Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 02.01.2019 • $2.00

DEVELOPMENTS IN INVESTIGATION OF OFFICER’S DEATH

DRINKING ALLEGATIONS OFFICERS ‘CONSUMED ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WHILE ON-DUTY’

CHIEF VS. PROSECUTOR HAYDEN CALLS GARDNER’S ACCUSATIONS ‘OFFENSIVE’

Republicans spur rebuke of Trump’s plans to pull out troops BY KAROUN DEMIRJIAN Washington Post

WASHINGTON • The vast majority of

Senate Republicans backed Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday in a rebuke of President Donald Trump’s rationale for withdrawing U.S. troops from Syria and Afghanistan, voting to declare that Islamic State’s presence and activity in both countries continue to pose a serious threat to the United States. The measure, presented as an amendment to a greater Middle East policy bill, is a striking reprimand of the president from a GOP that has become increasingly comfortable expressing its opposition to Trump’s foreign policy through votes on the Senate floor. See REBUKE • Page A5

Fewer Missouri students pass new state tests BY DAVID HUNN AND JANELLE O’DEA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police Officer Nathaniel Hendren leaves the Justice Center in St. Louis on Thursday after making bail. Hendren was charged with involuntary manslaughter and armed criminal action in the fatal shooting of Officer Katlyn Alix on Jan. 24.

SEQUENCE OF EVENTS ON THE NIGHT OF SHOOTING Forest Park

Arsenal Str eet

1

e Hampto n Avenu

St. wa e p

C

1:07 a.m., Jan. 24: Alix is pronounced dead at the hospital.

44

ST. LOUIS • One week after the death of a

police officer during a Russian roulette-like shooting, Police Chief John Hayden dodged questions about allegations of on-duty drinking, offered a fiery defense of the police investigation into the death and pledged new procedures to monitor the whereabouts of police officers on duty. Nathaniel Hendren, 29, the officer charged in the death of Officer Katlyn Alix, 24, was released from jail about noon Thursday after relatives made his bail. Hendren, who was on duty but in his apartment when the shooting occurred, is charged with involuntary manslaughter and armed criminal action. It was a day of rapid developments: • Hayden, in his first public statements since shortly after the shooting, slammed Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner over her accusations that investigators had obstructed efforts to get blood tests of Hendren and his partner, Patrick Riordan, as “unwarranted, certainly untimely, and absolutely irresponsible.” • Police records obtained by the Post-Dispatch showed an allegation of drinking on duty was filed against Hendren and Riordan less than 30 minutes after Alix was pronounced dead. • The judge at Hendren’s court hearing

100

hip

3

See STUDENTS • Page A5

ulevard

BY CHRISTINE BYERS AND ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ter Ave. Manches

40

Tower Grove Park

10:50 p.m. Jan. 23: Officers Nathaniel Hendren and Patrick Riordan report for roll call at the St. Louis police Hendren department south patrol substation at 3157 Sublette Avenue.

Grand Bo

Gardner

A SS I G N E D PAT R O L A R E A

Kingshigh way

Hayden

McCauslan d Ave.

64

55

ois av r G

2

C ar ond

ele

tP ark

New name for WU engineering school

• B1

McKee marketing retail space near NGA HQ • B1 Blues are switching to 101.1 FM • C1

Leaders from business groups Civic Progress, the Regional Business Council and the St. Louis Regional Chamber have formed a new private-sector economic development effort to attract and retain businesses, jobs and talent. The newly formed St. Louis Regional Economic Development Alliance, a subsidiary of the Chamber, will have its own CEO and board, the Chamber announced Thursday. Suzanne Sitherwood, president and CEO of Spire, will serve as board chair for the Alliance. Steve Johnson is being hired as CEO, with a start date expected in March. Since 2015, Johnson has worked as See ALLIANCE • Page A4

See HAYDEN • Page A4

Paper sues over medical marijuana records • A4

Leaders of three business groups form new alliance BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

30

At some point, they go to Hendren’s residence in the 700 block of Dover Place. Off-duty officer Katlyn Alix stops by. She is shot in the chest. Just before 1 a.m., Jan. 24: A neighbor says she heard a gunshot and yelling. Alix 12:56 a.m.: Hendren and Riordan call dispatcher on police radios as they take Alix to St. Louis University Hospital.

e. Av

Students across Missouri and St. Louis struggled on state academic performance exams last year, thanks in part to a new and more difficult test, according to education officials and data set to be released Friday. The percentage of students passing English exams statewide dropped more than 10 points, to 49 percent from 61 in 2017, according to the state data. Math fell five percentage points, to 42 percent from 47. It’s the fourth new test in five years for Missouri students, and the constant flux has drawn the ire of school superintendents and educators.

The hammer falls

TODAY

How to avoid the Super Bowl GO! MAGAZINE

Mizzou ‘shocked and dismayed’ by NCAA sanctions

46°/36° CLOUDY AND MILDER

TOMORROW

56°/45° MOSTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER C10

SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 141, No. 32 ©2019

Bommarito INFINITI .com

EN7 P O 4/ 2


M 1 FRIDAY • 02.01.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM LOVE PRIZES?

MEET LUCKY AND TINA

Enter for the chance to take home a great gift for your valentine (or even yourself ) in our Lots of Love giveaway. stltoday.com/contests

Tina and Lucky are two-year-old guinea pigs looking for a forever home. Are you the human they’ve been searching for? stltoday.com/pets

UPCOMING CHATS Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 7–10 a.m. on holidays. service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number.......................... 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon............. 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand ........314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig..... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ..............314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.... 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan ........ 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley............ 314-340-8301

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips PRICING The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 01/13/19, 01/27/19, 02/17/19, 02/24/19, 03/10/19, 03/17/19, 03/31/19, 04/14/19, 04/21/19, 05/19/19, 05/26/19, 06/16/19, 06/23/19, 07/14/19, 07/21/19, 08/18/19, 08/25/19, 09/01/19, 09/08/19, 09/15/19, 09/22/19, 10/20/19, 11/03/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/15/19, 12/22/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. Contact at 1-314-340-8888 for additional information.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS All subscription offers available at STLtoday.com, including those advertised through our email promotions, on-site messaging, social media and any external means of promotion, are valid for new subscribers only. You must not have been a subscriber in the past thirty (30) days to register for a new subscription offer.

AUTO-RENEWAL, CANCELLATION, AND REFUND POLICY EZ Pay is a convenient electronic payment method that automatically renews your Digital Only or Full Access news subscription service (your “Subscription”). If you register for EZ Pay or debit banking (ACH) payments, your Subscription will continue for the length of the term you select on your plan. On the last day of your current term (your “Renewal Date”), your plan will automatically renew for the same term unless you choose to cancel more than twenty-one (21) days before your Renewal Date (your “Cancellation Date”). If you do not affirmatively cancel your Subscription before your Cancellation Date, YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR AN ADDITIONAL TERM for the plan you initially selected at the rates in effect at the time of renewal. You may cancel your subscription at any time by calling 1-314-340-8888. If you have provided us with a valid credit card number or an alternate payment method saved in your account and you have not cancelled by your Cancellation Date, your subscription will be automatically processed up to fourteen (14) days in advance of your Renewal Date and the payment method you provided to us at or after the time of your initial Subscription purchase will be charged. We reserve the right to change your Subscription rate at any time. If you are not satisfied with your Subscription rate or service, you may cancel your Subscription at any time, and receive a refund for any amounts you have prepaid beyond the date you cancel your Subscription.

FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home I havdelivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 01/13/19, 01/27/19, 02/17/19, 02/24/19, 03/10/19, 03/17/19, 03/31/19, 04/14/19, 04/21/19, 05/19/19, 05/26/19, 06/16/19, 06/23/19, 07/14/19, 07/21/19, 08/18/19, 08/25/19, 09/01/19, 09/08/19, 09/15/19, 09/22/19, 10/20/19, 11/03/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/15/19, 12/22/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 02-12-16-29-54 Powerball: 06 Power play: 2 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $191 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $125 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 04-06-10-29-45 Lucky ball: 10

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 08-21-23-27-41-42 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.2 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 05-08-12-15-26 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $165,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 217 Evening: 155 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 4969 Evening: 3418

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 04-20-24-26-41 Evening: 06-07-09-14-33 LOTTO Thursday: 01-11-12-22-27-40 Extra shot: 11 Estimated jackpot: $8.5 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 974 FB: 8 Evening: 846 FB: 6 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 9248 FB: 2 Evening: 8967 FB: 8

They were kids playing with guns — St. Louis tragedies TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

They were just kids, playing with guns on the city’s South Side. One was 5. He walked around inside his parents’ house west of Benton Park in search of candy. He found a gun. He shot his brother. Jermon Perry was 7. He died. The boys’ father had a permit for the gun. The weapon was in a holster in a dresser drawer. They were just kids, playing with guns on the city’s North Side. One was 4. He lived in the O’Fallon neighborhood. He shot himself in the face and hand. Police officers happened to be nearby and got the boy to a hospital quickly. The other boy was 2. He found a .38-caliber handgun in the family house near Bellefontaine Cemetery. The gun discharged, and a bullet struck the boy’s father, who was asleep in his bed. Darrion Noble was 27. He died. They were just kids playing with guns. In America, kids, or the people around them, die every single day, because of our nation’s unhealthy obsession with guns. Black and white. Young and old. Some leave their guns on tables, loaded. Others think they can handle them but can’t. They were just kids, playing with guns, in Jefferson County. Two 17-year-olds found a gun in a city park in Festus. They went back to one of their houses and took turns pointing it. Zackary Depung was shot in the upper back, near the neck. He died. In 2017, the year of all of these incidents, Missouri had the second-most unintentional shootings of children in the nation, according to Everytown For Gun Safety, a nonprofit organization that advocates for reasonable gun safety laws. Nationally, there were 132 children killed in unintentional gun incidents in 2017, according to Children’s Firearm Safety Alliance, another organization that tracks such entirely preventable occurrences. In 2018, 87 children were killed in such accidents.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

The casket of St. Louis police Officer Katlyn Alix is carried out of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis after her funeral on Wednesday.

So far in this brand new year, eight children have died at the hands of another child handling a gun. They were just kids, playing with guns on the city’s South Side. They lived just north of Carondelet Park, four young men, “playing with their newly acquired guns,” they told police. One gun discharged. Spencer Weber was shot in the head. He died. That was two years ago. They were just kids, playing with guns, on the city’s South Side. It was less than a week ago, this time farther east in the Carondelet neighborhood. One of them had a new revolver. He pointed it away and pulled the trigger. Click. She pointed it at him. Click. He pointed one more time, at her. The bullet struck Katlyn Alix in the chest. The 24-year-old member of the St. Louis Police Department died. Her fellow police officer, Nathaniel Hendren, 29, has been charged in her death. They were just kids, playing with guns. Alix was a little younger than my daughter was when she graduated from the police academy. They even look a lit-

Fenton mayor’s late-night hit-and-run to be discussed by Board of Aldermen BY LEAH THORSEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FENTON • An allegation that Mayor Joshua Voyles initially misled police about his involvement in a hit-and-run accident is set to be discussed at a Board of Aldermen meeting next week. Alderman Bob Brasses, who is challenging Voyles in the April 2 mayoral election, said Thursday he requested the matter be placed on the agenda of the board’s meeting Thursday. Voyles Voyles, 37, was questioned by St. Louis County police early Dec. 16 after a man called to report that someone had driven off after hitting the rear driver’s side of his Dodge Ram pickup about 1:15 a.m. as it sat in his driveway in the 1200 block of Valiant Drive. The man followed a tan pickup he saw driving away — it left a trail of leaking fluid in its wake — to Voyles’ house around the corner in the 300 block of Fury Drive, according to a police report. The tan truck was parked in Voyles’ driveway and leaking oil, with damage to its passenger side wheel well, front bumper and headlight. Voyles answered the door when a police officer knocked about 1:40 a.m. and told the officer he didn’t know his truck had been damaged, the report said. He also said he’d been drinking earlier with friends at the Hotshots bar on South Highway Drive in Fenton, and that a friend had driven him home and another friend named Jack had driven his truck back to his house. But when the officer asked for Jack’s last name, phone number or address, Voyles allegedly responded, “I really don’t know more than his first name.” The officer wrote that Voyles smelled of alcohol and that his speech was

slurred and “disorganized,” which made it difficult to get an accurate or detailed statement. Because Voyles was inside his house, and not behind the wheel, the officer didn’t test his blood-alcohol level. Police later reviewed surveillance footage from Hotshots, but found “nothing of value,” the report says. Police also checked with neighbors to see if any had security videos from that night, also without success. A few days later, when interviewed again by police, Voyles said some “dude” who he thought was a friend brought his truck home. He eventually confessed to the hit-and-run, telling officers that “he was scared and nothing like this has happened to him before,” according to the report. He said he ran into the rear of the Dodge Ram and panicked, and that he “felt horrible and was sorry for what had happened” and wanted to make everything right. Officers told him to contact his insurance company. The owner of the Ram said that if his truck was fixed, he would not seek prosecution against Voyles for leaving the scene of the crash. Police closed the case after confirming with Voyles’ insurance company on Jan. 17 that the Ram was undergoing about $5,100 in repairs. Voyles on Thursday described the accident as “a personal matter” and said he’ll be at the board meeting next week. “I admit I made a mistake,” he said. “I owned up to it and apologized, and have been doing everything I can to make it right.” Brasses said Fenton residents have been asking questions about what happened. “We need to investigate and see whether we should take action,” he said. No vote will be taken at the meeting, Brasses said. The matter is set to be discussed under the miscellaneous portion of the agenda.

tle alike. My daughter is a sergeant now, who supervises young police officers, and surely would not approve of such behavior. “What were they thinking?” she texted me. Perhaps they weren’t thinking at all. This week, two other city police officers were charged with crimes related to an incident at a South Side bar where they allegedly got into a fight with another patron. He had a gun. They had guns. The patron ended up shot. So did a cop. Both survived. Bar fights happen. But when guns are involved, people get hurt, or die. That’s what happened to Scott Beary about this time last year, at a bar in Florissant. Two guys got in an argument about a dog. A man pulled a gun. A 43-year-old father ended up dead. And three kids will be raised without their dad. Men in a bar acting like children. Kids at home playing with grown-up toys. Cops playing hooky. They were just kids, playing with guns. And now they’re dead. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE ‘Homeland’ return is delayed “Homeland” fans will have to wait longer than expected for the start of the last season. Showtime said that the drama’s planned return in June has been pushed back to fall. The complexity of production is the reason for the delay of season eight, Showtime entertainment president Gary Levine said Wednesday. Claire Danes stars in “Homeland,” which has taken her bipolar, former CIA agent Carrie through conflicts that sometimes mirrored real-world events. Last year, Carrie struggled to uncover an international conspiracy trying to harm America’s democratic institutions and was reunited with her mentor, played by Mandy Patinkin. Howard honored as Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year • Bryce Dallas Howard was paraded through Harvard Square by extravagantly costumed college students. The “Jurassic World” star was honored Thursday as Woman of the Year by Harvard University’s Hasty Pudding Theatricals. The nation’s oldest collegiate theatrical organization planned to roast the 37-yearold actor, producer and director and bestow their coveted pudding pot. Howard also was scheduled to catch a preview of the troupe’s newest production, which is its first with women in the cast. Hasty Pudding picked Howard because she’s an accomplished actress “committed to expanding the role of women” in storytelling.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor-comedian Garrett Morris is 82. Bluegrass singer Del McCoury is 80. Actor-director Terry Jones is 77. Actress Sherilyn Fenn is 54. Singer Lisa Marie Presley is 51. Rapper Big Boi is 44. Musician Jason Isbell is 40. TV personality Lauren Conrad is 33. Singer Harry Styles is 25. From news services


LOCAL

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Dated report misleads Better Together, chiefs say Area police officials cite lessons learned after Ferguson

ment this week that they do not care for the idea. They said it would “almost certainly” result in another crisis like the unrest in Ferguson. A statement from the St. Louis Area Police Chiefs Association noted Better Together’s proposal was based on a report published in April 2015 by the Police Executive Research Forum, a national membership organization of police executives primarily from the largest city, county and state law enforcement agencies in the United States. PERF said it had “never be-

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-dispatch

A cornerstone of the Better Together proposal to merge St. Louis and St. Louis County is that the new metro city would consolidate all police departments into one. The police chiefs of more than 70 police departments in the St. Louis area said in a joint state-

fore encountered” the degree of fragmentation it found in greater St. Louis, a problem which caused “uneven delivery of police services to area residents.” But the police chiefs said things are different today. Since the PERF report, the statement said, “law enforcement in St. Louis learned some valuable lessons.” “The most important lesson was that there needed to be community policing with a true connection to the people in the community,” the chiefs’ statement said. “That can only be

established with a continuity of contact and service that allows better understanding for and from everyone involved.” The chiefs said their organization was “reborn from the lessons of Ferguson.” Five years ago, about a quarter of their agencies were accredited or in the process of seeking accreditation. Now it’s 90 percent. They said Better Together ignored their efforts to learn and improve, and that abolishing municipal departments would “return to a policing structure disconnected from the very communities it alleges it wishes

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

to help.” There are 55 police departments in the city and county, the two largest by far being the St. Louis police and the St. Louis County police. Ed Rhode, a Better Together spokesman, said in response that consolidating the police “will provide police officers the ability to communicate with each other about crime and share information which will provide a safer environment for the police and citizens alike.” Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com

Post-Dispatch wins top award from AP editors in Missouri ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

KANSAS CITY • The Post-Dispatch won the top award among the largest newspapers in Missouri in the 2018 Missouri Associated Press Media Editors newspaper contest. Winners were announced Thursday. Nineteen newspapers submitted 413 entries in the contest, which featured news and sports stories and photos from 2018. A list of winners can be found at http://discover.ap.org/contests/Missouri-newspaper. The Associated Press is a nonprofit news cooperative representing 1,400 newspapers and 5,000 broadcast stations in the United States. The Post-Dispatch won the general excellence award among newspapers with more than 1 million weekly readers. STLtoday.com, the newspaper’s website, won best website. Post-Dispatch journalists also won awards for feature writing, opinion writing, headlines, investigative reporting, spot news reporting, spot news photography, feature photography, graphics, photo story and sports photography.

“i wanted to help kids with cancer. i look like an egg,” said William Speerbrecker, 7, of Clayton, who shaved his head as did his father, Nathan, during a St. Baldrick’s Foundation Head-Shaving event Thursday inside Koburg dining Hall at Concordia Seminary to raise money for children’s cancer research. This event honored Brett Haubrich, a St. Louis boy who was diagnosed with anaplastic astrocytoma, a type of brain tumor, in June 2014. Brett died in 2018.

FEBRUARY is National Replacement Window Month at Renewal by Andersen

Call before February 28th!

Get

0 0 0%

$

Get

$350 OFF every window

$700 OFF every patio door

1

Down

with

Payments

1

plus

Interest

Save an extra 3% on your entire order1

for 1 year1

Why did we declare February National Replacement Window Month? Because you’ve just about had it with your drafty rooms that are almost too cold to use! Get this project done and get relief with this special February-only offer!

Why Renewal by Andersen? • Renewal by Andersen is the full-service replacement window division of Andersen, a 116-year-old family-owned company with a reputation for excellence in window and patio door craftsmanship.

• Our exclusive • Our factory-trained composite Fibrex® Certified Master windows are not Installers have years of only beautiful, they’re experience installing remarkably strong, only windows and patio offer superior energy doors, and they’ll treat efficiency and require you and your home with minimal maintenance.† the utmost respect. Available Exterior Colors**

SANDSTONE

CANVAS

®

TERRATONE

WHITE

COCOA BEAN

DARK BRONZE

BLACK

FOREST GREEN

RED ROCK

Call to schedule your FREE Window and Patio Door Diagnosis

314-754-8447 636-373-7360 618-690-4005

1 Offer not available in all areas. Discount applied by retailer representative at time of contract execution and applies to purchase of 3 or more windows and/or patio doors. Cannot be combined with other offers. To qualify for discount offer, initial contact for a free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis must be made and documented on or before 2/28/19 with the appointment then occurring no more than 10 days after the initial contact. No payments and deferred interest for 12 months available to well qualified buyers on approved credit only. Not all customers may qualify. Higher rates apply for customer with lower credit ratings. Financing not valid with other offers or prior purchases. No Finance Charges will be assessed if promo balance is paid in full in 12 months. Renewal by Andersen retailers are independently owned and operated retailers, and are neither brokers nor lenders. Any finance terms advertised are estimates only, and all financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Renewal by Andersen retailers, under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements. Renewal by Andersen retailers do not assist with, counsel or negotiate financing, other than providing customers an introduction to lenders interested in financing. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are marks of Andersen Corporation. ©2019 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2019 Lead Surge LLC. All rights reserved. *Using U.S. and imported parts. **Not all exterior colors are available as interior colors. Ask your Design Consultant for details. †See limited warranty for details.


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

Paper sues over medical marijuana records BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Post-Dispatch on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against the state Department of Health and Senior Services after the department repeatedly declined to release records that would reveal who is seeking to sell medical marijuana in Missouri. Post-Dispatch attorney Joseph Martineau of Lewis Rice filed the lawsuit in Cole County Circuit Court and asked Circuit Judge Daniel R. Green to order the state to release the records. Voters approved Amendment 2 in November, making Missouri the 33rd state to legalize marijuana for medicinal use. The Department of Health and Senior Services is overseeing the program. Sales are supposed to start early next year. On Jan. 7, the DHSS started accepting nonrefundable application fees from businesses. The Post-Dispatch requested copies of documents that companies submit-

ted with their application fees. The department has refused to release any information, except the amount of revenue generated from the fees, and the number of forms the department has received, saying the constitutional amendment forbids release of the records. The amendment says, in part, that the department “shall maintain the confidentiality of reports or other information obtained from an applicant or licensee containing any individualized data, information, or records related to the licensee or its operation … .” In the lawsuit, Martineau argued the DHSS was relying on an “overly-restrictive interpretation” of that provision to justify concealing names of businesses and identifying information. “(T)he provision does not say that the Department ‘shall maintain the confidentiality of the applicant or licensee’ as well as the reports or other information obtained from the applicant or licensee,” Martineau wrote.

“Laws intended to maintain the confidentiality of an individual’s identity include explicit, clear and unambiguous language to that effect,” Martineau wrote, citing provisions related to child sex abuse and domestic violence records as examples. Amendment 2 “says nothing about maintaining the confidentiality of the identity or identification of individuals or companies applying for licenses,” he said. The campaign manager for the group that backed Amendment 2 told the PostDispatch last month the wording of the amendment was not intended to close off access to applicants’ identifying information. “The language was included in Amendment 2 to keep the medical information of patients confidential, as well as sensitive information from applicants, such as security plans and financials, private,” John Payne, campaign manager for New Approach Missouri, said in a statement. But, he said, “We wouldn’t necessarily expect all of the application to be closed.

Allegations of on-duty drinking prompt new police procedures

DRINKING ALLEGATIONS Police Lt. William Brown alleged in a report obtained by the Post-Dispatch that Hendren “recklessly discharged a firearm resulting in the death of another officer” and that Hendren and Riordan “consumed alcoholic beverages while on-duty.” James Towey, Riordan’s attorney, said that Riordan “blew all zeroes” when he was given a breath test after the shooting. Riordan told investigators that he had taken “a few sips of a beer” while at Hendren’s house, Towey said. “He poured the rest out in a kitchen sink, leaving the can by the sink, and that should be confirmed by crime scene photos,” Towey said, declining to answer any further questions.

Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

mind and wait to see all of the facts when they come out. Then we can make decisions about what we believe happened in that room that day.” Hendren, who has been suspended without pay from the police department, left the St. Louis Justice Center shortly after noon. He still had a black eye, an injury sources say he sustained after “headbutting” the back windshield of a police SUV outside the hospital on the night of the shooting.

HAYDEN • FROM A1

characterized the shooting as an intentional act, noting that each step alleged — unholstering the gun, unloading and reloading it and pointing it at someone — were all intentional acts. Hendren and Riordan went to Hendren’s apartment in the 700 block of Dover Place after attending roll call at the south patrol station, a source told the Post-Dispatch. Alix, who was off duty, stopped by. According to the probable cause statement, Hendren took all the bullets out of a revolver, then put one back in. He pointed the gun away and pulled the trigger. The gun didn’t fire. Alix then pointed the gun at him and pulled the trigger. Hendren then took the gun again and pulled the trigger. This time, Alix was shot in the chest, records say. Hayden said at the press conference that he was unable to answer many questions because the case was still under investigation. He announced that commanders would be at every roll call to remind officers to stay on their beats while on duty, and he said supervisors would begin checking officers’ whereabouts hourly using GPS and radios. He defended the department, which has seen about a dozen police officers charged with crimes or plead guilty to charges in the past 16 months. He noted that none of the incidents was connected, but conceded that he was “concerned about the culture of the department.” “I think what is clear is that, under this administration, we’re going to make sure officers are held accountable for misdeeds.”

For instance, we don’t see any reason the name of the applicants wouldn’t be public.” Post-Dispatch Editor Gilbert Bailon said the newspaper is advocating for transparency. “The State of Missouri already has collected more than $2 million in fees from pre-applications of people and companies that seek to be licensed to sell medical marijuana in the state. The public has a right to know who seeks to engage in the medical marijuana business and who has paid the state pre-application fees.” The cultivation facility application fee is $10,000. The application fee for both dispensaries and marijuana-infused product manufacturing facilities is $6,000. The amendment designates fees collected as well as a 4 percent sales tax on medical marijuana to the administration of the fledgling program as well as a new veterans’ health care fund.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden leaves a press conference Thursday on the fatal shooting of Officer Katlyn Alix by Officer Nathaniel Hendren at Hendren’s house last week. Prosecutors allege that Hendren and Alix were playing a form of Russian roulette.

Hendren’s attorney, Talmage Newton IV, said Thursday night that he could not comment on the results of Hendren’s alcohol and drug screen because he did not have the results. He accused the police department and circuit attorney’s office of “providing information to everyone but me.” Hendren and Riordan took Alix to St. Louis University Hospital after she was shot in the chest, calling dispatchers from their police radios at 12:56 a.m. Alix was pronounced dead at 1:07 a.m. Brown filed the allegations of misconduct at 1:30 a.m. Jan. 24, according to the document. He alleged that Hendren violated the department’s policy on standards of conduct. Brown also accused Hendren and Riordan of violating the department’s alcohol policy, which says: “No employee shall report for duty or remain on duty with an alcohol concentration of .04 or greater. Moreover, no employee shall consume alcohol while on duty and/or engaged in city business. This includes a prohibition on alcohol consumption during the entire work period, including, but not limited to, lunch and dinner breaks.” The department has confirmed only that it has a policy requiring officers be tested for the presence of drugs and alcohol in an officer-involved shooting, but has not disclosed the results.

HENDREN RELEASED At a court hearing Thursday morning, Associate Circuit Judge David Roither increased Hendren’s bail to $100,000 but allowed him to post 10 percent of that, or $10,000, or retain the services of a bondsman.

He ordered Hendren held on house arrest at his apartment in south St. Louis and be monitored via GPS or another electronic device. Hendren also was ordered to turn over his passport and any guns he has. Alix’s husband, Anthony Meyer, spoke at the hearing, but what he said was inaudible to spectators. During the rest of the hearing, Meyer, also a St. Louis police officer, alternated between staring at Hendren and at Hendren’s relatives, who were sitting behind Hendren in court. Hendren’s attorney said his client was not a flight risk or a danger to the community. He graduated with honors from Columbia College in Missouri and spent four years with the U.S. Marines before “serving with distinction for the past 14 months” with St. Louis police. He said Hendren had virtually no assets with which to make bail. Assistant Circuit Attorney Rachel Smith called Hendren’s alleged actions a “blatant disregard for human life” and an “outrageous betrayal of the public trust,” saying it would be inappropriate to treat it like other cases. She said lowering the bail would send a message that “somehow this is just business as usual.” Before announcing his decision, Roither said that he hunted and had been trained in firearm safety, and reminded everyone that “you don’t point a muzzle at anything you don’t intend to shoot.” He then pointed out a new Missouri Supreme Court requirement that judges consider all alternatives to incarceration. Members of the Alix and Hendren families declined to comment on their way out of the courthouse. Newton urged people “to keep an open

POLICE DEPARTMENT VS. CIRCUIT ATTORNEY Minutes before the press conference began, Hayden said he was served with a court order made at Gardner’s request about a Missouri Supreme Court rule that limits what he could say about the case. He would not comment on the allegation that Hendren and his partner had been drinking that night, how Hendren got a black eye, whether he and Riordan had a history of leaving their patrol areas, whether the department had GPS data about where the officers were that night or what would happen to Riordan. Hayden tore into Gardner’s characterization in a letter released Tuesday about the conduct of the investigation. The letter said a police lieutenant erroneously told her office that a hospital would not honor a search warrant for the officers’ blood. She also complained that the police department had taken urine and breath tests in a way that she believed would block their use in a criminal prosecution. “Let it be crystal clear that the accusation lodged by the circuit attorney, to say the least, was both offensive and insulting to the Force Investigative Unit and myself,” he said, raising his voice. “The accusation by the circuit attorney that any action taken by the members of our Force Investigation Unit or our internal affairs division on this tragic morning as an obstructionist tactic was unwarranted, certainly untimely, and absolutely irresponsible.” Several commanders and members of the rank and file at the press conference nodded in agreement as Hayden spoke. Gardner fired back after the press conference with a prepared statement: “The Circuit Attorney’s position is that this criminal investigation should take precedence over the internal administrative investigation. In this instance, internal policies were used to circumvent our efforts to obtain the evidence we requested,” according to the statement. “It is time to focus our efforts on working together to seek the truth of this matter, so we can get justice for Katlyn Alix and the community,” the statement said. Nassim Benchaabane and Kim Bell contributed to this report. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

New economic development alliance will market St. Louis region as a whole ALLIANCE • FROM A1

ST. LOUIS REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE BOARD

CEO of the Missouri Partnership, which performs similar functions focused on marketing Missouri, attracting companies looking to locate new facilities and preparing proposals to help current companies expand. The new Alliance will concentrate on those economic development functions for the entire St. Louis region, funneling prospects to public-sector economic development organizations such as the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, the Leadership Council Southwest Illinois or the Economic Development Center of St. Charles that craft incentive packages and finalize details. “We’re the ones who want to lead the concierge level of marketing and response,” Chamber CEO Tom Chulick said. “We want to be able to market the entirety of the St. Louis region.” Johnson worked as a vice president of the Chamber’s economic development efforts for a decade before leaving to lead the Missouri Partnership. Initially, the Chamber’s current economic development staff of six or seven people will move to the new organization, which hopes to grow to a staff of about 15 people. “That’s a very good move,” said Denny Coleman, who led the St. Louis County Economic Council and its successor the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership for 25 years. “Steve (Johnson) is

Suzanne Sitherwood (Spire) *board chair Warner Baxter (Ameren) Ken Cella (Edward Jones) David Farr (Emerson) Bruce Holland (Holland Construction) David Kemper (Commerce Bank) Orvin Kimbrough (Midwest Bank) Rich Liekweg (BJC) Kathy Mazzarella (Graybar) Tom Minogue (Thompson Coburn) Michael Neidorff (Centene) Randy Schilling (Board Paq/OPO) David Steward (World Wide Technology) Andy Taylor (Enterprise Holdings) Greg Twardowski (Whelan Security)

very well respected, and he’s a real pro. ... He’s very familiar with all the players in St. Louis.” Economic development isn’t a new function for the Chamber. What’s different now, Chulick said, is that both Civic Progress and the RBC members are on board and that the Alliance’s focus will be only on attraction and retention, which often involves gathering data to respond to business inquiries about workforce, demographics and infrastructure. Regional business leaders have made a multiyear commitment to the new organization to fund a $4 million budget. “The thing to me that’s been lacking is

a coordinated effort on the corporate side for attraction efforts,” Coleman said. “The fact that the three business organizations are getting together to do this is a real plus for the region.” The new effort comes amid turmoil in the region’s economic development landscape. The St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, a quasi-public economic development agency that represents St. Louis and St. Louis County, ousted CEO Sheila Sweeney a month ago after reports of contracts awarded to political donors of St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger and allegations of staff turnover and low morale. And Chulick, for instance, took over a year ago at the Chamber after then-CEO Joe Reagan resigned following employee complaints of low morale and a hostile work environment. Chulick shook up the Chamber’s economic development department in April, ousting its director and adding two positions focused on business recruitment. Chulick said the timing of the new Economic Development Alliance wasn’t related to issues at other economic development organizations. The Chamber’s board and those of the other organizations began exploring how to elevate the private sector’s role in business recruitment back in the spring and summer, he said. “We’re growing, but our competitors are outpacing us,” Chulick said. “We’ve got to think bigger and bolder than ever

before. ... How do we become best in class to compete at a level at which we’ve never competed that has the full support of the business community?” The move could give the Chamber and other private sector business groups more visibility after what has seemed a less public role in economic development. A former Chamber executive, Beverly Estes, told the Post-Dispatch last year that in recent years “you hardly saw the Chamber’s name in print.” The Alliance will stay out of other economic development functions, such as providing seed capital for entrepreneurs and offering job training and workforce development. The Chamber still has staff who have a hand in those functions, as do public economic development organizations. “We want to be the lead in business recruitment,” Chulick said of the new Alliance. “We want to be the lead marketer for the region nationally and globally.” But in order for the new Alliance to work, there needs to be “good staff on the ground” at the local economic development organizations to take “the handoffs” from the business attraction team and close the deal, Coleman said. “You do need that coordination, and that would be the only missing piece today, so hopefully (interim Partnership CEO) Rodney Crim will have the freedom and flexibility to staff up the Partnership in an appropriate fashion,” he said.


NEWS

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

McConnell: ‘Threats remain’ REBUKE • FROM A1

That it was spearheaded by McConnell, R-Ky., who often waits to cross Trump until there is overwhelming momentum in his conference, indicates how deeply the president’s announcements broke faith within the party. Republicans spent years accusing Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama, of pursuing capricious troop withdrawals and have refused to defend Trump’s efforts to do the same. “I believe the threats remain. ISIS and al-Qaida have yet to be defeated, and American national security interests require continued commitment to our mission

nounced he would be withdrawing American military personnel from Syria, tweeting: “We have defeated ISIS in Syria, my only reason for being there during the Trump presidency.” A month later, Islamic State claimed credit for an attack in Syria that left four Americans dead. The backlash from Republicans has been steady, with some of the president’s closest allies warning him about the dangers of leaving before al-Qaida, Islamic State and their affiliates are expunged. Talk of an impulsive pullout from Syria has incited fears of a militant resurgence there, as well as concern for the safety of Kurdish fighters who

there,” McConnell said Thursday, before the 68-to-23 vote. However, the measure divided Senate Democrats, with many arguing that rebuking Trump was not worth the cost of greenlighting endless war. “This amendment is not the right way for us to proceed as a means of correcting Trump’s backward policies,” Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., said. “It could, frankly, get us even more deeply mired into a series of conflicts in the Middle East.” Nearly every Senate Democrat expected to run for president in 2020 voted against the amendment. In December, Trump an-

have partnered with U.S. forces. Some lawmakers have warned that a vacuum caused by the United States’ departure is likely to be filled by forces aligned with Iran, posing a threat to ally Israel. Thursday’s vote comes as U.S. negotiations with the Taliban have raised the prospect of a withdrawal, too, from Afghanistan, where U.S. forces have been deployed for more than 17 years. McConnell’s amendment names al-Qaida and Islamic State as “a global threat, which merits increased international contributions to the counterterrorism, diplomatic and stabilization efforts underway in Syria and Afghanistan.” It hat-tips “the positive role” the United States and its allies have played in Syria and Afghanistan “fighting terrorist groups, countering Iranian aggression, deterring the

further use of chemical weapons, and protecting human rights.” Critically, it also warns that “withdrawal of the United States forces from the ongoing fight against these groups ... could allow terrorists to regroup, destabilize critical regions, and create vacuums that could be filled by Iran or Russia, to the detriment of United States’ interests and those of our allies.” While the Senate’s Thursday vote does not carry the weight of law or prevent the president from pursuing his plans, it puts Senate Republicans on the record as being at odds with Trump’s Middle East policy. In recent months, Senate Republicans have backed bipartisan measures expressing support for NATO, and to hold Saudi Arabia’s crown prince responsible for the death of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Video linked to carjacking of woman, 80, is released by city police

LAW & ORDER

BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Roderick Wilson, on Truck 13 of the St. Louis Fire Department, monitors a smoldering roof in the 5800 block of Wabada Avenue on Thursday. CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

EAST ST. LOUIS > Man is fatally shot on porch • Detectives with the Illinois State Police have no suspects after a man was gunned down on the front porch of a home in East St. Louis on Wednesday. Sgt. Elbert Jennings of the Illinois State Police said the victim was shot about 7:45 p.m. Wednesday in the 500 block of North 13th Street in East St. Louis. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The victim’s name had not been released, according to the St. Clair County coroner’s office. Jennings said anyone with information is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. ST. LOUIS > Shooting near midtown wounds one • A man shot in the face was in critical condition after being dropped off at a St. Louis hospital. The victim, 21, was shot in the 2900 block of Bell Avenue near midtown about 8:15 p.m. Wednesday, police say. He was in critical but stable condition at a hospital. The

victim had gunshot wounds to his face, legs and hip. He had been taken to the hospital by “private conveyance,” police said. Police said they had no suspects and, because of the victim’s condition, police weren’t able to interview him. ST. LOUIS > Carjacking after car trouble • A driver who pulled over with car trouble Wednesday was carjacked at gunpoint in St. Louis, authorities say. The male victim, 37, pulled to the curb at Hamilton and Kennerly avenues in the Wells-Goodfellow neighborhood about 1 p.m. Wednesday because he was having car trouble, St. Louis police said Thursday. The man and his passenger, a 52-year-old man, got out and were looking under the hood of the vehicle, a Dodge Ram pickup. Suddenly, a dark-colored sedan pulled up alongside them. A man in his late 20s got out of the sedan, pulled a gun and demanded the victims step away from the truck. The gunman then jumped into

the pickup and drove away, with his accomplice following in the sedan. Police say the victims were unhurt. Police say the gunman was a black man, in his late 20s, with a heavy build. He was 5-foot-9 to 5-foot-11 and was wearing a black sweat suit. ST. FRANCOIS COUNTY > Crash kills one • One man was killed and another was injured in a head-on crash Wednesday afternoon in St. Francois County, police say. The man who died is identified as Emmanuel P. Sohn, 37, of Cadet, Mo. Sohn was driving a 2014 Chevrolet Cruze west on Old Bonne Terre Road about 1:20 p.m. Wednesday. The Missouri Highway Patrol said Sohn’s car crossed the center line and hit an oncoming pickup head-on, east of Woodland Acres Drive. Sohn was pronounced dead at the scene. The patrol said Sohn had not been wearing a seat belt. Kyle R. Lord, 30, of Bonne Terre,

was driving the pickup, a 2013 Ford F-350. Police say Lord was not wearing a seat belt. He suffered moderate injuries. SPANISH LAKE > Victim is identified in house fire • A man found dead after a large house fire Tuesday morning was identified by police as Jacob Weber, 102. Authorities were called to a single-family ranch home engulfed in flames about 11:47 a.m. in the 12500 block of Lusher Road, according to St. Louis County police. Lusher Road runs along Highway 367. After fire departments from around the area extinguished the fire, investigators discovered Weber was in the home. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Firefighting efforts were hampered by a broken water main nearby, but the flames were under control within a half-hour, the Black Jack Fire Protection District said in a social media post. The cause of the fire appears accidental but is still under investigation, police said.

Comparisons difficult because tests changed

These districts had the highest — or lowest — percentage of students pass their 2018 state-required tests.

STUDENTS • FROM A1

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

“What we’re hearing from school board members and administrators is to a large extent frustration that we’ve had these changing assessments,” said Brent Ghan, deputy executive director for the Missouri School Boards’ Association. “Scores could be interpreted as being lower, but what’s really happening is we’ve got assessments based on higher expectations and different state standards.” Student scores fall into four categories: below basic, basic, proficient and advanced. Scores at proficient and advanced are counted as passing. Fifty of the St. Louis region’s 75 districts watched passing rates fall by double digits on the English tests. All but seven dropped points on the math test. Passing rates even declined in perennial testing powerhouses such as Lindbergh schools, in south St. Louis County, where they dipped by 9 percentage points, to 71 percent in English and 65 percent in math. The Webster Groves and Brentwood districts both posted double-digit drops in English, to 65 percent passing, for both. Superintendents across the region said they were frustrated with yet another change to the test, and hopeful — as were state officials — for some stability in coming years. Missouri adopted national standards, called the Common Core, a few years ago. But a conservative backlash led the Legislature to order a new set of education benchmarks in 2016. Soon thereafter, the state started to develop its own standards and tests. Last year was the first they were given statewide. “The last five years have been very hard on our districts, instructionally,” said education department official Kevin Freeman, director of the Missouri School Improvement Program. “They just haven’t had any consistency.” Area superintendents explained that the test subject matter didn’t just get harder — the state actually changed the way it asked questions, and required higher scores to pass the tests, too. “It required kids to think differently,” said Kelvin Adams, superintendent of St. Louis Public Schools, whose passing rates dropped almost 11 percentage points to 23

TOP 5 Franklin St. Louis Co. St. Louis Co. St. Louis Co. St. Louis Co.

Spring Bluff R-XV (Sullivan) Kirkwood R-VII Clayton Ladue Lindbergh

BOTTOM 5 St. Louis city St. Louis Co. St. Louis city St. Louis city St. Louis city

Pct. passing Confluence Academies 19.4 Riverview Gardens 17.9 La Salle Charter School 15.3 Carondelet Leadership Academy 12.8 Preclarus Mastery Academy 8.9

BEST AND WORST ST. LOUIS-AREA SCHOOL TEST RESULTS

Pct. passing 83 74.6 74.4 72.5 71

MATH TOP 5 Franklin St. Louis Co. St. Louis Co. Franklin St. Louis Co.

Spring Bluff R-XV (Sullivan) Clayton Ladue Franklin County R-II Brentwood

Pct. passing 79.7 74.5 70.6 67.6 67.1

BOTTOM 5 St. Louis city St. Louis city St. Louis Co. St. Louis Co. St. Louis city

Pct. passing Hawthorn Leadership School for Girls 15.5 St. Louis College Prep 15.2 Normandy Schools Collaborative 12.6 Riverview Gardens 12.5 Carondelet Leadership Academy 11.1

percent in English and about 4 points to 19 percent in math. On previous tests, students picked one response, for instance, per math problem. On this test, they could pick several. The tests also got harder to pass, said Pattonville Superintendent Tim Pecoraro. For instance, he said, 85 percent or more of his high school kids usually pass the Algebra II test. Last year, not

ST. LOUIS • Police are increasing efforts to find a carjacker who demanded that an 80-year-old woman give him the keys to her Cadillac or he would kill her. The victim complied and wasn’t hurt in the robbery, which happened about 4:30 p.m. Jan. 16 in the 5000 block of North Kingshighway. On Thursday, St. Louis police released a videotape and asked for the public’s help identifying the robber and his accomplice. Anyone with information is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. The video, taken nearly 40 minutes after the holdup, shows two people walking on a sidewalk with their backs to the camera. It was filmed from the porch of a home. Police haven’t said what street the home is on, or how far it is from the carjacking. Based on that video, police say they have updated the descriptions of the two suspects. The first is a black man, 16 to 22 years old, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-9. He wore a blue or gray hooded sweatshirt and black sweatpants with white stripes. He carried a small black bag. The second suspect is also a black man, 16 to 22 years old and 6 feet tall. He wore a black jacket and pants with white stripes. He had a blue hooded sweatshirt underneath the jacket and gray or white socks pulled up to the knees. He carried a black book bag. They drove away in the woman’s 2014 Cadillac CTS. The car later was recovered by police in the 5900 block of Horton Place. The carjacking happened in the city’s Mark Twain neighborhood, just north of Interstate 70. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

even 56 percent made it. “It’s not because this group can’t do Algebra II,” Pecoraro said. “The threshold changed. “That’s why our message to staff is we’re not going to freak out.” In total, passing rates at Pattonville, in northwest St. Louis County, fell by 15 percentage points in English and almost 9 in math. “We’ll take the data and make improvements,” he said. State law bars the education department from stripping a district’s accreditation based on the first year of a new test. That led the department to adjust test scores — one of several measures examined for state accreditation. Accreditation points in the St. Louis Public Schools and Ferguson-Florissant district for instance, rose enough to keep their state stamp of approval, should they be reviewed this year. In 2017, those districts’ academic points dipped some, pushing their Annual Performance Report score below the accreditation threshold. Neither lost accreditation — they were not up for review by the state board last year, and would likely have been spared via other state rules, regardless. But this year, they both earned substantially more points toward accreditation. The state has cautioned that scores can’t be compared between all of the tests. And with no year-to-year comparison, the next best thing a district can do is compare itself to state performance, said Carter Snow, coordinator of student assessment for the Parkway School District. Parkway’s 2018 passing rates fell almost 11 percentage points in English and 7 in math. The district, however, also compared its scores to state averages. And it found that, depending on the subject, Parkway’s performance was stacking up. “Typically the state dropped a little bit more than we did,” Snow said. “It’s hard to say it’s progress, but we are satisfied.” This is all difficult to explain to students, parents and teachers, said Adams, the St. Louis schools chief. But state administrators said on Thursday that they were happy to finally have a Missouri test, and swore that it won’t change. “There is a sense of relief that we’re going to have stability moving forward,” said Freeman, the state administrator. “Next year, you will be able to look at 2019 and compare it 2018, and go, ‘Hmm. That is interesting.’”


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

The fate of net neutrality is back in court FCC will defend its decision to remove internet protections BY BRIAN FUNG Washington Post

The fate of the internet will once again rest in the hands of three federal judges when they hear oral arguments Friday in a pivotal challenge to the Federal Communications Commission. From a courtroom in downtown Washington, FCC lawyers will argue that the agency acted correctly last year when it officially took its net neutrality rules off the books — legally clearing the way for internet providers to speed up, slow down or block apps and websites, if they choose. State and local officials, tech compa-

nies and consumer groups are urging the court to countermand the FCC, saying the agency’s decision is based on a faulty analysis and flawed reasoning. Without the protection of the net neutrality rules, supporters say, internet providers will be unconstrained in their ability to steer customers toward proprietary or partner services, reshaping the internet to their own commercial benefit and to the detriment of ordinary users. “This wasn’t how the internet was meant to be,” said Denelle Dixon, COO of Mozilla, which makes the Firefox web browser and is leading the court fight against the FCC. “An internet that enables consumer choice necessarily protects net neutrality. Without protecting net neutrality, (broadband providers) will control the internet experiences of everyone. And that cannot be what happens.” Mozilla’s involvement, along with that of Etsy, Vimeo and tech-backed digital rights groups, underscores the tense rela-

tionship between Silicon Valley companies and the broadband providers they rely on to reach consumers. Caught in between are regulators who have written and rewritten rules for net neutrality with every change in administration dating back to President George W. Bush. With Friday’s hearing, the FCC will become the latest federal agency in the era of President Donald Trump to find itself in court. The legal showdown marks the second time in four years the FCC has faced judicial review over internet policies; in 2015, the positions were reversed, when regulators during Barack Obama’s presidency successfully defended net neutrality rules from a suit by internet providers. Having failed to defeat the rules in court, opponents of the regulations sought to change them from within. FCC officials argue that Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, acted within the agency’s authority when he held a vote in 2017 to reverse how the FCC oversees internet

providers. Agency officials say they are returning to a time when internet providers were more lightly policed. Matthew Berry, FCC chief of staff, said that since net neutrality rules came off the books last summer, the internet has continued to thrive without disastrous consequences that activists predicted. Opponents of the FCC rejected that assertion this week, citing research from Northeastern University that suggests some wireless carriers may have slowed service to Netflix and other video providers. They also warn that internet providers are largely “on good behavior” during the court battle but could change. The central debate on Friday, experts say, is likely to focus on whether the FCC erred in its decision-making process. Critics will argue that the FCC cherrypicked economic evidence to justify the repeal. The FCC will argue that it presented a reasoned analysis based on evidence at its disposal.

POLAR VORTEX

DIGEST

Cold comfort: Rapid warmup on way

Trump set to reveal details of next month’s N. Korea summit President Donald Trump said Thursday that he would announce next week the site and date for the second summit he plans with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in February. Trump later said he would probably make the announcement during his State of the Union address to Congress on Tuesday. “They very much want the meeting,” Trump told reporters, and he asserted that his administration had made “tremendous progress” toward reining in the North’s nuclear ambitions. Trump long has contended that his outreach to Kim and their initial summit last June in Singapore have put the U.S. and North Korea on the path to peace. But his own intelligence chiefs believe there is little likelihood Kim will voluntarily give up his nuclear weapons.

DAILY HERALD VIA AP

A steamy fog rises along a road in Roselle, Ill., early Thursday. The weather system that put much of the Midwest into a historic deep freeze was expected to ease over the next few days, as the cold temperatures spread to the East.

BY TAMMY WEBBER AND JEFF KAROUB Associated Press

CHICAGO • In Illinois, temperatures could

rise by 80 degrees within days. In Michigan, melting snow and rain and a 17-mile ice jam on the Muskegon River could lead to flooding. And across the Midwest, the warmer forecast was sure to bring more broken roads and burst water mains. The polar vortex that brought many cities to a standstill was expected to come to a swift end with a rapid thaw that experts say could be unprecedented. But the sudden swing from long johns to short sleeves could create problems of its own. “I don’t think there’s ever been a case where we’ve seen (such a big) shift in temperatures” in the winter, said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the Weather Underground firm. On Thursday, the system marched east, spreading arctic conditions over an area spanning from Buffalo to Brooklyn in New York. In the western part of the state, a storm that dumped up to 20 inches of snow gave way to subzero temperatures and face-stinging wind chills. In New York City, about 200 firefighters battling a blaze in a commercial building took turns getting warm on buses.

The number of deaths that could be blamed on the cold climbed to at least 15. For the nation’s midsection, relief was as close as the weekend. Rockford, Ill., was at a record-breaking minus 31 on Thursday morning but should be about 50 on Monday. Other previously frozen areas could see temperatures of 55 degrees or higher. The dramatic warmup will offer a respite from the bone-chilling cold that canceled schools, closed businesses and halted trains. But potholes will appear on roads and bridges weakened by the freezethaw cycle. The same cycle can crack water mains and homeowners’ pipes. Scores of vehicles will be left with flat tires and bent rims. In Detroit, where some water mains are almost 150 years old, city workers were dealing with dozens of breaks, said Palencia Mobley, deputy director of the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department. “We’ll have all hands on deck. Hopefully, we’ll be able to address as many of the issues as possible over the next week,” Mobley said. A bridge in the western Michigan community of Newaygo was closed as the icejammed Muskegon River rose above flood stage.

Officials in Buffalo watched for flooding on the Upper Niagara River because of ice. In other signs that the worst of the deep freeze was ending, Xcel Energy lifted on Thursday a request to its Minnesota natural gas customers to lower thermostats to ease concern about conserving gas. Masters, from Weather Underground, said the polar vortex was “rotating up into Canada” and not expected to return in the next couple of weeks. If it does return in late February, “it won’t be as intense.” Still, memories of the dangerous cold were bound to linger. At least 144 people in Illinois visited emergency rooms for cold-related injuries over two days. Most of the injuries were hypothermia or frostbite, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. The effect on the overall economy was not expected to be much. Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said one reason the severe cold weather would have less impact is that, unlike in a hurricane, most people did not lose electric power. “People may be in their homes, but they can do things such as online shopping,” Zandi said. “Life goes on. It is a disruption to daily life, but it is not a big hit to the economy.”

20 people are charged in crackdown on ‘birth tourism’ BY AMY TAXIN Associated Press

SANTA ANA, CALIF. • Dongyuan Li’s business was called You Win USA, and authorities say she coached pregnant Chinese women on how to get into the United States to deliver babies who would automatically enjoy all the benefits of American citizenship. Over two years, Li, 41, raked in millions through her business, where mothers-tobe paid between $40,000 and $80,000 to come to California, stay in an upscale apartment and give birth, authorities said. Li, who was arrested Thursday, is one of 20 people charged in the first federal crackdown on birth tourism businesses that prosecutors said brought hundreds of pregnant women to the United States. Jing Dong, 42, and Michael Wei Yueh Liu, 53, who allegedly operated USA Happy Baby, also were arrested. More than a dozen others, including the operator of a third such business, also face charges but are believed to have returned to China, federal prosecutors in Los Angeles said. Though it isn’t illegal to visit the United States while pregnant, authorities said the businesses — which were raided by federal agents in 2015 — touted the benefits of having U.S. citizen babies, who could get free public education and years later help their parents immigrate. They also allegedly had women hide

their pregnancies while seeking travel visas and lie about plans, with one You Win USA customer telling consular officials she was going to a Trump hotel in Hawaii. The charges include conspiracy, visa fraud and money laundering. But U.S. authorities said the businesses also posed a national security risk because their customers, some who worked for the Chinese government, secured American citizenship for children who can move back to the United States and, once they’re 21, sponsor their parents for green cards. “I see this as a grave national security concern and vulnerability,” said Mark Zito, assistant special agent-in-charge of Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s homeland security investigations. “Are some of them doing it for security because the United States is more stable? Absolutely. But will those governments take advantage of this? Yes, they will.” Messages left for Li’s and Dong’s attorneys were not immediately returned. Derek Tung, Liu’s attorney, said the growing interest among Chinese women to give birth to American babies drew attention to a practice long used by citizens of other countries. His client had nothing to do with getting women visas from China but worked almost as a subcontractor to provide housing once they arrived, he said. “My client is merely the provider. The

people who are in China are the ones in charge of everything,” he said. Birth tourism businesses have long operated in California and other states and cater to couples from China, Russia, Nigeria and elsewhere. In 2015, federal agents in California raided three dozen sites connected with the three businesses. More than 20 people were designated as material witnesses, but some later fled to China and were charged with violating federal court orders, and a lawyer who helped them leave the country was convicted of obstruction of justice. This week, a federal grand jury indicted four people who allegedly ran the birth tourism businesses until the 2015 raids. Each business brought hundreds of customers to give birth in the United States, and some didn’t pay all medical costs tied to their care, prosecutors said. One couple paid the indigent rate for their hospital bills — $4,080 — even though they had more than $225,000 in a U.S. bank account they had used to shop at luxury stores, according to court papers. Li, who operated You Win USA and paid in full for a $2.1 million home in Irvine, Calif., told an undercover federal agent posing as a pregnant Chinese citizen that her company would train her to interview for a visa, according to court filings. At one point, the papers said, she sent a text to her husband about the business, saying, “After all, this is not legal!”

Facebook boots pages linked to Iran • Facebook says it has removed 783 Iranlinked pages, accounts and groups from its service for what it calls “coordinated inauthentic behavior.” That’s the social network’s term for fake accounts run with the intent of disrupting politics and elections. Facebook has been disclosing such purges more regularly in recent months, including those of pages linked to groups in Myanmar, Bangladesh and Russia. The accounts on Facebook and Instagram typically misrepresented themselves as locals in more than two dozen countries ranging from Afghanistan, Germany, India, Saudi Arabia and the U.S. Facebook said Thursday that the accounts had spent about $30,000 on advertisements. Court blocks requirement for soda warnings • A federal appeals court blocked on Thursday a San Francisco law requiring health warnings on advertisements for soda and other sugary drinks in a victory for beverage and retail groups that sued to block the ordinance. The law violates constitutionally protected commercial speech, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a unanimous ruling. The judges kicked the case back to a lower court. The American Beverage Association, which represents Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and others, joined retail and advertising organizations to fight the rule. The law passed by San Francisco in 2015 required beverage advertisements within city limits to include warnings that drinking sugary drinks contribute to health problems. Sanders proposes estate tax for billionaires • Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., is proposing to expand the estate tax on wealthy Americans, including a rate of as much as 77 percent on the value of estates above $1 billion. Sanders, who’s considering a second run for president, said in a statement that his plan would apply to the wealthiest 0.2 percent of Americans. It would set a 45 percent tax on the value of estates between $3.5 million and $10 million, increasing gradually to 77 percent for amounts more than $1 billion. The current estate tax kicks in when an estate is worth about $11 million. The legislation would raise up to $2.2 trillion in taxes from the families of all 588 billionaires in the U.S., according to a summary of the plan. Sanders’ plan comes as potential Democratic challengers to President Donald Trump eye progressive tax ideas intended to reduce income inequality. Testimony ends in trial over census citizenship question • A federal judge in Maryland has finished hearing trial testimony for lawsuits challenging the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Plaintiffs’ attorney Denise Hulett says trial testimony ended Thursday. U.S. District Judge George Hazel is set to hear closing arguments by attorneys for the government and plaintiffs on Feb. 21. Hazel began hearing testimony a week after a federal judge in New York barred President Donald Trump’s administration from adding a citizenship question to the census for the first time since 1950. The Justice Department is appealing. Hulett represents the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Plaintiffs also include residents of Texas, Arizona, Nevada and Florida. From news services


NATION

02.01.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

Middle ground lacking in wall debate BY ANDREW TAYLOR AND ALAN FRAM Associated Press

WASHINGTON • House

Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared Thursday that there will be no “wall money” in any compromise border security deal as she and President Donald Trump signaled that congressional negotiators may never satisfy his demands for his Southwest border proposal. Trump, who in recent weeks has expressed indifference to whether the term “wall” or something else is used, clung with renewed tenacity to the word that became his campaign mantra, declaring, “A wall is a wall.” Yet in a series of tweets and statements, he issued conflicting messages about what he’d need to declare victory and suggested that repairing existing structures along the boundary could be a major component of a triumph. Amid signs that Trump’s leverage in Congress is dwindling, he seemed to aim one tweet at his conservative followers. He wrote that Democrats “are not going to give money to build the DESPERATELY needed WALL. I’ve got you covered. Wall is already being built, I don’t expect much help!” Pelosi, D-Calif., left the door open for an accord

AP PHOTOS

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., shown Thursday, has held fast to her opposition to wall funding.

that could finance some barriers, citing what she said was already existing “Normandy fencing” that blocks vehicles. “If the president wants to call that a wall, he can call that a wall,” she said. She added: “Is there a place for enhanced fencing? Normandy fencing would work.” Yet Pelosi’s other remark — “There’s not going to be any wall money in the legislation” — underscored the linguistic battle underway. It showed that Democrats see no reason to let Trump claim a win in a cause that stirs his hardright voters and enrages

liberals. Trump’s political muscle weakened after Democrats’ capture of House control in the November election. It waned further after his surrender last week in ending a record 35-day partial government shutdown without getting a penny of the $5.7 billion he’d demanded to start building the wall. In another sign of his flagging hold over lawmakers, the GOP-controlled Senate backed legislation on a 68-23 vote Thursday that opposes withdrawal of U.S. troops from Syria and Afghanistan.

President Donald Trump, shown Thursday, has said he will get the border wall built one way or another.

When Trump folded on the shutdown, he agreed to reopen government until Feb. 15, giving lawmakers time to craft a bipartisan border security deal. If there’s no deal by then, Trump has threatened to revive the shutdown or declare a national emergency, which he claims would let him shift billions from unrelated military construction projects to erecting his wall. He criticized Democrats’ negotiating stance so far, telling reporters in the Oval Office that Pelosi is “just playing games” and saying GOP bargainers are “wasting their time.” In an interview with The

New York Times published Thursday night, Trump said he has “set the stage” to take action on his own. “I’ll continue to build the wall, and we’ll get the wall finished,” he added. “Now whether or not I declare a national emergency — that you’ll see.” D e m o c ra t s re m a i n united against those tactics. Republican opposition seems nearly as strong, and GOP leaders are becoming increasingly assertive about telegraphing those feelings to Trump. Sen. John Cornyn, RTexas, told reporters that “there are a lot of us that are trying to dissuade”

Massive shipment of fentanyl seized Border agents find $4.7 million in meth, synthetic opioids in truck headed to Arizona BY ANITA SNOW Associated Press

Trump from declaring a national emergency should border security talks deadlock. Cornyn, a close adviser to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, said he has “absolute confidence” that such a declaration would be challenged in court, tying up the money, and said Congress might vote to defy him. “The president needs to know that before he heads down that path,” Cornyn said. No. 2 Senate GOP leader John Thune of South Dakota told reporters that “a lot of folks are uncomfortable” with an emergency declaration. He stopped short of ruling out a challenge by the Senate. Lawmakers caution that if Trump declares an emergency, future Democratic presidents might do the same for issues they favor that Congress derails. Democrats offered further details of their border security plan Thursday, unveiling a measure that would provide no wall funds. It would boost spending for scanners at ports of entry, humanitarian aid for apprehended migrants, and new aircraft and ships to police the U.S.-Mexico border. It would freeze the number of border patrol agents and block wall construction in wildlife refuges along the border.

Courts turn away hundreds of immigrants, blame shutdown ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX • U.S. Customs and

Border Protection officials announced Thursday their biggest fentanyl bust ever, saying they seized nearly 254 pounds of the deadly synthetic opioid from a secret compartment inside a load of Mexican produce heading into Arizona. The drug was found hidden Saturday morning in a compartment under the rear floor of a tractor-trailer after a scan during secondary inspection indicated “some anomalies” in the load, and the agency’s police dog team alerted officers to the presence of drugs, Nogales CBP Port Director Michael Humphries said. Most of the seized fentanyl with an overall street value of about $3.5 million was in white powder form, but about 2 pounds of it was contained in pills. Agents also seized nearly 395 pounds of methamphetamine with a street value of $1.18 million, Humphries said. “It is said that a quartermilligram, or the size of a few grains of salt, of fentanyl, which is a dangerous opioid, can kill a person very quickly,” Humphries said. The seizure, he said, had prevented an immeasurable number of doses of the drug “that could have harmed so many families.” Mexican traffickers have been increasingly smuggling the drug into the United States, mostly hidden in passenger vehicles and tractor-trailers trying to head through ports of

ARIZONA DAILY STAR VIA AP

A display on Thursday shows the fentanyl and meth that was seized by Customs and Border Protection officers over the weekend at the Nogales Port of Entry in Nogales, Ariz. The drugs were being smuggled into the U.S. hidden in a truck carrying produce from Mexico.

entry in the Nogales, Ariz., and San Diego areas. Fentanyl has caused a surge in fatal overdoses around the U.S., including the 2016 accidental death of pop music legend Prince, who consumed the opioid in counterfeit pills that looked like the narcotic analgesic Vicodin. U.S. law enforcement officials say the illicit version of the painkiller is now seen mostly as a white powder that can be mixed with heroin for an extra

kick as well as blue pills that are counterfeits of prescription drugs such as oxycodone. The legal prescription form of the drug is used mostly to provide relief to cancer patients suffering unbearable pain at the end of their lives. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration officials have said that although 85 percent of the illicit fentanyl entering the United States from Mexico is seized at San Diego-area border crossings, an increas-

ing amount is being detected on the border with Arizona, a state where the Sinaloa cartel controls the drug trade and fatal fentanyl overdoses are rising. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in a recent report that fentanyl is now the drug most often involved in fatal overdoses across the country, accounting for more than 18,000, or almost 29 percent, of the 63,000 overdose fatalities in 2016.

MIAMI • Already backlogged immigration courts faced more hurdles Thursday when hundreds of immigrants arrived with government-issued notices to appear for hearings that were never scheduled. U.S. immigration officials blamed the government shutdown and extreme winter weather for the confusion about immigration court hearings. The part of the Justice Department overseeing immigration courts said some immigrants with notices to appear Thursday would not be able to proceed with those hearings. In Miami, immigrants from Honduras and Guatemala who recently requested asylum in the United States arrived to a downtown court building only to be turned away by court personnel. They were told they were not scheduled to appear, contrary to what their government-issued document said. Similar backlogs have occurred nationwide since a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling said that notices given for immigrants to appear in court need to include a time and date. Before that June ruling, the Department of Homeland Security would issue undated notices, and the Executive Office for Immigration Review would set the hearings. The Immigration Review office said the shutdown prevented immigration courts from issuing new hearing notices. Weather-related closures this week also slowed the agency’s processing of cases. It was not clear how many people were affected Thursday, but migrants in Phoenix and San Francisco also were turned away after being told their cases had not been scheduled.

D O N AT E YO U R C A R

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri * 100% Tax Deductible * Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycle & RVs

WheelsForWishes.org

Call:(314) 499-1300

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS The Carpenters’ Joint Training Fund of St. Louis admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all of the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at its school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

If public wall bid fails, private backers hope to step in ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON • What started as an on-

line fundraiser to provide President Donald Trump with donations for his southern border wall has morphed into a foundation whose members vow to build a wall themselves. The “We the People Will Build the Wall” campaign has surpassed $20 million since it was created in December by Air Force veteran and triple amputee Brian Kolfage. The campaign has received almost 350,000 donations even as wall opponents derided the effort and after the longest government shutdown in U.S. history ended with Congress refusing Trump’s call for billions in funding. Kolfage and Trump supporters have organized a nonprofit corporation, WeBuildtheWall Inc. Its board of directors includes former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, an immigration opponent who has advised Trump. The group spent part of this week in South Texas touring the U.S.Mexico border and meeting landowners the group hopes will allow private

construction on their land. Whether a private group could build such a wall remains to be seen. There are legal and environmental obstacles in South Texas that have delayed the U.S. government, even with its powers to seize land and waive laws for national security. The group acknowledges the obstacles. But Dustin Stockton, one of the group’s leaders, said he still believed they could build something in “months, not years.” “We talked to several people who weren’t interested in having a wall five or six years ago who have since changed their mind based on what they’re seeing happening on their land,” Stockton said. He declined to identify the landowners they met, but said they said the security situation at the border had gotten worse. Experts on border walls are skeptical. The fundraising so far “is still a tiny sum compared to the cost of any significant fencing on the border,” said Reece Jones, a University of Hawaii professor and author of the book

“Violent Borders.” U.S. Customs and Border Protection is working to build 33 miles of new walls and fencing in the Rio Grande Valley. The construction was funded by Congress in March. So far, the government has awarded 14 miles of construction for a total of $313 million, or roughly $22 million a mile. The average cost of 1 mile built by the government exceeds what the campaign has raised. “Walls alone are a very ineffective way to secure a border because they are expensive and still need to be constantly guarded,” Jones said. “Even then, people regularly go over, under, around or through them.” Most land along the Rio Grande is privately owned, and many landowners oppose surrendering their land for a border wall. The U.S. government has the authority to seize land under eminent domain and will likely have to sue many landowners to build more barriers. It can also waive environmental laws to speed construction. A private group doesn’t have those powers.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 02.01.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

County vs. County Taxpayers foot litigants’ bills. Why did judge close doors on early hearing?

S

the port authority Board of Commissiont. Louis County Circuit Court ers, which is why they’re now in court. Judge Thea Sherry had every legal Four positions on the seven-member right to kick out a reporter from a preliminary hearing Wednesday in board expired last June. Stenger had authority to name replacements beforewhich, bizarrely, St. Louis County is suing hand but didn’t. Those four remain in itself. Maybe she didn’t want the reporter their expired board seats today. That raises to hear all the coffee-spewing guffaws as fundamental questions about their legal lawyers representing the opposing litiauthority, especially since they constitute gants realized that their legal fees are bea quorum to approve whatever measures ing charged to the same source: St. Louis Stenger wants. County taxpayers. In June, the County Council voted But the effect of her decision to close to forbid commissioners from serving public access to a preliminary conference after their terms expire. The council later — denying access to the Post-Dispatch’s approved a bill to transfer Jeremy Kohler — was that nominating authority for members of the public won’t commissioners from the get to know what was discounty executive to the councussed on their dime and in cil. Then the council named its their name as plaintiff St. own port authority board. Louis County Port Authority The authority now effecsquared off against defendant tively has two boards. This St. Louis County. “crippling uncertainty,” the Since taxpayers are paying Stenger-appointed board the bills, the public has a right says in its lawsuit, is why to know every detail of these the county is now fighting proceedings. The first quesagainst itself in court. County tion taxpayers need to ask is Counselor Peter Krane reprewhy the judge needed to hold Judge Thea Sherry sents the defendant, while an the hearing in secret. Sherry’s outside firm paid by taxpayers represents answer via a spokesperson boils down to: the Stenger-appointed board. The County Because she can. Council also has separate legal representaBut a second question might be the tion in the case — yes, paid by taxpayers. more salient one: Why is the county suing About $5 million worth of important itself in the first place? port authority business hangs in limbo. Recall the nightmare that was 2018, A city-county economic development when County Executive Steve Stenger’s agency controls that money, but its leaderpenchant for bickering and intransigence ship is deeply immersed in controversy nearly cost him a primary election in over questionable contracts benefiting August. He engaged in endless public some big Stenger campaign donors. brawls with Republicans and Democrats The public has a crystal-clear interest on the County Council. They fought about in this case. Which is why Sherry must budgeting, contracting and economic rethink closing the doors on any aspect of development, transparency, and legal repthese proceedings. resentation. And they fought about membership on

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

John Maupin (center), the chair of the St. Louis County Council-appointed Port Authority, goes over the agenda on Nov. 29 after convening the first meeting of the body in a conference room outside the council chambers in Clayton. Attending are (from left) Robert Butler, Robert Birdsong, Mike Hejna and Skip Mange. Not pictured is member Amy Hunter.

Price of freedom High cash bail without due process violates defendants’ fundamental rights.

I

f America’s constitutional principle of justice had to be boiled down to four words,they would be:“innocent until proven guilty.” That’s at the core of everything that happens from the arrest to the courtroom. A trial establishes guilt. Punishment is meted out only after a guilty verdict is rendered. Yet hundreds of low-income criminal defendants in St. Louis who can’t come up with thousands of dollars for cash bail are routinely jailed by the city, often for more than a month, before they can even talk to a public defender. Those who can pay are free until trial; those who can’t — even those accused of relatively minor, nonviolent crimes — remain behind bars for extended periods, prohibited from even contesting the bail amount, until the system decides to start the trial that will determine whether they’ve committed any crime. This is incarceration for poverty, pure and simple. It must end. The civil rights organization ArchCity Defenders filed suit Monday in U.S. District Court in St. Louis against the city, Sheriff Vernon Betts and numerous judges and other officials, the PostDispatch’s Celeste Bott reported.“Every day in the city of St. Louis, presumptively innocent individuals remain in jail simply because they are too poor to pay for their freedom,” the suit says. The plaintiffs don’t argue that the concept of requiring bail while awaiting trial is inherently unjust. Rather, they allege

it is being applied here with,“a complete lack of process,” says ArchCity Executive Director Blake Strode. The plaintiff alleges, for example, that judges who initially set bail don’t follow standard legal guidelines, such as assessing the necessity of cash bail, the defendant’s ability to pay, the available alternatives to bail or other factors. The average cash bail is around $25,000. If defendants attempt to argue over the necessity or amount of the bail, they are told a lawyer has to make that argument, the lawsuit adds. A defendant who can’t afford a lawyer has to wait until a public defender is appointed — a wait that often lasts a month or more. The defendant sits behind bars that whole time. The announcement Wednesday by Missouri Supreme Court Chief Justice Zel Fischer of new rules restricting use of bail by the state’s courts adds much-needed clarity, but ArchCity is pressing ahead with its suit anyway, as it should. Setting new rules doesn’t mean much if, as alleged, the city court system is ignoring the rules already in place. Certainly there are cases in which high bail is appropriate. But it’s a denial of due process if St. Louis’ justice system automatically jails defendants for weeks awaiting trial while they receive no legal representation and no avenue to argue the conditions of bail. Ultimately, it’s a denial of the core principle of “innocent until proven guilty.”

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Better Together is like buying a fun-size candy bar Do St. Louis County residents like funsize candy bars? That’s where you pay more for less candy than you used to get in years past. Somehow we’re supposed to think getting ripped off is fun. Well that’s exactly what the Better Together proponents are trying to sell us. Less representation. More taxation. Oh, but never fear, St. Louis County: Better Together is ready with its community organizers to listen to our concerns and assure us nothing like that will ever happen. St. Louis city crime statistics are front-page news. St. Louis city finances are depleted. City residents show up on local TV stations complaining about their trash not being picked up on a pretty regular basis. Do St. Louis County residents need to see more to figure out what’s in store for us if these power- and money-hungry people get their way? They will say anything to get our support, because they can’t wait to get their hands on our money. And this is nothing new. Remember St. Louis 2004 folks? Same agenda — different name. If they don’t schmooze enough people to vote for their power grab this time around, they’ll just wait a few years and try it again under another benign and happy name. Don’t fall for it, St. Louis County. Carol Buzzetta • Florissant

No room for more elitists in St. Charles County Regarding “Better Together plans for lawsuits” (Jan. 30): Our sincerest apology: St. Charles County has already exceeded our allocation of white elitists and must graciously decline Chesterfield’s application. Henry Watkins • O’Fallon, Mo.

Approach to deciding makeup of metro area is outrageous So Better Together and the Post-Dispatch think bigger is better (editorial “A greater St. Louis,” Jan. 29)? I don’t know which is more outrageous: having five elitists or millions of people in outstate Missouri decide the political, economic and social makeup of the St. Louis metro area. Of course, there are some advantages to some kind of consolidation. But the approach being taken sure smells like a money and power grab running wild. I don’t know who these 10,000 residents are that the editorial mentions helped craft this product, but I know I wasn’t one of them. David M. Huddart • Clayton

Missouri should require treatment for animal abusers Kudos to Missouri state Rep. Chrissy Sommer, R-St. Charles, for sponsoring legislation that would allow — and in some cases require — psychiatric or psychological evaluation and treatment for people convicted of animal abuse (“Animal abusers could be ordered into counseling under state proposal,” Jan. 29). As the story noted, the National Sheriffs’ Association recognizes what humane organizations have long known: that animal abuse is a precursor to other forms of abuse and crimes, from domestic violence to murder. In 2016, the FBI added animal cruelty to its National Incident-Based Reporting System in an effort to get a more complete picture of the nature of

animal abuse, the crimes for which it is a marker, and the best plans for intervention. Illinois has already mandated psychological counseling for various forms of animal cruelty. It is past time for Missouri to do so. The Legislature should pass Sommer’s bill. And while they’re at it, they should require counseling for people who abuse humans as well. Sarah Newman • Lake Saint Louis

Sultan’s column pours scorn on innocent people Aisha Sultan’s column “Lessons for Covington Catholic parents” (Jan. 27) was unbelievably incongruous. It was posited on a false narrative that had been later corrected. The Covington Catholic school boys were simply waiting at the appointed place for their bus. They were called unspeakable names by the Black Hebrew Israelites. That was racism. Then Native American Nathan Phillips marched into their group beating his drum. One or some of the Native Americans told them they didn’t belong here. They were harassed. Sultan accused the student, Nick Sandmann, of having a smirk on his face. That was no smirk; it was a clear, nonthreatening, respectful smile. A biased mind will ultimately determine a willful, biased interpretation. Sultan’s comparison to the Julie Williams’ experience is both illogical and irrational. There is no equivalency. This didn’t happen on an uncrowded sidewalk, as did Williams’ experience. It happened in a mass of people with little wiggle room. She ends her disparaging column with how she would want her children to act toward someone shouting slurs at them or their friends. I hope she would want her children to never falsely pour scorn on innocent people, as she did in her column. Helen Louise Herndon • Kirkwood

Inviting Arpaio to Republican gathering is a mistake As a Republican, it is a profound disappointment that the St. Louis County GOP leadership invited Sheriff Joe Arpaio to headline this year’s LincolnReagan dinner. Those who argue Arpaio deserves this honor by virtue of his “long and distinguished” law enforcement career exhibit no discernment, if not willful ignorance. Yes, Arpaio’s career was long and distinguished — long in misconduct, malfeasance and abuse, and distinguished by brazen lawlessness. He deserves no platform or honor from the party of Lincoln and Reagan. His invitation to speak at a dinner named for those two men profanes the name of both. The Lincoln-Reagan dinner is an opportunity to showcase why the Republican values of individual freedom, limited government and fiscal responsibility are the principles best suited to guide our nation’s governance. Arpaio’s career honored none of those values. At a time when the Republican Party desperately needs to become a bigger tent, this choice is more suited to shrink us to the size of a cocktail umbrella. Arpaio’s invitation should be rescinded and given to a speaker worth of the legacy of Lincoln, Reagan and the GOP. Otherwise, there will soon be no legacy worth honoring. Ryan Prisock • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

GREED OR SELF-DEFENSE? • The classic definition of chutzpah is the child who kills both of his parents, then begs for mercy because he is an orphan.

That story comes to mind in the case in California where two juries have deadlocked on verdicts for Lyle and Erik Menendez, the brothers who said they killed their parents to end years of abuse. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

By any other name Any new entity formed by city-county merger needs a new name entirely. BY DAN CONNORS

When out of towners ask where you’re from, what do you tell them? Much is being made of the St. Louis city/county merger proposal by Better Together. As a lifelong resident of this area, I’m still putting my head around it. No doubt there will be intense discussion between now and the election in 2020, some of it fueled by emotion and some by statistics. The problem as I see it is that the discussion has become a question of identity. For generations now, those living in the county have looked down at those in the city, establishing a dual identity as both St. Louisans and citizens of their own special little haven in the suburbs — Creve Coeur, Florissant, Kirkwood, etc. Chesterfield is looking into seceding from

the county, and many other municipalities may be as well. Something like this not only steps all over the status quo of multiple bureaucracies, but the very identities of the citizens who prefer to separate themselves. In an instant, we would become the ninth- or 10thlargest city in the U.S., and our rankings in national lists of crime, health care and livability would change dramatically (hopefully for the better.) The fractured nature of our current governmental system holds St. Louis back in many ways, but the real question Better Together needs to address is, “Who are we, and what do we stand for?” How do we convince new businesses, families conventions and tourists to choose this city over others? There needs to be a positive vision to convince the many angry and scared citizens that this is

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Scaffolding surrounds the statue of King Louis IX as workers begin the process of restoration in 2017.

the better way to go. Where to start? How about with a name? Our name is our brand. As Bill McClellan has pointed out before in the Post-Dispatch, St. Louis could use a better name. The city is named after an obscure 13th century French monarch who had nothing to do with the new world. (For decades, I thought St. Louis was named after Louis XIV, who’s much better known.)

Why would Pierre Laclede name his new settlement after Louis IX of all people? I propose the new entity formed by this union needs a new name entirely, in order to make a fresh start and overcome decades of provincialism and stagnation. But what name should we use? My first choice would be Baseball Heaven, Mo., because if there’s anything that unites this entire

Dan Connors of St. Louis County is a lifelong St. Louisan and CPA. He’s a freelance writer working on a novel set all around the St. Louis area, “Skunked.” He can be reached at connorsd@aol.com.

In Afghanistan, we have delegitimized the government we claim to support. BY RYAN CROCKER

AP

Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax is no way to run government — but a good way to run a campaign Wealth taxes, once popular among Western nations, are trending toward extinction. There are three things to note about Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s proposed wealth tax. The first is that it won’t do what she promises. The second is that it won’t happen. And the third is that both of those cavils are almost beside the point. The Massachusetts Democrat wants to tax fortunes greater than $50 million at a rate of 2 percent of assets a year, with billionaires kicking in an additional 1 percent. Economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman estimate that the tax would raise $2.75 trillion over 10 years, all from people most voters don’t like very well. The plan is less realistic than wishful. Saez and Zucman McArdle assume perfect implementation, with no broad exemptions that would enable ultrarich people, and their squads of tax attorneys, to structure their wealth around the tax. After a few rounds of legislative horse-trading, any real-world bill would be much more complex than the Warren camp envisions and thus easier to avoid. Which is why most countries have decided to avoid the bother. Consumption taxes such as sales or value-added taxes are easy to administer and raise lots of revenue. Income taxes are trickier but still simple compared with taxing wealth. Most people regularly receive payments that are easy to track and can be valued at ... the sum of the payments. But what is the value of a business with one shareholder? A large piece of timberland that hasn’t been sold for 50 years? An

then perhaps so can Ladue and Clayton. And if we can create a better, more cohesive unit, including Metro East, St. Charles and Jefferson counties where possible, we can join the likes of Louisville and Indianapolis, who’ve already entered the 21st century with their own restructuring. When people ask me where I’m from, I always say St. Louis, even though I’ve never lived within the city limits. I wrote on these pages about the 250 cakes that graced our region just five years ago,and my search for all of them gave me a unique appreciation for the many unique treasures this area has to offer. We have a great opportunity and challenge here with St. Louis; we just need to organize it and brand it better than we’re doing currently. Meet me in Cahokia?

U.S. is surrendering to the Taliban

The Massachusetts Democrat wants to tax fortunes greater than $50 million at a rate of 2 percent of assets a year, with billionaires kicking in an additional 1 percent. Economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman estimate that the tax would raise $2.75 trillion over 10 years, all from people most voters don’t like very well.

BY MEGAN MCARDLE

region, it’s baseball. Or how about selling the naming rights to any company that wants to pay for them? Think of the money. Topeka renamed itself Google, Kan., trying to get new high-speed internet project. (It didn’t work.) Another idea would be to name the new city Chesterfield, just to mess with the folks in West County. (Sorry guys, we really don’t want you to leave us.) The best choice, however, remains Cahokia, Mo., in honor of the mound builders who established this region as a civilizational hub over a thousand years ago. That name sounds both powerful and iconic to me and would give us a unique identity. There’s much to be discussed about how a new entity would function, and there’s a ton of mistrust out here in the county about what we would gain and what we would lose. If Dogtown and Central West End can exist as functional entities inside a bigger whole,

irreplaceable antique or artwork? Taxing those things means creating a lot of administrative capacity to track and price the assets, with the wealthy and their lawyers fighting every step of the way. That’s one reason wealth taxes, once popular among Western nations, are trending toward extinction; the paltry revenue wasn’t worth the administrative headache. Nor the capital flight and slower rate of capital formation such taxes tend to induce. Those problems would be particularly acute with Warren’s plan because she has targeted the very wealthy rather than the merely affluent. Doing so mitigates the inevitable wailing about family-owned farms, as well as some of the pressure to lard the tax with those revenue-depleting exemptions. But taxing only the super-rich means taxing people with a lot of unique, hard-to-value assets, and who can confound auditors by shifting their wealth into even more of those assets. And these are the minor problems with the Warren plan. The big problem is Article 1, Section 9 of the Constitution, which forbids “direct taxes” on people or property unless they’re “apportioned” — doled out among the states by population. Instituting an income tax required a constitutional amendment to override that clause, and Warren’s plan might well require another. Warren’s team, and many other progressives, have offered ingenious arguments for the plan’s constitutionality. Probably not clever enough, however, to sway a conservative-leaning Supreme Court. But one suspects that feasibility isn’t the goal here. It’s of a piece with the Republicans who kept promising to “repeal and replace” Obamacare without bothering to game out

the “replace” part. Also of a piece with the progressive penchant for ever-larger spending plans based on ever-more-fanciful math. All are symptoms of Congress’ growing inability to legislate. If you can’t do anything anyway, then why not make your presidential promises really amazing, rather than tepidly realistic? If the plans die in committee, voters may never find out the truth; better yet, they may blame the opposition rather than your excessively vibrant fantasy life. Political theater has always been a key part of lawmaking, but now that Congress has given up on lawmaking, it’s all we have left. Fiery monologues ... wild applause from fans ... impassioned booing from the peanut gallery ... then bring down the curtain and start getting ready for the next performance. It’s troubling that Warren is reviving a dusty old policy idea that has failed almost everywhere it has been tried. But it’s much more troubling that she has decided to focus her agenda on a proposal that almost certainly cannot be implemented without getting three-quarters of the states to vote for a constitutional amendment — or a Supreme Court that skews to the left. Offering policies that can’t possibly be implemented as described, even if all the political winds line up just right, was supposed to be a Trumpian trait. More and more, it’s becoming business as usual. It’s no way to run a government, but in the current climate, it is, sadly, a pretty good way to run a presidential campaign. Megan McArdle Twitter: @asymmetricinfo Copyright The Washington Post

January 2002. I arrive in Kabul, Afghanistan, to reopen the U.S. Embassy. Destruction is everywhere. Kabul airport is closed, its runways cratered and littered with destroyed aircraft. The drive south from the military base at Bagram is through a wasteland. Nothing grows. No structures stand. In the city itself, entire blocks have been reduced to rubble, recalling images of Berlin in 1945. More than two decades of almost constant war left a terrible legacy. The damage was not only to the physical infrastructure. The Afghan people had suffered enormously through the civil war that began in the late 1970s and the tyranny of the Taliban that followed. None had suffered more than Afghan women and girls. After the U.S. invasion in October 2001 ousted the Taliban for harboring the alQaida planners of the 9/11 terrorist attack, the human toll from the Taliban rule is why the United States’ initial assistance efforts focused on people rather than things. I remember taking our first congressional visitor, Joe Biden, D-Del., who was then chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, to visit a girls school that we had helped to open. A first-grade class that Biden visited had students from 6 to 12. The older girls had reached school age when the Taliban was in power, so they had been denied an education. They weren’t embarrassed now to be in a class with children half their age — they were just happy to be learning. At the end of Taliban rule, about 900,000 children were in school, all of them boys. When I left Afghanistan as ambassador in 2012, there were 8 million students, 40 percent of them girls. We also encouraged Afghan women to play their rightful roles in business, in the Legislature, elsewhere in government and in the military, and they did. The implicit message was that if you step forward, we’ve got your back. It was a time when American interests and American values were in harmony. I hosted receptions to recognize Afghan women of courage. Through the U.S. Agency for International Development, we funded efforts to establish shelters for women fleeing spousal or other familial abuse — a reminder that in

Afghanistan’s male-dominated society, it wasn’t only the Taliban who threatened women’s safety. Now, the United States is negotiating directly with the Taliban. A framework agreement was announced on Monday calling for a cease-fire that could lead to the full withdrawal of U.S. troops. The Taliban would commit to not harboring terrorist organizations that could threaten U.S. security. In other words, the Taliban promised no 9/11 replay. The framework was reached without the involvement of the Afghan government. The Taliban has said all along that it refuses to negotiate with the government, which it considers to be the illegitimate puppet of the U.S. occupation. By acceding to this Taliban demand, we have ourselves delegitimized the government we claim to support. This current process bears an unfortunate resemblance to the Paris peace talks during the Vietnam War. Then, as now, it was clear that we were just negotiating the terms of our surrender. The Taliban will offer any number of commitments, knowing that when we are gone and the Taliban is back, we will have no means of enforcing any of them. It does not have to go like this. The United States could announce that talks won’t proceed beyond the framework, to matters of substance, without the full inclusion of the Afghan government. Right now, the inclusion of the Afghans is only theoretical. We could also note that unless some other solution is found, U.S. troops will remain in Afghanistan as long as the current government wants them, protecting the United States’ national security interests and defending core values, such as women’s rights, that we have fostered there since 2001. President Barack Obama proved in Iraq that America cannot end a war by withdrawing its forces — the battle space is simply left to our adversaries. In Afghanistan, President Donald Trump has a choice. He can follow Obama’s example and leave the country to the Taliban, or he can make clear that the United States has interests, values and allies, and will stand behind them. Ryan Crocker is a diplomat in residence at Princeton University and a former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait and Lebanon.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

OBITUARIES Adams, Jack L. - Ballwin Brannaker, Evelyn Daisy - Swansea, IL Brunnert, Sylvester - Florissant Carl, Betty Jo - Pacific, MO Enright, Helen M. - St. Louis Floden, Virginia Ann - St. Peters, MO Grix, Loraine Marie - St. Charles

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Hanch, David J. - Manchester, MO Harper, Elizabeth June - St. Louis Heath, Thomas Grover - St. Charles Horn, Harland - St. Louis Kalmon, Rita - St. Louis Mueller, Phyllis Ann - Augusta, MO, formerly Florissant Nestor, Edward M. - St. Louis

Enright, Helen M.

Newman, LaVerne S. - St. Louis Patrick, Evelyn - St. Louis Reed, Patricia Ann - St. Louis Robb, Jacquelyn F. - Hazelwood Schmid, Beatrice M. - St. Charles Waltersam, Paula - St. Louis Whitworth, Anthony P. - Chesterfield

Patrick, Evelyn

90, Jan. 30, 2019. Wife of the Evelyn passed away peacefully at late Eugene Enright; beloved Mari de Villa Senior Care Center mo t h e r o f M a u r e e n (J oh n ) of Alzheimer's disease January Berosky, Tom (Jean) Enright, Jeff 16 at age 86 years. She was Enright, Jennifer (Eric) Renfer comforted by family and friends and the late Christine Enright; d u rin g h er s ix yea rs t h ere. grandmother of 8 and greatGrateful for sharing her life are: grandmother of 2. She was a her husband Dr. Roman Patrick; devoted wife and mother, and her sons Mark of Sandy, UT, enjoyed spending time with her Scott of St. Louis; her grandson family. She was a devout Daniel of Naples, FL; plus many Catholic. If desired, donations to nephews, nieces and cousins. the Juvenile Diabetes She has a namesake, Evelyn Foundation. Parker in CA. She was preceded Service: Private services held. A service of JOHN L. in death by her parents William and Amanda Parker, brothers ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes. William and Grady and a sister, Lorene. Her daughter, Heather, died at age twenty-seven. Evelyn was born in the village of Wolf Mountain, NC and Adams, Jack L. Floden, Virginia Ann graduated from high school in Mill Spring, NC. She received RN 87, of Ballwin, Missouri, died 85, on 1/30/2019. Vis: Mon., 2/4, 4-7 p.m., Baue, 3950 and BSN degrees from Duke University, Durham, NC then joined peacefully on January 28, 2019, West Clay St., burial Mapelwood Memorial Lawn Cemetery, the faculty at Duke teaching pediatric nursing. After the family in Chesterfield, Missouri. Emporia, KS on 2/6, 1 p.m. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com moved to St. Louis in 1964 and after the children graduated The Reverend Jack L. Adams from high school Evelyn studied economics at St. Louis was born on June 5, 1931, in University and the University of Missouri - St. Louis. She joined Grix, Loraine Marie Harrisburg, IL and grew up in the a women's investment group and became a very successful c o a l m i n i n g c o mmu n i t y o f (nee Olive), 1/31/2019. Vis: 4-8 p.m. Fri., 2/1 at Hutchens-Stygar. investor. Mass 10 a.m. Sat., 2/2 at St. Robert Bellarmine. Interment Galatia, IL. He was the beloved Evelyn's interests included: fishing, crafting and sewing only son of Rex and Essie Adams. Calvary. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com novelty items for craft and art fairs, sewing clothing items for Jack was a graduate of Southern small children at Kingdom House and gardening. She was Illinois University at Carbondale Hanch, David J. known for her ability to brighten a room, her positive energy, and Drew Theological Seminary baptized into the Hope of Christ's kind nature and wonderful smile. in Madison, NJ. Resurrection, Tuesday, January The family wishes to express thanks to the staff at Mari de Jack began his career as a 29, 2019 at the age of 70. Villa for the care Evelyn received and to the musicians who young pastor to four tiny Methodist churches in the vicinity of A Webster Groves Native, was provided entertainment each afternoon for patients and guests. Crab Orchard, IL, from 1950 - 1953 and at Dickinson Memorial, the beloved husband of 37 years Services: A gathering will be held for friends and family at Mt. Staten Island, NY, 1953 - 1956. Other pastorates in Illinois were to Barbara Hanch (nee Lang); Zion Methodist Church, 1485 Craig Road, St. Louis, MO at 2:30 at East St. Louis, Carbondale, East Alton and Carmi. In 1973, loving father of Steven (Kate) p.m., Saturday, February 2, followed by a memorial service at Jack moved to the Missouri East Conference of the United Hanch and Julie (Daniel) Clark; 3:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please plant a flower where you Methodist Church where he ministered at Union UMC until 1982 brother of Mark and Chris Hanch; wish this spring. Donations may be made to a charity of your and then Salem-in-Ladue UMC until his retirement in 1994. dear uncle, cousin and friend. choice. Jack married his high school sweetheart, Mary Lou Fletcher, in Services: Funeral Mass at St. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com 1950. He and Mary Lou had four sons, Steve, Stan, Dave and Joseph Catholic Church, Greg. Mary Lou passed away in 2011 after 60 years of a Manchester, Monday, February wonderful marriage. Jack was lucky enough to find another Reed, Patricia Ann 4 t h a t 10 :0 0 a.m. In lieu of lovely woman with whom to share his life, Annie (Heagerty) flowers, contributions may be made to American Kidney (nee Kelly) Wednesday, January 30, 2019. Beloved wife of the Piskulich. Married in 2012, they divided their time between Foundation or Masses. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral late Nelson J. Reed Jr.; dear mother of Mary (Nathan) Bement, Ballwin and a home on the Lake of the Ozarks. Paul (Dona Coleman) Reed, Peter (Karen) Reed and the late Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, In addition to his role as a Methodist pastor, Jack was also a Saturday, February 2nd from 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign Daniel and Karen (surviving Ann Marie Digiacomo) Reed; dear community leader in various organizations in each of the the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com. grandmother of Natalie, Jackie, Heather, Holly, Nate and Holly; municipalities where he served. Over the years, Jack spent dear great-grandmother of Alyssa, Kinley, Blake, Sidney and many an hour on the golf course with his countless friends from Brady; dear sister of Charles (Nancy) and Michael (Kathy) Kelly; Harper, Elizabeth June all walks of life. He was a long-time member of Glen Echo our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Country Club. Visitation Saturday, February 2, 2019, 10 a.m. until service at Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Jack is survived by his dear wife, Annie, his four loving sons, 11 a.m. at St. Lucas UCC (11735 Denny Rd.) Interment St. Tuesday, February 5, 10:00 a.m. Interment Lakewood Park Steve (Barbara), Stan (Francesca), Dave (Blair) and Greg Lucas UCC Cemetery. Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the National (Sheila); one step-son Pat (Michelle), one step-daughter Christy Parkinson's Disease Foundation appreciated. Visitation (Scott); eight grandchildren, three step-grandchildren and six Monday, 4-8 p.m. Heath, Thomas Grover great-grandchildren. of St. Charles, MO, passed away Sunday, January 27, Services: Visitation will be held on Saturday, February 2, 9-11 2019, age 93. Husband of the late Nellie Heath; son of Robb, Jacquelyn F. a.m., with a memorial service to follow, at Manchester United the late Grover and Florence Heath; father of Dan 81, of Hazelwood, MO., died January 20, 2019. Loving mother of Methodist Church, 129 Woods Mill Road, Manchester, MO 63011. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to Manchester (Julie) Heath, Sue (Dave) Salmo, and Mary (Mark) Maltenfort; Paul Roberts and Diana Robb. Loving sister of Jeanette Pauly. UMC, Epworth Children and Family Services or Siteman Cancer survived by two siblings; seven grandchildren; fourteen great- Services: A memorial service will be held on February 2, 2019 at 10:30 a.m. at Florissant Presbyterian Church. Donations can Center. As a final gift of service Reverend Adams donated his grandchildren. Preceded in death by five siblings. Services: Visitation Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 be made to ALZ.org. Alternativefuneralcremation.com body to Washington University School of Medicine. p.m., Memorial Service Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019, 9:30 a.m. at Baue Cave Springs, 3950 West Clay Street. Schmid, Beatrice M. Brannaker, Evelyn Daisy Interment St. Charles Memorial Gardens. Memorials to 102, of St. Charles, on 1/29/19. Visitation: 9:30-10:30am on Sat., (nee Belue), born December 16, People Helper Project. Visit Baue.com 2/2 with a 10:30am Mass immediately following at St. Joseph 1938, passed into God's Care and Catholic Church, Cottleville. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com keeping, Tuesday, January 29, Horn, Harland 2019. Mon., Jan. 28, 2019. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., Sat., Beloved Mother of Chris Waltersam, Paula Feb. 2, 4-8 p.m. with funeral at 6 p.m. (same day) with (Wendy) Brannaker and Dawn (nee Raab) Jan. 29, 2019. Memorial gathering at Fey Funeral honors. Inurnment J.B. Nat'l Cemetery at a later date. (William) Bonezzi. Grandmother Home Mon., Feb. 4, 10:30 a.m. until time of service at 12:15 p.m. of Jack and Alan Brannaker, Burial following at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Ashley and Nick McManus. Sister Kalmon, Rita t o M a rt h a B r o c k m e y e r a n d January 29, 2019. Devoted wife of the late Fredrick Joseph Whitworth, Anthony P. Debbie Carpenter. Dear Aunt, Kalmon. Beloved mother of Kathy Kalmon and Ricky (Julie) Great Aunt and friend to many. Kalmon; loving grandmother of Allison and Lauren Kalmon; 49, of Chesterfield, Missouri died suddenly on January 30th, Proceeded in death by Elmer F. dear sister of Jutta Levy; beloved sister-in-law of David Levy and 2019 at his home. A wake will be held on Sunday, February 3, Brannaker Jr. beloved husband, the late Larry Soffer; dear daughter of the late Samuel and from Noon-3 p.m. at Buchholz Mortuary in Chesterfield and a Wayne Belue brother, Paul Davis brother. Frieda Fass; loving aunt to Bobby (Susan) Soffer, Sheri Soffer Mass will be held on Monday, 10 am at St. Clare of Assisi Services: Funeral service at St. John United Church of Christ, and Steven Soffer; dear great-aunt to Landon Soffer and Drew Church. 332 Old Sulphur Spring Rd., Manchester, Saturday, 10:00 a.m. Soffer; beloved aunt to Ann Soffer; companion and dear friend Tony was born on January 31st, 1969. He was a graduate of Interment St. John United Church of Christ Cemetery. In lieu of of David Samuels. She leaves behind many relatives and dear Chaminade College Preparatory School and the University of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association. friends in St. Louis and throughout the country. Missouri. He loved skiing with his boys, and cheering for the Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, Services: Graveside service Sunday, February 3, 11:00 a.m. at Mizzou Tigers. He was the husband of Elizabeth (Grady) 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday 4-8 p.m. Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Contributions in Whitworth, proud father of Jack and Clayton Whitworth, son of and Saturday, at the church, 9 a.m. until time of service. Jacqueline (Moss) Whitworth and the late George H. Whitworth, her memory may be made to the Alzheimer's Association, Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at brother of Jocelyn (Stephen) Einspanier, Eileen Whitworth and 9370 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO, 63132. Schrader.com. Christopher Whitworth. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE Tony was committed to overcoming his battle with chronic alcoholism. It is a horrible disease that took his life, but did not Brunnert, Sylvester "Frog" Mueller, Phyllis Ann diminish it. We hope that Tony's death and legacy shine a light 94, Florissant, MO, January 29, 2019. Visitation Mon., (nee Lovell), 84, of Augusta, MO, formerly of Florissant, MO, on, and help lessen the stigma associated with alcohol-related Feb. 4, 9:30-11:30 a.m. & funeral 11:30 a.m. at Pitman died 1-29-2019. Vis. 11-1 p.m., Monday, 2-4-19 at Kurrus Funeral illnesses. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a scholFuneral Home, Warrenton, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com Home in Belleville, IL. Funeral 1 p.m. www.kurrusfh.com arship donation to Chaminade College Prep School in Tony's name. Please visit Buchholz Mortuary for more information. Donation link for Chaminade: https://www.chaminadeCarl, Betty Jo Nestor, Edward M. (nee Clyde), 95, on Tues., Jan. 29, 2019. Mother of James M. Carl fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wed. stl.org/support-us/support-us/named-scholarships/namedscholarship-donations and friend to many. January 30, 2019. Beloved husband of Cathy Nestor (nee Smith) Services: Vis. Sat., Feb. 2, 2019, 4 until time of service at 7 p.m. for 36 years; son of the late Edward J. Nestor, Jr. and the late Online Guest book @ www.buchholzmortuary.com at Nieburg-Vitt, Thiebes Funeral Home, 231 E. Union St., Pacific, Peggy Murphy Nestor; dearest father of Thomas (Tera) Nestor, MO 63069. Fraternal Notices Anne Nestor; dearest brother of Kathleen (Jim) Frey, Anne (Michael) Blind; dear brother-in-law of Sandy Lawson and Patricia (Joe) Christopher; dear nephew, cousin, uncle, greatLOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. uncle, neighbor, Herr and friend to many. Please be advised of the death of Services: Visitation 10:00 a.m. until time of service at 12:00 Bro. Harold D. Griffin p.m. on Sat., February 2, 2019 at DeSmet Jesuit High School, Production - Retired 233 S. New Ballas Road, 63141. Private burial at a later date. In Member 61 Years lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to the Edward M. Nestor January 14, 2019 Memorial De Smet Jesuit Scholarship Fund for the benefit of Services were held children of first responders and military, Pancreatic Cancer Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. Action Network: 1500 Rosecrans Avenue, Suite 200, Manhattan David A. Roth, F.S. Beach, CA 90266, and St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf: 1314 Strassner Brentwood, MO 63144. www.boppchapel.com Florists

Newman, LaVerne S.

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

(nee Schultheis) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Tuesday, January 29, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Jack C. Newman; loving mother of Janet (Ron) Hodel, Thomas (the late Cathleen) and James (Jean) Newman; dear grandmother of Heather Hodel and Jacob Newman; dear sister of Deacon Glen Schultheis and the late Marie Schaller; dear aunt, sister-in-law and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, February 4, 9:30 a.m. to St. Dominic Savio Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment JB National C e me t e r y . M e mo r i a l s t o t h e P e r e g r i n e Societ y appreciated. Visitation Sunday, 1-5 p.m.

Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

Dierbergs Florist

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

STLtoday.com/obits


02.01.2019 • FriDay • M 1

WORLD

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A13

European nations back barter deal with Iran Germany, France, Britain strive to sustain nuclear pact, avoid U.S. sanctions BY DAVID RISING associated Press

BERLIN • Three European countries that

have been working to preserve a deal limiting Iran’s nuclear capability have established a new system so their companies can continue trading with the Middle Eastern nation without incurring U.S. sanctions, diplomats said Thursday. The barter-type system set up by France, Germany and Britain is designed to allow businesses to skirt direct financial transactions with Iran and thereby evade possible U.S. sanctions, setting up a potential collision with President Donald

Trump’s hard-line policies on Tehran. Once the process is up and running, a financial institution, known as an “Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges” or INSTEX, would run a payment channel, brokering Iranian imports in and European exports out, while insulating the companies involved. In a joint statement, the foreign ministers of Germany, Britain and France sought to allay Washington’s possible fears. “INSTEX will function under the highest international standards with regards to anti-money laundering, combating the financing of terrorism and EU and U.N. sanctions compliance,” their statement said. The three nations have been working on the plan for months. It follows Trump’s decision last year to unilaterally withdraw from the international accord aimed at preventing Tehran from developing nu-

clear weapons in exchange for economic incentives. His administration also introduced new sanctions on Iran. The other parties to the 2015 agreement — France, Britain, Germany, Russia and China — have been scrambling to keep the deal alive. In recent months, Iranian officials threatened to resume enriching uranium to higher purities than allowed under the deal, putting pressure on the Europeans to find a way around the sanctions. “This is a clear, practical demonstration that we remain firmly committed to the historic 2015 nuclear deal struck with Iran ... for as long as Iran keeps implementing it fully,” British Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt said. The ministers emphasized that their payment channel is “aimed at facilitating legitimate trade between European economic operators and Iran.” Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad

Javad Zarif welcomed the establishment of INSTEX, saying in a tweet it was a “long overdue 1st step” to save the nuclear deal. “We remain ready for constructive engagement with Europe and on equal footing & with mutual respect,” Zarif wrote. The U.S. State Department said it was “closely following” reports on the European mechanism for details about exactly what would be involved. “As the president has made clear, entities that continue to engage in sanctionable activity involving Iran risk severe consequences that could include losing access to the U.S. financial system and the ability to do business with the United States or U.S. companies,” the State Department said in a statement. Many of Europe’s biggest companies shut off all commerce with Iran when the U.S. stepped up sanctions, exercising an abundance of caution.

Opposition leader warns state agents in Venezuela to leave family alone

Concerns grow about waste left behind by dam collapse in Brazil Environmental group has begun testing river water ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUMADINHO, BRAZIL • A Brazilian

environmental group began testing river water Thursday near where a dam holding back mine waste collapsed to measure the level of toxicity and assess risks to humans and other forms of life. The dam failure unleashed a surge of mud that buried buildings adjoining the dam and parts of the nearby city of Brumadinho. Authorities said Thursday 110 bodies had been recovered and 238 people are listed as missing. Vale SA, the Brazilian company that owned and operated the iron ore mine, has said the torrent of reddish-brown mud unleashed Friday did not have dangerous levels of metals. Vale said it was carrying out its own water quality tests. The first tests were made on Jan. 25 and Jan. 26 but the company said it did not have results yet. Environmental groups and federal authorities believe there could be risks. SOS Mata Atlantica made the first of several tests about a half-mile from where the dam failed. Preliminary results in that stretch of the Paraopeba River showed a low level of oxygen in the water and high levels of nitrate and phosphate. The group used a protocol that looks at 14 different parameters, developed in the 1970s by the National Sanitation Foundation, an independent U.S. water testing organization. Within an hour, experts on the ground learned that the water grade of this segment of the river had gone from more than 40 points, or “good,” to 23.8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido is shown Thursday with his wife, Fabiana Rosales, and daughter Miranda.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DIGITALGLOBE VIA AP

This combination of satellite images shows fields and farm homes near Brumadinho, Brazil, on Sept. 23 (top) and on Jan. 25, after a dam collapse.

points, which the index labels as “bad.” Final results will take several days. “There could be some fish (still alive), but only a few species could survive these conditions,” said Thiago Felix, a biologist with the group. Dead fish were seen floating this week along the river miles from the breached

DIGEST

others when they tried to capture it with a net, and injured at least one resident who pelted it with rocks. The injuries were not life-threatening.

Belgian teens again skip school, march for climate protections Thousands of teenagers in Belgium skipped school for the day for the fourth week in a row Thursday in an attempt to push authorities into providing better protection for the world’s climate. Police say the march through Brussels drew at least 12,500 students, and another march in Liege had at least as many protesters as the youth movement spread across the country. In Leuven, near Brussels, there were more than 3,000 protesters, including many primary school pupils. The sustained success of the marches comes despite school measures to dissuade students who continue to stay away every Thursday. It started with a few thousand four weeks ago and swelled to 35,000 last week. The protests have kept a focus on climate change as a political pressure point before national and European Union elections. Poland exported 5,500 pounds of meat from sick cows to EU • Thousands of pounds of meat from sick cows who were slaughtered illegally in Poland were exported to 10 other European Union countries, the country’s top veterinary official said on Thursday. Pawel Niemczuk said about 5,500 pounds of the meat was exported to Finland, Hungary, Estonia, Romania, Sweden, France, Spain, Lithuania, Portugal and Slovakia. Meat from sick cows also went to locations in Poland but has been recalled. The veterinary official said authorities in EU countries to which the meat was exported were alerted.

dam. An indigenous community said they were told not to use the water or fish in it. Even if the tests don’t show dangerous levels of toxicity, experts say that high levels of iron rust and aluminum could alter the river bottom, harming the river’s ecosystem.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A protester takes part in a climate change rally attended by thousands of students in Brussels on Thursday.

Arrested Cameroon opposition leader faces 8 charges • The attorney for Cameroon’s arrested main opposition leader says he faces eight charges including sedition, insurrection and inciting violence. Christopher Ndong said Thursday that Maurice Kamto also faces charges that include hostility against the fatherland and disruption of peace. If he is found guilty, he could face five years to life in prison. Kamto and members of his Movement for the Renaissance of Cameroon party were arrested on Monday in Douala. The party over the weekend had called for protests against what it called irregularities in the Oct. 7 election that saw President Paul Biya easily win a seventh term. Leopard strays into residential area in India, injures 4 • A leopard strayed into a residential area in India on Thursday and injured at least four people before it was locked inside a room, a forest ranger said. Kuldip Kumar said a group of rangers reached the area in Jalandhar city in Punjab state after residents alerted police. He said the leopard bit one ranger and clawed two

French officers convicted in tourist’s rape • Two French policemen have been convicted of gang rape and sentenced to seven years in prison after a Canadian tourist reported being assaulted at the Paris police headquarters, the city’s public prosecutor’s office said Thursday. Emily Spanton said she met a group of officers in an Irish pub in April 2014 and they invited her for a nighttime tour of police headquarters. There, she claimed she was forced to drink whisky, perform oral sex and was raped several times. The Associated Press does not identify alleged victims of sexual violence unless they agree to be named, as Spanton did. The officers denied any wrongdoing and claim Spanton consented. Lebanese factions form government after 9-month deadlock • Lebanese political factions agreed Thursday to form a new government, breaking a nine-month deadlock that only deepened the country’s economic woes. Rival political groups had been locked in disagreement over the makeup of a new government since May, after the country’s first parliamentary elections in nine years. Lebanon’s Shiite group Hezbollah made gains at the expense of the largest Sunni party, led by Prime Minister Saad Hariri. Rival factions worked out a compromise allowing representation of Sunni lawmakers backed by Hezbollah. The government will be headed by Hariri, a Western-backed Sunni politician. From news services

CARACAS, VENEZUELA • The Venezuelan opposition leader challenging Nicolas Maduro’s claim to the presidency warned officers from a feared state security unit Thursday to stay away from his family after he accused them of showing up at his apartment in a tense brush with the very force he is trying to persuade to switch allegiance and back him. A visibly flustered but determined Juan Guaido told a crowd gathered at a university that members of a special police unit known for its brutal tactics had gone to his high-rise apartment in a middleclass neighborhood of Caracas while his 20-month-old daughter was inside. Guaido said four agents from the police’s Special Action Force arrived at the building asking for his wife, who owns the unit. Guaido had been living there with his family until recently, when he began changing locations as a security precaution amid the current crisis. In a statement on Twitter, Venezuela’s police denied that special agents had gone to Guaido’s home, dismissing the claim as “totally FALSE.” Guaido, 35, is at the center of Venezuela’s political upheaval as he presses forward with establishing a transitional government after swearing himself in as the nation’s rightful president in a move denounced by Maduro as a U.S.-backed coup. In a country where the socialist leader’s foes often end up behind bars, Guaido has thus far managed to avoid arrest, but in recent days authorities have let it be known that even as his powerful international support grows Guaido isn’t untouchable. On Tuesday, the government-stacked Supreme Court barred Guaido from leaving the country and froze his bank accounts. “Once more they are playing the intimidation game and once more it has gone bad for them,” Guaido said later Thursday outside his family’s home as supporters cheered. “Children are sacred. Wives are sacred. So don’t cross that red line.” Even while denouncing the special police force, Guaido appealed to them and the military to abandon Maduro and abide by the constitution, which he contends instructs him as leader of the oppositioncontrolled National Assembly to take the presidency. The opposition and a large segment of the international community consider Maduro’s re-election fraudulent, in part because the president’s most popular adversaries were barred from running. A swift end to the tumult appears unlikely as both Guaido and Maduro dig in for a protracted conflict with geopolitical dimensions. Maduro has been crisscrossing Venezuela, overseeing military exercises and vowing to defend his socialist government no matter the cost. The military’s top leadership is backing Maduro.


NEWS

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

New clues to ocean churn that drives climate WA S H I N GT O N • One of the key drivers of the world’s climate is an area in the North Atlantic Ocean where warmer water and colder water mix and swirl. When scientists went for their first close look at this critical underwater dynamo, they found they were looking in the wrong place — by hundreds of miles. The consequences are not quite yet understood, but eventually it could change forecasts of one of the worst-case global warming scenarios — still considered unlikely this century — in which the mixing of the water stops and climate chaos ensues. It’s called the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, and scientists describe it as a giant ocean conveyor belt that moves water from Greenland south to beyond the tip of Africa and into the Indian Ocean. Warm, salty water near the surface moves north and mixes with cold, fresher water near Greenland. As that water cools and sinks, it drives a slow circulation that is critical to global climate, affecting the location of droughts and frequency of hurricanes. It also stores heattrapping carbon dioxide deep in the ocean. The faster it moves, the more warm water gets sent into the depths to cool. The area where warm

it east of Greenland, closer to Scotland. The computer simulations that predict how the climate could change in coming years didn’t factor in exactly where the conveyor belt engine is, and now they may be able to. Lozier and several outside experts said this didn’t change their trust in the models, especially because when the models are checked with what is happening in the real world, they are found to be generally accurate. “It doesn’t mean that the models are all wrong at all,” said Tom Delworth, a senior scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s geophysical lab in Princeton, N.J.

water turns over in the North Atlantic is considered to be the engine of the conveyor belt. Scientists thought it was in the Labrador Sea west of Greenland. But then a new international science team measured temperature, saltiness and the speed of ocean currents throughout the North Atlantic to try to better understand the conveyor belt. The preliminary results after hundreds of measurements in 21 months found that the engine was several hundreds of miles east of where they had figured, said study lead author Susan Lozier, an ocean sciences professor at Duke University. The study, published in Thursday’s journal Science, puts

HAIRCUTS

10

FIND THE CHEAPEST GAS IN TOWN

STLTODAY.COM/ TRAFFIC

this century. But the Nobel Prize-winning scientific panel concluded it is likely to get about a third slower if greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current pace. A study last year found that global warming is weakening the system, saying the conveyor belt was moving at its slowest speed in nearly 140 years of records.

ISABELA LE BRAS VIA AP

A probe that collects water samples and measures temperature, salinity and pressure is prepared for deployment near Greenland in September. Scientists were studying the circulation of warm and cold waters stretching from around Greenland south to beyond the tip of Africa.

$ Check gas prices and see real-time traffic conditions.

sidered a potential climate tipping point that was the premise of the scientifically inaccurate 2004 disaster movie “The Day After Tomorrow.” Based on computer model studies, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported in an earlier study that it was “very unlikely” that the conveyor belt would collapse

MIT’s Carl Wunsch and other outside experts said the study was helpful, but noted that 21 months of study was not enough to know if this location was temporary or permanent. Scientists have long feared that the conveyor belt could be slowing and, in a worst-case scenario, could even stop and cause abrupt and catastrophic climate change. It is con-

BY SETH BORENSTEIN Associated Press

Cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer.

e r a c r i a h Ray’s

Appointment Required. 2544 Lemay Ferry Rd. (Dierbergs Plaza)

314-892-9136

GROUNDHOG DAY STOREWIDE SALE

! F F O % 0 3 0 2 sted Retail Price! Sugge

g th Financin 9 or 12 Mon Financing. t No-Interes le to a il a Av b yers. qualified bu Only. acts New Contr mmerce Contact Co ditional Bank for ad on. informati Installed nly. Materials O 9

, 201

r y 14

ebrua ires F

Exp

Clark Floor Co. Family owned and operated for Over 37 years.

7525 S. Lindbergh

314-487-0151

HRS: M-W-F 9:00 to 7:30, Tues. & Thur. 9:00 to 5:00 Sat. 9:00 to 3:00

Make shopping for your sweetheart easy this year!

Come on,

get app-y! Downloa app today and get instant ccess.

ENTER THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOTS OF LOVE G I V E A W A Y PRESENTED BY

Are you feeling the love? You'll have the chance to take home a great prize!

ENTER DAILY THROUGH FEB. 7:

STLtoday.com/contests


02.01.2019 • FriDay • M 1

NATION

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A15

State of affairs at play in State of the Union Trump plans to focus on unity; shutdown fight, other issues loom BY LAURIE KELLMAN AND LUIS ALONSO LUGO associated Press

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump said Thursday that “unity” would be the theme of his first State of the Union address under divided government and that he respects Stacey Abrams, who will give the Democratic response. “I hope she does a good job. I respect her,” Trump said of Abrams, who will be the first black woman to deliver the rebuttal. Trump will give his speech Tuesday before a joint session of Congress at a sensitive time in talks over keeping the government open and funding the border wall he is demanding as part of any deal. Members of Congress are inviting federal work-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump, shown Thursday in the Oval Office with U.S. manufacturers, announced that his State of the Union address next week will focus on unity. The speech is scheduled for Tuesday night.

ers worried about another shutdown after Feb. 15. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian election meddling also hovers. Trump will also be surrounded by living reminders of the changes wrought by the 2018 midterm elections that ushered Democrats into the House majority. Sitting behind him will be House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat who

maneuvered the president into retreating last week on his demand for a border wall in exchange for an end to the longest government shutdown in history. In the audience will be a record number of women in Congress, many of whom will wear white in honor of suffragettes. In the gallery above will be Victorina Morales, who worked for one of Trump’s clubs in New Jersey for

years though she was born in Guatemala and lived in the U.S. illegally. Morales, a guest of Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said in an interview that she felt respectful toward the president. But she does have a message for him after years of hearing Trump describe immigrants as a scourge that takes jobs from Americans. “Forget about the wall, stop separating families

and focus on immigration reform,” she said. A woman who cleaned the president’s clothes and made his bed at his Bedminster, N.J., club is attending the address, too. Sandra Diaz, 46, a native of Costa Rica who worked at Trump’s club from 2010 to 2013, will be attending as a guest of Rep. Jimmy Gomez, D-Calif., according to the attorney for both women, Anibal Romero.

Diaz said last month that she was also hired without legal papers and that supervisors at the club knew it. She is now a legal permanent U.S. resident. Diaz said she decided to speak out because she was angry about the president’s describing immigrants as violent. After Trump speaks it will be Abrams’ turn. Abrams has been heavily courted by Democrats to run for a U.S. Senate from Georgia seat after narrowly losing her bid to be the nation’s first African-American female governor. On Sunday, Abrams will take her push for voting rights to the airwaves in her home state during the Super Bowl. Abrams’ political group, Fair Fight, has bought airtime on Georgia affiliates broadcasting the game so that Abrams, who is from Atlanta, can push for election law changes. Abrams, 45, has said her rebuttal will come “at a moment when our nation needs to hear from leaders who can unite for a common purpose.”

Judge approves rigorous reforms in consent decree for Chicago police

Government’s witnesses ‘lie, steal’ for a living, El Chapo’s lawyer says

Changes include paperwork anytime an officer points a gun at someone

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY MICHAEL TARM associated Press

CHICAGO • A federal judge on Thursday approved a far-reaching plan for court-supervised reforms of the beleaguered Chicago Police Department, two years after a U.S. Justice Department report found a long history of racial bias and excessive use of force by officers in the nation’s third-largest city. Judge Robert Dow’s approval of the consent decree — without ordering any notable changes to the draft presented to him — is a culmination of a process that started with the release of video in 2015 showing white Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times. It led to the Justice Department investigation. The 236-page plan negotiated between Illinois and Chicago officials calls for community policing, data collection on how some 13,500 officers work and expanded training on use of force. One provision will require officers to file paperwork each time they point a gun at someone, even if they don’t fire. Dow’s ruling calls the plan “an important step” to repair the damaged relationship between the police department and members of the community it has sworn to protect.

“But it is a beginning, not an end,” he said. “The consent decree is not a panacea, nor is it a magic wand.” Dow cited some complaints about the tens of millions of dollars the plan will cost over what could take a decade or more to implement. That includes $2.85 million annually for a monitoring team. He noted Chicago has paid more than $650 million since 2004 for not fully reforming the department in litigation and settlements over police abuse. He said if the city had spent $2.85 million a year since its founding in 1790, it still wouldn’t have reached that lofty amount from the past 15 years alone. Of the thousands of comments in filings, letters, emails and a special two-day hearing to gauge public opinion on the plan, Dow said most were supportive of the plan — with the notable exception of the police union. Police union leaders took particular exception to the gun-pointing provision, which they argued would cause officers to hesitate to draw weapons at times when their lives are in danger. “Some provisions have been criticized, either as too strict or too lax,” Dow wrote. “But, on balance, the vast majority of public commenters have en-

Estate Liquidation & Evaluation

NEW YORK • A defense attorney for Joaquin “El

CHICAGO TRIBUNE VIA AP

Former Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke attends his sentencing hearing in Chicago on Jan. 18 for a 2014 shooting that led to federal scrutiny and police department reforms approved by a judge on Thursday.

dorsed the vast majority of the decree’s provisions — and many who think the decree should go further are content to accept the decree as it is.” Among other provisions are that officers issue verbal warnings before any use of force and provide life-saving aid after force is used. It also set a 180-day deadline for investigations to be completed by the police department’s internal affairs bureau and the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, and calls for better training and supervision of officers. A key to the plan is an independent monitor appointed by the judge. The person would ensure that changes called for in how police work are implemented and report to the judge on whether the city is hitting benchmarks. The oversight would continue until a judge determines the city has fully complied,

a process that is likely to take several years. The plan would build on some changes the department already has made, such as issuing body cameras to every officer. Former Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel unveiled the 200-plus-page decree in July. Madigan, with Emanuel’s support, sued the city last year to ensure court oversight was a feature of any reform plan. The lawsuit killed a draft plan negotiated with President Donald Trump’s administration that didn’t envision a court role in reforming the department — a departure from practice during President Barack Obama’s administration. Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions criticized the proposed consent decree, saying it unfairly maligned good officers.

Iowa Republicans seek to weaken courts on abortion ASSOCIATED PRESS

DES MOINES, IOWA • More than

• Antique & Estate Jewelry • Gold, Silver & Platinum Fine Jewelry • Scrap Gold - Broken Chains, Class Rings, Old Wedding Bands, • Certified Diamonds • Gold & Silver Bullion Bars & Coins • Sterling Silver - Flatware, Hollowware, Candlesticks & Old Jewelry Trusted Estate Jewelry Buyers for over 35 Years

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

Chapo” Guzman assailed the federal case against the accused Mexican drug lord as “a fantasy,” telling a U.S. jury Thursday that the prosecution relied on a parade of cooperating witnesses who “lie, steal, cheat, deal drugs and kill people” for a living. In an impassioned closing argument, defense attorney Jeffrey Lichtman said prosecutors failed to address a “600-pound gorilla” of reasonable doubt in their bid to convict one of the world’s most notorious accused drug traffickers. He dismissed the testimony of government witnesses as “repulsive, dishonest garbage” and called into question the motives of the U.S. Justice Department, which he accused of disregarding another man the defense calls the actual cartel leader. The prosecution, Lichtman added, orchestrated a “scripted event” over the past three months in federal court in Brooklyn based on shifting accounts of degenerate drug dealers seeking leniency in their own cases. “A house that’s built on a rotten foundation won’t stand for long,” Lichtman said. Prosecutors have described the evidence against Guzman as overwhelming. Assistant U.S. Attorney Amanda Liskamm, in a rebuttal argument, said it’s “inescapable” that Guzman directed a murderous drug syndicate, calling the shots from behind bars at times. To believe Guzman is not guilty, Liskamm said, is to believe he is the “unluckiest man in the world” — the victim of an implausible conspiracy involving both the FBI and career narcotraffickers. Guzman faces drug and murder conspiracy charges and could spend the rest of his life in an American prison if convicted. Lichtman scoffed at the notion that Guzman amassed multimillion-dollar wealth over the course of three decades. He said the government had failed to produce evidence of ill-gotten gains beyond the word of the cooperating witnesses. Prosecutors “expect you to ignore all the problems in their case,” Lichtman said. “They expect you to ignore the dishonesty of their witnesses.” Lichtman singled out an allegation by a cooperator that Guzman had paid a $100 million bribe to a Mexican president to call off a manhunt. He argued that made no sense since authorities still arrested his client and sent him to the U.S. in 2017 to face drugtrafficking charges The lawyer said it would make more sense that the bribe was paid by Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, since he’s never been arrested. The defense has sought to portray Zambada as the true leader of the cartel.

half of the Republican-dominated Iowa Senate has signed on to a constitutional amendment aimed at weakening the state court system’s power to review abortion restrictions, just days after an Iowa judge overturned what would have been the nation’s broadest such limit. The amendment would state that the Iowa Constitution “does not secure or protect a right to abortion.” Spurred by last week’s legal defeat of a measure seeking to ban abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, it’s an attempt at nullifying Iowa Supreme Court precedent declaring that women have a fundamental right to control their own bodies. Other conservative states have deployed the tactic of a constitutional amendment, which in Iowa would have to twice clear both chambers of the Legislature before going to voters for ratification. The move lays the groundwork to ban abortions in Iowa should the increasingly conservative U.S. Supreme Court overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that established a woman’s legal right to terminate a pregnancy. “When the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, with a constitu-

tional amendment the people and their elected representatives would be able to again decide the issue rather than the state courts in Iowa,” said Clarke Forsythe, senior counsel at Americans United for Life, a Washington-based anti-abortion law firm and advocacy group. Voters in Alabama and West Virginia passed similar constitutional amendments in November. Tennessee passed one in 2014. At the root of much of the state activity is the belief that Roe could be overturned. Such a decision would return the regulation of abortion to the states. The belief is that those with constitutional amendments declaring no right to an abortion exists would have a better chance of abortion-limiting legislation surviving legal challenges. “States hostile to reproductive rights are working to enshrine in the constitution or state statutes something that would come into effect if the federal right is undercut or overturned,” said Elisabeth Smith, chief counsel of state policy for the Center for Reproductive Rights, a New York-based nonprofit group. Heidi Sieck, CEO of #VoteProChoice, a national political campaign that works to elect pro-choice candidates, said even if the Roe fight is lost in the short term, many

women passionate about women’s rights have been compelled to run for office and are winning. The proposed Iowa amendment was introduced Jan. 24 by Republican Sen. Jake Chapman, two days after a state court judge struck down an attempt by the Legislature to limit abortion. It has the backing of 29 out of 50 senators. The legislation came after Judge Michael Huppert’s ruling striking down the “fetal heartbeat” law that Gov. Kim Reynolds signed in May. The measure would have outlawed abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. Huppert Chapman concluded that the Iowa Supreme Court affirmed in a June 2018 ruling that women have a fundamental right to an abortion under the Iowa Constitution and the heartbeat law violated that. “The notion that a woman has a right to an abortion under Iowa’s constitution gravely misinterprets our state’s constitution,” Chapman said. The amendment “puts the responsibility back onto the legislative body. We are the ones who are going to make the determination of what should or should not be,” he said.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

FEBRUARY is National Replacement Window Month at Renewal by Andersen Why did we declare February National Replacement Window Month? Because you’ve just about had it with your drafty rooms that are almost too cold to use! Get this project offer! done and get relief with this special February-only offer!

Call before February 28th!

Get

Get

$350 OFF every window

$700 OFF every patio door

1

0 0 0%

$

Down

with

1

plus

Payments

Interest

Save an extra 3% on your entire order1

for 1 year1

Why Renewal by Andersen? • Renewal by Andersen is the full-service replacement window division of Andersen, a 116-year-old family-owned company with a reputation for excellence in window and patio door craftsmanship. • Our exclusive composite Fibrex® windows are not only beautiful, they’re remarkably strong, offer superior energy efficiency and require minimal maintenance.† • Our factory-trained Certified Master Installers have years of experience installing only windows and patio doors, and they’ll treat you and your home with the utmost respect.

Renewal by Andersen of St. Louis has an amazing reputation. With 182 Google reviews, we have earned a rating of 4.7 s.

Customer Review My experience with Renewal by Andersen was a completely pleasant experience. Everyone involved was a true professional and I’m completely satisfied and happy with my new windows. My new windows have not only eliminated cold and hot air drafts but also greatly improved the sound levels from the nearby streets and highways. I never thought I’d be so excited about windows, but I love my new Renewal by Andersen windows! –Karen K., Renewal by Andersen customer, Chesterfield, MO

Available Exterior Colors**

SANDSTONE

CANVAS

®

TERRATONE

WHITE

COCOA BEAN

DARK BRONZE

BLACK

FOREST GREEN

RED ROCK

Call to schedule your FREE Window and Patio Door Diagnosis

314-328-8898 636-373-7411 618-857-3448 1

Offer not available in all areas. Discount applied by retailer representative at time of contract execution and applies to purchase of 3 or more windows and/or patio doors. Cannot be combined with other offers. To qualify for discount offer, initial contact for a free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis must be made and documented on or before 2/28/19 with the appointment then occurring no more than 10 days after the initial contact. No payments and deferred interest for 12 months available to well qualified buyers on approved credit only. Not all customers may qualify. Higher rates apply for customer with lower credit ratings. Financing not valid with other offers or prior purchases. No Finance Charges will be assessed if promo balance is paid in full in 12 months. Renewal by Andersen retailers are independently owned and operated retailers, and are neither brokers nor lenders. Any finance terms advertised are estimates only, and all financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Renewal by Andersen retailers, under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements. Renewal by Andersen retailers do not assist with, counsel or negotiate financing, other than providing customers an introduction to lenders interested in financing. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are marks of Andersen Corporation. ©2019 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2019 Lead Surge LLC. All rights reserved. *Using U.S. and imported parts. **Not all exterior colors are available as interior colors. Ask your Design Consultant for details. †See limited warranty for details.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 02.01.2019 • B

McKELVEY BOOSTS WU University is renaming its engineering school after Square co-founder BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After a big gift from one of its most famous graduates, Washington University’s engineering school will have a new name soon: the James McKelvey School of Engineering. The donation will fund more engineering scholarships, faculty recruitment and give the school an unconstrained endowment to invest in future needs as research and technology evolves. The amount of the donation was undisclosed. Jim McKelvey, the St. Louis native who co-founded mobile payment company Square and local job-training nonprofit LaunchCode, said he first enrolled in Washington University in 1983 as an economics student. He still graduated with an eco-

“My wish is that someone who doesn’t know they want to be an engineer just comes into this school and finds out.” — Jim McKelvey

nomics degree, but along the way he found computer science at the engineering school, which he said “changed my life.” He earned that degree, too, authoring two computer programming textbooks while still a student. Between more scholarships and the hiring of faculty at the intersection of engineering and other disciplines, he hopes other students can discover engineering the same way he did. “My wish is that someone who doesn’t know they want to be an engineer just comes into this school and finds out,” McKelvey said. Instead of just having an engineering school on the east end of campus, “we have to weave engineering into the fabric of the university,” engineering school Dean

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

This rendering shows McKelvey Hall as it would be viewed looking southeast across the courtyard.

Fallout looms in quartz dispute Stone companies say retroactive duties could bankrupt them

See MCKELVEY • Page B4

McKee marketing retail space next to NGA’s new HQ He owns some 1,600 properties nearby BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Partnership to examine ‘workplace culture’ as interim CEO settles in BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

QILAI SHEN • Bloomberg

TRUMP, XI WILL TALK President’s decision to take personal control of negotiations raises stakes in tussle between world’s largest two economies. B4

A month after ousting its CEO amid reports of poor morale and high turnover, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership moved to get a handle on workplace culture and its hiring procedures. At a special meeting Wednesday, the board voted to establish an “employee experience committee” to review the Partnership’s human resource policies. The committee will oversee matters involving em- Crim ployee compensation, benefits and conduct. It will also “evaluate workplace culture” and ensure professional development for staff, according to the resolution the board passed. “This is in line with a number of previous discussions in terms of just looking at

our overall employee culture and making sure we have adequate policies and procedures in place,” interim CEO Rodney Crim said. Crim, a top executive at the Partnership since its 2013 formation, succeeded CEO Sheila Sweeney in January. Sweeney was hired in 2015 after CEO Denny Coleman retired. Her tenure saw significant turnover, and former employees told the Post-Dispatch the Partnership was beset by low morale and often used as a political tool for St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. Formed in 2013, the Partnership was designed to merge some of the business recruitment functions for St. Louis and St. Louis County. Based in Clayton, most of its staff was See WORKPLACE • Page B5

See MCKEE • Page B4

LAND FOR LEASE Paul McKee is marketing land next to the NGA St. Lo uis A ve.

Parn ell

See NICKLAUS • Page B5

N. Market Jefferson

If you’re remodeling your kitchen, you may find yourself paying more because of a fight over Chinese quartz. Stone companies in St. Louis say countertop quartz, which is actually an engineered material made from crushed stone and resin, has been a growing part of their business in recent years. Quartz countertops are popular because they’re durable and stain-resistant and come in a variety of colors.

The final say on the quartz duties is up to the U.S. International Trade Commission, which is likely to decide by June whether the U.S. industry was injured by Chinese trade practices. A coalition of 200 quartz fabricators — firms that cut the material to size and prepare it for installation — is asking the ITC to use a broad definition of the industry. The firms say U.S. fabricators collectively employ 50,000 workers, far more jobs than are at stake at Cambria. Graniterra, a 25-employee stone fabricator in St. Louis, is part of the coalition. “The tariffs have definitely thrown a major risk or curveball into the quartz market,”

N. Leffingwell

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Some of the companies fear, though, that a trade case involving quartz could put them out of business. Cambria, a quartz producer in Le Sueur, Minn., launched the case last April, alleging that several Chinese companies were subsidized by their country’s government and were dumping product for less than it cost to make. In preliminary rulings last year, the U.S. Commerce Department imposed duties as high as 348 percent on quartz imported from China. That’s in addition to 10 percent tariffs President Donald Trump imposed last year on a broad range of Chinese products. Those tariffs are scheduled to go to 25 percent March 2 unless Trump and Chinese officials settle their trade dispute.

Glasgow

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Joe Siu, a fabricator at Graniterra, hand polishes a quartz countertop Wednesday at the firm’s warehouse at 1551 South Kingshighway.

It’s been just over a month since St. Louis handed off 97 acres north of downtown for the construction of a $1.75 billion intelligence agency facility, and brokers are already marketing property nearby owned by Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration. Gershman Commercial real estate has a brochure out promoting retail space for lease on an almost 23-acre site at the northwest corner of Jefferson and Cass avenues. That’s right across Jefferson from the future home of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, which is expected to open McKee about 2025 with some 3,100 employees. “Located at the main entrance of the NGA campus,” the Gershman brochure says. Though the city terminated McKee’s development rights to the 1,500 acres surrounding the NGA site over the summer, as well as the tax increment financing district that covered it, the marketing material is a reminder that he still owns an estimated 1,600 properties surrounding the site that he acquired over more than a decade. With so much land in the area still owned by NorthSide, much of the future development around the planned NGA site in north St. Louis will still hinge on McKee and his lender, the Bank of Washington, despite their soured relationship with City Hall that has the two sides battling in court. The Gershman brochure shows a site plan with a big-boxstyle retail development plan,

NGA

Cass

20 acres for lease 1/4 MILE Post-Dispatch

BUSINESS

1 M


NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD EXPANDING Plancorp opened an office in San Jose, Calif. HELPING OUT Cigna and Express Scripts employees assembled 3,000 backpacks filled with food for families in the Normandy School District as part of the newly merged company’s national Healthier Kids for Our Future program. GCS Credit Union employees raised $1,000 to benefit the Soup-N-Share Outreach Program. St. Clair County Transit District donated a retired 13-passenger bus to Caritas Family Solutions to provide basic, emergency and recreational transportation for the youths at St. John Bosco Children’s Center. MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS St. Louis Composting Inc. acquired Kansas City-based Lawn-Corps. OPENING Flying Colours Corp., a maintenance, repair, overhaul and completions business, opened at Spirit of St. Louis Airport. Marriott opened a 91-suite TownePlace Suites by Marriott hotel: • 6101 Center Grove Road, Edwardsville. SSM Health Physical Therapy opened an outpatient Day Institute center: • 1552 Country Club Plaza Drive, Unit 1570, St. Charles Regions Bank opened a branch: • 7 South Vandeventer Avenue, St. Louis P’sghetti’s Pasta and Sandwiches opened a restaurant: • 932 Meramec Station Road, Valley Park Total Access Urgent Care opened a center: • 1005 South Big Bend Boulevard, Richmond Heights

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

Clayco, BatesForum building PEOPLE IN BUSINESS Casino rocket plant in Alabama

Queen gets new chief as CQ Holding president

Blue Origin’s BE-4 liquefied natural gas fueled rocket engine. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Clayco and BatesForum are the construction and architectural leaders of Blue Origin’s new rocket manufacturing plant that broke ground this week in Huntsville, Ala. The 350,000-square-foot facility will house the tooling and infrastructure equipment and operations for a BE-4 liquefied natural gas fueled rocket engine used in orbital rockets. United Launch Alliance tapped Kent, Wash.-based Blue Origin in September to supply an engine for its Vulcan Centaur Rocket. Blue Origin was founded by tech entrepreneur Jeff Bezos, chairman, president and CEO of Amazon. The manufacturing plant is slated to open in 2020, and the first test flight of the

new engine is expected in 2021. “This new manufacturing facility is a wonderful addition to Clayco’s aerospace and advanced manufacturing portfolio,” Clayco CEO Bob Clark said in a statement. “This project is a testament to the collaboration of our enterprise and our focus to support clients that have a mission that goes beyond the walls of their facility.” Chicago-based construction and engineering firm Clayco has a sizable office in Overland. St. Louis-based BatesForum was created by the 2018 merger of architectural firm Bates and Clayco subsidiary Forum Studio. Other partners in the facility project are building and engineering partners Fite Building Company, WMB-ROI, Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood Inc. and J.M. Mullis Inc.

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

As Wall Street spasmed with fear, 401(k) savers held steady BY STAN CHOE Associated Press

While professional traders on Wall Street scrambled to sell stocks amid a fear-fueled, nearly 20 percent drop for the S&P 500 late last year, most people at home remained relatively calm when it came to their own retirement savings. So say numbers from Fidelity Investments, which show that the vast majority of 401(k) participants continued to sock savings away in their accounts and refrained from the perhapstempting choice to abandon stocks and hide out in the safety of cash. Investors held the steadfast approach even as the average 401(k) balance dropped to $95,600 by the end of the year, down 10 percent from three months earlier. The chief culprit was a fear about a possible recession, which sent the S&P 500 down 19.8 percent between setting its latest record high on Sept. 20 and hitting a bottom on Christmas Eve. It’s an encouraging sign because stocks have historically provided the best returns over the long term. So, as long as someone is willing to stomach such bouts of volatility and hold on for years, owning stocks is one of the best ways an investor can have a bigger pot to pay for retirement. “The most encouraging thing is that most people didn’t have a knee-jerk reaction, and they continued to save or increased their savings rates” said Jeanne Thompson, senior vice president at Fidelity. “This is the proof that the messaging has gone through. We’ve come a long way in the last 10 years.” Much of the credit goes to one of the most powerful forces in investing: inertia. People often lean toward making no changes, particularly when it involves something as big and complicated as saving for retirement. Employers and the investment industry have tried to harness that for good by automatically enrolling workers into 401(k) plans, automatically setting them up to increase their contributions each year and automatically placing their savings into target-date retirement funds. That way, if workers take no action with their 401(k) accounts, they’re still saving a portion of each paycheck and putting their money into investments that are appropriate for their age. Last quarter, 99.1 percent of all 401(k) participants at Fidelity continued to regularly contribute, the highest percentage since early 2011. Target-date funds take care of how to divvy up an investor’s nest egg, and they keep a lot of money in stocks when retirement is decades away and shift to more bonds as time goes on. That allows savers to put the investment decisions on autopilot, and only 5.6 percent of Fidelity’s 401(k) investors changed how their assets were divvied up during the fourth quarter. “The market went down,” Thompson said, “but in terms of employees’ behavior, it continues to remain incredibly positive.”

0 DOWN

Terry Hanger was promoted to president of CQ Holding Co., which operates the Casino Queen in East St. Louis and the Casino Q u e e n M a rquette in Iowa. Hanger most recently served as general manager of the Casino Queen. He succeeds Jeff Watson, who resigned to serve as an associate Hanger judge on Illinois’ 20th Judicial Circuit. In his new position, Hanger will be responsible for all daily operations, as well as for overseeing governmental, regulatory and organized labor relations. He will also serve on the board of directors for the Casino Queen and be the gaming facility’s key contact for the Illinois and Iowa gaming boards. Hanger joined Casino Queen in 2000 as director of information technology. He earned a master’s degree in information management from Washington University and a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Millikin University.

$

NEW 2019

INFINITI

Givens

Winslow

Schwartz

Ryan Dau

Cara Dau

Hansen

Lochner

Hamilton

Bradley

Kerckhoff

Funk

Caluori

QX60

AWD, SUNROOF, HEATED SEATS LEASE FOR

459

$

*

A MONTH

2 or More Available VIN 5N1DL0MM7KC511630

NEW 2019

INFINITI QX50

AWD, SUNROOF, HEATED SEATS LEASE FOR

496

$ 2 or More Available VIN 3PCAJ5M36KF106489

A MONTH

* 39 mo. lease, $0 down cash or trade. $0 Security Deposit, 10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 mile available. Plus tax, title and license fees. 1st payment not included. See dealer for details. Offers expire 2/28/19.

Cullinan Properties Ltd. added Rob Lochner as vice president of development.

Bommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400

BommaritoINFINITI.com

THURSDAY JOB FAIR • HireLive 2019 Career Fair features companies looking to fill positions in sales, retail and management. • 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Doubletree Westport Hotel, 1973 Craigshire Road • Free, no registration required. For more information, go to hirelive.com

Gateway Extrusions promoted Simone Bradley to maintenance manager. Ogletree Deakins elevated Sarah Kuehnel to shareholder.

Jennifer Bouquet, president of J&J Boring, was re-elected president/ chairman of the board of directors of SITE Improvement Association. Mike Steiniger, president of Kuesel Excavating Co., was elected vice president, and Pat Moriarty, president of Concrete Strategies, was elected as secretarytreasurer. EDM Inc. promoted Chris Kerckhoff to vice president.

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

Spellman Brady & Co. hired Michelle Hamilton as director of business development.

Edward Jones added the following principals: Tim Baldes, Alex Bast, Gail Childs, Irasa Downing, Steve Harris, Niki Hendrixson, Tom Hicks, Colette Kantouth, Aaron Ladner, Maria O’Brien, Emery Skolfield, Kristen Steffens and Jim Crowe.

BUSINESS CALENDAR

Business editor Economic development Energy and environment Business columnist Transportation and real estate

Dau Furniture named Ryan Dau as operations manager and Cara Dau as customer relations manager. The Tom Dunn CPA Firm hired Eric D. Hansen as a partner.

Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2018.

LISA BROWN JACOB BARKER BRYCE GRAY DAVID NICKLAUS MARK SCHLINKMANN

Travis Schwartz was promoted to assistant project manager at Impact Strategies.

*

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

TUESDAY COMMUNITY UPDATE • The Chouteau Greenway project hosts an open house to provide a community update and gather feedback on the public-private partnership. • 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Local 36 Sheet Metal Workers Union Hall, 2319 Chouteau Avenue •For more information, visit ChouteauGreenway.org

Arizon Cos. added Anna Givens as a corporate office coordinator and Zack Winslow as a senior project manager for the Arizon Building Systems product line.

314-340-8127 314-340-8291 314-340-8307 314-340-8213 314-340-8265

Brinkmann Constructors promoted Jennifer Funk to vice president of finance. Samantha E. Caluori joined Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC as an associate.


MARKET PLACE

02.01.2019 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed higher Thursday as the benchmark S&P 500 index posted its best monthly gain since October 2015. Strong corporate earnings helped power January’s monthlong rally. Communications and health care stocks powered Thursday’s gain.

Microsoft

200

10

140

180

8

90

120

160

N D 52-week range

J $116.18

Dow Jones industrials

24,600

Close: 24,999.67 Change: -15.19 (-0.1%)

$123.02

J $218.62

Vol.: 76.8m (3.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $400.5 b

26,000

2,660

Close: 2,704.10 Change: 23.05 (0.9%)

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

25,000

Mar 19 Mar 19 Mar 19

376.50 915.25 516.50

-4.75 -5.75 -.25

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

142.10 124.80 56.25 14.02 278.90

-.27 -1.35 -1.20 -.01 +1.60

Copper

2,400

CHG

Jan 19 Feb 19 Feb 19 Feb 19 Feb 19

Milk

23,000

CLOSE

CHICAGO MERC

Hogs

2,600

ICE

S

O

D

2,200

J

A

S

O

N

D

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 19 Mar 19 Mar 19

74.40 105.90 25.78

+.04 +3.80 -.34

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Mar 19 Feb 19 Feb 19 Mar 19

53.79 1.3593 187.64 2.814

-.44 -.0230 -2.20 -.040

Cotton

J

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

4,833 3,797 1942 880 110 4

2,864 2,491 1882 1034 71 25

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

N

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 25049.62 10110.50 729.46 12315.14 7303.12 2708.95 1837.32 28042.37 1500.74

LOW 24842.09 9992.87 709.67 12196.19 7205.94 2678.65 1821.39 27741.45 1484.82

CLOSE 24999.67 10059.37 727.25 12299.04 7281.74 2704.10 1835.39 27992.41 1499.42

CHG. -15.19 -19.33 +15.15 +76.65 +98.66 +23.05 +8.18 +250.87 +12.48

%CHG. WK -0.06% s -0.19% s +2.13% s +0.63% s +1.37% s +0.86% s +0.45% s +0.90% s +0.84% s

MO QTR s t s t s t s t s t s t s t s t s t

YTD +7.17% +9.69% +2.01% +8.13% +9.74% +7.87% +10.36% +8.71% +11.19%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

39.29 30.06 +.69 +2.3

Aegion Corp

AEGN

15.12

26.80 18.15 +.18 +1.0 +11.2 -29.1 14

+5.3 -16.2

6 2.04f General Motors ... Home Depot

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.62

1.96 +.08 +4.2

+7.5 -11.1 dd

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

71.72 55.88 +.52 +0.9

-4.6 -18.6 15

70.95 69.34 +1.40 +2.1

+6.3 +24.4 24 1.90f Lowes

5.25

TKR GM HD

... Huttig Building Prod HBP 1.00 Lee Enterprises

LEE

52-WK LO HI 30.56

45.00 39.02

-.07 -0.2 +16.7

158.09 215.43 183.53 +1.35 +0.7

+6.8

-4.9 dd

1.52

-7.7 20

4.12

1.57

7.39

2.40 +.03 +1.3 +33.3 -66.5 dd

...

1.84

3.30

2.73 +.06 +2.2 +29.4 +0.8

...

AEE

51.89

LOW

81.16 117.70 96.16 +.41 +0.4

64.55 117.06 76.44 +1.50 +2.0 +16.2 -30.7 19 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

MNK

11.65

Arch Coal

ARCH

75.09 102.61 88.13 +1.50 +1.7

MA

156.80 225.35 211.13 +7.11 +3.5 +11.9 +22.7 49 1.32f

MCD

146.84 190.88 178.78 -2.99 -1.6

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.69

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

33.05 28.47

37.79

87.00 53.61 +1.14 +2.2 +28.3 -38.7 10

Belden Inc

BDC

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

11.80

2.78 +.02 +0.7

+7.8 -74.9 dd

-.60 -2.1 +15.5

-7.1 11

1.60 MasterCard ... McDonald’s

3.75

10.45

4.73

-.11 -2.3 +19.7 -44.1 15

38.13 23.61

-.49 -2.0 +17.4 -32.5

0.20 Peabody Energy

BTU

29.08

47.84 35.70

-.49 -1.4 +17.1

SKIS

4.45

... Perficient

26.63

41.09 29.84 +.15 +0.5

+7.2

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

45.31

62.08 49.09 -2.06 -4.0

-7.2 +8.4 15 1.04b Reinsurance Gp

Centene Corp.

CNC

97.61 148.98 130.57 +.51 +0.4 +13.2 +19.7 18

Charter

CHTR 250.10 396.64 331.05+41.14 +14.2 +16.2 -23.0 66

Citigroup

C

48.42

80.70 64.46 +.24 +0.4 +23.8 -16.4 10

CBSH

53.40

72.55 59.80

Edgewell

EPC

35.85

59.16 39.45 +.30 +0.8

+5.6 -30.9 21

Emerson

EMR

55.39

79.70 65.47

+9.6

Energizer Holdings

-.66 -1.1 -.22 -0.3

ENR

42.74

65.57 47.40 +1.65 +3.6

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

58.15 44.13

Esco Technologies

ESE

54.35

71.47 65.11 +1.03 +1.6

Foresight Energy

FELP

3.19

FutureFuel

FF

11.32

4.34

3.30

...

-6.7 21

1.94 US Bancorp

+5.0 -11.5 31 1.20f US Steel -7.2 13 0.52f Verizon

0.28

31.09 25.51 +.23 +0.9 +14.6 +29.1 46

...

4.56 +.02 +0.4

18.23

RGA

127.84 163.12 144.45 +1.36 +1.0

RELV

... UPS B

-2.6 -11.6 dd

5.68

70.66 102.78 92.82 +.66 +0.7

SR

1.80 Stifel Financial

0.80

PRFT

... Spire Inc

3.83 60.09

4.64

5

POST

... Reliv

+6.1 +9.5 15 1.04f Target Corp.

-.81 -1.8 +17.3 ...

0.28 Post Holdings

1.92 ...

+0.7 +7.8 27

17.87

CAL

Commerce Banc.

-7.2 21

OLN

Caleres Inc.

-0.9 14

+4.1

36.65 21.86 +.02 +0.1 +38.4 +18.9

0.60 Olin

292.47 394.28 385.62 -2.10 -0.5 +19.6 +16.8 36 8.22f Peak Resorts

6.24

4.29 +.23 +5.7

81.13 79.37 +1.61 +2.1

-9.3

+4.1 +21.9

0.52

9

...

-9.2 13

2.40

+1.3 -23.4 dd

...

+3.0

SF

38.39

68.76 47.87

TGT

60.15

90.39 73.00 +.67 +0.9 +10.5

UPS

89.89 133.56 105.40 +4.21 +4.2

USB

43.14

-1.2 12

2.56

+8.1 -18.2 18

3.64

58.50 51.16 +.12 +0.2 +11.9

-8.8 12

X

17.08

47.64 22.54 +.32 +1.4 +23.6 -41.9 13

VZ

46.09

61.58 55.06 +1.06 +2.0

-2.1 +4.6

1.48 0.20

7 2.41f

0.32 WalMart

WMT

81.78 109.98 95.83 +1.03 +1.1

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

59.07

86.31 72.26 +.65 +0.9

+5.8

WFC

43.02

66.31 x48.91

+6.1 -20.8 11 1.80f

-.73 -1.5

+2.9 -10.1 55 2.08f -3.7 13

1.76

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

S&P 500 index delivers biggest monthly gain since 2015 BY DAMIAN J. TROISE AND ALEX VEIGA associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trader Michael Urkonis works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in December.

results beat forecasts, but the company’s key personal computing segment fell short of estimates. Concern over the ongoing U.S.-China trade conflict, uncertainty over the path of interest rates and a weakening global economy helped knock the market into a steep slump in December. While concern over trade and a slowing economy remain, corporate earnings have put investors in a buying mood. And this week, the Federal Reserve sent a strong signal to the markets that it is in no hurry to raise interest rates in coming months, another confidence boost for the market. Among the biggest gainers in January were Xerox and Celgene, which climbed 42.8 percent and 38 percent, respectively. General Electric also turned in a big January gain: 34.2 percent. Boeing notched the biggest January gain in the 30-company Dow, rising 19.6 percent. U.S. crude oil fell 0.8 percent to settle at $53.79 per barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 0.4 percent to close at $61.89 per barrel in London. Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.64 percent from 2.69 percent late Wednesday. The dollar fell to 108.66 yen from 108.92 yen on Wednesday. The euro weakened versus the dollar to $1.1479 from $1.1492. Gold rose 0.7 percent to $1,319.70 an ounce. Silver added 0.9 percent to $16.07 an ounce. Copper gained 0.6 percent to $2.78 a pound. In other energy futures trading, wholesale gasoline fell 1.4 percent to $1.36 a gallon. Heating oil slid 1 percent to $1.88 a gallon. Natural gas dropped 1.4 percent to $2.81 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Energy futures closed lower Thursday. U.S. crude oil, wholesale gasoline, heating oil and natural gas declined. Gold, silver and copper rose.

2.38 1.88 1.38

5.50 5.00 4.50

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.39 2.46 2.55 2.45 2.43 2.51 2.63 3.00

-0.02 -0.03 -0.02 -0.06 -0.08 -0.07 -0.06 -0.05

1.46 1.66 1.89 2.15 2.52 2.65 2.71 2.94

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

TREASURIES

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.98 3.22 7.03 3.85 3.99 .75

-0.01 -0.03 -0.07 ... -0.03 -0.08

1.80 2.97 5.79 3.63 3.45 .56

-.03 -0.1 +15.6 -26.7 15 0.48f

-5.7 -15.4 dd

Wall Street got its mojo back in January after finishing 2018 with its worst December since 1931. Stocks finished higher Thursday, closing out the month with the best gain for the S&P 500 index since October 2015. A series of strong corporate earnings helped power the monthlong rally, which followed a dismal December that nearly brought the benchmark index into a bear market, meaning a decline of 20 percent from a recent peak. Facebook helped drive the market higher on Thursday after reporting solid user metrics. Charter Communications soared after its revenue came in ahead of forecasts. General Electric also climbed. Amazon reported earnings after the close of regular trading that topped Wall Street’s forecasts. Homebuilders surged following new data showing sales of new U.S. homes soared in November. Strong results and outlooks from big U.S. companies seem to be calming some of the fear investors had that a recession might be looming. “Overall, we’re still encouraged that this earning season is comforting to people,” said Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist at LPL Financial. The S&P 500 index rose 23.05 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,704.10. It rose 7.9 percent in January. In December, it tumbled 9.2 percent. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 15.19 points, or 0.1 percent, to 24,999.67. The Nasdaq composite climbed 98.66 points, or 1.4 percent, to 7,281.74. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies picked up 12.48 points, or 0.8 percent, to 1,499.42. Communications, health care and consumer goods and services stocks powered Thursday’s market gain as investors remained focused on corporate earnings, which have been mixed. Facebook beat Wall Street’s profit and revenue forecasts, despite an increase in spending on privacy and security. Its user base grew to 2.32 billion, up 9 percent from a year earlier and higher than analysts’ forecasts. The stock gained 10.8 percent to $166.69. General Electric reported mixed results for the fourth quarter, but revenue and profit were still higher across most of its segments. The industrial conglomerate has been cutting costs and spinning off units for years in a bid to boost its bottom line. The stock climbed 11.6 percent to $10.16. Microsoft fell 1.8 percent to $104.43 although the technology company swung to a profit in its latest quarter, driven by revenue growth at its cloud-computing platform. The

+9.80 +.14 +8.50

+7.1 +16.3 18 2.37f

-1.2 +4.3 18

18.97 18.31 +.45 +2.5 +15.4 +33.0 22 0.24a Wells Fargo

Silver

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

BUD

6

CHG

CLOSE

1319.70 16.02 824.70

Gold

Interestrates Interestrates

Ameren Corp

-1.9

.0267 .7268 .2717 1.3117 .7616 .1489 1.1492 .0141 .2730 .009181 .052435 .0153 .0751 .000901 1.0058

PreciousMetals

Platinum

ABInBev

+6.2

PREV

.0268 .7265 .2742 1.3113 .7615 .1492 1.1444 .0141 .2752 .009184 .052261 .0153 .0754 .000898 1.0054

NEW YORK

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$16.11

PE: ... Vol.: 344.7m (2.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $88.4 b Yield: 0.4%

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

22,000 A

J

ExchangeRates

DATE

Feeder cattle Live cattle

N D 52-week range

$6.66

$225.35

Vol.: 10.9m (2.4x avg.) PE: 42.7 Mkt. Cap: $215.6 b Yield: 0.6%

CHICAGO BOT

2,800

24,000

6

J

Futures

S&P 500

3,000

27,000

N D 52-week range

$156.80

PE: 25.1 Yield: ...

2,720

2,600

10 DAYS

N D 52-week range

GE

Close: $10.16 1.06 or 11.7% The maker of jet engines and electricity turbines announced a $1.5 billion settlement related to the financial crisis in 2008. $12

160

25,120

21,000

General Electric

MA

Close: $211.13 7.11 or 3.5% The credit card company reported better-than-expected financial results, with growth in key purchase volume measures. $220

110

Vol.: 55.3m (1.4x avg.) PE: 43.3 Mkt. Cap: $801.6 b Yield: 1.8%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

MasterCard

FB

Close: $166.69 16.27 or 10.8% The social media company reported robust earnings and revenue, with 9 percent growth in its monthly user base. $180

100

$83.83

24,080

Facebook

MSFT

Close: $104.43 -1.95 or -1.8% The software giant grew earnings in its cloud-computing business, but results in its key personal computing segment were weak. $120

GlobalMarkets INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

2704.10 11173.10 6968.85 27942.47 4992.72 43987.94 20773.49 97393.75 15540.60 8969.27

CHG

CHG

YTD

+23.05 -8.56 +27.22 +299.62 +17.96 +356.58 +216.95 +397.56 +56.05 +3.56

+0.86% -0.08% +0.39% +1.08% +0.36% +0.82% +1.06% +0.41% +0.36% +0.04%

+7.87% +5.82% +3.58% +8.23% +5.54% +5.64% +3.79% +10.82% +8.50% +6.41%

BUSINESS DIGEST Mastercard profit beats on holiday season boost • Mastercard Inc. joined rival Visa Inc. in reporting a biggerthan-expected quarterly profit, as a strong holiday season led to a surge in transactions on its payments network, sending its shares up 5 percent before the bell Thursday. The U.S. holiday season was the strongest in six years, as a strong economy prompted more people to use their credit and debit cards for shopping, helping both Visa and Mastercard. Mastercard’s “gross dollar volume” — which refers to the dollar value of transactions processed — rose 9.5 percent to $1.55 trillion worldwide in the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31. It processed 24.7 billion transactions in the quarter, up 21 percent on a local currency basis. However, growth in cross-border payments, or transactions made by overseas cardholders, slowed at both the companies, suggesting that customers were cutting back on travel plans due to growing political uncertainties. Purchase, N.Y.-based Mastercard’s net income rose to $1.6 billion, or $1.55 per share, from $1.2 billion, or $1.14 per share, a year earlier. Analysts were expecting a profit of $1.52 per share. Net revenue rose to $3.81 billion from $3.31 billion, brushing past analysts’ estimates of $3.79 billion, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. U.S. new home sales jump nearly 17 percent in November • Sales of new U.S. homes soared in November, defying higher mortgage rates. But they were still below year-ago levels. The Commerce Department said Thursday that new home sales jumped 16.9 percent in November from the previous month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 657,000. The report was delayed by the 35-day government shutdown. Despite the healthy gain, sales remained 7.7 percent below the pace from a year ago. The housing market stumbled badly at the end of the year as mortgage rates reached a seven-year high near 5 percent. Sales of existing homes plunged in December and were 3.1 percent lower in 2018 than the previous year. Steady price gains, higher borrowing costs, and a limited supply of available houses have discouraged many would-be buyers.

Claims for U.S. jobless benefits bounce up to 253,000 • The number of Americans applying for unemployment checks hit the highest mark since September 2017, but they’re still low enough that most workers continue to enjoy job security. The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications for jobless aid rose by 53,000 last week to 253,000 from a 49-year low 200,000 the week before. The four-week average, which is less volatile, rose by 5,000 to 220,250. The number of federal workers seeking unemployment benefits fell 42 percent, to 14,739. A 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government ended last week. Claims are a proxy for layoffs. Unemployment has dropped to 3.9 percent. Employers last month went on a hiring spree and added 312,000 jobs. The January jobs report, out Friday, is expected to show they began 2019 by hiring 165,000. Sprint beats revenue estimates, loses fewer phone subscribers • Sprint Corp. on Thursday posted thirdquarter revenue that beat estimates while the U.S. wireless carrier lost fewer customers than expected even as it cut back on price promotions to improve financials. The company posted a net loss of 3 cents a share versus a net profit last year, when it benefited from a U.S. tax cut. Sprint lost a net 26,000 so-called “postpaid” phone subscribers who pay a recurring bill during the third quarter ended Dec. 31, fewer than the 32,000 subscriber losses analysts had expected, according to research firm FactSet. The company has focused on promoting data plans for devices like tablets and smartwatches, which helps customers stick with the carrier longer if they have more devices on the network. Sprint reported a net loss of $141 million, or 3 cents per share, in the quarter, compared with a net income of $7.16 billion, or $1.76 per share, a year earlier, when the company benefited from a change in U.S. tax laws. In July, Sprint revamped its unlimited wireless plans to include more perks at higher prices, in order to make more money from customers on the plans. From staff and wire reports


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

Trump plans trade confab with China’s Xi Tariffs are set to increase March 2 on $200 billion in Chinese goods BY DAVID J. LYNCH Washington Post

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump said Thursday that he would meet Chinese President Xi Jinping in February in hopes of finalizing a trade deal, even as a leading business group warned that China had offered nothing new to resolve several major stumbling blocks during two days of talks this week. Trump’s decision to seize personal control of the negotiations raised the already high stakes in efforts to defuse conflict between the world’s two largest economies. Negotiators, who have yet even to prepare a draft agreement, must in the next 30 days settle issues that have bedeviled U.S. and Chinese diplomats for years in order to leave the two presidents with a manageable to-do list for their head-to-head bargaining. At the White House, the president suggested that the talks might blow past his March deadline, and he cast doubt on the extent of an eventual agreement. “I think we can do it by March 1st. Can you get it down on paper by March 1st? I don’t know. I can tell you on March 1st the tariff on China goes to 25 percent,” he told reporters. Technically, the tariff on $200 billion in imports

from China increases at 12:01 a.m. on March 2. “This is going to be a very big deal, or it’s going to be a deal that we’ll just postpone for a little.” After insisting for the past year that they would not settle for the sort of half measures that previous U.S. administrations had accepted, Trump administration officials now risk precisely that outcome: a partial deal that avoids grappling with the thorniest elements in the Chinese state-led economic model. The two sides made headway this week on opening Chinese markets and securing greater intellectual property protections for foreign companies, according to Myron Brilliant, executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who had spoken to members of the U.S. delegation. But the Chinese team offered nothing to break the deadlock over major elements of China’s economic model, including state subsidies, state-owned enterprises and forced technology transfer, he said. Negotiators this week are not expected to produce a “framework agreement or negotiating document,” which must be fleshed out before Trump

QILAI SHEN • Bloomberg

President Donald Trump and Xi Jinping, China’s president, shake hands during a news conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing in November 2017.

sits down with Xi, Brilliant said. “I don’t think we’re getting very far, not yet in these negotiations. ... We’re going to have to see more progress made,” he added. The White House announced in January that Trump plans to meet in late February with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Vietnam has been discussed as a potential venue, so adding a stop to bargain with Xi might work, some analysts said. “It can’t be settled below that level,” William Reinsch, a former Commerce Department official, said of the U.S.-China trade spat. Even as the president signaled a willingness to take personal control of the negotiations, a leading American business group insisted that additional progress was needed before the two leaders should

meet. Dennis Wilder, a former top China analyst for the CIA, said the Chinese are betting that they can secure a better deal in direct leader-to-leader horsetrading. For the U.S., presidential involvement is needed to break the “bureaucratic logjam” between hardliners such as U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Trump advisors who fear the trade war’s impact on the U.S. economy and financial markets, he said. “Trump is the kind of guy who’s never going to accept that the deal is good enough unless he’s in the room cutting the deal,” Wilder said, calling a summit “the inevitable conclusion” of the trade conflict. Wilder, who directed East Asian affairs for the National Security Council under President George W.

Bush, suggested that the two leaders could huddle on Hainan Island, off the southern Chinese coast. U.S. and Chinese diplomats are scheduled Thursday to conclude two days of talks aimed at a deal to avert an increase in U.S. tariffs on $200 billion in imports from China by a March 2 deadline. “Meetings are going well with good intent and spirit on both sides,” Trump wrote. “China does not want an increase in Tariffs and feels they will do much better if they make a deal. They are correct.” The president is seeking structural changes in China’s state-led economic model as well as a major increase in the annual value of American goods purchased by Chinese customers. China has offered to accelerate orders for products such as American soybeans and liquefied natural gas but is resisting demands to overhaul its industrial policies. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, who heads the Chinese negotiating team, is scheduled to meet with Trump in the Oval Office after the talks. The meeting underscores the dialogue’s seriousness. During a visit by Liu last year, Trump declined to meet with Xi’s close adviser, a slight that irritated Chinese authorities. With a month remaining before their self-imposed deadline, both countries have reasons to want a deal. China’s economy was

slowing even before the U.S. tariffs began depressing demand for its exports, so the trade war is making a difficult situation worse for Xi. Trump, meanwhile, has seen his public approval ratings battered by the partial government shutdown and is said to worry about the tariff war’s impact on U.S. financial markets. The Dow Jones industrial average remains about 8 percent below its October record high. A deal for additional Chinese purchases of American goods can be completed quickly. But some analysts say that securing an agreement addressing U.S. complaints about China’s alleged theft of trade secrets, forced technology transfer requirements for joint ventures and discrimination against foreign companies is difficult to imagine in the short time remaining. The president insisted that he remains intent on a “very comprehensive transaction,” rather than a partial accord. Any deal that does not include China opening its markets for manufacturing and agricultural products to U.S. producers will be”unacceptable,” the president wrote. “China’s representatives and I are trying to do a complete deal, leaving NOTHING unresolved on the table. All of the many problems are being discussed and will be hopefully resolved,” he wrote.

McKee brochure suggests retail, recreation, brewery MCKEE • FROM B1

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

This rendering shows McKelvey Hall as it would be viewed from Skinker Boulevard.

Donation funds needs, opportunities MCKELVEY • FROM B1

Aaron Bobick said. The engineering school is already collaborating with researchers in political science, economics and finance, Bobick said. He hopes to use the McKelvey donation to hire more faculty at the intersection of those disciplines. “Being able to pursue faculty at those boundaries is a tremendous advantage,” Bobick said. In addition to dedicated pools for scholarships and faculty retention, McKelvey said he wanted the school to have an unconstrained pool of money to invest as needs and circumstances change. “I realized having resources in the hands of an institution like Washington University was a very,

very good bet,” McKelvey said. While the engineering school currently has research strengths in nanoparticle technology, materials research, cybersecurity, machine learning and bioengineering, Bobick said the unconstrained gift would allow the university to adapt to unknown change. “Opportunities arise because of the changing dynamics and research and needs of society,” he said. It’s McKelvey’s second major gift to the university in just more than two years. In late 2016, he donated $15 million for the naming rights to a new engineering building under construction and set to open in 2020 near the intersection of Skinker

Boulevard and Forest Park Parkway. James M. McKelvey Sr. Hall, will be named after the younger McKelvey’s father, who was dean of the engineering school for 27 years before retiring in 1996. It will house the Department of Computer Science & Engineering. As part of the major campus renovations underway along Skinker Boulevard, the engineering school is also building the new Henry A. and Elvira H. Jubel Hall, which is expected to open this year and will house the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science. McKelvey’s StarLake Holdings recently purchased the Post-Dispatch building downtown and leases it to the newspaper.

McKelvey has seen the value of San Franciscobased Square, which he co-founded with fellow St. Louis native and Twitter founder Jack Dorsey, more than double in the last year. Since Square’s initial public offering in 2015, its share price rose from about $10 to over $71.35 a share as of Thursday’s closing price. McKelvey has been selling millions of shares of stock over the last year, reducing his holdings from about 20.2 million shares at the end of March 2018 to some 15.6 million shares as of the beginning of this month, according to Securities and Exchange Commission filings. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Compare Our CD Rates

complete with a large commercial space and out-lot development space surrounded by ample parking spots. It says it’s available for retail, restaurant or a large recreation user, apparently the type of indoor recreation businesses that have increasingly filled big-box commercial spaces around the country. The brochure also mentions a microbrewery and nursery “concept.” While McKee’s NorthSide appears to own much of the site, he does not own all the parcels, according to land records. It wasn’t clear whether he intended to acquire them, if he was developing the site himself or looking for a development partner. In an email, McKee said that it was too early to discuss the project and that the brochure had been “mailed out inadvertently.” The brochure also touts McKee’s planned “HealthWorks Campus” on the former Pruitt-Igoe housing complex site at the southeast corner of Jefferson and Cass avenues. He and his representatives have talked

about that project for years since acquiring the site from the city in 2016. Though two walls appeared to go up in the middle of last year, they collapsed in late December after strong wind. A timeline there is uncertain. However, NorthSide’s $20 million GreenLeaf Market project near Tucker Boulevard and 13th Street is almost complete. The ZOOM gas station opened in October, and the GreenLeaf Market grocery is tentatively set to open in the late spring, McKee said in an email. Gershman began marketing the NorthSide real estate just north of the GreenLeaf market in December. There, too, it promotes a leasing opportunity for future retail sites on the edge of a large surface parking lot, including a possible bank, a Dunkin’ Donuts and a three-story hotel with 120 keys. The historic bank building at 13th Street and Cass Avenue is preserved on the site plan. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Missouri State University is accepting applications for a

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER Reporting to the President, the Chief Information Officer (CIO) serves as the senior executive officer responsible for providing leadership and management to the units of the Information Services division and is responsible for system-wide planning, management, security, and coordination of the technology resources of the Missouri State System.

Bank-issued, FDIC-insured 1-year

2-year

3-year

2.55 % 2.65 % 2.90 % APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

APY*

For required qualifications and application procedures: https://jobs.missouristate.edu or call (417) 836-4683.

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 1/24/2019. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Successful candidates must be committed to working with diverse student and community populations. Employment will require a criminal background check at University expense.

FDI-1867H-A

Call or visit your local financial advisor today. www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Katie Warchol, AAMS® Financial Advisor

Heather Aehle Financial Advisor

101 S Hanley Road, Suite 475 Clayton, MO 63105 314-862-1592

1001 Craig Rd Ste 101 Creve Coeur, MO 63146 314-809-1944

EO/AA/M/F/Veterans/Disability/Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity


BUSINESS

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

Shifting prescription discounts to patients Trump administration says plan would lower prices to consumers BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR associated Press

The administration of President Donald Trump unveiled a plan Thursday to channel now-hidden prescription drug discounts directly to patients, saying that would eventually lower prices for consumers. The proposed regulation from Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar aims to eliminate behindthe-scenes rebates among drugmakers, middlemen and insurers and instead encourage that they be paid directly to consumers when they buy their medications. The idea is to do away with a hidden cost seen as

contributing to artificially high list prices for prescription drugs. The proposal was co-authored with the Health and Human Services inspector general’s office. The proposal comes as Trump is under political pressure to deliver results on his repeated promises to slash prescription drug costs. Democrats in Congress want to empower Medicare to directly negotiate prices with drug companies, but Republicans prefer a market-based approach that keeps the government out of setting prices. But the impact for consumers may not be immediate, since the changes would take effect over the next year if all goes according to plan.

Also, drugmakers do not currently provide discounts for all their medications. “Americans— particularly our seniors— pay more than they need to for their prescription drugs because of a hidden system of kickbacks to middlemen,” Azar said in a statement. “President Trump is proposing to end this era of backdoor deals in the drug industry, bring real transparency to drug markets, and deliver savings directly to patients when they walk into the pharmacy.” Prices for brand-name drugs have continued to rise, although data shows the total number of price hikes this year is somewhat lower than at the same time in 2018, and the overall percentage increase isn’t as steep. Facing heavy criticism from Trump and Dem-

ocrats, some drugmakers have pledged to take fewer or smaller increases as the industry tries to avoid government regulation. Thursday’s proposal applies directly to Medicare prescription drug plans and Medicaid managed care plans, but administration officials say they believe the impact will eventually be broader. Insurers and middlemen like CVS and St. Louis County-based Express Scripts oppose the idea, saying that the discounts from drugmakers are used to keep premiums lower for everybody. HHS officials acknowledge that Medicare prescription premiums could go up by $3 to $5 as a result of the change, but said they expect greater savings for people buying medications.

Those patients would see their copays and cost-sharing reduced when they go to fill a prescription. On rebates, drugmakers have been supportive of the administration’s approach, but the industry vehemently disagrees with other Trump ideas, including an experiment using lower international prices to cut Medicare costs for some drugs. Thursday’s complex proposal would work by doing away with an exemption from federal anti-kickback rules that currently allows drugmakers, insurers and middlemen called pharmacy benefit managers to negotiate rebates among themselves. It would be replaced with a new exemption for discounts offered directly to consumers. HHS says today’s hid-

den rebates can amount to 26 percent to 30 percent of a drug’s list price. Azar contends that under the current system everybody but the patient benefits from high prices. A high list price makes room for bigger negotiated rebates for insurers and middlemen. And drugmakers then merely build that expectation into their prices. By doing away with hidden rebates, Azar says he’s hoping to force the industry to lower its prices. Democrats, however, say pharmaceutical pricing is a like a black box, and there’s no guarantee prices reflect the actual costs of research, development and manufacturing. Generics account for nearly 90 percent of prescriptions filled, but brand-name drugs account for more than 70 percent of the spending.

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Roy Peterson, a fabrication supervisor, grabs a slab of quartz to be cut at Graniterra at 1551 South Kingshighway in St. Louis on Wednesday.

Trade battle endangers small firms NICKLAUS • FROM B1

Joe Siu, a fabricator at Graniterra, hand polishes samples for the showroom on Wednesday.

We Specialize in Area Rugs! More Selection at Sale Prices!

Over 8,400 Rugs!

60-70% Off

said John Parish, the firm’s vice president. “You have consumers and builders trying to make decisions amid these trade developments, and they don’t know what is happening.” Builders, Parish said, often want to order product now that they’ll need in 18 months. It’s hard for him to quote a price without knowing how the trade case will turn out. To make things worse for some firms, the Commerce Department ruled in November that the duties should apply retroactively to any quartz imported after August. Larry LaBrier, co-owner of Unique Stone Concepts in St. Louis, had imported about 10 shipping containers’ worth of quartz that

may be affected by the retroactive duty. A 300-percentplus penalty, he said, would bankrupt the company. “Any day, Customs could walk in here and ask for a couple million dollars,” LaBrier said. “I cannot pay it.” Mark McLaren, vice president of small importing firm BlueBoat International, is also worried about the retroactive penalty. He had two containers’ worth of Chinese quartz arrive in August and September for a commercial project that was in its final stages of construction. The quartz’s import value was $48,000, which means the duties could total $167,000. If the government tries to collect, McLaren says, “BlueBoat will shut down and every-

body will have to find new jobs.” That’s one message the stone dealers in St. Louis and other cities are trying to emphasize: The quartz tariffs won’t just hurt the Chinese, they’ll hurt small businesses, workers and consumers across America. Their other message is that the U.S. quartz industry is more than just Cambria and a couple of other domestic manufacturers. It’s also firms such as Graniterra that measure your kitchen, cut the stone and make sure it fits perfectly — and those firms are helped, not hurt, by imports. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Suggested retail

Volume Rug Gallery St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret

8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood) VolumeCarpet.com

314-963-7847

New panel revives employee focus WORKPLACE • FROM B1

HAVING TROUBLE WITH HIGH PROPERTY TAXES?

WE CAN HELP! 314-454-0505 info@PARresidential.com • The largest property tax consulting firm in the metro area • Over $9 Million in tax savings since 2009!

NO SAVINGS, NO FEE!

an outgrowth of the St. Louis County Economic Council, and it still manages county boards such as the St. Louis County Port Authority and Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority. The county executive appoints 11 members of the board, and the mayor of St. Louis appoints four. The new “employee experience committee” revives a dormant human resources committee that Crim said had not been active in recent years. Partnership board chairman Karlos Ramirez appointed Ed James, a longtime member of the St. Louis County Port Authority, and Missy Kelley, CEO of Downtown STL Inc., to the

new committee. “I think it’s really a good move, and I think we’re following through with what the bylaws and the intent of this Partnership is really about,” said Partnership board member Mike Walter, a former business manager for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. “Why it’s taken so long I’m not sure.” Board member Kathy Osborn, who heads the Regional Business Council, said last week that she would not accept a reappointment to the organization from Stenger. She did not participate in the meeting Wednesday. In a letter sent to area elected officials, Osborn urged Stenger to allow Crim to perform “a top to bottom review of the staff-

ing, positions and compensation of the Partnership staff.” Ramirez commended Crim for pushing for the review and said it would “move the organization forward.” The board also established a committee to advise it on real estate issues and appointed Mary Campbell, associate vice chancellor for real estate at Washington University; Otis Williams, executive director of the St. Louis Development Corp.; Linda Martinez, deputy mayor for development for the city of St. Louis; and Sandy Parker, board member of the St. Louis County Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

Corporate blitz is targeting trade war Lobbyists raise pressure on Washington amid tariff talks BY MATT TOWNSEND Bloomberg

Corporate America is taking the gloves off in its campaign to end President Donald Trump’s trade war. A coalition of more than 200 trade associations spanning agriculture, manufacturing, retail, technology, oil and even liquor will begin a two-pronged attack next week to try to end the policies they see as damaging. The campaign, called Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, will involve blanketing Capitol Hill with farmers and other business owners, plus debuting an ad aimed at parents that essentially says the trade war might be endangering babies. The escalation comes at a crucial time: The president and Chinese officials are meeting this week with just a month to go before U.S. tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese imports are slated to more than double to 25 percent. It also marks a shift in strategy. After a year of struggling to directly sway Trump and his inner circle, including running ads on Fox News — his favorite cable channel — corporate lobbyists are ratcheting up pressure outside the White House. “People have to think through different strategies because the normal operating procedure doesn’t work,” said Matt Priest, chief executive officer of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, which is part of the wider coalition. “Some of that strategy is paying off, but the response isn’t the response we would’ve liked.” Next week, about 100 executives and business owners from companies big and small will visit Washington to lobby Congress, especially the large freshmen class — mostly Democrats — that may still be formulating their stances on trade. Support is also needed for a bipartisan bill intended to rein in the president’s trade authority. The group descending on Washington includes people like Brent Bible, who runs a 5,000-acre corn and soybean farm in Romney, Ind.

Soybeans were hit by retaliatory Chinese tariffs last year, pushing down prices to a point where farmers no longer make money. His farm also took a hit when U.S. levies on steel and aluminum made equipment pricier. “Just get it fixed,” said Bible, who holds an economics degree. If this dispute goes on much longer, he said he worries about a “snowball effect” that could make soybeans almost worthless. Bible voted for Trump but said his support has waned in recent months. “If we don’t get a deal soon, then we are looking at a major long-term impact.” This coalition was formed in September, and its activities so far have included hosting antitariff events across the country that generated local media attention and publishing stats on the impact of the trade war. The new push takes that further. It will include a news conference on Feb. 6 with a bipartisan group of senators, including Mark Warner, D-Va., and Pat Toomey, R-Pa., who crafted the bill to reduce presidential trade powers. The coalition also has a new ad that tries to tug at the heartstrings of Americans by getting them to feel the pain it says Trump’s trade war is causing. The spot, which will first run online in Washington and swing states like Ohio and Pennsylvania, features Cribs for Kids, a Pittsburgh-based charity that sells 100,000 low-cost portable baby beds a year to local governments and hospitals. The partners then give them to lowincome families, who might not have one otherwise. In the ad, the nonprofit group’s executive director, Judy Bannon, says Trump’s tariffs are increasing costs for the cribs it imports from China. The charity has already seen a decline in orders after a 10 percent levy on Chinese goods last year, Bannon said in an interview. She paints the impact in life-and-death terms, saying that getting babies to sleep in cribs and on their backs — a message reinforced on the charity’s cribs — reduces sudden infant death syndrome.

QILAI SHEN • Bloomberg

A gantry crane operates as containers sit Wednesday at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in Shanghai.

“As a nonprofit, we never thought tariffs would affect us, but they do,” Bannon says in the 30-second video. The spot also tries to drive home the point that tariffs are essentially taxes on U.S. companies, despite Trump’s Twitter proclamations that China is the one paying the duties. “President Trump says that China is paying these tariffs, but I see the cost on my invoices.” Despite strong opposition from corporate America and the lobbying infrastructure it bankrolls, thwarting Trump on trade hasn’t been easy. The impact of the tariffs is still small when compared with the overall U.S. economy and hasn’t resulted in widespread price increases for consumers. Several lobbyists noted that the government shutdown ended only when airports were disrupted, and that kind of bellwether event hasn’t materialized yet with tariffs. The administration has done its part

by avoiding hitting consumer products directly to blunt public outcry. And because the trade war is promoted by the White House, most of America’s CEOs have remained publicly silent, for fear of being criticized publicly by Trump or raising the ire of the administration officials overseeing tariff exemptions. That’s a far cry from 2017, when executives complained on TV and in congressional testimony in a successful bid to kill the borderadjustment tax backed by former Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan. To be sure, there have been victories in corporate America. Lobbyists for farmers, seen as a crucial part of Trump’s base, pushed the administration to authorize $12 billion in relief funds after Beijing retaliated with its own tariffs. Trade groups also got plenty of items taken off the final tariff lists, including car booster

seats. They also point to Trump delaying the next tariff hike by two months to March to allow for more negotiations. The timing of this escalated opposition could be helpful. The president just took a hit from the government shutdown. The political calendar has already turned to the 2020 presidential race, and Trump needs a strong economy for his re-election bid. That story is harder to tell with almost daily reports of U.S. companies — from Apple to Stanley Black & Decker — partly blaming weak results on the trade war. “A lot things are coming to a head,” said Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, another coalition member. With Trump’s re-election bid looming, “do you think he’s going to risk a stock market fall over a 25 percent tariff — at this point? But I don’t know anyone who has been right calling Trump’s moves.”

Mortgage rates creep up, but ‘bigger moves are on the horizon’ BY KATHY ORTON Washington Post

After holding steady for nearly a month while awaiting a resolution to the federal government shutdown, fixed mortgage rates cautiously crept up this week. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average inched up to 4.46 percent with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.) The rate was 4.45 percent a week ago and 4.22 percent a year ago. The 15-year fixed-rate average ticked up to 3.89 percent with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.88 percent a week ago and 3.68 percent a year ago. The five-year adjustable-rate average jumped to 3.96 percent with an average 0.3 point. It was 3.90 percent a week ago and 3.53 percent a year ago. “Rates jumped around somewhat over the past week, dipping after soft housing and consumer confidence data, and climbing after a strong private payrolls report,” said Aaron Terrazas, a senior economist at Zillow. “But bigger moves are on the horizon. As often occurs when (Federal Reserve) statements catch markets off guard, bond yields fell after the (Fed) announced its inclination to pause future rate hikes. Mort-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Carpenters Eric LePage (left) and Chuck Vander Bol work last February at McBride Homes’ Cobblestone Crossing on Highway P in O’Fallon, Mo.

gage rates seem certain to follow in step. The next major data event on the horizon is Friday’s jobs report and, after weeks of relative calm, markets are poised for increased volatility.” As expected, the Fed did not raise its benchmark rate at its meeting this week. Instead, the central bank signaled that it was in no rush to do so. That was enough to cause the stock market to surge and long-term bond yields to slip, but too late in the week to be factored into Freddie Mac’s survey. The government-

supported mortgage backer aggregates rates weekly from 125 lenders nationwide to come up with national average mortgage rates. The Fed doesn’t set mortgage rates, but its decisions influence them. The central bank changed its description of the U.S. economy to “solid” from “strong,” a slight downgrade. The Fed’s cautiousness coupled with pending home sales’ dropping to their lowest point in five years and home prices’ rising at a slower pace could keep rates in check.

“On the heels of relatively weak December home contract signings, mortgage rates held relatively steady this week, which is good news for buyers currently in the market,” said Danielle Hale, chief economist for Realtor.com. “Today’s rate data was gathered before the conclusion of the Fed meeting yesterday, and while there was no change to short-term rates, the Fed’s statement did indicate that conditions warranted a ‘patient’ view of whether additional adjustments are necessary. In response, long-term rates slipped slightly lower, suggesting less upward pressure on mortgage rates in the weeks ahead.” Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found the experts it surveyed were evenly split on where rates are headed. Half said rates would decrease, while the other half said rates will remain relatively stable in the coming week. Jim Sahnger, a mortgage planner at C2 Financial, is one who predicts that rates will move lower. “The Fed released its statement Wednesday afternoon and stated what the rest of us already knew: The economy is slowing, signs of inflation are backing down and, with that, announced that future rate hikes must be warranted and not expected,” Sahnger said. “Bonds should

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever.

benefit and rates should improve slightly over the next week. The only thing that could change this would be a blockbuster employment report on Friday.” Meanwhile, mortgage applications continued to pull back this week, according to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association. The market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — decreased 3 percent from a week earlier. The refinance index fell 6 percent from the previous week, while the purchase index slipped 2 percent. The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 42 percent of all applications. “After increased activity in the early weeks of 2019, mortgage applications decreased for the second straight week, said Bob Broeksmit, president and chief executive of the Mortgage Bankers Association. “Although mortgage rates have trended lower since the fall, they are still higher than this time a year ago, and likely played a role in the dip in purchase applications last week. The key driver to increase purchase activity this spring is inventory, especially at the entry-level price range. Demand is the strongest right now at the price point of most first-time buyers.”

Come in and find out why our clients say,

“I’m so glad I found you!”

Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling. STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 02.01.2019 • C

SHOCK, DISMAY MU plans to appeal NCAA sanctions after hammer falls

Mizzou penalized for cooperating, gets unfair result

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One whistleblower sure can do a lot of damage to an athletics department not named North Carolina. It does not seem to matter if said whistleblower, in this case a rogue part-time athletics academic tutor named Yolanda Kumar, once described herBEN self as “vengeful” and FREDERICKSON “miserable.” St. Louis It does not seem Post-Dispatch to matter if she made claims that could not be corroborated in the NCAA’s investigation into academic fraud at the University of

COLUMBIA, MO. • The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions brought down the hammer on the University of Missouri for a former tutor’s admission of academic fraud and doing so blindsided the MU football, baseball and softball programs with postseason bans for the upcoming season, on top of scholarship and recruiting limitations. The NCAA released its findings and penalties on Thursday, ruling that former tutor Yolanda Kumar, though unnamed in the report, violated NCAA ethical conduct, academic misconduct and academic See MU • Page C3

BILL GREENBLATT • UPI

Athletics director Jim Sterk (left), here with football coach Barry Odom, said he expected Mizzou would get probation and have to forfeit some games.

See FREDERICKSON • Page C3

THE MAJOR VIOLATIONS > In the NCAA report, former Mizzou athletics tutor Yolanda Kumar was found to have committed academic fraud with the following actions: • Completed coursework for six athletes in two MU math courses • Completed math coursework for four athletes through a non-NCAA school

• Completed algebra coursework for two football players through Division II Adams State U. • Assisted two football players to complete MU’s math placement exam

Bruce’s best chance Former Ram has his best shot at the HOF BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I

saac Bruce can’t catch another pass, score another touchdown or deliver another downfield block. His résumé is what it is. Perhaps he can embellish it for Pro Football Hall of Fame voters with some lobbying. But Bruce never has been fond of patting himself on the back. “I’m not a fan of campaigning,” Bruce said. “I don’t like doing that. I found the scripture in the Bible a long time ago that says: ‘Let another man praise you and not your own lips.’” In his fifth year of eligibility, Bruce is a Hall of Fame finalist for the third time. He’s still waiting for that Saturday afternoon knock on the hotel room door, with Hall of Fame

See BRUCE • Page C4

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Donald leads Rams’ sack attack

Blues jump right in after break

He hopes to place pressure on Brady

They face 14 games in the next 28 days

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ATLANTA • Practically every member of the Los Angeles Rams has a favorite story about Aaron Donald’s feats of ridiculous athleticism. Michael Brockers loved the moment at Carolina in 2016 when Donald beat the Panthers’ left guard and launched himself like Superman, swallowing up Cam Newton while airborne. Nickell Robey-Coleman preferred the game at San Francisco this season when Donald shredded a double-team and sacked C.J. Beathard — not by grabbing him, but by shoving the 49ers’ center into his own quarterback. See SUPER • Page C4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams defensive end Aaron Donald set an NFL record for sacks by an interior lineman. SUPER BOWL LIII Patriots vs. Rams • 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Atlanta • KMOV (4)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester skates during the game against the Anaheim Ducks on Jan. 23. > 6 p.m. Saturday at Blue Jackets, FSM > Blues radio going from KMOX to 101.1 FM. C2

That the Blues came back from the All-Star break and their bye week — a combined seven days between their last game and their first practice on Thursday — feeling refreshed, invigorated and tanned, is not surprising. A week on a beach someplace warm, with no one slamming your body into a wall at high speed, will do that. But the Blues also came back feeling confident, probably more confident than they have all season. The way they have played of late, coupled with the ground they have closed on the rest of See BLUES • Page C5

SPORTS

Is it ever okay to encourage kids to “tough it out”?

Our MomDocs know.

For more information, visit ChildrensMD.org/Sports for trusted health advice from pediatricians who are also moms. ©S

1 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 2/2 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/5 at Panthers 6 p.m. FSM

Thursday 2/7 at Lightning 6:30 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/9 vs. Predators 1 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Saturday 2/2 at Rhode Island 3 p.m. CBSSN

Women’s basketball Tuesday 2/5 vs. Dayton 8 p.m. CBSSN

Sunday 2/3 vs. George Washington 1 p.m., CBSSN

Wednesday 2/6 at Fordham 6 p.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Saturday 2/2 vs. Vanderbilt 7:30 p.m. SEC Network

Women’s basketball Tuesday 2/5 at Tennessee 8 p.m. ESPN2

Monday 2/4 at LSU 6 p.m. SEC Network

Thursday 2/7 vs. Texas A&M 6 p.m. SEC Network

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 2/2 vs. Nebraska 1:15 p.m. BTN

Tuesday 2/5 vs. Michigan St. 6 p.m. ESPN2

Saturday 2/9 vs. Rutgers 3 p.m. BTN

Thursday 2/14 at Ohio State 6 p.m. ESPN/2

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Saturday 2/2 vs. Eastern Kentucky 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Thursday 2/7 at Austin Peay 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 2/2 vs. Eastern Kentucky 2 p.m.

Thursday 2/7 at Austin Peay 5:15 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 2/1: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sat. 2/2: vs. Orlando, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 4 p.m. College: Pennsylvania at Cornell, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: Davidson at St. Bonaventure, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Michigan at Iowa, FS1 6 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Hornets, FSM 6 p.m. College: Yale at Harvard, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Knicks, ESPN 7 p.m. College: Buffalo at Bowling Green, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Maryland at Wisconsin, FS1 8 p.m. College: Wright State at Illinois-Chicago, ESPNU 9 p.m. NBA: Rockets at Nuggets, ESPN BOXING 9 p.m. Super middleweights: Ronald Ellis vs. DeAndre Ware, Showtime GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Phoenix Open, second round, GOLF 3:30 a.m. (Sat.) European Tour: Saudi International, third round, GOLF GYMNASTICS 6 p.m. College women: Arkansas at Georgia, SEC Network 7:30 p.m. College women: Alabama at Missouri, SEC Network RUGBY 1:45 p.m. Six Nations Championship: France vs. Wales, NBCSN SOCCER 1:20 p.m. Bundesliga: Hannover vs. Leipzig, FS2 TENNIS 4 a.m. (Sat.) WTA: St. Petersburg-WTA & Hua Hin-WTA, Tennis Channel WRESTLING 6 p.m. College: Michigan at Penn State, BTN 8 p.m. College: Ohio State at Illinois, BTN

DIGEST Arenado, Rockies agree on $26 million deal Nolan Arenado and the Colorado Rockies have agreed to a $26 million deal to avoid arbitration, the largest one-year salary for an arbitration-eligible player. Josh Donaldson set the previous mark at $23 million with Toronto last season. The 27-year-old Arenado was set to pass that record even if he went to arbitration. Arenado asked for $30 million earlier this month, while the Rockies offered $24 million. Arenado has won a Gold Glove at third base in each of his six major league seasons. He is a career .291 hitter with 186 home runs, 616 RBIs and an .886 OPS. He batted .297 with an NL-leading 38 homers last season, finishing third in MVP voting while making $17.85 million. Arenado is eligible for free agency after the 2019 season and figures to be the top player on the market next offseason. (AP) Padres meeting with Harper • The Padres have jumped into the tepid free agent market with both feet. A source confirmed representatives of the team, including general partner Peter Seidler, were scheduled to visit with superstar outfielder Bryce Harper in Las Vegas on Thursday. This is seen as something of extended due diligence, and it is not thought that the team’s pursuit of Harper is as earnest as its continued efforts to land Manny Machado. Ken Rosenthal first reported the Padres’ plans to meet with Harper. (The San Diego Union-Tribune) Ohtani cleared for training • AL Rookie of the Year Shohei Ohtani has been medically cleared to resume full strength training on his right arm following Tommy John surgery, although he will not be ready to hit for the Los Angeles Angels by opening day. Angels general manager Billy Eppler provided a positive update Thursday on the recovery of his two-way star. The Angels expect Ohtani to be their designated hitter at some point in 2019, but he will not be active when the Angels open the regular season in late March, Eppler says. Ohtani is not expected to pitch again until 2020. (AP) Astros, Miley have deal • Houston filled an opening in its rotation, agreeing to a $4.5 million, one-year contract with 32-year-old lefthander Wade Miley. Miley was 5-2 with a 2.57 ERA in 16 starts and 80 2/3 innings for the Milwaukee Brewers last year. (AP) Zhang out in Thailand tennis • Australian Open doubles champion Zhang Shuai retired from her second-round singles against Chinese countrywoman Wang Yafan citing dizziness at the Thailand Open on Thursday. The fifth-seeded Zhang was trailing 4-1 when she retired against Wang in hot and humid conditions. Wang advanced to a quarterfinal on Friday against Magda Linette of Poland, who overcame Monica Niculescu of Romania 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 in 2 ½ hours. (AP) Ambush play two at home • The St. Louis Ambush (6-7) will host a pair of South Central Division soccer games this weekend at Family Arena, playing the Florida Tropics (4-7) Friday at 7:35 p.m. and the Orlando SeaWolves (3-5) Saturday at 7:05 p.m. (News sources)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

M 1 • FRIDAY • 02.01.2019

MEDIA VIEWS

Blues moving to 101.1 FM BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

All-sports format is big draw

For the third time in their 52-year history, the Blues are switching radio stations. The first two moves were made because the team was tired of being behind the Cardinals in the pecking order of importance. That again is a component of the move that was announced Thursday, that the broadcasts are going from KMOX (1120 AM) to WXOS (101.1 FM) next season as a fouryear deal begins. But Chris Kerber, the team’s vice president of broadcast and content development as well as its radio play-by-play broadcaster, said there is much more this time. “The arrangement we had with KMOX and the Cardinals was so good that by no means was that the deciding factor,” he said. But WXOS, as an all-sports station, can devoted much more time to the team than can stations such as KMOX that are locked into daylong non-sports formats. “This is more about the future opportunities to deliver broader content, both digital and over the air that we haven’t been able to in the history of the franchise,” Kerber said. He cited an example: “A game-day morning skate live broadcast, where as the team is hitting the ice we’re just finding out what lines are going to play to-

gether (that night), who is going to be the starting goaltender, who are the scratches going to be — to be able to bring that to people live on the air, and podcast that for those that missed the live broadcast,” is something enticing. “It’s not the fault of any station the team has been on, it’s just because of the formatting of those stations that type of opportunity hasn’t been there and now it is.” The deal also calls for Bluesrelated content on the local stations in addition to WXOS that are owned by Hubbard Radio — WIL (92.3 FM), KSHE (94.7 FM), KPNT (105.7 FM) and WARH (106.5 FM). At KMOX (1120 AM), there also has been cross-promotion with the other Entercom Communicationsowned stations in the market — KNOU-FM (96.3 FM), KFTK-FM (97.1 FM), KYKY (98.1 FM) and KEZK (102.5 FM). Kerber said the Hubbard stations are more “in the wheelhouse of demographics” for the Blues than are Entercom’s. It’s a coup for 101.1, which is celebrating its 10th year in the sports-talk format and hasn’t had an anchor high-profile team on its airwaves since the Rams left after the 2015 NFL season. The station

is the radio home of the St. Louis University men’s basketball team, but the addition of the Blues will vault it back into the prominence of the pro-sports business. “It has always been a dream to partner with the St. Louis Blues organization,” John Kijowski, who runs Hubbard’s St. Louis operations, said in a statement. “The Blues management team is a class act and their fans are the best in professional hockey.” Entercom didn’t comment beyond a statement: “... We have mutually agreed to part ways. We thank the Blues organization for their partnership throughout the years and wish the team continued success.” Kerber and analyst Joey Vitale are expected to continue to form the radio broadcast team, and the games will remain on KMOX for the remainder of this season. “They did everything they could (at KMOX), they put their best foot forward,” to keep the Blues, Kerber said. “Me personally, being a St. Louis guy, I understand the pride of what it means saying, ‘I’ve been a broadcaster on KMOX.’ But there’s a great opportunity for raising the level of content we’re able to deliver to Blues fans through the allsports format.”

Rolling Romo finally in a Super Bowl DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Tony Romo never made it to a Super Bowl in his 13 seasons playing for the Dallas Cowboys, but he’s about to jump on American sports’ biggest stage in his second season as a broadcaster. He has made a remarkably smooth transition from quarterback to analyst, as his glibness combined with his uncanny ability to anticipate plays has made him a big hit. Colleague Jim Nantz has anointed him “Romostradamus.” Romo will tote his crystal ball into Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Sunday to perform for what almost undoubtedly will be his biggest audience ever, as he’ll be the analyst alongside play-by-play announcer Nantz for CBS’ telecast of the Rams-Patriots Super Bowl matchup (KMOV, Channel 4 locally at 5:30 p.m.). And he’s eager to grab his microphone. “As far as the pressure of the Super Bowl ... I’m just going to go out and do what you normally did and you know, usually if you’re pretty good at your job, you’ll just figure out a way to make things work,” he said on a recent conference call. Romo has been making it work for two seasons, and was especially sharp in the AFC title game on Jan. 20. He foreshadowed a New England run to the right side that resulted in a touchdown by Sony Michel, then later a pass to tight end Rob Gronkowski. “He’s your guy when it’s one-on-one (coverage),” Romo said as the Patriots lined up for the snap. Then Tom Brady threw the ball to Gronkowski for a big gain. The New Yorker magazine said its analysis of that telecast revealed that Romo was correct on 13 of the 15 plays he predicted in the late going of that game. It is reminiscent of the way Hank Stram called plays before they unfolded while working with Jack Buck on yesteryear “Monday Night Football” radio broadcasts. All this prompted free-agent baseball star Bryce Harper to tweet: “Just called Tony Romo to see

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tony Romo has been a hit as CBS’ lead NFL game analyst, with an uncanny ability to predict plays. Partner Jim Nantz calls him “Romostradamus.”

where I’m going to play next year.” And Rams defensive coordinator Wade Phillips, when asked how he’ll counteract the Patriots’ unpredictable offense, reportedly quipped that he’ll listen to Romo’s call of the game. Nantz said he often has seen Romo shine in predicting plays, and that a vast amount of preparation allows him to tip off viewers. “People think Tony’s a fortune teller but, you know, this isn’t guesswork and this isn’t psychic ability,” Nantz said on the call. “... So when we have these key moments late in the game and we’re all dazzled about what he’s doing, this is the testament to years and years of his work and preparation. ... We’re the beneficiaries of it at CBS. But the viewers are more than anybody.” Romo said he doesn’t feel pressure to have to keep delivering with his reading of the tea leaves. “I don’t go into any game saying I have to do something,” he said. “... I probably did a little bit more last game that I had previous ones just because I just felt like the moment’s there. ... You don’t analyze it and come up with a plan of attack for it. ... Your natural instincts take over and from there you kind of go.” CBS officials said it was evident Romo was their man after an initial gathering over dinner as his playing career wound down in 2016. After Romo left that meeting, CBS Sports chairman Sean McMa-

nus said he told the other network executives on hand, “‘That’s our guy. We got to get this guy.’” But Romo still was an active player who probably could have come back for another season or two, though probably not with Dallas. He got the offer from CBS, and had to make a decision. It was time to “decide in some ways where you’re going in life,” Romo said. “Because for a little bit you don’t know. And you’re still trying to determine your future and what avenue you want to take. And then I left there just excited about CBS. ... It gets you ready to make the leap.” He accepted the offer, Phil Simms was moved from CBS’ top NFL booth to a predominant role in the studio and Romo has shined. Someone recently asked him to predict the outcome of the Super Bowl and he went with 28-24 — but didn’t say which team would win. But he did say the losing team would have the ball at the end of the game but fail to score.

WARNER’S WORLD Former Rams quarterback Kurt Warner will provide the analysis, alongside play-by-play broadcaster Kevin Harlan, for the Super Bowl national radio broadcast. The production airs locally on WXOS (101.1 FM). Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

KMOV optimistic despite touchy matchup for STL BY DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There has been quite a bit of angst in St. Louis since the Super Bowl matchup was set nearly two weeks ago, with what are widely considered the two most despised NFL teams locally set to play. The New England Patriots pulled the second-biggest upset in Super Bowl history, beating the Rams 20-17 as a 14-point underdog in the cap to the 2001 season to get their dynasty started. Later, reports surfaced that the Patriots inappropriately taped the Rams’ walk-through practice ahead of the game, which could have tipped them off on some plays. The validity and extent of the reports have been questioned for years, but nonetheless have stoked ire from St. Louisans toward the Patriots and the league.

That ill will was topped three seasons ago with Rams owner Stan Kroenke moving the team back to Los Angeles. That has led to many local and national media reports in recent days about ambivalence in St. Louis toward this Rams-Patriots matchup. But the real test comes at the Nielsen ballot box, which will measure local TV viewership of the game. The telecast will appear on KMOV (Channel 4), and station general manager Mike Murphy thinks the number will be good. “The Super Bowl is the Super Bowl, people who like football are going to watch,” he said. “The issues that happened a long time ago were with Stan Kroenke, not the players or team or coaches.” But Murphy said a Kansas CityRams matchup would have been more tantalizing for KMOV. “It would be kind of ironic, the

team that’s trying to make inroads into St. Louis and the team that left,” he said. “I think it would have done very well.”

LAGGING LA The recent NFL conference title games produced huge television ratings in the markets of the teams that were competing — except one. Kansas City (60.1), New Orleans (59.8) and Boston (58.5) all had more than half the homes with a TV tuned to the game. That’s according to Nielsen. But Los Angeles clunked in at 26.4 percent, which was worse than the number the Rams drew in the town they spurned three seasons ago. St. Louis generated a 26.4 rating. Astonishingly,the New EnglandKansas City AFC title game drew a better rating (27.5) in LA than the Rams pulled in the NFC contest in which they beat the Saints.


COLLEGE SPORTS

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

Tigers get the shaft after cooperating

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Louisville beats UConn

FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

Missouri. It does not seem to matter if she once made public an offer to sell evidence for the case to the highest bidder to help pay bills. It does not seem to matter if the NCAA was worried enough about her threats of breaking confidentiality that it eventually hit Kumar — its own whistleblower, remember — with a 10-year show cause, which is the same punishment once handed to former Baylor coach Dave Bliss, who tried to frame a murdered player as a drug dealer. It does not seem to matter if the NCAA found no signs of a larger systemic issue beyond Kumar, who alleged without any proof the NCAA could unearth that her superiors steered her toward wrongdoing. And it does not seem to matter that Mizzou athletics director Jim Sterk and his department were complimented by the NCAA for their honesty and cooperation in an investigation that pivoted from the NCAA shaking Mizzou’s hand to dropping an anvil on its head. Mizzou, like so many programs that have come under NCAA scrutiny, was told to come clean to lessen the blow. It expected vacated wins and probation. Instead, scorched earth. The big question after reading over the lengthy list of punishments handed down from the NCAA was if Mizzou would have been better off finding a rogue booster to pay off its rogue tutor. Or perhaps it should have pulled a North Carolina, and pointed out that Kumar worked with non-athletes, too, so therefore her transgression should simply be overlooked. When the NCAA chief hearing officer on this case, David Roberts, said during Thursday’s teleconference that “You can certainly make that argument,” when asked if a ruling like this encourages other schools to slam the door when the NCAA comes calling, he had said everything he needed to say. This punishment warns against cooperation. And Roberts’ attempt to rally and mention how things might have been worse if Mizzou would have tried the black-hat approach was halfhearted, at best. Nowhere, neither in the report Roberts presented nor his words on the teleconference, could he point to one place that explained how Mizzou’s cooperation helped. Roberts likely regrets telling the truth so bluntly. Mizzou must, too. When Kumar’s whistle blew in a Facebook post in late 2016, Mizzou took action. It cut ties with Kumar. An internal investigation launched. Involved players sat. Information was handed over to the SEC and NCAA. Mizzou cleaned up its mess with gusto, hoping the NCAA was watching. Instead the NCAA, perhaps still embarrassed by its massive swing and miss in its investigation of North Carolina’s sham classes, was sharpening a sword, lusting for blood. The wide-ranging list of punishments hits Mizzou in multiple areas, from the record books that will show vacated wins, to recruiting, to financing, to the future. Baseball, football and softball players will be blamed for the decisions of strangers. All are ineligible for a postseason. Players whose years of eligibility are limited to a season that now features a postseason ban will be allowed to transfer without penalty. It’s the right rule for the students. It can be crushing to their programs. All of this, for what? For two costly mistakes made by Mizzou. The first was hiring and employing and not overseeing properly a tutor who completed academic work for 12 Mizzou athletes between the summer of 2015 and the summer of 2016. Blame is trickier than normal to assign. When Kumar’s rule-breaking began, Sterk was still the athletics director at San Diego State, and none of the football, baseball or softball coaches were in their current positions. Only Barry Odom was at the school. He was then the defensive coordinator. Still, athletics departments must know what their student athletes are (and are not) doing when it comes to coursework. Schools must know now which university employees are interacting with players, and they must have an idea of the integrity of those employees. Not knowing is no longer an excuse. It hasn’t been for a while. Especially when the department was already on probation thanks to the sins of former basketball coach Frank Haith’s program. Mizzou was, at best, guilty of ignorance. The NCAA’s search for seedier motives reached a dead end. The investigation is closed and no one else is involved, Roberts confirmed on Thursday. Mizzou’s second mistake was believing the NCAA when it said it would take into consideration Mizzou’s proactive response to mistake number one. For years, the NCAA has hinged heavy-handed punishments on shaky and unreliable sources that would not be trusted in the court of law. It hitched its wagon to Kumar despite her character concerns and the NCAA’s inability to prove her most damning claim, that her superiors pressured her to help athletes cheat. If the NCAA could have proven that, you better believe it would have been in the report. The NCAA could not. Yet the punishments make it seem like that conclusion was reached. Whatever good Mizzou’s honesty and cooperation created is nowhere to be found. Instead, an organization that spent a bulk of Thursday’s teleconference saying it’s unfair to compare this case to any other included in its own report a pathetic explanation of how Mizzou was pummeled for one rogue tutor while North Carolina skated on an academic fraud investigation that revolved around sham classes. The difference? North Carolina fought. It defended those sham classes with fierceness, knowing the truth while refusing to admit it. And it worked. Add this to the list of mind-boggling messages the NCAA now sends.

FEB 8-10

WELCOMES THE

St. Charles Convention Center FRI 11-5 • SAT 10-5 SUN 10-4 FREE PARKING

Huge Savings H O On Golf Gear

FRONT DOOR BONUS

Presented by

Restrictions Apply. See Website for details.

With paid admission While supplies last

All Attendees Receive Restrictions Apply. Details on Website.

26 Front Door Bonus Rounds!

Presented by

With paid admission. While supplies last

• 13 Rounds to Courses From Lake of the Ozarks Golf Trail • Old Kinderhook Round • Oak Terrace Resort & Spa 4-some • Fore Honor Golf & Events Center 4-some Enter-to-Win Prizes • Sun Valley Golf Course 4-some 1st 1,500 each day $10 Off Game Play Coupon Rangefinder Golf Vacation SPONSORS

stlouisgolfexpo.com

Kids Day Sat.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Louisville guard Asia Durr (25) shoots over Connecticut guard Christyn Williams in Louisville on Thursday.

Huskies held to 38 percent shooting ASSOCIATED PRESS

Asia Durr scored 14 of her 24 points in the second quarter, Dana Evans added 20 points and No. 3 Louisville held No. 2 UConn to 38 percent shooting in a 78-69 victory Thursday night. After starting 0 for 4 from the field in the first quarter, Durr made three consecutive 3s to open the second and put the Cardinals (20-1) up 32-24. Evans scored 12 points in the second half, hitting a 3-pointer with 1:55 remaining for a 70-59 lead, to help Louisville end a 17-game losing streak in the series. Jazmine Jones and Sam Fuehring followed with two free throws each for a 13-point lead and the Cardinals added four more from the line in the final 1:30 to seal their first series victory against UConn (18-2) since the inaugural meeting in the 1993 NCAA Tournament. Jones finished with 13 points and 12 rebounds, and Fuehring added 10 points and 12 rebounds. Napheesa Collier (Incarnate Word) had 20 points, and Crystal Dangerfield added 19 for the Huskies. They had won their previous seven since losing at Baylor. Morehead State 73, SIU Edwardsville 67 • Allie Troeckler scored 14 points, and Jay’Nee Alston had 6 rebounds, but SIU Edwardsville couldn’t escape turnover trouble in a loss to Morehead State. The Cougars started strong but committed 22 turnovers, falling to 9-11 for the season. SLU 60, George Mason 53 • Jordyn

Frantz scored 17 points, Ciaja Harbison scored 16, and the Billikens beat George Mason.

MEN No. 13 Houston 73, Temple 66 • Corey Davis Jr. scored 24 points, DeJon Jarreau added 14 points and 12 rebounds and Houston beat Temple to avenged its only loss of the season. Jarreau had 10 points in the second half, and Davis finished 12 of 13 from the free-throw line for the Cougars (21-1, 8-1 American Athletic Conference). Breaon Brady had 13 points and six rebounds. No. 17 Purdue 99, Penn State 90 • Carsen Edwards scored 38 points, including 20 in the first half and a fourpoint play in overtime, to lead Purdue past Penn State. Ryan Cline added 20 points and Trevion Williams scored 10 for the Boilermakers (15-6, 7-2 Big Ten). Lamar Stevens scored 24 points, and Rasir Bolton added 18 for the Nittany Lions (7-14, 0-10). SIU Edwardsville 83, Morehead State 76 • Tyrese Williford scored 23 points, David McFarland added 18, and SIU Edwardsville posted a 51-point second half to beat Morehead State. Belmont 97, Southeast Missouri 71 • Kevin McClain scored 31 points, and was one of three Belmont starters to top 20 points as the Bruins beat Southeast Missouri. Ledarrius Brewer led Southeast Missouri with 22 points and five rebounds.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Tennessee (19-1) idle. Next: at Texas A&M, Saturday. 2. Duke (18-2) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Sat. 3. Virginia (19-1) idle. Next: vs. Miami, Sat. 4. Gonzaga (19-2) at BYU, late. Next: vs. San Diego, Saturday. 5. Michigan (20-1) idle. Next: at Iowa, Friday. 6. Michigan State (18-3) idle. Next: vs. Indiana, Saturday. 7. Kentucky (17-3) idle. Next: at Florida, Sat. 8. Nevada (20-1) idle. Next: vs. Boise St., Sat. 9. North Carolina (16-4) idle. Next: at No. 15 Louisville, Saturday. 10. Marquette (19-3) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Tuesday. 11. Kansas (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Texas Tech, Saturday. 12. Virginia Tech (17-3) idle. Next: at No. 23 N.C. State, Saturday. 13. Houston (21-1) beat Temple 73-66. Next: at UCF, Thursday. 14. Villanova (17-4) idle. Next: vs. Georgetown, Sunday. 15. Louisville (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 North Carolina, Saturday. 16. Texas Tech (17-4) idle. Next: at No. 11 Kansas, Saturday. 17. Purdue (15-6) beat Penn State 99-90, OT. Next: vs. Minnesota, Sunday. 18. Buffalo (19-2) idle. Next: at Bowling Green, Friday. 19. LSU (17-3) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas, Sat. 20. Iowa State (16-5) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Sat. 21. Maryland (17-5) idle. Next: at No. 24 Wisconsin, Friday. 22. Mississippi State (15-5) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Saturday. 23. N.C. State (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 Virginia Tech, Saturday. 24. Wisconsin (15-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Maryland, Friday. 25. Florida State (15-5) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Saturday.

MU hit with severe penalties by NCAA MU • FROM C1

extra benefits rules when she completed academic work for 12 Mizzou athletes between the summer of 2015 and the summer of 2016. Kumar, who was hired as a tutor in 2010 and worked in that role for all but four semesters until she resigned in 2016, told investigators she felt pressure to ensure the athletes passed courses, but the investigation “did not support that her colleagues directed her to complete the student-athletes’ work.” For most of the MU athletes involved, Kumar completed online coursework, including assignments, quizzes and exams. She completed an entire course for one athlete and completed portions of a placement exam for two athletes. Missouri athletics director Jim Sterk said he was “shocked and dismayed” at the penalties and that the NCAA committee “abused its discretion” with the postseason bans and scholarship reductions, especially considering the NCAA report lauded MU for its cooperation with the process. Sterk expected Mizzou to land on probation and possibly have to vacate wins from games in which the involved athletes played. In all the school’s discussions with the NCAA the last two years, postseason bans were never discussed, a university source said. Mizzou plans to appeal the ruling to the NCAA’s Infractions Appeals Committee, a separate panel from the group that made Thursday’s ruling. MU will continue to work with attorney Michael Glazier, who specializes in cases involving the NCAA. As long as the appeals process is ongoing, the three penalized teams will be able to compete in postseason play this year, Sterk said. He guessed the appeals process could take up to six months. “We expect to win that appeal,” he said. The infractions committee hit Mizzou hard with penalties even though its evidence indicated Kumar acted alone as a rogue tutor. “We went ahead and interviewed

a number of people at the institution and there was no evidence to corroborate or support the assertion she was pressured or compelled to do this by others,” said David Roberts, the committee’s chief hearing officer. Then why such harsh penalties? Roberts explained that because Mizzou and the NCAA’s enforcement staff agreed that Kumar had committed a severe Level I violation, the infractions committee was bound to adhere to the NCAA’s penalty structure. “Academic integrity and unethical conduct strike at the heart of the core of NCAA values,” Roberts said. “In this particular case, given the parties acknowledged the conduct occurred about the case before us, the (NCAA) prescribes those penalties.” Kumar could not be reached for comment Thursday and did not respond to messages from the Post-Dispatch, but she went on a Twitter binge, publishing the names of several former MU athletes she alleged to help cheat. The Post-Dispatch could not corroborate the allegations. Mizzou football coach Barry Odom tweeted a strongly worded statement echoing Sterk’s tone: “The committee’s decision is completely unjust and unfair — to our team, our staff and to our alumni. I’m very grateful for the clear, decisive and unified leadership we have here at Mizzou, and I’m looking forward to doing whatever I can to assist with the appeals process. Together, we will fight for this great institution and I will damn sure fight for my team!” Former football coach Gary Pinkel, who retired after the 2015 season, declined to comment when reached Thursday. Any athletes who wish to transfer from Mizzou will be eligible for a waiver to avoid the NCAA’s one-year sit-out rule, Roberts said. One football player who won’t be on the move is quarterback Kelly Bryant, the graduate transfer from Clemson who moved to campus earlier this month. He has only one year of eligibility to play for the Tigers. “He’s staying and looking forward to getting to know his teammates and competing in the SEC,” Ramon Rob-

inson, Bryant’s longtime personal trainer, told the Post-Dispatch in a text message. Kumar began working with Mizzou athletes in 2010 but it wasn’t until the summer of 2015 that she claimed to start doing coursework for athletes. That summer she was assigned to work with a men’s basketball player, whom she was told needed to pass a course to graduate. At the same time, she was struggling financially and asked MU for a pay advance and a raise. She was denied the advance but received a $5-an-hour raise. The report said she “believed her raise to be an overt acknowledgment and approval of her misdeeds,” though the NCAA’s findings did not support “a broader institutional scheme.” She continued similar activities with other athletes, the report said. During the 2017 season, Mizzou self-imposed two multi-game suspensions for football players A.J. Logan and T.J. Warren for their involvement in the case. Sterk hoped that would mitigate MU’s punishment, but instead the committee came down hard, using the Division I membership-approved infractions penalty guidelines for the following measures: • Three years of probation from Jan. 31, 2019 to Jan. 30, 2022. • A postseason ban for the baseball and softball programs for the upcoming 2019 season. • A postseason ban for the football program for the upcoming 2019 season. • Records for games that the football, baseball and softball players participated will be vacated. • A 5-percent reduction in scholarships for football, baseball and softball during the 2019-20 academic year. • Recruiting restrictions for the football, baseball and softball programs for the 2019-20 academic year. • A fine of $5,000 plus 1 percent of each of the football, baseball and softball budgets. • A 10-year show-cause order for Kumar, during which any NCAA member school that employs her must restrict her from any athletically related duties.


COLLEGE SPORTS

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 2

Tigers get the shaft after cooperating

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Louisville beats UConn

FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

Missouri. It does not seem to matter if she once made public an offer to sell evidence for the case to the highest bidder to help pay bills. It does not seem to matter if the NCAA was worried enough about her threats of breaking confidentiality that it eventually hit Kumar — its own whistleblower, remember — with a 10-year show cause, which is the same punishment once handed to former Baylor coach Dave Bliss, who tried to frame a murdered player as a drug dealer. It does not seem to matter if the NCAA found no signs of a larger systemic issue beyond Kumar, who alleged without any proof the NCAA could unearth that her superiors steered her toward wrongdoing. And it does not seem to matter that Mizzou athletics director Jim Sterk and his department were complimented by the NCAA for their honesty and cooperation in an investigation that pivoted from the NCAA shaking Mizzou’s hand to dropping an anvil on its head. Mizzou, like so many programs that have come under NCAA scrutiny, was told to come clean to lessen the blow. It expected vacated wins and probation. Instead, scorched earth. The big question after reading over the lengthy list of punishments handed down from the NCAA was if Mizzou would have been better off finding a rogue booster to pay off its rogue tutor. Or perhaps it should have pulled a North Carolina, and pointed out that Kumar worked with non-athletes, too, so therefore her transgression should simply be overlooked. When the NCAA chief hearing officer on this case, David Roberts, said during Thursday’s teleconference that “You can certainly make that argument,” when asked if a ruling like this encourages other schools to slam the door when the NCAA comes calling, he had said everything he needed to say. This punishment warns against cooperation. And Roberts’ attempt to rally and mention how things might have been worse if Mizzou would have tried the black-hat approach was halfhearted, at best. Nowhere, neither in the report Roberts presented nor his words on the teleconference, could he point to one place that explained how Mizzou’s cooperation helped. Roberts likely regrets telling the truth so bluntly. Mizzou must, too. When Kumar’s whistle blew in a Facebook post in late 2016, Mizzou took action. It cut ties with Kumar. An internal investigation launched. Involved players sat. Information was handed over to the SEC and NCAA. Mizzou cleaned up its mess with gusto, hoping the NCAA was watching. Instead the NCAA, perhaps still embarrassed by its massive swing and miss in its investigation of North Carolina’s sham classes, was sharpening a sword, lusting for blood. The wide-ranging list of punishments hits Mizzou in multiple areas, from the record books that will show vacated wins, to recruiting, to financing, to the future. Baseball, football and softball players will be blamed for the decisions of strangers. All are ineligible for a postseason. Players whose years of eligibility are limited to a season that now features a postseason ban will be allowed to transfer without penalty. It’s the right rule for the students. It can be crushing to their programs. All of this, for what? For two costly mistakes made by Mizzou. The first was hiring and employing and not overseeing properly a tutor who completed academic work for 12 Mizzou athletes between the summer of 2015 and the summer of 2016. Blame is trickier than normal to assign. When Kumar’s rule-breaking began, Sterk was still the athletics director at San Diego State, and none of the football, baseball or softball coaches were in their current positions. Only Barry Odom was at the school. He was then the defensive coordinator. Still, athletics departments must know what their student athletes are (and are not) doing when it comes to coursework. Schools must know now which university employees are interacting with players, and they must have an idea of the integrity of those employees. Not knowing is no longer an excuse. It hasn’t been for a while. Especially when the department was already on probation thanks to the sins of former basketball coach Frank Haith’s program. Mizzou was, at best, guilty of ignorance. The NCAA’s search for seedier motives reached a dead end. The investigation is closed and no one else is involved, Roberts confirmed on Thursday. Mizzou’s second mistake was believing the NCAA when it said it would take into consideration Mizzou’s proactive response to mistake number one. For years, the NCAA has hinged heavy-handed punishments on shaky and unreliable sources that would not be trusted in the court of law. It hitched its wagon to Kumar despite her character concerns and the NCAA’s inability to prove her most damning claim, that her superiors pressured her to help athletes cheat. If the NCAA could have proven that, you better believe it would have been in the report. The NCAA could not. Yet the punishments make it seem like that conclusion was reached. Whatever good Mizzou’s honesty and cooperation created is nowhere to be found. Instead, an organization that spent a bulk of Thursday’s teleconference saying it’s unfair to compare this case to any other included in its own report a pathetic explanation of how Mizzou was pummeled for one rogue tutor while North Carolina skated on an academic fraud investigation that revolved around sham classes. The difference? North Carolina fought. It defended those sham classes with fierceness, knowing the truth while refusing to admit it. And it worked. Add this to the list of mind-boggling messages the NCAA now sends.

FEB 8-10

WELCOMES THE

St. Charles Convention Center FRI 11-5 • SAT 10-5 SUN 10-4 FREE PARKING

Huge Savings H O On Golf Gear

FRONT DOOR BONUS

Presented by

Restrictions Apply. See Website for details.

With paid admission While supplies last

All Attendees Receive Restrictions Apply. Details on Website.

26 Front Door Bonus Rounds!

Presented by

With paid admission. While supplies last

• 13 Rounds to Courses From Lake of the Ozarks Golf Trail • Old Kinderhook Round • Oak Terrace Resort & Spa 4-some • Fore Honor Golf & Events Center 4-some Enter-to-Win Prizes • Sun Valley Golf Course 4-some 1st 1,500 each day $10 Off Game Play Coupon Rangefinder Golf Vacation SPONSORS

stlouisgolfexpo.com

Kids Day Sat.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Louisville guard Asia Durr (25) shoots over Connecticut guard Christyn Williams in Louisville on Thursday.

Huskies held to 38 percent shooting ASSOCIATED PRESS

Asia Durr scored 14 of her 24 points in the second quarter, Dana Evans added 20 points and No. 3 Louisville held No. 2 UConn to 38 percent shooting in a 78-69 victory Thursday night. After starting 0 for 4 from the field in the first quarter, Durr made three consecutive 3s to open the second and put the Cardinals (20-1) up 32-24. Evans scored 12 points in the second half, hitting a 3-pointer with 1:55 remaining for a 70-59 lead, to help Louisville end a 17-game losing streak in the series. Jazmine Jones and Sam Fuehring followed with two free throws each for a 13-point lead and the Cardinals added four more from the line in the final 1:30 to seal their first series victory against UConn (18-2) since the inaugural meeting in the 1993 NCAA Tournament. Jones finished with 13 points and 12 rebounds, and Fuehring added 10 points and 12 rebounds. Napheesa Collier (Incarnate Word) had 20 points, and Crystal Dangerfield added 19 for the Huskies. They had won their previous seven since losing at Baylor. Morehead State 73, SIU Edwardsville 67 • Allie Troeckler scored 14 points, and Jay’Nee Alston had 6 rebounds, but SIU Edwardsville couldn’t escape turnover trouble in a loss to Morehead State. The Cougars started strong but committed 22 turnovers, falling to 9-11 for the season. SLU 60, George Mason 53 • Jordyn

Frantz scored 17 points, Ciaja Harbison scored 16, and the Billikens beat George Mason.

MEN No. 13 Houston 73, Temple 66 • Corey Davis Jr. scored 24 points, DeJon Jarreau added 14 points and 12 rebounds and Houston beat Temple to avenged its only loss of the season. Jarreau had 10 points in the second half, and Davis finished 12 of 13 from the free-throw line for the Cougars (21-1, 8-1 American Athletic Conference). Breaon Brady had 13 points and six rebounds. No. 17 Purdue 99, Penn State 90 • Carsen Edwards scored 38 points, including 20 in the first half and a fourpoint play in overtime, to lead Purdue past Penn State. Ryan Cline added 20 points and Trevion Williams scored 10 for the Boilermakers (15-6, 7-2 Big Ten). Lamar Stevens scored 24 points, and Rasir Bolton added 18 for the Nittany Lions (7-14, 0-10). SIU Edwardsville 83, Morehead State 76 • Tyrese Williford scored 23 points, David McFarland added 18, and SIU Edwardsville posted a 51-point second half to beat Morehead State. Belmont 97, Southeast Missouri 71 • Kevin McClain scored 31 points, and was one of three Belmont starters to top 20 points as the Bruins beat Southeast Missouri. Ledarrius Brewer led Southeast Missouri with 22 points and five rebounds.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Tennessee (19-1) idle. Next: at Texas A&M, Saturday. 2. Duke (18-2) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Sat. 3. Virginia (19-1) idle. Next: vs. Miami, Sat. 4. Gonzaga (19-2) beat BYU 93-63. Next: vs. San Diego, Saturday. 5. Michigan (20-1) idle. Next: at Iowa, Friday. 6. Michigan State (18-3) idle. Next: vs. Indiana, Saturday. 7. Kentucky (17-3) idle. Next: at Florida, Sat. 8. Nevada (20-1) idle. Next: vs. Boise St., Sat. 9. North Carolina (16-4) idle. Next: at No. 15 Louisville, Saturday. 10. Marquette (19-3) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Tuesday. 11. Kansas (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Texas Tech, Saturday. 12. Virginia Tech (17-3) idle. Next: at No. 23 N.C. State, Saturday. 13. Houston (21-1) beat Temple 73-66. Next: at UCF, Thursday. 14. Villanova (17-4) idle. Next: vs. Georgetown, Sunday. 15. Louisville (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 North Carolina, Saturday. 16. Texas Tech (17-4) idle. Next: at No. 11 Kansas, Saturday. 17. Purdue (15-6) beat Penn State 99-90, OT. Next: vs. Minnesota, Sunday. 18. Buffalo (19-2) idle. Next: at Bowling Green, Friday. 19. LSU (17-3) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas, Sat. 20. Iowa State (16-5) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Sat. 21. Maryland (17-5) idle. Next: at No. 24 Wisconsin, Friday. 22. Mississippi State (15-5) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Saturday. 23. N.C. State (16-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 Virginia Tech, Saturday. 24. Wisconsin (15-6) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Maryland, Friday. 25. Florida State (15-5) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Saturday.

MU hit with severe penalties by NCAA MU • FROM C1

extra benefits rules when she completed academic work for 12 Mizzou athletes between the summer of 2015 and the summer of 2016. Kumar, who was hired as a tutor in 2010 and worked in that role for all but four semesters until she resigned in 2016, told investigators she felt pressure to ensure the athletes passed courses, but the investigation “did not support that her colleagues directed her to complete the student-athletes’ work.” For most of the MU athletes involved, Kumar completed online coursework, including assignments, quizzes and exams. She completed an entire course for one athlete and completed portions of a placement exam for two athletes. Missouri athletics director Jim Sterk said he was “shocked and dismayed” at the penalties and that the NCAA committee “abused its discretion” with the postseason bans and scholarship reductions, especially considering the NCAA report lauded MU for its cooperation with the process. Sterk expected Mizzou to land on probation and possibly have to vacate wins from games in which the involved athletes played. In all the school’s discussions with the NCAA the last two years, postseason bans were never discussed, a university source said. Mizzou plans to appeal the ruling to the NCAA’s Infractions Appeals Committee, a separate panel from the group that made Thursday’s ruling. MU will continue to work with attorney Michael Glazier, who specializes in cases involving the NCAA. As long as the appeals process is ongoing, the three penalized teams will be able to compete in postseason play this year, Sterk said. He guessed the appeals process could take up to six months. “We expect to win that appeal,” he said. The infractions committee hit Mizzou hard with penalties even though its evidence indicated Kumar acted alone as a rogue tutor. “We went ahead and interviewed

a number of people at the institution and there was no evidence to corroborate or support the assertion she was pressured or compelled to do this by others,” said David Roberts, the committee’s chief hearing officer. Then why such harsh penalties? Roberts explained that because Mizzou and the NCAA’s enforcement staff agreed that Kumar had committed a severe Level I violation, the infractions committee was bound to adhere to the NCAA’s penalty structure. “Academic integrity and unethical conduct strike at the heart of the core of NCAA values,” Roberts said. “In this particular case, given the parties acknowledged the conduct occurred about the case before us, the (NCAA) prescribes those penalties.” Kumar could not be reached for comment Thursday and did not respond to messages from the Post-Dispatch, but she went on a Twitter binge, publishing the names of several former MU athletes she alleged to help cheat. The Post-Dispatch could not corroborate the allegations. Mizzou football coach Barry Odom tweeted a strongly worded statement echoing Sterk’s tone: “The committee’s decision is completely unjust and unfair — to our team, our staff and to our alumni. I’m very grateful for the clear, decisive and unified leadership we have here at Mizzou, and I’m looking forward to doing whatever I can to assist with the appeals process. Together, we will fight for this great institution and I will damn sure fight for my team!” Former football coach Gary Pinkel, who retired after the 2015 season, declined to comment when reached Thursday. Any athletes who wish to transfer from Mizzou will be eligible for a waiver to avoid the NCAA’s one-year sit-out rule, Roberts said. One football player who won’t be on the move is quarterback Kelly Bryant, the graduate transfer from Clemson who moved to campus earlier this month. He has only one year of eligibility to play for the Tigers. “He’s staying and looking forward to getting to know his teammates and competing in the SEC,” Ramon Rob-

inson, Bryant’s longtime personal trainer, told the Post-Dispatch in a text message. Kumar began working with Mizzou athletes in 2010 but it wasn’t until the summer of 2015 that she claimed to start doing coursework for athletes. That summer she was assigned to work with a men’s basketball player, whom she was told needed to pass a course to graduate. At the same time, she was struggling financially and asked MU for a pay advance and a raise. She was denied the advance but received a $5-an-hour raise. The report said she “believed her raise to be an overt acknowledgment and approval of her misdeeds,” though the NCAA’s findings did not support “a broader institutional scheme.” She continued similar activities with other athletes, the report said. During the 2017 season, Mizzou self-imposed two multi-game suspensions for football players A.J. Logan and T.J. Warren for their involvement in the case. Sterk hoped that would mitigate MU’s punishment, but instead the committee came down hard, using the Division I membership-approved infractions penalty guidelines for the following measures: • Three years of probation from Jan. 31, 2019 to Jan. 30, 2022. • A postseason ban for the baseball and softball programs for the upcoming 2019 season. • A postseason ban for the football program for the upcoming 2019 season. • Records for games that the football, baseball and softball players participated will be vacated. • A 5-percent reduction in scholarships for football, baseball and softball during the 2019-20 academic year. • Recruiting restrictions for the football, baseball and softball programs for the 2019-20 academic year. • A fine of $5,000 plus 1 percent of each of the football, baseball and softball budgets. • A 10-year show-cause order for Kumar, during which any NCAA member school that employs her must restrict her from any athletically related duties.


FOOTBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

NFL NOTEBOOK

Judge denies an NFC do-over Fans had filed lawsuit over missed call in championship game

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rams’ Nickell Robey-Coleman (23) breaks up a pass and collides with the Saints’ Tommylee Lewis near the end of the NFC title game.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A courtroom quest by two New Orleans Saints ticketholders for a full or partial do-over of this year’s NFC championship game because of a blown “no-call” by game officials was rejected Thursday by a federal judge. NFL officials have acknowledged that flags should have been thrown when a Rams defensive back leveled a Saints receiver with a helmet-tohelmet hit at a crucial point in the final minutes of regulation time. The Rams won the Jan. 20 conference championship in overtime and are set to play the New England Patriots in Sunday’s Super Bowl in Atlanta. Fan reaction in New Orleans has included disbelief, anger and resignation, expressed in newspaper headlines, billboards (“They reffed up” said one), promises by some restaurants and bars that they won’t show the Super Bowl broadcast, and posters of blind referees. And at least two lawsuits. One was a class-action lawsuit on behalf of ticketholders that was awaiting action in state court. The other was filed by season ticketholders Tommy Badeaux and Candis Lambert two days after the game. It sought a court order forcing the NFL to implement a rule allowing Commissioner Roger Goodell to investigate “extraordinarily

unfair acts” that affect the game. Remedies under that rule include rescheduling the game in full, or from the point at which the unfair act occurred. It was not immediately clear if U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan’s ruling against Badeaux and Lambert would be appealed. Their lawyer, Frank D’Amico, said in an email he would have a statement later Thursday. The NFL did not immediately respond to an emailed request for reaction. Morgan rejected arguments that Badeaux and Lambert were entitled to an order, known as a “writ of mandamus,” forcing the NFL or Goodell to take action. “None of the actions Plaintiffs might seek to compel Commissioner Goodell to do are the kinds of actions a writ of mandamus may address,” Morgan said in a 17-page ruling in which she detailed the extraordinary circumstances in which Louisiana law allows a writ of mandamus to be issued. Moore becomes Dallas OC • The Cowboys have promoted Kellen Moore to offensive coordinator and hired former Dallas quarterback Jon Kitna to replace Moore as QB coach. Moore is replacing Scott Linehan after one season on the coaching staff, and just one year after retiring as a player. Moore was quarterback Dak Prescott’s backup in his final

season in 2017. The former Boise State standout spent six seasons as a player but started only two games — both when Tony Romo was injured during the 2015 season in Dallas. That was the only season in which Moore appeared in a game. Moore spent his first three seasons in Detroit, beginning when Linehan was offensive coordinator of the Lions. Moore replaced Wade Wilson as quarterbacks coach of the Cowboys as soon as he retired. Kitna spent the last three of his 15 NFL seasons as Romo’s backup with the Cowboys. He was the head coach at Waxahachie High School in the Dallas area for three years before spending last season at a private school in Phoenix. Rams’ Whitworth wins award • Rams tackle Andrew Whitworth is the recipient of the NFL Players Association’s Alan Page Community MVP award for his work in the Los Angeles area. Whitworth was not at the union’s news conference, and his wife, Melissa, accepted the award and the $100,000 check that will go to the Big Whit 77 Foundation. Former Falcons tackle Mike Kenn introduced Melissa Whitworth and noted her husband went “above and beyond in serving his city.” Whitworth donated a game check to help-

ing people in Thousand Oaks who were displaced by fires — the Whitworth family was one of them — and to survivors of victims of a mass shooting in the area. “This means a lot to our family,” Melissa Whitworth said, “but not as much as it’s about the community of Thousand Oaks. I’ve never been through anything quite like the month of November in Southern California. Twelve people were murdered 5 miles away, and hours later our entire city was on fire.” She noted there were firefighters “whose chose to save our house when theirs were burning.” Browns No. 1 in cap space • The Cleveland Browns will carry over a league-leading $56.5 million in salary cap space from this season, the NFL Players Association announced. According to the numbers released Thursday, the Browns are projected to enter the new league year about $82 million under the cap. The league’s collective bargaining agreement allows teams to carry over unused salary cap space to the next season. Indianapolis had the secondhighest carryover at $49.1 million, followed by San Francisco ($35 million), Tennessee ($25.6 million) and Houston ($18.8 million) to round out the top five.

Bruce hopes Hall of Fame comes knocking BRUCE • FROM C1

president David Baker on the other side informing him of his selection to football’s most exclusive club. It’s an overdue knock. Bruce finished his 16-year career — almost all played as a St. Louis Ram — second only to Jerry Rice in receiving yards (15,424), fifth in receptions (1,024) and seventh in touchdown catches (91). His career is littered with big games and big catches, most notably the game-winning 73-yard touchdown catch and run to give St. Louis a 23-16 victory over Tennessee in Super Bowl XXXIV. Don’t forget Bruce’s 14.9 yards per catch, higher than any of the 12 other pass-catchers in NFL history who have at least 1,000 career catches. That’s more than Jerry Rice. More than Terrell Owens. More than Marvin Harrison. More than ... well, you get the point. Talk to longtime NFL assistant coach Rick Venturi, and he’ll tell you how the New Orleans Saints would provide safety help for the cornerback lined up over Bruce. Talk to former Saints head coach Jim Haslett and he’ll tell you how surprised — even astounded — he was to see Bruce and teammate Torry Holt lifting weights late in the day and late in the week in an otherwise-abandoned Saints practice facility prior to Super Bowl XXXVI against New England in New Orleans. “We were looking for a spot (to lift),” Bruce said. “Try to keep the routine as regular as we could. Because after practice that year, we had run a lot of routes and stuff, you start to lose weight. So you want to make sure you keep your muscular tone.” Talk to Mike Martz and he’ll tell you that what truly made Bruce special was how quickly he got in and out of breaks on his routes. No wasted motion. Precise. It made him play faster than his timed speed. Few defensive backs could catch up.

“You can see the impact and you can see the numbers,” Bruce said. “And you can talk to the people who were responsible for stopping you. Were they successful sometimes? Yeah. But most of the time they weren’t. And you can see what happened.” What happened should be more than good enough to get Bruce in the Hall of Fame. Outwardly, Bruce says his approach has changed this year as he waits for that knock. “I’m not doing jumping jacks any more,” Bruce said. “I think first year I was eligible I was super, super excited. Right now it takes family and friends talking about it to get me excited.” But on the inside? “My expectation level is up,” Bruce said. “That never went down from Day 1.” There are no other wide receivers among the group of 15 modern-day finalists up for consideration. Tight end Tony Gonzalez, considered a lock as a first-year eligible candidate, is the only other pass-catcher in the group. Running back Edgerrin James is the only other skill-position player. There are lots of offensive linemen: Tony Boselli, Alan Faneca, Steve Hutchinson and Kevin Mawae. Lots of defensive backs: Steve Atwater, Champ Bailey, Ty Law, John Lynch, Ed Reed. A couple of coaches: Don Coryell and Tom Flores. And one defensive lineman: Richard Seymour. The hard-hitting Atwater played his high school football at Lutheran North in north St. Louis County. The innovative Coryell coached the St. Louis football Cardinals in the 1970s. As for Bruce, this looks like his best chance to make the Hall of Fame since he became eligible in 2015. But he’s not handicapping the field. “I browse through (the list), but I don’t do that,” he said. “I don’t like getting into comparing because it’s different. You take

a wide receiver versus a safety on defense or offensive lineman. I mean, it’s hard. The voters, they’ve got a tough job. It’s something they signed up for.” On Saturday, Bruce may go out for breakfast in Atlanta, where the vote takes place and where Super Bowl LIII takes place Sunday between the Los Angeles Rams and the New England Patriots. Then he has an event scheduled, an appearance where he does some signing and talks some football. “I think it’s for Bud Light,” Bruce said. He has to be back in his hotel room by 3 p.m. to wait for the knock, to see if he’s one of up to five modern-era inductees in the Class of 2019. Former Kansas City Chiefs safety Johnny Robinson is the seniors candidate. Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen and former Dallas Cowboys executive Gil Brandt are up in the contributors category. The overall class can have as many as eight inductees. So there will be anxious moments Saturday, but Bruce will keep his sanity as always. “I control it, I don’t let it control me,” Bruce said. “I don’t take it to bed every night. I don’t let it bog me down as far as being on the front of my brain. It’s not my main focus. “People who do that, and do that with other things, that’s where depression starts to kick in. It starts to make you ungrateful. And I’m definitely not an ungrateful person. I’d much rather give God thanks for everything that he’s given me: The talent, the ability, the longevity, and those type things. “I can go out and I can thank him for that as opposed to just really keeping my eye on this situation. Or starting to tear someone down if they don’t like the way I played or if they didn’t vote for me. That’s not my style.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Rams’ D-line believes it can pressure Brady SUPER • FROM C1

“Aaron can do things you didn’t know were possible,” said Rams defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, no stranger to improbable feats himself. Donald is the NFL’s current sacks champion, the only unanimous AllPro and a probable two-time league Defensive Player of the Year. But Los Angeles’ powerful defensive tackle has one more daunting task in the Super Bowl. Donald and the Rams must figure out how to pressure Tom Brady, who completely stumped the New England Patriots’ first two playoff opponents. The Chargers and Chiefs never sacked the 41-year-old superstar while he sat comfortably behind his stellar offensive line and picked apart their defenses for 691 yards passing, completing 71.1 percent of his throws. Donald, who set an NFL record for sacks by an interior lineman with 20½ this season, believes Los Angeles (15-3) can do what the Chargers and Chiefs couldn’t. “We’ll get to him, but we have to stay patient and don’t get frustrated,” Donald said. “We’ve got a great secondary that will do its job and make sure he doesn’t have easy throws. If he has to hold onto the ball, we’ll have our chances. We just have to go get him.” The Rams have been assembling the tools for this job all year long. In the spring, they signed the imposing Suh to a $14 million deal. They also acquired Aqib Talib and Marcus Peters, two elite cornerbacks who can create chances for their pass rush. They gave a six-year, $135 million contract extension to Donald in late August, making their best player happy after two offseason holdouts. He responded with the best season of his stellar career. Los Angeles then acquired edge rusher Dante Fowler from Jacksonville in late October, adding a speedy outside pass-rushing threat to a roster that lacked it. Fowler has 1½ sacks and six quarterback hits in the Rams’ past four games — including the biggest hit of LA’s season, forcing Drew Brees’ overtime interception in the NFC championship game. Fowler never became a superstar with the Jaguars, but he loves being a role player for LA. “I knew I was going to fit in with this defense because of A.D. and Suh,” Fowler said. “They make it easy for everybody else on the defense. They cause so many problems.” Donald, Suh and Brockers are a formidable defensive line, and their teamwork has improved each month. Although Donald doesn’t have a sack in the Rams’ two postseason games, he draws double-teams that free up Suh, who has 1½ sacks and four quarterback hits in an outstanding postseason. Even if Donald and Suh win their individual matchups on the line, Brady’s quick decisions and swift release make him awfully difficult for anyone to touch. He was sacked just 21 times in the regular season. Although the Chiefs tied for the NFL lead with 52 sacks in the regular season, they hit Brady just once and never sacked him in the AFC title game. A week earlier, the Chargers’ dynamic pass-rushing duo of Melvin Ingram and Joey Bosa never got to him. Even if the Rams can’t sack Brady, they must attempt to get him moving before his receivers’ routes develop. That’s an area in which Donald specializes: Although he faces more double-teams than just about any defensive player, he consistently penetrates the opponents’ backfield regardless. “There’s nothing he can’t do in regards to disrupting a game,” Rams coach Sean McVay said. When Brady doesn’t face quick pressure, he is typically able to lacerate opposing defenses with short passes. Just ask the Chargers and Chiefs. “That’s crazy,” Brockers said when told about Brady’s sack-free postseason. “He’s the G.O.A.T., but he’s just another quarterback. He’s going to try to avoid the pressure. It’s our job as D-linemen to get to him, so we’re putting the pressure on ourselves to try to influence him and try to get him off his spot.” The Rams believe they have the players for the job, and they also might have the scheme. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips’ 3-4 defense stopped Brady in the 2015 AFC title game. Phillips’ Broncos — including Talib — hit Brady 17 times and made him miserable while going 27 of 56 in the Patriots’ 20-18 loss. Fowler has studied video of that game for years now. He would love to play the role of Von Miller, who got 2½ sacks and an interception. Phillips isn’t getting into any specifics of the Rams’ plan against Brady, camouflaging his sharp mind behind his usual geniality. “Unfortunately for me, I get older, but Tom Brady doesn’t,” the 71-yearold Phillips said.


HOCKEY

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Winnipeg 51 33 Nashville 52 30 Minnesota 50 26 Dallas 50 25 Colorado 50 22 Blues 49 22 Chicago 51 18 Pacific GP W Calgary 51 33 San Jose 52 29 Vegas 52 29 Vancouver 51 23 Anaheim 51 21 Arizona 50 23 Edmonton 50 23 Los Angeles 50 20

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

L OT 16 2 18 4 21 3 21 4 20 8 22 5 24 9 L OT 13 5 16 7 19 4 22 6 21 9 23 4 24 3 26 4

Pts 68 64 55 54 52 49 45 Pts 71 65 62 52 51 50 49 44

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Tampa Bay 50 37 11 2 Toronto 49 30 17 2 Montreal 51 28 18 5 Boston 51 27 17 7 Buffalo 50 25 19 6 Florida 48 20 20 8 Detroit 51 19 25 7 Ottawa 50 19 26 5 Metropolitan GP W L OT NY Islanders 49 29 15 5 Pittsburgh 50 27 17 6 Washington 50 27 17 6 Columbus 50 28 19 3 Carolina 50 24 20 6 NY Rangers 50 22 21 7 Philadelphia 51 22 23 6 New Jersey 50 19 24 7

GF 176 161 142 127 169 139 156 GF 190 187 157 147 120 132 144 114

Pts 76 62 61 61 56 48 45 43 Pts 63 60 60 59 54 51 50 45

GA 143 135 142 128 162 149 190 GA 145 167 140 161 153 142 163 150

GF 201 174 154 148 145 152 145 156 GF 147 176 171 161 140 143 146 149

Home 19-6-2 16-9-0 13-9-3 16-8-2 10-8-5 12-13-2 10-10-6 Home 17-4-5 17-4-4 16-6-3 12-10-3 10-8-8 9-12-3 12-13-1 12-13-1

GA 144 140 149 135 149 170 172 187 GA 122 154 162 155 149 168 172 171

Home 20-5-0 14-11-1 14-10-2 17-7-3 14-6-3 10-6-5 10-12-4 12-10-4 Home 14-7-3 14-9-2 13-8-4 14-10-2 13-8-4 13-7-5 11-10-3 13-7-4

Away 14-10-0 14-9-4 13-12-0 9-13-2 12-12-3 10-9-3 8-14-3 Away 16-9-0 12-12-3 13-13-1 11-12-3 11-13-1 14-11-1 11-11-2 8-13-3

Div 10-7-0 8-5-0 9-4-1 5-6-1 4-7-3 6-7-3 9-4-3 Div 9-5-1 10-4-3 11-4-2 6-5-3 5-6-3 8-7-1 7-10-1 8-8-1

Away 17-6-2 16-6-1 14-8-3 10-10-4 11-13-3 10-14-3 9-13-3 7-16-1 Away 15-8-2 13-8-4 14-9-2 14-9-1 11-12-2 9-14-2 11-13-3 6-17-3

Div 12-3-0 7-6-2 9-5-4 12-6-2 8-6-3 9-5-3 4-8-4 6-8-2 Div 13-5-1 7-6-1 9-4-2 11-5-1 7-7-2 5-8-3 5-8-1 7-9-1

Perron is placed on IR Winger has been dealing with upper-body injury

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik (44) battles for the puck against David Perron on Jan. 14 in Washington.

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday NY Rangers 4, New Jersey 3 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, OT Winnipeg 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 2 Dallas 1, Buffalo 0 Friday Calgary at Washington, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. NY Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 6 p.m.

Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Chicago at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Nashville at Florida, 6 p.m. Vegas at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Saturday Edmonton at Philadelphia, noon New Jersey at Montreal, 1 p.m. Detroit at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Blues at Columbus, 6 p.m. Vegas at Florida, 6 p.m. Los Angeles vs. NY Islanders

at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Toronto, 6 p.m. Dallas at Nashville, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m. Arizona at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Boston at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Edmonton at Montreal, 1 p.m. Calgary at Carolina, 1 p.m.

Flyers extend streak to six

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Philadelphia defenseman Travis Sanheim (6) celebrates his winning goal with teammates Phil Varone (44) and Radko Gudas (3). ASSOCIATED PRESS

Travis Sanheim scored a power-play goal 2:56 into overtime and the Philadelphia Flyers beat the Boston Bruins 3-2 on Thursday night to extend their season-best winning streak to six. Sanheim assisted on Oskar Lindblom’s tying goal with 9:24 left in the third period, then beat Tuukka Rask with a long wrist shot in the final seconds of a power play after Brad Marchand was sent off for tripping. Claude Giroux also scored for Philadelphia, and Jakub Voracek had two assists. Carter Hart made 23 saves for the resurgent Flyers, who have won seven of eight to improve to 2223-6 and took the season series against the Bruins 2-1. David Pastrnak scored both goals for the Bruins. Rask, out with a concussion since Jan. 19, stopped 38 shots in his return. The Bruins lost their third straight.

Travis Konecny, who drew the penalty on Marchand in OT, assisted with Sean Couturier on Sanheim’s winner from the left circle. Pastrnak scored a powerplay goal 3:05 into the game to put the Bruins up 1-0, beating Hart with a one-timer. Pastrnak reached 30 goals for the third straight season when he tipped in a shot by Bergeron 5:11 into the second, putting Boston up 2-1.

NOTEBOOK Vermette retires • Center Antoine Vermette will retire after 14 NHL seasons as one of the best faceoff men of his generation. Vermette won 56.6 percent of his faceoffs, the ninthbest mark since the league began tracking the statistic in 1997-98. The 36-year-old won the Stanley Cup with Chicago in 2015. He most recently played for Anaheim, but didn’t sign with a team after becoming a free agent last summer.

NHL SUMMARIES Rangers 4, Devils 3

Flyers 3, Bruins 2, OT

NY Rangers 1 1 2 — 4 New Jersey 2 0 1 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Hischier 14, 5:10 (pp). 2, New Jersey, Johansson 8 (Boyle, Severson), 16:18 (pp). 3, NY Rangers, Zibanejad 18 (Hayes), 19:58 (pp). Penalties: Coleman, NJ, (tripping), 1:00; Staal, NYR, (holding), 3:51; Smith, NYR, (tripping), 10:43; Fast, NYR, (tripping), 14:58; Johansson, NJ, (interference), 19:53. Second period: 4, NY Rangers, Zibanejad 19 (Hayes, Zuccarello), 16:36 (pp). Penalties: Wood, NJ, (interference), 13:11; Coleman, NJ, (hooking), 16:22; NY Rangers bench, served by Kreider (too many men on the ice), 19:23. Third period: 5, NY Rangers, Kreider 23 (Zibanejad, Zuccarello), 4:43. 6, New Jersey, Yakovlev 2 (Johansson, Hischier), 5:36. 7, NY Rangers, Zibanejad 20 (Zuccarello, Buchnevich), 15:24. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 6-12-7: 25. New Jersey 8-5-9: 22. Power-plays: NY Rangers 2 of 4; New Jersey 2 of 4. Goalies: NY Rangers, Lundqvist 16-12-7 (22 shots-19 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 14-15-6 (25-21). A: 16,514. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Corey Syvret. Linesmen: Brian Murphy, Jonny Murray.

Philadelphia 1 0 1 1 — 3 Boston 1 1 0 0 — 2 First period: 1, Boston, Pastrnak 29 (Krug, Marchand), 3:05 (pp). 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 15 (Voracek), 19:16. Penalties: Giroux, PHI, (tripping), 1:47. Second period: 3, Boston, Pastrnak 30 (Bergeron, Chara), 5:11. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Lindblom 7 (Voracek, Sanheim), 10:36 (pp). Penalties: Moore, BOS, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 6:42; Kuraly, BOS, (holding stick), 8:46. Overtime: 5, Philadelphia, Sanheim 5 (Couturier, Konecny), 2:56 (pp). Penalties: Marchand, BOS, (tripping), 0:57. Shots: Philadelphia 8-17-11-5: 41. Boston 10-7-8: 25. Power-plays: Philadelphia 2 of 2; Boston 1 of 1. Goalies: Philadelphia, Hart 8-5-1 (25 shots-23 saves). Boston, Rask 14-8-4 (41-38). A: 17,565.

Jets 4, Blue Jackets 3

Through Thursday, January 31, 2019 GP G Nikita Kucherov, TB 50 22 Mikko Rantanen, COL 50 23 Johnny Gaudreau, CGY 51 29 Connor McDavid, EDM 49 29 Patrick Kane, CHI 50 29 Nathan MacKinnon, COL 50 27 Brayden Point, TB 50 30 Blake Wheeler, WPG 51 9 Mark Scheifele, WPG 51 26 Mitchell Marner, TOR 49 20 David Pastrnak, BOS 51 30 Sean Monahan, CGY 51 27 Leon Draisaitl, EDM 50 27 3 tied with 58 pts.

Columbus 2 1 0 — 3 Winnipeg 1 1 2 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 26 (Wheeler, Morrow), 4:34. 2, Columbus, Panarin 20 (Jones, Murray), 8:52. 3, Columbus, Anderson 16 (Jones, Panarin), 13:30 (pp). Penalties: Dubois, CBJ, (holding), 1:21; Perreault, WPG, (slashing), 12:40; Appleton, WPG, (interference), 14:07. Second period: 4, Winnipeg, Appleton 3 (Lemieux, Copp), 13:21. 5, Columbus, Bjorkstrand 8 (Wennberg, Foligno), 14:18. Penalties: Werenski, CBJ, (interference), 6:47. Third period: 6, Winnipeg, Roslovic 4 (Trouba, Myers), 8:47 (pp). 7, Winnipeg, Connor 22 (Trouba, Little), 18:46. Penalties: Murray, CBJ, (interference), 7:03; Scheifele, WPG, (delay of game), 13:53; Anderson, CBJ, (hooking), 19:10. Shots: Columbus 11-12-8: 31. Winnipeg 8-9-9: 26. Power-plays: Columbus 1 of 3; Winnipeg 1 of 4. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 19-16-1 (26 shots-22 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 23-14-1 (31-28). A: 15,321. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Brian Mach.

NHL Scoring Leaders

NHL Calendar Feb. 23: Stadium Series, Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, Lincoln Financial Field. April 6: Last day of regular season. April 10: Stanley Cup playoffs begin.

A 57 51 44 44 42 44 35 54 36 42 31 34 34

PTS 79 74 73 73 71 71 65 63 62 62 61 61 61

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

Winger David Perron, who missed the final three games before the All-Star break with an upper-body injury, will miss at least one more after the team put him on injured reserve on Thursday. And one is the minimum. Interim coach Craig Berube said Perron would not accompany the team when it left on Friday for Columbus but could join the team later. “He’s not going to come with us on the start, that’s for sure,” Berube said. “We’ll see how he’s doing and if he feels like he can come on the trip, he can join us on the trip.” The Blues play in Columbus on Saturday, then play at Florida on Tuesday and Tampa Bay on Thursday. Perron had a 13-game point streak going when he was hurt in the Boston game on Jan. 17. He’s second on the team in scoring with 35 points on 17 goals and 18 assists.

THOMAS CLOSE Forward Robert Thomas, who has been out with an injured shoulder and thought he might have a chance to play in the Anaheim game right before the break but didn’t, could be back in the lineup on Saturday. “I think that’s the way everyone’s feeling, that I might have a chance to play,” he said. “It will be good. Everything is starting to come along and I feel a lot better.”

Thomas skated with the fourth line (Ivan Barbashev, Robby Fabbri and Mackenzie MacEachern) in practice and said Thursday was the first day he had been cleared for contact. “He looked good out there so he’ll get more of that tomorrow,” Berube said. “We’ll do some drills in practice where he sees how he feels with the contact.” MacEachern, who was sent down after the Anaheim game so he could get in games with San Antonio, was recalled on Thursday in another vote of confidence for the rookie forward. With Thomas still on injured reserve and Perron joining him, the Blues have 21 players on the roster at the moment.

BACK IN MOTION Coming off a week off the ice, Berube wanted the team to have a busy practice session and he liked what he saw. “It was good,” he said. “Twenty-five minutes of good crisp flow and skating, passing, pace, and then I wanted to get some scrimmage time in there to get them on their toes and thinking about game-like situations. “They worked hard. I thought the pace was good, the skating was there. They looked good to me. The passing and the puck skills are a little off from the time away and not being on the ice, but overall, we were happy with practice.” General manager Doug Armstrong said last week that Berube would finish out the season as coach and would be a candi-

date for the job for next season. Berube said that doesn’t change things for him. “I’m not too worried about all that,” he said. “I’m not. I enjoy what I’m doing right now, coaching this team and I think we’re making strides and we’re going in the right direction. That’s all I can focus on. I love working with these guys. They’re a great group of guys and I think they want to win, and I think we’re going in the right direction.”

ALL-STAR MEMORIES Ryan O’Reilly spent his break in San Jose, where he was the Blues’ representative at the All-Star Game. “It was good,” he said. “It was fun. It would have been nice to win the (final) game, but you get to see a lot of guys and it’s nice going to California and getting some sunshine there.” At an event filled with the league’s best talent, one player stood out to O’Reilly. “It’s pretty casual at those events, but just to be on the same team as him, watching Patrick Kane, that was pretty impressive,” he said. “He gets the puck, especially three-on-three, no one can get him off it. It’s his puck, he’s doing what he wants with it. I was on the ice a few times with him, it’s just amazing the plays he can make and seeing it from the other end was obviously a lot nicer.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Blues will play 14 games this month BLUES • FROM C1

the Western Conference, has changed the complexion of a season that seemed doomed. “I feel like we’re building something really good inside here, especially after the last game,” right winger Vladimir Tarasenko said. “A lot of good emotions inside the locker room, a lot of positive. It’s a good time for us. Now we’re ready to make a push and keep it in the right direction. “We know the season is not over like everyone said a couple months ago. We feel pretty confident now.” Confidence is something that has been in short supply for the Blues this season, as they struggled to find a consistent path to success. But they restart the season on Saturday in Columbus with a 6-3-1 mark in their past 10 games, which is as good as it’s been for the Blues this season and is better than all but one of the teams currently in the wild card race. The Blues are three points out of a wild card berth, another rarity. “At one point, I couldn’t even tell you how many points we were out,” goalie Jake Allen said. “I think we’ve put ourselves in a great spot, with an opportunity to capitalize on something that the first two months of the year a lot of people probably counted us completely out of as a possibility.” The Blues still have plenty of doubters, and as solid a statement as the Blues made right before the break with a dominating win over Anaheim, the Los Angeles game right before it, where the Blues blew a 2-0 lead and lost 4-3, costing them two valuable points, is one of the reasons those doubts persist. Now they start February, which looms as a short yet unforgiving month. In the upcom-

ing 28 days, the Blues will play 14 games with three sets of backto-backs. Of those 14 games, 11 of them are against teams that right now are in a playoff spot and nine of them are on the road. Three of their first five games are against teams that in the top five in the league in points, including league-leading Tampa Bay. And at the end of the month, on Feb. 25, is the trade deadline, something that figures to loom over players on the team, particularly pending unrestricted free agents Jay Bouwmeester, Carl Gunnarsson and Pat Maroon. A year ago, the Blues entered this stretch of the season in a playoff spot but heading down. This year, the Blues are out but feel they’re heading up. “It’s a different feeling because we feel like we’re playing well,” captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “We’ve built this thing in the right direction. We have some momentum. We ended on a really good note against Anaheim. We can only go up from here and treat every game like a playoff game. We don’t really have a choice. You’re playing 14 games in one month. You should be dialed in mentally. It’s going to be on us to make sure we’re ready.” “We’ve been crawling our way back into this fight and we ended the break, I thought, pretty good,” said center Ryan O’Reilly. “It wasn’t the best ending but our last game I thought was really good and we want to build. It’s going to be really tough to get in, but I think we can for sure. … If we do the right things and play the right way, it’s going to roll, and that can be a really good thing for us.” The break is a double-edged sword. While the time off is welcome, it also is why games are crammed together. Some players took the chance to head to a beach somewhere, like the Caribbean or Mexico. Some, like Pi-

etrangelo, stayed home with their family, in his case, with his infant triplets. “This month is going to be a grind,” Pietrangelo said. “It’s going to be tough. It’s a good thing we have this kind of reset. ... I think given an opportunity to spend six days at home with my kids, I’m going to do it every time. It was a good chance to reset and enjoy some time at home. A lot of quality time. Gave their mom a break that’s well earned. You don’t get many opportunities to put them down to sleep or get up with them in the morning, so to get that opportunity is pretty special.” Confidence, like momentum (or sleep, if you have triplets), can be a fleeting thing. A fragile psyche was something interim coach Craig Berube — who spent his break in Philadelphia, which may explain his lack of a tan — has pointed to as one of the team’s issues this season. Now, the team seems to be on a more even keel, with a destination in sight but with some strong waves in between. “It starts when you stop worrying about stuff happening around you and just worry about your game,” Tarasenko said. “Every guy here supports each other. You guys can feel it from the stands and we just play for each other. We feel pretty confident now and it’s nice to be here with the guys. With the work process, we can build a really good momentum and something really good here.” Did the break run the risk of breaking the momentum they had built up? “It’s more about confidence,” Tarasenko said, “and I don’t think the break can affect confidence.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE NFL

Favorite

Points Underdog Open Current Super Bowl LIII • Sunday, Atlanta Patriots PK 2.5 Rams Money Line: Patriots -$140 vs. Rams +$120. 1st half line: Patriots -1.5. 1st half total: Over/under 28.5. 1st quarter line: Patriots -.5. 1st quarter total: Over/under 10.5. 2nd quarter line: Patriots -.5. 2nd quarter total: Over/under 17.0. 3rd quarter line: Patriots -.5. 3rd quarter total: Over/under 10.5. 4th quarter line: Patriots -.5. 4th quarter total: Over/under 14.5. Total points for Patriots: Over/under 29.5 Total points for Rams: Over/under 27.5 1st half points for Patriots: Over/under 15.0 1st half points for Rams: Over/under 14.0 Will the game go into overtime: No -$1200 vs. yes +$600 Team to score first: Pats -$125, Rams +$105 Team to score last: Pats -$110, Rams -$110 First to score wins: Yes -$160, No +$140 Will either kicker hit the upright/ crossbar: No -$600 vs. yes +$400 NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 4.5 Grizzlies Celtics NL KNICKS Thunder 1.5 HEAT JAZZ 11.5 Hawks NUGGETS 4 Rockets COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Penn 5.5 CORNELL Princeton PK COLUMBIA Brown 1 DARTMOUTH HARVARD 1.5 Yale Davidson 1 ST. BONA Michigan 3 IOWA No Kentucky 3.5 IUPUI WISC-GREEN BAY 6 Wisconsin-Milw Wright St 2 ILLINOIS-CHI WISCONSIN 5 Maryland Added Game CANISIUS 3 Quinnipiac Write-In Games W ILLINOIS 3.5 N Dakota Buffalo 7.5 BOWLING GREEN NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Predators -$120/even PANTHERS CAPITALS -$110/-$110 Flames PENGUINS -$240/+$200 Senators Lightning -$145/+$125 ISLANDERS SABRES -$150/+$130 Blackhawks Maple Leafs -$165/+$145 RED WINGS HURRICANES -$110/-$110 Vegas STARS -$135/+$115 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 49.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2019 B. Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with 3B Nolan Arenado a one-year contract. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed LHP P.J. Browne. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed 2B Ridge Hoopii-Haslam to a contract extension. Signed INF R.J. Asuncion. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Traded 1B Collin Ferguson to Rockland (Can-Am) for RHP Chris Pennell. WASHINGTON WILD THINGS — Traded RHP Chase Cunningham to Southern Illinois for LHP Nick Durazo and future considerations. BASKETBALL | NBA NEW YORK KNICKS — Traded C Kristaps Porzingis, Gs Tim Hardaway Jr., Trey Burke and Courtney Lee to Dallas for G Dennis Smith Jr., C DeAndre Jordan, G-F Wesley Matthews and two future first-round picks. WASHINGTON WIZARDS — Signed G John Jenkins to a 10-day contract. WNBA WASHINGTON MYSTICS — Promoted Eric Thibault to associate head coach. FOOTBALL | NFL DALLAS COWBOYS — Promoted Kellen Moore to offensive coordinator. Named Jon Kitna quarterbacks coach. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Retained defensive line coach Jerry Montgomery and running backs coach Ben Sirmans. Promoted Jason Simmons to defensive backs coach and Ryan Downard to assistant defensive backs coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Named Anthony Piroli strength & conditioning coach; Roger Kingdom speed & conditioning coach; and Michael Stacchiotti assistant strength & conditioning coach. HOCKEY | NHL NHLPA C Antoine Vermette announced his retirement. LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled Fs Mike Amadio, Austin Wagner and D Sean Walker from Ontario (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned G Cam Johnson to Binghamton (AHL). Recalled G Mackenzie Blackwood and D Eric Grybafrom Binghamton. Placed D Sami Vatanen on injured reserve. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Recalled F Michael Dal Colle and D Devon Toews from Bridgeport (AHL). SOCCER | MLS ATLANTA UNITED — Transferred Miguel Almiron to Newcastle United (EPL) for an undisclosed fee. COLUMBUS CREW — Acquired $175,000 of General Allocation Money from Montreal for an international roster spot for the 2019 MLS season. D.C. UNITED — Acquired D Leonardo Jara from Boca Juniors (Superliga Argentina). Signed D Akeem Ward. OTTAWA FURY — Signed D-M Dakota Barnathan. COLLEGE NCAA — Placed Missouri’s football, baseball and softball programs on three years of probation and one-year postseason bans for academic misconduct involving a tutor who completed coursework for athletes. CAMPBELL — Promoted tight ends coach Nick Grimes to offensive coordinator.

GOLF

Joaquin Niemann Chesson Hadley Zach Johnson Martin Kaymer Chase Wright Danny Lee Harris English Tony Finau Mackenzie Hughes Sean O’Hair Nick Taylor Adam Hadwin Steve Stricker Jimmy Walker Sam Ryder Brandon Hagy C.T. Pan Patton Kizzire Ryan Moore Vaughn Taylor Blair Hamilton Jason Kokrak Scott Stallings Kenny Perry Talor Gooch Jonas Blixt Cody Gribble Lucas Glover Si Woo Kim Brice Garnett Charl Schwartzel Ryan Armour Adam Long Keith Mitchell Brendan Steele Kyle Stanley Joel Dahmen Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Austin Cook Bill Haas Peter Uihlein Jim Herman Patrick Rodgers Tyler Duncan Colt Knost Whee Kim Michael Hopper

36-35 31-40 34-37 34-37 34-37 36-36 33-39 35-37 35-37 34-38 36-36 31-41 37-35 37-35 35-37 36-36 35-38 39-34 35-38 36-37 38-35 37-36 36-37 38-35 38-35 36-37 36-37 37-37 35-39 34-40 38-36 36-38 35-39 36-38 35-40 37-38 39-36 36-39 37-38 35-41 39-37 40-36 38-38 37-39 38-38 38-39 39-40 38-41

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 79 79

E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +8 +8

EURO | Saudi International Leaders Thursday | Royal Greens Golf & CC King Abdulla Economic City, Saudi Arabia Purse: $3.5 million Yardage: 7,010; Par: 70 First Round Thomas Pieters, Belgium Zander Lombard, South Africa Renato Paratore, Italy Alfie Plant, England Ross Fischer, England Justin Harding, South Africa Jake McLeod, Australia Richard Sterne, South Africa Shaun Norris, South Africa Victor Perez, France Joost Luiten, Netherlands Jorge Campillo, Spain Justin Walters, South Africa Chris Paisley, England Matteo Manassero, Italy Also Patrick Reed, United States Dustin Johnson, United States Bryson Dechambeau, United States Ian Poulter, England Henrik Stenson, Sweden Sergio Garcia, Spain Brooks Koepka, United States Ernie Els, Spain Justin Rose, England Kurt Kitayama, United States David Lipsky, United States Sean Crocker, United States

63 65 65 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 68 68 68 68 69 69 70 70 71 71 72

NFL INJURY REPORT Sunday NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at LOS ANGELES RAMS: PATRIOTS: DNP: LB Dont’a Hightower (illness). LIMITED: DT Malcom Brown (calf). RAMS: LIMITED: S Blake Countess (foot).

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Area results Women’s basketball SLU 60, George Mason 53 Morehead State 73, SIU Edwardsville 67 Belmont 91, Southeast Missouri 57 UMSL 71, Rockhurst 65 McKendree 58, Indianapolis 51 Emporia State 83, Lindenwood 63 Maryville 87, William Jewell 75 Lyon 98, STL Pharmacy 54 Missouri Baptist 68, Central Baptist 63 LU-Belleville 68, Park 57 Men’s basketball SIU Edwardsville 83, Morehead State 76 Belmont 97, Southeast Missouri 71 UMSL 75, Rockhurst 59 Indianapolis 86, McKendree 62 Emporia State 85, Lindenwood 68 Maryville 90, William Jewell 85 STL Pharmacy 76, Lyon 69 Missouri Baptist 77, Central Baptist 57 Park 84, LU-Belleville 64 Area schedule FRIDAY W: Washington at Carnegie Mellon, 5 p.m. W: Missouri State at Drake, 6 p.m. W: SIU Carbondale at Northern Iowa, 7 p.m. M: Washington at Carnegie Mellon, 7 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL Major scores East Baruch 68, York (NY) 53 Bryant 71, Wagner 64 CCSU 78, St. Francis Brooklyn 72 Fair. Dickinson 80, LIU Brooklyn 77 Georgetown 80, Xavier 73 Manhattan 62, Fairfield 49 Marist 78, Iona 74 Monmouth (NJ) 66, Siena 55 Purdue 99, Penn St. 90, OT Rider 59, St. Peter’s 51 Sacred Heart 87, Mount St. Mary’s 79 St. Francis (Pa.) 76, Robert Morris 73 Yeshiva 67, Mount St. Vincent 54 Southwest Houston 73, Temple 66 S. Dakota St. 86, Oral Roberts 80 Texas Rio Grande Valley 77, Chicago St. 46

PGA | Phoenix Open Thursday | Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $7.1 million Yardage: 7,261; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Justin Thomas 30-34 Rickie Fowler 32-32 Harold Varner III 31-33 Martin Laird 32-33 J.T. Poston 32-33 Tyrrell Hatton 34-32 Byeong Hun An 31-35 Bubba Watson 32-34 Scott Piercy 34-32 Charley Hoffman 33-33 David Hearn 32-35 Emiliano Grillo 36-31 Webb Simpson 33-34 Andrew Landry 33-34 Cameron Smith 34-33 Matt Kuchar 35-32 Nick Watney 32-35 Brian Gay 35-32 Trey Mullinax 33-34 Matthew Wolff 32-35 Tom Hoge 34-33 Branden Grace 35-32 35-32 John Huh Xander Schauffele 34-33 Jon Rahm 34-33 Ollie Schniederjans 33-34 Ryan Palmer 33-35 Freddie Jacobson 35-33 Keegan Bradley 34-34 Grayson Murray 33-35 Kevin Na 34-34 Morgan Hoffmann 33-35 Phil Mickelson 34-34 Gary Woodland 35-33 Hideki Matsuyama 32-36 Russell Henley 33-35 Bud Cauley 32-36 James Hahn 34-34 Alex Noren 32-37 J.J. Spaun 35-34 Luke List 35-34 Sungjae Im 35-34 Ted Potter, Jr. 35-34 J.B. Holmes 34-35 Rory Sabbatini 35-34 Denny McCarthy 33-36 Aaron Baddeley 34-35 Andrew Putnam 34-35 Brandt Snedeker 35-34 Kevin Tway 34-35 Brian Harman 34-35 Stewart Cink 33-36 Richy Werenski 34-35 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 34-35 Alex Cejka 36-33 Jhonattan Vegas 36-34 Cameron Champ 35-35 Kevin Kisner 33-37 Brandon Harkins 36-34 Beau Hossler 35-35 Carlos Ortiz 36-34 Stephan Jaeger 37-33 Max Homa 35-35 Michael Kim 37-33 Abraham Ancer 36-34 Hunter Mahan 35-35 Sung Kang 35-35 Adam Schenk 34-36 Sam Burns 37-33 John Catlin 36-34 Chez Reavie 34-37 Chris Kirk 35-36 Bronson Burgoon 34-37 Kevin Streelman 35-36 Satoshi Kodaira 33-38 Chris Stroud 34-37 Russell Knox 36-35 K.J. Choi 34-37 Billy Horschel 36-35 Daniel Berger 37-34 Brian Stuard 35-36 Robert Streb 35-36 Seamus Power 34-37 Ryan Blaum 34-37

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

64 64 64 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

-7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

Midwest Augsburg 76, Carleton 69 Benedictine (Kan.) 86, Grand View 60 Bethel (Minn.) 85, St. John’s (Minn.) 81 Carroll (Wis.) 77, Wheaton (Ill.) 70 Columbia (Mo.) 75, Williams Baptist 57 Detroit 78, Cleveland St. 64 E. Illinois 67, E. Kentucky 66 Grinnell 110, Beloit 83 Gustavus 80, Hamline 72 Hillsdale 81, Tiffin 76 Lake Forest 73, Ripon 69 Martin Luther 84, North Central (Minn.) 81 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Concordia (Wis.) 68 Minn.-Morris 76, Crown (Minn.) 74, OT Mount Mercy 68, Graceland (Iowa) 67 Northwestern (Minn.) 105, Bethany Lutheran 101 Northwood (Mich.) 90, Lake Superior St. 85 SIU-Edwardsville 83, Morehead St. 76 St. Norbert 78, Lawrence 68 St. Olaf 90, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 85 St. Scholastica 86, Wis.-Superior 52 St. Thomas (Minn.) 94, Macalester 61 Wayne (Mich.) at Grand Valley St., ppd. Wis.-La Crosse 60, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 52 Wis.-Parkside 71, N. Michigan 65, OT Wis.-River Falls 96, Wis.-Stout 72 Youngstown St. 75, Oakland 74 South Appalachian St. 104, Louisiana-Laf. 77 Austin Peay 77, Tennessee Tech 66 Belmont 97, SE Missouri 71 Christian Brothers 84, Shorter 72 Coast. Carolina 92, La.-Monroe 81 Coll. Charles. 70, J. Madison 53 ETSU 74, Samford 66 East Carolina 66, Tulane 65 Elon 57, Delaware 56 FAU 69, Louisiana Tech 61 Furman 71, The Citadel 61 Jacksonville St. 88, Murray St. 68 Lake Erie 72, Kentucky Wesleyan 63 Marshall 91, UTEP 86 North Greenville 74, King (Tenn.) 67 Old Dominion 72, North Texas 61 Rice 65, Charlotte 61 Southern Miss. 89, FIU 73 Tennessee St. 68, UT Martin 67 Towson 77, UNC Wilm. 76 UNC Greensboro 93, VMI 66 Union (Tenn.) 99, West Georgia 79 W. Carolina 105, Chattanooga 96 W. Kentucky 96, UTSA 88, OT William & Mary 75, Drexel 69 Wofford 76, Mercer 67

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared 1. Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. 2. UConn (18-2) lost to No. 3 Louisville 78-69. Next: at Cincinnai, Saturday. 3. Louisville (20-1) beat No. 2 UConn 78-69. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. 4. Oregon (19-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Utah, Friday. 5. Notre Dame (20-2) beat Clemson 101-63. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Sunday. 6. Mississippi State (19-1) at LSU. Next: at Alabama, Sunday. 7. N.C. State (21-0) beat Wake Forest 59-50. Next: vs. North Carolina, Sunday. 8. Stanford (17-2) at California, late. Next: vs. California, Saturday. 9. Oregon State (17-3) idle. Next: vs. Colorado, Friday. 10. Marquette (18-3) idle. Next: at DePaul, Sunday. 11. Maryland (19-2) beat Wisconsin 75-57. Next: at Illinois, Monday. 12. Texas (17-4) idle. Next: at

Oklahoma, Saturday. 13. Iowa (16-4) at Michigan, ppd. Next: at Penn State, Sunday. 14. Utah (18-1) idle. Next: at No. 4 Oregon, Friday. 15. Gonzaga (19-2) at Pacific, late. Next: at Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 16. South Carolina (15-5) beat No. 19 Kentucky 74-70. Next: at Arkansas, Sunday. 17. Rutgers (17-4) beat Indiana 69-64. Next: at Minnesota, Sunday. 18. Syracuse (17-4) beat Virginia 72-68. Next: at No. 3 Louisville, Thursday. 19. Kentucky (17-5) lost to No. 16 South Carolina 74-70. Next: vs. Florida, Sunday. 20. Texas A&M (16-4) beat Vanderbilt, 69-53. Next: at Mississippi, Sunday. 21. Arizona State (14-6) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday. 22. Michigan State (15-5) vs. Penn State, ppd. Next: vs. Purdue, Sunday. 23. Iowa State (16-5) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Saturday. 24. Florida State (18-3) beat Miami 62-58. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday. 25. BYU (17-4) lost to Loyola Marymount, 61-58. Next: at Pepperdine, Saturday.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct Toronto 37 16 .698 Philadelphia 33 18 .647 Boston 32 19 .627 Brooklyn 28 25 .528 New York 10 40 .200 Southeast W L Pct Miami 24 25 .490 Charlotte 24 26 .480 Washington 22 29 .431 Orlando 21 31 .404 16 34 .320 Atlanta Central W L Pct Milwaukee 37 13 .740 Indiana 32 19 .627 Detroit 22 28 .440 Chicago 12 40 .231 Cleveland 11 41 .212

GB — 3 4 9 25½ GB — ½ 3 4½ 8½ GB — 5½ 15 26 27

L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 7-3 0-10 L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 2-8 3-7

Str L-1 W-1 W-2 L-1 L-11 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-2 L-4 W-1 W-1 W-2

NASCAR

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 31 22 Houston 29 21 Dallas 23 28 New Orleans 23 29 Memphis 20 32 Northwest W L Denver 35 15 Oklahoma City 32 18 Portland 32 20 Utah 29 23 Minnesota 25 26 Pacific W L Golden State 36 14 LA Clippers 28 23 LA Lakers 26 25 Sacramento 26 25 Phoenix 11 42

GB — ½ 7 7½ 10½ GB — 3 4 7 10½ GB — 8½ 10½ 10½ 26½

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 1-9 L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 8-2 5-5 L10 10-0 4-6 4-6 6-4 1-9

Str W-4 L-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 Str W-4 W-6 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str W-11 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-9

Cup Series Schedule Sunday, Feb. 10: Advance Auto Parts Clash, Daytona Beach, Fla. Thursday, Feb. 14: Duel 1 at Daytona, Daytona Beach, Fla. Thursday, Feb. 14: Duel 2 at Daytona, Daytona Beach, Fla. Sunday, Feb. 17: Daytona 500, Daytona Beach, Fla. Sunday, Feb. 24: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500, Hampton, Ga. Sunday, March 3: Pennzoil 400, Las Vegas Sunday, March 10: TicketGuardian 500, Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, March 17: Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. Sunday, March 24: STP 500, Martinsville, Va. Sunday, March 31: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, April 7: Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. Saturday, April 13: Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. Sunday, April 28: Geico 500, Talladega, Ala. Sunday, May 5: MENCS race, Dover, Del. Saturday, May 11: MENCS race, Kansas City, Kan. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy Open, Concord, N.C. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. Sunday, May 26: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Camping World 400, Joliet, Ill. Saturday, July 6: Coke Zero Sugar 400, Daytona Beach, Fla. Saturday, July 13: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. Sunday, July 21: Foxwoods Resort Casino 301, Loudon, N.H. Sunday, July 28: Gander Outdoors 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, Aug. 4: Go Bowling at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Sunday, Aug. 11: Consumers Energy 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Saturday, Aug. 17: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sunday, Sept. 1: Bogangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. Sunday, Sept. 8: Big Machine Vodka 400 at the Brickyard, Indianapolis Sunday, Sept. 15: South Point 400, Las Vegas Saturday, Sept. 21: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. Sunday, Sept. 29: Bank of American ROVAL 400, Concord, N.C. Sunday, Oct. 6: MENCS race, Dover, Del. Sunday, Oct. 13: 1000Bulbs. com 500, Talladega, Ala. Sunday, Oct. 20: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Sunday, Oct. 27: First Data 500, Martinsville, Va. Sunday, Nov. 3: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, Nov. 10: MENCS race, Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, Nov. 17: Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead, Fla. x-non-points race

BASEBALL Cardinals spring training Date Sat. 2/23 Sun. 2/24 Mon. 2/25 Tue. 2/26 Wed. 2/27 Thu. 2/28 Fri. 3/1 Sat. 3/2 Sun. 3/3 Mon. 3/4 Tue. 3/5 Wed. 3/6 Fri. 3/8

Opponent at Marlins vs. Nationals vs. Tigers (SS) at Nationals vs. Braves vs. Mets at Astros vs. Marlins vs. Mets at Tigers at Phillies at Yankees SS vs. Nationals SS at Astros Sat. 3/9 vs. Astros Sun. 3/10 at Mets Mon. 3/11 vs. Nationals Tue. 3/12 at Braves Wed. 3/13 at Marlins Thu. 3/14 vs. Mets Fri. 3/15 SS at Astros SS vs. Astros Sat. 3/16 at Nationals Sun. 3/17 at Marlins Mon. 3/18 vs. Phillies Wed. 3/20 vs. Marlins Thu. 3/21 SS vs. Yankees SS at Nationals Fri. 3/22 at Mets (SS) Sat. 3/23 at Nationals Sun. 3/24 vs. Marlins Mon. 3/25 at Memphis

Time 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:10 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:35 12:10 12:05 12:05 6:05

TV FSM+ FSM FSM

FSM FSM

FSM+ FSM

FSM

FSM FSM FSM

Jan. 31-Feb. 15: Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla. Feb. 6-8: Owners’ meetings, Orlando, Fla. Feb. 10: Voluntary reporting date for Oakland pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 11: Voluntary reporting date for Seattle pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 13: Voluntary reporting date for other teams’ pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 15: Voluntary reporting date for other players on Oakland and Seattle. Feb. 18: Voluntary reporting date for other teams’ other players. Feb. 23: Mandatory reporting date. March 20-21: Opening series, Seattle vs. Oakland at Tokyo. March 28: Opening day for other teams, active rosters reduced to 25 players. April 13-14: St. Louis vs. Cincinnati at Monterrey, Mexico. May 4-5: Houston vs. Los Angeles Angels at Monterrey, Mexico. June 3: Amateur draft starts. June 13: Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15: International amateur signing period closes. June 29-30: New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2: International amateur signing period opens. July 9: All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21: Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31: Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Aug. 18: Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31: Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Sept. 1: Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 1-2: Wild-card games. November TBA: Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who became free agents, fifth day after World Series. November TBA: Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 15th day after World Series. Dec. 2: Last day for teams to offer 2020 contracts to unsigned players on their 40-man rosters. Dec. 8: Hall of Fame Modern Baseball committee vote announced, San Diego. Dec. 9-12: Winter meetings, San Diego.

All-Star reserves Western Conference player pool LaMarcus Aldridge, Spurs Anthony Davis, Pelicans Nikola Jokic, Nuggets Damian Lillard, Trail Blazers Klay Thompson, Warriors Karl-Anthony Towns, Timberwolves Russell Westbrook, Thunder Eastern Conference player pool Bradley Beal, Wizards Blake Griffin, Pistons Kyle Lowry, Raptors Khris Middleton, Bucks Victor Oladipo, Pacers Ben Simmons, 76ers Nikola Vucevic, Magic

Home 21-7 19-8 18-7 15-9 12-14 Home 22-4 17-7 22-7 15-9 17-9 Home 18-6 15-11 16-12 15-10 7-19

Away 16-11 12-13 11-13 12-14 6-22 Away 13-11 7-18 6-20 8-16 8-21 Away 15-9 14-12 8-16 7-20 5-22

Conf 22-10 20-13 23-10 20-13 6-28 Conf 14-18 18-15 15-18 15-15 11-23 Conf 25-7 24-10 14-18 9-22 9-25

Away 10-15 10-13 5-21 8-20 8-18 Away 13-11 15-11 10-13 14-14 8-17 Away 18-8 13-12 10-13 11-15 4-23

Conf 22-15 17-13 13-19 14-19 13-19 Conf 21-10 18-14 18-17 17-14 15-19 Conf 21-10 19-16 18-17 14-19 7-26

Thursday Detroit 93, Dallas 89 Orlando 107, Indiana 100 Milwaukee 105, Toronto 92 San Antonio 117, Brooklyn 114 LA Lakers at LA Clippers, late. Philadelphia at Golden State, late. Wednesday Boston 126, Charlotte 94 Chicago 105, Miami 89 Dallas 114, New York 90 Denver 105, New Orleans 99 Minnesota 99, Memphis 97, OT Washington 107, Indiana 89 Sacramento 135, Atlanta 113 Portland 132, Utah 105 Friday Memphis at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Miami, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9 p.m. Saturday LA Clippers at Detroit, 4 p.m. Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m. Chicago at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Houston at Utah, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Sunday Memphis at New York, noon Oklahoma City at Boston, 1 p.m. LA Clippers at Toronto, 2 p.m.

Bucks win Eastern battle vs. Raptors

THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo takes a shot over Raptors forward OG Anunoby on the way to scoring 19 points in a 105-92 victory in Toronto. ASSOCIATED PRESS

the longest injury-related absence of his 16-year career. James was out for nearly five weeks with a groin injury.

Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 19 points, Khris Middleton had 18 and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Raptors 105-92 on Thursday night, ending Toronto’s seasonbest home winning streak at 10 games. D.J. Wilson scored a career-high 16 points and Eric Bledsoe had 14 as Milwaukee (37-13) clinched the season series with their third victory in four meetings with Toronto this season. The Bucks stayed atop the Eastern Conference, 1 1/2 games ahead of the Raptors (37-16). Pascal Siakam scored 28 points and Kawhi Leonard had 16 for the Raptors.

Porzingis traded to Mavs • The New York Knicks traded Kristaps Porzingis to the Dallas Mavericks, parting with their young All-Star forward as he recovers from a torn knee ligament. The Knicks acquired Dennis Smith Jr., DeAndre Jordan and Wesley Matthews in the deal, while also sending guards Tim Hardaway Jr., Trey Burke and Courtney Lee to Dallas. The Knicks also get an unprotected draft pick in 2021 and another pick in 2023.

NOTEBOOK James back for Lakers • LeBron James was back in the lineup for the Lakers late Thursday night against the Clippers after

Davis an All-Star reserve • New Orleans star Anthony Davis was one of 14 players announced as reserves for the All-Star Game on Feb. 17 in Charlotte, N.C.

FSM FSM FSM FSM

MLB Calendar

NBA

Pct .585 .580 .451 .442 .385 Pct .700 .640 .615 .558 .490 Pct .720 .549 .510 .510 .208

Home 21-5 21-5 21-6 16-11 4-18 Home 11-14 17-8 16-9 13-15 8-13 Home 22-4 18-7 14-12 5-20 6-19

NBA SUMMARIES Magic 107, Pacers 100

Spurs 117, Nets 114

Indiana: Bogdanovic 8-18 4-4 21, Young 8-13 0-0 16, Turner 10-16 6-6 27, Collison 7-13 1-1 16, Joseph 2-7 0-0 4, McDermott 2-5 1-1 5, Sabonis 1-9 2-4 4, Leaf 1-2 0-0 3, Sumner 2-4 0-0 4, Holiday 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 41-91 14-16 100. Orlando: Isaac 4-12 4-4 13, Gordon 4-9 2-4 10, Vucevic 8-15 0-0 17, Augustin 4-8 10-10 20, Fournier 3-11 0-0 7, Iwundu 3-4 0-0 7, Bamba 1-3 1-1 3, Briscoe 0-2 0-0 0, Ross 11-18 3-3 30. Totals 38-82 20-22 107. Indiana 19 29 25 27 — 100 Orlando 24 27 18 38 — 107 3-point goals: Indiana 4-19 (Leaf 1-1, Collison 1-3, Turner 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-5, Sumner 0-1, Joseph 0-1, Holiday 0-1, McDermott 0-2, Young 0-2), Orlando 11-25 (Ross 5-8, Augustin 2-3, Iwundu 1-1, Vucevic 1-2, Fournier 1-3, Isaac 1-6, Gordon 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 42 (Young 10), Orlando 48 (Isaac 13). Assists: Indiana 26 (Collison 10), Orlando 25 (Briscoe 8). Total fouls: Indiana 18, Orlando 19. Technicals: Indiana coach Pacers (Defensive three second), Orlando coach Magic (Defensive three second). A: 16,625 (18,846).

Brooklyn: Kurucs 4-8 1-2 9, Graham 1-4 1-2 3, Allen 6-7 1-3 14, Russell 10-26 3-4 25, Harris 7-10 1-1 18, Hollis-Jefferson 2-4 2-4 6, Carroll 5-13 5-7 18, Davis 3-4 0-0 6, Napier 4-13 5-6 15. Totals 42-89 19-29 114. San Antonio: White 8-13 7-9 26, Gay 7-11 0-0 15, Aldridge 5-13 10-11 20, Forbes 4-15 0-0 11, DeRozan 5-16 5-6 15, Cunningham 0-0 0-0 0, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 1-7 0-0 3, Gasol 1-4 0-0 2, Poeltl 0-1 0-0 0, Mills 6-13 3-3 17, Belinelli 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 40-100 25-29 117. Brooklyn 25 26 38 25 — 114 San Antonio 29 23 33 32 — 117 3-point goals: Brooklyn 11-34 (Harris 3-5, Carroll 3-8, Russell 2-7, Napier 2-9, Allen 1-1, Graham 0-1, Kurucs 0-3), San Antonio 12-33 (White 3-4, Forbes 3-7, Mills 2-6, Belinelli 2-6, Gay 1-3, Bertans 1-6, DeRozan 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 46 (Davis 11), San Antonio 50 (Aldridge 13). Assists: Brooklyn 30 (Russell 9), San Antonio 23 (White 6). Total fouls: Brooklyn 23, San Antonio 21. A: 18,057 (18,581).

Pistons 93, Mavericks 89

INCLUDES GAMES OF WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2019 SCORING AVERAGE G FG FT PTS AVG Harden, HOU 47 497 484 1708 36.3 Davis, NOR 41 430 303 1203 29.3 Curry, GOL 39 381 176 1141 29.3 Leonard, TOR 38 368 254 1060 27.9 Durant, GOL 50 481 327 1384 27.7 George, OKC 49 450 265 1339 27.3 Embiid, PHL 47 424 375 1280 27.2 Antetokounmpo, MIL 46 451 296 1220 26.5 Lillard, POR 51 443 316 1347 26.4 Griffin, DET 47 419 282 1235 26.3 Booker, PHX 40 350 209 993 24.8 Beal, WAS 51 467 196 1261 24.7 Walker, CHA 50 426 210 1219 24.4 Irving, BOS 43 387 130 1017 23.7 LaVine, CHI 45 365 224 1032 22.9 Towns, MIN 51 417 231 1154 22.6 Mitchell, UTA 48 394 184 1079 22.5 Thompson, GOL 50 426 90 1085 21.7 Westbrook, OKC 42 347 167 910 21.7 DeRozan, SAN 48 400 226 1033 21.5 Harris, LAC 51 398 183 1083 21.2 Holiday, NOR 52 426 160 1100 21.2 Aldridge, SAN 52 433 227 1097 21.1 McCollum, POR 51 421 120 1071 21.0 Vucevic, ORL 50 434 110 1036 20.7 Doncic, DAL 49 331 221 999 20.4 Hield, SAC 51 386 85 1030 20.2 Conley, MEM 51 351 217 1029 20.2 Jokic, DEN 49 374 183 987 20.1 Randle, NOR 47 343 222 936 19.9 Butler, PHL 39 270 174 764 19.6 Russell, Bro 51 388 81 995 19.5 Hardaway Jr., NYK 46 282 199 880 19.1 Kuzma, LAL 47 340 128 896 19.1 Gallinari, LAC 44 254 221 836 19.0 Oladipo, IND 36 249 103 675 18.8 Williams, LAC 45 267 248 841 18.7 Rose, MIN 38 274 105 706 18.6 Murray, DEN 47 328 122 869 18.5 Redick, PHL 49 303 146 901 18.4 Wiggins, MIN 47 308 152 845 18.0 Warren, PHX 43 297 101 772 18.0 Barnes, DAL 46 269 160 812 17.7 Capela, HOU 42 315 109 739 17.6 Fox, SAC 50 313 192 872 17.4 Middleton, MIL 47 289 126 815 17.3 Richardson, MIA 47 280 139 815 17.3 Dinwiddie, Bro 49 275 198 844 17.2 Ingram, LAL 40 264 134 683 17.1 Clarkson, CLE 51 338 86 855 16.8

Dallas: Barnes 10-24 5-5 27, Kleber 1-3 1-2 4, Mejri 2-5 0-0 4, Brunson 4-14 1-2 9, Finney-Smith 3-9 0-0 6, Nowitzki 3-9 0-0 7, Powell 4-8 1-2 10, Harris 6-11 2-3 15, Broekhoff 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 36-88 10-14 89. Detroit: Bullock 1-8 1-2 4, Griffin 8-26 6-8 24, Drummond 11-13 2-2 24, Jackson 6-14 4-4 17, Brown 0-3 0-0 0, Johnson 0-7 0-0 0, Pachulia 1-2 2-2 4, Calderon 1-1 0-0 3, Galloway 3-6 2-3 11, Robinson III 1-1 1-2 4, Kennard 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 33-86 18-23 93. Dallas 21 28 21 19 — 89 Detroit 19 26 18 30 — 93 3-point goals: Dallas 7-25 (Barnes 2-7, Powell 1-2, Broekhoff 1-2, Kleber 1-2, Harris 1-4, Nowitzki 1-5, Finney-Smith 0-3), Detroit 9-33 (Galloway 3-6, Griffin 2-7, Calderon 1-1, Robinson III 1-1, Jackson 1-4, Bullock 1-8, Kennard 0-3, Johnson 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 44 (Mejri 9), Detroit 52 (Drummond 20). Assists: Dallas 18 (Brunson 6), Detroit 21 (Jackson 9). Total fouls: Dallas 21, Detroit 24. A: 14,075 (20,491).

Bucks 105, Raptors 92 Milwaukee: Middleton 7-9 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 7-13 4-5 19, Lopez 5-13 0-1 11, Bledsoe 6-12 0-0 14, Brogdon 3-10 3-4 11, Ilyasova 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 6-10 1-1 16, Hill 3-7 2-2 10, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Snell 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 39-79 13-17 105. Toronto: Leonard 7-20 2-3 16, Siakam 12-19 2-3 28, Ibaka 4-15 4-4 12, Lowry 4-11 1-1 10, Green 0-4 0-0 0, Anunoby 0-2 0-0 0, Powell 4-6 0-0 10, Monroe 0-0 0-0 0, Wright 2-6 0-0 4, VanVleet 4-9 0-0 10, McCaw 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 37-93 11-13 92. Milwaukee 22 34 31 18 — 105 Toronto 25 22 29 16 — 92 3-point goals: Milwaukee 14-38 (Wilson 3-6, Snell 2-2, Brogdon 2-4, Hill 2-5, Bledsoe 2-6, Middleton 1-1, Antetokounmpo 1-4, Lopez 1-8, Brown 0-1, Ilyasova 0-1), Toronto 7-27 (Powell 2-2, Siakam 2-3, VanVleet 2-4, Lowry 1-6, McCaw 0-1, Wright 0-1, Green 0-1, Anunoby 0-2, Leonard 0-2, Ibaka 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 50 (Antetokounmpo 9), Toronto 39 (Ibaka 10). Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Bledsoe 6), Toronto 16 (Siakam, Lowry, VanVleet 3). Total fouls: Milwaukee 16, Toronto 20. A: 19,800 (19,800).

NBA LEADERS

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG FGA Gobert, UTA 293 451 Jordan, DAL 208 323 Capela, HOU 315 499 Harrell, LAC 319 512 Adams, OKC 311 507 Sabonis, IND 276 451 Ayton, PHX 337 567 McGee, LAL 212 359 Collins, ATL 264 450 Antetokounmpo, MIL 451 787 Allen, Bro 213 373 Favors, UTA 223 391 Simmons, PHL 337 592 Gibson, MIN 217 385 Siakam, TOR 301 538 Randle, NOR 343 631 Whiteside, MIA 232 429 Kanter, NYK 248 460 Young, IND 276 514 Cauley-Stein, SAC 287 535 Horford, BOS 216 407 Ibaka, TOR 323 611 Vucevic, ORL 434 834 Gay, SAN 239 461 James, LAL 340 656 Brogdon, MIL 270 522 Grant, OKC 246 476 Aldridge, SAN 433 839 Jackson Jr., MEM 264 516 Davis, NOR 430 846 3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA Bertans, SAN 97 199 Curry, POR 65 134 Harris, Bro 112 244 Hield, SAC 173 378 Curry, GOL 203 450 Gallinari, LAC 107 240 Morris, DEN 60 135 Bogdanovic, IND 96 221 Harris, LAC 104 240 Augustin, ORL 86 199 Warren, PHX 77 180 Bjelica, SAC 73 171 Forbes, SAN 114 268 Green, TOR 118 279 Korver, UTA 92 218 Beasley, DEN 95 226 Morris, BOS 100 239 Rose, MIN 53 127 Moore, NOR 60 144 Brogdon, MIL 67 161 Irving, BOS 113 274 Collison, IND 50 123 Snell, MIL 58 143 Shamet, PHL 93 230 George, OKC 174 433 Mills, SAN 94 235 Batum, CHA 71 178 Belinelli, SAN 100 252 Hernangomez, DEN 61 154 McDermott, IND 57 145 FREE THROW PERCENTAGE FT FTA Brogdon, MIL 102 107 Curry, GOL 176 189 Hood, CLE 101 110 Belinelli, SAN 82 90 Lillard, POR 316 348 Durant, GOL 327 361 Gallinari, LAC 221 244 Williams, LAC 248 275 Redick, PHL 146 162 Green, WAS 101 113 Harris, LAC 183 207 Caldwell-Pope, LAL 91 103 Morris, BOS 94 108 Harden, HOU 484 557 Hield, SAC 85 98 Augustin, ORL 122 141 LaVine, CHI 224 259 Richardson, MIA 139 161 Jackson, DET 124 144 Leonard, TOR 254 296 Lamb, CHA 125 146

PCT .650 .644 .631 .623 .613 .612 .594 .591 .587 .573 .571 .570 .569 .564 .559 .544 .541 .539 .537 .536 .531 .529 .520 .518 .518 .517 .517 .516 .512 .508 PCT .487 .485 .459 .458 .451 .446 .444 .434 .433 .432 .428 .427 .425 .423 .422 .420 .418 .417 .417 .416 .412 .407 .406 .404 .402 .400 .399 .397 .396 .393 PCT .953 .931 .918 .911 .908 .906 .906 .902 .901 .894 .884 .883 .870 .869 .867 .865 .865 .863 .861 .858 .856


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

FOR THE RECORD AMERICA’S LINE NFL

Favorite

Points Underdog Open Current Super Bowl LIII • Sunday, Atlanta Patriots PK 2.5 Rams Money Line: Patriots -$140 vs. Rams +$120. 1st half line: Patriots -1.5. 1st half total: Over/under 28.5. 1st quarter line: Patriots -.5. 1st quarter total: Over/under 10.5. 2nd quarter line: Patriots -.5. 2nd quarter total: Over/under 17.0. 3rd quarter line: Patriots -.5. 3rd quarter total: Over/under 10.5. 4th quarter line: Patriots -.5. 4th quarter total: Over/under 14.5. Total points for Patriots: Over/under 29.5 Total points for Rams: Over/under 27.5 1st half points for Patriots: Over/under 15.0 1st half points for Rams: Over/under 14.0 Will the game go into overtime: No -$1200 vs. yes +$600 Team to score first: Pats -$125, Rams +$105 Team to score last: Pats -$110, Rams -$110 First to score wins: Yes -$160, No +$140 Will either kicker hit the upright/ crossbar: No -$600 vs. yes +$400 NBA Points Underdog Favorite HORNETS 4.5 Grizzlies Celtics NL KNICKS Thunder 1.5 HEAT JAZZ 11.5 Hawks NUGGETS 4 Rockets COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog Penn 5.5 CORNELL Princeton PK COLUMBIA Brown 1 DARTMOUTH HARVARD 1.5 Yale Davidson 1 ST. BONA Michigan 3 IOWA No Kentucky 3.5 IUPUI WISC-GREEN BAY 6 Wisconsin-Milw Wright St 2 ILLINOIS-CHI WISCONSIN 5 Maryland Added Game CANISIUS 3 Quinnipiac Write-In Games W ILLINOIS 3.5 N Dakota Buffalo 7.5 BOWLING GREEN NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Predators -$120/even PANTHERS CAPITALS -$110/-$110 Flames -$240/+$200 Senators PENGUINS Lightning -$145/+$125 ISLANDERS SABRES -$150/+$130 Blackhawks Maple Leafs -$165/+$145 RED WINGS HURRICANES -$110/-$110 Vegas STARS -$135/+$115 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 49.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2019 B. Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with 3B Nolan Arenado a one-year contract. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Signed LHP P.J. Browne. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed 2B Ridge Hoopii-Haslam to a contract extension. Signed INF R.J. Asuncion. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Traded 1B Collin Ferguson to Rockland (Can-Am) for RHP Chris Pennell. WASHINGTON WILD THINGS — Traded RHP Chase Cunningham to Southern Illinois for LHP Nick Durazo and future considerations. BASKETBALL | NBA NEW YORK KNICKS — Traded C Kristaps Porzingis, Gs Tim Hardaway Jr., Trey Burke and Courtney Lee to Dallas for G Dennis Smith Jr., C DeAndre Jordan, G-F Wesley Matthews and two future first-round picks. WASHINGTON WIZARDS — Signed G John Jenkins to a 10-day contract. WNBA WASHINGTON MYSTICS — Promoted Eric Thibault to associate head coach. FOOTBALL | NFL DALLAS COWBOYS — Promoted Kellen Moore to offensive coordinator. Named Jon Kitna quarterbacks coach. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Retained defensive line coach Jerry Montgomery and running backs coach Ben Sirmans. Promoted Jason Simmons to defensive backs coach and Ryan Downard to assistant defensive backs coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Named Anthony Piroli strength & conditioning coach; Roger Kingdom speed & conditioning coach; and Michael Stacchiotti assistant strength & conditioning coach. HOCKEY | NHL NHLPA C Antoine Vermette announced his retirement. LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled Fs Mike Amadio, Austin Wagner and D Sean Walker from Ontario (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned G Cam Johnson to Binghamton (AHL). Recalled G Mackenzie Blackwood and D Eric Grybafrom Binghamton. Placed D Sami Vatanen on injured reserve. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Recalled F Michael Dal Colle and D Devon Toews from Bridgeport (AHL). SOCCER | MLS ATLANTA UNITED — Transferred Miguel Almiron to Newcastle United (EPL) for an undisclosed fee. COLUMBUS CREW — Acquired $175,000 of General Allocation Money from Montreal for an international roster spot for the 2019 MLS season. D.C. UNITED — Acquired D Leonardo Jara from Boca Juniors (Superliga Argentina). Signed D Akeem Ward. OTTAWA FURY — Signed D-M Dakota Barnathan. COLLEGE NCAA — Placed Missouri’s football, baseball and softball programs on three years of probation and one-year postseason bans for academic misconduct involving a tutor who completed coursework for athletes. CAMPBELL — Promoted tight ends coach Nick Grimes to offensive coordinator.

GOLF PGA | Phoenix Open Thursday | Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $7.1 million Yardage: 7,261; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Justin Thomas 30-34 Rickie Fowler 32-32 Harold Varner III 31-33 Martin Laird 32-33 J.T. Poston 32-33 Tyrrell Hatton 34-32 Byeong Hun An 31-35 Bubba Watson 32-34 Scott Piercy 34-32 Charley Hoffman 33-33 David Hearn 32-35 Emiliano Grillo 36-31 Webb Simpson 33-34 Andrew Landry 33-34 Cameron Smith 34-33 Matt Kuchar 35-32 Nick Watney 32-35 Brian Gay 35-32 Trey Mullinax 33-34 Matthew Wolff 32-35 Tom Hoge 34-33 Branden Grace 35-32 John Huh 35-32 Xander Schauffele 34-33 Jon Rahm 34-33 Ollie Schniederjans 33-34 Ryan Palmer 33-35 Freddie Jacobson 35-33 Keegan Bradley 34-34 Grayson Murray 33-35 Kevin Na 34-34 Morgan Hoffmann 33-35 Phil Mickelson 34-34 Gary Woodland 35-33 Hideki Matsuyama 32-36 Russell Henley 33-35 Bud Cauley 32-36 James Hahn 34-34 Alex Noren 32-37 J.J. Spaun 35-34 Luke List 35-34 Sungjae Im 35-34 Ted Potter, Jr. 35-34 J.B. Holmes 34-35 Rory Sabbatini 35-34 Denny McCarthy 33-36 Aaron Baddeley 34-35 Andrew Putnam 34-35 Brandt Snedeker 35-34 Kevin Tway 34-35 Brian Harman 34-35 Stewart Cink 33-36 Richy Werenski 34-35 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 34-35 Alex Cejka 36-33 Jhonattan Vegas 36-34 Cameron Champ 35-35 Kevin Kisner 33-37 Brandon Harkins 36-34 Beau Hossler 35-35 Carlos Ortiz 36-34 Stephan Jaeger 37-33 Max Homa 35-35 Michael Kim 37-33 Abraham Ancer 36-34 Hunter Mahan 35-35 Sung Kang 35-35 Adam Schenk 34-36 Sam Burns 37-33 John Catlin 36-34 Chez Reavie 34-37 Chris Kirk 35-36 Bronson Burgoon 34-37 Kevin Streelman 35-36 Satoshi Kodaira 33-38 Chris Stroud 34-37 Russell Knox 36-35 K.J. Choi 34-37 Billy Horschel 36-35 Daniel Berger 37-34 Brian Stuard 35-36 Robert Streb 35-36 Seamus Power 34-37 Ryan Blaum 34-37

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

M 2 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

64 64 64 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

-7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

Joaquin Niemann Chesson Hadley Zach Johnson Martin Kaymer Chase Wright Danny Lee Harris English Tony Finau Mackenzie Hughes Sean O’Hair Nick Taylor Adam Hadwin Steve Stricker Jimmy Walker Sam Ryder Brandon Hagy C.T. Pan Patton Kizzire Ryan Moore Vaughn Taylor Blair Hamilton Jason Kokrak Scott Stallings Kenny Perry Talor Gooch Jonas Blixt Cody Gribble Lucas Glover Si Woo Kim Brice Garnett Charl Schwartzel Ryan Armour Adam Long Keith Mitchell Brendan Steele Kyle Stanley Joel Dahmen Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Austin Cook Bill Haas Peter Uihlein Jim Herman Patrick Rodgers Tyler Duncan Colt Knost Whee Kim Michael Hopper

36-35 31-40 34-37 34-37 34-37 36-36 33-39 35-37 35-37 34-38 36-36 31-41 37-35 37-35 35-37 36-36 35-38 39-34 35-38 36-37 38-35 37-36 36-37 38-35 38-35 36-37 36-37 37-37 35-39 34-40 38-36 36-38 35-39 36-38 35-40 37-38 39-36 36-39 37-38 35-41 39-37 40-36 38-38 37-39 38-38 38-39 39-40 38-41

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 79 79

E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +8 +8

EURO | Saudi International Leaders Thursday | Royal Greens Golf & CC King Abdulla Economic City, Saudi Arabia Purse: $3.5 million Yardage: 7,010; Par: 70 First Round Thomas Pieters, Belgium Zander Lombard, South Africa Renato Paratore, Italy Alfie Plant, England Ross Fischer, England Justin Harding, South Africa Jake McLeod, Australia Richard Sterne, South Africa Shaun Norris, South Africa Victor Perez, France Joost Luiten, Netherlands Jorge Campillo, Spain Justin Walters, South Africa Chris Paisley, England Matteo Manassero, Italy Also Patrick Reed, United States Dustin Johnson, United States Bryson Dechambeau, United States Ian Poulter, England Henrik Stenson, Sweden Sergio Garcia, Spain Brooks Koepka, United States Ernie Els, Spain Justin Rose, England Kurt Kitayama, United States David Lipsky, United States Sean Crocker, United States

63 65 65 65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 68 68 68 68 69 69 70 70 71 71 72

NFL INJURY REPORT Sunday NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at LOS ANGELES RAMS: PATRIOTS: DNP: LB Dont’a Hightower (illness). LIMITED: DT Malcom Brown (calf). RAMS: LIMITED: S Blake Countess (foot).

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Area results Women’s basketball SLU 60, George Mason 53 Morehead State 73, SIU Edwardsville 67 Belmont 91, Southeast Missouri 57 UMSL 71, Rockhurst 65 McKendree 58, Indianapolis 51 Emporia State 83, Lindenwood 63 Maryville 87, William Jewell 75 Lyon 98, STL Pharmacy 54 Missouri Baptist 68, Central Baptist 63 LU-Belleville 68, Park 57 Men’s basketball SIU Edwardsville 83, Morehead State 76 Belmont 97, Southeast Missouri 71 UMSL 75, Rockhurst 59 Indianapolis 86, McKendree 62 Emporia State 85, Lindenwood 68 Maryville 90, William Jewell 85 STL Pharmacy 76, Lyon 69 Missouri Baptist 77, Central Baptist 57 Park 84, LU-Belleville 64 Area schedule FRIDAY W: Washington at Carnegie Mellon, 5 p.m. W: Missouri State at Drake, 6 p.m. W: SIU Carbondale at Northern Iowa, 7 p.m. M: Washington at Carnegie Mellon, 7 p.m.

Next: vs. No. 14 Utah, Friday. 5. Notre Dame (20-2) beat Clemson 101-63. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Sunday. 6. Mississippi State (20-1) beat LSU 68-35. Next: at Alabama, Sunday. 7. N.C. State (21-0) beat Wake Forest 59-50. Next: vs. North Carolina, Sunday. 8. Stanford (17-3) lost to California 81-80. Next: vs. California, Saturday. 9. Oregon State (17-3) idle. Next: vs. Colorado, Friday. 10. Marquette (18-3) idle. Next: at DePaul, Sunday. 11. Maryland (19-2) beat Wisconsin 75-57. Next: at Illinois, Monday. 12. Texas (17-4) idle. Next: at Oklahoma, Saturday. 13. Iowa (16-4) at Michigan, ppd. Next: at Penn State, Sunday. 14. Utah (18-1) idle. Next: at No. 4 Oregon, Friday. 15. Gonzaga (20-2) beat Pacific 63-51. Next: at Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 16. South Carolina (15-5) beat No. 19 Kentucky 74-70. Next: at Arkansas, Sunday. 17. Rutgers (17-4) beat Indiana 69-64. Next: at Minnesota, Sunday. 18. Syracuse (17-4) beat Virginia 72-68. Next: at No. 3 Louisville, Thursday. 19. Kentucky (17-5) lost to No. 16 South Carolina 74-70. Next: vs. Florida, Sunday. 20. Texas A&M (17-4) beat Vanderbilt 69-53. Next: at Mississippi, Sunday. 21. Arizona State (14-6) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday. 22. Michigan State (15-5) vs. Penn State, ppd. Next: vs. Purdue, Sunday. 23. Iowa State (16-5) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Saturday. 24. Florida State (18-3) beat Miami 62-58. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Sunday. 25. BYU (17-4) lost to Loyola Marymount 61-58. Next: at Pepperdine, Saturday.

NASCAR Cup Series Schedule Sunday, Feb. 10: Advance Auto Parts Clash, Daytona Beach, Fla. Thursday, Feb. 14: Duel 1 at Daytona, Daytona Beach, Fla. Thursday, Feb. 14: Duel 2 at Daytona, Daytona Beach, Fla. Sunday, Feb. 17: Daytona 500, Daytona Beach, Fla. Sunday, Feb. 24: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500, Hampton, Ga. Sunday, March 3: Pennzoil 400, Las Vegas Sunday, March 10: TicketGuardian 500, Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, March 17: Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. Sunday, March 24: STP 500, Martinsville, Va. Sunday, March 31: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, April 7: Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. Saturday, April 13: Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. Sunday, April 28: Geico 500, Talladega, Ala. Sunday, May 5: MENCS race, Dover, Del. Saturday, May 11: MENCS race, Kansas City, Kan. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy Open, Concord, N.C. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. Sunday, May 26: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Camping World 400, Joliet, Ill. Saturday, July 6: Coke Zero Sugar 400, Daytona Beach, Fla. Saturday, July 13: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. Sunday, July 21: Foxwoods Resort Casino 301, Loudon, N.H. Sunday, July 28: Gander Outdoors 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, Aug. 4: Go Bowling at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Sunday, Aug. 11: Consumers Energy 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Saturday, Aug. 17: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sunday, Sept. 1: Bogangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. Sunday, Sept. 8: Big Machine Vodka 400 at the Brickyard, Indianapolis Sunday, Sept. 15: South Point 400, Las Vegas Saturday, Sept. 21: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. Sunday, Sept. 29: Bank of American ROVAL 400, Concord, N.C. Sunday, Oct. 6: MENCS race, Dover, Del. Sunday, Oct. 13: 1000Bulbs. com 500, Talladega, Ala. Sunday, Oct. 20: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Sunday, Oct. 27: First Data 500, Martinsville, Va. Sunday, Nov. 3: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, Nov. 10: MENCS race, Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, Nov. 17: Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead, Fla. x-non-points race

MEN’S BASKETBALL Major scores

BASEBALL

East Baruch 68, York (NY) 53 Bryant 71, Wagner 64 CCSU 78, St. Francis Brooklyn 72 Fair. Dickinson 80, LIU Brooklyn 77 Georgetown 80, Xavier 73 Manhattan 62, Fairfield 49 Marist 78, Iona 74 Monmouth (NJ) 66, Siena 55 Old Westbury 86, St. Joseph’s (LI) 74 Purdue 99, Penn St. 90, OT Rider 59, St. Peter’s 51 Sacred Heart 87, Mount St. Mary’s 79 St. Francis (Pa.) 76, Robert Morris 73 Yeshiva 67, Mount St. Vincent 54

Date Sat. 2/23 Sun. 2/24 Mon. 2/25 Tue. 2/26 Wed. 2/27 Thu. 2/28 Fri. 3/1 Sat. 3/2 Sun. 3/3 Mon. 3/4 Tue. 3/5 Wed. 3/6 Fri. 3/8

Far West Arizona St. 95, Arizona 88, OT Cal Poly 71, UC Riverside 45 Gonzaga 93, BYU 63 Loyola Mary. 60, Pacific 42 New Mexico St. 70, UMKC 54 Oregon 78, Utah 72 Oregon St. 76, Colorado 74 Pepperdine 83, Portland 58 Portland St. 76, Weber St. 75 Sacramento St. 74, Idaho St. 58 Southwest Houston 73, Temple 66 S. Dakota St. 86, Oral Roberts 80 Texas Rio Grande Valley 77, Chicago St. 46 Midwest Augsburg 76, Carleton 69 Benedictine (Kan.) 86, Grand View 60 Bethel (Minn.) 85, St. John’s (Minn.) 81 Carroll (Wis.) 77, Wheaton (Ill.) 70 Columbia (Mo.) 75, Williams Baptist 57 Detroit 78, Cleveland St. 64 E. Illinois 67, E. Kentucky 66 Grinnell 110, Beloit 83 Gustavus 80, Hamline 72 Hillsdale 81, Tiffin 76 Lake Forest 73, Ripon 69 Martin Luther 84, North Central (Minn.) 81 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Concordia (Wis.) 68 Minn.-Morris 76, Crown (Minn.) 74, OT Mount Mercy 68, Graceland (Iowa) 67 Northwestern (Minn.) 105, Bethany Lutheran 101 Northwood (Mich.) 90, Lake Superior St. 85 SIU-Edwardsville 83, Morehead St. 76 St. Norbert 78, Lawrence 68 St. Olaf 90, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 85 St. Scholastica 86, Wis.-Superior 52 St. Thomas (Minn.) 94, Macalester 61 Wayne (Mich.) at Grand Valley St., ppd. Wis.-La Crosse 60, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 52 Wis.-Parkside 71, N. Michigan 65, OT Wis.-River Falls 96, Wis.-Stout 72 Youngstown St. 75, Oakland 74 South Appalachian St. 104, Louisiana-Laf. 77 Austin Peay 77, Tennessee Tech 66 Belmont 97, SE Missouri 71 Christian Brothers 84, Shorter 72 Coast. Carolina 92, La.-Monroe 81 Coll. Charles. 70, J. Madison 53 ETSU 74, Samford 66 East Carolina 66, Tulane 65 Elon 57, Delaware 56 FAU 69, Louisiana Tech 61 Furman 71, The Citadel 61 Jacksonville St. 88, Murray St. 68 Lake Erie 72, Kentucky Wesleyan 63 Marshall 91, UTEP 86 North Greenville 74, King (Tenn.) 67 Old Dominion 72, North Texas 61 Rice 65, Charlotte 61 Southern Miss. 89, FIU 73 Stillman 95, Loyola NO 93 Tennessee St. 68, UT Martin 67 Towson 77, UNC Wilm. 76 UCF 73, UConn 67 UNC Greensboro 93, VMI 66 Union (Tenn.) 99, West Georgia 79 W. Carolina 105, Chattanooga 96 W. Kentucky 96, UTSA 88, OT William & Mary 75, Drexel 69 Wofford 76, Mercer 67

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL How the top 25 fared 1. Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. 2. UConn (18-2) lost to No. 3 Louisville 78-69. Next: at Cincinnai, Saturday. 3. Louisville (20-1) beat No. 2 UConn 78-69. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. 4. Oregon (19-1) idle.

Cardinals spring training Opponent at Marlins vs. Nationals vs. Tigers (SS) at Nationals vs. Braves vs. Mets at Astros vs. Marlins vs. Mets at Tigers at Phillies at Yankees SS vs. Nationals SS at Astros Sat. 3/9 vs. Astros Sun. 3/10 at Mets Mon. 3/11 vs. Nationals Tue. 3/12 at Braves Wed. 3/13 at Marlins Thu. 3/14 vs. Mets Fri. 3/15 SS at Astros SS vs. Astros Sat. 3/16 at Nationals Sun. 3/17 at Marlins Mon. 3/18 vs. Phillies Wed. 3/20 vs. Marlins Thu. 3/21 SS vs. Yankees SS at Nationals Fri. 3/22 at Mets (SS) Sat. 3/23 at Nationals Sun. 3/24 vs. Marlins Mon. 3/25 at Memphis

Time 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:10 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:35 12:10 12:05 12:05 6:05

TV FSM+ FSM FSM

All-Star reserves

Eastern Conference player pool Bradley Beal, Wizards Blake Griffin, Pistons Kyle Lowry, Raptors Khris Middleton, Bucks Victor Oladipo, Pacers Ben Simmons, 76ers Nikola Vucevic, Magic

Str Home L-1 21-5 W-2 21-5 W-2 21-6 L-1 16-11 L-11 4-18 Str Home L-1 11-14 L-1 17-8 W-1 16-9 W-1 13-15 L-1 8-13 Str Home W-2 22-4 L-4 18-7 W-1 14-12 W-1 5-20 W-2 6-19

L Pct GB L10 Str 22 .585 — 6-4 W-4 21 .580 ½ 6-4 L-1 28 .451 7 4-6 L-1 29 .442 7½ 3-7 L-1 32 .385 10½ 1-9 L-2 L Pct GB L10 Str 15 .700 — 7-3 W-4 18 .640 3 7-3 W-6 20 .615 4 7-3 W-3 23 .558 7 8-2 L-1 26 .490 10½ 5-5 W-1 L Pct GB L10 Str 15 .706 — 9-1 L-1 23 .549 8 4-6 L-1 25 .510 10 4-6 L-1 25 .510 10 6-4 W-1 42 .208 26 1-9 L-9

Home 21-7 19-8 18-7 15-9 12-14 Home 22-4 17-7 22-7 15-9 17-9 Home 18-7 15-11 16-12 15-10 7-19

Away 16-11 13-13 11-13 12-14 6-22 Away 13-11 7-18 6-20 8-16 8-21 Away 15-9 14-12 8-16 7-20 5-22

Conf 22-10 20-13 23-10 20-13 6-28 Conf 14-18 18-15 15-18 15-15 11-23 Conf 25-7 24-10 14-18 9-22 9-25

Away 10-15 10-13 5-21 8-20 8-18 Away 13-11 15-11 10-13 14-14 8-17 Away 18-8 13-12 10-13 11-15 4-23

Conf 22-15 17-13 13-19 14-19 13-19 Conf 21-10 18-14 18-17 17-14 15-19 Conf 21-10 19-16 18-17 14-19 7-26

Thursday Detroit 93, Dallas 89 Orlando 107, Indiana 100 Milwaukee 105, Toronto 92 San Antonio 117, Brooklyn 114 LA Lakers at LA Clippers, late Philadelphia 113, Golden State 104 Wednesday Boston 126, Charlotte 94 Chicago 105, Miami 89 Dallas 114, New York 90 Denver 105, New Orleans 99 Minnesota 99, Memphis 97, OT Washington 107, Indiana 89 Sacramento 135, Atlanta 113 Portland 132, Utah 105 Friday Memphis at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Miami, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9 p.m. Saturday LA Clippers at Detroit, 4 p.m. Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m. Chicago at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 6 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Houston at Utah, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Sunday Memphis at New York, noon Oklahoma City at Boston, 1 p.m. LA Clippers at Toronto, 2 p.m.

Bucks win Eastern battle vs. Raptors

THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo takes a shot over Raptors forward OG Anunoby on the way to scoring 19 points in a 105-92 victory in Toronto. ASSOCIATED PRESS

the longest injury-related absence of his 16-year career. James was out for nearly five weeks with a groin injury.

Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 19 points, Khris Middleton had 18 and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Raptors 105-92 on Thursday night, ending Toronto’s seasonbest home winning streak at 10 games. D.J. Wilson scored a career-high 16 points and Eric Bledsoe had 14 as Milwaukee (37-13) clinched the season series with their third victory in four meetings with Toronto this season. The Bucks stayed atop the Eastern Conference, 1 1/2 games ahead of the Raptors (37-16). Pascal Siakam scored 28 points and Kawhi Leonard had 16 for the Raptors.

Porzingis traded to Mavs • The New York Knicks traded Kristaps Porzingis to the Dallas Mavericks, parting with their young All-Star forward as he recovers from a torn knee ligament. The Knicks acquired Dennis Smith Jr., DeAndre Jordan and Wesley Matthews in the deal, while also sending guards Tim Hardaway Jr., Trey Burke and Courtney Lee to Dallas. The Knicks also get an unprotected draft pick in 2021 and another pick in 2023.

NOTEBOOK James back for Lakers • LeBron James was back in the lineup for the Lakers late Thursday night against the Clippers after

Davis an All-Star reserve • New Orleans star Anthony Davis was one of 14 players announced as reserves for the All-Star Game on Feb. 17 in Charlotte, N.C.

NBA SUMMARIES FSM+ FSM

FSM FSM FSM FSM FSM FSM FSM FSM

Jan. 31-Feb. 15: Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla. Feb. 6-8: Owners’ meetings, Orlando, Fla. Feb. 10: Voluntary reporting date for Oakland pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 11: Voluntary reporting date for Seattle pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 13: Voluntary reporting date for other teams’ pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 15: Voluntary reporting date for other players on Oakland and Seattle. Feb. 18: Voluntary reporting date for other teams’ other players. Feb. 23: Mandatory reporting date. March 20-21: Opening series, Seattle vs. Oakland at Tokyo. March 28: Opening day for other teams, active rosters reduced to 25 players. April 13-14: St. Louis vs. Cincinnati at Monterrey, Mexico. May 4-5: Houston vs. Los Angeles Angels at Monterrey, Mexico. June 3: Amateur draft starts. June 13: Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15: International amateur signing period closes. June 29-30: New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2: International amateur signing period opens. July 9: All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21: Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31: Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Aug. 18: Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31: Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Sept. 1: Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 1-2: Wild-card games.

Western Conference player pool LaMarcus Aldridge, Spurs Anthony Davis, Pelicans Nikola Jokic, Nuggets Damian Lillard, Trail Blazers Klay Thompson, Warriors Karl-Anthony Towns, Timberwolves Russell Westbrook, Thunder

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W San Antonio 31 Houston 29 Dallas 23 New Orleans 23 Memphis 20 Northwest W Denver 35 Oklahoma City 32 Portland 32 Utah 29 Minnesota 25 Pacific W Golden State 36 LA Clippers 28 LA Lakers 26 Sacramento 26 Phoenix 11

Pct GB L10 .698 — 6-4 .654 2½ 7-3 .627 4 7-3 .528 9 7-3 .200 25½ 0-10 Pct GB L10 .490 — 5-5 .480 ½ 5-5 .431 3 6-4 .404 4½ 3-7 .320 8½ 4-6 Pct GB L10 .740 — 8-2 .627 5½ 5-5 .440 15 5-5 .231 26 2-8 .212 27 3-7

FSM FSM

MLB CALENDAR

NBA

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 37 16 Philadelphia 34 18 Boston 32 19 Brooklyn 28 25 New York 10 40 Southeast W L Miami 24 25 Charlotte 24 26 Washington 22 29 Orlando 21 31 16 34 Atlanta Central W L Milwaukee 37 13 Indiana 32 19 Detroit 22 28 Chicago 12 40 Cleveland 11 41

Magic 107, Pacers 100

Spurs 117, Nets 114

Indiana: Bogdanovic 8-18 4-4 21, Young 8-13 0-0 16, Turner 10-16 6-6 27, Collison 7-13 1-1 16, Joseph 2-7 0-0 4, McDermott 2-5 1-1 5, Sabonis 1-9 2-4 4, Leaf 1-2 0-0 3, Sumner 2-4 0-0 4, Holiday 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 41-91 14-16 100. Orlando: Isaac 4-12 4-4 13, Gordon 4-9 2-4 10, Vucevic 8-15 0-0 17, Augustin 4-8 10-10 20, Fournier 3-11 0-0 7, Iwundu 3-4 0-0 7, Bamba 1-3 1-1 3, Briscoe 0-2 0-0 0, Ross 11-18 3-3 30. Totals 38-82 20-22 107. Indiana 19 29 25 27 — 100 Orlando 24 27 18 38 — 107 3-point goals: Indiana 4-19 (Leaf 1-1, Collison 1-3, Turner 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-5, Sumner 0-1, Joseph 0-1, Holiday 0-1, McDermott 0-2, Young 0-2), Orlando 11-25 (Ross 5-8, Augustin 2-3, Iwundu 1-1, Vucevic 1-2, Fournier 1-3, Isaac 1-6, Gordon 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 42 (Young 10), Orlando 48 (Isaac 13). Assists: Indiana 26 (Collison 10), Orlando 25 (Briscoe 8). Total fouls: Indiana 18, Orlando 19. Technicals: Indiana coach Pacers (Defensive three second), Orlando coach Magic (Defensive three second). A: 16,625 (18,846).

Brooklyn: Kurucs 4-8 1-2 9, Graham 1-4 1-2 3, Allen 6-7 1-3 14, Russell 10-26 3-4 25, Harris 7-10 1-1 18, Hollis-Jefferson 2-4 2-4 6, Carroll 5-13 5-7 18, Davis 3-4 0-0 6, Napier 4-13 5-6 15. Totals 42-89 19-29 114. San Antonio: White 8-13 7-9 26, Gay 7-11 0-0 15, Aldridge 5-13 10-11 20, Forbes 4-15 0-0 11, DeRozan 5-16 5-6 15, Cunningham 0-0 0-0 0, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Bertans 1-7 0-0 3, Gasol 1-4 0-0 2, Poeltl 0-1 0-0 0, Mills 6-13 3-3 17, Belinelli 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 40-100 25-29 117. Brooklyn 25 26 38 25 — 114 San Antonio 29 23 33 32 — 117 3-point goals: Brooklyn 11-34 (Harris 3-5, Carroll 3-8, Russell 2-7, Napier 2-9, Allen 1-1, Graham 0-1, Kurucs 0-3), San Antonio 12-33 (White 3-4, Forbes 3-7, Mills 2-6, Belinelli 2-6, Gay 1-3, Bertans 1-6, DeRozan 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 46 (Davis 11), San Antonio 50 (Aldridge 13). Assists: Brooklyn 30 (Russell 9), San Antonio 23 (White 6). Total fouls: Brooklyn 23, San Antonio 21. A: 18,057 (18,581).

Pistons 93, Mavericks 89 Dallas: Barnes 10-24 5-5 27, Kleber 1-3 1-2 4, Mejri 2-5 0-0 4, Brunson 4-14 1-2 9, Finney-Smith 3-9 0-0 6, Nowitzki 3-9 0-0 7, Powell 4-8 1-2 10, Harris 6-11 2-3 15, Broekhoff 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 36-88 10-14 89. Detroit: Bullock 1-8 1-2 4, Griffin 8-26 6-8 24, Drummond 11-13 2-2 24, Jackson 6-14 4-4 17, Brown 0-3 0-0 0, Johnson 0-7 0-0 0, Pachulia 1-2 2-2 4, Calderon 1-1 0-0 3, Galloway 3-6 2-3 11, Robinson III 1-1 1-2 4, Kennard 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 33-86 18-23 93. Dallas 21 28 21 19 — 89 Detroit 19 26 18 30 — 93 3-point goals: Dallas 7-25 (Barnes 2-7, Powell 1-2, Broekhoff 1-2, Kleber 1-2, Harris 1-4, Nowitzki 1-5, Finney-Smith 0-3), Detroit 9-33 (Galloway 3-6, Griffin 2-7, Calderon 1-1, Robinson III 1-1, Jackson 1-4, Bullock 1-8, Kennard 0-3, Johnson 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 44 (Mejri 9), Detroit 52 (Drummond 20). Assists: Dallas 18 (Brunson 6), Detroit 21 (Jackson 9). Total fouls: Dallas 21, Detroit 24. A: 14,075 (20,491).

Bucks 105, Raptors 92 Milwaukee: Middleton 7-9 3-4 18, Antetokounmpo 7-13 4-5 19, Lopez 5-13 0-1 11, Bledsoe 6-12 0-0 14, Brogdon 3-10 3-4 11, Ilyasova 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 6-10 1-1 16, Hill 3-7 2-2 10, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Snell 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 39-79 13-17 105. Toronto: Leonard 7-20 2-3 16, Siakam 12-19 2-3 28, Ibaka 4-15 4-4 12, Lowry 4-11 1-1 10, Green 0-4 0-0 0, Anunoby 0-2 0-0 0, Powell 4-6 0-0 10, Monroe 0-0 0-0 0, Wright 2-6 0-0 4, VanVleet 4-9 0-0 10, McCaw 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 37-93 11-13 92. Milwaukee 22 34 31 18 — 105 Toronto 25 22 29 16 — 92 3-point goals: Milwaukee 14-38 (Wilson 3-6, Snell 2-2, Brogdon 2-4, Hill 2-5, Bledsoe 2-6, Middleton 1-1, Antetokounmpo 1-4, Lopez 1-8, Brown 0-1, Ilyasova 0-1), Toronto 7-27 (Powell 2-2, Siakam 2-3, VanVleet 2-4, Lowry 1-6, McCaw 0-1, Wright 0-1, Green 0-1, Anunoby 0-2, Leonard 0-2, Ibaka 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 50 (Antetokounmpo 9), Toronto 39 (Ibaka 10). Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Bledsoe 6), Toronto 16 (Siakam, Lowry, VanVleet 3). Total fouls: Milwaukee 16, Toronto 20. A: 19,800 (19,800).

76ers 113, Warriors 104 Philadelphia: Butler 3-12 1-1 7, Chandler 3-6 0-0 8, Embiid 8-24 10-12 26, Simmons 10-13 6-9 26, Redick 5-12 1-1 15, Brewer 2-5 0-0 4, Bolden 3-5 0-0 8, Muscala 2-4 0-0 5, McConnell 2-3 0-0 4, Shamet 3-4 1-1 10. Totals 41-88 19-24 113. Golden State: Durant 11-24 2-2 25, Green 1-6 2-2 4, Cousins 3-10 1-2 7, Curry 14-27 3-4 41, McKinnie 5-5 1-2 11, Looney 6-8 2-4 14, Cook 0-4 0-0 0, Livingston 1-2 0-0 2, Iguodala 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-88 11-16 104. Philadelphia 30 23 42 18 — 113 Golden State 35 25 26 18 — 104 3-point goals: Philadelphia 12-36 (Redick 4-10, Shamet 3-4, Bolden 2-3, Chandler 2-5, Muscala 1-2, Brewer 0-2, Embiid 0-5, Butler 0-5), Golden State 11-37 (Curry 10-18, Durant 1-7, Looney 0-1, Iguodala 0-2, Cousins 0-2, Cook 0-3, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 49 (Embiid 20), Golden State 37 (Green 8). Assists: Philadelphia 30 (Simmons, Butler 6), Golden State 30 (Green 10). Total fouls: Philadelphia 19, Golden State 19. Technicals: Green. A: 19,596 (19,596).

NBA LEADERS INCLUDES GAMES OF WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2019 SCORING AVERAGE G FG FT PTS AVG Harden, HOU 47 497 484 1708 36.3 Davis, NOR 41 430 303 1203 29.3 Curry, GOL 39 381 176 1141 29.3 Leonard, TOR 38 368 254 1060 27.9 Durant, GOL 50 481 327 1384 27.7 George, OKC 49 450 265 1339 27.3 Embiid, PHL 47 424 375 1280 27.2 Antetokounmpo, MIL 46 451 296 1220 26.5 Lillard, POR 51 443 316 1347 26.4 Griffin, DET 47 419 282 1235 26.3 Booker, PHX 40 350 209 993 24.8 Beal, WAS 51 467 196 1261 24.7 Walker, CHA 50 426 210 1219 24.4 Irving, BOS 43 387 130 1017 23.7 LaVine, CHI 45 365 224 1032 22.9 Towns, MIN 51 417 231 1154 22.6 Mitchell, UTA 48 394 184 1079 22.5 Thompson, GOL 50 426 90 1085 21.7 Westbrook, OKC 42 347 167 910 21.7 DeRozan, SAN 48 400 226 1033 21.5 Harris, LAC 51 398 183 1083 21.2 Holiday, NOR 52 426 160 1100 21.2 Aldridge, SAN 52 433 227 1097 21.1 McCollum, POR 51 421 120 1071 21.0 Vucevic, ORL 50 434 110 1036 20.7 Doncic, DAL 49 331 221 999 20.4

Hield, SAC 51 386 85 1030 20.2 Conley, MEM 51 351 217 1029 20.2 Jokic, DEN 49 374 183 987 20.1 Randle, NOR 47 343 222 936 19.9 Butler, PHL 39 270 174 764 19.6 Russell, Bro 51 388 81 995 19.5 Hardaway Jr., NYK 46 282 199 880 19.1 Kuzma, LAL 47 340 128 896 19.1 Gallinari, LAC 44 254 221 836 19.0 Oladipo, IND 36 249 103 675 18.8 Williams, LAC 45 267 248 841 18.7 Rose, MIN 38 274 105 706 18.6 Murray, DEN 47 328 122 869 18.5 Redick, PHL 49 303 146 901 18.4 Wiggins, MIN 47 308 152 845 18.0 Warren, PHX 43 297 101 772 18.0 Barnes, DAL 46 269 160 812 17.7 Capela, HOU 42 315 109 739 17.6 Fox, SAC 50 313 192 872 17.4 Middleton, MIL 47 289 126 815 17.3 Richardson, MIA 47 280 139 815 17.3 Dinwiddie, Bro 49 275 198 844 17.2 Ingram, LAL 40 264 134 683 17.1 Clarkson, CLE 51 338 86 855 16.8 FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG FGA PCT Gobert, UTA 293 451 .650 Jordan, DAL 208 323 .644 Capela, HOU 315 499 .631 Harrell, LAC 319 512 .623 Adams, OKC 311 507 .613 Sabonis, IND 276 451 .612 Ayton, PHX 337 567 .594 McGee, LAL 212 359 .591 Collins, ATL 264 450 .587 Antetokounmpo, MIL 451 787 .573 Allen, Bro 213 373 .571 Favors, UTA 223 391 .570 Simmons, PHL 337 592 .569 Gibson, MIN 217 385 .564 Siakam, TOR 301 538 .559 Randle, NOR 343 631 .544 Whiteside, MIA 232 429 .541 Kanter, NYK 248 460 .539 Young, IND 276 514 .537 Cauley-Stein, SAC 287 535 .536 Horford, BOS 216 407 .531 Ibaka, TOR 323 611 .529 Vucevic, ORL 434 834 .520 Gay, SAN 239 461 .518 James, LAL 340 656 .518 Brogdon, MIL 270 522 .517 Grant, OKC 246 476 .517 Aldridge, SAN 433 839 .516 Jackson Jr., MEM 264 516 .512 Davis, NOR 430 846 .508 3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA PCT Bertans, SAN 97 199 .487 Curry, POR 65 134 .485 Harris, Bro 112 244 .459 Hield, SAC 173 378 .458 Curry, GOL 203 450 .451 Gallinari, LAC 107 240 .446 Morris, DEN 60 135 .444 Bogdanovic, IND 96 221 .434 Harris, LAC 104 240 .433 Augustin, ORL 86 199 .432 Warren, PHX 77 180 .428 Bjelica, SAC 73 171 .427 Forbes, SAN 114 268 .425 Green, TOR 118 279 .423 Korver, UTA 92 218 .422 Beasley, DEN 95 226 .420 Morris, BOS 100 239 .418 Rose, MIN 53 127 .417 Moore, NOR 60 144 .417 Brogdon, MIL 67 161 .416 Irving, BOS 113 274 .412 Collison, IND 50 123 .407 Snell, MIL 58 143 .406 Shamet, PHL 93 230 .404 George, OKC 174 433 .402 Mills, SAN 94 235 .400 Batum, CHA 71 178 .399 Belinelli, SAN 100 252 .397 Hernangomez, DEN 61 154 .396


02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

GIRLS BASKETBALL • LEBANON 35, NEW ATHENS 22

DOUBLE TROUBLE Reinneck twins keep Greyhounds on track for another league title BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

LEBANON, ILL. • Officially, Lebanon High senior guard Emily Reinneck is the older sibling. She was born 12 minutes ahead of Abigail. But Emily doesn’t flaunt her tiny age advantage. “We’re the same — twins,” Emily said. “Equal.” That equal but deadly duo was on fire Thursday night. Emily pumped in 22 points and Abigail added nine to lead the Greyhounds to a 35-22 win over New Athens in a Cahokia Conference Kaskaskia Division showdown. The Greyhounds (18-11) all but nailed down their fourth successive league title with the win. They sport a 9-1 conference mark and can grab the crown with wins over Valmeyer and Steeleville the next two days. Those teams have a combined 4-17 conference mark. Emily and Abigail have helped their team flourish in what was supposed to be a transition year. Lebanon lost three key starters — including the standout Bass sisters — from last year’s team, which finished third in Class 1A. But the Greyhounds, with the Reinneck girls leading the way, have reloaded — not rebuilt. And Emily is the first to express her surprise with the success. “We weren’t expecting it to go very well either,” Emily said. “This is a lot better than what we thought at the beginning of the season. I’m real proud of all the girls for stepping up.” Explaind Abigail, “It was hard work that helped it come together.” Emily’s ability to take control of the offense over the last few weeks has played a key role in the resurgence. She pumped in a career-high 36 points in a 61-47 win over Metro East Lutheran on Jan. 25.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com TIM VIZER • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Lebanon’s Abigail Reinneck passes to a teammate on Thursday in Lebanon, Ill.

Her 22-point effort on Thursday pushed her past the 1,500-point plateau. She sits atop the all-time girls scoring list at Lebanon. “She can do so many different things besides just score,” Lebanon coach Chad Cruthis said. “She’s helped us get our confidence back these last couple games.” Emily is shooting 58 percent from the field and 40 percent from the 3-point line. She has averaged 24.5 points since the Christmas holiday. A good majority of her success comes from the connection she has with Abigail. Abigail, for one, loves watching Emily take over the offense. “It’s neat knowing that she’s got the (school scoring) record,” Abigail said.” Makes me so proud.” The Reinneck girls had a hand in 27 of the Greyhounds’ first 31 points. Emily got the ball rolling with a long-range 3-pointer just 23 seconds into the contest. She added two more baskets, one on a scintillating coast-to-coast layup, for a 7-2 lead.

New Athens (13-11, 9-3) stayed within striking distance behind junior Danika White, who led the Yellow Jackets with 10 points. A short jumper by Taylor Marhanka brought the visitors to within 17-14 early in the third quarter. But Lebanon responded with a quick 6-2 burst. Emily hit a pair of baskets surrounded by a layup from Abigail for a 23-16 cushion. Abigail quickly put the game away with a 3-pointer just 28 seconds into the final quarter. “I was really pleased, especially with our defensive effort,” said Cruthis, who recorded his 300th career win against Metro East Lutheran. “Tonight was proof that on nights when the ball stops falling, you’ve got to keep grinding and that’s what we did.” New Athens struggled to get into any offensive rhythm, thanks to the Greyhounds in-your-face defense. “Their pressure caused us to panic,” New Athens coach Erik Hager said. “We were running around like a chicken with its head cut off.”

BOYS BASKETBALL • JENNINGS 72, LUTHERAN NORTH 48

Carter’s return sparks Warriors BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

JENNINGS • The polar vortex put the area in the deep freezer the last few days. It’s as cold as cold gets. The last thing Donzell Carter wants to do is ice down his back. A senior forward for the Jennings boys basketball team, Carter wants to stay on the court and that means getting chilly with it. So that’s what he does. “It’s not fun at all,” Carter said with a laugh. But Carter had plenty of fun Thursday night as he returned to the court and led Jennings to a 7248 win over neighbor Lutheran North at Jennings. The No. 5 small school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, Jennings (12-6) has won consecutive games after dropping tough matchups against Cardinal Ritter, McCluer North and Webster Groves. Carter missed all or part of those games with a balky back. He started every game as a junior as the Warriors made a playoff run and finished third in Class 4. Shuffling in and out of the lineup has not made senior year as enjoyable as it could be for the 6-foot-5 and 210-pound Carter. “I’ve been practicing real hard and trying to get back in rhythm. I’ve been out for a minute,” Carter said. “I’m working on my game, getting in a rhythm with my team.” Carter scored 14 points, grabbed seven rebounds and made two steals. He was one of the many Warriors who flexed on an undermanned and inexperienced North. Senior swingman Elijah Hicks had a team-high 20 points, grabbed

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL O’FALLON SHOOTOUT Springfield Southeast (4-1) vs. Alton (16-7-1), 5:30 p.m. Belleville West (21-1) vs. O’Fallon (7-13), 7 p.m. Springfield Lanphier (2-2) vs. Collinsville (20-3), 8:30 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Crystal City (7-12) at Jefferson (14-6), 5:30 p.m. McCluer North (16-3) at Ladue (12-6), 5:30 p.m. North Callaway (15-5) at Elsberry (6-7), 5:30 p.m. Union (10-7) at New Haven (12-7), 6 p.m. St. Louis Patriots (6-7) at Principia (4-11), 6 p.m. Mater Dei (16-9) at Breese Central (13-9), 6 p.m. Wood River (8-16) at Brussels (9-8), 6 p.m. Owensville (8-10) at Hermann (15-4), 6 p.m. Edwardsville (5-15) at East St. Louis (19-5), 6 p.m. Sumner (3-14) vs. Metro (6-12), at McKinley, 6:15 p.m. McKinley (10-8) vs. Northwest Academy (2-10), at Miller Career, 6:15 p.m. New Athens (9-11) at Lebanon (0-21), 6:15 p.m. Steeleville (14-10) at Dupo (12-12), 6:15 p.m. Salem (13-10) at Freeburg (15-9), 6:15 p.m. Medicine and Biosc (2-10) at Cleveland (2-13), 6:15 p.m. Gateway Science (3-14) at Gateway STEM (12-11), 6:15 p.m. Crossroads (1-14) at Valley Park (9-7), 6:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South (15-2) at Liberty (13-5), 7 p.m. Webster Groves (15-2) at Parkway South (7-12), 7 p.m. Windsor (9-11) at Hillsboro (16-4), 7 p.m. Pacific (7-11) at St. James (10-9), 7 p.m. Wright City (5-12) at Silex (0-9), 7 p.m. Lindbergh (10-7) at Kirkwood (12-7), 7 p.m. Summit (11-7) at Oakville (2-15), 7 p.m. Hazelwood West (7-9) at Mehlville (14-6), 7 p.m. Priory (13-5) at MICDS (10-8), 7 p.m. Parkway Central (14-5) at Pattonville (8-11), 7 p.m. Chaminade (9-8) at De Smet (17-3), 7 p.m.

Lutheran South’s Macy Schelp (3) puts up a shot in between Principia’s Jordan Fredrickson (55) and Aria McMullin on Thursday in Town and Country. Please see story and additional photos on STLhighschoolsports.com.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS GIRLS BASKETBALL O’F Christian 7 6 6 12 31 Rosati-Kain 10 9 9 7 35 R (5-13): Bethany 16, Al-Baaj 6, King 4, O’Connell 4, Sextro 3, Chatman 2. FG 13 (2), FT 7-13. Luth. South 19 17 19 13 68 Principia 4 8 7 10 29 L (15-3): Pawlitz 31, Akerson 11, Schmidt 10, Schelp 6, Heskett 4, Christ 2, Haase 2, Kassel 2. FG 26 (12), FT 4-5. P (10-8): Fredrickson 16, Rather 8, Boyman 3, Denson 2. FG 7 (2), FT 13-20. Maplewood-RH 4 5 6 15 30 Brentwood 19 11 4 16 50 M (0-16): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. B (2-10): Clay 17, Diemeke 15, Ellington 6, Hill 6, Lucas 4, Harris 2. FG 21 (2), FT 6-13. Ursuline 10 19 6 13 48 Clayton 9 3 12 8 32 U (8-10): Scherzinger 19, LaMartina 12, Effer 8, Adrian 5, Hodge 4. FG 18 (2), FT 10-15. C (9-7): Litteken 13, M. Upshaw 9, Nettles 4, Wade 3, Pierce 2, Gallegos 1. FG 11 (2), FT 8-12. MICDS 19 11 21 4 55 V. Duchesne 5 9 4 6 24 M (12-8): Brooks 21, Harrell 17, Holmes 6, Gira 3, Pease 2, Rickers 2, Small 2, Smith 2. FG 24 (1), FT 6-9. O’Fallon 5 16 17 26 64 Bellvl. West 6 7 8 9 30 O (23-6): Bell 17, Bullock 12, Best 7, Schloer 6, Akoro 4, Foster 4, Gordon 4, Schieppe 3, Christopher 2, Lovelace 2, Williams 2. FG 23 (5), FT 12-17. B (12-15): Goodwin 10, Jones 8, R. Bennett 4, Nunn 4, Gray 2, Lampley 2. FG 10 (3), FT 7-12. Staunton 10 12 11 11 44 Gillespie 8 11 17 1 37 S (20-9): Scanzoni 17, Bruhn 14, Bandy 4, Long 4, Masinelli 4, Bekeske 1. FG 18 (2), FT 6-15. G (11-17): Mix 9, Taylor 7, Bires 4, Jarman 4, Schmidt 4, Link 3, Barrett 2, Bertolino 2, Hayes 2. FG 14 (1), FT 8-14. Gate. Legacy 4 6 2 10 22 A. Marquette 13 24 20 5 62 A (20-9): Snipes 16, Neal 11, A. Williams 9, Porter 7, Connors 6, Kirchner 4, Nelson 4, Kline 2, K. Williams 2, Foersterling 1. FG 20 (5), FT 17-32. Troy 7 18 13 13 51 Pky. Central 12 17 19 11 59 T (12-6): K. Mennemeyer 17, DeClue 12, Illig 11, O. Mennemeyer 7, Bova 2, Caldwell 2. FG 21 (7), FT 2-8. P (13-4): Kelly 24, Cooke 15, O. Stephens 7, Coleman 5, Hilton 4, Moore 2, M. Stephens 2. FG 23 (2), FT 11-13. Wesclin 9 16 12 17 54 Gibault 19 10 21 11 61 G (13-14): Davis 21, Wightman 18, Kuecker 8, Grither 6, Hooten 4, M. Bernal 2, Wirth 2. FG 23 (1), FT 14-28. Duchesne 24 DuBourg 34 DB (7-11): Klump 9, Nelson 8, Vails 7, Niethe 5, Henson 3, Behnen 2. FG 11 (3), FT 9-20.

Triad 11 9 7 6 33 Civic Mem. 20 12 15 12 59 T (11-13): Barisch 16, Powell 5, Miller 3, Suess 3, Bohnenstiehl 2, Cochran 2, Fandrey 2. FG 8 (2), FT 15-22. C (24-5): Hall 17, Tyus 10, J. Christeson 9, Niemeier 9, Zupan 6, Ray 3, Buhs 2, Klaustermeier 2, Hardy 1. FG 21 (5), FT 12-18. E. St. Louis 13 11 8 9 41 Edwardsville 12 7 22 13 54 Ed (25-2): Love 14, Harris 13, Burg 8, Hulme 8, Townsend 7, Smith 2, Stephen 2. FG 20 (3), FT 11-13. Granite City 7 11 6 6 30 Collinsville 22 17 24 5 68 C (13-11): King 17, Bush 13, Mitchell 12, Knutson 11, Fenton 5, Liljegren 5, Doyle 3, Becker 2. FG 26 (4), FT 12-21. Washington 24 Summit 50 S (9-9): Manuel 15, Martens 12, Crews 9, Bryant 4, Kelley 4, Manalang 2, McLemore 2, Potter 2. FG 19 (4), FT 8-18. St. Joseph’s 13 7 7 14 41 Ladue 17 8 20 19 64 L (12-5): Peete 23, Minkler 18, Collins 16, Douglas 2, Hay 2, Speicher 2, Rogers 1. FG 22 (11), FT 9-15. Freeburg 16 10 17 9 52 Mascoutah 4 9 5 17 35 F (20-6): Oliver 13, Schwemmer 10, Kimes 9, Eichenlaub 8, A. Holcomb 8, Cockrell 3, Gebke 1. FG 22 (4), FT 4-9. OTHER AREA SCORES MICDS 55, Villa Duchesne 24 O’Fallon 63, Belleville West 30 Staunton 44, Gillespie 37 Alton Marquette 62, Gateway Legacy 22 Parkway Central 59, Troy 51 Gibault 61, Wesclin 54 DuBourg 34, Duchesne 24 Civic Memorial 59, Triad 33 Edwardsville 54, East St. Louis 41 Collinsville 68, Granite City 30 Summit 50, Washington 24 Ladue 64, St. Joseph’s 41

BOYS BASKETBALL Luth. South 16 26 26 7 Principia 9 5 8 11 P (4-12): Hoffman 9, Towle 8, Legard 7, James 6, Coyne 3. FG 11 (7), FT 4-6. OTHER AREA SCORES Jennings 72, Lutheran North 48 Hillsboro, Ill. 65, Ramsey 45 Carnahan 58, Hallsville 56

75 33

HOCKEY MID-STATES CHALLENGE CUP Prelims - Red Conference De Smet 2, Chaminade 0 D: Thomas Kampmeinert, Ben Lodes; shutout by Jakub Dobes Edwardsville 3, Ladue 3 CBC 6, Marquette 2 MID-STATES WICKENHEISER CUP Prelims - Pool D Westminster 7, Fox 1 Parkway West 5, Parkway South 1 MVCHA 2A PLAYOFFS Belleville 7, Freeburg/Wate 2 Civic Memorial 12, Wood River 9

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Jennings’ Elijah Hicks (23) slips between Lutheran North’s Isaiah Williams (21) and D’Vion Harris to the basket on Thursday in Jennings.

four rebounds and had two steals. Sophomore guard Damarion Shanklin had 10 points and three steals. Sophomore forward Karl Moore had six points, six rebounds and blocked four shots as Jennings overpowered Lutheran North (8-11). “We’re in class right now. Jennings is very good,” Lutheran North coach Gerald Jones said. “I expect them to be right back in the same position they were last year. We played a really good team tonight.” Jennings scored the first seven points of the game and led 18-11 after the first quarter. It pushed its lead to 28-18 at halftime. The Warriors let loose with a halfcourt trap that the Crusaders struggled to solve. The lead ballooned to 47-31 at the end of the third quarter and only grew from there. “For us it’s about getting better.

Fox (7-12) at Northwest-CH (3-15), 7 p.m. Festus (13-6) at Perryville (11-9), 7 p.m. Hazelwood Central (11-7) at Ritenour (3-16), 7 p.m. FH Central (11-7) at Troy (5-14), 7 p.m. Timberland (10-8) at Fort Zumwalt East (9-9), 7 p.m. St. Vincent (10-7) at St. Pius X (15-5), 7 p.m. John Burroughs (9-7) at Westminster (12-7), 7 p.m. Brentwood (8-9) at Bayless (2-15), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (6-11) at Francis Howell (17-2), 7 p.m. St. Charles (10-8) at Warrenton (6-13), 7 p.m. Seckman (3-14) at Affton (4-10), 7 p.m. Jackson (4-2) at Farmington (15-2), 7 p.m. Jennings (11-6) at Lafayette (8-11), 7 p.m. Clayton (7-10) at Normandy (6-10), 7 p.m. Parkway West (2-15) at Eureka (12-5), 7 p.m. University City (10-9) at Parkway North (4-13), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (8-9) at Washington (5-15), 7 p.m. FH North (2-15) at Holt (10-8), 7 p.m. Lovejoy (11-11-1) at Madison (11-9-1), 7 p.m. St. Clair (9-10) at Sullivan (14-4), 7 p.m. Borgia (11-8) at St. Dominic (7-11), 7:15 p.m. St. Mary’s (9-10) at Tolton (14-4), 7:15 p.m. Duchesne (9-11) at DuBourg (5-14), 7:15 p.m. Cahokia (5-15) at Marion (13-11), 7:15 p.m. Bunker Hill (4-12) at Nokomis (18-5), 7:15 p.m. Vianney (5-14) at St. Louis U. High (3-13), 7:30 p.m. Carlinville (6-17) at Hillsboro, Ill. (12-10), 7:30 p.m. Columbia (15-7) at Mascoutah (15-8), 7:30 p.m. Greenville (13-10) at Staunton (11-10), 7:30 p.m. Wesclin (11-14) at Carlyle (6-20), 7:30 p.m. Jerseyville (10-14) at Civic Memorial (7-17), 7:30 p.m. Roxana (12-12) at Gillespie (6-14), 7:30 p.m. St. Charles West (13-6) at Orchard Farm (9-10), 7:30 p.m. Valmeyer (9-15) at Marissa (17-2), 7:30 p.m. Salem (13-10) at Freeburg (15-9), 7:30 p.m. Triad (8-14) at Waterloo (7-18), 7:30 p.m. Mount Olive (2-17) at Edinburg (0-4), 7:30 p.m. Mount Vernon (15-7) at Carbondale (18-4), 7:30 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (9-12) at Althoff (11-11), 7:30 p.m.

We were excited to play, haven’t played since Saturday,” Jennings coach Travis Wallace said. “The guys came out and played harder. We executed. We switched things up and tried something different.” Jennings has the size and length to be a truly fearsome opponent. But Wallace has been trying to get more consistency out of his team. “Once we get these guys healthy we can have practices. We’ve got a month to get it done,” Wallace said. “We’re not going to rush anyone back, we’re going to let them heal up as much as they can and let these other guys get some playing experience.” Jones, who took over this winter after a successful run at Northwest Academy that included one state title and two state semifinal appearances, is preaching process to a team full of underclassmen.

Pana (9-13) at Litchfield (14-7), 7:30 p.m. Vandalia (15-7) at Piasa Southwestern (9-13), 7:30 p.m. Trinity (16-2) at Luth. St. Charles (6-13), 7:30 p.m. Nashville (25-2) at Sparta (8-9), 7:45 p.m. Grandview (3-17) at Herculaneum (5-12), 8 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL BORGIA TOURNAMENT Pool A Union (13-5) vs. Borgia (6-10), 5:30 p.m. Pool B Summit (8-9) vs. Parkway South (10-7), 7 p.m. WEBSTER WINTER CHALLENGE Consolation semifinals Cor Jesu (11-7) vs. Webster Groves (8-11), 5:30 p.m. Troy vs. St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. Championship semifinals Incarnate Word (17-1) vs. Rock Bridge (7-2), 7 p.m. Parkway Central vs. Ladue, 8:30 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Crossroads (5-8) at Valley Park (8-11), 5 p.m. Timberland (3-13) at Fort Zumwalt East (10-6), 5:30 p.m. Parkway North (16-3) at Hazelwood Central (16-5), 5:30 p.m. St. Charles (9-10) at Warrenton (7-10), 5:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South (7-10) at Liberty (8-10), 5:30 p.m. St. Clair (13-5) at Sullivan (12-5), 5:30 p.m. Affton (3-13) at Riverview Gardens (2-11), 5:30 p.m. John Burroughs (12-7) at Westminster (12-6), 5:30 p.m. Brentwood (1-9) at Bayless (3-10), 5:30 p.m. FH North (13-5) at Holt (7-11), 5:30 p.m. Mehlville (2-12) at Francis Howell (11-9), 5:30 p.m. Owensville (10-8) at Hermann (16-4), 5:30 p.m. Wright City (2-11) at Silex (4-6), 5:30 p.m. Eureka (9-8) at McCluer North (13-6), 6 p.m. St. Charles West (8-10) at Orchard Farm (11-8), 6 p.m. Trinity (12-4) at Luth. St. Charles (19-2), 6 p.m. Miller Career (11-7) at Cahokia (6-7), 6:15 p.m. Principia (10-7) at Visitation (4-15), 6:30 p.m. Grandview (11-7) at Herculaneum (12-8), 6:30 p.m.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Highland’s Bella LaPorta (13) goes up for a shot on Thursday in Highland. The Bulldogs snapped the Panthers’ 14-game winning streak with a 50-34 victory. Please see story and photos on STLhighschoolsports.com.

Metro (14-7) at Lift For Life (9-8), 6:30 p.m. Pattonville (8-7) at Lindbergh (7-11), 7 p.m. McCluer (1-14) at Fox (8-5), 7 p.m. Kirkwood (16-3) at Hazelwood West (8-6), 7 p.m. Hazelwood East (5-13) at McCluer S-Berkeley (12-6), 7 p.m. Oakville (10-8) at Seckman (10-7), 7 p.m. Northwest-CH (9-11) at University City (4-12), 7 p.m.

HOCKEY Lutheran South (5-14-1) vs. Eureka (4-15-1), at FSI Shark Tan, 6:45 p.m. Clayton (11-9) vs. Fort Zumwalt South (9-11-1), at Lindenwood Ic, 7:15 p.m. Francis Howell (13-7) vs. Summit (13-4-2), at Fenton Forum, 7:20 p.m. FH Central (13-6-1) vs. Lafayette (11-7-2), at Rec-Plex, 7:45 p.m. Oakville (6-13-2) vs. Kirkwood (11-8-2), at Queeny Park, 8:15 p.m. Webster Groves (9-11) vs. Fort Zumwalt East (11-6-3), at Webster Rink, 8:45 p.m. FH North (0-19) vs. St. Mary’s (0-21), at Lindenwood Ic, 9 p.m. MICDS (13-5-2) vs. Priory (15-4-2), at Fenton Forum, 9 p.m. Parkway South (9-10-1) vs. Duchesne (15-5), at Rec-Plex, 9:30 p.m. Lindbergh (9-10-1) vs. Seckman (10-10), at South County, 9:30 p.m. Vianney (13-6-1) vs. St. Louis U. High (17-2-1), at Affton Rink, 9:45 p.m.

WRESTLING Borgia at Union, 5 p.m. Lutheran South at Principia, 5 p.m. Holt at Timberland, 6 p.m. CBC at Whitfield, 6 p.m. HANCOCK QUAD, 5 p.m. Teams: Brentwood, Hancock, MaplewoodRH, New Madrid County Central

GIRLS WRESTLING CLASS 1 DISTRICT 1 TOURNAMENT At St. Clair, 5:30 p.m. Teams: Affton, Cape Girardeau Central, De Soto, DuBourg, Eureka, Farmington, Festus, Fox, Hancock, Hillsboro, Kirkwood, Lafayette, Lindbergh, Marquette, Mehlville, North County, Northwest Cedar Hill, Oakville, Owensville, Pacific, Park Hills Central, Parkway West, Poplar Bluff, Principia, Rolla, Seckman, Sikeston, St. Clair, St. James, Ste. Genevieve, Sullivan, Summit, Union, Washington, Webster Groves, Windsor CLASS 1 DISTRICT 2 TOURNAMENT At Fort Zumwalt North, 6 p.m. Teams: Battle, Brentwood, Centralia (Mo.), Clayton, Fort Zumwalt East, Fort Zumwalt North, Fort Zumwalt South, Fort Zumwalt West, Francis Howell, Francis Howell Central, Francis Howell North, Fulton, Hazelwood Central, Hazelwood East, Hickman, Holt, Kirksville, Liberty, Lutheran St. Charles, Maplewood-RH, McCluer, McCluer North, McCluer South-Berkeley, Normandy, Orchard Farmd, Palmyra, Pattonville, Ritenour, Rock Bridge, St. Charles, Timberland, Troy, Warrenton, Winfield, Wright City

GIRLS SWIMMING McCluer at St. Charles West, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Borgia, 3:45 p.m. Lutheran St. Charles at FH Central, 8:30 p.m. SUBURBAN CONFERENCE YELLOW POOL Meet-Finals At Kirkwood, 4 p.m. Teams: Eureka, Kirkwood, Lafayette, Lindbergh, Marquette, Parkway Central, Parkway South, Parkway West Lutheran South at Affton, 4:15 p.m. SUBURBAN CONFERENCE RED POOL Meet-Finals At Summit, 4:30 p.m. Teams: Clayton, Hazelwood West, Ladue, McCluer North, Mehlville, Oakville, Parkway North, Pattonville, Summit, Webster Groves


C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

CLASSIFIED All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Land for Sale 100 premium acres near Holcomb, MO in Dunklin, County. Only 200 miles from St. Louis. Soil can yield 2.5-3.0 bales of cotton per year. Soil can grow any crop, including soybeans & wheat. $10,000 per acre. Call 618-684-3154.

Audi

Ford

Mercedes Benz

Chevrolet Trucks

Sport Utility

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: 5K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $38,444 #28886L

'17 Ford Mustang: Ecoboost, 6-Speed, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $18,990 #C9077A

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $35,100 #P9651

'17 Chevrolet Silverado: 2500HD High Country, 8K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $60,100 #79723A

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus: 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD $46,100 #29075A

BMW

'12 Ford Focus Titanium, H/B, Clean Carfax, Only 61K Miles $9,996 #35596A

'11 Audi A5: Coupe, Quattro, 46K Miles $16,990 #B9709

'16 BMW 4: Series 435i xDrive, 26K Miles, AWD, Coupe, $33,500 #P9722

Rental-MO Duplex, non-smoking, 2 br, 1 ba, n e w ly - r e mo d e le d, super-quiet neighborhood near Carondelet Park, full bsmt w/ wshr & dryer. Appliances furnished. $825 rent, $825 sec. dep. Small pets allowed. Call 314-853-4181 or email rdvinton@hotmail.com LOVELY home 3 blks from Affton HS. 3BR, 1.5BA, A/C, laundry, garage, yard, util incl. Serious offers w / m e t ic u lo u s references only. (914) 490-7777

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk

'15 BMW M3: 4 Door Sedan, 29K Miles, RWD, Manual $42,100 #P9684

'10 Ford Fusion: Loaded, Very Clean, $6,992 #40428A

'10 BMW 328: xDrive, Auto, Local Trade $10,490 #V19235A

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 618-465-1444, Mon-Fri 9-5. 3113 Washington, Alton, IL

Cadillac 17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, 27K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD $44,963 #80335A

'17 Cadillac XTS: FWD, $22,695 Stock #P06963 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '03 Cadillac Deville Stock #P06999A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Vacation Rentals 2 Bedroom 2 bath condo in Bradenton Florida avail. for rent on a monthly basis. sleep up to 8 people. Located on a golf course. No pets please. Please call Bill. (314) 363-1470

Acura '16 Acura ILX: w/Premium Pkg, 28K Miles, Blue, Auto $19,490 #B9181

Audi '13 Audi S8: 4 Door Sedan, AWD, 47K Miles, 8 Cyl 4.0L, $42,444 #P9730

'15 Chevrolet Spark: Hatch, 1LT, Auto $7,999 Stock #190228A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Camaro: Coupe, $12,900 Stock #P06852 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Camaro: Certified, 2 Door Coupe, 2SS, $31,714 Stock #181193A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Impala: Clean Carfax, FWD, 97K Miles, $9,946 #P6677A

'17 Chevy Camaro SS, RWD, Carfax 1 Owner, Arctic Blue Metallic, $34,490 #M19042A

'13 Chevy Silverado 2500HD: LTZ, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Crew Cab, $36,500 #80299A

'16 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, 18K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $34,000 #29047A

'14 Chevy Silverado: 3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax $34,100 #79281A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $42,444 #28888L

'08 Chevy Silverado: V8, Auto, 4WD, $15,490 #V19141B

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $42,444 #28849L

'10 Chevy Silverado LT, 4x4, One Owner, Clean Carfax $17,657 #420229A

2018 Audi Q7: Prestige, 8K Miles, AWD, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $59,780 #28823L

Misc. Autos

'03 Honda Civic EX, 2 Door Coupe, Clean Carfax, FWD, 5-speed Manual, $3,990 #V19144A

'17 Honda Accord: Sport, 26K Miles, Black, Auto, Black Leather, $19,990 #C9412A

'16 Honda Accord Coupe, EX-L, 28K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, FWD, $21,990 #C19071A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '16 ATS: Coupe, AWD, 34K, Nav, Roof $24,490 '15 ATS: Luxury Sedan, Black $21,490 '14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Nav, Roof $23,490 '15 ATS: Luxury, AWD, 28K $25,490

Ford Trucks '11 Ford F150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, Loaded. $18,990 #44028B

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Certified, AWD $39,100 #98000L

'15 SRX: Luxury, 39K, Chromes, Roof $26,490 '06 Honda Civic: Si Coupe, Black, Manual $8,990 #B9612

'18 Honda Accord: Sport, One Owner, Only 3K Miles $25,990 #37022A

Chevrolet Evergreen Real Estate, LLC

Mini Cooper

'07 Ford Mustang: GT, Red, M/T, Loaded, Very Clean $9,469 #P6648

205 N 9th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

314-421-2980 ********* Rental-IL

'05 Mercury Grand Marquis Sedan, GS, Stock #P07086A Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'15 Mini Cooper: Roadster, Convertible, $19,490 #B9461

Honda '16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29K Miles, AWD, Sedan, $34,500 #12382A

Mercury

'18 XT5: Premium, Luxury, Dark Granite $37,990

GMC Trucks

'17 XT5: Luxury, AWD, 13K, Bronze $37,990

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, 36K Miles, Clean Carfax, $35,100 #P9669

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $43,100 #P9665

15 BMW X5 35d: AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, $37,100 #P9574

'15 Escalade: Luxury, Nav, Roof, AWD $48,490

Hyundai BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

Misc Trucks '98 Ram 1500: 2WD Reg Cab Stock #P07008 Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ram 1500 Tradesman: 19K Miles, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $31,490 #B9588

VOLKSWAGEN'S

Infiniti

'07 EOS: Auto, Silver, Local Trade $8,490

'14 Ram 2500: Laramie, Diesel, 41K Miles, Black, Nav, Sharp $46,990 #B9170 '15 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, White, 14K Miles $30,990 #C9648

'10 CC: Sport, Manual, Leather $9,990 '11 Tiguan: AWD, Red, Just Arrived $9,990 '14 Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, Auto, Heated Seats $10,990

'18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $39,100 #P9356

'15 Cadillac Escalade: ESV, Premium, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 41K Miles $47,500 #80283A

1-866-244-9085 '17 Hyundai Sonata: $13,900 Stock # P07056 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Infiniti Q50: $24,720 Stock #P07081 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Infiniti Q50: Lux, 23K Miles, AWD, Black $28,490 #B9519

'17 BMW X3: SDrive28I $26,591 Stock #P07078 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 BMW X5: xDrive 35i, AWD, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $38,336 #P9744

'13 CTS-V: Coupe, 28K, Black, Auto $41,990

'18 Escalade: ESV, Luxury, 35K, Black $61,490

'11 Honda Accord: SE, White, Automatic, Local Trade $9,990 #M18524A

'18 Audi Q7: 3.0 Quattro, 11K Miles, Black, Local Trade $62,220 #V18668A

Nissan/Datsun Trucks '15 Nissan Titan: 52K Miles, Crew Cab, 4WD, $27,990 #B9063

'12 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, 50K Miles, 1 Owner $17,990 #C19046A

Crossovers

'16 Chevy Traverse: FWD, LS, $18,414 Stock #181117A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Jetta: 5K, Auto, Gray $15,490 '16 Audi A7 3.0 Prestige: 64K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Sportback, AWD, $36,500 #P9705

'16 Audi A7 3.0 Prestige: 22K Miles, Sportback, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $46,100 #P9688

'18 Audi A6 2.0T: Premium Plus, FrontTrak, 2K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax $39,100 #P9686

'16 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Sport, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $49,100 #P9681

'16 Audi A6 3.0T: Prestige, 30K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $36,100 #P9664

18 Audi Q7: Prestige, Quattro, Sportback, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $62,100 #P9657

'18 Audi A5 Coupe: Premium Plus, 4K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner AWD, $40,446 #P9604

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $41,100 #P9238

'14 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, 58K Miles, Certified, $12,490 #M18625A

'13 Chevy Camaro: 2SS, 59K Miles, 6-Speed, Leather $21,990 #C19119A

'17 Chevy Cruze LT, FWD, Auto, 16K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $16,469 #P6694

'13 Chevy Cruze: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 58K Miles, $9,969 #35587A

'16 Chevy Cruze: Limited, LT, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $10,976 #42807B

Jeep '14 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, Sahara, 5-Speed Auto, 4WD, $28,490 #C9522A

'18 Tiguan: LTD, FWD, 7K, Black $18,990 '15 Jeep Wrangler: 4 Door Sport, 58K Miles, 4WD, Auto, Hard Top $28,490 #B9518

'17 Jeep Renegade: Latitude, 4WD, 10K Miles, Red, $19,990 #B9587

Kia '18 Kia Optima: $17,474 Stock #P07090 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Kia Soul Plus: 41K Miles, Black, 1 Owner, Auto $13,490 #B9360A

'15 Chevy Camaro ZLT: Loaded, Very Clean $17,990 #420204A

'13 Chevy Corvette: 3LT, Conv, Only 13K Miles, New Tires, Clean Carfax $38,990#P6646

'16 Chevy Malibu: LT, 29K Miles, FWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $16,569 #P6624

'14 Audi RS 7: Prestige, 49K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax #P9510 $58,100

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $33,100 #P9588

'17 Lexus RC: Black w/Red, 21K Miles $35,490 #B9509

'16 Lexus IS350: White, Certified, $30,490 #B9427

Chrysler

Lincoln

'16 Chrysler 300: $19,432 Stock #P07068 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $21,990 #44323A

Dodge

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 8K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner $40,100 #28581L

'18 Audi A5 Premium: 6K Miles, Clean Carfadx 1 Owner, $36,500 #28237L

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $39,100 #28140L

'16 Audi S5 Premium Plus: 18K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, Heated Front Seats $40,100 #28074A

'18 Golf: SE, 4K, Auto, Like New $21,490

Nissan/Datsun '17 Nissan Sentra: $13,285 Stock #P07035 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Porsche

'13 Dodge Challenger: SXT, 59K Miles, Black, Certified, $15,990 #M18600A

'16 Dodge Challenger: Hellcat, 19K Miles, Red, Manual, 2 Keys! $49,490 #B9463

'11 Dodge Charger: SE, RWD, Clean Carfax, 4 Door Sedan, $10,490 #B9332A

'16 Ford Focus: SE, 33K Miles, Automatic, $11,990 #V19063A

'16 Audi RS 7 Prestige: 50K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, Glacier White Metallic $64,500 #29084A

'18 Chevy Suburban: LT, 4WD, Roof, DVD, Nav, White $46,990 #B9689

Range Rover/Land Rover

Scion '16 Scion iM: Hatchback, White, Nav, Manual $14,990 #B9658

Subaru '17 Subaru Crosstrek: $21,574 Stock #180367A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Toyota '18 Toyota Camry: SE, $21,518 Stock #P07099 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Toyota Camry: SE, 500 Miles, Black, Auto $26,990 #V8997B

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 21k Miles, $34,100 #P9607

'18 Audi Q7: Prestige, 7K Miles, AWD, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $58,100 #28820L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 8K Miles $41,100 #28758L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $42,100 #28658L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Premium Plus, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, 6K Miles $42,100 #28649L

'16 Toyota Corolla: Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax $11,569 #44172A

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $53,100 #28602L

Volkswagen

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 9K Miles, AWD $42,100 #28392L

'11 Volkswagen Jetta: TDI, Auto, Certified $9,490 #V9609

'05 Mazda RX-8: Shinka Edition, Manual, Local Trade $7,490 #M18348A '16 Volkswagen Golf: R-32, AWD, Certified, 41K Miles $28,990 #V9525

'11 Mazda3: i Touring, FWD, Gunmetal Blue Mica, $8,490 #M9344B

'16 Cadillac SRX: Performance Collection, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $29,776 #P6641

'15 Chevy Traverse: LTZ, Loaded, Full Power, Leather, $21,647 #44255AA

'14 Chevrolet Traverse LT. FWD, 3rd Row Seating, Heated Front Seats $14,990 #44292A

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Very Clean. $10,290 #420054B

'14 Chevrolet Equinox: LS, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $11,664 #P6427B

'11 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $8,996 #P6616A

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified $40,990 #P6600

'15 Dodge Durango: R/T, AWD, Red w/Black, 35K Miles $32,490 #C18262C

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $42,100 #28326L

'17 Dodge Durango: Citadel, 21K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $38,490 #C18161A

'18 Audi Q3 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $35,100 #28209L

'15 Dodge Durango: LTD, Nav, AWD, 36K Miles, Sunroof, $29,490 #B9555A

'18 Audi Q7: Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $51,765 #28207L

15 Ford Explorer: Limited, FWD, Bronze Fire Metallic $22,876 #44385A

'10 Volkswagen CC: Sport, 6-Speed Manual, 96K Miles $9,990 #V8367A '13 Mazda6: i Sport, Carfax 1 Owner, 82K Miles, FWD, $9,990 #44348A

'12 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, Loaded, Full Power $9,990 #35054A

'14 Volvo S60 T5, 86K Miles, $12,950 #198012 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Chevrolet Trucks '17 Mazda MX-5 Miata: RF Grand Touring, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner 6-Speed Manual $25,963 #P6674

STLtoday.com/classifieds

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: 22K Miles, Quattro, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $34,100 #P9625

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, $46,100 #P9619

Volvo Ford

Sport Utility '17 Audi Q7 Prestige: 53K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $41,500 #P9697

'18 Chevy Tahoe: 4WD, LT, Certified, $42,784 Stock #P07028 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Equinox: $19,478 Stock #P07061 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Z-71, Black, 41K Miles, 4WD, $41,890 #C9505A

Mazda '12 Mazda 3: i Touring, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $8,969 #35598A

Fiat '17 Fiat 500L: Trekking, 15K Miles, Auto $17,490 #M18617A

'17 Lexus RX350: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD $39,100 #P9626

'12 Porsche 911: Black Edition, Convertible RWD, Clean Carfax $54,100 #P9511

Lexus

'18 Audi A4: 2.0T Premium Plus, Quattro, 8K Miles, $38,444 #28704L

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 9K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner $42,100 #28600L

'16 Passat: SE, 43K, Blue, Certified $15,990

'15 Land Rover LR4: 4WD, $36,990 #C18198B

'17 Chevy Spark: LS, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $10,469 #P6727

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: AWD, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $37,100 #28604L

'16 Jetta: Sport, 30K, Certified $15,490

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $42,100 #28175L

'15 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500, LT, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, $30,776 #P6662

'12 Ford Edge: SEL, FWD, Black, $11,376 #P6644A

'18 Ford Expedition: Max LTD, Black, 23K Miles, 4WD $57,990 #B9437

STLtoday.com/homes


02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'18 GMC Acadia: FWD, SLT, $29,396 Stock #P07054 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Acadia Denali: 30K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Auto, $33,226 #P6701

'12 Mercedes Benz ML350: 4matic, Pano Roof, Auto $15,990 #V18547A

'17 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali: Crew Cab, 23K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 owner $43,963 #P9751

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Quicksilver Metallic $47,100 P9606

'16 GMC Yukon: XL Denali, 47K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $47,444#80333A

'15 GMC Yukon SLT: 49K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 owner, $38,500 #80190A

'11 GMC Terrain: SLE-2, AWD, 75K Miles, White $13,990 #V19240A

'12 GMC Terrain: SLE-2, AWD, $11,490 #M9595A

'18 GMC Terrain: 4K Miles, White $22,990 #B9076B

'14 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, Chrome Wheels, Loaded $33,990 #C19032B

'15 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded $41,990 #420141B

'09 Honda Pilot: EX-L, AWD, 3rd Row $8,990 #M18636A

'15 Hyundai Tuscon: LTD, Pano Roof, Nav, AWD, 25K Miles $21,990 #B9593

Notice of Request for Proposals REQUES T FOR PROPOS ALS to be received by Forest Park Forever located at 5 5 9 5 Grand Dr in Forest Park, St. Louis, MO 63112 until Feb. 21, 2019, at 1 PM for a Natural Playscape Project in Forest Park. RFP docs are available in PDF format at www.forestpark forever.org/bids or for copy at FPF during office hours. Equal opportunity bidding event. Women and Minority in Business are encouraged to participate.

'18 Mercedes-Benz GLE 43: AMG, 11K Miles, Nav, Pano Roof, White $65,990 #C18080A

'18 Nissan Rogue: AWD, $18,811 Stock #P07097 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Nissan Murano: $29,708 Stock #P07003 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Nissan Rogue: SL, 17K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, $23,990 #V18623A

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University S ealed bids for the PHAS E II RENOVATION, WOODS HOUSE will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on FEBRUARY 21, 2 0 1 9 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted.

'08 Nissan Pathfinder: LE, Local Trade, Just Arrived $9,990 #C19020C

'14 Nissan Pathfinder: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Auto, Heated Seats, $16,990 #44111A

'16 Subaru Crosstrek: LTD, 47K Miles, Crystal White, Local Trade $21,490 #V19030B

Dogs '08 Saturn VUE: XR, FWD, $7,763 #44383A

'18 Toyota Rav4: XLE, 1K Miles, White w/ Tan $25,990 #M18606A

Golden Retriever Pups, AKC, 1st shots, dewormed, dewclaws removed. $600 ea. 618-458-7221 or 618-979-2009 Newfoundland female pups, AKC, 8wks, Sire 152 lb Dame 119 lb . 2 hrs S. of Saint Louis. $1000. Call Debra 573-318-6245 Poodles toy, AKC, males, 16 wks, smart, no shedding, hlth guar. easy to housebrk, $6 50, Valentines HOLD 636-537-3797 Shih Tzu Pups, males, 8wks, King Charles Cavalier pups. Shots & all AKC Reg. Call (636)699-5911

'18 Toyota 4-Runner: SR5, 9K Miles, 4WD, Loaded $37,990 #C18141RA

Tiny teacup chihuahua puppies ready for new homes. Home raised & spoiled rotten. Can deliver to six flags exit of I 44. Text 417 230 5952 for more info 500 4172305952

'11 Volkswagen Tiquan: AWD, Leather, Roof, Well Cared For $9,990 #V19245A

Seasoned Oak & Hickory Delivered & Stacked. Over 25 yrs of service 573-513-6510

'12 Toyota Highlander: SE, FWD, 103K Miles, Blue $16,490 #V18543A

Firewood/Fuel

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665 WANTED Old Sealed Whiskey $ (618)581-7915

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets '18 Dodge Grand Caravan: 32K Miles, 2WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $19,796 #P6601

BELLEVILLE, IL FLEA MARKET Sat., Feb. 2, 9am-4pm Sun., Feb. 3, 9am-3pm Free Parking & Admission

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $42,500 #98056L

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 4K Miles, $42,500 #98048L

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $42,500 #98023L

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 8K Miles, Certified, Carfax 1 Owner $37,100 #97205L

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Certified $35,444 #97175L

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: SRT8, 73K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax $34,600 #P9680

'16 Jeep Cheroke: Trailhawk, 8K Miles, 4WD, Black, Leather $28,990 #V18665B

'16 Jeep Patriot: Sport, SE, 22K Miles, FWD, Carfax 1 Owner $14,990 #M18646A

'17 Jeep Patriot Sport, 17K Miles, FWD, 5-Speed Manual Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $15,469 #P6685

'17 Jeep Renegade Latitude, 4WD, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $19,233 #P6688

'18 Kia Sportage: LX, FWD, $19,541 Stock #P07091 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Land Rover Discovery: Sport, 26K Miles, 4WD, White w/Tan $32,990 #B9388

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $39,100 #79760A

'18 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, AWD, $27,036 Stock #P07065 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Mazda CX-9: Signature, Clean Carfax, 2K Miles, AWD, $38,100 #12129L

'16 Mazda CX-3: Touring, White, 13K Miles, Certified, $20,490 #M9530

'17 Mazda CX-5: Touring, 29K Miles, Mazda Certified $22,490 #M18567A

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that 3207 ML Manager, LLC, a Missouri limited liability company, duly organized by the Missouri Secretary of State on January 9, 2013 (the "Company"), has filed with the Missouri Secretary of State a Notice of Winding Up of a Limited Liability Company effective as of the 30th day of January, 2019. Any person, persons, corporations or other bus in e s s e n t it ie s h a v in g claims against the Company must file the same by stating: a) name; b) address; c) current phone number; and d) basis of the claim within three (3) years from the date of this Notice. The information must be mailed to Bennett S. Keller, Esq., Lathrop & Gage LLP, 7701 Forsyth Blvd., Suite 500, St. Louis, Missouri 63105. Any claim against the Corporation will be barred unless a proceeding to enforce the claim is commenced within three (3) y ears after the publication of this Notice.

Merchandise Wanted '16 Volkswagen Touraeg: Executive, 32K Miles, AWD, Certified, $29,490 #V18546A

Mini vans

'18 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, $35,100 #P9500

Public Notices

3207 ML Manager, LLC

'10 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: Loaded, Full Power $6,994 #420175B

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $34,100 #P9551

Bids/Proposals

'17 Toyota Sienna: XLE, 8 Pass, Red, 23K Miles $27,990 #V8997A

Vans '18 Chevy Express Passenger Van: Certified Pre-Owned $26,746 Stock #P07038 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Express Cargo Van, 24K Miles, Certified, RWD, $23,869 #P6649

First full weekend of every month featuring all kinds of vendors with antiques, collectibles, craft items, vintage items, tools, variety of foods and Much More! St. Clair County Event Center 1550 E. State Rt 15 Belleville, IL 62221 618-830-7552

Come early for breakfast at the Country Cafe! www.scceventcenter.com

3207 Developer, LLC

Landscape Laborers Surecut Lawncare, LLC seeks 18 te mp FT Landscape Laborers 4/1/19-12/15/19. Duties: lay sod, s e e d lawns , mow gras s , trim bushes & trees, plant flowers, bushes, & trees, water plant material, fertilize lawns, rake lawns. Must be able to use lawn mower, weedeater, rake, hoe, bobcat, & aerator. Employer will provide all tools, supplies, & equip. 1 mo exp. req. Be able to lift up to 5 0 lbs. Worksite 610 Babler Park Dr, Wildw ood, MO 6 3 0 0 5 & sites in St. C harles & St . Louis C ounties. $ 1 4 . 5 2 /hr M on-Sat; 4 0 hrs/w k. Shifts 7am-5pm. OT may be avail @ $ 2 1 . 7 8 /hr. Work hrs = to @ least 3/4ths of workdays in each 12-wk period. Paid weekly; single workweek used as standard for computing wages. All deductions from pay req by law. If worker completes 5 0 % of contract, employer will reimburse worker for transp & subsistence from place of recruit to place of work. Upon completion of contract or where worker is dismissed earlier, employer will provide or pay for worker's reasonable costs of return transp & subsistence back home, except where worker will not return due to subsequent employment w/ another employer. Transp pay or reimbursement = to most eco & reasonable common carrier for distance involved. Daily subsistence provided @ a rate of $12.26/ day to a max of $51.00/ day w/ receipts. Applicants seeking to inquire about job or send apps, indications of avail &/or resumes contact nearest MO Job Center at 212 Turne r B l v d , S t . Pe te rs , MO 63376, (636) 255-6060 or fax resumes to Robin Earleywine 6364 5 8 - 6 6 4 6 us ing Job Orde r # 12587061.

Public Notices North Carolina, Wake County, File No. 18 CVD 011962 in the general court of justice, district court division Nicole Smith, Plaintiff, Vs Harry Smith III, Defendant. Notice of service of process by publication To: Harry Smith III take note: that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the general court of justice, District Court Division, by the plaintiff herein, the nature of which is as follows: Absolute divorce based upon one y ear's separation. You are required by law to make defense to such pleading within forty (40) days from the date of the first publication of this notice. If you fail to do so, the plaintiff will seek the relief sought herein. This the 31st day of December, 2018.

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that 3207 Tenant, LLC, a Missouri limited liability company, duly organized by the Missouri Secretary of State on January 9, 2013 (the "Company"), h a s f i l e d w i t h t h e M i s s o u ri Secretary of State a Notice of Winding Up of a Limited Liability Company effective as of the 30th day of January, 2019. Any person, persons, corporations or other bus in e s s e n t it ie s h a v in g claims against the Company must file the same by stating: a) name; b) address; c) current phone number; and d) basis of the claim within three (3) years from the date of this Notice. The information must be mailed to Bennett S. Keller, Esq., Lathrop & Gage LLP, 7701 Forsyth Blvd., Suite 500, St. Louis, Missouri 63105. Any claim against the Corporation will be barred unless a proceeding to enforce the claim is commenced within three (3) y ears after the publication of this Notice. 3207 Tenant, LLC

To Whom It May Concern,

Please reply to: Deborah Bond Yagmin 14135 Westchester Drive Colorado Springs, CO 80921

Bids/Proposals BIDS REQUESTED New Construction MBE / WBE Encouraged 30 Units Multi Family St. Louis, MO For Bid Information: 636-931-4244 or alinkddiamond@gmail.com / nleoni@sbcglobal.net Double Diamond Construction 1000 A Truman Blvd. Crystal City, MO 63019

BIDS REQUESTED New Construction Section 3 / MBE / WBE Encouraged 40 Units Multi Family Cape Girardeau, MO For Bid Information: 636-931-4244 or alinkddiamond@gmail.com / nleoni@sbcglobal.net Double Diamond Construction 1000 A Truman Blvd. Crystal City, MO 63019

BIDS REQUESTED Rehab Section 3 / MBE / WBE Encouraged 48 Units Multi Family Marble Hill, MO For Bid Information: 636-931-4244 or alinkddiamond@gmail.com / nleoni@sbcglobal.net Double Diamond Construction 1000 A Truman Blvd. Crystal City, MO 63019

Dogs Cockapoo & Mini Bernedoodle Pups for sale! Lots of gorgeous color choices. $1300+ midwestdoodleranch.com 816-383-0489

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now ! LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 sieversretrievers.com

Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìBid #19-022 WWTP: All-Weather Refrigerated Samplers“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. CS T, February 1 2 , 2 0 1 9 . Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

INVITATION TO BID #19-023 CALCINED CLAY FIELD DRYING CONDITIONER CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is accepting sealed bids to furnish and deliver calcined clay field drying conditioner. Specifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìBid #19-023 Calcined Clay Field Drying Conditioner“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 b y 2 : 0 0 P. M. C S T, February 1 2 , 2 0 1 9 . Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

LETTING NO. 8689 2019 CAPTITAL MAIN REPLACEMENT PROJECT/CMRP - SIX (6) INCH MAIN IN MORGAN ST. Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Public Service in Room 208 City Hall, 1200 Market S treet, St. Louis, M o . Until 1:45 PM, CT, on MA R C H 5 , 2 0 1 9 then publicly opened and read. Plans and Specifications may be examined on the Board of Public S ervice website http://www.stlbps.org/ planroom (BPS On Line Plan Room) and may be purchased directly through the BPS website from INDOX Services at cost plus shipping. No refunds will be made.

Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

The Kirkwood R-VII School District is seeking qualified bids for miscellaneous maintenance projects including asphalt replacement and maintenance, track replacement, roof replacement and construction projects including renovations for s e c u rity ve s tib u le s a n d a classroom. Please visit our webs i t e @ h t t p : / / w w w . kirkwoodschools.org and click on RFPs within the Links section for additional information. .

All bidders must regard Federal Executive Order 11246, "Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Employment Opportunity", the "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Specifications" set forth within and referenced at w w w .stl-bps.org (Announcements).

LETTING NO. 8687 T2019 CAPITAL MAIN REPLACEMENT PROGRAM EIGHT (8) INCH MAIN IN BANCROFT AVENUE, CITY OF ST. LOUIS WATER DIVISION

Bidders shall comply with all applicable City, State and Federal laws (including MBE/WBE policies).

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

Search “stltoday” in your App Store

The Kirkwood School District R7 is seeking qualified bids for the following maintenance projects: KSD 2 0 1 9 Door Replacement, KSD 2019 Flooring Replacement, and the T I L 2 0 1 8 Pa rkin g Are a Improvements. Please visit out w e b s it e @ h t t p s : / / w w w. kirkwoodschools.org and click on RFPs within the Links section. .

The Lindbergh Schools, Board of Education, seeks Request for Qualifications (RFQ) from qualified Ene rgy S e rvice C ompanie s (ESCO). District wide facility improvements include, but are not limited to, modifications or replaceme nts of systems or facilities through a performance based savings contract. This R F Q is a qualifications bases selection process. It is NOT a bid. The RFQ document can be obtained and downloaded from the Lindbergh S chools website, under the Departments heading, Business and Finance listing, Requests for Proposals section. All questions should be directed to Ms. Joël C r a c c h i o l o , C FO, via e m a i l JoelCracchiolo@Lindbergh Schools.ws. All submittals are to be delivered by 10: 00 AM local time, Tues day, February 1 2 , 2019. Respondents may be requested to attend an in- person interview with Lindbergh after the submittal date. All submittals will b e e va lu a te d bas e d o n the following criteria: [ a] Experience and technical competence for the type of services desired by the Board. [ b] The capacity and capability of the firm to perform the tasks requested. [ c] The firm's past record of performance with respect to estimating, scheduling and cost controls. [ d] The firm's proximity to and familiarity with the geographical area in which the proje ct s hall be locate d. [ e ] References from prior clients. The statements of qualification are prepared at the respondent's expense and become property of Lindbergh Schools and therefore public record.

Bidders shall comply with all applicable City, State and Federal laws (including MBE/WBE policies).

Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Public Service in Room 208 City Hall, 1200 Market S treet, St. Louis, M o . Until 1:45 PM, CT, on MA R C H 5 , 2 0 1 9 then publicly opened and read. Plans and Specifications may be examined on the Board of Public S ervice website http://www.stlbps.org/ planroom (BPS On Line Plan Room) and may be purchased directly through the BPS website from INDOX Services at cost plus shipping. No refunds will be made.

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that 3207 Tenant Manager, LLC, a Missouri limited liability company, duly organized by the Missouri Secretary of State on January 9, 2013 (the "Company "), has filed with the Missouri Secretary of State a Notice of Winding Up of a Limited Liability Company effective as of the 30th day of January , 2019. Any person, persons, corporations or other business entities having claims against the Company must file the same by stating: a) name; b) address; c) current phone number; and d) basis of the claim within three (3) years from the date of this Notice. The information must be mailed to Bennett S. Keller, Esq., Lathrop & Gage LLP, 7701 Forsyth Blvd., Suite 500, St. Louis, Missouri 63105. Any claim against the Corporation will be barred unless a proceeding to enforce the claim is commenced within three (3) y ears after the publication of this Notice.

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is accepting sealed bids to purchase three allweather refrigerated samplers. Specifications are available at w w w.ofallon.mo .us under Bid Opportunities.

Bernice Bond Arnold AKA Bernice S . Bond AKA B e r n i c e Bo n d passed away December 26, 2018. Creditors have until June 26, 2019 to forward bills for collection.

Cats WANTED: Siamese Kitten Call (618)466-1510

INVITATION TO BID #19-022 WWTP: ALL-WEATHER REFRIGERATED SAMPLERS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that 3207 Developer, LLC, a Missouri limited liability company, duly organized by the Missouri Secretary of State on January 9, 2013 (the "Company"), has filed with the Missouri Secretary of State a Notice of Winding Up of a Limited Liability Company effective as of the 30th day of January, 2019. Any person, persons, corporations or other bus in e s s e n t it ie s h a v in g claims against the Company must file the same by stating: a) name; b) address; c) current phone number; and d) basis of the claim within three (3) years from the date of this Notice. The information must be mailed to Bennett S. Keller, Esq., Lathrop & Gage LLP, 7701 Forsyth Blvd., Suite 500, St. Louis, Missouri 63105. Any claim against the Corporation will be barred unless a proceeding to enforce the claim is commenced within three (3) y ears after the publication of this Notice.

STLtoday.com/jobs '18 Chevy Express: Cargo Van, 21K Miles, RWD, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 owner $24,569 #P6628

Bids/Proposals

Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $ 1 2 5 .0 0 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans. missouristate.edu/.

All bidders must regard Federal Executive Order 11246, "Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Employment Opportunity", the "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Specifications" set forth within and referenced at w w w .stl-bps.org (Announcements).

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT The Wentzville RIV School District has filed an "E-Rate application seeking the purchase of network connectivity and equipment". If you are interested in bidding, please go to the USAC website: http://www.usac.org/sl/ search for said application.

WENTZVILLE R-IV SCHOOL DISTRICT ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Central Office, 280 Interstate Drive, Wentzville, MO 63385, until THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2019 AT 2 P.M. CDT, for the New District Warehouse Building. Bids will be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6707 Plainview Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109, (314) 781-9855, FAX (314) 7810163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for procuring bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. THERE IS NO PRE-BID MEETING SCHEDULED FOR THIS PROJECT.

3207 Tenant Manager, LLC

STLtoday.com/readerrewards


GOLF

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Varner, Thomas, Fowler share Phoenix Open lead

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

EUROPEAN TOUR 76th-ranked Pieters leads Saudi International Thomas Pieters shot 7-under 63 to take a two-stroke lead on Thursday after the first round at the Saudi International, a new European Tour event being held amid scrutiny of the kingdom’s human-rights record and condemnation following the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The 76th-ranked Pieters made seven birdies and was bogey-free around the Royal Greens Golf and Country Club in King Abdullah Economic City, Saudi Arabia, where the world’s top three players — Justin Rose, Brooks Koepka, and Dustin

Johnson — are playing. None are within four shots of the lead, with No. 3-ranked Johnson faring best after a 68. Koepka shot 69 and top-ranked Rose bogeyed the last hole for an even-par 70. Rose and Johnson both struggled to read the greens, described as “grainy.” “Collectively, our group was probably the worst putting round I’ve seen for three professional golfers in a long, long time,” said Rose, who played alongside Koepka and former British Open champion Henrik Stenson (68). Coming off the first overseas win of his career at the Dubai Desert Classic, Bryson DeChambeau shot 68 and was tied with Johnson and Stenson.

IT’S A NEW YEAR AND TIME FOR A NEW YOU HANS WIEMANN OFFERS THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY TO HELP SLOW THE PROCESS OF FURTHER HAIR LOSS AND RESTORE YOUR HAIR TO A HEALTHIER, FULLER CONDITION.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Justin Thomas hits from the second fairway during the first round of the Phoenix Open on Thursday. Thomas shares the lead with Harold Varner III and Rickie Fowler.

putt bogey, but bounced back with three straight birdies on the front nine. He had a two-putt birdie on the par-15 13th and got up-and-down from a greenside bunker at the other back-nine par 5, the 15th. Following his birdie on No. 16, Varner missed two chances for the outright lead on the closing holes. He three-putted from 105 feet on the drivable par-4 17th hole and missed an 18-foot birdie putt on 18. Even so, Varner carded his lowest round of the season and earned a tie with the two desert roommates. “I played well, drove it really well and had lots of opportunities,” Varner said. Thomas opened 2019 with a third-place finish at the Sentry Tournament of Champions and was tied for 16th at the Sony Open with four rounds in the 60s. Playing in near-perfect conditions in the morning, the 2017 PGA Championship winner started on the back nine and went out in 2-under 34 with birdies on Nos. 15 and 18. Thomas’ 9-foot putt on 18 began a string of six birdies in seven holes, including five on putts inside of 5 feet to shoot a 5-under 30 on the front nine. Fowler, twice a runner-up at the Phoenix Open, also started on No. 10 and jump-started his round with an eagle on the par-5 13th after knocking his 236-yard approach shot to 17 feet. He also twoputted from 45 feet for birdie on No. 3, but misread a putt on the par-4 ninth that would have given him the outright lead — and chance to trash talk his roommate for the week, Thomas. “We’re sharing a house this week, so I wanted bragging rights at dinner tonight.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. • Harold Varner III overcame an early bogey with three straight birdies, moving himself in position to tie for the lead. He got it with a long putt and a dab on the loudest hole in golf. Varner snaked in a long birdie putt on the par-3 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale on Thursday, capping off a 7-under 64 to tie Rickie Fowler and Justin Thomas for the first-round lead at the Phoenix Open. Varner set off the rowdiest roars of the afternoon with his 31-foot putt at the hole turned into a stadium. “I love entertaining people and what better hole to do it,” he said. Playing in pristine conditions before storms are expected to hit this weekend, Fowler and Thomas made their way around the desert layout without much trouble. Martin Laird and J.T. Poston were a shot back at 65 and four players shot 66, including two-time Masters champion Bubba Watson. Another 16 players shot 67 on a day when 70 players were under par. Among them was Oklahoma State sophomore Matthew Wolff, who overcame some early nerves in his first PGA Tour start. The 19-year-old had a bogey on his second hole, the par-4 11th, but closed with five birdies to open three shots out of the lead. Defending champion Gary Woodland and Phil Mickelson each shot 68. Varner, who missed the cut at Torrey Pines last week, blew his first putt past the hole on the par-4 second hole for a three-

Find out why you are losing hair and what options WILL WORK for you. Call and schedule your FREE MICROSCOPIC HAIR AND SCALP EVALUATION TODAY • PRP-Platelet Rich Plasma -laseR haiR theRaPy-haiR RestoRation-aRtas ® Robotic FUe haiR tRansPlants

$

750

CALL FOR A FREE HAIR AND SCALP ANALYSIS CONSULTATION PLEASE MENTION COUPON WHEN SCHEDULING APPOINTMENT

314-236-9884 or 618-215-7398 “TECHNOLOGY MEETS THE ART OF HAIR RESTORATION”

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

Low clouds and milder WIND WSW 4-8 mph

Spotty freezing drizzle WIND S 6-12 mph

Mostly cloudy

46°

36°

SUNDAY

OFF

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

MONDAY

ANY HAIR SOLUTION FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

While the worst of the polar vortex invasion will be over, cold weather will still hold across the Great Lakes and Northeast today. Nuisance snow will sweep through the mid-Atlantic as a bit of rain and drizzle dampens the Gulf Coast and southern Plains. Rain and mountain snow will return to most of the West Coast.

TUESDAY

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND SSW 7-14 mph

Warm with clouds A touch of rain and sun WIND WIND SSW 10-20 mph S 8-16 mph

Cooler with a little rain WIND S 8-16 mph

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Watch for a few spots of freezing drizzle this morning, then dry the rest of the day. Temperatures are rising into the 40s today. The 50s and 60s are back this weekend. Time to go back outside.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 28/24 29/24 Bloomington Urbana 29/20 31/23

Kirksville 36/30

Quincy 35/30

Decatur 35/24

Springfield 57 35/27 Effingham 70 55 41/31

35

Joplin 51/45

Columbia 45/38 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 46/36 City 46/33 55 47/37 Union 48/36 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 49/39 46/36 Farmington 48/36 Cape Girardeau 47/37 Springfield 48/41 Poplar Bluff West Plains 47/38 55 49/41 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

20 18 14

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

12.39 +0.06 9.94 -9.89 12.47 +1.02 9.65 +1.31 15.25 +1.51

16 12.84 15 13.03 25 17.66 26 16.15 18 17.05 419 419.09 21 6.94 30 8.01 27 13.08 32 21.91

-0.18 -0.04 +1.04 +0.44 +0.81 +0.09 -0.28 -1.08 -1.73 -1.16

16.56 +0.20 12.04 +0.31 12.03 -0.50

15 16 24

3.74 -0.16 0.91 -0.53 8.65 -0.56

15

2.87 -0.20

40

44.36 -0.08 356.81 359.68 494.66 656.65 708.29 659.77 915.60 840.56 600.29 410.24 606.85 448.06

+0.09 -0.75 +0.62 -0.64 -0.04 -0.24 -0.04 -0.30 -0.40 -0.15 -0.45 -0.24

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 -10

35

21

7 S

Average High

46

46 34

21

F

Forecast Temperature

56

47

S

28 14 M

22

36

45

62

Average Low

49 51

8 -6 W

F

S

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Thursday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

53 1058 1028 2918 2789

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

43° noon

43° 4 p.m.

34° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

M

T

Houston 67/57

-10s -0s

0s

Warm front

Rise

Set

7:08 a.m. 4:52 a.m.

5:23 p.m. 2:43 p.m.

Last Quarter

28

Feb 4

Feb 12

Feb 19

Feb 26

15

16

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

W

T

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

17/-1/pc 57/33/pc 21/9/pc 59/39/s 68/56/sh 26/18/sn 61/40/pc 51/38/c 24/14/s 63/43/pc 37/33/sn 56/33/pc 19/18/pc 36/30/sn 22/18/sn 64/53/sh 69/62/sh 52/27/s 30/27/s 58/54/sh 16/12/pc 21/4/s 82/68/pc 67/57/c 35/26/c 45/38/s 66/55/pc 53/41/r

Miami 79/68

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

33/21/pc 56/37/pc 18/14/pc 60/46/pc 69/57/c 43/31/pc 64/49/c 50/38/r 35/25/pc 66/48/pc 50/34/pc 62/41/s 41/37/i 47/37/pc 43/37/c 65/56/t 71/59/sh 57/35/c 43/40/sh 62/56/c 38/34/r 34/22/pc 80/69/sh 69/56/r 46/38/pc 54/50/sh 60/48/r 61/45/c

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

63/55/c 43/35/i 53/42/r 79/68/c 19/17/c 20/17/c 62/46/pc 48/38/r 63/54/pc 23/18/pc 55/45/sh 39/30/s 73/61/sh 23/15/sn 71/55/c 22/16/sn 20/5/s 52/43/r 60/54/r 48/38/pc 67/57/sh 65/58/pc 61/54/r 53/43/r 76/63/pc 68/48/c 31/24/sn 49/40/c

59/50/r 53/39/pc 64/49/c 79/68/sh 40/36/r 36/31/pc 65/51/c 61/43/pc 64/57/sh 36/31/pc 62/51/sh 47/38/sh 75/62/c 40/29/pc 70/56/c 41/35/pc 29/12/pc 52/39/r 59/49/r 49/42/r 69/59/c 65/56/r 60/51/r 51/38/r 76/63/c 70/52/c 48/34/pc 60/51/sh

Thursday in the 48 contiguous states Low: -53 Cotton, Minn.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Sun Moon

Monterrey 74/55

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Extremes

Skywatch

Atlanta 59/39

Chihuahua 74/42

High: 79 Tamiami, Fla.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

New York 23/18 Washington 31/24

Kansas City 45/38

El Paso 67/43

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Toronto 12/3 Detroit 16/12

Los Angeles 63/55

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Full Moon

33

S

Absent Absent Absent Low - 461

30° 8 a.m.

Denver 52/27

Cold front

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

First Quarter

2 T

Pollen Yesterday

New Moon

50

45

Chicago 19/18

Statistics through 5 p.m. Thursday Temperature High/low 22°/2° Normal high/low 41°/25° Last year high/low 59°/34° Record high 74° (1989) Record low -9° (1936) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Thu. 0.01” Month to date (normal) 2.93” (2.40”) Year to date (normal) 2.93” (2.40”) Record for this date 1.62” (1988)

Montreal 11/6

Minneapolis 20/17

San Francisco 61/54

65

8

T

Billings 49/35

56° 45° 62° 51° 65° 33° 49° 45°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 45/38

Winnipeg 9/-1

Seattle 53/43

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

38/33/sh 60/51/s 68/47/pc 92/76/s 45/21/s 38/34/c 88/65/c 71/52/s 83/72/pc 39/29/pc 69/64/pc 56/39/s 78/59/pc 39/32/sn 49/34/sh 91/66/s

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

41/33/c 62/54/pc 67/43/s 92/76/pc 42/25/pc 38/33/sn 80/57/pc 71/49/pc 82/71/pc 40/31/pc 71/66/c 57/39/s 77/59/pc 40/29/pc 48/29/pc 90/67/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

75/45/pc 11/6/s 29/23/sf 79/68/sh 83/56/pc 70/48/pc 46/37/t 94/80/pc 60/54/r 83/73/pc 94/60/s 39/24/s 74/71/sh 46/36/s 12/3/s 47/40/r

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

76/46/pc 21/7/sn 30/25/c 78/70/sh 86/57/pc 71/47/pc 41/32/c 96/79/s 57/46/t 84/71/pc 93/62/s 46/36/pc 78/71/pc 53/40/s 34/25/c 45/34/sh

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


BOTANICAL GARDEN EXHIBIT PRESENTS PLANTS AS ART Page 14

St

il l

s al

ty o ve r th e Ra m s?

11

ge

d ay , St. L

h ouisa ns ca n ex plore ot

ns o i t er op

Pa

Su n

SU PE RB OW L

D I E U T G O R U O Y NEW ALBUM BY BAS TAPS INTO HIS HERITAGE Page 6

Page 22

On

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 02.01.19–02.07.19 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

G T N H I E D I . . O . V A

CHOCOLATE PIG EXCELS AT SWEET BUT STUMBLES OVER SAVORY


02.01.19–02.07.19 ▼

ON SALE TODAY AT NOON

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5

TODAY - SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 15 - 16

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. A burrowing owl at the St. Louis Zoo

Recording a second album of acoustic tunes wasn’t a big stretch for New York punk band Bayside. Page 7

Movie that starts with a boy suing his parents for bringing him into the world only gets more depressing. Page 17

Samson Crouppen thanks Tiffany Haddish for his big St. Louis homecoming. Page 8

Recently reviewed movies. Page 18

Syna So Pro slides into her new role as resident DJ at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. Page 8 Ticket Tracker. Page 9

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Sheryl Underwood at Helium, Vince Gill at Stifel Theatre, Waka Flocka Flame at the J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts, Steve Aoki at Ryse Nightclub and Panic! At the Disco at Enterprise Center. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

THEA EL

E TR

STIF

ON SALE 10AM 04 TODAY 04 AT19

MO

ST LOUIS

THURSDAY, APRIL 4

TONIGHT

Music & Clubs On his third album, “Milky Way,” rapper Bas tackles love and taps into regions that were part of his upbringing. Page 6

FemFest unites female artists for “all love, no competition.” Page 10

The cast of “Rent: Live” said the show must go on. It didn’t, really. Page 19 Dan Gilroy’s latest film, “Velvet Buzzsaw,” is best described as “weird.” Page 20 TV Q&A. Page 21

See & Do New exhibit at Missouri Botanical Garden shows off native plants as art. Page 14 “Fiddler on the Roof” director Bartlett Sher has a knack for revivals. Page 15 Recently reviewed theater. Page 15

Screens Peter Jackson presents an urgent history lesson composed of restored, colorized archive footage. Page 16

Fuel The Chocolate Pig, in the Cortex Innovation Community, excels at sweet but stumbles on savory. Page 22

ON THE COVER • Patriots quarterback Tom Brady holds the Lombardi Trophy after winning the Super Bowl in 2017. Associated Press photo

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4

FEBRUARY 13 - 14

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com StifelTheatre.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ “Evita” and “A Streetcar Named Desire” lead 2019 St. Louis Theater Circle award nominations. stltoday.com/arts ➨ Eight St. Louis-area Steak ‘n Shake restaurants are closed temporarily for remodeling. stltoday.com/dining ➨ Take a peek inside the creepy hospital featured in M. Night Shyamalan’s hit movie “Glass.” stltoday.com/movies ➨ Blueprint Coffee is set to open a location in a new Kranzberg Arts Foundation venue. stltoday.com/offthemenu

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : S T. L O U I S Z O O ( O W L ) ; J I M W R I G H T ( V I N C E G I L L ) ; L A U R I E S K R I VA N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( C H O C O L AT E P I G )

Cover story This Sunday, when the rest of America is glued to the Rams-Pats Super Bowl, bitter St. Louisans have other options. Page 11


SAVE BILLS. CALL MILLS!

HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS

• BEST WINDOW VALUE • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE 18mon/No Interest FINANCING*

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 02/28/19.

$200 OFF WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 02/28/19.

*with approved credit

314-429-7000 “Cheering for no groundhog shadows on Saturday. And I might eat a Crock-Pot of buffalo chicken dip while I finish my epic housecleaning project on Sunday.” •

millswindow.com “The kids have a day off school — we might pull ourselves from our screens and head up to the Alton area to spot some migrating swans and eagles.” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com

25+ yEA

18 MONTHS *

FREE

RWINDOWS S

FINANCING

Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com

artists on their instruments of flute, viola, and guitar. Amy Porter,, Juan-Miguel Hernandez and João Luiz are artists widely sought after. Joining together, they form a concert trio experience with emotion and love of music that radiates electricity.

Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com “Attending the first Super Bowl Music Festival in Atlanta with Bruno Mars, Cardi B, Aerosmith, Post-Malone, Migos, Ludacris and more. It’s co-produced by St. Louis’ own Synergy Productions.” •

CO-PRESENTED WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC “I’m going to see ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ at the Fox Theatre.” •

Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Elena Quinones • features intern Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

“This weekend, I’m looking forward to hearing the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra in Mendelssohn’s ‘Scottish’ Symphony, along with pianist Kirill Gerstein playing Scriabin.” •

CONTACT US “Super Bowl food and the commercials! What game?!” •

TiCkETS/DonATionS: stlclassicalguitar.org or 314-567-5566

Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

stltoday.com/go

stltoday.com/apps

@gostlouis

“Watching the Super Bowl and rooting against both teams.” •

@gostl

@gostl

COPYRIGHT 2019 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Brendon Urie of Panic! at the Disco

BEST BETS

Kasi Lemmons WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Center for Global Citizenship Auditorium at St. Louis University, 3672 West Pine Mall • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO RSVP to donna.neely@slu.edu

FRIDAY St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: Mendelssohn’s ‘Scottish’ Symphony

Actress and director Kasi Lemmons, who has written the libretto for a new opera, will discuss the book it’s based on, a memoir by newspaper columnist Charles Blow. Opera Theatre of St. Louis will present the world premiere of “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” in June. Lemmons, whose diverse career includes playing Jody Foster’s roommate in “The Silence of the Lambs” and writing and directing “Eve’s Bayou,” will talk about turning a book into an opera (music will be by Terrence Blanchard). Lemmons was born in St. Louis. BY JANE HENDERSON

WHEN 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$112 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

This weekend’s concerts by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra feature two works by Russians and one by a German composer struck by his visit to Scotland. Led by German composerconductor Matthias Pintscher, the SLSO will perform Rachmaninoff’s “The Isle of the Dead,” Scriabin’s Piano Concerto and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3, “Scottish.” The soloist is the gifted Russian-American pianist Kirill Gerstein. BY

SATURDAY Groundhog Day

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

WHEN 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Alton Visitor Center, 200 Piasa Street, Alton • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO visitalton.com

‘Classic Mystery Game’ WHEN 8 p.m. WednesdaysSaturdays; Friday through Feb. 16 • WHERE The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive • HOW MUCH $15-$20 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

SATE presents a play that “investigates Western society in 2019 through the lens of the hilarious 1985 movie ‘Clue,’” which in turn was based on the board game of the same name. Part of the company’s “Season of Ritual,” the parody/spoof/send-up is the brainchild of Katy

Keating and Michael Cassidy Flynn and directed by Keating. BY CALVIN WILSON

Cathedral Concerts: American Spiritual Ensemble WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, 4431 Lindell Boulevard • HOW MUCH $19-$42 • MORE INFO 314533-7662; cathedralconcerts.org

Founded by Everett McCorvey in 1995, the American Spiritual Ensemble is composed of

a group of fine classically trained singers. Although their repertoire includes opera, classical music, jazz and Broadway, their mission is “to keep the American Negro spiritual alive.” McCorvey and the ASE will bring their artistry to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis for what promises to be an exciting performance. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Sheryl Underwood

Vince Gill

WHEN 7:30 and 10 p.m. FridaySaturday • WHERE Helium Comedy Club, St. Louis Galleria, 1151 St. Louis Galleria Street, Richmond Heights • HOW MUCH $25$35 • MORE INFO heliumcomedy.com

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $56.50-$72 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

place is Sheryl Underwood, one of the hosts of CBS’ “The Talk.” Underwood was a no-holdsbarred kind of comedian in the past. It will be inDeon Cole had Sheryl Underwood teresting to been scheduled to see whether perform this weekend at being in America’s Helium, but for the second homes each morning has time, he canceled. He owes changed her comedy rouSt. Louis big-time. In Cole’s tine. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Country music veteran Vince Gill is eyeing the release of his next album, and hopefully he’ll preview some of the new tunes in concert. He recently told the Post-Dispatch that the new album will be different from his earlier work. “I’m not saying (the

The St. Louis Zoo’s groundhog died several years ago, but the region has another weatherpredicting rodent: Murray the groundhog, who lives at TreeHouse Wildlife Center in Dow, Ill. He’ll steal the spotlight from several Metro East political dignitaries who will gather on Groundhog Day for his fourth annual forecast. Last year, he accurately predicted six more weeks of winter. A press release notes that Murray has a 50

percent accuracy rating. So, you know, maybe go to enjoy the free chainsaw carving demonstration, too. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Waka Flocka Flame WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts at Lindenwood University, 2300 West Clay Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $10.50-$25.50 • MORE INFO lindenwood.edu

We love it when performers pop up in unusual spaces — like when Big Freedia performed in December at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. On Saturday, rapper Waka Flocka Flame brings new energy — hip-hop at its most raucous — to the J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts at Lindenwood University. The concert is presented by the Lindenwood Campus Activities Board, which warns the performance may contain adult language and themes. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Steve Aoki WHEN 9 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Ryse Nightclub at Ameristar Casino, 1 Ameristar Boulevard, St. Charles • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

The top dance music DJs keep filing through Ryse Nightclub, with Steve Aoki this weekend. The music will be explosive, and there will be cake. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Story of the Year, Memphis May Fire, Descrepancies WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $22-$25 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

St. Louis rock stalwart Story of the Year promises an insane night with its concert this weekend at the Pageant, one for the books.

FAST FORWARD Big Eyes, Big Minds International Children’s Film Festival of St. Louis, Feb. 9-23 at the St. Louis Zoo: Youngsters can enjoy a selection of live-action and animated short films, followed by related activities, in the zoo’s Anheuser-Busch Theater • “Milk Like Sugar,” Feb. 13-March 3 at Washington University’s A.E. Hotchner Studio Theatre: The Black Rep presents Kirsten Greenidge’s drama that’s “an astute, gut-wrenching observation of the impact of racism on African-American youth,” says director Nicole Brewer • Mardi Gras Cajun Cook-Off, Feb. 16 at Soulard Market Park: Amateur chefs face off for a panel of judges, as pro chefs serve authentic Creole cuisine • “La Cage aux Folles,” Feb. 29-March 23 at the Marcelle: New Line Theatre presents Jerry Herman and Harvey Fierstein’s bawdy musical about family values 4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events stltoday.com/go

A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( PA N I C ! AT T H E D I S C O , U N D E R W O O D ) ; 1 2 R F ( L O B S T E R )

album) is political in any way, shape or form. But it’s not afraid of talking about some subjects that are generally not much out in the forefront in music.” The concert is a rescheduled date; his November show was postponed due to illness. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON


Waka Flocka Flame

festively decorated exhibit hall. From 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday and Feb. 8, enjoy appetizers, wine and jazz at the adults-only Friday Night Flights; tickets are $15-$35.

GREAT RIVERS AND ROUTES

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

GROUND HOG DAY

WEDNESDAY Dani Shapiro WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

Can’t wait to see what it all means. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘Children’s China’ WHEN Saturday through Oct. 27, festival 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday; hours are noon-5:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, noon-8 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Magic House, 516 Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH Free with $12 admission • MORE INFO 314-822-8900; magichouse.org

“Children’s China,” a traveling exhibit that first opened at the Magic House in 2014, returns in time for the Year of the Pig. Learn to write in Chinese characters, visit a panda reserve, shop at a traditional neighborhood market and get moving on some playful fitness equipment. On Saturday, celebrate the Chinese New Year with face-painting, crafts, and demonstrations by dancers and martial artists. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Orchid Show

A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( WA K A )

WHEN Saturday through March 24 • WHERE Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard • HOW MUCH $5 in addition to regular garden admission, free for members • MORE INFO 314-577-5100; mobot.org

Step into a tropical landscape and see hundreds of vibrant orchids at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show. This year’s show focuses on the cultivation of orchids for the home gardener. Orchid Nights, on Thursdays from Feb. 14 to March 7, include live music and libations; tickets are $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

stltoday.com/go

SUNDAY ‘The Hundred Dresses’ WHEN 7 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays; Sunday through Feb. 24 • WHERE The Grandel, 3610 Grandel Square • HOW MUCH $14-$20 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Bullying, prejudice and immigration are addressed in William Kent Williams’ “The Hundred Dresses,” a play based on a children’s book by Eleanor Estes and presented by Metro Theater Company. The story revolves around Wanda Petronski, a young immigrant, and her new classmates. Directed by Julia Flood, the company’s artistic director. BY CALVIN WILSON

MONDAY ‘Legally Blonde — The Musical’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Monday • WHERE Stifel Theatre, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $32-$82 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

Elle Woods follows her ex-boyfriend to Harvard Law School in an attempt to get him back, but she ends up finding much more in “Legally Blonde — The Musical,” based on the hit movie starring Reese Witherspoon. BY GABE HARTWIG

TUESDAY Chloe Benjamin WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

Last year’s best-selling

novel by Chloe Benjamin is now out in paperback. “The Immortalists” is a family saga about siblings who are told by a fortuneteller when they are going to die. How will this prophecy (and is it true?) affect these four lives. Benjamin will discuss her book. BY JANE HENDERSON

Panic! At the Disco WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Enterprise Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $27-$67 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Following last weekend’s two-night engagement by Eric Church, things continue to heat up at Enterprise Center. The venue’s first big rock show of the year is by Panic! At the Disco. The band is on the second leg of its “Pray for the Wicked Tour,” named after its latest album, a No. 1 hit on the Billboard 200. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Morpho Mardi Gras WHEN 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdaysSaturdays; Friday through March 31 • WHERE Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House, 15193 Olive Boulevard, Chesterfield • HOW MUCH Free with $5-$8 admission, free to children 2 and under • MORE INFO 314-577-0888; butterflyhouse.org

It’s a parade of more than 2,000 blue morpho butterflies inside the conservatory of the Butterfly House, and you’re invited to celebrate them at this family-friendly Mardi Gras party. The morphos join about 1,500 other butterflies, and when you’re done marveling, make a masquerade mask and enjoy the bugs in the

Dani Shapiro has written several memoirs about her life (“Hourglass,” “Slow Motion” and more), but what happens when science upends your previous narrative? As has been reported widely, her new book, “Inheritance,” centers on a genealogy DNA test that revealed Shapiro’s biological father wasn’t the man she believed was her father. But beyond the surprise is a story of medical ethics, identity and love. BY JANE HENDERSON

FIND OUT IF OUR RESIDENT GROUNDHOG SEES HIS SHADOW!

Saturday, Feb. 2 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Alton Visitor Center, 200 Piasa St., Alton Area Mayors wil present the proclaimation

The award-winning Jasper String Quartet will bring a varied and interesting program to Washington University’s 560 Music Center. With a former St. Louisan, J Freivogel (Kirkwood High School), as first violin, the Jaspers are the professional quartet in residence at Temple University’s Center for Gifted Young Musicians; the New York Times named their album “Unbound” one of the 25 best classical recordings of 2017. They’ll perform Haydn’s String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 64 No. 6; Akira Nishimura’s String Quartet No. 2, “Pulse of the Lights,” and Mendelssohn’s Quartet in D Major, Op. 44 No. 1.

Itchy Brothers Chainsaw Artists Demonstrations

www.RiversAndRoutes.com

THURSDAY Jasper String Quartet WHEN 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE E. Desmond Lee Concert Hall, 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue • HOW MUCH $20, $15 for seniors, $5 for students • MORE INFO 314-935-6543; music.wustl.edu/events

FREE ADMISSION

PRESENTED BY

A ST. LOUIS THING

THE POST-DISPATCH

TRIVIA NIGHT Test your knowledge of all things St. Louis at this one-of-a-kind St. Louis trivia night to support 100 Neediest Cases.

FEBRUARY 8, 2019 @ MOOLAH SHRINE CENTER DOORS OPEN – 6 PM | TRIVIA STARTS – 7 PM

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

SPONSORED BY

SPACE IS LIMITED RESERVE YOUR TABLE NOW AT: STLToday.com/ourevents 02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

5


STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC ▼

BAS

Bas expresses himself with music reflecting his heritage On his third album, ‘Milky Way,’ rapper tackles love and taps into regions that were part of his upbringing BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

S

uperstar rapper J. Cole set the hip-hop community abuzz last month when he and his Dreamville Records put out a call for artists to join them in Atlanta for marathon recording sessions. Rappers, singers, producers and songwriters converged to lay down material in hopes of it making it onto the upcoming Dreamville compilation album “Revenge of the Dreamers III.” One of those rappers was Bas, who visits St. Louis on Thursday for his “Milky Way Tour.” Bas says he was “endlessly inspired” by the sessions, which featured “four or five recording setups, 13 or 14 production setups, jumping in a room and laying a hook down, laying a verse down, just collaborating.” Bas says the countless songs recorded are still being worked on and narrowed down to determine which will make it onto the compilation. He was a part of about 200 of the songs himself, including one with rappers Smino and Saba. “These are really cool songs, some collaborations with people you want to see, some you didn’t know you wanted to hear,” he says. “That’s all part of the fun.” Being affiliated with Cole and Dreamville — Bas’ label since his 2014 debut, “Last Winter” — has its benefits, including being able to express himself in a supportive, familial environment. He’s also been able to travel the world and watch fans respond to his music. “Hip-hop is culturally tied to so many people — the way they dress, the way they dance — and it’s fun to be able to contribute to that on a global scale,” he says. Bas’ new album, “Milky Way,” is his third. It has themes of love — of self and of others. He says the album marks his best kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

6

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

attempts at sonically recognizing all the regions that were part of his upbringing — coming from Sudanese parents, being raised in Paris and growing up in Queens in New York City. “I tapped into a lot of the music that inspired me and defined the regions I’m from with sounds sourced from New York and European electronic music and African beats,” Bas says. “On every project, I’m learning something new about how to express myself. You become more confident and take those risks, and don’t worry about how audiences will receive it. I’m in a very confident space.” Bas’ Fubar show will be his headlining debut in St. Louis. He has opened here for Cole and was the musical guest in November at Art, Beats & Lyrics at Ballpark Village. “I really enjoyed that, and I was pleasantly surprised,” he says. “I had a good amount of fans at ABL, though it wasn’t necessarily billed as a Bas show. It was more of an event with a performer. But it was cool to see some people surprised, like they accidentally found something good.” He says the tour is an incredible blessing. “I’m seeing my ticket counts go up,” Bas says. “That’s part of the journey, and it’s gratifying. I don’t know what it’ll be in St. Louis, but regardless, it’s my first time headlining and definitely not the last.” Bas says he learned to put together a live show from touring with Cole. “I learned about making it more than just a ‘press play tape show,’” he says. “I make sure I invest in things that add to the total experience for the concertgoer. You have to invest in your touring even if it means you’re taking home less money than you should. Money you spend to build your show will help you build your brand.” WHAT Bas with Rexx Life Raj, K. Roosevelt, Innanet James, Correy C • WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Fubar, 3108 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $22 • MORE INFO etix.com

stltoday.com/blender

@kevincjohnson

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : R A FA E L R I O S F O R T H E F I E N D S + M I L K S T U D I O S

“ON EVERY PROJECT, I’M LEARNING SOMETHING NEW ABOUT HOW TO EXPRESS MYSELF. YOU BECOME MORE CONFIDENT AND TAKE THOSE RISKS, AND DON’T WORRY ABOUT HOW AUDIENCES WILL RECEIVE IT. I’M IN A VERY CONFIDENT SPACE.”


Compare Our CD Rates Bank-issued, FDIC-insured Bayside

1-year 2-year 3-year

deposit 2.55 % APY* Minimum $1000.00 deposit 2.65 % APY* Minimum $1000.00 deposit 2.90 % APY* Minimum $1000.00

*Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 1/24/2019. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic. gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

ecording a second album of acoustic tunes wasn’t a big stretch for New York punk band Bayside. The band released its simply titled “Acoustic” in 2006 and is promoting its followup, “Acoustic Volume 2.” “It’s something that has done well for us in the past when we were coming up as a band,” says bassist Nick Ghanbarian. “So I think we have that side to us that people like and ask for because we did that in our formative years.” Deciding which songs to include on “Acoustic Volume 2” involved plucking hit tunes the band had released since its last acoustic album, mixed with songs that lent themselves to such treatment and songs that could use revamping. “We wanted to give the songs new life,” Ghanbarian says. The album’s track listing includes “Sick Sick Sick,” “Duality,” “Landing Feet First” and “Blame It on Bad Luck.” The one new song on the album is “It Don’t Exist,” a tune about lost love. Ghanbarian says the song covers familiar territory for the band and seemed like a good way to

PHOTO: MEGAN THOMPSON

R

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

stltoday.com/go

introduce the acoustic album. “We wanted to stick to what we do best, and to what fans love, while presenting something that people can relate to,” he says. Going acoustic has everything to do with the state of the music industry today, he says. “It’s been a wacky 20 years since 2000, when we were worried about Napster.” Since debuting in 2004 with “Sirens and Condolences,” Ghanbarian says, the band has seen a lot. Bayside released its last album, “Vacancy,” in 2016. Ghanbarian says that — with social media, attention spans and distractions — an album’s shelf life isn’t what it used to be. The band wanted to keep its name out there, but “we weren’t ready to put out a brand-new album,” he says. “So we decided to do something we knew our core audience would like, and we could tour on it.” One thing that has remained constant in the industry is the public’s need to experience music live. To that end, Bayside brings its new acoustic tour to the Old Rock House this weekend. The band is having the most fun it has ever had on the @kevincjohnson

Call or visit your local financial advisor today.

road. Ghanbarian gives all the credit to the fans and “how well they know the songs and their being open-minded to the songs sounding different.” After playing thousands of shows, he says, “musicianship and the performance is something you don’t think about as much after the 1,000th time. This connection with the fans (at acoustic shows) is the best part every night. It’s about going back and challenging ourselves, finding the groove and comfort level to do this properly.” He says there’s a challenge when recording acoustically, but the band has been able to meet it. “The challenge is not to be boring,” Ghanbarian says. “When we do this acoustically, we know that it’s quiet, slow. We have to be conscious of tempos and dynamics. We have to make sure it doesn’t become boring and monotonous, and I think we’re doing a good job at that. I’ve noticed fans more than ever are fully involved, that all eyes are on us. They’re singing along.” Bayside is working on the follow-up to “Vacancy.” “We’re going a little heavier, a little darker. After seven records, we’re pretty consistent with how we write, and people know what to expect, but we want to get a little outside of the box for us.” WHAT Bayside (Acoustic), Golds • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $22-$25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Katie Warchol, AAMS® Financial Advisor 101 S Hanley Road, Suite 475 Clayton, MO 63105 314-862-1592

Heather Aehle Financial Advisor 1001 Craig Rd Ste 101 Creve Coeur, MO 63146 314-809-1944

FDI-1867H-A

Bayside takes another major acoustic turn on new album, tour

TICKETS ON SALE NOW MARCH 13, 2019 @ ST. LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER PRESENTED BY

Explore the Science Center

after hours while tasting from 50 of the best restaurants in town featured in Ian Froeb’s STL100 List!

EVENT SPONSORS

Visit STLtoday.com/ourevents for tickets & more info! 02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

7


BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

Samson Crouppen

C

omedian Samson and see the family and to Crouppen had build this new experience.” his big St. Louis He describes his comedic homecoming a year ago when style as “I don’t give a he opened for friend Tiffany (expletive),” though “a lot of Haddish at the Pageant. comedians now are afraid to Her performance was say some things. They’re on unfocused — more on that edge, especially the ones who later — but he basically are famous. I’m not famous. I stole the show. know I’m an ass. My comedy is “I don’t want to say I was just saying whatever I want in scared, but it was hard doing that show,” says Crouppen, who a respectful way. But if brands want to attach themselves to lives in Los Angeles. It was his first St. Louis show since leaving me, I might watch what I say.” His self-deprecating home. He had suspected material covers family and that folks might question his “explaining white success despite his privilege to oblivious work on Comedy white people.” A Central and TruTV. drummer with LA “I’d been band Artifex, his waiting for that set often includes a opportunity musical element; he where people walked out to G-Eazy would say, ‘Wow, Tiffany Haddish at the Pageant, and he he’s coming back in fancies freestyle rapping. a big way,’ and Tiffany Crouppen says Robin blessed me,” he says. “That’s Williams and Dave Chappelle one of my career highlights.” have been big influences. “I Now Crouppen, 42, is back blame saying ‘bitch’ so much for more. He’s headlining on Dave Chappelle,” he says. a show at Das Bevo with His father and his brother — other funny folks including Terry Crouppen of the Brown comedian Del Harrison, St. & Crouppen Law Firm and Louis native J. Lee (“The Andy Crouppen, respectively Orville”), Post-Dispatch sports — are both lawyers and also columnist Benjamin Hochman influenced his sense of humor. and Y98 host Tim Convy. Law was never in “I really wanna start an annual comedy show, like ‘Andy his path, though. “Every Jewish parent wants Cohen Comes Home,’ but let’s their kid to be a lawyer or do ‘Samson Crouppen Comes doctor, but my dad was very Home,’ and see if anybody supportive of my comedy really cares,” he says. “I’m career,” Crouppen says. “His bringing LA comedians mixed dad insisted on his being a with St. Louis comedians. It’s lawyer. It was a different time.” a great excuse to come home kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

8

@kevincjohnson

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

His C-student status at Clayton High School (class of 1995) didn’t bode well for law school, he thought. Crouppen spent four years at the Second City in Chicago, learning improv and sketch comedy. “I wanted to be submerged in comedy,” he says. “I started there making pizzas at Second City with Jordan Peele. ... He used to say he was going to be as big as Eddie Murphy.” Crouppen met Haddish in 2006 at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles, on a night called the Comedy Playground, hosted by Kevin Hart. “The minute I met Tiffany, I said, ‘You’re a superstar,’” he says. “To see it all happen for her is very exciting for me. This vision I had was true.” He and Haddish were in a sketch comedy troupe together, and she was always down for whatever crazy ideas he had. They hosted comedy and karaoke nights together, and he was there for her when she was getting divorced. Crouppen considers her family, and when she came to St. Louis for her two Pageant shows, she stayed at his father’s home. Those two shows came after her return earlier in the day from Africa, Crouppen says. He picked her up from the airport, she showered and they hurried to the Pageant. She was so exhausted that she slept between her shows. More recently, a New Year’s Eve show in Miami didn’t go well, and she apologized. “People don’t realize she’s an amazing stand-up,” Crouppen says. “She’s like Richard Pryor as a woman. But what people don’t realize is she works 16- to 18-hour days every day — long, tough hours like a coal miner — and the exhaustion showed through that night. I imagine a similar thing happened New Year’s Eve.” WHAT Samson Crouppen, Del Harrison, Benjamin Hochman, Tim Convy, J. Lee • WHEN 8:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Das Bevo, 4749 Gravois Avenue • HOW MUCH $10-$15 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

— keep the vibe going by finding ways to have the music enhance the visuals. I’ll be set up in the main gallery in front of the pieces. I’m playing music, performing, but it’s not about me, it’s about the experience. I’m tired of lugging all this gear around, so I’m going to start using backing tracks, and I’ll loop over the tracks. There will still be a segment of live looping and recorded backing tracks. The difference is, before, everything I played out has been building the song 100 percent in front of you live. This is not that. This is the direction I’m heading in musically. I’ve exhausted every avenue of how to build a track, and it’s time to move on.

Syna So Pro

Q • Do you have a preferred instrument?

Q&A ▼

Syna So Pro slides into her new role as CAM resident DJ BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

S

yna So Pro is the resident DJ for the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis this year, performing at First Fridays, exhibitions and other special events. But the funny thing? Syna So Pro (aka Syrhea Conaway) is the first to say she’s not even a DJ. “I’ve never done the proper DJ thing,” she says. “I don’t own turntables or have any of that. That’s not what I do. I’m not a DJ who spins records. That’s why I was nervous about accepting the residency. “I’m a musician — a multi-instrumentalist. But DJs are responsible for getting the vibes, and I can do that.” Syna So Pro’s multiple instruments include guitar, bass, violin, keyboards and vocals, and she mixes them loop-style to create her own one-woman band. She’s an adjunct faculty member at COCA, performed in Metro Theater Company’s recent “Wonderland: Alice’s Rock & Roll Adventure,” and plays in the bands YOUPEOPL and Pat Sajak’s Assassins. She has four albums under her belt, most recently “Vox” (2016). Q • How did the residency come about? A • I give props to Stan Chisholm of 18andCounting, who was the DJ-inresidence last year. He recommended me. When CAM reached out to me, I asked, “Do you guys know I’m not a DJ? I’m totally down with doing

this, though I’m a little uncomfortable with the title of DJ residency when there are other DJs in town who could also do this.” But when they explained what they were looking for, I said OK. This will be a big challenge for me. Q • How will you approach the residency set?

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

A • I’ll go see the exhibition and write a soundtrack and score to each of the artists in the exhibition based on what I see and on the artist’s statement and bio. It makes me have to work a little harder and expand a little more. How can I enhance the experience for people attending the exhibition? That’s what the DJ does

stltoday.com/blender

A • I love playing the bass guitar and singing backing vocals. People who aren’t musicians write off the bass as “You’re just the bass player.” But the bass and drums are the most important part of the band. Most people know me for playing bass in various bands. I love playing the bass, and it’s where I’m most comfortable. Q • How did you go about getting proficient at so many instruments? A • I started playing violin when I was 7. By 10, I taught myself how to play piano. Q • What genres do you cover in your performances? A • It fluctuates and morphs. It’s pop elements with classical thrown in with a little bit of experimental effects and sounds. Q • Who would you name as your main influence? A • That’s difficult to answer. I’m a gypsy of music. My music is 100 percent mine. I felt like it was given to me. WHAT Syna So Pro • WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO camstl.org

@kevincjohnson

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : H A N D O U T S ( C R O U P P E N A N D S Y N A S O P R O ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( H A D D I S H )

Samson Crouppen thanks Haddish for his big homecoming


TICKET TRACKER ▼

Country Rock Cabaret ticketweb.com • Stormy Daniels, 8:30 and 11:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, $20.

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • Jim James, Amo Amo, 8 p.m. May 15, $41-$46, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Enterprise Center livenation.com • John Mayer’s “Summer Tour 2019,” 7:30 p.m. Sept. 3, $69.50-$150, on sale at noon Friday.

Helium Comedy Club heliumcomedy.com • Damon Wayans, 8 p.m. March 21, 7:30 and 10 p.m. March 22-23, 7 p.m. March 24, $45.

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre livenation.com • Country Megaticket with Rascal Flatts and special guests, May 17; Dierks Bentley with Jon Pardi and Tenille Townes, June 1; Brad Paisley with Chris Lane and Riley Green, June 28; Chris Young with Chris Janson and more, July 11; Florida Georgia

P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S E E N ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( M AY E R )

John Mayer

Line with Dan + Shay, Morgan Wallen and Hardy, Aug. 8; Luke Bryan with Cole Swindell and Jon Langston, Aug. 17; Jason Aldean with Kane Brown, Carly Pearce and Dee Jay Silver, Aug. 24; lawn Megaticket is $199, silver level Megaticket is $359, gold is $599, platinum is $899, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

SEEN ON THE SCENE ▼

ERIC CHURCH • JAN. 25 • ENTERPRISE CENTER 1 Maddie Poertner (left) and Emily Deters, both of St. Louis 2 Whitney Spa (left) and Kim Clark, both of Alton 3 Ben Fulton and Samantha Dutton, both of Waltonville, Ill. 4 Tori Honey (left) of St. Charles and Samantha Salger of Red Bud 5 Ethan Schwartz and Danielle Rist, both of Millstadt, Ill. 6 From left: Makenzie Mudd of Silex, Kelly Pietzman of Troy, Mo., and Emily Mudd of Silex LEA DELARIA • JAN. 26 • JAZZ ST. LOUIS 7 Divina (left) and Mahlon Garvin of Cottleville 8 Janie and Bob Bedwell of Chesterfield 9 Mitch Bolen and Dana Huxley, both of Chesterfield 10 George and Chelsea Cepicky of Columbia, Ill. 11 Tisha and Ameed Miko of Belleville 12 Kelly Camerer of Waterloo and James Idoux of Belleville

• 105.7 The Point Big Summer Show with Third Eye Blind & Jimmy Eat World’s “Summer Gods Tour” with Ra Ra Riot, 7 p.m. June 25, on sale at noon Friday.

The Pageant

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

ticketmaster.com • I’m a Survivor Cancer Benefit with Al B. Sure, 7 p.m. Feb. 21, $30-$50. • The Mavericks, 8 p.m. April 25, $45-$55, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Chvrches, Cherry Glazerr, 8 p.m. May 1, $28.50-$31, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

The Ready Room eventbrite.com • Wild Belle, 8 p.m. April 6, $15.

Stifel Theatre ticketmaster.com • “An Evening With Bon Iver,” 8 p.m. April 4, $36.50$96, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

stltoday.com/go

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

9


FemFest unites artists for ‘love, not competition’ LLManny will make her debut at all-female event BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

St. Louis rapper-singer LLManny may be new to the music scene, but she’s already being heard. She makes her debut at the all-female FemFest 5, part of a stacked deck of rappers, singers, poets and musicians. LLManny will also make her debut as kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

10

a nominee and performer at the SLUM Fest Awards on Feb. 23 at the Bootleg at Atomic Cowboy (rescheduled from January). She’s nominated for best new artist and best female artist, and she’ll be the first performer of the night with her song “Issa Bop.” She’s newly signed under a management deal with Knox Entertainment, the home of Marquise Knox and Little Dylan. Though Knox Entertainment is known for blues music, it took on LLManny and dubbed her the Empress of Hip-Hop and Soul. She feels especially honored to get this kind of notice after just one project, her debut EP, “Soul Glo.” “It’s just a great feeling,” she says. “I’m new to the scene, and I went the whole 2018 without getting booked for anything.” Looking forward to Saturday night’s FemFest, she says she’s excited to perform with “some of the best female acts in St. Louis and in the nation — some I’ve heard before, some I haven’t heard before.” LLManny already has a co-sign from St. Louis rapper Bates, FemFest’s co-founder and headliner. “Bates didn’t know me until she heard my music, and she reached out to me and gave

stltoday.com/blender

@kevincjohnson

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

me so much recognition and love,” she says. LLManny is grateful for events like FemFest that showcase female performers. She says they’re still very necessary. “It brings females together musically. There’s so much competition in the industry with females. They think there can LLMANNY only be one queen, one empress, one goddess. We need to embrace and uplift each other. We’re outnumbered in the game. So we need to expand our audience and increase our numbers. It’s all love, not competition.” Though LLManny has been making music for the last five years, she only began taking it seriously about 18 months ago. One of the first things she did was remove her old unmastered music from SoundCloud. “I knew the music I was creating wasn’t getting enough recognition,” she says. She also understood that to make moves, she’d have to buckle down. “I started to ask

“THERE’S SO MUCH COMPETITION IN THE INDUSTRY WITH FEMALES. THEY THINK THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE QUEEN, ONE EMPRESS, ONE GODDESS. WE NEED TO EMBRACE AND UPLIFT EACH OTHER.”

questions and looked at how people were moving,” she says. She also reached out to successful St. Louis artists including Knox, Mvstermind and Arshad Goods. “They helped me get ready to push myself, and so far so good.” She says they taught her about the importance of communicating with those she’s working with and not being afraid to ask for second opinions. LLManny’s authentic self is represented on “Soul Glo” and songs like “Issa Bop,” “11:17” and “Vibe On.” “I want to be the voice for my people and help them better themselves and be comfortable with themselves,” she says. LLManny knows it could be a tough road ahead for her musically, but she isn’t discouraged. “Nobody is checking for rappers here, especially female rappers,” she says. “There’s Tiffany Foxx, but they’re not checking for the underground scene. But we’ve got music too, from the middle of the map. So you never know what kind of vibe you’re going to catch.” WHAT FemFest 5 with Bates, Davyne Truth, Cedes, Mz. Tigga, G.A. Barz, Katarra, Poetiq, Da Goddess, Shana B, Chill, Fatt Lexx, Leethal the Poet, Rinaa Phoenix, Aja “LA Starr” Owens, DJ Nico, DJ Rico Steez and more • WHEN 5 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Fubar, 3108 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $10 • MORE INFO fubarstl.com

stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: HANDOUT

THE BLENDER


ANYTHING BUT THE SUPER BOWL This Sunday, when the rest of America is glued to the Rams-Pats game, St. Louisans have options BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

PHOTOS: 123RF (OWL); URINAL SCREEN (HOTSHOTS)

Your endodontist not open for a root canal Sunday evening? • Have you already thanked all those old socks that no longer spark joy? • Is your hair already shampooed? Your toilet already clean? • Here in St. Louis, watching the Rams-Patriots Super Bowl on Sunday is pretty low on our list of priorities. • We’re still saltier than a feedbag full of Tostitos after the Rams abandoned us for the West Coast in 2016. (We were already pretty salty over their Super Bowl loss to the Patriots in 2002.) Who in their self-loathing mind wants to see the Los Angeles Rams battle the Pats? • We can help you not watch the Super Bowl — or at least make life tolerable if you have to. Kickoff is at 5:30 p.m. Start your mental or physical escape plan now.

SLAM THE RAMS Hotshots bars in Missouri will have these Stan Kroenke urinal screens in place on Super Bowl Sunday. You know what to do.

stltoday.com/go

CELEBRATE A SUPERB OWL Burrowing owls and more varieties are on view at the St. Louis Zoo and the World Bird Sanctuary.

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

11


CELEBRATE THE SUPERB OWL.

P H O T O S : S T. L O U I S Z O O ( O W L ) ; H O T S H O T S ( D A R T B O A R D ) ; C R I S T I N A M . F L E T E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( O R C H I D ) ; H A N D O U T S ( S C R E E N S H O T S )

If you don’t give a hoot about the Super Bowl, perhaps you can find interest in a superb owl. There are plenty of chances for that. Visit the St. Louis Zoo (1 Government Drive, Forest Park; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday), which is home to spectacled, screech, great horned, barred and burrowing owls. The World Bird Sanctuary (125 Bald Eagle Ridge Road, Valley Park; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday) is home to several owls, some of which were hatched there and some who were rehabbed and cannot live in the wild. (If you’re still in the mood, the sanctuary hosts adults-only Owlentine and Wine events at 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday for $45 per person.) For the main event, stop in for a drink at Tick Tock Tavern in the Tower Grove East neighborhood. Its Superb Owl Sunday party will feature live music by jazz guitarist Erin Stratman at 3 p.m. and a screening of the 1987 owl-themed slasher film “Stage Fright” at 6:30 p.m. No football will be shown on TV, and guests are invited to bring a dish to share. This is the fourth year of the NFL-less event.

LEARN SOMETHING NEW, THEN PAUSE FOR REFLECTION.

DESTROY A COMPUTER. MAYBE GLANCE AT THE GAME.

A barred owl at the St. Louis Zoo

Arch Reactor is a makerspace/ hackerspace that was started in 2009 by a group of friends who like tinkering and eating pizza. The group, which usually hosts workshops for metalsmithing and Harry Potter wand-making, is throwing a Super Bowl of Destruction party Sunday. It’s a time to break down the hardware donations that can’t be used or repaired — hard drives, computers and server equipment. Morgan Miransky of Arch Reactor says the tradition started four years ago with three shelves of donated items that the group didn’t want to move to its new home in midtown. “It’s not quite ‘Office Space’ — smashing things with baseball bats — but a lot of times we will have a table of people taking hard drives apart,” he says. The materials are sorted for recycling; they even keep the aluminum to use in their own smelter. One guy used aluminum to make a hitch for a bicycle trailer, and ballbearings have been made from cast aluminum for a makermade 72-inch belt sander. If you absolutely must watch the game, it will be projected onto an 18-foot wall. Everyone is invited to bring a snack to share while working out their football frustrations in a deconstructive way.

WHEN 1 p.m.-midnight Sunday • WHERE Tick Tock Tavern, 3459 Magnolia Avenue • HOW MUCH Free; bring a dish • MORE INFO facebook.com/ticktocktavernstl

WHEN Noon-8 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Arch Reactor, 2215 Scott Avenue • HOW MUCH Free; bring a snack • MORE INFO archreactor.org

If you’re avoiding the tube, you might as well pregame by checking out a new exhibit. Most of these institutions close before kickoff, so make sure to get there early. That’s time you would’ve spent grazing on the appetizer table anyway. (These spots have cafes; grab a snack, and imagine it’s wings or nachos.) The annual Orchid Show at the Missouri Botanical Garden opens with a member preview Friday. The Orchid Society of Greater St. Louis Sale is Saturday and Sunday, and “Botanical Art Worldwide: America’s Flora” is on view through May in the garden’s Sachs Museum. (4344 Shaw Boulevard; 9 a.m.5 p.m., $5 admission to orchid show for nonmembers) The Magic House in Kirkwood opens its interactive exhibit “Children’s China” on Saturday. (516 South Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood; 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sunday, free with $12 general admission) “Guitar: The Instrument That Rocked the World,” which opened last month at the St. Louis Science Center, offers the world’s largest playable guitar and dozens of artifacts and guitars. (5050 Oakland Avenue; 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday, $5-$10.95)

SLAM THE RAMS — AND THEIR OWNER. Hotshots Sports Bar & Grill knows an opportunity for a good gimmick, which is why the chain of bars put in another order for a few dozen urinal screens bearing Rams owner Stan Kroenke’s face. On Sunday, frustrated fans at Missouri Hotshots locations can take a leak on Kroenke’s likeness. For those who don’t use urinals, the bars will honor his face on their dartboards. The bars will repeat specials from their Slam the Rams promotion from when the team left for Los Angeles — though the urinal screens couldn’t be reused. “They were all stolen while being used, which is honestly kinda out there,” says Justin Boyd, spokesman for Hotshots. “We’re not talking one or two — we’re talking 30 or 35 of them.” Customers who come to hate-watch the game will benefit from the Rams’ demise: The bar will offer beer discounts for each touchdown scored against the team. If the Rams lose, Hotshots will host a Slam the Rams happy hour from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday. “We’re really not rooting for anybody but cheap beer,” Boyd says.

Cattleya Persepolis “Splendor” AM/AOS orchid at the Missouri Botanical Garden

WHEN 5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Hotshots Sports Bar & Grill locations in Missouri • MORE INFO hotshotsnet.com

SWAP SOME CLOTHING, AND LOOK GOOD FOR THE BIG GAME.

WATCH THE COMMERCIALS — AND ONLY THE COMMERCIALS.

For the price of a beer and chips, you can walk out of Perennial community workshop Sunday with a new wardrobe for the game — or at least a few new-to-you pieces. The gathering space and workshop hosts a community clothing swop every couple of months on Sunday afternoons. This one coincides with the Super Bowl. Workers sort and organize the clothes, and visitors can browse, try them on and take home as much as will fit in a bag. Between 80 and 100 people usually show up, and time passes quickly, says Karalynn Skinner, office administrator at Perennial. “It’s a little chaotic, but it’s fun,” she says. “I’ve gotten too many things.” The event is closet-, budget- and earth-friendly. After the swap, workers sort the swapped items, keeping T-shirts, jeans and sweaters that can be repurposed in their own workshops and sending the rest to a textile manufacturer. Clothing is weighed as people bring it in. Each event helps keep 800 to 900 pounds of it out of the landfill, Skinner says.

Several companies have already revealed their Super Bowl spots, but there’s still no better time to tune into the game than during the commercials. Kristin Chenoweth teaches dogs the Avocados from Mexico jingle. Michael Bublé will hawk Bubly, PepsiCo’s sparkling water brand. Luke Wilson the closetalker demonstrates why you might need Colgate. Anheuser-Busch touts wind power with the help of a Dalmatian atop a Clydesdale hitch. While you’re watching, make it a party game: Fill out a Bingo card with brand names before the game, and mark them off as you see their ads, or rate your favorites on a scorecard. A-B is hosting a Super Bowl Commercial Watch Party at the Biergarten at Anheuser-Busch. The ticket includes a tailgate buffet, two beers, contests and photo ops with the Clydesdales. Dalmatians and their owners are invited to enjoy a special Dalmatian VIP area at no extra cost.

Sarah Jessica Parker in a Stella Artois commercial

Michael Bublé in a Bubly commercial

A Dalmatian in a Budweiser commercial

WHEN 1-3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Perennial, 3762 South Broadway • HOW MUCH $10 if you bring clothing to swap; $15 if you don’t • MORE INFO 314-832-2288; perennialstl.org

WHEN 4:30 p.m. Sunday; buffet begins at 5:30 p.m. • WHERE The Biergarten at Anheuser-Busch, 1200 Lynch Street • HOW MUCH $45 • MORE INFO budweisertours.com

Now on Stage Fox Box Office 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com NOW thru FEBRUARY 10 12

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

February 22-24 stltoday.com/go

stltoday.com/go

March 1-3

March 12-17 02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

13


STLTODAY.COM/ARTS ▼

Botanical garden exhibit shows native plants as art Watercolors and drawings in ‘Botanical Art Worldwide: America’s Flora’ depict indigenous plants BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

o look carefully at Susan Tomlinson’s watercolor on paper of the Maclura pomifera — to see the maze of crannies on its fruit, the delicate, dried tips of its leaves — is to have a new appreciation for the monkey brain. Maclura pomifera is the botanical name of the Osage orange, also known as the monkey brain, the horse apple and the mock orange, among other nicknames. While you might have childhood memories of chucking them at a sibling, a new exhibit at the Missouri Botanical Garden is meant to give you a new appreciation for that particular tree as well as other trees, plants and flora depicted in 46 pieces of art. “Botanical Art Worldwide: America’s Flora,” from the American Society of Botanical Artists, is on view Friday through May 1 at

T

vhahn@post-dispatch.com

14

@valeriehahn

the garden’s Sachs Museum. The exhibition was first shown at the United States Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C. This is its second stop. Similar exhibitions showcasing indigenous plants were held in 24 other countries. The works — mostly watercolor on paper, some watercolor on vellum, others pen and ink, colored pencil and oil — depict realistic images. The artwork accomplishes what even photography cannot: the fine lines of a longleaf pine cone, the three dimensions and shadows cast by the leaves of a Lone Mesa snakeweed, the roots, leaves, flowers and fruit of a Virginia strawberry. “It’s a long-lived art, and I don’t see that will stop anytime soon, despite our advances in technology,” says Sachs Museum curator Nezka Pfeifer. The museum building, closed for decades, was renovated and reopened last spring. The job of the artist, she says, is to have us look at a plant or flower in a new way, to make us more observant, and perhaps more

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

respectful. Some works depict the plants at different times of year or in various stages of growth. She said she’s read studies that revealed how drawing plants can help artists and those who study plants remember their subtle differences, which helps their work and research. “That active looking makes us more aware the next time we see a plant,” she says. Carol Woodin, director of exhibitions for the ASBA, also made a watercolor painting of a yellow lady’s slipper that’s included in the exhibit. She says botanical art has undergone a huge revitalization in recent decades. She thinks artists are reacting to the digital world, spending big blocks of time with their subject. Some artists promote environmental awareness, reminding people not to forget plants when they talk about caring for the earth. “People can read a lengthy essay about how important things are, but a piece of art can show you something different, even though you’ve looked at something 100 times,” Woodin says. “The artist’s eye can bring out something that someone has never noticed.” Several of the plants and trees depicted

in the art can be found growing at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Along with “Showy Milkweed” by Vanessa Martin and “Milkweed Pods” by Beverly Simone, both watercolors on paper, five specimens of Missouri milkweed will be part of a display that addresses the STL Milkweeds for Monarchs project and the garden’s work to recover the threatened Mead’s milkweed. The display also includes drawings and a collection of 10 moss specimens from garden botanist Bruce Allen, author-illustrator of “Moss Flora of Central America,” the fourth and final volume of which was published last year. There also are several botanically illustrated plates from the collection of Jeanne Zarucci, a professor of art history and French at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. WHAT “Botanical Art Worldwide: America’s Flora” • WHEN Friday through May 1; hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily • WHERE Steven and Peter Sachs Museum, Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free with garden admission; $12 for ages 13 and up, $4-$6 for St. Louis city/county residents, free for children and members • MORE INFO 314-577-5100; mobot.org

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : VA L E R I E S C H R E M P H A H N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Drawings and watercolors of “Botanical Art Worldwide: America’s Flora” are on view at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Sachs Gallery. The exhibit includes Susan Tomlinson’s watercolor on paper (inset) of the Maclura pomifera, or Osage orange.


Andrew Keeler (with Princeton) in “Avenue Q” at the Playhouse @ Westport Plaza

A scene from the national tour of “Fiddler on the Roof”

Q&A

refugees and immigration is an important one.

‘Fiddler on the Roof’ director has a knack for reviving classics P H O T O S : J O A N M A R C U S ( “ F I D D L E R ” ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( S H E R ) ; J O H N F L A C K ( “AV E N U E Q ” )

BY CALVIN WILSON | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC

‘F

iddler on the Roof,” one of the classic American musicals, made a triumphant return to Broadway in 2015. Directed by Bartlett Sher, the show was nominated for three Tony Awards, including best revival of a musical. That production has taken to the road and is playing at the Fox Theatre through Feb. 10. Recently, Sher, who won a Tony in 2008 for directing the revival of “South Pacific” and was nominated last year for “My Fair Lady,” spoke with Go! Magazine. The interview has been edited for length and clarity. Q • What was it about “Fiddler on the Roof” — a show about a Jewish family coping with change in early 20th-century imperial Russia — that inspired you to direct a revival? A • Well, it’s one of the great musicals, and that’s always cwilson@post-dispatch.com

stltoday.com/go

Q • What were some of the challenges of directing a touring version of the show? A • It’s mostly spatial. When you make a touring show, you have to make a show that will fit in every theater in the country. So you have to in some ways redesign and rethink the piece as something that very much represents the original but can go from place to place. That becomes a big technical part of the job.

Q • You’ve worked on new musicals, but you’ve been particularly something Bartlett Sher successful at reviving important. But I classic ones. What’s the think my reasons were appeal of that for you? a little more personal. My A • These shows that we father was born in Lithuania in love so much are part of our a shtetl (a small Jewish town history — they’re part of who or village), so I was interested we are. And I think it’s a big in exploring that — especially part of a director’s job to be at a time when the issue of able to explore our past and to reinterpret it and ask why @calvinwilsonstl

it’s important to us now. I think it’s important for us to look at “Fiddler” right now. It’s a very pertinent show, and it’s important to remember the kinds of stories that influenced the kind of people we’ve become. Q • You’re the original director of J.T. Rogers’ “Oslo,” which premiered at Lincoln Center in 2016. The drama about the Oslo Peace Accords went on to win a Tony for best play, and a Repertory Theatre of St. Louis production of the show opens Feb. 8. What did you think of the play? A • “Oslo” is a great play. Audiences like to go places they haven’t been before, and you don’t have to know exactly what happened in the Oslo Peace Accords to enjoy it. It’s an enormously engaging and entertaining and surprising piece of theater. WHAT “Fiddler on the Roof” • WHEN Through Feb. 10 • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $29-$104 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER ▼

‘Avenue Q’ WHEN Through March 3 • WHERE Playhouse @ Westport Plaza, 635 West Port Plaza • HOW MUCH $30-$75 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

“Sesame Street” is the inspiration for this outrageous, and outrageously funny, musical comedy that mostly focuses on puppets. But it’s definitely not for children. The show is as joyous as it is irreverent. Directed by Lee Anne Mathews. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘District Merchants’ WHEN Through Feb. 10 • WHERE Wool Studio Theatre, Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive • HOW MUCH $42-$45 • MORE INFO newjewishtheatre.org

“The Merchant of Venice” gets an American makeover in Aaron Posner’s brilliant play about money and mercy, presented by

New Jewish Theatre. With Gary Wayne Barker, J. Samuel Davis and Courtney Bailey Parker. Directed by Jacqueline Thompson.

and Hamlet. Witty and imaginative, and just what sophisticated theatergoers are looking for. Directed by Philip Boehm. BY CALVIN WILSON

BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Mother-----With the Hat’ WHEN Through Feb. 10 • WHERE .ZACK, 3224 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $18-$20 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

‘The Wolves’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $46-$71 • MORE INFO repstl.org

R-S Theatrics presents Stephen Adly Guirgis’ hilarious play about love and betrayal. The terrific cast includes Adam Flores, Aaron Dodd and Sofia Lidia. Directed by Carl Overly Jr. An experience not to be missed by anyone who cares about theater.

A girls’ soccer team comes to fascinating life in Sarah DeLappe’s comedy-drama set mostly during warmup sessions. Unlike anything you’ve seen before. The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis production is directed by Melissa Rain Anderson. BY

BY CALVIN WILSON

CALVIN WILSON

‘Wittenberg’ WHEN Through Feb. 10 • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

Find more performances in our calendar, and add your own group’s upcoming events. stltoday.com/events

Upstream Theater presents a comedy by David Davalos involving Martin Luther, Faustus

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

15


STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

‘They Shall Not Grow Old’ is an immersive WWI marvel Peter Jackson presents an urgent history lesson composed of restored, colorized archive footage ★★★★ BY LINDSEY BAHR | ASSOCIATED PRESS

irector Peter Jackson is upfront about what audiences should not expect from his unconventional World War I documentary, “They Shall Not Grow Old.” This is a film made by a non-historian for an audience of nonhistorians, he says. There are no dates, names or locations. Neither are there any talking heads or historians or politics. It’s just images and the voices of those who were there, telling their own stories.

D 16

And the result is riveting — an immersive, haunting and often transcendent experience that’s unlike anything you’ve ever seen before. That’s because Jackson has done something revolutionary by restoring, colorizing and adding 3-D depth to 100-year-old footage from the archives of the Imperial War Museum, depicting everything from basic training to the trenches. Although there are many smiles as the men as young as 15 and 16 look upon the camera that’s filming them, it does not spare you the harrowing stuff. You watch as soldiers strip off their shoes and socks to reveal gangrene.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

You see dead bodies piled on top of one another, a hand sticking out of the mud, barebottomed soldiers trying to relieve themselves in a makeshift, and quite public, toilet. The mechanics of a cannon are downright hypnotic. The 3-D effects make you feel as though you’ve been transported to another world, and this isn’t even taking into account the voices. The narration comes from hundreds of hours of BBC and IWM interviews from the middle of the century (Jackson wanted the veterans telling their stories in their 60s, where possible). You never learn who is talking, and the voices change quite frequently, but somehow, with all this somewhat random collection of anecdotes and footage, Jackson and his team give what is perhaps the most honest collective account of the Great War that’s ever been committed to film. They talk about joining up, and lying about their ages in order to do so, the rigors of basic training, the logistical difficulties of having one uniform for the entire war, the pain of the army-issued boots, many of which didn’t

actually even fit the soldiers. They also talk about the unique camaraderie in the trenches as somewhat fleeting, which struck me as something I hadn’t heard before in all the band-of-brothers narratives out there, and what it was like when the person next to you was suddenly killed, and the weariness and apathy both they and the Germans seemed to feel as the war stretched on and everyone just wanted to go home. And the big gut-punch is yet to come when they begin to describe what it was like to re-enter civilian life after the war: No one cared. And no one wanted to talk about the war. These veterans were now a nuisance and a burden. “They Shall Not Grow Old” won’t prepare you for that history test or ready you to talk about the Gallipoli or Verdun. And yet, while it might not be a conventional history lesson, it is a necessary and utterly urgent one. WHAT “They Shall Not Grow Old” • RUN TIME 1:39 • RATING R • CONTENT Disturbing war images

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O : WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S

A scene from the WWI documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old”


Filmmaker tests audience with chaotic ‘Capernaum’ Movie that starts with a boy suing his parents for bringing him into the world only gets more depressing ★★½

PHOTO: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

BY ANN HORNADAY | WASHINGTON POST

s the story of a feisty, vulnerable 12-year-old navigating the unforgiving streets of modern Beirut, “Capernaum” feels like a pointedly pessimistic offshoot of “The Bicycle Thief,” the classic Italian neorealist tale of dispossession and dogged perseverance. Drenched in poverty, hopelessness and impotent fury, this impassioned if ambiguously focused story often feels like an exercise in psycho-emotional stamina, as writer-director Nadine Labaki puts her endearing young

A

stltoday.com/go

protagonist into increasingly agonizing situations, sorely testing the audience’s capacity for vicarious but wrenchingly realistic suffering. Since making her effervescent feature debut “Caramel” in 2007, Labaki has embraced an eclectic, unpredictable approach to stories, genre and tone. Her most recent film, “Where Do We Go Now?,” was a lively amalgam of satire, musical and mordant folk tale. With “Capernaum,” the filmmaker discovers a far more sober side. As the movie opens, a boy named Zain (Zain Al Rafeea) is being led before a judge. But, strangely — despite the handcuffs he’s wearing — he’s also the plaintiff. It turns

out that the youngster is in jail for an act of violence but has announced that he wants to sue his parents for the crime of bringing him into a world defined by physical hardship, emotional neglect, mental anguish and a fatal lack of innocence. From that moment on, “Capernaum” shows viewers what has brought Zain to this point, a grievous litany of parental indifference and social hostility that recalls Dickens at his most heartbreaking and Swift at its most floridly overstated. Zain lives in a cramped apartment with several brothers and sisters; one of them, a sweet girl named Sahar (Cedra Izam), is in danger of being sold into marriage by her parents to a much older shopkeeper in the neighborhood. At a pivotal point in the narrative, Zain leaves home, taking refuge in an amusement park where he meets an Ethiopian immigrant named Rahil (Yordanos Shiferaw). Along with her infant son, they form a kind of provisional family, offering a ray of hope that Zain will find the safety and nurturing he instinctively knows is his due. No spoilers, but fair warning: It doesn’t

get better. Labaki, who reportedly shaped “Capernaum” to echo real-life events in the lives of her nonprofessional cast, isn’t interested in reassurance or easy resolutions. Zain’s trials will only become more difficult and dangerous as more calamities befall him and Rahil, as they become prey to a black market in which people literally don’t exist without documentation and can be commodified like so many cigarettes or pirated DVDs. It’s an unrelenting portrait, prone to opportunistic stakesraising, but given undeniable pathos by the enormously sympathetic Al Rafeea, whose face can convey winsomeness and stark world-weariness at the same time. But when Labaki turns her atZain Al Rafeea tention to the trial, her (left) and ideas become garbled Cedra Izam in and unclear. “Capernaum” At some junctures, “Capernaum” veers dangerously close to equating poverty and moral incompetence; later in the film, Zain’s mother makes a bitter speech to his lawyer (played by Labaki) about being judged. At that point, the target for the filmmaker’s ire seems to be the “system,” but who or what exactly that is remains fuzzy and ill-defined. The result is a movie eager to show viewers the unending depredations visited upon people dislocated by war, injustice and lack of resources, but not nearly as adamant when it comes to providing incisive context or clear paths forward. Not that “Capernaum” is responsible for solving the problems it presents. And yet, despite small but powerful gestures in the finale, it leaves the audience feeling just as immobilized and powerless as its characters. Labaki chose the title “Capernaum” because the word was often used to mean “chaos” in French literature. That’s precisely what she presents to us, with precious little relief in sight. WHAT “Capernaum” • RUN TIME 2:30 • RATING R • CONTENT Strong language and some drug elements • LANGUAGE In Arabic with subtitles

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

17


‘Instant Family’ ★★½

‘On the Basis of Sex’ ★★★

‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

PG-13 • 2:00 • Felicity Jones

★★★★

WASHINGTON POST

plays feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg in an adoring biography that ends well before she’s sworn in as a Supreme Court justice. The wonderful Armie Hammer plays her husband. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Kid Who Would Be King’ ★★★

‘Ralph Breaks the Internet’ ★★½

PG • 2:00 • A biracial kid (voiced by Shameik Moore) takes up a legendary superhero mantle in this multidimensional mindtrip from Sony Pictures Animation. The seventh Spider-Man movie to hit the big screen feels more like a one-of-a-kind, wall-crawling experience.

PG • 2:00 • The Arthurian legend gets a modern and more youthful spin in this surprisingly delightful film full of action, heart, a crazy-haired Patrick Stewart (as “old” Merlin) and a few genuinely good gags. ASSOCIATED PRESS

PG • 1:54 • Having liberated arcade game characters in “Wreck-it Ralph” (2012), its sequel sends the hulking, big-fisted Ralph (voiced by John C. Reilly) and the glitchy candy-colored racer Vanellope von Schweetz (Sarah Silverman) into that expansive internet.

‘Mary Poppins Returns’ ★½

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PG-13 • 2:00 • Mark Wahlberg

and Rose Byrne star as a couple who are unable to conceive children of their own and who choose to adopt — not just one child, but three siblings. Based on co-writer/director Sean Anders’ own experience.

PG • 1:11 • Disney’s sequel

starring Emily Blunt and LinManuel Miranda works hard to evoke the undeniable charms of the original 1964 film, but without the spoonful of sugar to help it all go down. Directed by Rob Marshall. WASHINGTON POST

‘Mortal Engines’ PG-13 • 2:08 • Centuries

ALSO IN THEATERS t

Aquaman’ ★★ PG-13 • 2:22 • Jason Momoa’s charisma is as formidable as his brawn, but this movie about the long-haired, shirtless superhero is soggy with Atlantis mythology and drowns in special effects. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ ★★½ PG-13 • 2:15 • As Queen

frontman Freddie Mercury, Rami Malek delivers a committed, thoroughly inhabited performance, which winds up transcending the regrettably thin material at hand. WASHINGTON POST

‘Bumblebee’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:53 • While hard-core

fan-boys may complain it’s too soft, this film may turn out to be the perfect way to save “Transformers.” This charming tale of a girl and her adorable carrobot flips the script on the tired, bloated franchise. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Cold War’ ★★★★ R • 1:28 • Writer-director

Pawel Pawlikowski draws on his own parents’ relationship for inspiration for his near-perfect film set in post-WWII Poland. In Polish, French, German, Russian, Italian and Croatian with subtitles. WASHINGTON POST

‘Destroyer’ ★★½ R • 2:03 • A barely

recognizable Nicole Kidman stars as a terrible cop in a terrible cop movie. Director Karyn Kusama, originally from St. Louis, keeps the pace slow and our interest fairly low. DANIEL NEMAN

18

‘Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch’ ★★½ PG • 1:30 • Benedict Cumberbatch voices the green Christmas grouch in this adaptation (the third) of Dr. Seuss’ 1957 children’s book. This computer-animated version is beautiful to look at, but the new material doesn’t resonate. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Escape Room’ PG-13 • 1:40 • Six strangers find themselves in circumstances beyond their control and must use their wits to find the clues or die. Directed by Adam Robitel. Not reviewed.

‘Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:14 • The nifflers are cute. But there’s something far less adorable that has also escaped in this Harry Potter prequel, which takes a turn for the dark

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

side that will satisfy adult fans. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Favourite’ ★★★½ R • 2:01 • Oscar winners

Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone play a pair of women sucking up to England’s Queen Anne in the 18th century. You’d swear they have paid staffs of comedy writers hidden beneath their voluminous skirts. STAR TRIBUNE

‘Glass’ ★★ PG-13 • 2:09 • Writer-director

M. Night Shyamalan reminds us he is the ultimate mastermind, the king of the twists. But the true master at work is James McAvoy, who reprises his role from “Split.” TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Green Book’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:10 • Movie based

on a true story recounts a 1962 road trip when a Bronx-bred Italian-American (Viggo Mortensen) was

hired to drive a renowned black pianist, Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), to concert engagements across the Deep South. Directed by Peter Farrelly. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The House With a Clock in Its Walls’ ZERO STARS PG • 1:39 • Supernatural

thriller manages to find the perfect un-sweet spot — it’s too scary for little kids, not scary enough for older ones, not funny or clever enough for their parents, and too redundant for everyone. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ ★★★½ R • 1:59 • Director Barry

Jenkins (“Moonlight”) delivers a heartbreaking story of obstacles and injustices in 1970s Harlem. ASSOCIATED PRESS

after civilization collapsed, an enigmatic woman, an outcast and an outlaw unite to try to stop London, now a dangerous metropolis on wheels. With Hugo Weaving, Hera Hilmar, Robert Sheehan, Jihae. Written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson. Directed by Christian Rivers. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘The Mule’ ★ R • 1:56 • The film is a

fairly straightforward adaptation of a true story from the New York Times Magazine, but the racist cultural stereotypes and appalling treatment of women are all thanks to screenwriter Nick Schenk and director Clint Eastwood. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Night School’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:51 • Kevin Hart is funny as a night-school student in a class led by a shockingly violent teacher (Tiffany Haddish). But it’s the group of beloved comic character actors surrounding them who carry the movie through its bumpy patches.

WASHINGTON POST

‘Stan & Ollie’ ★★★½ PG • 1:37 • Barely

recognizable Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly star in a generous, warmhearted film about the comic duo of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Directed by Jon S. Baird. WASHINGTON POST

‘Roma’ ★★★★

‘A Star Is Born’ ★★★½

R • 2:15 • Masterful drama

R • 2:17 • Bradley Cooper

by Alfonso Cuarón is based on his memories of growing up in a bourgeois Mexico City household in the 1970s, shot through with vivid sensory cues that pulse with delight, sensuality and sadness. WASHINGTON POST

makes his directorial debut with a lavishly delightful remake that stars Lady Gaga as an unknown singer who becomes a pop sensation. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Upside’ ONE-HALF STAR

‘Second Act’ ★★

PG-13 • 2:06 • A lazy, skirt-

PG-13 • 1:43 • In a mashup of

chasing ex-con (Kevin Hart) accidentally gets a job taking care of a wealthy businessman who became a paraplegic (Bryan Cranston). It’s based on a true story, but it’s predictable and lacking in drama and laugh-out-loud moments. ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Working Girl” and “Maid in Manhattan,” Jennifer Lopez plays a woman who’s passed over for a promotion at a big-box store and lands an interview at a multinational cosmetics firm — thanks to an impressive resume cooked up by her teenage godson. Good cast; nearly hopeless script. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Shoplifters’ ★★★★ R • 2:01 • The impoverished

but happy Shibata family survives by stealing from Tokyo grocery stores. When they find a tiny girl, shivering and neglected, they take her, too. As filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda slowly and deliberately reveals, much of this isn’t quite what it seems. SEATTLE TIMES

‘Smallfoot’ ★★½

‘Vice’ ★½ R • 2:12 • Christian Bale nails it as Dick Cheney, plotting his rise from a misdirected young man in Wyoming to one of the most notorious gray eminences in American politics. But the rest of the movie, written and directed by Adam McKay, is an absurd mess. WASHINGTON POST

Use our calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

PG • 1:36 • In a reverseBigfoot tale, a happygo-lucky Himalayan Yeti (voiced by Channing Tatum) finds evidence of humans. It’s predictable, but the journey is worth watching.

PHOTO: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

From left: John C. Reilly, Shirley Henderson, Steve Coogan and Nina Arianda in “Stan & Ollie”

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

stltoday.com/go


“VIEWERS GOT SOMETHING ENTIRELY DIFFERENT AS FOX MADE THE CALL TO AIR A FILMED DRESS REHEARSAL IN WHICH BRENNIN HUNT PLAYED A FULLY AMBULATORY ROGER. WHAT RESULTED WAS A “RENT: NOT QUITE LIVE” THAT BETRAYED THE ETHOS OF THEATER AND THE ATTEMPT TO TELEVISE IT AND ENDED UP WORSE FOR IT.”

The cast of “Rent: Live” in a dress rehearsal that aired Sunday night.

COMMENTARY ▼

‘Rent: Live’ cast said the show must go on. It didn’t, really. BY DREW GOINS | WASHINGTON POST

PHOTO: FOX

A

t the top of the first commercial break of Sunday night’s broadcast of “Rent: Live,” the musical’s cast announced that one of their co-stars had broken his foot the night before and would be unable to perform the show’s demanding choreography. But, said Valentina, playing Angel, “the show must go on.” The thing is, “Rent: Live” didn’t, in fact, go on. Viewers got something entirely different as Fox made the call to air a filmed stltoday.com/go

dress rehearsal in which Brennin Hunt played a fully ambulatory Roger. What resulted was a “Rent: Not Quite Live” that betrayed the ethos of theater and the attempt to televise it and ended up worse for it. The trend with these telecasts has been to hew closer to the actual theatrical experience. Early entrants into the genre such as “The Sound of Music” and “Peter Pan,” filmed on NBC soundstages, were deadened by the lack of a live audience. Fox’s production of “Grease” and then NBC’s “Jesus Christ Superstar” put bodies in the house. There was new sound mixing

to work out and dickering over the optimal amount of woo-hooing, but the whole thing suddenly felt much more vibrant. It felt like theater. So it was that much more jarring when the “Rent” producers bucked the trend to make such an untheatrical decision. So much of the excitement of live theater comes from encountering the art form’s real-time hurdles. That doesn’t just mean waiting for unexpected things to go wrong, but for unexpected things to go right, too. We root for the recovery just as much as the wobble. Producers had plenty of options to handle the bump of a broken foot Broadway-style. Nothing about “Rent” specifies that Roger not use crutches or any other adaptive technology, and the last 10 minutes of the telecast — actually aired live — showed that Hunt was no less dynamic for his medical boot. Alternatively, the potential for triumph if an understudy thrust into America’s living rooms had turned in a riveting performance would have electrified the production.

This improvisational spirit is what defines theater in general. And it’s a particularly important element of “Rent.” The most cherished — and painful — part of the musical’s legend is the everythinggone-wrong circumstances under which it first opened in 1996. The morning of its first preview offBroadway, the show’s creator, 35-year-old Jonathan Larson, died suddenly of an aortic dissection. The production was thrown into chaos, but the cast and crew agreed that Larson would have wanted his opus to go up as scheduled. The musical began as a staged singthrough, the cast seated at tables. By the Act I closer, “La Vie Boheme,” the energy had mounted so high that the cast launched into the number’s unbridled choreography, followed by a fully realized Act II. Larson had written a show vibrant enough that the show had no choice but to go on. Trust the power of a really good piece of theater, and it transcends. Fox didn’t trust “Rent” or its cast in these circumstances, and the audience was the loser. According to Variety, viewership tanked, too; the show drew the lowest ratings ever for a live TV musical. The worst part of this whole debacle is that a live version of the show still ran concurrently with Fox’s broadcast of the dress rehearsal. The actual Sunday night show, which was performed just for the in-person audience that had come to New York for the telecast, was the showrunners’ best option, and they just chose not to air it. The few clips Fox released showed a pared-down “Rent” that is subdued but arresting — and poignantly reminiscent of the 1996 opening. It’s informal and a bit rough, but that’s what would have made it so good. In the announcement of the producers’ decision, Valentina huddled close with her co-stars, including Vanessa Hudgens (who performed in “Grease: Live” hours after her father’s death) in a very “Rent” tableau. This show is “about community, resiliency and bouncing back,” she said. It sure is. It’s just a shame the “Rent: Live” we saw wasn’t.

02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


Gilroy’s latest film, now on Netflix, best described as ‘weird’

Zawe Ashton and Jake Gyllenhaal in “Velvet Buzzsaw”

BY LINDSEY BAHR | ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARK CITY, UTAH

an Gilroy’s satirical contemporary artworld thriller “Velvet Buzzsaw” is available to Netflix subscribers worldwide on Friday, but he and his team gave audiences at the Sundance Film Festival a sneak peek at the film Sunday night where the word most commonly used to praise it was “weird.” “Dan is crazy,” Rene Russo, who is married to Gilroy, said in Park City, Utah. “He’s got this crazy imagination, and he’s just kind of outside the box.” The film reunites Gilroy

D

with Jake Gyllenhaal, who starred in his directorial debut, “Nightcrawler.” That dark thriller about an ambulancechasing journalist went on to become a box office hit and, so, when Gilroy landed on the idea for “Velvet Buzzsaw,” which would star Gyllenhaal as a snobby critic and Russo as a savvy gallery owner and art dealer, there were a lot of film studios who wanted to put their name behind it.

Netflix was one of them. Gilroy was unsure at first about Netflix, though, so he started reading a little more about the company. He came across a quote where someone said that Netflix was going to destroy the theatrical experience, but following it were 50 comments about how that person must live in New York or Los Angeles or Chicago, where “you can see everything.”

SUPER DUPER

SUNDAY

“I suddenly thought, wow, democratization,” Gilroy said. “It is an elitist point of view to think that everybody in the world has access to the things that New York, LA and Chicago have. That really was the deciding factor. If you really want to reach the widest possible audience, here’s this technology that can do this. ... And what is the theatrical experience? 500 people in a theater? 100? Does 50 count? Does four people on a Friday night on my 50-inch widescreen count? It does to me.” Producer Jennifer Fox, who has been behind films like “Michael Clayton,” said Netflix made it “at a level that it should have been made at. They got it. And it’s really out there.” Out there is right, for the ensemble film that co-stars John Malkovich, Toni Collette, Daveed Diggs, Billy Magnussen and relative newcomer Zawe Ashton in which the discovery

of a dead artist’s works ends up taking its own body count. But that’s Gilroy’s operating mode for his own films which aren’t bound by traditional genre or constraints. It’s why “Velvet Buzzsaw” is about everything — the pretentiousness of the contemporary art world, the fluidity of criticism and even sexuality, and, you know, a demon art spirit out for blood. “If I follow one rule in any form of entertainment it is, ‘Do Not Bore.’ You cannot bore,” Gilroy said. “My (playwright) father pounded that into my head.” Gilroy wrote the critic character Morf, who is as fluid in his sexuality as he is in his art opinions, specifically for Gyllenhaal who he said is “one of the most fearless actors alive right now.” “He’s always pushing himself with the craziest ideas that often end up in the movie,” Gilroy said. “I like working with people who want to take

a sledgehammer to all this, and Jake is that person.” The feeling is mutual for Gyllenhaal, who said their connection is “sort of inexplicable.” “But I’m not asking any questions about it,” Gyllenhaal said. “I just show up when he asks.” After the “Velvet Buzzsaw” experience, Gilroy himself is a Netflix believer. “I couldn’t speak highly enough about Netflix. The traditional studios in some way have created Netflix. The traditional studios have gone from making a broad range of films to doing branded IP and franchises and it has left a void for original, range of films to get made,” Gilroy said. “And Netflix is making them en masse, and it’s a very exciting time. I think history is being written right now.” WHAT “Velvet Buzzsaw” • WHEN Streaming Friday • WHERE Netflix • MORE INFO netflix.com/velvetbuzzsaw

at

February 3rd, 2019 ALL DAY Y HAPPY HOUR PRICES 11am–Midnight

$13 Domestic Buckets $2.00 Shot Specials PHOTO: NETFLIX

Free Food Buffet at Halftime JOHNNY’S WEST BAR & GRILL

314-736-5646 • 12068 Dorsett Rd, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 20

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

stltoday.com/go


“STEVE COOGAN AND JOHN C. REILLY DELIVER DYNAMITE PERFORMANCES.” -Jason Zinoman, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Jake McDorman and Candice Bergen in “Murphy Brown”

PRODUCED BY

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

FAYEWARD WRITTENBY JEFFPOPE DIRECTEDBY JONS.BAIRD NOW PLAYING

CREVE COEUR AMC DINE-IN THEATRES WEST OLIVE 16 12657 Olive Blvd amctheatres.com

ST. LOUIS LANDMARK PLAZA FRONTENAC CINEMA 210 Plaza Frontenac (314) 994-3733

CHESTERFIELD MARCUS CHESTERFIELD GALAXY 14 CINE 450 THF Blvd (636) 532-8141

DES PERES MARCUS DES PERES 14 CINE 12701 Manchester Rd (314) 822-4903

ST. LOUIS MARCUS RONNIES 20 CINE & IMAX 5320 S Lindbergh Blvd (314) 843-4336

ST. CHARLES MARCUS ST. CHARLES STADIUM 18 CINE 1830 S 1st Capitol Dr (636) 946-1862

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.STANANDOLLIEFILM.COM

®

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE B E ST FO R E I G N L A N G UAG E F I L M

CAPERNAUM WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

A FILM BY NADINE LAB AKI

STARTS TODAY VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.CAPERNAUM-MOVIE.COM TV Q&A ▼

Q • Would you be able to tell me if my favorite TV program, “Murphy Brown,” will return and when?

P H O T O : WA R N E R B R O S .

A • The most recent season of the series consisted of 13 episodes, the last of which aired in December. There were reports that its run was cut short and the series had been canceled, but show creator Diane English has consistently said the plan was for 13 episodes this season. (I know, longtime viewers are used to the broadcast-TV model of two dozen or more episodes in a season. Many shows no longer do that. “The Conners,” for example, just wrapped up its current season after 11 episodes.) As for whether “Murphy” will be back for another run, there’s nothing official yet. English told the Hollywood Reporter last year “we’re in a tough time slot, opposite football, and at 9:30. It’s kind of tough for comedy, but we’re doing better than what was there before. We win our time slot in entertainment

stltoday.com/go

programming almost weekly. And so I think it bodes well. I’m optimistic. I haven’t been told anything yet, but I’ll learn more very soon.” Q • I just finished watching Seasons 1 and 2 of “Shooter” on Netflix. The final episode of Season 2 ended rather abruptly with many issues unresolved. Has the series been canceled, or will there be a Season 3? A • When people discover a show on Netflix, Hulu or another streaming source, they do not always know that many of those programs had a life before streaming. “Shooter,” inspired by the novel “Point of Impact” and the movie “Shooter,” is one of those. It originally aired on USA Network, which decided in August 2018 to end the series after three seasons. Two of those seasons are indeed on Netflix, while you can find the third for now on usanetwork.com; you need to sign in with the password for your cable or satellite provider. I have also found some Season 3

episodes on my service’s On Demand channel. Q • I understand a movie was made based on the book “Our Souls at Night” by Kent Haruf. Jane Fonda and Robert Redford were to be the stars. I’ve watched for it, both in theaters and on DVD. Was the movie ever released? A • Yes, though not on disc and not in many theaters. Instead, it has been on Netflix since 2017. As Deadline.com reported in 2016, “Redford controlled the book and set it up at Netflix … with the streaming service finding another star-driven film to fill an original production slate.” Netflix has become a major player in the movie business, with recent Oscar nominations for Netflixbacked films “Roma” (10, including best picture) and “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” (three), both of which I watched on the streaming service. Not that this thrills theater owners. Several chains that offer special packages of the best-picture nominees have excluded “Roma” from their

lineups — while claiming to offer, in one company’s words, “all the year’s best.”

NOW SHOWING

Q • A few months back there was an English show called “The Split.” Will it continue at a later date? A • Yes, possibly at a much later date. The BBC and SundanceTV have ordered a second season of the drama about a family of divorce lawyers from writer Abi Morgan (“The Iron Lady,” “The Hour”). But where Morgan said in the secondseason announcement that “we look forward to seeing you in 2019,” I’m told it won’t get to SundanceTV this year. It’s a possibility for 2020, but that’s not definite either. Q • Will “For the People” be back? A • Yes. The legal drama begins a new season March 7 on ABC. BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

OMNIMAX® Theater 02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

21


STLTODAY.COM/DINING

The Peanut Butter Bomb dessert at the Chocolate Pig

The Chocolate Pig excels at sweet, stumbles on savory Some dishes are ridiculous, some need editing, but the dining scene could benefit from a little audacity ★★ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

t the Chocolate Pig, which opened in November in the Central West End’s Cortex Innovation Community, you can order a flight of three different kinds of bacon — pork, beef and lamb — arranged around a pool of an herbflecked white-chocolate sauce. This might not sound appealing on paper, but you’re at

A

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

22

a restaurant called the Chocolate Pig, and to my knowledge there is no living, oinking chocolate pig on the premises to admire, so you might as well order the bacon. Each bacon in the flight ($16) receives its own garnish. The conventional pork bacon, crisp and meaty, is dressed with a sherrycoffee gastrique and a little arugula. Atop the thin strips of lamb bacon is a scoop of tapenade. The beef-belly bacon sits on a mound of “quick” kimchi.

stltoday.com/offthemenu

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

None of these garnishes make themselves necessary. The pork’s gastrique doesn’t register at all. The tapenade reinforces rather than contrasts the naturally strong, saltintensified flavor of the lamb. That quick kimchi lacks any funk or fire; it can’t stand up to the beef, which in texture and taste resembles teriyaki-flavored jerky. The white-chocolate sauce, though, I enjoyed. Imagine a sweeter béarnaise sauce. The novelty of dipping the different bacon slices into the sauce wears off quickly — this dish could be half as big (and half the price) — but for a few bites it’s fun. If you knew nothing about the Chocolate Pig besides its name, you might imagine a restaurant serving dish after dish like this bacon flight. These dishes might be ridiculous — they might, like the bacon flight, need some editing — but they would give the Chocolate Pig a unique identity. But a better name for this restaurant might be the Chocolate & the Pig. The

latest venture from Bissinger’s sibling company 23 City Blocks Hospitality (the Caramel Room at Bissinger’s, Handcrafted by Bissinger’s), it feels like two concepts rolled into one sleek space on the ground floor of Cortex’s newly built 4220 Duncan building. There are even two bars in the 125-seat dining room, a conventional one and a counter that wraps around a small open kitchen. Patrick Russell, who previously worked at the Marshall, Va., restaurant Field & Main, oversees the savory menu. This treads familiar gastropub and comfort-food fare but does distinguish itself here and there. An India pale ale broth cut with green chiles and garnished with crisp garlic and pickled Fresno chiles supercharges a bowl of braised mussels ($14). I soaked up as much of the broth as I could with the provided slices of grilled bread. Chicken-fried Brussels sprouts ($9) are springy and bittersweet beneath a batter that is crunchy but not oily. Russell accents the fried sprouts with confit lemon and pickled green onion and sets the whole thing over a pool of cooling buttermilk dressing. A miso mustard gives a thick, juicy, grilled pork chop ($29) a peppery top note and an undergirding of umami. Both accents are vital, as the chop’s sides, candied sweet potatoes and braised collard greens, lean toward the sweet. My pork chop was grilled to the requested medium, but a couple of other dishes suffered from kitchen missteps. I asked for my burger ($13), from the lunch menu, medium-rare, but it was on the well side of medium. The braised lamb shank ($28), a honking bone-in cut, didn’t fall off the bone, and its flavor was duller than lamb should be. The texture suggested overbraising, and a shower of fried leeks and a few wafers of candied lemon had to carry the dish rather than accent the meat. The duck-confit “cassoulet” ($22) is a conceptual mess. As those quotation marks suggest, this isn’t a traditional cassoulet, but a confit duck leg served over a chalky whitebean puree with a tangle of braised kale and a scattering of pickled chiles. It didn’t work on its own merits — the chiles and kale were the only strong flavors — except as an inducement to order true cassoulet at a different restaurant a few evenings later. Tyler Davis, most recently of the late restaurant Element, is the executive pastry chef. His menu finds more bridges between sweet and savory. The Chocolate Pig Candy Bar ($8) is a maple-bacon ice-cream bar with stltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O S : L A U R I E S K R I VA N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H


The Blue Owl

The Bacon Flight Herbed with White Chocolate at Chocolate Pig

Restaurant & Bakery In Historic Kimmswick

Valentine Candlelight Dinner Sat, Feb 9th & Thurs, Feb 14th 4pm - 8pm By Reservations

Sweeter Than Flowers!!! Our Famous Double Dipped Chocolate Covered Strawberries Order Today!

theblueowl.com Tues. - Fri. 10-3 • Sat. & Sun. 10-5

636.464.3128 hazelnut-toffee praline both in the bar and crumbled atop it. The bacon flavor is mild, giving the dish the same nudge of seasoning that salted caramel would. Even more intriguing is Milk & Cereal ($9), caramelized pork rinds and bananas with malted-milk ice cream and a dulce de leche sauce. Davis told me in an interview when the Chocolate Pig opened that the dish is meant to evoke eating a cracklingrice cereal like Rice Krispies, and while you can’t hear any snap, crackle or pop, the dish hits this mark. The most dramatic dessert is the Peanut Butter Bomb (small $7, large $12), a darkchocolate sphere that the server partially dissolves at the table by pouring warm berry sauce over it. Inside is a peanutbutter mousse, a peanut-butter crumble and berries. Dramatic, yes — but compared to the candy bar or the Milk & Cereal, the flavors are strikingly straightforward. I suppose the bacon flight with white chocolate had me primed for a surprise piece of pork inside that chocolate bomb. The St. Louis dining scene circa 2019 could benefit from something so audacious. WHERE The Chocolate Pig, 4220 Duncan Avenue • MORE INFO 314-272-3230; thechocolatepig.com • MENU Gastropub fare and an extensive dessert program • HOURS Lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

stltoday.com/go

The Milk & Cereal dessert at the Chocolate Pig

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 3/1/19. Not Valid Valentine’s Day

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 3/1/19. Not Valid Valentine’s Day

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, • 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway. SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd • 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd 02.01.19-02.07.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

23


T H E S T. L O U I S P O S T- D I S PAT C H

PARDI PAWS PET Photo

Contest

Whether your pet is partying in Soulard – or just parading around the living room – our Pardi Paws Pet Photo Contest gives you TWO ways to paw-ticipate to WIN: #1. MYSTICAL KREWE OF BARKUS Register your pet NOW to be IN the Purina Pet Parade on Sunday, Feb. 9 in Soulard. We’ll snap a pic of your pooch at the parade and you can vote for your favorites online!

#2. COUCH PAW-TATO KREWE Does your pet do their paw-tying at home? Or did they attend the parade as a spectator? Upload photos of you furry friends in their Mardi Gras finest for another chance to win.

PRESENTED BY

ENTER NTER YOUR PHOTO THROUGH FEB. 26:

STLtoday.com/contests STL 24

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 02.01.19-02.07.19

stltoday.com/go


Hakimian LAST 2 DAYS! Brothers EVERY RUG IS NOW REDUCED

ONLY THE FINEST ORIENTAL RUGS

STORE CLOSING SALE

NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED

THIS SALE ENDS ON FEB. 3

60%~80%

OPEN EVERYDAY: MON ~ SUN 10-6 7911 CLAYTON RD. CLAYTON, MISSOURI

314. 725. 3600

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Friday • 02.01.2019 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, West deals NORTH ♠6 2 ♥Q J 4 ♦K Q 6 4 ♣A K 10 9 WEST EAST ♠A 10 9 8 5 ♠J 7 ♥K 8 7 ♥10 9 5 ♦A ♦10 8 3 2 ♣Q J 5 3 ♣8 7 6 4 SOUTH ♠K Q 4 3 ♥A 6 3 2 ♦J 9 7 5 ♣2 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 1♠ Dbl Pass 3♥ Pass 4♥ All pass Opening lead: Ace of ♦ What would you bid with the North hand over South’s jump to three hearts? We like three spades, which should be interpreted as either a heart raise too good to just bid four hearts, or a good hand with only three hearts that might be better off in a contract other than hearts. South would have bid three no trump over three spades and the superior contract would have been reached. West shifted to a low club at trick two, which declarer won with dummy’s ace and then

ruffed a club. A low heart to dummy’s queen was ducked by West, who would have done better to rise with his king and play another heart. This was not easy to see and West’s duck was a reasonable play. South ruffed another club with his remaining low heart, cashed the ace of hearts, and led a diamond. West had no answer. He couldn’t hurt declarer by ruffing with his king, so he discarded a spade. South won the diamond in dummy and led the queen of hearts. West won with the king, but the defense had no trumps remaining and South couldn’t be prevented from building a spade trick for his tenth trick. Well done! The play in three no trump would have been interesting. We leave it to readers to work out the play after a spade lead to South’s king and a diamond toward the dummy. The contract cannot be defeated. (02/01/19)

Across 1 Dominant figure 16 High-end Italian sports car 17 1997 Notorious B.I.G. hit whose title lyric precedes “strictly for the weather” 18 Queen who styled herself as Isis, familiarly 19 ___ Lopez opening (chess tactic) 20 Some superhero attire 21 Yankees All-Star pitcher Severino 22 Chris of “The Good Wife” 24 Four-thirds of a dram: abbr. 25 “___ time!” 26 Brother-to-be

29 Cosmetics company whose letters appear in leftto-right order in “cosmetics company” 30 Electron particle emission 32 Relative of cashmere 34 Money replaced by euros 35 Thrash 36 Prepare for a bomb, say 38 Euphoria 42 Court plea, briefly 43 County east of Devon 45 “If u ask me ...” 46 America’s busiest airport after ATL and LAX 47 ___ América (soccer tournament)

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME February 1 WORD — STABLE (STABLE: STAY-bul: Not subject to extreme change or fluctuation.) Average mark 34 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 39 or more words in STABLE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — PSYCHOSES cosy sepoy peso hope shoe poesy hose shop pose echo chess posh epoch chop posse epos chose posy espy cope psych copse psyche copy scope RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

48 49 51 53

Rose Screw up New toy? Legislative body of Russia 54 “Gil Blas” author 58 Everywhere 59 Things that contain 59-Across that contain 59-Across that ...

Down 1 Online gamer’s problem 2 Orate 3 “100 Years ... 100 Movies,” e.g. 4 Many employees of the Lego company 5 So 6 Seriously shortchange 7 ___ Little, “The Wire” character 8 Prolific 9 Event of 1964 and 2020 10 It’s two hours behind Pacific: abbr. 11 Memorable time 12 12 points, typographically 13 Many a battery charger 14 Instrument whose name comes from the Latin for “heavenly”

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Your creativity and energy take you down a new path. You could feel “off” when handling a personal matter that appears to upset a partner. Tonight: Express your happiness that the weekend is here.

If Feb. 1 is your birthday • You are strong and willful. This year, these qualities emerge even more. If single, you might find that a friendship is heating up. If attached, make sure your significant other is A-OK with plans before making them. Capricorn often backs away from you. They see your strength.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★ You could be anchored on a position or an opinion. Others might see you as unbudging. Is taking a stand worth it on this particular issue? Avoid someone who can dig in with equal determination. Tonight: Order in.

ARIES (March 20-April 19) ★★★★ Tension is high as you attempt to clear your desk and simultaneously clear out some issues as well. You understand that others hold you responsible for certain projects, whether you are in charge or not. Tonight: You’re a force to be dealt with. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★★ Reach out for someone you often share with, ask opinions from and swap jokes with. You might want to take the edge off a misunderstanding that has been a problem. A friend could be overly demanding without realizing it. Tonight: As you like it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Defer if you want to be around a partner or associate. This person seems to feel as if he or she has a hot idea and does not want to be derailed. He or she wants total control. Tonight: Do not get locked into a power play. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You are emotional about a key person in your life. You see this person as becoming an obstacle in relating. This person is expressing his or her feelings clearly. Imagine what his or her mindset could be and why. Tonight: Sort through different possibilities. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★ Fortunately, you have the ability to work past the feelings of many people. Willingly, you put in extra effort to alleviate a problem before it happens. You feel you have cleared a lot of hassles. Tonight: Bypass being social.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Do not hesitate to ask questions, especially when dealing with an angry loved one or a child. Your creativity comes forward as you attempt to take some of the fire off the situation. Tonight: Favorite people, favorite hangout.

Puzzle by David Steinberg

15 Hard to eat quietly, in adspeak 21 ___ Dems (U.K. political party, informally) 23 Highish bridge holding 26 “Je vous en ___” (French for “You’re welcome”) 27 City on the Mexican border

28 Things that amaze 29 Noted arms manufacturer 31 Designer Gucci 33 Indicator of a coming storm 36 Friend of Tarzan 37 Tar 39 Communication means since 1911 40 Hobbit corrupted by the Ring 41 “That HURTS!”

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1228

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ Investigate what is happening with a financial matter. It appears that you and another person have very different views of the same situation. You might not find agreement easy. Tonight: Relax, please. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You might feel pressured to deal with a situation in a certain manner. Ask yourself if you would like to postpone this issue and just relax. Tonight: Do not fuss over details. Focus on the big picture. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You could instigate a problem without meaning to. Understand that others are touchy at this moment. You could ask a question only to witness a full-blown argument. Tonight: A smile goes a long way.

42 Refusal with a contraction 44 Lewdness 47 Host Bert of old game shows 48 Vim 50 Gucci competitor 52 Corner office, maybe 53 Out of juice 55 Car that went defunct in 1936 56 Place to count sheep 57 Pair of nines?

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★★ You could be questioning the nature of another person’s attitude. Indulge this person, and ultimately you will be happier. You could break your budget if you do, so be reasonable. Tonight: Out on the town. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

02.01.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Wife resents being sent to the bench est with me when he says no to something, but just can’t bring himself to say no to his brother. Either way, it’s exhausting and ridiculous. — COMPETING FOR ATTENTION Dear Competing • If you and your husband haven’t blocked out some time each week to spend together — a date night — you should. While I don’t think it’s healthy for you to be entirely dependent upon him for social contact, I do think you should be higher on his list of priorities than his brother. Because you have already discussed this and seem to have gotten nowhere, please consider finding some other social outlets so you aren’t so isolated. Special interest groups or hobbies come to mind. Dear Abby • I was waiting in line to get a cup of coffee and the customer behind me was so close she was almost touching me. Then she coughed without covering her mouth. I stepped

away, but she closed in on me and coughed again without covering. I turned and politely asked her to step back and cover her mouth the next time she coughed. She said she had an allergy and not a cold. I suggested that because we are in the midst of cold and flu season, there’s no way that I — or anyone else — could know the difference between a cough from allergy or illness. Was it rude on my part? — RUDE IN MINNESOTA Dear Rude • What you said was not rude; it was common sense. The notion that if you don’t think you’re sick (“only allergic”), you have the right to cough on others is misguided. When you asked the woman not to hover near you, she should have respected your request, stepped back and not closed in again whether or not she continued to cough. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Stoop is longer. 2. Eyes are different. 3. Branch is added. 4. Window is missing. 5. Newspaper is longer. 6. Leg is moved.

Dear Abby • My husband and I have been married for 12 years. Things are generally good, but we keep having the same old argument related to his little brother. They have a close relationship, which is great, but I often end up feeling like I’m playing second fiddle to my brother-in-law. If I ask my husband to go out and do something on the weekend, he’ll say he doesn’t feel like it. Minutes later, if his brother makes the same suggestion, he’s up and getting ready to go! Sometimes I end up along for the ride, which lessens the sting a little, but usually I’m left alone. It wouldn’t be so bad if not for the fact that I don’t have family close by, and I’m the agency lead where I work, so having “work friends” isn’t an option. This leaves my husband the only person I have to spend time with. I have tried explaining this to him, but when I try, he overreacts and claims I don’t want him to spend any time with his brother, which is not what I’m saying. I have begun to feel that he’s hon-

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Guest gets thoughtless treatment

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • When I was a guest in some friends’ home, my bathroom had a cat box in it, which smelled bad, and the cat frequently knocked litter all over the floor. I asked where a broom was. My friend swept it up with one and pointed to where it was stored, never moving the box or apologizing. She knew that I had a longtime milk allergy and tried to plan accordingly. However, the husband, who fancies himself a chef, kept trying to offer me dishes I couldn’t eat and was upset when I declined. I brought a proper gift, bought them a dinner and thought I behaved correctly, but I didn’t think the visit went well. Gentle Reader • Did you suppose that your friends hated the scented candle you brought them so much that they were quietly

trying to kill you with cat smells and milk? Miss Manners concedes that it was not nice for the kitty litter cleaning to be left to you and for the husband to push food on you, but recommends that you call this behavior what it is: mindless thoughtlessness. You might find other accommodations next time you are in their city. Dear Miss Manners • It happens, not so infrequently, that during a conversation where I am relating a story to a friend, the friend interrupts and gives an account of a similar situation that has happened to her. I then politely listen to her story, and by the time she finishes, the content of my tale has lost its significance. This usually happens with well-meaning friends. I don’t want to alienate them with a rude response, but at the same time, it would be nice to be able to finish

my story before they so eagerly jump in to tell theirs. How should I handle this type of waning etiquette? Gentle Reader • Talk faster? Barring that, Miss Manners recommends that you try returning to your narrative, saying, “Oh dear, I got so wrapped up in your story that I am afraid I lost track of mine,” followed by a wistful look and a polite but weak smile. And then resolve to model good behavior and be an advocate for someone else the next time there is an impolite interruption. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

Hakimian Brothers ONLY THE FINEST ORIENTAL RUGS Trusted Name in St. Louis Over 50 Years

2/1/19

7:00

7:30

FOX Last Man 2 Standing (N)

The Cool Kids (N) (cc)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Hell’s Kitchen: What’s FOX 2 News at 9:00pm Your Motto? (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

CBS MacGyver A crime boss Hawaii Five-0 Grover Blue Bloods A medium 4 offers to surrender. has an emotional reac- claims to have informa(N) (cc) tion. (N) (cc) tion. (N) NBC Blindspot The team 5 searches for a serial killer. (N) (cc)

The Blacklist An impor- Dateline NBC (N) (cc) tant backer of Red’s is killed. (N)

PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc)

Father Brown: The Tree Midsomer Murders A of Truth. Miscarriage of village librarian turns justice. up dead. (cc)

CW 11

Donnybrook

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Dynasty: Filthy Games. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Fallon tries to prove Rebecca and Greg take herself. (N) a day trip. (N) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Fresh Off 30 the Boat (N)

Speechless 20/20 Daughter of serial killer Dennis Rader. (N) (N) (cc)

ION CSI: Crime Scene In46 vestigation: Bodies in Motion.

CSI: Crime Scene Inves- CSI: Crime Scene Intigation A movie star’s vestigation Death on a death. flight of stairs.

STORECLOSING SALE

LAST 2 DAYS! NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED EVERY INCREDIBLE RUG IS NOW REDUCED

60%~80% Our multi-million dollar inventory of fine handmade oriental rugs from Persia and many neighboring countries must all be sold in the next 2 days. All shapes and sizes are available, new and antique, traditional and contemporary. We look forward to seeing you in our Showroom where you can find the rug of your dreams before our doors close forever.

314.725.3600

10:00 AM- 6:00 PM OPEN EVERY DAY! 7911 CLAYTON RD. CLAYTON, MISSOURI


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 02.01.2019

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Burning tongue? Doctor doesn’t have a clue Dear Dr. Roach • I have a “burning tongue.” I’ve had it since my 40s. I’m now 84 years old. I could cook an egg on my tongue. It never goes away. I once mentioned this to my doctor, but she just shook her head and didn’t have a clue. I’m convinced I’ll never know what causes this. Any ideas? — C.B.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Burning mouth syndrome is the term used to describe a burning sensation in the mouth when no medical or dental cause can be identified. It is most common in women after menopause, and symptoms may be only on the tongue or even just the tip of the tongue. It sometimes is associated with a dry mouth or with abnormal taste sensation. There are some conditions that can look like burning mouth syndrome but have known causes, such as oral herpes and aphthous ulcers, but a careful exam should find these (and 40-some years is way too long). Some nutritional deficiencies can cause these symptoms, but in your case, I am pretty certain you have the “idiopathic” (no known cause) type. Some authorities believe it is related to trigeminal neuralgia. No treatment is effective for everyone, but a tricyclic antidepressant (such as amitriptyline, which works on pain fibers), gabapentin and pramipexole have been effective for some people. A neurologist might be a useful consultant, since your doctor was remarkably unhelpful and lacking in curiosity.

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • I received a Zoster (Zostavax) shot in 2014. I am 65 years old. Now my nurse practitioner says I need to get the Shingrix shot. There are two doses costing $300 per dose. This is not covered by Medicare. Is this really necessary? I am looking for a second opinion. — S.M.

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

Answer • Coverage for vaccinations under Medicare comes from Part D, which not everyone has, and which may be provided by multiple insurers. Most Medicare Part D plans do cover the Shingrix shot (and I agree with your NP that it is a good idea — it gives additional protection on top of what you got from the Zostavax). There may be different “cost-sharing” amounts you have to pay, only some of which may be reimbursed. You also may have a deductible that needs to be paid before getting any coverage. You can call your Medicare Part D plan’s member services department to find out whether Shingrix is covered, or when it will be.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

Profile for stltoday.com

2.1.19  

2.1.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

2.1.19  

2.1.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Profile for dmsgroup

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded