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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

HORRIFIC THURSDAY • 02.15.2018 • $2.00

17 DEAD IN FLORIDA SCHOOL SHOOTING Suspect is former student who had been expelled

JOEL AUERBACH • Associated Press

Parents wait for news after reports of a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday.

multiple magazines. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., told reporters that Cruz pulled a fire alarm and then, wearing a gas mask, began tossing smoke bombs and shooting people as they ran through the haze. Police say Cruz gunned down a dozen people inside buildings on the school’s sprawling campus, two more on the grounds, and one more on the corner of Pine Island Road as he fled. Two more died at the hospital. Many underwent surgery at Broward Health hospitals. The sheriff’s office said the school, with about 3,200 students, had been cleared by early evening. No victims were identified. “It’s a day that you pray, every day when you get up, that you will never have to see,” school Superintendent Robert Runcie, appearing at a media staging area near the school, told WSVN-TV. “It is in front of us. I ask the community for prayers and

BY CHARLES RABIN, CARLI TEPROFF, KYRA GURNEY AND DAVID SMILEY Miami Herald

PARKLAND, FLA. • An American night-

mare unfolded Wednesday afternoon at a high school in southern Florida after police say an expelled teenager returned to campus and opened fire with an assault rifle, killing 17 and wounding 15 more in the worst school shooting in Florida history. Just before dismissal at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, thousands of students, puzzled at the sound of a fire alarm, were thrown into a panic when gunfire punctuated the din. As teachers and students fled through hallways and hid under desks, a gunman opened fire, leaving a trail of bodies and stunned confusion in his wake. The Broward County Sheriff’s Office said Nikolas Cruz, 19, walked the halls of the high school wielding an AR-15 and

SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL VIA AP

Students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday after a shooter opened fire on the campus.

See SHOOTING • Page A8

Porter scandal is now under congressional investigation

Number of refugees here dropping sharply under Trump administration

BY HERMAN WONG AND MIKE DEBONIS Washington Post

ST. LOUIS • The number

The Republican chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is investigating the White House’s employment of former senior aide Rob Porter after allegations emerged that he abused his two ex-wives — a rare GOP foray into alleged misbehavior in the top echelon of the administration of President Donald Trump. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., the panel’s chairman, sent letters See PORTER • Page A7

TODAY

72°/33°

Warming up

MILD WITH SHOWERS

RESETTLED REFUGEES

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

of refugees coming into St. Louis is expected to drop by about two-thirds from two years ago, resulting in layoffs at the region’s largest resettlement agency. The steep drop comes after President Donald Trump decided to reduce to 45,000 the maximum number of refugees that would be allowed in the country this year. This follows the sharp cut to 50,000 refugees in 2017 from the 110,000 figure the administration of President Barack Obama had approved. In 2016, Obama had raised

The nonprofit International Institute has helped more than 24,000 refugees since 1979 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 ’80 ’85 ’90 ’95 ’00 ’05 ’10 ’15 SOURCE: International Institute of St. Louis

the number to 85,000 from a prior cap of 70,000. Obama approved the progressive two-year bump so

The Birds are back

VA chief in hot water for high-priced overseas trip

the U.S. could accept more Syrian refugees. But after Trump was elected in November 2016, he made good on his campaign promise to tighten borders, including implementing a “Muslim ban.” He has since signed three executive orders placing travel bans on various Muslim majority countries. In addition to Syria, they include Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia and Yemen (Sudan and Iraq have been dropped from the list). The U.S. Supreme Court agreed last month to rule on the legality of the latest version of the travel ban. For the International

WASHINGTON • Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, traveling on what he said was an “essential” trip to London and Copenhagen, improperly accepted Wimbledon tickets and brought along his wife at taxpayer expense, according to a scathing new inspector general’s report. The report says Shulkin and some top staff members made a number of false and misleading statements both to justify the

See REFUGEES • Page A7

See TRIP • Page A7

Law would shield student journalists

BY JOSEPH TANFANI Los Angeles Times

• A4

Road salt, mist blamed for outages

• A11

PARTLY SUNNY

Coach of year: MU’s Cuonzo Martin?

• B1

WEATHER B12

Shiffrin looking good for Olympic gold

TOMORROW

SPORTS

38°/27°

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

• B1

1 M Vol. 140, No. 46 ©2018


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

HORRIFIC THURSDAY • 02.15.2018 • $2.00

17 DEAD IN FLORIDA SCHOOL SHOOTING Suspect is former student who had been expelled

JOEL AUERBACH • Associated Press

Parents wait for news after reports of a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday.

multiple magazines. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., told reporters that Cruz pulled a fire alarm and then, wearing a gas mask, began tossing smoke bombs and shooting people as they ran through the haze. Police say Cruz gunned down a dozen people inside buildings on the school’s sprawling campus, two more on the grounds, and one more on the corner of Pine Island Road as he fled. Two more died at the hospital. Many underwent surgery at Broward Health hospitals. The sheriff’s office said the school, with about 3,200 students, had been cleared by early evening. No victims were identified. “It’s a day that you pray, every day when you get up, that you will never have to see,” school Superintendent Robert Runcie, appearing at a media staging area near the school, told WSVN-TV. “It is in front of us. I ask the community for prayers and

BY CHARLES RABIN, CARLI TEPROFF, KYRA GURNEY AND DAVID SMILEY Miami Herald

PARKLAND, FLA. • An American night-

mare unfolded Wednesday afternoon at a high school in southern Florida after police say an expelled teenager returned to campus and opened fire with an assault rifle, killing 17 and wounding 15 more in the worst school shooting in Florida history. Just before dismissal at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, thousands of students, puzzled at the sound of a fire alarm, were thrown into a panic when gunfire punctuated the din. As teachers and students fled through hallways and hid under desks, a gunman opened fire, leaving a trail of bodies and stunned confusion in his wake. The Broward County Sheriff’s Office said Nikolas Cruz, 19, walked the halls of the high school wielding an AR-15 and

SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL VIA AP

Students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday after a shooter opened fire on the campus.

See SHOOTING • Page A8

Porter scandal is now under congressional investigation

Number of refugees here dropping sharply under Trump administration

BY HERMAN WONG AND MIKE DEBONIS Washington Post

ST. LOUIS • The number

The Republican chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is investigating the White House’s employment of former senior aide Rob Porter after allegations emerged that he abused his two ex-wives — a rare GOP foray into alleged misbehavior in the top echelon of the administration of President Donald Trump. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., the panel’s chairman, sent letters See PORTER • Page A7

TODAY

72°/33°

Warming up

MILD WITH SHOWERS

RESETTLED REFUGEES

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

of refugees coming into St. Louis is expected to drop by about two-thirds from two years ago, resulting in layoffs at the region’s largest resettlement agency. The steep drop comes after President Donald Trump decided to reduce to 45,000 the maximum number of refugees that would be allowed in the country this year. This follows the sharp cut to 50,000 refugees in 2017 from the 110,000 figure the administration of President Barack Obama had approved. In 2016, Obama had raised

The nonprofit International Institute has helped more than 24,000 refugees since 1979 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 ’80 ’85 ’90 ’95 ’00 ’05 ’10 ’15 SOURCE: International Institute of St. Louis

the number to 85,000 from a prior cap of 70,000. Obama approved the progressive two-year bump so

The Birds are back

VA chief in hot water for high-priced overseas trip

the U.S. could accept more Syrian refugees. But after Trump was elected in November 2016, he made good on his campaign promise to tighten borders, including implementing a “Muslim ban.” He has since signed three executive orders placing travel bans on various Muslim majority countries. In addition to Syria, they include Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia and Yemen (Sudan and Iraq have been dropped from the list). The U.S. Supreme Court agreed last month to rule on the legality of the latest version of the travel ban. For the International

WASHINGTON • Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, traveling on what he said was an “essential” trip to London and Copenhagen, improperly accepted Wimbledon tickets and brought along his wife at taxpayer expense, according to a scathing new inspector general’s report. The report says Shulkin and some top staff members made a number of false and misleading statements both to justify the

See REFUGEES • Page A7

See TRIP • Page A7

Law would shield student journalists

BY JOSEPH TANFANI Los Angeles Times

• A4

Road salt, mist blamed for outages

• A11

PARTLY SUNNY

Coach of year: MU’s Cuonzo Martin?

• B1

WEATHER B12

Shiffrin takes gold in giant slalom

TOMORROW

SPORTS

38°/27°

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

• B1

2 M Vol. 140, No. 46 ©2018


M 1 THURSDAY • 02.15.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM CARDS COVERAGE

NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE FISH FRY

For coverage, videos and pictures from Jupiter, check stltoday.com/ cardinals regularly and get the Cardinals Update newsletter at stltoday. com/newsletters

There isn’t any fin more St. Louis than a Lenten fish fry! We’re in search of the top spots suggested by readers like you. stltoday.com/contests

UPCOMING CHATS

Thursday: Dave Matter on MU sports, 11 a.m. Friday: Blues hockey with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Monday: Cardinals baseball from spring training, 1 p.m. Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

‘Antiques Roadshow’ features treasures from area attics JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HIT THE ROADSHOW • After more than

seven months of waiting, the most recent St. Louis visit of PBS’ popular “Antiques Roadshow” will hit the airwaves on Monday. Starting at 7 p.m., KETC (Channel 9) will show the first of three St. Louisbased, hour-long episodes of the show, which was in our town in July to film footage for the broadcasts. In all, almost 5,000 people brought more than 10,000 items into America’s Center to be appraised by the show’s constellation of collectibles experts. The second is set to air at 7 p.m. Feb. 26, followed by a behind-the-scenes “Living St. Louis” special at 9 p.m. Because of membership drives at Channel 9, the third and final hour of the show will not air until March 26.

WGBH

An “Antiques Roadshow” appraiser gives a woman good news about a silver tea set. The PBS series visited St. Louis in July.

The short includes fake interviews with Hamm’s childhood friends, teachers and others actors, who all tell of their love of his “incredible talents.”

Katie McGrath

Jon Hamm

HAMM TIME • Surely, the first thought most people have of Jon Hamm is, “Now that’s one funny guy.” Right? But if “handsome,” “suave” or “sophisticated” somehow crossed your mind first, then check out the four-minute mockumentary that H&R Block has posted that stars STL’s No. 1 celeb and John Burroughs grad. Titled “The Method,” the satirical film short (available on YouTube) shows the process Hamm has used to make himself “the finest actor of his generation,” as the stuffy British narrator proclaims.

ALL THAT JAZZ • Singer and former STLer Katie McGrath has picked up some Big Apple accolades. McGrath has been named the 2018 Bistro Award winner for “best New York debut,” for her cabaret show, “Significant Others.” The show made its debut in June in New York. It then played in St. Louis, at the Gaslight Cabaret Festival in November and the Kranzberg Arts Center earlier this month. McGrath, who moved to New York in 2016, will pick up her award March 12 at the Gotham Comedy Club in NYC. The Bistro Awards were established in 1985 and recognize excellence among cabaret, jazz, and comedy artists. BIG HEART • No surprise that many

Times subject to change

STLers included some article of red clothing in their Wednesday wardrobe for Valentine’s Day. But that wasn’t near enough for wellknown wisdom wielder Reginald Yarber, who was decked out from head to toe in crimson hues before taking up his regular post outside St. Patrick Center in downtown St. Louis. A 55-year-old Sikeston native — who makes no bones telling people he is a former junkie, drug dealer and felon who once shot his own uncle — can be seen most days outside of the center before and after he visits his psychiatrist. And for Valentine’s Day, the ever-stylish Yarber passed on his usual words of wisdom, in his unusual way: “Life is a piece of cake, and a cake is only as good as its ingredients.” SAFE SPACE • Ballwin seems to have locked up its standing as the safest city in St. Louis County. For a third year running, the west St. Louis County suburb made a list of safest cities in the U.S. Neighborhood Scout, a real estate marketing site, crunched the most recent FBI crime statistics for U.S. cities with a population of at least 25,000. The transgressions used in the analysis were from the FBI’s 2016 crime statistics for burglary; larceny/theft; motor vehicle theft; murder; rape; armed robbery; and aggravated assault. The study even breaks down Ballwin’s neighborhoods for safety and highlights five of the safest: New Ballwin Road/ Westglen Village; Clayton Road/Country Club Drive; Manchester/Old Ballwin roads; Fern Glen; and City Center. In 2016, home security company Safewise listed Ballwin as the safest city in St. Louis County (and No. 3 in Missouri). Then last year, SafeWise placed Ballwin as the safest city in St. Louis County, again trailing Cottleville for the distinction of being the safest city in the metro area. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Dunham writes about getting hysterectomy at 31 Lena Dunham has written an incredibly personal essay about coming to terms with permanent infertility at age 31. Vogue.com published on Wednesday Dunham’s detailed account of her decision to undergo a hysterectomy late last year to relieve what she describes as debilitating pain from endometriosis. Dunham, the award-winning creator of “Girls” and LennyLetter.com, also shares her profound desire to experience pregnancy and become a mother and her grief over losing her fertility. She says dealing with endometriosis distanced her from her romantic partner. Dunham and musician Jack Antonoff announced in January that they had ended their five-year relationship. Connick to star in stage version of ‘The Sting’ • “The Sting,” the musical, has found its Henry Gondorff. Harry Connick Jr. will play the role made famous by Paul Newman. The crooner will star in the upcoming musical version of the Chicago-set 1973 movie, which will bow at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Milburn, N.J., on March 29. The Academy Award-winning movie was known for its use of music by Scott Joplin, especially “The Entertainer.” Paxton family files wrongful death suit • The family of Bill Paxton has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against a Los Angeles hospital and the surgeon who performed the actor’s heart surgery shortly before he died. The suit filed Friday against Cedars-Sinai Medical Center alleges that the surgeon used a “high risk and unconventional surgical approach” that was unnecessary and that he lacked the experience to perform, and that he played down the procedure’s risks. Paxton’s death certificate says he died Feb. 25, 2017, from a stroke, 11 days after surgery to replace a heart valve and repair aorta damage. He was 61.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Claire Bloom is 87. Actress Jane Seymour is 67. Singer Melissa Manchester is 67. Actress Lynn Whitfield is 65. Cartoonist Matt Groening is 64. Singer Ali Campbell is 59. San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto is 32. Actor Steven Michael Quezada is 55. Country singer Michael Reynolds is 54. Actress Renee O’Connor is 47. Actress Sarah Wynter is 45. Actress Natalie Morales is 33. Actress Amber Riley is 32. From news services

THEATER REVIEW

LOTTERY

Woman tracks her abuser in tense drama

MULTISTATE GAMES

BLACKBIRD

BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

John Pierson, an actor of such benign aspect that he looks perfect for the role of a minister, seems to favor parts that take him in exactly the opposite direction. At the St. Louis Actors’ Studio, where he’s an associate artistic director, he’s played such characters as a bigamist (“The Ride Down Mount Morgan”), a dermatologist involved in elaborate sex games (“Closer”) and an architect in love with an animal (“The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”). Now, in the troupe’s new production of David Harrower’s “BlackBird,” things are even more disturbing. Pierson plays Ray, a child molester. Ray doesn’t see himself that way, of course. Strangely, his victim, Una, doesn’t exactly see him that way, either. Fifteen years after everything happened, when she was 12 and he was 40, Una has chanced upon his photo and driven for hours to track him down at his workplace. Ray is stunned and horrified. He’s got a job now and a relationship with a (grown) woman. He just wants Una to leave. Una, played by Elizabeth Berkenmeier, refuses to go — although she won’t or can’t explain why she came. She prods him for information, which he doles out

When • Through Feb. 25; 8 p.m. ThursdaysSaturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays Where • Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue How much • $30-$35 More info • 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster. com

reluctantly, until at last she exclaims, “I don’t know everything, and you don’t know anything!” With that, Berkenmeier launches into a mesmerizing monologue about the last time Una and Ray were together, a night of sex and abandonment. Berkenmeier’s delivery — ranging from tenderness to fury, from terror to a taste for chocolate candy — straps us in for a steep and emotional roller-coaster ride. She shows us the 12-year-old inside Una, raging and hurt and maybe in control of the young woman standing before us. That’s what Ray did to her, and it’s unforgivable. But Una doesn’t focus on that. (Perhaps she can’t. She mentions a psychiatrist she once saw, who whispered inaudibly. Obviously, that was not the help she needed.) She wants something, but what? To kill Ray? He grabs her bag to look

for a weapon but finds tissues. Does she want to scream at him? To find closure? To finish whatever they started years before? Director Annamaria Pileggi keeps their encounter on a razor’s edge, never closing off any possibilities and never letting any of them resolve. “BlackBird” is not an easy play and not merely because of its subject matter. It’s because Harrower engineers this roller coaster with hairpin turns. Berkenmeier’s swings in mood, language and behavior as Una are matched by Pierson’s as Ray. He strains nervously to take charge, he tersely answers questions (maybe truthfully, maybe not), he throws a litter-kicking tantrum at the state of the break room. He also weeps and apologizes. He reveals a self-loathing so profound that he has to explain it to a wall instead of to Una. In Pierson and Berkenmeier, Pileggi has found actors who, together, keep their balance on that razor’s edge — and in the process, allow us in the audience to do so as well. But that doesn’t mean we won’t get cut. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

LOTTO Wednesday: 01-11-15-33-36-43 Estimated jackpot: $2.4 million SHOW ME CASH Wednesday: 07-13-19-25-30 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 975 Evening: 877 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 6697 Evening: 0857

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Wednesday Midday: 06-07-31-42-45 Evening: 08-09-28-40-42 LOTTO Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $4.25 million PICK-3 Wednesday Midday: 315 FB: 5 Evening: 552 FB: 3 PICK-4 Wednesday Midday: 5125 FB: 5 Evening: 4282 FB: 1

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A12 Editorial .............. A14 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Joe Holleman ........ A2 Letters to editor .. A14 Obituaries ........... A16

POWERBALL Wednesday: 37-39-44-46-69 Powerball: 26 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $203 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 05-12-15-46-49 Mega ball: 01 Megaplier:4 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $168 million

Pat Gauen ............. A4 Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................. A13 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather ............... B12

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $8.92, Sunday-Friday $9.10, Monday-Friday $6.88, Thursday-Sunday $7.09, Sat-Mon $6.16, Fri-Sun $6.16, Sun-Mon $5.62, Sat-Sun Only $5.62, Sunday Only $4.09. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 7/16/17, 8/27/17, 9/17/17, 9/24/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17, 12/3/17, 12/17/17, 12/24/17, 1/14/18, 2/18/18, 3/18/18, 4/15/18, 5/20/18, 6/24/18, 7/15/18, 8/26/18, 9/09/18, 9/23/18, 10/14/18, 11/22/18 and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account set up fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

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02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A3

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • THURSDAY • 02.15.2018

Law would shield student journalists BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • In 1991,

a young Eric Greitens wrote an essay to the Post-Dispatch. The senior at Parkway North High School was participating in a writing contest with the prompt “What the First Amendment Means to Me.” The future Missouri governor said that while leaders since the country’s founding had “nourished” the First Amendment, recent events had “begun to erode the liberties which are the basis for freedom of thought.” As one example, Greitens pointed to the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the 1988 Hazelwood vs. Kuhlmeier case, which allowed school administrators to censor student publications. “I am specifically concerned about the erosion of student rights protected under the First Amendment,” Greitens wrote. “We need courage and wisdom to stand against the mounting silence and reignite the freedom of expression.” A quarter century later, Greitens, a Republican, may get the chance to help reverse the direction he said the country was heading. The Missouri

House on Wednesday gave first-round approval to legislation that would largely shield student journalists from censorship by their schools. The idea started to gain traction in the 2016 legislative session. Lawmakers were fuming at the time about a November 2015 incident at the University of Missouri-Columbia, when communications professor Melissa Click, during protests on a public quad, called for “muscle” to remove student journalists. The Cronkite New Voices Act, this year sponsored by Rep. Kevin Corlew, R-Kansas City, states that “material in school-sponsored media shall not be suppressed solely because it involves political or controversial subject matter.” The law would apply to public high schools and public universities and colleges. For high schools, the measure allows teachers and administrators to use prior restraint when an administrator or an adviser “reasonably determines” the material is slanderous or libelous, invades privacy, violates the law, threatens violence, or is likely to disrupt order in the school, among other things.

College students would not receive protection for printing such materials. The proposal also states that school staff cannot be disciplined for refusing to halt publication of lawful stories. For high schools, the measure allows districts to draft regulations on when and how students can express themselves, as well as rules forbidding vulgar or offensive language. The legislation states that schools, faculty and staff could be held liable in court if they knew about or participated in promoting unlawful content. Students 18 or older could be held liable for publishing unlawful material. Rep. Bryan Spencer, R-Wentzville, worried about who would be held accountable if rogue minor students published libelous pieces without editor knowledge. Corlew said there would be few cases of libel in general. “I don’t think you’re going to see a lot of that,” Corlew said. “Our student advisers and student journalists are seeking to be professional.” It is unclear whether Greitens has altered his views on student censorship in recent years. His spokesman could not immediately be reached for

comment. Greitens has maintained an icy relationship with the press, dragging out open records requests and holding few news events during his first year in office. His associates formed the group A New Missouri Inc., which acts as a sort of campaign committee but does not reveal its donors because of its nonprofit status. Greitens and his team are also the subject of an ongoing probe by Attorney General Josh Hawley, a Republican, who is investigating the administration’s use of Confide, a cellphone app that deletes text messages after they’ve been read. Perhaps offering a clue into Greitens’ thinking, in October he wrote on social media an open letter to his young sons, Joshua and Jacob. He was opposing a decision by a Mississippi school district to remove the book “To Kill a Mockingbird” from its curriculum. “A culture of banned books leads to a culture of brittle people,” Greitens wrote. “If you avoid what might offend or bother you, you’ll also miss out on things that will stretch and strengthen you.” The legislation is House Bill 1940.

Express ashes mark start of Lent, again BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • “We’ll do a con-

densed version because your car is running,” said the Rev. Erin Counihan, outfitted in full liturgical dress as she leaned through the passenger window of a Ford F150. Counihan, of Oak Hill Presbyterian Church, said a short prayer before dipping her finger in ashes and forming a cross on the head of driver Patricia Schellert. “Remember you are dust, and to dust you shall return,” Counihan said. Schellert then scooted over back behind the steering wheel and continued on her way to pick up some groceries at Schnucks. Thanks to Ashes to Go, Schellert could officially check “get ashes” off her to-do list on Ash Wednesday, which marks the start of Lent for many Christians. The ashes serve as a reminder of mortality. These roadside ashes have been distributed by a group of St. Louis clergy on the corner of Arsenal Street and Grand Boulevard near Tower Grove Park every Ash Wednesday for the past 12 years. They administer them to drive-through and walk-up visitors. It began in 2007 as a collaboration between churches including Oak Hill Presbyterian, Compton Heights Christian Church and St. John’s Episcopal Church, Tower Grove. “It’s all about getting out into the streets and going to the people rather than as-

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Iris Robles of Florissant receives ashes Wednesday from the Rev. Alan Meyers of Oak Hill Presbyterian Church, at the corner of Arsenal Street and Grand Boulevard as part of Ashes to Go.

suming that they are going to come to us,” said the Rev. Amy Chambers-Cortright, of St. John’s. “We use Ash Wednesday as an opportunity to share and let people know that they are welcome.” But Chambers-Cortright acknowledges not everyone is a fan of drive-through ashings. “I understand that people are offended by separating the ash from communion and liturgical services, but I respectfully disagree,” she said. “I think you have to think creatively and outside the box today to reach people, so why not go out into the streets where they are?” Over the years, the idea of

express ashes has grown in popularity in cities across the country, and several other churches in the St. Louis area have joined in. This year, St. Thomas Holy Spirit Lutheran Church in Sunset Hills and Manchester United Methodist Church in west St. Louis County both had their own versions of roadside ashes. But don’t expect to see any Roman Catholic priests on the corner in the city for Ash Wednesday. Though there is no express rule against express ashes, it’s not in the traditional practice for Catholics, according to the Archdiocese of St. Louis. “In practice for us, Ash

Wednesday is a time to slow down and assess your spiritual life,” said archdiocese spokesman Gabe Jones. “So taking time out and going to a Mass or a service is an important part of that.” But while those traditional Ash Wednesday services are often solemn, Ashes To Go tend to be joyful events mixed with some quieter moments of reflection, Chambers-Cortright said. “To some it might even be a little too cheerful for Ash Wednesday,” she said. “There’s lots of smiles, lots of laughter. I think most people are just happy to see us.”

Independent U.S. Senate hopeful offers new choice BY KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Kansas City attorney Craig O’Dear will formally enter Missouri’s U.S. Senate race on Thursday as an independent, banking on an anti-partisan theme in what is shaping up as one of the most quintessentially partisan races in America this year. O’Dear will launch his campaign under the auspices of the Centrist Project, a national effort to elevate nonpartisan candidates on the premise that the two major parties have become too uncompromising for most Americans. “Our country is at a historically difficult moment,” said O’Dear, a partner with the St. Louis-based international law firm of Bryan Cave, which has a Kansas City office. “The hyper-partisan warfare of these two parties is a major part of the problem.” O’Dear, 60, has never run for office before but has been active in fundraising for candidates of both major parties. He joins a field that includes two frontrunners — incumbent Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Republican challenger Josh Hawley — who both are getting heavy backing from their respective national parties. The contest is seen as

one of the most important this year in the two parties’ fight for control of Congress. Missouri, O’Dear once considered a “purple” state that could go either way in national elections, has been strongly Republican in the past few election cycles. Republican President Donald Trump won the state by almost 20 percentage points over Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016. Within that generally Republican atmosphere, though, are some indications that Missouri’s voters are less partisan than its political leaders. Though Trump won big here, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., in the same election, was narrowly re-elected against Democratic challenger Jason Kander, by a less-than 3 points. “Even though Trump won by 19 points, I’ve talked to so many Trump voters who say that was an much about the alternative candidate as it was about Trump,” O’Dear said. “People are frustrated with the choices. The whole reason I’m running is to give them a different choice.” In fact, in an era of partisanship so strong that it often seems to be the only thing

driving both parties, O’Dear does tout some unusual bipartisan credentials. In the 2016 election cycle, he contributed money to both Clinton and Blunt, and hosted a fundraiser for Republican Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. In an interview this week, O’Dear said his politics leaned somewhat Republican for years, to the point of joining the Young Republicans when he was younger. He said that started to change about 10 years ago. “Certainly part of it was the changes in the Republican Party, but also just changes in the political climate. I have never bought into the game of ‘red jerseys versus blue jerseys.’ I’ve always been more interested in policy,” he said. “I see President Trump as a symptom of this environment, (but) this hyper-partisan warfare, this pre-dated Trump. My focus is, how do we address those divisions?” On the issues, O’Dear tends to focus more on process than on specific policy positions. On health care, for example, “I don’t think the answer is government-run health care, but that doesn’t mean government doesn’t have a role in the process,” he said. “We need a legislative process that pulls all the good people and smart

people in the Senate together in a bipartisan approach that really looks at why is it costing us so much. I don’t see either party doing that.” Successful independent campaigns for the Senate are rare but not unheard of. Two independents currently sit there: Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine, both of whom caucus with the Democrats. O’Dear said that, if elected, he wouldn’t regularly caucus with either party. Though O’Dear set up an exploratory committee last month, he won’t formally enter the race until Thursday, kicking it off with a news conference in Kansas City. As a result, he didn’t have to report fundraising totals in the round of federal campaign reports that came out last month. He declined this week to divulge how much money he had raised, saying only: “We have money. We’re not going to talk about that yet, but I feel good about it.” The Centrist Project is a national nonprofit founded in 2013 by economist Charlie Wheelan, under the banner of what it calls “Country over party.” Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

Progressive income tax may be hot election issue PAT GAUEN For the Post-Dispatch

Only mature readers should proceed beyond this point because you’re about to see the T-word. Taxes. Many think it the most obscene term in the language. My neighbors in Illinois are going to hear the word a lot in this gubernatorial election year, given that the state debt is still astronomical, the income tax was just increased, property tax rates are hair-curling and the infrastructure is crumbling. Maybe that’s why the state has been experiencing a net loss, by recent trends, of almost four residents an hour. That leaves nearly 34,000 fewer people to help bear the financial pain. So what’s new? How about the impending debate over a progressive income tax? It appears that many Democrats want one, and many Republicans don’t. You may need a little help to understand the issue. Illinois has a “flat” state personal income tax, currently 4.95 percent. After deductions or other adjustments, you pay 4.95 percent of your income — whether you earned $10,000 or $10 million. So if your adjusted income was $160,000, the tax in Illinois would be 4.95 percent of that, or $7,920. Hold that thought. Hypothetically, let’s say Illinois passed a progressive, or tiered, tax with a rate of 4.95 percent on the first $150,000, and 6 percent on income above that. You would pay 4.95 percent on $150,000 ($7,425) and 6 percent on the remaining $10,000 ($600) for a total tax bill of $8,025. Some folks run off the rails at this point, mistakenly thinking that the 6 percent “bracket” would apply to the whole $160,000, for a tax bill of $9,600. Nobody is proposing that. The federal income tax uses seven brackets for individuals. Every state adjoining Illinois has some kind of progressive tax structure except Indiana. (It has a flat state rate of 3.3 percent. But unlike in Illinois, Hoosier counties are allowed to tax income there too. With an average county rate reported at 1.5 percent, the 4.8 percent total rate comes pretty close to Illinois.) Sometimes you’ll hear people complain that they will earn less money because a pay raise pushed them into a higher tax bracket. It doesn’t really work that way. The higher rate applies only to the income that goes above the bracket’s threshold. They never end up with less. All but one of the Democrats running for Illinois governor have advocated for some kind of progressive tax. Most lack specifics so far. The idea presumably would be to set high brackets to reap extra taxes from the relatively wealthy, without affecting the middle class. That concept contrasts with Missouri, which has 11 brackets, all aimed at extremely low income levels. There is no distinction between the middle class and the rich, taxing all income over $9,001 at the top rate of 6 percent. The fundamental question in Illinois is whether it is fair to expect people to pay greater percentages of income tax for their affluence when they arguably put less burden on government services than the poor. It already has been answered in the federal tax system and those of the 34 states that have progressive income taxes. There appears to be no momentum to abandon those. Even the recent big federal tax overhaul — a gift to the rich that was camouflaged behind shorter-term benefits for ordinary people — adjusted the rates but not the use of brackets. This year’s real Illinois political argument — heck, every year’s Illinois political argument — will be over state spending, property tax relief and debt retirement. Republicans, such as Gov. Bruce Rauner, argue that high Illinois taxes are strangling commerce and feeding the exodus. They argue that a better business climate will deliver more revenue. Democrats are more committed to preserving social services and generally less afraid of taxation. You can blame them for a long-term under-funding of the state’s pensions and services, in a reckless quest to eat their cake and have it too. But it’s no comfort that, on a national scale anyway, the GOP has been prioritizing private profits over compassion. Neither Rauner nor his re-election opponent in the March 20 primary, state Rep. Jeanne Ives, wants a progressive income tax. Both would prefer a general tax reduction. Among Democrats running for governor, J.B. Pritzker, state Sen. Daniel Biss, Chris Kennedy, Tio Hardiman and Bob Daiber have said they want some kind of bracketing; Dr. Robert Marshal does not. (By the way, I listed the Democrats in finishing order from last month’s early “We Ask America Poll.”) Passing a progressive income tax would pose a particular challenge, since it would require amending the Illinois Constitution. pgauen.post.dispatch@gmail.com


LOCAL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim identified • Police have identified a 22-year-old man who was fatally shot Monday night in the city’s College Hill neighborhood. Javon Dove was found unconscious by officers in the 1400 block of East John Street about 7:30 p.m. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Police said they had no information to release on any suspects. Dove lived in the 2100 block of Obear Avenue, a few blocks from the shooting scene, according to police. ST. LOUIS > Pedestrian dies after being struck by 2 vehicles • A woman who was hit by two different vehicles while crossing North Grand Boulevard Tuesday night was pronounced dead at a hospital. The woman, Tamika Davis, 36, was killed as she tried to cross west to east at Montgomery Street about 6:30 p.m., police said. A southbound 2003 Toyota Tacoma pickup struck Davis and knocked her into the northbound lanes, police said. She was then struck by a Chrysler 300 sedan. She was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. The drivers are cooperating, police said. EDWARDSVILLE > Charge against pastor is dropped • Prosecutors have dropped a conspiracy charge that accused a pastor of helping destroy evidence that a church elder was producing child porn with secret cameras at a Bethalto church. The charges came after the church elder, David L. Von Bergen, was accused of planting hidden cameras inside Zion Lutheran Church, including in a bathroom and the changing area of the sacristy. While Von Bergen was attempting to retrieve the cameras on Christmas Eve 2015, he was discovered by the Rev. Kale Hanson, who agreed to destroy the camera memory cards, prosecutors said. Von Bergen pleaded guilty to a charge of producing child pornography and was sentenced on Friday to 15 years in prison. Madison County State’s Attorney Thomas D. Gibbons dropped the charge against Hanson on the same day, saying authorities now believe Hanson didn’t know what was on the cards he destroyed. ST. LOUIS > Ex-worker admits defrauding business • A man from Alton pleaded guilty in federal court here Wednesday and admitted defrauding his former employer of more than $140,000. Thomas H. Vogt, 60, worked for the owner of a Missouri restaurant and often bought hundreds of thousands of dollars in supplies and equipment for the business, his indictment says. Prosecutors say Vogt also sought reimbursement for expenses that the company had already paid. Vogt pleaded guilty to one count of interstate transportation of stolen property. He took the proceeds to his bank in Illinois, prosecutors said. Vogt is to be sentenced on May 22. CAHOKIA > One dead, one injured in fire • A man was killed and his adult daughter was critically hurt in a house fire early Wednesday in Cahokia. Both victims — ages 90 and 59 — were unconscious and not breathing when firefighters pulled them from the home about 2 a.m. Tim Carpenter identified the victims as his grandfather, Lloyd Metz, and mother, Cynthia Metz. Assistant Fire Chief Sharon Davis of the Camp Jackson Fire Department said the fire was in the first block of Westwood Drive, just south of Camp Jackson Road. The home is a one-story, single-family home with vinyl siding. Davis said there was nothing suspicious about the blaze. It apparently was an accidental fire, she said, although the cause is under investigation. Firefighters heard no smoke detectors in the home. TOWN AND COUNTRY > Police search for polite thief • The thief who stole two bottles of tequila and a cartload of pots and pans

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A5

SWEETS FOR THE SWEET from Town Country stores last week was, at least, polite about it. When he Suspect in wheeled the robbery shopping cart toward the exit of the Home Goods store last Thursday, an employee asked if he was going to pay for the items. “No, ma’am,” he replied, and left. He loaded everything into a black Volkswagen Passat and drove away. Town and Country Police Detective Chris Hunt said Wednesday that he needed the public’s help to find the man. Hunt released a

surveillance image of the thief. The suspect is a black man in his 40s who wore a stocking cap, gray hooded sweatshirt and a camouflage jacket. He has a gap between his front teeth. He stole from two businesses in the Manchester Meadows Shopping Center at about 10 a.m. last Thursday. From Total Wine and More, he hid two bottles of tequila underneath his clothes and walked out. Then he pushed a shopping cart filled with pots and pans out of the At Home store, Hunt said. Police say the Passat he left in was driven by another man. Anyone who recognizes the thief is asked to call Hunt at 314-587-2866.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Ann and John Macke of Oakville share a piece of cake on Valentine’s Day at the St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church fish fry on Wednesday. For the first time since 1945 Valentine’s Day fell on Ash Wednesday, with the church taking advantage of the opportunity for an early fish fry. The Mackes have been married for 51 years.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Investigators visit the state Capitol in Greitens probe BY JACK SUNTRUP AND KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Investigators work-

ing for the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office were in Jefferson City on Wednesday, three state lawmakers said. St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner, a Democrat, announced last month that her office would conduct a criminal investigation into claims that Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican, took a compromising photograph of his lover and threatened to release it if she spoke about the affair. Greitens lived in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis at the time of his 2015 extramarital affair. He has acknowledged the affair but has denied allegations of potential blackmail. The reason for the investigators’ visit

DIGEST JEFFERSON CITY > Proposal to raise marriage age advances • The Missouri House gave initial approval Wednesday to a measure that would raise the legal age of marriage to 17 from 15. Currently, if a 15-year-old applies for a marriage license, a county’s recorder of deeds is obligated to issue one. In addition to increasing the age requirement, the bill would require a judge to rule that the marriage is advisable. Rep. Jean Evans, R-Manchester, said the goal was to help protect girls from being abused and trafficked. While Democrats were generally supportive of the measure, some Republicans expressed reservations about Evans’ proposal. Rep. Wanda Brown, R-Lincoln, said the legislation would circumvent the rights of parents. Others expressed concern that the bill could violate religious freedoms. Rep. Mike Moon, R-Ash Grove, and Rep. Nick Marshall, R-Parkville, said the law would send the wrong message — namely, that teenagers could engage in premarital sex “with impunity.” To get on the “right side of God,” those teenagers would then have to jump through hoops to get married, he said. The legislation is House Bill 1630. LADUE > Superintendent announces plans to resign • Ladue Superintendent Donna Jahnke announced that she will retire at the end of next school year. By the time she retires, she will have had 36 years of working experience in education, with all but four in the Ladue district. “It has been the greatest privilege of my life to serve the students and families of the Ladue School District as a teacher, an

was unclear. Rep. Nate Walker, R-Kirksville, told the Post-Dispatch he had spoken with investigators Jack Foley and William Tisaby mid-afternoon Wednesday. Walker was an early backer of Greitens during the 2016 campaign but was among a handful of House Republicans who called last month for Greitens’ resignation. “Yes, I did meet with them,” he said of the investigators. Walker would not say what types of questions the investigators asked, but signaled that the issues they were interested in went beyond revelations surrounding the extramarital affair. “They’re looking into some things in the governor’s office,” he said. “They asked a lot of questions. … Good investigators investigate everything.” Susan Ryan, a spokeswoman for the

circuit attorney, declined to answer any questions, except to say that Foley and Tisaby are among investigators working on the Greitens probe. Sens. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, and Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, also said investigators from the prosecutor’s office were in the Capitol on Wednesday. “Two came to my office,” ChappelleNadal said from the Senate floor, adding that Foley was one of them. “There are two that are in the building,” Schaaf added. Schaaf, a frequent critic of Greitens, said he wanted to shed light on the ongoing investigation. “If they are in the building talking to people … I thought I should get that into the public sphere,” Schaaf said. Greitens has rejected the calls for his

administrator, and for the last five years as superintendent,” Jahnke said in a statement. “I am excited to have more than a year to continue to lead the district and move important initiatives forward, while working on a transition plan that allows me to hand over the reins in a manner that best serves our students and our Ladue Schools community.” Jahnke started working in Ladue in 1991 as a teacher. She also served as director of community services, a principal and assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction before becoming superintendent in 2013. The search for a new superintendent will begin this summer. MAPLEWOOD > City OKs plan for trail • Officials have tentatively decided to give Great Rivers Greenway the go-ahead to build a trail through the city along a northern route that would run in part along busy Greenwood Boulevard. But they want stipulations and the right to nix the plan if safety concerns aren’t adequately addressed. About two dozen people turned out for a public hearing on the matter before Tuesday’s council meeting. Several expressed safety concerns about the northern route. Great Rivers Greenway had asked the city to approve one of two routes for a greenway through the city with a Feb. 14 deadline so it can proceed with design plans and obtaining funding. The group would build the trail with federal funding, but the city would have to maintain it. The council instructed City Manager Martin J. Corcoran on Tuesday to draft a letter to Great Rivers saying the city will approve the northern route if several stipulations are met and if the city can back out if officials don’t feel the plan meets its safety concerns. From staff and correspondent reports

resignation that followed his public acknowledgment of the affair. The allegations of blackmail were made public by the ex-husband of the woman who had a relationship with Greitens. The ex-husband released audio last month that he described as a secret recording he made of his then-wife telling him about the non-consensual photo and the threat. Greitens has denied any criminal wrongdoing. But he has declined multiple times to say whether he took a photograph. At a news conference last week, Greitens said he wanted to move past the controversy. “We’re ready to move forward,” he said. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

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NEWS

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A7

Hawley, legislative Republicans split on arbitration BY SKY CHADDE st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Measures that would keep complaints against large employers private have gained favor in the House and Senate, but the state’s top law enforcement officer has signaled his discontent, at least in certain cases. Legislation that’s progressed in the House and Senate would give arbitrators the authority to decide whether an arbitration agreement between an employer and an employee is enforceable. Studies have shown that employers win more often than employees during arbitration, which is a private system of justice with no appeal process. But Josh Hawley, Missouri’s attorney general and a Republican, along with every other state’s attorney general, signed a letter this week asking Congress to outlaw arbitration in the case of sexual harassment. “We, as a nation, must do better to protect victims of sexual harassment, and

part of this is allowing them access to the judicial system in lieu of forced arbitration,” Hawley said in a statement. During debate on the proposed legislation, which is pending before the House and Senate, bill sponsors denied allegations that arbitration agreements protect sexual harassers. Rep. Gina Mitten, D-Richmond Heights, said during a committee hearing that the proposal would silence those who have been sexually harassed — an egregious development, she said, during the “me too” movement. “This is not a partisan issue,” she said. “Gretchen Carlson, whom I think we can pretty well agree is not my liberal best friend, has said, ‘Arbitration agreements are a sexual harasser’s dream.’” Carlson, a former Fox News host who has said she was harassed by the network’s late leader, Roger Ailes, has been outspoken about her belief that such agreements protect abusers. The attorneys general’s letter states that most arbitration agreements are found in

Cabinet member in trouble for high-cost travel expenses

Scandal raises questions about what top aides may have known, and when PORTER • FROM A1

Wednesday to FBI Director Christopher Wray and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly asking for information on what they knew about the allegations against Porter and when they knew it — an inquiry prompted by an apparent contradiction between the timeline offered by the White House and offered by Wray in congressional testimony on Tuesday. “I have real questions about how someone like this could be considered for employment,” Gowdy said on CNN’s “New Day” on Wednesday, adding that “the chronology is not favorable for the White House.” The Porter scandal has raised sharp questions about what Trump’s top aides may have known about the accusations and when. The White House has struggled to contain a widening crisis over its handling of Porter, who resigned last week. Wray’s testimony to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on Tuesday, indicating that the FBI raised concerns about Porter in March, directly rebutted what Trump’s aides have said publicly about when the bureau informed White House officials about Porter’s security-clearance investigation. White House officials said the FBI first contacted them in the summer about Porter’s clearance, according to a report from The Washington Post’s Ellen Nakashima and Shane Harris. Officials also claimed the investigation was never completed and they did not know the extent of the allegations against Porter. Gowdy’s probe encompasses the larger question of whether more White House officials are working with temporary security clearances, indicating potential vetting problems. According to the letters sent to Wray and Kelly, the House panel is “investigating the policies and practices by which interim security clearances are investigated and adjudicated within the Executive Branch, and the extent to which any security clearance issued to Porter comported with those policies and processes.” As the White House staff secretary, Porter was responsible for handling the flow of paperwork to and from Trump’s desk — including some of the most sensitive secrets of the federal government. Watchdogs have raised the possibility that Porter could have been subject to blackmail by someone aware of the allegations against him. Two of Porter’s ex-wives, as well as a former girlfriend,

have publicly recounted episodes of verbal and physical abuse; one has shared pictures of a facial injury she said Porter inflicted. Porter has denied wrongdoing. Gowdy’s letters come nearly a week after the allegations against Porter exploded — prompting an initial wagon-circling from the White House, then his resignation. Questions since then have focused on whether Kelly ignored credible warnings from the FBI and kept Porter in his job. On Thursday, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., the top Democrat on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, urged Gowdy to take action, accusing Republicans of having “constructed a wall around the White House in order to prevent any credible oversight whatsoever.” Cummings pointed to Democratic requests dating to the weeks after the 2016 presidential election for more information about security clearances for senior Trump aides. “If you had agreed to any of our previous requests for information on these matters, the White House would have been required to answer key questions about why Mr. Porter was denied a final security clearance, who at the White House was aware of this information, and how Mr. Porter was allowed to remain in his position,” Cummings wrote. On Wednesday, Cummings struck a more cooperative note, commending Gowdy for launching a probe. “But obviously,” Cummings added, “the credibility of this investigation will be judged by how thorough it is in obtaining documents and interviewing witnesses, and how bipartisan it is in its conclusions.” Cummings said he personally wished to interview Kelly, Wray and White House Counsel Donald McGahn. In the letters, Gowdy requested information on the process for obtaining an interim security clearance, what was known about Porter and who allowed his interim clearance. The probe will also look at when and who in the White House knew about the domestic abuse allegations. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., asked about Porter’s employment Wednesday, said: “If a person who commits domestic violence gets into government, then there’s a breakdown in the system. There’s a breakdown in the vetting system, and that needs to be addressed.” Breaking his silence about abuse, Trump said Wednesday he’s “totally opposed to domestic violence.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.

harassment claims private. “This bill is not about sexual harassers,” Corlew said. “It’s about providing an effective alternative to dispute resolution.” It was unclear Wednesday if Hawley supported a blanket ban on arbitration or just in the instance of sexual harassment claims. The letter Hawley signed states that arbitration agreements have benefits “in other contexts,” and it praised Microsoft for ending such agreements only for sexual harassment claims. In his statement, Hawley focused on arbitration agreements among elected officials. “Allowing our elected representatives to settle harassment claims in secret perpetuates bad behavior — and prevents constituents from knowing the true nature of their elected officials,” he said. The Missouri House of Representatives has dealt with six complaints of sexual harassment in the past two years, according to the Associated Press.

contracts’ “fine print,” making it difficult for employees to know they’ve lost the right to sue in court. “These clauses typically are presented in boilerplate ‘take-it-or-leave-it’ fashion by the employers,” the letter says. “As a consequence, many employees will not even recognize that they are bound by arbitration clauses until they have been sexually harassed and attempt to bring suit.” But Rep. Kevin Corlew, R-Kansas City, who introduced one of the legislature’s proposals, criticized Mitten for using recent stories about sexual harassment in the workplace to argue against the proposal. “We’ve had this bill now for three years, and some of these arguments are being brought up for the first time,” he said during a hearing. “It’s somewhat offensive to me that they are taking advantage of some of the tragic stories that we’ve heard and trying to (join) them with this bill.” Corlew said in an interview Wednesday that he had spoken with Hawley about alleviating concerns about keeping sexual

TRIP • FROM A1

$122,334 trip and in defending it afterwards. His chief of staff, Vivieca Wright Simpson, doctored an email to persuade an agency ethics lawyer to approve a $4,300 flight for Shulkin’s wife, the report found. Another aide devoted “many hours” to arranging for tourist activities for Shulkin and his wife, the report found, “time that should have been spent conducting official VA business and not for providing personal travel concierge services.” Shulkin and his attorneys denounced the report as “one-sided” and said investigators bent the evidence “in an effort to manufacture violations where none exist.” They said Shulkin spent the “vast majority” of his time on official business. “Any sightseeing by the secretary was incidental to the substance of the trip,” says the response, included in the report. Shulkin becomes the latest of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet members to run into trouble for improper travel expenses. Trump’s first secretary of Health and Human Services, Tom Price, resigned in September after revelations that he had spent at least $400,000 on private charter flights. Three other members of the Cabinet have stirred criticism for taking expensive flights on private or military planes. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spent $12,000 to charter a flight to his Montana home. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt billed the government for $58,000 in flights. And Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin took his wife along to a trip to Fort Knox, Ky., where they viewed the solar eclipse. The report by VA Inspector General Michael Missal says Shulkin and his wife spent nine days in Europe, but business meetings accounted for only 3½ days. The allegation of the falsified email is the most serious in the report. A VA ethics lawyer at first denied a request to have the agency pick up the expenses for Shulkin’s wife, Merle Bari, but told Simpson, the chief of staff, that the agency could justify the expense under certain conditions — such as if Shulkin were receiving an award.

Simpson then doctored an email from a staff member to make it read, “We’re having a special recognition dinner at the U.S. Ambassador’s residence,” and forwarded it to the ethics lawyer. “Exactly what I needed,” the lawyer wrote, and signed off on the ticket. In fact, Shulkin never got any award during the trip, the report says. Missal referred the doctored email to the Justice Department for potential criminal prosecution, but the department declined. The report says the Wimbledon tickets were an improper gift from a British businesswoman who was involved with a charity event supported by the VA. Shulkin says that the gift was appropriate because they were personal friends and that the woman had no business with the VA.

PRUITT BLAMES TRAVELERS

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency has broken months of silence about his frequent premiumclass flights at taxpayer expense, saying he needs to fly first class because of unpleasant interactions with other travelers. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt spoke about his flight costs on Tuesday in a pair of interviews in New Hampshire, following a first-class flight to meet with the state’s Republican governor and tour a toxic waste site. Pruitt told the New Hampshire Union Leader he had some “incidents” on flights shortly after his appointment by Trump last year. “We live in a very toxic environment politically, particularly around issues of the environment,” said Pruitt, who confirmed to the newspaper that he had flown first class from Washington to Boston before continuing on to New Hampshire. “We’ve reached the point where there’s not much civility in the marketplace and it’s created, you know, it’s created some issues and the (security) detail, the level of protection is determined by the level of threat.” Pruitt is the first EPA administrator to have a 24-hour security detail that accompanies him at all times, even at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Fewer refugees means fewer city residents, dollars REFUGEES • FROM A1

Institute of St. Louis, which helps resettle about 1 percent of the refugees that are approved for legal entry into the U.S. by the State Department, that means a sharp decline in the number of people they serve. In the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 2016, the institute resettled 1,153 refugees; 118 of those came through the agency’s Springfield, Mo., satellite office. In the next fiscal year, when Trump was elected and took office, the number dropped to a total of 713, with 54 of those in Springfield. During the first four months of this fiscal year, the institute has helped resettle 121 people, 45 of those in the smaller office. With the number of resettlements dropping significantly, the agency has shut down the refugee program for the remainder of its fiscal year in the Springfield office and has cut 10 positions at its St. Louis office, leaving 70 full-time jobs. Anna Crosslin, CEO of the International Institute,

said agency cuts could go deeper if the number of refugees resettled fell below the estimated 450 for the year. There is typically a surge in the summer, but political climate, policy changes and upheavals in unstable countries around the globe can affect best guesses, she said. The numbers of refugees resettled has dropped significantly before, most notably after the 2001 terrorist attacks. The agency receives federal funding for each refugee it helps resettle, accounting for about 13 percent of its $7.2 million budget. The agency runs several other programs for immigrants and refugees that serve 8,000 people from 75 countries. They include English classes, after-school tutoring, a micro-lending program and fee-based interpretation and translation services. The agency also spends about $300,000 a year to organize the Festival of Nations, which attracts about 125,000 people a year to Tower Grove Park to sample foods from around the world. The agency relies on corporate sponsorship and

the sale of food and beverages to help offset the costs and keep it a free event. Crosslin said that despite a smaller staff, the agency still had a large campus to maintain, including paying utility bills and mortgage payments. Three years ago, the International Institute moved into the old St. Elizabeth Academy, an all-girls Catholic high school that closed in 2013. The institute still owns its former headquarters on South Grand Boulevard and hopes a sale will help ease the financial pinch. “We’ve got to raise other money. We have some savings, so we have a cushion to help us manage. But we don’t like what we’re having to do, laying off staff, losing experts to help refugee families,” Crosslin said. Crosslin said a dip in refugees ultimately meant a continued drop in the city’s population, which has been on the decline for more than 60 years. St. Louis has about 311,000 residents, based on population estimates by the Census Bureau. In 1950, the population was more than 856,000.

Population numbers calculated every 10 years by the Census Bureau determine how billions of federal dollars are divvied up to spend on infrastructure such as bridges, roads, schools and hospitals. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

WHAT WAS I DOING NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the ASBESTOS REMOVAL, WOODS HOUSE will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on MARCH 1, 2018 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder’s expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans.missouristate.edu/. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

Do you or someone you know have mild Alzheimer’s disease? Then you may be interested in the DAYBREAK-ALZ clinical research study. We’re looking for volunteers to help us find out whether an investigational medication will slow the rate of cognition and functional decline. To learn more please visit www.daybreak-alzstudy.com or contact your local study team at 1-877-270-5696 www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT – NCT02783573 EudraCT – 2015-005625-39

Mild Alzheimer’s disease Clinical Research Study DAYBREAK-ALZ Print Advert_V2.1_USA(EN)_08July2016


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FLORIDA SCHOOL SHOOTING

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

A ‘detestable act’

MIKE STOCKER • South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP

Students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday after a shooter opened fire on the campus.

DEADLIEST MASS SHOOTINGS IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY

SHOOTING • FROM A1

their support for the children and their families. Potentially there could have been signs out there. But we didn’t have any warning or phone calls or threats that were made.” The shooter, identified by Sheriff Scott Israel as Cruz, managed to leave campus before he was cornered and taken into custody in Coral Springs. He was taken to Broward Health North, and then was taken away from the hospital in a police escort. Israel, whose triplets once attended the high school, called the shooting a “detestable act” and “catastrophic.” He did not name a motive for the shooting, which he said didn’t immediately appear to have been prompted by any confrontation. Nor did he explain why Cruz, known by other students as a loner infatuated with guns and knives, was expelled from school beyond saying that it was for disciplinary reasons. A teacher at the school told the Miami Herald that Cruz, 19, had been identified as a potential threat to fellow students in the past. Math teacher Jim Gard said he believed the school administration had sent out an email warning teachers that Cruz had made threats against other teenagers in the past. Another student interviewed by the Herald said Cruz was punished once for having bullet casings at school. “We were told last year that he wasn’t allowed on campus with a backpack on him,” said Gard, who said Cruz had been in his class last year. “There were problems with him last year threatening students, and I guess he was asked to leave campus.” The shooting began just before dismissal, after Cruz pulled the fire alarm. Students and teachers were puzzled because the school had already held a fire drill that day. Still, some left their bags by their desks and walked out of their classrooms.

THE SHOOTING STARTS

“Six kids ran back into my room, and I locked the door, turned out the lights and had the kids go to the back of the room,” Gard said. “I told the kids to hang in there, it may still be a drill.” It wasn’t. Nicholas Coke, who was sitting in English class when the fire alarm went off, described people jumping fences, running behind the middle school and staying in classrooms to cower and pray after gunshots went off. Some students took photos and posted video to social media. “I wasn’t going to stick around and find out what was going on,” he said. A video posted to social media showed students hiding under desks, screaming as at least 20 shots rang out. Some students believed there was a second shooter at the school, but the sheriff’s office gave no indication that was the case. On the first floor, Geovanni Vilsant, 15, said he was in a Spanish class when a fire alarm went off, urging all the students out of their classrooms. Then, two minutes later, shots rang out, enveloping the three-floor building in explosions. Geovanni, a freshman, said he saw three bloody bodies on the floor as he was fleeing the school. “There was blood everywhere,” he said. “They weren’t moving.” His elder brother, who jumped a fence and sought refuge in a nearby neighborhood, ran back around to try to find Geovanni. “I had to go back for him,” Bradley Vilsant said from a nearby Walmart

Of the 30 deadliest shootings in the U.S. dating to 1949, 19 have taken place in the last 10 years. If the shooter was killed or died by suicide during the incident, that death is not included in the totals below. 1. THE HARVEST MUSIC FESTIVAL: 58 KILLED October 1, 2017 • A gunman, identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, fires from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on a crowd of more than 20,000 gathered on the Las Vegas Strip for the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival. He kills 58 people and injures more than 500. Police believe the gunman then kills himself.

JOHN McCALL • South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP

A family reunites after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Wednesday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A student shows a law enforcement officer a photo or video from his phone Wednesday in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting.

where the brothers fled with about 100 other students. Some at the school said a football coach and security guard, Aaron Feis, was shot when he jumped in front of several students, although that report remains unconfirmed. As students hid and escaped, SWAT teams swarmed the sprawling campus. The FBI-led Joint Terrorism Task Force, consisting of local, state and federal agents, sent a squad to the school to assist the sheriff’s office and other law enforcement. Initially, they urged teachers and students to remain barricaded inside until police reached them. Eventually, they began clearing buildings one at a time. Students streamed out in a line with their hands up. Others ran frantically, bookbags strapped to their backs. Federal authorities said believed the high school shootings were an isolated incident. Worried parents trying to find their children stood by, helpless. Authorities designated pick-up for students at a nearby hotel. Parents, some of whom were still searching for their children after 8 p.m., stood about a mile away as police blocked them from getting closer to their children. Many spoke on their cellphones, trying to calm their children down. Denise Perez paced as she spoke to her daughter Marsiel Baluja. Her daughter told her that she was sitting between Publix and Walmart with a bunch of other students. They were

surrounded by armed marshals. “Just stay calm, baby,” she said. Perez just wanted to get closer to her daughter. “This is really hard,” she said as she cried. Victoria Olvera, 17, a junior, was able to walk out after getting clearance by police officers. She said she was in history class when she heard shots. “Everyone started running,” she said. As the evening wore on, and students had been safely evacuated from the school, attention turned to those who were wounded in the gunfire. Dr. Evan Boyar, medical director for the department of emergency medicine at Broward Health North, said of the eight patients there, three were in critical condition and three were stable. “As a human being, you can imagine that they would be in shock or be emotional about the whole situation,” Boyar said. Boyar said the hospital routinely ran drills to be prepared for situations such as this. Doctors would not disclose details further than that regarding injuries to any of the patients or the suspect. However, Dr. Igor Nichiporenko, the medical director for trauma at Broward Health North, did say that all of the victims suffered from gunshot wounds. Three patients were still in the operating room, Nichiporenko said. “They’re going to have successful surgeries. They’re going to recover,” Nichiporenko said. “They’re going to go home.”

STUDENT ARRESTED IN WASHINGTON STATE

Authorities arrested a Washington state student suspected in a school shooting plot after his grandmother showed officers plans for an attack. Police in Everett, which is about 30 miles north of Seattle, arrested Joshua Alexander O’Connor, 18, on attempted murder and other charges at ACES High School on Tuesday, The Daily Herald reported. Earlier, O’Connor’s grandmother called 911 and showed responding officers a journal where he allegedly drew up plans to shoot students and use homemade explosives at the school, police said. O’Connor wrote that he wanted the death count to be as high as possible so that the shooting would be infamous, according to court papers. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

2. PULSE NIGHT CLUB: 49 KILLED June 12, 2016 • Omar Saddiqui Mateen, 29, opens fire inside Pulse, a gay nightclub, in Orlando, Fla. At least 49 people are killed and more than 50 are injured. Police shoot and kill Mateen during an operation to free hostages officials say he was holding at the club. 3. VIRGINIA TECH: 32 KILLED April 16, 2007 • Student Seung-Hui Cho, 23, goes on a shooting spree, killing 32 people in two locations and wounding an undetermined number of others on the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va. The shooter dies by suicide. 4. SANDY HOOK: 27 KILLED December 14, 2012 • Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children, ages 6 and 7, and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., before turning the gun on himself. Investigators later find the shooter’s mother, Nancy Lanza, dead from a gunshot wound. 5. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH IN SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, TEXAS: 26 KILLED

November 5, 2017 • A man walks into a small church in a rural Texas town and guns down 26 people. The shooter, identified by two law enforcement sources as Devin Patrick Kelley, is found dead after a brief chase, but it’s unclear if he is killed or takes his own life. It is the deadliest mass shooting in Texas history. 6. LUBY’S CAFETERIA IN KILLEEN, TEXAS: 23 KILLED October 16, 1991 • In Killeen, Texas, George Hennard, 35, crashes his pickup through the wall of a Luby’s Cafeteria. After getting out of the truck, Hennard fatally shoots 23 people. He then takes his own life. 7. McDONALD’S IN SAN YSIDRO, CALIF.: 21 KILLED July 18, 1984 • In San Ysidro, Calif., James Huberty, 41, armed with a long-barreled Uzi, a pump-action shotgun and a handgun, fatally shoots 21 adults and children at a McDonald’s. A police sharpshooter kills Huberty one hour after the rampage begins. 8. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS: 18 KILLED August 1, 1966 • Charles Joseph Whitman, a former Marine, kills 16 and wounds at least 30 while shooting from a tower at the University of Texas at Austin. Police officers Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy shoot and kill Whitman in the tower. Whitman had killed his mother and wife earlier in the day. 9. HIGH SCHOOL IN PARKLAND, FLA.: AT LEAST 17 KILLED

February 14, 2018 • A former student opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The suspect, a former student, was expelled for disciplinary reasons, officials said. He was taken into custody shortly after the attack. 10. SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.: 14 KILLED December 2, 2015 • Married couple Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik open fire on an employee gathering taking place at Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, killing 14 people. They are killed in a shootout with police later in the day. 10. EDMOND, OKLA.: 14 KILLED August 20, 1986 • In Edmond, Okla., part-time mail carrier Patrick Henry Sherrill, armed with three handguns, kills 14 postal workers in 10 minutes and then takes his own life with a bullet to the head. CNN


NEWS

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

Admiral says North Korea aiming to reunify countries Kim’s goal is communist rule on peninsula BY RICHARD LARDNER associated Press

WASHINGTON • North

Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s long-term goal is to reunify the divided Korean Peninsula under his totalitarian government, the senior U.S. Navy officer overseeing military operations in the Pacific told lawmakers Wednesday. Adm. Harry Harris Jr. said during testimony before the House Armed Services Committee there’s a prevailing view that Kim needs a nuclear arsenal to safeguard his regime. But Harris says Kim is after much more. “I think we are self-limiting if we view North Korea’s nuclear ambitions as solely a means to safeguard his regime,” said Harris, who leads U.S. Pacific Command. “I do think that he is after reunification under a single communist system. So he’s after what his grandfather failed to do and his father failed to do and he’s on a path to achieve what he feels is his natural place.” Kim’s father and grandfather were the late North Korean rulers Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung. Harris also said North Korea’s advancing nuclear weapon and ballistic missile programs put “him in a position to blackmail the South and other countries in the region and us.” The testimony from Harris, an officer who’s been in uniform for nearly 40 years and speaks bluntly, came as athletes from North Korea are participating in the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The games led to a remarkable moment of reconciliation between the rivals, but their decades-long animosities could easily erupt again after the Olympics.

KRT/AP

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attends a military parade recently. U.S. Navy Admiral Harry Harris called North Korea’s Olympic delegation a “charm offensive.”

Harris called North Korea’s Olympic delegation, which included Kim’s sister Kim Yo Jong, a “charm offensive.” He said it behooves the U.S. and South Korea “not to be charmed” by Pyongyang and to consider North Korea “for the regime it is and to deal with it on the basis of fact, not charm.” Top U.S. intelligence officials on Tuesday delivered their latest threat assessment, telling the Senate Intelligence Committee that the risk of conflict with North Korea is higher today than at any time since the end of the Cold War. Their wide-ranging intelligence report also said North Korea will likely conduct more missile tests this year and not negotiate away its nuclear capabilities. Vice President Mike Pence, who was in Pyeongchang for the start of the Olympics, said the U.S. was open for talks without preconditions with North Korea, a subtle shift in White House policy. But diplomacy between Washington and Pyongyang won’t start unless Kim Jong Un wants it to. Harris insisted that any future talks with Pyongyang “must be focused on achieving a complete, verifiable, and irreversible

denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.” But he didn’t advocate a change in U.S. policy, telling the committee that the State Department’s campaign to pressure North Korea to abandon its nuclear program was “what we should be doing.” The admiral said China, which is North Korea’s main trading partner, “can and should do more” as part of the pressure campaign. Harris also criticized Russia’s “limited contributions.” He said China and Russia hosted 75 percent of the roughly 80,000 North Korean “guest workers” employed abroad. These workers are allowed to leave the country but must send most of what they earn back to the government’s coffers in Pyongyang. The U.S. has been urging countries not to host the workers as part of a broader effort to cut off the cash North Korea needs to finance its nuclear program. Harris has led U.S. Pacific Command since May 2015. President Donald Trump announced last week that he was nominating Harris to be U.S. ambassador to Australia. The post requires Senate confirmation.

New York firm did not meet several requirements

S A N J U A N , P U E R TO R I C O • Puerto Rico’s

Housing Department said Wednesday that it would suspend a $133 million deal with a U.S. company hired to repair homes damaged by Hurricane Maria because a review board found the contract had been improperly awarded. The department’s contractor review board published a ruling on Tuesday that New York-based Adjusters International received the contract, which was subsidized by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, though it did not meet several requirements. Eric Perez-Ochoa, an attorney for Adjusters International, said in a statement that the company complied with all requirements and was studying the board’s decision, adding that it was “deeply disappointed.” He said that thousands of Puerto Ricans were enrolled in the home repairs program and that crews were conducting nearly 1,500 home inspections a day, with 700 Puerto Ricans helping out. He said the company offered a savings of more than $20 million compared with the other proposal. “This decision puts that progress at risk and may cost Puerto Rico more money,” he said. A company vice president, Daniel Craig, had been nominated by President Donald Trump to the No. 2 position at FEMA but later withdrew from consideration. Craig, an exFEMA official under thenPresident George W. Bush, had faced a 2011 federal investigation that concluded he falsified government travel and timekeeping re-

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Pills May Replace Diapers And Padded Underwear At Stores Clinical studies show new pill may be effective enough to replace adult diapers for bladder control; initial users show dramatic reduction in trips to the bathroom, embarrassing leaking, and nighttime urgency.

Housing repair contract suspended by Puerto Rico BY DANICA COTO associated Press

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A9

cords — findings he has rejected as being the result of a poor investigation. The 2011 report has not been publicly disclosed. FEMA spokesman Daniel Llargues said the agency was not involved in any process tied to the contract and referred all questions to Puerto Rico’s Housing Department. Meanwhile, Puerto Rico Housing Secretary Fernando Gil said in a statement that his agency was evaluating other options to avoid interrupting home repairs more than five months after the Category 4 storm hit. He noted his agency had requested that Puerto Rico justice officials submit the contract to the review board even though they are not legally required to do so. “Ensuring transparency in contract awards is of paramount importance,” Gil said. “Our focus continues to be to help all families that require our assistance and ensure the reconstruction of Puerto Rico.” Officials have said that Hurricane Maria destroyed 70,000 to 75,000 homes and damaged an additional 300,000 homes across the island of 3.3 million people. Adjusters International was contracted to make minor repairs to homes, such as fixing roofs, walls, windows and water heaters. It is unclear how many homes the company has repaired or how much, if any, it had been paid for its work. Housing Department spokeswoman Leticia Jover did not return messages for comment. A department report stated in part that the company had approved nearly 10,000 applications and that nearly 36,500 applications had been completed.

The contract had been challenged by one of the companies that lost the initial bid, Los Angelesbased AECOM. Jover said the contract would remain suspended until a ruling from Puerto Rico’s Court of Appeals. The review board said that Adjusters International should have been disqualified because it did not meet requirements, including having a $35 million line of credit and a certification authorizing it to do business in Puerto Rico. “The offer from Adjusters should have been disqualified and under no circumstance should it have proceeded to the second round of evaluations,” the board said. Puerto Rico has come under increased federal scrutiny after the U.S. territory awarded a $300 million contract to tiny Whitefish Energy Holdings LLC after the storm. The contract was later cancelled and led to the resignation of the power company director. Whitefish is based in the small Montana town that is Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s hometown. The U.S. Congress has set aside several billion dollars in disaster recovery funds for Puerto Rico, but concerns remain over potential mismanagement of money in a U.S. territory struggling to restructure a portion of its $73 billion public debt amid an 11year recession. Officials with FEMA and the Treasury Department said in a recent letter that they were temporarily withholding a billiondollar emergency loan because the island was not facing a cash shortage as it has repeatedly warned about in recent months.

Robert Ward, Associated Health Press AHP− Adult diaper sales are expected to plummet as results from a clinical trial on a new, patented bladder control pill have finally been released. Sold under the brand name UriVarx™, the new pill contains key ingredients that keeps the bladder from releasing voluntarily, which reduces accidents and frequent bathroom trips. Perhaps more impressive, it also targets the tiny muscles around the bladder, which helps the bladder to create a tighter seal. This would explain why the average UriVarx™ user in clinical trials experiences a 66% reduction in urinary incontinence symptoms, such as day and night leaking and sudden urges to urinate.

NEW DISCOVERY IN BLADDER CONTROL Until now, doctors believed it was impossible to strengthen the muscles that control the bladder. They are amazed to see that it can now be done with the non-prescription UriVarx™ pill. “As you get older, and the involuntary muscles around your bladder weaken, you lose urinary control. With your bladder wall unable to properly seal, you constantly leak and feel pressure to urinate” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj of Innovus Pharmaceuticals. “UriVarx™ targets the bladder muscles and help restores vital kidney health, reducing urgency and frequency. It also helps you “hold it” for hours so you never have to worry about embarrassing accidents ever again!”

FREEDOM FROM SUDDEN URGES AND LEAKS Since hitting the market, sales for the patented UriVarx™ pill have soared and there are some very good reasons why. To begin with, the double blind large clinical studies published in the clinicaltrials.gov have been impressive. Participants taking UriVarx™ saw a stunning reduction in urinary frequency, which resulted in fewer bathroom trips both day and night. They also experienced a dramatic decrease in incontinence episodes, such as leaking and bed wetting. The active ingredients in UriVarx™ comes from a patented formula. It is both safe and healthy. There are also no known serious side effects in its history of use. Scientists believe that the ingredients target the muscles of the bladder to grow stronger. These muscles are responsible for keeping the bladder tightly sealed. They also help the bladder to completely empty, allowing bacteria to be flushed from the urinary tract. Research has shown that as you get older, certain hormonal changes in the body cause these muscles to shrink and become lose. This is what causes the bladder to be over active and the resulting urine accidents and why UriVarx™ seems to be so effective in the published clinical trials.

EXCITING RESULTS FROM URIVARX USERS Many UriVarx™ users say their bladders have never been stronger. For the first

NEW PILL MAY REPLACE DIAPERS FOR BLADDER CONTROL: This new patented clinically proven pill solution is now available nationwide time in years, they are confident and in complete control. Adult pads and diapers are no longer a big worry.

thousands of UriVarx™ users get results exactly like the participants in the study. It’s an amazing product.”

“After my third child, I couldn’t control my bladder. I was running to the bathroom all the time! And once I hit my 60s it became so unpredictable I needed to wear adult pads every day” explained Marie L. of Danbury, CT.

HOW IT WORKS

“I was embarrassed so before going to my doctor I decided to try UriVarx and I’m so glad I did! The urgency is gone and I no longer feel like my bladder is about to explode. I can also “hold it” when I need to so I’m no longer living in constant fear of finding a bathroom.”

IMPRESSIVE CLINICAL RESULTS The exciting clinical results published on the government clinical website clinicaltrials.gov show that UriVarx™ can strengthen your bladder fast, significantly reducing the urine urgency and leaks. In a new double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, 142 men and women with bladder control issues were separated into two groups. The first group was given a placebo while the other received UriVarx™. The results were incredible. The participants who received UriVarx™ saw major improvements in leaking, pressure, and the urgency to go − all without the usual side effects seen in prescription drugs! They also reported fewer trips to the bathroom both day and night. Overall, the UriVarx™ group experienced: • 56% Reduction in Urge Incontinence • 66% Reduction in Stress Incontinence • 61% Reduction in Urgency • 33% Reduction in Frequency • 46% Reduction in Nighttime Bathroom Trips Additionally, at the end of clinical trial and after seeing the results, 84% of the participants taking UriVarx™ said it significantly improved their quality of life. “The clinical findings are incredible, but people still wonder if it will really work” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj. “It’s normal to be skeptical, but we’ve seen

UriVarx™ is a pill that’s taken just once daily. It does not require a prescription. The active ingredients are patented natural extracts. Research shows that as we get older, the muscles which surround the bladder weaken. This is caused by hormonal changes in the body that causes the muscles to atrophy and weaken. When they become too small and weak, they cannot seal your bladder shut, which causes leaking, accidents, among other incontinence symptoms. It also prevents your bladder from fully emptying, which can result in persistent bacterial infections and UTIs. UriVarx’s™ active ingredient targets the muscles around the bladder, making them stronger. Supporting ingredients in UriVarx™ support kidney function and overall urinary health.

BLADDER PROBLEMS GONE With daily use, UriVarx™ can restore strong bladder control and help users overcome leakage without the negative side effects or interactions associated with drugs. Leakage sufferers can now put an end to the uncontrollable urges, the embarrassing accidents, and enjoy an entirely new level of comfort and confidence.

HOW TO GET URIVARX IN MISSOURI This is the official release of UriVarx™ in Missouri. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to anyone suffering from bladder issues who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all Missouri residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free Hotline number is 1-800-729-4009 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of UriVarx™ is currently available in your region.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE TAKING THIS SUPPLEMENT. URIVARX IS NOT A DRUG.


WORLD

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Embattled South African President Zuma resigns BY CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG •

South African President Jacob Zuma resigned on Wednesday in a televised address to the nation, ending a turbulent tenure marred by corruption scandals that sapped the popularity of the ruling African National Congress and hurt one of Africa’s biggest economies. The resignation signaled an imminent end to a leadership crisis in South Africa and set the stage for Zuma to be replaced by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, who has promised a robust campaign against corruption but will quickly face pressure to produce results in a country struggling with unemployment, economic ineq-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

South African President Jacob Zuma addresses the nation in a televised speech Wednesday from Pretoria.

uity and other problems. Ahead of 2019 elections, Ramaphosa also has the tough task of rebuilding a ruling party whose moral stature has diminished since it took power at the end of white minority rule in 1994. “I have therefore come

to the decision to resign as president of the republic with immediate effect,” said Zuma, who added that he took the decision even though he disagreed with the ruling party’s demand that he quit immediately or face a motion of no confidence in the parliament on

Putin’s arms buildup puts Japan on defensive in dispute BY HENRY MEYER AND ISABEL REYNOLDS Bloomberg News

MOSCOW • Russia is

accelerating a military buildup on islands claimed by Japan, threatening to blow a hole in Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s efforts to lure President Vladimir Putin into settling the dispute. The government in Tokyo lodged a formal protest after 2,000 Russian troops held military exercises last week on the four islands, called the Southern Kurils in Russia and the Northern Territories in Japan. A few days before, Russia paved the way for its first military airbase in the area. Russia’s twin strikes came as diplomats from both countries met Feb. 6 to discuss joint economic

development of the territories. Abe the next day marked Japan’s annual “Northern Territories Day” with a pledge that he and Putin would resolve the “abnormal” lack of a peace treaty after WWII. Failure to end the dispute over the islands seized by Soviet troops at the end of the war would deal a severe blow to Abe, who has poured time and energy into seeking a breakthrough since coming to power in 2012. For the Kremlin, cooler ties with Tokyo may put at risk promised Japanese investment and undermine Russian efforts to peel away a key U.S. ally. While determined to stay close to the U.S., Abe’s eager to strike a deal with Russia partly to counterbalance China’s growing economic and military power.

“The Japanese side has unrealistic ideas about the possible time frame for all this,” said Fyodor Lukyanov, head of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, a research group that advises the Kremlin. Russia is expanding its military presence “to damp expectations,” he said. The two leaders have met 20 times. Abe’s due to visit Putin’s hometown in May to address the annual St. Petersburg International Economic Forum. The premier’s also under fire at home. “It’s good to have warm relations at the top level, but just because you are friends doesn’t mean they will give the islands back,” said Yasuhide Nakayama, chairman of the foreign affairs committee in Japan’s lower house of parliament.

Thursday. Zuma, 75, had said he was willing to resign early from his second five-year term but wanted to stay in office for several more months. “Of course, I must accept that if my party and my compatriots wish that I be removed from office, they must exercise that right and do so in the manner prescribed by the constitution,” Zuma said. The African National Congress welcomed the resignation, expressing gratitude for Zuma’s “loyal service” during his nearly 10 years as president and encouraging party members to support Ramaphosa, now the country’s acting president. By the end of the week, Ramaphosa is likely to be elected president by the ANCdominated parliament and

to give a state of the nation address that had been postponed during the political turmoil. South Africa’s biggest opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, said the ruling party must act against associates of Zuma who are also suspected of wrongdoing and mismanagement. “Zuma built a deep system of corruption that has penetrated every part of the government and the criminal prosecution system,” Democratic Alliance leader Mmusi Maimane said. “Now the country looks to Cyril Ramaphosa to save us from a man that he and the ANC protected and supported. We must never allow this to happen again,” said Maimane, who wants parliament to be dissolved

so that early elections can be held. Ramaphosa, a union leader during apartheid, was a key negotiator of the transition from white minority rule to democracy in the 1990s and later became a wealthy businessman. He replaced Zuma as leader of the ANC in December and has been consolidating his control, while also raising his international profile with a visit last month to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. On Wednesday morning, South African police raided the home of prominent business associates of Zuma who are accused of being at the center of corruption scandals that have infuriated the country. Several people were arrested.

French court clears 1, convicts 2 in trial linked to terrorism BY PHILIPPE SOTTO Associated Press

PARIS • A French court

acquitted on Wednesday a man charged with harboring Islamic extremists after they carried out the 2015 Paris attacks, bringing a surprising end to the first criminal trial linked to the country’s deadliest extremist violence since World War II. The presiding judge said the Paris court found Jawad Bendaoud, 31, not guilty of providing lodging to two of the attackers and helping them hide from police when they were the most-wanted criminals in France. The court also convicted and sentenced two codefendants in the case to prison terms Wednesday. The Nov. 13, 2015, attacks on Paris cafes, the

national stadium and the Bataclan concert hall left 130 people dead. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility. Addressing Bendaoud at a verdict hearing, Judge Isabelle Prevost-Desprez said the evidence was “insufficient to prove your guilt.” “It has not been proven that Jawad Bendaoud provided accommodation to two individuals whom he knew to be terrorists,” she said in her ruling. Bendaoud, standing behind a glass-enclosed dock, raised his fist in victory and blew kisses to the public and his lawyers at the news. He faced up to six years in prison if convicted of harboring terrorists. Bendaoud denied knowing the identity of the men to whom he rented a small flat in Saint-Denis. One

of them was Abdelhamid Abaaoud, the suspected ringleader of the Paris attacks. Xavier Nogueras, the lawyer for Bendaoud, said he was “extremely moved” that the court found his client innocent. Of his co-defendants, Mohamed Soumah, who was accused of acting as an intermediary with Bendaoud to secure lodging for the two fugitives, received a 5-year prison sentence. Youssef Ait-Boulahcen, who was accused of knowing the extremist’s whereabouts and not informing authorities, was sentenced to three years in prison plus a year that was suspended. Both had denied the accusations. The Paris prosecutor’s office announced it was appealing the whole verdict.

DIGEST Netanyahu won’t step down, he says Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vowed to carry on Wednesday after police recommended indicting him on corruption charges, dismissing the allegations and the critics calling on him to step down. With his coalition partners dutifully lining up behind him, the longtime leader readied himself for a prolonged battle over his political legitimacy. The police announcement that Netanyahu’s acceptance of nearly $300,000 in gifts from two billionaires amounted to bribery sent shock waves through the Israeli political system and delivered a humiliating blow to Netanyahu after years of allegations and investigations. But it did not appear to immediately threaten his lengthy rule as reaction largely fell along partisan lines. Dutch make everyone an organ donor • Senators in the Netherlands approved a law Tuesday that makes all Dutch adults potential organ donors unless they opt out. Every person over 18 who is not registered as a donor will receive a letter asking if they want to donate their organs after death. Those who do not respond to the first letter, or to a second letter six weeks later, will be considered organ donors, although they can amend their status. Bomb kills 4 in Bolivia • Bolivian officials said Wednesday that a bomb caused an explosion that killed four people during Carnival celebrations. The explosion happened late Tuesday in the middle of celebrations in Oruro, killing four and wounding 10. An ally of President Evo Morales publicly implied that opposition forces were behind the attack. Mexican intelligence agency tails candidate • Mexico’s Interior Department acknowledged Wednesday that a federal

intelligence agency sent a plainclothes agent to tail an opposition presidential candidate, even though the candidate never asked for and apparently did not want a tail. There have long been fears the ruling party was using the National Center for Security and Investigation for political spying. Interior Secretary Alfonso Navarrete said that the agency had put a tail on candidate Ricardo Anaya solely for security reasons, and said authorities had thought he had been informed. Talks falter in Northern Ireland • Talks to restore a government to Northern Ireland ended in failure Wednesday, just two days after the main Catholic and Protestant parties said they were close to resolving a 13-month political impasse. The two sides traded blame for failing to break a stalemate that has left Northern Ireland’s 1.8 million people without a functioning administration for more than a year. Lions kill suspected poacher • Managers of a wildlife area in South Africa say a pride of lions killed a suspected poacher. The Umbabat Private Nature Reserve said that the man was killed last week and that two sets of human tracks were found nearby, suggesting the alleged poacher had companions. It said the tracks indicated that the companions were “fleeing the scene at a very rapid pace.” Zimbabwean opposition leader dies • Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai died Wednesday at age 65, ending a long campaign to lead his country that brought him jailings, beatings and accusations of treason. Tsvangirai died Wednesday in a Johannesburg hospital, said Elias Mudzuri. The opposition leader had been battling colon cancer for two years. From news services

Hockey with Heart is a six-part series with the St. Louis Blues covering character education both on and off the ice. Join us each week for a new player feature and activities to use in your classroom.

RESPECT Alexander Steen is more than just a scorer and play maker. The 33-year-old left winger has been a competitive, hard-working leader in more than 600 games with the organization. That doesn’t come easy; it comes with earning the respect of his teammates and fans.

ALEXANDER STEEN

Written by Mike Kern | Photo by Joe Puetz

father, who also was a competitive, hard-working, dependable player. It’s those intangibles that make him one of the most valuable players on the club.

Steen began his NHL career in Toronto and played three-plus years with the Maple Leafs before being traded to the St. Louis Blues in November 2008. In his first nine seasons in St. Louis, Steen averaged more than 18 goals each year (with a career-best 33 goals during the 2013-14 season) and 27 assists each year (hitting a career high of 40 in 2014-15). He’s on pace to match those numbers again in 2017-18. Steen has been a well-respected player during the Blue’s resurgence as one of the recurring top teams in the Western Conference. Earlier this season, he moved into the Top 10 for career games played with the team, but to him, it seems just like yesterday. “It’s gone by fast,” Steen said. “You integrate with the community in a different way and get to know the fantastic people in St. Louis and the people in the organization and everyone seems to become family.” And for Steen, ‘family’ goes beyond earning the respect of his teammates. It includes the many fans who support the team and the players who have come before him. “For us to be in the position we are in now, we need to have an understanding and respect for all those previous players and for the people who support you – friends, family, community, the fans,” he added. “It’s extremely important for us to be able to do what we are doing today. You take a lot of pride in the team logo and everything that it represents … You feel a responsibility to leave this wonderful jersey in a better spot than when I got it.” Perhaps some of that sense of history was instilled by his father Thomas Steen, who played 950 games in 14 seasons with the Winnipeg Jets from 1981-95. The younger Steen has taken on the same attributes of his

Like his teammates, Steen is also hard-working and dependable off the ice. He has the utmost respect for what this city and its fans have meant to the team, and he understands the responsibility that he and his teammates have to the people of St. Louis. “The community involvement and giving back, charity-wise, is something that we naturally think about,” Steen says. “We are very fortunate to be doing what we do. We get so much support from our community, it’s important to show that respect in return. “It’s important to be engaged with what’s going on in the community,” he continues. “Whether it’s helping during a natural disaster, visiting a children’s hospital, or spending time with fans, it’s important that we give back.”

Visit nie.post-dispatch.com for online activities that accompany this feature


LOCAL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A11

Road salt, misty rain blamed for power outages here BY DENISE HOLLINSHED st. Louis Post-dispatch

Road salt and a misty rain Wednesday combined to cause small fires on power poles that caused small outages spread throughout the area, according to Ameren Missouri. At least 9,000 customers were without power for parts of Wednesday in St. Louis and St. Louis County, the utility said. An-

other 3,000 customers lost power in Kirkwood, which has its own utility. Ameren said it started receiving calls about 6 a.m. Officials said a combination of road salt kicked up by cars onto power poles and the misty rain caused at least 20 insulators to malfunction. A heavier rain might have washed the salt away, but the mist made the problem worse. The repairs on the poles caused traffic to be rerouted in some areas.

The number of residences without power quickly dwindled to less than 300, with 99 percent in St. Louis and St. Louis County. Kirkwood said it also struggled with outages. A fire on one line knocked out power to most of downtown, the city said. Power was back on by 3 p.m. An outage caused the cancellation of a show at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis in Webster Groves on Wednesday after-

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noon. Officials said taht it took several hours to clear a damaged pole and that they were working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power. Ameren asked anyone with information about a damaged pole to report it at 800552-7583. Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

Former deputy sheriff accused of sex assault BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. CLAIR COUNTY • A former sheriff’s deputy accused of soliciting sex from a woman he pulled over was sued in federal court Wednesday, along with the St. Clair County sheriff. The lawsuit says that Robert Sneed pulled the Cahokia woman over on Feb. 16, 2017. She was driving a newly purchased car, and didn’t have her title, license or insurance with her. Sneed told her he would follow her home so she could get the title, the suit says. He Sneed went inside her home to use the bathroom, then demanded oral sex in exchange for not towing her car or taking her to jail, the suit says. She refused, and Sneed approached her and grabbed her, the suit says. He was in uniform and armed, and she “was extremely scared,” the lawsuit says. She took him to her bedroom, where he sexually assaulted her, the suit says. Sneed returned on Aug. 28, pushing his way into the woman’s home and raping her, the lawsuit says. “We just want to make sure that he’s brought to justice — that this is exposed,” said the woman’s attorney, Louis J. Meyer. He added, “We want to put it out there to see if other people will come forward.” Sneed, 45, of the 9700 block of Winchester Street in Mascoutah, faces two counts of official misconduct in St. Clair County Circuit Court. He was placed on administrative leave after the charges were filed but has since resigned. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in East St. Louis, seeks unspecified compensation from Sneed, Sheriff Richard Watson and the county for alleged constitutional violations, assault and battery and other claims. The woman is not identified in the suit. The suit says the sheriff’s office knew that Sneed was going through emotional problems after the death of his son in 2016, yet continued to allow him to work. Watson’s office had not yet seen the suit and declined to comment Wednesday. Sneed had worked as a deputy for five years and had been an officer on the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina, Watson said at the time. Sneed’s attorney, Lloyd Cueto, could not be immediately reached for comment Wednesday.

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Investors raise $50 million for education Help for Varsity Tutors educational tech firm includes Zuckerberg By daVId NICKLaus St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Varsity Tutors, already one of the St. Louis area’s fastest-growing and bestfunded technology startups, has raised an additional $50 million in capital. Learn Capital of San Mateo is the lead investor for Varsity’s series C funding round. Other investors include TCV,

a venture capital firm in Palo Alto, Calif., and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, a philanthropic effort started by Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan. Varsity Tutors has raised $107 million since it was founded in 2007, a total reached by only a handful of other St. Louis startups. It matches students with tutors for instructional

sessions, most of which take place online. The company says it has 40,000 experts available in more than 1,000 subjects and has arranged more than 3 million hours of live instruction for 100,000 students. Chuck Cohn, founder and CEO, said the new funding would fuel further growth. He said the money would be used to enhance Varsity’s online and mobile tutoring product, build new products, offer other types of instruction beyond traditional tutoring and expand internationally.

Varsity recently introduced instant tutoring, through which a student can click on one of 150 subjects and be connected with an instructor within 15 seconds. “Instant tutoring has received tremendous traction from clients,” Cohn said. “It’s one of the things that is fueling our growth.” New non-academic offerings may include music lessons and technical subjects, such as computer programming, Cohn said. Varsity Tutors acquired First Tutors, a British com-

Levine, lead singer for Maroon 5, invested in 2015. Cohn said he was introduced to Chan Zuckerberg through Learn Capital, which focuses on educational technology startups. C h a n Z u c ke rb e rg ’s website says the initiative works through a combination of engineering, grantmaking, investments and advocacy. “Education through personalized learning” is one of its focus areas.

pany that arranges offline instructional sessions, last year. Cohn sees it as a beachhead for introducing Varsity’s product in Europe. “We have a tremendous opportunity to build upon the platform we’ve acquired and introduce those students to our online platform,” he said. Clayton-based Varsity has more than 500 employees, including 123 in the St. Louis area. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is Varsity Tutors’ second celebrityconnected investor. Adam

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Desco to start building $80 million development on old Shriners Hospital site

Hazelwood gives Emerald more time to repay loan; electric van maker renamed

By BrIaN FELdT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By BrIaN FELdT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Desco Group will begin demolishing the old Shriners Hospital in Frontenac within the next week, officials said Wednesday, paving the way for the firm’s planned $80 million mixed-use development to be anchored by a Life Time Fitness. The project, which will also include additional retail and office space, is expected to be complete in the fall of 2019. Two sitdown restaurants are also part of the plan. Tenants for those portions of the project have not yet been disclosed. Desco closed on Feb. 6 on its deal to acquire the 15-acre site from the hospital. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. The property, according to St. Louis County records, has an appraised value of nearly $12 million.

The city of Hazelwood has extended its loan agreement with Emerald Automotive as the electric van maker remains in contention for landing a lucrative contract with the U.S. Postal Service. Under the extended terms of the agreement, which were approved by the Hazelwood City Council earlier this month, Emerald will have to pay back a $3 million loan it received from the city in 2011, plus interest, in 2020. The previous agreement was set to expire at the end of this year. Winning the contract, which could be worth more than $5 billion, would help Emerald deliver on a promise it made in 2011 – to manufacture thousands of electric vans in Hazelwood and support up to 300 jobs. The contract is expected

PROVIDED BY THE DESCO GROUP

A rendering of the proposed three-story building that will include ground-level retail and office space.

After the real estate deal, Desco sold 10 acres of the site to Life Time Fitness. Grant Mechlin and Mark Kornfeld of Sansone Group represented Life Time in the deal. Desco previously agreed to pay about $170,000 in payments in lieu of taxes to the city annually, with a cost-of-living adjustment over 20 years. The project also qualifies for 50 percent property tax abatement, the first of its kind in the city’s development

history. Additionally, the city will collect a 1 percent sales tax within the project, to be used for related public improvements. Plans for the development were first announced in May 2017. The hospital left its 2001 South Lindbergh Boulevard site in 2015 after 52 years and moved to a smaller facility in St. Louis. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

to be awarded this summer, Hazelwood Economic Developer David Cox said. Emerald had hoped to make vehicles here much sooner, but production plans stalled after the company shifted its funding strategy from pursing federal dollars to private financing. In 2014, Chinese automotive company Zhejiang Geely Holding Group announced it had acquired Emerald with plans to invest a minimum of $200 million by 2019 to develop new vehicles. And a year later, Emerald announced it was one of 15 companies vying for the postal service contract. Meanwhile, Geely in January renamed Emerald as London EV Company USA to consolidate its brand with an affiliated company, the London EV Company (formerly the London Taxi Company). The London EV Com-

pany provided new vehicle prototypes to the U.S. government through its U.S. partner (formerly Emerald) and said it was committed to bringing significant investment and job creation to the U.S. Gary Marble, director of marketing and communications for the company, said Geely planned to manufacture vehicles in Hazelwood as soon as possible. Cox said that if approved, London EV Company USA could establish its manufacturing plant in one of several Hazelwood area business parks, including Aviator Business Park (on the site of the former Ford Motor Company plant) or a new 300-acre industrial park planned by NorthPoint Development just north of the existing Park 370 Industrial Park and St. Louis Outlet Mall. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

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MARKET WATCH

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed higher Wednesday for the fourth day in a row, with technology and banks accounting for a big slice of the market’s gains. Bond yields rose following a report showing consumer prices rose in January at a faster rate than economists expected.

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LOW 24490.36 10294.08 660.10 12504.24 6977.07 2648.87 1832.89 27461.91 1483.29

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64.89 54.68

-.57 -1.0

-7.3 +9.9 21

1.75

3.10

2.40

5

...

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

49.34 37.71

-.22 -0.6

-9.4

+4.3 +48.7 21

1.64

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

7.52

Bank of America

BAC

22.07

32.67 32.00 +.82 +2.6

+8.4 +42.5 21

0.48 Monsanto Co

Belden Inc

BDC

64.60

87.15 73.83 +4.26 +6.1

-4.3 +15.2 14

0.20 Olin

OLN

27.79

Boeing

BA

BTU

22.58

SKIS

4.00

101.21 126.50 104.20 +.40 +0.4 60.13

99.53 93.06 +2.93 +3.3 12.30

7.69 -1.30 -14.5

-6.4

-4.4 14 2.00f General Motors

-8.9 14

-6.6 +13.7

... Home Depot

HD

1.83 Lee Ent

LEE

1.60 Lowes 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

-0.1 +31.8

9 1.60f MasterCard

-6.2 +10.9

5

... McDonald’s

173.68 361.45 344.85 +1.69 +0.5 +16.9+116.0 36 6.84f Peabody Energy 7.25

11.90

7.80

-.10 -1.3 -15.2 -32.8 17

GM

... Peak Resorts

46.76 41.81 +.41 +1.0

+2.0 +19.8 dd

1.52

143.25 207.61 184.69 +.97 +0.5

31.92

-2.6 +51.3 26

3.56

...

...

LOW

70.76 108.98 96.93 +.87 +0.9

MNK

15.27

+2.1 -23.0

55.33 16.15 +.19 +1.2 -28.4 -55.7

...

MA

109.16 177.11 172.52 +2.40 +1.4 +14.0 +54.6 40

MCD

126.40 178.70 159.99 -2.41 -1.5

-7.0 +47.3 27

4.04

MON 109.61 123.15 120.18 +.07 +0.1

+2.9 +13.6 21

2.16

38.84 32.72 +.45 +1.4

-8.0 +44.4 10

0.80

41.17 41.35 +1.41 +3.5

+5.0

6.20

5.25

-.05 -0.9

-2.8

...

1.00

CAL

22.39

34.34 29.35 +.11 +0.4 -12.3 +8.2 15

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

16.20

20.29 18.86 +.27 +1.5

-1.1 +12.2 36

...

CASS

53.23

65.00 58.38 +.52 +0.9

0.96 Post Holdings

POST

71.06

89.04 74.75 +2.39 +3.3

-5.7

...

65.03 112.42 102.13

Centene Corp.

CNC

-.87 -0.8

+1.2 +77.8 19

... ReinsGrp

RGA

Charter

CHTR 308.30 408.83 358.94 +3.26 +0.9

+6.8 +19.6 cc

... Reliv

RELV

Citigroup

C

56.55

80.70 76.71 +1.53 +2.0

+3.1 +39.9 15

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

59.72 58.89 +1.37 +2.4

+5.5 +16.2 21 0.94f Stifel Financial

SF

41.93

68.76 62.80 +1.83 +3.0

+5.4 +37.0 20

0.40

Edgewell

EPC

46.83

82.06 54.48 +4.32 +8.6

-8.3 -23.5 14

TGT

48.56

78.70 75.35 +1.47 +2.0 +15.5 +23.2 16

2.48

Emerson

EMR

56.77

74.45 71.31 +.93 +1.3

+2.3 +28.5 27

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

Enterprise Financial EFSC Esco Technologies Express Scripts

1.28 Spire Inc

SR

... Target Corp.

121.93 165.12 153.98 +3.75 +2.5

-6.4 cc

3.72 60.09

13.77

-1.3 +31.9 14 2.00f

5.43 +.08 +1.5 +13.8 +28.1 dd

82.85 64.20

62.86 54.25 +1.08 +2.0 +13.1 +14.7 19

1.16 US Bancorp

USB

49.54

58.50 55.31 +1.17 +2.2

+3.2 +13.6 16 1.20f

36.65

49.68 48.00 +.85 +1.8

+6.3 +25.4 19

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

41.83 38.69 +1.89 +5.1

+9.9 +17.3 22

ESE

50.30

66.80 61.80 +1.40 +2.3

+2.6 +14.2 21

0.32 Verizon

54.77 49.51

ESRX

55.80

83.49 74.93 +1.34 +1.8

+0.4 +10.7 12

Foresight Energy

FELP FF

3.53 12.20

7.39

3.91

-.11 -2.8 -10.6 -43.3 dd

16.39 12.78 +.09 +0.7

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-9.3 +10.2 16 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.96 -0.9 -10.5 +19.4 18 3.64f

-.57 -1.1

-6.5 +3.6

0.20

VZ

42.80

7

2.36

WMT

69.33 109.98 101.70 +.72 +0.7

+3.0 +57.7 23

2.04

WBA

63.82

88.00 68.48 +.59 +0.9

-5.7

-6.6 14

1.60

WFC

49.27

66.31 59.55 +1.55 +2.7

-1.8 +20.5 14

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Major Brands sues Mast-Jägermeister St. Louis-based beer, wine and spirits distributor Major Brands sued Mast-Jägermeister US and Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits on Tuesday alleging Jägermeister violated Missouri’s franchise law by terminating its distribution agreement with the distributor without justifiable cause. Instead, Jägermeister planned to consolidate with Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits nationwide, according to the lawsuit. Major Brands, with more than $400 million in annual revenue, has had the Jägermeister account for more than 40 years. Major Brands’ chairman and CEO Sue McCollum said the spirit was the distributor’s No. 1 cordial. The suit alleges Southern Glazer’s purposefully influenced the German-based Jägermeister to cut ties with Major Brands to consolidate with Southern, which is based in Miami. A spokeperson for Southern Glazer’s said it was premature to comment on the lawsuit, but confirmed the company had received the petition. Officials with Jägermeister were not immediately available for comment. Major Brands is seeking $25,000 in damages from Jägermeister and Southern Glazer’s, and to nullify their decision to reverse Jägermeister’s decision to terminate its contract with Major Brands effective April 1. Sam’s Club offering free shipping • Sam’s Club is offering free shipping for premium members and simplifying its membership tiers. The Walmart-owned warehouse club began offering free shipping Wednesday on online orders for Plus members on 95 percent of the items it sells. Most shipping costs previously were based on the item’s size and weight, the shipping method and the delivery address. Free shipping and faster delivery have been key areas as retailers try to adapt to shoppers’ shift online. Online leader Amazon has driven strong loyalty

with free shipping through its $99-a-year Prime membership. Amazon is also reportedly planning a new service to pick up packages from businesses and deliver them to consumers. Meanwhile, Target bought late last year grocery delivery startup Shipt to speed up same-day deliveries. Sam’s Club is also converting its three membership plans into two. Sam’s Plus will still carry a $100 annual fee, while the Business and Savings plans will convert to Sam’s Club memberships with an annual fee of $45. The company is trying to better compete with rival Costco Wholesale Corp. by focusing on the more affluent customer. It has added more fresh produce and other higher-quality products. “We are creating a new Sam’s Club for our members,” CEO John Furner said. He said the chain was targeting suburban families with children who have annual incomes between $75,000 and $125,000 — which closely tracks Costco’s core customers. Sunset Hills office project approved • A lot split and permit were approved Tuesday night by the Sunset Hills Board of Aldermen for a new 20,000-square-foot, one-story office building for Grimco Inc., a distributor of products in the sign industry. The new corporate office for the company, now based in Fenton, is expected to have about 65 employees initially. The 4.2-acre lot is at Gravois and Sappington Barracks roads. About 2.5 acres of the site will be used for the office building, and the rest will be reserved for future development. Edgewell names CFO • Edgewell Personal Care named Rod Little chief financial officer of the Chesterfield-based company that makes Schick razors and Banana Boat sunscreen. Little previously was an executive at HSN Inc. and Elizabeth Arden Inc. He’ll begin working at Edgewell March 5 and will be based at the company’s Shelton, Conn., office. From staff and wire reports

+27.40 +.35 +23.40

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.57 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.64 2.84 2.91 3.17

-0.01 +0.01 +0.03 +0.06 +0.09 +0.09 +0.07 +0.06

.54 .65 .82 1.24 1.96 2.29 2.47 3.06

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.86 3.09 6.36 3.84 3.64 .77

... ... +0.07 +0.01 +0.03 +0.03

1.65 2.61 5.73 3.98 3.35 .45

...

UPS

FutureFuel

Silver

1.38 1.13 .63

CHG

CLOSE

1355.50 16.86 999.10

Gold

-.85 -1.3 -14.6 +9.7 18 2.25f

1.94 UPS B

... WalMart

102.12 135.53 106.60

4.50 4.25 3.75

.0500 .7858 .3034 1.3878 .7940 .1578 1.2355 .0156 .2830 .009285 .053620 .0174 .0838 .000922 1.0702

PreciousMetals

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

.0503 .7911 .3101 1.3987 .7986 .1575 1.2435 .0156 .2831 .009338 .053880 .0176 .0856 .000934 1.0744

NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.91 percent Wednesday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.28

Cass Info. Systems

-1.5 30

CHG

+1.41 +.0277 +4.75 -.007

0.12p

-0.3 dd

Caleres Inc.

+0.3

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

AT&T Inc

$14.75 PE: 22.3 Yield: ...

ExchangeRates

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

F

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

Aegion Corp

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

-.19 -0.5

TKR

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 2.0m (4.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.4 b

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

N

$10.35

PE: ... Yield: ...

Feeder cattle Hogs

11

$21.03

DATE

ACCO

Close: $12.95 1.80 or 16.1% The maker of Trapper Keeper binders had a solid fourth quarter and said it will start paying a quarterly dividend of 6 cents. $14

F

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

2,600

23,000

Futures

Soybeans

10 DAYS

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 41.7m (20.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $823.5 m

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,698.63 Change: 35.69 (1.3%)

N

$5.50

PE: 212.8 Yield: ...

2,700

24,000

Close: $16.97 7.93 or 87.7% After years of declines, the watchmaker had a stronger fourth quarter than analysts expected.

F

S&P 500

2,680

27,000

21,000

F

2,840

Dow Jones industrials

24,840

Acco Brands

FOSL

$350 300

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Fossil

NFLX

Close: $266.00 7.73 or 3.0% The streaming video service reportedly signed a production deal with “Glee” producer Ryan Murphy.

$247.52

26,320

Netflix

CMG

Close: $289.91 38.58 or 15.4% The Mexican food chain named the CEO of Taco Bell as its next CEO.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2698.63 12339.16 7213.97 30515.60 5165.26 48400.75 21154.17 83542.88 15328.27 8899.10

CHG

CHG

YTD

+35.69 +142.66 +45.96 +676.07 +56.03 +474.02 -90.51 +2644.18 +111.80 +146.46

+1.34% +1.17% +0.64% +2.27% +1.10% +0.99% -0.43% +3.27% +0.73% +1.67%

+0.94% -4.48% -6.16% +1.99% -2.77% -1.93% -7.08% +9.35% -5.43% -5.15%

Neighbors challenge plan for 22-story apartment tower BY MARY SHAPIRO special to the Post-dispatch

CLAYTON • The owner of two

buildings is challenging plans to build a 22-story apartment tower in downtown Clayton. KP Development, which owns two adjacent commercial buildings, has filed an appeal to the Jan. 9 vote by the Board of Aldermen that approved a rezoning, as well as a subdivision plat, requested by developer Flaherty & Collins for the Shaw Park Tower. The project is slated to include luxury apartments and groundlevel retail stores at 8049 Forsyth Boulevard. While Gary Feder, an attorney representing KP, discussed the appeal at the board meeting Tuesday night, Mayor Harold Sanger asked that he and the board be able to further study the issue, so a vote won’t take place before Feb. 27. The site is less than an acre and is now used as a city surface parking lot at the northeast corner of Brentwood and Forsyth boulevards, across the street from Shaw Park. Flaherty & Collins has a contract to buy the lot from the city. The current city parking lot has 29 hourly, metered parking spaces and 103 leased spaces. The city’s Plan Commission had requested that a minimum of 29 hourly public parking spaces be provided in the garage of Shaw Park Tower. Plans are for a 457,575-squarefoot mixed-use building with 7,821 square feet of first floor retail and 228 apartments as well as 324 parking spaces in an eightstory garage to the north. The total project cost is estimated to be $100 million. Feder has said the city’s original request for proposals called for coordination of development with adjoining property owners. KP has its own plan for a ninestory boutique office building with first-floor retail stores on the remainder of the city block surrounded by the parking lot.

A new rendering of the planned 22-story Shaw Park Tower luxury apartments tower and garage at Forsyth and Brentwood boulevards.

Feder has said the company fears there won’t be enough parking in the garage attached to the proposed apartment tower to accommodate its plans and to provide parking for area businesses that would make up for loss of the surface parking lot. KP’s appeal states the board’s decision will have a demonstrable and potentially significant adverse impact on the current use of its property; KP will lose access to leased spaces on the surface parking lot that will not be replaced; and the fair market value of the KP development properties will affect sale potential of the KP properties. However, City Manager Craig Owens and Susan Istenes, director of planning and development services, wrote in a memo dated

Tuesday that KP’s argument that it would suffer a loss of resale value “is unsupported by any asserted facts” and “speculative at best.” They said KP didn’t specify “in any meaningful way” how it would “suffer a demonstrable and material adverse effect” from the city’s decision, so KP hadn’t established that it was an “aggrieved party” and didn’t have standing to appeal. They also said no zoning regulations were violated by having the hearing and vote on the same night. Feder, on Tuesday, claimed the city’s standards were “exceedingly high” for proving a negative impact and said the rezoning action before closure on the sale of 8049 Forsyth was “highly unique.”


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

THURSDAy • 02.15.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Greitens goes to school Missouri lawmakers are teaching the governor lessons about leadership.

W

hat may have worked for Gov. Eric Greitens in the military is not going over so well in Missouri. His heavy-handed takeover of the Missouri Board of Education late last year has backfired, leaving the board without a quorum to make important decisions affecting students, educators and families. After Greitens clumsily stacked the eight-member board that oversees Missouri’s public schools the last six months of 2017, there remain only three members on the board who have been confirmed by the Senate. Greitens appointed 10 people for five spots, and then removed two who did not seem fully committed to his goal of removing the widely respected commissioner, Margie Vandeven. Two others declined and one resigned. The remaining five Greitens appointees and three holdover members voted 5-3 to fire Vandeven in December. After masterminding the effort to install a state education commissioner of his choosing, Greitens can’t get the state Senate to confirm his state board appointees. That leaves the commissioner’s post vacant. It would be almost humorous if the results weren’t so serious. Consider the fallout: Charter schools can’t get their contracts renewed; school accountability changes are delayed; a residency program to improve staffing in St. Louis-area schools is waiting to launch; and a decision on governing St. Louis schools is stalled. Educating Missouri’s young people may be the best economic development tool the state has, but Greitens has fumbled the effort badly. Legislators were understandably

troubled by Greitens’ political maneuvering involving a board that the state constitution says is to be free of political interference. When Greitens withdrew and then resubmitted his five appointees in early January, trying to buy more time for their confirmation, senators were unappeased. They are blocking the process. Sen. Gary Romine, R-Farmington, sponsor of Senate Bill 794, seeks to bar Greitens from using tactics he employed to stack the school board and other commissions, such as the Missouri Housing Development Commission and the Veterans Commission. Facing the backlash, the governor withdrew three of the housing commission appointees on Feb. 1. The votes of some Greitens’ appointees — cast without their confirmation — are in limbo. Greitens, who campaigned on his boast of being a political outsider, has overstepped his bounds. He has few legislative allies, having mocked and spurned lawmakers, many of whom consider him combative and arrogant. Romine is flexing the Senate’s muscle to show the governor that the legislative branch plays a role in curbing excesses of the state’s highest executive. Romine’s proposal would slow down the appointment process and require more transparency when new board and commission members are made. For a politically ambitious man with an enviable background as a Rhodes scholar and a Navy SEAL, Greitens has shown he has many lessons to learn. Too bad he’s being educated at the expense of Missouri’s schoolchildren.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens greets lawmakers as he enters the House chamber last month for his annual State of the State address to a joint session of the Legislature.

Glory days Deficits and efficiency be damned. Pentagon riding high.

W

ay back in 2011, when Republicans, and at least a few Democrats, still cared about budget deficits, Congress and President Barack Obama struck their budget “sequestration” deal, setting limits on how much the nation’s defense and domestic discretionary budgets could grow. Under that deal, the defense budget for 2018 was supposed to be $548 billion, still more than the next seven nations spend combined. Last week Congress, having decided that deficits don’t matter, set the 2018 defense budget at $700 billion and the 2019 budget at $716 billion. Domestic spending went up as well. Sequestration now seems like a joke, and it was. Almost immediately, Congress — urged along by the generals in the Pentagon — decided the military couldn’t make do on a half-trillion dollars. As usual, the Pentagon backed Congress down by making noises about eliminating weapons made in key congressional districts. Donald Trump was elected president, having criticized Obama for turning the U.S. military into a “disaster.” Obama, following sequestration guidelines and drawing down the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, did reduce military spending growth. But Trump’s first defense budget request was only 3 percent larger than Obama’s last. Trump’s latest proposal would boost Pentagon spending by 14 percent over two years. Another big change: The Defense Department released its National Defense Strategy review in January. It calls for a

return to great power competition with Russia and China while at the same time maintaining anti-terrorism operations and building a nuclear defense shield. It’s easy to see how that would eat $716 billion a year. “The money is going from readiness to modernization to nuclear deterrent,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said of the $716 billion budget.“You look at the strategy, and you see where it’s going.” The budget asks for more ships (including some the Navy didn’t ask for), more planes (including 24 St. Louis-made F/A-18s and 90 of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighters that Trump has correctly said are overpriced) and more troops (8,500 for the Army, 5,000 for the Navy, 5,800 for the Air Force and 1,000 new Marines). The troops will get a 2.4 percent raise, too, in line with what private sector wage growth is expected to be. And even though there’s general agreement that the nation has far more military bases than it needs, there will be no new round of base-closing talks. Not factored into the new military budget was a 2015 Pentagon study that found $125 billion in administrative waste in its business operations. Shocked at the report’s findings,“senior defense officials moved swiftly to kill it by discrediting and suppressing the results,” the Washington Post reported. With the urgency for streamlining operations gone and a deficits-be-damned attitude abroad in Washington, the military is back to its Reagan-era budgetary glory days. Who needs a parade?

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS ONLINE GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS U.S. cannot wait to prevent election cyberattacks All of the United States intelligence agencies agree that Russia meddled in our 2016 elections. The Department of Homeland Security has stated that in 2016 Russia targeted voter registration systems in 21 states and several were penetrated. As far as we know, they didn’t change any data this time, only looked at it. There is reporting that Russia is still using social media to stir up dissension and turmoil in the United States. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Russia is already trying to interfere in our 2018 midterm elections. These cyberattacks are acts of war, yet we don’t seem to be doing much to prevent further attacks. We cannot wait. It is bad enough that Russia can use social media to spread lies that might affect an election, but what if it succeeds in changing voter registration rolls or vote counts? When elections can’t be trusted, democracy dies. In July, the U.S. House and Senate voted to authorize President Donald Trump to implement tough new sanctions on Russia for meddling in our 2016 election. So far, President Trump has done nothing. There also doesn’t seem to be any significant effort to prevent cyberattacks on future elections. President Trump controls the executive branch of government and can focus its resources on protecting us from outside interference in our elections. He can also coordinate with Congress, the states and private corporations to determine what they can do. We need action now to protect our elections. Wil Fritz • St. Louis County

Disgruntled voters must get involved in elections Disgruntled voters who didn’t vote in the presidential election, because they didn’t want to vote for the lesser of two evils, appear to be less patriotic and disrespectful than the players who take a knee, or don’t cover their heart during the Pledge of Allegiance. When these voters decided not to participate in our election process, the very process that maintains our great freedom, they were exhibiting a disrespect far greater than the ballplayers’ exercise of their freedom of speech. The election system is not perfect, but it is the best system in the world. It allows for us to participate without having to vote for party candidates, or cast an opposition vote, by writing in anyone’s name, including a fictitious one. This write-in process allows us to do our part in government, and tells all those involved that we would rather have anyone else, even a cartoon character, than the individual they placed on the ballot to represent us. In the meantime, if disgruntled voters now see the damage done by not voting, perhaps they will consider making a positive difference in the next election. They can contribute greatly by actively working to support or create an alternative party, or demonstrating to our community, including those too young to vote, the importance of our democracy. Respecting the vote will greatly elevate our most cherished and important right as a citizen of our great United States of America. Norman Moss • Arnold

Column insults Bill Clinton by comparing him to Greitens Bill McClellan simply cannot resist sticking forks into former President Bill Clinton. The worst insult came in the column in which McClellan compares Clinton to Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens (“Bill and Eric — peas in a pod,” Feb. 11). Greitens, who was elected by shooting a machine gun

into a forest, doesn’t seem to make friends as much as destroy enemies. He’s a man whose hypocrisy knows no bounds. On the other hand, Clinton’s accomplishments were legion. According to reports, 6 million jobs were created in the first two years of his administration. In 1993, Clinton cut taxes to 15 million lowincome families and made tax cuts available to 90 percent of small businesses while raising taxes on just 1.2 percent of wealthiest taxpayers. Most importantly, the deficit went down three years in a row. Clinton signed the Brady Bill, requiring a five-day waiting period in handgun purchases, made education a priority, signed initiatives to protect health insurance, strengthened families through other bills such as the Family and Medical Leave Act and opened foreign markets to American goods. It’s true that Clinton had a reputation with the ladies, as did many of our great presidents. And did McClellan learn anything during his recent visit to the Clinton Library in Little Rock? He said in his column that the library was “too pro-Clinton.” I remember thinking during a visit that the library was magnificently reproductive, historical and well-organized. I suggest that most presidential libraries emphasize the leaders’ accomplishments. There are men for whom powerful, brilliant and accomplished guys are too much of a threat to their egos. No doubt that includes newspaper columnists. Esther Talbot Fenning • St. Charles

Economic policies threaten our prosperity I am willing to pay higher taxes, something our wealthiest citizens have a chronic aversion to doing. The steady Obama recovery from the recession enabled me to retire, and the “Trump market” has benefited me, too. Now, however, I fear the recent GOP/Trump tax cut, when coupled with the bipartisan spending bill, will produce a doublewhammy effect like in 1926, which led to the 1929 Great Depression. Of course, either bill alone would have had a short-term stimulative effect. And the spending bill was a long-overdue touch of sanity. Unfortunately, together the two bills may give us the equivalent of an economic sugar high. And you know what happens with sugar highs. First, 82 percent of the GOP tax cut already gave the top 1 percent a huge windfall, by adding trillions to our government deficit. The debt service on those deficits will eat into future budgets, which will be funded by the government selling treasuries to the wealthy and bankers — and to China. To pay that debt, American workers will be taxed, adding a second enormous transfer to our wealthiest. Together, this compound double steal will vastly exacerbate the polarization of wealth that has been escalating in our country over the last three decades, distorting and destabilizing our economic ecosystem. “Trickle down,” a plausible-sounding Republican myth that has been disproved repeatedly, will not restore a healthy balance to our society. Wealth does not trickle down; money naturally gravitates to the wealthy. America will not correct this imbalance with a more progressive tax system; Citizens United has weighted the political scales against that. In 1926, the economy was roaring. Only the average Joe complained that “the rich get richer.” But the implosion of 1929 exposed our folly. Let’s not repeat that scenario. Ed Protzel • University City Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

02.15.2018 • THURSDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

LINCOLN DAY LYNCHING • The lynching of a negro, by torture and burning at the stake, at McMinville, Tenn., on Lincoln Day was one of a series of horrible manifestations of mob violence that will tend to injure Americans in the eyes of Europeans, especially Germans, when we are fighting for humane ideals. Tennessee cannot afford to let the perpetrators of this Lincoln Day lynching to go unpunished. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Missouri Legislature should not repeal post-Ferguson reforms Bill is bad policy that harms lower-income communities, violates U.S. Constitution. BY JOSH HOUSE

Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Department of Justice’s “Dear Colleague” letter, which was issued to state and local governments to remind them of constitutional standards in the use of fines and fees. The letter arose from the department’s Ferguson investigation. Now, as if to follow in Sessions’ footsteps, state Sen. Bob Dixon, R-Springfield, wants to undo the state’s post-Ferguson reforms. This is a mistake. The DOJ’s investigation into the Ferguson police department revealed sobering facts about criminal justice in local municipal courts. The investigation concluded that Ferguson police and staff were expected to use the city’s criminal justice system, not to protect the public, but to produce revenue for the city, “leading to procedures that raise due process concerns and inflict unnecessary harm on members of the Ferguson community.”

For instance, one man was confronted by police while cooling off in his car, searched without cause, and charged with eight code violations — including not wearing his seat belt in the parked vehicle. Unfortunately, Ferguson was not alone: Many Missouri municipalities used fines and fees as significant sources of revenue. To stem these abuses, Missouri passed a slew of reforms to remove revenue incentives, remove conflicts of interest and promote good governance. But a bill has been introduced that would roll back Missouri’s municipal court reforms. Among the changes that Dixon’s Senate Bill 553 would make: Municipalities would once again be able to suspend driver’s licenses to coerce payment of fines or fees; incarcerate individuals for the nonpayment of fines related to minor violations; and ticket rental properties without being subject to code enforcement reforms. The bill also eases reporting requirements and restrictions on how

State Sen. Bob Dixon (R) Springfield.

Among the changes that Dixon’s Senate Bill 553 would make: Municipalities would once again be able to suspend driver’s licenses to coerce payment of fines or fees; incarcerate individuals for the nonpayment of fines related to minor violations; and ticket rental properties without being subject to code enforcement reforms.

much municipalities can rely on municipal court revenues. This bill is not “starting a conversation.” It is bad policy that harms lower-income communities and violates the U.S. Constitution. Sen. Ed Emery, R-Lamar, has a similar proposal with Senate Bill 692. When cities use their court system to raise revenue, it traps lower-income citizens in a cycle of poverty. It places burdens on some of the most vulnerable members of society. Criminal defendants are disproportionately lower income, yet this system

places the burden of financing the criminal justice system on them. When people cannot pay up, draconian sanctions like suspending driver’s licenses or incarcerating defendants only makes life harder. After all, it is almost impossible to earn money to pay a fine when you do not have a license to drive to work or when you are locked up in a municipal jail. This approach also increases tension between the police and the communities they serve. Turning law enforcement into revenue collectors also distracts them from their actual mission to protect residents from harm.

Using the criminal and civil justice systems to produce revenue is unconstitutional because it subverts the administration of justice to municipalities’ desire for revenue. The Ferguson investigation revealed that “the court primarily use[d] its judicial authority as the means to compel the payment of fines and fees that advance the City’s financial interests.” But the U.S. Supreme Court has said that defendants cannot be jailed simply for being poor, and prosecutors and municipal judges cannot have a financial incentive to convict defendants. Judges and prosecutors should be neutrally enforcing the law, not convicting defendants to fill cities’ coffers (and indirectly pay their own salaries). Police departments should be tasked with protecting and serving the public, not collecting revenue. Many Missouri municipalities were violating these basic tenets of our criminal justice system. Missouri’s Legislature should not allow them to return to their bad old ways. Josh House is an attorney with the Institute for Justice.

America and its allies nearly destroyed Raqqa to rescue it Syrian city experienced a ferocity of urban combat rarely seen since World War II. DAVID IGNATIUS Washington Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Workers fix a sewer main New Orleans last month. The city is perhaps one of the best examples of what President Donald Trump calls the country’s “crumbling infrastructure.”

The fallacy of ‘crumbling’American infrastructure U.S. roads and bridges could use updating, but the problem isn’t under-investment. JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

It’s Infrastructure Week (again), and who among us can contain his excitement? The president, for one. According to reports, President Donald Trump wanted to announce the biggest investment in public works since President Dwight Eisenhower unveiled the interstate highway system. But in the wake of tax cuts, the real deficit was too big to close what Trump calls “the infrastructure deficit.” So he had to settle for a plan that would spend $200 billion in federal taxpayer money over the next decade and lay the rest of the $1.5 trillion on state and local taxpayers. It almost surely won’t fly. Many states are as broke as the federal government — and they can’t print money. In his Big Building, Big Spending ambitions, Trump is at his most conventional. Politicians, as transportation expert Randal O’Toole puts it, have a deep-seated bias in favor of “ribbon-cutting over brooms.” They just love wielding a giant pair of scissors to cut a shiny ribbon on a new project. You can put your name on a new tunnel or bridge. It’s harder to take credit for fixing an existing one. Even Trump’s insistence that our infrastructure is “crumbling” is among the most enduring clichés of American politics. A search of LexisNexis shows that America’s infrastructure has been crumbling since the late 1970s. And it’s

simply not true. The most recent data is from 2012, when President Barack Obama was insisting that our infrastructure was crumbling. At that time, 80 percent of our highways were in acceptable shape or better. Nearly 97 percent of rural roads met that grade. Bridge failures in Washington state in 2013 and Minnesota in 2007 were greeted as symbolic proof of systemic disrepair. But the Washington state bridge collapsed because a truck driver carrying an oversized load ignored posted warnings. It would have collapsed if it had been brand-new. And the Minnesota collapse was the result of a construction defect. Meanwhile, the conditions of our bridges have been improving consistently for the last two decades. Of course some American infrastructure could use updating. The problem, however, isn’t under-investment. In 2014, according to the Congressional Budget Office, federal state and local governments spent $416 billion on infrastructure. The real problem is that we don’t spend money on the right problems. A recent exposé by the New York Times showed that politicians and the unions that own them are to blame for the Big Apple’s deteriorating subway system. For years they’ve raided transportation funds for pet projects, like failing upstate ski resorts. Beyond New York, a perfect storm of ribbon-cutting fetishizing, environmentalism and envy of other countries has led to high-speed-rail mania. Although zippy trains are nifty, they zoom past the fact America

has the best rail system — for our needs. In Europe, trucks move goods and trains move people. In America, we do it the other way around. Trump’s proposal does include a few worthwhile ambitions, such as streamlining the approval process for public works and improving incentives to come in under budget. After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, then-California Gov. Pete Wilson used his emergency powers to bypass the usual red tape and unionized extortion that drive up costs and string out construction time. Experts thought it would take two years to fix the Santa Monica Freeway. Wilson offered contractors huge cash bonuses to meet tight deadlines. The repairs were completed in less than three months. The Trump plan, however, would leave it to Congress to figure out how to de-boondoggle-ize infrastructure projects, which is not a cause for optimism. Trump sees infrastructure investment pretty much the same way Democrats do — as a jobs program. That doesn’t work either (see: Japan). But if Trump had begun his presidency with building as his top priority, he would have won a lot of bipartisan support and turned the GOP into a big-government party much sooner. Alas — or, depending on your point of view, lucky break — he spent his capital, political and fiscal, elsewhere. And now there’s none left for the riot of ribbon-cutting he wanted. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency

RAQQA, SYRIA • Hell descended on this city twice: first when it was captured by Islamic State fighters in 2014 and made their capital, and then when it was liberated last year by U.S.-backed forces in a campaign that flattened much of the center of the city. Photos and videos show the damage here, but they don’t prepare you for the intensity of the destruction. Buildings are pulverized into rubble, block after block. Reconstruction in some areas is a distant prospect. It will take years just to clear away the shattered concrete and jungle of twisted rebar. Raqqa experienced a ferocity of urban combat rarely seen since World War II. Think of newsreels of Stalingrad in 1943 or Berlin in 1945. Those cities are symbols of the fury of war and the cost of liberation, and Raqqa should be, too. Raqqa’s liberators were members of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led militia that captured the city one building at a time. They surrounded Raqqa in late June and then squeezed it, ever tighter, until October, when resistance finally collapsed. Brave as they were, the SDF fighters couldn’t have won without devastating fire support from U.S. warplanes, armed drones and artillery. It was a brutally effective combination. One of the last redoubts was the local hospital. The Islamic State left a farewell message: The city is laced with IEDs, which have injured nearly 500 people since October, including more than 150 children. Some unforgettable images emerged during a day-long tour of the city last week with U.S. Special Operations forces who directed the campaign: mass graves dug in a public amphitheater to intimidate adversaries, the midtown traffic circle where the Islamic State videoed its grisly executions for the Internet; the stadium where the jihadists tortured prisoners in underground dungeons. The Islamic State made the city a theater of death. People here try to express the horror of those days, but what’s most telling is the distant, hollow look in their eyes.“If you didn’t need something, you didn’t go outside,” says a weathered man named Abu Basser, standing in front of the ruined building that was once the Islamic State’s administrative headquarters.“We saw the darkest days of our lives.”

On the street in front of him, a few yellow taxis are flitting by. Bus service has just resumed. Perhaps 50,000 people, a sixth of Raqqa’s former population, have returned. We stop in Mishlib, a neighborhood in the eastern district of the city. Two ladies pull out plastic chairs from their house, and a little crowd gathers on the sidewalk. Sajida, a hauntingly pretty 10-year-old dressed in a turtleneck and ripped jeans, hugs a female U.S. Army officer in tan camouflage; Ahmed, 20, a cigarette glowing at his lips, remembers the days when the Islamic State cut off people’s fingers if they smoked. He tries a laugh. “The children were living a nightmare,” says one of the mothers, who’s still worried enough about the jihadists that she doesn’t want to give her name.“They were taught how to kill.” Near her is a little girl in pink sneakers and a sky-blue sweatshirt that says “Goofy” and, close by, a boy in a Gap jacket making funny faces. Looking at their smiles as they cluster for photographs, you think: Whatever they lived through, they’re not frightened now. What are the lessons of Raqqa? One is that the United States fulfilled its commitment of 2014 to “degrade and ultimately destroy” the Islamic State. The conquest of its capital, however chilling, demonstrates the much-doubted quality of U.S. resolve. The U.S. military’s strategy here was “annihilation,” and it meant it. The next time, adversaries should be warier of picking a fight. Another moral is that it’s a mistake to let a determined adversary like the Islamic State ever gain control of an urban center like Raqqa, or Mosul in Iraq, which was also cratered in its liberation. Once committed fighters take over a city, they can be rooted out only at great human cost. And finally, Raqqa is a warning to be careful about destroying the ruling order, anywhere, without knowing what will come next. Russian President Vladimir Putin keeps making this point — the United States was reckless to encourage the overthrow of authority in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Libya without better planning for the “day after” — and he’s probably right. Too often, the vacuums have been filled by warlords, foreign mercenaries and death cults. The United States and its allies nearly destroyed Raqqa to rescue it from a caliphate that governed by torture. It was a just war, but we should try hard to avoid having to fight one like it again. David Ignatius davidignatius@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This image from drone video shows damaged buildings in Raqqa, Syria, on Oct. 19, two days after Syrian Democratic Forces said military operations to oust the Islamic State group ended.


WORLD

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Women poorer, hungrier than men worldwide U.S. only developed country with rising maternal death rate BY AMANDA ERICKSON Washington Post

Women are poorer, more hungry and more discriminated against than men, according to a new report from the United Nations. The report, called “Turning Promises Into Action: Gender Equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” looks at how women around the world are faring in several key areas. It is pegged to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which lays out several global bench marks, such as eliminating extreme poverty and hunger and getting all children into school. Significant progress has been made on the targets overall (though many probably will not be met). But this study looks at

how well women, specifically, are doing. And it finds that in nearly every category, they do worse than men. The report says there are 122 women ages 25 to 34 who live in extreme poverty for every 100 men in that age group. The percentage of women living in poor households hovers near 12.8 percent. For men, it’s 12.3 percent, which means that about 5 million more women are struggling. It’s harder for women to escape poverty, the report’s authors say, because women have less access to jobs and economic opportunities. In many places, the laws make it impossible for women to inherit wealth, own land and access credit. And, of course, even when women do find jobs, they are often paid less than men. Women have less time to work, too, because they do a disproportionate share of the housework, cooking and child care. Women are also more vulnerable to food insecurity in nearly

two-thirds of all countries. When a crisis hits, the report finds, women are more likely than men to go hungry. The highest percentage of women who face this challenge is in subSaharan Africa, though it’s a problem worldwide. Maternal death continues to be a major problem. Globally, 303,000 women died from pregnancy-related causes in 2015. Nearly two-thirds of those deaths occurred in sub-Saharan Africa, the report’s authors say. And low-income women are particularly vulnerable. This is a challenge in the United States, too, the only developed country where the rate of maternal deaths is growing. Women are vulnerable in other ways, too. According to the United Nations, 1 in 5 women and girls ages 15 to 49 reported experiencing physical or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner in the past 12 months. The report’s authors also sur-

OBITUARIES

Aguado, Carol A. - Waterloo, IL Baer, Vernon A. - St. Louis Brown, Mary E. - St. Louis Davis, Kathryn Ann "Kate" - O'Fallon, MO Faron, Noreen E. - St. Louis Gianino, Joseph Rolla - St. Louis

Aguado, Carol A.

February 14, 2018. Services: Visitation 11 a.m. until time of Memorial Service at 12 Noon, Saturday, February 17, at Quernheim Funeral Home, 800 S. Market St. Waterloo, 62298.

Baer, Vernon A.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, F e b r u a r y 1 3 , 2 0 18 . B el oved husband of the late Vera Baer (nee Gambino); dear father of Timothy (Marie) and Frank (Bernadette) Baer; dear grandfather of Nathan, Adam, Jen, Justin, Nikki, Christina, Luke, and grea t -gra n d fa t h er of Ryd er, Austin and Haylee. Vernon served in Korea in the US Army during the Korean Conflict. While in the Army, he was a known softball pitcher and back in St. Louis pitched for the KSD-TV Weatherbirds and struck out Jack Buck after Jack hit a home run in prior at bat. He was an employee at the Post-Dispatch for 51 years in the marketing department. Services: Visitation 9:30 a.m. until Mass time at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, February 20 at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Church, Ferguson, with luncheon to follow Mass. Interment 1:30 p.m. at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Brown, Mary E.

(nee Landgraf) on Tuesday, February 13, 2018, age 67. Beloved wife of Kenneth P. Brown, Sr.; mother of Kenny P. Jr., Heather E. (Robert) Baldes, and Tiffany M. (Maj Dave USAF) Levene; grandmother of Paul and Robert Baldes and Hannah and Emily Levene; daughter of Norman H. and (the late) Delores M. Landgraf; sister of Carol (Dan) Westbrock, cousin of Linda (Jerry) Cherry; dear aunt, cousin, and friend to many. A selfless woman with a strong heart who enjoyed life's adventures and lived to laugh and love with her family. Services: Friday (Feb. 16), 11:00 a.m., at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Avenue (63116). Private Interment, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION: THURSDAY (Feb. 15), 3:00- 8:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to lustgarten.org in support of pancreatic cancer research are appreciated.

Davis, Kathryn Ann "Kate"

(nee Henderson) 80, O'Fallon MO. Went to be with God on Feb. 9th 2018. Beloved wife of Donald E. Davis; loving mother to Jean A. Rapert, Norman L. Davis, late Mary F. Davis, and John M. Davis; dear grandmother and great grandmother to 19. Services: Visitation and memorial at Cornerstone Methodist Church, O'Fallon, MO. on Sat. Feb. 17th at 9:30am.

Faron, Noreen E.

died February 13, 2018. Dear sister of Jeanette Seymour (the late Charlie), Roy (Emily) Faron, Paul (Barbara) Faron, Ann (Larry) Mauch, the late Bernice (the late Cliff) Magin, and the late Ed (the late Marge) Faron. Our dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Noreen was an active member of St. Monica Parish. She dedicated her life to helping others and especially enjoyed working with the Missionaries of Charities in North St. Louis. Noreen will be remembered for her life of prayer, service, and kindness to all. Services: A visitation and Mass will be held at St. Monica Catholic Church, 12136 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO. 63141 on Sat., Feb. 17 at 9AM with Mass at 10AM. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to honor Noreen's memory may contribute to the Missionaries of Charity, 3629 Cottage Ave. St. Louis, MO 63113. May the angels lead you into paradise and welcome you home! Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

veyed national laws around the world and found that women are more likely to face legalized discrimination. “Over the past 25 years, progress has been made through, for example, legislation prohibiting discrimination based on sex with respect to inheritance and citizenship, laws that guarantee equality within the family and laws that address domestic violence,” they write. “However, while progress has been significant, discriminatory constitutional and legislative provisions remain in place in many countries, leaving women without protection or legal basis to claim their rights.” There are some bright spots. Around the world, more women are going to school than ever before, and many are staying in school longer. Worldwide, 90.3 percent of primary school-age girls were enrolled in school in 2015, compared with 82.2 percent in 2000. (For boys, the number is slightly higher — 91.9

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Gooch, Dr. Mary - Wellsville Magin - see Faron Mauch - see Faron Rafterman, Alan Scott - St. Louis Rath, Margaret M. - Hazelwood Seymour - see Faron

Gooch, Dr. Mary

percent of primary school-age boys were enrolled in 2015.) Even so, the report estimates that 15 million girls will never get the chance to learn to read or write. It’s a particularly acute challenge in places such as Africa, where 48.1 percent of adolescent girls are kept from school, along with 25.7 percent of girls who are of primary-school age. (For boys, the numbers are 43.6 percent and 21.7 percent, respectively.) One issue that schools still need to grapple with is providing adequate sanitation facilities for menstruating girls. The report says that “where adequate sanitation facilities are lacking, for example, concerns over safety and menstrual hygiene management may keep girls away from school or compromise their learning experience.”

Silverberg, Devorah "Debby" - St. Louis Steinhaeufel, Roylene M. - St. Louis Stuber, Kurt F. - St. Louis Williams, Richard W. - Wentzville

Williams, Richard W.

February 13, 2018. Services: A Mass of Christian Burial for Dr. 93, Feb. 12, 2018. Services: Vis. Thurs., Feb. 15, 4-8 pm at Mary Gooch, 70, of Wellsville, will be at 12:00 noon, Friday, Feb- Pitman Funeral Home and Fri. Feb. 16, 8:30am until Service ruary 16th at Church of the Resurrection in Wellsville. 9:30am, UMC of Wentzville, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com Visitation will be held from 9:00 a.m. until the time of service, Friday, at the church. Services are under the direction of the Florists Myers Funeral Home in Wellsville. Condolences to the family may be made at www.myersfuneralhome.biz.

Dierbergs Florist

Rafterman, Alan Scott

Beloved son, brother, uncle, cousin, nephew and friend, passed away on February 12th at the age of 50. Alan was preceded in death by his father and uncle. Alan was loved and admired for his giant heart, electric personality, love of music, the arts, passion for life, and unwavering loyalty to family, friends and NY Yankees. A New York native, Alan received his BA from SUNY Albany, and JD from Fordham Law. Alan was an Assistant DA for the Bronx District Attorney's Office and clerked for the Honorable Bernard Newman at the US Court of International Trade in NYC. He litigated and counseled clients at Gra u b a rd Miller, Westerman Ball, Merrill Lynch, Bressler, and Wells Fargo Advisors. A gifted securities attorney, he was admired for his unique legal mind and skills as a trial lawyer. However, it was his honesty and compassion that won him respect by legal peers and adversaries throughout his 26-year career. Services: Sunday, February 18 at 10 a.m., at Gutterman's in Woodbury, NY and New Montefiore Cemetery in West Babylon, NY Donations can be made to The Sheldon in St. Louis and the St. Louis Zoo.

Rath, Margaret M.

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STLtoday.com/obits

Baptized into the Hope of Christ Resurrection, Tuesday, February 13, 2018. Loving daughter of the late Minnie and Joseph E. Rath; beloved sister of the late Robert, John, Joseph Rath, Dorothy Bass, Lillian Haenel, Gilbert and Thomas Rath; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, great great-aunt and friend to many. Services: Visitation 9:00-10:30 a.m., Saturday, February 17, at St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church, 615 D u n n Rd., Hazelwood, 63042, followed by a 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment Memorial Park Cemetery. Masses Preferred. Online guest book at www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Silverberg, Devorah "Debby"

February 13, 2018 Beloved wife of Dr. Alan B. Silverberg; dear mother and motherin-law of Amy (Jeffrey Spence) Silverberg and Rachel (Daniel Rubin) Silverberg; dear grandmother of Lena Dory Spence, Daphne Alice Spence, Oliver Elias Rubin, and Delilah June Rubin; dear sister and sister-in-law of Harriet (Jerold) Lander and Philip (Susan) Simon; dear cousin, aunt, and friend. The family would like to thank dedicated caregivers Mary Kourik, Irene McConnell, Annie Young, and Alice McBride. Services: Graveside service Friday, February 16, 10:00 a.m. at United Hebrew Cemetery, 7855 Canton Avenue. Memorial contributions preferred to the Missouri Botanical Garden. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Steinhaeufel, Roylene M.

(nee Hasty), passed away on Tuesday, February 13, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth Steinhaeufel; loving mother of Stephanie (Martin) Bennet and Michael Steinhaeufel; d ea r grandmother of Sa ra h Bennet; loving sister of Stephen Hasty; dearest sister-in-law of Virginia Steinhaeufel and the late J oh n St ein h a eu fel a n d Ruth McGowen; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Gianino, Joseph Rolla Services: Visitation will be held Friday, February 2, 2018. Dear father of Joseph Richard (Gracie on Saturday from 12 - 3 p.m. at STYGAR FLORISSANT CHAPEL Kintz), Jacob (Sunny), Jonathan and Jason Gianino and Lisa AND CREMATION CENTER, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. in (Dakota) Taggart; dear grandfather of Lilly, Jonathan Jr., and Florissant, followed by service at 3 p.m. Interment will be held Meara; dear cousin of Dr. Michael Barbieri; dear uncle of Judy privately at Memorial Park Cemetery on Tuesday. Online Mercurio and Michael Schrampf. condolences a n d gu es t b ook may be found at Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com. Sunday, February 18 from 12-4 p.m. Inurnment Monday, Feb. 19, 9:30 a.m. at Resurrection Cemetery. Contributions to the AmeStuber, Kurt F. rican Diabetes Association or the American Heart Association would be appreciated. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, February 11, 2018. Husband of the late Anna R. Stuber (nee Gwerder); dear father of Silvia Anna Marie and David Christian (Vivian Chuang) Stuber; d ea r grandfather of Katherine Stuber and Audrey Chuang-Stuber; dear brother of Walter Stuber and the late Werner Stuber; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Kurt was the proprietor of European Watch & Clock Repair. Services: Funeral Mass at 11:00 a.m. Saturday (Feb. 17) at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church. Friends may visit at church from 9:30 a.m. until Mass time. Interment private. A service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes.

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NATION

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • A17

Romney focusing on Utah, not Trump Republican will soon announce Senate bid

laser-focus on Utah and will suggest that Washington has much to learn from the state the former Massachusetts governor now calls home. “I think Mitt’s going to make it very clear that he’s not running for the Senate because of or in spite of anything to do with Donald Trump,” said Spencer Zwick, Romney’s former fundraising chief who now leads fundraising efforts for House Speaker Paul Ryan. Romney, a Mormon, is widely liked and respected in Utah, which is heavily Mormon. He attended Brigham Young University in Provo, helped turn around the scandalplagued 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City

BY MICHELLE L. PRICE AND STEVE PEOPLES associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY • Mitt

Romney will soon announce his bid for Utah’s Senate seat held by retiring Orrin Hatch, a position some hope the 2012 GOP presidential nominee will use to continue his biting criticism of President Donald Trump. The announcement was planned for Thursday but was delayed Wednesday evening after the shooting at a Florida high school.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks about the tech sector last month in Utah.

Romney, who once called Trump “a phony” who was unfit for office, is not expected to address the president in an announcement video he plans to re-

Trump’s parade would cost millions BY ERICA WERNER Washington Post

President Donald Trump’s military parade would cost between $10 million and $30 million, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said on Wednesday. Mulvaney offered the estimate during questioning at the House Budget Committee. He said the White House hadn’t budgeted for the parade and would either rely on Congress to appropriate funds, or use money that already had been approved. “The estimates I’ve seen, they’re very preliminary, is between 10 [million dollars] and 30 [million dollars] depending upon the length,” Mulvaney said. “Obviously an hour parade is different from a fivehour parade in terms of the cost and the equipment and those types of things.” It was the first cost estimate of the military parade Trump has directed the Pentagon to plan later this year. Democrats and some Republicans have questioned the need for such an event, suggesting it could have authoritarian overtones depending on how it’s conducted. Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., voiced such concerns when she posed the question to Mulvaney. “I want to ask you about this military parade the president is proposing,

you know the parade that is very similar to those held in authoritarian countries like in North Korea,” Lee said. “How much is that parade going to cost and where is that money coming from?” Mulvaney told Lee that “We’ve actually had military parades in this country before,” including as recently as the 1990s. Although Mulvaney did not specify what he was referring to, there was a parade in Washington in 1991 to celebrate the U.S. victory in the first Gulf War. More than 8,000 U.S. troops participated. That parade cost about $12 million in 1991, which would be about $21 million or $22 million in today’s dollars. Earlier this year Trump directed his generals to plan a parade for later this year to showcase U.S. military might. The inspiration was France’s Bastille Day celebration last year, which Trump attended in Parade with French President Emmanuel Macron and apparently found very impressive. “We’ve not accounted for it in this year’s budget simply because it’s come up at the last minute,” Mulvaney told Lee. “So we’ll continue to work with you folks if we decide to push forward with that initiative.”

lease online, according to people with direct knowledge of his plans. Instead, those close to Romney say he is planning a campaign with a

BY ALAN FRAM AND KEVIN FREKING associated Press

• A group of senators reached a bipartisan agreement Wednesday aimed at balancing Democrats’ fight to offer citizenship to young “Dreamer” immigrants with President Donald Trump’s demands for billions to build his coveted border wall with Mexico, lawmakers said. But though the measure sprang from about two dozen senators with centrist views on the issue and was winning support from many Democrats, it faced an uncertain fate. While not specifically mentioning the bipartisan pact, Trump urged lawmakers to oppose any plan that doesn’t meet his more stringent demands, which include curbs on legal immigration and the abolition of a visa lottery. The Senate’s No. 2 Republican, John Cornyn of Texas, warned that lawmakers needed to address Trump’s entire proposal, saying, “We need to take the president seriously.” There were also qualms among Democrats. The party’s No. 2 Senate leader, Dick Durbin of Illinois, said some Democrats had “serious issues” with parts of the plan. Those WA S H I N GTO N

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (left) , D-N.Y., and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., walk outside the chamber during debate Wednesday in the Senate on immigration.

concerns focused on its spending for Trump’s wall and its bar against Dreamers sponsoring their parents for legal residency. “We’re not there yet,” Durbin said of the 60 votes the proposal would need for approval. So far, none of the other competing immigration proposals from either side seems able to do that. Republicans control the chamber 51-49, though Sen. John McCain, RAriz., has missed the last several weeks while battling cancer. The bipartisan proposal was emerging as senators spent a third day of debate largely as they spent the first two — with the

chamber floor mostly empty. Other than an initial roll call allowing formal debate to begin, there have been no other votes while party leaders talk behind the scenes about scheduling votes on specific proposals. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has said he wants the Senate to finish considering immigration legislation this week. Final showdown votes were possible Thursday. According to several senators, the centrist proposal would grant a 10- to 12-year route to citizenship for Dreamers, with Sen. Lindsey Graham, RS.C., saying it would cover

1.8 million of them. That’s the same number Trump has suggested helping with his own wider-ranging but more restrictive proposal. Dreamers are young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children and still have no permanent protection from deportation. The plan would provide $25 billion over a decade for a wall and other border security measures, the same total Trump has requested. It would bar Dreamers from sponsoring their parents for citizenship, far narrower than Trump’s proposal to prevent all legal immigrants from bringing parents and siblings to the U.S. The moderates’ measure does not alter a lottery that distributes about 55,000 visas annually to people from diverse countries. Trump has proposed ending it and redistributing its visas to other immigrants, including some who are admitted based on job skills, not family ties. “The diversity lottery is kind of toxic politically because of some of the things said by the president,” said Graham, a reference to a vulgar description Trump used for African countries during a discussion of immigration.

U.S. health care tab to keep rising, federal report says

NPR host fired over abuse allegations

3 killed at New Orleans Mardi Gras • A festive close to Mardi Gras was marred by shootings across New Orleans that left three people dead and five others wounded. The first two shootings happened in the afternoon, when fights broke out near the traditional parade route. Police named Eddie Dingle, 21, as a suspect in one of the shootings and said investigators obtained

that are good for America. “If President Trump says or does something that he finds offensive or divisive, unnecessarily divisive, then I think you will continue to hear Romney as the voice of reason and conscience in the Republican Party,” Jowers said. Though he delivered a scathing speech denouncing Trump during the 2016 presidential election, Romney softened his stance after Trump won the presidency and put himself forward as a candidate for secretary of state. But he resumed his criticism last year, calling out the president for blaming “both sides” after a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Group of senators reach deal across aisle on Dreamers, wall

DIGEST

The host of one of National Public Radio’s most successful programs has been fired over allegations of workplace abuse. Boston radio station WBUR said Wednesday that “On Point” host Tom Ashbrook was cleared of sexual misconduct but created an abusive environment for staff. He’s been on leave since December. Ashbrook said he was “deeply disappointed” and called his firing “profoundly unfair.” He apologized to colleagues who found him and the show’s pace “just too much.” The station had received complaints from 11 men and women who previously worked on the show and accused Ashbrook of verbal abuse, bullying and unwanted touching. Outside firms hired to investigate say Ashbrook didn’t violate sexual misconduct policies but was abusive in other ways. More than 290 NPR stations carry the show.

and made Utah his primary home after losing the 2012 presidential election. In addition to his name recognition, Romney, 70, has a deep network of fundraisers and his own personal wealth to help carry him. If he becomes Utah’s next senator, some supporters hope that the one-time Trump critic could serve as a political and moral counterweight to a president they see as divisive, erratic and undignified. Kirk Jowers, the former chairman and general counsel of Romney’s leadership PACs, said Romney “will always be a straight shooter” and would speak up and support the president when he takes actions

BY NOAM N. LEVEY Tribune Washington Bureau

CHICAGO TRIBUNE VIA AP

Installers and curators look over the new acquisition “Bottle Rack,” by conceptual artist Marcel Duchamp, at the Art Institute of Chicago on Monday. Art Institute President James Rondeau said the piece “is among the most pivotal, landmark works in Marcel Duchamp’s profoundly influential body of work.”

a warrant for his arrest on a second-degree murder charge. The third shooting began as people celebrated Tuesday night at a house party in the Lower 9th Ward, about two miles from the parade route. Police spokeswoman Ambria Washington said multiple suspects opened fire on a car with five people inside. The driver drove to a gas station before two of the people in the car died. Teachers strike in West Virginia • Teachers in a growing number of West Virginia counties are skipping school for a day to protest the state’s pay and health insurance. The House of Delegates passed legislation Tuesday to give teachers 2 percent

raises the next fiscal year and 1 percent in the three years after that. The Senate last week approved 1 percent raises in each of the next five years. Gov. Jim Justice said health insurance coverage will be unchanged for the next 17 months. Media outlets report public school employees in Cabell, Lincoln and Wayne counties voted Tuesday to stay out of classes Friday. Mason County schools announced Wednesday its employees also plan to skip work Friday. Teachers in Logan, Mingo and Wyoming counties held a one-day work stoppage Feb. 2. Couple sentenced in terrorism case • A Texas couple have been sentenced to prison terms for lying

about the Islamic State group activities of their two sons in the Middle East. Prosecutors say Mohommad Ali, 57, was sentenced Tuesday to one year in prison. His wife, Sumaiya Ali, 49, received 30 months. The couple, from Plano, pleaded guilty last year to making false statements to the FBI related to international terrorism. Prosecutors alleged the couple’s adult sons, Arman Ali and Omar Ali, traveled to Syria to fight with the militant group. Mohammad and Sumaiya Ali in 2015 were questioned by FBI agents and denied knowing their sons were in Syria or associated with the Islamic State group. From news services

WASHINGTON • Driven by rising prices for drugs and medical services, the nation’s health care tab will continue to outpace economic growth over the next decade, according to a new government report. And by 2026, health care spending will account for almost one-fifth of the U.S. economy, a record. The report, which was prepared by independent economists at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is widely regarded as an important measure of the nation’s health care system, echoes many recent warnings about rising costs. At the same time, the report underscores the increasing urgency of confronting the ever-growing burden that health care imposes on family checkbooks and government spending. “High and rising costs expose two often overlooked problems,” Harvard economist David Cutler noted in an article accompanying the new spending projections, published in the journal Health Affairs. “First, spending is too high because many dollars are wasted. … Second, high medical costs combined with stagnant incomes for a

large share of the population and the inability of governments at all levels to raise tax dollars leads to increased health and economic disparities,” Cutler wrote. The report indicates that the rate of rising costs has moderated somewhat compared with the years before the 2008 Great Recession. From 1990 to 2007, health care spending increased 7.3 percent a year on average, far outpacing economic growth. By contrast, annual spending is projected to increase 5.5 percent on average between 2017 and 2026, the report’s authors conclude. But the future spending growth is considerably faster than in the decade following the recession, when costs increased 4.2 percent annually on average. More worrisome, the annual growth rate over the next decade is expected to average one percentage point more than overall economic growth. That means that health care will expand to 19.7 percent of the economy in 2026 from about 17.9 percent of the economy in 2016. Some of the increase reflects the fact that a big part of the U.S. population is aging and will therefore require more medical care, the authors note.


NATION

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH STLTODAY ON FACEBOOK

Get the early word on news scoops. facebook.com/STLPD NOTICe TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IMPROVEMENTS, ROBERT W. PLASTER CENTER FOR FREE ENTERPRISE will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on MARCH 8, 2018 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted.

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Blood test to diagnose brain injuries gets U.S. OK BY LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press

CHICAGO • The first blood

test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won U.S. govern-

ment approval. The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry’s race to find a way to diagnose

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concussions. The test doesn’t detect concussions and the approval won’t immediately change how patients with suspected concussions or other brain trauma are treated. But Wednesday’s green light by the Food and Drug Administration “is a big deal because then it opens the door and accelerates technology,” said Michael McCrea, a brain injury expert at Medical College of Wisconsin. The test detects two proteins present in brain cells that can leak into the bloodstream after a blow to the head. Banyan’s research shows the test can detect them within 12 hours of injury. It’s designed to help doctors quickly determine which patients with suspected

concussions may have brain bleeding or other brain injury. Patients with a positive test would need a CT scan to confirm the results and determine if surgery or other treatment is needed. The test will first be used in emergency rooms, possibly as soon as later this year, but Banyan’s hope is that it will eventually be used on battlefields and football fields. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the test fit with the agency’s goals of delivering new technologies to patients and reducing unnecessary radiation exposure. Traumatic brain injuries affect an estimated 10 million people globally each year. They often get CT scans to detect bleeding or

other abnormalities. The scans expose patients to radiation, but in many patients with mild brain injuries including concussions, abnormalities don’t show up on these imaging tests. With Department of Defense funding, Banyan’s research shows its Brain Trauma Indicator can accurately pick up brain trauma later found on CT scans. It also shows that absence of the two proteins in the test is a good indication that CT scans will be normal. That means patients with negative blood tests can avoid CT scans and unnecessary radiation exposure, said Dr. Jeffrey Bazarian, a University of Rochester emergency medicine professor involved in Banyan’s research.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 02.15.2018 • B

EMBRACING CHANGE

Martin national coach of year?

New pitching coach, new philosophies front and center in spring training

Why not? He’s done stellar job at Mizzou

CHRIS LEE • P-D

Coach Cuonzo Martin has the Tigers rolling after a disastrous stretch before he arrived.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

New Cardinals pitching coach Mike Maddux carries a three-ring binder and believes in quality over quantity in preparing his staff this spring.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • With gizmos

players wore on the field and gadgets they could take home, the Cardinals spent last spring gathering data about tailoring training to what goes on inside a player. Yet one of the most significant changes so far this year came when they looked outside the organization. For the first time in more than two decades, the Cardinals hired a pitching coach who had not

You bring somebody in and you’ve got to give them some autonomy to do what they want to do. You look at (Mike) Maddux’s experience and what he’s been through and he definitely had some input.” — John Mozeliak, Cards’ head of baseball operations, on Mike Maddux

previously been with their organization. And on Wednesday, as pitchers and catchers held their first official workout of 2018, Mike Maddux’s fingerprints were clear on the schedule. One of the longest-tenured and highest-paid meat his position, Maddux took the field with his new charges, wearing No. 31 and clasping a three-ring binder in his left arm. He described the workouts for the day with the same peppy tempo See CARDINALS • Page B5

How can Cards divvy catching duties? BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • It looms.

Straightaway center at a practice field here, a monstrous greenish fence hangs in the batter’s eye, a “two-story” backdrop that also can shield the sun. On Wednesday, during a serene batting practice session, Carson Kelly suddenly unleashed this swing of his, barbecuing a baseball that seemingly singed the upper part of the

centerfield fence. “That’s what I’ve been working on in my game this offseason — putting more power into my game and utilizing my body more, instead of my hands,” said Kelly, 23. “And that’s kind of a result of it.” They call it “pitchers and catchers,” but the first day of organized workouts seems to be ceremoniously about pitchers and pitchers. There they are, these walking and talking demigods, unfurling their first hurls of spring to the anonymous armored storm troopers, See HOCHMAN • Page B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Cardinals’ Carson Kelly stows his catching gear and prepares for batting practice at spring training on Wednesday in Jupiter, Fla.

America’s Shiffrin is in good position ASSOCIATED PRESS

See OLYMPICS • Page B6

See FREDERICKSON • Page B4

Blues lament the NHL bypassing Olympics BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Mikaela Shif-

frin turned in an electric opening run of the Olympic giant slalom Thursday, sitting in second position and in prime position for a gold medal. The 22-year-old American standout trails leader Manuela Moelgg of Italy by a scant 0.20 seconds heading into the final run later in the day (late Wednesday St. Louis time) at Yongpyong Alpine Center. The sun was out and the wind muted. Finally, the women were racing. Shiffrin was just happy for that, given all the postponements due to weather and strong wind. The women’s giant slalom was initially scheduled for Monday but moved to Thursday. The slalom was supposed to be Wednesday but got pushed to Friday. Down the road about 30 miles (50 kilometers) in Jeongseon, the men were racing the Olympic downhill Thursday. That was supposed to take place Sunday. “Oh my gosh, last night, I was like, ‘Are we ever

Make a better case. Other deserving candidates do exist. And no one has to vote right now. But take a snapshot of the current college basketball landscape, and consider where Missouri once appeared in that photo, then name a more deserving candidate than Cuonzo Martin as we begin the annual coachof-the-year debate. Not just Southeastern Conference coach of the year, either. I’m thinking national. That said, the top three candidates nationally might call the new-andimproved SEC home. If you wear blinders and focus only on what happens on the court — therefore dismissing a connection to an ongoing FBI investigation that claimed an assistant coach and players — then Auburn’s Bruce Pearl is a strong contender. Despite yet another NCAA anvil hanging over the noted NCAA cheater’s head, Pearl and his team have a 23-3 record (11-2 SEC) and a first-place spot in the league standings after beating Kentucky 76-66 at home on Wednesday night. Not bad, considering one of his team’s 14 losses last season came against eight-win Mizzou. Tennessee’s Rick Barnes is in the mix. The league’s wise media members picked his Volunteers to finish 13th. They’re currently ranked No. 18 in the nation and sitting second in the standings. The Volunteers are 19-6 (9-4 SEC) after seven wins in their last eight games. Barnes, a master of rebuilding, averaged 22.3 wins during his crucial third seasons at Providence,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mikaela Shiffrin of the United States reacts to her time during the first run of the women’s giant slalom on Thursday in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Other than perhaps making the Hockey Hall of Fame, there’s no greater individual honor for a hockey player than representing their country in the Olympics. And other than perhaps winning the Stanley Cup, what could be better than having your team — from your country — win an Olympic gold medal. “It’s a great tournament,” forward Alexander Steen said of the Olympic hockey experience. “It’s a great experience for the players. It’s too bad that we didn’t have that opportunity this year. It’s incredible to be there with the other athletes from your country and to see the whole atmosphere of the Olympics. “It’s hard to replicate. I know we did that World Cup, and had the world championships and other tournaments, but there’s nothing like the Olympics.” Steen is among six current Blues who have represented their country in past Olympic games. See BLUES • Page B7 > 7:30 p.m. Friday at Stars, FSM

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

THURSDAY • 02.15.2018 • B

EMBRACING CHANGE

Martin national coach of year?

New pitching coach, new philosophies front and center in spring training

Why not? He’s done stellar job at Mizzou

CHRIS LEE • P-D

Coach Cuonzo Martin has the Tigers rolling after a disastrous stretch before he arrived.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

New Cardinals pitching coach Mike Maddux carries a three-ring binder and believes in quality over quantity in preparing his staff this spring.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • With gizmos

players wore on the field and gadgets they could take home, the Cardinals spent last spring gathering data about tailoring training to what goes on inside a player. Yet one of the most significant changes so far this year came when they looked outside the organization. For the first time in more than two decades, the Cardinals hired a pitching coach who had not

You bring somebody in and you’ve got to give them some autonomy to do what they want to do. You look at (Mike) Maddux’s experience and what he’s been through and he definitely had some input.” — John Mozeliak, Cards’ head of baseball operations, on Mike Maddux

previously been with their organization. And on Wednesday, as pitchers and catchers held their first official workout of 2018, Mike Maddux’s fingerprints were clear on the schedule. One of the longest-tenured and highest-paid meat his position, Maddux took the field with his new charges, wearing No. 31 and clasping a three-ring binder in his left arm. He described the workouts for the day with the same peppy tempo See CARDINALS • Page B5

How can Cards divvy catching duties? BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • It looms.

Straightaway center at a practice field here, a monstrous greenish fence hangs in the batter’s eye, a “two-story” backdrop that also can shield the sun. On Wednesday, during a serene batting practice session, Carson Kelly suddenly unleashed this swing of his, barbecuing a baseball that seemingly singed the upper part of the

centerfield fence. “That’s what I’ve been working on in my game this offseason — putting more power into my game and utilizing my body more, instead of my hands,” said Kelly, 23. “And that’s kind of a result of it.” They call it “pitchers and catchers,” but the first day of organized workouts seems to be ceremoniously about pitchers and pitchers. There they are, these walking and talking demigods, unfurling their first hurls of spring to the anonymous armored storm troopers, See HOCHMAN • Page B5

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Cardinals’ Carson Kelly stows his catching gear and prepares for batting practice at spring training on Wednesday in Jupiter, Fla.

Shiffrin grabs the gold in giant slalom ASSOCIATED PRESS

See OLYMPICS • Page B6

See FREDERICKSON • Page B4

Blues lament the NHL bypassing Olympics BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • One Olympic

gold medal down for Mikaela Shiffrin. More just might be on deck. The 22-year-old American used a hard-charging final run to win the giant slalom Thursday for her second career Olympic title. She trailed by 0.20 seconds after the first run, but powered through a course filled with ruts to quickly make up time in the second. Shiffrin ended up 0.39 seconds ahead of Ragnhild Mowinckel of Norway at Yongpyong Alpine Center. Federica Brignone of Italy took bronze, 0.46 behind Shiffrin’s combined time of 2 minutes, 20.02 seconds. First-run leader Manuela Moelgg of Italy wound up eighth. At the 2014 Sochi Games, Shiffrin won the slalom title at age 18. She will defend that title Friday. It was an ideal day for racing, with the temperature around 21 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind about 8 mph. That’s quite a difference from the last few days when three of the opening four races were

Make a better case. Other deserving candidates do exist. And no one has to vote right now. But take a snapshot of the current college basketball landscape, and consider where Missouri once appeared in that photo, then name a more deserving candidate than Cuonzo Martin as we begin the annual coachof-the-year debate. Not just Southeastern Conference coach of the year, either. I’m thinking national. That said, the top three candidates nationally might call the new-andimproved SEC home. If you wear blinders and focus only on what happens on the court — therefore dismissing a connection to an ongoing FBI investigation that claimed an assistant coach and players — then Auburn’s Bruce Pearl is a strong contender. Despite yet another NCAA anvil hanging over the noted NCAA cheater’s head, Pearl and his team have a 23-3 record (11-2 SEC) and a first-place spot in the league standings after beating Kentucky 76-66 at home on Wednesday night. Not bad, considering one of his team’s 14 losses last season came against eight-win Mizzou. Tennessee’s Rick Barnes is in the mix. The league’s wise media members picked his Volunteers to finish 13th. They’re currently ranked No. 18 in the nation and sitting second in the standings. The Volunteers are 19-6 (9-4 SEC) after seven wins in their last eight games. Barnes, a master of rebuilding, averaged 22.3 wins during his crucial third seasons at Providence,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

American Mikaela Shiffrin reacts after her dazzling second run put her on top Thursday in the women’s giant slalom in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Other than perhaps making the Hockey Hall of Fame, there’s no greater individual honor for a hockey player than representing their country in the Olympics. And other than perhaps winning the Stanley Cup, what could be better than having your team — from your country — win an Olympic gold medal. “It’s a great tournament,” forward Alexander Steen said of the Olympic hockey experience. “It’s a great experience for the players. It’s too bad that we didn’t have that opportunity this year. It’s incredible to be there with the other athletes from your country and to see the whole atmosphere of the Olympics. “It’s hard to replicate. I know we did that World Cup, and had the world championships and other tournaments, but there’s nothing like the Olympics.” Steen is among six current Blues who have represented their country in past Olympic games. See BLUES • Page B7 > 7:30 p.m. Friday at Stars, FSM

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Friday 2/16 at Stars 7:30 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 2/23 at Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/24 at Mets* 12:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 2/25 at Predators 11:20 a.m. KSDK (5)

Friday 2/23 vs. Jets 7 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game

Sunday 2/25 vs. Astros* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Monday 2/26 at Twins* 12:05 p.m.

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 2/17 at Richmond 5 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

Wednesday 2/28 at Duquesne 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 2/17 at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/24 at Kentucky 7:15 p.m. ESPN

Tuesday 2/27 at Vanderbilt 6 p.m. ESPN2

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Sunday 2/18 vs. Nebraska 2:30 p.m. BTN

Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN

Thursday 2/22 vs. Purdue 6 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Sunday 2/25 at Rutgers 2 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. NASCAR trucks: NextEra Energy Resources 250, practice, FS1 1:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: NextEra Energy Resources 250, practice, FS1 3:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: NextEra Energy Resources 250, final practice, FS1 6 p.m. NASCAR: Can-Am Duels, FS1 BASKETBALL 4 p.m. College women: Southern Illinois-Edwardsville at UT-Martin, ESPNU College women: Purdue at Maryland, BTN 5 p.m. 5:30 p.m. College women: Alabama at Tennessee, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Purdue at Wisconsin, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Temple at Wichita State, ESPN2 College women: Duke at Syracuse, FSM 6 p.m. 6 p.m. College: Cincinnati at Houston, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Tulsa at Connecticut, ESPNU 7 p.m. College: Ohio State at Penn State, BTN 7 p.m. College: SIU Edwardsville at UT Martin, WSIE (88.7 FM) 7:30 p.m. College women: Mississippi State at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Arizona at Arizona State, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Oregon at USC, ESPN2 College: Alabama-Birmingham at Louisiana Tech, CBSSN 8 p.m. 8 p.m. College: Campbell at Radford, ESPNU NBA: Lakers at Timberwolves, TNT 8 p.m. 10 p.m. College: Oregon State at UCLA, FS1 College: St. Mary’s (Calif.) at San Francisco, ESPNU 10 p.m. GOLF PGA: Genesis Open, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. 9 p.m. LPGA: Australian Open, second round, GOLF (Fri.) European PGA: Oman Classic, second round, GOLF 4 a.m. OLYMPICS • See listings on page B4 SOCCER 9:50 a.m. UEFA: FC Astana vs. Sporting CP, FS2 Noon UEFA: Ostersund vs. Arsenal, FS2 UEFA: FC Copenhagen vs. Atletico Madrid, FS2 2 p.m.

DIGEST

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

MOTOR SPORTS

Hendrick takes a chance

New driver lineup features Johnson, loads of potential ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAYTONA BEACH, FLA. • Rick Hendrick threw a glamorous party last fall when he formally introduced his 2018 driver lineup. It was a lavish car unveiling that used lasers, spotlights and an emcee to celebrate a Hendrick Motorsports roster that had undergone a dramatic makeover. Each of the four drivers was paired with someone for the event. Chase Elliott was joined by his Hall of Fame father, Bill, who helped uncover the new No. 9 his son will drive this year in his honor. William Byron was introduced with Jeff Gordon, who won four titles in Byron’s new No. 24. Alex Bowman came out with Dale Earnhardt Jr., the guy who helped him get his ride when Earnhardt retired. The team owner accompanied seven-time NASCAR champion and Hendrick frontman Jimmie Johnson. Standing next to glittering new race cars, the quartet was able to briefly mask the striking youthfulness of Hendrick’s rebuilt organization. Now, at the Daytona 500, the four drivers stand alone. They passed their first test, and the boss could not be prouder. Bowman, who sat out all of last year waiting for Earnhardt’s seat to open, put a Hendrick car on the Daytona 500 pole for a recordtying fourth consecutive year. Johnson was third fastest. Byron, a rookie rushed into a Cup car this year because Kasey Kahne was fired, was fifth. Elliott was 10th. “We’ve got a lot of racing to do and we’re going to make mistakes,” Hendrick said. “But to come down here, it’s a statement by the whole organization to run four cars and get them that close.” Hendrick preemptively noted that the organization may have a roller-coaster season, largely because of the various resumes on his roster.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hendrick Motorsports owner Rick Hendrick (front) with three of his team drivers (left to right) Alex Bowman, Jimmie Johnson and Chase Elliott, look on from pit road before pole qualifying for the NASCAR Daytona 500 last weekend. Bowman, 24, won the pole for Sunday’s season-opener.

Johnson is the best of his era, and even though Elliott is entering just his third season, he made NASCAR’s playoffs last year and proved he has the potential to be a star. Bowman and Byron? Well, no one knows yet. Byron won seven races as a rookie in the Truck Series in 2016 and would have won the championship, too, but an engine failure stopped him nine laps away from what should have been win No. 8. He won the Xfinity Series title last year, earning the promotion to the Cup series. His Cup debut will be the Daytona 500, and his first time racing a Cup car at all will be Thursday in a qualifying race. He’s 20. Bowman had a brief career as a backmarker in the Cup Series, but was basically out of a ride when he received a lifeline from Earnhardt. JR Motorsports got Bowman nine Xfinity Series races in 2016, and when Earnhardt was sidelined, he pushed Hendrick to put Bowman in the car. Bowman was good enough in those 10 races — a golden-tickettype audition — to land the job full time when Earnhardt retired. He had to sit out all of last year as he waited, but Hendrick made it up to him with an engine that has him

on the Daytona 500 pole. He’s 24. Aside from Johnson, in his 17th season, the roster has a combined 158 Cup starts with zero victories. It’s three kids, Hendrick views it, at the start of their careers. Byron, Bowman and Elliott are fast, and will now develop their talents in the best equipment with on-thejob training. Hendrick knows there will be bumps. But he doesn’t care because there’s some fresh air in the building. “It’s fun, and that’s what I need at this point in my life...,” he said. Winning the pole was definitely fun, and Hendrick used the opportunity to back Bowman into a bet in which the two will drag race their Corvettes. The loser also will lose his ride. Bowman is still making payments to a Hendrick dealership on that car. Hendrick, forever a car salesman, was wheeling and dealing with his new prospects. A sheepish Bowman made it clear he’ll do whatever the boss says. Hendrick likens it to 1993, when a 21-yearold Gordon blazed his way into the organization with a ridiculous mustache and a briefcase that carried nothing but a racing magazine and a Game Boy. “We had good luck with that,” Hendrick said.

GOLF

Woods returning to tough Riviera

Golfer Haas escapes serious injury in fatal crash

Professional golfer Bill Haas, son of Belleville’s Jay Haas, was hospitalized but escaped serious injury following a rollover crash in Los Angeles that killed the driver of the Ferrari he was riding in and injured the driver of a BMW, officials said Wednesday. The two cars collided in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to Los Angeles police officer James Stoughton. The driver of the Ferrari, who died at the scene, was a member of the family that Haas was staying with as he prepared to play this week in the Genesis Open at nearby Riviera Country Club, the golfer’s manager, Allen Hobbs, said. The 35-year-old Haas, a six-time PGA Tour, will withdraw from the tournament. The crash is under investigation. The driver of the BMW, a 50-year-old woman, was hospitalized in serious condition. (AP) Mizzou wrestlers rally at SIUE • After falling behind 9-0, the No. 3-ranked Missouri wrestling team won eight straight matches to win 30-9 Wednesday at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. The host Cougars (6-13) got an overtime win from Zac Gentzler at 125 pounds and a forfeit at 133 to grab the early lead. But the Tigers (18-0) came roaring back, getting technical falls from Joey Lavallee (157), Daniel Lewis (174) and Canten Marriott (184) to lead the way. Other Mizzou winners were Jaydin Eierman (141), Alex Butler (149), Francis Howell’s Connor Flynn (157), Willie Miklus (197) and heavyweight Wyatt Koelling. (Joe Lyons) Real Madrid, Liverpool post Champions wins • Cristiano Ronaldo scored a goal in each half as host Real Madrid came from behind to defeat Paris Saint-Germain 3-1 in their first-leg match in the round of 16 of the Champions League Wednesday. Adrien Rabiot put PSG ahead in the 33rd minute but Ronaldo equalized by converting a penalty kick just before halftime and put the home team on top in the 83rd. Marcelo sealed the victory three minutes later to give the two-time defending champions a commanding lead heading into next month’s second leg in Paris. In Portugal, Sadio Mane had a hat trick as visiting Liverpool routed Porto 5-0 in the opening leg of their round-of-16. Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino also scored to give the Premier League side a huge advantage ahead of the second leg in England on March 6. (AP) Manziel announces comeback plans • Former Heisman Trophywinning quarterback Johnny Manziel says he’s making a football comeback. Manziel tweeted Wednesday morning that he has signed with the developmental Spring League in Austin, Texas, which will play from March 28 to April 15. The league is designed for players hoping to impress NFL scouts. Drafted into the NFL by Cleveland in 2014, Manziel was cut after two rocky seasons in 2015 and has not played football since. (AP)

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tiger Woods greets a well-wisher after a news conference where he talked about his charitable works off the course and his return to the Genesis Open at Riviera Country Club after an absence of 12 years.

Continues comeback at course he has not played at since 2006 ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • Even when Tiger Woods hardly ever lost, he never could win at Riviera. Woods resumes his comeback from a fourth back surgery at the Genesis Open, marking his return to the course where he made his PGA Tour debut as a 16-year-old amateur, and the course where he walked away in the middle of the tournament and never returned. He has played Riviera eight times as a pro, the most of any PGA Tour course where he hasn’t won. “I love the golf course. I love the layout. It fits my eye,” Woods said. “And I play awful. It’s very simple. It’s just one of those weird things. A lot of the holes, you hit nice, soft cuts. And I used to love to hit nice, soft cuts. And for some reason, I just didn’t play well.” Woods is playing this year against the strongest and deepest field of the year, primarily because his foundation runs the tournament. He has not been back to Riviera since 2006, when he was caught in the rain without an umbrella, shot 74 and made the cut

on the number. The next morning, Woods withdrew with the flu and never returned. He’s not the same player he was then. His father died a few months after that 2006 tournament, and after Woods missed the cut for the first time in a major at the U.S. Open, he went on to win his final six PGA Tour events of the year, including the last two majors. There was one stretch at the end of 1999 and early in 2000 when Woods won or was runnerup in 10 out of 11 starts on the PGA Tour. The exception? He finished seven shots behind in a tie for 18th at Riviera. The dynamics are different now. Woods is 42 and has played just 17 times on the PGA Tour over the last four years dating to his first back surgery a week before the 2014 Masters. He hasn’t won in nearly five years. He is No. 550 in the world. While the goal is to win — that hasn’t changed — the expectations have tempered through time and reality that he is learning a new swing after fusion surgery on his lower back. His speed and power are back. His putting and chipping are better. He tied for 23rd at Torrey Pines three weeks ago. “I’d eventually like to win tournaments,” Woods said. “I’m try-

ing to get to that point.” He flew out from Florida with Justin Thomas, the PGA Tour player of the year, and said he told him that he is still making subtle changes in his posture and in his swing because he is learning what he can do with a stronger, healthier back. “The more tournaments I play in, the more I’ll be able to get a better understanding of that,” Woods said. “But also, I don’t want to play too much. This is still all new to me, and I just want to be real smart about it.” Woods is an eight-time winner at Torrey Pines. He is 0 for 10 at Riviera, which includes appearances as an amateur in 1992 and 1993. The opposite of that would be Dustin Johnson, the defending champion, who considers Riviera the best course he plays all year. Woods will play the opening two rounds with Thomas and Rory McIlroy. They will be right in front of Phil Mickelson, Matt Kuchar and Tommy Fleetwood of England. On the other side of the draw, Jordan Spieth is playing with Patrick Cantlay and Kevin Chappell. They will be right in front of Johnson, Adam Scott and Bubba Watson, all of whom have trophies from Riviera.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

ROUNDUP

Providence tops No. 3 Villanova ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyron Cartwright scored 17 points and host Providence withstood several late surges to stun third-ranked Villanova 7671 on Wednesday night. Rodney Bullock and Alpha Diallo each added 14 points for the Friars (17-9, 8-5 Big East), who snapped a five-game losing streak to the Wildcats. It was Providence’s first win over Villanova since Jan. 24, 2016. Mikal Bridges had 19 points for Villanova, but fouled out with 1:12 to play in the game. Jalen Brunson added 14 points. Villanova (23-3, 10-3) pulled within 5954 on a pair of free throws by Omari Spellman with 6:25 left. But the Friars outscored the Wildcats 8-4 over the next two minutes to push the lead back to 67-58. Collin Gillespie gave the Wildcats a chance after his layup trimmed Providence’s lead 72-69 with 29 seconds left. But that was as close as Villanova would get. Auburn beats Kentucky • Bryce Brown returned from a shoulder injury to score 18 points in leading No. 10 Auburn to a 76-66 victory over Kentucky. The host Tigers (233, 11-2 Southeastern Conference) overcame a horrid shooting start to take control down the stretch, with some big baskets from Brown. The Wildcats (17-9, 6-7) dropped their fourth straight. Seminoles rally past Clemson • Phil Cofer scored 17 points, Trent Forrest added 16 and host Florida State rallied from an 18-point deficit in the second half to defeat 11th-ranked Clemson 81-79 in overtime on Wednesday. The Seminoles (18-8, 7-7 Atlantic Coast Conference) didn’t take their first lead until 1:05 remaining in overtime when Forrest made a driving layup to put them up 75-74. After Clemson was called for a 5-second violation on the inbounds, Forrest came up big with another driving layup to put FSU up by three. Clemson (20-5, 9-4) scored four of the next six points to get within 79-78 but Forrest made both free throws with 5.3 seconds remaining to extend the margin to three.

AREA

Salukis win in OT • Westminster Christian grad Aaron Cook made two free throws with 4.1 seconds left in overtime, lifting Southern Illinois University Carbondale to an 81-80 win over visiting Missouri State. The Salukis (18-10, 10-5 Missouri Valley) got 22 points from Armon Fletcher (Edwardsvile) while Sean Lloyd scored 20 of his 21 after halftime. For Missouri State (17-11, 7-8), Jarrid Rhodes scored 21 and Alize Johnson (15 points, 16 rebounds) recorded his 18th double-double of the season.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

Balanced Indiana turns back Illinois Illini have lost 10 of their last 12 and four in a row

INDIANA 78, ILLINOIS 68

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Providence forward Rodney Bullock dunks for two of his 14 points, as Villanova guard Mikal Bridges (right) defends, Wednesday night in the Friars’ upset victory.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Virginia (24-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Wednesday, Feb. 21. 2. Michigan State (25-3) idle. Next: at Northwestern, Saturday. 3. Villanova (23-3) lost to Providence 76-71. Next: at No. 4 Xavier, Saturday. 4. Xavier (24-3) beat Seton Hall, 102-90. Next: vs. No. 3 Villanova, Saturday. 5. Cincinnati (23-2) idle. Next: at Houston, Thursday. 6. Purdue (23-4) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Thursday. 7. Texas Tech (22-4) idle. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. 8. Ohio State (22-5) idle. Next: at Penn State, Thursday. 9. Gonzaga (23-4) idle. Next: vs. Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 10. Auburn (23-3) beat Kentucky 76-66. Next: at South Carolina, Sunday. 11. Clemson (20-5) lost to Florida State 81-79, OT. Next: vs. No. 12 Duke, Sunday. 12. Duke (21-5) beat Virginia Tech 74-52. Next: at No. 11 Clemson, Sunday. 13. Kansas (20-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 20 West Virginia, Saturday. 14. North Carolina (20-7) idle. Next: at Louisville, Saturday. 15. Saint Mary’s (24-3) idle. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 16. Rhode Island (21-3) idle. Next: at St. Bonaventure, Friday. 17. Arizona (20-6) idle. Next: at No. 25 Arizona State, Thursday. 18. Tennessee (19-6) idle. Next: at Georgia, Saturday. 19. Wichita State (19-5) idle. Next: vs. Temple, Thursday. 20. West Virginia (19-7) idle. Next: at No. 13 Kansas, Saturday. 21. Texas A&M (17-9) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Saturday. 22. Michigan (21-7) beat Iowa 74-59. Next: vs. No. 8 Ohio State, Sunday. 23. Oklahoma (16-9) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday. 24. Nevada (21-5) at Boise State, late. Next: at Utah State, Saturday. 25. Arizona State (19-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 17 Arizona, Thursday.

BLOOMINGTON, IND. • Juwan Morgan was one of three Indiana players to score 14 points Wednesday night and he posted his eighth double-double this season to lead the Hoosiers past Illinois 78-68. The Hoosiers (15-12, 8-7 Big Ten) have won three straight since snapping a fourgame losing streak. Morgan also had 10 rebounds, a career-high five blocks, four steals and three assists. Leron Black finished with 20 points before fouling out and Kipper Nichols added 16 to lead the Fighting Illini. Illinois (12-15, 2-12) has lost four in a row and 10 of 12. And, as has been the case recently, the Hoosiers relied on a stout defense and a strong closing punch to seal this one. Indiana first took control with a 14-0 run midway through the first half and still led 35-25 at halftime. Illinois, which was 1 of 12 on 3-pointers in the first half, adjusted in the second half by repeatedly feeding the ball inside. For a while, it worked perfectly. The Illini methodically trimmed the deficit, getting within 51-49 with 12:26 left. They could have cut the deficit to one if Nichols could have completed a threepoint play. Instead, he missed and the Hoosiers countered with an 8-2 spurt to rebuild a 59-51 lead and Robert Johnson’s 3 with 7:24 to go extended the margin to nine. Illinois never got closer than six again.

BIG PICTURE

Illinois: The struggles continue. Foul trouble, poor shooting and allowing too many easy baskets were a recipe for disaster. And that’s exactly the Illini got — again. Indiana: The Hoosiers continue to build momentum as the season winds down. With two winnable road games up next, a strong finish is exactly what Indiana fans hope to see.

FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A 33 8-12 3-4 1-7 2 Black Eboigbodin 10 1-3 2-2 2-4 0 22 0-3 0-0 2-2 2 Alstork Frazier 38 5-14 2-5 0-2 5 Jordan 30 1-6 4-6 1-2 0 24 4-9 6-9 1-3 0 Nichols Lucas 21 3-4 1-2 0-1 1 12 0-3 0-0 0-1 1 M.Smith Vesel 10 0-0 2-2 0-0 1 Totals 200 22-54 20-30 7-22 12 Percentages: FG.407, FT.667. 3-point goals: 4-19, .211. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 12. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 12. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb INDIANA Min M-A M-A O-T A 22 2-3 5-8 0-6 1 McSwain Morgan 37 4-8 6-7 3-10 3 20 1-4 0-1 0-1 2 Green Johnson 37 5-9 2-4 0-6 4 McRoberts 20 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 24 5-6 2-2 0-2 0 Durham Newkirk 21 4-6 2-2 0-0 3 13 5-7 3-5 2-3 0 J.Smith Hartman 6 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 Totals 200 26-44 20-29 5-31 14 Percentages: FG.591, FT.690. 3-point goals: 6-14, .429. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 18. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 18. Steals: 9. Technical fouls: None. 25 43 — Illinois Indiana 35 43 —

PF 5 4 3 1 3 3 3 1 1 24

PTS 20 4 0 12 7 16 7 0 2 68

PF 4 3 0 3 4 2 3 3 1 23

PTS 9 14 3 14 0 14 11 13 0 78

68 78

rebounds. ... The Illini finished 4 of 19 on 3s, shot 40.7 percent overall and scored a season-low 25 points in the first half. ... Illinois was called for 24 fouls and was 20 of 30 on free throws. ... The Illini have not won this season when allowing 75 or more points. Indiana: Johnson and Aljami Durham also scored 14 points each. Justin Smith added 13 and Josh Newkirk had 11. ... The Hoosiers shot 64.7 percent from the field in the second half and 59.1 percent for the game. ... Devonte Green left midway through the second half with an apparent knee injury and did not return. ... The Hoosiers had a 34-23 rebounding advantage and were 20 of 29 from the freethrow line.

UP NEXT

Illinois: Hosts Nebraska on Sunday. Indiana: Will go for the season sweep Saturday at Iowa.

KEY STATS

Illinois: Trent Frazier scored 12 points and had five assists. ... Black grabbed seven

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COLLEGE BASKETBALL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 2

ROUNDUP

Providence tops No. 3 Villanova ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyron Cartwright scored 17 points and host Providence withstood several late surges to stun third-ranked Villanova 7671 on Wednesday night. Rodney Bullock and Alpha Diallo each added 14 points for the Friars (17-9, 8-5 Big East), who snapped a five-game losing streak to the Wildcats. It was Providence’s first win over Villanova since Jan. 24, 2016. Mikal Bridges had 19 points for Villanova, but fouled out with 1:12 to play in the game. Jalen Brunson added 14 points. Villanova (23-3, 10-3) pulled within 5954 on a pair of free throws by Omari Spellman with 6:25 left. But the Friars outscored the Wildcats 8-4 over the next two minutes to push the lead back to 67-58. Collin Gillespie gave the Wildcats a chance after his layup trimmed Providence’s lead 72-69 with 29 seconds left. But that was as close as Villanova would get. Auburn beats Kentucky • Bryce Brown returned from a shoulder injury to score 18 points in leading No. 10 Auburn to a 76-66 victory over Kentucky. The host Tigers (233, 11-2 Southeastern Conference) overcame a horrid shooting start to take control down the stretch, with some big baskets from Brown. The Wildcats (17-9, 6-7) dropped their fourth straight. Seminoles rally past Clemson • Phil Cofer scored 17 points, Trent Forrest added 16 and host Florida State rallied from an 18-point deficit in the second half to defeat 11th-ranked Clemson 81-79 in overtime on Wednesday. The Seminoles (18-8, 7-7 Atlantic Coast Conference) didn’t take their first lead until 1:05 remaining in overtime when Forrest made a driving layup to put them up 75-74. After Clemson was called for a 5-second violation on the inbounds, Forrest came up big with another driving layup to put FSU up by three. Clemson (20-5, 9-4) scored four of the next six points to get within 79-78 but Forrest made both free throws with 5.3 seconds remaining to extend the margin to three.

AREA

Salukis win in OT • Westminster Christian grad Aaron Cook made two free throws with 4.1 seconds left in overtime, lifting Southern Illinois University Carbondale to an 81-80 win over visiting Missouri State. The Salukis (18-10, 10-5 Missouri Valley) got 22 points from Armon Fletcher (Edwardsvile) while Sean Lloyd scored 20 of his 21 after halftime. For Missouri State (17-11, 7-8), Jarrid Rhodes scored 21 and Alize Johnson (15 points, 16 rebounds) recorded his 18th double-double of the season.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B3

Balanced Indiana turns back Illinois Illini have lost 10 of their last 12 and four in a row

INDIANA 78, ILLINOIS 68

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Providence forward Rodney Bullock dunks for two of his 14 points, as Villanova guard Mikal Bridges (right) defends, Wednesday night in the Friars’ upset victory.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Virginia (24-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Wednesday, Feb. 21. 2. Michigan State (25-3) idle. Next: at Northwestern, Saturday. 3. Villanova (23-3) lost to Providence 76-71. Next: at No. 4 Xavier, Saturday. 4. Xavier (24-3) beat Seton Hall, 102-90. Next: vs. No. 3 Villanova, Saturday. 5. Cincinnati (23-2) idle. Next: at Houston, Thursday. 6. Purdue (23-4) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Thursday. 7. Texas Tech (22-4) idle. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. 8. Ohio State (22-5) idle. Next: at Penn State, Thursday. 9. Gonzaga (23-4) idle. Next: vs. Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 10. Auburn (23-3) beat Kentucky 76-66. Next: at South Carolina, Sunday. 11. Clemson (20-5) lost to Florida State 81-79, OT. Next: vs. No. 12 Duke, Sunday. 12. Duke (21-5) beat Virginia Tech 74-52. Next: at No. 11 Clemson, Sunday. 13. Kansas (20-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 20 West Virginia, Saturday. 14. North Carolina (20-7) idle. Next: at Louisville, Saturday. 15. Saint Mary’s (24-3) idle. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 16. Rhode Island (21-3) idle. Next: at St. Bonaventure, Friday. 17. Arizona (20-6) idle. Next: at No. 25 Arizona State, Thursday. 18. Tennessee (19-6) idle. Next: at Georgia, Saturday. 19. Wichita State (19-5) idle. Next: vs. Temple, Thursday. 20. West Virginia (19-7) idle. Next: at No. 13 Kansas, Saturday. 21. Texas A&M (17-9) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Saturday. 22. Michigan (21-7) beat Iowa 74-59. Next: vs. No. 8 Ohio State, Sunday. 23. Oklahoma (16-9) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday. 24. Nevada (22-5) beat Boise State, 77-72. Next: at Utah State, Saturday. 25. Arizona State (19-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 17 Arizona, Thursday.

BLOOMINGTON, IND. • Juwan Morgan was one of three Indiana players to score 14 points Wednesday night and he posted his eighth double-double this season to lead the Hoosiers past Illinois 78-68. The Hoosiers (15-12, 8-7 Big Ten) have won three straight since snapping a fourgame losing streak. Morgan also had 10 rebounds, a career-high five blocks, four steals and three assists. Leron Black finished with 20 points before fouling out and Kipper Nichols added 16 to lead the Fighting Illini. Illinois (12-15, 2-12) has lost four in a row and 10 of 12. And, as has been the case recently, the Hoosiers relied on a stout defense and a strong closing punch to seal this one. Indiana first took control with a 14-0 run midway through the first half and still led 35-25 at halftime. Illinois, which was 1 of 12 on 3-pointers in the first half, adjusted in the second half by repeatedly feeding the ball inside. For a while, it worked perfectly. The Illini methodically trimmed the deficit, getting within 51-49 with 12:26 left. They could have cut the deficit to one if Nichols could have completed a threepoint play. Instead, he missed and the Hoosiers countered with an 8-2 spurt to rebuild a 59-51 lead and Robert Johnson’s 3 with 7:24 to go extended the margin to nine. Illinois never got closer than six again.

BIG PICTURE

Illinois: The struggles continue. Foul trouble, poor shooting and allowing too many easy baskets were a recipe for disaster. And that’s exactly the Illini got — again. Indiana: The Hoosiers continue to build momentum as the season winds down. With two winnable road games up next, a strong finish is exactly what Indiana fans hope to see.

FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A 33 8-12 3-4 1-7 2 Black Eboigbodin 10 1-3 2-2 2-4 0 22 0-3 0-0 2-2 2 Alstork Frazier 38 5-14 2-5 0-2 5 Jordan 30 1-6 4-6 1-2 0 24 4-9 6-9 1-3 0 Nichols Lucas 21 3-4 1-2 0-1 1 12 0-3 0-0 0-1 1 M.Smith Vesel 10 0-0 2-2 0-0 1 Totals 200 22-54 20-30 7-22 12 Percentages: FG.407, FT.667. 3-point goals: 4-19, .211. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 12. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 12. Steals: 10. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb INDIANA Min M-A M-A O-T A 22 2-3 5-8 0-6 1 McSwain Morgan 37 4-8 6-7 3-10 3 20 1-4 0-1 0-1 2 Green Johnson 37 5-9 2-4 0-6 4 McRoberts 20 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 24 5-6 2-2 0-2 0 Durham Newkirk 21 4-6 2-2 0-0 3 13 5-7 3-5 2-3 0 J.Smith Hartman 6 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 Totals 200 26-44 20-29 5-31 14 Percentages: FG.591, FT.690. 3-point goals: 6-14, .429. Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 18. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: 18. Steals: 9. Technical fouls: None. 25 43 — Illinois Indiana 35 43 —

PF 5 4 3 1 3 3 3 1 1 24

PTS 20 4 0 12 7 16 7 0 2 68

PF 4 3 0 3 4 2 3 3 1 23

PTS 9 14 3 14 0 14 11 13 0 78

68 78

rebounds. ... The Illini finished 4 of 19 on 3s, shot 40.7 percent overall and scored a season-low 25 points in the first half. ... Illinois was called for 24 fouls and was 20 of 30 on free throws. ... The Illini have not won this season when allowing 75 or more points. Indiana: Johnson and Aljami Durham also scored 14 points each. Justin Smith added 13 and Josh Newkirk had 11. ... The Hoosiers shot 64.7 percent from the field in the second half and 59.1 percent for the game. ... Devonte Green left midway through the second half with an apparent knee injury and did not return. ... The Hoosiers had a 34-23 rebounding advantage and were 20 of 29 from the freethrow line.

UP NEXT

Illinois: Hosts Nebraska on Sunday. Indiana: Will go for the season sweep Saturday at Iowa.

KEY STATS

Illinois: Trent Frazier scored 12 points and had five assists. ... Black grabbed seven

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B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Stone sends message in loss As starters sit, SLU reserves provide toughness against Duquesne

COURTESY OF SLU ATHLETICS

St. Louis University junior Tara Dusharm (45) came off the bench to score a career-high 16 points in 11 minutes Wednesday night. BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Deficits have not alarmed the St. Louis University women’s basketball team this season, so trailing by 20 points in the fourth quarter Wednesday night coach Lisa Stone was hoping her team could make a run. How she went about it was different than usual. Looking for a toughness and defensive intensity that often have been lacking this season, Stone sat several starters for most of the final 10 minutes. And although Duquesne emerged with a 76-66 win at Chaifetz Arena, Stone walked away hoping that her bench had delivered a message the rest of the team will respond to in the final weeks of the regular season. “It was their grit on defense and that intensity that quite frankly we’ve been looking for,” Stone said. “Not only did we get it, but I rewarded them with more minutes and they deserved it. It sent a great message the way they played. We were down 20 and they cut it to eight.

That has nothing to do with me. That’s them. That’s a gut check that has to resonate with the team.” Center Tara Dusharm scored 16 points in 11 minutes. Kerri McMahan had 12 points and six assists and Aaliyah Covington finished with 10 points. They took some of the minutes normally reserved for Jackie Kemph, Maddy Gits and Jordyn Frantz, who were spectators in the fourth quarter. SLU (8-5 in the Atlantic 10, 14-12 overall) slipped into fifth place in a season that has been marked with frustration after the team reached 25 wins in each of the previous two years. The Billikens won’t get there this season but there are still goals ahead. “We would have liked to win, but as coach said, I think that’s the toughest we’ve played all year in the fourth quarter and the end of the second quarter,” McMahan said. “That’s the most toughness and grit the team has shown.” After finishing tied for first and third, respectively, in the A-10 the last two years, SLU has

not fared as well against the best teams in the league this season. The Billikens are 1-4 against the four teams ahead of them and still have a home meeting with first-place Dayton. Duquesne exploited one of the Billikens’ weaknesses. The Dukes (11-2, 21-5) shot 50 percent and scored 76 points against a SLU defense that ranks 13th in the A-10. “We’re near the bottom in defense and quite frankly it’s very troubling to me because we’ve been playing the same defense for four years,” Stone said. “It’s the toughness, readiness, effort and loose balls displayed by the group that finished the game. They busted their tails.” The visitors shot out of the gate in the first quarter as Chassidy Omogrosso scored 12 of her game-high 26 points, forcing SLU to play catch-up throughout the night. Kemph, Gits, Frantz and Jenny Vliet were all quiet offensively as they combined to make six of 33 shots and score 13 points. They average a combined 46 points for the season. With few shots falling for

SLU, Duquesne was able to open up a 31-17 lead in the second quarter. McMahan and Covington spurred a run that helped the Billikens pull within five points by halftime. The Dukes went on a 17-6 run to start the third quarter, eventually stretching their lead to as many as 22 points despite committing 18 turnovers, including a rash of traveling violations. “I don’t think the team ever feels down and out,” McMahan said. “A lot of our girls are extremely competitive. At this point it’s about getting better and finding toughness for 40 minutes.” Stone got what she wanted for 10 minutes. The score would have been a little tighter in the fourth if McMahan’s 60-foot swish had come a second sooner when the third quarter ended. “I see a lot of brightness coming from this game in what was demonstrated by the kids who didn’t give up,” Stone said. “I take a lot of good things from the game, I really do.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Martin has rescued MU men’s basketball program from abyss FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Clemson and Texas. He should top that with his third Tennessee team. Pearl, by the way, is in season No. 4 at Auburn. Martin is in his first at Mizzou. I bet you neither Pearl nor Barnes — and I would extend this list to include national coach of the year candidates such as Rhode Island’s Dan Hurley, Purdue’s Matt Painter and Ohio State’s Chris Holtmann — were envious of the situation Martin inherited when Mizzou hired him as Kim Anderson’s replacement. A once-proud program had turned into a punch line. The Tigers had won 27 of 95 games (and eight of 54 conference games) since the 2014-15 season. Sprinkled on top were legitimate questions about how recent racial turmoil on campus had damaged the brand and opened the door for negative recruiting. Flash forward. Mizzou is 18-8 (8-5 SEC) and pointed in the right direction for the program’s first NCAA Tournament appearance since 2013. The Tigers are in the midst of their second five-game winning streak of the season. Their fourpoint win against No. 21 Texas A&M this week marked their third conquest of a ranked opponent. Impressive. Even more so when you remember, as if you could forget, that Michael Porter Jr., the crown jewel of Martin’s first recruiting class, was sidelined and headed for back surgery just two

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Mizzou coach Cuonzo Martin talks with guard Kassius Robertson, who has turned into a team leader and offensive force under the coach.

minutes into the season-opener. This notion of a late-season MPJ comeback is gaining serious traction. What a differencemaker that could be. Just don’t let it overshadow what’s happened while the likely NBA draft lottery pick has healed. Martin has pulled perhaps the most depressing program in high major college hoops from an abyss, overhauled its severely-damaged psyche and produced a body of work that would have been well-received even if MPJ had played this entire time. Graduate transfer guard Kassius Robertson has turned into one of the best stories in college basketball, a team leader and leading scorer who went from a high school graduate with a single Division I offer to receiving

back-to-back SEC player of the week honors. Freshmen big men Jeremiah Tilmon and Jontay Porter seem to unlock a higher level of play every month. But perhaps the best testament to Martin’s coaching is the spirited play of inherited holdovers who have attacked their new roles. Recruiting is a crucial part of coaching. Recruiting, however, doesn’t help Kevin Puryear accept coming off the bench when it’s best for his team. It doesn’t help Jordan Barnett shoot a career-high 90.3 percent from the free throw line. It doesn’t help Jordan Geist go from shooting 28.6 percent from 3-point range go to shooting 41.2 percent. That’s coaching. Eighteen wins with five regular-season games to go? That matches the combined win to-

tal of the past two Tigers teams. Eight conference wins? That matches the past three. It hasn’t been perfect. The Braggin’ Rights loss was a gut-punch. There was that dreadful no-show at Utah. Then a three-game SEC losing streak that sure seemed like the beginning of the end. Watching this guard-challenged team inbound the ball causes hives to breakout from Kansas City to The Lou. Yet every single time you start to write off these Tigers, they rebound. Well, they defend like crazy, then rebound. But you get my point. The loss of MPJ didn’t stop them. The transfer of one point guard (Blake Harris) and the suspension of another (Terrence Phillips) became speed bumps. Lose three straight league games? Answer with five consecutive wins. Asked for the secret, the players simply point to Martin. A season that started with MPJ-Mania instead put a spotlight on the coach. He’s delivered. And in a poetic twist, he soon has to navigate his team through the superstar’s return. The Tigers are better if MPJ plays. And now that they know what they are capable of without him, he comes back as an asset instead of a savior. The result could be a team no one wants to share a bracket line with next month. It’s on Martin to make the transition without sacrificing momentum. That’s good news for Mizzou. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Ohtani draws attention as Angels begin workouts Shohei Ohtani emerged from the clubhouse and tipped his cap to the swarm of Japanese countrymen capturing his every move, cameras clicking a mile a minute. He offered that signature smile, something Angels manager Mike Scioscia noticed right away and appreciates as much as his new two-way star’s “extraordinary” baseball talent. As a small group of Japanese fans cheered and waved their flag, Ohtani walked to a back field at Tempe Diablo Stadium and got to work with the rest of the pitchers and catchers on a dreary Day 1 of spring training Wednesday. His supporters all-out sprinted up the bleachers and around left field to get there for another glimpse. Ohtani said it was a shorter day than he’s used to back home. “Baseball-wise on the field I’m going to be nothing different than what I was doing in Japan,” he said through translator and friend Ippei Mizuhara. Ohtani’s first bullpen session is scheduled for Thursday and Scioscia said it would be this weekend or early next week before the lanky righthander faces live hitters. “There’s going to be a lot of resources we have to get him ready,” Scioscia said. No, Scioscia doesn’t know yet where Ohtani will hit in the lineup on the days he bats. No, he won’t be playing the outfield. Yes, Scioscia has seen him run. Yes, it’s quite impressive. Yes, he can absolutely steal bases if he has the chance. “He’s a special athlete,” the manager said, noting there is a plan for when Ohtani will take pregame batting practice in Arizona. “He’s had great success playing in Japan, running the bases and doing things that a position player needs to do to try to get himself in position to score a run. He has a great stride, he’s got tremendous speed. He can steal a base. There’s a lot of things he can do. I want him to play baseball. So, if he’s out there, he’s going to play baseball.” White Sox’s Garcia wins in arbitration • Chicago outfielder Avisail Garcia won his salary arbitration case and will get a raise to $6.7 million instead of the White Sox’s $5.85 million offer. Garcia was a first-time All-Star last year, when he was second in the AL batting race while posting career bests with a .330 average, 18 homers and 80 RBIs. He made $3 million. Players lead 8-6 with decisions to be announced Thursday for pitchers Collin McHugh, Marcus Stroman, Jake Odorizzi (Highland High) and Trevor Bauer. Four more hearings are scheduled, with the 22 decisions being the most since players won 14 of 24 cases in 1990. Royals scout kicked out of freeagent camp • As teams started spring training workouts across Florida and Arizona, the players’ association had a Kansas City Royals scout escorted out of the union’s opening training session for unsigned free agents. About 15 players attended the first day of workouts Wednesday at the union’s camp in Bradenton, Fla. Media was barred from the IMG Academy. The scout was told he was not welcome but could set up a session with an individual player at the player’s discretion, several people familiar with the situation said. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized. “Tito” Francona dies • Former major leaguer John “Tito” Francona, the father of Cleveland Indians manager Terry Francona and a Cardinal in 1965 and 1966, has died. He was 84. The Indians said the elder Francona died his home in New Brighton, Pa., Tuesday night. Francona played in the majors for 15 seasons, six with the Indians. In 164 games with the Cardinals, he hit .236 with nine homers and 36 RBIs. Terry Francona is affectionately called “Tito” after his father. The elder Francona batted .363 and finished fifth in AL MVP voting in 1959, his first season with the Indians. He led the AL in doubles the following year, and in 1961 he was an AL All-Star and led the league in singles. Braves sign backup catcher • Catcher Chris Stewart has agreed to $575,000, one-year contract with Atlanta. The 35-year-old hit .183 in 51 games with the Pittsburgh Pirates last season. He is a seven-year major league veteran. “This is a depth move, an insurance move,” general manager Alex Anthopoulos said Wednesday before the first spring training workout. Stewart will back up Tyler Flowers and Kurt Suzuki. Associated Press


02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

BASEBALL

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Norris ‘honored’ to be a Card Hurler dominated Birds early in his big-league days BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • The Philadelphia Phil-

lies had a lefthanded pitcher named Tommy Underwood in the 1970s, and he had beaten the Cardinals five times in a row in 1975-76. That’s when general manager Bing Devine decided to acquire him at the trading deadline in 1977, sending talented outfielder Bake McBride to Philadelphia. But Underwood was not facing the Cardinals any more, and he wound up that season going 6-9 with them and was moved to Toronto before the next season. Now here is Bud Norris. Even though the Cardinals more or less evened the score with Norris as the years went on, diehard fans won’t forget the start of Norris’ career with the Houston Astros. His first big-league win was a 2-0 triumph over the Cardinals on Aug. 2, 2009 at Busch Stadium. Later in the season, Norris beat them 3-0. The next year, he extended his winning streak to four games against them and at the end of his first 28 innings against the Cardinals, he had allowed just one earned run. Slugger Albert Pujols took to calling him “Chuck Norris.” “I played with Albert last year with the Angels and we had some good jokes in the clubhouse about it,” Norris said. “(The Cardinals) definitely knew when I was coming into town. It was no easy task getting through that lineup. But some of my best games were in Busch Stadium and I won’t forget them.” It doesn’t look as if Norris will get to face the Cardinals this season. He officially became their newest member on Wednesday, signing a one-year contract with incentives after a base of $3 million.

“I’m honored to be here,” said Norris, who will be 33 next month. “This a worldclass organization. Every time I went into St. Louis and I had my ‘A’ game, I think the fans and the organization get a little credit because it brought out the best in me. There’s no place like Busch Stadium. There’s no place like the fan base there.” After winning five of his first six decisions against the Cards, whom he has beaten more than any other team, the Cardinals rallied to cut the margin to 8-7 although Norris still had a good (3.44) earned-run average against them. “They’d seen enough of me,” Norris said. “They beat me a couple of times in Houston. I gave up a couple of late hits, with Jon Jay being one of them. But I remember going to St. Louis and always throwing the ball well.” Pressed into service as a closer early last year when Huston Street and Cam Bedrosian were hurt for the Angels, Norris recorded 19 saves in 23 opportunities. He is with the Cardinals as insurance for the rotation and a possible late-inning man in the bullpen if needed. But he would rather start. “I know I can pitch in a lot of roles with a lot of versatility,” he said. “But the excitement of possibly of making a rotation again. ... in my heart of hearts I believe I can do that.”

MOZELIAK: CARDINALS ACTIVE

All pitchers but lefthander Brett Cecil, who will be absent until Monday for personal reasons, were on hand for the first pitchers/ catchers workout Wednesday and Cardinals president of baseball operations John Mozeliak indicated the core of the team might well be the one that opens the season. “That’s not to say that there couldn’t be some things that we do between now and the time when we get to opening day, but we’re very confident in the group we’ve brought in here,” he said.“We feel like we’ve addressed our needs. When I look back on

our off-season, I feel we were pretty active. From engaging in some trade talks from Day One to where we ended up, it felt like a normal and busy off-season to me. “For some reason, it doesn’t feel like we’ve done much, but from an internal standpoint, we feel like we have.” The Cardinals added relievers Luke Gregerson and Dominic Leone, outfielder Marcell Ozuna, nearly outfielder Giancarlo Stanton, starter Miles Mikolas and now Norris.

CARDINALS • FROM B1

he expected: “Do them. Do them right. Do them quick. We’re going to be out of here really soon. Short day. But a productive day.” Change was, after all, part of his deal. “You bring somebody in and you’ve got to give them some autonomy to do what they want to do,” said John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations. “You look at Maddux’s experience and what he’s been through and he definitely had some input. Change can be healthy. Smart leaders listen, and they evolve.” With the exception of Brett Cecil, who missed the first workout to take care of a personal matter, all of the Cardinals’ pitchers and catchers were in uniform for the start of the team’s camp at Roger Dean Stadium. Most of the players had to complete physicals early Wednesday, delaying the start of the first official workout. Though, that was also by design, manager Mike Matheny said. Because of sleep studies conducted by the team’s performance department, the Cardinals have elected to push report time back an hour. That’s new for early-bird Matheny and the dawn brigade, but it’s being enforced with them, too. The training staff is coming in later. The weight room might be closed. The later start time dovetails with what Maddux believes will be a quicker schedule for pitchers and create a “game speed” urgency to the workouts. Matheny saved his annual spring speech to the clubhouse until next week’s full-squad workout, but already one of his tent-pole messages is clear. “We’re going to be intentional about everything we do,” the manager said. “Everything we learned (last spring) we’d be crazy not to put that into application. Part of that is defining what does a good spring training look like? What are our goals? Be very intentional about everything that we do. We

HOCHMAN • FROM B1

around this club — one who had no ties to the Cardinals. Maddux said he wished he had met George Kissell. “I have always been trying to promote from within, and I feel we’ve done an OK job at it,” Mozeliak said. “I would give myself a ‘B’ if I had to. It hasn’t been perfect. Sometimes you don’t have the internal answers. Sometimes it’s sort of like building a roster. If you don’t have a shortstop, sometimes you’ve got to go get one. We needed someone with experience and had been through a lot of different scenarios. Maddux could check those boxes.” Cardinal directions will still direct camp, though new points will be steered by data. The Cardinals learned last year that players who were open to monitoring got about seven hours of quality sleep,on average,Matheny said. He added that’s not enough. Like several teams did last year, the Cardinals are adopting more sleep, later start times, less breakfast at the batting cage. Workouts and weightlifting will be modified, based on studies. A selection of players will have their swings limited, and with only a short window before games the Cardinals intend to be careful with outfielders’ arms, especially in early games.Much of this stems from the studies done by the performance department, and its suggestions. Individualized springs could be the future. “I hope that is exactly where we go,” Mozeliak said. “Where you’re from a high level and putting a team together, but from a 10,000-foot view you’re trying to make sure that you’re catering to every individual’s needs. That’s more of a longer-term plan, but we’re getting there. Why you build that type of research group is to make changes.” As pitchers ready for the arrival of position players, officially, next week, and the club pushes toward personalized programs, Mozeliak identified one reason behind a different feel to Wednesday’s start. There’s a new personality to the staff. “You only get to do this once: first day with a new organization,” Maddux said. “Hell, yeah, that’s very exciting. Try not to screw it up.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

Cards manager Mike Matheny edged Mozeliak by one shot in a golf matchup Tuesday, with the final shot coming in spectacular fashion. “Very disappointing,” Mozeliak said, smiling. “I couldn’t be happier for the individual, but I’m still crushed.” Matheny’s second shot on the ninth hole at the championship course at PGA National found the grandstand. Mozeliak, trailing by a shot, was on the green in two. “I thought, at the very least, we’re going to push,” Mozeliak said, meaning tie. “And, with him being up there (in the grandstand), it could be a disaster” for Matheny. Eschewing a drop, Matheny chipped from the stands — and the ball hopped into the cup for a birdie. Match over. “It was so impressive,” Mozeliak said. Asked if this might be a harbinger, Mozeliak joked, “For him, it’s good fortune. For ‘Mo,’ it’s not so good.” New coach Willie McGee also posted an eagle in this off-day outing, chipping in for a 3 on a par-5. • The Cardinals will be one of a dozen or more teams watching a showcase in the Seattle area Thursday for former Cy Young winner Tim Lincecum. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

have taken a lot of pride in not wasting anybody’s time out there. We have to have that give back, and the give back is the focus and the intensity.” Announcements and schedules are posted on corkboards in the clubhouse. Hanging there Wednesday was a white paper, listing all 30 teams, ranked by total Gold Glove Awards won. The Cardinals lead, with 86. Opposite that list was the day’s schedule, and new to it was a breakdown of what each group of pitchers will be doing from Wednesday through the start of the exhibition games. That’s new. Since Mozeliak’s first year with the organization, more than 20 years ago, the schedule for pitchers had been crafted by Dave Duncan or later influenced by what Derek Lilliquist learned from Duncan and then tweaked with Matheny. Maddux has similar benchmarks — he, too, wants every starter to be able to throw 100 pitches in a game by the end of spring training — but also some twists. He said he wants them doing more baseball actions, such as fielding, while focusing on building arm strength. “Try to maximize their attention span,” he said. “We do it short. But we do it hard. And we don’t go out there and try to see how long we can do it. We see how well we can do it in a short time. That way you get a good effort and you do it as much to game speed as we can.” Relievers will be expected to throw backto-back games before leaving Florida and appear in three out of four games toward the end of camp. He’ll have daily meetings with pitchers. That’s new. “I’ve heard that,” starter Adam Wainwright said. “I loved my time with ‘Dunc’ and ‘Lilly’ and I will still do a lot of the things they gave to me. It is kind of exciting to have an outside opinion.” That became a goal of Mozeliak and the front office this winter after midseason rearrangement of Matheny’s staff and offseason churn. Maddux’s sudden availability this winter and interest in the Cardinals led to his fourth stop in a 16-year career. Mozeliak called it a “refresh” of the coaching staff. The fresh comes from a rare bird

How can Birds keep Molina and Kelly both in the mix? crouched behind the plates. But it’s a big day for the catchers, too. And after a hard day’s work, there was the great Yadier, as well as the Yadi heir. They have a positive relationship, and it was visible this day, the two backstops talking shop, Molina soaking up some sun, Kelly soaking up some Yadi. But it looms. Even in amicability, the reality is the Cardinals arguably have the best catcher in the league and the best catching prospect in the league. Someone always will not be playing. “Last year, in terms of (Kelly’s) development, he didn’t get as much playing time as maybe we would’ve hoped,” admitted Cards president of baseball operations John Mozeliak. “But he’s been very diligent this offseason. He’s shown up ready to go. He understands that this role is not an everyday role, but trying to find a way to keep him fresh, I think, is important. “… The coaching staff will weigh in, but obviously the manager makes the lineup. That’s his decision. Now, probably the caveat to that is someone like Yadi, who’s had his career, does have some say in how he’s feeling, when he can go. And he’s a player that wants to go every day.” The Cards have spent ample time analyzing sleep cycles and the importance of body rest. You’ll read about that elsewhere in this publication. But will there be similar application of this approach to the catching position? And how will the parties involved handle it? On a sunny day in February, one can’t help but think of a chilly day in September, with important baseball to be played and a lineup decision to be made. We talk a lot about the education of manager Mike Matheny. How he continuously grows as a baseball thinker. And how this season, in particular, he’ll lean on his beefed-up coaching staff, in so many facets. The return of beloved Jose Oquendo could be Matheny’s secret weapon, if utilized right. Mozeliak wouldn’t share his desired balance of playing time for his catchers, “because I don’t want to be beholden to that, until we have a better feel on how that may play out.” Is there a number good for Carson’s development? “I’m going to defer back to what I’ve always said about young players — young players should play,” “Mo” said. “There’s certainly a benefit of getting major-league experience, even if you’re sitting on the bench, getting exposure to that. But that’s a fine line between that and actually not playing. I think when you’re looking at someone in their early to mid 20s, I think playing is important.” Perhaps it’s matching Kelly with, say, Luke Weaver during many of the spins of the rotation? Last season, Kelly started 14 games. He hit .174 with the big club with a .240 on-base percentage. In Memphis, Kelly hit .283 with a .375 OBP. He’s yet to homer in a major-league game. His swing Wednesday showed he very well might this season. “You have to have that drive,” Kelly said. “And this game is all about adjustments. It’s staying sharp, being ready when you’re called upon, and I feel like this offseason I’ve really, really honed into that.” Will perhaps the best catching prospect in baseball seldom play for the next three years? Molina turns 36 the day before Kelly turns 24 in July. And Molina announced last month that he will play out the next three years of his contract, with the hopes of three parades. If the manager and coaches do this right, they could have a catching situation that would be the envy of baseball. If bungled, it could have ramifications. So for now, we have a baseball situation similar to the Green Bay Packers — when one of the best quarterbacks in the game, Hall of Fame worthy Brett Favre, had the best quarterback prospect as his backup. “I suppose you could say that from a talent standpoint,” Mozeliak said when offered up the comp, “but it’s also a little premature and take someone and say that Carson Kelly is going to be Aaron Rodgers. There are some differences there. The one thing you hope to have is Yadi mentoring and helping Carson’s learning curve of what to expect at this level. ... I would say that he doesn’t have much to prove or anything to prove at Triple-A.”

A CHIP TO REMEMBER

Cards pitching coach Mike Maddux (center) talks with hurler Daniel Poncedeleon (right) as manager Mike Matheny observes on Wednesday.

Maddux wants to pick up the pace in camp for hurlers

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B5


PY EONGCH A NG 2018

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THURSDAY • 02.15.2018

HIGHLIGHTS SWEDISH DEFENSEMAN DAHLIN IS HOCKEY’S NEXT BIG THING The Olympic men’s hockey tournament lacks the luster (and ratings) that NHL talent delivers, but it’s not without star power. Rasmus Dahlin, a 17-year-old D-man from Sweden, is the youngest hockey player at the Games and considered a lock to be the first player taken in the draft this June. Catch some of his sweet moves on YouTube and you’ll understand why teams low in the NHL standings may be “Fallin’ for Dahlin.”

Rasmus Dahlin

WORLD’S BEST SNOWBOARD CROSSER SEEKS FIRST GOLD

POWER OR ARTISTRY? USA’S CHEN HAS IGNITED A DEBATE

No one has a better chance at redemption at the Games than USA’s Lindsey Jacobellis, the most dominant athlete in the history of snowboard cross. Ten X-Games golds, five world championships, but no Olympic gold. At Turin in 2006, she had gold secured but added a little razzle-dazzle, slipped and fell, and finished second. She was favored but did not medal in the last two Games. She competes Thursday at 7 p.m. (KSDK, Ch. 5).

No one has ever performed jumps with the power and proclivity of Nathan Chen, the 18-year-old from Salt Lake City who has changed men’s figure skating. He has the record for landing seven quadruple jumps in one program, and he’s the only skater with five types of quads. Purists don’t like that artistry is being compromised for power, but rumor is that Chen will go for six quads in Thursday’s short program (KSDK, Ch. 5).

NOTEBOOK

Team USA blows hockey lead Americans can’t hold 2-0 lead, lose in OT to Slovenia WIRE SERVICES

The U.S. men’s hockey team did just about everything right for the first 40 minutes of its Olympic opener Wednesday night. Then the third period started and everything fell apart. Slovenia made a hard push, the Americans played on their heels and a promising night ended in disappointment. Slovenia’s Jan Mursak tied the game with 97 seconds left in regulation and his goalie pulled, then scored the game-winner 38 seconds into overtime to hand Team USA a stunning 3-2 loss in the preliminary round at Kwandong Hockey Center. “If you don’t play for 60 minutes, you put yourself in a position where you might not win,” U.S. coach Tony Granato said. If nothing else, Team USA learned a valuable lesson. They can’t assume two strong periods will be enough. Minnesota Wild prospect Jordan Greenway, the first African-American to play for Team USA in the Olympics, centered the top line, with Ryan Stoa and captain and longtime NHL player Brian Gionta, 38, on his wings. Greenway finished with four shots and a goal. Team USA held the edge in shots 36-25, but Slovenia capitalized on one more scoring chance. The Americans return to the ice Thursday against Slovakia (9 p.m., CNBC), which stunned Russia 3-2 in the other Group B opener. (AP)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jan Mursak of Slovenia shoots the puck past U.S. goaltender Ryan Zapolski for the winner in overtime.

White apologizes for comment • Hours after winning the men’s halfpipe at these 2018 Winter Olympics, Shaun White faced questions about a sexual harassment suit filed by Lena Zawaideh, a former drummer in his band. The claim, which dates to 2016, has returned to the news this week. “Honestly, I’m here to talk about the Olympics, not gossip,” White told reporters. “I am who I am, and I’m proud of who I am,” he continued. “And my friends, you know, love me and vouch for me, and I think that stands on its own.” When a reporter tried to follow up, U.S. Ski & Snowboard official Nick Alexakos interrupted, saying: “I think we’re here to talk about the gold medal. … If you don’t have another question, why don’t you go ahead and pass the mike.” Later in the day, during an appearance on NBC’s “Today” show, White apologized for using “gossip” in reference to the

lawsuit, saying it was “a poor choice of words to describe such a sensitive subject” and that he is “truly sorry.” In an email to the media, Zawaideh’s attorney took exception, stating: “Mr. White’s comments, on the world stage, directly impugn the character of Ms. Zawaideh. No woman wants to be called a ‘gossip’ or a liar by the harasser.” According to the lawsuit, White repeatedly sexually harassed Zawaideh, forced her to watch pornography and told her how to dress and get her hair cut. The suit also alleged that on separate occasions, White grabbed Zawaideh’s backside, tried to kiss her and shoved a bottle of vodka into her mouth and forced her to drink from it. The parties settled for an undisclosed amount in May. (Los Angeles Times) Ratings are down six percent • Television’s age of lowered rat-

ings expectations has come to the Winter Olympics. Through the first five nights of NBC’s coverage in Pyeongchang, prime-time coverage is being watched by an average of 23.8 million viewers, according to Nielsen, down 6 percent from the same point from 2014 Sochi. The total includes cable and digital audiences that were not counted in the network’s average in 2014, meaning the drop in viewership might have been steeper if those numbers were taken out. The additional platforms add around 2 million viewers to the 2018 total. Still, NBC executives weren’t in a panic. Mark Lazarus, chairman of NBC Broadcasting and Sports, said Tuesday that the prime-time audience is ahead of what it promised to advertisers. Mindful of how the proliferation of television viewing options has diminished TV ratings across the board, the network guaranteed an audience for Pyeongchang that is smaller than what it promised in 2014. (AP) Dutch woman breaks Olympic record • Jorien ter Mors won gold in the 1,000 meters and kept the Netherlands perfect in speedskating with five wins in five races. Her time of 1 minute, 13.56 seconds beat the high-altitude Olympic mark that Chris Witty set to win at the 2002 Salt Lake City Games by 0.27 seconds. Nao Kodaira and Miho Takagi, expecting to finish 1-2 for Japan, had to settle for 2-3 behind ter Mors after both slumped over the last half lap. It has been all orange on the oval so far, and the Netherlands is favored to add a sixth gold on Thursday when Sven Kramer skates in the 10,000. (AP)

WEDNESDAY’S MEDALISTS

Eric Frenzel

ASSOCIATED PRESS LUGE Men’s Doubles GOLD: Germany (Tobias Arlt, Tobias Wendl) SILVER: Austria (Georg Fischler, Peter Penz) BRONZE: Germany (Toni Eggert, Sascha Benecken) NORDIC COMBINED Individual (Normal Hill) GOLD: Eric Frenzel, Germany SILVER: Akito Watabe, Japan BRONZE: Lukas Klapfer, Austria SNOWBOARD Men’s Halfpipe GOLD: Shaun White, United States SILVER: Ayumu Hirano, Japan BRONZE: Scott James, Australia SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1000 GOLD: Jorien Ter Mors, Netherlands SILVER: Nao Kodaira, Japan BRONZE: Miho Takagi, Japan

MEDALS TABLE Nation Norway Germany Netherlands Canada United States Japan France OA Russia Austria Sweden Italy South Korea Australia Czech Republic Switzerland Finland China Slovakia Kazakhstan

G 4 7 5 3 4 0 2 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

S 6 2 4 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0

B 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 1

Tot 13 12 11 10 7 7 5 5 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1

TV SCHEDULE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mikaela Shiffrin attacks the gate during the first run of the women’s giant slalom on Thursday.

Shiffrin has a great first run OLYMPICS • FROM B1

going to race?!’” Shiffrin said, laughing. “It’s really nice. And it’s fair today, which is really, really important, especially at the Olympics. The conditions are great. The weather is beautiful. And it’s a pleasure to be racing today.” The top 30 finishers from the first run go in reverse order for the final run, with their times combined to determine the winner. Shiffrin will be second to last. Moelgg was the first racer on the course and finished in a blistering time of 1 minute, 10.62 seconds. Her best finish at the Olympics was 11th in the slalom at the 2010 Vancouver Games. The 34-year-old Moelgg has never won a World Cup race. Moelgg’s teammate, Federica

Brignone, was in third position and remains within striking distance, just 0.29 seconds back. One of the favorites, Tessa Worley of France, struggled and is 1.44 seconds behind. Swiss skier Lara Gut fell on the hill and slid into a row of photographers off to the side. She appeared unhurt and got back up. On her first pass through the course, Shiffrin described the snow as “chattery” in the middle section, meaning she — along with everyone else — was in for a bumpy ride. “I still think everyone had some first-run jitters. So what you saw there from anybody, it wasn’t really a good depiction of what we can all do,” Shiffrin said. “So second run is going to be like a new race. I think it’ll be really, really interesting.”

Shiffrin finished fifth in the GS at the 2014 Sochi Games. She’s the defending Olympic slalom champion. Coming into these Winter Games, there was talk about Shiffrin possibly chasing after not one or two but five medals. Given the compacted schedule due to all the delays, the plan could be altered. The flip-flopping has been particularly burdensome. “It’s been a difficult few days, but it’s all about remaining positive and remaining energized and excited to get the Games going,” said Mike Day, Shiffrin’s coach. “At this point, the difficult days are just motivation for actually getting to compete. We’re battling a little bit of fatigue from going up and down the gondola every day, and the excitement of getting ready to race and the disappointment of not getting to race. But we’re in

good shape.” Men’s downhill • Aksel Lund Svindal won the men’s downhill in Pyeongchang, making the 35-year-old Norwegian the oldest-ever Olympic gold medalist in Alpine skiing. Svindal was 0.12 seconds faster than Norwegian teammate Kjetil Jansrud down the 1 4/5-mile (2.9-kilometer) course at Jeongseon. Beat Feuz of Switzerland took bronze, 0.18 behind Svindal’s time of 1 minute, 40.25 seconds. Lower-ranked skiers were yet to start in the 57-racer lineup, though none is regarded as a threat to the medal-winning times. The men’s downhill was one of three Alpine races that were supposed to be held earlier in the week, but were postponed because of gusty winds.

THURSDAY 4 a.m. • Cross country: women’s 10K final (NBCSN) 4 a.m. • Men’s curling: Canada vs. Norway (USA) 6:10 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Switzerland vs. Canada (live, NBCSN) 6:10 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Czech Republic vs. South Korea (live, USA) 8:30 a.m. • Luge: Team relay final; Speedskating: men’s 1,0000 final (NBCSN) 11 a.m. • Biathlon: men’s 20K final (NBCSN) 1 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Italy (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Cross country: women’s 10K final; Speedskating: men’s 1,0000 finals (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. Switzerland (CNBC) 4 p.m. • Hockey game of the day (NBCSN) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: Men’s short program (live, NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Figure skating: men’s short program (live); Skiing: men’s super G (live); Snowboard cross: women’s final (live); Skeleton: men’s final; Freestyle skiing: women’s aerials (KSDK, Ch. 5) 9 p.m. • Men’s hockey: USA vs. Slovakia (live, CNBC) 10 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Sweden; Cross country: men’s 15K final (live, NBCSN) EARLY FRIDAY 12:05 a.m. • Luge: team relay final; Biathlon: men’s 20K final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Russia vs. Slovenia (live, NBCSN)


PY EONGCH A NG 2018

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • THURSDAY • 02.15.2018

HIGHLIGHTS SWEDISH DEFENSEMAN DAHLIN IS HOCKEY’S NEXT BIG THING The Olympic men’s hockey tournament lacks the luster (and ratings) that NHL talent delivers, but it’s not without star power. Rasmus Dahlin, a 17-year-old D-man from Sweden, is the youngest hockey player at the Games and considered a lock to be the first player taken in the draft this June. Catch some of his sweet moves on YouTube and you’ll understand why teams low in the NHL standings may be “Fallin’ for Dahlin.”

Rasmus Dahlin

WORLD’S BEST SNOWBOARD CROSSER SEEKS FIRST GOLD

POWER OR ARTISTRY? USA’S CHEN HAS IGNITED A DEBATE

No one has a better chance at redemption at the Games than USA’s Lindsey Jacobellis, the most dominant athlete in the history of snowboard cross. Ten X-Games golds, five world championships, but no Olympic gold. At Turin in 2006, she had gold secured but added a little razzle-dazzle, slipped and fell, and finished second. She was favored but did not medal in the last two Games. She competes Thursday at 7 p.m. (KSDK, Ch. 5).

No one has ever performed jumps with the power and proclivity of Nathan Chen, the 18-year-old from Salt Lake City who has changed men’s figure skating. He has the record for landing seven quadruple jumps in one program, and he’s the only skater with five types of quads. Purists don’t like that artistry is being compromised for power, but rumor is that Chen will go for six quads in Thursday’s short program (KSDK, Ch. 5).

NOTEBOOK

U.S. women lose to Canada Men’s hockey team falls in OT after blowing 2-0 lead WIRE SERVICES

Meghan Agosta and Sara Nurse each scored in the second period and defending Olympic champion Canada clinched the top spot in pool play by edging the United States 2-1 on Thursday in an early showdown between the dominant powers in women’s hockey. Genevieve Lacasse made 44 saves, including stopping Hilary Knight at the post inside the final 90 seconds. Brianne Decker hit two posts, the second time coming in the final seconds, before the two rivals ended up in a scrum. Officials reviewed the final play and ruled no goal. The Canadians also had two goals disallowed. Kendall Coyne scored the lone goal for the Americans. Canada and the United States are the only countries to ever win gold at the Olympics. The Americans won gold in 1998 when women’s hockey joined the Olympics, while Canada is here looking for a fifth straight gold medal for the country that created the sport. The U.S. men’s team did just about everything right for the first 40 minutes of its Olympic opener. Then the third period started and everything fell apart. Slovenia made a hard push, the Americans played on their heels and a promising night ended in disappointment. Slovenia’s Jan Mursak tied the game with 97 seconds left in regulation and his goalie pulled, then scored the game-winner 38 seconds into overtime to hand

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson (17) of the United States and MariePhilip Poulin of Canada compete for the puck Thursday.

Team USA a stunning 3-2 loss in the preliminary round at Kwandong Hockey Center. “If you don’t play for 60 minutes, you put yourself in a position where you might not win,” U.S. coach Tony Granato said. The Americans return to the ice Thursday against Slovakia (9 p.m., CNBC), which stunned Russia 3-2 in the other Group B opener. (AP) German pair wins gold • Aliona Savchenko and Bruno Massot of Germany won Olympic pairs figure skating gold with a flawless, record-setting free skate. Savchenko and Massot scored 159.31 points in their program set to music by Armand Amar on the final day of pairs skating. That gave them 235.90 points, catapulting them from fourth place after a shaky short program. It’s Germany’s first pairs gold since 1952. China’s Sui Wenjing and Han Cong, who led after the short program, recovered from a slow

start to their free skate to finish second. Canada’s Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford took the bronze. White apologizes for comment • Hours after winning the men’s halfpipe at these 2018 Winter Olympics, Shaun White faced questions about a sexual harassment suit filed by Lena Zawaideh, a former drummer in his band. The claim, which dates to 2016, has returned to the news this week. “Honestly, I’m here to talk about the Olympics, not gossip,” White told reporters. “I am who I am, and I’m proud of who I am,” he continued. “And my friends, you know, love me and vouch for me, and I think that stands on its own.” When a reporter tried to follow up, U.S. Ski & Snowboard official Nick Alexakos interrupted, saying: “I think we’re here to talk about the gold medal. … If you don’t have another question, why don’t you

go ahead and pass the mike.” Later in the day, during an appearance on NBC’s “Today” show, White apologized for using “gossip” in reference to the lawsuit, saying it was “a poor choice of words to describe such a sensitive subject” and that he is “truly sorry.” In an email to the media, Zawaideh’s attorney took exception, stating: “Mr. White’s comments, on the world stage, directly impugn the character of Ms. Zawaideh. No woman wants to be called a ‘gossip’ or a liar by the harasser.” According to the lawsuit, White repeatedly sexually harassed Zawaideh, forced her to watch pornography and told her how to dress and get her hair cut. The suit also alleged that on separate occasions, White grabbed Zawaideh’s backside, tried to kiss her and shoved a bottle of vodka into her mouth and forced her to drink from it. The parties settled for an undisclosed amount in May. (Los Angeles Times) Ratings are down six percent • Television’s age of lowered ratings expectations has come to the Winter Olympics. Through the first five nights of NBC’s coverage in Pyeongchang, prime-time coverage is being watched by an average of 23.8 million viewers, according to Nielsen, down 6 percent from the same point from 2014 Sochi. The total includes cable and digital audiences that were not counted in the network’s average in 2014, meaning the drop in viewership might have been steeper if those numbers were taken out. The additional platforms add around 2 million viewers to the 2018 total. (AP)

WEDNESDAY’S MEDALISTS

Eric Frenzel

ASSOCIATED PRESS LUGE Men’s Doubles GOLD: Germany (Tobias Arlt, Tobias Wendl) SILVER: Austria (Georg Fischler, Peter Penz) BRONZE: Germany (Toni Eggert, Sascha Benecken) NORDIC COMBINED Individual (Normal Hill) GOLD: Eric Frenzel, Germany SILVER: Akito Watabe, Japan BRONZE: Lukas Klapfer, Austria SNOWBOARD Men’s Halfpipe GOLD: Shaun White, United States SILVER: Ayumu Hirano, Japan BRONZE: Scott James, Australia SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1000 GOLD: Jorien Ter Mors, Netherlands SILVER: Nao Kodaira, Japan BRONZE: Miho Takagi, Japan

MEDALS TABLE Nation Norway Germany Netherlands Canada United States Japan France OA Russia Austria Italy Sweden Australia South Korea Czech Republic Switzerland China Finland Slovakia Kazakhstan Spain

G 4 8 5 3 5 0 3 0 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

S 7 2 4 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0

B 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 4 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 1

Tot 14 13 11 11 8 7 6 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1

TV SCHEDULE

Mikaela Shiffrin attacks the gate during the first run of the women’s giant slalom on Thursday.

Shiffrin surges to gold medal OLYMPICS • FROM B1

postponed because of weather and strong wind. The women’s giant slalom was initially scheduled for Monday but moved to Thursday. The slalom was supposed to be Wednesday, but got pushed to Friday. Coming into the Pyeongchang Olympics, there was talk about Shiffrin possibly chasing after five medals. She’s certainly off to a great start, placing her hand over her heart right after seeing her time. She later fell to the snow in excitement. The only thing that might slow down Shiffrin is exhaustion, due to the compacted schedule because of all the delays. The flip-flopping of events has been particularly burdensome.

“It’s been a difficult few days, but it’s all about remaining positive and remaining energized and excited to get the games going,” said Mike Day, Shiffrin’s coach. “At this point, the difficult days are just motivation for actually getting to compete. We’re battling a little bit of fatigue from going up and down the gondola every day, and the excitement of getting ready to race and the disappointment of not getting to race. But we’re in good shape.” Men’s downhill • Aksel Lund Svindal became the oldest Olympic gold medalist in Alpine skiing by winning the men’s downhill. The 35-year-old Norwegian was 0.12 seconds faster than teammate Kjetil Jansrud down

the 1 4/5-mile (2.9-kilometer) course. Beat Feuz of Switzerland took bronze, 0.18 behind Svindal’s winning time of 1 minute, 40.25 seconds. In what he said was most likely his last Winter Games, Svindal finally got the only downhill honor missing from his resume. “That’s probably my last Olympics, so it’s a good thing I could be fast,” said Svindal, who had season-ending surgery the past two years. “It’s basically the first year I have skied in February in four years.” The race started in near-perfect calm and cold conditions four days after it was postponed because of fierce winds that made racing unsafe. It was 34 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) under sunshine and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. In a race that often has a sur-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

prise winner, the new Olympic champion has been the most consistent downhill racer over the past decade despite a series of severe injuries. In fact, the three medalists were the most touted pre-race favorites. Jansrud took downhill bronze four years ago and Feuz is the current world champion. Svindal got silver in downhill at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, where he won a medal of each color, and was fourth at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. He also won world championship gold medals in downhill in 2007 and 2013. Now, after turning 35 in December, he is three months older than Mario Matt was in 2014 when the Austrian won the Olympic slalom. The oldest Olympic medalist in Alpine racing is Bode Miller, who was 36 when he took bronze in super-G at the Sochi Games.

THURSDAY 4 a.m. • Cross country: women’s 10K final (NBCSN) 4 a.m. • Men’s curling: Canada vs. Norway (USA) 6:10 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Switzerland vs. Canada (live, NBCSN) 6:10 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Czech Republic vs. South Korea (live, USA) 8:30 a.m. • Luge: Team relay final; Speedskating: men’s 10,000 final (NBCSN) 11 a.m. • Biathlon: men’s 20K final (NBCSN) 1 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Italy (NBCSN) 2 p.m. • Cross country: women’s 10K final; Speedskating: men’s 10,000 finals (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4 p.m. • Women’s curling: USA vs. Switzerland (CNBC) 4 p.m. • Hockey game of the day (NBCSN) 6 p.m. • Figure skating: Men’s short program (live, NBCSN) 7 p.m. • Figure skating: men’s short program (live); Skiing: men’s super G (live); Snowboard cross: women’s final (live); Skeleton: men’s final; Freestyle skiing: women’s aerials (KSDK, Ch. 5) 9 p.m. • Men’s hockey: USA vs. Slovakia (live, CNBC) 10 p.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. Sweden; Cross country: men’s 15K final (live, NBCSN) EARLY FRIDAY 12:05 a.m. • Luge: team relay final; Biathlon: men’s 20K final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 1:40 a.m. • Men’s hockey: Russia vs. Slovenia (live, NBCSN)


NHL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Tampa Bay 57 38 16 3 Boston 55 35 12 8 Toronto 59 35 19 5 Detroit 55 23 23 9 Florida 53 24 23 6 Montreal 55 22 26 7 Ottawa 55 19 27 9 Buffalo 57 17 30 10 Metropolitan GP W L OT Washington 56 32 17 7 Pittsburgh 58 32 22 4 Philadelphia 57 28 19 10 New Jersey 56 28 20 8 Carolina 57 27 21 9 Columbus 57 29 24 4 NY Islanders 58 27 25 6 NY Rangers 57 27 25 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Nashville 55 34 Winnipeg 57 33 Blues 59 34 Dallas 57 33 Minnesota 56 31 Colorado 55 30 Chicago 57 24 Pacific GP W Vegas 56 37 San Jose 57 30 Calgary 57 29 Los Angeles 56 30 Anaheim 58 27 Edmonton 55 23 Vancouver 56 22 Arizona 57 15

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

L OT 12 9 15 9 21 4 20 4 19 6 21 4 25 8 L OT 15 4 19 8 20 8 21 5 20 11 28 4 28 6 32 10

Pts 79 78 75 55 54 51 47 44 Pts 71 68 66 64 63 62 60 59

Pts 77 75 72 70 68 64 56 Pts 78 68 66 65 65 50 50 40

GF 204 185 198 149 154 144 147 137 GF 176 182 169 168 158 154 194 166

GF 173 183 170 175 168 174 160 GF 192 166 161 162 161 157 147 137

GA 154 133 165 166 172 172 194 188 GA 165 174 167 174 169 162 214 175

GA 143 154 151 151 158 163 166 GA 154 158 164 140 166 184 180 195

Home 19-5-1 19-7-4 19-8-2 12-11-7 13-9-3 14-10-6 12-11-5 8-16-4 Home 20-8-2 21-7-1 14-9-6 15-10-3 15-9-5 17-10-1 15-10-4 18-10-3 Home 19-5-3 21-5-2 19-12-0 20-9-1 20-4-5 19-7-1 12-12-3 Home 20-4-2 15-9-3 13-13-3 14-9-3 15-9-4 12-14-2 10-14-3 7-16-4

Away 19-11-2 16-5-4 16-11-3 11-12-2 11-14-3 8-16-1 7-16-4 9-14-6 Away 12-9-5 11-15-3 14-10-4 13-10-5 12-12-4 12-14-3 12-15-2 9-15-2

Div 9-5-1 12-2-2 8-5-1 6-11-2 8-4-1 10-6-2 5-10-3 5-6-2 Div 11-5-3 11-5-0 6-4-5 8-7-1 6-5-4 10-8-2 8-8-1 7-6-3

Away 15-7-6 12-10-7 15-9-4 13-11-3 11-15-1 11-14-3 12-13-5 Away 17-11-2 15-10-5 16-7-5 16-12-2 12-11-7 11-14-2 12-14-3 8-16-6

Div 11-4-2 8-6-2 9-5-2 9-10-0 10-9-0 7-8-1 6-9-2 Div 13-1-1 14-4-3 8-6-3 8-9-3 9-5-6 10-5-0 5-9-1 2-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Wednesday Toronto 6, Columbus 3 Montreal at Colorado, late Florida at Vancouver, late Tuesday Carolina 7, Los Angeles 3 Columbus 4, NY Islanders 1 Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 3 Buffalo 5, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 5, Calgary 2 New Jersey 5, Philadelphia 4, SO Detroit 2, Anaheim 1 Nashville 4, Blues 3, OT Winnipeg 4, Washington 3, OT Minnesota 3, NY Rangers 2 Vegas 5, Chicago 2 Arizona 2, San Jose 1 Thursday Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Arizona, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Philadelphia at Columbus, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Blues at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Los Angeles at Buffalo, noon Anaheim at Minnesota, 1 p.m. NY Rangers at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Edmonton at Arizona, 3 p.m. New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Montreal at Vegas, 6 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Detroit at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 9 p.m.

Leafs roll past Blue Jackets

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Maple Leafs goaltender Frederik Andersen makes a save on the Blue Jackets’ Nick Foligno (center) during the third period Wednesday night.

Andersen has 54 saves, Kadri picks up hat trick ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nazem Kadri had three goals and two assists, Frederik Andersen made a careerhigh 54 saves and the surging Toronto Maple Leafs beat the visiting Columbus Blue Jackets 6-3 on Wednesday night. Patrick Marleau added a goal and two assists and Mitch Marner had a goal and an assist as Toronto closed out a perfect five-game hometand. It was Kadri’s fourth career hat trick, and the five points set a career high. The Blue Jackets recorded 50 or more shots for the third straight game, making them the first team to accomplish the feat in the post-expansion era (since 196768). Nick Foligno had a goal and two assists, and Joonas Korpisalo made 22 saves. Toronto played much of the game without defenseman Jake Gardiner, who departed with a lower-body injury after one period. It was unclear when the injury occurred, but he took a hard slash to the legs from Matt Calvert. The Maple Leafs had a 4-2 lead before Jack Johnson beat Andersen with a slap shot from the left circle that went off the post and into the net at 14:35 of the second. It was Johnson’s third goal of the season. Toronto then put it away with two in the third. Kadri got his 21st of the season at 11:21, and Marleau added an emptynetter with 1:47 left.

NOTEBOOK

Canucks GM gets extension • The Vancouver Canucks signed GM Jim Benning to a multiyear contract extension Wednesday. Benning has served four years in the role since joining the Canucks in May 2014. “I’m grateful to the Aquilini family and to Trevor Linden for the commitment they’ve made to me and for their con-

fidence in our long-term vision for the Vancouver Canucks,” Benning said in a statement. “I’m excited about the direction of our team and the depth and talent we continue to build. “I believe we are on the right track and I am pleased to continue the work we started four years ago when we set out to build a championship team.” Prior to joining the Canucks, Benning spent seven seasons as the Boston Bruins assistant GM, being part of a Stanley Cup champion in 2011. He also served as the Buffalo Sabres director of amateur scouting for 12 years. Benning played 12 NHL seasons as a defenseman with the Toronto Maple Leafs and Vancouver. New Hurricanes owner embraces past • The new owner of the Carolina Hurricanes has a soft spot for his team’s old identity — the Hartford Whalers. In the month since Tom Dundon assumed control of the Hurricanes, they’ve brought back the old “Brass Bonanza” fight song, stocked the shelves in the team store with that beloved whale-tail logo and have discussed bringing back the Whalers, too — if only for a future turnback-the-clock night. Under his leadership, the Hurricanes have done a 180-degree turn in the way they view, market and appreciate their past. “It’s ours, right? I mean, it’s who we were. It’s part of the history,” Dundon said. In the month since Dundon bought a majority share of the team from longtime owner Peter Karmanos Jr., the 46-yearold Dallas businessman has made several changes — most visibly, the embracing of who the Hurricanes were before they became the Hurricanes. That’s a drastic shift from their approach under Karmanos. He purchased the Whalers in 1994 and moved the franchise to North Carolina three years later, never looking back.

NHL SUMMARIES Maple Leafs 6, Blue Jackets 3 Columbus 1 2 0 — 3 Toronto 2 2 2 — 6 First period: 1, Toronto, Moore 5 (Dermott, Polak), 4:38. 2, Toronto, Kadri 19, 7:36. 3, Columbus, Foligno 12 (Kukan, Wennberg), 18:21. Penalties: Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 5:31; Foligno, CBJ, (hooking), 10:40. Second period: 4, Columbus, Foligno 13 (Wennberg, Bjorkstrand), 2:25. 5, Toronto, Kadri 20 (Rielly, Dermott), 8:03. 6, Toronto, Marner 13 (Marleau, Kadri), 10:17. 7, Columbus, Johnson 3 (Foligno, Nutivaara), 14:35. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (slashing), 4:37. Third period: 8, Toronto, Kadri 21 (Marner, Marleau), 11:21. 9, Toronto, Marleau 19 (Kadri, Komarov), 18:13. Penalties: Kadri, TOR, (holding), 8:55; Foligno, CBJ, (elbowing), 13:57. Shots: Columbus 19-22-16: 57. Toronto 12-7-9: 28. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, Korpisalo 5-6-0 (27 shots22 saves). Toronto, Andersen 29-15-4 (57-54). A: 18,890. Referees: Francis Charron, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Steve Barton.

TUESDAY LATE GAMES

Coyotes 2, Sharks 1 Arizona 1 1 0 — 2 San Jose 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Arizona, Connauton 5 (Richardson, Cousins), 7:58. 2, San Jose, Boedker 8 (Vlasic, Braun), 9:20. Penalties: Domi, ARI, (hooking), 12:24; Donskoi, SJ, (high sticking), 18:48. Second period: 3, Arizona, Goligoski 8 (Rieder, Fischer), 9:35 (pp). Penalties: Couture, SJ, (holding), 9:12; Hjalmarsson, ARI, (tripping), 12:29; Rinaldo, ARI, (high sticking), 15:46; Richardson, ARI, (hooking), 19:32. Third period: None. Penalties: Goodrow, SJ, (roughing), 11:50; Archibald, ARI, (roughing), 11:50. Shots: Arizona 7-13-6: 26. San Jose 12-17-12: 41. Power-plays: Arizona 1 of 2; San Jose 0 of 4. Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 10-14-6 (12 shots-12 saves), Wedgewood 5-9-4 (29-28). San Jose, Jones 16-15-5 (26-24). A: 17,125. Referees: Steve Kozari, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Trent Knorr.

GoldenKnights5,Blackhawks2 Chicago 1 1 0 — 2 Vegas 1 0 4 — 5 First period: 1, Chicago, Wingels 7 (Gustafsson, DeBrincat), 2:10 (pp). 2, Vegas, Carpenter 3 (Engelland, Bellemare), 5:06. Penalties: Engelland, VGK, (high sticking), 1:00; Gustafsson, CHI, (hooking), 12:06; Keith, CHI, (tripping), 14:10; Kane, CHI, (hooking), 19:16. Second period: 3, Chicago, DeBrincat 21 (Hartman, Sharp), 6:37. Penalties: Fleury, VGK, Penalty Shot (interference —throwing object (penalty shot)), 2:59; Seabrook, CHI, (slashing), 10:35; Wingels, CHI, (tripping), 19:24. Third period: 4, Vegas, Hunt 2 (Miller, Perron), 1:14 (pp). 5, Vegas, Smith 17 (Schmidt, Karlsson), 3:07. 6, Vegas, Perron 14 (Neal), 4:54. 7, Vegas, Nosek 4, 18:44. Penalties: Sharp, CHI, (cross checking), 2:26; Perron, VGK, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:26; Lindberg, VGK, (hooking), 11:46; Murphy, CHI, (delay of game), 18:52. Shots: Chicago 10-8-13: 31. Vegas 12-13-12: 37. Power-plays: Chicago 1 of 2; Vegas 1 of 6. Goalies: Chicago, Glass 3-6-3 (36 shots-32 saves). Vegas, Fleury 17-6-2 (31-29). A: 18,085. Referees: Jake Brenk, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Brandon Gawryletz.

Steen has been on tear in Blues’ last 22 games

AUSTIN STEELE • asteele@post-dispatch.com

Surging Blues left winger Alexander Steen (right), maneuvering against Minnesota defenseman Ryan Suter on Feb. 6, says he has “more jump this year than I did last year.”

Forward’s 20 points lead team in that time frame BY JIM THOMAS st. Louis Post-dispatch

Back on Dec. 23, Alexander Steen ended a 17-game goal drought with an empty-net tally that helped clinch a 3-1 victory for the Blues in Vancouver. Starting with that game, over a 22game stretch that included Tuesday’s 4-3 overtime loss in Nashville, Steen is the Blues’ leading scorer. With a goal and an assist against the Predators, Steen has 10 goals and 10 assists over the 22 games. Vladimir Tarasenko is next with eight goals and eight assists for 16 points, followed by Paul Stastny (5-10-15), Brayden Schenn (6-8-14) and Alex Pietrangelo (2-11-13). That’s a healthy spike in production considering Steen, a left winger, had a modest three goals and 14 assists in his first 31 games this season. He has become something of a closer as well, with five of his last seven goals coming in the third period. “I’m not a stats guy,” Steen said recently. “I’ve felt really good about my game since I came back from the injury. As far as stats go, it is what it is for me. “I get frustrated when I feel like I haven’t played well and there have been (those) nights, obviously. But for the most part, I’ve liked my jump this year and energy. I would say I have more jump this year than I did last year.” Steen missed most of training camp and the first six games of the regular season because of a broken thumb, compliments of a slash by Antoine Roussel of Dallas in the Blues’ exhibition opener. Steen concedes the thumb wasn’t 100 percent healed when he returned to the lineup. “It took me a while,” he said. “It was a little sensitive, especially puck-touches when the stick is vibrating in your hand. It was a little tough for a couple of weeks.”

THOMPSON HEADS TO AHL

The San Antonio express was running again Wednesday, with the Blues assigning rookie forward Tage Thompson to the

American Hockey League franchise. Thompson had been a scratch in four of the Blues’ last five games, with coach Mike Yeo saying before the last three that Thompson was “dinged up” although not specifying the injury. Even so, Thompson had continued to practice with the team. When Thompson was a healthy scratch Feb. 6 against Minnesota, Yeo indicated that Thompson had things he needed to work on in his game. “When he’s on top of his game, he’s playing with more pace, he’s getting to the offensive zone,” Yeo said at the time. “And it seems like he hasn’t been able to get to that type of game. “His hands show up in certain areas. His skill shows up in certain areas, but a lot of times right now it’s with his feet planted. He beats a guy, but then if you’re not moving your feet then you’re gonna be forced to try and beat the guy again.” It’s the second stint this season for Thompson in San Antonio. After earning a spot on the Blues’ opening-day roster, he was sent down in mid October after appearing in four games (with no points). In 20 games since his return to the Blues on Dec. 18, Thompson had three goals and three assists, earning a spot on the second power-play unit.

BLUENOTES

According to results listed in the Blues’ media guide, Tuesday’s game in Nashville marked the first time in franchise history the team lost a game in overtime on a penalty shot. Filip Forsberg’s winner was the 40th penalty shot against the Blues in franchise history, and the 19th successful one. • Blues prospect Klim Kostin was suspended for one game by the American Hockey League for an illegal check to the head of an opponent. He sat out San Antonio’s game Wednesday against Milwaukee. • Following a day off Wednesday, the Blues return to practice Thursday at IceZone in Hazelwood. The team then leaves for Friday’s game in Dallas. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Going to Olympics ‘disruptive’ to NHL BLUES • FROM B1

He and Patrik Berglund were part of Sweden’s silver medal team in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Vladimir Tarasenko played for Russia in 2014. Alex Pietrangelo and Jay Bouwmeester were part of Canada’s gold medal team in Sochi, while Paul Stastny played for Team USA. Stastny and Bouwmeester have played in two Olympics, with Bouwmeester also on Team Canada in the 2006 Games in Turin, Italy, and Stastny also on Team USA for the 2010 Games in Vancouver, British Columbia. “It was the best experience I’ve had in my career just in terms of being part of that Olympic family,” Pietrangelo said. “I don’t think you realize it until you (go).” A seventh member of the current Blues, Vladimir Sobotka, was selected to play for the Czech Republic in 2014, but did not participate because of injury. The decision was made long ago by the NHL — last spring — not to send its players to the Olympics this year. During his recent visit to St. Louis, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman explained the reasons. “This is a huge disruption to the season,” Bettman said. “If we were shutting down for the next three weeks, all of the momentum of the season would be gone. Teams would come back in disparate shape because some NHL teams would send 10 players, some would send one or two, some teams would be on vacation, others halfway around the world. “If you look at the times the games are being played, it doesn’t make up for not having a home game for three or four weeks and not being on TV. ... We’ve done it five times (sent NHL players to the Olympics). We’ve seen the impact, and in the final analysis, it’s disruptive. “The IOC wouldn’t let us promote the fact that we’re there, we can’t use the rings, can’t use the video. ... We did it five times, we understand what it’s like, and it just didn’t make sense any more.” So as Pietrangelo said: “The decision was taken out of our hands a long time ago.” But with the 2018 Winter Olympics underway in Pyeongchang, South Korea,it has been hard for Blues Olympians not to think of past experiences. And maybe what might have been this year. “You see all the other athletes walking out in the opening ceremony together,” Pi-

etrangelo said. “It was a really cool experience, something that I never thought I’d get the opportunity to do.” As for those NHL players who wouldn’t be participating in the Olympics? “It (stinks). Guys like us don’t get their two-week break, right?” asked Canadian Brayden Schenn, laughing. But who knows? Maybe someone such as Schenn, whose career has reached new heights this season, would’ve had a chance to make his country’s Olympic team this time around. And maybe for him and others, this would have been their only chance. “Your career is only so long, so you have to miss out on this Olympics, I think guys are pretty bummed out,” Schenn said. “You know, you have to wait another four years and who knows if you get a chance again to do that. “So for a lot of guys in this locker room it would’ve been a three-week break that I’m sure guys would’ve liked. But at the same time, there’s a lot of guys that miss out on an opportunity to go represent their country.” Without most of the world’s top players in Pyeongchang, the hockey competition lacks much of the luster it had during the five Olympiads in which the NHL participated. But Steen says he’ll still keep tabs on how Sweden is doing. Schenn said he won’t necessarily wake up for any 5:30 a.m. live telecasts, but he’ll look for replays and watch highlights later in the day. Pietrangelo says he’ll watch not just hockey, but other Olympic events as well. “I think after having gone (in 2014) and talked to other athletes and seen how they prepare to get over there and how big of a deal it is for a lot of them, I gained a new appreciation for a lot of the sports that maybe I don’t watch on a regular basis,” he said. As for the coach of the Blues, he’s as much of a hockey fan as the next guy. But as might be expected, he’s been a little preoccupied lately. “To be honest with you, I haven’t really spent a lot of time thinking about (the Olympics),” Mike Yeo said recently. “We’ve got a lot that we’re kind of wrapped up in here, and we’re just trying to stay focused on that.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NHL

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 2

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Tampa Bay 57 38 16 3 79 204 154 19-5-1 19-11-2 9-5-1 Boston 55 35 12 8 78 185 133 19-7-4 16-5-4 12-2-2 Toronto 59 35 19 5 75 198 165 19-8-2 16-11-3 8-5-1 Florida 54 25 23 6 56 158 175 13-9-3 12-14-3 8-4-1 Detroit 55 23 23 9 55 149 166 12-11-7 11-12-2 6-11-2 Montreal 56 22 27 7 51 144 174 14-10-6 8-17-1 10-6-2 Ottawa 55 19 27 9 47 147 194 12-11-5 7-16-4 5-10-3 Buffalo 57 17 30 10 44 137 188 8-16-4 9-14-6 5-6-2 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div Washington 56 32 17 7 71 176 165 20-8-2 12-9-5 11-5-3 Pittsburgh 58 32 22 4 68 182 174 21-7-1 11-15-3 11-5-0 Philadelphia 57 28 19 10 66 169 167 14-9-6 14-10-4 6-4-5 New Jersey 56 28 20 8 64 168 174 15-10-3 13-10-5 8-7-1 Carolina 57 27 21 9 63 158 169 15-9-5 12-12-4 6-5-4 Columbus 57 29 24 4 62 154 162 17-10-1 12-14-3 10-8-2 NY Islanders 58 27 25 6 60 194 214 15-10-4 12-15-2 8-8-1 NY Rangers 57 27 25 5 59 166 175 18-10-3 9-15-2 7-6-3 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L Nashville 55 34 12 Winnipeg 57 33 15 Blues 59 34 21 Dallas 57 33 20 Minnesota 56 31 19 Colorado 56 31 21 Chicago 57 24 25 Pacific GP W L Vegas 56 37 15 San Jose 57 30 19 Calgary 57 29 20 Los Angeles 56 30 21 Anaheim 58 27 20 Edmonton 55 23 28 Vancouver 57 22 29 Arizona 57 15 32

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B7

OT 9 9 4 4 6 4 8 OT 4 8 8 5 11 4 6 10

Pts 77 75 72 70 68 66 56 Pts 78 68 66 65 65 50 50 40

GF 173 183 170 175 168 176 160 GF 192 166 161 162 161 157 150 137

GA Home 143 19-5-3 154 21-5-2 151 19-12-0 151 20-9-1 158 20-4-5 163 20-7-1 166 12-12-3 GA Home 154 20-4-2 158 15-9-3 164 13-13-3 140 14-9-3 166 15-9-4 184 12-14-2 184 10-15-3 195 7-16-4

Away Div 15-7-6 11-4-2 12-10-7 8-6-2 15-9-4 9-5-2 13-11-3 9-10-0 11-15-1 10-9-0 11-14-3 7-8-1 12-13-5 6-9-2 Away Div 17-11-2 13-1-1 15-10-5 14-4-3 16-7-5 8-6-3 16-12-2 8-9-3 12-11-7 9-5-6 11-14-2 10-5-0 12-14-3 5-9-1 8-16-6 2-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Wednesday Toronto 6, Columbus 3 Colorado 2, Montreal 0 Florida 4, Vancouver 3 Tuesday Carolina 7, Los Angeles 3 Columbus 4, NY Islanders 1 Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 3 Buffalo 5, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 5, Calgary 2 New Jersey 5, Philadelphia 4, SO Detroit 2, Anaheim 1 Nashville 4, Blues 3, OT Winnipeg 4, Washington 3, OT Minnesota 3, NY Rangers 2 Vegas 5, Chicago 2 Arizona 2, San Jose 1 Thursday Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Arizona, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Friday Philadelphia at Columbus, 6 p.m. NY Islanders at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Blues at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Los Angeles at Buffalo, noon Anaheim at Minnesota, 1 p.m. NY Rangers at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Edmonton at Arizona, 3 p.m. New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Montreal at Vegas, 6 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Detroit at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 9 p.m.

Leafs roll past Blue Jackets

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Maple Leafs goaltender Frederik Andersen makes a save on the Blue Jackets’ Nick Foligno (center) during the third period Wednesday night.

Andersen has 54 saves, Kadri picks up hat trick ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nazem Kadri had three goals and two assists, Frederik Andersen made a careerhigh 54 saves and the surging Toronto Maple Leafs beat the visiting Columbus Blue Jackets 6-3 on Wednesday night. Patrick Marleau added a goal and two assists and Mitch Marner had a goal and an assist as Toronto closed out a perfect five-game hometand. It was Kadri’s fourth career hat trick, and the five points set a career high. The Blue Jackets recorded 50 or more shots for the third straight game, making them the first team to accomplish the feat in the post-expansion era (since 196768). Nick Foligno had a goal and two assists, and Joonas Korpisalo made 22 saves. Toronto played much of the game without defenseman Jake Gardiner, who departed with a lower-body injury after one period. It was unclear when the injury occurred, but he took a hard slash to the legs from Matt Calvert. The Maple Leafs had a 4-2 lead before Jack Johnson beat Andersen with a slap shot from the left circle that went off the post and into the net at 14:35 of the second. It was Johnson’s third goal of the season. Toronto then put it away with two in the third. Kadri got his 21st of the season at 11:21, and Marleau added an emptynetter with 1:47 left.

NOTEBOOK

Canucks GM gets extension • The Vancouver Canucks signed GM Jim Benning to a multiyear contract extension Wednesday. Benning has served four years in the role since joining the Canucks in May 2014. “I’m grateful to the Aquilini family and to Trevor Linden for the commitment they’ve made to me and for their con-

fidence in our long-term vision for the Vancouver Canucks,” Benning said in a statement. “I’m excited about the direction of our team and the depth and talent we continue to build. “I believe we are on the right track and I am pleased to continue the work we started four years ago when we set out to build a championship team.” Prior to joining the Canucks, Benning spent seven seasons as the Boston Bruins assistant GM, being part of a Stanley Cup champion in 2011. He also served as the Buffalo Sabres director of amateur scouting for 12 years. Benning played 12 NHL seasons as a defenseman with the Toronto Maple Leafs and Vancouver. New Hurricanes owner embraces past • The new owner of the Carolina Hurricanes has a soft spot for his team’s old identity — the Hartford Whalers. In the month since Tom Dundon assumed control of the Hurricanes, they’ve brought back the old “Brass Bonanza” fight song, stocked the shelves in the team store with that beloved whale-tail logo and have discussed bringing back the Whalers, too — if only for a future turnback-the-clock night. Under his leadership, the Hurricanes have done a 180-degree turn in the way they view, market and appreciate their past. “It’s ours, right? I mean, it’s who we were. It’s part of the history,” Dundon said. In the month since Dundon bought a majority share of the team from longtime owner Peter Karmanos Jr., the 46-yearold Dallas businessman has made several changes — most visibly, the embracing of who the Hurricanes were before they became the Hurricanes. That’s a drastic shift from their approach under Karmanos. He purchased the Whalers in 1994 and moved the franchise to North Carolina three years later, never looking back.

NHL SUMMARIES Maple Leafs 6, Blue Jackets 3

Avalanche 2, Canadiens 0

Panthers 4, Canucks 3

Columbus 1 2 0 — 3 Toronto 2 2 2 — 6 First period: 1, Toronto, Moore 5 (Dermott, Polak), 4:38. 2, Toronto, Kadri 19, 7:36. 3, Columbus, Foligno 12 (Kukan, Wennberg), 18:21. Penalties: Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 5:31; Foligno, CBJ, (hooking), 10:40. Second period: 4, Columbus, Foligno 13 (Wennberg, Bjorkstrand), 2:25. 5, Toronto, Kadri 20 (Rielly, Dermott), 8:03. 6, Toronto, Marner 13 (Marleau, Kadri), 10:17. 7, Columbus, Johnson 3 (Foligno, Nutivaara), 14:35. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (slashing), 4:37. Third period: 8, Toronto, Kadri 21 (Marner, Marleau), 11:21. 9, Toronto, Marleau 19 (Kadri, Komarov), 18:13. Penalties: Kadri, TOR, (holding), 8:55; Foligno, CBJ, (elbowing), 13:57. Shots: Columbus 19-22-16: 57. Toronto 12-7-9: 28. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, Korpisalo 5-6-0 (27 shots22 saves). Toronto, Andersen 29-15-4 (57-54). A: 18,890. Referees: Francis Charron, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, Steve Barton.

Montreal 0 0 0 — 0 Colorado 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: None. Second period: 1, Colorado, Soderberg 11 (Bourque, Greer), 15:55. Penalties: Kerfoot, COL, (high sticking), 1:55; Pacioretty, MTL, (hooking), 8:44; Toninato, COL, (slashing), 11:39. Third period: 2, Colorado, Kerfoot 14, 16:58. Penalties: Rantanen, COL, (holding), 1:40; Soderberg, COL, (delay of game), 3:00; Deslauriers, MTL, (slashing), 8:56. Shots: Montreal 9-17-17: 43. Colorado 7-13-5: 25. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 4; Colorado 0 of 2. Goalies: Montreal, Niemi 2-6-1 (25 shots-23 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 14-11-2 (44-44). A: 14,928. Referees: Pierre Lambert, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Steve Miller.

Florida 4 0 0 — 4 Vancouver 2 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Vancouver, Del Zotto 5 (Baertschi, Horvat), 0:37. 2, Florida, Dadonov 14 (Bjugstad, Barkov), 7:36. 3, Vancouver, Horvat 14 (Baertschi), 8:10. 4, Florida, McGinn 8 (Ekblad, Malgin), 13:01 (pp). 5, Florida, Petrovic 1 (McCann), 17:25. 6, Florida, Bjugstad 10 (Barkov), 18:36. Penalties: Boeser, VAN, (hooking), 11:12; Bjugstad, FLA, (delay of game), 14:34. Second period: 7, Vancouver, Boeser 27 (Horvat, D.Sedin), 13:16 (pp). Penalties: Stecher, VAN, (holding), 4:40; Haley, FLA, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 7:24; Pysyk, FLA, (interference), 11:22; MacKenzie, FLA, (tripping), 13:14. Third period: None. Penalties: Haley, FLA, (high sticking), 2:54; Del Zotto, VAN, (tripping), 4:58; Huberdeau, FLA, (elbowing), 13:38; H.Sedin, VAN, (holding), 17:23. Shots: Florida 14-6-14: 34. Vancouver 16-13-8: 37. Power-plays: Florida 1 of 4; Vancouver 1 of 6. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 14-12-5 (37 shots-34 saves). Vancouver, Nilsson 6-9-1 (20-20), Markstrom 16-19-5 (14-10). A: 17,412. Referees: Garrett Rank, Graham Skilliter.

Steen has been on tear in Blues’ last 22 games

AUSTIN STEELE • asteele@post-dispatch.com

Surging Blues left winger Alexander Steen (right), maneuvering against Minnesota defenseman Ryan Suter on Feb. 6, says he has “more jump this year than I did last year.”

Forward’s 20 points lead team in that time frame BY JIM THOMAS st. Louis Post-dispatch

Back on Dec. 23, Alexander Steen ended a 17-game goal drought with an empty-net tally that helped clinch a 3-1 victory for the Blues in Vancouver. Starting with that game, over a 22game stretch that included Tuesday’s 4-3 overtime loss in Nashville, Steen is the Blues’ leading scorer. With a goal and an assist against the Predators, Steen has 10 goals and 10 assists over the 22 games. Vladimir Tarasenko is next with eight goals and eight assists for 16 points, followed by Paul Stastny (5-10-15), Brayden Schenn (6-8-14) and Alex Pietrangelo (2-11-13). That’s a healthy spike in production considering Steen, a left winger, had a modest three goals and 14 assists in his first 31 games this season. He has become something of a closer as well, with five of his last seven goals coming in the third period. “I’m not a stats guy,” Steen said recently. “I’ve felt really good about my game since I came back from the injury. As far as stats go, it is what it is for me. “I get frustrated when I feel like I haven’t played well and there have been (those) nights, obviously. But for the most part, I’ve liked my jump this year and energy. I would say I have more jump this year than I did last year.” Steen missed most of training camp and the first six games of the regular season because of a broken thumb, compliments of a slash by Antoine Roussel of Dallas in the Blues’ exhibition opener. Steen concedes the thumb wasn’t 100 percent healed when he returned to the lineup. “It took me a while,” he said. “It was a little sensitive, especially puck-touches when the stick is vibrating in your hand. It was a little tough for a couple of weeks.”

THOMPSON HEADS TO AHL

The San Antonio express was running again Wednesday, with the Blues assigning rookie forward Tage Thompson to the

American Hockey League franchise. Thompson had been a scratch in four of the Blues’ last five games, with coach Mike Yeo saying before the last three that Thompson was “dinged up” although not specifying the injury. Even so, Thompson had continued to practice with the team. When Thompson was a healthy scratch Feb. 6 against Minnesota, Yeo indicated that Thompson had things he needed to work on in his game. “When he’s on top of his game, he’s playing with more pace, he’s getting to the offensive zone,” Yeo said at the time. “And it seems like he hasn’t been able to get to that type of game. “His hands show up in certain areas. His skill shows up in certain areas, but a lot of times right now it’s with his feet planted. He beats a guy, but then if you’re not moving your feet then you’re gonna be forced to try and beat the guy again.” It’s the second stint this season for Thompson in San Antonio. After earning a spot on the Blues’ opening-day roster, he was sent down in mid October after appearing in four games (with no points). In 20 games since his return to the Blues on Dec. 18, Thompson had three goals and three assists, earning a spot on the second power-play unit.

BLUENOTES

According to results listed in the Blues’ media guide, Tuesday’s game in Nashville marked the first time in franchise history the team lost a game in overtime on a penalty shot. Filip Forsberg’s winner was the 40th penalty shot against the Blues in franchise history, and the 19th successful one. • Blues prospect Klim Kostin was suspended for one game by the American Hockey League for an illegal check to the head of an opponent. He sat out San Antonio’s game Wednesday against Milwaukee. • Following a day off Wednesday, the Blues return to practice Thursday at IceZone in Hazelwood. The team then leaves for Friday’s game in Dallas. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Going to Olympics ‘disruptive’ to NHL BLUES • FROM B1

He and Patrik Berglund were part of Sweden’s silver medal team in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Vladimir Tarasenko played for Russia in 2014. Alex Pietrangelo and Jay Bouwmeester were part of Canada’s gold medal team in Sochi, while Paul Stastny played for Team USA. Stastny and Bouwmeester have played in two Olympics, with Bouwmeester also on Team Canada in the 2006 Games in Turin, Italy, and Stastny also on Team USA for the 2010 Games in Vancouver, British Columbia. “It was the best experience I’ve had in my career just in terms of being part of that Olympic family,” Pietrangelo said. “I don’t think you realize it until you (go).” A seventh member of the current Blues, Vladimir Sobotka, was selected to play for the Czech Republic in 2014, but did not participate because of injury. The decision was made long ago by the NHL — last spring — not to send its players to the Olympics this year. During his recent visit to St. Louis, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman explained the reasons. “This is a huge disruption to the season,” Bettman said. “If we were shutting down for the next three weeks, all of the momentum of the season would be gone. Teams would come back in disparate shape because some NHL teams would send 10 players, some would send one or two, some teams would be on vacation, others halfway around the world. “If you look at the times the games are being played, it doesn’t make up for not having a home game for three or four weeks and not being on TV. ... We’ve done it five times (sent NHL players to the Olympics). We’ve seen the impact, and in the final analysis, it’s disruptive. “The IOC wouldn’t let us promote the fact that we’re there, we can’t use the rings, can’t use the video. ... We did it five times, we understand what it’s like, and it just didn’t make sense any more.” So as Pietrangelo said: “The decision was taken out of our hands a long time ago.” But with the 2018 Winter Olympics underway in Pyeongchang, South Korea,it has been hard for Blues Olympians not to think of past experiences. And maybe what might have been this year. “You see all the other athletes walking out in the opening ceremony together,” Pi-

etrangelo said. “It was a really cool experience, something that I never thought I’d get the opportunity to do.” As for those NHL players who wouldn’t be participating in the Olympics? “It (stinks). Guys like us don’t get their two-week break, right?” asked Canadian Brayden Schenn, laughing. But who knows? Maybe someone such as Schenn, whose career has reached new heights this season, would’ve had a chance to make his country’s Olympic team this time around. And maybe for him and others, this would have been their only chance. “Your career is only so long, so you have to miss out on this Olympics, I think guys are pretty bummed out,” Schenn said. “You know, you have to wait another four years and who knows if you get a chance again to do that. “So for a lot of guys in this locker room it would’ve been a three-week break that I’m sure guys would’ve liked. But at the same time, there’s a lot of guys that miss out on an opportunity to go represent their country.” Without most of the world’s top players in Pyeongchang, the hockey competition lacks much of the luster it had during the five Olympiads in which the NHL participated. But Steen says he’ll still keep tabs on how Sweden is doing. Schenn said he won’t necessarily wake up for any 5:30 a.m. live telecasts, but he’ll look for replays and watch highlights later in the day. Pietrangelo says he’ll watch not just hockey, but other Olympic events as well. “I think after having gone (in 2014) and talked to other athletes and seen how they prepare to get over there and how big of a deal it is for a lot of them, I gained a new appreciation for a lot of the sports that maybe I don’t watch on a regular basis,” he said. As for the coach of the Blues, he’s as much of a hockey fan as the next guy. But as might be expected, he’s been a little preoccupied lately. “To be honest with you, I haven’t really spent a lot of time thinking about (the Olympics),” Mike Yeo said recently. “We’ve got a lot that we’re kind of wrapped up in here, and we’re just trying to stay focused on that.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FOR THE RECORD

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 41 40 30 23 19 W 33 30 24 18 18 W 34 32 33 28 20

L 16 19 25 36 40 L 24 28 33 39 41 L 22 24 25 29 37

Pct .719 .678 .545 .390 .322 Pct .579 .517 .421 .316 .305 Pct .607 .571 .569 .491 .351

GB — 2 10 19 23 GB — 3½ 9 15 16 GB — 2 2 6½ 14½

L10 9-1 5-5 6-4 2-8 1-9 L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 8-2 7-3 6-4 2-8

Str W-7 L-3 W-5 L-8 L-7 Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-3 L-2 Str W-4 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-1

Home 24-4 21-11 18-10 16-12 11-21 Home 17-10 14-12 15-15 11-16 13-17 Home 20-7 19-9 20-11 19-12 13-16

Away 17-12 19-8 12-15 7-24 8-19 Away 16-14 16-16 9-18 7-23 5-24 Away 14-15 13-15 13-14 9-17 7-21

Conf 25-7 25-13 16-13 11-24 12-22 Conf 20-14 21-17 13-18 11-25 8-30 Conf 25-12 19-17 23-15 17-19 17-17

Str W-10 L-3 W-3 L-7 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 W-2 L-1 W-11 Str W-3 W-2 L-2 L-1 L-7

Home 23-6 22-6 15-12 13-17 11-19 Home 23-7 20-10 23-7 16-11 18-9 Home 22-7 16-12 14-14 8-17 9-21

Away 21-7 13-18 16-14 5-21 7-21 Away 12-18 13-16 8-19 15-15 12-19 Away 22-6 14-14 9-19 10-22 9-20

Conf 26-8 20-14 15-19 15-22 10-28 Conf 26-10 18-17 20-18 17-15 19-14 Conf 25-10 20-16 11-23 10-25 12-25

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 44 35 31 18 18 W 35 33 31 31 30 W 44 30 23 18 18

L 13 24 26 38 40 L 25 26 26 26 28 L 13 26 33 39 41

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Pct .772 .593 .544 .321 .310 Pct .583 .559 .544 .544 .517 Pct .772 .536 .411 .316 .305

GB — 10 13 25½ 26½ GB — 1½ 2½ 2½ 4 GB — 13½ 20½ 26 27

L10 10-0 4-6 5-5 1-9 2-8 L10 4-6 4-6 7-3 6-4 10-0 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 4-6 1-9

Wednesday Charlotte 104, Orlando 102 Detroit 104, Atlanta 98 Philadelphia 104, Miami 102 Indiana 108, Brooklyn 103 Washington 118, New York 113 Houston 100, Sacramento 91 LA Clippers 129, Boston 119 New Orleans 139, LA Lakers 117 Oklahoma City 121, Memphis 114 Toronto 122, Chicago 98 Utah 107, Phoenix 97 Golden State at Portland, late Tuesday Toronto 115, Miami 112 Cleveland 120, Oklahoma City 112 Houston 126, Minnesota 108 Milwaukee 97, Atlanta 92 Sacramento 114, Dallas 109 Denver 117, San Antonio 109 Thursday Denver at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Friday Team World vs. Team USA at Los Angeles, Calif., 8 p.m. Saturday No games scheduled. Sunday 2018 All-Star game Team LeBron vs. Team Stephen at Los Angeles, Calif., 7 p.m.

Beal rallies Wizards past Knicks NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bradley Beal (Chaminade prep) scored 36 points, and the visiting Washington Wizards overcame a 27-point deficit to beat the slumping New York Knicks 118-113 on Wednesday night. St. Louis native Otto Porter Jr. added 22 points and Ian Mahinmi had 17 for the Wizards, who trailed 68-41 late in the second quarter. Washington then went on a 42-15 run to tie it at 83 with 3:32 left in the third. Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 37 points — 32 in the first half — to lead the Knicks, who’ve lost a season-worst eight straight and are 0-4 since losing All-Star Kristaps Porzingis to a season-ending knee injury. Enes Kanter added 24 points and 14 rebounds. Markieff Morris’ 3-pointer with 1:22 left in the third quarter gave Washington its first lead since it made the game’s first basket. Washington led for good after Porter’s jumper with 6:27 remaining and pulled ahead by as many as eight on three occasions in the final minutes.

Embiid sits out • Philadelphia center Joel Embiid sat out the 76ers’ game Wednesday night against Miami because of soreness in his right ankle. Scheduled to start for the Eastern Conference in the All-Star game this weekend, Embiid had 17 points in a victory over New York on Monday night. Dunn back with Bulls • Guard Kris Dunn was back in the Chicago Bulls’ lineup after missing 11 games because of a concussion. Dunn is averaging 13.7 points and 6.4 assists. He was injured making a fast-break dunk against the Golden State Warriors on Jan. 17. He landed awkwardly and his face slammed into the floor, resulting in a concussion and two dislocated front teeth. Warriors’ McCaw sidelined • Second-year Warriors guard Patrick McCaw will miss at least four weeks after breaking a bone in his left wrist Monday night against the Suns. McCaw is averaging 3.7 points, 1.4 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 15.6 minutes for the defending NBA champions.

NBA SUMMARIES 76ers 104, Heat 102

Wizards 118, Knicks 113

Pacers 108, Nets 103

Miami: Richardson 2-5 0-0 6, Winslow 0-3 3-4 3, Whiteside 7-10 2-3 16, Dragic 6-14 4-6 18, T.Johnson 4-7 2-2 12, Babbitt 2-3 0-0 6, J.Johnson 8-10 4-5 22, Adebayo 0-3 3-4 3, Wade 4-13 0-2 8, Ellington 2-9 3-3 8. Totals 35-77 21-29 102. Philadelphia: Covington 2-13 4-5 9, Saric 5-12 6-6 19, A.Johnson 2-2 1-2 5, Simmons 8-15 2-5 18, Redick 6-19 0-0 14, Booker 4-6 1-2 9, Holmes 4-7 3-5 11, McConnell 1-6 0-0 2, Belinelli 7-12 0-0 17. Totals 39-92 17-25 104. Miami 29 33 19 21 — 102 Philadelphia 20 19 34 31 — 104 3-point goals: Miami 11-27 (J.Johnson 2-2, T.Johnson 2-3, Richardson 2-3, Babbitt 2-3, Dragic 2-5, Ellington 1-7, Wade 0-2, Winslow 0-2), Philadelphia 9-35 (Belinelli 3-5, Saric 3-8, Redick 2-12, Covington 1-8, Holmes 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 29 (Whiteside 10), Philadelphia 60 (Simmons 12). Assists: Miami 23 (T.Johnson 6), Philadelphia 25 (Simmons 10). Total fouls: Miami 21, Philadelphia 23. Technicals: McConnell, Redick, Saric. A: 20,492 (21,600).

Washington: Porter Jr. 10-18 2-3 22, Morris 6-11 0-0 13, Gortat 3-7 0-0 6, Beal 14-22 4-4 36, Satoransky 4-8 0-0 9, Oubre Jr. 1-6 0-0 2, Scott 2-6 0-0 5, Mahinmi 6-8 5-8 17, Meeks 2-2 4-4 8. Totals 48-88 15-19 118. New York: Hardaway Jr. 14-24 3-3 37, Beasley 8-24 0-0 16, Kanter 9-15 6-8 24, Jack 1-5 2-2 5, Lee 4-12 0-0 8, Thomas 3-4 0-0 8, O’Quinn 1-2 0-0 2, Ntilikina 2-2 1-2 5, Mudiay 3-9 2-3 8. Totals 45-97 14-18 113. Washington 26 25 39 28 — 118 New York 39 33 15 26 — 113 3-point goals: Washington 7-22 (Beal 4-7, Morris 1-2, Scott 1-2, Satoransky 1-4, Porter Jr. 0-3, Oubre Jr. 0-4), New York 9-19 (Hardaway Jr. 6-9, Thomas 2-2, Jack 1-1, Mudiay 0-2, Lee 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 45 (Gortat, Mahinmi 8), New York 42 (Kanter 14). Assists: Washington 31 (Satoransky 11), New York 21 (Kanter, Jack 5). Total fouls: Washington 16, New York 17. A: 19,812 (19,812).

Indiana: Bogdanovic 5-11 2-2 14, T.Young 5-12 3-4 13, Turner 2-8 6-6 11, Joseph 5-12 4-7 15, Oladipo 9-24 6-6 25, Jefferson 6-7 1-1 13, Sabonis 3-7 2-2 8, J.Young 1-2 0-0 2, Stephenson 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 39-90 24-28 108. Brooklyn: Carroll 6-13 4-6 21, Acy 2-4 2-2 8, Allen 4-7 2-3 10, Dinwiddie 0-7 7-10 7, Crabbe 9-16 1-1 24, Cunningham 3-9 0-1 6, Mozgov 0-2 0-0 0, Russell 7-14 4-4 18, Harris 4-11 0-0 9. Totals 35-83 20-27 103. Indiana 22 32 19 35 — 108 Brooklyn 23 31 25 24 — 103 3-point goals: Indiana 6-15 (Bogdanovic 2-6, Joseph 1-1, Turner 1-1, Stephenson 1-2, Oladipo 1-4, T.Young 0-1), Brooklyn 13-35 (Carroll 5-8, Crabbe 5-11, Acy 2-4, Harris 1-4, Russell 0-2, Cunningham 0-2, Dinwiddie 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 52 (Turner 14), Brooklyn 44 (Carroll 10). Assists: Indiana 20 (Oladipo 4), Brooklyn 24 (Russell 9). Total fouls: Indiana 20, Brooklyn 20. A: 13,159 (17,732).

Hornets 104, Magic 102

Sacramento: Jackson 5-9 0-0 12, Sampson 3-3 1-2 7, Cauley-Stein 6-16 0-2 12, Fox 3-10 2-2 9, Bogdanovic 8-15 0-0 20, Koufos 0-3 0-0 0, Hield 5-14 0-0 12, Temple 6-12 0-0 13, Carter 2-5 2-2 6. Totals 38-87 5-8 91. Houston: Mbah a Moute 4-9 2-2 11, Tucker 4-8 0-0 10, Capela 6-11 1-1 13, Paul 6-11 4-4 19, Harden 7-19 9-11 28, Black 0-0 0-0 0, Anderson 3-9 0-0 8, Green 1-7 0-0 2, Johnson 2-9 4-4 9. Totals 33-83 20-22 100. Sacramento 25 20 18 28 — 91 Houston 20 35 17 28 — 100 3-point goals: Sacramento 10-32 (Bogdanovic 4-8, Jackson 2-5, Hield 2-9, Fox 1-3, Temple 1-5, Carter 0-2), Houston 14-49 (Harden 5-15, Paul 3-7, Tucker 2-6, Anderson 2-7, Mbah a Moute 1-5, Johnson 1-5, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 48 (Cauley-Stein, Koufos 8), Houston 48 (Capela 11). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Cauley-Stein, Bogdanovic 5), Houston 19 (Harden 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Houston 14. A: 18,055 (18,055).

Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 2-7 1-2 5, Williams 2-8 1-2 6, Howard 9-16 4-6 22, Walker 6-19 4-4 20, Batum 5-11 0-0 14, Kaminsky 1-5 0-0 2, Zeller 3-3 0-0 6, Carter-Williams 2-5 2-2 6, Lamb 6-10 3-3 17, Graham 2-4 0-0 6. Totals 38-88 15-19 104. Orlando: Simmons 2-5 1-1 5, Hezonja 10-20 0-0 21, Biyombo 3-7 5-6 11, Augustin 5-11 2-2 16, Fournier 5-15 1-2 13, Iwundu 1-1 2-2 4, Speights 5-12 2-2 16, Birch 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 2-8 2-2 8, Afflalo 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 36-86 15-17 102. Charlotte 20 34 31 19 — 104 Orlando 26 27 25 24 — 102 3-point goals: Charlotte 13-30 (Batum 4-7, Walker 4-8, Lamb 2-3, Graham 2-3, Williams 1-5, Kaminsky 0-2, Carter-Williams 0-2), Orlando 15-37 (Augustin 4-6, Speights 4-8, Mack 2-3, Afflalo 2-3, Fournier 2-10, Hezonja 1-6, Simmons 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 45 (Howard 13), Orlando 48 (Biyombo 11). Assists: Charlotte 26 (Batum 7), Orlando 21 (Augustin 4). Total fouls: Charlotte 15, Orlando 17. A: 18,428 (18,846).

Pistons 104, Hawks 98 Atlanta: Prince 4-15 6-7 14, Collins 3-8 5-6 11, Dedmon 4-9 0-0 8, Delaney 3-9 4-5 11, Dorsey 4-11 0-0 9, Bembry 3-6 0-0 6, White 6-11 0-0 15, Muscala 3-8 0-0 7, Plumlee 2-3 0-0 4, Taylor 6-9 1-1 13. Totals 38-89 16-19 98. Detroit: Johnson 4-9 5-6 14, Griffin 4-10 1-3 13, Drummond 5-10 3-3 13, Smith 8-13 6-7 22, Bullock 6-13 0-0 15, Ennis III 3-6 4-4 11, Tolliver 3-10 2-2 11, Nelson 0-5 0-0 0, Kennard 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 35-83 21-25 104. 98 Atlanta 14 19 28 37 — 22 23 37 22 — 104 Detroit 3-point goals: Atlanta 6-33 (White 3-7, Delaney 1-2, Dorsey 1-4, Muscala 1-5, Bembry 0-2, Taylor 0-2, Collins 0-2, Dedmon 0-3, Prince 0-6), Detroit 13-33 (Griffin 4-7, Bullock 3-7, Tolliver 3-8, Johnson 1-3, Ennis III 1-3, Kennard 1-4, Nelson 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 43 (Collins 10), Detroit 47 (Drummond 15). Assists: Atlanta 25 (Taylor, Delaney 7), Detroit 26 (Griffin, Smith 9). Total fouls: Atlanta 21, Detroit 18. Technicals: Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 15,849 (21,000).

Raptors 122, Bulls 98 Toronto: Anunoby 2-8 1-3 5, Ibaka 9-12 0-0 20, Valanciunas 7-9 0-0 14, Lowry 5-10 6-6 20, DeRozan 3-11 1-1 7, Miles 1-2 1-1 4, Powell 1-6 0-0 2, McKinnie 1-1 0-0 3, Siakam 7-9 1-2 17, Nogueira 1-2 0-0 2, Poeltl 4-4 2-2 10, Wright 3-7 0-0 7, VanVleet 4-11 0-0 11. Totals 48-92 12-15 122. Chicago: Holiday 3-6 0-0 8, Markkanen 5-10 3-3 14, Lopez 5-8 0-0 10, Dunn 3-9 2-2 8, LaVine 5-17 0-0 11, Valentine 2-7 2-2 6, Zipser 1-5 0-0 2, Portis 8-14 2-4 18, Vonleh 1-1 1-1 3, Felicio 1-2 2-2 4, Grant 3-7 0-0 6, Arcidiacono 0-1 0-0 0, Nwaba 2-4 4-6 8. Totals 39-91 16-20 98. 27 34 34 27 — 122 Toronto Chicago 33 16 27 22 — 98 3-point goals: Toronto 14-38 (Lowry 4-7, VanVleet 3-6, Siakam 2-2, Ibaka 2-3, McKinnie 1-1, Miles 1-2, Wright 1-3, Nogueira 0-1, Valanciunas 0-1, DeRozan 0-3, Anunoby 0-4, Powell 0-5), Chicago 4-24 (Holiday 2-4, Markkanen 1-3, LaVine 1-4, Grant 0-1, Nwaba 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-1, Portis 0-2, Dunn 0-2, Valentine 0-3, Zipser 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 50 (Valanciunas 9), Chicago 42 (Nwaba, Markkanen 6). Assists: Toronto 38 (Lowry 10), Chicago 17 (Grant 7). Total fouls: Toronto 22, Chicago 16. Technicals: Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg. A: 21,006 (20,917).

Rockets 100, Kings 91

Pelicans 139, Lakers 117 L.A. Lakers: Ingram 9-17 3-4 21, Randle 9-13 2-2 20, Lopez 3-9 0-0 8, Hart 5-6 2-3 15, Caldwell-Pope 2-6 0-0 5, Kuzma 10-20 0-0 23, Brewer 2-5 5-6 9, Frye 1-1 0-0 3, Bryant 1-2 0-0 2, Zubac 1-2 2-2 4, Ennis 0-4 0-0 0, Thomas 1-1 1-1 3, Payton II 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 46-90 15-18 117. New Orleans: Moore 6-13 0-0 14, Davis 15-18 10-11 42, Okafor 1-4 1-2 3, Rondo 2-5 0-0 4, Holiday 10-19 2-2 24, Miller 6-8 3-3 19, Mirotic 7-17 0-0 16, Diallo 3-4 3-3 9, Liggins 1-2 0-0 3, Cooke 0-0 0-0 0, Clark 2-9 0-0 5. Totals 53-99 19-21 139. L.A. Lakers 33 33 25 26 — 117 New Orleans 46 33 24 36 — 139 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 10-22 (Hart 3-3, Kuzma 3-8, Lopez 2-4, Frye 1-1, Caldwell-Pope 1-2, Ennis 0-1, Payton II 0-1, Bryant 0-1, Ingram 0-1), New Orleans 14-32 (Miller 4-6, Davis 2-2, Moore 2-4, Holiday 2-5, Mirotic 2-8, Liggins 1-1, Clark 1-5, Rondo 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 37 (Caldwell-Pope 8), New Orleans 48 (Davis 15). Assists: L.A. Lakers 26 (Caldwell-Pope 8), New Orleans 35 (Holiday 11). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 21, New Orleans 20. Technicals: Thomas 2, Kuzma, L.A. Lakers coach Luke Walton 2, Rondo 2. Ejected: Thomas, Rondo. A: 15,436 (16,867).

Thunder 121, Grizzlies 114 Oklahoma City: George 10-15 2-3 28, Anthony 7-18 1-1 19, Adams 4-9 3-5 11, Westbrook 6-14 11-12 23, Abrines 0-2 0-0 0, Huestis 0-2 0-2 0, Grant 2-3 1-4 5, Patterson 4-7 1-2 12, D.Johnson 1-1 1-2 3, Felton 3-7 4-4 12, Ferguson 3-3 0-0 8. Totals 40-81 24-35 121. Memphis: Brooks 6-15 0-0 14, Green 2-4 0-0 5, Gasol 4-11 2-3 10, Evans 8-18 3-5 23, Harrison 10-16 3-3 28, Parsons 2-4 0-0 5, Martin 7-12 2-2 17, Davis 4-4 0-0 8, Chalmers 1-2 2-2 4, McLemore 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-86 12-15 114. Oklahoma City 34 39 19 29 — 121 33 20 31 30 — 114 Memphis 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 17-37 (George 6-9, Anthony 4-10, Patterson 3-4, Ferguson 2-2, Felton 2-4, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-1, Abrines 0-2, Westbrook 0-4), Memphis 14-27 (Harrison 5-5, Evans 4-7, Brooks 2-6, Parsons 1-1, Martin 1-2, Green 1-2, Chalmers 0-1, Gasol 0-3). Fouled out: Harrison. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 38 (Westbrook 13), Memphis 41 (Evans 9). Assists: Oklahoma City 26 (Westbrook 15), Memphis 29 (Gasol 9). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 19, Memphis 25. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second), Evans, Memphis coach JB Bickerstaff, Harrison 2. Ejected: Harrison. A: 16,012 (18,119).

Clippers 129, Celtics 119 L.A. Clippers: Harris 8-16 2-2 21, Gallinari 4-11 10-10 20, Jordan 11-14 8-9 30, Rivers 4-10 0-0 10, Bradley 5-8 0-0 10, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Harrell 3-5 3-4 9, Teodosic 3-6 2-2 10, L.Williams 6-18 5-6 19. Totals 44-88 30-33 129. Boston: Tatum 4-13 1-1 10, Horford 8-17 2-2 20, Baynes 4-8 0-0 8, Irving 11-21 6-6 33, Brown 4-12 2-2 12, Morris 4-8 2-2 13, Theis 0-3 2-2 2, Monroe 2-3 4-4 8, Rozier 5-12 1-2 13. Totals 42-97 20-21 119. L.A. Clippers 34 27 32 36 — 129 25 32 34 28 — 119 Boston 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 11-29 (Harris 3-5, Teodosic 2-3, Rivers 2-5, Gallinari 2-7, L.Williams 2-9), Boston 15-31 (Irving 5-7, Morris 3-4, Horford 2-4, Rozier 2-5, Brown 2-5, Tatum 1-4, Theis 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 43 (Jordan 13), Boston 46 (Morris 11). Assists: L.A. Clippers 26 (L.Williams 6), Boston 24 (Irving 8). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 21, Boston 31. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Jazz 107, Suns 97 Phoenix: Warren 2-7 1-2 5, Bender 2-5 0-0 6, Len 3-7 8-10 14, Payton 5-11 2-2 13, Booker 8-20 6-9 28, Dudley 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 10-15 0-1 22, Chriss 2-4 0-0 5, Ulis 1-4 0-0 2, Daniels 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 34-79 17-24 97. Utah: Ingles 4-16 2-2 13, Favors 7-9 4-6 18, Gobert 5-8 4-4 14, Mitchell 10-24 0-0 24, O’Neale 7-12 2-2 19, Crowder 5-12 5-6 15, Jerebko 0-5 2-2 2, Neto 1-5 0-0 2, Burks 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-92 19-22 107. 97 Phoenix 23 18 30 26 — Utah 27 23 22 35 — 107 3-point goals: Phoenix 12-29 (Booker 6-14, Jackson 2-3, Bender 2-5, Chriss 1-1, Payton 1-2, Ulis 0-1, Daniels 0-3), Utah 10-34 (Mitchell 4-11, O’Neale 3-3, Ingles 3-9, Favors 0-1, Neto 0-2, Crowder 0-4, Jerebko 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 41 (Payton 11), Utah 54 (Gobert 17). Assists: Phoenix 19 (Payton 12), Utah 22 (Mitchell 7). Total fouls: Phoenix 25, Utah 17. A: 18,306 (19,911). TUESDAY LATE GAMES

Nuggets 117, Spurs 109

San Antonio: Anderson 1-3 0-2 2, Gasol 4-10 2-2 10, Bertans 4-9 1-2 12, D.Murray 6-10 0-0 12, Green 2-3 2-2 7, Hilliard 0-1 0-0 0, Lauvergne 12-15 2-4 26, Forbes 2-8 1-2 5, Parker 7-11 3-4 17, White 1-1 0-0 2, Mills 3-8 0-0 8, Paul 0-0 0-0 0, Ginobili 2-3 4-4 8. Totals 44-82 15-22 109. Denver: Barton 9-19 0-0 20, Chandler 8-19 1-2 17, Jokic 8-15 5-6 23, J.Murray 6-9 2-3 17, G.Harris 7-17 0-0 15, Lyles 4-6 3-3 11, Arthur 2-2 0-0 5, Morris 0-0 0-0 0, D.Harris 1-4 4-4 7, Beasley 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 46-93 15-18 117. San Antonio 32 29 29 19 — 109 30 28 29 30 — 117 Denver 3-point goals: San Antonio 6-22 (Bertans 3-8, Mills 2-6, Green 1-2, Gasol 0-1, Ginobili 0-1, Forbes 0-4), Denver 10-32 (J.Murray 3-6, Jokic 2-5, Barton 2-7, Arthur 1-1, G.Harris 1-3, D.Harris 1-4, Lyles 0-1, Chandler 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 42 (Lauvergne 11), Denver 35 (Jokic 13). Assists: San Antonio 24 (Parker 4), Denver 29 (Jokic 11). Total fouls: San Antonio 22, Denver 18. A: 17,623 (19,155).

AMERICA’S LINE

BOXING

NBA Favorite Points Underdog BUCKS 3 Nuggets T’WOLVES 10 Lakers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog NORTHEASTERN 12 Drexel Purdue 10 WISCONSIN Cincinnati 3 HOUSTON HOFSTRA 4.5 William & Mary TOWSON 12.5 Delaware NC-WILMINGTON 1.5 Elon WICHITA ST 11.5 Temple CHARLOTTE PK Utep CONNECTICUT 3 Tulsa Charleston 5 JAMES MADISON APPALACHIAN ST 4 S Alabama COASTAL CARO 1 Troy PENN ST PK Ohio St Marshall 7.5 RICE Middle Tenn St 7 SOUTHERN MISS OLD DOMINION 10.5 Utsa UT-Arlington 3 UL-MONROE UL-LAFAYETTE 14 Texas St W Kentucky 4.5 N TEXAS GONZAGA 24 Loyola-M’mount LOUISIANA TECH 2 Uab USC 5.5 Oregon ARIZONA ST 1 Arizona WASHINGTON PK Utah Byu 11.5 PEPPERDINE SAN DIEGO 4 Pacific Cal-Santa Barb PK LONG BEACH ST PORTLAND 3.5 Santa Clara Cal-Davis 4.5 CAL-POLY SLO St. Mary’s-CA 9 SAN FRANCISCO CAL-IRVINE 8 Hawaii UCLA 8.5 Oregon St Colorado 4.5 WASHINGTON ST Added Games NC-Greensboro 10.5 CITADEL MERCER 16.5 Vmi FURMAN 16 Tenn-Chatt FAIRFIELD 10.5 Marist RIDER 13.5 Siena Manhattan 1.5 QUINNIPIAC SE MISSOURI ST 5 E Illinois Wofford 3 W CAROLINA TENN-MARTIN 4.5 SIU-Edw’ville BELMONT 17 E Kentucky N DAKOTA 5 Southern Utah MURRAY ST 10 Jack’ville St TENNESSEE ST 10.5 Morehead St AUSTIN PEAY 6 Tennessee Tech NO COLORADO 17 No Arizona Montana 1.5 E WASHINGTON IDAHO 12 Montana St SACRAMENTO ST 3 Idaho St PORTLAND ST 3.5 Weber St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PENGUINS -$200/+$170 Kings Hurricanes -$110/-$110 DEVILS ISLANDERS -$135/+$115 Rangers SENATORS -$140/+$120 Sabres LIGHTNING -$260/+$220 Red Wings WILD -$125/+$105 Capitals PREDATORS -$200/+$170 Flames Ducks -$110/-$110 BLACKHAWKS Canadiens -$120/even COYOTES VEGAS KNIGHTS-$230/+$190 Oilers SHARKS -$220/+$180 Canucks Grand Salami: Over/under 63.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Friday At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev. (ESPN), Raymundo Beltran vs. Paulus Moses, 12, for the vacant WBO World lightweight title; Egidijus Kavaliauskas vs. David Avanesyan, 10, welterweights. Saturday At Manchester, England, George Groves vs. Chris Eubank Jr., 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World and Eubanks’ IBO super middleweight titles (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Ryan Walsh vs. Isaac Lowe, 12, for Walsh’s British featherweight title; Zach Parker vs. Adasat Rodriguez, 10, super middleweights; Tommy Langford vs. Jack Arnfield, 12, for Langford’s British middleweight title; Arfan Iqbal vs. Simon Vallily, 10, for Iqbal’s English cruiserweight title. At El Paso, Texas (FOX), Devon Alexander vs. Victor Ortiz, 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Rogelio Medina, 12, super middleweights. At Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas (SHO), Danny Garcia vs. Brandon Rios, 12, welterweights; David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for Benavidez’s WBC World super middleweight title; Ray Robinson vs. Yordenis Ugas, 12, welterweights; Lionell Thompson vs. Edwin Rodriguez, 10, light heavyweights; Ladarius Miller vs. Argenis Mendez, 10, lightweights. Feb. 22 At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif. (ESPN), Joseph Diaz, Jr. vs. Victor Terrazas, 12, for Diaz’s NABO featherweight title. Feb. 24 At the Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Wisaksil Wangek vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, for Wangek’s WBC World super flyweight title; Carlos Cuadras vs. McWilliams Arroyo, 10, junior bantamweights; Donnie Nietes vs. Juan Carlos Reveco, 12, for Nietes’ IBF flyweight title; Brian Viloria vs. Artem Dalakian, 12, for the vacant WBA World flyweight title. Feb. 28 At Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Danny Roman vs. Ryo Matsumoto, 12, for Roman’s WBA super bantamweight title. March 1 At Tokyo, Luis Nery vs. Shinsuke Yamanaka, 12, for Nery’s WBC World bantamweight title; Ryosuke Iwasa vs. Ernesto Saulong, 12, for Iwasa’s IBF junior featherweight title. March 3 At Paris, Brian Castano vs. Cedric Vitu, 12, for Castano’s WBA World super welterweight title. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Deontay Wilder vs. Luis Ortiz, 12, for Wilder’s WBC world heavyweight title; Jermall Charlo vs. Hugo Centeno, 12, for vacant WBC interim middleweight title. At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO), Sergey Kovalev vs. Igor Mikhalkin, 12, for Kovalev’s WBO-IBO light heavyweight titles; Dmitry Bivol vs. Sullivan Barrera, 12, for Bivol’s WBA World light heavyweight title; Vaughn Alexander vs. Jaime Solorio, 10, middleweights. March 6 At Chonburi, Thailand, Knockout CP Freshmart vs. Toto Landero, 12, for CP Freshmart’s WBA strawweight title. March 9 At Costa Mesa, Calif. (ESPN2), Ronny Rios vs. Azat Hovhannisyan, 10, junior featherweights. At Deadwood, S.D. (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Viktor Postol, 12, for vacant interim WBC junior welterweight title; Ivan Baranchyk vs. Anthony Yigit, 12, junior welterweights. March 10 At Struer, Denmark, Dina Thorslund vs. Alicia Ashley, 10, for vacant WBC interim women’s junior featherweight title; Dennis Ceylan vs. Jesus Sanchez, 10, featherweights. At Alamodome, San Antonio (SHO), Sergey Lipinets vs. Mikey Garcia, 12, for Lipinets’s IBF junior welterweight title; Rances Barthelemy vs. Kiryl Relikh, 12, for the vacant WBA World super lightweight title; Richard Commey vs. Alejandro Luna, 12, lightweights; Mario Barrios vs. Eudy Bernardo, 10, junior welterweights. At Carson, Calif. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Andy Vences vs. Erick DeLeon, 10, junior lightweights. March 17 At Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York (ESPN), Jose Ramirez vs. Amir Imam, 12, for the vacant WBC World super lightweight title; Oleksandr Gvozdyk vs. Mehdi Amar, 12, for vacant WBC interim light heavyweight title; Felix Verdejo vs Antonio Lozada Jr., 10, lightweights; Christopher Diaz vs. Miguel Beltran Jr., 10, super featherweights. March 18 At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Moises Calleros, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title. At Marseille, France Ryad Merhy vs. Arsen Goulamirian, 12, for vacant WBA World cruiserweight title. At Cardiff, Wales (SHO), Anthony Joshua vs. Joseph Parker, 12, IBF-WBA-WBO heavyweight titles; Alexander Povetkin vs. David Price, 12, heavyweights. April 7 At TBA (SHO), Jarrett Hurd vs. Erislandy Lara, 12, IBF-WBA junior middleweight titles. At San Juan, Puerto Rico, Angel Acosta vs. Ryuji Hara, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title. April 14 At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Martin Murray, 12, for Saunders’ WBO middleweight title; Terry Flanagan vs. Maurice Hooker, 12, for the vacant WBO super lightweight title. April 15 At Yokohama, Japan, Ryota Murata vs. Felice Blandamura, 12, for Murata’s WBA World middleweight title. April 21 At TBA (SHO), Adrien Broner vs. Omar Figueroa, 12, junior welterweights. May 5 At TBA (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s IBF-WBA-WBC middleweight titles. May 11 At Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for IBF-WBA-WBC cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). May 19 At Montreal (SHO), Adonis Stevenson vs. Badou Jack, 12, for Stevenson’s WBC light heavyweight title. At Leeds, England, Lee Selby vs. Josh Warrington, 12, for Selby’s IBF featherweight title.

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with LHP Hector Santiago on a minor league contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with C Chris Stewart on a one-year contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Bud Norris on a one-year contract. Designated RHP Rowan Wick for assignment. Frontier League GRIZZLIES — Signed RHP Tyler Hunt and RHP Matt Oxner. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed RHP Connor Kelly. NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP Neil Kozikowski. RASCALS — Signed OF Connor Oliver to a contract extension. Placed RHP Tim Koons and OF Brandon Thomas on the suspended list. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Signed LHP James Murly and 1B/OF Ryan Rodriguez. BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES SPARKS — Signed G Cappie Pondexter. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Named Chris Achuff assistant defensive line caoch, Ray Brown offensive line coach, Alonso Escalante defensive quality control coach, Charlie Harbison assistant defensive backs coach, Don Johnson senior assistant defensive line coach, Randal McCray assistant special teams coach, David Merritt Sr. defensive backs coach, Jason Michael tight ends coach, Troy Rothenbuhler offensive quality control coach, Cameron Turner offensive assistant coach and Kirby Wilson running backs coach. Retained linebackers coach Larry Foote, wide receivers coach Kevin Garver, assistant offensive line coach Steve Heiden, quarterbacks coach Byron Leftwich, strength and conditioning coach Buddy Morris, and running backs coach Terry Allen. ATLANTA FALCONS — Named Bernie Parmalee running backs coach, Mayur Chaudhari assistant special teams coach and Chad Walker assistant offensive coach. BUFFALO BILLS — Named Terry Robiskie receivers coach. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed T Bobby Hart. NEW YORK JETS — Promoted quarterbacks coach Jeremy Bates to offensive coordinator. Named Rick Dennison offensive line coach/run game coordinator and Steve Jackson assistant defensive backs coach. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed C Daniel Kilgore to a three-year contract extension. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Assigned D Korbinian Holzer to San Diego (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled F Michael Mersch from Ontario (AHL). BLUES — Reassigned F Tage Thompson to San Antonio (AHL) and D Nolan De Jong to Colorado (ECHL). Announced San Antonio hae recalled F Brady Shaw from Colorado. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Signed general manager Jim Benning to a multiyear contract extension.

COLLEGES

SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK RED BULLS — Acquired a 2019 fourth-round draft pick from Toronto for the right of first refusal for G Caleb Patterson-Sewell.

W: SIU Edwardsville at UT Martin, 2 p.m. W: UMSL at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Stephens at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at FreedHardeman, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Park, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri at Auburn, 6 p.m. M: Eastern Illinois at Southeast Missouri, 6:30 p.m. M: SIU Edwardsville at UT Martin, 7 p.m. M: UMSL at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Missouri Baptist at FreedHardeman, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at Park, 7:30 p.m.

COLLEGE CITADEL — Named Dave Zelenock volleyball coach. HAMPTON — Named Bobby Blizzard wide receivers coach and Kenyon Blue cornerbacks coach. RADFORD — Named Scott Davis associate athletics director for advancement. TENNESSEE — Announced Robert Gillespie, running backs coach, will not return next season.

SOCCER Champions League (Home teams listed first) SECOND ROUND | FIRST LEG Tuesday Basel (Switzerland) 0, Manchester City (England) 4 Juventus (Italy) 2, Tottenham (England) 2 Wednesday Real Madrid (Spain) 3, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1 Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool (England) 5 Feb. 20 Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Feb. 21 Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m. SECOND LEG March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

Area schools Baseball

SW Illinois 2, Webster 1 Webster 5, SW Illinois 2

Women’s basketball

St. Louis CC 84, Lincoln Land CC 64

Men’s basketball

St. Louis CC 86, Mineral Area College 75 Wrestling Mizzou 30, SIUE 9

Thursday’s basketball schedule

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

Wednesday 1. UConn (25-0) did not play. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 2. Mississippi State (26-0) did not play. Next: at Vanderbilt, Thursday. 3. Baylor (24-1) did not play. Next: vs. Kansas, Saturday. 4. Louisville (25-2) did not play. Next: at Boston College, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (23-2) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Thursday. 6. Texas (21-4) beat Texas Tech 87-72. Next: at No. 21 Oklahoma State, Saturday. 7. UCLA (21-4) did not play. Next: at No. 15 Oregon State, Friday. 8. South Carolina (20-5) did not play. Next: at No. 20 Georgia, Thursday. 9. Oregon (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 10. Maryland (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Thursday. 11. Tennessee (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 12. Florida State (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 13. Missouri (20-5) did not play. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 14. Stanford (18-8) did not play. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 15. Oregon State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 UCLA, Friday. 16. Ohio State (21-6) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Sunday. 17. Duke (20-6) did not play. Next: at Syracuse, Thursday. 17. Texas A&M (19-7) did not play. Next: vs. Florida, Thursday. 19. Green Bay (22-2) did not play. Next: at Cleveland State, Thursday. 20. Georgia (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 South Carolina, Thursday. 21. Oklahoma State (18-7) did not play. Next: vs. No. 6 Texas, Saturday. 22. South Florida (21-5) beat SMU 64-54. Next: at UCF, Sunday. 23. Michigan (20-8) lost to Minnesota 93-87. Next: vs. No. 10 Maryland, Thursday. 24. Belmont (24-3) did not play. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Thursday. 25. N.C. State (20-6) did not play. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday.

Men’s national scores East American U. 60, Boston U. 56 Bucknell 94, Loyola (Md.) 53 G. Wash. 83, UMass 72 Holy Cross 70, Army 65 Lehigh 88, Colgate 78 Navy 71, Lafayette 69 Providence 76, Villanova 71 Saint Joseph’s 71, Fordham 55 South Davidson 74, VCU 63 Duke 74, Virginia Tech 52 East Carolina 82, Tulane 80 Florida St. 81, Clemson 79, OT George Mason 85, Dayton 67 Houston Bapt. 77, Northwestern St. 70 SE Louisiana 71, New Orleans 64 UCF 72, South Florida 57 Vanderbilt 81, Mississippi St. 80 Midwest Bradley 70, Illinois St. 58 Cleveland St. 75, Detroit 72 Drake 90, Indiana St. 76 Fort Wayne 90, W. Illinois 74 Indiana 78, Illinois 68 Loyola (Chi.) 80, Valparaiso 71 Michigan 74, Iowa 59 S. Illinois 81, Missouri St. 80, OT Youngstown St. 75, Oakland 73 Southwest Kansas St. 82, Oklahoma St. 72 Lamar 85, Incarnate Word 62 McNeese St. 76, Cent. Arkansas 72 South Dakota 85, Oral Roberts 67 Steph. F. Austin 87, Texas A&M-CC 68 Far West Denver 94, Nebraska-Omaha 78 East American U. 60, Boston U. 56 Bucknell 94, Loyola (Md.) 53 G. Wash. 83, UMass 72 Holy Cross 70, Army 65 Lehigh 88, Colgate 78 Navy 71, Lafayette 69 Providence 76, Villanova 71 Saint Joseph’s 71, Fordham 55 South Davidson 74, VCU 63 Duke 74, Virginia Tech 52 Florida St. 81, Clemson 79, OT George Mason 85, Dayton 67 Houston Bapt. 77, Northwestern St. 70 UCF 72, South Florida 57 Vanderbilt 81, Mississippi St. 80 Midwest Cleveland St. 75, Detroit 72 Drake 90, Indiana St. 76 Fort Wayne 90, W. Illinois 74 Loyola (Chi.) 80, Valparaiso 71 Michigan 74, Iowa 59 Youngstown St. 75, Oakland 73 Southwest Kansas St. 82, Oklahoma St. 72 Lamar 85, Incarnate Word 62 McNeese St. 76, Cent. Arkansas 72 South Dakota 85, Oral Roberts 67

GOLF Area holes in one Emerald Greens • Wayne Keagy, hole No. 6, 120 yards, 9-iron, Feb. 14. Whitmoor • Jason Steeno, hole No. 11, 150 yards, 8-iron.

PGA Tour Feb. 15-18 • Genesis Open, Riviera CC, Los Angeles Feb. 22-25 • Honda Classic, PGA National (Champion GC), Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. March 1-4 • WGC-Mexico Championship, Club de Golf Chapultepec, Mexico City March 8-11 • Valspar Championship, Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead), Palm Harbor, Fla. March. 15-18 • Arnold Palmer Invitational, Bay Hill Golf Club and Lodge, Orlando, Fla. March 21-25 • WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Austin CC, Austin, Texas March 22-25 • Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, Corales Punatacana Resort & Club, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. March 29-April 1 • Houston Open, Golf Club of Houston (Tournament Course), Humble, Texas April 5-8 • Masters, Augusta National GC, Augusta, Ga. April 12-15 • RBC Heritage, Harbour Town GL, Hilton Head Island, S.C. April 19-22 • Valero Texas Open, TPC San Antonio (AT&T Oaks Course), San Antonio April 26-29 • Zurich Classic of New Orleans, TPC Louisiana, Avondale, La. May 3-6 • Wells Fargo Championship, Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, N.C. May 10-13 • The Players Championship, TPC Sawgrass (Stadium Course), Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. May 17-20 • AT&T Byron Nelson, Trinity Forest GC, Dallas May 24-27 • Dean & DeLuca Invitational, Colonial CC, Fort Worth, Texas May 31-June 3 • Memorial Tournament, Muirfield Village GC, Dublin, Ohio June 7-10 • FedEx St. Jude Classic, TPC Southwind, Memphis, Tenn. June 14-17 • U.S. Open, Shinnecock Hills GC, Southampton, N.Y. June 21-24 • Travelers Championship, TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn. June 28-July 1 • The National, TBA July 5-8 • The Greenbrier Classic, The Greenbrier (The Old White TPC), White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. July 12-15 • John Deere Classic, TPC Deere Run, Silvis, Ill. July 19-22 • The Open Championship, Carnoustie GC, Carnoustie, Scotland July 19-22 • Barbasol Championship, Robert Trent Jones Trail (Grand National Lake), Auburn, Ala. July 26-29 • RBC Canadian Open, Glen Abbey GC, Oakville, Ontario Aug. 2-5 • WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, Firestone CC (South Course), Akron, Ohio Aug. 2-5 • Barracuda Championship, Montreux Golf and CC, Reno, Nev. Aug. 9-12 • PGA Championship, Bellerive CC, St. Louis Aug. 16-19 • Wyndham Championship, Sedgefield CC, Greensboro, N.C. Aug. 23-26 • The Northern Trust, Ridgewood CC, Paramus, N.J. Aug. 31-Sept. 3 • Dell Technologies Championship, TPC Boston, Norton, Mass. Sept. 6-9 • BMW Championship, Aronimink GC, Newtown Square, Pa. Sept. 20-23 • Tour Championship, East Lake GC, Atlanta Sept. 28-30 • Ryder Cup, Le Golf National (Albatross Course), SaintQuentin-en-Yvelines, France

LPGA Tour Feb 15-18 • ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open, Kooyonga GC, Adelaide Feb. 21-24 • Honda LPGA Thailand, Siam CC, Chonburi March 1-4 • HSBC Women’s Championship, Sentosa GC, Singapore March 15-18 • Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25 • Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1 • ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif. April 11-14 • LOTTE Championship, Ko Olina GC, Kapolei, Hawaii April 19-22 • HUGEL-JTBC Championship, Wilshire CC, Los Angeles April 26-29 • Event name TBA, Lake Merced GC, San Francisco May 3-6 • Volunteers of America LPGA Texas Classic, Old American GC, The Colony, Texas May 17-20 • Kingsmill Championship, Kingsmill Resort, Williamsburg, Va. May 24-27 • LPGA Volvik Championship, Travis Pointe CC, Ann Arbor, Mich. May 31-June 3 • U.S. Women’s Open, Shoal Creek (Ala.) G&CC June 8-10 • ShopRite LPGA Classic, Stockton Seaview Hotel and GC, Galloway, N.J. June 14-17 • Meijer LPGA Classic, Blythefield CC, Grand Rapids, Mich. June 22-24 • Walmart NW Arkansas Championship, Pinnacle CC, Rogers, Ark. June 28-July 1 • KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, Kemper Lakes GC, Olympia Fields, Ill. July 5-8 • Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, Thornberry Creek at Oneida (Wis.) July 12-15 • Marathon Classic, Highland Meadows GC, Sylvania, Ohio July 26-29 • Aberdeen Standard Investments Ladies Scottish Open, Gullane GC, East Lothian, Scotland Aug. 2-5 • Ricoh Women’s British Open, Royal Lytham & St Annes, Lancashire, England Aug. 16-19 • Indy Women in Tech Championship, Brickyard Crossing GC, Indianapolis Aug. 23-26 • CP Women’s Open, Wascana CC, Regina, Saskatchewan Aug. 30-Sept. 2 • Cambia Portland (Ore.) Classic, Columbia Edgewater CC Sept. 13-16 • The Evian Championship, Evian Resort, Evian-les-Bains, France Sept. 27-30 • Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia, TPC Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Oct. 4-7 • UL International Crown, Jack Nicklaus GC Korea, Incheon Oct. 11-14 • LPGA KEB-Hana Bank Championship, Incheon, South Korea. Oct. 18-21 • Event name TBA, course TBA, Shanghai Oct. 25-28 • Swinging Skirts LPGA Taiwan Championship, Miramar G&CC, New Taipai City Nov. 2-4 • TOTO Japan Classic, Seta GC, Shiga, Japan Nov. 7-10 • Blue Bay LPGA, Jian Lake Blue Bay GC, Hainan Island, China Nov. 15-18 • CME Group Tour Championship, Tiburon GC, Naples, Fla.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FOR THE RECORD

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 41 16 Boston 40 19 Philadelphia 30 25 New York 23 36 Brooklyn 19 40 W L Southeast 33 24 Washington Miami 30 28 Charlotte 24 33 Orlando 18 39 Atlanta 18 41 Central W L Cleveland 34 22 Milwaukee 32 24 Indiana 33 25 Detroit 28 29 Chicago 20 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 44 13 San Antonio 35 24 New Orleans 31 26 Memphis 18 38 Dallas 18 40 W L Northwest 35 25 Minnesota Oklahoma City 33 26 Portland 32 26 Denver 31 26 Utah 30 28 Pacific W L Golden State 44 14 30 26 LA Clippers LA Lakers 23 33 Sacramento 18 39 Phoenix 18 41

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

Pct .719 .678 .545 .390 .322 Pct .579 .517 .421 .316 .305 Pct .607 .571 .569 .491 .351 Pct .772 .593 .544 .321 .310 Pct .583 .559 .552 .544 .517 Pct .759 .536 .411 .316 .305

GB — 2 10 19 23 GB — 3½ 9 15 16 GB — 2 2 6½ 14½ GB — 10 13 25½ 26½ GB — 1½ 2 2½ 4 GB — 13 20 25½ 26½

L10 9-1 5-5 6-4 2-8 1-9 L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 8-2 7-3 6-4 2-8 L10 10-0 4-6 5-5 1-9 2-8 L10 4-6 4-6 6-4 7-3 10-0 L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str W-7 L-3 W-5 L-8 L-7 Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-3 L-2 Str W-4 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-1

Home 24-4 21-11 18-10 16-12 11-21 Home 17-10 14-12 15-15 11-16 13-17 Home 20-7 19-9 20-11 19-12 13-16

Away 17-12 19-8 12-15 7-24 8-19 Away 16-14 16-16 9-18 7-23 5-24 Away 14-15 13-15 13-14 9-17 7-21

Conf 25-7 25-13 16-13 11-24 12-22 Conf 20-14 21-17 13-18 11-25 8-30 Conf 25-12 19-17 23-15 17-19 17-17

Str W-10 L-3 W-3 L-7 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 W-11 Str L-1 W-2 L-2 L-1 L-7

Home 23-6 22-6 15-12 13-17 11-19 Home 23-7 20-10 17-11 23-7 18-9 Home 22-7 16-12 14-14 8-17 9-21

Away 21-7 13-18 16-14 5-21 7-21 Away 12-18 13-16 15-15 8-19 12-19 Away 22-7 14-14 9-19 10-22 9-20

Conf 26-8 20-14 15-19 15-22 10-28 Conf 26-10 18-17 18-15 20-18 19-14 Conf 25-11 20-16 11-23 10-25 12-25

Wednesday Charlotte 104, Orlando 102 Detroit 104, Atlanta 98 Philadelphia 104, Miami 102 Indiana 108, Brooklyn 103 Washington 118, New York 113 Houston 100, Sacramento 91 LA Clippers 129, Boston 119 New Orleans 139, LA Lakers 117 Oklahoma City 121, Memphis 114 Toronto 122, Chicago 98 Utah 107, Phoenix 97 Portland 123, Golden State 117 Tuesday Toronto 115, Miami 112 Cleveland 120, Oklahoma City 112 Houston 126, Minnesota 108 Milwaukee 97, Atlanta 92 Sacramento 114, Dallas 109 Denver 117, San Antonio 109 Thursday Denver at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Friday Team World vs. Team USA at Los Angeles, Calif., 8 p.m. Saturday No games scheduled. Sunday 2018 All-Star game Team LeBron vs. Team Stephen at Los Angeles, Calif., 7 p.m.

Beal rallies Wizards past Knicks NOTEBOOK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bradley Beal (Chaminade prep) scored 36 points, and the visiting Washington Wizards overcame a 27-point deficit to beat the slumping New York Knicks 118-113 on Wednesday night. St. Louis native Otto Porter Jr. added 22 points and Ian Mahinmi had 17 for the Wizards, who trailed 68-41 late in the second quarter. Washington then went on a 42-15 run to tie it at 83 with 3:32 left in the third. Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 37 points — 32 in the first half — to lead the Knicks, who’ve lost a season-worst eight straight and are 0-4 since losing All-Star Kristaps Porzingis to a season-ending knee injury. Enes Kanter added 24 points and 14 rebounds. Markieff Morris’ 3-pointer with 1:22 left in the third quarter gave Washington its first lead since it made the game’s first basket. Washington led for good after Porter’s jumper with 6:27 remaining and pulled ahead by as many as eight on three occasions in the final minutes.

Embiid sits out • Philadelphia center Joel Embiid sat out the 76ers’ game Wednesday night against Miami because of soreness in his right ankle. Scheduled to start for the Eastern Conference in the All-Star game this weekend, Embiid had 17 points in a victory over New York on Monday night. Dunn back with Bulls • Guard Kris Dunn was back in the Chicago Bulls’ lineup after missing 11 games because of a concussion. Dunn is averaging 13.7 points and 6.4 assists. He was injured making a fast-break dunk against the Golden State Warriors on Jan. 17. He landed awkwardly and his face slammed into the floor, resulting in a concussion and two dislocated front teeth. Warriors’ McCaw sidelined • Second-year Warriors guard Patrick McCaw will miss at least four weeks after breaking a bone in his left wrist Monday night against the Suns. McCaw is averaging 3.7 points, 1.4 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 15.6 minutes for the defending NBA champions.

NBA SUMMARIES 76ers 104, Heat 102

Wizards 118, Knicks 113

Pacers 108, Nets 103

Miami: Richardson 2-5 0-0 6, Winslow 0-3 3-4 3, Whiteside 7-10 2-3 16, Dragic 6-14 4-6 18, T.Johnson 4-7 2-2 12, Babbitt 2-3 0-0 6, J.Johnson 8-10 4-5 22, Adebayo 0-3 3-4 3, Wade 4-13 0-2 8, Ellington 2-9 3-3 8. Totals 35-77 21-29 102. Philadelphia: Covington 2-13 4-5 9, Saric 5-12 6-6 19, A.Johnson 2-2 1-2 5, Simmons 8-15 2-5 18, Redick 6-19 0-0 14, Booker 4-6 1-2 9, Holmes 4-7 3-5 11, McConnell 1-6 0-0 2, Belinelli 7-12 0-0 17. Totals 39-92 17-25 104. Miami 29 33 19 21 — 102 Philadelphia 20 19 34 31 — 104 3-point goals: Miami 11-27 (J.Johnson 2-2, T.Johnson 2-3, Richardson 2-3, Babbitt 2-3, Dragic 2-5, Ellington 1-7, Wade 0-2, Winslow 0-2), Philadelphia 9-35 (Belinelli 3-5, Saric 3-8, Redick 2-12, Covington 1-8, Holmes 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 29 (Whiteside 10), Philadelphia 60 (Simmons 12). Assists: Miami 23 (T.Johnson 6), Philadelphia 25 (Simmons 10). Total fouls: Miami 21, Philadelphia 23. Technicals: McConnell, Redick, Saric. A: 20,492 (21,600).

Washington: Porter Jr. 10-18 2-3 22, Morris 6-11 0-0 13, Gortat 3-7 0-0 6, Beal 14-22 4-4 36, Satoransky 4-8 0-0 9, Oubre Jr. 1-6 0-0 2, Scott 2-6 0-0 5, Mahinmi 6-8 5-8 17, Meeks 2-2 4-4 8. Totals 48-88 15-19 118. New York: Hardaway Jr. 14-24 3-3 37, Beasley 8-24 0-0 16, Kanter 9-15 6-8 24, Jack 1-5 2-2 5, Lee 4-12 0-0 8, Thomas 3-4 0-0 8, O’Quinn 1-2 0-0 2, Ntilikina 2-2 1-2 5, Mudiay 3-9 2-3 8. Totals 45-97 14-18 113. Washington 26 25 39 28 — 118 New York 39 33 15 26 — 113 3-point goals: Washington 7-22 (Beal 4-7, Morris 1-2, Scott 1-2, Satoransky 1-4, Porter Jr. 0-3, Oubre Jr. 0-4), New York 9-19 (Hardaway Jr. 6-9, Thomas 2-2, Jack 1-1, Mudiay 0-2, Lee 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 45 (Gortat, Mahinmi 8), New York 42 (Kanter 14). Assists: Washington 31 (Satoransky 11), New York 21 (Kanter, Jack 5). Total fouls: Washington 16, New York 17. A: 19,812 (19,812).

Indiana: Bogdanovic 5-11 2-2 14, T.Young 5-12 3-4 13, Turner 2-8 6-6 11, Joseph 5-12 4-7 15, Oladipo 9-24 6-6 25, Jefferson 6-7 1-1 13, Sabonis 3-7 2-2 8, J.Young 1-2 0-0 2, Stephenson 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 39-90 24-28 108. Brooklyn: Carroll 6-13 4-6 21, Acy 2-4 2-2 8, Allen 4-7 2-3 10, Dinwiddie 0-7 7-10 7, Crabbe 9-16 1-1 24, Cunningham 3-9 0-1 6, Mozgov 0-2 0-0 0, Russell 7-14 4-4 18, Harris 4-11 0-0 9. Totals 35-83 20-27 103. Indiana 22 32 19 35 — 108 Brooklyn 23 31 25 24 — 103 3-point goals: Indiana 6-15 (Bogdanovic 2-6, Joseph 1-1, Turner 1-1, Stephenson 1-2, Oladipo 1-4, T.Young 0-1), Brooklyn 13-35 (Carroll 5-8, Crabbe 5-11, Acy 2-4, Harris 1-4, Russell 0-2, Cunningham 0-2, Dinwiddie 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 52 (Turner 14), Brooklyn 44 (Carroll 10). Assists: Indiana 20 (Oladipo 4), Brooklyn 24 (Russell 9). Total fouls: Indiana 20, Brooklyn 20. A: 13,159 (17,732).

Hornets 104, Magic 102

Sacramento: Jackson 5-9 0-0 12, Sampson 3-3 1-2 7, Cauley-Stein 6-16 0-2 12, Fox 3-10 2-2 9, Bogdanovic 8-15 0-0 20, Koufos 0-3 0-0 0, Hield 5-14 0-0 12, Temple 6-12 0-0 13, Carter 2-5 2-2 6. Totals 38-87 5-8 91. Houston: Mbah a Moute 4-9 2-2 11, Tucker 4-8 0-0 10, Capela 6-11 1-1 13, Paul 6-11 4-4 19, Harden 7-19 9-11 28, Black 0-0 0-0 0, Anderson 3-9 0-0 8, Green 1-7 0-0 2, Johnson 2-9 4-4 9. Totals 33-83 20-22 100. Sacramento 25 20 18 28 — 91 Houston 20 35 17 28 — 100 3-point goals: Sacramento 10-32 (Bogdanovic 4-8, Jackson 2-5, Hield 2-9, Fox 1-3, Temple 1-5, Carter 0-2), Houston 14-49 (Harden 5-15, Paul 3-7, Tucker 2-6, Anderson 2-7, Mbah a Moute 1-5, Johnson 1-5, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 48 (Cauley-Stein, Koufos 8), Houston 48 (Capela 11). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Cauley-Stein, Bogdanovic 5), Houston 19 (Harden 9). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Houston 14. A: 18,055 (18,055).

Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 2-7 1-2 5, Williams 2-8 1-2 6, Howard 9-16 4-6 22, Walker 6-19 4-4 20, Batum 5-11 0-0 14, Kaminsky 1-5 0-0 2, Zeller 3-3 0-0 6, Carter-Williams 2-5 2-2 6, Lamb 6-10 3-3 17, Graham 2-4 0-0 6. Totals 38-88 15-19 104. Orlando: Simmons 2-5 1-1 5, Hezonja 10-20 0-0 21, Biyombo 3-7 5-6 11, Augustin 5-11 2-2 16, Fournier 5-15 1-2 13, Iwundu 1-1 2-2 4, Speights 5-12 2-2 16, Birch 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 2-8 2-2 8, Afflalo 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 36-86 15-17 102. Charlotte 20 34 31 19 — 104 Orlando 26 27 25 24 — 102 3-point goals: Charlotte 13-30 (Batum 4-7, Walker 4-8, Lamb 2-3, Graham 2-3, Williams 1-5, Kaminsky 0-2, Carter-Williams 0-2), Orlando 15-37 (Augustin 4-6, Speights 4-8, Mack 2-3, Afflalo 2-3, Fournier 2-10, Hezonja 1-6, Simmons 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 45 (Howard 13), Orlando 48 (Biyombo 11). Assists: Charlotte 26 (Batum 7), Orlando 21 (Augustin 4). Total fouls: Charlotte 15, Orlando 17. A: 18,428 (18,846).

Pistons 104, Hawks 98 Atlanta: Prince 4-15 6-7 14, Collins 3-8 5-6 11, Dedmon 4-9 0-0 8, Delaney 3-9 4-5 11, Dorsey 4-11 0-0 9, Bembry 3-6 0-0 6, White 6-11 0-0 15, Muscala 3-8 0-0 7, Plumlee 2-3 0-0 4, Taylor 6-9 1-1 13. Totals 38-89 16-19 98. Detroit: Johnson 4-9 5-6 14, Griffin 4-10 1-3 13, Drummond 5-10 3-3 13, Smith 8-13 6-7 22, Bullock 6-13 0-0 15, Ennis III 3-6 4-4 11, Tolliver 3-10 2-2 11, Nelson 0-5 0-0 0, Kennard 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 35-83 21-25 104. 98 Atlanta 14 19 28 37 — 22 23 37 22 — 104 Detroit 3-point goals: Atlanta 6-33 (White 3-7, Delaney 1-2, Dorsey 1-4, Muscala 1-5, Bembry 0-2, Taylor 0-2, Collins 0-2, Dedmon 0-3, Prince 0-6), Detroit 13-33 (Griffin 4-7, Bullock 3-7, Tolliver 3-8, Johnson 1-3, Ennis III 1-3, Kennard 1-4, Nelson 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 43 (Collins 10), Detroit 47 (Drummond 15). Assists: Atlanta 25 (Taylor, Delaney 7), Detroit 26 (Griffin, Smith 9). Total fouls: Atlanta 21, Detroit 18. Technicals: Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 15,849 (21,000).

Raptors 122, Bulls 98 Toronto: Anunoby 2-8 1-3 5, Ibaka 9-12 0-0 20, Valanciunas 7-9 0-0 14, Lowry 5-10 6-6 20, DeRozan 3-11 1-1 7, Miles 1-2 1-1 4, Powell 1-6 0-0 2, McKinnie 1-1 0-0 3, Siakam 7-9 1-2 17, Nogueira 1-2 0-0 2, Poeltl 4-4 2-2 10, Wright 3-7 0-0 7, VanVleet 4-11 0-0 11. Totals 48-92 12-15 122. Chicago: Holiday 3-6 0-0 8, Markkanen 5-10 3-3 14, Lopez 5-8 0-0 10, Dunn 3-9 2-2 8, LaVine 5-17 0-0 11, Valentine 2-7 2-2 6, Zipser 1-5 0-0 2, Portis 8-14 2-4 18, Vonleh 1-1 1-1 3, Felicio 1-2 2-2 4, Grant 3-7 0-0 6, Arcidiacono 0-1 0-0 0, Nwaba 2-4 4-6 8. Totals 39-91 16-20 98. 27 34 34 27 — 122 Toronto Chicago 33 16 27 22 — 98 3-point goals: Toronto 14-38 (Lowry 4-7, VanVleet 3-6, Siakam 2-2, Ibaka 2-3, McKinnie 1-1, Miles 1-2, Wright 1-3, Nogueira 0-1, Valanciunas 0-1, DeRozan 0-3, Anunoby 0-4, Powell 0-5), Chicago 4-24 (Holiday 2-4, Markkanen 1-3, LaVine 1-4, Grant 0-1, Nwaba 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-1, Portis 0-2, Dunn 0-2, Valentine 0-3, Zipser 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 50 (Valanciunas 9), Chicago 42 (Nwaba, Markkanen 6). Assists: Toronto 38 (Lowry 10), Chicago 17 (Grant 7). Total fouls: Toronto 22, Chicago 16. Technicals: Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg. A: 21,006 (20,917).

Rockets 100, Kings 91

Pelicans 139, Lakers 117

Clippers 129, Celtics 119 L.A. Clippers: Harris 8-16 2-2 21, Gallinari 4-11 10-10 20, Jordan 11-14 8-9 30, Rivers 4-10 0-0 10, Bradley 5-8 0-0 10, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Harrell 3-5 3-4 9, Teodosic 3-6 2-2 10, L.Williams 6-18 5-6 19. Totals 44-88 30-33 129. Boston: Tatum 4-13 1-1 10, Horford 8-17 2-2 20, Baynes 4-8 0-0 8, Irving 11-21 6-6 33, Brown 4-12 2-2 12, Morris 4-8 2-2 13, Theis 0-3 2-2 2, Monroe 2-3 4-4 8, Rozier 5-12 1-2 13. Totals 42-97 20-21 119. L.A. Clippers 34 27 32 36 — 129 25 32 34 28 — 119 Boston 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 11-29 (Harris 3-5, Teodosic 2-3, Rivers 2-5, Gallinari 2-7, L.Williams 2-9), Boston 15-31 (Irving 5-7, Morris 3-4, Horford 2-4, Rozier 2-5, Brown 2-5, Tatum 1-4, Theis 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 43 (Jordan 13), Boston 46 (Morris 11). Assists: L.A. Clippers 26 (L.Williams 6), Boston 24 (Irving 8). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 21, Boston 31. A: 18,624 (18,624).

L.A. Lakers: Ingram 9-17 3-4 21, Randle 9-13 2-2 20, Lopez 3-9 0-0 8, Hart 5-6 2-3 15, Caldwell-Pope 2-6 0-0 5, Kuzma 10-20 0-0 23, Brewer 2-5 5-6 9, Frye 1-1 0-0 3, Bryant 1-2 0-0 2, Zubac 1-2 2-2 4, Ennis 0-4 0-0 0, Thomas 1-1 1-1 3, Payton II 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 46-90 15-18 117. New Orleans: Moore 6-13 0-0 14, Davis 15-18 10-11 42, Okafor 1-4 1-2 3, Rondo 2-5 0-0 4, Holiday 10-19 2-2 24, Miller 6-8 3-3 19, Mirotic 7-17 0-0 16, Diallo 3-4 3-3 9, Liggins 1-2 0-0 3, Cooke 0-0 0-0 0, Clark 2-9 0-0 5. Totals 53-99 19-21 139. L.A. Lakers 33 33 25 26 — 117 New Orleans 46 33 24 36 — 139 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 10-22 (Hart 3-3, Kuzma 3-8, Lopez 2-4, Frye 1-1, Caldwell-Pope 1-2, Ennis 0-1, Payton II 0-1, Bryant 0-1, Ingram 0-1), New Orleans 14-32 (Miller 4-6, Davis 2-2, Moore 2-4, Holiday 2-5, Mirotic 2-8, Liggins 1-1, Clark 1-5, Rondo 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 37 (Caldwell-Pope 8), New Orleans 48 (Davis 15). Assists: L.A. Lakers 26 (Caldwell-Pope 8), New Orleans 35 (Holiday 11). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 21, New Orleans 20. Technicals: Thomas 2, Kuzma, L.A. Lakers coach Luke Walton 2, Rondo 2. Ejected: Thomas, Rondo. A: 15,436 (16,867).

Phoenix: Warren 2-7 1-2 5, Bender 2-5 0-0 6, Len 3-7 8-10 14, Payton 5-11 2-2 13, Booker 8-20 6-9 28, Dudley 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 10-15 0-1 22, Chriss 2-4 0-0 5, Ulis 1-4 0-0 2, Daniels 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 34-79 17-24 97. Utah: Ingles 4-16 2-2 13, Favors 7-9 4-6 18, Gobert 5-8 4-4 14, Mitchell 10-24 0-0 24, O’Neale 7-12 2-2 19, Crowder 5-12 5-6 15, Jerebko 0-5 2-2 2, Neto 1-5 0-0 2, Burks 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-92 19-22 107. 97 Phoenix 23 18 30 26 — Utah 27 23 22 35 — 107 3-point goals: Phoenix 12-29 (Booker 6-14, Jackson 2-3, Bender 2-5, Chriss 1-1, Payton 1-2, Ulis 0-1, Daniels 0-3), Utah 10-34 (Mitchell 4-11, O’Neale 3-3, Ingles 3-9, Favors 0-1, Neto 0-2, Crowder 0-4, Jerebko 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 41 (Payton 11), Utah 54 (Gobert 17). Assists: Phoenix 19 (Payton 12), Utah 22 (Mitchell 7). Total fouls: Phoenix 25, Utah 17. A: 18,306 (19,911).

Thunder 121, Grizzlies 114

Trail Blazers 123, Warriors 117

Oklahoma City: George 10-15 2-3 28, Anthony 7-18 1-1 19, Adams 4-9 3-5 11, Westbrook 6-14 11-12 23, Abrines 0-2 0-0 0, Huestis 0-2 0-2 0, Grant 2-3 1-4 5, Patterson 4-7 1-2 12, D.Johnson 1-1 1-2 3, Felton 3-7 4-4 12, Ferguson 3-3 0-0 8. Totals 40-81 24-35 121. Memphis: Brooks 6-15 0-0 14, Green 2-4 0-0 5, Gasol 4-11 2-3 10, Evans 8-18 3-5 23, Harrison 10-16 3-3 28, Parsons 2-4 0-0 5, Martin 7-12 2-2 17, Davis 4-4 0-0 8, Chalmers 1-2 2-2 4, McLemore 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-86 12-15 114. Oklahoma City 34 39 19 29 — 121 33 20 31 30 — 114 Memphis 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 17-37 (George 6-9, Anthony 4-10, Patterson 3-4, Ferguson 2-2, Felton 2-4, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-1, Abrines 0-2, Westbrook 0-4), Memphis 14-27 (Harrison 5-5, Evans 4-7, Brooks 2-6, Parsons 1-1, Martin 1-2, Green 1-2, Chalmers 0-1, Gasol 0-3). Fouled out: Harrison. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 38 (Westbrook 13), Memphis 41 (Evans 9). Assists: Oklahoma City 26 (Westbrook 15), Memphis 29 (Gasol 9). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 19, Memphis 25. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second), Evans, Memphis coach JB Bickerstaff, Harrison 2. Ejected: Harrison. A: 16,012 (18,119).

Jazz 107, Suns 97

Golden State: Durant 17-27 10-10 50, Green 6-13 3-3 16, Pachulia 0-1 1-2 1, Curry 6-17 2-2 17, Thompson 6-15 2-2 17, Casspi 0-2 0-0 0, Looney 0-0 0-0 0, West 3-5 0-0 6, McGee 2-2 0-0 4, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6, Young 0-3 0-0 0, Iguodala 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-90 18-19 117. Portland: Harkless 1-5 0-0 3, Aminu 3-4 2-2 9, Nurkic 7-14 3-6 17, Lillard 14-25 12-12 44, McCollum 12-26 2-2 29, Davis 0-1 0-0 0, Collins 1-1 0-0 3, Napier 3-10 0-0 8, Turner 2-5 2-2 6, Connaughton 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 45-93 21-24 123. Golden State 27 24 36 30 — 117 Portland 40 23 29 31 — 123 3-point goals: Golden State 13-37 (Durant 6-14, Thompson 3-7, Curry 3-10, Green 1-3, Young 0-3), Portland 12-33 (Lillard 4-11, McCollum 3-8, Napier 2-8, Collins 1-1, Aminu 1-2, Harkless 1-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Golden State 41 (Green 12), Portland 49 (Nurkic 13). Assists: Golden State 24 (Green 7), Portland 20 (Lillard 8). Total fouls: Golden State 24, Portland 18. Technicals: Golden State coach Warriors (Defensive three second). A: 19,520 (19,393).

AMERICA’S LINE

BOXING

Men’s national scores

NBA Favorite Points Underdog BUCKS 3 Nuggets T’WOLVES 10 Lakers COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog NORTHEASTERN 12 Drexel Purdue 10 WISCONSIN Cincinnati 3 HOUSTON HOFSTRA 4.5 William & Mary TOWSON 12.5 Delaware NC-WILMINGTON 1.5 Elon WICHITA ST 11.5 Temple CHARLOTTE PK Utep CONNECTICUT 3 Tulsa Charleston 5 JAMES MADISON APPALACHIAN ST 4 S Alabama COASTAL CARO 1 Troy PENN ST PK Ohio St Marshall 7.5 RICE Middle Tenn St 7 SOUTHERN MISS OLD DOMINION 10.5 Utsa UT-Arlington 3 UL-MONROE UL-LAFAYETTE 14 Texas St W Kentucky 4.5 N TEXAS GONZAGA 24 Loyola-M’mount LOUISIANA TECH 2 Uab USC 5.5 Oregon ARIZONA ST 1 Arizona WASHINGTON PK Utah Byu 11.5 PEPPERDINE SAN DIEGO 4 Pacific Cal-Santa Barb PK LONG BEACH ST PORTLAND 3.5 Santa Clara Cal-Davis 4.5 CAL-POLY SLO St. Mary’s-CA 9 SAN FRANCISCO CAL-IRVINE 8 Hawaii UCLA 8.5 Oregon St Colorado 4.5 WASHINGTON ST Added Games NC-Greensboro 10.5 CITADEL MERCER 16.5 Vmi FURMAN 16 Tenn-Chatt FAIRFIELD 10.5 Marist RIDER 13.5 Siena Manhattan 1.5 QUINNIPIAC SE MISSOURI ST 5 E Illinois Wofford 3 W CAROLINA TENN-MARTIN 4.5 SIU-Edw’ville BELMONT 17 E Kentucky N DAKOTA 5 Southern Utah MURRAY ST 10 Jack’ville St TENNESSEE ST 10.5 Morehead St AUSTIN PEAY 6 Tennessee Tech NO COLORADO 17 No Arizona Montana 1.5 E WASHINGTON IDAHO 12 Montana St SACRAMENTO ST 3 Idaho St PORTLAND ST 3.5 Weber St NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PENGUINS -$200/+$170 Kings Hurricanes -$110/-$110 DEVILS ISLANDERS -$135/+$115 Rangers SENATORS -$140/+$120 Sabres LIGHTNING -$260/+$220 Red Wings WILD -$125/+$105 Capitals PREDATORS -$200/+$170 Flames Ducks -$110/-$110 BLACKHAWKS Canadiens -$120/even COYOTES VEGAS KNIGHTS-$230/+$190 Oilers SHARKS -$220/+$180 Canucks Grand Salami: Over/under 63.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

Friday At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev. (ESPN), Raymundo Beltran vs. Paulus Moses, 12, for the vacant WBO World lightweight title; Egidijus Kavaliauskas vs. David Avanesyan, 10, welterweights. Saturday At Manchester, England, George Groves vs. Chris Eubank Jr., 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World and Eubanks’ IBO super middleweight titles (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Ryan Walsh vs. Isaac Lowe, 12, for Walsh’s British featherweight title; Zach Parker vs. Adasat Rodriguez, 10, super middleweights; Tommy Langford vs. Jack Arnfield, 12, for Langford’s British middleweight title; Arfan Iqbal vs. Simon Vallily, 10, for Iqbal’s English cruiserweight title. At El Paso, Texas (FOX), Devon Alexander vs. Victor Ortiz, 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Rogelio Medina, 12, super middleweights. At Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas (SHO), Danny Garcia vs. Brandon Rios, 12, welterweights; David Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for Benavidez’s WBC World super middleweight title; Ray Robinson vs. Yordenis Ugas, 12, welterweights; Lionell Thompson vs. Edwin Rodriguez, 10, light heavyweights; Ladarius Miller vs. Argenis Mendez, 10, lightweights. Feb. 22 At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif. (ESPN), Joseph Diaz, Jr. vs. Victor Terrazas, 12, for Diaz’s NABO featherweight title. Feb. 24 At the Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Wisaksil Wangek vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, for Wangek’s WBC World super flyweight title; Carlos Cuadras vs. McWilliams Arroyo, 10, junior bantamweights; Donnie Nietes vs. Juan Carlos Reveco, 12, for Nietes’ IBF flyweight title; Brian Viloria vs. Artem Dalakian, 12, for the vacant WBA World flyweight title. Feb. 28 At Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Danny Roman vs. Ryo Matsumoto, 12, for Roman’s WBA super bantamweight title. March 1 At Tokyo, Luis Nery vs. Shinsuke Yamanaka, 12, for Nery’s WBC World bantamweight title; Ryosuke Iwasa vs. Ernesto Saulong, 12, for Iwasa’s IBF junior featherweight title. March 3 At Paris, Brian Castano vs. Cedric Vitu, 12, for Castano’s WBA World super welterweight title. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Deontay Wilder vs. Luis Ortiz, 12, for Wilder’s WBC world heavyweight title; Jermall Charlo vs. Hugo Centeno, 12, for vacant WBC interim middleweight title. At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO), Sergey Kovalev vs. Igor Mikhalkin, 12, for Kovalev’s WBO-IBO light heavyweight titles; Dmitry Bivol vs. Sullivan Barrera, 12, for Bivol’s WBA World light heavyweight title; Vaughn Alexander vs. Jaime Solorio, 10, middleweights. March 6 At Chonburi, Thailand, Knockout CP Freshmart vs. Toto Landero, 12, for CP Freshmart’s WBA strawweight title. March 9 At Costa Mesa, Calif. (ESPN2), Ronny Rios vs. Azat Hovhannisyan, 10, junior featherweights. At Deadwood, S.D. (SHO), Regis Prograis vs. Viktor Postol, 12, for vacant interim WBC junior welterweight title; Ivan Baranchyk vs. Anthony Yigit, 12, junior welterweights. March 10 At Struer, Denmark, Dina Thorslund vs. Alicia Ashley, 10, for vacant WBC interim women’s junior featherweight title; Dennis Ceylan vs. Jesus Sanchez, 10, featherweights. At Alamodome, San Antonio (SHO), Sergey Lipinets vs. Mikey Garcia, 12, for Lipinets’s IBF junior welterweight title; Rances Barthelemy vs. Kiryl Relikh, 12, for the vacant WBA World super lightweight title; Richard Commey vs. Alejandro Luna, 12, lightweights; Mario Barrios vs. Eudy Bernardo, 10, junior welterweights. At Carson, Calif. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Andy Vences vs. Erick DeLeon, 10, junior lightweights. March 17 At Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York (ESPN), Jose Ramirez vs. Amir Imam, 12, for the vacant WBC World super lightweight title; Oleksandr Gvozdyk vs. Mehdi Amar, 12, for vacant WBC interim light heavyweight title; Felix Verdejo vs Antonio Lozada Jr., 10, lightweights; Christopher Diaz vs. Miguel Beltran Jr., 10, super featherweights. March 18 At Kobe, Japan, Ryuya Yamanaka vs. Moises Calleros, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBO strawweight title. At Marseille, France Ryad Merhy vs. Arsen Goulamirian, 12, for vacant WBA World cruiserweight title. At Cardiff, Wales (SHO), Anthony Joshua vs. Joseph Parker, 12, IBF-WBA-WBO heavyweight titles; Alexander Povetkin vs. David Price, 12, heavyweights. April 7 At TBA (SHO), Jarrett Hurd vs. Erislandy Lara, 12, IBF-WBA junior middleweight titles. At San Juan, Puerto Rico, Angel Acosta vs. Ryuji Hara, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title. April 14 At London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Martin Murray, 12, for Saunders’ WBO middleweight title; Terry Flanagan vs. Maurice Hooker, 12, for the vacant WBO super lightweight title. April 15 At Yokohama, Japan, Ryota Murata vs. Felice Blandamura, 12, for Murata’s WBA World middleweight title. April 21 At TBA (SHO), Adrien Broner vs. Omar Figueroa, 12, junior welterweights. May 5 At TBA (PPV), Gennady Golovkin vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, for Golovkin’s IBF-WBA-WBC middleweight titles. May 11 At Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for IBF-WBA-WBC cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). May 19 At Montreal (SHO), Adonis Stevenson vs. Badou Jack, 12, for Stevenson’s WBC light heavyweight title. At Leeds, England, Lee Selby vs. Josh Warrington, 12, for Selby’s IBF featherweight title.

East American U. 60, Boston U. 56 Bucknell 94, Loyola (Md.) 53 G. Wash. 83, UMass 72 Holy Cross 70, Army 65 Lehigh 88, Colgate 78 NC State 74, Syracuse 70 Navy 71, Lafayette 69 Providence 76, Villanova 71 Saint Joseph’s 71, Fordham 55 South Auburn 76, Kentucky 66 Davidson 74, VCU 63 Duke 74, Virginia Tech 52 East Carolina 82, Tulane 80 Florida St. 81, Clemson 79, OT George Mason 85, Dayton 67 Georgia 72, Florida 69, OT Houston Bapt. 77, Northwestern St. 70 Nicholls 73, Sam Houston 72 SE Louisiana 71, New Orleans 64 UCF 72, South Florida 57 Vanderbilt 81, Mississippi St. 80 Wake Forest 79, Georgia Tech 62 Midwest Bradley 70, Illinois St. 58 Cleveland St. 75, Detroit 72 Drake 90, Indiana St. 76 Fort Wayne 90, W. Illinois 74 Indiana 78, Illinois 68 Loyola (Chi.) 80, Valparaiso 71 Michigan 74, Iowa 59 S. Illinois 81, Missouri St. 80, OT St. John’s 77, DePaul 76 Xavier 102, Seton Hall 90 Youngstown St. 75, Oakland 73 Southwest Kansas St. 82, Oklahoma St. 72 Lamar 85, Incarnate Word 62 McNeese St. 76, Cent. Arkansas 72 Memphis 70, SMU 67 South Dakota 85, Oral Roberts 67 Steph. F. Austin 87, Texas A&M-CC 68 Far West Denver 94, Nebraska-Omaha 78 Fresno St. 77, San Jose St. 57 Nevada 77, Boise St. 72 New Mexico 78, Utah St. 63 UC Riverside 69, CS Northridge 62 UNLV 81, Air Force 73

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with LHP Hector Santiago on a minor league contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with C Chris Stewart on a one-year contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Bud Norris on a one-year contract. Designated RHP Rowan Wick for assignment. Frontier League GRIZZLIES — Signed RHP Tyler Hunt and RHP Matt Oxner. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed RHP Connor Kelly. NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP Neil Kozikowski. RASCALS — Signed OF Connor Oliver to a contract extension. Placed RHP Tim Koons and OF Brandon Thomas on the suspended list. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Signed LHP James Murly and 1B/OF Ryan Rodriguez. BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES SPARKS — Signed G Cappie Pondexter. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Named Chris Achuff assistant defensive line caoch, Ray Brown offensive line coach, Alonso Escalante defensive quality control coach, Charlie Harbison assistant defensive backs coach, Don Johnson senior assistant defensive line coach, Randal McCray assistant special teams coach, David Merritt Sr. defensive backs coach, Jason Michael tight ends coach, Troy Rothenbuhler offensive quality control coach, Cameron Turner offensive assistant coach and Kirby Wilson running backs coach. Retained linebackers coach Larry Foote, wide receivers coach Kevin Garver, assistant offensive line coach Steve Heiden, quarterbacks coach Byron Leftwich, strength and conditioning coach Buddy Morris, and running backs coach Terry Allen. ATLANTA FALCONS — Named Bernie Parmalee running backs coach, Mayur Chaudhari assistant special teams coach and Chad Walker assistant offensive coach. BUFFALO BILLS — Named Terry Robiskie receivers coach. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed T Bobby Hart. NEW YORK JETS — Promoted quarterbacks coach Jeremy Bates to offensive coordinator. Named Rick Dennison offensive line coach/run game coordinator and Steve Jackson assistant defensive backs coach. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed C Daniel Kilgore to a three-year contract extension. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Assigned D Korbinian Holzer to San Diego (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled F Michael Mersch from Ontario (AHL). BLUES — Reassigned F Tage Thompson to San Antonio (AHL) and D Nolan De Jong to Colorado (ECHL). Announced San Antonio hae recalled F Brady Shaw from Colorado. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Signed general manager Jim Benning to a multiyear contract extension.

COLLEGES

SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK RED BULLS — Acquired a 2019 fourth-round draft pick from Toronto for the right of first refusal for G Caleb Patterson-Sewell.

W: SIU Edwardsville at UT Martin, 2 p.m. W: UMSL at McKendree, 5:30 p.m. W: Stephens at LU-Belleville, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at FreedHardeman, 5:30 p.m. W: Harris-Stowe at Park, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri at Auburn, 6 p.m. M: Eastern Illinois at Southeast Missouri, 6:30 p.m. M: SIU Edwardsville at UT Martin, 7 p.m. M: UMSL at McKendree, 7:30 p.m. M: Missouri Baptist at FreedHardeman, 7:30 p.m. M: Harris-Stowe at Park, 7:30 p.m.

COLLEGE CITADEL — Named Dave Zelenock volleyball coach. HAMPTON — Named Bobby Blizzard wide receivers coach and Kenyon Blue cornerbacks coach. RADFORD — Named Scott Davis associate athletics director for advancement. TENNESSEE — Announced Robert Gillespie, running backs coach, will not return next season.

SOCCER Champions League (Home teams listed first) SECOND ROUND | FIRST LEG Tuesday Basel (Switzerland) 0, Manchester City (England) 4 Juventus (Italy) 2, Tottenham (England) 2 Wednesday Real Madrid (Spain) 3, Paris Saint-Germain (France) 1 Porto (Portugal) 0, Liverpool (England) 5 Feb. 20 Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Feb. 21 Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m. SECOND LEG March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

Area schools Baseball

SW Illinois 2, Webster 1 Webster 5, SW Illinois 2

Women’s basketball

St. Louis CC 84, Lincoln Land CC 64

Men’s basketball

St. Louis CC 86, Mineral Area College 75 Wrestling Mizzou 30, SIUE 9

Thursday’s basketball schedule

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

Wednesday 1. UConn (25-0) did not play. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 2. Mississippi State (26-0) did not play. Next: at Vanderbilt, Thursday. 3. Baylor (24-1) did not play. Next: vs. Kansas, Saturday. 4. Louisville (25-2) did not play. Next: at Boston College, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (23-2) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Thursday. 6. Texas (21-4) beat Texas Tech 87-72. Next: at No. 21 Oklahoma State, Saturday. 7. UCLA (21-4) did not play. Next: at No. 15 Oregon State, Friday. 8. South Carolina (20-5) did not play. Next: at No. 20 Georgia, Thursday. 9. Oregon (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 10. Maryland (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Thursday. 11. Tennessee (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 12. Florida State (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 13. Missouri (20-5) did not play. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 14. Stanford (18-8) did not play. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 15. Oregon State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 UCLA, Friday. 16. Ohio State (21-6) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Sunday. 17. Duke (20-6) did not play. Next: at Syracuse, Thursday. 17. Texas A&M (19-7) did not play. Next: vs. Florida, Thursday. 19. Green Bay (22-2) did not play. Next: at Cleveland State, Thursday. 20. Georgia (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 South Carolina, Thursday. 21. Oklahoma State (18-7) did not play. Next: vs. No. 6 Texas, Saturday. 22. South Florida (21-5) beat SMU 64-54. Next: at UCF, Sunday. 23. Michigan (20-8) lost to Minnesota 93-87. Next: vs. No. 10 Maryland, Thursday. 24. Belmont (24-3) did not play. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Thursday. 25. N.C. State (20-6) did not play. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday.

GOLF Area holes in one Emerald Greens • Wayne Keagy, hole No. 6, 120 yards, 9-iron, Feb. 14. Whitmoor • Jason Steeno, hole No. 11, 150 yards, 8-iron.

PGA Tour Feb. 15-18 • Genesis Open, Riviera CC, Los Angeles Feb. 22-25 • Honda Classic, PGA National (Champion GC), Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. March 1-4 • WGC-Mexico Championship, Club de Golf Chapultepec, Mexico City March 8-11 • Valspar Championship, Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead), Palm Harbor, Fla. March. 15-18 • Arnold Palmer Invitational, Bay Hill Golf Club and Lodge, Orlando, Fla. March 21-25 • WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Austin CC, Austin, Texas March 22-25 • Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, Corales Punatacana Resort & Club, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. March 29-April 1 • Houston Open, Golf Club of Houston (Tournament Course), Humble, Texas April 5-8 • Masters, Augusta National GC, Augusta, Ga. April 12-15 • RBC Heritage, Harbour Town GL, Hilton Head Island, S.C. April 19-22 • Valero Texas Open, TPC San Antonio (AT&T Oaks Course), San Antonio April 26-29 • Zurich Classic of New Orleans, TPC Louisiana, Avondale, La. May 3-6 • Wells Fargo Championship, Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, N.C. May 10-13 • The Players Championship, TPC Sawgrass (Stadium Course), Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. May 17-20 • AT&T Byron Nelson, Trinity Forest GC, Dallas May 24-27 • Dean & DeLuca Invitational, Colonial CC, Fort Worth, Texas May 31-June 3 • Memorial Tournament, Muirfield Village GC, Dublin, Ohio June 7-10 • FedEx St. Jude Classic, TPC Southwind, Memphis, Tenn. June 14-17 • U.S. Open, Shinnecock Hills GC, Southampton, N.Y. June 21-24 • Travelers Championship, TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn. June 28-July 1 • The National, TBA July 5-8 • The Greenbrier Classic, The Greenbrier (The Old White TPC), White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. July 12-15 • John Deere Classic, TPC Deere Run, Silvis, Ill. July 19-22 • The Open Championship, Carnoustie GC, Carnoustie, Scotland July 19-22 • Barbasol Championship, Robert Trent Jones Trail (Grand National Lake), Auburn, Ala. July 26-29 • RBC Canadian Open, Glen Abbey GC, Oakville, Ontario Aug. 2-5 • WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, Firestone CC (South Course), Akron, Ohio Aug. 2-5 • Barracuda Championship, Montreux Golf and CC, Reno, Nev. Aug. 9-12 • PGA Championship, Bellerive CC, St. Louis

LPGA Tour Feb 15-18 • ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open, Kooyonga GC, Adelaide Feb. 21-24 • Honda LPGA Thailand, Siam CC, Chonburi March 1-4 • HSBC Women’s Championship, Sentosa GC, Singapore March 15-18 • Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC, Phoenix March 22-25 • Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif. March 29-April 1 • ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC, Rancho Mirage, Calif. April 11-14 • LOTTE Championship, Ko Olina GC, Kapolei, Hawaii April 19-22 • HUGEL-JTBC Championship, Wilshire CC, Los Angeles April 26-29 • Event name TBA, Lake Merced GC, San Francisco May 3-6 • Volunteers of America LPGA Texas Classic, Old American GC, The Colony, Texas May 17-20 • Kingsmill Championship, Kingsmill Resort, Williamsburg, Va. May 24-27 • LPGA Volvik Championship, Travis Pointe CC, Ann Arbor, Mich. May 31-June 3 • U.S. Women’s Open, Shoal Creek (Ala.) G&CC June 8-10 • ShopRite LPGA Classic, Stockton Seaview Hotel and GC, Galloway, N.J. June 14-17 • Meijer LPGA Classic, Blythefield CC, Grand Rapids, Mich. June 22-24 • Walmart NW Arkansas Championship, Pinnacle CC, Rogers, Ark. June 28-July 1 • KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, Kemper Lakes GC, Olympia Fields, Ill. July 5-8 • Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, Thornberry Creek at Oneida (Wis.) July 12-15 • Marathon Classic, Highland Meadows GC, Sylvania, Ohio July 26-29 • Aberdeen Standard Investments Ladies Scottish Open, Gullane GC, East Lothian, Scotland


02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES

Misc. Autos

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B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Jack Bond O’Fallon wrestling With a takedown in overtime, Bond (41-3) defeated Joliet West’s Jonathan Pullen 5-3 at 170 pounds and will head to the Class 3A state tournament in Champaign as a sectional champion. It’s a second successive state trip for Bond, a senior who is ranked third by Illinois Matmen and fourth by the Illinois Wrestling Officials and Coaches Association. Bond, who placed first in tournament action at Mascoutah, second at Parkway South and third at both Geneseo and Francis Howell, has not lost to an Illinois wrestler this season. Katie Brown Lutheran South basketball A 5-foot-9 senior forward, Brown filled up the stat sheets in a 69-29 win over St. Pius X, piling up 14 points, 10 rebounds, nine steals and seven assists. It was one of the highlights of Brown’s season that includes being named to the all-tournament team at the John Burroughs Invitational after leading the Lancers to their second consecutive title at the event. A starter since midway through her sophomore season, Brown is averaging 13 points, six rebounds, two assists and 3.5 steals. She was a starter on the school’s volleyball team that won state in 2016 and finished second last fall. She has signed to play volleyball at Elmhurst College in Chicago. Caleb Conedera Timberland wrestling A junior, Conedera pinned his way to the championship at 132 pounds in the Class 4 District 2 tournament at Francis Howell, knocking off two-time state medalist Andrew Godier of Francis Howell Central in the title match. Conedera (37-3) won tournament titles earlier this season at Westminster, St. Charles West and in the Gateway Athletic Conference. He’s ranked fourth at 132 by missouriwrestling.com and by rankwrestlers. com. Payton Dunn Westminster swimming At the Metro League Championships, the Wildcats junior, won the 200 freestyle (1:59.50), 500 freestyle (5:16.83) and was the anchor in the 400 freestyle relay, which earned a state qualifying mark in their win. Dunn also swam the butterfly leg on the Wildcats’ 200 medley relay, which finished second. Last month at the COMO Invitational at Mizzou, which features many of the best teams from across the state, Dunn finished seventh in the 500 freestyle and 11th in the 200 freestyle. She will compete in the 200 freestyle and 500 freestyle at this weekend’s state meet and has made an early commitment to swim at Pepperdine. Connie Gonzalez MICDS squash A senior who is the No. 1 seed for the Rams, Gonzalez led her team to a second-place finish in Division III of the 2018 U.S. Squash High School National Championships in Philadelphia. MICDS, which was one of only a few teams not hailing from the Northeast, toppled the second and third seeds along the way. Gonzalez, who was 14-1 this season, went 3-1 in her matches at the tournament, capping it off with a 3-1 win over a player from Hopkins School. A senior co-captain previously voted team MVP three times, Gonzalez also helped MICDS advance to nationals by winning all four of her matches at the Mercersburg/Tom Flanagan Invitational. Jacob Orsay Ladue wrestling Orsay, who placed third at 160 pounds as a junior, captured his second consecutive district championship with two pins and a major decision in the Class 3 District 2 tournament at Hannibal. Orsay improved to 34-0 as a senior and has a record of 76-1 over the last two seasons. He’s ranked No. 1 at 170 by rankwrestlers. com and third by missouriwrestling.com. His other tournament titles this season came at John Burroughs, Chaminade, St. Charles and MICDS. Jamel Warren Hancock basketball A 6-foot-5 senior forward, Warren eclipsed the 1,000-point mark for his career in a win over Bayless on Tuesday. Last week, he had consecutive double-doubles to lead the conference champion Tigers to a pair of home wins. He had 17 points, 13 rebounds, four assists and three steals in a 59-48 win over DuBourg and put up 31 points, 11 rebounds and four steals to lift the Tigers past Valley Park 70-44. A four-year starter, Warren is averaging 14.5 points and 7.9 rebounds. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Send nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com

GO ONLINE FOR MORE Girls basketball • Jim Faasen’s weekly notebook takes a look at several area teams, including Parkway North after consecutive victories against Kirkwood and Incarnate Word. Basketball • Area leaders, schedules, box scores and photo galleries. Postseason schedules • Catch up on the latest matchups in the Illinois playoffs and get ready for the Missouri district tournaments to begin.

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

MISSOURI GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

A HAPPY HOME

Beard sisters won’t have to compete against each other thanks to meet’s new format BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

Ann Perry let out a sigh of relief when she found out her daughters would not have to face off against each other in the 43rd annual Missouri Girls Swimming and Diving Championships. A proud of mother of two top-notch swimmers who attend different schools, Perry realized she could yell in full throat for Cor Jesu senior Nicole Beard and Parkway West sophomore Lauren Beard. “Usually, when they go against each other in club (meets), I just yell, ‘Go Beard girls,’ “ Perry said. Mom will not have to do that this time when the twoclass, three-day meet begins Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. The MSHSAA has divided the state meet into a Class 1 and Class 2 format for the first time in the long history of event. The boys state meet also used a split-class program in November. The move gives some smaller schools a better chance at postseason glory. Plus, it will alleviate any anxiety for Perry and her husband, Stuart Beard. Cor Jesu will compete in Class 2, with swimming prelims Friday afternoon and finals Saturday afternoon. Parkway West is slotted for the smaller Class 1 division, which kicks off the meet with prelims at 12:30 p.m. Thursday leading into swimming finals at 10 a.m. Friday. “It’s hard as a mom to see one win and not the other,” Perry said.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Beard sisters, Parkway West sophomore Lauren (left), and Cor Jesu senior Nicole, will compete in the Missouri championships beginning Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. Parkway West is in Class 1 and Cor Jesu is in Class 2. This is the first season the meet has been split into two divisions.

“Now, we can hope that both do their best.” The Beard sisters will be competing in the maximum four events, including two of the same individual races. Both are entered in the 200yard individual medley and each one will swim a leg on their respective 200 medley relay teams. Unlike mom, the girls were looking forward to racing against one another in the 200 IM. Nicole posted a qualifying time of 2 minutes, 14.24 seconds. Lauren is slightly behind at 2:14.70. Both are in the top 15 in state, regardless of class. “It would have been fun to see who would finish first,” Lauren admitted. Explained Nicole, “I would have liked to end my high

school career with her (on the same team) by my side. It’s been a fun rivalry.” This time around, both Beards can theoretically grab a gold medal in the same event. That opportunity is not lost on Ann. “I think they’d rather be swimming against each other in some respects,” Perry said. “But as a parent, this is perfect.” The two-class system was implemented at the boys meet for the first time in November, with Cape Central (Class 1) and Rock Bridge (Class 2) capturing team titles. Girls coaches around the state have conflicting views on the change, just like the swimmers. Cor Jesu senior Karisa

DIVING FOR THE TOP Westminster freshman O’Meara takes aim at state title BY BILL HESTER Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Margo O’Meara needed just one day to surpass the exploits of her talented coach. The Westminster freshman diver one-upped Steve Braun on opening day. “In the first 11-dive meet in which she competed, she had a better score than I did in my whole career,” said Braun who was a three-time state diving champion at Webster Groves High from 1976-78. O’Meara won the Metro League conference title last week with a score of 524, almost 200 points better than any other diver in the six-team meet. The eye-popping score would been a record at the state meet, which will be contested Thursday through Saturday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. The Class 1 diving competition is scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday, and O’Meara leads the 32-entrant field. Class 1 swimming prelims start at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, with finals at 10 a.m. Friday before the Class 2 meet begins Friday afternoon. It didn’t take Braun long to figure out he had someone very special to work with this winter. O’Meara has been both steady and at times spectacular in her freshman campaign. She also set a meet record earlier this season at the COMO meet in Columbia. “I was so excited to dive in high school and it has been an amazing experience,” O’Meara said. “I have gotten so much support from my teammates and coaches. I’m definitely where I want to be right now.” The all-classes state meet record of 523.5 was set in 1991 by Nerinx Hall’s Julie Grimmer. Whoever wins the Class 1 diving title Thursday will be the class record holder since this is the first year the meet has been split into two classes. O’Meara has added several difficult dives to her already expansive repertoire.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Westminster freshman diver Margo O’Meara will compete in the Missouri Class 1 championships Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex.

“Margo is just so strong,” Braun said. “That enables her to go really high and she is able to complete the more difficult dives.” Braun said that O’Meara has been the ideal student despite coming into high school with a great diving background. “Margo has it all and is a pleasure to coach,” Braun said. “She is what I call a beautiful diver. She has the strength and she has excellent form.” And there is one more attribute that Braun feels will work to her advantage as she prepares for the state meet. “She is an intense competitor and I think she will be at her best when the most is on the line,” Braun said. O’Meara is also a very good swimmer. She swam a leg on the 400-yard freestyle relay team at the conference meet Tuesday. The Wildcats won the event and in the process made the qualifying time for the state meet. She also was a part of the conference champion 200 freestyle

relay team and finished third individually in the 50 freestyle. “I’ve really enjoyed swimming this year,” O’Meara said. “I only dive at the country club.” Diving will be what is on O’Meara’s mind as she prepares for her first high school state meet. And she comes into the meet with a mature mindset. “Honestly, I am taking things one step at a time right now,” O’Meara said. “I am healthy and as with any 11-dive meet, I just need to keep my focus. I want to have fun and dive to the best of my ability.” If she does that she could be standing on the top of the podium at the RecPlex. “I have been coaching high school divers for about 30 years and she is the best I have seen as a freshman in Missouri,” Braun said. “I was a three-time champ and I really expect her to beat that.” Her first chance comes Thursday.

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Franz, who is a legitimate threat in the 100 butterfly and 200 IM, liked it better as a one-class system. “That way if you win, you know that you’re the best because you beat everybody,” Franz noted. Lafayette, the overall state champion from last year, is a serious threat to grab the Class 2 crown. Senior Franceska Petrosino, who is headed to the University of Kansas, has grabbed the No. 1 seed in the 100 freestyle. She is also a threat in the 500 free. The Lancers always are a threat in the relay races. It was their quartet power that led them to last year’s state crown. Marquette sports a deep lineup that helped impressive meet titles in the CoMo Invitational and Suburban West Conference championships. Marquette qualified a state-best 19 swimmers for the meet. Lafayette is right behind with 18. Parkway South has 18 competitors in action this weekend, led by senior Kirsten Votava, who has the area’s top time in the 100 backstroke (58.13) The Class 1 team championship is up for grabs. Parkway West, Notre Dame de Sion and Glendale lead the way with 16 qualifiers each. St. Charles High junior Autumn Looney is in position to grab two golds. She has the area’s top time in the 50 free (23.81) and 100 butterfly (55.08). Incarnate Word sophomore Ellie Wehrmann has the top time in the class in the 100 and 200 free.

ssmhealth.com/urgent


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Jack Bond O’Fallon wrestling With a takedown in overtime, Bond (41-3) defeated Joliet West’s Jonathan Pullen 5-3 at 170 pounds and will head to the Class 3A state tournament in Champaign as a sectional champion. It’s a second successive state trip for Bond, a senior who is ranked third by Illinois Matmen and fourth by the Illinois Wrestling Officials and Coaches Association. Bond, who placed first in tournament action at Mascoutah, second at Parkway South and third at both Geneseo and Francis Howell, has not lost to an Illinois wrestler this season. Katie Brown Lutheran South basketball A 5-foot-9 senior forward, Brown filled up the stat sheets in a 69-29 win over St. Pius X, piling up 14 points, 10 rebounds, nine steals and seven assists. It was one of the highlights of Brown’s season that includes being named to the all-tournament team at the John Burroughs Invitational after leading the Lancers to their second consecutive title at the event. A starter since midway through her sophomore season, Brown is averaging 13 points, six rebounds, two assists and 3.5 steals. She was a starter on the school’s volleyball team that won state in 2016 and finished second last fall. She has signed to play volleyball at Elmhurst College in Chicago. Caleb Conedera Timberland wrestling A junior, Conedera pinned his way to the championship at 132 pounds in the Class 4 District 2 tournament at Francis Howell, knocking off two-time state medalist Andrew Godier of Francis Howell Central in the title match. Conedera (37-3) won tournament titles earlier this season at Westminster, St. Charles West and in the Gateway Athletic Conference. He’s ranked fourth at 132 by missouriwrestling.com and by rankwrestlers. com. Payton Dunn Westminster swimming At the Metro League Championships, the Wildcats junior, won the 200 freestyle (1:59.50), 500 freestyle (5:16.83) and was the anchor in the 400 freestyle relay, which earned a state qualifying mark in their win. Dunn also swam the butterfly leg on the Wildcats’ 200 medley relay, which finished second. Last month at the COMO Invitational at Mizzou, which features many of the best teams from across the state, Dunn finished seventh in the 500 freestyle and 11th in the 200 freestyle. She will compete in the 200 freestyle and 500 freestyle at this weekend’s state meet and has made an early commitment to swim at Pepperdine. Connie Gonzalez MICDS squash A senior who is the No. 1 seed for the Rams, Gonzalez led her team to a second-place finish in Division III of the 2018 U.S. Squash High School National Championships in Philadelphia. MICDS, which was one of only a few teams not hailing from the Northeast, toppled the second and third seeds along the way. Gonzalez, who was 14-1 this season, went 3-1 in her matches at the tournament, capping it off with a 3-1 win over a player from Hopkins School. A senior co-captain previously voted team MVP three times, Gonzalez also helped MICDS advance to nationals by winning all four of her matches at the Mercersburg/Tom Flanagan Invitational. Jacob Orsay Ladue wrestling Orsay, who placed third at 160 pounds as a junior, captured his second consecutive district championship with two pins and a major decision in the Class 3 District 2 tournament at Hannibal. Orsay improved to 34-0 as a senior and has a record of 76-1 over the last two seasons. He’s ranked No. 1 at 170 by rankwrestlers. com and third by missouriwrestling.com. Jamel Warren Hancock basketball A 6-foot-5 senior forward, Warren eclipsed the 1,000-point mark for his career in a win over Bayless on Tuesday. Last week, he had consecutive double-doubles to lead the conference champion Tigers to a pair of home wins. He had 17 points, 13 rebounds, four assists and three steals in a 59-48 win over DuBourg and put up 31 points, 11 rebounds and four steals to lift the Tigers past Valley Park 70-44. Compiled by Paul Kopsky. Please submit nominations to pkopsky@stltoday.com

MISSOURI GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

A HAPPY HOME

Beard sisters won’t have to compete against each other thanks to meet’s new format At St. Peters Rec-Plex CLASS 2 SCHEDULE Swimming preliminaries, 5 p.m. Friday Diving finals, 9 a.m. Saturday Swimming finals, 3 p.m. Saturday CLASS 1 SCHEDULE Swimming preliminaries, 12:30 p.m. Thursday Diving finals, 5 p.m. Thursday Swimming finals, 10 a.m. Friday

BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

Ann Perry let out a sigh of relief when she found out her daughters would not have to face off against each other in the 43rd annual Missouri Girls Swimming and Diving Championships. A proud of mother of two top-notch swimmers who attend different schools, Perry realized she could yell in full throat for Cor Jesu senior Nicole Beard and Parkway West sophomore Lauren Beard. “Usually, when they go against each other in club (meets), I just yell, ‘Go Beard girls,’ “ Perry said. Mom will not have to do that this time when the twoclass, three-day meet begins Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. The MSHSAA has divided the state meet into a Class 1 and Class 2 format for the first time in the long history of event. The boys state meet also used a split-class program in November. The move gives some smaller schools a better chance at postseason glory. Plus, it will alleviate any anxiety for Perry and her husband, Stuart Beard. Cor Jesu will compete in Class 2, with swimming

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Beard sisters, Parkway West sophomore Lauren (left), and Cor Jesu senior Nicole, will compete in the Missouri championships beginning Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. Parkway West is in Class 1 and Cor Jesu is in Class 2. This is the first season the meet has been split into two divisions.

prelims Friday afternoon and finals Saturday afternoon. Parkway West is slotted for the smaller Class 1 division, which kicks off the meet with prelims at 12:30 p.m. Thursday leading into swimming finals at 10 a.m. Friday. “It’s hard as a mom to see one win and not the other,” Perry said. “Now, we can hope that both do their best.” The Beard sisters will be

competing in the maximum four events, including two of the same individual races. Both are entered in the 200yard individual medley and each one will swim a leg on their respective 200 medley relay teams. Unlike mom, the girls were looking forward to racing against one another in the 200 IM. Nicole posted a qualifying time of 2 minutes, 14.24

Westminster freshman O’Meara takes aim at state title BY BILL HESTER Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Margo O’Meara needed just one day to surpass the exploits of her talented coach. The Westminster freshman diver one-upped Steve Braun on opening day. “In the first 11-dive meet in which she competed, she had a better score than I did in my whole career,” said Braun who was a three-time state diving champion at Webster Groves High from 1976-78. O’Meara won the Metro League conference title last week with a score of 524, almost 200 points better than any other diver in the six-team meet. The eye-popping score would been a record at the state meet, which will be contested Thursday through Saturday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. The Class 1 diving competition is scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday, and O’Meara leads the 32-entrant field. Class 1 swimming prelims start at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, with finals at 10 a.m. Friday before the Class 2 meet begins Friday afternoon. It didn’t take Braun long to figure out he had someone very special to work with this winter. O’Meara has been both steady and at times spectacular in her freshman campaign. She also set a meet record earlier this season at the COMO meet in Columbia. “I was so excited to dive in high school and it has been an amazing experience,” O’Meara said. “I have gotten so much support from my teammates and coaches. I’m definitely where I want to be right now.” The all-classes state meet record of 523.5 was set in 1991 by Nerinx Hall’s Julie Grimmer.

INCARNATE WORD Emily Schroeder (200 IM, 500 free) Ellie Wehrmann (200 free, 100 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free JOHN BURROUGHS Michaela Bach (100 backstroke) Cassie Berns (diving) Kristen Mason (50 free, 100 free) Kaitlyn Rowbottom (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Alexa Kouvelis (200 free, 500 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free LADUE Harriet Bezzant (200 free, 500 free) Riley Deutsch (200 IM, 100 butterfly) Mary Dieckhaus (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Samantha Fischer (diving) Sophie Fredman (50 free, 100 breaststroke) Lena Liang (500 free, 100 breaststroke) Leda Liang (100 free) Talia Warticovschi (200 free, 100 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free LIBERTY Hallie Anderson (100 butterfly)

Hannah Kerr (100 free) Caroline Myers (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Marjori Russo (100 free) Relays: 200 free, 400 free LUTHERAN SOUTH Madeline Rauh (200 IM, 100 butterfly) LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES Savanna Dennison (100 backstroke) Meredith Leigh (200 free) Andrea Rogers (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Hannah Thoenen (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free MICDS Madigan Kinsey (200 IM, 100 breastroke) Caroline Liekweg (200 free, 500 free) Relays: 200 medley, 400 free PARKWAY CENTRAL Kily Eckenrode (diving) Grecia Escalante (200 free) Emily Kaiser (100 butterfly) Abigail Levine (100 butterfly, 100 breaststroke) Rheanna Morris (100 free) Kate Orso (diving) Alexis Poe (50 free, 100 free)

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Westminster freshman diver Margo O’Meara will compete in the Missouri Class 1 championships Thursday at the St. Peters Rec-Plex.

Whoever wins the Class 1 diving title Thursday will be the class record holder since this is the first year the meet has been split into two classes. O’Meara has added several difficult dives to her already expansive repertoire. “Margo is just so strong,” Braun said. “That enables her to go really high and she is able to complete the more difficult dives.” Braun said that O’Meara has been the ideal student despite coming into high school with a great diving background. “Margo has it all and is a pleasure to coach,” Braun said. “She is what I call a beautiful diver. She has the strength and she has excellent form.”

Margaret Ripp (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Shelby Ripp (200 IM, 500 free) Rebecca Waxberg (200 free, 100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free PARKWAY NORTH Megan Battles (50 free, 500 free) Abigail Bockerstett (200 IM) Paige Bolling (200 IM, 500 free) Sarah Jellis (100 butterfly) Meagan Sotolar (200 free, 500 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free PARKWAY WEST Lauren Beard (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Reese Berry (100 breaststroke) Sarah Bonnett (200 free, 100 butterfly) Natalie Hitchcock (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Claire Lynn (diving) Maria Newton (200 free, 500 free) Jessica Schlueter (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Sophie Vietor (100 free) Sophie Wojdylo (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free PRINCIPIA Riley Small (200 IM, 100 backstroke) ROSATI-KAIN Laya Young (50 free, 100 free))

And there is one more attribute that Braun feels will work to her advantage as she prepares for the state meet. “She is an intense competitor and I think she will be at her best when the most is on the line,” Braun said. O’Meara is also a very good swimmer. She swam a leg on the 400-yard freestyle relay team at the conference meet Tuesday. The Wildcats won the event and in the process made the qualifying time for the state meet. She also was a part of the conference champion 200 freestyle relay team and finished third individually in the 50 freestyle. “I’ve really enjoyed swimming this year,” O’Meara said. “I only dive at the country club.”

ST. CHARLES Hannah Doss (50 free, 100 backstroke) Autumn Looney (50 free, 100 butterfly) ST. DOMINIC Kate Nelson (100 free, 100 breaststroke) Sarah Nelson (50 free, 100 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free ST. JOSEPH’S Gretchen Allman (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Sam Camfield (diving) Ally Duggan (200 IM, 100 free) Maddie Hernandez (50 free, 100 breaststroke) Annie Kreikemeier (200 IM, 500 free) Emmi Mattern (100 butterfly) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free SUMMIT Macy Ryan (diving) Kennady Schertzer (diving) Ursuline Jessica Garcia (200 free, 500 free) Elissa Schmidt (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 400 free VILLA DUCHESNE Carly Fesler (100 backstroke) Caroline Roderick (100 backstroke) Peri George (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke)

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seconds. Lauren is slightly behind at 2:14.70. Both are in the top 15 in state, regardless of class. “It would have been fun to see who would finish first,” Lauren admitted. Explained Nicole, “I would have liked to end my high school career with her (on the same team) by my side. It’s been a fun rivalry.” This time around, both Beards can theoretically grab a gold medal in the same event. That opportunity is not lost on Ann. “I think they’d rather be swimming against each other in some respects,” Perry said. “But as a parent, this is perfect.”

DIVING FOR THE TOP

GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING STATE MEET • CLASS 1 AREA QUALIFIERS BORGIA Emily Reuwer (100 butterfly, 100 backstroke) Relays: 200 medley, 400 free CLAYTON Brooke Becker (diving) Sophia Thompson (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Bridget Walsh (diving) FORT ZUMWALT EAST Emma Gulovsen (200 free, 500 free) Catie Hutchison (diving) Rachel Springer (200 free, 100 free) Relays: 400 free FORT ZUMWALT NORTH Gwen Raziq (50 free, 500 free) Michaela Russ (100 breaststroke) Dani Smith (diving) Nadia Wuest (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 400 free FORT ZUMWALT SOUTH Sarah Jellinek (100 butterfly) Abigail Regenstein (diving) Quincy Ung (100 butterfly) Relays: 400 free

M 2 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

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Annie Fox (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free VISITATION Kate Atkinson (100 breaststroke) Audrey Dino (200 IM, 100 backstroke) Christina Jurotich (200 IM, 100 breaststroke) Corinne Michael (50 free, 100 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free WASHINGTON Aubrie Moreland (200 free, 500 free) Relays: 400 free WEBSTER GROVES Madeline Collier (50 free, 100 backstroke) Parker Hagemann (200 free, 100 backstroke) Kendra Howard (200 IM) Katherine Kempf (500 free) Elisabeth Ragan (50 free, 100 free) Chloe Vitale (diving) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free WESTMINSTER Lauren Bell (200 free, 500 free) Payton Dunn (200 free, 500 free) Jenna Galakatos (100 butterfly) Hailey Kittelson (100 breaststroke) Margo O’Meara (diving) Grace Skiljan (100 free) Relays: 200 medley, 200 free, 400 free


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

WRESTLING STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS MISSOURI SPOTLIGHT

BIG MAC

Fourth title would put Whitfield senior McAteer in elite company BY JOE LYONS st. Louis Post-dispatch

Whitfield senior Mike McAteer has maintained a similar approach throughout his high school wrestling career. “I want to dominate,” McAteer said when asked about the state tournament, which runs Thursday through Saturday at Mizzou Arena. “My goal is to take control of the match early and then, once I feel like I have the win secured, I go for the pin. If you focus on the pin from the start, you take a chance on making a mistake. But when I take the mat, I’m all business, nothing real flashy or fancy. “I want to get the win and move on.” It’s a plan that has served McAteer well. Already a three-time champion with 11 pins in 12 career state tournament matches, McAteer enters this year’s Class 1 competition at 126 pounds at 47-2 and with a career record of 187-10. This weekend, if all goes as planned, McAteer will join an elite group of four-time prep champions in Missouri. To date, there have been just 26 in state history and only four from St. Louis area — Normandy’s Vernon “Hap” Whitney (1949-52), Ritenour’s Ray “Buzzy” Bergfeld (1951-54), Parkway Central’s Scott Schatzman (1992-95) and Whitfield’s Rodney Hahn (2011-2014). In Class 4, also at 126, CBC’s Malik Johnson also is vying to become a four-timer. “It’s definitely in the back of my mind,” the 18-year-old McAteer said. “There’s definitely some pressure because everybody expects you to win again. But I try to block all that out and just focus on wrestling my match. Physically, I’m ready, so now it’s just a matter of making sure I’m as prepared mentally for these next few days.” McAteer first tried wrestling as a fifth grader in the Purler Wrestling Academy, but only after giving a number of other sports a try. “Basketball, soccer, baseball, I was terrible,” he recalled. “But right away, wrestling was fun. I enjoyed myself and I could tell I was getting better. Pretty soon, it became our family sport; we were going all over the country for tournaments.” McAteer was leaning toward attending CBC when he wrestled future Whitfield teammate and state champion J.R. Ditter in a Little

BEN LOEWNAU • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Whitfield senior Mike McAteer will try to become one of only a handful of St. Louis area wrestlers to win four career state championships when he competes Thursday through Saturday in the Class 1 state tournament at Mizzou Arena.

League event. “After the match, Buddy Smith, who coached at Whitfield and was coaching J.R., talked to me about Whitfield,” McAteer explained. “Looking back, I couldn’t be happier about the way things turned out.” Whitfield head coach Charlie Sherertz feels the same way. “It didn’t take long before I realized Mike was something special,” the veteran coach said. “I’d like to think I had a little something to do with it, but Mike was pretty solid when he got here and he’s worked hard to keep improving. He’s an intelligent kid who knows what he needs to do to stay prepared. “Technically, he’s a very sound wrestler. But the thing that sets Mike apart is his strength. He’s super-strong, super-tenacious and he’s very skilled. He just swarms and overwhelms his opponents.” Soon after capturing his third state championship, McAteer committed to the United States Military Academy at West Point. “I honestly didn’t consider anywhere else,” he said. “It’s something I’ve been thinking about for as long as I can remember. My grandfather served in the Navy in World War II and talks all the time about the opportunities he had through his military career and my dad has said that his biggest regret in life was that he never served. I’ll get an incredible education as well as a chance to wrestle and to serve, which is important to me.” McAteer, who plans to study ei-

AREA STATE QUALIFIERS ILLINOIS

CLASS 3A Alton (1) 152: Courteney Wilson, senior, 41-12 Belleville West (3) 106: Josh Koderhandt, freshman, 39-7 132: Justin Koderhandt, senior, 40-6 138: Garrett Bass, senior, 28-8 Edwardsville (3) 113: Noah Surtin, junior,. 46-1 126: Luke Odom, sophomore, 46-1 220: Josh Anderson, junior, 32-10 O’Fallon (1) 170: Jack Bond, senior, 41-3 CLASS 2A Cahokia (6) 120: Marquis Wilson, senior, 25-6 132: Rodney Evans, senior, 34-5 152: Martell Boone, senior, 35-1 170: Rozell Baker, senior, 35-5 182: Arnold Edwards, sophomore, 32-10 220: Jacob Bullock, junior, 41-2 Civic Memorial (2) 106: Caine Tyus, freshman, 37-5 113: Caleb Tyus, freshman, 36-5 East St. Louis (2) 106: Anthony King, sophomore, 33-1 195: Jaylen Washington, sophomore, 29-11 Jerseyville (1) 160: Zeke Waltz, sophomore, 26-8 Mascoutah (1) 113: Kylar Montgomery, freshman, 34-10 Triad (1) 138: Garrett Bakarich, sophomore, 40-9 CLASS 1A Althoff (7) 106: Matthew Minick, sophomore, 41-13 113: Isaiah Bernal, sophomore, 32-17 126: Chase Bittle, senior, 47-3 132: Anthony Federico, sophomore, 37-6 138: Max Kristoff, junior, 47-7 160: Danny Braunagel, senior, 50-0 182: Zac Braunagel, senior, 47-2 Carlyle (1) 195: Nathan Husman, senior, 27-6 Roxana (1) 145: Alex Maguire, junior, 35-8 Wood River (2) 170: Jake Erslon, junior, 38-7 220: Zach Kincade, senior, 34-8

MISSOURI

CLASS 4 Chaminade (2) 113: Sam Schultz, sophomore,30-10 285: Danny Conley, senior, 42-1 CBC (8) 113: Cevion Severado, senior, 40-4 120: Vincent Zerban, freshman, 27-4 126: Malik Johnson, senior, 26-0 132: Joshua Saunders, sophomore, 30-3 138: Kyle Prewitt, junior, 35-5 152: Will Edgar, junior, 27-3 182: D.J. Shannon, senior, 34-3 195: Charlie Cadell, senior, 18-9 De Smet (3) 106: Eric Lovelace, junior, 41-2 160: Cory Peterson, junior, 41-3 195: Trevor Tinker, sophomore, 36-16 Eureka (7) 126: Ryan Lester, junior, 37-5 145: Jack Sauter, senior, 24-21 170: Luke Dickhaus, sophomore, 29-15 182: Kyle Dickhaus, senior, 35-4 195: Matt Gentry, junior, 41-5 220: Jake McCollum, sophomore, 35-11 285: Brendan Carter, senior, 12-5 Fort Zumwalt North (7) 113: Nathan Burns, senior, 17-18 120: Teddy Hickey, junior, 40-4 126: Logan Prinster, sophomore, 26-15 145: Jack Ederer, senior, 26-4 152: Derick Buda-Smith, sophomore, 40-12 170: Cameron Pickering, senior, 41-5 195: Nate O’Neal, senior, 27-10 Fort Zumwalt West (3) 145: Austin Landow, senior, 41-6 170: Austin Reeves, junior, 28-10 285: Jordan Williams, senior, 14-3 Fox (2) 126: Dylan Looney, junior, 32-13 285: Joseph Johnson, junior, 37-8 Francis Howell (9) 106: J.T. Roberts, freshman, 22-16 113: Josh Kyle, sophomore, 35-11 138: Robert Saunders, sophomore, 22-18 152: Peter Enos, senior, 45-2 170: Geoffrey Seebeck, senior, 29-20

182: Dylan Fridrich, senior, 27-16 195: Jack Flynn, senior, 43-0 220: Nathan Odonohue, senior, 33-10 285: Ryan Skillington, sophomore, 38-11 Francis Howell Central (8) 126: Kaden Hart, freshman, 22-9 132: Andrew Godier, junior, 25-9 145: Corey Wait, junior, 20-3 152: Trevor Liggett, senior, 36-8 160: Jonathan Floyd, junior, 36-9 170: Jacob Kroger, senior, 20-16 182: Weston Klein, senior, 33-15 285: Scott Arnold, senior, 36-13 Francis Howell North (2) 138: Jacob Smith, senior, 45-4 220: Hunter Collins, senior, 25-21 Hazelwood West (2) 106: Mark Mallari, sophomore, 18-16 182: Christian Brinkley, senior, 32-8 Holt (9) 106: Hayden Ferrell, freshman, 26-16 120: Carter Smith, sophomore, 6-0 132: Joel Hagemeier, junior, 27-21 138: Will Chambers, junior, 26-22 145: Max Worth, senior, 36-18 152: Jeff Farris, senior, 27-6 160: Colton Hawks, sophomore, 46-4 195: Cole Mueller, junior, 16-2 220: Tim Sisson, junior, 6-14 Kirkwood (1) 152: Jacob Hibbard, senior, 41-9 Lafayette (9) 106: Jalin Reese, sophomore, 32-16 113: Jayden Carson, junior, 40-4 120: Jaylen Carson, junior, 37-5 145: Cameron Wegener, senior, 51-2 152: Anthony Michaels, senior, 27-4 160: Jacob Malven, senior, 40-15 182: Andrew Duke, senior, 20-17 195: Austin Wegener, junior, 39-13 220: Cortez Woods, senior, 41-5 Lindbergh (5) 106: J.P. Homfeld, freshman, 40-6 145: Dawson Javier, junior, 42-4 160: Micah Feliciano, junior, 30-17 220: Logan Wells, senior, 44-4 285: Lucas Osia, senior, 41-5 Marquette (3) 120: Jack Lenox, junior, 49-4 170: Jalen Gayfield, senior, 43-5 220: Marco Perla, junior, 46-9 McCluer North (2) 113: David Vance, junior, 22-13 132: Jacob Roberson, senior, 31-14 Mehlville (2) 152: Joe Stegall, senior, 44-10 195: Ibrahima Sy, junior, 41-11 Northwest (3) 138: Austin Akins, junior, 34-15 160: Caleb Camacho, senior, 49-5 182: Chase Stegall, sophomore, 48-4 Parkway South (1) 132: Garret Kloeppel, junior, 29-2 Ritenour (2) 120: Austin Cornell, senior, 36-7 160: Ryan Howerton, senior, 27-5 Seckman (9) 106: Skyler Akers, sophomore, 45-3 113: Jack Wrocklage, senior, 34-9 120: Kai Orine, junior, 46-2 126: Cameron Fusco, senior, 42-1 132: Tyler Lowe, senior, 23-29 138: Anthony Chellew, sophomore, 36-17 145: Gavin Moore, sophomore, 28-20 160: Blake Fritz, junior, 33-17 170: Jermey Ashlock, junior, 41-12 Timberland (4) 126: Evan Wasson, sophomore, 28-18 132: Caleb Conedera, junior, 37-3 182: Jaxtin Steffeny, junior, 27-18 220: Ben Holmes, junior, 15-9 Troy (2) 120: Jacob Williams, senior, 17-10 126: Trevor Seely, junior, 29-14 138: Luke Hardy, senior, 39-5 CLASS 3 Clayton (1) 220: Jeremiah Austin, junior, 36-10 De Soto (5) 126: Devin Francis, junior, 22-20 132: Connor Zimmermann, soph., 30-18 160: Logan Zimmermann, junior, 38-4 170: Lucas Watson, junior, 20-10 285: Landon Porter, sophomore, 40-2 Festus (4) 106: Dillon French, sophomore, 36-8 113: Zack Naucke, freshman, 34-5 145: Luke Shaver, freshman, 33-20

ther economics or engineering, will report July 17 for basic training. And he’ll be joined by Whitfield heavyweight Max Darrah (24-0), a threetime state medalist who’ll be gunning for his third straight state championship this weekend. “Max and I have been friends a long time, but he made up his own mind after his visit to West Point,” explained McAteer, whose younger brother Connor placed third at 106 last year as a freshman. As a team, the Warriors are favorites to repeat in Class 1. No surprise there, since the program has won six championships and finished first or second in 10 of the past 11 seasons. “We’d definitely like to go out on top,” McAteer said. “It’s a really strong group. We know that if we go out and wrestle to our abilities, things will work out for us.” Asked to compare McAteer to some of the other top-level competitors he’s coached at Whitfield, Sherertz quickly backed off. “I did that a few years back and got all sorts of calls and emails from the other guys,” the coach joked. “I’ve been fortunate to coach some excellent wrestlers here — Drake Hovis, Conor Hovis, Ryan Mango, Chris Wilkes, Mike Kissel, Rodney Hahn — and they were all special in their own way. “But I’ll say this: Mike’s right up there.” Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

152: Cole Bennett, senior, 37-13 Fort Zumwalt East (3) 113: Braden Stark, sophomore, 25-15 126: Shakboz Hasanov, junior, 30-15 152: Eric Linck, senior, 31-15 Fort Zumwalt South (10) 106: Sam Jeffries, sophomore, 14-16 113: Nick Lindley, senior, 31-7 120: Benjamin Lindley, junior, 27-10 145: Christian Null, senior, 36-18 152: Caleb Knobel, senior, 25-6 160: Chase Mercer, senior, 45-6 170: John Kershman, senior, 35-17 182: Alex Drmac, junior, 32-18 195: Joshua Cox, senior, 22-22 285: Jacob Adams, junior, 29-17 Hazelwood East (2) 152: Jalynn Jenkins, senior, 26-17 285: Derron Funches, junior, 15-6 Hillsboro (5) 120: James Short, sophomore, 36-11 126: Nick Short, senior, 41-9 132: Dillon Owens, senior, 30-3 145: Jordon Sanders, senior, 26-11 285: Joe Becker, junior, 35-6 Ladue (4) 106: Jake Mann, freshman, 49-4 160: Aiden Morley, senior, 50-7 170: Jacob Orsay, senior, 34-0 182: Callen Morley, sophomore, 34-13 Liberty (5) 113: Cameron Steinhoff, senior, 33-6 126: Wyatt Haynes, freshman, 35-9 132: Ben Leach, senior, 32-13 138: Christian Zeik, junior, 32-1 145: Trentin Helton, junior, 33-13 McCluer (2) 132: Jaylon Whitted, junior, 11-8 182: Albert Brown, senior, 27-14 Pacific (9) 106: Vincent Boyen, sophomore, 35-10 113: Jakob Balleydier, senior, 34-10 120: Callum Sitek, freshman, 40-4 126: Noah Patton, junior, 41-5 132: Gage Kassing, senior, 36-6 152: Ben Courtney, junior, 43-4 170: James Anding, junior, 33-1 220: Chase Keleman, senior, 14-7 285: Trevor Heitsch, junior, 29-19 Parkway West (3) 120: Joshua McCallister, senior, 34-3 138: Donald Griffin, sophomore, 29-12 182: Jackson Barnhart, junior, 34-4 St. Charles (11) 106: Payton Irvin, freshman, 30-15 113: Ben Bohr, junior, 39-5 120: Jordan Kestner, senior, 31-4 126: Jordan Medina, junior, 36-13 132: Alex Clutter, senior, 41-4 138: Tommy Truong, junior, 29-11 152: Cody Thorne, junior, 17-8 170: Treyvon Ward, freshman, 38-7 195: Dahvonte Henry, junior, 35-9 220: Justin Mowry, sophomore, 26-8 285: Cody Imbierowicz, junior, 39-9 Summit (5) 113: Dezmond McSellers, junior, 24-14 126: JT Hale, junior, 28-13 138: Sam Frankowski, junior, 33-4 182: Karthnik Mogallapu, junior, 31-10 195: Evan Brooks, junior, 37-5 Union (4) 120: Carter Sickmeier, sophomore, 33-14 170: Ryder Kuenzel, freshman, 34-17 182: David Clark, sophomore, 32-18 195: Haiden Meyer, junior, 32-4 University City (3) 120: Gabriel Sekou, senior, 35-8 145: Peter Zhang, junior, 29-13 285: Jonathan York, senior, 37-2 Warrenton (2) 106: Bryce Edison, sophomore, 20-15 160: Jerrett Villinger, junior, 47-2 Washington (4) 106: Tate Hendricks, sophomore, 23-21 138: Dana Cates, junior, 27-27 182: Gunnar Noud, senior, 12-7 195: Michael Boehling, senior, 33-20 Webster Groves (3) 138: Charles Getz, junior, 8-6 145: Eric Pettibone, junior, 24-9 220: Temitayo Sobamowo, senior, 24-12 Westminster (2) 195: Patrick Andrews, junior, 17-20 220: Charlie McCracken, senior, 43-3 Windsor (6) 120: Andrew Kinder, senior, 39-12 145: Grant Pauli, sophomore, 44-6 152: Jacob Warren, senior, 41-0 160: Chris Butts, freshman, 34-19 170: Connor Richey, senior, 34-12 182: Ryan Yarnell, senior, 49-0

CLASS 2 Affton (2) 182: Jadon Harrison, senior, 36-9 285: Kyle Johnson, junior, 32-15 Borgia (3) 113: Adam Hellebusch, senior, 33-8 132: Reid Posinski, senior, 28-8 138: Dylan Hellebusch, senior, 35-4 John Burroughs (2) 160: Sam Mulligan, senior, 31-6 195: Jason Kemp, senior, 24-5 Lutheran South (1) 138: Jacob Mirly, senior, 39-6 Miller Career (1) 132: De’on Partlow, senior, 8-3 O’Fallon Christian (3) 113: Jonathan Cochrum, senior, 34-4 152: Jacob Ottenlips, senior, 32-11 285: Chase McCoy, sophomore, 34-8 Orchard Farm (1) 145: Brandon Siebert, senior, 28-16 Owensville (5) 120: Austin Angell, senior, 18-22 145: Dustin Jahnsen, senior, 36-11 152: Blaine Schoenfeld, junior, 29-20 160: Tanner Rector, senior, 28-9 195: Colton Moore, senior, 30-13 Priory (5) 120: Elliot Holdosh, junior, 22-24 170: Greg Rowles, senior, 42-4 182: Louis Rowles, junior, 29-9 195: Nathan Abad, senior, 26-18 220: Dalton Bingman, sophomore, 37-9 St. Charles West (6) 120: Evan Parker, freshman, 19-26 126: Trent Busby, sophomore, 23-27 145: Brandon Carbray, senior, 46-8 160: Trevor Hachtel, junior, 42-12 170: Brendan Noack, senior, 34-16 182: Tristan Hachtel, junior, 39-12 St. Clair (5) 120: Dalton Thompson, sophomore, 40-8 132: Jason Landing, senior, 42-3 152: Ryan Herman, junior, 43-1 195: Aaron Herman, junior, 35-8 220: Josh Richards, senior, 42-1 Winfield (1) 152: Clark Rogers, sophomore, 41-6 CLASS 1 Brentwood (6) 106: Owen Brotherton, freshman, 25-17 113: Louis Song, junior, 11-17 132: Xavier Lane, freshman, 29-10 152: Nathan Butler, sophomore, 25-18 170: Tayveon Brown, senior, 29-10 285: Richard McQuay, senior, 28-13 Cleveland NJROTC (1) 182: Keith Smith, junior, 13-6 Hancock (6) 113: Tristin Benson, senior, 38-7 120: Blade Crook, sophomore, 32-13 126: Xavier Smith, freshman, 31-13 132: Ashton Wynn, junior, 26-6 182: Raul Carlin, junior, 21-17 195: Davonte Trotter, senior, 37-8 Gateway Academy (1) 145: Gabe Corson, senior, 20-9 Lutheran St. Charles (9) 106: Henry Kaiser, sophomore, 27-21 113: Adam Runge, sophomore, 24-20 120: Isaac Conrad, sophomore, 31-16 132: Jaren Foster, freshman, 22-24 160: T.J. Lawrence, freshman, 26-23 170: A.J. Snow III, freshman, 13-15 195: Anthony Heard, junior, 42-10 220: Bowen Li, senior, 22-23 285: Gabriel Rubio, freshman, 18-11 Principia (4) 145: Garrett Sheets, junior, 29-10 160: William Buchanan, senior, 20-11 170: Stevie Keyes, junior, 12-13 195: Alex Reyes, junior, 28-11 Sumner (4) 126: Keon Hollis, senior, 28-9 138: Keith Clay, senior, 35-6 145: Daryus Webb, senior, 32-3 220: Daniel Young, senior, 33-6 Whitfield (12) 106: Logan Ferrero, freshman, 39-9 113: Connor McAteer, sophomore, 34-13 120: Wade Raeman, junior, 39-10 126: Mike McAteer, senior, 47-2 132: J.R. Ditter, senior, 40-6 138: Legend Alicea, junior, 15-27 152: Matt Schueddig, so. …. 25-23 160: Ethan Hovis, junior, 39-16 170: Zac Russell, junior, 42-9 182: Noah Elmore, senior, 40-5 220: William Boldt, senior,38-4 285: Max Darrah, senior, 24-0

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • B11

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS GIRLS BASKETBALL

Hancock 7 6 15 4 32 DuBourg 25 15 16 8 64 H (10-13): Stewart 15, Warren 6, Turner 5, Moultrie 4, Stroup 2. FG 13 (3), FT 3-10. D (9-12): Nelson 32, Loehr 14, Niethe 11, Klump 4, Mueller 2, Gagen 1. FG 27 (9), FT 1-10. Jennings 17 19 15 7 58 Haz. East 8 0 10 3 21 J (11-9): White 16, Whitt 9, Carrawell 6, Scott 6, Johnson 5, Martin 4, Rigmaiden 4, Raiford 3, Demease 2, McCaskill 2, Monger 1. FG 24 (4), FT 6-21. H (2-22): Bufford 7, Bluett 6, Daniels 3, Harris 2, T. Johnson 2, Williams 1. FG 6 (2), FT 7-13. Orchard Farm 1 8 15 8 32 O’F Christian 11 11 17 11 50 Or (15-10): Hopkins 21, Braune 5, Johnston 3, Hedges 2, Davis 1. FG 10 (3), FT 9-15. O’ (18-7): King 24, Stugart 10, Kinsey 7, Markham 5, Stone 4. FG 19 (2), FT 10-15. Summit 9 18 15 16 58 Clayton 5 7 15 9 36 S (6-17): Martens 13, Bryant 12, Manuel 11, Hager 6, Kelley 6, Crews 4, Faust 2, McLemore 2, Sasser 2. FG 20 (4), FT 14-19. C (8-14): Downs 11, Gallegos 6, Litteken 6, Markenson 5, M. Upshaw 4, Higgins-Thomas 2, Wade 2. FG 14 (2), FT 6-22. 10 13 20 16 59 Lafayette Haz. West 6 6 2 12 26 H (10-10): Mathews 10, Patterson 8, Dilworth 6, Nilges 2. FG 12 (2), FT 0-4. Triad 3 6 6 4 19 23 10 10 5 48 Civic Mem. C (28-2): Eaton 17, A. Tyus 12, Hall 5, Pfeifer 3, Schmidt 3, Buhs 2, Christeson 2, Sontag 2, K. Tyus 2. FG 17 (6), FT 8-14. Champaign Cen 6 7 12 6 31 17 8 17 9 51 O’Fallon O (25-4): Gordon 16, Thurwalker 12, Bell 9, Best 6, Schloer 4, Chamberlain 2, C. Keller 2. FG 21 (3), FT 6-12. FZ North 11 11 9 4 35 3 8 15 11 37 Timberland F (8-15): K. Grimes 12, J. Grimes 6, Moody 5, Robinson 5, Bauer 2, Clausner 2, Meiser 2, Hoff 1. FG 11 (2), FT 11-19. T (5-17): Raines 15, Lamb 11, Reiter 4, Rose 4, Auringer 2, Langston 1. FG 14 (2), FT 7-15. Holt 14 14 14 4 46 Liberty 5 7 4 10 26 L (5-16): Schaeffer 11, Watson 4, Patterson 3, Van Pamel 3, Groves 2, Riggins 2, M. Giljum 1. FG 10 (1), FT 5-13. Trinity 18 13 10 6 47 Bayless 4 5 6 13 28 B (1-21): Hayes 17, Howell 9, Cedeno 2. FG 11 (5), FT 1-2. Valley Park 5 5 11 12 33 Lutheran SC 14 11 7 13 45 L (15-9): Lindesmith 15, Grzeskowiak 12, Ernstmeyer 9, Preusser 4, Michel 3, Civey 2. FG 18 (3), FT 6-15. Rosati-Kain 12 7 13 3 35 Duchesne 14 8 7 9 38 R (3-15): Al-Baaj 15, Jones 8, Zink-Duda 6, Nahm 4, Sextro 2. FG 14 (4), FT 3-4.

Wednesday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. D (4-19): Briscoe 15, Edmondson 8, Pardo 5, Seiler 4, Schultenrich 2, Varvera 2, Weber 2. FG 15 (5), FT 3-7.

BOYS BASKETBALL

Pattonville 14 10 15 11 50 8 10 52 McCluer North 14 20 M (12-11): Ray 27, Butler 11, Evans 6, Daniels 3, Mosley-Mull 3, Traylor 2. FG 18 (4), FT 12-22. Pky. West 12 10 9 23 59 6 15 20 13 60 Maplewood-RH P (6-17): Akinwumi 21, Robinson 12, Loaney 10, Scott 10, Wills 6. FG 21 (4), FT 13-21. M (12-10): Brunson 17, Becton 12, Roberson 11, Grady-Liska 9, Guynn 8, Brown 2, King 1. FG 24 (2), FT 10-18. Brentwood 12 6 19 12 49 Orchard Farm 13 12 16 19 60 O (19-7): Frederick 17, Cooley 12, Shegog 11, Wolf 7, C. Grimes 6, Lindoff 4, C. Grimes 3. FG 20 (4), FT 16-24. Lift For Life 16 20 4 18 58 North Tech 5 14 16 18 53 L (12-13): Singleton 13, Turner 12, Love 10, Dabney 7, Anderson 6, Sanford 5, Johnson 4, Baker 1. FG 20 (5), FT 13-21. Fox 20 20 23 17 80 Affton 9 17 18 23 67 A (4-17): Hayden 21, Barshow 15, Olliges 13, Bradford 11, Roberts 4, Westbrook 3. FG 24 (10), FT 9-20. Whitfield 9 13 22 12 56 Ladue 11 12 8 7 38 W (17-7): Watson 32, Taylor 12, Newlin 3, Ramsey 3, Stucco 3, Holton 2, McCray 1. FG 16 (5), FT 19-29. L (16-8): Okpala 13, Stiebler 11, Garrett 4, Boyd 3, Schneider 3, Bussard 2, Horwitz 2. FG 11 (2), FT 14-21. Seckman 10 26 10 17 63 7 22 12 23 64 Windsor W (10-12): E. Worley 23, Schmidt 17, C. Hartmann 11, E. Worley 6, P. Hartmann 2, Van Etten 2, Williams 2, Alford 1. FG 21 (3), FT 19-28.

THURSDAY’S SCHEDULE GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING

MISSOURI CLASS 1 CHAMPIONSHIPS At St. Peters Rec-Plex Swimming preliminaries, 12:30 p.m. Diving finals, 5 p.m.

WRESTLING

ILLINOIS CHAMPIONSHIPS At State Farm Center, Champaign Class 3A, 5 p.m. Class 2A, 3 p.m. Class 1A, 1 p.m. MISSOURI CHAMPIONSHIPS At Mizzou Arena, Columbia Class 4, 5 p.m. Class 3, 5 p.m. Class 2, 10 a.m. Class 1, 10 a.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Hazelwood West (10-10) at Riverview Gardens (5-15), 5 p.m. Owensville (8-15) at Union (10-13), 5:30 p.m. John Burroughs (7-15) at Lutheran North (19-3), 5:30 p.m. Winfield (2-20) at FZ East (8-13), 5:30 p.m. St. Dominic (16-5) at Westminster (8-14), 6 p.m. Ursuline (7-13) vs. Nerinx Hall (11-12) at Webster University, 6 p.m. University City (11-9) at Cardinal Ritter (16-4), 6 p.m. Visitation (14-8) at St. Joseph’s (17-5), 6 p.m. Crystal City (8-13) at Northwest Academy (13-7), 6 p.m. St. Clair (17-6) at St. James (12-12), 6 p.m. Villa Duchesne (6-13) at Cor Jesu (9-15), 6 p.m. Sumner (12-4) at Soldan (9-11), 6 p.m. Affton (10-14) at Herculaneum (19-3), 6 p.m. Incarnate Word (18-5) at Whitfield (18-5), 6:30 p.m. DuBourg (9-12) at

Notre Dame (13-8), 6:45 p.m. Ritenour (11-10) at Lutheran South (14-8), 7 p.m. Grandview (20-2) at Hillsboro (12-11), 7 p.m. Festus (12-9) at Ste. Genevieve, 7 p.m. Windsor (3-16) at Seckman (9-10), 7 p.m. Sullivan (19-4) at Pacific (10-12), 7 p.m. Hermann (21-3) at New Haven (14-9), 7:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

MVCHA CLASS 2A PLAYOFFS Championship, Game 1 At McKendree Rec-Plex O’Fallon (17-5-1) vs. Columbia (20-1-2), 7:30 p.m. MVCHA CLASS 1A PLAYOFFS Championship, Game 1 At East Alton Rink Highland (10-10-3) vs. Triad (10-13-3), 7:15 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL

St. Louis College (12-9) vs. Blue Knights (9-12) at St. Louis Christian, 5 p.m. Bismarck at Grandview (5-18), 5:30 p.m. Riv. Gardens (6-16) at Hazelwood Central (21-2), 5:30 p.m. Principia (12-10) at St. Pius X (9-11), 5:30 p.m. Gate. Science (3-11) at Affton (4-17), 5:30 p.m. Valle at Crystal City (5-17), 5:30 p.m. Normandy (9-15) at Haz. East (16-5), 5:45 p.m. St. Dominic (11-10) at Clayton (4-17), 6 p.m. Meadow Heights at St. Vincent (17-4), 6 p.m. Card. Ritter (17-8) at St. Mary’s (22-3), 7 p.m. Vall. Park (17-6) at Herculaneum (8-15), 7 p.m. John Burroughs (15-7) at Luth.North (13-12), 7 p.m. Vashon (17-4) vs. Webster Groves (14-7) at Meramec CC, 7 p.m. Bayless (6-15) at Maplewood-RH (12-10), 7 p.m. North County (12-3) at Perryville, 7:15 p.m.

PAUL HALFACRE • sTLhighschoolsports.com

New Athens’ Danika White (23) makes a pass Monday during a Class 1A girls sectional semifinal game at Goreville High School in Goreville, Ill.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • ILLINOIS PLAYOFFS SCOREBOARD 4A CHATHAM GLENWOOD REGIONAL First round, Monday Champaign Centennial 36, Quincy 33 Semifinals, Wednesday O’Fallon 51, Champaign Centennial 31 Glenwood 50, Springfield 49 (OT) Championship, Thursday O’Fallon (25-4) at Chatham Glenwood (22-8), 7 p.m. CLASS 4A BELLEVILLE EAST REGIONAL First round, Tuesday Belleville West 40, Alton 36 Collinsville 73, Granite City 15 Semifinals, Wednesday Edwardsville 65, Belleville West 18 Belleville East 64, Collinsville 48 Championship, Friday Edwardsville (26-0) at Belleville East (18-9), 7 p.m. CLASS 3A CIVIC MEMORIAL REGIONAL First round, Monday Triad 64, Cahokia 60 Semifinals, Wednesday Civic Memorial 48, Triad 19 East St. Louis 48, Highland 39 Championship, Thursday Civic Memorial (28-2) vs. East St. Louis (15-10), 7 p.m. CLASS 3A FREEBURG REGIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Breese Central 48, Columbia 26 Freeburg 45, Jerseyville 37

Championship, Thursday Breese Central (25-3) vs. Freeburg (21-6), 7 p.m. 2A HAMILTON COUNTY SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Mater Dei 57, Vienna 30 Harrisburg 43, Nashville 30 Championship, Thursday Mater Dei (22-7) vs. Harrisburg (31-0), 7 p.m. 2A RIVERTON SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Auburn 45, Tri-City 36 Pleasant Plains 45, Alton Marquette 23 Championship, Thursday Auburn (25-5) vs. Pleasant Plains (28-3), 7 p.m. CLASS 1A GOREVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals, Monday Meridian 65, Bluford Webber 36 New Athens 51, Gallatin County 49 Championship, Thursday New Athens (15-12) vs. Meridian (18-9), 7 p.m. CLASS 1A NORTH GREENE SECTIONAL Semifinal, Monday Lebanon 55, Carrollton 35 Semifinal, Tuesday Okawville 45, Jacksonville Routt 33 Championship, Thursday Lebanon (29-1) vs. Okawville (23-8), 7 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • AREA RANKINGS LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record LW 1. Edwardsville 25-0 1 2. Haze. Central 18-6 4 3. Parkway North 19-5 3 4. Kirkwood 19-3 2 5. O’Fallon 24-4 5 6. St. Joseph’s 17-5 6 7. Parkway Central 19-3 8 8. Francis Howell 16-7 10 9. Howell Central 19-4 7 10. Holt 15-6 9

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record LW 1. Lebanon, Ill. 29-1 2 2. Civic Memorial 27-2 4 3. Incarnate Word 18-5 1 4. Whitfield 18-5 3 5. Metro 20-6 5 6. Lutheran North 19-3 7 7. MICDS 19-3 9 8. Grandview 20-2 8 9. Herculaneum 19-3 6 10. Sullivan 19-4 10


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

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National Extremes

WEATHER • Low 53, High 72 • Winds SSW 5-15 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 85° Presidio, Texas

Low: -17° Jackman, Maine

Very mild with showers

110s

Temperatures will be well above average today with highs forecast to reach the low 70s in the St. Louis area. A cold front will gradually push southward with showers likely, especially later today into early tonight. Friday will be much colder with highs only in the upper 30s. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

56°

DRIVE

67°

Slight chance of showers

70°

Chance of showers

BEDTIME

53°

Showers likely Slight chance of rain

74 69 70 72 72 73 69 59 71 73 60 72 74

W

mostly cloudy showers showers showers showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

70s

H

42 56 37 46 50 41 54 40 44 34 45 44

57 69 43 61 62 53 67 53 61 41 63 60

50s 40s 20s

FRIDAY

33°/38°

Partly sunny and colder

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

27°/47°

Flood Stage

Current Level

Partly cloudy

Chance of showers

rain showers rain showers showers rain showers rain showers cloudy showers showers

Kansas City 50 / 69

Kirksville 41 / 59

Joplin 59 / 73

Springfield 45 / 63

St. Louis 53 / 72 Poplar Bluff 58 / 71

Carbondale 56 / 69

+ 0.19 + 0.15 + 0.07 + 0.22 + 0.13 + 0.20 + 0.47 + 0.74 + 0.06 - 0.35

Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Wednesday, Feb 14th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 537 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 12 Month (Total) 495 Season 3216 Year Ago 2581 Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.54 18 12.23 Peoria 14 9.41 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.12 Sullivan 16 - 2.77 Valley Park 24 5.54 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.55 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 36.72 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.02 0.00 + 0.01 0.00 + 0.01 + 1.35

SUN & MOON

New Feb 15 Sunrise

First Feb 23

Full Mar 1

6:52 AM Sunset

Last Mar 9 5:39 PM

Moonrise 6:50 AM Moonset 5:38 PM

A partial solar eclipse will occur today. However, it is not visible in the St. Louis area. A solar eclipse is a type of syzygy that occurs when the moon passes between the sun and Earth.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.88 354.71 494.46 655.15 705.58 652.34 908.47 839.13 594.45 404.83 600.64 443.15

- 0.12 0.00 - 0.01 + 0.11 + 0.10 + 0.08 + 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.04 + 0.01 - 0.15 - 0.05

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 87°

Lower 48 temps only

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 36 Albuquerque 43 Anchorage 19 Atlanta 57 Atlantic City 46 Baltimore 47 Billings 12 Biloxi, Ms. 61 Birmingham 61 Bismarck 11 Boise 29 Boston 37 Buffalo 36 Burlington, Vt. 32 Charleston, S.C. 53 Charleston, W.V. 56 Charlotte 54 Cheyenne 28 Chicago 37 Cincinnati 56 Cleveland 44 Colorado Spgs. 34 Concord, N.H. 28 Dallas 61 Daytona Beach 58 Denver 31 Des Moines 35 61 Destin, Fl. 37 Detroit 56 El Paso 57 Evansville 22 Fairbanks 9 Fargo 29 Flagstaff 63 Fort Myers 2 Great Falls 31 Green Bay 35 Hartford 69 Honolulu 64 Houston 48 Indianapolis 63 Jackson, Ms. 26 Juneau 73 Key West 45 Las Vegas 57 Little Rock 51 Los Angeles 59 Louisville

50 56 29 72 64 67 17 72 75 14 42 56 50 45 78 69 74 35 43 67 56 55 49 81 77 46 45 72 48 65 69 24 13 40 84 11 39 53 78 75 64 80 33 81 63 73 70 71

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers snow partly sunny mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy partly sunny showers showers showers snow snow rain and snow sunny snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy snow sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny showers

39 34 14 61 53 56 3 61 61 -3 30 44 35 37 60 55 62 9 24 41 34 16 37 46 60 16 10 62 29 49 40 1 -5 22 63 8 13 43 64 62 35 62 27 72 42 54 51 47

43 52 28 71 61 62 34 75 69 26 46 54 35 38 80 59 75 36 28 43 36 39 45 52 81 43 24 75 34 53 41 14 20 43 84 34 21 51 80 73 37 68 35 81 62 54 76 51

showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers mostly cloudy mostly sunny showers partly cloudy rain and snow showers rain and snow rain and snow partly cloudy rain showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers rain and snow partly cloudy showers showers sunny sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers rain partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny snow sunny showers partly cloudy showers snow showers sunny sunny sunny showers sunny rain

City

Today L H

56 Macon 66 McAllen, Tx. 63 Memphis 70 Miami 33 Milwaukee Minneapolis 24 Missoula, Mt. 20 59 Mobile Montgomery 60 61 Nashville New Orleans 65 New York City 44 Norfolk, Va. 50 Oklahoma City 57 Omaha 32 Orlando 61 Palm Springs 51 Philadelphia 46 Phoenix 54 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 31 Portland, Or. 37 Providence 37 Raleigh 53 Rapid City 20 Reno 23 Richmond, Va. 50 Sacramento 38 St. Petersburg 66 Salt Lake City 33 San Antonio 61 San Diego 53 San Francisco 45 Santa Fe 35 Savannah 55 Seattle 35 63 Shreveport 22 Sioux Falls 36 Syracuse 58 Tallahassee 65 Tampa 51 Tucson 60 Tulsa 50 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 68 50 Wichita Wilmington, De. 46 53 Yuma

76 85 75 84 40 33 30 75 78 74 80 63 71 81 44 82 72 67 66 61 47 49 54 74 26 44 72 61 79 39 73 67 62 51 79 46 80 30 50 79 80 60 80 70 82 74 66 73

W

mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy sunny rain cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow sunny showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

60 65 52 69 20 1 19 60 62 55 63 51 61 32 11 63 52 54 51 41 36 39 45 62 -2 20 61 35 64 27 61 53 45 25 60 39 62 0 35 58 64 49 34 60 67 25 54 52

77 85 53 84 24 19 34 76 80 58 77 54 73 41 27 85 73 60 71 45 46 50 55 76 36 52 70 63 77 45 71 72 63 48 81 48 64 22 35 83 80 67 42 65 82 40 61 74

mostly cloudy mostly sunny showers sunny sunny sunny snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers fog rain showers mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny rain mostly cloudy rain showers rain showers showers partly cloudy sunny showers sunny sunny partly cloudy showers sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain showers sunny rain and snow partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny windy rain partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

73 35 46 46 70 75 21 24 25 70 55 -9 72 73 36 28

89 48 54 70 88 83 41 41 40 84 74 16 82 88 43 37

sunny mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy rain and snow

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

34 63 44 75 44 58 28 43 40 71 48 30 8 71 57 54

39 71 55 86 60 73 51 49 59 94 75 41 19 81 79 77

showers partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.12 - 0.09 - 0.38 + 0.08 - 0.03

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

A frontal boundary will bring rain to portions of the southern Great Lakes, Ohio Valley, and Midwest. Parts of the north-central Rockies and north-central Plains will see a little snow. Wet weather is also expected across parts of the southern Rockies and Desert Southwest. High pressure will be in control throughout the Southeast and Gulf Coast. City

W

Flood Stage

-0s Alaska Low: -29°

Chicago 37 / 43

Wintry Mix

0s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 7.50 23 4.02 Jefferson City 21 3.34 Hermann 20 1.36 Washington 25 7.41 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.28 Louisiana 15 12.25 Dam 24 25 14.65 Dam 25 26 14.66 Grafton 18 15.98 M.Price, Pool 419 419.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.43 St Louis 30 0.04 Chester 27 2.33 Cape Girardeau 32 9.34

24-Hr Change

10s

MONDAY

31°/54° 44°/63°

Partly sunny

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.13” 0.17” 1.13” 1.40” 3.53”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

66° 40° 45° 27° 74° -2° 59° 41°

Snow

30s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:51 p.m.) Low (12:13 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1954) Record Low (1905) High Last Year Low Last Year

T-storms

60s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Rain

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

56 58 49 56 51 59 50 41 54 56 41 53 56

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

90s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

100s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

31 40 22 75 32 72 54 23 26 70 59 41 34 35 26 39

33 53 39 83 53 82 84 37 34 82 75 57 42 42 39 49

snow showers mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny rain


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Thursday • 02.15.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, West deals NORTH ♠A Q 8 7 ♥5 4 ♦Q 3 2 ♣A 9 7 3 WEST EAST ♠2 ♠Void ♥K 10 9 8 3 ♥Q 7 6 ♦A J 8 ♦10 9 6 5 4 ♣K Q 10 2 ♣J 8 6 5 4 SOUTH ♠K J 10 9 6 5 4 3 ♥A J 2 ♦K 7 ♣Void The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1♥ Dbl 2♥ 6♠ All pass Opening lead: King of ♣ The Morton’s Fork Coup in bridge is named after Cardinal Morton, Chancellor of the Exchequer for a bygone English king. He was charged with collecting the king’s taxes. He believed that people who lived nicely could obviously afford to pay taxes and those that lived frugally must have substantial savings and could also afford to pay. The people were said to be caught on “Morton’s Fork.” South’s jump to slam was a reasonable gamble. Should partner have a singleton heart, three spades to the ace and the queen of diamonds would be

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD enough for slam. A doubleton heart with partner would require a bit more than that, but not much. Not knowing what to discard on the ace of clubs, South played low from dummy on the opening club lead and ruffed in his hand. He led the jack of spades, drawing trump, and immediately led a low diamond away from his king. This caught West on “Morton’s Fork.” Should West play low, dummy’s queen would win the trick and the king of diamonds would be discarded on the ace of clubs. Should West rise with his ace instead, South could discard both of his heart losers, one on the ace of clubs and one on the queen of diamonds. Six spades making six either way. East was too much of a gentleman to point out that the slam would have been defeated with a heart lead. (02/15/18)

Across

1 Start of a magic incantation 5 Hasbro toy that involves pulling and twisting 10 Degree in abstract mathematics 13 AMC’s “Better Call ___” 14 Celebrating Hanukkah, say 15 Opposite of 29-Down 16 Line from someone who’s been interrupted 19 Kinda ... or a continuation of 16-Across 20 Bump heads 21 Like a course labeled “101” 22 School in San

Luis Obispo 24 Some almanac info 25 What may take its toll?: abbr. 26 Most hajjis 28 Cousin of contra31 Pass on, as lore 33 Ewe can do it! 36 Line from someone who’s been interrupted 39 Joined ... or a continuation of 36-Across 40 Is appealing 41 Hollywood’s Cameron 42 Some canasta plays 43 Square figure? 45 Big pipes 47 Body shot? 51 Actress Hayek of “Frida” 52 Elite group

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Feb. 15 is your birthday • This year you have a way of stunning others by taking the most unexpected actions. If you are single, you could meet someone from out of the blue. If you are attached, your sweetie might point out that you seem unusually rigid. A fellow Aquarius could be just as stubborn as you are.

WORD GAME February 15 WORD — CADAVERS (CADAVERS: kuh-DAV-ers: Dead bodies, especially intended for dissection.) Average mark 23 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 31 or more words in CADAVERS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — CISLUNAR uncial slain cairn urinal slur clan uric snail curl nail snarl incur naris laic incus auric lain insular rail lair sail rain liar salic rani lira sari ruin lunar scan ulna scar

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

54 Hit 2011 animated film 55 Line from someone who’s been interrupted 58 Beethoven’s “Minuet ___” ... or a continuation of 55-Across 59 Visibly embarrassed 60 “I can’t ___” 61 Photographer Goldin 62 Giving orders 63 Bingo relative

Down

1 Jiggly dish 2 Makings of a model? 3 Oscar winner Mercedes 4 Imitating 5 Stop, at sea 6 Sees red? 7 Crux 8 School of thought 9 Co-written best-seller 10 Wham or bam 11 City near ancient Carthage 12 Fruity drink brand 14 Fruity filled cakes 17 Clumsy boat 18 Man buns and the Mannequin Challenge, once 23 Dr. ___ 24 Engages in

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Some of your friends seem to be out of sorts. You can expect one of them to make a major change that could affect you. Tonight: Where the crowds are. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You are determined to make a difference. Know that you are likely to run into the unexpected. Your smile opens doors and permits you to lead others through this wildly emotional day. Tonight: On top of the world. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You could experience some fast changes that you did not anticipate. How you deal with a close friend at a distance could surprise not only that person, but you as well. Tonight: Read between the lines. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You could be emotional and unclear about what to do. Trust that in a few days, you will have made the right decision with the help of a partner. You seem to be overwhelmed when considering the pros and cons of a financial situation. Tonight: Make headway. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might feel as if there is no other choice than the present one. Stay more in touch with what you need. Do not hesitate to forge ahead to make your wish a possibility. Tonight: Go with the flow. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You can be difficult and touchy. In fact, today you might

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Sam Trabucco

some pregame banter 26 Provider of global support? 27 Tara of “American Pie” 28 Bustle 29 Only spoken word (by Marcel Marceau) in Mel Brooks’ “Silent Movie” 30 50-50, e.g. 32 Just made

(out) 33 Obesity meas. 34 Computing pioneer Lovelace 35 The whole shebang 37 Plan to pay later, say 38 Exchanged bonds? 42 Marcel Marceau, e.g. 44 Weakling 45 Hawaii’s ___ Loa 46 Ally (with)

47 Stylike 48 Really, really want 49 George ___, Vermont senator for 34 years 50 It’s taboo 51 Ad space meas. 52 Leatherworkers’ tools 53 T-shaped crosses 56 Nigerian tribe 57 Quaint cry

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0111

WORD SCRIMMAGE

feel more irritated than usual just doing your normal thing. If you don’t feel comfortable with what is going on, stop and reflect on the issue before starting up a conversation. Ask questions. Tonight: Opt for togetherness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Be realistic about what you find out. You might want to keep some information to yourself for now. Reflect on what is happening, then assess the implications and your choices. Tonight: Stay within your budget. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You could be at a point where you can’t deal with the stress surrounding an older person or relative. You would be well-advised to keep your cool for now. Tonight: This, too, shall pass.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be trying to approach a situation differently. Stay with the tried and true for now, while you weigh the pros and cons of a potential new direction. Tonight: Plans could change at any moment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You will need to stay on top of what is causing you and a close friend some stress. You might not be as comfortable handling a certain financial arrangement as you thought you’d be. Tonight: Pay bills first, then decide. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might want to head in a new direction. Your vision could be changing because of a new set of needs and desires. You are likely to make this adjustment more gracefully than you had thought possible. Tonight: All smiles.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Reach out to someone you rarely spend time with but trust implicitly. The two of you will enjoy the bantering back and forth. Whether you realize it, you are helping each other question one another’s beliefs in order to make a health, strong decision. Tonight: Make it early. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.15.2018 • Thursday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCh • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Invite late wife’s mom to wedding?

Dear Looking • Although your late wife is gone, her parents are

still your children’s grandparents and therefore should be treated as part of your family. While you might feel awkward if you were in their position, consider how hurt they will be if they are not included on the guest list. The decision whether to attend should be theirs to make. Welcome them and treat them with kindness. A wife can be ‘‘replaced,” but a daughter cannot, which is why Karen is still grieving. Dear Abby • I need advice on how to deal with a friend/neighbor’s messy, unkempt backyard. We are getting ready to put our house on the market, and I’m concerned their yard may be a deterrent to potential buyers. Their pool looks like a swamp, and various pieces of lawn furniture are strewn about the yard. Tables are turned upside down and random items are thrown about. They are friends of ours, but I have no clue how to broach such a sensitive topic without upsetting them. Please help. — LIVING

NEXT TO A SWAMP Dear Living • Because those neighbors are friends, I assume they are aware that you are selling your home. If you live in an area that’s prone to any dangerous mosquito-borne viruses, you would be doing them a favor to point out that their pool equipment needs fixing because still water makes an excellent breeding place for mosquitoes. As to the state of their yard, your real estate agent may have some suggestions about how to handle that. If you and your spouse volunteer to help your neighbors make it more attractive, they might be receptive. However, if they refuse and you live in a community with a neighborhood association that regulates how properties must look in order to preserve their value, consider bringing this to its attention. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

DR. FOX

Beer-loving dog now wants Diet Coke Dear Dr. Fox • We have a small part-Chihuahua dog, age 7, and she loves to have sips of my husband’s home-brewed beer. The other day she licked up some Diet Coke I accidentally spilled, and really liked it. Now she wants to drink some when I sit down with my husband, and I have my pop and he has his beer. She is not interested in the beer anymore. I know dogs like sweet things, and there’s no alcohol in the pop. Is that OK? Like me, she’s a bit overweight. — H.W., Fargo, N.D. Dear H.W. • Part of living with a dog is sharing treats, but ideally they should only be given as a reward for training purposes, and as a daily ritual (as we do with our dog when we come back from a walk). Once you start sharing while you are eating and drinking, you’ll have a dog who will always be pestering you and will be quite

likely to get overweight with treat after treat. I see nothing wrong giving your dog a teaspoon or so of beer when you and your husband are sitting back and having drinks together, but give it to her in her own saucer. As for the soda: The sugar substitute aspartame, found in many diet sodas, is classified as a neuro-excitant. This excitotoxin is a brain nerve stimulant that may have addictive qualities for people. It can affect behavior, mood, sleep and judgment, and can increase appetite and impair metabolism, aggravating obesity and diabetes when consumed in significant daily amounts — certain public officials being no exception. My late mother-in-law, who had diabetes but craved sweets, used to put aspartame on much of what she ate, including tomatoes. She once phoned me to say

Differences: 1. Book is missing. 2. Doorknob is smaller. 3. Mailbox is smaller. 4. Window is smaller. 5. Hat is moved. 6. Bush is smaller.

Dear Abby • My wife passed away two years ago at age 40 after a long bout with cancer. We had three children, ages 7 to 12. I am 44 and engaged now to a wonderful woman. We are planning to have a small wedding with fewer than 50 guests. While the kids and I are doing well, my late wife’s mother, ‘‘Karen,” is still grieving. She has a forceful personality and can be quite pushy. She lives nearby. We have not finalized the arrangements or sent out invitations. Karen has been asking if she and my former father- in-law are invited, but we haven’t answered her yet. She says she’s hurt because she feels we don’t want her there. Is it proper etiquette to invite the parents of a deceased spouse to a remarriage? The kids seem to not care either way. If it were me, I’d feel awkward being there. Help! — LOOKING TO THE FUTURE IN ILLINOIS

TV THURSDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 2/15/18

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that she felt she like was having seizures when she went to bed, and her doctor could not give her a reason. Knowing about her diet soda and artificial sweetener addictions, I advised her to switch to the herbal product Stevia. She immediately followed my advice, and her distressing neurological symptoms never recurred. Aspartame was approved by the U.S. government (under protest from one expert panelist on the review board whom I knew well) as a safe substitute for saccharine, and is now in many manufactured foods and beverages, the absurdity of which borders on the insane. Bake your own dog cookies as per the recipe on my website, drfoxvet.net, or get a good brand made only in the U.S. or Canada.

PBS Donny9 brook

Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxVet.net. Send mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

MYTV Blue Bloods A car from Blue Bloods An elusive Blue Bloods Erin must 46 a classic film is stolen. serial killer taunts take a case from a col(cc) Danny. league.

FOX Gotham Gordon tries to 9-1-1: Point of Origin. 2 broker a deal. (cc) An emergency at an Indian wedding. CBS The Big 4 Bang Theory

Young Sheldon (7:31)

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Mom (8:01) Life in S.W.A.T.: K-Town. A (cc) Pieces (cc) search for a drug ring’s leader. (cc)

NBC Í2018 Winter Olympics: Figure Skating, Snowboarding, Skeleton, Free5 style Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing. (N) (cc)

CW 11

800 Words (cc) Donnybrook: Your Turn

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

The Doctor Blake Mysteries: The Silence. (cc)

Supernatural: Break- Arrow: Divided. Oliver down. Donna’s niece is discovers Cayden’s sekidnapped. (cc) cret. (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

ABC The Bachelor Winter Games The participants try 20/20: Roseanne: The 30 speed skating. (N) (cc) Return. (N) (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • THUrSDAy • 02.15.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

What can be done to get off insulin injections? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • My doctor placed me on insulin for diabetes because I was not able to bring my glucose below 100. The bloodwork results are now 120 glucose and 6.6 hemoglobin A1C. I have been averaging 6.5 hemoglobin A1C for over two years. I have been taking glucose readings three times a day, with results between 108 and 147 mg/dl. My blood pressure reads 117/61, and my heart rate averages 55. All my bloodwork is within normal limits. I’m 65 years old and was wondering if taking the insulin is needed at this time. I still work, and I’m very active for my age. I take 15 units of insulin injections at night before bed. I also take XIGDUO XR 10 mg/1,000 mg in the morning after breakfast. The other medication I take is 10 mg of simvastatin before bedtime for my cholesterol, which is within the limit when I do my bloodwork. What can I do to get off the insulin? — S.R.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • I understand why people want to stop taking insulin. Many people do not like giving themselves an injection every day. However, it is hard to argue with the success you have had on your current regimen. Your blood sugars, confirmed by your A1C, are in the nearnormal range, and your results are very close to what most experts would recommend. Another consideration is that the insulin you are taking keeps your own pancreas from having to make insulin. This might help your long-term ability to regulate blood sugar. Your insulin is a long-acting form of human insulin, which is the most natural way of replacing the insulin your body can’t make enough of. You also take a potent combination of oral medicines to help the insulin work better. I spoke with one expert, who said she would consider looking at your body’s ability to make insulin (through a blood test called a C-peptide level). If that level were low, it would be unlikely that you would have success going off insulin. If you still feel strongly about trying to get off insulin, speak to the doctor managing your diabetes about trying to slowly taper off the insulin, going down one or two units a day every week or so. Do not try this without discussing with your doctor; he or she would need to monitor your sugars very carefully during the process.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

2.15.18  

2.15.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

2.15.18  

2.15.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch