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SPRING IS IN THE AIR

St. Louis Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina (left) talks with Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith during spring training Sunday in Jupiter, Fla. Full-squad workouts begin Monday. Sports, B1

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

MONDAY • 02.19.2018 • $2.00

Simple fixes can help improve school safety

ALONG FOR THE RIDE

MetroLink security enhancements still a work in progress MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Phil Hancock of H&G Schultz Door installs a door knob Friday at the newly renovated Pattonville Early Childhood Center in Maryland Heights. The Pattonville district is working to make its buildings safer.

Details gleaned from shootings are incorporated into renovations for Pattonville district INSIDE • Third-graders selling AR-15 raffle tickets in Missouri. A7

BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When Pattonville School District leaders planned the transformation of an old elementary school into a revamped preschool, they thought of everything they could add to the building to protect their 3- and 4-year-olds from a potential shooter.

For example, all the classroom and office doors have new locks that will automatically engage during a lockdown. Pattonville officials wanted those locks because they knew that, during the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, Conn., people died because classroom doors were not locked in time, said See SAFETY • Page A6

A ‘BIG TENT’ FOR PROGRESS St. Louis’ Urban League still advocating for African-Americans BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was a small item, appearing deep in this newspaper 100 years ago. “Negro Aid Society Formed” was the headline, announcing that a branch of the Urban League would be started in St. Louis “to work for the improvement of negroes in the city in matters pertaining to health, employment, education, housing, recreation and delinquency.” As the article noted, the action was prompted to assist the growing number of blacks migrating from the South to seek industry jobs. The article appeared June 9, 1918, and was published three months after a See URBAN LEAGUE • Page A4

Amid all the recent talk about a proposed $1.4 billion Northside-Southside MetroLink line, Lee Williams says local leaders first need to deal with crime on the existing light-rail system. “We ought to address that issue with additional funds before we talk about expanding,” said Williams, a St. Louis resident and regular MetroLink rider who raised the issue at a recent public forum on transit. “It’s important for us to feel safe,” he said. Responding to concerns of riders like Williams, local elected leaders say they have

made dealing with crime on MetroLink a priority. But nine months after announcing a “memorandum of understanding” aimed at boosting security on the transit system, that effort remains a work in progress. Police agencies in St. Louis, St. Louis County and St. Clair County say they have stepped up enforcement on MetroLink and are cooperating more following a spate of high-profile incidents of violence last year. But they differ in their approaches. Since May, the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department, with an influx of extra funding from the county’s transit district, has deployed a deputy on every MetroLink train there in higher-crime evening hours See RIDE • Page A3

Ex-Trump aide Gates to plead guilty, testify against Manafort BY DAVID WILLMAN Los Angeles Times

A former top aide to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign will plead guilty to fraud-related charges within days – and has made clear to prosecutors that he would testify against Paul J. Manafort Jr., the lawyerlobbyist who once managed the campaign. The change of heart by Trump’s former deputy campaign manager, Richard W. Gates III, who had pleaded not guilty after being indicted in October on charges similar to See AIDE • Page A4

Gates Testimony could be case’s ‘cherry on top’

Manafort Accused of taking Ukraine payments

Presidential ire • Trump vents frustration over Russia probe, rails against FBI. A14 Facebook wariness • After Russian meddling, company will verify ads with postcards. A14

Messenger: Putting fox in charge of henhouse • A2

U.S. Olympic team has been disappointing • B1

Rev. Jesse Jackson shares insights here • A2

Austin Dillon wins the Daytona 500 • B1

TODAY

71°/61°

Spring fling

SHOWERS

POST-DISPATCH

Sheila Jones, 12, takes part in a typing class for children in May 1969. The class was established by the Urban League of St. Louis. The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis will celebrate its 100th anniversary this year. In the background is Julia Boykin, also 12.

TOMORROW

73°/36° SHOWERS

WEATHER B10

1 M POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Vol. 140, No. 50 ©2018


M 1 MONDAY • 02.19.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM MOZELIAK TALKS

BEST PLACE TO WORK

UPCOMING CHATS

Monday Cardinals from spring training, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Blues hockey, 1 p.m.

The Cardinals President John Mozeliak talks Marcell Ozuna (left) and the impact his bat could bring into the lineup. stltoday.com/watch

Is your workplace the best? You have until March 23 to nominate it for the annual Top Workplaces awards. stltoday.com/nominate

Harassment bill: ‘Putting fox in charge of henhouse’ TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For 20 years, Mary Kay Morrow worked at Hallmark Cards Inc., in Kansas City. By 2002 she was an associate product manager. That year, Hallmark’s management came up with a new way to deal with employee complaints about discrimination and harassment. The company instituted the “Hallmark Dispute Resolution Program,” forcing employees, without their consent, into arbitration for any employment issues. A year later, Morrow was fired. Hallmark said it was for poor performance. She thought it was age discrimination. She sued. The court sided with Hallmark and said Morrow needed to submit to arbitration. She persisted in her legal battle. In June 2008, she won. The Western District of the Missouri Court of Appeals ruled that companies can’t simply force arbitration on employees and take away one of the oldest constitutional rights in Missouri, the right to trial by jury. “The idea that an employer can create any legal contract it dares to create (based on a condition of at-will employment) cannot be sustained upon reflection,” the court wrote. The decision has guided Missouri employment law for a decade. And Hallmark has been trying to find a work-around ever since. “They have been lobbying for pro-arbitration bills in the Missouri Legislature ever since that case was resolved,” says

Kansas City attorney Mark Jess. Jess represented Morrow in the case. So he’s more than an interested observer in the heated debate in the Legislature over Rep. Kevin Corlew’s House Bill 1512. The bill was heading toward House passage last week until it came up against an unexpected and accidental obstacle: Attorney General Josh Hawley. Like Corlew, Hawley is a Republican. Hawley hasn’t taken a position against the bill. But last week he signed on to a letter along with every attorney general in the country that asked Congress to explicitly end forced arbitration in sexual harassment cases. Hawley’s letter advocates for the exact opposite of what Corlew’s bill would do. Both Corlew and Hawley have said that they have talked about making sure that his bill is ultimately amended so that it doesn’t shield sexual harassers from public scrutiny. That hasn’t happened yet. Even if it does, that misses the point, Jess says. “All discrimination is wrong,” he says. “All of these disputes should be out in the open.” Corlew’s bill is being pushed by Hallmark, the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and other business groups. It is part of a long-standing Republican push in Missouri to stack the judicial system in favor of employers and against workers. And it might have worked this year, too, if not for the national #MeToo movement, which sparked the letter from Hawley and his fellow attorneys general. “Access to the judicial system, whether federal or state, is a fundamental right of all Americans,” they wrote. The letter also criticized the secrecy of employment

arbitration contracts and how they tend to tilt the playing field unfairly toward the employer. To Jess, this is what lawmakers have to understand if they continue to debate Corlew’s bill. “Almost all arbitrators are former defense lawyers who are paid by employers,” Jess said. “It is literally putting the fox in charge of the henhouse. It’s an obvious conflict of interest.” Corlew’s bill would give arbitrators, not courts, the ultimate say in whether a discrimination or harassment complaint deserved to be conducted in the secrecy of arbitration or the transparency of open court. “You could have a serial sexual harasser and nobody even knows because it’s all decided in secret,” Jess says. “It’s such an unfair system, it’s insane.” A Hallmark lobbyist didn’t return calls for this column. But they have been plenty active in the Capitol. “Lobbyists worked the marble halls with great fervor to bend votes their way, but they apparently failed to garner enough support, and the bill never came up for a vote,” wrote state Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, this week in his newsletter to constituents. “Forcing employees or consumers to give up their fundamental rights is unAmerican,” wrote Barnes, who is an attorney. “For the sake of every Missourian who cares about the Constitution and an impartial system of justice, the ideas in House Bill 1512 should die a permanent death.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

‘Three Billboards’ wows Brits

Ferocious female-led tragicomedy “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” was the big winner Sunday at the British Academy Film Awards in London. Martin McDonagh’s movie about a bereaved mother seeking justice won five trophies including best film, outstanding British film and best actress, for Frances McDormand. McDonagh won the original screenplay prize for “Three Billboards,” which also netted Sam Rockwell the supporting actor trophy. Allison Janney was named best supporting actress for playing ice skater Tonya Harding’s domineering mother in “I, Tonya.” Guillermo del Toro won the directing prize for monster fantasy “The Shape of Water,” which also took trophies for music and production design. Gary Oldman won the best actor prize for playing British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour.” The British prizes, known as BAFTAs, are considered a key indicator of success at Hollywood’s Oscars in two weeks’ time. Gown gossip • Where does one find a wedding gown that’s chic but suitable for a church so regal it’s the burial place of monarchs? With only three months to go before Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding May 19 at Windsor Castle, both the fashion and bridal worlds are abuzz with talk of who the bride will pick to design her dress and what kind of look she will go for.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Carlin Glynn is 78. Singer Smokey Robinson is 78. Singer Lou Christie is 75. Talk-show host Lorianne Crook is 61. Singer Seal is 55. Actress Justine Bateman is 52. Actor Benicio Del Toro is 51. Singer-actress Haylie Duff is 33. Actress Victoria Justice is 25. Actor David Mazouz is 17. From news services

BOX OFFICE Estimated ticket sales in millions for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to ComScore.

Education, youth key to future, Jackson says Civil rights activist shares his experiences, insights at Black History Month event BY ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The Rev. Jesse Jackson’s life

was what everyone wanted to hear about Sunday afternoon at the keynote speech of St. Louis Public Library’s Black History Month program. Hundreds of people came to hear about his career as a civil rights activist, from his experience getting arrested at 19 during a sit-in at a library for white people to marching alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Jackson, 76, spoke at two events Sunday afternoon at Christ Church Cathedral, 1210 Locust Street, hosted by the St. Louis Public Library. He was interviewed on stage by KTVI (Channel 2) reporter Kim Hudson, but the questions were submitted by the crowd. In addition to sharing stories about his own history, he put a heavy emphasis on the value of educating young people across the country about the importance of voting. Jackson urged young people to not just be “a good news clip,” but to take their frustration and their energy to the polls. “Voting does matter,” he emphasized. “Go get the kids. Educate them on voting.” He put some of that responsibility on high school principals and teachers, saying there should be a day where school leaders help of-age students register to vote, clearing a large hurdle for them when the time comes to actually cast a ballot. That resonated with Vales Eddington of Pasadena Hills. A retired teacher, she said responsibility to educate students on the power of voting does fall on schools,

PEOPLE

1. “Black Panther” 2. “Peter Rabbit” 3. “Fifty Shades Freed” 4. “Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle” 5. “The 15:17 to Paris” 6. “The Greatest Showman” 7. “Early Man” 8. “Maze Runner: The Death Cure” 9. “Winchester” 10. “Samson”

$192.0 $17.3 $16.9 $7.9 $7.7 $5.1 $3.2 $2.5 $2.2 $2.0

Associated Press

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Saturday: 13-26-39-44-62 Powerball: 02 Power play: 3 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $246 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $185 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Rev. Jesse Jackson signs autographs after speaking to a crowd on Sunday at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown St. Louis as part of Black History Month. The event was hosted by the St. Louis Public Library.

to some degree. Sunday was the first time Eddington got to hear Jackson speak. She snagged his signature in a book about black history that she’s been reading. It was a special occasion for Alice Stanley of St. Louis, too. Hearing Jackson talk about how the ongoing effort for equality can’t fall solely on the backs of younger generations resonated with Stanley. Older generations have to step up and help be a voice for ongoing civil rights efforts, Jackson

stressed. Stanley agreed. “Him saying that the fight isn’t over and we still need to continue to get out there struck me,” she said. This is Jackson’s second trip to St. Louis in the past week. He made an appearance at a memorial service for Temptations’ singer Dennis Edwards on Feb. 11. Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

INSIDE

LOTTO Saturday: 01-08-12-25-27-36 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1 million SHOW ME CASH Sunday: 04-10-17-19-24 Monday’s estimated jackpot: $114,000 PICK-3 Sunday Midday: 325 Evening: 634 PICK-4 Sunday Midday: 3110 Evening: 0643

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Sunday Midday: 02-15-34-42-43 Evening: 03-13-31-32-45 LOTTO Saturday: 06-14-16-27-34-44 Extra shot: 16 Estimated jackpot: $4.75 million PICK-3 Sunday Midday: 235 FB: 5 Evening: 454 FB: 7 PICK-4 Sunday Midday: 2110 FB: 4 Evening: 7269 FB: 0

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Votes in Congress . A16

Puzzles .................EV2

Weather................B10

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LOCAL

02.19.2018 • MONDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

ADVERTISEMENT People board an eastbound MetroLink train at the Clayton MetroLink station in 2017.

RIDE • FROM A1

— from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. Nine deputies are involved, up from three. Sheriff Richard Watson says that gives passengers a sense of security and deters wrongdoers. “Nothing takes the place of being seen by your ridership and by people who might want to pull something,” he said. Watson said there was a 7 percent decrease in 2017 in overall reported incidents on MetroLink in his county. He didn’t break that down into types of crimes. St. Louis County police now have 44 officers assigned to their MetroLink unit, reflecting a doubling announced in 2016. However, Police Chief Jon Belmar says putting an officer on every train ride isn’t needed there, based on the level of crime and call data his department sees. “When you’re on the cars (at all times), you’re not anywhere else except on the cars,” he said. “We wanted to be able to stay agile enough to respond to calls on the perimeter on the line.” He said, “We’ve got the officers up where we need them.” Belmar says overall serious crime on MetroLink in the county dropped 14.6 percent last year, to 41 incidents from 48 in 2016. That includes crimes such as robbery, larceny and aggravated assault. The category also includes murder and sex offenses; the county had one apiece in 2017, up from none the previous year. Lesser crime increased 5.3 percent, to 456 from 433. Standing out among those, he said, were weapons violations, which jumped to 40 from 14, and drug violations, up 13.6 percent. He said that’s likely due to the increase in officers and the resulting capacity to identify such cases. Lt. John Blaskiewicz, who heads MetroLink enforcement for St. Louis city police, says his officers work hard but he needs more of them. “I’m working with six officers, a sergeant and myself, so that’s eight,” he said. “The county has 44. Where would you expect the line to be safer?” Blaskiewicz says he hopes he’ll get additional people assigned to his unit as the department gradually adds more officers with proceeds from a sales tax hike approved by voters in November. But he said he realizes his new chief, John Hayden, has to deal with many other pressing security needs across the city as well. Incidents of serious crime on MetroLink in the city doubled last year, to 126 from 63 in 2016. Less serious crime dropped by 14.9 percent, to 137 incidents from 161. “Statistically the improvements aren’t there,” Blaskiewicz told two Metro officials after the forum on Feb. 8. “My goal is ... more police officers. That’s how I improve things.” Some objectives in the memorandum of understanding have been reached, such as setting up a joint MetroLink task

force headed by St. Louis County police at a new headquarters at 5977 Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis. Also underway is an advisory committee made up of police, prosecutors, transit union officials and members of Citizens for Modern Transit, a local advocacy group. But there is still no common radio dispatching system to deploy officers from all three police agencies. Belmar said developing that was delayed by the large amount of time and effort by county and city police in dealing with unrest last year after the acquittal of former city Officer Jason Stockley in a 2011 shooting. Belmar said the time spent on selecting a new city chief also slowed things. Also lacking are uniform prosecution procedures in the city and St. Louis County called for in the memorandum. County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch continues to refuse to prosecute fare violations issued by Metro’s own public safety officers because of doubts about their legitimacy. Last year he also said he stopped prosecuting those cases because MetroLink operated on an honor system. But McCulloch last week said he would resume prosecuting fare violations written up by county police, which he stopped doing last spring unless a defendant also faced more serious charges. The system now has no turnstiles. Instead, fare inspectors randomly require riders to produce time-stamped tickets. The memorandum also called for exploring “the cost and feasibility of installing a barrier system” for MetroLink to limit physical access to the 37 stations. That has yet to happen. But the EastWest Gateway Council of Governments is hiring a consulting firm to do a “security audit” of each station. The audit, which will begin in the spring and take about six months, will recommend possible changes. Meanwhile, officials continue to discuss installing temporary barriers at three spots — Blaskiewicz said the North Hanley, Forest Park-DeBaliviere and Emerson Park stations have been recommended by the police agencies — on a trial basis. Under this idea, staffers would check tickets as people get ready to enter trains during heavy-use periods. Former St. Louis Mayor Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. says public concern over criminal activity has been “the principal reason” for a continued decline in MetroLink ridership. Annual passenger boardings dropped 14.7 percent over a four-year period through last June. From July through December, ridership was down 9.2 percent from the same period in 2016. Schoemehl, a member of the Bi-State Development Agency board that oversees MetroLink, commended St. Clair County for routinely patrolling platforms and trains in evening hours. He said he’s baffled why St. Louis County doesn’t do the same. He didn’t criticize St. Louis police. “Sheriff Watson has been able to make a sea-change difference” in creating a secure environment, Schoemehl said. He added that “we’d all be better off” if Watson headed the MetroLink-wide security effort.

ASK THE ROAD CREW Chat with Andrew Gates of the Missouri Department of Transportation, Jamie Wilson of the St. Louis Streets Department and David Wrone of the St. Louis County Department of Transportation each Wednesday at 1 p.m. at stltoday.com/chat. Here is an edited excerpt from recent weeks: SteveK: The stoplight at Lindbergh Boulevard and Quailways and Tealbrook drives needs a bit of an adjustment. It will turn red on Lindbergh for no cars on either side street. This has happened in the evening and morning. And it is a long red for Lindbergh. Gates: I have shared that with our signal team to see if there is an issue. That signal is one of three we are replacing on Lindbergh this year. Tom: You can’t be serious about the Shrewsbury Interstate 44 bridge work. Are you really going to reduce westbound lanes to just two? Do you understand the size of the traffic backups that will occur each and every day until the work is done in December? Please tell me that you will reconsider this! Gates: We are serious and understand the potential backups. We have to repair the bridge and simply do not have enough space to put three narrowed lanes in each direction in that area. The only way we could possibly do it is having 9-foot lanes in each direction and that would give you an unsafe margin around tractor trailers. We encourage drivers to combine errands, adjust their commute time, consider alternate routes such as Highway 40 (Interstate 64), Manchester or Watson roads, carpool, public transit and any other method to reduce traffic on I-44 in that area.

Jimmy Z: Who is responsible for painting the railroad bridges over the interstates? Gates: The railroads are responsible for the maintenance of their bridges. Dave: During off-peak times — I’ve noticed it mostly on weekends — the left turn light from eastbound Lindbergh to northbound Tesson Ferry Road and the westbound Lindbergh to southbound Tesson Ferry are on the same cycle and the lanes come dangerously close to one another. Would it be possible to have some sort of line drawn showing the separation or could the lights be kept on different cycles as they are during peak times? Gates: There are some lines that are supposed to help drivers in both directions stay in their lanes but they look like they may be fading. I have asked our striping team to freshen them up when schedules and weather allow. Stlcommuter: When turning left onto an entrance ramp to a highway and you have a green to yellow yield light, do you have the right of way over people entering the highway from the other direction who are facing a red yield sign? Gates: Yes. Traffic on the roadway with the signal has the right of way over traffic on the roadway with the yield sign.

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FROM A1

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

A CONSTANT BUDDY Alex Hogland (left), 18, of Imperial, brought his bearded dragon on Sunday to the Show Me Reptile & Exotic Show at the District 9 Machinist Hall in Bridgeton. Hogland wasn’t selling his pet. He said it traveled everywhere with him. Behind him is Timothy Hudgins, 30, from Harvel, Ill., with his jungle carpet python.

M 1 • MONDAY • 02.19.2018

Plea change could bolster case against Manafort AIDE • FROM A1

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Urban League working to ‘protect our progress’ URBAN LEAGUE • FROM A1

series of meetings were held to discuss ways to garner national publicity that would “wipe out the bad impression made by the East St. Louis race riots.” Those violent clashes occurred the summer before. During a 48-hour period in July 1917, at least 300 homes and businesses were burned. The official death count landed at 48 although news accounts put that number five times higher. At that time, the National Urban League was still a young agency, formed in 1910 in New York and initially known as The Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes. There were just a handful of chapters when St. Louis joined, compared to 90 today, but the mission a century ago is essentially the same as now: creating economic equity. “In the past, it’s been about jobs. In the present, it’s about jobs. In the future, it’s about jobs,” said Marc Morial, president of the National Urban League and a former New Orleans mayor. “We were Morial founded to help people transition from rural, agricultural jobs to industrial jobs. Now we are helping move people from industrial to technology fields, providing job training programs to navigate this brave new world.” Nowhere is the agency’s priority of jobs more evident than in Ferguson. Last year, the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis opened a job center on the spot where a QuikTrip once stood. The convenience store on West Florissant Avenue was burned down after the shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014 and became known as ground zero for the months of unrest that followed. The opening in July of the new building, officially known as the Ferguson Community Empowerment Center, served as the kickoff event of the National Urban League conference, which drew more than 25,000 people to America’s Center in downtown St. Louis. It also served as a venue to promote the local chapter’s centennial, which will officially be marked at a gala next month. The keynote speaker will be Academy Awardwinning actress Viola Davis. Mike McMillan, president of the local affiliate, said the job center, co-owned by the Salvation Army, stands as an example of what is possible when minority workers are given a chance. At least 75 percent of contractors and employees who built the $4 million facility are African-American. The center houses the agency’s Save Our Sons program, providing workforce training for young men, and an afterschool tutoring program dubbed Readers to Leaders. They are among the 30 programs the Urban League offers, serving more than 100,000 people a year in St. Louis, St. Louis County and St. Clair County. The Urban League, which bills itself as both a social service agency and a civil rights organization, does not endorse political candidates but does weigh in on public policy issues and major events. For example, the local affiliate put out a statement after the September acquittal of former St. Louis police Officer Jason Stockley on murder charges. “The results of this case and other cases of police shootings across this nation show that there are often no consequences to law enforcement for killing African Americans,” the Urban League wrote. “These verdicts breed the hate, distrust and fear that we work to overcome daily. With all of the efforts to move our community forward in the past three years after the events in Ferguson, this is a major setback to improving racial relations in the St. Louis community.” Activism was something McMillan’s predecessor, James Buford, brought into

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com Mike McMillan, president of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, helps dedicate the Ferguson Community Empowerment Center on July 26. The Urban League partnered with the Salvation Army to run the center on the site of a former QuikTrip that was burned during days of unrest after Ferguson teen Michael Brown’s death in 2014.

URBAN LEAGUE OF METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS Founded • 1918 Employees • 225 Membership • 500 Annual budget • $20 million People served • More than 100,000 Programs offered • 30 More info • ulstl.com

CENTENNIAL GALA The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis will celebrate 100 years with a dinner on March 24. Who • Keynote speaker, Viola Davis, star of “How to Get Away With Murder” Where • Marriott St. Louis Grand, 800 Washington Avenue When • Reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 7 How much • Tickets begin at $250 per person More info • ulstl.com/centennial-gala

the local chapter, arguing that it was too docile an organization. In 1999, he and the Rev. Al Sharpton were among a group of protesters arrested for blocking Interstate 70. They were there highlighting the lack of minorities hired to do road repairs. Buford also organized three busloads to the Million Man March in Washington in 1995, an event not endorsed by the national Urban League. Despite his deviations, the local Urban League board stood behind him.

A ‘BIG TENT’

Morial said the Urban League, like many long-running civil rights organizations, has to broaden its reach to remain relevant. That includes bringing in a new generation of leaders. In 2004, the agency started the Urban League Young Professionals, an auxiliary group that more than two-thirds of affiliates now have, including in St. Louis. The group has monthly meetings to talk about ways to have a stronger, unified voice in the community. “We’re trying to be a big tent,” Morial said. While it is great that young people are taking to the streets to protest, there is more to fighting injustice. “It’s an essential tactic,” Morial said of the uprisings that followed after the events in Ferguson and the Stockley verdict. But making change takes work on multiple fronts and doing it only through protest “is a narrow view.” Changes in attitudes and public policy must also be done in boardrooms, where heads of corporations have the money and influence

to make a difference. Buford headed the local Urban League for nearly three decades before retiring in 2013. As he was winding down his final year, he told the Post-Dispatch that his early years at the helm were looked at with apprehension by those his agency was charged with serving. He went to private school in a city where the majority of blacks get a public education. And he is a Republican in a city full of Democrats. But his political affiliation ultimately helped him, he said. “Everybody in high places is Republican,” he said. And it’s those with money that he had to work with to ensure those struggling have a voice, Buford said. Morial said the generational handoff of the local Urban League chapter from Buford, who was 68 when he announced his retirement, to McMillan, who was 41 when he took over, has proven a successful one. “James Buford was the guy who really built the modern Urban League and Mike McMillan has not missed a beat in terms of continuing the momentum,” Morial said. McMillan points to the opening of the Ferguson center and hosting the National Urban League conference as both highlights and examples of the push to keep the agency in the forefront of making changes in a region that suffers from racial disparity in major quality of life issues, including housing, education, jobs and criminal justice. “If you look at what happened in Ferguson, it exposed the racial inequities and government public polices that need to be corrected,” McMillan said. By continuing to build programs that help minorities get access to jobs and education, the Urban League will help erase the stark differences holding minorities back, he said. In the current political environment, that will remain a challenge for all social service agencies and civil rights organizations, Morial said. “We’re in the age of Trump, the age of significant pushback,” he said. That includes continued efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, voter suppression legislation and little desire to reform the criminal justice system, he said. “We have to resist, resist every effort to turn back the hands of time,” Morial said. “We have to protect our progress.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

Manafort’s, was described in interviews by people familiar with the case. “Rick Gates is going to change his plea to guilty,” said a person with direct knowledge of the new developments, adding that the revised plea would be presented in federal court in Washington “within the next few days.” That individual and others who discussed the matter spoke on condition of anonymity, citing a judge’s gag order restricting comments about the case to the news media or public. Gates’ defense attorney, Thomas C. Green, did not respond to messages left by phone and email. Peter Carr, a spokesman for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, declined on Saturday to comment. Mueller is heading the prosecutions of Gates and Manafort as part of the wideranging investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether Trump or his aides committed crimes before, during or since the campaign. The imminent change of Gates’ plea follows negotiations over the last several weeks between Green and two of Mueller’s prosecutors — senior assistant special counsels Andrew Weissmann and Greg D. Andres. According to a person familiar with those talks, Gates, a longtime political consultant, can expect “a substantial reduction in his sentence” if he fully cooperates with the investigation. He said that Gates was likely to serve about 18 months in prison. The delicate terms reached by the opposing lawyers, he said, will not be specified in writing: Gates “understands that the government may move to reduce his sentence if he substantially cooperates — but it won’t be spelled out.” One of the final discussion points has centered on exactly how much cash or other valuables — derived from Gates’ allegedly illegal activity — the government will require him to forfeit as part of the guilty plea. Gates, 45, who is married and has four children, does not appear to be well positioned financially to sustain a high-powered legal defense. “He can’t afford to pay it,” said one lawyer who is involved with the investigation. “If you go to trial on this, that’s $1 million to $1.5 million. Maybe more, if you need experts” to appear as witnesses. The Oct. 27 indictment showed that prosecutors had amassed substantial documentation to buttress their charges that both Manafort and Gates — who were colleagues in political consulting for about a decade — had engaged in a complex series of allegedly illegal transactions rooted in Ukraine. The indictment alleged that both men, who for years were unregistered agents of the Ukraine government, hid millions of dollars of Ukraine-based payments from U.S. authorities. According to the indictment, Gates and Manafort “laundered the money through scores of United States and foreign corporations, partnerships and bank accounts” and took steps to evade related U.S. taxes. If Manafort maintains his not-guilty plea and fights the charges at a trial, the testimony from Gates could provide Mueller’s team with first-person descriptions of much of the allegedly illegal conduct. Gates’ testimony, a person familiar with the pending guilty plea said, would place a “cherry on top” of the government’s already-formidable case against Manafort. The same individual said he did not believe Gates had information to offer Mueller’s team that would “turn the screws on Trump.” The president has repeatedly called the special counsel’s investigation a “witch hunt.” Gates joined Trump’s presidential campaign in June 2016, when the candidate hired Manafort as its chairman. At the Republican National Convention the next month, Gates directly handled the campaign’s operations as Manafort’s top aide. Perhaps the most controversial step taken by Trump’s campaign at the convention concerned how the U.S. should deal with the tense relations between Russia and Ukraine, which repudiated Moscow in a 2014 revolt. When a delegate proposed that the Republican platform call for “providing lethal defensive weapons” to Ukraine’s military in its struggle against Russian-backed armed forces, the Trump campaign defeated the effort. Instead of U.S. weaponry, the convention platform committee accepted the campaign’s substitute language, which offered Ukraine “appropriate assistance.” In mid-August 2016, Trump fired Manafort after reports of potentially improper payments he had received from a pro-Russia political party aligned with his longtime client, Viktor Yanukovych, who was Ukraine’s prime minister from 2010 to 2014. Gates, however, remained with the Trump campaign through the election, serving as a liaison to the Republican National Committee. He also assisted Trump’s inaugural committee.


LOCAL

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

LAW & ORDER MARYLAND HEIGHTS > Gunfire along I-270 leads to charges • A man who pulled over on Interstate 270 and began firing shots in the air on Saturday afternoon has been charged, police said. No one was injured in the bizarre incident, and a motive wasn’t clear. Marvin Byrd II, 46, of Bellefontaine Neighbors, was charged Sunday with unlawful use of a weapon, unlawful possession of a firearm and resisting arrest. He was being held at the St. Louis County Jail in lieu of $40,000 bail. Maryland Heights police said they got a call about 3 p.m. Saturday that a man had gotten out of a vehicle on I-270 just south of Interstate 70 and was firing a gun into the air. Byrd at first refused commands to show officers his hands, but they were eventually able to arrest him, police said. Officers took a gun into evidence. Several lanes of the interstate were closed for a short time, police said. Byrd, of the 10100 block of Cabot Drive, is a convicted felon, which is why he was charged with unlawful possession of a firearm, according to police. He was sentenced to three years in prison in 2003 after pleading guilty to drug and gun charges and a count of resisting arrest.

Halls, Symphony excel with music by youthful Romantics Music review • Concert features Schubert, von Weber, Mendelssohn BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-dispatch

A little more than half of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra spent the last few days in Lincoln, Neb., performing a program with ballerina Misty Copeland and other members of American Ballet Theatre. The rest of the ensemble (and some substitutes) held down the fort at home. They held it firmly, in a wellplayed program of familiar, ac-

cessible music. British conductor Matthew Halls, in his SLSO debut, led with plenty of vigor and no baton. The weekend’s program was by three youthful and exceptional German Romantic composers: Franz Schubert (who wrote his Symphony No. 3 in D major at 18), Carl Maria von Weber (he wrote his Clarinet Concerto at 24) and Felix Mendelssohn (a prodigy who composed his Symphony No. 1 in C minor when just 15). The soloist was familiar: SLSO principal clarinet Scott Andrews. Halls got his start as a keyboard player and early-music specialist, but he has a fine grasp of the Romantic pieces he led at Powell Hall. His account of the Schubert

NORMANDY > Robber uses app to target victims • Police believe the same person posed as a cellphone seller on an app called Letgo and robbed three people in different encounters Sunday, shooting one of them. Normandy police received a call from one of the victims near Bermuda and Castro drives, but later determined the victim had been robbed in Ferguson, said Normandy Sgt. Tameika Sanders. Not long after that, about 5 p.m., another victim walked into Normandy police headquarters to report they had been robbed in the 5800 block of Bermuda Drive after responding to a cellphone ad on Letgo, Sanders said. The app allows users to buy and sell used items locally. While officers were writing that report, a third victim called police from the 5800 block of Bermuda Drive about 5:30 p.m. to report he had been robbed and shot. The victim was being treated for injuries that were not lifethreatening, Sanders said. Sanders said her department believes the robber may try to change his location once information about these robberies gets out, so she is warning online shoppers to pick public locations, like a police station, to meet sellers.

was as well-formed as it was energetic. (He also has an endearing habit of running onstage during the bows to urge particularly exceptional players to stand before the whole orchestra; after the Schubert, the first up were associate principal clarinet Diana Haskell, associate principal oboe Philip Ross and associate principal bassoon Andrew Gott.) Andrews brought his familiar singing tone and copious technical skills to play in the Weber; it sounded effortless,and held the listener. This was an outstanding performance of a concerto that doesn’t get heard enough (the SLSO most recently played it in 1998), despite a few horn bobbles. Halls supported his soloist admirably.

After the intermission, Halls sprang into action with the Mendelssohn. The winds owned the first movement. After the lovely, lyrical second movement came the danceable Menuetto; the fourth movement, Allegro con fuoco, really was fiery. Halls wasn’t afraid to go for extremes of dynamics, from the almost inaudible pizzicato of the low strings in the fourth movement to the bravura conclusion, bringing a fine concert to a fitting end. The only mystery was in the relatively small audience for a Saturday night with good weather and the kind of “safe” programming many patrons say they want. Those who stayed home missed a great opportunity.

NOW THROUGH MONDAY

ST. LOUIS > Boy injured in shooting • A 9-year-old boy was conscious and breathing at a hospital after he was shot Sunday in St. Louis. The boy was hit in the buttocks just before 3 p.m. near North Grand Boulevard and Montgomery Street. The address is in the Jeff-VanderLou neighborhood. The boy was taken to Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center. His medical condition was not available. EAST ST. LOUIS > Police shoot, injure armed man • Police officers shot at an SUV at a McDonald’s in East St. Louis early Sunday after an armed man inside brandished a gun, according to authorities. One man inside the vehicle was hit, and was taken to a St. Louis hospital with injuries described as not lifethreatening. Another man in the SUV was arrested. The SUV may be tied to an earlier drive-by shooting in Washington Park that left two people injured, according to the Illinois State Police, which is investigating the officerinvolved shooting. East St. Louis police were called to the McDonald’s at 24th and State streets about 5 a.m., Illinois State Police Sgt. Jerri Hochmuth said. The caller reported two men inside an SUV in the drivethrough lane had guns. When officers arrived at the McDonald’s and tried to pull over the car, they saw a weapon being brandished, Hochmuth said. Three officers shot at the men. The SUV stopped in front of the restaurant. One man was arrested while the injured man was taken to a hospital.

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NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MONDAY • 02.19.2018

Shooting survivors lash out at Trump Students who escaped Florida massacre urge gun control; national marches planned BY JASON DEAREN, TERRY SPENCER AND ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press

PARKLAND, FLA. • Students who escaped the deadly school shooting in Florida focused their anger Sunday at President Donald Trump, contending that his response to the attack has been needlessly divisive. “You’re the president. You’re supposed to bring this nation together, not divide us,” said David Hogg, 17, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, speaking on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “How dare you,” he added. Hogg was responding to Trump’s tweet Saturday that Democrats hadn’t passed any gun control measures during the brief time they controlled Congress with a supermajority in the Senate. Trump also alluded to the FBI’s failure to act on tips that the suspect was dangerous, while bemoaning the bureau’s focus on Russia’s role in the 2016 election. Trump was at his Florida estate Sunday but did not mention the attack in a series of tweets. After more than a day of criticism from the students, the White House said the president would hold a “listening session” with unspecified students on Wednesday and meet with state and local security officials Thursday. Florida politicians, meanwhile, scrambled to produce legislation in response to the Feb. 14 attack that killed 17 people. Nikolas Cruz, a 19-year-old who had been expelled from the school, is being held without bail in the Broward County jail, accused of 17 counts of first-degree murder. In a TV interview, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., embraced a Democratic bill in the Florida legislature to allow courts to temporarily prevent people from having

MIAMI HERALD VIA AP

Mourners (from left) Tatana Hobson, 14, Annia Hobson, 13, and Leilany Canate, 16, gather in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Sunday, days after a deadly attack by a former student.

guns if they are determined to be a threat to themselves or others. Gov. Rick Scott, also a Republican, is expected to announce a legislative package with GOP leaders this week. Emma Gonzalez, another student who survived the attack, cited Trump, Rubio and Scott by name in a warning to politicians who are supported by the National Rifle Association. “Now is the time to get on the right side of this, because this is not something that we are going to let sweep under the carpet,” she said on “Meet the Press.” The students’ pointed comments are the latest signs of increased pressure for gun control. The students have vowed to become the face of a movement for tighter firearm regulations

and plan to visit the Capitol in Tallahassee this week to demand immediate action. They are also calling for anti-gun violence demonstrations in Washington and other cities on March 24. Organizers behind the Women’s March, an anti-Trump and female empowerment protest, called for a 17-minute, nationwide walkout by teachers and students on March 14. The Network for Public Education, an advocacy organization for public schools, announced a day of walkouts, sit-ins and other events on school campuses on April 20, the anniversary of the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado that left 12 students and one teacher dead. Not every student at the school was calling for more gun con-

trol. James Ciaramello, a senior in the school’s JROTC program, said Cruz had been one of his cadets. On Friday, he paused at a memorial in a park in front of a photo of one victim, Peter Wang, 15, another JROTC student who was killed after opening a door so others could escape. “He’s just messed up,” Ciaramello said of Cruz. “I mean, tighter gun control, it’s not going to help. There’s always a way around it.” School and government records obtained Sunday show Cruz was diagnosed as developmentally delayed at age 3 and had disciplinary issues dating to middle school. In February 2014, while in eighth grade, Cruz was transferred to a special school for children with emotional and be-

havioral issues. He stayed there until 10th grade, when he was transferred to Stoneman Douglas. A month after arriving, Cruz was written up for using profanity. Last year, Cruz was expelled. On Sept. 28, 2016, an investigator from the Florida Department of Children and Families visited Cruz and his mother, Lynda Cruz, after he posted video showing him cutting himself. The report showed that Cruz had written a racial epithet and a Nazi symbol on his book bag, which his mother made him erase. The investigator said Cruz was suffering from depression and on medication and had told Lynda Cruz he planned to buy a gun, but she couldn’t determine why. She said he had been depressed after breaking up with a girlfriend who had been cheating on him, the investigator said. A school counselor told the investigator that Lynda Cruz had always tried to help her son and followed through on his therapy and medication, but the counselor was concerned about the youth’s desire to buy a gun. A counselor told the DCF investigator he had visited the school and that he did not believe Cruz was a danger to himself or others. The case was closed, with the investigator concluding that Cruz was receiving help. After Lynda Cruz died in November, Cruz moved into the home of a teenage friend. The friend’s parents told the SunSentinel newspaper they had no idea the extent of Cruz’s issues. “We had this monster living under our roof and we didn’t know,” Kimberly Snead told the newspaper in an interview published Sunday. “We didn’t see this side of him.” The Sneads said Cruz seemed unable to do even simple tasks such as use the microwave.

‘Red flag laws’ are cited as way to pare gun violence BY RYAN J. FOLEY AND DON THOMPSON Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. • The warnings around

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

A vestibule with bulletproof glass separating the main office at the newly renovated Pattonville Early Childhood Center, photographed on Friday, now serves as the main entrance.

New locking mechanisms on doorknobs at the Pattonville Early Childhood Center allow off-site automatic locking and unlocking for school shooting situations.

‘Every time a tragedy happens, we learn things’ SAFETY • FROM A1

SCHOOL SAFETY TIPS

Pattonville Chief Financial Officer Ron Orr. To get into the building, visitors have to enter a small room lined with concrete blocks and speak with an office assistant from behind a window of bulletproof glass to gain access to the hallway. Pattonville officials wanted that bulletproof window because, at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the shooter shattered the transaction window with a shower of bullets to force his way into the school. “Every time a tragedy happens, we learn things,” Orr said. Even before Wednesday’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., where at least 17 people were killed, even before January’s shooting at Marshall County High in Benton, Ky., in which two students were killed, Missouri educators and architects have been asking themselves: If a shooter were to come for our children, would our school buildings be able to stop them? The frequency of school shootings in the United States has pushed building safety beyond simply having working fire alarms, locked front doors or an intercom to buzz in visitors. Architects and safety experts are asking school leaders scores of questions: Do the first-floor windows and doors have bulletproof glass or film? Are there surveillance cameras and fences around the property? Are the bus drop-off lanes clearly separate from parent drop-off lanes? Many educators will say protecting schools against potential shootings has become a necessity. But some experts still worry that schools are not actively pursuing safety as a priority. “I can’t tell you how many schools I just walked in the door,” said Clayton architect Art Bond. “It’s time to articulate this and bring this to the forefront … to put safety in schools without making it look like a fortress. We’re trying to do this in a way that is nonintrusive.” Bond has visited what’s been called the “safest school in America” in Shelbyville, Ind., and the newly built

Sandy Hook school to study how to build safe schools. He is designing schools to protect students not only from intruders, but also from bullies. For example, creating wide, open hallways without nooks or crannies, or bathrooms with open entryways, allows teachers to spot bullying more quickly. Bond has incorporated those kinds of designs in schools such as the reimagined Ladue Horton Watkins High School currently under construction, the newly renovated MaplewoodRichmond Heights Early Childhood Center, Special School District’s new Northview High School and Pattonville’s new Early Childhood Center. Bond Architects has worked with 110 schools in 26 districts. School safety can especially be an issue because many children attend school in a building that dates back several decades. “Many educators across the coun-

Safety experts and architects recommend that schools: • Build a sturdy set of double doors at the front entrance to control access • Position classrooms away from the front entrance • Install an intercom and a sturdy transaction window at front entrance • Separate and clearly mark a parent drop-off lane and a bus lane • Keep parking lot a distance away from school • Glaze first-floor windows with bulletproof film or glass • Remove parking space signs reserved for specific people, which can indicate whether an administrator is inside • Number classrooms with signs that are visible down inside hallways and from outside the building • Install locks on all classroom and office doors • Trim shrubbery or trees that hug the building • Install surveillance cameras • Place bollards in front of the school building • Compartmentalize after-school activities in one part of the building so the rest of the building can be secured after hours

try are dealing with buildings that were designed decades ago and not at a time when security was an issue,” said Ken Trump, president of National School Safety and Security Services. “Many architects design schools with the goals of staying in or under budget, for aesthetics and educational purposes, and oftentimes those criteria are in conflict with some of the better practices with designing schools with security in mind.” One issue is cost. Indeed, many school districts have had to launch multimillion-dollar bond issues to get the safety upgrades they wanted. Pattonville, for example, is spending $4.3 million from its recently approved $23 million, no-tax-increase bond issue on safety and security upgrades. But Bond said some renovations don’t take a lot of money. “These are things that can be done for a few thousand dollars, and not hundreds of thousands of dollars,” Bond said. Bullet-resistant film on windows, for example, costs less than bulletproof glass. Simply posting number signs above every classroom door, making them visible to anyone looking down a hallway, as well as numbers on classroom windows facing outside, helps emergency responders to recognize immediately where to go. Groundskeepers can cut shrubs and trees that hug school buildings, to limit hiding places for intruders. Experts say one of the riskiest misconceptions is thinking that a school shooting can’t happen here. “Yes, school safety is very important in all school districts throughout the state … everybody says that. However, we don’t all necessarily show that that is a priority with our strategic planning,” said Amy Bledsoe, education safety coordinator for the Center for Education Safety in Missouri. “I still think there’s just kind of an underlying feeling or thought that it will not happen here in Missouri.” Kristen Taketa @Kristen_Taketa on Twitter ktaketa@post-dispatch.com

Nikolas Cruz seemed to flash like neon signs: expelled from school, fighting with classmates, a fascination with weapons and hurting animals, disturbing images and comments posted to social media, previous mental health treatment. In Florida, that wasn’t enough for relatives, authorities or his schools to request a judicial order barring him from possessing guns. Only five states have laws enabling family members, guardians or police to ask judges to temporarily strip gun rights from people who show warning signs of violence. Supporters of these measures, deemed “red flag laws” or gunviolence restraining orders, say they can save lives by stopping some shootings and suicides. Florida, where Cruz is accused of using an AR15 assault weapon to kill 17 people at his former high school, lacks such a law. He was able to legally own the semi-automatic rifle, even though his mother, classmates and teachers had at times described him as dangerous and threatening, and despite repeated police visits to his home. Red flag legislation has been introduced by Democratic state lawmakers, but it hasn’t been heard during this year’s session, and its fate is uncertain in a state Legislature controlled by Republicans who generally favor expanding gun rights. After Wednesday’s shooting, Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, said he would work to make sure people with mental illnesses didn’t have access to guns, but he offered no specifics. Florida’s GOP Sen. Marco Rubio — facing withering criticism over his acceptance of $3.3 million in career campaign cash donated through the National Rifle Association — is going a step further now. Rubio said on a Sunday morning show that state legislators should “absolutely” consider enacting a law enabling family members or law enforcement officials to ask a court to remove guns from a person who poses a danger. Rubio told Miami CBS affiliate WFOR that it was an “example of a state law” that could have helped prevent the Florida shooting. In 2014, California became the first state to let family members ask a judge to remove firearms from a relative who appears to pose a threat. Its legislature took action after a mentally ill man, Elliot Rodger, killed six students and wounded 13 others near the University of California, Santa Barbara, before killing himself. California’s law also empowers police to petition for the protective orders, which can require authorities to remove firearms for up to one year. Connecticut, Indiana, Oregon and Washington also have some version of a red flag law. More than a dozen others, including Missouri, Hawaii and New Jersey, are considering bills to enable family members or police to petition the courts to take weapons away from people showing signs of mental distress or violence. The Florida shooting has revived debate about whether teachers and school administrators should have that authority as well. California lawmakers voted to expand their law in 2016 so that high school and college personnel, co-workers and mental health professionals can seek the restraining orders, but Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, called the effort premature and vetoed it. State Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, said he planned to reintroduce the bill.


NATION

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • A7

Third-graders selling AR-15 raffle tickets in Missouri BY MAX LONDBERG Kansas City Star

Third-graders in a Missouri community are continuing to sell raffle tickets for an AR-15 to benefit their traveling baseball team after the same type of rifle was used to slaughter and injure dozens at a Florida school. Levi Patterson, the coach of a 9-and-under baseball team in Neosho, Mo., told The Star the idea was conceived before the shooting in Parkland, Fla. A father of one of the players — who co-founded Black Rain Ordnance Inc., a weapons purveyor in Neosho — offered the weapon for the raffle. Patterson said by phone Saturday that he considered finding a different raffle item after Wednesday’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, but ultimately decided to “turn it into a positive thing” af-

ter “getting the hate.” “One of the people from the hate group turned in (a Facebook post about the raffle) for I don’t know what,” Patterson said. The post had shown a weapon next to the school logo, leading to fierce criticism by some until Facebook removed the post, according to Patterson. After this story was published, Patterson said he mistakenly said the critics were part of a hate group. He said he does not view them as a hate group but as a concerned group that has “every right to stand up for what they believe in.” “I applaud them for standing up for what they believe in. I just think they have feelings to this specific type of gun (that are) different than people around here do,” he said. Patterson said donations have poured in as the criticism reached a peak following the

LUKE SHARRETT • Bloomberg

AR-15 rifles and their cousins are among the nation’s most popular and profitable weapons. The AR-15 fires one bullet with each pull of the trigger, but it is easily modified to shoot continuously.

Florida shooting; people from as far away as Colorado offered to buy tickets on Facebook. The perpetrator in Florida killed 17 people and injured at least 14 with an AR-15 in six minutes. “Are you all tone deaf?” wrote Dan Weaver in a comment on Patterson’s page. “AR15 kills

seventeen so you raffle a gun for child sports? Lord, people wake the hell up. Justify all you want but you are wrong, period.” Patterson responded by writing that “gun raffles have been going on for years. Evil has and will always exist. Our hearts break for those involved, and we do not take that lightly.”

He also told The Star that he was not making a political statement with the raffle item. It was simply what had been offered by Black Rain. He said critics view the weapon as a “killing machine.” On Wednesday, Patterson took to Facebook to fire back at the “concerned group” critical of the raffle. “We appreciate your ‘concern’ but please understand, we are not, have not, and will not force one of our boys to sell raffle tickets for the Black Rain AR15 Spec 15, if they are uncomfortable doing so,” he wrote. He told The Star that all the players, who range in age from 7 to 9, are selling the raffle tickets. The raffle is not affiliated with the Neosho School District. The winner must pass a background check before receiving the gun. Lee Woodward, the principal of South Elementary School in Neosho, announced the raffle on her Facebook page and encouraged purchases to support the “9u Neosho baseball players, coaches, and parents.” The post was made hours after the Florida shooting.

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NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

Duckworth still breaking barriers, and she likes it BY LAURIE KELLMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Breaking down barriers is nothing new for Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and that’s the way she likes it. Duckworth, a decorated Iraq War veteran who lost both legs when her helicopter was shot down, is an Asian-American woman in the mostly white, mostly male and very fusty Senate. And now, with a baby due in April, she’ll be the first senator to give birth while in office. And so, along with her legislative and political goals, she is adding a new one: educating the tradition-bound Senate on creating a workplace that makes room for new mothers. “She’s been through things that you and I will probably never understand,” said Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., who had two children while serving in Congress. “So I’m sure for her (having a baby) is in no way daunting. She’s also someone who’s had a whole career in a male-dominated world.” Duckworth, who turns 50 in March, said she appreciated the historic nature of her baby’s birth, as well as the fact that she represents working mothers and women having babies later in life. She fully expects to have to find a place to nurse in some quiet parlor off the Senate floor. But she said having a baby was just one of many stops on the trail ahead. “This is the last job that I want,” Duckworth said of the Illinois Senate seat once held by Barack Obama. The former president is one of several men she ticks off as mentors and role models. They include Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., former Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., and the late Democratic Sens. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii and Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts — all backers of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which made the nation’s landscape a little easier to navigate. But she sees both problems with compliance and efforts to undermine the law. She points to flaws in Chicago’s mass transit system, for example, and in a women’s restroom at a U.S. embassy overseas. And floating through Congress now is a bill designed to curb frivolous lawsuits under the ADA that Duckworth and others say weakens it. Duckworth is already the first female amputee elected to Congress, the first Asian-American to represent Illinois in Washington and the first member of Congress born in Thailand. Her story of resilience and grit set her in the rare company of grievously injured veterans who later served in the Senate — Dole, a World War II veteran, and John McCain, who was

kept prisoner for more than five years in Vietnam. “If you take gender out of it, it’s not that new,” said Duckworth, a year into her own Senate term. But gender can’t be ignored as the nation reckons with sexual misconduct at home and in the workplace, especially because Congress is not exactly known for being on the leading edge of equality. The first area specifically set up for lactation opened in the Capitol only a dozen years ago. The House installed its first restroom for women lawmakers in 2011. The Senate has had its own women’s restroom for 25 years. Duckworth, one of 22 women in the Senate, has the experience to give her policy advice and criticisms of President Donald Trump an especially authoritative edge. His demand for a military parade? “Our troops in danger overseas don’t need a show of bravado, they need steady leadership,” she said. His complaint that Democrats didn’t sufficiently applaud his State of the Union address? “I will not be lectured about what our military needs by a five-deferment draft dodger,” reads the Tweet pinned atop her page, referring to Trump’s deferment from Vietnam due to a foot ailment. She refuses to “mindlessly cater to the whims of Cadet Bone Spurs and clap when he demands I clap.” CBS’ “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” gave Duckworth full credit for the nickname. In a gag ad earlier this month, a new G.I. Joe doll resembling Trump, named “Cadet Bonespurs,” lolls in a hammock while his comrades march off to war. When Trump tweets that Democrats don’t care about the military, “she takes that personally. She answered personally,” Durbin said. Politics and the military were not Duckworth’s original goals. As she worked on a master’s degree in international affairs in the early 1990s at George Washington University, Duckworth was aiming to become an ambassador. She signed up for ROTC to learn more about the military. She fell in love with the challenge — and with a cadet named Bryan Bowlsbey. They married in 1993. Duckworth has said she applied to fly helicopters because she wanted the same power as men — and because it was one of the few combat jobs open to women. She was the senior officer co-piloting a Black Hawk on Nov. 12, 2004, when a grenade fired by an Iraqi insurgent exploded in a fireball at Duckworth’s feet. She lost both legs and partial use of her arm and faced a grueling recovery.

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., speaks Wednesday to Goldman Sachs’ summit in Washington. Duckworth was a helicopter pilot in the Iraq War. She lost both legs after being shot down. AP

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RIDES

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • A9

Acura

Chevrolet

Honda

Mercedes Benz

Nissan/Datsun

Sport Utility

'09 Acura MDX 3.7L: Technology Package with Entertainment Package $13,990 #28507A

'17 Chevy Cruze: LS, Only 3K Miles $13,998

'13 Honda Accord Sport: Alabaster Silver Metalic, 84K Miles $12,400 #97021A

'13 Mercedes-Benz C 250: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Sunroof $14,791 #96671A

'15 Nissan Altima 2.5: 51K Miles, Remainder of Factory Warranty, $12,469 #40929B

'10 Cadillac Escalade: AWD, Nav, Roof, DVD, $21,490 #B8757A

'09 Acura MDX: 3.7L Technology Package, AWD, Low Miles, Clean Carfax $13,633 #28450A

'11 Chevy Malibu: LTZ, Loaded $9,990 #P6309A

Hyundai

'04 Acura MDX: 4WD, Navigation, Very Sharp $9,990 #B8880A

'13 Chevy Cruze: LT, Clean Carfax, Auto $8,989 #33589B

'09 Acura TSX: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors & Front Seats, Power Moonroof $8,990 #V17721A

'07 Acura TL: Alabaster Silver metallic, TL Type S, Navigation $11,400 #12210A

Audi '10 Audi A6 3.0: Premium Tiptonic, Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera $11,633 #39017A

'15 Audi Allroad Wagon: 38K Miles, Panoroof, $28,990 #B8777

'12 Audi A5: 2.0T, Clean Carfax, Local Trade, $13,990 #33543A

'14 Hyundai Elantra: Limited, 30K, Sunroof, Red $12,990 #M17332A

'17 Chevy Spark: One Owner, GM Certified $11,990 #P6374

'13 Chevy Cruze: GM Certified, One Owner, $9,990 #P6369

'08 Chevy Cobalt:LT, 4 Door, Auto, Very Clean $5,590 #42234B

'13 Chevy Sonic: LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Manual, Victory Red, $7,469 #42158A

'14 Chevy Spark: LS, Grape Ice, One Owner Clean Carfax, Certified $8,449 #P6235A

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Manual, Sunroof, 36K $10,990 #B8775

'15 Hyundai Sonata: Limited, 30K Miles, Auto, Black $16,490 #M17233A

'11 Hyundai Elantra: FWD, Heated Door Mirrors, $6,490 #B8987A

'11 Infiniti M37x: Clean Carfax, Platinum Graphite, AWD, Heated Front Seats $13,900 #95537A

'08 Infiniti G37 Journey: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Frotn Seats, Sunroof $11,633 #96031A

Jeep

BMW '10 BMW 328i: xDrive, Jet Black, 88K Miles, AWD $10,900 #11600A

'16 BMW 328i: x-Drive, 32K, Automatic $26,990 #B8606

'14 Chevy Cruze: LT, GM Certified! $12,770 #400067A

'12 Chevy Impala: LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Summit White $8,776 #400067A

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, 4WD, Loaded!! Black, $31,990 #B8786A

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: 4WD, $28,707 #180135A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Patriot Latitude: 4x4, Loaded, $14,990 #P6295

Kia

'08 BMW 128i: Convertible, Cashmere Silver Metallic - Gold $11,400 #28292A

'14 Kia Forte: LX, 65K Miles $9,900 #27763B

Dodge '11 Chevy Impala: LT, FWD, Flex Fuel, Remote Start, $6,990 #V180209A

Buick

'13 Dodge Avenger: SXT, 62K, Certified, Gray $8,990 #C17297B

'14 Dodge Dart: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start $13,769 #33541A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: 22K Leather, Red, 1 owner $21,490 #C17445A

'16 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, 19K, Black, Nav & Bose $25,490 #C172208A

'06 Buick Terraza: #P06550A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Buick Verano: 25K Miles, $14,123 #40020A

Fiat '13 Fiat 500 Sport: Hatchback, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #B8799B

Ford '13 Ford C-Max: Hybrid, SE, Hatchback, One Owner, Local Trade $10,418 #400294A

'12 Kia Optima LX: A6, Ebony Black, FWD, $8,400 #27752M

'15 Kia Optima LX: $12,900 Stk# P06451 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $9,490 #C8795B

Lexus '08 Lexus IS 350: Mercury Metallic, 110K Miles, $10,633 #28284B

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black, 28K, Nav, Loaded $34,490 #B8879

'16 Cadillac CTS: 3K, Like New, Save!! $33,290 #C16150R

'11 Cadillac DTS: Pure Luxury w/o the Price Tag $9,990 #C16019RB

'01 Cadillac Deville: Sedan, Call Us!#P06496A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '91 Cadillac Allante: Coupe, Heated Front Seats $9,490 #C17020R2

Chevrolet '14 Chevy Spark: . LS, Hatchback, Auto, Summit White, 51K Miles $7,123 #79324A

'05 Chevy Impala: LS, Sandstone $4,791 #40027A

'13 Ford C-Max: Hybrid, Se, Loaded $10,418 #400294A

'16 Ford Focus: 5 Door Hatchback, SE $11,268 #P06501 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Ford Focus: 3 Door Coupe, ZX3S #170873A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Ford Focus: SE, 4 Door Sedan $9,150 #170223A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Ford Focus: 5 Door Hatchback, Manual $12,981 #P06560 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Ford Fusion S: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified FWD, $11,500 #28418A

'13 Ford Fusion: Loaded $11,462 #42041B

'05 Ford Mustang: Coupe, RWD, Legend Lime Clearcoat Metallic $7,990 #V18049B

'11 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, Silver Ice Metallic $7,633 #79282A '14 Ford Taurus: Limited, Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats $11,700 #7847B '15 Chevy Cruze LTZ: Clean Carfax, GM Certified PreOwned, Heated Front Seats, $14,700 #28400B

'12 Chevy Camaro: Convertible, LT, Auto, Certified $13,990 #C17394A

'10 Chevy Camaro: 1LT $13,089 #180425A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Sonic: Hatchback, LT, Manual $8,804 #P06543 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

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Honda '11 Honda Accord: 3.5 EX-L, Coupe, Polished Metal Metallic - Gray $7,123 #P9016A

Lincoln '15 Lincoln MKC: Select, Local Trade, Save!! $20,490 #M17359A

Mazda '01 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Convertible, Brilliant Black Clearcoat $9,123 #11584A

'14 Mazda Mazda6 i: Touring, Soul Red $11,900 #11585A

'12 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Grand Touring, Hard Top Convertible, $13,791 #11539A

'13 Mazda Mazdaspeed 3: Touring, Hatchback, Manual Transmission, Black Mica $13,900 #95543B

'16 Mazda Miata: Grand Touring, 2K Miles, Automatic, Black $25,990 #M16524R

'06 Mazda Mazda3 s: Copper Red Mica, Heated Front Seats $7,990 #M18022A

'10 Mazda 3i: Gunmetal Blue Mica, New Arrival, Low Miles $8,992 #35314A

'85 Pontiac Fiero GT: Manual, 94K, Sharp $4,490 #M17439A

'10 Subaru Forest 2.5X: Motor Trend Certified, AWD $10,791 #28216A

'14 Mini Cooper: Countryman, Pano Roof, Auto, 66K $15,990 #B9020

'15 Subaru Impreza: Hatchback, Sunroof, Automatic, Black $18,990 #M17558A

'15 Mini Cooper: White, Automatic, 23K $15,990 #B8882

Toyota

'14 Mini Cooper: Loaded $14,590 #40339A

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS 1-866-244-9085 VOLKSWAGEN'S

'16 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, AWD, 30K, Certified $27,490 #C8747

'12 Chevrolet Equinox: 1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Backup Camera $11,776 #42079A

Subaru

Mini Cooper

'15 Toyota Prius Four: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified $15,123 #38233A

'16 Toyota Avalon: 4 Door Sedan, XLE, $21,069 #P06561 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Toyota Avalon: 4 Door Sedan, XLE, $20,384 #P06565 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Toyota Camry: LE, Blue Ribbon Metallic, $9,888 #78736B

'10 Chevy Suburban: 1 500, LT1, $14,123 #78642B

'10 Chevy Equinox: $7,950LT, Brown, 2.4L 4 Cyl, Power Seat $8,633 #11681A

'14 Chevy Equinox LS: Carfax One Owner, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth $12,700 #78207A

'13 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth $8,791 #P9002A

'09 Chevy Trailblazer: LT, Summit White, $7,990 #79036A

'12 Chevy Equinox: LTZ, FWD, 60K Miles, $13,990 #39313A

'13 Passat SE: 30K, Black, Auto, Roof, Call Today! '13 Passat SE: 40K, White, Auto, Roof, Nav, Call Today! '13 Jetta GLI: Nav, Auto, Red, 1 Owner $12,490

Volkswagen '11 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L SE Sedan, Black Uni, $6,700 #27376M

'14 CC 2.0T R-Line: Auto, Red, Local Trade $12,490 '13 Routan SE: Black, 74K, Just Arrived $13,490 '12 Jetta: SE, 73K, Sunroof, Auto, $9,990

'16 Jetta: Pure White, 15K, Auto, Local Trade $11,490

'14 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8T, SEL Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, GPS, $12,791 #P8913A

'17 Volkswagen Passat: 1.8Turbo, 12K, White $15,490 #V8390

'13 CC: R-line, Red, Auto, Loaded $12,490 '14 Passat: Wolfsburg Edt, Candy White, Alloys $12,490 '13 Passat: Roof, Nav, 35K, Auto, Black $12,990 '17 Jetta: 7K, Pure White, Auto $13,990 '17 Golf: Sport Wagen, 4K, Platinum Gray, Auto $18,990

Cadillac '17 Cadillac ATS: Red, 2K, Automatic $30,990 #C17378R

'10 Mercury Grand Marquis: Vibrant White Clear Coat, 101K Miles $6,400 #39099A

'13 Jetta: Black, 2.5 Liter, Auto, Certified, $10,990

'11 Chevy Cruze: Crystal Red Metallic Tintcoat, Heated Front Seats, Remote Start $9,440 #P6284A

Pontiac

Mercury

Infiniti

'15 Jeep Renegade Sport: One Owner Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 4WD $14,633 #78293B '05 Audi TT 3.2L: Coupe, 117K Miles $7,900 #28306A

'11 Mercedes-Benz E 350: 4matic, Sedan, 106K Miles, $13,700 #28467A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085 '91 Allante: White, 70K, Local Trade $9,990 '15 SRX: Performance, AWD, White, 22K, Certified Call Today! '12 CTS: Performance Collection, 47K, Certified, Auto $19,990

'12 Volkswagen Jetta: 2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified $9,490 #V18123A

'13 Volkswagen Passat: Diesel!! Diesel!! Automatic, $16,490 #V8683

Chevrolet Trucks '15 Chevy Silverado: 4WD, V8, White, 22" Black Wheels $31,490 #B8730

'13 Chevy Silverado 1500: Regular Cab, Long Box, Work Truck 2WD, $14,000 #170222A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Silverado: LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K $37,990 #B8861

'18 XT5: Premium, 4K, Nav, Pano Roof $49,990 '17 XTS: All Colors, All Options, 9 to Choose From, Starting at $29,990 '15 ATS: Certified, Navigation, 30K, $26,490 '08 STS: Crystal Red, 63K, Local Trade, AWD $10,990 '17 CTS: Sedan, Luxury, Crystal White, AWD, 11K, $38,990

'13 Chevy Equinox: 1LT, AWD, Silver Ice $13,990 #79176B

'11 Chevy Traverse: FWD, Sunroof/Moonroof, Power Seat $11,633 #96617B

'15 Chevy Equinox: Blue Velvet Metallic, LT w/1LT, 53K Miles $15,990 #79238A

'12 Chevy Equinox: FWD, $10,340 #P06566 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Traverse: Certified $21,000 #180213A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox: 2LT $16,000 #171245A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy HHR: LT w/ 2LT #180216B Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Traverse: Certified, FWD, $21,000 #180213A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Silverado: $21,000 #P06363 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Traverse: Chromes, M/R, $15,769 #42309B

'13 Chevy Avalanche: One Owner, Loaded $28,990 #42280A

Ford Trucks '16 Ford F-150: Super Crew, 22K, Auto $29,990 #V17738A

'15 Chevy Tahoe: LTZ, M/R, Loaded, Certified $44,590 #40473A

'10 Ford F-150: XLT, 4WD, V8, White $18,990 #B8858

'13 Chevy Equinox: Very Clean, $11,490 #42311B

'14 ATS: Luxury Collection, AWD, Black, Certified $21,990 '16 Escalade: 16K, Premium Collection, Loaded $68,990

GMC Trucks '14 GMC Sierra: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Leather, Bose, White $32,490 #V18081A

'17 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Luxury Package, Certified, $42,990 #P6241

Mitsubishi 03 Mitsubishi Eclipse: FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Sportronic 2.4L 4-Cyl, $6,490 #B8914

'13 GMC Sierra Denali: Crew Cab, Every Option $26,490 #C17388B

'14 Chevy Equinox: LT w/ 1LT, Black $12,990 #28024M

Nissan/Datsun

Misc Trucks

'11 Nissan Maxima 3.5: Clean Carfax, GPS, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, Bluetooth $10,500 #96650B

'07 Ram 1500: 4WD, Reg Cab, SLT $14,900 #P06532 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'10 Chevy Suburban 1500: Taupe Gray Metallic $15,990 #79086B

'10 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified $9,123 #95497B

'11 Ram 1500: Crew Cab, Outdoorsman Edition, 4WD $20,490 #B8657

Toyota Trucks

'14 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Super Black, $12,700 #11314A

'11 Dodge Nitro: Heat Package, 4WD, 75K, Certified $11,490 #M17411B

Sport Utility '10 Acura MDX: 3.7L, Technology Package, Aspen White Pearl $12,900 #79133A

'15 Nissan Sentra: SL, Auto, 36K Miles, Backup Camera $12,490 #C8495A '14 BMW X5: White, 37K, Nav, Pano Roof, $34,990 #B8866 '07 Nissan Altima 2.5: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles $8,990 #M17409A

'12 Mazda Mazda3i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $10,469 #33759A

'14 Chevy Equinox: LT, FWD, Black $14,123 #79240A

'12 BMW X5: xDrive 35d, AWD, Deep Sea Blue Metallic $13,990 #28502A

'08 Ford Edge: Limited, Light Ice Blue, Camel Leather $8,633 #78809B

'10 Ford Escape: Limited, FWD, Gold Leaf Metallic $8,990 #28248B

'13 Ford Escape S: Tuxedo Black, $11,700 #39028A

'15 Nissan Altima: Black, Loaded $11,969 #40929B

'10 Honda Accord: 2.4 LX, FWD, Recent Arrival! $7,990 #M17522A

'16 Buick Encore: Sport Touring, Roof, Nav, 17K $18,490 #V17674A

'06 Mazda Mazda3: Loaded $6,469 #35367A '11 Honda CR-Z: EX, New Arrival, Crystal Black Pearl, Bluetooth, $7,991 #33248B

'06 Nissan Maxima: 3.5 SE, One Owner, Clean Carfax $6,990 #P9344A

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See More Rides Ads On Page A12


NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

Trump once again wants to cut energy assistance to the poor

Under fire for travel expenses, EPA’s Pruitt cancels trip to Israel

BY DAVID SHARP Associated Press

BY JULIET EILPERIN AND RUTH EGLASH Washington Post

PORTLAND, MAINE • The administration of President Donald Trump is once again calling for the complete elimination of a heating assistance program that helps to keep the homes of low-income families warm. And once again, program supporters are vowing to fight it. The administration is using the same arguments from a year ago when it tried to abolish the program, saying that it’s rife with fraud and that no one would be left freezing if the program went away. “These arguments are very misleading and wrong,” said Mark Wolfe, director of the National Energy Assistance Directors’ Association in Washington. The program, known as LIHEAP — Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program — helps families pay their heating bills primarily in the form of a grant that’s sent directly to utility companies or heating fuel vendors. Trump tried to eradicate the program last year but encountered resistance in Congress. In October, he released nearly $3 billion, or roughly 90 percent, of the funding. Critics say that money won’t go as far as in past years because of rising prices. Nonetheless program supporters say LIHEAP is a lifeline for the elderly, disabled and others on fixed incomes. “If the president turned around and did away with that funding, I have no idea how we’d survive in the winter,” said Dwayne LaBrecque, a diabetic who is on disability after losing several toes and part of his foot to infection. LaBrecque’s income plummeted when he lost his job as a shipping manager, leaving him to cobble together an existence for himself, his fiancée and their five children in the rural Maine town of Hartford. The family received about $1,000 in heating assistance this winter, and that money is already gone. LaBrecque, a Trump supporter, said he hoped the president would have a change of heart. LaBrecque said he wouldn’t be voting for Trump again if he succeeds in killing off the program. The president’s 2019 budget was released Monday and would cut other social programs such as federal housing assistance and the food stamp program in addition to eliminating heating aid. Like last year, the proposal faces an uphill fight in Congress. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., an independent, told the White House budget director that the Trump administration was creating “a situation where people will go cold, some may freeze to death.” LIHEAP is popular in both cold weather and warm weather states. All told, the program helps 6 million households.

WASHINGTON • Environmental

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ing with officials from Israeli water technology companies and a tour of a toxic land remediation site. Pruitt also planned to travel to the port of Haifa to see sustainability efforts there, the official said. Pruitt had also explored the idea of meeting with political activists in Israel. Officials at the Yesha Council, an umbrella group representing Jewish settlers in the West Bank, said they had discussed with U.S. government officials the idea of Pruitt meeting with Oded Revivi, the council’s chief foreign envoy. But nothing had been locked into place, they added. During a trip to New Hampshire on Tuesday, Pruitt emphasized that he did not make the choice himself to switch to more expensive flights. “I’m not involved in any of those decisions,” he told the New Hampshire Union Leader. “Those are all made by the (security) detail, the security assessment in addition to the chief of staff.”

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Israel briefed on his plans. Support staff from the U.S. Embassy, which is in Tel Aviv, were supposed to accompany him on his trip, standard protocol for any visiting cabinet members. Israeli officials confirmed that Pruitt’s trip was official state business but could not say if the usual visits had been scheduled. He had been slated to meet with Israel’s Environment Minister Ze’ev Elkin, but the office of the Israeli minister, a senior member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party, confirmed that the meeting had been canceled. Neither the U.S. embassy in Israel nor the Israeli Foreign Ministry would comment on Pruitt’s change in plans. A week ago, an EPA official said the administrator intended to meet with government officials as well as private-sector representatives and visit multiple sites in Israel “to gain an understanding of Israel’s unique infrastructure and environmental challenges.” Those stops included a water recycling plant, a meet-

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02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

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Sport Utility '13 Ford Escape SE: One Owner, Ruby Red Tinted, Turbocharged VCT $9,123 #39226A

'08 Ford Edge: Black Clear Coat $9,700 #79268C

'16 Ford Explorer: XLT, FWD, Black, 18K $28,490 #B8557A

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'14 Volvo XC60: AWD, Loaded, Black, $20,990 #B8851

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Mini vans '11 Chrysler Town & Country: Limited, One Owner, Trailer Tow Package $12,990 #97114B

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'11 Kia Sportage: EX, Black Cherry, FWD, 6 speed Automatic $10,500 #78437B

'09 Kia Sportage: EX, One Owner, Very Clean $8,443 #33671A

'13 Dodge Journey: SE, Automatic, Black w/Black Cloth $7,490 #C8575B

'16 Dodge Grand Caravan: White, Allows, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $15,490 #B8839

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E-bids for St. Louis Community College's Request for Qualifications No. B0003688 for a legal consulting contract will be received until 2:00 p.m. (local time) on March 8, 2018 at cgreen2@stlcc.edu, and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be acc e s s e d o n o u r w e b s i t e at w w w.stlcc.edu/purchasing or by calling (314) 539-5225. EOE/AA Employer.

CITY OF FENTON, MISSOURI NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

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'11 Land Rover LR4 HSE: Black w/ Black Leather, Roof, Nav, DVD $20,990 #B8855

'16 Lexus NX 200t: AWD, 9K Miles, Sunroof $34,990 #C17318A

'11 Toyota Sienna: Blizzard Pearl, FWD $13,123 #97221A

'11 Toyota Sienna: Super White, FWD $12,400 #39239A

'08 Lexus GX470: 4WD, Nav, Roof, Auto, Luxury! $18,490 #C18124A

'17 Ford T350: 15 Passenger Van, Medium Raised Roof, $31,490 #B9007

'15 Lexus RX350: AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, 28K $32,490 #B8879

'13 Nissan NV200: Compact Cargo Van, FWD, Carfax 1 Owner $8,990 #B8921

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Board of Legal Services of Eastern M issouri meets 12 PM on 03/08/18, 4232 Forest Park Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63108. For more information, call 314256-8751. E-bids for St. Louis Community College, Invitation for Bid No. B0003691 for Sheet Metal Components will be received until 3:00 p.m. (local time) on March 12, 2018 at ktorrence6@stlcc.edu, a n d i m m e d i a t e l y t h e r e a f t er opened and read. Bid documents can be accessed on our website at www.stlcc.edu/purchasing or call (314) 539-5226. EOE/AA Employer.

Responses f o r St . Louis Community College's Request for Proposal No. B0003694 for supplemental IT services and support will be received until 2:00 p.m. (local time) on March 9, 2018 at cgreen2@stlcc.edu, and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be accessed on our website at www.stlcc.edu /purchasing or call (314) 539-5225. EOE/AA Employer.

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF THE CITY OF ST. CHARLES BID NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the school district of the City of St. Charles is accepting bids from companies interested in bidding on the custom cabinetry for the Building Trades house on Lot 17 Expedition Trail S ubdivision, 34 Expedition Trail Ct., St. Charles, MO 63303. The house will be a 2,874 sq.ft. story and a half. Interested bidders will need to speak with the Building Trades instructor for details and specifications prior to submitting a bid. Contact Karen Hollander at L e w is & C lark C areer C enter, 2 4 0 0 Zumbehl Rd., St. Charles, MO 63301, or by phone (636) 4434 9 6 1 between the hours of 7:00 am to 3 :0 0 pm by February 2 1 , 2018. Sealed bids should be addressed to Dr. Andrew Stewart, Director of Lew is & C lark Career Center, 2 4 0 0 Zumbehl Rd., St. Charles, MO 6 3 3 0 1 . Bids are to be received on or before 2:00 pm, February 26, 2018. Bid opening is scheduled for 2:15 pm on February 26, 2018 at 2400 Zumbehl Rd. , St . Charles, MO 63301. The district reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any technicalities therein. www.stcharlessd.org

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The City of Fenton, Missouri seeks bids from qualified contractors for Water/Ferry S treet Demolition Services. Sealed bids addressed to the Fenton City Hall at 625 New Smizer Mill Road, Fenton Mis s ouri, will be accepted by t h e C i t y u n t i l 1 0 : 0 0 a . m. (prevailing local time) on the 8th day of March 2018 at which time all bids received will be opened and read aloud. The Bid Documents are on file at Fenton City Hall. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 10: 00 a.m. at 625 New Smizer Mill Road, Fenton, MO 63026 (City Hall).

INVITATION FOR BID Southeast M issouri State University will be receiving Sealed Bids for the following work involved in the Johnson Hall HVAC Improvements Lecture Hall 200, Bid Number 10931 at the Facilities Management Service Center, 610 Washington Avenue, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 until 2:30 PM on Thursday, March 8, 2018, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Bidders are informed that the Project is subject to the requirements of Section 292.675, RSMo, which requires all contractors or subcontractors doing work on the Project to provide, and require its on-site employees to complete, a ten (10) hour course in construction safety and health approved by t h e Occupational Sa f e t y a n d Health Administration ("OSHA") or a similar program approved by the Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Relations which is at least as stringent as an approved O SH A program. All employ ees who have not previously completed the program must complete the program within sixty (60) days before the date work on the Project commences. On-site employees found on the worksite without documentation of the required training shall have twenty (20) days to produce such documentation before being subject to removal from the Project. A certified or cashier's check or bid bond executed by Bidder and approved Surety Company, in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted with each proposal. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 10:00 AM on Thursday, February 22, 2018, at the office of Facilities Management as listed above. An electronic copy of all project drawings and specifications will be issued free of charge to contractors who request the link by calling (573) 651-2599. Documents may then be printed as desired by the plan holders, as no paper copies will be issued by the University. Angela Meyer, Director Facilities Management

STLtoday.com/ contests

Bids/Proposals

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IMPROVEMENTS, ROBERT W. PLAST ER CEN T ER FOR FREE ENTERPRISE will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on MARCH 8, 2018 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans. missouristate.edu/. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

Premier Charter School is seeking proposals for a Construction Management firm. Required experience in gut rehab, flat roof repair, and mechanical with a history of meeting timelines and staying under budget. Please contact Janice Denigan at jdenigan@premiercharter school.org if you have any questions. Respond noting firm experience and include resumes of principals required by 2/16/18 emailed to jdenigan @premiercharterschool.org.

REQUEST FOR FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT COMPANY The S chool District of University City, MO is seeking proposals for food manage me nt s e rvice s . Interested parties should contact the Finance Dept. at (3 1 4 ) 2 9 0 4008 or by e-mail at shafertepe@ucityschools.org to obtain a copy of the proposal requirements. Proposals will be accepted until 9:00a.m. on March 14, 2018

Sealed bids for Renovate Existing Structure, H u n d h a u s e n Residence, Deutschheim State Historic Site, Hermann, Missouri, Project No. X1711-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 3/15/2018. For specific proje c t in f o r ma t io n and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT Accepting Sealed Bids for "Sennheiser Wireless Mic & Lapel Systems " Bids are Due February 22, 2018 10:30 AM CST Bid Specifications available through Vendor Registry on District Website http://wentzville.k12.mo.us or carolharvey@wsdr4.org

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NATION

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • A13

DIGEST Rosalynn Carter undergoes surgery Former first lady Rosalynn Carter is recovering from surgery at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Carter, 90, had surgery on Sunday to remove scar tissue from a portion of her small intestine, The Carter Center said in a statement. The surgery was successful. The scar tissue, the statement said, developed after a cyst was removed many years ago. Carter is expected to remain hospitalized for several days. Virginia House backs Medicaid expansion • Virginia’s Republicancontrolled House of Delegates has reached a draft state budget that would expand Medicaid, dropping years of partisan resistance in the face of pressure from newly empowered Democrats. The House plan would impose requirements that Medicaid

recipients seek work training and contribute to their coverage through private insurers as a condition of receiving health coverage. But the state Senate, which is also controlled by Republicans, has signaled that it will not include Medicaid expansion in its budget proposal, which was due out later Sunday. Penn State students raise $10 million for charity • Hundreds of hardy Penn State students raised more than $10 million for pediatric cancer patients in the annual 46-hour dance marathon known as Thon, in State College, Pa. The $10,151,663.93 total was announced Sunday afternoon at the conclusion of the Penn State Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic Dance Marathon, billed as the world’s largest student-run philanthropy. Money raised benefits pediatric cancer patients and their families

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Volunteers wear decorative hats Sunday during a parade to mark Chinese New Year, the Year of the Dog, in the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington.

a sightseeing helicopter crashed at the Grand Canyon earlier this month are still hospitalized in critical condition. Three British tourists were killed on Feb.

at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Grand Canyon crash victims still critical • Four people who survived when

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Hair likely to be Washington’s • Tucked in the pages of a grimy, leather-bound almanac in the archives at New York’s Union College was a tiny envelope with the hand-scrawled words “Washington’s hair.” The hair was discovered in a pocketsize almanac for the year 1793 that belonged to Philip

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J. Schuyler, son of General Philip Schuyler, who served under Washington during the Revolutionary War and founded Union College in 1795. Susan Holloway Scott, an independent scholar and author, said locks of hair were frequently given as gifts during Washington’s day and it’s likely Martha Washington gave the snip of her husband’s hair to Eliza Schuyler, daughter of the general and wife of Alexander Hamilton. Eliza passed it on to her son, James A. Hamilton, as noted by the handwriting on the envelope: “from James A. Hamilton given him by his mother, Aug. 10, 1871.” Newborn hippo in Dallas dies • The first baby hippopotamus born at a new Dallas Zoo exhibit has died. The Dallas Morning News reported that zoo officials said a female hippo gave birth early Saturday to her first calf, but she did not help the newborn to the surface of the pool soon enough. Dallas Zoo vice president of animal operations and welfare Harrison Edell said in a statement that “there was no safe way” for staff to assist the calf. Small plane lands on California highway median • A small plane landed on the median of a highway in northern California, but no injuries were reported. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor says the pilot reported engine trouble before bringing the plane down Sunday on a grassy strip dividing State Route 101 in Santa Clara County. Gregor said the pilot, who was the only person on board, wasn’t hurt during the landing near San Martin Airport, south of San Jose. The California Highway Patrol said there were no injuries on the ground. There was no damage to the single-engine Piper PA-46. From news services

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Does someone you love need nursing home care now or in the near future? Are you afraid your loved one will have to spend all their savings to qualify for benefits? If so, they can’t afford for you to miss this important workshop.

STEPHEN C. JONES

ST. LOUIS, MO – Many people find themselves in a crisis situation when a loved one suddenly needs more care than the family can provide. With care in a nursing home in Missouri routinely costing $60,000 per year or more, it’s easy to see that the stakes are high! Without the right advice many people needlessly spend down their life savings, thinking they have no other option. The good news is that this can almost always be avoided. Even if your loved one is already in a nursing home, if there are assets left to protect, there are often strategies to help save what they have left,and qualify for benefits to pay for the care they need. You just have to know how.

At this meeting, here is some of what you will discover:

• • • •

Why what you’ve heard about qualifying for nursing home benefits is probably wrong! How to avoid having your loved one’s savings wiped out by a nursing home spend down. How Medicaid works: the default rules that often don’t have to apply to you. Why the “default” rules are not the end of the story: strategies that can be used to gain eligibility for benefits, while protecting your loved one’s assets. • What can be done NOW to protect the home from being taken by the State through Medicaid Estate Recovery.

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NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

Trump vents frustration over Russia probe, rails against FBI President tweets, saying ‘they are laughing their asses off in Moscow’ at continued fallout

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY CATHERINE LUCEY AND JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. • As the

nation mourned, President Donald Trump kept largely silent about the Florida school shooting victims and the escalating gun control debate, instead raging at the FBI for what he perceived to be a fixation on the Russia investigation at the cost of failing to deter the attack. From the privacy of his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, Trump vented about the investigation in a marathon series of tweets over the weekend. He said Sunday that “they are laughing their asses off in Moscow” at the lingering fallout from the Kremlin’s election interference and that the administration of President Barack Obama bore some blame for the meddling. Trump was last seen publicly Friday night when he visited the Florida town reeling from a school shooting that left 17 dead and gave rise to a studentled push for more gun control. White House aides advised the president against golfing so soon after the tragedy, so Trump spent much of the holiday weekend watching cable television news and grousing to club members and advisers. Trump met Sunday afternoon with House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., discussing immigration, taxes, infrastructure and the Florida shooting, the White House said. Amid a growing call for action on guns, the White House said Sunday that the president would host a “listening session” with students and teachers this week, but offered no details on who would attend or what would be discussed. On Monday, 17 Washington students plan a “lie-in” near the White House to advocate for tougher gun laws. Students who survived the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland are planning a march on Washington next month to pressure politicians to take action on gun violence. Some lawmakers said it would take a

Russian meddling leads Facebook to change procedures

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This office building in St. Petersburg, Russia, photographed Sunday, is believed to be the location of a “troll factory” aiming to undermine American politics.

powerful movement to motivate Congress. “I am not optimistic that until there is real action by the American public to demand change in Congress that we’re going to see real action to confront gun violence out of this Congress,” said Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” Throughout the weekend, the president’s mind remained on Russia after an indictment from special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday charged 13 Russians with a plot to interfere in the U.S. presidential election. Trump viewed as proof of his innocence Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s declaration that the indictment doesn’t show that any American knowingly participated and is deeply frustrated that the media are still suggesting that his campaign may have colluded with Russian officials, according to a person who has spoken to the president in the last 24 hours but is not authorized to publicly discuss private conversations. Trump has fumed to associates at Mar-a-Lago that the media “won’t let it go” and will do everything to delegitimize his presidency. He made those complaints to members who stopped by his table Saturday as he dined with his two adult sons and TV personality Geraldo Rivera. Initially pleased with the Justice Department’s statement, Trump has since griped that Rosenstein did not go far enough in declaring that he was cleared of wrongdoing, and grew angry when his national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, gave credence to the notion

that Russia’s meddling affected the election, the person said. Trump’s frustration bubbled over on Twitter, where he stressed that the Russian effort began before he declared his candidacy, asserted that the Obama administration bore some blame for the election meddling and insisted he had never denied that the Kremlin interfered in the 2016 U.S. campaign. James Clapper, a former director of national intelligence, said on CNN’s “State of the Union” that the president was not focusing on the bigger threat. “Above all this rhetoric here, again, we’re losing sight of, what is it we’re going to do about the threat posed by the Russians? And he never — he never talks about that,” said Clapper. “It’s all about himself, collusion or not.” Trump said late Saturday that the FBI “missed all of the many signals” sent by the Florida suspect and argued that agents were “spending too much time trying to prove Russian collusion with the Trump campaign.” The FBI received a tip last month that the man now charged in the school shooting had a “desire to kill” and access to guns and could be plotting an attack. But the agency said Friday that agents failed to investigate. Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican and frequent Trump critic, called that tweet an “absurd statement” on CNN’s “State of the Union,” adding that the “FBI apparently made a terrible mistake, and people should be held accountable. But we need leadership out of the executive.”

MENLO PARK, CALIF. • Facebook will soon rely on centuries-old technology — the post office — to try to prevent foreign meddling in U.S. elections. Baffled in 2016 by Russian agents who bought ads to sway the U.S. presidential campaign, Facebook’s global politics and government outreach director, Katie Harbath, told a meeting of the National Association of Secretaries of State in Washington on Saturday that the company would send postcards to potential buyers of political ads to confirm they reside in the U.S. The recipient would then have to enter a code in Facebook to continue buying the ad. The method will first apply to ads that name candidates ahead of the midterm elections in November, Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said. The plan was announced a day after special counsel Robert Mueller charged 13 Russians with interfering in the presidential election. Mueller’s indictment described how Russian agents stole Social Security numbers and other information from real Americans and used them to create bank and PayPal accounts in order to buy online ads. Agents also recruited Americans to do things such as hold up signs at rallies organized to create content for Russian-created social media posts. Facebook uncovered some 3,000 Russianlinked ads on Facebook and Instagram bought before and after the November 2016 election that it says may have been seen by as many as 150 million users. But ads were only part of the problem, as the Mueller indictments say that Russian agents also set up fake pages with names such as “Secured Borders,” “Blacktivist” and “United Muslims of America” that had hundreds of thousands of followers. Facebook did not say how the new postcard method of verification would prevent foreign agents from setting up local mailing addresses and hiring people in the U.S. to check them. But Stone said the method was “one piece of a much larger effort to address foreign electoral influence on our platform.” Facebook’s efforts largely center around verifying people on the platform are who they say they are. To catch duplicitous ad-buyers, for instance, it is now testing out in Canada a system that allows people to see which ads are being bought by a Facebook page — say, a candidate’s — even if the person checking the ad is not in the group to whom the ad was intended to be shown. Stone said Facebook was also able to detect and remove “tens of thousands” of fake Facebook pages in advance of French, German and British elections last year using improved machine learning techniques. The company has said it would double the number of people working on its safety and security team to 20,000 this year and add 1,000 people to review advertising content.

Celebrate the 2018 honorees, the best of the best in local business, as chosen by Ladue News readers.

2018

Thursday, March 22, 2018

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Enjoy live music, passed hors d’oeuvres, food stations and an open bar. Mix and Mingle wiTh The plaTinuM prOviders ThaT bring gOOd business TO Our area. Honorees and local businesses will be on hand sampling products, providing demonstrations, offering giveaways and more. Complimentary valet parking and gift bags for all guests.

TickeTs On sale nOw - $35 Go to laduenews.com and click on the Platinum List link.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

MONDAy • 02.19.2018 • A15 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Winds of change Missouri’s rural way of life is threatened by more than wind power.

M

Co. of Illinois, gained local approval from issouri is stifling efforts to the counties along its path in September. bring wind power sweepThe PSC said it would pass through ing down the plains from Marion, Knox, Adair, Schuyler and Lewis Kansas to Indiana and into counties, “mostly via existing transmisthe grid beyond. State Public Service sion easements.” Commission regulators have invoked a The Grain Belt Express plan is more controversial court ruling that says wind ambitious. It would cross the northern transmission lines must be approved by part of the state from St. Joseph on the each individual county along their path. west to a terminus between Bowling The ruling gives some of the state’s Green and Hannibal on the east. It would least populated counties authority cross Buchanan, Clinton, to disrupt plans for Caldwell, Carroll, Chariton, power distribution Missouri has Randolph, Monroe and Ralls on a regional, or even been for years counties. broader, scale. The Opponents from the $2.2 billion line would the only one of group Block Grain Belt help make the nation four states to Express — Missouri warn less dependent on withhold approval that the project would not dirty, coal-fired power bring cheap clean energy or plants and provide a for the 780jobs to their communities. clean, renewable energy mile Grain Belt They say the company is source. Missouri has been for Express overhead offering “empty claims and years the only one of transmission line. false promises,” when their intent is to force property four states to withhold owners to sell easements approval for the 780or have their land condemned through mile Grain Belt Express overhead transmission line. A Houston-based company eminent domain. Rural property owners fear that the is developing the Clean Line Energy lines will displace communities, disrupt project, which regulators acknowledge farm operations and bring economic is “in the public interest” and could save disaster for some while others get electric customers in some Missouri citwealthy. It’s easy to understand why ies millions of dollars annually. farmers may not want wind turbines Those claims have not stopped landwhipping the air over their land, but owners along parts of the line from more is at stake than picturesque farms objecting to the use of eminent domain and a long-valued way of life. to build transmission towers on their The Earth is in the grip of global property. While the Grain Belt Express warming, and the nation’s power sector line has hit one snag after another trying is the largest source of carbon emissions to win regulatory approval, the PSC last contributing to the problem. Working month gave permission to an Ameren together to harness renewable energy subsidiary to proceed with its $250 milrather than blocking progress will go a lion, 100-mile Mark Twain Transmislong way in guaranteeing that the rural sion Project in northeast Missouri. way of life doesn’t change. The subsidiary, Ameren Transmission

Deepening divisions

M

Midterms, Mizzou, Parkland. Russian trolls never sleep.

Trump’s election. oments after news broke This is simply not true. Intelligence offiWednesday that a gunman cials have gone to great pains to say they had killed 17 people at a south can’t determine whether Russia flipped Florida high school, trackthe election or not, though Russia certainly ing services noted a surge in social media favored Trump over Democrat Hillary activity linked to automated political propaganda sources called “bots” and Russia- Clinton. Former National Intelligence Director linked Twitter accounts. James Clapper took issue with Pence last Russia doesn’t miss a trick when it week, telling NPR that “it stretches creducomes to exploiting divisions in American society. Little wonder, then, that Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 13 Russian citizens and three companies for interfering with the 2016 elections. And little wonder that three top U.S. intelligence officials said last week that Russia is already meddling with the midterm U.S. elections. It can hit very close to home. In the current edition of the journal Strategic Studies Quarterly, an Air Force colonel named Jarred Prier reports RusGOOGLE STREETS sian trolls seized on racial The headquarters of Russia’s Internet Research Agency in St. unrest at the University Petersburg, a notorious troll farm with ties to the Russian of Missouri-Columbia in government. The agency and 12 of its workers were indicted November 2015 for a “par- by Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Friday for interfering ticularly effective Twitter in the 2016 U.S. election. hoax.” A false and inflammatory tweet was picked up and retweeted lity, given the magnitude, scope and depth of the Russian efforts, that they didn’t have by at least 70 robot accounts. impact on individual voter decisions. But To think that Russia wouldn’t attempt again, the intelligence community did not to exploit racial, economic, political and and could not gauge the impact on indisocial divisions in the United States to vidual voter decisions.” benefit a preferred candidate or party — or Dan Coats, the director of National simply to weaken the nation — is naive. It ignores the long history by the Russian and Intelligence, Christopher Wray, the FBI director and Mike Pompeo, the CIA direcSoviet governments of using disinformator, were all appointed by Trump. They tion as a matter of state policy. told the Senate Intelligence Committee The internet, aided by a credulous and last week that their agencies see no signs uninformed U.S. citizenry and disengaged that Russia is stopping. social media platforms, has only made Said Coats: “There should be no doubt their job easier. A teenager in Omsk getting instructions and payments from a vast and that Russia perceives its past efforts as successful and views the 2018 U.S. midcompartmentalized intelligence operation term elections as a potential target for can do more damage than any of John Le Russian influence operations.” Carre’s spies. If enough Russian trolls and bots get But Vice President Mike Pence said last enough gullible people stirred up, anything week that U.S. intelligence agencies had can happen. It already did. concluded that all this effort had nothing to do with his and President Donald

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Time for action to limit semiautomatic weapons In the wake of yet another mass school shooting, leaders are calling for healing and peace. If the nation is to mourn every time there is a mass shooting in this country, we would be in a permanent state of mourning. How about a time for action? How many children and adults have to die horrible deaths before we say enough is enough and do something? In April 1996, a man wielding a semiautomatic weapon killed 35 people in Tasmania. Australia’s response? Within two weeks, all six states agreed to pass sweeping changes to their gun laws. They banned all semiautomatic rifles and shotguns, enacted a 28-day waiting period, thorough background checks and a requirement to present a justifiable reason to own a gun. They also bought back one-third of their country’s firearms and destroyed them. This hasn’t made Australia immune to gun violence, but it has had only one mass shooting since. While I don’t think banning shotguns would ever be a reality in America, why can’t we all just agree that it makes no sense whatsoever that citizens with no training and no justifiable reason are allowed to purchase semiautomatic weapons that can kill scores of people? It is time for action. Doug Stopke • St. Charles County

Keep flags at half-staff for a long time Seeing flags once again at half-staff leads me to this thought: Let’s just leave all flags lowered until our leaders pass some form of reasonable gun control. Phillip Klasskin • University City

NRA would have everyone be armed When a shooting and killing occurs in a high school, the National Rifle Association response is to arm the teachers; in a university, arm the students; in a church, arm the parishioners; in a restaurant, arm the patrons. When all of America is armed, will the killings stop? Robert McKay • St. Louis County

Stop using ‘shooter’ when describing killings I am a subscriber to the Post-Dispatch and I have been following the various stories concerning the Parkland, Fla., school killings. We all pray for the families of those who were senselessly taken by an evil, deranged individual. I wish everyone, including members of the media, would stop using the term “shooter” when describing such murderous acts. I honestly believe that these killers recognize the word “shooter” as something cool and exciting. A YouTube comment that could be from the Parkland school killer said he was going to be a professional school shooter. It was as though his sick mind thought this to be some sort of an accomplishment. John Mueller • St. Paul

Media must report on unprincipled administration I want to address the letter writers and Post-Dispatch readers who find it objectionable for the media to constantly criticize President Donald Trump. Some have expressed the need to come together as American citizens in a show of acceptance, put aside our differences

and move forward together as a country. To those people I want to ask, is it desirable for a president of the United States to be a racist bigot? Is it acceptable that America is no longer the leader of the free world? Is it acceptable that President Trump committed adultery on his third wife with a porn star and paid her $130,000 in hush money? Is it acceptable that this president has told 2,610 lies and counting, and that his lying is incessant, compulsive and destroying the credibility of the United States of America? Is it desirable to watch this administration promote cruel and hurtful legislation? Is it desirable for this administration to eliminate scientists’ positions in the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Weather Service? Is it acceptable that White House staffers have not been fully vetted for security clearance more than one year after taking office? This is why the media must maintain vigilance to report on the facts of this administration. This is an aberrant, dangerous and unprincipled administration that is destroying our democracy, our country and our trust with allies around the world. For the millions of Americans who openly oppose this pathetically unprofessional and abnormal administration, there will be no coming together — only resistance among those of us who see the truth for what it is. Donald Nations • St. Charles

‘Marginal’ hardly describes Russian election attack Sen. Roy Blunt said he believes that the Russians had only a “marginal” effect on the 2016 elections (Feb. 16). I do not think 200,000 Russian troll tweets, 3,814 Russian Twitter accounts and at least 3,000 Facebook ads is a marginal attack on our democracy. The ads and tweets were viewed by tens of millions of Americans. The Russians consider their attack on our democracy a rip-roaring success. They will certainly launch more attacks during the 2018 midterm elections because of political descriptions of the attack, such as provided by Sen. Blunt. For the next election, do not be fooled again by the political parties’ media partners, Russian Facebook ads or tweets. The media do not have to accept political ads without knowing the real source. This also includes ads from 503( c) organizations with secret donors. Voters in the next election should consider the source of information they rely on to help cast their ballot. Dan Gould • Ballwin

Hard to ‘drop’ generations of slavery and oppression I think that a few other considerations need to be mentioned, and seriously considered, in regard to the letter “Drop the concept of race, which is just a social construct” (Feb. 10). To “drop the concept of race” is to drop the concept of generations of slavery and oppression imposed on people merely for the color of their skin. To “drop the concept of race” is to ignore countless obstacles that still limit people of color today due to centuries of systemic racism. To “drop the concept” of race is to forgive white America for a crime of which it has not yet apologized. Allison Bettlach • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Past presidents spent their birthdays working, partying BY LILLIAN CUNNINGHAM Washington Post

What’s the deal with Presidents Day? It started as a celebration of George Washington’s birthday on Feb. 22. But in the 1970s, the holiday was moved to the third Monday in February to create more three-day weekends. Now we use it to honor all U.S. presidents. To help kick off the celebration, here are some tidbits about our leaders’ special days. George Washington never did much to celebrate his birthday (when he was 28, he spent the day building a fence around his peach trees). But as he got older and more distinguished, others would often throw celebrations for him. In 1778, during the Revolutionary War, a group of soldiers surprised their commander in chief by playing fife and drums outside his quarters at Valley Forge. And later, while president, galas were held in Washington’s honor — including one where, afterward, a young woman who was there wrote to her mother, “When he bowed to me, I could scarcely resist the impulse of my heart.” Thomas Jefferson was not a big fan of birthdays — a friend once recalled his saying that the only birthday he believed in celebrating was the nation’s, on the Fourth of July. In 1803, while president, Jefferson reiterated that distaste to his attorney general, writing: “I have declined letting my own birthday be known, and have engaged my family not to communicate it.” James Polk was the first president to turn 50 in office, but to

VOTES IN CONGRESS • FEB. 12-16 Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week of Feb. 12-16, including the four Senate votes in which Republicans and Democrats failed to come to a compromise on immigration reform.

say he celebrated the occasion would be a stretch. It didn’t dawn on Polk that it was his birthday until he was listening to a church sermon that day. Since then, only six other men have marked their half-century while president of the United States. Franklin Roosevelt hosted a toga party in the White House for his 52nd birthday. He dressed as Caesar, and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt dressed as the Oracle of Delphi, with guests also donning white robes and Grecian headbands. Other fun facts: • Although three presidents (John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe) have died on the Fourth of July, only one has been born on it: Calvin Coolidge. • The most well-known presidential birthday celebration was probably John Kennedy’s 45th, which was celebrated at New York City’s Madison Square Garden and featured Marilyn Monroe singing “Happy birthday, Mr. President.” However, that party took place nearly two weeks before Kennedy’s actual birthday. The following year — the year of his assassination — Kennedy celebrated aboard a yacht on the Potomac River, which runs alongside Washington. • While his father was serving as vice president, George W. Bush rang in his 40th birthday at the Broadmoor hotel in Colorado Springs with friends — and a lot of drinking. The following morning, on a hungover jog through the mountains, he decided to give up alcohol entirely. • Barack Obama is the most recent president to have turned 50 in office. He celebrated with an outdoor barbecue in the Rose Garden, followed by music and dancing in the White House.

HOUSE

Americans With Disabilities Act Lawsuits • The House on Feb. 15 passed, 225-192, a bill (HR 620) that would delay by at least four months the opportunity to file civil actions that allege public facilities are in violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act. At present, when parties seek to redress violations such as architectural barriers to wheelchair access, they can immediately register a complaint with the Department of Justice or file a civil suit in federal court. The bill adds a preliminary “notice and cure” step in which those with complaints must provide written notice to the property owner, who then has up to 120 days to show “substantial progress” toward fixing the deficiency. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Yes • Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin; Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth, Mo.; Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, Ill.; Rodney Davis, R-Taylorville, Ill.; John Shimkus, R-Collinsville; Jason Smith, R-Salem, Mo. No • William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis. Payday Loans, Usury Laws • Voting 245-171, the House on Feb. 14 passed a bill (HR 3299) that would allow the interest on payday loans to bust stateset usury limits when the loan originates with a federally chartered bank in another state having higher or nonexistent interest caps. Numerous states and the District of Columbia have usury laws that limit interest rates charged on short-term loans by financial institutions including so-called payday lenders. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Yes • Luetkemeyer, Wagner, Smith, Davis, Shimkus, Bost. No • Clay.

Bajner, Janet Marie

Janet Marie (LeBaube) Bajner, of St. Louis, Missouri, born on February 26, 1936 in St. Louis, passed away at age 81 on February 16, 2018. Survived by her son & daughter, brother, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. Donations: Evelyn's Hospice House In St. Louis

Bipartisan Immigration Plan • The Senate failed, 54-45, to reach 60 votes needed to approve a bipartisan plan that would provide a path to citizenship to 1.8 million undocumented residents known as Dreamers and $25 billion for a wall on the southern border. A yes vote was to approve the most popular of three pending immigration plans. (HR 2579) Yes • Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; Dick Durbin, D-Ill.; Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill. No • Roy Blunt, R-Mo.

Celebrations of Life

Dooling, Mary Lee - St. Louis Hanks, Fredie "Bubby" - St. Louis Karl, Richard John - Fenton Kramer, Aurelia Ann "Regie" - Ballwin, MO

Dooling, Mary Lee

Kramer, Aurelia Ann "Regie"

(nee Knop), 79, February 17, 2018. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Wednesday, 3-7 p.m. For more info, see Schrader.com.

Lichius, Donald

87, Feb. 16, 2018. Visit., Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Wed., 5-8 p.m. Private interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. For more info, see Schrader.com.

Opich, Shirley R.

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McCain-Coons Immigration Plan • Voting 52-47, the Senate failed to reach 60 votes needed to approve an immigration proposal that laid out a citizenship path for up to 1.8 million Dreamers but did not fund President Trump’s signature border wall. A yes vote supported a plan sponsored by Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Chris Coons, D-Del. (HR 2579) Yes • McCaskill, Durbin, Duckworth. No • Blunt. Sanctuary Cities, Immigration Enforcement • Voting 54-45, the Senate on Feb. 15 failed to reach 60 votes needed to adopt a GOP-sponsored proposal to deny federal nonsecurity grants to so-called “sanctuary cities” that refuse to act as an arm of federal immigration enforcement. There are more than 400 sanctuary cities nationwide. They say that allowing local police to double as federal agents would destroy rapport they need with immigrant communities to do their work. A yes vote was to adopt this amendment to HR 2579 (above). Yes • McCaskill, Blunt. No • Durbin, Duckworth.

KEY VOTES AHEAD

The House and Senate are in Presidents Day recess in the week of Feb. 19. The votes and descriptions are compiled by Voterama in Congress a legislative tracking organization.

Trump Immigration Plan • The Senate defeated, 39-60, a measure embodying a plan by President Trump that would eventually grant legality to Dreamers while funding a border wall and prohibiting

(nee Holland) Born Jan. 4, 1929, died Feb. 17, 2018. Beloved wife of the late John E. "Jack" Dooling, loving mother of John (Patricia), M a r y L e e W i l l i a ms , J o s e p h (Denise) and Kathleen "Kitty", dear grandmother of Patrick CLINKINGBEARD FUNERAL HOME, Gainesville, MO (Brenna Fitzgerald) Dooling, M a r i a h (Joe) Cericola, Katie Dooling, Abby (Tom) Wiese, and Baygents, Howard A. Aa ron Williams, dear greatFriday, February 16, 2018. Loving husband of Marylee grandmother of Henry, Owen and Pratt-Baygents and the late Kathleen Baygents; dear Violet Cericola, Nol a n and father of Lawrence (Dianne) Baygents, James (Patti) Josselyn Wiese, and Finn Dooling. Baygents, Carol (Duane) Keller and the late Mary (surviving Services: Visitation and funeral Mass will be held Tues. Feb. 20 Glen) Parker, Ruth (Thomas) Sisson and Steve (Kari) Pratt; at St. Gabriel the Archangel Catholic Church, 6303 Nottingham dearest grandpa of Kayla, Katelyn, Jamie, Thomas, Kyle and Ave. Visitation at 9 a.m. with the Mass to follow at 11 a.m. Mary Nicole; great-grandpa of Wesley, William and Nadia. Howard is Lee Dooling was an award-winning St. Louis City public school a grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, uncle and friend to teacher. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, all. contributions to the St. Vincent DePaul Society appreciated. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS Wednesday, February 21 at 10 a.m. Interment at St. Paul Churchyard Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Hanks, Fredie "Bubby" Siteman Cancer Center appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 3-8 on Friday, February 16, 2018. p.m. Best friend and love of my life Christine Odom; dear son of Czarnecki, Melissa L. Rachel and the late Fred Hanks; (nee Sutterer), Entered into rest on Saturday, February 17, 2018. dear father of Katie and the late Beloved wife of Michael Czarnecki; loving mother of Tyler, AshBen Hanks; dear grandfather of ley and Travis Czarnecki; dearest daughter of Kathy (Gary) OleSamir and Ajdin; dear father-inksy; cherished granddaughter of the late James and Nadine law of Juso; dear brother of Kim, Lemmons; sister of Bobby Oleksy; dear sister-in-law, aunt, Dennis, Denny, Debbie and cousin and special friend to many. Sharon; our dear uncle, greatServices: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 uncle, cousin and friend. Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, February 22, 10 a.m. Interment Services: Funeral from KUTIS Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, February 20, 1 p.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Visitation Monday, Donovan, Gerard L. "Jerry" Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Fri., Feb. 16, 2-9 p.m. 2018. Beloved husband of the late Shirley Ann Donovan (nee Plume); dear father of Michael J. Donovan; our dear brother-inKarl, Richard John law, uncle, cousin and friend of many. 2/17/18. Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Wed. Services: Funeral at the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral 9:30 am to St. Paul Church (Fenton) for 10 am Mass. Visitation Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Thur., Feb. 22 at 10 a.m. Tues., 4-8 pm. Interment Park Lawn. kutisfuneralhomes.com Visitation 5-9 p.m. Wednesday. Ortman Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Beautiful Memorials

most family-based immigration. A yes vote backed the least-popular immigration plan before the Senate. (HR 2579) Yes • Blunt. No • McCaskill, Duckworth, Durbin.

McCaskill was one of four Democrats to vote yes. She referenced the killing of Randy Nordman, of New Florence, Mo., who was killed by a man in the country illegally. McCaskill issued this statement: “While there are arguments to be made on both sides of this issue, my experience learning the details surrounding the death of a Missourian at the hands of an undocumented immigrant pushed me to the side of trying to force as much cooperation as possible between state, local, and federal law enforcement authorities in this space.”

SENATE

OBITUARIES

Bajner, Janet Marie - Theodosia, MO Baygents, Howard A. - St. Louis Czarnecki, Melissa L. - Imperial, MO Donovan, Gerard L. "Jerry" - St. Louis

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

(nee Motte), Friday, February 16, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Carl Opich; dear mother of Sharon (Charlie) Hood, Rose (Garreth) Dowell and the late John (surviving Becky) Opich; dear grandmother of Jolene (Daniel), Michael, Jeffrey, Randy, Daniel, Alice and Zack; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, February 23, 9:30 a.m. with Mass celebrated at St. Matthias Catholic Church 10 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Lichius, Donald - Ellisville, MO Opich, Shirley R. - St. Louis Paubel, Frederic - St. Louis Whittle, Elenora I. - St. Louis

Paubel, Frederic

in the presence of Jesus, passed away Tuesday, February 13, 2018 surrounded by his family. Beloved husband of Rosemary (nee Evers). Dear father and father-in-law of Pamela Ulrich, Kimberly (Daniel) Sextro and the late Gwen Paubel. Our dear grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, uncle, cousin and friend to many. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Humane Society of St. Louis or the American Parkinson's Disease Association in St. Louis. Services: Funeral service Tuesday, February 20, 11 a.m. at BUCHHOLZ Spanish Lake Mortuary, 1645 Redman Ave, St. Louis. Interment New Bethlehem Cemetery. Online guestbook at buchholzmortuary.com. VISITATION MON., 4-8 P.M.

Whittle, Elenora I.

Fri., 2/16/18. Vis. KUTIS AFFTON, 10151 Gravois, Tues., 2/20, 3-7 pm, then Wed., 2/21 Lutheran Ch. of Webster Gardens from 9 am until service time 10 am Interment Sunset Cem.

Fraternal Notices

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W.

Please be advised of the death of Bro. Lawrence F. Ruzicka. Journeyman Wireman on Pension Member 66 Years Passed away on February 7, 2018 Services have already been held. Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

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Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

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WORLD

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • A17

Mixed legacy and uncertain future in Iraq amid U.S. troop drawdown Coalition, local forces must battle corruption, dysfunction in addition to Islamic State BY SUSANNAH GEORGE associated Press

QAIM, IRAQ • From their out-

post on Iraq’s westernmost edge, U.S. 1st Lt. Kyle Hagerty and his troops watched civilians trickle into the area after American and Iraqi forces drove out the Islamic State group. They were, he believed, families returning to liberated homes, a hopeful sign of increasing stability. But when he interviewed them on a recent reconnaissance patrol, he discovered he was wrong. They were families looking for shelter after being driven from their homes in a nearby town. Those who pushed them out were forces from among their “liberators” — Shiite militiamen who seized control of the area after defeating the militants. It was a bitter sign of the mixed legacy from the United States’ intervention in Iraq to help defeat the militants. American-backed military firepower brought down the Islamic State “caliphate,” but many of the divisions and problems that helped fuel the extremists’ rise remain unresolved. The U.S.-led coalition, which launched its fight against Islamic State in August 2014, is now reducing the numbers of American troops in Iraq, after Baghdad declared victory over the extremists in December. Iraqi and U.S. officials say the exact size of the drawdown has not been decided. U.S. and Iraqi commanders in western Iraq warn that victories over Islamic State could be undercut by a large-scale withdrawal. Iraq’s regular military remains dependent on U.S. support. Many within Iraq’s minority groups view the U.S. presence as a buffer against the Shiitedominated central government. Still, Iranian-backed militias with strong voices in Baghdad are pushing for a complete U.S. withdrawal, and some Iraqis liken any American presence to a form of occupation. That has left an uncomfortable limbo in this area that was the last battlefield against the extremists. Coalition commanders still work with Iraqi forces to develop long-term plans for stability even as a drawdown goes ahead with no one certain of its eventual extent.

HEARTS AND MINDS — AGAIN

“Let’s go win us some hearts and minds,” Sgt. Jonathan Cary, 23, joked as he and Hagerty and the patrol convoy set off from a base outside the town of Qaim, evoking a phrase used in American

policy goals for Iraq ever since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein. After just a few hours moving on foot across farmland and orchards to a cluster of modest houses, Hagerty realized the families he thought were returnees to the area were in fact newly displaced. Their homes in Qaim had been confiscated by the government-affiliated Popular Mobilization Forces, or PMF, made up mainly of Shiite paramilitary fighters backed by Iran. “Our end goal is a stable Iraq, right?” Hagerty said later, back at the base. “But when you see stuff like that, it makes you wonder if they are ever going to be able to do it themselves.” After victories against Islamic State, the PMF has built up a presence in many parts of Sunnimajority provinces, including western Anbar. It formally falls under the command of the prime minister, but some Iraqi commanders accuse the PMF of being a rival to government power. PMF flags line highways crisscrossing Anbar. At a PMF checkpoint outside al-Asad airbase — a sprawling complex used by Iraqi and coalition forces — U.S. convoys are regularly stopped for hours while busloads of PMF fighters are waved through. U.S. Marine Col. Seth Folsom works closely with the branches of Iraq’s security forces — Sunni tribal fighters and the Iraqi army — who are increasingly concerned about the rise in power of the PMF. Iran has given no indication of dialing back its support. “The biggest question I get now is, ‘how long can we count on you being here?’” Folsom said of his conversations with Iraqi commanders and politicians. That decision ultimately rests with Iraq’s political leadership, he said. “I guess some people could see that as a cop-out, but at the same time it’s not my place as a lowly colonel to define how long the U.S. presence is going to be.”

‘FORWARD LINE OF FREEDOM’

For senior officers leading the fight against Islamic State, decades of U.S. military intervention in Iraq has defined their careers. The top U.S. general in Iraq — Lt. Gen. Paul Funk — served in Iraq four times: in the Gulf war in 1991; in the 2003 invasion; in the surge when some 170,000 American troops were serving in Iraq in 2007; and most recently in the fight against Islamic State. “It will definitely be positive,”

Funk said of the legacy of the U.S. role against Islamic State in Iraq. “People see their young men and women out here defeating evil. That’s a positive thing.” On a recent flight from Baghdad to a small U.S. outpost in northern Syria near Manbij — a trip that traversed the heart of the battlefield for the past 3½ years — Funk described the future of the fight as ideological and open-ended. “The problem is people believe it’s already over, and it’s not,” he said. “Beating the ideology, destroying the myth, that’s going to take time.” Touching down on the perimeter of the Manbij base, Funk exclaimed: “Welcome to the front line of freedom!” Funk predicts the ideological fight could take years and easily require U.S. troop deployments elsewhere. He said that is one reason he believes it’s so important to visit U.S. troops on the current front lines — to show them “the American people believe in their purpose.” Many of the young U.S. troops interviewed said they didn’t know anything about the Islamic State group when they enlisted. Rayden Simeona, 21, a corporal in the Marines, enlisted in 2014, when all he knew about the U.S. military was from movies and video games. “I felt like I wasn’t going anywhere with my life, I had no idea what IS was. I just knew I wanted to go to war,” he said. Once deployed, he said talk rarely broached the big questions of “What we are doing here?” or “Why?” “But I do wonder all the time: Why are we spending all this money in Iraq?” he said.

IS THE JUICE WORTH THE SQUEEZE?

Along Iraq’s border with Syria, the two Iraqi forces charged with holding a key stretch of territory lack direct communication. One force falls under the Defense Ministry and the other under the Interior Ministry, and their radios are incompatible. Instead, the troops use Nokia cellphones in a part of the country where network coverage is spotty to nonexistent. At the nearby coalition outpost near Qaim, U.S. Army Lt. Col. Brandon Payne spends much of his time filling communications gaps by relaying messages between branches of Iraq’s military. “The coordination is not where we hoped it would be,” Payne said. “But they do talk to each other, and we see that as a

sign of progress.” Tactical shortcomings within Iraq’s military are partially what fueled the expansion of the coalition’s footprint in Iraq in the past three years. As Iraqi ground forces demonstrated an inability to communicate and coordinate attacks across multiple fronts, U.S. forces moved closer to the fighting and sped up the pace of territorial gains. Despite the caliphate’s collapse, those weaknesses have persisted. Iraqi forces remain dependent on coalition intelligence, reconnaissance, artillery fire and airstrikes. Payne regularly shuttles among his base, Qaim and the Syrian border to coordinate security and repel Islamic State attacks from the Syrian side. “I would say we are still needed,” Payne said. “We are getting great results with this model, but you see how much goes into it.” The base, once a small, dusty outpost, now houses a few hundred coalition troops and is a maze of barracks, gyms, a dining facility and a chapel. “At some point, someone much higher up than me is going to decide the juice is just not worth the squeeze,” Payne said, referring to the cost of such a large outpost in a remote corner of the country.

ROTTEN LEADERSHIP

Iraqi army Lt. Col. Akram Salah Hadi, who works closely with Payne’s soldiers at the Qaim outpost, said coalition training and intelligence sharing had improved the performance of his unit. But overall, the U.S. effort in Iraq gives him little hope for the future. Corruption in the military, Hadi said, remains as bad as it was in 2014, when it was seen as a major reason why entire Iraqi divisions simply dissolved in the assault on Mosul. Iraqi soldiers with talent can’t rise through the ranks without political connections. Top ranks are bloated with officers who have bought promotions. “With leadership like this, the rest will always be rotten,” he said. Coalition programs that have trained tens of thousands of Iraqi troops have largely focused on the infantry, not the junior officers needed to lead units. Folsom, the U.S. Marine colonel, said military power would not heal Iraq’s divisions. “I have a saying out here,” he added, “‘You can’t want it more than them.’”

DIGEST Israel arrests senior telecom executives Israeli police said Sunday they arrested senior officials from the country’s national telephone company as part of an investigation into alleged corruption offenses. Israeli media said among those arrested were close associates of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who is fighting for his political life after being accused of taking bribes from billionaire supporters. Russian man kills 5, wounds 4 at church • A gunman opened fire with a hunting rifle on churchgoers leaving a service in Russia’s Dagestan region, killing five people and wounding four others, then was shot and killed by police. The shootings took place Sunday evening in Kizlyar, a town of about 50,000 people on the border with Chechnya. Regional Interior Ministry spokesman Ruslan Gadzhiibragimov said the gunman was an area resident and his wife had been detained for questioning. Latvian banking expert is questioned • Latvia’s top banking official, a key member of the European Central Bank, was detained Sunday after being questioned for hours by anti-corruption authorities amid accusations of bribery and money laundering in the nation’s financial system. Latvian state TV showed Ilmars Rimsevics arriving at the offices of the country’s anti-corruption agency Saturday night and leaving early Sunday, after what the broadcaster said was a raid on his office and property. Avalanche kills 2 in France • Two skiers were killed Sunday by an avalanche in the French Alps at the Val-d’Isere ski resort, close to the Italian border. Local newspaper Le Dauphine said the two victims were a man, 44, and his daughter, 11, from the Paris region who were skiing on a run that was closed due to the avalanche risk. Another avalanche, in Switzerland near the border with France, injured two people. Dynamite caused blasts at Bolivia’s Carnival • Bolivian authorities said Sunday that both of the explosions that killed 12 people during recent Carnival celebrations were caused by dynamite, not exploding gas canisters as initially thought. Interior Minister Carlos Romero said officials were still trying to determine who planted the explosives in the southern city of Oruro, and why. He said dynamite caused both the Feb. 10 and Feb. 13 explosions. From news services

All 65 aboard plane are feared dead in crash in Iran Iranian commercial plane crashes in foggy, mountainous region; aircraft had been grounded for seven years BY NASSER KARIMI AND JON GAMBRELL associated Press

TEHRAN, IRAN • An Iranian commercial airplane brought back into service only months ago after being grounded for seven years crashed Sunday in a foggy, mountainous region of southern Iran, and officials said they feared all 65 people on board were killed. The crash of the Aseman Airlines ATR-72 marks yet another fatal aviation disaster for Iran, which for years was barred from buying airplane parts for needed maintenance due to Western sanctions over its contested nuclear program. Its nuclear accord with world powers allows it to get those parts, and the country has made deals worth tens of billions of dollars for new aircraft. However, U.S. President Donald Trump’s refusal to recertify the deal has injected uncertainty into those sales while Iranians still fly in aging aircraft. The ATR-72, a twin-engine turboprop used for short-distance regional flying, went down near its destination of the southern Iranian city of Yasuj, some 485 miles south of the Iranian capital, Tehran, where it took off. It wasn’t immediately clear what caused the crash, although weather was severe in the area. Dense fog, high wind and heavy snow in the Zagros Mountains made it impossible for rescue crews in helicopters to reach the site Sunday, state television reported. Aseman Airlines spokesman Mohammad Taghi Tabatabai told state TV that all on board Flight

TASNIM NEWS AGENCY VIA AP

Family members of plane crash victims weep in the village of Bideh, near where the plane crashed in southern Iran on Sunday. All 65 passengers and crew members are believed to have died.

No. EP3704 had been killed. Those on board included 59 passengers and six crew members, the state-run IRNA news agency reported Sunday night, lowering the death to 65 from an initially reported 66. “After searching the area, we learned that unfortunately ... our dear passengers had lost their lives,” Tabatabai said. Both Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani offered their condolences. Tabatabai said the plane crashed into Mount Dena, which is about 14,435 feet tall. The

plane’s last signal, at 11:35 p.m. Saturday St. Louis time, showed it at 16,975 feet and descending, according to airplane-tracking website FlightRadar24. The pilot was in contact with the tower 14 miles from the airport, state TV said. One previous passenger on the route posted a video Sunday showing that the flight typically comes in just over the mountain peaks. Aeronautical charts for the airport warn pilots to keep an altitude of 15,000 feet in the area. The airport itself is at nearly 6,000 feet. The Iranian Red Crescent said

it had deployed to the area. Locals described hearing the crash, although no one had found the crash site yet, according to state TV. Aseman Airlines, owned by Iran’s civil service pension foundation, is a semi-private air carrier headquartered in Tehran that specializes in flights to remote airfields across the country. It also flies internationally. Aseman Airlines is Iran’s third-largest airline by fleet size, behind state carrier Iran Air and Mahan Air. However, it is banned from flying in the European Union over safety concerns.

The carrier has a fleet of 29 aircraft, including six ATR aircraft, according to FlightRadar24. The ATR-72 that crashed Sunday, with the tail number EPATS, had been built in 1993, Aseman Airlines CEO Ali Abedzadeh told state TV. On Instagram, Aseman Airlines highlighted the doomed aircraft in October, saying it had been “grounded” for seven years but would be “repaired and will be operational after checking and testing.” It wasn’t clear what led to the grounding, though Iran only recently regained access to the airplane parts market after the nuclear deal. European airplane manufacturer ATR, a Toulouse, Francebased partnership of Airbus and Italy’s Leonardo SpA., said it had no immediate information about the crash. Aseman Airlines has suffered other major crashes with fatalities. In October 1994, a twinpropeller Fokker F-28 1000 commuter plane operated by the airline crashed near Natanz, 180 miles south of Tehran, killing 66 people on board. An Aseman Airlines chartered flight in August 2008, flown by an Itek Air Boeing 737, crashed in Kyrgyzstan, killing 74 people. Under decades of international sanctions, Iran’s commercial passenger aircraft fleet has aged, with air accidents occurring regularly in recent years. After the 2015 landmark nuclear deal with world powers, Iran signed deals with Airbus and Boeing to buy scores of passenger planes worth billions of dollars. Home to 80 million people, Iran represents one of the world’s last untapped aviation markets.


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

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MONDAY • 02.19.2018 • B

WHO’S ON FIRST

(AND SECOND AND THIRD) EVER-SHIFTING INFIELD Who started for the Cards in 2017 at first, second and third? FIRST BASE

SECOND BASE

?

THIRD BASE

Ready to go Carpenter doesn’t care where he plays Moving parts Cards infield features lots of versatility

Gyorko: 102 Carpenter: 16

Cardinals infielder Matt Carpenter plays long toss last week in Jupiter, Fla.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Others: 7

Peralta: 14

Garcia: 23

Wong:99 DeJong: 19 Others: 10

Garcia: 21 Carpenter: 13

Carpenter: 110 Voit: 18

Others: 5

Martinez: 29

BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

JUPITER, FLA. • Is Matt Carpenter the first baseman or the third baseman? Is Jedd Gyorko the third baseman? Is Jose Martinez the first baseman? As the Cardinals begin fullsquad workouts Monday, the answers to all these questions are “yes.” This is to say that while the middle of the infield seems constant with Paul DeJong at shortstop and Kolten Wong at second, the corners may have a revolving-door motif. For the moment, Carpenter, programmed to play first, second and third this spring, will be spending most of his time defensively at first base although maybe not the first day or two. Manager Mike Matheny said on Sunday that Carpenter had been experiencing back tightness — he was slowed last spring by a similar back ailment that actually was a strained oblique muscle. But Carpenter insisted he wasn’t concerned “at all,” and that what he has now is not related to what he had last year when he had to scratch himself from the victorious U.S. team in the World Baseball Classic. “I’m not even supposed to be here,” Carpenter said. “We haven’t even started yet. It’s not really news.” Matheny said, “Carp’s going to focus most of his (defense) at first base at this point but he’s going to get work at third and See CARDINALS • Page B4 > Matheny counts on legends’ input. B4 > 12:05 p.m. Friday at Marlins, FSM

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The United States’ Madison Olsen crashes Friday during the women’s freestyle aerial final at Phoenix Snow Park in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Red, white and bruised Analysis: Olympics thus far have been a downer for U.S. > Ice dancing • The Canadian team of Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir will skate in competition for the final time Monday (7 p.m., KSDK, Ch. 5) > Men’s hockey • U.S faces do or die game at 9:10 p.m. Monday (NBCSN)

Blues seem unlikely for big deadline deal

BY TIM DAHLBERG Associated Press

moment for the U.S. team at this Winter Olympics. Not Shaun White blitzing the halfpipe in a final run to win gold, a victory that came with some baggage itself. Not Chloe Kim delighting fans from two countries when she won her halfpipe title. No, it came on Friday when — within 20 seconds of each other — Nathan Chen skated his way out of medal contention and Mikaela Shiffrin faltered in the slalom, with which she had been expected to win. See OLYMPICS • Page B6

residents

26 MEDALS

So far this Olympics A medal for every

204,000 NORWEGIANS UNITED STATES

320 MILLION residents

10 MEDALS

So far this Olympics A medal for every

32 MILLION AMERICANS

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See NASCAR • Page B7 > Cup Series at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Sunday, KTVI-2

See HOCHMAN • Page B4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAYTONA BEACH, FLA. • The No. 3

is No. 1 again at Daytona, on a day, in a race and at a place forever linked with the great Dale Earnhardt. Austin Dillon won the Daytona 500 on Sunday night driving the iconic No. 3 Chevrolet that Earnhardt piloted for most of his career. Earnhardt was behind the wheel of No. 3 when he won his only Daytona 500 in 1998, and when he was killed in an accident on the final lap of the race three years later. Dillon’s victory, in the 60th running

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHRIS LEE • Post-Dispatch

Bryan Eversgerd chats with Triple-A coach Dernier Orozco.

JUPITER, FLA. • This is the story about the man who won the lottery and then won the lottery again. See, thousands of boys dream of playing for the St. Louis Cardinals. Bryan Eversgerd was a farmboy from Carlyle, Ill., and a southpaw for Kaskaskia College. Went to a tryout. Worked his way up through the system. And became a Cardinal, pitching in the 1990s. Thousands of men dream of coaching for the St. Louis Cardinals. Bryan Eversgerd planted seeds all over the farm system, coaching in the minors for 15 years. So many buses. And then he got the call from the bullpen – to go to the bullpen. “It’s a dream come true again,” said Eversgerd, the Cards’ new

He wins Daytona with number linked to Earnhardt

Austin Dillon celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the Daytona 500.

New bullpen coach has pitchers’ trust

5.3 MILLION

Dillon puts No. 3 back on top

On any given night this season, the Blues have shown that they not only can compete with any teams in the league but beat them. But can they do it consistently enough to be considered a true Stanley Cup contender this year? The specific results there are mixed. There are eight teams in the National Hockey League that have more points than St. Louis. The Blues are 6-7-3 against those eight, going a combined 5-1-1 against Toronto, Vegas and Winnipeg, 1-1 vs. Pittsburgh but 0-5-2 against

> 7 p.m. Tuesday vs. Sharks, FSM

NORWAY

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • It was, perhaps, the defining

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See BLUES • Page B5

BY THE NUMBERS

‘Gerdy’ just keeps living the dream

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 2/20 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/23 vs. Jets 7 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 2/23 at Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/24 at Mets* 12:10 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/27 at Wild 7 p.m. NBCSN

Sunday 2/25 at Predators 11:20 a.m. KSDK (5)

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Mizzou women beat Vols

*Exhibition game

Sunday 2/25 vs. Astros* 12:05 p.m. FSM

FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Monday 2/26 at Twins* 12:05 p.m.

In front of the biggest home crowd in team history, the No. 13 Missouri women’s basketball team knocked off No. 11 Tennessee at Mizzou Arena Sunday afternoon, getting 32 points from Sophie Cunningham in the 7773 victory. The announced attendance of 11,092 was the most for a home MU women’s game, eclipsing the previous record of 10,321 set in 2002 against Kansas at the Hearnes Center. “I was blown away just thinking about the environment and the support, just phenomenal,” Tigers coach Robin Pingeton said during her postgame radio interview. The victory kept the Tigers (22-5, 10-4 SEC) in contention for a top-four seed and double bye in the SEC tournament in Nashville. Mizzou and Louisiana State are tied for third place, one game behind second-place South Carolina. The win was MU’s first over Tennessee since 2013 and just the second over the Lady Vols since the Tigers joined the SEC. Wearing pink uniforms for the Play4Kay cancer fund in honor of former North Carolina State coach Kay Yow, the Tigers overcame 16 turnovers by shooting 55.6 percent and making all but three of 22 free throws. Cunningham’s 3-pointer with 4:53 broke open a tie game and the Tigers played with the lead the rest of the day. Mizzou led by as many as five in the fourth quarter, forcing the Lady Vols (21-6, 9-5) to foul. The Tigers made 10 of 12 free throws in the final two minutes to close out the win. Frericks complemented Cunningham’s second 30-point game of the season with 16 points and seven rebounds while Cierra Porter added 13. (Dave Matter)

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

Wednesday 2/28 at Duquesne 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 3/3 vs. St. Bonaventure 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/24 at Kentucky 7:15 p.m. ESPN

Tuesday 2/27 at Vanderbilt 6 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 3/3 vs. Arkansas 5 p.m. ESPN or ESPN2

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN

Thursday 2/22 vs. Purdue 6 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Sunday 2/25 at Rutgers 2 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 2/28 Big Ten tourn. (NYC) vs. TBA, BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5 p.m. College women: Florida State at Duke, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Miami at Notre Dame, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Maryland at Northwestern, FS1 6 p.m. College: Howard at North Carolina Central, ESPNU 6 p.m. College women: Syracuse at Pittsburgh, FSM 6 p.m. College women: Georgia at Mississippi, SEC Network 7 p.m. College women: Baylor at Texas, ESPN2 8:05 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Kansas, ESPN 8:05 p.m. College: Minnesota at Wisconsin, FS1 9 p.m. College women: UCLA at Oregon, ESPN2 HOCKEY 3 p.m. Bruins at Flames, NHL Network 7:30 p.m. Kings at Blackhawks, NHL Network OLYMPICS • See listings on page B6 SOCCER 1:20 p.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Leipzig, FS2 1:30 p.m. FA Cup: Wigan Athletic vs. Manchester City, FS1

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Wichita State forward Rashard Kelly (0) drives to the basket against Cincinnati’s Gary Clark in the Shockers’ road win.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Virginia (24-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Wednesday.

DIGEST

2. Michigan State (26-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday.

NHL player is racially taunted in Chicago

3. Villanova (24-3) idle. Next: vs. DePaul, Wednesday.

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said the league condemns the behavior of four male fans at United Center in Chicago who on Saturday night chanted a racial taunt against a black player on the opposing team, leading them to being ejected from the building. Bettman said no one “should ever have to endure such abuse at one of our games.” Washington Capitals forward Devante Smith-Pelly was taunted by fans while he served a major penalty for fighting. The fans shouted “basketball, basketball, basketball,” during the Blackhawks’ 7-1 win. An off-ice official sitting next to Smith-Pelly notified building security and the fans were removed. Smith-Pelly understood immediately what that chant meant in being directed at a black hockey player in a sport dominated by white athletes. “It’s sad that in 2018 we’re still talking about the same thing over and over,” Smith-Pelly said. “You’d think there would be some sort of change or progression, but we’re still working toward it, I guess, and we’re going to keep working toward it.” The Blackhawks issued a statement apologizing to Smith-Pelly and the Capitals, and said they “are committed to providing an inclusive environment.” Smith-Pelly said he stepped forward publicly to call out the fans for what they said because he didn’t want to “brush it under the rug. I guess I’m trying to get the conversation started and show whoever these people were their true colors,” he said. (AP)

5. Cincinnati (23-4) lost to No. 19 Wichita State 76-72. Next: vs. UConn, Thursday.

MU falls in baseball • The University of Missouri baseball team lost at Florida International 11-5 after opening its season with wins Friday and Saturday in Miami. On Sunday, the Tigers gave away a 5-2 lead in the fifth inning, hit six batters and stranded nine runners. Cody Siebenberger (0-1), one of six MU pitchers on the day, recorded just one out in the fifth and took the loss after FIU scored the go-ahead run on Christian Khawam’s RBI double. Zach Hanna had a three-run double to give Mizzou a 5-2 lead in the fifth. (Dave Matter) Ambush swept in Syracuse • Syracuse rallied from a 2-0 deficit to beat the visiting Ambush 4-3 in a Major Arena Soccer League match. The victory completed a weekend sweep for the home team, (12-7) which beat the Ambush 7-5 Friday night. Dylan Hundelt and Cody Costakis gave the Ambush (3-18) an early lead Sunday, but the Knights responded with the game’s next four goals. The visitors’ Joao Pepe scored on the power play in the fourth quarter. The Ambush close their season next Sunday, taking on the Monterrey Flash (18-1) in a 3:05 p.m. game at Family Arena in St. Charles. (Joe Lyons) STLFC ties in tune-up game • St. Louis FC tied Florida International University 1-1- in an exhibition soccer match in Melbourne, Fla. Christian Volesky scored for STLFC. (From news services) Anderson wins tennis title • Top-seeded Kevin Anderson won the first New York Open tennis tournament, beating No. 2 seed Sam Querrey 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (1) for his fourth career ATP Tour title. Last year’s U.S. Open runner-up dominated the tiebreaker after a tight third set, winning the first six points and leading Querrey to slam his racket to the court in frustration. Anderson will move to career-high ninth in the ATP rankings that are released Monday. (AP) Butturff wins bowling title • Jakob Butturff beat Marshall Kent 244-154 in the final match of the PBA 60th Anniversary Classic, in Indianapolis, to claim his third title on the Professional Bowlers’ Association tour. Kent advanced to the championship match with a 218-210 win over Keven Williams of Springfield, Mo., who never had finished higher than 34th place in his three-year PBA career. Butturff, as the top seed, had a bye into the finals. (From news services)

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4. Xavier (24-4) idle. Next: at Georgetown, Wednesday. 6. Purdue (24-5) beat Penn State 76-73. Next: at Illinois, Thursday. 7. Texas Tech (22-5) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Wednesday. 8. Ohio State (22-7) lost to No. 22 Michigan 74-62. Next: vs. Rutgers, Tuesday. 9. Gonzaga (25-4) idle. Next: at San Diego, Thursday. 10. Auburn (23-4) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Wednesday. 11. Clemson (20-6) lost to No. 12 Duke 66-57. Next: at Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 12. Duke (22-5) beat No. 11 Clemson 66-57. Next: vs. Louisville, Wednesday. 13. Kansas (21-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 23 Oklahoma, Monday. 14. North Carolina (21-7) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Wednesday. 15. Saint Mary’s (25-4) idle. Next: vs. Pepperdine, Thursday. 16. Rhode Island (21-4) idle. Next: at La Salle, Tuesday. 17. Arizona (21-6) idle. Next: at Oregon State, Thursday. 18. Tennessee (19-7) idle. Next: vs. Florida, Wednesday. 19. Wichita State (21-5) beat No. 5 Cincinnati 76-72. Next: vs. Tulane, Wednesday. 20. West Virginia (19-8) idle. Next: at Baylor, Tuesday. 21. Texas A&M (17-10) idle. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Tuesday. 22. Michigan (22-7) beat No. 8 Ohio State 74-62. Next: at Penn State, Wednesday. 23. Oklahoma (16-10) idle. Next: at No. 13 Kansas, Monday. 24. Nevada (23-5) idle. Next: vs. San Jose State, Wednesday. 25. Arizona State (19-7) idle. Next: at Oregon, Thursday.

Shockers upset No. 5 Cincinnati • Landry Shamet scored 19 points, and No. 19 Wichita State ended the nation’s longest home-court winning streak, beating No. 5 Cincinnati 7672 to leave the American Athletic Conference race wide-open. The Shockers (21-5, 11-3) beat a Top 5-team on the road for the first time since 1964 as the Bearcats (23-4, 12-2) had their 39-game home winning streak halted. Loyola earns share of MVC title • Marques Townes scored 22 points and Clayton Custer added four 3-pointers and 17 points as Loyola-Chicago claimed at least a share of its first Missouri Valley Conference regularseason championship Sunday with a 76-66 victory at Evansville. Led by former St. Louis U. assistant coach Porter Moser, the Ramblers (23-5, 13-3) have won five straight and 12 of 13. The Purple Aces slipped to 16-13 and 6-10.

AREA

Missouri State falls to Drake • Reed Timmer completed a 4-point play with 1.8 seconds left in the game to cap a 20-point outing in Drake’s 67-63 win over Missouri State. Graham Woodward was left open in the corner for a 3-pointer to give Drake a 63-62 lead with 13.8 to go. After Alize Johnson made 1 of 2 free throws, Timmer lost control of it on a dribble through his legs, but regained it and launched a deep 3-pointer just before the buzzer. Nick McGlynn and De’Antae McMurray each added nine points for Drake (16-13, 10-6 Missouri Valley Conference).

Black sparks Illini past Cornhuskers BY MARK TUPPER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • There has

been drama watching Trent Frazier grow into a freshman scoring machine. There’s been heartache watching big leads evaporate and big comebacks fall short. But quietly and without much fanfare in the middle of this odd Illini basketball season, Leron Black has just gone about his business. On Sunday, business was very, very good. Black scored 17 of his careerhigh 28 points in the first half and continued his season-long trend of making difficult shots look easy as the Illini threw an unexpected curve into Nebraska’s NCAA Tournament push, winning 72-66 at State Farm Center. Once again Illinois was faced with a do-or-die moment with the score 63-63 and less than three minutes to go. In past close calls, Illinois had made mental errors, missed free throws or broken down on defense. But Sunday afternoon, playing before a sellout crowd of 15,544, Illinois (13-15, 3-12 Big Ten) broke through. The Fighting Illini went to Black on the low block and when he missed, he ripped away his own rebound and scored to give the Illini a 65-63 lead with 2:37 to play. The Cornhuskers pulled a point closer when Isaac Copeland hit one of two free throws with 2:25 to go. But one again Illinois turned to Black, a 6-foot-7 junior who has shown an uncanny ability to score over taller defenders or through traffic. This time he hit a difficult baseline jumper with 1:57 to go to put Illinois ahead 67-64. Each team had two scoreless possessions before Mark Smith soared for a rebound on Trent Frazier’s missed 3-pointer. The ball went out of bounds and on video review, possession was awarded to Illinois. Nebraska was forced to foul and Frazier made one of two

ILLINOIS 72, NEBRASKA 66 FG FT Reb NEBRASKA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Copeland 35 5-11 4-6 2-5 2 0 17 Roby 32 5-7 1-2 1-10 2 4 14 Gill 28 3-8 0-0 1-4 0 1 8 Palmer 36 5-14 2-4 0-3 4 2 13 33 1-9 0-0 0-2 4 4 3 Watson Taylor 18 2-2 2-3 0-3 1 2 6 Tshimanga 13 2-2 1-3 0-0 0 2 5 5 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Allen Totals 200 23-53 10-18 4-27 13 15 66 Percentages: FG.434, FT.556. 3-point goals: 10-26, .385. Team rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 9. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 9. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Black 31 11-18 3-3 1-7 0 2 28 Nichols 31 5-13 0-0 2-7 2 5 12 Alstork 19 1-2 0-0 2-3 3 1 2 Frazier 36 3-12 3-4 0-1 1 2 12 Jordan 29 3-9 0-0 1-7 1 3 6 Lucas 22 1-4 0-1 2-4 6 1 2 Smith 18 2-3 3-3 0-1 3 3 8 Eboigbodin 10 0-0 0-0 1-2 0 2 0 Williams 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Vesel 2 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 Totals 200 27-62 9-11 9-33 16 19 72 Percentages: FG.435, FT.818. 3-point goals: 9-21, .429. Team rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 8. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: 8. Steals: 3. Technical fouls: None. Nebraska 36 30 — 66 Illinois — 43 29 72 A: 15,544.

free throws with 25.4 seconds to go to push Illinois’ lead to 68-64. Nebraska immediately rushed the ball up the floor and James Palmer, Jr. scored on a layup to cut the lead to two with 19.6 seconds left. And even though he has struggled in some late-game free throw situations, coach Brad Underwood got the ball to Frazier. He was fouled with 18.3 seconds to go and made both free throws. Smith, who had his biggest impact in a Big Ten game this season, added two more to seal the victory. Black, who made 11 of 18 shots and three of four from 3-point distance, was the one player Nebraska couldn’t control. “He’s a highly rated kid out of high school who is just growing into his own,” Nebraska coach Tim Miles said. “I takes time to figure out what works for you and I’m sure Brad has been a good influence on him. Leron was terrific.” Kipper Nichols and Frazier each added 12 points and Black and Nichols each had seven rebounds. Smith scored eight points, his best offensive output since Jan. 11

(against Iowa). Illinois used hot shooting and good ball movement to blister Nebraska in the first half. Shooting 62 percent, Illinois took a 43-36 lead. But the Illini bogged down when Nebraska switched to a zone defense to open the second half. After Black scored at the 15:57 mark, Illinois went on a 5½ minute scoring drought while Nebraska opened a 52-47 lead. It was a 3-pointer by Smith that put Illinois back on top, 53-52, and seconds later came a crazy play that Underwood thought was a key to the game. A loose ball led to a wild scramble with at least three pileups. Bodies were scattered everywhere. The ball kept squirting into the air. And the fact that his entire team got in on the scrum pleased Underwood greatly. “That was the game,” Underwood said. “That’s everything, everything, everything we have to be about. That wasn’t one guy on the floor. That was three, four, all of them fighting to win the game. “They didn’t care about a little burn from the floor. They didn’t care about getting knocked. We haven’t seen that often and (today) I knew we were in great shape when we got to that point.” Copeland led Nebraska (20-9, 11-5) with 17 points. And Dixon native Isaiah Roby added 14. But after scoring 13 in the first half, he had just one free throw after halftime. Like Underwood, Frazier liked the fight that had the crowd roaring as loud as it’s been this season. “We’ve been talking about it all week in practice, playing with emotion,” Frazier said. “That one possessions, when everyone dove on the ball, that was incredible. If we come out here to fight every night like that, we’ll win.” Illinois has little time to savor its first victory since Jan. 30. The Illini play at second-ranked Michigan State on Tuesday night.


SPORTS

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • B3

James leads his team to NBA All-Star win Captain scores game-high 29 points, including decisive basket, in 148-145 victory TEAM LEBRON 148, TEAM STEPHEN 145

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LOS ANGELES • LeBron James picked a winner in the NBA All-Star Game. James scored 29 points, most of any player, and hit the go-ahead layup with 34.5 seconds to play as his hand-picked team rallied to win an uncommonly entertaining showcase, beating Team Stephen (Curry) 148-145 Sunday night. For the first time in the 67 editions of the All-Star Game, the league abandoned the traditional East-West format used since 1951 and allowed team captains James and Curry to choose their own rosters. That twist turned a sometimes staid event into the world’s richest pickup game, and the intrigue was reflected on the Staples Center court, where a real basketball game broke out. LeBron’s team even won an All-Star game with defense: On the final possession, James and Kevin Durant blanketed Curry, preventing the 3-point-shooting superstar from getting off a potential tying shot. “I think myself and Stephen took it upon ourselves when we took on this format that we had to change the way this game was played,” said James, who also had 10 rebounds and eight assists and was named the game’s most valuable player. Both teams played defense for long stretches and contested many shots, with James’ group even picking up full-court late in the first half. Team LeBron also rallied from a double-digit deficit in the final minutes, tying it at 144-144 on James’ 3-pointer with 1:31 to play. Los Angeles native DeMar DeRozan hit one free throw to put Team Steph ahead, but James claimed the lead with his layup after some sharp passing by his teammates. DeRozan then made a turnover on an attempted pass to Giannis Antetokounmpo, and Russell Westbrook broke out for a layup with 10.7 seconds left. Team Steph had one last chance, but even the usually unguardable Curry couldn’t find enough space to launch a 3 between his fellow captain and Durant, his Golden State teammate. Curry finished with 11 point,s on four-for-14 shooting. “We got stops when we needed to,” Westbrook said. Indeed. The All-Stars’ shooting percentages and final scores were way down from recent seasons, reflecting the effort on the floor. The relaxed All-Star vibe was still at

FG FT Reb LEBRON Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Durant 29:57 7-13 2-2 1-6 5 3 James 31:28 12-17 1-1 0-10 8 2 Davis 16:58 6-9 0-0 1-2 1 2 Irving 27:36 6-16 0-0 2-7 9 2 Westbrook 28:28 4-11 2-3 3-8 8 2 George 26:30 6-15 0-0 1-5 4 2 Drummond 17:25 7-7 0-0 1-3 0 2 Beal 16:51 5-10 0-0 0-0 0 1 Oladipo 15:00 3-8 0-0 0-2 3 0 Walker 13:51 5-10 0-0 1-2 1 0 Dragic 11:28 1-3 0-0 0-4 1 2 Aldridge 4:28 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 Totals 240 62-120 5-6 10-49 40 18 Percentages: FG.517, FT.833. 3-point goals: 19-58, .328. Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 14. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 14. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb STEPHEN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Antetknmpo 26:24 6-14 4-6 4-7 2 2 DeRozan 26:36 7-13 6-7 2-6 2 1 Embiid 20:04 8-13 1-1 3-8 1 3 Curry 26:34 4-14 0-0 2-6 5 0 Harden 27:04 5-19 0-0 1-7 8 1 Thompson 21:44 5-11 0-0 1-4 0 0 Lowry 21:25 2-11 0-0 2-7 11 1 Lillard 20:56 9-14 0-0 2-3 2 0 Towns 18:11 7-11 2-2 4-10 0 0 Green 18:00 0-0 3-4 3-5 2 0 Horford 12:59 2-4 2-2 0-5 2 0 Totals 240 55-124 18-22 24-68 35 8 Percentages: FG.444, FT.818. 3-point goals: 17-65, .262. Team rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 17. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 17. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. LeBron 31 45 33 39 — Stephen 42 36 34 33 — A: 17,801. Officials: James Capers, Tony Brown, Gary Zielinski

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Team LeBron’s Kevin Durant (left) celebrates with captain LeBron James on Sunday night.

Staples, however: Curry chowed down on a box of popcorn on the bench during the third quarter, and the stars made time and room for plenty of good-looking dunks and alley-oops. Each member of the winning team made a cool $100,000, a distinct raise from previous seasons in another attempt to make things more interesting.

GOLF ROUNDUP Jin Young Ko wins Australian open

South Korea’s Jin Young Ko shot a 3-under par 69 Sunday to clinch a 3-shot, start-to-finish win in the LPGA Tour’s Australian Women’s Open in Adelaide, Australia. Playing her first tournament as a full LPGA member, Ko shot 65, 69, 71, 69 to lead all four rounds and finish with a total of 274, 14-under par at the Kooyonga Golf club. Ko started the day four shots clear of 21-year-old Hannah Green, who was bidding to become the first Australian to win since Karrie Webb in 2014. Luiten wins Oman Open • Joost Luiten of the Netherlands won the inaugural Oman Open in Muscat to break a title drought of nearly 17 months. The 32-year-old Dutchman shot a 4-under 68 to finish on 16-under 272, two shots ahead of his friend, England’s Chris Wood (69). Durant secures Chubb Classic • Joe Durant birdied the final two holes — and got some help from Steve Stricker — to win the PGA Tour Champions’ Chubb Classic. Durant shot a 5-under 67 on Sunday in Naples, Florida, for a four-stroke victory over Stricker, David Toms, Lee Janzen, Billy Mayfair and Tim Petrovic. Tied with Durant with two holes left, Stricker dropped a stroke when Durant birdied the 17th. On the par-4 18th, Stricker hit into the water and made a double bogey. The 53-year-old Durant closed with a 15-footer to finish at 19-under 197 on TwinEagles’ Talon course. He earned $240,000 for his third victory on the 50-and-over tour after winning four PGA Tour titles. Associated Press

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The All-Star draft led to interesting dynamics on court. Curry chose his Golden State teammates Klay Thompson and Draymond Green, but the trio had to play against Durant. James also chose Oklahoma City duo Westbrook and Paul George to play along with Kyrie Irving, who forced a trade away from James in Cleveland just last summer.

LOS ANGELES • Bubba Watson ended two years without winning with his third victory at Riviera. Watson seized control Sunday with two par putts as everyone around him was dropping shots, then pulling ahead by holing a bunker shot on the par-3 14th hole. He closed with a 2-under 69 for a two-shot victory in the Genesis Open over Kevin Na and Tony Finau, and more tears on the 18th green. It was his first victory since he won at Riviera two years ago, rising to No. 4 in the world. Watson showed up this year at No. 117, coming off a year filled with so many doubts that he says he considered retirement on a dozen occasions. He joined Ben Hogan and Lloyd Mangrum as three-time winners at Riviera. Hogan’s victories include a U.S. Open. Na hit a wedge close to perfection from the worst angle on the reachable par-4 10th hole for a birdie and two-putted for birdie on the 11th to briefly take the lead. He fell back with consecutive bogeys and shot 69. Finau lurked all day. His last chance was an eagle putt on the 17th that stopped inches short of the hole. Patrick Cantlay had a one-shot lead going to the back nine until he ran into tree trouble on the 12th and 13th holes. The UCLA alum could do no better than pars the rest of the way for a 71 to tie for fourth with Scott Stallings (68). Phil Mickelson also was in the hunt. He was within one shot of the lead when he hit a 4-iron from a

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Irving and James had no obvious friction, even laughing and joking on the bench. Neither did Durant and Westbrook, who broke up in 2016 when Durant left Oklahoma City for Golden State. For Team Stephen, DeRozan and Damian Lillard led the way with 21 points each. Jimmy Butler didn’t play after being selected for the fourth time. The All-Star Game featured no Lakers or Clippers, who share Staples Center during the regular season. But several All-Stars have Los Angeles roots, including area natives Paul George, Russell Westbrook, DeRozan, James Harden and Klay Thompson. George and James are coveted as offseason signings by Lakers fans, but there was no reprise of the “We want Paul!” chants for the Palmdale, Calif., native after Saturday’s All-Star practice. Next year’s All-Star Game will be in Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina was scheduled to host the 2017 game, but lost it in because of the state legislature’s Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, which is considered by many to be discriminatory. Hornets owner Michael Jordan got a standing ovation when he appeared at center court to reveal the logo for next year’s game.

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Watson wins Riviera for third time

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Bubba Watson reacts after winning the Genesis Open on Sunday.

deep bunker on the 15th hole to just right of the green. But he went after birdie and watched the ball roll 20 feet down the hill, leading to bogey. Mickelson shot 68 and tied for sixth. Coming off good weeks at Phoenix and Pebble Beach, Mickelson has three straight top 10s for the first time since 2009. Watson, meanwhile, wrapped up another fun-filled week in Los Angeles on and off the golf course, which included an appearance in the NBA All-Star celebrity game. Far more memorable was getting his 10th career PGA Tour victory. “My goal has always been to get 10 wins. So many emotions going through my head right now,” Watson said, choking back tears. “You never know if you’re going to play good

again. You never know if you’re going to lift the trophy.” Watson once jokingly said he would retire if he reached 10 tour victories, though this should only motivate him more, especially with the Masters closing in. Watson already had two green jackets. He finished at 12-under 272 and moved to No. 41 in the world, which makes him eligible for the World Golf Championship in Mexico City in two weeks. Watson had a one-shot lead going into the final round, though this was up for grabs from the start. A week of sun made Riviera firmer than usual and penalized even the slightest mistakes, especially starting on the 12th hole when the course turns back toward the west and into the wind. Watson hit a delicate chip from short of the 12th green to 8 feet and made the par putt on its last turn. Then, he came up short to a tough pin on the 13th, chipped to 8 feet and made it again to take a one-shot lead. His big moment came on the 14th. Watson hit too big of a fade toward the left pin, and it came up short and into the bunker. He blasted out and watched it bang into the pin and disappear, and he pointed at caddie Ted Scott and said, “You called it.” From there he didn’t make any mistakes with pars on the next two, two putts from 60 feet for birdie on the 17th and a safe par on the 18th. Defending champion Dustin Johnson, starting the final round four shots behind, made a double bogey on No. 5 that derailed him. Johnson made a triple bogey on that hole in the opening round.


SPORTS

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 2

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • B3

James leads his team to NBA All-Star win Captain scores game-high 29 points, including decisive basket, in 148-145 victory TEAM LEBRON 148, TEAM STEPHEN 145

FROM NEWS SERVICES

LOS ANGELES • LeBron James picked a winner in the NBA All-Star Game. James scored 29 points, most of any player, and hit the go-ahead layup with 34.5 seconds to play as his hand-picked team rallied to win an uncommonly entertaining showcase, beating Team Stephen (Curry) 148-145 Sunday night. For the first time in the 67 editions of the All-Star Game, the league abandoned the traditional East-West format used since 1951 and allowed team captains James and Curry to choose their own rosters. That twist turned a sometimes staid event into the world’s richest pickup game, and the intrigue was reflected on the Staples Center court, where a real basketball game broke out. LeBron’s team even won an All-Star game with defense: On the final possession, James and Kevin Durant blanketed Curry, preventing the 3-point-shooting superstar from getting off a potential tying shot. “I think myself and Stephen took it upon ourselves when we took on this format that we had to change the way this game was played,” said James, who also had 10 rebounds and eight assists and was named the game’s most valuable player. Both teams played defense for long stretches and contested many shots, with James’ group even picking up full-court late in the first half. Team LeBron also rallied from a double-digit deficit in the final minutes, tying it at 144-144 on James’ 3-pointer with 1:31 to play. Los Angeles native DeMar DeRozan hit one free throw to put Team Steph ahead, but James claimed the lead with his layup after some sharp passing by his teammates. DeRozan then made a turnover on an attempted pass to Giannis Antetokounmpo, and Russell Westbrook broke out for a layup with 10.7 seconds left. Team Steph had one last chance, but even the usually unguardable Curry couldn’t find enough space to launch a 3 between his fellow captain and Durant, his Golden State teammate. Curry finished with 11 point,s on four-for-14 shooting. “We got stops when we needed to,” Westbrook said. Indeed. The All-Stars’ shooting percentages and final scores were way down from recent seasons, reflecting the effort on the floor. The relaxed All-Star vibe was still

FG FT Reb LEBRON Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Durant 29:57 7-13 2-2 1-6 5 3 James 31:28 12-17 1-1 0-10 8 2 Davis 16:58 6-9 0-0 1-2 1 2 Irving 27:36 6-16 0-0 2-7 9 2 Westbrook 28:28 4-11 2-3 3-8 8 2 George 26:30 6-15 0-0 1-5 4 2 Drummond 17:25 7-7 0-0 1-3 0 2 Beal 16:51 5-10 0-0 0-0 0 1 Oladipo 15:00 3-8 0-0 0-2 3 0 Walker 13:51 5-10 0-0 1-2 1 0 Dragic 11:28 1-3 0-0 0-4 1 2 Aldridge 4:28 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 Totals 240 62-120 5-6 10-49 40 18 Percentages: FG.517, FT.833. 3-point goals: 19-58, .328. Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 14. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 14. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb STEPHEN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF Antetknmpo 26:24 6-14 4-6 4-7 2 2 DeRozan 26:36 7-13 6-7 2-6 2 1 Embiid 20:04 8-13 1-1 3-8 1 3 Curry 26:34 4-14 0-0 2-6 5 0 Harden 27:04 5-19 0-0 1-7 8 1 Thompson 21:44 5-11 0-0 1-4 0 0 Lowry 21:25 2-11 0-0 2-7 11 1 Lillard 20:56 9-14 0-0 2-3 2 0 Towns 18:11 7-11 2-2 4-10 0 0 Green 18:00 0-0 3-4 3-5 2 0 Horford 12:59 2-4 2-2 0-5 2 0 Totals 240 55-124 18-22 24-68 35 8 Percentages: FG.444, FT.818. 3-point goals: 17-65, .262. Team rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 17. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 17. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. LeBron 31 45 33 39 — Stephen 42 36 34 33 — A: 17,801. Officials: James Capers, Tony Brown, Gary Zielinski

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Team LeBron’s Kevin Durant (left) celebrates with captain LeBron James on Sunday night.

at Staples, however: Curry chowed down on a box of popcorn on the bench during the third quarter, and the stars made time and room for plenty of good-looking dunks and alley-oops. The lack of competitiveness in 2017 — when the East and West combined for 374 points — prompted the league and the players union to make some changes

GOLF ROUNDUP Jin Young Ko wins Australian open

South Korea’s Jin Young Ko shot a 3-under par 69 Sunday to clinch a 3-shot, start-to-finish win in the LPGA Tour’s Australian Women’s Open in Adelaide, Australia. Playing her first tournament as a full LPGA member, Ko shot 65, 69, 71, 69 to lead all four rounds and finish with a total of 274, 14-under par at the Kooyonga Golf club. Ko started the day four shots clear of 21-year-old Hannah Green, who was bidding to become the first Australian to win since Karrie Webb in 2014. Luiten wins Oman Open • Joost Luiten of the Netherlands won the inaugural Oman Open in Muscat to break a title drought of nearly 17 months. The 32-year-old Dutchman shot a 4-under 68 to finish on 16-under 272, two shots ahead of his friend, England’s Chris Wood (69). Durant secures Chubb Classic • Joe Durant birdied the final two holes — and got some help from Steve Stricker — to win the PGA Tour Champions’ Chubb Classic. Durant shot a 5-under 67 on Sunday in Naples, Florida, for a four-stroke victory over Stricker, David Toms, Lee Janzen, Billy Mayfair and Tim Petrovic. Tied with Durant with two holes left, Stricker dropped a stroke when Durant birdied the 17th. On the par-4 18th, Stricker hit into the water and made a double bogey. The 53-year-old Durant closed with a 15-footer to finish at 19-under 197 on TwinEagles’ Talon course. He earned $240,000 for his third victory on the 50-and-over tour after winning four PGA Tour titles. Associated Press

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and add an incentive of $100,000 for each winning player. Losing players get $25,000 each. In addition, the winning team gets $350,000 donated to the charity of the captain’s choice — $200,000 more than the loser. Still, James disputed the idea that the new format — which also included the

LOS ANGELES • Bubba Watson ended two years without winning with his third victory at Riviera. Watson seized control Sunday with two par putts as everyone around him was dropping shots, then pulling ahead by holing a bunker shot on the par-3 14th hole. He closed with a 2-under 69 for a two-shot victory in the Genesis Open over Kevin Na and Tony Finau, and more tears on the 18th green. It was his first victory since he won at Riviera two years ago, rising to No. 4 in the world. Watson showed up this year at No. 117, coming off a year filled with so many doubts that he says he considered retirement on a dozen occasions. He joined Ben Hogan and Lloyd Mangrum as three-time winners at Riviera. Hogan’s victories include a U.S. Open. Na hit a wedge close to perfection from the worst angle on the reachable par-4 10th hole for a birdie and two-putted for birdie on the 11th to briefly take the lead. He fell back with consecutive bogeys and shot 69. Finau lurked all day. His last chance was an eagle putt on the 17th that stopped inches short of the hole. Patrick Cantlay had a one-shot lead going to the back nine until he ran into tree trouble on the 12th and 13th holes. The UCLA alum could do no better than pars the rest of the way for a 71 to tie for fourth with Scott Stallings (68). Phil Mickelson also was in the hunt. He was within one shot of the lead when he hit a 4-iron from a

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draft to determine the rosters — created a greater desire to win. “It’s more important that I get every one of my guys back healthy,” he told TNT during the second quarter. “We can get some good conditioning with this game.” The draft led to interesting dynamics on court, with James throwing his first pass of the night to former Cleveland teammate Kyrie Irving. The pair combined for 17 assists. “It’s pretty awesome,” Irving said about being with James again. James drafted Irving despite knowing that point guard requested a trade from the Cavs because, among other reasons, he no longer wanted to play with James. Irving was dealt to a conference rival — the Celtics — and apparently James isn’t harboring ill-will. “If (Irving) was available, I was taking him,” James said. Curry chose his Golden State teammates Klay Thompson and Draymond Green, but the trio had to play against Durant. James also chose Oklahoma City duo Westbrook and Paul George. For Team Stephen, DeRozan and Damian Lillard led the way with 21 points each. Jimmy Butler didn’t play after being selected for the fourth time.

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Bubba Watson reacts after winning the Genesis Open on Sunday.

deep bunker on the 15th hole to just right of the green. But he went after birdie and watched the ball roll 20 feet down the hill, leading to bogey. Mickelson shot 68 and tied for sixth. Coming off good weeks at Phoenix and Pebble Beach, Mickelson has three straight top 10s for the first time since 2009. Watson, meanwhile, wrapped up another fun-filled week in Los Angeles on and off the golf course, which included an appearance in the NBA All-Star celebrity game. Far more memorable was getting his 10th career PGA Tour victory. “My goal has always been to get 10 wins. So many emotions going through my head right now,” Watson said, choking back tears. “You never know if you’re going to play good

again. You never know if you’re going to lift the trophy.” Watson once jokingly said he would retire if he reached 10 tour victories, though this should only motivate him more, especially with the Masters closing in. Watson already had two green jackets. He finished at 12-under 272 and moved to No. 41 in the world, which makes him eligible for the World Golf Championship in Mexico City in two weeks. Watson had a one-shot lead going into the final round, though this was up for grabs from the start. A week of sun made Riviera firmer than usual and penalized even the slightest mistakes, especially starting on the 12th hole when the course turns back toward the west and into the wind. Watson hit a delicate chip from short of the 12th green to 8 feet and made the par putt on its last turn. Then, he came up short to a tough pin on the 13th, chipped to 8 feet and made it again to take a one-shot lead. His big moment came on the 14th. Watson hit too big of a fade toward the left pin, and it came up short and into the bunker. He blasted out and watched it bang into the pin and disappear, and he pointed at caddie Ted Scott and said, “You called it.” From there he didn’t make any mistakes with pars on the next two, two putts from 60 feet for birdie on the 17th and a safe par on the 18th. Defending champion Dustin Johnson, starting the final round four shots behind, made a double bogey on No. 5 that derailed him. Johnson made a triple bogey on that hole in the opening round.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

‘Gerdy’ instills passion

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Cards embrace tradition

HOCHMAN • FROM B1

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Hall of Famer Ozzie Smith talks with former Cardinals teammate and outfield instructor Willie McGee on Sunday.

Matheny counts on legends’ input BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

J U P I T E R , F L A . • The laughs couldn’t be contained and they echoed into the Cardinals clubhouse early Sunday morning as, for a few hours, the coaches’ room became “Comedy Central,” according to manager Mike Matheny. That could mean only one thing: Ozzie Smith and Willie McGee had been reunited. “I think that was part of the spark,” Matheny said. “But then it turned into everybody. They’re in there just telling stories. It’s the ancillary stories guys are going to get — talking about the commitment and even the history. The history of this organization is something that’s so important to us, and it’s communicated best by the voices who were a part of it.” With McGee having moved from guest instructor to full-fledged member of Matheny’s staff this year, Smith’s arrival heralded the beginning of legends weeks around the Cardinals’ spring training campus. Within an hour of reporting to Roger Dean Stadium, Smith was on the field working with minor-league shortstop Tommy Edman. On Monday, the Cardinals expect former ace Chris Carpenter to begin his turn as a guest instructor. Matheny has lobbied Hall of Fame closer Bruce Sutter to pay a visit and work with some of the young relievers the team will need for late innings. And, as games begin, Bob Gibson is scheduled to make his annual appearance and his assignment, Matheny explained, is about the same every year: “Are you kidding? You’re Bob Gibson. You walk on this field and you’ve got everybody’s attention.” Having former greats and Hall of Famers cycle through camp, slip on the uniform and even conduct some drills has become a staple of Cardinals spring training, stretching back several managers and several generations. But it’s more than instructing that they’re invited to do. Matheny invites them to play evaluator, too. “One hundred percent. One hundred percent,” the manager said. “One of my best evaluators I’m missing right now is my buddy Red (Schoendienst). It is amazing the stuff that

he would pick up. ‘Did you see that kid?’ And what did you think about the stuff?’ It’s that valuable. They’ve been around the game for so long and they just see stuff. There are guys that I need to be more conscious of, ‘What did you see?’” The Cardinals do not expect Lou Brock or Schoendienst to attend spring training this year, though Matheny said he spoke to Schoendienst on the phone Sunday morning just to get his feel for what he’s “heard, seen, and thinking.” As a guest instructor, McGee would offer his views when asked, and it was a few years ago when McGee championed a young outfielder that he had been working with. He told Smith about him, raved to Matheny about him, and tried to build some confidence in the kid because he felt Tommy Pham had the makings of a starter. Before the workout Sunday, Matheny made his annual suggestion to players to seek out Smith, whether the player is a shortstop or not. “Among us we have a guy who is a World Series champion, 15-time AllStar and 13 consecutive Gold Gloves (and) might be a guy you want to go listen to,” Matheny said. “We make a huge deal when we have our Hall of Famers, our legends, around. Because they’re not hood ornaments and they’re great about going around and making spring training feel even better. But they have a huge responsibility in passing on the tradition of being a Cardinal.” Matheny called Smith “synonymous with our brand.” And now there’s a field that says so. One of the offseason additions at Roger Dean Stadium’s back field was a sign at the practice infield that reads, “Land of Oz.” The sign adds that it is where Cardinals infielders go to become “wizards.” Smith, who has been candid about the team’s erosion of fundamentals in recent years, was thrilled by the sign — and by the return to brand-named defense he believes will come with Jose Oquendo’s return to the staff. He also had an idea about the fields. “Probably should name all of the fields for Hall of Famers,” he said. “Today I’m at Bob Gibson Field. I’m at Stan Musial Field.” He said some of the evaluation an instructor like him can do is obvious — “Hey, the ball flies off Marcell Ozuna’s bat,” he joked — and that other, more-critical takes should be left to the coaches, like McGee. Matheny wants to tease out that info

from Smith, too. “There is still a dance around here, ‘I don’t want to step on anybody’s toes,’” Matheny said. “OK. Throw that out the window. Let’s check our egos. What do we see? Let’s get out of our lanes a little bit. It’s ‘Carp Blanche.’ Give us what you got?” He did say “Carp” not “carte,” using Carpenter’s nickname. On purpose. “Run with it,” he said.

SCHAFER PITCHES, FOR NOW

For a few more weeks, two-way player Jordan Schafer will continue to focus on pitching before integrating outfield work into his schedule. The lefty, who had his bid to pitch and play for the Cardinal cut short a year ago by elbow surgery, has been only on a pitcher’s program for the early weeks of spring training, and that, he said, is because it’s where he has the most to prove. “I have to show I can get guys out, and that I am healthy,” he said. “There’s enough of a sample size of me as an outfielder. They know that.” Schafer spent six years in the majors as an outfielder and purely on his position profile would appeal to the Cardinals as one of their fastest runners, best fielders, and a lefthanded bat off the bench. Unable to find regular playing time as an outfielder, Schafer reinvented himself as a reliever and the Cardinals are giving him a chance to win a job as a multitasker. He’s on a minor-league deal and could start the season trying his two-way play at Class AAA.

EXTRA BASES

Brett Cecil, who has missed the first week of camp to attend to a personal matter, is expected to report Monday. Matheny downplayed any concern about the lefty’s readiness, and as a reliever he’ll need only a handful of exhibitions to be ready for opening day. … Brawny outfielder Tyler O’Neill reported to camp and practiced with teammates, as did center fielder Tommy Pham. … The Marlins announced Dillon Peters would start Friday’s Grapefruit League opener against the Cardinals. The Cardinals have not announced a starter. … Matheny said the one pitcher, all time, that he would have wanted to catch was Gibson. However, the manager added, the famously competitive and prickly righthander “would have hated me.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

bullpen coach. Amazing story. Incredible. ... OK, so now with that out of the way, let’s get to it — just how will the duo of Eversgerd and pitching coach Mike Maddux take the Cards to the next level? The responsibility these two men have is paramount. They must turn the question marks on the pitching staff into exclamation points. In the past two seasons, the teams with the fourlowest ERAs have made the National League playoffs. The Cards have finished seventh and sixth. Of course, Maddux is the big-name hire, but he and “Gerdy” work in concert and make for a fascinating combination. “You got a very outspoken guy with Maddux, and he’s just fun,” Manager Mike Matheny said on a sunny Sunday here while bullpen sessions stirred behind him. “And you can tell, he’s asking questions to learn about them and figure out how to help them — and then ‘Gerdy’ is just a great complement because he’s a natural coach and encourager. He’s always trying to figure out ways to push guys. You watch the field, he’s got them working, but he’s always observing. I think they complement each other well at this point.” With Eversgerd, 49, he’s the homegrown coach who grew the latest crop of pitchers, and he’s arriving in St. Louis along with some of his pitching pupils. Eversgerd coached the masterful pitching staff in Memphis last season, and on his watch, Luke Weaver and Jack Flaherty have become big leaguers — “Gerdy” helped develop Flaherty’s changeup. In a way, Eversgerd’s journey is similar to Derek Lilliquist, who groomed young Jaime Garcia, Lance Lynn and others in the minors before becoming bullpen coach for St. Louis. Lilliquist worked with Dave Duncan on the 2011 title team and then became the Cards pitching coach … until being replaced this winter by Maddux. Talking to people around camp about Eversgerd, you hear similar themes of passion. Sam Tuivailala said the players call him “the bulldog,” because Eversgerd has an attack-mode mindset on pitching. Mike Mayers, who had a 3.28 ERA with Memphis last year, spoke of the mental approach Eversgerd taught, finding that fine line between aggressiveness but control. And from my eyes, so much of coaching isn’t just being smart, but how to maximize your message. Coaches spend countless hours watching film, swimming through stats and collecting notes. I’ve sometimes seen smart young coaches deluge players with information. It’s all helpful information, but it’s too much and it backfires. It’s about picking your spots, pressing buttons and zeroing in on a few key points that the kid will definitely retain. And so far in camp, numerous folks have gushed about the communication skills of Eversgerd and Maddux. The two first met in 1996. They were pitchers in Red Sox camp. Maddux ended up making the team, “Gerdy” didn’t. “I remember him being young and really hungry for information,” said Maddux, 56. “And really wanting to blend in. And with his personality, he blended in right away. He was a hard-working young man. Our time together wasn’t long enough, but now we get to rekindle that romance. We’re going to be partners here for a while.” Maddux is part guru, part goof, finding cracks in mechanics and then cracking jokes. Of he and “Gerdy,” the coach made this comparison: “I would just say we’re Johnny Carson-Ed McMahon. You say something, he laughs. And that keeps everybody going — he’s got a great cackle! A great sense of humor. … “Right now, we’ve got 32 pitchers, so there are going to be 32 different (coaching) philosophies. Customize it with everybody. Everybody is their own guy. … And I think having ‘Gerdy’ there is invaluable. It’s been invaluable because he does have traction with (the young pitchers). He knows them personally. That’s one of the big things — we can all see physically what they do, but he definitely speeds (the process) to get to know the guy, because they already trust him. And the trust is something I have to earn.” There wasn’t much walking in Memphis. Eversgerd’s staff allowed a league-low 366 free passes. And their 3.77 ERA not only led the league, but was also the only ERA under 4.00 in the Pacific Coast League. So many of those Memphis men will be with St. Louis this season, reunited with their pitching coach in the bullpen. He helped get them to this level — now he and Maddux must take them to the next one. “Gerdy” has spent a lifetime preparing for this job. “Somebody once told me that you learn twice as much as a coach than you do as a player, and I truly believe that,” said the pride of Carlyle High. “It’s been great. I’m really fortunate to be in this organization because of the guys that have come through this system – the George Kissells, the Dave Ricketts — this organization is so blessed to have so many great people. Red Schoendienst, Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, name after name after name — and you get a little nugget from each one. I’ve been blessed to be surrounded by so many great baseball people, and it’s rubbed off, I guess.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

Versatility of Carpenter, Gyorko, Martinez will create options CARDINALS • FROM B1

he’s going to get work at second. “We’re probably not going to move him around a whole lot at the beginning. We just want to be careful. It’s something that’s happened before and we just want to stay ahead of it.” Matheny said he also didn’t think it to be a problem but “any time you have one thing start to bother you, it’s always a danger of that being a domino effect, of compensating, and then something else is liable to pop up. “He’s out here doing his own voluntary work. We’re just keeping an eye on him. Once again, there’s not a huge rush. We know how much he works. Sometimes these can be a blessing in disguise, too, especially for a guy like him. We’re at times having to take his bat away from him.” Matheny said Carpenter had come to camp well ahead of most players and taken many ground balls. “He’s ahead,” Matheny said. Carpenter has made fewer

starts (177) at first base in his career than at second (189) and third (414) although 110 of those starts at first came last year when he had 16 starts at third and 13 at second. “Most seasons, I really don’t stay at one spot,” he said. “We plan for all of it and adjust as we go. The plan for this year is to get a few reps at every spot so it doesn’t sneak up on us.” The kicker here is that last year Carpenter finished with a sore right shoulder, and he isn’t entirely sure that changing positions and throws didn’t have something to do with it. “Umm. . . good question,” Carpenter said. “It’s hard to say that it didn’t. I definitely think that when you prepare for a season to throw at third, it’s different than preparing for a throw at first. Who knows? It’s all probably a part of it. But I think we’re probably past that and, hopefully, it won’t come back this season.” For Carpenter, first base was a work in progress last year because he didn’t get as many

repetitions there in the spring. “Where I was at the end of the year compared to where I was at the beginning was night and day,” said the 32-year-old. “I think the coaches would agree. “I don’t know what it looks like from a metrics standpoint, but I feel like I improved a bunch. We’re hoping that this back tightness will be a thing that will last a couple of days and we won’t have to worry about it.” He may not line up at the same position every day, but Carpenter plans on being an everyday player. “I could care less what (the position) is _ whatever keeps me in the lineup, whatever makes us the best team that day, whatever serves the need,” he said. Matheny said that Gyorko would see most of his work at third base this spring with some appearances at second, where he has made 340 starts compared to 139 at third. 102 of which came last year. “I think it’s going to be mostly third,” said Gyorko, who started at first, second, third and short-

stop in his first year with the Cardinals in 2016. “But I prepared this off-season to be able to play second, if need be, and maybe short. “We’ll see. Nothing is guaranteed around here but with Jose in the fold ... I’m probably moving down the depth chart at first.” Gyorko, who said he “wore down” in the second half of last season when he also had a right hamstring injury, has redistributed his weight by cutting back on his carbs in the off-season. “Bread, potatoes, rice ... they’re gone. It (stinks),” Gyorko said, smiling. Matheny said that Martinez, who surprised observers with his big 2017 season, would get work both at first base and in the outfield this spring. “The catalyst is going to be to try to find at-bats for Jose,” Carpenter said. “He’s limited only to first base and outfield, so on a day when it looks like you want to get him in there, might be a day that I give Jedd some rest or, depending on how Kolten’s play-

ing or what’s going on with him, physically with him, to give him a rest. “There’s no doubt that Jose’s bat plays for our lineup. But, with the way the season works out, your best hitter off the bench always plays more than you think he’s going to play. I was Jose Martinez in 2012 (when Carpenter had 296 at-bats and batted .294). “You hate to say it, but someone’s going to get hurt.” The Cardinals are hoping for their first playoff appearance in three seasons. Gyorko is among those hoping for his first. He has played five seasons in the majors. “It’s annoying that I can’t get there,” he said. “That’s why we play. “To see how much energy and excitement there is during those playoff games ... it’s not that I want to get there. I need to get there.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • B5

Hosmer, Padres agree to 8-year deal ASSOCIATED PRESS

MLB NOTEBOOK

Just the thought of free agent first baseman Eric Hosmer joining the downtrodden, youthful San Diego Padres sent a morning jolt through the team’s spring training clubhouse. The on-field vibe seemed equally cheery, as country music blared and players went to work under sunny skies in the Arizona desert. Hosmer reached a preliminary agreement on an eight-year, $144 million contract with the Padres, pending a physical. A person with direct knowledge of

the deal confirmed the tentative deal, speaking on the condition of anonymity Sunday because there had been no formal announcement of Hosmer’s signing. It would become official once he passes a physical early in the week. While the final position players reported Sunday — most were already in spring camp — ahead of Monday’s first fullsquad workout, Hosmer, who spent is first seven major league seasons with Kansas City, wasn’t expected in the desert until at

EASTERN CONFERENCE GP 59 56 61 56 58 57 58 59 GP 61 58 59 59 60 60 59 60

W 39 35 36 26 24 21 22 17 W 35 33 31 30 29 27 29 27

Red Sox bring back Nunez • Boston has re-signed infielder Eduardo Nunez to a one-year contract with a player option for 2019, giving them another proven second baseman to fill in while Dustin Pedroia recovers

from knee surgery . Nunez’s deal was done on Sunday, the day before the Red Sox hold their first full-squad workout of spring training. He gets a guaranteed $6 million, according to multiple reports, including $4 million this season and a $2 million buyout. Nunez can reportedly exercise a $4 million option for 2019. The 30-year-old batted a career-high .313 with 33 doubles and 12 home runs over 114 games last season between San Francisco and Boston. After being acquired by the Red Sox in a trade on July 25, Nunez made 25 of 38

starts at second base. He also hit eight homers in only 38 games for Boston. Angels sign Young, Carter • The Los Angeles Angels have signed veteran slugger Chris Carter and outfielder Chris Young. Carter got a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training on Sunday, while Young agreed to a one-year contract. Young hit .235 with 25 RBIs for the Red Sox last year. With the Yankees last season, Carter batted .201 with eight homers, but the first baseman led the NL with 41 homers for Milwaukee in 2016.

NHL NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Ottawa Montreal Buffalo Metropolitan Pittsburgh Washington New Jersey Philadelphia NY Islanders Carolina Columbus NY Rangers

least Monday. The 28-year-old Hosmer batted a career-high .318 in 2017 and matched his best from the previous season with 25 home runs. A four-time Gold Glover and AllStar in ’16, he drove in 94 runs and scored 98 last season. He also had a career-best .385 onbase percentage.

L 17 13 20 24 25 27 29 31 L 22 18 20 19 25 23 25 28

OT 3 8 5 6 9 9 7 11 OT 4 7 8 10 6 10 5 5

Pts 81 78 77 58 57 51 51 45 Pts 74 73 70 70 64 64 63 59

GF 211 186 204 166 155 156 149 141 GF 195 182 180 178 200 162 157 173

GA 159 139 172 185 174 199 185 195 GA 180 174 181 172 214 180 169 191

Home 20-6-1 19-7-4 19-8-2 13-9-3 12-12-7 14-11-5 14-10-6 8-17-4 Home 23-7-1 20-8-2 16-10-3 14-9-6 16-10-4 15-10-6 17-11-2 18-11-3

Away 19-11-2 16-6-4 17-12-3 13-15-3 12-13-2 7-16-4 8-19-1 9-14-7 Away 12-15-3 13-10-5 15-10-5 16-10-4 13-15-2 12-13-4 12-14-3 9-17-2

Div 10-5-1 12-2-2 9-5-1 8-4-1 6-13-2 6-10-3 10-6-2 5-6-3 Div 12-5-0 11-5-3 10-7-1 8-4-5 10-8-1 6-7-5 10-9-3 7-8-3

L 15 14 21 22 20 23 26 L 15 19 20 21 22 30 30 32

OT 9 9 4 4 7 4 8 OT 4 8 11 8 5 4 6 10

Pts 79 77 72 72 69 66 58 Pts 82 72 69 68 67 52 52 44

GF 196 177 179 171 172 179 169 GF 202 175 167 168 167 162 157 143

GA 157 150 157 153 166 173 170 GA 158 161 170 173 145 191 189 197

Home 23-5-2 19-7-3 21-9-1 19-12-0 20-5-6 20-8-1 13-13-3 Home 22-4-2 17-9-3 15-9-4 13-14-3 14-9-3 12-14-2 11-15-3 9-16-4

Away 12-10-7 15-7-6 13-12-3 15-10-4 11-15-1 11-15-3 12-13-5 Away 17-11-2 15-10-5 14-11-7 17-7-5 17-13-2 12-16-2 12-15-3 8-16-6

Div 9-6-2 11-4-2 10-10-0 9-6-2 10-9-0 7-9-1 6-9-2 Div 14-1-1 15-4-3 9-5-6 8-6-3 8-9-3 10-7-0 5-10-1 3-8-5

Oilers win on McDavid’s hat trick

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Dallas Blues Minnesota Colorado Chicago Pacific Vegas San Jose Anaheim Calgary Los Angeles Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 59 57 59 60 58 58 59 GP 58 59 60 59 58 58 59 59

W 35 34 34 34 31 31 25 W 39 32 29 30 31 24 23 17

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Sunday Philadelphia 7, NY Rangers 4 Edmonton 4, Colorado 2 New Jersey 3, Carolina 2, OT Pittsburgh 5, Columbus 2 Toronto 3, Detroit 2 San Jose 5, Dallas 2 Winnipeg 7, Florida 2 Saturday Los Angeles 4, Buffalo 2 Anaheim 3, Minnesota 2, SO Ottawa 6, NY Rangers 3 Arizona 1, Edmonton 0 New Jersey 4, Tampa Bay 3 Vegas 6, Montreal 3 Pittsburgh 5, Toronto 3 Detroit 3, Nashville 1

Chicago 7, Washington 1 Vancouver 6, Boston 1 Florida 6, Calgary 3 Monday Minnesota at NY Islanders, noon Washington at Buffalo, 2 p.m. Boston at Calgary, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Nashville, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Anaheim at Vegas, 9 p.m.

Tuesday Montreal at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 6 p.m. Columbus at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Boston at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Wednesday Ottawa at Chicago, 7 p.m. Dallas at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Calgary at Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

Sharks 5, Stars 2

Maple Leafs 3, Red Wings 2

Dallas 0 0 2 — 2 San Jose 4 1 0 — 5 First period: 1, San Jose, Pavelski 15 (Meier, Vlasic), 0:27. 2, San Jose, Karlsson 8 (Pavelski, Meier), 5:59. 3, San Jose, Boedker 10 (Braun, Hansen), 15:08. 4, San Jose, Boedker 11 (Vlasic, Tierney), 17:23. Penalties: Johns, DAL, (tripping), 3:21; Methot, DAL, (tripping), 15:23. Second period: 5, San Jose, Braun 2 (Karlsson, Pavelski), 5:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 6, Dallas, Smith 5 (Johns, Ritchie), 5:35. 7, Dallas, Pitlick 11 (Klingberg, Roussel), 8:57. Penalties: None. Shots: Dallas 11-5-12: 28. San Jose 6-14-8: 28. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 0; San Jose 0 of 2. Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 24-16-3 (5 shots-1 saves), Lehtonen 10-5-1 (23-22). San Jose, Jones 18-15-5 (28-26). A: 17,562. Referees: Chris Rooney, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Kory Nagy.

Toronto 0 2 1 — 3 Detroit 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: None. Second period: 1, Detroit, Mantha 20 (Tatar, Nyquist), 5:51 (pp). 2, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 24 (Gardiner, Bozak), 7:02. 3, Toronto, Marner 14 (Kadri), 7:20. Penalties: Zaitsev, TOR, (hooking), 4:05; Ouellet, DET, (slashing), 10:39; Larkin, DET, (delay of game), 16:00. Third period: 4, Detroit, Zetterberg 8 (Helm, Nyquist), 9:17. 5, Toronto, Matthews 27 (Nylander, Hyman), 19:29. Penalties: None. Shots: Toronto 15-12-7: 34. Detroit 12-8-9: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 2; Detroit 1 of 1. Goalies: Toronto, McElhinney 7-4-0 (29 shots-27 saves). Detroit, Mrazek 8-7-3 (34-31). A: 19,515. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Scott Driscoll.

Penguins 5, Blue Jackets 2 5 2

Devils 3, Hurricanes 2, OT

Flyers 7, Rangers 4 Philadelphia 3 2 2 — 7 NY Rangers 0 — 4 3 1 First period: 1, NY Rangers, Hayes 14 (Sproul), 1:30. 2, Philadelphia, MacDonald 4 (Lehtera, Filppula), 4:53. 3, NY Rangers, Nash 18 (Buchnevich, Skjei), 10:54. 4, Philadelphia, Laughton 10 (Provorov), 12:11. 5, Philadelphia, Manning 5 (Giroux, Konecny), 14:53. 6, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 10 (Holland), 17:21. Penalties: Gostisbehere, PHI, Major (fighting), 0:15; Buchnevich, NYR, Major (fighting), 0:15; Simmonds, PHI, Major (fighting), 11:23; DeAngelo, NYR, Major (fighting), 11:23; Weise, PHI, Major (fighting), 12:14; McLeod, NYR, Major (fighting), 12:14; Gilmour, NYR, (high sticking), 15:16. Second period: 7, Philadelphia, Patrick 6 (Simmonds, Manning), 2:01. 8, NY Rangers, Holland 1 (McLeod, Holden), 5:47. 9, Philadelphia, Konecny 15 (Giroux, Couturier), 15:40. Penalties: None. Third period: 10, Philadelphia, Giroux 20 (Konecny), 9:23. 11, Philadelphia, Lehtera 1 (Weise, Filppula), 12:46. Penalties: None. Shots: Philadelphia 11-9-17: 37. NY Rangers 14-14-12: 40. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 1; NY Rangers 0 of 0. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 8-7-3 (14 shots-11 saves), Lyon 1-1-0 (26-25). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 23-21-4 (37-30). A: 18,006. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Greg Devorski.

Jets 7, Panthers 2

New Jersey 1 1 0 1 — 3 Carolina 0 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, New Jersey, Hischier 13 (Vatanen, Kinkaid), 10:56 (pp). Penalties: Pesce, CAR, (holding), 10:27; Slavin, CAR, (tripping), 15:22. Second period: 2, Carolina, Teravainen 14 (van Riemsdyk, Rask), 6:05. 3, New Jersey, Zacha 6 (Moore), 15:33. Penalties: Slavin, CAR, (cross checking), 7:44; Bratt, NJ, (holding), 8:12; Moore, NJ, (holding), 13:23; Lappin, NJ, (hooking), 16:34. Third period: 4, Carolina, Skinner 20 (Slavin, Pesce), 18:42. Penalties: Skinner, CAR, (interference), 11:23; Zacha, NJ, (high sticking), 11:23. Overtime: 5, New Jersey, Hall 24 (Palmieri, Vatanen), 4:37. Penalties: None. Shots: New Jersey 9-6-3-3: 21. Carolina 13-15-13-1: 42. Power-plays: New Jersey 1 of 3; Carolina 0 of 3. Goalies: New Jersey, Kinkaid 13-7-2 (42 shots-40 saves). Carolina, Ward 17-8-4 (21-18). A: 18,680. Referees: Francis Charron, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Kiel Murchison.

Florida 1 1 0 — 2 Winnipeg 1 2 4 — 7 First period: 1, Florida, Malgin 10 (Bjugstad, Matheson), 8:57 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Connor 20 (Wheeler, Laine), 12:06 (pp). Penalties: Myers, WPG, (tripping), 7:16; Pysyk, FLA, (boarding), 11:53. Second period: 3, Winnipeg, Ehlers 23 (Morrissey, Myers), 4:39. 4, Florida, Barkov 20 (Dadonov, Yandle), 7:34 (pp). 5, Winnipeg, Scheifele 18 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 18:29. Penalties: Roslovic, WPG, (holding), 7:12; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 9:28; Bjugstad, FLA, (tripping), 16:25. Third period: 6, Winnipeg, Connor 21 (Wheeler, Myers), 3:38. 7, Winnipeg, Little 13 (Myers, Perreault), 6:03. 8, Winnipeg, Perreault 16 (Roslovic), 15:27. 9, Winnipeg, Laine 27 (Little, Perreault), 18:25. Penalties: Byfuglien, WPG, (interference), 10:27. Shots: Florida 12-8-7: 27. Winnipeg 12-15-7: 34. Power-plays: Florida 2 of 4; Winnipeg 1 of 2. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 15-13-5 (34 shots-27 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 31-8-8 (27-25). A: 15,321. Referees: Jon Mclsaac, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Brian Mach.

Oilers 4, Avalanche 2

Points leaders

Edmonton 0 1 3 — Colorado 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Colorado, Jost 6, 4:04. Penalties: Caggiula, EDM, (tripping), 5:03; Colorado bench, served by Wilson (too many men on the ice), 10:09. Second period: 2, Edmonton, McDavid 24 (Benning, Maroon), 11:57. 3, Colorado, Kerfoot 15 (Wilson, Lindholm), 13:07. Penalties: Draisaitl, EDM, (slashing), 9:13. Third period: 4, Edmonton, McDavid 25 (Draisaitl, Russell), 8:59. 5, Edmonton, Strome 8 (Larsson, Cammalleri), 13:18. 6, Edmonton, McDavid 26 (Draisaitl, Klefbom), 18:34. Penalties: Benning, EDM, (tripping), 14:05. Shots: Edmonton 17-8-15: 40. Colorado 9-11-6: 26. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 1; Colorado 0 of 3. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 20-22-2 (26 shots-24 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 14-12-2 (39-36). A: 18,076. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Dave Jackson. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Libor Suchanek.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Connor McDavid had his third hat trick of the season, and the Edmonton Oilers beat the hosting Colorado Avalanche 4-2 Sunday to snap a six-game losing streak. McDavid now has 11 goals in the last nine games and two hat tricks. His first two goals tied it up, and his last one was into an empty net at 18:34 of the third. He has five goals in two games against the Avs this season. Ryan Strome also scored and Cam Talbot had 24 saves for the Oilers, who snapped Colorado’s 10-game home winning streak. Hall scores late in OT as Devils beat Hurricanes • Taylor Hall scored on a rebound with 22 seconds left in overtime, giving the New Jersey Devils a 3-2 vic-

NHL SUMMARIES

Pittsburgh 3 1 1 — 1 Columbus 0 1 — First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Sheahan 7 (Oleksiak, Guentzel), 1:41. 2, Pittsburgh, Dumoulin 4 (Malkin, Rust), 6:57. 3, Columbus, Panarin 16 (Atkinson, Dubois), 9:53. 4, Pittsburgh, Sheahan 8 (Guentzel, Oleksiak), 11:29. Penalties: Jarry, PIT, served by Guentzel, (tripping), 18:41. Second period: 5, Pittsburgh, Aston-Reese 4 (Letang, Hunwick), 9:29. Penalties: Guentzel, PIT, (slashing), 13:16. Third period: 6, Columbus, Wennberg 6 (Jenner), 2:21. 7, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 19 (Maatta), 14:09. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 7-5-11: 23. Columbus 10-13-14: 37. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 0; Columbus 0 of 2. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Jarry 10-4-2 (37 shots-35 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 24-19-5 (23-18). A: 19,100. Referees: Chris Lee, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Derek Nansen.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oilers’ Adam Larsson (right) congratulates center Connor McDavid on his game-winning empty-netter.

4 2

PLAYER Kucherov Malkin McDavid Giroux Stamkos Gaudreau Wheeler Kessel Crosby Ovechkin Voracek Tavares Kopitar Hall Barzal Bailey MacKinnon Couturier Marchessault Schenn Kane

TEAM TBL PIT EDM PHI TBL CGY WPG PIT PIT WSH PHI NYI LAK NJD NYI NYI COL PHI VGK STL CHI

G 31 33 26 20 24 19 16 24 19 34 11 30 25 24 16 15 24 29 21 24 22

A 46 37 43 49 44 49 51 42 47 31 54 34 38 38 46 47 37 30 37 31 33

PTS 77 70 69 69 68 68 67 66 66 65 65 64 63 62 62 62 61 59 58 55 55

tory over the hosting Carolina Hurricanes. The goal extended Hall’s league-best scoring streak to 11 games. New Jersey had won the first of the teams’ four meetings this season on Thursday night to start the Hurricanes’ threegame losing streak. Keith Kinkaid stopped 40 shots for the Devils. Flyers surge past Rangers • Travis Konecny scored the tiebreaking goal late in the second period and Flyers goaltender Alex Lyon made 25 saves in relief and the visiting Philadelphia Flyers went on to down the New York Rangers 7-4 on Sunday. Konecny’s 15th goal of the season at 15:40 of the second snapped a 4-4 tie as the surging Flyers won for the sixth time in

seven games. Konecny also had two assists. Claude Giroux and Jori Lehtera scored in the third to finish the win, Lyon’s first in the NHL. Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist allowed all seven goals. Sheahan shoots Penguins past Blue Jackets • Riley Sheahan scored two goals in the first period, rookie Tristan Jarry had 35 saves and the Pittsburgh Penguins beat the hosting Columbus Blue Jackets 5-2. Jake Guentzel had a goal and two assists, and Brian Dumoulin and Zach Aston-Reese also scored for the Penguins. They have won five straight and 10 of their last 12. The win moved them past Washington into first place in the Metropolitan Division.

Don’t expect major deal at deadline BLUES • FROM B1

Boston, Nashville, Tampa Bay and Washington. All of that factors into how general manager Doug Armstrong views the fast-approaching trade deadline — now just a week away. He has been nothing if not consistent in how he views this year’s team and this year’s deadline. With that in mind it seems safe to assume that nothing that happens good or bad in the three games remaining — against San Jose, Winnipeg, and Nashville — before the Feb. 26 trade deadline is likely to change that. In early January, Armstrong told the Post-Dispatch that he didn’t think the team’s championship window was open yet — that it might be a year or two away. He added that as the trade deadline approached, the idea was to protect as many of the team’s “good young pieces” as possible. In an interview Saturday with Post-Dispatch columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz, the message hadn’t changed. Armstrong views the Blues as a top 10 team this season, but not a leading contender that’s a player, or even two, away from the Stanley Cup. And that continues to guide his approach. Armstrong doesn’t want to go all-in to obtain a “rental” — a player scheduled for unrestricted free agency after this season. That doesn’t mean he won’t pursue one if the price is right, and there are some interesting rentals thought to be on the market. Among them are Buffalo’s Evander Kane, Edmonton’s Patrick Maroon and Rick Nash and Michael Grabner of the New York Rangers — all forwards. Kane, 26, has been a productive scorer with 28 goals last season and 18 so far this season. But he’s had some off-the-ice issues, and if the Blues were to

acquire him it would take a lot to re-sign him after this season given his $5.25 million salarycap hit this season. Keeping Nash beyond the Blues’ remaining 22 regularseason games and any playoff contests this season wouldn’t figure to be cheap, either, given his $7.8 million cap hit this campaign. In addition, Nash has a modified no-trade clause, and the Blues would have to be on his list of 12 teams that would be acceptable to him in a trade. Nash has scored 30-plus goals eight times during his career, but while still productive at age 33, his goal-scoring numbers are declining. He has 18 goals this season and had 23 last season. Nash’s Rangers teammate, Grabner, is three years younger at age 30 and has scored 50 goals since the start of the 2016-17 season. Keeping him beyond the remainder of this season figures to be much cheaper given his $1.65 million cap hit this year. Last but not least is Maroon, a St. Louisan who once played club hockey for Oakville High. He’s 29, has a cap figure of $1.5 million and has a big body that can provide a presence in front of the net. After scoring a career-high 27 times last season, Maroon has 14 goals this season. But again, like Grabner, Nash and Kane, the Blues would be trading for a player in Maroon who will be a unrestricted free agent after this season. In the case of any of those players, would it be worth parting with top prospects Tage Thompson, Robert Thomas, Jordan Kyrou or Klim Kostin — and perhaps more — as part of a deal? As for players who have time left on their contract after this season, the one name that has come up for a while and linked to the Blues is Ottawa winger Mike Hoffman. Hoffman, known for a quick release, averaged 27 goals in his previous three seasons. Al-

though not quite on that pace, he has scored 16 goals this season. At age 28, he’s under contract for two additional seasons, at $5.19 million per year. One of Hoffman’s Ottawa teammates, center Derick Bressard, also has been mentioned as a possible trade candidate. He’s under contract through the 2018-19 season, at $5 million. Armstrong has a reputation for keeping such matters close to the vest. So there’s no telling who he’s had discussions on, or in whom he’s most interested. It seems just as likely that it’s a name (or names) that has not come up in media speculation. As for who the Blues might send out in any pre-deadline trades? Besides the organization’s top prospects, there has been speculation surrounding the likes of Robby Fabbri, Patrik Berglund and Vladimir Sobotka. Whether there’s any fire behind that smoke remains to be seen. Otherwise, the Blues don’t have a ton of salary-cap room, even to squeeze somebody in for the final quarter of the season. CapFriendly.com projects the Blues to have $339,879 in cap room by season’s end. And keep in mind, the Blues have limited resources in terms of draft picks to deal. Their first-rounder in the upcoming draft goes to Philadelphia as the final piece of last year’s trade for Brayden Schenn. What once seemed like a surplus on defense is no more, what with Joel Edmundson out until very late in the regular season because of a broken forearm and Jay Bouwmeester missing most practices to finesse a lower-body injury through the remainder of the campaign. So with a projected $14.4 million of salary-cap space for 2018-19, the best time to strike might be this coming offseason, not this coming trade deadline. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


P Y E O N G NEWS CH A NG 2018

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • MONDAY • 02.19.2018

HIGHLIGHTS SOUTH KOREA’S LEE UPSET, BUT IT TOOK AN OLYMPICS RECORD

IT’S DO OR DIE FOR AMERICANS VS. SLOVAKIA IN MEN’S HOCKEY

SWAN SONG FOR CANADIAN LEGENDS IS MUST-WATCH TV

South Korea’s darling of the Games, Lee Sang-hwa, lost her two-Olympics hold on the 500 meters speedskate, losing to Japan’s Nao Kodaira. Lee took silver in 37.33 seconds, but Kodaira’s 36.94 is an Olympics record, and she’s the first woman under 37 seconds at sea level. Brittany Bowe was the highest U.S. finisher, in fifth place, and teammates Heather Bergsma and Erin Jackson were 11th and 24th.

Ryan Donato’s two goals in a 2-1 win over Slovakia on Thursday is Team USA’s only win in three Group B hockey games, so the Americans will be skating to stay alive from here on. First up is a rematch Monday (9:10 p.m., NBCSN), the winner advancing to the quarterfinals, where it will lace up for a quick turnaround Tuesday against the Czech Republic. The Czechs and Sweden are the only 3-0 teams in the tournament.

The Canadian ice dancing team of Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir will skate in competition for the final time Monday (7 p.m., KSDK, Ch. 5). Partners on the ice for 20 years, they’ve won four Olympics medals together (2 gold, 2 silver) and would be the only figure skaters with five medals if they reach the podium. Their rivaly with France’s Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron should bring out the best from both teams.

Nao Kodaira

NOTEBOOK

SUNDAY’S MEDALISTS

Hirscher wins, hits milestone Victory in men’s giant slalom is by biggest Olympic margin in 50 years

ALPINE SKIING Men’s Giant Slalom GOLD: Marcel Hirscher, Austria SILVER: Henrik Kristoffersen, Norway BRONZE: Alexis Pinturault, France BIATHLON Men’s 15km Mass Start GOLD: Martin Fourcade, France SILVER: Simon Schempp, Germany

FROM NEWS SERVICES

BRONZE: Emil Hegle Svendsen, Norway

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Two events, two gold

medals for Marcel Hirscher. And the 28-year-old Austrian has a good chance to leave the Winter Olympics with one more. Hirscher won the men’s giant slalom Sunday, finishing in 2 minutes, 18.04 seconds, and beating Norway’s Henrik Kristoffersen by 1.27 seconds — the largest victory in the event at an Olympics in 50 years. He won the alpine combined last week and still has the slalom — his best event — to come. “At t h e m o m e n t , I ’m pumped!” Hirscher said. At Yongpyong Alpine Center, Hirscher led after the first run, but saw Kristoffersen rise from 10th-fastest in the morning to having the quickest time in the second run. “Wow, it was not so easy to be the absolute favorite in this discipline, then sitting up there as the leader from the first run knowing that Henrik ripped it,” Hirscher said. “I had no choice. I knew I have to give 100 percent and I had to go into this battle.” France’s Alexis Pinturault took the bronze, finishing 1.31 seconds behind Hirscher. Ted Ligety, the 2014 Olympic champion, was 15th with a time of 2:21.25.

Canada soars in ice dancing • Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lead the ice dance competition at the after a record-breaking short program set to the rock music of the Rolling Stones, the Eagles and Santana. The Canadian duo scored 83.67 points to lead their training partners and biggest rivals, Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron, by more than a point heading into Tuesday’s free dance. The French couple scored 81.93 points for their Latin short program. Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue of the U.S. are third, two-hundredths of a point ahead of their compatriots, Alex and Maia Shibutani. .

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Men’s 4x10km Relay GOLD: Norway (Martin Johnsrud Sundby, Didrik Toenseth, Simen Hegstad Krueger, Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo) SILVER: OA Russia (Andrey Larkov, Alexey Chervotkin, Alexander Bolshunov, Denis Spitsov) BRONZE: France (Jean Marc Gaillard, Maurice Manificat, Adrien Backscheider, Clement Parisse) FREESTYLE SKIING Men’s Aerials GOLD: Oleksandr Abramenko, Ukraine SILVER: Jia Zongyang, China BRONZE: Ilia Burov, OA Russia Men’s Slopestyle GOLD: Oystein Braten, Norway SILVER: Nick Goepper, United States BRONZE: Alex Beaulieu-Marchand, Canada SPEEDSKATING Women’s 500 GOLD: Nao Kodaira, Japan SILVER: Lee Sang-Hwa, South Korea BRONZE: Karolina Erbanova, Czech Republic

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Austria’s Marcel Hirscher celebrates after roaring to the men’s giant slalom title on Sunday.

Fourcade wins in photo • In a dramatic photo finish in the biathlon 15-kilometer mass start, France’s Martin Fourcade edged Germany’s Simon Schempp to win his second gold medal of the Games. Fourcade was caught by Schempp over the frantic final 100 meters and the two skiers came to the line neck-and-neck. Fourcade, the world’s No. 1 biathlete, reached out his left foot ahead of Schempp as both skiers slid through the finish. Fourcaden quickly slammed his ski pole to the ground thinking he’d lost the race, but replays showed he won by the narrowest of margins. It was a reversal for Fourcade, who had taken silver in a dramatic finish to the same event in Sochi four years ago. It was his fourth career gold medal. Schempp took the sil-

ver and Norway’s Emil Hegle Svendsen grabbed the bronze. Braaten skies to gold • Norway’s Oystein Braaten captured the gold medal in ski slopestyle by edging American Nick Goepper, who added a silver medal to the bronze he won four years ago in Sochi. Canadian Alex BeaulieuMarchand took the bronze. American Gus Kenworthy failed to land any of his three runs and came in last. Kenworthy, who came out as gay about two years after capturing the silver medal in Russia and has become a strong, steady voice in the LGBT community. Canada rebounds in curling • Canada’s women curlers are fighting their way back from a shocking string of losses. The Ca-

nadians nabbed an 8-3 win over Japan in round-robin play. Canada’s women are the defending world champions and came into the Games as the favorite to win gold. But they fell to last place in the standings after losing their first three games. Monday’s game marks their third straight win, putting them fourth place in the rankings. Korea and Sweden are now tied for first place, followed by Japan. Drug suspicion • Russia’s Alexander Krushelnitsky, who won the bronze medal in mixed-doubles curling with his wife, is suspected of having tested positive for the banned substance meldonium, Reuters reported, citing an unnamed source. Some of Krushelnitsky’s teammates said a coach confirmed the report.

Big budget, little production from American squad OLYMPICS • FROM B1

And with it went any chance the U.S. had of redeeming itself in what is shaping up as a frustrating Olympics for an American team that had hopes of ending up near the top of the medal table. The biggest team in the Olympics — 241 athletes — has been a flop so far, winning so few medals that you can count them on both hands. Take away the new wave of snowboarding events, and you can count them with one hand. But if those waving the red, white and blue want a statistic that really stuns, consider this: • Through the first 61 medal events, Norway — a nation of 5.3 million people — was leading with 26 medals, or one for every 204,000 Norwegians. • The U.S., a nation of some 320 million people, had 10 medals. That’s one for every 32 million Americans. It could be worse. Russia — which won the medal count in Sochi four years ago — still was looking for its first gold. But at least the Russians — who are not an official team here — have an excuse because some of their best dopers from Sochi were banned from these Games. Even the partial Russian team had 11 medals overall, one more than the U.S. The U.S. runs an extensive winter training program with millions of dollars spent every year to train top athletes just for this occasion. The U.S. Olympic Committee took in more than $300 million in 2016 alone, with a big chunk of that used to train

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The United States’ Lindsey Vonn finished in a tie for sixth place in the women’s super-G Olympics competition on Saturday in South Korea.

elite athletes. That’s a lot of money with very little to show for it. Through the daytime events Sunday (U.S. time), American athletes were sixth on the medal list. Take away the new sports added to the Olympics since 1992, and the U.S. would have a grand total of two medals. The Associated Press had projected the U.S. to have 20 medals at this point, and Team USA has averaged 30 medals total over the last three Winter Olympics. With the dismal performance have come dismal ratings for NBC, which paid $963 million for the Games, up from $775

million for Sochi. While the Olympics still win the primetime battle in the U.S., the total audience tuning in was down 16 percent Thursday night, with the viewership on NBC alone down 29 percent. What should be more concerning to the network — and U.S. officials — is the lack of star power emerging in South Korea. Shiffrin delivered gold in her first race but stumbled in the giant slalom. White, meanwhile, might be in his last Olympics and was tarnished by reports of a civil sexual harassment suit against him. U.S. teenagers have a lot of

potential. Kim dominated in the halfpipe and could be a favorite in future Olympics, and fellow 17-year-old Red Gerard won gold in men’s snowboard slopestyle. The teen figure skaters Nathan Chen and Vincent Zhou finished fifth and sixth, but they were the biggest jumpers in the competition and could be back with more experience. At the other end of the experience spectrum, former gold medalists Lindsey Vonn and Ted Ligety have so far failed to deliver. Add in the lackluster performance of the U.S. men’s hockey team — which lost 4-0 to Russia on Saturday — and the absence of any medals in (non-short track) speed skating, and there’s not a lot to cheer about. The Games still could be salvaged somewhat by some of the stars with more events left. Shiffrin has an outside shot at two golds in the combined and downhill, and Vonn is one of the favorites in the downhill. There’s a new Big Air event in which Americans are competitive, and there might be a medal or two left in some of the outlying sports. But the days when Eric Heiden could win five speed skating golds or American figure skaters could dominate appear over. It’s hard to believe, but the last medal for a U.S. woman figure skater was the silver Sasha Cohen won in Turin 12 years ago. The rest of the world has caught up. That’s little excuse, though, for what has been so far a flop of Olympic proportions.

MEDALS TABLE Nation

G

S

B

Tot

Norway

9

Germany

9

9

8

26

5

4

18

Canada

5

5

6

16

Netherlands

6

5

2

13

OA Russia

0

3

8

11

United States

5

3

2

10

Austria

4

2

4

10

France

4

2

4

10

Japan

2

5

3

10

Sweden

4

3

0

7

Switzerland

2

4

1

7

South Korea

3

1

2

6

Italy

2

1

3

6

Czech Republic

1

2

3

6

China

0

5

1

6

Britain

1

0

3

4

Slovakia

1

2

0

3

Australia

0

2

1

3

Finland

0

0

3

3

Belarus

1

1

0

2

Spain

0

0

2

2

Poland

1

0

0

1

Ukraine

1

0

0

1

Slovenia

0

1

0

1

Kazakhstan

0

0

1

1

Liechtenstein

0

0

1

1

Through Sunday

TV SCHEDULE MONDAY 6:10 a.m. • Women’s hockey semifinal: USA vs. TBA (live); Ski jumping: men’s team large hill final (NBCSN) 10 a.m. • Bobsled: two-man final; Speedskating: men’s 500 final; women’s team pursuit (NBCSN) 11:30 a.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Canada (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Ski jumping: men’s large hill final; Speedskating: men’s 500 final; women’s team pursuit (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. China (CNBC) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: Ice dancing final (live); Skiing: women’s downhill training (NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Figure skating: ice cancing final (live); Freestyle skiing: women’s halfpipe final (live); Bobsled: two-man final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 9:10 p.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination game, teams TBA (live, NBCSN) 11:05 p.m. • Freestyle skiing: men’s halfpipe (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 11:30 p.m. • Men’s curling: Canada vs. Japan (NBCSN) EARLY TUESDAY 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination game, teams TBA (live, NBCSN)


P Y E O N G NEWS CH A NG 2018

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • MONDAY • 02.19.2018

HIGHLIGHTS SOUTH KOREA’S LEE UPSET, BUT IT TOOK AN OLYMPICS RECORD

IT’S DO OR DIE FOR AMERICANS VS. SLOVAKIA IN MEN’S HOCKEY

SWAN SONG FOR CANADIAN LEGENDS IS MUST-WATCH TV

South Korea’s darling of the Games, Lee Sang-hwa, lost her two-Olympics hold on the 500 meters speedskate, losing to Japan’s Nao Kodaira. Lee took silver in 37.33 seconds, but Kodaira’s 36.94 is an Olympics record, and she’s the first woman under 37 seconds at sea level. Brittany Bowe was the highest U.S. finisher, in fifth place, and teammates Heather Bergsma and Erin Jackson were 11th and 24th.

Ryan Donato’s two goals in a 2-1 win over Slovakia on Thursday is Team USA’s only win in three Group B hockey games, so the Americans will be skating to stay alive from here on. First up is a rematch Monday (9:10 p.m., NBCSN), the winner advancing to the quarterfinals, where it will lace up for a quick turnaround Tuesday against the Czech Republic. The Czechs and Sweden are the only 3-0 teams in the tournament.

The Canadian ice dancing team of Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir will skate in competition for the final time Monday (7 p.m., KSDK, Ch. 5). Partners on the ice for 20 years, they’ve won four Olympics medals together (2 gold, 2 silver) and would be the only figure skaters with five medals if they reach the podium. Their rivaly with France’s Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron should bring out the best from both teams.

Nao Kodaira

NOTEBOOK

SUNDAY’S MEDALISTS

U.S. women to play for gold Blowout of Finland vaults hockey team into championship contest

ALPINE SKIING Men’s Giant Slalom GOLD: Marcel Hirscher, Austria SILVER: Henrik Kristoffersen, Norway BRONZE: Alexis Pinturault, France BIATHLON Men’s 15km Mass Start GOLD: Martin Fourcade, France SILVER: Simon Schempp, Germany

FROM NEWS SERVICES

BRONZE: Emil Hegle Svendsen, Norway

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Jocelyne Lamoureux and

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Men’s 4x10km Relay

Hilary Knight scored power-play goals 34 seconds apart midway through the second period to give the United States a 4-0 lead, and the Americans went on to beat Finland 5-0 early Monday in an Olympics women’s hockey semifinal game. The U.S. advanced to the goldmedal contest, which is set for 10 o’clock Wednesday night (St. Louis time). It will face the winner of the Canada-Russian team game, which was to be played later Monday. Finland meets the loser of that contest for the bronze medal. Against Finland, Gigi Marvin and Dani Cameranesi scored in the first period for the U.S. Cameranesi added a power-play goal in the third period. Maddie Rooney made 14 saves in gaining the shutout.

Hirscher dominates • Two events, two gold medals for Marcel Hirscher. And the 28-year-old Austrian has a good chance to leave the Winter Olympics with one more. Hirscher won the men’s giant slalom Sunday, finishing in 2 minutes, 18.04 seconds and beating Norway’s Henrik Kristoffersen by 1.27 seconds — the largest victory in the event at an Olympics in 50 years. He won the alpine combined last week and still has the slalom — his best event — to come. “At t h e m o m e n t , I ’m pumped!” Hirscher said. At Yongpyong Alpine Center, Hirscher led after the first run, but saw Kristoffersen rise from 10th-fastest in the morning to having the quickest time in the second run. “Henrik ripped it,” Hirscher said. “I had no choice. I knew I have to give 100 percent and I had to go into this battle.” France’s Alexis Pinturault took the bronze, finishing 1.31 seconds behind Hirscher. Ted Ligety, the 2014 Olympic champion, was 15th with a time of 2:21.25.

GOLD: Norway (Martin Johnsrud Sundby, Didrik Toenseth, Simen Hegstad Krueger, Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo) SILVER: OA Russia (Andrey Larkov, Alexey Chervotkin, Alexander Bolshunov, Denis Spitsov) BRONZE: France (Jean Marc Gaillard, Maurice Manificat, Adrien Backscheider, Clement Parisse) FREESTYLE SKIING Men’s Aerials GOLD: Oleksandr Abramenko, Ukraine SILVER: Jia Zongyang, China BRONZE: Ilia Burov, OA Russia Men’s Slopestyle GOLD: Oystein Braten, Norway SILVER: Nick Goepper, United States BRONZE: Alex Beaulieu-Marchand, Canada SPEEDSKATING Women’s 500 GOLD: Nao Kodaira, Japan SILVER: Lee Sang-Hwa, South Korea BRONZE: Karolina Erbanova, Czech Republic

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A shot by American Jocelyne Lamoureux sails by Finland goalie Noora Raty for a goal in the second period.

Canada soars in ice dancing • Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lead the ice dance competition after a record-breaking short program set to the music of the Rolling Stones, the Eagles and Santana. The Canadian duo scored 83.67 points to lead their training partners and biggest rivals, Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron, by more than a point heading into Tuesday’s free dance. The French couple scored 81.93 points for their Latin short program. Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue of the U.S. are third, two-hundredths of a point ahead of their compatriots, Alex and Maia Shibutani.

Martin Fourcade edged Germany’s Simon Schempp to win his second gold medal of the Games. Fourcade was caught by Schempp over the frantic final 100 meters and the two skiers came to the line neck-and-neck. Fourcade, the world’s No. 1 biathlete, reached out his left foot ahead of Schempp as both skiers slid through the finish. Fourcaden quickly slammed his ski pole to the ground thinking he’d lost, but replays showed he won by the narrowest of margins. It was his fourth career gold medal. Schempp took the silver and Norway’s Emil Hegle Svendsen grabbed the bronze.

Fourcade wins in photo • In a dramatic photo finish in the biathlon 15-kilometer mass start, France’s

Braaten skies to gold • Norway’s Oystein Braaten captured the gold medal in ski slopestyle by

edging American Nick Goepper, who added a silver medal to the bronze he won four years ago in Sochi. Canadian Alex BeaulieuMarchand took the bronze. American Gus Kenworthy failed to land any of his three runs and came in last. Canada rebounds in curling • Canada’s women curlers are fighting their way back from a shocking string of losses. The Canadians nabbed an 8-3 win over Japan in round-robin play. Canada’s women are the defending world champions but fell to last place in the standings after losing their first three games. Monday’s match marks their third straight win, putting them fourth place in the rankings. Korea and Sweden are tied for first place, followed by Japan.

Big budget, little production from American squad OLYMPICS • FROM B1

And with it went any chance the U.S. had of redeeming itself in what is shaping up as a frustrating Olympics for an American team that had hopes of ending up near the top of the medal table. The biggest team in the Olympics — 241 athletes — has been a flop so far, winning so few medals that you can count them on both hands. Take away the new wave of snowboarding events, and you can count them with one hand. But if those waving the red, white and blue want a statistic that really stuns, consider this: • Through the first 61 medal events, Norway — a nation of 5.3 million people — was leading with 26 medals, or one for every 204,000 Norwegians. • The U.S., a nation of some 320 million people, had 10 medals. That’s one for every 32 million Americans. It could be worse. Russia — which won the medal count in Sochi four years ago — still was looking for its first gold. But at least the Russians — who are not an official team here — have an excuse because some of their best dopers from Sochi were banned from these Games. Even the partial Russian team had 11 medals overall, one more than the U.S. The U.S. runs an extensive winter training program with millions of dollars spent every year to train top athletes just for this occasion. The U.S. Olympic Committee took in more than $300 million in 2016 alone, with a big chunk of that used to train

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The United States’ Lindsey Vonn finished in a tie for sixth place in the women’s super-G Olympics competition on Saturday in South Korea.

elite athletes. That’s a lot of money with very little to show for it. Through the daytime events Sunday (U.S. time), American athletes were sixth on the medal list. Take away the new sports added to the Olympics since 1992, and the U.S. would have a grand total of two medals. The Associated Press had projected the U.S. to have 20 medals at this point, and Team USA has averaged 30 medals total over the last three Winter Olympics. With the dismal performance have come dismal ratings for NBC, which paid $963 million for the Games, up from $775

million for Sochi. While the Olympics still win the primetime battle in the U.S., the total audience tuning in was down 16 percent Thursday night, with the viewership on NBC alone down 29 percent. What should be more concerning to the network — and U.S. officials — is the lack of star power emerging in South Korea. Shiffrin delivered gold in her first race but stumbled in the giant slalom. White, meanwhile, might be in his last Olympics and was tarnished by reports of a civil sexual harassment suit against him. U.S. teenagers have a lot of

potential. Kim dominated in the halfpipe and could be a favorite in future Olympics, and fellow 17-year-old Red Gerard won gold in men’s snowboard slopestyle. The teen figure skaters Nathan Chen and Vincent Zhou finished fifth and sixth, but they were the biggest jumpers in the competition and could be back with more experience. At the other end of the experience spectrum, former gold medalists Lindsey Vonn and Ted Ligety have so far failed to deliver. Add in the lackluster performance of the U.S. men’s hockey team — which lost 4-0 to Russia on Saturday — and the absence of any medals in (non-short track) speed skating, and there’s not a lot to cheer about. The Games still could be salvaged somewhat by some of the stars with more events left. Shiffrin has an outside shot at two golds in the combined and downhill, and Vonn is one of the favorites in the downhill. There’s a new Big Air event in which Americans are competitive, and there might be a medal or two left in some of the outlying sports. But the days when Eric Heiden could win five speed skating golds or American figure skaters could dominate appear over. It’s hard to believe, but the last medal for a U.S. woman figure skater was the silver Sasha Cohen won in Turin 12 years ago. The rest of the world has caught up. That’s little excuse, though, for what has been so far a flop of Olympic proportions.

MEDALS TABLE Nation

G

S

B

Tot

Norway

9

Germany

9

9

8

26

5

4

18

Canada

5

5

6

16

Netherlands

6

5

2

13

OA Russia

0

3

8

11

United States

5

3

2

10

Austria

4

2

4

10

France

4

2

4

10

Japan

2

5

3

10

Sweden

4

3

0

7

Switzerland

2

4

1

7

South Korea

3

1

2

6

Italy

2

1

3

6

Czech Republic

1

2

3

6

China

0

5

1

6

Britain

1

0

3

4

Slovakia

1

2

0

3

Australia

0

2

1

3

Finland

0

0

3

3

Belarus

1

1

0

2

Spain

0

0

2

2

Poland

1

0

0

1

Ukraine

1

0

0

1

Slovenia

0

1

0

1

Kazakhstan

0

0

1

1

Liechtenstein

0

0

1

1

Through Sunday

TV SCHEDULE MONDAY 6:10 a.m. • Women’s hockey semifinal: Canada vs. Russia (live); Ski jumping: men’s team large hill final (NBCSN) 10 a.m. • Bobsled: two-man final; Speedskating: men’s 500 final; women’s team pursuit (NBCSN) 11:30 a.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Canada (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Ski jumping: men’s large hill final; Speedskating: men’s 500 final; women’s team pursuit (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. China (CNBC) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: Ice dancing final (live); Skiing: women’s downhill training (NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Figure skating: ice cancing final (live); Freestyle skiing: women’s halfpipe final (live); Bobsled: two-man final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 9:10 p.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination game, teams TBA (live, NBCSN) 11:05 p.m. • Freestyle skiing: men’s halfpipe (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 11:30 p.m. • Men’s curling: Canada vs. Japan (NBCSN) EARLY TUESDAY 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: elimination game, teams TBA (live, NBCSN)


SPORTS

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE NBA • Odds to win the championship Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/2 ............................. 1/2 Rockets ....................10/1 ............................9/2 Cavaliers ...................5/1 .............................6/1 Celtics........................8/1 ............................12/1 Raptors ....................50/1 ...........................15/1 Thunder ...................20/1 ..........................20/1 Spurs........................12/1...........................30/1 Wizards ....................35/1 ..........................50/1 Timberwolves ......... 40/1..........................50/1 Bucks........................50/1 ..........................50/1 76ers ....................... 80/1.......................... 75/1 Heat.........................100/1 .......................100/1 Pistons ................... 200/1....................... 150/1 Pacers .....................250/1 .......................200/1 Jazz..........................150/1 .......................200/1 Nuggets...................100/1 .......................200/1 Blazers ....................150/1 .......................300/1 Clippers...................100/1 .......................500/1 Pelicans...................100/1 .......................500/1 Hornets ...................250/1 .......................500/1 Grizzlies...................150/1 ..........................OFF Lakers .....................150/1 ..........................OFF Bulls ........................250/1 ..........................OFF Hawks......................250/1 ..........................OFF Mavericks................250/1 ..........................OFF Knicks..................... 500/1..........................OFF Nets........................ 500/1..........................OFF Kings .......................750/1 ..........................OFF Suns.........................750/1 ..........................OFF Magic..................... 1000/1.........................OFF COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Oakland...................... 5...........................IUPUI NOTRE DAME ............. 4.............Miami-Florida NORTHWESTERN ......PK................... Maryland NO KENTUCKY .........16.5 .........Youngstown St WRIGHT ST................ 14...............Cleveland St ILLINOIS-CHI ............. 10........................Detroit WISCONSIN ................ 6...................Minnesota KANSAS.....................8.5 ................. Oklahoma NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog Wild ....................-$120/even......... ISLANDERS Capitals ............. -$155/+$135..............SABRES Bruins................ -$135/+$115..............FLAMES PREDATORS ......-$220/+$180 ........... Senators BLACKHAWKS ....-$110/-$110 .................. Kings VEGAS KNIGHTS -$175/+$155................. Ducks Grand Salami: Over/under 34.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League BOSTON — Designated RHP Ben Taylor for assignment. Agreed to terms with INF Eduardo Nunez on a one-year contract. CHICAGO — Assigned RHP Dylan Covey outright to Charlotte (IL). MINNESOTA — Placed RHP Michael Pineda on the 60-day DL. TAMPA BAY — Traded RHP Jake Odorizzi to Minnesota for SS Jermaine Palacios. National League LOS ANGELES — Agreed to terms with 2B Chase Utley on a two-year contract. MIAMI — Assigned RHP Severino Gonzalez outright to New Orleans (PCL). Agreed to terms with 1B Eric Campbell on a minor league contract. NEW YORK — Placed 3B T.J. Rivera on the 60-day DL. Ageed to terms with LHP Jason Vargas on a two-year contract. PHILADELPHIA — Agreed to terms with LHP Fernando Abad on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL | NBA G League AGUA CALIENTE — Acquired G Tim Quarterman from the available player pool. HOCKEY | National Hockey League NY RANGERS — Returned G Brandon Halverson to Hartford (AHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Rochester F Colin Blackwell two games. HARTFORD — Released G Drew Fielding from a professional tryout agreement. Signed D Desmond Bergin to a professional tryout agreement.

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Atlantic Pct Toronto 41 16 .719 Boston 40 19 .678 Philadelphia 30 25 .545 23 36 .390 New York Brooklyn 19 40 .322 Southeast W L Pct 33 24 .579 Washington Miami 30 28 .517 Charlotte 24 33 .421 18 39 .316 Orlando Atlanta 18 41 .305 Central W L Pct 34 22 .607 Cleveland Indiana 33 25 .569 Milwaukee 32 25 .561 28 29 .491 Detroit Chicago 20 37 .351 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Southwest Houston 44 13 .772 San Antonio 35 24 .593 31 26 .544 New Orleans Memphis 18 38 .321 Dallas 18 40 .310 W L Pct Northwest Minnesota 36 25 .590 Oklahoma City 33 26 .559 32 .552 Denver 26 Portland 32 26 .552 Utah 30 28 .517 Pacific W L Pct 44 14 .759 Golden State LA Clippers 30 26 .536 LA Lakers 23 34 .404 18 39 .316 Sacramento Phoenix 18 41 .305 Monday-Wednesday • No games Thursday Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. New York at Orlando, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 9 p.m. LA Clippers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday Atlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Washington, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. Dallas at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

GB — 2 10 19 23 GB — 3½ 9 15 16 GB — 2 2½ 6½ 14½ GB — 10 13 25½ 26½ GB — 2 2½ 2½ 4½ GB — 13 20½ 25½ 26½

NBA leaders Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG 50 465 429 1565 31.3 Harden, HOU Antetokounmpo, MIL 53 542 362 1473 27.8 Davis, NOR 51 512 332 1396 27.4 Curry, GOL 43 363 238 1142 26.6 56 569 250 1486 26.5 James, CLE Lillard, POR 51 431 315 1332 26.1 Durant, GOL 50 461 249 1299 26.0 57 543 289 1449 25.4 Westbrook, OKC Cousins, NOR 48 406 294 1210 25.2 Irving, BOS 53 477 215 1310 24.7 Oladipo, IND 52 462 222 1268 24.4 Booker, PHX 44 355 238 1066 24.2 DeRozan, TOR 57 475 335 1351 23.7 Embiid, PHL 44 366 267 1042 23.7 Beal, WAS 57 492 225 1348 23.6 Williams, LAC 55 407 307 1274 23.2 Walker, CHA 55 417 265 1257 22.9 Porzingis, NYK 48 390 218 1088 22.7 George, OKC 56 426 222 1261 22.5 Butler, MIN 55 413 339 1233 22.4 FG Pct. Capela, HOU Jordan, LAC Adams, OKC Kanter, NYK Collins, ATL Gibson, MIN Valanciunas, TOR Randle, LAL Favors, UTA Whiteside, MIA Rebounds Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Cousins, NOR Howard, CHA Towns, MIN Embiid, PHL Capela, HOU Davis, NOR Kanter, NYK Jokic, DEN Assists Westbrook, OKC Harden, HOU James, CLE

FG 319 247 320 335 218 322 253 326 282 231 G 55 51 48 57 61 44 52 51 55 51

OFF 277 219 105 188 179 98 165 124 198 138 G 57 50 56

FGA 488 379 511 555 376 560 446 583 512 420 DEF 587 548 512 530 563 391 411 424 389 402 AST 593 450 500

TOT 864 767 617 718 742 489 576 548 587 540

PCT .654 .652 .626 .604 .580 .575 .567 .559 .551 .550 AVG 15.7 15.0 12.9 12.6 12.2 11.1 11.1 10.7 10.7 10.6 AVG 10.4 9.0 8.9

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL STANDINGS America East Vermont UMBC Hartford Albany Stony Brook New Hampshire Mass.-Lowell Maine Binghamton

Conf 12-1 10-3 9-4 8-6 6-8 6-8 4-9 3-10 2-11

All 22-6 19-9 16-11 20-9 11-17 10-18 10-16 6-22 11-17

American Cincinnati Houston Wichita St. Tulsa UCF Memphis Temple Connecticut SMU Tulane E. Carolina So. Florida

Conf 12-2 11-3 11-3 9-5 8-6 7-7 7-8 6-8 5-9 4-10 4-10 1-14

All 23-4 21-5 21-5 16-10 17-9 16-11 15-12 13-14 15-12 13-13 10-15 8-20

Atlantic 10 Rhode Island St. Bona. Davidson St. Louis U. VCU St. Joseph’s (Pa.) Richmond Duquesne Dayton George Mason Geo. Washington La Salle Massachusetts Fordham

Conf 13-1 10-4 10-4 8-6 7-7 7-7 7-7 6-8 6-8 6-8 5-9 5-9 4-10 4-10

All 21-4 20-6 15-10 15-12 15-12 12-14 9-17 15-12 12-14 12-15 12-15 11-16 11-16 9-17

ACC Virginia Duke N. Carolina Clemson Va. Tech Louisville N. Carolina St. Florida St. Miami (Fla.) Syracuse Boston College Notre Dame Georgia Tech Wake Forest Pittsburgh

Conf 13-1 10-4 10-5 9-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-7 7-7 7-7 6-8 6-8 4-10 3-12 0-15

All 24-2 22-5 21-7 20-6 19-8 18-9 18-9 19-8 18-8 18-9 16-11 16-11 11-16 10-17 8-20

Atlantic Sun FGCU Lipscomb Jacksonville North Florida NJIT Kennesaw St. Stetson USC Upstate

Conf 11-2 9-4 7-6 7-6 6-7 6-7 4-9 2-11

All 20-10 19-9 13-17 13-17 13-15 10-18 12-18 7-23

Big 12 Texas Tech Kansas Kansas St. West Virginia Baylor TCU Oklahoma Texas Oklahoma St. Iowa St.

Conf 10-4 10-4 8-6 8-6 7-7 6-8 6-8 6-8 5-9 4-10

All 22-5 21-6 19-8 19-8 17-10 18-9 16-10 16-11 15-12 13-13

Big East Xavier Villanova Creighton Providence Butler Seton Hall Marquette Georgetown St. John’s DePaul

Conf 12-3 11-3 8-6 8-6 8-7 7-7 6-8 5-9 3-11 3-11

All 24-4 24-3 19-8 17-10 18-10 18-9 15-11 15-10 14-13 10-16

Big Sky Montana Weber St. Idaho E. Washington N. Colorado Idaho St. Portland St. Montana St. North Dakota So. Utah Sacramento St. N. Arizona

Conf 13-2 12-2 11-3 9-5 9-6 7-7 6-8 6-9 5-10 4-10 3-11 1-13

All 20-7 19-7 19-7 14-13 18-10 12-13 16-11 13-15 10-17 10-15 6-21 4-24

Big South Winthrop UNC Asheville Radford Campbell Liberty High Point Charleston So. Gardner-Webb Presbyterian Longwood

Conf 12-4 12-4 10-6 9-7 8-8 8-8 7-9 7-9 4-12 3-13

All 18-9 19-10 17-12 15-13 17-12 13-14 12-15 12-17 11-18 6-23

Big Ten Michigan St. Purdue Ohio St. Michigan Nebraska Penn St. Indiana Maryland Northwestern Wisconsin Minnesota Illinois Rutgers Iowa

Conf 14-2 13-3 13-3 11-5 11-5 9-7 9-7 7-9 6-9 5-10 3-12 3-12 3-13 3-13

All 26-3 24-5 22-7 22-7 20-9 19-10 16-12 18-11 15-13 12-16 14-14 13-15 13-16 12-17

Big West UCSB UC Davis UC Irvine CS-Fullerton Long Beach St. Hawaii Cal Poly CS-Northridge UC Riverside

Conf 9-3 9-4 9-4 8-4 7-5 6-6 3-10 3-10 2-10

All 20-6 18-9 14-15 15-9 13-15 15-10 8-19 6-21 7-19

Colonial Charleston Northeastern Hofstra William & Mary Towson Elon N.C.-Wilmington James Madison Delaware Drexel

Conf 13-3 12-4 10-6 9-7 8-8 6-9 6-10 5-10 5-11 5-11

All 22-6 19-9 17-11 16-11 18-11 14-14 9-19 9-19 12-17 11-18

C-USA Middle Tenn. Old Dominion W. Kentucky Marshall UTSA UAB N. Texas La. Tech Southern Miss Fla. Atlantic Fla. Int’l UTEP Rice Charlotte

Conf 14-1 12-2 12-2 10-4 8-6 8-7 7-7 7-8 6-9 5-9 5-9 3-11 2-12 1-13

All 22-5 21-5 20-7 19-8 15-12 17-11 14-13 16-12 13-15 11-15 11-16 8-18 5-22 5-20

Horizon Wright St. N. Kentucky Ill.-Chicago Oakland Milwaukee IUPUI Youngstown St. Green Bay Cleveland St. Detroit

Conf 12-3 12-3 11-4 9-6 7-9 6-9 6-10 5-11 5-11 4-11

All 20-8 19-8 16-12 17-11 14-15 9-17 8-21 10-19 8-21 8-20

Ivy Penn Harvard Yale Brown Cornell Columbia Princeton Dartmouth

Conf 9-1 9-1 5-5 4-6 4-6 4-6 3-7 2-8

All 19-7 14-11 12-14 11-12 10-13 7-16 11-14 6-17

MAAC Rider Canisius Niagara Iona Manhattan Fairfield Quinnipiac Monmouth St. Peter’s Siena Marist

Conf 14-2 13-3 11-5 10-6 8-8 7-9 7-9 6-10 4-12 4-12 4-12

All 21-7 19-10 18-11 16-12 13-15 12-15 10-18 10-18 10-17 8-21 6-22

GOLF PGA | Genesis Open

MAC Buffalo Toledo Ball St. Bowling Green Eastern Mich. Western Mich. Kent St. Miami (Ohio) Central Mich. N. Illinois Akron Ohio

Conf 12-2 11-3 9-5 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 6-8 5-9 5-9 4-10 4-10

All 20-7 19-8 18-9 16-11 16-11 15-12 13-14 13-14 16-11 12-15 11-15 11-15

MEAC Savannah St. N.C. A&T Beth.-Cookman Hampton Norfolk St. N.C. Central Morgan St. S. Carolina St. Howard Florida A&M Coppin St. Md.-E. Shore Delaware St.

Conf 10-2 9-3 9-3 9-4 8-4 7-5 6-6 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-8 2-11 0-12

All 13-14 16-11 15-12 14-14 10-17 13-13 10-15 9-18 8-20 6-23 5-23 6-22 2-25

Mo. Valley Loyola (Chi.) SIU C’dale Drake Illinois St. Bradley Missouri St. Evansville Indiana St. Valparaiso N. Iowa

Conf 13-3 11-5 10-6 9-7 8-8 7-9 6-10 6-10 5-11 5-11

All 23-5 19-10 16-13 15-13 18-11 17-12 16-13 11-17 14-15 13-15

Mtn. West Nevada Boise St. Fresno St. UNLV Wyoming New Mexico San Diego St. Utah St. Air Force Colorado St. San Jose St.

Conf 12-2 11-4 9-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 7-7 7-8 4-9 4-11 0-14

All 23-5 21-6 19-8 19-8 17-10 13-14 15-10 14-14 10-15 11-17 3-22

Northeast Conf Wagner 13-3 St. Francis (Pa.) 10-6 Mt. St. Mary’s 10-6 St. Francis (N.Y.) 10-6 Robert Morris 9-7 LIU Brooklyn 8-8 Fair. Dickinson 8-8 Central Conn. St. 6-10 Sacred Heart 4-12 Bryant 2-14

All 20-7 16-11 16-13 13-15 15-14 13-16 11-16 13-16 9-20 3-26

Ohio Valley Murray St. Belmont Austin Peay Tenn. St. Jacksonville St. Tenn. Tech SEMO E. Illinois SIUE E. Kentucky Tenn.-Martin Morehead St.

Conf 14-2 14-2 11-5 10-6 9-7 9-7 8-8 6-10 5-11 4-12 4-12 2-14

All 22-5 22-7 16-12 15-12 18-11 17-12 14-15 10-17 9-18 10-19 9-20 6-21

Pac-12 Arizona UCLA USC Utah Washington Stanford Arizona St. Oregon Colorado Oregon St. Washington St. California

Conf 11-3 10-5 10-5 9-6 8-6 8-6 7-7 7-7 7-8 5-9 2-12 2-12

All 21-6 19-8 19-9 17-9 18-9 14-13 19-7 17-10 15-12 13-13 10-16 8-19

Patriot Bucknell Navy Colgate Lehigh Boston U. Holy Cross Lafayette Army Loyola (Md.) American U.

Conf 14-2 10-6 10-6 9-7 8-8 7-9 7-9 6-10 6-10 3-13

All 20-9 19-10 15-12 14-13 12-15 10-17 9-18 13-14 8-19 6-21

SEC Auburn Tennessee Arkansas Missouri Alabama Florida Mississippi St. Kentucky Texas A&M Georgia LSU So. Carolina Vanderbilt Mississippi

Conf 11-3 9-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 7-7 7-7 6-8 6-8 6-8 5-9 5-9 4-10

All 23-4 19-7 19-8 18-9 17-10 17-10 19-8 18-9 17-10 15-11 15-11 14-13 11-16 11-16

Southern Conf E. Tennessee St. 14-1 UNC Greensboro 12-3 Furman 10-5 Wofford 10-5 Mercer 8-7 W. Carolina 7-8 Samford 5-11 Citadel 4-11 Va. Military 3-12 Chattanooga 3-13

All 23-5 21-7 19-9 19-9 15-13 12-16 9-20 9-18 8-18 9-20

Conf Southland Nicholls St. 12-2 SE Louisiana 12-3 S.F. Austin 11-3 Sam Houston St. 11-4 New Orleans 11-4 Lamar 9-6 Abilene Christian 7-7 Central Ark. 7-7 McNeese St. 6-8 Texas A&M-CC 5-9 Houston Baptist 2-12 Incarnate Word 0-14 Northwestern St. 0-14

All 18-9 18-10 22-5 17-11 14-12 17-11 15-12 13-14 10-15 8-16 6-21 5-19 3-22

SWAC Grambling St. Southern U. Ark.-Pine Bluff Prairie View Texas Southern Jackson St. Alabama St. Alcorn St. Alabama A&M Miss. Valley St.

Conf 11-3 9-5 9-5 8-5 8-5 7-7 6-7 6-8 2-11 2-12

All 15-12 13-14 9-19 11-16 8-18 10-17 6-19 10-17 2-24 2-25

Summit S. Dakota St. S. Dakota IPFW Denver N. Dakota St. Neb.-Omaha Oral Roberts W. Illinois

Conf 11-1 11-2 7-6 7-6 4-8 4-8 4-9 2-10

All 23-6 24-6 18-12 13-14 13-15 9-19 10-20 11-14

Sun Belt La.-Lafayette Georgia St. Ga. Southern La.-Monroe South Alabama Troy Texas-Arlington Texas St. Appalachian St. Coastal Carolina Arkansas St. Ark.-Little Rock

Conf 13-1 10-4 8-6 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-8 7-8 7-8 6-9 4-10 3-11

All 23-4 19-8 17-10 13-12 14-13 13-14 16-12 14-14 12-16 12-16 9-18 6-21

West Coast Gonzaga St. Mary’s BYU Pacific San Diego San Francisco Santa Clara Portland Loyola M’mount Pepperdine

Conf 15-1 14-2 10-6 9-7 8-8 8-8 8-8 4-12 3-13 1-15

All 25-4 25-4 21-8 14-15 17-11 16-13 11-17 10-19 8-19 4-24

WAC New Mexico St. Utah Valley Seattle Grand Canyon Texas-RGV Cal State B’field UMKC Chicago St.

Conf 9-2 8-3 8-3 6-5 5-6 4-7 4-7 0-11

All 22-5 19-8 19-9 17-10 14-14 11-15 9-19 2-26

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL • HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Men’s national scores

1. UConn (26-0) beat Temple 106-45. Next: at Tulane, Wednesday. 2. Mississippi State (28-0) beat No. 17 Texas A&M 76-55. Next: vs. Auburn, Thursday. 3. Baylor (25-1) did not play. Next: at No. 6 Texas, Monday. 4. Louisville (27-2) beat North Carolina 67-57. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (25-2) beat Boston College 89-55. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Thursday. 6. Texas (22-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 3 Baylor, Monday. 7. UCLA (21-5) did not play. Next: at No. 9 Oregon, Monday. 8. South Carolina (22-5) beat Kentucky 81-63. Next: vs. LSU, Thursday. 9. Oregon (24-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 UCLA, Monday. 10. Maryland (22-5) lost to Minnesota 93-74. Next: at No. 23 Michigan, Thursday. 11. Tennessee (21-6) lost to No. 13 Missouri 77-73. Next: at Florida, Thursday. 12. Florida State (22-4) did not play. Next: at No. 17 Duke, Monday. 13. Missouri (22-5) beat No. 11 Tennessee 77-73. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. 14. Stanford (19-9) did not play. Next: at Washington, Friday. 15. Oregon State (21-6) beat Southern Cal 69-63. Next: at Arizona, Friday. 16. Ohio State (22-6) beat Purdue 73-60. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 17. Duke (20-7) did not play. Next: vs. No. 12 Florida State, Monday. 17. Texas A&M (20-8) lost to No. 2 Mississippi State 76-55. Next: at Arkansas, Thu.. 19. Green Bay (23-3) did not play. Next: at UIC, Monday. 20. Georgia (21-5) did not play. Next: at Mississippi, Monday. 21. Oklahoma State (18-8) did not play. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday. 22. South Florida (22-5) beat UCF 77-68, OT. Next: vs. Houston, Wednesday. 23. Michigan (20-8) did not play. Next: vs. No. 10 Maryland, Thursday. 24. Belmont (26-3) did not play. Next: at Jacksonville State, Wednesday. 25. N.C. State (21-6) beat Wake Forest 74-61. Next: at Pittsburgh, Thursday.

East Colgate 68, Loyola (Md.) 47 Hartford 69, Vermont 68 Houston 80, Temple 59 Manhattan 82, Niagara 72 Mass.-Lowell 74, Binghamton 69 Monmouth (NJ) 93, Siena 89, 3OT Rider 83, Canisius 82 Seton Hall 82, DePaul 77 Stony Brook 72, New Hampshire 63 UMBC 68, Albany (NY) 60 South Campbell 79, Liberty 69 Duke 66, Clemson 57 Florida St. 88, Pittsburgh 75 High Point 66, Gard.-Webb 65 Radford 74, Presbyterian 68, OT

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • B7

Sunday | Riviera Country Club | Los Angeles Purse: $7.2 million | Yardage: 7,322 | Par: 71 Final Bubba Watson (500) $1,296,000 68-70-65-69 Tony Finau (245) $633,600 66-71-68-69 Kevin Na (245) $633,600 68-70-67-69 Patrick Cantlay (123) $316,800 66-69-69-71 Scott Stallings (123) $316,800 71-68-68-68 Adam Hadwin (92) $241,200 70-74-66-66 Phil Mickelson (92) $241,200 70-71-67-68 Cameron Smith (92) $241,200 72-68-65-71 Martin Laird (70) $180,000 68-73-68-68 Ryan Moore (70) $180,000 68-68-71-70 Xander Schauffele (70) $180,000 71-70-68-68 Jordan Spieth (70) $180,000 71-70-69-67 Justin Thomas (70) $180,000 69-71-67-70 Aaron Baddeley (56) $133,200 72-68-67-71 James Hahn (56) $133,200 70-69-70-69 Derek Fathauer (50) $111,600 68-70-68-74 Dustin Johnson (50) $111,600 74-69-64-73 Sung Kang (50) $111,600 70-72-69-69 Alex Noren (50) $111,600 71-69-71-69 Bud Cauley (40) $78,000 70-72-69-70 Kevin Chappell (40) $78,000 69-71-70-71 Talor Gooch (40) $78,000 73-70-67-71 Jason Kokrak (40) $78,000 68-72-69-72 Rory McIlroy (40) $78,000 71-69-73-68 Vaughn Taylor (40) $78,000 72-70-68-71 Rafa Cabrera Bello (27) $46,996 72-67-73-70 John Huh (27) $46,996 70-72-70-70 Luke List (27) $46,996 72-71-69-70 Peter Uihlein (27) $46,996 70-73-69-70 Dominic Bozzelli (27) $46,996 67-75-69-71 Matt Kuchar (27) $46,996 73-71-69-69 Anirban Lahiri (27) $46,996 72-69-67-74 Jamie Lovemark (27) $46,996 68-70-73-71 Graeme McDowell (27) $46,996 69-66-70-77 Patrick Rodgers (27) $46,996 70-71-72-69 Sam Saunders (27) $46,996 67-69-72-74 Luke Donald (18) $33,120 71-72-72-68 Tommy Fleetwood (18) $33,120 70-71-73-69 Branden Grace (18) $33,120 70-72-69-72 Charles Howell III (18) $33,120 74-70-69-70 Jonas Blixt (12) $24,516 71-71-68-74 Bryson DeChambeau (12) $24,516 71-69-72-72 Brandon Harkins (12) $24,516 71-70-74-69 Charley Hoffman (12) $24,516 75-69-69-71 Troy Merritt (12) $24,516 68-71-72-73 Pat Perez (12) $24,516 72-70-69-73 Kevin Streelman (12) $24,516 72-70-69-73 Nick Taylor (12) $24,516 71-71-74-68 Chad Campbell (8) $17,964 73-71-73-68 Paul Casey (8) $17,964 73-71-71-70 Austin Cook (8) $17,964 74-66-73-72 Brendan Steele (8) $17,964 72-71-71-71 Tom Hoge (6) $16,437 67-73-71-75 Retief Goosen (6) $16,437 68-71-75-72 Martin Kaymer (6) $16,437 73-67-75-71 HaoTong Li $16,437 71-71-69-75 Adam Schenk (6) $16,437 76-67-72-71 Adam Scott (6) $16,437 72-72-71-71 Ben Silverman (6) $16,437 72-71-70-73 Ryan Blaum (5) $15,696 71-70-72-74 J.B. Holmes (5) $15,696 71-71-73-72 Harold Varner III (5) $15,696 73-70-72-72 Kelly Kraft (4) $15,408 71-72-72-73 Ryan Armour (4) $15,120 71-71-74-73 Padraig Harrington (4) $15,120 71-73-71-74 Sean O’Hair (4) $15,120 71-72-73-73 Martin Piller (4) $14,832 72-72-75-71 Abraham Ancer (3) $14,400 72-69-75-75 Greg Chalmers (3) $14,400 73-69-74-75 Thomas Pieters (3) $14,400 71-71-71-78 Charl Schwartzel (3) $14,400 71-73-73-74 Tyrone Van Aswegen (3) $14,400 70-72-75-74 Chez Reavie (3) $13,896 68-76-77-71 Vijay Singh (3) $13,896 72-70-73-77 Sangmoon Bae (2) $13,608 73-71-73-77 David Lingmerth (2) $13,608 73-71-76-74

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272 274 274 275 275 276 276 276 277 277 277 277 277 278 278 280 280 280 280 281 281 281 281 281 281 282 282 282 282 282 282 282 282 282 282 282 283 283 283 283 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 284 285 285 285 285 286 286 286 286 286 286 286 287 287 287 288 289 289 289 290 291 291 291 291 291 292 292 294 294

-12 -10 -10 -9 -9 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +10 +10

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274 277 278 279 281 281 282 282 282 282 282 282 283 283 283 284 284 284 285 285 285 285 285 285 285 285 286 286 286 287 287 287 287 288 288 288 288 288 288 289 289 289 289 289 289 290 290 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 291

-14 -11 -10 -9 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3

LPGA | Australian Open Sunday | Kooyonga Golf Club | Adelaide, Australia Purse: $1.3 million | Yards: 6,599 | Par: 72 Final Jin Young Ko $195,000 65-69-71-69 Hyejin Choi $118,649 69-71-70-67 Hannah Green $86,072 69-74-66-69 Katherine Kirk $66,583 72-73-69-65 Marina Alex $48,720 71-72-70-68 Minjee Lee $48,720 72-70-69-70 Charley Hull $28,528 74-69-70-69 Ariya Jutanugarn $28,528 69-72-72-69 Emma Talley $28,528 68-69-76-69 So Yeon Ryu $28,528 69-75-68-70 Jiyai Shin $28,528 67-71-74-70 Sun Young Yoo $28,528 68-70-72-72 Georgia Hall $20,051 75-71-70-67 Cristie Kerr $20,051 71-72-71-69 Tiffany Joh $20,051 73-71-69-70 Nicole Broch Larsen $16,933 72-74-70-68 Chella Choi $16,933 69-73-70-72 Nasa Hataoka $16,933 72-67-72-73 Ally McDonald $13,666 74-69-73-69 Lindy Duncan $13,666 72-71-73-69 Olivia Cowan $13,666 70-71-75-69 Stephanie Na $13,666 73-69-73-70 Moriya Jutanugarn $13,666 69-72-74-70 Katelyn Dambaugh $13,666 71-72-70-72 Lydia Ko $13,666 68-74-71-72 Mo Martin $13,666 68-72-72-73 Angela Stanford $11,043 73-73-74-66 Ha Na Jang $11,043 72-69-75-70 Cindy LaCrosse $11,043 72-74-69-71 Madelene Sagstrom $9,614 78-69-71-69 Luna Sobron Galmes $9,614 68-76-74-69 Yani Tseng $9,614 70-76-71-70 Karine Icher $9,614 70-72-70-75 Wichanee Meechai $7,990 74-73-71-70 Karis Davidson $7,990 75-69-74-70 Jenny Haglund $7,990 75-69-73-71 Wei-Ling Hsu $7,990 73-72-71-72 Robynn Ree $7,990 74-73-68-73 a-Yuri Yoshida 70-72-72-74 Caroline Masson $6,366 71-74-73-71 Nelly Korda $6,366 68-78-70-73 Peiyun Chien $6,366 72-71-73-73 Haru Nomura $6,366 70-71-75-73 Laura Davies $6,366 72-71-72-74 Jodi Ewart Shadoff $6,366 68-74-73-74 Sandra Changkija $5,424 71-75-72-72 Caroline Inglis $5,424 68-76-74-72 Brittany Lang $4,460 74-73-75-69 Eun Hye Jo $4,460 75-72-72-72 Michele Thomson $4,460 75-70-73-73 Ryann O’Toole $4,460 71-74-73-73 Cydney Clanton $4,460 70-75-73-73 Celine Herbin $4,460 73-73-71-74 Amy Olson $4,460 72-72-73-74 Yu Liu $4,460 70-74-71-76 Jeongmin Cho $4,460 74-69-72-76

Euro | Oman Open Sunday | Al Mouj Golf | Muscat, Oman Purse: $1.75 million | Yards: 7,365 | Par: 72 Final Joost Luiten, Netherlands 72-66-66-68 Chris Wood, England 70-66-69-69 Julien Guerrier, France 69-69-66-71 Jorge Campillo, Spain 73-70-66-68 Seungsu Han, United States 70-69-70-68 Alexander Levy, France 71-69-67-70 Robert Rock, England 69-71-69-69 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 68-71-70-69 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 74-67-68-70 Benjamin Hebert, France 72-70-69-68 Matthew Southgate, England 65-70-69-75 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 72-68-70-70 Nico Geyger, Chile 72-72-67-69 Andrew Johnston, England 71-68-69-72 Adrian Otaegui, Spain 69-71-66-74 Sam Brazel, Australia 68-71-72-70 Marcus Kinhult, Sweden 69-69-74-69 Edoardo Molinari, Italy 73-71-67-70 70-72-70-69 Andrea Pavon, France Andy Sullivan, England 67-73-71-70 Also Daniel Im, United States 75-69-72-73

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272 274 275 277 277 277 278 278 279 279 279 280 280 280 280 281 281 281 281 281

289

Champions | Chubb Classic Sunday | TwinEagles Golf Club (Talon Course) | Naples, Fla. Purse: $1.6 million | Yards: 7,193 | Par: 72 Final Joe Durant $240,000 67-63-67 — 197 Lee Janzen $98,560 66-67-68 — 201 Billy Mayfair $98,560 68-69-64 — 201 Tim Petrovic $98,560 71-66-64 — 201 Steve Stricker $98,560 68-63-70 — 201 David Toms $98,560 68-68-65 — 201 Scott McCarron $57,600 66-68-68 — 202 John Daly $51,200 68-68-67 — 203 Miguel Angel Jimenez $44,800 64-68-72 — 204 $38,400 69-67-69 — 205 Tom Lehman $38,400 68-68-69 — 205 Rocco Mediate $38,400 66-68-71 — 205 Kevin Sutherland $31,200 68-67-71 — 206 Kent Jones Jeff Maggert $31,200 73-65-68 — 206 Stephen Ames $25,632 70-67-70 — 207 Gary Hallberg $25,632 65-70-72 — 207 $25,632 73-64-70 — 207 Colin Montgomerie Jesper Parnevik $25,632 66-71-70 — 207 Gene Sauers $25,632 71-68-68 — 207 Glen Day $18,784 66-74-68 — 208 Steve Flesch $18,784 69-71-68 — 208 Wes Short, Jr. $18,784 68-69-71 — 208 Tommy Tolles $18,784 69-71-68 — 208 Scott Verplank $18,784 69-69-70 — 208 Michael Allen $13,943 73-69-67 — 209 Billy Andrade $13,943 72-68-69 — 209 Bart Bryant $13,943 71-69-69 — 209 Jose Maria Olazabal $13,943 70-68-71 — 209 Scott Parel $13,943 68-73-68 — 209 Brandt Jobe $13,943 70-67-72 — 209 Kirk Triplett $13,943 71-65-73 — 209

UConn 84, East Carolina 80 UNC-Asheville 85, Charleston S. 80, OT Winthrop 79, Longwood 64 Midwest Drake 67, Missouri St. 63 Illinois 72, Nebraska 66 Loyola (Chi.) 76, Evansville 66 Michigan 74, Ohio St. 62 Purdue 76, Penn St. 73 Wichita St. 76, Cincinnati 72 Southwest Tulsa 73, South Florida 61 Far West Denver 66, Oral Roberts 65 Stanford 77, California 73

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AREA COLLEGES Sunday’s results

Softball Concordia 7, UMSL 4 (8 inn.) Mo. Southern 5, UMSL 3 Baseball FIU 11, Mizzou 5 Harris Stowe 4, UMSL 2 UMSL 4, Harris Stowe 3 (10 inn.) Three Rivers 2, SW Illinois 0 SW Illinois 6, Three Rivers 5 Men’s basketball Washington 86, Carnegie 71 Women’s basketball Washington 86, Carnegie 66

Late Saturday

Women’s basketball Mo. Baptist 80, Will. Baptist 67 Men’s basketball Mo. Baptist 75, Will. Baptist 71

Monday’s area basketball M: Crowley’s Ridge at Harris-Stowe, 6 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An emotional Darrell Wallace Jr. speaks to the media after finishing second at Daytona Speedway on Sunday.

Dillon wasn’t a factor until the final lap NASCAR • FROM B1

of “The Great American Race,” came 17 years to the day of Earnhardt’s fatal crash. “Man, this place is awesome,” said Dillon. “I don’t know what it is about storylines and Daytona. This place just creates history and I’m proud to be a part of it and make some history here.” Dillon wasn’t a factor in his Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet until the final lap in overtime when he got a push from Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. that helped him get to leader Aric Almirola. Dillon spun Almirola then whizzed by to give Childress, his grandfather, another iconic victory in the beloved No. 3. “My grandfather has done everything for me and everybody knows it,” Dillon said. “There’s a lot of pressure on me to perform because I’ve had a little bit of everything. But I like that pressure, the same with the No. 3, there’s a lot of pressure behind it, but I’m willing to take it and go with it.” As for the aggressive move that wrecked Almirola? Dillon was doing what has to be done to win at Daytona, where he led just once for one lap — the final one. “I think I blacked out and just everything just kind of kept going, and we were staying in the gas, and things were happening fast. The last lap of the Daytona 500, you just don’t lift, actually the last couple laps,” Dillon said, adding his only other option was to ease off the gas and avoid Almirola. “I guess I could have lifted and gave it to him,” he said. “I guess that was my other option, give up a Daytona 500 ring that I’m wearing. If he needs to do it to (retaliate) at Talladega for everybody to feel good, I’ve got a Daytona 500 championship trophy, ring, whatever. I don’t care. I’ve got the 3 back in victory lane at Daytona.” Almirola, in his debut race for Stewart-Haas Racing, was devastated. “My heart is broken. I thought I was going to win the Daytona 500,” Almirola said. Childress was overjoyed. “To come back 20 years later after Dale’s great victory, and to be able to celebrate 20 years later, with my grandson, it is just a storybook tale,” he said. “It’s tough on him running that 3, but we had, I’d say, 97 percent support from Earnhardt fans who wanted him to run that number.” The No. 3 was dormant from Earnhardt’s death until Childress brought it back in 2014 for his grandson. Wallace, the first black driver in the Daytona 500 field since 1969, finished second in a 1-2 finish for Chevrolet and Childress’ engine program. Wallace drives the No. 43 car for Richard Petty and sobbed in his post-race news conference after his mother came to the front of the room to give him a hug. Wallace, from Mobile, Alabama, received a telephone call from Hank Aaron before the race; and Lewis Hamilton, the four-time Formula One world champion and only black driver in that series, tweeted his support to Wallace. Denny Hamlin, the 2016 winner, finished third in a Toyota. Ryan Blaney, who led a race-high 118 laps, faded to seventh after giving the win away in regulation. He wrecked Kurt Busch, the defending race winner, trying to reclaim his lead and the contact damaged Blaney’s Ford. It spoiled what should have been a Team Penske party — car owner Roger Penske had three contenders, all considered favorites — but all came up empty. Brad Keselowski wrecked early racing for the lead and although Joey Logano finished fourth, it wasn’t the victory Penske expected from one of his drivers. “It’s a shame you don’t close it out, but you try to just learn from your mistakes and try to do better next time,” Blaney said. “This one definitely stings, but hopefully we can get another shot at it one day.” The day was also a bust for Danica Patrick, who made the Daytona 500 her final NASCAR race. With new boyfriend NFL quarterback Aaron Rodgers cheering her on, Patrick was collected in an accident and finished 35th. The only woman to lead laps in the Daytona 500 and win the pole for this race then told a story about an exchange she had earlier this week with four-time NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon. “He said his last Daytona didn’t go well, either, and I was like ‘Oh wow, I don’t remember that. I remember your career.’ So I hope that is how it is with me with everybody,” she said. DAYTONA 500 RESULTS Sunday | Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap: 2.50 miles | (Start pos. in parentheses) Driver Car Laps Points 1. (14) Austin Dillon Chev. 207 42 2. (7) Darrell Wallace Jr Chev. 207 39 Toy. 207 35 3. (2) Denny Hamlin 4. (5) Joey Logano Ford 207 41 Chev. 207 32 5. (21) Chris Buescher 6. (16) Paul Menard Ford 207 42 Ford 207 48 7. (3) Ryan Blaney 8. (13) Ryan Newman Chev. 207 29 9. (22) Michael McDowell Ford 207 39 10. (20) AJ Allmendinger Chev. 207 27 11. (37) Aric Almirola Ford 206 33 12. (29) Justin Marks Chev. 206 0 13. (18) Trevor Bayne Ford 206 28 14. (39) David Gilliland Ford 206 0 15. (10) Clint Bowyer Ford 206 22 16. (19) Jamie McMurray Chev. 205 21 17. (1) Alex Bowman Chev. 205 29 Toy. 205 30 18. (24) Martin Truex Jr 19. (38) Kyle Larson Chev. 204 18 20. (34) Gray Gaulding Toy. 204 17 21. (27) Jeffrey Earnhardt Chev. 204 16 22. (40) Mark Thompson Ford 203 15 23. (33) William Byron Chev. 203 14 24. (30) D.J. Kennington Toy. 201 13 25. (12) Kyle Busch Toy. 200 12 Ford (a) 198 21 26. (11) Kurt Busch 27. (36) Matt DiBenedetto Ford (a) 198 10 28. (25) Brendan Gaughan Chev. (a) 198 9 29. (9) R. Stenhouse Jr Ford (a) 197 15 30. (15) David Ragan Ford (a) 107 7 31. (6) Kevin Harvick Ford (a) 105 10 32. (31) Brad Keselowski Ford (a) 102 5 Chev. (a) 101 7 33. (4) Chase Elliott 34. (26) Kasey Kahne Chev. (a) 101 3 35. (28) Danica Patrick Chev. (a) 101 2 36. (8) Erik Jones Toy. (a) 59 1 Toy. (a) 59 1 37. (17) Daniel Suarez 38. (35) Jimmie Johnson Chev. (a) 59 1 39. (23) Ty Dillon Chev. (a) 59 1 40. (32) Corey Lajoie Chev. (e) 8 1 a=accident. e=engine

RACE STATISTICS Avg. Speed of Winner: 150.551 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 26 minutes, 15 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.260 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 37 laps. Lead Changes: 24 among 14 drivers. Lap Leaders: A.Bowman 0; D.Hamlin 1-10; J.Marks 11; Ku.Busch 12-14; A.Bowman 15-22; E.Jones 23-33; R.Stenhouse 34-44; C.Elliott 45-48; J.Logano 49-51; Ku.Busch 52-62; A.Bowman 63-67; R.Blaney 68-93; P.Menard 94; M.Truex 95-98; R.Blaney 99-122; A.Allmendinger 123; R.Blaney 124-170; D.Hamlin 171-173; R.Blaney 174-193; D.Hamlin 194; Ku.Busch 195-196; R.Blaney 197; D.Hamlin 198-205; A.Almirola 206; A.Dillon 207 Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Blaney, 5 times for 113 laps; D.Hamlin, 4 times for 18 laps; Ku.Busch, 3 times for 13 laps; A.Bowman, 3 times for 11 laps; E.Jones, 1 time for 10 laps; R.Stenhouse, 1 time for 10 laps; C.Elliott, 1 time for 3 laps; M.Truex, 1 time for 3 laps; J.Logano, 1 time for 2 laps; A.Allmendinger, 1 time for 0 laps; A.Almirola, 1 time for 0 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 0 laps; J.Marks, 1 time for 0 laps; P.Menard, 1 time for 0 laps. Top 16 in Points: 1. R.Blaney, 48; 2. A.Dillon, 42; 3. P.Menard, 42; 4. J.Logano, 41; 5. M.McDowell, 39; 6. D.Wallace, 39; 7. D.Hamlin, 35; 8. A.Almirola, 33; 9. C.Buescher, 32; 10. M.Truex, 30; 11. A.Bowman, 29; 12. R.Newman, 29; 13. T.Bayne, 28; 14. A.Allmendinger, 27; 15. C.Bowyer, 22; 16. Ku.Busch, 21.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH MONDAY’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE BOYS

MISSOURI -Class 3 District 6 at Duchesne First round Sumner vs Trinity, 3 p.m. Lutheran N. vs Orchard Farm, 4:30 p.m. North Tech vs Northwest Academy, 6 p.m. MS-Berkeley vs Duchesne, 7:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 5 at Vashon First round Cleveland vs Cardinal Ritter, 6:30 p.m. Brentwood vs Maplewood-RH, 5 p.m. Roosevelt vs Carnahan, 2 p.m. Metro vs Lift For Life , 3:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 4 at Whitfield First round Bayless vs Whitfield, 2:30 p.m. DuBourg vs Principia, 4 p.m. Herculaneum vs Hancock, 5:30 p.m. St. Louis College Prep vs Valley Park, 7 p.m. -Class 2 District 5 at Elsberry First round Crossroads vs Crystal City, 4:30 p.m. Silex vs New Haven, 6 p.m. Monday. Medicine and Bio. vs McKinley, 7:30 p.m. -ILLINOIS Class 2A Staunton Regional First round Litchfield vs Staunton, 6 p.m. Gillespie vs Hillsboro, Illinois, 7:30 p.m. -Class 2A Pinckneyville Regional First round Trico vs Sparta, 6 p.m. Dupo vs Red Bud, 7:30 p.m. -Class 2A Wood River Regional First round Roxana vs Wood River, 7 p.m. -Class 1A Mount Olive Regional First round Father McGivney vs Hardin Calhoun, 7 p.m. -Class 1A Okawville Regional First round Lebanon, Illinois vs Marissa, 6 p.m. New Athens vs Valmeyer, 7:30 p.m. Other area games: Kirkwood at Jefferson City, 4 p.m. Seckman at Oakville, 7 p.m. Washington at Warrenton, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS

MISSOURI -Class 3 District 9 at Fatima First round Southern Boone vs South Callaway, 4 p.m. Tolton vs Fatima, 5:30 p.m. Dixon vs Hermann, 7 p.m. St. James vs Blair Oaks, 8:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 7 at Winfield First round Montgomery Co. vs North Callaway, 4 p.m. Wright City vs Lutheran St. Charles, 5:30 p.m. Bowling Green vs Winfield, 7 p.m. -Class 3 District 5 at Vashon First round Brentwood 75, Roosevelt 46 Metro 95, Carnahan 24 Lift For Life 92, Cleveland 16 Semifinals, Monday Brentwood vs Cardinal Ritter, 11 a.m. Metro vs Lift for Life, 12:30 p.m. -Class 3 District 3 at Cuba First round Park Hills Central 91, Bourbon 24 West County (Leadwood) 62, Jefferson 48 Steelville, Missouri 55, St. Pius X 31 Grandview 56, Cuba 44 Semifinals, Monday West County vs Park Hills Central, 6 p.m. Grandview vs Steelville, Mo., 7:30 p.m. -Class 2 District 5 at Elsberry First round Crystal City 67, Crossroads College Prep 35 Elsberry 54, McKinley 14 Medicine and Bioscience vs Silex, (n) ILLINOIS -Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional Teutopolis vs Mater Dei, 8 p.m. -Class 1A Brown County Super-Sectional Lewistown vs Lebanon, Illinois, 7 p.m. Other area games: Marquette at Parkway South, 5:30 p.m Seckman at Oakville, 5:30 p.m. Perryville at Ste. Genevieve, 6 p.m. Potosi at Northwest-CH, 6 p.m. Eureka at Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Washington at Zumwalt East, 6:30 p.m. Union at De Soto, 7 p.m. Warrenton at Holt, 7 p.m. Liberty at Zumwalt South, 7 p.m. Rosati-Kain at Borgia, 7:15 p.m.

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 1A BROWN COUNTY SUPER-SECTIONAL PREVIEW

Reinneck twins fill different roles to help Lebanon make history BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

LEBANON, ILL. • It is only 12

minutes. But Lebanon High junior Emily Reinneck occasionally will play the age card with her twin sister, Abigail. “Once in a while, I’ll tell her, ‘I’m older, I’m the boss so you better listen to me,’ “ Emily said. Abigail is never impressed. “Twelve minutes, does that really matter?” she said. Actually, the Reinneck twins are the best of friends — both on and off the basketball court. Their camaraderie and harmony has played a key role in the Greyhounds’ program-record run to the elite eight. Lebanon (30-1) faces Lewistown (29-4) in the Class 1A Brown County Super-Sectional at 7 p.m. Monday in Mount Sterling. The winner advances to the state tournament, which begins Friday in Normal. The Greyhounds are coming off the first sectional championship in school history thanks to a 50-46 triumph over Okawville on Thursday. Emily and Abigail form the second set of twins, age-wise, on a team led by seniors Kendra and Krista Bass. The Reinneck girls are the more laid-back of the two sets, but they are extremely important to the team’s success. Emily, a 5-foot-8 winger, is second in scoring at 13.1 points per game. Abigail, 5-8, is the defensive stopper. Her ability to hold the opposition’s top gun in check has been invaluable during the playoff run. “What she does largely goes unnoticed,” Lebanon coach Chad Cruthis said of Abigail. “But she’s the best at what she does.” The Reinneck girls have that unspoken twin bond. They know exactly where the other will be on the court. And one is rarely seen without the other away from the court.

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Lebanon’s Abigail Reinneck (left) and twin sister Emily pose during the 1A North Greene Sectional final.

“She’s my best friend and we’re always together,” Emily said. “People are used to it. If you see one of us, you see us both.” Like regular sisters, they have their share of squabbles, most of which are minor. Occasionally, one will point out a mistake by the other in practice. But after a mean glance or a short stare down, the miscue is quickly forgotten. “It’s great having someone to talk to,” Abigail said. “She always knows what I’m thinking.” Emily scored 11 points in the sectional final. Abigail held Rockets senior standout Madison Hackstadt in check most of the night. “(Emily’s) the scorer, I like defense,” Abigail said. “We’ve got a

lot of good shooters on this team. I don’t mind getting them the ball.” Emily has scored 11 or more points in four of the last five games. She leads the Greyhounds with 99 assists, one more than Abigail. The Reinnecks are super-aggressive at both ends of the court and they each possess a high-intensity motor. “They won’t back down from each other — or the other teams,” Kendra Bass said. “That’s what I like about them.” The Reinneck twins hope to continue their basketball careers side-by-side in college. But for now, both are enjoying the ride in Lebanon. The Greyhounds’ success is a big

deal in this tiny town. The players were treated like royalty over the weekend in anticipation of the biggest girls game in school history. “It’s great that we’re doing things that the people of this town will remember for a long time,” Emily said. Lebanon, which won its first 24 games, has set a school record for most wins in a season. Lewistown has won its last nine games following a 48-46 loss to Farmington on Jan. 20. The Indians, under coach Greg Bennett, are making their first super-sectional appearance in 15 years. They finished second in Class 1 in 1999-2000, losing to Okawville 73-49 in the championship game.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • CLASS 2A SALEM SUPER-SECTIONAL PREVIEW

Getting back to basics after early struggles paying off for Mater Dei BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Mater Dei girls basketball team celebrates after the Class 2A girls sectional championship game.

The Mater Dei girls basketball team was scuffling. After two consecutive regional titles, the Knights lost four of their first seven games this season. Veteran coach Dave Kohnen knew something had to be done. “We did not look good early in the season and we knew that,” Kohnen said. “Probably our best practice was in my room for an hour and a half to straighten things out. Sometimes the best practice isn’t on the floor.” That team meeting worked. The Knights have won 20 of 23 games since and are back in the super-sectional round after knocking off previously unbeaten Harrisburg 55-44 in the McLeansboro Sectional championship Thursday.

“Practices changed a lot this year,” junior Ciara Perkes said. “We focused more on actual practice and we’ve practiced really hard.” Mater Dei (23-7) plays Teutopolis (27-6) in the Class 2A Salem Super-Sectional at 8 p.m. Monday at Salem High School. Mater Dei and Teutopolis split a pair of regular-season meetings. The winner goes to the Class 2A state tournament, which begins on Friday in Normal. Mater Dei has ridden a stingy defense to seven successive victories. The Knights have allowed an average of 35 points a game this season. Perkes, the point guard, has led the defensive charge. “She’s underrated on defense,” Kohnen said. “She had to guard two tough point guards these last two nights (sectional

semifinal and sectional championship games) and I thought she did a great job on both of them.” After graduating four seniors from last year’s team, which lost to Camp Point in the elite eight, it took some time for the new players to adjust. “Since about mid-January, they started talking to each other more,” Kohnen said. “Before the game, they’re playing music and enjoy being with each other.” Perkes, Shannon Lampe and Myah Beckmann are the vocal leaders on the team. The trio helped right the ship when Harrisburg made a run late. “Last year we lost multiple starters and with them stepping up, they definitely took a lead role,” Mater Dei junior Kierra Winkeler said. “We were all ready for this and we weren’t ready to go home.”

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FOOTBALL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TEE IT UP

Redskins, Cousins could be headed to messy situation want to use the franchise or transition tag. The Redskins have applied the franchise tag to Cousins the past two seasons, and the option to tag and trade Cousins still is on the table. But that maneuver is risky. Washington could tag the 29-year-old quarterback to prevent him from becoming a free agent when the new league year begins on March 14. By trading him, the Redskins would be able to recoup some form of compensation in return for his exit. But they won’t be able to pull off a trade until Cousins signs the franchise tag and, therefore, the quarterback could very well play the stall tactic. And as long as Washington is unable to deal him, the Redskins are handicapped in free agency because they’d still be on the hook for the $34.5 million for Cousins. One thing is certain in all of this: Cousins will get paid handsomely. Several quarterback-needy teams and playoff contenders are interested in the former backup who has been a starter for the last three seasons. The Cleveland Browns and New York Jets have a considerable amount of cash to spend in free agency, and the Denver Broncos, Buffalo Bills and Minnesota Vikings are expected to be in the running to land Cousins, who threw for 4,093 yards, 27 touchdowns and 13 interceptions this past season for the Redskins (7-9). Cousins repeatedly has said he’s looking to join a franchise that gives him the best chance to win.

WASHINGTON POST

The Washington Redskins can designate Kirk Cousins as their “franchise player” starting Tuesday. But if they do, expect the quarterback to go on the offensive. Cousins will file a grievance through the NFL players’ union if the Redskins stick the tag on him, according to a person with knowledge of the situation who spoke on the condition of anonymity. The basis for the complaint is simple: Cousins could argue that the organization is violating the terms of the collective bargaining agreement because the team has no intention of engaging in good-faith negotiations on a long-term deal, or having him play under the franchise tag amount of $34.5 million guaranteed in 2018. Several league sources have characterized the potential act of tagging Cousins as a “spiteful” move, citing the spirit of the franchise tag and the ongoing saga involving both camps. The franchise tag is typically used to buy teams more time so that they can continue contract talks on a possible long-term deal. Players who are tagged have to sign a multiyear contract or extension by July 16. Washington, however, recently agreed to a trade with Kansas City for quarterback Alex Smith and signed him to a longterm extension that would keep him under the Redskins’ control for another five years. NFL teams have from Feb. 20 to March 6 to designate the players on whom they

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National Extremes

WEATHER • Low 52, High 71 • Winds S 10-20 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 88° Laredo, Texas

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Windy, warm, and very wet

110s

It will be windy, warm, and wet across the St. Louis area today and Monday. Periods of showers along with some embedded thunderstorms are expected both days in association with a slow-moving frontal boundary. Colder air will return to the region on Wednesday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

58°

Showers/ few storms

LUNCH

DRIVE

66°

70°

Showers/ few storms

Showers/ few storms

BEDTIME

65°

Showers/few storms

100s 90s 70s

4-DAY FORECAST

72 70 73 71 73 70 65 65 72 70 58 71 70

W

showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s 20s

TUESDAY

61°/73°

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

H

40 52 38 42 42 41 49 40 44 35 43 39

63 70 56 64 64 63 68 62 65 50 66 63

36°/40° 30°/46° 38°/55°

Showers/ Chance of rain Mostly cloudy isolated storms

showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers showers

Kansas City 53 / 65

Kirksville 45 / 65

Joplin 56 / 70

Springfield 43 / 66

St. Louis 52 / 71 Poplar Bluff 52 / 70

Carbondale 52 / 70

Flood Stage

Current Level

0.00 + 0.09 - 0.62 - 0.48 + 0.08 + 0.20 - 0.33 - 0.40 - 0.33 + 0.49

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Feb 16th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 4,452 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 28 Month (Total) 576 Season 3297 Year Ago 2630 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 14.35 18 12.45 Peoria 14 9.74 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.29 Sullivan 16 - 2.59 Valley Park 24 5.68 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.58 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 39.40 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.27 + 0.28 - 0.13 + 1.69 + 0.10 + 0.04 - 0.02 + 0.94

SUN & MOON

First Feb 23 Sunrise

Full Mar 1

Last Mar 9

6:47 AM Sunset

New Mar 17 5:43 PM

Moonrise 8:59 AM Moonset 9:39 PM

On this date in 1473, astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus was born in Poland. From his observations, Copernicus believed that all the planets orbited the sun. This became known as the heliocentric theory of the solar system. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.45 354.98 494.71 655.15 705.66 652.67 908.24 839.20 594.42 405.13 600.66 443.18

+ 0.29 + 0.11 + 0.12 - 0.01 + 0.03 + 0.16 - 0.09 + 0.01 - 0.04 + 0.05 + 0.01 0.00

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Lower 48 temps only

Today L H

W

Tomorrow L H W

41 Albany, N.Y. 28 44 showers Albuquerque 41 58 mostly cloudy 30 17 Anchorage 19 29 partly cloudy Atlanta 55 71 mostly cloudy 58 50 Atlantic City 31 54 showers 48 Baltimore 33 51 rain -16 Billings -1 5 snow Biloxi, Ms. 61 73 mostly cloudy 63 61 Birmingham 56 77 cloudy -4 Bismarck -1 6 snow Boise 24 31 mostly cloudy 14 44 Boston 29 47 showers 50 Buffalo 32 50 showers 40 Burlington, Vt. 27 45 rain 60 Charleston, S.C. 57 76 showers 56 Charleston, W.V. 44 72 showers Charlotte 49 58 mostly cloudy 54 -6 Cheyenne 9 17 snow 47 Chicago 38 56 showers 59 Cincinnati 43 68 showers 55 Cleveland 36 59 showers 17 Colorado Spgs. 27 45 partly cloudy Concord, N.H. 20 46 mostly cloudy 39 65 Dallas 60 73 showers Daytona Beach 62 80 partly cloudy 64 4 Denver 18 23 snow 29 Des Moines 40 43 rain 63 62 75 partly sunny Destin, Fl. 55 33 55 showers Detroit 57 67 mostly cloudy 49 El Paso 61 50 70 showers Evansville 13 13 27 snow Fairbanks 1 2 10 cloudy Fargo 29 34 snow showers 9 Flagstaff 65 85 mostly sunny 68 Fort Myers -22 -13 -2 snow Great Falls 25 30 34 freezing rain Green Bay 42 24 46 showers Hartford 66 cloudy 66 80 mostly Honolulu 64 80 mostly cloudy 67 Houston 60 40 64 showers Indianapolis 60 81 mostly cloudy 66 Jackson, Ms. 18 34 mostly cloudy 21 Juneau 74 73 80 partly cloudy Key West 32 42 50 partly cloudy Las Vegas 63 50 77 showers Little Rock 40 48 59 partly cloudy Los Angeles 63 47 74 showers Louisville

61 42 31 75 69 71 7 74 80 9 28 59 65 53 79 81 74 10 61 76 73 27 57 72 80 17 31 75 66 59 78 29 10 25 86 7 37 60 81 77 72 82 33 81 48 75 61 79

showers mostly cloudy fog mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy very cold mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy rain rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers showers mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy rain thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy freezing rain partly sunny showers partly cloudy showers snow snow sunny mostly sunny very cold freezing rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers showers mostly cloudy showers sunny rain sunny mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

58 Macon 71 McAllen, Tx. 56 Memphis 72 Miami 33 Milwaukee Minneapolis 20 Missoula, Mt. 3 60 Mobile Montgomery 59 56 Nashville New Orleans 64 New York City 36 Norfolk, Va. 39 Oklahoma City 53 Omaha 31 Orlando 62 Palm Springs 49 Philadelphia 32 Phoenix 55 Pittsburgh 35 Portland, Me. 24 Portland, Or. 23 Providence 28 Raleigh 43 Rapid City 0 Reno 20 Richmond, Va. 35 Sacramento 33 St. Petersburg 68 Salt Lake City 27 San Antonio 64 San Diego 54 San Francisco 42 Santa Fe 35 Savannah 58 Seattle 25 59 Shreveport 15 Sioux Falls 27 Syracuse 59 Tallahassee 66 Tampa 50 Tucson 57 Tulsa 37 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 71 53 Wichita Wilmington, De. 32 52 Yuma

77 89 77 81 39 22 14 80 81 75 82 49 61 70 32 84 60 50 62 60 47 36 48 53 5 33 55 52 82 34 77 56 52 53 78 35 80 17 43 81 84 64 71 52 80 67 49 63

W

mostly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain snow snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain rain thunderstorms freezing rain partly cloudy mostly sunny showers mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy snow snow showers rain sunny sunny snow cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers rain partly cloudy showers showers sunny

Tomorrow L H W

60 71 64 74 36 15 -7 63 60 63 66 46 52 61 20 66 41 49 41 53 40 24 45 47 -9 11 49 27 68 17 65 44 38 25 60 24 64 9 41 62 68 38 63 50 74 41 47 40

80 86 79 83 50 22 18 79 82 81 82 66 75 69 25 85 61 70 55 73 52 38 59 76 5 34 74 53 83 26 74 59 52 37 81 37 78 13 67 83 85 53 67 73 82 46 70 60

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy rain snow mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers fog mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy rain rain and snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy very cold sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy snow showers thunderstorms sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms snow showers showers mostly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

72 31 45 50 79 74 27 30 25 77 55 -15 73 63 48 27

85 44 63 64 93 81 43 43 39 83 73 10 83 75 55 43

sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny showers mostly cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

34 66 41 75 43 59 34 42 38 60 52 24 20 73 59 52

45 72 48 88 58 75 60 51 57 88 77 42 29 83 81 79

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny showers snow showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.03 - 0.40 - 0.14 - 0.15 - 0.13

Very unhealthy

Good

Hawaii High: 82°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 7.70 23 3.46 Jefferson City 21 2.85 Hermann 20 0.91 Washington 25 St. Charles 7.13 MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.48 Louisiana 15 11.84 Dam 24 25 14.54 Dam 25 26 14.73 Grafton 18 15.84 M.Price, Pool 419 419.30 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.61 St Louis 30 0.85 Chester 27 4.20 Cape Girardeau 32 11.92

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

A frontal boundary will trigger showers across portions of the Northeast, Great Lakes, Midwest, Missouri Valley, and southern Plains. Some embedded thunderstorms are also possible. Parts of the upper Midwest will see a wintry mix of precipitation. Snow is forecast across the central Rockies and Intermountain West. Warm and mainly dry conditions will be in place throughout much of the Southeast and Gulf Coast. City

W

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.54” 1.44” 1.77” 3.84”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

53° 27° 46° 28° 74° -9° 63° 49°

-0s Alaska Low: -19°

Chicago 38 / 56

Ice

0s

Chance of showers

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (4:44 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1971) Record Low (1936) High Last Year Low Last Year

10s

FRIDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

51 53 48 47 49 56 53 45 49 52 50 50 48

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

28 34 24 76 45 74 55 28 26 71 61 32 32 25 24 28

33 47 38 91 55 82 84 45 28 78 75 48 40 33 37 36

snow showers cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly sunny sunny cloudy


Nominate A Soldier Submit stories through April 15, 2018: STLtoday.com/StoriesofHonor PRESENTED BY:

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Monday • 02.19.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE QUIZ ANSWERS • BOB JONES Q 1 • North-South vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠Q J 10 ♥Q 5 ♦7 ♣K J 10 9 7 4 2 Right-hand opponent opens one heart. What call would you make? A • We suspect that many readers will choose two clubs, which would not be a sin. We prefer to increase the pressure with this low-defense hand. Bid three clubs. Q 2 • East-West vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠A J 9 2 ♥A Q 9 5 3 ♦9 7 ♣K 2 SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♥ Pass 2♦ Pass ? What call would you make? A • Experts disagree. Old timers want a two-spade rebid here to show extras. Many modern experts don’t agree. Let’s be modern. Bid two spades.

Across

Q 4 • Neither vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠J ♥J ♦A K 10 8 6 5 3 2 ♣A J 8 Two passes to you. What call would you make? A • Were partner not a passed hand, we would open one diamond. Here it is too likely that the opponents will outbid you in a major, maybe to game. Open five diamonds. Q 5 • East-West vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠10 7 6 4 ♥A 8 3 2 ♦Q 9 5 3 ♣3 Partner opens one no trump and right-hand opponent passes. What call would you make? A • Bid two clubs, Stayman, and pass any response, even two diamonds. Should partner bid two of a major, do not raise. (02/19/18)

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME February 19 WORD — RADICAL (RADICAL: RAD-ih-kul: Marked by an extreme departure from the usual or customary.) Average mark 13 words. Time limit 25 minutes. Can you find 17 or more words in RADICAL? The list will be published tomorrow. SATURDAY’S WORD — FLAMINGO fail foam loan moan fang foaming loin moil film foil long mola final lame align naif flag laming along nail flagon limn among noil flam ling magi gain flaming lingo mail gamin flan lion main goal fling loaf malign golf flog loafing mango foal loam mano RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

wants to.

Q 3 • Both vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠K 9 7 4 ♥K J 6 4 ♦9 ♣Q J 9 8 WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1♦ Pass 2♦* ? *Decent hand, forcing to at least 3♦ What call would you make? A • If you wait for them to sign off in three diamonds before you double, partner will have to bid at the three level. Double now and partner will only bid at the three level if he

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

1 Big advertiser at auto races 4 Sunoco competitor 9 Distinctive smell 13 Breakfast restaurant chain 15 Quarter Pounder topper 16 Jay who preceded Jimmy Fallon 17 Singer’s latest 19 “What’s gotten ___ you?” 20 Poems whose titles often start “To a ...” 21 Con’s opposite 22 Alternatives to Nikes 23 Lodge member 24 Like religious

institutions visà-vis the IRS 26 King Arthur’s magician 29 The lion in summer? 30 “Disgusting!” 31 What gigabytes might measure 35 Vexes 39 “We can go safely now” 42 Like food from a West African drive-through? 43 Tire material 44 In the style of 45 Envision 47 Scores two under par 49 “Excuse me?” 55 YouTube posting, casually 56 Praise highly 57 The Diamondbacks, on scoreboards 58 Vicinity 60 ___ mon-

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

ster (desert denizen) 61 Final words of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech ... or a hint to the endings of 17-, 24-, 39- and 49-Across 64 Wartime friend 65 Actress Christina 66 Chunk of concrete 67 Loch ___ monster 68 Approved, as a contract 69 Resting place?

Down

1 Covet one’s neighbor’s wife, e.g. 2 “The Cosby Show” son 3 Volatile situation 4 Mustard in the game Clue, e.g.: abbr. 5 Bumbling 6 Queen’s crown 7 Shout at Fenway Park 8 Final word shouted before “Happy New Year!” 9 Cruet filler at an Italian restaurant 10 Jeans material 11 Not bottled, at a bar 12 Perch in a

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Deal with others directly to ensure that you get the results you want. Taking some time to have an important discussion will mean a lot to the other party. Tonight: Quality time with a special friend.

If Feb. 19 is your birthday • This year you might be more focused on your social life than your professional life. If you are single, you might be a little pushy when you start seeing someone. If you are attached, the two of you might be discussing the purchase of a new residence or a second home. Aries can be too pushy for your taste.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH A key person in your life is likely to express his or her dismay over the fact that you don’t want him or her to take the lead. Tonight: Go along with the moment.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Follow your thoughts, especially if they involve a trip with a new friend and/or getting some expert advice. Even if you act somewhat impulsively, you aren’t likely to encounter a problem. Tonight: Answer emails and return calls first. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH One-on-one relating seems to take up a good part of your time. You might have to help calm down someone with whom you are financially involved. Tonight: Time is your best friend. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You could be taken aback by how authoritative a partner sounds. You might wonder where this person is coming from. Stop wondering, and just listen to his or her message. Tonight: Among the crowds. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You could feel tension rising around you. Though this stress might have little to do with you, you are likely to find yourself in the middle of a problem that you have no interest in. Tonight: Vanish whenever you can. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Be aware of others’ needs. A loved one might request some one-on-one time. Schedule a visit, but know that it does not need to take place right now. You do have to give this person some time, though, as he or she is important to you. Tonight: Live in the here and now.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might feel as if you need to cover a lot of ground. Determination and high energy will be important in accomplishing key tasks. Tonight: Kick back and relax.

Puzzle by Agnes Davidson and Zhouqin Burnikel

chicken house 14 Green shampoo 18 ___ Pie (frozen treat) 22 Tree toppler 25 French president’s palace 26 Catcher’s glove 27 Canyon effect 28 More proximate 32 East Lansing sch. 33 Gambling parlor, for short 34 Umbrella part

36 Super bargains 37 Vitaminrich green vegetable 38 Mmes. of Madrid 40 Dresses up for a comic con, say 41 Fancy tie 46 Grab a bite 48 TV’s “2 Broke ___” 49 Started 50 Napoleon, on St. Helena

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0115

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You will bypass several difficult situations. However, each hassle you encounter seems to add to your grumbling. If you are not careful, you could lose your temper. Don’t push to get your way. Tonight: Flirt the night away! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You often find that you feel overburdened with responsibilities. What might be wise is to work from home more often, whenever you can. Try to see if you can eliminate any of your tasks by enlisting the help of a friend or loved one. Tonight: A change of pace will rejuvenate you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your high energy allows you to cruise right past a problem with ease. Others might express some admiration at how easily you can handle stressful situations. Tonight: Flex with the moment.

51 Vexes 52 Bobby who sang “Mack the Knife” 53 Big name in vacuum cleaners 54 Sister’s daughter, e.g. 59 “Right now!” 61 Payday, often: abbr. 62 Help 63 Letters on an unfinished sched.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Be careful when dealing with difficult financial matters. You might feel as if you have enough funds to take care of any immediate unanticipated costs, and can afford to take a risk. Tonight: Do some shopping, and run some errands. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.19.2018 • Monday • M 1

ST. LoUIS PoST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Former plain Jane obsessed with looks

Dear Late Bloomer • There’s a saying, “You can fool Mother Nature, but you can’t fool Father Time.” What it boils down to is, time takes its toll on everyone. It isn’t shallow to have the feelings you are experiencing. But please remember that beauty is more than what’s on the surface. Perhaps it’s time to start concentrating on qualities that accentuate your inner rather

than external beauty — kindness, warmth, intelligence, generosity, an appreciation for the value of others — because charm lasts longer than beauty. This is not to say I don’t appreciate the value of cosmetic surgery, which can do wonders for a person’s sagging ego. But your appearance should not be the focus of your life because, frankly, it isn’t healthy. Dear Abby • I am writing in response to the letter from “Military Service Marker” you printed on Dec. 22. When my uncle, a military veteran, passed away, he was without a military service marker, too. His two kids (my cousins) didn’t bother to obtain one, probably out of sheer laziness. Feeling that it was important, I took the initiative and contacted the VA myself. I obtained the record of his honorable discharge (form DD 214) and his death certificate. I filled out the appropriate paperwork and my uncle got the marker to which he was en-

titled free of charge. It was delivered directly to the cemetery, and the only cost involved was the installation. It was well worth it, and I have never asked my cousins for a dime. I felt proud about having done something for a deserving vet! — BILL B. IN MISSOURI Dear Bill • My thanks to you and to the scores of other readers who wrote to share this information with me. It is important to know that relatives of deceased military veterans can receive these military markers at no cost. Starting the process is as easy as contacting the cemetery, the VA at www.cem.va.gov/hmm/, or a local VFW or American Legion post for assistance. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Stack of papers is moved. 2. Hair is different. 3. Paper on floor is missing. 4. Doorway is not as wide. 5. Lampshade is smaller. 6. Earring is missing.

Dear Abby • When I was in my teens, and even into my 20s and 30s, I was a plain Jane. I had little self-confidence. But strangely, I’m one of those people who has gotten better looking as I’ve aged. Now in my 50s, I am better looking than many women my age or even younger. Men definitely notice me, and I love it. My problem is, I’m now obsessed with my appearance. I constantly worry that I’ll lose my looks. I have even considered cosmetic surgery. I don’t want to be the shallow person I see I’m becoming. What can I do? — LATE BLOOMER

CAROLYN HAX

Feeling urge to dump longtime partner Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn • I have been with my partner for six years and have just graduated from college. I love my partner and could see myself happily married to them for the long haul. However, I am beginning to feel wistful about never having dated anyone else — or kissed anyone else for that matter — and if I feel this way at 22, I fear that by 35 I’ll go mad and uproot my life at an even worse time. Yet, I can’t imagine going through the pain of breaking up with the perfect partner just because of a stupid seven-year itch. How do I make sense of these feelings? I tell my partner everything, and hiding this feeling is suffocating, but I would never want to hurt them, and I know this would devastate them. I feel too young to be this seriously committed but obviously unwilling to

dump someone I think could be right for marriage in 10 years. I thought I’d made up my mind to break up, but then I saw them and my mind was completely unmade because I love them so much. But how can I love them and still be interested in exploring other things? I could use some perspective. — To Break Up or Not to Break Up? Answer • Stop hiding this feeling. The relationship might not be able to withstand your telling this truth, but it will not be able to withstand your hiding it. Trust that. And have a little more respect for your feelings. It’s not a “stupid seven-year-itch,” it’s a legitimate point in your development as a person. What you do with it won’t be “smart” or “stupid,” either — there are only “honest” and “dishonest.” Hiding is dishonest. Stop thinking outcomes altogether, in

fact, and just operate from a place of respect. Your partner might feel the same way, no? Getting out of an outcome mindset should include a hard look at your vocabulary. You’re going to have a tough time figuring yourself out if you see this in terms of having to “dump” someone you obviously love. Respect your doubts, respect your partner, and let your next step, whatever it is, be born of that respect. Often I advise people to figure out what they want to say before they go into a conversation, to help them focus, but it’s also OK not to know what you want out of something besides the intimacy of sharing. You probably can’t know what you want until you bring yourself to a place of integrity. So talk. You can do this. tellme@washpost.com

TV MONDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 2/19/18

7:00

7:30

FOX Lucifer A murder is 2 connected to a dating app. (cc)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Resident An old Fox 2 News at 9:00pm army buddy visits Con- (N) (cc) rad. (cc)

CBS Big Brother: Celebrity The Big 4 Bang Edition (N) (cc) Theory

Young Sheldon: Pilot.

Bull: Thanksgiving. Bull finds himself working a case solo.

NBC Í2018 Winter Olympics: Figure Skating, Freestyle Skiing, Bobsled. Fig5 ure skating (ice dance final); freestyle skiing (women’s halfpipe); bobsled (two-man final). (N) (cc) Independent Lens Black colleges PBS Antiques Roadshow 9 “Longest Bearded Man” and universities. (N) (cc) banner. (N) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

Living St. Louis

DC’s Legends of Tomor- Whose Line Whose Line row: Here I Go Again. Is It Any- Is It Anyway? way? (N) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

ABC The Bachelor Arie visits the women’s home30 towns. (N) (cc)

The Good Doctor Shaun encounters prejudice. (9:01) (cc)

MYTV NCIS: Los Angeles Pri- NCIS: Los Angeles: 46 vate military contrac- Tuhon. (cc) tors are slain.

NCIS: Los Angeles An explosion at a fish market.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • MOnDAy • 02.19.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Who owns medical records: patient or physician? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • On three different occasions, I have had to change doctors: once when I moved out of state, once when my doctor moved out of state and just recently when my doctor sold his private practice. The two first times, I asked for my personal medical records and received a complete file, including notes the doctor had written as to possible reasons for ordering some of my tests. This last instance was different. The doctor sold his practice to another group of doctors. It was only by luck that I saw a small notice in a local newspaper that informed his patients that he was no longer in business and that records could be obtained at his old address. The office was closed for a week, but reopened with new doctors. When I asked for my records, I received a small package consisting of copies of forms and tests. It was much smaller and obviously a sanitized version of the originals. Who owns my personal medical records, and who is authorized to see those records? I had assumed that payment for an office visit entitled me to ownership. Only I, other than doctor and staff, could decide who might view my medical information. When talking to insurance companies or a hospital, I have to sign a form in order to let even my wife hear or see my medical information. But now I know that my medical file is also with a group of doctors I do not know. I do understand that it might not be practicable to ship patient files between doctors, but what is the destination of original files? Is there a time limit in limbo before they are destroyed? — A.T.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

Answer • In some states, the physician’s practice owns the actual medical record, but in most the law is not clear. In one state (New Hampshire), the patient owns the content of the medical record. What is clear is that the authority to access your medical record is covered federally in the U.S. by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which protects the privacy and security of your information. According to this act (called “HIPAA”), a patient is entitled to “inspect, review and receive a copy of his or her own medical records and billing records.” Also, you can have your entire record sent to another physician. In most states, the practice or hospital must keep those records for a period of time: at least six years, in my state. For pediatrics, it’s six years after turning 18. You can learn more about your HIPAA rights at http://bit.ly/2lEDEF8.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics