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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • $2.00

SHUT DOWN AGAIN SENATE • GOP Sen. Rand Paul holds up spending bill over deficit concerns

KEY POINTS WITHIN HELD-UP BILL

HOUSE • Bill’s fate was uncertain there as Democrats dug in over immigration

Government funded through March 23 Congress can spend $500 billion more Military spending increases by 10 percent Domestic spending increases by 10 percent Federal health programs receive needed funding Storm-ravaged states, territories get more aid Tax cuts extend for individuals, businesses for 2017 Fight against opioid epidemic receives money Debt ceiling is raised until March 2019 GOP priorities like abstinence education are funded America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve is sold down ‘Dreamers’ and future taxpayers get no attention

PRESIDENT • Trump earlier this week called on all lawmakers to back the bill BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

Trump to seek 24 Boeing Super Hornets • B1

WASHINGTON • The govern-

ment stumbled into a midnight shutdown Thursday as a rogue Senate Republican blocked a speedy vote on a massive, bipartisan, budget-busting spending deal, protesting the return of trillion-dollar deficits on the watch of Republicans controlling Wash-

ington. A shutdown — technically a lapse in agency appropriations — became inevitable as GOP Sen. Rand Paul repeatedly held up votes on the budget plan, which is married to a six-week government-wide spending measure.

The Senate recessed about 10 p.m. St. Louis time with plans to reconvene just after 11 p.m. Paul was seeking a vote on reversing spending increases and refused to speed things up when he was denied. “I ran for office because I was very critical of President Obama’s trillion-dollar deficits,” the KenSee SHUTDOWN • Page A7

BURN KEEPS PARK’S PRAIRIE IN PEAK SHAPE

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Jon Wingo of DJM Ecological Services works a controlled burn of a four-year-old prairie in Forest Park on Thursday. A winter burn of about 22 acres is being conducted in phases by the company, under contract with Forest Park Forever. The burns help maintain the health of the savannas and prairies in the park.

Accusations about Porter no secret to Kelly, others ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Pressure

mounted on White House chief of staff John Kelly on Thursday as questions swirled about his defense of a senior aide he fought to keep in a highly sensitive West Wing job despite accusations of spousal abuse from two exwives. White House staff secretary Rob Porter, a member of President Donald Trump’s inner circle, cleaned out his desk on Thursday. But the aftershocks of his resignation reverberated amid concerns about his access to classified See PORTER • Page A5

TODAY

Argument over dog costs West County father his life

Elections board seeks Republican poll workers

Individual taxpayers bear brunt of state budget

BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY SKY CHADDE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Indi-

“When in this country are we going to stop with the violence?” asked Beary’s brother Don Beary. “You get in an argument in a bar and somebody has to pull out a gun and turn it into the Wild West? Now my brother, my best friend, is dead.” Scott Beary has three children ages 16, 15 and 13.

Wanted: Republicans in north St. Louis County. Republican election judges, that is. State law requires that each polling place be stafed by at least two Republican and two Democratic election judges. But recruiting Republican poll workers to the predominantly Democratic area has proved so diicult that the St. Louis County Board of Elections for the first time put out a geographically specific plea on an insert with this year’s personal property tax declaration mailings: “Workers are

See BAR • Page A4

See ELECTION • Page A4

See AUDITOR • Page A4

Dispute at bar escalated quickly, witnesses say BY KIM BELL AND ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FLORISSANT • A father

was shot and killed at the Show-Me’s Sports Bar & Grill Wednesday afternoon — reportedly after an argument about a dog boiled over and another man pulled a gun. Scott Beary, 43, of Winchester, was killed in the shooting. Beary was a husband, father and volunteer baseball coach and had recently spent months in Texas and Florida to help with hurricane reconstruction, according to family members.

Scott Beary

Soulard Central

New Arch park name closer to oicial

• A3

Another dark day in the stock market

• B1

Schenn leads way as Blues batter Avs

• C1

vidual taxpayers now fund a large majority of Missouri’s budget, a situation that could spell trouble if there’s a recession, according to a report from the state auditor’s oice. Although factors such as low unemployment point to a healthy economy, the state’s budget is in a precarious position, according to the report. It cited cuts to individual and corporate taxes — and decreases in revenue from sales tax — coupled with increased mandatory spending,

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • $2.00

SHUT DOWN AGAIN SENATE • GOP Sen. Rand Paul delays passage of spending bill over deficit concerns

KEY POINTS WITHIN HELD-UP BILL

HOUSE • Bill’s fate was uncertain there as Democrats dug in over immigration

Government funded through March 23 Congress can spend $500 billion more Military spending increases by 10 percent Domestic spending increases by 10 percent Federal health programs receive needed funding Storm-ravaged states, territories get more aid Tax cuts extend for individuals, businesses for 2017 Fight against opioid epidemic receives money Debt ceiling is raised until March 2019 GOP priorities like abstinence education are funded America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve is sold down ‘Dreamers’ and future taxpayers get no attention

PRESIDENT • Trump earlier this week called on all lawmakers to back the bill BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Lawmakers were striving to reopen the federal government after stumbling into a midnight shutdown Thursday when a rogue Senate Republican blocked a speedy vote on a massive, bipartisan, budget-busting spending deal, protesting the return of trillion-dollar deficits on

Trump to seek 24 Boeing Super Hornets • B1 the watch of Republicans controlling Washington. A shutdown — actually a lapse in agency appropriations — became inevitable as GOP Sen. Rand Paul held up votes on the budget plan, which is married to a six-week government-wide

spending measure. The Senate recessed about 10 p.m. St. Louis time and reconvened just after 11 p.m. in an attempt to end debate on the bill. Earlier, Paul had been seeking a vote on reversing spending increases and refused to speed things up when he was denied. “I ran for office because I was See SHUTDOWN • Page A7

BURN KEEPS PARK’S PRAIRIE IN PEAK SHAPE

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Jon Wingo of DJM Ecological Services works a controlled burn of a four-year-old prairie in Forest Park on Thursday. A winter burn of about 22 acres is being conducted in phases by the company, under contract with Forest Park Forever. The burns help maintain the health of the savannas and prairies in the park.

Accusations about Porter no secret to Kelly, others ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Pressure

mounted on White House chief of staff John Kelly on Thursday as questions swirled about his defense of a senior aide he fought to keep in a highly sensitive West Wing job despite accusations of spousal abuse from two exwives. White House staff secretary Rob Porter, a member of President Donald Trump’s inner circle, cleaned out his desk on Thursday. But the aftershocks of his resignation reverberated amid concerns about his access to classified See PORTER • Page A5

TODAY

Argument over dog costs West County father his life

Elections board seeks Republican poll workers

Individual taxpayers bear brunt of state budget

BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY SKY CHADDE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Indi-

“When in this country are we going to stop with the violence?” asked Beary’s brother Don Beary. “You get in an argument in a bar and somebody has to pull out a gun and turn it into the Wild West? Now my brother, my best friend, is dead.” Scott Beary has three children ages 16, 15 and 13.

Wanted: Republicans in north St. Louis County. Republican election judges, that is. State law requires that each polling place be stafed by at least two Republican and two Democratic election judges. But recruiting Republican poll workers to the predominantly Democratic area has proved so diicult that the St. Louis County Board of Elections for the first time put out a geographically specific plea on an insert with this year’s personal property tax declaration mailings: “Workers are

See BAR • Page A4

See ELECTION • Page A4

See AUDITOR • Page A4

Dispute at bar escalated quickly, witnesses say BY KIM BELL AND ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FLORISSANT • A father

was shot and killed at the Show-Me’s Sports Bar & Grill Wednesday afternoon — reportedly after an argument about a dog boiled over and another man pulled a gun. Scott Beary, 43, of Winchester, was killed in the shooting. Beary was a husband, father and volunteer baseball coach and had recently spent months in Texas and Florida to help with hurricane reconstruction, according to family members.

Scott Beary

Soulard Central

New Arch park name closer to oicial

• A3

Another dark day in the stock market

• B1

Schenn leads way as Blues batter Avs

• C1

vidual taxpayers now fund a large majority of Missouri’s budget, a situation that could spell trouble if there’s a recession, according to a report from the state auditor’s oice. Although factors such as low unemployment point to a healthy economy, the state’s budget is in a precarious position, according to the report. It cited cuts to individual and corporate taxes — and decreases in revenue from sales tax — coupled with increased mandatory spending,

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WEST COUNTY VOLVO CARS 636-200-2822 • www.wcvolvo.com 14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011

per mo*

2018 XC90 T5

2018 XC60 AWD

7 PASSENGER Lease for 39 months,

MOMENTUM Lease for 39 months,

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Vol. 140, No. 40 ©2018

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$ stk# 19289

459 per mo*

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* Total due includes $2350 cap cost reduction, plus customer to pay first payment, tax, title, license and dealer administrative fee. Lease at 7,500 miles per year (additional miles are available). Offer includes all Volvo incentives. S60 msrp $41175. XC60 msrp $45515, XC90 msrp $52395. No security deposit with approved credit. Financing though VCFS. Expires 2/28/18. ALL TRADE-IN ACCEPTED


M 1 FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM ‘BLACK PANTHER’ GIVEAWAY

KEEP UP WITH THE CARDINALS

Kevin C. Johnson is giving away five ‘Black Panther’ prize packs, including passes to the advance screening on Monday. stltoday.com/contests

Spring training is days away, so keep up with the nonstop Cardinals coverage with our baseball newsletter. stltoday.com/ newsletters

UPCOMING CHATS Times subject to change Friday: Talk Blues hockey at 1 p.m. Monday: Cardinals chat from spring training, 1 p.m. Tuesday: Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday: Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m.

Krewson’s lament over integrity doesn’t shine light on airport deal Mayor inherited a tainted process made worse under her watch TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mayor Lyda Krewson is hacked of. Amid the slew of criticism over the process by which the city is allowing one powerful political donor — Rex Sinquefield — tremendous control over the potential privatization of St. Louis Lambert International Airport, Krewson isn’t happy about being dragged into the fray. “When your integrity is questioned, it really hacks you of,” she told Post-Dispatch editors and reporters in a meeting recently. “I have never taken a dime from Rex Sinquefield … To insinuate that I have a conflict of interest in this case is not right.” On one hand, it’s easy to feel Krewson’s pain. She didn’t start this fight. It was former Mayor Francis Slay, who, weeks before he ended the longest tenure of any mayor in St. Louis history, secretly flew to Washington on the tab of his top donor — Sinquefield — and started the ball rolling on a potential privatization plan. It was Slay who first agreed to allow Sinquefield, through one of his nonprofits, Grow Missouri, to fund and direct the initial steps. Last week, as Krewson was on her “woe is me” tour, Slay, too, joined the fray. “A great deal has been written and said about the efort being undertaken to explore the possibility of improving St. Louis Lambert International Airport, and generating a much-needed infusion of money to invest in our city through the federal government’s airport privatization program,” Slay wrote in an op-ed on the Post-Dispatch editorial page. “Unfortunately, much of it is ill-informed.” In his entire piece, Slay never told his readers who or what was ill-informed. Like Krewson bemoaning the alleged questioning of her integrity, it was a classic “straw man” argument. In fact, most critics of the privatization process to date — a majority of the Board of Aldermen, a state senator, a privatization think tank, me — have focused on

Krewson

Slay

the lack of transparency and the rampant conflicts of interest or appearances of conflict between Sinquefield and the city. Besides the fact that the retired investor who aims to get rid of the city earnings tax was Slay’s biggest donor, and that two of his political empire’s employees — Nancy Rice and Ed Rhode — helped run Krewson’s campaign, there are many others: • There is former Slay chief of staf Jef Rainford, who started talking about airport privatization while in the mayor’s oice, then worked on the issue as a private consultant, and now is a lobbyist for a company that intends to bid on the privatization contract. Meanwhile, he’s also on the Better Together board, which is another of Sinquefield’s plethora of nonprofits. • There is Mary Ellen Ponder, the Slay chief of staf who followed Rainford, who left the mayor’s oice to work for Travis Brown, the lobbyist who founded Pelopidas, the company that employs Rice and Rhode and oversees Sinquefield’s network of nonprofits. • There is the city’s new lobbying team, including Jeff Aboussie and Tom Dempsey. Aboussie also lobbies for Sinquefield. Dempsey works for Brown. • There is the fact that the first agreement between the city and Grow Missouri was never canceled, even while the process of choosing who would advise the city was going on. Grow Missouri actually submitted draft language of the request for proposals that it eventually won, and was the only bidder to have an exclusive attorney-client relationship with the city as the process was underway. It was the veritable dictionary definition of conflict of interest, where the city’s responsibilities to one party (Grow Missouri) conflicted with its ability to fairly serve other

parties (taxpayers and the other bidders). • Then there’s the selection committee. City ordinance takes conflict of interest so seriously that it requires members of the committee to sign disclosures outlining any potential conflicts they or family members might have with firms that bid for city work, going back three years. All five members of the selection committee signed such disclosures on Sept. 18, listing no potential conflicts, which is fine except for this: The bids on the request for proposal weren’t due until Oct. 20. How could the members of the selection committee know if they have any conflicts before they knew who was bidding? Krewson’s problem isn’t that her integrity is being questioned, it’s that she inherited a tainted process that her administration has made worse. If she wants to understand how important it is to the potential success of the idea that she says could be fabulous, all she has to do is look to Kansas City, where a much smaller privatization efort to build a new airport terminal is awash with allegations of conflict that leaves the project in limbo. Process matters. Transparency in government matters. So does understanding why avoiding potential conflicts of interest are good policy whether or not one’s integrity is intact. That’s a lesson former Mayor Slay learned before his first election. In his first run for mayor, Slay faced allegations of conflict of interest over a similar big-money deal. Competing casino investors were vying for one available license, and in 2000 Slay and other politicians returned donations after questions of impropriety were raised. Slay gave $2,500 back not because he had done anything wrong, he said, but because of the appearance that he might have sullied the process. “I don’t want to be the kind of mayor who dances through ethical mine fields or blames others for his mistakes,” Slay said then. Nearly two decades later, Krewson has her dancing shoes on, and the mistakes are piling up. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Tarantino sorry for remarks about Polanski rape victim Quentin Tarantino apologized Thursday to Roman Polanski rape victim Samantha Geimer for comments he made in a 2003 radio interview with Howard Stern. In a statement to IndieWire, Tarantino said he was “ignorant and insensitive and, above all, incorrect.” In the interview with Stern, Tarantino said that Geimer “wanted to have it” and that she was “down to party.” “Fifteen years later, I realize how wrong I was,” said Tarantino. Polanski has been a fugitive since fleeing to France in 1978 while awaiting sentencing for unlawful sex with a minor. On Tuesday, Geimer, 54, said Tarantino “was wrong,” adding, “I bet he knows it.” Dead rocker’s family sues doctor who prescribed opioids • The family of a longtime guitarist for 3 Doors Down is accusing an Alabama doctor of fueling the rocker’s opioid addiction before he died of a drug overdose. Matthew Roberts, 38, was found dead in August 2016 in a hotel outside Milwaukee. In the lawsuit, Roberts’ family says Dr. Richard Snellgrove began prescribing high levels of opioids to the musician in 2006. Roberts co-wrote the song “Kryptonite.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Carole King is 76. Actor Joe Pesci is 75. Singer Travis Tritt is 55. Actor Michael B. Jordan is 31. Actress Camille Winbush is 28. From news services

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Neighborhood seeks new approach to improve Rockefeller Foundation helps Wells-Goodfellow BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Wells-Goodfellow neighborhood is one of the best examples of the deep challenges faced by many St. Louis neighborhoods beyond the city’s prosperous central spine. Poverty and vacancy are endemic. Investment is scarce. That’s partly why the community development experts who came to St. Louis from around the country decided to spend two days there putting their heads together with city oicials and locals who do the same kind of work. When they go home, they want to leave behind a handful of ideas that a resourcestrapped city can actually implement to make change in some of its most-neglected neighborhoods. The exercise is part of St. Louis’ participation with the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Initiative. The city was selected to join the initiative in late 2014, in the wake of the social unrest that started in Ferguson. Since then, it used money from the group to hire Patrick Brown to lead a new

Oice of Resilience, tasked with developing a plan to address local problems such as high crime, civil unrest and educational disparities. Brown hopes the exercise this week will help local oicials connect with organizations that provide resources to urban areas. The civil strife that started in Ferguson made St. Louis the “poster child” for issues caused by inequity, Brown said, and moved the region into the consciousness of nonprofits devoted to helping urban areas address poverty and inequity. “There is an interest to provide the city with resources to do that,” Brown said. “We just have to get our act together.” There are already “many levers” at St. Louis’ disposal, said Jeb Brugmann, the director of solutions development and innovation at 100 Resilient Cities, an initiative of the Rockefeller Foundation. The city’s land bank, the Land Reutilization Authority, owns thousands of properties it can use to attract developers. Community development corporations, which can act as neighborhood stabilization and reinvestment mechanisms, too often here are “operating on the margins,” he said. In stronger parts of St. Louis, tech firms are growing and spurring redevelopment.

“There is momentum in the city,” Brugmann said. The challenge is spreading that momentum to stagnant portions of St. Louis. The sessions this week focused on economic development strategies and how to spur more private investment in places that don’t see much of it. “We need to push development here,” Brown said. “We need to push demand here.” The 100 Resilient Cities grant runs through the end of this year, and Brown’s salary runs out in the fall. He’s due to produce his resilience strategy for the city by the late summer or early fall. But the collaboration with the Resilient Cities network, Rockefeller Foundation and other urban-centric nonprofits won’t end there. And a new crop of city oicials will have hopefully gained some insight into new approaches to solving old challenges. It’s no silver bullet, Brown cautions. But it’s a step in the right direction. “For far too long, we’ve promised too much and delivered too little,” he said. “Everything we’re talking about here today takes a lot of time.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

CORRECTIONS • Mothers who kill their children are betrayed by their own maternal instinct, which becomes twisted to believe death is the only way to protect them, according to the research of forensic psychiatrist Dr. Phillip Resnick. The statement was incorrectly attributed in a story on Tuesday’s front page. In the same story, another statement lacked attribution. Most women with postpartum psychosis do not harm themselves or others, according to Postpartum Support International. • A spokesman for the St. Louis circuit attorney’s office says two brothers who were allegedly robbed last year by Patrick John Owens were incorrect in their understanding of why they were contacted by a prosecutor. She said the prosecutor called to ask if they would cooperate in the case.

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LOCAL

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Analysis sees tightening congressional races here GOP representatives Wagner, Bost lose some ground to opponents BY KEVIN MCDERMOTT St. Louis Post-dispatch

U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, is still favored to win re-election this year, but may have less of a lock than previously thought against potential Democratic challenger Cort VanOstran. And in Illinois, U.S. Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, whose district reaches into the Metro East, is now in a toss-up race against the likely Democratic nominee, St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly. Those two pronouncements Thursday from the national Cook Political Report — on the heels of Tuesday’s shocking Democratic win in a Missouri House district in Wagner’s area — have Democrats here sounding giddy and Republicans sounding sober. The new analysis “just means the race has the potential to become competitive,” Missouri Republican Party Executive Director Sam Cooper said in a statement. “I’m not worried about that in Congresswoman Wagner’s district. She has been a stalwart for the (district) since she was elected.” Bost spokesman George O’Connor, also in a statement, said of the latest analysis: “That’s not news.” “Based simply on historical trends, we know that this will be a competitive race — as it will be in battleground districts across the country,” he wrote. “... We are confident in our base of support and in having the resources we need to get our message out.” Cook, a nonpartisan analytical site which both parties watch for pre-election trends, says the two St. Louis-area congressional districts are among 21 GOP House seats nationwide that have moved toward the Democrats heading into this election year, based on factors like fundraising and local polling. “Just when you think the political environment has gotten bad enough for Republicans, it gets worse,” the report’s author, Cook House Editor David Wasserman, said in an interview. Wasserman said a big factor in shifting Republican prospects around the country is “the extent to which Democratic challengers have outraised Republican incumbents.” That’s a somewhat unusual situation that both Wagner and Bost were in during the most recent quarter of fundraising, according to campaign reports. Wagner’s 2nd Congressional District encompasses parts of St. Louis, St. Charles and Jefferson counties. Thursday’s Cook report moves the district from its previous ranking of “Strong Republican” — the most secure ranking for GOP incumbents under Cook’s system — to the weaker “Likely Republican.”

Wagner

VanOstran

Bost

The rankings below that are “Leans Republican” and “Toss-up,” and then into various levels of Democratic advantage. Cook’s assessment noted that when Wagner decided to skip a Senate run this year and instead seek re-election to the House, “most considered her a lock.” But VanOstran, an attorney and one of several Democrats vying for the party nomination to challenge Wagner, “surprised some” by raising more than Wagner in the third and fourth quarters of 2017, the report continues. “Wagner will have access to all the money she needs,” the report notes, with her $3.2 million on hand going into 2018. But it also notes that President Donald Trump didn’t do as well in her district in 2016 as he did in other Missouri suburban districts. The analysis predicts that Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., may need to carry the 2nd District to win re-election this year, meaning she might end up putting major money into it to bring out Democrats, which would hurt Wagner. Wasserman, the Cook editor, said his analysis did take into account Tuesday’s surprise victory by Democrat Mike Revis in a special election for the 97th District Missouri House, which overlaps part of Wagner’s district and was expected to go heavily Republican. He called that victory “an extreme case” due to low turnout, but added: “This is a district that only voted for Trump by 10 points. Considering how energized Democrats are, you have to take that into account.” Wagner spokesman Brecht Mulvihill pointed to Wagner’s “strong grass-roots support and a considerable

Jeferson National Expansion Memorial name would be dropped BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-dispatch

WASHINGTON • The Gateway Arch National Park is about to become oicial. The U.S. House of Representatives has passed legislation, which was approved by the Senate in December, that renames what is now oicially known as the Jeferson National Expansion Memorial. The bill passed the House by voice vote on Wednesday. The legislation was sponsored in the Senate by Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; and in the House by Reps. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, and Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin. Blunt said that “renaming the park will better highlight its central feature and make it more immediately recognizable to the millions of people who visit St. Louis every year.” McCaskill said that “as the memorial grounds reopen this summer, it’s the perfect time to bring our majestic park together under a new name that highlights this remarkable symbol.” Wagner called the arch “the largest man-made monument in the U.S.” that “has been welcoming visitors to the banks of the Mississippi River since its construction in 1965.” The measure renaming the monument must be signed by President Donald Trump to become oicial. Earlier this week, the House passed another regional park-related bill by voice vote, this one establishing the “Ste. Genevieve National Historical Park.” Members of the Missouri delegation introduced it last summer. It would make the village of Ste. Genevieve, the oldest U.S. settlement west of the Mississippi River, a National Historic Site under the purview of the National Park Service. That bill must still pass the Senate and be signed by Trump to become law.

Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

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Gateway Arch National Park to become oicial

Kelly

cash-on-hand advantage.” In a statement, VanOstran’s campaign claimed “unprecedented grass-roots enthusiasm every single day” and “rooms packed with concerned voters from Chesterfield to Oakville every night.” Challenging VanOstran for the Democratic nomination in Missouri’s Aug. 7 primaries are Army veteran Mark Osmack, St. Louis elected school board member Bill Haas and political science professor John Messmer. All are far behind in fundraising. Bost’s 12th Congressional District takes in a big swath of Illinois’ southwestern region, including St. Clair County and parts of Madison County. The Cook report previously had the two-term Republican in a “Leans Republican” seat, but now has it as a toss-up. Recent campaign disclosure reports showed Kelly brought in about $315,000 in the fourth quarter of 2017, to Bost’s roughly $248,000. Unlike Wagner, Bost isn’t sitting on a massive funding advantage from previously raised dollars. Kelly’s most recent campaign report showed him going into 2018 with $520,523 on hand, to Bost’s $686,012. The Cook report noted that Trump won the district by 15 points in 2016, and that Bost has been “consistently underestimated” in the past. But it also said Kelly may be Democrats’ “most prized recruit of the 2018 cycle” because of his military and prosecutorial background. “Republicans ... (will) have a hard time painting Kelly as a liberal. This is a top-tier Democratic opportunity,” states the report. “By declaring our race a toss-up, the Cook Report is simply saying what all of us in the Kelly Coalition already know,” Kelly campaign manager Sam Barrett said in a statement. Kelly is being challenged in Illinois’ March 20 Democratic primary by David Bequette and Pat McMahan, neither of whom had raised significant funding as of the end of December.

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

City Museum must pay $325,000 over injury BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis jury has

ordered City Museum to pay $325,000 to an English woman who alleged that one of its steel tube slides caused her a serious knee injury. After a three-day trial in St. Louis Circuit Court, the jury found City Museum in downtown St. Louis liable for Amy Atkinson’s torn knee ligaments and broken leg on the slide in 2015. Her suit claimed she was hurt when she slid down the 70-footlong indoor slide on her back, launched over a hump on the way down and got her left foot caught in the slide’s ceiling.

The civil jury in Circuit Judge M ichael Noble’s courtroom Wednesday returned an 11-1 verdict in favor of Atkinson Atkinson. “This is a pattern that City Museum has had for years where they build things because they’re artsy and interesting but have not taken the steps to ensure that they’re safe,” said Amy Gunn, who represented Atkinson along with lawyers Elizabeth Washam and Tony Friedman. A lawyer for City Museum said Thursday he would have to seek permission from the museum to comment. In court filings, City

Museum blamed Atkinson for her injury, saying she was careless, negligent and reckless; failed to use the slide properly; and assumed risk of any injury while at the museum. Atkinson was injured April 2, 2015, during a trip to St. Louis with about a dozen students as part of an annual exchange program between the Abingdon School in Oxfordshire, England, , and Chaminade College Preparatory School in Creve Coeur. Atkinson is a geography teacher at Abingdon who helps coordinate the program with Chaminade. Atkinson, now 30, sued City Museum in 2016 alleging negligence, a flawed slide design and failure to test the slide or keep it

safe. Her lawyers said she was injured one week before she would have tried out for the Women’s Elite Rugby team in the U.K. The suit also alleged that the slide injured other guests. According to the lawsuit, a man’s torn knee ligament in August 2014 led to the slide’s shutdown and repair, but that the museum ignored a state inspection that October that recommended the hump be removed “to avoid excessive launching of guest from slide surface.” The slide reopened to the public in January 2015, the lawsuit said. Atkinson’s lawsuit cited similar knee injuries to two other guests from the slide within a month of Atkinson’s.

It isn’t the first time City Museum has been sued over injuries. It settled a lawsuit in 2010 with the family of a 10-year-old Kansas boy who fell 13 feet on the museum’s outdoor jungle gym four years earlier. His family claimed the boy sufered brain damage from the fall. In response to that lawsuit, founder Bob Cassilly said at the time that City Museum is no more dangerous than a playground and that visitors must use common sense when exploring its caves, tunnels and slides. Cassilly died in a bulldozer accident in 2011. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Man killed at Florissant bar after quarrel over dog a 55-year-old man was booked on suspicion of second-degree murder at the bar. The PostDispatch is not identifying him because charges are not yet filed..

BAR • FROM A1

Shortly before his death, his wife gave birth to a premature daughter, Jocelyn. The funeral for the 11-day-old infant was Feb. 2, just five days before her father was killed. The shooting occurred about 4 p.m. inside the bar at North New Florissant Road near U.S. Highway 67. Don Beary said his brother stopped by the bar with a friend after he got of work at CSM Construction, an emergency restoration company. The argument that eventually led to his death started over the weight of a German shepherd, one witness told the Post-Dispatch. The gunman’s friend told bar patrons that his dog was 290 pounds. Beary told the man he didn’t believe it, said Carl Leavy, who saw the shooting. “I know, it sounds ridiculous,” Leavy, 46, said. While at first the disagreement didn’t seem heated, one of the men later disparagingly commented on Beary’s weight, prompting the deadly encounter, Leavy said.

A BAR ARGUMENT Leavy gave a full statement to police about what he heard and saw. He even drew a seating chart of the bar to explain who was where. He gave this account to the Post-Dispatch: Leavy arrived after work to the bar about 3 p.m. He is a lifelong resident of Florissant and comes to the bar and restaurant occasionally, but he said he didn’t recognize any of the four men at the bar. He said he sat and could overhear some of what they were saying. Beary was having a casual conversation with the others about construction jobs. He even exchanged numbers with the man

A CARING FATHER

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Police oicers keep watch Wednesday outside the Show-Me’s Sports Bar & Grill in Florissant after two people were shot inside the establishment. Scott Beary, 43, of Winchester, was killed.

who eventually would shoot him, saying he would use his construction services, Leavy said. The man who was talking about his dog was a friend of the shooter. He told the bar patrons he had a 290-pound German shepherd. Beary was dubious. “He said, ‘I’m 325 pounds, I can’t even fathom a dog as big as I am,’” Leavy said. The dog owner said the dog was in the car and said he could prove it. He invited Beary out to see the dog, but a phone call or other distraction kept Beary from going, Leavy said. Soon, the dog owner left, along with his friend, who was the gunman. When the gunman returned a few minutes later, he seemed agitated, Leavy said. “He didn’t seem the same,”

Leavy said. No one yet knew he had a gun. The bartender tried to get the man to leave and gave him his check: $7.45. The gunman paid cash, Leavy said. Beary was leaving too, and as he passed the gunman tapped him on the shoulder and said, “No hard feelings,” according to Leavy. Beary was rounding a corner to leave when the gunman called him a “fat (expletive),” according to Leavy. Beary returned, walked up to the man and said, “Why would you say that?” Seconds later, Leavy heard four or five shots. He said he was about 5 feet away from the gunfire, and the gunman was firing directly into Beary’s chest. Leavy said the bartender rushed over to separate the men,

Republican poll workers needed for North County election sites ELECTION • FROM A1

needed throughout St. Louis County, specifically Republicans willing to work in North County.” Some Republicans don’t want to drive that far, and others are afraid of some of the neighborhoods, said Rick Stream, the county board’s Republican director of elections. “We try to convince people that there’s no danger,” he said. The green insert advertising the one-day job, which requires advance training, urges people to respond online at vote4stlco.com/pollaccess. The election board must find about 400 Republicans for North County to work at each election on April 3, Aug. 7 and Nov. 6. Stream said the insert has caused some confusion, especially on social media, among people who think the board is up to something nefarious by recruiting Republicans to an area of the region where Democrats are the majority, when it’s just trying to comply with the law. A study published in 2015 by Lindenwood University’s Missouri Policy Journal mapped the political polarization in St. Louis County, and noted the northeastern part of St. Louis County had “extremely high voting results for the Democrat Party,” from 80 to 100 percent in most of the voting precincts. The board included a similar insert seeking election judges with property-tax mailings in 2015 to ready for the 2016 elections, but didn’t mention North County then. “We tried to be more specific this time with who we were looking for,” said Eric Fey, the county’s Democratic director of elections. In the southern and middle parts of the county, finding a balance of Republicans and Democrats isn’t exceedingly diicult, he said.

It is tougher to get Democratic election judges in west St. Louis County, he said, not unlike the struggle in the city of St. Louis to find Republicans and vice versa in St. Charles County, where Democratic poll judges are in hot demand. Really, just finding anyone to take the job isn’t easy. “Poll-worker recruitment involves a lot of begging, crying down on your knees, (saying) ‘Please don’t quit.’ Can your brother work? Can your mother work?’” Fey said. The election authority is grappling with a 20 percent drop in workers, about half of whom had died, said Stream, the Republican director. That loss includes people who don’t want to drive to the board of elections’ new oice in the old Northwest Plaza in St. Ann for training, which used to happen in Maplewood. “A lot of people see it as too far north, and they don’t want to go that far,” Stream said. And Election Day is long, without a hefty paycheck to entice workers. All told, it can be a 15-hour day, with pay of between $125 and $155, plus $30 to $65 for training. Training for election judges is set to start next week, and the election board accepts applications all year. Florissant Mayor Tom Schneider said he was somewhat surprised there’s a shortage of Republican judges in North County, given the number of active Republican clubs in area townships. And those people who’ve concluded that it’s too unsafe to come to his neck of the woods to work an election? Said Schneider of such thinking: “It’s tiresome and trite and ignorant.” Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com

herded the gunman over to a different area of the bar and grabbed the gun. Leavy said he held the dying man’s head and searched for a pulse while Beary’s friend tried to stop the bleeding. Florissant Police Chief Timothy Lowery confirmed that the shooter was disarmed and detained by other patrons of the bar until police arrived. Another man in the bar, Ryan Jacobsmeyer, 37, of Troy, Mo., was shot in an extremity, police said. He was treated at a hospital and released. Police said the shooting occurred after an argument between the men turned physical, but have not confirmed Leavy’s account. Police said prosecutors are working to file charges against the gunman. Police records show

Friends and family said Scott Beary will be remembered as a caring husband and father who became a fast friend to almost everyone he met. “I never knew someone who had as many friends as Beary,” said Josh Carroll, a friend who played softball with Beary for 12 years. “He was just one of those big, lovable guys that everybody knew.” Carroll said the last time he saw his friend was when he visited the hospital as Beary cared for his premature daughter shortly before her death. “It kills me,” Carroll said. “His wife lost a baby and nine days later her husband. It’s hard enough dealing with that in a lifetime let alone a little over a week.” Beary was a lifelong resident of the Manchester area, Don Beary said. He lived on St. Lawrence Drive in the small community of Winchester. Over the least year, Beary spent more than four months in Texas and Florida working with his company to rebuild communities affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Don Beary said. The Beary family is taking donations at GoFundMe.com/ scottbeary for expenses after losing both a baby and father within two weeks. “I hope people who hear this story learn that if you get in an altercation, just walk away,” Don Beary said. “I know that’s what my brother would do if he could do it again. It’s not worth it. What a waste — 43 years old leaving three kids behind and now he’s gone.”

Auditor’s report says Missouri budgeting leaves state unprepared for next recession AUDITOR • FROM A1

including to Medicaid. Auditor Nicole Galloway, a Democrat, said the situation makes it diicult for the state to meet its obligations to its residents. “I hear from taxpayers throughout the state who want quality schools for their children, safe roads and bridges, and afordable higher education,” she said in a statement. “Budgeting requires the courage of common sense. The Legislature and the governor need to be honest with Missourians on how decisions in Jeferson City afect citizens’ daily lives.” In 2003, individual income taxes funded 53 percent of the state’s general revenue fund. In 2017, that figure was about 65 percent, according to the report. Part of the shift was a corporate tax cut, passed with heavy Republican support in 2015, that reduced annual state revenue by $177 million. A 2014 cut to individual taxes could also result in about $621 million less in revenue by 2022. The federal tax cut is also expected to reduce state revenue by $58 million. “The state has become increasingly reliant on individual income tax revenue for general revenue funding, making the state’s tax base more sensitive to economic fluctuations,” the report reads. Last month, Gov. Eric Greitens unveiled a plan to cut individual and corporate taxes by $800 million in an effort “turbocharge the economy,” and he’s back on the road this week touting the plan. Referring to the report, Greitens said Democrats are always opposed to tax cuts, adding the auditor’s analysis was inaccurate. “Her numbers are off,” he said Thursday, during a question-and-answer session for the Missouri Press Association. “We’re confident in the numbers we have. ... Every single tax cut we’re making we’re paying for. This is a responsible plan.” Medicaid spending has also become a larger part of the budget since the early 2000s. In 2003, it made up 19 percent of general revenue spending. In 2016, it was 23 percent, according to the report.

The Senate is considering implementing work requirements for able-bodied recipients of Medicaid, and Greitens’ budget proposal cuts spending on Medicaid by $40 million.

TAX CREDITS The report also states that tax credits have contributed to the budget crunch. In November, the Missouri Housing Development Commission voted to stop issuing low-income housing tax credits. The credits — which have a powerful group backing them — have been criticized as ineicient and expensive for the state, but they also help fund housing projects in some of its poorest areas, including in St. Louis. Greitens said the vote showed “politics as usual is over.” At the November meeting, Lt. Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, said the Legislature should debate the issue, adding the move was made for “political purposes.” The move should help the state long term, but it “will have little to no short-term impact on state revenues,” the report states. RAINY DAY FUND Also, should a recession hit, the state’s rainy day fund doesn’t have enough money to weather it, according to the report. The report quotes a Moody Analytics study saying that Missouri’s Budget Reserve Fund needs about $900 million to be able to handle a recession. It had about $591 million in 2017, according to the report. But the fund has also fluctuated as the state has used its money to cover for shortages, the report states. At one point, the fund had only about $100 million. During the 2008 financial crisis, the fund never dipped below $400 million. Using rainy day funds “will result in such funds not being available for budget stabilization when a recessionary economic period hits,” the report states. “Not having suicient budget reserve funds available for budget stabilization will necessitate drastic budget cuts when the economy can least aford them, and will be in areas that directly impact Missouri families.”


NEWS

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Afair questions plague Crawford County, Mo., Greitens as he defends deputy is ired amid spending blueprint inquiry over slaying BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Gov. Eric Gre-

itens on Thursday reiterated that law enforcement has not contacted him or his associates regarding an ongoing criminal investigation by the St. Louis circuit attorney. “We’ve answered all of those questions, and you know that the answer is ‘no,’” he told a journalist at a Thursday news conference sponsored by the Missouri Press Association. “Does anyone have any questions about the business in front of the people of Missouri?” Greitens, a Republican, highlighted eforts to expand rural broadband internet, cut income taxes and drop $25 million in new money on an infrastructure fund, among other topics discussed at the annual press association capital gathering. He also defended his budget blueprint, which would cut $68 million from higher education. Greitens also announced a new effort for the Missouri National Guard to train with the Israeli Defense Forces. It wasn’t immediately clear how much money the endeavor would cost and what the genesis of the idea was. “These joint training exercises will relate to disaster response, homeland security, counterterrorism, our responses to nuclear, biological and chemical attacks,” Greitens told reporters. “There’s a lot that we can learn from each other.” Greitens also was asked whether he took a photograph of the woman with whom he had an extramarital affair.

Last month, the governor acknowledged an affair but denied related allegations that he threatened to release a compromising photograph of the woman. He has denied taking a photograph of the woman to blackmail her, but has not said publicly whether he took a photograph. On Thursday, he again sidestepped the question. “We have answered all of those questions,” Greitens said. “We’ve answered them in multiple interviews, and we’re ready — we’re ready to move forward.” The criminal investigation of Greitens revolves around the photograph he allegedly took of the woman without her consent, and what Greitens then allegedly threatened to do with it. Attorney General Josh Hawley, a Republican, has also started an inquiry into the governor and his team’s reported use of a cellphone app which deletes text messages after they’ve been read, in possible violation of the state’s open records laws. Hawley and the Missouri Press Association have proposed legislative tweaks to state open records laws which would give the attorney general subpoena authority and create penalties for those who violate records-retention laws. “I absolutely support commonsense reforms, some of them along the lines that Josh has proposed,” Greitens said, without addressing the investigation. “We would be happy to support that.” Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

BY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A Crawford County sheriff’s

deputy has been fired after being on administrative leave pending an internal investigation. Sherif Darin Layman said Vernon Zelch was dismissed Monday from the department but wouldn’t explain why other than it involved standards. Zelch, 65, of Bourbon, is a veteran law enforcement officer who most recently worked as a civil process server. He handled subpoenas and other Crawford County court records for the sherif’s department. He’s been scrutinized by the family of a man who went missing for months. Zelch’s son, Deacon Zelch, was charged in September with first-degree murder and armed criminal action in the April 2016 death of Edward Hillhouse, 28, of the Bourbon area, about an hour southwest of St. Louis. Hillhouse was missing for 17 months before a regional task force found him buried on Deacon Zelch’s property at 2026 State Highway J. According to the probable cause statement, police were tipped of in September by a confidential informer who claimed Deacon Zelch killed Hillhouse and used a backhoe to bury the body and other evidence. Oicials said Hillhouse died from a single gunshot to the head from a small-caliber weapon. Hillhouse relatives accused Deputy Vernon Zelch of meddling in the case, according to reports by KMOV-TV (Channel 4). “That is part of the investigation at this point, and I can’t say whether he was or was

not,” Sherif Layman told the Post-Dispatch on Thursday. “He was accused of that.” Still, he fired the deputy Monday. “We have standards that have to be met as well,” Layman said. Reached by telephone, Vernon Zelch said he wouldn’t comment on the dismissal, but he denied getting in the way of his son’s murder case. “I was just a civil processor,” he said. “I had no authority to do anything.” He added about the Hillhouse death: “This is a tragedy for our community, and they have lost a son. It appears I am losing a son, and I will pray for them all every day.” Hillhouse’s sister, Kayla Tolliver, previously told KMOV that prayers aren’t enough. “The fact is, a deputy’s son killed my brother, and I feel like it was covered up so long,” she said. On Thursday, she wrote on Facebook: “For those of you who think Vernon wouldn’t cover for his son or that he wasn’t interfering, well if there was enough proof to fire him (then) I’d say there’s something there.” Vernon Zelch had been a deputy at the Crawford County Sheriff’s Department since 2011. He’s a former assistant police chief in Sullivan and sheriff’s deputy in Franklin County. He has also been a guest host for radio programs in Sullivan and has written columns for the Sullivan Independent News. In addition to murder, Deacon Zelch also faces a drug-related charge in Crawford County. His attorney declined to comment Thursday. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

Porter fallout focuses attention on Kelly’s future as chief of staf PORTER • FROM A1

information. Kelly faced criticism for defending Porter, only to belatedly reverse course hours after the publication of photos showing one of the ex-wives with a black eye. “It’s fair to say we all could have done better over the last few hours or last few days in dealing with this situation,” said White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah, who faced a barrage of questions about Kelly during a press briefing.

SOMETHING AMISS Though the allegations against Porter became public this week, Kelly learned last fall that something was amiss with the staff secretary’s attempts to get a security clearance, according to an administration official who insisted on anonymity to discuss internal matters. The chief of staff had sought information about the status of security clearance applications for top aides, and it was then he learned there were allegations against Porter from his ex-wives, said the oicial. Porter and Kelly later discussed the allegations. The White House oicial said that staffers felt misled about how Porter downplayed the allegations, both to Kelly at the end of the 2017 and to White House counsel Don McGahn near the beginning of Trump’s term. When the allegations first emerged against Porter, a number of senior aides rallied around him, and the White House acknowledged that personal rela-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White House Chief of Staf John Kelly (left), shown with staf secretary Rob Porter in November, worked closely with Porter in the White House.

tionships may have played a role in their response. Communications director Hope Hicks, who was dating the staff secretary, helped draft the original statements defending him, according to three current and former White House oicials. Shah said Thursday that Hicks later “recused” herself from some aspects of the matter, but it was unclear from what. Kelly was Porter’s loudest defender, including after graphic photos of alleged abuse emerged. Only later did the chief of staf, who had argued for Porter to keep his post, release a second statement in which he said he supported Porter’s resignation.

TRUMP UNAWARE Shah said that Trump was not aware until Tuesday of the accusations against Porter, who was

a frequent presence in the Oval Oice and helped craft the president’s State of the Union address. By the time the president was briefed on the claims against Porter on Wednesday, the oncerising White House aide had resigned, according to the oicial. A number of lawmakers criticized Kelly, and a leading women’s group called him to resign.

FOCUS ON KELLY The president, for his part, has not signaled to allies that he is on the verge of making a change. But Trump has long chafed at the controls placed on him by Kelly and in recent weeks has privately fumed about the chief of staff to his circle of informal advisers, according to two people who speak to the president regularly but are not authorized to publicly discuss private conversations.

Trump also was angry that Kelly did not bring the Porter allegations to him sooner, according to one of the people. Kelly drew Trump’s ire last month when he seemed to suggest that the president was flipflopping on his call for a border wall. Trump complained to aides that the chief of staff had portrayed him as a child who had to be managed, a contention that irked the president in the wake of the way he was portrayed in the recent Michael Wolf book, “Fire and Fury.” But a dismissal of Kelly could revive the narrative of a White House in crisis as it faces the ongoing Russia probe and the midterm elections. Kelly’s handling of the Porter afair has rattled some aides, who questioned his full-throated defense of an accused batterer, according to more than a halfdozen White House officials and outside advisers who were not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations. Democrats swiftly called for an investigation into Porter’s presence at the White House. “If John Kelly is covering this up, he needs to be held accountable,” Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., told CNN’s “New Day,” adding, “He better have a really good reason. Otherwise, he’s gone, too.” Toni Van Pelt, head of the National Organization for Women, was more direct. She revisited accusations that Trump himself has sexually harassed women, allegations he has denied. “White House chief of staff John Kelly must resign,” said Van Pelt. “His pathetic defense of

staf secretary Rob Porter reveals his true nature — an enabler of sexual abusers, a betrayer of trust and an avoider of responsibility.”

CLEARANCE QUESTIONS The White House was also put on the defensive about Porter’s interim security clearance, fielding questions about how someone could handle some of the nation’s most sensitive documents while potentially being ripe for blackmail. In Thursday’s briefing, Shah outlined the background check procedure, which is run by the federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies and was still underway for Porter. Attorneys who specialize in security clearance said Porter should have disclosed the allegations, including the protective order granted to one woman, when he filed his national security application. John V. Berry, who represents government employees, noted that interim clearance would not have prohibited Porter from having access to sensitive information. Both of Porter’s ex-wives have detailed the abuse they said they suffered at Porter’s hands and said they informed the FBI. One of them, Jennifer Willoughby, posted about it on Instagram in April 2017 and wrote of Porter that “When I tried to get help, I was counseled to consider carefully how what I said might afect his career.” She wrote Thursday that she hoped her “story and my words can be a beacon forward for anyone who needs to be reminded: You are seen. You matter. You are enough.”

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

Hillsboro mayor defends himself after arrest He acknowledges he did resist ‘a little bit’ BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HILLSBORO • The mayor here

explained his arrest by a Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy on Monday by claiming the deputy went overboard by arresting and pepper-spraying him. Hillsboro Mayor Dennis Bradley, 65, admits however, that he has long had a personal dispute with the deputy and did “resist arrest a little bit.” According to an account by the Jeferson County sherif’s office, Bradley began yelling expletives at the uniformed deputy at a High Ridge gas station about 2 p.m. Monday. The mayor challenged the deputy to a physical confronta-

tion, told him to take off his badge and poked him in the chest, Capt. Gary Higginbotham said. The deputy Bradley warned Bradley not to touch him again, and that if he did, he would be arrested, police said. Police say Bradley again poked the deputy, who then ordered the mayor to put his hands behind his back, police said. Bradley walked away and refused to comply, so the deputy used “soft control tactics” to handcuf him, police said. Bradley then allegedly grabbed and twisted the deputy’s hand, police said. The deputy used pepper spray on Bradley and the mayor was arrested on suspicion of fourth-degree assault on a law enforcement oicer, resisting ar-

rest and stalking and harassing. Another deputy took Bradley to jail, where he was booked and released pending criminal charges. But Bradley claims that the police account is misleading. “I am irritated because the department is putting out every dirty detail and making me out to be the villain and that’s just not true,” Bradley said in a phone interview Thursday morning. “I never assaulted him, he assaulted me.” Bradley said he did not want to talk about all the details of the confrontation on advice of his lawyer, but said he and the deputy had been in a dispute since the deputy arrested his family member in 2014. “This is a family member who I love very much,” Bradley said. “I believe he was treated very badly, and I would defend him like anybody who loves their family.”

Bradley admits he was speaking to the deputy Monday about his family member’s arrest, but claims he posed no physical threat to the deputy. But, Bradley said, when the deputy attempted to arrest him, he did “resist arrest a little bit” with the hope that the deputy would call for backup. “I know how this deputy has treated my family in the past and I didn’t want to be alone in the patrol car with him,” Bradley said. Police also claim after Bradley was released, he walked across the parking lot of the jail and was standing next to the deputy’s patrol car. Bradley would not respond to that claim. The deputy filed a petition for a restraining order against the mayor. A judge granted the order Tuesday. In the petition, the deputy

claims the mayor would follow him around the county while he was on duty and berate him while he tried to work. The deputy also claimed Bradley would pull up next to him at stoplights, make a vulgar gesture and mouth words at him, according to the petition. The deputy arrested the mayor’s son on suspicion of driving while intoxicated in 2014, according to the petition. Bradley said, however, the claims of harassment in the deputy’s petition were exaggerated. The mayor said he will not resign, but believes the Hillsboro Board of Alderpersons are not supporting him. “I grew up in America, and here you’re innocent until proven guilty,” Bradley said. “Not all the facts are out yet.” Erin Hefernan • 314-340-8145 @erinhef on Twitter ehefernan@post-dispatch.com

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NEWS

02.09.2018 • FriDay • M 1

Horses, houses and cars, too: Tax breaks tucked into budget BY MARCY GORDON associated Press

WA S H I N G T O N • Congress passed a $1.5 trillion tax cut package just two months ago. Turns out it wasn’t enough. Wedged into the new mammoth Senate spending deal is a pack of tax breaks for homeowners and electric car owners — as well as goodies for motor speedways. There’s also tax relief for people and businesses afected by the California wildfires and the hurricanes that devastated Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Owners of racehorses will get a break, too. The new tax benefits didn’t make it into the Republicanbacked tax overhaul enacted in December, which had to land under a $1.5 trillion limit in order to pass the Senate with a simple majority of 51 votes. Now, with fresh bipartisan legislation allowing the shattering of tight caps on defense and domestic programs, lawmakers have found room for dozens more tax breaks. The provisions for the disasterstruck areas and the extensions of benefits for homeowners and energy savers are popular with lawmakers from both parties. Most of the proposed tax breaks are not

new, but extend expired provisions through the end of this year. Among the proposed extensions of tax benefits for homeowners: the deduction for mortgage insurance premiums and the exclusion from income of some forgiven debts on mortgages. The deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses for higher education also is extended, subject to certain caps. Tax credits are extended for investments homeowners make to improve energy eiciency, such as solar panels, windows, skylights, water heaters and heat pumps. The $1,000 to $2,000 credit for building or selling new energy-eicient homes is extended. The $4,000 to $40,000 credit for purchases of new hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles is extended, as is the credit for 10 percent of the amount paid for new two-wheeled plug-in electric cars. Electric car charging stations also benefit. The tax law that kicked in Jan. 1 already provides a credit of up to $7,500 for purchases of larger plug-in electric cars such as the Tesla Model 3 and Chevrolet Bolt. And it ofers tax support for wind and solar energy — while also boosting oil and gas production. Other extensions: the 20 percent credit that employers can

claim for wages and health care expenses related to employing certain members of an Indian tribe; the credit for railroad track maintenance; special rules for expensing in qualified film and television productions; and benefits for business activities in so-called empowerment zones. The roar of NASCAR racing, a perennial favorite among both parties, can be heard in the extension of tax rules for so-called motor sports entertainment complexes. The shortened, seven-year period for writing down the value of the asset would be extended. Lawmakers have promoted racing, with its correlated food vending and other facilities, as a job creator. A big winner: International Speedway Corp., which owns and operates 13 motor sports facilities, including Daytona International Speedway, Darlington Raceway and Talladega Superspeedway. The owners of racehorses get an extension of the three-year period for writing down that asset. Also in the spending plan is nearly $90 billion in disaster aid for Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico. That includes tax relief: allowing for hardship withdrawals from retirement plans, deductions for property losses and other benefits.

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A7

12 KEY POINTS IN SPENDING PROPOSAL It funds the government through March 23 • The intention is to give lawmakers a bit more time to craft all the details needed for the full appropriations bills that become the oicial federal budget. It gives Congress permission to spend $500 billion more • Republican and Democratic leaders have agreed to spend a lot more money over the next two years, scrapping the “caps” that were in place on both military and nonmilitary funding. While some lawmakers are balking at the hefty price tag and how much is added to the debt, many are willing to set aside those concerns because they are getting more money for programs they care about most. It would ensure there won’t be another budget battle before the 2018 midterm election. Military spending jumps 10 percent • The deal gives about $700 billion for national defense and war spending in 2018 and $716 billion in 2019, a major increase for the Pentagon. This works out to roughly a 10 percent increase over the $634 billion spent last iscal year on defense. “The defense hawks got everything they wanted in this deal,” said Todd Harrison, a budget expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Military leaders had complained for years that spending caps were gutting the modernization budget and forcing the military to slash essential tasks such as pilot training hours or ship maintenance. However, the largess also removes any pressure for the military to make reforms. For example, the Pentagon said it has 22 percent excess base capacity that it would like to close. The extra money also removes pressure to cut weapons systems that some believe are better suited to the last war, such as the Atlantic 10 Conference attack jet or the U-2 high altitude surveillance plane. ‘Historic’ 10 percent increase in domestic spending • Some Democrats are calling this deal a win because it gives a “historic” boost to nondefense spending. Overall, domestic spending would rise by $63 billion this iscal year and $68 billion the following year. President Donald Trump had proposed a substantial decrease in domestic spending in his irst budget, but this deal would boost total nondefense spending by about 10 percent (from $539 billion last year to $591 billion this year). The deal includes more money for everything from child care to college afordability to infrastructure. There is also additional money going to fund the Internal Revenue Service and Social Security Administration so there will be more staf to help Americans who need help with paperwork. Federal health programs get much-needed funding • Meeting a Democratic priority, the agreement funnels billions of dollars for several key health care priorities — funding Community Health Centers for two years, extending the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and staving of cuts to Medicare and Medicaid that would have been triggered had caps not been lifted. “All I can say is the obvious: It’s great to get the funding for these inally nailed down,” said Tim Jost, a health care expert at the Washington and Lee University School of Law. “It inally brings stability to some very important health care programs.” About $7 billion will be spent on the Community Health Centers, which provided care to 26.5 million Americans in 2016. Across the country, about 2,600 of these centers — which primarily help low-income people — would be slated for closure if the federal government stopped funding them entirely. Congress already agreed to fund the CHIP program in January, but only for six years. This deal will extend that to 10 years. The deal also gives an extra $2 billion a year in 2018 and 2019 to help Veterans Afairs with its health care backlog.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Paul Ryan, shown Thursday on Capitol Hill, supports the Senate budget plan.

Budget would hike military, domestic spending SHUTDOWN • FROM A1

tucky senator said. “Now we have Republicans hand in hand with Democrats offering us trilliondollar deficits. I can’t in all honesty look the other way.” While the government’s authority to spend some money would expire at midnight, there weren’t likely to be many clear immediate efects. Essential personnel would remain on the job regardless, and it appeared possible — although not likely — that the measure could pass both the Senate and House before most federal employees were due to report for work. If the measure were to pass in the wee hours of the morning, the government would open in the morning on schedule, said John Czwartacki, spokesman for the Office of Management and Budget, the agency responsible for coordinating any shutdown. At the White House, there appeared to be little sense of concern. Aides closed shop early in the night, with no comment on the display on the Hill. The president did not tweet early on. But frustrations were clear in both sides of the Capitol, where just hours earlier leaders had been optimistic that the budget deal was a sign they had left behind some of their chronic dysfunction. Senate Democrats sparked a three-day partial government shutdown last month by filibustering a spending bill, seeking relief for “Dreamer” immigrants who have lived in the country illegally since they were children. This time it was a Republican’s turn to throw a wrench in the works. Paul brushed of pleas from his fellow Republicans, who billed the budget plan as an “emergency” measure needed for a depleted military. “We will efectively shut down the federal government for no good reason,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, as his requests to move to a vote were repeatedly rejected by Paul. Paul was unfazed. “I didn’t come up here to be part of somebody’s club. I didn’t come up here to be liked,” he said.

Approval of the measure in the Senate seemed assured — eventually — while the situation in the House remained dicey. In that chamber, progressive Democrats and Tea Party Republicans opposed the measure, which contains roughly $400 billion in new spending for the Pentagon, domestic agencies, disaster relief and extending a host of health care provisions. However, House GOP leaders said they were confident they had shored up support among conservatives for the measure, which would shower the Pentagon with money but add hundreds of billions of dollars to the nation’s $20 trillion-plus debt. House Democratic leaders opposed the measure — arguing it should resolve the plight of Dreamers — but not with all their might. The legislation doesn’t address immigration, though Republican Speaker Paul Ryan said again Thursday he was determined to bring an immigration bill to the floor this year — albeit only one that has President Donald Trump’s blessing. At a late afternoon meeting, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California made it plain she wasn’t pressuring fellow Democrats to kill the bill, which is packed with money for party priorities like infrastructure, combating opioid abuse and helping college students. Still, it represented a bitter defeat for Democrats who followed a risky strategy to use the party’s leverage on the budget to address immigration and ended up scalded by last month’s three-day government shutdown. Protection for the Dreamers under former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, expires next month. Republicans were sheepish about the bushels of dollars for Democratic priorities and the return next year of $1 trillionplus deficits. But they pointed to money they have long sought for the Pentagon, which they say needs huge sums for readiness, training and weapons modernization.

“It provides what the Pentagon needs to restore our military’s edge for years to come,” said Ryan. Beyond $300 billion worth of record increases for the military and domestic programs, the agreement adds nearly $90 billion in overdue disaster aid for hurricane-slammed Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, a politically charged increase in the government’s borrowing cap and a grab bag of health and tax provisions. There’s also $16 billion to renew a slew of expired tax breaks that Congress seems unable to kill. “I love bipartisanship, as you know,” said Sen. Jeff Flake, RAriz. “But the problem is the only time we discover bipartisanship is when we spend more money.” The deal contains far more money demanded by Democrats than had seemed possible only weeks ago. “We’re not going to get DACA as part of this,” said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the Budget Committee. “So if we can negotiate a deal like I think we’ve gotten that essentially meets every other one of our priorities then I think that’s where a lot of the Democrats are.” Added conservative Democrat Henry Cuellar of Texas, “It’s an easy ‘yes.’” Combined with the Republicans’ December tax cut bill, the burst in spending would put the GOP-controlled government on track for the first $1 trillion-plus deficits since Obama’s first term and the aftermath of the most recent recession nine years ago. “This budget deal shows just how broken the budget process is, that Congress thinks the only way to agree to a budget is to put hundreds of billions of dollars on the nation’s credit card,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a Washington-based group. The agreement would increase the government’s borrowing limit to prevent a first-ever default on U.S. obligations that looms in just a few weeks. The debt limit would be suspended through March 2019, putting the next vote on it safely past this year’s midterm elections.

Help for Puerto Rico • The spending package would provide nearly $90 billion in disaster relief for Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, and Texas — areas still trying to recover from devastating hurricanes last year. That is more than double what the Trump administration initially requested. About $16 billion of that money is expected to go to Puerto Rico, as swaths of the island continue to face power outages and a lack of safe drinking water, said Ramon Luis Nieves, a former Puerto Rican state senator who has lobbied Congress for more funding for the island. The allocation is still short of the $94 billion that Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said is necessary to help the island recover from Hurricane Maria. (For instance, the deal allocates about $2 billion to repairing the island’s energy grid, while Rosselló has said $17 billion will be necessary.) “I hope this is just the beginning of trying to comply with the governor’s request,” Luis Nieves said. More tax cuts for 2017 • The deal also extends a lot of tax cuts for individuals and businesses for 2017. Yes, you read that right. It’s a massive retroactive tax break. Even though people spend all of 2017 thinking those tax breaks were done and making their plans based on that, they now get surprise tax relief. “This is not an ideal way of making federal policy,” says Scott Greenberg, a senior analyst at the Tax Foundation. “It’s probably not a good idea to make retroactive tax extenders in the irst place.” So who gets the extra tax breaks? A bunch of green energy projects such as wind, geothermal and fuel cells. Rum producers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Film, TV and theater production companies. And people will be able to deduct private mortgage insurance and mortgage debt relief. Money to start ighting the opioid epidemic • The deal would funnel $6 billion over two years to ight the opioid crisis with new grants, prevention programs and “law enforcement eforts” across the country. States with the highest mortality rates would get the most federal dollars. The debt ceiling is raised until March 2019 • To pay for all of this, the government is going to have to borrow more money. That’s why the deal also waives the debt ceiling — the cap on how much the U.S. Treasury can borrow — until March 1, 2019. More money for GOP social priorities like abstinence education • The deal includes funding for more abstinence education, and it includes a provision to exempt Berea College in Kentucky, a school where students do not pay tuition, from having to pay the new tax on large college endowments that was enacted as part of the GOP tax bill. America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve would be sold down • In an efort to pay for at least a bit of the price tag, the bill calls for selling 15 percent of America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve. But the selling would not start until 2022. Budget hawks who are concerned about how high America’s debt is call “pay fors” like this gimmicks that are one-time revenue increases. Congress was trying to get away from those, but this bill appears to abandon that commitment. 2 losers: “Dreamers” and future taxpayers don’t do well in this deal • The bill does nothing for the 619,000 young people known as “Dreamers” who were brought to America illegally as children and have grown up in the United States. If they followed the rules, a President Barack Obama-era program known as DACA allowed them to stay in the country. But that protection is set to end on March 6. This deal still leaves them hanging, although House Speaker Paul Ryan says Congress will deal with them next. Congress is also spending more money that the government does not have. Someone will have to pay for that down the line, either by raising taxes or future spending cuts. Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, slammed the deal as “terrible.” Her organization predicts the U.S. will hit $1 trillion in deicits as early as next year. Even worse, with this budget deal, her group says trillion-dollar deicits are here to say, possibly for the next decade. “If this bill passes, it is pretty much the end of iscal discipline,” tweeted Ben Ritz, a former budget analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center who also interned for some Democratic politicians. Washington Post


NEWS

02.09.2018 • FriDay • M 2

Horses, houses and cars, too: Tax breaks tucked into budget BY MARCY GORDON associated Press

WA S H I N G T O N • Congress passed a $1.5 trillion tax cut package just two months ago. Turns out it wasn’t enough. Wedged into the new mammoth Senate spending deal is a pack of tax breaks for homeowners and electric car owners — as well as goodies for motor speedways. There’s also tax relief for people and businesses afected by the California wildfires and the hurricanes that devastated Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Owners of racehorses will get a break, too. The new tax benefits didn’t make it into the Republicanbacked tax overhaul enacted in December, which had to land under a $1.5 trillion limit in order to pass the Senate with a simple majority of 51 votes. Now, with fresh bipartisan legislation allowing the shattering of tight caps on defense and domestic programs, lawmakers have found room for dozens more tax breaks. The provisions for the disasterstruck areas and the extensions of benefits for homeowners and energy savers are popular with lawmakers from both parties. Most of the proposed tax breaks are not

new, but extend expired provisions through the end of this year. Among the proposed extensions of tax benefits for homeowners: the deduction for mortgage insurance premiums and the exclusion from income of some forgiven debts on mortgages. The deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses for higher education also is extended, subject to certain caps. Tax credits are extended for investments homeowners make to improve energy eiciency, such as solar panels, windows, skylights, water heaters and heat pumps. The $1,000 to $2,000 credit for building or selling new energy-eicient homes is extended. The $4,000 to $40,000 credit for purchases of new hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles is extended, as is the credit for 10 percent of the amount paid for new two-wheeled plug-in electric cars. Electric car charging stations also benefit. The tax law that kicked in Jan. 1 already provides a credit of up to $7,500 for purchases of larger plug-in electric cars such as the Tesla Model 3 and Chevrolet Bolt. And it ofers tax support for wind and solar energy — while also boosting oil and gas production. Other extensions: the 20 percent credit that employers can

claim for wages and health care expenses related to employing certain members of an Indian tribe; the credit for railroad track maintenance; special rules for expensing in qualified film and television productions; and benefits for business activities in so-called empowerment zones. The roar of NASCAR racing, a perennial favorite among both parties, can be heard in the extension of tax rules for so-called motor sports entertainment complexes. The shortened, seven-year period for writing down the value of the asset would be extended. Lawmakers have promoted racing, with its correlated food vending and other facilities, as a job creator. A big winner: International Speedway Corp., which owns and operates 13 motor sports facilities, including Daytona International Speedway, Darlington Raceway and Talladega Superspeedway. The owners of racehorses get an extension of the three-year period for writing down that asset. Also in the spending plan is nearly $90 billion in disaster aid for Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico. That includes tax relief: allowing for hardship withdrawals from retirement plans, deductions for property losses and other benefits.

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A7

12 KEY POINTS IN SPENDING PROPOSAL It funds the government through March 23 • The intention is to give lawmakers a bit more time to craft all the details needed for the full appropriations bills that become the oicial federal budget. It gives Congress permission to spend $500 billion more • Republican and Democratic leaders have agreed to spend a lot more money over the next two years, scrapping the “caps” that were in place on both military and nonmilitary funding. While some lawmakers are balking at the hefty price tag and how much is added to the debt, many are willing to set aside those concerns because they are getting more money for programs they care about most. It would ensure there won’t be another budget battle before the 2018 midterm election. Military spending jumps 10 percent • The deal gives about $700 billion for national defense and war spending in 2018 and $716 billion in 2019, a major increase for the Pentagon. This works out to roughly a 10 percent increase over the $634 billion spent last iscal year on defense. “The defense hawks got everything they wanted in this deal,” said Todd Harrison, a budget expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Military leaders had complained for years that spending caps were gutting the modernization budget and forcing the military to slash essential tasks such as pilot training hours or ship maintenance. However, the largess also removes any pressure for the military to make reforms. For example, the Pentagon said it has 22 percent excess base capacity that it would like to close. The extra money also removes pressure to cut weapons systems that some believe are better suited to the last war, such as the Atlantic 10 Conference attack jet or the U-2 high altitude surveillance plane. ‘Historic’ 10 percent increase in domestic spending • Some Democrats are calling this deal a win because it gives a “historic” boost to nondefense spending. Overall, domestic spending would rise by $63 billion this iscal year and $68 billion the following year. President Donald Trump had proposed a substantial decrease in domestic spending in his irst budget, but this deal would boost total nondefense spending by about 10 percent (from $539 billion last year to $591 billion this year). The deal includes more money for everything from child care to college afordability to infrastructure. There is also additional money going to fund the Internal Revenue Service and Social Security Administration so there will be more staf to help Americans who need help with paperwork. Federal health programs get much-needed funding • Meeting a Democratic priority, the agreement funnels billions of dollars for several key health care priorities — funding Community Health Centers for two years, extending the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and staving of cuts to Medicare and Medicaid that would have been triggered had caps not been lifted. “All I can say is the obvious: It’s great to get the funding for these inally nailed down,” said Tim Jost, a health care expert at the Washington and Lee University School of Law. “It inally brings stability to some very important health care programs.” About $7 billion will be spent on the Community Health Centers, which provided care to 26.5 million Americans in 2016. Across the country, about 2,600 of these centers — which primarily help low-income people — would be slated for closure if the federal government stopped funding them entirely. Congress already agreed to fund the CHIP program in January, but only for six years. This deal will extend that to 10 years. The deal also gives an extra $2 billion a year in 2018 and 2019 to help Veterans Afairs with its health care backlog.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Paul Ryan, shown Thursday on Capitol Hill, supports the Senate budget plan.

Budget would hike military, domestic spending SHUTDOWN • FROM A1

very critical of President Obama’s trillion-dollar deficits,” the Kentucky senator said. “Now we have Republicans hand in hand with Democrats offering us trilliondollar deficits. I can’t in all honesty look the other way.” While the government’s authority to spend some money expired at midnight, there weren’t likely to be many clear immediate efects. Essential personnel would remain on the job regardless, and it appeared possible — although not certain — that the measure could pass both the Senate and House before most federal employees were due to report for work. If the measure were to pass in the wee hours of the morning, the government would open in the morning on schedule, said John Czwartacki, spokesman for the Office of Management and Budget, the agency responsible for coordinating any shutdown. At the White House, there appeared to be little sense of concern. Aides closed shop early in the night, with no comment on the display on the Hill. The president did not tweet early on. But frustrations were clear in both sides of the Capitol, where just hours earlier leaders had been optimistic that the budget deal was a sign they had left behind some of their chronic dysfunction. Senate Democrats sparked a threeday partial government shutdown last month by filibustering a spending bill, seeking relief for “Dreamer” immigrants who have lived in the country illegally since they were children. This time it was a Republican’s turn to throw a wrench in the works. Paul brushed of pleas from fellow Republicans, who billed the budget plan as an “emergency” measure for a depleted military. “We will efectively shut down the federal government for no good reason,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, as his requests to move to a vote were repeatedly rejected by Paul. Paul was unfazed. “I didn’t come up here to be part of somebody’s club. I didn’t come up here to be liked,” he said.

Approval of the measure in the Senate seemed assured — eventually — while the situation in the House remained dicey. In that chamber, progressive Democrats and Tea Party Republicans opposed the measure, which contains roughly $400 billion in new spending for the Pentagon, domestic agencies, disaster relief and extending a host of health care provisions. However, House GOP leaders said they were confident they had shored up support among conservatives for the measure, which would shower the Pentagon with money but add hundreds of billions of dollars to the nation’s $20 trillion-plus debt. House Democratic leaders opposed the measure — arguing it should resolve the plight of Dreamers — but not with all their might. The legislation doesn’t address immigration, though Republican Speaker Paul Ryan said again Thursday he was determined to bring an immigration bill to the floor this year — albeit only one that has President Donald Trump’s blessing. At a late afternoon meeting, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California made it plain she wasn’t pressuring fellow Democrats to kill the bill, which is packed with money for party priorities like infrastructure, combating opioid abuse and helping college students. Still, it represented a bitter defeat for Democrats who followed a risky strategy to use the party’s leverage on the budget to address immigration and ended up scalded by last month’s three-day government shutdown. Protection for the Dreamers under former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, expires next month. Republicans were sheepish about the bushels of dollars for Democratic priorities and the return next year of $1 trillionplus deficits. But they pointed to money they have long sought for the Pentagon, which they say needs huge sums for readiness, training and weapons modernization.

“It provides what the Pentagon needs to restore our military’s edge for years to come,” said Ryan. Beyond $300 billion worth of record increases for the military and domestic programs, the agreement adds nearly $90 billion in overdue disaster aid for hurricane-slammed Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, a politically charged increase in the government’s borrowing cap and a grab bag of health and tax provisions. There’s also $16 billion to renew a slew of expired tax breaks that Congress seems unable to kill. “I love bipartisanship, as you know,” said Sen. Jeff Flake, RAriz. “But the problem is the only time we discover bipartisanship is when we spend more money.” The deal contains far more money demanded by Democrats than had seemed possible only weeks ago. “We’re not going to get DACA as part of this,” said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the Budget Committee. “So if we can negotiate a deal like I think we’ve gotten that essentially meets every other one of our priorities then I think that’s where a lot of the Democrats are.” Added conservative Democrat Henry Cuellar of Texas, “It’s an easy ‘yes.’” Combined with the Republicans’ December tax cut bill, the burst in spending would put the GOP-controlled government on track for the first $1 trillion-plus deficits since Obama’s first term and the aftermath of the most recent recession nine years ago. “This budget deal shows just how broken the budget process is, that Congress thinks the only way to agree to a budget is to put hundreds of billions of dollars on the nation’s credit card,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a Washington-based group. The agreement would increase the government’s borrowing limit to prevent a first-ever default on U.S. obligations that looms in just a few weeks. The debt limit would be suspended through March 2019, putting the next vote on it safely past this year’s midterm elections.

Help for Puerto Rico • The spending package would provide nearly $90 billion in disaster relief for Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, and Texas — areas still trying to recover from devastating hurricanes last year. That is more than double what the Trump administration initially requested. About $16 billion of that money is expected to go to Puerto Rico, as swaths of the island continue to face power outages and a lack of safe drinking water, said Ramon Luis Nieves, a former Puerto Rican state senator who has lobbied Congress for more funding for the island. The allocation is still short of the $94 billion that Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said is necessary to help the island recover from Hurricane Maria. (For instance, the deal allocates about $2 billion to repairing the island’s energy grid, while Rosselló has said $17 billion will be necessary.) “I hope this is just the beginning of trying to comply with the governor’s request,” Luis Nieves said. More tax cuts for 2017 • The deal also extends a lot of tax cuts for individuals and businesses for 2017. Yes, you read that right. It’s a massive retroactive tax break. Even though people spend all of 2017 thinking those tax breaks were done and making their plans based on that, they now get surprise tax relief. “This is not an ideal way of making federal policy,” says Scott Greenberg, a senior analyst at the Tax Foundation. “It’s probably not a good idea to make retroactive tax extenders in the irst place.” So who gets the extra tax breaks? A bunch of green energy projects such as wind, geothermal and fuel cells. Rum producers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Film, TV and theater production companies. And people will be able to deduct private mortgage insurance and mortgage debt relief. Money to start ighting the opioid epidemic • The deal would funnel $6 billion over two years to ight the opioid crisis with new grants, prevention programs and “law enforcement eforts” across the country. States with the highest mortality rates would get the most federal dollars. The debt ceiling is raised until March 2019 • To pay for all of this, the government is going to have to borrow more money. That’s why the deal also waives the debt ceiling — the cap on how much the U.S. Treasury can borrow — until March 1, 2019. More money for GOP social priorities like abstinence education • The deal includes funding for more abstinence education, and it includes a provision to exempt Berea College in Kentucky, a school where students do not pay tuition, from having to pay the new tax on large college endowments that was enacted as part of the GOP tax bill. America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve would be sold down • In an efort to pay for at least a bit of the price tag, the bill calls for selling 15 percent of America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve. But the selling would not start until 2022. Budget hawks who are concerned about how high America’s debt is call “pay fors” like this gimmicks that are one-time revenue increases. Congress was trying to get away from those, but this bill appears to abandon that commitment. 2 losers: “Dreamers” and future taxpayers don’t do well in this deal • The bill does nothing for the 619,000 young people known as “Dreamers” who were brought to America illegally as children and have grown up in the United States. If they followed the rules, a President Barack Obama-era program known as DACA allowed them to stay in the country. But that protection is set to end on March 6. This deal still leaves them hanging, although House Speaker Paul Ryan says Congress will deal with them next. Congress is also spending more money that the government does not have. Someone will have to pay for that down the line, either by raising taxes or future spending cuts. Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, slammed the deal as “terrible.” Her organization predicts the U.S. will hit $1 trillion in deicits as early as next year. Even worse, with this budget deal, her group says trillion-dollar deicits are here to say, possibly for the next decade. “If this bill passes, it is pretty much the end of iscal discipline,” tweeted Ben Ritz, a former budget analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center who also interned for some Democratic politicians. Washington Post


NATION

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

South Dakota could ban teaching about gender identity Public elementary, middle schools would be afected BY JAMES NORD Associated Press

PIERRE, S.D. • South Da-

kota lawmakers will consider banning the teaching of gender identity in public elementary and middle schools, a push that critics say targets transgender students in the same way some states limit the positive portrayal of homosexuality in the classroom. The state would be the first in the nation to block instruction on gender identity or gender expression, said Nathan Smith, public policy director at GLSEN, a national group focused on safe schools for LGBTQ students. But the organization recently counted seven states with restrictions on positively portraying homosexuality in health classes, sometimes called “no-promo-homo” laws. The states are Alabama, Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas. “It’s maybe a little different in the way that it’s crafted and maybe a little diferent in the way, sort of the population that it targets, but the underlying concerns are the same for us as they would be in ... a traditional ‘no-promohomo’ law,” Smith said. “We think that it’s bad broadly for LGBTQ students in South Dakota.” LGBTQ students in states with such laws are more likely to face assault and harassment at school, and get less support from teachers and administrators, according to a GLSEN research brief. South Dakota’s bill would cover public school students from kindergarten through seventh grade. State Education Department spokeswoman Mary Stadick Smith said that she’s not aware of gender identity being taught in schools. Republican Sen. Phil Jensen, the sponsor, said he has constituents concerned it might become an issue in schools. Jensen said he’s worried about teaching children topics that aren’t age-appropriate and that students are failing to master the basics. “I think we need to be focusing on reading, writing and arithmetic,” Jensen said. GLSEN isn’t aware of any other states considering a bill like South Dakota’s, Smith said. States including California, Massachusetts and Washington have moved in the opposite direction. Washington included gender identity as an optional topic for districts to teach in recently revised health learning standards. For example, it suggests kindergarten students understand there are many ways to express gender and third-graders recognize the importance of treating others with respect regarding gender identity, which is defined as someone’s inner sense of their gender.

Oicials had heard from teachers, parents and national health experts interested in students understanding and being aware of gender identity, said Nathan Olson, spokesman for Washington’s Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. The Washington state office doesn’t track how many districts are teaching the new “self-identity” topic, which took efect for the current school year. In California, a 2011 law mandates including disabled and LGBTQ people in history and social science lessons. Massachusetts lawmakers in 2011 barred discrimination against public school students based on gender identity. Jeff Perrotti, director of the Massachusetts Safe Schools Program for LGBTQ Students, said some schools in the state are teaching gender identity and expression

in the classroom.Mimi Lemay said the Massachusetts district where her 7-yearold transgender son, Jacob, goes to school has become

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better about being inclusive as parents have pushed the issue. Teaching about gender identity is important

for transgender children and for their classmates, who will grow up accepting their peers, said Lemay, who speaks to schools and

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companies about making them safer spaces for LGBT people. “Being transgender is innate. It is who you are,” she said.

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02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A9

ADVANCING ST. LOUIS | NATALIE DuBOSE OF NATALIE’S CAKES AND MORE PRODUCED BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

Baking with Purpose Natalie DuBose serves her community in more ways than one. By Jennifer Mason Marketing Content Contributor

space and donate the remaining funds to other businesses in the community. HOW DID STARBUCKS GET INVOLVED? They saw me on the news and were touched by my story. The Starbucks contacts would come in every week for months asking me if I was OK and eventually offered me a partnership. Today, the signature caramel cakes are sold in 42 Starbucks. They told me my cakes were doing well in the stores and they were ready to introduce my cookies.

N

atalie’s Cakes and More was founded in 2010 by Natalie DuBose. While working two and three jobs, DuBose started selling her bakery items at a local lea market on the weekends. The more cakes she baked, the more she sold. After researching on how to become an entrepreneur, DuBose established a location in the business district in Ferguson. In June 2014, DuBose opened her doors, and popularity for her signature TELL US ABOUT YOUR caramel cakes, sculpted buttercream OTHER PARTNERSHIPS. iced cakes and cookies grew. Her pas- Shortly after the repairs were complete, sion for baking and cake decorating the head of Schnucks bakery departwas being illed, and she was living the ment at the main ofice reached out to American Dream. me. He said his mother got started the Six months after DuBose opened exact same way and wanted to ensure her business, she was faced with un- I was a staple in the city of Ferguson. expected turmoil. The city of Fergu- He asked me what I did well, and I told son was experiencing protesting and him about my signature caramel cake. unrest after the verdict was released He said, ‘well, let’s start selling it for over the shooting of Michael Brown. you.’ I’m currently selling my cakes at Natalie’s Cakes and More was heav- ive Schnucks locations and we’ll be ily vandalized and advancing to addiDuBose had to start tional locations soon. NATALIE DuBOSE over from scratch. We also sell our cakes and cookies at This June the BORN • St. Louis shop celebrates its Washington UniverLIVES • Ferguson fourth anniversary. sity, Saint Louis UniWhen asked if she versity, University of AGE • 36 ever considered walkMissouri - St. Louis, TITLE • Owner, Natalie’s ing away, DuBose and we just inalized Cakes and More responded, “No. So a contract with UniEMPLOYEE SIZE • Small (0-150) many times we miss versity of Missouriour opportunities beColumbia. cause we are afraid In addition, our to say yes. I learned to say yes irst and products are located in approximately igure it out later. If it works — great. 34 neighborhood grocery markets and If it doesn’t — lesson learned. We try gas stations. It’s been a domino effect. our best to take every opportunity, all I didn’t know any of these contacts bewhile paying it forward.” fore and didn’t do any marketing. It’s very humbling, and I’m grateful for HOW DID YOU REBUILD IN THE the opportunity. AFTERMATH OF FERGUSON? Rioting is not covered under insur- WHAT DO YOU TAKE PRIDE IN? ance because it’s not a natural disas- We want our customers to have fresh ter. That’s why many businesses at the products and so we bake to order. time started GoFundMe pages. You will rarely ind anything frozen After all was said and done, a little in our bakery. If you do, it’s because over $200,000 was raised. I was able it just came out of the oven, and we to furnish my kitchen with industrial are quickly chilling it so we can begin appliances, buy our irst computer and decorating. replace the items that were damaged. Even though we are not a traditionIt was an opportunity to rebuild the al employer, I’ve always wanted to be

an employer of choice. I want to be a part of the growth in the community and encourage others to do so. When you work where you live you have a different mindset about how your community should be. WILL YOU BE OPENING ANY NEW LOCATIONS IN THE FUTURE? Yes! City Foundry is on track to open in 2019 with 20 unique food stalls, and I’m one of them. I will be the only bakery at the location and plan to hire 12 parttime employees. I was also given the opportunity to help design the space I’ll be operating. We’ve also been in discussions with a university in Illinois to operate a small cafeteria for lunches and bakery items. The project gives us an opportunity to get our feet wet in running another location so when we go to the City Foundry, we will be ready. The potential launch date could be as early as next month. Stay tuned for more details.

Photo courtesy of Jon Gitchoff

“Even though we are not a traditional employer, I’ve always wanted to be an employer of choice. I want to be a part of the growth in the community and encourage others to do so.”

HOW DO YOU ENJOY GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY? Starbucks didn’t have to pay it forward through me, but it planted a seed for me to do the same through the nonproit organizations I help support in the community. Moline Elementary School, Peabody Elementary School, Ferguson 360 Dance Studio, The Nehemiah Program, Connections to Success and the Save Our Sons program are a few of the nonproits the cake shop enjoys supporting. The needs vary from supply shortages to event luncheons or bus rental fees. No matter the need, if we can’t help them, we connect them to a person or organization who can.

- Natalie DuBose Owner, Natalie’s Cakes and More

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? I love the lemon supreme cake that I make. It’s a lemon-baked cake topped with lemon curd illing. I don’t like illing on the inside of my cake, but I do like it on the top. I drizzle the top of the cake with lemon curd illing and put drops of cream cheese on top.

Advancing St. Louis highlights local leaders of small businesses and large corporations that are impacting the St. Louis region from a variety of industries. These leaders are Advancing St. Louis by inspiring change and starting conversations. Are you interested in having your story told? Contact Jennifer Mason, who coordinates marketing content, at jmason@stltoday.com.

McCarthy helps Ranken Take your Jordan extend care to more company to the top children and their families

Source: topworkplaces.com

Earning a Top Workplaces award helps your organization stand out and attract top talent. People want to work where culture is valued and their voices are heard. The Top Workplaces survey provides leaders with valuable data-driven insights to unlock potential and inspire performance. The entire process boosts morale, increases employee engagement and a shared sense of pride. Creating a top workplace is more than offering great beneits and vacation time, it’s about organizational health. Employees want to align with the company’s vision, be challenged and feel they are valued, appreciated and heard.

Top Workplaces research partner, Energage, surveys employees at participating workplaces and then ranks the employers based on the results of those 24-question surveys. The survey is free, and companies will receive feedback on their workplace practices. Organizations with 50 or more employees are eligible, including nonproits, government entities, public and private companies. When you’re proud of your workplace, it deserves to be recognized. Nominate your company for a Top Workplaces award to celebrate its amazing culture and people. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch is looking for the best in the St. Louis region for the 2018 Top Workplaces section publishing in June. Nominations are due by Feb. 16.

The new Berges Family Foundation Adolescent Center more than doubles the size of Ranken Jordan Pediatric Bridge Hospital and adds nearly 30 inpatient beds.

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An expansion of Ranken Jordan Pediatric Bridge Hospital — arguably the region’s most distinctive hospital building — is bringing exceptional care to more children and their families. A 78,000-square-foot addition more than doubles the size of the facility and adds nearly 30 inpatient beds. Anyone who drives past the colorful structure on Dorsett Road in Maryland Heights might mistake the hospital for a children’s museum or even an entertainment center. The building’s playful, whimsical design exempliies Ranken Jordan’s role as a

bridge between care that pediatric patients receive at a traditional hospital and their own home. “The building is an essential part of our healthcare team,” said Lauri Tanner, Ranken Jordan president and CEO. “As you walk through the space, it deinitely doesn’t feel like a traditional hospital environment. We created a lot of wonder.” Constructed by St. Louis-based McCarthy Building Companies and designed by Space Architecture + Design, the building and design teams worked closely together to create a healing environment that lifts the spirits of children with complex medical conditions.

Read more at STLTODAY.COM/ADVANCINGSTL


NEWS

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

DIGEST

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

JEFFERSON CITY > Messenger, PostDispatch win honors • The Post-Dispatch and columnist Tony Messenger won top honors in the Missouri Associated Press Media Editors news writing and photography contest, which were announced Thursday. Messenger won the news writing sweepstakes award for his series of columns looking at safety and policing on the MetroLink system. The columns raised a number of questions, including whether St. Louis County oicers were loitering in a security oice when they were supposed to be patrolling trains. The Post-Dispatch won the general excellence award among the largest newspapers. Staf from the newspaper also won top honors in its division for feature writing; public interest/investigative or in-depth reporting; spot news; feature photography; photo story; and spot news photos. Nineteen newspapers submitted 429 entries in the contest. ELLISVILLE > City hopes for cut if voters approve medical marijuana • In case Missouri ever makes medical marijuana legal, Ellisville oicials are asking staf to craft potential legislation to govern the locations and requirements for greenhouses and retail dispensaries. Acting Mayor Dan Dufy and the City Council, at a work session on Wednesday, approved asking staf to develop the zoning text amendments, after Councilman Ken Newhouse suggested consideration of the issue to bring in money from marijuana growth and sales, should it become legal statewide. Newhouse said the issued could go before voters later this year. “I agree completely — this would be a potential source of retail revenue for us,” Dufy said. Councilman Stephen Chismarich added that legislation on greenhouses could also include allowing smaller hydroponic growing areas. Councilman Vince McGrath agreed, saying “marijuana isn’t an easy crop to grow — you won’t see people throwing seeds out in a ield.” ST. JOHN > Children’s parties fall to budget ax • The Grinch may have left the annual Breakfast With Santa intact, but dwindling revenues have stolen St. John’s yearly Easter and Halloween parties. The parties are victims of budget cuts brought on by shrinking sales tax revenue, Police Chief and City Manager J. R. “Rusty” Morris said after the City Council meeting on Monday. Breakfast With Santa will still be ofered to residents’ children and grandchildren at no cost, but the Easter egg hunt, held for more than 30 years, and the Halloween party, started about 10 years ago, are gone. The three parties cost the city $5,000 a year. Cutting two parties will save the city about $3,000. The Christmas party is more expensive because it includes a meal, Morris said. Another factor in the decision to cut the parties was dwindling participation, he added. “Basically the cost of doing business continues to rise, (while) sales taxes are being impacted due to consumer spending habits shifting more towards internet sales and catalog sales, which is ultimately impacting the amount of sales tax revenue ... ” he said. “We’re part of the (St. Louis County) pool, so ultimately what isn’t being purchased at big-box stores and being bought online is impacting the whole pool.” From staf and correspondent reports

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Maryland Heights Fire rescue personnel practice ice rescues on Thursday in Creve Coeur Lake. They are Capt. robert Daus (foreground), ireighter paramedic Jim Shankle (left) and Assistant Chief Steve rinehart. They practice in the lake at least once a year, along with classroom training and reviews. rinehart said they have never lost someone who fell into the lake in his 30-year career. To see a video of the ice rescue practice, go to stltoday.com.

Champion swimmer accuses coach of abuse over the supervision of people who work with young athletes. Former sports doctor for USA Gymnastics, Larry Nassar, was sentenced recently to decades in prison for sexual abusing young girls in his care. Hutchison left coaching but remains a member of USA Swimming as the owner of member club King Aquatic near Seattle, the organization said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE • A U.S. Olympic champion

swimmer has accused a team coach of sexually abusing her starting when she was 16, the latest misconduct allegations against those charged with caring for young athletes. Ariana Kukors, now 28, also told authorities that Sean Hutchison took thousands of sexually explicit photographs of her, according to a search warrant document filed by a federal agent. She told officers that he kissed and touched her when she was 16 and engaged in sexual activity with her when she was 17 at the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships in Victoria, British Columbia, the document said. Hutchison denies abusing Kukors and has not been charged with a crime. U.S. authorities and police seized electronic devices from his Seattle apartment this week that they say may contain evidence, the Seattle PI reported . Hutchison faced an investigation by USA Swimming in 2010 over his ties to Kukors but it was closed with no misconduct found. USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport, said Thursday that it learned of the underage abuse allegations this week. Kukors, the 2009 world champion in the 200-meter individual medley who placed fifth in that event in the 2012 Olympics, accused Hutchison of “grooming” her for sexual abuse when she was 13 and he was her coach at a Seattle-area swim club. “I never thought I would share my story because I was able to leave a horrible monster and build a life I could have never imagined for myself,” she said in a statement released through her attorneys Wednesday. “But in time, I’ve realized that stories like my own are too important to go

NO MONEY FOR VICTIMS’ DAD A man who tried to attack Nassar in a Michigan courtroom last week is thanking people who donated $31,000 online but says he doesn’t want the money. Randy Margraves says refunds are available. After March 9, any money in the GoFundMe account will be donated to groups that help victims of abuse. Margraves’ three daughters said they were sexually assaulted by Nassar. Sherif’s deputies stopped him when he tried to attack Nassar. He apologized to the judge.

Ariana Kukors

unwritten.” Hutchison, 46, who was an assistant coach on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team, said the two were in a relationship after the 2012 Olympics and that she lived in his Seattle home for more than a year. The investigation comes amid scrutiny

Baby, it’s cold inside... Rise & Shine for Heat

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Former VA contractor pleads guilty in kickback scheme • A former contractor for the John Cochran Veterans Administration Medical Center in St. Louis pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor blackmail charge Thursday and admitted a role in a kickback scheme. Jeramy Wegman, 38, kicked back a portion of the more than $180,000 that he earned from Feb. 1, 2014, to April 30, 2015, to former heating and cooling shop foreman Tony Pedretti, his plea says. Wegman could face up to a year in prison when sentenced in May. Pedretti, 44, of Whiting, Ind., was sentenced to 20 months in prison after he admitted steering about $270,000 in work to co-conspirators. Former contractor David Graham, 25, and his stepfather, Scott Geary, also pleaded guilty and were sentenced to three years probation. LINCOLN COUNTY > Pilot injured in crash of small plane • Only the pilot was aboard a small plane when it crashed Thursday afternoon in an unincorporated area of Lincoln County, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. Trooper Dallas Thompson said the plane’s pilot, who was the owner, was taken to a hospital with a possible broken arm. The plane came down near Wolf Creek Road and Highway U. Thompson did not know what made the plane come down. He said the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash. The area is about 7 miles southwest of Troy, Mo. ST. LOUIS > Man gets 23 years in child porn case • A man from Shelby County, Mo., was sentenced in federal court here to 23 years in federal prison Thursday for producing child pornography. Stephen Bartlett, 56, of Shelbina, admitted shooting pictures and movies of himself

Friday, February 9, 2018 6:00 am - 10:30 am

sexually abusing a 10-yearold girl, according to his guilty plea to two counts of producing child porn. The Missouri Children’s Division and police in Shelbina, which is Bartlett about 40 miles west of Hannibal, began investigating reports of an “unhealthy” girl, Bartlett’s plea says, and learned he was once arrested and accused of sexually abusing another girl in Massachusetts. Investigators then found the images containing child porn. Bartlett still faces pending charges of statutory rape, statutory sodomy, child molestation and the use of a child in a sexual performance. EAST ST. LOUIS > Woman admits defrauding bankruptcy ilers • A woman from St. Peters pleaded guilty to 21 felonies, including bankruptcy fraud, Thursday and admitted defrauding debtors by overcharging them for bankruptcy ilings, prosecutors said. Phebe Ibrahim, 50, also tried to conceal her role by leaving her name of of documents and told clients not to mention her, the U.S. attorney’s oice said. She also falsiied certiicates claiming that her clients had credit counseling, as required, they said. Ibrahim’s indictment says she charged $250 to prepare bankruptcy documents. The maximum allowed fee is $150. Ibrahim, formerly Phebe Khan, was preparing bankruptcy petitions in the Southern District of Illinois. Ibrahim pleaded guilty to seven counts each of bankruptcy fraud, causing false statements to be made under penalty of perjury in a bankruptcy case, and falsifying records in a bankruptcy case, prosecutors said. She is scheduled to be sentenced May 10. Bankruptcy court documents say Ibrahim also worked in Missouri and has been forced to repay her fees to clients before.

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WORLD

02.09.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A11

Vice president pushes hard line on N. Korea In S. Korea for the Olympics, Pence is out to counter ‘propaganda’ by rogue regime BY ZEKE MILLER associated Press

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA • Vice President

Mike Pence is trying to counter North Korean “propaganda” around the Winter Olympics by shining a spotlight on the North’s nuclear weapons program and human rights abuses. Pence, who will lead the U.S. delegation to the games’ opening ceremonies on Friday, met Thursday with South Korean President Moon Jae-in to press for a more clear-eyed approach toward the nucleararmed neighbor to the north. Moon has looked at the games as an opportunity to pursue a diplomatic opening with North Korea — a move the vice president cautioned against. Pence avoided public criticism of Moon, congratulating South Korea on hosting the games and pledging continued support in addressing the North’s nuclear threat. But privately, officials said, Pence expressed concern to Moon about his more conciliatory tone toward North Korea. Moon, for his part, took the opportunity to highlight the visit of North Korean oicials to the global competition, referring to the “Olympic Games of peace.” He added his hope that it becomes “a venue that leads to dialogue for the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.” The games will be attended by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s sister and other senior officials. And female ice hockey players from both Koreas will

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (left) meets with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in Seoul on Thursday. Pence is leading the U.S. delegation at the Winter Olympics in South Korea.

compete as one team. Eager to put a reality check on the thaw in relations, Pence will meet Friday morning with North Korean defectors and pay respects at the Cheonan Memorial in Seoul, which honors the 46 South Korean sailors killed in a 2010 torpedo attack attributed to the North. And Pence’s personal guest at the games will be Fred Warmbier, the father of Otto Warmbier, an American who died last year days after his release from captivity in North Korea.

Before departing Japan for Korea earlier Thursday, Pence warned that past attempts to pursue openings with the North have been met with “willful deception, broken promises, and endless and escalating provocations.” He also ratcheted up his rhetoric on the North’s human rights abuses in a speech to U.S. service members at Yokota Air Base in Japan. “As we speak, an estimated 100,000 North Korean citizens labor in modernday gulags,” Pence said. “Those who dare raise their voices in dissent are imprisoned, tortured and even murdered, and their children and grandchildren are routinely punished for their family’s sins against the state.” Pence also has promised the U.S. will soon unveil “the toughest and most ag-

gressive round of economic sanctions on North Korea ever.” Aides acknowledged that the vice president’s cynical message is an unusual one for Pence, but said the circumstances warrant the tone. U.S. oicials have grown increasingly dire in their warnings about the North’s march toward developing an operational nuclear-tipped ballistic missile capable of reaching the continental U.S. Pence told reporters that despite disagreements over how to approach North Korea, the state of the alliance between the U.S. and South Korea is “strong.” Administration officials said they had long expected the North would seek to use the Olympics, taking place just 50 miles from the heavily-mined Demilitarized Zone dividing the Koreas, as an opportunity to put a softer face on the regime, and painted Pence’s visit as a counterbalance to those eforts. At the same time, the vice president has deliberately left the door open to a possible encounter with North Korean officials expected to be in attendance. On Wednesday, the North announced that Kim Yo Jong, the sister of dictator Kim Jong Un, would attend the games, joining the country’s nominal head of state, Kim Yong Nam. A top North Korean oicial seemed to rule out a potential meeting with U.S. oicials in the North’s state-run media on Thursday, but Pence suggested to reporters that it was still a possibility. “We haven’t requested a meeting with North Korea, but if I have any contact with them — in any context — over the next two days, my message will be the same as it was here today: North Korea needs to once and for all abandon its nuclear and ballistic missile ambitions,” Pence said.

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

CLASSIFIED 101 WINTERSET COURT, DARDENNE PRAIRIE

FOR SALE

OPEN SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11TH • 1-3pm

900 Stonecastle Dr, O’Fallon, MO 63366

Enclave Subdivision! New Construction Craftsman brick & stone ranch w/ 3 bed, 2.5 ba. The main loor offers hand-scraped wood looring, w/ceramic tile in baths & laundry. The open Great rm, kitchen & breakfast rm have 12’ ceilings. Kitchen has 42" & 35" tall painted Shaker style cabinets, cherry Shaker style cabinets at the spacious center island, granite LISTING AGENT: counter tops, stainless steel BARRY UPCHURCH, appliances & butler’s pantry. ABR, CRS, GRI

This magniicent 5,000 square foot 1.5 story executive estate is nestled on 3.2 park-like acres w/heated saltwater pool. Multiple entertaining spaces include a hearth room, formal dining room, 2 story great room w/dual sided ireplace & inished lower level w/recreation room, wet bar, study/5th bedroom, & large bath. The open concept kitchen boasts granite counters, 42” custom stained & painted cabinetry & features designer stainless steel appliances incl. Viking gas range, Fisher & Paykel dishwasher, double ovens w/warming drawer, wine/beverage fridge & more! Sunny breakfast room & patio. Owner’s suite features a large walk-in closet with his & her organizers, luxurious bath w/double bowl vanity, soaking tub & large shower w/multiple showerheads & sprayers. 3 bedrooms upstairs w/ private baths & walk-in closets. Private study on mezzanine level. Plus TWO laundry areas! The huge deck & stunning pool overlooking the beautiful & serene setting makes this home a perfect “staycation” for family & friends!! Just 25 minutes from the Airport!

Call Jennifer Silver 636-978-1777 www.investors-title.com Paid Advertisement

Shari Wynn NMLS# 260167 314-889-0680 swynn@gershman.com

BARRY UPCHURCH REALTY 636-530-7727

$449,000 All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Homes for Sale-MO Benton Park Home w/3 ac. in Ste. Genevieve C n t y F u l l B r ic k C u s t o m B u ilt Ranch Home 2108 sq ft 4 beds, 2.5 baths $289,900 573-883-

Land for Sale

Misc. Merchandise For Sale

Public Notices

Public Notices

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

ATTN: FLOORING CONTRACTORS & STORES Wholesale Carpet Closing after 4 0 y rs. , Racks of New Carpet Pad, Cove Base, Glue, Patch, Carpet Remnants, and Carpet Display Racks on Wheels. Everything Goes - Cheap! East Alton Plaza Call 618-973-6000

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Superior Court of Arizona Maricopa County

Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Director of OATS , I nc. East Re gion on March 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 , at 7 :0 0 p.m. to consider a project partially funded by the Missouri Department of Transportation, pursuant to S ections 5 3 1 1 , 5 3 3 9 and/or 5310 of Title 49, United States Code.

JUVENILE COURT ADMINISTRATION

Care Services IN-HOME CAREGIVER NEEDED! 32 hour week, South County Area, starting pay $13.27/ hr Call 314722-3299

Antique/Classic Special Interest AUTOMOTIVE SWAP MEET, Belleville IL. Feb 11th 6am - 1pm $4 Admission (217) 491-8822

Landscape Laborers

2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

R E Auctions Real Estate Auction

Wed., Feb 14 at 12PM 1241 Selma Ave., St. Louis, MO Open House: Sun., Feb 11, 12-2PM Auction held onsite. Mostly brick 3BR ranch home situated on spacious corner lot. LR/DR combo, separate FR, eat-in kitchen & part finished basement. Att 1 car gar and a det 2 car gar.

www.adamsauctions.com ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751

Rental-MO 2 br duplexes $695, 3 br apt $725 Carondelet area, $30 app fee, call to be prequalified by phone 3142219568 63108, Central West End Large 3 bdr, 1 bth Apt., W/D hookup, Cent. Air, Decks. $950/mo 256-457-2353

Clayton, MO for rent: 7536 Parkdale #4. Heart of Clayton. 2 bdrms, carpet, dishw, a/c, w/d hookups. $800/mo, $25 extra for htd garage. Call 314283-5746.

Lawn Pride D B A C la n c y Br o s . Lands cape C ompany #3 C ool Meadows Dr. Ballwin, MO 63011 is hiring landscaper for sod laying, planting mowing, trimming, watering, digging, spreading dirt, raking, pruning, mulching, and loading and unloading materials. Lifting require d up to 35lbs . On the job training. No education req'd. 3 mo n t h s e xp e rie n c e r e q ' d . $13.81/hr. $20.72 O.T. 8am-5pm, M-F., Some O.T. & weekends may be available. 4 positions available for temporary, fulltime work. 4/1/18 - 11/15/18. St. Louis County area jobsites. Transportation provided to and from area jobsites from a central St. Louis County area pick up location. Call Timothy at 6363 9 4 -5 0 2 0 or fax resume to 6 3 6 2 3 0 -5 8 6 3 . Apply @ St. Charles County Job Center @ 6 3 6 -2 5 5 6060, JO#12442457. Assistance finding and securing lodging is available at no additional charge to the worker. Workers will be reimbursed by check for transportation (including meals & necessary lodging) to the place of employment if the worker completes 50% of the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide, at no charge, all tools, supplies and equipment required to perform the job.

Boston Terriers Pups: (3) Male black & white, 8 wks old, shots & vet checked, Registered. Great Valentines Day Gift! $600 each. 314-520-1537

We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

Bargain Box Rear Time rototiller 14 inch $100 314-381-8614

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Golden Retrievers puppies english cream. AKC reg. Shots, microchipped, home raised. 5-F, 4-M. $1800 Call 480-861-7591

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, OFA, Selectively Bred. Shots, wormed, health guar. See parents. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com Havamalts, Golden Retrievers, Woodles, Chiweenies, Shihapoos, Shiba Inus, Shih Tzus, Other Cute Poos !

DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court

4. The source of the local match will be from unre s tricte d fe de ral funds, local cash, donations and in-kind match.

Elisa K Kulosman vs. Elmir Kulosman To the Defendant: Chap. 56 of Acts of 1949 requires parts of citation underlined to be in bold type when printed in newspapers.

LAB PUPPIES, Yellow, Valentine's Day Ready $600. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar., Call (314)791-5629

Hampshire Probate and Family Court 33 King Street, Suite 3 Northampton, MA 01060

LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow, black, chocolate. See Parents, Calm. Shots, Wormed, Health Guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com

The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for Adultery, Abuse

Mini/Toy Australian Shepherd pup, 6Blue Merles, 3mini males, 3toy females, R e g. C h lines, 8 w ks, $600 314-795-9041 Schnoodle Puppies (REG) Male and Female Hypoallergenic and do not shed. $500 (573)205-0504 Standard Poodle puppies. AKC, 2 females and 5 males. $800. call (660)537-9761 St Bernard pups, AKC, 6 wks Pet $950 Breeder $1350. Valentine's Day delivery avail. $950/$1350 636-333-2814

Seasoned Oak & Hickory delivered/ stacked. Cherry also available for smoking. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ forGerman-Japanese WW IIrelics 314-438-8665

The C omplaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. S EE S upplemental Probate Court Rule 411.

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U-City: BEAUTIFUL LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA condo, D/W hook-up, C/A, off street parking. $950/ mo. 256-457-2353

Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action.

6. Organizations interested in the proposed service may request information concerning the project from the applicant. 7 . OATS does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, or age in employment or provision of services. 8 . A n y p e rs o n re q u e s t in g information or requiring special accommodations to attend the hearing may contact Pam Knox, East Region OATS Office, 1 8 6 Northwest IndustrialCt., Bridgeton, MO 63044, (314) 888-6720.

In the Matter of the Guardianship for: Arianna Rynae Smith NOTICE OF HEARING REGARDING Petition for Guardianship of a Minor Read this notice carefully. An important court proceeding that affects your rights has been scheduled. If you do not understand this notices, contact a lawyer for help. Notice is given that the Petitioner has filed with the Court a Petition for Guardianship of a Minor. Hearing Information: A court hearing has been scheduled to consider the petition as follows: Hearing Date and Time: 23-Mar-2018 at 8:45 am Hearing Place: 3131 W. Durango, Phoenix, AZ 85009-6292 Judicial Officer: Honorable Lisa Ann VandenBerg Res pons e: You can file a written response to the petition. File your original written response with the court, mail a copy of the original response to the Petitioner(s), and provide a copy of your response to the Judicial Officer named above at least 5 business days before the hearing. Or, you can appear in person at the hearing. You must appear at the hearing only if you wish to object to the petition. Ad d itio n a l in fo rma tio n fo r assistance may be available from th e S e lf S e rvic e C e n te r a t http://www.superiorcourt.maricopa. gov/supiorcourt/Self- ServiceCenter/Index.asp

Elisa K Kulosman 83 West Street A Northampton, MA 01060 Your answer, if any, on or before 02/16/2018. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, Hon. Linda S Fidnick, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 8, 2018

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 2/27/18 at 7:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 7601 Manchester, M aplew ood, MO 63143, to hear citizen's comments on a request by Lily Li of Toasty Sub & Sushi Kitchen located at 3001 S. Big Bend for a full liquor license by the drink.

/s/ Michael J. Casey Register of Probate

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time.

The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time.

PETITION 18-C

PETITION 18-D

Industrial Realty LLC/Ecology Investors LLC requests a variance to allow an alternative paving surface on a 1.98-acre parcel in the I-2 Heavy Industrial District. The property is located on lot 7 of Mid Rivers Trade Park as recorded at the St. Charles Recorders Ofice; south side of Ecology Drive, east of Mid Rivers Mall Drive.

Cornerstone Wealth Management, LLC requests a variance to allow an increase in the size of a sign in the C-1 Neighborhood Commercial District. The property is located on Lot 1 of Titan Homes Ofice Complex record plat as recorded in Plat Book 46 Page 386 at the St. Charles Recorders Ofice; south side of Mexico Road, west of Pioneer Drive – 7417 Mexico Road.

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at St. Peters City Hall, One St Peters Centre Boulevard, St. Peters Missouri 63376; Phone 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 670.

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at St. Peters City Hall, One St Peters Centre Boulevard, St. Peters Missouri 63376; Phone 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 1670.

LOCATION MAP

LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

Notice of Public Hearing City of St. Peters Board of Adjustment

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED.

5. At the hearing, OATS will afford an opportunity for interested persons or agencies to be heard regarding the project. Interested persons may submit orally, or in w ri t i n g , e v i d e n c e a n d recommendations with respect to said project. If no person(s) request to give either oral or written statements three days prior to the public hearing, the applicant is not required to hold the public hearing.

Case Number JG11240

You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon:

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For more information call or go online at

2. The location of the project will be to serve residents in OATS East Region, comprised of two counties in Missouri. The total project will be 87 counties in Missouri.

Docket No. HS17D0401DR

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1. Requesting financial assistance in an amount necessary to complete funding and operate in OATSí East service region comprised of St. Charles and St. Louis Counties.

3 . The total estimated cost of the project is $6,074,376 Federal Funds $241,850 Local Funds $5,832,526

636-240-3647

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15 ACRES - CAPE COUNTY Hwys W & Y - House & 3 acres Call 573-243-5554

Nickolas A. Dalba, Jr. Cell: 314-574-8304

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Homes for Sale-IL H o me a n d 14.5 acres for sale. K e m p e r I L. Pond, 56x 30 pole building, tillable, and pasture. 1000 sq ft home, 2br 1 bath, with loft. City water. $149,500 618-5350186 6185350186

Jennifer Smerek NMLS# 260971 314-889-0667 jsmerek@gershman.com

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STLtoday.com/letters NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of O’Fallon will conduct a Public Hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on March 1, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the O’Fallon Municipal Centre located at 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri, concerning the following request for Preliminary Plat per Chapter 400, Article XVI, of the Municipal Code: Request for Preliminary Plat Name of Owner/Applicant: St. John’s Bank and Trust Company Present Zoning Classiication: C-2/PUD General Business District Planned Unit Development Proposed Use: Two (2) Lot Subdivision Location of Property: Waterbury Town Center/ Waterbury Falls Drive

N.T.S.

The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 18-E Dennis McHugh requests a variance to permit a reduction of the twenty-ive (25) foot front building setback to permit the addition of an open air porch. The property is located on Country Lake Estates lot 4, as recorded in Book 19 Page 143 at the St. Charles Recorder’s Ofice, more commonly known as 1 Country Lake Court.

Highway K

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 1438. SITE

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LOCATION MAP

The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 18 - B Mark and Emily Mitchell request a variance to permit a garage that exceeds ive hundred square feet in area, fourteen feet in height, ifty percent of the ground loor area of a principle building, and is within the side yard. Also, a variance to permit a fence beyond the front building line and amend Petition 16-B to extend the time to pave the gravel driveway. The property is located on the west side of Stoll Lane, north of Mexico Road. (13-15 Stoll Lane). All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 1670. LOCATION MAP

Crusher Dr.

(Seal) ________________________________ Pamela L. Clement, City Clerk City of O’Fallon, Missouri

LEGAL DESCRIPTION Country Lake Estates lot 4, as recorded in Book 19 Page 143 at the St. Charles Recorder’s Ofice, more commonly known as 1 Country Lake Court.

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.


WORLD

02.09.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A13

Syria, U.S. trade blame over deadly airstrike American military oicial says it was self-defense after Russian-backed forces attacked space. A stronghold of Islamic State militants until late last year, the province also was the group’s main source of oil revenue. U.S.backed Kurdish-led forces have been fighting for control of Deir el-Zour with rival Russianbacked Syrian troops that are reinforced by Iranian-supported militias. The U.S.-backed forces control areas east of the Euphrates River and most of the oil and gas fields, while government forces are based in the west. Previous friction was reported before, but Wednesday’s incident appeared to be the largest since last year. Islamic State militants have been dispersed in the province, which also has a number of U.S. bases. In an email Thursday to The Associated Press, Col. Thomas F. Veale said the coalition reported to the Russians the buildup of the pro-government forces in the area before the attack, and com-

BY SARAH EL DEEB associated Press

BEIRUT • Syrian state-run media said Thursday that a U.S. strike on government-backed troops in eastern Syria killed and wounded dozens of tribal fighters, calling it a new effort “to support terrorism.” The U.S.-led coalition said its action was in “self-defense,” citing a major attack on its allied forces and U.S. advisers in Deir el-Zour province by at least 500 fighters, battle tanks, howitzers and mortars. The overnight attack, which a U.S. military oicial earlier said killed about 100 of the attackers, added another layer to the Syrian conflict that is once again plunging into a new and unpredictable spiral of violence. The attack in Deir el-Zour province in northeastern Syria occurred in crowded battle

municated with them during and after it. The Russian oicials offered assurances that they would not engage the coalition forces in the area, Veale said. “Pro-regime forces initiated hostilities with artillery pieces (howitzers). Additionally, Syrian pro-regime forces maneuvered T-55 and T-72 main battle tanks with supporting mortar fire in what appears to be a coordinated attack on Syrian Democratic Forces approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) east of the Euphrates River de-confliction line in Khusham, Syria,” Veale said. By crossing the river, the progovernment forces would have violated the existing agreement between Washington and Moscow, approaching U.S.-backed forces based near an oil field. Russia is the main ally of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Asked if Russia was responsible for not stopping the attack,

DIGEST Remains may be victims of suspected serial killer Toronto police said Thursday they’ve recovered the remains of at least six people from planters on a property connected to alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur. Detective Sgt. Hank Idsinga said the remains, found on property McArthur used as storage in exchange for doing the landscaping, included some from one of the ive men McArthur is already charged with killing, Andrew Kinsman. McArthur was arrested Jan. 18 and charged with two counts of murder. Police said they were on a wide search for other victims, and expect to ile more charges.

CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Forensic anthropologist professor Kathy Gruspier (second from left) and police oicers investigate Thursday at a property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur worked in Toronto. Toronto police say they’ve recovered the remains of at least six people there.

Mexican police arrested in disappearances of 15 • Authorities in Mexico’s Gulf coast state of Veracruz announced charges Thursday of “forced disappearance” against 19 current or former state police oicials and oicers, saying they kidnapped and killed 15 innocent civilians. Veracruz Gov. Miguel Angel Yunes said the victims included two women and two minors. Veracruz has been the scene of grisly police kidnap-killings before but in the cases announced Thursday, state police oicials and their subordinate oicers were apparently working for gangs or

Pakistan reinforces Valentine’s ban • Pakistan’s media regulatory authority, acting on a court order, has instructed all news channels, radio stations and print media to refrain from promoting Valentine’s Day. A Pakistani court last year banned celebrations on Valentine’s Day, saying it was against Islam and promotes western culture. Since then, the agency has taken steps to ensure a blackout on any Valentine’s Day promotions in print or electronic media. Pakistani Islamist and right-wing parties also view Valentine’s Day as a vulgar Western import.

drug cartels, Yunes said. Uruguay continues aid for ex-Gitmo prisoners • Uruguay’s government has decided to extend for another year the economic aid that it has given six former Guantanamo Bay prisoners who resettled in the country in 2014, an oicial said Thursday. The government liaison with the ex-Guantanamo inmates, Christian Mirza, said they will receive a minimum salary of about $450 until January 2019. Mirza said the government will pay their rent and might pay so they can learn a trade, seek psychological therapy and

Veale said: “The de-confliction efort has served its purpose. Just as the coalition does not direct the operations of the SDF, the Russians do not direct operations of the Syrian regime.” Veale said the coalition suspects the Syrian pro-government forces were trying to seize terrain from the U.S.-backed forces liberated from militants last year, including major oil fields. The Russian Defense Ministry said the U.S. airstrike wounded 25 pro-Syrian volunteers. It alleged the incident showed that Washington was not interested in fighting Islamic militants but wanted “to seize and hold Syrian economic assets.” Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia said he will raise the coalition’s airstrike during closed consultations in the U.N. Security Council. Syria’s state media said the coalition bombed government-

backed troops in Khusham, describing them as tribal fighters. The media cited reports of dozens killed and wounded. The oicial state news agency SANA said the local fighters were battling Islamic State militants and the U.S.-backed SDF in the area. SANA labeled it an “aggression” and a “new massacre.” It later reported that 10 strikes by the coalition had caused “massive destruction.” The head of the SDF unit in the area, Ahmed Abu Khawla, told AP the attackers were government-backed local militias known as the National Defense Forces. He said they started the attack near oil fields on the east side of the Euphrates. “It was a little bit stronger than the usual clashes in the area. Everyone is back to their bases,” said Abu Khawla, the head of the Deir el-Zour Military Council.

study Spanish. The four Syrians, one Tunisian and one Palestinian spent more than 12 years in Guantanamo without being charged. They resettled in Montevideo in December 2014 after former President Jose Mujica invited them to Uruguay as a humanitarian gesture.

2016, shootout with police that ultimately led to his capture. He left his prison cell in France on Monday — the irst public glimpse of the man linked to plots in Paris and Brussels that killed a total of 162 people. But Abdeslam refused to stand for the judge and told her he wouldn’t answer her questions. Abdeslam and Soiane Ayari, an Islamic State ighter, are charged with attempted murder in a terrorist context and face 20 years in prison.

Carnival security boosted over gang violence • Authorities in Rio de Janeiro state said Thursday that security is being beefed up as the world-famous Carnival bash begins, following a wave of violence caused by rival drug traicking gangs. Gov. Luiz Fernando Pezao said that security forces will total more than 17,000 statewide per day. Brazil’s most popular Carnival party starts Friday and ends Tuesday. Rio’s security secretary Roberto Sa said police face a war-like challenge from gangs. Terrorism suspect’s trial wrapping up in Belgium • The weapons stockpile in his hideout and the Islamic State ighter covering his getaway with a spray of gunire were signs of a deadly plot to come, a Belgian prosecutor argued Thursday in the trial of the man who was once Europe’s most wanted fugitive. Salah Abdeslam refused to attend the inal day of his trial in Brussels for a March 15,

Snow’s best-eaten-by date determined • How safe is it to eat snow? A Romanian university has published the results of just such a study. The 2017 experiment showed it was safe to eat snow that was a half-day old, and safer to eat it in the colder months. But at two days old, the snow is not safe to eat, Istvan Mathe, a professor at the Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, said. Scientists collected snow from a park in central Romania in January and February and placed it in sterile containers. They then tried to grow bacteria and mold in them. After one day, there were 5 bacteria per millimeter in January. In February that number quadrupled. “I am not recommending anyone eats snow. Just saying you won’t get ill if you eat a bit,” he said. From news services

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

INVITATION TO BID #18-027 4-INCH DIESEL POWERED TRAILER MOUNTED TRASH PUMP CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

NOTICE TO BIDDERS: DISTRICT-WIDE INNOVATION ROOM PROJECT FY17-18 (BI)

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids to furnish and deliver a 4” diesel powered trailer mounted trash pump. Specifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities.

The Rockwood School District invites y ou to submit a bid according to Rockwood School District's D I S T R I C T - W I D E INNOVATION ROOM PROJECT FY1-18 specifications. For further project details and information regarding the mandatory Pre-Bid m e e t i n g , e t c ., please visit h t t p : / / f i n d r f p. c o m , o r www.rsdmo.org or call the Construction Secretary at 636-7333270.

Sealed Bid Proposals for: Public Improvement Plans for ITTC Diesel Mechanics Training Center Request for Bid Proposal Owner: Ozarks Technical Community College 1001 East Chestnut Expressway Springfield, Missouri 65802 All endorsed "Proposals" shall be mailed to or delivered to the office of the College Project Manager, Blayne Radford, Operations Center, Ozarks Technical Community C olle ge , 9 3 3 E. C e ntral A v e ., Springfield, Missouri 65802, no later than 2: 00 p.m., CST, February 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 , (time s hall be de termined by the clock in the College Project Manager's office). All received and qualified proposals will be opened and read aloud publicly. Construction Drawings and Specifications will be available on February 5 , 2 0 1 8 and may be purchased or downloaded through Springfield Blueprint, 219 E. Pershing, Springfield, Missouri 65806. (417) 869-7316.

Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked “4-Inch Diesel Powered Trailer Mounted T r a s h P u m p “ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 2:00 P.M. CST, February 22, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

D ire c t a ll q u e s tio n s to th e Engineer: Anderson Engineering: Aaron Hargrave, 4 1 7 -8 6 6 -2 7 4 1 or ahargrave@andersonengineer inginc.com The bidde r unde rs tands that Ozarks Technical Community College reserves the right to award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder and to reject any or all bids and / or to waive any technicalities or informalities in the bidding. PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A prebid conference is scheduled for 1:30 pm, Wednesday, February 7, 2 0 1 7 , beginning at the offices of the College Project Manager, Operations Center, Ozarks Technical Community College, 933 E. Central Ave . , S pringfield, Missouri 65802. PREVAILING WAGES: Prevailing wages shall be paid in accordance with the Missouri Division of Labor Standards, Annual Wage Order in effect at the time of construction.

NOTICE TO BIDDERS: DISTRICT WIDE CAFETERIA FLOOR IN-FILL PROJECT FY17-18 The Rockwood School District invites y ou to submit a bid according to Rockwood School District's District Wide Cafeteria Floor In-fill Project F Y 1 7 - 1 8 specifications. For further project details and information regarding the mandatory Pre-Bid meeting, etc., please visit http:// findrfp.com , or w w w .rsdmo.org or call the Construction Secretary at 636733-3270.

Bids/Proposals Public Notice Pursuant to the provisions of Title 42 Section 441.304(f) Code of Federal Regulations, public notice is given regarding the submission of the Missouri Children with Developmental Disabilities (MOCDD) and Partnership for Hope (PFH) Waiver renewals. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requires states to obtain public input during the development of a waiver (or a waiver renewal or a waiver amendment with substantive changes). Stakeholders are being asked to provide public input and comment in order to allow Missouri to submit these two waiver renewals. Please see complete draft of the waiver renewals on the MO HealthNet w e b s i t e at: https:// dss.mo.gov/mhd/alerts~public-notices.htm. Written Public Comments MO HealthNet will accept written public comments within 30 days from February 9, 2018. Written public comments may be mailed or emailed to: MO HealthNet Division P.O. Box 6500 Jefferson City, MO 65102-6500 Attn: MO HealthNet Director Email: Ask.MHD@dss.mo.gov Public Hearing

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of O'Fallon will conduct a Public Hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on March 1, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the O'Fallon Municipal Centre located at 100 North Main Street, O'Fallon, Missouri and before the City Council on March 8, 2018 at 7:30 p.m. in t h e C o u n c il C h a mb e r s o f t h e O'Fallon Municipal Centre located a O Missouri, concerning an Ordinance amending certain provisions of Title IV: Land Use, Chapter 400; related to R-3 District Regulations.

NOTICE TO BIDDERS: NEW EUREKA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROJECT FY17-18 (BI) The Rockwood School District invites y ou to submit a bid according to Rockwood School District's New Eureka E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l Pro j e c t FY17-18 (BI) specifications For further project details and information regarding the mandatory PreBid meeting, etc ., please visit h t t p : / / f i n d r f p. c o m , o r www.rsdmo.org or call Dickinson Hussman Architects at 314-7278500.

(Seal) ____________________ Pamela L. Clement, City Clerk City of O'Fallon, Missouri

SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION: All Work for this project shall be substantially complete by May 14, 2018.

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Premier Charter School is seeking proposals for a Construction Management firm. Required experience in gut rehab, flat roof repair, and mechanical with a history of meeting timelines and staying under budget.

There will be a public hearing in which the public is invited to comment on the M O C D D and PF H Waiver renewal applications. The public hearing is scheduled: February 20, 2018 9 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. James C. Kirkpatrick State Information Center Interpretive Center 600 W. Main Street, Room 139 Jefferson City, MO 65101 Public may call toll free for teleconference 877-820-7831 Pin: 35666479# Verbal or written comments will be accepted. Complete copies of the MOCDD and PFH waiver renewal applications are available at each of the DMH Regional Offices, by request, and at the public hearings. Braille copies will be made available as needed upon request. Comments will be summarized for CMS.

Please contact Janice Denigan at jdenigan@premiercharter school.org if you have any questions. Respond noting firm experience and include resumes of principals required by 2/16/18 emailed to jdenigan @premiercharterschool.org.

STLtoday.com/jobs

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR TRAINING SERVICES

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL(S) ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY RFB 18-03129 SWITCHING EQUIPMENT

East-West Gateway Council of Governments is seeking a qualified consultant to provide a S P S S Training Course. Funding for this project will be provided by the U.S. D e p t . o f H o m e l a n d S e c u r i t y. Proposals due 2:00 p.m. March 6, 2 0 1 8 . L a t e p r o p o s a ls w ill be returned. Details can be obtained at www. ewgateway.org or by calling 314-421-4220 ext. 208.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR TRAINING SERVICES East-West Gateway Council of Governments is seeking a qualified consultant to provide a GIS Training Course. Funding for this project will be provided by the U.S. D e p t . o f H o m e l a n d S e c u r i t y. Proposals due 2:00 p.m. March 5, 2 0 1 8 . L a t e p r o p o s a ls w ill be returned. Details can be obtained at www. ewgateway.org or by calling 314-421-4220 ext. 208.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Massman-Alberici, a Joint Venture, is soliciting proposals for the Terminal Railroad Association of St . Louis project for the Merchants Bridge Main Span Replacement, East and West Approach Retrofit, East Approach site work and turnout/ crossover construction as part of the Merchants Bridge Improvements project between St. Louis, MO and Venice, IL. The Letting date is 2/21/18 by 2:00 PM. Please email estimating@ massman.net your intent, work scope and subsequent proposal by 2/19/18 by 5 : 0 0 PM . D B E G o a l is 10%. DBE’s must be MoDOT or IDOT certified. Subcontract/ Supplier work scope includes Bearings, C o n c r e t e Demolition, Drilled Sh a f t C a s in g s , Electrical/ Navigational Lighting, Embankment, Excavation, Hauling, Micropile, Misc. Metals, Precast Wall Panels, Reinforcing Steel/ Rebar, Sheetpile, Structural Steel, Tension Bars, Track & Ballast, and Waterproofing. For all technical questions respond t o J o h n K e l l e y , jkelley@massman.net, 913-2912600. Proposals / Quotations please send to the Estimating D e p a r t m e n t , estimating@massman.net.

The St Louis Public Library is requesting Proposal submissions f r o m q u a lif ie d contractors for Switching Equipment. Sealed Proposal packets will be received by the Purchasing Manager, St. Louis Public Library, 1415 Olive St, St. Louis, Missouri, 63103, until 4:00 p.m. CDT, Monday , M arch 12, 2018. In order to obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal, please contact Don Gillum during regular business hours by phone, 314.539.0312, email, dgillum@slpl.org , or at the above address.

Request for Qualifications Great Rivers Greenway is soliciting the following RFQs: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Planning due March 2 , 2 0 1 8 . Geographic Information System (GIS) Services due March 9, 2018. Full RFQs can be found at https://greatriversgreenway. org/jobs-bids/ Great Rivers Greenway reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. EOE

SCOTTRADE CENTER INTERIOR PAINTING PROJECT Clayco is requesting proposals on behalf of Kiel Center Partners to repaint all substrates within the interior bowl of Scottrade Center. For bid package distribution and general inquiries regarding the project please contact: grunlohp@claycorp.com A pre bid walk through will be held on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 from 9:30am - 11:30am at the Scottrade Center. All interested bidders shall meet at the Scottrade security office located on 1 5 th Street.

The Kirkwood School District R-7 is requesting bids from qualified bidders for Doors Replacement Project and the N G L – Parking Lot Improvement Project. Please visit our website @ http://www.kirkwoodschools.org and click on RFPs within the Links section.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 02.09.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

‘hat’s your interpretation’ St. Louis parking operations should be under a city agency, not the treasurer’s oice.

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taxpayers. We hope a court agrees. Boyd is ho wouldn’t want a job suing Jones to impose constitutional clarwhere you can spend $2 ity over the treasurer’s official duties. million without having to The law matters, and when public ask for approval? St. Louis officials exceed their authority to pursue Treasurer Tishaura Jones believes she personal agendas, it’s definitely a point to is in that enviable position and told the be quibbled over. Board of Aldermen’s streets commitJones holds unusual authority over $18 tee on Tuesday that she doesn’t need authorization to spend the city’s parking million in parking revenue, of which 40 percent goes into the city’s budget after all revenue. “That’s your interpretation,” she repeat- payments for capital improvements and debt service have been edly told Alderman Jeffrey made.Last fiscal year,that Boyd, 22nd Ward, as he came out to $1.68 million explained at a City Hall for the city. hearing her legal obligation St. Louis is unique to get formal approval to among major cities spend money. because its municipal “You can’t, on and on parking division is under again, just spend public control of a non-municfunds without a legislative ipal treasurer’s office act,” Boyd said. For Jones to that doesn’t submit to imply otherwise is absurd oversight by the mayor or on its face. Board of Aldermen. The Jones said that she does not need spending authoriDAVID CARSON • Post-Dispatch state law that mandates this arrangement needs to zation because, as treasurer, St. Louis Treasurer be changed, as Jones hershe chairs the Parking Tishaura Jones. self has acknowledged. Commission, which The city’s Parking Commission, which oversees spending from parking revenue. the treasurer heads, includes the compWhen Boyd asked her whether parking troller, the streets director, the director of funds are public funds, her response, parking operations and the chairman of again, was: “That’s your interpretation.” the Streets, Traffic and Refuse Committee, Jones needs to get the message that which currently is Boyd. city coffers are not her personal piggy The comptroller’s office said in August bank. She said her $2 million expenditure that Jones had $32 million in the Parkwas to study the proposed expansion of MetroLink — a study the city neither asked ing Commission’s reserve fund. Jones has argued that maintaining a hearty for nor authorized. She chided Boyd, askreserve helps keep credit ratings strong ing whether the study should be stopped and insures more than $60 million in outbecause he contends correct procedures standing debt from modernizing parking were not followed. She asked why they meters and building parking garages. were quibbling “over pennies.” That’s understandable. But what’s left is “It’s a process,” Boyd told her.“You did not the treasurer’s play money to spend as not follow the process under the law.” Well, that’s his interpretation. And ours. she pleases. And probably that of most other St. Louis

Insecurity on parade Like a banana republic dictator, Trump wants a big military display.

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his sexual escapades in the 1980s were ot everyone loves a parade the “my personal Vietnam.” way President Donald Trump He used the military as a foil during the does. He wants a huge, excampaign, referring to it as a “disaster” pensive military parade down and a “shambles.” As president, however, Pennsylvania Avenue, but Republican he frequently mentions “our great milimembers of Congress are throwing cold tary.” water on the idea, and Democrats are Every president honors the military, but openly mocking it. The Washington Post reported this week Trump is the first one to order up a fullbore Red Square-on-May-Day extravathe president suggested the idea during a Jan. 18 meeting to Defense Secretary James ganza featuring tanks, missiles, howitzers and thousands of marching troops. PresiMattis and Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, dent George H.W. Bush staged a smaller chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The “Victory Celebration” in June 1991 to mark Pentagon’s takeaway from the meeting the end of the first Gulf War. The second was that the parade was an order, not a request. “The marching orders were: I want a parade like the one in France,” a military official told the Post. “This is being worked at the highest levels of the military.” It’s tough to rank all of Trump’s bizarre initiatives, but a muscle-flexing military parade is close to the top. Trump is said to have been awestruck at a July 14 Bastille Day parade ASSOCIATED PRESS he witnessed in Paris. The Bastille Day Parade in 2013. President Trump saw the He was still agog at 2017 version and was so impressed he wanted one just like it. the United Nations in Iraq war hasn’t ended so well. Thousands September. of troops remain there and in Afghanistan. “It was one of the greatest parades I’ve This is not exactly time to unfurl the “misever seen,” Trump told reporters.“It was sion accomplished” banners. two hours on the button, and it was miliHouse Armed Services Committee tary might, and I think a tremendous thing Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, for France and for the spirit of France.” tactfully told CNN that a parade is “not It must have been some parade to necessary.” change Trump’s views of France so draSen. John Kennedy, R-La., stated,“I matically. During the 2016 campaign, he think confidence is silent and insecurity is derided France’s immigration policies and loud. America is the most powerful counquoted a mysterious friend named “Jim” try in all of human history; you don’t need as saying “Paris is no longer Paris.” to show it off.” Trump’s views on the military also have But showing off is what this president is changed significantly. He never served all about. He would use the pretext of honduring the Vietnam War, having received oring the military to honor himself. Great four student deferments and one medical nations don’t behave this way. deferment for bone spurs. In 1997, he said

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yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Warn women about possibility of postpartum depression Regarding “Postpartum psychosis cited by experts as possible factor” (Feb. 6): If Mary Jo Trokey was not mentally ill before her baby was born, then she was not mentally ill when she killed herself and her family. Postpartum depression is not a mental illness; it is a temporary psychosis undoubtedly caused by an imbalance of her hormones, probably progesterone. Doctors need to be more informative about this possibility when a woman is about to deliver or has delivered her baby. I have treated postpartum depression and hormone imbalance for many years. Postpartum depression is very treatable, by hormone replacement and sometimes antidepressants along with the hormones. A woman is too embarrassed to talk about the feelings she is having regarding her baby, often demonic and dangerous. She needs to understand that this is not that unusual. The only fatality I have seen in my practice over the years was one woman who killed herself after her physician took her of hormones and left her only with antidepressants. Readers should talk to women about these feelings they are having, and doctors should warn the women about this possibility. Patricia Coughlin • St. Louis County Life Cycles Counseling

Businesses’ health care plan picks people over proits? The editorial “Taming a tapeworm” (Feb. 5) endorses a single-payer solution to contain health care costs. Warren Buffett, a single-payer advocate, knows a national single-payer program would increase U.S. businesses’ profits by decreasing health care expenses, and should help their employees thrive. Buffett has created, with other corporate CEOs, a unique not-for-profit model that is not based on Medicare, our single-payer program for seniors. Unlike politicians, Buffett isn’t corrupted by “donations” from the insurance lobbies, which the Supreme Court protects as free speech. How ironic it will be for the American business community to adopt this unique model of people over profits health care, because our government will not. Mimi Signor • University City

Pelosi hands out ‘crumbs’ to federal workers I read that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi characterized the $1,000 bonuses certain companies gave their employees due to tax reform and the increased paychecks due to less taxes deducted as “crumbs.” I work for the federal government, and Rep. Pelosi is a member of Congress, which means she has a lot of influence over spending. She had many opportunities to raise Department of Defense spending and specifically cost-of-living increases for federal workers. Federal workers received an increase on Jan. 1, which for me was less than $500 annually. Seems Rep. Pelosi likes giving crumbs to federal workers. John Simon • Fairview Heights

Danforth can’t match McCaskill for defending women Regarding “Hawley is now facing whispers of buyer’s remorse within party” (Feb. 7): John Danforth, an Episcopal minister,

criticizes Claire McCaskill for being a “shrewd operator.” I certainly hope so. She’s a fierce defender of women and men. She’s had years of experience prosecuting sexual predators and helped us get rid of Todd Akin, who blamed pregnant rape victims because they were not “legitimately” raped. Danforth himself has admitted in writing that he went too far and hurt Anita Hill when he defended Clarence Thomas from John Danforth charges of harassment during his confirmation hearings in 1991. Now all of a sudden Hill is believed, aided by scores of women who were famous enough to challenge their perpetrators. And we have Thomas on the Supreme Court. If I recall, even Jesus was kinder to women than some of today’s clergy. Elizabeth Powell • St. Louis County

Political ad is ofensive on so many levels Regarding “Illinois governor candidate stands by ad blasted as ‘racist’ ” (Feb. 4): The anti-Bruce Rauner commercial that stereotypes several people in a racist, misogynistic and transphobic way is probably the most ofensive political commercial I have ever seen. It ofends on so many levels. Shame on St. Louis networks for airing it and shame on Illinois residents, no matter which party you belong to, for not insisting it be stopped. This one went way too far. Tom Kiehl • Ladue

To ight poverty, show support for more foreign aid Over half of the world lives in poverty, which means people don’t have access to fresh drinking water, adequate shelter, enough food or proper education. While children around the world are dying from lack of medical treatment or malnutrition, the United States has the largest military defense budget in history, far surpassing defense spending of any other country. Additionally, the United States has the resources to end global poverty while still having the largest defense budget on record. Many people seem to think that the United States spends far more on foreign aid than it does. The truth is, the United States spends less than 1 percent of its budget on foreign aid. The Borgen Project is an organization dedicated to addressing global poverty and lobbying Congress to act. The Borgen Project believes that the United States should be doing more because it has the money to end global poverty. Furthermore, the U.S. could benefit from helping the world’s poor, as people who are brought out of poverty start spending money on commodities and increasing the number of consumers in the world. I urge Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt to support the international affairs budget. I also ask that people who believe the U.S. should be doing more to call or email their congressional leaders to support the international affairs budget. Lauren Baker • St. Charles

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TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

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02.09.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

TRAINING YOUNG MEN • Warning Americans not to base great expectations on the signs of unrest in Germany, former President Taft urges greater preparation for war. If the men are not needed for active service, they will be better men and better citizens on account of their training. We shall see the beneficial efects of military training in the young men of the land. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Reviving rural Missouri Universities deliver solutions and hope in places like the Bootheel. BY MUN CHOI

In December, The Chronicle of Higher Education published “A Dying Town,” a story about the challenges facing the Missouri Bootheel. It details the struggles many Missourians face in staying healthy and prosperous, including the stories of several residents who, without a college degree, Choi had no safety net when jobs left their towns, the economy stuttered or medical bills piled up. The story lights a fire under anyone working in the fields of public health or education. As we continue to strive toward making higher education as beneficial and accessible as possible, it is vital that we ensure no community falls between the cracks. Higher education has real, proven benefits, but unfortunately

we often hear only about the obvious ones. It’s true — college graduates earn about 65 percent more over their lifetimes than those with only a high school education. But money doesn’t tell the whole story. Those with a college education are less likely to suffer from debilitating conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. These characteristics have economic components, but studies show that a college education plays a role. Public higher education does not operate solely on the individual level. As a land-grant institution, the University of Missouri has an obligation to carry the benefits of university research beyond the campus. We stridently support our student and faculty researchers, who are making strides toward bettering lives in Missouri communities and in society. For example, Mizzou scientists, cardiologists and engineers are fighting heart disease by working to develop revolutionary new cardiovascular stents, a project that has received millions of dollars in

federal grants. At Missouri University of Science and Technology, we empower teachers to educate the next generation of researchers through Project Lead The Way, a precollege program that inspires students to become involved in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. More than 3,000 elementary and secondary education teachers have attended Project Lead The Way classes at Missouri S&T, giving them the tools they need to provide their students with quality science and engineering education. We are committed to improving the lives of Missourians, and this means cost must not be a barrier to quality higher education. Recently, we signed the Missouri Land Grant Compact, which allows all Pell Grant recipients who are residents of Missouri to attend Mizzou tuition-free, provided they meet admissions requirements. We also have lowered the cost of educational materials by adopting open source and lower-cost textbooks. For students from low-income

families, these efforts mean the prospect of a college education is less burdened by financial concerns. Mizzou is helping to broaden access to medical care across the state with the Springfield Clinical Campus and Missouri Telehealth Network through Mizzou’s School of Medicine. One telehealth initiative, Show-Me ECHO, helps rural physicians treat chronic pain and conditions like hepatitis C. The University of MissouriKansas City houses the UMKC School of Dentistry, which, as the only public dental school in Missouri, includes courses that deploy students to provide dental care in underserved areas. In addition, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, together with Mizzou, recently received a joint $1.8 million federal grant to train social workers to serve underserved populations with educational and health access programs. Our mission is service, an ethic that guides us in all the work we do. To see what that ethic looks like, look no further than Freda

Kershaw, who was profiled in The Chronicle’s story. Freda works in Pemiscot County for Mizzou’s ParentLink program, which provides research-based information and resources to parents and youths across Missouri. ParentLink has expanded its services in the Bootheel, and with the help of community liaisons like Freda, the program inspires communities to work together to improve the health and wellness of their residents. For some, wellness means planting a garden where there was an empty lot. And just as that garden serves as a symbol of the will to change lives for the better, our hope is that the University of Missouri is more than a system of brick-and-mortar institutions. It is an ethic, and we are striving to ensure that ethic continues to spread across Missouri in all its forms.

Mun Choi is president of the University of Missouri system.

Mental health support in the newborn nursery Missouri can extend the period of Medicaid coverage for new mothers who are otherwise uninsured. BY CYNTHIA ROGERS AND JOHN N. CONSTANTINO

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron attend the traditional Bastille Day military parade on the Champs Elysees in July.

he problem with Trump’s parade here is good reason why we have not made military parades a standard part of our patriotic repertoire. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

Military parades, “treasonous” opponents — do you sense a pattern here? President Donald Trump is such a master of the politics of distraction that everything he says and does is assumed to be a diversion from something more important, the Russia collusion issue above all. It’s certainly true that in Trump’s exotic circus of scandal and outrage, many stories that would have engulfed earlier administrations roll right off the back of the news cycle.Consider, for starters, his profiting while president from his resorts and golf clubs, his alleged payoff of a porn star, and the resignation of the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over conflicts of interest. On the substance of policy, he can govern largely by stealth. Discussion of the decisions his administration has made on a range of regulatory, environmental, labor, health care and tax matters gets pushed to the bottom of the public agenda. It will thus be tempting to dismiss Trump’s desire to have a big military parade as yet another ploy to change the subject. Trump knows perfectly well that many liberals are uneasy with massive demonstrations of military strength, so some who might raise their voices in dissent could draw back out of fear that he is baiting them and that they’ll play into his hands. Trump clearly longs to be the lead figure on the reviewing stand gazing out on the tanks and missiles as a tribute to his own power, while casting his

critics as unpatriotic foes of our men and women in uniform. But this is precisely why his parade proposal should be treated as dangerous and not simply another bout of Trumpian ego enhancement. It comes within days of Trump’s charge that Democrats who did not stand and cheer him during his State of the Union address could be guilty of “treason.” When a leader who often praises strongmen abroad defines routine political opposition as disloyalty to country and then suggests hauling out the military to march in our streets as he looks down from on high, friends of freedom should take notice. Those who challenge the portrayals of Trump as an authoritarian or an autocrat because our freedoms are still intact miss the point. In enduring democracies such as ours, liberty is eroded slowly by politicians who undermine the norms and practices that protect it. There is good reason why we have not made military parades a standard part of our patriotic repertoire. Trump said he got this idea from France, our democratic ally whose Bastille Day military procession goes back 138 years. This gives him cover because spectacles of the sort Trump has in mind are associated less with free nations than with dictatorships in Russia, North Korea, China, and the totalitarian regimes of the 1930s. The United States, born in republican opposition to royalist rule, has been properly reticent about flaunting our formidable arsenal, typically limiting such displays to celebrations of war victories. This is in keeping with a tradition that regularly honors those who sacrifice to defend our country, but resolutely limits the political role of the armed

forces. There is also an element of pragmatism in our shunning of martial ostentatiousness. Our military is, as Defense Secretary James Mattis has said,“the world’s most feared and trusted force.” There is no need to prove this with a pageant of might that is at least as likely to inspire resentment as respect — especially since it is now inevitable that even our friends abroad would see Trumpian excess in this break with our past, as Rick Noack noted in The Washington Post. Mattis has done better than most Trump appointees in avoiding complicity with the president’s worst abuses. Perhaps Mattis has decided to preserve his influence by humoring Trump’s parade envy. Here’s hoping that instead, a Marine who knows what genuine battlefield heroism entails will find a way to sideline this very bad idea. He might persuade Trump to contain his self-indulgence and spend the money a parade would cost on scholarships for the children of wounded warriors and those who have died in battle, or to help homeless vets. This is what real patriotism looks like. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the last great general to serve as president, urged “an alert and knowledgeable citizenry” to mesh the “huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.” Trump’s parade is the antithesis of Ike’s prudence and his commitment to safeguarding our democracy.

E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

A first reflex in taking in a tragedy of the rarity, horror and sadness of the suspected murder-suicide that occurred last week in St. Louis is to sift through the ashes looking for clues to warning signs that might have helped prevent it. Whether any signs are found may depend on whether Mary Jo Trokey — the new mother suspected of killing her family and herself — was ever screened for a perinatal mental health condition; if screened, whether she accessed treatment; and if treated, whether the treatment was optimized to meet the demands of any catastrophic mental health condition. Any adverse event that stems from a new parent’s unrecognized or untreated mental health condition should serve as a warning signal that our community and our health systems can do better. Perhaps it is not widely known, but The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends screening at least once during the perinatal period — which spans pregnancy and the first year after a baby’s birth. And the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends screening at the 1-, 2-, 4-, and 6-month well-baby checkup visits. Most important, validated screening tools exist at each of these stages to identify nearly all parental psychiatric syndromes, most notably postpartum depression in mothers. Such screenings take only minutes to complete but typically are not paid for by health insurers and, therefore, occur inconsistently, though many conscientious obstetricians and pediatricians do their best to adhere to the guidelines. Inconsistent screening levels, however, are not nearly adequate to identify mental health conditions that commonly (on the order of 20 percent of all live births) endanger mothers and their infants in less spectacular but nevertheless enduring and catastrophic ways — ranging from chronic depression to maternal suicide to infant neglect or abuse — and that disproportionately affect the tens of thousands of U.S.mothers whose temporary pregnancy insurance — primarily through Medicaid — expires 60 days after their babies are born. Screening is a necessity, as research shows that a majority of

women with these symptoms will not report them on their own. Currently, in Jefferson City, we have an opportunity to address this sad state of affairs by extending the period of Medicaid coverage for new mothers who are otherwise uninsured. Evidence from the United Kingdom shows that the cost of untreated postpartum mental health conditions is £8.1 billion — more than $11 billion — per year, while the annual cost of effective treatment is 15 percent of that total, suggesting a true opportunity for significant cost savings. Despite a lack of medical insurance reimbursement, over the past five years BJC HealthCare has piloted early universal screening (during pregnancy and upon delivery) under the auspices of the Washington University Perinatal Behavioral Health Service. We have shown that screening, referral and initial psychotherapy services whenever necessary can be delivered at a cost of about $285 per screened family. This effort materialized on the basis of generous support from the Steward Family Foundation, Generate Health, the Missouri Foundation for Health, the Foundation for Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the St. Louis Children’s Hospital Foundation, the St. Louis County Children’s Service Fund, Eden’s Army, the Ollie Hinkle Heart Foundation and private donors — all of whom had the foresight to invest in a model that standardized the delivery of mental health screening and treatment services for all new mothers. Other community agencies and providers have followed suit, many with support from the Perinatal Behavioral Health Initiative launched by Generate Health in 2017, the central goal of which is to create a standardized screening and referral protocol for the entire region. The opportunity is upon us to make comprehensive screening at regular intervals the standard of care, to ensure that such screenings are paid for, and that all mothers who screen positive have access to the mental health interventions that will adequately support them, their newborn babies and their families. Dr. Cynthia Rogers and Dr. John N. Constantino work in the Department of Psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine and St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

A portion of the St. Raphael Catholic Church bulletin from Christmas weekend 2017 announces the baptism of Taylor Rose Trokey. on Feb. 2, the 3-month-old girl and her parents, Mary Jo Trokey and Matthew Trokey, were all found dead in their St. Louis home in an apparent double murder-suicide.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

OBITUARIES Balmer, Carole Marie - St. Louis Banaskavich, Louise - St. Louis Benz, Mark A. - Lake Elsinore, CA Brewer, Marigene Smith - Jefferson City Buescher, Elvanita L. - St. Louis Doyle, Suzanne Marie - St. Louis Ebe,Conrad W. - St. Louis Farmer, Judy Kay - St. Louis Fredman, Herbert I. - St. Louis Gahn, Lawrence "Larry" - St. Louis Glaser, Donald T. - St. Louis Green, Christopher Matthew - Sherwood, AR, formerly of St. Louis Guese, Harold P. - St. Louis Herbert, Theodore M. "Ted" - Breckenridge Hills

Celebrations of Life

Hollman, John Bruce - Eureka, MO Johnston, Anneliese E. "Anna" - St. Louis Kreienkamp, Emma Louise - St. Louis Litsch, Loretta S. - St. Louis Mange, Barbara K. - St. Louis Mayer, Donald L. - St. Charles Miller - see Reinke Moskop, Helen Frances - Dallas, formerly St. Louis Murphy, Phyllis Jo Ann - St. Louis O'Connor, Matilda D. - St. Louis Pera, OFM, Fr. Sylva - St. Louis Reinke, Gilbert A. - St. Louis Reise, Ruth - see Whitworth Richer, Gloria L. - St. Louis Rogers, Alice - Washington, MO

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Rogers, John L. - Maryland Heights Schaedler, Robert M. - St. Charles Schob, Mary - St. Louis Sofian, Freda - St. Louis Spitler, Rosemary A. - St. Louis Suter - see Murphy Temme, Ruth Ann - St. Louis Thaller - see Murphy Vierling - see Murphy Weable, Lawrence "Larry" D. - Lake St. Louis Weimer, Carole C. - St. Charles Whitworth, Virginia Ruth - St. Louis Willoh, Donald - Imperial Wittmayer - see Reinke

Balmer, Carole Marie

Fredman, Herbert I.

Mange, Barbara K.

(nee Ahlers), August 25, 1938-February 7, 2018. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Carole joined her beloved husband Hank, parents Harry and Viola Ahlers, and her sister, Cathy Wright, in heaven on Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Dear mother of Tina Balmer, Toni (Jeff) Mitchell, Kurt (Cathy) Balmer, Sr., Lisa (Kevin) Quinn, Michael Balmer, Dwain (Kelly) Balmer, and Dan (Kathy) Balmer. Dear sister of Mary Ann (John) Harper and brother Al (Judy) Ahlers. Loving grandmother of Carrie (Mark) Oyarzabal, Rebecca Cohen, Kurt Balmer, Jr., Henry Balmer, Kristen (Chad) Mottert, Erin (Chris) Bahde, Maggie Quinn, Michelle Quinn, Tyler Balmer, Courtney Balmer, Braeden Lane, Jenna Balmer, Jack Balmer; and great-grandmother of Sydney Halbach, Victor Oyarzabal, Caitlyn Balmer, Sophia Balmer, Logan Mottert, Chase Mottert, Mary Cohen, and Annie Cohen. Dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, and friend to many. Carole's faith community was a driving force in her life. A long-time parishioner of Immaculate Conception Parish, her ministries included Marriage Encounter, grief counseling, and catechist for the Rite of Initiation. Services: Visitation Monday, February 12, 4-8 pm, at Kutis Funeral Home, South County. Family and friends may gather at 9:30 am Tuesday, February 13, for procession to Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated in Carole's honor at 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception Church, Arnold, MO. Burial to follow in Immaculate Conception Cemetery.

February 8, 2018, beloved husband of Shirley Fredman; dear father and father-in-law of Sander (Joyce), Ronnie (Donna) and Barry (Marie) Fredman; dear grandfather of Clara, Grace and Benyamin Fredman; dear brother and brother-in-law of Norman (Micheline), Yoseph (the late Freyda) and Shlomo (Marsha) Fredman. Our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service Friday, February 9th, 10:30 a.m. at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd. No visitation prior to service. Interment Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to Washington University, Joel S. Perlmutter, MD, Campus Box 8111, 660 S. Euclid, 63110, Memo Section: for Dr. Joel Permutter PD Research, H.F. Epstein Hebrew Academy, 1138 N Warson Road, 63132 or Saul Mirowitz Jewish Community School, 348 S. Mason Road, 63141. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL

February 7, 2018; beloved wife of Franklin E. Mange; dear mother and mother-in-law of Lawrence Mange, Joyce Mange, Martin (Carole) Mange and Emily Mange; dear grandmother of Megan Mange, Erica Mange, and Scarlet Zell; dear sister and sister-in-law of Gerry (Walter) Schwab; dear sister-in-law of Arthur (Elaine) Mange and Jean (late Wilton) Agatstein; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday, February 11, 9:30 a.m. at Berger Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd., followed by a service at 10:00 a.m. Interment New Mt. Sinai Cemetery, 8430 Gravois Road. Memorial contributions preferred to Independence Center, 4245 Forest Park Avenue, 63108 or a charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL

Banaskavich, Louise 92, passed away on 2/8/18. Services: Vis 2/12/18 9:30 until Service at 11:30 AM at Hutchens-Stygar Funeral Home 9587 Mid Rivers Mall Dr., St. Charles. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Benz, Mark A. 55, Obit Evans-Brownmortuary.com. Memorial Mass 11 a.m. Feb. 10, 2018 at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 3400 St. Gregory Lane, St Ann, MO.

Brewer, Marigene Smith 73, of Jefferson City, passed away on January 25, 2018, at St. Mary's Hospital in Jefferson City. She was born September 29, 1944, in Newark, New Jersey, the only child of the late Edward and Berenice Cobb Smith. M a r i g e n e w a s a l ife-l on g learner and educator, and an avid reader. She frequenting the local library on a weekly basis, where she also volunteered. Marigene also served on the board of JC Learning in Retirement. on January 1, 1997, Marigene married Michael Brewer, who survives at the home. They enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, and traveling throughout Missouri and across the country. Marigene fought a courageous battle with cancer, showing tremendous strength in the face of adversity and teaching her family how to live each day to its fullest. In addition to her husband, Marigene is survived by two aunts, Elmetta Willis of Poplar Bluff, and Marie (Ninky) Wolpers and husband Jerry of Perry, MO, numerous cousins, three step children, Paula Brewer Mraz and husband Ray of High Ridge, Ross Brewer and wife Pok Suk of Colorado Springs, CO, and Kurt Brewer and wife Justina of Russellville, six step grandchildren, and one step greatgrandchild. Services: Visitation Friday, February 9, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. at Valhalla Funeral Home. Marigene will be interred with her parents during a family service at Valhalla Cemetery in St. Louis. Memorial contributions are suggested to the Dreams to Reality Boutique in Jefferson City. www.valhallafuneralhomes.com

Buescher, Elvanita L.

Gahn, Lawrence "Larry", Jr. Resting in the arms of the Lord on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018. Beloved husband of the late Betty C. Gahn; dear father of Rochelle (Robert) Viviano, Richard Woods, Kimberly (Waimun) Wong, Tiffany (Allen) Cheesman, Marnie (Jay) Cruz and the late Shane (Angelia) Woods; dear grandfather to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, Mon., Feb. 12, 10:30 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cem. Vis. Sun., 4-6 p.m.

Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Thur., Feb. 8, 2018. Beloved father and father-in-law of Deborah (David Reese) Ebe, Kimberly E b e a n d Melissa (Randall) Harris; dear grandfather of Cole and Caden; dear brother and brother-in-law of Herb and Della Ebe; our dear uncle and friend. Servi c es : Fu n era l from the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Mon., Feb. 12, 9:30 a.m. to St. John Bosco Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Peter Cemetery, Kirkwood, MO. Visitation 4-7 p.m. Sunday. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Farmer, Judy Kay (nee Garling), on Tues., Feb. 6, 2018. Memorial Gathering Sat. Feb 10, at Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood from 10 am-12 pm, sharing of memories at 11:30 am. Full obituary at www.boppchapel.com

Moskop, Helen Frances

The Greatest Generation lost another of its precious members when Helen Frances Moskop died in Dallas from complications of Glaser, Donald T. dementia on February 4, 2018. He lived life to the fullest and loved fiercely. He leaves a huge She was just 11 days short of her hole in our hearts. 96th birthday. https://www.stlouiscremation.com/obituary/donald-t-glaser She was born February 15, 1922 Services: Celebration of Life-SilverLeaf Lounge (3442 Hereford in St. Louis, Mo., the daughter of St., St. Louis 63139) Sunday, February 11, 2018, 2-5 p.m. Ralph and Clara Baxter. She graduated from Cleveland High, ST. LOUIS CREMATION then Harris College and began a career in education, but like many of her generation, when the time came, she chose marriage, homemaking, and raising Green, Christopher Matthew three children. 46, Feb. 2, 2018. Beloved husband, father, son, Her marriage to Roy Moskop was delayed by World War II. But brother, uncle, cousin and friend to many. when the war ended and Roy returned from overseas, they Services: Memorial service 12 p.m., Feb. 13, Arkansas were married on Oct. 6, 1945--beginning a marriage that lasted State Veterans Cem. Gunn Funeral Home, Little Rock, AR. for 72 years. She brought to their marriage her expertise as a seamstress, tailor, and knitter of clothes for herself and the family. Guese, Harold P. They say that life doesn't really begin until the kids leave Mon., Feb. 6, 2018. home and the dog dies. When that happened, Helen and Roy did Beloved husband of some serious traveling. They spent their senior years circling Virginia Guese (nee the globe on trips to every continent except Antarctica. Reiser); loving father of Lorraine She is survived by her husband, Roy; their three children, (Patrick) Flachs, Norma Brock, Kerry, Randall, and Nancy; their grandchildren, Jeremy, Kat, Jeannette Bommarito, Marilyn Dennis, Katherine, Walker, Colleen, and Jesse; and their great(Larry) Gubbels & Warren Guese; grandchildren, Alyssa, Ashlynn, Avary, Kaedin, and Avery. preceded in death by his grandServices: A memorial service will be held at NorthPark son Phillip Guese; proud grandPresbyterian Church, 9555 N. Central Expwy, Dallas, TX, on father, great-grandfather, greatFriday, February 16 at 3:00 p.m. The family requests that any great-grandfather, uncle & friend. memorials be given to NorthPark Presbyterian Church, the Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH Alzheimer's Association, or a charity of your choice. COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Mon. Feb. 12, 1:30 p.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of Murphy, Phyllis Jo Ann flowers, contributions appreciated to St. Anthony's Hospice. (nee Sickler), fortified with the Visitation Sun. 4-8 p.m. Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church, on Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Herbert, Theodore M. "Ted" Arthur E. Murphy; dearest July 15, 1941 - February 5, 2018 of Breckenridge Hills. mother Terry (Marilyn) Murphy, Services: Visitation at SHEPARD FUNERAL Chapel, 9255 Natural Jo Ann (Gary) Thaller, Kevin Bridge Rd. at I-170 (314-426-6000), Sunday, 2-6 p.m. Murphy, Debbie (Tom) Suter and with Funeral Monday, 10 a.m. Burial Memorial Park Kim (Jim) Vierling; loving grandCemetery. Additional details at mother of 14; great-grandmother www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com of 13; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. PhylHollman, John Bruce lis was very active with the Red 93, of Eureka, MO, died Feb. 2, 2018 at Mary Mount Manor in Cross, Voter's Commission and in Eureka. He was born December 23, 1924 in St. Louis, MO, the the last 20 years was very involved in the Delmar Gardens and son of the late Arthur and Gladys (Bruce) Hollman. He married Villas Community. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH County, Mary Jane Anna. She preceded him in death. 5255 Lemay Ferry, Sunday, February 11 from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mr. Hollman is survived by a daughter Lou Ann Wright; three Mass Monday, February 12, 11:30 a.m. at Assumption Catholic sons: David, Donald and Walter Hollman; three grandchildren: Church (Mattis Rd.) Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In George Hollman, Angela Beermann and Steven Wright; and a lieu of flowers, memorials to Cardinal Glennon Children's sister, Delores Stubbs. Foundation or Masses appreciated. Services: A Memorial Mass will be held Saturday, February 17, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church O'Connor, Matilda D. (Shrewsbury), 7622 Sutherland Ave., St. Louis, MO 63119 (nee Novak), on Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Wife of the late John P. Johnston, Anneliese E. "Anna" O'Connor; dear mother of Rev. Andrew O'Connor, Stephen Passed away in Vero Beach, Florida on Saturday, January 27, O'Connor, Mary (Tim) Feltman, Kathleen (Bill) Dickson and John 2018. Beloved wife of the late Arthur Johnston; she was a dear (Roxanne) O'Connor; dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sisfriend to many. ter, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: A graveside service will be held at Jefferson Barracks Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on National Cemetery Friday, February 9th, at 12:45 p.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church (5020 Rhodes Please meet at the cemetery's main office by 12:30 p.m. to Ave). Visitation at church from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Interment attend. A Kutis Affton Service. Calvary Cemetery. A service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes.

(nee Newton) Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on February 7, 2018 at the age of 100 years. Beloved wife of the late Aloys S. Buescher for 51 years; dear mother of Kathleen (Jim) Soehngen, Gene (Kathy) Buescher, and Mary (Walter) Schalk; dear grandmother of Elizabeth (Rick) Liable, Margaret (Brian) Fresenburg, Katherine (Michael) Manzelli, Carolyn (Steve) Roach, Julie Soehngen, Rob (Teagen) Soehngen, Randy (Amy) Buescher, Eric (Rina) Buescher, Christy Schalk, and Michael (Stephanie) Schalk; dear great-grandmother of Collin, Emily, Kyle, Paige, Cecelia, Logan, Aaron, Evelyn, and Jameson; dear sister of William Newton, and Kathleen (Sam) Scott; dear sister of the late Roy (Marie) Newton, Elmer (Audrey) Newton, Harry (June) Newton, Jean (Earl) Blattel, and Ted (Ginny) Newton; dear daughter of the late Samuel and Anna Newton; dear Aunt, great-aunt, sister-in-Law, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral Mass on Friday Feb. 9 at 10:00am at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church, 4900 Ringer Rd. Visitation at church from 9:30 to 10:00 a.m. Interment National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to the American Red Cross or a Veteran's organization of your choice. A Kreienkamp, Emma Louise service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES. (nee Brostmeyer) Monday, February 5, 2018 at the age of 101 years. Loving wife of the late Roy H. Kreienkamp. Beloved mother of Gerald Kreienkamp, Cheryl (Robert) Wittling, and Karen Doyle, Suzanne Marie (the late Dennis) Clodfelter. Dearest grandmother of Lori BarBorn on January 6, 1959, passed away February 6, 2018. Loving low, Randy Wittling, Scott (Natalie) Clodfelter, and Sean Clodmother of John (Jessie) Bowman and Jennifer Bowman; felter. Dear great-grandmother of Kaylee, Keara, and Kristie cherished daughter of Shirley Flavin; dear sister of Lawrence Barlow. Our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and dear friend to Doyle, Joseph Doyle and Mary (Donald) McLaughlin; our dear many. aunt, niece, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation will be held on Saturday, February 10, Suzanne was a beautiful, talented artist and human being, we 10:00 a.m. until time of Service at 12:00 p.m. at the Immanuel will miss her terribly. United Church of Christ, 221 Church Street, Ferguson, MO. Services: The family will gather at Resurrection Cemetery, Interment Friedens Cemetery. A Service of the Stygar Florissant 6901 Mackenzie Rd., on Sat., Feb. 10, 11 a.m. for 11:30 a.m. Chapel. Service. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Stray Rescue of St. Louis. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL

Ebe, Conrad W.

Mayer, Donald L. February 6, 2018. Vis. Feb. 11, 4-8 p.m., Baue, St. Charles, 620 Jefferson St., Mon., 10-11 a.m. at St. Cletus, St. Charles. Mass to follow. Visit Baue.com

Pera, OFM, Fr. Sylvano

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, February 6, 2018, at the age of 91. Fr. Sylvano was born February 10, 1926 in Memphis, TN, the son of Louis J. and Ida (Pisani) Pera. Survivors include his niece Alice Gunn and nephew Patrick Posey. He was preceded in death by his parents, and siblings Louis Pera, Jr., Teresa Posey, and Robert Pera. Our dear Franciscan brother, Colleague and friend to many. Fr. Sylvano entered the Franciscan Order on July 4, 1945 and was ordained a priest June 24, 1952. He served as a formation director, teacher and as a pastor for many parishes throughout the Midwest for most of his priestly life. Services: Funeral services Monday, February 12, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, 3140 Meramec Street, St. Louis, MO. Visitation 9 a.m. until Mass of Litsch, Loretta S. (nee Johnson), on Monday, Feb- Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment Sts. Peter and Paul ruary 5, 2018. Beloved wife of Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the Sacred Heart the late Charles C. Litsch; loving Province, St. Anthony Friary, 3140 Meramec Street, St. mother of Ken (Sue) And Cliff Louis, MO 63118-4399. Arrangements under Hoffmeister Colo(Elissa) Litsch, Christy (Charles) nial Mortuary. Condolences at www.hoffmeistercolonial.com Sturtevant; dear grandmother of 5; great-grandmother of 4; dear Reinke, Gilbert A. sister of Marilyn Hall; dear friend Asleep in Jesus on Wednesday, February 7, 2018, at of Arlene Stenzel and Shirley age 93. Nahn. Beloved husband of the late Doris A. Reinke (nee Services: Visitation at KUTIS Koshelnick); father of Karen (John) Wittmayer and Kathy (Rich) AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Miller; grandfather of Jennifer Wittmayer and Allison (fiancé Saturday Feb. 10 at 12 noon Thomas) and Emily Miller; dear friend to many and known for until service at 4 p.m. Interhis radiant smile. ment J.B. National Cemetery on Monday at 9:15 a.m. Contributions to Timothy Lutheran Church or Lutheran Senior Services are appreciated. His family would like to acknowledge the Forest Park Neighborhood at Laclede Groves for their care and love shown to "Mr. Gil". Services: Family and friends to gather, 9:30 a.m. Saturday SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND (Feb. 10), at Timothy Ev. Lutheran, 6704 Fyler Ave (63139), until SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES time of service, 11:00 a.m. Saturday. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. A service of JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES STLtoday.com/obits (314) 352-2600.


NATION

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A17

DIGEST Governors push for input on Interior agency moves A bipartisan group of 19 Western governors said Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke did not consult with them about major plans for reorganizing the agency, and have asked him to delay implementing those until he speaks with them. The Feb. 1 letter from the Western Governors Association said the group had asked Zinke in April 2017 to be consulted on any reshuling of the department, which wields authority over public lands in the West. Zinke, who was a Republican congressman from Montana, said last month he wants to reorganize the department’s regions along river basins and other natural boundaries instead of state lines. Teen sentenced to 6 years after livestreaming caused crash • A California teen has been sentenced to more than six years in prison for driving drunk in a car crash that killed her younger sister. She was livestreaming at the time of the crash. The Merced Sun Star reports Obdulia Sanchez, 19, was sentenced Thursday after being convicted of gross vehicular manslaughter, DUI and child endangerment stemming from the July crash. The car driven by Sanchez veered of a road in Los Banos. Authorities

say she overcorrected, causing the vehicle to overturn, ejecting and killing her 14-year-old sister. Prosecutors say Sanchez was livestreaming on Instagram while driving. Report alleges taxpayer funds paid for prostitute in Utah • The Utah House of Representatives was investigating Thursday whether a lawmaker who abruptly resigned used a state-issued cellphone and hotel room paid for with taxpayer money to arrange trysts with a prostitute. State House Speaker Greg Hughes declined to comment on a report in British newspaper the Daily Mail that alleged former state Rep. Jon Stanard, a Republican, twice hired a prostitute in 2017. House Chief of Staf Greg Hartley said he was checking legislative records to see if the chamber paid for hotel stays and the cellphone the report alleges Stanard used. Phone and text messages left with Stanard’s cellphone were not returned. Stanard, who is married and from St. George, resigned Tuesday night after serving ive years in the House. Another close call with an asteroid • Another asteroid is headed our way — the second this week — but there’s no need to worry.

The newly discovered space rock will pass within 39,000 miles of Earth on Friday afternoon. That’s less than one-ifth the distance to the moon. Designated 2018 CB, the asteroid is an estimated 50 feet to 130 feet in length. The manager of NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies, Paul Chodas, said asteroids this size usually don’t come this close. McGowan’s former manager commits suicide • Former entertainment industry executive Jill Messick died by suicide on Wednesday after a long struggle with depression, according to a statement from her family obtained by CNN. Messick, 50, worked as an executive at Harvey Weinstein’s ilm company, Miramax, from 1997 to 2003. Prior to that, Messick was actress Rose McGowan’s manager at the time McGowan claims Weinstein raped her in 1997. Messick’s name resurfaced in recent months in coverage of the Weinstein sex harassment scandal. In their statement Thursday, Messick’s family said she “became collateral damage in an already horriic story.” Representatives for Weinstein and McGowan did not immediately respond to requests for comment. From news services

OBITUARIES Richter, Gloria L.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Eagles coaches and players parade up Benjamin Franklin Parkway toward the Museum of Art during their Super Bowl victory parade Thursday in Philadelphia. The Eagles beat the New England Patriots.

Celebrations of Life

Temme, Ruth Ann

(nee Luebke), asleep in Jesus, Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Beloved wife of William J. Richter; dear mother of Denise (Dennis) Yates, Bryan (Shari), Craig (Diane) and the late Scott Richter; our dear grandmother of 8; great-grandmother of 7; sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. , Friday, February 9, 5-8 p.m., then to Peace Lutheran Church (South County), Saturday, February 10 for visitation at 9:30 a.m. until service at 10:30 a.m. Interment Oak Hill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Peace Lutheran Church appreciated.

Asleep in Jesus, Ruth Ann Temme passed away on February 7, 2018 at the age of 89. She was the beloved wife of Roland Temme. She is survived by her son, Wayne E. (Yvonne) Temme of Wright City, MO; daughter, Laura Temme of St. Peters, MO; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; sister, Arline Kersting of Wentzville, MO; brother, George E Jackson, Jr. of Branson, MO. She is preceded in death by her father, George Jackson; mother, Georgia Jackson nee Leu; brothers, Kenneth Jackson, Vernon J. Jackson, and O ma r Jackson; sisters, Constance Yount, Arvilla Evans, and Marcella Eisenbath. Ruth Ann was a member of Immanuel Lutheran Church where she volunteered as a Sunday school teacher, as well as a member of the Ladies Aid and PTO. She took part with the the Rogers, Alice brail workers, and volunteered a lot of time to the city of of Washington, MO on February 2, 2018. Dear mother of Lisa Wentzville. She will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved Rogers (Mark Schmiemeier) and Laura Rogers; dear grand- her. mother of Joshua, Nicholas, Isabelle, Olivia, and Samuel. Services: Visitation Monday, February 12, 2018 from 3:00 pm Memorial Mass on Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 10 a.m. at to 7:00 pm at Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Washington, MO. Arrangements in Wentzville, Missouri 63385. Funeral service Tuesday, February care of Nieburg-Vitt Funeral Home, Washington. 13, 2018 at 11:00am at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Wentzville, Missouri. Burial will be at St. Charles Memorial Gardens, Saint Charles, Missouri. Memories Rogers, John L. and condolences may be expressed at Age 83, Maryland Heights, Feb. 5, 2018. Vis. Baue www.pitmanfuneralhome.com. Cave Springs, Mon., Feb. 12, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.; Service to follow at 12 p.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks. Visit Baue.com Weable, Lawrence "Larry" D. Age 70, February 6, 2018. Visitation Sunday, February 11, 3-7 p.m. at Carter-Ricks Funeral Home, Winfield. Funeral Monday, Schaedler, Robert M. February 12, 12 p.m. at Carter-Ricks. 48, of St. Charles, February 2, 2018, Services: Baue 620 Jefferson St. Visitation Sun., Feb. 11, 4-8pm, Funeral Mon., Feb. 12, 11:30 Visit Baue.com Weimer, Carole C. (nee Herndon), 3/16/1947 - 2/2/2018 Home with her Lord and Savior. Beloved wife of the late Lester B. Weimer; loving daughSchob, Mary Feb. 5, 2018, age 90. Dear wife of the late Leonard G. Schob; ter of the late Houston B. and Mathilda Stukenbrock Herndon; dear mother of Tom (Mary) Schob, Chris (the late Tom) Honold, dear mother of David H. (Jennifer) and Brian A. Weimer; dear Teri (Dave) Reiter; beloved grandma, great-grandma, aunt , sister of Helen L. and Houston B. Herndon, Jr. (Rita); sister-inlaw, aunt and cousin. Services to be private. Interment at cousin and a friend to many. Services: Visitation Sun., Feb 11, 5-8 p.m., HUTCHENS Mortuary, Sunset Memorial Park. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com 675 Graham Rd. Funeral Mass, 10 a.m., Mon, Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 751 Jefferson St., Florissant. Whitworth, Virginia Ruth (nee Hornung), 92, of St. Louis, MO, fortified with Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on February 5, 2018. Sofian, Freda Survived by her children Stephen (Jane) Reise, Philip (Angela) (nee Feinberg) February 6, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Jack H. Sofian; dear mother of Rabbi David (Simone) Sofian and Neal Reise, David (Diane Diamond) Reise, Mary (William) Dalton, and (Cheri McCoubrey) Sofian; loving grandmother of Joshua Richard (Jennifer) Reise; siblings Margaret "Alice" Nuernberger, (Samara) Sofian, Nehama (Chad) Miller, Aaron, Rachael and Evelyn Horning, and William Hornung; and numerous grandNoah Sofian; beloved great grandmother of Ilana, Reagan, children, great grandchildren, extended family members, and Meira, Nadav, Ziva, Orly, Izzi, and Levi; dear sister of Marcia friends. She is preceded in death by her parents Charles and Estelle Hornung; her husband Russell Whitworth; her son (Howard) Denenholz; loving aunt and great aunt. Services: Funeral service Sunday, February 11, 1:30PM at Joseph Reise; siblings Miriam McMains, Sister M. Susanne Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Road with interment Hornung, SSND, and Thomas Hornung; and in-laws George to follow at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Nuernberger and Marguerite Desotelle. Services: Visitation will be held at Alexander-White-Mullen Road. Visitation for Freda 1:00 PM Sunday. Contributions in Funeral Home, 11101 St. Charles Rock Road, St. Ann, MO 63074, her memory may be made to the Crohn's and Colitis on Friday, 2/9/2018, from 4pm to 8pm. Funeral Mass will be Foundation, 1034 S. Brentwood Blvd., Suite 1510, St. Louis, held at The Chapel at Mother of Good Counsel, 6825 Natural MO, 63117. Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63121 on Saturday, 2/10/2018, at A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE 9:30 am. Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery in St. Louis. Memorial Donations may be made to Mother of Spitler, Rosemary A. Good Counsel Home. www.alexanderstlouis.com. (nee Bertani), Baptized in the Hope of Christ Resurrection on Willoh, Donald Monday February 5, 2018 at the Don proudly served in the U.S. a ge of 73 . Rosemary w a s Navy for 21 years. In 1999, he preceded in death by her parents retired from Sunmark Brands/ A mb r o s e a n d Mary Bertani, Nestle. Preceded in death by husband Joe Spitler and brother his beloved wife, Mary P. Frank (Virginia) Bertani. (Stork) Willoh, he is survived by She is survived by a brother their 3 children: Don (Mo) Louis (Vicky) (Eileen); nieces and Willoh of Jefferson City, Dirk nephews: Susan (Michael), Linda Willoh of Cedar Hill, and Julie (Kevin), John (Mary) (Caroline), (Brian) King of Imperial; 4 Ann (Greg), Steven (Elizabeth) grandchildren: Sam Willoh; Joe and Michael (Christine); great Willoh, and Gabriel and Katie nieces and nephews: Tiffany, Brittany, Kelsi, Lauren, Madeline, King. His infectious smile and Elyse, Christopher (Megan), Megan, Noah, Lauren, Jack and Ben; good humor will be missed by great-great niece Melody and nephew Daniel; the Maroney many more family and friends. Memorials may be made to family; dear friend to Lil and many others. Shriner's Hospital. Rosemary was a longtime member of the St. Louis Hills Home Services: A memorial service will be March 3 at 1 pm at St. Assn. and an officer of the Francis Park Board. Service: Funeral Mass Saturday, February 10, 2018, 10:00 Rose of Lima Catholic Church in DeSoto, Mo. KUTIS a.m., St. Raphael the Archangel Church Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Friday, February 9, 4-8 p.m. Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. Donations in Rosemary's honor to Friends of Francis Park, www.friendsoffrancispark.org appreciated. Condolences to SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE THEM GREAT | STLtoday.com/obits

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Fraternal Notices

LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Walter J. Helms Sr. Journeyman Wireman on Pension Member 55 Years - February 2, 2018 Visitation, February 10, 2018 11 am-1 pm Funeral immediately following - Russell Colonial Funeral Home, 530 E. Springfield Ave., St. Clair, MO 63077 Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S. Please be advised of the death of Wayne F. Wenzinger Gold Card Member February 7, 2018 Services yet to be determined Bob Rapisardo, Pres. Brian Litteken, Sec'y.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • B

STOCKS CONTINUE TO PLUNGE • Eight stocks fell for every one that rose on NYSE; 98 percent of S&P stocks also dropped • Dow and S&P now 10 pct. below their record highs, oicially making loss a ‘correction’ BY MARLEY JAY Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Traders Peter Tuchman (left) and Patrick Casey work Thursday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stocks tumbled all day long, led by technology, banks, retail, travel companies and homebuilders.

Trump to seek 24 Boeing Super Hornets, the most since iscal year 2012

NASAL SPRAY TO REDUCE NIGHTLY BATHROOM TRIPS

Stocks plunged again Thursday, and for the second time in four days the Dow Jones industrial average sank more than 1,000 points. The two best-known stock market indexes, the Dow and the Standard & Poor’s 500, have dropped 10 percent from their all-time highs, set Jan. 26. That means they are in what is known on Wall Street as a “correction,” their first in almost two years. Stocks fell further and further as the day wore on and sufered their fifth loss in the last six days. Many of the companies that led the market’s gains over the last year have struggled badly in the last week. Those included technology companies, banks, retailers, travel companies and homebuilders. After huge gains in the first weeks of this year, stocks started to tumble last Friday after the Labor Department said workers’ See DOW • Page B5

St. Louis’ costs and culture lure tech startup irm SwipeSum says its auction software can save merchants money on credit-card processing

Order would be a boon to company’s assembly line in North County BY TONY CAPACCIO Bloomberg

President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2019 budget will request 24 Super Hornet jets built by Boeing, reversing an Obama administration decision to stop buying the fighter after this year, according to two people familiar with the decision. The Navy has argued that it needs more of the planes designated F/A-18E/F to fill a shortage in its inventory until more of Lockheed Martin’s newer F-35s are deployed. Before Trump even took office, he’d promoted the Super Hornet as a less costly alternative to the F-35, though the two planes have diferent capabilities. Such a reversal would bolster the prospects of Being’s north St. Louis County assembly line, which only a couple of years ago faced an uncertain future as the military considered winding down orders for the Super Hornets made here. Instead, new foreign orders are now expected to keep the line running into the next decade, and a renewed commitment from the U.S. military for the St. Louis facility’s biggest product, the Super Hornet, could help keep many of the 14,000 Boeing jobs here safe for even longer. The proposal in the budget due to be See BOEING • Page B5

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

during the night and restore a good night’s sleep for millions. “There are estimated to be 40 million people in the U.S. who get up two or more times a night to void,” Anderson, CEO of Avadel Pharmaceuticals, a Chesterfield-based pharmaceutical company. “There is

When Michael Seaman founded payment-software company SwipeSum in 2016, he couldn’t imagine building it anywhere but Southern California. It’s where he lived, for one thing. The Los Angeles area had a vibrant startup culture and was home to large companies in the payments business. To him, L.A. was the natural place to start his company. His brother and co-founder, Stephen, concurred at first. When SwipeSum began signing up investors and customers, though, he began pushing back on his brother’s choice of location. Why not St. Louis? Stephen Seaman, 33, who had lived here for four years, knew about the city’s growing startup scene, and he knew whatever money SwipeSum raised would go farther here. “It got real when we got the first check from our first investor,” Stephen recalled. “Someone had trusted us with their hardearned money, and we had better use it wisely.”

See DRUG • Page B5

See NICKLAUS • Page B4

First of its kind • Chesterield drug company targets overproduction of urine at night Good night’s sleep • Up to 40 million may be afected by need to go, targeted by Noctiva BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mike Anderson balks at the idea that getting older has to mean more trips to the bathroom during the night. In fact, he says he has a remedy: a first-of-its-kind product that will soon hit the market to reduce the overproduction of urine made

Hotel operator Midas Hospitality starts $100 million fund for growth BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Work will soon begin on Midas Hospitality’s $28 million 129-room Aloft Hotel in Cortex, at 4245 Duncan Avenue.

The $25 million Element by Westin hotel will be on the site of Habitat for Humanity St. Louis’ current headquarters.

Midas Hospitality, a growing hotel operator in the St. Louis area, has plans to raise up to $100 million to help fund future acquisitions and development. The money raised will be deployed in key markets such as Charlotte, N.C., Dallas,

Atlanta, Denver and St. Louis, and help accelerate future growth. Midas, along with an ailiated development firm called MC Hotel Construction, separately reported a combined $137.7 million in revenue in 2017, a 40 percent increase over 2016. Established in 2006, Midas has See MIDAS • Page B5

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NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Mortgage rates climb to highs not seen since 2016

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

PGAV doubles space by renovating, expanding its downtown studio

BY KATHY ORTON Washington Post

Mortgage rates continued their ascent this week, their fifth consecutive increase. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average shot up to 4.32 percent with an average 0.6 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.) It was 4.22 percent a week ago and 4.17 percent a year ago. The 30-year fixed rate has risen about 40 basis points (a basis point is 0.01 percentage point) since the start of the year and hasn’t been this high since December 2016. The 15-year fixed-rate average jumped to 3.77 percent with an average 0.5 point. It was 3.68 percent a week ago and 3.39 percent a year ago. The five-year adjustable rate average rose to 3.57 percent with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.53 percent a week ago and 3.21 percent a year ago.

RATES FOLLOW BONDS “Mortgage rates moved sharply higher last week, spurred by a sell-of in the stock market and further evidence of a strong economy that will soon force the world’s major central banks to push interest rates higher,” Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow, said in a statement. “This week, political uncertainty should wane as congressional negotiators have agreed to a two-year budget, but financial market volatility could continue. Short-term market fluctuations aside, the trend in rates is clearly upward after spending years near historic lows.” Mortgage rates tend to follow the same path as long-term bond yields, which have been steadily climbing. The yield on the 10-year Treasury has climbed about 40 basis points since the start of the year on fears of escalating inflation and concerns about Federal Reserve rate hikes. Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that most of the experts it surveyed say rates will continue to move higher in the coming week. Michael Becker, branch manager of Sierra Pacific Mortgage, is one who predicts rates will go up. Meanwhile, mortgage applications were flat last week, according to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association. The market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — ticked up 0.7 percent from a week earlier. The refinance index rose 1 percent, while the purchase index was unchanged from a week ago.

REFINANCING DOWN The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 46.4 percent of all applications, falling to its lowest level since July. “Even with the rate increase, there was little change in refinance application volume for the week,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA chief economist. “However, there has been little change in refinance application volume over the last month or frankly over the last year. We seem to be at or close to a floor with respect to refinances.” “February is really the kickoff for the spring buying season each year,” he said. “This week, we saw a 7 percent increase in purchase applications. However, that just represents typical seasonal growth at this time of year, so on an adjusted basis, purchase volume was flat. On a [year-overyear] basis, purchase volume was up 8 percent, consistent with the strong reading we received on the job market on Friday.” The MBA also released its mortgage credit availability index (MCAI) this week that showed credit availability increased in January. The MCAI rose 2.1 percent to 182.9 last month. A decline in the MCAI indicates that lending standards are tightening, while an increase signals they are loosening. “Credit availability increased across the board in January, more than reversing December declines in almost all component indices,” Lynn Fisher, MBA’s vice president of research and economics, said in a statement. “Jumbo credit programs rebounded most strongly and reached a new series high, driven by an increase in the number of programs with reduced documentation requirements. In government lending programs, credit availability remains somewhat lower than the rest of 2017.”

This rendering from PGAV shows its renovation at 200 North Broadway.

PGAV is renovating and expanding its downtown studio. The $3.2 million project will nearly double the firm’s space at 200 North Broadway to create innovative workspace to accommodate recent staff expansion.

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Construction group elects Bouquet board president Jennifer Bouquet, president of J&J Boring, was elected 2018 president of the SITE Improvement Association’s board of directors. Bouquet, who succeeds Mike Kappal of Byrne & Jones Construction, is the first woman to lead the board in its 52-year history. SITE is an independent construction trade association representi n g 2 0 0 Bouquet co n t ra c tors and businesses associated with the construction industry in eastern Missouri. In addition, Todd Wall, vice president of estimating for J.M. Marschuetz, was elected vice president of the board, and Michael Steiniger, president of Kuesel Excavating Co., was elected secretary/treasurer.

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The St. Louis chapter of the American Institute of Architects elected Barbara Anderson-Kerlin of HOK as 2018 president. Other oicers include Lucy Williams of Lucy Williams, Architect, as vice president and president-elect; Steve Anton of Anton Architecture as past-president; Marcus Moomey of KAI Design & Build as secretary; and William Albinson of Etegra Inc. as treasurer. Post Holdings Inc. promoted Steve Schonhof to senior vice president of Integrated Supply Chain for its Michael Foods and Bob Evans Foods businesses.

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Anders CPAs + Advisors promoted Michael R. Staford to chief operating oicer. Dave M. Finklang and Brent E. McClure were promoted to principals in the Tax Services Group, and Jason N. Gotway was promoted to solutions architect in the Technology Services Group. Armstrong Teasdale named Mark L. Stoneman as the leader of Corporate Services. Contegix hired Chuck Cioi as chief inancial oicer. The UP Cos. added Karl Lederman as general manager, service and ield operations, for Power UP Electrical Contractors. Kevin P. Green was promoted to partner at Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli PC.

BUSINESS CALENDAR MONDAY NONPROFIT • SCORE presents this workshop on starting and operating a nonproit business. •5:30 p.m. — 8:30 p.m.; Fontbonne University, 6800 Wydown Boulevard, Anheuser-Busch Hall, Room 206, St. Louis •$35 preregistered, $45 at the door. Register: http://conta.cc/2EbdFR7 PRICING STRATEGY • SCORE presents this workshop for business owners on price strategy. •6 p.m. — 9 p.m.; Fontbonne University, 6800 Wydown Boulevard, Anheuser-Busch Hall,

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF LISA BROWN JACOB BARKER MIKE FAULK BRIAN FELDT BRYCE GRAY SAMANTHA LISS DAVID NICKLAUS MARK SCHLINKMANN

The renovation involves the 10th and 11th floors of the building used by two of the firm’s divisions, PGAV Destinations and PGAV Planners. The general contractor for the project is ISC Contracting.

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Business editor Economic development Business of sports and civic agencies Retail and inancial institutions Energy and environment Business of health Business columnist Transportation and real estate

314-340-8127 314-340-8291 314-340-8656 314-340-8528 314-340-8307 314-340-8017 314-340-8213 314-340-8265

To e-mail a staf member, use the irst initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Zak Co. hired Ashley N. Jenkins as a marketing coordinator. Room 208, St. Louis •$35 preregistered, $45 at the door. Register: http://conta.cc/2FIqlf9

TUESDAY TAX REFORM • Commercial Real Estate Women hosts this luncheon program looking at the impact of tax reform on the commercial real estate industry. •11:30 a.m. — 1 p.m.; Slate, 1015 Locust Street, St. Louis •$45 for members, $65 for nonmembers. For more information: https://crewstl.org/ events/luncheon/2018-02-13-luncheon

Alex Gurdian joined Heideman Associates as a mechanical engineer. Delores Hardwick was promoted to chief of staf for Grace Hill Settlement House. Steven F. Damm joined Murphy Co. as senior engineer in its Institutional Engineering Group. Kaitlyn Knickmeyer was hired as receptionist. Aegion Corp. added Brian Groody as president of its Corrosion Protection platform.

Find out what Jim Gallagher and David Nicklaus have to say on this week’s episode of “The Bottom Line.” stltoday.com/watch


MARKET WATCH

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks sank again Thursday, pulling down the Dow Jones industrial average by more than 1,000 points for the second time in four days. The Dow and the Standard & Poor’s 500 index are now down more than 10 percent from their all-time highs, set Jan. 26.

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HIGH 24903.68 10560.07 663.69 12701.88 7073.99 2685.27 1865.39 27872.53 1511.21

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

LOW 23849.23 10159.60 647.86 12270.65 6776.77 2580.56 1801.28 26819.56 1463.74

CLOSE 23860.46 10159.60 647.90 12270.65 6777.16 2581.00 1801.29 26822.11 1463.79

CHG. -1032.89 -400.99 -9.86 -416.53 -274.83 -100.66 -61.25 -1002.75 -44.18

%CHG. WK -4.15% t -3.80% t -1.50% t -3.28% t -3.90% t -3.75% t -3.29% t -3.60% t -2.93% t

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CHG

Crude oil

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

61.15 1.7650 192.13 2.697

-.64 -.0010 -1.00 -.005

Cotton

YTD -3.47% -4.27% -10.43% -4.20% -1.83% -3.46% -5.22% -3.50% -4.67%

365.75 987.75 456.25 CLOSE

ICE

A

Mar 18 Mar 18 Mar 18

147.25 125.77 73.40 13.47 307.20

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

D

CHG

DATE

Milk

2,500

CLOSE

Mar 18 Feb 18 Feb 18 Feb 18 Feb 18

Copper

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

42.70 35.57 -1.36 -3.7

-8.5

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 23.91

-6.0 +18.0 19

Amdocs

DOX

58.29

71.37 63.79 -1.01 -1.6

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.81

64.89 52.59

-.60 -1.1 -10.8 +9.9 20 1.83f Lee Ent

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

49.34 35.81

-.42 -1.2 -14.0

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

-.10 -0.4

105.61 126.50 103.60 -3.47 -3.2 60.13

99.53 86.00 -1.27 -1.5

-8.9 13

-7.7 +31.8 11

-.31 -3.2 +15.5 +10.9

1.60 Lowes 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

-7.1 +13.7

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

7.52

BAC

22.07

32.67 29.74 -1.51 -4.8

Belden Inc

BDC

64.60

87.15 66.88 -4.42 -6.2 -13.3 +15.2 12

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

... Home Depot

6

+0.7 +42.5 19

1.40 MasterCard

12.05

8.30

-.05 -0.6

GM

... McDonald’s

-9.8 -32.8 18

46.76 40.75 -1.64 -3.9

-0.6 +19.8 dd

1.52

-4.4 +51.3 25

3.56

31.92

LEE

5.00

9.24

6.15

1.75

3.10

2.40

-.12 -1.9 ...

...

LOW

70.76 108.98 95.01 -4.91 -4.9

MNK

15.91

-7.5 +10.9

6

...

+2.1 -23.0

5

...

+2.2 +48.7 21

1.64

55.33 15.88 -1.14 -6.7 -29.6 -55.7

MA

107.54 177.11 160.62 -8.11 -4.8

MCD

...

+6.1 +54.6 37

1.00 4.04

125.27 178.70 158.97 -6.74 -4.1

-7.6 +47.3 27

MON 107.27 123.15 119.08 -1.33 -1.1

+2.0 +13.6 21

0.20 Olin

OLN

27.79

38.84 30.97 -2.08 -6.3 -13.0 +44.4

BTU

22.58

41.17 37.61 -2.70 -6.7

-4.5

SKIS

4.00

5.25 +.05 +1.0

-2.8

... Peak Resorts

6.20

9

...

2.16 0.80 0.28

CAL

22.39

34.34 28.23

-.63 -2.2 -15.7 +8.2 14

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

16.20

20.29 18.50

-.18 -1.0

-3.0 +12.2 36

...

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

53.23

65.00 54.85

-.77 -1.4

0.96 Post Holdings

POST

72.19

89.04 72.94

-.73 -1.0

-7.9

...

-1.5 28

Centene Corp.

CNC

65.03 112.42 100.36 -4.02 -3.9

-0.5 +77.8 19

... ReinsGrp

RGA

Charter

CHTR 308.30 408.83 348.65 -14.90 -4.1

+3.8 +19.6 cc

... Reliv

RELV

Citigroup

C

80.70 71.87 -3.12 -4.2

-3.4 +39.9 14

+0.2 +16.2 20 0.94f Stifel Financial

56.55

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

59.72 55.95 -1.52 -2.6

Edgewell

EPC

50.50

82.06 49.45 -3.01 -5.7 -16.7 -23.5 12

Emerson

EMR

56.77

74.45 66.40 -2.56 -3.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

Enterprise Financial EFSC Esco Technologies Express Scripts

1.28 Spire Inc ... Target Corp.

SR

121.93 165.12 146.45 -6.67 -4.4 3.72 60.09

13.77

5.35

-6.4 cc

-6.1 +31.9 13 2.00f

-.07 -1.3 +12.2 +28.1 dd

SF

41.93

68.76 59.49 -3.20 -5.1

-0.1 +37.0 19

0.40

TGT

48.56

78.70 71.11 -2.14 -2.9

+9.0 +23.2 15

2.48

102.12 135.53 109.28 -2.63 -2.4

-8.3 +19.4 18

3.32

62.86 52.92 -1.53 -2.8 +10.3 +14.7 18

1.16 US Bancorp

USB

49.54

58.50 52.65 -2.15 -3.9

-1.7 +13.6 15 1.20f

36.65

49.68 46.45 -1.15 -2.4

+2.9 +25.4 19

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

41.83 33.95 -1.33 -3.8

-3.5 +17.3 20

ESE

50.30

66.80 61.55 -2.95 -4.6

+2.2 +14.2 20

0.32 Verizon

54.77 49.04 -1.97 -3.9

ESRX

55.80

83.49 73.35 -1.60 -2.1

-1.7 +10.7 12

4.17 +.07 +1.7

-4.6 -43.3 dd

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

3.53 12.20

7.50

16.39 12.23

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-.42 -3.3 -13.2 +10.2 15 0.24a Wells Fargo

-7.3 +3.6

0.20

VZ

42.80

WMT

67.56 109.98 100.02 -2.83 -2.8

7

2.36

+1.3 +57.7 22

2.04

WBA

63.82

88.00 68.22 -3.31 -4.6

-6.1

-6.6 14

1.60

WFC

49.27

66.31 55.40 -2.14 -3.7

-8.7 +20.5 13

1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Twitter posts irst quarterly proit • Twitter made money for the irst time in its nearly 12-year history. Twitter’s user base pales compared with Facebook and the Facebook-owned Instagram, and that means fewer advertising opportunities. Thursday, San Francisco-based Twitter said it had an average of 330 million monthly active users in the inal three months of last year, unchanged from the previous quarter. By contrast, Facebook has 2.2 billion and Instagram has more than 800 million. Twitter grew revenue by 2 percent to $732 million in the inal three months of 2017. That’s above the $687 million that analysts polled by FactSet were expecting. Its net income — a irst — was $91 million, or 12 cents per share. Adjusted earnings were 19 cents — ahead of analyst expectations of 14 cents. The San Francisco company’s stock jumped $3.27, or 12 percent, to close Thursday at $30.18. It peaked during the day at $35, its highest level since 2015. CVS Health eyes wage boosts with tax beneit • CVS Health’s fourth-quarter earnings nearly doubled, fueled by a $1.5 billion tax beneit. The company said Thursday that it will use the break it gets from the recently completed federal tax overhaul to raise starting pay for its hourly workers and pare debt ahead of its planned, $69 billion acquisition of the insurer Aetna. CVS also announced Thursday that it was raising its starting wage for hourly workers to $11 an hour from $9. It will not increase health insurance premiums for the 2018-2019 plan year, and it will start a parental leave program that gives full-time employees with a new baby four weeks of at full pay. In the fourth quarter, the company earned $3.29 billion. Revenue climbed 5 percent to $48.38 billion. New Brazilian steakhouse planned at the Galleria • Texas de Brazil, a chain of Brazilian-American steakhouse with nearly 50 locations nationwide, plans to open its irst Missouri restaurant at the St. Louis Galleria. The Richmond Heights City Council on Feb. 5 approved a liquor license request for the restaurant in the former location of a string of restaurants that have opened and closed, including Casa del Mar, Vida and Houlihan’s. According to its Facebook page, the restaurant will open later this month. Amazon adding free Whole Foods delivery • Amazon delivery is coming to

Whole Foods, but not yet in St. Louis. The online retailing giant plans to roll out two-hour delivery at the organic grocer this year to those who pay for Amazon’s $99-a-year Prime membership. The move is the latest by Amazon to put its stamp on its recent purchase of Whole Foods. Amazon has cut prices on bananas, yogurt and other items, and began selling Kindle e-readers in some of its 470 stores. Initially, delivery service is available only in Austin, Texas; Cincinnati; Dallas; and Virginia Beach, Va. Amazon says it will be nationwide this year. Shoppers will be able to order meat, seafood and other grocery items through Amazon’s Prime Now app and website. Seattle-based Amazon says there’s no extra fee for two-hour deliveries above $35, but one-hour delivery will cost $8. PepsiCo takes on LaCroix • PepsiCo Inc. is bringing its marketing muscle to the sparkling-water craze with a new drink aimed squarely at LaCroix, the upstart market leader. Called Bubly, the drink will come in eight lavors and hit stores at the end of February. PepsiCo will advertise the product with two television ads on March 4 during the Academy Awards, one of the most-watched television events of the year. The Purchase, N.Y.-based beverage giant said the Bubly launch will be one of its biggest ever. LaCroix, which is produced by National Beverage Corp., doesn’t use traditional mass-media advertising. It built its consumer base through aggressive retail marketing and social media, said Duane Stanford, executive editor of BeverageDigest, the trade journal that irst reported on PepsiCo’s plans. The sparking-water category is growing by double digits annually, with LaCroix boosting volume by 63 percent in 2016, Stanford said. Sparkling water is attractive for PepsiCo and rival Coca-Cola Co. The two industry leaders are pushing their portfolios beyond their namesake soft drinks as consumers are increasingly looking for more healthful products with less sugar. Per capita carbonated softdrink consumption fell to a 31-year low in the U.S. in 2016, according to Beverage Digest. Meanwhile, bottled water consumption has been on the rise. PepsiCo launched a new still bottledwater brand, Lifewtr, last year. The maker of Mountain Dew and Gatorade aims for two-thirds of its global beverage portfolio to have 100 calories or fewer from added sugars per 12-ounce serving by 2025. From staf and wire reports

PREV

.0501 .7799 .3044 1.3922 .7943 .1580 1.2263 .0155 .2858 .009188 .053020 .0171 .0823 .000912 1.0668

.0508 .7825 .3056 1.3879 .7955 .1595 1.2276 .0156 .2864 .009140 .053430 .0174 .0833 .000918 1.0609

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1316.90 16.31 978.40

Gold Silver

+5.30 +.10 -3.30

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note slipped to 2.83 percent Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

4.50 4.25 3.75

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.54 1.72 1.89 2.11 2.57 2.76 2.83 3.13

... ... ... -0.02 +0.01 +0.02 -0.01 +0.02

.53 .61 .77 1.15 1.80 2.12 2.34 2.95

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

1.38 1.13 .63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.84 3.06 6.02 3.76 3.56 .74

+0.02 +0.05 -0.07 +0.06 +0.05 +0.06

1.64 2.57 5.72 3.96 3.31 .37

...

UPS

... WalMart

PE: 130.9 Yield: ...

82.85 63.60 +.75 +1.2 -15.4 +9.7 18 2.25f

1.94 UPS B

-4.7 +28.5 25

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

0.12p

-0.3 dd

Caleres Inc.

-5.8

$94.89

Platinum

139.05 207.61 181.22 -10.07 -5.3

F

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

0.48 Monsanto Co

166.35 361.45 329.66 -16.75 -4.8 +11.8+116.0 34 6.84f Peabody Energy 7.25

52-WK LO HI

TKR HD

$32.43

Interestrates Interestrates

-2.6 +18.8 17 1.00f Huttig Building Prod HBP

Bank of America

12.30

9.47

-4.4 13 2.00f General Motors

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 13.6m (10.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $7.7 b

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

N

ExchangeRates

DATE

CHICAGO MERC

Live cattle

2,600

S

$25.73

Feeder cattle Hogs

A

60

F

Futures

2,700

22,000

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 34.4m (5.4x avg.) PE: 12.1 Mkt. Cap: $7.1 b Yield: 3.1%

CHICAGO BOT

24,000 23,000

N

$18.90

PE: 28.5 Yield: ...

Close: 2,581.00 Change: -100.66 (-3.8%)

2,560

26,000

F

S&P 500

2,720

27,000

D J 52-week range

Vol.: 10.2m (11.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.7 b

PE: ... Yield: ...

2,880

10 DAYS

N

$52.12

$35.00

Close: 23,860.46 Change: -1,032.89 (-4.1%)

23,760

F

GRUB

Close: $89.04 19.13 or 27.4% The online food-ordering service announced a partnership with Yum Brands, the owner of KFC and Taco Bell. $90

$100

Dow Jones industrials

25,200

GrubHub

HBI

Close: $19.57 -2.39 or -10.9% The apparel maker’s fourth-quarter profit and annual forecast fell short of analyst expectations.

30

Vol.: 162.0m (7.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $22.4 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Hanesbrands

IRBT

Close: $59.80 -28.24 or -32.1% The robotics company’s profit forecast for 2018 disappointed investors.

$40

$14.12

26,640

iRobot

TWTR

Close: $30.18 3.27 or 12.2% The social media company posted its first-ever quarterly profit and its sales grew.

GlobalMarkets INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

2581.00 12260.29 7170.69 30451.27 5151.68 47862.11 21890.86 81532.53 15065.61 8763.11

CHG

CHG

YTD

-100.66 -330.14 -108.73 +128.07 -104.21 -1114.35 +245.49 -1234.20 -264.97 -211.90

-3.75% -2.62% -1.49% +0.42% -1.98% -2.28% +1.13% -1.49% -1.73% -2.36%

-3.46% -5.09% -6.73% +1.78% -3.03% -3.02% -3.84% +6.72% -7.05% -6.60%

AC Hotel looks to lock up old Clayton police site

RENDERING COURTESY OF CITY OF CLAYTON

Investors in the AC Hotel planned for Clayton include Montana-based developer HomeBase and Rusty Keeley, of St. Louis-based L. Keeley Construction.

Development group iles plans for 12-story, 218-room facility BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-dispatch

New plans filed with the city of Clayton show a 12-story, 218-room AC Hotel on the site of the old Clayton Police Department headquarters at 227 South Central Avenue. Montana developer HomeBase and Rusty Keeley, CEO of St. Louis-based L. Keeley Construction, are behind the project. The development group agreed to acquire the property from the city of Clayton for $2.37 million in September. The project is expected to cost $45 million. A conceptual review of the mixed-use development will be Feb. 20 at the city’s Plan Commission and Architectural Review Board. The project will include a fitness center, meeting space and rooftop patio and bar.

Clayton first sought private development plans for the building next to the MetroLink station in the summer of 2015. It followed up with a second request for proposals in February and received four responses by April. The city also plans on subleasing 100 of its parking spaces in the Shaw Park garage to accommodate hotel guests. The former police headquarters has been vacant since the department moved to 10 South Brentwood Boulevard about five years ago. HomeBase and Keeley plan to build a $40 million AC Hotel in the Central West End just north of Lindell Boulevard next to the Chase Park Plaza. The building that used to house the KPLR studio just behind the York House will come down to make way for the project, and a surface parking lot will be removed. An AC Hotel is also planned for the $104 million overhaul of the Jefferson Arms building in downtown St. Louis. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

Will tax cut mean worker bonuses? Small businesses operate on tighter margins, still aren’t sure how changes to law will afect them BY JOYCE M. ROSENBERG AP Business Writer

Small business owners may want to hand out bonuses and raises now that there’s a new tax law, but many don’t know if they’ll have any wealth to share. “We didn’t base any raises or bonuses on the tax situation because, quite frankly, until it actually happens, no one’s sure what’s going to happen,” says Rod Hughes, a vice president at Kimball Hughes Public Relations in Blue Bell, Pa. The company gave its seven full-time employees year-end bonuses last month. It’s easier for big companies such as Walmart and Home Depot to award bonuses because they already know their top tax rate is dropping to 21 percent from 35 percent under the old law. Millions of small business owners have far less certainty. The law provides for a break for the owners of sole proprietorships, partnerships and small businesses structured as what are called S corporations. But while they can deduct 20 percent of their business income, the size of the deduction declines when an individual owner’s taxable income reaches $157,500. And the IRS still needs to issue regulations on how these owners’ business income is calculated. “The 20 percent deduction is extremely complex

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Andrew Tjernlund, co-owner of Tjernlund Products in White Bear Lake, Minn., has given raises and bonuses, mindful of the need to recruit and retain talented workers.

and it’s going to require a complete understanding of how the statute works,” says William Hornberger, an attorney with tax expertise at the firm Jackson Walker in Dallas. Big companies also have an advantage because they have billions of dollars in cash reserves. Small and mid-size businesses often don’t have such cushions or access to big lines of credit that can help pay operating costs if revenue slows. Giving bonuses or raises in response to a potential tax cut could leave smaller companies vulnerable to a cash flow crisis. Even when tax professionals have more clarity about the law, small and

mid-sized companies are likely to hold off. Owners typically give raises at the end of the year or early in the new year, after they have assessed how employees and the company overall have performed. If owners have a sense of what their revenue and profits will be in the year ahead, that goes into the mix as well. Mark Carpenter has consulted both of his accounting firms about the law, and gotten different opinions about its potential impact on his roofing company. “We need to see how the rules change and if it allows us to raise wages,” says Carpenter, whose business, Columbia Roofing & Sheet

Startup gets bang for St. Louis buck NICKLAUS • FROM B1

Michael, 30, a former professional pole vaulter, continued to argue for L.A. until he visited St. Louis for the first time last fall. He quickly changed his mind. “The one thing I was really concerned about, and the reason the L.A startup tech scene is so successful, is the culture around it,” Michael Seaman said. “People work really hard, but they have fun doing it. I found out you have all the same stuf here.” SwipeSum is now based at the Industrious coworking space on Washington Avenue. Michael Seaman moved to St. Louis in January and found himself quickly invited to meetings with other tech startups, with potential investors and with Clearent, a Clayton-based creditcard processor. After a few weeks here, Michael Seaman is convinced that the business will grow faster than if he had stayed in California. “We have pretty aggressive plans,” he said. “This move now looks like a nobrainer.” SwipeSum is seeking to raise $2.5 million in seed capital and getting ready to hire a sales staff. Stephen Seaman said he expected

Metal, is based in Tualatin, Ore. He has already given employees raises and bonuses based on the company’s performance, but needs to be careful with cash flow because the business is growing rapidly. It’s not known exactly how many companies overall have awarded raises or bonuses based on the law. The most recent report on employee wages from payroll company ADP covers the fourth quarter of 2017 and doesn’t reflect the impact of the law. But the first-quarter report also may not reveal any trends because it won’t specify the factors that go into higher pay, spokeswoman Allyce Hackmann says.

U.S. airlines cut involuntary passenger bumping to record low BY ALANA WISE reuters

SwipeSum founders Michael and Steven Seaman visit Urban Chestnut Brewing Co. in a scene from their video.

to hire the first employee soon and to have between 10 and 12 employees by the end of this year. As SwipeSum recruits, the brothers hope to stand out by giving each employee a MacBook laptop and $2,000 annual vacation stipend. SwipeSum’s software lets merchants set up an auction in which creditcard processors bid for their business. Michael Seaman, who worked in the industry for several years, says he’s trying to bring transparency and cost savings to what is often a business’ secondlargest expense, after labor. “The whole industry is built around hiding as much margin as possible,” he explains. “There’s no way for business owners, without a lot of research, to find the best holistic solution and best rate for their

business.” To introduce their business to St. Louis, the brothers created a video in which they visit Busch Stadium, the Fox Theatre and other local attractions. The video starts with Michael saying, “I just moved to St. Louis from sunny California, and it’s (bleep) cold.” Later, he calls St. Louis “the most ideal spot to plant our roots” and says SwipeSum has “aspirations of being the most dynamic tech startup in St. Louis.” Michael Seaman says he was gratified to see the video get 10,000 views the day it was posted. As he’s finding out, St. Louis is the kind of town where everybody wants to meet, and ask if they can help, the new startup kid on the block. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

lafer, whose dealerships are located in Flemington, N.J. It’s worth noting that many of the big corporations gave one-time bonuses, not permanent raises. So if the tax cut turns out to be less of a boon than expected, or the companies have a bad year, they’re not committed to higher compensation going forward. But the prospect of a tax cut does help some owners feel more secure about increasing staffers’ pay. Tjernlund Products has given raises and bonuses, mindful of the need to recruit and retain talented workers in Minnesota’s tight labor market; the state’s unemployment rate is a full percentage point below the national rate of 4.1 percent. C o - ow n e r A n d rew Tjernlund doesn’t know what taxes will be like for the company that manufactures fans and ventilation equipment. But he sees the law as an opportunity to be a more competitive employer. “The tax cut allows us to invest more in our growing business,” he says. “In this low-unemployment environment, securing and rewarding our employees is the best use of this freedup money.” Hughes also believes tax savings can help his company in a tough labor market. “The war for talent is only going to get harder as we go along,” he says.

Many business owners say they don’t base decisions, including raises and bonuses, primarily on how much money they might save on taxes. Small business advisers say they’ve been seeing their clients holding to that conservative approach since the law went on the books in December. “The idea of giving more money to employees purely on speculation that you’re going to see more in your pocket, that’s counterintuitive,” says David Lewis, CEO of OperationsInc, a human resources provider based in Norwalk, Connecticut, whose clients are primarily small and midsized companies. Rob Basso is seeing raises being awarded by the clients of his company, Advantage Payroll Services, but he’s not hearing that the tax cut is a factor. “What they’re doing is sticking to the normal reasons for giving raises, like giving merit raises,” says Basso, whose company is based in Plainview, New York. Steve Kalafer has given the 700 employees of his car dealerships bonuses of up to $500 because Flemington Car & Truck Country Family of Brands will benefit from the corporate tax cut. But any further bonuses, or raises, will depend on how many cars his dealerships sell. “We don’t have a clear trend for the year,” says Ka-

U.S. airlines reduced the number of passengers involuntarily bumped from their seats on crowded planes to the lowest number on record in 2017, the U.S. Department of Transportation said on Thursday. U.S. carriers bumped passengers at a rate of just 0.34 per 10,000 passengers last year, nearly halving the rate of 0.62 per 10,000 set in 2016. Last year’s rate was the lowest since recordkeeping began in 1995, the Transportation Department said in a report. The improvement follows an industry pledge to overhaul overbooking policies after the forceful removal of a passen-

ger from an overbooked United Airlines flight last year sparked a worldwide backlash and calls for increased government oversight of airline regulations. Delta Air Lines, the second largest U.S. carrier by passenger traffic, recorded the fewest bumped passengers in 2017, at a rate of 0.05 denied boarding per 10,000. United, the No. 3 U.S. carrier, bumped passengers at a rate of 0.23 per 10,000 passengers. American Airlines, the country’s largest airline, had a rate of 0.38 per 10,000. While a record-breaking year for airline safety and performance, 2017 was also a time of reckoning for carrier customer service practices, after

a series of unflattering headlines and public relations nightmares shined a critical light on the industry. After the United Airlines incident and a subsequent congressional inquiry into the matter, major U.S. carriers announced changes to their booking policies. These included increasing the maximum pa sse n ge r i n ce n t ive for passengers to forgo their flights, which rose to nearly $10,000 in the cases of United and Delta. Southwest Airlines said the carrier would no longer overbook its flights. In 2017, Southwest bumped passengers at a rate of 0.53 per 10,000 passengers, ranking ninth out of 12 airlines measured.

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BUSINESS

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

Disappointing reports add to market jitters DOW • FROM B1

wages grew at a fast rate in January. That’s good for the economy, but investors worried it will hurt corporate profits and that rising wages are a sign of faster inflation. It could prompt the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates at a faster pace, which would act as a brake on the economy. “Far and away the most important things are the fear that the Fed is going to make a mistake, and higher wages are going to cut into margins,” said Scott Wren, senior global equity strategist for Wells Fargo Investment Institute. The worry, he said, is that the Fed will raise interest rates too quickly. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 1,032.89 points, or 4.1 percent, to 23,860.46. Boeing, Goldman Sachs and Home Depot took some of the worst losses.

The S&P 500, the benchmark for many index funds, shed 100.66 points, or 3.8 percent, to 2,581. It hasn’t been that low since mid-November. The Nasdaq composite fell 274.82 points, or 3.9 percent, to 6,777.16. Tom Martin, senior portfolio manager with Globalt Investments, said he didn’t see anything specific moving the market lower, just a continuation of a shift in investor mindset from fear of missing out in a rising market to worry of clocking big losses in a market that’s turned. “This is going to take longer to work out than people expect,” he said. “In January we talked about fear of missing out. What we have now is what I call fear of getting caught.” The losses were broad. Eight stocks fell for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange and 490 of the companies in the

S&P 500 took a loss. The market didn’t get much help Thursday from company earnings reports, several of which disappointed investors. While U.S. companies mostly did well at the end of 2017, a number of them had a weak finish to the year. Hanesbrands, which makes underwear, T-shirts and socks, reported a smaller profit than investors expected, and its forecast for the current year didn’t live up to analysts’ estimates either. The company also said it will pay $400 million to buy Australian retailer Bras N Things. The stock dropped $2.39, or 10.9 percent, to $19.57. IRobot, which makes Roomba vacuums, plummeted 32 percent after projected a smaller annual profit than Wall Street was expecting. The stock dropped $28.24 to $59.80.

Twitter had a banner day, soaring 12 percent after turning in a profit for the first time. Its fourth-quarter revenue was also better than expected. The stock rose $3.27 to $30.18. Online delivery company GrubHub soared after it announced a partnership with Yum Brands, the parent of Taco Bell and KFC. GrubHub will provide the delivery people and technology to let people order food from those restaurants. GrubHub jumped $19.13, or 27.4 percent, to $89.04. After a sharp loss Wednesday, benchmark U.S. crude lost 64 cents, or 1 percent, to $61.15 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, the international standard for oil prices, gave up 70 cents, or 1.1 percent, to $64.81 per barrel in London. Stocks in Europe declined and bond yields increased after the

Bank of England said could raise interest rates in coming months because of the strong global economy. That also sent the pound higher. Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 1.5 percent and the French CAC 40 lost 2 percent. Germany’s DAX declined 2.6 percent. Bond prices wobbled and turned higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.83 percent from 2.84 percent. Rising yields have made bonds more appealing to some investors compared to stocks. The yield on the 10-year note was as low as 2.04 percent as recently as September. In other commodities trading, wholesale gasoline remained at $1.77 a gallon. Heating oil lost 1 cent to $1.92 a gallon. Natural gas gave up 1 cent to $2.70 per 1,000 cubic feet. In Tokyo the Nikkei 225 index rose 1.1 percent.

If drug succeeds, Avadel may change business strategy DRUG • FROM B1

a great percentage of those who get up more than two, three, even four times, which clearly would be a handicap to getting a good night’s sleep.” Over the last few months, his drug company, Avadel, has hired about 100 individuals across the country to prepare for the launch of Noctiva. There are about 60 employees in the Chesterfield oice. Avadel’s products are not produced at the Chesterfield site, rather, they’re made by contract manufacturers in Europe and the U.S. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, it is the first drug to be approved to treat the overproduction of urine, which is technically known as nocturnal polyuria. While there are other products on the market that aim to alleviate issues related to urination, this is the first to stop overproduction of urine at nighttime. Anderson said many people who produce too much urine are treated with overactive bladder drugs or drugs to treat an enlarged prostate. Noctiva is a patent-protected nasal spray that can allow a patient to sleep four to six hours before needing to get up, Anderson said. In the coming weeks, 80 representatives across the country will start promoting the drugs in doctors’ oices.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Mike Anderson is the CEO of Chesterield-based Avadel Pharmaceuticals.

Anderson said people have come to accept that getting older means having to get up at night. “You don’t have to (get up), and that will be part of our message — it’s not just a factor of aging.” The launch will represent an important milestone in the company’s strategic plan. In September the company acquired Noctiva, thanks, in part, to the cash it generated from

turning unapproved, or legacy pharmaceutical products, into approved products. As the company finds success with products such as Noctiva, it will likely slowly retreat from that strategy, relying more heavily on the cash generated from the sale of the newly acquired products, Anderson said. The company’s biggest unapproved-to-approved success was with Bloxiverz, an intravenous

drug that is used in surgery to reverse the efects of a neuromuscular block, or a paralysis of the muscles. Today, Bloxiverz is the most frequently used drug of its kind. About 4 million vials of it are sold each year, according to an annual filing made with U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. In 2015, the drug generated $150 million in sales for Avadel after its approval by the FDA

in 2013. Sales have declined as competitors began to develop the same drug. In 2016, revenue generated from Bloxiverz declined to $83 million. “The unapproved-to-approved market was never designed to be a long-term solution, because you can’t protect the products and you’re susceptible to declining prices (in) no time at all,” Anderson said. “We knew that that’s not a long-term solution, but it has provided the cash to do the clinical study and to buy Noctiva.” Like many of his colleagues, Anderson worked for KV Pharmaceutical. It was there that he came up with his business model for Eclat, a company that he founded in 2010. “I had the business plan in the back of my head for a couple of years. I took it to New York and one week later three guys were willing to fund it,” he said. Eclat was later purchased by France-based Flamel Technologies and would later be renamed as Avadel. This will be an important year for Avadel, Anderson said. In addition to what it hopes will be a successful launch of Noctiva, the company is looking to complete a clinical trial for a new drug and will seek its fourth approval for an unapproved drug already on the market. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

Midas looks to cash infusion to expand its golden touch MIDAS • FROM B1

developed approximately $500 million worth of hotel properties across 14 states. The company is behind two high-profile projects soon to begin in midtown — the $25 million, 153-room Element by Westin on the site of the current Habitat for Humanity St. Louis headquarters at 3763 Forest Park Avenue, and the $28 million, 129-room Aloft Hotel in Cortex at 4245 Duncan Avenue. Habitat for Humanity St. Louis is moving its headquarters to a former grocery store property at the corner of South Grand Boulevard and Chippewa Street in south St. Louis. Midas also recently opened the $25 million dual-branded Residence Inn and Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott in Maryland Heights in January. The new fund, said co-founder and managing member J.T. Norville, is a “unique vehicle for our investors in St. Louis.” Approximately $5 million of the total fund has been raised to date, Norville said. “There are other real estate funds in St. Louis, but none that are strictly focused on the hotel sector,” he said. “With that type of capital, we’ll be going after bigger projects moving forward.” U.S. hotel transaction volume is expected to remain flat around $28 billion in 2018, according to research from real estate firm JLL. JLL found an increase in buying activity from private equity and institutional investors — more than 70 percent of hotel transactions worth $45 billion were acquired by such investors, up from 62 percent in 2014. Revenue per available room (RevPAR) and average daily rate (ADR) — two key metrics watched closely by industry experts — have risen in the St. Louis market from $73.55 and $108.18, respectively, in fiscal 2016 to $76.01 and $111.85

in fiscal 2018, according to data from the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission. Occupancy rates, meanwhile, have remained about flat. Midas, with nearly 900 employees nationwide, has steadily increased revenue over the last decade to $79.4 million in 2017. The MC Hotel Construction affiliate, which shares an office building in Maryland Heights with Midas, has grown rapidly since being founded in 2013 from just $1 million in its first year to $58.3 million last year. Both companies actually leveraged the economic recession between 2008 and 2010 to grow. “We started at an ideal time,” said Midas co-founder David Robert. “We didn’t have any old, ugly assets in our portfolio that would have to sufer through the recession, and we also had the opportunity to find some opportunities to buy assets low.” Robert said Midas is on track to grow into a 50-hotel portfolio company by 2020 with enterprise-wide revenue of $270 million and more than 1,500 employees. Gary Andreas, a hotel analyst with H&H Consulting, said Midas’ growth trajectory is similar to Drury Hotels, the St. Louisbased firm founded in the early 1970s that has more than $500 million in annual revenue. “Drury got started as a construction company and then started building limited service hotels,” Andreas said. Andreas said investors for hotels typically seek a company ready to act on several projects at once. “Midas has made that commitment and they’ve got the staff in-house to start on considerably larger properties than a lot of pure property management ownership companies do,” he said. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

This photo from Boeing shows two F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. The Navy has argued that it needs more of the planes designated F/A-18E/F to ill a shortage in its inventory.

If Super Hornet request approved, local plant may stay busy for years BOEING • FROM B1

presented Feb. 12 is likely to be welcomed in Congress, which has consistently added more Super Hornets than requested and resisted Pentagon plans under former President Barack Obama to phase out the older fighter. Lawmakers approved 12 of the aircraft in fiscal 2016 when none were requested and 12 more in fiscal 2017 when two were requested. This fiscal year, House and Senate appropriators have proposed adding 10 aircraft to the 14 requested. If Boeing “can get the cash for this, it’s very good news” because 24 aircraft per year is the minimum economic production rate to keep Boeing’s plant in north St. Louis County operating, Richard Aboulafia, military aircraft analyst for the Teal Group, said in an email. Boeing also is working with the Kuwaiti government to build as many as 32 F/A-18s for Kuwait over the next few years.

“The big question is: How long will the Navy sustain the line?” Aboulafia said. “But in the ‘here and now,’ this is very good news for one of Boeing’s most profitable programs.” The people familiar with the budget request asked not to be identified in advance of its release. Lt. Seth Clarke, a Navy spokesman, said in an email, “I can’t confirm a specific number” for any aircraft procurement in the coming budget. The fiscal 2019 request for the Super Hornets will be the largest since fiscal 2012, when the Navy asked for funds to buy 28 of the fighters. As president-elect in 2016, Trump upended years of Pentagon procurement practices with a tweet announcing he’d asked Boeing to price an upgraded Super Hornet as a potential replacement for what he called “the tremendous cost and cost overruns of the Lockheed Martin F-35.” While Defense Secretary Jim

Mattis ordered a review the next month pitting the F-35C against “an advanced Super Hornet,” no results were ever announced. Trump later switched to praise of the F-35, taking credit for cost reductions in a contract that was already under negotiation when he took oice. The president’s request appears to be in line with previous indications from the Navy that it was again looking to the Hornet to fulfill its mission. Last year, the military branch said it wanted to buy 80 Super Hornets over the next five years. Whether the president’s request for fiscal 2019 is ultimately approved by Congress is another matter. It has yet to officially pass the budget for fiscal 2018, which includes the funding for the original 24 Hornets. A spokesman for Boeing said the firm couldn’t comment until President Trump’s budget is officially released next week. The Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • C

DeJong hits all the right notes Shortstop inds balance through music BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. •

DERRICK GOOLD • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Paul DeJong prepares for Cardinals spring training on Thursday in Jupiter, Fla.

From an adjacent room came the sound of a performer warming up on a violin that had been molded and crafted several years before the U.S. Constitution. Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong stood close enough to hear and awaited the start of Wednesday’s concert by fielding questions about his brother’s contagious fondness for classical music. A student in Florida State’s master’s program for music theory, the younger, taller and

lither brother Matthew chose music over baseball, sound over fury; and Paul started listing the instruments his kid brother played: Oboe, piano … “And yours is?” came the question. “A baseball bat,” Paul said. With less than two weeks before the Cardinals’ first oicial full-squad workout — on Feb. 19 — DeJong, his agent, Burton Rocks and his agent’s parents attended a concert Wednesday featuring a string quartet from the Palm Beach Symphony. It was the second performance by See CARDINALS • Page C3

BLUES SHOW FIGHT Schenn has early bout, scores twice in win against Avalanche

INSIDE • C3

Wong OK with the bottom of the lineup

> Pitchers and catchers report Tuesday. > Cards chat: Talk baseball Monday at 1 p.m. STLtoday.com

Time lies for soccer standout Oklahoma State signs skilled Lawler

PAUL KOPSKY • Post-Dispatch

Anna Lawler is a two-time AllAmerican from Summit High.

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

recent teammate, Tom Brady, has a salary that averages $20.5 million a year. Garoppolo, a former second-round draft pick out of Eastern Illinois, earned approximately $3.5 million total in his first four years in the

Summit soccer star Anna Lawler has packed quite a bit into her first 18 years, so it probably shouldn’t be surprising that she cannot believe time flies much quicker than anybody ever expects. She had no idea how quickly the 2018 national letter of intent signing day would arrive when she committed to play soccer for Oklahoma State University in February 2016. It seems like only yesterday that she was breaking from the herd as a kindergartener for the Saint Margaret Mary Parish co-ed recreation soccer team. Wasn’t in just yesterday that she was the Post-Dispatch’s 2016 All-Metro Player of the Year? Has it really been a decade since multiple coaches made strong cases to include her on their rosters after her first select team tryout with St. Louis Soccer Club? Does she really have only one semester left to try to win a state title at Summit? Does she really have only one Elite Clubs National League national tournament remaining with her Scott Gallagher club team this summer? Time flies when you’re conquering the soccer world and shining in the classroom during an exceptional high school and select soccer career that has been

See NFL • Page C4

See ORTIZ • Page C8

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Avalanche left wing Gabriel Landeskog (left) fights with Blues center Brayden Schenn in the opening seconds of Thursday’s game.

BLUES 6 AVALANCHE 1 > 7 p.m. Friday at Jets, FSM > Bettman: St. Louis will get an All-Star Game at some point. C4 > HELPFUL ROOKIE: Vince Dunn is the first Blues rookie defenseman to record three assists in a game since Erik Johnson in January 2008 (Source: NHL).

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After Tuesday’s disheartening 6-2 loss to Minnesota, many wondered who among the Blues would drag the team into the fight. The answer, three seconds into Thursday’s game against Colorado: Brayden Schenn. The puck had barely dropped for the night’s proceedings when Schenn dropped gloves with Colorado captain Gabriel Landeskog. “I was wondering what was See BLUES • Page C4

Blues defenseman Carl Gunnarsson (left) tangles with Colorado Avalanche left wing Gabriel Bourque in the second period at Scottrade Center.

Garoppolo’s deal with 49ers is richest in NFL history BY MATT BARROWS The Sacramento Bee

SANTA CLARA, CALIF. • San

Francisco 49ers fans can exhale. Their team has locked up Jimmy Garoppolo with a longterm deal. The 49ers signed the quar-

terback to a five-year contract, the team announced Thursday evening. Garoppolo’s new contract is worth as much as $137.5 million, according to the NFL Network, which first reported the deal. That averages $27.5 million a year, making it the richest in NFL history. The

team planned a news conference for Friday. To put $27.5 million a year in perspective, Detroit quarterback Matthew Stafford’s deal — which he signed in August and which previously had been the NFL’s biggest — averages $27 million a year. Garoppolo’s

SPORTS

w w w. m i e s n e r s f l o w e r s . c o m

1 M

Win Her Over With Our Exquisite Flowes & hocolates! 9723 Clayton Road | St. Louis, MO 63124 |

(314) 567-6650


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 02.09.2018 • C

DeJong hits all the right notes Shortstop inds balance through music BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. •

DERRICK GOOLD • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Paul DeJong prepares for Cardinals spring training on Thursday in Jupiter, Fla.

From an adjacent room came the sound of a performer warming up on a violin that had been molded and crafted several years before the U.S. Constitution. Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong stood close enough to hear and awaited the start of Wednesday’s concert by fielding questions about his brother’s contagious fondness for classical music. A student in Florida State’s master’s program for music theory, the younger, taller and

lither brother Matthew chose music over baseball, sound over fury; and Paul started listing the instruments his kid brother played: Oboe, piano … “And yours is?” came the question. “A baseball bat,” Paul said. With less than two weeks before the Cardinals’ first oicial full-squad workout — on Feb. 19 — DeJong, his agent, Burton Rocks and his agent’s parents attended a concert Wednesday featuring a string quartet from the Palm Beach Symphony. It was the second performance by See CARDINALS • Page C3

BLUES SHOW FIGHT Schenn has early bout, scores twice in win against Avalanche

INSIDE • C3

Wong OK with the bottom of the lineup

> Pitchers and catchers report Tuesday. > Cards chat: Talk baseball Monday at 1 p.m. STLtoday.com

Time lies for soccer standout Oklahoma State signs skilled Lawler

PAUL KOPSKY • Post-Dispatch

Anna Lawler is a two-time AllAmerican from Summit High.

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

recent teammate, Tom Brady, has a salary that averages $20.5 million a year. Garoppolo, a former second-round draft pick out of Eastern Illinois, earned approximately $3.5 million total in his first four years in the

Summit soccer star Anna Lawler has packed quite a bit into her first 18 years, so it probably shouldn’t be surprising that she cannot believe time flies much quicker than anybody ever expects. She had no idea how quickly the 2018 national letter of intent signing day would arrive when she committed to play soccer for Oklahoma State University in February 2016. It seems like only yesterday that she was breaking from the herd as a kindergartener for the Saint Margaret Mary Parish co-ed recreation soccer team. Wasn’t in just yesterday that she was the Post-Dispatch’s 2016 All-Metro Player of the Year? Has it really been a decade since multiple coaches made strong cases to include her on their rosters after her first select team tryout with St. Louis Soccer Club? Does she really have only one semester left to try to win a state title at Summit? Does she really have only one Elite Clubs National League national tournament remaining with her Scott Gallagher club team this summer? Time flies when you’re conquering the soccer world and shining in the classroom during an exceptional high school and select soccer career that has been

See NFL • Page C4

See ORTIZ • Page C8

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Avalanche left wing Gabriel Landeskog (left) fights with Blues center Brayden Schenn in the opening seconds of Thursday’s game.

BLUES 6 AVALANCHE 1 > 7 p.m. Friday at Jets, FSM > Bettman: St. Louis will get an All-Star Game at some point. C4 > HELPFUL ROOKIE: Vince Dunn is the first Blues rookie defenseman to record three assists in a game since Erik Johnson in January 2008 (Source: NHL).

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After Tuesday’s disheartening 6-2 loss to Minnesota, many wondered who among the Blues would drag the team into the fight. The answer, three seconds into Thursday’s 6-1 victory against Colorado: Brayden Schenn. The puck had barely dropped for the night’s proceedings when Schenn dropped gloves with Colorado captain Gabriel Landeskog. “I was wondering what was See BLUES • Page C4

Blues defenseman Carl Gunnarsson (left) tangles with Colorado Avalanche left wing Gabriel Bourque in the second period at Scottrade Center.

Garoppolo’s deal with 49ers is richest in NFL history BY MATT BARROWS The Sacramento Bee

SANTA CLARA, CALIF. • San

Francisco 49ers fans can exhale. Their team has locked up Jimmy Garoppolo with a longterm deal. The 49ers signed the quar-

terback to a five-year contract, the team announced Thursday evening. Garoppolo’s new contract is worth as much as $137.5 million, according to the NFL Network, which first reported the deal. That averages $27.5 million a year, making it the richest in NFL history. The

team planned a news conference for Friday. To put $27.5 million a year in perspective, Detroit quarterback Matthew Stafford’s deal — which he signed in August and which previously had been the NFL’s biggest — averages $27 million a year. Garoppolo’s

SPORTS

w w w. m i e s n e r s f l o w e r s . c o m

2 M

Win Her Over With Our Exquisite Flowes & hocolates! 9723 Clayton Road | St. Louis, MO 63124 |

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SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Friday 2/9 at Jets 7 p.m. FSM

Sunday 2/11 vs. Penguins 11:20 a.m. KSDK (5)

Tuesday 2/13 at Predators 7 p.m. FSM

Friday 2/16 at Stars 7:30 p.m. FSM

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 2/10 vs. La Salle 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/17 at Richmond 5 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/20 at Dayton 8 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/24 vs. George Washington 7 p.m., FSM

M 1 • FRIDAY • 02.09.2018

MEDIA VIEWS

A Costas-less Olympics begins He’s ‘100 percent glad’ to have done, now be done, with them

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 2/10 vs. Mississippi St. 1 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 2/13 vs. Texas A&M 6 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 2/17 at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN or ESPN2

Tuesday 2/20 vs. Mississippi 8 p.m. ESPN2

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Sunday 2/11 vs. Penn State 6 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 2/14 at Indiana 7:30 p.m. BTN

Sunday 2/18 vs. Nebraska 2:30 p.m. BTN

Tuesday 2/20 at Michigan State 6 p.m. ESPN or ESPN2

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sat. 2/10: vs. Cedar Rapids, 7:05 p.m. Sun. 2/25: vs. Monterrey, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 5 p.m. NHRA: Lucas Oil NHRA Winternationals, qualifying, FS1 BASKETBALL 5 p.m. College: Toledo at Miami (Ohio), CBSSN 6 p.m. NBA: Clippers at Pistons, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Davidson at Rhode Island, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Princeton at Harvard, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. College: Minnesota at Indiana, FS1 6:30 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Celtics, FSM Plus 7 p.m. College women: Marquette at Xavier, FS2 8 p.m. College: Detroit Mercy at Oakland, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Kent State at Ball State, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. NBA: Timberwolves at Bulls, ESPN GOLF 11 a.m. Champions: Boca Raton Championship, first round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Pebble Beach Pro-Am, second round, GOLF 10 p.m. European PGA: ISPS Handa World Super 6, third round, GOLF GYMNASTICS 6 p.m. College women: Alabama at Florida, SEC Network 7:30 p.m. College women: LSU at Missouri, SEC Network HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. College: Ohio State at Notre Dame, NBCSN 7 p.m. Blues at Jets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. College: St. Cloud State at Miami (Ohio), CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Minnesota at Wisconsin, BTN OLYMPICS • See listings on page C8 SOCCER 1:20 p.m. Bundesliga: Leipzig vs. Augsburg, FS2 TENNIS 6 p.m. College Tennis Georgia vs. Georgia Tech, Tennis Channel WRESTLING 6 p.m. College: Northwestern at Purdue, BTN

DIGEST Long-sufering Eagles’ fans finally get parade Philadelphia’s first Super Bowl parade provided catharsis Thursday for hundreds of thousands of Eagles fans, deliriously joyful after decades without a title and relishing the national spotlight. Fans clad in Eagles green jammed the streets from near the stadium to the rally at the city’s famed “Rocky” steps, lining up 20 deep in spots to catch a glimpse of the champs. The Eagles rode in open-top double decker buses in a parade nearly 60 years in the making. Center Jason Kelce gave voice to every frustrated Philly fan with an impassioned speech, saying, “We were a bunch of underdogs. Bottom line is we wanted it more!” (AP) Other NFL news • The Chiefs have cut 32-year-old cornerback Darrelle Revis, a move that was expected due to the incentive-laden, two-year contract he signed in November.... The Steelers overhauled a portion of their defensive coaching staf Thursday, hiring former Alabama assistant Karl Dunbar as defensive line coach and ex-UCLA defensive coordinator Tom Bradley as defensive backs coach. ... A person with knowledge of the situation confirms to The Associated Press the Indianapolis Colts have sought permission to interview Bufalo defensive coordinator Leslie Frazier for their head-coaching vacancy. (AP) Missouri softball season delayed • A mechanical issue on the plane scheduled to fly the Missouri softball team to Arizona forced the cancellation of the season opener scheduled for Thursday against San Jose State. The team, which flew out late Thursday, will open against UTEP at 12:30 p.m. Friday (St. Louis time) in the Kajikawa Classic in Tempe, Ariz. There are no plans to reschedule Thursday’s game. (Staf report) Ex-Oregon safety headed to Mizzou • The Missouri football team secured a commitment Thursday from former Oregon safety Khalil Oliver, who plans to play for Mizzou as a graduate transfer, he announced on Twitter. Oliver, who visited Mizzou last weekend, posted 73 tackles in 23 games at the Pac-12 school and started last season’s opener before sufering an injury. He decided to transfer during the season and was expected to graduate in December, allowing him to enroll elsewhere and play immediately. Oliver was Oregon’s special teams player of the year in 2016 when he started seven games and made 46 tackles. In September, he told The Oregonian that he hoped to receive a medical hardship waiver and have two years of eligibility at his next school. The Tigers can use a veteran in the secondary with the loss of senior starting FS Anthony Sherrils and might have another hole to fill should starting strong safety Kaleb Prewett not return. Prewett, a transfer from Kansas State, has been suspended indefinitely for violating undisclosed team rules. (Dave Matter) Alumni event highlights Ambush weekend • The St. Louis Ambush will celebrate 30 years of professional indoor soccer in St. Louis Saturday with a 5 p.m. alumni game featuring former Steamers, Storm and Ambush players against former players from their MISL and NPSL squads at Family Arena in St. Charles. The alumni game will be followed by a Major Arena Soccer League match between the Ambush and the Cedar Rapids Rampage (8-9) at 7:05 p.m. On Friday, the Ambush (2-15) play the Kansas City Comets (5-11) on the road. Last weekend, the visiting Comets defeated the Ambush 10-8 in St. Charles. (Joe Lyons)

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VIRGINIA SHERWOOD • NBC

Bob Costas (right) hands NBC’s prime-time Olympics hosting job to Mike Tirico after being in that role 11 times.

DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For people of a “certain age,” in their 50s or older, Jim McKay was the face of the Olympics on television. He anchored ABC’s coverage of six Games in the 1970s and ’80s after making his mark in 1972 with memorable reporting on the crisis in Munich, when 11 Israelis were murdered by Arab terrorists. To younger generations, Bob Costas is their McKay. As the Olympics migrated from ABC to NBC, with a few on CBS during the transition, Costas became the man. He served as prime-time host a record 11 times, beginning in 1992, and was involved in covering 12 Games after making his debut in the late-night hosting role in 1988 when the summer competition was held in South Korea. But no more. The Games this winter are back in South Korea, with the opening ceremony set for Friday, but Costas is not. It was announced a year ago that he was significantly reducing his workload at NBC, and ended his long run as its lead NFL host in the just-completed season. Now he is relinquishing his unprecedented Olympics run. So for the first time in three decades, Costas hasn’t been doing the arduous amount of preparation needed to be ready for not only what might happen in the Olympics field of competition but also for any unexpected political twists and turns. Those duties now fall to Mike Tirico, and Costas sounds as if he will enjoy being back on the other side of the television set. “I don’t think it will be a strange feeling because I made up my mind so long ago,” Costas, 65, said. “I knew I was going to step aside after Rio (in 2016), so I’m completely acclimated to this. I knew this is what I wanted to do with both the football and Olympics. I knew it for a long time. I miss the people I work with more than I miss the assignment.” He’s looking forward to tuning in from afar. “I’ll watch because so many of my friends and colleagues are involved,” he said. “I’ll keep an eye on it. Am I going to sit there tethered to the couch and watch every single minute? No. I’ll watch more than enough of it ... and I’m sure they’ll do a really good job. Tirico’s a very talented guy and he’s prepared hard for the assignment. The broadcast is in good hands.” And Costas is philosophical about his unparalleled run. “I view the Olympics as one of the great experiences of my life,” he said. “One of the centerpieces of my career. I had countless great experiences associated with it (in many) portions of the world, made lifelong friendships and had more memories than I can possibly recount. So I’m tremendously glad that I did it, and am satisfied that I did it long enough. I did 12 of them (overall), I left on my own terms and that’s a good feeling. “I don’t have any misgivings about it at all. It’s not 60-40 or 90-10. I’m 100 percent happy I did it, and I’m 100 percent glad that I stopped.” But he has not stopped as a broadcaster. He continues to have some assignments for NBC, with his next scheduled appearance on its Kentucky Derby coverage in May. And his greatly reduced NBC schedule has allowed him to increase his broadcasting workload with his favorite sport, baseball, on MLB Network. He is set to call about 20 games for it again this season, beginning with a YankeesBlues Jays contest on March 30 followed by the Cardinals home

opener, on April 5 against the Diamondbacks (that telecast figures be blacked out in St. Louis in favor of Fox Sports Midwest’s coverage). All this has led to Tirico, a former mainstay at ESPN before moving to NBC in 2016, assuming the prime-time role. For Friday’s opening ceremony, (7-10 p.m., KSDK, Channel 5 locally) he’ll be working with Katie Couric. “I’ve had the chance over 25, 30 years of doing this covering basketball and football, now to experience new sports, new athletes, it has been a thrill,” Tirico said on a recent conference call. “I was watching men’s skeleton on the Olympic Channel the other day, and I said, ‘What has happened to my life?’ But I loved it, and I was excited to watch it. That’s the joy of the Games.”

SCHLANGER SOARS St. Louisan Steve Schlanger will be covering the Olympics for the fourth time for NBC, calling biathlon and some alpine skiing competition. And he relishes the assignment. “Alongside the Super Bowl and soccer’s World Cup, the Olympics are the biggest stage in sports,” said Schlanger, who went to St. Louis University High and the University of Missouri. “It resonates in a way few events can. And even beyond sports, it is a massive television event. You know you are being watched by a huge national audience. As a broadcaster, that is an important responsibility. So it’s a huge honor to be given a platform like this as a broadcaster on one of the most exclusive events in all of sports television.” Schlanger is in the midst of a whirlwind run. He said he has not spent a weekend at home since early October and won’t do so again until early April. He called a lot of NBC’s World Cup alpine skiing events leading to the Olympics, did some U.S. Olympic Trials in other sports and also broadcasts college hockey and basketball. Then after the Olympics, he’ll work on NBC’s coverage of next month’s Paralympics in South Korea before being involved in NBC’s Tour de France coverage this summer, for the sixth time. “I really enjoy being part of a globally popular event,” he said. “It’s an honor to be involved in these one-of-a-kind experiences because they are so rare in the world of sports broadcasting. This is quite the journey and I’m enjoying every step.” Meanwhile, KSDK newscaster Rene Knott is at the Games filing reports for the station and had a pre-Olympics report from the DMZ that separates North and South Korea. TIME TRAVEL The major time difference between the United States and South Korea — St. Louis is 13 hours behind — actually isn’t bad for NBC, which will show many events in prime time in the U.S. That’s because competition that is going on at 10 a.m. there is taking place at 9 p.m. here. “Contrary to popular belief, the ... time difference works really great for live,” NBC Olympics President Jim Bell said on a recent conference call. “People initially think, gosh, it’s all the way on the other side of the world, but the time difference is ... right when many of the marquee events — figure skating, alpine, snowboarding — are going to be taking place.” NBC again will be streaming its coverage live throughout the Games, at NBCOlympics.com and on the NBC Sports app. And for the first time that will include the opening ceremony, with that coverage begins at 5 a.m. Friday. Coverage is spread among many NBCUniversal cable/satellite outlets in addition to NBC — NBCSN, USA, CNBC and Olym-

St. Louis is fourth-worst in Super Bowl TV ratings St. Louis and NBC just didn’t mix this NFL season. The local rating for Sunday’s Super Bowl telecast was worse than all but three of the 56 major markets in which Nielsen measures viewership electronically, and comes after St. Louis finished 47th for NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” telecasts in 2017. Nielsen says 41.6 percent of homes with a TV in the St. Louis market were tuned in, on average, to KSDK (Channel 5) on Sunday when it was airing NBC’s telecast of Philadelphia’s exciting 41-33 upset victory over New England. The only worse ratings among the major markets came in Los Angeles (41.0), Miami (38.7) and Salt Lake City (37.7). At the other end of the spectrum, Bufalo surprisingly led the way (56.4 rating), followed by Philadelphia (56.2) and Boston (55.9). The last time a Super Bowl drew a lower rating in St. Louis came more than a decade ago — the Indianapolis-Chicago matchup in February 2007 drew a 41.1 figure. And this year’s number was a significant fall from last year’s rating: 47.5, for New England’s overtime victory over Atlanta after trailing by 25 points. Nationally, the game generated a rating of 47.4, which was a drop of 3 percent from last year’s figure of 48.8. This year’s contest averaged 103.4 million viewers, a 7 percent dip from last year’s figure of 111.3 million (on Fox). A NEW SELECTION • For the first time since CBS began showing the unveiling of the NCAA Tournament field in 1982, the “Selection Sunday” show will be carried on another network this season. TBS, whose parent company Turner Broadcasting is in a partnership with CBS to televise the tourney through 2032, will show the participants and seedings being disclosed beginning at 5 p.m. March 11. It will take place in a two-hour production, something CBS tried two years ago and was widely panned for taking too long to fill the bracket. CBS went back to a shorter production last season to much better results. The format for this year’s program hasn’t been announced. TBS also will televise the national final and semifinal games this year, which it had two years ago for the first time before returning to CBS last season. Next year, CBS has the selection program, national semifinals and title game. Dan Caesar

pic Channel. Those channels are available in most subscription packages, though customers of Charter Spectrum, the largest pay-forprogramming provider in the St. Louis market, must have the “Silver package” to receive the Olympic Channel (at 245 and 807 on the Charter Spectrum lineup). It is dedicated to a lot of coverage of U.S. athletes, but has no live events scheduled.

BLUES BIZ The NHL isn’t interrupting its season this time for the Olympics, and NBC is managing to squeeze in a few games around its massive coverage of the Games. It has the Blues’ home contest Sunday against Pittsburgh, with its lead broadcast team of Mike ‘Doc’ Emrick (play-by-play) and Eddie Olczyk (analyst) in the booth. Blues commentator Darren Pang fills in for rinkside analyst/ reporter Pierre McGuire, who is covering the Olympics. NBC’s pregame show starts at 11 a.m., with the opening faceof set for 20 minutes later. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

NOTEBOOK Union will hold spring training in Bradenton for free agents The baseball players’ union will open its own spring training camp for the irst time since the end of the 1994-95 strike, inviting free agents to work out at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Union head Tony Clark said Thursday the camp will open Tuesday and workouts will start the following day under Bo Porter, the Houston Astros’ manager in 2013-14. The camp is scheduled to run through March 4, and the union has the option to extend the camp through the end of the month. More than 100 players who exercised their right to become free agents are without inal agreements. Agent Scott Boras, who represents 15 top-level free agents, isn’t sure whether his clients will work out at IMG or at his company’s facilities in North Miami, Fla., and Newport Beach, Calif. Duncan joins White Sox as consultant • The White Sox have hired longtime major league pitching coach Dave Duncan as a consultant. Duncan will evaluate video and provide feedback throughout the organization. He worked the past four years with the Arizona Diamondbacks as an assistant to the general manager and pitching consultant. Duncan spent a major league record 32 seasons as a pitching coach and was part of three World Series champions with Oakland and the Cardinals under Tony La Russa. He was also pitching coach with Cleveland, Seattle and the White Sox. Duncan coached four Cy Young Award winners: Chicago’s LaMarr Hoyt, Oakland’s Bob Welch and Dennis Eckersley, and the Cardinals’ Chris Carpenter. Wheeler wins, Grimm loses in arbitration • Righthander Zack Wheeler beat the Mets in salary arbitration and reliever Justin Grimm lost to the Chicago Cubs, leaving players with a 7-4 record in this year’s hearings. Wheeler gets a raise from $800,000 to $1.9 million instead of New York’s $1.5 million ofer. Grimm was given a hike from $1,825,000 to $2.2 million. He had asked for $2,475,000. Wheeler, 27, had Tommy John surgery on March 25, 2016, made one minor league appearance that August and returned to the Mets last spring. He went 3-7 with a 5.21 ERA in 17 starts last season while battling biceps tendinitis and a stress reaction in his right arm. Grimm, a 29-year-old righthander, was 1-2 with a 5.53 ERA in 50 relief appearances. Twelve players remain scheduled for hearings through Feb. 16. Associated Press

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

Wong OK with hitting 7th, 8th Second baseman also hopes to steal more in ’18 BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

JUPITER, FLA. • Unlike recent springs,

Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong sees no need in lobbying to bat leadof. Wong most likely will hit eighth, perhaps seventh once in a while, and he is content with it. He knows full well that Dexter Fowler is penciled in as Mike Matheny’s leadof hitter, and if it isn’t Fowler, then Matt Carpenter will assume the position. “I’m just stoked to be in the lineup,” Wong said Thursday at the Cardinals’ complex, where a couple dozen players went through informal workouts. “Honestly, I really do enjoy hitting seventh or eighth. “I feel like I have a really good grasp at how to succeed at that position. You really have to be thinking what you’re going to do hitting eighth. How many outs are there? What are you going to do if the pitcher is hitting behind you? If there’s a pinch-hitter behind you, how are you going to attack the at-bat?” The statistics bear out Wong’s success at hitting down in the lineup last year. He had a .414 on-base percentage and .299 average while hitting eighth in 33 starts and .420 and .347 batting seventh in 30

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Second baseman Kolten Wong expects to run more and score more this season.

starts. His on-base percentage overall was .376, well above his .323 career average, and his .285 batting average also was a career high. By contrast, his on-base average in 14 starts as a leadof man was just .324 and his batting average .254. Having adapted to batting at the bottom, Wong now looks to maximize his ability to steal bases, with the help of Willie McGee, who swiped 352 bases in his career but will be a full-time coach instead of only a spring training instructor. “When Willie would come around here, he would light guys up,” Wong said of McGee’s positive influence. “You know what this guy ofers. You know how good he was

as a player so everyone around here wants to see what we can learn from this guy. Seeing what he did on the bases ... I’m going to pick his brain on that.” Wong stole eight bases in 10 attempts last year and was perfect the year before but tried only seven times. He said he felt he should steal 20 bases “at least” this season, which would match his big-league high set in 2014. “Having a guy like Willie will open that up for us,” Wong said. “I’ve been a 20-stolen base guy my whole career (twice in the minors).” Having just eight last year “was not me,” Wong said. “But there were situations that came into play. Hitting eighth with the pitcher behind you, there’s times you can pick (to go) and times when you can’t. That played a lot into it. “You know the pitcher is up there to (bunt) you over, so stealing in that situation is not the best play because if they throw you out, it’s like, ‘Why would you do that? The pitcher is going to give himself up to get you over,’” Wong, 27, said. “But if my stolen bases aren’t going to be up, I’m definitely going to get my runs scored up.” Wong’s best runs scored total was 71 in 2015, the only year of five that he played more than 121 games in the majors. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

DeJong inds comfort in baseball and music CARDINALS • FROM C1

the symphony that DeJong had seen this ofseason, and he followed it with a meeting Thursday to brainstorm ways he could be more involved with the symphony’s philanthropic goals. DeJong, 24, is coming of a season where he won the Cardinals’ starting job at shortstop, hit a franchise record 25 homers for a rookie at that position, and finished second in the National League Rookie of the Year voting. His profile on the field is growing — which has him thinking about balancing his interests of of it, too. He wants both to stay in tune. “I enjoy the comfort of music,” DeJong said. “Growing up is really where I found that balance. I had it as a kid. Playing baseball and school were my main two. Playing an instrument when I was a kid was third. That rounded me out. I had to make a decision. I chose baseball over music, but it’s something I’ll always have because of what I had as a child. I want to

DERRICK GOOLD • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Paul DeJong (right) talks with Palm Beach Symphony principal cellist Claudio Jafe and concertmaster Evija Ozolins after a concert at the Palm Beach County History Museum.

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grow with it.” Along with fellow infielders Kolten Wong and Matt Carpenter, DeJong has reported early to the Cardinals’ Roger Dean Stadium facility to get work with coaches Jose Oquendo and Oliver Marmol and a feel for each other’s rhythm in the field. They want to harmonize, so to speak. DeJong and Wong are set to be the Cardinals’ everyday middle infield, and the team through word (comments) and deed (trades) have stood tall and bet big on DeJong having an encore. Including 48 games at Class AAA Memphis to start the year, DeJong hit 38 home runs and drove in 99 RBIs. Only two shortstops in the majors had a better slugging percentage than DeJong’s .515 at the position, and only four, including Francisco Lindor and Carlos Correa, had a higher OPS than DeJong’s .836. He produced like his predecessor, Aledmys Diaz, but only had an opening to do so when Diaz struggled in his second season. DeJong is entering his. “It’s my third spring training and all three have been vastly diferent,” he said. “First one was (prospect) camp. Second one was big-league camp. Third one – starter. To me, maybe the status has changed, but the preparation has to be the same. What I did last year worked so I’m going to focus on the same things and improve others. What I want to hear are my own expectations and my own thoughts and nothing external.” The production did bring attention, and this offseason DeJong got to scratch his science itch by filming a few experiments on Long Island for a New York news channel. He went on MLB Network and discussed the science of baseball during winter meetings. When he relocated to the Jupiter area to begin working out at the Cardinals’ facility, his agent, who has encouraged him to seek his outside interests — from biochem to ice fishing — invited him to the symphony. Rocks serves on the board of the Young Friends of the Palm Beach Symphony and knew of the DeJong family’s fondness for music. His brother would also choose the music for dinner. Classical. “I would have gone Metallica or Judas Priest,” DeJong joked. The accompaniment caught his ear and widened it to all genres of music. He sought out the meeting Thursday to discuss ways to link his interests — science and music — and perhaps funnel that into the symphony’s work with local youths. Rocks said the focus is on “areas where the economic plight is so great that there isn’t the access” to music. “Can we bridge that gap?” DeJong added. “Just because I wasn’t able to do it at a high level doesn’t mean I can’t foster it.” DeJong and his agent invited a reporter along to attend Wednesday’s performance, which was held in a courtroom built in 1916 that now is part of The Palm

Beach County History Museum. The concert featured three pieces, all with a Spanish influence and each bracketed around the history of a shipwreck that gave this area its name. On Jan. 9, 1878, the 175-ton Providencia grounded near modern day Mar-a-Lago, the president’s favorite getaway. Its cargo included 20,000 coconuts, which were claimed by pioneers and sold, 2 ½ cents per. The planting of these coconuts gave this region of Florida its palm trees — which were not native — and ultimately led to its cities’ names, from Palm Beach to West Palm Beach and beyond. Before each piece, a video encouraged the audience to “envision as you listen” and then gave three scenes from Palm Beach’s history. DeJong admitted, at times, he didn’t envision coconut-fueled beach parties or palm-lined gardens, but … baseball. “My mind does wander to baseball, somehow,” he said. “You always imagine walk-up songs, honestly. Is this what I’d like to hear walking up at Busch Stadium?” All three pieces featured a concertmaster, Evija Ozolins, playing an Antonion Gragnani violin made in 1782 — more than a century before the coconuts came to Palm Beach. One of the pieces, Luigi Boccherini’s Guitar Quintet No. 4 in D Major, G. 488 (Fandango), allowed the cellist to shine, whether it was scampering after the tempo set by the violins or even, at one point, recreating the sound of castanets. After the concert, DeJong posed for pictures with the musicians, shook hands, and talked with the cellist Claudio Jaffe about the Boccherini. A cellist himself, Boccherini wanted a piece to show of, and with a royal patron he was often asked to compose music to entertain.“He was the king’s human iPod,” Jafe told DeJong. There was a time, DeJong described at the performance, when he had music at his fingertips. He played the piano, and an injury kept him of the field and at the keys. He learned some Beethoven and learned to adore Polish composure Frederic Chopin. Evidently, only two performances in, word has spread. Moments before Wednesday’s concert started, another member of the audience leaned forward to ask DeJong a question. “Are you going to play?” said Karen Rogers, of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. “Will you be nervous?” It took DeJong a perplexed moment to realize she was not talking about baseball, rather the idea that at an upcoming blacktie event for the symphony DeJong was going to reintroduce himself to the piano. He shook his head. All of his practices at this time of year focuses on a different kind of percussion. “I heard a rumor,” Rogers said, leaning back in her seat. “Come and see me on the field, though,” he smiled. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 02.09.2018

BLUES NOTEBOOK

An All-Star Game at some point Bettman: Scottrade is on track for one BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said St. Louis will be getting an All-Star Game at some point. He just doesn’t know when. Bettman was in St. Louis on Thursday as part of his annual tour around the league. While here, he met with Blues owner Tom Stillman, team president Chris Zimmerman, sponsors, season ticket holders and the media, and watched the game. It was his first time seeing Scottrade Center since its offseason renovations. “I think it’s fair to say if all the upgrades are completed and the money is put into the building as it needs to be, there will be an All-Star Game here,” he said. “I can’t give you the date, so I’m not making an oicial announcement or award, but there’s no reason we wouldn’t bring an AllStar Game here. We have some other commitments that we have to make in some other buildings, but if this building continues on the path it’s on and the things are done that need to be done, we’ll be here with an All-Star Game at some point. I don’t have any doubt about that.” The Blues are bidding for the 2020 All-Star Game. The NHL

brought its mostly annual game to St. Louis last in 1988, and since then has gone to a few cities, Montreal, Tampa, Los Angeles and now San Jose, which will host the 2019 game, twice since then. The league brought one of its other in-season marquee events, the Winter Classic, to St. Louis last season and drew 46,556 fans to Busch Stadium. “It certainly doesn’t hurt,” Bettman said. “We brought the Winter Classic here knowing it would be successful. There are great hockey fans, great sports fans in St. Louis. We knew when we awarded it it was at a sensitive time and we thought it would be good for the city to bring a major event here. It reinforced everything I believed about this market as a sports and hockey market. The good experience didn’t dampen our enthusiasm.” The league announced San Jose as the site for 2019 at the 2018 game. Bettman said the league would like to be ahead of that on announcing the next site, but wasn’t sure if that would happen. An announcement on 2020 would come no later than the 2019 All-Star Game.

CONFIDENCE ARTIST Forward Vladimir Tarasenko came into the game tied for the team lead in goals with 21, but he didn’t have a goal in the past five games. Not long before that, he

BLUES AT JETS When/Where • 7 p.m., Friday, Bell MTS Place, Winnipeg TV/Radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Jets • There is no tougher place to play this season than Bell MTS Place. The Jets have the league’s best home record (20-3-2), with one of those victories coming in a 4-0 triumph against the Blues on Dec. 17. Friday’s contest marks the fifth game in a massive 10-game homestand. Top center Mark Scheifele is expected to return against the Blues after missing 16 games with an upper-body injury. The Jets didn’t blink in his absence, going 11-2-3. A balanced attack features eight players with 10 or more goals, led by Patrik Laine (24) and Nikolaj Ehlers (20). But the team MVP is Blake Wheeler with 14 goals and 44 assists. Jim Thomas

had six goals in 11 games. “I would say that in talking with Vlady yesterday, that he’s frustrated,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “This has been a trying year for him. It’s been really the first time in his career that he’s kind of had to deal with something like this, and he’s learning how to

deal with that.” Yeo rearranged the lines against Colorado, putting Tarasenko on a line with Alexander Steen and Paul Stastny. “He’s just got to find a way to keep working,” Yeo said. “He’s got to work from the drop of the puck to the final buzzer, and if he does that then I like to believe that he’s too good to stop. “I don’t care if you’re a firstyear player in the league or if you’re a superstar, every player deals with confidence issues. He’s going to have to work his way out of that, there’s no question. But he’s a player that he puts so much onus on himself and pressure on himself to score. He knows that we need him to score. And then the frustration can kick in if he does not score. So he’s just going to have to work past that. He’s going to have to generate momentum, generate chances, and trust that if he does those things over and over again that good things will happen.”

NOTES Chris Thorburn and Robert Bortuzzo were healthy scratches as the Blues went back to 12 forwards and six defensemen. … The forecast high in Winnipeg for Friday is 8, with a low of minus 12. … The game was Kyle Brodziak’s 200th with the Blues. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues left wing Jaden Schwartz (left) and defenseman Alex Pietrangelo congratulate center Brayden Schenn after Schenn scored his second goal.

Hutton back in net, stellar in win over Avalanche BLUES • FROM C1

going on when I saw Bergy (Patrik Berglund) taking the faceof,” coach Mike Yeo said. It was Schenn’s 16th regularseason fight as an NHL player but first as a Blue. Before the game oicials stepped in Schenn’s jersey was off, but the crowd was into it and so were the Blues. Alexander Steen skated by the penalty box before play resumed and tapped the box in front of Schenn to show his appreciation. “People have different opinions of fighting, but it sends a message to your team,” Yeo said. “He wanted to send a message to the team and he did that.” Message received. The result was a much-needed response after that not-so-Wild game against Minnesota — a 6-1 win over Central Division rival Colorado before 18,951 at Scottrade Center. And Schenn, who said he thought about fighting all day long was, just getting started. He recorded two goals, and was a fireball in general on the ice. The Blues matched their season high for goals in a period with four in the second period. They scored more than four times in a game for the first time since Dec. 9 in Detroit — the game in which Jaden Schwartz was injured and the team’s offense seemingly went into a deep freeze. The Blues, who beat the Avalanche here 3-1 just two weeks ago, are now 9-0-3 in their last 12 games against Colorado. At 33-20-3 overall, the Blues now have 69 points and moved to

Colorado Blues

0 1

1 4

0 1

— —

1 6

First period B: Schenn 22 (Dunn, Schwartz), 8:41 (pp). Penalties: Schenn, STL, Major (fighting), 0:03; Landeskog, COL, Major (fighting), 0:03; Toninato, COL, (hooking), 8:05; Tarasenko, STL, (roughing), 10:10. Second period C: Bourque 4, 2:50. B: Barbashev 3 (Upshall, Parayko), 4:17. B: Schenn 23 (Berglund), 5:05. B: Brodziak 8 (Steen, Dunn), 7:38. B: Pietrangelo 9 (Stastny, Dunn), 15:01. Penalties: Thompson, STL, (hooking), 11:00; Pietrangelo, STL, (holding), 18:45. Third period B: Stastny 12 (Bouwmeester, Gunnarsson), 6:00. Penalties: Bouwmeester, STL, (roughing), 6:20; Girard, COL, (interference), 6:50; Gunnarsson, STL, (hooking), 16:48. Shots on goal Colorado 8 7 9 24 Blues 13 11 7 31 Power-plays Colorado 0 of 5; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Colorado, Bernier 16-10-2 (20 shots-17 saves), Varlamov 13-10-2 (11-8). Blues, Hutton 15-5-1 (24-23). A: 18,951. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, David Brisebois.

seven points ahead of the Avalanche (29-20-4) in the Central. “Guys played really hard for each other tonight,” Yeo said. “You saw the way guys were blocking shots and you saw Vlady (Tarasenko) jumping in there when Stas (Paul Stastny) got hit. It was a team that had each other’s backs tonight. There were bright spots all over the ice for St. Louis, including a career-high three assists by rookie defenseman Vince Dunn and strong goaltending when it mattered from Carter Hutton. And after Stastny scored his 12th goal of the season in the third period and the Blues’ sixth of the night, he had a goal in all three of the team’s games against Colorado — his former team — this season. Schenn got the scoring started at the 8:41 mark of the open-

ing period, with the Blues on the power play, Schenn pounced on the rebound of a Schwartz blast from the right faceoff circle for his team-leading 22nd goal of the season and a 1-0 lead. It was Schenn’s 300th career point, his seventh power-play goal of the season and his second such score in the last two games against Colorado. It was that kind of night for the Blues, who were full of fight. When Nikita Zadorov absolutely flattened Stastny about a minute later, alternate captain Vladimir Tarasenko was the first of not one, not two, but three Blues to confront Zadorov — with Tarasenko drawing a roughing penalty. The other two Blues on the scene? Captain Alex Pietrangelo and alternate captain Steen. That’s the kind of penalty a team can live with. The Blues killed it off, with the help of a painful block by Joel Edmundson, and kept going at the Avalanche. Steen clanged a shot of the far post with 3:50 to go in the period. Hutton, making his 12th start in the last 15 games, made some point-blank saves, including a couple in rapid succession against Blake Comeau. Unfortunately for Edmundson, he was done for the night with an upper-body injury after blocking a Nail Yakupov shot at the 12-minute mark of the period. The pace in the second period was quick, and so was the scoring. A giveaway by Vladimir Sobotka deep in Blues territory was converted into a game-tying goal by Colorado’s Gabriel Bourque, who beat Hutton stick side at the

2:50 mark. But instead of sagging, the Blues pushed back and pushed back some more. Ivan Barbashev scored from a tight angle, beating Avalanche goalie Jonathan Bernier with a roof shot over Bernier’s stick shoulder at 4:17 of the period. Just 48 seconds later, it became a 3-1 Blues lead when Schenn scored his second goal of the game. With the Blues buzzing around the Colorado zone, Berglund sent the puck toward the net. It actually bounced off Schenn, who quickly found the puck and beat Bernier with a backhand at the 5:05 mark. It was the fourth multi-goal game for Schenn this season. He had a hat trick Dec. 5 in Montreal and two goals against Edmonton both on Nov. 16 and Nov. 21. At this point, many in the crowd began yelling something about Avalanche owner Stan Kroenke. (Couldn’t quite make it out.) That was it for Bernier, pulled in favor of Semyon Varlamov. It didn’t help the Avalanche. In his 200th game with the Blues, Kyle Brodziak made it 4-1 with his eighth goal of the season and his first in 15 games. Then Pietrangelo got in the act with his ninth goal of the season and just his second since Nov. 9 for a 5-1 lead. That made it a four-goal period for the Blues. The only other time that happened this season came in the third period of an 8-3 romp over visiting Edmonton on Nov. 21. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

49ers give Garoppolo 5-year deal NFL • FROM C1

league. The 49ers, of course, are a franchise known for quarterbacks. Three of them — Y.A. Tittle, Joe Montana and Steve Young — are in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. But none created the early tenure buzz Garoppolo generated. After trading a secondround pick to New England for him on Oct. 30, the 49ers gave the 26-year-old passer his first start on Dec. 3 in his hometown of Chicago. Garoppolo completed 70 percent of his passes and led the team on a last-minute drive that ended with a game-winning field goal. It was only the team’s second win of the season, but it ended up being a typical outing for Garoppolo. His next four starts also ended in victories with Garoppolo receiving stellar marks in accuracy, improvisational skills and leadership. Coach Kyle Shanahan and general manager John Lynch suspected they had a franchise quarterback when they traded for him in October; they were certain of it when the season ended in December with wins over the Tennessee Titans, Jacksonville Jaguars and Los Angeles Rams, all teams that would be heading into the playofs. Left tackle Joe Staley, the 49ers’ longest-tenured player, said teammates’ confidence in Garoppolo — and by extension, the confidence in themselves — rose with every victory. “It’s a team game and everything, and I think everyone would like to say their position is as important as any other,” Staley said on SiriusXM NFL radio Thursday. “But we’re not fooling anybody — it’s a quarterbackdriven (league). And you have to have a lot of confidence in that quarterback position. And Jimmy really gave us that spark at the end of the year.” Garoppolo’s immediate success also sent a panic through 49ers fans because he was scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent on March 14. Conspiracy theories about the Patriots’ true plans — a second-round pick was suspiciously low for a potential franchise quarterback — abounded online and there was a worry that somehow he’d get away. The team and Garoppolo’s agent, Don Yee, began discussing a long-term deal in earnest when the 2017 season ended. The talks heated up the week of the Super Bowl and continued this week. San Francisco could have placed the franchise tag, a one-year deal worth about $23.5 million, on Garoppolo, all but assuring he’d be with the team for the 2018 season. The first day to do that would have been Feb. 20. The new deal exceeds that on a per-year basis, but may not be tops in the league for long. Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins is poised to hit free agency next month while other established quarterbacks such as Atlanta’s Matt Ryan, Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers and Seattle’s Russell Wilson are poised for new contracts as well. The 49ers were expected to have more than $100 million in salary-cap space for 2018 and it will be interesting to see how Garoppolo’s deal is structured. ESPN reported it was worth $90 million in the first three years, suggesting it was front-loaded to take advantage of the team’s salarycap cushion.

Jimmy Garoppolo


SPORTS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FRIDAY • 02.09.2018

BLUES NOTEBOOK

An All-Star Game at some point Bettman: Scottrade is on track for one BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said St. Louis will be getting an All-Star Game at some point. He just doesn’t know when. Bettman was in St. Louis on Thursday as part of his annual tour around the league. While here, he met with Blues owner Tom Stillman, team president Chris Zimmerman, sponsors, season ticket holders and the media, and watched the game. It was his first time seeing Scottrade Center since its offseason renovations. “I think it’s fair to say if all the upgrades are completed and the money is put into the building as it needs to be, there will be an All-Star Game here,” he said. “I can’t give you the date, so I’m not making an oicial announcement or award, but there’s no reason we wouldn’t bring an AllStar Game here. We have some other commitments that we have to make in some other buildings, but if this building continues on the path it’s on and the things are done that need to be done, we’ll be here with an All-Star Game at some point. I don’t have any doubt about that.” The Blues are bidding for the 2020 All-Star Game. The NHL

brought its mostly annual game to St. Louis last in 1988, and since then has gone to a few cities, Montreal, Tampa, Los Angeles and now San Jose, which will host the 2019 game, twice since then. The league brought one of its other in-season marquee events, the Winter Classic, to St. Louis last season and drew 46,556 fans to Busch Stadium. “It certainly doesn’t hurt,” Bettman said. “We brought the Winter Classic here knowing it would be successful. There are great hockey fans, great sports fans in St. Louis. We knew when we awarded it it was at a sensitive time and we thought it would be good for the city to bring a major event here. It reinforced everything I believed about this market as a sports and hockey market. The good experience didn’t dampen our enthusiasm.” The league announced San Jose as the site for 2019 at the 2018 game. Bettman said the league would like to be ahead of that on announcing the next site, but wasn’t sure if that would happen. An announcement on 2020 would come no later than the 2019 All-Star Game.

CONFIDENCE ARTIST Forward Vladimir Tarasenko came into the game tied for the team lead in goals with 21, but he didn’t have a goal in the past five games. Not long before that, he

BLUES AT JETS When/Where • 7 p.m., Friday, Bell MTS Place, Winnipeg TV/Radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Jets • There is no tougher place to play this season than Bell MTS Place. The Jets have the league’s best home record (20-3-2), with one of those victories coming in a 4-0 triumph against the Blues on Dec. 17. Friday’s contest marks the fifth game in a massive 10-game homestand. Top center Mark Scheifele is expected to return against the Blues after missing 16 games with an upper-body injury. The Jets didn’t blink in his absence, going 11-2-3. A balanced attack features eight players with 10 or more goals, led by Patrik Laine (24) and Nikolaj Ehlers (20). But the team MVP is Blake Wheeler with 14 goals and 44 assists. Jim Thomas

had six goals in 11 games. “I would say that in talking with Vlady yesterday, that he’s frustrated,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “This has been a trying year for him. It’s been really the first time in his career that he’s kind of had to deal with something like this, and he’s learning how to

deal with that.” Yeo rearranged the lines against Colorado, putting Tarasenko on a line with Alexander Steen and Paul Stastny. “He’s just got to find a way to keep working,” Yeo said. “He’s got to work from the drop of the puck to the final buzzer, and if he does that then I like to believe that he’s too good to stop. “I don’t care if you’re a firstyear player in the league or if you’re a superstar, every player deals with confidence issues. He’s going to have to work his way out of that, there’s no question. But he’s a player that he puts so much onus on himself and pressure on himself to score. He knows that we need him to score. And then the frustration can kick in if he does not score. So he’s just going to have to work past that. He’s going to have to generate momentum, generate chances, and trust that if he does those things over and over again that good things will happen.”

NOTES Chris Thorburn and Robert Bortuzzo were healthy scratches as the Blues went back to 12 forwards and six defensemen. … The forecast high in Winnipeg for Friday is 8, with a low of minus 12. … The game was Kyle Brodziak’s 200th with the Blues. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues left wing Jaden Schwartz (left) and defenseman Alex Pietrangelo congratulate center Brayden Schenn after Schenn scored his second goal.

Hutton back in net, stellar in win over Avalanche BLUES • FROM C1

going on when I saw Bergy (Patrik Berglund) taking the faceof,” coach Mike Yeo said. Normally, Schenn’s supposed to take the faceoff. But these aren’t normal times. Not after that performance against the Wild, not after hearing boos on your home ice. Not after seeing the competition creeping ever closer in the tight Central Division. Schenn thought about fighting during the day. “It’s not a good feeling,” he said. He actually talked to Blues television analyst Darren Pang during pregame and got his opinion. “He thought, ‘Why not?’,” Schenn said. “So ...” So, Schenn told Berglund to take the opening faceof. Berglund to Schenn: “Well, what’s the set play?” Schenn back to Berglund: “There is no set play.” And that was that. Puck drop. Gloves drop. Game (and fight) on. Before game oicials stepped in Schenn’s jersey was off, but the crowd was into it and so were the Blues. Alexander Steen skated by the penalty box before play resumed and tapped the box in front of Schenn to show his appreciation. “People have different opinions of fighting, but it sends a message to your team,” Yeo said. “He wanted to send a message to the team and he did that.” Message received. The result was a much-needed response before 18,951 at Scottrade Center, after that not-so-Wild game against Minnesota two nights earlier. And Schenn was just getting

Colorado Blues

0 1

1 4

0 1

— —

1 6

First period B: Schenn 22 (Dunn, Schwartz), 8:41 (pp). Penalties: Schenn, STL, Major (fighting), 0:03; Landeskog, COL, Major (fighting), 0:03; Toninato, COL, (hooking), 8:05; Tarasenko, STL, (roughing), 10:10. Second period C: Bourque 4, 2:50. B: Barbashev 3 (Upshall, Parayko), 4:17. B: Schenn 23 (Berglund), 5:05. B: Brodziak 8 (Steen, Dunn), 7:38. B: Pietrangelo 9 (Stastny, Dunn), 15:01. Penalties: Thompson, STL, (hooking), 11:00; Pietrangelo, STL, (holding), 18:45. Third period B: Stastny 12 (Bouwmeester, Gunnarsson), 6:00. Penalties: Bouwmeester, STL, (roughing), 6:20; Girard, COL, (interference), 6:50; Gunnarsson, STL, (hooking), 16:48. Shots on goal Colorado 8 7 9 24 Blues 13 11 7 31 Power-plays Colorado 0 of 5; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Colorado, Bernier 16-10-2 (20 shots-17 saves), Varlamov 13-10-2 (11-8). Blues, Hutton 15-5-1 (24-23). A: 18,951. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Shandor Alphonso, David Brisebois.

started. He recorded two goals, and was a fireball in general on the ice on a night when the Blues scored more than four times in a game for the first time since Dec. 9 in Detroit — the game in which Jaden Schwartz was injured and the team’s offense seemingly went into a deep freeze. “He’s a helluva player,” goalie Carter Hutton said of Schenn. “And that (fight) gets the crowd right into it, sends a message to everybody that we’re not messing around tonight and he backs it up. “Truthfully, I hate fighting, especially when you get to know guys, you never want to see anyone get hurt. I’m kind of like the mom of the team I guess when it comes to fighting, but it’s one of those things.” The Blues, who beat the Avalanche here 3-1 just two weeks

ago, are now 9-0-3 in their last 12 games against Colorado. At 33-20-3 overall, the Blues now have 69 points and moved to seven points ahead of the Avalanche (29-20-4) in the Central. “Guys played really hard for each other tonight,” Yeo said. “You saw the way guys were blocking shots and you saw Vlady (Tarasenko) jumping in there when Stas (Paul Stastny) got hit. It was a team that had each other’s backs tonight. There were bright spots all over the ice for St. Louis, including a career-high three assists by rookie defenseman Vince Dunn and strong goaltending when it mattered from Hutton. After Stastny scored his 12th goal of the season in the third period to end the night’s scoring, that gave him a goal in all three games against his former team this season. The only downer of the night was an injury to what looked like the right hand or wrist of defenseman Joel Edmundson blocking a shot in the first period. He was done for the night and Yeo already has ruled him out of Friday’s game in Winnipeg. “It’s tough to see that,” Dunn said. “He’s shown a lot of heart, blocking that one on the PK. A guy like that goes head-first into everything.” Schenn got the scoring started at the 8:41 mark of the opening period with the Blues on the power play, pouncing on the rebound of a Schwartz blast from the right faceoff circle for his team-leading 22nd goal of the season and a 1-0 lead. Along with the fight, the goal helped set the tone for the Blues.

When Nikita Zadorov absolutely flattened Stastny about a minute later, alternate captain Tarasenko was the first of three Blues to confront Zadorov — with Tarasenko drawing a roughing penalty. The other two Blues on the scene? Captain Alex Pietrangelo and alternate captain Steen. “I didn’t see any of them when I left the ice,” Stastny claimed. “I got put in a body bag there.” The pace in the second period was quick, and so was the scoring. A giveaway by Vladimir Sobotka deep in Blues territory was converted into a game-tying goal by Colorado’s Gabriel Bourque, who beat Hutton stick side at the 2:50 mark. But instead of sagging, the Blues pushed back. Ivan Barbashev scored from a tight angle, beating Avalanche goalie Jonathan Bernier with a roof shot at 4:17 of the period. Just 48 seconds later, it became a 3-1 Blues lead when Schenn scored his second goal of the game. At this point, many in the crowd began yelling something about Avalanche owner Stan Kroenke. (Couldn’t quite make it out.) That was it for Bernier, pulled in favor of Semyon Varlamov. It didn’t help the Avalanche. In his 200th game with the Blues, Kyle Brodziak made it 4-1 with his eighth goal of the season and his first in 15 games. Then Pietrangelo got in the act with his ninth goal of the season and just his second since Nov. 9 for a 5-1 lead. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

49ers give Garoppolo 5-year deal NFL • FROM C1

league. The 49ers, of course, are a franchise known for quarterbacks. Three of them — Y.A. Tittle, Joe Montana and Steve Young — are in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. But none created the early tenure buzz Garoppolo generated. After trading a secondround pick to New England for him on Oct. 30, the 49ers gave the 26-year-old passer his first start on Dec. 3 in his hometown of Chicago. Garoppolo completed 70 percent of his passes and led the team on a last-minute drive that ended with a game-winning field goal. It was only the team’s second win of the season, but it ended up being a typical outing for Garoppolo. His next four starts also ended in victories with Garoppolo receiving stellar marks in accuracy, improvisational skills and leadership. Coach Kyle Shanahan and general manager John Lynch suspected they had a franchise quarterback when they traded for him in October; they were certain of it when the season ended in December with wins over the Tennessee Titans, Jacksonville Jaguars and Los Angeles Rams, all teams that would be heading into the playofs. Left tackle Joe Staley, the 49ers’ longest-tenured player, said teammates’ confidence in Garoppolo — and by extension, the confidence in themselves — rose with every victory. “It’s a team game and everything, and I think everyone would like to say their position is as important as any other,” Staley said on SiriusXM NFL radio Thursday. “But we’re not fooling anybody — it’s a quarterbackdriven (league). And you have to have a lot of confidence in that quarterback position. And Jimmy really gave us that spark at the end of the year.” Garoppolo’s immediate success also sent a panic through 49ers fans because he was scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent on March 14. Conspiracy theories about the Patriots’ true plans — a second-round pick was suspiciously low for a potential franchise quarterback — abounded online and there was a worry that somehow he’d get away. The team and Garoppolo’s agent, Don Yee, began discussing a long-term deal in earnest when the 2017 season ended. The talks heated up the week of the Super Bowl and continued this week. San Francisco could have placed the franchise tag, a one-year deal worth about $23.5 million, on Garoppolo, all but assuring he’d be with the team for the 2018 season. The first day to do that would have been Feb. 20. The new deal exceeds that on a per-year basis, but may not be tops in the league for long. Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins is poised to hit free agency next month while other established quarterbacks such as Atlanta’s Matt Ryan, Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers and Seattle’s Russell Wilson are poised for new contracts as well. The 49ers were expected to have more than $100 million in salary-cap space for 2018 and it will be interesting to see how Garoppolo’s deal is structured. ESPN reported it was worth $90 million in the first three years, suggesting it was front-loaded to take advantage of the team’s salarycap cushion.

Jimmy Garoppolo


SPORTS

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

Cavaliers deal away six players

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Blues Dallas Minnesota Colorado Chicago Paciic Vegas San Jose Calgary Los Angeles Anaheim Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 53 54 56 55 54 53 54 GP 53 53 54 53 55 52 54 54

W L OT Pts GF 32 12 9 73 166 32 13 9 73 176 33 20 3 69 161 32 19 4 68 171 29 19 6 64 162 29 20 4 62 168 24 22 8 56 157 W L OT Pts GF 35 14 4 74 181 28 17 8 64 153 28 18 8 64 153 29 19 5 63 153 26 19 10 62 155 23 25 4 50 146 21 27 6 48 140 13 32 9 35 126

GA 138 143 141 142 156 156 152 GA 145 145 153 128 159 168 176 189

Home Away Div 18-5-3 14-7-6 10-4-2 20-3-2 12-10-7 8-5-2 19-11-0 14-9-3 8-5-1 19-8-1 13-11-3 9-10-0 18-4-5 11-15-1 9-9-0 19-7-1 10-13-3 7-8-1 12-12-3 12-10-5 6-8-2 Home Away Div 19-3-2 16-11-2 12-1-1 14-7-3 14-10-5 12-2-3 13-13-3 15-5-5 8-6-3 14-9-3 15-10-2 8-9-3 14-9-3 12-10-7 8-5-5 12-13-2 11-12-2 10-3-0 10-14-3 11-13-3 5-9-1 6-16-3 7-16-6 1-8-5

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Montreal Ottawa Bufalo Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Columbus NY Islanders Carolina NY Rangers

GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 54 37 14 3 77 194 142 18-5-1 19-9-2 9-3-1 52 33 11 8 74 173 124 18-6-4 15-5-4 12-1-2 56 32 19 5 69 182 156 16-8-2 16-11-3 6-5-1 51 23 22 6 52 146 164 13-8-3 10-14-3 8-4-1 52 21 23 8 50 136 154 11-11-7 10-12-1 6-11-2 54 22 26 6 50 142 169 14-10-5 8-16-1 10-6-2 53 19 25 9 47 141 182 12-11-5 7-14-4 5-9-3 54 15 29 10 40 124 178 7-15-4 8-14-6 3-6-2 GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 53 31 17 5 67 165 154 19-8-1 12-9-4 10-5-3 55 30 22 3 63 169 166 20-7-1 10-15-2 11-5-0 53 27 18 8 62 159 159 15-9-3 12-9-5 7-6-1 54 26 19 9 61 157 158 14-9-5 12-10-4 6-4-4 53 27 22 4 58 139 150 16-10-1 11-12-3 8-7-2 55 26 23 6 58 184 201 14-8-4 12-15-2 8-7-1 54 24 21 9 57 144 164 12-9-5 12-12-4 6-5-4 54 25 24 5 55 157 168 17-10-3 8-14-2 7-6-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Included in Cleveland’s shuling of its roster Thursday was a trade sending Dwyane Wade (right) back to Miami, where he played 13 seasons and won three NBA titles.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NBA STANDINGS

With their NBA title hopes fading fast, the Cavaliers got aggressive at the trading deadline. They swapped teams. Cleveland completely changed its look — and perhaps its chances of winning a championship this season — on Thursday with a stunning sequence of deals. The Cavs traded six players, including Isaiah Thomas, Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose, and two future draft picks in moves designed to not only help them in the short term but could potentially help keep LeBron James beyond this season. Just like that, the Cavs traded nearly half their roster, got younger and maybe wedged themselves back into contention to make a fourth straight Finals appearance against Golden State. The Cavs began their shocking overhaul by sending the disappointing Thomas along with forward Channing Frye and one of their two first-round picks to the Los Angeles Lakers for point guard Jordan Clarkson (Missouri) and forward Larry Nance Jr. As the Thomas swap was being digested around the league, the Cavs completed a three-team deal with Utah and Sacramento. The Cavs sent Rose, who has also been slowed by injury, and forward Jae Crowder to the Jazz for forward Rodney Hood. They’ll receive guard George Hill from the Kings in exchange for guard Iman Shumpert. And if all that wasn’t enough, the Cavs then dealt Wade to Miami for a heavily protected second-round pick. It’s a homecoming for the 36-year-old Wade, who played 13 seasons in Miami, winning three NBA titles — two of them with James. Wade has said he wanted to end his career with the Heat, and he’ll get his chance.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

MORE TRADES New Orleans agreed to trade veteran forward Dante Cunningham to Brooklyn for third-year guard Rashad Vaughn. • Portland traded forward Noah Vonleh to Chicago for Milovan Rakovic. • Orlando agreed to trade point guard Elfrid Payton to Phoenix for a 2018 second-round pick. • Denver traded Emmanuel Mudiay to New York and acquired Devin Harris from Dallas in a three-team deal. The Mavericks will get Doug McDermott from New York. • Detroit acquired guard Jameer Nelson from Chicago for center Willie Reed (SLU). The Bulls also received the right to swap secondround draft picks in 2022. Chicago then waived Reed. • Detroit traded James Ennis to Detroit for Brice Johnson and a second-round draft pick. OTHER NEWS • Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook and Carmelo Anthony sat out Thursday with ankle injuries. • Charlotte guard Kemba Walker has been picked to replace injured Kristaps Porzingis in the NBA AllStar Game. • Boston signed free agent center Greg Monroe, who was waived last week by Phoenix. He is averaging 10.4 points and 7.4 rebounds this season. • Chicago point guard Kris Dunn is out of the NBA’s concussion protocol, though he will miss at least two more games. • Dallas guard Seth Curry had surgery for a stress fracture in his lower left leg, an injury that kept him out all season. • Golden State forward Draymond Green was fined $50,000 by the NBA for directing offensive language toward a game oicial.

Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Paciic Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 40 35 28 18 17 W 34 31 29 29 26 W 41 27 22 17 18

L 13 21 25 36 37 L 23 24 25 25 28 L 13 25 31 36 38

Pct .755 .625 .528 .333 .315 Pct .596 .564 .537 .537 .481 Pct .759 .519 .415 .321 .321

GB — 6½ 12 22½ 23½ GB — 2 3½ 3½ 6½ GB — 13 18½ 23½ 24

L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 6-4 8-2 L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 4-6 1-9

Str W-6 W-1 L-2 L-5 L-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-3 L-3 W-7 Str L-2 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-4

Home 20-6 22-6 14-12 13-16 10-18 Home 22-6 19-9 22-7 15-10 15-9 Home 19-7 16-12 13-14 8-16 9-20

Away 20-7 13-15 14-13 5-20 7-19 Away 12-17 12-15 7-18 14-15 11-19 Away 22-6 11-13 9-17 9-20 9-18

Conf 22-8 20-11 14-19 15-20 9-25 Conf 25-9 16-16 18-17 16-14 16-14 Conf 22-10 20-16 10-21 9-22 12-22

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Boston Toronto Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 40 38 26 23 19 W 31 29 23 18 17 W 31 30 30 27 18

L 16 16 25 33 37 L 24 26 30 36 38 L 22 23 25 26 35

Thursday Orlando 100, Atlanta 98 Toronto 113, New York 88 Boston 110, Washington 104, OT Charlotte at Portland, late Dallas at Golden State, late Oklahoma City at LA Lakers, late Wednesday Detroit 115, Brooklyn 106 Houston 109, Miami 101 Cleveland 140, Minnesota 138, OT Indiana at New Orleans, ppd. Utah 92, Memphis 88 San Antonio 129, Phoenix 81

Pct .714 .704 .510 .411 .339 Pct .564 .527 .434 .333 .309 Pct .585 .566 .545 .509 .340

GB — 1 11½ 17 21 GB — 2 7 12½ 14 GB — 1 2 4 13

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 6-4 3-7 5-5 5-5 4-6 L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str W-1 W-4 W-1 L-5 L-4 Str L-2 L-5 L-1 W-3 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-1 W-5 L-7

Friday LA Clippers at Detroit, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Denver at Houston, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Utah, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 9:30 Saturday New Orleans at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. LA Clippers at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.

Home 21-8 23-4 14-10 16-11 11-18 Home 17-10 13-12 15-14 11-14 12-16 Home 20-7 18-9 19-11 18-10 11-14

Away 19-8 15-12 12-15 7-22 8-19 Away 14-14 16-14 8-16 7-22 5-22 Away 11-15 12-14 11-14 9-16 7-21

Conf 25-11 22-7 14-13 11-21 12-21 Conf 18-14 20-15 12-17 11-22 7-27 Conf 23-12 17-16 20-15 16-18 16-15

Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 7:30 Denver at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Sunday Toronto at Charlotte, noon Cleveland at Boston, 2:30 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 2:30 p.m. New York at Indiana, 4 p.m. Dallas at Houston, 6 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Utah at Portland, 8 p.m.

Thursday Blues 6, Colorado 1 Buffalo 4, NY Islanders 3 Calgary 3, New Jersey 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 3 Ottawa 4, Nashville 3, OT Tampa Bay 5, Vancouver 2 Arizona 4, Minnesota 3, OT Dallas 4, Chicago 2 Vegas at San Jose, late Wednesday Toronto 3, Nashville 2, SO Boston 6, NY Rangers 1 Los Angeles 5, Edmonton 2

Friday Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Calgary at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Blues at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday Buffalo at Boston, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Columbus, 6 p.m. Nashville at Montreal, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Toronto, 6 p.m.

Magic 100, Hawks 98

NBA LEADERS

Atlanta: Prince 7-12 1-2 19, Ilyasova 2-4 1-2 5, Plumlee 2-2 0-0 4, Schroder 5-15 7-8 19, Bazemore 3-10 0-0 6, Muscala 2-5 1-1 5, Collins 4-9 0-0 9, Dedmon 3-11 0-0 8, Taylor 0-3 1-2 1, Delaney 4-6 1-2 11, Dorsey 5-9 0-1 11. Totals 37-86 12-18 98. Orlando: Simmons 5-11 2-2 13, Hezonja 2-7 4-6 8, Biyombo 5-9 0-0 10, Augustin 5-14 6-6 18, Fournier 7-14 6-6 22, Iwundu 2-5 0-0 4, Speights 5-12 0-0 14, Birch 1-1 0-0 2, Mack 4-10 1-2 9, Afflalo 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-85 19-22 100. Atlanta 23 16 31 28 — 98 Orlando 26 13 30 31 — 100 3-point goals: Atlanta 12-30 (Prince 4-7, Delaney 2-3, Schroder 2-4, Dedmon 2-8, Collins 1-1, Dorsey 1-3, Ilyasova 0-1, Bazemore 0-3), Orlando 9-30 (Speights 4-10, Fournier 2-4, Augustin 2-6, Simmons 1-1, Afflalo 0-1, Iwundu 0-1, Mack 0-3, Hezonja 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 47 (Collins 12), Orlando 36 (Hezonja 10). Assists: Atlanta 25 (Schroder, Prince 5), Orlando 20 (Augustin 9). Total fouls: Atlanta 23, Orlando 22. A: 16,215 (18,846).

Through Wednesday’s games Scoring G FG Harden, HOU 46 435 Antetokounmpo, MIL 49 499 Curry, GOL 39 335 Davis, NOR 47 461 James, CLE 53 538 Durant, GOL 46 425 Westbrook, OKC 55 530 Cousins, NOR 48 406 Lillard, POR 47 383 Irving, BOS 49 442 DeRozan, TOR 53 449 Booker, PHX 43 347 Oladipo, IND 49 428 Beal, WAS 54 468 Embiid, PHL 41 340 Williams, LAC 51 377 Porzingis, NYK 48 390 Walker, CHA 51 383 Aldridge, SAN 53 469 Butler, MIN 51 385

Raptors 113, Knicks 88 New York: Hardaway Jr. 4-14 0-0 9, Beasley 7-13 7-7 21, O’Quinn 4-10 1-2 9, Jack 4-7 1-1 10, Lee 1-6 2-2 4, Thomas 1-3 0-0 2, Hicks 2-5 1-2 5, Kornet 4-9 0-0 11, Ntilikina 2-6 1-2 5, Burke 4-9 2-2 12, Dotson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-83 15-18 88. Toronto: Anunoby 2-5 1-1 6, Ibaka 4-12 2-2 13, Valanciunas 7-12 2-4 18, Lowry 2-10 1-2 7, DeRozan 2-11 3-3 8, Powell 0-2 0-0 0, Miles 4-8 0-0 11, Siakam 6-9 1-1 14, Poeltl 6-7 1-1 13, Nogueira 1-2 0-0 2, VanVleet 4-11 0-0 10, Wright 5-6 0-0 11. Totals 43-95 11-14 113. New York 18 23 25 22 — 88 Toronto 23 29 30 31 — 113 3-point goals: New York 7-27 (Kornet 3-7, Burke 2-3, Jack 1-2, Hardaway Jr. 1-6, Hicks 0-1, Dotson 0-1, O’Quinn 0-1, Thomas 0-2, Lee 0-4), Toronto 16-43 (Miles 3-5, Ibaka 3-7, Valanciunas 2-3, VanVleet 2-5, Lowry 2-8, Wright 1-1, Siakam 1-2, Anunoby 1-4, DeRozan 1-5, Nogueira 0-1, Powell 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 43 (Kornet 10), Toronto 52 (Valanciunas 10). Assists: New York 19 (Jack 6), Toronto 31 (VanVleet, Siakam 6). Total fouls: New York 15, Toronto 17. Technicals: New York coach Jeff Hornacek, Toronto coach Raptors (Defensive three second), Ibaka, DeRozan. A: 19,800 (19,800).

Celtics 110, Wizards 104, OT Boston: Tatum 3-9 5-7 11, Horford 5-8 1-2 12, Baynes 1-3 0-0 2, Irving 9-19 9-10 28, Brown 7-16 1-2 18, Theis 3-4 0-2 7, Marc.Morris 5-14 4-4 15, Monroe 2-5 1-3 5, Rozier 4-6 2-4 12. Totals 39-84 23-34 110. Washington: Porter Jr. 9-18 6-6 27, Mark.Morris 3-6 2-2 9, Gortat 4-7 2-4 10, Satoransky 6-12 0-0 14, Beal 7-27 1-1 18, Oubre Jr. 3-10 3-4 11, Scott 3-5 0-1 7, Mahinmi 3-6 0-0 6, Frazier 0-3 0-0 0, Meeks 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 38-95 16-20 104. Boston 26 23 26 23 12 — 110 Washington 27 24 19 28 6 — 104 3-point goals: Boston 9-26 (Brown 3-8, Rozier 2-2, Theis 1-2, Marc.Morris 1-2, Horford 1-4, Irving 1-5, Tatum 0-3), Washington 12-26 (Porter Jr. 3-5, Beal 3-9, Satoransky 2-2, Oubre Jr. 2-4, Mark. Morris 1-2, Scott 1-3, Frazier 0-1). Fouled out: Mark. Morris. Rebounds: Boston 45 (Marc.Morris 8), Washington 52 (Porter Jr. 11). Assists: Boston 16 (Irving 6), Washington 28 (Beal 9). Total fouls: Boston 20, Washington 23. Technicals: Monroe, Marc.Morris, Rozier, Oubre Jr.. A: 20,356 (20,356).

FG Percentage Capela, HOU Jordan, LAC Adams, OKC Kanter, NYK Collins, ATL Henson, MIL Gibson, MIN Valanciunas, TOR Randle, LAL Whiteside, MIA Rebounds Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Cousins, NOR Howard, CHA Towns, MIN Embiid, PHL Capela, HOU Davis, NOR Kanter, NYK Jokic, DEN Assists Westbrook, OKC Harden, HOU James, CLE Green, GOL Simmons, PHL Rondo, NOR Teague, MIN Dinwiddie, Bro Lillard, POR Lowry, TOR

FG 293 222 300 315 204 195 295 228 291 213 G 51 47 48 53 57 41 48 47 52 47

OFF 255 199 105 180 166 90 151 116 186 127 G 55 46 53 47 50 39 46 55 47 50

FT 392 344 231 304 234 231 271 294 277 194 325 232 205 219 253 289 218 248 226 304

PTS 1448 1367 1066 1258 1403 1198 1405 1210 1181 1210 1284 1038 1178 1287 972 1186 1088 1155 1189 1138

FGA 445 340 471 521 344 331 515 407 525 387 DEF 541 500 513 488 527 361 366 382 363 369 AST 566 412 463 342 362 279 326 366 312 321

AVG 31.5 27.9 27.3 26.8 26.5 26.0 25.5 25.2 25.1 24.7 24.2 24.1 24.0 23.8 23.7 23.3 22.7 22.6 22.4 22.3 PCT .658 .653 .637 .605 .593 .589 .573 .560 .554 .550

TOT 796 699 618 668 693 451 517 498 549 496

AVG 15.6 14.9 12.9 12.6 12.2 11.0 10.8 10.6 10.6 10.6 AVG 10.3 9.0 8.7 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.1 6.7 6.6 6.4

Sunday Pittsburgh at Blues, 11 a.m. NY Rangers at Winnipeg, 2 p.m. Detroit at Washington, 2 p.m. Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m. Calgary at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Colorado at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Vegas, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Senators top Predators in OT ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Hofman scored 3:01 into overtime, lifting the host Ottawa Senators to a 4-3 victory over the Nashville Predators on Thursday night. Chris DiDomenico, Max McCormick and former Blues player Magnus Paajarvi also scored as the Senators (1925-9) won for the fourth time in five games. Craig Anderson made 35 saves for his 15th win of the season. P.K. Subban scored twice for the Predators (32-12-9), and Calle Jarnkrok picked up his 13th goal. Juuse Saros stopped 32 shots.

NOTEBOOK Rangers waive Smith • The New York Rangers have waived defenseman Brendan Smith, less than eight months after resigning him to a four-year, $17 million contract. Other news • Carolina placed forwards Marcus Kruger and Josh Jooris on waivers. The Hurricanes can send either or both to their AHL affiliate in Charlotte upon clearing waivers at noon Friday. ... Buffalo Sabres defenseman Jake McCabe will miss between three and four weeks after having surgery to repair a thumb injury.

NHL SUMMARIES Sabres 4, Islanders 3

Stars 4, Blackhawks 2

NY Islanders 0 1 2 — 3 Buffalo 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 22 (Reinhart, C.Nelson), 7:41. 2, Buffalo, Rodrigues 3 (Scandella, Reinhart), 13:21. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Buffalo, O’Reilly 16 (Ristolainen, Okposo), 7:18 (pp). 4, NY Islanders, Tavares 28 (Hickey, B.Nelson), 13:06. Penalties: Larsson, BUF, (high sticking), 2:06; Aho, NYI, (hooking), 6:49; Tavares, NYI, (high sticking), 10:50. Third period: 5, NY Islanders, Johnston 2 (Clutterbuck), 7:30. 6, NY Islanders, Lee 28 (Leddy, Bailey), 14:33 (pp). 7, Buffalo, Reinhart 11 (Rodrigues, Eichel), 15:46. Penalties: Antipin, BUF, (hooking), 1:34; Eichel, BUF, (tripping), 13:32. Shots: NY Islanders 10-10-9: 29. Buffalo 4-10-8: 22. Power-plays: NY Islanders 1 of 3; Buffalo 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 16-16-4 (22 shots-18 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 12-20-7 (29-26). A: 16,872.

Dallas 0 3 1 — 4 Chicago 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Chicago, Toews 15 (Seabrook), 9:07. Penalties: Klingberg, DAL, (delay of game), 5:55; Wingels, CHI, (slashing), 19:04. Second period: 2, Dallas, Seguin 27 (Radulov, Hamhuis), 5:44. 3, Dallas, Johns 7 (Faksa, Elie), 6:43. 4, Chicago, Anisimov 14 (Hinostroza, Seabrook), 12:48 (pp). 5, Dallas, Pitlick 10 (Klingberg), 19:55. Penalties: Benn, DAL, (high sticking), 7:17; Radulov, DAL, (holding), 11:40. Third period: 6, Dallas, Seguin 28 (Pateryn), 19:02. Penalties: Benn, DAL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 10:31. Shots: Dallas 14-9-7: 30. Chicago 12-17-10: 39. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 1; Chicago 1 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 23-14-3 (39 shots-37 saves). Chicago, Forsberg 5-9-3 (29-26). A: 21,422.

Senators 4, Predators 3, OT

NBA SUMMARIES

Colorado at Carolina, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 9 p.m.

Nashville 2 0 1 0 — 3 Ottawa 1 2 0 1 — 4 First period: 1, Nashville, Subban 14, 0:34. 2, Ottawa, DiDomenico 6 (Z.Smith, Dzingel), 8:00. 3, Nashville, Jarnkrok 13 (Hartnell, Bonino), 18:05. Penalties: Phaneuf, OTT, Major (fighting), 7:26; Hartnell, NSH, Major (fighting), 7:26; Pageau, OTT, (slashing), 12:09; Sissons, NSH, (holding), 18:22. Second period: 4, Ottawa, McCormick 1 (Dzingel, Borowiecki), 4:08. 5, Ottawa, Paajarvi 3 (Karlsson), 11:59. Penalties: Turris, NSH, (holding), 7:20. Third period: 6, NSH, Subban 15 (Josi, Hartnell), 15:42. Penalties: White, OTT, (tripping), 7:09. Overtime: 7, Ottawa, Hoffman 15 (Chabot), 3:01. Penalties: None. Shots: Nashville 9-4-18-3: 34. Ottawa 7-15-7-3: 32. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Ottawa 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Saros 5-4-5 (32 shots-28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 15-17-5 (34-31).

Lightning 5, Canucks 2

Flyers 5, Canadiens 3 Montreal 0 2 1 — 3 Philadelphia 0 2 3 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Plekanec, MTL, (holding), 4:06; Giroux, PHI, (interference), 6:24. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 12 (Giroux, Couturier), 0:42. 2, Montreal, Lehkonen 5, 9:09 (sh). 3, Philadelphia, Giroux 16 (Simmonds, Gostisbehere), 9:37 (pp). 4, Montreal, Shaw 4 (Froese), 18:49. Penalties: Plekanec, MTL, (tripping), 6:22; Froese, MTL, (slashing), 8:44; Patrick, PHI, (holding), 12:38; Plekanec, MTL, (hooking), 19:21. Third period: 5, Philadelphia, Voracek 11 (Gostisbehere, Giroux), 0:27 (pp). 6, Philadelphia, Konecny 13 (Gostisbehere), 1:28. 7, Montreal, Gallagher 19 (Drouin, Galchenyuk), 17:06 (pp). 8, Philadelphia, Provorov 10 (Elliott), 19:04. Penalties: Konecny, PHI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 11:30; Drouin, MTL, (tripping), 11:30; Laughton, PHI, (holding), 16:30. Shots: Montreal 9-8-11: 28. Philadelphia 10-7-11: 28. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 3; Philadelphia 2 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 15-20-4 (27 shots-23 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 21-11-7 (28-25). A: 19,655.

Vancouver 0 0 2 — 2 Tampa Bay 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 28 (Killorn, Hedman), 14:36. Penalties: Johnson, TB, (slashing), 6:33; Boeser, VAN, (holding), 19:50. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Gourde 20 (Johnson, Sergachev), 1:38 (pp). 3, Tampa Bay, Erne 1 (Sustr, Namestnikov), 13:40. 4, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 20 (Johnson, Gourde), 17:14. Penalties: Hutton, VAN, (roughing), 7:15. Third period: 5, Vancouver, Boeser 26 (H.Sedin, Edler), 6:28 (pp). 6, Vancouver, Baertschi 12 (Edler, Horvat), 10:55. 7, Tampa Bay, Hedman 8 (Stamkos, Kucherov), 16:21 (pp). Penalties: Girardi, TB, (high sticking), 5:12; Girardi, TB, (high sticking), 5:12; Virtanen, VAN, (hooking), 15:59. Shots: VAN 10-9-10: 29. Tampa Bay 11-17-8: 36. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 3; Tampa Bay 2 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 6-9-1 (36 shots-31 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 32-10-2 (29-27). A: 19,092. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Jonny Murray.

Through Wednesday’s games Player, team GP Nikita Kucherov, TB 53 Phil Kessel, PIT 55 Connor McDavid, EDM 52 Evgeni Malkin, PIT 51 Jakub Voracek, PHI 53 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 49 Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 53 Steven Stamkos, TB 53 Sidney Crosby, PIT 55 John Tavares, NYI 54 Alex Ovechkin, WAS 53 Claude Giroux, PHI 53 Blake Wheeler, WPG 54 Anze Kopitar, LA 53 Josh Bailey, NYI 50 2 tied with 53 pts.

Flames 3, Devils 2

GOALTENDING LEADERS

Calgary 0 3 0 — 3 New Jersey 0 — 2 1 1 First period: None. Penalties: Hamilton, CGY, (boarding), 11:38. Second period: 1, CGY, Monahan 26 (Giordano, Hamilton), 4:16. 2, NJD, Hall 20, 7:23. 3, CGY, Gaudreau 18 (Ferland), 14:33. 4, CGY, Monahan 27 (Brodie, Gaudreau), 18:05. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, NJD, Zacha 4 (Hall, Boyle), 7:23 (pp). Penalties: Hamonic, CGY, (high sticking), 6:49. Shots: Calgary 12-12-1: 25. New Jersey 8-12-12: 32. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 0; New Jersey 1 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 5-1-2 (32 shots-30 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 10-6-2 (25-22). A: 13,085.

GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE 10 games minimum Name Team Carter Hutton, STL Darcy Kuemper, LAK Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK Tuukka Rask, BOS Kari Lehtonen, DAL Corey Crawford, CHI Curtis McElhinney, TOR Anton Khudobin, BOS Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Pekka Rinne, NSH Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Juuse Saros, NSH WINS Name Team Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL Connor Hellebuyck, WPG Braden Holtby, WSH Pekka Rinne, WSH Frederik Andersen, TOR Ben Bishop, DAL Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ Tuukka Rask, BOS Mike Smith, CGY Devan Dubnyk, MIN Henrik Lundqvist, NYR Brian Elliott, PHI Jonathan Quick, LAK Cam Talbot, EDM Jake Allen, STL John Gibson, ANA Matt Murray, PIT Cory Schneider, NJD Jonathan Bernier, COL

Coyotes 4, Wild 3, OT Arizona 0 1 2 1 — 4 Minnesota 1 2 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Staal 24 (Spurgeon, Ennis), 17:13. Penalties: Martinook, ARI, (hooking), 8:04. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Cullen 5 (Dumba, Olofsson), 5:54. 3, Minnesota, Reilly 1 (Parise, Cullen), 9:59. 4, Arizona, Cousins 8 (Richardson, Goligoski), 11:30. Penalties: Koivu, MIN, (cross checking), 18:18. Third period: 5, ARI, Connauton 4 (Stepan, Goligoski), 8:02. 6, ARI, Cousins 9 (Stepan, Ekman-Larsson), 19:41. Penalties: None. Overtime: 7, Arizona, Keller 15 (Connauton, Perlini), 3:55. Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 11-14-13-2: 40. Minnesota 12-7-6-3: 28. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 1; Minnesota 0 of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 9-14-5 (28 shots-25 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 21-10-4 (40-36). A: 18,816.

NHL SCORING LEADERS G 27 24 22 30 10 24 16 19 17 27 32 15 14 21 13

A 39 41 41 32 52 37 45 41 43 32 26 43 44 36 44

PTS 66 65 63 62 62 61 61 60 60 59 58 58 58 57 57

GPI 24 16 22 35 17 28 10 19 44 39 44 14

MIN 1172 877 1328 2069 890 1583 555 1077 2577 2311 2585 848

GA 34 26 44 72 33 60 21 41 98 89 100 33

GPI 44 44 39 39 46 41 43 35 45 36 46 39 40 41 38 40 34 35 27

MIN 2577 2585 2263 2311 2750 2363 2592 2069 2635 2021 2536 2277 2319 2243 2138 2278 1859 2068 1558

W 31 28 27 27 26 22 22 22 22 21 21 20 20 19 18 18 18 17 16

AVG 1.74 1.78 1.99 2.09 2.22 2.27 2.27 2.28 2.28 2.31 2.32 2.33

L 10 6 10 8 15 14 17 8 15 10 17 11 18 18 15 14 12 11 9

OT 2 8 2 4 4 3 4 4 6 3 4 7 2 2 2 5 1 6 2


SPORTS

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

Cavaliers deal away six players

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Nashville Winnipeg Blues Dallas Minnesota Colorado Chicago Paciic Vegas San Jose Calgary Los Angeles Anaheim Edmonton Vancouver Arizona

GP 53 54 56 55 54 53 54 GP 54 54 54 53 55 52 54 54

W L OT Pts GF 32 12 9 73 166 32 13 9 73 176 33 20 3 69 161 32 19 4 68 171 29 19 6 64 162 29 20 4 62 168 24 22 8 56 157 W L OT Pts GF 36 14 4 76 186 28 18 8 64 156 28 18 8 64 153 29 19 5 63 153 26 19 10 62 155 23 25 4 50 146 21 27 6 48 140 13 32 9 35 126

GA 138 143 141 142 156 156 152 GA 148 150 153 128 159 168 176 189

Home Away Div 18-5-3 14-7-6 10-4-2 20-3-2 12-10-7 8-5-2 19-11-0 14-9-3 8-5-1 19-8-1 13-11-3 9-10-0 18-4-5 11-15-1 9-9-0 19-7-1 10-13-3 7-8-1 12-12-3 12-10-5 6-8-2 Home Away Div 19-3-2 17-11-2 13-1-1 14-8-3 14-10-5 12-3-3 13-13-3 15-5-5 8-6-3 14-9-3 15-10-2 8-9-3 14-9-3 12-10-7 8-5-5 12-13-2 11-12-2 10-3-0 10-14-3 11-13-3 5-9-1 6-16-3 7-16-6 1-8-5

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Florida Detroit Montreal Ottawa Bufalo Metropolitan Washington Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Columbus NY Islanders Carolina NY Rangers

GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 54 37 14 3 77 194 142 18-5-1 19-9-2 9-3-1 52 33 11 8 74 173 124 18-6-4 15-5-4 12-1-2 56 32 19 5 69 182 156 16-8-2 16-11-3 6-5-1 51 23 22 6 52 146 164 13-8-3 10-14-3 8-4-1 52 21 23 8 50 136 154 11-11-7 10-12-1 6-11-2 54 22 26 6 50 142 169 14-10-5 8-16-1 10-6-2 53 19 25 9 47 141 182 12-11-5 7-14-4 5-9-3 54 15 29 10 40 124 178 7-15-4 8-14-6 3-6-2 GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 53 31 17 5 67 165 154 19-8-1 12-9-4 10-5-3 55 30 22 3 63 169 166 20-7-1 10-15-2 11-5-0 53 27 18 8 62 159 159 15-9-3 12-9-5 7-6-1 54 26 19 9 61 157 158 14-9-5 12-10-4 6-4-4 53 27 22 4 58 139 150 16-10-1 11-12-3 8-7-2 55 26 23 6 58 184 201 14-8-4 12-15-2 8-7-1 54 24 21 9 57 144 164 12-9-5 12-12-4 6-5-4 54 25 24 5 55 157 168 17-10-3 8-14-2 7-6-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Included in Cleveland’s shuling of its roster Thursday was a trade sending Dwyane Wade (right) back to Miami, where he played 13 seasons and won three NBA titles.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NBA STANDINGS

With their NBA title hopes fading fast, the Cavaliers got aggressive at the trading deadline. They swapped teams. Cleveland completely changed its look — and perhaps its chances of winning a championship this season — on Thursday with a stunning sequence of deals. The Cavs traded six players, including Isaiah Thomas, Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose, and two future draft picks in moves designed to not only help them in the short term but could potentially help keep LeBron James beyond this season. Just like that, the Cavs traded nearly half their roster, got younger and maybe wedged themselves back into contention to make a fourth straight Finals appearance against Golden State. The Cavs began their shocking overhaul by sending the disappointing Thomas along with forward Channing Frye and one of their two first-round picks to the Los Angeles Lakers for point guard Jordan Clarkson (Missouri) and forward Larry Nance Jr. As the Thomas swap was being digested around the league, the Cavs completed a three-team deal with Utah and Sacramento. The Cavs sent Rose, who has also been slowed by injury, and forward Jae Crowder to the Jazz for forward Rodney Hood. They’ll receive guard George Hill from the Kings in exchange for guard Iman Shumpert. And if all that wasn’t enough, the Cavs then dealt Wade to Miami for a heavily protected second-round pick. It’s a homecoming for the 36-year-old Wade, who played 13 seasons in Miami, winning three NBA titles — two of them with James. Wade has said he wanted to end his career with the Heat, and he’ll get his chance.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MORE TRADES New Orleans agreed to trade veteran forward Dante Cunningham to Brooklyn for third-year guard Rashad Vaughn. • Portland traded forward Noah Vonleh to Chicago for Milovan Rakovic. • Orlando agreed to trade point guard Elfrid Payton to Phoenix for a 2018 second-round pick. • Denver traded Emmanuel Mudiay to New York and acquired Devin Harris from Dallas in a three-team deal. The Mavericks will get Doug McDermott from New York. • Detroit acquired guard Jameer Nelson from Chicago for center Willie Reed (SLU). The Bulls also received the right to swap secondround draft picks in 2022. Chicago then waived Reed. • Detroit traded James Ennis to Detroit for Brice Johnson and a second-round draft pick. OTHER NEWS • Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook and Carmelo Anthony sat out Thursday with ankle injuries. • Charlotte guard Kemba Walker has been picked to replace injured Kristaps Porzingis in the NBA AllStar Game. • Boston signed free agent center Greg Monroe, who was waived last week by Phoenix. He is averaging 10.4 points and 7.4 rebounds this season. • Chicago point guard Kris Dunn is out of the NBA’s concussion protocol, though he will miss at least two more games. • Dallas guard Seth Curry had surgery for a stress fracture in his lower left leg, an injury that kept him out all season. • Golden State forward Draymond Green was fined $50,000 by the NBA for directing offensive language toward a game oicial.

Atlantic Boston Toronto Philadelphia New York Brooklyn Southeast Washington Miami Charlotte Orlando Atlanta Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago

W 40 38 26 23 19 W 31 29 23 18 17 W 31 30 30 27 18

L 16 16 25 33 37 L 24 26 31 36 38 L 22 23 25 26 35

Pct .714 .704 .510 .411 .339 Pct .564 .527 .426 .333 .309 Pct .585 .566 .545 .509 .340

GB — 1 11½ 17 21 GB — 2 7½ 12½ 14 GB — 1 2 4 13

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 6-4 3-7 5-5 5-5 4-6 L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str W-1 W-4 W-1 L-5 L-4 Str L-2 L-5 L-2 W-3 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 L-1 W-5 L-7

Home 21-8 23-4 14-10 16-11 11-18 Home 17-10 13-12 15-14 11-14 12-16 Home 20-7 18-9 19-11 18-10 11-14

Away 19-8 15-12 12-15 7-22 8-19 Away 14-14 16-14 8-17 7-22 5-22 Away 11-15 12-14 11-14 9-16 7-21

Conf 25-11 22-7 14-13 11-21 12-21 Conf 18-14 20-15 12-17 11-22 7-27 Conf 23-12 17-16 20-15 16-18 16-15

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Memphis Dallas Northwest Minnesota Oklahoma City Portland Denver Utah Paciic Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 40 35 28 18 17 W 34 31 30 29 26 W 42 27 23 17 18

L 13 21 25 36 38 L 23 25 25 25 28 L 13 25 31 36 38

Thursday Orlando 100, Atlanta 98 Toronto 113, New York 88 Boston 110, Washington 104, OT Portland 109, Charlotte 103, OT Golden State 121, Dallas 103 LA Lakers 106, Oklahoma City 81 Wednesday Detroit 115, Brooklyn 106 Houston 109, Miami 101 Cleveland 140, Minnesota 138, OT Indiana at New Orleans, ppd. Utah 92, Memphis 88 San Antonio 129, Phoenix 81

Pct GB .755 — .625 6½ .528 12 .333 22½ .309 24 Pct GB .596 — .554 2½ .545 3 .537 3½ .481 6½ Pct GB .764 — .519 13½ .426 18½ .321 24 .321 24½

L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 6-4 8-2 L10 6-4 6-4 8-2 4-6 1-9

Str W-6 W-1 L-2 L-5 L-2 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 W-3 W-7 Str W-1 W-2 W-4 W-1 L-4

Friday LA Clippers at Detroit, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Denver at Houston, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Utah, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 9:30 Saturday New Orleans at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. LA Clippers at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.

Home 20-6 22-6 14-12 13-16 10-18 Home 22-6 19-9 16-10 22-7 15-9 Home 20-7 16-12 14-14 8-16 9-20

Away 20-7 13-15 14-13 5-20 7-20 Away 12-17 12-16 14-15 7-18 11-19 Away 22-6 11-13 9-17 9-20 9-18

Conf 22-8 20-11 14-19 15-20 9-26 Conf 25-9 16-17 16-14 18-17 16-14 Conf 23-10 20-16 11-21 9-22 12-22

Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m. LA Lakers at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 7:30 Denver at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Sunday Toronto at Charlotte, noon Cleveland at Boston, 2:30 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 2:30 p.m. New York at Indiana, 4 p.m. Dallas at Houston, 6 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Utah at Portland, 8 p.m.

Thursday Blues 6, Colorado 1 Buffalo 4, NY Islanders 3 Calgary 3, New Jersey 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 3 Ottawa 4, Nashville 3, OT Tampa Bay 5, Vancouver 2 Arizona 4, Minnesota 3, OT Dallas 4, Chicago 2 Vegas 5, San Jose 3 Wednesday Toronto 3, Nashville 2, SO Boston 6, NY Rangers 1 Los Angeles 5, Edmonton 2

Friday Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Calgary at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Vancouver at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Blues at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday Buffalo at Boston, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Columbus, 6 p.m. Nashville at Montreal, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Toronto, 6 p.m.

Raptors 113, Knicks 88

Magic 100, Hawks 98

New York: Hardaway Jr. 4-14 0-0 9, Beasley 7-13 7-7 21, O’Quinn 4-10 1-2 9, Jack 4-7 1-1 10, Lee 1-6 2-2 4, Thomas 1-3 0-0 2, Hicks 2-5 1-2 5, Kornet 4-9 0-0 11, Ntilikina 2-6 1-2 5, Burke 4-9 2-2 12, Dotson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-83 15-18 88. Toronto: Anunoby 2-5 1-1 6, Ibaka 4-12 2-2 13, Valanciunas 7-12 2-4 18, Lowry 2-10 1-2 7, DeRozan 2-11 3-3 8, Powell 0-2 0-0 0, Miles 4-8 0-0 11, Siakam 6-9 1-1 14, Poeltl 6-7 1-1 13, Nogueira 1-2 0-0 2, VanVleet 4-11 0-0 10, Wright 5-6 0-0 11. Totals 43-95 11-14 113. New York 18 23 25 22 — 88 Toronto 23 29 30 31 — 113 3-point goals: New York 7-27 (Kornet 3-7, Burke 2-3, Jack 1-2, Hardaway Jr. 1-6, Hicks 0-1, Dotson 0-1, O’Quinn 0-1, Thomas 0-2, Lee 0-4), Toronto 16-43 (Miles 3-5, Ibaka 3-7, Valanciunas 2-3, VanVleet 2-5, Lowry 2-8, Wright 1-1, Siakam 1-2, Anunoby 1-4, DeRozan 1-5, Nogueira 0-1, Powell 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New York 43 (Kornet 10), Toronto 52 (Valanciunas 10). Assists: New York 19 (Jack 6), Toronto 31 (VanVleet, Siakam 6). Total fouls: New York 15, Toronto 17. Technicals: New York coach Jeff Hornacek, Toronto coach Raptors (Defensive three second), Ibaka, DeRozan. A: 19,800 (19,800).

Atlanta: Prince 7-12 1-2 19, Ilyasova 2-4 1-2 5, Plumlee 2-2 0-0 4, Schroder 5-15 7-8 19, Bazemore 3-10 0-0 6, Muscala 2-5 1-1 5, Collins 4-9 0-0 9, Dedmon 3-11 0-0 8, Taylor 0-3 1-2 1, Delaney 4-6 1-2 11, Dorsey 5-9 0-1 11. Totals 37-86 12-18 98. Orlando: Simmons 5-11 2-2 13, Hezonja 2-7 4-6 8, Biyombo 5-9 0-0 10, Augustin 5-14 6-6 18, Fournier 7-14 6-6 22, Iwundu 2-5 0-0 4, Speights 5-12 0-0 14, Birch 1-1 0-0 2, Mack 4-10 1-2 9, Afflalo 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-85 19-22 100. Atlanta 23 16 31 28 — 98 Orlando 26 13 30 31 — 100 3-point goals: Atlanta 12-30 (Prince 4-7, Delaney 2-3, Schroder 2-4, Dedmon 2-8, Collins 1-1, Dorsey 1-3, Ilyasova 0-1, Bazemore 0-3), Orlando 9-30 (Speights 4-10, Fournier 2-4, Augustin 2-6, Simmons 1-1, Afflalo 0-1, Iwundu 0-1, Mack 0-3, Hezonja 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 47 (Collins 12), Orlando 36 (Hezonja 10). Assists: Atlanta 25 (Schroder, Prince 5), Orlando 20 (Augustin 9). Total fouls: Atlanta 23, Orlando 22. A: 16,215 (18,846).

Celtics 110, Wizards 104, OT Boston: Tatum 3-9 5-7 11, Horford 5-8 1-2 12, Baynes 1-3 0-0 2, Irving 9-19 9-10 28, Brown 7-16 1-2 18, Theis 3-4 0-2 7, Marc.Morris 5-14 4-4 15, Monroe 2-5 1-3 5, Rozier 4-6 2-4 12. Totals 39-84 23-34 110. Washington: Porter Jr. 9-18 6-6 27, Mark.Morris 3-6 2-2 9, Gortat 4-7 2-4 10, Satoransky 6-12 0-0 14, Beal 7-27 1-1 18, Oubre Jr. 3-10 3-4 11, Scott 3-5 0-1 7, Mahinmi 3-6 0-0 6, Frazier 0-3 0-0 0, Meeks 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 38-95 16-20 104. Boston 26 23 26 23 12 — 110 Washington 27 24 19 28 6 — 104 3-point goals: Boston 9-26 (Brown 3-8, Rozier 2-2, Theis 1-2, Marc.Morris 1-2, Horford 1-4, Irving 1-5, Tatum 0-3), Washington 12-26 (Porter Jr. 3-5, Beal 3-9, Satoransky 2-2, Oubre Jr. 2-4, Mark. Morris 1-2, Scott 1-3, Frazier 0-1). Fouled out: Mark. Morris. Rebounds: Boston 45 (Marc.Morris 8), Washington 52 (Porter Jr. 11). Assists: Boston 16 (Irving 6), Washington 28 (Beal 9). Total fouls: Boston 20, Washington 23. Technicals: Monroe, Marc.Morris, Rozier, Oubre Jr.. A: 20,356 (20,356).

Trail Blazers 109, Hornets103 Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-9 0-0 6, Williams 4-6 0-0 10, Howard 3-11 1-1 7, Walker 13-26 8-8 40, Batum 5-15 0-0 11, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Kaminsky 6-14 1-1 17, Zeller 1-3 2-4 4, Carter-Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Graham 0-1 1-2 1, Lamb 3-11 1-1 7. Totals 38-98 14-17 103. Portland: Harkless 4-7 0-0 8, Aminu 2-7 1-2 6, Nurkic 10-14 4-5 24, Lillard 6-22 3-3 18, McCollum 7-18 6-7 22, Turner 5-7 2-2 13, Davis 3-3 1-1 7, Leonard 1-2 0-0 3, Collins 2-6 1-2 6, Napier 0-3 0-0 0, Connaughton 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 41-90 18-22 109. Charlotte 18 27 20 32 6 — 103 Portland 29 20 30 18 12 — 109 3-point goals: Charlotte 13-33 (Walker 6-11, Kaminsky 4-8, Williams 2-3, Batum 1-8, Graham 0-1, Lamb 0-2), Portland 9-31 (Lillard 3-11, McCollum 2-5, Leonard 1-1, Turner 1-2, Aminu 1-2, Collins 1-4, Harkless 0-3, Napier 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 44 (Howard 15), Portland 57 (Aminu 15). Assists: Charlotte 17 (Batum 5), Portland 18 (Lillard 8). Total fouls: Charlotte 16, Portland 19. A: 19,178 (19,393).

Warriors 121, Mavericks 103 Dallas: Matthews 7-17 1-2 17, Nowitzki 6-10 3-3 16, Powell 7-9 4-4 18, Smith Jr. 8-18 2-2 22, Barea 2-9 2-2 6, Kleber 1-6 0-0 2, Mejri 5-10 0-0 10, Ferrell 3-9 1-2 9, Collinsworth 1-4 0-0 2, J.Jones 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 40-93 14-17 103. Golden State: Durant 8-13 4-4 24, Green 4-17 3-4 12, Pachulia 3-4 2-2 8, St.Curry 7-12 2-2 20, Thompson 8-15 0-0 18, Casspi 0-0 0-0 0, Looney 3-3 0-2 6, West 4-6 2-2 10, McGee 0-1 4-4 4, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6, Young 2-5 0-0 6, Iguodala 2-3 0-0 5, McCaw 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 45-88 17-20 121. Dallas 33 27 25 18 — 103 Golden State 23 37 33 28 — 121 3-point goals: Dallas 9-37 (Smith Jr. 4-9, Ferrell 2-5, Matthews 2-9, Nowitzki 1-4, J.Jones 0-1, Mejri 0-1, Kleber 0-3, Barea 0-5), Golden State 14-29 (Durant 4-6, St.Curry 4-9, Young 2-3, Thompson 2-6, Iguodala 1-2, Green 1-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 35 (Nowitzki 11), Golden State 51 (Green 10). Assists: Dallas 19 (Barea 8), Golden State 37 (St. Curry 8). Total fouls: Dallas 16, Golden State 18. Technicals: Matthews, Green. A: 19,596 (19,596).

Lakers 106, Thunder 81 Oklahoma City: George 11-25 2-6 29, Patterson 0-6 0-0 0, Adams 4-11 5-8 13, Felton 3-8 0-0 7, Huestis 0-3 0-0 0, Singler 1-2 1-2 3, Grant 4-9 0-0 8, Collison 2-2 0-2 4, Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Dozier 1-2 0-0 2, Abrines 3-10 1-1 8, Ferguson 0-5 0-0 0, Hamilton 2-5 0-0 5. Totals 32-90 9-19 81. L.A. Lakers: Hart 4-9 0-0 10, Randle 8-16 1-1 17, Lopez 4-14 1-2 9, Ingram 7-11 2-2 19, Caldwell-Pope 7-10 3-3 20, Kuzma 6-15 2-2 16, Brewer 3-6 0-0 6, Bryant 1-3 0-0 2, Zubac 2-6 3-3 7, Caruso 0-4 0-0 0, Ennis 0-0 0-0 0, Payton II 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 42-96 12-13 106. Oklahoma City 27 19 20 15 — 81 L.A. Lakers 30 22 31 23 — 106 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 8-34 (George 5-12, Felton 1-2, Hamilton 1-2, Abrines 1-6, Grant 0-1, Huestis 0-2, Ferguson 0-4, Patterson 0-5), L.A. Lakers 10-31 (Ingram 3-4, Caldwell-Pope 3-5, Hart 2-5, Kuzma 2-8, Bryant 0-1, Payton II 0-1, Randle 0-1, Caruso 0-2, Lopez 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 50 (George, Adams 9), L.A. Lakers 51 (Lopez, Kuzma 9). Assists: Oklahoma City 16 (Felton, George, Hamilton 3), L.A. Lakers 28 (Ingram 6). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 11, L.A. Lakers 19. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second). A: 18,997 (19,060).

Sunday Pittsburgh at Blues, 11 a.m. NY Rangers at Winnipeg, 2 p.m. Detroit at Washington, 2 p.m. Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m. Calgary at NY Islanders, 6 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Colorado at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Vegas, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Senators top Predators in OT ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Hofman scored 3:01 into overtime, lifting the host Ottawa Senators to a 4-3 victory over the Nashville Predators on Thursday night. Chris DiDomenico, Max McCormick and former Blues player Magnus Paajarvi also scored as the Senators (1925-9) won for the fourth time in five games. Craig Anderson made 35 saves for his 15th win of the season. P.K. Subban scored twice for the Predators (32-12-9), and Calle Jarnkrok picked up his 13th goal. Juuse Saros stopped 32 shots.

NOTEBOOK Rangers waive Smith • The New York Rangers have waived defenseman Brendan Smith, less than eight months after resigning him to a four-year, $17 million contract. Other news • Carolina placed forwards Marcus Kruger and Josh Jooris on waivers. The Hurricanes can send either or both to their AHL affiliate in Charlotte upon clearing waivers at noon Friday. ... Buffalo Sabres defenseman Jake McCabe will miss between three and four weeks after having surgery to repair a thumb injury.

NHL SUMMARIES Sabres 4, Islanders 3

Stars 4, Blackhawks 2

NY Islanders 0 1 2 — 3 Buffalo 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 22 (Reinhart, C.Nelson), 7:41. 2, Buffalo, Rodrigues 3 (Scandella, Reinhart), 13:21. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Buffalo, O’Reilly 16 (Ristolainen, Okposo), 7:18 (pp). 4, NY Islanders, Tavares 28 (Hickey, B.Nelson), 13:06. Penalties: Larsson, BUF, (high sticking), 2:06; Aho, NYI, (hooking), 6:49; Tavares, NYI, (high sticking), 10:50. Third period: 5, NY Islanders, Johnston 2 (Clutterbuck), 7:30. 6, NY Islanders, Lee 28 (Leddy, Bailey), 14:33 (pp). 7, Buffalo, Reinhart 11 (Rodrigues, Eichel), 15:46. Penalties: Antipin, BUF, (hooking), 1:34; Eichel, BUF, (tripping), 13:32. Shots: NY Islanders 10-10-9: 29. Buffalo 4-10-8: 22. Power-plays: NY Islanders 1 of 3; Buffalo 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 16-16-4 (22 shots-18 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 12-20-7 (29-26). A: 16,872.

Dallas 0 3 1 — 4 Chicago 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Chicago, Toews 15 (Seabrook), 9:07. Penalties: Klingberg, DAL, (delay of game), 5:55; Wingels, CHI, (slashing), 19:04. Second period: 2, Dallas, Seguin 27 (Radulov, Hamhuis), 5:44. 3, Dallas, Johns 7 (Faksa, Elie), 6:43. 4, Chicago, Anisimov 14 (Hinostroza, Seabrook), 12:48 (pp). 5, Dallas, Pitlick 10 (Klingberg), 19:55. Penalties: Benn, DAL, (high sticking), 7:17; Radulov, DAL, (holding), 11:40. Third period: 6, Dallas, Seguin 28 (Pateryn), 19:02. Penalties: Benn, DAL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 10:31. Shots: Dallas 14-9-7: 30. Chicago 12-17-10: 39. Power-plays: Dallas 0 of 1; Chicago 1 of 4. Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 23-14-3 (39 shots-37 saves). Chicago, Forsberg 5-9-3 (29-26). A: 21,422.

Senators 4, Predators 3, OT

NBA SUMMARIES

Colorado at Carolina, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 9 p.m.

Nashville 2 0 1 0 — 3 Ottawa 1 2 0 1 — 4 First period: 1, Nashville, Subban 14, 0:34. 2, Ottawa, DiDomenico 6 (Z.Smith, Dzingel), 8:00. 3, Nashville, Jarnkrok 13 (Hartnell, Bonino), 18:05. Penalties: Phaneuf, OTT, Major (fighting), 7:26; Hartnell, NSH, Major (fighting), 7:26; Pageau, OTT, (slashing), 12:09; Sissons, NSH, (holding), 18:22. Second period: 4, Ottawa, McCormick 1 (Dzingel, Borowiecki), 4:08. 5, Ottawa, Paajarvi 3 (Karlsson), 11:59. Penalties: Turris, NSH, (holding), 7:20. Third period: 6, NSH, Subban 15 (Josi, Hartnell), 15:42. Penalties: White, OTT, (tripping), 7:09. Overtime: 7, Ottawa, Hoffman 15 (Chabot), 3:01. Penalties: None. Shots: Nashville 9-4-18-3: 34. Ottawa 7-15-7-3: 32. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Ottawa 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Saros 5-4-5 (32 shots-28 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 15-17-5 (34-31).

Lightning 5, Canucks 2 Vancouver 0 0 2 — 2 Tampa Bay 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 28 (Killorn, Hedman), 14:36. Penalties: Johnson, TB, (slashing), 6:33; Boeser, VAN, (holding), 19:50. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Gourde 20 (Johnson, Sergachev), 1:38 (pp). 3, Tampa Bay, Erne 1 (Sustr, Namestnikov), 13:40. 4, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 20 (Johnson, Gourde), 17:14. Penalties: Hutton, VAN, (roughing), 7:15. Third period: 5, Vancouver, Boeser 26 (H.Sedin, Edler), 6:28 (pp). 6, Vancouver, Baertschi 12 (Edler, Horvat), 10:55. 7, Tampa Bay, Hedman 8 (Stamkos, Kucherov), 16:21 (pp). Penalties: Girardi, TB, (high sticking), 5:12; Girardi, TB, (high sticking), 5:12; Virtanen, VAN, (hooking), 15:59. Shots: VAN 10-9-10: 29. Tampa Bay 11-17-8: 36. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 3; Tampa Bay 2 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 6-9-1 (36 shots-31 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 32-10-2 (29-27). A: 19,092. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Jonny Murray.

Flames 3, Devils 2 Calgary 0 3 0 — 3 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Hamilton, CGY, (boarding), 11:38. Second period: 1, CGY, Monahan 26 (Giordano, Hamilton), 4:16. 2, NJD, Hall 20, 7:23. 3, CGY, Gaudreau 18 (Ferland), 14:33. 4, CGY, Monahan 27 (Brodie, Gaudreau), 18:05. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, NJD, Zacha 4 (Hall, Boyle), 7:23 (pp). Penalties: Hamonic, CGY, (high sticking), 6:49. Shots: Calgary 12-12-1: 25. New Jersey 8-12-12: 32. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 0; New Jersey 1 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 5-1-2 (32 shots-30 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 10-6-2 (25-22). A: 13,085.

Coyotes 4, Wild 3, OT Arizona 0 1 2 1 — 4 Minnesota 1 2 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Minnesota, Staal 24 (Spurgeon, Ennis), 17:13. Penalties: Martinook, ARI, (hooking), 8:04. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Cullen 5 (Dumba, Olofsson), 5:54. 3, Minnesota, Reilly 1 (Parise, Cullen), 9:59. 4, Arizona, Cousins 8 (Richardson, Goligoski), 11:30. Penalties: Koivu, MIN, (cross checking), 18:18. Third period: 5, ARI, Connauton 4 (Stepan, Goligoski), 8:02. 6, ARI, Cousins 9 (Stepan, Ekman-Larsson), 19:41. Penalties: None. Overtime: 7, Arizona, Keller 15 (Connauton, Perlini), 3:55. Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 11-14-13-2: 40. Minnesota 12-7-6-3: 28. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 1; Minnesota 0 of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 9-14-5 (28 shots-25 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 21-10-4 (40-36). A: 18,816.

Flyers 5, Canadiens 3 Montreal 0 2 1 — 3 Philadelphia 0 2 3 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Plekanec, MTL, (holding), 4:06; Giroux, PHI, (interference), 6:24. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 12 (Giroux, Couturier), 0:42. 2, Montreal, Lehkonen 5, 9:09 (sh). 3, Philadelphia, Giroux 16 (Simmonds, Gostisbehere), 9:37 (pp). 4, Montreal, Shaw 4 (Froese), 18:49. Penalties: Plekanec, MTL, (tripping), 6:22; Froese, MTL, (slashing), 8:44; Patrick, PHI, (holding), 12:38; Plekanec, MTL, (hooking), 19:21. Third period: 5, Philadelphia, Voracek 11 (Gostisbehere, Giroux), 0:27 (pp). 6, Philadelphia, Konecny 13 (Gostisbehere), 1:28. 7, Montreal, Gallagher 19 (Drouin, Galchenyuk), 17:06 (pp). 8, Philadelphia, Provorov 10 (Elliott), 19:04. Penalties: Konecny, PHI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 11:30; Drouin, MTL, (tripping), 11:30; Laughton, PHI, (holding), 16:30. Shots: Montreal 9-8-11: 28. Philadelphia 10-7-11: 28. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 3; Philadelphia 2 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 15-20-4 (27 shots-23 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 21-11-7 (28-25). A: 19,655.

Knights 5, Sharks 3 Vegas 1 1 3 — 5 San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, San Jose, Pavelski 11 (Burns, Meier), 4:40. 2, Vegas, Haula 21 (Miller, Perron), 14:00. Penalties: Theodore, VGK, (slashing), 9:19. Second period: 3, Vegas, W.Karlsson 29 (Marchessault, Smith), 0:37. 4, San Jose, Meier 13 (Tierney, Burns), 11:47 (pp). Penalties: Marchessault, VGK, (holding), 4:10; San Jose bench, served by Labanc (too many men on the ice), 5:02; Eakin, VGK, (hooking), 10:13; M.Karlsson, SJ, served by O’Regan, (slashing), 12:46. Third period: 5, San Jose, Pavelski 12 (Burns, Couture), 7:45 (pp). 6, Vegas, McNabb 3 (Eakin, Lindberg), 9:36. 7, Vegas, Neal 24 (Perron, Miller), 15:10. 8, Vegas, Marchessault 20 (Schmidt, Smith), 18:39 (pp). Penalties: Boedker, SJ, (tripping), 3:09; Tuch, VGK, (high sticking), 6:47; Tierney, SJ, (tripping), 10:11; DeMelo, SJ, (high sticking), 17:47. Shots: Vegas 4-17-12: 33. San Jose 16-9-13: 38. Power-plays: Vegas 1 of 5; San Jose 2 of 4. Goalies: Vegas, Fleury 16-5-2 (38 shots-35 saves). San Jose, Jones 15-14-5 (32-28). A: 17,562.

NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Wednesday’s games Player, team GP Nikita Kucherov, TB 53 Phil Kessel, PIT 55 Connor McDavid, EDM 52 Evgeni Malkin, PIT 51 Jakub Voracek, PHI 53 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 49 Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 53 Steven Stamkos, TB 53 Sidney Crosby, PIT 55 John Tavares, NYI 54 Alex Ovechkin, WAS 53 Claude Giroux, PHI 53 Blake Wheeler, WPG 54 Anze Kopitar, LA 53 Josh Bailey, NYI 50 2 tied with 53 pts.

G 27 24 22 30 10 24 16 19 17 27 32 15 14 21 13

A 39 41 41 32 52 37 45 41 43 32 26 43 44 36 44

PTS 66 65 63 62 62 61 61 60 60 59 58 58 58 57 57


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

Badgers pull away late Cunningham’s 29 points for victory over Illini lead Mizzou by Kentucky ROUNDUP

ASSOCIATED PRESS

North Carolina’s Joel Berry II goes up for a shot in Thursday’s win over Duke.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

WIRE AND STAFF REPORTS

The No. 15 Missouri women’s basketball team blitzed visiting Kentucky from the opening tip and held on for an 83-78 victory Thursday night. The Tigers (19-5, 7-4 Southeastern Conference) shot 78 percent in the first quarter to secure an early cushion then survived an injury scare from star player Sophie Cunningham. The junior guard took herself out of the game late in the second quarter grasping her right thumb in pain. With the Tigers ahead 41-32, Cunningham started the second half and finished with a game-high 29 points. The Wildcats (12-13, 4-7) got within seven points with an 8-0 run midway through the fourth quarter, but Cunningham responded with her fifth 3-pointer to push the lead back to double digits. But Kentucky wouldn’t go away, getting back within three points on Taylor Murray’s 3-pointer with seven seconds left. Cunningham clinched the victory with two free throws on MU’s final possession. Murray led Kentucky with 23 points. Cierra Porter gave the Tigers 16 points and 13 rebounds, while Jordan Frericks added 15 points and Amber Smith scored 13. (Dave Matter)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois guard Te’Jon Lucas lips up a shot between Ethan Happ (top) and Brad Davison.

“Ethan did a real good job. He had eight assists. He’s a pretty complete player. It was very unselfish of him to find guys and CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It took Wisconsin his teammates did a good job of finding 17 seconds Thursday to demonstrate how him at opportune times. “There hasn’t been a game when he and why it would extend its seven-year hasn’t been double-teamed or tripledomination over the Illini. Seventeen seconds is what it took for teamed.” Not even freshman guard Trent Frazier Ethan Happ to score from directly under the basket. Then Wisconsin’s crafty, mo- could offset what Happ was doing and Frazier gave it a heck of a bile, 6-foot-10 junior did try. He scored a careerit again. And again. And WISCONSIN 78, ILLINOIS 69 FG FT Reb high 32 points, made 7 of six times in a row before WISCONSIN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Ford 23 1-5 2-2 1-3 1 4 5 11 from 3-point range and one of his point-blank Happ 32 12-20 3-5 2-6 8 3 27 tried to keep the Illini in shots failed to failed to Reuvers 24 3-4 2-2 0-0 2 4 9 30 4-7 4-6 1-3 5 2 14 it nearly by himself in the find its way into the bas- Davison Iverson 35 1-5 1-4 3-9 2 3 3 Pritzl 28 3-4 6-6 0-6 2 3 15 second half. ket. Illikainen 15 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 3 He had a bit of help Illinois’ inability to Van Vliet 6 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Moesch 5 0-0 2-2 0-1 0 0 2 from Leron Black, who solve Happ’s free-wheel- Schlundt 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 contributed 13 points and ing drives to the hoop Totals 200 25-47 20-27 7-30 20 22 78 FG.532, FT.741. 3-point 11 rebounds. But while paved the way to Wis- Percentages: goals: 8-15, .533. Team rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: 10. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: those two were making consin’s 78-69 victory 10. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. 16 of 32 shots, the rest of and the program’s 13th FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS the Illini team was makstraight triumph over ILLINOIS Black 31 6-12 1-2 6-11 0 2 13 22 1-2 1-4 0-1 0 3 4 ing just 5 of 23. Illinois. It also ended Finke Nichols 15 0-1 0-0 1-1 1 1 0 Mark Alstork, who Wisconsin’s recent five- Alstork 29 1-9 6-7 0-4 0 3 8 Frazier 33 10-20 5-6 0-1 2 3 32 scored 19 Sunday at Ohio game losing streak. Lucas 21 0-3 0-0 0-2 4 4 0 State, was 1 for 9. How long has it been Jordan 21 2-3 4-4 2-5 0 2 9 Smith 14 1-5 1-1 0-0 0 2 3 Wisconsin was in since Illinois beat Wis- Eboigbodin 13 0-0 0-0 1-1 0 4 0 Williams 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 front 54-52 with 9:36 to consin? Totals 200 21-55 18-24 10-26 7 24 69 play when Happ went to When it last happened Percentages: FG.382, FT.750. 3-point goals: 9-24, Team rebounds: 4. Team the bench with his third – on Jan. 2, 2011 – Deme- Turnovers: 11..375. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: foul. That seemed to be tri McCamey was Illinois’ 11. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. Wisconsin 36 42 — 78 a chance for the Illini to lead guard. He scored Illinois 33 36 — 69 make a move. 21 points and Mike Da- A: 13,062. But with Happ out, vis added 11 and 14 rebounds. Peorian Bill Cole chipped in with Wisconsin actually increased its lead. A basket by Nate Reuvers made it 56-52 and 11 more points. Yep, Illinois (12-13, 2-10) hasn’t beaten following a turnover by Illinois’ Aaron Wisconsin since fans were arguing about Jordan, Khalil Iverson scored to put Wisconsin ahead 58-52. the value of Bill Cole. At the 7:56 mark, Happ returned and Those days are long gone and today fans can argue how Illinois should have quickly scored on another layup to make defended Happ. Because whoever was it 60-52, giving the Badgers a bit of on him Thursday night at the State Farm breathing room. Frazier was at his best when he personCenter failed to slow him down much. And Michael Finke, Mark Alstork, Kip- ally scored 11 straight points for the Ilper Nichols and Leron Black took turns lini in the second half. The highlight came when he used a crossover dribble to lose trying. And when it wasn’t Happ scoring, it Happ and launched a rainbow 3 that tied was Happ passing out of trouble to open the game 44-44. He tied it twice more with 3-pointers, 3-point shooters. Wisconsin (11-15, 4-9) worked the inside-out game beautifully, first at 49-49, then at 52-52. But that’s when Wisconsin began pulling away. hitting 8 of 15 3s. Illinois hosts Penn State at 6 p.m., “When Illinois puts that type of pressure on (Happ), we have to find other Sunday. ways,” Wisconsin coach Greg Gard said. BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & review

Tar Heels upend archrival Duke • Joel Berry II scored 21 points and No. 21 North Carolina rallied from 12 down in the first half to beat visiting No. 9 Duke 8278 in Thursday’s renewal of the fierce rivalry. Kenny Williams made six 3-pointers and matched his career high with 20 points for the Tar Heels (18-7, 7-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who roared out of halftime with a 16-2 run. Gary Trent Jr. scored 16 points to lead the Blue Devils (19-5, 7-4). (AP)

AREA SEMO rallies for road win • Freshman Justin Carpenter scored 20 points and sophomore Denzel Mahoney added 15 points to go over 1,000 in his career, leading Southeast Missouri to a 78-62 win over host Morehead State in Kentucky. SEMO (11-15, 5-8 Ohio Valley) trailed by one at halftime but opened the second stanza with a 12-2 run to take control and went on to snap a four-game losing streak. (AP) Eastern Illinois wins at SIUE • Montell Goodwin scored 21 points and Ray Crossland and Muusa Dama added 17 apiece as the visiting Panthers held on for a 78-74 win at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Thursday. Eastern (9-15, 5-8 Ohio Valley) hit six free throws in the final 16 seconds to secure the win. Daniel Kinchen scored 21 to lead the Cougars (8-16, 4-9). (Staf report) Illinois State wins in OT • Elijah Clarance and William Tinsley combined for 29 points of the bench and Illinois State (14-11, 8-5 Missouri Valley) posted a 76-68 overtime win over visiting Southern Illinois University Carbondale (16-10, 8-5). (AP)

1. Villanova (22-2) idle. Next: vs. Butler, Saturday. 2. Virginia (23-1) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Saturday. 3. Purdue (23-3) idle. Next: at No. 4 Michigan State, Saturday. 4. Michigan State (23-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 Purdue, Saturday. 5. Xavier (22-3) idle. Next: at Creighton, Saturday. 6. Cincinnati (22-2) idle. Next: at SMU, Sunday. 7. Texas Tech (20-4) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Saturday. 8. Auburn (21-3) idle. Next: at Georgia, Saturday. 9. Duke (19-5) lost to No. 21 North Carolina 82-78. Next: at Georgia Tech, Sunday. 10. Kansas (19-5) idle. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. 11. Saint Mary’s (24-2) beat Loyola Marymount 83-62. Next: vs. No. 12 Gonzaga, Saturday. 12. Gonzaga (22-4) beat Pacific 71-61. Next: at No. 11 Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 13. Arizona (19-6) lost to UCLA 82-74. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Saturday. 14. Ohio State (21-5) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Saturday. 15. Tennessee (18-5) idle. Next: at Alabama, Saturday. 16. Clemson (20-4) beat Pittsburgh 72-48. Next: at Florida State, Wednesday. 17. Oklahoma (16-7) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 18. Rhode Island (19-3) idle. Next: vs. Davidson, Friday. 19. West Virginia (18-6) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 20. Michigan (19-7) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Sunday. 21. North Carolina (18-7) beat No. 9 Duke 82-78. Next: at N.C. State, Saturday. 22. Wichita State (18-5) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Saturday. 23. Nevada (20-5) idle. Next: vs. San Diego State, Saturday. 24. Kentucky (17-7) idle. Next: at Texas A&M, Saturday. 25. Miami (18-5) idle. Next: at Boston College, Saturday.

FEB 9-11

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COLLEGE BASKETBALL

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

Badgers pull away late Cunningham’s 29 points for victory over Illini lead Mizzou by Kentucky ROUNDUP

ASSOCIATED PRESS

North Carolina’s Joel Berry II goes up for a shot in Thursday’s win over Duke.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

WIRE AND STAFF REPORTS

The No. 15 Missouri women’s basketball team blitzed visiting Kentucky from the opening tip and held on for an 83-78 victory Thursday night. The Tigers (19-5, 7-4 Southeastern Conference) shot 78 percent in the first quarter to secure an early cushion then survived an injury scare from star player Sophie Cunningham. The junior guard took herself out of the game late in the second quarter grasping her right thumb in pain. With the Tigers ahead 41-32, Cunningham started the second half and finished with a game-high 29 points. The Wildcats (12-13, 4-7) got within seven points with an 8-0 run midway through the fourth quarter, but Cunningham responded with her fifth 3-pointer to push the lead back to double digits. But Kentucky wouldn’t go away, getting back within three points on Taylor Murray’s 3-pointer with seven seconds left. Cunningham clinched the victory with two free throws on MU’s final possession. Murray led Kentucky with 23 points. Cierra Porter gave the Tigers 16 points and 13 rebounds, while Jordan Frericks added 15 points and Amber Smith scored 13. (Dave Matter)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois guard Te’Jon Lucas lips up a shot between Ethan Happ (top) and Brad Davison.

“Ethan did a real good job. He had eight assists. He’s a pretty complete player. It was very unselfish of him to find guys and CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It took Wisconsin his teammates did a good job of finding 17 seconds Thursday to demonstrate how him at opportune times. “There hasn’t been a game when he and why it would extend its seven-year hasn’t been double-teamed or tripledomination over the Illini. Seventeen seconds is what it took for teamed.” Not even freshman guard Trent Frazier Ethan Happ to score from directly under the basket. Then Wisconsin’s crafty, mo- could offset what Happ was doing and Frazier gave it a heck of a bile, 6-foot-10 junior did try. He scored a careerit again. And again. And WISCONSIN 78, ILLINOIS 69 FG FT Reb high 32 points, made 7 of six times in a row before WISCONSIN Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Ford 23 1-5 2-2 1-3 1 4 5 11 from 3-point range and one of his point-blank Happ 32 12-20 3-5 2-6 8 3 27 tried to keep the Illini in shots failed to failed to Reuvers 24 3-4 2-2 0-0 2 4 9 30 4-7 4-6 1-3 5 2 14 it nearly by himself in the find its way into the bas- Davison Iverson 35 1-5 1-4 3-9 2 3 3 Pritzl 28 3-4 6-6 0-6 2 3 15 second half. ket. Illikainen 15 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 3 He had a bit of help Illinois’ inability to Van Vliet 6 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0 Moesch 5 0-0 2-2 0-1 0 0 2 from Leron Black, who solve Happ’s free-wheel- Schlundt 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 contributed 13 points and ing drives to the hoop Totals 200 25-47 20-27 7-30 20 22 78 FG.532, FT.741. 3-point 11 rebounds. But while paved the way to Wis- Percentages: goals: 8-15, .533. Team rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: 10. Blocked shots: 6. Turnovers: those two were making consin’s 78-69 victory 10. Steals: 6. Technical fouls: None. 16 of 32 shots, the rest of and the program’s 13th FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS the Illini team was makstraight triumph over ILLINOIS Black 31 6-12 1-2 6-11 0 2 13 22 1-2 1-4 0-1 0 3 4 ing just 5 of 23. Illinois. It also ended Finke Nichols 15 0-1 0-0 1-1 1 1 0 Mark Alstork, who Wisconsin’s recent five- Alstork 29 1-9 6-7 0-4 0 3 8 Frazier 33 10-20 5-6 0-1 2 3 32 scored 19 Sunday at Ohio game losing streak. Lucas 21 0-3 0-0 0-2 4 4 0 State, was 1 for 9. How long has it been Jordan 21 2-3 4-4 2-5 0 2 9 Smith 14 1-5 1-1 0-0 0 2 3 Wisconsin was in since Illinois beat Wis- Eboigbodin 13 0-0 0-0 1-1 0 4 0 Williams 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 front 54-52 with 9:36 to consin? Totals 200 21-55 18-24 10-26 7 24 69 play when Happ went to When it last happened Percentages: FG.382, FT.750. 3-point goals: 9-24, Team rebounds: 4. Team the bench with his third – on Jan. 2, 2011 – Deme- Turnovers: 11..375. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: foul. That seemed to be tri McCamey was Illinois’ 11. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. Wisconsin 36 42 — 78 a chance for the Illini to lead guard. He scored Illinois 33 36 — 69 make a move. 21 points and Mike Da- A: 13,062. But with Happ out, vis added 11 and 14 rebounds. Peorian Bill Cole chipped in with Wisconsin actually increased its lead. A basket by Nate Reuvers made it 56-52 and 11 more points. Yep, Illinois (12-13, 2-10) hasn’t beaten following a turnover by Illinois’ Aaron Wisconsin since fans were arguing about Jordan, Khalil Iverson scored to put Wisconsin ahead 58-52. the value of Bill Cole. At the 7:56 mark, Happ returned and Those days are long gone, and today fans can argue how Illinois should have quickly scored on another layup to make defended Happ. Because whoever was it 60-52, giving the Badgers a bit of on him Thursday night at the State Farm breathing room. Frazier was at his best when he personCenter failed to slow him down much. And Michael Finke, Mark Alstork, Kip- ally scored 11 straight points for the Ilper Nichols and Leron Black took turns lini in the second half. The highlight came when he used a crossover dribble to lose trying. And when it wasn’t Happ scoring, it Happ and launched a rainbow 3 that tied was Happ passing out of trouble to open the game 44-44. He tied it twice more with 3-pointers, 3-point shooters. Wisconsin (11-15, 4-9) worked the inside-out game beautifully, first at 49-49, then at 52-52. But that’s when Wisconsin began pulling away. hitting 8 of 15 3s. Illinois hosts Penn State at 6 p.m., “When Illinois puts that type of pressure on (Happ), we have to find other Sunday. ways,” Wisconsin coach Greg Gard said. BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & review

Tar Heels upend archrival Duke • Joel Berry II scored 21 points and No. 21 North Carolina rallied from 12 down in the first half to beat visiting No. 9 Duke 8278 in Thursday’s renewal of the fierce rivalry. Kenny Williams made six 3-pointers and matched his career high with 20 points for the Tar Heels (18-7, 7-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who roared out of halftime with a 16-2 run. Gary Trent Jr. scored 16 points to lead the Blue Devils (19-5, 7-4). (AP)

AREA SEMO rallies for road win • Freshman Justin Carpenter scored 20 points and sophomore Denzel Mahoney added 15 points to go over 1,000 in his career, leading Southeast Missouri to a 78-62 win over host Morehead State in Kentucky. SEMO (11-15, 5-8 Ohio Valley) trailed by one at halftime but opened the second stanza with a 12-2 run to take control and went on to snap a four-game losing streak. (AP) Eastern Illinois wins at SIUE • Montell Goodwin scored 21 points and Ray Crossland and Muusa Dama added 17 apiece as the visiting Panthers held on for a 78-74 win at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Thursday. Eastern (9-15, 5-8 Ohio Valley) hit six free throws in the final 16 seconds to secure the win. Daniel Kinchen scored 21 to lead the Cougars (8-16, 4-9). (Staf report) Illinois State wins in OT • Elijah Clarance and William Tinsley combined for 29 points of the bench and Illinois State (14-11, 8-5 Missouri Valley) posted a 76-68 overtime win over visiting Southern Illinois University Carbondale (16-10, 8-5). (AP)

1. Villanova (22-2) idle. Next: vs. Butler, Saturday. 2. Virginia (23-1) idle. Next: vs. Virginia Tech, Saturday. 3. Purdue (23-3) idle. Next: at No. 4 Michigan State, Saturday. 4. Michigan State (23-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 3 Purdue, Saturday. 5. Xavier (22-3) idle. Next: at Creighton, Saturday. 6. Cincinnati (22-2) idle. Next: at SMU, Sunday. 7. Texas Tech (20-4) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Saturday. 8. Auburn (21-3) idle. Next: at Georgia, Saturday. 9. Duke (19-5) lost to No. 21 North Carolina 82-78. Next: at Georgia Tech, Sunday. 10. Kansas (19-5) idle. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. 11. Saint Mary’s (24-2) beat Loyola Marymount 83-62. Next: vs. No. 12 Gonzaga, Saturday. 12. Gonzaga (22-4) beat Pacific 71-61. Next: at No. 11 Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 13. Arizona (19-6) lost to UCLA 82-74. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Saturday. 14. Ohio State (21-5) idle. Next: vs. Iowa, Saturday. 15. Tennessee (18-5) idle. Next: at Alabama, Saturday. 16. Clemson (20-4) beat Pittsburgh 72-48. Next: at Florida State, Wednesday. 17. Oklahoma (16-7) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 18. Rhode Island (19-3) idle. Next: vs. Davidson, Friday. 19. West Virginia (18-6) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 20. Michigan (19-7) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Sunday. 21. North Carolina (18-7) beat No. 9 Duke 82-78. Next: at N.C. State, Saturday. 22. Wichita State (18-5) idle. Next: vs. UConn, Saturday. 23. Nevada (20-5) idle. Next: vs. San Diego State, Saturday. 24. Kentucky (17-7) idle. Next: at Texas A&M, Saturday. 25. Miami (18-5) idle. Next: at Boston College, Saturday.

FEB 9-11

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FOR THE RECORD

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1 TRANSACTIONS

AMERICA’S LINE

BASEBALL MLB — Suspended free agent minor league RHP Landon Hughes 68 games and Boston C Jacob Romanski (Pawtucket-IL) 100 games, both without pay, for their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE — Named Adam Esselman coordinator of baseball information. WHITE SOX — Named Dave Duncan pitching consultant. Agreed to terms with LHP Xavier Cedeno, INF Jake Elmore and RHPs Jeanmar Gomez and Bruce Rondon on minor league contracts. CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RHP Stephen Fife on a minor league contract. National League MIAMI — Agreed to terms with RHPs Tyler Cloyd, Jumbo Diaz, Javy Guerra, Drew Rucinski, Jacob Turner, and Alex Wimmers; LHP Mike Kickham; C Bryan Holaday; INFs Cristhian Adames, Johnny Giavotella, Yadiel Rivera, and Jonathan Rodriguez, and OFs Rafael Ortega, JB Shuck, and Scott Van Slyke on minor league contracts. METS — Renewed their player development contract with Columbia (SAL) through 2020. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA — Acquired F Okaro White from Miami for F Luke Babbitt and then waived White. BOSTON — Signed C Greg Monroe. BROOKLYN — Acquired F Dante Cunningham from New Orleans for G Rashad Vaughn. CHICAGO — Acquired C Willie Reed and the right to swap 2022 second-round draft picks from Detroit for G Jameer Nelson and then waived Reed. Acquired F Noah Vonleh and cash considerations from Portland for the draft rights to C Milovan Rakovic. CLEVELAND — Acquired G Jordan Clarkson and F Larry Nance Jr. from the Los Angeles Lakers for G Isaiah Thomas, F Channing Frye and a 2018 protected first-round draft pick. MIAMI — Acquired G Dwyane Wade from Cleveland for a protected 2024 second-round draft pick. Waived C AJ Hammons. WASHINGTON — Traded G-F Sheldon Mac and cash considerations to Atlanta for a protected 2019 second round draft pick. Women’s National Basketball Association ATLANTA — Signed F Angel McCoughtry to a multiyear contract. HOCKEY | NHL CAROLINA — Placed Fs Marcus Kruger and Josh Jooris on waivers. NEW JERSEY — Recalled F Jimmy Hayes from his conditioning loan to Binghamton (AHL). Acquired Fs Christoph Bertschy and Mario Lucia from Minnesota for D Viktor Loov. NY RANGERS — Recalled D Neal Pionk from Hartford (AHL). Waived D Brendan Smith. SOCCER Major League Soccer KANSAS CITY — Traded G Andrew Dykstra to Colorado for a 2020 second-round draft pick. United Soccer League USL — Named Brad Baker vice president of broadcasting, effective Feb. 13. OTTAWA FURY FC — Signed MF Cristian Portilla and D Kyle Porter. COLLEGE EASTERN MICHIGAN — Named Ben Needham assistant football coach. NEW MEXICO — Suspended football coach Bob Davie for 30 days without pay, following multiple investigations that examined whether he and coaching staff interfered with criminal investigations or misconduct cases involving players. TENNESSEE — Named Tyson Helton offensive coordinator, Kevin Sherrer defensive coordinator/inside linebackers coach, Terry Fair cornerbacks coach, Craig Fitzgerald strength coach, Will Friend offensive line coach, Robert Gillespie running backs coach, David Johnson receivers coach, Charles Kelly special teams coordinator, Brian Niedermeyer tight ends coach, Tracy Rocker defensive line coach, Chris Rumph co-defensive coordinator/ outside linebackers coach, Drew Hughes director of player personnel and Todd Watson director of football operations. TCU — Pormoted Jeremy Modkins to cornerbacks coach. UCONN — Reinstated F Eric Cobb to the men’s basketball team. VANDERBILT — Named Jason Tarver defensive coordinator, Shawn Mennenga special teams coordinator, Aaron Moorehead wide receivers coach and Terrence Brown cornerbacks coach. WISCONSIN — Named Alando Tucker director for sudent-athlete engagement.

NBA Favorite Points Underdog 76ERS 5.5 Pelicans PISTONS 3.5 Clippers Cavaliers NL HAWKS CELTICS 4 Pacers HEAT 1.5 Bucks T’Wolves 6.5 BULLS ROCKETS 8.5 Nuggets JAZZ 5.5 Hornets Blazers 6 KINGS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Penn 7 DARTMOUTH HARVARD 1.5 Princeton BROWN 6.5 Cornell YALE 4.5 Columbia RHODE ISLAND 6.5 Davidson 7 Minnesota INDIANA OAKLAND 14 Detroit Write-In Games Toledo 3 MIAMI-OHIO BALL ST 5 Kent St Added Game IDAHO 6 E Washington NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Flames -$120/even RANGERS CAPITALS -$145/+$125 Blue Jackets ISLANDERS -$125/+$105 Red Wings HURRICANES -$175/+$155 Canucks Kings -$110/-$110 PANTHERS JETS -$135/+$115 Blues STARS -$110/-$110 Penguins DUCKS -$135/+$115 Oilers Grand Salami: Over/under 46.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

GOLF PGA | Pebble Beach Thurs. | Pebble Beach, Calif. | Purse: $7.4M At p-Pebble Beach GL, YDS: 6,816; Par: 72 At s-Spyglass Hill, YDS: 6,953; Par: 72 At m-Monterey Peninsula, YDS: 6,958; Par: 71 First Round Kevin Streelman 33-32 — 65 -7s Beau Hossler 34-31 — 65 -7p Matt Kuchar 32-34 — 66 -6s Aaron Wise 31-34 — 65 -6m Julian Suri 34-32 — 66 -6s Cameron Percy 33-33 — 66 -5m Chez Reavie 33-34 — 67 -5p Patrick Cantlay 34-32 — 66 -5m Troy Merritt 36-31 — 67 -5p Will Zalatoris 34-33 — 67 -5s Rob Oppenheim 34-33 — 67 -5p Paul Casey 33-34 — 67 -5p Dustin Johnson 33-34 — 67 -5s Keith Mitchell 34-33 — 67 -5s Zecheng Dou 33-34 — 67 -5p Shane Lowry 31-36 — 67 -4m Rory McIlroy 34-34 — 68 -4s Jon Rahm 31-36 — 67 -4m Charley Hoffman 33-34 — 67 -4m Chris Stroud 33-35 — 68 -4s Talor Gooch 32-35 — 67 -4m Stephan Jaeger 34-34 — 68 -4p Chris Kirk 32-35 — 67 -4m Tyrone Van Aswegen 31-36 — 67 -4m Jimmy Walker 35-33 — 68 -4s Branden Grace 32-36 — 68 -4p Ted Potter, Jr. 34-34 — 68 -4p Peter Malnati 32-35 — 67 -4m Jonas Blixt 32-35 — 67 -4m Ben Crane 34-34 — 68 -4p Xinjun Zhang 31-37 — 68 -4p Chesson Hadley 34-34 — 68 -3m Ryan Blaum 33-35 — 68 -3m Alex Cejka 34-35 — 69 -3s Gary Woodland 35-34 — 69 -3s Pat Perez 33-35 — 68 -3m Phil Mickelson 38-31 — 69 -3s Martin Piller 32-36 — 68 -3m Nicholas Lindheim 33-35 — 68 -3m Jonathan Randolph 34-35 — 69 -3s Zac Blair 36-33 — 69 -3s Derek Fathauer 36-33 — 69 -3p Russell Henley 33-35 — 68 -3m Brendon de Jonge 33-36 — 69 -3p Ben Martin 36-32 — 68 -3m Brandon Harkins 34-34 — 68 -3m Rory Sabbatini 33-35 — 68 -3m Bubba Watson 32-36 — 68 -3m Jason Day 34-35 — 69 -3s Brian Gay 37-32 — 69 -3s Steve Stricker 34-35 — 69 -3s Corey Conners 34-34 — 68 -3m George McNeill 36-34 — 70 -2p Rafa Cabrera Bello 36-33 — 69 -2m Derek Ernst 33-36 — 69 -2m D.A. Points 35-35 — 70 -2s Sean O’Hair 33-36 — 69 -2m Cameron Tringale 34-36 — 70 -2p Dominic Bozzelli 34-35 — 69 -2m Daniel Summerhays 34-36 — 70 -2s Jason Kokrak 34-36 — 70 -2s Ricky Barnes 34-36 — 70 -2p Rod Pampling 34-35 — 69 -2m K.J. Choi 35-34 — 69 -2m Nick Watney 35-35 — 70 -2s Ryan Armour 36-34 — 70 -2p Kevin Na 36-34 — 70 -2s Eric Axley 35-34 — 69 -2m

Robert Garrigus Patrick Rodgers Vaughn Taylor Brandt Snedeker Kevin Kisner David Hearn Hunter Mahan Joel Dahmen Andrew Putnam Nate Lashley Paul Dunne J.T. Poston Matt Every Russell Knox Mac Hughes Scott Piercy J.B. Holmes Brice Garnett Robert Streb J.J. Henry Aaron Baddeley Greg Chalmers Graeme McDowell Sangmoon Bae Bryson DeChambeau Jim Herman Billy Horschel Bronson Burgoon Ben Silverman Tyler Duncan Austin Cook Scott Stallings Trey Mullinax Denny McCarthy Shawn Stefani Fabian Gomez Jason Bohn Adam Schenk Kyle Thompson Steve Wheatcroft Jerry Kelly Jordan Spieth Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Brett Stegmaier Charlie Beljan Stewart Cink Kevin Chappell Jonathan Byrd Johnson Wagner Brian Stuard Stuart Appleby Matt Atkins Kelly Kraft Scott Brown William McGirt Cameron Davis Seamus Power Sam Ryder James Hahn Matt Jones Grayson Murray Billy Hurley III Maverick McNealy Rick Lamb Richy Werenski Nick Taylor Tim Herron Luke Donald Conrad Shindler David Solomon Cody Gribble Vijay Singh Tom Hoge Patrick Reed Andrew Yun Colt Knost Roberto Diaz Lanto Griffin Padraig Harrington Adam Scott Ethan Tracy Ernie Els Mike Weir Peter Jacobsen Angel Cabrera Ken Duke David Duval

33-37 36-34 36-34 36-35 37-34 33-38 34-37 33-38 33-37 34-36 35-36 35-36 35-35 33-38 36-35 32-39 39-32 34-37 31-40 36-35 35-35 35-35 34-37 34-37 33-37 34-36 36-35 36-34 33-37 36-36 38-34 36-36 36-36 36-36 35-37 35-37 35-36 32-39 34-38 36-35 35-37 36-36 36-36 35-37 36-36 34-38 34-39 38-35 39-34 37-36 35-37 36-37 34-38 36-37 36-37 35-38 35-38 33-39 37-36 36-38 35-39 37-37 38-36 38-36 38-36 35-38 35-40 35-40 38-37 35-40 37-37 37-38 35-40 35-40 35-40 38-37 42-34 38-37 39-37 41-34 40-37 38-38 38-39 38-39 38-40 41-37 40-39 38-41

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70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 70 70 71 71 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 70 70 71 71 70 70 71 70 70 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 71 71 72 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 72 73 72 73 73 73 73 72 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 73 75 75 75 75 74 75 75 75 75 75 76 75 76 75 77 76 77 77 78 78 79 79

-2p -2s -1m -1s -1s -1p -1s -1p -1m -1m -1s -1p -1m -1s -1s -1p -1p -1p -1p -1p -1m -1m -1p -1p -1m -1m -1s -1m -1m Ep Ep Ep Es Ep Es Ep Em Em Es Em Es Es Es Es Ep +1m +1p +1s +1p +1p +1m +1s +1m +1s +1p +1s +1p +1m +1p +2s +2p +2p +2p +2s +2p +2m +3p +3p +3s +3p +3m +3s +3p +3p +3p +3s +4s +4m +4p +4m +5s +5m +5s +5s +6s +6p +7s +8m

EURO TOUR | Perth leaders Thursday | Perth, Australia Purse: $1.75M | Yards: 7,143; Par: 72 (36-36) Leading Scores Brett Rumford 35-29 — 64 James Nitties 32-34 — 66 Lee Westwood 34-32 — 66 Wade Ormsby 34-33 — 67 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 31-36 — 67 Yikeun Chang 32-35 — 67 Gareth Paddison 33-34 — 67 Jason Scrivener 33-34 — 67 Sebastien Gros 34-33 — 67 Prom Meesawat 33-34 — 67 Nicholas Fung 35-32 — 67 Daisuke Kataoka 33-34 — 67 Marcus Fraser 34-34 — 68 Lucas Herbert 33-35 — 68 Jazz Janewattananond 35-33 — 68 Sam Horsfield 34-34 — 68 David Lipsky 35-33 — 68 Seungsu Han 34-34 — 68 Zander Lombard 35-33 — 68 Jens Fahrbring 35-33 — 68

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF Man City 26 22 3 1 74 Man United 26 17 5 4 51 Liverpool 26 14 9 3 59 Chelsea 26 15 5 6 46 Tottenham 26 14 7 5 51 Arsenal 26 13 6 7 51 Burnley 26 9 9 8 21 Leicester 26 9 8 9 38 Bournemouth 26 8 7 11 30 Everton 26 8 7 11 29 Watford 26 8 6 12 37 West Ham 26 6 9 11 32 Brighton 26 6 9 11 21 Crystal Palace 26 6 9 11 24 Southampton 26 5 11 10 28 Newcastle 26 6 7 13 24 Swansea 26 6 6 14 19 Stoke 26 6 6 14 26 Huddersfield 26 6 6 14 19 West Brom 26 3 11 12 21 Saturday Tottenham vs. Arsenal, 6:30 a.m. Stoke vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Everton vs. Crystal Palace, 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Watford, 9 a.m. Swansea vs. Burnley, 9 a.m. Man City vs. Leicester, 11:30 a.m.

GA 19 18 31 23 24 35 23 35 37 45 45 46 35 39 38 36 37 52 46 37

Pts 69 56 51 50 49 45 36 35 31 31 30 27 27 27 26 25 24 24 24 20

COLLEGES Area scores Women’s basketball Morehead State 60, Southeast Missouri 58 Bellarmine 83, McKendree 72 UMSL 79, Indianapolis 63 Lewis 75, Maryville 66 Missouri Bapitst 75, Stephens 46 Webster University 91, Spalding 78 Missouri 83, Kentucky 78 Men’s basketball Southeast Missouri 78, Morehead State 62 Eastern Illinois 78, SIU Edwardsville 74 Bellarmine 87, McKendree 66 Maryville 83, Lewis 81 Harris-Stowe 60, William Woods 51 Indianapolis 77, UMSL 70, OT Illinois State 76, SIU Carbondale 68, OT Baseball Missouri Baptist 14, Mount Mercy 0 Missouri Baptist 11, College of the Ozarks 2 Softball Mississippi College 9, UMSL 6 UMSL 3, Delta State 2

FRIDAY’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Washington at Brandeis, 5 p.m. W: Illinois State at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Bradley at Missouri State, 7 p.m. M: Washington at Brandeis, 7 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Missouri Valley JV, 7 p.m.

Men’s basketball THURSDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES East Canisius 89, Siena 65 Fair. Dickinson 77, Sacred Heart 67 Florida G.C. 75, NJIT 70 LIU Brooklyn 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 67 Monmouth (NJ) 72, Iona 50 Mount St. Mary’s 71, CCSU 57 New Hampshire 71, Maine 56 Niagara 95, Quinnipiac 76 Northeastern 70, Delaware 67 Rider 77, Manhattan 73 St. Francis Brooklyn 77, Robert Morris 65 St. Peter’s 70, Marist 66 St. Rose 83, American International 67 Stony Brook 81, Mass.-Lowell 68 Towson 94, Drexel 92 UMBC 78, Binghamton 68 Vermont 72, Albany (NY) 67 Wagner 96, Bryant 76 South Chattanooga 85, The Citadel 82 Clemson 72, Pittsburgh 48 Coll. Charles. 82, William & Mary 77 Georgetown (Ky.) 70, Cumberlands 68 Georgia St. 106, Louisiana-Laf. 92 Hampton 95, Howard 81 Hofstra 67, Elon 48 Kennesaw St. 89, North Florida 81 Life 81, Campbellsville 73 Lipscomb 82, Jacksonville 59 Louisiana Tech 83, Charlotte 65 La.-Monroe 66, Ga. Southern 64, OT Louisville 77, Georgia Tech 54 Marshall 76, FIU 66 Mid. Tennessee 94, Rice 75 Midway 77, Cincinnati Christian 76 Murray St. 84, Austin Peay 63 N. Kentucky 54, Milwaukee 52 North Carolina 82, Duke 78 North Texas 67, UAB 60 Old Dominion 68, Southern Miss. 63 Pikeville 107, Lindsey Wilson 77 SC-Upstate 91, Stetson 79 SE Missouri 78, Morehead St. 62 South Alabama 73, UALR 56 Steph. F. Austin 99, McNeese St. 95

UT Martin 70, E. Kentucky 69 Union (Tenn.) 61, Lee 57 W. Carolina 72, VMI 60 Midwest Columbia (Mo.) 68, Hannibal-LaGrange 67 E. Illinois 78, SIU-Edwardsville 74 IUPUI 78, Cleveland St. 73 N. Michigan 80, Northwood (Mich.) 72 Omaha 71, W. Illinois 68 Saginaw Valley St. 105, Michigan Tech 94, 2OT South Dakota 86, Fort Wayne 69 UIC 100, Youngstown St. 75 UMKC 74, Seattle 67 Utah Valley 97, Chicago St. 57 Wayne (Mich.) 66, Grand Valley St. 60 Wis. Lutheran 86, Maranatha Baptist 49 Wright St. 68, Green Bay 64 Southwest Oral Roberts 67, N. Dakota St. 66, OT Tulsa 91, Tulane 89, OT Far West Utah 75, Stanford 60

Women’s basketball HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. UConn (23-0) idle. Next: vs. Wichita State, Saturday. 2. Mississippi State (25-0) beat Florida 98-50. Next: vs. Kentucky, Sunday. 3. Baylor (22-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 24 TCU, Saturday. 4. Louisville (25-1) idle. Next: at No. 1 UConn, Monday. 5. Notre Dame (22-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Sunday. 6. Texas (19-4) idle. Next: vs. Kansas St., Sat. 7. South Carolina (19-5) beat Alabama 79-66. Next: vs. Florida, Sunday. 8. UCLA (19-4) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Fri. 9. Oregon (21-4) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 10. Maryland (21-3) beat Michigan State 76-68. Next: at Rutgers, Sunday. 11. Tennessee (20-4) beat Arkansas 90-85. Next: vs. No. 18 Georgia, Sunday. 12. Florida State (20-4) beat Virginia 77-62. Next: at Miami, Sunday. 13. Ohio State (20-5) beat Rutgers 90-68. Next: at South Florida, Sunday. 14. Texas A&M (19-6) beat Mississippi 83-54. Next: at LSU, Sunday. 15. Missouri (19-5) beat Kentucky 83-78. Next: at Arkansas, Sunday. 16. Oregon State (17-6) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday. 17. Stanford (16-8) idle. Next: vs. Utah, Fri. 18. Georgia (21-3) beat Vanderbilt 67-55. Next: at No. 11 Tennessee, Sunday. 19. Duke (19-6) idle. Next: at Clemson, Sun. 20. Green Bay (21-2) idle. Next: at Milwaukee, Saturday. 21. Michigan (20-6) beat Northwestern 84-63. Next: at Michigan State, Sunday. 22. Oklahoma State (17-6) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 23. N.C. State (19-6) lost to Miami 52-48. Next: at North Carolina, Sunday. 24. TCU (16-7) idle. Next: at No. 3 Baylor, Sat. 25. Arizona St. (17-7) idle. Next: at USC, Fri.

WINTER OLYMPICS Early Friday | Pyeongchang, South Korea

Figure Skating Team Event | Men’s Short Program 1. Shoma Uno, Japan, 103.25. 2. Alexei Bychenko, Israel, 88.49. 3. Patrick Chan, Canada, 81.66. 4. Nathan Chen, United States, 80.61. 5. Matteo Rizzo, Italy, 77.77. 6. Junhwan Cha, South Korea, 77.70. 7. Han Yan, China, 77.10. 8. Mikhail Kolyada, Russia, 74.36. 9. Paul Fentz, Germany, 66.32. 10. Chafik Besseghier, France, 61.06.

Freestyle Skiing Moguls | Women’s Qualification 1 1. Perrine Laffont, France, 79.72 (Q). 2. Andi Naude, Canada, 79.60 (Q). 3. Morgan Schild, United States, 77.74 (Q). 4. J. Dufour-Lapointe, Canada, 77.66 (Q). 5. Jaelin Kauf, United States, 77.45 (Q). 6. Britteny Cox, Australia, 76.78 (Q). 7. Yulia Galysheva, Kazakhstan, 76.36 (Q). 8. Keaton McCargo, United States, 75.67 (Q). 9. Arisa Murata, Japan, 74.13 (Q). 10. Audrey Robichaud, Canada, 72.48 (Q). 11. Regina Rakhimova, Russia, 71.77. 12. Marika Pertakhiya, Russia, 70.43. 13. Chloe Dufour-Lapointe, Canada, 69.53. 14. Jakara Anthony, Australia, 69.49. 15. Madii Himbury, Australia, 68.98. 16. Camille Cabrol, France, 68.89. 17. Claudia Gueli, Australia, 68.68. 18. Hedvig Wessel, Norway 68.64.

19. Seo Jee Won, South Korea, 68.46. 20. Ekaterina Stolyarova, Russia, 67.69. 21. Deborah Scanzio, Switzerland, 66.38. 22. Tess Johnson, United States, 65.55. 23. Katharina Foerster, Germany, 63.17. 24. Lea Bouard, Germany, 55.71. 25. Melanie Meilinger, Austria, 54.95. 26. Ayaulum Amrenova, , Kazakhstan, 52.78. 27. Wang Jin, China, 51.29. 28. Guan Ziyan, China, 48.11. 29. Tetiana Petrova, Ukraine, 46.19. 30. Seo Jung Hwa, South Korea, 16.57.

Mixed doubles curling Country W Switzerland 3 Canada 2 Norway 2 OA Russia 2 China 1 South Korea 1 United States 1 Finland 0 Wednesday United States 9, OA Russia 3 Norway 9, Norway 6 South Korea 9, Finland 4 Switzerland 7, China 5 Thursday Switzerland 7, Finland 6 China 8, South Korea 7 Canada 6, United States 4 OA Russia 4, Norway 3 Norway 8, South Korea 3 Switzerland 9, United States 4 Canada 10, China 4 OA Russia 7, Finland 5 Canada vs. Finland, late China vs. OA Russia, late United States vs. South Korea, late Switzerland vs. Norway, late

Ski jumping Men’s K90 Individual Top qualifiers 1. Andreas Wellinger, Germany, (103.0, 70.0, 57.0) 133.5 (Q). 2. Kamil Stoch, Poland, (104.0, 72.0, 56.0) 131.7 (Q). 3. Dawid Kubacki, Poland, (104.5, 73.0, 53.5) 129.6 (Q). 4. Richard Freitag, Germany, (102.0, 68.0, 56.0) 129.1 (Q). 5. Stefan Kraft, Austria, (102.5, 69.0, 55.5) 128.6 (Q). 6. Markus Eisenbichler, Germany, (102.5, 69.0, 54.5) 127.7 (Q). 7. Karl Geiger, Germany, (102.0, 68.0, 54.5) 125.5 (Q). 8. Daniel Andre Tande, Norway, (100.0, 64.0, 54.0) 123.0 (Q). 9. Stefan Hula, Poland, (100.5, 65.0, 54.0) 122.7 (Q). 10. Simon Ammann, Switzerland, (102.0, 68.0, 52.5) 122.3 (Q). 11. Maciej Kot, Poland, (99.0, 62.0, 54.0) 122.0 (Q). 12. Evgeniy Klimov, Russia, (102.0, 68.0, 52.5) 121.4 (Q). 13. Johan Andre Forfang, Norway, (100.0, 64.0, 54.0) 121.1 (Q). 14. Peter Prevc, Slovenia, (99.0, 62.0, 54.5) 120.2 (Q). 15. Andreas Stjernen, Norway, (100.0, 64.0, 53.0) 119.3 (Q). 16. Jernej Damjan, Slovenia, (99.5, 63.0, 54.0) 118.9 (Q). 17. Vladimir Zografski, Bulgaria, (98.5, 61.0, 54.0) 118.8 (Q). 18. Junshiro Kobayashi, Japan, (101.0, 66.0, 50.0) 118.4 (Q). 19. Robert Johansson, Norway, (98.0, 60.0, 53.0) 118.3 (Q). 20. Noriaki Kasai, Japan, (98.0, 60.0, 54.0) 117.7 (Q). 21. Ryoyu Kobayashi, Japan, (98.0, 60.0, 52.5) 115.3 (Q). 22. Tilen Bartol, Slovenia, (97.0, 58.0, 52.5) 115.1 (Q). 23. Mackenzie Boyd-Clowes, Canada, (98.0, 60.0, 53.0) 114.6 (Q). 24. Roman Koudelka, Czech Republic, (97.5, 59.0, 52.5) 114.5 (Q). 25. Kevin Bickner, United States, (98.0, 60.0, 51.5) 114.0 (Q). 26. Michael Haybock, Austria, (97.0, 58.0, 52.5) 112.4 (Q). 27. Manuel Fettner, Austria, (95.0, 54.0, 52.5) 109.4 (Q). 28. Denis Kornilov, Russia, (94.5, 53.0, 51.0) 107.2 (Q). 29. Timi Zajc, Slovenia, (94.0, 52.0, 51.5) 107.1 (Q). 30. Jonathan Learoyd, France, (94.5, 53.0, 51.5) 106.7 (Q).

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FOR THE RECORD

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 2 TRANSACTIONS

AMERICA’S LINE

BASEBALL MLB — Suspended free agent minor league RHP Landon Hughes 68 games and Boston C Jacob Romanski (Pawtucket-IL) 100 games, both without pay, for their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE — Named Adam Esselman coordinator of baseball information. WHITE SOX — Named Dave Duncan pitching consultant. Agreed to terms with LHP Xavier Cedeno, INF Jake Elmore and RHPs Jeanmar Gomez and Bruce Rondon on minor league contracts. CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RHP Stephen Fife on a minor league contract. National League MIAMI — Agreed to terms with RHPs Tyler Cloyd, Jumbo Diaz, Javy Guerra, Drew Rucinski, Jacob Turner, and Alex Wimmers; LHP Mike Kickham; C Bryan Holaday; INFs Cristhian Adames, Johnny Giavotella, Yadiel Rivera, and Jonathan Rodriguez, and OFs Rafael Ortega, JB Shuck, and Scott Van Slyke on minor league contracts. METS — Renewed their player development contract with Columbia (SAL) through 2020. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA — Acquired F Okaro White from Miami for F Luke Babbitt and then waived White. BOSTON — Signed C Greg Monroe. BROOKLYN — Acquired F Dante Cunningham from New Orleans for G Rashad Vaughn. CHICAGO — Acquired C Willie Reed and the right to swap 2022 second-round draft picks from Detroit for G Jameer Nelson and then waived Reed. Acquired F Noah Vonleh and cash considerations from Portland for the draft rights to C Milovan Rakovic. CLEVELAND — Acquired G Jordan Clarkson and F Larry Nance Jr. from the Los Angeles Lakers for G Isaiah Thomas, F Channing Frye and a 2018 protected first-round draft pick. MIAMI — Acquired G Dwyane Wade from Cleveland for a protected 2024 second-round draft pick. Waived C AJ Hammons. WASHINGTON — Traded G-F Sheldon Mac and cash considerations to Atlanta for a protected 2019 second round draft pick. Women’s National Basketball Association ATLANTA — Signed F Angel McCoughtry to a multiyear contract. HOCKEY | NHL CAROLINA — Placed Fs Marcus Kruger and Josh Jooris on waivers. NEW JERSEY — Recalled F Jimmy Hayes from his conditioning loan to Binghamton (AHL). Acquired Fs Christoph Bertschy and Mario Lucia from Minnesota for D Viktor Loov. NY RANGERS — Recalled D Neal Pionk from Hartford (AHL). Waived D Brendan Smith. SOCCER Major League Soccer KANSAS CITY — Traded G Andrew Dykstra to Colorado for a 2020 second-round draft pick. United Soccer League USL — Named Brad Baker vice president of broadcasting, effective Feb. 13. OTTAWA FURY FC — Signed MF Cristian Portilla and D Kyle Porter. COLLEGE EASTERN MICHIGAN — Named Ben Needham assistant football coach. NEW MEXICO — Suspended football coach Bob Davie for 30 days without pay, following multiple investigations that examined whether he and coaching staff interfered with criminal investigations or misconduct cases involving players. TENNESSEE — Named Tyson Helton offensive coordinator, Kevin Sherrer defensive coordinator/inside linebackers coach, Terry Fair cornerbacks coach, Craig Fitzgerald strength coach, Will Friend offensive line coach, Robert Gillespie running backs coach, David Johnson receivers coach, Charles Kelly special teams coordinator, Brian Niedermeyer tight ends coach, Tracy Rocker defensive line coach, Chris Rumph co-defensive coordinator/ outside linebackers coach, Drew Hughes director of player personnel and Todd Watson director of football operations. TCU — Pormoted Jeremy Modkins to cornerbacks coach. UCONN — Reinstated F Eric Cobb to the men’s basketball team. VANDERBILT — Named Jason Tarver defensive coordinator, Shawn Mennenga special teams coordinator, Aaron Moorehead wide receivers coach and Terrence Brown cornerbacks coach. WISCONSIN — Named Alando Tucker director for sudent-athlete engagement.

NBA Favorite Points Underdog 76ERS 5.5 Pelicans PISTONS 3.5 Clippers Cavaliers NL HAWKS CELTICS 4 Pacers HEAT 1.5 Bucks T’Wolves 6.5 BULLS ROCKETS 8.5 Nuggets JAZZ 5.5 Hornets Blazers 6 KINGS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Penn 7 DARTMOUTH HARVARD 1.5 Princeton BROWN 6.5 Cornell YALE 4.5 Columbia RHODE ISLAND 6.5 Davidson 7 Minnesota INDIANA OAKLAND 14 Detroit Write-In Games Toledo 3 MIAMI-OHIO BALL ST 5 Kent St Added Game IDAHO 6 E Washington NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Flames -$120/even RANGERS CAPITALS -$145/+$125 Blue Jackets ISLANDERS -$125/+$105 Red Wings HURRICANES -$175/+$155 Canucks Kings -$110/-$110 PANTHERS JETS -$135/+$115 Blues STARS -$110/-$110 Penguins DUCKS -$135/+$115 Oilers Grand Salami: Over/under 46.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

GOLF PGA | Pebble Beach Thurs. | Pebble Beach, Calif. | Purse: $7.4M At p-Pebble Beach GL, YDS: 6,816; Par: 72 At s-Spyglass Hill, YDS: 6,953; Par: 72 At m-Monterey Peninsula, YDS: 6,958; Par: 71 First Round Kevin Streelman 33-32 — 65 -7s Beau Hossler 34-31 — 65 -7p Matt Kuchar 32-34 — 66 -6s Aaron Wise 31-34 — 65 -6m Julian Suri 34-32 — 66 -6s Cameron Percy 33-33 — 66 -5m Chez Reavie 33-34 — 67 -5p Patrick Cantlay 34-32 — 66 -5m Troy Merritt 36-31 — 67 -5p Will Zalatoris 34-33 — 67 -5s Rob Oppenheim 34-33 — 67 -5p Paul Casey 33-34 — 67 -5p Dustin Johnson 33-34 — 67 -5s Keith Mitchell 34-33 — 67 -5s Zecheng Dou 33-34 — 67 -5p Shane Lowry 31-36 — 67 -4m Rory McIlroy 34-34 — 68 -4s Jon Rahm 31-36 — 67 -4m Charley Hoffman 33-34 — 67 -4m Chris Stroud 33-35 — 68 -4s Talor Gooch 32-35 — 67 -4m Stephan Jaeger 34-34 — 68 -4p Chris Kirk 32-35 — 67 -4m Tyrone Van Aswegen 31-36 — 67 -4m Jimmy Walker 35-33 — 68 -4s Branden Grace 32-36 — 68 -4p Ted Potter, Jr. 34-34 — 68 -4p Peter Malnati 32-35 — 67 -4m Jonas Blixt 32-35 — 67 -4m Ben Crane 34-34 — 68 -4p Xinjun Zhang 31-37 — 68 -4p Chesson Hadley 34-34 — 68 -3m Ryan Blaum 33-35 — 68 -3m Alex Cejka 34-35 — 69 -3s Gary Woodland 35-34 — 69 -3s Pat Perez 33-35 — 68 -3m Phil Mickelson 38-31 — 69 -3s Martin Piller 32-36 — 68 -3m Nicholas Lindheim 33-35 — 68 -3m Jonathan Randolph 34-35 — 69 -3s Zac Blair 36-33 — 69 -3s Derek Fathauer 36-33 — 69 -3p Russell Henley 33-35 — 68 -3m Brendon de Jonge 33-36 — 69 -3p Ben Martin 36-32 — 68 -3m Brandon Harkins 34-34 — 68 -3m Rory Sabbatini 33-35 — 68 -3m Bubba Watson 32-36 — 68 -3m Jason Day 34-35 — 69 -3s Brian Gay 37-32 — 69 -3s Steve Stricker 34-35 — 69 -3s Corey Conners 34-34 — 68 -3m George McNeill 36-34 — 70 -2p Rafa Cabrera Bello 36-33 — 69 -2m Derek Ernst 33-36 — 69 -2m D.A. Points 35-35 — 70 -2s Sean O’Hair 33-36 — 69 -2m Cameron Tringale 34-36 — 70 -2p Dominic Bozzelli 34-35 — 69 -2m Daniel Summerhays 34-36 — 70 -2s Jason Kokrak 34-36 — 70 -2s Ricky Barnes 34-36 — 70 -2p Rod Pampling 34-35 — 69 -2m K.J. Choi 35-34 — 69 -2m Nick Watney 35-35 — 70 -2s Ryan Armour 36-34 — 70 -2p Kevin Na 36-34 — 70 -2s Eric Axley 35-34 — 69 -2m

Robert Garrigus Patrick Rodgers Vaughn Taylor Brandt Snedeker Kevin Kisner David Hearn Hunter Mahan Joel Dahmen Andrew Putnam Nate Lashley Paul Dunne J.T. Poston Matt Every Russell Knox Mac Hughes Scott Piercy J.B. Holmes Brice Garnett Robert Streb J.J. Henry Aaron Baddeley Greg Chalmers Graeme McDowell Sangmoon Bae Bryson DeChambeau Jim Herman Billy Horschel Bronson Burgoon Ben Silverman Tyler Duncan Austin Cook Scott Stallings Trey Mullinax Denny McCarthy Shawn Stefani Fabian Gomez Jason Bohn Adam Schenk Kyle Thompson Steve Wheatcroft Jerry Kelly Jordan Spieth Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Brett Stegmaier Charlie Beljan Stewart Cink Kevin Chappell Jonathan Byrd Johnson Wagner Brian Stuard Stuart Appleby Matt Atkins Kelly Kraft Scott Brown William McGirt Cameron Davis Seamus Power Sam Ryder James Hahn Matt Jones Grayson Murray Billy Hurley III Maverick McNealy Rick Lamb Richy Werenski Nick Taylor Tim Herron Luke Donald Conrad Shindler David Solomon Cody Gribble Vijay Singh Tom Hoge Patrick Reed Andrew Yun Colt Knost Roberto Diaz Lanto Griffin Padraig Harrington Adam Scott Ethan Tracy Ernie Els Mike Weir Peter Jacobsen Angel Cabrera Ken Duke David Duval

33-37 36-34 36-34 36-35 37-34 33-38 34-37 33-38 33-37 34-36 35-36 35-36 35-35 33-38 36-35 32-39 39-32 34-37 31-40 36-35 35-35 35-35 34-37 34-37 33-37 34-36 36-35 36-34 33-37 36-36 38-34 36-36 36-36 36-36 35-37 35-37 35-36 32-39 34-38 36-35 35-37 36-36 36-36 35-37 36-36 34-38 34-39 38-35 39-34 37-36 35-37 36-37 34-38 36-37 36-37 35-38 35-38 33-39 37-36 36-38 35-39 37-37 38-36 38-36 38-36 35-38 35-40 35-40 38-37 35-40 37-37 37-38 35-40 35-40 35-40 38-37 42-34 38-37 39-37 41-34 40-37 38-38 38-39 38-39 38-40 41-37 40-39 38-41

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 70 70 71 71 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 70 70 71 71 70 70 71 70 70 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 71 71 72 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 72 73 72 73 73 73 73 72 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 73 75 75 75 75 74 75 75 75 75 75 76 75 76 75 77 76 77 77 78 78 79 79

-2p -2s -1m -1s -1s -1p -1s -1p -1m -1m -1s -1p -1m -1s -1s -1p -1p -1p -1p -1p -1m -1m -1p -1p -1m -1m -1s -1m -1m Ep Ep Ep Es Ep Es Ep Em Em Es Em Es Es Es Es Ep +1m +1p +1s +1p +1p +1m +1s +1m +1s +1p +1s +1p +1m +1p +2s +2p +2p +2p +2s +2p +2m +3p +3p +3s +3p +3m +3s +3p +3p +3p +3s +4s +4m +4p +4m +5s +5m +5s +5s +6s +6p +7s +8m

EURO TOUR | Perth leaders Thursday | Perth, Australia Purse: $1.75M | Yards: 7,143; Par: 72 (36-36) Leading Scores Brett Rumford 35-29 — 64 James Nitties 32-34 — 66 Lee Westwood 34-32 — 66 Wade Ormsby 34-33 — 67 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 31-36 — 67 Yikeun Chang 32-35 — 67 Gareth Paddison 33-34 — 67 Jason Scrivener 33-34 — 67 Sebastien Gros 34-33 — 67 Prom Meesawat 33-34 — 67 Nicholas Fung 35-32 — 67 Daisuke Kataoka 33-34 — 67 Marcus Fraser 34-34 — 68 Lucas Herbert 33-35 — 68 Jazz Janewattananond 35-33 — 68 Sam Horsfield 34-34 — 68 David Lipsky 35-33 — 68 Seungsu Han 34-34 — 68 Zander Lombard 35-33 — 68 Jens Fahrbring 35-33 — 68

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF Man City 26 22 3 1 74 Man United 26 17 5 4 51 Liverpool 26 14 9 3 59 Chelsea 26 15 5 6 46 Tottenham 26 14 7 5 51 Arsenal 26 13 6 7 51 Burnley 26 9 9 8 21 Leicester 26 9 8 9 38 Bournemouth 26 8 7 11 30 Everton 26 8 7 11 29 Watford 26 8 6 12 37 West Ham 26 6 9 11 32 Brighton 26 6 9 11 21 Crystal Palace 26 6 9 11 24 Southampton 26 5 11 10 28 Newcastle 26 6 7 13 24 Swansea 26 6 6 14 19 Stoke 26 6 6 14 26 Huddersfield 26 6 6 14 19 West Brom 26 3 11 12 21 Saturday Tottenham vs. Arsenal, 6:30 a.m. Stoke vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Everton vs. Crystal Palace, 9 a.m. West Ham vs. Watford, 9 a.m. Swansea vs. Burnley, 9 a.m. Man City vs. Leicester, 11:30 a.m.

GA 19 18 31 23 24 35 23 35 37 45 45 46 35 39 38 36 37 52 46 37

Pts 69 56 51 50 49 45 36 35 31 31 30 27 27 27 26 25 24 24 24 20

COLLEGES Area scores Women’s basketball Morehead State 60, Southeast Missouri 58 Bellarmine 83, McKendree 72 UMSL 79, Indianapolis 63 Lewis 75, Maryville 66 Missouri Bapitst 75, Stephens 46 Webster University 91, Spalding 78 Missouri 83, Kentucky 78 St. Louis CC 87, Three Rivers 80 Men’s basketball Southeast Missouri 78, Morehead State 62 Eastern Illinois 78, SIU Edwardsville 74 Bellarmine 87, McKendree 66 Maryville 83, Lewis 81 Harris-Stowe 60, William Woods 51 Indianapolis 77, UMSL 70, OT Illinois State 76, SIU Carbondale 68, OT Webseter University 75, Spalding 64 St. Louis CC 75, Three Rivers 73, OT Wisconsin 78, Illinois 69 Baseball Missouri Baptist 14, Mount Mercy 0 Missouri Baptist 11, College of the Ozarks 2 Softball Mississippi College 9, UMSL 6 UMSL 3, Delta State 2

FRIDAY’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Washington at Brandeis, 5 p.m. W: Illinois State at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Bradley at Missouri State, 7 p.m. M: Washington at Brandeis, 7 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Missouri Valley JV, 7 p.m.

Men’s basketball THURSDAY’S NATIONAL SCORES East Baruch 61, Hunter 50 Canisius 89, Siena 65 Fair. Dickinson 77, Sacred Heart 67 Florida G.C. 75, NJIT 70 LIU Brooklyn 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 67 Monmouth (NJ) 72, Iona 50 Mount St. Mary’s 71, CCSU 57 New Hampshire 71, Maine 56 Niagara 95, Quinnipiac 76 Northeastern 70, Delaware 67 Rider 77, Manhattan 73 St. Francis Brooklyn 77, Robert Morris 65 St. Peter’s 70, Marist 66 St. Rose 83, American International 67 Stony Brook 81, Mass.-Lowell 68 Towson 94, Drexel 92 UMBC 78, Binghamton 68 Vermont 72, Albany (NY) 67 Wagner 96, Bryant 76 Yeshiva 76, St. Joseph’s (NY) 53 South Chattanooga 85, The Citadel 82 Clemson 72, Pittsburgh 48 Coll. Charles. 82, William & Mary 77 Cumberland (Tenn.) 79, Shawnee St. 78 Georgetown (Ky.) 70, Cumberlands 68 Georgia St. 106, Louisiana-Laf. 92 Hampton 95, Howard 81 Hofstra 67, Elon 48 Jacksonville St. 82, Tennessee Tech 65 Kennesaw St. 89, North Florida 81 Life 81, Campbellsville 73 Lipscomb 82, Jacksonville 59 Louisiana Tech 83, Charlotte 65 La.-Monroe 66, Ga. Southern 64, OT Louisville 77, Georgia Tech 54 Marshall 76, FIU 66 Mid. Tennessee 94, Rice 75 Midway 77, Cincinnati Christian 76 Murray St. 84, Austin Peay 63 N. Kentucky 54, Milwaukee 52

North Carolina 82, Duke 78 North Texas 67, UAB 60 Old Dominion 68, Southern Miss. 63 Pikeville 107, Lindsey Wilson 77 SC-Upstate 91, Stetson 79 SE Missouri 78, Morehead St. 62 South Alabama 73, UALR 56 Steph. F. Austin 99, McNeese St. 95 Tennessee St. 64, Belmont 56 Troy 89, Arkansas St. 83 UT Martin 70, E. Kentucky 69 Union (Tenn.) 61, Lee 57 W. Carolina 72, VMI 60 W. Kentucky 75, FAU 63 Wiley 84, LSU-Alexandria 80 Midwest Columbia (Mo.) 68, Hannibal-LaGrange 67 E. Illinois 78, SIU-Edwardsville 74 IUPUI 78, Cleveland St. 73 Illinois St. 76, S. Illinois 68, OT N. Michigan 80, Northwood (Mich.) 72 Omaha 71, W. Illinois 68 Rio Grande 83, Grand Canyon 81 Saginaw Valley St. 105, Michigan Tech 94, 2OT South Dakota 86, Fort Wayne 69 UIC 100, Youngstown St. 75 UMKC 74, Seattle 67 Utah Valley 97, Chicago St. 57 Wayne (Mich.) 66, Grand Valley St. 60 Wis. Lutheran 86, Maranatha Baptist 49 Wisconsin 78, Illinois 69 Wright St. 68, Green Bay 64 Southwest Houston 67, SMU 58 Oral Roberts 67, N. Dakota St. 66, OT Tulsa 91, Tulane 89, OT Far West Cal St.-Fullerton 75, Cal Poly 59 Montana 80, Portland St. 60 Montana St. 92, Sacramento St. 76 N. Colorado 85, Idaho St. 82 New Mexico St. 69, CS Bakersfield 43 Oregon 65, Washington 40 S. Dakota St. 83, Denver 75 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 83, Loyola Mary. 62 San Francisco 65, Portland 63 UC Riverside 64, Hawaii 60 UC Santa Barbara 90, UC Davis 81 UCLA 82, Arizona 74 Utah 75, Stanford 60 Weber St. 84, North Dakota 76

Women’s basketball HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. UConn (23-0) idle. Next: vs. Wichita State, Saturday. 2. Mississippi State (25-0) beat Florida 98-50. Next: vs. Kentucky, Sunday. 3. Baylor (22-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 24 TCU, Saturday. 4. Louisville (25-1) idle. Next: at No. 1 UConn, Monday. 5. Notre Dame (22-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Sunday. 6. Texas (19-4) idle. Next: vs. Kansas St., Sat. 7. South Carolina (19-5) beat Alabama 79-66. Next: vs. Florida, Sunday. 8. UCLA (19-4) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Fri. 9. Oregon (21-4) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 10. Maryland (21-3) beat Michigan State 76-68. Next: at Rutgers, Sunday. 11. Tennessee (20-4) beat Arkansas 90-85. Next: vs. No. 18 Georgia, Sunday. 12. Florida State (20-4) beat Virginia 77-62. Next: at Miami, Sunday. 13. Ohio State (20-5) beat Rutgers 90-68. Next: at South Florida, Sunday. 14. Texas A&M (19-6) beat Mississippi 83-54. Next: at LSU, Sunday. 15. Missouri (19-5) beat Kentucky 83-78. Next: at Arkansas, Sunday. 16. Oregon State (17-6) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday. 17. Stanford (16-8) idle. Next: vs. Utah, Fri. 18. Georgia (21-3) beat Vanderbilt 67-55. Next: at No. 11 Tennessee, Sunday. 19. Duke (19-6) idle. Next: at Clemson, Sun. 20. Green Bay (21-2) idle. Next: at Milwaukee, Saturday. 21. Michigan (20-6) beat Northwestern 84-63. Next: at Michigan State, Sunday. 22. Oklahoma State (17-6) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. 23. N.C. State (19-6) lost to Miami 52-48. Next: at North Carolina, Sunday. 24. TCU (16-7) idle. Next: at No. 3 Baylor, Sat. 25. Arizona St. (17-7) idle. Next: at USC, Fri.

WINTER OLYMPICS Early Friday | Pyeongchang, South Korea

Figure Skating TEAM EVENT Men’s Short Program 1. Shoma Uno, Japan, 103.25. 2. Alexei Bychenko, Israel, 88.49. 3. Patrick Chan, Canada, 81.66. 4. Nathan Chen, United States, 80.61. 5. Matteo Rizzo, Italy, 77.77. 6. Junhwan Cha, South Korea, 77.70. 7. Yan Han, China, 77.10. 8. Mikhail Kolyada, Russia, 74.36. 9. Paul Fentz, Germany, 66.32. 10. Chafik Besseghier, France, 61.06. Pairs Short Program 1. E. Tarasova and V. Morozov, Russia, 80.92. 2. M. Duhamel and E. Radford, Canada, 76.57. 3. A. Savchenko and B. Massot, GER, 75.36. 4. A.S. Knierim and C. Knierim, USA, 69.75. 5. Yu Xiaoyu and Zhang Hao, China, 69.17. 6. J. Vanessa and M. Cipres, France, 68.49. 7. N. Della Monica and M. Guarise, Italy, 67.62. 8. Miu Suzaki and Ryuichi Kihara, JAP, 57.42. 9. P. Conners and E. Krasnopolski, ISL, 54.47. 10. Kim Kyueun and Kam Alex Kang Chan, South Korea, 52.10. Points Standings 1. Canada, 17. 2. United States, 14. 3. Japan, 13. 3. Russia, 13. 4. Israel, 11. 5. Italy, 10. 5. China, 10. 5. Germany, 10. 9. South Korea, 6. 9. France, 6.

Freestyle Skiing Moguls | Top men qualifiers Men’s Qualification Run 1 1. Mikael Kingsbury, Canada, 86.07 (Q). 2. Aleksandr Smyshliaev, Russia, 83.93 (Q). 3. Dmitriy Reikherd, Kazakhstan, 81.23 (Q). 4. Troy Murphy, United States, 80.95 (Q). 5. Ikuma Horishima, Japan, 80.35 (Q). 6. Daichi Hara, Japan, 80.01 (Q). 7. Pavel Kolmakov, Kazakhstan, 79.98 (Q). 8. Philippe Marquis, Canada, 77.77 (Q). 9. Matt Graham, Australia, 77.28 (Q). 10. Sacha Theocharis, France, 76.55 (Q). Moguls | Top women qualifiers 1. Perrine Laffont, France, 79.72 (Q). 2. Andi Naude, Canada, 79.60 (Q). 3. Morgan Schild, United States, 77.74 (Q). 4. Justine Dufour-Lapointe, Canada, 77.66 (Q). 5. Jaelin Kauf, United States, 77.45 (Q). 6. Britteny Cox, Australia, 76.78 (Q). 7. Yulia Galysheva, Kazakhstan, 76.36 (Q). 8. Keaton McCargo, United States, 75.67 (Q). 9. Arisa Murata, Japan, 74.13 (Q). 10. Audrey Robichaud, Canada, 72.48 (Q).

Mixed doubles curling Country W Switzerland 3 Canada 2 Norway 2 OA Russia 2 China 1 South Korea 1 United States 1 Finland 0 Wednesday United States 9, OA Russia 3 Norway 9, Norway 6 South Korea 9, Finland 4 Switzerland 7, China 5 Thursday Switzerland 7, Finland 6 China 8, South Korea 7 Canada 6, United States 4 OA Russia 4, Norway 3 Norway 8, South Korea 3 Switzerland 9, United States 4 Canada 10, China 4 OA Russia 7, Finland 5 Canada vs. Finland, late China vs. OA Russia, late United States vs. South Korea, late Switzerland vs. Norway, late

Ski jumping Men’s K90 Individual Top qualifiers 1. Andreas Wellinger, Germany, (103.0, 70.0, 57.0) 133.5 (Q). 2. Kamil Stoch, Poland, (104.0, 72.0, 56.0) 131.7 (Q). 3. Dawid Kubacki, Poland, (104.5, 73.0, 53.5) 129.6 (Q). 4. Richard Freitag, Germany, (102.0, 68.0, 56.0) 129.1 (Q). 5. Stefan Kraft, Austria, (102.5, 69.0, 55.5) 128.6 (Q). 6. Markus Eisenbichler, Germany, (102.5, 69.0, 54.5) 127.7 (Q). 7. Karl Geiger, Germany, (102.0, 68.0, 54.5) 125.5 (Q). 8. Daniel Andre Tande, Norway, (100.0, 64.0, 54.0) 123.0 (Q). 9. Stefan Hula, Poland, (100.5, 65.0, 54.0) 122.7 (Q). 10. Simon Ammann, Switzerland, (102.0, 68.0, 52.5) 122.3 (Q).

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PY EONGCH A NG 2018

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Games, by the numbers As spectacle unfolds, some igures to make sense of it all

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A skater practices at the Gangneung Oval during a speed skating training session prior to the 2018 Winter Olympics.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA •

The world hasn’t seen such an intersection of sports and politics since the U.S. boycotted the 1980 Moscow Olympics and the Soviets returned the favor four years later in Los Angeles. The Winter Olympics begin Friday in a rugged and brutally cold area of rural

3:

Mikaela Shifrin’s goal is to do what no skier has ever done: win five gold medals on the slopes. The young American star probably won’t do that, but there’s a good chance she can win three, something skiers have done only three times. Shifrin is a prohibitive favorite to defend the slalom title she won in Sochi, a top contender in the giant slalom and the favorite in the combined.

2:

The number of North Korean athletes who qualified for the Olympics on merit. Up to 22 will actually compete in the games, cheered on by a highly choreographed group of singers and dancers, along with the sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

100:

The perfect number Shaun White scored last month to give him a spot in the snowboard halfpipe. The U.S. star won the first two golds in the sport before flaming out in Sochi.

13,500:

The number of eggs Norway’s Olympic team will be sending back after a breakfast order went sunny side up. Norway thought it was ordering 1,500 eggs from a Korean distributor for the Games but a translation mistake caused 15,000 to be delivered instead.

mountains near the North Korean border, with a lot more at stake than the glittery medals chased by the best ice and snow athletes in the world. They will unfold — oicially, at least — without the Russians, who dominated on the ice and snow and in the backroom of the drug testing labs four years ago in Sochi. And they will take place amid rising world tensions and

50:

Miles from the mountains of Pyeongchang to the North Korean border.

4:

The unofficial over-under for the number of halfpipe snowboarders carried of the slopes on stretchers. White himself was sent to the hospital twice after crashes last year, and defending gold medalist Iouri Podladtchikov was knocked out in a scary crash last month at the Winter X Games.

149:

In Sochi the best teams were made up of NHL players, 149 of them in all. No current players will be in Pyeongchang, after the league decided its best interests were not served by shutting down in midseason for three weeks like it did the last five Winter Olympics.

$900

million: The amount of ads NBC has sold for its broadcast of the games.

14:

The time difference in hours from New York, which is why some of the biggest prime-time events on NBC will actually take place in the morning in Korea.

a last-minute rapprochement of sorts between the two Koreas that may be as much of a show as the games themselves. Politics are very much in play, but in the end the Olympics are usually defined more by numbers than philosophies. With that in mind, here’s some numbers that might help make sense of it all:

86:

The number of workers ill with norovirus a day before opening ceremony. The figure is expected to rise, forcing organizers to bring in 900 military personnel to take the place of sick or exposed security workers.

M 1 • FRIDAY • 02.09.2018

OLYMPICS NOTEBOOK Flap over coin flip for U.S. flag bearer Shani Davis would’ve been a fitting choice to carry the American flag into the Olympic opening ceremony, a superb athlete who helped break racial barriers at the Winter Games. Someone might have dropped the coin on this one. The U.S. Olympic Committee came up with a voting process that could quite plausibly end in a tie. It did, of course. And how was the deadlock broken? With the flip of a coin. The flip went in favor of Erin Hamlin, so the luger will have the honor of carrying the stars and stripes into the stadium on Friday night . “Maybe the process is a tad flawed,” said Joey Mantia, one of Davis’ teammates on the U.S. speedskating team. While Hamlin is certainly deserving — she’ll be competing in her fourth and final Olympics at Pyeongchang — her resume pales in comparison. Her only Olympic medal is a bronze. The 35-yearold Davis has two golds and a pair of silvers, not to mention a bunch of world championships and the second-most World Cup titles for any male skater in the history of the sport. Beyond the stellar results, Davis has been a trailblazer. An African-American in a mostly white sport, he became the first black athlete to win an individual gold medal at the Winter Games with his 1,000meter triumph in 2006. Four years later, he became the first skater — of any color — to defend his title in that event. Perhaps it’s not surprising that Davis will be joined in Pyeongchang by the first two AfricanAmerican women to make the U.S. speedskating team — Erin Jackson on the big oval and Maame Biney in short track. “I don’t think there’s been an African-American flag bearer, ever, for the Winter Games,” Mantia pointed out, quite correctly. “That would’ve been really cool.” Davis took ofense at how it all went down or, at the very least, expressed his frustrations through whoever was running his verified Twitter account on Thursday. “I am an American and when I won the 1000m in 2010 I became the first American to 2-peat in that event,” the tweet said. “@TeamUSA dishonorably tossed a coin to decide its 2018 flag bearer. No problem. I can wait until 2022. #BlackHistoryMonth2018.” Trouble is, Davis isn’t likely to get another chance at carrying the flag. He would have to keep skating until he’s 39 to make it to Beijing. These Olympics — his fifth — are largely viewed as the farewell to a brilliant career. Appeal denied for Russian athletes • The Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that 45 Russian athletes who were excluded from the Pyeongchang Olympics over doping concerns can’t compete. They and two coaches wanted the court to overturn the International Olympic Committee’s decision not to invite them. The games will still include 168 Russians who have been invited as “Olympic Athletes from Russia,” competing in neutral uniforms under the Olympic flag. Bobsledder recovering • U.S. bobsledder Justin Olsen resumed light workouts three days after an emergency appendectomy and is expected to compete in the Olympics. Olsen was hospitalized Monday and underwent laparoscopic surgery. Associated Press

4:

If it’s a Winter Olympics there have to be new sports. There are four of them in this Olympics, including a mass start speedskating event featuring 24 skaters, which has been compared to a NASCAR race on ice.

WINTER OLYMPICS ON TV FRIDAY 5 a.m. • Opening ceremony, streamed live at nbcolympics. com 7-10 p.m. • Opening ceremony (KSDK Ch. 5, tape)

168:

Russia is officially banned from the Olympics because of a state-sponsored doping scheme the country carried out in Sochi. But 168 Russians will still compete under a neutral flag as “Olympic Athletes from Russia” while 45 others had their appeal to compete turned down Thursday by The Court of Arbitration for Sport.

SATURDAY

10.5:

Noon-4 p.m. • Speedskating: women’s 3,000 final; Biathlon: women’s 7.5 sprint final; Curling: USA vs. Norway mixed doubles (NBCSN)

The over-under for gold medals won by

U.S. athletes.

32:

The temperature water freezes, and also the forecast for Friday night’s opening ceremonies. Organizers are giving 35,000 fans heated seat cushions, hand warmers and other gear to ward of the cold in the outdoor stadium, where winds are expected to make it feel like it is in the 20’s.

1-4 a.m. • Cross country: women’s skiathlon final (live); Curling: USA vs. China mixed doubles (NBCSN) 4-6:35 a.m. • Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final (live, NBCSN) 6-8:30 a.m. • Women’s hockey: Switzerland vs. South Korea (live, USA) 6:35-10:30 a.m. • Ski jumping: men’s normal hill final (live); Snowboarding: men’s slopestyle (NBCSN) 10:30 a.m.-noon • Luge: men’s singles (NBCSN)

2-5 p.m. • Snowboarding: men’s slopestyle; Speedskating: men’s 1,500 final; Ski jumping: men’s normal hill final; Luge: men’s singles (KSDK, Ch. 5) 6-8:45 p.m. • Snowboarding: men’s slopestyle final (live, NBCSN) 7-10 p.m. • Figure skating: team event (live), ice dancing short, ladies’ short; Skiing: men’s downhill final (KSDK, Ch. 5) 8:45 p.m.-12:30 a.m. • Curling: USA vs. Finland mixed doubles; Snowboarding: women’s slopestyle (live, NBCSN)

Lawler is a gifted player, student, team leader and role model ORTIZ • FROM C1

nothing short of brilliant. “It honestly feels like I just committed not even a year ago,” she said. “When I committed two years ago I thought, ‘I have all this time.’” Those 24 months went by quickly, which is why it’s important to highlight her accomplishments before the 5-foot-9 holding midfielder takes her talents to Oklahoma State next Fall. Most of the media attention was focused on the football players during Wednesday’s national letter of intent signing day. Those young men definitely deserved their accolades, and so do the young ladies who proudly carry on St. Louis’ rich soccer tradition. There’s not enough space in the sports section to highlight all the special soccer players who have honed their skills in St. Louis and made this beloved baseball town one of the America’s most vibrant soccer meccas. Lawler, who is arguably the area’s top girls soccer player in this year’s class, is trying to appreciate the final semester she

has at Summit and at home with her two younger sisters and her parents. “My parents tell me you have to want to work and try your best and be the best that you can, but at the same time you need to enjoy your time and enjoy what you have with your friends and teammates because it does go quickly,” she said. “If I can pass a message along it is enjoy your time. “It all flies by, so you need to soak in everything around you because it goes fast. Your friends, high school soccer, club soccer, high school in general, going out with your friends, it all goes by really quickly.” Lawler has accomplished quite a bit during her high school career. She’s actually one of the most accomplished high school athletes in the area regardless of gender or sport. Mizzou, Kentucky, Purdue and Colorado all ofered her scholarships. She even considered Princeton, which should tell you something about her academic bona fides. Lawler, who has a weighted 4.2 grade point average, led Summit to the state soccer finals as a freshman and sophomore. Summit fell in the district finals last

year, so she’s hungry to return to state as a senior. The two-time All-America selection is ranked as the 45th best girls soccer prospect overall and the 10th best defender in the country by TopDrawerSoccer.com, which also lists her as the Heartland Region’s top player. In 2016 Lawler was Missouri’s Gatorade Player of the Year and the Post-Dispatch All-Metro Player of the Year. She is expected to be one of the top contenders for the 2018 All-Metro Player of the Year honor. “Since I’ve known her and seen her play, she’s always been a leader both on and of the field,” her club coach Ralph Richards said. “This year especially she and some of the other seniors have really led the ECNL program with the work they do in community and on the playing field.” It says quite a bit about Lawler that she is considered a leader on a stacked club team that includes several players who received academic and athletic scholarships to play soccer at the next level. She is a leader on a club team that includes Webster Groves High’s Isabel Burke

(who will play at St. Louis University), Eureka High’s Blythe Beldner (Mizzou), Incarnate Word’s Emily Groark (Colorado), Lutheran South’s Kasey Hartmann (SLU), Eureka’s Hayley Jackovic (Xavier), Nerinx Hall’s Gabby Smith (Butler), Nerinx Hall’s Margaret LaVigne (University of Nebraska-Omaha) and MICDS’ Delaney Schultz (Rice). More importantly, Lawler is a leader at home. She doesn’t shy away from the responsibility she has to set a good example for her two younger sisters, Sara, 16, and Kate, 9. “I have two younger sisters who tell me they look up to me because they’re following the soccer trail,” she said. “I think it’s like a special thing to have two younger sisters because I think I have to set a positive example. “It’s something that’s in the back of my mind. I strive to be a better person because their eyes are always on me. It’s definitely special.” Lawler’s quite special as well. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

THURSDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Hermann 10 13 6 16 45 Paciic 19 24 10 17 70 H (8-14): Anderson 12, Scheidegger 12, Holland 8, Moeckli 6, Schannuth 4, Ash 3. FG 12 (3), FT 18-23. P (16-4): VanLeer 26, Strong 14, Hennessy 9, Boyer 6, Fleming 6, Harris 4, Casey 3, Hoerchler 2. FG 29 (9), FT 3-8. Riverview 13 16 13 11 53 Haz. East 28 12 12 24 76 H (16-5): Brown 16, Fultz 16, Horton 13, Gilmore 12, McBride 10, Shepherd 7, Foster 2. FG 27 (11), FT 11-18. Haz. West 12 11 8 18 49 Haz. Central 17 26 15 14 72 HW (10-10): Doyle 7, Gray 7, Jones Jr. 7, J. Thornton 7, Lavalle 6, Cooper 4, Griin 3, Riney 3, A. Thornton 3, Hester 2. FG 18 (3), FT 10-14. HC (21-1): S. Williams 16, C. Williams 16, Ball 8, Heard 7, Cobb 6, Covington-Berry 6, Wright 6, Craddieth 4, Perkins 3. FG 27 (3), FT 15-23. McCluer 10 6 8 17 41 McCluer North 16 19 16 14 65 M (11-11): Butler 20, Evans 12, Ray 9, Daniels 8, Simmons 8, Banks 4, Ephron 2, Mosley-Mull 2. FG 25 (5), FT 10-17. Fath.McGivney 2 16 10 6 34 Gibault 18 12 17 21 68 F (7-19): Loeler 16, Shumate 9, Weir 4, Scott 3, Taphorn 2. FG 13 (1), FT 7-14. G (8-18): Huels 21, Kesler 13, Altadonna 10, Doerr 8, J. Sweeney 5, Adams 3, Kohnz 3, Simonton 3, Besserman 2. FG 27 (10), FT 4-9. Principia 7 23 8 7 45 Bayless 0 10 7 5 22 P (12-9): Towle 12, Brantingham 10, Thomas 10, Wingert 5, Fox 4, Grow 2, Kearney 2. FG 19 (5), FT 2-4. B (6-13): Gunter 9, Herndon 7, Johnson 6. FG 8 (2), FT 4-9. McKinley 10 16 17 6 49 Gateway STEM 19 23 30 12 84 G (11-10): Sevier 17, Ellis 13, Hemphill 12, Frye 9, Norman 6, Sykes 6, Jones 5, Pruitt 5, Banks 4, Bell 3, Venerable 3, Warren 1. FG 33 (12), FT 6-12. Metro 13 9 19 19 60 CSOMB 11 10 9 14 44 M (14-8): Carlock 22, Thomas 12, Davie 7, Isom 7, Boehlje 6, Turner 6. FG 20 (3), FT 17-26. C (3-11): Quinn 22, Valley 7, Burch 5, Williams 5, Wright 3, King-Lee 2. FG 18 (5), FT 3-10. Pky. South 19 21 26 18 84 Eureka 22 10 21 23 76 P (13-8): A. Sommer 19, Doyle 18, A. Sommer 17, Mullen 11, DeRouse 9, Skidmore 6, Rollins 4. FG 26 (8), FT 24-37. E (14-8): Summers 27, Taggart 18, Herbert 12, Billingsley 5, King 5, Haskins 4, Smith 4, Sanders 1. FG 28 (9), FT 11-22. Hillsboro 17 23 18 11 69 Seckman 9 7 11 3 30 H (20-3): G. Pinkley 21, Brewer 17, Keller 16, Lampkins 4, Moore 4, Martin 3, Craig 2, Fleming 2. FG 21 (5), FT 22-23. Pky. West 18 6 10 15 49 Webster 20 24 15 21 80 P (6-16): Akinwumi 16, Scott 10, Loaney 8, Geraghty 5, Robinson 3, Gieseking 2, Miller 2, Wills 2, J. Morgan 1. FG 20 (4), FT 5-8. Oakville 15 9 14 21 59 Afton 14 11 6 20 51 O (8-9): Gillmann 24, Purschke 11, Beardsley 8, Pinner 5, Portell 5, Golden 3, Whitman 2, Morlen 1. FG 20 (6), FT 13-21. A (4-16): Barshow 19, Olliges 17, Hayden 7, Bradford 4, Chatman 2, Roberts 2. FG 14 (10), FT 13-16. Brentwood 14 24 26 20 84 Cleveland 13 13 17 27 70 B (6-13): C. Jones 20, King 15, Gordan 13, C. Hill 9, Mitchell 7, C. Hill 6, Neil 5, Mays 4, M. Jones 3, Young 2. FG 35 (3), FT 11-27. Westminster 13 11 16 18 58 Whitield 17 11 6 19 53 We (12-10): Orf 20, Montgomery 12, Adams 6, Cusumano 6, Linam 6, Token 6, Alldredge 2. FG 21 (8), FT 8-10. Wh (16-7): Watson 29, Ramsey 8, Taylor 8, Stucco 6, McCray 2. FG 16 (8), FT 13-16.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Cor Jesu 10 8 10 18 46 Whitield 14 16 25 5 60 C (8-15): Hummel 27, Carlson 13, Anderson 3, Hite 2, Wilson 1. FG 17 (1), FT 11-16. W (185): Blackwell 22, Moore 12, Foster-Walker 9, Blakemore 6, Daniels 5, Griin 5, LawsonHicks 1. FG 23 (6), FT 8-11. Crossroads 7 5 11 11 34 DuBourg 11 14 15 16 56 D (8-12): Vales 21, Nelson 12, Klump 10, Loehr 7, Gagen 4, Niethe 2. FG 24 (5), FT 3-15.

Thursday’s basketball box scores are sponsored by Maryville University. Triad 14 9 5 14 42 Waterloo 10 8 11 20 49 T (8-15): Barisch 16, Wilson 10, Cochran 5, Miller 4, Suess 4, Fandrey 3. FG 13 (6), FT 1015. W (4-19): Luedeman 29, Aldridge 9, Bosler 4, Novack 4, Diekman 3. FG 16 (1), FT 16-28. McCluer North 16 15 14 10 55 McCluer 11 9 14 8 42 M (11-13): Gibson 18, Johnson 16, Cunningham 12, Davis 7, Pinkston 2. FG 19 (6), FT 11-27. Jerseyville 11 15 3 18 47 Civic Mem. 20 11 14 13 58 C (27-2): Hall 13, Eaton 10, K. Tyus 10, Standefer 8, Schmidt 7, A. Tyus 5, Pfeifer 4, Buhs 1. FG 20 (1), FT 17-20. Haz. East 7 0 17 6 30 Riverview 5 18 9 6 38 H (2-21): Buford 9, Bluett 8, Hancock 6, Daniels 3, Harris 2, McCowan 2. FG 10 (4), FT 6-22. R (514): Dickens 13, Clark 10, D. Kaiser 6, J. Kaiser 6, Campbell 2, Adams 1. FG 15 (1), FT 7-12. Mascoutah 9 7 7 10 33 Highland 17 20 25 12 74 M (3-22): Keeling 19, Strong 6, Heriford 2, Hilbing 2, Mostoller 2, Singletary 2. FG 13 (4), FT 3-7. H (19-10): Brown 14, Klucker 12, Rifel 11, LaPorta 10, Baer 9, Portell 9, Kesner 4, K. Taylor 3, Nyquist 2. FG 32 (7), FT 3-6. St. Joseph’s 19 14 22 19 74 V. Duchesne 10 7 14 12 43 S (16-5): Kerr 19, Lally 12, LaBelle 11, Little 8, Sakamoto 7, Welch 6, Origliasso 4, Roux 4, Tyson 3. FG 27 (5), FT 15-20. V (4-12): Gast 21, Deines 10, Burns 3, Metz 3, Mueller 3, Adamitis 2, Griesediek 1. FG 14 (2), FT 13-21. Centralia IL 5 5 6 7 23 Columbia 10 23 12 8 53 Co (16-10): Edwards 21, Harrell 6, Jackson 6, Mathews 6, Bonaldi 5, Touchette 4, Henke 3, Barthel 2. FG 24 (0), FT 5-10. In. Word 13 17 14 16 60 Visitation 16 10 10 15 51 V (14-8): Long 19, Ott 13, Spence 13, Delano 4, Pittenger 2. FG 19 (3), FT 10-14. Haz. Central 17 26 26 7 76 Haz. West 7 12 10 8 37 HW (10-8): Patterson 12, Dilworth 7, Wells 7, Mathews 6, Blackson 3, Nilges 2. FG 14 (1), FT 8-16. Brentwood 4 10 21 8 43 Maplewood-RH 2 6 4 8 20 B (12-10): M. Callihan 13, Clay 12, Hill 6, Ingersoll 6, Tonis 4, Gombas 2. FG 19 (1), FT 4-12. Normandy 11 6 6 7 30 Vashon 4 7 11 6 28 N (1-19): Jackson 8, Hall 6, Hardimon 6, Glover 5, Baker 1. FG 9 (0), FT 8-25. St. Dominic 7 9 10 12 38 Borgia 13 16 8 9 46 S (15-5): Hermann 18, Kasubke 7, Poli 6, Morrow 2, Zoellner 2, M. Ballard 1, Forbeck 1, Miller 1. FG 13 (4), FT 8-13. E. St. Louis 14 12 21 20 67 O’Fallon 14 19 19 16 68 E (14-10): Stanley 29, Glanton 12, Newson 8, Hicks 7, Milton 5, S. Johnson 4, Taylor 2. FG 24 (8), FT 11-13. O (24-4): Thurwalker 19, Schloer 15, Stubbleield 11, Best 8, C. Keller 6, Bullock 3, C. Keller 3, Mueller 2, Gordon 1. FG 24 (6), FT 14-24. Bellvl. West 5 6 13 15 39 Collinsville 7 17 13 22 59 C (12-13): Liljegren 21, King 8, Weeks 8, Govan 5, Mitchell 4, Bush 3, Becker 2, Buehne 2, Fenton 2, Ford 2, Knutson 2. FG 22 (5), FT 10-16.

HOCKEY Challenge Cup-Prelims - Red Division Kirkwood 8, Priory 0

GIRLS BASKETBALL ILLINOIS REGIONAL TOURNAMENTS — Class 2A Alton Marquette Regional Championship, Thursday Alton Marquette 34, Piasa Southwestern 24 — Class 2A Arthur Regional Championship, Thursday Sullivan 40, Tuscola 34 — Class 2A Nashville Regional Championship, Thursday Nashville 46, Sesser-Valier 38 — Class 2A Pinckneyville Regional Championship, Thursday Mater Dei 51, Pinckneyville 31

— Class 2A Litchfield Regional Championship, Friday Carlinville (20-8) vs. Auburn, 7 p.m. — Class 1A Carrollton Regional Championship, Thursday Carrollton 51, Greenfield 46 — Class 1A Metro-East Regional Championship, Friday Lebanon (27-1) vs. Metro-East Lutheran (15-11), 7 p.m. — Class 1A Cobden Regional Championship, Thursday New Athens 49, Elverado 30

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

The Mater Dei basketball team celebrates with the championship plaque after a Class 2A regional championship game at Pinckneyville Community High School on Thursday. See story on STLhighschoolsports.com

CLASS 2A ALTON MARQUETTE REGIONAL

Explorers make ofensive adjustments, win irst regional title in six seasons BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

ALTON • Payton Connors could have

been upset. Instead, the Alton Marquette junior guard made the best of a diicult situation Connors, usually a starter, began Thursday’s Class 2A Marquette Regional championship game against Piasa Southwestern on the bench. Explorers coach Lee Green chose to go with a bigger lineup, which momentarily cost Connors her spot. But in the second half, when the Explorers decided to speed up the game, Green called on Connors — and she came through with flying colors. The 5-foot-6 spark plug hit six foul shots in the final 4 minutes and 7 seconds to help the Explorers to a hard-fought 34-24 win. “I was just happy to help my team,” Connors said. Marquette (20-8) captured its first regional title since the 2011-2012 campaign. The Explorers will face Pleasant Plains (27-3) in the semifinal round of the Riverton Sectional at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Riverton High. Pleasant Plans, ranked fifth in the latest statewide poll, has won 10 in a row. Connors and senior guard Lila Snider banded together to help the

hosts take control of the defensive struggle in the second half. Snider triggered a tell-tale 8-0 run in the third quarter with five points and a pair of steals. Connors, who finished with seven points, then nailed down the landmark victory with some rare success at the free-throw line. She entered the contest shooting a dismal 37.7 percent (23 of 61) from the stripe. But much to her surprise, she connected on 5 of 6 in a span of 2:10 to pump a one-point lead to 28-22. “I have no idea,” she said of her new-found success. “But, I’m glad it did.” Marquette used a lock-down defense and some timely plays on offense to hold off the upset-mind Birds, who finished 17-12. Snider, who finished with a gamehigh 12 points, led the defensive charge with one impressive play after another in the third-quarter run, which gave Marquette the lead for good. Southwestern took a 15-14 advantage on a foul shot throw by junior Bailey Weible, who finished with a team-high 10 points. On the ensuing possession, Snider recorded a steal and a pair of foul shots for a one-point cushion. Seconds later, she added another theft. Her steal and layup led to an oldfashioned 3-point play and a 19-15

advantage. Connors followed with another free throw and Peyton Kline chipped in with a basket to give Marquette a 22-15 cushion. “It was a close game and realized I needed to step it up,” Snider said. Southwestern, which was searching for its 20th regional crown, fought back but Connors sealed the deal. “We showed some heart,” Southwestern coach Steve Wooley said. “We just couldn’t end up with (two) good possessions in a row.” Green, who took over last season, set a goal of winning a regional title for his team, which came up just short last season. “At the start of the summer, we talked about it every time we (broke a huddle) and put our hands in the middle, we’d say regional champs,” Snider noted. “So this means everything for our team.” The Explorers adapted ofensively after missing 13 of 14 3-point shots. They made 142 triples leading up to the contest and lived by the 3-pointer at times. Yet when their long-range shooting touch wasn’t there, they got the job done at the foul line and on the defensive end. Kline added seven points to the winning attack. Senior Lauren Fischer chipped in with six points.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Normandy breaks through for irst victory since 2012 BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

The streak is finally over. After a string of futility spanning six years and 109 games, the Normandy High girls basketball team finally tasted victory on Thursday. The Vikings recorded a landmark 30-28 win over

Vashon in a Public High League game at Vashon High. Sophomore guard Briana Hall said the win was cause for celebration. “I feel just so happy,” Hall said. “We did it. We finally did it. It’s amazing. We’re real proud. We did what we had to do.” The Vikings (1-19)

built a lead and held on as sophomore center Barbara Echols corralled a rebound with 2.2 seconds left to seal the win after the Wolverines (5-7) went for the tying shot. “The girls came out and did what is expected of them,” second-year coach Tanisha Albert said. “What is expected of them is to

not give up.” Senior Alexis Jackson led the Vikings with eight points. Hall and Jaylay Hardimon each added six in the victory. The win comes less than six weeks after Normandy fell 39-27 to Vashon as part of the Public High League Christmas Tournament. “We knew it would be

tough,” Hall said. “We just did our best to keep working hard and doing what our coach tells us to do.” Normandy athletics director Terrence Hamilton got a chance to share the victory with the team. “I hugged coach Albert after the game, and we don’t usually hug,” Ham-

ilton said. “The girls celebrated and it was great. It was almost like we won a state championship. I know all the hard work they’ve all put in and to get to see them celebrate success is so amazing.” Priory to Thursday, Normandy’s last win was a 4843 triumph over Riverview on Feb. 7, 2012.

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE O’Fallon (9-13) at Belleville East (10-12), 7:30 p.m. Alton (13-8) at Collinsville (15-9), 7:30 p.m. Edwardsville (12-8) at Granite City (8-14), 7:30 p.m. Lutheran North (11-12) at Principia (12-9), 7:30 p.m. New Athens (5-16) at Marissa (8-16), 7:30 p.m. Belleville West (20-2) at East St. Louis (10-9), 7:30 p.m. Litchield (12-12) at Carlinville (7-15), 7:30 p.m. Roxana (4-21) at Alton Marquette (25-0), 7:30 p.m. ME Lutheran (11-13) at Woodlawn (3-5), 7:30 p.m. Carbondale (18-5) at Cahokia (11-11), 7:30 p.m. Althof (4-19) at Marion (15-10), 7:30 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (18-4) at Mount Vernon (12-9), 7:30 p.m. North Tech (4-17) at Mater Dei (11-12), 7:30 p.m. Washington (9-12) at Liberty (16-6), 7:30 p.m. Orchard Farm (17-7) at Warrenton (14-5), 7:30 p.m. Okawville (17-8) at Red Bud (12-10), 7:45 p.m. Freeburg (14-12) at Wesclin (20-4), 7:45 p.m. Carterville (1-10) at Nashville (19-6), 7:45 p.m. St. Charles (15-7) at St. Charles West (8-12), 8 p.m. Trinity (17-3) at Cardinal Ritter (17-7), 8 p.m. Herculaneum (7-14) at Crystal City (4-17), 8:30 p.m.

WRESTLING

GIRLS BASKETBALL Valley Park (11-11) at Hancock (8-11), 5 p.m. Troy (12-8) at Timberland (4-16), 5:30 p.m. FH Central (17-3) at Fort Zumwalt West (7-14), 5:30 p.m. Holt (13-6) at Fort Zumwalt East (8-11), 5:30 p.m. Lindbergh (10-10) at Oakville (11-7), 5:30 p.m. Webster Groves (9-12) at Summit (5-16), 5:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (7-13) at Fort Zumwalt South (12-8), 5:30 p.m. Lafayette (13-6) at Fox (7-9), 5:30 p.m. Seckman (9-8) at Marquette (7-12), 5:30 p.m. Villa Duchesne (4-11) at Westminster (8-12), 5:30 p.m. Parkway North (17-5) at Kirkwood (18-2), 5:30 p.m. Northwest-CH (3-16) at Mehlville (3-16), 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell (14-7) at FH North (5-15), 5:30 p.m. Wright City (2-17) at Clopton (4-2), 5:30 p.m. Notre Dame de Sion at North Tech (7-11), 5:30 p.m. Herculaneum (17-3) at Crystal City (8-12), 5:30 p.m. Pattonville (12-7) at Ritenour (10-9), 5:30 p.m. Lutheran North (17-3) at Principia (16-6), 5:45 p.m. Parkway Central (17-3) at Clayton (7-12), 6 p.m. University City (11-8) at Ladue (12-6), 6 p.m. Union (10-11) at Hermann (18-3), 6 p.m.

INJURY SHOULD NEVER INTERRUPT the game you love That’s why we have a team of medical all-stars on our side.

At the Washington University and St. Louis Children’s Young Athlete Center, we are dedicated to ensuring young athletes like Tajah, who underwent ACL reconstruction and customized rehab, can return to her basketball team with as little interruption as possible. Because we’re not just experts in our field, we’re Guardians of Childhood. Meet Tajah at StLouisChildrens.org/Tajah

MICDS (17-3) at John Burroughs (7-13), 6 p.m. Orchard Farm (15-8) at Warrenton (10-6), 6 p.m. Washington (11-10) at Liberty (5-13), 6 p.m. McKinley (3-15) at Gateway STEM (13-6), 6:30 p.m. Trinity (8-12) at Cardinal Ritter (14-4), 6:30 p.m. St. Charles (13-8) at St. Charles West (6-14), 6:30 p.m. Normandy (1-19) at Northwest Academy (12-6), 6:30 p.m. Medicine and Biosc (5-10) vs. Roosevelt (5-10), at McKinley, 6:30 p.m. Parkway South (10-10) at Eureka (14-7), 7 p.m. Metro (18-5) at KC Center, 7 p.m. Afton (10-11) at McCluer S-Berkeley (11-6), 7 p.m. O’Fallon Christian (15-7) at Luth. St. Charles (14-7), 7:30 p.m.

(Note: Top four individuals in each weight class advance to state tournament) ILLINOIS — Class 3A Alton Sectional Friday, 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Area teams: Alton, Belleville East, Belleville West, Collinsville, Edwardsville, Granite City, O’Fallon, — Class 2A Lincoln Individual Sectional Friday, 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Area teams: Cahokia, Civic Memorial, East St. Louis, Highland, Jerseyville, Mascoutah, Triad, Waterloo — Class 1A Vandalia Individual Sectional Friday, 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Teams: Althof, Carlyle, Metro-East Lutheran, Roxana, Wood River MISSOURI — Class 4 District 1 Tournament At Lindbergh Friday, 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Teams: CBC, Eureka, Fox, Jackson, Kirkwood, Lafayette, Lindbergh, Marquette, Mehlville, Northwest Cedar Hill, Oakville, Parkway South, Poplar Bluf, Seckman, SLUH, Vianney — Class 4 District 2 Tournament At Francis Howell Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Chaminade, De Smet, Fort Zumwalt North, Fort Zumwalt West, Francis Howell, Francis Howell Central, Francis Howell North, Hazelwood Central, Hazelwood West, Holt, McCluer North, Pattonville, Ritenour, Timberland, Troy Buchanan

— Class 3 District 1 Tournament At Farmington Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Cape Central, De Soto, Farmington, Festus, Gateway STEM, Hillsboro, North County, Paciic, Sikeston, St. Mary’s, Summit, Union, Washington, Webster Groves, Windsor — Class 3 District 2 Tournament At Hannibal Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Clayton, Fort Zumwalt East, Fort Zumwalt South, Hannibal, Hazelwood East, Ladue, Liberty, McCluer, MICDS, Parkway Central, Parkway North, Parkway West, St. Charles, University City, Warrenton, Westminster — Class 2 District 1 Tournament At Ste. Genevieve Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Afton, Borgia, Cape Notre Dame, Dexter, DuBourg, Kennett, Lift for Life, Lutheran South, Owensville, Park Hills Central, Potosi, St. Clair, St. James, Ste. Genevieve, Sullivan — Class 2 District 2 Tournament At Mexico Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Fulton, John Burroughs, Kirksville, McCluer South-Berkeley, Mexico, Miller Career, Moberly, Normandy, O’Fallon Christian, Orchard Farm, Priory, Soldan, St. Charles West, Winield — Class 1 District 1 Tournament At Whitield Friday, 5 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Teams: Brentwood, Cleveland, Gateway Science Academy, Hancock, Herculaneum, Lutheran North, Lutheran St. Charles, MaplewoodRH, New Madrid County Central, Palmyra, Principia, Sumner, Valle Catholic, Whitield

HOCKEY Mid-States Challenge Cup Quarterinals SLUH vs. TBD, 8 p.m. at Afton Ice Arena Chaminade vs. Oakville, 9:30 p.m. at South County Ice De Smet vs. Vianney, 8:15 p.m. at Queeny CBC vs. TBD, 9:45 p.m. at Afton Ice Arena Mid-States Founders Cup Parkway West vs. Francis Howell North, 7:45 p.m. at Rec-Plex Whitield vs. Holt, 7:15 p.m. at Lindenwood Ice Arena Lutheran South vs. Clayton, 7:15 p.m. at Fenton Forum

Tajah, Age 17 Town & Country, MO

© St. Louis Children’s Hospital 2017

BOYS BASKETBALL St. Vincent (13-4) at Grandview (5-16), 5:30 p.m. New Haven (6-16) at Owensville (2-9), 5:30 p.m. O’Fallon Christian (14-8) at Luth. St. Charles (2-20), 6 p.m. Wood River (6-17) at Bunker Hill (1-19), 6 p.m. Father McGivney (7-18) at Brussels (4-15), 6 p.m. Chaminade (16-4) at CBC (7-12), 6 p.m. Breese Central (10-13) at Greenville (15-10), 6 p.m. Silex (1-7) at North Callaway (10-11), 6 p.m. Steeleville (15-10) at Trico (7-6), 6:15 p.m. Mount Olive (10-9) at Spr. Lutheran, 6:15 p.m. Valmeyer (13-11) at Dupo (4-18), 6:15 p.m. Carnahan (7-12) at Cleveland (4-13), 6:30 p.m. Rock Bridge (6-0) at Hazelwood Central (21-1), 6:30 p.m. Valley Park (16-5) at Hancock (15-5), 6:30 p.m. Roosevelt (5-14) at Soldan (10-11), 6:30 p.m. St. Pius X (9-10) at Jeferson (15-7), 7 p.m. Lutheran South (10-11) at Priory (11-8), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (2-17) at Fort Zumwalt South (18-3), 7 p.m. MICDS (11-10) at John Burroughs (13-7), 7 p.m. Webster Groves (12-7) vs. Summit (8-12), at Webster, 7 p.m. St. Louis U. High (10-12) at Vianney (13-8), 7 p.m. Paciic (16-4) at St. Clair (5-14), 7 p.m. Parkway North (8-12) at Kirkwood (12-8), 7 p.m. Ladue (15-7) at University City (6-15), 7 p.m. Wright City (8-10) at Clopton (2-5), 7 p.m. St. James (15-6) at Sullivan (11-9), 7 p.m. Holt (9-12) at Fort Zumwalt East (11-10), 7 p.m. Troy (12-9) at Timberland (6-14), 7 p.m. Northwest-CH (1-18) at Mehlville (12-8), 7 p.m. Lindbergh (9-10) at Oakville (8-9), 7 p.m. FH Central (7-13) at Fort Zumwalt West (11-10), 7 p.m. Seckman (6-11) at Marquette (13-8), 7 p.m. Pattonville (7-9) at Ritenour (10-11), 7 p.m. Francis Howell (20-3) at FH North (4-14), 7 p.m. Lafayette (9-12) at Fox (5-14), 7 p.m. Clayton (4-15) at Parkway Central (18-4), 7 p.m. Bayless (6-13) at Brentwood (6-13), 7 p.m. Windsor (9-11) at Perryville (5-6), 7:15 p.m. Duchesne (15-7) at St. Mary’s (21-3), 7:15 p.m. Borgia (10-10) at St. Dominic (11-8), 7:15 p.m. Carlyle (11-16) at Columbia (13-10), 7:30 p.m. Union (8-13) at Hermann (8-14), 7:30 p.m. Triad (12-12) at Jerseyville (12-11), 7:30 p.m.


GOLF

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 02.09.2018

Streelman, Hossler grab share of lead ASSOCIATED PRESS

The one time Rory McIlroy could have been slightly annoyed was the very reason the AT&T Pebble Beach (Calif.) Pro-Am was so enjoyable. A shadow. McIlroy was just starting to take his driver back on the par-5 seventh at Spyglass Hill when he saw the shadow of his father move. With so much sunshine Thursday across the Monterey Peninsula, that was inevitable. “So I backed of it. I said, ‘Fine, stand still.’ Blocked it way right and hit my second in the water,” McIlroy said. “Hard to say anything. Chipped in for birdie, so I was like, ‘You’re forgiven.’” There wasn’t much not to like on a day like this, especially for Kevin Streelman and Beau Hossler. Streelman doesn’t even play the most golf on his pro-am team

Spyglass. He played with hockey great Wayne Gretzky, who had two birdies. Johnson was at 67 and looked as though he might just be getting started. If that’s the case, he might have a problem. The top 25 pro-am teams advance to Sunday. One problem. Gretzky has to be in Edmonton on Sunday as the 1984-85 Oilers are celebrated as a fan vote of the greatest NHL team in the last century. The fact that tickets to the gala are going for $99 suggests the Great One probably needs to be there. “He’s going to play as long as he can,” Johnson said.

the 156 players broke par. Defending champion Jordan Spieth was not among them. He missed a birdie chance from 3 feet on the par-5 13th hole, which was annoying because he didn’t have many looks like that. Spieth made one birdie, one bogey and 16 pars. He was at 72 and, after grabbing lunch, was headed out to the practice green for some work. It might have been more irritating on any other day but this one — not with the scenery, the ambiance at Spyglass and the social nature of this pro-am. Country singer Jake Owen kept it light, stopping on his way to the 16th tee to sing a song when someone handed him a guitar. Dustin Johnson, a two-time Pebble winner and the No. 1 player in the world, had very little stress after he got up-and-down from the collar of the green at the par-3 fifth hole for bogey at

was on the Shore Course at Monterey Peninsula, which plays to a par 71. Also at 6 under were Matt Kuchar and Julian Suri, who were at Spyglass. Suri grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., and has moved up to No. 66 in the world based on his play on the European Tour. Pebble Beach is his third straight sponsor’s exemption on the PGA Tour. McIlroy, meanwhile, used that unlikely birdie on No. 7 to begin his move that eventually reached 4 under until a scrappy finish for a 68, leaving him three shots behind in his debut in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. “A couple of messy holes coming in,” he said. “Made a good bogey on 16. Made a great par on 17. It was nice to finish with a birdie at the last. So all in all pretty pleased.” Scoring conditions were so good — everything was good about this day — that 97 out of

— his partner is Arizona Cardinals receiver Larry Fitzgerald, a golf fanatic — but he managed to put together another strong round at Spyglass and keep bogeys of his card for a 7-under 65. He shared the lead to par with Hossler, who added another strong memory from northern California. Hossler, who challenged for the lead as a 17-yearold on the weekend of the 2012 U.S. Open at Olympic Club, was bogey-free at Pebble Beach. Hossler birdied the 16th and 17th and had a chance to take the lead on the par-5 18th until enough wind came up to make it a challenge. He sent his tee shot to the right, his second into a fairway bunker, didn’t quite reach the green and had to make an 8-foot putt to save par. “Just a lot going on there, so I was glad to get out of there with a 5,” Hossler said. Aaron Wise also had a 65. He

Rumford leads in Australia • Defending champion Brett Rumford shot an 8-under 64 to take a two-stroke lead over Lee Westwood and James Nitties in the World Super 6 Perth in Australia at Lake Karrinyup Country Club.

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WEATHER • Low 35, High 55 • Winds SSW/N 5-10 mph

National Extremes

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. High: 91° Thermal, California

Low: -32° Stambaugh, Michigan

Mild today, colder tonight

110s

Mild temperatures are expected out ahead of an approaching cold front today. Highs across the St. Louis area will top out in the middle 50s. Colder air will settle into the region tonight. A wintry mix is forecast for Saturday into Saturday night.

100s

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

38°

52°

48°

36°

Partly sunny

Partly sunny Mostly cloudy Lots of clouds

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

90s

70s

4-DAY FORECAST

61 54 47 55 51 56 36 27 54 57 27 55 58

W

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

50s 40s

20s SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

27°/32°

22°/28°

16°/38° 27°/46°

Wintry mix possible

Cloudy, light snow early

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

26 33 19 28 28 25 31 25 30 17 29 26

H

Chicago 19 / 28

Kirksville 26 / 27 Kansas City 33 / 36

Joplin 36 / 56

Springfield 29 / 41

St. Louis 35 / 55 Carbondale 33 / 55 Poplar Bluff 29 / 55

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

0.00” 0.01” 0.62” 1.24” 3.02” Current Level

+ 0.13 - 0.05 + 0.11 + 0.07 + 0.22 0.00 - 0.35 - 0.91 - 0.95 - 0.76

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Feb 8th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 281 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 31 Yesterday 310 Month (Total) 3031 Season 2461 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.77 18 12.03 Peoria 14 9.91 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 3.14 Sullivan 16 - 2.75 Valley Park 24 5.59 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 1.56 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 22.68 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

+ 0.30 0.00 + 0.09 - 0.01 - 0.01 - 0.06 0.00

SUN & MOON

New Feb 15 Sunrise

First Feb 23

Full Mar 1

6:59 AM Sunset

Last Mar 9 5:32 PM

Moonrise 2:14 AM Moonset 12:36 PM

The planet Venus is starting to climb out of the sun’s glare on its way to an evening apparition that lasts most of 2018. Our first glimpse of the bright planet will come near the end of February.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.36 354.78 494.33 655.16 705.54 652.51 908.71 839.14 594.46 404.65 600.79 443.28

+ 0.72 - 0.03 + 0.01 + 0.03 + 0.07 - 0.06 - 0.08 - 0.01 - 0.01 + 0.08 - 0.06 - 0.03

+ 0.59 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Lower 48 temps only

Accumulating snowfall is expected across parts of the Midwest and southern Great Lakes in association with an area of low pressure and associated frontal boundary. A few scattered showers will develop throughout parts of the Gulf Coast and coastal sections of the Southeast. Some snow is also forecast across parts of the northern Rockies. Dry conditions will persist across much of the West Coast. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 10 Albuquerque 33 Anchorage 5 Atlanta 37 Atlantic City 22 Baltimore 22 Billings -3 Biloxi, Ms. 50 Birmingham 36 Bismarck -16 Boise 39 Boston 17 Buffalo 14 Burlington, Vt. 10 Charleston, S.C. 40 Charleston, W.V. 23 Charlotte 32 Cheyenne 30 Chicago 19 Cincinnati 25 Cleveland 15 Colorado Spgs. 35 Concord, N.H. 8 Dallas 40 Daytona Beach 60 Denver 26 Des Moines 15 52 Destin, Fl. 14 Detroit 39 El Paso 30 Evansville -26 Fairbanks -13 Fargo 24 Flagstaff 66 Fort Myers -5 Great Falls 7 Green Bay 14 Hartford 64 Honolulu 49 Houston 25 Indianapolis 38 Jackson, Ms. 10 Juneau 73 Key West 50 Las Vegas 31 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 28 Louisville

28 65 22 58 39 44 7 64 62 6 53 34 29 24 65 56 58 35 28 50 35 52 28 69 76 32 18 62 29 74 54 4 3 60 84 0 18 34 80 66 45 60 28 81 76 59 77 56

W

Tomorrow L H W

snow sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow showers showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow snow mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers snow sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy

26 37 11 50 37 35 -9 61 52 -10 30 30 25 20 55 39 49 8 14 35 29 18 23 50 61 14 3 59 20 46 36 -16 -11 31 66 -18 -1 28 65 58 28 55 16 74 51 47 56 40

44 64 27 63 55 50 20 70 65 13 45 47 33 35 73 54 60 21 23 42 34 26 43 50 81 25 14 68 28 75 45 3 11 55 84 23 18 47 81 72 36 70 34 82 74 52 69 49

rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers rain rain partly cloudy showers showers sunny sunny rain snow rain and snow showers rain showers snow snow rain snow snow rain and snow showers showers snow snow showers snow showers sunny rain very cold partly cloudy windy partly sunny sunny partly cloudy rain partly cloudy showers freezing rain showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy rain

City

Today L H

37 Macon 50 McAllen, Tx. 36 Memphis 72 Miami 17 Milwaukee 2 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 23 47 Mobile Montgomery 39 31 Nashville New Orleans 51 New York City 21 Norfolk, Va. 27 Oklahoma City 36 Omaha 14 Orlando 61 Palm Springs 60 Philadelphia 24 Phoenix 51 Pittsburgh 15 Portland, Me. 10 Portland, Or. 41 Providence 16 Raleigh 31 Rapid City -1 Reno 31 Richmond, Va. 26 Sacramento 43 St. Petersburg 63 Salt Lake City 41 San Antonio 46 San Diego 52 San Francisco 51 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 42 Seattle 41 41 Shreveport 4 Sioux Falls 11 Syracuse 49 Tallahassee 62 Tampa 45 Tucson 38 Tulsa 27 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 71 31 Wichita Wilmington, De. 22 54 Yuma

59 67 60 82 22 11 29 65 61 64 71 35 51 62 18 81 85 42 82 41 29 50 35 57 4 66 53 74 78 60 64 68 69 62 65 48 62 10 28 70 80 82 61 46 81 40 41 85

W

Tomorrow L H W

rain showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy snow showers showers sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny sunny snow mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny showers mostly cloudy showers very cold snow showers mostly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

51 59 49 73 7 -5 15 61 52 49 62 33 43 25 4 63 59 35 51 34 23 35 30 44 -9 31 39 46 65 35 54 53 50 31 55 35 55 -8 26 59 65 46 27 37 72 16 34 54

71 83 56 83 20 14 32 73 70 57 73 50 62 26 13 84 80 52 81 45 41 52 48 61 13 51 57 65 79 46 73 65 66 60 74 48 65 12 36 74 80 80 30 52 82 24 51 82

showers partly sunny showers partly cloudy snow sunny partly cloudy showers showers showers showers rain showers cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny rain sunny rain rain and snow partly cloudy rain showers partly cloudy sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers sunny showers partly cloudy snow showers mostly cloudy sunny rain showers cloudy rain sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

71 31 48 48 73 74 19 19 27 77 57 -18 71 63 31 25

85 37 65 74 86 83 39 38 39 83 82 11 82 84 42 40

partly cloudy rain and snow mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

30 56 47 75 56 56 26 39 23 67 45 8 15 72 56 45

42 62 54 81 70 74 44 42 48 90 67 19 25 82 82 75

mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly sunny partly cloudy cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.16 - 0.03 + 0.04 + 0.49 + 0.73

Very unhealthy

Good

Jet Stream

-10s

Hawaii High: 83°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 7.85 23 4.51 Jefferson City 21 4.34 Hermann 20 2.50 Washington 25 8.57 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 11.61 Louisiana 15 12.03 Dam 24 25 14.39 Dam 25 26 13.82 Grafton 18 15.36 M.Price, Pool 419 418.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 3.07 St Louis 30 - 0.32 Chester 27 3.06 Cape Girardeau 32 9.79

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

48° 19° 43° 26° 70° -12° 40° 22°

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (3:16 p.m.) Low (6:53 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1990) Record Low (1895) High Last Year Low Last Year

-0s

City

snow partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy snow cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Wintry Mix

0s

Alaska Low: -42°

W

36 55 28 41 45 29 53 31 33 23 41 40

10s

TUESDAY

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

L

Snow

30s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

33 29 32 32 32 36 33 26 34 34 24 34 31

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

T-storms

60s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

80s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

32 22 21 73 37 73 57 23 24 68 57 32 16 38 26 15

35 36 40 90 56 81 84 41 32 84 70 48 25 43 37 32

mostly cloudy rain and snow mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny snow showers partly cloudy partly cloudy snow


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 02.09.18–02.15.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

LUKAS NELSON IS ON THE ROAD — AGAIN LIFE IS THE BUBBLES AT THE MAD CRAB ANNETTE BENING IS AT HER BEST IN ‘LIVERPOOL’

YOUR GUIDE TO

MARDI GRAS MEET ONE OF THE CREATORS OF SOULARD’S BIG STREET PARTY By Valerie Schremp Hahn


SEE+DO

02.09.18–02.15.18

16 Romance dance The popularity of St. Louis Ballet’s “Nutcracker” inspired its artistic director to create a program linked to Valentine’s Day. BY CALVIN WILSON

Wanda Love of St. Louis calls out for beads at the 2017 Mardi Gras Grand Parade. FEB. 17-18

SATURDAY, FEB. 24

THE BIG SCREEN 17 Star power “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” spotlights Annette Bening at her best. BY CALVIN WILSON 19 Missed opportunity “The 15:17 to Paris,” which stars its real-life heroes, doesn’t live up to the thrilling true story on which it’s based.

MAR. 1-4

MAR. 7-11

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit

FRIDAY, MAR. 16

FUEL 22 Surf’s up The Mad Crab in University City is less a restaurant than a party with food. BY IAN FROEB

ScottradeCenter.com

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

COVER STORY

MUSIC+CLUBS

11 Mardi Gras guide Harpo’s in Soulard, which opened in the fall, was the site of the neighborhood’s first Mardi Gras party in 1980. BY VALERIE

6 Keeping it real The 29-year-old son of country music icon Willie Nelson is currently on tour with his band Promise of the Real. BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ

SCHREMP HAHN

UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR

24•7

WEDNESDAY, APR. 18 ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM!

SATURDAY, APR. 28 ON SALE NOW

Y& TODA ROW! R TOMO

WEDNESDAY, JUN. 6

FEB. 9-10

MONDAY, MAR. 5

4 Best Bets Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Cupid’s Undie Run at Ballpark Village, “The Humans” at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, “The Price Is Right Live!” at the Fox Theatre and the Africa World Documentary Film Festival at the Missouri History Museum. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks.

7 Casting a spell St. Louis band Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players performs Friday night at the Mayor’s Mardi Gras Ball at City Hall. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

LUKAS NELSON IS ON THE ROAD — AGAIN LIFE IS THE BUBBLES AT THE MAD CRAB ANNETTE BENING IS AT HER BEST IN ‘LIVERPOOL’

YOUR GUIDE TO

MARDI GRAS MEET ONE OF THE CREATORS OF SOULARD’S BIG STREET PARTY By Valerie Schremp Hahn

Andrea Heyse marches through Soulard at last year’s Mardi Gras Grand Parade. PHOTO BY DAVID CARSON, POST-DISPATCH

8 O Fortuna! This weekend, the St. Louis Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, led by guest conductor Bramwell Tovey, take on two choral classics. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

15 Deep blues A new compilation album by the St. Louis Blues Society features performances by some of the area’s best musicians. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

ON SALE TODAY AT 11AM!

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.09.18-02.15.18

COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

stlouisblues.com stlo

02.09.18–02.15.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

FRIDAY,, FEB. 23 vs

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

ON THE COVER


Here’s what we’re looking forward to in the coming week

“Valentine’s in Vegas!” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com

“Bundling up for Mardi Gras.” •

“The opening ceremonies of the Olympics! I clear my calendar. I get snacks. It’s the best Olympic event.” •

“It’s a toss-up between two big choral programs: ‘Chichester Psalms’ and ‘Carmina Burana’ at the SLSO all weekend; and the St. Louis Chamber Chorus, in a concert that will include dance, on Sunday afternoon.” •

Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event & sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof • Post-Dispatch vice president of advertising, 314-340-8529, dbischof@post-dispatch.com

“Going to the Mayor’s Mardi Gras Ball for the first time Friday night.” •

CONTRIBUTORS Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • arts writer

“Watching ‘Red Scare on Sunset’ — the name alone makes me laugh — at Stray Dog Theatre.” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • events.stltoday.com Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise

“A weekend full of plays!” •

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

stltoday.com/apps

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OVERHEARD ONLINE On a new book about the creator of “The Beverly Hillbillies” BARRY HOEHN “‘The Beverly Hillbillies’ was comic genius. I still enjoy the reruns today.” ➙ ROB HAISLIP “Shows like ‘The Beverly Hillbillies,’ ‘Andy Griith,’ ‘Green Acres’ — not even a hint of anything crude or controversial. Just great comedy that your kids can watch with you.” ➙ RALPH MURPHY “Great show. Along with ‘Andy Griith.’ I can still watch these shows over today’s TV.” ➙ ANDY GOULD “Can you imagine something like ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’ or ‘Gilligan’s Island’ being produced today? Not a snowball’s chance in %#@&. The PC crowd and SJWs would come unglued.”

Get our free app for daily Best Bets, reviews and more ➙ stltoday.com/apps

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


‘Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story’

BETS FRIDAY Africa World Documentary Film Festival WHEN 10 a.m. Friday, 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday • WHERE Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Boulevard, Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO mohistory.org

Documentary features and shorts from around the world that focus on African culture will be screened in this threeday festival. The films represent countries including the United States, Haiti, Brazil, Nigeria, Norway and South Africa. Topics cover a wide range, including art, business, culture, immigration and race. The festival is presented in collaboration with the E. Desmond Lee Professorship in African/AfricanAmerican Studies at the International Studies and Programs oice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. BY

CALVIN WILSON

events are ✔ These Editor’s Picks

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $30-$82 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

vibrant ✔ This musical traces the short, meteoric career of Buddy Holly, the artist who created the basic rock-band lineup and a roster of classic hits, including “Peggy Sue,” “That’ll Be the Day” and “Rave On.” BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘The Humans’ WHEN Friday through March 4 • WHERE Browning Mainstage, Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $18.50-$89 • MORE INFO 314-968-7340; repstl.org

Karam’s ✔ Stephen “The Humans,” winner of four Tony Awards including best play, finds the Blake family at Thanksgiving dinner, all of them anxious about the future and at least one of them anxious about things that aren’t even real. It makes its St. Louis debut under the direction of Steven Woolf. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

The Rock Pack WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $25-$70 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

Cupid’s Undie Run

SATURDAY Cupid’s Undie Run WHEN Noon-4 p.m. Saturday; race begins at 2 p.m. • WHERE Ballpark Village, 601 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $40 • MORE INFO cupids.org

are at least two events Saturday where seeing half-naked ✔ There people in the middle of the street would not be unexpected. One: Soulard Mardi Gras. The other: Cupid’s Undie Run, where participants will strip to their skivvies for a brief run around Ballpark Village. The annual pantsless party, which takes place in 30 cities nationwide, raises money to find a cure for neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder afecting one in 3,000 children. BY GABE HARTWIG

Every name on the Rock Pack bill may not be the most recognizable for everyone, but the songs certainly will be. Onstage will be Kelly Keagy (of Night Ranger), Steve Augeri (of Journey), John Payne (of Asia) and Lou

Gramm (of Foreigner). BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

They Might Be Giants WHEN 9 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

They Might Be Giants hit the Pageant stage Friday night bearing a new album, “I Like Fun” — an inviting title if ever there was one. An expanded lineup of musicians will be featured, performing all-time favorites and

rarities. The group will do a meet-and-greet at 5 p.m. Friday at Vintage Vinyl, where it will sign copies of the new album. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

NEWMARK

‘Infected’ WHEN Friday through Feb. 25 • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

a day✔ Playing trader in quarantine, Alan Knoll delivers a manic monologue that reflects the man’s mental state, spiraling down like a market in freefall. Upstream Theater

FAST FORWARD “Art in Bloom,” March 2-4 at the St. Louis Art Museum: Floral designers will reinterpret dozens of works from the museum’s collection • Ian Froeb’s STL 100, March 4 in the Post-Dispatch: Don’t miss our restaurant critic’s fourth annual guide to the most essential restaurants in St. Louis • Pink, March 14 at Scottrade Center: The acrobatic diva, who belted the national anthem at Sunday’s Super Bowl, brings her “Beautiful Trauma World Tour” to town • k.d. lang, March 16 at the Peabody Opera House: For her “Ingénue Redux” tour, lang will perform her 1992 album “Ingénue” in its entirety

4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.09.18-02.15.18

presents German author Albert Ostermaier’s drama, which artistic director Philip Boehm translated. Patrick Siler directs. BY JUDITH

had a passionate involvement years before — when she was 12 and he was 40. He thought he had remade his life; she never has. Annamaria Pileggi directs. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘BlackBird’ WHEN Friday through Feb. 25 • WHERE Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue • HOW MUCH $30-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

✔ Elizabeth Berkenmeier and John Pierson co-star in David Harrower’s deeply disturbing drama about a woman who tracks down the man with whom she

‘Silent Sky’ WHEN Friday through Feb. 18 • WHERE Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 Union Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE INFO 314667-5686; westendplayers.org

the early 20th ✔ Incentury, pioneering astrophysicist Henrietta Leavitt was thrilled to go to work at the Harvard Observatory —

Pink

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ events.stltoday.com stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( C U P I D ’ S U N D I E R U N ) ; M AT T Y O R K / A P ( P I N K )

BEST


JUDITH NEWMARK

SATURDAY Chinese Brush Painting WHEN 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE The Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH Free with $11 admission • MORE INFO 314822-8900; magichouse.org

To honor the Chinese New Year, visitors can “brush up” on Chinese brush painting with visiting artist Pin Yang. She’ll share techniques for painting bamboo, pandas, flowers, birds and other subjects at a drop-in workshop. No reservations are required. Yan’s visit is part of the museum’s Visiting Art Series. Yan was born into an artistic family in China and is now a scientist at Washington University. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

SUNDAY St. Louis Chamber Chorus: Concert IV, ‘Love Dances’ WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City • HOW MUCH $30, $10 for students • MORE INFO 636-4584343; chamberchorus.org

region’s ✔ The finest a cappella choir takes on something diferent in its pre-Valentine’s Day ofering “Love

stltoday.com/go

Dances.” It’s a partnership with dancers, pianists and choral music celebrating the power of love. The program includes music by Morten Lauridsen, Johannes Brahms and Missouri-born composer Emma Lou Diemer, as well as the world premiere of a commission by acclaimed British composer Francis Pott. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Chamber Project St. Louis: ‘Origins’ WHEN 7 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Schlafly Tap Room, 2100 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $5-$15 • MORE INFO chamberprojectstl.org

It’s a party: Chamber Project St. Louis celebrates its 10th anniversary Sunday evening with beer, cake and some of the musical works that helped get the group started: Rebecca Clarke’s Duo for Clarinet and Viola, Mark O’Connor’s “Old Country Fairy Tale,” the “Elegiac Trio” by Arnold Bax, and Prokofiev’s Quintet in G minor, Op. 39, for oboe, clarinet, violin, viola and double bass. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

MONDAY Chamber Music Society of St. Louis: ‘Lovefest, Revived’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $38 • MORE INFO 314-9416309; chambermusicstl.org

How do you celebrate Valentine’s Day? How about a date night that

features both food and great chamber music? The Chamber Music Society of St. Louis ofers two chances to enjoy “Lovefest,” featuring a talented quintet of musicians — violinists Jessica Cheng and Andrea Jarett, violist Chris Tantillo, cellist Bjorn Ranheim and pianist Alla Voskoboynikova — in music of Brahms, Chopin, Debussy, Suk, Kriesler, Dvorak and Borodin. The relaxed cabaret setting allows the audience to sip something while listening. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Jan Jacobi WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Spencer Road library, 427 Spencer Road, St. Peters • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO youranswerplace.org

How did young Abe Lincoln feel about living in a small cabin, hunting for food and burying his mother? St. Louis educator Jan Jacobi imagines what the future president was like in “Young Lincoln,” a historical novel for young adult readers. Jacobi will talk about the book, the first fiction published by Reedy Press, on the anniversary of Lincoln’s 1809 birthday. BY JANE HENDERSON

TUESDAY PnB Rock with Lil Baby WHEN 8 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $29.50-$32.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

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Rapper-singer PnB Rock headlines Tuesday at Delmar Hall. His new album is “Catch These Vibes,” which includes “Friends,” “Scrub” and “Issues.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

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only to discover that the observatory itself was of-limits to women. She and her female colleagues — all brilliant, highly educated women — were “computers,” making calculations based on male scientists’ observations. But she persevered. Under the direction of Ellie Schwetye, Rachel Tibbetts stars as Leavitt. “Silent Sky” is by Lauren Gunderson, the widely produced, scientifically inclined playwright who stunned audiences at the Rep Studio with her arresting teenage drama “I and You.” BY

‘The Price Is Right Live!’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$55 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Come on down to the Fox Theatre for your chance to play Plinko and Clifhangers, and to spin the Big Wheel, at “The Price Is Right Live!,” based on CBS’ popular daytime game show. The traveling, interactive show has played to live audiences for nearly 10 years, giving away more than $12 million in cash and prizes. You could even win — muster your best Rod Roddy voice here, folks — A BRAND-NEW CAR! BY

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VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

THURSDAY Amy Bloom WHEN 7 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Ethical Society, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $30-$35, includes 1-2 tickets and a copy of book • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Eleanor Roosevelt’s letters to and from reporter Lorena Hickok revealed much about their loving relationship: The pair not only went on trips together, but “Hick” lived in the White House. Coming on the heels of biographies, Amy Bloom’s novel imagines the relationship from Hick’s point of view. Bloom will talk about “White Houses,” which goes on sale Tuesday. Bloom’s other books include “Lucky Us,” “Away” and “A Blind Man Can See How Much I Love You.” BY JANE HENDERSON

THE SHELDON CONCERT HALL 2017–2018 SEASON

Brian Owens: Love Songs February 13 & 14 at 10 a.m. Coffee and Pastries at 9 a.m.!

Livingston Taylor February 23 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by Midwest BankCentre Welcomed by KDHX

Delfeayo Marsalis & The Uptown Jazz Orchestra March 3 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by The Steward Family Foundation and World Wide Technology, Inc. | Welcomed by 88.7 The Sound

CALL METROTIX AT 314.534.1111 OR VISIT THESHELDON.ORG

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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SHAZAM ST. LOUIS TOP 10

MOST-SHAZAMED SONGS FOR FEB. 6-12 1 “Pray for Me” (The Weeknd & Kendrick Lamar) 2 “New Freezer” (Rich the Kid feat. Kendrick Lamar) 3 “God’s Plan” (Drake) 4 “At the Club” (Jacquees & Dej Loaf) 5 “New Rules” (Dua Lipa) 6 “Perfect” (Ed Sheeran) 7 “Lemon” (N.E.R.D. & Rihanna) 8 “Last Night” (DJ Luke Nasty) 9 “Sky Walker” (Miguel feat. Travis Scott) 10 “Melanin Magic” (Remy Ma)

of the Real’s fourth album, which is self-titled. It’s an album of soulful songs such as “Set Me Down on a Cloud,” about a friend who lost a child in a tragic accident, and “Forget About Georgia,” about an ex-girlfriend whose name Nelson would be reminded of onstage every night when his dad sang “Georgia on My Mind.” But the album is deeply philosophical (“If I Started Over”), and it rocks and has twang to spare, too, all of which explains its success on the Americana airwaves and charts. Mainstream country success doesn’t seem to be in the cards for Nelson, however, nor does he particularly want it. “A big part of what goes out into the mainstream is (due to) payola,” he says. “That’s just a fact of life. But the thing about good art is, it lasts forever and it grows. It’s a slow-burner, but it turns into a big fire.” Nelson started playing guitar and writing songs as a pre-teen. He wrote “You Were It” when he was 11, and his dad recorded it for his 2004 album “It Always Will Be.” “It made me feel like, ‘OK, this is something I can do,’” Nelson says. Moving to the mainland to go to college, Nelson dropped out to form Promise of the Real a decade ago. “We started our band kind of based on a love for Neil,” he says. “The name of the band came from one of his songs, ‘Walk On.’ There’s a line in it, ‘Sooner or later it all gets real.’” The band met Young at Farm Aid, and Young invited them to play with him at a 2014 concert protesting the Keystone Pipeline. Since then, they’ve played on his albums “The Monsanto Years,” “Earth” and “The Visitor.”

Lukas Nelson

On the road (again) Lukas Nelson, son of country music icon Willie Nelson, is on tour with his band Promise of the Real BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ / SPECIAL TO GO! MAGAZINE

ukas Nelson would probably rather be on the golf course right now, but instead he’s dashing between terminals at LAX in anticipation of a flight to Nashville, Tenn. “I was in the wrong terminal and had to go underground for a minute,” he says, returning from a dropped cell connection. These days, hurrying from one place to another must be second nature to Nelson, the 29-year-old son of country music icon Willie Nelson. Nelson is currently on tour with his band Promise of the Real; they’ll open for Blackberry Smoke on Thursday at the Pageant. At other times, he can be found on the road (again), playing guitar and singing with his dad, who just announced a show April 18 at the Peabody Opera House.

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And for the past few years, Nelson and POTR have also been backing another legendary musician, Neil Young, on tour and in the studio. “I’ve learned how to pace myself,” Nelson says with a laugh.“It’s a natural state of being for me,since I grew up this way.” Though he learned the peripatetic life of a musician from his dad, Nelson mostly grew up in Hawaii, where he still lives. He was at home in Maui on Jan. 13 when a false ballistic missile alert was issued. The state was panicked, but Nelson? Not so much. “I slept through it!” he says with a laugh. “And it actually didn’t come through my phone. I mean, what are you going to do anyway if a missile hits? Duck under a table?” Last year saw the release of Promise

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“I always told myself Neil was the one person that I would stop and quit what I was doing to go out and play with him,” Nelson says. “And, lo and behold, that’s what happened.” If Nelson and the band weren’t busy enough with music, they also appear in a pair of upcoming films: the remake of “A Star is Born,” starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper (who also directs), and “Paradox,” starring Neil Young, directed by Daryl Hannah. “Bradley saw me at Desert Trip, which we played with Neil. They called it ‘Oldchella’ because it was Neil and Paul McCartney and Bob Dylan and the Stones and Roger Waters. (Bradley) saw me and said, ‘I want that guy to teach me the ropes, how to look authentic as a musician. I ended up writing a bunch of songs for the movie, and the band is in the movie.” Nelson also became friends with Lady Gaga, who wound up singing with Nelson on a couple of the album’s tracks, including “Find Yourself.” “Stefani (Germanotta, Gaga’s real name) and I became good friends, and she really liked the song,” he says. “I had that song for a long time, and she said she really related to it, so we re-cut it. She’s a star. She really is a star.” As for “Paradox,” Nelson describes it as “avant-garde. It’s so out there and fun. You don’t know what’s going on the whole time, but that’s the point. You just get lost in the paradox of life. “If you love Neil, that’s what you love about him. (His films) are not polished, but neither is Neil. There’s so much out there that’s perfect and polished, and we need a little more humanity and imperfection. “That’s the philosophy of Neil — the perfection of imperfection.” WHAT Blackberry Smoke, Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real • WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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P H O T O S : A M Y H A R R I S / A P ( N E L S O N ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( L I PA )

Dua Lipa


material we’re playing.” He considers the shows a classroom for the crowd and for the band — but a classroom with a bar. “We really learn these BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM songs,” he says. “For the musicians, they’re often already performed music xcitement for the thrust into learning a lot from “Forrest Gump” and Muny’s upcoming of these songs at the “The Blues Brothers.” 100th anniversary last minute. It can Canan says season amps up with a be a real cram little help from the Mayor’s taking on so session.” many artists Mardi Gras Ball, Friday While many can be a huge night at St. Louis City Hall. of the songs headache, Produced by Alexis are immediately but he has it Tucci and Mardi Gras Sean Canan recognizable, igured out. He Inc., the evening’s he says, “you might has a pool of 40 to entertainment will hear 15 songs you haven’t 50 musicians he can tap include a musical tribute into when lining up a show, heard before. We’re really to “The Wiz,” one of the educating people on all which eliminates one band musicals on the Muny’s these classic bands.” having to cover so many summer schedule. Canan balances other artists’ material. St. Louis band Sean Voodoo Players with his “I’m like the musical Canan’s Voodoo Players, other band, original act director,” says singerfeaturing vocalists Laren Falling Fences, which guitarist Canan, the one Loveless and Coco Soul, has a Sunday residency constant in Sean Canan’s will perform during the at McGurk’s Irish Pub. Voodoo Players. “I pick dance-friendly takes on Falling Fences brings musicians from the Prince and other Michael together another of genre, or particular fans Jackson songs, along Canan’s bands, Bockman, of the genre we’re doing. with Mardi Gras classics with Joe Stickley. I picked fans who were such as “Iko Iko,” “Mardi “It’s deinitely more of the biggest fans of Ween Gras Mambo” and “All a straightforward rock to do Ween with me. I on a Mardi Gras Day.” ’n’ roll, folksy kind of have a network, and that “We’re going to keep band,” he says of Fallen really helps, so I’m not the party going, for sure,” Fences, which started as putting all the weight on Canan says. His band will acoustic and later moved play a similar set Saturday four or ive people, and to full-ledged rock. a musician may only be afternoon at Joanie’s “Our originals are on one show a month. during the Mardi Gras more like Dylan and “We like to re-create celebration in Soulard. Petty. Acoustic music has The last few years, Sean the song, and we like been good for me overall to reinterpret the Canan’s Voodoo Players musically, but I’m a rock song. That’s our twist have covered a plethora ’n’ roller, and that’s how — our recipe. Our fans of artists in concert, I’ve been my whole life.” appreciate us nailing including Bob Marley, the Falling Fences released the songs, but they also Beatles, Ween, the Band, a self-titled debut album appreciate us going of Fleetwood Mac, Phish and in 2014 and is currently the cuf,” he says. Jimi Hendrix. A Talking working on the follow-up. Canan says his shows Heads night is March 2 have more jam-band at the Old Rock House. WHAT Sean Canan’s Voodoo elements than traditional Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players at the Mayor’s Mardi Gras Ball • WHEN 7 tribute bands. That Players, which have a p.m.-midnight Friday • Wednesday night residency allows the band to WHERE St. Louis City Hall, “keep it fresh and really at Broadway Oyster Bar, 1200 Market Street • HOW feature the musicians also enjoy playing movie MUCH $150 and up • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org soundtrack shows. They’ve onstage as well as the

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PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW SHAPTER

Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players will cast Mardi Gras spell

WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY LIVE IN CONCERT

APRIL 18 • PEABODY OPERA HOUSE TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, FEB 9 AT 10AM! TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE SCOTTRADE CENTER BOX OFFICE, BY PHONE AT 800-745-3000, OR ONLINE AT TICKETMASTER.COM. facebook com/willienelson

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW NEW VENUE WITH MORE SPACE!

MARCH 14, 2018 @ ST. LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

Explore the Science Center after hours while tasting from 50 of the best restaurants in town featured in Ian Froeb’s STL100 List! ~ Live Music by DJ Nune

EVENT SPONSORS

All trademarks are the property of their respective owners • EFFEN® Vodka, 100% neutral spirits distilled from wheat grain, 40% alc./vol. and Flavored Vodkas, Distilled from Grain, 37.5% alc./vol. © 2017 EFFEN Import Company, Chicago, IL • Jim Beam® Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, 40% Alc./Vol. ©2017 James B. Beam Distilling Co., Clermont, KY • Maker's Mark® and Maker's 46® Bourbon Whisky, 45 and 47% Alc./Vol. ©2017 Maker's Mark Distillery, Inc., Loretto, KY.

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St. Louis County Library

Engaging the Present to Honor the Past Celebrate Black History Month at SLCL. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.slcl.org/black-history-celebration. All events are FREE and open to the public.

Program sites are accessible. Upon two weeks’ notice, accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities. Call 314-994-3300 or visit www.slcl.org.

note for note, cut for cut CLASSIC ALBUMS LIVE PERFORMS: EAGLES: HOTEL CALIFORNIA WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 14 8PM

314.516.4949 touhill.org 8

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the score interesting even for those who’ve done it repeatedly. “I try a little bit each time we do the piece to heighten the delight and the awareness of the poems, which are fabulous — but only if you know what you’re saying,” she says. “And the amount of text is so overwhelming that it’s hard to know what you’re saying.” “Carmina,” Kaiser says, “sits on top of the wheel of BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER / SBMILLER@POST-DISPATCH.COM fortune. Most of the piece is dancelike, charming and with wonderful orchestral wonderful dance rhythms. his weekend, color. The charm of it is in It’s powerful and full of the St. Louis the use of the orchestra, musical challenges and Symphony Chorus with some beautiful and Orchestra, led by guest contrasts and melodies and conductor Bramwell Tovey, very moving.” interesting “Carmina” take on two choral classics. rhythms that (it’s properly The irst is Leonard really are pronounced Bernstein’s “Chichester captivating. The “CAR-meePsalms.” The second is thing is to sing nah,” not “carone of the most popular Amy Kaiser it lightly and with a MEE-nah”) has compositions of the sense of the text and the been heard here often. 20th century, Carl Orf’s meaning of the text. It is “Even though I’ve done “Carmina Burana.” not just this monstrous, it many times, and many Together, they’re a huge ponderous stuf. It’s a very of our singers have done sing for the chorus. diferent experience when “Chichester,” a selection it many times, it is still you do it beautifully.” a wonderful, joyful, fun of psalms sung in Hebrew, It’s also demanding for piece to do,” Kaiser says. was composed for the the soloists. This time, Orf’s driving rhythms 1965 Southern Cathedrals they’re the excellent and chants, as well as the Festival at England’s soprano Tracy Dahl, tenor big “O Fortuna” chorus Chichester Cathedral. Benjamin Butterield and that opens and closes SLSO chorus director Amy baritone James Westman. the piece, have become Kaiser calls it “the best Kaiser credits music touchstones in popular pairing with ‘Carmina director David Robertson music as well as in the Burana’ that I remember.” with the enjoymentclassical world. (Breathes “Chichester” uses a enhancing idea of there a composer of treble soloist. Devin A. projecting texts on the ilm, TV or commercial Best, 12, will sing it with screen, “being able to scores who has never the SLSO; heard last see the poems as they go borrowed from it?) year as Winield Joad in by. To me that’s actually It’s a challenge for all of “The Grapes of Wrath” the greatest pleasure.” the musicians. The chorus at Opera Theatre of St. also deals with the dense Louis, he’s a member of WHAT St. Louis Symphony medieval texts, primarily the St. Louis Children’s Orchestra: “Chichester Psalms” and “Carmina in Latin and Middle Choirs. “He’s a beautiful Burana” • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday German. Kaiser helps singer with great stage and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday • singers new to it by seating WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, presence,” Kaiser says. them next to veterans who About a half-hour 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$112 • MORE have mastered the piece. long, “Chichester” “has INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org She also works to keep wonderful melodies,

O Fortuna! SLSO ofers ‘Carmina Burana’ and Bernstein

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PHOTOS: HANDOUTS

Black History Celebration 2018

Soprano Tracy Dahl


Vintage Valentine Wine Pairing Dinner February 14, 2018 | 7:00PM

5 Courses of Gourmet Delights paired with an International sampling of Fine Wines! Salmon Caper Crostini, Cioppino, Sweet & Smoky Duck Breast & Greens, Veal Osso Bucco, & Blackberry-topped Chocolate-marbled Cheesecake!

All pictures shown are for illustration purposes only. Actual product may vary.

Buy your tickets now - limited seating available.

Tickets: www.SanctuariaSTL.com/Vintage SANCTUARIASTL.COM • 4198 MANCHESTER AVE., ST. LOUIS, MO 63110 • 314.535.9700 • 

Surf N’ Turf Valentine Dinner 3 Course Valentine Dinner for TWO!

With your choice: 1 Bottle of Wine (House Red or White)

OR

4 Old Fashioned Cocktails

Smoked Salmon Cakes

Crown Valley Big Bison Tenderloin Filets

Chocolate-marbled Cheesecake with Strawberry

Buy your ticket now, space is limited!

www.HendricksBBQ.com/SurfNTurf HENDRICKSBBQ.COM • 1200 SOUTH MAIN ST., ST. CHARLES, MO 63301 • 636.724.8600 •  stltoday.com/go

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

All pictures shown are for illustration purposes only. Actual product may vary.

February 14, 2018 | 7:00 PM

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• John Oates and the Good Road Band, Feb. 16, canceled, refunds at point of purchase.

BEGGIN’ PET PARADE • FEB. 4 • SOULARD 1 Violet Sparks (left) and Jen Guzman, both of St. Louis 2 Christopher Michalski and Rachel Hofmann, both of St. Louis, with their dog, Abigail 3 Katie Castree and Brett Benyo, both of St. Louis, with Romeo 4 Chase Grimmett of St. Louis, with Jax 5 From left: Kiara Fernandez, Jenna Tallman and Zeke Kreun, all of St. Peters, with Murphy 6 Shannon and Kyle Mertens of St. Louis, with Bonnie (left) and Beadie 7 Maggie Hill of Edwardsville, with Ozzie 8 Hanah Brown and Mike Kitchell, both of St. Louis, with Nori 9 Josh and Rachael Pawlak of St. Louis, with Gus (left) and Simon 10 Scott and Lori Herman of St. Louis, with Guinness 11 Sara and James Syron of St. Louis, with Gizmo 12 Nicole Wolf (left) and Krystal Hargas, both of St. Louis, with Bailey (left) and Roxy • HELP CHOOSE THE WINNERS OF THE COSTUME CONTEST AT STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS

The Ambassador metrotix.com

The Pageant ticketmaster.com

• Lyfe Jennings, Flirt, DJ Kut, 8 p.m. March 16, $30-$50.

• Spoon, 8 p.m. May 16, $35$37.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• After 7, Rhoda G, DJ Kut, 7 p.m. April 1, $37.50-$67.50. Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • An Evening with Sloan, 8 p.m. June 22, $22-$25. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre livenation.com • Poison, Cheap Trick, 7 p.m. May 26, on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday, lawn and select reserved are $19 the irst week of sales. • Chicago, REO Speedwagon, 7:30 p.m. June 23, on sale at noon Friday.

Justin Timberlake

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iPARTY

Peabody Opera House ticketmaster.com • Willie Nelson & Family, 7:30 p.m. April 18, $48$123.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

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• Variety’s Dinner With the Stars with John Legend, 8 p.m. April 28, $72-$140. • alt-j, 8 p.m. June 6, $53.50-$73.50, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday. Scottrade Center livenation.com • Elton John, 8 p.m. Oct. 30, sold out. • Justin Timberlake, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13, $49.50-$225.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Feb. 26.

Find iParty photos from this event and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/iparty

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P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( I PA R T Y ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( J U S T I N T I M B E R L A K E )

TICKET TRACKER

Old Rock House metrotix.com


MARDI GRAS GUIDE

The building at 1017 Russell Boulevard, site of the neighborhood’s first Mardi Gras party nearly 40 years ago, reopened in the fall as Harpo’s.

Back where it started P H O T O : VA L E R I E S C H R E M P H A H N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Soulard’s newest bar gears up for the year’s biggest street party BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN / VHAHN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

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he Soulard building that is now home to Harpo’s bar is where Mardi Gras festivities in St. Louis got their start nearly 40 years ago. But back then, it was simply a place for a group of guys to drink and have fun. John Rieker knew the history of the old row house at 1017 Russell Boulevard when he took it over and renovated it last year, reopening it in the fall as Harpo’s, one of a regional chain. “This will be our first Mardi Gras, and we’re already heavily planning,” he says. “It’s a very exciting thing. It’s something Soulard does well.” The building had operated as Johnny’s Restaurant & Bar for more than two decades, and before that, Hilary’s. In 1980, Bob Brinkman simply knew it as his buddy Hilary Clements’ place. ➼

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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John Rieker, owner of Harpo’s in Soulard

From left: Jeanne Kuhl, Mary Jo Huber and Michell Dupske, daughters of Hilary Clements, at Soulard Mardi Gras in 2014

a couple of blocks west to John D. McGurk’s Irish Pub. At midnight, the party marched up the street carrying a casket. “There was somebody in the casket,” Brinkman recalls. “He was alive, though kind of cold.” It was so cold, he says, that the trumpet froze to the trumpeter’s lips. The next year, the friends decided to

Bob Brinkman

have another party. When they opened the door at midnight for the parade, there were 1,200 people waiting to join, Brinkman says. For its third year, the parade moved to daytime and included the Mizzou marching band. In 1984, Clements opened a restaurant and piano bar on the first floor of the rowhouse, known as Hilary’s, and

the rest is history. Brinkman, who had worn the tuxedo he wore that night in 1980 to the annual Mayor’s Ball until last year (it was getting “very snug”), says he and his buddies didn’t know much about Mardi Gras except for what they had seen in movies. Their party certainly wasn’t celebrating the French heritage of the Soulard neighborhood. “You gotta remember,” Brinkman says, “this is a bunch of drunks throwing a party.” Still, he’s proud. Every year, the retired jeweler goes down to Twelfth Night to help kick of the celebration. He wears his trusty grey top hat. He gets razzed and toasted because it’s his birthday. On this year’s First Night march through Soulard, Rieker gave a toast from Harpo’s balcony and talked about his status as the “new kid on the block.” Brinkman got a look at the renovated bar and said Rieker did a nice job and wished him well. Rieker rebuilt the deck on the back of the building and renovated the bar area and the second floor. He kept some of the Mardi Gras decorations, including a neon Bud Light sign on the second level. He says he’s eager to welcome revelers this weekend. He plans to set up a tent in front and sell tickets for second-floor access, which will include a bufet. “It’s fun,” Rieker says. “We’re the newest bar down here this year (in the building) that started Mardi Gras.”

P H O T O S : VA L E R I E S C H R E M P H A H N / P - D ( J O H N R I E K E R ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ; J O N G I T C H O F F ( B O B B R I N K M A N ) ; D AV I D C A R S O N / P - D ( 2 0 1 7 M A R D I G R A S )

Brinkman, of south St. Louis County, turned 82 on Twelfth Night, the Jan. 6 event that kicked of St. Louis’ Mardi Gras season. And yes, he still goes to the Mardi Gras Grand Parade; he gets to ride with his family on a special float. He is the last survivor of the group of five friends credited with starting the first Mardi Gras in Soulard. “I enjoy it out of the sheer ... pride I get for what we had started and for people following us and how they’ve expanded it,” he says. “You’d be crazy not to take pride in that.” He and his buddies used to play liar’s poker at the bar in Mansion House on Saturday nights. Somebody suggested they throw a Mardi Gras party. On the courthouse steps, Clements had just bought a run-down Soulard row house for a song. The first floor was nothing but bare brick walls and a wood floor. The second floor was Clements’ apartment. On the third floor, nicknamed the “blue zoo,” were apartments that Clements rented out. There originally were to be 20 party investors, but the others were “too cheap to put in money,” Brinkman says. So five of them put in $250 apiece and invited 50 guests. They recruited a uniformed doorman from the Chase Park Plaza to check invites, a St. Louis police oicer for security, a cook to whip up Cajun food and Don Scherer’s Dixieland Band for music. Even though about 20 inches of snow covered the ground, Clements had connections with the street department and managed to get the street plowed

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GIVE A SWEET GIFT THIS VALENTINE’S DAY! FOX THEATRE GIFT CARDS ARE GREAT FOR ANY SPECIAL OCCASION. TWO SHOWS February 13 &14 12

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February 23-25 stltoday.com/go


MARDI GRAS GRAND PARADE ROUTE AND PARKING RESTRICTIONS When • 11 a.m. Saturday How much • Free More info • stlmardigras.org Mark et 64

Busch Stadium

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Chou teau Park

MARDI GRAS GUIDE

Soulard Mardi Gras revelers crowd Russell Boulevard in 2017.

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LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL

and downtown. This will be Mayor Lyda Krewson’s irst time as hostess.

MAYOR’S MARDI GRAS BALL

WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE St. Louis City Hall, 1200 Market Street • HOW MUCH $150 and up • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

The City Hall rotunda turns into a colorful, loud echo chamber each year for the Mayor’s Mardi Gras Ball. Proceeds from the black-tie gala beneit the Mardi Gras Foundation, which awards grants to improve Soulard

BUD LIGHT GRAND PARADE

The Grand Parade is the largest Mardi Gras celebration in the Midwest, and this year’s theme

honors the centennial of the Muny in Forest Park. Enjoy the street party and live music in Soulard after the parade, but plan before you go. Organizers recommend arriving early or using public transportation to travel to and from the festivities. Dress for the weather, don’t bring coolers, bottles, cans or backpacks, and don’t even think about drinking

if you’re underage. Metro will ofer special shuttles from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday between Civic Center Station (near 14th and Spruce streets) and Soulard (10th Street between Carroll and Marion). Round-trip passes are $6 and can only be bought at the station. For more information, visit metrostlouis.org or call 314231-2345 or 618-271-2345.

Post-Dispatch

WHEN 11 a.m. Saturday • WHERE Parade steps of on Seventh Street south of Busch Stadium, travels east on Chouteau Avenue, then south on Broadway to the Anheuser-Busch Brewery at Sidney Street • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

BLUES ALUMNI EXPERIENCE

An all-inclusive ticket for this tent lets you hang with some of the best Blues alums in a climatecontrolled environment

One of Ireland’s est Loved Artists

1 • Resident R acc access, permit par parking only 2•C Closed to traic and parking from 3 a.m. Saturday to 2 a.m. Sunday.

right on the parade route. When the parade ends, join the party outside the tent for games, gear and beverages. We think it’s worth checking out just for what the Mardi Gras Inc. website calls “NSFW story time with Blues legends.” WHEN 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Lafayette Lofts at

Seventh Street and Ann Avenue • HOW MUCH $110 • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

Fabulousfox.com

Fox Box Office 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com

February 27 stltoday.com/go

February 28

March 2-4

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MARDI GRAS GUIDE

BUD LIGHT PARTY TENT

Party in style with nine hours of “beer, beats and booze,” with in/out privileges so you can check out other events in the neighborhood. Admission includes an open bar, a Cajun lunch bufet, private restrooms and beads. The tent is heated, too. WHEN 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Soulard Market Park,

South Eighth Street and Lafayette Avenue • HOW MUCH $125 in advance • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

FAT BLUESDAY

WHEN 6 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Bud Light Party Centre, Soulard Market Park, South Eighth Street and Lafayette Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

Crowds of people line the Mardi Gras Grand Parade route last year in Soulard.

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P H O T O : D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Celebrate Fat Tuesday by watching the Blues take on the Nashville Predators on a giant screen in the heated Bud Light Party Tent. Also enjoy a cash bar and food from Soulard bars and restaurants.

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Deep blues The Blender A new album by the St. Louis Blues Society features some of the area’s best

P H O T O S : C H R I S L E E / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( T O W N S E N D ) ; R E E D R A D C L I F F ( M O N R O E A N D W I L S O N )

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis Blues Society president Jeremy SegelMoss has a great response when he’s asked what the local blues scene is all about. “I just hand them this CD,” he says, referring to “17 in 17,” the fourth and latest of the blues society’s annual compilation CDs. The new project features Devil’s Elbow, Marcell Strong and the Apostles, Alonzo Townsend, Kim Massie, Chase Garrett, Teec’a Easby, Brian Owens, Nick Pence & Joey Glynn, Charisse “Swan” Sauls, Brother Jeferson Band, Matt “The Rattlesnake” Lesch, Eastsiders Review Band, Marty Abdullah, Jason David Cooper, Annie & The Fur Trappers, Kyle Yardley and Melissa Neels. Since its first incarnation, “14 in 14,” the compilation has featured 62 acts. The blues society hasn’t had to repeat any acts and won’t have to until 2020. “That’s a testament to how deep our music scene is in St. Louis,” SegelMoss says. “There’s just a huge wealth of talent here.” He knows. He’s the entertainment coordinator for the annual Big Muddy Blues Festival (and founder of his own blues act, the Bottoms Up Blues Gang). When the compilation series started, artists submitted songs that had been previously recorded. Now, all the songs are recorded for the compilation. Segel-Moss says more and more musicians are hearing about the project and wanting to participate. Also, more musicians are feeling comfortable with the recording process. Some of them may perform out all the time but rarely record. “This helps create new music,” Segel-Moss says, pointing to artists like Roland Johnson Jr. and Gene Jackson, who recorded songs for the project and went on to stltoday.com/blender

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@kevincjohnson

make full albums. Paul Niehaus IV handles the production end of the project at his Blue Lotus Studio. He points out a few of the highlights on “17 in 17.”

Brian Owens, “Lord Knows (Ain’t Personal)” • “When producing this compilation, the intention was to push stylistic diversity as much as possible. We wanted to push the boundaries of what people consider the blues. Blues has so many branches and evolutions. Brian and I collaborated on the music, and his son wrote the lyrics. Alonzo Townsend It’s a deep soulful cut featuring a big background vocal arrangement that’s all of Brian’s voices.”

Kim Massie, “Little Girl Lost” • “It was inspired by true events in her life, about her Chase Garrett, “Sailor being the primary caretaker Man” • “Chase is a recent Alice Monroe of of her great granddaughter Eastsiders Review Band transplant to St. Louis from out of necessity. It’s very Iowa. He’s a world-class personal. It’s also the first blues and boogie-woogie song Kim has ever recorded piano player and quite a and released, so it’s pretty young man. This track is special. I plan to continue him solo sitting at a piano collaborating and making and singing this song. The more songs with her. The song lyrics are sexual and tongueMat Wilson features a string arrangement by of Devil’s Elbow in-cheek.” Kevin O’Konnor.” Alonzo Townsend, “Letter to My City” • “It’s a great track — the first track Alonzo has done. He’s obviously the son of a St. Louis legend (Grammy winner Henry Townsend). He brought in lyrics he had written, and we didn’t quite know what we would do musically. We sat down, and before long we had an idea. In a half hour the whole song was done. The socially conscious lyrics are very modern in (their) message — very relevant to right now. Musically, it’s inspired by North Mississippi, the Hill Country as opposed to the Delta.” Marcel Strong and the Apostles, “I Got to Find My Baby” • “Marcel has been around St. Louis for a long time performing. He’s 77 years old, and he’s absolutely amazing — Southern soul at its finest. He brought his band in to cut that track and brought in a CD with seven diferent demo songs and gave it to me, and we decided which song to cut. We cut the song live with everybody in the same room.” @blenderpd

@kevincjohnson

Mainstage S EN T! OP IGH N O T

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MORE APPLAUSE AUSE

ALL DRESSED UP

COMING SUNDAY

Each month, our theater critic honors the best performances onstage and behind the scenes. See who gets her fi first rst JJ Awards. stltoday.com/cultureclub

Through Feb. 18, vote daily to decide which pups had the best costumes in the Beggin’ Pet Parade. stltoday.com/contests

Marvel’s “Black Panther,” in theaters Feb. 16, is poised to be the next great achievement in black cinema. In A&E

Romance dance St. Louis Ballet gets into the spirit of Valentine’s Day with ‘Love Stories’ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

L

ove can put a spring in your step, and that principle certainly applies to St. Louis Ballet. At a time when competition for the entertainment dollar couldn’t be fiercer, the company has enjoyed success with an annual program themed to

16

Valentine’s Day. The latest edition, “Love Stories,” will be performed Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center. The program’s name changes each year, but not its focus on dances that exude romance, says Gen Horiuchi, artistic director of St. Louis Ballet.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.09.18-02.15.18

“This is our fifth year,” he says. “We started in 2014 with ‘Love Is in the Air.’” The popularity of the company’s “Nutcracker” performances during the Christmas season inspired him to create another program linked to a holiday, he says. “Valentine’s weekend is something to celebrate,” Horiuchi says. “People feel connected, so they have a reason to go out. And we’re steadily building audiences every year.” “Love Stories” features six pieces of varying lengths by notable choreographers. “Last year, we presented three

WHAT St. Louis Ballet: “Love Stories” • WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE

Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Road • HOW MUCH $24-$59 • MORE INFO 314-516-4949; touhill.org

Find more events, reviews and blogs by our critics ➙ stltoday.com/arts stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : P R AT T K R E I D I C H

“Love Stories” by St. Louis Ballet

midsize ballets,” Horiuchi says. “But this year, we’re doing smaller pieces.” Horiuchi choreographed two of the pieces: the world premiere of “Head Over Heels,” set to music by Barbara Harbach, and “La Vie,” performed to Claude Bolling’s Suite for Chamber Orchestra and Jazz Piano Trio. Melodically and structurally, Harbach’s “Transformation for String Quartet” and “Carondelet Caprice for Chamber Ensemble” were key inspirations for “Head Over Heels,” Horiuchi says. “She was inspired by early 1900s American folk culture,” he says. Accordingly, the piece romantically evokes the moods and feelings of the period. Also on the program are Miriam Mahdaviani’s “Between the Lines” (with music by George Gershwin), Christopher d’Amboise’s “Pandora’s Box” (set to a Schubert score), Michael Uthof’s “in g major” (set to Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G Major for the Left Hand) and Nilas Martins’ “Fasi d’Amore” (music by Puccini). The Martins piece will feature live performances by two opera singers and a pianist. Horiuchi describes the jazzy “La Vie” as a “signature work” of St. Louis Ballet. “The entire company is in it, so it’s a good closer for the program,” he says. “And it’s always good to bring back an oldie.” The 2017-2018 St. Louis Ballet season continues March 2-3 with a new production in its contemporarydance series “Go!” at the Grandel Theater, and April 13-15 with the ballet “Cinderella” at the Touhill.


RENT

THIS!

TOP REDBOX RENTALS FOR JAN. 29-FEB. 4 1 “Geostorm” (Warner) 2 “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” (Lionsgate) 3 “Blade Runner 2049” (Warner) 4 “It” (Warner) 5 “Jigsaw” (Lionsgate) 6 “American Made” (Universal) 7 “The Foreigner” (Universal) 8 “Despicable Me 3” (Universal) 9 “Happy Death Day” (Universal) 10 “The Mountain Between Us” (Fox)

OUR MOVIE RATINGS ★ Skip it ★★ So-so ★★★ Good ★★★★ Excellent

Annette Bening and Jamie Bell in “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Star power ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’ spotlights Annette Bening at her best ★★★

PHOTO: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

G

loria Grahame (Annette Bening) was once a movie star whose specialty was portraying tough but seductive women in dark 1950s crime dramas such as “In a Lonely Place” and “The Big Heat.” And she still believes she belongs on the silver screen. But it’s the late 1970s, and her glory days are behind her. Why

else would she accept a stage role in England, far away from Hollywood? Grahame may no longer be an ingénue, but she hasn’t lost her spark. That doesn’t go unnoticed by Peter Turner (Jamie Bell), whom she meets in Liverpool. An aspiring actor, Turner is much younger than she is, but the connection between them is strong and immediate. Their romance is as unlikely as it is inevitable.

Find more reviews, theaters and movie news ➙ stltoday.com/movies

Preoccupied with her looks and insecure about her allure, Grahame isn’t the easiest person to get to know. But she allows Turner to get closer than either of them might have expected. So close, in fact, that she turns to him when she’s forced to deal with a threat that she had done her best to ignore. Grahame had long put her sex appeal before her health. But the cost of that obsession may be death. Based on a memoir by Turner, “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” is a wonderfully acted and stylishly mounted tribute to a screen legend in danger of being forgotten. Unfortunately, the film focuses too much on Grahame’s illness and eventually succumbs to melo-

drama. Still, audiences seeking something more dramatically fulfilling than a comic-book flick probably won’t mind. Working from a screenplay by Matt Greenhalgh (“Nowhere Boy”), director Paul McGuigan (“Wicker Park”) has trouble maintaining the story’s momentum. But Bening is outstanding as a woman who fears that her fame and beauty are slipping away, and Bell (“Billy Elliot”) brings to his character a heartbreaking vulnerability. “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” is best appreciated as a showcase for their fine performances. WHAT “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” • RUN TIME 1:45 • RATING R • CONTENT Language, sexual content and nudity

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Offering home decor worthy of a repeat performance...

From left: Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan and Jack Black in “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle”

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Feb. 2 through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore:

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1. ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Sony, $10,930,222, 3,352 locations, $3,261 average, $352,572,974, 7 weeks.

2. ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’ 20th Century Fox, $10,474,895, 3,793 locations, $2,762 average, $40,035,094, 2 weeks.

3. ‘Winchester’ Lionsgate, $9,307,626, 2,480 locations, $3,753 average, $9,307,626, 1 week.

4. ‘The Greatest Showman’ 20th Century Fox, $7,695,644, 2,588 locations, $2,974 average, $137,370,816, 7 weeks.

5. ‘The Post’ 20th Century Fox, $5,218,122, 2,462 locations, $2,119 average, $67,202,632, 7 weeks.

6. ‘Hostiles’ Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures, $5,108,228, 2,934 locations, $1,741 average, $20,822,641, 7 weeks.

7. ‘12 Strong’ Warner Bros., $4,706,481, 2,918 locations, $1,613 average, $37,300,034, 3 weeks.

8. ‘Den of Thieves’ STX Entertainment, $4,551,163, 2,112 locations, $2,155 average, $36,152,095, 3 weeks.

9. ‘The Shape of Water’

15. ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’

Fox Searchlight, $4,448,520, 2,341 locations, $1,900 average, $44,728,570, 10 weeks.

Disney, $2,338,242, 1,467 locations, $1,594 average, $614,455,022, 8 weeks.

16. ‘Forever My Girl’ 10. ‘Paddington 2’ Warner Bros., $3,277,453, 2,388 locations, $1,372 average, $36,481,132, 4 weeks.

11. ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Fox Searchlight, $3,013,022, 1,726 locations, $1,746 average, $41,777,073, 13 weeks.

12. ‘I, Tonya’ Neon Rated, $2,469,724, 1,450 locations, $1,703 average, $22,553,612, 9 weeks.

13. ‘Padmaavat’ Viva Entertainment, $2,438,930, 345 locations, $7,069 average, $8,900,499, 2 weeks.

14. ‘Darkest Hour’ Focus Features, $2,362,975, 1,486 locations, $1,590 average, $48,786,132, 11 weeks.

Roadside Attractions, $2,290,138, 1,427 locations, $1,605 average, $12,551,792, 3 weeks.

17. ‘Phantom Thread’ Focus Features, $2,129,155, 1,186 locations, $1,795 average, $14,163,264, 6 weeks.

18. ‘Coco’ Disney, $1,729,708, 1,636 locations, $1,057 average, $204,789,437, 11 weeks.

19. ‘The Commuter’ Lionsgate, $1,666,757, 1,494 locations, $1,116 average, $34,266,504, 4 weeks.

20. ‘Insidious: The Last Key’ Universal, $1,462,810, 1,253 locations, $1,167 average, $65,753,770, 5 weeks. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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PHOTO: SONY PICTURES

AT THE BOX OFFICE


Spencer Stone in “The 15:17 to Paris”

Amateur hour ‘he 15:17 to Paris’ stars its real-life heroes but doesn’t live up to thrilling true story ★★ BY KATIE WALSH / TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

n the summer of 2015, three young American men from Sacramento, Calif., boarded a train in Amsterdam, en route to Paris, while enjoying a timehonored rite of passage: a European backpacking trip. In Brussels, another young man boarded the train, with a backpack full of guns and 300 rounds of ammunition. After tussling with American teacher Mark Moogalian and shooting him in the neck, he found himself in a car with a trio of Americans filled up with youthful bravado, military training and a desire to not die lying down. What other heady combination could inspire a person to tackle a shirtless man cocking an AK-47 in a confined space? When these events happen, espe-

P H O T O : WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S

I

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

cially when the heroes are as appealingly young and attractive as these are, there is the typical fanfare — awards and decorations, ticker-tape parades, talk show appearances and even “Dancing With the Stars.” Perhaps a book and maybe even a movie made about you, such as “The 15:17 to Paris,” directed by Clint Eastwood, adapted for the screen by Dorothy Blyskal. Eastwood decided to take a leap and go further in his biographical depiction, casting the major players as themselves in this blend of documentary and narrative filmmaking. It’s a risk that doesn’t quite pay of. While the three friends do have their charms on “Ellen” or a late-night talk show, their performances in the feature film are essentially an argument for hiring

professional actors. However, the amateur performances aren’t the biggest problem with “The 15:17 to Paris.” After a while, the awkward line readings fade away, and their natural charisma shines. But for an incident that took about a minute or two, expanding the story to feature length is a stretch, and Blyskal’s script — filled with eye-roll-inducing, on-the-nose dialogue — doesn’t know where to focus. The film jumps between short moments before the attack and the boys’ upbringing as mischievous kids, obsessed with guns and war and bonding as outsiders at their Christian school. Years later, Spencer joins the Air Force, Alek the Oregon National Guard, and Anthony enters college. There are a few carefully placed scenes illustrating Spencer’s desire to save lives, to be a hero, whether training as a medic or thinking quickly during an active shooter alert. He feels as though life is catapulting him toward a place he needs to be.

The story could have explored that hunger for action and purpose, or even what drives someone to take a huge risk such as he did, tackling attacker Ayoub El-Khazzani, narrowly escaping death when El-Khazzani’s guns jammed. Rather than searching for inner depth or meaning, it’s written of as fate and the grace of God, while much of the film is spent on shallow and essentially meaningless scenes of the guys sightseeing around Europe. They may be playing themselves, but there’s no real cinematic character development for the benefit of the audience. The action sequence on the train is truly remarkable, and Eastwood shoots with a documentary-style immediacy, but the surrounding film — especially the script and performances — doesn’t serve this thrilling true-life story or the audience. The casting is an interesting experiment, but “The 15:17 to Paris” fails to ever leave the station. WHAT “The 15:17 to Paris” • RUN TIME 1:34 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Bloody images, violence, some suggestive material, drug references and language

02.09.18-02.15.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


‘Forever My Girl’ ★★½ PG • 1:44 • Alex Roe and

Jessica Rothe star in the tale of a country star who regrets abandoning the love of his life. Directed by Bethany Ashton Wolf. TNS ‘The Greatest Showman’ ★★★ PG • 1:45 • Hugh Jackman makes a dazzling P.T. Barnum in this movie musical loosely based on the showman’s life. But the rest of the ilm is utterly forgettable. With Michelle Williams. Directed by Michael Gracey. CW

Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan in “Fifty Shades Freed”

ALSO IN THEATERS ‘12 Strong’ ★★½ R • 2:10 • Thor goes to war in the story of a Special Forces captain (Chris Hemsworth) on a mission in Afghanistan in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. Entertaining but without much depth. With Michael Shannon. Directed by Nicolai Fuglsig. CALVIN WILSON

‘All the Money in the World’ ★★★½ R • 2:12 • Based on the noniction book by John Pearson, this absorbing drama about J. Paul Getty (Christopher Plummer, replacing Kevin Spacey) represents director Ridley Scott at his

1980s. Directed by Luca Guadagnino. CW

best. Also starring Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg. CW ‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ R • 1:51 • Bill Pullman (“Independence Day”) stars in this Western about a longtime sidekick who saddles up on his own to avenge a murder. With Peter Fonda and Kathy Baker. Directed by Jared Moshé. Not reviewed. ‘Call Me by Your Name’ ★★★ R • 2:12 • Timothée Chalamet (in a breakout role) and Armie Hammer star in this coming-of-age story set in Italy in the

Amazon Adventure (NR) Fri & Sat: 11:00 AM, 1:00, 3:00 Sun: 1:00, 3:00 Mon: 11:00 AM, 1:00, 3:00 Tue & Wed: 1:00, 3:00 Thu: 11:00 AM, 1:00, 3:00 Dream Big: Engineering Our World Wed: 11:00 AM

‘Coco’ ★★★½ PG • 1:45 • The latest from Pixar tells the heartwarming story of a young boy in a rural Mexican town searching for his roots in the Land of the Dead. With voices of Benjamin Bratt and Gael García Bernal. Written and directed by Lee Unkrich. JODY MITORI ‘The Commuter’ ★★½

‘Downsizing’ ★★½ R • 2:15 • Matt Damon stars in this satire about a man who has himself shrunk down to doll size. A rare misire from director Alexander Payne (“Sideways”). CW ‘Father Figures’

PG-13 • 1:44 • Liam

NO STARS

Neeson can’t save this mediocre thriller set on a commuter train. CW

R • 1:53 • Owen Wilson

‘Daddy’s Home 2’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:40 • Will Ferrell

and Mark Wahlberg re-team for this sequel about a dad and a stepdad with diferent personalities. With Mel Gibson. TNS ‘Darkest Hour’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:05 • Gary

Oldman shines as Winston Churchill in this drama set during the early days of World War II. Directed by Joe Wright. CW

Extreme Weather (NR) Tue: 11:00 AM Journey to the South Paciic (G) Fri & Sat: 10:00 AM, 12:00, 2:00, 4:00 Sun: 12:00, 2:00, 4:00 Mon–Thu: 10:00 AM, 12:00, 2:00, 4:00 slsc.org

‘Den of Thieves’ ★★½ R • 2:20 • This often surprisingly efective LA crime thriller is saddled with the wrong leading man — Gerard Butler. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

and Ed Helms embark on a quest to ind their father in this unfunny, ofensive, tone-deaf comedy. TNS ‘Ferdinand’ ★★ PG • 1:46 • A bull who’s erroneously assumed to be dangerous embarks on a big adventure in this animated feature. Directed by Carlos Saldanha. TNS ‘Fifty Shades Freed’ R • 1:41 • Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan return in the third installment of the erotic drama. With Eric Johnson and Eloise Mumford. Written by Niall Leonard, based on the novel by E.L. James.

‘Hostiles’ ★★★½ R • 2:14 • Christian Bale stars in this irst-rate Western about a soldier charged with escorting a Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) on a dangerous journey. With Rosamund Pike. Directed by Scott Cooper. CW ‘Insidious: The Last Key’ A parapsychologist discovers a horriic threat inside her own home. With Lin Shaye, Angus Sampson, Leigh Whannell. Written by Whannell. Directed by Adam Robitel. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘The Insult’ ★★★ R • 1:52 • Ziad Doueiri directed this drama, set in the Middle East, about a petty squabble between a Muslim and a Christian that escalates into a national crisis. The ilm is nominated for a foreign-language Oscar. In Arabic and French with English subtitles. WASHINGTON POST

‘I, Tonya’ ★★★ R • 2:01 • Margot Robbie stars as the infamous Olympic igure skater who became a tabloid sensation. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:59 • With its smart casting (Jack Black, Kevin Hart, Dwayne Johnson and Karen Gillan) and lively action sequences, this new version of the game is an overall upgrade. JM ‘Justice League’ ★★ PG-13 • 2:01 • Earth is

under threat again in this lackluster comicbook lick that’s just out to steal your money and time. With Gal Gadot and Ben Aleck. CW ‘Lady Bird’ ★★★★ R • 1:33 • Saoirse Ronan

is Oscar-worthy in a comedy-drama about a wonderfully complicated young woman who’s at odds with the world — and herself. Joyful, heartbreaking and hilarious. Directed by Greta Gerwig. CW ‘The Lego Ninjago Movie’ ★★ PG • 1:41 • The Legothemed movie franchise hits a bump with this ilm based in part on a toy. With voices of Jackie Chan and Justin Theroux. TNS ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’ ★★½ PG-13 • 2:20 • Wes Ball directed this energetic if lackluster sequel in the franchise based on a young-adult science iction saga. TNS ‘Molly’s Game’ ★★★½ R • 2:20 • Jessica

Chastain is terriic as the proprietor of a high-stakes poker game in the factbased directorial debut of screenwriter Aaron Sorkin (“The Social Network”). Stylish, absorbing and fun to watch. With Idris Elba. CW

‘Murder on the Orient Express’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:54 • Kenneth Branagh stars in and directed this unnecessary remake based on the Agatha Christie mystery novel. With a starry cast including Michelle Pfeifer, Daisy Ridley and Penélope Cruz. CW

‘The Shape of Water’ ★★★★ R • 2:03 • Sally Hawkins stars in this richly imaginative fantasy about a mute waitress who falls for a sea creature during the Cold War. One of the best ilms of 2017. Directed by Guillermo del Toro. CW

‘Oscar Nominated Shorts’ Annual presentation of the Academy Award nominees in the liveaction, animated and documentary short categories. Not reviewed.

‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:32 • The Resistance continues to battle the First Order in this exciting sequel to “The Force Awakens.” With Daisy Ridley, John Boyega and Oscar Isaac. Directed by Rian Johnson. CW

‘Paddington 2’ ★★★ PG • 1:43 • The lovable bear (voiced by Ben Whishaw) is back — and behind bars — in a new kid-friendly lick. JM ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:33 • Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson star in what is reportedly the inal entry in the comedy-with-music franchise. TNS ‘Phantom Thread’ ★★★★ R • 2:10 • Daniel DayLewis turns in a ine performance as a dress designer in 1950s England. Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. CW ‘The Post’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 1:55 • Meryl Streep

and Tom Hanks star in the fact-based story of the Washington Post and its battle to publish the Pentagon Papers. Directed by Steven Spielberg. CW ‘Proud Mary’ R • 1:29 • Taraji P. Henson stars as a Boston hit woman. Written by John Stuart Newman & Christian Swegal and Steven Antin. Directed by Babak Najai. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:10 • Chris

Hemsworth stars as the Norse god in this mighty silly comicbook movie that lacks any signiicant reason to exist other than generating box-oice bucks. Still, it’s adequately entertaining. With Tom Hiddleston, Jef Goldblum and Cate Blanchett. Directed by Taika Waititi. CW ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ ★★★★ R • 1:55 • Frances McDormand is outstanding in this dark comedy about a grieving mom who goes to war with her local police department. One of the best ilms of the year. CW ‘Winchester’ PG-13 • 1:39 • Helen Mirren plays the reallife Sarah Winchester, a 19th-century heiress who inherits a fortune from her husband’s creation of the Winchester repeating rile and believes she is haunted by those killed by the irearm. With Jason Clarke and Sarah Snook. Directed by the Spierig Brothers. Not reviewed. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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The Mad Crab’s Angry Combo includes a pound of crawish, a pound of head-of shrimp, a halfpound of snow crab, 10 chicken wings, four pieces of sausage, plus corn and potatoes.

Surf’s up Join the seafood-boil party at the Mad Crab in University City ★★ BY IAN FROEB / RESTAURANT CRITIC / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

O

n a winter Thursday evening at the Mad Crab in University City, the smooth-asTupperware voice of Bruno Mars rattles the nautically decorated walls. Servers tear butcher stltoday.com/ofthemenu

22

paper from a roll and slap it down on tables; they carry buckets of clinking bottles of Bud and Bud Light. Customers hunker over steaming plastic bags filled with crawfish and crabs, twisting tails, cracking claws. The Mad Crab is less a restaurant

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@ianfroeb

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than a party with food. The more people you bring with you and the more food you order, the happier you’ll be. Then again, I was perfectly content to dine by myself one visit, though that might be because not everyone near and dear to me shares my love of sucking the matter out of shrimp heads. Victor Ho opened the Mad Crab last July inside a drab standalone building (the former Vietnamese restaurant Kim Son) along Olive Boulevard a mile east of Interstate 170. Though a new concept for St. Louis, the Mad Crab follows a template that has become popular in Texas and California. I encountered a version of the concept first-hand in Houston about a year ago. Specifically, I ate at Crawfish and Noodles, one of the most prominent of the Viet-Cajun restaurants that have blossomed in that city over the past decade or so, places where spicy boiled crawfish shares the table with pho and other traditional Vietnamese fare. My meal there was so great that I waited longer to visit the Mad Crab than I usually would have so as not to compare it to a single other (and not identical) experience. The Mad Crab concept is straightforward. First, you pick the seafood: crab (a whole Dungeness or snow or king legs), crawfish, shrimp (head on or of), lobster (whole or tail), clams or mussels. If you want, you can add corn on the cob, potatoes, or beef or pork sausage. You probably should. The corn ofers a snappy textural contrast

OUR FOOD RATINGS ★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ Extraordinary

to the seafood, and the potatoes soak up the boiling sauce. A side order of light, crisp fries ($4) also makes for a fine sop for all the excess sauce. Which sauce you choose is nearly as consequential as the seafood: the peppery Cajun, the buttery lemon-pepper or the exceptionally garlicky garlic. You can also combine the three as Whole Sha-Bang. Finally, you pick a spice level from not hot to mild, medium or XXX. Medium is plenty hot. My lips tingled for a good hour after the meal. Prices are variable. A monitor above the bar displays the current cost. I paid $9.99 for a pound of frozen crawfish (fresh weren’t available). A pound of head-on shrimp was $11, headless were $13 and deveined were $15. A pound of snow-crab legs were $22; a pound of king crab legs were $45. Combination meals are also available: A pound each of crawfish and head-of shrimp with sausage, corn and potatoes for $26.99; the same with a half-pound of snow crab and chicken wings for $45.99. Your boil arrives at the table in a plastic bag. There are no plates, no utensils aside from shellers and crackers. There are plastic gloves, but if your aim is to keep your hands completely clean, you’ll need more than one pair. The quality of the seafood I ate was good. The head-on shrimp, especially, were plump and tender, and the snowcrab meat was abundant in the shell and sweet. I wasn’t surprised to find a couple of duds among the frozen crawfish — nothing gross, just chewy— but it was literally only a couple. Maybe the best compliment I can pay to the seafood is that even through the intensity of the medium-spicy Cajun seasoning, I could taste their individual flavors. You’re here for the seafood boil, but if someone in your group just can’t handle it — say, oh, I don’t know, your 4-year-old daughter — the fried shrimp (with fries, $11) is a decent op-

Find more restaurant news and reviews ➙ stltoday.com/dining stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : R I C H A R D PA C K

THE LATEST FROM STLTODAY.COM/OFFTHEMENU The Sugarire Smoke House juggernaut rolls on. The barbecue restaurant is now open at 670 Walton Drive in Farmington, Mo. Sugarire co-founder Mike Johnson has partnered with family for the new location. His uncle and aunt Bill and Leanna Johnson and cousins Charles and Patrick Johnson are co-owners. The menu follows the usual Sugarire template. The restaurant is open daily from 11 a.m. until it sells out. Since opening in Olivette in 2012, Sugarire has added locations in St. Charles, Valley Park, downtown St. Louis, Washington, Mo., and O’Fallon, Mo. According to the statement announcing the Farmington opening, Sugarire will also expand this year to Cape Girardeau, Mo., O’Fallon, Ill., Indianapolis and Denver. BY IAN FROEB


tion, the meat sweet and yielding under its crisp batter jacket. Also don’t overlook the gumbo ($6.50), with crawfish, sausage, an oyster or two, and fresh okra in a broth so rich I imagine its roux was the color of pure Fried shrimp basket cacao. with Cajun fries The chicken wings (six for $6.50, 10 for $9) are availFried ish basket able with each of the three with Cajun fries boil sauces, but if you want the flavor of those sauces, you should just order one of the seafood boils. I was intrigued by the crawfish fried rice ($10), but this is literal to a fault: ordinary fried rice with crawfish. I recommend it only if you want crawfish without getting your hands WHERE The Mad Crab, 8080 Olive Boulevard, dirty. University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; Better to ignore the distractions, facebook.com/madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawfish though, and dig into the steaming, • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, staining mess.

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2018 Nissan Pathinder CONFIDENCE: ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ALL ABOUT TRACTION. Pathinder gives you the choice of 2WD, 4WD, and Auto Modes. Turn the available Intelligent 4x4 dial, located just behind the gearshift, to lock into 4WD on rough terrain and in varying weather. Turn it again to switch into 2WD for better mileage. The intuitive Auto Mode senses slippery roads or rough terrain and automatically adjusts power to each wheel. When things smooth out, it switches back to 2WD.

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IMPRESSIVE PASSENGER VOLUME Pathinder gives you the choice of 2WD, 4WD, and Auto Modes. Turn the available Intelligent 4x4 dial, located just behind the gearshift, to lock into 4WD on rough terrain and in varying weather. Turn it again to switch into 2WD for better mileage. The intuitive Auto Mode senses slippery roads or rough terrain and automatically adjusts power to each wheel. When things smooth out, it switches back to 2WD. Content provided by: nissanusa.com

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2018 Nissan Pathinder

DRIVING WITH DAN By DAN WIESE Contributing Automotive Writer

A classy, seven-seat minivan surrogate Back in the mid-'80s, Pathinder started life as a roughneck SUV that was little more than a Nissan Hardbody pickup with a roofed back seat -- not it for polite society, but tougher than a two-dollar steak. Nissan, however, has taken Pathinder to inishing school over the years. Today -- no longer riding a truck platform but, rather, shar-

cia accents, license plate inisher, badging and splash guards. Pathinder's regular trim roster includes S, SV, SL and Platinum, each available with front- or all-wheel drive. Signiicantly updated in 2017, Pathinder continues its cultural enlightenment in 2018 with small upgrades: now-standard Intelligent Cruise control and

For 2018, Pathfinder adds upgrades like now-standard Intelligent Cruise control and Automatic Emergency Braking.

ing its foundation since 2012 with the Altima sedan -- this crossover is elegant and reined. It's also lamboyant, in a subtle kind of way, expanding availability of its eye candy-laden Midnight Edition for 2018. Offered only on the tony Platinum trim last year, Midnight dawns on the more accessible SL in 2018. It's a package that features, among other things, black 20-inch aluminum-alloy wheels and -- all black -- mirror caps, spoiler, roof rails, grille surround, front and rear fas-

Automatic Emergency Braking, for example, along with a new Rear Door Alert system that can remind drivers of something -- or a kid -04

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left in the back seat. Every Pathinder, including the tony Platinum 4WD we drove, is powered by a 3.5-liter V-6 with direct injection and variable-valve timing. That engine produces 284 hp and 259 lb.-ft. of torque, all managed by a CVT automatic. We've never been a big fan of CVTs, but nobody makes them better than Nissan. Although no one would call this three-row, seven-passenger crossover a performance ride, its CVT is adept at locating the proper gear ratio at any given moment. That said, Pathinder isn't great fun to drive. Just a competent family wagon that drives and rides like the big vehicle it is. Even equipped with what Nissan calls 4WD -- really all-wheel drive -- Pathinder offers no lowrange gearing, although there is a torque-lock button and hill-descent control for mild off-pavement duty. Despite its SUV dressing, this is really a seven-seat minivan surrogate -- a task at which it's quite competent. That's evident in its cabin, which, in our Platinum, was beautifully appointed with leather, satin metal and wood. Meanwhile, the front seat is roomy, the middle row spacious, and even the third row can accommodate two adults. Access to row three is as handy as can be expected thanks to a middle row whose seat scoots forward, cushion lips up and back tilts, resulting in a compressed chair that makes for a wide third-row-access portal. Fold rear rows and the resulting cargo space is lat in a bay that can be accessed via

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2018 Nissan Pathfinder DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or four-wheel drive BASE PRICE: FWD: $31,765; 4WD: $33,455 PRICE AS DRIVEN: $47,855; Platinum 4WD, $1,700 Mobile Entertainment System, plus small options: slash guards, premium paint, carpeted floor mats, illuminated kick plates ENGINE: 3.5-liter V-6 HORSEPOWER: 284 at 6400 rpm TORQUE: 259 lb.-ft. at 4800 rpm RECOMMENDED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: Continuously variable (CVT) "Xtronic" automatic EPA MPG: FWD: 20 city/27 hwy/23 combined; 4WD: 19/26/22 (19/26/21 for Platinum 4WD) WHERE BUILT: Smyrna, Tenn. CARGO (behind 3rd/2nd/1st row): 16.0 cu. ft./47.8 cu. ft./79.8 cu. ft. TOWING MAX.: 6,000 lbs. a power liftgate that opens with a kick under the bumper. Oh, folded seats also enhance the driver's rear view, which is pinched when all seven head restraints are up. Pathinder's infotainment controls are intuitive, with a touch screen and redundant hard buttons and knobs, and our Platinum boasted a humongous sun roof, along with twin rear video screens provided by an optional Mobile Entertainment System. For SUV buyers who want, essentially, a minivan that looks tougher, Pathinder is a inishing school graduate.


Thanks to innovations in car tech, it’s a good time to be a senior driver DEAR CAR TALK: You recently answered a question from another 83-year-old woman who asked about upgrading her car for a newer Subaru with more safety features. I just want to second your advice. I took your suggestion and bought a new car with such features, and I love it! I feel much safer now. Thanks. --Barbra DEAR BARBRA: Aw, c’mon Barbara. I know you just wanted that 28-speaker stereo! This is actually a pretty good time to be a senior without a car. You no longer have to be isolated or stranded. Now you can summon a Lyft, instantly, on your iPhone, and

get picked up and dropped off anywhere you want. And in a decade or so, cars probably will be capable of driving themselves, so we won’t even need luxuries like vision, hearing and relexes. But for those who still count on their cars and like to be able to drive themselves around, there are (early self-driving) technologies that are worth upgrading to now. We particularly recommend cars with city- and highway-speed automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring and lane-keeping assist. Those can be lifesavers. And then there are the mere fender savers, like rear cross-trafic alert and audible parking sensors. And while these technologies are great

05

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for everybody, they’re particularly helpful for older drivers, whose relexes may have slowed down a bit. Automatic emergency braking, in particular, is awesome. If you don’t notice that a car in front of you has slowed or stopped, you’ll get an audible warning. If you don’t react and hit the brakes yourself, the car will then hit the brakes for you in order to prevent or lessen the severity of an accident. It’s pretty amazing. What usually happens with older drivers is that at some point, there’s an “incident.” You don’t notice a stopped car, or you lose all common sense and try to brave a Trader Joe’s parking lot on a Saturday morning, and bang -- there’s an accident. At that point, the kids gang up and decide it’s time

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CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI Contributing Automotive Writer cartalk@gmail.com

to coniscate your Mercedes S-Class, and you lose a big piece of your independence. Well, these safety features can often delay that day of reckoning by helping you avoid certain accidents. Not every accident, but a lot of common ones. So why not take advantage of them if you can? Everybody should, but especially those whose lives and routines could be permanently disrupted by one unfortunate accident. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety maintains a pretty good list of cars that have the most up-to-date safety equipment. You can ind the 2018 picks at http:// www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/TSP-List. Look for cars with TSP-Plus ratings (Top Safety Pick Plus). And if you actually go out to buy one of those cars, be sure to carefully check the equipment on the exact car you purchase, since many of these features are optional still. So, some cars on the lot will have the good stuff, and some identical-looking cars won’t. Triple-check -- or better yet, bring a grandson who plays linebacker with you to deal with the salesman. And Barbara, we hope these technologies get you safely through the next decade, when you can write back, and I’ll recommend a self-driving car for you. *** If it ain’t broke, you won’t have to ix it! Order Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/Ruin, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or email by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com. (c) 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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#B8921

#C8795B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

#C17020R2

#M8767A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$8,990

$9,490

$9,490

$9,490

2004 Acura MDX 3.5L

2011 Cadillac DTS

2008 Pontiac GT Conv.

2012 VW CC LUX

#B8880A

#C16019RB

#B9004

#V8948

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$9,990

$9,990

$9,990

$10,490

2011 Hyundai Sonata SE

2010 Honda Accord EX

2015 Nissan Versa Note

2011 Buick Regal CXL

#V17784A

#C8975A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

#B8881

#V17515A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$10,990

$10,990

$11,290

$11,490

2013 VW CC

2015 Dodge Dart SXT

2013 VW Passat TDI

2017 VW Golf Sport Wagon

#V16048A

#M16456B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$11,990

#V8683

$11,990

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

Bommaritostpeters.com 08

RIDES MAGAZINE

#V8228

SALE PRICE

$16,490

SALE PRICE

$18,990

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 •

TOLL FREE

1-888-591-4944 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


6 Years / 100,000 Miles 12 Months / 12,000 Miles 24 Months / 24,000 Miles

BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

6 Months / 7,500 Miles

Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

COME SEE "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS" EVERYDAY

6 ACRES = 400 PRE-OWNED VEHICLES = $AVINGS 2005 Ford Mustang

2007 Lexus RX 350

2013 Dodge Avenger SXT

2005 Dodge Ram 1500

#V18049B

#B8792A

#C17297B

#V17349A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$6,990

$8,990

$8,990

$9,990

2014 Ford Focus HB SE

2012 Chevy Impala LTZ

2012 Honda Accord EX-L

2013 VW Jetta SE

#V17753A

#C8884A

#B8776A

#V8950

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$10,490

$10,490

$10,990

$10,990

2013 Fiat 500 HB Abarth

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2011 Dodge Nitro

2006 Ford Mustang

#B8859A

#B8775

#M17411B

#B8893A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$10,990

$11,490

$11,490

$11,490

2015 Nissan Sentra SL

2013 Mini Cooper S

2012 Buick Regal Premium

2008 Honda Ridgeline RTL

#C8495A

#B8849

#C17233RA

#C8750A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$11,990

$12,990

$12,990

$12,990

2017 VW Jetta S

2013 Nissan Pathfinder

2007 BMW 335i Conv.

2013 Hyundai Veloster

#V8589

#M18057A

#V18226B

#B8943

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$12,990

$13,490

$13,490

$13,490

2012 Chevrolet Camaro 1LT

2014 Ford Escape SE

2013 GMC Terrain SLE-1

2016 Dodge Grand Caravan

#C17394A, CONV.

#B8788

#V18080A

#B8839

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$13,990

$13,990

$14,490

$15,490

2015 Hyundai Sonata

2013 Honda Civic Si

2011 Cadillac SRX

2018 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

#M17233A

#V17468B

#C17276A

#V17747B

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$16,490

$16,990

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

Bommaritostpeters.com 09

RIDES MAGAZINE

$16,990

$17,490

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300 •

TOLL FREE

1-888-591-4944 Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


Find your next certiied pre-owned vehicle at

Lou Fusz Chevrolet PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER Over 900 Pre-owned to choose from at Fusz.com 12,826

$

11,175

$

$

14,140

2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE

2015 CHEVROLET CRUZE

2014 CHEVROLET MALIBU

38mpg Stk# C11443Q

29k Stk# C11530P

38k Stk# C11506P

15,617

$

15,587

15,497

$

$

$

14,507

2014 CHEVROLET MALIBU 4cyl miles Stk# C11498P

16,578

$

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2014 GMC TERRAIN

36k Stk# C11510P

LT, 2,780 Miles, Stk# C11458P

18,000 Miles Stk# C11512P

38k Stk# C11504P

$

16,663

$

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

$

18,892

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2015 GMC TERRAIN

backup camera Stk# C11505P

backup camera Stk# C11501P

SLE Stk# C11532P

$

20,991

18,123

$

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

41k Stk# C11526P

$

17,245

33,989

$

37,989

48,884

$

2014 CHEVROLET IMPALA

2018 CHEVROLET IMPALA

2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500

2015 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN

LTZ Stk# C171825A

448 Miles, Stk# C11520P

4WD Stk# C180683A

LTZ,Leather Stk# C181098A

5120 N Service Rd. St. Peters, MO

CALL (636) 875-5374

www.LouFuszChevrolet.com 10

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


#27244L

SALE PRICE

$

39,888

2015 GMC Terrain Denali

SALE PRICE

21,388

2014 Chevy Tahoe LT

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

28,888

2017 Lincoln Navigator Select

SALE PRICE

44,388

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

19,888

2015 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie

SALE PRICE

32,888

29,888

SALE PRICE

$

39,888

30,388

2015 Lincoln MKC #26457A

SALE PRICE

$

22,888

2012 GMC Yukon SLT

#78775A

#78684A

SALE PRICE

$

30,888

2015 Toyota RAV4 Limited

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

22,388

2015 Acura MDX 3.5L Technology

SALE PRICE

31,888

2017 Infiniti Q60 3.0t Premium

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

32,888

$

11,388

2015 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

34,888

2016 Mazda CX-3 Grand Touring

SALE PRICE

19,888

9,888

2015 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT

SALE PRICE

$

34,888

2014 Honda Accord Sport

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

11,888

2012 Nissan Murano S

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

11,388

2014 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

SALE PRICE

34,888

2014 VW Passat 1.8T SEL

SALE PRICE

14,888

2015 Lexus RC F #27010M

$

39,888

20,888

2014 Audi S4 2.0T

SALE PRICE

24,888

45,888

2015 Chevy Suburban 1500 LT #78642A

SALE PRICE

$

39,888

2017 Chevy Tahoe LT #P9027

#27763A

$

SALE PRICE

49,888

#78795A

$

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

44,888

2013 Toyota 4Runner Limited

2013 Chevy Equinox LS

#78806A

#P9002A

$

SALE PRICE

31,888

2014 GMC Acadia SLT-1

#P8913A

$

SALE PRICE

#79064B

#78667A

$

# P8980

$

$

2014 Subaru Tribeca 3.6R

#11195A

$

34,888

2016 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT

#27766A

$

2017 Infiniti QX80 Limited

#78531A

$

#96589A

#28248A

$

$

2016 Acura MDX SH-AWD

#28227A

#96023L

$

23,888

#28216A

#78685A

$

$

2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X

#11306A

#96270C

$

#P8949

$

2013 Infiniti QX56

#28055A

$

#P8907

#27112A

#P9025

$

$

2015 Audi A8 4.0T

#78808A

$

2015 VW Jetta 1.8T SE

#28009A

#78060A

$

2014 Mercedes Benz M-Class

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

22,888

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

9,888

2008 Mazda MX-5 Grand Touring #11388B

#78699A

$

$

SALE PRICE

$

10,888

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2017 Audi A4 2.0T

West County Pre-Owned Center

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED VEHICLES

2017 Audi A6 2.0T

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


2010 DODGE CALIBER SXT Stk. #48955-2

2009 BUICK ENCLAVE $ 2WD CLX Stk. #48538-2

$

7,397

11,397

2014 KIA FORT KOUP $ SX Stk. #48698-2

2014 CHEVROLET SPARK LS Stk. #50212-1

8,995

2010 JEEP PATRIOT $ 2WD LIMITED Stk. #49098-1

11,995

$

8,995

2008 HYUNDAI ACCENT $ GLS Stk. #67760-1

4,995

2016 NISSAN VERSA $ NOTE S Stk. #94962SL

2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $ 2WD GLS Stk. #49379-2

2007 FORD EDGE $ AWD SEL PLUS Stk. #49381-1

2015 CHRYSLER 200 C Stk. #49484-1

$

11,995

2014 HYUNDAI TUCSON $ AWD GLS Stk. # 49264-2

2009 HONDA PILOT $ 4WD EX-L Stk. #67076-1

2010 TOYOTA $ COROLLA S Stk. #48980-2

2017 NISSAN VERSA $ 1.6 SV Stk. #95187SL

2005 GMC SIERRA 1500 $ 4X4 CREW CAB Stk. #50214-5

2011 KIA SORENTO AWD EX Stk. #68127-1

11,697

8,995

8,397

12,995

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

10,995

10,995

370

70 270

HYUNDAI 40/64

12

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

9,995

10,397

$

10,997


2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT Stk. #68961-1

$5,995

2013 HYUNDAI VELOSTER Stk. #68319-1

$11,397

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN Stk. #49505-1

$9,995

2013 KIA SORENTO Stk. #48959-1

Stk. #47440-1

Stk. #49291-1

Stk. #48377-2

$10,397

Stk. #49380-1

$8,995

$8,397 13

$8,995

2011 KIA SORENTO AWD EX

$5,995

2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2WD SLT Stk. #48308-1

$5,497

2008 FORD F150 2WD SUPERCAB

2009 MERCURY MARINER 2WD Stk. #69051-1

$10,995

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX FWD LT

$6,995

2009 HONDA PILOT EX-L Stk. # 67076-1

$8,995

2008 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0 S

$5,995

2009 TOYOTA CAMRY LE Stk. #48916-1

Stk. #49296-1

2013 HYUNDAI SONATA HYBRID

$9,397

2010 MAZDA MAZDA3I Stk. #49285-1

2012 FORD FUSION SEL V6

Stk. #68127-1

2012 MAZDA CX-9 FWD TOURING Stk. #48915-1

$10,995

RIDES MAGAZINE

2007 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER

$8,397

Stk. #68036-2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

$10,997

2015 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE Stk. #68813-1

stltoday.com/RIDES

$10,995


SUNTRUP PRE-OWNED Visit us online for complete inventory

www.SuntrupBuickGMC.com

SAVE $1,000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON YOUR NEXT PRE-OWNED VEHICLE!!! 6,888

$

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2009 KIA OPTIMA

2017 NISSAN VERSA SEDAN

1LT Stk # 49166-1

32mpg Stk # 24213-2

36 mpg Stk # 24390-1

10,888

$

$

11,477

$

10,899

$

2015 CHEVROLET SPARK

2011 BUICK REGAL

2011 BUICK REGAL

2LT Stk # 24575-1

black leather Stk # 48846-1

CXL Stk # 23952-1

11,999

12,499

12,499

$

2014 KIA SOUL

2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LIMITED

Alien Green Stk # 24289-1

Certiied Stk # P3794

Remote Start Stk # P3793

$

13,990

14,888

10,489

$

2015 CHEVROLET CRUZE Certiied Stk # P3751

11,799

$

2015 HYUNDAI SONATA 37 mpg Stk # P3749

13,900

$

2014 CHEVROLET MALIBU 36mpg Stk # P3806

13,900

$

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE

2014 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA SPORT

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2014 BUICK VERANO

Manual Stk # 24517-1

Heated Leather Stk # P3761-1

Leathert Stk # 49348-1

crew cab Stk # P3802

$

WEY BUU SED!!

9,990

$

7,900

$

$

14,900

$

NEARLY 500 NEW & USED VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM!

S

CAR

* With down payment of $2,500 cash or trade, With Approved Credit, based on 4.9% APR for 72 months.

866-420-7771 14

RIDES MAGAZINE

Credit Problems? CALL STACEY Specializing in Bankruptcies

636-939-0800

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

4200 N. SERVICE RD. I-70 & CAVE SPRINGS stltoday.com/RIDES

W BUE

US Y CARESD !!


Bommarito 2009 Toyota Corolla S Silver, Auto

South County Pre-Owned Center

2006 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SE

2011 Ford Focus SE

2009 Kia Sportage EX

2013 Chevy Cruze LS

One Owner, Clean Carfax

One Owner, Great Miles

One Owner, Very Clean

GM Certiied, One Owner

2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid SE Hatchback, One Owner, Local Trade

SALE PRICE $6,990

SALE PRICE $6,990

SALE PRICE $7,469

SALE PRICE $8,443

SALE PRICE $9,990

2013 Ford Fusion SE

2013 Chevy Equinox

2012 Chevy Equinox 1LT

2017 Chevy Spark LT

2012 Chevy Silverado 1500

2015 Nissan Altima 2.5

Loaded

Very Clean

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Local Trade

One Owner, GM Certiied

Reg. Cab Pickup, Clean Carfax

Remainder of Factory Warranty, 51K Miles

2009 Nissan Maxima

2014 Dodge Dart Limited

2012 Audi A5 2.0T

2016 Jeep Patriot Latitude

2014 Mini Cooper

2013 Dodge Journey R/T

Loaded, Only 44K Miles

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Remote Start

Clean Carfax, Local Trade

One Owner, Clean Carfax

Loaded

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Remote Start

2015 Chevy Trax LS

2015 Nissan Rogue

2016 Ford Escape SE

2017 Chevy Cruze Premier

2014 GMC Terrain SLE-1

2012 Jeep Wrangler Sport

1 Owner, Clean Carfax,Certiied

Clean Carfax, Factory Warranty

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Backup Camera

Like New, Certiied

1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Certiied

Very Clean

SALE PRICE $11,462

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$10,418

SALE PRICE $11,490 SALE PRICE $11,776 SALE PRICE $11,990 SALE PRICE $11,990 SALE PRICE $12,469

$12,990 SALE PRICE $13,769 SALE PRICE $13,990 SALE PRICE $14,440 SALE PRICE $14,590 SALE PRICE $14,881

SALE PRICE $14,989 SALE PRICE $15,990 SALE PRICE $17,444 SALE PRICE $17,469 SALE PRICE $17,469 SALE PRICE $19,476

PRE-OWNED VEHICLES • CARS • SUVS • TRUCKS • UNDER $10,000 - ALL STATE INSPECTED 2004 Chevy Cavalier .................... SALE PRICE $4,990 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix New Tires SALE PRICE $4,990 2007 Kia Optima Clean Carfax .......... SALE PRICE $4,990 2004 Chevy Trailblazer 5 Star Rating SALE PRICE $7,426 2013 Chevy Sonic LS One Owner .... SALE PRICE $7,469 2012 Ford Focus SEL Local Trade ... SALE PRICE $7,669

2007 Chevy Impala LS New Arrival .. SALE PRICE $7,718 2011 Honda CR-Z New Arrival .......... SALE PRICE $7,991 2012 Chevy Cruze 1LT One Owner .. SALE PRICE $8,444 2014 Chevy Spark LS Clean Carfax .. SALE PRICE $8,449 2012 Chevy Cruze ECO New Arrival SALE PRICE $8,769 2012 Chevy Impala LT Clean Carfax . SALE PRICE $8,776

2013 Chevy Cruze LT Clean Carfax .. SALE PRICE $8,989 2019 Kia Sportage AWD Suv ........... SALE PRICE $8,990 2010 Mazda 3i Low Miles ................. SALE PRICE $8,992 2013 Hyundai Elantra One Owner .... SALE PRICE $8,996 2011 Volvo C30 T5 Fuel Eficient ....... SALE PRICE $9,769 2011 Chevy Malibu LTZ Loaded ..... SALE PRICE $9,990

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 â&#x20AC;¢ PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

suntrup 100k warranty 0.9% financing on all 2013 & 2014 Certiied Volvos

$12,680

$12,800

$13,800

$13,855

2010 nissan PaThfinder

2012 CheVroleT equinoX lTZ

2013 VolVo s60 T5

Leather, Stk # 192871

AWD, Stk # L13541

2012 hyundai genesis CouPe

AWD, Stk # P42021

306hp, Stk # L13372

$14,800

$15,000

$15,000

$19,800

2011 VolVo C70

2011 CadillaC CTs

2012 Volkwagen eos

2013 VolVo XC60

Convertible Stock # 187912

Leather, Stk # 191581

convertible, Stk # 192431

Leather Stk # 189521

$20,000

$23,855

$24,500

$25,000

2009 leXus ls 460

2015 VolVo XC60 T5 Premier

2017 VolVo V60 T5

2014 dodge ram

Premier Stk # L1364

Quad Cab Express Stk # 189043

V8 Stk # 188381

Leather, 66K Miles, Stk # P42161

$25,000

$29,500

$38,750

$44,980

2012 PorsChe Cayenne

2015 leXus is350

2017 VolVo s90 T5

2017 gmC yukon slT

AWD, Stk # 191261

Awd, Stock # 188491

leather,15k Stk # L1330

Blk,Leather, Stk # P4187

www.wcvolvo.com 16

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

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St. Louis Auto 2727 Delmar Bl Blvd. • St. Louis, MO • All Vehicles Guaranteed To Pass MVI & Emissions • We Take Trade Ins • Great Cash Deals

• Great Cash Deals! • 20 Cars Under $2000 • Warranty On Engine & Transmission

→ →

14 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT Auto, Air, PW, PL, CD $

3500

DOWN

Mon-Fri 9 am - 5:30 pm 1st & Last Saturday of Month 10 am - 3 pm

Downs Start @ $ 500 Payments Low Monthly Payments

01 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS

Term 12 - 18 - 24 Months

Auto 4-speed, Air, PW, PL, CD $

1800

CASH

07 CHEVY SILVERADO 350

08 FORD FUSION I4

04 FORD ESCAPE XLT

05 DODGE STRATUS SXT

97 HONDA ACCORD

Stake Bed, Auto, Air, PL, PW, CD

Auto 5-speed, Air, PW, PL, CD

Auto, Air, PW, PL, CD, Alloys, 4WD

Auto, Air, V-6, PL, PW, CD

Auto 4-Speed, Air, PL, PW, CD

$

13,995

CASH

1500

$

DOWN

$

1200

1000

$

DOWN

DOWN

500

$

DOWN

12 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0

07 KIA SEDONA

06 NISSAN ALTIMA

09 CHEVROLET COBALT LS

07 PONTIAC G6

CVT, Air, PW, PL, CD

Auto, Air, PW, PL, CD, 107k Miles

Auto, Air, PL, PW, CD

Manual 5-speed, Air, PW, PL, CD

Auto, Air, PW, PL, CD

1200

$

DOWN

$

Call

1200

$

850

$

DOWN

DOWN

$

1200

DOWN

All Financed Cars Guaranteed To Pass State Inspection & Emission Testing www.stlouisautocarsales.com

314-436-2277 17

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2017 AUDI A6 PREMIUM PLUS

2015 FORD MUSTANG

Stk# 12019A

SALE PRICE

18,450

$

2012 AUDI TT RS

Stk# P9044

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

39,950

$

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

42,450

$

15,250

$

Stk# 39021A

SALE PRICE

22,250

$

22,950

SALE PRICE

$

12,750

Stk# 28449A

$

SALE PRICE

34,550

2010 TOYOTA PRIUS FOUR

Stk# 11314A

SALE PRICE

11,950

$

2015 KIA OPTIMA SXL

$

Stk# 11195A

2015 AUDI A5 PREMIUM PLUS

2014 NISSAN ALTIMA S

2016 MAZDA CX-3 GRAND TOURING Stk# 11633A

Stk# 27540L

2013 GMC ACADIA DENALI

2016 KIA SOUL SOUL+

Stk# P9069A

2012 NISSAN MURANO S

Stk# 11594A

SALE PRICE

9,450

$

2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE

Stk# 40160A

SALE PRICE

19,950

$

Stk# 96089A

SALE PRICE

9,950

$

BommaritoWest County PRE-OWNED CENTER

15736 MANCHESTER AT CLARKSON RD. TOLL

View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritowestcounty.com FREE 18

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2012 GMC TERRAIN SLE SLE-2 Stk# C18086C

SALE PRICE

2014 NISSAN ALTIMA S

$

12,990

2015 SUBARU IMPREZA SPORT LIMITED Stk# M17558A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

18,990

SALE PRICE

12,990

Stk# M9006

SALE PRICE

$

37,990

Stk# C8795B

SALE PRICE

21,990

$

10,990

Stk# C17252A2

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

8,490

Stk# C17422A

SALE PRICE

24,990

$

2008 LEXUS GX 470

$

9,490

2011 GMC YUKON DENALI

$

$

Stk# V17721A

2014 CADILLAC ATS LUXURY

2013 KIA SOUL BASE

2010 HONDA ACCORD EX Stk# C8975A

SALE PRICE

$

2016 MAZDA CX-5 SPORT

2018 CADILLAC XT5

Stk# C18005R

Stk# B8976

2009 ACURA TSX

Stk# C18124A

SALE PRICE

18,490

$

2011 BUICK REGAL CXL TURBO

27,490

$

Stk# V17515A

SALE PRICE

11,490

$

BommaritoSt. Peters PRE-OWNED CENTER 4190 N. Service Rd. â&#x20AC;¢ I-70 & Cave Springs View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritostpeters.com 19

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

TOLL FREE

1-866-244-9085

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Buick Verano

2013 Cadillac SRX

Stk# P06285

#P06461

$15,699

$14,500

Premium Collection, AWD, 52K Miles, One Owner, #C17148A1

2007 Acrua TL

2012 Audi A5

2014 BMW X5

2016 Buick Encore

Alabaster Silver metallic, TL Type S, Navigation #12210A

2.0T, Clean Carfax, Local Trade, #33543A

White, 37K, Nav, Pano Roof, #B8866

$10,888

$13,990

$34,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2009 Acura MDX

2014 Audi A6 S

2012 BMW X5

2017 Buick Encore

2015 Buick Verano

2012 Cadillac SRX

3.7L Technology Package, AWD, Low Miles, Clean Carfax #28450A

Charcoal Grey #188431

xDrive35i, Sport Activity, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD #28411A

Preferred, Ebony Twilight, 2K Miles #39237

25K Miles, #40020A

49K, Pano Roof, Mocha, Certified #C17416RA

$13,888

$25,890

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2006 Acura TL

2010 Audi A6 3.0

2000 Buick Century

2016 Buick LaCrosse

1991 Cadillac Allante

2011 Cadillac SRX

One Owner, Local Trade, Power Sunroof, #96447A

Premium Tiptonic, Clean Carfax, AWD, Backup Camera #39017A

Custom, 4 Door Sedan, Green #133074

Premium, Black, Local Trade, Nav! #C17220RA

Coupe, Heated Front Seats #C17020R2

Luxury Collection, Clean Carfax, AWD, Panorama Sunroof, #96576A

$14,888

$18,070

$25,490

$14,388

$26,490

$18,490

$11,388

$3,995

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2009 Acura TSX

2005 Audi TT 3.2L

2013 Buick Enclave

2012 Buick LaCrosse

2016 Cadillac CTS

2012 Chevrolet Equinox

FWD, Heated Door Mirrors & Front Seats, Power Moonroof #V17721A

Coupe, 117K Miles #28306A

Leather, Nav, Dual Sunroof #49381-1

Carfax One Owner, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats #96427A

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

1LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Backup Camera #42079A

$6,888

$10,888

$9,490

$14,888

$8,990

$7,888

$23,900

$11,776

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$35,990

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2010 Acura ZDX

2016 BMW 328

2015 Buick Enclave

2015 Buick Regal

2010 Cadillac Escalade

2013 Chevy Avalanche LTZ

Tech Package, Clean Carfax, Backup Camera #79057A

x-Drive, Roof, Navigation #B8606

Premium, AWD, 61K Miles, Blue Stk# P06184

Turbo, Stk #P06457

$16,800

AWD, Local Cadillac Trade, Loaded #B8757A

38,500 miles , leather.

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$21,490

Call for Price

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

By owner 314-606-8400

$15,888

$26,990

$22,799

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

20

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2013 Chevy Avalanche

2014 Chevy Captiva

2014 Chevy Cruze

2013 Chevy Cruze

2010 Chevy Equinox

2013 Chevy Equinox

One Owner, Loaded #42280A

Sport LS Stk# P06454A

1LT, Turbo, Automatic, 33K Miles #C11454P

LT, Clean Carfax, Auto #33589B

LT, Brown, 2.4L 4 Cyl, Power Seat #11681A

2LT #P06550

$28,990

$11,731

$8,989

$8,388

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2010 Chevy Aveo

2017 Chevy Colorado

2014 Chevy Cruze

2013 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Equinox LS

2016 Chevy Equinox

Summit White #96613C

Z71, #170162A

LS, Automatic Transmission, 31K Miles, #C11445P

GM Certified, One Owner, #P6369

Carfax One Owner, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth #78207A

LTZ, Stk# 180319A

$4,888

$10,912

$9,990

$13,888

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2005 Chevy Aveo

2015 Chevy Colorado Z71

2011 Chevy Cruze

2012 Chevy Cruze

2013 Chevy Equinox

2013 Chevy Equinox

LS, Hatchback, Orange #403163

Crew Cab, Long Box, 4WD, #P06387

LTZ, Silver Ice Metallic #79282A

ECO, New Arrival, Bluetooth, #42535A

LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth #P9002A

Very Clean, #42311B

$3,495

$23,900 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,388

$8,769

$9,888

$11,490

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2010 Chevy Camaro

2004 Chevy Colorado

2015 Chevy Cruze LTZ

2012 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Equinox

2012 Chevy Equinox

1LT #180425A

LS #180104A

$7,990

Clean Carfax, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Heated Front Seats, #28400B

1LT One Owner, Local Trade, Remote Start, Summit White #35355A

LTZ #P06470

$13,089

1LT, Black, Rear Camera #95549B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$8,444

$18,400

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2010 Chevy Camaro

2013 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Cruze

2011 Chevy Cruze

2017 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Impala

1LT #P06496

1LT, Automatic, One Owner Clean Carfax, #C171478A

LT, Hatchback #170521

$8,471

$17,300

Limited, LT Package, 3.6L V6 #C11453P

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$17,247

Crystal Red Metallic Tintcoat, Heated Front Seats, Remote Start #P6284A

#P06277

$12,629

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,872 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$13,800

$30,000

21

$14,888

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$14,000

$21,336

$13,888

$11,497


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2010 Chevy Impala LT

2014 Chevy Impala

2012 Chevy Malibu

2015 Chevy Silverado

2014 Chevy Silverado 1500

V6, #C180518A

Lmtd, LTZ, #P06567

LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K #B8861

#171071

$10,519

LS, 2.4L, Automatic Transmission, 41K Miles #C171543A

#170537A

$12,900

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,954

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$37,990

$30,952

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Chevy Impala

2007 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Malibu

2013 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Silverado 1500

2017 Chevy Sonic LS

LS, #P06569

LS, Precision Red, New Arrival, Fuel Efficient #42355A

1LT, #P06529

Extended Cab #P06363

$16,860

LTZ, 4WD, 39K, Local Trade #V17159A

$31,490

$9,999

$11,636

$7,718

$21,000

2017 Chevy Sonic

#170580

$12,684

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Impala LT

2012 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado 1500

2012 Chevy Silverado

2016 Chevy Sonic

Stk# P06520

LT, One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Summit White #400067A

1LT Stk #P06526

Crew Cab, Short Box, 4WD, LT, 11K Miles, #171142A

Reg Cab, P/U, Clean Carfax #42309A

LTZ, Stk# P06563

$19,442 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$31,986 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Chevy Impala

2011 Chevy Impala

2011 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado 1500

2014 Chevy Sonic

2017 Chevy Sonic LS

2LT Stk# 171226A

LT, FWD, Flex Fuel, Remote Start, #V180209A

LTZ, Loaded #P6309A

Crew Cab, Standard Box, 4WD, LTZ Z71, Only 24K Miles, Stk# 171156A

LTZ, Hatchback, Turbo, Automatic Transmission #C171766N

Stk #170709

$9,990

$37,500

$10,498

$16,800

$8,776

$6,990

$16,947

$11,990

$12,500

$12,684

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Impala

2012 Chevy Malibu

2015 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Silverado 1500

2017 Chevy Sonic LS

2013 Chevy Sonic

1LT #P06521

1LT, 73K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, #C180569A

4WD, V8, White, 22" Black Wheels #B8730

#170222A

#170530

$18,236

$12,684

LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Manual, Victory Red, #42158A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$31,490

$14,000 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$10,556

22

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$7,469


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Chevy Spark

2017 Chevy Spark

2010 Chevy Travers LS

2015 Chevy Traverse

2016 Chrysler 300C

2014 Dodge Dart

LT, hatchback, 18K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, #C11455P

One Owner, GM Certified #P6374

Dark Metallic Blue #78085A

1LT #P06437A

#P06380

$18,831

$19,000

Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start #33541A

$13,769

$9,111

$11,990

$8,388

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2014 Chevy Spark

2014 Chevy Spark

2012 Chevy Traverse

2016 Chevy Trax

2007 Chrysler PT Cruiser

2011 Dodge Durango Citadel

LS, Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, #C172264A

LS, Grape Ice, One Owner Clean Carfax, Certified #P6235A

1LT, FWD, 3rd Row Seat, 3.6L V6 #C11473FIU

AWD, 4 Door, LTZ, #P06346

$16,900

Touring, Black, #567647

AWD, Navigation, Rear Entertainment, Backup Camera #79300A

$11,902

$7,325

$8,449

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$4,995

$14,388

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Chevy Spark LS

2012 Chevy Tahoe LT

2012 Chevy Traverse

2015 Chevy Trax

2008 Chrysler Sebring LX

2002 Dodge Durango

#170166

#P06119A

$22,500

LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles #39274A

LS, One Owner Clean Carfax, Certified, #P6308

Convertible #P06513A

$10,614

Sport, Gray, Automatic, 2WD #211283

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$14,388

Call Today!

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

2017 Chevy Spark LS

2006 Chevy Trailblazer

2017 Chevy Traverse

2013 Chrysler 300 C

2013 Dodge Avenger

2016 Dodge Grand Caravan

Hatchback #170937

$10,683

Gci, 4WD, Lt Pkg #C11450FIU

LT, AWD #P3764

Sunroof, Leather, 45K Miles #48844-2

SXT, Motor Trend Certified, Loaded! #C17297B

White, Allows, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner #B8839

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,985

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$8,990

$15,490

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2018 Chevy Spark 1LT

2004 Chevy Trailblazer

2011 Chevy Traverse

2014 Chrysler 300

2016 Dodge Charger

2013 Dodge Journey

Stk# 180231

$15,989

New Arrival, NHTSA 5-Star Rating, Silver Green #42314A

LT, #171197A

4 Door Sedan, 300S, AWD, 23K Miles, Stk# P06252

SXT #P06499

SE, Automatic, Black w/Black Cloth #C8575B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,426

$18,412

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$24,900

23

$14,000

RIDES MAGAZINE

$14,989

$17,900

$20,000 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$5,995

$7,490


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Dodge Journey

2013 Ford C-Max

2014 Ford Escape

2016 Ford Explorer

2006 Ford Five Hundred

2012 Ford Focus

SXT #P06426

$14,500

Hybrid, SE, Hatchback, One Owner, Local Trade #400294A

51K Miles, FWD, Certified #B8788

XLT, FWD, Black w/ Black Wheels #B8557A

SE, White, 4 Door Sedan #140337

SEL, One Owner, Local Trade, Backup Camera #40412A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$28,490

$6,495

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Dodge Journey

2008 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Escape SE

2017 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford Focus SE

2014 Ford Fusion S

R/T, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start, Backup Camera #42419A

Limited, Light Ice Blue, Camel Leather #78809B

One Owner, Ruby Red Tinted, Turbocharged VCT #39226A

LTD, Black on Black #P4245

Carfax One Owner, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified, #12021A

Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified FWD, #28418A

$10,888

$35,000

$14,881

$10,418

$9,388

$13,990

$9,388

$7,669

$10,888

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2011 Dodge Nitro

2008 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Escape S

2010 Ford F-150

2016 Ford Focus

2017 Ford Fusion

Heat Package, 4WD, 75K, Certified #M17411B

Black Clear Coat #79268C

Tuxedo Black, #39028A

XLT, 4WD, V8, White #B8858

SE #P06560

SE #P3725

$18,990

$11,490

$10,888

$10,888

$12,981

$13,900

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2005 Dodge Ram

2015 Ford Edge

2013 Ford Escape

2015 Ford F350 Lariat

2012 Ford Focus

2014 Ford Fusion

SLT, Auto, Local Trade #V17349A

Titanium, Leather, Heated Seats #P3724

SEL, Loaded #33513A

Diesel, 4x4, Crew, Loaded #P3757

SEL #171242A

SE #P06530

$13,469

$47,900

$7,853 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$9,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2013 Fiat 500 Sport

Hatchback, Heated Front Seats #B8799B

$7,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$21,900

$12,519

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2016 Ford Edge

2010 Ford Escape

2007 Ford Fiesta

2011 Ford Focus

2013 Ford Fusion

#170387A

XLT, FWD, Flex Fuel, New Arrival #M8911A

SE Sedan, 63K Miles #C171265A

SE, One Owner, Great Miles #42366A

Loaded #42041B

$25,000 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

24

$6,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

RIDES MAGAZINE

$7,444 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

$7,469 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

stltoday.com/RIDES

$11,462 Bommarito South 866-721-7269


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2008 Ford Fusion

1992 Ford Ranger

1992 GMC Rally Wagon

2010 GMC Terrain

2016 GMC Yukon

2011 Honda CR-Z

I4, SEL, 4 Door, Red, #113463

2WD, Green, 5-Speed Manual #A57928A

G2500, Orange, #507523

SEL-1, Gold Mist Metallic #78478A

SLT #171158B

$9,888

$42,968

EX, New Arrival, Crystal Black Pearl, Bluetooth, #33248B

$5,995

$2,000

$5,500

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2006 Ford Mustang GT

2014 Ford Taurus

2014 GMC Sierra

2012 GMC Terrain

2009 Honda Accord

2015 Honda Odyssey

Premium, Automatic, 91K #B8893A

Limited, Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #7847B

SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, Leather, Bose, White #V18081A

SLT-2 Stk# P06570

EX-L, Automatic Transmission, #C11481Q

EX-L #192461

$11,490

$12,888

$32,490

$13,452

$9,248

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2014 Ford Mustang

1999 Ford Taurus

2010 GMC Sierra

2015 GMC Yukon

2010 Honda Accord

2016 Honda Pilot

Convertible, V6 #P06395A

FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Overdrive 3.0L, V6 #C18084A

SLE, 4x4, Z71, 88K #48276-2

XL, Denali, Loaded, Certified #C17441B

LX, 88K, Automatic, Well Serviced #V18112A

Elite, AWD, 30K, Loaded #B8869

$7,991

$25,850

$12,000

$4,490

$44,990

$10,490

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2011 Ford Mustang

2016 Ford Transit Connect

2010 GMC Terrain

2013 GMC Yukon Denali

2014 Honda Accord

2013 Hyundai Elantra

#180287A

XLT, Rear Lift Gate, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, #P8975A

SLT2, AWD, Auto, Navigation #M17267C

XL, #191421

$11,987

$28,942

One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth #27766A

One Owner #33747A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$10,490 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2005 Ford Mustang

2015 GMC Acadia

2015 GMC Terrain

2013 GMC Yukon Denali

2010 Honda Accord

2011 Hyundai Elantra

Coupe, RWD, Legend Lime Clearcoat Metallic #V18049B

SLT, Nav, Leather, 1 Owner #P3752

Navigation, Sunroof, Chromes, Loaded #B8801

DVD, Sunroof, Black #48966-1

$31,777

2.4 LX, FWD, Recent Arrival! #M17522A

FWD, Heated Door Mirrors, #B8987A

$22,990

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$7,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$14,888

$26,500 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

25

$20,888

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

$11,888

$7,990

stltoday.com/RIDES

$38,990

$8,996

$6,490 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Hyundai Sonata

2011 Infiniti G37X

2004 Jaguar Vanden

2016 Jeep Patriot

2012 Jeep Wrangler

#P06477

$13,299

Leather, AWD, 66K, #48576-1

White, Loaded, Well Serviced #C8785A

Sport, Stk# P06538

Sport, Very Clean #33711A

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$14,888

$7,490

$13,594

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2012 Hyundai Santa Fe

2008 Hyundai Sonata

2011 Infiniti M37x

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2015 Jeep Renegade Sport

2008 Kenworth T660

Limited, V6, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified #28424A

Powder White Pearl #28268B

Clean Carfax, Platinum Graphite, AWD, Heated Front Seats #95537A

Limited, Nav, Leather, 45K #49173-1

One Owner Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, 4WD #78293B

with C15 Cat. 10 speed. 556k mi. Good brakes. 75% Tires. Rigmaster.

2012 Hyundai Genesis

Coupe, 65K Miles, #L13372

$13,855

$4,388

$19,476

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$14,388

$24,888

$14,388

$42,500

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

618-535-0186

2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2014 Infiniti Q50

2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2016 Jeep Renegade

2013 Kia Optima

GLS, Silver, Automatic #823563

Auto, Pano Roof, Premium Wheels #B8943

38K Miles #189551

$20,000

EX, 21K, Auto, Pano Roof #C18133A

$13,490

Laredo, 4WD, Black #B8773A

LTD Stk #P06420

$25,000

$7,490

$13,388

$5,495

$15,490

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2013 Hyundai Sonata

2011 Infiniti FX50

2008 Infiniti QX56

2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2011 Jeep Wrangler

2016 Kia Optima LX

Limited, 2.0 Turbo, 72K, Loaded #B8825A

$17,890

#192911

Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Rear Entertainment #28304A

Limited, 4WD, Blue #681116A

Unlimited, 4x4, Must See! #48874-3

$13,490 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$14,481

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Hyundai Sonata

2008 Infiniti G37 Journey

2010 Infiniti QX56

2016 Jeep Patriot

2014 Jeep Wrangler

2015 Kia Optima LX

Stk# P06476

One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Frotn Seats, Sunroof #96031A

Tuscon Pearl, 3rd Row Seating #97213A

Sport Stk# P06468

Unlimited #171235M

Stk# P06451

$15,888

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,398 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,888

$11,388 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

26

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

$24,900

$3,995

$12,562

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

#P06510

$29,000

$12,900

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2007 Kia Optima

2013 Kia Soul

2011 Lexus CT 200

2016 Lexus NX 200t

2013 Lincoln MKZ

2006 Mazda Mazda3 s

Clean Carfax, Local Trade Ruby Red #33013B

Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, #C8795B

53K, Auto, Sunroof, Great MPG w/Luxury #B8854

7K Miles, AWD, #C17318A

AWD, #P06535

$19,647

Copper Red Mica, Heated Front Seats #M18022A

$7,990

$9,490

$14,490

$34,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2001 Kia Rio

2016 Kia Soul

2013 Lexus GX460

2007 Lexus RX350

2010 Mazda 3i

2012 Mazda Mazda3i

4 Door Sedan, Red, Automatic, #080606

Hatchback, 22K Miles, #P9069A

83K Miles #P42411

$27,890

AWD, Navigation, Roof #B8792A

Gunmetal Blue Mica, New Arrival, Low Miles #35314A

Touring, Hatchback, One Owner, Clean Carfax #33759A

$4,990

$3,195

$13,888

$8,992

$10,469

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$10,490

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2011 Kia Sorento

2011 Kia Sportage

2008 Lexus IS 350

2015 Lexus RX350

2012 Mazda Mazda 3

2015 Mazda Mazda6 i

EX, FWD, Automatic #C180793B

EX, Black Cherry, FWD, 6 speed Automatic #78437B

Mercury Metallic, 110K Miles, #28284B

AWD, Black, 28K, Nav, Loaded #B8879

66K Miles #193071

Touring, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Low Miles #P9062

$34,490

$9,800

$7,891

$15,888

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$10,388

$11,388

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Kia Sorento SX

2009 Kia Sportage

2009 Lexus LS 460

2016 Lincoln MKC

2013 Mazda Mazda3

2007 Mazda Mazda6 i

V6, Motor Trend Certified, AWD, Backup Camera #96746A

EX, One Owner, Very Clean #33671A

Grey, 74K, #188381

Premier, Loaded!! #48741-1

i Sport, One Owner Clean Carfax #C172244M

Glacier Silver Metallic #11598A

$8,443

$20,000

$6,388

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$7,421

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2016 Kia Soul

2011 Land Rover LR4 HSE

2008 Lexus LX 470

2013 Lincoln MKX

2016 Mazda Mazda3

2008 Mazda MX-5

5 Door Wagon #P06466

Black w/ Black Leather, Roof, Nav, DVD #B8855

4.7L V8, Clean Carfax, 4WD, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating #96616A

96K Miles, #P42491

Sport #P06557

$14,860

$13,392

Convertible, Grand Touring, Clean Carfax, Low Miles #11388B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$7,888

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$15,888

$20,990

27

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

$20,888

$16,780

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$10,888


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata

2016 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

2014 Mini Cooper

2012 Nissan Altima 2.5

2014 Nissan Maxima

2014 Nissan Murano S

Grand Touring, Hard Top Convertible, #11539A

C 300 Sedan, 18K Miles, Stk# 170890A

Loaded #40339A

One Owner Clean Carfax, CVT w/Xtronic #96271A

S #P06484

#P06483

$13,888

$8,388

$16,532

$26,900

$14,590

$17,750

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Mazda MX-5 Miata

1999 Mercedes-Benz E320

2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse

2015 Nissan Altima 2.5

2006 Nissan Maxima

2013 Nissan NV200

Club Convertible, True Red, Low Miles, #11612A

4matic, Wagon, Tan #014611

FWD, 4-Speed Auto with Sportronic 2.4L 4-Cyl, #B8914

Remainder of Factory Warranty, 51K Miles, #40929B

3.5 SE, One Owner, Clean Carfax #P9344A

Compact Cargo Van, FWD, Carfax 1 Owner #B8921

$8,990

$6,490

$12,469

$6,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

1992 Mazda MX-5 Miata

2010 Mercury Gr Marquis

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander

2007 Nissan Altima 2.5

2009 Nissan Maxima

2013 Nissan Pathfinder

Convertible, Red, #303970A

Vibrant White Clear Coat, 101K Miles #39099A

ES, Stk #P06475

One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles #M17409A

SV, Loaded, Only 44K Miles, #400040B

FWD, Auto, Local Trade #M18057A

$6,888

$18,105

$15,888

$3,500

$13,490

$12,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$8,990

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2013 Mercedes-Benz C 250

2009 Mercury Sable

2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

2010 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV

2014 Nissan Murano

2017 Nissan Pathfinder

Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Sunroof #96671A

Sedan, 114K Miles, #39142A

AWD, Silver #060594

Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified #95497B

LE, AWD, Nav, Power Roof #B8835

SL, 24K Miles #P4255

$8,888

$19,990

$4,500

$15,888

$4,995

$27,890

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2011 Mercedes-Benz E 350

2013 Mini Cooper

2014 Nissan Altima 2.5

2011 Nissan Maxima 3.5

2012 Nissan Murano

2014 Nissan Rogue

4matic, Sedan, 106K Miles, #28467A

Auto, Pano Roof, Certified, Heated Seats #B8849

Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Super Black, #11314A

Clean Carfax, GPS, heated & Cooled Front Seats, Bluetooth #96650B

Motor Trend Certified, AWD, Low Miles #11195A

SV, #P06485

$11,888

$10,388

$11,388

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$14,388 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$5,888

$12,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

28

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$15,296


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Nissan Rogue

2008 Pontiac Grand Prix

2008 Saturn Vue

2006 Toyota Camry

1990 Toyota Land Cruiser

2012 Volkswagen CC

One Owner Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Magnetic Black #P6256

New Tires, New Battery, Local Trade #400163B

4-Cyl, XE #11680A

One Owner, Heated Front Seats, Power Sunroof #97204A

4WD Engine: 4.0L 6CYL. Automatic, Mileage: 73,531

Navigation, Sunroof, Automatic #V8948

$15,990

$4,990

$6,888

$8,388

$ 4,000

$10,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

By Owner (314) 649-4495

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2015 Nissan Versa

2008 Pontiac Torrent

2016 Scion FR-S

2010 Toyota Camry

2015 Toyota Prius Four

2016 Volkswagen CC

Note, "SR", 21K Miles Automatic #B8881

Heated Front Seats, Remote Start #V17749A

20K, Black #49272-1

LE, Clean Carfax, One Owner, FWD, Magnetic Gray #96089A

Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified #38233A

Sport, 5K Miles, Auto #V8362

$11,290

$7,490

$18,900

$8,388

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2017 Nissan Versa

2011 Ram 1500

2010 Subaru Forest 2.5X

2007 Toyota Corolla CE

2010 Toyota Prius

2012 Volkswagen CC

Only 1K Miles #24390-1

Outdoorsman Package, 4WD #B8657

Motor Trend Certified, AWD #28216A

One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, 5-Speed Manual #11630A

Hatchback #11594A

Turbocharged, Urano Gray, Motor Trend Certified #27404M

$14,388

$23,990

$10,888

$20,490

$11,388

$4,990

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

1985 Pontiac Fiero GT

2011 Ram 1500

2014 Subaru WRX

2009 Toyota Corolla

2017 Toyota Rav4

2009 Volkswagen CC

Manual, Denon Tape Deck, Cell Phone, #M17439A

SLT, 4WD, Reg Cab, #171088A

STI, Certified, Well Cared For #B8860

S, Silver, Auto #31180A

XLE #P3788

$4,990

Call Today!

$24,490

$6,990

Heated Door Mirrors, Must See! #97033B

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$21,900

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2008 Pontiac G6

2014 Ram 2500

2011 Toyota Camry

2010 Toyota Highlander

2004 Toyota Sienna

2011 Volkswagen Jetta

FWD, Fuel Efficient, NHTSA 5-Star Rating #V17537A

Laramie, Mega Cab, 4WD, 46K #B8815A

LE, Automatic #M8767A

Magnetic Gray Metallic, #P9072A

$6,490

$9,490

2.5L SE Sedan, Black Uni, #27376M

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$14,388

CE, Carfax 1 Owner, Local Trade #C17309D

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Call Today!

29

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

RIDES MAGAZINE

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

$8,388

$9,888

$7,388

$4,490

$6,888

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


2012 Volkswagen Jetta

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2016 Volkswagen Touareg

2013 Volvo S60

2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified #V18123A

1.8T, SEL Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, GPS, #P8913A

Sport, 18K Miles, #V17082A

AWD, Grey, 78K Miles #P42021

$14,875

2017 Volvo S90 T5

2015 VW Jetta 1.8T SE

$39,825

#P42171

1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Turbo, #P8949

$9,490

$14,888

$31,490

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2006 Volkswagen Jetta

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2013 Volkwagen Jetta

2015 Volvo S60 T5

2014 Volvo XC60

2017 VW Tiguan

GLI, Fuel Efficient, Turbocharged, Salsa Red #V18038A

PZEV #P06571

SE, Auto, Alloys, Leather 62K Miles #V8950

AWD, Plat, Cert, 0.9%, Wrnty, #L1336

5K Miles, FWD, Like New, Save, #V8226

$10,990

$21,990

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$20,990

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$23,995

AWD, Loaded, Black, #B8851

$8,490

$12,620

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2001 Volkswagen Passat

2011 Volvo C30

2002 Volvo S60

2011 Volvo XC90

1992 Bobcat 643

SE, 35K, Sunroof, Navigation, Auto #V8935

GLX, V6, Silver #293415

T5, Hatchback, Fuel Efficient, Sunroof, #35255A

2.4T Turbo, Blue, Automatic #200222

92K Miles #19265-1

$4,495

$11,850

28.5 hp, diesel, recently serviced, does have aux hidraulics 3000 hrs.

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

By Owner 314-474-4192

$12,990 Bommarito St. Peters 866-244-9085

$2,800 St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

$9,769 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

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St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

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RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


2011 FORD MUSTANG

2014 FORD MUSTANG

Reduced Price! V6, 43K Miles

Convertible, V6, Clean Carfax, 73K Mi.

*

$11,987

STK# 180287A

STK# P06395A

2010 CHEVY CAMARO 1LT

2010 CHEVY CAMARO 1LT REDUCED PRICE! V6, 88K Miles

Reduced Price! Sunroof, Clean Carfax, 78K Miles

*

$12,480

STK# P06496

STK# 180425A

2016 BUICK UICK ENCORE STK# P06346

$

One Owner, Clean Carfax, V6 52K Miles

*

18,206

STK# P06521

2016 CHRYSLER 300C

*

$18,236

2016 MERCEDESBENZ C300

RWD, New Tires, Remote Start, 48K Mi

Turbocharged, RWD, 18K Miles

$19,000*

STK# P06380

$16,900* 2017 CHEVY IMPALA 1LT

2016 DODGE CHARGER SXT STK# P06499

$13,089

One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, 41K Miles

$16,000* Reduced Price! RWD, 3.6L V6, 55K Miles

*

2016 CHEVY TRAX LTZ

FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, 21K Miles, STK# P06285

$12,000*

STK# 170890A

*

$27,000

*Tax, Title, License Fees F Extra. Photos may not be actual representation.

31

DON BROWN CHEVROLET

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

02-09-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

HWY 44

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32

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The Difference Is In The Detail! We Buy... Walter’s has an outstanding reputation gold, platinum, silver, diamonds estate jewelry, coins & watches.

for high quality jewelry and diamonds, with our knowledgeable staff and our excellent service. Walters Jewelry Inc. • Four Generations • Since 1925 230 North Main St. St. Charles 63301 636-724-0604 or 636-946-7352

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Friday • 02.09.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, East deals NORTH ♠J 5 3 ♥Q 10 8 3 ♦Q 6 4 ♣K 9 3 WEST EAST ♠4 ♠7 6 ♥A 7 6 2 ♥K J 5 4 ♦J 3 2 ♦A K 10 9 7 ♣J 10 8 7 2 ♣Q 6 SOUTH ♠A K Q 10 9 8 2 ♥9 ♦8 5 ♣A 5 4 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♦ 4♠ All pass Opening lead: Two of ♦ East-West were playing “third and fifth” leads, where the lowest card is led from any holding with an odd number of cards — three, five, or seven. This lead is made without regard to the strength of the suit and no honor card is promised. This approach can be helpful when the key to the defense is working out declarer’s distribution. There are other hands, however, where knowing that partner has an honor in the suit when he leads a low card can be more important. Declarer in today’s deal was Barbara Travis, a leading Australian player. She played low

from dummy on the opening diamond lead, losing to East’s king. Travis won the spade shift with her ace and took a moment to think about the hand. The contract has little apparent play, seeming to have four inescapable losers. Declarer can scramble just enough entries to make the hand if East started with exactly three hearts to the ace, king, jack, but that was an unlikely lie of the cards. Travis decided to try for a swindle, taking advantage of the fact that her hand was hidden from the defenders. She crossed to dummy with the jack of spades, drawing the last trump, and led a low diamond away from dummy’s queen. East, not knowing who held the jack, rose with the ace and Travis had pulled it off. She was able to discard her club loser on the queen of diamonds to make her contract. (02/09/18)

Across 1 Professional wrestling program since 1999 10 Orion : Hunter :: Cetus : ___ 15 Southwestern casserole with a cornbread crust 16 Comfortable 17 Part of Wagner’s “Ring” cycle, with “The” 18 The “she” in the line “To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman” 19 “All ___ is autobiographical”: Fellini 20 Rank below marquis 21 “What a shame”

22 “That hurts!” 24 One up? 26 “Tommyrot!” 28 Little sandwiches for dessert 29 Coppertone no. 32 Activity next to a bar 35 Fund 37 Just for the fun of it 39 Popular beer pong container 40 Cry at the end of a family trip 42 Game you never want to get your fill of? 43 Milk source 44 Ricochet 46 “Get it?” 47 Email button that moves a message to one’s inbox 49 “On the double!”

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME February 9 WORD — EULOGIZED (EULOGIZED: YOO-lih-jized: Praised highly in speech or writing.) Average mark 26 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 33 or more words in EULOGIZED? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — PROPOSED sped redo pepo spoor rode peso spore rodeo poor epos rood pope doer rope pore does rose pose door odor poser dope oops prep dose oppose prod drop sopped prop droop sore prose RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

52 Villain 55 Fat, to François 57 Radio station call letters that ask a question? 58 ___ State (Rhode Island nickname) 59 Hunt for treasure, in a way 61 Revolution 62 Chocolate source 63 Old newspaper photo sections, informally 64 Crustacean in Creole cuisine

Down 1 Drift 2 1980s skiing champ Phil 3 Question of responsibility 4 Heinie 5 Bauhaus figure 6 “Dancers at the Bar” painter 7 City north of Lisbon 8 Captain in “Apocalypse Now” 9 Homer’s neighbor 10 Traditional January events 11 Play (around) 12 Actor Leon of “The Postman Always Rings Twice”

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

If Feb. 9 is your birthday • This year you express your caring attitude more completely. Others respond to your greater sensitivity, and they like what they experience. If you are single, you might decide to change your status, as you could meet someone very special. If you are attached, your outgoing nature draws in quite a few friends. Sagittarius gets frustrated easily. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Reach out to a friend who often challenges you. You want this person’s support and feedback. It will make a big diference when you attempt to sleuth through a problem. Tonight: Think “weekend.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Tap into your sixth sense before responding to others. You know what is best for you, and you’ll want to move past an immediate issue. Tonight: A close associate comes forward. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Allow more openness when dealing with a complicated person in your life. A boss has a lot to share that might not make sense to you right now. Tonight: Be with friends. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You could be unusually emotional right now, especially as you have so much ground to cover. Be willing to stop and have a long-overdue conversation about a personal or professional matter. Know that you will be happy with the outcome. Tonight: Know when to call it a night! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Allow more spontaneity into your day. You tend to demand a lot from yourself, so perhaps you need to lighten up the moment. Allow a loved one to be more expressive than in the past. Understand that the change, though pleasant, could be awkward as well. Tonight: All smiles.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Ned White

13 “Girls” creator/ star Dunham 14 Sized up 21 Defensive retort 23 When repeated, a Northwest city 25 Modernists, briefly 27 Attendance inventories 29 Staple feature of Groucho Marx’s “You Bet Your Life”

30 Spittoon sound 31 Dandies 32 Heavyweight champ Riddick 33 Over 34 Accord 36 Completely, in modern slang 38 White wine cocktails 41 Popular BBC car series 45 Hand-held percussion instrument 47 Mystery writer

Marsh 48 Colorful talker 50 “Arabian Nights” prince 51 Actor Maguire 52 Yahoo 53 Prefix with phobia 54 Economic concern 56 No longer barefoot 59 Include discreetly, in a way 60 ‘L’ overseer

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0105

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★★ Be more in touch with your feelings about a domestic or personal matter. You generally become uncomfortable when becoming more expressive. Tonight: Invite a friend over. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★ Clarify in your mind what is important to share. You might doubt that the receivers of your message could also have diiculty dealing with the feelings you arouse in them. Tonight: Paint the town red. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ You could feel overly tired and withdrawn. You have a lot of ground to cover. You might decide to take some shortcuts, which could have inancial implications. Tonight: Make it your treat.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You might be in the mood to spread some good news. For the most part, you’ll achieve a lot of what you want. Your emotional feelings come forward. Tonight: Touch base with a close loved one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★ Examine your feelings before taking a stand. You might not be in touch with what is happening within yourself. You might want to hold of before sharing how much prejudice and negativity you are witnessing. Tonight: Visit with a friend. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ Examine what is going on around you. You could be unusually picky or demanding when it comes to pursuing a long-term goal or desire. Friends and loved ones could play a signiicant role in your day. Tonight: Choose a favorite stressbuster.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Your feelings might be closer to the surface than you realize. You suddenly might ind yourself having to answer some touchy questions. Know that you can say “no” and walk away. You could be withdrawn. Tonight: Leader of the gang. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.09.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Clash over girl’s living arrangements

Dear Heartbroken • It would have been helpful if you had mentioned why your daughter is an-

gry with you and is preventing your grandchild from contacting you and vice versa. If she’s in such bad shape that it is negatively affecting your granddaughter, your questions should be addressed to a lawyer. If your granddaughter is in her teens, she might be considered mature enough to ask to live with a relative other than her mother. If not, and her mother’s hostility is affecting her schoolwork, a trusted teacher or counselor might be able to see she gets the emotional support she needs. Dear Abby • My husband is very outgoing. He loves chatting on the phone for hours and talks with all the neighbors up and down the street. He’s retired, so it’s fine — up to a point. We have a set time for dinner, which is 6:30, and he knows it. Invariably he’ll be on the phone or up the street when it’s close to dinner. I always remind him 10 to 15 minutes ahead, which gives him time to be here to eat, but he’ll keep chatting until he’s any-

where from 15 minutes to half an hour late to dinner. I put time and efort into preparing my meals. I grow my own vegetables and think of creative things to fix. He always comments how great the meals are, so it’s not that he doesn’t like my food. If it’s not eaten promptly, it’s overcooked/mushy/wilted, etc., so I go ahead and eat if he’s not here. I’d like him to be with me when I sit down at the table. I feel it’s incredibly rude for him to be late. When I tell him that, he laughs like it’s a big joke. — FED UP IN NAPA, CALIF. Dear Fed Up • I can’t force your husband to the dinner table, and neither can you. To toss his dinner into the garbage would be too overtly hostile and a waste of food. Try this: Tell him dinner time is 6:30, but prepare the food as if it’s for 6:45 or 7. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Sleeve is longer. 2. Duster is longer. 3. Leg is moved. 4. Doorway is missing. 5, Nose is larger. 6. Pillow is added.

Dear Abby • How old does a child have to be before she is able to choose a relative to live with? I’m the one my granddaughter wants to stay with. Her home life is in turmoil because of her parents’ nasty divorce. Ever since her mother (my daughter) found out my granddaughter wants to live with me, she has forbidden her to talk to me, and me to contact her. Her mother is depressed and angry but won’t seek counseling. She doesn’t talk to me unless it’s to say ugly things. My granddaughter said her mother never smiles anymore. We are very close and this hurts my heart. She’s a good girl and should be able to be happy. We live several hours away and are more than willing to have her. She already has a room here, and our home is never happier than when she’s visiting.— HEARTBROKEN IN OKLAHOMA

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Unexpected guests must still be fed

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • I am planning a celebration of my late husband’s life, and being good to myself by having it catered. Nothing fancy, but I am worrying about how much food and drink to order. In light of the current habit of disregarding a request for a response, could I include on the invitation something like, “If you attend without an RSVP, kindly do not eat or drink anything”? I am sorely tempted. Gentle Reader • People are sorely tempted to do many things, but civilization is hinged on thwarting those baser desires. Meanwhile, Miss Manners is left wondering how you would even go about policing those guests who show up unannounced. A rap on the hand as they reach for a shrimp? Unfortunately, the only proper thing to do with these brazen

guests is to express surprise at their appearance. Courting insult in the form of threats is a rude and fruitless activity. However, if you find yourself running low on refreshments and those same guests have the gall to complain, you may say, “Oh dear, I’m afraid that I only planned for those who told me they were attending.”

directly to them anyway on the day in question. The sole exception is when they are being used as a gift wrapper themselves, such as with cash or a gift certificate. As for the latter, I consider it suitable when the element of surprise and anticipation is important, but again, I think it wasteful to wrap gifts when shipping them to the receiver’s address.

Dear Miss Manners • When is it necessary to give a card, and to wrap a gift? For the former, I’ve always felt that it’s appropriate when sending greetings through the mail, but not face-to-face. I’ve consistently told family to please not give me cards in person, yet they continue to do so anyway. I find them a waste of paper (and money, as some of the fancy ones are very expensive) when you’re just going to say “Happy birthday” or “Merry Christmas”

Gentle Reader • The purpose of a present is to show gratitude or appreciation. Efforts to make the act of giving as eicient — in other words, efortless — as possible therefore invalidate the reason for giving the present in the first place. By contrast, wrapping and accompanying notes emphasize those reasons. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

2/9/18

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

FOX Who Shot Biggie & Tupac? The murders of the 2 hip-hop legends. (cc) CBS 4

Big Brother: Celebrity Edition (N) (cc)

9:00

Blue Bloods Frank is forced to honor a conspirator.

NBC 2018 Winter Olympics: Opening Ceremony. Mike Tirico and Katie Couric 5 host coverage of the Opening Ceremony from PyeongChang Olympic Stadium. (N) (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

Hashtag MeToo, Now

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Be My Valentine; A 30 Charlie Brown Valentine

Father Brown Father Brown discovers a secret. (cc)

Midsomer Murders The owner of Midsomer Life magazine.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: Trent?! (N) (cc)

Jane The Virgin Jane and Rafael try to be friends. (N)

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Mama’s Hogan’s Hogan’s Family (cc) Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

Child Support Two 20/20 (9:01) (cc) Californians vie for the prize. (N) (cc)

MYTV CSI: Crime Scene Inves- CSI: Crime Scene In46 tigation: A Space Odd- vestigation Catherine ity. (cc) re-examines a case.

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation An unexplained illness.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.09.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Erratic heart rate may be atrial ibrillation FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • A couple weeks ago, I had a sudden fast heartbeat with a very irregular and erratic pulse (approximately 150-161) for about six hours, along with a very low blood pressure, ranging from 74/59 to 79/52. I first felt a strange thumping in my neck area. I am treated for high blood pressure with amlodipine, losartan and HCTZ. My BP usually is in the normal range, and I have never had an episode like this. I called my doctor’s oice a day later, and he ordered a Holter monitor (I will have it tomorrow). I was feeling some anxiety before this happened, but this has been an entirely new event for me. My other medications include thyroxine. I am 90 years old, in good health, mild arthritis, alert and oriented. What could possibly cause such an episode? — E.P.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • A sudden, fast heart rate without exertion can be caused by anxiety or fright; however, that doesn’t sound like what happened to you. Your report sounds very much as though you had an episode of atrial fibrillation. The atria are the top chambers of the heart, which fill with blood passively from the veins of the body (on the right side) or the lungs (on the left), and contract to fill the ventricles. The right atrium also normally provides the electrical stimulation for the heart. In atrial fibrillation, instead of, say, 60 beats a minute, the atria may put out a thousand impulses a minute. The heart cannot possibly respond to all those impulses (there is a safeguard built into the electrical system), so the heart rate becomes highly irregular and variable. The rate may be normal, but more frequently it is too fast. One of the goals in atrial fibrillation is to control the heart rate, to protect the heart from going too fast. A rate of 160 in a 90-yearold is not safe, and the fact that your blood pressure went down is concerning: I would have considered admitting you to the hospital in this situation, and certainly would have recommended that you be seen and get an EKG at the time. People with atrial fibrillation also are at risk for blood clots forming in the heart, and these can travel to the brain, causing a stroke. The other major goal of treating atrial fibrillation is to reduce stroke risk. This requires anticoagulation. There are other possible causes for fast heart rates, but the erratic nature makes me think atrial fibrillation is the diagnosis. Please let me know the results of your heart monitor.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible.Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

2.9.18  
2.9.18  

2.9.18 St. Louis Post-Dispatch