones

We specialize in home modifications that improve the quality and longevity of life! Founded on a heartfelt devotion to therapeutic solutions that treat the whole person.

• • • •

Home modifications Barrier Free Showers No subcontractors No-pressure home evaluation BEFORE

AFTER AFTER

Tub-to-Shower starting at

5,900

$ STAIR LIFTS

RAMPS

call today and receive a free in home quote

RIDES

314-758-0594 • 618-857-3458

Audi

Buick

Chevrolet

Chevrolet

Chevrolet

'09 Acura MDX 3.7L: Technology Package with Entertainment Package $13,991 #28507A

'12 Audi A5: 2.0T, Clean Carfax, Local Trade, $13,990 #33543A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, 19K, Black, Nav & Bose $25,490 #C172208A

'14 Chevy Spark: . LS, Hatchback, Auto, Summit White, 51K Miles $7,123 #79324A

'13 Chevy Cruze: LT, Clean Carfax, Auto $8,989 #33589B

'14 Chevy Cruze: LT, GM Certified! $12,770 #400067A

'09 Acura MDX: 3.7L Technology Package, AWD, Low Miles, Clean Carfax $13,000 #28450A

'05 Audi TT 3.2L: Coupe, 117K Miles $9,123 #28306A

'06 Buick Terraza: #P06550A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'05 Chevy Impala: LS, Sandstone $4,791 #40027A

'17 Chevy Spark: One Owner, GM Certified $11,990 #P6374

'12 Chevy Impala: LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Summit White $8,776 #400067A

'13 Chevy Cruze: GM Certified, One Owner, $9,990 #P6369

'11 Chevy Cruze: Crystal Red Metallic Tintcoat, Heated Front Seats, Remote Start $9,440 #P6284A

'15 Buick Verano: 25K Miles, $13,991 #40020A

'04 Acura MDX: 4WD, Navigation, Very Sharp $9,990 #B8880A

'09 Acura TSX: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors & Front Seats, Power Moonroof $8,990 #V17721A

BMW '10 BMW 328i: xDrive, Jet Black, 88K Miles, AWD $10,900 #11600A

'16 BMW 328i: x-Drive, 32K, Automatic $26,990 #B8606

Audi '10 Audi S4 3.0: AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $15,791 #96709A

'10 Audi A6 3.0: Premium Tiptonic, Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera $12,123 #39017A

'11 Chevy Impala: LT, FWD, Flex Fuel, Remote Start, $6,990 #V180209A

Cadillac '17 Cadillac ATS: Red, 2K, Automatic $30,990 #C17378R

'16 Cadillac CTS: 3K, Like New, Save!! $33,290 #C16150R

'11 Cadillac DTS: Pure Luxury w/o the Price Tag $9,990 #C16019RB

Buick '16 Buick LaCrosse: 22K Leather, Red, 1 owner $21,490 #C17445A

'15 Audi Allroad Wagon: 38K Miles, Panoroof, $28,990 #B8777

'01 Cadillac Deville: Sedan, Call Us!#P06496A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'91 Cadillac Allante: Coupe, Heated Front Seats $9,490 #C17020R2

STLtoday.com/homes

'15 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, Heated Front Seats, $14,123 #28400B

'12 Chevy Camaro: Convertible, LT, Auto, Certified $13,990 #C17394A

'10 Chevy Camaro: 1LT $13,089 #180425A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Sonic: Hatchback, LT, Manual $8,804 #P06543 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Cruze: LS, Only 3K Miles $13,998

'11 Chevy Malibu: LTZ, Loaded $9,990 #P6309A

'08 Chevy Cobalt:LT, 4 Door, Auto, Very Clean $5,590 #42234B

Chrysler '14 Chrysler 300S: Silver Metallic Clearcoat, RWD $15,991 #95182M

'13 Chevy Sonic: LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Manual, Victory Red, $7,469 #42158A

'14 Chevy Spark: LS, Grape Ice, One Owner Clean Carfax, Certified $8,449 #P6235A

See More Rides Ads On Page B11


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 02.20.2018 • B

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals outfielders Marcell Ozuna (left), Dexter Fowler (center) and Tommy Pham go through conditioning drills on Monday at the team’s spring training camp in Jupiter, Fla.

Cards look forward Success of past is nice, but it’s time to focus on 2018 season

Still so many question marks But whatever happens, just don’t be the Mariners

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • For the Cardinals, especially as spring training revs, their past is ever-present. They talk about it, they invite it to camp, they see it on the walls, they drape themselves in it and hold themselves up to it. The tradition, success and expectations of the organization has become a staple of chairman Bill DeWitt Jr.’s introductory comments to the team each February, and there have been spring days when the manager will count the number of World Series rings won by people seated in the clubhouse. The 11 championships and long-standing success of the organization never seems out of reach because the team often has just added to it. Often. Not always. This spring arrives at a distance.

Cards chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. talks with manager Mike Matheny on Monday.

JUPITER, FLA. • He might not even get to St. Louis this year, but he gets St. Louis. And raised north of the border, Tyler O’Neill’s perspective brought introspective. “Coming to play baseball in St. Louis,” the Cardinals minor leaguer said, “it’s like playing hockey in Canada. This is live-ordie baseball over here.” Our city adores baseball the way a whole nation adores the sport that defines it. And so, this season isn’t just pivotal to those inside the Cards’ complex – it’s pivotal to a whole community that is already

See CARDINALS • Page B3

> 12:05 p.m. Friday at Marlins, FSM > Cards welcome back Motte. B3 > BoSox nab J.D. Martinez. B2

See HOCHMAN • Page B2

Kennedy is latest victim of SEC beast League is now as competitive as ever JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Andy Kennedy was a perfectly fine basketball coach for the old Southeastern Conference. He posted a 245-154 record and won 20 or more games nine times at Ole Miss, which was unheard at that school. He took the Rebels to the NCAA Tournament twice and the National Invitational Tournament six times. Ah, but the SEC wants to be great in basketball these days. One by one, its schools poured more money into hoops. One by one, they made ambitious coaching hires and began playing more ambitious nonconference schedules. The league once dominated by Kentucky and Florida could send eight or nine teams to this year’s NCAA Tournament. Those schools that miss will be expected

EIGHT NCAA BIDS FOR THE SEC? Mock NCAA brackets have eight teams from the Southeastern Conference solidly in the NCAA tournament. A look by seed: 2: Auburn 4: Tennessee 5: Kentucky 6: Texas A&M 7: Mizzou, Alabama 8: Arkansas, Florida Source: Bracket Matrix.com

> SEC tournament March 7-11 at Scottrade Center

Kennedy

See GORDON • Page B4 > MU up next • 8 p.m. Tuesday vs. Mississippi, ESPN2 > Martin wants MU back on script vs. Rebels. B4

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

Virtue, Moir dance to gold for Canada American siblings team to win bronze ASSOCIATED PRESS

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Tessa Virtue and Scott

Moir won the gold medal in ice dance at the Pyeongchang Olympics, becoming the most decorated figure skaters in Olympic history with their third gold and fifth medal overall. The Canadian pair scored a record 206.07 points, highlighted by their dramatic free dance set to the music of Moulin Rouge, to beat training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron. The French pair broke their own world record for a free dance with 123.35 points to “Moonlight Sonata,” forcing Virtue and Moir to beat their own best by 3.28 points. The Canadians’ score of 122.40 points gave them room to spare. American siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani took the bronze medal with a strong free skate. See OLYMPICS • Page B6

THE LATEST > Women’s hockey: U.S., Canada reach final (10:10 p.m. Wednesday, NBCSN) > Another medal for U.S.: Sigourney takes bronze in freestyle halfpipe. > Norway pulling away: Speedskating gold gives them 28 medals. TUESDAY NIGHT ON TV 6 p.m.: Figure skating: ladies short program (NBCSN) 7 p.m.: Skiing: Women’s downhill final; Figure skating: ladies short program; Bobsled: women’s competition; Snowboarding: men’s big air competition (KSDK, Ch. 5)

Rust finally gathers on Blues ironman Bouwmeester has been battling injuries BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In a career in which his hallmark has been day-in, day-out consistency, this season has been very different for Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester. On Nov. 1, 2016, he played in his 1,000th NHL game. And in the time it took him to get there, his teams, the Blues and Florida Panthers, had played 1,041 games, meaning he had suited up for 96 percent of the games he could. By the end of last season, he had played in 1,071 games and missed just 42. At one point, he played 737 games in a row, the sixth-longest ironman streak in NHL history. Getting to 1,100 did not go as smoothly. He took a puck to the foot in training camp, suffered a broken bone and missed the first 21 games of the season. He came back, played 10 games, and then suffered a different injury and missed nine more games. Throw in another absence for him to See BLUES • Page B7

Bouwmeester

ON THE BOARD Games played leaders among active players Jaromir Jagr 1,733 Patrick Marleau 1,554 Joe Thornton 1,493 Matt Cullen 1,422 Zdeno Chara 1,406 Marian Hossa 1,309 Henrik Sedin 1,307 Daniel Sedin 1,283 Scott Hartnell 1,230 Justin Williams 1,140 BOUWMEESTER 1,100

> Blues up next • > 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Sharks, FSM > Blues bring Blais back from the minors again. B7

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 02.20.2018 • B

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals outfielders Marcell Ozuna (left), Dexter Fowler (center) and Tommy Pham go through conditioning drills on Monday at the team’s spring training camp in Jupiter, Fla.

Cards look forward Success of past is nice, but it’s time to focus on 2018 season

Still so many question marks But whatever happens, just don’t be the Mariners

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • For the Cardinals, especially as spring training revs, their past is ever-present. They talk about it, they invite it to camp, they see it on the walls, they drape themselves in it and hold themselves up to it. The tradition, success and expectations of the organization has become a staple of chairman Bill DeWitt Jr.’s introductory comments to the team each February, and there have been spring days when the manager will count the number of World Series rings won by people seated in the clubhouse. The 11 championships and long-standing success of the organization never seems out of reach because the team often has just added to it. Often. Not always. This spring arrives at a distance.

Cards chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. talks with manager Mike Matheny on Monday.

JUPITER, FLA. • He might not even get to St. Louis this year, but he gets St. Louis. And raised north of the border, Tyler O’Neill’s perspective brought introspective. “Coming to play baseball in St. Louis,” the Cardinals minor leaguer said, “it’s like playing hockey in Canada. This is live-ordie baseball over here.” Our city adores baseball the way a whole nation adores the sport that defines it. And so, this season isn’t just pivotal to those inside the Cards’ complex – it’s pivotal to a whole community that is already

See CARDINALS • Page B3

> 12:05 p.m. Friday at Marlins, FSM > Cards welcome back Motte. B3 > BoSox nab J.D. Martinez. B2

See HOCHMAN • Page B2

Kennedy is latest victim of SEC beast League is now as competitive as ever JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Andy Kennedy was a perfectly fine basketball coach for the old Southeastern Conference. He posted a 245-154 record and won 20 or more games nine times at Ole Miss, which was unheard at that school. He took the Rebels to the NCAA Tournament twice and the National Invitational Tournament six times. Ah, but the SEC wants to be great in basketball these days. One by one, its schools poured more money into hoops. One by one, they made ambitious coaching hires and began playing more ambitious nonconference schedules. The league once dominated by Kentucky and Florida could send eight or nine teams to this year’s NCAA Tournament. Those schools that miss will be expected

EIGHT NCAA BIDS FOR THE SEC? Mock NCAA brackets have eight teams from the Southeastern Conference solidly in the NCAA tournament. A look by seed: 2: Auburn 4: Tennessee 5: Kentucky 6: Texas A&M 7: Mizzou, Alabama 8: Arkansas, Florida Source: Bracket Matrix.com

> SEC tournament March 7-11 at Scottrade Center

Kennedy

See GORDON • Page B4 > MU up next • 8 p.m. Tuesday vs. Mississippi, ESPN2 > Martin wants MU back on script vs. Rebels. B4

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

Virtue, Moir dance to gold for Canada American siblings team up for bronze ASSOCIATED PRESS

GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA • Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir were

the last couple to leave the ice after their warm-up Monday (St. Louis time), the Canadian ice dancers soaking in every second before their final Olympic performance. They sure made it a memorable one. After watching their training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron break the world record with a flawless free skate, Virtue and Moir took the ice one last time with a dazzling, dramatic interpretation of “Moulin Rouge.” Every movement was synchronized, every element raw and emotional, and the only question left was whether it was enough. They wound up with a personal-best 122.40 points for a record 206.07 total, pushing them past their French rivals’ score of 205.28 and making them the most decorated figure skaters in Olympic history.

See OLYMPICS • Page B6

THE LATEST > Women’s hockey: U.S., Canada reach final (10:10 p.m. Wednesday, NBCSN) > Another medal for U.S.: Sigourney takes bronze in freestyle halfpipe. > Norway pulling away: Speedskating gold gives them 28 medals. TUESDAY NIGHT ON TV 6 p.m.: Figure skating: ladies short program (NBCSN) 7 p.m.: Skiing: Women’s downhill final; Figure skating: ladies short program; Bobsled: women’s competition; Snowboarding: men’s big air competition (KSDK, Ch. 5)

Rust finally gathers on Blues ironman Bouwmeester has been battling injuries BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In a career in which his hallmark has been day-in, day-out consistency, this season has been very different for Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester. On Nov. 1, 2016, he played in his 1,000th NHL game. And in the time it took him to get there, his teams, the Blues and Florida Panthers, had played 1,041 games, meaning he had suited up for 96 percent of the games he could. By the end of last season, he had played in 1,071 games and missed just 42. At one point, he played 737 games in a row, the sixth-longest ironman streak in NHL history. Getting to 1,100 did not go as smoothly. He took a puck to the foot in training camp, suffered a broken bone and missed the first 21 games of the season. He came back, played 10 games, and then suffered a different injury and missed nine more games. Throw in another absence for him to See BLUES • Page B7

Bouwmeester

ON THE BOARD Games played leaders among active players Jaromir Jagr 1,733 Patrick Marleau 1,554 Joe Thornton 1,493 Matt Cullen 1,422 Zdeno Chara 1,406 Marian Hossa 1,309 Henrik Sedin 1,307 Daniel Sedin 1,283 Scott Hartnell 1,230 Justin Williams 1,140 BOUWMEESTER 1,100

> Blues up next • 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Sharks, FSM > Blues bring Blais back from the minors again. B7

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 2/20 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/23 vs. Jets 7 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 2/23 at Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/24 at Mets* 12:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/27 at Wild 7 p.m. NBCSN

Sunday 2/25 at Predators 11:20 a.m. KSDK (5)

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Martinez, Red Sox reach deal

*Exhibition game

Sunday 2/25 vs. Astros* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Monday 2/26 at Twins* 12:05 p.m.

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

Wednesday 2/28 at Duquesne 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 3/3 vs. St. Bonaventure 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/24 at Kentucky 7:15 p.m. ESPN

Tuesday 2/27 at Vanderbilt 6 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 3/3 vs. Arkansas 5 p.m. ESPN or ESPN2

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN

Thursday 2/22 vs. Purdue 6 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Sunday 2/25 at Rutgers 2 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 2/28 Big Ten tourn. (NYC) vs. TBA, BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STL FC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A source reports the Diamondbacks and J.D. Martinez have settled on a $110 million, five-year contract. ASSOCIATED PRESS

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. College: Illinois at Michigan State, ESPN, KFNS (590 AM) 6 p.m. College: Rutgers at Ohio State, BTN 6 p.m. College: West Virginia at Baylor, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Creighton at Butler, FS1 6 p.m. College: Boston College at North Carolina State, FSM Plus 6 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Texas A&M, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Rhode Island at La Salle, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Mississippi, ESPN2, KTRS (550 AM) 8 p.m. College: St. Louis U. at Dayton, ESPNU, WXOS (101.1 FM) 8 p.m. College: Indiana at Nebraska, BTN 8 p.m. College: Kentucky at Arkansas, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Vanderbilt at Louisiana State, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Northern Iowa at Valparaiso, CBSSN HOCKEY 7 p.m. Blues vs. Sharks, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) OLYMPICS • See listings on page B6 SOCCER 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Chelsea vs. Barcelona, FS1 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Bayern Munich vs. Besiktas JK, FS2

DIGEST Jets reportedly are in heavy pursuit of QB Cousins

The New York Jets are reportedly going all-in on Kirk Cousins. ESPN on Monday cited sources saying the team is “willing to pay whatever it takes” to sign the Washington quarterback, who is slated to become an unrestricted free agent in March. Washington probably won’t re-sign Cousins after acquiring Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith in a trade last month. And if the team elects to give him a third franchise tag, Cousins reportedly will fight to block it by filing a grievance to the players’ union. Cousins, who turns 30 this summer and is entering his prime, could command a record-breaking contract in free agency. He could surpass Jimmy Garoppolo’s $27.5 million average ($137.5 million over five years), which the 49ers quarterback signed this month. The Jets have been searching for a long-term solution at quarterback for years and are flush with $73 million in projected salary-cap space, which can increase to $100 million after several cuts. Josh McCown told the Daily News earlier this month that he wants to return as the Jets’ starting quarterback and would be more than willing to mentor Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg. But the Jets could build a sustainable contender around Cousins — though they won’t be his only potential suitors. The Broncos, Bills, Browns, Cardinals and Jaguars may also be in play for the prized free agent, which figures to drive up the price for him. Cousins, however, has said money isn’t the only factor. “Is money a part of it? Sure. Is it the only thing? No,” he told Pro Football Talk Live last month. “It is about winning.” (New York Daily News) Vikes add coach • The Minnesota Vikings hired Todd Downing as a senior offensive assistant, bringing him back after he was the Raiders’ offensive coordinator last year. He’ll begin his 18th season in the NFL, the first five of which were with the Vikings. He was with the Rams, while there were based in St. Louis, from 2006–2008 — first as a defensive assistant and special teams assistant then as defensive quality control coach. (AP) “Sunday Ticket” price rises • NFL fans who watch games on DirecTV’s “Sunday Ticket” will be paying more. According to tvanswerman.com, the “Sunday Ticket” package price is increasing from $281.94 in 2017 to $293.94 this fall. Add the Red Zone channel and the Fantasy channel, and the cost will be $395.94. “Sunday Ticket” shows all Sunday afternoon NFL games, except those of teams in the local market. (Kansas City Star) My Boy Jack wins Derby prep race at Oaklawn • My Boy Jack charged up the rail, in the mud, to win the Grade III Southwest Stakes by 4½ lengths at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Ark., and emerge as a contender for the Kentucky Derby. My Boy Jack, ridden by Kent Desormeaux, covered the 1 1/16 miles in 1:46.00 and returned $19.60, $8.20 and $5.20. Combatant was second ($6.00, $4.00) and Sporting Chance third ($5.00). Mourinho, the favorite at 6-5, finished fourth. Next up for My Boy Jack probably is the Arkansas Derby, on April 14 at Oaklawn. That’s three weeks before the Kentucky Derby, on May 5 at Churchill Downs in Louisville. (From news services) U.S. track boss put on leave • USA Track and Field placed its president, Vin Lananna, on temporary leave to avoid potential conflict of interest concerns over an investigation into the awarding of the 2021 world championships to Eugene, Ore. The Department of Justice is investigating possible racketeering, money laundering and fraud charges related to the awarding of the Eugene championships and the 2019 championships to Doha, Qatar. Lananna long has served as president of the nonprofit that hosts events in Eugene. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

J.D. Martinez and the Boston Red Sox have, at long last, come to an agreement. The slow dance between the free agent slugger and the powerdeficient team wrapped up Monday when they settled on a $110 million, five-year contract. A person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press about the deal, speaking on condition of anonymity because it was subject to a physical. Martinez has the right to opt out early and become a free agent again. Speculation Martinez and the AL East champions would eventually wind up together had been swirling ever since he became a free agent last November. Boston was seeking to add power to a lineup that hit an AL-low 168 home runs. The 30-year-old Martinez has changed his swing to improve his launch angle and become one of the top home-run threats in the majors. The move helps the Red Sox counter the huge deal their biggest rivals pulled off in December. The New York Yankees, who finished two games behind Boston in the division last year, acquired NL MVP Giancarlo Stanton — who led the majors with 59 home runs — in a trade with Miami. Martinez hit .303 with 45 homers and 104 RBIs last year for Detroit and Arizona, which acquired him on July 18 for three prospects. He had 29 homers and 65 RBIs in 62 games with the Diamond-

backs, and hit a record-tying four home runs in a game. Martinez started a combined 112 games in right field last year. Martinez was among several prominent free agents still available over the weekend. Eric Hosmer is in the process of finalizing a $144 million, eight-year deal with San Diego while third baseman Mike Moustakas and pitchers Jake Arrieta and Alex Cobb are among the stars looking for places to play. D’backs reach deal with Dyson • The Arizona Diamondbacks have agreed to a two-year, $7.5 million deal with outfielder Jarrod Dyson. Arizona announced the contract late Monday afternoon, shortly after the Red Sox reached agreement on a five-year, $110 million contract with Martinez. Dyson hit .251 and stole 28 bases for Seattle last season. He hit five home runs with 30 RBIs in 111 games with the Mariners. He played all of his seven previous major league seasons with the Kansas City Royals. Nats, Benoit reach agreement • Joaquin Benoit and the Washington Nationals have agreed in principle to a major league contract that will pay the 40-yearold reliever $1 million for the 2018 season, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. The person told The Associated Press about the free-agent agreement, which is pending completion of a physical. Benoit is a right-hander who

first got to the big leagues in 2001, when he pitched in one game as a starter. He has gone on to make a total of 764 career appearances, with 709 out of the bullpen, mostly in middle relief. In all, Benoit is 58-49 with a 3.83 ERA, 53 saves and 1,058 strikeouts in 1,068 2-3 innings. Players win 12-10 in arbitration cases • Cincinnati Reds second baseman Scooter Gennett has won his salary arbitration case, giving players a final 12-10 margin over clubs this year. Gennett was awarded a raise from $2,525,000 to $5.7 million. The Reds offered $5.1 million. Players finished with a winning record for the second time in three years, but only their fourth since 1996. The 22 decisions were the most since players went 14-10 in 1990. Just five players settled among the 27 who swapped proposed salaries with their teams last month. Gennett hit .295 last year and set career bests with 27 homers and 97 RBIs in his first season with the Reds. He hit four homers in a game on June 6. With many teams adopting “file and trial” strategies, the only players who reached agreements after the Jan. 12 exchange of proposed salaries were Houston outfielder George Springer, Baltimore second baseman Jonathan Schoop, Orioles pitcher Kevin Gausman, Detroit shortstop Jose Iglesias and Pittsburgh reliever Felipe Rivero.

Cards can’t afford to become regular HOCHMAN • FROM B1

frustrated, deflated and, if you step back and look at it, hasn’t felt this way since the spring of 2009, when the Cards came to camp after missing the playoffs in consecutive seasons. It’s not just unfamiliar territory — it’s uncomfortable territory. The Cards can’t afford to become “regular.” Actually, that’s the problem – they can afford it, because win 90 or lose 90, they’ll still be a profitable institution. But this season is about restoration. Replenishing. This team must, once again, nourish St. Louis. It’s about playing baseball that St. Louis Cardinals fans can hang their red hats on. The team has not lived up to its end of the bargain since 2015. The full squad practiced Monday for the first time in 2018, and I think this improved club can flirt with 90 wins, a respectable total. But where does that get you in a division with the Cubs and Brewers? And here’s the fear. Even with the improved record, the postseason berth could come down to just a couple games. And the 2018 Cards are relying on too many question marks. They have to be right about Miles Mikolas. They have to be right with at least two of these four fellows: Luke Weaver, Alex Reyes, Adam Wainwright and Jack Flaherty. And the bullpen? Look, Brandon Morrow would’ve been so good, but he got to pick his team and he signed a two-year, $21 million deal with the Cubs. And on paper, Addison Reed looked ridiculously enticing, but there may have been workload fear on his arm. The Cards’ bullpen, of all seasons, will need to be formidable — and there aren’t many sure things in that pen. That’s not to say it won’t be a great pen. It’s just saying that Luke Gregerson had a bad ERA last year, as did Brett Cecil. And Jordan Hicks, when-

ever he arrives, has yet to pitch in Double-A as of now. And the bullpen, though it has some new faces, blew 41 leads last season. “We have to play better. Pitch better. Hit better,” Cecil said Monday. “If we want to make the playoffs, we’ve got to improve on some things.” This offseason, the Cards needed to identify the relief pitchers that would best bolster this bullpen. It’s quite possible they believe they did. It’s possible that by October, we’ll be gushing about, say, Dominic Leone or Gregerson or Bud Norris (or prospects Hicks, Dakota Hudson, Ryan Helsley or others). But it’s February and that No. 41 sure lingers. Offensively, there is so much to like about the St. Louis lineup. In a way, I wonder if the fanbase isn’t even as excited about Marcell Ozuna as it should be? There were long lines to meet him at Winter Warm-Up, but not as long as I anticipated. Maybe it was because he was the consolation prize after losing out on Giancarlo Stanton? Or maybe it’s because stat projections have him regressing following his 37 homer-and-.924 OPS season? And while there is so much optimism about the offense, I will throw this out — What happens if Paul DeJong gets hurt? Or plays poorly? The Cards have depth at every position except shortstop. Perhaps now is a time to at least acknowledge the existence and importance of Yairo Munoz, the minor-league shortstop nabbed in the Stephen Piscotty trade. He swiped 22 bases last season and hit .300 in Class-AA and ClassAAA. As we head into the pivotal season, I’ll bring up something I’ve mentioned before. Not everyone agrees with this assessment, but I think it’s fair to at least say and discuss. And that is, if the Cardinals miss the playoffs

again, three years in a row, at that point, they’re the Seattle Mariners. They’re a stagnant, “regular” (there’s that word again) franchise. In the past four years, for instance, the Mariners’ win totals have been 78, 86, 76 and 87. They haven’t made the playoffs since 2001. In recent years, they’ve watched as a division rival has tanked and rebuilt itself into a World Series champ, just like the Cardinals have seen in their own division. The Mariners are just, kind of, there. Cardinals fans don’t deserve to have the Mariners. Here at Cards camp, manager Mike Matheny was asked point blank: For the Cards to be better than the last two years, what has to happen? He first deadpanned: “Win more games,” which got a few chuckles because it’s the obvious answer. But then the skipper revealed a little more into his mindset: “It’s all about improving, that’s what we talk about — it’s about maximizing what we have,” Matheny said. “It’s about our mindset. It’s about being process-oriented and then really fine-tuning the minor details. That’s what our focus will be. But how we’ll be judged is going to be whether or not we win more games. But to us, we try to even set a higher standard for ourselves — what it needs to look like not just each and every game, but each and every pitch. And those are the things we feel are more in our control, and so that’s where the majority of our focus will be.” The Olympics are going on right now. The nation of Canada waits impatiently as its team plays for a medal. And in St. Louis, there’s similar excitement and nervousness about the mettle of its team. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Motte, and beard, welcomed back ‘I still think I’ve got something’

0-2 in six late-season appearances for the Cardinals after going a combined 14-4 at Memphis and Class AA Springfield. Flaherty, talking on what he had observed in his month in the majors, said, “I’m watching the way a lot of the guys went about their business. Everyone is very detail-oriented, very specific about what they’re doing each day. I took that and try to put it in my own program.”

BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • Once the bull-

pen session was over, Cardinals All-Star catcher Yadier Molina greeted a former catcher with the words, “Welcome back, papi.” The first time Jason Motte was in a Cardinals big-league clubhouse was in 2005 when he was dressing next to outfielder So Taguchi. Motte was a minor-league catcher summoned to help warm up pitchers such as Jeff Suppan. Ultimately, Motte, because he couldn’t hit, became a pitcher himself and went on to record the last out of the 2011 World Series for the Cardinals and lead the National League in saves with 42 in 2012. Tommy John elbow surgery followed after that and then stops with the Chicago Cubs, Colorado and Atlanta ensued but on Monday, Motte was back in the Cardinals’ clubhouse and wearing his old No. 30. If the 35-year-old reliever, who has signed a minor-league contract with the Cardinals, doesn’t make the club, he will play at Class AAA Memphis, where he lives and where he met his future wife, Caitlin, a decade ago. He has gone full cycle. “Yeah, right back where it all started,” said the bearded Motte. And he has some kind of bushy beard, although it has several different colors now. “About 27,” joked Motte. “I’ve got gray, black, red, brown, probably some food in there. I just ate some breakfast, so maybe a little bit of some eggs. It’s a little bit of everything.” Longtime teammate Adam Wainwright moved past a cluster of reporters to embrace Motte. “That’s such a good beard,” marveled Wainwright. Motte mixed in some minor league work in the Braves’ system last year and was 1-0 with the big-league club in 46 games. He had to go beardless in the minors, per Atlanta policy, and he said, “It was brutal. It was a

VISITORS POLICY

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina embraces Jason Motte after he threw his first bullpen session Monday.

terrible 2 ½ weeks of my life.” Motte’s .172 average in 2005 here at Palm Beach and a .133 mark for nine games with the same club in 2006 helped lead to his transformation to a pitcher. “Hitting a buck-80 was kind of the icing on the cake,” said Motte. His inability to hit has stayed with Motte in his major league career. He has batted five times in nine seasons, including one playoff at-bat — and struck out every time. Motte doesn’t throw 101 miles per hour anymore. He said he touches anywhere between 93 and 96, but now he relies a lot on his cutter. “I still think I’ve got something there,” said Motte, “but you’ve got to locate.” Motte had been facing hitters at Memphis University “just in case. When that call came, I’d be ready to go,” he said.

“If it was meant to be, someone was going to call. If it wasn’t, I’d have been on carpool duty, like I’d been doing all off-season.” Manager Mike Matheny said, “We’re going to bring him in, give him a chance to throw and see what we’ve got.”

CECIL WILL GO SLOWLY

Lefthander Brett Cecil made his first appearance in camp. Cecil, who was absent because of a family health matter, said he hadn’t thrown in 2 ½ weeks and estimated he wouldn’t be throwing bullpens here for a week-and a half. “I had just gotten off the mound — not throwing, but the downhill motion — when I had to stop,” he said. “But it shouldn’t take me that long.” Cecil estimated he might miss three turns during the exhibition

Was Valentine’s Day a let down? Let The St. Louis Men’s Clinic Lift you up!

schedule but still should have four or five left. Matheny said, “We’re going to have to just go slow and follow his program.”

FLAHERTY TO START OPENER

Jack Flaherty, one of the Cardinals’ top pitching prospects, started the final game of the regular season last year. This year, he will start the first exhibition game on Friday against the Miami Marlins. Matheny made the announcement Monday morning, noting that more than just the Cardinals’ presumed rotation will get starters’ innings, at least in the spring. That certainly would cover Flaherty, who may open the season in Triple-A and other such power arms, including Dakota Hudson. The 22-year-old Flaherty was

99 office visit

OUR PHYSICIANS OFFER PERSONALIZED SOLUTIONSTO FIT YOUR NEEDS

• $99 office visit includes physician examination, blood test to determine testosterone and PSA level, and a test dose of medication (medications extra). • ED treatment by licensed Missouri Physicians • Our prescription medications work when the pills & herbals fail • See results on your first visit or no charge • No surgery, no pills, no herbals • Private and discreet • If you have Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, or Prostate Problems, WE CAN HELP.

Ask About Our Revolutionary WAVE Therapy And The Priapus Shot. For more information and to schedule your private exam with our doctors call now.

777 South New Ballas Rd, Suite 119 W St. Louis, MO 63141 • 314-282-8080 www.stlmensclinic.com

M. CARP SITS OUT; C. CARP STEPS IN

Full-scale drills began on Monday under 80-degree temperatures. Infielder Matt Carpenter did not participate, resting a sore back. The first pitcher vs. hitter sessions will take place Tuesday and Wednesday. Pitchers will get a day off from throwing on Thursday before the first game Friday. Chris Carpenter, a Cardinals Hall of Famer, made his first appearance of the spring as an instructor. Carpenter said he would make three trips here this spring to work with both major league and minor league pitchers. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Redbirds pick up the pace in camp CARDINALS • FROM B1

$

Major League Baseball, after obtaining an agreement with the players association, will institute some measures to increase the pace of play this year, most notably limiting a team to six mound visits per nine-inning game, exclusive of when pitchers actually are being changed. “Full support,” said Matheny, who serves on the rules committee. “I watched the postseason (games) and there were times when guys were going out to the mound so often that I was getting tired of it. I get it. Our guys go when they have a purpose and it’s just going to be more coordination before we have a middle infielder or before we have a catcher go out. We’re going to say. ‘Check with us,’ and we’ll say go ahead. It’s obviously something we’re going to keep close track of.”

History always is closer when you’ve added to it. “Every year puts another line in the organization’s history, and every team is supposed to put another notch up there — 100 wins, the division (title), the playoffs, a World Series,” infielder Matt Carpenter said. “I have a champagne bottle from every year I’ve played for this team but 2016 and 2017, the past two.There was nothing to celebrate. But we can learn.” Putting such lessons into practice began, officially, Monday. The Cardinals held their first full-squad workout of their 127th season, peeling out of the clubhouse at Roger Dean Stadium after the annual opening comments from executives and manager Mike Matheny. The Cardinals have had 10 consecutive winning seasons, and yet are coming off their first back-to-back absences from the postseason in even longer. The offseason peaked with two active weeks that netted a reliever, a starter and a potentially transformative hitter in Marcell Ozuna. Then it passed recently with some bullpen additions, but not another splash. The Cardinals believe they’ve improved, believe they’re challengers in the National League Central Division, but aren’t regarded as favorites. Matheny declined to say whether that was part of his message. While some of the things said always are similar — history sets the bar — he did allow one thing that had changed this year. The tone. “It’s got to be different every year,” he said. “There is always something different than happened the year before. Win 100 games or lose in the World Series — that’s a different tone than back-to-back years of not being in the postseason. I think you just have to be honest. What are our thoughts? What’s the truth? They’re not looking for a well-spoken speech. They’re looking for the truth.” Several times in the past week, Matheny said one thought he cannot shake is “this team.” Throughout the offseason, he kept his smartphone handy and notes program open so that he could tip-tap a note any time he read a line in a book, heard a suggestion from a coach or caught a story that might apply to the 2018 team. He collects all those thoughts in the days leading up to his opening remarks but doesn’t let them coalesce until he’s spent a few days around the team. He wants to read the room before he talks. This year is his seventh spring as manager, his seventh spring address. This time, he spoke to the club without notes. “Most times I do have some,” he said. “It really was so real and true that it just kind of flowed at times. Yeah, you can get up there and have a Winston Churchill and present something very eloquent, but it’s the day in and the day out and what you actually do. There is still a purpose in that vision. Let’s

don’t forget this. Let’s be on guard for that.” There were some things written and said Monday in the clubhouse that players were specifically told not to disclose. Matheny stressed that what he shared had added importance if “it’s just meant for those guys.” Some general outlines of the camp’s focus already have surfaced in his comments, and the phrasing of others. Several players Monday described the necessity to have clubhouse-wide “buy-in” on the goals, something veterans saw flagging last year. A Cardinals player referred to last year’s camp as more “laid back.” This year’s is snappier, more familiar. Players ran from station to station Monday, as directed. Last year, they walked. “A very refreshing tone has already been here the last week or so,” pitcher Adam Wainwright said. “It’s something you cannot fake. I think we’re onto something here.” The schedule of camp also has shifted. Pitching coach Mike Maddux’s influence is obvious, from the grouping of pitchers in similar roles or levels to the game-speed focus, especially when fielding. Matheny said other coaches had similar sway in the schedule. It’s also clear that the hitting- and weight-room work that players used to do as bookends for the official workouts now are part of the global approach to the schedule. Matheny said there will be players they try to monitor because “they’ll swing themselves silly.” That is all, as they say, intentional. This spring, unlike several recent ones, is more condensed. Position players will have only four days before the Grapefruit League opener, on Friday vs. Miami. That scrunch means less time and perhaps less live batting practice for some pitchers than usual. The Cardinals plan shorter appearances at the beginning for regulars.The Cardinals are out to make sure it does not mean another year of ragged fundamentals. “There are just some constants in the game that are just right,” Matheny said. “When things are just right, those aren’t things you want to let go. There is new. New people.” Their past is direction. It’s how they can reclaim the present. “If you think in 2011 they won the World Series because of Tony (La Russa’s) message on opening day of spring training — that’s just a ridiculous thing to say,” Carpenter said. “To say the Philadelphia Eagles won the Super Bowl because on the first day of training camp they had the most-perfect message? … We talk about the past, but we don’t dwell on it. The past is the standard. The present is the focus. How you win is when you have buy-in from everyone in the locker room, from everyone on the team. You can feel when that’s palpable. “We’ll find out if we have that fairly quickly.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

M 1 • TUESDAY • 02.20.2018

Martin wants MU back on script Tigers host Ole Miss in first game since 5-game winning streak ended MISSOURI VS. MISSISSIPPI

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • If it didn’t say MIZZOU splashed across the players’ black jerseys, Cuonzo Martin might not have recognized the team on the court Saturday at the Pete Maravich Assembly Center. At least not for the first 10 minutes or so. In a deeper, more balanced Southeastern Conference, Martin’s Tigers were probably bound to lose eventually, but he was troubled by his team’s play early in the 64-63 loss at Louisiana State, especially on the offensive end. The crisp ball movement wasn’t there. The selfless decision-making was absent. Neither team pulled away from the other, but Martin’s Tigers got away from the script that directed their five-game winning streak. Leading scorer and graduate senior Kassius Robertson, the team’s elder statesman and inhouse expert on the pulse of the locker room, said Mizzou played “selfishly.” With two days to reflect on the outcome, Martin didn’t disagree with that assessment “More than anything it’s moving the ball well offensively the first five, 10 minutes,” he said Monday, “sharing the basketball, making the right plays.” The Tigers (18-9, 8-6 SEC) have four regular-season games left to recapture the style that propelled them near the top of the conference standings. With last place Ole Miss (11-16, 4-10) visiting Mizzou Arena for Tuesday’s 8 p.m. tipoff, the Tigers are in a four-way jam for third place, still with a strong chance for a top-four finish and a double bye in the SEC tournament. Multiple projections have Martin’s team entrenched in the NCAA Tournament — ESPN. com and CBSSports.com both have Mizzou as a No. 7 seed in the bracket — but the Tigers can polish their credentials the next two weeks against a favorable schedule. Among the top eight teams in the SEC, the Tigers play the lightest schedule, facing four teams with a collective league record of 24-32. Ole Miss visits Columbia on a seven-game losing streak and now without its longtime coach. Andy Kennedy announced last week he’d step down at season’s end but instead decided Sunday to leave the Rebels immediately. Assistant coach Tony Madlock will coach the Rebels at Mizzou Arena, marking the first time in 12 years Kennedy won’t be on the Ole Miss sideline. “A.K.’s a great guy,” Madlock said Monday. “He’s taught me so much and given me the opportunity to work under him. He told me to be myself and let my instincts take over. It’s a tough situation, but hey, it’s what we’ve been dealt and we’ll deal with it.” Martin doesn’t expect any curveballs from the Rebels under Madlock, a career assistant who’s spent the last four seasons in Oxford. “They have the blueprint,” Martin said. “Tony’s been

When • 8 p.m. Where • Mizzou Arena Series • Mississippi leads 9-2. Last meeting, Mizzou 75, Mississippi 69. Feb. 6, 2018 TV, radio • ESPN2, KTRS (550 AM) Records • MU (18-9, 8-6), Mississippi (11-16, 4-10) About Mizzou • The Tigers saw their five-game winning streak end Saturday at Louisiana State with a 64-63 loss. LSU scored the go-ahead layup in the final minute then got the ball back on Kassius Robertson’s offensive foul on MU’s next possession. … Jordan Barnett connected on 6 of 8 3-pointers to lead the Tigers with 18 points. … The Tigers had their worst free-throw shooting game of the season, making just 7 of 17. … Mizzou fell behind 11-0 at Mississippi two weeks ago before Robertson and Jontay Porter pulled the Tigers out of the early deficit with 27 and 18 points, respectively. About Mississippi • Andy Kennedy, the longest tenured coach in the SEC, announced earlier this month that he’d step down at season’s end but Sunday decided to leave the team immediately. Tony Madlock, a Division I assistant for more than 20 years, will serve as the Rebels interim coach the rest of the season. … The Rebels have lost seven straight games, most recently falling to rival Mississippi State 79-62 in Starkville. … Deandre Burnett leads Mississippi with 14.8 points per game but struggled in the first meeting against Mizzou with just five points in 32 minutes. … Terence Davis led the Rebels with 20 points against MU. He’s scored just 19 points in the last three games. Dave Matter

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri head coach Cuonzo Martin shouts instructions to his team during a game against Mississippi State on Feb. 10.

around Andy for a long time. He knows what he’s doing. He’s been in this game for quite a while. He’s battle tested. And he knows his team, so it’s not like they’re bringing in a coach who doesn’t know the personnel. He understands that.” As for his team, Martin’s Tigers have built their NCAA profile behind sturdy defense and efficient, unselfish offense. They got away from that blueprint Saturday. Mizzou didn’t record its first assist until more than 10 minutes had come off the clock and during a six-minute stretch missed nine of 11 shots. For the season the Tigers have averaged an assist on 57 percent of their field goals, which ranks No. 73 among all Division I teams and

third in the SEC. In the first half Saturday, that average was down to just 33.3 percent. It didn’t help that freshman center Jeremiah Tilmon had his worst offensive game of the season. Tilmon had been sick heading into the game — Martin said he was dehydrated — but still managed to log 22 minutes on the court, when he wasn’t chugging water on the sideline. For just the third time all season he didn’t connect on a field goal attempt, finishing 0 for 6 with only a free throw and one rebound. “LSU won the game, but I give Jeremiah credit for getting out there and trying to play in that game,” Martin said. “He battled through it and came up short.

STANDINGS Auburn Tennessee Arkansas Missouri Alabama Florida Mississippi State Kentucky Texas A&M Georgia LSU South Carolina Vanderbilt Mississippi

CONF 11-3 9-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 7-7 7-7 6-8 6-8 6-8 5-9 5-9 4-10

ALL 23-4 19-7 19-8 18-9 17-10 17-10 19-8 18-9 17-10 15-11 15-11 14-13 11-16 11-16

He’ll be ready to go (Tuesday) night.” With four games left before postseason play tips off, Martin believes Saturday’s loss can reset the course the Tigers had mapped before Saturday’s setback. “When there’s a level of comfort guys lose sight of what got you to the point of having success,” he said. “That’s what happens. I think the guys will be fine.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

‘The recruiting is better. The coaching is better’ GORDON • FROM B1

to get there soon. Expectations just keep rising. So Kennedy won’t be on the sidelines when Ole Miss plays at Mizzou Tuesday night. Assistant coach Tony Madlock will be in charge as acting head coach. Kennedy became the latest casualty in this hoops renewal, following the likes of Kim Anderson, Johnny Jones, Donnie Tyndall, Rick Ray, Tony Barbee and Anthony Grant out the door. “Andy proved that Ole Miss can be a consistent winner,” Florida coach Mike White said during the SEC’s coaching teleconference. “Ole Miss, year in and year out for over a decade, has been very competitive in the non-conference, been very competitive in SEC play. His numbers speak for themselves.” Until recently, the school’s basketball facilities were substandard. So were his staffing and recruiting resources. Yet Kennedy still set school records. “He was able to build a practice facility, build a brand-new arena, attract great talent,” White said, who earlier worked as an assistant coach under Kennedy at Ole Miss. But last Monday Kennedy resigned effective at season’s end. A week later he quit effective

immediately after the Rebels suffered lopsided losses to Arkansas and Mississippi State. Ole Miss made him a lame duck coach this season and his players responded accordingly. Which is to say that they didn’t respond to him at all. “We all know that ‘clean breaks’ are always best, and I should have realized this last Monday,” Kennedy said with his second statement. “My apologies.” Ole Miss athletic director Ross Bjork is a former athletic development officer at Mizzou. He has watched the Cuonzo Martin hiring lift the MU program back to national relevance in Year 1. That was just the latest strong basketball coaching hire in the SEC. White made the leap from Louisiana Tech to Florida and reached the NCAA’s Elite Eight in his second season. Former Providence, Clemson and Texas coach Rick Barnes has restored order at Tennessee. Former Pittsburgh and UCLA coach Ben Howland has recruited top-end talent to Mississippi State. Former NBA player and coach Avery Johnson is driving Alabama back onto the national stage. Will Wade, a coaching baby-face at age 35, is energizing LSU after winning at Chat-

tanooga and VCU. (The frenetic Wade may have burned more calories in that single one-point victory over Missouri than predecessor Johnny Jones did during his entire final season.) Former Valparaiso coach Bryce Drew seems certain to succeed at Vanderbilt, where Kevin Stallings became stale after 17 years. The Commodores could play spoiler in this year’s SEC Tournament at Scottrade Center and, like LSU, they have big-time recruits arriving for next season. Frank Martin took South Carolina to the Final Four, John Calipari is still running his NBA Developmental Program at Kentucky and Billy Kennedy could get Texas A&M back to the Big Dance this season. Master showman Bruce Pearl has worked recruiting miracles at Auburn, but his carriage could turn into the pumpkin once the FBI, the NCAA and the school get done examining how his program greased its gears. In the meantime, he keeps winning. So when a SEC team slips, as Ole Miss did this season, there is no end to its suffering. The Rebels carry a seven-game losing streak into Boone County. “This league is a monster,” beleaguered Georgia coach Mark

Fox observed Saturday after the Bulldogs managed to beat Tennessee. “The key for our league, is one through 14, it’s just so hard,” Howland said during the teleconference. “I don’t care who you play, it is a difficult game every night.” No longer is basketball an activity to keep fans occupied until spring football arrives. It is a major revenue source for the league and a ratings builder for the SEC Network. “The recruiting is better. The coaching is better,” Avery Johnson said during the teleconference. “Teams get better support at home, in terms of fan support.” The quest for league-wide greatness will only intensify going forward. That mandate has come down from SEC commissioner Greg Sankey. “Every team in this league is good and dangerous and competitive,” White said during the teleconference. “Every arena is difficult to play in. It’s obviously as competitive as it’s ever been. It’s as competitive as any league in the country.” And as Kennedy found out, that’s not for everyone. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

ROUNDUP

Virginia stays at No. 1, Duke to 5th ASSOCIATED PRESS

Virginia strengthened its hold on No. 1 in the AP Top 25 as it coasts to an Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title, while Duke made a big jump after a pair of impressive wins without its top freshman. The Cavaliers earned 42 of 65 first-place votes in the poll released Monday. That’s 12 more than last week, when they reached No. 1 for the first time since the Ralph Sampson era. The top four remained unchanged, with No. 2 Michigan State earning 19 first-place votes after rallying from 27 down to beat Northwestern. Thirdranked Villanova got the other four first-place votes after winning at No. 4 Xavier. And Duke jumped seven spots to No. 5 after beating Virginia Tech and Clemson despite playing without Marvin Bagley, the ACC’s scoring and rebounding leader who is recovering from a knee sprain.

WOMEN

Kristy Wallace scored 23 points and had seven assists as No. 3 Baylor won its eighth consecutive Big 12 championship Monday night with a 93-87 win over No. 6 Texas. Wallace scored 14 in the third quarter and rescued the Lady Bears after Texas had started the second half with a charge and briefly held the lead. Wallace scored eight in a 14-5 run that allowed Baylor to take control again. Wallace scored 27 the first time these teams met this season. Baylor (26-1, 16-0) has now won 18 of the last 19 matchup with Texas. With two games left, Baylor is gunning for a third undefeated conference season in school history. Texas came in two games behind Baylor and needed a win to keep its own conference title hopes alive.

AP POLL team

1. Virginia (42)

w-l 24-2

pts pv 1601

1

2. Michigan St. (19)

26-3

1565

2

3. Villanova (4)

24-3

1509

3

4. Xavier

24-4

1398

4

5. Duke

22-5

1292

12

6. Texas Tech

22-5

1206

7

6. Gonzaga

25-4

1206

9

8. Kansas

21-6

1166

13

9. Purdue

24-5

1130

6

10. North Carolina

21-7

1074 14

11. Cincinnati

23-4

12. Auburn

23-4

873 10

13. Wichita St.

21-5

870 19

954

5

14. Arizona

21-6

831

17

15. Clemson

20-6

683

11

16. Ohio St.

22-7

680

8

17. Michigan

22-7

615 22

18. Rhode Island

21-4

455 16

19. Tennessee

19-7

427 18

20. Nevada

23-5

330 24

21. West Virginia

19-8

329 20

22. St. Mary’s

25-4

291

23. Houston

21-5

263

15 -

24. Middle Tennessee

22-5

87

-

25. Florida St.

19-8

63

-

Others receiving votes: Baylor 52, Kentucky 33, Arizona St 32, Arkansas 23, UCLA 20, St. Bonaventure 13, Virginia Tech 12, Creighton 10, Penn St. 6, Kansas St 5, Missouri 5, Texas A&M 4, TCU 4, Butler 2, Loyola of Chicago 2, Alabama 1, Oklahoma 1, Boise St. 1, ETSU 1.

USA TODAY POLL team

1. Michigan St. (20)

w-l

26-3

pts pv 782

1 3

2. Virginia (8)

24-2

773

3. Villanova (4)

24-3

745

2

4. Xavier

24-4

656

4

5. Duke

22-5

655 10

6. Gonzaga

25-4

602

8

7. Texas Tech

22-5

588

6

8. Kansas

21-6

566

13 7

9. Purdue

24-5

526

10. North Carolina

21-7

498 16

11. Cincinnati

23-4

497

404 18

5

12. Wichita St.

21-5

13. Auburn

23-4

358

14. Arizona

21-6

340 19

11

15. Ohio St.

22-7

339

9

16. Michigan

22-7

325

21

17. Clemson

20-6

324

12

18. Rhode Island

21-4

263 14

19. Tennessee

19-7

208

17

20. St. Mary’s

25-4

173

15

21. West Virginia

19-8

168 20

22. Nevada

23-5

143 24

23. Houston

21-5

119

24. Middle Tennessee

22-5

72

25. Arizona St.

19-7

47 22

Others receiving votes: Creighton 34, Kentucky 31, Virginia Tech 20, Florida State 18, Texas A&M 15, Florida 14, Seton Hall 13, Baylor 12, St. Bon. 11, UCLA 11, Butler 9, Kansas State 9, Miami 9, Nebraska 7, Loyola (Chi.) 6, Arkansas 3, ETSU 2, Boise State 1, Louisiana-Laf. 1, New Mexico State 1, Oklahoma 1, TCU 1. > Records through Sunday > 25 points for a first-place vote (parentheses)


BASKETBALL

02.20.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

Ford mimics last season’s formula with short bench

Edwardsville grad may give Illini an extra jolt Team seeks strong finish against Spartans BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

With 28 points in a victory over Nebraska Sunday, Illini junior Leron Black had a career night. Trent Frazier had his Jan. 19 with 32 points against Wisconsin. And the last time Illinois played Michigan State, Kipper Nichols stepped up with 27 points. Illinois is finally adding more scoring options. If Mark Smith (Edwardsville) can build on a potential breakthrough performance against Nebraska, he could broaden the pool of players Illini coach Brad Underwood can count on down the home stretch of a long season. Underwood said Monday he expects Smith to finish strong. “My message to Mark is, ‘Be a good player. It’s time,’” Underwood said. “My confidence in Mark has always been maybe a little higher than he has in himself. I challenge him every day. He has a tremendous amount of offensive talent. He has struggled defensively but he’s getting better. “I expect Mark to have a great end of the season, I really do.” Smith scored eight points against Nebraska. More than that, he made several impact plays including three assists, a rebound and an aggressive battle for another rebound that went out of bounds off a Nebraska player. Illinois retained possession on that play at a critical juncture late in a close game. “That might have been the key play in the game,” Underwood said. “Just Mark’s willingness to get in there.” Until Sunday, Smith had not scored eight points since he totaled eight at Michigan 11 games ago. He played 18 minutes Sunday, including crunch time minutes to close out a tight game and he hadn’t played that long in the last six games. “I’m just glad I could do something to help the team win,” Smith said Monday. “That’s all I really care about. Points don’t bother me.” Smith said he’d like to have a strong finish, just as Underwood is predicting. “It would be great to see my hard work pay off,” he said. “I just keep trusting the process. I know it will help me later. I feel like every time I go out there I’m getting better.” Tonight at Michigan State, Smith will be playing in a building he visited during the recruiting process when he was a senior at Edwardsville High School. “I’ve walked around that campus a lot,” he said. “It would be great to get a big win there.” To do that, Illinois would have to upset the second-ranked team in the country, a team coming off a historic comeback after falling behind by 27 points Saturday against Northwestern. Michigan State held Northwestern to 11 points in the second half and won the game, 65-60. It was its 10th straight victory. The Spartans beat Illinois 8774 in Champaign on Jan. 22 when Miles Bridges scored 31 points and Jaren Jackson Jr. added 21 points and 11 rebounds. Michigan State, like other teams coached by Tom Izzo in

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Dayton’s Darrell Davis passes around SLU’s Jalen Johnson (left) and Hasahn French on Saturday. BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis University’s most recent — and possibly most improbable — win of the season provided the first look at how coach Travis Ford plans to adjust playing time as the Billikens try to survive with a seven-man roster. The answer: not much. Ford basically stuck to using six players in Saturday’s win at Richmond. Center Rashed Anthony picked up five minutes in reserve. Walk-on Markos Psimitis didn’t leave the bench. If SLU can remain competitive and picking up wins, he sees no point in changing because this is pretty much what Ford was doing in the closing two months last season, when the Billikens made do with little use of reserves. “I have thought about that,” Ford said. “It’s the same situation numbers-wise. Almost identical. We’re doing some of the same things. We’re trying to control the pace of the game to help us with the short bench as much as we can.” To get by at Richmond, Ford had four players log 35 or more minutes. Jalen Johnson started and played 21 minutes, Aaron Hines provided 30 off the bench and Anthony received his handful. Whether Ford can count on that formula to produce such glowing results when the Billikens play Tuesday night at Dayton and moving forward remains to be seen. SLU shot 58 percent, avoided foul trouble and did not get overly fatigued down the stretch while fighting off the Spiders’ attempt at a comeback. All of that on the road and without Jordan Goodwin in the lineup for the first time this season. So, the A-10 has a scenario that no one expected with four regular-season games remaining. SLU is in fourth place in the Atlantic 10, one game ahead of VCU, St. Joseph’s and Richmond. The Billikens have climbed the standings in the midst of penalties being re-

SLU AT DAYTON When • 8 p.m. Where • Dayton Arena All-time series • Dayton leads 32-26 TV/radio • ESPNU; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU 15-12, 8-6 in Atlantic 10; Dayton 12-14, 6-8 About the Billikens • Hasahn French was named the co-rookie of the week in the A-10 based on one game. He had 15 points, seven rebounds, four assists and three steals against Richmond. He also became the all-time blocked shot leader among SLU freshmen with 52. ... Javon Bess has recorded four consecutive double-doubles, averaging 13.8 points and 12.3 rebounds during that stretch. ... The Billikens have won three of their last four road games. About the Flyers • Dayton is the top shooting team in the A-10, hitting 48.6 percent of its shots. ... The Flyers are the last team that outrebounded the Billikens, winning the battle 32-28 at Chaifetz Arena. ... Forward Josh Cunningham ranks seventh in the country, shooting 65.5 percent. ... Dayton has posted some good home wins, including St. Bonaventure (82-72), VCU (10679) and Davidson (65-64). ... The Flyers shoot 74 percent from the free throw line. Stu Durando

STANDINGS CONF Rhode Island 13-1 St. Bonaventure 10-4 Davidson 10-4 St. Louis U. 8-6 VCU 7-7 St. Joseph’s (Pa.) 7-7 Richmond 7-7 Duquesne 6-8 Dayton 6-8 George Mason 6-8 George Washington 5-9 La Salle 5-9 Massachusetts 4-10 Fordham 4-10

ALL 21-4 20-6 15-10 15-12 15-12 12-14 9-17 15-12 12-14 12-15 12-15 11-16 11-16 9-17

vealed in the Title IX investigation and losing a starter, who contributed a little bit of everything.

“I know where we are, but I don’t spend a lot of time looking back,” Ford said. “There’s no focus on how we got here. I am proud of these guys. We’re shorthanded and I said after the (Richmond) game that we’ve faced a lot of adversity but we’ve got to prepare for another game.” Ford relied on seven players in the second half of the conference schedule last season and went 8-9 down the stretch with a group that was less athletic, physical and talented. Johnson, Hines and Roby were in that group. They are helping to do again this season what they learned last season. After struggling late in games against VCU, George Mason and Davidson, the Billikens have toughened up in the closing minutes of tight games. The win at Richmond came after fighting off La Salle and St. Joseph’s down the stretch. “Any time you win, you gain confidence,” Ford said. “For our guys, we’ve done a better job of making free throws down the stretch. But it’s mostly been about our defense. We’ve been doing a good job of defending and rebounding and controlling the time on the clock. Our time management has been good.” And as long as the Billikens stay out of foul trouble, the management of playing time might work. Despite the shortage of personnel, the Billikens don’t have anyone among the top 10 in playing time in the A-10. Ford expects a different type of game from Dayton than Richmond. The Flyers are one of the few teams in the A-10 that can match up against the Billikens physically. Ford would prefer SLU take its chances in a physical game rather than see the Flyers create an uptempo pace. “They’re one of the more physical teams in our league,” Ford said. “We’ve done a good job of rebounding lately with a fairly good margin. This is one team that can match us sizewise and athletically.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NBA NOTEBOOK

ILLINOIS AT MICHIGAN STATE When • 6 p.m. Where • Breslin Center, East Lansing, Mich. TV/radio • ESPN, KFNS (590 AM) Records • Illinois 13-15 overall, 3-12 in Big Ten; No. 2 Michigan State 26-3, 14-2 Of note • Michigan State coming off historic comeback in which it trailed Northwestern by 27 and 23 in the second half. Spartans outscored Northwestern 38-11 in second half and won 65-60. STANDINGS Michigan State Purdue Ohio State Michigan Nebraska Penn State Indiana Maryland Northwestern Wisconsin Illinois Minnesota Rutgers Iowa

CONF 14-2 13-3 13-3 11-5 11-5 9-7 9-7 8-9 6-10 6-10 3-12 3-13 3-13 3-13

ALL 26-3 24-5 22-7 22-7 20-9 19-10 16-12 19-11 15-14 13-16 13-15 14-15 13-16 12-17

the past, is taking aim on a strong finish that could lock down a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. “They’re a team that really hurt us in transition the first time,” Underwood said. “They scored 26 points in transition. We had an early lead and three times we took 3-pointers with 21, 22 seconds on the shot clock. Those ended up being easy baskets for Michigan State and we never recovered.” Illinois will fly home after tonight’s game and have a one-day prep for Thursday night’s home game against No. 9 Purdue. Then Illinois will fly to Piscataway, N.J. on Saturday for Sunday afternoon’s regular season finale at Rutgers. From there, the Illini plans to stay out East, shifting to New York City to prepare for its likely Big Ten Conference Tournament opener Wednesday at Madison Square Garden.

NBA STANDINGS

Curry endorses new All-Star format ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stephen Curry would love to be an NBA All-Star Game captain again next year, especially since the game will be in his hometown of Charlotte. LeBron James would be OK with someone else taking his place, depending on who the top two vote-getters are, although his draft prowess led to Team LeBron beating Team Stephen 148-145 Sunday night . And there’s a definite appetite for the NBA to televise the captains’ draft rather than conduct it clandestinely like it was this year. “Televise it,” said DeMar DeRozan of Team Stephen. “Give the people what they want to see” Players raved about the new format of having captains draft the teams rather than the traditional format of East vs. West. And James finally revealed his draft order: Kevin Durant, Anthony Davis, his former Cleveland teammate Kyrie Irving and DeMarcus Cousins, who missed the game due to a season-ending injury. “I know who I like watching and I had a draft board. I had a process,” James said. Curry didn’t divulge his draft order. The new format had a negligible impact on ratings. Total viewership was down slightly compared to last year, although it improved over 2014, the previous time the showcase faced the Winter Olympics.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois guard Mark Smith looks to drive around a Nebraska defender Sunday.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Chicago

W 41 40 30 23 19 W 33 30 24 18 18 W 34 33 32 28 20

L 16 19 25 36 40 L 24 28 33 39 41 L 22 25 25 29 37

Pct .719 .678 .545 .390 .322 Pct .579 .517 .421 .316 .305 Pct .607 .569 .561 .491 .351

GB — 2 10 19 23 GB — 3½ 9 15 16 GB — 2 2½ 6½ 14½

L10 9-1 5-5 6-4 2-8 1-9 L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 6-4 2-8

Str W-7 L-3 W-5 L-8 L-7 Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-3 L-2 Str W-4 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-1

Home 24-4 21-11 18-10 16-12 11-21 Home 17-10 14-12 15-15 11-16 13-17 Home 20-7 20-11 19-10 19-12 13-16

Away 17-12 19-8 12-15 7-24 8-19 Away 16-14 16-16 9-18 7-23 5-24 Away 14-15 13-14 13-15 9-17 7-21

Conf 25-7 25-13 16-13 11-24 12-22 Conf 20-14 21-17 13-18 11-25 8-30 Conf 25-12 23-15 19-17 17-19 17-17

Pct .772 .593 .544 .321 .310 Pct .590 .559 .552 .552 .517 Pct .759 .536 .404 .316 .305

GB — 10 13 25½ 26½ GB — 2 2½ 2½ 4½ GB — 13 20½ 25½ 26½

L10 10-0 4-6 5-5 1-9 2-8 L10 5-5 4-6 7-3 6-4 10-0 L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 4-6 1-9

Str W-10 L-3 W-3 L-7 L-2 Str W-1 W-1 W-3 W-1 W-11 Str L-1 W-2 L-3 L-1 L-7

Home 23-6 22-6 15-12 13-17 11-19 Home 24-7 20-10 23-7 17-11 18-9 Home 22-7 16-12 14-14 8-17 9-21

Away 21-7 13-18 16-14 5-21 7-21 Away 12-18 13-16 9-19 15-15 12-19 Away 22-7 14-14 9-20 10-22 9-20

Conf 26-8 20-14 15-19 15-22 10-28 Conf 27-10 18-17 20-18 18-15 19-14 Conf 25-11 20-16 11-24 10-25 12-25

WESTERN CONFERENCE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry served as an All-Star Game captain.

Turner Sports announced Monday that the game drew an average of 7.7 million viewers Sunday night on TNT. Last year’s game attracted an average of 7.8 million. In 2014 during the Sochi Olympics, an average of 7.5 million people watched the NBA’s best at the All-Star Game. Turner said the ratings improved among key demographics, including people ages 18 to 34, and that video views on social media channels were up 37 percent compared to 2017.

Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 44 35 31 18 18 W 36 33 32 32 30 W 44 30 23 18 18

L 13 24 26 38 40 L 25 26 26 26 28 L 14 26 34 39 41

Monday-Wednesday No games Thursday Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. New York at Orlando, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Clippers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Atlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Washington, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. Dallas at Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 8 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Lakers at Sacramento, 9 p.m.


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

M 1 • TUESDAY • 02.20.2018

HIGHLIGHTS NO SURPRISE, USA AND CANADA REACH WOMEN’S HOCKEY FINAL

TWO MORE GOLDS FOR NORWAY, WHICH UPS MEDALS TOTAL TO 28

SHIFFRIN DROPS DOWNHILL TO FOCUS ON COMBINED

By identical scores of 5-0, the United States and Canada won their semifinal matches against Finland and Russia, respectively, to reach the gold-medal game (10:10 p.m. Wednesday, NBCSN). This will be the fifth time in six Olympics that the North American rivals will have met in the final since women’s hockey became an Olympics sport. Team USA won the inaugural, in 1998. and Canada has won the last four.

Havard Lorentzen of Norway won the 500 speedskate in 34.41 seconds, and the Norwegians won team ski jumping, giving the nation of 5.3 million residents the lead with 28 medals through Monday (local time). Germany was second, with 20. Norway’s best total in a Winter Olympics had been 26 medals, from 2014 Sochi and 1994 Lillehammer. In the medal count, Norway leads in gold (11), silver (9) and bronze (8).

A forecast for high winds late in the week forced a move of the women’s skiing combined up a day − from Thursday to Wednesday (St. Louis time). That prompted Mikaela Shiffrin of the U.S. to drop out of the downhill event, which is set for Tuesday. Shiffrin, the giant slalom winner last week, said racing on back-to-back days would reduce her chance to win the combined. USA’s Lindsey Vonn is the downhill favorite.

Havard Lorentzen

NOTEBOOK

Sharpe wins freestyle halfpipe

MONDAY’S MEDALISTS BOBSLED Men’s Two-Man GOLD: Germany (Francesco Friedrich, Thorsten Margis)

She earns Canada first medal in event; American is third

Janis Strenga)

FROM NEWS SERVICES

SKI JUMPING

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Cassie Sharpe put on a

Team Event Large Hill

show in the women’s freestyle halfpipe final on Tuesday, soaring to a 95.80 score for her second run to give Canada its first Olympic medal in the event pioneered by the late Canadian star Sarah Burke. Sharpe topped qualifying on Monday with a pair of big runs and went even higher in the finals. Her winning run included a 180-degree spin and the kind of air the rest of the 12-woman field simply couldn’t match. France’s Marie Martinod added a second silver medal to go with the one she captured in Sochi four years ago when the sport made its Olympic debut. Martinod scored 92.60 on her second run but fell during her third to assure Sharpe of the gold. American Brita Sigourney edged teammate Annalisa Drew for the bronze medal. Drew scored 90.80 on her final run to slip past Sigourney only to have Sigourney, the next skier down, put up a 91.80. Defending Olympic champion Maddie Bowman of the United States fell on the final hit during each of her three runs in the finals. Burke helped pave the way for halfpipe to reach the Olympics, winning four X Games in the event. She died in 2012 following complications from a training fall in Park City, Utah. Sharpe is among a group of skiers carrying on Burke’s legacy. The group includes Martinod, who was considering retirement before the sport became part of the Olympic program. Burke talked her out of it, saying Martinod needed to help show the world what freestyle halfpipe skiing was all about. Martinod, at 33 the oldest skier in the field, threw down a pair of stylish runs to put pressure on Sharpe. When she bailed midway through her final run, assuring Sharpe of gold, she laughed and raised her hands. She celebrated her second Olympic medal with her 8-year-old daughter. Sharpe, who raps to herself before each run and wears a mouth guard with a gold tooth painted

GOLD: Canada (Justin Kripps, Alexander Kopacz) BRONZE: Latvia (Oskars Melbardis,

GOLD: Norway (Andreas Stjernen, Robert Johansson, Johan Andre Forfang, Daniel Andre Tande) SILVER: Germany (Richard Freitag, Karl Geiger, Andreas Wellinger, Stephan Leyhe) BRONZE: Poland (Kamil Stoch, Stefan Hula, Maciej Kot, Dawid Kubacki) SPEEDSKATING Men’s 500 GOLD: Havard Lorentzen, Norway SILVER: Cha Min-Kyu, South Korea BRONZE: Gao Tingyu, China

ASSOCIATED PRESS

American Brita Sigourney competes in the women’s freestyle halfpipe final, in which she won the bronze medal.

in the middle, talked openly after qualifying about the chance to have a “victory lap” if she knew she had gold in hand before her final run. It happened just as envisioned, though her last trip didn’t go down quite like she planned. The 25-year-old washed out halfway through her run, though it hardly mattered. Russian doping case • A doping charge against curling bronze medalist Alexander Krushelnitsky could keep Russia from being reinstated before the end of the Winter Olympics. International Olympics Committee spokesman Mark Adams confirmed the positive test and said it could have “consequences” in evaluating the behavior of the Russian team. Russian athletes are participating as “Olympic Athletes from Russia.” The IOC suspended the Russian Olympic Committee last year in connection with a massive doping scheme at the 2014 Sochi Olympics but allowed 168 athletes to compete under neutral uniforms and without the national flag. Russian Curling Federation president Dmitry Svishchev said

it is possible someone spiked Krushelnitsky’s food or drink. He suggested that rival Russian athletes or Russia’s political enemies could be responsible. U.S. beats Canada in curling • The United States men needed to upset Canada to have any realistic hope of moving on to the Olympic medal round in curling. John Shuster delivered a dramatic 9-7 victory, scoring the winning points with a whisker-thin margin in an extra end in Gangneung. The Americans still have a fight on its hands to get to the playoffs. At 3-4, they are in seventh place in the 10-team field with two games left in round -robin play. The U.S. probably will have to win both games and then a tiebreaker to advance. Sweden (6-1) is in first place, followed by Switzerland (5-2). Great Britain and Canada (4-3) are next. Double bobsledding gold • Canada and Germany tied for the gold medal in two-man bobsledding. The Canadian sled driven by Justin Kripps and pushed by Alexander Kopacz and the German one driven by Francesco Friedrich and pushed by Thorsten Margis finished in 3 minutes, 16.86 seconds.

It’s the second time countries have shared gold in this event in Olympic history. Canada and Italy tied in 1998. Italy got the gold over West Germany in 1968, even though both sleds had the same time. The Olympics then utilized a fastest-heat tiebreaker. Latvia got bronze Monday, with Oskars Melbardis and Janis Strenga finishing 0.05 seconds back in the closest three-sled finish in Olympic history. Nico Walther and Christian Poser of Germany finished 0.20 seconds back of the lead and somehow didn’t win a medal. It was the closest finish by the top four sleds in any Olympic sliding race ever. Super G winner shifts gears • Ester Ledecka, the surprise winner of the super-G in Alpine skiing, will be the first women’s super-G champion to not enter the downhill at the same Winter Games since Diann Roffe in 1994. Ledecka, of the Czech Republic, won the super-G after never finishing better than seventh in 19 career World Cup ski races. She is also a snowboarder and is expected to enter qualifying for the parallel giant slalom in that sport. That would make her the first Olympic competitor in Alpine skiing and snowboarding.

Record outing is golden for Canadian ice dancers OLYMPICS • FROM B1

It’s the second gold medal of the Pyeongchang Games for Virtue and Moir, who were instrumental in helping Canada win the team event. It was their third gold overall after winning their home Olympics in Vancouver in 2010, and their fifth overall after two silver medals at the Sochi Games. The total broke a tie with Russia’s Evgeni Plushenko and Sweden’s Gillis Grafstrom for most medals in figure skating, and they tied the record for gold medals shared by Grafstrom, Sonja Henie of Norway and Irina Rodnina of the Soviet Union. The Americans were assured of an ice dance medal when the Shibutanis, who helped the U.S. win team bronze, laid down their best performance of the season. The so-called Shib Sibs’ sharply choreographed program to “Paradise” by Coldplay was perfect until a shaky rotational lift late in the program. They trailed teammates Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue by two-hundredths of a point after the short dance, and their near-season-best free dance allowed them to make up the difference. The third American team, Madison Chock and Evan Bates, also was within sight of the podium after the short dance. But their rare fall enter-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada perform during the ice dance portion of the Olympic free dance figure skating final, which they won.

ing their combination spin was enough to damage an otherwise beautiful performance to “Imagine” that still drew applause from the crowd. Chock has an ankle injury that she aggravated Monday during warmups. Moir acknowledged his nerves nearly got the best of him before their short program began on the ice dancing schedule. “People assume because we’ve been doing this so long that we can hold it together, and that’s not the case,” Moir said. “It’s not easy to get out there with all of the country watching at home.”

Added Virtue: “We put the pressure on ourselves. It’s a big part of being tested competitors, and we push each other and we push the limits.”

VONN GEARS UP

American Lindsey Vonn used the final practice run before the women’s downhill skiing event to test different racing lines on the course. Some worked, some didn’t, and Vonn went outside a gate clocking the fourth-fastest time behind Ramona Siebenhofer of Austria. The American star says, “Some of the lines I took today I think were faster. Others not.”

Siebenhofer was 0.20 seconds faster than Michelle Gisin of Switzerland, whose sister Dominique tied for victory in the 2014 Olympic downhill. Nadia Fanchini of Italy was third, 0.21 behind the leader. Vonn was 0.29 back, having stood up and carved a turn before the finish line. Mikaela Shiffrin was fifth fastest, though she is preparing for the Alpine combined event on Thursday. Shiffrin will skip the downhill — which is to be contested Tuesday night (St. Louis time). Vonn, meanwhile, prefers not to dwell on what shapes up as a significant story line. “I’ve tried not to think about it as being my last Olympic downhill. Just focus on the moment, the right here and the right now. And I think later I’ll reflect on how much I enjoyed it and how much my teammates and my coaches made it special for me,” Vonn said. “But you can’t get too sentimental right now, because I still have to race. I still have to be focused. And afterward, I’ll do some reflecting.” What she also hopes to do, of course, is win a second gold medal in her sport’s fastest event, to go along with the one from the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Vonn missed the Sochi Games four years ago after tearing ligaments in her right knee and has said these will be her last goround at an Olympics.

MEDALS TABLE Nation

G

S

B

Tot

Norway

11

9

8

28

Germany

10

6

4

20

Canada

8

5

6

19

Netherlands

6

5

2

13

United States

5

3

4

12

France

4

4

4

12

OA Russia

0

3

8

11

Austria

4

2

4

10

Japan

2

5

3

10

Sweden

4

3

0

7

South Korea

3

2

2

7

Switzerland

2

4

1

7

China

0

5

2

7

Italy

2

1

3

6

Czech Republic

1

2

3

6

Britain

1

0

3

4

Slovakia

1

2

0

3

Australia

0

2

1

3

Finland

0

0

3

3

Belarus

1

1

0

2

Poland

1

0

1

2

Spain

0

0

2

2

Ukraine

1

0

0

1

Slovenia

0

1

0

1

Kazakhstan

0

0

1

1

Latvia

0

0

1

1

Liechtenstein

0

0

1

1

Through two events Tuesday

TV SCHEDULE TUESDAY 4 a.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) 6 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination round, Switzerland vs. Germany (live, NBCSN) 6 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination round, Finland vs. Korea (live, USA) 8:30 a.m. • Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final; Biathlon: mixed relay final (NBCSN) 11:45 a.m. • Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final; Short track: women’s 3,000 relay final; Women’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Biathlon: mixed relay final; Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Switzerland (CNBC) 4 p.m. • Hockey game of the day, TBA (NBCSN) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: ladies short program (live, NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Skiing: Women’s downhill final (live); Figure skating: ladies short program (live); Bobsled: women’s competition; Snowboarding: men’s big air competition (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 9 p.m. • Men’s hockey: Quarterfinal, Czeck Republic vs. USA/Slovakia winner (live, CNBC) 9:35 p.m. • Women’s curling: Canada vs. Great Britain, South Korea vs. Russia (NBCSN) 11:05 p.m. • Freestyle skiing: men’s ski cross final; Short track: women’s 3,000 relay final (KSDK, Ch. 5) EARLY WEDNESDAY 1:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: bronze medal game, Finland vs. Russia (live, USA) 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: quarterfinal, Russia vs. Slovenia/Norway winner (live, NBCSN)


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

M 2 • TUESDAY • 02.20.2018

HIGHLIGHTS NO SURPRISE, USA AND CANADA REACH WOMEN’S HOCKEY FINAL

TWO MORE GOLDS FOR NORWAY, WHICH UPS MEDALS TOTAL TO 28

SHIFFRIN DROPS DOWNHILL TO FOCUS ON COMBINED

By identical scores of 5-0, the United States and Canada won their semifinal matches against Finland and Russia, respectively, to reach the gold-medal game (10:10 p.m. Wednesday, NBCSN). This will be the fifth time in six Olympics that the North American rivals will have met in the final since women’s hockey became an Olympics sport. Team USA won the inaugural, in 1998. and Canada has won the last four.

Norway’s Havard Lorentzen won the 500 speedskate in 34.41 seconds, and the Norwegians won team ski jumping, giving the nation of 5.3 million residents the lead with 28 medals through Monday (local time). Germany was second, with 20. Norway’s best total in a Winter Olympics had been 26 medals, from 2014 Sochi and 1994 Lillehammer. In the medal count, Norway leads in gold (11), silver (9) and is tied for first in bronze (8).

A forecast for high winds late in the week forced a move of the women’s skiing combined up a day − from Thursday to Wednesday (St. Louis time). That prompted Mikaela Shiffrin of the U.S. to drop out of the downhill event, which is set for Tuesday. Shiffrin, the giant slalom winner last week, said racing on back-to-back days would reduce her chance to win the combined. USA’s Lindsey Vonn is the downhill favorite.

Havard Lorentzen

NOTEBOOK

MONDAY’S MEDALISTS

U.S. rolls to hockey quarterfinals

BOBSLED Men’s Two-Man GOLD: Germany (Francesco Friedrich, Thorsten Margis)

Men’s team surges past Slovakia, faces Czech Republic next

Janis Strenga)

FROM NEWS SERVICES

SKI JUMPING

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Ryan Donato scored two

Team Event Large Hill

goals, Troy Terry had three assists and the United States beat Slovakia 5-1 in the qualification round Monday night (St. Louis time) to advance to face the Czech Republic in the Olympic men’s hockey quarterfinals. That contest is set for 9:10 p.m. Tuesday (St. Louis time). College kids again led the way for the U.S., which scored more against Slovakia then it did in all three preliminary-round games. James Wisniewski, Mark Arcobello and Garrett Roe also scored for the Americans, who took advantage of a five-on-three power play for hits on Donato and goaltender Ryan Zapolski. Shaking off a collision with Ladislav Nagy, goalie Ryan Zapolski had arguably his best game of the tournament, stopping 21 of the 22 shots he faced. Zapolski and the U.S. also beat Slovakia 2-1 in the preliminary round when Donato scored twice. With his second two-goal game, Donato equaled his father, Ted, who scored four goals for the U.S. at the 1992 Games. Canadian wins women’s halfpipe • Cassie Sharpe put on a show in the women’s freestyle halfpipe final on Tuesday, soaring to a 95.80 score for her second run to give Canada its first Olympic medal in the event. Sharpe topped qualifying on Monday with a pair of big runs and went even higher in the finals. Her winning run included a 180-degree spin and the kind of air the rest of the 12-woman field simply couldn’t match. France’s Marie Martinod added a second silver medal to go with the one she captured in Sochi four years ago when the sport made its Olympic debut. Martinod scored 92.60 on her second run but fell during her third to assure Sharpe the gold. American Brita Sigourney edged teammate Annalisa Drew for the bronze medal. Drew scored 90.80 on her final run to slip past Sigourney only to have Sigourney, the next skier down, put up a 91.80. Defending Olym-

GOLD: Canada (Justin Kripps, Alexander Kopacz) BRONZE: Latvia (Oskars Melbardis,

GOLD: Norway (Andreas Stjernen, Robert Johansson, Johan Andre Forfang, Daniel Andre Tande) SILVER: Germany (Richard Freitag, Karl Geiger, Andreas Wellinger, Stephan Leyhe) BRONZE: Poland (Kamil Stoch, Stefan Hula, Maciej Kot, Dawid Kubacki) SPEEDSKATING Men’s 500 GOLD: Havard Lorentzen, Norway SILVER: Cha Min-Kyu, South Korea BRONZE: Gao Tingyu, China

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ryan Donato (16) of the U.S. celebrates with teammates after scoring in the third period of a 5-1 win over Slovakia.

pic champion Maddie Bowman of the United States fell on the final hit during each of her three runs in the finals. Russian doping case • A doping charge against curling bronze medalist Alexander Krushelnitsky could keep Russia from being reinstated before the end of the Winter Olympics. International Olympics Committee spokesman Mark Adams confirmed the positive test and said it could have “consequences” in evaluating the behavior of the Russian team. Russian athletes are participating as “Olympic Athletes from Russia.” If he is found guilty, he could be banned and forced to return his bronze medal. The IOC could keep Russian athletes from marching in the closing ceremony under the Russian flag. Russian Curling Federation president Dmitry Svishchev said it is possible someone spiked Krushelnitsky’s food or drink with meldonium, which was banned in 2016. He suggested that Russia’s political enemies could be responsible. U.S. beats Canada in curling • The United States men needed to upset Canada to have any re-

alistic hope of moving on to the Olympic medal round in curling. John Shuster delivered a dramatic 9-7 victory, scoring the winning points with a whisker-thin margin in an extra end in Gangneung. The Americans still have a fight on its hands to get to the playoffs. At 3-4, they are in seventh place in the 10-team field with two games left in round -robin play. The U.S. probably will have to win both games and then a tiebreaker to advance. Sweden (6-1) is in first place, followed by Switzerland (5-2). Great Britain and Canada (4-3) are next. Double bobsledding gold • Canada and Germany tied for the gold medal in two-man bobsledding. The Canadian sled driven by Justin Kripps and pushed by Alexander Kopacz and the German one driven by Francesco Friedrich and pushed by Thorsten Margis finished in 3 minutes, 16.86 seconds. It’s the second time countries have shared gold in this event in Olympic history. Canada and Italy tied in 1998. Italy got the gold over West Germany in 1968, even though both sleds had the same time. The Olympics then utilized a fastestheat tiebreaker. Latvia got bronze this time,

with Oskars Melbardis and Janis Strenga finishing 0.05 seconds back in the closest three-sled finish in Olympic history. Germany finished 0.20 seconds back of the lead and somehow didn’t win a medal. It was the closest finish by the top four sleds in any Olympic sliding race ever. Korean hockey dream over • The Korean women’s hockey team has ended its historic Olympic run with a fifth straight loss, with thousands of fans shouting “We are one” and waving a “unification flag.” Korea, which included players from North and South Korea, was defeated by Sweden 6-1 to cap a 0-5 run in the Games. South Korean player Kim Heewon wiped away tears as she and teammates waved to cheering fans. Some spectators also wept. Super G winner shifts gears • Ester Ledecka, the surprise winner of the super-G in Alpine skiing, will be the first women’s super-G champion to not enter the downhill at the same Winter Games since Diann Roffe in 1994. Ledecka, of the Czech Republic, also a snowboarder and is expected to enter qualifying for the parallel giant slalom in that sport.

Record outing is golden for Canadian ice dancers OLYMPICS • FROM B1

It was the second gold medal of the Pyeongchang Games for Virtue and Moir, who were instrumental in helping Canada win the team event. It also was their third gold overall after winning their home Olympics in Vancouver in 2010, and their fifth medal overall after two silvers at the Sochi Games four years ago. They retired for two years after that disappointment, content with their place in history, only to decide a couple years ago to make one more run at Olympic glory. They finished it exactly how they had imagined. “It definitely feels like we are close to the end of our career, and we are very proud of this,” Moir said. “We came back to win the second gold medal, that was the goal. “This was a very intense competition and we’re happy the way things turned out for us. We have the greatest respect for (the French team) and they skated so well, and they push us to be at our best.” Their medal total broke a tie with Russia’s Evgeni Plushenko and Sweden’s Gillis Grafstrom for the most in Olympic figure skating, and their golden haul matched the record shared by Grafstrom, Sonja Henie of Norway and Irina Rodnina of the Soviet Union. “We were able to rely on our team and our coaches and training, and just go out there and sa-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada perform during the ice dance portion of the Olympic free dance figure skating final, which they won.

vor it,” Virtue said. American siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani won the bronze medal with a near-flawless free skate that totaled 192.59 points, edging teammates Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue by just under five points. “This was the most incredible moment for us today,” Maia Shibutani said. “We did four performances on Olympic ice we can be so proud of, and we got two Olympic medals (including the team). We did it for ourselves and Team USA and everyone who supported us.” Still, the race for the gold medal came down to two teams a cut above the rest.

Vitue and Moir have been the standard bearers for the better part of a decade, the longesttenured ice-dance team in Canadian history. They carried the Maple Leaf flag into the opening ceremony, and their rockinspired Latin short dance broke their own world record the previous day. Papadakis and Cizeron were the new rivals on the scene, bringing a fresh, contemporary style that had won the judges over. They upset the Canadians at the Grand Prix Final in December, then set the world record with their elegant, mesmerizing performance at last month’s European championships.

The French couple, whose wardrobe malfunction in the short dance made them a trending topic worldwide, drew the penultimate starting number for the free dance. They put on a program that former ice dancer Meryl Davis described as “art in motion” — their lifts were effortless, choreographed elements smooth and synchronized twizzles as if they were tied together. Their score of 123.35 points was exactly what they needed to make a case for gold. Virtue and Moir answered the challenge with 4 minutes to last a lifetime, a program certain to go down in Olympic history. The throaty, gritty portion of “El Tango de Roxanne” had the crowd roaring, and the finishing lift was a fitting conclusion to an exemplary performance. And their exemplary careers. The Americans had assured themselves a medal when the “Shib Sibs,” who helped the U.S. win the team bronze, put on their best performance of the season. Their sharply choreographed show to “Paradise” by Coldplay made up the two-hundredths of a point they trailed Hubbell and Donohue after the short dance. The third American team, Madison Chock and Evan Bates, was within sight of the podium after the short dance. But a rare and stunning fall entering their combination spin was enough to damage an otherwise beautiful performance to “Imagine” that still drew an emotional applause.

MEDALS TABLE Nation

G

S

B

Tot

Norway

11

9

8

28

Germany

10

6

4

20

Canada

8

5

6

19

Netherlands

6

5

2

13

United States

5

3

4

12

France

4

4

4

12

OA Russia

0

3

8

11

Austria

4

2

4

10

Japan

2

5

3

10

Sweden

4

3

0

7

South Korea

3

2

2

7

Switzerland

2

4

1

7

China

0

5

2

7

Italy

2

1

3

6

Czech Republic

1

2

3

6

Britain

1

0

3

4

Slovakia

1

2

0

3

Australia

0

2

1

3

Finland

0

0

3

3

Belarus

1

1

0

2

Poland

1

0

1

2

Spain

0

0

2

2

Ukraine

1

0

0

1

Slovenia

0

1

0

1

Kazakhstan

0

0

1

1

Latvia

0

0

1

1

Liechtenstein

0

0

1

1

Through two events Tuesday

TV SCHEDULE TUESDAY 4 a.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) 6 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination round, Switzerland vs. Germany (live, NBCSN) 6 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination round, Finland vs. Korea (live, USA) 8:30 a.m. • Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final; Biathlon: mixed relay final (NBCSN) 11:45 a.m. • Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final; Short track: women’s 3,000 relay final; Women’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Biathlon: mixed relay final; Nordic combined: men’s large hill/10K final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Switzerland (CNBC) 4 p.m. • Hockey game of the day, TBA (NBCSN) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: ladies short program (live, NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Skiing: Women’s downhill final (live); Figure skating: ladies short program (live); Bobsled: women’s competition; Snowboarding: men’s big air competition (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 9:10 p.m. • Men’s hockey: Quarterfinal, Czech Republic vs. USA (live, CNBC) 9:35 p.m. • Women’s curling: Canada vs. Great Britain; South Korea vs. Russia (NBCSN) 11:05 p.m. • Freestyle skiing: men’s ski cross final; Short track: women’s 3,000 relay final (KSDK, Ch. 5) EARLY WEDNESDAY 1:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: bronze medal game, Finland vs. Russia (live, USA) 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: quarterfinal, Russia vs. Slovenia/Norway winner (live, NBCSN)


HOCKEY

02.20.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Montreal Ottawa Buffalo Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina NY Islanders Columbus NY Rangers

GP 59 57 61 56 58 58 58 60 GP 59 61 59 59 60 61 59 60

W 39 36 36 26 24 22 21 17 W 34 35 31 30 27 29 29 27

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 17 3 81 211 159 20-6-1 19-11-2 13 8 80 188 140 19-7-4 17-6-4 20 5 77 204 172 19-8-2 17-12-3 24 6 58 166 185 13-9-3 13-15-3 25 9 57 155 174 12-12-7 12-13-2 29 7 51 149 185 14-10-6 8-19-1 28 9 51 158 204 14-11-5 7-17-4 32 11 45 143 198 8-18-4 9-14-7 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 18 7 75 185 176 20-8-2 14-10-5 22 4 74 195 180 23-7-1 12-15-3 20 8 70 180 181 16-10-3 15-10-5 19 10 70 178 172 14-9-6 16-10-4 23 10 64 162 180 15-10-6 12-13-4 26 6 64 203 219 16-11-4 13-15-2 25 5 63 157 169 17-11-2 12-14-3 28 5 59 173 191 18-11-3 9-17-2

Div 10-5-1 12-2-2 9-5-1 8-4-1 6-13-2 10-6-2 6-10-3 5-6-3 Div 11-5-3 12-5-0 10-7-1 8-4-5 6-7-5 10-8-1 10-9-3 7-8-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Dallas Blues Minnesota Colorado Chicago Pacific Vegas San Jose Los Angeles Calgary Anaheim Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 58 59 59 60 59 58 60 GP 58 59 59 60 60 58 59 59

W 35 35 34 34 32 31 25 W 39 32 32 30 29 24 23 17

L OT Pts GF 14 9 79 182 15 9 79 196 21 4 72 179 22 4 72 171 20 7 71 177 23 4 66 179 27 8 58 170 L OT Pts GF 15 4 82 202 19 8 72 175 22 5 69 170 21 9 69 169 20 11 69 167 30 4 52 162 30 6 52 157 32 10 44 143

GA Home Away Div 152 20-7-3 15-7-6 11-4-2 157 23-5-2 12-10-7 9-6-2 157 21-9-1 13-12-3 10-10-0 153 19-12-0 15-10-4 9-6-2 169 20-5-6 12-15-1 10-9-0 173 20-8-1 11-15-3 7-9-1 173 13-14-3 12-13-5 6-9-2 GA Home Away Div 158 22-4-2 17-11-2 14-1-1 161 17-9-3 15-10-5 15-4-3 146 14-9-3 18-13-2 8-9-3 175 13-14-4 17-7-5 8-6-3 170 15-9-4 14-11-7 9-5-6 191 12-14-2 12-16-2 10-7-0 189 11-15-3 12-15-3 5-10-1 197 9-16-4 8-16-6 3-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday Minnesota 5, NY Islanders 3 Washington 3, Buffalo 2 Boston 2, Calgary 1, OT Nashville 5, Ottawa 2 Los Angeles 3, Chicago 1 Anaheim at Vegas, late Sunday Philadelphia 7, NY Rangers 4 Edmonton 4, Colorado 2 New Jersey 3, Carolina 2, OT Pittsburgh 5, Columbus 2 Toronto 3, Detroit 2 Winnipeg 7, Florida 2 San Jose 5, Dallas 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

Tuesday Montreal at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 6 p.m. Columbus at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Wednesday Ottawa at Chicago, 7 p.m. Dallas at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Calgary at Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

Thursday Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Minnesota at New Jersey, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Toronto, 6 p.m. Washington at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Rangers at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 7 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Calgary at Arizona, 8 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

Ovechkin scores 35th goal

Blues bring Blais back

Forward arrives from minors for 5th time this season BLUES VS. SHARKS

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In what has become a familiar scene for the Blues this season, the team recalled forward Sammy Blais from San Antonio on Monday. It’s the fifth time this season Blais has been called up from the American Hockey League. He’s done well at San Antonio, where he’s tied for the team lead in points with Andrew Agozzino (both have 11 goals and 17 assists). But Blais has been in 30 games for the Rampage and Agozzino (who is the property of the Colorado Avalanche) has been in 50. In 10 games with the Blues, Blais has one goal and two assists, and he usually has done well in his first game or two after being called up and then drifted to lower levels. On his last call-up, he got hurt in a game against Winnipeg on Dec. 16 and went on the injured reserve list, on which he stayed until Jan. 5, when he was cleared to play and sent to San Antonio. Blais played the past two games in San Antonio on a line with Tage Thompson and Zach Sanford, and it appears Sanford could be staying down a while. Sanford doesn’t have to go through waivers, so the Blues can keep him in the AHL as long as they want. He had no points in two games over the weekend as he returns to action after missing the start of the season because of a dislocated shoulder. Blues coach Mike Yeo said Sanford’s play would determine when he joins the team. “We sent him down without

When/where • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Scottrade Center TV/radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Sharks • Where have they been? Sixty games into the season, the Blues have played 29 of 30 opponents in the NHL. They’re already done playing 13 teams for the season. But they’ve yet to play the Sharks. Starting Tuesday, three of the Blues’ next 16 games are against San Jose, which currently sits second in the Pacific Division with 72 points. Joe Thornton remains on injured reserve following knee surgery. After leaving Sunday’s game against Dallas because of an undisclosed injury, Brent Burns’ status is questionable. Logan Couture has a team-high 23 goals. The Sharks have won four of their last five, but now start a four-game trip. Jim Thomas

telling him that there was anything guaranteed for him,” Yeo said. “He knows that he’s got to play hockey games and that hasn’t changed. … He’s missed a lot of time here, so he’s got to play hockey games. We sent him down, go play some hockey games and earn a callup.”

LINE DRIVES

Blais wasn’t on hand for practice on Monday. So it’s not certain how he’ll fit into the lineup for the game Tuesday with San Jose, though the Blues generally

wouldn’t have called him up if they didn’t play on using him. Regardless, with the team on a three-game losing streak, Yeo has rearranged his lines. Dmitrij Jaskin moved up to the top six, playing alongside Jaden Schwartz and Brayden Schenn in the spot that recently was being filled by Patrik Berglund. Fourthline center Kyle Brodziak moved up to center the third line, with Vladimir Sobotka and Berglund on the wings. The fourth line was Scottie Upshall, Oskar Sundqvist and Ivan Barbashev; Yeo said Sundqvist, who has not played for the Blues since Jan. 9, will play. The Blues sent Sundqvist to San Antonio for a conditioning stint, and want to get him back in the lineup. “Trying to shake things up, I guess,” Brodziak said. “Hopefully we can find something that clicks.” The Blues have scored five goals in their past three games.

NOTES

Robert Bortuzzo, who took a hard hit on Friday in Dallas and didn’t play most of the third period, missed his second day of practice on Monday. Bortuzzo also didn’t skate on Saturday. (The team took Sunday off.) “We’ll see how he is (Tuesday),” Yeo said. If Bortuzzo can’t play, Chris Butler would get into his first game this season. • The Blues continue to wait on newly acquired winger Nikita Soshnikov to get his U.S. work visa and joining the team. “I’m hoping for the end of the week,” Yeo said. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin scored his league-leading 35th goal in a 3-2 win over the Buffalo Sabres on Monday in Buffalo, N.Y. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin scored his league-leading 35th goal, and the Washington Capitals reclaimed the top spot in the Metropolitan Division with a 3-2 win over the hosting Buffalo Sabres on Monday. John Carlson had a goal and assist and Philipp Grubauer stopped 32 shots. Wild beat Islanders • Matt Cullen and Tyler Ennis scored in Minnesota’s three-goal second period, and the Wild beat hosts New York Islanders 5-3.

Jason Zucker added two goals and Joel Eriksson Ek also scored for the Wild, who have earned at least a point in six of their past seven games (4-1-2). Bruins beat Flames in OT • Brad Marchand scored his 22nd goal 3:36 into overtime to give the Boston Bruins a 2-1 win in Calgary. David Pastrnak also scored for Boston (36-13-8), which moved within one point of Tampa Bay for first place in the Atlantic Division and Eastern Conference. Boston has two games in hand. J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester (right), in front of the Wild’s Ryan White last spring, has his eye on the puck.

NHL SUMMARIES Bruins 2, Flames 1, OT

Kings 3, Blackhawks 1

Boston 1 0 0 1 — 2 Calgary 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Boston, Pastrnak 22 (Bergeron), 5:59. Penalties: Krejci, BOS, (hooking), 8:26; Giordano, CGY, (slashing), 15:56. Second period: 2, Calgary, Tkachuk 22 (Gaudreau, Monahan), 5:28 (pp). Penalties: Hathaway, CGY, Major (fighting), 1:12; McQuaid, BOS, Major (fighting), 1:12; Heinen, BOS, (slashing), 4:15; Stajan, CGY, (slashing), 11:41; Grzelcyk, BOS, (holding), 17:44. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Overtime: 3, Boston, Marchand 22 (Nash), 3:36. Penalties: None. Shots: Boston 13-10-7-2: 32. Calgary 4-8-12-5: 29. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Calgary 1 of 3. Goalies: Boston, Rask 24-10-4 (29 shots-28 saves). Calgary, Rittich 6-3-3 (32-30). A: 19,289. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Vaughan Rody.

Los Angeles 2 1 0 — 3 Chicago 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Los Angeles, Mitchell 4 (Thompson, Clifford), 8:31. 2, Los Angeles, Andreoff 3 (Brodzinski, Amadio), 16:37. Penalties: Murphy, CHI, (high sticking), 6:05. Second period: 3, Los Angeles, Phaneuf 5 (Martinez, Kempe), 4:04 (pp). Penalties: Bouma, CHI, (interference), 2:46. Third period: 4, Chicago, Sharp 7 (Dahlstrom), 1:42. Penalties: Sharp, CHI, (hooking), 2:59; Kempe, LA, (tripping), 5:02. Shots: Los Angeles 15-14-3: 32. Chicago 4-11-13: 28. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 3; Chicago 0 of 1. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 22-21-2 (28 shots-27 saves). Chicago, Forsberg 6-11-3 (32-29). T: 2:29. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Derek Amell.

Capitals 3, Sabres 2 Washington 0 2 1 — 3 Buffalo 0 0 2 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Larsson, BUF, (tripping), 17:53; Connolly, WSH, (interference), 18:54. Second period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 35 (Djoos, Carlson), 1:18. 2, Washington, Carlson 11 (Vrana, Oshie), 13:33. Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 13:33. Third period: 3, Buffalo, Okposo 10 (Rodrigues, S.Wilson), 12:42. 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 16, 19:34. 5, Buffalo, Kane 19 (O’Reilly, Reinhart), 19:56. Penalties: Backstrom, WSH, (slashing), 4:14. Shots: Washington 14-10-6: 30. Buffalo 10-7-17: 34. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 1; Buffalo 0 of 3. Goalies: Washington, Grubauer 6-7-3 (34 shots-32 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 4-10-3 (29-27). A: 18,228. Referees: Peter MacDougall, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Tim Nowak.

Wild 5, Islanders 3 Minnesota 1 3 1 — 5 NY Islanders 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Eriksson Ek 2 (Ennis, Coyle), 7:02. 2, NY Islanders, Johnston 3 (Cizikas, Boychuk), 19:15. Penalties: Foligno, MIN, (slashing), 16:26. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Lee 30 (Pulock, Hickey), 1:57. 4, Minnesota, Cullen 6 (Suter, Dumba), 9:54. 5, Minnesota, Zucker 24 (Suter, Dumba), 12:17. 6, Minnesota, Ennis 8 (Spurgeon, Cullen), 14:06. 7, NY Islanders, Fritz 1 (Aho, Lee), 16:31. Penalties: Pulock, NYI, (interference), 16:54. Third period: 8, Minnesota, Zucker 25 (Staal), 16:38. Penalties: Granlund, MIN, (hooking), 0:25; Parise, MIN, (hooking), 9:11; Parise, MIN, (slashing), 18:37. Shots: Minnesota 11-12-9: 32. NY Islanders 12-6-17: 35. Power-plays: Minnesota 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 4. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 24-11-5 (35 shots-32 saves). NY Islanders, Halak 18-19-4 (32-27). A: 15,342. Referees: Tom Kowal, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Darren Gibbs.

Predators 5, Senators 2 Ottawa 1 1 0 — Nashville 2 2 1 — First period: 1, Nashville, Josi 10 (Ellis, Turris), 9:28 (pp). 2, Nashville, Arvidsson 19 (Johansen, Forsberg), 14:32. 3, Ottawa, Pageau 8 (Stone, Karlsson), 16:03 (pp). Penalties: Chabot, OTT, (slashing), 7:45; Stone, OTT, (interference), 11:14; Sissons, NSH, (interference), 15:41. Second period: 4, Nashville, Ellis 4 (Josi, Fiala), 6:34 (pp). 5, Ottawa, McCormick 2 (Claesson, Shore), 8:05. 6, Nashville, Arvidsson 20 (Forsberg), 10:00. Penalties: Z.Smith, OTT, (tripping), 6:18; Salomaki, NSH, (roughing), 15:43; Stone, OTT, (holding stick), 16:18. Third period: 7, Nashville, C.Smith 18 (Fiala), 8:15. Penalties: Subban, NSH, (hooking), 0:20; Claesson, OTT, (slashing), 17:08. Shots: Ottawa 14-15-9: 38. Nashville 9-15-17: 41. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 3; Nashville 2 of 5. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 17-18-5 (41 shots-36 saves). Nashville, Rinne 30-9-4 (38-36). A: 17,177. Referees: Jake Brenk, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Brian Murphy.

2 5

Points leaders PLAYER Kucherov Malkin McDavid Giroux Stamkos Gaudreau Wheeler Kessel Crosby Ovechkin Voracek Tavares Kopitar Hall Barzal Bailey MacKinnon Couturier Marchessault Schenn Kane Monahan Marchand Barkov Kuznetsov Klingberg

TEAM TBL PIT EDM PHI TBL CGY WPG PIT PIT WSH PHI NYI LAK NJD NYI NYI COL PHI VGK STL CHI CGY BOS FLA WSH DAL

G 31 33 26 20 24 19 16 24 19 34 11 30 25 24 16 15 24 29 21 24 22 27 21 20 15 7

A 46 37 43 49 44 49 51 42 47 31 54 34 38 38 46 47 37 30 37 31 33 27 33 34 39 47

PTS 77 70 69 69 68 68 67 66 66 65 65 64 63 62 62 62 61 59 58 55 55 54 54 54 54 54

Banged-up Bouwmeester perseveres BLUES • FROM B1

attend the birth of a child and it was 60 games into the season before he got the 29th he needed to reach 1,100. That came on Friday, in Dallas, the Blues’ most recent contest. He has missed 31 games this season, almost as many as he missed in the first 14 seasons of his NHL career. Not only that, but Bouwmeester’s unspecified, nagging lower-body injury is at the point that since he returned to the lineup on Dec. 30, Bouwmeester almost never practices or takes part in a morning skate. He was on the ice on Monday at the IceZone in Hazelwood, but that was one of his few times out there this season. “It’s been a little different,” he said. “It is what it is. I’m kind of dealing with a couple things but that’s part of experience. I know how to get myself ready for the games and felt fine in them. The start of this season wasn’t great: getting hurt in training camp, missed the start of the season. That was frustrating. Then it’s been a little frustrating as we go. As long as you’re playing the games, it’s all good.” Though it may sound like a dream situation — No practice! Only games! — it’s not. “Usually if you’re on that schedule, it means something’s going on,” Bouwmeester said. “I’d rather much be out there. You need the practice. There are little things you need to work on, passing, shooting, pretty basic stuff, but it’s always nice to have

days in between games to work on it. (Practice is) fun. We play hockey for a living, so there’s an element of fun to it.” But that’s not the new normal for Bouwmeester. Even with an injury that has eliminated his practice time, he continues to roll up significant ice time — he played 27:45 against Colorado on Feb. 8. But at an average now of 20 minutes on the dot per game, he’s on pace for his lowest average ice time since his rookie season of 2002-03. “He’s done a great job for us. I’ve been very impressed,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “I think it would be tougher for a younger player. ‘Bo’ has been around a long time and obviously knows what he needs to do to be successful. As you get older and more mature in your career, then I would say it’s easier to prepare mentally and not rely as much on the physical side of things. ... He knows what he’s doing out there.” To make up for the lack of onice work, Bouwmeester does more off ice. When the Blues are skating in practice, Bouwmeester usually is back in the training room. “Usually I (ride a) bike, do a little workout, then stretch, a bunch of stuff,” Bouwmeester said. “I’ve got a pretty good routine down now, but obviously it would be much nicer to be out there.” Bouwmeester is only the 11th active player to hit the 1,100game mark, though two of those ahead of him — Jaromir Jagr, who just left the NHL and is playing in Europe, and Marian Hossa,

who has a progressive skin disorder and is sitting out the entire season — soon might be coming off that list. At 34, Bouwmeester is by far the youngest player on the list and he could have a lot of hockey ahead of him. “Yes, but there’s less guys playing into their 40s,” Bouwmeester said. “I don’t know. It’s one of those things, I’ve got another year left on my contract. Hopefully I’ll be back next year, after that, you go from there. You have a lot of different things you think about now. I’ve got a family now. It’s growing. Those are things we’ll sit down and decide about. But as long as I feel good, I’d like to keep going. That’s one thing you talk about, when you do retire? You can’t go back. So you have to enjoy it and play as long as you can because once it’s over, it’s over.” With 22 games left this season, Bouwmeester could, if he plays as often as he has in the past, hit 1,200 at the tail end of the 201819 season. If he has as many injuries then as he has this season, however, the next milestone could be further away. “It’s like birthdays,” he said. “After a certain point, you don’t want to know what number it is. “I’ve been pretty fortunate throughout my career with injuries. I got to 1,000 games at a relatively young age. That was a cool thing. Now it’s just you want to keep playing as long as you can. I feel I can still play.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

02.20.2018 • TUESDAY • M 2

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Montreal Ottawa Buffalo Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina NY Islanders Columbus NY Rangers

GP 59 57 61 56 58 58 58 60 GP 59 61 59 59 60 61 59 60

W 39 36 36 26 24 22 21 17 W 34 35 31 30 27 29 29 27

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 17 3 81 211 159 20-6-1 19-11-2 13 8 80 188 140 19-7-4 17-6-4 20 5 77 204 172 19-8-2 17-12-3 24 6 58 166 185 13-9-3 13-15-3 25 9 57 155 174 12-12-7 12-13-2 29 7 51 149 185 14-10-6 8-19-1 28 9 51 158 204 14-11-5 7-17-4 32 11 45 143 198 8-18-4 9-14-7 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 18 7 75 185 176 20-8-2 14-10-5 22 4 74 195 180 23-7-1 12-15-3 20 8 70 180 181 16-10-3 15-10-5 19 10 70 178 172 14-9-6 16-10-4 23 10 64 162 180 15-10-6 12-13-4 26 6 64 203 219 16-11-4 13-15-2 25 5 63 157 169 17-11-2 12-14-3 28 5 59 173 191 18-11-3 9-17-2

Div 10-5-1 12-2-2 9-5-1 8-4-1 6-13-2 10-6-2 6-10-3 5-6-3 Div 11-5-3 12-5-0 10-7-1 8-4-5 6-7-5 10-8-1 10-9-3 7-8-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Dallas Blues Minnesota Colorado Chicago Pacific Vegas San Jose Anaheim Los Angeles Calgary Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 58 59 59 60 59 58 60 GP 59 59 61 59 60 58 59 59

W 35 35 34 34 32 31 25 W 39 32 30 32 30 24 23 17

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 14 9 79 182 152 20-7-3 15-7-6 11-4-2 15 9 79 196 157 23-5-2 12-10-7 9-6-2 21 4 72 179 157 21-9-1 13-12-3 10-10-0 22 4 72 171 153 19-12-0 15-10-4 9-6-2 20 7 71 177 169 20-5-6 12-15-1 10-9-0 23 4 66 179 173 20-8-1 11-15-3 7-9-1 27 8 58 170 173 13-14-3 12-13-5 6-9-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 16 4 82 202 160 22-5-2 17-11-2 14-2-1 19 8 72 175 161 17-9-3 15-10-5 15-4-3 20 11 71 169 170 15-9-4 15-11-7 10-5-6 22 5 69 170 146 14-9-3 18-13-2 8-9-3 21 9 69 169 175 13-14-4 17-7-5 8-6-3 30 4 52 162 191 12-14-2 12-16-2 10-7-0 30 6 52 157 189 11-15-3 12-15-3 5-10-1 32 10 44 143 197 9-16-4 8-16-6 3-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday Minnesota 5, NY Islanders 3 Washington 3, Buffalo 2 Boston 2, Calgary 1, OT Nashville 5, Ottawa 2 Los Angeles 3, Chicago 1 Anaheim 2, Vegas 0 Sunday Philadelphia 7, NY Rangers 4 Edmonton 4, Colorado 2 New Jersey 3, Carolina 2, OT Pittsburgh 5, Columbus 2 Toronto 3, Detroit 2 Winnipeg 7, Florida 2 San Jose 5, Dallas 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

Tuesday Montreal at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 6 p.m. Columbus at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Wednesday Ottawa at Chicago, 7 p.m. Dallas at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Calgary at Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

Thursday Columbus at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Minnesota at New Jersey, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Toronto, 6 p.m. Washington at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Rangers at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 7 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Calgary at Arizona, 8 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

Ovechkin scores 35th goal

Blues bring Blais back

Forward arrives from minors for 5th time this season BLUES VS. SHARKS

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In what has become a familiar scene for the Blues this season, the team recalled forward Sammy Blais from San Antonio on Monday. It’s the fifth time this season Blais has been called up from the American Hockey League. He’s done well at San Antonio, where he’s tied for the team lead in points with Andrew Agozzino (both have 11 goals and 17 assists). But Blais has been in 30 games for the Rampage and Agozzino (who is the property of the Colorado Avalanche) has been in 50. In 10 games with the Blues, Blais has one goal and two assists, and he usually has done well in his first game or two after being called up and then drifted to lower levels. On his last call-up, he got hurt in a game against Winnipeg on Dec. 16 and went on the injured reserve list, on which he stayed until Jan. 5, when he was cleared to play and sent to San Antonio. Blais played the past two games in San Antonio on a line with Tage Thompson and Zach Sanford, and it appears Sanford could be staying down a while. Sanford doesn’t have to go through waivers, so the Blues can keep him in the AHL as long as they want. He had no points in two games over the weekend as he returns to action after missing the start of the season because of a dislocated shoulder. Blues coach Mike Yeo said Sanford’s play would determine when he joins the team. “We sent him down without

When/where • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Scottrade Center TV/radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Sharks • Where have they been? Sixty games into the season, the Blues have played 29 of 30 opponents in the NHL. They’re already done playing 13 teams for the season. But they’ve yet to play the Sharks. Starting Tuesday, three of the Blues’ next 16 games are against San Jose, which currently sits second in the Pacific Division with 72 points. Joe Thornton remains on injured reserve following knee surgery. After leaving Sunday’s game against Dallas because of an undisclosed injury, Brent Burns’ status is questionable. Logan Couture has a team-high 23 goals. The Sharks have won four of their last five, but now start a four-game trip. Jim Thomas

telling him that there was anything guaranteed for him,” Yeo said. “He knows that he’s got to play hockey games and that hasn’t changed. … He’s missed a lot of time here, so he’s got to play hockey games. We sent him down, go play some hockey games and earn a callup.”

LINE DRIVES

Blais wasn’t on hand for practice on Monday. So it’s not certain how he’ll fit into the lineup for the game Tuesday with San Jose, though the Blues generally

wouldn’t have called him up if they didn’t play on using him. Regardless, with the team on a three-game losing streak, Yeo has rearranged his lines. Dmitrij Jaskin moved up to the top six, playing alongside Jaden Schwartz and Brayden Schenn in the spot that recently was being filled by Patrik Berglund. Fourthline center Kyle Brodziak moved up to center the third line, with Vladimir Sobotka and Berglund on the wings. The fourth line was Scottie Upshall, Oskar Sundqvist and Ivan Barbashev; Yeo said Sundqvist, who has not played for the Blues since Jan. 9, will play. The Blues sent Sundqvist to San Antonio for a conditioning stint, and want to get him back in the lineup. “Trying to shake things up, I guess,” Brodziak said. “Hopefully we can find something that clicks.” The Blues have scored five goals in their past three games.

NOTES

Robert Bortuzzo, who took a hard hit on Friday in Dallas and didn’t play most of the third period, missed his second day of practice on Monday. Bortuzzo also didn’t skate on Saturday. (The team took Sunday off.) “We’ll see how he is (Tuesday),” Yeo said. If Bortuzzo can’t play, Chris Butler would get into his first game this season. • The Blues continue to wait on newly acquired winger Nikita Soshnikov to get his U.S. work visa and joining the team. “I’m hoping for the end of the week,” Yeo said. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin scored his league-leading 35th goal in a 3-2 win over the Buffalo Sabres on Monday in Buffalo, N.Y. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alex Ovechkin scored his league-leading 35th goal, and the Washington Capitals reclaimed the top spot in the Metropolitan Division with a 3-2 win over the hosting Buffalo Sabres on Monday. John Carlson had a goal and assist and Philipp Grubauer stopped 32 shots. Wild beat Islanders • Matt Cullen and Tyler Ennis scored in Minnesota’s three-goal second period, and the Wild beat hosts New York Islanders 5-3.

Jason Zucker added two goals and Joel Eriksson Ek also scored for the Wild, who have earned at least a point in six of their past seven games (4-1-2). Bruins beat Flames in OT • Brad Marchand scored his 22nd goal 3:36 into overtime to give the Boston Bruins a 2-1 win in Calgary. David Pastrnak also scored for Boston (36-13-8), which moved within one point of Tampa Bay for first place in the Atlantic Division and Eastern Conference. Boston has two games in hand. J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester (right), in front of the Wild’s Ryan White last spring, has his eye on the puck.

NHL SUMMARIES Bruins 2, Flames 1, OT

Kings 3, Blackhawks 1

Boston 1 0 0 1 — 2 Calgary 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Boston, Pastrnak 22 (Bergeron), 5:59. Penalties: Krejci, BOS, (hooking), 8:26; Giordano, CGY, (slashing), 15:56. Second period: 2, Calgary, Tkachuk 22 (Gaudreau, Monahan), 5:28 (pp). Penalties: Hathaway, CGY, Major (fighting), 1:12; McQuaid, BOS, Major (fighting), 1:12; Heinen, BOS, (slashing), 4:15; Stajan, CGY, (slashing), 11:41; Grzelcyk, BOS, (holding), 17:44. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Overtime: 3, Boston, Marchand 22 (Nash), 3:36. Penalties: None. Shots: Boston 13-10-7-2: 32. Calgary 4-8-12-5: 29. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Calgary 1 of 3. Goalies: Boston, Rask 24-10-4 (29 shots-28 saves). Calgary, Rittich 6-3-3 (32-30). A: 19,289. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Vaughan Rody.

Los Angeles 2 1 0 — 3 Chicago 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Los Angeles, Mitchell 4 (Thompson, Clifford), 8:31. 2, Los Angeles, Andreoff 3 (Brodzinski, Amadio), 16:37. Penalties: Murphy, CHI, (high sticking), 6:05. Second period: 3, Los Angeles, Phaneuf 5 (Martinez, Kempe), 4:04 (pp). Penalties: Bouma, CHI, (interference), 2:46. Third period: 4, Chicago, Sharp 7 (Dahlstrom), 1:42. Penalties: Sharp, CHI, (hooking), 2:59; Kempe, LA, (tripping), 5:02. Shots: Los Angeles 15-14-3: 32. Chicago 4-11-13: 28. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 3; Chicago 0 of 1. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 22-21-2 (28 shots-27 saves). Chicago, Forsberg 6-11-3 (32-29). T: 2:29. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Derek Amell.

Capitals 3, Sabres 2

Predators 5, Senators 2

Washington 0 2 1 — 3 Buffalo 0 0 2 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Larsson, BUF, (tripping), 17:53; Connolly, WSH, (interference), 18:54. Second period: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 35 (Djoos, Carlson), 1:18. 2, Washington, Carlson 11 (Vrana, Oshie), 13:33. Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 13:33. Third period: 3, Buffalo, Okposo 10 (Rodrigues, S.Wilson), 12:42. 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 16, 19:34. 5, Buffalo, Kane 19 (O’Reilly, Reinhart), 19:56. Penalties: Backstrom, WSH, (slashing), 4:14. Shots: Washington 14-10-6: 30. Buffalo 10-7-17: 34. Power-plays: Washington 0 of 1; Buffalo 0 of 3. Goalies: Washington, Grubauer 6-7-3 (34 shots-32 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 4-10-3 (29-27). A: 18,228. Referees: Peter MacDougall, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Tim Nowak.

Ottawa 1 1 0 — Nashville 2 2 1 — First period: 1, Nashville, Josi 10 (Ellis, Turris), 9:28 (pp). 2, Nashville, Arvidsson 19 (Johansen, Forsberg), 14:32. 3, Ottawa, Pageau 8 (Stone, Karlsson), 16:03 (pp). Penalties: Chabot, OTT, (slashing), 7:45; Stone, OTT, (interference), 11:14; Sissons, NSH, (interference), 15:41. Second period: 4, Nashville, Ellis 4 (Josi, Fiala), 6:34 (pp). 5, Ottawa, McCormick 2 (Claesson, Shore), 8:05. 6, Nashville, Arvidsson 20 (Forsberg), 10:00. Penalties: Z.Smith, OTT, (tripping), 6:18; Salomaki, NSH, (roughing), 15:43; Stone, OTT, (holding stick), 16:18. Third period: 7, Nashville, C.Smith 18 (Fiala), 8:15. Penalties: Subban, NSH, (hooking), 0:20; Claesson, OTT, (slashing), 17:08. Shots: Ottawa 14-15-9: 38. Nashville 9-15-17: 41. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 3; Nashville 2 of 5. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 17-18-5 (41 shots-36 saves). Nashville, Rinne 30-9-4 (38-36). A: 17,177. Referees: Jake Brenk, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Brian Murphy.

Wild 5, Islanders 3 Minnesota 1 3 1 — 5 NY Islanders 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Eriksson Ek 2 (Ennis, Coyle), 7:02. 2, NY Islanders, Johnston 3 (Cizikas, Boychuk), 19:15. Penalties: Foligno, MIN, (slashing), 16:26. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Lee 30 (Pulock, Hickey), 1:57. 4, Minnesota, Cullen 6 (Suter, Dumba), 9:54. 5, Minnesota, Zucker 24 (Suter, Dumba), 12:17. 6, Minnesota, Ennis 8 (Spurgeon, Cullen), 14:06. 7, NY Islanders, Fritz 1 (Aho, Lee), 16:31. Penalties: Pulock, NYI, (interference), 16:54. Third period: 8, Minnesota, Zucker 25 (Staal), 16:38. Penalties: Granlund, MIN, (hooking), 0:25; Parise, MIN, (hooking), 9:11; Parise, MIN, (slashing), 18:37. Shots: Minnesota 11-12-9: 32. NY Islanders 12-6-17: 35. Power-plays: Minnesota 0 of 1; NY Islanders 0 of 4. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 24-11-5 (35 shots-32 saves). NY Islanders, Halak 18-19-4 (32-27). A: 15,342. Referees: Tom Kowal, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Darren Gibbs.

2 5

Ducks 2, Golden Knights 0 Anaheim 1 0 1 — 2 Vegas 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Anaheim, Silfverberg 13 (Rakell, Cogliano), 13:32. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Vermette, ANA, (hooking), 4:05. Third period: 2, Anaheim, Manson 4 (Getzlaf, Rakell), 7:01. Penalties: Marchessault, VGK, (slashing), 6:21; Kesler, ANA, (cross checking), 6:21; Cogliano, ANA, (slashing), 13:59. Shots: Anaheim 4-8-8: 20. Vegas 8-5-20: 33. Power-plays: Anaheim 0 of 0; Vegas 0 of 2. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 22-15-6 (13 shots-13 saves), R.Miller 7-4-5 (20-20). Vegas, Fleury 19-7-2 (20-18). A: 18,267. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Matt MacPherson.

Banged-up Bouwmeester perseveres BLUES • FROM B1

attend the birth of a child and it was 60 games into the season before he got the 29th he needed to reach 1,100. That came on Friday, in Dallas, the Blues’ most recent contest. He has missed 31 games this season, almost as many as he missed in the first 14 seasons of his NHL career. Not only that, but Bouwmeester’s unspecified, nagging lower-body injury is at the point that since he returned to the lineup on Dec. 30, Bouwmeester almost never practices or takes part in a morning skate. He was on the ice on Monday at the IceZone in Hazelwood, but that was one of his few times out there this season. “It’s been a little different,” he said. “It is what it is. I’m kind of dealing with a couple things but that’s part of experience. I know how to get myself ready for the games and felt fine in them. The start of this season wasn’t great: getting hurt in training camp, missed the start of the season. That was frustrating. Then it’s been a little frustrating as we go. As long as you’re playing the games, it’s all good.” Though it may sound like a dream situation — No practice! Only games! — it’s not. “Usually if you’re on that schedule, it means something’s going on,” Bouwmeester said. “I’d rather much be out there. You need the practice. There are little things you need to work on, passing, shooting, pretty basic stuff, but it’s always nice to have

days in between games to work on it. (Practice is) fun. We play hockey for a living, so there’s an element of fun to it.” But that’s not the new normal for Bouwmeester. Even with an injury that has eliminated his practice time, he continues to roll up significant ice time — he played 27:45 against Colorado on Feb. 8. But at an average now of 20 minutes on the dot per game, he’s on pace for his lowest average ice time since his rookie season of 2002-03. “He’s done a great job for us. I’ve been very impressed,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “I think it would be tougher for a younger player. ‘Bo’ has been around a long time and obviously knows what he needs to do to be successful. As you get older and more mature in your career, then I would say it’s easier to prepare mentally and not rely as much on the physical side of things. ... He knows what he’s doing out there.” To make up for the lack of onice work, Bouwmeester does more off ice. When the Blues are skating in practice, Bouwmeester usually is back in the training room. “Usually I (ride a) bike, do a little workout, then stretch, a bunch of stuff,” Bouwmeester said. “I’ve got a pretty good routine down now, but obviously it would be much nicer to be out there.” Bouwmeester is only the 11th active player to hit the 1,100game mark, though two of those ahead of him — Jaromir Jagr, who just left the NHL and is playing in Europe, and Marian Hossa,

who has a progressive skin disorder and is sitting out the entire season — soon might be coming off that list. At 34, Bouwmeester is by far the youngest player on the list and he could have a lot of hockey ahead of him. “Yes, but there’s less guys playing into their 40s,” Bouwmeester said. “I don’t know. It’s one of those things, I’ve got another year left on my contract. Hopefully I’ll be back next year, after that, you go from there. You have a lot of different things you think about now. I’ve got a family now. It’s growing. Those are things we’ll sit down and decide about. But as long as I feel good, I’d like to keep going. That’s one thing you talk about, when you do retire? You can’t go back. So you have to enjoy it and play as long as you can because once it’s over, it’s over.” With 22 games left this season, Bouwmeester could, if he plays as often as he has in the past, hit 1,200 at the tail end of the 201819 season. If he has as many injuries then as he has this season, however, the next milestone could be further away. “It’s like birthdays,” he said. “After a certain point, you don’t want to know what number it is. “I’ve been pretty fortunate throughout my career with injuries. I got to 1,000 games at a relatively young age. That was a cool thing. Now it’s just you want to keep playing as long as you can. I feel I can still play.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 4A CHAMPAIGN CENTENNIAL SECTIONAL SEMIFINAL

Edwardsville advances to face familiar foe BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • Edwardsville

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Edwardsville’s Kate Martin (22) dribbles Monday as Chatham Glenwood’s Courtney Jenkins defends during the a Class 4A Champaign Centennial Sectional girls basketball semifinal. The Tigers won to advance to the sectional final.

senior guard Myriah Noodel-Haywod could hardly contain herself. After sitting most of the second quarter in foul trouble, Noodel-Haywood came out and provided some valuable second-half points Monday in the Tigers’ 51-40 win over Chatham Glenwood in a Class 4A Champaign Centennial Sectional girls basketball semifinal. “I never like to sit down like that, it’s hard, but I was cheering them on from the bench,” Noodel-Haywood said. “No matter if I’m on the floor or off the floor, I want to help my team.” Edwardsville (28-0, No, 1 in the STLhighschoolsports.com largeschools rankings and in Class 4A) advanced to play Rock Island (24-7) at 7 p.m. Thursday at Centennial in the sectional championship. The Tigers are going for their 13th sectional title in 15 years and have beaten Rock Island in the sectional

final three consecutive seasons. A 3-point play by Noodel-Haywood late in the third quarter helped push the Tigers back out to a 4033 lead after Glenwood had cut an 11-point halftime deficit to four points. “It was huge, like we celebrated,” said Noodel-Haywood, who scored 10 points. Glenwood (23-9), which beat O’Fallon of the Southwestern Conference last week in a regional final, was plagued by 21 turnovers. Senior forward Makenzie Bray led Glenwood with a game-high 22 points. “I think we were fighting and we just had too many turnovers,” Glenwood coach Marnie Fauser said. “You know, Edwardsvile’s a good team so we wish them the best of luck.” Edwardsville coach Lori Blade said Monday’s win was a step forward after Friday’s one-point victory at Belleville East in the Belleville East Regional final. “They are a tough team, just be-

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 1A BROWN COUNTY SUPER-SECTIONAL

HISTORIC JOURNEY

Lebanon rolls past Lewistown to earn first appearance in state tournament BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

MOUNT STERLING, ILL. • Lebanon coach Chad

Cruthis didn’t know how it would feel. But Monday, Cruthis and the rest of his Lebanon girls basketball team got to experience what it’s like to qualify for the state tournament “It feels better than I ever thought it could,” Cruthis said. Lebanon made more school history Monday as it punched its first ticket to Class 1A state semifinals with a 59-32 victory against Lewistown in the 1A Brown County SuperSectional at Brown County High School. “It feels great,” Lebanon senior Krista Bass said. “We’re all excited because we don’t have to go to school on Friday, so that’s a plus.” After winning the program’s first sectional championship last week, Lebanon (31-1) advanced to play Danville Schlarman (31-1) in the Class 1A state semifinals at Redbird Arena in Normal at 1 p.m. Friday. Danville defeated Annawan in its super-sectional game, 43-36. Okaw Valley and Stockton play in the opening 1A semifinal at 11 a.m. Friday. Cruthis pointed to his team’s success as a result of the upbringing and the work the players had put in for a number of years. “Bottom line is that these girls have worked hard all the way back in third and fourth grade,” Cruthis said.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Lebanon girls basketball team celebrates Monday after beating Lewistown in the championship of the Class 1A Brown County Super-Sectional in Mount Sterling, Ill.

“The late Kerry Allen, who’s a great coach, took these girls to win a state championship in middle school when they were in eighth grade. I wasn’t given the keys to a Pinto. I was given the keys to a ‘69 Chevy Camaro that just need a little bit of bodywork and sprucing up.” Greyhounds senior Kendra Bass, who the PCL in her right leg last month and was thought lost for the season before returning in last week’s sectional final, did Monday against Lewistown what she’s done all season. Score. Bass scored a game-high 26 points to send the Greyhounds on their way to Normal. “What a great story,” Cruthis said. “You talk

about a girl that has preserved. Last year with a torn labrum and this year with a PCL tear. When she called me that morning (before the regional title game) and told me that she could play, I nearly fell out of my chair because she was supposed to be done for the season.” Cruthis was confident that his team could get to Redbird Arena without Kendra, but the outlook is slightly different now that he has his leading scorer back in the fold. Lebanon’s defense was nearly perfect in the first quarter as Lebanon only gave up the one basket and forced eight turnovers. Throughout the game, Lebanon’s defense allowed Lewistown to shoot 27 percent from the field and

forced 18 turnovers. “We saw that they don’t handle pressure very well up front, so we just had to make sure we took away the drive and force them to go to the left,” said Krista Bass, Kendra’s twin sister who had five steals. While Lewistown’s defense caused some issues early in the game for Lebanon, multiple touches in the post by senior Madison Schoenfeld helped loosen up the Lewistown defense. Schoenfeld finished with eight points, 13 rebounds and one block. “She needs to touch the ball almost all the time down the floor, just to respect where she was at,” Cruthis said. “Her cleaning up the rebounds and stick backs, we don’t get here without her.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 2A SALEM SUPER-SECTIONAL

Mater Dei falls one step short again BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

SA L E M , I L L . • Kierra

Winkeler shook her head and looked to the sky. The Mater Dei junior winger simply couldn’t believe what was happening. The usually sure-shooting Knights misfired on one shot after another Monday night in dropping a 40-26 decision to Teutopolis in the Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional at B.E. Gum Gymnasium. Mater Dei, which lost an elite eight contest for the second year in a row, couldn’t buy a basket in game’s first 18 minutes and 29 seconds, failing behind 22-7 with their poorest offensive start of the season. “Every other night this postseason, our shots have been falling,” Winkeler said. “But this wasn’t our night.” The Knights missed 20 of 22 shots in the first half and failed on 22 of their initial 24 attempts. They missed all six of their 3-point shots and didn’t

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Mater Dei’s Myah Beckmann (22) shows her emotion Monday in the final seconds of a season-ending loss to Teutopolis during the Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional.

hit back-to-back baskets until midway through the third quarter. Mater Dei finished the game 7 for 39 (17.9) from the floor. “The past two or three weeks, those shots went in for us,” Mater Dei veteran coach Dave Kohnen said. “Tonight, they didn’t.” Winkeler led the Knights (23-8) with 11 points, but she missed eight of 11 shots from the field. Abby

Braundmeier added six points. Shannon Lampe chipped in with a teamhigh eight rebounds. Teutopolis (28-6) used an aggressive ball-hawking defense to hold the Knights to their second-lowest output of the season. “Our defense was exactly what we talked about,” Teutopolis coach Laurie Thompson said. “I was super-proud of the way we came out.”

Mater Dei bounced the Wooden Shoes 56-42 just 22 days earlier in a regularseason game in Breese. “We didn’t play like we should have against them,” said Teutopolis senior center Macy Michels, who had a game high 12 points and 11 rebounds. “This time, we had more intensity.” Teutopolis took control early and never let up off the accelerator. The Wooden Shoes bolted out to a 13-2 lead in the first 10-plus minutes. They pumped the lead to 19-7 at the break and then pushed the advantage to 16 midway through the third . Mater Dei used an 11-2 blitz to get to within 32-25 on a pair of free throws by Winkeler with 3:54 left in the contest. But Teutopolis answered with two free throws each by Michels and Marinna Hemmen to pump the lead back to 11 points. Teutopolis will face Chicago Marshall (18-7) in the state semifinal at 7:15 p.m. Friday at Redbird Arena in Normal.

cause they are so pesky on defense and so physical,” said Blade of Glenwood. “I thought we did some really good things. We just turned the ball over, uncharacteristically, in certain situations and we need to focus on that a little bit. I thought our mentality was much better in the warmup tonight than it was in the Belleville East game. We haven’t been playing really well lately and, hopefully, we’ll survive long enough to turn that corner. It’s going to happen, you go in stretches. You just hope it’s not in the postseason.” Kate Martin led Edwardsville with 15 points while sophomore guard Quierra Love added 13. The Tigers helped themselves by making 20 of 24 shots from the freethrow line. “We knew that they are a team that was never going to stop fighting, so props to them,” Martin said. “They did a great job. I think we’re headed in the right direction and we’re going to work hard at practice the next few days.”

MONDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

Bayless 9 13 6 6 34 Whitfield 23 25 20 10 78 B (6-17): Johnson 11, Patton 10, Gunter 9, Woodard 4. FG 11 (2), FT 10-16. W (18-7): Holton 15, Stucco 13, Watson 13, Ramsey 12, Newlin 7, Alexander 5, Simon 5, Margelis 4, McCray 2, Wilkinson 2. FG 33 (11), FT 1-4. Sumner 4 13 14 7 38 Trinity 23 21 25 8 77 T (20-3): Thames 17, Kalkbrenner 10, Rush 10, Franklin 8, Jones 8, Dockett 6, Williams 6, Young 6, Weekly 4, Nobles 2. FG 31 (3), FT 12-13. Metro 7 8 10 7 32 Lift For Life 28 30 14 5 77 M (14-9): Thomas 15, Carlock 6, Davie 4, Mennerick 4, Isom 3. FG 11 (1), FT 9-27. L (13-13): Singleton 20, Turner 17, Jackson 11, Anderson 8, Dabney 5, Johnson 5, McDaniels 5, Douglass 2, Love 2, Sanford 2. FG 28 (9), FT 12-19. Kirkwood 10 18 16 12 61 Jeff City 9 15 15 17 60 K (14-10): Loyd 24, Clay 11, McDowell 11, Kanzler 7, Maclin 6, Phipps 2. FG 22 (5), FT 12-20. DuBourg 7 10 9 8 34 Principia 16 10 14 14 54 D (9-16): E. Johnson 9, Sanford 8, Dunlap 7, Brickhouse 6, Wesley 4. FG 12 (3), FT 7-13. P (13-12): Wingert 24, Towle 17, Brantingham 8, Thomas 3, Fox 2. FG 19 (7), FT 9-17. Luth. North 25 18 11 28 82 Orchard Farm 12 15 15 27 69 L (15-12): White 30, Nesbitt 23, J. Smith 14, Patterson 9, Buford 3, Ogunjobi 3. FG 31 (4), FT 16-28. O (19-8): C. Grimes 14, Lindoff 14, Wolf 13, C. Grimes 11, Frederick 7, Shegog 6, Cooley 4. FG 25 (8), FT 11-14. Herculaneum 12 11 12 11 46 Hancock 13 23 19 17 72 He (8-17): Sales 16, Duncan 10, Moloney 8, Jansen 6, Leathers 4, Stepp 2. FG 18 (6), FT 4-6. Ha (19-5): Richardson 30, Warren 17, Burton 6, Livingston 6, Moultrie 4, Hunter 3, Jennings 2, Stroup 2, Turner 2. FG 28 (1), FT 15-21. 3 16 13 7 39 Lebanon Marissa 6 5 8 18 37 L (12-18): D. Krumsieg 12, Bennett 11, Grob 6, L. Krumsieg 4, Goetter 3, Guthrie 3. FG 13 (4), FT 9-14. M (10-18): Gilley 12, Steinwagner 12, Riggins 6, Portz 3, Bowlby 2, McHughes 2. FG 13 (3), FT 8-9. Cleveland 8 11 15 4 38 Ritter 26 33 22 7 88 R (18-9): Fleming 18, Davis 17, Moore 13, Welch 8, Morris 7, Torrey 6, Armstead 5, Mosby 5, Catchings 4, Pate 3, Wilkerson 2. FG 37 (7), FT 7-11. 15 10 12 14 51 Roxana Wood River 5 14 4 11 34 R (6-23): Huffman 19, Beckman 10, White 9, Golenor 8, Lara 5. FG 16 (3), FT 16-20. College Prep 7 11 23 26 67 Valley Park 19 24 14 8 65 C (13-9): Anderson 23, Martin 13, Wiley 11, Robinson 10, Gray 7, Gleghorn 2, Adkins 1. FG 23 (5), FT 16-24. V (18-7): Shaw 31, Courtney 11, Rogers 9, Pickett 8, Burkert 4, Rausch 2. FG 22 (5), FT 16-24. New Athens 4 10 9 24 47 Valmeyer 9 23 25 12 69 N (5-20): Deutschman 17, Heintz 13, Mattingly 8, Patton 3, Lintker 2, MazariegoMejia 2, Shevlin 2. FG 14 (5), FT 14-18. V (15-14): Reinhardt 20, Rowold 13, Chism 10, O. Miller 6, Crossin 5, Juelfs 5, Whipple 3, Fausz 2, B. Miller 2, Whitlock 2, Brinkman 1. FG 24 (13), FT 8-10. 11 4 8 11 34 Dupo Red Bud 10 19 14 13 56 D (6-20): Allen 13, Steinhauer 11, Calhoun 4, Kyle 3, Touchette 3. FG 14 (1), FT 5-9. R (16-11): Birchler 15, Reichmann 12, Ziebold 7, Birkner 5, A. Kueker 5, Carter 4, Cowell 4, D. Kueker 3, Sievers 1. FG 24 (5), FT 3-14. MS-Berkeley 2 14 7 8 31 Duchesne 14 20 18 12 64 D (18-8): Schneider 15, Fairless 13, Moore 13, Loewenstein 7, Norwine 7, Tune 4, Galtney 3, Suellentrop 2. FG 21 (6), FT 16-20.

Monday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. GIRLS BASKETBALL

Brentwood 10 7 10 2 29 Ritter 20 16 18 17 71 B (14-12): Franklin 10, Gombas 9, Jones 4, M. Callihan 2, Ingersoll 2, Tonis 2. FG 13 (2), FT 1-4. R (18-4): Boyd 20, Wilson 18, Woods 11, Tomlin 9, Haynes 6, Hamm-Bey 3, Booker 2, McBride 2. FG 31 (6), FT 3-10. Lift For Life 10 17 4 13 44 Metro 12 17 15 22 66 M (23-6): Flowers 31, Bland 14, Goldman 11, Burt 5, Hudson 3, Hunt 2. FG 22 (2), FT 20-27. Marquette 15 7 17 16 55 Pky. South 13 13 11 20 57 M (9-14): Price 15, Brown 14, Deves 10, Watkins 8, McGinnis 4, E. Morrow 2, Williams 2. FG 23 (3), FT 6-10. Seckman 11 6 4 6 27 Oakville 10 13 9 3 35 S (10-12): Stuckmeyer 8, Kriese 6, Parton 4, Townsend 4, Stamm 3, Mercer 2. FG 8 (3), FT 8-12. O (15-7): Kuntze 12, Elguezabal 9, Zarr 9, Costello 3, Boaz 2. FG 13 (2), FT 7-13. Warrenton 5 11 11 10 37 Holt 16 10 18 8 52 W (13-7): K. Nelson 15, Dixon 5, Frye 5, M. Nelson 5, Smith 3, Frederick 2, Payne 2. FG 13 (2), FT 9-18. H (17-6): Forrest 15, N. Griesenauer 12, Green 7, A. Meyer 4, Robinson 4, Bargaineer 3, Tranor 3, Berendzen 2, A. Meyer 2. FG 19 (6), FT 8-13. Potosi 13 3 10 9 35 Northwest-CH 9 9 17 16 51 N (6-18): Fortner 22, Lakin 7, Long 7, Nall 7, Owens 6, Bowen 2. FG 23 (0), FT 5-17. Edwardsville 15 14 12 10 51 Glenwood 9 9 17 5 40 E (28-0): Martin 15, Love 13, NoodelHaywood 10, Pranger 9, Townsend 4. FG 15 (1), FT 20-24. G (4-3): Bray 22, Lahr 9, Jenkins 4, Green 3, Joos 2. FG 12 (1), FT 15-18. Liberty 3 11 6 5 25 FZ South 17 13 20 7 57 L (5-18): Van Pamel 12, Watson 6, Patterson 4, Riggins 2, Groves 1. FG 8 (0), FT 9-20. F (15-9): Mahoney 13, Popp 10, Stroh 9, Light 7, Smith 6, Askins 5, Atherton 3, Bradshaw 2, Turks 2. FG 21 (9), FT 6-18. Salem 11 14 14 16 55 St. Clair 6 21 23 14 64 St (19-6): Sohn 12, Machelett 11, A. Hinson 9, M. Hinson 8, LaCrone 7, York 7, Schmidtke 3, Shirey 3, Bursey 2, E. Hinson 2. FG 18 (2), FT 26-43. 11 7 7 3 28 Rosati-Kain Borgia 22 21 22 13 78 R (3-16): Al-Baaj 14, Zink-Duda 5, Clark 4, Bethany 3, O’Connell 2. FG 11 (4), FT 2-6. B (12-11): Lackey 21, Moss 14, Kimminau 12, Gettemeier 11, Grus 6, Herbst 6, Harriman 4, Marquart 3, Struckhoff 1. FG 33 (3), FT 9-15. 8 13 9 10 40 Teutopolis Mater Dei 2 5 9 10 26 T (10-5): Michels 12, S. Bueker 11, J. Bueker 8, Hemmen 4, M. Mette 3, Hiemerg 2. FG 12 (2), FT 14-22. M (23-8): Winkeler 11, Braundmeier 6, Lampe 4, Perkes 3, Beckmann 2. FG 7 (0), FT 12-20.

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

Hazelwood East (16-7) at Eureka (16-8), 7 a.m. North Callaway (15-11) vs. O’Fallon Christian (17-9), at Winfield, 5:30 p.m. Ritenour (12-12) at Parkway South (16-8), 6 p.m. Kirkwood (14-10) at Mehlville (14-9), 6 p.m. Webster Groves (15-8) at Hazelwood Central (22-2), 6 p.m. Parkway Central (19-5) at Timberland (7-16), 6 p.m. Bunker Hill (1-22) vs. ME Lutheran (13-16), at Mount Olive, 6 p.m. Roxana (6-23) vs. Wesclin (23-4), at Wood River, 6 p.m. McCluer North (12-11) at Lindbergh (11-12), 6 p.m. Roxana (6-23) vs. Wesclin (23-4), at Wood River, 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (12-11) at Parkway West (7-17), 6:30 p.m. Clayton (6-17) at Lutheran South (10-14), 7 p.m. Liberty (18-7) at Fort Zumwalt South (20-3), 7 p.m. Westminster (14-10) at MICDS (12-11), 7 p.m. Pacific (19-4) at Rolla (5-0), 7 p.m. De Smet (5-17) at Troy (15-9), 7 p.m. TBD at Lindbergh (11-12), 7 p.m. FH North (4-17) at St. Charles West (8-15), 7 p.m. Althoff (4-21) at CBC (9-13), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (4-18) at Holt (10-12), 7 p.m. Priory (12-10) at St. Dominic (11-11), 7 p.m. Warrenton (16-6) at FH Central (7-16), 7 p.m. Owensville (2-12) at Sullivan (12-12), 7 p.m. St. Clair (5-18) at Salem (3-6), 7 p.m. Pattonville (7-12) at Fox (7-17), 7 p.m. Summit (9-14) at Seckman (6-15), 7 p.m. Lebanon (12-18) at Okawville (20-8), 7 p.m. Sparta (6-11) at Pinckneyville (12-2), 7 p.m. Staunton (15-12) vs. Nashville (21-7), at Staunton, 7 p.m. McCluer (4-18) at Northwest-CH (1-22), 7 p.m. Vianney (13-10) at Borgia (12-11), 7:15 p.m. Breese Central (11-15) at Columbia (15-11), 7:30 p.m. Jerseyville (14-12) at Waterloo (7-19), 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon (10-15) at Edwardsville (15-8), 7:30 p.m. Belleville East (11-14) at Collinsville (15-12), 7:30 p.m. Alton (14-10) at Belleville West (23-2), 7:30 p.m. Mascoutah (15-10) at Triad (13-13), 7:30 p.m. Effingham (5-7) at Mater Dei (12-14), 7:30 p.m. Hillsboro (21-4) at North County (12-3), 7:30 p.m. East St. Louis (11-10) at Granite City (9-16), 7:30 p.m.

Civic Memorial (17-9) at Highland (19-8), 7:30 p.m. Bowling Green (5-4) vs. Montgomery County (11-4), at Winfield, 7:30 p.m. Brussels (5-17) at Mount Olive (11-10), 7:30 p.m. Carlyle (11-19) vs. Piasa Southwestern (18-7), at Wood River, 7:30 p.m. Hermann (8-17) vs. St. James (18-6), at Fatima, 8:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Lutheran North (20-3) at Duchesne (5-19), 3 p.m. Valley Park (12-12) vs. DuBourg (9-14), at Whitfield, 4:15 p.m. North Tech (7-14) vs. Trinity (10-13), at Duchesne, 4:30 p.m. Troy (14-8) at Holt (17-6), 5:30 p.m. Owensville (8-16) at Sullivan (20-4), 5:30 p.m. Crystal City (9-15) vs. New Haven (15-9), at Elsberry, 5:30 p.m. Fox (7-13) at McCluer (6-17), 5:30 p.m. Bayless (1-21) vs. Herculaneum (20-3), at Whitfield, 5:45 p.m. Lutheran South (15-8) at Villa Duchesne (6-14), 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (8-16) at Parkway Central (20-3), 6 p.m. Visitation (14-9) at Ladue (14-7), 6 p.m. Lindbergh (12-11) at Hazelwood West (10-10), 6 p.m. FH North (5-17) at St. Charles West (6-17), 6 p.m. Oakville (15-7) at Parkway North (20-5), 6 p.m. Marquette (9-14) at Ritenour (11-12), 6 p.m. Notre Dame (14-8) at Westminster (8-15), 6 p.m. Carterville (22-5) vs. East St. Louis (16-10), at Carbondale, 6 p.m. Northwest Academy (14-7) vs. Orchard Farm (15-10), at Duchesne, 6 p.m. Parkway West (7-17) at St. Charles (14-9), 6:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (7-16) at Francis Howell (17-7), 7 p.m. McCluer North (12-13) at Webster Groves (11-13), 7 p.m. Festus (12-10) at Farmington (6-5), 7 p.m. Jefferson City (7-4) at Pacific (10-13), 7 p.m. McCluer North (12-13) at Webster Groves (11-13), 7 p.m. Northwest-CH (6-18) at Riverview Gardens (5-16), 7 p.m. Liberty (5-18) at Rosati-Kain (3-16), 7:15 p.m. Hancock (10-13) vs. Principia (17-8), at Whitfield, 7:15 p.m. Breese Central (26-3) vs. Salem (14-11), at Carbondale, 7:30 p.m. Sumner (12-4) vs. McCluer S-Berkeley (12-8), at Duchesne, 7:30 p.m.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 4A CHAMPAIGN CENTENNIAL SECTIONAL SEMIFINAL

Edwardsville advances to face familiar foe BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • Edwardsville

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Edwardsville’s Kate Martin (22) dribbles Monday as Chatham Glenwood’s Courtney Jenkins defends during the a Class 4A Champaign Centennial Sectional girls basketball semifinal. The Tigers won to advance to the sectional final.

senior guard Myriah Noodel-Haywod could hardly contain herself. After sitting most of the second quarter in foul trouble, Noodel-Haywood came out and provided some valuable second-half points Monday in the Tigers’ 51-40 win over Chatham Glenwood in a Class 4A Champaign Centennial Sectional girls basketball semifinal. “I never like to sit down like that, it’s hard, but I was cheering them on from the bench,” Noodel-Haywood said. “No matter if I’m on the floor or off the floor, I want to help my team.” Edwardsville (28-0, No, 1 in the STLhighschoolsports.com largeschools rankings and in Class 4A) advanced to play Rock Island (24-7) at 7 p.m. Thursday at Centennial in the sectional championship. The Tigers are going for their 13th sectional title in 15 years and have beaten Rock Island in the sectional

final three consecutive seasons. A 3-point play by Noodel-Haywood late in the third quarter helped push the Tigers back out to a 4033 lead after Glenwood had cut an 11-point halftime deficit to four points. “It was huge, like we celebrated,” said Noodel-Haywood, who scored 10 points. Glenwood (23-9), which beat O’Fallon of the Southwestern Conference last week in a regional final, was plagued by 21 turnovers. Senior forward Makenzie Bray led Glenwood with a game-high 22 points. “I think we were fighting and we just had too many turnovers,” Glenwood coach Marnie Fauser said. “You know, Edwardsvile’s a good team so we wish them the best of luck.” Edwardsville coach Lori Blade said Monday’s win was a step forward after Friday’s one-point victory at Belleville East in the Belleville East Regional final. “They are a tough team, just be-

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 1A BROWN COUNTY SUPER-SECTIONAL

HISTORIC JOURNEY

Lebanon rolls past Lewistown to earn first appearance in state tournament BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

MOUNT STERLING, ILL. • Lebanon coach Chad

Cruthis didn’t know how it would feel. But Monday, Cruthis and the rest of his Lebanon girls basketball team got to experience what it’s like to qualify for the state tournament “It feels better than I ever thought it could,” Cruthis said. Lebanon made more school history Monday as it punched its first ticket to Class 1A state semifinals with a 59-32 victory against Lewistown in the 1A Brown County SuperSectional at Brown County High School. “It feels great,” Lebanon senior Krista Bass said. “We’re all excited because we don’t have to go to school on Friday, so that’s a plus.” After winning the program’s first sectional championship last week, Lebanon (31-1) advanced to play Danville Schlarman (31-1) in the Class 1A state semifinals at Redbird Arena in Normal at 1 p.m. Friday. Danville defeated Annawan in its super-sectional game, 43-36. Okaw Valley and Stockton play in the opening 1A semifinal at 11 a.m. Friday. Cruthis pointed to his team’s success as a result of the upbringing and the work the players had put in for a number of years. “Bottom line is that these girls have worked hard all the way back in third and fourth grade,” Cruthis said.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Lebanon girls basketball team celebrates Monday after beating Lewistown in the championship of the Class 1A Brown County Super-Sectional in Mount Sterling, Ill.

“The late Kerry Allen, who’s a great coach, took these girls to win a state championship in middle school when they were in eighth grade. I wasn’t given the keys to a Pinto. I was given the keys to a ‘69 Chevy Camaro that just need a little bit of bodywork and sprucing up.” Greyhounds senior Kendra Bass, who the PCL in her right leg last month and was thought lost for the season before returning in last week’s sectional final, did Monday against Lewistown what she’s done all season. Score. Bass scored a game-high 26 points to send the Greyhounds on their way to Normal. “What a great story,” Cruthis said. “You talk

about a girl that has preserved. Last year with a torn labrum and this year with a PCL tear. When she called me that morning (before the regional title game) and told me that she could play, I nearly fell out of my chair because she was supposed to be done for the season.” Cruthis was confident that his team could get to Redbird Arena without Kendra, but the outlook is slightly different now that he has his leading scorer back in the fold. Lebanon’s defense was nearly perfect in the first quarter as Lebanon only gave up the one basket and forced eight turnovers. Throughout the game, Lebanon’s defense allowed Lewistown to shoot 27 percent from the field and

forced 18 turnovers. “We saw that they don’t handle pressure very well up front, so we just had to make sure we took away the drive and force them to go to the left,” said Krista Bass, Kendra’s twin sister who had five steals. While Lewistown’s defense caused some issues early in the game for Lebanon, multiple touches in the post by senior Madison Schoenfeld helped loosen up the Lewistown defense. Schoenfeld finished with eight points, 13 rebounds and one block. “She needs to touch the ball almost all the time down the floor, just to respect where she was at,” Cruthis said. “Her cleaning up the rebounds and stick backs, we don’t get here without her.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 2A SALEM SUPER-SECTIONAL

Mater Dei falls one step short again BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

SA L E M , I L L . • Kierra

Winkeler shook her head and looked to the sky. The Mater Dei junior winger simply couldn’t believe what was happening. The usually sure-shooting Knights misfired on one shot after another Monday night in dropping a 40-26 decision to Teutopolis in the Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional at B.E. Gum Gymnasium. Mater Dei, which lost an elite eight contest for the second year in a row, couldn’t buy a basket in game’s first 18 minutes and 29 seconds, failing behind 22-7 with their poorest offensive start of the season. “Every other night this postseason, our shots have been falling,” Winkeler said. “But this wasn’t our night.” The Knights missed 20 of 22 shots in the first half and failed on 22 of their initial 24 attempts. They missed all six of their 3-point shots and didn’t

BEN LOEWNAU • STLhighschoolsports.com

Mater Dei’s Myah Beckmann (22) shows her emotion Monday in the final seconds of a season-ending loss to Teutopolis during the Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional.

hit back-to-back baskets until midway through the third quarter. Mater Dei finished the game 7 for 39 (17.9) from the floor. “The past two or three weeks, those shots went in for us,” Mater Dei veteran coach Dave Kohnen said. “Tonight, they didn’t.” Winkeler led the Knights (23-8) with 11 points, but she missed eight of 11 shots from the field. Abby

Braundmeier added six points. Shannon Lampe chipped in with a teamhigh eight rebounds. Teutopolis (28-6) used an aggressive ball-hawking defense to hold the Knights to their second-lowest output of the season. “Our defense was exactly what we talked about,” Teutopolis coach Laurie Thompson said. “I was super-proud of the way we came out.”

Mater Dei bounced the Wooden Shoes 56-42 just 22 days earlier in a regularseason game in Breese. “We didn’t play like we should have against them,” said Teutopolis senior center Macy Michels, who had a game high 12 points and 11 rebounds. “This time, we had more intensity.” Teutopolis took control early and never let up off the accelerator. The Wooden Shoes bolted out to a 13-2 lead in the first 10-plus minutes. They pumped the lead to 19-7 at the break and then pushed the advantage to 16 midway through the third . Mater Dei used an 11-2 blitz to get to within 32-25 on a pair of free throws by Winkeler with 3:54 left in the contest. But Teutopolis answered with two free throws each by Michels and Marinna Hemmen to pump the lead back to 11 points. Teutopolis will face Chicago Marshall (18-7) in the state semifinal at 7:15 p.m. Friday at Redbird Arena in Normal.

cause they are so pesky on defense and so physical,” said Blade of Glenwood. “I thought we did some really good things. We just turned the ball over, uncharacteristically, in certain situations and we need to focus on that a little bit. I thought our mentality was much better in the warmup tonight than it was in the Belleville East game. We haven’t been playing really well lately and, hopefully, we’ll survive long enough to turn that corner. It’s going to happen, you go in stretches. You just hope it’s not in the postseason.” Kate Martin led Edwardsville with 15 points while sophomore guard Quierra Love added 13. The Tigers helped themselves by making 20 of 24 shots from the freethrow line. “We knew that they are a team that was never going to stop fighting, so props to them,” Martin said. “They did a great job. I think we’re headed in the right direction and we’re going to work hard at practice the next few days.”

MONDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

Bayless 9 13 6 6 34 Whitfield 23 25 20 10 78 B (6-17): Johnson 11, Patton 10, Gunter 9, Woodard 4. FG 11 (2), FT 10-16. W (18-7): Holton 15, Stucco 13, Watson 13, Ramsey 12, Newlin 7, Alexander 5, Simon 5, Margelis 4, McCray 2, Wilkinson 2. FG 33 (11), FT 1-4. Sumner 4 13 14 7 38 Trinity 23 21 25 8 77 T (20-3): Thames 17, Kalkbrenner 10, Rush 10, Franklin 8, Jones 8, Dockett 6, Williams 6, Young 6, Weekly 4, Nobles 2. FG 31 (3), FT 12-13. Metro 7 8 10 7 32 Lift For Life 28 30 14 5 77 M (14-9): Thomas 15, Carlock 6, Davie 4, Mennerick 4, Isom 3. FG 11 (1), FT 9-27. L (13-13): Singleton 20, Turner 17, Jackson 11, Anderson 8, Dabney 5, Johnson 5, McDaniels 5, Douglass 2, Love 2, Sanford 2. FG 28 (9), FT 12-19. Kirkwood 10 18 16 12 61 Jeff City 9 15 15 17 60 K (14-10): Loyd 24, Clay 11, McDowell 11, Kanzler 7, Maclin 6, Phipps 2. FG 22 (5), FT 12-20. DuBourg 7 10 9 8 34 Principia 16 10 14 14 54 D (9-16): E. Johnson 9, Sanford 8, Dunlap 7, Brickhouse 6, Wesley 4. FG 12 (3), FT 7-13. P (13-12): Wingert 24, Towle 17, Brantingham 8, Thomas 3, Fox 2. FG 19 (7), FT 9-17. Luth. North 25 18 11 28 82 Orchard Farm 12 15 15 27 69 L (15-12): White 30, Nesbitt 23, J. Smith 14, Patterson 9, Buford 3, Ogunjobi 3. FG 31 (4), FT 16-28. O (19-8): C. Grimes 14, Lindoff 14, Wolf 13, C. Grimes 11, Frederick 7, Shegog 6, Cooley 4. FG 25 (8), FT 11-14. Herculaneum 12 11 12 11 46 Hancock 13 23 19 17 72 He (8-17): Sales 16, Duncan 10, Moloney 8, Jansen 6, Leathers 4, Stepp 2. FG 18 (6), FT 4-6. Ha (19-5): Richardson 30, Warren 17, Burton 6, Livingston 6, Moultrie 4, Hunter 3, Jennings 2, Stroup 2, Turner 2. FG 28 (1), FT 15-21. 3 16 13 7 39 Lebanon Marissa 6 5 8 18 37 L (12-18): D. Krumsieg 12, Bennett 11, Grob 6, L. Krumsieg 4, Goetter 3, Guthrie 3. FG 13 (4), FT 9-14. M (10-18): Gilley 12, Steinwagner 12, Riggins 6, Portz 3, Bowlby 2, McHughes 2. FG 13 (3), FT 8-9. Cleveland 8 11 15 4 38 Ritter 26 33 22 7 88 R (18-9): Fleming 18, Davis 17, Moore 13, Welch 8, Morris 7, Torrey 6, Armstead 5, Mosby 5, Catchings 4, Pate 3, Wilkerson 2. FG 37 (7), FT 7-11. 15 10 12 14 51 Roxana Wood River 5 14 4 11 34 R (6-23): Huffman 19, Beckman 10, White 9, Golenor 8, Lara 5. FG 16 (3), FT 16-20. College Prep 7 11 23 26 67 Valley Park 19 24 14 8 65 C (13-9): Anderson 23, Martin 13, Wiley 11, Robinson 10, Gray 7, Gleghorn 2, Adkins 1. FG 23 (5), FT 16-24. V (18-7): Shaw 31, Courtney 11, Rogers 9, Pickett 8, Burkert 4, Rausch 2. FG 22 (5), FT 16-24. New Athens 4 10 9 24 47 Valmeyer 9 23 25 12 69 N (5-20): Deutschman 17, Heintz 13, Mattingly 8, Patton 3, Lintker 2, MazariegoMejia 2, Shevlin 2. FG 14 (5), FT 14-18. V (15-14): Reinhardt 20, Rowold 13, Chism 10, O. Miller 6, Crossin 5, Juelfs 5, Whipple 3, Fausz 2, B. Miller 2, Whitlock 2, Brinkman 1. FG 24 (13), FT 8-10. 11 4 8 11 34 Dupo Red Bud 10 19 14 13 56 D (6-20): Allen 13, Steinhauer 11, Calhoun 4, Kyle 3, Touchette 3. FG 14 (1), FT 5-9. R (16-11): Birchler 15, Reichmann 12, Ziebold 7, Birkner 5, A. Kueker 5, Carter 4, Cowell 4, D. Kueker 3, Sievers 1. FG 24 (5), FT 3-14. MS-Berkeley 2 14 7 8 31 Duchesne 14 20 18 12 64 D (18-8): Schneider 15, Fairless 13, Moore 13, Loewenstein 7, Norwine 7, Tune 4, Galtney 3, Suellentrop 2. FG 21 (6), FT 16-20.

Monday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. GIRLS BASKETBALL

Brentwood 10 7 10 2 29 Ritter 20 16 18 17 71 B (14-12): Franklin 10, Gombas 9, Jones 4, M. Callihan 2, Ingersoll 2, Tonis 2. FG 13 (2), FT 1-4. R (18-4): Boyd 20, Wilson 18, Woods 11, Tomlin 9, Haynes 6, Hamm-Bey 3, Booker 2, McBride 2. FG 31 (6), FT 3-10. Lift For Life 10 17 4 13 44 Metro 12 17 15 22 66 M (23-6): Flowers 31, Bland 14, Goldman 11, Burt 5, Hudson 3, Hunt 2. FG 22 (2), FT 20-27. Marquette 15 7 17 16 55 Pky. South 13 13 11 20 57 M (9-14): Price 15, Brown 14, Deves 10, Watkins 8, McGinnis 4, E. Morrow 2, Williams 2. FG 23 (3), FT 6-10. Seckman 11 6 4 6 27 Oakville 10 13 9 3 35 S (10-12): Stuckmeyer 8, Kriese 6, Parton 4, Townsend 4, Stamm 3, Mercer 2. FG 8 (3), FT 8-12. O (15-7): Kuntze 12, Elguezabal 9, Zarr 9, Costello 3, Boaz 2. FG 13 (2), FT 7-13. Warrenton 5 11 11 10 37 Holt 16 10 18 8 52 W (13-7): K. Nelson 15, Dixon 5, Frye 5, M. Nelson 5, Smith 3, Frederick 2, Payne 2. FG 13 (2), FT 9-18. H (17-6): Forrest 15, N. Griesenauer 12, Green 7, A. Meyer 4, Robinson 4, Bargaineer 3, Tranor 3, Berendzen 2, A. Meyer 2. FG 19 (6), FT 8-13. Potosi 13 3 10 9 35 Northwest-CH 9 9 17 16 51 N (6-18): Fortner 22, Lakin 7, Long 7, Nall 7, Owens 6, Bowen 2. FG 23 (0), FT 5-17. Edwardsville 15 14 12 10 51 Glenwood 9 9 17 5 40 E (28-0): Martin 15, Love 13, NoodelHaywood 10, Pranger 9, Townsend 4. FG 15 (1), FT 20-24. G (4-3): Bray 22, Lahr 9, Jenkins 4, Green 3, Joos 2. FG 12 (1), FT 15-18. Liberty 3 11 6 5 25 FZ South 17 13 20 7 57 L (5-18): Van Pamel 12, Watson 6, Patterson 4, Riggins 2, Groves 1. FG 8 (0), FT 9-20. F (15-9): Mahoney 13, Popp 10, Stroh 9, Light 7, Smith 6, Askins 5, Atherton 3, Bradshaw 2, Turks 2. FG 21 (9), FT 6-18. Salem 11 14 14 16 55 St. Clair 6 21 23 14 64 St. Clair (19-6): Sohn 12, Machelett 11, A. Hinson 9, M. Hinson 8, LaCrone 7, York 7, Schmidtke 3, Shirey 3, Bursey 2, E. Hinson 2. FG 18 (2), FT 26-43. 11 7 7 3 28 Rosati-Kain Borgia 22 21 22 13 78 R (3-16): Al-Baaj 14, Zink-Duda 5, Clark 4, Bethany 3, O’Connell 2. FG 11 (4), FT 2-6. B (12-11): Lackey 21, Moss 14, Kimminau 12, Gettemeier 11, Grus 6, Herbst 6, Harriman 4, Marquart 3, Struckhoff 1. FG 33 (3), FT 9-15. 8 13 9 10 40 Teutopolis Mater Dei 2 5 9 10 26 T (10-5): Michels 12, S. Bueker 11, J. Bueker 8, Hemmen 4, M. Mette 3, Hiemerg 2. FG 12 (2), FT 14-22. M (23-8): Winkeler 11, Braundmeier 6, Lampe 4, Perkes 3, Beckmann 2. FG 7 (0), FT 12-20.

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

CLASS 2A WOOD RIVER REGIONAL Semifinals Roxana (6-23) vs. Wesclin (23-4), 6 p.m. Carlyle(11-19)vs.PiasaSW(18-7),7:30p.m. CLASS 2A STAUNTON REGIONAL Semifinals Nashville (21-7) at Staunton (15-12), 7 p.m. CLASS 2A PINCKNEYVILLE REGIONAL Semifinals Sparta at Pinckneyville, 7 p.m. CLASS 1A MOUNT OLIVE REGIONAL First round Bunker Hill (1-22) vs. ME Luth. (13-16), 6 p.m. Brussels (5-17) at Mount Olive (11-10), 7:30 p.m. CLASS 1A OKAWVILLE REGIONAL Semifinals Lebanon (12-18) at Okawville (20-8), 7 p.m. CLASS 3 DISTRICT 7 TOURNAMENT At Winfield, semifinals North Callaway (15-11) vs. O’Fallon Christian (17-9), 5:30 p.m. Bowling Green vs. Montgomery County 7:30 p.m. CLASS 3 DISTRICT 9 TOURNAMENT At Fatima, first round South Callaway vs. Blair Oaks, 4 p.m. Tolton at Fatima, 5:30 p.m. Dixon vs. Southern Boone, 7 p.m. Hermann (8-17) vs. St. James (18-6), 8:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES Ritenour (12-12) at Park. South (16-8), 6 p.m. Kirkwood (14-10) at Mehlville (14-9), 6 p.m. Webster Groves (15-8) at Haz.Central (22-2), 6 p.m. Parkway Central (19-5) at Timberland (7-16), 6 p.m. McCluer North (12-11) at Lindbergh (11-12), 6 p.m. FZ West (12-11) at Park. West (7-17), 6:30 p.m. Clayton (6-17) at Luth. South (10-14), 7 p.m. Liberty (18-7) at FZ South (20-3), 7 p.m. Westminster (14-10) at MICDS (12-11), 7 p.m. Pacific (19-4) at Rolla, 7 p.m. De Smet (5-17) at Troy (15-9), 7 p.m. FH North (4-17) at SC West (8-15), 7 p.m. Althoff (4-21) at CBC (9-13), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (4-18) at Holt (10-12), 7 p.m. Priory (12-10) at St. Dominic (11-11), 7 p.m. Warrenton (16-6) at FH Central (7-16), 7 p.m. Owensville (2-12) at Sullivan (12-12), 7 p.m. St. Clair (5-18) at Salem (3-6), 7 p.m. Pattonville (7-12) at Fox (7-17), 7 p.m. Summit (9-14) at Seckman (6-15), 7 p.m. Hazelwood East (16-7) at Eureka (16-8), 7 p.m. McCluer (4-18) at Northwest-CH (1-22), 7 p.m. Vianney (13-10) at Borgia (12-11), 7:15 p.m. Breese Central (11-15) at Columbia (15-11), 7:30 p.m. Mascoutah (15-10) at Triad (13-13), 7:30 p.m. Jerseyville (14-12) at Waterloo (7-19), 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon (10-15) at Edwardsville (15-8), 7:30 p.m.

Belleville East (11-14) at Collinsville (15-12), 7:30 p.m. Alton (14-10) at Belleville West (23-2), 7:30 p.m. Effingham at Mater Dei (12-14), 7:30 p.m. Hillsboro (21-4) at North County, 7:30 p.m. East St. Louis (11-10) at Granite City (9-16), 7:30 p.m. Civic Memorial (17-9) at Highland (19-8), 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

CLASS 3A CARBONDALE SECTIONAL Semifinal Carterville (22-5) vs. E.St. Louis (16-10), 6 p.m. Breese Central (26-3) vs. Salem (14-11), 7:30 p.m. CLASS 3 DISTRICT 4 TOURNAMENT At Whitfield, first round Valley Park (12-12) vs. DuBourg (9-14), 4:15 p.m. Bayless (1-21) vs. Herculaneum (20-3), 5:45 p.m. Hancock (10-13) vs. Principia (17-8), 7:15 p.m. CLASS 3 DISTRICT 6 TOURNAMENT At Duchesne, first round Luth.North (20-3) at Duchesne (5-19), 3 p.m. North Tech (7-14) vs. Trinity (10-13), 4:30 p.m. NW Acad. (14-7) vs. Orch. Farm (15-10), 6 p.m. Sumner (12-4) vs. MS-Berkeley (12-8), 7:30 p.m. CLASS 2 DISTRICT 5 TOURNAMENT At Elsberry, semifinals Crystal City (9-15) vs. New Haven (15-9), 5:30 p.m. Silex vs. Elsberry, 7 p.m. OTHER GAMES Troy (14-8) at Holt (17-6), 5:30 p.m. Owensville (8-16) at Sullivan (20-4), 5:30 p.m. Fox (7-13) at McCluer (6-17), 5:30 p.m. Luth.South (15-8) at Villa Duchesne (6-14), 6 p.m. FZ North (8-16) at Park. Central (20-3), 6 p.m. Visitation (14-9) at Ladue (14-7), 6 p.m. Lindbergh (12-11) at Haz. West (10-10), 6 p.m. FH North (5-17) at SC West (6-17), 6 p.m. Oakville (15-7) at Park. North (20-5), 6 p.m. Marquette (9-14) at Ritenour (11-12), 6 p.m. Notre Dame (14-8) at Westminster (8-15), 6 p.m. Park. West (7-17) at St. Charles (14-9), 6:30 p.m. FZ West (7-16) at Francis Howell (17-7), 7 p.m. McCluer North (12-13) at Webster Groves (11-13), 7 p.m. Festus (12-10) at Farmington, 7 p.m. Jefferson City (7-4) at Pacific (10-13), 7 p.m. McCluer North (12-13) at Webster Groves (11-13), 7 p.m. Northwest-CH (6-18) at Riv. Gardens (5-16), 7 p.m. Liberty (5-18) at Rosati-Kain (3-16), 7:15 p.m.

WRESTLING

CLASS 3A MATTOON SECTIONAL Edwardsville vs. Providence Catholic, 6 p.m.. CLASS 2A MATTOON SECTIONAL Cahokia vs. Mahomet-Seymour, 6 p.m.. CLASS 1A BENTON SECTIONAL Althoff vs. Monticello, 6 p.m.


SPORTS

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

BOYS BASKETBALL • NOTEBOOK

Paul sets Vianney single-game scoring record Senior guard’s 41 points passes mark set in ’88 by future NFL QB Green

AREA RANKINGS LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Hazelwood Central 22-2 2. Belleville West 23-2 3. Webster Groves 15-8 4. Chaminade 19-4 5. Francis Howell 22-3 6. Parkway Central 19-5 7. Edwardsville 15-8 8. Fort Zumwalt South 20-3 9. Liberty 18-7 10. East St. Louis 11-10 SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Vashon 18-4 2. Alton Marquette 28-0 3. Confluence 21-4 4. St. Mary’s 23-3 5. Northwest Academy 17-6 6. Jennings 22-3 7. Whitfield 17-7 8. Trinity 19-3 9. Wesclin 23-4 10. Cardinal Ritter 17-9

BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

C.J. Paul was gassed. A senior guard for the Vianney basketball team, Paul stepped into the visitors’ locker room at Chaminade at halftime Friday night and tried to catch his breath. “I was so tired,” Paul said. “Chaminade plays at such a fast pace.” The Red Devils run at every opportunity. To counter their rapid pace, the Golden Griffins (13-10) were sending players back on defense in transition. It’s a lot of up and down for a Vianney team that prefers to run a little, slow the pace and grind out games. “I was focused on a lot of different things,” Paul said. None of which included his own personal scoring total. Paul thought he shot the ball well in the first half. He kept shooting and it kept going in, but he didn’t know he had 26 points, three shy of his career best for a full game. “I thought I had 15 or so,” Paul said. When his hot shooting continued in the second half and Chaminade pulled away, Paul was given the opportunity to do something that had not been done in 30 years. He broke Vianney’s single-game scoring record. Paul finished with 41 points to put him front of Vianney graduate and one-time National Football League star Trent Green, who scored 40 points in 1988, his senior season. Paul’s record-breaking bucket came on a layup late in the fourth quarter. It was a stark contrast to how he did damage most of the night as he hit eight 3-pointers, also a new school record. “We did a really good job of sharing the ball,” Paul said. “My teammates would find me and I’d knock it down.” In the blur that was the first half the 6-foot-4 and 170-pound Paul hit five 3-pointers. The No. 4 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Chaminade (19-4 overall, 7-1 league) did win 97-72 and avenge its only Metro Catholic Conference defeat this season. But the two times the Golden Griffins played the Red Devils this season something incredible happened. Vianney’s 61-57 victory on Dec. 21 at home was its first win over Chaminade since 2012. On Friday, Paul set himself apart from every

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Vianney’s C.J. Paul (right) scored 41 points Friday in a loss at Chaminade. It set a program-record for single-game points, surpassing the 40-point game of future NFL quarterback Trent Green in 1988.

player to pull on a Vianney jersey. There have been some talented players and teams since Green scored 40 in 1988. The Golden Griffins have sent plenty of players off to play college basketball. They reached the state semifinals in 2013. The year before that they went 27-2 and set the school record for wins. The cupboard has not been bare during coach Kevin Walsh’s tenure and yet it’s Paul who did something none of the previous Griffins could. “I never expected to have that happen,” Paul said. “I’m grateful. I’m grateful to Coach Walsh, who has always believed in me, my teammates, too. It’s such an honor.”

WEBSTER GROVES COACH GOES ALL IN ON GORDON

Jay Blossom has never dealt with anything like this before. He hopes he’ll never deal with anything like it again. But in the moment, Blossom, the longtime Webster Groves basketball coach, is doing what he thinks is best. Statesmen senior post Carte’Are Gordon will not be further disciplined for leaving the bench and making contact with Vashon’s Mario McKinney Jr. at the end of the first half of their matchup Thursday at St. Louis Community College–Meramec. Gordon was ejected from the game for

AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog NC STATE...................7.5...........Boston College BAYLOR ...................... 2................... W Virginia OHIO ST..................... 15...................... Rutgers Rhode Island.............6.5 ................... LASALLE BUTLER ...................... 5....................Creighton BALL ST..................... 10...................No Illinois W MICHIGAN .............. 5.................. C Michigan E MICHIGAN ..............PK........................ Toledo TEXAS A&M................ 6..............Mississippi St MICHIGAN ST .............17 ........................ Illinois BOWLING GREEN ....... 7.......................... Akron Buffalo ......................6.5 ..............MIAMI-OHIO OHIO U ....................... 4........................ Kent St NEBRASKA................3.5 ......................Indiana DAYTON...................... 5.................. Saint Louis MISSOURI..................9.5 ................ Mississippi ARKANSAS................. 4.....................Kentucky LSU............................4.5 .................Vanderbilt WYOMING................... 4................ New Mexico VALPARAISO .............. 4............Northern Iowa E TENNESSEE ST....... 20........................Citadel NC-Greensboro .........1.5.................. WOFFORD MERCER ................... 11.5................ W Carolina FURMAN...................20.5 ...........................Vmi

Area basketball schedule

NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog FLYERS ..............-$165/+$145..........Canadiens MAPLE LEAFS .. -$200/+$170........... Panthers CAPITALS ..........-$125/+$105............Lightning DEVILS................-$110/-$110 .......Blue Jackets Predators.......... -$145/+$125........ RED WINGS JETS................... -$175/+$155.................. Kings BLUES................ -$135/+$115................Sharks Bruins................ -$145/+$125............... OILERS CANUCKS............-$110/-$110 .......... Avalanche Grand Salami: Over/under 52.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Presley on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY — Agreed to terms with RHPs Heath Fillmyer, Sam Gaviglio, Jesse Hahn, Jakob Junis, Brad Keller, Andres Machado, Kevin McCarthy, Burch Smith and Kyle Zimmer; LHPs Brian Flynn, Tim Hill and Eric Stout; C Meibrys Viloria and INFs Samir Duenez, Hunter Dozier and Whit Merrifield on one-year contracts. LOS ANGELES — Agreed to terms with 1B Chris Carter on a minor league contract and OF Chris Young on a one-year contract. National League ARIZONA — Agreed to terms with OF Jarrod Dyson on a two-year contract. CINCINNATI — Agreed to terms with RHP Ben Rowen on a minor league contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Motte on a minor league contract. SAN DIEGO — Agreed to terms with 1B Eric Hosmer on an eight-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO — Agreed to terms with LHP Tony Watson on a two-year contract. FOOTBALL | National Football League MINNESOTA — Named Todd Downing senior offensive assistant. HOCKEY | National Hockey League CAROLINA — Reassigned F Lucas Wallmark to Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO — Traded D Michal Kempny to Washington for a conditional 2018 third-round draft pick. DETROIT — Acquired a 2018 conditional fourth-round draft pick and a 2019 conditional third-round draft pick from Philadelphia for G Petr Mrazek. NY ISLANDERS — Recalled G Eamon McAdam from Worcester (ECHL) to Bridgeport (AHL). Recalled G Christopher Gibson from Bridgeport on an emergency basis. SAN JOSE — Recalled F Alex Schoenborn from Allen (ECHL) to San Jose (AHL). TAMPA BAY — Assigned D Matt Spencer from Syracuse (AHL) to Adirondack (ECHL). VEGAS — Recalled F Keegan Kolesar from Quad City (ECHL) to Chicago (AHL). SOCCER | Major League Soccer COLORADO — Signed M Enzo Martinez to a one-year contract. COLLEGE DENVER — Named Karlton Creech vice chancellor for athletics and recreation. ETSU — Signed men’s basketball coach Steve Forbes to a contract extension through the 2022-23 season. GEORGIA SOUTHERN — Agreed to a contract extension with men’s basketball coach Mark Byington through the 2021-22 season.

Tuesday W: Kaskaskia at St. Louis CC, 5:30 p.m. M: West Plains at St. Louis CC, 7 p.m. Wednesday W: SLU at VCU, 5 p.m. W: State Fair at Jefferson, 5 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Parkland, 5:30 p.m. W: SWIC at Southeastern Illinois, 5:30 p.m. M: Loyola at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: Bradley at Missouri State, 7 p.m. W: Austin Peay at SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. M: Lewis & Clark at Olney, 7 p.m. M: SWIC at Southeastern Illinois, 7:30 p.m. Thursday W: SEMO at Eastern Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. W: McKendree at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: NW Missouri at Lindenwood, 5:30 p.m. W: Quincy at UMSL, 5:30 p.m. W: Illinois Springfield at Maryville, 5:30 p.m. W: Lyon at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Hannibal-LaGrange at Mo. Baptist, 5:30 p.m. W: Central Baptist at Harris-Stowe, 5:30 p.m. M: SEMO at Eastern Kentucky, 7 p.m. M: Austin Peay at SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. W: Vanderbilt at Missouri, 7 p.m. M: NW Missouri at Lindenwood, 7:30 p.m. M: McKendree at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Quincy at UMSL, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Illinois Springfield, 7:30 p.m. M: Lyon at LU-Belleville, 7:30 p.m. M: Hannibal-LaGrange at Mo. Baptist, 7:30 p.m. M: Central Baptist at Harris-Stowe, 7:30 p.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. Virginia (24-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 2. Michigan State (26-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday. 3. Villanova (24-3) idle. Next: vs. DePaul, Wednesday. 4. Xavier (24-4) idle. Next: at Georgetown, Wednesday. 5. Duke (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Louisville, Wednesday. 6. Gonzaga (25-4) idle. Next: at San Diego, Thursday. 6. Texas Tech (22-5) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Wednesday. 8. Kansas (22-6) beat Oklahoma 104-74. Next: at No. 6 Texas Tech, Saturday. 9. Purdue (24-5) idle. Next: at Illinois, Thursday. 10. North Carolina (21-7) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Wednesday. 11. Cincinnati (23-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 12. Auburn (23-4) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Wednesday. 13. Wichita State (21-5) idle. Next: vs. Tulane, Wednesday. 14. Arizona (21-6) idle. Next: at Oregon State, Thursday. 15. Clemson (20-6) idle. Next: at Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 16. Ohio State (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Tuesday. 17. Michigan (22-7) idle. Next: at Penn State, Wednesday. 18. Rhode Island (21-4) idle. Next: at La Salle, Tuesday. 19. Tennessee (19-7) idle. Next: vs. Florida, Wednesday. 20. Nevada (23-5) idle. Next: vs. San Jose State, Wednesday. 21. West Virginia (19-8) idle. Next: at Baylor, Tuesday. 22. Saint Mary’s (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Pepperdine, Thursday. 23. Houston (21-5) idle. Next: at Memphis, Thursday. 24. Middle Tennessee (22-5) idle. Next: vs. UAB, Saturday. 25. Florida State (19-8) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Sunday.

National men’s basketball East Delaware St. 69, Coppin St. 51 South Alabama St. 82, Alcorn St. 62 Beth.-Cook. 96, Morgan St. 95, OT Hampton 114, Savannah St. 102, OT MVSU 76, Prairie View 71 N. Kentucky 70, Youngstown St. 51 NC A&T 78, Md.-E. Shore 69 NC Central 83, Howard 66 Norfolk St. 76, SC State 62 Southern U. 60, Alabama A&M 50 Midwest IUPUI 74, Oakland 67 Ill.-Chicago 94, Detroit 87 Kansas 104, Oklahoma 74 Maryland 71, Northwestern 64 Miami 77, Notre Dame 74 Wisconsin 73, Minnesota 63, OT Wright St. 72, Cleveland St. 63 Southwest Ark.-Pine Bluff 62, Texas South. 61

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. UConn (26-0) idle. Next: at Tulane, Wednesday. 2. Mississippi State (28-0) idle. Next: vs. Auburn, Thursday. 3. Baylor (26-1) beat No. 6 Texas 93-87. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 4. Louisville (27-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (25-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Thursday. 6. Texas (22-5) lost to No. 3 Baylor 93-87. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 7. South Carolina (22-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 24 LSU, Thursday. 8. Oregon (24-4) vs. No. 10 UCLA, late. Next: at Arizona State, Friday. 9. Florida State (22-5) lost to No. 20 Duke 79-66. Next: vs. Boston College, Thursday. 10. UCLA (21-5) at No. 8 Oregon, late. Next: vs. Colorado, Thursday. 11. Missouri (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. 12. Oregon State (21-6) idle. Next: at Arizona, Friday. 13. Maryland (22-5) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday. 14. Ohio State (22-6) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 15. Tennessee (21-6) idle. Next: at Florida, Thursday. 16. Stanford (19-9) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 17. Texas A&M (20-8) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday. 18. South Florida (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Houston, Wednesday. 19. Georgia (22-5) beat Mississippi 66-52. Next: at Alabama, Thursday. 20. Duke (21-7) beat No. 9 Florida State 79-66. Next: vs. North Carolina, Sunday. 21. N.C. State (21-6) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Thursday. 22. Green Bay (24-3) beat UIC 66-37. Next: vs. Oakland, Friday. 23. Belmont (26-3) idle. Next: at Jacksonville State, Wednesday. 24. LSU (18-7) idle. Next: at No. 7 South Carolina, Thursday. 25. Oklahoma State (18-8) idle. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday.

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF Man City 27 23 3 1 79 Man United 27 17 5 5 51 Liverpool 27 15 9 3 61 Chelsea 27 16 5 6 49 Tottenham 27 15 7 5 52 Arsenal 27 13 6 8 51 Burnley 27 9 9 9 21 Leicester 27 9 8 10 39 Everton 27 9 7 11 32 Bournemouth 27 8 7 12 31 Watford 27 8 6 13 37 West Ham 27 7 9 11 34 Newcastle 27 7 7 13 25 Brighton 27 6 10 11 22 Crystal Palace 27 6 9 12 25 Swansea 27 7 6 14 20 Huddersfield 27 7 6 14 23 Southampton 27 5 11 11 28 Stoke 27 6 7 14 27 West Brom 27 3 11 13 21 Saturday Leicester vs. Stoke, 6:30 a.m. Bournemouth vs. Newcastle, 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Swansea, 9 a.m. West Brom vs. Huddersfield, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Watford vs. Everton, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Man United vs. Chelsea, 8:05 a.m.

GA 20 19 31 23 24 36 24 40 46 41 47 46 36 36 42 37 47 40 53 40

Champions League (Home teams listed first) Second Round FIRST LEG | Feb. 13 Basel (Switzerland) 0, Manchester City (England) 4 Juventus (Italy) 2, Tottenham (England) 2 Feb. 14 Real Madrid (Spain) 3, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1 Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool (England) 5 Tuesday Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m.

Pts 72 56 54 53 52 45 36 35 34 31 30 30 28 28 27 27 27 26 25 20

Points 1,247 952 936 820 814 814 792 790 758 757 750 730 630 628 618 599 589 543 530 517 513 499 475 470 459

Thursday Florida Southern vs. Detroit, 12:05 p.m. U. of Tampa vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. Northeastern vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Boston College vs. Boston, 2 p.m. U. of Minnesota vs. Minnesota, 5:05 p.m.

Money $2,961,988 $2,539,667 $2,101,184 $1,832,041 $2,073,900 $1,901,356 $1,917,173 $2,032,227 $2,231,800 $1,817,485 $1,777,915 $1,543,658 $1,532,084 $1,853,200 $1,486,316 $1,459,197 $1,506,517 $1,387,367 $1,412,058 $1,139,764 $1,515,758 $1,090,606 $1,204,250 $1,033,447 $1,085,345

PGA | Upcoming events

LPGA money leaders Trn 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

FIELD GOAL PCT. Capela, HOU Jordan, LAC Adams, OKC Kanter, NYK Collins, ATL Gibson, MIN Valanciunas, TOR Randle, LAL Favors, UTA Whiteside, MIA

Wednesday Arizona State vs. Arizona, 2:10 p.m.

Feb. 22-25: Honda Classic, PGA National (Champion GC), Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. March 1-4: WGC-Mexico Championship, Club de Golf Chapultepec, Mexico City March 8-11: Valspar Championship, Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead), Palm Harbor, Fla. March. 15-18: Arnold Palmer Invitational, Bay Hill Golf Club and Lodge, Orlando, Fla. March 21-25: WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Austin CC, Austin, Texas March 22-25: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, Corales Punatacana Resort & Club, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. March 29-April 1: Houston Open, Golf Club of Houston (Tournament Course), Humble, Texas

1. Brittany Lincicome 2. Jin Young Ko 3. Wei-Ling Hsu 4. Hannah Green 5. Shanshan Feng 5. Amy Yang 7. Katherine Kirk 8. Danielle Kang 9. So Yeon Ryu 10. Marina Alex 10. Minjee Lee 12. Nelly Korda 13. Lexi Thompson 13. Bronte Law 15. Charley Hull 16. Ariya Jutanugarn 17. Laetitia Beck 18. Emma Talley 18. Sun Young Yoo 20. Brooke M. Henderson 21. Mo Martin 22. Caroline Masson 23. Tiffany Joh 24. Azahara Munoz 25. Lindy Duncan 25. Moriya Jutanugarn

Ty Cochran never ceases to be amazed. Through ups and downs, and there have been plenty of downs, Clayton shows up to practice every day and goes to work with a smile on its collective face. It inspires Cochran, the Greyhounds’ second-year head coach. “This is the most persistent group I’ve been around,” Cochran said. Clayton is 6-17. It won its season opener Nov. 27 and didn’t win again until Jan. 3, a streak of nine consecutive defeats. It also has had separate losing streaks of three and four games. But the Greyhounds now have the right kind of a streak, a winning streak. Clayton won back-to-back games last week for the first time this season. It beat St. Dominic 49-45 at home on Thursday then won at Affton 54-31 on Friday. In Cochran’s two seasons as coach, the Greyhounds have never won more than two in a row. They will try for three at 7 p.m. Tuesday when they travel to Lutheran South. Cochran said what he’s really been impressed by was how his team has competed since it broke its nine-game losing streak. They’ve been in every game, save one, headed into the fourth quarter. They lost a 30-28 heartbreaker to John Burroughs. They hung tough with Parkway Central the night coach Rick Kirby announced this season would be his last.

Spring training games

PGA | FedEx Cup Leaders 1. Patton Kizzire 2. Dustin Johnson 3. Jon Rahm 4. Brendan Steele 5. Jason Day 6. Tony Finau 7. Chez Reavie 8. Pat Perez 9. Justin Thomas 10. Patrick Cantlay 11. Gary Woodland 12. Austin Cook 13. Brian Harman 14. Justin Rose 15. Chesson Hadley 16. Phil Mickelson 17. Ted Potter, Jr. 18. Bubba Watson 19. Cameron Smith 20. James Hahn 21. Marc Leishman 22. Andrew Landry 23. Rickie Fowler 24. J.J. Spaun 25. Ryan Armour

this is the toughest thing I’ve dealt with,” Blossom said.

BASEBALL

GOLF

Money $210,000 $195,000 $135,766 $107,908 $82,199 $82,199 $70,291 $57,715 $50,364 $48,720 $48,720 $46,824 $40,458 $40,458 $40,435 $32,655 $31,905 $31,851 $31,851 $31,131 $30,362 $28,202 $26,155 $24,305 $22,494 $22,494

LPGA | Upcoming events Feb. 21-24: Honda LPGA Thailand, Siam CC, Chonburi March 1-4: HSBC Women’s Championship, Sentosa GC, Singapore March 15-18: Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25: Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1: ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Last week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

CLAYTON CELEBRATES SEASON’S FIRST WINNING STREAK

making contact with McKinney as he rushed across the court to celebrate teammate Courtney Ramey’s dunk as time expired in the first half. Because of his ejection, Gordon was automatically ineligible to compete in Webster’s game the next night at Pattonville due by National Federation of State High School Associations guidelines. “My plan right now talking to our administration, talking to Carte, talking to our staff and people I trust, is to give him another opportunity. And it’s not an easy decision,” Blossom said. “I’m not 100 percent sure it’s the best but I got into this business to help kids. He’s made progress in the classroom this last month. He’s worked hard. We still have work to do, but we’re making progress.” The showdown against Vashon, the No. 1 small school and two-time defending Class 4 champion, was Gordon’s second game back after he was suspended for two weeks and three games for an altercation before Webster’s 65-58 win Jan. 26 over St. Louis U. High. Gordon, a 6-foot-8 power forward for the Statesmen (15-8, No. 3 large school), has signed with St. Louis University. “He’s got some personal issues that we’re dealing with and I think it affects things. I know I’m out there on an island with him now. In my 29 years of coaching

SECOND LEG | March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

Last week 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 10 8 —

3-POINT PCT. Thompson, GOL Ingles, UTA Bullock, DET Hill, CLE Horford, BOS George, OKC Moore, NOR Collison, IND Korver, CLE Miller, NOR

Friday Grapefruit League Cardinals vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Washington vs. Houston, 12:05 p.m. Detroit vs. NY Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Baltimore, 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay (ss), 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Atlanta vs. NY Mets, 12:15 p.m. Cactus League LA Angels vs. Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee (ss), 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland, 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. LA Dodgers, 2:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Colorado, 2:10 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego, 2:10 p.m.

REBOUNDS Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Cousins, NOR Howard, CHA Towns, MIN Embiid, PHL Capela, HOU Davis, NOR Kanter, NYK Jokic, DEN

NBA LEADERS G 50 53 51 43 56 51 50 57 48 53 52 44 57 44 57 55 55 48 56 55 54 41 57

FG 465 542 512 363 569 431 461 543 406 477 462 355 475 366 492 407 417 390 426 413 478 311 473

FT 429 362 332 238 250 315 249 289 294 215 222 238 335 267 225 307 265 218 222 339 228 208 152

PTS 1565 1473 1396 1142 1486 1332 1299 1449 1210 1310 1268 1066 1351 1042 1348 1274 1257 1088 1261 1233 1209 909 1239

3FG 184 146 75 61 78 187 93 70 127 111

FREE THROW PCT. Redick, PHL Lee, NYK Belinelli, PHL Lillard, POR Curry, GOL Murray, DEN Paul, HOU Saric, PHL Collison, IND Williams, LAC

Saturday Grapefruit League Washington vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Houston, 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Detroit, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. NY Yankees vs. Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. NY Mets, 12:10 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss), 5:05 p.m. Cactus League LA Dodgers (ss) vs. Kansas City, 2:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Texas vs. Chicago Cubs, 2:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Cincinnati, 2:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. LA Dodgers (ss), 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. LA Angels, 2:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle, 2:10 p.m.

SCORING Harden, HOU Antetknmpo, MIL Davis, NOR Curry, GOL James, CLE Lillard, POR Durant, GOL Westbrook, OKC Cousins, NOR Irving, BOS Oladipo, IND Booker, PHX DeRozan, TOR Embiid, PHL Beal, WAS Williams, LAC Walker, CHA Porzingis, NYK George, OKC Butler, MIN Aldridge, SAN Griffin, DET McCollum, POR

FG 319 247 320 335 218 322 253 326 282 231

AVG 31.3 27.8 27.4 26.6 26.5 26.1 26.0 25.4 25.2 24.7 24.4 24.2 23.7 23.7 23.6 23.2 22.9 22.7 22.5 22.4 22.4 22.2 21.7

FGA 488 379 511 555 376 560 446 583 512 420

PCT .654 .652 .626 .604 .580 .575 .567 .559 .551 .550

3FGA 405 322 166 136 179 432 215 162 295 258

PCT .454 .453 .452 .449 .436 .433 .433 .432 .431 .430

FTA 134 113 109 341 260 163 150 138 116 343

PCT .940 .938 .927 .924 .915 .914 .907 .899 .897 .895

FT 126 106 101 315 238 149 136 124 104 307

G 55 51 48 57 61 44 52 51 55 51

OFF 277 219 105 188 179 98 165 124 198 138

DEF 587 548 512 530 563 391 411 424 389 402

TOT 864 767 617 718 742 489 576 548 587 540

AVG 15.7 15.0 12.9 12.6 12.2 11.1 11.1 10.7 10.7 10.6

ASSISTS Westbrook, OKC Harden, HOU James, CLE Simmons, PHL Rondo, NOR Green, GOL Teague, MIN Dinwiddie, Bro Lillard, POR Curry, GOL

G 57 50 56 54 43 50 50 58 51 43

AST 593 450 500 396 315 366 355 389 335 278

AVG 10.4 9.0 8.9 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.1 6.7 6.6 6.5

STEALS George, OKC Bledsoe, MIL Oladipo, IND Dunn, CHI Westbrook, OKC Butler, MIN Simmons, PHL Harris, DEN Harden, HOU Cousins, NOR

G 56 49 52 41 57 55 54 54 50 48

STL 124 104 109 83 111 107 102 98 88 79

AVG 2.21 2.12 2.10 2.02 1.95 1.95 1.89 1.81 1.76 1.65

BLK 115 108 87 97 96

AVG 2.40 2.12 2.07 1.94 1.85

BLOCKS Porzingis, NYK Davis, NOR Turner, IND Durant, GOL Capela, HOU

G 48 51 42 50 52

BLUES STATISTICS SKATERS Schenn Tarasenko Schwartz Stastny Pietrangelo Steen Parayko Sobotka Brodziak Upshall Edmundson Berglund Dunn Jaskin Gunnarsson Bortuzzo Barbashev Bouwmeester Thompson Thorburn Blais Sundqvist Bennett Megan Schmaltz GOALIES Allen Hutton

GP 41 26

GP 60 60 40 60 56 54 60 60 59 56 56 36 53 54 49 55 31 29 24 32 10 30 6 1 4

TOI/G 19:29 19:33 19:12 18:46 25:26 18:39 22:41 17:21 12:15 10:59 20:15 15:54 16:29 11:47 15:53 14:41 11:58 20:00 12:50 7:09 11:15 11:27 10:48 8:21 12:41

W-L-OT 19-17-2 15-5-2

G 24 23 18 12 9 13 5 9 9 6 6 8 4 5 5 1 3 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 SA 1139 653

A 31 29 24 28 28 24 24 15 10 11 9 6 10 8 3 7 4 4 3 4 2 3 0 0 0

PTS 55 52 42 40 37 37 29 24 19 17 15 14 14 13 8 8 7 6 6 4 3 3 0 0 0

GA 105 39

+/16 16 22 -2 11 -8 5 -6 11 -1 -1 -5 10 5 14 2 0 7 -6 -3 1 -3 -2 0 0

GAA 2.72 1.81

PIM 50 15 16 14 16 16 13 42 29 38 53 20 12 6 20 35 2 14 8 29 6 12 0 0 4 SV 1034 614

PP 8 3 5 3 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

SHG 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SV% .908 .940

GW 7 3 2 1 3 2 0 3 2 2 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3

S 151 239 94 132 152 128 153 106 81 62 104 69 99 86 39 63 25 41 40 23 8 33 6 1 0 A 1 0

S% 15.9 9.6 19.1 9.1 5.9 10.2 3.3 8.5 11.1 9.7 5.8 11.6 4 5.8 12.8 1.6 12 4.9 7.5 0 12.5 0 0 0 0

MIN 2,316:17 1,293:21


SPORTS

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

BOYS BASKETBALL • NOTEBOOK

Paul sets Vianney single-game scoring record Senior guard’s 41 points passes mark set in ’88 by future NFL QB Green

AREA RANKINGS LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Hazelwood Central 22-2 2. Belleville West 23-2 3. Webster Groves 15-8 4. Chaminade 19-4 5. Francis Howell 22-3 6. Parkway Central 19-5 7. Edwardsville 15-8 8. Fort Zumwalt South 20-3 9. Liberty 18-7 10. East St. Louis 11-10 SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Vashon 18-4 2. Alton Marquette 28-0 3. Confluence 21-4 4. St. Mary’s 23-3 5. Northwest Academy 17-6 6. Jennings 22-3 7. Whitfield 17-7 8. Trinity 19-3 9. Wesclin 23-4 10. Cardinal Ritter 17-9

BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

C.J. Paul was gassed. A senior guard for the Vianney basketball team, Paul stepped into the visitors’ locker room at Chaminade at halftime Friday night and tried to catch his breath. “I was so tired,” Paul said. “Chaminade plays at such a fast pace.” The Red Devils run at every opportunity. To counter their rapid pace, the Golden Griffins (13-10) were sending players back on defense in transition. It’s a lot of up and down for a Vianney team that prefers to run a little, slow the pace and grind out games. “I was focused on a lot of different things,” Paul said. None of which included his own personal scoring total. Paul thought he shot the ball well in the first half. He kept shooting and it kept going in, but he didn’t know he had 26 points, three shy of his career best for a full game. “I thought I had 15 or so,” Paul said. When his hot shooting continued in the second half and Chaminade pulled away, Paul was given the opportunity to do something that had not been done in 30 years. He broke Vianney’s single-game scoring record. Paul finished with 41 points to put him front of Vianney graduate and one-time National Football League star Trent Green, who scored 40 points in 1988, his senior season. Paul’s record-breaking bucket came on a layup late in the fourth quarter. It was a stark contrast to how he did damage most of the night as he hit eight 3-pointers, also a new school record. “We did a really good job of sharing the ball,” Paul said. “My teammates would find me and I’d knock it down.” In the blur that was the first half the 6-foot-4 and 170-pound Paul hit five 3-pointers. The No. 4 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Chaminade (19-4 overall, 7-1 league) did win 97-72 and avenge its only Metro Catholic Conference defeat this season. But the two times the Golden Griffins played the Red Devils this season something incredible happened. Vianney’s 61-57 victory on Dec. 21 at home was its first win over Chaminade since 2012. On Friday, Paul set himself apart from every

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Vianney’s C.J. Paul (right) scored 41 points Friday in a loss at Chaminade. It set a program-record for single-game points, surpassing the 40-point game of future NFL quarterback Trent Green in 1988.

player to pull on a Vianney jersey. There have been some talented players and teams since Green scored 40 in 1988. The Golden Griffins have sent plenty of players off to play college basketball. They reached the state semifinals in 2013. The year before that they went 27-2 and set the school record for wins. The cupboard has not been bare during coach Kevin Walsh’s tenure and yet it’s Paul who did something none of the previous Griffins could. “I never expected to have that happen,” Paul said. “I’m grateful. I’m grateful to Coach Walsh, who has always believed in me, my teammates, too. It’s such an honor.”

WEBSTER GROVES COACH GOES ALL IN ON GORDON

Jay Blossom has never dealt with anything like this before. He hopes he’ll never deal with anything like it again. But in the moment, Blossom, the longtime Webster Groves basketball coach, is doing what he thinks is best. Statesmen senior post Carte’Are Gordon will not be further disciplined for leaving the bench and making contact with Vashon’s Mario McKinney Jr. at the end of the first half of their matchup Thursday at St. Louis Community College–Meramec. Gordon was ejected from the game for

AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGES

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog NC STATE...................7.5...........Boston College BAYLOR ...................... 2................... W Virginia OHIO ST..................... 15...................... Rutgers Rhode Island.............6.5 ................... LASALLE BUTLER ...................... 5....................Creighton BALL ST..................... 10...................No Illinois W MICHIGAN .............. 5.................. C Michigan E MICHIGAN ..............PK........................ Toledo TEXAS A&M................ 6..............Mississippi St MICHIGAN ST .............17 ........................ Illinois BOWLING GREEN ....... 7.......................... Akron Buffalo ......................6.5 ..............MIAMI-OHIO OHIO U ....................... 4........................ Kent St NEBRASKA................3.5 ......................Indiana DAYTON...................... 5.................. Saint Louis MISSOURI..................9.5 ................ Mississippi ARKANSAS................. 4.....................Kentucky LSU............................4.5 .................Vanderbilt WYOMING................... 4................ New Mexico VALPARAISO .............. 4............Northern Iowa E TENNESSEE ST....... 20........................Citadel NC-Greensboro .........1.5.................. WOFFORD MERCER ................... 11.5................ W Carolina FURMAN...................20.5 ...........................Vmi

Area basketball schedule

NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog FLYERS ..............-$165/+$145..........Canadiens MAPLE LEAFS .. -$200/+$170........... Panthers CAPITALS ..........-$125/+$105............Lightning DEVILS................-$110/-$110 .......Blue Jackets Predators.......... -$145/+$125........ RED WINGS JETS................... -$175/+$155.................. Kings BLUES................ -$135/+$115................Sharks Bruins................ -$145/+$125............... OILERS CANUCKS............-$110/-$110 .......... Avalanche Grand Salami: Over/under 52.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BALTIMORE — Agreed to terms with OF Alex Presley on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY — Agreed to terms with RHPs Heath Fillmyer, Sam Gaviglio, Jesse Hahn, Jakob Junis, Brad Keller, Andres Machado, Kevin McCarthy, Burch Smith and Kyle Zimmer; LHPs Brian Flynn, Tim Hill and Eric Stout; C Meibrys Viloria and INFs Samir Duenez, Hunter Dozier and Whit Merrifield on one-year contracts. LOS ANGELES — Agreed to terms with 1B Chris Carter on a minor league contract and OF Chris Young on a one-year contract. National League ARIZONA — Agreed to terms with OF Jarrod Dyson on a two-year contract. CINCINNATI — Agreed to terms with RHP Ben Rowen on a minor league contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Motte on a minor league contract. SAN DIEGO — Agreed to terms with 1B Eric Hosmer on an eight-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO — Agreed to terms with LHP Tony Watson on a two-year contract. FOOTBALL | National Football League MINNESOTA — Named Todd Downing senior offensive assistant. HOCKEY | National Hockey League CAROLINA — Reassigned F Lucas Wallmark to Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO — Traded D Michal Kempny to Washington for a conditional 2018 third-round draft pick. DETROIT — Acquired a 2018 conditional fourth-round draft pick and a 2019 conditional third-round draft pick from Philadelphia for G Petr Mrazek. NY ISLANDERS — Recalled G Eamon McAdam from Worcester (ECHL) to Bridgeport (AHL). Recalled G Christopher Gibson from Bridgeport on an emergency basis. SAN JOSE — Recalled F Alex Schoenborn from Allen (ECHL) to San Jose (AHL). TAMPA BAY — Assigned D Matt Spencer from Syracuse (AHL) to Adirondack (ECHL). VEGAS — Recalled F Keegan Kolesar from Quad City (ECHL) to Chicago (AHL). SOCCER | Major League Soccer COLORADO — Signed M Enzo Martinez to a one-year contract. COLLEGE DENVER — Named Karlton Creech vice chancellor for athletics and recreation. ETSU — Signed men’s basketball coach Steve Forbes to a contract extension through the 2022-23 season. GEORGIA SOUTHERN — Agreed to a contract extension with men’s basketball coach Mark Byington through the 2021-22 season.

Tuesday W: Kaskaskia at St. Louis CC, 5:30 p.m. M: West Plains at St. Louis CC, 7 p.m. Wednesday W: SLU at VCU, 5 p.m. W: State Fair at Jefferson, 5 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Parkland, 5:30 p.m. W: SWIC at Southeastern Illinois, 5:30 p.m. M: Loyola at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: Bradley at Missouri State, 7 p.m. W: Austin Peay at SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. M: Lewis & Clark at Olney, 7 p.m. M: SWIC at Southeastern Illinois, 7:30 p.m. Thursday W: SEMO at Eastern Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. W: McKendree at Missouri S&T, 5:30 p.m. W: NW Missouri at Lindenwood, 5:30 p.m. W: Quincy at UMSL, 5:30 p.m. W: Illinois Springfield at Maryville, 5:30 p.m. W: Lyon at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Hannibal-LaGrange at Mo. Baptist, 5:30 p.m. W: Central Baptist at Harris-Stowe, 5:30 p.m. M: SEMO at Eastern Kentucky, 7 p.m. M: Austin Peay at SIU Edwardsville, 7 p.m. W: Vanderbilt at Missouri, 7 p.m. M: NW Missouri at Lindenwood, 7:30 p.m. M: McKendree at Missouri S&T, 7:30 p.m. M: Quincy at UMSL, 7:30 p.m. M: Maryville at Illinois Springfield, 7:30 p.m. M: Lyon at LU-Belleville, 7:30 p.m. M: Hannibal-LaGrange at Mo. Baptist, 7:30 p.m. M: Central Baptist at Harris-Stowe, 7:30 p.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. Virginia (24-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 2. Michigan State (26-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday. 3. Villanova (24-3) idle. Next: vs. DePaul, Wednesday. 4. Xavier (24-4) idle. Next: at Georgetown, Wednesday. 5. Duke (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Louisville, Wednesday. 6. Gonzaga (25-4) idle. Next: at San Diego, Thursday. 6. Texas Tech (22-5) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Wednesday. 8. Kansas (22-6) beat Oklahoma 104-74. Next: at No. 6 Texas Tech, Saturday. 9. Purdue (24-5) idle. Next: at Illinois, Thursday. 10. North Carolina (21-7) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Wednesday. 11. Cincinnati (23-4) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday. 12. Auburn (23-4) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Wednesday. 13. Wichita State (21-5) idle. Next: vs. Tulane, Wednesday. 14. Arizona (21-6) idle. Next: at Oregon State, Thursday. 15. Clemson (20-6) idle. Next: at Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 16. Ohio State (22-7) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Tuesday. 17. Michigan (22-7) idle. Next: at Penn State, Wednesday. 18. Rhode Island (21-4) idle. Next: at La Salle, Tuesday. 19. Tennessee (19-7) idle. Next: vs. Florida, Wednesday. 20. Nevada (23-5) idle. Next: vs. San Jose State, Wednesday. 21. West Virginia (19-8) idle. Next: at Baylor, Tuesday. 22. Saint Mary’s (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Pepperdine, Thursday. 23. Houston (21-5) idle. Next: at Memphis, Thursday. 24. Middle Tennessee (22-5) idle. Next: vs. UAB, Saturday. 25. Florida State (19-8) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Sunday.

National men’s basketball East Delaware St. 69, Coppin St. 51 South Alabama St. 82, Alcorn St. 62 Beth.-Cook. 96, Morgan St. 95, OT Hampton 114, Savannah St. 102, OT MVSU 76, Prairie View 71 N. Kentucky 70, Youngstown St. 51 NC A&T 78, Md.-E. Shore 69 NC Central 83, Howard 66 Norfolk St. 76, SC State 62 Southern U. 60, Alabama A&M 50 Midwest IUPUI 74, Oakland 67 Ill.-Chicago 94, Detroit 87 Kansas 104, Oklahoma 74 Maryland 71, Northwestern 64 Miami 77, Notre Dame 74 Wisconsin 73, Minnesota 63, OT Wright St. 72, Cleveland St. 63 Southwest Ark.-Pine Bluff 62, Texas South. 61

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. UConn (26-0) idle. Next: at Tulane, Wednesday. 2. Mississippi State (28-0) idle. Next: vs. Auburn, Thursday. 3. Baylor (26-1) beat No. 6 Texas 93-87. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 4. Louisville (27-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (25-2) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Thursday. 6. Texas (22-5) lost to No. 3 Baylor 93-87. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 7. South Carolina (22-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 24 LSU, Thursday. 8. Oregon (25-4) beat No. 10 UCLA 101-94, OT. Next: at Arizona State, Friday. 9. Florida State (22-5) lost to No. 20 Duke 79-66. Next: vs. Boston College, Thursday. 10. UCLA (21-6) lost to No. 8 Oregon 101-94, OT. Next: vs. Colorado, Thursday. 11. Missouri (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. 12. Oregon State (21-6) idle. Next: at Arizona, Friday. 13. Maryland (22-5) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday. 14. Ohio State (22-6) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 15. Tennessee (21-6) idle. Next: at Florida, Thursday. 16. Stanford (19-9) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 17. Texas A&M (20-8) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday. 18. South Florida (22-5) idle. Next: vs. Houston, Wednesday. 19. Georgia (22-5) beat Mississippi 66-52. Next: at Alabama, Thursday. 20. Duke (21-7) beat No. 9 Florida State 79-66. Next: vs. North Carolina, Sunday. 21. N.C. State (21-6) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Thursday. 22. Green Bay (24-3) beat UIC 66-37. Next: vs. Oakland, Friday. 23. Belmont (26-3) idle. Next: at Jacksonville State, Wednesday. 24. LSU (18-7) idle. Next: at No. 7 South Carolina, Thursday. 25. Oklahoma State (18-8) idle. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday.

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF Man City 27 23 3 1 79 Man United 27 17 5 5 51 Liverpool 27 15 9 3 61 Chelsea 27 16 5 6 49 Tottenham 27 15 7 5 52 Arsenal 27 13 6 8 51 Burnley 27 9 9 9 21 Leicester 27 9 8 10 39 Everton 27 9 7 11 32 Bournemouth 27 8 7 12 31 Watford 27 8 6 13 37 West Ham 27 7 9 11 34 Newcastle 27 7 7 13 25 Brighton 27 6 10 11 22 Crystal Palace 27 6 9 12 25 Swansea 27 7 6 14 20 Huddersfield 27 7 6 14 23 Southampton 27 5 11 11 28 Stoke 27 6 7 14 27 West Brom 27 3 11 13 21 Saturday Leicester vs. Stoke, 6:30 a.m. Bournemouth vs. Newcastle, 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Swansea, 9 a.m. West Brom vs. Huddersfield, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Watford vs. Everton, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Man United vs. Chelsea, 8:05 a.m.

GA 20 19 31 23 24 36 24 40 46 41 47 46 36 36 42 37 47 40 53 40

Champions League (Home teams listed first) Second Round FIRST LEG | Feb. 13 Basel (Switzerland) 0, Manchester City (England) 4 Juventus (Italy) 2, Tottenham (England) 2 Feb. 14 Real Madrid (Spain) 3, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1 Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool (England) 5 Tuesday Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m.

Pts 72 56 54 53 52 45 36 35 34 31 30 30 28 28 27 27 27 26 25 20

Points 1,247 952 936 820 814 814 792 790 758 757 750 730 630 628 618 599 589 543 530 517 513 499 475 470 459

Thursday Florida Southern vs. Detroit, 12:05 p.m. U. of Tampa vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. Northeastern vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Boston College vs. Boston, 2 p.m. U. of Minnesota vs. Minnesota, 5:05 p.m.

Money $2,961,988 $2,539,667 $2,101,184 $1,832,041 $2,073,900 $1,901,356 $1,917,173 $2,032,227 $2,231,800 $1,817,485 $1,777,915 $1,543,658 $1,532,084 $1,853,200 $1,486,316 $1,459,197 $1,506,517 $1,387,367 $1,412,058 $1,139,764 $1,515,758 $1,090,606 $1,204,250 $1,033,447 $1,085,345

PGA | Upcoming events

LPGA money leaders Trn 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

FIELD GOAL PCT. Capela, HOU Jordan, LAC Adams, OKC Kanter, NYK Collins, ATL Gibson, MIN Valanciunas, TOR Randle, LAL Favors, UTA Whiteside, MIA

Wednesday Arizona State vs. Arizona, 2:10 p.m.

Feb. 22-25: Honda Classic, PGA National (Champion GC), Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. March 1-4: WGC-Mexico Championship, Club de Golf Chapultepec, Mexico City March 8-11: Valspar Championship, Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead), Palm Harbor, Fla. March. 15-18: Arnold Palmer Invitational, Bay Hill Golf Club and Lodge, Orlando, Fla. March 21-25: WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Austin CC, Austin, Texas March 22-25: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, Corales Punatacana Resort & Club, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. March 29-April 1: Houston Open, Golf Club of Houston (Tournament Course), Humble, Texas

1. Brittany Lincicome 2. Jin Young Ko 3. Wei-Ling Hsu 4. Hannah Green 5. Shanshan Feng 5. Amy Yang 7. Katherine Kirk 8. Danielle Kang 9. So Yeon Ryu 10. Marina Alex 10. Minjee Lee 12. Nelly Korda 13. Lexi Thompson 13. Bronte Law 15. Charley Hull 16. Ariya Jutanugarn 17. Laetitia Beck 18. Emma Talley 18. Sun Young Yoo 20. Brooke M. Henderson 21. Mo Martin 22. Caroline Masson 23. Tiffany Joh 24. Azahara Munoz 25. Lindy Duncan 25. Moriya Jutanugarn

Ty Cochran never ceases to be amazed. Through ups and downs, and there have been plenty of downs, Clayton shows up to practice every day and goes to work with a smile on its collective face. It inspires Cochran, the Greyhounds’ second-year head coach. “This is the most persistent group I’ve been around,” Cochran said. Clayton is 6-17. It won its season opener Nov. 27 and didn’t win again until Jan. 3, a streak of nine consecutive defeats. It also has had separate losing streaks of three and four games. But the Greyhounds now have the right kind of a streak, a winning streak. Clayton won back-to-back games last week for the first time this season. It beat St. Dominic 49-45 at home on Thursday then won at Affton 54-31 on Friday. In Cochran’s two seasons as coach, the Greyhounds have never won more than two in a row. They will try for three at 7 p.m. Tuesday when they travel to Lutheran South. Cochran said what he’s really been impressed by was how his team has competed since it broke its nine-game losing streak. They’ve been in every game, save one, headed into the fourth quarter. They lost a 30-28 heartbreaker to John Burroughs. They hung tough with Parkway Central the night coach Rick Kirby announced this season would be his last.

Spring training games

PGA | FedEx Cup Leaders 1. Patton Kizzire 2. Dustin Johnson 3. Jon Rahm 4. Brendan Steele 5. Jason Day 6. Tony Finau 7. Chez Reavie 8. Pat Perez 9. Justin Thomas 10. Patrick Cantlay 11. Gary Woodland 12. Austin Cook 13. Brian Harman 14. Justin Rose 15. Chesson Hadley 16. Phil Mickelson 17. Ted Potter, Jr. 18. Bubba Watson 19. Cameron Smith 20. James Hahn 21. Marc Leishman 22. Andrew Landry 23. Rickie Fowler 24. J.J. Spaun 25. Ryan Armour

this is the toughest thing I’ve dealt with,” Blossom said.

BASEBALL

GOLF

Money $210,000 $195,000 $135,766 $107,908 $82,199 $82,199 $70,291 $57,715 $50,364 $48,720 $48,720 $46,824 $40,458 $40,458 $40,435 $32,655 $31,905 $31,851 $31,851 $31,131 $30,362 $28,202 $26,155 $24,305 $22,494 $22,494

LPGA | Upcoming events Feb. 21-24: Honda LPGA Thailand, Siam CC, Chonburi March 1-4: HSBC Women’s Championship, Sentosa GC, Singapore March 15-18: Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25: Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1: ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Last week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

CLAYTON CELEBRATES SEASON’S FIRST WINNING STREAK

making contact with McKinney as he rushed across the court to celebrate teammate Courtney Ramey’s dunk as time expired in the first half. Because of his ejection, Gordon was automatically ineligible to compete in Webster’s game the next night at Pattonville due by National Federation of State High School Associations guidelines. “My plan right now talking to our administration, talking to Carte, talking to our staff and people I trust, is to give him another opportunity. And it’s not an easy decision,” Blossom said. “I’m not 100 percent sure it’s the best but I got into this business to help kids. He’s made progress in the classroom this last month. He’s worked hard. We still have work to do, but we’re making progress.” The showdown against Vashon, the No. 1 small school and two-time defending Class 4 champion, was Gordon’s second game back after he was suspended for two weeks and three games for an altercation before Webster’s 65-58 win Jan. 26 over St. Louis U. High. Gordon, a 6-foot-8 power forward for the Statesmen (15-8, No. 3 large school), has signed with St. Louis University. “He’s got some personal issues that we’re dealing with and I think it affects things. I know I’m out there on an island with him now. In my 29 years of coaching

SECOND LEG | March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

Last week 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 10 8 —

3-POINT PCT. Thompson, GOL Ingles, UTA Bullock, DET Hill, CLE Horford, BOS George, OKC Moore, NOR Collison, IND Korver, CLE Miller, NOR

Friday Grapefruit League Cardinals vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Washington vs. Houston, 12:05 p.m. Detroit vs. NY Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Baltimore, 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay (ss), 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Atlanta vs. NY Mets, 12:15 p.m. Cactus League LA Angels vs. Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee (ss), 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland, 2:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. LA Dodgers, 2:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Colorado, 2:10 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego, 2:10 p.m.

REBOUNDS Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Cousins, NOR Howard, CHA Towns, MIN Embiid, PHL Capela, HOU Davis, NOR Kanter, NYK Jokic, DEN

NBA LEADERS G 50 53 51 43 56 51 50 57 48 53 52 44 57 44 57 55 55 48 56 55 54 41 57

FG 465 542 512 363 569 431 461 543 406 477 462 355 475 366 492 407 417 390 426 413 478 311 473

FT 429 362 332 238 250 315 249 289 294 215 222 238 335 267 225 307 265 218 222 339 228 208 152

PTS 1565 1473 1396 1142 1486 1332 1299 1449 1210 1310 1268 1066 1351 1042 1348 1274 1257 1088 1261 1233 1209 909 1239

3FG 184 146 75 61 78 187 93 70 127 111

FREE THROW PCT. Redick, PHL Lee, NYK Belinelli, PHL Lillard, POR Curry, GOL Murray, DEN Paul, HOU Saric, PHL Collison, IND Williams, LAC

Saturday Grapefruit League Washington vs. Miami, 12:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Houston, 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Detroit, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. NY Yankees vs. Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. NY Mets, 12:10 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss), 5:05 p.m. Cactus League LA Dodgers (ss) vs. Kansas City, 2:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Texas vs. Chicago Cubs, 2:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Cincinnati, 2:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. LA Dodgers (ss), 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. LA Angels, 2:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle, 2:10 p.m.

SCORING Harden, HOU Antetknmpo, MIL Davis, NOR Curry, GOL James, CLE Lillard, POR Durant, GOL Westbrook, OKC Cousins, NOR Irving, BOS Oladipo, IND Booker, PHX DeRozan, TOR Embiid, PHL Beal, WAS Williams, LAC Walker, CHA Porzingis, NYK George, OKC Butler, MIN Aldridge, SAN Griffin, DET McCollum, POR

FG 319 247 320 335 218 322 253 326 282 231

AVG 31.3 27.8 27.4 26.6 26.5 26.1 26.0 25.4 25.2 24.7 24.4 24.2 23.7 23.7 23.6 23.2 22.9 22.7 22.5 22.4 22.4 22.2 21.7

FGA 488 379 511 555 376 560 446 583 512 420

PCT .654 .652 .626 .604 .580 .575 .567 .559 .551 .550

3FGA 405 322 166 136 179 432 215 162 295 258

PCT .454 .453 .452 .449 .436 .433 .433 .432 .431 .430

FTA 134 113 109 341 260 163 150 138 116 343

PCT .940 .938 .927 .924 .915 .914 .907 .899 .897 .895

FT 126 106 101 315 238 149 136 124 104 307

G 55 51 48 57 61 44 52 51 55 51

OFF 277 219 105 188 179 98 165 124 198 138

DEF 587 548 512 530 563 391 411 424 389 402

TOT 864 767 617 718 742 489 576 548 587 540

AVG 15.7 15.0 12.9 12.6 12.2 11.1 11.1 10.7 10.7 10.6

ASSISTS Westbrook, OKC Harden, HOU James, CLE Simmons, PHL Rondo, NOR Green, GOL Teague, MIN Dinwiddie, Bro Lillard, POR Curry, GOL

G 57 50 56 54 43 50 50 58 51 43

AST 593 450 500 396 315 366 355 389 335 278

AVG 10.4 9.0 8.9 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.1 6.7 6.6 6.5

STEALS George, OKC Bledsoe, MIL Oladipo, IND Dunn, CHI Westbrook, OKC Butler, MIN Simmons, PHL Harris, DEN Harden, HOU Cousins, NOR

G 56 49 52 41 57 55 54 54 50 48

STL 124 104 109 83 111 107 102 98 88 79

AVG 2.21 2.12 2.10 2.02 1.95 1.95 1.89 1.81 1.76 1.65

BLK 115 108 87 97 96

AVG 2.40 2.12 2.07 1.94 1.85

BLOCKS Porzingis, NYK Davis, NOR Turner, IND Durant, GOL Capela, HOU

G 48 51 42 50 52

BLUES STATISTICS SKATERS Schenn Tarasenko Schwartz Stastny Pietrangelo Steen Parayko Sobotka Brodziak Upshall Edmundson Berglund Dunn Jaskin Gunnarsson Bortuzzo Barbashev Bouwmeester Thompson Thorburn Blais Sundqvist Bennett Megan Schmaltz GOALIES Allen Hutton

GP 41 26

GP 60 60 40 60 56 54 60 60 59 56 56 36 53 54 49 55 31 29 24 32 10 30 6 1 4

TOI/G 19:29 19:33 19:12 18:46 25:26 18:39 22:41 17:21 12:15 10:59 20:15 15:54 16:29 11:47 15:53 14:41 11:58 20:00 12:50 7:09 11:15 11:27 10:48 8:21 12:41

W-L-OT 19-17-2 15-5-2

G 24 23 18 12 9 13 5 9 9 6 6 8 4 5 5 1 3 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 SA 1139 653

A 31 29 24 28 28 24 24 15 10 11 9 6 10 8 3 7 4 4 3 4 2 3 0 0 0

PTS 55 52 42 40 37 37 29 24 19 17 15 14 14 13 8 8 7 6 6 4 3 3 0 0 0

GA 105 39

+/16 16 22 -2 11 -8 5 -6 11 -1 -1 -5 10 5 14 2 0 7 -6 -3 1 -3 -2 0 0

GAA 2.72 1.81

PIM 50 15 16 14 16 16 13 42 29 38 53 20 12 6 20 35 2 14 8 29 6 12 0 0 4 SV 1034 614

PP 8 3 5 3 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

SHG 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SV% .908 .940

GW 7 3 2 1 3 2 0 3 2 2 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3

S 151 239 94 132 152 128 153 106 81 62 104 69 99 86 39 63 25 41 40 23 8 33 6 1 0 A 1 0

S% 15.9 9.6 19.1 9.1 5.9 10.2 3.3 8.5 11.1 9.7 5.8 11.6 4 5.8 12.8 1.6 12 4.9 7.5 0 12.5 0 0 0 0

MIN 2,316:17 1,293:21


SOCCER

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

Messi still waiting to score on Chelsea Barcelona star gets 9th chance Tuesday ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON • As unlikely as it sounds, Lio-

nel Messi is still waiting to score his first goal against Chelsea after drawing a blank in eight previous Champions League matches. The five-time World Player of the Year is likely to get another chance to break his duck this week and Chelsea manager Antonio Conte believes the past will count for little when Barcelona visits Stamford Bridge on Tuesday. “I hope we maintain this tradition but we are speaking about a fantastic player,” Conte said ahead of the last-16, first-leg Champions League game. “The most important thing is the present. “We must have great respect but at the same time we must be excited to play this type of game and take on this type of challenge. It won’t be easy because we know very well this player, we are talking about one of the best in the world.” The teams have produced some epic games in the past although they have not met in the Champions League since Chelsea pulled off a remarkable semifinal vic-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Five-time World Player of the Year Lionel Messi and Barcelona play Chelsea Tuesday.

tory over Barcelona on the way to winning the trophy in 2012.Messi missed a penalty in the second leg at the Nou Camp as the London club overcame the first-half dismissal of captain John Terry, and a 2-0 deficit, to draw the game 2-2 and secure an

Man City shocked by Wigan in FA Cup • Manchester City’s pursuit of a quadruple ended on Monday when it was surprisingly eliminated from the FA Cup by losing at third-division Wigan 1-0. Wigan beat City in the 2013 FA Cup final, and this time Will Grigg’s late goal was enough for the League One side to pull off another upset in the fifth round. They face Southampton in the quarterfinals. City was forced to play the entire second half with 10 men after Fabian Delph was red-carded on the stroke of halftime for a strong challenge on Max Power. City dominated possession but could not take advantage. Sergio Aguero headed over early on and Ilkay Gundogan forced a good save from Christian Walton before miskicking from another good position. Controversy then erupted when referee Anthony Taylor dismissed Delph following a sliding challenge on Power. Taylor initially had a yellow card in his hand, but eventually brandished the red one. City was further frustrated after the break and Grigg capitalized on a Kyle Walker error to win it for Wigan 11 minutes from time. The Northern Ireland international seized possession on halfway and charged upfield before slotting a fine shot past Bravo from the edge of the area. Wigan survived a nervy finish, with the final whistle prompting a pitch invasion.

unforgettable 3-2 aggregate win. Bayern Munich hosts Besiktas in Tuesday’s other game while the following day sees Manchester United traveling to Sevilla, and Shakhtar Donetsk playing host to Roma. Two weeks ago, the prospect of a Chelsea win over Barca would have been unthinkable after Conte’s men had slumped to successive defeats by two of the Premier League’s lesser lights. The London club was still smarting from a 3-0 home loss against Bournemouth when it traveled to Watford and succumbed to an embarrassing 4-1 reverse. Chelsea has got back on track since then, though, easing past West Bromwich Albion 3-0 in the league last Monday before swatting aside second-tier Hull 4-0 in the FA Cup four days later. Barca has lost only once in 38 matches this season since falling in the Spanish Super Cup to Real Madrid in August. It has a seven-point lead at the top of La Liga and has reached the final of the Copa del Rey. Messi is having another stellar campaign, scoring 27 times in all competitions, and he helped set up two goals in Saturday’s 2-0 win at Eibar. Philippe Coutinho is ineligible for Barca following his move from Liverpool.

ENT ER TO WIN

VIP Hockey Experience for engaged couples 20 engaged couples will receive special access to a private St. Louis Blues practice on March 15, lunch and additional prizes!

ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL WIN A FUNJET VACATION FOR 2 TO MEXICO, ALL-INCLUSIVE

ENTER THRU MARCH 4: STLtoday.com/contest SPONSORS

National Extremes

WEATHER • Low 47, High 73 • Winds S 10-20 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 90° Laredo, Texas

Low: -24° Butte, Montana

More wet times ahead

More periods of showers along with some storms can be expected across the St. Louis area today as a frontal boundary slowly moves eastward. Temperatures will be well above average with highs topping out in the low 70s. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

Showers/ few storms

Showers/ few storms

Showers/ few storms

Showers/ few storms

63°

69°

65°

47°

70 72 67 73 69 66 49 52 68 68 36 72 72

W

showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers mostly cloudy showers showers

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Slight chance Mostly cloudy of rain

Chance of showers

Chance of showers

H

58 64 53 61 60 52 63 56 53 40 60 60

67 73 61 69 69 63 71 65 62 49 69 68

Chicago 53 / 61

showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers

Kansas City 42 / 49

Kirksville 47 / 52

Joplin 62 / 66

Springfield 60 / 69

St. Louis 61 / 73 Poplar Bluff 63 / 72

Carbondale 64 / 73

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.25 + 0.20 + 0.54 + 0.11 - 0.12 0.00 + 0.36 + 0.18 - 0.21 - 0.06

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Feb 16th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 4,452 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 8 Month (Total) 584 Season 3305 Year Ago 2638 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 14.38 18 12.49 Peoria 14 9.93 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.43 Sullivan 16 - 1.56 Valley Park 24 5.89 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.08 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 39.44 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.03 + 0.04 + 0.19 + 0.15 + 1.03 + 0.21 + 0.50 + 0.04

SUN & MOON

First Feb 23 Sunrise

Full Mar 1

Last Mar 9

6:45 AM Sunset

New Mar 17 5:44 PM

Moonrise 9:31 AM Moonset 10:42 PM

On this date in 1947, the first animals in space were launched aboard a V-2 rocket. The animals aboard were two fruit flies who were recovered alive after they reached an altitude of 68 miles. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.74 355.05 494.78 654.90 705.76 652.84 908.13 839.26 594.34 405.12 600.66 443.10

+ 0.29 + 0.07 + 0.07 - 0.25 + 0.10 + 0.17 - 0.11 + 0.06 - 0.08 - 0.01 0.00 - 0.08

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

70s

T-storms

70s

50s

80s Ice

80s

80s Hawaii High: 82°

Jet Stream

A slow-moving frontal boundary will trigger clusters of showers along with some thunderstorms from parts of the Great Lakes down to parts of Texas. High pressure will keep dry conditions in place across much of the East Coast. Colder air will move into the northern Rockies and north-central Plains. Today L H

W

Tomorrow L H W

53 Albany, N.Y. 40 61 rain Albuquerque 30 45 mostly cloudy 23 18 Anchorage 17 29 partly cloudy Atlanta 59 76 mostly cloudy 63 Atlantic City 47 70 mostly cloudy 53 Baltimore 46 71 mostly cloudy 56 -9 Billings -10 7 sunny Biloxi, Ms. 62 76 mostly cloudy 66 Birmingham 61 81 mostly cloudy 65 Bismarck -2 11 mostly cloudy -9 19 Boise 13 29 sunny Boston 44 60 mostly cloudy 52 57 rain Buffalo 51 66 53 Burlington, Vt. 42 56 rain Charleston, S.C. 58 78 mostly cloudy 63 Charleston, W.V. 56 81 partly cloudy 60 Charlotte 54 73 mostly cloudy 61 Cheyenne -5 14 mostly cloudy -2 28 Chicago 53 61 showers Cincinnati 60 77 mostly cloudy 61 53 Cleveland 56 70 showers Colorado Spgs. 13 28 mostly cloudy 8 Concord, N.H. 39 54 partly cloudy 43 Dallas 67 72 thunderstorms 43 Daytona Beach 65 80 mostly cloudy 66 Denver 6 20 mostly cloudy 6 Des Moines 29 32 mostly cloudy 12 66 64 76 showers Destin, Fl. 44 53 67 showers Detroit 38 50 58 partly cloudy El Paso 46 62 76 showers Evansville 7 15 28 snow Fairbanks 3 11 mostly cloudy -5 Fargo 6 10 24 sunny Flagstaff 69 85 mostly sunny 69 Fort Myers -13 -18 13 very cold Great Falls 18 26 35 freezing rain Green Bay 43 60 mostly cloudy 50 Hartford 67 mostly cloudy 65 82 Honolulu 67 79 thunderstorms 67 Houston 43 60 73 showers Indianapolis 63 83 mostly cloudy 66 Jackson, Ms. 19 34 mostly cloudy 22 Juneau 74 74 82 partly cloudy Key West 31 34 48 sunny Las Vegas 55 64 77 showers Little Rock 40 40 61 sunny Los Angeles 63 mostly cloudy 63 81 Louisville

73 47 32 76 74 75 14 79 80 18 34 70 59 64 79 77 76 23 36 62 58 29 69 45 81 29 27 77 49 61 49 25 16 28 86 15 27 70 82 78 47 81 37 81 51 57 62 64

rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain showers mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly sunny showers sunny showers snow sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers

City

Today L H

60 Macon 70 McAllen, Tx. 64 Memphis 74 Miami 38 Milwaukee 18 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. -6 64 Mobile Montgomery 60 63 Nashville New Orleans 69 New York City 48 Norfolk, Va. 54 Oklahoma City 64 Omaha 21 Orlando 67 Palm Springs 41 Philadelphia 46 Phoenix 42 Pittsburgh 57 Portland, Me. 39 Portland, Or. 25 Providence 44 Raleigh 50 Rapid City -9 Reno 10 Richmond, Va. 50 Sacramento 27 St. Petersburg 70 Salt Lake City 17 San Antonio 67 San Diego 47 San Francisco 37 Santa Fe 24 Savannah 59 Seattle 25 65 Shreveport 10 Sioux Falls 45 Syracuse 61 Tallahassee 68 Tampa 38 Tucson 63 Tulsa 48 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 74 30 Wichita Wilmington, De. 45 40 Yuma

80 85 78 83 49 23 19 81 83 81 80 67 75 69 24 84 58 70 56 76 49 38 59 73 6 34 75 54 83 27 75 61 51 39 80 39 81 14 66 83 85 54 67 72 83 38 69 60

Tomorrow L H W

W

mostly cloudy 64 80 showers mostly cloudy 71 87 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 60 63 showers mostly cloudy 75 83 partly cloudy rain 23 31 partly cloudy cloudy 2 21 sunny partly cloudy -1 23 snow mostly cloudy 67 81 showers showers 64 82 showers mostly cloudy 64 72 showers showers 69 81 showers mostly cloudy 56 71 fog mostly cloudy 58 78 partly cloudy showers 27 37 showers mostly cloudy 7 28 sunny mostly cloudy 66 86 partly cloudy sunny 41 59 mostly sunny mostly cloudy 55 77 mostly cloudy sunny 38 60 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 58 68 showers showers 40 67 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 28 39 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 50 63 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 61 78 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy -14 19 sunny sunny 14 40 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 58 80 mostly cloudy sunny 28 55 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 69 82 partly cloudy snow showers 14 34 mostly cloudy thunderstorms 63 71 thunderstorms sunny 48 61 showers sunny 39 54 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 14 40 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 63 81 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 27 40 mostly cloudy thunderstorms 65 66 thunderstorms snow -8 17 sunny showers 54 66 showers showers 64 84 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 69 85 partly cloudy sunny 32 61 partly cloudy 27 39 showers showers mostly cloudy 59 77 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 74 83 partly cloudy 17 34 mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy 53 77 mostly cloudy 39 63 partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

70 32 48 46 79 75 27 27 30 74 55 -3 74 61 39 27

85 43 63 66 93 82 43 41 35 82 72 14 83 79 50 43

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny showers showers partly cloudy partly sunny snow thunderstorms partly cloudy partly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

30 67 43 77 43 59 38 43 43 64 49 36 15 74 59 55

44 72 49 86 61 75 55 48 57 89 75 39 22 84 80 79

partly sunny cloudy cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers rain partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.37 + 0.30 - 0.01 - 0.01 + 0.08

Very unhealthy

Good

40s

60s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 8.07 23 3.76 Jefferson City 21 2.84 Hermann 20 0.90 Washington 25 St. Charles 7.21 MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.72 Louisiana 15 12.04 Dam 24 25 15.08 Dam 25 26 14.84 Grafton 18 15.72 M.Price, Pool 419 419.30 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.97 St Louis 30 1.03 Chester 27 3.99 Cape Girardeau 32 11.86

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.89” 1.42” 1.52” 2.65” 3.92”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

62° 51° 46° 28° 77° -3° 72° 41°

60s 60s

70s

City

W

30s

30s

20s

Snow

40s

Alaska Low: -12°

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (12:10 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2016) Record Low (1936) High Last Year Low Last Year

20s

32°/38° 30°/49° 44°/58° 45°/57°

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

30s 60s

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

10s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

58 64 60 62 62 62 42 47 62 61 34 61 59

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

20s 50s 40s

Rain

40s

0s

10s

30s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

40s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

19 42 25 77 39 74 55 28 19 66 61 32 38 27 28 25

26 45 37 92 53 82 82 45 26 70 75 48 51 38 35 35

partly cloudy rain cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy snow partly cloudy


02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES Kia

Rides Ads Continued from Page

'15 Kia Optima LX: $12,900 Stk# P06451 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $9,490 #C8795B

A16

Lexus

'13 Dodge Avenger: SXT, 62K, Certified, Gray $8,990 #C17297B

'08 Lexus IS 350: Mercury Metallic, 110K Miles, $10,000 #28284B

'14 Dodge Dart: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start $13,769 #33541A

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black, 28K, Nav, Loaded $34,490 #B8879

Lincoln Fiat '13 Fiat 500 Sport: Hatchback, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #B8799B

'15 Lincoln MKC: Select, Local Trade, Save!! $20,490 #M17359A

Mazda Ford '13 Ford C-Max: Hybrid, SE, Hatchback, One Owner, Local Trade $10,418 #400294A

'01 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Convertible, Brilliant Black Clearcoat $9,123 #11584A

'14 Mazda Mazda6 i: Touring, Soul Red $12,123 #11585A '13 Ford C-Max: Hybrid, Se, Loaded $10,418 #400294A

'16 Ford Focus: 5 Door Hatchback, SE $11,268 #P06501 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Ford Focus: 3 Door Coupe, ZX3S #170873A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Ford Focus: SE, 4 Door Sedan $9,150 #170223A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Ford Focus: 5 Door Hatchback, Manual $12,981 #P06560 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Ford Fusion S: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified FWD, $11,000 #28418A

Misc. Autos

Chevrolet Trucks

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'15 Chevy Silverado: 4WD, V8, White, 22" Black Wheels $31,490 #B8730

'13 Chevy Traverse: Chromes, M/R, $15,769 #42309B

'06 Jeep Commander: Limited $8,123 #77468A

'13 Chevy Silverado 1500: Regular Cab, Long Box, Work Truck 2WD, $14,000 #170222A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Silverado: LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K $37,990 #B8861

'13 Chevy Avalanche: One Owner, Loaded $28,990 #42280A

CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085 '91 Allante: White, 70K, Local Trade $9,990

Dodge

'12 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Grand Touring, Hard Top Convertible, $13,791 #11539A

'13 Mazda Mazdaspeed 3: Touring, Hatchback, Manual Transmission, Black Mica $13,991 #95543B

'16 Mazda Miata: Grand Touring, 2K Miles, Automatic, Black $25,990 #M16524R

'06 Mazda Mazda3 s: Copper Red Mica, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #M18022A

'10 Mazda 3i: Gunmetal Blue Mica, New Arrival, Low Miles $8,992 #35314A

'15 SRX: Performance, AWD, White, 22K, Certified Call Today! '12 CTS: Performance Collection, 47K, Certified, Auto $19,990 '18 XT5: Premium, 4K, Nav, Pano Roof $49,990 '17 XTS: All Colors, All Options, 9 to Choose From, Starting at $29,990 '15 ATS: Certified, Navigation, 30K, $26,490 '08 STS: Crystal Red, 63K, Local Trade, AWD $10,990 '17 CTS: Sedan, Luxury, Crystal White, AWD, 11K, $38,990 '14 ATS: Luxury Collection, AWD, Black, Certified $21,990 '16 Escalade: 16K, Premium Collection, Loaded $68,990

Mitsubishi 03 Mitsubishi Eclipse: FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Sportronic 2.4L 4-Cyl, $6,490 #B8914

Nissan/Datsun '11 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Clean Carfax, GPS, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, Bluetooth $10,000 #96650B

'10 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified $8,791 #95497B

'14 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Super Black, $12,123 #11314A

'15 Nissan Sentra: SL, Auto, 36K Miles, Backup Camera $12,490 #C8495A

'07 Nissan Altima 2.5: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles $8,990 #M17409A

'13 Ford Fusion: Loaded $11,462 #42041B

'12 Mazda Mazda3i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $10,469 #33759A '05 Ford Mustang: Coupe, RWD, Legend Lime Clearcoat Metallic $7,990 #V18049B '06 Mazda Mazda3: Loaded $6,469 #35367A '14 Ford Taurus: Limited, Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats $11,123 #7847B

'15 Nissan Altima: Black, Loaded $11,969 #40929B

'06 Nissan Maxima: 3.5 SE, One Owner, Clean Carfax $6,990 #P9344A

Honda '11 Honda Accord: 3.5 EX-L, Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic - Gray $7,123 #P9016A

'10 Honda Accord: 2.4 LX, FWD, Recent Arrival! $7,990 #M17522A

'11 Honda CR-Z: EX, New Arrival, Crystal Black Pearl, Bluetooth, $7,991 #33248B

'13 Honda Accord Sport: Alabaster Silver Metalic, 84K Miles $12,123 #97021A

Hyundai '14 Hyundai Elantra: Limited, 30K, Sunroof, Red $12,990 #M17332A

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Manual, Sunroof, 36K $10,990 #B8775

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 30K Miles, Auto, Black $16,490 #M17233A

'11 Hyundai Elantra: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors, $6,490 #B8987A

Jeep '15 Jeep Patriot: Sport, FWD, 67K Miles, $11,123 #P8975B

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, 4WD, Loaded!! Black, $31,990 #B8786A

'11 Mercedes-Benz E 350: 4matic, Sedan, 106K Miles, $14,123 #28467A

'14 Nissan Altima: Super Black, FWD, $11,123 #79183A

Mercury

Pontiac

'10 Mercury Grand Marquis: Vibrant White Clear Coat, 101K Miles $6,123 #39099A

Subaru

'14 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Pano Roof, Auto, 66K $15,990 #B9020

'10 Subaru Forest 2.5X: Motor Trend Certified, AWD $10,791 #28216A

'15 Mini Cooper: White, Automatic, 23K $15,990 #B8882

'14 Mini Cooper: Loaded $14,590 #40339A

'14 Kia Forte: LX, 65K Miles $9,900 #27763B

'12 Kia Optima LX: A6, Ebony Black, FWD, $8,123 #27752M

'15 Subaru Impreza: Hatchback, Sunroof, Automatic, Black $18,990 #M17558A

Toyota '13 Toyota Avalon XLE: Nautical Blue, FWD, 49K Miles $15,990 #79384A

'16 Ford F-150: Super Crew, 22K, Auto $29,990 #V17738A

'10 Ford F-150: XLT, 4WD, V8, White $18,990 #B8858

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS 1-866-244-9085 VOLKSWAGEN'S '13 Passat SE: 30K, Black, Auto, Roof, Call Today! '13 Passat SE: 40K, White, Auto, Roof, Nav, Call Today! '13 Jetta GLI: Nav, Auto, Red, 1 Owner $12,490 '14 CC 2.0T R-Line: Auto, Red, Local Trade $12,490 '13 Routan SE: Black, 74K, Just Arrived $13,490

'13 Jetta: Black, 2.5 Liter, Auto, Certified, $10,990 '16 Jetta: Pure White, 15K, Auto, Local Trade $11,490 '13 CC: R-line, Red, Auto, Loaded $12,490

'13 Passat: Roof, Nav, 35K, Auto, Black $12,990 '17 Jetta: 7K, Pure White, Auto $13,990 '17 Golf: Sport Wagen, 4K, Platinum Gray, Auto $18,990

STLtoday.com/jobs

'16 Toyota Avalon: 4 Door Sedan, XLE, $21,069 #P06561 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Toyota Avalon: 4 Door Sedan, XLE, $20,384 #P06565 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Toyota Camry: LE, Blue Ribbon Metallic, $7,991 #78736B

Volkswagen '11 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L SE Sedan, Black Uni, $7,123 #27376M

'14 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8T, SEL Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, GPS, $12,791 #P8913A

'17 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8Turbo, 12K, White $15,490 #V8390

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #V18123A

'13 Volkswagen Passat: Diesel!! Diesel!! Automatic, $16,490 #V8683

'13 Chevy Equinox: Very Clean, $11,490 #42311B

'17 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Luxury Package, Certified, $42,990 #P6241

GMC Trucks '14 GMC Sierra: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Leather, Bose, White $32,490 #V18081A

'14 Chevy Equinox: LT w/ 1LT, Black $12,123 #28024M

'13 GMC Sierra Denali: Crew Cab, Every Option $26,490 #C17388B

'14 Chevy Equinox: LT, FWD, Black $14,123 #79240A

Misc Trucks

'11 Dodge Nitro: Heat Package, 4WD, 75K, Certified $11,490 #M17411B

'07 Ram 1500: 4WD, Reg Cab, SLT $14,900 #P06532 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Toyota Trucks '11 Ram 1500: Crew Cab, Outdoorsman Edition, 4WD $20,490 #B8657

'14 Jeep Cherokee Latitude: 4x4, Granite Crystal, 83K Miles $15,123 #79097A

'10 Acura MDX: 3.7L, Technology Package, Aspen White Pearl $12,900 #79133A

'14 BMW X5: White, 37K, Nav, Pano Roof, $34,990 #B8866

'12 BMW X5: xDrive 35d, AWD, Deep Sea Blue Metallic $14,123 #28502A

'16 Buick Encore: Sport Touring, Roof, Nav, 17K $18,490 #V17674A

'11 Buick Enclave: CXL-1, Cocoa $11,123 #78636B

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, 28K $32,490 #B8879

'13 Ford Escape SE: One Owner, Ruby Red Tinted, Turbocharged VCT $9,000 #39226A

'14 Lincoln MKZ: Roof, Nav, Auto, Certified, $18,990 #B8875

'08 Ford Edge: Black Clear Coat $10,123 #79268C

'13 Chevy Equinox: 1LT, AWD, Silver Ice $13,991 #79176B

'11 Chevy Traverse: FWD, Sunroof/Moonroof, Power Seat $11,000 #96617B

'15 Chevy Equinox: Blue Velvet Metallic, LT w/1LT, 53K Miles $15,123 #79238A

'12 Chevy Equinox: FWD, $10,340 #P06566 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Traverse: Certified $21,000 #180213A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox: 2LT $16,000 #171245A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy HHR: LT w/ 2LT #180216B Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Traverse: Certified, FWD, $21,000 #180213A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Silverado: $21,000 #P06363 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Lincoln MKZ: $19,647 #P06535 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Lincoln MKX: Loaded, Very Clean $17,990 #P6270A

'16 Ford Explorer: XLT, FWD, Black, 18K $28,490 #B8557A

'14 Ford Escape: SE, FWD, 51K Miles, Red $14,490 #B8788

'09 Ford Escape: FWD, V6, Auto, XLT #180319A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Ford Escape: XLT, FWD, Flex Fuel, New Arrival $6,990 #M8911A

'10 GMC Terrain: SEL-1, Gold Mist Metallic $9,123 #78478A

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 28K, Every Option $57,490 #B8560

'12 Chevy Equinox: LTZ, FWD, 60K Miles, $14,123 #39313A

'11 Land Rover LR4 HSE: Black w/ Black Leather, Roof, Nav, DVD $20,990 #B8855

'13 Ford Escape S: Tuxedo Black, $11,123 #39028A

'10 Chevy Suburban: 1 500, LT1, $14,123 #78642B

'09 Chevy Trailblazer: LT, Summit White, $8,991 #79036A

'16 Kia Soul: Hatchback, 22K Miles, $14,123 #P9069A

'08 Lexus GX470: 4WD, Nav, Roof, Auto, Luxury! $18,490 #C18124A

'13 GMC Terrain: SLT-2, Atlantis Blue Metallic, FWD, Auto, $13,123 #79100A

'13 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $8,791 #P9002A

'09 Kia Sportage: EX, One Owner, Very Clean $8,443 #33671A

'10 Ford Escape: Limited, FWD, Gold Leaf Metallic $9,123 #28248B

'12 Chevrolet Equinox: 1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Backup Camera $11,776 #42079A

'14 Chevy Equinox LS: Carfax One Owner, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth $12,123 #78207A

'13 Kia Sorento SX: Snow White Pearl, Motor Trend Certified, AWD, $15,791 #96746A

'16 Lexus NX 200t: AWD, 9K Miles, Sunroof $34,990 #C17318A

'13 Ford Escape: SEL, Loaded $13,469 #33513A

'10 Chevy Equinox: $7,950LT, Brown, 2.4L 4 Cyl, Power Seat $8,123 #11681A

'11 Kia Sportage: EX, Black Cherry, FWD, 6 speed Automatic $10,000 #78437B

'08 Ford Edge: Limited, Light Ice Blue, Camel Leather $9,000 #78809B

Sport Utility

Misc. Autos

'14 Passat: Wolfsburg Edt, Candy White, Alloys $12,490

Kia

'85 Pontiac Fiero GT: Manual, 94K, Sharp $4,490 #M17439A

Mini Cooper

'12 Jetta: SE, 73K, Sunroof, Auto, $9,990 '15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: 4WD, $28,707 #180135A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Patriot Latitude: 4x4, Loaded, $14,990 #P6295

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5: 51K Miles, Remainder of Factory Warranty, $12,469 #40929B

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LTZ, M/R, Loaded, Certified $44,590 #40473A

'12 Jeep Wrangler: Sport, Very Clean $19,476 #33711A

Ford Trucks

'10 Cadillac Escalade: AWD, Nav, Roof, DVD, $21,490 #B8757A

Mercedes Benz '13 Mercedes-Benz C 250: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Sunroof $14,791 #96671A

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B11

'15 GMC Terrain: SLT, Chromes, Sunroof, $19,990 #B8801

'17 GMC Acadia: FWD, SLE, $25,485 #180324A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 GMC Yukon: XL, SLT, Black, Loaded $21,990 #P6199A

'12 GMC Terrain: SLE-1, Black, 26K Miles $14,123 #78501A

'01 Honda CR-V: Clover Green Pearl, 4x4 $4,991 #79236A

'12 Hyundai Santa Fe: Limited, V6, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified $13,500 #28424A

'17 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport $17,403 #P06504 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Hyundai Tuscon: LTD, Loaded! $12,469 #42189AA

'15 Mazda CX-9: AWD, Nav, Roof, White $26,990 #M8790

'14 Nissan Murano: LE, AWD, Nav, Power Roof $19,990 #B8835

'16 Nissan Rogue: One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Magnetic Black $15,990 #P6256

'08 Pontiac Torrent: Heated Front Seats, Remote Start $7,490 #V17749A

'14 Subaru WRX: STI, Certified, Well Cared For $24,490 #B8860

'10 Toyota Highlander: Magnetic Gray Metallic, $13,123 #P9072A

'17 Volkswagen Tiguan: SEL, Nav, Pano Roof, Fender Audio, 10K $23,990 $V18043A

'14 Volvo XC60: AWD, Loaded, Black, $20,990 #B8851

Mini vans '11 Chrysler Town & Country: Limited, One Owner, Trailer Tow Package $12,123 #97114B

'13 Dodge Journey: SE, Automatic, Black w/Black Cloth $7,490 #C8575B

'16 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, Allows, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $15,490 #B8839

'13 Dodge Journey: R/T, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start, Backup Camera $14,881 #42419A

'11 Toyota Sienna: Blizzard Pearl, FWD $13,123 #97221A

'11 Toyota Sienna: Super White, FWD $12,400 #39239A '10 Infiniti QX56: Tuscon Pearl, 3rd Row Seating $15,123 #97213A

'13 Infiniti JX35: 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, Midnight Garnet $15,791 #95512A

Vans '17 Ford T350: 15 Passenger Van, Medium Raised Roof, $31,490 #B9007

'13 Nissan NV200: Compact Cargo Van, FWD, Carfax 1 Owner $8,990 #B8921

STLtoday.com/readerrewards


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

$

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

Tired of the Ringing in your ears?

50

Gift Card

with appointment

Great Way To Use Your Tax Refund!

F inally - A Sollution ution

WindoWs WindoW Windo W offEr:

r o b a l l l a 60% off tions apply) es (new orders only, r

tric

- 12 months same as cash, Payments as low as $79 per month - $500 discount certificate on new entry door w/purchase of windows. Seniors and repeat customers discounts!

(*minimum purchase may be required with approved credit)

to Relieve Ringing In Your Ears and Hearing Loss! Do you suffer from constant buzzing, roaring, or ringing sound in your ears?

30

DAY RISK FREE

Are you starting to notice that you don’t catch every word of the conversation?

Whitey Herzog TRIAL

Satisfied

Finally, there’s an answer to Southwestern these problems. Nu-Ear electronic Patient has recently introduced a nearly 100% Invisible aid that helps eliminate the Special Price! ringing - and your high frequency hearing loss.

795 5

$

outhwestern

Hearing Centers

Fully Digi tal NuEar ITC *

Call to be Connected to one of our 31 Locations

(314) 230-8120 (618) 206-5941 (636) 203-9843

314-230-8109 • 618-206-5932 • 636-203-9651

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist. *Fits up to mild loss. All offers expire in 2-weeks.

ADVERTORIAL

ST. LOUIS ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION CLINIC

Local Doctors Restore

Men’s Sex Life

ST. LOUIS • A local group of physicians in St. Louis specialize in only one unique, niche area – men’s sexual performance, treating men for ED who cannot take Viagra®, Levitra® and Cialis® due to medical conditions and adverse side effects. These local St. Louis doctors offer the latest state-of-the-art European technology for in-office treatment of erectile dysfunction without the use of medication, surgery or injections. The SwissWave Protocol is a medical breakthrough using painless acoustic energy waves to improve a man’s sexual performance and produce an erection. This protocol eliminates the need for medications by regenerating blood vessels and erectile tissue. SwissWave can treat almost any man – regardless of his age or medical history, including men well into their nineties with diabetes, heart conditions, prostate cancer and high blood pressure. Developed in Switzerland, the medical device used in this extremely effective approach has been cleared by the FDA for the repair of soft tissue and improved blood circulation and is being used throughout the world. Patients see a state licensed physician. Individual results may vary.

© All rights reserved.

ACTUAL PATIENTS ARE TALKING: “I’m 79 years old and visiting your clinic was the best choice I’ve ever made! I only wish I had known about it years ago. I never expected such fast results.” Jack B. “It’s been eleven years since I was able to get and maintain an erection. No pill or pump ever worked for me. Your treatment worked on the first visit!” Larry K. Signed statements are kept on file and at patient’s request, only first names and initials are used. Appointments are booked far in advance, but occasionally someone can be accommodated quickly. Patients are assured of utmost privacy and professionalism with private waiting rooms and an all-male staff. Further information is available by calling:

(314) 347-0200 STL Medical Solutions 605 Old Ballas Road, Ste 100 St. Louis, MO 63141 www.STLMedicalSolutions.com


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Tuesday • 02.20.2018 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Neither vulnerable, North deals NORTH ♠A J 10 8 7 ♥K 8 6 ♦A 3 ♣Q 9 7 WEST EAST ♠9 6 5 3 2 ♠4 ♥3 ♥10 5 4 ♦K 10 9 2 ♦J 8 7 6 5 ♣J 3 2 ♣K 6 5 4 SOUTH ♠K Q ♥A Q J 9 7 2 ♦Q 4 ♣A 10 8 The bidding: NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST 1♠ Pass 2♥ Pass 3♥ Pass 4♣ Pass 4♦ Pass 4NT Pass 5♦* Pass 7♥ All pass *3 key cards, among the 4 aces and the king of hearts Opening lead: 10 of ♦ West knew that North held the ace of diamonds from the auction. He reasoned that declarer would not risk going down at trick one on a diamond finesse if there were another line of play available. South could have ducked this lead around to his queen, but who would have done that? A diamond was the only lead to trouble the contract. Dummy’s ace of diamonds won the first trick and South

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD led a heart to his queen and cashed the ace of hearts. Had the trumps split 2-2, South would have claimed, cashing the high spades in his hand before crossing to dummy with the king of hearts to cash the rest of the spades. As it was, declarer led a heart to the king, drawing the last trump, then led a spade to his king, and overtook the queen of spades with dummy’s ace. The horrible spade split defeated the contract. Declarer was extremely unlucky, but also lazy. After the king of hearts, South should have crossed back to his hand with the king of spades and cashed all of his hearts, followed by the ace of clubs. In the four-card ending, West would not have been able to keep all four of his remaining spades and the king of diamonds. South would have had his 13 tricks. It’s a good idea to run your long suit before committing to a crucial play. You never know what might happen. (02/20/18)

Across

1 “Later, alligator!” 6 What a divorce may generate for a celeb 11 Cab alternative 14 Pharmaceutical giant that makes Valium 15 Visitor to Roswell, supposedly 16 Post-truth ___ 17 Neighborhood where kimchi might be found, informally 18 Its root was once used in root beer 20 Process of aging 22 Minuscule amount 23 Only threeletter astrological sign

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

its cap. 56 Units of resistance 57 Snitch 63 Exotic 65 English horseracing venue 66 Informal top 67 Expressways with tolls 68 Dance-based fitness program 69 The “A” of IPA 70 A liquid one is easy to trade 71 Olympic blades

Down

1 Torah holders 2 Fawn over, with “on” 3 Blue “W” for Microsoft Word, e.g. 4 “That’s a bummer” 5 Martial arts pro 6 Word before metal or instinct 7 Rickman of the Harry Potter films 8 The winks in tiddlywinks, e.g. 9 Old Spanish coin 10 Genetic molecule 11 Weightless state, informally 12 Hopping mad 13 “m” or “n,” in phonetics 19 Over and done

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult. If Feb. 20 is your birthday • This year you bypass many problems as you focus intensely on certain areas of your life. If you are single, you have an unusual allure that draws others to you. If you are attached, your relationship will become deeper this year. Taurus adds an interesting dimension to conversations.

WORD GAME February 20 WORD — PURVEYED (PURVEYED: per-VADE: Supplied; furnished.) Average mark 19 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 25 or more words in PURVEYED? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — RADICAL racial card radial

clad

raid

laic

rail

laid

acid

lair

acrid

lard

aria

liar

arid

lira

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

24 Yankees great dubbed “The Old Perfessor” 26 What always deserves a good licking? 31 Sushi bar tuna 32 Like guyliner, stylistically 33 Word after he or she 35 10th-century Holy Roman emperor 39 Curses ... or what 18-, 20-, 26-, 48-, 57and 63-Across are, literally? 43 Schleps 44 Catcher’s place 45 Pablo Neruda composition 46 Accessory for a bad hair day 48 Poppycock 51 Chichi chihuahua accessory 55 Montgomery is

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

dial

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Use the morning for any matter that is significant. Your ideas could shock an associate or a friend. How you deal with a personal matter could change radically. Handle finances with clarity and force. Tonight: Indulge yourself. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You might get up in the morning feeling somewhat sluggish. The good news is that you will feel a lot better by midday. Tonight: Make plans that you find exciting. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You might accept an unexpected invitation for breakfast. Not only will you have the opportunity to catch up on a friend’s news, but you also will be in a good mood for the remainder of the day. Tonight: Head home. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Accept your role at work. You could be tired and withdrawn in the morning, but you will be full of energy by midafternoon. At some point, an unexpected event could throw you off your present course. Tonight: Time for some fun! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Detach in order to see the whole story. Loosen up and relax by getting out of your own head. See what it would be like to walk in someone else’s shoes. Tonight: Out and about. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Deal with a loved one directly in order to get the results you want. You seem to

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by David Steinberg

21 Thicket 25 Popular DIY website 26 What “←” signifies 27 1847 Melville novel 28 Uncouth fellow 29 ___ of office 30 Climber’s spike 34 Show in a showroom, say 36 “___: Legacy” (sci-fi sequel) 37 Bookie’s quote 38 “Mm-hmm”

40 Unoriginal piece 41 Exam with logic games, in brief 42 Of the kidneys 47 Video game inspired by pentominoes 49 Slimeball 50 Really, really likes 51 “Ish” 52 A unicycle has one 53 Awards show VIP

54 Pool hall items 58 “Get ___ to a nunnery”: Hamlet 59 Word repeated during a mic check 60 Pinnacle 61 Place for a piercing 62 H’s, in fraternity names 64 Org. concerned with soil and water

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0116

WORD SCRIMMAGE

understand each other well and can handle most hassles together. A partner might have drawn the wild card with funds. Tonight: Detach, and you’ll gain clarity. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Defer to a partner. You will discover a lot more about this person throughout the day. Detach, and you’ll gain a new perspective. Try to determine what the best way is to continue on a long-term basis. Tonight: Dinner for two. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Tackle your errands and other various tasks in the morning, when you are likely to be at your best. Whether you’re networking or just taking an afternoon off to socialize, you will want some people time. Tonight: Respond to an offer.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Pace yourself, knowing that your energy could be limited. You might need to deal with a loved one in the morning. Be more flexible and creative with this person. Tonight: Make it early. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You could be witness to some uproar around your family or domestic life. Remain sensitive to the possibilities that surround this situation. A solution will appear, given some time. Tonight: Let off some steam. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You hear news that could surprise you and possibly force your hand. You might be taken aback by what you hear. Return calls in the morning as quickly as you can. Tonight: All smiles.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your finances continue to be high priority in the morning. You could feel as if you are on a roller coaster ride. You need to stay calm in order to gain a new perspective. Pick up the phone, and ask for what you want. Tonight: Hang out with a friend. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.20.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Irked by younger colleagues’ work ethic

Dear Stressed • You might be happier and healthier if, rather than retire early, you talked to a licensed mental health profes-

sional about how to manage your stress. You can’t control the behavior (or misbehavior) of your younger co-workers. That’s your boss’ responsibility. If their lack of punctuality and poor attendance doesn’t bother your employer, you should not be letting it affect you. And as to the woman who complains about her aches, her pains and her ex — why are you listening to that? You have only a few more years until you reach an age at which you can retire with all the benefits you have earned — and without having to cut back. Dear Abby • I recently had a phone conversation with a cousin who lives on the other side of the country. We talk once a month. She has always been judgmental and negative about our cousins, aunts, uncles, etc., who — for the most part — she rarely communicates with. In the past, when she would put them down, I’d cut the conversation short. During our last chat, she started in on my brother. That’s

when I lost it. I gave her a piece of my mind and hung up. Since then, she has texted and called a few times, but I haven’t responded. I feel bad for what happened, but at the same time, I refuse to listen to her talk badly about and judge other family members. How should I handle this? — HATES JUDGMENT IN OHIO Dear Hates Judgment • You should respond to your cousin. She needs to understand that you are changing the rules regarding further conversations with her. Explain that it has always made you uncomfortable when she said unkind, judgmental things about family members, and that when she started in on your brother, you finally reached your limit. Tell her that in the future when you talk, it must be about positive things and not family members. After that, the ball will be in her court. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

MISS MANNERS

Is filming wedding proposal tacky? Dear Miss Manners • I realize we live in an electronic world, where it now seems EVERYTHING is on display. Some young friends of ours have announced their engagement, which is happy news indeed. However, when we next saw them, they insisted on showing us the video of the potential groom asking his intended to be his wife. Allegedly, the woman knew nothing about being filmed until various onlookers popped out of the woodwork to congratulate them. In the video, the poor woman looks slightly terrified. Am I the only person in the world who finds this tacky? What ever happened to two people sharing private, intimate moments that belong only to them? Must the world witness everything? Gentle Reader • You are not the only person. There are two of us, but probably not many more. Nowadays, Plato would have to

revise his quotation from Socrates that “the unexamined life is not worth living.” It is now the unpublicized life that is thought to be not worth living. Miss Manners would be wary of continuing to watch the posts of people who believe that the world wants to share their most intimate moments. Dear Miss Manners • I have managed a small personnel firm for almost 20 years. Employers from accounting firms to waste-management companies contract my firm to post job vacancies, screen applicants, conduct telephone interviews and present them with a short list of candidates, from which personal interviews are set with the employer. It is a very rewarding profession. In the last two years, a disturbing trend has emerged: A growing number of candidates have not been showing up for scheduled

interviews. There is no call to cancel or reschedule, or to apologize for or explain their absence. Candidates simply fail to appear. May I suggest to any job-hunter approaching an interview that if for any reason you decide not to proceed, please say so. A simple “I’d like to withdraw my application” is sufficient. Not showing up is not only rude, but could be career-limiting. Gentle Reader • In return for these people having made it easier for you to eliminate unsuitable candidates, Miss Manners believes you might want to inform them that you are noting in their files that evidently they are not interested in finding jobs. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

Differences: 1. Leg is moved. 2. Pocket on side of golf bag is missing. 3. Vest is missing. 4. Cap is larger. 5. Ball is oved. 6. Bush is smaller.

Dear Abby • I am almost 62 and struggling to get through the day at work. It’s not because of the work itself, but I am extremely unhappy in the work environment. I have been here more than 20 years, and I have a real problem with the work ethic of the younger employees. They come in to work anywhere from a halfhour to two hours late. One of them takes hourlong breaks, twohour lunches and then leaves early. Another comes to work and complains nonstop about her drive, her ex and all her aches and pains. (She just turned 40.) I go home every night frustrated and so stressed out I snap at my poor husband. I really want to retire. It wouldn’t be a financial burden, although we would have to cut back on a little spending. Any advice? — STRESSED AND TIRED

TV TUESDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 2/20/18

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Lethal Weapon Riggs 2 deals with conspiracy theories.

LA to Vegas The Mick: Fox 2 News at 9:00pm The Matri- (N) (cc) (cc) arch.

CBS NCIS Reeves sees his 4 friend get kidnapped. (cc)

Bull A college roomNCIS: New Orleans The mate is accused of mur- team looks for a missder. (cc) ing operative.

NBC Í2018 Winter Olympics: Alpine Skiing, Figure Skating, Bobsled, Snow5 boarding. Alpine skiing (women’s downhill); figure skating (ladies’ short program); bobsled; snowboarding. (N) (cc) PBS We’ll Meet Again: Free- Frontline: Bitter Rivals: Iran and Saudi Arabia. 9 dom Summer. (N) (cc) Rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia. (Part 1 of 2) (N) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

The Flash: The Trial of Black Lightning JefThe Flash. Barry’s mur- ferson Pierce must fight der trial begins. crime again. Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

ABC The Bachelor Winter Games (N) (cc) 30

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) Kevin (Probably) Saves the World: Old Friends. (N) (cc)

MYTV Criminal Minds A kid- Criminal Minds Perpe- Criminal Minds: Legacy. 46 napped Russian immi- trators hunt the victims. Homeless people in grant. (cc) (cc) Kansas City.

Baby it’s cold outside

Warm up your

Winter With A

neW patriot Sunroom And enjoy

50% off

inStaLLation

SUNROOMS • SCREEN ROOMS PORCH CONVERSIONS CANOPIES • PERGOLAS CALL US TODAY!

314-732-0018 618-663-4051

Pat Lewis Co-Owner


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.20.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Urine left in bladder can lead to an infection FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I am a 70-year-old male. In 2013, I experienced an episode of total urinary retention. My urologist’s diagnosis was enlarged prostate, and he tried treating me, unsuccessfully, with drugs, after which I underwent a TURP operation. Six months later, I experienced another episode of urinary retention, which resulted in a transurethral resection of the bladder neck operation. Between these two operations, I had two urinary tract infections. A year after my initial surgery, I experienced another UTI, and frequent and weak-stream urination, so I switched to a new urologist. After examining me, he said that my bladder neck was almost completely blocked with scar tissue. He recommended and performed immediate surgery. I have since relocated and have not experienced any more episodes of urinary retention. My urinary stream is good, and I am not on any medications (like Flomax, etc.) whatsoever. However, my new urologist is concerned because I continue to have UTIs — about two per year, with my most recent being in October. He thinks the UTIs are being caused because I can’t empty my bladder fully (a sonogram showed 250 ml left in the bladder after I urinate). My urologist put me on antibiotics and scheduled me for a follow-up visit, when he intends to perform a cystoscopy. I am concerned about where all this is leading. Despite having three operations, I still have sexual function and no incontinence. I do not want to go under the knife again and risk permanent, damaging side effects if I can avoid it. So, I am seeking your opinion as to how to resolve these recurring UTIs. — Anon.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

Answer • After urinating, the bladder should be very nearly empty — less than 12 ml. With 250 ml left in the bladder, urine infections are going to be almost impossible to prevent. Since the urine stays in the bladder, any bacteria that gets in can grow, and won’t be removed from the bladder when you void. I do understand your desire to avoid further operations, but I have to agree with your urologist that you really might benefit from it if you continue to have so much urine left in the bladder. The risk for developing sexual dysfunction with this kind of operation (presumably, a revision of the bladder neck surgery) is very small; however, there is a risk of incontinence, which must be balanced against the benefits. If after the cystoscopy your urologist feels that the benefits outweigh the risks, I would take that very seriously.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics