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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 02.13.2018 • $2.00

WHITE HOUSE’S $4.4 TRILLION BUDGET PROPOSAL

MILITARY TRUMPS DEFICIT

FIVE THINGS TO KNOW

BY ANDREW TAYLOR AND MARTIN CRUTSINGER Associated Press

Dead on arrival? • This budget may be more irrelevant than usual because it doesn’t take into account a recent hike in spending limits for defense and domestic programs. Red ink • The budget showed a dramatic increase in deficits over the 10-year budget window. Medicare slashed • The budget calls for about $500 billion in cuts from projected Medicare spending over the next decade. Infrastructure work • Trump wants to use $200 billion over the next decade to support $1.5 trillion in new spending to rebuild the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. Privatized space station • The budget proposes pulling NASA out of the International Space Station by 2025 with private businesses running the space station instead.

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump unveiled a $4.4 trillion budget plan Monday that envisions steep cuts to America’s social safety net but mounting spending on the military, formally retreating from last year’s promises to balance the federal budget. The president’s spending outline for the first time acknowledges that the Republican tax overhaul passed last year would add billions to the deficit and not “pay for itself” as Trump and his Republican allies asserted. If enacted as proposed, though no presidential budget ever is, the plan would establish an era of $1 trillion-plus yearly deficits. See BUDGET • Page A4

WITH A SPRING IN THEIR STEP

Report says top opioid makers paid anti-pain advocates $9 million at play in McCaskill’s findings BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright throws off the mound Monday at the Cardinals spring training complex in Jupiter, Fla. Pitchers and catchers officially report Tuesday. The remainder of the squad is scheduled to check in on Sunday, with full workouts set to begin next Monday. FULL COVERAGE IN SPORTS

Trump hedges on extensive plan to rebuild roads, bridges BY KEN THOMAS Associated Press

WA S H I N GTO N • President Donald Trump sent Congress a sweeping plan Monday to rebuild the nation’s depleted roads and bridges — then immediately raised doubts about how committed he was to delivering on that campaign promise. “If you want it badly, you’re going to get it,” Trump told state and local officials during a meeting at the White House. “And if you don’t want it, that’s OK with me, too.” Trump suggested that his proposal — aimed at spurring $1.5 trillion in spending over a decade — was not as important to him as other recent administration efforts to cut taxes and boost military spending. See ROADS • Page A5

TODAY

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‘Village’ provides socialization, volunteers for older St. Louisans

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BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. ANN • In the days just before

in development. Five years ago, Gordon helped start what would become known as STL Village, a nonprofit that shares the model of similar networks across the country. It is funded by annual memberships and fun-

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draisers, and those who join determine what the priorities of the village should be. With older people “swimming in an ocean of ageism,” villages are crucial in helping

a top official in St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s office told the County Council that a long-term lease for county office space at the former Northwest Plaza shopping mall would save taxpayers $10 million, a much different conversation was happening among county officials reviewing the lease. “The bottom line is that any claim that this is a cost-savings measure for the County would appear to be quite inaccurate,” Ted Medler, the county’s division manager for planning and programming, wrote on June 1, 2016, to Nichalos Gardner, who was then the county transportation director.

Gloria Gordon, 94, one of the original members of STL Village, talks to the group last month during a “Souper Sunday” gathering at Executive House in the Central West End.

Snowboarder Chloe Kim wins gold

Mound City South

See OPIOIDS • Page A4

Emails counter Stenger’s claim of money saved on office lease

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A few months ago, Gloria Gordon decided it was time to give up driving. For many older adults, parking the car for the final time symbolizes letting go of independence. But Gordon, 94, doesn’t see it that way. She is part of a network of people who help each other, whether it be with a ride to the doctor or assistance setting up a computer. The group, now entering its fifth year, is called a village. Not a brick-and-mortar community but one that links those 50 and older to one another to remain independent, socially engaged and educated on issues such as health care and scams targeting the elderly. The village movement began about 15 years ago in Boston and has grown to 230 communities in 46 states. There are 130 more villages

WASHINGTON • Sen. Claire McCaskill released a report Monday alleging that from 2012 to 2017, leading manufacturers of opioids gave $9 million to pain treatment advocacy groups, an arrangement the report says “may have played a significant role in creating the necessary conditions for the U.S. opioids epidemic.” The leading opioids manufacturer named in the report, Purdue Pharma, just announced it would stop promoting opioids to doctors. The founder of the top association taking drugmakers’ money — the U.S. Pain Foundation — said that “any funding we receive has never nor will it ever influence what we will do to help

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M 1 TUESDAY • 02.13.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM TIME FOR CHOCOLATE

VALENTINE HELP Whether you need to find a romantic restaurant or get the best gift, we have help for your Feb. 14 celebration. stltoday.com/holidays

Skip the heart-shaped box of drugstore candy and create a chocolate treat at home for that special someone. stltoday.com/holidays

UPCOMING CHATS

Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday: Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Wednesday: Sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz, 1 p.m. Thursday: Dave Matter on MU sports, 11 a.m.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

Miklasz added to Athletic roster for Cardinals coverage JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WRITE MOVES • The new sports voice around town, The Athletic, has added a major name to its roster: local sports chatmaster Bernie Miklasz. M iklasz announced Monday on Twitter that he will join the new online publication: “Proud to join @TheAthleticSTL and contribute my voice to Cardinals and MLB coverage.” Miklasz Miklasz said he will remain in his post as the morning-drive man on WXOS-FM 101.1, noting that he recently signed a five-year contract extension. “I just really like what that site is doing … and I couldn’t resist the opportunity to get involved,” Miklasz said in an interview. He said he will write two Cardinals columns a week for The Athletic, and will continue to write for the radio station’s website. The Athletic also hit the Twittersphere on Monday to promise Miklaszpenned columns for the upcoming Cardinals baseball season. “Bernie will bring a thoughtful but fearless voice to Cardinals coverage,” the publication’s Twitter account proclaimed. Miklasz has been anchoring local

sports news on the ESPN affiliate since 2015, after having worked 26 years as a columnist at the Post-Dispatch. This makes the second well-known STL sports scribe to join the new subscription-based online publication. In August, Blues hockey writer Jeremy Rutherford left the Post-Dispatch to take over the hockey beat at The Athletic. The Athletic started in 2016 in San Francisco and now covers 18 U.S. markets. WAVELENGTHS • Scott Roddy, program director for WIL-FM 92.3, keeps climbing the list ladder. Roddy has again been named by Radio Ink magazine as one of the “Best Program Directors In Country Radio.” This year, he ranked at No. 18, up from his ranking last year at No. 24. Roddy The article notes that the station had “a very big year” in 2017, being named as the majormarket station of the year by the Country Music Association. Roddy, who also is the program director at WARH-FM 106.5 (The Arch) came to STL in March 2016. GONE TOO SOON • Aside from its residents dying too soon, St. Louis is a relatively healthy place to live. But because of a dismal ranking in health care, St. Louis city finished at No. 59 for “Healthiest & Unhealthiest Cities

in the U.S.” Personal finance website WalletHub examined the largest 174 cities by looking at four categories to come up with its rankings: health care; food; fitness; and green space. Our fair burg finished in the top 40 for green space (31st), which focuses on park land, trails and recreation areas; and in fitness (40th), which considered fitness clubs and rate of physical activity. We came in at No. 71, still in the upper half, when it came to food. That category considered fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity rates and number of dietitians and nutritionists per capita. And then came health care. St. Louis sunk close to the bottom, with a ranking of No. 141. In one of the subcategories for health, premature death (years of potential life lost), St. Louis finished dead last out of the 174 cities. Other factors in the health category included frequency and cost of doctor visits and insurance coverage. Still, we’re doing better than most other cities in our general area. Only Chicago (No. 18) and Overland Park, Kan. (No. 30), finished higher than St. Louis. Finishing lower on the list were Cincinnati (66), Springfield, Mo. (101), Kansas City (122), Louisville, Ky. (130), Indianapolis (139) and Memphis, Tenn. (165). Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

At end of dark drama, ‘Humans’ finds light ‘THE HUMANS’

Willy and Linda Loman, the couple at the heart of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” have two sons — young adults going nowhere, not close to each other, sometimes willing to feign family feeling but in fact indifferent to, or angry at, their parents. Erik and Deirdre Blake, the couple at the heart of Stephen Karam’s “The Humans,” have two daughters — young adults whose respective careers, in law and music, aren’t exactly working out. But here’s the difference: The sisters love each other, and they love their parents. The Blakes, like the Lomans, have seen better days. The children make the difference. Maybe that explains why “Salesman,” which ends with Willy’s death (a likely suicide), is a tragedy — and “The Humans,” which just opened at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, is an essentially optimistic drama. It ends with Erik walking out of a dark apartment to join his family outside, in the light. The Blakes, after all, have done perhaps the best thing that parents can do: They’ve raised children who trust each other. Their family will continue after the parents are gone. Director Steven Woolf — who directed “Salesman” at the Rep 20 years ago — treats the Blakes with frank affection, employing a fine cast to tell their Thanksgiving Day story. For the holiday, Erik (Brian Dykstra), his wife, Deirdre (Carol Schultz, who played Linda Loman in that 1998 production), and Erik’s mother, Momo (Darrie Lawrence), who is in a late stage of dementia, come to New York from their home in Scranton, Pa. Their daughter Ai-

When • Through March 4 Where • Browning Mainstage, Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves How much • $18.50-$89 More info • 314-968-7340; repstl.org

mee (Kathleen Wise), a lawyer in Philadelphia, also came. They are celebrating at the dingy duplex apartment in Chinatown where daughter Brigid (Lauren Marcus) lives with her boyfriend, Richard Saad (Fajer Kaisi). The apartment, a thoroughly depressing concoction by designer Gianni Downs, tells us plenty before a line is spoken — just as Wilson Chin’s elegant design for “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley” did a few months ago. It’s impossible to overestimate the effect of good set design on a whole production. The place is drastically underfurnished, without so much as a calendar on the walls. Deirdre brings a contribution to the decor, but the little statue of the Madonna isn’t exactly appreciated. Almost everybody is worried about something. Aimee has just broken up with her girlfriend. Plus, her firm has let her know she’s not going anywhere, because she’s so debilitated by colitis that she’s no longer an earner. Lauren can’t find work in music and fears a life serving drinks. Deirdre, who has an office job and also cares for Momo, is exhausted. Only Richard — still a graduate student at 38, but with a large inheritance coming — and (presumably) Momo can face the future calmly. Erik blames himself, not unreasonably, for losing the good job he had held for years. He’s working, but the cut in salary

and prestige hurt his pride and the family circumstances. It’s left him shaky. Haunted by terrible dreams of monsters that eat people and memories of 9/11, which he witnessed from a coffee shop across the street from the twin towers, Erik tries to maintain his composure. But we see the cracks. He’s terrified when the lights go out, staggering around in the dark. He presses a cold can of beer to his forehead to steady himself. He trembles when a deathlike figure, just an elderly neighbor dressed in black, passes by the open door with her laundry. But Erik also takes his mother’s hand and speaks to her gently. He enjoys the meal. He strives to show his daughters the strong, reliable man who raised them. And they all display that kind of warmth. The whole family is good to Momo, happy to help her as often as she needs it. Aimee has a wrenching phone conversation with her ex — but she also has an open, affectionate conversation with Brigid, like little girls who have slipped away from the “grown-ups” table to exchange secrets. And Richard, auditioning very successfully for the role of “good son-inlaw,” makes a warm host. He’s the only one willing to listen to Erik’s frightening dreams and to counter them with a story about a comic book about aliens. In their dreams, Richard explains, the monsters are the humans. But as we learn from the Blakes, humans can also protect themselves, by creating and sustaining families. That’s not everything. But it’s as reassuring as a light in the dark. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

McCartney wins Wolf Prize

Israel’s prestigious Wolf Prize is honoring Paul McCartney this year as well as scientists from the U.S., Japan and Britain, among other countries. The Wolf Foundation said that McCartney “is one of the greatest songwriters of all time.” On Monday the foundation announced its winners for 2018, with laureates in the fields of chemistry, agriculture, mathematics, physics and the arts. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois received the Wolf Prize in agriculture for “leading the genomics revolution in the organismal and population biology of the honeybee.” Another important Israeli prize went to author David Grossman. Israel’s Education Ministry announced on Monday that Grossman, who also won the 2017 Man Booker International Prize for his novel “A Horse Walks Into a Bar,” was the Israel Prize for Literature winner for 2018. Grossman’s books have been translated into more than 30 languages and adapted into films. In 2015, he received the St. Louis Literary Award. Cache of Nazi history donated • A German cultural foundation says it has been bequeathed photos, films, manuscripts, letters and files from the estate of Leni Riefenstahl, the legendary filmmaker best known for the propaganda movies she made for Nazi Germany. The Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation said Monday that Riefenstahl’s sole heir, her former secretary, donated the complete collection amassed by the filmmaker, who died in 2003. Riefenstahl always defended her work, saying she knew nothing of Nazi atrocities.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Kim Novak is 85. Singer-bassistactor Peter Tork is 76. Talk-show host Jerry Springer is 74. Singer Peter Gabriel is 68. Singer Henry Rollins is 57. Singer Feist is 42. Actress Mena Suvari is 39.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $203 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $153 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Monday: 07-11-33-37-47 Lucky ball: 10

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CORRECTIONS • A photo accompanying a story about African-American movie milestones in Sunday’s A&E section was incorrectly identified as director Oscar Micheaux. Micheaux’s photo appears Micheaux here. • The changes to electric company regulatory rules created by legislation advanced by the Missouri Senate last week do not affect regulation for other types of utilities. An editorial Sunday said regulatory rules for Spire Inc., the former Laclede Gas, would be affected.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business .............. A10 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Joe Holleman ........ A2 Letters to editor .. A12 Obituaries ........... A14

PEOPLE

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THEATER REVIEW

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People ................... A2 Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks .................. A11 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. B10

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LOCAL

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Mansion is salvaged in hopes of revival If preservationist prevails, parts will go to City Museum BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

Gutted by a July fire, it’s a matter of time before the rest of the stately mansion built in 1860 is demolished. But some portion of the Clemens House — complete with cast-iron busts, Greek-revival columns and classic red St. Louis brick — will hopefully live on somewhere other than its Cass Avenue address north of downtown. Jim Meiners wants that place to be City Museum. He and his crew have been at work for the last three weeks salvaging what they can from the mansion built by wealthy St. Louisan James Clemens Jr., a relative of Mark Twain. They hope to reconstruct a small part of the mansion in City Museum “so people can get an idea of just how grand this house was,” Meiners said. With eight iron windows topped with Greek-revival busts, some salvaged columns and enough brick from the fire-gutted structure, he said he should have enough to recreate a portion of the house in the downtown museum. He already has a relationship with City Museum, where he has donated other artifacts he’s collected from around St. Louis. (Some sources say the woman’s face on the busts is the death mask of Clemens’ wife, Eliza Mullanphy, who died of cholera in 1853. But Michael Allen, director of the Preservation Research

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Jim Meiners (left) and Carlos Mendoza remove an 800-pound cast iron window frame Monday from the Clemens House in the 1800 block of Cass Avenue. The house, built in 1860 by James Clemens Jr., a relative of Mark Twain, burned last July. Meiners and his crew have been salvaging what they can from the mansion over the past three weeks in the hope of reconstructing parts of it at City Museum.

Office, has written there is no evidence it is Eliza’s face and instead is a common likeness of the Roman goddess Juno.) City Museum Director Rick Erwin said in an email that nothing has been finalized yet but that the museum “is excited that someone is working to preserve elements of the house” and “we’d be happy to show those elements in one form or another.” For years, the historic man-

sion on Cass Avenue stood empty. It was acquired by a company affiliated with developer Paul McKee in 2005 and later transferred to his NorthSide Regeneration company. Plans to rehab the structure never materialized before fire destroyed the Greek revival mansion last summer. Meiners said McKee is donating the artifacts to him and that the developer has been “very ac-

commodating.” McKee had been issued a demolition permit last month but said he wanted to save the more fragile pieces of architecture before tearing the rest down. Some distant relatives of the Clemens family have contacted McKee about obtaining some of the busts. He said he will be preserving those and as many bricks and other artifacts as possible “for whatever we re-

build on this site.” “This didn’t happen by accident,” McKee said. “The idea was trying to hang on to as many of these artifacts as we could.” As for Meiners, he is salvaging the mansion at his own cost. He hopes to recoup some of the expense with a GoFundMe campaign. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

CONCERT REVIEW

Chorus adds new work, piano to explore aspects of love BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER st. Louis Post-dispatch

For Sunday afternoon’s program at the 560 Music Center, “Love Dances,” the St. Louis Chamber Chorus and artistic director Philip Barnes mixed it up. Renowned for its superb a cappella singing, this time the choir was accompanied by piano for most of the concert. Barnes usually plays mix and match with compositions, arranging them on the program to complement or contrast with one another; this concert had just four works, three of them comprising several parts. One piece was accompanied by dancers. One thing wasn’t unusual: The Chamber Chorus added another important new work to the choral repertoire. Francis Pott’s “Ardor Amoris (The Burning Heat of Love)” was commissioned by a couple with deep ties to the choir, Bruce and Linda Ryder. (He’s a longtime member of the second tenor section; she was the executive director for two decades until retiring last year.)

Intended to complement the first work on the program, the “Liebeslieder Waltzes,” op. 52, by Johannes Brahms, “Ardor” succeeds both at that and as a standalone piece. Pott set six poems in English, three by women, three by men: Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”), “Renouncement,” by Alice Meynell, Robert Herrick’s “To Electra,” Emily Dickinson’s “Wild Nights!,” “Stillness,” by James Elroy Flecker, and Sonnet 14 (from the Portuguese), by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. It’s a remarkable composition, innovative in the best ways. Pott demonstrated his understanding of good choral writing (and pianism) and provided a mix of moods, from yearning and ardor to lightness and melancholy to contentment. The lovely, intelligent final movement brought a satisfying resolution, and the whole contains a profound message about the nature of love. It received a solid first performance. The program opened with the Brahms, a set of

18 folk-inspired settings of love songs by Georg Friedrich Daumer (18001875) for chorus and piano four hands. The “Liebeslieder” also rings the changes of love’s moods but stays mostly on the lighter side; it was wellsung throughout. Morten Lauridsen’s lovely “Les Chansons des Roses” filled out the first

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The presence of a grand piano in the center of the stage blocked the view of the singers from much of the house, however, and was distracting; there were moments when the choir and piano weren’t completely together.

commissioned Washington University student Rachael Servello to create a dance for six of her fellow students, an interesting addition for this dance-themed season. The excellent pianists were Lan Sim Lim Kimler, who performed in all four works, and Annette Burkhart, who played in the Brahms and the Diemer.

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half. The first four of its five songs are a cappella; the piano accompanies the last, “Dirait-on.” The choir made the most of Lauridsen’s beautiful writing. The second half began with the intriguing Agnus Dei from “MASS,” by Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927), for chorus, two pianos and timpani. Barnes

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LOCAL

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Mansion is salvaged in hopes of revival If preservationist prevails, parts will go to City Museum BY JACOB BARKER st. Louis Post-dispatch

Gutted by a July fire, it’s a matter of time before the rest of the stately mansion built in 1860 is demolished. But some portion of the Clemens House — complete with cast-iron busts, Greek-revival columns and classic red St. Louis brick — will hopefully live on somewhere other than its Cass Avenue address north of downtown. Jim Meiners wants that place to be City Museum. He and his crew have been at work for the last three weeks salvaging what they can from the mansion built by wealthy St. Louisan James Clemens Jr., a relative of Mark Twain. They hope to reconstruct a small part of the mansion in City Museum “so people can get an idea of just how grand this house was,” Meiners said. With eight iron windows topped with Greek-revival busts, some salvaged columns and enough brick from the fire-gutted structure, he said he should have enough to recreate a portion of the house in the downtown museum. He already has a relationship with City Museum, where he has donated other artifacts he’s collected from around St. Louis. (Some sources say the woman’s face on the busts is the death mask of Clemens’ wife, Eliza Mullanphy, who died of cholera in 1853. But Michael Allen, director of the Preservation Research

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Jim Meiners (left) and Carlos Mendoza remove an 800-pound cast iron window frame Monday from the Clemens House in the 1800 block of Cass Avenue. The house, built in 1860 by James Clemens Jr., a relative of Mark Twain, burned last July. Meiners and his crew have been salvaging what they can from the mansion over the past three weeks in the hope of reconstructing parts of it at City Museum.

Office, has written there is no evidence it is Eliza’s face and instead is a common likeness of the Roman goddess Juno.) City Museum Director Rick Erwin said in an email that nothing has been finalized yet but that the museum “is excited that someone is working to preserve elements of the house” and “we’d be happy to show those elements in one form or another.” For years, the historic man-

sion on Cass Avenue stood empty. It was acquired by a company affiliated with developer Paul McKee in 2005 and later transferred to his NorthSide Regeneration company. Plans to rehab the structure never materialized before fire destroyed the Greek revival mansion last summer. Meiners said McKee is donating the artifacts to him and that the developer has been “very ac-

commodating.” McKee had been issued a demolition permit last month but said he wanted to save the more fragile pieces of architecture before tearing the rest down. Some distant relatives of the Clemens family have contacted McKee about obtaining some of the busts. He said he will be preserving those and as many bricks and other artifacts as possible “for whatever we re-

build on this site.” “This didn’t happen by accident,” McKee said. “The idea was trying to hang on to as many of these artifacts as we could.” As for Meiners, he is salvaging the mansion at his own cost. He hopes to recoup some of the expense with a GoFundMe campaign. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Black patrons accuse Applebee’s of racial profiling Restaurant alleged women ran out on bill, told them to leave BY JOE ROBERTSON AND IAN CUMMINGS Kansas City star

A St. Louis woman’s Facebook post saying she was racially profiled at an Independence, Mo., Applebee’s has gone viral after restaurant staff accused her and a friend of leaving without paying their bill during a previous visit. In the post, the woman wrote that she was shopping with a female friend at the Independence Center shopping mall when they stopped at Applebee’s to eat. There, restaurant staff accused them of running out on a bill the night before. The women denied that and said they felt they were accused because they are black. The restaurant’s owners said they’ve found no indications of any racial bias. A description of the incident, and a video showing part of it, were posted Saturday to the Facebook

account of Alexis Brison. According to the Facebook profile, she attended Rockhurst University, works at Ted Drewes and lives in St. Louis. The video has been viewed more than 2 million times and the post shared more than 56,000 times since it went online Saturday. During their meal, the women were approached by an Independence police officer, a mall security guard and a restaurant manager. The police officer told the women that they had been accused of leaving without paying their bill during a visit to the restaurant the night before. The women strongly denied the accusation. One of the women said she had not been to the restaurant before. “This is what black people have to deal with,” one of the women said in the video of the encounter. Restaurant staff and the

police officer asked the women to pay their bill, leave and not come back. The women paid and left. Applebee’s in a written statement to The Star on Sunday said that it regrets any incidents like the one depicted in the video, but said it has found no indications that the store’s action was racially motivated. But on Monday, ABC News reported, an Apple-

bee’s spokesperson said: “After an internal investigation and in line with our values, the franchise terminated the manager, server and another employee involved in the incident. We do not tolerate racism, bigotry or harassment of any nature, and we have taken additional steps to close the restaurant at this time in order for the team there to re-

girl and a girl who wore MAKEUP,” the woman wrote. “This is a clear example of RACIAL PROFILING that should not be stood for. Just because we are black does not mean we are all criminals, and I will not be treated as such.” Brison said Sunday that she did not want to comment further on the incident.

group, reflect, learn and grow from this.” Brison wrote that she was offended at what she said was a racially biased false accusation — even more so after learning that it may have been based on a minimal description. “After leaving, calls were made to the restaurant and the manager stated that our accuser remembered that there was a SKINNY

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

Members enjoy activities such as poker, happy hours VILLAGE • FROM A1

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Arlene Zarembka (right), 70, talks to her fellow STL Village members at a gathering in the Central West End last month. Zarembka was telling (from left) George Nikolajevich, 71, Mary Ann Tipton, 66, and Tom Fox, 80, about a political activism group she is in called Momentum.

JOINING A VILLAGE

STL VILLAGE Boundaries of the community that links those 50 and older to various services.

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After his partner of 35 years died four years ago, he found himself isolated. “I didn’t really have a lot of friends and acquaintances,” Barrett said. “The friends I’ve made through the village, I don’t know what I’d do without them.” Joining the village, Barrett has ventured to places he had not been before, including day trips to Cahokia Mounds, wine country and Bellefontaine Cemetery. Barrett serves on the group’s activities committee, which is planning a trip to Chicago. While he does not yet tap into the services aspect of the village, Barrett pays the full membership. He knows he may need a volunteer’s

Post-Dispatch

help someday. But more importantly, he wants to give the village as much support as possible. “It means a lot to me,” Barrett said. The budget for the village is small, about $82,000 a year, and there is only one paid position, held by executive director Madeline Franklin. She said the village is marketed primarily by word-of-mouth and has a goal of expanding to 100 members this year. The average membership of villages nationwide is 125. Meanwhile, the St. Louis village is working to help residents in both the Old North and Tower Grove East neighborhoods form their own networks. Organizers

Budget calls for cuts to domestic programs The open embrace of red ink is a remarkable public reversal for Trump and his party, which spent years objecting to President Barack Obama’s increased spending during the depths of the Great Recession. Rhetoric aside, however, Trump’s pattern is in line with past Republican presidents who have overseen spikes in deficits as they increased military spending and cut taxes. “We’re going to have the strongest military we’ve ever had, by far,” Trump said in an Oval Office appearance Monday. “In this budget, we took care of the military like it’s never been taken care of before.” Trump’s budget revived his calls for big cuts to domestic programs that benefit the poor and middle class, such as food stamps, housing subsidies and student loans. Retirement benefits would remain mostly untouched by Trump’s plan, as he has pledged, though Medicare providers would absorb about $500 billion in cuts — a nearly 6 percent reduction. Some beneficiaries in Social Security’s disability program would have to re-enter the workforce under proposed changes to eligibility rules. While all presidents’ budgets are essentially dead on arrival — Congress writes and enacts its own spending legislation — Trump’s plan was dead before it landed. It came three days after the president signed a bipartisan agreement that set broad parameters for spending over the next two years. That deal, which includes large increases for domestic programs, rendered Monday’s Trump plan for 10-year, $1.7 trillion cuts to domestic agencies such as the departments of Health and Human Services, Agriculture and Housing and Urban Development even more unrealistic. The White House used Monday’s event to promote its long-awaited plan to increase funding for infrastructure. The plan would put up $200 billion in federal money over 10 years in hopes of leveraging a total of $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending, relying on state and local governments and the private sector to contribute the bulk of the funding. Trump’s budget blueprint includes a $2 billion ask for another 24 Navy F/A-18 fighter jets built by Boeing in St. Louis, and an added $323.6 million to continue construction on a new National GeospatialIntelligence Agency complex on the city’s North Side. Trump is proposing work requirements for several federal programs, including

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both change the attitudes toward the elderly while creating safe, vibrant links to others who may also be facing social isolation, Gordon said. Still, there is resistance to joining a group that targets those of a certain age. Some seniors view asking for assistance as a weakness, an admission of getting old. That is why the group is holding steady at 75 members. “How am I going to look if I ask for help?” Gordon said, echoing the comments she has heard. “We’re a smart bunch of people and can figure out a way to say: ‘It’s OK to ask for help.’” Gordon made her remarks during a recent Sunday afternoon social, featuring a couple of pots of soup and more than a couple of bottles of wine. It took place in the community room of a condo building in the Central West End, the heart of the Village and the neighborhood where Gordon lives and wants to stay. When the group was formed, it was thought members would be drawn to a pool of volunteers to help with minor home repairs and offer rides to the grocery store, and to tap into a list of vetted service providers such as plumbers, electricians and lawn care companies. Instead, members want more social activities. A billiard party, poker games, happy hours, a creative writing group and trips to places such as Kansas City and Bentonville, Ark., have dotted the calendar of events so far. Within the group, there are the “not readies,” said Sally Nikolajevich, 66, who serves as board chairman and is a member along with her husband, George, 71. That includes those who are in their 50s and 60s who want to enhance their social circle but do not need to lean on others for help around the house or with transportation, she said. As a result, STL Village offers a two-tiered membership. To tap all aspects of the village, the cost is $600 per year and open only to those who live in the village footprint, which includes the Central West End and the eastern portion of University City, to Pennsylvania Avenue. The boundary stops at Vandeventer Avenue on the east, goes north to Page Boulevard and runs south along parts of Clayton, Oakland and Manchester avenues. An associate membership, for $300, is open to any St. Louis area resident, and gives access to social events and to the list of preferred vendors, but not to the pool of volunteers. Ron Barrett, 78, was drawn to the social aspect of the group.

housing subsidies, food stamps and Medicaid. Such ideas have backing from powerful figures in Congress including Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who promises action on a “workforce development” agenda this year. There was immediate opposition from Democrats. “The Trump budget proposal makes clear his desire to enact massive cuts to health care, anti-poverty programs and investments in economic growth to blunt the deficit-exploding impact of his tax cuts for millionaires and corporations,” said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the House Budget Committee. Some Republicans, on the other hand, said spending was much too high. “This budget continues too much of Washington’s wasteful spending — it does not balance in 10 years, and it creates a deficit of over a trillion dollars next year,” said Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida. Trump’s plan aims at other familiar targets. It would eliminate the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The administration wants NASA out of the International Space Station by 2025 and private businesses running the place instead. But the domestic cuts would be far from enough to make up for the plummeting tax revenue projected in the budget. Trump’s plan sees a 2019 deficit of $984 billion, though White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney admits $1.2 trillion is more plausible after last week’s congressional budget pact and $90 billion worth of disaster aid is tacked on. That would be more than double the 2019 deficit the administration promised last year. All told, the new budget sees accumulating deficits of $7.2 trillion over the coming decade; Trump’s plan last year projected a 10-year shortfall of $3.2 trillion. And that’s assuming Trump’s rosy economic predictions come true and Congress follows through — in an election year — with politically toxic cuts to social programs, farm subsidies and Medicare providers. Last year Trump’s budget promised such ideas could generate a small budget surplus by 2027; now, his best-case scenario is for a $450 billion deficit that year, more than $300 billion of which can be traced to his December tax cut. Chuck Raasch of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

To learn more about STL Village: Phone • 314-240-5020 Online • stlvillage.org

are doing so in a hub-and-spoke model so the new groups can tap into the established STL Village for various services and not have to apply for their own nonprofit status. Groups in north St. Louis County and in Richmond Heights also have been in contact about creating their own villages. Natalie Galucia, director of operations for Village to Village Network, a national organization providing guidance and resources for each of the communities, said the slow growth of the St. Louis village is fairly typical. “There is a core group that gets in and is really busy right from the get-go,” Galucia said. “But there are still some a little hesitant, who don’t join or drop out because they don’t see the value just yet.” As each new village matures and word gets out of what the community model is about, memberships typically increase, she said. STL Village members such as Gordon are using the group to change perceptions of old age as more than disabilities and dementia, said Nancy MorrowHowell, a gerontologist and director of the Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging at Washington University.

She co-teaches an interdisciplinary class called “When I’m Sixty-Four: Transforming Your Future.” It’s a freshman seminar that takes its title from a Beatles song about loving your sweetheart well after youth has faded: When I get older, losing my hair, many years from now. Will you still be sending me a valentine, birthday greetings, bottle of wine? “We say: You’re going to live into your 80s and 90s, and half of you into the 100s, so be thinking about it now, and about changing society so it will be better,” Morrow-Howell said. She was familiar with the village movement; when it came to St. Louis, she got involved and then tapped into members to come to her class. In the fall, 15 members of STL Village participated in the class alongside 75 freshmen. “It’s important that they bring in their own stories, and the students are talking with them instead of about them,” MorrowHowell said. “They are an important voice in the conversation.” Gordon, a psychologist, has long been pushing back against negative perceptions of older people. She shared the story of her doctor walking into the exam room and saying: “Hello, young lady.” It did not sit well with Gordon. After the appointment concluded, Gordon told the doctor she did not appreciate the greeting. “He said other patients like it, and I told him things are changing now and advised him to stop doing it,” Gordon said. “That’s what it takes. This is a period of consciousness. Ageism is so deeply enmeshed in our society. People don’t realize they are acting on the basis of a negative attitude of people who are older. They think being condescending is somehow laudable.” It’s a story Gordon shares with the Washington University class as well. Morrow-Howell said the village movement has the opportunity to take on an advocacy role as the country prepares for the “longevity revolution.” Gordon agrees, saying that once older adults admit they are indeed older adults, stereotypes will begin to crumble and villages will be viewed as an extension of living, not as a group for the elderly. “There are an awful lot of people who don’t want to tell their age because of the way they will be viewed,” Gordon said. “I never wanted to hide my age. I brag about it.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

First report alleged drugmakers lacked policies to prevent overuse OPIOIDS • FROM A1

people with chronic pain.” Congress and the Trump administration have started attacking the opioid epidemic by promising more money — including an additional $6 billion last week — for prevention and treatment. McCaskill, D-Mo., began an investigation last year into drugmakers’ policies in advocating for the use of opioids and the industry’s relationships with third-party groups, many of them nonprofits, that dot the medical industry landscape. McCaskill released her first report in September, alleging that some drugmakers lacked policies to prevent overuse. The report released Monday concluded that the top opioid manufacturers helped fund advocacy organizations in the anti-pain sphere. “Notably, a majority of these groups also strongly criticized 2016 guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that recommended limits on opioid prescriptions for chronic pain — the first national standards for prescription opioids and a key federal response to the ongoing epidemic.” McCaskill’s investigators concluded. “The fact that these same manufacturers provided millions of dollars to the groups described below suggests, at the very least, a direct link between corporate donations and the advancement of opioids-friendly messaging.” Opioid overdose killed more than 42,000 Americans in 2016, and McCaskill cited state statistics showing that in Missouri that year, about 60 percent of the 1,300 drug overdose deaths came from opioids. Total cost to the state in treatment and other expenses was $12.6 billion in 2016, McCaskill said. Her report said that Purdue, Janssen, Mylan, Depomed and Insys provided almost $8.9 million to 14 outside groups working on chronic pain and other opioid-related issues between January 2012 and March 2017.” Purdue was the largest, at just over $4 million granted to an array of third-

party health and pain-related groups, the report concluded. The maker of OxyContin, which has been the target of numerous lawsuits, announced Saturday it would stop promoting opioids to doctors. The company also produced another opioid called Hysingla. “We have supported third-party organizations, including with annual dues and unrestricted grants, that are interested in helping patients receive appropriate care,” Purdue spokesman Robert Josephson told the PostDispatch. “We agree that the CDC’s guideline is an important public health tool and have been directing prescribers to the guideline and its recommendations since it issued in March 2016.” The largest recipient of opioid manufacturers’ donations was the Connecticut-based U.S. Pain Foundation, which received just under $3 million from 2012-2017, McCaskill’s investigators found. Paul Gileno, founder and president of the U.S. Pain Foundation, said that “our funding is used for positive programs,” and that “U.S. Pain has never issued guidelines” on what remedies people in pain should use. McCaskill and Sen. Ron Johnson, RWis., last month got into an argument at a hearing when Johnson asserted that the expansion of Medicaid had a role in the opioid crisis. McCaskill said there was no evidence of that. McCaskill’s report is entitled, “Fueling the Epidemic; Exposing the Financial Ties Between Opioid Manufacturers and Third Party Advocacy Groups.” The McCaskill report touches only one corner of the political influence industry as it relates to opioids. In 2016, The Associated Press and the Center for Public Integrity concluded that from 2006-2015, drug makers spent more than $880 million in state lobbying and campaign contributions, much of it fighting further restrictions on opioids, while groups attempting to curb opioid use put forward only about $4 million. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

Trump Jr.’s wife opens powder-filled letter BY JAKE PEARSON associated Press

NEW YORK • Donald Trump Jr.’s wife

was taken to a New York City hospital on Monday as a precaution after she opened an envelope addressed to her husband that contained an unidentified white powder, though police later said the substance wasn’t dangerous. The episode happened after 10 a.m. when Vanessa Trump, 40, opened the letter at her mother’s midtown Manhattan apartment, investigators said. She called 911 and said she was coughing and

felt nauseated, police said. The powder turned out to be cornstarch, according to a report in the New York Times. “Thankful that Vanessa & my children are safe and unharmed after the incredibly scary situation that occurred this morning,” Donald Trump Jr. wrote on Twitter. “Truly disgusting that certain individuals choose to express their opposing views with such disturbing behavior.” The New York Fire Department said it treated three patients who were taken to a hospital for evaluation.

Trump releases infrastructure proposal ROADS • FROM A1

“If for any reason, they don’t want to support to it, hey, that’s going to be up to them,” Trump said of the Republicancontrolled Congress. “What was very important to me was the military, what was very important to me was the tax cuts, and what was very important to me was regulation.” Speaking of infrastructure, Trump added: “This is of great importance, but it’s not nearly in that category. Because the states will have to do it themselves if we don’t do it. But I would like to help the states out.” The plan is centered on using $200 billion in federal money to leverage more than $1 trillion in local and state tax dollars to fix America’s infrastructure, such as roads, highways, ports and airports. The administration released a 55-page “legislative outline” for lawmakers who will write the legislation. With the plan heavily dependent on state and local dollars, Democrats warned it would raise tolls on commuters, sell off government-owned infrastructure to Wall Street and eliminate critical environmental protections. The proposal lists Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and Dulles International Airport as examples of assets that could be sold. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., warned that the proposal included studying whether the Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation’s largest public utility, should sell its transmission assets. He called it “a looney idea” with “zero chance of becoming law.” “After a full year of empty boasts, the president has finally unveiled a puny infrastructure scam that fully fails to meet the need in America’s communities,” said House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California. Convening a roomful of state and local leaders, Trump listened as governors and mayors pitched individual projects in their states and described the challenges involved with gaining federal permits.

“It seems to me that the pyramids in Egypt were built faster than some of the projects that we’re contemplating,” said Esteban Bovo, chairman of the MiamiDade County Commission in Florida. Trump vowed repeatedly that the federal permitting process would be streamlined but said it would be up to state and local leaders to ensure that local permits don’t hold up worthy projects. “Washington will no longer be a roadblock to progress. Washington will now be your partner,” Trump said. During the meeting, the former real estate developer reveled in his past life as a builder, pointing to his 1980s completion of a troubled renovation of Wollman Rink in New York City’s Central Park. When a local official from Pennsylvania noted plans to add connections for an interstate highway — estimated to cost more than $500 million — Trump was blunt. “Get the price down a little bit,” he said to laughter. “To me this is a very, very sexy subject,” Trump said. “The media doesn’t find it sexy. I find it sexy because I was always a builder, I always knew how to build on time, on budget.” The proposal features two key components: an injection of funding for new investments and to speed up repairs of crumbling roads and airports, as well as a streamlined permitting process that would reduce the wait time to get projects under way. Officials said the $200 billion in federal support would come from cuts to existing programs. Half the money would go to grants for transportation, water, flood control, cleanup at some of the country’s most polluted sites and other projects. States, local governments and other project sponsors could use the grants — which administration officials cast as incentives — to cover no more than 20 percent of the costs. Transit agencies generally count on the federal government for half the cost of major construction projects, and federal dollars can make up as much as 80 percent of some highway projects.

Officials alarmed at expense, emails show EMAILS • FROM A1

Several internal emails reviewed by the Post-Dispatch show that despite the assurance of Stenger’s advisers that the deal made financial sense, officials in several county departments were alarmed about the expense and the length of the lease. And they were concerned about an unusual negotiation for a two-decade commitment to rent more than 150,000 square feet at the renovated mall in St. Ann, now known as the Crossings at Northwest. The deal will cost taxpayers at least $69 million, and could run as high as $77 million, according to the newspaper’s analysis of the county’s real estate contracts. The owners of the Crossings, Robert and P. David Glarner, are friends of Stenger who have donated $365,000 to his campaign, an amount that is unparalleled in county politics. The Glarners and Stenger have repeatedly denied any quid pro quo; Stenger has called the question tiresome. The newspaper revealed on Feb. 5 that the deal does not save money – and has the potential to cost millions. Days before the newspaper’s story, Stenger’s advisers insisted the deal saved money. But the newspaper pointed out their figures did not include millions of dollars the county will pay for property taxes at the Crossings and to rent empty space at buildings across the county that were vacated months or years before their leases ended. In a statement emailed to the newspaper on Monday, Stenger said he was “not personally enriched by a campaign contribution and would never allow one to influence my decisions on behalf of St. Louis County.” He said the officials involved in the conversations about the Crossings lease in 2016 “based their estimates on incomplete information.” And he stuck with the claim that the county was saving money. He said there were “numerous County staff members who wholeheartedly endorse and approve of this move” and that feedback on the Crossings from residents and employees “has already been overwhelmingly positive. They tell us that the facility is a nicer, safer and far more convenient setting to visit and to work in.” The County Council voted 6-1 in July 2016 to approve the Crossings lease, but now the council has scheduled hearings before its ethics committee to review the deal. The first is scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday. Emails reviewed by the newspaper were obtained by the ethics com-

mittee chair, Councilman Ernie Trakas, in response to requests he sent to several employees in the county’s public works, some of whom are expected to testify. “I think we obviously found documents that show that the department of public works and transportation employees as well as county counselor’s office did not see the Crossings lease as the great deal it’s been portrayed as,” Trakas said Monday. He said those officials were “customarily and routinely involved in developing lease agreements for space the county rents.” The emails seem to run counter to Stenger’s Northwest Plaza narrative, suggesting that his administration acted against the advice of career county government employees who would normally be involved in approving real estate deals. Under terms of the lease, the mall’s owners have “absolutely no risk,” Gardner wrote on March 2, 2016, to Medler, Stephanie Leon Streeter, deputy director of the county’s departments of transportation and public works, and Bob Grant, the deputy county counselor. “I can only imagine that looking closer at this, we are probably selling our soul to the DEVIL on this one.” Gardner, who left in April to accept a job with the mass transit system in Washington, could not be reached for comment. Medler and Streeter, who still work for the county, also could not be reached. Medler wrote that Anthony Badino, a top Stenger adviser who had managed the county executive’s 2014 campaign, had unilaterally negotiated the lease with the Glarners. “He negotiated it alone and then dumped it on legal,” Medler wrote. Badino could not be reached for comment. In a meeting with a reporter this month, Stenger’s staff could provide no evidence that before agreeing to the Crossings lease, the county conducted a side-by-side analysis of other options, from renovating current offices to renting other locations or building a new office. But the emails unearthed by Trakas showed the county did have an analysis in 2015 comparing the cost of building new office space to renting space either at the Crossings or at another site. “On the spreadsheet, in each case, purchasing space is more economical than leasing space,” Streeter wrote in July 2015. “Please help me understand.” Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

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Drug Companies Fear Release of the New AloeCure

Big Pharma stands to lose billions as doctors’ recommend drug-free “health cocktail” that adjusts and corrects your body’s health conditions. by David Waxman Seattle Washington: Drug company execs are nervous. That’s because the greatest health advance in decades has hit the streets. And analysts expect it to put a huge crimp in “Big Pharma” profits.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

JEFFERSON CITY • Leg-

islation that would boost penalties for those who assault law enforcement animals failed in the Missouri House on Monday — and jolted back to life broader discussions in the chamber over race and policing. A group of AfricanAmerican lawmakers derided the proposal, saying the GOP-led Legislature had continually refused to consider legislation strengthening police accountability standards. “We don’t care about the marginalized citizens of this state,” Rep. Brandon Ellington, D-Kansas City, said on the House floor last week. “We care more about four-legged canines than we do about people that walk with two legs.” And in a surprise move, a coalition of Republicans joined with Democrats to knock down the measure. Only 73 lawmakers voted in favor of the proposal; it takes 82 votes to advance legislation. The defeat on the House floor was a blow to Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican, who said in January that penalties for those who assault police dogs are not strong enough. In December, a 17-yearold suspected of stealing allegedly stabbed a Cass County sheriff’s canine named Champ as the dog apprehended the suspect. The dog survived and reportedly returned to duty . Under current law, someone convicted of assault on a law enforcement animal could receive up to 15 days in jail and a $700 fine. Under the proposal by Rep. Robert Cornejo, R-St. Peters, the maximum punishment would be a year behind bars and a $2,000 fine. If the dog dies or is disabled, the person could receive a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, up from the current maximum of four years. Cornejo said his only motivation was ensuring

those who assault the dogs received a just punishment.

FERGUSON REPORT

Opponents wondered about racial disparities in the use of police canines, and who might be affected most under any revisions to the law. In a 2015 report on the Ferguson Police Department, the U.S. Department of Justice found that “in every canine bite incident for which racial information is available, the subject was AfricanAmerican.” Investigators concluded that dogs were often used “not to counter a physical threat but to inflict punishment.” In one case, officers in 2011 were dispatched to an abandoned Ferguson home. Though police characterized the situation as a likely burglary, Justice Department investigators characterized the scene as a trespassing by teenagers. A n o f f i ce r sa i d a 14-year-old boy was hiding in a crawl space, curled up in a ball. The teenager did not show his hands, according to the officer, and refused to leave the crawl space despite warnings that the dog could be used. The boy told investigators he never heard any warnings, never hid in a crawl space, and was bitten as he tried to run away from the dog upon seeing it. “Even if the officer’s version of the force used were accurate, the use of the dog to bite the boy was unreasonable,” according to the Ferguson report. In 2015, St. Louis County police banned canines from being used in crowd control situations, a practice the federal government criticized.

SELF-DEFENSE

Opponents also wondered whether someone could be prosecuted if they act in self defense when a dog bites them. Don Cook, a Los Angeles attorney who has sued police departments over use of canines, said it is natural

Smoke inhalation likely killed man in kitchen fire BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ALTON • A 45-year-old

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

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man was killed in a kitchen fire at his home on Saturday, with a smoke alarm still sounding when firefighters arrived. Firefighters saw some light smoke coming from the back of the singlestory, wood-frame home in the 2300 block of Amelia Street when they arrived at 11:30 a.m. Saturday. The doors were locked, so they forced their way into the home and found a smoldering fire in the kitchen, said Alton Fire Chief Bernie Sebold. “The fire appeared to have been burning for some time and was beginning to die down,” Sebold said. As one crew put out the fire, another searched the house and found Terry Wilson unresponsive. He was pronounced dead at 12:14 p.m. at Alton Memorial Hospital, according to Madison County Coroner Stephen Nonn. Preliminary autopsy results indicate Wilson died from smoke inhalation, and toxicology tests were pending. Fire alarms were sound-

ing when firefighters arrived, Sebold said. “There are so many different factors, I can’t explain why someone wouldn’t hear smoke alarms, they could be a deep sleeper, and I don’t know the medical history,” Sebold said. Sebold said the fire marshal will investigate since there was a fatality, but nothing appeared suspicious. “The fire was contained to the kitchen, but there was heavy smoke damage throughout the home and some heat damage to adjacent rooms,” Sebold said. Funeral arrangements are pending at Cathy Williams & Sons Funeral Home. In another fire in Alton, a 6-year-old boy accidentally set himself on fire while playing with a lighter in his room Sunday night, Sebold said. Fi re f i g h te rs we re called to the 2600 block of Sidney Street about 8:20 p.m. The boy’s mother ran him out to an arriving ambulance, and he was said to be stable at a hospital.

carceration rates,” Dogan said in an interview, “this bill takes us in the wrong direction.”

law enforcement. “At a time when we need to be exploring ways to reduce prison rates and in-

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to defend oneself when a dog is attacking. “What are you going to do when you have a large, aggressive dog coming up to you — like it’s going to attack and bite you?” Cook asked. “What’s the natural reaction in most people? Try to defend themselves.” Rep. Shamed Dogan, RBallwin, was one of the Republicans who did not back the measure, calling the penalties “too harsh.” Dogan resented the implication that opponents of the legislation were anti-

TY *

Bill on police animals, penalties fails in House

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

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LOCAL

02.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Trump has precedent in desire for military parades CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WA S H I N GTO N • President

Donald Trump has taken his share of criticism in proposing to have a grand military parade in Washington. VoteVets, a veterans group that isn’t generally supportive of Trump, called the idea “an international disgrace” designed only to satisfy “a wannabe banana republic strongman.” Usual Trump supporter Robert O’Neill, the retired Navy SEAL who claims he killed Osama bin Laden, called the idea “third-world (expletive).” But in Trump’s defense, American presidents — including Missouri’s own Harry S. Truman — saw it fitting to have military parades. Not all the nation’s previous military parades were conducted in the immediate aftermath of wars, either, although parades after the Civil War, both world wars and the first Gulf War in 1991 are most remembered. Throughout American history,

tens of thousands of soldiers — often accompanied by tanks or other big weapons — have marched down Pennsylvania Avenue. The Grand Review of the Armies Parade in May 1865 alone took two days for nearly 150,000 men to pass in review. And that one was full of political intrigue and angry public demonstrations that would rival anything of the Trump era. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy had military parades for their inaugurations, a testament to the saberrattling tension of the escalating Cold War. But it was an Army Day parade reviewed by Truman in April 1947 that may most closely match the kind of thing Trump has been talking about. Truman’s parade came two years after the end of World War II, at a time of flashpoint tension around the globe. Like Trump, the Democrat Truman was warning that U.S. military forces were being hollowed out. This Trump claim led to a boost of nearly 10 percent in defense spending in a budget deal cut last week. Reporting on that 1947 parade, the Washington Post said

that Truman “had recently warned against lessening of the armed forces.” Truman, an artillery officer in World War I, reveled in the 82nd Airborne’s show of force as it marched past on a sunny April day. A dozen A-26 attack bombers flew overhead. A dozen tank destroyers rumbled down the avenue in front of Truman, followed by “numerous jeeps, light tanks, half tracks,” the Post reported. The parade commemorated the 30th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I. It came less than a month after the launching of the “Truman Doctrine,” where the U.S. supplied military material to countries fighting the spread of Communism, beginning that summer with Greece and Turkey. Truman would order the Berlin Airlift 14 months later. Like now, tension was rising with the then-Soviet Union and China. Truman’s job-approval rating in the month of the ’47 parade was 57 percent, but it would dip to 36 percent the following spring. Trump’s job approval was 40 percent in the latest Gallup Poll. The difference? While Truman was a veteran, Trump got

a medical deferment for bone spurs during Vietnam. There long has been tension between civilian leadership and the military, the guaranteed frictions from the Constitution and the ethic of the civilian soldier meeting the call in crisis. Eisenhower warned of the military-industrial complex that glorified and profited from war. He had seen war in its utter debasement. Trump’s and Bill Clinton’s Vietnam deferments were campaign issues. A month after the Civil War and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, the acerbic and relentless William Tecumseh Sherman created a scene at the Grand Review in Washington when he refused to shake Secretary of War Edwin Stanton’s hand on the review stand. Sherman and Stanton had feuded for years, beginning with the Lincoln administration failure, in Sherman’s mind, to adequately back him up when Sherman’s critics called him insane. At war’s end, Stanton publicly criticized Sherman — known for his scorched-earth March to the Sea that broke the Confederacy’s final will to fight — for being too

easy in surrender terms. It got so bad that there were press reports that officers in Sherman’s army, while awaiting the parade in camp across the Potomac River in Alexandria, Va., wanted to remove Stanton from office. The future president Ulysses S. Grant, who sat in review with President Andrew Johnson, ordered Sherman to cut the chatter and to settle down his army of rowdy Westerners and scores of freed slaves and other camp followers that had attached to them in the war’s final months. Sherman’s review-stand snub of Stanton was “noticed by the multitude, who in the enthusiasm of the moment loudly applauded the act, and even laughed at the secretary in his discomfiture,” the New York Tribune reported. Stanton remembered it differently, writing in his memoirs that Sherman “offered me his hand, but I declined it publicly, and the fact was universally noted.” That civilian-military wound never healed. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER JEFFERSON COUNTY > 11-year-old dies two days after being shot by mother • An 11-year-old boy whose mother shot him before killing herself at their Barnhart home Saturday has died, police said. The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department confirmed that Sammy Schweitzer died shortly after 5 a.m. Monday at a hospital. Jefferson County sheriff’s deputies were called to a home in the 7200 block of Valley Drive in Barnhart just after midnight on Saturday. Jefferson County Sheriff Dave Marshak said the deputies found a woman and a boy who had gunshot wounds. They were taken to hospitals; the mother was pronounced dead. The boy survived until Monday morning. Marshak identified the woman as Tara Kelleher, 49. Kelleher’s fiancé was in the home at the time but was not considered a suspect, Marshak said. Investigators are searching for a motive in the shooting. ST. LOUIS > Suspect charged in two carjackings • A man from Hazelwood is facing federal charges after being accused of two carjackings, including that of a Meals on Wheels volunteer. Jorion Garrett, 19, of the 6900 block of Woodhurst Drive, was indicted Wednesday on two counts of armed carjacking and two charges of brandishing a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence.

the case out of the sheriff’s department in Edwardsville. Chaparral Lane is a horseshoe-shaped road off Route 162 just south of Glen Carbon. The residential area is bounded to the north by woods, a creek and Madison County Transit’s Nickel Plate walking and biking trail. Anyone with information is asked to contact authorities at 618-692-4433.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police investigate a multiple-vehicle crash Monday at the corner of Kingshighway and Lindell Boulevard. Police were in pursuit of a carjacking suspect before the crash.

Charging documents claim Garrett was one of two men who stole a 2014 Jeep Liberty Garrett from the Meals on Wheels volunteer on Jan. 4 in the 8300 block of Sagewood Lane in Hazelwood. That same day, Garrett posted a picture of himself on Facebook with a semiautomatic handgun. St. Louis County police spotted and pursued the stolen Liberty on Jan. 11, but Garrett and a passenger ran off after the SUV blew a tire, charging documents say. Garrett’s fingerprints were found in the SUV, and the

victim identified him as her robber, the documents say. The indictment also accuses Garrett and others of carjacking a 2016 Dodge Journey in St. Louis County on Nov. 21. Garrett was arrested Feb. 6 when police and agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives raided his home and found him there with a .40-caliber handgun with a defaced serial number, court documents show. He is scheduled to enter a plea of not guilty Wednesday. MADISON COUNTY > Shooting victim found in street • The Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis has identified a man found

dead from gunshot wounds Sunday as a St. Louis County resident. Deputies from the Madison County sheriff’s office went to the area of Chaparral Lane near Glen Carbon shortly after 8 p.m. after someone reported that shots had been fired. Deputies found the dead man laying in the street. He was identified Monday night as Tyrone A. Grady, 45. He lived in the 10400 block of Melvich Drive in north St. Louis County. Sheriff John Lakin requested that the Major Case Squad investigate the “apparent homicide,” according to a press release. There are now more than 20 investigators working on

ST. LOUIS > Pursuit of carjacking suspect ends with crash • A police pursuit of a man suspected of a carjacking ended when the car crashed at the intersection of Lindell Boulevard and Kingshighway on Monday afternoon, critically injuring its driver and sending two others to the hospital. The car had been taken in a carjacking in Pagedale. Police say two men were in the car when the passenger forced the driver out and took off in the car. The driver who had been forced out of the car then told officers from Pagedale and the North County Police Cooperative that his car had been stolen and the man who took it had a gun, according to Cooperative Police Chief Tim Swope. Officers from the North County Police Cooperative began chasing the vehicle about 1:45 p.m. when they spotted it in Wellston, Swope said. At least six cars were involved in a crash at the intersection in the Central West End, near the Chase Park Plaza Hotel. The man

driving the stolen vehicle was taken to a hospital with critical injuries, and Swope said two other people were taken to hospitals with minor to moderate injuries. Five other people declined medical treatment. PINE LAWN > Man charged in fatal shooting • A man has been charged with murder in a fatal shooting this month. Devin R. Hunt, 35, was also charged with armed criminal action. Hunt fatally shot Erik Ervin, also 35, who was found dead on a parking lot Hunt in the 4500 block of Jennings Station Road on Feb. 3, according to court documents. That’s just south of Interstate 70. An eyewitness identified Hunt as the shooter, according to court documents. The witness said Hunt shot Ervin about 1:45 p.m. as the victim ran away. Hunt was arrested Sunday night and charged Monday. He was ordered held without bail. Ervin lived in the 1100 block of Riverview Boulevard in St. Louis, police said. Authorities gave two addresses for Hunt, one in the 1700 block of Bacon Street in St. Louis and the other on Jennings Station Road in Pine Lawn not far from the shooting scene.

Ex-officer charged with sexual assault Woman says incident happened after she called about stolen car BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A former St. Louis police officer has been charged with sodomy after a pregnant mother of four says he forced her into a sex act while he was on duty in 2015, according to court documents. The victim said she called police because her car had been stolen from her home a b o u t 10 p.m. on June 12, 2015, in the 3600 block of Ko s c i u s ko Stewart Street, according to court documents. Officer John Stewart responded in uniform and in a marked police car. Sources confirmed to the Post-Dispatch that Stewart resigned from the police department less than a week after allegations of inappropriate sexual contact surfaced, so an internal affairs investigation was never completed. A department spokeswoman

said Stewart was on the force from Jan. 3, 1989, to June 13, 2015. Former Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce’s office declined to issue criminal charges against Stewart. It’s unclear what led current Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner to charge Stewart, 51, of O’Fallon, Mo., with sodomy on Jan. 31. Her spokeswoman, Susan Ryan, said she could not discuss what caused prosecutors to change course because it is an open investigation. In a statement, Ryan wrote: “Based upon our investigation over the last several months, Mr. Stewart has been charged with one count of Felony Sodomy or Attempted Sodomy in the 1st Degree. This is an ongoing investigation. Anyone with information about this incident should call the Circuit Attorney’s Office.” S te wa r t p o s te d a $60,000 bail, according to court records. His attorney, John Rogers, refused to comment. The Post-Dispatch does not name victims of sexual

assault. In this case, the alleged victim, who was 25 at the time of the alleged assault, wrote the probable cause statement and is named in the court documents. Having the alleged victim author the probable cause statement is “not common, but not unusual,” Ryan said. “It’s another way to bring these cases forward,” she said. The victim alleges that she and Stewart discussed her stolen car while he was standing outside the doorway to her apartment. “After the defendant concluded his official duties as a police officer, he requested to enter my apartment,” according to the statement. He then began complimenting the victim’s physical appearance. The victim wrote that she refused to let him touch her and that he then exposed himself to her, according to the documents. “I did not consent to the defendant’s sexual advances, but complied as I was in fear of serious physical injury to myself

and my children, who were present at the time,” she wrote. The victim said she preserved some of the evidence following the alleged assault, and the crime lab later confirmed the presence of Stewart’s DNA on a garment and a cup. Her cousin filmed a 10-minute documentary about the ordeal, interviewing her in a hospital bed where she was battling cancer. She said she had just put her four children to bed for the night and feared Stewart might kill her if she didn’t comply given that the shootings of Michael Brown and VonDerrit Myers had recently happened. Both were black men killed by white police officers. Stewart’s alleged victim is black and Stewart is white. “I did what I thought was best and that was being compliant,” she said in the video. “Obviously, he knew that I didn’t want to do it.” Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

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NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

Satellites show melting ice sheets are speeding up rise in sea levels

DIGEST Portraits of Obamas are unveiled When Barack Obama speaks, people listen. At least they did when he was in the White House. But at a ceremony Monday to unveil portraits of him and Michelle Obama, the former president said artist Kehinde Wiley cheerfully ignored almost all of his suggestions. “He listened very thoughtfully to what I had to say before doing exactly what he always intended to do,” Obama said. “I tried to negotiate less gray hair, but Kehinde’s artistic integrity would not allow it. I tried to negotiate smaller ears and struck out on that as well.” The final product depicts Obama sitting in a straightbacked chair and looking serious while surrounded by greenery. Michelle Obama’s portrait, painted by Amy Sherald, shows her in a black and white dress looking thoughtful with her hand on her chin. Both artists were chosen by the Obamas. The portraits will hang in the National Portrait Gallery, part of the Smithsonian group of museums. The gallery has a complete collection of presidential portraits. Different portraits of the Obamas will eventually hang in the White House. The artist Sherald will have her first solo museum exhibition starting May 11 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. Trump clarified on domestic violence • The White House on Monday defended President Donald Trump’s failure to acknowledge publicly the women who have accused former staff secretary Rob Porter of domestic violence. With questions still swirling about who knew what and when, spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders repeatedly told reporters that the “president and the entire administration take domestic violence very seriously and believe all allegations need to be investigated thoroughly.” The statement came

BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Melting ice sheets in Greenland

and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world’s oceans on average will be at least 2 feet higher by the end of the century, according to researchers who published in Monday’s Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. Sea level rise is caused by warming of the ocean and melting from glaciers and ice sheets. The research, based on 25 years of satellite data, shows that pace has quickened, mainly from the melting of massive ice sheets. It confirms scientists’ computer simulations and is in line with predictions from the United Nations, which releases regular climate change reports. “It’s a big deal” because the projected sea level rise is a conservative estimate and it is likely to be higher, said lead author Steve Nerem of the University of Colorado. Outside scientists said even small changes in sea levels can lead to flooding and erosion. “Any flooding concerns that coastal communities have for 2100 may occur over the next few decades,” Oregon State University coastal flooding expert Katy Serafin said in an email. Of the 3 inches of sea level rise in the past quarter century, about 55 percent is from warmer water expanding; the rest is from melting ice. But the process is accelerating, and more than three-quarters of that acceleration since 1993 is due to melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, the study shows. Like weather and climate, there are two factors in sea level rise: year-to-year small rises and falls that are caused by natural events and larger long-term rising trends linked to man-made climate change. Nerem’s team removed the natural effects of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption that temporarily chilled Earth and the climate phenomena El Nino and La Nina, and found the accelerating trend. Sea level rise, more than temperature, is a better gauge of climate change, said Anny Cazenave, director of Earth science at the International Space Science Institute in France, who edited the study. Global sea levels were stable for about 3,000 years until the 20th century, when they rose and then accelerated due to global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and natural gas, said climate scientist Stefan Rahmstorf of the Potsdam Institute in Germany, who wasn’t part of the study. Two feet of sea level rise “would have big effects on places like Miami and New Orleans,” Nerem said. He said those cities could survive at great expense. But when a storm hits like 2012’s Superstorm Sandy, sea level rise on top of storm surge can lead to record-setting damages, researchers said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama stand on stage Monday as their portraits are unveiled at a ceremony at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington. The gallery has a complete collection of presidential portraits.

in response to repeated questions about why the president has not uttered similar words himself. In tweets and in public remarks, Trump has made no mention of the two ex-wives who accuse Porter of physical and emotional abuse. Porter has denied the allegations. Baltimore detectives guilty of corruption • Two Baltimore police detectives were convicted of racketeering, conspiracy and robbery Monday in a trial that’s part of an ongoing federal investigation into corruption among rogue members of the city’s beleaguered police force. After the jury foreman read the verdict, Detectives Daniel Hersl and Marcus Taylor were shackled and led out of U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The men were each convicted under the federal Hobbs Act, which prohibits interference with interstate commerce. They face up to 20 years on each count, for a total of 60 years. The trial was dominated by four ex-detectives who testified that the police force’s Gun Trace Task Force was actually made up of thugs with badges who stole cash, resold looted narcotics

and lied under oath. They detailed acts of astonishing police criminality stretching back to 2008.

world champion in the 200meter individual medley, placed fifth in that event at the 2012 Olympics.

Swimmer details abuse • Olympic swimmer Ariana Kukors said in an emotional interview Monday that her former coach “stole so much” from her in the decade she alleges he sexually abused her starting when she was a minor. Kukors, 28, told The Associated Press that she can’t get the time back but she can speak out so others recognize the signs of people grooming others for abuse or similar misconduct. Kukors says Sean Hutchison, who began coaching her at a swim club near Seattle, groomed her for sexual abuse when she was 13, started touching and kissing her when she was 16 and engaging in sexual activity when she was 17. She told authorities that he took thousands of sexually explicit photos of her as a minor. Hutchison, 46, a former Olympic assistant coach, has denied the allegations and has not been charged with a crime. Federal and local investigators searched his Seattle apartment last week for computers and other devices. Kukors, the 2009

Amazon to cut staff • After a ramp-up of hiring last year, Amazon says it will cut a “small” number of positions at its Seattle headquarters. The company did not give an exact number, but The Seattle Times, citing a person familiar with the cuts, says they affect a few hundred people. That would be a small percentage of the 40,000 people Amazon employs at its headquarters, and an even smaller proportion of its 566,000 employees worldwide. Worms pulled from woman’s eye • An Oregon woman who had worms coming out of her eye is being called the first known human case of a parasitic infection spread by flies. Fourteen tiny worms were removed from the left eye of the 26-year-old in August 2016. Scientists reported the case Monday. The woman was diagnosed with Thelazia gulosa, a type of worm seen in cattle in the northern United States but never before in humans. From news services

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M 1 TUESDAY • 02.13.2018 • A10

Downtown boosters hail trial of free electric cab service

Spire, public agency lock horns over taxes DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The “on-demand transportation service” will enable point-to-point travel for users in five-passenger electric vehicles, called eCabs. Free service will be offered for downtown rides through June 30. BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Starting this week, electric vehicle cab service — offered to the public for free — is coming to downtown St. Louis, as part of a pilot project. Service will be offered “to and from anywhere within downtown St. Louis,” according to Downtown STL Inc., the organization that — along with the Austin-based company, Electric Cab of North America — is coordinating the project as part of its overall aim to promote vibrancy of the city’s urban core. The service territory will range roughly from the Mississippi River to 18th Street and from Cass Avenue to Highway 40 (Interstate 64). The “on-demand transportation service” will enable point-to-point travel for users in electric, five-passenger “eCabs” that can be hailed on the street or through an app or phone number. The ride service functions similarly to competitors like UberPool and LyftLine, by enabling multiple passengers to travel to similar

destinations in the same eCab. Starting Tuesday, the service will be available at certain downtown hotels. But from March 1 through June 30, the service will be available to the general public, according to Koran Addo, communications director for St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson. The service will start out with three vehicles during the four-month pilot period. The eCabs will have limited hours, from 5 to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, as well as from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. during the workweek, Monday to Friday. The service will not be offered on Sundays. “This new service will help people move about downtown without having to move their car,” Missy Kelley, president and CEO of Downtown STL Inc., said in a statement. “For those who choose to leave their car at home, they can take public transit to get here then use the eCab to get around downtown throughout the day.” Though free to riders, the pilot has a cost of $135,000, borne by the Downtown St. Louis Community Improvement Dis-

trict, a taxing district managed by Downtown STL Inc. Addo said the pilot is consistent with the city’s efforts to adopt new technology that can provide economic and environmental benefits. “Any way to enhance our downtown, we’d like to explore,” said Addo. “This could be an asset for moving people around in a convenient, environmentally friendly way.” This is the second pilot program to test drive electric vehicles in the city within the last year. Last April, Metro Transit experimented with an electric bus made by the company Proterra. The model tested could drive 250 miles on a single charge — more than enough to cover the 200 miles that Metro buses typically travel per day. Though no subsequent orders of electric buses have yet materialized, officials are “continuing to explore the technology,” according to Jerry Vallely, a spokesperson for BiState Development, the organization that oversees Metro. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Spire’s natural gas customers in Missouri may benefit soon from the company’s lower tax rate, but first they must await the results of a showdown that’s captivating Wall Street. The utility, formerly known as Laclede Group, has already cut rates in Alabama by 3 to 4 percent to account for the tax cut that Congress passed in December. In Missouri, the taxes have been wrapped into a broader rate case that Spire filed last year. Spire argued at first that the tax law’s effects were not “known and measurable” and that it passed too late to be part of the rate case. By the end of a hearing last week, however, the company seemed to agree that $28.5 million in taxes could be refunded. That’s close to estimates made by the Missouri Public Service Commission’s staff and by groups representing consumers and businesses. The PSC could decide the rate case as soon as Thursday, but contentious issues remain. One of them, a technical-sounding question about Spire’s balance sheet, has caught the stock market’s attention. Spire says its Missouri utility is capitalized with 54 percent equity and 46 percent debt. The ratio is important for ratemaking purposes because the PSC calculates a return on equity that utilities are allowed to earn. The more equity, the higher the company’s permissible profit. In a preliminary vote Jan. 31, the PSC said it would use Spire’s parent-company equity ratio of 49 percent rather than the utilitylevel 54 percent. Spire’s shares fell 3 percent that day and 5 percent the next as several analysts issued alarmist reports. Credit Suisse called the decision “another step backward for Missouri” and Moody’s called it

“credit negative.” Guggenheim Partners opined that Spire should “think about redirecting capital out of Missouri.” Edward Jones analyst Andy Smith, who has a “buy” rating on Spire, said the equity issue could reduce the company’s earnings by a few percentage points. “It’s definitely a negative for the company, but there are some things they can do to mitigate the negative,” Smith said Monday. Spire’s position is that parentcompany debt was used for acquisitions and shouldn’t count against its Missouri rate case. The counterargument is that parentcompany equity is the only true measure, because subsidiaries’ capital structures can be manipulated. Spire, in final arguments to the commission last week, attempted to link the tax-cut and capitalstructure issues. It says it prefers to pass through the tax reduction “now rather than later,” and that getting its way on equity “would make it feasible for the company to do so while, at the same time, mitigating these adverse market reactions.” John Coffman, utility consumer counsel for the Consumers Council of Missouri, was glad to hear that Spire agreed with consumer groups on the size of the tax windfall, but wants the PSC to stick to its guns on capital structure. “If we win on this issue but we lose on an issue we thought we had won … it’s hard to know how all the pieces will fit together,” he said. Spire calculates that if it’s allowed to use the capital structure it wants, and make certain other changes in its rate base, the net result would be an $11.9 million reduction in natural-gas rates. That’s not the full $28.5 million in tax cuts, but it’s better than the $29 million rate increase Spire originally sought. Can Wall Street and consumers both claim partial victory? We should know the result of this showdown soon. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

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MARKET WATCH

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks rose Monday, sending the Dow Jones industrial average up 410 points, as the market clawed back more of its big losses from the last two weeks. Apple jumped and led a rally in technology stocks and consumer-focused companies like retailers also rose.

CSRA

$55

35

50

65

30

30

45

60

20

25

N

D J 52-week range

$40.58

2,900

26,000

2,800

25,000

40

F $39.14

S&P 500

Wheat

A

S

O

N

StocksRecap NYSE Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,215 3,125 1872 976 31 50

4,040 5,653 2146 781 11 80

D

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

J

2,400

F

HIGH 24765.16 10368.37 670.54 12627.41 7023.62 2672.61 1848.71 27690.78 1498.11

LOW 24290.48 10119.06 657.41 12416.92 6879.69 2622.45 1813.83 27167.53 1466.88

S

CLOSE 24601.27 10301.28 666.98 12560.12 6981.96 2656.00 1839.15 27526.61 1490.98

O CHG. +410.37 +164.67 +5.95 +154.30 +107.47 +36.45 +18.22 +367.22 +13.14

N

D

%CHG. WK +1.70% s +1.62% t +0.90% t +1.24% t +1.56% s +1.39% s +1.00% t +1.35% s +0.89% t

J

MO QTR t s t s t t t s t s t s t s t s t s

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

367 1001.75 464

CHG

+1.47 +.60 -.10

Copper ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 18 Mar 18 May 18

76.45 121.40 25.86

-.23 -.45 +.06

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

59.29 1.6785 183.89 2.552

+.09 -.0217 -1.62 -.032

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

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32.55

42.70 36.37 +.32 +0.9

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19.11

28.19 23.57

-7.3 +18.0 19

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DOX

58.93

71.37 65.33 +.16 +0.2

-0.2 +18.8 18 1.00f Huttig Building Prod HBP

5.00

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51.89

64.89 55.07

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1.75

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ARII

34.29

49.34 37.87 +2.12 +5.9

ABInBev

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ARCH

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101.21 126.50 104.20 +1.05 +1.0 60.13

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BAC

22.07

32.67 31.12 +.79 +2.6

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0.48 Monsanto Co

MON 109.61 123.15 120.44 +1.80 +1.5

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64.60

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... ReinsGrp

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46.83

82.06 50.98 +.86 +1.7 -14.2 -23.5 13

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EMR

56.77

74.45 70.31 +1.24 +1.8

Energizer Holdings

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-1.0

-1.5 29

5.20

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POST

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89.04 72.82 +1.18 +1.6

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48.56

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36.65

49.68 46.70

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18.55

41.83 36.22 +1.98 +5.8

+2.9 +17.3 21

ESE

50.30

66.80 61.90 +.70 +1.1

+2.7 +14.2 21

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.77 50.11 +.26 +0.5

7

2.36

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55.80

83.49 72.89 +1.15 +1.6

-2.3 +10.7 12

WMT

69.33 109.98 99.55 +.35 +0.4

+0.8 +57.7 22

2.04

WBA

63.82

88.00 68.46 +.05 +0.1

-5.7

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1.60

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66.31 56.50 +.40 +0.7

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1.56

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4.09

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-6.4 -43.3 dd

0.13 Walgreen Boots

16.39 12.55 +.03 +0.2 -10.9 +10.2 15 0.24a Wells Fargo

102.12 135.53 106.31

+2.7 +37.0 19

-.57 -0.8 +10.2 +23.2 15

USB

FELP

-.03

... -10.8 +19.4 18 3.64f

-5.3 +3.6

0.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Missouri lobbyists form Nexus Group • Four Missouri lobbyists previously with the Dentons law firm left to form their own governmental relations firm called Nexus Group. Led by partners Rodney Boyd, Kate Casas, Brian Grace and Kelvin Simmons, the Nexus Group is based in Jefferson City and is a member of Dentons 50, a multistate lobbying network. Nexus Group’s clients include Civic Progress, Express Scripts, Centene, Major Brands, the St. Louis Blues, Spire and the Missouri Economic Development Council. Startup awarded NIH grant • SentiAR, a St. Louis-based developer of software that allows physicians to view holographic images of patients’ hearts in an augmented reality setting, has received a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The money will help SentiAR further develop its augmented reality software to help surgeons perform cardiac ablation procedures. The startup, founded by a group of Washington University professors, is backed financially by the BioGenerator, Cultivation Capital, PinPoint Holdings II, Oakland Capital Partners, and additional grant funding. The company, which has its office in the Cortex innovation district, was officially spun out of Washington University’s School of Medicine and School of Engineering in 2017. Eat-Rite Diner reopening • A local married couple plans to reopen the Eat-Rite Diner just south of downtown St. Louis. Shawna Holtman and her husband, Joel, have acquired the restaurant at the corner of Chouteau Avenue and South Seventh Street from former owner L.B. Powers. The couple, both of whom are real estate agents in the area, plan to reopen the restaurant under the Eat-Rite name this spring, Shawna Holtman said. The Eat-Rite closed in October 2017 after the exhaust fan in the kitchen experienced mechanical issues. Powers was the force behind the Eat-Rite and its greasy spoon menu of burgers since 1970 — but the building is believed to date to the 1930s. The 24-hour diner was known to attract customers looking for a bite after late-night bars closed at 3 a.m. SixThirty to increase investments • SixThirty, the St. Louis-based venture fund that invests in startup companies in the financial services technology sector, has a new $10 million fund that will enable it to increase the size of its typical investment from $100,000 to $250,000. Atul Kamra, managing director of SixThirty, told the PostDispatch that the firm has increasingly seen more mature companies apply for funding, which has led to a need for an increased investment. SixThirty, which started as an accelerator program, has invested $3.7 million into approximately 35 startups to date. The firm is leveraging St. Louis’ deep roots in financial services to attract quality startups into its portfolio. SixThirty counts major St. Louis firms such as Edward Jones, Wells Fargo Advisors, Maritz Holdings, MasterCard, Reinsurance Group of America and Enterprise Bank & Trust, among others, as partners. The new fund will allow SixThirty to invest in another 30 to 50 companies over the next several years. From staff and wire reports

+11.10 +.43 +11.30

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.57 1.80 1.87 2.08 2.55 2.76 2.86 3.14

+0.02 +0.07 ... +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 ... -0.03

.53 .64 .79 1.19 1.89 2.21 2.41 3.01

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.85 3.06 6.36 3.82 3.59 .75

-0.01 -0.02 +0.20 +0.03 +0.01 -0.01

1.62 2.59 5.76 3.94 3.33 .39

...

1.16 US Bancorp

FF

Silver

1.38 1.13 .63

CHG

CLOSE

82.85 65.80 +.10 +0.2 -12.4 +9.7 18 2.25f

62.86 53.60 +.18 +0.3 +11.7 +14.7 19

Foresight Energy

4.50 4.25 3.75

.0500 .7789 .3031 1.3806 .7927 .1589 1.2231 .0155 .2834 .009214 .053260 .0171 .0830 .000920 1.0653

1324.20 16.55 972.80

Gold

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

PREV

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was unchanged at 2.86 percent on Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.28

UPS

... WalMart

+5.30

0.12p

-0.3 dd

1.94 UPS B

FutureFuel

+0.9 +28.5 27

6.20

9

$68.89

.0500 .7843 .3035 1.3827 .7929 .1578 1.2284 .0156 .2834 .009202 .053682 .0173 .0838 .000923 1.0651

Platinum

+2.5 +19.8 dd

Avadel Pharma

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

12.30

-9.1

-6.6 +13.7

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Cardinals start pre-leasing apartments at Ballpark Village BY BRIAN FELDT st. Louis Post-dispatch

The St. Louis Cardinals and their development partner, Baltimore-based Cordish Cos., are now pre-leasing units in their planned 29-story apartment building in Ballpark Village. Cordish started sending emails to prospective tenants Feb. 1. A website for leasing to the general public is expected to be live by March. Rents for the building, according to a Cordish spokeswoman, would range from $1,400 per month for a one-bedroom apartment to $3,450 per month for a penthouse suite. A one-bedroom suite would lease for $1,750 per month, and a two-bedroom option would cost $2,500 per month. A property manager said rates are still in flux and could rise depending on demand for the units. Officials with the Cardinals did not return requests for comment. The 297-unit tower, which will be called One Cardinal Way, will have views into Busch Stadium and of the nearby Gateway Arch. Leasing rates for existing downtown apartments average $878 per month, according to research from real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield. One Cardinal Way units will compare with premium rental rates seen in areas such as Clayton, where rents can hover around $2,300 per month. More than 3,700 apartment units are currently under construction in the St. Louis market, the Cushman & Wakefield

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF CORDISH COS. AND ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

The 29-story luxury apartment building called One Cardinal Way will have 297 units.

A rendering shows a unit with a view into Busch Stadium. Rents are expected to range from $1,400 per month for a one-bedroom apartment to $3,450 for a penthouse suite.

data showed. Construction crews broke ground on the tower in late 2017. The apartments are part of the broader $260 million second phase of Ballpark Village, which also calls for a 10-story, 117,000-squarefoot office building to open in mid-2019 and an eightstory Live! By Loews Hotel. The entire development

is expected to be complete in mid-2020. The development is one of several apartment projects planned in the downtown area. C h e s te r f i e l d - b a s e d HDA Architects announced in late 2017 plans to develop a 33-story, $100 million high-rise at 300 South Broadway, which currently houses a St. Louis Community College

administrative building. And Dallas-based Alterra International’s $104 million overhaul of the Jefferson Arms building at 415 Tucker Boulevard is expected to feature more than 200 apartment units as part of a larger project that includes a hotel and ground-level retail. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAy • 02.13.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Ticketing for dollars Pagedale gets well-deserved rebuke for rampant nuisance ordinances.

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that Pagedale, along with some other federal judge’s recent premunicipalities, began raising money liminary approval of a sweepfrom non-traffic cases because of a ing consent decree forcing Missouri law that caps the amount of the city of Pagedale to repeal revenue municipalities can collect from cash-generating ordinances prompts a traffic fines. legitimate question of whether the muThe consent decree does not require nicipality could be the next in St. Louis Pagedale to refund money to citizens County to disincorporate. Municipaliwho were ticketed or to pay attorney’s ties that cannot deliver services without fees. Those who were ticketed will not preying on citizens should be dissolved. face jail unless they have an attorney or Pagedale, with an area of about one have waived their right to an square mile, denies that ordiAny attorney. nances — such as a ban on The decree bans the city sagging pants, walking on the municipality from using municipal arrest left side of a crosswalk, walkthat depends warrants to collect civil court ing in a roadway if a sidewalk so heavily debt, which Pagedale denied is nearby, or barbecuing in doing. City authorities also your front yard (unless it’s on such agree to hold at least one day a national holiday) — are revenuesession and one night court intended to raise revenue. Community ordinances ban- raising tactics session monthly, and to hold no more than seven trials per ning dish antennas, basketball doesn’t court session. hoops, volleyball nets, swimdeserve to Pagedale residents Valarie ming or wading pools or other exist. Whitner, Vincent Blount recreational equipment in the and retiree Mildred Bryant, front of a house also will be plaintiffs in the class-action repealed. lawsuit against the city, agreed with the City leaders say the ordinances are consent decree. Whitner said it was “in aimed at safety and quality of life. the best interests of the class.” Maintaining standards in a community Among abuses cited in the lawsuit, is a worthwhile goal, but harassing and Bryant was ordered to repaint her house agitating residents with phony excuses and ensure that it had matching curtains for raising revenue should not be part of or other window treatments. Authorithe effort. ties threatened to demolish Whitner and In 2014, Pagedale handed out 2,555 Blount’s house after they were ticketed citations for such offenses, nearly two for such offenses as high grass, peeling per household for the city, the Postpaint, an overgrown tree and failing to Dispatch reported. An analysis of state recycle. court data showed that to be a nearly This is another solid reason to con500 percent increase from 2010 — which would be a shocking wave of lawlessness solidate St. Louis County’s disparate municipalities and make more efficient by residents if the basis for the citations use of taxpayer money. weren’t so contrived. What happened over those years was

Killing the canary Chemical Safety Board helps prevent disasters. Trump wants to snuff it out.

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hen a massive steam explosion last year at Loy Lange Box Co. near Soulard sent a steel tank rocketing through the air, killing four people, only one federal agency had the authority and expertise to enter the scene, conduct investigations and provide an expert assessment on how to prevent such future accidents. The agency was the U.S. Chemical Safety Board. In his reckless bid to gut any agency that regulates U.S. business, President Donald Trump is trying to kill the CSB, the chemical industry’s canary in the coal mine. Trump’s 2018 budget request proposed to cut CSB funding to the point that it could no longer operate. Senior administration officials say the 2019 budget will do the same unless Congress intervenes to restore funding. Trump’s effort couldn’t possibly be for reasons of fiscal efficiency. The CSB’s annual budget is a mere $11 million. That wouldn’t even cover a day’s worth of work on Trump’s proposed $21.6 billion border wall. The administration has worked systematically to dismantle federal review functions that help guarantee worker safety and ensure that industries engaging in environmentally risky ventures don’t wind up causing public health disasters. Last month, Trump proposed actions that would reduce federal safety requirements on offshore drilling imposed after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico. He also wants to relax petroleum companies’ readiness for responding to major oil spills. In late January, Trump’s nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, Michael Dourson, withdrew from consideration after his past connections to the chemical industry became public. Among Dourson’s former clients were Dow Chemical Co., Koch Industries and Chevron Corp. Against that backdrop, it comes as little surprise that Trump is trying to dismantle the independent Chemical Safety Board. The CSB investigates major industrial accidents in much the same way that the National Transportation Safety Board investigates airline, train and shipping disasters.

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS ONLINE, GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Legislators should support fair pay for nonprofit workers

Schumer also called for a military parade

The governor’s proposal for a $650 annual raise for eligible Missouri state workers is a response to the costly consequences of a high turnover rate among these workers (“Greitens is pushing new rules for hiring, firing,” Jan. 29). Yet, this is not the only group of state-funded workers with low wages resulting in a high turnover rate. Nonprofit direct support professionals, who provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities through organizations like Easterseals Midwest, are paid by state grants and also face these same challenges. According to a 2017 industry report from ANCOR, direct support professionals experience an average turnover rate of 45 percent in 17 states, including Missouri. Additionally, 56 percent will leave an agency after one year, 35 percent within six months. Not only does this challenge the constancy of support people receive, the report estimates every vacancy costs an agency $4,200 to $5,200. Below-living wages, set by the state, are the reason for this high turnover rate. By 2024, this field expects to need an additional 1.1 million workers to meet demand. Last year, Easterseals received a $1.5 million cut in state funding. As corporations benefit from reduced tax rates and offer higher wages, turnover rates for nonprofits will continually increase due to lack of funding and an inability to provide competitive wages. The direct support professional workforce provides vital support for our community’s most vulnerable. We need our state representatives to champion this cause and support fair pay for nonprofit, state-funded workers. Wendy Sullivan • Ballwin CEO, Easterseals Midwest

In the Post-Dispatch’s daily glassy-eyed bashing of anything Trump, the “Insecurity on parade” editorial (Feb. 9) took down President Donald Trump for wanting a parade to honor our military for serving in the war on terror. It went so far as to use the terms “banana republic dictator” and “Red Square on May Day.” In 2014, New York Sen. Chuck Schumer and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio pumped for a military parade of their own. According to CBS New York, Schumer explained,“After all, these men risked their lives to protect us. They experienced terrible trial and tragedy along the way.” Said CBS, Schumer called for “a grand event at the Canyon of Heroes that would include military brass, color guards, military bands and flyovers.” De Blasio fell all over himself in agreement.“The brave men and women who have selflessly served our nation with courage and skill in Iraq and Afghanistan deserve recognition for their sacrifice,” he claimed.“I stand with Sen. Schumer in his call for a parade to honor our veteran heroes, and New York City would be proud to host this important event.” It took me two minutes online to find this. Why couldn’t the Post-Dispatch have done the same? Apparently when Trumpbashing is the goal, anything goes. Joseph Elstner • Ballwin

Need coordinated effort to improve maternal mortality rates

CRISTINA M. FLETES • Post-Dispatch

Crews work to remove a 1½-ton tank from Faultless Linen in Soulard on April 19 that had crashed through the roof of the building on April 3. Four people were killed in the incident, in which a 25-foottall tank at Loy-Lange Box Co. exploded, went airborne and crashed through the roof at Faultless Linen.

No other federal agency has the CSB’s level of expertise in enforcing industry safety standards. Last summer the agency’s experts deployed to a refinery explosion in Crosby, Texas, right after Hurricane Harvey hit the Houston area. They did likewise immediately after a massive 2013 explosion leveled the town of West, Texas. The agency has no regulatory mission; it’s primary function is to review industrial disasters and present recommendations on standards and practices to avoid future accidents. The administration apparently sees a nefarious purpose in that, as if evil lurks in safety recommendations and industry best practices. The president is, once again, illinformed. It’s up to Congress to continue funding CSB at least at current levels, as it did last year, until someone can educate Trump on why industrial accidents, just like plane crashes, are good things to avoid.

I would like to commend two of our Washington University students, Anirudh Prabu and Ishaan Shah, for taking action to raise awareness when they learned of the unacceptably high maternal mortality rate in our country and state (“Missouri needs to help its physicians prevent mothers from dying,” Feb. 8). The lack of data and adequate health care for women without insurance before and after pregnancy certainly contributes to our soaring maternal mortality rate. This is a complex, systems-level issue with many contributors, including rising rates of obesity and chronic disease burden, delayed child-bearing, addiction, and disparities in both access and outcomes. African-American women and those living in rural areas are much more likely to die of pregnancy-related causes in Missouri and nationwide. At Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital, we are actively working on innovative ways to provide care to high-risk women to optimize maternal and neonatal outcomes, such as group prenatal care for teens, lowrisk adults and women with diabetes. But, let us be clear — this is not solely a hospital level problem, nor are the solutions. In order to tackle these complex problems, we certainly need better data collection for which Prabu and Shah advocated in their commentary. As we learn from the success of the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, it is going to take a coordinated effort at the state, local, community and health care provider level to significantly improve maternal mortality rates for the women of Missouri. Dr. Ebony Boyce Carter • St. Louis

Metropolitan Orchestra brings teachers together to perform Adam Rodgers (“Symphony’s concert with educators is wonderful,” Feb. 8) is indeed correct that the St. Louis Symphony is one of this city’s gems. He described a wonderful side-by-side concert with music educators that he hoped would be repeated once a year. Incredibly, he could observe the same marvelous phenomenon at every single concert of the Metropolitan Orchestra of St. Louis. Now in its sixth season, this orchestra draws on the wealth of talented professional musicians in our area, including many local music educators. These teachers have not given up performing on their instruments to dedicate their lives and souls to their students. In fact, the honing of their skills and playing alongside professionals makes them even better teachers and players. The Metropolitan Orchestra of St.Louis’ musical standards are exacting. Teachers have real-life experience that they can impart to their students. And in addition, the “Share the Music Stand” program allows several exceptional students to play each performance with the orchestra — all rehearsals and the concert. St. Louis is blessed to have hundreds of exceptional musicians in its midst. You hear them at the Symphony and at the Muny, the Fox, area chamber ensembles and at churches and in the Metropolitan Orchestra of St. Louis. Please check us out. Richard Walters • Webster Groves Vice president, Metropolitan Orchestra of St. Louis

Student has refreshing take on President Truman’s example Congratulations to Addison Graham on the excellent commentary “Truman’s regard for the truth can serve as our example” (Feb. 6). It is refreshing to find a young person encouraging people to look for truth in more sources than social media. Thanks to Graham for reminding us of one of our own who said “the buck stops here.” Mary Ann Kohring • St. Louis County Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

02.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

WISE REPUBLICAN COUNSEL • We reprint in another column an editorial which appeared in Tuesday’s Globe-Democrat, urging Republicans to

abandon all thought of partisan advantage in questions touching the war and to unite in loyal support of the Wilson administration. This is excellent advice. It has the greater weight because it is uttered by the leading Republican newspaper in the Middle West. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Return community college to an institution that builds our city’s future

Chancellor refuses to take responsibility for his failures in leadership. savings. Next year, Pittman’s own compensation will increase to $343,400, the highest of any Missouri community college chancellor, and 70 percent above the national average. With a majority of its faculty Furthermore, the chancellor voting no confidence in Chancelcontinues to insist that cutting lor Jeff Pittman, St. Louis Comemployees was the primary means munity College must now deof meeting the budget shortfall. mand the Board of Trustees seek And now he wants us to believe a new leader to face the state’s that retirement is the only way to latest round of higher educacounteract layoffs. He shifts the tion cuts. With even deeper cuts blame entirely onto senior faculty: needed to meet this new budget Either retire or watch your colshortfall, we must all demand leagues lose their jobs. How can that this round — unlike the last anyone believe faculty are not one that terminated 58 full-time employees — meet our standards bearing this burden alone? Next, Pittman claimed of accountability. the college “has a staffing If there’s any question guideline that compares about the faculty’s 65 favorably with most compercent vote of no conmunity colleges ... and fidence, one need only sets faculty levels based read Pittman’s previous on enrollment.” So why guest column, in which won’t the administration he rationalizes the mass reveal how it calculated layoffs rather than take needing to cut 70 faculty responsibility for his failJeff Pittman and 25 staff? Or how they ures in leadership. chose — a mere two weeks after In his column Dec. 28, Pittman the board approved the layoffs — claimed fewer administrative which departments to cut? positions indicated “the faculty Layoffs by department are are not bearing the burden (of the disturbingly inconsistent: Some budget shortfall) alone.” What he doesn’t mention is that while indi- lost more than half their faculty, others fewer than 10 percent. vidual campuses may have fewer Worse, some departments were administrators, new district-level cut so unevenly as to devastate positions and significant raises individual campuses — Forest Park are eating into any top-level

BY MELODY S. GEE, MICHELLE PARRINELLO-CASON, PAMELA GARVEY, LISA MARTINO-TAYLOR AND ELVA MAXINE BEACH

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

People hold up signs supporting speakers opposed to possible staff reductions during a St. Louis Community College board meeting last year.

went from 11 English faculty to five. Coincidentally, these faculty’s offices will soon be demolished for the $39 million new building with the chancellor’s offices. The administration suggests declining enrollment caused the layoffs, but the numbers tell a different story. One example is Forest Park’s developmental English courses, over half of which were taught by adjuncts who are only hired once full-time faculty course loads are set. Clearly, students need more English teachers, not 14 fewer across the district. With fewer teachers, will the college eliminate classes, along

Governing

withtheenemy You don’t keep people in the White House who’ve been credibly accused of domestic abuse.

the White House, where Porter’s 29-year-old girlfriend, Hope KATHLEEN Hicks, is director of communicaPARKER tions, have been all over the lot. Washington Post First, Porter was fired, then he wasn’t, next he resigned, cleaned out his desk and was leaving, but not yet. Porter denied all allegaWhen White House staff sections and claimed he was the retary Rob Porter resigned target of a smear campaign. But Wednesday amid allegations that by whom? he abused his two ex-wives and Not by his two ex-wives, one a former girlfriend, he parted the of whom had sought a restraincurtains on a Trumpian-scale ing order against Porter during personnel and security disaster. their marriage. Neither of them Bottom line: You don’t keep sought out the Daily Mail, which people in the White House broke the story. Rather, reportwho’ve been credibly accused of ers pursued them, according to domestic abuse. I’d be the first to the women. But who tipped off argue that an allegation doesn’t the reporters necessarily and why talk constitute guilt, to them if not and there’s been for revenge? Or no adjudication something. The of these charges. plot doesn’t so But there are much thicken as sound reasons gurgle and ooze for security the way swamps checks and, sometimes do. based on what Rumors the FBI disabound, needcovered, Porter less to say. One didn’t qualify. goes that former Indeed, he Trump camnever did receive paign manager full clearance Corey Lewanand remained in dowski, who the White House as the president’s ASSOCIATED PRESS author Michael Wolff claimed right-hand man White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter (center) hands President once dated on a temporary Donald Trump a confirmation order for James Mattis as defense Hicks, is behind permit datsecretary in January last year as White House Chief of Staff the smear. ing back to his Reince Priebus (right) watches. Porter is stepping down following Another story first day on the allegations of domestic abuse by his two ex-wives. line in the Daily job. That he Mail involves a former girlfriend his military achievements, Kelly remained onboard for more than warning the White House of allemay be the least-qualified chief a year is surprising to all but the gations against Porter. Pending of staff in recent history, includWhite House staff, who, given further revelations, I’ll leave you ing his lackluster predecessor, their cumulative inexperience, with a quote from the late, great may not have realized that people Reince Priebus, who is Jim Baker Kate O’Beirne, pundit emeritus, by comparison. usually are denied employment who used to say,“Never cheat on It is unclear how events related in far-less significant jobs if they your mistress.” to Porter unfolded — or didn’t can’t pass security checks. Ultimately, assuming you’re unfold — or who knew what and Exceptions can be made, of feeling disgusted by now, this when. If these questions sound course. And the president has unfolding story isn’t about bad familiar, they shouldn’t be disthe authority to waive a security marriages, philandering or missed as unimportant. Repubclearance. But what possible rearomance. The shock and awe licans who were offended by the son could there be to keep someemanating from the White House lack of governing experience of one inside the classified world about Porter aren’t so much a Barack Obama should be equally of the White House under such outraged by this administration’s. commentary on the man, but circumstances? Not only is there are testament to the surreal and Kelly has pleaded ignorance reason to question his character, potentially perilous incompeabout Porter’s alleged abusive but the overarching message here tence surrounding the president. background, saying he only is that this White House isn’t Nearly every day reconfirms the recently found out about it. But it much concerned about domestic reality that having once been a appears that Kelly was informed violence. chief executive (or a reality TV The simple answer may be that last fall and that White House star) is no recommendation for Counsel Don McGahn knew a Porter is one of only a few people governance. year ago. The Washington Post over on Pennsylvania Avenue P.S. Kushner hasn’t cleared reported Thursday: “When who knew how to do anything. security yet, either. McGahn informed Kelly this fall For one, he’s well-connected in about the reason for the security Republican circles. His father, Kathleen Parker clearance holdup, he agreed that Roger Porter, worked in three kathleenparker@washpost.com Porter should remain.” administrations and was, I’m Copyright The Washington Post Meanwhile, comments from told, top-drawer. The younger Porter, now 40, is a Rhodes scholar who worked for Republican Sens. Mike Lee, Rob Portman and Orrin Hatch, for whom he was chief of staff. Moreover, at Harvard, he was a classmate of Jared Kushner, who took a class from the senior Porter, who was teaching a class on the American presidency. Washington, if you haven’t heard, is a small town. Most likely, Porter was deemed too valuable to the White House given that he, and virtually no one else, including the president and chief of staff John Kelly, understood how the legislative branch of government works. Whatever

with students’ choices, flexibility and access? More likely they will just use more adjuncts, for as little as $2,100 per course, who go without basic resources like dedicated offices (let alone benefits or job security) and who hold one-third the number of office hours as full-time teachers. In fact, several terminated faculty were “invited” to reapply as adjuncts after their contracts end. The message was clear: If you want to continue teaching, you’ll do it without fair pay, benefits or protection. Finally, Pittman wants us to believe “the decisions concerning reductions in faculty and

staff were made strategically to minimize impact on students.” We need only look at the reading department’s 64 percent cut — with a shocking 100 percent elimination at Forest Park — to know otherwise, and to see the unmistakable attack on developmental education. This August, nearly all developmental reading and English faculty will be gone. And developmental students — the most vulnerable, underserved, and in need of intensive support — will be assigned to underpaid, unprotected adjuncts. Without regard for program stability or student need, the impact of these layoffs will be anything but minimal. Of all the facts, including those Chancellor Pittman selectively airs, the one that matters most is that he prioritized expensive buildings and administrator salaries over the people who do the actual work of teaching and supporting students. We, the taxpayers, must demand that the board return St. Louis Community College to an institution that builds our city’s future. We cannot, neither in times of prosperity nor crisis, expect less than the highest standard of integrity, and a real commitment to hope. Melody S. Gee, Michelle Parrinello-Cason, Pamela Garvey, Lisa Martino-Taylor and Elva Maxine Beach are faculty members at St. Louis Community College.

The agony of the moderate left Democrats live in a thankless world in which they have responsibility without real power. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

It’s not easy being on the moderate left these days. Politicians and activists committed to defending both liberal democracy and a practical, socially generous approach to government find themselves constantly torn between short-term imperatives and long-term hopes. This was brought home last week by two very different political struggles. In the United States, congressional Democrats divided over whether to provide the votes Republicans needed to pass a budget bill to keep the government open. In Germany, Social Democratic leaders agreed to form a grand coalition that would extend Chancellor Angela Merkel’s tenure, but the arrangement could still be voted down by the party’s rank-and-file. The contexts, of course, are different. The U.S. is led by an unstable politician who caters to far-right feelings on race and immigration. Merkel is the embodiment of liberal democratic moderation. Trump is pandering to the authoritarian right. Merkel is trying to defeat it. To that end, she conceded a lot to the Social Democratic Party on public spending, labor questions and European integration, which makes her party’s right uneasy. Moreover, given the way the German political system works, the Social Democrats would hold positions in the government as true partners. In the United States, the Democrats have lost both the executive and legislative branches. Yet they feel a responsibility to do what they can to protect social programs and to keep the federal apparatus functioning. At the same time, Republicans are incapable of governing without help from Democrats. The GOP far right won’t give House Speaker Paul Ryan the votes he requires to pass compromises, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell usually needs supermajorities. Democrats thus live in a thankless world in which they have responsibility without real power. If they accept less than a full loaf, they are trashed for not sticking to principle. If they turn down what they are offered, they are accused of obstruction. It’s instructive that Senate and House Democrats behaved differently on the budget. In the House, 73 Democrats voted yes, but 119 voted no. The balance was the other way among Senate Democrats: 37 yes, 12 no. There are a variety of reasons

for this contrast, but one is straightforward: McConnell has pledged to Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer a real debate and vote on protecting Dreamers, the young immigrants who were brought to the United States illegally as children but are as American as any of us. Ryan has refused to commit to a similarly open process. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi hoped she could use the threat of holding out enough of her party’s votes to push Ryan on the Dreamers. Ryan instead gambled that the proposal contained enough money for Democratic priorities that a sufficient number of Pelosi’s troops would find it impossible to vote no. Ryan was right, because Democratic negotiators got the better end of the deal on the domestic side. They won spending on everything from health care and opioids to disaster relief and infrastructure. Pelosi knew this, too, and praised these gains in a speech on Friday. So while she urged a no vote, she did not make it a test of party loyalty. When it comes to the Dreamers, their fate depends almost entirely on Ryan: Will he allow passage of a bill satisfactory to the Senate and force President Trump to make a choice? Or will he insist on legislation only acceptable to his right wing? Pelosi & Co. can scream all they want. They still lack the power to force Ryan’s hand. It’s a reality that’s hard to accept with so many lives on the line. Nonetheless, the choice facing Germany’s Social Democrats is tougher. In the United States at least, Democrats are running well in the polls. “In our case, there’s some redemption in all of this because at the end of the year, the electoral outcome is extremely promising,” said Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va. The Social Democrats, on the other hand, have steadily lost ground in the surveys by allying with Merkel. Forming a government with her again could further strengthen the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) by making it the main opposition. Yet, rejecting the deal would mean walking away from progress on so much of the party’s program while risking governmental chaos that could help the AfD anyway. Because they see compromise as essential to incremental reform, politicians of the moderate left always face dilemmas of this sort. But at a time when democratic values are under challenge, their torment is all the more agonizing. E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Gunman kills himself after fatally shooting three women

DETROIT FREE PRESS

DETROIT • A barricaded gunman fatally shot himself, ending a several-hour standoff that left three women dead and injured three police officers. The gunman’s death was discovered via a video surveillance robot that Michigan State Police — who relieved Detroit police of their duties several hours into the active

OBITUARIES

Block - see Slezak Broughton, Nancy J. - St. Louis Brown, William "Bill" J. - St. Louis Burke - see McClure Capkovic - see Pierson Collins - see Pierson DuBois, Robert J. - St. Louis Eatherton, Violet Estella - Eureka Eller Sr., Frank Edward - St. Louis Ferguson - see Pierson

Broughton, Nancy J.

83, Feb. 10, 2018. Visitation Thurs., Feb. 15, 2018, 4:00 until Funeral service at 6 p.m. at Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Wentzville, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

scene — sent in through a second-floor window. “The third robot was able to go into the top window and that’s when we discovered the individual was deceased,” 1st Lt. Michael Shaw, a state police spokesman, said Monday. When police entered the house, they discovered that a female hostage had also been killed.

Two other women were killed earlier in the night by the 49-year-old shooter. One of the women is believed to be related to a woman the suspect was dating. It was unclear whether another victim was the girlfriend or what prompted the shooting, which began Sunday night. Two officers were struck in the leg. All three injured officers were expected to be released from the hospital this week.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Gallagher, Patrick T. - St. Louis Garegnani, Robert - St. Louis Hawkins, Dorothy "Dottie" - St. Louis Herndon, Helen C. - Marthasville, MO Hodge - see Lazzareschi Lazzareschi, Elma Ruth - Ballwin Leonard, Lavada J. "Mick" - St. Louis McClure, Joan L. - St. Louis Merli, Richard - St. Charles Mueller, Louis Frank - Los Altos Hills, CA

Merli, Richard

February 11, 2018, age 77. Services: Vis. Baue Cave Springs, Tue., Feb. 13, 4-8 p.m. Svc. All Saints Catholic Church, Wed., Feb. 14, 9:30 a.m. Visit baue.com

Pierson, Viola M. - St. Louis Robinett, William "Sparky" - Fenton Schenberg, Robert D. "Rob" - St. Louis Scotino, Juanita - St. Louis Slezak, Rita Jo - St. Louis Smith - see McClure Stevens, Sigaford "Steve" - St. Louis Tevis, C. Larry - Festus Unser, Michael C. - St. Louis

Stevens, Sigaford "Steve"

85, on Sun. Feb. 11, 2018. Loving father of Charles (Anna) McCormick, Rose Dodd, Sigaford Glen Stevens, Calvin (Lisa) Stevens, the late Brown, William "Bill" J. Mueller, Louis Frank Jerry L. McCormick and Susan C. Visitation: Thurs. Feb. 15, 4 - 8 p.m. @ Kutis South 5255 Lemay Louis Frank Mueller passed away suddenly on Sunday, February La. Cherished grandfather of 9 Ferry. Services: Fri. Feb. 16, 11 a.m. @ Kutis, burial @ Sunset 4th. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri to Louis Frank & Francis and great-grandfather of 6. Dear Memorial. May Mueller. brother of M a rgie (Harold) KUTIS FUNERAL HOME Louis is survived by his loving partner, Barbara-Lynn Smith; Amberger, Verni Novis (Carol) Stechildren Peter Mueller (Kris) of Colorado Springs, CO, Leslie vens, Rex (Ruth) Stevens, Porter Mueller (Susan) of Madison, WI, Hilary Mueller (Maureen) of (Karen) Stevens and the late RonDuBois, Robert J. Hyannis, MA, Chris Mueller (Cheryl) of Springfield, OR, Rodney nie Stevens. Our dear father-in54, Saturday, February 11, 2018. Visitation Thursday, Helfrich (June) of San Jose, Gregory Helfrich of Los Altos Hills; law, brother-in-law, uncle, greatFebruary 15, 2018 from 4-8 p.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral grandchildren, Elisabeth and Thomas Mueller, Mark and Amy uncle, cousin and friend. Home Maplewood Chapel, 7456 Manchester Helfrich and one great grandchild, Noah Helfrich. Services: Visitation on Wed. Feb. 14, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. to Louis is also survived by his sisters, Joan Cawdrey of Mason, 8:00 p.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., OH and Linda Ashford (Dennis) of Lee's Summit, MO, but Fenton, MO. Interment private. Memorials to the MO Eatherton, Violet Estella (nee Hellmann), passed away, Sunday, February 11, 2018 at the predeceased by his brother Ken Mueller, first wife, Carol and Veterans Home appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com second wife, Eddyce. age of 101. His positivity, love and generosity will be deeply missed. Beloved wife of the late Curtis W. Eatherton; dearest sister of Tevis, C. Larry the late Earl Hellmann and twin, Viola Gaehle; dearest aunt of Services: Friends and family are invited to a visitation on Ronald Hellmann, Marlene Mangold, Donald Melville, Karen Thursday Feb. 15th 2018 from 3-7 p.m. and a funeral service on 78, of Festus, MO, February 10, 2018. Retired teacher with Trokey, Marilyn Weber, Nancy Dorris and Kathleen Hardesty; our Friday, Feb. 16th at 10:00 a.m. at Spangler Mortuary, Los Altos. Jefferson R-7 Junior High. Beloved husband of Mary Beth (nee Burial to follow at San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery. More D on ova n ) Tevis; dear father of Keri Leigh Creed, dear dear great-aunt and friend. grandfather of Olivia Kathleen and Charles Harrison Creed; dear Services: Funeral service at Bethel United Methodist Church, to read & directions at www.spanglermortuary.com brother of Carol Sue (Carl) Shipman. 17500 Manchester Road, Wildwood, Thursday, 12:30 p.m. SPANGLER MORTUARY Services: Private. Memorials preferred to Safe Harbor Interment Bethel Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be Hospice, Fredericktown, MO. made to Bethel United Methodist Church. Visitation at church Thursday, 10:30 a.m. until time of service. A service of the Pierson, Viola M. SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may Sunday, February 11, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, Unser, Michael C. sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. 10151 Gravois, Wednesday, February 14 at 10 a.m. Interment Entered into rest Saturday, February 10, 2018 at age 67. Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday, 4-9 p.m. Beloved husband of Patricia Unser (McDonnell); loving father of Jackie Unser and Lauren (Roy) Eagan; dear brother of Linda Eller Sr., Frank Edward (Les) Wulfert, Steve (Chris) Unser and Diana (Lowell) Tebbetts; 86 years, on February Robinett, William "Sparky" cherished uncle of Bruce Wulfert, Nick and Matt Unser; dear 11, 2018. Entered into rest on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Survived by his wife Beloved husband of Phyllis Robinett (nee Bowlin); friend to many. Services: A memorial gathering at Faith Lutheran Church of 67 years, Marilyn (nee Wert) loving father of Kim Robinett Bowen, Kathy (Bob) Eller, children, Janet (Bill Lingua) Robinett Davis, Jeff Robinett, Sherry (Jim) Anderson and (Telegraph Rd.) Thursday, February 15 from 10:00 a.m. until Anthony, Cheryl (Bob) Masson, Dwayne (Sue) Cluck; cherished grandfather of 14, great-grand- time of service 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, Radnor Station and Frank Edward (Susan father of 5; dear brother of Benjamin "Jimmy" (Thelma) Pennington) Eller Jr., 9 grandchilRobinett, Jerry (Linda) Robinette and the late Ruby (Smokey) Bldg. 2, Suite 320, 290 King of Prussia Rd., Radnor, PA dren, and 11 great grandchildren. Meador and Kenny Robinett; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin 19087. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY service. Frank retired after 35 years from and friend to many. the Parkway School District and Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Florists was the former Associate Pastor Ferry Rd., Thursday, February 15, 10:30 a.m. Interment J.B. for the senior adults at The Rock National Cemetery. Contributions in Sparky's memory may Church for 10 years. Dierbergs Florist be made to a veteran's charity of your choice. Visitation Order 24 Hours Services: Visitation Tuesday, February 13, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 until time of service at 12:00 noon at at CHAPEL HILL Dierbergs.com MORTUARY, 10305 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood, MO. Interment Schenberg, Robert D. "Rob" Oak Hill Cemetery. February 11, 2018. Schnucks Florist Beloved husband of Susanne Schenberg; dear father 65 Metro Locations Gallagher, Patrick T. and father-in-law of Ali (Jeff) Kalina, Emily (Kevin) 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Fri., Feb. 9, 2018. Visitation at ORTMANN'S, Thur., Feb. 15, 4-8 Lepine, Chava Schenberg, Dominique Boesch and Colin Boesch; p.m. Funeral Mass at Holy Spirit Church, Fri., Feb. 16 at 10 a.m. dear grandfather of Taylor and Gabe Kalina; dear son of Joseph Cemeteries/Mausoleums More info at www.osfuneralhomes.com. B. and Gerry Schenberg; dear brother and brother-in-law of Elaine Knobler and Sandy (Michael) Wexler; our dear son-in-law, (6) Burial plots in BELLERIVE GARDEN CEMETERY. brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Garegnani, Robert Age 58, baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Feb. Services: Funeral service Wednesday, February 14, 10 a.m. at Cemetery asking $6500 per plot. I am asking $1000 per plot. This is a deal! Call 314-842-5865 7, 2018. Dearest son of late Joann and Henry Garegnani; be- BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Boulevard, 63132. No loved brother of Diane (Jim) Mori, Tony Johnston and the late visitation prior to funeral service. Interment follows at United David M. Garegnani; loving uncle of Joshua, Michael, Rachel, Hebrew Cemetery, 7855 Canton Avenue, 63130. Memorial contributions preferred to St. Louis Men's Group Against Cancer, Madeleine and Nicholas; dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation 9 a.m. until Memorial Mass Fri., Feb. 16, 10 12951 Olive Boulevard, 63141 or to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. a.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church. Calcaterra Funeral Home. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Hawkins, Dorothy "Dottie"

Sun., Feb. 11, 2018. Visitation Fri., Feb. 16, 12:00, with funeral at 1 p.m., at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. See boppchapel.com for full obituary.

Herndon, Helen C.

age 93, of Marthasville, MO, passed away on February 11, 2018. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Scotino, Juanita

Visitation at St. Mark Catholic Church, Fri., Feb. 16, 9 a.m. until Mass 10:00 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. For complete information go to www.kutisfuneralhomes.com

Leonard, Lavada J. "Mick"

McClure, Joan L.

Feb. 9, 2018. Services: Funeral Wed., Feb. 14, 10 am at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Vis. Tues., 4-8 pm. Interment, Resurrection. Visit Boppchapel.com for full obituary.

THEM GREAT

Slezak, Rita Jo

(nee Block) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Dear daughter of the late Joseph and Rita Block (nee Mraz.) Beloved wife of the late Lazzareschi, Elma Ruth Donald Slezak for 25 years until his death. Wonderful sister of (nee Day), now sheltered in the arms of Jesus, Friday, February Karen Block and the late Alan Block. Dear godmother, cousin, niece, sister-in-law, aunt and friend to many. 9, 2018 at the age of 85. Beloved wife of Julius Lazzareschi; Rita Jo was a devoted daughter and sister, leaving her office loving mother of Linda (Michael) Hodge and Mark (Angie) Lazzareschi; devoted grandmother of Mindy (Brian) Wiethop, job of many years to help in the care giving of her parents and Emma Lazzareschi and Anthony Lazzareschi; great-grandmother brother until their death. Rita Jo was a lifelong member of St. of Brian; sister of Carl (Nancy) Day and the late James Day, Glen Paul Catholic Church of Fenton. Being Baptized, making her Day, Norma Day and Helene Borisch; sister-in-law of Clyde (Jos- First Communion, being Confirmed and getting married at St. ephine) Lazzareschi, Donna Day and Mary Day; dear aunt, great Paul. She was an avid fan of classic cars, entering both of her cars in many car shows. She enjoyed baking and donating aunt and friend to many. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and cakes. She loved animals including her own cat, Fluffy. She will Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, be dearly missed by her family and friends. Thursday, February 15, 2018, 11:30 a.m. Interment, Sunset Me- Services: from Fieser Funeral Home, 401 Gravois Rd. Thursday, morial Park, Affton. If desired, contributions may be made to February 15, 2018 at 9 a.m. to St. Paul Catholic Church, Mass 10 a.m. Interment: St. Paul Cemetery. Donations to Open Door Old Trails Historical Society, P.O. Box 852 Manchester, MO Animal Sanctuary or St. Vincent DePaul Society of St. Paul 63011. Visitation, Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign Church are appreciated. Visitation from 4-8 p.m. on Tuesday the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. and Wednesday.

passed away peacefully Sunday, February 11, 2018. Loving wife of the late Virgil L. Leonard. Caring mother of Marsha A. (Terry) Harris and Kristine G. (Michael) Nolde. Beloved grandmother of Bradley (Laura), Rebecca (Jay) and Patrick. Great-grandmother of Ellie. Services: Private family services will be held at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial to the American Cancer Society or American Heart Association would be appreciated. Online g u e s t b o o k at buchholzmortuary.com A BUCHHOLZ Mortuary West service.

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STLtoday.com/obits

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LOCAL

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LAW & ORDER ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Man is fatally shot • The Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis is investigating the shooting death of a man here Monday afternoon. Police identified the man as Cole E. Weirciszewski, 19. Police did not provide an address for him. Deputies with the St. Clair County

sheriff’s office were called to Memorial Hospital in Belleville about 5:15 p.m. after Weirciszewski arrived there with a gunshot wound to the chest, Capt. Bruce Fleshren said. Investigators believe Weirciszewski was shot in the 100 block of Paulette Drive, Fleshren said. The block, near Illinois Route 15 and Frank Scott Parkway West, is just outside Belleville in

unincorporated St. Clair County. Authorities ask anyone with any information about the shooting to call the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department at 618-825-5204. ST. LOUIS > 1 dead, 1 badly hurt in crash • One person was killed and another severely injured Monday night in a two-vehicle crash in south St. Louis.

OBITUARIES

Block - see Slezak Broughton, Nancy J. - St. Louis Brown, William "Bill" J. - St. Louis Burke - see McClure Capkovic - see Pierson Collins - see Pierson DuBois, Robert J. - St. Louis Eatherton, Violet Estella - Eureka Eller Sr., Frank Edward - St. Louis Ferguson - see Pierson

Broughton, Nancy J.

83, Feb. 10, 2018. Visitation Thurs., Feb. 15, 2018, 4:00 until Funeral service at 6 p.m. at Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Wentzville, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018 The crash happened about 9:35 p.m. near Kingshighway and Arsenal Street, police said. CASTLE POINT > Man found mortally wounded • A man was fatally shot Monday night in north St. Louis County. St. Louis County officers called to a shooting about 7 p.m. in the 10200 block of Count Drive in

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Gallagher, Patrick T. - St. Louis Garegnani, Robert - St. Louis Hawkins, Dorothy "Dottie" - St. Louis Herndon, Helen C. - Marthasville, MO Hodge - see Lazzareschi Lazzareschi, Elma Ruth - Ballwin Leonard, Lavada J. "Mick" - St. Louis McClure, Joan L. - St. Louis Merli, Richard - St. Charles Mueller, Louis Frank - Los Altos Hills, CA

Merli, Richard

February 11, 2018, age 77. Services: Vis. Baue Cave Springs, Tue., Feb. 13, 4-8 p.m. Svc. All Saints Catholic Church, Wed., Feb. 14, 9:30 a.m. Visit baue.com

Castle Point found the man dead in the street with at least one gunshot wound, Sgt. Shawn McGuire said. Police had not identified the man as of Monday night and did not know his age, McGuire said. Authorities ask anyone with any information about the shooting to call the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210 or CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

Pierson, Viola M. - St. Louis Robinett, William "Sparky" - Fenton Schenberg, Robert D. "Rob" - St. Louis Scotino, Juanita - St. Louis Slezak, Rita Jo - St. Louis Smith - see McClure Stevens, Sigaford "Steve" - St. Louis Tevis, C. Larry - Festus Unser, Michael C. - St. Louis

Stevens, Sigaford "Steve"

85, on Sun. Feb. 11, 2018. Loving father of Charles (Anna) McCormick, Rose Dodd, Sigaford Glen Stevens, Calvin (Lisa) Stevens, the late Brown, William "Bill" J. Mueller, Louis Frank Jerry L. McCormick and Susan C. Visitation: Thurs. Feb. 15, 4 - 8 p.m. @ Kutis South 5255 Lemay Louis Frank Mueller passed away suddenly on Sunday, February La. Cherished grandfather of 9 Ferry. Services: Fri. Feb. 16, 11 a.m. @ Kutis, burial @ Sunset 4th. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri to Louis Frank & Francis and great-grandfather of 6. Dear Memorial. May Mueller. brother of M a rgie (Harold) KUTIS FUNERAL HOME Louis is survived by his loving partner, Barbara-Lynn Smith; Amberger, Verni Novis (Carol) Stechildren Peter Mueller (Kris) of Colorado Springs, CO, Leslie vens, Rex (Ruth) Stevens, Porter Mueller (Susan) of Madison, WI, Hilary Mueller (Maureen) of (Karen) Stevens and the late RonDuBois, Robert J. Hyannis, MA, Chris Mueller (Cheryl) of Springfield, OR, Rodney nie Stevens. Our dear father-in54, Saturday, February 11, 2018. Visitation Thursday, Helfrich (June) of San Jose, Gregory Helfrich of Los Altos Hills; law, brother-in-law, uncle, greatFebruary 15, 2018 from 4-8 p.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral grandchildren, Elisabeth and Thomas Mueller, Mark and Amy uncle, cousin and friend. Home Maplewood Chapel, 7456 Manchester Helfrich and one great grandchild, Noah Helfrich. Services: Visitation on Wed. Feb. 14, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. to Louis is also survived by his sisters, Joan Cawdrey of Mason, 8:00 p.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., OH and Linda Ashford (Dennis) of Lee's Summit, MO, but Fenton, MO. Interment private. Memorials to the MO Eatherton, Violet Estella (nee Hellmann), passed away, Sunday, February 11, 2018 at the predeceased by his brother Ken Mueller, first wife, Carol and Veterans Home appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com second wife, Eddyce. age of 101. His positivity, love and generosity will be deeply missed. Beloved wife of the late Curtis W. Eatherton; dearest sister of Tevis, C. Larry the late Earl Hellmann and twin, Viola Gaehle; dearest aunt of Services: Friends and family are invited to a visitation on Ronald Hellmann, Marlene Mangold, Donald Melville, Karen Thursday Feb. 15th 2018 from 3-7 p.m. and a funeral service on 78, of Festus, MO, February 10, 2018. Retired teacher with Trokey, Marilyn Weber, Nancy Dorris and Kathleen Hardesty; our Friday, Feb. 16th at 10:00 a.m. at Spangler Mortuary, Los Altos. Jefferson R-7 Junior High. Beloved husband of Mary Beth (nee Burial to follow at San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery. More D on ova n ) Tevis; dear father of Keri Leigh Creed, dear dear great-aunt and friend. grandfather of Olivia Kathleen and Charles Harrison Creed; dear Services: Funeral service at Bethel United Methodist Church, to read & directions at www.spanglermortuary.com brother of Carol Sue (Carl) Shipman. 17500 Manchester Road, Wildwood, Thursday, 12:30 p.m. SPANGLER MORTUARY Services: Private. Memorials preferred to Safe Harbor Interment Bethel Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be Hospice, Fredericktown, MO. made to Bethel United Methodist Church. Visitation at church Thursday, 10:30 a.m. until time of service. A service of the Pierson, Viola M. SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may Sunday, February 11, 2018. Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, Unser, Michael C. sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. 10151 Gravois, Wednesday, February 14 at 10 a.m. Interment Entered into rest Saturday, February 10, 2018 at age 67. Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday, 4-9 p.m. Beloved husband of Patricia Unser (McDonnell); loving father of Jackie Unser and Lauren (Roy) Eagan; dear brother of Linda Eller Sr., Frank Edward (Les) Wulfert, Steve (Chris) Unser and Diana (Lowell) Tebbetts; 86 years, on February Robinett, William "Sparky" cherished uncle of Bruce Wulfert, Nick and Matt Unser; dear 11, 2018. Entered into rest on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Survived by his wife Beloved husband of Phyllis Robinett (nee Bowlin); friend to many. Services: A memorial gathering at Faith Lutheran Church of 67 years, Marilyn (nee Wert) loving father of Kim Robinett Bowen, Kathy (Bob) Eller, children, Janet (Bill Lingua) Robinett Davis, Jeff Robinett, Sherry (Jim) Anderson and (Telegraph Rd.) Thursday, February 15 from 10:00 a.m. until Anthony, Cheryl (Bob) Masson, Dwayne (Sue) Cluck; cherished grandfather of 14, great-grand- time of service 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, Radnor Station and Frank Edward (Susan father of 5; dear brother of Benjamin "Jimmy" (Thelma) Pennington) Eller Jr., 9 grandchilRobinett, Jerry (Linda) Robinette and the late Ruby (Smokey) Bldg. 2, Suite 320, 290 King of Prussia Rd., Radnor, PA dren, and 11 great grandchildren. Meador and Kenny Robinett; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin 19087. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY service. Frank retired after 35 years from and friend to many. the Parkway School District and Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Florists was the former Associate Pastor Ferry Rd., Thursday, February 15, 10:30 a.m. Interment J.B. for the senior adults at The Rock National Cemetery. Contributions in Sparky's memory may Church for 10 years. Dierbergs Florist be made to a veteran's charity of your choice. Visitation Order 24 Hours Services: Visitation Tuesday, February 13, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 until time of service at 12:00 noon at at CHAPEL HILL Dierbergs.com MORTUARY, 10305 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood, MO. Interment Schenberg, Robert D. "Rob" Oak Hill Cemetery. February 11, 2018. Schnucks Florist Beloved husband of Susanne Schenberg; dear father 65 Metro Locations Gallagher, Patrick T. and father-in-law of Ali (Jeff) Kalina, Emily (Kevin) 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Fri., Feb. 9, 2018. Visitation at ORTMANN'S, Thur., Feb. 15, 4-8 Lepine, Chava Schenberg, Dominique Boesch and Colin Boesch; p.m. Funeral Mass at Holy Spirit Church, Fri., Feb. 16 at 10 a.m. dear grandfather of Taylor and Gabe Kalina; dear son of Joseph Cemeteries/Mausoleums More info at www.osfuneralhomes.com. B. and Gerry Schenberg; dear brother and brother-in-law of Elaine Knobler and Sandy (Michael) Wexler; our dear son-in-law, (6) Burial plots in BELLERIVE GARDEN CEMETERY. brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Garegnani, Robert Age 58, baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Feb. Services: Funeral service Wednesday, February 14, 10 a.m. at Cemetery asking $6500 per plot. I am asking $1000 per plot. This is a deal! Call 314-842-5865 7, 2018. Dearest son of late Joann and Henry Garegnani; be- BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Boulevard, 63132. No loved brother of Diane (Jim) Mori, Tony Johnston and the late visitation prior to funeral service. Interment follows at United David M. Garegnani; loving uncle of Joshua, Michael, Rachel, Hebrew Cemetery, 7855 Canton Avenue, 63130. Memorial contributions preferred to St. Louis Men's Group Against Cancer, Madeleine and Nicholas; dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation 9 a.m. until Memorial Mass Fri., Feb. 16, 10 12951 Olive Boulevard, 63141 or to the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. a.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church. Calcaterra Funeral Home. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Hawkins, Dorothy "Dottie"

Sun., Feb. 11, 2018. Visitation Fri., Feb. 16, 12:00, with funeral at 1 p.m., at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. See boppchapel.com for full obituary.

Herndon, Helen C.

age 93, of Marthasville, MO, passed away on February 11, 2018. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Scotino, Juanita

Visitation at St. Mark Catholic Church, Fri., Feb. 16, 9 a.m. until Mass 10:00 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. For complete information go to www.kutisfuneralhomes.com

Leonard, Lavada J. "Mick"

McClure, Joan L.

Feb. 9, 2018. Services: Funeral Wed., Feb. 14, 10 am at BOPP CHAPEL, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Vis. Tues., 4-8 pm. Interment, Resurrection. Visit Boppchapel.com for full obituary.

THEM GREAT

Slezak, Rita Jo

(nee Block) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Dear daughter of the late Joseph and Rita Block (nee Mraz.) Beloved wife of the late Lazzareschi, Elma Ruth Donald Slezak for 25 years until his death. Wonderful sister of (nee Day), now sheltered in the arms of Jesus, Friday, February Karen Block and the late Alan Block. Dear godmother, cousin, niece, sister-in-law, aunt and friend to many. 9, 2018 at the age of 85. Beloved wife of Julius Lazzareschi; Rita Jo was a devoted daughter and sister, leaving her office loving mother of Linda (Michael) Hodge and Mark (Angie) Lazzareschi; devoted grandmother of Mindy (Brian) Wiethop, job of many years to help in the care giving of her parents and Emma Lazzareschi and Anthony Lazzareschi; great-grandmother brother until their death. Rita Jo was a lifelong member of St. of Brian; sister of Carl (Nancy) Day and the late James Day, Glen Paul Catholic Church of Fenton. Being Baptized, making her Day, Norma Day and Helene Borisch; sister-in-law of Clyde (Jos- First Communion, being Confirmed and getting married at St. ephine) Lazzareschi, Donna Day and Mary Day; dear aunt, great Paul. She was an avid fan of classic cars, entering both of her cars in many car shows. She enjoyed baking and donating aunt and friend to many. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and cakes. She loved animals including her own cat, Fluffy. She will Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, be dearly missed by her family and friends. Thursday, February 15, 2018, 11:30 a.m. Interment, Sunset Me- Services: from Fieser Funeral Home, 401 Gravois Rd. Thursday, morial Park, Affton. If desired, contributions may be made to February 15, 2018 at 9 a.m. to St. Paul Catholic Church, Mass 10 a.m. Interment: St. Paul Cemetery. Donations to Open Door Old Trails Historical Society, P.O. Box 852 Manchester, MO Animal Sanctuary or St. Vincent DePaul Society of St. Paul 63011. Visitation, Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign Church are appreciated. Visitation from 4-8 p.m. on Tuesday the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. and Wednesday.

passed away peacefully Sunday, February 11, 2018. Loving wife of the late Virgil L. Leonard. Caring mother of Marsha A. (Terry) Harris and Kristine G. (Michael) Nolde. Beloved grandmother of Bradley (Laura), Rebecca (Jay) and Patrick. Great-grandmother of Ellie. Services: Private family services will be held at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial to the American Cancer Society or American Heart Association would be appreciated. Online g u e s t b o o k at buchholzmortuary.com A BUCHHOLZ Mortuary West service.

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02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

NEWS

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

Tough immigration debate on future of DACA starts in Senate Divisions over how far measure should reach threaten talks BY ALAN FRAM associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Senate’s

two top leaders put on a show of camaraderie Monday as their chamber launched its immigration debate, but they also laid down markers underscoring how hard it will be to reach a deal that can move through Congress. “We really do get along, despite what you read in the press,” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., at a previously scheduled appearance alongside his counterpart, Senate Majority Leader Mitch

McConnell, R-Ky., at the University of Louisville. There was even ribbing when Schumer presented McConnell with a bottle of bourbon made in his home New York City borough of Brooklyn. McConnell, whose state knows a thing or two about bourbon, proclaimed, “There’s no such thing as Brooklyn bourbon.” But just days after the two leaders brokered a bipartisan $400 billion budget agreement and helped shepherd it into law, both men made clear that an immigration agreement will be tough. “The time for political posturing is behind us,” McConnell said later Monday on the Senate floor. He said while Democrats have called for “swift action” on immigration, “now’s the time to back up the talk with the hard

work of finding a solution.” That, he pointedly said, would mean passage by the Senate and the House of a measure “the president will sign.” McConnell expressed support for a wide-ranging proposal by President Donald Trump that the Senate is expected to vote on this week. It would pave a path to citizenship for up to 1.8 million young “Dreamer” immigrants in the U.S. illegally, a lure for Democrats that many Republicans oppose. Trump also wants $25 billion for Trump’s border wall with Mexico and other security measures, as well as curbs on legal immigration — a must for many Republicans. Many Democrats consider some of the proposals, including limiting the relatives that legal immigrants can bring to the

U.S., to be nonstarters. In his own remarks on the Senate floor, Schumer expressed opposition to such a sweeping approach. “The only enemy here is overreach,” Schumer said. “Now is not the time nor the place to reform the entire legal immigration system. Rather, this is the time for a narrow bill” — which Democrats have said would help the Dreamers and provide some money for border security. The comments came as the Senate voted 97-1 — Ted Cruz, R-Texas, provided the sole “no” vote — to plunge into an openended immigration debate that’s been promised by McConnell. Both parties’ leaders hope debate can be concluded this week, but it’s unclear if that will happen or what the product, if any, will be.

Iraq recovery estimated at $88 billion

WORLD DIGEST Russia investigates deadly airliner crash Wading through knee-deep snow, hundreds of emergency workers searched a vast field near Moscow on Monday for remains of the 71 victims from the crash of a Russian airliner, and aviation experts began deciphering the jet’s two flight recorders. Investigators quickly ruled out a terrorist attack in Sunday’s crash of the An-148 regional jet bound for Orsk in the southern Urals. The air disaster has reignited questions, however, about the twin-engine plane that was developed by Russia and Ukraine but phased out of production amid the political crisis between the neighbors. The model has a spotty safety record, with one previous crash and a string of major incidents in which pilots struggled to land safely. The carrier, Saratov Airlines, has grounded several other An-148s in its fleet pending the crash investigation. The plane’s fuel tanks exploded on impact, gouging a deep crater and scattering wreckage across 74 acres. President Vladimir Putin put off a planned trip to Sochi and stayed in Moscow to monitor the investigation Monday. The Kremlin said U.S. President Donald Trump called Putin to express his condolences. Unclaimed painting given to Jewish heirs • A 16th-century oil painting that fell into Nazi hands during World War II was returned by France’s government to a Jewish couple’s heirs Monday. The Flemish painting “Triptych of the Crucifixion” is attributed to Joachim Patinir, and it had sat unclaimed in a French museum for seven decades. French Culture Minister Francoise Nyssen presented it to the grandchildren of Hertha and Henry Bromberg during a ceremony at Paris’ culture ministry. The Jewish couple sold works under duress to secure their passage from Nazi Germany to the United States. “The feeling of thanks and gratitude is more valuable than the painting itself,” said a grandson, Christopher Bromberg.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Homeless people push their belongings Monday through the rubble of al-Rashid military base belonging to the former Iraqi army in Baghdad, Iraq. Kuwait this week is hosting a series of conferences on rebuilding Iraq after the onslaught of the Islamic State group.

Foreign aid sought after devastation by Islamic State BY MALAK HARB AND JON GAMBRELL associated Press

KUWAIT CITY • Kuwait on

Monday opened a week of conferences seeking aid for rebuilding Iraq after the onslaught of the Islamic State group, seeking tens of billions of dollars for a nation only a generation ago that invaded it. Authorities estimate Iraq needs $88.2 billion to restore a country smashed after the Sunni extremists seized the country’s second-largest city of Mosul and a mass of territory in June 2014. While the U.S. will not make any new direct aid pledges at the conference, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is expected to announce an over $3 billion finan-

cial package, an American official said. Still, far more money will be needed, Iraqi officials say. “We finished one battle but we are engaged now with a war for reconstruction,” said Mustafa al-Hiti, the head of Iraq’s reconstruction fund for areas affected by terrorist operations. Among the hardest-hit areas is Mosul, which Iraqi forces, aided by Iranian-backed Shiite militias and a U.S.-led coalition, recaptured in July 2017. Their victory came at a steep cost for Mosul, as coalition airstrikes and extremist suicide car bombs destroyed homes and government buildings. Of the money needed, Iraqi officials estimate $17 billion would go toward rebuilding homes, the biggest single line item offered Monday on the first day of meetings. The United Nations estimates 40,000 homes need to be rebuilt in Mosul alone. “The majority of the damage was to western Mosul as it went

through one of the worst and fiercest battles in history,” said Nofal al-Akoub, the governor of Iraq’s Nineveh province. It “led to the total destruction of its infrastructure.” Al-Akoub said $42 billion was needed for his province alone, as it is home to Mosul. Iraq needs some $20 billion now to begin its reconstruction, al-Hiti said. The war against the Islamic State group displaced more than 5 million people. Only half have returned to their hometowns in Iraq. However, officials acknowledge a feeling of fatigue from international donors, especially after the wars in Iraq and Syria sparked the biggest mass migration since World War II. Billions of dollars poured into Iraq after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein, with what feels now like little visible effect. While Iraq is OPEC’s second-largest crude producer and home to the world’s fifth-largest

known reserves, it says it needs $7 billion to repair oil and gas fields. It has struggled to pay international firms running them. The U.S. alone spent $60 billion over nine years — some $15 million a day — to rebuild Iraq. Around $25 billion went to Iraq’s military, which disintegrated during the 2014 offensive of the Islamic State group, which grew out of al-Qaida in Iraq. U.S. government auditors also found massive waste and corruption, fueling suspicions of Western politicians like Trump who want to scale back foreign aid. The over $3 billion package now planned for Iraq from the Americans will come from the Export-Import Bank of the United States, according to a U.S. official. The official said the package will be structured so that the initial amount could rise to as much as $5 billion over several years. The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the package prior to its announcement.

U.S. open to N. Korean talks with no preconditions Subtle policy shift provides S. Korea a little leverage BY MATTHEW PENNINGTON associated Press

WASHINGTON • The U.S. is open for talks without preconditions with nuclear North Korea, Vice President Mike Pence has declared, subtly shifting White House policy after Olympics-inspired gestures of respect between the rival Koreas. That provides a little more leverage for South Korea in its path-finding outreach to the North and could reduce potential strains in the U.S.-South Korean alliance. But diplomacy between Washington and Pyongyang won’t start unless Kim Jong Un wants it to. While the North Korean dictator, who has yet to meet a foreign leader,

has invited the South Korean president for a rare summit, Kim has given no sign of being ready to talk to the U.S. A back channel of diplomatic communication between North Korea and the State Department has remained open since President Donald Trump took office, but the only substantive talks reported to date were in the first half of last year over the fate of several Americans in North Korean custody. The North has refused to negotiate over its nuclear weapons as it nears its goal of being able to launch an atomic-tipped missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. Trump views those weapons as America’s primary national security threat. His administration’s 2019 budget proposal, released Monday, includes hundreds of millions dollars more for missile defense, adding 20 strategic interceptors in Alaska to protect against long-range,

North Korean projectiles. Meanwhile, Pence is making clear that the U.S. will keep escalating sanctions pressure on the North until it takes clear steps toward giving up its nukes. But at the same time, Pence signaled more openness to engagement with Pyongyang. “The point is, no pressure comes off until they are actually doing something that the alliance believes represents a meaningful step toward denuclearization,” Pence told The Washington Post on his flight home from the Olympics in South Korea this past weekend. “So the maximum pressure campaign is going to continue and intensify. But if you want to talk, we’ll talk.” That’s a marked departure from the uncompromising message that Pence delivered at every public stop on his trip, when he repeatedly assailed North Korea on human rights and nu-

clear provocations, and threw cold water on South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s outreach to the North by snubbing its delegation at the games. Pence’s office said that didn’t reflect a shift in Trump administration policy, as the president has previously expressed openness to talks, nor a reduction in U.S. concerns over North Korea’s provocative behavior. Evans Revere, a former senior State Department official for East Asia, voiced surprise over Pence’s remarks, noting that as recently as December the White House pulled the plug on Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s public advocacy of unconditional talks to test the water with North Korea. T illerson’s response to Pence’s comments was guarded. He said “it’s too early to judge” whether a diplomatic process could be starting and made clear the obstacle to progress is Kim.

Old WWII bomb leads to airport shutdown • Flights in and out of London City Airport were canceled Monday after a 1,100-pound unexploded World War II bomb was found nearby in the River Thames. The Metropolitan Police service cleared an area within 700 feet of the bomb, including several residential streets, as officers worked with specialists from the Royal Navy to remove the device. Police said the German bomb was found Sunday at the George V Dock during pre-planned work at City Airport. London City, the smallest of London’s international airports, handled 4.5 million passengers last year. Cyclone hits Tonga • Tonga began cleaning up Tuesday after a cyclone hit overnight, while some people in the nearby Pacific nation of Fiji began preparing for the storm to hit them. Cyclone Gita destroyed homes and churches in Tonga and caused widespread power outages after it tore through the island nation just south of the capital, Nuku’alofa. There were no immediate reports of serious injuries or deaths. The cyclone was packing winds of over 124 miles per hour when it made landfall. The nation has declared a state of emergency. The cyclone was continuing to intensify and was predicted to hit some southern Fiji islands Tuesday night. Experts predict the cyclone would miss Fiji’s major population centers, including the capital, Suva. Oxfam leader resigns • Oxfam’s deputy chief executive resigned Monday, saying she took “full responsibility” for failing to act immediately in the sexual misconduct scandal involving charity’s workers in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. Penny Lawrence, Oxfam program director at the time, said she was “ashamed that this happened on my watch.” At an emergency meeting Monday with British government officials, Oxfam’s leaders “also made a full and unqualified apology” and spoke of a “deep sense of disgrace and shame,” said British Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt. It’s unclear whether the resignation and the apology will quell the scandal, which emerged when the Times of London reported last week that seven former Oxfam staff members who worked in Haiti faced misconduct allegations that included using prostitutes and downloading pornography. Oxfam says it investigated the allegations in 2011 and then fired four people and let three others resign after uncovering sexual misconduct, bullying, intimidation and failure to protect staff. From news services


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

RIDES

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

Acura

Chevrolet

Honda

Mazda

Nissan/Datsun

Chevrolet Trucks

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'06 Acura TL: One Owner, Local Trade, Power Sunroof, $6,888 #96447A

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Audi '10 Audi A6 3.0: Premium Tiptonic, Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera $11,388 #39017A

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BMW '16 BMW 328i: x-Drive, 32K, Automatic $26,990 #B8606

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Dodge

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Ford '15 Buick Verano: 25K Miles, $14,388 #40020A

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Jeep '15 Jeep Renegade Sport: One Owner Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 4WD $14,388 #78293B

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Kia '15 Kia Optima LX: $12,900 Stk# P06451 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Kia Soul: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, $9,490 #C8795B

Chevrolet '11 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, Silver Ice Metallic $8,250 #79282A

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Lexus

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Mazda

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Volvo Mitsubishi

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GMC Trucks

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Lincoln

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Pontiac

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Ford Trucks

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Mercedes Benz

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See More Rides Ads On Page B9 STLtoday.com/homes


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 02.13.2018 • B

CARDS GOING BIG ON RELIEF OPTIONS

CHRIS LEE • Post-Dispatch

Blues goaltender Jake Allen has had an up-and-down year, with many of the downs coming recently.

Outlook for Blues is good, could be amazing Many vital moves have to be made in next two years JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Alex Reyes throws off the mound Monday at the Cardinals’ spring training complex in Jupiter, Fla.

Addition of Norris also is insurance for starting rotation

Maybe the Redbirds have the right idea passing on big names

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • With a bullpen to restock and

roles to sort out, the Cardinals have, in the words of one executive, “cast a wide net” and decided to throw a bunch of different options at the late innings, including a familiar addition Monday. From quantity, they believe quality will emerge. “Can you start off the season with some questions in it? I think the answer is yes,” said John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations. “But in the end you’ve got to find an answer.” The Cardinals did some last-minute shopping Monday by agreeing to terms with pitcher Bud Norris, the former starter who flummoxed the Cardinals when he was with Houston. The one-year, $3 million deal is spiked with incentives and can become official late Tuesday once Norris passes a physical. Pitchers and catchers are required to report to the area by the end of day Tuesday, and the Cardinals expect Norris to See CARDINALS • Page B3

JUPITER, FLA. • There is a man with a packed ASSOCIATED PRESS

Veteran Bud Norris delivers a pitch for the Angels last season, when he appeared as both a starter and a reliever.

LINEUP CHANGES Tommy Pham is being penciled in at No. 2 in the batting order, a spot he says he enjoys. B3

VIDEOS FROM JUPITER Watch Monday’s spring training action. stltoday.com/watch

suitcase and nowhere to go. Inside the suitcase are 41 saves from a season ago. But Greg Holland — a name uttered in St. Louis so much, you wonder where he went to high school — still doesn’t have a destination. I myself was enamored by the past performance of Holland, the Colorado closer a year ago. Forty-one saves. But I’m learning as we all are that teams aren’t looking for the Greg Holland of this offseason … they’re looking for the Greg Holland of last offseason. And on a day news broke that the Cardinals agreed to terms with a different reliever — Bud Norris, who saved 19 games for the Angels — it’s fair to at least look into this mindset. Of course,

See HOCHMAN • Page B2

The Blues wedged peak talent under the NHL salary cap during the 2015-15 season. They went “all in” and reached the Final Four for the first time in 15 years. They are on schedule to peak again in two seasons, when several talented prospects could add skill and payroll flexibility. But while fans get excited about what’s to come, Blues management must decide who will stay. Which players will remain past the NHL’s Feb. 26 trade deadline? Who will last beyond this summer, when several Blues become restricted See GORDON • Page B5 > 7 p.m. Tuesday at Predators, FSM > Inside • Sanford is close to returning to action. B5

Younger Porter is emerging at Mizzou

PY EONGCH A NG 2018

Kim wins halfpipe gold medal for U.S. 17-year-old from California dominates the competition

CHRIS LEE • P-D

Jontay Porter has averaged 13.5 points the last four games while shooting 52.9 percent.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA • Gold medal

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

already in hand and Olympic dream fully realized, Chloe Kim could have turned her third and final run in the women’s snowboarding final into a victory lap. Only she didn’t. She couldn’t. Gold medals are nice. But to the 17-year-old star, the journey is the point, not the destination. It’s about proving something. Not to quiet whatever doubters might remain in a sport in which she’s stamping herself as an all-time great as a teenager, but to herself. So she went for it. “I knew that if I went home with a gold medal knowing I could do better, I wasn’t going to be satisfied,” Kim said. That shouldn’t be a problem. Kim turned her coronation into an exclamation point, stomping a pair of 1080 spins (three complete turns), then practically diving into a hug with American teammate and bronze medal winner Arielle Gold to seal a moment

See OLYMPICS • Page B4 > Olympics • American speedskaters are struggling . B4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chloe Kim of the United States leaps on her snowboard during the women’s Olympics halfpipe finals Tuesday in Pyeongchang, South Korea, en route to winning the gold medal.

COLUMBIA, MO. • Michael Porter Jr. stood at midcourt and watched his Missouri teammates cruise through pregame shooting drills at Alabama on Jan. 31. Still nursing his surgically repaired lower back, Porter made eye contact with his younger brother, nodded his head and circled his index fingers around each other, the unofficial hand gesture for, “Pick up the pace, little brother!” Mizzou’s healthy Porter had stalled in recent weeks, suffering through the worst three-game stretch of his otherwise promising freshman season. In losses to Texas See MIZZOU • Page B7

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 2/13 at Predators 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/16 at Stars 7:30 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/23 vs. Jets 7 p.m. FSM

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 2/17 at Richmond 5 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

Wednesday 2/28 at Duquesne 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 2/13 vs. Texas A&M 6 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/17 at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/24 at Kentucky 7:15 p.m. ESPN

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 2/14 at Indiana 7:30 p.m. BTN

Sunday 2/18 vs. Nebraska 2:30 p.m. BTN

Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN

Thursday 2/22 vs. Purdue 6 p.m. Fox Sports 1

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STL FC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Georgetown at Butler, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Texas A&M, ESPNU, KTRS (550 AM) College: Maryland at Nebraska, BTN 6 p.m. 6 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Texas Tech, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Kansas at Iowa State, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Arkansas at Mississippi, SEC Network College: Boston College at Pittsburgh, ESPNews 6 p.m. 7 p.m. College: Bemidji State at Creighton, FS2 7 p.m. NBA: Cavaliers at Thunder, TNT 7 p.m. College women: Baylor at Oklahoma State, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. College: Richmond at Rhode Island, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Virginia at Miami, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Michigan State at Minnesota, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Louisiana State at Alabama, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Northwestern at Rutgers, BTN College: South Carolina at Tennessee, ESPNU 8 p.m. 8 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Texas Tech, ESPNews 9:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Nuggets, TNT HOCKEY Blues at Predators, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. MISCELLANEOUS Westminster Kennel Club dog show, final night, FS1 7 p.m. OLYMPICS • See listings on page B4 SOCCER 10:50 a.m. UEFA Europe League: FK Crvena zvezda vs. CSKA Moscow, FS2 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Juventus vs. Tottenham Hotspur, FS1 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: FC Basel vs. Manchester City, FS2

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Arbitration hearings are booming ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto’s Marcus Stroman and Tampa Bay’s Jake Odorizzi went to hearings to begin the final week of what could be the busiest salary arbitration season since 1990. Stroman asked for a raise from $3.4 million to $6.9 million on Monday in a hearing before arbitrators Edna Francis, Elizabeth Neumeier and Gary Kendellan. The Blue Jays argued he should be paid $6.5 million. Odorizzi requested a hike from $4.1 million to $6.3 million instead of the Rays’ $6.05 million offer in a case heard by Dennis Archer, Phillip LaPorte and Matt Goldberg. Players lead 7-6 with decisions pending until late this week for Stroman, Odorizzi and Cleveland pitcher Trevor Bauer. Seven more hearings are scheduled, and 23 decisions would be the most since players won 14 of 24 cases in 1990. A 26-year-old righthander, Stroman went 13-9 with a 3.09 ERA in 2017. He struck out 164, two shy of his career high, and walked a career-worst 62 in 201 innings. Odorizzi, a righthander from Highland who turns 28 next month, was 10-8 with a 4.14 ERA in 28 starts last year. He struck out 127, his lowest total in four full major league seasons, and walked a career-high 61. Stroman is eligible for free agency after the 2020 season.

Odorizzi is eligible after the 2019 season and could be dealt by the low-payroll Rays. Closer Roberto Osuna lost to the Blue Jays and will get $5.3 million instead of his $3.8 million request. Infielder Adeiny Hechavarria beat the Rays in arbitration and will get $5.9 million instead of the team’s $5.3 million offer. Blue Jays will retire Halladay’s No. 32 • Roy Halladay’s No. 32 will be retired by the Toronto Blue Jays before their opener against the New York Yankees on March 29. Halladay died at age 40 on Nov. 7 when the plane he was piloting crashed into the Gulf of Mexico. Toronto will wear a No. 32 patch on its uniforms this season. Roberto Alomar’s No. 12 is the only other player whose number was retired by the Blue Jays. Halladay spent 12 of his 16 big league seasons with Toronto and went 148-75 for the Blue Jays with six All-Star selections. He won the 2003 AL Cy Young Award after winning a club-record 22 games. Halladay spent his last four seasons with Philadelphia, including the Game 5 pitching duel against the Cardinals’ Chris Carpenter during the 2011 National League Division Series. Nationals pay cash for Reynolds • The Washington Nationals have acquired utility player Matt Reynolds from the New York Mets in exchange for cash.

Cardinals pitchers Michael Wacha (left) and Alex Reyes greet each other Monday as the team gathers for spring training,

Border collie shines at Westminster dog show

A border collie finished off a Slick night at Westminster. Alert and agile, Slick won the herding group title Monday night at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show and earned a place in the best in show ring. This is the third straight year Slick has earned a ribbon at this event, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Next, Slick and handler Jamie Clute will try for the biggest prize in American dogdom when the “best in show” winner is crowned Tuesday night. “He’s a once-in-a-lifetime dog,” Clute said, adding he’s also playful. “He’s a blast. He bites my feet and licks my ears.” Other winners Monday were Biggie, a pug in the toy group; Lucy, a borzoi in the hound group and Flynn, a bichon frise in the nonsporting group. On Tuesday, winners will be selected in the sporting, working and terrier groups before the “best in show” champion is chosen from the seven group champions.

U.S. soccer team to face Paraguay • The United States men’s national soccer team will host Paraguay in an exhibition on March 27 in Cary, N.C. The U.S. Soccer Federation also confirmed exhibitions against Ireland in Dublin on June 2 and versus France at Lyon on June 9. Bruce Arena quit as coach in October after the Americans failed to qualify for the World Cup, ending a streak of seven straight appearances in soccer’s showcase. The U.S. has played a pair of matches under interim coach Dave Sarachan, tying 1-1 at Portugal in November and 0-0 at home against Bosnia-Herzegovina last month. Oden wants to play again • Greg Oden, the top pick in the 2007 NBA draft pick, plans to attempt a comeback this summer in the Big3. The 3-on-3 league announced that he will be part of this year’s draft pool and take part in the draft combine. Oden was picked first in ’07 by Portland, which selected him over Kevin Durant. But the 7-footer battled injuries throughout his career and played in just 105 games, averaging 8.0 points. Folks hired as AD at Maryville • Lonnie Folks, a St. Louis native and 1982 Maryville graduate, has been named the director of athletics and recreation at Maryville University. Folks rose through the ranks at the school to become assistant director of athletics and coach for women’s soccer and softball, winning four conference titles and two conference tournament titles. He also served as the women’s basketball coach and sports information director. He went on to Stockton University, where he has worked since 1999 as director of athletic operations, director of athletics and recreation and director for student affairs operations. From news services

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Contracts • Free agent Ryan Hanigan has agreed to a minor league contract with the Cleveland Indians, a deal contingent on the catcher passing a physical. The 37-year-old played 33 games last season for the Colorado Rockies, batting .267 with two homers and 12 RBIs. Hanigan has also played for Boston, Tampa Bay and Cincinnati during an 11-year major league career. ... Infielder Trevor Plouffe has agreed to a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers and will report to spring training. He would get a $1.75 million, one-year contract if added to the 40-man roster under the deal announced Monday. Plouffe hit .198 with nine homers and 19 RBIs in 100 games for Oakland and Tampa Bay, which acquired him June 17. The 31-year-old was selected by Minnesota with the 20th overall pick in the 2004 amateur draft and played for the Twins from 2010-16. He has a .242 batting average with 105 homers and 376 RBIs in eight major league seasons.

LONG TIME, NO SEE?

DIGEST

150th British Open to be played at St. Andrews • The British Open is returning to St. Andrews, the home of golf in 2021. The Old Course will host the 150th anniversary of the world’s oldest major tournament to mark “a true celebration of golf’s original championship and its historic ties to St. Andrews,” the R&A said Monday. It will be the 30th time the Open Championship is played on the Old Course, and the first since 2015 when Zach Johnson lifted the claret jug after a three-way playoff. It ends the cycle of St. Andrews staging the Open every five years since 1990. It first hosted the event in 1873, when an 18-hole course was used in the championship for the first time. Tom Kidd won that year.

The 27-year-old Reynolds made his major league debut with the Mets in 2016. He hit .230 with one homer and five RBIs in 68 games last season. Reynolds can play all four infield positions and both corner outfield spots. The Oklahoma native was selected in the second round of the 2012 draft out of the University of Arkansas.

DAVID CARSON P-D

MORE ONLINE Find more Cardinals photos and videos from spring training. stltoday.com

Lengthy deals to get closers can backfire HOCHMAN • FROM B1

Norris also provides the Cards with fill-in starter potential, a valuable resource. But the Cards would hope that Norris logs a lot of games out of the pen this year, because that means their planned starters actually started. OK, so a winter ago, Holland was coming off Tommy John surgery. Mark Melancon? Now this was the big-money closer on the market, because he had 47 saves in his suitcase from 2016. Teams vetted Holland’s arm. And the Rockies’ deep dive into Holland’s numbers, along with assurance from scouts and their pitching coach, led Colorado to take the $7 million, one-year gamble. It paid off as Holland indeed saved the 41 games for the Rockies, who made the playoffs. His production was worth the payout. But now he seeks a multi-year deal. But who’s to say he won’t end up like … Melancon? The Giants signed Melancon to the the big money — a four-year, $62 million contract — and he had a 4.50 earned run average with 11 saves in 32 games. The point is, many teams are trying to find the reliever who can outperform their salary. They’re trying to find savvy gambles like the Rockies did a season ago with Holland. Because while Holland had a good year in 2017, there are some red flags for future years. For in-

stance, last year he had uneven production, with pockets of poor pitching. And he’s 32 years old, certainly not elderly, but a threeyear contract does seem daunting. He’ll end up somewhere. And he’ll save some games, sure. But 41 saves just sitting there, on the free agent market, is eye-catching. It reminds me of last year, when 47 homers were just sitting there. It was stupefying to some — he hit the most homers in all of baseball, but at one point, an online headline read: “Mark Trumbo is still a free agent for some reason.” Incidentally, that was written on Jan. 13 a year ago. Imagine if I’d told you then that numerous sluggers would still be free agents in 2018 on Feb. 13? Yet, JD Martinez, Eric Hosmer, Logan Morrison and Mike Moustakas are currently unemployed. But back to Trumbo, it seemed bonkers that 47 homers went unclaimed. He finally resigned with Baltimore to a threeyear deal. But the stats on the back of baseball cards are just that – a small sampling of the stats and research used to calculate estimations of future performance. And so, Greg Holland is not a Cardinal and probably will not be a Cardinal. The Birds on the Bat will try to miss bats with what our paper’s Derrick Goold called “musical chairs.” Ultimately, the team will be left with one person who has proved he is the closer. But there will be a lot of rounds around the chairs to get there. Luke Gregerson, Norris, perhaps Dominic Leone and maybe others will take a spin. In a world where so many fans want a Holland, this isn’t music to their ears.

And while the Cards will be feeling out their new bullpen pitchers, their coaches with be feeling out how they’ll use them. Not just who they’ll use, but how they decide who they’ll use. The Cards signed pitching coach extraordinaire Mike Maddux to help find the Cy in young Carlos Martinez but also help Mike Matheny manage the bullpen. The manager and his coach will use spring training to figure out how decisions will be made. That’s a lot of feeling out to happen in March games. It could very well spill into April. As for using different players, that’s the beauty of a team with depth in its system. It’s not what everyone wants to hear. Some fans just want the Cards to buy Holland and then refuse to ever have buyer’s remorse. But there is a case to be made for bolstering the bullpen with intriguing omens – Norris’ games with the Angels before injury, Gregerson’s strikeout rate, Leone’s WHIP (walks and hits per innings pitched) – while acknowledging the firepower that awaits in Springfield. Or Memphis. All this developing pitching the Cardinals have in the system. It might not be part of the bullpen in the spring, but it will be by the fall. The question is, will the Cards be in it by the fall? “You have to have a roster where all 25 guys contribute,” Cardinals outfielder Tommy Pham said Monday. “You see these teams that are in the playoffs, that are winning now, you saw the Dodgers, the Cubs. That team depth is very important.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Tuesday 2/13 at Predators 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/16 at Stars 7:30 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Sharks 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/23 vs. Jets 7 p.m. FSM

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 2/17 at Richmond 5 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

Wednesday 2/28 at Duquesne 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Tuesday 2/13 vs. Texas A&M 6 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/17 at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/24 at Kentucky 7:15 p.m. ESPN

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 2/14 at Indiana 7:30 p.m. BTN

Sunday 2/18 vs. Nebraska 2:30 p.m. BTN

Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN

Thursday 2/22 vs. Purdue 6 p.m. Fox Sports 1

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STL FC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Georgetown at Butler, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Texas A&M, ESPNU, KTRS (550 AM) College: Maryland at Nebraska, BTN 6 p.m. 6 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Texas Tech, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Kansas at Iowa State, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Arkansas at Mississippi, SEC Network College: Boston College at Pittsburgh, ESPNews 6 p.m. 7 p.m. College: Bemidji State at Creighton, FS2 7 p.m. NBA: Cavaliers at Thunder, TNT 7 p.m. College women: Baylor at Oklahoma State, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. College: Richmond at Rhode Island, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Virginia at Miami, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Michigan State at Minnesota, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Louisiana State at Alabama, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Northwestern at Rutgers, BTN College: South Carolina at Tennessee, ESPNU 8 p.m. 8 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Texas Tech, ESPNews 9:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Nuggets, TNT HOCKEY Blues at Predators, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. MISCELLANEOUS Westminster Kennel Club dog show, final night, FS1 7 p.m. OLYMPICS • See listings on page B4 SOCCER 10:50 a.m. UEFA Europe League: FK Crvena zvezda vs. CSKA Moscow, FS2 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Juventus vs. Tottenham Hotspur, FS1 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: FC Basel vs. Manchester City, FS2

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Arbitration hearings are booming ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto’s Marcus Stroman and Tampa Bay’s Jake Odorizzi went to hearings to begin the final week of what could be the busiest salary arbitration season since 1990. Stroman asked for a raise from $3.4 million to $6.9 million on Monday in a hearing before arbitrators Edna Francis, Elizabeth Neumeier and Gary Kendellan. The Blue Jays argued he should be paid $6.5 million. Odorizzi requested a hike from $4.1 million to $6.3 million instead of the Rays’ $6.05 million offer in a case heard by Dennis Archer, Phillip LaPorte and Matt Goldberg. Players lead 7-6 with decisions pending until late this week for Stroman, Odorizzi and Cleveland pitcher Trevor Bauer. Seven more hearings are scheduled, and 23 decisions would be the most since players won 14 of 24 cases in 1990. A 26-year-old righthander, Stroman went 13-9 with a 3.09 ERA in 2017. He struck out 164, two shy of his career high, and walked a career-worst 62 in 201 innings. Odorizzi, a righthander from Highland who turns 28 next month, was 10-8 with a 4.14 ERA in 28 starts last year. He struck out 127, his lowest total in four full major league seasons, and walked a career-high 61. Stroman is eligible for free agency after the 2020 season.

Odorizzi is eligible after the 2019 season and could be dealt by the low-payroll Rays. Closer Roberto Osuna lost to the Blue Jays and will get $5.3 million instead of his $3.8 million request. Infielder Adeiny Hechavarria beat the Rays in arbitration and will get $5.9 million instead of the team’s $5.3 million offer. Blue Jays will retire Halladay’s No. 32 • Roy Halladay’s No. 32 will be retired by the Toronto Blue Jays before their opener against the New York Yankees on March 29. Halladay died at age 40 on Nov. 7 when the plane he was piloting crashed into the Gulf of Mexico. Toronto will wear a No. 32 patch on its uniforms this season. Roberto Alomar’s No. 12 is the only other player whose number was retired by the Blue Jays. Halladay spent 12 of his 16 big league seasons with Toronto and went 148-75 for the Blue Jays with six All-Star selections. He won the 2003 AL Cy Young Award after winning a club-record 22 games. Halladay spent his last four seasons with Philadelphia, including the Game 5 pitching duel against the Cardinals’ Chris Carpenter during the 2011 National League Division Series. Nationals pay cash for Reynolds • The Washington Nationals have acquired utility player Matt Reynolds from the New York Mets in exchange for cash.

Cardinals pitchers Michael Wacha (left) and Alex Reyes greet each other Monday as the team gathers for spring training,

Border collie shines at Westminster dog show

A border collie finished off a Slick night at Westminster. Alert and agile, Slick won the herding group title Monday night at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show and earned a place in the best in show ring. This is the third straight year Slick has earned a ribbon at this event, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Next, Slick and handler Jamie Clute will try for the biggest prize in American dogdom when the “best in show” winner is crowned Tuesday night. “He’s a once-in-a-lifetime dog,” Clute said, adding he’s also playful. “He’s a blast. He bites my feet and licks my ears.” Other winners Monday were Biggie, a pug in the toy group; Lucy, a borzoi in the hound group and Flynn, a bichon frise in the nonsporting group. On Tuesday, winners will be selected in the sporting, working and terrier groups before the “best in show” champion is chosen from the seven group champions.

U.S. soccer team to face Paraguay • The United States men’s national soccer team will host Paraguay in an exhibition on March 27 in Cary, N.C. The U.S. Soccer Federation also confirmed exhibitions against Ireland in Dublin on June 2 and versus France at Lyon on June 9. Bruce Arena quit as coach in October after the Americans failed to qualify for the World Cup, ending a streak of seven straight appearances in soccer’s showcase. The U.S. has played a pair of matches under interim coach Dave Sarachan, tying 1-1 at Portugal in November and 0-0 at home against Bosnia-Herzegovina last month. Oden wants to play again • Greg Oden, the top pick in the 2007 NBA draft pick, plans to attempt a comeback this summer in the Big3. The 3-on-3 league announced that he will be part of this year’s draft pool and take part in the draft combine. Oden was picked first in ’07 by Portland, which selected him over Kevin Durant. But the 7-footer battled injuries throughout his career and played in just 105 games, averaging 8.0 points. Folks hired as AD at Maryville • Lonnie Folks, a St. Louis native and 1982 Maryville graduate, has been named the director of athletics and recreation at Maryville University. Folks rose through the ranks at the school to become assistant director of athletics and coach for women’s soccer and softball, winning four conference titles and two conference tournament titles. He also served as the women’s basketball coach and sports information director. He went on to Stockton University, where he has worked since 1999 as director of athletic operations, director of athletics and recreation and director for student affairs operations. From news services

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Contracts • Free agent Ryan Hanigan has agreed to a minor league contract with the Cleveland Indians, a deal contingent on the catcher passing a physical. The 37-year-old played 33 games last season for the Colorado Rockies, batting .267 with two homers and 12 RBIs. Hanigan has also played for Boston, Tampa Bay and Cincinnati during an 11-year major league career. ... Infielder Trevor Plouffe has agreed to a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers and will report to spring training. He would get a $1.75 million, one-year contract if added to the 40-man roster under the deal announced Monday. Plouffe hit .198 with nine homers and 19 RBIs in 100 games for Oakland and Tampa Bay, which acquired him June 17. The 31-year-old was selected by Minnesota with the 20th overall pick in the 2004 amateur draft and played for the Twins from 2010-16. He has a .242 batting average with 105 homers and 376 RBIs in eight major league seasons.

LONG TIME, NO SEE?

DIGEST

150th British Open to be played at St. Andrews • The British Open is returning to St. Andrews, the home of golf in 2021. The Old Course will host the 150th anniversary of the world’s oldest major tournament to mark “a true celebration of golf’s original championship and its historic ties to St. Andrews,” the R&A said Monday. It will be the 30th time the Open Championship is played on the Old Course, and the first since 2015 when Zach Johnson lifted the claret jug after a three-way playoff. It ends the cycle of St. Andrews staging the Open every five years since 1990. It first hosted the event in 1873, when an 18-hole course was used in the championship for the first time. Tom Kidd won that year.

The 27-year-old Reynolds made his major league debut with the Mets in 2016. He hit .230 with one homer and five RBIs in 68 games last season. Reynolds can play all four infield positions and both corner outfield spots. The Oklahoma native was selected in the second round of the 2012 draft out of the University of Arkansas.

DAVID CARSON P-D

MORE ONLINE Find more Cardinals photos and videos from spring training. stltoday.com

Lengthy deals to get closers can backfire HOCHMAN • FROM B1

Norris also provides the Cards with fill-in starter potential, a valuable resource. But the Cards would hope that Norris logs a lot of games out of the pen this year, because that means their planned starters actually started. OK, so a winter ago, Holland was coming off Tommy John surgery. Mark Melancon? Now this was the big-money closer on the market, because he had 47 saves in his suitcase from 2016. Teams vetted Holland’s arm. And the Rockies’ deep dive into Holland’s numbers, along with assurance from scouts and their pitching coach, led Colorado to take the $7 million, one-year gamble. It paid off as Holland indeed saved the 41 games for the Rockies, who made the playoffs. His production was worth the payout. But now he seeks a multi-year deal. But who’s to say he won’t end up like … Melancon? The Giants signed Melancon to the the big money — a four-year, $62 million contract — and he had a 4.50 earned run average with 11 saves in 32 games. The point is, many teams are trying to find the reliever who can outperform their salary. They’re trying to find savvy gambles like the Rockies did a season ago with Holland. Because while Holland had a good year in 2017, there are some red flags for future years. For in-

stance, last year he had uneven production, with pockets of poor pitching. And he’s 32 years old, certainly not elderly, but a threeyear contract does seem daunting. He’ll end up somewhere. And he’ll save some games, sure. But 41 saves just sitting there, on the free agent market, is eye-catching. It reminds me of last year, when 47 homers were just sitting there. It was stupefying to some — he hit the most homers in all of baseball, but at one point, an online headline read: “Mark Trumbo is still a free agent for some reason.” Incidentally, that was written on Jan. 13 a year ago. Imagine if I’d told you then that numerous sluggers would still be free agents in 2018 on Feb. 13? Yet, JD Martinez, Eric Hosmer, Logan Morrison and Mike Moustakas are currently unemployed. But back to Trumbo, it seemed bonkers that 47 homers went unclaimed. He finally resigned with Baltimore to a threeyear deal. But the stats on the back of baseball cards are just that – a small sampling of the stats and research used to calculate estimations of future performance. And so, Greg Holland is not a Cardinal and probably will not be a Cardinal. The Birds on the Bat will try to miss bats with what our paper’s Derrick Goold called “musical chairs.” Ultimately, the team will be left with one person who has proved he is the closer. But there will be a lot of rounds around the chairs to get there. Luke Gregerson, Norris, perhaps Dominic Leone and maybe others will take a spin. In a world where so many fans want a Holland, this isn’t music to their ears.

And while the Cards will be feeling out their new bullpen pitchers, their coaches with be feeling out how they’ll use them. Not just who they’ll use, but how they decide who they’ll use. The Cards signed pitching coach extraordinaire Mike Maddux to help find the Cy in young Carlos Martinez but also help Mike Matheny manage the bullpen. The manager and his coach will use spring training to figure out how decisions will be made. That’s a lot of feeling out to happen in March games. It could very well spill into April. As for using different players, that’s the beauty of a team with depth in its system. It’s not what everyone wants to hear. Some fans just want the Cards to buy Holland and then refuse to ever have buyer’s remorse. But there is a case to be made for bolstering the bullpen with intriguing omens – Norris’ games with the Angels before injury, Gregerson’s strikeout rate, Leone’s WHIP (walks and hits per innings pitched) – while acknowledging the firepower that awaits in Springfield. Or Memphis. All this developing pitching the Cardinals have in the system. It might not be part of the bullpen in the spring, but it will be by the fall. The question is, will the Cards be in it by the fall? “You have to have a roster where all 25 guys contribute,” Cardinals outfielder Tommy Pham said Monday. “You see these teams that are in the playoffs, that are winning now, you saw the Dodgers, the Cubs. That team depth is very important.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Pham says he enjoys No. 2 spot in order BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • When manager Mike Matheny was outlining the batting order probabilities for his top four hitters Monday, he spoke of Dexter Fowler hitting first, Matt Carpenter third and Marcell Ozuna fourth, where he had batted most often for the Miami Marlins last year. That leaves Tommy Pham hitting second, which he did much of last season for the Cardinas. “I like hitting second,” said Pham, who checked in at the Cardinals’ complex before returning to Miami, where he will continue workouts until Sunday, when he’ll return for the official start of camp for position players next week. “It’s a fun spot. You can make a lot of things happen.” What the 29-year-old Pham made happen last year was that he hit .313, slugged .520 and had an on-base percentage of .420 while hitting second. For the most part then, he was hitting behind Carpenter, who is not a threat to run. Fowler is a threat to steal, but Pham said he not only wouldn’t be bothered by that possibility, he would welcome it. “I’m all for that,” said Pham, who started games batting in every spot of the batting order except ninth last year. “I’d take strikes to let guys run. I’ve taken a lot of strikes. “I wouldn’t say every time but if I don’t have a strike and I see a guy run and he has a good jump, I probably will let him take the bag. If I didn’t, I’d be a hypocrite because I want to run, too.” Continuing, Pham said, “You don’t want to be down two strikes but 0-1 is not so bad. At times, you take a first pitch right down the middle that you feel like you can drive. But I’d rather have the guy at second than first because he’s 90 feet closer to scoring.” Pham said he wasn’t going to be the old-school No. 2 hitter, who would give himself up with a right-side ground ball to move a runner from second to third. “I think the game has kind of evolved where giving up yourself like that doesn’t really favor you. That’s what the statistics show,” said Pham.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitching coach Mike Maddux (second from right) listens as manager Mike Matheny talks during a strategy and positioning discussion Monday in Jupiter, Fla.

“The only time I might give myself up is if he’s at second and I might try to drag bunt. That’s a little different. I could try get a hit out of it. If I don’t succeed, at the very least, I could move him over.” If Fowler and Pham both are on base, Pham said, “it’s beneficial to Carp because teams can’t shift (defensively) for him. So it’ll be very important for Dex and I to get on base.” Pham came to Jupiter to be checked by the training staff, which he said wanted to see what kind of shape he was in. Pham said he passed muster and he looks ahead to his first full season as a regular. “Last year was just the beginning,” Pham said. “I think I can do a lot more. I know I can.” Matheny, discussing his lineup potentials, said he wanted to maintain flexibility but he said, “We have some of our best opportunity if we get Dex locked into that first spot. That does free up Carp to be possibly in that third (spot). Tommy did a great job at second. And then Ozuna’s done a great job filling that role in the fourth spot.” Against righthanded pitching, that would give the Cardinals a left-rightleft-right combination for their top four. “That’s a pretty good group of guys that

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somebody’s going to have to look at the first time through the order,” Matheny said.

MOZELIAK TRUMPETS VALERA

John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations, added a wrinkle Monday to the projection of who would constitute the Cardinals’ bench when he threw out the name of infielder Breyvic Valera. Speaking to Post-Dispatch reporters after the club’s unofficial workout, Mozeliak spoke highly of the versatility of Valera, who, as a switch-hitter, also adds a lefthanded element to the bench. Valera got only one start late last season for the Cardinals after being summoned from Memphis. But he has rare value in these days of stratospheric strikeout totals in that he has walked more times (260) than he has struck out (236) in his eightseason minor league career, excluding one walk and no strikeouts in 10 at-bats with the Cardinals last year. The 26-year-old Venezuelan had just one hit for the Cardinals but he batted .314 at Memphis after hitting .341 there the year before. His lifetime average in the minors is .303 and last year he started games at second base, third base, left field and right field.

Norris provides option in bullpen and the rotation CARDINALS • FROM B1

join the team Wednesday, the first official day of spring training workouts for pitchers and catchers. Norris, who turns 33 in March, will be given a chance to start should the Cardinals decide any of the young pitchers counted on need more seasoning in the minors. But he arrives with the most saves in 2017 of any current Cardinals pitcher, and if he’s not needed in the rotation the Cardinals are eager to see how his reinvention as a reliever could solve one of their biggest unknowns at the start of spring training. The Cardinals expect Luke Gregerson to open the year at closer, and all around him they have added relievers like Dominic Leone and now Norris to combine with Tyler Lyons, Brett Cecil, John Brebbia, Matt Bowman and others to sort out the late innings. Rookie Alex Reyes, who had a 40-pitch bullpen session Monday, leads a wave of youth that the Cardinals will also test this spring to see if — and when — they can bolster the bullpen. It’s not quite closer by committee, but from a committee the Cardinals seek a closer. “I think you have to have some definition of roles,” Mozeliak said. “I think having some flexibility in those roles is OK. My experience is guys kind of want to know what they’re supposed to be doing. Closer by committee hasn’t seemed to be a great model, in terms of true success.” A starter in his 20s, Norris has bounced between the bullpen and rotation the past three seasons, just as he bounced from team to team. A year ago, with the Los Angeles Angels, he went five for five in save opportunities in April. Before a knee injury sidelined him in June, Norris had finished 23 games, saved 11 of them, and struck out 42 batters in 33 1/3 innings. He took a 2.43 ERA and a .197 batting average against into his stint on the disabled list. He finished the year with 19 saves and a 4.70 ERA as a reliever. Of interest to the Cardinals as an indicator of the role he could play for them, Norris struck out 11.2 batters per nine innings. It’s similar success missing bats that has the Cardinals intrigued by Lyons in a high-leverage role and open to Reyes debuting this year as a reliever. Reyes, 23, continued his steady return from elbow surgery with two sets of 20 pitches off the mound. He has yet to throw at full strength with his fastball. He has not thrown a curveball or a changeup off the mound. At this point, the medical team, not the coaching staff, is scripting

In discussing bench options, Mozeliak said, “The one I wouldn’t lose sight of is Breyvic, from an offensive standpoint. He is a switch hitter. He really can play anywhere. ... If you’re looking at a 25th man ... if there’s a lefthanded bat, what could it be? Well, the one guy internally I feel like we overlook is Breyvic.” With Jose Martinez as a fourth outfielder and backup first baseman pretty much in place and Valera a possibility off the bench, youngsters Harrison Bader and Tyler O’Neill might be jousting for one job as reserve outfielders. “Both are very good defensively. Both can play all three (outfield spots). Both are righthanded,” said Mozeliak. “My concern is with one of the younger guys not getting a lot of playing time, like Bader and O’Neill. If they are on the bigleague club and just not getting a lot of opportunity, you could see the flip-flop.” That would mean the Interstate 55 journey between Memphis and St. Louis if one is stagnating in the majors. “My philosophy is that young players should be playing,” said Mozeliak. “And these guys are both young players.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

his work. His next test will be throwing three sets of 15 pitches in a setting similar to Monday’s. A year removed from elbow reconstruction, Reyes is on a deliberately slowed throwing program with an eye on having him ready for May. His role, the team has said, is to be determined. “It is early, but we start fast,” manager Mike Matheny said. “He’s going to be on a program that is suited to how his body is responding. We’ve made it very clear that we’re going to be careful with him. I think there is going to be a tendency when you have a guy with his kind of ability that you want to try and fast-forward what you need (for) the team right now. But it’s going to stay on track for what’s best for him, and when he’s ready and when they tell us he’s ready.” As a young starter for the Astros, Norris bedeviled the Cardinals, causing them more trouble than some of the game’s elite pitchers did. He won his first four starts against the Cardinals, and Houston won five of his first six vs. the former division rivals. In his career, he was 8-7 with a 3.44 ERA in 19 games (16 starts). Mozeliak said a goal for the Cardinals was to add some insurance for the rotation if one of the planned starters was hurt or, in the team’s evaluation, not ready to start in the majors. Norris drew criticism two years ago for his comments to USA Today about baseball being “America’s game (and) if you’re going to come into our country and make our American dollars, you need to respect a game that has been here for over a hundred years.” His comments were viewed as culturally insensitive, and he apologized the day after they were printed. He told Post-Dispatch sports writer Jesus Ortiz on Monday that he had grown in recent years and he was “super-excited to go out and play meaningful baseball every night.” The Cardinals considered any issues in the past. It is previous seasons where the Cardinals are drawing evidence of their approach this season with the late innings. In many of their most successful seasons, the Cardinals reworked the bullpen on the go with an infusion of youth. From Adam Wainwright and Josh Kinney in 2006 to Carlos Martinez, Kevin Siegrist, and closer Trevor Rosenthal in 2013, the jolt helped. Now it’s a strategy. As Reyes readies and Norris arrives, there will be musical chairs, relievers vying for roles – until spring stops. “Well, I would like to think that we’re a little deeper than that,” Mozeliak said. “Picking up Leone, adding Gregerson, and all of sudden with the preexisting guys, it’s going to be a competitive camp, especially when you start thinking about that 12th or 13th spot.” Or, they hope, the ninth inning. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


PY EONGCH A NG 2018

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAY • 02.13.2018

HIGHLIGHTS DUTCH AREN’T SLOWING DOWN IN SPEEDSKATING BLITZ

TRAILBLAZING BINEY WILL GO FOR GOLD IN 500 SPEEDSKATE

HAMLIN SHOOTING FOR SECOND MEDAL IN SINGLES LUGE

Ireen Wust won gold in the 1,500 meters Monday, a record 10th Olympic speedskating medal. Two days after falling 0.08 seconds short of winning 3,000 gold, Wust’s reaction was “Only gold is the one that counts for me.” Well, she’s won five Olympic golds. Dutch teammate Marrit Leenstra was third, giving the Netherlands six of a possible nine speedskating medals through three events.

Born in Ghana and an immigrant to the U.S. at age 5, Maame Biney is the first African-American woman to be on the U.S. speedskating team. The 18-year-old Virginian won the Olympic Trials in the 500 meters and was bronze medalist at the 2017 World Junior Championships. She races in the finals at 6 a.m. Tuesday (no TV), with replays scheduled for 11:30 a.m. (NBCSN) and 11:05 p.m. (KSDK, Ch. 5).

If you missed Erin Hamlin going for gold in the women’s luge singles early Tuesday, NBCSN will replay the event during its 8:30-11:30 a.m. slot. Hamlin, 31, won bronze in 2014, the first medal for an American woman in the event, and she claimed a gold and two silver medals at the 2017 World Championships. Pyeongchang is her last hurrah, as she recently announced her retirement.

Biney

NOTEBOOK

U.S. speedskaters are lacking podium time FROM NEWS SERVICES

Three events into the Olympic speedskating competition and the Americans remain off the podium. The latest setback came Monday when world champion Heather Bergsma finished eighth in the 1,500 meters. Brittany Bowe had the highest U.S. finish — fifth — while Mia Manganello was 22nd of 26 skaters. Their results so far recall four years ago in Sochi when the U.S. team was blanked, a stunning result for a sport that in which America has earned its most Winter Olympic medals. Bergsma’s final time of 1 minute, 56.74 seconds was well off her personal best of 1:50.85, also the current world mark she set two years ago. She finished 2.39 seconds behind gold medalist Ireen Wust of the Netherlands. Bowe has lost valuable training time since suffering a concussion in July 2016 after colliding with a teammate during practice. The recovery limited her to one World Cup event before the Olympics. “Felt great,” she said. “Best 1,500 I’ve had in a couple of years. It gives me great momentum going into my favorite race, which is the 1,000, so super happy about it.” Bowe’s time of 1:55.54 had her in first place before she dropped to third with two pairs remaining. She got bumped off the podium by two Dutch skaters and another from Japan. Bowe’s personal best is 1:51.31. Swiss go for curling gold • Switzerland’s mixed doubles curling team secured a spot in the gold medal game, against Canada, by edging their Russian opponents 7-5 in a tense semifinal match. Earlier, the Canadians beat Norway 8-4 to advance to the title match early Tuesday of an event making its Olympic debut. The bronze-medal match was played Monday night (St. Louis time) and the Russians beat Norway 8-4. Japanese skater banished • Japanese short-track speedskater Kei Saito tested positive for acetalozamide, a diuretic that is also a

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Heather Bergsma of the U.S. (right), who was eighth, appears dejected while silver medallist Miho Takagi of Japan celebrates after the women’s 1,500 meters speedskating race at the Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, on Monday. The Netherlands’ Ireen Wust won the gold medal.

masking agent which can disguise the use of other banned substances. It is the first doping case of the Games to be announced and the Court of Arbitration for Sport says Saito “accepted on a voluntary basis to be provisionally suspended and to leave the Olympic Village.” Saito did not race in any event. Fourcade shines in biathlon • Martin Fourcade of France put the biathlon world back on its normal axis by winning the men’s 12.5-kilometer pursuit. He has now won six Olympic medals, three of them gold. But it was his eighth-place finish earlier that had everybody

talking. Tim Burke, in his best individual finish in three Games, was the top American, 18th out of 60 competitors. Laura Dahlmeier got her second gold of the Games for Germany by winning the women’s 10-kilometer pursuit. She was fourth in the world coming to Korea. The top U.S. woman was Emily Dreissigacker, who was 47th of 58. Canada rolls in men’s moguls • Canada won its third consecutive gold in men’s moguls. Mikael Kingsbury was the guy atop the medal platform. Casey Andringa of the U.S. made the final group of six, but finished fifth.

Kim ‘a little overwhelmed’ with performance OLYMPICS • FROM B1

four years in the making. “I don’t really know what’s happening and I’m actually feeling a little anxious right now,” Kim said. “I’m a little overwhelmed. But this is the best outcome I could ever ask for and it’s been such a long journey. Ahhh, just going home with the gold is amazing.” So is her riding. Competing in front of her extended family, a group that included her Korean-born parents and her South Korean grandmother, and apparently on an empty stomach — she actually tweeted during the competition that she was “hangry” after failing to finish her breakfast sandwich — Kim put on a show that delivered on her considerable pre-Olympic hype. She earned a 93.75 score during her first run, one that included just one 1080, not the two that have become her trademark. No matter. The perfection-flirting third run provided a cathartic exclamation point. “I knew that I did put down a really good first run, but I was also like, ‘I can do better than that. I can one up myself,’” Kim said. She’s the only one. Liu Jiayu took the silver medal with an 89.75 to become the first Chinese snowboarder to win a medal at the Olympics. Gold, who pondered retirement last summer, overcame a dislocated shoulder suffered during training to edge teammate and threetime Olympic medalist Kelly Clark for third place. Kim’s parents were born in South Korea and moved to the United States, putting their daughter in an interesting position heading into her first

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Champion Chloe Kim reacts after one of her scores was posted Tuesday. She earned a 93.75 on the first of her three finals runs then she had a near-perfect 98.75 figure on her final attempt.

Olympics. While she understands the urge to build a narrative around her that turns her into a connective tissue of sorts between the host country and the one she calls home, it’s one she has politely sidestepped. She views herself as just a kid from Torrance, Calif., who likes music, the mall, ice cream and, oh, by the way, putting down the kind of gravityescaping, physics challenging runs that have made her a dominant force in her sport. Kim would have made the Olympic team with ease four years ago, only to have the calendar get in the way. She was 13 at the time, too young to make the trip to Russia. She entered the quadrennium between the games with the kind of expectations reserved for the Shaun Whites of the snowboarding world. She has exceeded every one.

Standing atop the hill at calm and brilliant Phoenix Snow Park — a stark contrast to the windy mess that turned the women’s slopestyle final into an ugly, borderline unsafe and crashfilled mess 24 hours earlier — Kim looked down at the crowd that included her parents, three sisters, three aunts, two cousins and her grandmother Moon Jung ae and proceeded to waste little time while turning the final into a global coming-out party. She drilled her opening set, throwing in a 1080 — basically, three twists high above the pipe — before following it with a pair of flips (or “corks”). Kim celebrated at the end, pumping her fists as “USA! USA!” chants rained down. When her score flashed, she clasped her hands atop her head and drank in the moment.

Norway wins women’s ski jumping • Maren Lundby of Norway won the gold in women’s ski jumping, which was no surprise. She won seven of the 10 World Cup events this season. Sarah Hendrickson was the top American, finishing 19th of 30 jumpers. Alpine skiing begins • Alpine skiing finally got under way under blue skies and sunshine at the wind-buffeted Games. Thomas Dressen of Germany was the first racer in the downhill portion of the men’s Alpine combined event in Jeongseon. The wind again was a factor after forcing organizers to postpone

other events earlier in the week. Gusts higher up the mountain led organizers to lower the start, cutting 20 seconds from the run. The gates were moved to let racers take a safer line cresting the jumps. The third starter, Russian Pavel Trikhichev, crashed and slid into the safety fences after a ski hooked a gate. The race was delayed and was not over at press time. Trikhichev, the only Russian athlete in the race, was able to stand but it’s not clear how badly he was hurt. A slalom leg was scheduled to be raced early Tuesday morning (St. Louis time), and the Olympic champion is the skier with the fastest combined time.

MEDALS TABLE • Through one event Tuesday Nation Norway Germany Netherlands Canada United States France Japan Sweden Czech Republic

G 2 4 3 2 3 2 0 1 0

S 4 1 2 4 1 0 1 1 1

B 3 2 2 1 2 1 2 0 1

Tot 9 7 7 7 6 3 3 2 2

Nation OA Russia Finland Austria South Korea Australia China Slovakia Italy Kazakhstan

G 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

S 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

B 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

Tot 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

MONDAY’S MEDALISTS

TV SCHEDULE

BIATHLON Men’s 12.5km Pursuit GOLD: Martin Fourcade, France SILVER: Sebastian Samuelsson, Sweden BRONZE: Benedikt Doll, Germany Women’s 10km Pursuit GOLD: Laura Dahlmeier, Germany SILVER: Anastasiya Kuzmina, Slovakia BRONZE— Anais Bescond, France

TUESDAY 4-6:10 a.m. • Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s individual sprint (NBCSN) 6-8:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: USA vs. Olympic Athletes from Russia (live, NBCSN)

FIGURE SKATING Team Event GOLD: Canada SILVER: OA Russia BRONZE: United States FREESTYLE SKIING Men’s Moguls GOLD: Mikael Kingsbury, Canada SILVER: Matt Graham, Australia BRONZE: Daichi Hara, Japan SKI JUMPING Women’s Nornal Hill GOLD: Maren Lundby, Norway SILVER: Katharina Althaus, Germany BRONZE: Sara Takanashi, Japan SNOWBOARD Women’s Slopestyle GOLD: Jamie Anderson, United States SILVER: Laurie Blouin, Canada BRONZE: Enni Rukajarvi, Finland SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1500 GOLD: Ireen Wust, Netherlands SILVER: Miho Takagi, Japan BRONZE: Marrit Leenstra, Netherlands

8:30-11:30 a.m. • Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final; Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s individual sprint final (NBCSN) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. • Short track speedskating: 500 final; Curling: mixed doubles bronze medal match (NBCSN) 2-4 p.m. • Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final; Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s sprint finals (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4-7 p.m. • Curling: mixed doubles gold medal match (CNBC) 6-9:10 p.m. • Figure skating: pairs short program (live, NBCSN) 7-10:30 p.m. • Figure skating: Pairs short program (live); Skiing: women’s slalom, first run (live); Snowboarding: men’s halfpipe final (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 9:10-11:30 p.m. • Women’s hockey: Sweden vs. Switzerland (live, NBCSN) 11:05 p.m.-12:30 a.m. • Skiing: women’s slalom final (live); Short track speedskating: women’s 500 final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 11:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) EARLY WEDNESDAY 1:30-4:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: Korea vs. Japan (live, USA) 1:30-5:30 a.m. • Speedskating: women’s 1,000 final (live); Nordic combined: men’s normal hill/10K final (live); Skeleton: women’s training (NBCSN)


PY EONGCH A NG 2018

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • TUESDAY • 02.13.2018

HIGHLIGHTS DUTCH AREN’T SLOWING DOWN IN SPEEDSKATING BLITZ

TRAILBLAZING BINEY WILL GO FOR GOLD IN 500 SPEEDSKATE

HAMLIN SHOOTING FOR SECOND MEDAL IN SINGLES LUGE

Ireen Wust won gold in the 1,500 meters Monday, a record 10th Olympic speedskating medal. Two days after falling 0.08 seconds short of winning 3,000 gold, Wust’s reaction was “Only gold is the one that counts for me.” Well, she’s won five Olympic golds. Dutch teammate Marrit Leenstra was third, giving the Netherlands six of a possible nine speedskating medals through three events.

Born in Ghana and an immigrant to the U.S. at age 5, Maame Biney is the first African-American woman to be on the U.S. speedskating team. The 18-year-old Virginian won the Olympic Trials in the 500 meters and was bronze medalist at the 2017 World Junior Championships. She races in the finals at 6 a.m. Tuesday (no TV), with replays scheduled for 11:30 a.m. (NBCSN) and 11:05 p.m. (KSDK, Ch. 5).

If you missed Erin Hamlin going for gold in the women’s luge singles early Tuesday, NBCSN will replay the event during its 8:30-11:30 a.m. slot. Hamlin, 31, won bronze in 2014, the first medal for an American woman in the event, and she claimed a gold and two silver medals at the 2017 World Championships. Pyeongchang is her last hurrah, as she recently announced her retirement.

Biney

NOTEBOOK

U.S. speedskaters are lacking podium time FROM NEWS SERVICES

Three events into the Olympic speedskating competition and the Americans remain off the podium. The latest setback came Monday when world champion Heather Bergsma finished eighth in the 1,500 meters. Brittany Bowe had the highest U.S. finish — fifth — while Mia Manganello was 22nd of 26 skaters. Their results so far recall four years ago in Sochi when the U.S. team was blanked, a stunning result for a sport that in which America has earned its most Winter Olympic medals. Bergsma’s final time of 1 minute, 56.74 seconds was well off her personal best of 1:50.85, also the current world mark she set two years ago. She finished 2.39 seconds behind gold medalist Ireen Wust of the Netherlands. Bowe has lost valuable training time since suffering a concussion in July 2016 after colliding with a teammate during practice. The recovery limited her to one World Cup event before the Olympics. “Felt great,” she said. “Best 1,500 I’ve had in a couple of years. It gives me great momentum going into my favorite race, which is the 1,000, so super happy about it.” Bowe’s time of 1:55.54 had her in first place before she dropped to third with two pairs remaining. She got bumped off the podium by two Dutch skaters and another from Japan. Bowe’s personal best is 1:51.31. Swiss go for curling gold • Switzerland’s mixed doubles curling team secured a spot in the gold medal game, against Canada, by edging their Russian opponents 7-5 in a tense semifinal match. Earlier, the Canadians beat Norway 8-4 to advance to the title match early Tuesday of an event making its Olympic debut. The bronze-medal match was played Monday night (St. Louis time) and the Russians beat Norway 8-4. Japanese skater banished • Japanese short-track speedskater Kei Saito tested positive for acetalozamide, a diuretic that is also a

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Heather Bergsma of the U.S. (right), who was eighth, appears dejected while silver medallist Miho Takagi of Japan celebrates after the women’s 1,500 meters speedskating race at the Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, on Monday. The Netherlands’ Ireen Wust won the gold medal.

masking agent that can disguise the use of other banned substances. It is the first doping case of the Games to be announced, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport says Saito “accepted on a voluntary basis to be provisionally suspended and to leave the Olympic Village.” Saito did not race in any event. Fourcade shines in biathlon • Martin Fourcade of France put the biathlon world back on its normal axis by winning the men’s 12.5-kilometer pursuit. He has now won six Olympic medals, three of them gold. But it was his eighth-place finish earlier that had everybody

talking. Tim Burke, in his best individual finish in three Games, was the top American, 18th out of 60 competitors. Laura Dahlmeier got her second gold of the Games for Germany by winning the women’s 10-kilometer pursuit. She was fourth in the world coming to Korea. The top U.S. woman was Emily Dreissigacker, who was 47th of 58. Canada rolls in men’s moguls • Canada won its third consecutive gold in men’s moguls. Mikael Kingsbury was the guy atop the medal platform. Casey Andringa of the U.S. made the final group of six, but finished fifth.

Kim ‘a little overwhelmed’ with performance OLYMPICS • FROM B1

four years in the making. “I don’t really know what’s happening and I’m actually feeling a little anxious right now,” Kim said. “I’m a little overwhelmed. But this is the best outcome I could ever ask for and it’s been such a long journey. Ahhh, just going home with the gold is amazing.” So is her riding. Competing in front of her extended family, a group that included her Korean-born parents and her South Korean grandmother, and apparently on an empty stomach — she actually tweeted during the competition that she was “hangry” after failing to finish her breakfast sandwich — Kim put on a show that delivered on her considerable pre-Olympic hype. She earned a 93.75 score during her first run, one that included just one 1080, not the two that have become her trademark. No matter. The perfection-flirting third run provided a cathartic exclamation point. “I knew that I did put down a really good first run, but I was also like, ‘I can do better than that. I can one up myself,’” Kim said. She’s the only one. Liu Jiayu took the silver medal with an 89.75 to become the first Chinese snowboarder to win a medal at the Olympics. Gold, who pondered retirement last summer, overcame a dislocated shoulder suffered during training to edge teammate and threetime Olympic medalist Kelly Clark for third place. Kim’s parents were born in South Korea and moved to the United States, putting their daughter in an interesting position heading into her first

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Champion Chloe Kim reacts after one of her scores was posted Tuesday. She earned a 93.75 on the first of her three finals runs then she had a near-perfect 98.75 figure on her final attempt.

Olympics. While she understands the urge to build a narrative around her that turns her into a connective tissue of sorts between the host country and the one she calls home, it’s one she has politely sidestepped. She views herself as just a kid from Torrance, Calif., who likes music, the mall, ice cream and, oh, by the way, putting down the kind of gravityescaping, physics challenging runs that have made her a dominant force in her sport. Kim would have made the Olympic team with ease four years ago, only to have the calendar get in the way. She was 13 at the time, too young to make the trip to Russia. She entered the quadrennium between the games with the kind of expectations reserved for the Shaun Whites of the snowboarding world. She has exceeded every one.

Standing atop the hill at calm and brilliant Phoenix Snow Park — a stark contrast to the windy mess that turned the women’s slopestyle final into an ugly, borderline unsafe and crashfilled mess 24 hours earlier — Kim looked down at the crowd that included her parents, three sisters, three aunts, two cousins and her grandmother Moon Jung ae and proceeded to waste little time while turning the final into a global coming-out party. She drilled her opening set, throwing in a 1080 — basically, three twists high above the pipe — before following it with a pair of flips (or “corks”). Kim celebrated at the end, pumping her fists as “USA! USA!” chants rained down. When her score flashed, she clasped her hands atop her head and drank in the moment.

Norway wins women’s ski jumping • Maren Lundby of Norway won the gold in women’s ski jumping, which was no surprise. She won seven of the 10 World Cup events this season. Sarah Hendrickson was the top American, finishing 19th of 30 jumpers. Alpine skiing begins • Making good use of the No. 1 starting bib before the wind whipped up, Thomas Dressen had the fastest downhill run Tuesday in the men’s Olympic combined. Gusts led organizers to lower the start, cutting 20 seconds from the run. The gates were moved to let racers take a safer

line cresting the jumps. The German skier was 0.07 seconds faster than Aksel Lund Svindal of Norway in the opening race of the Alpine program at the Pyeongchang Games. Matthias Mayer of Austria, the 2014 Olympic champion in downhill, was 0.13 behind in third on a course shortened for safety reasons. The world’s best slalom skier, Marcel Hirscher, was well placed in 12th with only 1.32 seconds to make up in the Austrian’s specialized discipline early Tuesday morning (St. Louis time). The gold medalist will be the skier with the fastest combined time in the two sessions.

MEDALS TABLE • Through one event Tuesday Nation Norway Germany Netherlands Canada United States France Japan Sweden Czech Republic

G 2 4 3 2 3 2 0 1 0

S 4 1 2 4 1 0 1 1 1

B 3 2 2 1 2 1 2 0 1

Tot 9 7 7 7 6 3 3 2 2

Nation OA Russia Finland Austria South Korea Australia China Slovakia Italy Kazakhstan

G 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

S 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

B 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

Tot 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

MONDAY’S MEDALISTS

TV SCHEDULE

BIATHLON Men’s 12.5km Pursuit GOLD: Martin Fourcade, France SILVER: Sebastian Samuelsson, Sweden BRONZE: Benedikt Doll, Germany Women’s 10km Pursuit GOLD: Laura Dahlmeier, Germany SILVER: Anastasiya Kuzmina, Slovakia BRONZE— Anais Bescond, France

TUESDAY 4-6:10 a.m. • Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s individual sprint (NBCSN) 6-8:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: USA vs. Olympic Athletes from Russia (live, NBCSN)

FIGURE SKATING Team Event GOLD: Canada SILVER: OA Russia BRONZE: United States FREESTYLE SKIING Men’s Moguls GOLD: Mikael Kingsbury, Canada SILVER: Matt Graham, Australia BRONZE: Daichi Hara, Japan SKI JUMPING Women’s Nornal Hill GOLD: Maren Lundby, Norway SILVER: Katharina Althaus, Germany BRONZE: Sara Takanashi, Japan SNOWBOARD Women’s Slopestyle GOLD: Jamie Anderson, United States SILVER: Laurie Blouin, Canada BRONZE: Enni Rukajarvi, Finland SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1500 GOLD: Ireen Wust, Netherlands SILVER: Miho Takagi, Japan BRONZE: Marrit Leenstra, Netherlands

8:30-11:30 a.m. • Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final; Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s individual sprint final (NBCSN) 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. • Short track speedskating: 500 final; Curling: mixed doubles bronze medal match (NBCSN) 2-4 p.m. • Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final; Luge: women’s singles final; Cross Country: men’s and women’s sprint finals (KSDK, Ch. 5) 4-7 p.m. • Curling: mixed doubles gold medal match (CNBC) 6-9:10 p.m. • Figure skating: pairs short program (live, NBCSN) 7-10:30 p.m. • Figure skating: Pairs short program (live); Skiing: women’s slalom, first run (live); Snowboarding: men’s halfpipe final (live, KSDK, Ch. 5) 9:10-11:30 p.m. • Women’s hockey: Sweden vs. Switzerland (live, NBCSN) 11:05 p.m.-12:30 a.m. • Skiing: women’s slalom final (live); Short track speedskating: women’s 500 final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 11:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. • Men’s curling: USA vs. South Korea (NBCSN) EARLY WEDNESDAY 1:30-4:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: Korea vs. Japan (live, USA) 1:30-5:30 a.m. • Speedskating: women’s 1,000 final (live); Nordic combined: men’s normal hill/10K final (live); Skeleton: women’s training (NBCSN)


02.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1

BLUES

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

Yeo looks for Dunn to rebound Rookie defenseman has played well except for big mistake Sunday

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Sanford is close to return for Blues Forward injured shoulder in camp, hasn’t played yet BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues defenseman Vince Dunn falls to the ice after becoming entangled with Bryan Rust of Pittsburgh during the third period Sunday.

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The last month has been a pretty good one for Blues defenseman Vince Dunn. It all traces back to the Blues’ game at Toronto on Jan. 16, when Dunn was a late addition to the lineup because Jay Bouwmeester’s arrival from St. Louis after the birth of his second child was delayed. Dunn scored in overtime that night, and from there, everything has been great. He was plus-9 over the next 12 games, and was a minus in none of them. He had three assists against Colorado on Thursday, the first time a Blues rookie had done that in a decade. With his arrival, the Blues’ first powerplay unit, an iffy proposition much of the season, has become a productive unit. He is among the top rookie defensemen in just about every category, and you would almost forget he was a rookie, playing in his second professional year, right up until that moment Sunday when he made an ill-advised cross-ice pass that was meant for defensive partner Robert Bortuzzo but instead was a breakaway goal for Bryan Rust that turned out to be the game-winner in the Blues’ 4-1 defeat. “I thought I could get it over to Borts,” Dunn said Monday. “I probably make that play nine times out 10. Obviously it didn’t work. The game happens fast. When you make mistakes like that, good teams are going to find the way to put it in the net.” “It’s something to learn from, there’s no question,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said Monday. “It’s a big part of his development, but you see players that have been in the league for 10 years make mis-

BLUES AT PREDATORS When, where • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Bridgestone Arena, Nashville TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Predators • Central Division-leading Nashville has been red-hot over the past six weeks, going 10-1-4 since early January, and is doing it with defense. Only Tampa Bay’s Andrei Vasilevskiy has more wins (33) and shutouts (seven) among NHL goalies than Pekka Rinne’s 28 and five for Nashville. The Predators lead the league in goals scored by defensemen with 40, and All-Star P.K. Subban leads all NHL defensemen with 15 goals. Subban is among five Predators with at least 15 goals, a list headed by Viktor Arvidsson and Kevin Fiala with 18 apiece. Strong on special teams, Nashville ranks fifth in powerplay efficiency (23.1 percent) and seventh in penalty-killing (82.7 percent). Jim Thomas

takes like that from time to time. The biggest thing for me with Dunner is to bounce back with a game tomorrow.” He’ll get that chance Tuesday when the Blues continue their grueling — and telling — two weeks as they move from playing the defending Stanley Cup champions to playing the defending Stanley Cup runners-up and the team with the secondmost points in the Western Conference, the Nashville Predators. (They’re also the team that eliminated the Blues from the playoffs last season and a team they’re 0-2 against this season.) “He’s been very good,” Yeo said. “He made a mistake in a

game. That happens.” Indeed, the pluses in Dunn’s game have more than made up for the minuses, and he’s been a game-changer on the power play. On Jan. 25, for the game against Colorado, the Blues moved Dunn on to the first power-play unit, along with Jaden Schwartz, Brayden Schenn, Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko. In the previous 14 games, the Blues had scored three power-play goals, and two of them came after they were down 5-0 to Arizona. In the two games starting with Colorado, the Blues scored on three of six power plays. Even though the numbers have slowed down since then, having a man advantage isn’t the buzzkill it used to be. “He’s a guy who distributes the puck well,” Yeo said. “And what I think it’s done for us is I feel we now have two solid units. On that unit, he’s doing a real nice job bringing the puck up the ice. You see him, he’s making good decisions. When to keep it, when to dish it. He’s helped us have some zone entries and certainly he’s distributing the puck. He’s using the whole zone. He’s got two dangerous players on either side of him, obviously, with Vlady and Schwartzie and he uses both of them.” “Both units are playing great,” said Dunn. “I think I’m finding my way on mine, and I think it’s just making the plays that are there. I think at the start of the year we were complicating things a little bit and forcing too much. Now we’re getting into the zone. I think we struggled with that a little bit too. So now we’re getting in and we’re just getting pucks to the net.” In that game in Toronto, Dunn had seven shots on goal, and he’s

third among rookie defensemen in shots, and fifth in Corsi and Fenwick, which measure a team’s possession with a player on the ice. He has four goals and 10 assists this season; his 14 points are sixth best among rookie defensemen. Last season with the Chicago Wolves in the AHL, he had 13 goals and 32 assists. But some who saw him last season are surprised he’s done so well so soon in the NHL. “To be honest, yeah,” said Blues defenseman Chris Butler, who played with Dunn last season with the Wolves. “Vince obviously had an awesome season and you see what he can do offensively: his skating ability, his vision, his skill set. I really knew it was going to translate but I didn’t know it was going to translate this quick and I didn’t think he’d have as big a role as he has now. I’ll be honest: he’s surprised me, but I think he’s done an awesome job. You look at some of the goals he’s scored here. He wasn’t supposed to be in that game in Toronto and he scores the overtime winner. Those are huge goals and huge points as tight as this league is.” Ups and downs are inevitable in almost every rookie’s season, and Dunn has had a few. But when things have gone wrong, Yeo has liked the way Dunn has responded. “I’ve seen a good reset button from him,” Yeo said. “I go into every game with a good sense of what I’m going to see from him and what his game is going to look like, and that’s real valuable for us.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Blues have important decisions to make in next two years GORDON • FROM B1

or unrestricted free agents? How the team plays will help determine that. So will the organization’s player development. So will what the marketplace offers, both before the deadline and again during the summer. And so will general manager Doug Armstrong’s goal to contend year after year — even while building up toward another peak season down the road. This is a fascinating time for the franchise. A good team has the potential to become great as it adds more skill and strengthens its commitment to winning. Deft cap management will be critical. The Blues want to add as many good young (and low-paid) players as possible while getting their money’s worth from more expensive veterans. During the 2019-20 season, defensemen Vince Dunn and Jake Walman would still be on their entry level contract, as would forwards Robert Thomas, Jordan Kyrou, Tage Thompson and Klim Kostin. Forwards Zach Sanford and Sammy Blais could be on reasonable second contracts. Defensemen Jay Bouwmeester and Carl Gunnarsson’s contracts could be off the books, removing a combined cap hit of $8.3 million. Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo and center Brayden Schenn

would still be a year removed from unrestricted free agency and the massive raise such leverage brings. Armstrong should have the cap space to load a LOT of talent onto the team that season. Between now and then, though, much could happen. Which established veterans will depart and which young players will earn primary roles? Let’s start with goaltender, the most important position. This season offered Jake Allen the opportunity to finally establish he’s the guy. He hasn’t. For much of the new calendar year coach Mike Yeo has treated Carter Hutton as his No. 1 netminder, and for good reason. Hutton kept winning games. Allen played brilliantly in a loss at Boston and won at Winnipeg, where visiting teams seldom succeed this season. But he was shaky in relief of Hutton in the 6-2 loss to Minnesota and he allowed an untimely bad-angle goal Sunday in the 4-1 loss to Pittsburgh at Scottrade Center. So this issue remains unresolved. With Hutton headed toward unrestricted free agency and prospect Ville Husso still an unproven commodity, this remains a big Blues story. Can Allen finish strong, as he did last year? Is Hutton the answer? Will Husso factor in? Or

must Armstrong once again look outside to fill this most critical role? Failure on this front could derail the whole build-up. A more immediate challenge is sorting the pile of young veterans and prospects. Other teams will offer Armstrong short-term help before the trade deadline, but he must decide which assets he will deal. Presumably Thomas and Kyrou are off-limits. The pesky Thomas could be NHL-ready next season. Kyrou offers true star potential, which is hard to come by when a franchise seldom gets a lottery pick. Kostin is a fascinating case. He already looks like an NHL player. He shoots like one, too, but right now he can’t keep up in the AHL. A scout who saw him recently noted that Klim faded after his first few shifts for the San Antonio Rampage. “But you have to remind yourself that he’s only 19,” the scout noted. He is a boy among men. If Kostin hits — and there is still plenty of time for that — he could hit big. The same scout absolutely loved Blais, who has excelled at the AHL level for two years. “He’s always around the puck,” he noted. The rangy Thompson has only been sporadically productive for

the Blues, but he offers intriguing potential. So does Sanford, who has nearly recovered from shoulder surgery. Yeo has given Dmitrij Jaskin many opportunities in the top two forward lines, but he keeps falling back into the bottom six. The same goes for Ivan Barbashev. Are either of these guys keepers? The summer will bring more decisions, such as what to do with center Paul Stastny. He has been productive in the “walk” year of his contract and he is the most reliable Blue in the faceoff circle. But Stastny turns 33 next season and his current contract carries a $7 million cap hit. It will be interesting to see what he commands as an unrestricted free agent. Should the Blues try to re-up him for a shorter term and fewer dollars to buy Thomas time to grow? Or should they move on and use the cap room to pursue an upgrade? Several other veterans could come into play as well. Guys who appear to be in the long-term nucleus now may not be there in June. As the Blues try to build something special, everybody must earn their keep. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

Just how forward Zach Sanford fits in with the Blues is a question that has been around since the end of last season, and it’s a question that’s been on hold since he injured his shoulder on the first day of training camp. An answer may be coming soon because Sanford looks to be close to returning to action. The player acquired in the Kevin Shattenkirk trade last season has been stepping up his activity in practice, and his actual participation in games may not be too far away. The initial estimate on Sanford’s return was in five to six months. This weekend marks the five-month mark, and he could be playing again soon after that. “He’s coming along,” coach Mike Yeo said Monday. “I would say he’s obviously not in the lineup tomorrow, but we’re going to have to put a plan together for the best way to get him back as quickly as possible. His strength is there, his skating is there. Conditioning-wise we’re very pleased with where he’s at. For him, it’s just a comfort level of him feeling he’s ready to go in and compete and play at his level.” Getting him fully up to game speed is tricky at the moment because the Blues are in the middle of a run of five games in eight days, so practice time is limited. (The team had an optional skate Monday.) “We’re doing everything we can,” Yeo said. “Obviously we don’t have a full team skate today but we’re making sure we’re putting him into some one-on-one situations, some battles along the boards, whatever the case is. That’s obviously a way he can grow some confidence and feel that he’s ready to get into the game, but ultimately it’s going to be games that are what he needs to do.” The Blues could send him out on a conditioning assignment in the AHL to get in game shape, as the team has done with center Oskar Sundqvist, who isn’t hurt but just hasn’t been playing. To activate Sanford before the trade deadline Feb. 26 would require a roster move. Sanford, however, doesn’t have to clear waivers to be sent down. As to how the Blues might use him when that time comes, whether at center or on the wing, Yeo said the Blues haven’t figured that out yet. “Let’s just get him back now,” he said. “We don’t have the long-term plan right now.”

REBORN IN AHL

Sundqvist has done well in his conditioning stint in the AHL, with two goals and four assists in five games going into a game Monday night in Iowa. Conditioning assignments are limited to 14 days, and his would end Wednesday if he went the distance. San Antonio has a game that day, so the Blues could maximize his playing opportunities by keeping him there. “We’ll see” when Sundqvist rejoins the team, Yeo said. “We’ll see on that.” The Rampage, by the way, are in the midst of their annual rodeo trip, when their arena is in use by the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo, which runs from Feb. 8 to 25 and leads to one very long 11game road trip. Also, Yeo said he didn’t think Tage Thompson, whom he termed “dinged up,” would be available Tuesday at Nashville. “He wasn’t available to play yesterday and given the little amount of work he did yesterday I find it hard to believe he’s a player for us tomorrow,” he said. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Tampa Bay 56 38 15 3 54 34 12 8 Boston Toronto 58 34 19 5 Detroit 54 22 23 9 Florida 52 23 23 6 Montreal 55 22 26 7 Ottawa 54 19 26 9 Buffalo 56 16 30 10 Metropolitan GP W L OT Washington 55 32 17 6 Pittsburgh 57 31 22 4 Philadelphia 56 28 19 9 55 27 20 8 New Jersey Carolina 56 26 21 9 Columbus 55 28 23 4 NY Islanders 57 27 24 6 NY Rangers 56 27 24 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W 54 33 Nashville Winnipeg 56 32 Blues 58 34 Dallas 57 33 Minnesota 55 30 55 30 Colorado Chicago 55 24 Pacific GP W Vegas 55 36 San Jose 56 30 Calgary 56 29 Los Angeles 55 30 57 27 Anaheim Edmonton 54 23 Vancouver 56 22 Arizona 55 13

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

L OT 12 9 15 9 21 3 20 4 19 6 21 4 23 8 L OT 15 4 18 8 19 8 20 5 19 11 27 4 28 6 32 10

Pts 79 76 73 53 52 51 47 42 Pts 70 66 65 62 61 60 60 59

Pts 75 73 71 70 66 64 56 Pts 76 68 66 65 65 50 50 36

GF 201 180 192 147 147 144 144 132 GF 173 176 165 163 151 147 193 164

GF 169 179 167 175 165 174 157 GF 187 165 159 159 160 152 147 129

GA 149 131 162 165 167 172 188 185 GA 161 171 162 170 166 155 210 172

GA 140 151 147 151 156 163 155 GA 152 156 159 133 164 177 180 193

Home 19-5-1 18-7-4 18-8-2 11-11-7 13-9-3 14-10-6 12-11-5 7-16-4 Home 20-8-2 20-7-1 14-9-5 15-10-3 14-9-5 17-10-1 15-9-4 18-10-3 Home 18-5-3 20-5-2 19-12-0 20-9-1 19-4-5 19-7-1 12-12-3 Home 19-4-2 15-8-3 13-13-3 14-9-3 15-9-4 12-13-2 10-14-3 6-16-4

Away 19-10-2 16-5-4 16-11-3 11-12-2 10-14-3 8-16-1 7-15-4 9-14-6 Away 12-9-4 11-15-3 14-10-4 12-10-5 12-12-4 11-13-3 12-15-2 9-14-2

Div 9-4-1 12-2-2 8-5-1 6-11-2 8-4-1 10-6-2 5-10-3 4-6-2 Div 11-5-3 11-5-0 6-4-4 7-7-1 6-5-4 9-8-2 8-7-1 7-6-3

Away 15-7-6 12-10-7 15-9-3 13-11-3 11-15-1 11-14-3 12-11-5 Away 17-11-2 15-10-5 16-6-5 16-11-2 12-10-7 11-14-2 12-14-3 7-16-6

Div 10-4-2 8-6-2 9-5-1 9-10-0 10-9-0 7-8-1 6-9-2 Div 13-1-1 14-3-3 8-6-3 8-9-3 9-5-6 10-5-0 5-9-1 1-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Sunday Pittsburgh 4, Blues 1 NY Rangers 3, Winnipeg 1 Detroit 5, Washington 4, OT Vancouver 6, Dallas 0 Calgary 3, NY Islanders 2 Boston 5, New Jersey 3 Colorado 5, Buffalo 4 Philadelphia 4, Vegas 1 San Jose 3, Anaheim 2, SO Monday Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 3 Florida at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 8 p.m. Tuesday Los Angeles at Carolina, 6 p.m. Columbus at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Calgary at Boston, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Blues at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Chicago at Vegas, 9 p.m. Arizona at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Columbus at Toronto, 6 p.m. Montreal at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. Florida at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Thursday Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Arizona, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

CANADIAN PRESS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 39 40 29 23 19 W 32 30 23 18 18 W 33 31 32 27 20

L 16 18 25 35 39 L 24 26 33 38 39 L 22 24 25 29 36

Pct .709 .690 .537 .397 .328 Pct .571 .536 .411 .321 .316 Pct .600 .564 .561 .482 .357

GB — ½ 9½ 17½ 21½ GB — 2 9 14 14½ GB — 2 2 6½ 13½

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 2-8 1-9 L10 6-4 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 5-5 2-8

Str W-5 L-2 W-4 L-7 L-6 Str W-1 W-1 L-4 L-2 W-1 Str W-3 W-1 W-2 L-3 W-1

Home 23-4 21-10 17-10 16-11 11-20 Home 17-10 14-12 15-15 11-15 13-17 Home 20-7 18-9 20-11 18-12 13-15

Away 16-12 19-8 12-15 7-24 8-19 Away 15-14 16-14 8-18 7-23 5-22 Away 13-15 13-15 12-14 9-17 7-21

Conf 23-7 25-13 15-13 11-23 12-21 Conf 19-14 21-15 12-18 11-24 8-28 Conf 25-12 18-17 22-15 16-19 17-16

Str W-8 L-1 W-2 L-6 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 W-9 Str W-2 W-1 L-1 L-5 L-2

Home 22-6 22-6 14-12 13-16 11-18 Home 23-6 20-9 16-11 22-7 16-9 Home 21-7 16-12 14-14 9-21 8-17

Away 20-7 13-16 16-14 5-21 7-21 Away 12-18 12-16 15-15 8-19 12-19 Away 22-6 13-14 9-18 9-18 9-21

Conf 24-8 20-12 14-19 15-21 10-27 Conf 26-9 17-17 17-15 19-18 17-14 Conf 24-10 20-16 11-22 12-23 9-24

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Portland Denver Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Phoenix Sacramento

W 42 35 30 18 18 W 35 32 31 30 28 W 43 29 23 18 17

L 13 22 26 37 39 L 24 25 26 26 28 L 13 26 32 39 38

Pct .764 .614 .536 .327 .316 Pct .593 .561 .544 .536 .500 Pct .768 .527 .418 .316 .309

GB — 8 12½ 24 25 GB — 2 3 3½ 5½ GB — 13½ 19½ 25½ 25½

L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 7-3 9-1 L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 1-9 4-6

Sunday Toronto 123, Charlotte 103 Atlanta 118, Detroit 115 Cleveland 121, Boston 99 Indiana 121, New York 113 Houston 104, Dallas 97 Minnesota 111, Sacramento 106 Oklahoma City 110, Memphis 92 Utah 115, Portland 96 Monday New Orleans 118, Detroit 103 Philadelphia 108, New York 92 LA Clippers 114, Brooklyn 101 Chicago 105, Orlando 101 San Antonio at Utah, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday Miami at Toronto, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Atlanta at Detroit, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Indiana at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Boston, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 8 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Denver at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto’s James van Riemsdyk (second from right) celebrates with teammates after scoring the decisive goal against Tampa Bay goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy (left) on Monday night.

The 76ers’ T.J. McConnell is doused with water by Robert Covington at the end of a game against the Knicks on Monday in Philadelphia. The 76ers won 108-92.

Van Riemsdyk lifts Leafs to victory

Saric scores 24 as 76ers beat Knicks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

James Van Riemsdyk scored the winning goal at 4:37 of the third period, after Toronto had squandered a 3-0 lead before responding to beat Tampa Bay 4-3 Monday night. William Nylander had two goals and an assist in helping the streaking Maple Leafs build their three-goal advantage. Auston Matthews had three assists for the Maple Leafs (34-19-5), who extended their home winning streak to five with their eighth win in nine games overall. Jake Gardiner also scored, and Frederik Andersen made 28 saves in his 28th win of the season. Alex Killorn, Nikita Kucherov, and Yanni Gourde scored for the Lightning (38-15-3). Andrei Vasilevskiy made 19 saves. Toronto jumped in front 11:55 into the game on Nylander’s one-timer off a pass from Matthews. It was Nylander’s 13th goal of the season. Nylander scored again 3:08 into the second, beating Vasilevskiy on the blocker side. Nylander then picked up an assist when Gardiner’s wrist shot from inside the blue line went between Vasilevskiy’s legs, making it 3-0 with 8½ minutes left in the period. Tampa Bay replied with its first goal when Killorn picked up the rebound from Brayden Point’s initial shot and put the puck into a half-empty net at 15:59. Kucherov cut Toronto’s lead again when he got a pass from Killorn and beat Andersen 58 seconds into the third. Gourde tied the game just 20 seconds later, tipping Braydon Coburn’s shot from the point past Andersen at 1:18. Van Riemsdyk got the game-winner when his shot just squeezed past Vasilevskiy’s pad.

Coyotes rip Blackhawks • Max Domi and Clayton Keller scored in the first period as Arizona built a 2-0 lead en route to a 6-1 rout of visiting Chicago in a matchup of basement dwellers. Alex Goligoski, Tobias Rieder, Nick Cousins and Christian Dvorak also scored for the Coyotes, who are in last place in the Pacific Division. Alex DeBrincat scored for the Blackhawks, who are at the bottom of the Central Division standings.

NOTEBOOK

Buffalo loses Eichel • Sabres forward Jack Eichel has a sprained right ankle and coach Phil Housley said it’s premature to rule out Buffalo’s leading scorer for the rest of the season. Housley said Eichel will be sidelined at least a month, putting the player in a position to return in the final weeks of the season even though Buffalo might not have much to play for at that point. The Sabres are last in the Eastern Conference standings. Eichel was hurt Saturday when he was checked from behind by Boston’s Matt Grzelcyk and fell awkwardly into the boards. Eichel leads Buffalo with 22 goals and 53 points in 55 games in his third season since being selected with the No. 2 pick in the 2015 draft. Devils’ top goalie sidelined • New Jersey put top goaltender Cory Schneider on injured reserve because of groin and hip ailment, and he isn’t expected to resume skating until next week. Schneider hasn’t played since being hurt on Jan. 23. He leads the team with a 17-11-6 record with a 2.79 goals-against average. Keith Kinkaid and Eddie Lack are expected to share the Devils’ goaltending duties until he returns.

NHL SUMMARIES Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3

NHL Leaders

Tampa Bay 0 1 2 — 3 Toronto 2 — 4 1 1 First period: 1, Toronto, Nylander 13 (Gardiner, Matthews), 11:55. Penalties: Kucherov, TB, (hooking), 13:20; Zaitsev, TOR, (tripping), 16:02. Second period: 2, Toronto, Nylander 14 (Marner, Matthews), 3:08. 3, Toronto, Gardiner 4 (Matthews, Nylander), 11:36. 4, Tampa Bay, Killorn 10 (Kucherov, Point), 15:59. Penalties: Bozak, TOR, (tripping), 13:22. Third period: 5, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 30 (Killorn), 0:58. 6, Tampa Bay, Gourde 21 (Coburn, Stamkos), 1:18. 7, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 23 (Bozak), 4:37. Penalties: None. Shots: Tampa Bay 9-14-11: 34. Toronto 9-8-6: 23. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 33-11-2 (23 shots-19 saves). Toronto, Andersen 28-15-4 (34-31). A: 19,112. Referees: Dave Jackson, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Steve Miller.

THROUGH FEBRUARY 11 Goal Scoring Name Team Alex Ovechkin Washington Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh William Karlsson Vegas Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Anders Lee NY Islanders Tyler Seguin Dallas Sean Couturier Philadelphia John Tavares NY Islanders Sean Monahan Calgary Brock Boeser Vancouver Auston Matthews Toronto Patrice Bergeron Boston Patrik Laine Winnipeg Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Nathan MacKinnon Colorado James Neal Vegas Eric Staal Minnesota Logan Couture San Jose Brayden Schenn St. Louis Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis Assists Name Team Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Josh Bailey NY Islanders Claude Giroux Philadelphia Blake Wheeler Winnipeg John Klingberg Dallas Mathew Barzal NY Islanders

GP 55 53 55 55 57 57 56 57 55 52 47 49 56 57 49 55 55 52 58 58 GP 56 56 53 56 56 57 57

G 33 30 29 29 29 29 28 28 27 26 26 25 25 24 24 24 24 23 23 23 A 53 48 46 46 46 45 43

Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Connor McDavid Edmonton Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Brent Burns San Jose Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Nathan MacKinnon Colorado David Perron Vegas John Carlson Washington Taylor Hall New Jersey Mikko Rantanen Colorado Power Play Goals Name Team Patrik Laine Winnipeg Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Filip Forsberg Nashville Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Alex Ovechkin Washington Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Brock Boeser Vancouver Patric Hornqvist Pittsburgh Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Anders Lee NY Islanders Tyler Seguin Dallas Artem Anisimov Chicago Patrice Bergeron Boston Erik Haula Vegas Nathan MacKinnon Colorado Anthony Mantha Detroit John Tavares NY Islanders Mika Zibanejad NY Rangers

57 55 54 57 55 56 55 55 49 49 55 50 54

43 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 37 36 35 35 35

GP 56 53 55 40 55 55 56 52 49 57 57 57 45 49 51 49 52 57 47

PP 14 13 12 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dario Saric scored 24 points to pace all five starters in double figures, and the host Philadelphia 76ers won their fourth in a row, 108-92 over the slumping New York Knicks on Monday night. J.J. Redick had 18 points, Joel Embiid scored 17 and Robert Covington and Ben Simmons each chipped in 13 for the 76ers, who won their 10th straight at home to remain in playoff position in the Eastern Conference. Philadelphia, which never trailed, began the night in eighth place in the East, two games clear of Detroit. Reserve T.J. McConnell had a tripledouble with 10 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists. Michael Beasley scored 22 points to lead the Knicks, who lost their seventh straight. The Knicks were playing their third game without All-Star Kristaps Porzingis, who suffered a torn left ACL last Tuesday against Milwaukee. Davis-led Pelicans beat Pistons • Anthony Davis had 38 points and 10 rebounds to help the New Orleans Pelicans beat Detroit in another one of his strong performances against the Pistons. Davis is averaging 30.4 points per game

against the Pistons, his highest total against an NBA team. He scored a careerhigh 59 against them nearly two years ago. That’s one reason the Pelicans have won 11 of the last 12 against the Pistons. Detroit attempted to defend Davis with Andre Drummond and Blake Griffin, but they were no match for Davis inside, off the dribble or on the outside. The AllStar was 14 of 24 from the field, including three for six on 3-pointers. Clippers put 7 in double figures in win over Nets • Lou Williams scored 20 points, DeAndre Jordan had 16 points and 17 rebounds, and they got plenty of help from a balanced Clippers lineup in a 114101 victory over the Brooklyn Nets. LA put seven players in double figures and shot 56.5 percent from the field in its fourth win in five games, bouncing back nicely from a loss in Philadelphia. Austin Rivers scored 17 points, Danilo Gallinari had 16 and reserve Montrezl Harrell collected 15 on six-for-six shooting. The Clippers made 19 of their first 26 shots and won for the 12th time in 17 games. D’Angelo Russell and Joe Harris each scored 16 for the Nets, who dropped their sixth straight.

NBA SUMMARIES Pelicans 118, Pistons 103

Bulls 105, Magic 101

NBA Leaders

New Orleans: Moore 0-7 0-0 0, Davis 14-24 7-7 38, Okafor 4-10 0-0 8, Rondo 3-8 0-0 8, Holiday 8-16 5-5 21, Miller 4-8 0-0 12, Mirotic 7-16 3-3 21, Diallo 2-4 0-0 4, Cooke 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 1-5 1-1 4, Liggins 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 44-100 16-16 118. Detroit: Johnson 3-7 2-2 10, Griffin 8-17 5-6 22, Drummond 4-12 5-8 13, Smith 3-8 5-6 11, Bullock 4-13 5-5 14, Ennis III 2-5 1-2 5, Moreland 1-1 0-2 2, Tolliver 2-7 0-0 6, Ellenson 0-2 0-0 0, Buycks 0-3 0-0 0, Galloway 1-6 0-0 3, Nelson 5-12 1-1 12, Kennard 2-2 0-0 5. Totals 35-95 24-32 103. New Orleans 32 28 35 23 — 118 Detroit 31 21 28 23 — 103 3-point goals: New Orleans 14-34 (Miller 4-7, Mirotic 4-8, Davis 3-6, Rondo 2-5, Clark 1-3, Cooke 0-1, Moore 0-2, Holiday 0-2), Detroit 9-35 (Johnson 2-4, Tolliver 2-5, Kennard 1-1, Bullock 1-4, Galloway 1-6, Nelson 1-6, Griffin 1-6, Buycks 0-1, Ellenson 0-1, Ennis III 0-1). Fouled out: Tolliver. Rebounds: New Orleans 53 (Mirotic 12), Detroit 54 (Drummond 21). Assists: New Orleans 31 (Holiday 12), Detroit 18 (Nelson 5). Total fouls: New Orleans 25, Detroit 19. Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second), Drummond. A: 14,453 (21,000).

Orlando: Simmons 6-16 2-2 14, Hezonja 8-14 5-6 24, Biyombo 5-7 0-0 10, Augustin 1-6 2-2 5, Fournier 9-16 1-1 22, Iwundu 0-3 0-0 0, Speights 4-9 0-0 10, Birch 0-0 4-4 4, Mack 2-8 1-2 5, Afflalo 2-5 2-2 7. Totals 37-84 17-19 101. Chicago: Holiday 3-8 1-2 8, Markkanen 9-19 3-3 21, Lopez 2-6 2-2 6, Grant 6-9 1-3 14, LaVine 7-16 2-2 18, Valentine 4-10 2-3 11, Zipser 1-3 0-0 3, Portis 8-17 0-0 19, Arcidiacono 0-0 0-0 0, Nwaba 0-0 5-6 5. Totals 40-88 16-21 105. Orlando 27 24 20 30 — 101 Chicago 30 23 24 28 — 105 3-point goals: Orlando 10-31 (Hezonja 3-4, Fournier 3-6, Speights 2-6, Afflalo 1-3, Augustin 1-4, Iwundu 0-2, Simmons 0-3, Mack 0-3), Chicago 9-32 (Portis 3-6, LaVine 2-4, Zipser 1-3, Grant 1-3, Valentine 1-5, Holiday 1-5, Markkanen 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 38 (Birch 8), Chicago 47 (Holiday 9). Assists: Orlando 24 (Mack 6), Chicago 25 (Grant 7). Total fouls: Orlando 18, Chicago 13. Technicals: Mack, Chicago coach Bulls (Defensive three second). A: 18,611 (20,917).

Includes games of Sunday, February 11, 2018

76ers 108 , Knicks 92

L.A. Clippers: T.Harris 4-12 1-1 10, Gallinari 6-9 2-2 16, Jordan 8-11 0-0 16, Rivers 8-13 0-0 17, Bradley 4-11 2-2 11, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 1-3 0-0 2, Harrell 6-6 3-4 15, Teodosic 3-4 0-0 7, L.Williams 8-16 4-5 20, Wallace 0-0 0-0 0, Thornwell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 48-85 12-14 114. Brooklyn: Carroll 5-15 0-0 12, Acy 3-8 0-0 8, Allen 3-3 2-2 8, Dinwiddie 4-13 1-2 13, Crabbe 6-13 1-2 15, Cunningham 2-3 0-0 4, Webb III 0-1 0-0 0, Okafor 3-3 1-2 7, Whitehead 1-2 0-0 2, Russell 7-17 1-1 16, Stauskas 0-0 0-0 0, J.Harris 7-11 1-1 16. Totals 41-89 7-10 101. L.A. Clippers 34 32 24 24 — 114 Brooklyn 22 29 16 34 — 101 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 6-16 (Gallinari 2-3, Teodosic 1-1, Bradley 1-2, T.Harris 1-2, Rivers 1-3, Johnson 0-1, L.Williams 0-4), Brooklyn 12-40 (Dinwiddie 4-7, Crabbe 2-6, Acy 2-7, Carroll 2-7, J.Harris 1-4, Russell 1-7, Whitehead 0-1, Webb III 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 43 (Jordan 17), Brooklyn 37 (Carroll 10). Assists: L.A. Clippers 19 (L.Williams, Teodosic, Rivers 4), Brooklyn 27 (Dinwiddie 8). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 14, Brooklyn 15. Technicals: Brooklyn coach Nets (Defensive three second). A: 13,735 (17,732).

New York: Beasley 9-17 2-2 22, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Kanter 5-10 7-7 17, Jack 3-5 4-4 11, Hardaway Jr. 4-16 1-2 9, Kornet 0-2 0-0 0, Hicks 1-1 0-0 2, O’Quinn 2-5 0-0 4, Ntilikina 0-4 0-0 0, Burke 0-1 0-0 0, Mudiay 3-7 1-4 7, Dotson 0-2 2-2 2, Lee 4-8 7-7 18. Totals 31-78 24-28 92. Philadelphia: Covington 5-11 1-2 13, Saric 8-12 4-5 24, Embiid 6-12 4-6 17, Simmons 6-8 1-2 13, Redick 6-11 3-4 18, Johnson 2-4 1-2 5, Booker 2-2 1-1 5, McConnell 5-11 0-0 10, Anderson 1-2 1-2 3, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-74 16-24 108. 21 34 24 13 — 92 New York Philadelphia 31 26 29 22 — 108 3-point goals: New York 6-24 (Lee 3-4, Beasley 2-3, Jack 1-2, Dotson 0-1, Ntilikina 0-1, Kornet 0-2, Mudiay 0-3, Hardaway Jr. 0-8), Philadelphia 10-19 (Saric 4-6, Redick 3-6, Covington 2-4, Embiid 1-2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 33 (Kanter 13), Philadelphia 37 (McConnell 10). Assists: New York 16 (Kanter, Hardaway Jr. 3), Philadelphia 27 (McConnell 11). Total fouls: New York 22, Philadelphia 22. Technicals: Embiid. A: 20,589 (21,600).

Clippers 114, Nets 101

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG Capela, HOU 308 Jordan, LAC 228 Adams, OKC 308 Kanter, NYK 321 Collins, ATL 213 Gibson, MIN 306 Valanciunas, TOR 244 Randle, LAL 309 Whiteside, MIA 219 Towns, MIN 439 Favors, UTA 269 James, CLE 555 Howard, CHA 326 Drummond, DET 320 Antetokounmpo, MIL 521 Gortat, WAS 210 Davis, NOR 483 Lopez, CHI 310 Sabonis, IND 265 Simmons, PHL 362 Payton, PHX 246 Moore, NOR 287 436 Durant, GOL Beasley, NYK 260 Horford, BOS 281 440 Warren, PHX Cauley-Stein, SAC 258 Aldridge, SAN 478 Young, IND 304 Lyles, DEN 207

FGA 470 354 490 530 364 536 433 555 401 804 494 1023 603 593 967 393 905 587 503 690 471 552 846 509 552 871 514 954 610 417

PCT .655 .644 .629 .606 .585 .571 .564 .557 .546 .546 .545 .543 .541 .540 .539 .534 .534 .528 .527 .525 .522 .520 .515 .511 .509 .505 .502 .501 .498 .496

3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA 71 155 Bullock, DET Hill, CLE 60 132 Thompson, GOL 179 394 Ingles, UTA 139 307 Moore, NOR 91 209 Hield, SAC 111 255 Horford, BOS 76 175 Collison, IND 70 162 Korver, CLE 127 294 Nowitzki, DAL 98 227 Williams, CHA 82 190 Tatum, BOS 75 174 George, OKC 176 411 McCollum, POR 138 327 Towns, MIN 89 211 Miller, NOR 103 245 Durant, GOL 121 289 Curry, GOL 172 412 Tolliver, DET 94 228

PCT .458 .455 .454 .453 .435 .435 .434 .432 .432 .432 .432 .431 .428 .422 .422 .420 .419 .417 .412


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Tampa Bay 56 38 15 3 54 34 12 8 Boston Toronto 58 34 19 5 Florida 53 24 23 6 Detroit 54 22 23 9 Montreal 55 22 26 7 Ottawa 54 19 26 9 Buffalo 56 16 30 10 Metropolitan GP W L OT Washington 55 32 17 6 Pittsburgh 57 31 22 4 Philadelphia 56 28 19 9 55 27 20 8 New Jersey Carolina 56 26 21 9 Columbus 55 28 23 4 NY Islanders 57 27 24 6 NY Rangers 56 27 24 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W 54 33 Nashville Winnipeg 56 32 Blues 58 34 Dallas 57 33 Minnesota 55 30 55 30 Colorado Chicago 56 24 Pacific GP W Vegas 55 36 San Jose 56 30 Calgary 56 29 Los Angeles 55 30 57 27 Anaheim Edmonton 55 23 Vancouver 56 22 Arizona 56 14

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

L OT 12 9 15 9 21 3 20 4 19 6 21 4 24 8 L OT 15 4 18 8 19 8 20 5 19 11 28 4 28 6 32 10

Pts 79 76 73 54 53 51 47 42 Pts 70 66 65 62 61 60 60 59

Pts 75 73 71 70 66 64 56 Pts 76 68 66 65 65 50 50 38

GF 201 180 192 154 147 144 144 132 GF 173 176 165 163 151 147 193 164

GF 169 179 167 175 165 174 158 GF 187 165 159 159 160 157 147 135

GA 149 131 162 172 165 172 188 185 GA 161 171 162 170 166 155 210 172

GA 140 151 147 151 156 163 161 GA 152 156 159 133 164 184 180 194

Home 19-5-1 18-7-4 18-8-2 13-9-3 11-11-7 14-10-6 12-11-5 7-16-4 Home 20-8-2 20-7-1 14-9-5 15-10-3 14-9-5 17-10-1 15-9-4 18-10-3 Home 18-5-3 20-5-2 19-12-0 20-9-1 19-4-5 19-7-1 12-12-3 Home 19-4-2 15-8-3 13-13-3 14-9-3 15-9-4 12-14-2 10-14-3 7-16-4

Away 19-10-2 16-5-4 16-11-3 11-14-3 11-12-2 8-16-1 7-15-4 9-14-6 Away 12-9-4 11-15-3 14-10-4 12-10-5 12-12-4 11-13-3 12-15-2 9-14-2

Div 9-4-1 12-2-2 8-5-1 8-4-1 6-11-2 10-6-2 5-10-3 4-6-2 Div 11-5-3 11-5-0 6-4-4 7-7-1 6-5-4 9-8-2 8-7-1 7-6-3

Away 15-7-6 12-10-7 15-9-3 13-11-3 11-15-1 11-14-3 12-12-5 Away 17-11-2 15-10-5 16-6-5 16-11-2 12-10-7 11-14-2 12-14-3 7-16-6

Div 10-4-2 8-6-2 9-5-1 9-10-0 10-9-0 7-8-1 6-9-2 Div 13-1-1 14-3-3 8-6-3 8-9-3 9-5-6 10-5-0 5-9-1 1-8-5

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Sunday Pittsburgh 4, Blues 1 NY Rangers 3, Winnipeg 1 Detroit 5, Washington 4, OT Vancouver 6, Dallas 0 Calgary 3, NY Islanders 2 Boston 5, New Jersey 3 Colorado 5, Buffalo 4 Philadelphia 4, Vegas 1 San Jose 3, Anaheim 2, SO Monday Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 3 Florida 7, Edmonton 5 Arizona 6, Chicago 1 Tuesday Los Angeles at Carolina, 6 p.m. Columbus at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Calgary at Boston, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Blues at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Chicago at Vegas, 9 p.m. Arizona at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Columbus at Toronto, 6 p.m. Montreal at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. Florida at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Thursday Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 7 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Arizona, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Vegas, 9 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

CANADIAN PRESS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 39 40 29 23 19 W 32 30 23 18 18 W 33 31 32 27 20

L 16 18 25 35 39 L 24 26 33 38 39 L 22 24 25 29 36

Pct .709 .690 .537 .397 .328 Pct .571 .536 .411 .321 .316 Pct .600 .564 .561 .482 .357

GB — ½ 9½ 17½ 21½ GB — 2 9 14 14½ GB — 2 2 6½ 13½

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 2-8 1-9 L10 6-4 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 5-5 2-8

Str W-5 L-2 W-4 L-7 L-6 Str W-1 W-1 L-4 L-2 W-1 Str W-3 W-1 W-2 L-3 W-1

Home 23-4 21-10 17-10 16-11 11-20 Home 17-10 14-12 15-15 11-15 13-17 Home 20-7 18-9 20-11 18-12 13-15

Away 16-12 19-8 12-15 7-24 8-19 Away 15-14 16-14 8-18 7-23 5-22 Away 13-15 13-15 12-14 9-17 7-21

Conf 23-7 25-13 15-13 11-23 12-21 Conf 19-14 21-15 12-18 11-24 8-28 Conf 25-12 18-17 22-15 16-19 17-16

Away 20-7 13-17 16-14 5-21 7-21 Away 12-18 12-16 15-15 8-19 12-19 Away 22-6 13-14 9-18 9-21 9-19

Conf 24-8 20-13 14-19 15-21 10-27 Conf 26-9 17-17 17-15 19-18 18-14 Conf 25-10 20-16 11-22 9-24 12-24

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Portland Denver Utah Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W L 42 13 35 23 30 26 18 37 18 39 W L 35 24 32 25 31 26 30 26 29 28 W L 44 13 29 26 23 32 17 38 18 40

Pct GB L10 Str Home .764 — 9-1 W-8 22-6 .603 8½ 5-5 L-2 22-6 .536 12½ 5-5 W-2 14-12 .327 24 2-8 L-6 13-16 .316 25 2-8 L-1 11-18 Pct GB L10 Str Home .593 — 4-6 W-1 23-6 .561 2 5-5 W-1 20-9 .544 3 6-4 L-1 16-11 .536 3½ 7-3 W-1 22-7 .509 5 10-0 W-10 17-9 Pct GB L10 Str Home .772 — 7-3 W-3 22-7 .527 14 6-4 W-1 16-12 .418 20 7-3 L-1 14-14 .309 26 4-6 L-2 8-17 .310 26½ 1-9 L-6 9-21

Sunday Toronto 123, Charlotte 103 Atlanta 118, Detroit 115 Cleveland 121, Boston 99 Indiana 121, New York 113 Houston 104, Dallas 97 Minnesota 111, Sacramento 106 Oklahoma City 110, Memphis 92 Utah 115, Portland 96 Monday New Orleans 118, Detroit 103 Philadelphia 108, New York 92 LA Clippers 114, Brooklyn 101 Chicago 105, Orlando 101 Utah 101, San Antonio 99 Golden State 129, Phoenix 83 Tuesday Miami at Toronto, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Atlanta at Detroit, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Indiana at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Boston, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 8 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Denver at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toronto’s James van Riemsdyk (second from right) celebrates with teammates after scoring the decisive goal against Tampa Bay goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy (left) on Monday night.

The 76ers’ T.J. McConnell is doused with water by Robert Covington at the end of a game against the Knicks on Monday in Philadelphia. The 76ers won 108-92.

Van Riemsdyk lifts Leafs to victory

Saric scores 24 as 76ers beat Knicks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

James Van Riemsdyk scored the winning goal at 4:37 of the third period, after Toronto had squandered a 3-0 lead before responding to beat Tampa Bay 4-3 Monday night. William Nylander had two goals and an assist in helping the streaking Maple Leafs build their three-goal advantage. Auston Matthews had three assists for the Maple Leafs (34-19-5), who extended their home winning streak to five with their eighth win in nine games overall. Jake Gardiner also scored, and Frederik Andersen made 28 saves in his 28th win of the season. Alex Killorn, Nikita Kucherov, and Yanni Gourde scored for the Lightning (38-15-3). Andrei Vasilevskiy made 19 saves. Toronto jumped in front 11:55 into the game on Nylander’s one-timer off a pass from Matthews. It was Nylander’s 13th goal of the season. Nylander scored again 3:08 into the second, beating Vasilevskiy on the blocker side. Nylander then picked up an assist when Gardiner’s wrist shot from inside the blue line went between Vasilevskiy’s legs, making it 3-0 with 8½ minutes left in the period. Tampa Bay replied with its first goal when Killorn picked up the rebound from Brayden Point’s initial shot and put the puck into a half-empty net at 15:59. Kucherov cut Toronto’s lead again when he got a pass from Killorn and beat Andersen 58 seconds into the third. Gourde tied the game just 20 seconds later, tipping Braydon Coburn’s shot from the point past Andersen at 1:18. Van Riemsdyk got the game-winner when his shot just squeezed past Vasilevskiy’s pad.

Coyotes rip Blackhawks • Max Domi and Clayton Keller scored in the first period as Arizona built a 2-0 lead en route to a 6-1 rout of visiting Chicago in a matchup of basement dwellers. Alex Goligoski, Tobias Rieder, Nick Cousins and Christian Dvorak also scored for the Coyotes, who are in last place in the Pacific Division. Alex DeBrincat scored for the Blackhawks, who are at the bottom of the Central Division standings.

NOTEBOOK

Buffalo loses Eichel • Sabres forward Jack Eichel has a sprained right ankle and coach Phil Housley said it’s premature to rule out Buffalo’s leading scorer for the rest of the season. Housley said Eichel will be sidelined at least a month, putting the player in a position to return in the final weeks of the season even though Buffalo might not have much to play for at that point. The Sabres are last in the Eastern Conference standings. Eichel was hurt Saturday when he was checked from behind by Boston’s Matt Grzelcyk and fell awkwardly into the boards. Eichel leads Buffalo with 22 goals and 53 points in 55 games in his third season since being selected with the No. 2 pick in the 2015 draft. Devils’ top goalie sidelined • New Jersey put top goaltender Cory Schneider on injured reserve because of groin and hip ailment, and he isn’t expected to resume skating until next week. Schneider hasn’t played since being hurt on Jan. 23. He leads the team with a 17-11-6 record with a 2.79 goals-against average. Keith Kinkaid and Eddie Lack are expected to share the Devils’ goaltending duties until he returns.

NHL SUMMARIES Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3

Panthers 7, Oilers 5

Coyotes 6, Blackhawks 1

Tampa Bay 0 1 2 — 3 Toronto 2 — 4 1 1 First period: 1, Toronto, Nylander 13 (Gardiner, Matthews), 11:55. Penalties: Kucherov, TB, (hooking), 13:20; Zaitsev, TOR, (tripping), 16:02. Second period: 2, Toronto, Nylander 14 (Marner, Matthews), 3:08. 3, Toronto, Gardiner 4 (Matthews, Nylander), 11:36. 4, Tampa Bay, Killorn 10 (Kucherov, Point), 15:59. Penalties: Bozak, TOR, (tripping), 13:22. Third period: 5, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 30 (Killorn), 0:58. 6, Tampa Bay, Gourde 21 (Coburn, Stamkos), 1:18. 7, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 23 (Bozak), 4:37. Penalties: None. Shots: Tampa Bay 9-14-11: 34. Toronto 9-8-6: 23. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 33-11-2 (23 shots-19 saves). Toronto, Andersen 28-15-4 (34-31). A: 19,112. Referees: Dave Jackson, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Steve Miller.

Florida 1 2 4 — 7 Edmonton 1 2 — 2 5 First Period: 1, Florida, Ekblad 12 (Matheson, Malgin), 17:46 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Maroon 14 (McDavid, Auvitu), 18:35. Second Period: 3, Edmonton, Draisaitl 16, 2:46 (sh). 4, Florida, Malgin 9 (Pysyk, Matheson), 6:21. 5, Edmonton, Caggiula 8 (Russell, Khaira), 9:35. 6, Florida, Dadonov 12 (Bjugstad, Ekblad), 9:58. Third Period: 7, Florida, Trocheck 19 (Yandle, Barkov), 0:18 (pp). 8, Florida, Trocheck 20 (Yandle, Huberdeau), 6:05 (pp). 9, Edmonton, Slepyshev 3 (Letestu), 6:53. 10, Florida, Dadonov 13, 10:46. 11, Edmonton, McDavid 23 (Maroon), 14:58. 12, Florida, Trocheck 21 (Huberdeau), 19:00. Shots on Goal: Florida 13-14-13: 40. Edmonton 11-12-9: 32. Power-plays: Florida 3 of 4; Edmonton 0 of 0. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 14-12-5 (32 shots-27 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 19-20-2 (39-33). A: 18,347 (18,641). T: 2:39. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Tim Nowak.

Chicago 0 1 0 — Arizona 2 — 2 2 First Period: 1, Arizona, Domi 4 (Chychrun, Rieder), 1:32. 2, Arizona, Keller 16 (Stepan), 9:22. Second Period: 3, Chicago, DeBrincat 20 (Toews, Bouma), 4:33 (pp). 4, Arizona, Goligoski 7 (Keller, Domi), 7:06. 5, Arizona, Rieder 7 (Fischer), 9:33 (pp). Third Period: 6, Arizona, Cousins 10 (Goligoski, Connauton), 7:11. 7, Arizona, Dvorak 9 (Fischer, Rinaldo), 15:38. Shots on Goal: Chicago 10-17-11: 38. Arizona 10-7-5: 22. Power-play opportunities: Chicago 1 of 6; Arizona 1 of 4. Goalies: Chicago, Glass 3-5-3 (9 shots-6 saves), Forsberg 5-10-3 (13-10). Arizona, Raanta 10-14-6 (38-37). A: 14,357 (17,125). T: 2:29. Referees: Tim Peel, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Derek Amell, David Brisebois.

1 6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dario Saric scored 24 points to pace all five starters in double figures, and the host Philadelphia 76ers won their fourth in a row, 108-92 over the slumping New York Knicks on Monday night. J.J. Redick had 18 points, Joel Embiid scored 17 and Robert Covington and Ben Simmons each chipped in 13 for the 76ers, who won their 10th straight at home to remain in playoff position in the Eastern Conference. Philadelphia, which never trailed, began the night in eighth place in the East, two games clear of Detroit. Reserve T.J. McConnell had a tripledouble with 10 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists. Michael Beasley scored 22 points to lead the Knicks, who lost their seventh straight. The Knicks were playing their third game without All-Star Kristaps Porzingis, who suffered a torn left ACL last Tuesday against Milwaukee. Davis-led Pelicans beat Pistons • Anthony Davis had 38 points and 10 rebounds to help the New Orleans Pelicans beat Detroit in another one of his strong performances against the Pistons. Davis is averaging 30.4 points per game

against the Pistons, his highest total against an NBA team. He scored a careerhigh 59 against them nearly two years ago. That’s one reason the Pelicans have won 11 of the last 12 against the Pistons. Detroit attempted to defend Davis with Andre Drummond and Blake Griffin, but they were no match for Davis inside, off the dribble or on the outside. The AllStar was 14 of 24 from the field, including three for six on 3-pointers. Clippers put 7 in double figures in win over Nets • Lou Williams scored 20 points, DeAndre Jordan had 16 points and 17 rebounds, and they got plenty of help from a balanced Clippers lineup in a 114101 victory over the Brooklyn Nets. LA put seven players in double figures and shot 56.5 percent from the field in its fourth win in five games, bouncing back nicely from a loss in Philadelphia. Austin Rivers scored 17 points, Danilo Gallinari had 16 and reserve Montrezl Harrell collected 15 on six-for-six shooting. The Clippers made 19 of their first 26 shots and won for the 12th time in 17 games. D’Angelo Russell and Joe Harris each scored 16 for the Nets, who dropped their sixth straight.

NBA SUMMARIES Pelicans 118, Pistons 103

Bulls 105, Magic 101

Warriors 129, Suns 83

New Orleans: Moore 0-7 0-0 0, Davis 14-24 7-7 38, Okafor 4-10 0-0 8, Rondo 3-8 0-0 8, Holiday 8-16 5-5 21, Miller 4-8 0-0 12, Mirotic 7-16 3-3 21, Diallo 2-4 0-0 4, Cooke 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 1-5 1-1 4, Liggins 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 44-100 16-16 118. Detroit: Johnson 3-7 2-2 10, Griffin 8-17 5-6 22, Drummond 4-12 5-8 13, Smith 3-8 5-6 11, Bullock 4-13 5-5 14, Ennis III 2-5 1-2 5, Moreland 1-1 0-2 2, Tolliver 2-7 0-0 6, Ellenson 0-2 0-0 0, Buycks 0-3 0-0 0, Galloway 1-6 0-0 3, Nelson 5-12 1-1 12, Kennard 2-2 0-0 5. Totals 35-95 24-32 103. New Orleans 32 28 35 23 — 118 Detroit 31 21 28 23 — 103 3-point goals: New Orleans 14-34 (Miller 4-7, Mirotic 4-8, Davis 3-6, Rondo 2-5, Clark 1-3, Cooke 0-1, Moore 0-2, Holiday 0-2), Detroit 9-35 (Johnson 2-4, Tolliver 2-5, Kennard 1-1, Bullock 1-4, Galloway 1-6, Nelson 1-6, Griffin 1-6, Buycks 0-1, Ellenson 0-1, Ennis III 0-1). Fouled out: Tolliver. Rebounds: New Orleans 53 (Mirotic 12), Detroit 54 (Drummond 21). Assists: New Orleans 31 (Holiday 12), Detroit 18 (Nelson 5). Total fouls: New Orleans 25, Detroit 19. Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second), Drummond. A: 14,453 (21,000).

Orlando: Simmons 6-16 2-2 14, Hezonja 8-14 5-6 24, Biyombo 5-7 0-0 10, Augustin 1-6 2-2 5, Fournier 9-16 1-1 22, Iwundu 0-3 0-0 0, Speights 4-9 0-0 10, Birch 0-0 4-4 4, Mack 2-8 1-2 5, Afflalo 2-5 2-2 7. Totals 37-84 17-19 101. Chicago: Holiday 3-8 1-2 8, Markkanen 9-19 3-3 21, Lopez 2-6 2-2 6, Grant 6-9 1-3 14, LaVine 7-16 2-2 18, Valentine 4-10 2-3 11, Zipser 1-3 0-0 3, Portis 8-17 0-0 19, Arcidiacono 0-0 0-0 0, Nwaba 0-0 5-6 5. Totals 40-88 16-21 105. Orlando 27 24 20 30 — 101 Chicago 30 23 24 28 — 105 3-point goals: Orlando 10-31 (Hezonja 3-4, Fournier 3-6, Speights 2-6, Afflalo 1-3, Augustin 1-4, Iwundu 0-2, Simmons 0-3, Mack 0-3), Chicago 9-32 (Portis 3-6, LaVine 2-4, Zipser 1-3, Grant 1-3, Valentine 1-5, Holiday 1-5, Markkanen 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 38 (Birch 8), Chicago 47 (Holiday 9). Assists: Orlando 24 (Mack 6), Chicago 25 (Grant 7). Total fouls: Orlando 18, Chicago 13. Technicals: Mack, Chicago coach Bulls (Defensive three second). A: 18,611 (20,917).

Phoenix: Warren 6-18 2-2 14, Bender 1-6 1-3 3, Chandler 4-6 0-0 8, Payton 11-18 5-7 29, Jackson 4-18 0-0 8, Dudley 0-1 0-0 0, Chriss 0-2 1-2 1, Len 2-4 4-6 8, Gray 2-11 1-2 5, Daniels 3-8 0-0 7, Reed 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 33-95 14-22 83. Golden State: Durant 8-9 0-2 17, Casspi 7-10 4-5 19, Pachulia 2-4 0-0 4, Curry 8-17 3-3 22, Thompson 7-12 0-0 16, West 3-4 0-0 6, Looney 1-1 0-0 2, McGee 2-4 3-6 7, Livingston 2-6 0-0 4, Young 5-10 3-3 16, Iguodala 3-6 1-2 7, McCaw 4-6 0-0 9. Totals 52-89 14-21 129. Phoenix 24 21 26 12 — 83 Golden State 25 37 37 30 — 129 3-point goals: Phoenix 3-23 (Payton 2-4, Daniels 1-5, Dudley 0-1, Chriss 0-1, Reed 0-2, Gray 0-3, Jackson 0-3, Bender 0-4), Golden State 11-26 (Young 3-7, Curry 3-9, Thompson 2-4, Durant 1-1, Casspi 1-2, McCaw 1-2, Iguodala 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 47 (Chandler 9), Golden State 49 (Casspi 10). Assists: Phoenix 13 (Payton 5), Golden State 36 (Curry 7). Total fouls: Phoenix 17, Golden State 18. Technicals: Warren. A: 19,596 (19,596).

76ers 108 , Knicks 92

L.A. Clippers: T.Harris 4-12 1-1 10, Gallinari 6-9 2-2 16, Jordan 8-11 0-0 16, Rivers 8-13 0-0 17, Bradley 4-11 2-2 11, Dekker 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 1-3 0-0 2, Harrell 6-6 3-4 15, Teodosic 3-4 0-0 7, L.Williams 8-16 4-5 20, Wallace 0-0 0-0 0, Thornwell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 48-85 12-14 114. Brooklyn: Carroll 5-15 0-0 12, Acy 3-8 0-0 8, Allen 3-3 2-2 8, Dinwiddie 4-13 1-2 13, Crabbe 6-13 1-2 15, Cunningham 2-3 0-0 4, Webb III 0-1 0-0 0, Okafor 3-3 1-2 7, Whitehead 1-2 0-0 2, Russell 7-17 1-1 16, Stauskas 0-0 0-0 0, J.Harris 7-11 1-1 16. Totals 41-89 7-10 101. L.A. Clippers 34 32 24 24 — 114 Brooklyn 22 29 16 34 — 101 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 6-16 (Gallinari 2-3, Teodosic 1-1, Bradley 1-2, T.Harris 1-2, Rivers 1-3, Johnson 0-1, L.Williams 0-4), Brooklyn 12-40 (Dinwiddie 4-7, Crabbe 2-6, Acy 2-7, Carroll 2-7, J.Harris 1-4, Russell 1-7, Whitehead 0-1, Webb III 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 43 (Jordan 17), Brooklyn 37 (Carroll 10). Assists: L.A. Clippers 19 (L.Williams, Teodosic, Rivers 4), Brooklyn 27 (Dinwiddie 8). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 14, Brooklyn 15. Technicals: Brooklyn coach Nets (Defensive three second). A: 13,735 (17,732).

New York: Beasley 9-17 2-2 22, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Kanter 5-10 7-7 17, Jack 3-5 4-4 11, Hardaway Jr. 4-16 1-2 9, Kornet 0-2 0-0 0, Hicks 1-1 0-0 2, O’Quinn 2-5 0-0 4, Ntilikina 0-4 0-0 0, Burke 0-1 0-0 0, Mudiay 3-7 1-4 7, Dotson 0-2 2-2 2, Lee 4-8 7-7 18. Totals 31-78 24-28 92. Philadelphia: Covington 5-11 1-2 13, Saric 8-12 4-5 24, Embiid 6-12 4-6 17, Simmons 6-8 1-2 13, Redick 6-11 3-4 18, Johnson 2-4 1-2 5, Booker 2-2 1-1 5, McConnell 5-11 0-0 10, Anderson 1-2 1-2 3, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-74 16-24 108. 21 34 24 13 — 92 New York Philadelphia 31 26 29 22 — 108 3-point goals: New York 6-24 (Lee 3-4, Beasley 2-3, Jack 1-2, Dotson 0-1, Ntilikina 0-1, Kornet 0-2, Mudiay 0-3, Hardaway Jr. 0-8), Philadelphia 10-19 (Saric 4-6, Redick 3-6, Covington 2-4, Embiid 1-2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 33 (Kanter 13), Philadelphia 37 (McConnell 10). Assists: New York 16 (Kanter, Hardaway Jr. 3), Philadelphia 27 (McConnell 11). Total fouls: New York 22, Philadelphia 22. Technicals: Embiid. A: 20,589 (21,600).

Clippers 114, Nets 101

Jazz 101, Spurs 99 San Antonio: Anderson 5-12 6-8 16, Gasol 6-14 3-4 15, Bertans 5-8 0-0 12, Murray 6-14 0-0 12, Green 4-9 2-2 13, Lauvergne 4-5 2-2 10, Forbes 3-5 0-0 6, Mills 0-3 0-1 0, Parker 2-5 2-4 6, Ginobili 3-10 2-4 9. Totals 38-85 17-25 99. Utah: Ingles 7-13 2-2 20, Favors 6-9 7-10 19, Gobert 4-9 2-5 10, Mitchell 9-28 4-6 25, O’Neale 3-6 2-3 8, Crowder 4-11 3-4 14, Jerebko 1-2 0-0 3, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0, Neto 1-5 0-0 2, Burks 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-84 20-30 101. San Antonio 22 26 29 22 — 99 Utah 25 29 15 32 — 101 3-point goals: San Antonio 6-25 (Green 3-5, Bertans 2-4, Ginobili 1-5, Murray 0-1, Forbes 0-2, Gasol 0-2, Mills 0-3, Anderson 0-3), Utah 11-24 (Ingles 4-6, Crowder 3-5, Mitchell 3-9, Jerebko 1-1, O’Neale 0-1, Favors 0-1, Neto 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 44 (Gasol 15), Utah 43 (Gobert 12). Assists: San Antonio 23 (Gasol 6), Utah 15 (Ingles, Mitchell 5). Total fouls: San Antonio 24, Utah 24. A: 18,306 (19,911).


SPORTS

02.13.2018 • TUESDAY • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE NBA Favorite Points Underdog RAPTORS 8 Heat BUCKS 7.5 Hawks Rockets 2.5 T’WOLVES THUNDER 3.5 Cavaliers MAVERICKS 7.5 Kings NUGGETS 1 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog BUTLER 11.5 Georgetown Ball St 2.5 AKRON Kansas 7 IOWA ST Boston College 8 PITTSBURGH MISSOURI 1 Texas A&M NEBRASKA 2 Maryland St. Bona 2.5 LASALLE W Michigan 1.5 BOWLING GREEN TOLEDO 9 Ohio U Arkansas 1.5 MISSISSIPPI BUFFALO 13.5 Kent St E MICHIGAN 5 Miami-Ohio NO ILLINOIS 1 C Michigan NORTHERN IOWA 4 Evansville RHODE ISLAND 15 Richmond Virginia 6 MIAMI-FLORIDA TEXAS TECH 7 Oklahoma ALABAMA 6 Lsu TENNESSEE 12 S Carolina Northwestern 3 RUTGERS Michigan St 10 MINNESOTA Write-In Game JAMES MADISON 4.5 NC-Wilmington Added Game MONMOUTH 5 St. Peter’s NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS -$170/+$150 Flames HURRICANES -$125/+$105 Kings Lightning -$175/+$155 SABRES Blue Jackets -$120/even ISLANDERS FLYERS -$155/+$135 Devils PENGUINS -$260/+$220 Senators Ducks -$125/+$105 RED WINGS JETS -$135/+$115 Capitals WILD -$195/+$175 Rangers PREDATORS -$150/+$130 Blues VEGAS KNIGHTS-$200/+$170 Blackhawks SHARKS -$225/+$185 Coyotes Grand Salami: Over/under 69.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Promoted Mike Roose to athletic performance coordinator/strength and conditioning coach, Walter Miranda to Latin American pitching and rehabilitation coordinator, Devin Pearson assistant/ amateur scouting, Greg Rybarczyk senior analyst/baseball research and development and Dan Madsen, Jim Robinson, Quincy Boyd and Fred Peterson national scouting supervisors. Named Adan Severino and Daniel Abroms mental skills coordinators, Kevin Avilla minor league physical therapist, Humberto Sanchez DSL pitching coach and RJ Warner minor league clubhouse assistant, Reed Gragnani Mid-Atlantic area scout, Carl Moesche Northwest area scout, J.J. Altobelli part-time Southern California scout, Mike Ganley director/baseball systems, Bill Letson data architect/baseball systems, Dan Meyer analyst/baseball research and development, Aneko Knowles Bahamas scout and Alfredo Castellon Colombia scout. TEXAS RANGERS — Signed INF Trevor Plouffe to a minor league contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Named Chip Bowers president of business operations. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Signed RHP Daniel Minor. LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Signed LHP Josh Blanco and INF Jake Wark. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed LHP Mitch Lambson and RHP Victor Capellan. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Traded OF Johnny Bladel to Southern Maryland (Atlantic) for future considerations. SUSSEX COUNTY MINERS — Signed C Brian Mayer. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed INFs Taylor Oldham and Taylor Brennan. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed RHP Sean Johnson. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS — Traded OF Connor Oliver to River City for a player to be named. TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS — Signed LHP Seth Brenner and OF Jason Heinrich. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Recalled C Justin Patton from Iowa (NBAGL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G Marco Belinelli. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed CB Lou Young to a one-year contract and general manager Steve Keim to a contract extension through 2022. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed G Josh Andrews. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Re-signed DB Kevin Fogg to a one-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Placed F Troy Brouwer on injured reserve, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled G Jon Gillies from Stockton (AHL) and G Mason McDonald from Kansas City (ECHL) to Stockton. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled F Dylan Sadowy from Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed G Cory Schneider on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 23. Recalled F Nick Lappin from Binghamton (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled D Ryan Sproul from Hartford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Assigned G Chris Driedger from Belleville (AHL) to Brampton (ECHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Belleville F Mike Blunden two games. CLEVELAND MONSTERS — Recalled D Scott Savage from Jacksonville (ECHL) and G Ivan Kulbakov from Quad City (ECHL). LEHIGH VALLEY PHANTOMS — Assigned Fs Steve Swavely and Alex Krushelnyski to Reading (ECHL). MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Loaned D Rick Pinkston to Atlanta (ECHL). SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Recalled D Nolan DeJong from Colorado (ECHL). ECHL ATLANTA GLADIATORS — Agreed to terms with D Drew Baker. BRAMPTON BEAST — Released G Carmine Guerriero. Signed G Daniel Spence. FLORIDA EVERBLADES — Released F Nolan LaPorte. Loaned F Michael Kirkpatrick to Cleveland (AHL). GREENVILLE SWAMP RABBITS — Claimed G Greg Dodds off waivers from Indy. Loaned F Caleb Herbert to San Jose (AHL). IDAHO STEELHEADS — Loaned F Henrik Samuelsson to Rockford (AHL). JACKSONVILLE ICEMEN — Loaned G Austin Lotz to Manitoba (AHL). READING ROYALS — Added G Nick Niedert as emergency backup. SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Signed M Santiago Mosquera from Millonarios FC (Primera A-Colombia). PORTLAND TIMBERS — Waived D Rennico Clarke. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Named Jack Stefanowski goalkeeper coach. United Soccer League OTTAWA FURY — Signed G David Monsalve. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE — Fined South Carolina men’s basketball coach Frank Martin $25,000 for comments about an official that issued him a technical foul. ALBANY (NY) — Named Joe Davis passing game coordinator/quarterbacks coach and Jarred Holley safeties coach. HAMPTON — Named Hank Hughes defensive coordinator and Ataveus Cash quarterbacks coach and passing game coordinator. MINNESOTA STATE — Agreed to terms with softball coach Lori Meyer on a five-year contract extension. MISSISSIPPI — Announced men’s basketball coach Andy Kennedy will step down at the end of the season. SAN JOSE STATE — Announced the resignation of baseball coach Jason Hawkins. SOUTHERN CAL — Signed offensive coordinator Tee Martin and defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast to contract extensions. WILLIAM PENN — Announced it will add men’s and women’s lacrosse and men’s volleyball programs, to begin play in the 2019-20 academic year.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Men’s Top 25 Fared Monday 1. Virginia (23-2) did not play. Next: at Miami, Tuesday. 2. Michigan State (24-3) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Tuesday. 3. Villanova (23-2) did not play. Next: at Providence, Wednesday. 4. Xavier (23-3) did not play. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Wednesday. 5. Cincinnati (23-2) did not play. Next: at Houston, Thursday. 6. Purdue (23-4) did not play. Next: at Wisconsin, Thursday. 7. Texas Tech (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 23 Oklahoma, Tuesday. 8. Ohio State (22-5) did not play. Next: at Penn State, Thursday. 9. Gonzaga (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 10. Auburn (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Kentucky, Wednesday. 11. Clemson (20-4) did not play. Next: at Florida State, Wednesday. 12. Duke (20-5) did not play. Next:

vs. Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 13. Kansas (19-6) did not play. Next: at Iowa State, Tuesday. 14. North Carolina (20-7) beat Notre Dame 83-66. Next: at Louisville, Saturday. 15. Saint Mary’s (24-3) did not play. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 16. Rhode Island (20-3) did not play. Next: vs. Richmond, Tuesday. 17. Arizona (20-6) did not play. Next: at No. 25 Arizona State, Thursday. 18. Tennessee (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. South Carolina, Tuesday. 19. Wichita State (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. Temple, Thursday. 20. West Virginia (18-7) vs. TCU. Next: at No. 13 Kansas, Saturday. 21. Texas A&M (17-8) did not play. Next: at Missouri, Tuesday. 22. Michigan (20-7) did not play. Next: vs. Iowa, Wednesday. 23. Oklahoma (16-8) did not play. Next: at No. 7 Texas Tech, Tuesday. 24. Nevada (21-5) did not play. Next: at Boise State, Wednesday. 25. Arizona State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 17 Arizona, Thursday.

Women’s Top 25 Fared Monday 1. UConn (25-0) beat No. 4 Louisville 69-58. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 2. Mississippi State (26-0) did not play. Next: at Vanderbilt, Thursday. 3. Baylor (23-1) did not play. Next: at No. 21 Oklahoma State, Tuesday. 4. Louisville (25-2) lost to No. 1 UConn 69-58. Next: at Boston College, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (23-2) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Thursday. 6. Texas (20-4) did not play. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 7. UCLA (21-4) did not play. Next: at No. 15 Oregon State, Friday. 8. South Carolina (20-5) did not play. Next: at No. 20 Georgia, Thursday. 9. Oregon (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 10. Maryland (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Thursday. 11. Tennessee (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 12. Florida State (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 13. Missouri (20-5) beat Arkansas 84-58. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 14. Stanford (18-8) did not play. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 15. Oregon State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 UCLA, Friday. 16. Ohio State (20-6) did not play. Next: at Illinois, Tuesday. 17. Duke (20-6) did not play. Next: at Syracuse, Thursday. 17. Texas A&M (19-7) did not play. Next: vs. Florida, Thursday. 19. Green Bay (22-2) did not play. Next: at Cleveland State, Thursday. 20. Georgia (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 South Carolina, Thursday. 21. Oklahoma State (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 3 Baylor, Tuesday. 22. South Florida (20-5) did not play. Next: vs. SMU, Wednesday. 23. Michigan (20-7) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Wednesday. 24. Belmont (24-3) did not play. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Thursday. 25. N.C. State (20-6) did not play. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday.

Monday’s scores East Bucknell 65, Colgate 64 Canisius 81, Fairfield 63 Siena 82, Iona 78, OT South Alcorn St. 84, Ark.-Pine Bluff 52 Beth.-Cook. 99, NC Central 81 Chowan 82, Johnson C. Smith 81 Hampton 82, Coppin St. 79 Howard 84, Md.-E. Shore 56 Mercer 74, Samford 69 Morgan St. 74, Florida A&M 48 Norfolk St. 93, Delaware St. 58 North Carolina 83, Notre Dame 66 Savannah St. 108, NC A&T 106 Southern U. 55, MVSU 51 UNC Greensboro 74, ETSU 56 Southwest No scores reported from the Southwest. Midwest No scores reported from the Midwest. Far West No scores reported from the Far West.

SOCCER Champions League schedule (Home teams listed first) All Times Central Second Round First Leg Tuesday, Feb. 13 Basel (Switzerland) vs. Manchester City (England), 1:45 p.m. Juventus (Italy) vs. Tottenham (England), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 14 Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Paris Saint-Germain (France), 1:45 p.m. Porto (Portugal) vs. Liverpool (England), 1:45 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m. Second Leg Tuesday, March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Tuesday, March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. S evilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour FedEx Cup Leaders Through Feb. 11 1. Patton Kizzire 2. Jon Rahm 3. Dustin Johnson 4. Jason Day 5. Brendan Steele 6. Chez Reavie 7. Pat Perez 8. Gary Woodland 9. Austin Cook 10. Justin Thomas 11. Patrick Cantlay 12. Brian Harman 13. Justin Rose 14. Chesson Hadley 15. Ted Potter, Jr. 16. Tony Finau 17. Marc Leishman 18. Phil Mickelson 19. Andrew Landry 20. Rickie Fowler 21. J.J. Spaun 22. James Hahn 23. Ryan Armour 24. Keegan Bradley 25. Cameron Smith 26. Whee Kim 27. Brian Gay 28. Tom Hoge 29. Charles Howell III 30. Ollie Schniederjans 31. Brandon Harkins 32. Kevin Streelman 33. Alex Cejka 34. Bryson DeChambeau 35. Alex Noren 36. Si Woo Kim 37. Brian Stuard 38. Kyle Stanley 39. Chris Kirk 40. Ryan Palmer 41. Xander Schauffele 42. Luke List 43. Hideki Matsuyama 44. Martin Piller 45. Paul Casey 46. Zach Johnson 47. Rafa Cabrera Bello 48. Kevin Chappell 49. Jason Kokrak 50. Russell Knox 51. Beau Hossler 52. Grayson Murray 53. Brooks Koepka 54. Scott Brown 55. Bud Cauley 56. Nick Taylor 57. Scott Piercy 58. Peter Uihlein 59. Jhonattan Vegas 60. Anirban Lahiri 61. John Huh 62. Daniel Berger 63. Henrik Stenson 64. Adam Hadwin 65. Webb Simpson 66. Lucas Glover 67. Ben Martin 68. Sung Kang 69. Aaron Wise 70. Kevin Kisner 71. William McGirt 72. Patrick Rodgers 73. Vaughn Taylor 74. Emiliano Grillo 75. Tyrone Van Aswegen

Points 1,247 936 902 814 812 789 778 750 721 688 634 630 628 618 589 569 513 507 499 475 470 461 455 443 439 411 410 389 383 368 362 349 325 314 314 308 306 294 294 287 284 284 282 277 267 266 266 266 265 262 257 247 240 237 235 233 232 231 225 225 222 220 218 218 209 208 205 204 197 196 191 190 190 189 186

Money $2,961,988 $2,101,184 $2,428,067 $2,073,900 $1,814,077 $1,903,277 $2,007,711 $1,777,915 $1,525,694 $2,051,800 $1,500,685 $1,532,084 $1,853,200 $1,486,316 $1,506,517 $1,267,756 $1,515,758 $1,217,997 $1,090,606 $1,204,250 $1,033,447 $1,006,564 $1,070,225 $1,102,089 $1,170,858 $1,106,025 $935,503 $861,687 $884,332 $842,670 $747,950 $770,143 $803,985 $729,871 $759,240 $804,278 $718,697 $714,694 $643,220 $678,532 $691,906 $697,348 $737,213 $644,694 $659,254 $536,222 $716,861 $575,641 $547,475 $579,281 $576,902 $587,312 $739,667 $664,986 $526,909 $507,121 $452,418 $567,591 $494,885 $626,891 $450,146 $498,633 $679,667 $508,764 $415,788 $533,134 $415,439 $504,442 $391,974 $403,806 $414,992 $435,189 $456,205 $430,061 $369,273

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Mizzou women win big in Arkansas ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a game postponed a day because of icy weather, the No. 13 Missouri women’s basketball team had no trouble warming up at Arkansas in an 84-53 victory. The Tigers (20-5, 8-4 SEC) outscored the Razorbacks 3314 in the first quarter, a season-high scoring total for any quarter this season, and cruised the rest of the way, securing the program’s third consecutive 20-win season. Four MU players scored in double figures, led by Sophie Cunningham’s 18 points. Jordan Frericks added 15 points, while Jordan Chavis and Hannah Schuchts came off the bench to score 12 and 10, respectively. The Tigers led for all but the game’s first 15 seconds and climbed in front by as many as 31 points. Arkansas fell to 1213 and 3-9 in the SEC. Mizzou shot 73.3 percent from the field in the first half, including 8 of 15 from 3-point range, and doubled Arkansas’ points in the paint 32-16. It’s the first time MU has posted three straight 20-win seasons since 1984-87. The game was originally scheduled for Sunday afternoon, but icy conditions prevented MU’s team plane from leaving the Columbia airport. (Dave Matter) No. 1 UConn starts strong in win over No. 4 Louisville • Katie Lou Samuelson scored 26 points and top-ranked UConn used an early run to beat No. 4 Louisville 69-58 on Monday night. Napheesa Collier added 14 points and Gabby Williams had 12 points and 15 rebounds for the Huskies (250), who won their 76th consecutive home game and ended Louisville’s 13game road winning streak. Louisville (25-2) scored the first three points, and UConn rattled off 19 straight. Louisville was only able to get within 11 in the final 20 minutes. Every run the Cardinals tried to make in

the second half, Samuelson was there to answer it. She finished short of her season-high 33. Asia Durr missed her first five shots before finishing with 20 points to lead the Cardinals.

MEN

No. 14 North Carolina pulls away late to top Notre Dame • Theo Pinson scored 14 of his 16 points after halftime to go with 10 rebounds, helping No. 14 North Carolina pull away late to beat Notre Dame 83-66. Joel Berry II added 21 points for the Tar Heels (20-7, 9-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who closed a tough stretch with their third game in five days. The first two were emotional rivalry wins, the first coming at home against Duke and Saturday’s coming at North Carolina State. This time, UNC needed a 13-0 burst in the final 5½ minutes to finally get some separation against a team that just kept hanging around. Top scorer Luke Maye struggled to just eight points on 3-for-11 shooting after scoring 33 at N.C. State. But UNC still shot 57 percent after halftime for a fourth straight win. Martinas Geben and John Mooney each scored 18 points for the Fighting Irish (15-11, 5-8). No. 20 WVU beats TCU with strong bench scoring • Teddy Allen scored 16 points, giving No. 20 West Virginia a needed spark off the bench in an 8266 victory over TCU. James “Beetle” Bolden added 14 points, Daxter Miles Jr. scored 13 and Wes Harris had 11 points for West Virginia (19-7, 8-5 Big 12). Desmond Bane had 16 points, Vlad Brodziansky added 15 and Kouat Noi scored 12 for TCU (17-9, 5-8). West Virginia has had trouble holding onto leads throughout the Big 12 season but didn’t let the Horned Frogs come back from a 38-27 halftime deficit.

AP Poll Records through Feb. 11:

Record Pts 1. Virginia (30) 23-2 1557 2. Michigan St. (21) 24-3 1527 3. Villanova (9) 23-2 1518 4. Xavier (5) 23-3 1465 5. Cincinnati 23-2 1359 23-4 1269 6. Purdue 7. Texas Tech 21-4 1258 8. Ohio St. 22-5 1094 9. Gonzaga 23-4 1063 10. Auburn 22-3 1025 11. Clemson 20-4 945 12. Duke 20-5 942 13. Kansas 19-6 816 19-7 763 14. North Carolina 15. Saint Mary’s (Cal) 24-3 683 16. Rhode Island 20-3 666 17. Arizona 20-6 594 18. Tennessee 18-6 580 19. Wichita St. 19-5 495 20. West Virginia 18-7 339 21. Texas A&M 17-8 241 20-7 239 22. Michigan 23. Oklahoma 16-8 152 24. Nevada 21-5 87 25. Arizona St. 19-6 83 Others receiving votes: New Mexico St. 66, Florida 48, Creighton 44, Butler 43, Virginia Tech 29, Mid. Tennessee 26, Alabama 22, Houston 16, Nebraska 15, Missouri 14, Miami 10, Kentucky 8, TCU 8, ETSU 5, Oklahoma St. 4, St. Bon. 3, Louisville 2, Vermont 1, Florida St. 1.

Prv 2 4 1 5 6 3 7 14 12 8 16 9 10 21 11 18 13 15 22 19 — 20 17 23 —

USA Today Poll Records through Feb. 11:

Record Pts 1. Michigan State (17) 24-3 763 2. Villanova (8) 23-2 742 3. Virginia (5) 23-2 736 4. Xavier (1) 23-3 719 5. Cincinnati (1) 23-2 675 21-4 604 6. Texas Tech 7. Purdue 23-4 601 8. Gonzaga 23-4 542 9. Ohio State 22-5 517 10. Duke 20-5 486 11. Auburn 22-3 447 12. Clemson 20-4 424 13. Kansas 19-6 393 20-3 342 14. Rhode Island 15. Saint Mary’s 24-3 341 16. North Carolina 19-7 314 17. Tennessee 18-6 290 18. Wichita State 19-5 250 19. Arizona 20-6 237 20. West Virginia 18-7 184 21. Michigan 20-7 174 19-6 88 22. Arizona State 23. Oklahoma 16-8 87 24. Nevada 21-5 76 25. Creighton 18-7 62 Others receiving votes: Florida 57, Texas A&M 51, Mid. Tennessee 32, New Mexico State 30, Houston 25, Miami 23, Butler 20, Nebraska 18, Virginia Tech 17, Alabama 6, Loyola (Chi.) 6, UCLA 6, Louisville 5, Kentucky 4, Seton Hall 3, TCU 2, ETSU 1.

Pvs 4 1 2 5 6 7 3 11 16 8 9 15 10 19 12 22 14 21 13 17 20 — 18 23 —

Jontay Porter is showing up in draft projections MIZZOU • FROM B1

A&M, Auburn and Mississippi State, the just-turned-18 Jontay scored only 11 points, barely shot 25 percent from the floor, became a stranger to the free throw line and blocked just one shot. The rookie looked overwhelmed by opponents both bigger (A&M) and smaller (Auburn.) With Michael sidelined indefinitely, Mizzou couldn’t afford empty boxscores from multiple Porters. “My mentality going into games, I don’t know if I’m supposed to be the main scorer or a role player or be ‘the man,’” Jontay said a couple of hours later. “But I just told myself no matter how often you touch the ball just be aggressive. That doesn’t mean shoot the ball every time but be aggressive. I was lacking that the last five or six games.” Not at Alabama — and not since. Heading into Tuesday’s critical matchup with No. 21 Texas A&M, Mizzou’s resurgence can be directly tied to Porter’s awakening. The Tigers (17-8, 7-5 SEC) have won four straight games — tied with the Aggies (17-8, 6-6) for the SEC’s longest active winning streak — just as Porter has rediscovered his scoring touch. Since moving to the bench against Alabama, the 6-11 freshman has averaged 13.5 points the last four games while shooting 52.9 percent, including 50 percent (six of 12) from 3-point range. He’s reacquainted himself with the foul line (12 of 17) and blocked nine shots. Porter has played well enough that he’s no longer the only member of his family mentioned as a possible first-round pick in this summer’s NBA draft. Sports Illustrated’s latest projection has the Memphis Grizzlies selecting Michael with the fifth overall choice and the San Antonio Spurs taking Jontay 21 picks later. The Tigers have produced multiple first-round picks in the same draft just once, in 1983, when Steve Stipanovich and Jon Sundvold were chosen at No. 2 and 16. Whether both brothers will be one-and-done college players will be decided in the coming months, but while Mizzou fans wait for Michael’s next evaluation from his spinal surgeon — he’s hoping to get clearance to practice later this week — Jontay continues to emerge as one of the SEC’s most productive young players. He had his most complete game last Tuesday at Oxford, giving the Tigers 18 points, 13 rebounds and five blocked shots in just 23 minutes. Perhaps most impressive, in the game’s final minutes Porter made two crucial blocks while playing with four fouls. Three months into his first college season, Porter has stopped worrying about the soundtrack of whistles that hasn’t stopped screeching in his shadow. He’s picked up at least four fouls in 11 games. “Man, I don’t know at this point what I can do, what I can’t do, will

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri forward Jontay Porter tries to force a turnover against Auburn forward Anfernee McLemore last month at Mizzou Arena. “Just being aggressive is when I’m at my best and help my team the most,” Porter said.

MISSOURI VS. NO. 21 TEXAS A&M When • 6 p.m. Tuesday Where • Mizzou Arena Series • Texas A&M leads 18-16. Last meeting, Texas A&M 60, MU 49. Jan. 20 TV, radio • ESPNU, KTRS (550 AM) Records: • MU (17-8, 7-5), Texas A&M (17-6, 6-6) About Mizzou • The Tigers and Aggies share the SEC’s longest active winning streaks at four games. MU needed overtime to beat Mississippi State 89-85 on Saturday after blowing a 12-point lead with less than two minutes left in regulation. … On Monday, Kassius Robertson was named SEC player of the week for the second straight week. The graduate transfer scored a season-high 27 points last Tuesday at Ole Miss and then had 22 against Mississippi State. About Texas A&M • Billy Kennedy’s Aggies haven’t lost since dropping their Big 12/ SEC Challenge game at Kansas on Jan. 27. A&M has won four straight over Arkansas, South Carolina, Auburn and Kentucky to climb back into the AP Top 25. … A&M has lost three guards from its rotation in recent days. Duane Wilson, a grad transfer from Marquette, suffered a season-ending knee injury Saturday against Kentucky. Freshman J.J. Caldwell has been dismissed from the team, and freshman Jay Jay Chandler was suspended after reports both were arrested for marijuana possession. … Junior center Tyler Davis is one of the SEC’s best post players, averaging 14.3 points and 8.8 rebounds. … Admon Gilder is one of the league’s best two-way guards and helped hold MU’s Robertson to just seven points in the last meeting. Dave Matter

it be a foul or won’t it be,” he said after the win. “Just being aggressive is when I’m at my best and help my team the most.” His older brother is the least surprised Jontay fan. “I knew he was capable of this from the jump,” Michael said last week. “I played with him my whole life.” Michael said he’s urged Jontay to “stay aggressive.” “If we’re going to be as good as we can be, you have to be a big part of this team,” Michael recalled telling him. “He’s really starting to understand this and understand what he can do.” In Saturday’s overtime win over Mississippi State, the Tigers began

to pull away six minutes into the second half on Jontay’s 3-pointer from the top of the key. He eventually fouled out and was credited for two turnovers on inbounds plays during MU’s collapse at the end of regulation, though Martin was more upset at his guards for not meeting those passes with more vigor. Still, Porter finished with 10 points as the Tigers improved to 12-0 in games he’s reached double figure points. “They do some really smart things to take advantage of his skill level,” Mississippi State coach Ben Howland said. “He’s really coming on. He’s a great player.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 2 AMERICA’S LINE NBA Favorite Points Underdog RAPTORS 8 Heat BUCKS 7.5 Hawks Rockets 2.5 T’WOLVES THUNDER 3.5 Cavaliers MAVERICKS 7.5 Kings NUGGETS 1 Spurs COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog BUTLER 11.5 Georgetown Ball St 2.5 AKRON Kansas 7 IOWA ST Boston College 8 PITTSBURGH MISSOURI 1 Texas A&M NEBRASKA 2 Maryland St. Bona 2.5 LASALLE W Michigan 1.5 BOWLING GREEN TOLEDO 9 Ohio U Arkansas 1.5 MISSISSIPPI BUFFALO 13.5 Kent St E MICHIGAN 5 Miami-Ohio NO ILLINOIS 1 C Michigan NORTHERN IOWA 4 Evansville RHODE ISLAND 15 Richmond Virginia 6 MIAMI-FLORIDA TEXAS TECH 7 Oklahoma ALABAMA 6 Lsu TENNESSEE 12 S Carolina Northwestern 3 RUTGERS Michigan St 10 MINNESOTA Write-In Game JAMES MADISON 4.5 NC-Wilmington Added Game MONMOUTH 5 St. Peter’s NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS -$170/+$150 Flames HURRICANES -$125/+$105 Kings Lightning -$175/+$155 SABRES Blue Jackets -$120/even ISLANDERS FLYERS -$155/+$135 Devils PENGUINS -$260/+$220 Senators Ducks -$125/+$105 RED WINGS JETS -$135/+$115 Capitals WILD -$195/+$175 Rangers PREDATORS Blues -$150/+$130 VEGAS KNIGHTS-$200/+$170 Blackhawks SHARKS -$225/+$185 Coyotes Grand Salami: Over/under 69.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Promoted Mike Roose to athletic performance coordinator/strength and conditioning coach, Walter Miranda to Latin American pitching and rehabilitation coordinator, Devin Pearson assistant/ amateur scouting, Greg Rybarczyk senior analyst/baseball research and development and Dan Madsen, Jim Robinson, Quincy Boyd and Fred Peterson national scouting supervisors. Named Adan Severino and Daniel Abroms mental skills coordinators, Kevin Avilla minor league physical therapist, Humberto Sanchez DSL pitching coach and RJ Warner minor league clubhouse assistant, Reed Gragnani Mid-Atlantic area scout, Carl Moesche Northwest area scout, J.J. Altobelli part-time Southern California scout, Mike Ganley director/baseball systems, Bill Letson data architect/baseball systems, Dan Meyer analyst/baseball research and development, Aneko Knowles Bahamas scout and Alfredo Castellon Colombia scout. TEXAS RANGERS — Signed INF Trevor Plouffe to a minor league contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Named Chip Bowers president of business operations. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Signed RHP Daniel Minor. LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Signed LHP Josh Blanco and INF Jake Wark. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed LHP Mitch Lambson and RHP Victor Capellan. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Traded OF Johnny Bladel to Southern Maryland (Atlantic) for future considerations. SUSSEX COUNTY MINERS — Signed C Brian Mayer. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed INFs Taylor Oldham and Taylor Brennan. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed RHP Sean Johnson. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS — Traded OF Connor Oliver to River City for a player to be named. TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS — Signed LHP Seth Brenner and OF Jason Heinrich. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Recalled C Justin Patton from Iowa (NBAGL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G Marco Belinelli. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed CB Lou Young to a one-year contract and general manager Steve Keim to a contract extension through 2022. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed G Josh Andrews. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Re-signed DB Kevin Fogg to a one-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Placed F Troy Brouwer on injured reserve, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled G Jon Gillies from Stockton (AHL) and G Mason McDonald from Kansas City (ECHL) to Stockton. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled F Dylan Sadowy from Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed G Cory Schneider on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 23. Recalled F Nick Lappin from Binghamton (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled D Ryan Sproul from Hartford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Assigned G Chris Driedger from Belleville (AHL) to Brampton (ECHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Belleville F Mike Blunden two games. CLEVELAND MONSTERS — Recalled D Scott Savage from Jacksonville (ECHL) and G Ivan Kulbakov from Quad City (ECHL). LEHIGH VALLEY PHANTOMS — Assigned Fs Steve Swavely and Alex Krushelnyski to Reading (ECHL). MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Loaned D Rick Pinkston to Atlanta (ECHL). SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Recalled D Nolan DeJong from Colorado (ECHL). ECHL ATLANTA GLADIATORS — Agreed to terms with D Drew Baker. BRAMPTON BEAST — Released G Carmine Guerriero. Signed G Daniel Spence. FLORIDA EVERBLADES — Released F Nolan LaPorte. Loaned F Michael Kirkpatrick to Cleveland (AHL). GREENVILLE SWAMP RABBITS — Claimed G Greg Dodds off waivers from Indy. Loaned F Caleb Herbert to San Jose (AHL). IDAHO STEELHEADS — Loaned F Henrik Samuelsson to Rockford (AHL). JACKSONVILLE ICEMEN — Loaned G Austin Lotz to Manitoba (AHL). READING ROYALS — Added G Nick Niedert as emergency backup. SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Signed M Santiago Mosquera from Millonarios FC (Primera A-Colombia). PORTLAND TIMBERS — Waived D Rennico Clarke. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Named Jack Stefanowski goalkeeper coach. United Soccer League OTTAWA FURY — Signed G David Monsalve. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE — Fined South Carolina men’s basketball coach Frank Martin $25,000 for comments about an official that issued him a technical foul. ALBANY (NY) — Named Joe Davis passing game coordinator/quarterbacks coach and Jarred Holley safeties coach. HAMPTON — Named Hank Hughes defensive coordinator and Ataveus Cash quarterbacks coach and passing game coordinator. MINNESOTA STATE — Agreed to terms with softball coach Lori Meyer on a five-year contract extension. MISSISSIPPI — Announced men’s basketball coach Andy Kennedy will step down at the end of the season. SAN JOSE STATE — Announced the resignation of baseball coach Jason Hawkins. SOUTHERN CAL — Signed offensive coordinator Tee Martin and defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast to contract extensions. WILLIAM PENN — Announced it will add men’s and women’s lacrosse and men’s volleyball programs, to begin play in the 2019-20 academic year.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Men’s Top 25 Fared Monday 1. Virginia (23-2) did not play. Next: at Miami, Tuesday. 2. Michigan State (24-3) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Tuesday. 3. Villanova (23-2) did not play. Next: at Providence, Wednesday. 4. Xavier (23-3) did not play. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Wednesday. 5. Cincinnati (23-2) did not play. Next: at Houston, Thursday. 6. Purdue (23-4) did not play. Next: at Wisconsin, Thursday. 7. Texas Tech (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 23 Oklahoma, Tuesday. 8. Ohio State (22-5) did not play. Next: at Penn State, Thursday. 9. Gonzaga (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 10. Auburn (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Kentucky, Wednesday. 11. Clemson (20-4) did not play. Next: at Florida State, Wednesday. 12. Duke (20-5) did not play. Next:

vs. Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 13. Kansas (19-6) did not play. Next: at Iowa State, Tuesday. 14. North Carolina (20-7) beat Notre Dame 83-66. Next: at Louisville, Saturday. 15. Saint Mary’s (24-3) did not play. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 16. Rhode Island (20-3) did not play. Next: vs. Richmond, Tuesday. 17. Arizona (20-6) did not play. Next: at No. 25 Arizona State, Thursday. 18. Tennessee (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. South Carolina, Tuesday. 19. Wichita State (19-5) did not play. Next: vs. Temple, Thursday. 20. West Virginia (19-7) beat TCU 82-66. Next: at No. 13 Kansas, Saturday. 21. Texas A&M (17-8) did not play. Next: at Missouri, Tuesday. 22. Michigan (20-7) did not play. Next: vs. Iowa, Wednesday. 23. Oklahoma (16-8) did not play. Next: at No. 7 Texas Tech, Tuesday. 24. Nevada (21-5) did not play. Next: at Boise State, Wednesday. 25. Arizona State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 17 Arizona, Thursday.

Women’s Top 25 Fared Monday 1. UConn (25-0) beat No. 4 Louisville 69-58. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 2. Mississippi State (26-0) did not play. Next: at Vanderbilt, Thursday. 3. Baylor (23-1) did not play. Next: at No. 21 Oklahoma State, Tuesday. 4. Louisville (25-2) lost to No. 1 UConn 69-58. Next: at Boston College, Thursday. 5. Notre Dame (23-2) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Thursday. 6. Texas (20-4) did not play. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 7. UCLA (21-4) did not play. Next: at No. 15 Oregon State, Friday. 8. South Carolina (20-5) did not play. Next: at No. 20 Georgia, Thursday. 9. Oregon (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 10. Maryland (22-3) did not play. Next: vs. Purdue, Thursday. 11. Tennessee (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 12. Florida State (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 13. Missouri (20-5) beat Arkansas 84-58. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 14. Stanford (18-8) did not play. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 15. Oregon State (19-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 UCLA, Friday. 16. Ohio State (20-6) did not play. Next: at Illinois, Tuesday. 17. Duke (20-6) did not play. Next: at Syracuse, Thursday. 17. Texas A&M (19-7) did not play. Next: vs. Florida, Thursday. 19. Green Bay (22-2) did not play. Next: at Cleveland State, Thursday. 20. Georgia (21-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 South Carolina, Thursday. 21. Oklahoma State (18-6) did not play. Next: vs. No. 3 Baylor, Tuesday. 22. South Florida (20-5) did not play. Next: vs. SMU, Wednesday. 23. Michigan (20-7) did not play. Next: at Minnesota, Wednesday. 24. Belmont (24-3) did not play. Next: vs. Eastern Kentucky, Thursday. 25. N.C. State (20-6) did not play. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday.

Monday’s scores East Bucknell 65, Colgate 64 Canisius 81, Fairfield 63 Siena 82, Iona 78, OT West Virginia 82, TCU 66 South Alcorn St. 84, Ark.-Pine Bluff 52 Beth.-Cook. 99, NC Central 81 Chowan 82, Johnson C. Smith 81 Clayton St. 85, Augusta 72 Hampton 82, Coppin St. 79 Howard 84, Md.-E. Shore 56 Mercer 74, Samford 69 Morgan St. 74, Florida A&M 48 Norfolk St. 93, Delaware St. 58 North Carolina 83, Notre Dame 66 Savannah St. 108, NC A&T 106 Southern U. 55, MVSU 51 UNC Greensboro 74, ETSU 56 Midwest No scores reported from the Midwest. Southwest Baylor 74, Texas 73, 2OT Grambling St. 78, Texas South. 55 Prairie View 63, Jackson St. 58, OT Far West No scores reported from the Far West.

SOCCER Champions League schedule (Home teams listed first) All Times Central Second Round First Leg Tuesday, Feb. 13 Basel (Switzerland) vs. Manchester City (England), 1:45 p.m. Juventus (Italy) vs. Tottenham (England), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 14 Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Paris Saint-Germain (France), 1:45 p.m. Porto (Portugal) vs. Liverpool (England), 1:45 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 1:45 p.m. Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 1:45 p.m. Second Leg Tuesday, March 6 Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 1:45 p.m. Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 1:45 p.m. Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Tuesday, March 13 Manchester United (England) vs. S evilla (Spain), 2:45 p.m. Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), Noon Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 2:45 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour FedEx Cup Leaders Through Feb. 11

Points 1,247 1. Patton Kizzire 2. Jon Rahm 936 3. Dustin Johnson 902 4. Jason Day 814 5. Brendan Steele 812 6. Chez Reavie 789 7. Pat Perez 778 8. Gary Woodland 750 9. Austin Cook 721 10. Justin Thomas 688 11. Patrick Cantlay 634 12. Brian Harman 630 13. Justin Rose 628 14. Chesson Hadley 618 15. Ted Potter, Jr. 589 16. Tony Finau 569 17. Marc Leishman 513 18. Phil Mickelson 507 19. Andrew Landry 499 20. Rickie Fowler 475 21. J.J. Spaun 470 22. James Hahn 461 23. Ryan Armour 455 24. Keegan Bradley 443 25. Cameron Smith 439 26. Whee Kim 411 27. Brian Gay 410 28. Tom Hoge 389 29. Charles Howell III 383 30. Ollie Schniederjans 368 31. Brandon Harkins 362 32. Kevin Streelman 349 33. Alex Cejka 325 34. Bryson DeChambeau 314 35. Alex Noren 314 36. Si Woo Kim 308 37. Brian Stuard 306 38. Kyle Stanley 294 39. Chris Kirk 294 40. Ryan Palmer 287 284 41. Xander Schauffele 284 42. Luke List 43. Hideki Matsuyama 282 44. Martin Piller 277 45. Paul Casey 267 46. Zach Johnson 266 47. Rafa Cabrera Bello 266 48. Kevin Chappell 266 49. Jason Kokrak 265 50. Russell Knox 262 257 51. Beau Hossler 247 52. Grayson Murray 240 53. Brooks Koepka 54. Scott Brown 237 55. Bud Cauley 235 56. Nick Taylor 233 57. Scott Piercy 232 58. Peter Uihlein 231 59. Jhonattan Vegas 225 60. Anirban Lahiri 225 61. John Huh 222 62. Daniel Berger 220 63. Henrik Stenson 218 218 64. Adam Hadwin 65. Webb Simpson 209 208 66. Lucas Glover 67. Ben Martin 205 204 68. Sung Kang 69. Aaron Wise 197 196 70. Kevin Kisner 71. William McGirt 191

Money $2,961,988 $2,101,184 $2,428,067 $2,073,900 $1,814,077 $1,903,277 $2,007,711 $1,777,915 $1,525,694 $2,051,800 $1,500,685 $1,532,084 $1,853,200 $1,486,316 $1,506,517 $1,267,756 $1,515,758 $1,217,997 $1,090,606 $1,204,250 $1,033,447 $1,006,564 $1,070,225 $1,102,089 $1,170,858 $1,106,025 $935,503 $861,687 $884,332 $842,670 $747,950 $770,143 $803,985 $729,871 $759,240 $804,278 $718,697 $714,694 $643,220 $678,532 $691,906 $697,348 $737,213 $644,694 $659,254 $536,222 $716,861 $575,641 $547,475 $579,281 $576,902 $587,312 $739,667 $664,986 $526,909 $507,121 $452,418 $567,591 $494,885 $626,891 $450,146 $498,633 $679,667 $508,764 $415,788 $533,134 $415,439 $504,442 $391,974 $403,806 $414,992

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Mizzou women win big in Arkansas ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a game postponed a day because of icy weather, the No. 13 Missouri women’s basketball team had no trouble warming up at Arkansas in an 84-53 victory. The Tigers (20-5, 8-4 SEC) outscored the Razorbacks 3314 in the first quarter, a season-high scoring total for any quarter this season, and cruised the rest of the way, securing the program’s third consecutive 20-win season. Four MU players scored in double figures, led by Sophie Cunningham’s 18 points. Jordan Frericks added 15 points, while Jordan Chavis and Hannah Schuchts came off the bench to score 12 and 10, respectively. The Tigers led for all but the game’s first 15 seconds and climbed in front by as many as 31 points. Arkansas fell to 1213 and 3-9 in the SEC. Mizzou shot 73.3 percent from the field in the first half, including 8 of 15 from 3-point range, and doubled Arkansas’ points in the paint 32-16. It’s the first time MU has posted three straight 20-win seasons since 1984-87. The game was originally scheduled for Sunday afternoon, but icy conditions prevented MU’s team plane from leaving the Columbia airport. (Dave Matter) No. 1 UConn starts strong in win over No. 4 Louisville • Katie Lou Samuelson scored 26 points and top-ranked UConn used an early run to beat No. 4 Louisville 69-58 on Monday night. Napheesa Collier added 14 points and Gabby Williams had 12 points and 15 rebounds for the Huskies (250), who won their 76th consecutive home game and ended Louisville’s 13game road winning streak. Louisville (25-2) scored the first three points, and UConn rattled off 19 straight. Louisville was only able to get within 11 in the final 20 minutes. Every run the Cardinals tried to make in

the second half, Samuelson was there to answer it. She finished short of her season-high 33. Asia Durr missed her first five shots before finishing with 20 points to lead the Cardinals.

MEN

No. 14 North Carolina pulls away late to top Notre Dame • Theo Pinson scored 14 of his 16 points after halftime to go with 10 rebounds, helping No. 14 North Carolina pull away late to beat Notre Dame 83-66. Joel Berry II added 21 points for the Tar Heels (20-7, 9-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who closed a tough stretch with their third game in five days. The first two were emotional rivalry wins, the first coming at home against Duke and Saturday’s coming at North Carolina State. This time, UNC needed a 13-0 burst in the final 5½ minutes to finally get some separation against a team that just kept hanging around. Top scorer Luke Maye struggled to just eight points on 3-for-11 shooting after scoring 33 at N.C. State. But UNC still shot 57 percent after halftime for a fourth straight win. Martinas Geben and John Mooney each scored 18 points for the Fighting Irish (15-11, 5-8). No. 20 WVU beats TCU with strong bench scoring • Teddy Allen scored 16 points, giving No. 20 West Virginia a needed spark off the bench in an 8266 victory over TCU. James “Beetle” Bolden added 14 points, Daxter Miles Jr. scored 13 and Wes Harris had 11 points for West Virginia (19-7, 8-5 Big 12). Desmond Bane had 16 points, Vlad Brodziansky added 15 and Kouat Noi scored 12 for TCU (17-9, 5-8). West Virginia has had trouble holding onto leads throughout the Big 12 season but didn’t let the Horned Frogs come back from a 38-27 halftime deficit.

AP Poll Records through Feb. 11:

Record Pts 1. Virginia (30) 23-2 1557 2. Michigan St. (21) 24-3 1527 3. Villanova (9) 23-2 1518 4. Xavier (5) 23-3 1465 5. Cincinnati 23-2 1359 6. Purdue 23-4 1269 7. Texas Tech 21-4 1258 8. Ohio St. 22-5 1094 9. Gonzaga 23-4 1063 10. Auburn 22-3 1025 11. Clemson 20-4 945 12. Duke 20-5 942 13. Kansas 19-6 816 14. North Carolina 19-7 763 15. Saint Mary’s (Cal) 24-3 683 16. Rhode Island 20-3 666 17. Arizona 20-6 594 18. Tennessee 18-6 580 19. Wichita St. 19-5 495 20. West Virginia 18-7 339 21. Texas A&M 17-8 241 22. Michigan 20-7 239 23. Oklahoma 16-8 152 24. Nevada 21-5 87 25. Arizona St. 19-6 83 Others receiving votes: New Mexico St. 66, Florida 48, Creighton 44, Butler 43, Virginia Tech 29, Mid. Tennessee 26, Alabama 22, Houston 16, Nebraska 15, Missouri 14, Miami 10, Kentucky 8, TCU 8, ETSU 5, Oklahoma St. 4, St. Bon. 3, Louisville 2, Vermont 1, Florida St. 1.

Prv 2 4 1 5 6 3 7 14 12 8 16 9 10 21 11 18 13 15 22 19 — 20 17 23 —

USA Today Poll Records through Feb. 11:

Record Pts 1. Michigan State (17) 24-3 763 2. Villanova (8) 23-2 742 3. Virginia (5) 23-2 736 4. Xavier (1) 23-3 719 5. Cincinnati (1) 23-2 675 6. Texas Tech 21-4 604 7. Purdue 23-4 601 8. Gonzaga 23-4 542 9. Ohio State 22-5 517 10. Duke 20-5 486 11. Auburn 22-3 447 12. Clemson 20-4 424 13. Kansas 19-6 393 14. Rhode Island 20-3 342 15. Saint Mary’s 24-3 341 16. North Carolina 19-7 314 17. Tennessee 18-6 290 18. Wichita State 19-5 250 19. Arizona 20-6 237 20. West Virginia 18-7 184 21. Michigan 20-7 174 22. Arizona State 19-6 88 23. Oklahoma 16-8 87 24. Nevada 21-5 76 25. Creighton 18-7 62 Others receiving votes: Florida 57, Texas A&M 51, Mid. Tennessee 32, New Mexico State 30, Houston 25, Miami 23, Butler 20, Nebraska 18, Virginia Tech 17, Alabama 6, Loyola (Chi.) 6, UCLA 6, Louisville 5, Kentucky 4, Seton Hall 3, TCU 2, ETSU 1.

Pvs 4 1 2 5 6 7 3 11 16 8 9 15 10 19 12 22 14 21 13 17 20 — 18 23 —

Jontay Porter is showing up in draft projections MIZZOU • FROM B1

A&M, Auburn and Mississippi State, the just-turned-18 Jontay scored only 11 points, barely shot 25 percent from the floor, became a stranger to the free throw line and blocked just one shot. The rookie looked overwhelmed by opponents both bigger (A&M) and smaller (Auburn.) With Michael sidelined indefinitely, Mizzou couldn’t afford empty boxscores from multiple Porters. “My mentality going into games, I don’t know if I’m supposed to be the main scorer or a role player or be ‘the man,’” Jontay said a couple of hours later. “But I just told myself no matter how often you touch the ball just be aggressive. That doesn’t mean shoot the ball every time but be aggressive. I was lacking that the last five or six games.” Not at Alabama — and not since. Heading into Tuesday’s critical matchup with No. 21 Texas A&M, Mizzou’s resurgence can be directly tied to Porter’s awakening. The Tigers (17-8, 7-5 SEC) have won four straight games — tied with the Aggies (17-8, 6-6) for the SEC’s longest active winning streak — just as Porter has rediscovered his scoring touch. Since moving to the bench against Alabama, the 6-11 freshman has averaged 13.5 points the last four games while shooting 52.9 percent, including 50 percent (six of 12) from 3-point range. He’s reacquainted himself with the foul line (12 of 17) and blocked nine shots. Porter has played well enough that he’s no longer the only member of his family mentioned as a possible first-round pick in this summer’s NBA draft. Sports Illustrated’s latest projection has the Memphis Grizzlies selecting Michael with the fifth overall choice and the San Antonio Spurs taking Jontay 21 picks later. The Tigers have produced multiple first-round picks in the same draft just once, in 1983, when Steve Stipanovich and Jon Sundvold were chosen at No. 2 and 16. Whether both brothers will be one-and-done college players will be decided in the coming months, but while Mizzou fans wait for Michael’s next evaluation from his spinal surgeon — he’s hoping to get clearance to practice later this week — Jontay continues to emerge as one of the SEC’s most productive young players. He had his most complete game last Tuesday at Oxford, giving the Tigers 18 points, 13 rebounds and five blocked shots in just 23 minutes. Perhaps most impressive, in the game’s final minutes Porter made two crucial blocks while playing with four fouls. Three months into his first college season, Porter has stopped worrying about the soundtrack of whistles that hasn’t stopped screeching in his shadow. He’s picked up at least four fouls in 11 games. “Man, I don’t know at this point what I can do, what I can’t do, will

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Missouri forward Jontay Porter tries to force a turnover against Auburn forward Anfernee McLemore last month at Mizzou Arena. “Just being aggressive is when I’m at my best and help my team the most,” Porter said.

MISSOURI VS. NO. 21 TEXAS A&M When • 6 p.m. Tuesday Where • Mizzou Arena Series • Texas A&M leads 18-16. Last meeting, Texas A&M 60, MU 49. Jan. 20 TV, radio • ESPNU, KTRS (550 AM) Records: • MU (17-8, 7-5), Texas A&M (17-6, 6-6) About Mizzou • The Tigers and Aggies share the SEC’s longest active winning streaks at four games. MU needed overtime to beat Mississippi State 89-85 on Saturday after blowing a 12-point lead with less than two minutes left in regulation. … On Monday, Kassius Robertson was named SEC player of the week for the second straight week. The graduate transfer scored a season-high 27 points last Tuesday at Ole Miss and then had 22 against Mississippi State. About Texas A&M • Billy Kennedy’s Aggies haven’t lost since dropping their Big 12/ SEC Challenge game at Kansas on Jan. 27. A&M has won four straight over Arkansas, South Carolina, Auburn and Kentucky to climb back into the AP Top 25. … A&M has lost three guards from its rotation in recent days. Duane Wilson, a grad transfer from Marquette, suffered a season-ending knee injury Saturday against Kentucky. Freshman J.J. Caldwell has been dismissed from the team, and freshman Jay Jay Chandler was suspended after reports both were arrested for marijuana possession. … Junior center Tyler Davis is one of the SEC’s best post players, averaging 14.3 points and 8.8 rebounds. … Admon Gilder is one of the league’s best two-way guards and helped hold MU’s Robertson to just seven points in the last meeting. Dave Matter

it be a foul or won’t it be,” he said after the win. “Just being aggressive is when I’m at my best and help my team the most.” His older brother is the least surprised Jontay fan. “I knew he was capable of this from the jump,” Michael said last week. “I played with him my whole life.” Michael said he’s urged Jontay to “stay aggressive.” “If we’re going to be as good as we can be, you have to be a big part of this team,” Michael recalled telling him. “He’s really starting to understand this and understand what he can do.” In Saturday’s overtime win over Mississippi State, the Tigers began

to pull away six minutes into the second half on Jontay’s 3-pointer from the top of the key. He eventually fouled out and was credited for two turnovers on inbounds plays during MU’s collapse at the end of regulation, though Martin was more upset at his guards for not meeting those passes with more vigor. Still, Porter finished with 10 points as the Tigers improved to 12-0 in games he’s reached double figure points. “They do some really smart things to take advantage of his skill level,” Mississippi State coach Ben Howland said. “He’s really coming on. He’s a great player.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH MONDAY’S RESULTS

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

BOYS BASKETBALL • NOTEBOOK

Parkway Central celebrates Kirby; Gordon returns for Webster Groves Monday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. GIRLS BASKETBALL BOX SCORES

Crossroads 8 8 6 7 29 Hancock 15 11 9 8 43 H (9-12): Turner 18, Stroup 8, Stewart 7, Warren 6, Moultrie 4. FG 16 (1), FT 10-18. Soldan 6 5 6 7 24 Metro 19 19 18 7 63 M (20-6): Flowers 27, Bland 15, Goldman 9, Hudson 5, Hunt 3, Burt 2, Scott 2. FG 29 (2), FT 3-11. Pacific 19 24 20 8 71 Owensville 9 12 11 2 34 P (10-11): Brocato 23, Mueller 14, Burrows 10, Murray 6, Harrison 4, King 4, O’Neill 4, White 4, Toney 2. FG 28 (8), FT 7-12. McCluer 7 7 7 4 25 Luth. North 27 21 17 11 76 L (19-3): Moore-Hughes 19, Ferguson 16, Hayden 14, A. Buford 8, Dukes 8, Earls 4, Smith 4, Jackson 3. FG 29 (7), FT 11-13. Jefferson 14 17 26 10 67 Crystal City 13 13 6 7 39 J (12-11): Hearst 15, Becherer 14, Floyd 12, Cattoor 11, Chipps 5, Courtois 4, Fuller 4, Boulicault 2. FG 26 (6), FT 9-17. North Callawa 19 9 13 11 52 Mark Twain 8 8 13 18 47 N (12-11): Ausfahl 15, Emmons 15, Schlueter 14, R. Schmauch 5, Murray 2, D. Schmauch 1. FG 16 (7), FT 13-20. Brentwood 14 8 11 8 41 Herculaneum 24 20 18 9 71 B (13-11): Franklin 18, Jones 8, Clay 4, Gombas 4, Ingersoll 4, Tonis 2, Hill 1. FG 18 (2), FT 3-6. In. Word 10 9 27 17 63 Pky. North 10 23 22 21 76 I (18-5): Morris 18, Jackson-Morris 15, Woltman 14, Warren 8, Kell 3, Rolfes 3, Flowers 2. FG 25 (4), FT 9-12. P (19-5): Stovall 30, Davis 27, Rhodes 10, Stacker 6, A. Jordan 3. FG 25 (11), FT 15-19. Mascoutah 6 10 12 13 41 Columbia 8 8 17 17 50 C (17-10): Edwards 16, Bonaldi 10, Henke 10, Touchette 8, Harrell 6. FG 20 (1), FT 9-13. Holt 16 13 18 12 59 Haz. West 6 12 10 9 37 Ho (15-6): N. Griesenauer 30, Green 11, Adam 4, Bargaineer 4, A. Meyer 4, Robinson 4, Forrest 2. FG 24 (5), FT 6-10. Ha (10-9): Mathews 13, Patterson 12, Blackson 8, Dilworth 4. FG 15 (2), FT 5-9. O’F Christian 11 14 11 13 49 Liberty 11 4 3 3 21 O (17-7): Kinsey 14, Stugart 12, King 11, Markham 6, Stone 4, Herrin 2. FG 20 (3), FT 6-12. L (5-15): Schaeffer 9, Van Pamel 5, M. Giljum 2, Patterson 2, Watson 2, E. Giljum 1. FG 8 (1), FT 4-9. Clayton 13 18 7 21 59 JohnBurroughs 15 15 3 11 44 C (8-13): Markenson 14, Conner 11, M. Upshaw 10, Downs 8, Gallegos 6, Litteken 6, Nettles 2, Wade 2. FG 20 (2), FT 17-22. 19 8 12 18 57 Pattonville FH North 15 9 11 9 44 P (14-7): Battle 11, Brown 11, Smith 11, Mack 10, Jenkins 8, Nelson 6. FG 20 (0), FT 17-24. F (5-17): Willson 15, G. Delarue 11, I. Delarue 7, O’leary 4, Stevenson 3, Richardson 2, Stevens 2. FG 19 (4), FT 2-4. Pky. Central 20 11 15 13 59 Webster 17 9 8 15 49 P (19-3): Hilton 21, Kelly 13, O. Stephens 11, Moore 6, Coleman 5, Perry 3. FG 23 (3), FT 10-21. W (10-13): Rodriguez 13, Daniels 11, Moore 9, Lauren 8, Bailey 6, Ellis 2. FG 18 (5), FT 8-16. Zumwalt East 2 10 11 5 28 V. Duchesne 16 22 7 16 61 V (6-12): Mueller 19, Gast 17, Grewe 9, Deines 7, Griesediek 7, Burns 2. FG 18 (4), FT 21-25. Union 11 6 11 10 42 St. Clair 12 10 10 6 47 U (10-13): Resser 16, Seely 11, Overstreet 7, Bunch 6, Siedhoff 2. FG 11 (4), FT 16-22. S (17-6): Sohn 12, M. Hinson 9, Schmidtke 7, Buscher 6, Bursey 4, Machelett 4, A. Hinson 2, Shirey 2, LaCrone 1. FG 15 (1), FT 16-26. Triad 10 17 22 15 64 Cahokia 10 10 17 23 60 T (9-15): Barisch 17, Cochran 16, Renspurger 10, Suess 8, Miller 6, Fandrey 4, Wilson 3. FG 19 (3), FT 23-40. C (11-10): Jennings 14, Brownlee 12, Tucker 8, Wheaton 7, Jeffries 6, Wells 6, Roberson 3, Gines 2, Lacy 2. FG 21 (5), FT 13-24. Carrollton 9 6 11 9 35 Lebanon 9 17 15 14 55 L (29-1): Schoenfeld 16, A. Reinneck 13, K. Bass 11, E. Reinneck 6, K. Bass 4, Fertig 4, McNeese 1. FG 22 (6), FT 5-5. St. Dominic 5 16 9 8 38 Notre Dame 9 11 9 3 32 S (16-5): Miller 10, Kasubke 9, Benedict 6, Poli 6, Morrow 3, M. Ballard 2, Hermann 2. FG 16 (2), FT 4-7. N (13-8): Boemer 9, Neels 9, N. Klutho 5, Sodemann 4, Campbell 3, Scharenberg 2. FG 13 (3), FT 3-4. St. James 10 8 11 9 38 Hermann 11 15 13 17 56 H (20-3): Erickson 16, Godat 10, B. Grosse 9, Stiers 7, Schannuth 6, Brune 5, Schneider 2, Krueger 1. FG 22 (4), FT 8-12. North County 9 10 4 12 35 Festus 6 9 17 17 49 N (13-11): Winch 21, Christopher 4, Gant 3, Thomas 3, Huber 2, Mason 2. FG 15 (0), FT 5-11. F (12-9): Rickermann 20, Welsh 12, Oetting 11, Hebenstriet 4, Kuykendall 2. FG 13 (4), FT 19-28. Waterloo 10 5 8 10 33 Freeburg 26 11 19 13 69 W (4-21): Albers 12, Luedeman 6, Diekman 5, Schultheis 3, Aldridge 2, Bosler 2, Novack 2, Rodriguez 1. FG 13 (5), FT 2-7. F (20-6): Oliver 21, Cockrell 14, Eichenlaub 8, Mueller 8, Mense 5, Whitworth 4, Mirly 3, Holcomb 2, Kimes 2, Wolf 2. FG 26 (8), FT 9-13.

GIRLS SCORES

Francis Howell 44, Howell Central 37 Sullivan 55, New Haven 27

BOYS BASKETBALL BOX SCORES

Brentwood 9 13 11 23 56 8 21 11 26 66 Maplewood-RH B (7-14): Gordan 15, C. Hill 13, King 12, C. Jones 8, Mitchell 4, C. Hill 2, McClure 2. FG 20 (3), FT 13-22. M (11-10): Grady-Liska 22, Becton 12, Brunson 11, Guynn 9, Roberson 8, I. Pearson 4. FG 20 (3), FT 23-41. Crossroads 6 7 8 6 27 28 21 12 6 67 Hancock C (2-22): Caradine 6, Aguayo-Craig 5, Chester 3, Lutjens 3, Baumstark 2, Bogan 2, Guest 2, McAdoo 2, Thomas 2. FG 11 (1), FT 4-8. H (17-5): Richardson 18, Warren 16, Moultrie 8, Pickens 8, Burton 6, Pilica 4, Livingston 3, Stroup 3, Jennings 1. FG 25 (6), FT 11-15. Pittsfield 12 10 11 17 50 20 16 10 14 60 Jerseyville J (14-11): Hall 19, Wittman 12, Tuttle 11, Goldacker 6, Ross 5, Jackson 3, Rexing 2, Shaw 2. FG 20 (8), FT 12-17. Pky. South 22 9 19 13 63 24 10 15 12 61 Kirkwood P (14-8): DeRouse 19, A. Sommer 13, A. Sommer 11, Doyle 10, Mullen 6, Rollins 3, Skidmore 1. FG 20 (6), FT 17-24. K (12-10): Maclin 21, Clay 15, Kanzler 14, Tyrell 7, Lay 3, McDowell 1. FG 23 (4), FT 11-18. JohnBurroughs 6 5 12 7 30 8 8 4 8 28 Clayton J (15-7): Goldfarb 7, D. Miller 6, Worsham 6, Nicolais 5, Davila 4, Bolster 2. FG 12 (3), FT 3-8. C (4-17): Sams 13, C. Heusel 5, Tripathy 4, Chestnutt-Perry 3, Adams 2, Bax 1. FG 9 (2), FT 8-14. Duchesne 21 10 21 14 66 Borgia 6 10 13 10 39 D (16-8): Moore 19, Loewenstein 16, Fairless 14, Tune 6, Norwine 5, O’Brien 3, Suellentrop 3. FG 24 (5), FT 13-16.

BOYS SCORES

De Soto 53, Union 52 Madison 68, Metro-East Lutheran 64 Nokomis 57, Wood River 11 North County 70, Windsor 50 Park Hills Central 70, Sullivan 56

HOCKEY

MID-STATES CHALLENGE CUP Quarterfinals, Leg 2 SLUH 6, Edwardsville 1; SLUH wins series 2-0 CBC 2, Kirkwood 1; CBC wins series 2-0 MID-STATES WICKENHEISER CUP Quarterfinals, Leg 2 Marquette 5, Lafayette 2; Marquette wins series 2-0 MVCHA 2A PLAYOFFS O’Fallon 7, Freeburg/Waterloo 1; O’Fallon wins series 2-0

AREA RANKINGS, WEEK 11

BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

The more Rick Kirby scanned the crowd, the more faces he recognized. Faces he hadn’t seen in a long time. Faces Kirby didn’t think had much reason to be in Parkway Central’s gym Friday night. Unbeknownst to him, they did have a reason. They were there for him. The longtime Parkway Central boys basketball coach, Kirby was honored alongside his seniors Friday night in the Colts’ final home game this season. About 40 former players and their families, teachers, administrators and other former coaches showed up at Central to show their appreciation for Kirby, who officially announced this season would be his last. Kirby, 59, will step down from the only head coaching job he’s ever had when the Colts’ season ends, whenever that may be. “I’ve been thinking about it for a while,” Kirby said. This is the second time Kirby will walk away from the Colts. His first tenure began in 1988 and ended in 2005, when he wanted to spend more time watching his son, Austin, play college basketball. He was rehired as Central’s coach before the 2012-13 season. Over the course of his two tenures, Kirby has won more than 440 games and guided the Colts to five district titles and four state semifinal appearances. He’s the all-time wins leader for the entire Parkway School District. In 2012, he was inducted into the Missouri High School Coaches Hall of Fame. After the Colts’ senior night ceremony concluded, Parkway athletic director Mike Roth told Kirby they had another bit of business to attend to before the game began. “I thought he might walk to the bench and say ‘No’ and get ready to throw it up,” Roth said with a laugh. One by one, the former players who attended were announced and met Kirby on the court for a hug and a handshake. Kirby can be tough to crack, but he soaked in everything for as long as he could. “You live for times like these,” Kirby said. “That was a treasure to me. It’s something you’ll never forget.” The retirement ceremony was a surprise to not only Kirby but his players. They didn’t know this would be Kirby’s last season. In an effort to not distract his seniorladen team from its goal of returning to the Class 4 state semifinals, he kept his decision to himself. The news had slowly started to filter out, but Kirby didn’t make it official until Friday. “That’s why I waited so long,” he said. “I didn’t want them to think I was a quitter.” The No. 5 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Central (19-4) did enough to push past Clayton, 58-47. Senior guard DeAndre Campbell had 20 points to lead the Colts. Jake Silvestri scored 12 points on four 3-pointers. After his team gritted out the victory, Kirby made a point to tell the players his impending retirement didn’t change the way they should go about their business. It certainly won’t change how he coaches. “I’ve kicked their (butts) up one side of the gym and down the other,” Kirby said. “I will continue to do that until the last day of my coaching career.”

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Parkway Central boys basketball coach Rick Kirby talks to his players during a game against St. Charles earlier this season. Kirby, who has led the Colts to four state semifinal appearances, has announced this will be his last season as the program’shelm.

Parkway Central’s matchup Friday at Jennings has Kirby’s blood pumping. The No. 5 small school, Jennings (20-3) can be a dogged opponent and plays well at home in front of its fans. These teams met last season in the state quarterfinals, with Central winning 66-48. “It’s great, win, lose or draw,” Kirby said. “It’s going to be a hostile environment on the road and it’s perfect. This is the time of year you need great games.” If Kirby has his wish, the Colts will have their share of great games and make a fifth state semifinal appearance. When you’re in the moment every day it can be hard to take a step back and appreciate the sum of all that work. Orchestrated by Debbie, Kirby’s wife of 36 years, and their three children, Austin, Ashley and Lauren, the retirement ceremony showed him just that. Kirby got a glimpse of his impact as his former players greeted him on the court. “It was good to hug them all,” Kirby said. “It was special stuff.”

GORDON RETURNS, STATESMEN FACE VASHON

Carte’Are Gordon returned from a two-week suspension Friday. The 6-foot-7 power forward scored 11 points, grabbed 15 rebounds, blocked three shots and had five steals in Webster Groves’ 81-38 win at Summit. The No. 3 large school, Webster Groves (14-7) has won backto-back games and seven of its last eight. The lone defeat in that stretch was a 78-67 loss to Belleville West at the O’Fallon Shootout on Feb. 3. Gordon suspension stemmed from an altercation prior to the Statesmen’s 65-58 win over St. Louis U. High on Jan. 26. A St. Louis University signee, Gordon missed three games including the matchup with Belleville West. Webster coach Jay Blossom said Gordon has done everything he was asked to in order to return to the team. “He realized he made a mistake and accepted responsibility for it,” Blossom said. “He had a great week in the classroom and a good week on the court. Now we’re going to try to put together another good week.” The defending Class 5 champion, Webster takes on No. 1 small school and two-time defending Class 4 champion Vashon (17-4) at 7 p.m. Thursday at St. Louis Community College–Meramec. Webster is selling tickets ahead

GIRLS BASKETBALL ILLINOIS PLAYOFFS

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE

4A CHATHAM GLENWOOD REGIONAL First round, Monday Champaign Centennial 36, Quincy 33 Semifinals, Wednesday O’Fallon vs. Centennial, 6 p.m. Springfield High vs. Glenwood, 7:30 p.m. 4A BELLEVILLE EAST REGIONAL First round, Tuesday Belleville West (6-20) vs. Alton (9-16), 6 p.m. Gran.City (2-19) vs. Collinsville (12-13), 7:30 p.m. 3A CIVIC MEMORIAL REGIONAL First round, Monday Triad 64, Cahokia 60 Semifinals, Wednesday Triad vs. Civic Memorial, 6 p.m. East St. Louis vs. Highland, 7:30 p.m. 3A FREEBURG REGIONAL First round Columbia 50, Mascoutah 41 Freeburg 69, Waterloo 33 Semifinals, Tuesday Columbia vs Breese Central, 6 p.m. Jerseyville at Freeburg, 7:30 p.m. 2A HAMILTON COUNTY SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Vienna vs. Mater Dei (21-7), 6 p.m. Nashville (21-8) vs. Harrisburg, 7:30 p.m. 2A RIVERTON SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Auburn vs Tri-City, 6 p.m. Alton Marq. (20-8) vs. Pleasant Plains, 7:30 p.m. 1A GOREVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals, Monday Meridian 65, Bluford (Webber) 36 New Athens 51, Gallatin County 49 Championship, Thursday New Athens (15-12) vs. Meridian, 7 p.m. 1A NORTH GREENE SECTIONAL Semifinal, Monday Lebanon 55, Carrollton 35 Semifinal, Tuesday Okawville (22-8) vs. Jacksonville Routt, 7 p.m. Championship, Thursday Lebanon (29-1) vs. TBD, 7 p.m.

Grandview (5-17) at Valle, 5:30 p.m. New Haven (7-16) at Sullivan (11-10), 5:30 p.m. McCluer (3-17) at Ritenour (11-11), 5:30 p.m. North Callaway (12-11) at Mark Twain, 5:30 p.m. Riverview Gardens (4-16) at North Tech (4-18), 5:30 p.m. Wood River (7-18) at ME Lutheran (11-15), 6 p.m. Ramsey at Father McGivney (7-20), 6 p.m. Normandy (9-14) at Confluence (20-4), 6 p.m. Sumner (8-8) at Miller Career (10-10), 6 p.m. Hillsboro, Ill. (13-9) at Piasa Southwestern (16-7), 6 p.m. Jefferson (16-7) at Marquand Zion, 6 p.m. Gillespie (3-14) at Bunker Hill (1-21), 6 p.m. St. Vincent (15-4) at Kingston, 6 p.m. Parkway North (9-12) at Timberland (6-15), 6 p.m. Dupo (5-18) at Lebanon (11-16), 6:15 p.m. Breese Central (11-13) at Alton Marquette (26-0), 6:15 p.m. Lovejoy (14-12) at Valmeyer (13-12), 6:15 p.m. Bayless (6-14) at Hancock (16-5), 6:30 p.m. Valley Park (16-6) at Brussels (5-15), 6:30 p.m. Liberty (17-6) at FH North (4-15), 6:30 p.m. Roosevelt (5-16) vs. Medicine and Bio (2-11) at NW Academy, 6:30 p.m. Fox (5-15) at Parkway South (13-8), 7 p.m. Lutheran South (10-12) at Westminster (12-10), 7 p.m. Bismarck at Herculaneum (7-15), 7 p.m. St. Charles (16-7) at FH Central (7-14), 7 p.m. Union (9-13) at St. Clair (5-16), 7 p.m. Pacific (17-4) at Owensville (2-10), 7 p.m. Eureka (14-8) at Lindbergh (9-11), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (2-18) at University City (6-16), 7 p.m. Van-Far (3-0) at Wright City (10-10), 7 p.m. Priory (12-8) at Lutheran North (12-12), 7 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL

of time for the Vashon game. Last year’s matchup had people hanging from Vashon’s rafters as two eventual state champions battled from the first whistle to the last. Webster escaped with a 60-59 victory when senior point guard Courtney Ramey hit the go-ahead free throw with four seconds to play. Vashon’s buzzer-beater hit the rim and rolled out. “It’s a chance to play one of the premier programs in the state of Missouri,” Blossom said. “Our kids are excited and I know their kids are looking for revenge.”

JOHN BURROUGHS BEATS MICDS AT BUZZER

Josh Worsham brought down the house. A senior guard for John Burroughs, Worsham knocked down a runner just before time expired to lift the Bombers to a 46-45 win over MICDS at home Friday. It’s the first time Burroughs has beaten MICDS since it swept the 2012-13 season series. “It’s always good to beat your rival,” Burroughs coach Corey Frazier said. The win put Burroughs on the fast track to its first Metro League title since that 2012-13 season. The Bombers are 14-7 overall and 6-2 in conference. A victory Thursday at Lutheran North will lock up the league championship.

HAZELWOOD CENTRAL’S LOADED FINISH

For the second time in his brief tenure as Hazelwood Central’s coach and the first time in two months, Brandon Gilmore had to deal with defeat. The No. 1 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Central (21-2) took a 6857 loss to Rock Bridge in its final home game. It snapped the Hawks’ 14-game winning streak and gave them their first defeat since falling 75-69 to Chicago’s Orr Academy on Dec. 16 in the Midwest Showdown at Webster Groves High. “It helped us a lot. It humbled us a bit,” Gilmore said. “We needed to get back to basics.” Shaun Williams had a teamhigh 26 points for Central. A Kansas State signee, Williams was out-dueled by Rock Bridge standout junior shooting guard Isiaih Mosley, who had 33 points and grabbed eight rebounds. Mosley is the No. 3-rated recruit in Missouri in his class according to Rivals. com. He falls behind Poplar Bluff’s Marcedus Leech and Vashon’s Mario McKinney Jr. Gilmore said the plan was to play

Fort Zumwalt West (12-10) at Troy (13-9), 7 p.m. Oakville (9-9) at Northwest-CH (1-19), 7 p.m. Festus (12-10) at North County (10-3), 7 p.m. Lafayette (10-12) at Seckman (6-12), 7 p.m. Mehlville (13-8) at Marquette (14-8), 7 p.m. St. Louis Christian (4-10) at Vashon (17-4), 7 p.m. Chaminade (17-4) at De Smet (5-15), 7 p.m. St. Dominic (11-9) at O’Fallon Christian (15-8), 7:15 p.m. Perryville (5-6) at Hillsboro (20-3), 7:15 p.m. Borgia (11-10) at Luth. St. Charles (2-21), 7:15 p.m. Benton (6-1) at Mount Vernon (12-10), 7:20 p.m. Columbia (14-10) at Wesclin (21-4), 7:30 p.m. St. James (16-6) at Hermann (8-15), 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon (9-14) at Granite City (8-15), 7:30 p.m. Edwardsville (13-8) at Collinsville (15-10), 7:30 p.m. Red Bud (13-11) at New Athens (5-17), 7:30 p.m. Belleville East (11-12) at Belleville West (21-2), 7:30 p.m. Carlyle (11-17) at Greenville (15-11), 7:30 p.m. Litchfield (12-13) at Pana, 7:30 p.m. Carlinville (8-15) at Staunton (13-11), 7:30 p.m. Vandalia (8-5) at Roxana (4-22), 7:30 p.m. Waterloo (7-18) at Highland (17-8), 7:30 p.m. Mater Dei (12-13) at Civic Memorial (16-8), 7:30 p.m. St. Charles West (8-13) at Warrenton (14-6), 7:30 p.m. Sparta (5-10) at Okawville (18-8), 7:45 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Bayless (1-19) at Hancock (8-12), 5 p.m. Riverview Gardens (5-14) at McCluer North (11-13), 5:30 p.m. Fox (7-10) at Parkway South (11-11), 5:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (7-15) at Troy (13-8), 5:30 p.m. Oakville (12-7) at Northwest-CH (4-16), 5:30 p.m.

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 21-2 1. Hazelwood Central 2. Belleville West 21-2 3. Webster Groves 14-7 4. Chaminade 17-4 19-4 5. Parkway Central 6. Francis Howell 21-3 7. Edwardsville 13-8 8. Liberty 17-6 14-8 9. Alton 10. Fort Zumwalt South 19-3 SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 17-4 1. Vashon 2. Alton Marquette 26-0 3. Confluence 20-4 4. St. Mary’s 22-3 5. Northwest Academy 16-6 6. Jennings 20-3 7. Whitfield 16-7 8. Trinity 18-3 9. Wesclin 21-4 17-8 10. Cardinal Ritter

LW 1 3 4 2 5 8 7 — — 6 LW 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 8 10 9

a high-quality opponent at the end of the season to give the Hawks one last look at what it takes to run with some of the state’s elite. “That’s why we scheduled them at the end of the season,” he said. “It’s going to work out for us in the long run.” Central plays at Riverview Gardens on Thursday, then wraps its regular season next week with two powerhouses. It hosts No. 3 large school Webster Groves on Feb. 20 and then travels to No. 1 small school Vashon on Feb. 22. The matchup with Webster is a Suburban Conference crossover game. Central won the Suburban XII North and Webster won the Suburban XII South to set up the highpowered showdown.

TIP-INS

• St. Mary’s 88-46 win over Chaminade last week was the largest margin of defeat for Chaminade since at least the 1999-00 season. The No. 4 large school, Chaminade (17-4) lost by 30 or more points four other times since 1999-00. The previous largest margin was 38 in a 74-36 loss to McCluer at the Pattonville Tournament on December 2, 2011. Hazelwood Central beat the Red Devils by 36 in a 66-30 win at Pattonville, too, on December 11, 2012. Maplewood-Richmond Heights won 64-30 on February 11, 2012. Chaminade bounced back with a 78-70 win over CBC on Friday. The No. 4 small school, St. Mary’s (22-3) survived Duchesne in overtime on Friday. The Dragons host Cardinal Ritter at 7 p.m. Thursday. • Class 3 district play begins Saturday for area teams with the District 3 tournament at Cuba and the District 7 tournament at Winfield. Other area sites hosting include the District 4 tournament at Whitfield and the District 6 tournament at Duchesne. Roosevelt will host the District 5 tournament at Vashon. The No. 7 small school, Whitfield (16-7) is the top seed followed by Hancock (16-5) in the District 4 tournament. The No. 10 small school, Ritter (17-8) is the top seed in District 5. No. 8 small Trinity (18-3) is the top seed in District 6. O’Fallon Christian (15-8) is the No. 1 seed at Winfield. • No. 3 small school Confluence (20-4) is back in action when it hosts Normandy (9-14) at 6 p.m. Tuesday. It’ll be senior night for the Titans, who’ll look to give their home crowd a game to remember. Senior point guard Brandon Fredrick, who averages 28 points per game, will have the green light in his final home game.

Hermann (19-3) at Pacific (9-11), 5:30 p.m. St. Charles (14-8) at FH Central (18-3), 5:30 p.m. Lafayette (14-6) at Seckman (9-9), 5:30 p.m. Eureka (14-8) at Lindbergh (10-11), 5:30 p.m. Windsor (3-15) at Grandview (19-2), 5:30 p.m. Mehlville (3-17) at Marquette (8-12), 5:30 p.m. Ritenour (10-10) at McCluer (6-15), 5:30 p.m. Lutheran South (14-7) at Ursuline (6-13), 6 p.m. Ladue (13-6) at MICDS (18-3), 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (7-14) at Winfield (2-19), 6 p.m. Westminster (8-13) at Kirkwood (18-3), 6 p.m. St. Charles West (6-15) at Warrenton (11-6), 6 p.m. Herculaneum (17-3) at Meadow Heights, 6 p.m. Lift For Life (9-10) at Gateway STEM (14-6), 6:30 p.m. University City (11-9) vs. Metro (19-6) at Matthews-Dickey, 6:30 p.m. Vashon (5-7) at Soldan (8-10), 6:30 p.m. Washington (12-10) at Cor Jesu (8-15), 6:30 p.m. Nerinx Hall (10-12) at Fort Zumwalt South (13-8), 7 p.m. Valle Catholic (2-7) at Jefferson (11-11), 7 p.m. Wright City (2-17) at North Callaway (11-12), 7 p.m. Parkway West (5-17) at Affton (10-12), 7 p.m. Rosati-Kain (3-13) at Trinity (8-13), 7:15 p.m. De Soto (7-14) at Fredericktown (1-5), 7:30 p.m.

ICE HOCKEY

MVCHA 1A Playoffs at East Alton Rink Triad (8-13-3) vs. Edwardsville MVCHA (9-11-2), 7:15 p.m. Civic Memorial (6-14-5) vs. Highland (10-9-3), 8:45 p.m. Mid-States Challenge Cup quarterfinals at Queeny Park Oakville (14-9-2) vs. Chaminade (15-6-4), 9 p.m.

MUCH MORE ON STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM Hockey • Columbia continues its dream Mississippi Valley Conference Hockey Association season by sweeping Collinsville, advancing to the league’s championship series against O’Fallon. (WITH PHOTOS) Girls basketball • Danika White came through in the clutch, scoring with two seconds to play to lift New Athens to a victory against Gallatin County and into the Class 1A Goreville Sectional final. Girls basketball • Francis Howell leaned on its most experienced players to rally in the second half for a victory against rival Francis Howell Central.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH MONDAY’S RESULTS

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

BOYS BASKETBALL • NOTEBOOK

Parkway Central celebrates Kirby; Gordon returns for Webster Groves Monday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. GIRLS BASKETBALL BOX SCORES

Crossroads 8 8 6 7 29 Hancock 15 11 9 8 43 H (9-12): Turner 18, Stroup 8, Stewart 7, Warren 6, Moultrie 4. FG 16 (1), FT 10-18. Soldan 6 5 6 7 24 Metro 19 19 18 7 63 M (20-6): Flowers 27, Bland 15, Goldman 9, Hudson 5, Hunt 3, Burt 2, Scott 2. FG 29 (2), FT 3-11. Pacific 19 24 20 8 71 Owensville 9 12 11 2 34 P (10-11): Brocato 23, Mueller 14, Burrows 10, Murray 6, Harrison 4, King 4, O’Neill 4, White 4, Toney 2. FG 28 (8), FT 7-12. McCluer 7 7 7 4 25 Luth. North 27 21 17 11 76 L (19-3): Moore-Hughes 19, Ferguson 16, Hayden 14, A. Buford 8, Dukes 8, Earls 4, Smith 4, Jackson 3. FG 29 (7), FT 11-13. Jefferson 14 17 26 10 67 Crystal City 13 13 6 7 39 J (12-11): Hearst 15, Becherer 14, Floyd 12, Cattoor 11, Chipps 5, Courtois 4, Fuller 4, Boulicault 2. FG 26 (6), FT 9-17. North Callawa 19 9 13 11 52 Mark Twain 8 8 13 18 47 N (12-11): Ausfahl 15, Emmons 15, Schlueter 14, R. Schmauch 5, Murray 2, D. Schmauch 1. FG 16 (7), FT 13-20. Brentwood 14 8 11 8 41 Herculaneum 24 20 18 9 71 B (13-11): Franklin 18, Jones 8, Clay 4, Gombas 4, Ingersoll 4, Tonis 2, Hill 1. FG 18 (2), FT 3-6. In. Word 10 9 27 17 63 Pky. North 10 23 22 21 76 I (18-5): Morris 18, Jackson-Morris 15, Woltman 14, Warren 8, Kell 3, Rolfes 3, Flowers 2. FG 25 (4), FT 9-12. P (19-5): Stovall 30, Davis 27, Rhodes 10, Stacker 6, A. Jordan 3. FG 25 (11), FT 15-19. Mascoutah 6 10 12 13 41 Columbia 8 8 17 17 50 C (17-10): Edwards 16, Bonaldi 10, Henke 10, Touchette 8, Harrell 6. FG 20 (1), FT 9-13. Holt 16 13 18 12 59 Haz. West 6 12 10 9 37 Ho (15-6): N. Griesenauer 30, Green 11, Adam 4, Bargaineer 4, A. Meyer 4, Robinson 4, Forrest 2. FG 24 (5), FT 6-10. Ha (10-9): Mathews 13, Patterson 12, Blackson 8, Dilworth 4. FG 15 (2), FT 5-9. O’F Christian 11 14 11 13 49 Liberty 11 4 3 3 21 O (17-7): Kinsey 14, Stugart 12, King 11, Markham 6, Stone 4, Herrin 2. FG 20 (3), FT 6-12. L (5-15): Schaeffer 9, Van Pamel 5, M. Giljum 2, Patterson 2, Watson 2, E. Giljum 1. FG 8 (1), FT 4-9. Clayton 13 18 7 21 59 JohnBurroughs 15 15 3 11 44 C (8-13): Markenson 14, Conner 11, M. Upshaw 10, Downs 8, Gallegos 6, Litteken 6, Nettles 2, Wade 2. FG 20 (2), FT 17-22. 19 8 12 18 57 Pattonville FH North 15 9 11 9 44 P (14-7): Battle 11, Brown 11, Smith 11, Mack 10, Jenkins 8, Nelson 6. FG 20 (0), FT 17-24. F (5-17): Willson 15, G. Delarue 11, I. Delarue 7, O’leary 4, Stevenson 3, Richardson 2, Stevens 2. FG 19 (4), FT 2-4. Pky. Central 20 11 15 13 59 Webster 17 9 8 15 49 P (19-3): Hilton 21, Kelly 13, O. Stephens 11, Moore 6, Coleman 5, Perry 3. FG 23 (3), FT 10-21. W (10-13): Rodriguez 13, Daniels 11, Moore 9, Lauren 8, Bailey 6, Ellis 2. FG 18 (5), FT 8-16. Zumwalt East 2 10 11 5 28 V. Duchesne 16 22 7 16 61 V (6-12): Mueller 19, Gast 17, Grewe 9, Deines 7, Griesediek 7, Burns 2. FG 18 (4), FT 21-25. Union 11 6 11 10 42 St. Clair 12 10 10 6 47 U (10-13): Resser 16, Seely 11, Overstreet 7, Bunch 6, Siedhoff 2. FG 11 (4), FT 16-22. S (17-6): Sohn 12, M. Hinson 9, Schmidtke 7, Buscher 6, Bursey 4, Machelett 4, A. Hinson 2, Shirey 2, LaCrone 1. FG 15 (1), FT 16-26. Triad 10 17 22 15 64 Cahokia 10 10 17 23 60 T (9-15): Barisch 17, Cochran 16, Renspurger 10, Suess 8, Miller 6, Fandrey 4, Wilson 3. FG 19 (3), FT 23-40. C (11-10): Jennings 14, Brownlee 12, Tucker 8, Wheaton 7, Jeffries 6, Wells 6, Roberson 3, Gines 2, Lacy 2. FG 21 (5), FT 13-24. Carrollton 9 6 11 9 35 Lebanon 9 17 15 14 55 L (29-1): Schoenfeld 16, A. Reinneck 13, K. Bass 11, E. Reinneck 6, K. Bass 4, Fertig 4, McNeese 1. FG 22 (6), FT 5-5. St. Dominic 5 16 9 8 38 Notre Dame 9 11 9 3 32 S (16-5): Miller 10, Kasubke 9, Benedict 6, Poli 6, Morrow 3, M. Ballard 2, Hermann 2. FG 16 (2), FT 4-7. N (13-8): Boemer 9, Neels 9, N. Klutho 5, Sodemann 4, Campbell 3, Scharenberg 2. FG 13 (3), FT 3-4. St. James 10 8 11 9 38 Hermann 11 15 13 17 56 H (20-3): Erickson 16, Godat 10, B. Grosse 9, Stiers 7, Schannuth 6, Brune 5, Schneider 2, Krueger 1. FG 22 (4), FT 8-12. North County 9 10 4 12 35 Festus 6 9 17 17 49 N (13-11): Winch 21, Christopher 4, Gant 3, Thomas 3, Huber 2, Mason 2. FG 15 (0), FT 5-11. F (12-9): Rickermann 20, Welsh 12, Oetting 11, Hebenstriet 4, Kuykendall 2. FG 13 (4), FT 19-28. Waterloo 10 5 8 10 33 Freeburg 26 11 19 13 69 W (4-21): Albers 12, Luedeman 6, Diekman 5, Schultheis 3, Aldridge 2, Bosler 2, Novack 2, Rodriguez 1. FG 13 (5), FT 2-7. F (20-6): Oliver 21, Cockrell 14, Eichenlaub 8, Mueller 8, Mense 5, Whitworth 4, Mirly 3, Holcomb 2, Kimes 2, Wolf 2. FG 26 (8), FT 9-13.

GIRLS SCORES

Francis Howell 44, Howell Central 37 Sullivan 55, New Haven 27

BOYS BASKETBALL BOX SCORES

Brentwood 9 13 11 23 56 8 21 11 26 66 Maplewood-RH B (7-14): Gordan 15, C. Hill 13, King 12, C. Jones 8, Mitchell 4, C. Hill 2, McClure 2. FG 20 (3), FT 13-22. M (11-10): Grady-Liska 22, Becton 12, Brunson 11, Guynn 9, Roberson 8, I. Pearson 4. FG 20 (3), FT 23-41. Crossroads 6 7 8 6 27 28 21 12 6 67 Hancock C (2-22): Caradine 6, Aguayo-Craig 5, Chester 3, Lutjens 3, Baumstark 2, Bogan 2, Guest 2, McAdoo 2, Thomas 2. FG 11 (1), FT 4-8. H (17-5): Richardson 18, Warren 16, Moultrie 8, Pickens 8, Burton 6, Pilica 4, Livingston 3, Stroup 3, Jennings 1. FG 25 (6), FT 11-15. Pittsfield 12 10 11 17 50 20 16 10 14 60 Jerseyville J (14-11): Hall 19, Wittman 12, Tuttle 11, Goldacker 6, Ross 5, Jackson 3, Rexing 2, Shaw 2. FG 20 (8), FT 12-17. Pky. South 22 9 19 13 63 24 10 15 12 61 Kirkwood P (14-8): DeRouse 19, A. Sommer 13, A. Sommer 11, Doyle 10, Mullen 6, Rollins 3, Skidmore 1. FG 20 (6), FT 17-24. K (12-10): Maclin 21, Clay 15, Kanzler 14, Tyrell 7, Lay 3, McDowell 1. FG 23 (4), FT 11-18. JohnBurroughs 6 5 12 7 30 8 8 4 8 28 Clayton J (15-7): Goldfarb 7, D. Miller 6, Worsham 6, Nicolais 5, Davila 4, Bolster 2. FG 12 (3), FT 3-8. C (4-17): Sams 13, C. Heusel 5, Tripathy 4, Chestnutt-Perry 3, Adams 2, Bax 1. FG 9 (2), FT 8-14. Duchesne 21 10 21 14 66 Borgia 6 10 13 10 39 D (16-8): Moore 19, Loewenstein 16, Fairless 14, Tune 6, Norwine 5, O’Brien 3, Suellentrop 3. FG 24 (5), FT 13-16.

BOYS SCORES

De Soto 53, Union 52 Madison 68, Metro-East Lutheran 64 Nokomis 57, Wood River 11 North County 70, Windsor 50 Park Hills Central 70, Sullivan 56

HOCKEY

MID-STATES CHALLENGE CUP Quarterfinals, Leg 2 SLUH 6, Edwardsville 1; SLUH wins series 2-0 CBC 2, Kirkwood 1; CBC wins series 2-0 De Smet 5, Vianney 1; De Smet wins series 2-0 MID-STATES WICKENHEISER CUP Quarterfinals, Leg 2 Marquette 5, Lafayette 2; Marquette wins series 2-0 Westminster 5, Pky. South 2; Westminster wins series 2-0 MVCHA 2A PLAYOFFS O’Fallon 7, Freeburg/Waterloo 1; O’Fallon wins series 2-0 Columbia 9, Collinsville 0; Columbia wins series 2-0

AREA RANKINGS, WEEK 11

BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

The more Rick Kirby scanned the crowd, the more faces he recognized. Faces he hadn’t seen in a long time. Faces Kirby didn’t think had much reason to be in Parkway Central’s gym Friday night. Unbeknownst to him, they did have a reason. They were there for him. The longtime Parkway Central boys basketball coach, Kirby was honored alongside his seniors Friday night in the Colts’ final home game this season. About 40 former players and their families, teachers, administrators and other former coaches showed up at Central to show their appreciation for Kirby, who officially announced this season would be his last. Kirby, 59, will step down from the only head coaching job he’s ever had when the Colts’ season ends, whenever that may be. “I’ve been thinking about it for a while,” Kirby said. This is the second time Kirby will walk away from the Colts. His first tenure began in 1988 and ended in 2005, when he wanted to spend more time watching his son, Austin, play college basketball. He was rehired as Central’s coach before the 2012-13 season. Over the course of his two tenures, Kirby has won more than 440 games and guided the Colts to five district titles and four state semifinal appearances. He’s the all-time wins leader for the entire Parkway School District. In 2012, he was inducted into the Missouri High School Coaches Hall of Fame. After the Colts’ senior night ceremony concluded, Parkway athletic director Mike Roth told Kirby they had another bit of business to attend to before the game began. “I thought he might walk to the bench and say ‘No’ and get ready to throw it up,” Roth said with a laugh. One by one, the former players who attended were announced and met Kirby on the court for a hug and a handshake. Kirby can be tough to crack, but he soaked in everything for as long as he could. “You live for times like these,” Kirby said. “That was a treasure to me. It’s something you’ll never forget.” The retirement ceremony was a surprise to not only Kirby but his players. They didn’t know this would be Kirby’s last season. In an effort to not distract his seniorladen team from its goal of returning to the Class 4 state semifinals, he kept his decision to himself. The news had slowly started to filter out, but Kirby didn’t make it official until Friday. “That’s why I waited so long,” he said. “I didn’t want them to think I was a quitter.” The No. 5 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Central (19-4) did enough to push past Clayton, 58-47. Senior guard DeAndre Campbell had 20 points to lead the Colts. Jake Silvestri scored 12 points on four 3-pointers. After his team gritted out the victory, Kirby made a point to tell the players his impending retirement didn’t change the way they should go about their business. It certainly won’t change how he coaches. “I’ve kicked their (butts) up one side of the gym and down the other,” Kirby said. “I will continue to do that until the last day of my coaching career.”

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Parkway Central boys basketball coach Rick Kirby talks to his players during a game against St. Charles earlier this season. Kirby, who has led the Colts to four state semifinal appearances, has announced this will be his last season as the program’shelm.

Parkway Central’s matchup Friday at Jennings has Kirby’s blood pumping. The No. 5 small school, Jennings (20-3) can be a dogged opponent and plays well at home in front of its fans. These teams met last season in the state quarterfinals, with Central winning 66-48. “It’s great, win, lose or draw,” Kirby said. “It’s going to be a hostile environment on the road and it’s perfect. This is the time of year you need great games.” If Kirby has his wish, the Colts will have their share of great games and make a fifth state semifinal appearance. When you’re in the moment every day it can be hard to take a step back and appreciate the sum of all that work. Orchestrated by Debbie, Kirby’s wife of 36 years, and their three children, Austin, Ashley and Lauren, the retirement ceremony showed him just that. Kirby got a glimpse of his impact as his former players greeted him on the court. “It was good to hug them all,” Kirby said. “It was special stuff.”

GORDON RETURNS, STATESMEN FACE VASHON

Carte’Are Gordon returned from a two-week suspension Friday. The 6-foot-7 power forward scored 11 points, grabbed 15 rebounds, blocked three shots and had five steals in Webster Groves’ 81-38 win at Summit. The No. 3 large school, Webster Groves (14-7) has won backto-back games and seven of its last eight. The lone defeat in that stretch was a 78-67 loss to Belleville West at the O’Fallon Shootout on Feb. 3. Gordon suspension stemmed from an altercation prior to the Statesmen’s 65-58 win over St. Louis U. High on Jan. 26. A St. Louis University signee, Gordon missed three games including the matchup with Belleville West. Webster coach Jay Blossom said Gordon has done everything he was asked to in order to return to the team. “He realized he made a mistake and accepted responsibility for it,” Blossom said. “He had a great week in the classroom and a good week on the court. Now we’re going to try to put together another good week.” The defending Class 5 champion, Webster takes on No. 1 small school and two-time defending Class 4 champion Vashon (17-4) at 7 p.m. Thursday at St. Louis Community College–Meramec. Webster is selling tickets ahead

GIRLS BASKETBALL ILLINOIS PLAYOFFS

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE

4A CHATHAM GLENWOOD REGIONAL First round, Monday Champaign Centennial 36, Quincy 33 Semifinals, Wednesday O’Fallon vs. Centennial, 6 p.m. Springfield High vs. Glenwood, 7:30 p.m. 4A BELLEVILLE EAST REGIONAL First round, Tuesday Belleville West (6-20) vs. Alton (9-16), 6 p.m. Gran.City (2-19) vs. Collinsville (12-13), 7:30 p.m. 3A CIVIC MEMORIAL REGIONAL First round, Monday Triad 64, Cahokia 60 Semifinals, Wednesday Triad vs. Civic Memorial, 6 p.m. East St. Louis vs. Highland, 7:30 p.m. 3A FREEBURG REGIONAL First round Columbia 50, Mascoutah 41 Freeburg 69, Waterloo 33 Semifinals, Tuesday Columbia vs Breese Central, 6 p.m. Jerseyville at Freeburg, 7:30 p.m. 2A HAMILTON COUNTY SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Vienna vs. Mater Dei (21-7), 6 p.m. Nashville (21-8) vs. Harrisburg, 7:30 p.m. 2A RIVERTON SECTIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Auburn vs Tri-City, 6 p.m. Alton Marq. (20-8) vs. Pleasant Plains, 7:30 p.m. 1A GOREVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals, Monday Meridian 65, Bluford (Webber) 36 New Athens 51, Gallatin County 49 Championship, Thursday New Athens (15-12) vs. Meridian, 7 p.m. 1A NORTH GREENE SECTIONAL Semifinal, Monday Lebanon 55, Carrollton 35 Semifinal, Tuesday Okawville (22-8) vs. Jacksonville Routt, 7 p.m. Championship, Thursday Lebanon (29-1) vs. TBD, 7 p.m.

Grandview (5-17) at Valle, 5:30 p.m. New Haven (7-16) at Sullivan (11-10), 5:30 p.m. McCluer (3-17) at Ritenour (11-11), 5:30 p.m. North Callaway (12-11) at Mark Twain, 5:30 p.m. Riverview Gardens (4-16) at North Tech (4-18), 5:30 p.m. Wood River (7-18) at ME Lutheran (11-15), 6 p.m. Ramsey at Father McGivney (7-20), 6 p.m. Normandy (9-14) at Confluence (20-4), 6 p.m. Sumner (8-8) at Miller Career (10-10), 6 p.m. Hillsboro, Ill. (13-9) at Piasa Southwestern (16-7), 6 p.m. Jefferson (16-7) at Marquand Zion, 6 p.m. Gillespie (3-14) at Bunker Hill (1-21), 6 p.m. St. Vincent (15-4) at Kingston, 6 p.m. Parkway North (9-12) at Timberland (6-15), 6 p.m. Dupo (5-18) at Lebanon (11-16), 6:15 p.m. Breese Central (11-13) at Alton Marquette (26-0), 6:15 p.m. Lovejoy (14-12) at Valmeyer (13-12), 6:15 p.m. Bayless (6-14) at Hancock (16-5), 6:30 p.m. Valley Park (16-6) at Brussels (5-15), 6:30 p.m. Liberty (17-6) at FH North (4-15), 6:30 p.m. Roosevelt (5-16) vs. Medicine and Bio (2-11) at NW Academy, 6:30 p.m. Fox (5-15) at Parkway South (13-8), 7 p.m. Lutheran South (10-12) at Westminster (12-10), 7 p.m. Bismarck at Herculaneum (7-15), 7 p.m. St. Charles (16-7) at FH Central (7-14), 7 p.m. Union (9-13) at St. Clair (5-16), 7 p.m. Pacific (17-4) at Owensville (2-10), 7 p.m. Eureka (14-8) at Lindbergh (9-11), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (2-18) at University City (6-16), 7 p.m. Van-Far (3-0) at Wright City (10-10), 7 p.m. Priory (12-8) at Lutheran North (12-12), 7 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL

of time for the Vashon game. Last year’s matchup had people hanging from Vashon’s rafters as two eventual state champions battled from the first whistle to the last. Webster escaped with a 60-59 victory when senior point guard Courtney Ramey hit the go-ahead free throw with four seconds to play. Vashon’s buzzer-beater hit the rim and rolled out. “It’s a chance to play one of the premier programs in the state of Missouri,” Blossom said. “Our kids are excited and I know their kids are looking for revenge.”

JOHN BURROUGHS BEATS MICDS AT BUZZER

Josh Worsham brought down the house. A senior guard for John Burroughs, Worsham knocked down a runner just before time expired to lift the Bombers to a 46-45 win over MICDS at home Friday. It’s the first time Burroughs has beaten MICDS since it swept the 2012-13 season series. “It’s always good to beat your rival,” Burroughs coach Corey Frazier said. The win put Burroughs on the fast track to its first Metro League title since that 2012-13 season. The Bombers are 14-7 overall and 6-2 in conference. A victory Thursday at Lutheran North will lock up the league championship.

HAZELWOOD CENTRAL’S LOADED FINISH

For the second time in his brief tenure as Hazelwood Central’s coach and the first time in two months, Brandon Gilmore had to deal with defeat. The No. 1 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Central (21-2) took a 6857 loss to Rock Bridge in its final home game. It snapped the Hawks’ 14-game winning streak and gave them their first defeat since falling 75-69 to Chicago’s Orr Academy on Dec. 16 in the Midwest Showdown at Webster Groves High. “It helped us a lot. It humbled us a bit,” Gilmore said. “We needed to get back to basics.” Shaun Williams had a teamhigh 26 points for Central. A Kansas State signee, Williams was out-dueled by Rock Bridge standout junior shooting guard Isiaih Mosley, who had 33 points and grabbed eight rebounds. Mosley is the No. 3-rated recruit in Missouri in his class according to Rivals. com. He falls behind Poplar Bluff’s Marcedus Leech and Vashon’s Mario McKinney Jr. Gilmore said the plan was to play

Fort Zumwalt West (12-10) at Troy (13-9), 7 p.m. Oakville (9-9) at Northwest-CH (1-19), 7 p.m. Festus (12-10) at North County (10-3), 7 p.m. Lafayette (10-12) at Seckman (6-12), 7 p.m. Mehlville (13-8) at Marquette (14-8), 7 p.m. St. Louis Christian (4-10) at Vashon (17-4), 7 p.m. Chaminade (17-4) at De Smet (5-15), 7 p.m. St. Dominic (11-9) at O’Fallon Christian (15-8), 7:15 p.m. Perryville (5-6) at Hillsboro (20-3), 7:15 p.m. Borgia (11-10) at Luth. St. Charles (2-21), 7:15 p.m. Benton (6-1) at Mount Vernon (12-10), 7:20 p.m. Columbia (14-10) at Wesclin (21-4), 7:30 p.m. St. James (16-6) at Hermann (8-15), 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon (9-14) at Granite City (8-15), 7:30 p.m. Edwardsville (13-8) at Collinsville (15-10), 7:30 p.m. Red Bud (13-11) at New Athens (5-17), 7:30 p.m. Belleville East (11-12) at Belleville West (21-2), 7:30 p.m. Carlyle (11-17) at Greenville (15-11), 7:30 p.m. Litchfield (12-13) at Pana, 7:30 p.m. Carlinville (8-15) at Staunton (13-11), 7:30 p.m. Vandalia (8-5) at Roxana (4-22), 7:30 p.m. Waterloo (7-18) at Highland (17-8), 7:30 p.m. Mater Dei (12-13) at Civic Memorial (16-8), 7:30 p.m. St. Charles West (8-13) at Warrenton (14-6), 7:30 p.m. Sparta (5-10) at Okawville (18-8), 7:45 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Bayless (1-19) at Hancock (8-12), 5 p.m. Riverview Gardens (5-14) at McCluer North (11-13), 5:30 p.m. Fox (7-10) at Parkway South (11-11), 5:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (7-15) at Troy (13-8), 5:30 p.m. Oakville (12-7) at Northwest-CH (4-16), 5:30 p.m.

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 21-2 1. Hazelwood Central 2. Belleville West 21-2 3. Webster Groves 14-7 4. Chaminade 17-4 19-4 5. Parkway Central 6. Francis Howell 21-3 7. Edwardsville 13-8 8. Liberty 17-6 14-8 9. Alton 10. Fort Zumwalt South 19-3 SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 17-4 1. Vashon 2. Alton Marquette 26-0 3. Confluence 20-4 4. St. Mary’s 22-3 5. Northwest Academy 16-6 6. Jennings 20-3 7. Whitfield 16-7 8. Trinity 18-3 9. Wesclin 21-4 17-8 10. Cardinal Ritter

LW 1 3 4 2 5 8 7 — — 6 LW 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 8 10 9

a high-quality opponent at the end of the season to give the Hawks one last look at what it takes to run with some of the state’s elite. “That’s why we scheduled them at the end of the season,” he said. “It’s going to work out for us in the long run.” Central plays at Riverview Gardens on Thursday, then wraps its regular season next week with two powerhouses. It hosts No. 3 large school Webster Groves on Feb. 20 and then travels to No. 1 small school Vashon on Feb. 22. The matchup with Webster is a Suburban Conference crossover game. Central won the Suburban XII North and Webster won the Suburban XII South to set up the highpowered showdown.

TIP-INS

• St. Mary’s 88-46 win over Chaminade last week was the largest margin of defeat for Chaminade since at least the 1999-00 season. The No. 4 large school, Chaminade (17-4) lost by 30 or more points four other times since 1999-00. The previous largest margin was 38 in a 74-36 loss to McCluer at the Pattonville Tournament on December 2, 2011. Hazelwood Central beat the Red Devils by 36 in a 66-30 win at Pattonville, too, on December 11, 2012. Maplewood-Richmond Heights won 64-30 on February 11, 2012. Chaminade bounced back with a 78-70 win over CBC on Friday. The No. 4 small school, St. Mary’s (22-3) survived Duchesne in overtime on Friday. The Dragons host Cardinal Ritter at 7 p.m. Thursday. • Class 3 district play begins Saturday for area teams with the District 3 tournament at Cuba and the District 7 tournament at Winfield. Other area sites hosting include the District 4 tournament at Whitfield and the District 6 tournament at Duchesne. Roosevelt will host the District 5 tournament at Vashon. The No. 7 small school, Whitfield (16-7) is the top seed followed by Hancock (16-5) in the District 4 tournament. The No. 10 small school, Ritter (17-8) is the top seed in District 5. No. 8 small Trinity (18-3) is the top seed in District 6. O’Fallon Christian (15-8) is the No. 1 seed at Winfield. • No. 3 small school Confluence (20-4) is back in action when it hosts Normandy (9-14) at 6 p.m. Tuesday. It’ll be senior night for the Titans, who’ll look to give their home crowd a game to remember. Senior point guard Brandon Fredrick, who averages 28 points per game, will have the green light in his final home game.

Hermann (19-3) at Pacific (9-11), 5:30 p.m. St. Charles (14-8) at FH Central (18-3), 5:30 p.m. Lafayette (14-6) at Seckman (9-9), 5:30 p.m. Eureka (14-8) at Lindbergh (10-11), 5:30 p.m. Windsor (3-15) at Grandview (19-2), 5:30 p.m. Mehlville (3-17) at Marquette (8-12), 5:30 p.m. Ritenour (10-10) at McCluer (6-15), 5:30 p.m. Lutheran South (14-7) at Ursuline (6-13), 6 p.m. Ladue (13-6) at MICDS (18-3), 6 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (7-14) at Winfield (2-19), 6 p.m. Westminster (8-13) at Kirkwood (18-3), 6 p.m. St. Charles West (6-15) at Warrenton (11-6), 6 p.m. Herculaneum (17-3) at Meadow Heights, 6 p.m. Lift For Life (9-10) at Gateway STEM (14-6), 6:30 p.m. University City (11-9) vs. Metro (19-6) at Matthews-Dickey, 6:30 p.m. Vashon (5-7) at Soldan (8-10), 6:30 p.m. Washington (12-10) at Cor Jesu (8-15), 6:30 p.m. Nerinx Hall (10-12) at Fort Zumwalt South (13-8), 7 p.m. Valle Catholic (2-7) at Jefferson (11-11), 7 p.m. Wright City (2-17) at North Callaway (11-12), 7 p.m. Parkway West (5-17) at Affton (10-12), 7 p.m. Rosati-Kain (3-13) at Trinity (8-13), 7:15 p.m. De Soto (7-14) at Fredericktown (1-5), 7:30 p.m.

ICE HOCKEY

MVCHA 1A Playoffs at East Alton Rink Triad (8-13-3) vs. Edwardsville MVCHA (9-11-2), 7:15 p.m. Civic Memorial (6-14-5) vs. Highland (10-9-3), 8:45 p.m. Mid-States Challenge Cup quarterfinals at Queeny Park Oakville (14-9-2) vs. Chaminade (15-6-4), 9 p.m.

MUCH MORE ON STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM Hockey • Columbia continues its dream Mississippi Valley Conference Hockey Association season by sweeping Collinsville, advancing to the league’s championship series against O’Fallon. (WITH PHOTOS) Girls basketball • Danika White came through in the clutch, scoring with two seconds to play to lift New Athens to a victory against Gallatin County and into the Class 1A Goreville Sectional final. Girls basketball • Francis Howell leaned on its most experienced players to rally in the second half for a victory against rival Francis Howell Central.


SPORTS

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

Manchester City’s De Bruyne might be soccer’s best player ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND • For

Kevin De Bruyne, it was perhaps the ultimate compliment. Following another midfield masterclass from the Belgian, Manchester City coach Pep Guardiola was asked if De Bruyne had elevated himself to the level of Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo — and if he could even break their decade-long stranglehold on the Ballon d’Or, awarded to the man voted soccer’s top player. Guardiola usually dismisses any comparisons with Messi, a player he

rates as the “best in history” after having managed the Argentine from 2008-12 during Barcelona’s trophyladen golden era. He said last season that Messi “is on a table on his own” and De Bruyne could sit by the “table beside.” It seems like things have changed. “No doubt,” Guardiola said about De Bruyne being ready to supplant Messi and Ronaldo as the world’s best player. “He is not (just doing it in) one game. It’s the whole season, every three days playing that way. Every three days.” Guardiola had just seen De Bruyne orchestrate City’s 5-1 win

� �

over Leicester in the Premier League on Saturday, setting up three goals via a combination of teasing crosses and precision through-balls. Since the start of the 2012-13 season, no player in Europe’s top five leagues has more assists than De Bruyne with his 77. Ahead of the resumption of City’s Champions League campaign this week, Guardiola reckons De Bruyne needs to be successful in Europe’s top competition to be a contender. “He knows, and everyone knows, to be there you have to win titles — and titles and titles, especially one,” Guardiola said, referring to the

Champions League. “But the way he’s played, it’s difficult to find one (better) in Europe.” This could be City’s year, too. Barcelona and Real Madrid usually are the favorites to win the Champions League but City and Paris Saint-Germain — clubs backed by wealth from the oil-rich Middle East — look ready to usher in a new era. For City, the opportunity is there . The team’s previous best run was to the semifinals in 2016. Basel is the first opponent in the knockout stage, with the first leg of the last-16 series in Switzerland on Tuesday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin De Bruyne has 77 assists since the start of the 2012-13 season.

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National Extremes

WEATHER • Low 22, High 47 • Winds E/SE 3-8 mph

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 89° Naples, Florida

Low: -38° Malta, Montana

A cold start, better this afternoon

110s

A ridge of high pressure will drift to the east of the region today, which will allow winds to become southerly. This will help temperatures to warm into the mid-to-upper 40s this afternoon. Highs will be in the 60s on Wednesday and Thursday with rain chances as well.

MORNING

LUNCH

25°

DRIVE

41°

46°

BEDTIME

Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

41°

Partly to mostly cloudy

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

53 47 47 48 47 51 47 40 49 52 46 47 50

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

70s

H

11 24 4 14 16 9 22 8 15 4 13 13

37 48 30 40 42 34 46 34 40 28 41 39

50s 40s 20s

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

FRIDAY

37°/60° 52°/66°

Flood Stage

Current Level

21°/47°

partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Kansas City 23 / 47

Kirksville 12 / 40

Joplin 24 / 51

Springfield 13 / 41

St. Louis 22 / 47 Poplar Bluff 25 / 48

Carbondale 24 / 48

- 0.03 + 0.17 + 0.32 + 0.21 + 0.14 - 0.20 - 0.43 - 1.11 - 0.84 + 0.45

Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Monday, Feb 12th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 181 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 38 Month (Total) 452 Season 3173 Year Ago 2540 Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.49 18 12.16 Peoria 14 9.44 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.13 Sullivan 16 - 2.77 Valley Park 24 5.58 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.55 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 33.90 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.27 + 0.07 - 0.08 - 0.01 - 0.01 + 0.04 0.00 + 2.82

SUN & MOON

New Feb 15 Sunrise

First Feb 23

Full Mar 1

6:54 AM Sunset

Last Mar 9 5:37 PM

Moonrise 5:31 AM Moonset 3:45 PM

When viewed through a telescope or binoculars, the planet Venus will appear phased like the moon. This is because it is closer to the sun than Earth. Mercury also exhibits phases.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

356.11 354.74 494.47 655.04 705.57 652.39 908.57 839.13 594.47 404.75 600.80 443.20

+ 0.33 + 0.02 + 0.09 - 0.15 - 0.07 0.00 - 0.09 - 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.01 0.00 - 0.04

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 82°

Lower 48 temps only

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 14 Albuquerque 35 Anchorage 21 Atlanta 46 Atlantic City 22 Baltimore 24 Billings -7 Biloxi, Ms. 51 Birmingham 43 Bismarck 0 Boise 24 Boston 20 Buffalo 9 Burlington, Vt. 9 Charleston, S.C. 50 Charleston, W.V. 27 Charlotte 40 Cheyenne 13 Chicago 4 Cincinnati 22 Cleveland 10 Colorado Spgs. 21 Concord, N.H. 12 Dallas 35 Daytona Beach 67 Denver 16 Des Moines 11 60 Destin, Fl. 1 Detroit 41 El Paso 25 Evansville 16 Fairbanks 3 Fargo 29 Flagstaff 67 Fort Myers -6 Great Falls 3 Green Bay 18 Hartford 68 Honolulu 46 Houston 17 Indianapolis 39 Jackson, Ms. 35 Juneau 75 Key West 44 Las Vegas 29 Little Rock 54 Los Angeles 25 Louisville

32 60 35 53 38 40 34 68 63 28 46 30 30 26 54 49 45 46 30 43 34 52 32 49 75 47 33 71 27 71 48 24 24 38 86 39 31 34 81 56 41 64 39 81 59 49 63 51

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow partly cloudy rain and snow mostly sunny blowing snow mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy

21 37 18 47 29 32 29 61 53 15 35 25 27 22 44 41 37 29 24 39 30 30 11 44 62 29 26 60 22 46 39 10 16 27 65 29 20 22 69 54 32 56 29 73 45 43 54 44

42 59 31 61 51 53 39 70 66 40 44 46 48 42 65 61 61 51 42 54 48 60 43 67 73 59 46 68 42 68 59 22 35 43 85 34 42 44 79 75 51 75 35 80 62 62 66 60

partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers snow showers cloudy showers partly cloudy snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain rain windy partly cloudy rain rain partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers snow sunny rain and snow mostly sunny snow partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers rain showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers rain partly cloudy showers

City

Today L H

53 Macon 50 McAllen, Tx. 32 Memphis 72 Miami 7 Milwaukee 5 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 2 50 Mobile Montgomery 50 33 Nashville New Orleans 50 New York City 21 Norfolk, Va. 37 Oklahoma City 27 Omaha 14 Orlando 68 Palm Springs 48 Philadelphia 27 Phoenix 53 Pittsburgh 15 Portland, Me. 15 Portland, Or. 27 Providence 22 Raleigh 38 Rapid City -4 Reno 23 Richmond, Va. 32 Sacramento 37 St. Petersburg 67 Salt Lake City 31 San Antonio 43 San Diego 53 San Francisco 43 Santa Fe 28 Savannah 55 Seattle 31 35 Shreveport 9 Sioux Falls 10 Syracuse 62 Tallahassee 69 Tampa 50 Tucson 27 Tulsa 31 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 72 25 Wichita Wilmington, De. 25 50 Yuma

56 62 57 84 30 27 28 72 69 60 69 37 41 49 37 81 64 41 71 39 31 53 34 43 35 48 43 62 80 48 53 63 62 55 60 47 51 28 29 75 82 72 49 41 82 52 41 70

W

showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy

Tomorrow L H W

47 62 49 70 22 20 22 59 54 53 61 30 36 42 25 63 51 31 52 34 17 38 25 35 21 23 34 38 66 34 49 54 45 31 46 37 48 18 23 57 65 51 43 34 70 39 31 51

66 79 63 82 41 41 36 72 70 64 76 48 58 71 49 80 66 52 69 53 42 50 47 61 48 51 58 60 79 52 67 64 60 55 68 46 70 42 45 75 81 65 71 56 81 70 52 70

mostly cloudy cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers rain partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

73 30 48 57 72 73 19 28 32 63 55 16 73 68 34 33

89 43 62 67 88 81 46 41 38 77 72 42 83 90 45 41

mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers mostly sunny partly cloudy rain and snow sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

25 58 39 75 45 56 25 34 32 77 48 3 8 73 55 46

39 64 49 86 51 77 40 46 51 99 75 19 18 82 81 70

partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers rain mostly sunny snow showers partly cloudy partly sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.01 0.00 0.00 + 0.07 + 0.03

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Jet Stream

-10s

Parts of the Southeast and Gulf Coast will see a few showers and storms in association with a frontal boundary. A little wet weather is also forecast throughout portions of the Four Corners region and southern California. High pressure will be in control from the Northeast back to the upper Midwest. City

W

Flood Stage

-0s Alaska Low: -12°

Chicago 4 / 30

Wintry Mix

0s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 7.65 23 4.18 Jefferson City 21 3.25 Hermann 20 1.30 Washington 25 7.43 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.16 Louisiana 15 12.19 Dam 24 25 14.47 Dam 25 26 14.14 Grafton 18 15.66 M.Price, Pool 419 419.10 M.Price, Tail. 21 2.71 St Louis 30 - 0.90 Chester 27 2.75 Cape Girardeau 32 9.93

24-Hr Change

10s

SATURDAY

31°/37°

Cloudy, spotty Chance of rain Partly sunny Mostly sunny rain possible and colder

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.04” 0.96” 1.27” 3.36”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

38° 15° 44° 27° 78° -16° 57° 36°

Snow

30s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:59 p.m.) Low (5:19 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1938) Record Low (1899) High Last Year Low Last Year

T-storms

60s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Rain

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24 24 20 21 19 24 23 12 20 23 19 19 23

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

90s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

100s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

18 33 25 78 39 72 50 19 31 69 49 30 10 33 31 8

29 45 37 87 52 80 88 39 36 89 72 48 26 42 38 32

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny showers mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy


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Tuesday • 02.13.2018 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, East deals NORTH ♠A 6 5 ♥A K ♦9 4 3 ♣K 10 6 4 3 WEST EAST ♠10 9 4 2 ♠8 7 ♥10 9 7 4 3 ♥J 2 ♦Q 8 ♦A K J 10 7 6 2 ♣8 2 ♣J 7 SOUTH ♠K Q J 3 ♥Q 8 6 5 ♦5 ♣A Q 9 5 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♦ Dbl 1♥ 2♦ 3♦ 3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: Queen of ♦ Note West’s flimsy oneheart bid. Bids like this, essentially a psychic bid, can blow up on you when partner gets you overboard assuming that there are some values associated with your bid. They can work like a charm when your opponents are cold for a slam. The responses to a take-out double are simple: bid your best suit with 0-8 points, jump in your best suit with 9-11 points, and jump to game with 12 or more points. When not sure what game to bid, start with a cue bid of opener’s

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD suit. This sets up a game force and the partnership can proceed slowly to find their best game. North’s four-spade bid was a bit hasty. Having created a game force with his cue bid, he could have bid four clubs instead and reached an easier contract. We see no reason for either player to bid slam. The four spade contract succeeded when South discarded hearts on East’s diamonds at tricks two and three. He could then handle any return, draw trumps, and easily take 10 tricks. On this lie of the cards, with West holding only two diamonds, South could have ruffed the second diamond, played three rounds of trumps, and started on clubs. He might have made an overtrick if West mistimed when to use his master trump. West did not bid at the other table. North cue bid two diamonds, East bid three diamonds, and South bid four diamonds. This suggested shortness in diamonds with good support for any suit. North aggressively jumped to six clubs and the excellent slam was reached. (02/13/18)

Across

1 Perennial campaign issue 5 Airplane wing feature 9 Cool, giant sun 14 Taken by mouth 15 Sweat spot 16 Remote control button 17 Grinder 18 Totally focused 19 Brooding worry 20 Big part of the New World 23 It’s pitched with a pitchfork 24 Present oneself falsely 28 Greek island in the Aegean Sea 31 Common supply for a party 33 One cause for an R rating 34 Wagering venue, briefly

35 Like some missiles 38 Onetime Volvo competitor 39 Compromise ... or a phonetic hint to this puzzle’s shaded squares 43 Bad temper 44 Flashy 1940s men’s attire 45 Lead-in to bred or behaved 46 Channel for “Conan” 49 ___-Caps (theater candy) 50 Faux ___ 51 Seaside cookout 54 Fast-food chain with a goateed spokesman 56 Flashing light phenomenon 61 Ridiculous 64 Pink

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME February 13 WORD — STIGMATIC (STIGMATIC: stig-MAT-ik: Having a mark of infamy or disgrace.) Average mark 15 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 23 or more words in STIGMATIC? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — CALCINE lain cancel lance cane lane celiac lean clan lice clean lien acne line alien nail anile nice lace elan laic RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

65 Humdinger 66 Arms and legs 67 “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare,” e.g. 68 10-Down resident 69 On the nose 70 What’s happening and when, informally 71 Recorded message prompt

Down

1 Donald ___ Trump 2 ___ Blizzard (Dairy Queen offering) 3 Roseanne of “Roseanne” 4 Animal that hangs upside down in trees 5 Graffiti artist’s tool 6 Rich soil 7 Big name in beauty products 8 Game craze of the late 1980s and ’90s 9 Falcon rocket launcher 10 Yemen’s capital 11 Pull 12 Nativity scene figure 13 Emeritus: abbr. 21 Country to which Frederick Douglass was a U.S. ambassador

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

If Feb. 13 is your birthday • This year your creativity will take you down new paths, as long as you remain open. If you are single, Mr. or Ms. Right could spontaneously walk right into your life, especially in the second part of the year. If you are attached, the two of you start living differently, possibly because of a move or a mutual involvement or interest. A fellow Aquarius adds more of the unexpected to your life. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Zero in on your priorities in the morning when speaking with an associate. Once you have defined the objective, you might think that you are on cruise control. Tonight: A surprise points to a new beginning. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Suddenly, you are in the position where you become the leader of the gang. Whether this occurs at home or on the way to work, all eyes turn to you. Trust your judgment, and you will know what to do. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You could be in line to approach a busy group of people without even realizing it. Perhaps a boss has decided to bring you into a key meeting or get-together. Tonight: A force to be dealt with, once you make your decision. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Your feelings might be unusually intense about a matter that will affect you as well as others. You will head in an unexpected direction. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise first. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You might feel as if you are on a roll. You’ll accomplish more than you thought was even possible. A family member will surprise you with his or her support. Imagine what is going on with others, especially the quiet ones in your inner circle. Tonight: Go along for the ride.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Peter A. Collins

22 Natalie Cole’s “___ Got Love on My Mind” 25 Pack, as a car for travel 26 Napoli’s nation 27 Field where Jackie Robinson played 28 Like the meter in sonnets 29 Ed of “Modern Family” 30 Popular Belgian beer, for short

32 Fictional tree creature 36 Carmel finish? 37 Letters on an AM dial 38 1960s radical grp. 40 Canon model 41 Tinkered (with) 42 “Knock ___!” 46 Intradermal diagnostic, for short 47 Many a lounge 48 Some tennis wear

52 “___ Live” (daytime news program) 53 Kindle material 55 B equivalent 57 Salinger dedicatee 58 Tip of France? 59 Family 60 Idiot box 61 ___-de-France 62 Put the kibosh on 63 Operator’s org.?

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0109

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Stay focused on your key priorities. Funnel your energy into pursuing a main objective. You could be surprised by how fast you become integrated with others who have similar interests to yours. Tonight: Time for fun and games! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Touch base with a creative, persuasive person in your life. You will want to discuss your ideas and get some feedback. Keep an eye on new possibilities. Tonight: Time to let your hair down and try something new. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Don’t push a roommate or family member, unless you enjoy getting some flak. How you handle this person in the morning could define the remainder of the day. Tonight: Time to squeeze in some fun.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be delighted by what is happening within your immediate circle of friends. Communication flourishes, especially with an associate or new friend. Tonight: Get as much done as possible. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Be willing to ask an uncomfortable question or two. Do not hesitate to move in a new direction or create a more diverse situation with others actively involved. Tonight: Reach out to a loved one. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Realize what is being offered and ask questions before you accept someone’s invitation. Your sense of direction is pivotal to achieving the results you desire. Tonight: Go along with the moment.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You sense that more is going on than meets the eye. You would be well-advised to continue as you have been — just be more alert. Use caution with any dealings that involve your finances. Tonight: Be aware of your intuition. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.13.2018 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Wife loses her lust for husband

Dear Avoiding It • I can’t wave a magic wand and make you more physically attracted to your hus-

band. I can suggest that the most sensitive sexual organ in a woman’s body resides between her ears. However, I am not qualified to diagnose whether your problem may be of a physical nature. That’s why I’m advising you to ask your doctor to perform a thorough physical examination. If he or she finds nothing amiss, ask the doctor — or your health insurance company — to refer you to a licensed mental health professional who can help you figure out what’s going on. Dear Abby • My husband and I moved to a new town last year and are working on settling in and making friends. Our way has been to accept every invitation offered in hopes of building relationships in this small community. We recently had dinner at the home of a neighbor couple who were very welcoming, but we quickly realized the four of us have absolutely nothing in common. Making conversation through the meal and coffee taxed all of our

small-talk skills, and there were many painful silences. Any foray into current events, family life — even gardening — revealed stark differences that brought conversation to a screeching halt. We made an excuse to go home early and sent a thank-you note the next day. Usually, I think a dinner invitation requires a reciprocal invitation in the future. In this case, I’m wondering if it would be better to just let it go. Would it be rude to not reciprocate, or must I suck it up? — DIFFERENT IN THE WEST Dear Different • Do the right thing and invite the couple for dinner. It does not have to be in your home — a nice restaurant would do. If the evening was as uncomfortable as you have described, they may not accept your invitation. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

TV TUESDAY

MISS MANNERS

Bring back flirting and courtship Gentle Readers • Now that sexual harassment has been more clearly identified, it would be well to define legitimate courtship. The very term seems old-fashioned, although there is plenty of evidence that the old pattern is firmly fixed in the imagination. Just look at the stories couples present in their accounts and videos about getting together, now a routine fixture of weddings. These stories often begin with love at first sight, although the actual first sight may have been while flipping through staged photographs of multiple strangers, probably before reading their other attributes. There is the surprise proposal, with the gentleman down on his knees proffering a diamond ring while the lady is beside herself with astonishment, although the question of marriage has likely been long been debated in their mutual household. And there is the declaration of how

W

eager they are to begin their new lives together — although not before they have spent months, if not years, planning a showy festival while they go on with their joint lives, possibly even to the extent of having children. Miss Manners has no wish to strip away such romantic notions. On the contrary: She is hoping to encourage romance at the earlier stages. This is not a subtle or a patient age. But the idea that courtship begins with a frank show of desire, when no personal preliminaries have been mutually established, is the harasser’s excuse. And that has been unfortunately bolstered by the belief that love can be handled efficiently. At the same time that social manners invaded the workplace, businesslike methods were introduced into courtship: classified advertisements, resumes, short interviews, quick decisions.

Differences: 1. Arm is longer. 2. Pocket is added. 3. Steering wheel is not showing. 4. Paper is smaller. 5. Fence post is added. 6. Headrest is missing.

Dear Abby • I’m not attracted to my husband. I love him and don’t want to live without him, but I do not want to be physically intimate with him. I know it is unfair to him, and I have tried everything from antidepressants to meditation to diet, but nothing works. I used to have a high libido, but I haven’t wanted to have sex with him in years. We do it maybe two or three times a month because I force myself to, but it is unpleasant for me. He doesn’t want to guilt me into sex and hates that I force myself, but he has a very high libido. We are in our mid-20s and I know this is killing him — and us. I am attracted to some (but very few) others — just not to him. I have always been more emotionally attracted to women than men, but I don’t think that is it. I need help before our marriage starts to crumble. — AVOIDING IT IN SOUTH CAROLINA

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

This speed eliminates the delightfully inefficient and noncommittal stage known as flirting — the charged glances, the ambiguous overtures, the budding sense of compatibility — from which love can grow, but also, because it is ambiguous, from which either party can retreat at any point with honor. Is this a waste of time? Perhaps, but those who have tried it will tell you that there is hardly a more pleasant way to waste time. And most of all, it provides a clear signal, without the awkwardness of asking outright, about whether or not further intimacy will be welcome. Lunging is no more a courtship technique than hugging is a businesslike one. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

2/13/18

7:00

7:30

FOX Lethal Weapon Riggs 2 and Murtaugh investigate the mob.

8:00

8:30

9:00

CBS NCIS: Skeleton Crew. Bull: The Illusion of 4 Investigating a sailor’s Control. A celebrity kidnapping. sues Bull. (cc)

NCIS: New Orleans The team must secretly work a case.

NBC Í2018 Winter Olympics: Figure Skating, Alpine Skiing, Snowboarding. 5 Figure skating (pairs’ short); alpine skiing (women’s slalom); snowboarding (men’s halfpipe). (N) (cc) PBS We’ll Meet Again Lives American Experience: Frontline Killings linked The Bombing of Wall 9 intersect on Sept. 11. to the MS-13 gang. (N) Street. (N) (N) (cc) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

The Flash: Don’t Run. Amunet kidnaps and threatens Caitlin. Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Black Lightning Jefferson investigates his dad’s murder. (N)

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

ABC The Bachelor Winter Games The singles move 30 into the villa. (N) (cc)

Lights, Camera, Romance! (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds The unMYTV Criminal Minds: Poison. Criminal Minds The 46 Small-town residents team interviews serial solved case of a serial poisoned. (cc) killers. (cc) killer. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 02.13.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Exact dose hard to measure in natural product FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • Recently in your column, you discussed the need for dosages to be exact in some situations. What about the medical marijuana issue? In our small town, there are four dispensaries. If someone truly felt he or she needed it for medical issues, would that person get the same dosage at each location? If the doctor prescribes aspirin, he doesn’t have me go to the willow tree, or to the willow dispensary down the street. — J.O.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • You are exactly right that the content of the active components of marijuana varies from strain to strain and even from plant to plant. This makes getting exact dosages impossible. This is a general problem with natural products, which is why Western medicine has preferred to identify, extract and purify the active ingredients. There is a potential downside to this philosophy, which is that the purification may remove other substances, which may themselves have an effect or may modify the effect of a substance found in the original natural product. This appears to be the case with marijuana, as there are at least two compounds with important potential medical benefits, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, which has several subtypes, especially delta-9 and delta-4) and cannabidiol (CBD). The effect of dronabinol (Marinol), a synthetic form of delta-9 THC, is reported as being very different from natural marijuana by most people who have used both, though this may be an effect of dose, of speed of onset, or of expectations. Hence the interest in medical marijuana, with its multiple compounds and ability for growers to emphasize the THC or CBD content. Recreational users of marijuana have experience in achieving the correct dosage; however, for medical use (such as seizures), that ability isn’t relevant. I suspect the future will include a greater degree of chemical analysis of the THC and CBD content in a given batch.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Readers • The booklet on edema and lymphedema provides information on the causes of foot and ankle swelling. Readers can order a copy by writing: Dr. Roach Book No. 106 628 Virginia Dr. Orlando, FL 32803 Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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2.13.18  

2.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

2.13.18  

2.13.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch