1.22.19

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TUESDAY • 01.22.2019 • $2.00

A ‘FREE FOR ALL’

TEXTS BETWEEN OFFICERS BOONE AND HAYS THE DAY AFTER THE ASSAULT:

UNDERCOVER ST. LOUIS COP SAYS COLLEAGUES BEAT HIM DURING STOCKLEY PROTEST ‘LIKE RODNEY KING’ BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • An undercover St. Louis police officer who was

In this photo from a nearby resident, St. Louis police use a technique called kettling, in which exits are blocked in and people are arrested, on Sept. 17, 2017, at Washington Avenue and Tucker Boulevard. People were protesting the not-guilty verdict of former Officer Jason Stockley.

beaten by colleagues during protests in 2017 later described the attack as a “free for all” and told someone at police headquarters that he was beaten “like Rodney King,” according to recently released court documents. Detective Luther Hall’s statements about the night he was attacked were used by the FBI to justify searches of four officers’ cellphones and associated accounts as agents investigated both Hall’s attack and the arrest or detention of other protesters following the Sept. 15, 2017, acquittal of former St. Louis police Officer Jason Stockley. They provide the most detailed retelling of Hall’s version of the attack and new information about the resulting FBI investigation. That investigation resulted in charges in November against four police officers. Officers Dustin Boone, Randy Hays and Christopher Myers were accused of the physical assault and charged with depriving Hall of his constitutional rights and conspiracy to obstruct justice. Myers also

See HALL • Page A4

CARRYING ON KING’S LEGACY

Boone

Hays

Hays: Said he had told someone “the ass whooping can be explained. The camera thing can’t and we weren’t a part of that.” Boone: Replied he was “WAY more alright with what u and I did than what the others did! I don’t like that we put our hands on another cop, but the situation was a little (expletive) up, too, wasn’t JUST us.” Hays: Hall “could’ve announced himself any time. And he wasn’t complying. The camera thing is just ignorant, nothing we all haven’t done and if it was a protester it wouldn’t be a problem at all.”

Politicians appeal to black voters during King celebrations BY MICHAEL SCHERER AND ANNIE LINSKEY Washington Post

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Democratic presidential aspirants fanned out across the country Monday to praise the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and offer direct appeals to black voters who will play a major role in deciding on a nominee to challenge President Donald Trump. Former Vice President Joe Biden and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg called for more racial justice and poverty reduction Monday. Two other potential candidates, Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Cory Booker, D-N.J., sat side by side in the front middle pew at Zion Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., for its King holiday prayer service. At a later event, Sanders said: “Today we talk about justice, and today we talk about racism. I must tell you it gives me no pleasure to tell you that we now have a president of the

The government shutdown and frigid temperatures combined for a short, sparse Martin Luther King Day ceremony downtown. But pews were filled during a midday interfaith service at Leonard Missionary Baptist Church. STORY • A6

William Whittaker (left) leads the crowd in a chant during a Martin Luther King Day march on Monday in St. Louis. Pharaoh Gerumba carries a portrait of King that he made Sunday night.

Group to provide free menstrual supplies to low-income women

Viral standoff more complex than it seemed

BY BLYTHE BERNHARD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

You can’t buy them with food stamps, and Medicaid doesn’t cover them, but tampons and pads are a necessity for women’s health, advocates say. Starting in April, the new St. Louis Alliance for Period Supplies plans to distribute free menstrual products to women who need them. A recent survey of 183 lowincome women showed that nearly two-thirds can’t always afford pads or tampons, accord-

TODAY

45°/26°

ing to St. Louis University. The women reported substituting diapers, rags or paper towels during their periods. Some said they had resorted to stealing pads or collecting them from local emergency rooms. “Women are resourceful, and they make do, but making do for your whole cycle the entire month affects your sense of self and your dignity,” said Anne Sebert Kuhlmann, an associate professor of behavioral science and health education at SLU See WOMEN • Page A4

Freedom’s call

CLOUDY

TOMORROW

30°/22°

COLDER AND CLOUDY

WEATHER B10

BY MICHAEL E. MILLER Washington Post

WASHINGTON • The three groups

SURVIVAL MEDIA AGENCY VIA AP

In this image from a video taken Friday, a teenager stands face to face with a Native American singing and playing a drum in Washington. Three groups at the Lincoln Memorial for separate demonstrations were involved in an altercation.

Winter Warm-Up wraps up SPORTS

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See KING • Page A7

that met in the cold shadow of the Lincoln Memorial could hardly have been more different. They were indigenous-rights activists from Michigan, Catholic schoolboys from Kentucky — some wearing Make America Great Again hats — and Hebrew Israelites from the nation’s capital. They were Native American, white and black; old, young and middle age. And there, beneath the fallen president’s promise to work “with malice toward none, with charity for all,”

See VIDEO • Page A8

NAACP wants newscaster fired for slur

• A2

Man shot by deputy faces gun charges

• A3

10 percent of TSA screeners call in sick

• A9

Blues cough up 2-goal lead in 4-3 loss

• B1

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M 1 TUESDAY • 01.22.2019 • A2

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The Academy Award nominations are being announced Tuesday morning. Brush up on Oscar trivia with our acceptance speech quiz. stltoday.com/movies

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Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

NAACP wants newscaster fired for slur inserted into King’s name BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The St. Louis County NAACP met with a local news station Monday to call for the removal of the local newscaster who mispronounced the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s name to include a racial slur last week. KTVI (Channel 2) newscaster Kevin Steincross was speaking on the station’s morning news show at 5:34 a.m. Jan. 17 when he said a tribute to the civil rights icon at St. Louis University would honor “Martin Luther coon Jr.,” speaking a racial slur that has been used against black people. Steincross apologized on air a little after 9 a.m.: “Please know I have total respect for Dr. King, what he meant and what he continues to mean to our country. This was not intentional in any way, and I sincerely apologize,” he said. On Thursday, ahead of a meeting with the St. Louis County NAACP, a representative for Tribune Broadcasting said the station viewed the mispronunciation as an unfortunate mistake and did not plan to take additional disciplinary measures against Steincross after his apology. “The Fox2 management team spoke to Kevin following the mistake and we believe that it was truly inadvertent and does not reflect Kevin’s core beliefs,” a Tribune spokesperson said a written statement. That answer didn’t satisfy the county NAACP chapter. “There are some matters where it

is imperative we take a stand, and this is one of them,” said St. Louis County NAACP President John Gaskin. “I understand some people believe it was a mistake, but there are some mistakes in every field that are grounds for termination.” The slur has a painful history for African-Americans, often used by racists to denigrate King. “It needs to be taken seriously,” Gaskin said. The NAACP is joined by others in asking for more action, including the Ethical Society of Police, a police membership organization that represents primarily black officers, and Missouri state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed. After the meeting with KTVI leadership Monday afternoon, Gaskin said, “We’ve made our request and we’ll give them a chance to respond accordingly.” He declined to provide more details about the meeting but said the NAACP was standing firm in its request for Steincross’ termination. “We certainly understand people have brought up things about his character and him being an upstanding person, and although that may be the case, we’re talking about the incident at hand and it’s imperative we not get off the issue,” Gaskin said. If the station does not fire Steincross, “we’ll cross that bridge when we get there,” Gaskin said. A representative said Tribune Media had no comment after the meeting. Steincross was just the latest in a series of broadcasters making the same mis-

pronunciation of King’s name, sparking debates over whether the speakers revealed racism or just made simple mistakes. This month, upstate New York meteorologist Jeremy Kappell was fired after mispronouncing a Rochester park as “Martin Luther coon King Jr. Park,” appearing to stumble over the name. Three days later, News10NBC’s general manager announced that Kappell no longer worked for the station. In 2013, San Antonio meteorologist Mike Hernandez, said he also misspoke the name, calling the holiday “Martin Luther coon Day.” He apologized and kept his job. ESPN sports broadcaster Mike Greenberg in 2010 said he and co-host on the “Mike & Mike” radio show were “talking football with you on this Martin Luther coon King Jr. holiday” on air. He apologized and was not fired. In 2005, Las Vegas weather reporter Rob Blair said temperatures would be in the mid-60s on “Martin Luther coon King Jr. Day.” He was fired after working for the station for about three months. Steincross has been working at KTVI since 1996 in roles as a general assignment reporter, co-anchor and morning newscaster, according to his bio on Fox2Now.com. Nassim Benchaabane of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

Property tax breaks granted to developers and building owners by St. Louis cut revenue last year by $31 million, with public schools, libraries and local cultural institutions among those taking a hit. That is a bigger impact than in 2017, when property tax breaks awarded by the city reduced revenue collections by $29.6 million. The city of St. Louis and other local governments are required to estimate how incentives affect revenue under national accounting guidelines that went into effect two years ago. The disclosures are included in the city’s annual comprehensive financial reports. The most recent report was released last week by St. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green’s office. Tax abatements, a common economic development incentive, have been controversial in recent years. They freeze real estate assessments, typically for a decade, prior to new construction or big rehabilitation projects. Even homeowners can take advantage of the incentive if they are planning significant upgrades. Developers and some city officials point out the incentives are needed to help finance construction projects in a region where rents are often lower than those in other large metro areas and that the so-called forgone revenues never would have been generated without the tax breaks. And, they say, the new development helps attract residents who pay other taxes into city coffers. But critics who have placed heightened scrutiny on the incentives in recent years question whether developers, particularly in strong central corridor neighborhoods, actually need all the tax breaks they receive.

STUDIO GANG ARCHITECTS

The 36-story One Hundred apartment building on North Kingshighway, shown in a rendering, will get 95 percent property tax abatement for 10 years.

With a tight budget picture year after year, the city’s use of incentives has stayed a hot political topic and prompted some policy changes. In recent years, economic development officials and aldermen have hired analysts to up their game at the negotiating table with developers. At the same time, they’ve pared back the value of some tax breaks. Still, Glenn Burleigh, a member of local activist group Team TIF that tracks St. Louis’ use of development incentives, said he doesn’t expect much to change in the near future. “When we’re passing abatements for buildings that are 10, 15, 20 years in length, we’re going to be stuck with those

Cardi B, commentator trade jabs

The partial government shutdown has given us the celebrity Twitter feud we perhaps deserve: Rapper Cardi B and conservative commentator Tomi Lahren are having a tiff. Lahren was apparently unimpressed with the rapper’s recent expletive-laden video in which she blamed President Donald Trump’s insistence on border wall funding for the shutdown. “Our country is in a hellhole right now,” Cardi B told nearly 40 million Instagram followers. “All for a ... wall.” While fans started “Cardi for Prez” talk, Lahren wrote: “Looks like @iamcardib is the latest genius political mind to endorse the Democrats. HA! Keep it up, guys! #MAGA2020.” Cardi B responded Sunday: “Leave me alone I will dog walk you,” then Lahren posted her own volley: “Still doesn’t make your political rambling any less moronic. #BuildthatWall.” Cardi B fired again: “You’re so blinded with racism that you don’t even realize the decisions the president you root for is destroying the country you claim to love so much.” So there. “Gotti” Razzied • John Travolta’s John Gotti biopic “Gotti” has topped the 39th annual Razzie Awards with a co-leading six nominations. In nominations announced Monday, “Gotti,” the Will Ferrell comedy “Holmes & Watson,” conservative provocateur Dinesh D’Souza’s “Death of a Nation” and the R-rated puppet comedy “Happytime Murders” all earned six nominations. Nominated for worst picture are “Gotti,” “The Happytime Murders,” “Holmes & Watson,” “Robin Hood” and “Winchester.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

Actress Piper Laurie is 87. Singer Steve Perry is 70. Actress Linda Blair is 60. Actress Diane Lane is 54. Actor Christopher Kennedy Masterson is 39. Rapper Logic is 29.

St. Louis tax incentives kept $31 million from city institutions, schools last year BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PEOPLE

for a long time,” he said. Though the city and its various development arms approve the tax abatements, St. Louis Public Schools are actually most affected by lower property tax revenues despite having little to no say in how they are awarded. The city only receives about 19 cents of every property tax dollar collected, while the public school district takes in about 61 percent of St. Louis property tax collections. The remainder goes to the St. Louis Public Library, the Zoo and Museum District and other local services. St. Louis, therefore, didn’t collect about $5.5 million in property taxes that would have gone into local functions, a small fraction of its roughly $1 billion budget. Still, Team TIF pointed out that the difference is roughly half of the budget deficit that city leaders last year had to figure out how to close. St. Louis Public Schools, on the other hand, didn’t collect about $18.9 million due to tax abatements. The use of the city’s other large local development incentive, tax increment financing, or TIF, has slowed down in the last year, with fewer new TIF projects pushing back the future collection of local tax revenue. Like tax abatement, TIF freezes property assessments prior to new development and allows the developer to use the higher anticipated property taxes after development to finance construction. In addition, TIF also allows the developer to capture half of new sales taxes and earnings taxes. TIF projects will divert $364 million in future revenue, according to the comptroller’s report, and taxes paid from TIF projects paid down $37.6 million in TIF obligations last year.

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CORRECTIONS • The losing candidate in a 2018 Lincoln County judicial election was misidentified in a front-page story Monday. Adam Burkemper was defeated by Patrick Flynn in the race for circuit judge.

Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

JOE HOLLEMAN Joe’s St. Louis will return Jan. 29

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LOCAL

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Man shot by deputy is charged with gun crime FROM STAFF REPORTS

EAST ST. LOUIS • A man shot by a St.

Clair County sheriff’s deputy during a traffic stop in East St. Louis about midnight Friday is recovering at a hospital and is expected to be released to face a federal gun charge. St. Clair County authorities said Demetrius O. Ward, 42, had been charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm after the officer-involved shooting. He allegedly had a 9mm Taurus pistol and has an armed robbery conviction from 2005 that makes it illegal for him to have a gun,

Dark-money group that tried to sway Parkway voters fined

the sheriff’s department said. Ward was in serious but stable condition at a St. Louis hospital and will be transported to St. Clair County to face the gun Ward charge when he is released, authorities said. Illinois State Police are investigating the shooting, which authorities said began with a routine traffic stop in East St. Louis. The agency said a sheriff’s deputy tried to stop a vehicle near 27th Street and Missouri Avenue for a traffic violation. During a short

chase, a tire on the fleeing car blew, causing it to stop near Ridge Avenue and 18th Street. “The deputy reportedly shot the driver as he attempted to flee on foot from the traffic stop and in the process of fleeing placed the deputy in fear for his life,” an emailed statement from Illinois State Police said. The deputy, described as a seven-year police officer who has been with the sheriff’s department for two years, has been placed on administrative leave pending completion of the investigation. The sheriff’s department said it is aware of a video of the shooting that has been

posted on Facebook, but had no further comment. The video shows a man getting out of the vehicle after police order him to come out with his hands visible. The man then begins to run from the car, apparently drops something and is shot as he tries to pick up whatever he dropped. Five gunshots can be heard on the video. St. Clair County Capt. Bruce Fleshren said the results of the shooting investigation by Illinois State Police will be presented to county prosecutors for review. Ward lives on Wimmer Place in East St. Louis, not far from the shooting scene.

BLUE MORPHO MONDAY

BY JACK SUNTRUP st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri

ethics regulators this month fined a secretive Chesterfield group $100 after the group broke state law prior to last April’s Parkway School Board election. The nonprofit group Missouri Advocates for Educating Taxpayer Accountability, or MO AETA, admitted to sending out a mailer to Parkway voters without proper “clear and conspicuous” identifying information, as required by Missouri law. The mailer in question seemed to promote two candidates — Jeanie Ames and Jonathan Taylor — who had declared themselves the race’s “conservative” candidates. Ames had stirred controversy over her social media posts. She had described herself as a Confederate, called Michelle Obama a “giant rat” and retweeted a message about banning Islam in the United States. She and Taylor both lost their bids to join the school board in April. There were five candidates running for two spots on the board; Taylor and Ames netted the fewest votes. The ethics commission said the postcard boosting Taylor and Ames should have included the name of the principal officer of the group, in this case Margaret “Peggy” Welker, the president of MO AETA. Welker signed a consent order with the Missouri Ethics Commission on Jan. 11. The commission concluded that MO AETA violated state election law by omitting Welker’s name, according to a copy of the consent order ethics officials signed Wednesday. Welker declined to comment when reached by phone on Monday. In an unsigned email, MO AETA said it included most of the required identifying information, including the group’s Chesterfield address, but omitted Welker’s name. “THAT is our violation,” the email said. “Everyday citizens came together and created a flyer to inform Parkway voters,” the email said. “We are pleased the voters of Parkway had the opportunity to know more about whom they would vote in the April election.” Unlike most groups engaging in Missouri politics, Missouri Advocates for Educating Taxpayer Accountability did not form a campaign committee with the Missouri Ethics Commission. Instead, the group formed an organization under section 501(c)(4) of the federal tax code. That allowed the group to accept contributions without having to disclose donors. The move was similar to former Gov. Eric Greitens’ formation of the A New Missouri dark-money group, which accepted more than $6 million in donations yet has never revealed the source of the money. Then-state Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, filed a complaint with the ethics commission last year accusing A New Missouri of evading campaign contribution limits and campaign disclosure requirements. That complaint is still pending. It is unclear whether the Missouri Ethics Commission is weighing any other complaints against the MO AETA group. The secretary of state’s office dissolved the organization in December after Welker did not file necessary registration paperwork with the state.

Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Laura Chisholm releases butterflies Monday at the sophia M. sachs Butterfly House in Chesterfield. More than 1,000 butterflies will be released over the next week or so, said Chisholm, senior manager of collections, education and facilities. about 700 of those will be blue morphos, which are among the largest butterflies in the world and have scales that intensify and reflect blue light.

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ST. ANN • A South County man was killed when

he crashed a car while fleeing St. Ann police Saturday. The driver of the fleeing car, Arman Memetovic, 21, was identified in a Missouri Highway Patrol summary of the crash released Monday. Police were called to the Menards store on St. Charles Rock Road on Saturday afternoon after a store security officer saw a man and woman stealing items and confronted them, St. Ann police told KTVI (Channel 2). The male suspect told the store’s security guard he had a gun before the two fled in a 2001 Chevrolet Cavalier, police said. A police officer responding to the call spotted the vehicle and began a pursuit. Less than a minute later, the getaway car collided with a 2014 Lincoln MKS at Lynn Town Drive, according to police and the Missouri Highway Patrol. Memetovic, who was driving the fleeing car, was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The two other occupants of his vehicle, a 27-year-old man and a 25-year-old woman, had serious injuries. The driver of the other car, a 43-year-old man from the St. Louis area, was also taken to a hospital with serious injuries. Recent court cases against Memetovic — for drug possession and trespassing — give an address in the 3700 block of Lemay Village Lane in the Mehlville area. The chase came less than a week after another St. Ann police pursuit of people suspected of shoplifting from the same Menards. That chase, on Jan. 13, ended in a crash that injured a police officer. The chase went into St. Louis and Illinois before the shoplifting suspects’ truck hit a patrol vehicle at Highway 367 and Interstate 270 in Bellefontaine Neighbors. The officer’s car slammed into a concrete median. Both suspects initially ran, but they were apprehended and taken into custody. The officer was taken to a hospital where he was treated for a fractured chin, broken nose and a concussion, St. Ann police said at the time.

Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

Foristell woman acquitted in husband’s death BY RACHEL RICE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WARRENTON • A Foristell

woman who had been charged with first-degree murder in the shooting of her husband was cleared Monday. The jury deliberated for nearly four hours. Ashley Hunter, 31, shot her husband Nicholas Hunter, 30, on Jan. 15, 2015, claiming it was in self-defense after he physically attacked her during an argument. Police found him dead on their living room floor.

During the six-day trial, defense lawyer Scott Rosenblum argued that Nicholas Hunter had unpredictable moods, partially due to drinking and steroid use, and sometimes took his rage out on Ashley Hunter. On the night Ashley Hunter shot him, Nicholas Hunter had choked her so hard, Rosenblum said, that he lifted her off the ground. “It’s been a long process ... she’s been incarcerated for quite a bit, but I always believed it was self-defense,” Rosenblum said after the verdict was an-

nounced. “I’m very pleased and very grateful. And the family — their daughter came back home tonight.” Nicholas Hunter’s cousin Shannon Brady said she was stunned by the verdict. She remembers him as an “incredible person” who “would do anything for anyone.” Brady doesn’t believe Ashley Hunter’s claim that Nicholas Hunter hit her. “Ashley told me herself that he never laid a finger on her,” Brady said. “And when (pros-

ecutor) Kelly King asked her that on the stand, she admitted she told me that.” The Hunters’ marriage was not good and “happened very quickly,” Brady said, and Nicholas Hunter had been discussing divorce for several months before he was fatally shot. “I’m in shock,” Brady said of the verdict. “I don’t understand how the jury could come up with that based on the evidence.” Joel Currier of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police officers are gathered after a mass arrest on Sept. 17, 2017, at Washington Avenue and Tucker Boulevard in St. Louis. A group of officers twice chanted, “Whose streets? Our streets,” as protesters and others who were arrested were loaded into vans to be taken to jail.

is charged with destruction of evidence, accused of destroying Hall’s cellphone. Officer Bailey Colletta was accused of lying to a federal grand jury investigating the attack. All have pleaded not guilty. Hays’ lawyer, Brian Millikan, declined to comment. The other lawyers did not respond to requests for comment Monday. On Friday, a judge ordered redacted copies of the search warrants unsealed, and four of nine have been so far. In affidavits supporting the application for the warrants, FBI Special Agent Darren Boehlje wrote that Hall and his partner were undercover, “documenting protest activity and property destruction.” Hall was carrying a Nikon camera and a cellphone. Hall and his partner became separated when fleeing other officers who were firing pepper balls, bean bag rounds and mace into the crowd from vehicles, the affidavit says. The affidavit also notes that Hall did not hear an order to disperse prior to the police use of chemical agents and bean bag rounds. At an intersection, police SUVs pulled up and a female officer ordered Hall to get to the ground. As he was getting to his knees, Hall was picked up twice and slammed to the ground, face first, Boehlje wrote. His nose and lip were already bleeding when he was repeatedly kicked

and hit with closed fists and sticks, Boehlje wrote. Hall’s hands were in front of him on the ground, and although officers were telling him to put his hands behind his back, they were also standing on his arms, Boehlje wrote. “Hall described it as a ‘free for all,’” the affidavit says. Hall’s cellphone screen had been shattered from what Hall thought was a baton. After he was handcuffed, he watched as an officer took out his Nikon battery and threw the camera to the ground, breaking it, Boehlje wrote. The affidavit suggests there may be video of at least part of the incident, as Hall’s cellphone was “actively recording” as he surrendered. Hall did not want to reveal his identity. He made eye contact with someone he knew, and that person got two SWAT officers to take Hall away. He later received medical treatment in an armored vehicle before telling someone at headquarters that officers “beat the (expletive) out of him like Rodney King.” Hall then received more treatment at a temporary Highway Patrol medical facility. It took three layers of stitches to close the hole in his lip, and he suffered multiple herniated discs, the affidavit says. A jaw injury made it hard to eat and Hall lost about 15 pounds, Boehlje wrote. He identified four officers at the scene of his assault: Boone, Colletta, Hays and Myers,

Boehlje wrote. The affidavit also details text messages purportedly exchanged after the attack: The day after the assault, Boone and Hays discussed it by text, with Hays writing that he’d told someone “the ass whooping can be explained. The camera thing can’t and we weren’t a part of that.” Boone replies that he was “WAY more alright with what u and I did than what the others did! I don’t like that we put our hands on another cop, but the situation was a little (expletive) up, too, wasn’t JUST us.” Hays then echoed that, adding that Hall “could’ve announced himself any time. And he wasn’t complying. The camera thing is just ignorant, nothing we all haven’t done and if it was a protester it wouldn’t be a problem at all.” On Sept. 22, Boone writes that someone is trying to call Hall, apparently to arrange an apology. Hays replies that he wanted to apologize “before someone gets in his ear and true (sic) to turn this into something more than it was.” Boone replies, “EXACTLY! That’s my biggest fear now that it’s getting around. Somebody puts money or race in his ear and he listens for some reason and it’s over before we get to say a word.” Boone reached out to Hall in a text message on Sept. 25, 2017, apologizing and asking to do so again in-person, the af-

A makeshift flamethrower, sketchy GPS and a thief gets his reward BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BALLWIN • A bizarre week

Officer still hasn’t returned to duty after assault

HALL • FROM A1

A WEEK ON BALLWIN POLICE BEAT

fidavit says. Hall has still not returned to duty. The indictment says the three thought Hall was a protester and assaulted him “while he was compliant and not posing a physical threat to anyone.” All four officers were working protest duty on the “Civil Disobedience Team,” and several had exchanged electronic messages before and after the arrest expressing “disdain” for protesters and “excitement about using unjustified force against them and going undetected while doing so.” The Sept. 17, 2017, protest was one of many that followed the acquittal of former police Officer Jason Stockley on a murder charge for the fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith. Some protesters and their lawyers have questioned whether their allegations will be investigated as aggressively as Hall’s. In a written statement last month, U.S. Attorney Jeff Jensen said, “This office and the FBI will continue to accept and thoroughly investigate evidence of alleged police misconduct. Charges result only when witnesses are willing to speak to authorities, officers against whom allegations are being made can be identified, and there exists sufficient evidence to support the allegations against identified officers.” Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

of calls for Ballwin police officers included an arson ignited by a makeshift flamethrower at Lowe’s, a thief who caught himself in the act on camera, another who used his own grocery rewards card when stealing alcohol and a driver who got stuck on a golf course while following GPS directions. The police department took to Facebook to summarize the strange series of events with some humor. The string of crimes started on Monday morning, when a man stole alcohol from the CVS store at 14400 Clayton Road, but paid for other products. “The suspect was identified because his un-methodical tactics included using his rewards card while committing his crimes, which was registered to himself,” the department said in the Facebook post. He was identified and arrested for misdemeanor stealing, the department said. Then, on Wednesday, a driver got stuck on the Ballwin Golf Course. The motorist said GPS directed the incursion onto the golf course. “Officers helped the vehicle back onto the roadway with parting advice that included utilizing a different GPS proprietor,” police wrote on the department Facebook page. Early Thursday morning, a thief burglarized a unit in the Seven Trails apartment complex in the 300 block of Bolton Drive. Among the loot, a functioning wireless security camera that live-streamed the crime to the victim’s cellphone. Officers knew the thief from “previous encounters,” the department said. They arrested him and found the camera. “If your (sic) missing anything from your garage in this area give us a call, we have a good idea who the delinquent might be,” the post said. The week capped off with a call about an arson in the lawn and garden section of a Lowe’s store Saturday night. Police believe a group of teens attempting to make a flamethrower by using a bottle of spray paint and a lighter started the fire. Metro West firefighters extinguished the blaze before anyone was injured and prevented damage to the structure of the building. The teens have not been arrested.

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER LAKE SAINT LOUIS > Pedestrian struck, killed crossing I-70 • A Troy, Mo., man died after running in front of a pickup on Interstate 70 early Monday, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. Leonard J. Briley, 35, ran into the path of a 1996 Dodge Ram that was eastbound on I-70 near Lake Saint Louis Boulevard just after 5 a.m., the highway patrol said. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the truck, an 18-year-old Wentzville man, was taken to a nearby hospital with minor injuries, the patrol said. His damaged pickup was towed from the scene. It wasn’t clear why Briley was on the interstate.

Three lanes of the highway were closed early Monday morning and traffic was rerouted while authorities investigated. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Motorist killed in collision identified • A St. Peters woman was killed in a three-vehicle crash on Interstate 270 south of Manchester Road on Sunday afternoon, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. The chain-reaction crash started when a 2003 Chevrolet Malibu hit the median wall on northbound I-270 just after 3 p.m., according to the highway patrol. A 2000 Chevrolet Silverado pickup then hit the passenger side of the Malibu. That caused the Malibu to hit a third vehicle, a 2003 Ford F-150

pickup. A passenger in the Malibu, Dorothy F. Hewing, 65, of St. Peters, was pronounced dead at the scene. Charles E. Taylor, 18, of St. Peters, was driving the Malibu. He was taken to a hospital with minor injuries. Both were wearing seat belts. The drivers of the other vehicles were not injured. They were also wearing seat belts. One northbound lane was open while emergency crews worked at the scene after the crash, he said. All lanes reopened before 6 p.m. It wasn’t clear if weather played a role in the crash. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Officer injured in crash • A St. Louis

County police officer was taken to a hospital Monday morning after a crash on Interstate 55 in South County. The officer was at the scene about 7:30 a.m. after a black SUV hit a median in the southbound lane of the highway near Butler Hill Road, authorities said. The officer was helping the SUV’s driver gather belongings from the vehicle when another car lost control and struck the SUV. The officer was partially inside the car at the time, and was sent down an embankment near Butler Hill, police said. The officer was taken to a hospital with injuries that weren’t life-threatening. No one else was injured in the crash, police said.

The injured officer is assigned to the Affton-Southwest precinct and has been with the department for three years. ST. LOUIS > Man is found shot dead in backyard • A man was found fatally shot Monday afternoon, police said. The man was found dead with at least one gunshot wound shortly after 3 p.m. in the backyard of a home in the 4900 block of Emerson Avenue, St. Louis police said. The man had been shot in the torso. Police did not receive any phone calls for shots fired from the area Monday before the man was found. Homicide detectives were called to investigate. Police did not have more details.

Average woman spends $70-$100 a year on menstrual products WOMEN • FROM A1

who led the study published in the February issue of the medical journal Obstetrics and Gynecology. The average woman spends $70 to $100 a year on menstrual products. Unlike sunscreen and bandages, period supplies are not recognized as medical expense deductions by the IRS. Wearing pads for too long, or not using appropriate products can lead to urinary tract or other bacterial infections. In the local study, 36 percent of the women surveyed said they missed one or more

days of work each month because of a lack of access to menstrual products. “There’s a cost to being a woman, and we shouldn’t leave this as a luxury,” Kuhlmann said. “All women should be able to take care of themselves hygienically.” At least 10 states, including Illinois, have eliminated the so-called “tampon tax,” making menstrual products a nontaxable essential item typically reserved for food and prescription drugs. For the past year, Illinois also has required public middle and high schools to provide free prod-

ucts in their bathrooms. Two undergraduates at SLU recently launched Project Period to bring free supplies to campus. Dignity Period, a local charity that has distributed pads to thousands of girls and women in Ethiopia since 2015, will provide packets of reusable pads to the local alliance. It’s believed to be the first time that washable pads will be distributed through a charity in the U.S., said Angie Wiseman, executive director of the nonprofit. “It’s novel to lots of American girls and women,” Wiseman said. “We’re not adding to landfills.”

The packets will include two reusable pads made by Cotton Babies, a St. Louis-based cloth diaper company, along with detergent and care instructions. “Periods are not the favorite thing for anyone, so it’s an opportunity for us to ease that burden by knowing if they have a couple reusable pads, they’ll always have something,” Wiseman said. The St. Louis Area Diaper Bank will help with warehousing and distribution of the menstrual supplies through agencies that serve low-income women. The diaper bank already has received

donations of more than 200,000 disposable pads. The group also hopes to provide free supplies to local schools. “The mission of the diaper bank is to use diapers as a gateway resource to get engaged with services in the early years of child development,” said Jessica Adams, the diaper bank’s founder. “Period products are really different. Our end goal is just to make sure people have them so they can participate in their lives.” Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com


01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

King marchers carry on despite cold

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Event organizers and community members pray Monday on the steps of the Old Courthouse before a Martin Luther King Day march in St. Louis. Because the courthouse was closed due to the government shutdown, the event was moved from the rotunda, where it is usually held, to outside. BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The annual ceremony honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Old Courthouse is typically a two-hour affair, with several hundred people packing the rotunda of the downtown landmark where Dred Scott fought for his freedom. But a monthlong federal government shutdown still underway shuttered the Old Courthouse, part of Gateway Arch National Park, pushing Monday’s ceremony to the steps of the historic building, where slaves like Scott were sold. Organizers considered changing the location, but did not want to dispense with tradition. However, with bitterly cold temperatures, they edited this year’s ceremony down to 30 minutes, with about half a dozen activists and politicians including Mayor Lyda Krewson and Aldermanic Board President Lewis Reed making brief remarks. The group of dignitaries huddled behind the lectern was nearly the size of the crowd that had come to the event. Afterward, as in years past, the group, with St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden in the front, marched for nearly an hour. They headed west on Market Street, north on Tucker Boulevard, with a final turn onto Martin Luther King Drive and into Leonard Missionary Baptist Church, in the city’s Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood. A large police presence helped guide the 50 or so marchers and block intersections for easy passage. Inside the church, a long parade of speakers and performers kept the crowd on its feet, with hands to the sky, dancing in the aisles and a generous dose of praise. Every pew was filled. Reed led the crowd in a popular chant of “Keep That Dream Alive.” A band with a saxophonist out front did a rousing version of “When the Saints Go Marching In.”

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Terry-jean Walls joins the congregation in song Monday at the Leonard Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis.

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

The annual Martin Luther King Day march heads Monday down North Tucker Boulevard.

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Laura Rockett, a graduate of the University of MissouriSt. Louis, helps inspect and clean seed trays Monday in the greenhouse at EarthDance Farms in Ferguson. UMSL sponsored several projects for its Day of Service event. The seed trays are cleaned of debris and then sterilized before reuse this year.

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

People carry signs Monday as they parade down Market Street during the Martin Luther King Day march in St. Louis. The hourlong walk ended at Leonard Missionary Baptist Church in the city’s Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood. Inside the church, a long parade of speakers and performers kept the crowd on its feet.

As speakers often do at King events, Reed brought up the question of progress. “I’m feeling good today,” he said. “Have we made progress? Yes. Do we have a long way to go? Yes. Are we going to make it? Yes.” Hayden, 56, said he was a young boy when King was killed, but the civil rights leader’s legacy guided him through adulthood. It was a quote on individual pursuit that stuck with the chief. “If you can’t be the sun, be a star. For it isn’t by size that you win or fail,” King said. “Be the best of what you are.” Hayden said, “I’ve really tried to be that with my life.” Michael McMillan, CEO of Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, said the region has a long arc highlighting the challenges of AfricanAmericans. From Dred Scott to Ferguson. He urged those at the service to not take for granted gains that have been made, including voting rights. The budget battle that has led to a partial federal government shutdown is “yet another example of why we don’t have reasoning in Washington to do the right thing,” McMillan said. “We have to elect competent people standing for our community.” Betty Thompson, a civil rights activist and former state representative, told the crowd she came to reaffirm “that all men are created equal,” a phrase from the Declaration of Independence that King used in one of his most famous quotes: “Now, I say to you today my friends, even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream,” King said. “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.’” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“It’s cruel and immoral to tell people to pick up themselves by the bootstraps when they are taking away the boots,” says Darryl Commings, the pastor of Bethany Way Fellowship, who speaks at a rally Monday for Local 1 Janitors outside Bank of America Plaza. The protest was over wage cuts for the janitors.


NATION

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

King’s daughter decries disunity at Atlanta event saved by Delta

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A7

Kamala Harris announces candidacy on holiday

BY BEN NADLER associated Press

ATLANTA • A commemorative service for the Rev.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that was nearly imperiled by the federal government shutdown was held Monday morning in Atlanta at a church called King’s “spiritual home.” King’s daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, said in her remarks that the annual service at Ebenezer Baptist Church came during a moment of crisis in America. She condemned the gridlock and partisanship in Washington that led to the shutdown. “Our humanity is literally on the verge of digressing to two Americas and becoming the dis-United State of America,” she said. King also slammed what she called “the powerful resurgence of nationalistic and white supremacist ideologies” around the world. The event was attended by Republican U.S. Sen. David Perdue, Democratic Congresswoman Lucy McBath, and Emma Gonzalez, a survivor of the mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in February. Perdue, who is white, recounted growing up in Georgia during segregation and praised King as an inspiring leader who changed the world through courage. “He gave us hope during some of this country’s darkest days,” Perdue said of King. “Our country has overcome a lot, but there is much left to be done.” Ebenezer Church’s current pastor, the Rev. Raphael G. Warnock, also took aim at the government shutdown, calling this “a time of narrow vision and petty politicians.” Gonzalez sat just behind the speaker’s podium throughout much of the televised and livestreamed service, a highly visible position for the high school student turned gun-control activist. She said that King had paved the wave for future generations of peaceful protests. The annual service at Ebenezer Baptist was in doubt until Delta Air Lines gave the National Park Service funding to reopen the site. Delta is headquartered in Atlanta. In a statement posted to LinkedIn, Delta CEO Ed Bastian said the grant would keep the sites open from Jan. 19 to Feb. 3, the day of the upcoming Super Bowl game in Atlanta. “These historic landmarks represent the strength of our community and should always be made available for the public to enjoy,” Bastian said. The church is part of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park located in the “Sweet Auburn” district of downtown Atlanta. The civil rights leader was co-pastor with his father at the church from 1960 until his assassination in 1968.

4

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

President Donald Trump (center) and Vice President Mike Pence (left) are escorted Monday by Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt on a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington. KING • FROM A1

United States who is a racist.” The outreach came on a day suffused with political commemorations. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., became the first black candidate to declare her campaign for the presidency, choosing the King holiday to underscore the historymaking potential of her candidacy. Harris, 54, who grew up in Oakland, Calif., is one of the earliest Democrats to join what is expected to be a crowded field. She made her long anticipated announcement on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” “I am running for president of the United States,” she said. “And I’m very excited about it.” She portrayed herself as a fighter for justice, decency and equality in a video distributed by her campaign as she announced her bid. “They’re the values we as Americans cherish, and they’re all on

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks to reporters at Howard University after announcing a run for president Monday.

the line now,” Harris says in the video. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence briefly visited the King memorial in Washington for a wreath-laying near the statue of the slain civil rights leader. “Good morning, everybody. Great day. Beautiful day. Thank you for being here. Appreciate it,” the president said before departing. Black voters will have a key role in the Democratic primary campaign. They made up about 1 in 4 pri-

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"Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just."

– Thomas Jefferson, 1784

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EFFERSON was speaking of slavery which was commonly practiced and eventually held by the Supreme Court of the United States in the Dred Scott decision to be constitutionally protected. Today, our nation endures the killing of unborn children. On January 22, 1973, the Supreme Court of the United States in Roe vs. Wade, gave doctors a license to kill unborn children. Like the Dred Scott decision, Roe is BAD LAW. About one million abortions will be performed this year, the vast majority simply for reasons of convenience. The attack on the unborn continues by: • Huge government subsidies of Planned Parenthood, the leading abortion provider, which was recently filmed selling body parts of unborn children; • Forcing individuals, employers, and insurance companies to purchase or provide "health insurance" for contraceptives which can cause abortions; and violations of religious liberty. • Licensing of RU 486 (the "abortion pill"), and methotrexate, a cancer drug now used to kill the unborn; • Proposed use of taxpayers' money to fund abortions; • "Web cam" abortions where the doctor doesn't even physically examine the mother; • "Sex selection" abortions; • Sending abortion pills by mail; • Embryonic stem cell experimentation with taxpayers' money.

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mary voters and caucusgoers, on average, in the 2016 nomination fight. In some Southern states, including early-voting South Carolina, blacks represent a majority of the Democratic electorate. “You cannot in 2019 and 2020 get away with not talking about race,” said Symone Sanders, a black Democratic strategist who worked for Sanders in 2016 and has not yet picked a candidate this cycle. “What you are saying in Iowa should not look painstakingly different from what you are saying in South Carolina.” In Harlem, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand lashed out at Trump for inspiring “hate and darkness.” Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren denounced what she called the systematic suppression of black voters. In Boston, Warren called for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing a right to vote for every American. She made the comment after saying “people of color have been systematically denied the most basic of human rights: the right to vote.” In South Carolina, Booker also described the moment as calling for moral leadership: “We are dissatisfied that we live in a nation where you get a better justice system if you’re rich and guilty than poor and innocent. We are dissatisfied that all over America, thousands of children find it easier to find unleaded gasoline than unleaded water. We are dissatisfied that we are giving tax breaks to millionaires and billionaires. Our dissatisfaction needs to turn into action.” Before an audience of mostly blacks at the National Action Network event in Washington, both Biden and Bloomberg admitted to mistakes in their past records and laid out different policy focuses. “We have a lot to root out, most of all systematic racism that most of us whites don’t even like to acknowledge even exists,” Biden said. “It’s been built into every aspect of our

system.” Bloomberg echoed the call, talking about his recent visit to Tulsa, Okla., to commemorate the 1921 race riot that historians say killed more than 100 African-Americans. “We need to face up to history,” Bloomberg said. “The pace of progress is still too slow, but there is not a doubt in my mind that it is possible to accelerate the pace.” Neithe r Bid en nor Bloomberg gave any hints of their decision to mount campaigns. The event was hosted by the Rev. Al Sharpton, who has fashioned himself as a principal emissary for potential Democratic nominees hoping to reach out to black voters. He attended a second event later Monday with Gillibrand. “Because the Trump administration has appeared so hostile, a lot of blacks are looking at who can win rather than just having a view on a set of issues that they might think are selectively important,” Sharpton said in an interview. “It’s going to be a very interesting few months.” Biden repeated his regret for supporting toughon-crime measures in the 1990s, which he now admitted had worsened racial disparities. Biden successfully fought in 2010 to reduce the disparities in federal criminal sentencing for powder cocaine and crack cocaine that he had previously supported. He spoke about focusing on bail reform, increasing the minimum wage and increasing federal funding for vocational training as ways of reducing racial inequities. Bloomberg said he could not argue that “every decision I have made as mayor was perfect,” though he did not specifically distance himself from the stopand-frisk policing policy he supported over the objections of civil rights leaders like Sharpton. “Dr. King is still our drum major for justice,” Bloomberg said. “To truly celebrate the way he lived, we must redeem how he died.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

Notre Dame to cover up murals of Columbus and Native Americans ASSOCIATED PRESS SOUTH BEND, IND. • The University

SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE VIA AP

Kristin Fabian walks by a controversial mural in 2017 at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.

of Notre Dame will cover murals in a campus building that depict Christopher Columbus in America, the school’s president said, following criticism that the images depict Native Americans in stereotypical submissive poses before white European explorers. The 12 murals created in the 1880s by Luis Gregori were intended to encourage immigrants who had come to the U.S. during a period of anti-Catholic sentiment. But they conceal another side of Columbus: the exploitation and repression of Native Americans, said the Rev. John Jenkins, president of Notre Dame. It is a “darker side of this story, a side we must acknowledge,” Jenkins said in a letter Sunday. The murals in the Catholic university’s Main Building are painted directly on walls. Jenkins said they will be covered, although they still could be occasionally displayed. A permanent display of photos of the paintings will be cre-

ated elsewhere with an explanation of their context. “We wish to preserve artistic works originally intended to celebrate immigrant Catholics who were marginalized at the time in society, but do so in a way that avoids unintentionally marginalizing others,” Jenkins said. In 2017, more than 300 students, employees and Notre Dame alumni signed a letter in the campus newspaper that called for the removal of the murals. The president of the Native American Student Association praised Jenkins’ decision. “This is a good step towards acknowledging the full humanity of those native people who have come before us,” said Marcus Winchester-Jones of Dowagiac, Mich. But Notre Dame law student Grant Strobl said the decision was disappointing. “If we adopt the standard of judging previous generations by current standards, we may reach a point where there are no longer accomplishments to celebrate,” Strobl said.

Public reaction keeps shifting as details come out VIDEO • FROM A1

they came together in an altercation Friday that would echo nationwide for its ugliness. The Israelites and students exchanged taunts, videos show. The Native Americans and Hebrew Israelites say some students shouted, “Build the wall!” although the chant is not heard on the widely circulated videos, and The Cincinnati Enquirer quoted a student at the center of the confrontation who said he did not hear anyone say it. When a Native American elder intervened, singing and playing a prayer song, he found himself face to face with that dark-haired teen, whose frozen smile struck some as nervousness and others as arrogance. Neither budged. Video footage of the te n s e c o n f ro n ta t i o n quickly went viral, stirring outrage across the political spectrum. The teens’ church apologized Saturday, condemning the students’ actions. By Sunday, conservative commenters on social media were saying it was the students who had been wronged. The teen at the center of the video, who identified himself to The Enquirer as 11th-grader Nick Sandmann, said he and his classmates had been called “racists,” “bigots” and worse, and he was “remaining motionless and calm” in hope that things would not “get out of hand.” The Native American elder said he was caught in the middle. “When I took that drum and hit that first beat ... it was a supplication to God,” said Nathan Phillips, a member of the Omaha tribe and a Marine veteran. “Look at us, God, look at what is going on here; my America is being torn apart by racism, hatred, bigotry.” The incident, and the finger-pointing that followed, seemed to capture the worst of America at a moment of extreme political polarization, as discourse once again gave way to tribalism, and people drew conclusions on social media before all the facts were known.

‘DID I PROVOKE THAT?’

The students, from Covington Catholic High School in Park Hills, Ky., had come to Washington to participate in Friday’s March for Life, one of scores of school groups bused to the annual event. The Native American activists were there for the Indigenous Peoples March. So were the Hebrew Israelites, who believe African-Americans are God’s chosen people and the real descendants of the Hebrews of the Bible. “We were there to teach, to teach the truth of the Bible, to show them our

real history,” said Shar Yaqataz Banyamyan, one of five Hebrew Israelites on the National Mall that day. The group has militant members and “a long, strange list of enemies” that includes whites, Jews, Asians, members of the LGBTQ community, abortion rights advocates and continental Africans, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. Banyamyan said he and those with him believe in using blunt language, but not violence. A video he posted to social media shows them insulting other marchers. “Where’s your husband?” one Hebrew Israelite told a woman who had stopped to argue with the group. “Bring your husband. Let me speak to him.” At one point, the Hebrew Israelites began arguing with Native American activists, telling them the word “Indian” means “savage,” according to the video. While the two groups argued, some students laughed and mocked them, according to Banyamyan and another Hebrew Israelite, Ephraim Israel, who came from New York for the event. As tension grew, the Hebrew Israelites started insulting the students. “Tell them to come over in the lion’s den instead of mocking from over there,” Banyamyan can be heard saying in the video. “Y’all dirty-ass little crackers, your day is coming.” Phillips said he and his fellow Native American activists also had issues with the students throughout the day. “Before they got centered on the black Israelites, they would walk through and say things to each other, like, ‘Oh, the Indians in my state are drunks or thieves,’” the 64-year-old said. Sandmann said in his statement that he “did not witness or hear any students chant ‘build that wall’ or anything hateful or racist at any time. Assertions to the contrary are simply false.” He said he and his classmates were shouting cheers they knew from school, with permission from their chaperones, “to drown out the hateful comments that were being shouted at us by the protesters.”

A MOB MENTALITY

By 5 p.m., the light was fading on the National Mall, and both marches had mostly petered out. A group of about 100 Covington students had gathered on the stairs of the Lincoln Memorial, where they had been told to meet before catching their buses home. The Hebrew Israelites were still there and still insulting the students. “You all are a bunch of Donald Trump incest babies,” Israel said to them, according to the video,

before asking whether there were any black students among them. When a black Covington student came forward, Israel called him “Kanye West” and the N-word, the footage shows. At that point, the students began chanting and jumping and shouting. The songs culminated in one student stripping off his shirt and shouting as others cheered. “The chants are commonly used at sporting events. They are all positive in nature,” Sandmann said. “We would not have done that without obtaining permission from the adults in charge of our group.” Banyamyan said the Hebrew Israelites took the performance as a racist impersonation. “They were mocking my ancestors in a chant, one of them was jumping up and down like a caveman,” he said. “Did I provoke that?” To Jessica Travis, a Florida attorney who was at the memorial with her mother, the students looked out of control. “The kids really went into a mob mentality, honestly,” she said, adding that she did not see chaperones trying to control the situation. Travis said she heard one student tell the Hebrew Israelites to “drink the Trump water.” Jon Stegenga, a photojournalist who drove to Washington on Friday from South Carolina to cover the Indigenous Peoples March, recalled hearing students say “build the wall,” and “Trump 2020.” He said it was around that time that Phillips intervened. “He said, ‘I wish I could say something to these people, to the whole crowd,’” Stegenga said in an interview Sunday. Another member of the Indigenous Peoples March suggested that Phillips start singing, the photographer said. Phillips played a prayer song on a drum as he walked toward the students. Some of the students began doing a “Tomahawk chop” and dancing, the video shows. Although

Phillips said he found it offensive, he kept playing as he walked. Most of the students moved out of his way, the video shows. But Sandmann stayed still. When asked why he felt the need to walk into the group of students, Phillips said he was trying to reach the top of the memorial, where friends were standing. But Phillips also said he saw more than a teenage boy in front of him. He saw a long history of white oppression of Native Americans. “Why I should go around him?” he asked. “I’m just thinking of 500 years of genocide in this country, what your people have done. You don’t even see me as a human being.” Phillips said he blamed the students and the Hebrew Israelites for what happened. “If it wasn’t for those Israelites being there in the first place, this wouldn’t have happened,” he said. “And if it wasn’t for the lack of responsibility from school chaperones, this wouldn’t have happened either.” Sandmann, in his statement, said Phillips bore responsibility as well. “He locked eyes with me and approached me, coming within inches of my face,” the statement said. “I never interacted with this protester. I did not speak to him. I did not make any hand gestures or other aggressive moves. To be honest, I was startled and confused as to why he had approached me. We had already been yelled at by another group of protesters, and when the second group approached I was worried that a situation was getting out of control where adults were attempting to provoke teenagers.” School officials and the Catholic Diocese of Covington released a joint statement Saturday, condemning and apologizing for the students’ actions, but they had no additional comment Sunday. “The matter is being investigated, and we will take appropriate action, up to and including expulsion,” the statement said.

The debate over what happened continued to play out on social media Monday, with one Twitter user posting video that showed Covington students jumping and yelling around Phillips as he played. Sandmann does not appear to be in the clip. With his statement circulating, and more attention focused on the behavior of the Hebrew Israelites, some public reaction had already shifted. March for Life organizers, who on Saturday had called the teens’ behavior “reprehensible,” deleted that statement from their website Sunday evening and pledged to reserve judgment. “It is clear from new footage and additional accounts that there is more to this story than the original video captured,” the group said in a new statement. “We will refrain from commenting further until the truth is understood.” And Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., tweeted that “in the face of racist and homosexual slurs, the young boys refused to reciprocate or disrespect anyone.” “In the context of everything that was going on (which the media hasn’t shown) the parents and mentors of these boys should be proud, not ashamed, of their kids’ behavior. It is my honor to represent them,” Massie’s tweet said. In his statement, Sandmann said he had received “death threats via social media, as well as hateful insults.” He said he was “mortified that so many people have come to believe something that did not happen — that students from my school were chanting or acting in a racist fashion toward African-Americans or Native Americans.” Travis, who was in town to attend the Women’s March before sightseeing, said the scene on Friday shocked her and her mother. “It was really depressing,” she said, “to see we are even more divided than ever.”

Trump ‘never spoke’ with Cohen about false testimony, Giuliani says BY CHRIS SOMMERFELDT New york Daily News

President Donald Trump did not speak with Michael Cohen before he testified falsely before Congress about plans to develop a skyscraper in Moscow during the 2016 campaign, Rudy Giuliani said Monday, backing off previous assertions that such talks may have taken place. The former New York mayor, who serves as Trump’s top lawyer in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, said he had confirmed the matter with previous members of the president’s legal team, including ex-lead counsel John Dowd. “The president never spoke with Cohen about the congressional testimony,” Giuliani told the New York Daily News. However, Giuliani acknowledged Trump’s legal team conversed with Cohen’s lawyers — and possibly Cohen himself — before he went before the House and Senate intelligence committees in September 2017 and falsely testified that discussions to develop a Trump Tower in Moscow ended in January 2016. “Anything that happened between the lawyers would have been part of the joint defense agreement,” Giuliani said, claiming all parties involved believed at the time that Cohen’s planned testimony was truthful. Cohen has since admitted the Moscow project discussions continued well into the summer of 2016 and said in a guilty plea that he lied to lawmakers out of “loyalty” to Trump. Giuliani’s latest remarks came on the heels of his going on multiple cable news shows saying he wasn’t sure whether or not the president spoke with Cohen before his testimony. “I don’t know if it happened or didn’t happen,” Giuliani told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Sunday. “So what if he talked to him about it?” Dowd, who stepped down as Trump’s attorney in March, said in a text message Monday that the president never spoke directly with Cohen before the testimony. Stephen Ryan, the lawyer who represented Cohen at the time of his testimony, did not return a request for comment. Trump’s potential pretestimony talks with Cohen has come under increased scrutiny since BuzzFeed News reported last week that the president directed Cohen to lie about the Moscow project in order to protect himself — an explosive allegation that prompted congressional Democrats to raise the specter of impeachment. Mueller, who’s investigating whether Trump’s campaign colluded with Russians during the 2016 election, issued a rare statement disputing some “characterizations” and “descriptions” included in the BuzzFeed report.

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NATION

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

For the poor, ‘safety net’ in a shutdown does not feel safe BY JULIET LINDERMAN associated Press

10 pct. of TSA screeners call in sick over long weekend, sound alarm BY DAVID KOENIG associated Press

WASHINGTON • Doris Cochran,

a disabled mother of two young boys, is stockpiling canned foods these days, filling her shelves with noodle soup, green beans, peaches and pears — anything that can last for months or even years. Her pantry looks as though she’s preparing for a winter storm. But she’s just trying to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. For those like Cochran who rely on federal aid programs, the social safety net no longer feels so safe. As the longest government shutdown in U.S. history stretches into a fifth week, millions of poor Americans who depend on food and rental assistance are becoming increasingly worried about the future. Most major aid programs haven’t dried up yet. But each day the stalemate in Washington drags on, the U.S. inches closer to what advocates call a looming emergency. Those dependent on the aid are watching closely under a cloud of stress and anxiety. “I just don’t know what’s going to happen,” Cochran said, “and that’s what scares me the most.” With no indication of an imminent compromise, the Trump administration in recent weeks has scrambled to restore some services across the government. But two agencies crucial to the federal safety net — the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Agriculture — remain largely shuttered. The USDA announced this month that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which provides food aid to roughly 40 million Americans, will be funded through February. But should the shutdown stretch into March its status is unclear: With just $3 billion in reserves, the USDA won’t be able to cover the roughly $4.8 billion it pays in monthly benefits. The department was able to stretch the program for another month based on a loophole in a

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Doris Cochran works Friday on “an ugly sweater,” which she is planning to sell. She lives in subsidized housing in Arlington, Va.

spending bill. But as a result of congressional rules, food stamp benefits allotted for February are being given out early, before Jan. 20. There is no guarantee recipients will get food stamps for March. The impact of any lapse in these programs would be dramatic and unprecedented: The USDA says there has never before been a break in food stamp benefits since the program was made permanent in 1964. Food banks are already stretched thin thanks to a notable spike in demand from furloughed federal employees, contractors and others out of work due to the shutdown, said Carrie Calvert, the managing director for government relations at Feeding America, a hunger relief organization. For every meal Feeding America’s network of food pantries serves, federal food aid provides 12. “This is a potentially catastrophic situation,” Calvert said. “This could be an immediate emergency that grows exponentially.” Since the shutdown began, HUD has been unable to renew hundreds of contracts with private building owners who receive significant federal subsidies to provide housing to low-income families, the elderly and people with disabilities. Under these contracts, tenants pay a portion

of the rent and the federal government covers the rest. But between December and the end of February, roughly 1,700 contracts are slated to expire, meaning that HUD won’t be able to make their payments. The agency has asked landlords to dip into their reserves to cover rental costs until the government reopens, with a promise of reimbursement. Similarly, come February, 700 rental assistance contracts administered through a USDA program that offers aid to lowincome people in rural areas also will expire. A spokesman said the office “is exploring all options to mitigate any potential negative impact” to tenants. Those unknowns are causing anxiety and anguish among America’s most vulnerable. Eneaqua Lewis, 36, lives in a HUD-subsidized apartment on Roosevelt Island in New York City. She said she found out this month her building’s HUD contract expired Jan. 9. Lewis, a single mother raising a 10-year-old, was laid off from a construction job in December. Without an income or any significant savings, Lewis said she’d be forced to drain her meager retirement fund to cover the full amount due with no rental assistance subsidy. “People are really afraid right now and just don’t know what to do,” Lewis said.

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The percentage of TSA airport screeners missing work has hit 10 percent as the partial government shutdown stretches into its fifth week. The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that Sunday’s absence rate compared to 3.1 percent on the comparable Sunday a year ago. The workers who screen passengers and their bags face missing another paycheck if the shutdown doesn’t end early this week. According to TSA, many of them say the financial hardship is preventing them from reporting to work. The TSA says the national average waiting time in airport checkpoint lines is within the normal limit of 30 minutes, but there are longer lines at some airports. The agency has dispatched extra screeners to airports in Atlanta, LaGuardia Airport in New York, and Newark, N.J. A TSA spokesman said other airports might also be getting additional help. Sunday’s 10 percent absence rate indicates that more than 3,000 airport screeners missed work. The TSA has 51,000 screeners, and a spokesman said that about 33,000 work on any given day. That topped the previous high of 8 percent on Saturday. With fewer screeners, the TSA closed one of its security checkpoints at Baltimore/ Washington airport over the weekend, reopened it, but closed it again Monday afternoon, according to an airport spokeswoman. A checkpoint at Houston’s Bush Intercontinental Airport remained closed. An airport spokesman said lines were relatively short at the other six checkpoints. The TSA appeared to be managing the high sick-out rate as well as could be expected. The agency said that on Sunday it screened 1.78 million

passengers, and only 6.9 percent — roughly 120,000 people — had to wait 15 minutes or longer to get through security. No figures were yet available for Monday, but websites or spokespeople for several major airports including Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago’s O’Hare reported normal security lines and few problems. HartsfieldJackson Atlanta International Airport, which had some of the longest lines in the country last week, reported waits of 15 to 30 minutes at domestictravel checkpoints Monday. Los Angeles International Airport showed most lines under 20 minutes. The TSA got a break from bad weather: Storms in the Midwest and Northeast led airlines to cancel more than 4,400 flights over the threeday weekend, which reduced the number of passengers to screen. A few airports — San Francisco’s being the largest — conduct screening with government-approved private contractors, not the TSA. A long government shutdown and more TSA sick-outs could lead other airports to consider going private, although that hasn’t happened yet. The holiday honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is not as busy for travel as many other three-day weekends. However, inconvenience could become a crisis for the travel industry the longer the shutdown lasts — and there are few signs of movement by President Donald Trump or congressional Democrats to break the stalemate over border-wall spending that is causing the shutdown. “Presidents Day weekend is much bigger, and then spring break and Easter— those are really important,” said Savanthi Syth, an airline analyst for Raymond James. Presidents Day is Feb. 18, and Syth said if the shutdown drags into next month it could cause some passengers to cancel travel plans.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAy • 01.22.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Saying no to Trump

Congressional Republicans rebel against president’s Putin-coddling.

A

small political rebellion erupted the condition that Deripaska relinquishes control over those companies. But it isn’t among congressional Repubclear that is actually happening. So 11 Senlicans last week. The outcome ate Republicans, including newly seated was disappointing, but still it Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, joined represented a rare show of independence Democrats in attempting to prevent the from the worst instincts of the Trump sanctions from being lifted. administration. It included most of the We have criticized Hawley in the past GOP’s Missouri delegation, whose fealty to President Donald Trump has too often ap- for his general refusal to put any daylight between himself and Trump. But give peared limitless. credit where it’s House and due. Senate majorities Hawley not voted to prevent only cast the corthe administrarect vote here, but tion from lifting Sen. Josh his public statesanctions on a Hawley ment on it approRussian oligarch priately identified with close ties to the stakes: “Oleg President VladiDeripaska is a mir Putin. Sigbad guy who nificant numbers still appears to of Republicans be working in joined Democrats conjunction with in trying to halt Vladimir Putin. Until this latest Trumpian we know for certain that appeasement of the Deripaska no longer has Kremlin. control over these entities, Alas, the Senate’s 57-42 we need to maintain the vote to keep the sancpressure.” tions in place was still shy Would that fellow Misof the 60 votes needed. souri Republican Sen. Roy But in breaking with the Blunt had been able to see administration, one of the issue so clearly. Missouri’s two RepubliThe House voted 362 to can senators, and five of 53 to keep the sanctions in its six Republican House place. It was futile, given members, set partisanthe earlier Senate failure, ship aside and acted in the but a significant statenation’s best interests. That’s worth noting — and AP ment anyway, because 136 Republicans stood for the worth repeating. Russian metals magnate Oleg sanctions. Kudos to St. Oleg Deripaska is a Rus- Deripaska. Louis-area Republicans sian aluminum magnate Ann Wagner and Vicky Hartlzer of Miswho is close to Putin and is a former busisouri and Mike Bost and Rodney Davis of ness partner to Paul Manafort, Trump’s Illinois. prison-bound former campaign chairPresident Trump’s ongoing refusal to man. Deripaska — who has been credibly treat Putin as the dangerous adversary he accused of serious crimes, including muris has been a singularly bizarre theme of his der — was among Putin allies hit with U.S. sanctions last year for Russian meddling in presidency, and one that should concern all Americans. A significant portion of America’s elections. congressional Republicans indicated they The Treasury Department’s plan to finally are starting to share that concern. lift sanctions on three of Deripaska’s Hopefully, that’s not an aberration but a companies was presented as a way of stanew trend. bilizing the global aluminum market, on

False equivalence on immigration Non-starter plan to end the shutdown falls predictably flat on Capitol Hill.

P

resident Donald Trump offered on Saturday what he thought was a reasonable deal to end the government shutdown by equating his questionable quest for a border wall with a temporary reprieve for deportations of immigrant youths. His attempt to combine two unrelated but highly contentious political issues under the same umbrella of immigration fell predictably flat with congressional Democrats. Trump has imposed increasing financial hardship on 800,000 federal workers — who have endured 31 days without a paycheck — not because he and congressional Democrats disagree about the plight of immigrant youths brought here illegally by their parents. The sole issue behind the shutdown is his demand for $5.7 billion to build the border wall. Trump is showing increasing signs of desperation, two years into his presidency, to deliver on his campaign promise to build the wall and make Mexico pay for it. Instead of addressing the wall issue and finding realistic ways to work with Democrats on what both sides agree is the need for improved border security, Trump tried a cheap ploy. It didn’t work. Democrats have long recoiled over Trump’s 2017 decision to phase out President Barack Obama’s order protecting about 700,000 immigrant youths, many who now are adults, from being deported. Obama’s 2012 order, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was a compassionate move to protect youths from being penalized for their parents’ decision to come here illegally. Many have known no other home but America. To qualify for protection, immigrant

youths had to register their vital information with the government. When Trump ended DACA protections in 2017, all who registered were suddenly vulnerable to deportation, with the registration information they provided now serving as a way for government agents to hunt them down. Somehow, Trump sees an offer not to hunt down these voluntary registrants for the next three years as a quid pro quo for his wall. Democrats were understandably insulted, and Republican hard-liners denounced it as “amnesty.” Nonetheless, Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, is preparing legislation for a floor vote on Trump’s proposal after having blocked far more reasonable measures to end the shutdown. Trump’s DACA proposal follows remarks he made last week to farmers in New Orleans indicating a willingness to relax visa restrictions so farmers and businesses can obtain the immigrant labor they desperately need. Taken together, Trump appears to be promoting something akin to comprehensive immigration reform — which is something Democrats should be willing to discuss enthusiastically with him. But comprehensive immigration reform would require months of negotiations, and federal employees need to get back to work, with paychecks, now. Trump is badly mistaken if he thinks holding federal workers hostage will make Democrats come to the table. The only solution is to reopen the government and negotiate — without threats, empty offers and redherring distractions.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS McConnell surrenders legislative branch’s power Regarding “McConnell defers to Trump in shutdown” (Jan. 20): Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs to actually read the Constitution he has sworn to uphold. By not putting any legislation in front of the president that he is willing to sign, McConnell has effectively given the president 100 percent veto power that cannot be overridden. That’s not how the constitutional process is supposed to work. In fact, I would advise the Democrats to make their shutdown position all about the constitutional process rather than about the wall. We have a system that wisely divides governmental powers between three branches, with the legislative controlling the laws and appropriations. Executive powers don’t control those, but do provide for a veto of legislation subject to an override by a supermajority, which McConnell has now effectively negated. Shutting down the government to get legislation and appropriations that the president wants is essentially an act of extortion, and any “deal making” to get it back open is not only a surrendering of legislative branch power to the executive, but would invite it happening again and again. For the record, I’m not a Democrat, and didn’t vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton. Mike Micotto • Webster Groves

Trump wants to negotiate; Congress just wants power We have a businessman in the Oval Office who likes to negotiate, work out, hammer out and compromise. We have politicians in Congress who only want power. So who do you think cares about the people of the United States? Carol Costigan • Creve Coeur

should build a border wall, remember that the way the wall is funded will have much broader implications than whether it is built. Dawn Jones-Goldstein • Eureka

Trump voters could pay for the wall Here’s an idea that is democratic with a small d. Since a minority of voters chose this narcissist, let them fund his vanity wall. I’d say $100 each shouldn’t be too much to ask from each Trump voter and would provide over $6 billion. Since they are that worried about the “southern invasion,” they can directly contribute. Come on, show us some patriotism. Stop trying to make others (federal workers) pay for your idolatry. Steve Salamon • Ferguson

Pastor experiences mercy, love in Lutheran synod My experience with the Kirkwood-based Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod is much different from that of the Rev. Edward A. Engelbrecht, whose writing was the subject of the article “Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod accused of ‘institutional mobbing’ ” (Jan. 16). Like Engelbrecht, I am a pastor in the LCMS. However, while he speaks of “mobbing” and “sabotage” in the LCMS, I have experienced mercy and sacrificial love. For instance, Word of Life is an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse school our congregation helps support in south city, and it recently received a grant from LCMS Urban Ministry to fund a much-appreciated playground on our blacktop play area. A faith-motivated care for children who are oftentimes overlooked by our society is what this pastor has experienced in the LCMS. I pray God’s peace for Rev. Engelbrecht and God’s continued blessing on the LCMS. Rev. Matthew Clark • St. Louis

Paper can’t survive if it can’t be delivered

AP

Shutdown is battle over balance of power in government The current office of the president has expansion of presidential power at the core of its agenda. It should not come as a surprise that the first action with a Congress of the opposing party was to threaten to veto any budget that does not include spending on a border wall. The purpose of the ensuing government shutdown holding the American people captive is to see just how far presidential power can be extended over Congress. People aren’t losing their paychecks over a petty wall; they are losing their paychecks over a fundamental conflict over the balance of power in our government. The way this conflict plays out will have lasting implications. Regardless of people’s position on whether we

Reading the letter “Post-Dispatch’s customer service is nonexistent” (Jan. 18) from Jack Pendleton: His are the exact words I would also use. My wife and I have been subscribers since the summer of ’69. It is a shame that home delivery has deteriorated to the current level. I don’t believe that a daily paper can survive in a city if it can only be read online. Unfortunately this is where it seems that the Post-Dispatch is going. Charles Wormek • St. Louis County

Newspaper delivery has been unerring for many years I have subscribed to the daily PostDispatch for 59 years, ever since moving to St. Louis. In that time, I have never experienced a missed delivery. My home for 47 years is at the end of a long private road. On Saturday morning, Jan. 12, I awoke to deep snow covering the only way to my house. I was delighted and amazed to see my paper dry and waiting for me in the carport, just as it has been for all these years. I am grateful to my deliveryman, Glen Eddings, for allowing me to start each day with my coffee and favorite newspaper. Jo Ann Hughes • Chesterfield Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

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01.22.2019 • TUESDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

IN RUSSIA, DEJA VU ALL OVER AGAIN • Once upon a time, not long ago, there was a charismatic Russian leader who tried to steer his country in a new

direction. He was supported in his efforts by other progressive reformers, but he didn’t go fast enough. President Boris Yeltsin might do well to ponder the parable of Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

The government that goes wrong Trump is a slapstick genius for the comically disastrous way in which he runs the country. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch

Jimmy Johnson in a vacant house in north St. Louis.

St. Louis has a plan for vacancy Collaboration involves philanthropic partners, nonprofit organizations and local government officials. or names on buildings. But we believe the philanthropic community in St. Louis can also understand the value in a As detailed in the Post-Discommunity-focused process patch’s “Tipping Point” series, that rebuilds trust and reflects St. Louis has a serious vacant property challenge that cries out the realities, needs and desires of our unique neighborhoods. for serious action. Like other In fact, the very projects the metropolitan areas (including editorial board points to as the Baltimore, Detroit, Memphis, kinds of projects in which phiCleveland and Kansas City), we lanthropists are willing to invest must face the consequences of decades of suburban expansion, — the Gateway Arch renovation and Forest Park Forever — both population loss, detrimental public policies, predatory inves- included significant philanthropic investment in the plantors, regional dynamics that ning processes that ultimately have contributed to an overbuilt housing market and a hollowed- led to those improved spaces. In recent years, research and out urban core, and disinvestexperts have confirmed what ment. These consequences will not be reversed quickly, easily or many of us have come to know through experience: Vacant without considerable financial properties decrease surroundresources. ing property values, deplete the For more than three years, tax base, discourage investment a growing grassroots coaliin our communities, reduce tion of philanthropic partners, quality of life for residents and nonprofit organizations and negatively affect our ability to local government officials led compete as a region. Vacancy’s by the mayor’s office have been negative effects spill across working together to respond neighborhood — and municipal through an effort that has come — boundaries. to be known as the Vacancy Over the past year, the colCollaborative. The collaborative laborative’s work has included grew out of key recommendations provided to the city’s Land launching a new Neighborhood Vacancy Initiative housed at Reutilization Authority from Legal Services of Eastern Misthe Center for Community souri that, to date, has opened Progress (the leading national more than 70 cases to help nonprofit focused on helping residents and community orgacommunities tackle vacancy) nizations reduce and prevent and a consultant group known vacancy in their neighborhoods; as Asakura Robinson (“St. Louis producing a user-friendly Land Bank Assessment: Final vacancy tools resource guide; Report,” February 2017) as well engaging with residents to conas on-the-ground work from a vert vacant lots into high-qualvariety of nonprofit organizations and neighborhood leaders. ity open spaces; marketing more than 70 quality LRA properties The collaborative is a coalition to potential homeowners; pilotof partners committed to the ing block cleanreduction of It will take ups with targeted vacant property as a top priority significant dollars city services; and launching in the city of St. and serious a new vacancy Louis. community website that pulls The Posttogether 12 data Dispatch editorial engagement sets across four board recently to ensure city departments highlighted the that we keep in a way that opportunity for helps stakeholdphilanthropists neighborhoods ers take action. to be part of the at the center of So far, the colsolution (“Phisolutions. laborative has lanthropists want accomplished to help address this work with relatively few blight, but they need to see a staff and financial resources. plan”). The editorial suggested The challenge is both comthat St. Louis needs a plan to plex and multidisciplinary. tackle the issue of vacancy. Effectively addressing vacancy The ongoing work of the will take time, sustained comcollaborative is that plan. We mitment and close coordination are working hard to empower among the public and private neighborhoods to work toward sectors. It will take significant solutions together. What the dollars and serious community collaborative does not have is engagement to ensure that renderings of what communiwe keep neighborhoods at the ties would be like once crumcenter of solutions. To our philbling buildings and vacant lots no longer plague their neighbor- anthropic community waiting to invest: We ask you to join hoods. Nor should it. us, to engage with us on new Instead, we believe the transinitiatives and those already formation that can and should underway, and to support our take place in neighborhoods neighborhoods as they envision that struggle with blight should what’s next. be driven by one thing: the community. Solutions will look different in Wells Goodfellow Sundy Whiteside is the president of the St. than in The Ville or Gravois Park Louis Association of Community Organizations, based on the differing needs of and Patrick Brown is the chief resilience officer for the city of St. Louis and senior policy those who live there. adviser to Mayor Lyda Krewson on vacancy Yes, it may be harder to rally and blight. Together with their co-chairs, Bob donor support without a tidy Lewis and Austin Albert, they lead the Vacancy master plan, sponsorship perks Collaborative, online at stlvacancy.com. BY SUNDY WHITESIDE AND PATRICK BROWN

“The Play That Goes Wrong,” a British slapstick comedy, finished a short run at the Kennedy Center this month, so most Washingtonians didn’t get to see its characters stepping on each other, getting struck by falling objects and stymied by stuck doors, forgetting their lines, missing their cues, and eventually having the whole set fall down around them. But that’s okay. Here in the capital, we see a similar performance every day. Our version is The Government That Goes Wrong. President Donald Trump is, if nothing else, a slapstick genius for the comically disastrous way in which he runs the country. Large parts of the government have ceased to function for the longest time in U.S. history. Eight hundred thousand people are furloughed or forced to work without pay. Trump, who proudly said he would take blame for the shutdown, now says “the buck stops with everybody.” This mayhem has been created in service of Trump’s vision of a walled fortress on the border (an idea Trump’s own chief of staff once called “almost childish”) of the sort seen in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” (“Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!”). In the last several days alone: Trump, hosting the Clemson football team, ordered Big Macs and Whoppers because White House food preparers are on furlough. His tweet about the fastfood fest misspelled hamburger as “hamberder.” Trump, after publicly disparaging Jeff Sessions, his old attorney general (“Mr. Magoo), for failing to protect him from special counsel Robert Mueller, was

reportedly “startled” to learn on TV that — uh oh! — his nominee to be the new attorney general, William Barr, is a dear friend of Mueller. Trump’s lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani, undermined two years of Trump administration denials by telling CNN, “I never said there was no collusion” between Trump’s campaign and Russia. Trump, in a fit of pique because House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested he postpone his State of the Union address, used his awesome presidential powers to ... ground a government airplane that was supposed to take Pelosi to see U.S. troops in Afghanistan. On top of this, Trump found himself assuring the public that

he’s not a Russian asset (after The New York Times reported the FBI investigated exactly that possibility), and BuzzFeed reported that Trump directed Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about Russian contacts. It would appear Trump is following the immortal advice of Curly Howard: “If at first you don’t succeed, keep on sucking till you do suck seed.” Watching Trump’s serial bumbling brings to mind the famous “Pink Panther” scene in which Inspector Clouseau flies off the parallel bars, tumbles down the stairs, destroys a suit of armor and a piano, strikes a beekeeper, burns himself, knocks himself in the head with a vase and falls on a shotgun, which fires. Anybody who still believes in “American exceptionalism” will have to account for that week. How did the nation that liberated

Europe and put a man on the moon come to be led by Peter Sellers? But what if we could use Trump’s status as international laughingstock to America’s advantage? What if we could weaponize Trump’s slapstick buffoonery? In Syria, let us suppress Islamic State with precision-guided stink bombs. In Afghanistan, likewise, covert operatives can thwart the Taliban by putting Vaseline on their doorknobs, “accidentally” hitting them while carrying ladders and putting their fingers in warm water while they sleep. North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, who has earned a second meeting with Trump next month even though he hasn’t denuclearized, will be weakened into making concessions when, at the summit, his bed is filled with itching powder and his side of the stage is strewn with banana peels. Other geopolitical foes will be neutralized by upturned rakes and strategically placed mousetraps. AP Here at home, Democrats can likewise defeat Trump in his own style. Rather than postponing the State of the Union address, they should: Leave fake dog poo on the lectern where the germophobic president will speak and put soy sauce in his Diet Coke. Pelosi will greet Trump with a shock ring and a water-squirting lapel pin. Vice President Pence will discover a whoopee cushion when he sits. Republicans will find themselves stuck to their seats with Krazy Glue. Trump will discover that his teleprompter has the lyrics to “I Feel Pretty.” After suffering through a dismal two-year run of The Government That Goes Wrong, this is the showstopper we deserve. Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milban Copyright The Washington Post

Reality checks in with congressional fresh(wo)men The gals were barely through orientation before the powder room became a powder keg. KATHLEEN PARKER Washington Post

As the new freshman class of congressional women bopped, hopped and doo-wopped into town, old sourpusses smirked — they’ll meet reality soon enough. Actually, ’twas I who said this to herself. And, well, not to brag or anything. The gals were barely through orientation before the powder room became a powder keg, with some of the more lively issuing brash statements that many have interpreted as anti-Semitic, anti-Israel, anti-Republican, antiPresident Trump, and even antiSen. Lindsey Graham — all steeped in self-identity with an occasional dash of profanity. Remember when women just wanted to roar? Now they want to impeach the “mother------.” So said newly sworn-in Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich. She was only speaking to a MoveOn.org reception, so she was given a break. Besides, women hardly have the corner on stupid, overreaching, profane commentary. Tlaib’s bigger problem out of the gate is her apparent preference for a one-state solution to a negotiated, two-state Israel and Palestine, which came as a bit of a surprise. Tlaib initially campaigned as a pro-two-stater, for which she received the support of J Street, a nonprofit, pro-Israel organization. But after winning the Democratic primary, she seemed to drop Israel from the map. In an August interview with In These Times magazine, she was unequivocal: “One state. It has to be one state. Separate but equal does not work.”

J Street withdrew its endorsement soon thereafter. Whatever remains to be seen, it’s clear that Tlaib is a pro-Palestinian Palestinian, which she proudly clarified in a tweet earlier this month.“Right wing media targeting me again rather than focusing on the President’s reckless government shutdown. Yes, I am Muslim and Palestinian. Get over it.” She’s got a point there. But her approach is further complicated by her support of the controversial boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement aimed at shunning Israeli products and services because of the nation’s alleged human rights violations against Palestinians. Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. — the first Muslim woman to wear a hijab in Congress — also sympathizes with BDS. But her greater offense (to some) was last week’s comment that Lindsey Graham is “compromised,” insinuating that he was somehow beholden to Trump and was being essentially blackmailed into supporting the president. If it were true that Trump is hanging something over Graham’s head, this would at least help explain why the media’s favorite senator has all but abandoned his former, jovial self. But the real explanation is much simpler. He can’t get re-elected without the president, who remains popular among Graham’s core constituency: South Carolina Republicans. Not least (and by far most fun), the youngest woman ever elected to the Congress, 29-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., danced her way into her office a day after being sworn in. This selfparody was in response to a video that right-wing critics had surfaced of her dancing on a rooftop during college. A proud socialist,

Ocasio-Cortez says whatever pops into her head and is quickly becoming a quote collector’s favorite. Who doesn’t want to watch? One of the greatest hazards to politicians is the temptation to buy into his or her own myth. And in politics as in real life, it’s always a good idea to take the temperature of a room before opening one’s mouth. In 2019, it’s also prudent to pay homage to the queen, in this case Speaker Nancy Pelosi, before trying to burn down the House. For your further consideration, note that the rise of this new class of young women coincides with the victorious return of the 78-yearold Pelosi to the speakership. Chew on that for a while. The combustion of exuberance and overnight fame, thanks to the media’s excessive coverage of the rookies, could explain the giddy gall of some new members. And, really, who but the witless or numb could fail to appreciate that two women of the Islamic faith will bring strong voices to the floor for Muslim women (and men) around the world to hear? Or, that two Native American women will be among those guiding their country? As history-making and fun as the past few weeks have been, the reality part is about to hit the rest of America in the face. No matter what the new members say, their governing philosophy by and large is several longitudinal notches to the left of mainstream Democrats, as we’ve understood them. The reality is that for now, these women, who will be driving a lot of the action and attention, are the mainstream. Kathleen Parker kathleenparker@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

OBITUARIES

Andert, Crystal M. - Florissant, MO Barry, James T. "Jim," Jr. - Chesterfield Bayer, Donald G. - Belleville, IL Fischer, Mabel "LaVerne" - St. Louis Fulk, Nancy Jane - New Haven, MO, formerly Cahokia, IL

Andert, Crystal M.

of Florissant, Missouri, died Sunday, January 20, 2019 at the age of 94. Beloved wife, mother, s i s t e r , gra n d mot h er, grea t grandmother, friend and aunt to many. Born April 4, 1924 in Davis County Iowa to Charles Elbert and Ella May (Nighswonger) Hutchings, Crystal proudly worked as a "Rosie the Riveter" during WWII . She worked at Southwestern Bell (now AT&T) before becoming full time mom to four children. Crystal was very active in her children's school, sports and activities. Once her children got older she added her beloved Shetland Sheepdog Ozzie to the family, and turned to hobbies including beautiful quilting and trunk restoration. Crystal is survived by her children Catherine (Steve) Verhoeven, Charles (Catherine) Andert, Craig Andert, Christina Anderson, and four grandchildren Jeremy Andert, Varinda Sue (TJ) Ridl, Lisa Allen and Michelle Allen. Crystal is proceeded in death by her husband Charles of 69 years. Services: Visitation 5:00 - 8:00 pm Wednesday, January 23rd. Prayer Service 9:30 am, Thursday, January 24th, Hutchens Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant. Burial at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery at 11:15 am Thursday. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the American Cancer Society.

Barry, James T. "Jim," Jr.

of St. Louis, Missouri, baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection Saturday, January 19, 2019, comforted by Eileen, his wife of 49 1/2 years. He was 73 years old. Jim is survived by Eileen (née Kelly); his children Jay (Emily) Barry, Colleen (Chris) Vulin, Anne (Charlie) Bussmann, and Kelly (Kevin) Reilly; his adoring grandchildren, Leigh and Brynne Barry; Cora, Caelan, and Carolina Vulin; Brayden, Ryan, and Connor Bussmann; and Fina and Carrick Reilly - who all loved their "GP." Also survived by his brothers, Jack Barry and Tom Barry and their families, as well as many other family members and friends whom he cherished deeply. Jim was born on June 12, 1945, in New Rochelle, New York, to the late James T. "Bud" Barry, Sr., and Mary Barry (née Dockery). He was a lifelong resident of St. Louis, a devoted parishioner of Immacolata, St. Monica, and Ascension parishes, and an annual White House Jesuit retreatant. He was a graduate of St. Louis University High School (class of 1963), the University of Notre Dame (class of 1967), and St. Louis University School of Law (cum laude, class of 1970). He also served honorably as a captain in the U.S. Army Reserves. Jim had a successful legal career spanning more than 38 years, highlighted by the founding of The Barry Law Firm in 1980, in Clayton, MO, which specialized in banking, business, and commercial matters. Jim loved serving his many valued clients and friends. He was a member of the Missouri and Illinois Bar Associations, as well as a number of other professional and civic organizations. Jim was a passionate devotee of the University of Notre Dame, serving as vice president of the National Alumni Board, the chairman of the National Senior Alumni Board, a president and Man of the Year of the Notre Dame Club of St. Louis, and a fabulous enthusiast of the Fighting Irish football team. He also served on various boards and clubs for St. Louis University High School and St. Joseph's Academy. He was a director of the Western Golf Association Evans Scholars Foundation, served as a marshal for The Masters at Augusta National Golf Club for 16 years, and was a longtime member of Norwood Hills Country Club and the Missouri Athletic Club. Jim was a true Irish gentleman and will be remembered as a proud, hard-working, and much-loved husband, father, and grandfather, a prolific storyteller, and a tremendous friend and confidante to so many. Services: Visitation on Thursday, Jan. 24, from 4-8 pm, at Schrader Funeral Home & Crematory, 14960 Manchester Rd. at Holloway in Ballwin. Funeral Mass on Friday, Jan. 25, at 10:00am at Ascension Catholic Church, 230 Santa Maria Dr. in Chesterfield. If desired, donations can be made to White House Jesuit Retreat Center, 7400 Christopher Dr., St. Louis, MO, 63129. www.whretreat.org. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at schrader.com.

Bayer, Donald G.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019. Dear father of John (Lisa) Bayer; dear grandfather of Kristopher, Natalee, Bridgett and Kourtney; former husband of Paula Baker; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday, January 25, 9:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The American Diabetes Association appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 3-8 p.m.

Celebrations of Life

Kley, Dolores - Jennings Lehmann, Donna Sue - Saint Charles Meyer, Mary - Dellwood, MO Moore, Carl J. Jr. - St. Louis Mueller, Inez L. - Arnold

Fulk, Nancy Jane

(nee Dancey), passed away January 19, 2019. Beloved wife of Charles "Gene" Fulk; dearest mother of David (Jackie) Fulk, Christy (Kenneth) Dake, and Gina (Steven) Lancaster; dear grandmother and great-grandmother. Services: Burial will be at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis. Arrangements under the direction of Toedtmann & Grosse Funeral Home, New Haven, MO.

Kley, Dolores

Saturday, January, 19, 2019. Funeral Thurs., Jan. 24, 11:00 a.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., (Florissant). Visitation Wednesday 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Lehmann, Donna Sue

nee McReynolds, of Saint Charles, Missouri, passed away on Saturday, January 19, 2019, at the age of 70. Beloved wife of David R. Lehmann; cherished daughter of the late William and Clarice McReynolds; devoted mother of Jennifer L. (Matthew) LaRue of Arlington Heights, IL and Beth A. (Matthew) Hall of O'Fallon, MO; loving grandmother of Lucy, Amelia, Alexander, Carter, Kate, Fiona, Grady, and Stella; dear sister of Susan McReynolds; treasured aunt to many nephews and nieces; and dear friend to many. Donna was an elementary school teacher and retired after 33 years of teaching from the Rockwood and St. Charles School Districts. She will be dearly missed by her family and friends. Services: Visitation Wed., Jan. 23, Baue 620 Jefferson, 4-8 p.m.; private interment. Memorials may be made in Donna's honor to the American Diabetes Association or Immanuel Lutheran Church in St Charles. Visit Baue.com

Meyer, Mary

(nee Wierciszewski), Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Thomas Meyer, Jr.; dearest mother of Patricia (Donald) Taylor, Thomas (Eileen) Meyer, III and Ronald Meyer; dear grandmother of 6; great-grandmother of 4; daughter of the late Stella and Frank Wierciszewski; sister of Helen Hopkins and the late Pauline Kmiecik, Julia Kobermann and Aloysius Wierciszewski; our dear aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Funeral Thursday, January 24, 8:45 a.m. from Stygar Florissant Chapel, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. (Florissant), to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, 120 N. Elizabeth Ave. (Ferguson), Mass 9:15 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to the Alzheimers Association. Visitation Wednesday, 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Moore, Carl J. Jr.

Sun., Jan. 20, 2019. Beloved husband of Sylvia Moore (nee Wood); dear father of Brad (Gail), Steven (Lisa), Gregory and Jason Moore; our dear grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother, brother-in-law, uncle and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel 5255 Lemay Ferry Mon., Jan. 28 at 10am. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Semper Fi Fund appreciated. Visitation Sun. 4-7 p.m.

Mueller, Inez L.

(nee Ledford), fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church, Thursday, January 17, 2019. Loving wife of the late Ardwin H. Mueller for 59 years; d e a r e s t mot h er o f Gregory (Linda) and Timothy (Margaret) Mueller; dear grandmother of Daniel, Christopher, Nicole, Ian and Sean Mueller; dear greatgra n d mot h er of Ard w in and Quinn Mueller; dear sister of Jimmie (Jo) Ledford, the late G l a d d u s (the late Walter) Caswell; the late Ruby (the late Lowell) Harris, the late Johnny (the late Emmie) Ledford; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Inez was employed by Webster University and was very proud of the fact that over the 30 years, she attended night school and received her Bachelor of Arts Degree. Inez and Art raised their sons in Arnold, MO. After Inez and Art retired, they enjoyed traveling with their grandchildren across the United States and around the world. Inez spent her life helping others, never asking for anything in return, living a Christ-filled life in all her actions and deeds. A special loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law and friend who will be missed by everyone. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., on Friday, January 25, 9 a.m. to St. David's Catholic Church for 9:30 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to American Cancer Society appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m. “A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

Fischer, Mabel "LaVerne"

(nee Ellermeyer) Sunday, January 20, 2019. Beloved wife of Walter F. Fischer for 70 years; loving mom of Janet (George) Graham, Gary (Nancy) Fischer, and Donna Graves; dear grandma of 8, and great-grandma of 18; dear sister, sister-inlaw, aunt, cousin, and friend. A volunteer for many years at St. Anthony's Medical Center. Services: Funeral at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Fri., Jan. 25, 2019, 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorial contributions to Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge appreciated. Vis. Thurs. 5-9 p.m.

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STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Niewoehner, Clem J. - St. Louis O'Leary, Dennis J. - Imperial, MO Williams, Faith A. - Wentzville Wozniak, Greg - St. Louis

Niewoehner, Clem J.

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Judith A. Niewoehner (nee Siegrist); loving father of Scott (Jane) Niewoehner, Sharon (Terry) Heuerman and Michelle (John) Harris; cherished grandfather of Emily, Jacob and Ben Heuerman, Cory and Peyton Harris; dearest brother and brother-in-law of Linda Kramer and the late Paul (Rose) Niewoehner, Ruth (Jack) Sedlmayr and Lois (Tom) Albes; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., on Friday, January 25, 8:30 a.m. to St. Matthias The Apostle Catholic Church for 9 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Alzheimer's Association or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 3-9 p.m.

O'Leary, Dennis J.

Sun., Jan. 20, 2019. Beloved husband of Venita O'Leary. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SO. CO., 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wed., Jan. 23, 4-8 p.m. Service Thurs., Jan. 24, 11 a.m.

Williams, Faith A.

(nee Tegtmeyer); Sat.,Jan. 19, 2019. Vis. Wed., Jan. 23, 11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. Service 12:30 at Buchholz-Florissant, 619 Rue St. Francois. Inter Memorial Park. A Buchholz Florissant service.

Wozniak, Greg

Monday, January 21, 2019. Dear son of Betty and the late Irvin Wozniak; dear brother of Camille Hibdon, Mary Jane (Jim) Hawkins and Lisa (the late Thom) Hanak; our dear uncle, cousin, and friend. Services: Memorial Services will be held at a later date. In his memory contributions to The American Diabetes Association appreciated. Kutis Affton service.

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NATION

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Bitter cold blankets Northeast

DIGEST Chicago area girl dies in collapse of snow fort A 12-year-old girl who was playing in the snow with a friend died after a fort they had built collapsed on top of them Sunday afternoon, authorities said. The girl was playing with a 9-year-old girl near Rothem Church in Arlington Heights, Ill., when the snowbank fell on them, the Arlington Heights Police Department said in a news release. The 12-year-old was pronounced dead about 4:30 p.m. at Northwest Community Hospital, police said. The younger girl was treated for hypothermia and remains at the hospital. She is expected to survive, said Sgt. Charles Buczynski. The girls were at church with their families and went outside to play, police said. When an hour had passed and the girls hadn’t returned, the families went outside to look for them and found them buried in the snow. It’s not clear how long the girls were trapped in the snow.

CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Jeff Maguire digs out his driveway Monday in Carleton Place, Ontario. The weather contributed to multiple deaths over the holiday weekend. BY HOLLY RAMER associated Press

CONCORD, N.H. • Falling temperatures replaced the weekend’s falling snow Monday as bitter cold and gusty wind swept across the eastern United States. The National Weather Service had forecast that temperatures would be more than 20 degrees below normal across the Northeast, with wind gusts up to 30 mph and wind chills approaching minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit in northern New York and Vermont.

Key Democrats out to stop House members from living in offices BY KATE IRBY AND WILLIAM DOUGLAS McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON • Members of the House of Representatives who live in their Capitol Hill offices shouldn’t get too comfortable. The practice is going under the knife from the new Democratic leadership. Top Democrats are considering making the live-in lawmakers pay for bunking in prime government real estate — or ending the practice altogether. “How would you feel about attending a meeting in someone’s bedroom?” asked Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., a veteran member of the Congressional Black Caucus, which has spoken against the practice for years. Office-dwellers counter that the practice is frugal and efficient. “My constituents want me to do the job they elected me to do,” said Rep. Andy Barr, R-Ky. “They appreciate frugality too and appreciate the fact I’m focused on doing my job and not moving into Washington.” The CBC has long been appalled by the arrangements. “A lot of our Republican colleagues are very hard on people in public housing … when they in fact are living in public housing, without paying any taxes on it,” said Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., a former caucus chairman. Thompson called the practice “nasty,” saying it’s freeloading on the government’s dime. He’s been trying to end the practice for years. “Free janitorial, free cable, free security, free utilities. Ain’t a bad deal, is it?” said Thompson, who chairs the House Homeland Security Committee. “The reality is, you’re gaming the system.” Not true, said office-dweller Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Ky. “They’re going to clean your office anyway, and we’re using the gym we pay for. If I thought there was an expense to the government by doing it, that would be different,” he said. The initial fate of the sleepins in the House rests with its administration committee. Chairwoman Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., said the panel will tackle the issue later this year.

Atop the Northeast’s highest mountain, the temperature fell to minus 23 degrees Monday morning and dropped to minus 31 later in the afternoon, according to the Facebook page for Mount Washington Observatory, in New Hampshire. Wind chills were hovering around minus 80. In New York, Coast Guard crews moved quickly to rescue a 21-year-old man left stranded on an island in the Navensink River after his small boat broke down. The Coast Guard said two members waded through

34-degree water to bring the man to safety. The weather contributed to multiple deaths over the long Martin Luther King holiday weekend. In Connecticut, a utility company subcontractor died Sunday after being struck by a falling tree while working on a power line in Middletown. Thousands of homes and businesses in Connecticut remained without power Monday afternoon as temperatures dropped below zero in some locations. In Kansas, a snowplow driver

was killed when the plow drove onto the shoulder of a road and rolled over, throwing him under the vehicle. It wasn’t clear why the driver had moved to the shoulder from the roadway. And in Wisconsin, the Milwaukee County medical examiner’s office said a 59-year-old man and a 91-year-old man collapsed and died Sunday in separate incidents after removing snow. Another storm system is already developing over the Rockies that could blanket the same region with more snow by the end of the week.

Nazi’s art funds foundation for Jewish creative projects ASSOCIATED PRESS

Killings linked to undocumented man • Authorities investigating four recent Nevada killings say murder charges are pending against a man suspected of being in the U.S. illegally. Wilbur Martinez-Guzman, 20, was arrested Saturday in Carson City and was held on possession of stolen property, burglary and immigration charges. Authorities said they expected to file murder charges against him in the shooting deaths of an elderly Reno couple and two women who lived near the town of Gardnerville. Carson City Sheriff Ken Furlong said at a Sunday news conference that federal immigration authorities told his office MartinezGuzman had lived in Carson City for about a year and was in the country illegally. Furlong said Monday he didn’t know where Martinez-Guzman is originally from.

BERLIN • When Hilde Sch-

ramm inherited several paintings collected by her father, Hitler’s chief architect and Armaments Minister Albert Speer, she was only sure of one thing: She didn’t want them. Despite determining they probably hadn’t been looted from Jews during World War II, she wanted their legacy to somehow benefit others. So she huddled with friends around a rickety green table at her home-office in Berlin and came up with a plan to sell them and use the proceeds to support Jewish women’s creative projects in Germany. In 1994, that became the Zurueckgeben foundation, a project for which Schramm received an Obermayer German Jewish History Award on Monday. The honor was established by an American Jewish philanthropist to recognize the efforts of non-Jewish Germans to keep alive the Jewish cultural past. The foundation’s name translates as “return” or “give back” but also can mean “restitution,” and Schramm said it was intentionally chosen to emphasize its goal of raising awareness at a time when looted Jewish property and art was a little talked-about issue. “It was very much our point with this word ‘Zurueckgeben,’ which in a way is a provocation, because in a way nobody really can give back, to raise consciousness about the injury that had been done very broadly in Germany,” she told The Associated Press. Today, there’s a wider understanding that the Nazis plundered precious artworks and other property from Europe’s Jews, partially because of recent stepped-up German government efforts to identify heirs and organize restitution, and the popular 2014 Hollywood film “The Monuments Men.” But most of the focus has been on the big-ticket items like precious paintings and sculptures. Schramm’s foundation encourages Germans to take stock of the more mundane items in their households and question where they came from. In part it’s to fight the cliche perpetrated by the Nazis that all Jews were rich and powerful, and also to dispel the notion that only the Nazi elite profited at the expense of the Jews. “Let it come close to your families and look at what other ways the German population

Report reveals missile base • Days after the White House announced plans for a second nuclear summit between the United States and North Korea, a new think tank report has identified a secret North Korean ballistic missile base about 160 miles northwest of Seoul that is reportedly the headquarters of the country’s strategic missile force. The report, released Monday by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said the base is one of about 20 undeclared missile operating bases, part of North Korea’s ongoing ballistic missile program. Researchers at the center’s Beyond Parallel project said the latest report provides more evidence that North Korea is not dismantling its weapons facilities. “North Korea is not supposed to have these ballistic missile bases,” said Victor Cha, one of the report’s authors. After President Donald Trump’s historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last summer, Trump wrote on Twitter that there was “no longer a nuclear threat from North Korea.” The White House announced Friday that Trump would hold a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in February as the two sides seek to jump-start nuclear talks.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

In 1937, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler (from left) discusses plans for building a convention hall at Nuremberg with Lord Mayor Willy Liebel and Albert Speer, at Nuremberg, Germany.

Hilde Schramm, daughter of Hitler’s architect Albert Speer, is shown Monday in Berlin.

did profit. When Jews were expelled from their jobs, of course non-Jewish Germans could take their job,” Schramm said. “It’s not only the question of real objects being robbed but their whole existence ... this is to raise awareness that it did reach almost every family, a kind of involvement or profiting.” Because it’s almost impossible to determine the original owners of smaller items such as cutlery and furniture, donors to the foundation often give a symbolic amount to Zurueckgeben, or sell the items and give the proceeds. Since it began, hundreds of Germans have donated and the foundation has been able to pay out some $570,000 in grants to

support more than 130 Jewish women’s projects. Those include a children’s theater, exhibitions, dance shows, books and films. Schramm, 82, a former Greens party state lawmaker as well as an educator and author, has been involved in several other projects related to Nazi-era commemoration and atonement. She was previously honored by Berlin with the Moses Mendelssohn Prize, named after the Jewish philosopher and given to honor people for fostering tolerance. She has also helped organize a nonprofit association to support projects in Greece after the Greek financial crisis, and has hosted seven refugees from Afghanistan and Syria in her own home. That followed German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to open the country’s borders to more than 1 million migrants in 2015-16. “Wherever I went, whatever I did, I saw something which was a blind spot and I took it up,” she said. Schramm was only 9 when the war ended. Even though she was there at times with her father as he rubbed elbows with Hitler and other top Nazis, she said the persecution of the Jews was not something she was aware of.

Students linked to blackface • Two University of Oklahoma students have voluntarily withdrawn from the school after one appeared in a video posted on social media wearing blackface and using a racial epithet, the university’s president said Monday. Jim Gallogly said the two women apologized for what he called a “shocking, racist video” and that they appeared taken aback by the backlash after the video appeared on Twitter on Friday. He said the university is investigating whether a third student was involved in the video. Since the video surfaced, the OU Black Student Association has called for a zero-tolerance policy on hate speech, more social and cultural classes, more multicultural faculty and staff, and additional financial assistance for AfricanAmericans. Thief targets Girl Scouts • Authorities say a thief stole $1,000 from a group of Girl Scouts who were selling cookies at a New Jersey mall. Woodbridge Township police say the theft occurred between 4:20 and 4:50 p.m. Friday on the upper level of the Woodbridge Center mall. The money — about $500 cash and several checks — had been placed in a bank envelope and left unattended on a table where members of Girl Scout Troop 80062 were making their sales. Authorities say mall surveillance cameras captured a man, who may have been in disguise, picking up the envelope and putting it in his pocket. From news services


WORLD

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M 1 • Tuesday • 01.22.2019

China appears to confirm claim about gene-edited babies BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE Associated Press

Chinese authorities appear to have confirmed a scientist’s unpublished claim that he helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies and that a second pregnancy is underway, and say he could face consequences for his work. China’s official Xinhua News Agency said Monday that investigators in Guangdong province determined that the scientist, He Jiankui, evaded supervision of his work and violated research norms because he wanted to be famous. The report said He acted alone and will be punished for any violations of the law, although it didn’t say which regulations he may have broken. The scientist stunned the world in November by announcing that he had altered the DNA of twin girls at conception to try to help them resist infection with the AIDS virus. He’s work has been widely criticized as unethical because of questions about whether the participants truly understood the risks. It is also considered medically dangerous because of possible harm to other genes and the potential for DNA changes to be passed to future generations.

There has been no independent verification of his claim, and it has not yet been published, although He gave details at an international gene editing conference in Hong Kong. Some have speculated that the claim could be a hoax. But the Chinese investigation appears to confirm it. The Xinhua report says the twins and those involved in the second pregnancy will remain under medical observation with regular visits supervised by government health departments. “It does sound like they have confirmed the existence of the babies,” said Dr. Kiran Musunuru, a genetics journal editor from the University of Pennsylvania who reviewed materials He provided. Given that the Chinese investigation alleged ethical lapses, He’s work might not be published by a scientific journal, but “the information needs to be made available so we know exactly what was done,” Musunuru said. “It could be as simple as putting it on the web.” The scientist, He, could not be reached for comment. A media relations person who had been acting as He’s spokesman declined to comment. It’s unclear how many edited embryos remain from He’s experiment and what will become of them.

A microplate containing embryos that have been injected with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA is seen in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China’s Guangdong province in October. A Chinese investigation says scientist He Jiankui, who reported editing the genes of twin babies, acted on his own and will be punished for any violations of the law. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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DIGEST Bomber targets U.S. again in Syria An Islamic State suicide bomber targeted a joint convoy of U.S. and allied Kurdish forces in northern Syria on Monday, marking the second attack against U.S. troops in less than a week. The attack further highlighted the dangers surrounding U.S. plans to withdraw forces after a declaration that the extremist group had been defeated. The attack happened on a checkpoint on the edge of the town of Shaddadeh in the Hassakeh province, on a road used by local Kurdish fighters and the U.S.-led coalition fighting Isis militants near the Iraqi border. U.S. Army Col. Sean Ryan said there were no casualties among the U.S.-led coalition members. “We can confirm a combined U.S. and Syrian partner force convoy was involved” in the suicide bomb attack, he said. Venezuela quells uprising •  Venezuela plunged deeper into turmoil Monday as security forces put down a predawn uprising by national guardsmen that triggered violent street protests, and the Supreme Court moved to undercut the oppositioncontrolled congress’ defiant new leadership. Socialist party chief Diosdado Cabello said 27 guardsmen were arrested and more could be detained as the investigation unfolds. The mutiny struck at a time when opposition leaders have regained momentum in their efforts to oust President Nicolas Maduro. They have called for a nationwide demonstration Wednesday, urging Venezuelans — especially members of the armed forces — to abandon Maduro. May tries Plan B   •  British Prime Minister Theresa May unveiled her Brexit Plan B on Monday — and it looks a lot like Plan A. May launched a mission to resuscitate her rejected European Union divorce deal, setting out plans to get it approved by Parliament after securing changes from the EU to a contentious Irish border measure. May’s opponents expressed incredulity: British lawmakers last week dealt the deal a resounding defeat, and EU leaders insist they won’t renegotiate it. Opposition leader Jeremy

Corbyn of the Labour Party accused May of being in “deep denial” about her doomed deal. “This really does feel a bit like ‘Groundhog Day,’” he said, referring to the 1993 film starring Bill Murray, in which a weatherman is fated to live out the same day over and over again. More abuse reports in S. Korea • More South Korean female skaters are accusing their coaches of sexually abusing them, a group representing the athletes disclosed Monday following claims by two-time Olympic champion Shim Suk-hee that her former coach had repeatedly raped her. The announcement came amid a growing #MeToo movement in South Korea’s elite sports scene, which has been notorious for a brutal training culture and highly hierarchical relationships between coaches and athletes. In addition to Shim, female athletes in judo, taekwondo and wrestling have also accused their male coaches of sexual abuse. In a news conference at South Korea’s parliament, a group called Solidarity for Young Skaters said five other skaters had been sexually abused by their coaches. The group didn’t reveal any names. Academics urge release of Canadians • More than 100 academics and former diplomats are calling on China to release two Canadians who have been detained in apparent retaliation for the arrest of a top Chinese tech executive in Canada. The letter addressed to Chinese President Xi Jinping says the arrests send a chilling message that policy and diplomacy work is “unwelcome and even risky in China.” It notes that one of those detained, Michael Kovrig, is a former diplomat who was working as an expert on Asia for the International Crisis Group think tank. Fire kills 14 sailors   •  Two Tanzanian-flagged commercial vessels caught fire in the Black Sea, leaving at least 14 sailors dead, Russian officials said Monday. Five other sailors were missing. Officials said the fire erupted while fuel was being pumped from one tanker to another. The blaze spread from one ship to the other, prompting the crews to jump

D O N AT E YO U R C A R

overboard, according to Russian news agencies. The news agencies said the two vessels had 31 crew members combined who are citizens of Turkey and India.

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TUESDAY • 01.22.2019 • B

CHANGING LANDSCAPE

PHOTOS BY JON GITCHOFF

Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina signs an autograph for Isaiah Howard, of Washington, Ill., during the Winter Warm-Up on Monday at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch.

Teams are wising up, DeWitts say

WINTER WARM-UP View videos from the weekend’s events STLtoday.com/watch Flaherty enjoys his ties to Gibson. B4 Carpenter looking for consistency. B5

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Within moments Monday of two Cardinals executives telling fans all about the towers going up, the hotel coming in, and the apartments leasing out at Ballpark Village, Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. and his son, team President Bill DeWitt III, fielded the question preoccupying baseball: What is going on with the free-agent market? Two young, megawatt stars, Manny Machado and Bryce Harper, remain unsigned as February approaches, as do dozens of talented players who would boost contenders. Teams are spending less on free agents, contracts are getting shorter, agents seem to be waiting longer, and the one-time kings of winter, those seasoned vets, are frozen out. From the main stage at the team’s Winter Warm-Up, the Cardinals’ team president said he gets it, he understands the perception. See CARDINALS • Page B4

Hicks may be best as closer BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Reds acquire pitcher Gray from Yankees. B3 This year at the Winter WarmUp, manager Mike Shildt said the Cardinals might not have an official closer, which may sound startling to some, but hey — at least it’s not as bad as last year’s Winter Warm-Up, when it was

announced the closer would be Luke Gregerson. Shildt shared this year that “the game has evolved, we have more information now,” in reference to using key relievers in key moments, regardless of what inning those moments occur. And yes, the baseball save is like the fax machine of stats. But whether it’s via an innovative strategy or just old-fashioned See HOCHMAN • Page B5

Molina has Cardinals’ ears BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Bella Monroe, 10, of Godfrey, cheers for catcher Yadier Molina on the last day of the annual Winter Warm-Up.

“It’s not like people are hoarding money ... in this business. It’s how do they put their resources to have the best chance to win this year, next year, or down the road.” Bill DeWitt Jr.

Busch Stadium might need to relocate to The Hill. Cubs manager Joe Maddon once compared the Cardinals to Tony Soprano. What is he going to say when he finds out what manager Mike Shildt is calling catcher Yadier Molina?

“He’s the Yadfather,” Shildt said. “When he speaks, everybody is going to listen.” It was Don Vito Corleone who warned that “a friend should always underestimate your virtues and an enemy overestimate your faults.” Let the record show that Kris Bryant mixed them up. The Cubs’ third baseman underestimated Molina’s faults, and in doing so he has inspired a rival. The consensus among See FREDERICKSON • Page B5

Blues lose another puzzler to Kings Mistakes are costly as another 2-0 lead doesn’t stand up BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES • The first time the Blues played the struggling Kings this season, they lost 2-0 and KINGS 4 coach Mike Yeo got fired later that eveBLUES 3 ning. The teams met for > 9 p.m. Wednesday at a second time MonDucks, FSM day afternoon. This > MacEachern’s first career goal is a thrill. time, the result didn’t produce a coaching B6 change, just another gut punch of a loss. The Blues lost 4-3 to the Kings at Staples Center, yet another example of how just when you think you know what you’ll get from the improving Blues, you don’t. See BLUES • Page B6

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Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington is scored on by Kings defenseman Paul LaDue as left winger Alexander Steen tries to defend.

SPORTS

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Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 1/23 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/2 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/5 at Panthers 6 p.m. FSM

Thursday 2/7 at Lightning 6:30 p.m. FSM

M 1 • TUESDAY • 01.22.2019

Pats’ Brady still standing QB calls victory in title game highly emotional

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball

Wednesday 1/23 Saturday 1/26 vs. Davidson at Duquesne 1 p.m. 7 p.m. CBSSN

Wednesday 1/23 Sunday 1/27 at VCU vs. Dayton 12 p.m. 11 a.m.

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Wednesday 1/23 at Arkansas 8 p.m. SEC Network

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 vs. LSU 5 p.m. SEC Network

Thursday 1/24 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. SEC Network

Sunday 1/27 vs. Auburn 2 p.m.

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Wednesday 1/23 vs. Wisconsin 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/26 at Maryland 11 a.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/30 at Minnesota 8 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/30 at Minnesota 8 p.m. BTN

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 7:45 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 3:30 p.m.

Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 5:15 p.m.

Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 1 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 2/1: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sat. 2/2: vs. Orlando, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Auburn at South Carolina, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan, BTN 6 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Kentucky, ESPN 6 p.m. College: Texas Tech at Kansas State, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Villanova at Butler, FS1 6 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Georgia Tech, FSM 6 p.m. College: Clemson at Florida State, ESPNU 7 p.m. College: Wichita State at South Florida, CBSSN 7 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Thunder, NBA 7:30 p.m. College: Texas A&M at Florida, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Indiana at Northwestern, BTN 8 p.m. College: Duke at Pittsburgh, ESPN 8 p.m. College women: Oklahoma at TCU, FS1 8 p.m. College: Wake Forest at Virginia, FSM 8 p.m. College: Mississippi at Alabama, ESPNU 9 p.m. College: New Mexico at Nevada-Las Vegas, CBSSN 10 p.m. College: San Diego State at Fresno State, ESPNU GOLF 1 p.m. Web.com Tour: Bahamas Great Abaco Classic, GOLF HOCKEY 8 p.m. Red Wings at Oilers, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Spain, ESPN2 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open: Quarterfinals, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open: Quarterfinals, ESPN2 2:30 a.m. (Wed.) Australian Open: Quarterfinals, ESPN2

DIGEST Ronaldo plans to plead guilty to tax fraud

Cristiano Ronaldo will make an unwanted trip back to Madrid on Tuesday and is expected to plead guilty to tax fraud. Ronaldo will be in the Spanish capital on tax charges related to his time at Real Madrid. The Juventus forward is expected to appear before a judge and receive a suspended two-year sentence as part of a deal struck with Spain’s state prosecutor and tax authorities last year. The agreement will cost him nearly 19 million euros ($21.6 million) in fines. In Spain, a judge can suspend sentences for two years or less for first-time offenders. In 2017, a state prosecutor accused Ronaldo of four counts of tax fraud from 2011-14 worth 14.7 million euros ($16.7 million). Ronaldo was accused of having used shell companies outside Spain to hide income made from image rights. After being questioned for nearly 90 minutes in a Madrid court at the time, the Portuguese player told a judge he never tried to avoid taxes. The accusations didn’t involve his salary from Real Madrid, his club from 2009 until joining Italian champion Juventus last year. Ronaldo’s presence in court Tuesday is not expected to last long. Officials said he declined an option to address the court via video conference. (AP) Mizzou adds pledge from lineman • With national signing day two weeks away, the Missouri football team continued to put the final touches on its 2019 class with an oral commitment from junior college offensive lineman Angel Matute, who announced his decision on Twitter after visiting Mizzou over the weekend. Matute will come to the Tigers from Mount San Antonio College in Walnut, Calif., where he played left tackle and earned first-team AllSouthern California Football Association honors this past season. A 6-4, 275-pound prospect, Matute hails from Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. He’ll add to a 2019 class that started with 22 players who signed at the early signing date in December. (Dave Matter) Elsewhere in college football • The Indiana Hoosiers have hired longtime play-caller Kalen DeBoer as their associate head coach and offensive coordinator. Coach Tom Allen made the announcement. DeBoer replaces Mike DeBord, who retired in late December. ... Rutgers has named Maryland’s Andy Buh its defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. (AP) Vonn still weighing retirement • Lindsey Vonn has “so much to process” that she is going to take a few days to decide her future. Battling pain in her knees and failing to finish better than ninth in three races this weekend, Vonn said Sunday that immediate retirement from ski racing “is a possibility.” A message from U.S. ski team spokeswoman Megan Harrod says Vonn “is going to take the next couple/few days to think about how she will proceed and process everything, and then decide about how she will move forward based on that.” (AP) Pacquiao’s home burglarized • A spokesman for boxer Manny Pacquiao says the famed fighter’s Los Angeles home was robbed Saturday at about the time he was in the ring with rival Adrien Broner in Las Vegas. The spokesman confirmed the burglary to NBC News. (AP)

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New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrates with his teammates after the AFC championship game Sunday, a victory over Kansas City. THE WASHINGTON POST

Tom Brady is going to his ninth Super Bowl — as many as Joe Montana, Peyton Manning and Aaron Rodgers appeared in, combined. But after a tumultuous and erratic regular season, this one is different, and Brady keeps letting everyone know it. For one thing, he’s now 41, far closer to the end of his career than the beginning, no matter how long he intends to play. For another, he and the New England Patriots came into the AFC championship game against the Kansas City Chiefs as an underdog, the first time New England found itself in that position since 2014. “Everyone thinks we (stink),” Brady opined after the Patriots beat the Chargers in the divisional round, and that’s a theme he struck again after Sunday’s overtime victory in Kansas City sent New England to a fourth Super Bowl in five years. We’re here again, he seemed to say. Deal with it. “The odds were stacked against us,” Brady told reporters after the game. “It hasn’t been that way for us for a while. It certainly was this year.” This time, it seemed personal. On Monday, Brady admitted, “That was as emotional a game as I’ve been through, certainly in a long time” during his weekly WEEI interview. “We fought through adversity all year,” he said. Gone was the drama that created headlines last year, the rumors of a rift with coach Bill

SUPER BOWL LIII

Patriots vs. Rams Feb. 3, 5:30 p.m. KMOV (4) • at Atlanta

Belichick. Cameras caught Brady saying, “I love you, too,” to his longtime coach after the game. Which means that Belichick said it first? “We’ve always gotten along great,” Brady said on WEEI. “We’ve worked together for 19 years. We’ve had the same goals in mind for 19 years. He’s been a great, great mentor in my life. He’s taught me more than anyone could about the game of football. He’s the greatest coach of all time and we’ve had some great moments together.” Brady and his people, as is their custom, sent a postgame Instagram message that was a little more in-your-face than usual. This one, accompanied by a caption containing only the letter “W,” reminded everyone that Brady is “Still here,” as video showed him and Rob Gronkowski walking out of Arrowhead Stadium. As Gronk smiled, Diddy’s “Bad Boy for Life” started to play. The lyrics? “We ain’t goin’ nowhere, we ain’t goin’ nowhere, we can’t be stopped now ‘cause it’s bad boy for life.” Diddy posted the video on Instagram himself, writing “Congratulations to my brother @tombrady true Inspiration. Boy won’t stop!!!” Brady, the old guy whom ev-

eryone thought was finished, passed for 348 yards Sunday as New England dominated the game, outgaining the Chiefs 524 yards to 290 yards, finishing with double the number of first downs (36 to 18) and running 94 plays to Kansas City’s 47. For the second straight game, Brady was not sacked and the Chiefs got pressure on him on just 10 percent of his dropbacks. The Patriots came up with some new, lastminute wrinkles, including eight new plays that were added to the playbook in an 11 a.m. meeting Sunday inside the Westin Crown Center ballroom, Brady told Pro Football Talk’s Peter King. He told WEEI on Monday that it’s not unusual for offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels to come up with “plays that we’ve never even practiced” as “preparation goes right up to the beginning of a game.” In his last 17 playoff games — roughly the equivalent of a full season — Brady has gone 13-4, passing for 5,596 yards, with a 3316 touchdown-to-interception ratio. All that success aside, he was thinking of Chiefs phenom Patrick Mahomes after Sunday’s dramatics, seeking him out for a brief, private conversation. “I just went and saw him,” Brady told King, declining to offer details Monday. “I mean, he’s feeling like you think he’d feel when you lose a game like this. It hurts. He’s a hell of a ... I mean, what a great young player. So impressed with his poise, his leadership. He is spectacular.”

NFL NOTEBOOK Pass interference issues may become reviewable The officiating debacle acknowledged by the NFL at the end of Sunday’s NFC title game in New Orleans, which prompted widespread criticism from fans, players and coaches over what many deemed an outcome-changing call, could lead to a significant rule change. The league and its rulemaking competition committee plan to give consideration this offseason to making pass interference calls subject to instant replay review. “It will be discussed at length along with additional fouls that coaches feel should be subject to review,” one person familiar with the league’s inner workings said Monday, speaking on the condition of anonymity. Any change would have to be approved by at least three-quarters of the 32 owners. The competition committee always has been staunchly opposed in the past to making judgment calls such as pass interference reviewable by replay. NFL announces international games • The NFL will play four games in London next season but did not say which would be at Tottenham’s delayed new stadium and which would be at Wembley. The league also said Monday one game will be in Mexico City — Kansas City vs. the Los Angeles Chargers

at Azteca Stadium, which hosted games in 2016 and 2017. The Rams and Kansas City were to have played there Nov. 19, but the game was moved to Los Angeles because of poor field conditions. In London, the NFC champion Rams will play Cincinnati. The other games are Houston-Jacksonville, Carolina-Tampa Bay and ChicagoOakland. Jacksonville is owned by Shahid Khan, who also owns the Premier League club Fulham. Sportsbook credits Saints bets • A sportsbook in New Jersey is offering betting credits for customers who bet on the New Orleans Saints due to the widespread belief that the team was victimized by a blown call by referees during its loss Sunday in the NFC championship game. PointsBet initially said it “will refund all wagers” on the spread and money-line bets on the Saints. But later, PointsBet said those “refunds” would come in the form of bonus bets, not cash payouts. Pats-Chiefs draws huge rating • Sunday night’s game between the New England Patriots and Kansas City Chiefs was the secondmost watched and rated AFC championship game in 42 years. The overtime thriller on CBS averaged 53.919 million viewers, just shy of the 54.850 million who viewed Pittsburgh’s victory over the New York Jets in 2011.

Bears hire Monachino • The Chicago Bears have hired former Indianapolis Colts defensive coordinator Ted Monachino as senior defensive assistant and outside linebackers coach. Monachino worked for new Bears defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano in Indianapolis and with him on John Harbaugh’s staff in Baltimore. He was a senior defensive analyst for Missouri last season and was hired as Kansas State’s defensive coordinator and linebackers coach in December. Dolphins keep waiting • While the 2018 NFL champion has yet to be crowned, much of the league is already looking ahead to the 2019 season, and so far the Miami Dolphins are in last place. Vegas oddsmakers recently made the Dolphins a 300-1 choice to win the Super Bowl in Miami a year from now, by far the longest odds. And because Brian Flores’ team is headed for the Super Bowl, the Dolphins must wait another two weeks before they can seal a deal with the Patriots’ defensive playcaller to become their coach. The Dolphins interviewed Flores on Jan. 4, targeted him as their choice on Jan. 11 and are expected to meet with him this week. But no deal can become final until after the Patriots play the Rams in the Super Bowl on Feb. 3. From news services


SPORTS

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Gray traded from Yankees to Cincinnati

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Tigers fall to South Carolina MU women lose battle for second place in SEC FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Yankees have traded pitcher Sonny Gray to Cincinnati. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sonny Gray’s unsuccessful stretch with the Yankees ended when New York traded the pitcher to Cincinnati after the 29-year-old righthander agreed to a contract with the Reds that added $30.5 million from 202022. New York received infield prospect Shed Long and a high pick in this year’s amateur draft, then flipped Long to Seattle for 21-year-old outfielder Josh Stowers. The Yankees sent the Reds lefthander Reiver Sanmartin in the moves Monday. Coming off a last-place finish in the NL Central, the Reds have added Gray, Tanner Roark and Alex Wood to their rotation in offseason trades. Cincinnati and New York agreed to a deal Friday, pending a window for Gray to reach a long-term deal. Gray and the Yankees settled on a $7.5 million, one-year contract on Jan. 11 that avoided salary arbitration. He had been eligible for free agency after this season, and his new deal raises his guarantee to $38 million over four seasons. The new contract includes a 2023 club option. Gray was 15-16 with a 4.52 ERA overall for New York, which acquired him from Oakland in July 2017. He was dropped from the rotation last August after he smirked when fans booed as he walked off the Yankee Stadium mound in the third inning of a 7-5 loss to Baltimore. Gray had a 6.98 ERA at Yankee Stadium last year and a 3.17 ERA on the road. Flores, Diamondbacks finalize deal • Wilmer Flores endeared himself to New York Mets fans when he got emotional during a game in 2015 after believing media reports he had been traded. About 3½ years later, a deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks suits him just fine. Flores and the Diamondbacks finalized a one-year contract Monday, guaranteeing the infielder $4.25 million. He gets a $3.75 million salary this year as part of the deal, which includes a $6 million team option for 2020 with a $500,000 buyout. “I’ve always liked playing in Arizona. It’s one of my favorite stadiums,” said Flores, who is close friends with Diamondbacks outfielder David Peralta. “When they called and had interest in me, I wanted to go there.” Flores became a free agent last month when the Mets didn’t offer a 2019 contract. A versatile 27-year-old, Flores hit .267 with 11 home runs and 51 RBIs last year playing first, second and third base. He made $3.4 million. Flores is a career .262 hitter with 68 homers and 253 RBIs in parts of six seasons, all with the Mets. Rivera, Halladay, Martinez seem set for Hall election • Mariano Rivera figures to make quick work of his Hall of Fame ballot appearance, just as he did of opposing batters, and could even set another record when voting is announced Tuesday: for highest percentage of ballots. No one has ever been a unanimous Hall of Fame selection. Ken Griffey Jr. holds the mark for the top percentage at 99.32 when he was on 437 of 440 ballots two years ago. Rivera was picked by all 217 voters totaled through Monday afternoon by Ryan Thibodaux’s Hall of Fame vote tracker, about half the expected ballots. Roy Halladay also appeared headed to election in his first appearance on the Baseball Writers’ Association of America ballot, while Edgar Martinez seemed likely to join them in his 10th and final appearance. Mike Mussina also could gain the honor, but Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling probably will fall short while getting closer.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

There weren’t any major confrontations, but the Missouri women’s basketball team suffered a beatdown Monday in Columbia, S.C. South Carolina dominated the Tigers in the rivalry game at Colonial Life Arena as the No. 19 Gamecocks (13-5, 5-1) moved into sole possession of second place in the Southeastern Conference with a 79-65 win. South Carolina’s defensive pressure got to No. 25 Missouri (15-5, 4-2) early and often, forcing nine first-half turnovers and turning those into 17 points in the first half. The Gamecocks controlled the boards in the half, went on an 18-4 run and held a 14-point lead at halftime. Mizzou finished with 16 turnovers and lost the rebounding battle 35-29. Mizzou’s tough stretch continues at No. 15 Kentucky on Thursday. (Anne Rogers) No. 6 Michigan 69, No. 13 Maryland 55 • Cassius Winston and Kenny Goins scored 14 points each to help Michigan State beat Maryland with balanced offense and stifling defense. The Spartans (17-2, 8-0 Big

Ten) have won 12 straight this season to take sole possession of first in the conference. They have won 20 consecutive Big Ten regular season games dating to last year. Maryland’s leading scorer, Anthony Cowan, was held to a season-low seven points. (AP) No. 9 Kansas 80, No. 24 Iowa State 76 • Dedric Lawson had 29 points and 15 rebounds, Devon Dotson hit the clinching free throws with 5.9 seconds left and Kansas beat Iowa State. Marcus Garrett added 16 points and Lagerald Vick had 14 for the Jayhawks (16-3, 5-2 Big 12). Dotson finished with 11 points for Kansas. Talen Horten-Tucker had 16 for the Cyclones, while Michael Jacobson finished with 10 points and 11 rebounds and Nick Weiler-Babb had 10 points. (AP) No. 11 North Carolina 103, No. 10 Virginia Tech 82 • Freshman Coby White scored 27 points and North Carolina knocked down a season-high 16 3-pointers to beat Virginia Tech. Fellow rookie Nassir Little added a season-high 23 points for the Tar Heels (15-4, 5-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who

struggled out of the gate to fall behind by nine while making just 1 of their first 12 3s. (AP)

NOTEBOOK

Tennessee moves to No. 1 as Duke drops to 2 • Top-ranked Duke went down early in the week. No. 2 Michigan and No. 4 Virginia, the last of Division I’s unbeaten teams, both fell over the weekend. In all, six top-10 teams lost. Tennessee kept rolling amid chaos across the AP Top 25. The Vols are the new No. 1 in The Associated Press men’s college basketball poll on Monday, climbing three spots to earn their first top ranking since the 2007-08 season. Tennessee received 48 of 64 first-place votes from a media panel, well ahead of No. 2 Duke with 11. No. 3 Virginia received three first-place votes and No. 6 Michigan State two. Gonzaga and Michigan rounded out the top five. The only other time Tennessee (16-1, 5-0) was No. 1, it lost the next night to Vanderbilt — the Vols’ opponent on Wednesday St. Louis University received a vote at No. 23 from John Feinstein. It’s the Bills’ second time receiving votes this season. (AP)

MEN’S BASKETBALL

AP TOP 25 POLL Rec. 1.

Tennessee (48) 16-1

3

15-2 1520

1

3. Virginia (3)

16-1

1451

4

4. Gonzaga

18-2

1374

5

5. Michigan

17-1 1363

2. Duke (11)

1355

7.

1143 10

Nevada

18-1

6

8. Kentucky

14-3 1087

12

9. Kansas

15-3 1060

7

10. Virginia Tech

15-2 1007

9

11. North Carolina 14-4

895

13

12. Marquette

16-3

861

15

13. Maryland

16-3

751 19

14. Texas Tech

15-3

743

14. Buffalo

17-1

743 16

16. Auburn

13-4

627 14

17. Houston

18-1

544

18. Villanova

14-4

450 22

19. Iowa

16-3

332 23

20. Mississippi

14-3

291 18

21. NC State

15-3

282

22. Mississippi St.

14-3

266 24

23. Louisville

13-5

230

24. Iowa St.

14-4

156

25. LSU

14-3

154

8

21

17

Others: Florida St. 139, Purdue 111, Kansas St 91, Nebraska 66, Wisconsin 64, Oklahoma 16, Syracuse 13, Washington 11, Murray St. 9, Cincinnati 6, Wofford 5, St. Louis U. 3, San Francisco 2, Florida 2, TCU 1, Hofstra 1.

COACHES TOP 25 POLL 1.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

2

6. Michigan St. (2) 16-2

Rec.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson is fouled by Iowa State forward Cameron Lard during the first half.

Pts Pvs 1575

Tennessee (30) 16-1

Pts Pvs 798

3

2. Duke (2)

15-2

746

2

3. Virginia

16-1

720

1

4. Gonzaga

18-2

693

5

5. Michigan St.

16-2

682

6

6. Michigan

17-1

666

4

7.

18-1

561 10

8. Virginia Tech

15-2

520

9. Kentucky

14-3

502 14

10. Kansas

15-3

489

8

11. Marquette

16-3

441

13

12. North Carolina 14-4

403

15

13. Texas Tech

15-3

384

9

14. Buffalo

17-1

335

17

15. Auburn

13-4

331

12

Nevada

7

16. Maryland

16-3

317 22

17. Houston

18-1

314

17

18. Villanova

14-4

231

21

19. NC State

15-3

194 16

20. Mississippi

14-3

189 20

21. Iowa

16-3

180 24

22. Mississippi St.

14-3

147 23

23. Florida St.

13-5

90

24. Louisville

13-5

85

25. Iowa State

14-4

75

11

Others: LSU 54, Kansas State 50, Nebraska 40, Oklahoma 38, Purdue 30, Wisconsin 27, TCU 12, Furman 9, Indiana 9, Washington 9, North Texas 8, Ohio State 5, Arizona State 4, Cincinnati 4, Central Florida 3, Murray State 2, Texas State 2, Wofford 1.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Serena Williams ousts top-seeded Halep ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

As Serena Williams made her way out to the Australian Open’s main court during pre-match introductions, the voice booming over the stadium’s speakers implored spectators to welcome “the world’s No. 1 player — from Romania, Simona Halep.” Oops. Williams, wearing headphones, quickly pivoted and retreated back into the tunnel she’d just emerged from, making way for her fourth-round opponent Monday night. A couple of hours later, when Williams wrapped up her 6-1, 4-6, 6-4 victory over Halep in a contest filled with momentum swings and fantastic play by both, it was clear which woman really is No. 1, regardless of what the current rankings say. “It was a really intense match, and it was some incredible points,” said Williams, who improved to 9-1 against Halep and now meets 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova in the quarterfinals. “I love playing tennis and I love to play here and I love to be back out here.” The 37-year-old American sat out last year’s Australian Open after giving birth to a daughter months earlier and dealing with health complications. Since returning to the tour, Williams has reached the past two Grand Slam finals, losing both — and leaving her still one shy of equaling Margaret Court’s record of 24 major singles titles. Halep offered up the first real test Williams has faced at this year’s Australian Open, where she is bidding for an eighth trophy, pushing her throughout a back-and-forth matchup that was a fascinating mix of power, court coverage and shotmaking.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams (right) is congratulated by Simona Halep after winning their fourth-round match.

It wasn’t until Williams saved three break points in a monumental game to hold for 3-all in the third set that she gained control. “I was unlucky a little bit,” Halep said. Williams then broke for a 4-3 lead and finally was on her way. “In order for me to stay out there, I had to play a little like I knew I could,” said Williams, who is seeded 16th on account of all the time she took away from tennis. “I’m such a fighter. I just never give up. It’s definitely something that’s innate. I just work so hard for every point.” That she does. She also makes abundantly clear just how much every point means to her. Against Halep — who beat Serena’s older sister, Venus, in the third round — Williams frequently pumped her fists or yelled “Come on!” after key exchanges. When Halep hit one shot that caught the net tape and barely trickled over for a

winner, Williams looked pained and complained, “I mean, it’s not fair.” Pliskova advanced earlier Monday with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over two-time major champion Garbine Muguruza. The other quarterfinal on that side of the women’s bracket features No. 4 Naomi Osaka against No. 6 Elina Svitolina. Osaka, who beat Williams in last year’s U.S. Open final, edged No. 13 Anastasija Sevastova 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 in the fourth round, while Svitolina got past 2017 U.S. Open finalist Madison Keys 6-2, 1-6, 6-1. Later, Danielle Collins was to take on Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. In men’s matches, 2016 Wimbledon runner-up Milos Raonic knocked off No. 4-seeded Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-1, 7-6 (5), and next takes on No. 28 Lucas Pouille, a 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5, 7-6 (2) winner over No. 11 Borna Coric. No. 23 Pablo Carreno Busta

left the court yelling at the chair umpire after a disagreement in the concluding tiebreaker of his 6-7 (8), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (8) loss to No. 8-seeded Kei Nishikori in a 5-hour, 5-minute marathon that was the longest match of the tournament. Nishikori’s quarterfinal foe will be No. 1-seeded and six-time champion Novak Djokovic, who overcame a couple of tumbles to the court and a series of energysapping baseline exchanges — one point lasted 42 strokes! — to beat No. 15 Daniil Medvedev 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-3. After topping Medvedev in a 3-hour, 15-minute struggle to get back to the quarterfinals for the first time in three years, Djokovic joked during an oncourt interview: “Since I guess my next opponent is watching, I’m feeling fantastic. I’ve never felt fresher in my life.” Later, 14th-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas was to face 22ndseeded Roberto Bautista Agut.


SPORTS

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 2

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Gray traded from Yankees to Cincinnati

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Tigers fall to South Carolina MU women lose battle for second place in SEC FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Yankees have traded pitcher Sonny Gray to Cincinnati. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sonny Gray’s unsuccessful stretch with the Yankees ended when New York traded the pitcher to Cincinnati after the 29-year-old righthander agreed to a contract with the Reds that added $30.5 million from 202022. New York received infield prospect Shed Long and a high pick in this year’s amateur draft, then flipped Long to Seattle for 21-year-old outfielder Josh Stowers. The Yankees sent the Reds lefthander Reiver Sanmartin in the moves Monday. Coming off a last-place finish in the NL Central, the Reds have added Gray, Tanner Roark and Alex Wood to their rotation in offseason trades. Cincinnati and New York agreed to a deal Friday, pending a window for Gray to reach a long-term deal. Gray and the Yankees settled on a $7.5 million, one-year contract on Jan. 11 that avoided salary arbitration. He had been eligible for free agency after this season, and his new deal raises his guarantee to $38 million over four seasons. The new contract includes a 2023 club option. Gray was 15-16 with a 4.52 ERA overall for New York, which acquired him from Oakland in July 2017. He was dropped from the rotation last August after he smirked when fans booed as he walked off the Yankee Stadium mound in the third inning of a 7-5 loss to Baltimore. Gray had a 6.98 ERA at Yankee Stadium last year and a 3.17 ERA on the road. Flores, Diamondbacks finalize deal • Wilmer Flores endeared himself to New York Mets fans when he got emotional during a game in 2015 after believing media reports he had been traded. About 3½ years later, a deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks suits him just fine. Flores and the Diamondbacks finalized a one-year contract Monday, guaranteeing the infielder $4.25 million. He gets a $3.75 million salary this year as part of the deal, which includes a $6 million team option for 2020 with a $500,000 buyout. “I’ve always liked playing in Arizona. It’s one of my favorite stadiums,” said Flores, who is close friends with Diamondbacks outfielder David Peralta. “When they called and had interest in me, I wanted to go there.” Flores became a free agent last month when the Mets didn’t offer a 2019 contract. A versatile 27-year-old, Flores hit .267 with 11 home runs and 51 RBIs last year playing first, second and third base. He made $3.4 million. Flores is a career .262 hitter with 68 homers and 253 RBIs in parts of six seasons, all with the Mets. Rivera, Halladay, Martinez seem set for Hall election • Mariano Rivera figures to make quick work of his Hall of Fame ballot appearance, just as he did of opposing batters, and could even set another record when voting is announced Tuesday: for highest percentage of ballots. No one has ever been a unanimous Hall of Fame selection. Ken Griffey Jr. holds the mark for the top percentage at 99.32 when he was on 437 of 440 ballots two years ago. Rivera was picked by all 217 voters totaled through Monday afternoon by Ryan Thibodaux’s Hall of Fame vote tracker, about half the expected ballots. Roy Halladay also appeared headed to election in his first appearance on the Baseball Writers’ Association of America ballot, while Edgar Martinez seemed likely to join them in his 10th and final appearance. Mike Mussina also could gain the honor, but Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling probably will fall short while getting closer.

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

There weren’t any major confrontations, but the Missouri women’s basketball team suffered a beatdown Monday in Columbia, S.C. South Carolina dominated the Tigers in the rivalry game at Colonial Life Arena as the No. 19 Gamecocks (13-5, 5-1) moved into sole possession of second place in the Southeastern Conference with a 79-65 win. South Carolina’s defensive pressure got to No. 25 Missouri (15-5, 4-2) early and often, forcing nine first-half turnovers and turning those into 17 points in the first half. The Gamecocks controlled the boards in the half, went on an 18-4 run and held a 14-point lead at halftime. Mizzou finished with 16 turnovers and lost the rebounding battle 35-29. Mizzou’s tough stretch continues at No. 15 Kentucky on Thursday. (Anne Rogers) No. 6 Michigan 69, No. 13 Maryland 55 • Cassius Winston and Kenny Goins scored 14 points each to help Michigan State beat Maryland with balanced offense and stifling defense. The Spartans (17-2, 8-0 Big

Ten) have won 12 straight this season to take sole possession of first in the conference. They have won 20 consecutive Big Ten regular season games dating to last year. Maryland’s leading scorer, Anthony Cowan, was held to a season-low seven points. (AP) No. 9 Kansas 80, No. 24 Iowa State 76 • Dedric Lawson had 29 points and 15 rebounds, Devon Dotson hit the clinching free throws with 5.9 seconds left and Kansas beat Iowa State. Marcus Garrett added 16 points and Lagerald Vick had 14 for the Jayhawks (16-3, 5-2 Big 12). Dotson finished with 11 points for Kansas. Talen Horten-Tucker had 16 for the Cyclones, while Michael Jacobson finished with 10 points and 11 rebounds and Nick Weiler-Babb had 10 points. (AP) No. 11 North Carolina 103, No. 10 Virginia Tech 82 • Freshman Coby White scored 27 points and North Carolina knocked down a season-high 16 3-pointers to beat Virginia Tech. Fellow rookie Nassir Little added a season-high 23 points for the Tar Heels (15-4, 5-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who

struggled out of the gate to fall behind by nine while making just 1 of their first 12 3s. (AP)

NOTEBOOK

Tennessee moves to No. 1 as Duke drops to 2 • Top-ranked Duke went down early in the week. No. 2 Michigan and No. 4 Virginia, the last of Division I’s unbeaten teams, both fell over the weekend. In all, six top-10 teams lost. Tennessee kept rolling amid chaos across the AP Top 25. The Vols are the new No. 1 in The Associated Press men’s college basketball poll on Monday, climbing three spots to earn their first top ranking since the 2007-08 season. Tennessee received 48 of 64 first-place votes from a media panel, well ahead of No. 2 Duke with 11. No. 3 Virginia received three first-place votes and No. 6 Michigan State two. Gonzaga and Michigan rounded out the top five. The only other time Tennessee (16-1, 5-0) was No. 1, it lost the next night to Vanderbilt — the Vols’ opponent on Wednesday St. Louis University received a vote at No. 23 from John Feinstein. It’s the Bills’ second time receiving votes this season. (AP)

MEN’S BASKETBALL

AP TOP 25 POLL Rec. 1.

Tennessee (48) 16-1

3

15-2 1520

1

3. Virginia (3)

16-1

1451

4

4. Gonzaga

18-2

1374

5

5. Michigan

17-1 1363

2. Duke (11)

1355

7.

1143 10

Nevada

18-1

6

8. Kentucky

14-3 1087

12

9. Kansas

15-3 1060

7

10. Virginia Tech

15-2 1007

9

11. North Carolina 14-4

895

13

12. Marquette

16-3

861

15

13. Maryland

16-3

751 19

14. Texas Tech

15-3

743

14. Buffalo

17-1

743 16

16. Auburn

13-4

627 14

17. Houston

18-1

544

18. Villanova

14-4

450 22

19. Iowa

16-3

332 23

20. Mississippi

14-3

291 18

21. NC State

15-3

282

22. Mississippi St.

14-3

266 24

23. Louisville

13-5

230

24. Iowa St.

14-4

156

25. LSU

14-3

154

8

21

17

Others: Florida St. 139, Purdue 111, Kansas St 91, Nebraska 66, Wisconsin 64, Oklahoma 16, Syracuse 13, Washington 11, Murray St. 9, Cincinnati 6, Wofford 5, St. Louis U. 3, San Francisco 2, Florida 2, TCU 1, Hofstra 1.

COACHES TOP 25 POLL 1.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

2

6. Michigan St. (2) 16-2

Rec.

Kansas forward Dedric Lawson is fouled by Iowa State forward Cameron Lard during the first half.

Pts Pvs 1575

Tennessee (30) 16-1

Pts Pvs 798

3

2. Duke (2)

15-2

746

2

3. Virginia

16-1

720

1

4. Gonzaga

18-2

693

5

5. Michigan St.

16-2

682

6

6. Michigan

17-1

666

4

7.

18-1

561 10

8. Virginia Tech

15-2

520

9. Kentucky

14-3

502 14

10. Kansas

15-3

489

8

11. Marquette

16-3

441

13

12. North Carolina 14-4

403

15

13. Texas Tech

15-3

384

9

14. Buffalo

17-1

335

17

15. Auburn

13-4

331

12

Nevada

7

16. Maryland

16-3

317 22

17. Houston

18-1

314

17

18. Villanova

14-4

231

21

19. NC State

15-3

194 16

20. Mississippi

14-3

189 20

21. Iowa

16-3

180 24

22. Mississippi St.

14-3

147 23

23. Florida St.

13-5

90

24. Louisville

13-5

85

25. Iowa State

14-4

75

11

Others: LSU 54, Kansas State 50, Nebraska 40, Oklahoma 38, Purdue 30, Wisconsin 27, TCU 12, Furman 9, Indiana 9, Washington 9, North Texas 8, Ohio State 5, Arizona State 4, Cincinnati 4, Central Florida 3, Murray State 2, Texas State 2, Wofford 1.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Serena Williams ousts top-seeded Halep ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

As Serena Williams made her way out to the Australian Open’s main court during pre-match introductions, the voice booming over the stadium’s speakers implored spectators to welcome “the world’s No. 1 player — from Romania, Simona Halep.” Oops. Williams, wearing headphones, quickly pivoted and retreated back into the tunnel she’d just emerged from, making way for her fourth-round opponent Monday night. A couple of hours later, when Williams wrapped up her 6-1, 4-6, 6-4 victory over Halep in a contest filled with momentum swings and fantastic play by both, it was clear which woman really is No. 1, regardless of what the current rankings say. “It was a really intense match, and it was some incredible points,” said Williams, who improved to 9-1 against Halep and now meets 2016 U.S. Open runner-up Karolina Pliskova in the quarterfinals. “I love playing tennis and I love to play here and I love to be back out here.” The 37-year-old American sat out last year’s Australian Open after giving birth to a daughter months earlier and dealing with health complications. Since returning to the tour, Williams has reached the past two Grand Slam finals, losing both — and leaving her still one shy of equaling Margaret Court’s record of 24 major singles titles. Halep offered up the first real test Williams has faced at this year’s Australian Open, where she is bidding for an eighth trophy, pushing her throughout a back-and-forth matchup that was a fascinating mix of power, court coverage and shotmaking.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams (right) is congratulated by Simona Halep after winning their fourth-round match.

It wasn’t until Williams saved three break points in a monumental game to hold for 3-all in the third set that she gained control. “I was unlucky a little bit,” Halep said. Williams then broke for a 4-3 lead and finally was on her way. “In order for me to stay out there, I had to play a little like I knew I could,” said Williams, who is seeded 16th on account of all the time she took away from tennis. “I’m such a fighter. I just never give up. It’s definitely something that’s innate. I just work so hard for every point.” That she does. She also makes abundantly clear just how much every point means to her. Against Halep — who beat Serena’s older sister, Venus, in the third round — Williams frequently pumped her fists or yelled “Come on!” after key exchanges. When Halep hit one shot that caught the net tape and barely trickled over for a

winner, Williams complained, “I mean, it’s not fair.” Pliskova advanced earlier Monday with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over two-time major champion Garbine Muguruza. The other quarterfinal on that side of the women’s bracket features No. 4 Naomi Osaka against No. 6 Elina Svitolina. Osaka, who beat Williams in last year’s U.S. Open final, edged No. 13 Anastasija Sevastova 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 in the fourth round, while Svitolina got past 2017 U.S. Open finalist Madison Keys 6-2, 1-6, 6-1. Later, Danielle Collins was to face Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. In men’s matches, 2016 Wimbledon runner-up Milos Raonic knocked off No. 4-seeded Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-1, 7-6 (5), and next takes on No. 28 Lucas Pouille, a 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5, 7-6 (2) winner over No. 11 Borna Coric. No. 23 Pablo Carreno Busta left the court yelling at the chair umpire after a disagreement in

the concluding tiebreaker of his 6-7 (8), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (8) loss to No. 8-seeded Kei Nishikori in a 5-hour, 5-minute marathon that was the longest match of the tournament. Nishikori’s quarterfinal foe will be No. 1-seeded and six-time champion Novak Djokovic, who overcame a couple of tumbles to the court and a series of energysapping baseline exchanges — one point lasted 42 strokes! — to beat No. 15 Daniil Medvedev. Later, Stefanos Tsitsipas became the youngest man to reach a Grand Slam semifinal since 2007 after beating Roberto Bautista Agut to follow up on his stunning upset of Roger Federer. Tsitsipas is the first player from Greece to reach the semifinals of a Grand Slam, and is the youngest man to make the semifinals at a major since Djokovic at the 2007 U.S. Open. He’s the youngest man to do so in Australia since Andy Roddick in 2003.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WINTER WARM-UP

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Flaherty enjoys his ties to Gibson Cards great advises young righthander BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cardinals rookie Jack Flaherty, in the course of an 8-9 season with 3.34 earned run average in 2018, was 4-0 in August with a 1.13 ERA but finished a dreary September at 0-3, 5.34. “I didn’t do the little things right. Strike one. You’ve got to throw strike one. That’s what Miles (Mikolas) did all year long,” said Flaherty on Monday, the final day of the Cardinals’ Winter Warm-Up, which took place at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch. “You’ve got to get ahead of guys,” Flaherty said. “Getting in bad counts doesn’t really work out and I kind of figured that out in September. I don’t feel like I ended the season very well. My September was tough.” But Flaherty has an ace in the hole. Already having been counseled extensively by veteran Adam Wainwright and former Cardinals star Chris Carpenter, who works with pitchers throughout the system now, Flaherty also has made the acquaintance of one Bob Gibson. Gibson won 251 big-league games and threw 255 complete games. Flaherty has eight of the former and none of the latter. But the two Cardinals righthanders, one of Hall of Fame past and one who has a bright future, have bonded, mostly at Gibson’s behest. Gibson, now 83, made it known early last season that he would like to meet with Flaherty, 23. “It was special,” said Flaherty. “When you hear that a guy like that wants to meet you ... you know that’s not something that he does. Ever. I jumped at that opportunity. “He said he liked what I had. He liked what he saw.” Flaherty admits “trying to develop that relationship and use it for all that I could. “I try to reach out whenever I can, if I ever have any questions and he’s pretty good about getting back to me. It’s just special.” Gibson’s advice is simple. “He just tells me to work,” Flaherty said. He said, ‘You’re going to get tired at some point, but, at some point, you’re not going to get more tired. You just have to take whatever percentage you’re at and give 100 percent of that.’” Flaherty said he would be happy to have half the career of Gibson. “Absolutely. He was unbelievable,” said Flaherty. “He threw nine innings every time.”

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Cardinals outfielder Harrison Bader fist-bumps Nash Klinger, 4, of Carrollton, Ill., on Monday at the Winter Warm-Up.

Especially in postseason play. Gibson made nine World Series starts, pitching 81 innings, including seven nine-inning complete games and one of 10. His shortest was eight. “When I first came into the organization, I didn’t really know a whole lot about him,” Flaherty. “I felt I knew a lot about baseball but the more you hear about Bob Gibson, you start wanting to look up and see what he’s done. They changed the rules for him. Like, he was that dominant. You don’t really understand how good he was.” Flaherty, who was up briefly in 2017 before spending most of this past season in the majors, said he had watched postseason games in October but said, “Didn’t love that. Haven’t loved it the last two years. We sat around the last two years in October and watched these other teams that maybe we feel we’re better than.” Flaherty had grown up a Dodgers fan, but the Southern California native isn’t much of one anymore, for obvious reasons. His mother, Eileen, has been a bit slower to rid herself of the Dodgers. Eileen Flaherty was watching the World Series “and kind of getting excited,” said her son. “I said, ‘What have we got going on here? I’m not going to sit here and root

for them. I’ll sit here and watch the games with you.’”

BADER WILL BE ALL EARS

The Cardinals’ staff already included coach Willie McGee, a former Cardinals Gold Glove center fielder who liked to play virtually against the wall. This spring, McGee will be joined in camp by former Cardinals Gold Glover Jim Edmonds, who liked to play virtually behind second base. Incumbent Harrison Bader, who may be a Gold Glover himself one day, said he would try to draw from both, although he said he was prone to play deeper. “I’ve definitely grabbed and gathered a lot of information from both of them,” said Bader, “but I think it’s really important that you provide a number of aspects (to a player), because I kind of do tend to play a little deeper, but who knows? Spring training is a time to obviously get ready, but, to an extent, experiment. So I’m looking forward to working with Jim. Obviously he’s somebody I’ve looked up to my entire life, just as a young baseball player. So the information he is going to give me is going to be invaluable.”

GARCIA REBOUNDS

exposure to the major leagues in 2018 resulted in just two hits and seven strikeouts in 17 at-bats and an untimely pratfall as a pinch runner. While carrying the tying run in the eighth inning of a key late-season game with Milwaukee, Garcia fell down between third and home and then was tagged out at the plate as he belatedly tried to slide in. After the game, Garcia was distraught that he had cost his team the game, but he said his teammates and manager had helped him get over it. Through a translator, he said, “I obviously felt really bad during the last week of the season because we knew every moment counted for us to get to the postseason. But the fact that my teammates and my manager picked me up and talked to me about it, I was able to overcome it and get over it. “One of the first things that Mike Shildt told me was that that was one of those things that just happens and don’t worry about it. “It wasn’t your fault,” Shildt told Garcia. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Outfielder Adolis Garcia’s late-season

‘Market is changing’ in baseball, Cardinals president says CARDINALS • FROM B1

Owners must be “just cheaper.” No, Bill DeWitt III said, owners are getting “smarter.” “Fewer and fewer teams are unprepared for the analytical revolution that we’ve seen,” the president told fans. “When you really analyze it, dollars and cents, as well as projecting from an analytical standpoint, some of these 10-year-plus deals into a player’s late-30s just don’t pencil out. There aren’t as many teams willing to completely throw caution to the wind when they have a lot of smart people working the numbers. The market is changing.” Against the backdrop of this frostbitten market, the Cardinals introduced their 2019 roster and a pledge to return to the playoffs with the annual three-day fanfest at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch. For the first time in several winters, the Cardinals landed their initial target of the offseason, six-time All-Star Paul Goldschmidt. They were not runner-up, or “bridesmaid,” as executives said in past offseasons, drolly. They also signed free-agent lefty and October standout Andrew Miller, and with raises due returning players have a payroll that’s risen past $150 million and, with an addition still possible, headed toward $160 million. Yet, perception persists. The cash-wise Cardinals appear to be one move away from spending their way from contender to favorite. The third question fans asked John Mozeliak on Saturday was the first that awaited the DeWitts on Monday when a young fan asked if the Cardinals would sign Machado or Harper. The Cardinals have shown a willingness to bid big in each of the past three winters. After the 2015 season, they talked contracts worth around $200 million with outfielder Jason Heyward and lefty David Price. After 2016, the Cardinals upped their offer to land center fielder Dexter Fowler. And a year ago the Cardinals agreed to absorb around $255 million of Giancarlo Stanton’s remaining contract before he vetoed a trade. The Cardinals have missed on some expensive offers the past three winters and missed the playoffs in each of the following seasons. “The big plays,” DeWitt Jr. said, “would have limited what we would have done elsewhere.” An accessible example is the Stanton salary, which would have been a portion of the $26 million he’s owed for 2019. Into that line on the ledger the Cardinals have fit two players they wouldn’t have chased if Stanton was in their lineup: Marcell

DERRICK GOOLD • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. discusses the free agent freeze and more Monday. He credits the farm system with the team’s ability to stay competitive.

Ozuna ($12.25 million) and Goldschmidt ($15.5 million). DeWitt called the current roster “a payroll we can live with,” and yet they may not be able to tiptoe around a bigger commitment much longer. The Cardinals have finalized two $100 million contracts, none since Matt Holliday’s nine years ago. The Cardinals affirmed this weekend their intent to re-sign Goldschmidt, and that could take a five-year, $150 million offer or more. That length of contract, even into Goldschmidt’s mid30s, is more palatable to the Cardinals than the 10-year contracts some free agents are chasing in their 20s. “We’re not shying away from commitment,” chairman DeWitt said after his news conference Monday. He also said: “I always say to Mo there are a lot of ways in this industry to spend money to get better. You’ve got to pick your strategy. You’ve got to pick where you think you are and the best way to spend the money. It’s not like people are hoarding money and making a lot of money in this business. That’s not the case. It’s how do they put their resources to have the best chance to win this year, next year, or down the road.” He added later: “I think staying competitive, year in and year out, is a function of how good our farm system is.” That is also, increasingly, where spending has happened, on infrastructure. In baseball, the investment in player development has risen at a swifter rate than spending on the major-league roster for many teams. The Cardinals have built an

academy in the Dominican Republic — the first class from its high school graduates next week — and run two summer league teams there. The number of coaches and instructors at some levels has doubled. Analytics departments have grown in cost. Front offices that used to have a general manager and an assistant now have a president, a general manager, and multiple assistants. Bonuses for amateurs have swollen, but not minor-league salaries. Fans rarely audit these costs. With universally accepted data and less interest in taking risks on aging, high-cost free agents, teams have become venture capitalists. They’d rather invest in numerous startups and hope one hits big. Or pitches fast. At the same time, revenue is increasing for MLB. The Cardinals are early in a $1.2 billion broadcast rights deal that guarantees increased payments in coming years. Across the street from Busch Stadium, a posh development is rising, though the DeWitts stressed Ballpark Village is “a separate entity” and they’re not “sacrificing Cardinals resources” for the development. President DeWitt said at some point the revenue from Ballpark Village could aid the ballclub, “but that’s way down the road.” If the current marketplace persists, the one invited by the labor contract that chairman DeWitt helped negotiate for Major League Baseball, then teams will continue to exploit development spend-

ing rather than free-spending. Players are taking note. “The last offseason — the kind of thought you left (with) was OK, well, teams are evaluating age,” third baseman Matt Carpenter said. “But when you look at the two guys that are unsigned now — I mean, they’re 26 years old. So that can’t be the reason. So I don’t know. It’s a situation that is obviously an issue.” During his first Warm-Up, the beginning of his recruitment to remain a Cardinal, Goldschmidt expressed concern about what a static market means for the game. He described how baseball is in danger of slipping in quality because “to put out the best product, you need the best players.” With several teams advertising an uncompetitive year with their moves, that, too, erodes the quality of the game while also limiting the demand for free agents. The Cardinals have benefited from these market trends. Two teams pivoting into rebuilds allowed them to trade for Ozuna and Goldschmidt in consecutive winters. They were early investors in the analytics “revolution,” and that helped them stay ahead of rivals with player development. Nearly two-thirds of the team’s last pennant winner, in 2013, was homegrown, and, as a result, cost-effective. But even that team needed to be outfitted with a marquee free-agent (Carlos Beltran) and a $100 million man in Holliday. With a chill in the air between agents and players, and MLB, chairman DeWitt said Sunday he does not see a labor dispute nearing. Players are scrutinizing the situation. Jack Flaherty, 23, is two years away from arbitration, five from free agency, and yet he’s at the nexus of this moment. He’s the blue-chip return on development investment, the big-bonus pick with supervalue production. If healthy, he’s a candidate to be offered the security of an extension that could delay his free agency till he’s 30. Oh, and labor strife would hit as he nears his peak years. Flaherty described Sunday how players are talking, and how he’s “trying to take the time to understand what’s gone on, where everybody is at, why guys aren’t signing, why guys aren’t getting paid what they should be.” Philadelphia starter Jake Arrieta tweeted recently that players like Flaherty, who have less than three years of service time and make near league minimum, should pay attention. Flaherty responded: “We always notice.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


WINTER WARM-UP

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

Cards will do best if Hicks can be their closer HOCHMAN • FROM B1

comfort, here’s thinking that Jordan McKinley Hicks will pitch more ninth innings than his teammates do. “Ultimately,” president of baseball operations John Mozeliak said, “I hope we have someone we can count on for that ninth.” That means Hicks increasing his strikeout rate. And that means Hicks increasing his slider usage. “The sooner he starts learning that slider, becomes more confident with that slider,” catcher Yadier Molina said, “it’s going to be a huge pitch for him.” If the Cardinals are going to win meaningful baseball games, like they sure think they will, it’ll mean Hicks in the final-out picture in the paper. Catching the catcher is the coolest thing a pitcher can experience. We’ve seen Bruce Sutter squeeze Darrell Porter and Adam Wainwright and Jason Motte haul in leaping Yadi. And even though Yadi is getting up there in age, here’s thinking he’ll be able to get up there if he catches a Series-winning strike — and if anything, he’ll be aided by his Nike Jordan Brand “Jumpman” shoes. Speaking of which, at Monday’s Winter Warm-Up, Jordan Hicks’ kicks were Jordans. The player who turns 23 next season wore off-white Jordan 1s, which cost as much as a row of green seats. Hicks — along with Harrison Bader and Jack Flaherty — make up this new, stylish generation of sleek Cardinals. Monday was like a fashion show of sorts. There was some Fendi. Some Gucci. Some other brands I’ve never seen at Marshalls. But the fashion is a lot like Hicks’ fastball: It may look cool, but if it doesn’t lead to wins, it’s just vanity. Hicks famously reached 105 miles per hour on the radar gun last season. And his sinker averaged triple digits for the whole season. And yes, to his credit, his rate of hard-hit pitches was extremely low. But his walk rate was high, and he needs to increase his strikeout rate. It’s not that he can’t do it this year. It’s just a reminder that even fireballing phenoms can improve. But he’s building off a 3.59 ERA and, for those wondering, six saves. “I just expect him to be better,” said Flaherty, who makes January fans daydream of June days in which he goes seven, Andrew Miller pitches the eighth and Hicks the ninth. “Jordan was really, really good last year. He was special. Kind of came out to the scene, no one really knew what to expect. We knew he had a special arm and he showcased that a lot. I think he’s going to be a little more fine, throw a few more strikes. But he’s going to be really good.” Hicks has a classic closer’s modus operandi. He’s frighteningly confident. He speaks softly and judiciously, picking his words. He does otherworldly things regularly, which led him to wonder Monday: “Every year, my whole life, I’m not going say it’s going to happen (in 2019), but I’ve grown in velocity every single year. It’s not something I really care to do that much, but it’d be pretty cool. Maybe one time if I’m (up on a hitter) 0-2, throw one up in the zone, four seam, and try to get it, who knows? But it’s not something I’m planning on doing or anything.” He said “it’s awesome” that he threw 105 — and sometimes is asked to inscribe autographs with that number. But he’s not a novelty act. He’s a pitcher. And he’s a pitcher who could be a closer, even if they don’t want to call him that. And, yes, to Shildt’s point, there could be times in which two key lefties are up in the ninth, so he’d use Miller then and perhaps Hicks in the eighth. “Two days later, that could be conversed,” Shildt said. “We’ve got guys who can do and have done it and I think you’ll see Andrew being used — and that’s my ultimate job to put guys in position where they can best be successful. If you look at that over the scope of a nine-inning game and you just look to manage that — when that situation arises that’s when they’ll pitch. It will be higher leverage, obviously.” And though Bud Norris was St. Louis’ closer last year, it was Hicks who finished second on the Cardinals in the fancy Fangraphs stat that measures leverage index. Knowing that 1.0 is considered average, Hicks’ game leverage index was 1.44, just behind Norris’ 1.53 (inning, score and baserunners play into this stat). For Cleveland last year, Miller’s was 1.57 — and over the past three seasons, Miller’s has been 1.53. So Hicks has pitched from in the fire — fighting fire with fire. But just like Matt Carpenter will complement Paul Goldschmidt in the lineup, the multi-inning-eating Miller will complement Hicks. It’s up to the manager to manage it, and the Cards are in a way different situation in that regard now than at Winter Warm-Up time a year ago. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

Carpenter’s hopes high Third baseman wants to be more consistent month to month BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

Matt Carpenter, the Cardinals’ third baseman once and again, owes his return to that side of the diamond to the acquisition from Arizona of Paul Goldschmidt as the Cardinals’ new first baseman. But while Goldschmidt’s presence can help Carpenter defensively, as he can concentrate on just one position rather than three, he also can draw some offensive help from Goldschmidt. As erratic, yet very productive, as Carpenter’s season was in 2018, Goldschmidt’s was almost equally so. Carpenter was hitting .140 on May 15 but then batted .313 in June, .333 in July and .262 in August, totaling 28 of his 36 home runs in those three months. And then Carpenter slid back to .170 in the final month. Goldschmidt, who hit .144 in May, was at .213 on May 15. But, in June, the righthanded slugger batted .364, followed by .312 in July and .356 in August, totalling 24 of his 33 homers. And then Goldschmidt lagged in September, hitting only two home runs and driving in five runs. The two ranked 1-2 in total production at first base, but how they got there is the issue. “That’s a conversation that I’m actually really looking forward to having with him,” Carpenter said. “We haven’t had a chance to kind of break that down, but I’ve got some insights and ideas and really just experiences that I went through (in) that stretch, and I’m curious to hear what his was like — and how he got out of it. And maybe us putting those two thoughts and minds together ... we can avoid ever having to go through it again.” Carpenter also said he hoped to learn from new hitting coach Jeff Albert, who was Carpenter’s hitting coach 10 years ago at Palm Beach when Albert previously in the Cardinals’ system before moving to Houston. “That’s kind of the beauty of having a guy like Jeff Albert around,” Carpenter said Monday as the Cardinals’ Winter WarmUp wrapped up at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch. “The first conversations we had when we hired him was avoiding the ups

and downs that I went through — making it to where maybe my highs aren’t as high and my lows definitely aren’t as low. And you find a way to kind of meet in the middle with that, and we had a great conversation about it. “I’m certainly looking forward to having a number that looks a little better than .150 at the end of April.” Carpenter said Albert was “as good as anybody I’ve ever been around as far as knowing the biomechanics of a swing, knowing how it works and how to take some of the information that is gathered upstairs and break that down in a way that hitters can understand. I really think that’s one of the secret, not secret, but an (overlooked) acquisition that we made that’s really going to have a huge impact on our lineup. “One thing I love about Jeff is he is all about making the swing as efficient as possible to where you can avoid some swing-and-misses and you can put an emphasis on putting the ball in play and have tough at-bats. All the things he kind of stands for is really what great hitters should strive to do.” From a kid — an older one, mind you, at age 26 — when he joined the Cardinals to stay in 2012, Carpenter all of a sudden is an elder statesman who can be a free agent at the end of this season, if the Cardinals don’t pick up an $18.75 million club option when he will be 34. “I think about (time flying by) every day,” said Carpenter. “I mean, it just feels like you blink and it’s over. I heard a good quote yesterday (from former Cardinals reliever Jason Motte) that in this game, the days can be long but the years can be fast. That’s the life of a major league baseball player. It feels like I just got here and I’m already creeping up towards potentially the end of it.” But that discussion is for another day. Carpenter’s attention solely is on 2019, a year he feels will be large for the Cardinals. “You say this every year, because you feel like you have to, but you also believe it,” said Carpenter. “But it feels different this year than in years past. You look at this club and who we have and what we’ve acquired, combined with what we

saw last year of some of these young guys that made a splash and then some of the veterans who have been here a while, then with the new manager (Mike Shildt) and what he was able to do for us ... you put that all together and there is reason for excitement. I think there’s a reason why the pulse around here feels a little different. “This is as excited as I’ve ever been to start a season.” Catcher Yadier Molina said he was confident that playing one position would be good for Carpenter and his peace of mind and Carpenter said, “I just couldn’t be happier that now I’m getting an opportunity to move across the diamond, especially for who I’m moving for. When I got that phone call to know that was the guy we were getting for first base, I couldn’t have been more thrilled.” Both played their high school ball in the Houston area and were opponents in college (Texas Christian, Texas State), so Carpenter said, “We do have a history. And I don’t think it can be overstated that we have a great player coming in here, but (also) we have a really good person, a really good teammate. At the end of the day, we have a lot of young guys who are going to come in here and be watching, and they’re going to watch him with a very careful eye. They’re going to see everything he does and pay attention and you want a guy that’s going to set an example and do it in the right way. It’s just going to make us better. “I can speak about what kind of player he is until I’m blue in the face. He’s going to make us better in the infield. He’s going to make us better in the lineup.” Carpenter reminded reporters that he had been slated to play in one spot before but then had moved around. “I’ve been down this road a few times,” he said. “It would be great to know that at the end of the year I’ll look at the stat sheet and I’ll have 150 to 160 games started at third base. I just haven’t seen that play out that way before. But it’s nice to know that this is where we are going into spring.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Former Cardinals manager Tony La Russa signs a limited edition 2006 World Series Champions bottle of Budweiser beer for Garret Gutting of St. Peters on Monday at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch. PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Cardinals’ Molina ‘likes to have that respect’ FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Cardinals on all levels, from the front office to the minor leagues, seems to be that Bryant did the Cardinals a big favor when he slammed “boring” St. Louis during a Cubs Convention dig. Multiple players admitted the remarks were mostly harmless and probably taken out of context. Zero hesitated before falling in line behind Molina, who picked a scorched-earth response to Bryant and anyone else who cares to speak poorly of his baseball home. “I can tell you I was pretty happy to see what he did,” team President Bill DeWitt III said Monday. “Anything that motivates No. 4, and gets him fired up is something that resonates with the whole group,” added Matt Carpenter. “As long as I’ve known Yadier Molina, he’s about as passionate and fiery of a guy that you can ever come across, not just in baseball, but in life in general. And I can assure you that he’s not a guy who I would ever want on my bad side.” But it was the catcher now looking up at Molina from Class AAA who framed the bigger picture perfectly. “Yadi is a tough guy, and I think he likes to have that respect,” Andrew Knizner said. “I think it sort of connects to what position he plays. You’re always kind of defending home plate. I think he did the exact same thing in that Instagram post he put out. He was defending the home plate of St. Louis. I thought it was symbolic in a way.” Indeed. It would take a book with as many pages as innings Molina has caught to adequately explain why an entire city bends to kiss its catcher’s rings. Molina is the 36-year-old Cooperstown-worthy competitor whose Gatorade cooler is filled from the fountain of youth. Whether his challenger is an oppos-

ing manager who picked the wrong curse word, or a division rival with a microphone, he attacks with the same approach he uses to block an errant pitch. He smothers, leaving only enough air for an apology. St. Louis loves Molina for many reasons, and a big one is because Molina and St. Louis share a weakness, one that can turn into a strength if channeled properly. Molina and the city he calls home are both highly sensitive to any sign of disrespect. Outsiders tend to think it’s an inferiority complex. We call it pride. Neither the catcher nor his city can see shades of slight. There is respect, and then there is disrespect, and don’t bother arguing there are degrees in between. Molina’s knee, still healing from offseason surgery to remove a bone spur, is not expected to be game-ready until Grapefruit League games in March. But his desire to make Bryant regret his remarks is burning bright. An entire organization spent the weekend catching a contact high. “The energy he feeds us just purely by who he is and what he does really does lift the locker room up,” Harrison Bader said. Laughter filled the room when John Brebbia danced into a Winter Warm-Up media session as Justin Timberlake’s “Cry Me A River” played, a nod to the reliever’s response to Bryant’s slam. No one was joking when Molina appeared in that same room Monday and answered a question about this social media spat carrying over into the season. “Oh, it will,” Molina said. “It will carry. I can’t wait to get on the field.” Truth is, this is bigger than Bryant. It’s about Molina feeling great and growing tired at the exact same time. He still feels like a young man, other than the knee that is coming along. He’s even open to the notion of playing beyond the end of his current contract — but only with the Cardinals — if there is mutual in-

terest in an extension after the 2020 season. His number will be retired, and he should get a statue, but his body is telling him he’s not done yet. Molina also absolutely loves this 2019 team. He celebrated the Paul Goldschmidt trade by cracking open a cold beer on a boat. He continues to gush about his manager. He’s started calling Shildt “Jefe,” the Spanish word for boss. “He reminds me of Tony (La Russa), back in the day,” Molina said. “Tony is that type of manager. Playing the little ball. At the same time, trusting the guy. The communication is there. He reminds me of Tony. A lot.” High praise, considering Molina’s towering respect for Hall of Famer TLR. But Molina can also see what his fans see. Their irritation has become his. A proud baseball organization in a city obsessed with the game has surrendered its territory. There used to be consequences for coming at the Cardinals. Now even Ryan Dempster is piling on. What has happened to Molina’s team? I asked Molina if his 16th season is about restoring the brand as much as it is striking back against the Cubs. “We have to do something,” he said. “It’s disappointing for us as players not to be in the playoffs,” he added. “But, like I said, this year is different. We feel the difference right now. It’s going to be different.” He repeatedly used that word. Different. Asked to elaborate, he didn’t hedge. “I’m 100 percent sure that we have what we need to win the (World) Series,” Molina said. “Right now, it just depends on us. Try to stay healthy. And after that, we are going to show the world that we can do it.” The Cardinals have to show Chicago first, as their catalyst of a catcher will be sure to remind a proud family scorned. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

First career goal a thrill MacEachern gives the Blues a 1-0 lead BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES • In his dreams, Mackenzie MacEachern’s first NHL goal went off the crossbar, down and in. In reality, it slid slowly across the goal line. It didn’t matter; he’ll take it. “Growing up, you play it in your head or you’re playing street hockey with your buddies and you re-enact what you think will happen if you were to get your first goal,” MacEachern said Monday after the Blues lost to the Kings 4-3. “It’s a dream to go bar-down and have the cool goal, but the reality hits and that’s probably not my arsenal. I’m just going to bang a couple home here and there and I was fortunate enough for it to go in.” The goal came just past the halfway mark of the first period and put the Blues up 1-0. On a faceoff in the Kings’ end, Jordan Nolan, stepping in for Ivan Barbashev, who was kicked out of the circle, won the draw. Barbashev got the puck out of the corner and to Vince Dunn at the point. His shot was blocked by goalie Jonathan Quick, but the rebound fell to MacEachern in the crease, who with a dive knocked the puck in. “I thought I was all alone and then I felt the stick on me,” he said. “I don’t know if I was in the

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

moment, or the puck was actually going that slow into the net, but it crossed the goal line, so it was awesome. … I asked people, was it that slow or was I just living in the moment? They said it was that slow. I was fortunate enough the goalie didn’t get over and stop it. It was an awesome feeling for sure.” The goal came in MacEachern’s fifth NHL game and, while he’s been playing on the fourth line, interim coach Craig Berube has been giving MacEachern more ice time than a more heralded rookie, Jordan Kyrou. (Kyrou played just 4:55 on Monday.) “His skating is really good,” Berube said, “he works hard, he’s competitive and he’s physical. That’s his game.” The only thing missing from MacEachern’s first goal was a win. “It was awesome,” he said. “Getting the first NHL game is a huge dream. Getting the first NHL goal is an even bigger dream, so it’s awesome. But we’re in a winning business, so it was tough not to get the win.”

FIRST LOSS

Jordan Binnington got the start in goal for the Blues, his sixth in the past nine games. It also was his first loss, as the 4-3 defeat — the first time he’s allowed more than two goals in a game — dropped his record to 4-1-1. On most of the goals, Binnington was helpless to do much about them as turnovers led to

quick reversals that left the Kings with ample stretches of net to shoot at. Still, he felt he should have done better. “You always have a chance,” he said. “You want to be there to make the big saves for your team. I’m not happy with the outcome tonight. “I was a little frustrated after that second goal (a power-play shot from defenseman Drew Doughty). I felt like I should have made that save. From there, we battled. The penalty-killers were great, and I think we used that as energy and we responded, but it’s not the outcome we wanted.”

BLUENOTES

Tyler Bozak (concussion) and Robert Thomas (shoulder) both skated Monday morning, but Berube said there was no update on their status or whether they might be able to play Wednesday against Anaheim. “They all did well,” Berube said. “We’ll know more tomorrow if they’re available for the Anaheim game. Right now, I can’t tell you if anybody’s available for that game. We’ll have to see tomorrow.” Both are on injured reserve, so the Blues would have to make a roster move to activate one or both. … With no changes in the lineup, Joel Edmundson and Robby Fabbri were healthy scratches for the second game in a row. For Fabbri, it’s his third scratch in the past five games. … The game was Jay Bouwmeester’s 400th with the Blues.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Florida Ottawa Detroit Metropolitan NY Islanders Columbus Washington Pittsburgh Carolina NY Rangers Philadelphia New Jersey

GP 49 48 49 50 48 48 49 50 GP 48 48 48 48 48 48 48 48

W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 37 10 2 76 199 140 20-5-0 17-5-2 29 17 2 60 168 137 13-11-1 16-6-1 27 17 5 59 143 128 17-7-1 10-10-4 27 18 5 59 152 148 13-10-2 14-8-3 24 18 6 54 140 144 14-6-3 10-12-3 20 20 8 48 152 170 10-6-5 10-14-3 19 25 5 43 154 184 12-9-4 7-16-1 18 25 7 43 142 170 10-12-4 8-13-3 W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 29 15 4 62 145 119 14-7-3 15-8-1 28 17 3 59 154 146 14-9-2 14-8-1 27 16 5 59 162 149 13-8-3 14-8-2 26 16 6 58 169 146 13-8-2 13-8-4 23 20 5 51 133 144 13-8-4 10-12-1 21 20 7 49 139 164 13-6-5 8-14-2 19 23 6 44 139 169 10-10-3 9-13-3 18 23 7 43 140 164 13-6-4 5-17-3

Div 12-3-0 7-6-2 12-6-2 9-5-4 8-6-3 9-5-3 6-8-2 4-8-4 Div 13-5-1 11-5-1 9-4-2 7-5-1 7-7-2 4-7-3 4-8-1 6-8-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Minnesota Dallas Colorado Blues Chicago Pacific Calgary San Jose Vegas Vancouver Anaheim Edmonton Arizona Los Angeles

GP 48 51 49 49 49 48 50 GP 50 51 51 50 50 49 48 50

W L OT Pts GF GA 31 15 2 64 167 134 29 18 4 62 159 134 25 21 3 53 137 140 24 21 4 52 126 128 22 19 8 52 167 157 21 22 5 47 134 148 17 24 9 43 153 188 W L OT Pts GF GA 32 13 5 69 187 143 28 16 7 63 180 161 29 18 4 62 156 138 23 21 6 52 145 156 21 20 9 51 119 148 23 23 3 49 142 160 22 22 4 48 128 138 20 26 4 44 114 150

Home 18-6-2 16-9-0 13-9-3 15-8-2 10-7-5 12-13-2 9-10-6 Home 16-4-5 17-4-4 16-5-3 12-9-3 10-7-8 12-12-1 9-12-3 12-13-1

Away Div 13-9-0 10-7-0 13-9-4 8-5-0 12-12-0 8-4-1 9-13-2 5-6-1 12-12-3 4-6-3 9-9-3 6-7-3 8-14-3 9-4-3 Away Div 16-9-0 9-5-1 11-12-3 10-4-3 13-13-1 11-4-2 11-12-3 6-5-3 11-13-1 5-6-3 11-11-2 7-10-1 13-10-1 8-7-1 8-13-3 8-8-1

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday Nashville 4, Colorado 1 Los Angeles 4, Blues 3 Minnesota 4, Vegas 2 Florida 6, San Jose 2 Sunday Chicago 8, Washington 5 NY Islanders 3, Anaheim 0 Vancouver 3, Detroit 2 Arizona 4, Toronto 2 Carolina 7, Edmonton 4

Tuesday San Jose at Washington, 6 p.m. Arizona at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Carolina at Calgary, 8 p.m.

Nashville at Vegas, 9 p.m. Blues at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Carolina at Vancouver, 9:30 p.m. Thursday No games

Wednesday Arizona at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 8:30 p.m.

Avs can’t figure out Predators

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nashville defenseman P.K. Subban (left) slows down Colorado center Colin Wilson’s pursuit of the puck in the third period.

Kings center Jeff Carter hits Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo during the second period Monday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Los Angeles beats the Blues again

Pekka Rinne stopped a penalty shot in making 35 saves and the Nashville Predators knocked off the reeling Colorado Avalanche 4-1 on Monday to help Peter Laviolette capture win No. 600 of his NHL coaching career. Nick Bonino and Viktor Arvidsson scored 1:34 apart in the second period, while Roman Josi added another and Ryan Ellis contributed a late emptynetter from deep in his zone. The Predators maintained their mastery of the Avalanche, beating their Central Division rivals for a 12th time over the last 13 regular-season meetings. Alexander Kerfoot had the lone goal for an Avalanche squad that’s dropped five of

BLUES • FROM B1

Or maybe you do. The Blues let yet another two-goal lead get away — the sixth time this season they have lost after being up by two goals — and the number of points the team has passed up continues to tell one of several stories of the season. Those lost leads have cost the Blues nine points so far (they were able to take three of the games into overtime), and even if you figure they get only five of those points, they would be in the one of the wildcard spots. But they’re not, and the clock continues to run. The Blues had a chance, if they won both games in Southern California, to go into the All-Star break a point or two out of a playoff spot. Now, they won’t. “Mistakes,” interim coach Craig Berube said. “Two or three mistakes that cost us.” “We had a couple chances to grab momentum and we just broke down defensively and they were capitalizing,” captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “Those are the things we have to take out of our game here, especially on the road. But we had a chance to win and didn’t really take advantage of it.” That, of course, has been an issue for the Blues all season. Also, it’s taking a perfect or nearperfect game for them to get a win, and the Blues have to show themselves as a team that can routinely play a perfect or nearperfect game. Meanwhile, when they make a mistake, they pay a steep price. “We definitely let it slip away, that’s for sure,” Berube said. “The effort was there, the competitiveness was there, but we weren’t smart enough. We didn’t do the right thing at the right times.” In this case, being up 2-0 with 1:11 to go in the first was not good enough. The two-goal lead lasted 15 seconds. “Ideally coming out with two goals after the first would have

Blues Los Angeles

2 1

0 2

1 1

— —

3 4

First period B: MacEachern 1 (Dunn, Barbashev), 10:31. B: Sundqvist 9 (Pietrangelo, Barbashev), 18:49. L: Toffoli 8 (Leipsic), 19:04. Penalties: Dunn, STL, (holding), 7:43. Second period L: Doughty 5 (Kopitar, Carter), 7:15 (pp). L: Kopitar 14 (Brown, Muzzin), 18:16. Penalties: Kyrou, STL, (hooking), 6:10; Bortuzzo, STL, major (high sticking), 7:06; Bouwmeester, STL, (slashing), 8:39; Muzzin, LA, (holding stick), 12:32. Third period B: O’Reilly 18 (Pietrangelo, Tarasenko), 6:00 (pp). L: LaDue 2 (Toffoli, Leipsic), 9:53. Penalties: Phaneuf, LA, (cross checking), 5:18. Shots on goal 13 14 9 36 Blues 14 6 29 Los Angeles 9 Power-plays Blues 1 of 2; Los Angeles 1 of 5. Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 4-1-1 (29 shots-25 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 9-12-3 (36-33). A: 18,230. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Mark Shewchyk.

been an outstanding start for not being as great defensively tonight,” center Ryan O’Reilly said, “especially that first period. It could have been huge. We still had a one-goal lead on the road after the first. We needed to come out with a little bit more and unfortunately … it wasn’t our best game defensively and it killed us. ... I think we’re a better team than those guys and they beat us tonight.” The first goal for Los Angeles came 15 seconds after Oskar Sundqvist put the Blues up 2-0 with his ninth goal of the season. The Los Angeles goal was the result of a turnover by Ivan Barbashev, who had assists on the game’s first two goals, including the first NHL goal of rookie Mackenzie MacEachern. The second period spun out of control six minutes in when the Blues kept being called for penalties. First there was a hook on Jordan Kyrou, and then in a moment that personified the afternoon, Barbashev and Robert Bortuzzo came in on a shorthanded two-on-one. Barbashev passed to Bortuzzo, whose shot was blocked by Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick and then, as Bortuzzo went for the puck, he caught Kings defenseman Drew Doughty with a high stick and drew blood for a double mi-

nor. (“He should just pull out,” Berube said.) The five-on-three didn’t last long. Nine seconds in, Doughty scored to tie the game and the Kings had a man advantage for another 3:51. “It’s just stuff like that that we did tonight,” Berube said. “We kind of shot ourselves in the foot.” That the Blues managed to kill that off, and another five-onthree when Jay Bouwmeester was called for slashing while Bortuzzo was still in the box, without allowing another goal was no small accomplishment. But with 1:44 to go in the period, Pietrangelo couldn’t get the puck up ice, the Kings turned it into a twoon-one and Anze Kopitar scored to make it 3-2. And there was another difference. The Kings got a chance like that and converted. When the Blues did, they didn’t. For instance, Sammy Blais had an open net to shoot for but couldn’t get his stick on a puck from close range with 5:21 to play. “Turnovers or not, we still have to find a way to play in our end,” Pietrangelo said. “Mistakes happen. They make turnovers, too. We just have to find a way to pick ourselves up in those situations and limit the opportunities. We had a lot of chances where they couldn’t get the puck out of their own. We didn’t capitalize and they did.” The Blues had a ray of hope when O’Reilly tied the score with a great shot on a power play in the third, but just before the halfway point of the third, Tyler Toffoli outbattled Colton Parayko for a puck and got it to Brendan Leipsic, who got it to Paul LaDue, and it was in the net. “Every game’s different and we have to re-invent ourselves every game and tonight maybe we got away from things we’ve been doing and having success in,” O’Reilly said. “It’s tough to do every night, but that’s what the best teams do, and we can be one of those teams.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

seven. Rinne’s biggest save came on a penalty shot by Matt Nieto in the second period to keep the game scoreless. Bonino soon followed by lining a shot between the pads of Semyon Varlamov. The Predators are 232-1 when scoring first. Colorado was coming off a 7-1 win over Los Angeles on Saturday in which the team tied a franchise record with six goals in the second period. The scoring spree didn’t carry over. The Avs haven’t won two straight games since late November. New deal for Teravainen • The Carolina Hurricanes and forward Teuvo Teravainen have agreed to terms on a five-year contract extension for $27 million. The deal begins next season.

NHL SUMMARIES Panthers 6, Sharks 2

Predators 4, Avalanche 1

San Jose 0 2 0 — 2 Florida 1 1 4 — 6 First period: 1, Florida, Ekblad 10 (Vatrano, Barkov), 17:21. Penalties: Ekblad, FLA, (holding stick), 4:28; Meier, SJ, (roughing), 19:26; Pysyk, FLA, (roughing), 19:26. Second period: 2, San Jose, Couture 18 (Burns, Meier), 4:21. 3, Florida, Matheson 4 (Dadonov, Vatrano), 6:07. 4, San Jose, Meier 19 (Pavelski, Thornton), 13:20. Penalties: Kane, SJ, (hooking), 9:24; Pysyk, FLA, (interference), 14:19. Third period: 5, Florida, Yandle 7 (Huberdeau, Barkov), 2:27 (pp). 6, Florida, Trocheck 5 (Vatrano), 2:36. 7, Florida, Vatrano 16 (Dadonov, Barkov), 7:22. 8, Florida, Bjugstad 5 (Hawryluk, Sceviour), 19:22 (pp). Penalties: Kane, SJ, major (high sticking), 1:56; Dillon, SJ, Major (fighting), 15:02; Brown, FLA, Major (fighting), 15:02; Kane, SJ, served by Labanc, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:14. Shots: San Jose 7-14-8: 29. Florida 6-7-17: 30. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 2; Florida 2 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Dell 6-6-3 (9 shots-8 saves), Jones 22-10-4 (21-16). Florida, Luongo 10-11-1 (29-27). A: 14,014. Referees: Reid Anderson, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

Nashville 0 3 1 — 4 Colorado 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Blackwell, NSH, (elbowing), 1:43; Gaudreau, NSH, (tripping), 4:58; Zadorov, COL, Major (fighting), 11:51; Watson, NSH, Major (fighting), 11:51; Ekholm, NSH, (cross checking), 17:14; Nieto, COL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 17:14; Barrie, COL, (cross checking), 19:20. Second period: 1, Nashville, Bonino 13 (Jarnkrok), 5:01. 2, Nashville, Arvidsson 19 (Forsberg), 6:35. 3, Colorado, Kerfoot 9 (Girard), 16:43. 4, Nashville, Josi 8 (Bonino, Watson), 17:58. Penalties: Zadorov, COL, (kneeing), 1:51; Bonino, NSH, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 3:30; Jarnkrok, NSH, (hooking), 8:12; Compher, COL, (hooking), 18:31. Third period: 5, Nashville, Ellis 5 (Ekholm, Jarnkrok), 17:07. Penalties: Watson, NSH, (interference), 7:35; Calvert, COL, Major (fighting), 18:07; Irwin, NSH, Major (fighting), 18:07. Shots: Nashville 7-11-9: 27. Colorado 13-12-11: 36. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 3; Colorado 0 of 4. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 18-12-3 (36 shots-35 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 13-12-5 (26-23). A: 18,018. Referees: Jake Brenk, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, James Tobias.

Wild 4, Golden Knights 2

Name Kucherov Gaudreau Rantanen McDavid Kane MacKinnon Point Monahan Marner Wheeler Draisaitl Scheifele Stamkos Tkachuk Crosby Lindholm Pastrnak Landeskog Aho Tavares Kessel Panarin Marchand Burns

Minnesota 0 2 2 — 4 Vegas 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Vegas, Tuch 16 (Marchessault, Miller), 3:37 (pp). Penalties: Granlund, MIN, (interference), 2:40; Rask, MIN, (hooking), 11:11; Pirri, VGK, (holding), 17:35. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Foligno 4 (Seeler, Eriksson Ek), 9:09. 3, Minnesota, Staal 15 (Greenway, Suter), 10:22. 4, Vegas, Pacioretty 14 (Stastny, Miller), 12:36. Penalties: Zucker, MIN, (slashing), 14:38. Third period: 5, Minnesota, Coyle 8 (Staal, Spurgeon), 14:29. 6, Minnesota, Koivu 7 (Parise), 19:47. Penalties: Suter, MIN, (slashing), 0:15; Foligno, MIN, (delay of game), 1:04; Stastny, VGK, (hooking), 11:04. Shots: Minnesota 6-8-8: 22. Vegas 5-19-8: 32. Power-plays: Minnesota 0 of 2; Vegas 1 of 5. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 19-16-3 (32 shots-30 saves). Vegas, Fleury 27-13-4 (21-18). A: 18,328. Referees: Jean Hebert, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Travis Gawryletz, Ryan Gibbons.

Points leaders Team TBL CGY COL EDM CHI COL TBL CGY TOR WPG EDM WPG TBL CGY PIT CGY BOS COL CAR TOR PIT CBJ BOS SJS

G 22 29 23 29 29 27 30 27 19 9 26 25 26 24 21 21 27 29 21 30 20 19 19 9

A 56 44 50 43 41 43 35 34 42 52 33 34 31 33 36 36 29 25 33 23 33 34 34 44

P 78 73 73 72 70 70 65 61 61 61 59 59 57 57 57 57 56 54 54 53 53 53 53 53


SPORTS

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7 AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog February 3 • Super Bowl LIII, Atlanta Patriots .................PK.... 2.......................Rams Odds to win the Super Bowl MVP Player...............................................Odds Tom Brady....................................................6/5 Jared Goff ....................................................9/5 Todd Gurley.................................................12/1 Sony Michel.................................................15/1 James White .............................................. 18/1 Aaron Donald............................................. 18/1 C.J. Anderson.............................................20/1 Julian Edelman .......................................... 25/1 Brandin Cooks ...........................................40/1 Robert Woods............................................40/1 Rob Gronkowski.........................................40/1 Rex Burkhead ............................................50/1 Josh Reynolds............................................60/1 NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog RAPTORS....................11 .......................... Kings THUNDER..................5.5 ......................Blazers MAVERICKS................ 2.......................Clippers T’Wolves..................... 6........................... SUNS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Celtics’ Kyrie Irving goes in for a layup past the Heat’s Hassan Whiteside during the second quarter Monday.

Irving, Celtics top Miami, now have four straight wins ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyrie Irving had 26 points and 10 assists, Al Horford added 16 points and 12 rebounds and the Boston Celtics beat the Miami Heat 107-99 Monday night for their fourth straight victory. Irving has had 20 or more points and 10 or more assists in 11 games, the first Celtics’ player to accomplish the feat since Hall of Famer Larry Bird, who also had 11 in 198687. Jayson Tatum added 19 points and Marcus Morris 17 for the Celtics, who won their ninth straight at home and improved to 18-5 at TD Garden. Derrick Jones Jr. and Dion Waiters led the Heat with 18 points apiece.

NOTEBOOK

Anthony saga continues • Carmelo Anthony is going to Chicago, albeit only on paper. Where he’s going next remains unclear. A person with knowledge of the matter said the Houston Rockets are trading Anthony and an undisclosed amount of cash to the Bulls in a deal expected to be completed Tuesday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because the trade still needs league approval. When that comes — the NBA office was closed Monday to commemorate the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday — Anthony will have a new team, though he still won’t be back on the floor. The Bulls have no plans to play Anthony and will look to either trade him before the Feb. 7 deadline or ultimately waive him and make him a free agent. The trade ends a short-lived saga in Houston for Anthony, who averaged 13.4 points in 10 games with the Rockets. He has not played since Nov. 8.

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Philadelphia Boston Brooklyn New York Southeast Miami Charlotte Washington Orlando Atlanta Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

W 35 31 29 25 10 W 22 22 20 20 14 W 34 31 20 11 9

L 13 17 18 23 35 L 23 24 26 27 32 L 12 15 26 36 39

Pct .729 .646 .617 .521 .222 Pct .489 .478 .435 .426 .304 Pct .739 .674 .435 .234 .188

GB — 4 5½ 10 23½ GB — ½ 2½ 3 8½ GB — 3 14 23½ 26

L10 8-2 7-3 7-3 8-2 1-9 L10 5-5 4-6 7-3 3-7 3-7 L10 8-2 7-3 3-7 1-9 1-9

Str W-2 W-1 W-4 W-4 L-6 Str L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 Str W-5 W-2 L-2 W-1 L-4

Home 20-4 20-5 18-5 13-11 4-15 Home 11-12 16-8 15-8 12-13 8-13 Home 21-4 17-6 13-11 5-17 5-18

Away 15-9 11-12 11-13 12-12 6-20 Away 11-11 6-16 5-18 8-14 6-19 Away 13-8 14-9 7-15 6-19 4-21

Conf 22-8 20-13 20-10 17-12 6-25 Conf 12-17 17-13 13-17 14-13 10-23 Conf 22-7 23-8 14-17 8-19 7-23

Pct .565 .563 .468 .435 .404 Pct .689 .609 .604 .542 .478 Pct .696 .543 .532 .511 .229

GB — — 4½ 6 7½ GB — 3½ 3½ 6½ 9½ GB — 7 7½ 8½ 22

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 1-9 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 8-2 5-5 L10 9-1 4-6 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 L-1 W-1 L-4 L-6 Str W-2 W-2 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str W-7 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-4

Home 17-7 18-7 15-6 16-6 11-11 Home 20-4 14-7 20-7 13-9 16-8 Home 18-6 14-10 15-9 14-10 7-17

Away 9-13 9-14 7-19 4-20 8-17 Away 11-10 14-11 9-12 13-13 6-16 Away 14-8 11-11 10-13 10-13 4-20

Conf 17-12 20-15 13-16 12-19 13-16 Conf 18-9 16-14 16-16 14-13 12-17 Conf 20-10 18-15 17-15 13-18 7-21

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Dallas Memphis Northwest Denver Oklahoma City Portland Utah Minnesota Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 26 27 22 20 19 W 31 28 29 26 22 W 32 25 25 24 11

L 20 21 25 26 28 L 14 18 19 22 24 L 14 21 22 23 37

Monday Oklahoma City 127, New York 109 Chicago 104, Cleveland 88 Milwaukee 116, Dallas 106 Washington 101, Detroit 87 Orlando 122, Atlanta 103 Brooklyn 123, Sacramento 94 New Orleans 105, Memphis 85 Boston 107, Miami 99 Philadelphia 121, Houston 93 Portland 109, Utah 104 Golden State at Lakers, late

Sunday Indiana 120, Charlotte 95 LA Clippers 103, San Antonio 95 Minnesota 116, Phoenix 114 Tuesday Sacramento at Toronto, 6 p.m. Portland at Okla. City, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Wednesday Toronto at Indiana, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 6:30 p.m.

Houston at New York, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Memphis, 7 p.m. Detroit at New Orleans, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Phila., 7 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Golden St. at Washington, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Okla. City, 7 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

NBA SUMMARIES Pelicans 105, Grizzlies 85

Celtics 107, Heat 99

76ers 121, Rockets 93

New Orleans: Moore 3-6 0-0 6, Randle 6-9 8-11 20, Okafor 9-11 2-3 20, Payton 3-8 2-2 9, Jr.Holiday 9-16 2-6 21, Miller 1-4 0-0 3, Mirotic 6-15 4-4 21, Diallo 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier 1-3 0-0 2, Jackson 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 39-74 18-26 105. Memphis: Temple 3-10 1-2 9, Jackson Jr. 6-14 2-4 14, Gasol 9-19 3-5 22, Conley 7-15 3-4 20, Ju.Holiday 3-8 0-0 8, Rabb 2-5 1-2 5, Green 2-11 0-0 5, Mack 1-3 0-0 2, Carter 0-1 0-0 0, Watanabe 0-2 0-0 0, Washburn 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-88 10-17 85. 21 33 28 23 — 105 New Orleans 28 18 17 85 Memphis 22 — 3-point goals: New Orleans 9-26 (Mirotic 5-12, Jackson 1-1, Payton 1-2, Jr.Holiday 1-4, Miller 1-4, Moore 0-1, Frazier 0-1, Randle 0-1), Memphis 9-35 (Conley 3-9, Temple 2-7, Ju.Holiday 2-7, Gasol 1-4, Green 1-5, Mack 0-1, Jackson Jr. 0-1, Watanabe 0-1). Fouled out: Green. Rebounds: New Orleans 50 (Randle 12), Memphis 35 (Gasol, Temple 8). Assists: New Orleans 19 (Jr.Holiday 6), Memphis 21 (Conley 8). Total fouls: New Orleans 17, Memphis 19. Technicals: New Orleans (Defensive three second). A: 17,794 (18,119).

Miami: McGruder 0-3 0-0 0, J.Johnson 3-7 0-0 8, Whiteside 3-5 0-1 6, Richardson 4-13 0-0 11, Winslow 1-5 6-6 8, Jones Jr. 7-12 3-3 18, Adebayo 4-6 5-6 13, Wade 3-10 2-2 8, T.Johnson 3-9 0-0 9, Waiters 8-16 0-0 18. Totals 36-86 16-18 99. Boston: Tatum 8-13 0-0 19, Morris 6-11 3-3 17, Horford 8-11 0-0 16, Irving 11-19 2-3 26, Smart 2-7 0-0 6, Hayward 2-6 2-2 7, Ojeleye 1-1 0-0 3, Brown 3-9 0-0 6, Baynes 1-4 2-2 4, Rozier 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 43-87 9-10 107. Miami 23 27 18 31 — 99 Boston 33 17 37 20 — 107 3-point goals: Miami 11-35 (Richardson 3-8, T.Johnson 3-8, J.Johnson 2-3, Waiters 2-7, Jones Jr. 1-3, McGruder 0-2, Wade 0-2, Winslow 0-2), Boston 12-30 (Tatum 3-3, Irving 2-5, Smart 2-6, Morris 2-7, Ojeleye 1-1, Hayward 1-3, Rozier 1-3, Horford 0-1, Baynes 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 38 (Jones Jr. 9), Boston 36 (Horford 12). Assists: Miami 25 (Wade, Winslow 6), Boston 26 (Irving 10). Total fouls: Miami 16, Boston 21. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Houston: Gordon 2-13 2-3 8, Tucker 1-3 0-0 2, Nene 2-2 0-0 4, Harden 12-26 7-8 37, Rivers 0-5 0-2 0, Edwards 0-2 0-0 0, Clark 0-2 0-0 0, Faried 5-7 2-4 13, Chriss 1-3 2-2 4, Ennis III 2-7 3-3 7, Green 6-16 4-4 18. Totals 31-86 20-26 93. Philadelphia: Brewer 5-10 1-2 11, Chandler 4-4 0-0 9, Embiid 9-16 14-17 32, Simmons 3-12 3-4 9, Redick 5-10 5-5 16, Bolden 0-2 0-0 0, Muscala 0-3 2-2 2, Johnson 2-3 1-2 6, McConnell 6-11 0-0 12, Korkmaz 2-4 0-0 6, Shamet 7-13 1-1 18. Totals 43-88 27-33 121. Houston 26 24 13 30 — 93 Philadelphia 30 35 29 27 — 121 3-point goals: Houston 11-42 (Harden 6-13, Gordon 2-7, Green 2-9, Faried 1-2, Tucker 0-1, Chriss 0-1, Ennis III 0-1, Clark 0-2, Edwards 0-2, Rivers 0-4), Philadelphia 8-23 (Shamet 3-6, Korkmaz 2-4, Chandler 1-1, Johnson 1-1, Redick 1-5, Brewer 0-1, Bolden 0-1, Embiid 0-1, Muscala 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 38 (Harden, Tucker, Faried 6), Philadelphia 55 (Chandler, Embiid 14). Assists: Houston 14 (Harden, Rivers 3), Philadelphia 21 (Simmons 6). Total fouls: Houston 25, Philadelphia 22. Technicals: Faried, Harden, Houston coach Mike D’Antoni, Embiid. A: 20,313 (20,478).

Nets 123, Kings 94

Bulls 104, Cavaliers 88

Sacramento: Shumpert 1-10 2-2 4, Bjelica 1-3 0-0 2, Cauley-Stein 6-8 0-1 12, Fox 4-14 0-2 9, Hield 4-10 0-0 11, Jackson 6-8 0-0 14, Bagley III 3-7 3-4 9, Giles III 4-8 0-0 8, Mason 0-1 0-0 0, Ferrell 1-5 0-0 3, Bogdanovic 9-19 1-2 22. Totals 39-93 6-11 94. Brooklyn: Kurucs 6-9 2-2 14, Graham 2-3 3-4 8, Allen 3-5 2-2 8, Russell 12-24 0-0 31, Harris 8-14 0-0 19, Carroll 3-8 2-4 9, Hollis-Jefferson 2-7 1-1 5, Davis 2-2 2-2 6, Napier 3-4 4-4 10, Dinwiddie 3-12 4-5 11. Totals 45-90 20-24 123. 23 37 25 9 — 94 Sacramento 26 38 30 — 123 Brooklyn 29 3-point goals: Sacramento 10-25 (Hield 3-6, Bogdanovic 3-6, Jackson 2-3, Ferrell 1-1, Fox 1-2, Bjelica 0-1, Mason 0-1, Bagley III 0-2, Shumpert 0-3), Brooklyn 13-35 (Russell 7-13, Harris 3-4, Graham 1-2, Dinwiddie 1-5, Carroll 1-5, Allen 0-1, Kurucs 0-2, Hollis-Jefferson 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 37 (Hield 7), Brooklyn 56 (Davis 16). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Bogdanovic 11), Brooklyn 25 (Russell 8). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Brooklyn 15. A: 14,233 (17,732).

Chicago: Hutchison 2-3 3-4 8, Markkanen 5-11 0-0 13, Lopez 4-9 0-0 8, Dunn 5-10 2-2 13, LaVine 9-16 4-6 25, Parker 2-5 4-4 10, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 6-10 0-0 15, Arcidiacono 1-3 0-0 3, Harrison 1-2 0-0 3, Blakeney 0-2 1-2 1, Selden 1-5 3-4 5. Totals 36-76 17-22 104. Cleveland: Hood 1-8 2-2 4, Osman 3-7 1-2 8, Zizic 4-7 5-6 13, Sexton 7-17 2-3 18, Burks 1-7 1-1 3, Adel 0-0 0-0 0, Blossomgame 3-8 1-2 7, Frye 3-4 1-2 9, Dellavedova 1-6 1-2 3, Payne 4-11 2-4 11, Clarkson 4-12 4-5 12. Totals 31-87 20-29 88. Chicago 31 17 28 28 — 104 Cleveland 18 24 25 21 — 88 3-point goals: Chicago 15-30 (Markkanen 3-5, LaVine 3-6, Portis 3-6, Parker 2-3, Dunn 1-1, Hutchison 1-1, Harrison 1-2, Arcidiacono 1-3, Lopez 0-1, Selden 0-2), Cleveland 6-27 (Frye 2-2, Sexton 2-6, Osman 1-4, Payne 1-5, Hood 0-2, Dellavedova 0-3, Clarkson 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 50 (Lopez, Hutchison 9), Cleveland 38 (Zizic 9). Assists: Chicago 24 (Dunn 9), Cleveland 16 (Clarkson 4). Total fouls: Chicago 26, Cleveland 18. Technicals: Portis. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Bucks 116, Mavericks 106

Thunder 127, Knicks 109

Dallas: Matthews 6-14 0-0 15, Barnes 4-15 0-2 8, Jordan 6-11 3-6 15, Doncic 6-17 4-5 18, Brunson 6-15 2-2 16, Finney-Smith 5-8 0-0 13, Powell 2-5 0-0 4, Kleber 3-8 0-0 8, Harris 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 41-99 10-17 106. Milwaukee: Middleton 6-18 0-0 13, G.Antetokounmpo 10-20 10-12 31, Lopez 6-10 0-0 16, Bledsoe 8-16 4-4 21, Brogdon 6-14 6-6 19, Ilyasova 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 0-1 0-0 0, Maker 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 2-5 0-0 5, Snell 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 4-4 0-0 11. Totals 42-91 20-22 116. 26 33 25 22 — 106 Dallas 35 22 35 24 — 116 Milwaukee 3-point goals: Dallas 14-40 (Finney-Smith 3-5, Matthews 3-8, Brunson 2-3, Harris 2-4, Doncic 2-5, Kleber 2-6, Powell 0-1, Barnes 0-8), Milwaukee 12-32 (Lopez 4-7, Brown 3-3, Hill 1-2, Brogdon 1-2, G.Antetokounmpo 1-2, Bledsoe 1-7, Middleton 1-7, Snell 0-1, Ilyasova 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 48 (Jordan 15), Milwaukee 51 (G.Antetokounmpo 15). Assists: Dallas 24 (Doncic 10), Milwaukee 21 (Bledsoe, G.Antetokounmpo 5). Total fouls: Dallas 19, Milwaukee 19. Technicals: Powell 2. Ejected: Powell. A: 17,963 (17,500).

Oklahoma City: George 9-18 9-9 31, Grant 6-9 3-5 16, Adams 5-8 0-0 10, Westbrook 6-12 4-5 17, Ferguson 3-5 0-0 9, Nader 6-9 2-3 16, Noel 3-5 0-0 6, Patterson 1-2 0-0 2, Schroder 5-12 3-3 17, Diallo 1-2 1-2 3, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-83 22-27 127. New York: Knox 3-8 0-1 8, Vonleh 3-6 4-7 10, Kornet 1-4 0-0 2, Mudiay 6-11 2-2 14, Hardaway Jr. 7-14 5-6 23, Hezonja 2-5 1-2 5, Robinson 4-4 0-1 8, Kanter 5-11 1-1 11, Ntilikina 4-12 0-0 9, Trier 3-8 10-10 16, Dotson 1-4 1-2 3. Totals 39-87 24-32 109. 34 36 24 — 127 Oklahoma City 33 New York 16 31 35 27 — 109 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 15-29 (Schroder 4-7, George 4-9, Ferguson 3-5, Nader 2-3, Grant 1-2, Westbrook 1-2, Patterson 0-1), New York 7-23 (Hardaway Jr. 4-9, Knox 2-3, Ntilikina 1-3, Vonleh 0-1, Kanter 0-1, Trier 0-1, Kornet 0-1, Mudiay 0-2, Dotson 0-2). Fouled out: Robinson. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 49 (Westbrook 10), New York 36 (Robinson, Trier 6). Assists: Oklahoma City 26 (Westbrook 9), New York 25 (Trier 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 31, New York 23. Technicals: New York coach David Fizdale, Trier. A: 19,493 (19,812).

Wizards 101, Pistons 87 Detroit: Bullock 4-11 2-2 12, Griffin 9-16 7-11 29, Pachulia 2-3 0-0 4, Jackson 3-11 0-0 7, Brown 2-10 0-0 4, Johnson 2-5 0-0 4, Leuer 0-1 0-0 0, Galloway 3-5 0-0 8, Calderon 2-2 2-2 7, Lucas 0-1 2-2 2, Kennard 2-8 1-1 5, Thomas 2-4 0-0 5, Robinson III 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-77 14-18 87. Washington: Ariza 7-13 4-4 20, Green 5-11 1-1 11, Bryant 5-9 1-2 11, Satoransky 4-8 2-3 10, Beal 4-12 7-8 16, Brown Jr. 0-0 0-0 0, Porter Jr. 7-15 1-1 19, Dekker 4-6 2-2 11, Mahinmi 0-3 2-2 2, Payton II 0-0 0-0 0, Randle 0-1 1-4 1, McRae 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 21-27 101. Detroit 17 17 30 23 — 87 Washington 29 21 31 20 — 101 3-point goals: Detroit 11-34 (Griffin 4-7, Galloway 2-4, Bullock 2-7, Calderon 1-1, Thomas 1-2, Jackson 1-5, Lucas 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Brown 0-2, Kennard 0-4), Washington 8-23 (Porter Jr. 4-6, Ariza 2-5, Dekker 1-2, Beal 1-3, Mahinmi 0-1, Randle 0-1, Satoransky 0-1, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 40 (Griffin 9), Washington 45 (Bryant, Ariza 12). Assists: Detroit 22 (Bullock, Brown, Calderon, Griffin 4), Washington 24 (Satoransky 8). Total fouls: Detroit 21, Washington 18. Technicals: Griffin, Mahinmi. A: 16,229 (20,356).

Magic 122, Hawks 103 Orlando: Simmons 3-6 1-1 7, Isaac 4-8 0-0 8, Vucevic 12-23 4-4 29, Augustin 4-8 3-3 15, Fournier 9-18 8-9 29, Iwundu 0-0 0-0 0, Martin 3-5 0-0 8, Bamba 3-3 2-2 8, Briscoe 1-5 0-1 2, Ross 7-15 1-1 16. Totals 46-91 19-21 122. Atlanta: Prince 4-10 0-0 9, Collins 5-12 3-6 14, Dedmon 8-14 3-3 24, Young 8-13 5-6 21, Bembry 5-11 1-1 11, Spellman 0-1 0-0 0, Len 1-7 0-2 2, Lin 5-9 4-5 15, Carter 0-2 0-0 0, Dorsey 2-3 0-0 5, Hamilton 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-86 16-23 103. 28 — Orlando 32 31 31 122 Atlanta 26 21 25 — 103 31 3-point goals: Orlando 11-29 (Augustin 4-6, Fournier 3-6, Martin 2-3, Vucevic 1-3, Ross 1-7, Simmons 0-2, Isaac 0-2), Atlanta 9-30 (Dedmon 5-7, Dorsey 1-1, Collins 1-3, Lin 1-3, Prince 1-5, Carter 0-1, Spellman 0-1, Bembry 0-3, Len 0-3, Young 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 45 (Vucevic 14), Atlanta 44 (Collins 10). Assists: Orlando 29 (Fournier, Ross 7), Atlanta 23 (Bembry 7). Total fouls: Orlando 22, Atlanta 24. Technicals: Atlanta (Defensive three second) 2. A: 16,611 (18,118).

Trail Blazers 109, Jazz 104 Portland: Harkless 3-3 0-0 6, Aminu 4-6 0-0 8, Nurkic 8-17 6-8 22, Lillard 10-20 5-6 26, McCollum 6-17 0-1 14, Layman 5-9 0-0 12, Collins 0-4 0-0 0, Leonard 3-4 0-0 8, Curry 1-2 0-0 3, Turner 5-8 0-0 10. Totals 45-90 11-15 109. Utah: Ingles 1-7 0-0 2, Crowder 6-14 0-0 15, Favors 3-7 6-6 12, Mitchell 12-28 10-12 36, O’Neale 4-9 2-3 11, Niang 0-2 0-0 0, Gobert 4-10 2-4 10, Rubio 3-6 5-6 12, Korver 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 36-91 25-31 104. 15 109 Portland 29 39 26 — Utah 28 28 25 23 — 104 3-point goals: Portland 8-18 (Leonard 2-2, Layman 2-3, McCollum 2-4, Curry 1-1, Lillard 1-5, Collins 0-1, Aminu 0-2), Utah 7-33 (Crowder 3-9, Mitchell 2-8, O’Neale 1-2, Rubio 1-3, Niang 0-1, Favors 0-2, Ingles 0-3, Korver 0-5). Fouled out: Nurkic. Rebounds: Portland 44 (Lillard, Nurkic, Turner 8), Utah 48 (Gobert 13). Assists: Portland 30 (Lillard 8), Utah 21 (Ingles 6). Total fouls: Portland 22, Utah 19. Technicals: Turner, Aminu, Crowder, Gobert. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Scoring leaders Player James Harden Stephen Curry Anthony Davis Kevin Durant Kawhi Leonard LeBron James Joel Embiid Paul George Giannis Antetokounmpo Damian Lillard Blake Griffin Kemba Walker Bradley Beal Devin Booker Kyrie Irving Zach LaVine Karl-Anthony Towns Donovan Mitchell Russell Westbrook Klay Thompson DeMar DeRozan Tobias Harris LaMarcus Aldridge Jrue Holiday John Wall Nikola Vucevic CJ McCollum Buddy Hield Julius Randle Luka Doncic Mike Conley Jimmy Butler Tim Hardaway Jr. Nikola Jokic Derrick Rose Kyle Kuzma Victor Oladipo D’Angelo Russell Danilo Gallinari

Team HOU GSW NOP GSW TOR LAL PHI OKC MIL POR DET CHA WAS PHX BOS CHI MIN UTA OKC GSW SAS LAC SAS NOP WAS ORL POR SAC NOP DAL MEM PHI NYK DEN MIN LAL IND BKN LAC

GP 43 35 41 46 36 34 45 45 43 48 44 46 46 35 42 41 46 44 38 46 47 46 48 47 32 46 47 47 46 45 46 38 41 45 36 45 35 47 44

PTS 35.7 29.8 29.3 28.1 27.6 27.3 27.1 26.8 26.5 26.1 26 25 24.7 24.5 23.5 22.9 22.4 22 21.6 21.6 21.4 21 20.8 20.8 20.7 20.5 20.5 20.3 20.1 20 19.8 19.6 19.6 19.6 19.3 19.3 19.2 19.2 19

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Auburn....................... 7................S CAROLINA KENTUCKY ................6.5 ............Mississippi St BALL ST...................... 9.................Miami-Ohio BUTLER ...................... 1.....................Villanova OHIO U ....................... 6.................W Michigan E MICHIGAN ..............1.5...........Bowling Green AKRON ....................... 6.................. C Michigan Toledo .......................2.5 .................... KENT ST FLORIDA ST...............5.5 ....................Clemson KANSAS ST................. 1.................. Texas Tech GEORGIA TECH..........PK............... Notre Dame MICHIGAN ................12.5.................Minnesota Buffalo ......................8.5 ..............NO ILLINOIS S FLORIDA.................3.5 ..................Wichita St FLORIDA...................10.5 ............... Texas A&M VIRGINIA ................... 24...............Wake Forest Duke.......................... 12..............PITTSBURGH NORTHWESTERN ......PK.......................Indiana ALABAMA................... 1.................. Mississippi Boise St .....................3.5 ................ AIR FORCE UNLV..........................4.5 .............. New Mexico FRESNO ST................8.5 ............. San Diego St NIAGARA ...................3.5 ................. St. Peter’s NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog CAPITALS ..........-$140/+$120 ...............Sharks SENATORS..........-$110/-$110 .............. Coyotes Islanders ...........-$140/+$120 ...BLACKHAWKS OILERS ..............-$160/+$140 .........Red Wings FLAMES............. -$175/+$155.........Hurricanes Grand Salami: Over/under 31.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League NEW YORK — Acquired 2B Shed Long and a competitive balance Round A pick in the 2019 MLB draft from Cincinnati for RHP Sonny Gray and LHP Reiver Sanmartin. Traded 2B Shed Long to Seattle for OF Josh Stowers. SEATTLE — Designated INF/OF Kaleb Cowart for assignment. National League ARIZONA — Agreed to terms with INF Wilmer Flores on a one-year contract. Designated LHP Jared Miller for assignment. CINCINNATI — Agreed to terms with RHP Sonny Gray on a four-year contract. Frontier League EVANSVILLE — Signed OF Hunter Cullen to a contract extension. GRIZZLIES — Signed INF Dom Golubiewski. JOLIET — Signed RHP Daren Osby to a contract extension. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined Boston G Marcus Smart $35,000 for aggressively pursuing an opponent in an attempt to escalate a physical altercation and failing to leave the court in a timely manner following his ejection during a Jan. 19 game at Atlanta. WASHINGTON — Signed G Gary Payton II to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL | National Football League CHICAGO — Named Ted Monachino senior defensive assistant and outside linebackers coach. Monachino will be reunited with new Bears defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano after coaching together in two previous stops with the Indianapolis Colts (2016-17) and Baltimore Ravens (2010-11). NEW ORLEANS — Signed QB J.T. Barrett, DB Chris Campbell, DB J.T. Gray, DT Tomasi Laulie, LB Darnell Sankey and TE Nate Wozniak to reserve/future contracts. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG — Re-signed DE Jackson Jeffcoat to a two-year contract extension. Alliance of American Football SAN DIEGO — Traded TE Darryl Richardson to Memphis for RB Jahad Thomas. HOCKEY | National Hockey League ANAHEIM — Reassigned Cs Sam Carrick and Justin Kloos to San Diego (AHL). CAROLINA — Agreed to terms with F Teuvo Teravainen on a five-year contract extension through the 2023-24 season. LOS ANGELES — Assigned F Matt Luff to Ontario (AHL). American Hockey League BAKERSFIELD — Announced D Caleb Jones was assigned to the team by Edmonton. SOCCER | Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Signed F Antonio Bustamante to a homegrown contract. COLLEGE FLORIDA — Named Torrian Gray cornerbacks coach. INDIANA — Named Kalen DeBoer associate head football coach and offensive coordinator. NEW MEXICO — Named Jon NewmanGonchar volleyball coach. RUTGERS — Named Andy Buh defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. TENNESSEE — Promoted Arthur Smith to offensive coordinator.

BASEBALL Cardinals spring training Date Saturday 2/23 Sunday 2/24 Monday 2/25 Tuesday 2/26 Wednesday 2/27 Thursday 2/28 Friday 3/1 Saturday 3/2 Sunday 3/3 Monday 3/4 Tuesday 3/5 Wednesday 3/6 Friday 3/8

Opponent at Marlins vs. Nationals vs. Tigers (SS) at Nationals vs. Braves vs. Mets at Astros vs. Marlins vs. Mets at Tigers at Phillies at Yankees SS vs. Nationals SS at Astros Saturday 3/9 vs. Astros Sunday 3/10 at Mets Monday 3/11 vs. Nationals Tuesday 3/12 at Braves Wednesday 3/13 at Marlins Thursday 3/14 vs. Mets Friday 3/15 SS at Astros SS vs. Astros Saturday 3/16 at Nationals Sunday 3/17 at Marlins Monday 3/18 vs. Phillies Wednesday 3/20 vs. Marlins SS vs. Yankees Thursday 3/21 SS at Nationals Friday 3/22 at Mets (SS) Saturday 3/23 at Nationals Sunday 3/24 vs. Marlins Monday 3/25 at Memphis

Time 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:10 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:35 12:10 12:05 12:05 6:05

COLLEGES Area basketball schedule TUESDAY W: STL Pharmacy at Park, 5:30 p.m. W: Principia at Greenville, 5:30 p.m. W: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at Stephens, 7 p.m. M: Principia at Greenville, 7:30 p.m. M: STL Pharmacy at Park, 7:30 p.m. M: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 7:30 p.m.

Men’s basketball scores EAST Baylor 85, West Virginia 73 Bryant 76, St. Francis (Pa.) 67 Creighton 91, Georgetown 87 Fairleigh Dickinson 87, Mount St. Mary’s 69 Marist 62, Manhattan 46 Robert Morris 70, CCSU 59 Rutgers 76, Nebraska 69 Sacred Heart 62, Wagner 38 St. Francis Brooklyn 79, LIU Brooklyn 70 SOUTH Alcorn St. 74, Ark.-Pine Bluff 69 Bethune-Cookman 89, Md.-Eastern Shore 68 Florida A&M 60, Delaware St. 47 Florida Gulf Coast 87, Stetson 65 Harvard 84, Howard 71 Liberty 72, North Alabama 47 Lipscomb 86, Kennesaw St. 57 NC A&T 80, Coppin St. 71 NC Central 92, Morgan St. 64 NJIT 76, North Florida 72 Norfolk St. 74, SC State 69 North Carolina 103, Virginia Tech 82 Old Dominion 76, Charlotte 70 Presbyterian 68, SC-Upstate 59 Radford 72, Longwood 59 Southern U. 80, MVSU 56 W. Kentucky 68, Marshall 59 Winthrop 66, UNC-Asheville 45

MIDWEST Kansas 80, Iowa St. 76 Michigan St. 69, Maryland 55 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 83, Grambling St. 66 Texas Southern 75, Jackson St. 65 FAR WEST N. Colorado 77, Idaho St. 53 MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Tennessee (16-1) idle. Next: at Vanderbilt, Wednesday. 2. Duke (15-2) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tue. 3. Virginia (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Tuesday. 4. Gonzaga (18-2) idle. Next: at Santa Clara, Thursday. 5. Michigan (17-1) idle. Next: vs. Minnesota, Tuesday. 6. Michigan State (17-2) beat No. 13 Maryland 69-55. Next: at No. 19 Iowa, Thursday. 7. Nevada (18-1) idle. Next: vs. Colorado State, Wednesday. 8. Kentucky (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 22 Mississippi State, Tuesday. 9. Kansas (16-3) beat No. 24 Iowa State 80-76. Next: at No. 8 Kentucky, Saturday. 10. Virginia Tech (15-3) lost to No. 11 North Carolina 103-82. Next: vs. Syracuse, Saturday. 11. North Carolina (15-4) beat No. 10 Virginia Tech 103-82. Next: at Georgia Tech, Tuesday, Jan. 29. 12. Marquette (16-3) idle. Next: vs. DePaul, Wednesday. 13. Maryland (16-4) lost to No. 6 Michigan State 69-55. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. 14. Buffalo (17-1) idle. Next: at Northern Illinois, Tuesday. 14. Texas Tech (15-3) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Tuesday. 16. Auburn (13-4) idle. Next: at South Carolina, Tuesday. 17. Houston (18-1) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday. 18. Villanova (14-4) idle. Next: at Butler, Tue. 19. Iowa (16-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 6 Michigan State, Thursday. 20. Mississippi (14-3) idle. Next: at Alabama, Tuesday. 21. N.C. State (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 23 Louisville, Thursday. 22. Mississippi State (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 8 Kentucky, Tuesday. 23. Louisville (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 N.C. State, Thursday. 24. Iowa State (14-5) lost to No. 9 Kansas 80-76. Next: at No. 20 Mississippi, Saturday. 25. LSU (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Georgia, Wed. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Notre Dame (18-1) idle. Next: at Tennessee, Thursday. 2. Baylor (15-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 20 Iowa State, Wednesday. 3. UConn (16-1) idle. Next: vs. SMU, Wed. 4. Louisville (17-1) idle. Next: at No. 22 Florida State, Thursday. 5. Oregon (17-1) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday. 6. Stanford (16-1) idle. Next: at Colorado, Fri. 7. Mississippi State (17-1) idle. Next: at Florida, Thursday. 8. N.C. State (18-0) idle. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 9. Oregon State (15-3) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 10. Marquette (16-3) idle. Next: at Xavier, Fri. 11. Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Thursday. 12. Texas (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Kansas, Wed. 13. Syracuse (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Miami, Wed. 14. Rutgers (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 17 Iowa, Wednesday. 15. Kentucky (16-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Missouri, Thursday. 16. Arizona State (13-5) idle. Next: vs. UCLA, Friday. 17. Iowa (14-4) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Rutgers, Wednesday. 18. Gonzaga (17-2) idle. Next: vs. San Francisco, Thursday. 19. South Carolina (13-5) beat No. 25 Missouri 79-65. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Monday. 20. Iowa State (14-4) idle. Next: at No. 2 Baylor, Wednesday. 21. Utah (16-1) idle. Next: vs. California, Fri. 22. Florida State (16-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Louisville, Thursday. 23. Michigan State (13-5) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Thursday. 24. Texas A&M (14-4) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 25. Missouri (15-5) lost to No. 19 South Carolina 79-65. Next: at No. 15 Kentucky, Thursday.

AP women’s top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 20, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 18-1 735 1 1. Notre Dame (22) 2. Baylor (7) 15-1 713 2 16-1 703 2 3. UConn (1) 4. Louisville 17-1 651 4 17-1 623 5 5. Oregon 6. Stanford 16-1 608 6 7. Mississippi St. 17-1 578 7 18-0 549 8 8. N.C. State 9. Oregon St. 15-3 472 10 16-3 460 14 10. Marquette 16-2 442 9 11. Maryland 15-3 376 11 12. Texas 13. Syracuse 15-3 358 12 15-3 343 20 14. Rutgers 15. Kentucky 16-3 331 16 13-5 265 19 16. Arizona St. 14-4 261 22 17. Iowa 17-2 258 13 18. Gonzaga 19. South Carolina 12-5 245 15 14-4 145 18 20. Iowa St. 21. Utah 16-1 138 — 16-2 134 — 22. Florida St. 13-5 109 17 23. Michigan St. 24. Texas A&M 14-4 45 — 15-4 43 — 25. Missouri Others: BYU 32, Tennessee 23, Minnesota 21, Drake 20, UCF 20, Clemson 11, South Dakota 11, California 9, DePaul 8, Miami 6, Boise St. 3, Indiana 1.

TENNIS Australian Open results Monday’s complete results Seedings in parentheses Men’s Singles • Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Daniil Medvedev (15), Russia, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-3. Kei Nishikori (8), Japan, def. Pablo Carreno-Busta (23), Spain, 6-7 (8), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (8). Milos Raonic (16), Canada, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 6-1, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Lucas Pouille (28), France, def. Borna Coric (11), Croatia, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5, 7-6 (2). Women’s Singles • Fourth Round Serena Williams (16), United States, def. Simona Halep (1), Romania, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4. Karolina Pliskova (7), Czech Republic, def. Garbine Muguruza (18), Spain, 6-3, 6-1. Naomi Osaka (4), Japan, def. Anastasija Sevastova (13), Latvia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Elina Svitolina (6), Ukraine, def. Madison Keys (17), United States, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1.

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 23 19 3 1 54 13 60 Man City 23 18 2 3 62 17 56 Tottenham 23 17 0 6 48 23 51 Chelsea 23 14 5 4 40 19 47 Arsenal 23 13 5 5 48 32 44 Man United 23 13 5 5 46 33 44 Watford 23 9 6 8 32 32 33 Wolverhampton 23 9 5 9 27 31 32 Leicester 23 9 4 10 29 29 31 West Ham 23 9 4 10 30 34 31 Everton 23 8 6 9 34 33 30 Bournemouth 23 9 3 11 33 42 30 Brighton 23 7 5 11 25 32 26 23 6 4 13 23 32 22 Crystal Palace 23 5 7 11 25 40 22 Southampton Burnley 23 6 4 13 23 43 22 23 5 6 12 19 31 21 Newcastle Cardiff 23 5 4 14 19 44 19 23 3 5 15 21 51 14 Fulham Huddersfield 23 2 5 16 13 40 11 Tuesday Arsenal vs. Cardiff, 1:45 p.m. Wolverhampton vs. West Ham, 1:45 p.m. Fulham vs. Brighton, 1:45 p.m. Huddersfield vs. Everton, 1:45 p.m. Newcastle vs. Man City, 2 p.m. Man United vs. Burnley, 2 p.m. Wednesday Southampton vs. Crystal Palace, 1:45 p.m. Bournemouth vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m. Liverpool vs. Leicester, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. Watford, 2 p.m.


SPORTS

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 2

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7 AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite ....... Open/current ......Underdog February 3 • Super Bowl LIII, Atlanta Patriots .................PK.... 2.......................Rams Odds to win the Super Bowl MVP Player...............................................Odds Tom Brady....................................................6/5 Jared Goff ....................................................9/5 Todd Gurley.................................................12/1 Sony Michel.................................................15/1 James White .............................................. 18/1 Aaron Donald............................................. 18/1 C.J. Anderson.............................................20/1 Julian Edelman .......................................... 25/1 Brandin Cooks ...........................................40/1 Robert Woods............................................40/1 Rob Gronkowski.........................................40/1 Rex Burkhead ............................................50/1 Josh Reynolds............................................60/1 NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog RAPTORS....................11 .......................... Kings THUNDER..................5.5 ......................Blazers MAVERICKS................ 2.......................Clippers T’Wolves..................... 6........................... SUNS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Celtics’ Kyrie Irving goes in for a layup past the Heat’s Hassan Whiteside during the second quarter Monday.

Irving, Celtics top Miami, now have four straight wins ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyrie Irving had 26 points and 10 assists, Al Horford added 16 points and 12 rebounds and the Boston Celtics beat the Miami Heat 107-99 Monday night for their fourth straight victory. Irving has had 20 or more points and 10 or more assists in 11 games, the first Celtics’ player to accomplish the feat since Hall of Famer Larry Bird, who also had 11 in 198687. Jayson Tatum added 19 points and Marcus Morris 17 for the Celtics, who won their ninth straight at home and improved to 18-5 at TD Garden. Derrick Jones Jr. and Dion Waiters led the Heat with 18 points apiece.

NOTEBOOK

Anthony saga continues • Carmelo Anthony is going to Chicago, albeit only on paper. Where he’s going next remains unclear. A person with knowledge of the matter said the Houston Rockets are trading Anthony and an undisclosed amount of cash to the Bulls in a deal expected to be completed Tuesday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because the trade still needs league approval. When that comes — the NBA office was closed Monday to commemorate the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday — Anthony will have a new team, though he still won’t be back on the floor. The Bulls have no plans to play Anthony and will look to either trade him before the Feb. 7 deadline or ultimately waive him and make him a free agent. The trade ends a short-lived saga in Houston for Anthony, who averaged 13.4 points in 10 games with the Rockets. He has not played since Nov. 8.

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Philadelphia Boston Brooklyn New York Southeast Miami Charlotte Washington Orlando Atlanta Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

W 35 31 29 25 10 W 22 22 20 20 14 W 34 31 20 11 9

L 13 17 18 23 35 L 23 24 26 27 32 L 12 15 26 36 39

Pct .729 .646 .617 .521 .222 Pct .489 .478 .435 .426 .304 Pct .739 .674 .435 .234 .188

GB — 4 5½ 10 23½ GB — ½ 2½ 3 8½ GB — 3 14 23½ 26

L10 8-2 7-3 7-3 8-2 1-9 L10 5-5 4-6 7-3 3-7 3-7 L10 8-2 7-3 3-7 1-9 1-9

Str W-2 W-1 W-4 W-4 L-6 Str L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 Str W-5 W-2 L-2 W-1 L-4

Home 20-4 20-5 18-5 13-11 4-15 Home 11-12 16-8 15-8 12-13 8-13 Home 21-4 17-6 13-11 5-17 5-18

Away 15-9 11-12 11-13 12-12 6-20 Away 11-11 6-16 5-18 8-14 6-19 Away 13-8 14-9 7-15 6-19 4-21

Conf 22-8 20-13 20-10 17-12 6-25 Conf 12-17 17-13 13-17 14-13 10-23 Conf 22-7 23-8 14-17 8-19 7-23

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 1-9 L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 8-2 5-5 L10 9-1 4-6 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 L-1 W-1 L-4 L-6 Str W-2 W-2 W-3 L-1 W-1 Str W-8 W-1 L-2 L-1 L-4

Home 17-7 18-7 15-6 16-6 11-11 Home 20-4 14-7 20-7 13-9 16-8 Home 18-6 14-10 15-10 14-10 7-17

Away 9-13 9-14 7-19 4-20 8-17 Away 11-10 14-11 9-12 13-13 6-16 Away 15-8 11-11 10-13 10-13 4-20

Conf 17-12 20-15 13-16 12-19 13-16 Conf 18-9 16-14 16-16 14-13 12-17 Conf 21-10 18-15 17-16 13-18 7-21

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Houston San Antonio New Orleans Dallas Memphis Northwest Denver Oklahoma City Portland Utah Minnesota Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 26 27 22 20 19 W 31 28 29 26 22 W 33 25 25 24 11

L 20 21 25 26 28 L 14 18 19 22 24 L 14 21 23 23 37

Monday Oklahoma City 127, New York 109 Chicago 104, Cleveland 88 Milwaukee 116, Dallas 106 Washington 101, Detroit 87 Orlando 122, Atlanta 103 Brooklyn 123, Sacramento 94 New Orleans 105, Memphis 85 Boston 107, Miami 99 Philadelphia 121, Houston 93 Portland 109, Utah 104 Golden State 130, Lakers 111

Pct GB .565 — .563 — .468 4½ .435 6 .404 7½ Pct GB .689 — .609 3½ .604 3½ .542 6½ .478 9½ Pct GB .702 — .543 7½ .521 8½ .511 9 .229 22½

Sunday Indiana 120, Charlotte 95 LA Clippers 103, San Antonio 95 Minnesota 116, Phoenix 114 Tuesday Sacramento at Toronto, 6 p.m. Portland at Okla. City, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Wednesday Toronto at Indiana, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 6:30 p.m.

Houston at New York, 6:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Memphis, 7 p.m. Detroit at New Orleans, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Phila., 7 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Golden St. at Washington, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Okla. City, 7 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

NBA SUMMARIES Pelicans 105, Grizzlies 85

Celtics 107, Heat 99

76ers 121, Rockets 93

New Orleans: Moore 3-6 0-0 6, Randle 6-9 8-11 20, Okafor 9-11 2-3 20, Payton 3-8 2-2 9, Jr.Holiday 9-16 2-6 21, Miller 1-4 0-0 3, Mirotic 6-15 4-4 21, Diallo 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier 1-3 0-0 2, Jackson 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 39-74 18-26 105. Memphis: Temple 3-10 1-2 9, Jackson Jr. 6-14 2-4 14, Gasol 9-19 3-5 22, Conley 7-15 3-4 20, Ju.Holiday 3-8 0-0 8, Rabb 2-5 1-2 5, Green 2-11 0-0 5, Mack 1-3 0-0 2, Carter 0-1 0-0 0, Watanabe 0-2 0-0 0, Washburn 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-88 10-17 85. 21 33 28 23 — 105 New Orleans 28 18 17 85 Memphis 22 — 3-point goals: New Orleans 9-26 (Mirotic 5-12, Jackson 1-1, Payton 1-2, Jr.Holiday 1-4, Miller 1-4, Moore 0-1, Frazier 0-1, Randle 0-1), Memphis 9-35 (Conley 3-9, Temple 2-7, Ju.Holiday 2-7, Gasol 1-4, Green 1-5, Mack 0-1, Jackson Jr. 0-1, Watanabe 0-1). Fouled out: Green. Rebounds: New Orleans 50 (Randle 12), Memphis 35 (Gasol, Temple 8). Assists: New Orleans 19 (Jr.Holiday 6), Memphis 21 (Conley 8). Total fouls: New Orleans 17, Memphis 19. Technicals: New Orleans (Defensive three second). A: 17,794 (18,119).

Miami: McGruder 0-3 0-0 0, J.Johnson 3-7 0-0 8, Whiteside 3-5 0-1 6, Richardson 4-13 0-0 11, Winslow 1-5 6-6 8, Jones Jr. 7-12 3-3 18, Adebayo 4-6 5-6 13, Wade 3-10 2-2 8, T.Johnson 3-9 0-0 9, Waiters 8-16 0-0 18. Totals 36-86 16-18 99. Boston: Tatum 8-13 0-0 19, Morris 6-11 3-3 17, Horford 8-11 0-0 16, Irving 11-19 2-3 26, Smart 2-7 0-0 6, Hayward 2-6 2-2 7, Ojeleye 1-1 0-0 3, Brown 3-9 0-0 6, Baynes 1-4 2-2 4, Rozier 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 43-87 9-10 107. Miami 23 27 18 31 — 99 Boston 33 17 37 20 — 107 3-point goals: Miami 11-35 (Richardson 3-8, T.Johnson 3-8, J.Johnson 2-3, Waiters 2-7, Jones Jr. 1-3, McGruder 0-2, Wade 0-2, Winslow 0-2), Boston 12-30 (Tatum 3-3, Irving 2-5, Smart 2-6, Morris 2-7, Ojeleye 1-1, Hayward 1-3, Rozier 1-3, Horford 0-1, Baynes 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 38 (Jones Jr. 9), Boston 36 (Horford 12). Assists: Miami 25 (Wade, Winslow 6), Boston 26 (Irving 10). Total fouls: Miami 16, Boston 21. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Houston: Gordon 2-13 2-3 8, Tucker 1-3 0-0 2, Nene 2-2 0-0 4, Harden 12-26 7-8 37, Rivers 0-5 0-2 0, Edwards 0-2 0-0 0, Clark 0-2 0-0 0, Faried 5-7 2-4 13, Chriss 1-3 2-2 4, Ennis III 2-7 3-3 7, Green 6-16 4-4 18. Totals 31-86 20-26 93. Philadelphia: Brewer 5-10 1-2 11, Chandler 4-4 0-0 9, Embiid 9-16 14-17 32, Simmons 3-12 3-4 9, Redick 5-10 5-5 16, Bolden 0-2 0-0 0, Muscala 0-3 2-2 2, Johnson 2-3 1-2 6, McConnell 6-11 0-0 12, Korkmaz 2-4 0-0 6, Shamet 7-13 1-1 18. Totals 43-88 27-33 121. 26 24 13 30 — 93 Houston 30 35 29 27 — 121 Philadelphia 3-point goals: Houston 11-42 (Harden 6-13, Gordon 2-7, Green 2-9, Faried 1-2, Tucker 0-1, Chriss 0-1, Ennis III 0-1, Clark 0-2, Edwards 0-2, Rivers 0-4), Philadelphia 8-23 (Shamet 3-6, Korkmaz 2-4, Chandler 1-1, Johnson 1-1, Redick 1-5, Brewer 0-1, Bolden 0-1, Embiid 0-1, Muscala 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 38 (Harden, Tucker, Faried 6), Philadelphia 55 (Chandler, Embiid 14). Assists: Houston 14 (Harden, Rivers 3), Philadelphia 21 (Simmons 6). Total fouls: Houston 25, Philadelphia 22. Technicals: Faried, Harden, Houston coach Mike D’Antoni, Embiid. A: 20,313 (20,478).

Nets 123, Kings 94

Bulls 104, Cavaliers 88

Sacramento: Shumpert 1-10 2-2 4, Bjelica 1-3 0-0 2, Cauley-Stein 6-8 0-1 12, Fox 4-14 0-2 9, Hield 4-10 0-0 11, Jackson 6-8 0-0 14, Bagley III 3-7 3-4 9, Giles III 4-8 0-0 8, Mason 0-1 0-0 0, Ferrell 1-5 0-0 3, Bogdanovic 9-19 1-2 22. Totals 39-93 6-11 94. Brooklyn: Kurucs 6-9 2-2 14, Graham 2-3 3-4 8, Allen 3-5 2-2 8, Russell 12-24 0-0 31, Harris 8-14 0-0 19, Carroll 3-8 2-4 9, Hollis-Jefferson 2-7 1-1 5, Davis 2-2 2-2 6, Napier 3-4 4-4 10, Dinwiddie 3-12 4-5 11. Totals 45-90 20-24 123. 23 37 25 9 — 94 Sacramento 26 38 30 — 123 Brooklyn 29 3-point goals: Sacramento 10-25 (Hield 3-6, Bogdanovic 3-6, Jackson 2-3, Ferrell 1-1, Fox 1-2, Bjelica 0-1, Mason 0-1, Bagley III 0-2, Shumpert 0-3), Brooklyn 13-35 (Russell 7-13, Harris 3-4, Graham 1-2, Dinwiddie 1-5, Carroll 1-5, Allen 0-1, Kurucs 0-2, Hollis-Jefferson 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 37 (Hield 7), Brooklyn 56 (Davis 16). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Bogdanovic 11), Brooklyn 25 (Russell 8). Total fouls: Sacramento 20, Brooklyn 15. A: 14,233 (17,732).

Chicago: Hutchison 2-3 3-4 8, Markkanen 5-11 0-0 13, Lopez 4-9 0-0 8, Dunn 5-10 2-2 13, LaVine 9-16 4-6 25, Parker 2-5 4-4 10, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 6-10 0-0 15, Arcidiacono 1-3 0-0 3, Harrison 1-2 0-0 3, Blakeney 0-2 1-2 1, Selden 1-5 3-4 5. Totals 36-76 17-22 104. Cleveland: Hood 1-8 2-2 4, Osman 3-7 1-2 8, Zizic 4-7 5-6 13, Sexton 7-17 2-3 18, Burks 1-7 1-1 3, Adel 0-0 0-0 0, Blossomgame 3-8 1-2 7, Frye 3-4 1-2 9, Dellavedova 1-6 1-2 3, Payne 4-11 2-4 11, Clarkson 4-12 4-5 12. Totals 31-87 20-29 88. Chicago 31 17 28 28 — 104 Cleveland 18 24 25 21 — 88 3-point goals: Chicago 15-30 (Markkanen 3-5, LaVine 3-6, Portis 3-6, Parker 2-3, Dunn 1-1, Hutchison 1-1, Harrison 1-2, Arcidiacono 1-3, Lopez 0-1, Selden 0-2), Cleveland 6-27 (Frye 2-2, Sexton 2-6, Osman 1-4, Payne 1-5, Hood 0-2, Dellavedova 0-3, Clarkson 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 50 (Lopez, Hutchison 9), Cleveland 38 (Zizic 9). Assists: Chicago 24 (Dunn 9), Cleveland 16 (Clarkson 4). Total fouls: Chicago 26, Cleveland 18. Technicals: Portis. A: 19,432 (20,562).

Bucks 116, Mavericks 106

Thunder 127, Knicks 109

Dallas: Matthews 6-14 0-0 15, Barnes 4-15 0-2 8, Jordan 6-11 3-6 15, Doncic 6-17 4-5 18, Brunson 6-15 2-2 16, Finney-Smith 5-8 0-0 13, Powell 2-5 0-0 4, Kleber 3-8 0-0 8, Harris 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 41-99 10-17 106. Milwaukee: Middleton 6-18 0-0 13, G.Antetokounmpo 10-20 10-12 31, Lopez 6-10 0-0 16, Bledsoe 8-16 4-4 21, Brogdon 6-14 6-6 19, Ilyasova 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 0-1 0-0 0, Maker 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 2-5 0-0 5, Snell 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 4-4 0-0 11. Totals 42-91 20-22 116. 26 33 25 22 — 106 Dallas 35 22 35 24 — 116 Milwaukee 3-point goals: Dallas 14-40 (Finney-Smith 3-5, Matthews 3-8, Brunson 2-3, Harris 2-4, Doncic 2-5, Kleber 2-6, Powell 0-1, Barnes 0-8), Milwaukee 12-32 (Lopez 4-7, Brown 3-3, Hill 1-2, Brogdon 1-2, G.Antetokounmpo 1-2, Bledsoe 1-7, Middleton 1-7, Snell 0-1, Ilyasova 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 48 (Jordan 15), Milwaukee 51 (G.Antetokounmpo 15). Assists: Dallas 24 (Doncic 10), Milwaukee 21 (Bledsoe, G.Antetokounmpo 5). Total fouls: Dallas 19, Milwaukee 19. Technicals: Powell 2. Ejected: Powell. A: 17,963 (17,500).

Oklahoma City: George 9-18 9-9 31, Grant 6-9 3-5 16, Adams 5-8 0-0 10, Westbrook 6-12 4-5 17, Ferguson 3-5 0-0 9, Nader 6-9 2-3 16, Noel 3-5 0-0 6, Patterson 1-2 0-0 2, Schroder 5-12 3-3 17, Diallo 1-2 1-2 3, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-83 22-27 127. New York: Knox 3-8 0-1 8, Vonleh 3-6 4-7 10, Kornet 1-4 0-0 2, Mudiay 6-11 2-2 14, Hardaway Jr. 7-14 5-6 23, Hezonja 2-5 1-2 5, Robinson 4-4 0-1 8, Kanter 5-11 1-1 11, Ntilikina 4-12 0-0 9, Trier 3-8 10-10 16, Dotson 1-4 1-2 3. Totals 39-87 24-32 109. 34 36 24 — 127 Oklahoma City 33 New York 16 31 35 27 — 109 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 15-29 (Schroder 4-7, George 4-9, Ferguson 3-5, Nader 2-3, Grant 1-2, Westbrook 1-2, Patterson 0-1), New York 7-23 (Hardaway Jr. 4-9, Knox 2-3, Ntilikina 1-3, Vonleh 0-1, Kanter 0-1, Trier 0-1, Kornet 0-1, Mudiay 0-2, Dotson 0-2). Fouled out: Robinson. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 49 (Westbrook 10), New York 36 (Robinson, Trier 6). Assists: Oklahoma City 26 (Westbrook 9), New York 25 (Trier 8). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 31, New York 23. Technicals: New York coach David Fizdale, Trier. A: 19,493 (19,812).

Wizards 101, Pistons 87 Detroit: Bullock 4-11 2-2 12, Griffin 9-16 7-11 29, Pachulia 2-3 0-0 4, Jackson 3-11 0-0 7, Brown 2-10 0-0 4, Johnson 2-5 0-0 4, Leuer 0-1 0-0 0, Galloway 3-5 0-0 8, Calderon 2-2 2-2 7, Lucas 0-1 2-2 2, Kennard 2-8 1-1 5, Thomas 2-4 0-0 5, Robinson III 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-77 14-18 87. Washington: Ariza 7-13 4-4 20, Green 5-11 1-1 11, Bryant 5-9 1-2 11, Satoransky 4-8 2-3 10, Beal 4-12 7-8 16, Brown Jr. 0-0 0-0 0, Porter Jr. 7-15 1-1 19, Dekker 4-6 2-2 11, Mahinmi 0-3 2-2 2, Payton II 0-0 0-0 0, Randle 0-1 1-4 1, McRae 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 21-27 101. Detroit 17 17 30 23 — 87 Washington 29 21 31 20 — 101 3-point goals: Detroit 11-34 (Griffin 4-7, Galloway 2-4, Bullock 2-7, Calderon 1-1, Thomas 1-2, Jackson 1-5, Lucas 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Brown 0-2, Kennard 0-4), Washington 8-23 (Porter Jr. 4-6, Ariza 2-5, Dekker 1-2, Beal 1-3, Mahinmi 0-1, Randle 0-1, Satoransky 0-1, Green 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 40 (Griffin 9), Washington 45 (Bryant, Ariza 12). Assists: Detroit 22 (Bullock, Brown, Calderon, Griffin 4), Washington 24 (Satoransky 8). Total fouls: Detroit 21, Washington 18. Technicals: Griffin, Mahinmi. A: 16,229 (20,356).

Magic 122, Hawks 103 Orlando: Simmons 3-6 1-1 7, Isaac 4-8 0-0 8, Vucevic 12-23 4-4 29, Augustin 4-8 3-3 15, Fournier 9-18 8-9 29, Iwundu 0-0 0-0 0, Martin 3-5 0-0 8, Bamba 3-3 2-2 8, Briscoe 1-5 0-1 2, Ross 7-15 1-1 16. Totals 46-91 19-21 122. Atlanta: Prince 4-10 0-0 9, Collins 5-12 3-6 14, Dedmon 8-14 3-3 24, Young 8-13 5-6 21, Bembry 5-11 1-1 11, Spellman 0-1 0-0 0, Len 1-7 0-2 2, Lin 5-9 4-5 15, Carter 0-2 0-0 0, Dorsey 2-3 0-0 5, Hamilton 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-86 16-23 103. 28 — Orlando 32 31 31 122 Atlanta 26 21 25 — 103 31 3-point goals: Orlando 11-29 (Augustin 4-6, Fournier 3-6, Martin 2-3, Vucevic 1-3, Ross 1-7, Simmons 0-2, Isaac 0-2), Atlanta 9-30 (Dedmon 5-7, Dorsey 1-1, Collins 1-3, Lin 1-3, Prince 1-5, Carter 0-1, Spellman 0-1, Bembry 0-3, Len 0-3, Young 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 45 (Vucevic 14), Atlanta 44 (Collins 10). Assists: Orlando 29 (Fournier, Ross 7), Atlanta 23 (Bembry 7). Total fouls: Orlando 22, Atlanta 24. Technicals: Atlanta (Defensive three second) 2. A: 16,611 (18,118).

Trail Blazers 109, Jazz 104 Portland: Harkless 3-3 0-0 6, Aminu 4-6 0-0 8, Nurkic 8-17 6-8 22, Lillard 10-20 5-6 26, McCollum 6-17 0-1 14, Layman 5-9 0-0 12, Collins 0-4 0-0 0, Leonard 3-4 0-0 8, Curry 1-2 0-0 3, Turner 5-8 0-0 10. Totals 45-90 11-15 109. Utah: Ingles 1-7 0-0 2, Crowder 6-14 0-0 15, Favors 3-7 6-6 12, Mitchell 12-28 10-12 36, O’Neale 4-9 2-3 11, Niang 0-2 0-0 0, Gobert 4-10 2-4 10, Rubio 3-6 5-6 12, Korver 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 36-91 25-31 104. Portland 29 39 26 — 15 109 Utah 28 23 28 25 — 104 3-point goals: Portland 8-18 (Leonard 2-2, Layman 2-3, McCollum 2-4, Curry 1-1, Lillard 1-5, Collins 0-1, Aminu 0-2), Utah 7-33 (Crowder 3-9, Mitchell 2-8, O’Neale 1-2, Rubio 1-3, Niang 0-1, Favors 0-2, Ingles 0-3, Korver 0-5). Fouled out: Nurkic. Rebounds: Portland 44 (Lillard, Nurkic, Turner 8), Utah 48 (Gobert 13). Assists: Portland 30 (Lillard 8), Utah 21 (Ingles 6). Total fouls: Portland 22, Utah 19. Technicals: Turner, Aminu, Crowder, Gobert. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Warriors 130, Lakers 111 Golden State: Durant 8-13 3-4 20, Green 1-4 3-4 5, Cousins 2-9 4-5 8, Curry 3-12 3-3 11, Thompson 17-20 0-0 44, McKinnie 3-8 0-2 8, Bell 1-5 0-0 2, Looney 4-8 0-0 8, Jerebko 4-5 1-1 9, Livingston 2-3 0-0 4, Cook 2-8 0-0 5, Iguodala 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 50-98 14-19 130. LA Lakers: Hart 2-2 0-0 6, Kuzma 7-18 2-2 16, Chandler 0-1 1-2 1, Ingram 7-16 2-3 17, Caldwell-Pope 1-5 2-2 4, Mykhailiuk 2-4 0-0 5, Beasley 7-8 1-2 15, McGee 4-8 2-4 10, Zubac 7-8 4-4 18, Wagner 2-5 1-3 5, Caruso 2-3 1-4 6, Stephenson 1-5 4-8 6, Bonga 0-1 2-4 2. Totals 42-84 22-38 111. Golden State 29 36 45 20 — 130 LA Lakers 24 31 25 31 — 111 3-Point Goals: Golden State 16-37 (Thompson 10-11, McKinnie 2-5, Curry 2-10, Durant 1-2, Cook 1-4, Jerebko 0-1, Cousins 0-2, Green 0-2), LA Lakers 5-20 (Hart 2-2, Ingram 1-1, Caruso 1-1, Mykhailiuk 1-2, McGee 0-1, Bonga 0-1, Stephenson 0-2, Caldwell-Pope 0-2, Wagner 0-3, Kuzma 0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Golden State 50 (Cousins 9), LA Lakers 42 (McGee 9). Assists: Golden State 41 (Curry 12), LA Lakers 20 (Stephenson 5). Total Fouls: Golden State 27, LA Lakers 19. A: 18,997 (18,997).

Scoring leaders Player James Harden Stephen Curry Anthony Davis Kevin Durant Kawhi Leonard LeBron James Joel Embiid Paul George Giannis Antetokounmpo Damian Lillard Blake Griffin Kemba Walker Bradley Beal Devin Booker Kyrie Irving Zach LaVine Karl-Anthony Towns Donovan Mitchell

Team HOU GSW NOP GSW TOR LAL PHI OKC MIL POR DET CHA WAS PHX BOS CHI MIN UTA

GP 43 35 41 46 36 34 45 45 43 48 44 46 46 35 42 41 46 44

PTS 35.7 29.8 29.3 28.1 27.6 27.3 27.1 26.8 26.5 26.1 26 25 24.7 24.5 23.5 22.9 22.4 22

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Auburn....................... 7................S CAROLINA KENTUCKY ................6.5 ............Mississippi St BALL ST...................... 9.................Miami-Ohio BUTLER ...................... 1.....................Villanova OHIO U ....................... 6.................W Michigan E MICHIGAN ..............1.5...........Bowling Green AKRON ....................... 6.................. C Michigan Toledo .......................2.5 .................... KENT ST FLORIDA ST...............5.5 ....................Clemson KANSAS ST................. 1.................. Texas Tech GEORGIA TECH..........PK............... Notre Dame MICHIGAN ................12.5.................Minnesota Buffalo ......................8.5 ..............NO ILLINOIS S FLORIDA.................3.5 ..................Wichita St FLORIDA...................10.5 ............... Texas A&M VIRGINIA ................... 24...............Wake Forest Duke.......................... 12..............PITTSBURGH NORTHWESTERN ......PK.......................Indiana ALABAMA................... 1.................. Mississippi Boise St .....................3.5 ................ AIR FORCE UNLV..........................4.5 .............. New Mexico FRESNO ST................8.5 ............. San Diego St NIAGARA ...................3.5 ................. St. Peter’s NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog CAPITALS ..........-$140/+$120 ...............Sharks SENATORS..........-$110/-$110 .............. Coyotes Islanders ...........-$140/+$120 ...BLACKHAWKS OILERS ..............-$160/+$140 .........Red Wings FLAMES............. -$175/+$155.........Hurricanes Grand Salami: Over/under 31.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL | American League NEW YORK — Acquired 2B Shed Long and a competitive balance Round A pick in the 2019 MLB draft from Cincinnati for RHP Sonny Gray and LHP Reiver Sanmartin. Traded 2B Shed Long to Seattle for OF Josh Stowers. SEATTLE — Designated INF/OF Kaleb Cowart for assignment. National League ARIZONA — Agreed to terms with INF Wilmer Flores on a one-year contract. Designated LHP Jared Miller for assignment. CINCINNATI — Agreed to terms with RHP Sonny Gray on a four-year contract. Frontier League EVANSVILLE — Signed OF Hunter Cullen to a contract extension. GRIZZLIES — Signed INF Dom Golubiewski. JOLIET — Signed RHP Daren Osby to a contract extension. BASKETBALL | NBA NBA — Fined Boston G Marcus Smart $35,000 for aggressively pursuing an opponent in an attempt to escalate a physical altercation and failing to leave the court in a timely manner following his ejection during a Jan. 19 game at Atlanta. WASHINGTON — Signed G Gary Payton II to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL | National Football League CHICAGO — Named Ted Monachino senior defensive assistant and outside linebackers coach. Monachino will be reunited with new Bears defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano after coaching together in two previous stops with the Indianapolis Colts (2016-17) and Baltimore Ravens (2010-11). NEW ORLEANS — Signed QB J.T. Barrett, DB Chris Campbell, DB J.T. Gray, DT Tomasi Laulie, LB Darnell Sankey and TE Nate Wozniak to reserve/future contracts. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG — Re-signed DE Jackson Jeffcoat to a two-year contract extension. Alliance of American Football SAN DIEGO — Traded TE Darryl Richardson to Memphis for RB Jahad Thomas. HOCKEY | National Hockey League ANAHEIM — Reassigned Cs Sam Carrick and Justin Kloos to San Diego (AHL). CAROLINA — Agreed to terms with F Teuvo Teravainen on a five-year contract extension through the 2023-24 season. LOS ANGELES — Assigned F Matt Luff to Ontario (AHL). American Hockey League BAKERSFIELD — Announced D Caleb Jones was assigned to the team by Edmonton. SOCCER | Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Signed F Antonio Bustamante to a homegrown contract. COLLEGE FLORIDA — Named Torrian Gray cornerbacks coach. INDIANA — Named Kalen DeBoer associate head football coach and offensive coordinator. NEW MEXICO — Named Jon NewmanGonchar volleyball coach. RUTGERS — Named Andy Buh defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. TENNESSEE — Promoted Arthur Smith to offensive coordinator.

BASEBALL Cardinals spring training Date Saturday 2/23 Sunday 2/24 Monday 2/25 Tuesday 2/26 Wednesday 2/27 Thursday 2/28 Friday 3/1 Saturday 3/2 Sunday 3/3 Monday 3/4 Tuesday 3/5 Wednesday 3/6 Friday 3/8

Opponent at Marlins vs. Nationals vs. Tigers (SS) at Nationals vs. Braves vs. Mets at Astros vs. Marlins vs. Mets at Tigers at Phillies at Yankees SS vs. Nationals SS at Astros Saturday 3/9 vs. Astros Sunday 3/10 at Mets Monday 3/11 vs. Nationals Tuesday 3/12 at Braves Wednesday 3/13 at Marlins Thursday 3/14 vs. Mets Friday 3/15 SS at Astros SS vs. Astros Saturday 3/16 at Nationals Sunday 3/17 at Marlins Monday 3/18 vs. Phillies Wednesday 3/20 vs. Marlins SS vs. Yankees Thursday 3/21 SS at Nationals Friday 3/22 at Mets (SS) Saturday 3/23 at Nationals Sunday 3/24 vs. Marlins Monday 3/25 at Memphis

Time 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 12:05 12:10 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:05 5:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 12:05 5:35 12:10 12:05 12:05 6:05

COLLEGES Area basketball schedule TUESDAY W: STL Pharmacy at Park, 5:30 p.m. W: Principia at Greenville, 5:30 p.m. W: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 5:30 p.m. W: Missouri Baptist at Stephens, 7 p.m. M: Principia at Greenville, 7:30 p.m. M: STL Pharmacy at Park, 7:30 p.m. M: William Woods at Harris-Stowe, 7:30 p.m.

Men’s basketball scores EAST Baylor 85, West Virginia 73 Bryant 76, St. Francis (Pa.) 67 Creighton 91, Georgetown 87 Fairleigh Dickinson 87, Mount St. Mary’s 69 Marist 62, Manhattan 46 Robert Morris 70, CCSU 59 Rutgers 76, Nebraska 69 Sacred Heart 62, Wagner 38 St. Francis Brooklyn 79, LIU Brooklyn 70 SOUTH Alcorn St. 74, Ark.-Pine Bluff 69 Bethune-Cookman 89, Md.-Eastern Shore 68 Florida A&M 60, Delaware St. 47 Florida Gulf Coast 87, Stetson 65 Harvard 84, Howard 71 Liberty 72, North Alabama 47 Lipscomb 86, Kennesaw St. 57 NC A&T 80, Coppin St. 71 NC Central 92, Morgan St. 64 NJIT 76, North Florida 72 Norfolk St. 74, SC State 69 North Carolina 103, Virginia Tech 82 Old Dominion 76, Charlotte 70 Presbyterian 68, SC-Upstate 59 Radford 72, Longwood 59 Southern U. 80, MVSU 56 W. Kentucky 68, Marshall 59 Winthrop 66, UNC-Asheville 45

MIDWEST Kansas 80, Iowa St. 76 Michigan St. 69, Maryland 55 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 83, Grambling St. 66 Texas Southern 75, Jackson St. 65 FAR WEST N. Colorado 77, Idaho St. 53 MEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Tennessee (16-1) idle. Next: at Vanderbilt, Wednesday. 2. Duke (15-2) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tue. 3. Virginia (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Tuesday. 4. Gonzaga (18-2) idle. Next: at Santa Clara, Thursday. 5. Michigan (17-1) idle. Next: vs. Minnesota, Tuesday. 6. Michigan State (17-2) beat No. 13 Maryland 69-55. Next: at No. 19 Iowa, Thursday. 7. Nevada (18-1) idle. Next: vs. Colorado State, Wednesday. 8. Kentucky (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 22 Mississippi State, Tuesday. 9. Kansas (16-3) beat No. 24 Iowa State 80-76. Next: at No. 8 Kentucky, Saturday. 10. Virginia Tech (15-3) lost to No. 11 North Carolina 103-82. Next: vs. Syracuse, Saturday. 11. North Carolina (15-4) beat No. 10 Virginia Tech 103-82. Next: at Georgia Tech, Tuesday, Jan. 29. 12. Marquette (16-3) idle. Next: vs. DePaul, Wednesday. 13. Maryland (16-4) lost to No. 6 Michigan State 69-55. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. 14. Buffalo (17-1) idle. Next: at Northern Illinois, Tuesday. 14. Texas Tech (15-3) idle. Next: at Kansas State, Tuesday. 16. Auburn (13-4) idle. Next: at South Carolina, Tuesday. 17. Houston (18-1) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday. 18. Villanova (14-4) idle. Next: at Butler, Tue. 19. Iowa (16-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 6 Michigan State, Thursday. 20. Mississippi (14-3) idle. Next: at Alabama, Tuesday. 21. N.C. State (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 23 Louisville, Thursday. 22. Mississippi State (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 8 Kentucky, Tuesday. 23. Louisville (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 N.C. State, Thursday. 24. Iowa State (14-5) lost to No. 9 Kansas 80-76. Next: at No. 20 Mississippi, Saturday. 25. LSU (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Georgia, Wed. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared

1. Notre Dame (18-1) idle. Next: at Tennessee, Thursday. 2. Baylor (15-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 20 Iowa State, Wednesday. 3. UConn (16-1) idle. Next: vs. SMU, Wed. 4. Louisville (17-1) idle. Next: at No. 22 Florida State, Thursday. 5. Oregon (17-1) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday. 6. Stanford (16-1) idle. Next: at Colorado, Fri. 7. Mississippi State (17-1) idle. Next: at Florida, Thursday. 8. N.C. State (18-0) idle. Next: vs. Clemson, Thursday. 9. Oregon State (15-3) idle. Next: at Washington, Friday. 10. Marquette (16-3) idle. Next: at Xavier, Fri. 11. Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Thursday. 12. Texas (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Kansas, Wed. 13. Syracuse (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Miami, Wed. 14. Rutgers (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 17 Iowa, Wednesday. 15. Kentucky (16-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Missouri, Thursday. 16. Arizona State (13-5) idle. Next: vs. UCLA, Friday. 17. Iowa (14-4) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Rutgers, Wednesday. 18. Gonzaga (17-2) idle. Next: vs. San Francisco, Thursday. 19. South Carolina (13-5) beat No. 25 Missouri 79-65. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Monday. 20. Iowa State (14-4) idle. Next: at No. 2 Baylor, Wednesday. 21. Utah (16-1) idle. Next: vs. California, Fri. 22. Florida State (16-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Louisville, Thursday. 23. Michigan State (13-5) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Thursday. 24. Texas A&M (14-4) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. 25. Missouri (15-5) lost to No. 19 South Carolina 79-65. Next: at No. 15 Kentucky, Thursday.

AP women’s top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 20, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Notre Dame (22) 18-1 735 1 2. Baylor (7) 15-1 713 2 3. UConn (1) 16-1 703 2 4. Louisville 17-1 651 4 5. Oregon 17-1 623 5 6. Stanford 16-1 608 6 7. Mississippi St. 17-1 578 7 8. N.C. State 18-0 549 8 9. Oregon St. 15-3 472 10 10. Marquette 16-3 460 14 11. Maryland 16-2 442 9 15-3 376 11 12. Texas 13. Syracuse 15-3 358 12 14. Rutgers 15-3 343 20 15. Kentucky 16-3 331 16 16. Arizona St. 13-5 265 19 17. Iowa 14-4 261 22 18. Gonzaga 17-2 258 13 19. South Carolina 12-5 245 15 20. Iowa St. 14-4 145 18 21. Utah 16-1 138 — 22. Florida St. 16-2 134 — 23. Michigan St. 13-5 109 17 24. Texas A&M 14-4 45 — 25. Missouri 43 15-4 — Others: BYU 32, Tennessee 23, Minnesota 21, Drake 20, UCF 20, Clemson 11, South Dakota 11, California 9, DePaul 8, Miami 6, Boise St. 3, Indiana 1.

TENNIS Australian Open results Tuesday’s early results Seedings in parentheses: Men’s Singles • Quarterfinal Stefanos Tsitsipas (14), Greece, def. Roberto Bautista-Agut (22), Spain, 7-5, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (2)..

Monday’s complete results Men’s Singles • Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Daniil Medvedev (15), Russia, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-3. Kei Nishikori (8), Japan, def. Pablo Carreno-Busta (23), Spain, 6-7 (8), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (8). Milos Raonic (16), Canada, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 6-1, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Lucas Pouille (28), France, def. Borna Coric (11), Croatia, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5, 7-6 (2). Women’s Singles • Fourth Round Serena Williams (16), United States, def. Simona Halep (1), Romania, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4. Karolina Pliskova (7), Czech Republic, def. Garbine Muguruza (18), Spain, 6-3, 6-1. Naomi Osaka (4), Japan, def. Anastasija Sevastova (13), Latvia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Elina Svitolina (6), Ukraine, def. Madison Keys (17), United States, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1.

SOCCER English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 23 19 3 1 54 13 60 Man City 23 18 2 3 62 17 56 Tottenham 23 17 0 6 48 23 51 23 14 5 4 40 19 47 Chelsea Arsenal 23 13 5 5 48 32 44 Man United 23 13 5 5 46 33 44 Watford 23 9 6 8 32 32 33 Wolverhampton 23 9 5 9 27 31 32 23 9 4 10 29 29 31 Leicester West Ham 23 9 4 10 30 34 31 Everton 23 8 6 9 34 33 30 Bournemouth 23 9 3 11 33 42 30 Brighton 23 7 5 11 25 32 26 Crystal Palace 23 6 4 13 23 32 22 Southampton 23 5 7 11 25 40 22 Burnley 23 6 4 13 23 43 22 Newcastle 23 5 6 12 19 31 21 23 5 4 14 19 44 19 Cardiff Fulham 23 3 5 15 21 51 14 Huddersfield 23 2 5 16 13 40 11 Tuesday Arsenal vs. Cardiff, 1:45 p.m. Wolverhampton vs. West Ham, 1:45 p.m. Fulham vs. Brighton, 1:45 p.m. Huddersfield vs. Everton, 1:45 p.m. Newcastle vs. Man City, 2 p.m. Man United vs. Burnley, 2 p.m. Wednesday Southampton vs. Crystal Palace, 1:45 p.m. Bournemouth vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m. Liverpool vs. Leicester, 2 p.m. Tottenham vs. Watford, 2 p.m.


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MONDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

Pky. South 11 9 18 24 62 Pky. Central 13 13 14 20 60 PS (6-10): Skidmore 20, Sommer 15, Stone 10, Esker 8, Ellebrecht 7, Rollins 2. FG 17 (5), FT 23-25. PC (11-5): Ball 21, D. Harris 18, Littlejohn 5, Meier 5, Wessel 5, D. Harris 2, Roberts 2, Tillis 2. FG 17 (5), FT 21-27. Ritenour 4 16 6 12 38 DuBourg 18 11 10 13 52 R (3-14): Sanders 13, Mayberry 10, Corley 9, Clarke 4, Jackson 2. FG 15 (5), FT 3-9. D (5-13): Evans 15, Johnson 13, Shaw 7, Weekly 6, Holt 5, Brickhouse 4, Davis 2. FG 17 (3), FT 15-20. Trico 15 27 13 10 65 Red Bud 12 12 6 16 46 T (4-11): Compton 18, Naile 17, Wilson 11, W. Lodge 7, Smith 6, G. Thies 3, Kranawetter 2, Levan 1. FG 25 (3), FT 12-19. R (1-18): Kueker 12, Birkner 10, Wiegard 7, Amman 6, Grohman 4, Van Dorn 3, Ferrell 2, Malott 2. FG 16 (3), FT 11-15. Haz. Central 21 9 8 23 61 Pky. West 9 12 5 21 47 H (10-5): Scarbrough 17, Ervin 15, Garrett Jr 10, Roberts 9, Banks 4, Gowins 2, Jones 2, J. Reed 2. FG 25 (5), FT 6-13. P (1-13): Miller 15, Loaney 12, Geraghty 9, Bell 5, Gansen 5, Newman 1. FG 17 (5), FT 8-13. Duchesne 16 14 13 11 54 Luth. North 16 13 15 12 56 D (8-11): O’Brien 28, Suellentrop 19, Schwendemann 4, Gancarz 2, M. DeGuentz 1. FG 20 (6), FT 8-11. L (7-8): Robinson 12, Patterson 11, Williams 11, Washington 8, Buford 6, J. Smith 6, Harris 2. FG 22 (3), FT 9-17. U. City 14 14 15 16 59 Cahokia 18 14 13 8 53 U (9-8): Hampton 13, Abbey 12, Ming 10, Holland 9, Robinson 7, Thomas 6, Dotson 2. FG 17 (6), FT 19-28. C (2-15): Johnson 20, Baker 15, Brown 13, Harrison 4, Rogers 1. FG 24 (3), FT 2-5. Cleveland 10 2 14 2 28 De Smet 33 24 17 12 86 C (2-11): Gray 10, Perry 6, Haynes 5, D. McGee 4, Jackson 2, Russell 1. FG 11 (3), FT 3-6. D (15-3): Skoff 19, Keita 16, Asleson 10, Walker 9, Brussels 6, Goodwin 6, Neidenbach 6, Olson 6, Redmond 4, Western 3, Lane 1. FG 32 (9), FT 13-22. Pky. North 17 25 17 24 83 Sikeston 26 26 29 23 104 P (3-12): Howell 18, Mitchell 17, Kapetanovic 15, Taylor 9, Petty 8, Wilson 8, May 4, Powell 4. FG 30 (9), FT 14-21. S (7-0): O. Long 28, Jenkins 27, Howard 17, Jones 15, N. Hanson 8, LongLong 8, Ranson 1. FG 40 (6), FT 18-21. Haz. East 9 8 16 13 46 SLUH 6 6 31 9 52 H (6-10): Fultz 14, Dounds 9, Brown 5, Lowe 5, Shepherd 5, Wilson 4, Foster 3, Lane 1. FG 17 (5), FT 7-11. S (3-10): Cooper 24, Johnston 13, McClain 6, Bond 4, Tice 2, Wallace-Hughes 2, Lally 1. FG 16 (4), FT 16-21. Luth. South 18 12 14 20 64 Summit 10 9 8 21 48 L (10-5): Wagner 23, Yaeger 16, J. Reis 8, A. Reis 8, Lawson 7, Muhlhauser 2. FG 20 (13), FT 11-13. S (9-6): Coughlin 13, Garnatz 6, Jennings 6, J. Thomas 6, Humphrey 4, Kubee 4, Broten 3, Durell 3, Vaughan 2, Bell 1. FG 17 (4), FT 10-12. Steeleville 7 8 12 13 40 A. Marquette 27 18 18 14 77 S (11-8): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. A (19-3): Cox 18, Rice 12, Thompson 10, Hall 8, Terry 8, Harris 6, Hartrich 5, Hemann 3, McGee 3, Dixon 2, Hendricks 2. FG 30 (13), FT 4-6. Lafayette 18 12 8 11 49 Liberty 14 16 16 19 65 La (6-10): Campbell 11, Griffey 9, W. Tulloch 9, Schmitt 8, Stovall 7, Hewlett 3, RosenMcGinnis 2. FG 17 (5), FT 10-12. Li (12-3): Catchings 27, Lawson 16, Keller 11, McKeithen 9, Hauk 2. FG 24 (4), FT 13-17. MICDS 4 13 10 13 40 JohnBurroughs 11 16 10 20 57 M (9-7): J. Brooks 10, Spann 7, Roper 6, Mitchell-Day 5, Pronger 5, Nwamu 3, A. Wienstroer 3, S. Wienstroer 1. FG 12 (5), FT 11-19. J (9-5): Hardwick 27, D. Miller 20, B. Miller 6, Pittmann 4. FG 17 (3), FT 20-24. Bre. Central 9 14 16 8 65 Mater Dei 21 14 3 9 66 B (11-8): Wempe 19, Lopeker 10, S. Thomas 10, B. Thomas 8, Kampwerth 7, Haag 4, P. Jansen 4, Hamilton 3. FG 21 (3), FT 20-28. M (14-7): Goebel 17, Dant 14, Haake 11, Schadegg 9, Schuchman 8, Napovanice 5, Jasper 2. FG 22 (8), FT 14-20. FH North 19 11 15 19 67 Priory 14 17 15 18 77 F (2-12): Hople 24, Montgomery 16, Jones 11, Okoulatsongo 9, Lewis 4, Foster 3. FG 29 (6), FT 3-6. P (12-3): Ferrick 35, Kurz 16, Wilmsen 16, Kee 6, Spencer 4. FG 26 (5), FT 20-23. St. Louis Chr 11 18 14 15 58 Granite City 16 7 7 17 47 S (8-4): Nesbitt 16, Soll 11, Batchman 10, Makoi 9, Greene 8, Izemef 2, Musaka 2. FG 20 (3), FT 15-27. G (9-9): Mason 15, Moore 10, White 10, Jones 3, Tippitt 3, Baker 2, Hines 2, Watson 2. FG 18 (5), FT 6-11. Northwest-CH 4 11 15 3 33 Kirkwood 22 28 16 16 82 N (3-12): Davis 10, Luca 6, Mitchelle 5, Patient 4, Hahn 3, Lee 3, Watson 2. FG 13 (7), FT 0-1. K (11-5): Lay 15, Loyd 15, Massey 9, McDowell 8, Lien 7, Simmons 7, Evans 5, Lee 5, Phipps 4, Ferbet 3, Ferguson 3, Fortner 1. FG 30 (12), FT 10-20. Wright City 5 8 10 8 31 Hermann 20 18 20 8 66 W (3-10): Lucio 7, Seabaugh 6, Ebersohl 4, Lenoir 4, McRoberts 3, Simon 3, Pezold 2, Swaringen 2. FG 11 (3), FT 6-14. H (13-3): Anderson 21, Moeckli 14, Scheidegger 11, Ash 9, Hemeyer 4, Phillips 4, Holland 2, McKague 1. FG 23 (7), FT 13-23. Teutopolis 12 11 12 11 46 E. St. Louis 10 17 12 20 59 E (16-5): Robinson 17, Hargrove Jr. 11, T. Jones 9, Rice 8, Leflore 7, Anderson 4, Olivaria 3. FG 20 (5), FT 14-18. Mascoutah 7 8 4 6 25 Nashville 22 15 21 4 62 M (14-7): Bryant 7, Jowett 7, Green 5, Johnson 2, LaJoye 2, Seibert 2. FG 8 (2), FT 7-11.

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

GIRLS BASKETBALL • STRAFFORD 70, CARDINAL RITTER 51

N (21-2): Parker 22, Bultman 18, Harre 9, Anderson 6, Bergmann 3, Morris 2, Turner 2. FG 24 (9), FT 5-11. Alton 18 12 11 23 75 Soldan 8 15 22 19 71 A (14-7): Clay 24, Smith 19, Woods 17, J. Rivers 5, K. Rivers 4, Jones 2, Miller 2, Terrell 2. FG 27 (4), FT 17-25. S (12-7): Torey 20, J. Little 15, J. Little 14, Bishop 8, Hughes 6, Barnett 5, Martin 2, March 1. FG 22 (8), FT 19-26.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Fath.McGivney 12 4 9 10 35 Routt 20 20 17 6 63 F (16-9): Webb 17, Hoppes 7, Luehmann 3, McKee 3, Maller 2, Pendall 2, Traubitz 1. FG 13 (4), FT 5-8. Granite City 16 11 10 12 49 ME Lutheran 14 9 10 21 54 G (2-17): Wiehardt 15, Hurst 12, Reeves 9, Powell 6, Moore 5, Lange 2. FG 18 (3), FT 10-15. Lincoln Prep 12 10 16 12 50 Miller Career 13 14 8 18 53 M (10-5): A. Garrett 12, Seltzer 12, A. Garrett 8, R. Tally 7, Grayson 6, R. Tally 6, Rutlin 2. FG 19 (7), FT 8-12. North Greene 8 4 2 10 24 A. Marquette 23 11 13 7 54 A (17-7): Snipes 19, Fandrey 9, A. Williams 8, Neal 6, Nelson 5, Connors 4, Porter 3. FG 23 (3), FT 5-6. Strafford, MO 24 6 27 13 70 Ritter 17 2 11 21 51 R (9-3): Tomlin 18, Terry 17, Haynes 8, Wilson 4, Booker 2, McBride 2. FG 19 (6), FT 7-7. St. Pius X 20 14 14 6 54 Vashon 4 4 9 2 19 S (8-7): Agers 26, Baker 18, Johnson 7, Flanagan 2, Stetina 1. FG 21 (5), FT 7-18. Luth. South 15 17 15 19 66 Washington 5 7 7 14 33 L (12-3): Schelp 18, Pawlitz 16, Akerson 14, Heskett 12, Schmidt 4, Kassel 2. FG 20 (11), FT 15-20. W (0-14): Huxol 7, Kriebaum 6, Robinson 6, O’Bryant 4, Wang 4, Figas 2, Heien 2, Jacquin 2. FG 13 (2), FT 5-12. MICDS 9 11 12 2 34 JohnBurroughs 9 3 12 6 30 M (9-7): Harrell 9, Brooks 8, Pease 8, Small 4, Holmes 3, Gira 2. FG 12 (0), FT 10-14. Warrenton 10 11 8 7 36 Waynesville 7 0 11 8 26 Wr (7-8): Smith 10, Gerard 9, Frederick 6, Nelson 6, Payne 5. FG 11 (3), FT 11-16. Wy (3-2): Perry 18, Blake 3, Poinsette 3, Wright 2. FG 8 (5), FT 5-9. Auburn 8 9 18 12 47 Gillespie 16 10 7 4 37 A (3-3): Smith 27, Weaver 8, Divjak 5, Landers 5, Tanner 2. FG 18 (4), FT 7-19. G (9-15): Hayes 7, Taylor 7, Link 6, Mix 4, Niemeyer 4, Bertolino 3, Bires 2, Jarman 2, Schmidt 2. FG 15 (3), FT 4-5. Rosati-Kain 11 8 10 16 45 Orchard Farm 10 17 17 17 61 R (3-12): Cross 11, King 8, O’Connell 8, Bethany 7, Al-Baaj 3, Chatman 3, Emanuel 3, Sextro 2. FG 17 (5), FT 6-8. O (9-7): Hopkins 22, Dorsey 16, Hedges 8, Williams 8, Dahl 4, Montani 2, Runion 1. FG 20 (5), FT 16-26. Montgomery Co 11 6 13 27 57 Hermann 16 12 20 18 66 M (6-5): Henke 21, B. Oden 13, Prior 9, Finke 6, Johnson 6, P. Oden 2. FG 19 (4), FT 15-21. H (15-2): Erickson 23, Stiers 16, Winkelmann 11, Godat 7, Brune 4, Bickmeyer 3, Grosse 2. FG 20 (3), FT 23-29. New Haven 7 8 4 6 25 St. Clair 18 27 15 5 65 N (5-11): Overschmidt 6, Westermeyer 5, Munsinger 3, Rethemeyer 3, Wilson 3, Sidwell 2, Williams 2, Meyer 1. FG 10 (2), FT 3-8. S (10-5): Buscher 19, Sohn 12, Bursey 8, York 8, Machelett 7, Hinson 5, Arnold 3, M. Lowder 2, M. Lowder 1. FG 27 (5), FT 6-13. 20 15 22 12 69 Columbia Carlyle 10 6 11 2 29 Co (18-4): Henke 13, Touchette 13, Bonaldi 10, Wibbenmeyer 10, Jackson 7, Barthel 5, Kossina 5, Harrell 3, Khoury 3. FG 25 (3), FT 16-20. 17 12 12 5 46 Okawville New Athens 13 3 5 7 28 N (10-10): White 16, Deterding 4, Drake 4, Hager 2, Stewart 2. FG 8 (0), FT 12-16. Greenfield 12 8 8 14 42 Jerseyville 14 12 10 23 59 G (3-4): Schaaf 11, Vetter 9, Pohlman 6, Heavner 4, Walker 4, Foiles 3, Theivagt 3, Smith 1, Triplett 1. FG 15 (6), FT 6-16. J (16-6): Breden 17, Manns 14, Talley 11, Tuttle 8, Brown 4, S. Hudson 2, H. Hudson 2, Metzler 1. FG 23 (3), FT 10-21. Ursuline 10 7 15 10 42 Pacific 16 15 12 13 56 U (3-9): Scherzinger 12, LaMartina 11, Adrian 8, Effer 8, Hodge 3. FG 16 (4), FT 6-9. P (8-7): King 15, O’Neill 10, Brocato 8, Toney 8, Burrows 5, Harrison 5, Mueller 5. FG 19 (3), FT 15-22. Carlinville 11 10 2 22 45 Glenwood 6 13 21 25 65 C (18-3): Olroyd 24, Reels 7, Stewart 5, Tieman 4, Seal 2, Stayton 2, O’Dell 1. FG 14 (4), FT 13-25. G (1-4): Decker 20, Johnson 8, Joos 8, Black 6, Jenkins 6, Kaiser 6, Matthews 6, Pruitt 3, Schrage 2. FG 25 (10), FT 5-6. Mater Dei 23 19 10 12 64 Salem 9 11 12 7 39 M (18-5): Winkeler 28, Braundmeier 8, Lampe 6, Strieker 6, C. Toennies 6, Innes 4, L. Kramer 4, Albers 2. FG 26 (2), FT 10-15. S (2-20): Gillett 10, Bunnell 7, Harris 6, Jones 6, Allen 3, Kell 3, Harness 2, Quandt 2. FG 14 (3), FT 8-10. Chamois 9 12 8 8 37 Owensville 25 15 20 13 73 C: K. Keilholz 22, Wuelling 11, Slusser 4. FG 12 (4), FT 9-12. O (8-7): Diestelkamp 26, Miller 19, Finley 10, Angell 7, Skornia 5, Landolt 4, Elliot 2. FG 24 (8), FT 17-22. Hillsboro 7 10 11 3 31 Seckman 20 7 16 17 60 S (8-5): Parton 21, Mercer 8, Townsend 7, Critchlow 6, Harris 4, Lizenbee 4, Stephens 3, Wyman 3, Hake 2, Marsh 2. FG 18 (3), FT 21-42. 15 11 8 8 42 Pky. West Holt 15 11 4 13 43 P (3-14): T. Allgeyer 16, Reed 8, Swihart 7, Wolf 5, Thompson 4, Selm 2. FG 17 (5), FT 3-3. H (6-9): Green 12, Meyer 9, Adam 8, Tranor 8, Robinson 4, Dooley 2. FG 16 (5), FT 6-9.

GIRLS BASKETBALL • RANKINGS LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record Last week 1. Edwardsville....................................21-2 .............................1 2. Francis Howell Central ....................12-2 ............................ 2 3. Parkway Central............................. 11-4 ............................ 3 4. Parkway North................................12-3 ............................ 4 5. Hazelwood Central......................... 12-5 ............................ 5 6. O’Fallon ......................................... 18-5 ............................ 6 7. Kirkwood .........................................12-3 ............................ 7 8. Belleville East ................................ 15-9 ...........................— 9. Troy Buchanan ............................... 10-3 ............................ 9 10. Ladue ...........................................10-5 ...........................— SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record Last week 1. Incarnate Word ...............................14-1 .............................1 2. Greenville........................................22-1 ............................ 2 3. Cardinal Ritter .................................9-2 ............................ 3 4. Lutheran St. Charles .......................17-2 ............................ 4 5. Civic Memorial ............................... 21-5 ............................ 5 6. Lutheran North.............................. 11-4 ............................ 6 7. Union.............................................. 11-4 ............................ 7 8. Festus ............................................ 13-3 ...........................— 9. Columbia........................................ 17-4 ............................ 8 10. Metro ........................................... 13-5 ...........................—

Indians match state record with 102nd successive win BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

The Strafford High girls basketball team is not a machine after all. The Indians players, who have methodically rolled to three successive Class 3 state championships, have feelings and emotions, just like every other team in the state. “People may not know it, but we still get nervous before every game,” explained senior Madison Chittenden said. Added senior standout Hayley Frank, “And we still celebrate each win like it’s a big deal. Yes, winning is a way of life in Greene County. Strafford rolled to a landmark 7051 triumph over Cardinal Ritter on Monday in the Martin Luther King Showcase at Miller Career Academy. The Indians recorded their 102nd successive victory tying the Missouri state record set by Marshfield from 1987-1990. It is a safe bet that they will eclipse the mark on Thursday when they host Republic. Despite the long winning streak, which has stretched 1,096 days and 26,304 hours, the players don’t take their victories for granted. Every single one of the 102 wins has meaning. “It never gets old, it’s still a lot of fun,” Strafford coach Steve Frank said. “There’s so much effort put in by so many people to make this happen. Players, coaches, fans — because everyone is involved, it’s even more special.” Steve Frank, a former basketball standout at Clopton High in Clarksville, has been able to keep his team razor-sharp through all the pressures brought on by the winning streak. The Indians (20-0) last loss was a 55-53 setback to Marshfield on Jan. 21, 2016. Hayley Frank, a 6-foot-1 inch forward bound for Mizzou, is the ring-

40TH HERMANN TOURNAMENT First round New Haven (10-5) vs. St. Clair (6-9), 7:30 p.m. Warrenton (5-11) vs. St. James (8-7), 6 p.m. Chamois (0-1) vs. Montgomery County (4-6), 7:30 p.m. 57TH UNION INVITATIONAL First round Washington (3-12) vs. FZSouth (11-2), 5:30 p.m. Borgia (9-6) vs. Union (8-4), 7 p.m. 94TH BOWLING GREEN TOURNAMENT First round Silex vs. Bowling Green, 5:30 p.m. Winfield (6-10) vs. Elsberry (4-5), at 6:50 p.m. Louisiana vs. Van-Far, 5:30 p.m. Clopton (3-5) vs. North Callaway (12-3), 6:50 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Ste. Genevieve (7-4) at St. Vincent (9-5), 5 p.m. Metro (5-11) at McCluer S-Berkeley (5-9), 5:30 p.m. Gateway Academy at Maplewood-RH (8-8), 5:30 p.m. Mater Dei (13-7) at Madison (10-9-1), 6 p.m. Wesclin (10-12) at Staunton (7-9), 6 p.m. Belleville East (8-11) at Alton Marquette (18-3), 6 p.m. Whitfield (10-6) at Pattonville (7-9), 6 p.m. Jefferson (12-6) at Valle Catholic (6-4), 6 p.m. Gillespie (5-12) at Wood River (7-14), 6 p.m. Perryville (10-7) at Cape Central (5-1), 6 p.m. Marissa (14-2) at Lebanon (0-17), 6:15 p.m.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Strafford’s Hayley Frank (42) and Cardinal Ritter’s DeAnna Wilson battle for the opening tipoff during the MLK Showcase on Monday at Miller Career.

leader of this group. A three-time all-state performer and the reigning Gatorade Player of the Year, she had 29 points and 12 rebounds in Monday’s win despite missing 5 minutes and 16 seconds due to foul trouble. Frank said her team still celebrates wins, especially at home where the Indians hold pizza parties that morph into karaoke shows after triumphs in Strafford, which is just west of Springfield along I-44. “We know how to have fun,” Hayley Frank said. Chittenden added 13 points to the winning attack, but missed the final period with a shoulder injury. Kayley Frank, Hayley’s twin sister, added 12 points. Strafford used an 11-2 run over the first 2:38 of the third quarter to take control, 41-21. Ritter (9-3) managed to stay within striking distance during the first half behind the shooting of Brit’Nee Terry, who led her team with 17 points. But Kayley Frank hit back-to-back jumpers at the outset of the third period to kick-start the blitz. Hayley

Frank added a baseline jumper and Chittenden followed with a driving layup for a 38-21 lead. Taylor Dormann’s triple ended the blitz. “Reaching 102 (wins), it’s pretty crazy,” Hayley Frank said. “Starting high school, I never thought anything like that would happen. But it’s just a testament to the investment, the time, the dedication that everyone’s had. From coming in early in the morning to going to work every single game and practice. It shows that it all pays off.” The Indians start four seniors — the two Frank’s, Crittenden and Kyndall Compton. Junior Logan Jones rounds out the power-packed lineup. “Sometimes, I think we take winning for granted,” Jones said. “But when you see this, and you think about 102 (wins), it’s a good feeling. It makes it worth while.” The Indians have set a standard that will be hard to duplicate. “They’re what every team wants to be,” Ritter coach Tony Condra said. “Playing them, it’s a situation where you really can’t lose. You gain just by being in the game.”

BOYS BASKETBALL • LIBERTY 65, LAFAYETTE 49

Eagles clamp down defensively in Parkway West Showdown win BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

B A L LW I N • Chip Sodemann

reached deep into his bag of tricks Monday night and found what he needed — a 2-3 zone. The Liberty boys basketball coach, Sodemann was looking for something that could keep senior forward Corye Keller and junior guard Tommy Hilgartner on the court after both went into halftime with three fouls. “We were in some foul trouble and we’d been working on it a little bit,” Sodemann said. “We felt at that point that switching to the zone might have been the best move.” It was. Liberty scored the first seven points of the third quarter and never looked back as it beat Lafayette 6549 in the first round of the Parkway West Showdown. The No. 4 seed, Liberty (12-3) advanced to play top seed De Smet (153) at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. “I think it’ll be a game that shows us where our hearts (are) at,” Liberty junior guard Jayce Catchings said. “I have confidence in my team. I think it’ll be a good game.” Among the area’s top scorers, Catchings reached his average of 27 points as he led the Eagles to the victory. The 6-foot-2 smooth guard slashed his way to the basket and finished through contact. He showcased his range with a pair of 3-pointers, too. But even as Catchings was putting the ball in the basket in the first half, Liberty was unable to shake loose from Lafayette (6-10). The Lancers got contributions up and down their lineup as they led 1816 after the first quarter and tied the

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Valmeyer (8-13) at Steeleville (11-7), 6:15 p.m. Marion (12-9) at Centralia (Ill.) (7-10), 6:15 p.m. Gateway Science (2-14) vs. Roosevelt (9-7), 6:15 p.m. Columbia (12-6) at Salem (11-9), 6:15 p.m. Tolton (12-2) at O’Fallon Christian (11-7), 6:45 p.m. Hillsboro (14-4) at Oakville (2-12), 7 p.m. Fox (7-11) at Pacific (6-9), 7 p.m. Webster Groves (13-0) at Ladue (10-5), 7 p.m. Festus (11-5) at Farmington (13-2), 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (5-9) at FH Central (9-5), 7 p.m. Cahokia (2-14) at St. Louis U. High (2-10), 7 p.m. Brentwood (5-5) at Valley Park (9-4), 7 p.m. Francis Howell (14-2) at Holt (9-7), 7 p.m. Seckman (2-12) at Marquette (12-4), 7 p.m. Crossroads (0-10) at Hancock (7-4), 7 p.m. Clayton (6-8) at Westminster (9-6), 7 p.m. McCluer North (14-2) at Trinity (14-1), 7:15 p.m. Spr. Lutheran at Carlinville (6-13), 7:30 p.m. Columbia (12-6) at Salem (3-7), 7:30 p.m. Red Bud (1-17) at New Athens (7-10), 7:30 p.m. Father McGivney (3-20) at Freeburg (13-6), 7:30 p.m. East St. Louis (15-5) at O’Fallon (7-11), 7:30 p.m. Carlyle (5-17) at Pana (8-12), 7:30 p.m. Roxana (10-11) at ME Lutheran (12-10), 7:30 p.m. Edwardsville (5-12) at Alton (13-7-1), 7:30 p.m. Mount Olive (2-15) at Tri-City, 7:30 p.m. Litchfield (13-5) at Bunker Hill (2-10), 7:30 p.m. Sullivan (12-3) at Potosi (3-8), 7:30 p.m. Nashville (20-2) at Okawville (12-7), 7:45 p.m.

RICK ULREICH • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Liberty’s Jayce Catchings (left) and Jarring McKeithen (20) block Lafayette’s Trey Griffey’s shot during the Parkway West Showdown on Monday in Ballwin.

score at 30 at halftime. Lafayette was primed to put a scare into Liberty and break its four-game losing streak. Once the Eagles threw the zone at them, the Lancers weren’t able to figure it out before it was too late. “Our kids didn’t handle the zone real well,” Lafayette coach Matt Landwehr said. “We work against it a lot. We were real passive against it which isn’t our M.O., which was pretty disappointing. We didn’t look to attack it. Our kids didn’t adjust real well.” Liberty’s defensive adjustment paid dividends on offense. After Catchings and senior center Kent Lawson did most of the scoring in the first half, the other Eagles got into the action. Keller and senior guard Jarrin McKeithen each had nine points. All but two of their 18 combined points came after halftime. “We turned our defense into offense,” Sodemann said. “We were

45TH CARROLLTON INVITATIONAL Consolation quarterfinals Granite City vs. Father McGivney, 4 p.m. Nokomis vs. White Hall North Greene, 5:30 p.m. Championship quarterfinals Metro-East Lutheran vs. Jacksonville Routt, 7 p.m. Lebanon vs. Alton Marquette, 8:30 p.m. 38TH HILLSBORO INVITATIONAL Round robin Cape Girardeau Central vs. Alton, 5:30 p.m. Consolation semifinal Ritenour vs. Hillsboro, 7 p.m. 19TH HERMANN INVITATIONAL Round robin Montgomery County (6-4) vs. Battle (4-1), 6 p.m. LINDBERGH TOURNAMENT First round Kirkwood (12-3) vs. Lindbergh (7-7), 7 p.m. Marquette (8-6) vs. McCluer North (11-4), 8:30 p.m. Miller Career (9-5) vs. Jackson (2-1), 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell (7-8) vs. MICDS (8-7), 4 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Medicine and Biosc (8-4) at Carnahan (1-8), 0 a.m. Collinsville (11-8) at East St. Louis (7-13), 7:30 a.m. Fort Zumwalt West (10-7) at FH Central (12-2), 5:30 p.m. Brentwood (1-5) at Valley Park (4-11), 5:30 p.m. St. James (8-8) at Rolla (6-1), 5:30 p.m. Tolton (6-8) at O’Fallon Christian (2-13), 5:30 p.m. Cape Central vs. Alton (5-13), at Hillsboro, 5:30 p.m. Northwest-CH (6-11) at Hazelwood East (5-10), 5:45 p.m. Visitation (4-13) at Westminster (9-5), 6 p.m.

Timberland (2-12) at Lafayette (8-6), 6 p.m. University City (3-10) at Clayton (7-6), 6 p.m. Belleville West (11-12) at Triad (10-10), 6 p.m. Parkway Central (11-4) at Summit (8-7), 6 p.m. Wood River (11-8) at Hillsboro, Ill. (20-5), 6 p.m. Mascoutah (3-15) at Waterloo (6-13), 6 p.m. Grandview (9-7) at Kingston (0-5), 6 p.m. Cleveland (0-9) vs. Roosevelt (5-6), at McKinley, 6:15 p.m. Nerinx Hall (9-9) at Webster Groves (8-8), 7 p.m. FZ South (6-9) at FZEast (9-4), 7 p.m. FH North (12-4) at Troy (10-3), 7 p.m. Fox (7-4) at Festus (13-3), 7 p.m. Duchesne (6-12) at St. Charles (6-8), 7 p.m. Parkway South (8-6) at Sullivan (10-4), 7 p.m. Cor Jesu (9-6) at Borgia (6-7), 7:15 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (8-13) at Marion (10-14), 7:15 p.m. Breese Central (14-10) at Greenville (22-1), 7:30 p.m. O’Fallon (18-5) at Mater Dei (17-5), 7:30 p.m. Belleville East (15-9) at Edwardsville (21-2), 7:30 p.m. Nashville (16-7) at Sparta (5-9), 7:45 p.m.

HOCKEY

Collinsville (17-1) vs. Highland (1-16-1), at E. Alton Rink, 7:15 p.m. Freeburg/Waterloo (15-3) vs. Belleville Twsp. (15-3-1), at McKendree Rec, 7:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West (5-14) vs. Holt (5-14-1), at Wentzville, 8:30 p.m. Alton (7-10-1) vs. Edwardsville MVCHA (6-10-3), at E. Alton Rink, 8:45 p.m. Vianney (11-5-1) vs. De Smet (11-4-2), at Queeny Park, 9 p.m.

able to get some long rebounds, we were able to get some tips and steals and that’s what was effective.” Lawson had an excellent allaround game as he finished with 16 points, seven rebounds and blocked three shots. He was all about switching over to the zone to start the third quarter. The 6-foot-7 Lawson gets to plant himself in the middle of the paint and defend the rim. “We were on board (with the zone), it made us play more as a team,” Lawson said. “We depended on one another, we came out stronger. We started letting the game come to us.” Liberty outscored Lafayette 35-19 in the second half and often limited the Lancers from long range. “We switched into that 2-3 and it got them standing,” Catchings said. “We got some stops and layups on the other end. Those kills helped us pull away.”

WRESTLING

Gateway Science, Soldan at Borgia, 4 p.m. Park Hills Central, St. James at Owensville, 5 p.m. SLUH, Lindbergh at Vianney, 5 p.m. University City at Parkway North, 5 p.m. Seckman at Fox, 6 p.m. East St. Louis at Mascoutah, 6 p.m. Francis Howell Central at Timberland, 7 p.m. LADUE QUAD, 5 p.m. Teams: Hannibal, Ladue, St. Charles, Westminster

GIRLS WRESTLING

Francis Howell Central at Timberland, 3:30 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING

McCluer North at Hazelwood West, 3:30 p.m. Washington at St. Charles West, 3:30 p.m. Principia, Ursuline at Westminster, 4 p.m. Webster Groves at Mehlville, 4 p.m. Lutheran North, Timberland at Hazelwood Central, 4 p.m. Villa Duchesne at MICDS, 4:15 p.m. Oakville at Summit, 4:15 p.m. Ladue at Clayton, 4:15 p.m. Affton at McCluer, 4:15 p.m. Eureka at Parkway Central, 4:30 p.m. Lutheran South at St. Joseph’s, 4:30 p.m. Marquette at Lafayette, 4:30 p.m. Pattonville at Parkway North, 4:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt East vs. Incarnate Word at UMSL, 6:30 p.m


01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

Acura

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B9

CLASSIFIED

'16 Acura ILX: w/Premium Pkg, 28K Miles, Blue, Auto $19,490 #B9181

Audi '16 Audi RS 7 Prestige: 50K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, Glacier White Metallic $65,005 #29084A

'18 Audi A5 Premium: 6K Miles, Clean Carfadx 1 Owner, $38,765 #28237L

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 9K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner $43,444 #28600L

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: AWD, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $37,765 #28604L

'13 Audi S8: 4 Door Sedan, AWD, 47K Miles, 8 Cyl 4.0L, $43,300 #P9730

'16 Audi A7 3.0 Prestige: 64K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Sportback, AWD, $37,005 #P9705

'16 Audi S5 Premium Plus: 18K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, Heated Front Seats $40,765 #28074A

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $39,444 #28140L

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 8K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner $40,444 #28581L

'18 Audi A4: 2.0T Premium Plus, Quattro, 8K Miles, $39,300 #28704L

Chevrolet

'15 Chevrolet Malibu: 1 LS $12,036 Stock #181172A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Corvette: Grand Sport $27,990 #M18448A1

Honda

'03 Honda Civic EX, 2 Door Coupe, Clean Carfax, FWD, 5-speed Manual, $3,990 #V19144A

'14 Chevy Cruze: LTZ, 58K Miles, Certified, $12,490 #M18625A

'13 Chevy Camaro: 2SS, 59K Miles, 6-Speed, Leather $21,990 #C19119A

'17 Chevy Camaro SS, RWD, Carfax 1 Owner, Arctic Blue Metallic, $34,490 #M19042A

'17 Chevy Spark: LS, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $10,969 #P6727

'15 Chevy Camaro ZLT: Loaded, Very Clean $18,776 #420204A

'13 Chevy Corvette: 3LT, Conv, Only 13K Miles, New Tires, Clean Carfax $39,992#P6646

'13 Chevy Cruze: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 58K Miles, $10,969 #35587A

'12 Chevy Impala: 4 Door, Clean Carfax, 2WD, Gray $9,776 #SS1500B

'18 Honda Accord: Sport, One Owner, Only 3K Miles $25,990 #37022A

18 Audi Q7: Prestige, Quattro, Sportback, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $62,205 #P9657

'16 Audi A6 3.0T: Prestige, 30K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $36,205 #P9664

'16 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Sport, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $50,000 #P9681

Chrysler '18 Audi A6 2.0T: Premium Plus, FrontTrak, 2K Miles, FWD, Clean Carfax $40,444 #P9686

'16 Chrysler 300: $19,432 Stock #P07068 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Dodge '16 Audi A7 3.0 Prestige: 22K Miles, Sportback, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $45,444 #P9688

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus: 5K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $38,963 #28886L

'18 Audi A5 Coupe: Premium Plus, 4K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner AWD, $40,446 #P9604

'13 Dodge Challenger: SXT, 59K Miles, Black, Certified, $15,990 #M18600A

'16 Dodge Challenger: Hellcat, 19K Miles, Red, Manual, 2 Keys!$49,490 #B9463

'11 Dodge Charger: SE, RWD, Clean Carfax, 4 Door Sedan, $10,490 #B9332A

Fiat BMW '04 BMW 325i Wagon: White w/Tan, Nav, Roof $6,990 #M18545A

'17 Fiat Abarth: 13K Miles, Celeste Blue, Auto, Local Trade $15,990 #V18667A

Ford '16 BMW 4: Series 435i xDrive, 26K Miles, AWD, Coupe, $34,300 #P9722

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29K Miles, AWD, Sedan, $35,765 #12382A

'15 BMW M3: 4 Door Sedan, 29K Miles, RWD, Manual $43,444 #P9684

Cadillac '13 Cadillac CTS-V: Coupe, Black, 28K Miles, Auto $41,990 #C9528

'17 Cadillac XT5 Platinum: AWD, 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $35,765 #80091A

'16 Ford Focus: SE, 33K Miles, Automatic, $11,990 #V19063A

'12 Ford Focus Titanium, H/B, Clean Carfax, Only 61K Miles $10,469 #35596A

'05 Ford Freestyle :4 Door Wgn, Ltd., AWD, Stock #P06899A Call US DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Ford Fusion: Loaded, Very Clean, $7,226 #40428A

'16 Jetta: Sport, 30K, Certified $15,490

'17 Hyundai Sonata: $13,900 Stock # P07056 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chevrolet '17 Chevrolet Cruze LS: 17K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, FWD, $13,990 #P6669

'15 Chevrolet Spark: Hatch, 1LT, Auto $7,999 Stock #190228A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevrolet Malibu: $14,855 Stock #P06078 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Honda '17 Honda Accord: Sport, 26K Miles, Black, Auto, Black Leather, $19,990 #C9412A

'16 Honda Accord Coupe, EX-L, 28K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, FWD, $21,990 #C19071A

'16 Passat: SE, 43K, Blue, Certified $15,990 '18 Tiguan: LTD, FWD, 7K, Black $18,990

Sport Utility

'14 Ford F-150: XLT, Crew Cab, 4x4 $17,994 #420226A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: 22K Miles, Quattro, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $33,808 #P9625

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Certified, AWD $40,000 #98000L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 21k Miles, $34,765 #P9607

'18 Infiniti Q50: Lux, 23K Miles, AWD, Black $28,490 #B9519

Nissan/Datsun '17 Ford Mustang: Ecoboost, 6-Speed, RWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $18,990 #C9077A

Jeep '17 Jeep Renegade: Latitude, 4WD, 10K Miles, Red, $19,990 #B9587

'15 Jeep Wrangler: 4 Door Sport, 58K Miles, 4WD, Auto, Hard Top $28,490 #B9518

'14 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, Sahara, 5-Speed Auto, 4WD, $28,490 #C9522A

'09 Pontiac G6 Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax $6,990 #44242A

'17 Lexus RC: Black w/Red, 21K Miles $35,490 #B9509

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $33,765 #P9588

Lincoln '16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $22,676 #44323A

'14 Ram 2500: Laramie, Diesel, 41K Miles, Black, Nav, Sharp $46,990 #B9170

'17 Ram 1500: Crew Cab, V8, 4WD, 15K Miles, Longhorn Pkg $39,490 #C18259B

'98 Ram 1500: 2WD Reg Cab Stock #P07008 Call Us! DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'12 Porsche 911: Black Edition, Convertible RWD, Clean Carfax $54,765 #P9511

'15 Nissan Titan: 52K Miles, Crew Cab, 4WD, $27,990 #B9063

'16 Toyota Corolla: Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax $12,990 #44172A

Volkswagen '16 Lexus IS350: White, Certified, $30,490 #B9427

Misc Trucks '17 Ram 1500 Tradesman: 19K Miles, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $31,490 #B9588

Nissan/Datsun Trucks

'15 Land Rover LR4: 4WD, $36,990 #C18198B

'07 Volkswagen EOS: 2.0 Turbo, Local Trade, Silver, Auto $7,490 #V19088B

'16 Volkswagen Golf: R-32, AWD, Certified, 41K Miles $28,990 #V9525

'10 Volkswagen CC: Sport, 6-Speed Manual, 96K Miles $9,990 #V8367A

'14 Volkswagen Jetta: Sport Wagon, TDI, 9K Miles, $14,990 #V9621

'17 Nissan Frontier: King Cab, 4x2, Auto, $14,583 Stock #P06997 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Crossovers '17 Lexus RX350: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD $38,808 #P9626

'12 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, Loaded, Full Power $10,469 #35054A

'11 Mazda3: i Touring, FWD, Gunmetal Blue Mica, $8,490 #M9344B

Mercedes Benz '17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $34,808 #P9651

Mini Cooper '15 Mini Cooper: Roadster, Convertible, $19,490 #B9461

Misc. Autos BOMMARITO ST. PETERS CADILLAC CERTIFIED 6yr/100K 1-866-244-9085 '16 Escalade: ESV Premium, White, 26K, Certified, Call! '15 ATS: Luxury Sedan, Black $21,490 '14 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Nav, Roof $23,490

'15 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500, LT, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 32K Miles, $30,990 #P6662

'17 Chevrolet Silverado: 2500HD High Country, 8K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $60,205 #79723A

'14 Chevrolet Silverado: 1500 Reg Cab, Std. Box, 2WD $16,917 Stock #181140A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '08 Chevy Silverado: V8, Auto, 4WD, $15,490 #V19141B

'10 Chevy Silverado LT, 4x4, One Owner, Clean Carfax $17,657 #420229A

'14 Chevy Silverado: 3500HD, LTZ, Crew Cab, 4WD, Clean Carfax $35,765 #79281A

'18 Audi Q7: 3.0 Quattro, 11K Miles, Black, Local Trade $62,220 #V18668A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $42,963 #28888L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Certified, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $41,808 #28658L

'18 Audi Q7: Premium, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $51,765 #28207L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $42,765 #28175L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 9K Miles, AWD $42,765 #28392L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Quattro, Ibis White, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $42,765 #28326L

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige: 53K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $42,005 #P9697

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, 11K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $53,765 #28602L

'18 Audi Q7: Prestige, 7K Miles, AWD, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $59,000 #28820L

'18 Audi Q3 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Quattro, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $35,765 #28209L

'13 Chevy Silverado 2500HD: LTZ, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Crew Cab, $37,005 #80299A

'17 Chevy Colorado: Ext. Cab, Long Box, 4WD, Z71, $27,848 Stock #P07009 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Ford Trucks '04 Ford F-450: Super Duty, DRW XLT, 4WD, Super Cab, $16,490 #V9313D

'15 SRX: Luxury, 39K, Chromes, Roof $26,490 '10 Ford F-150: 4x4, 4WD, White, Auto $20,490 #C9357B

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: AWD, Clean Carfax, One Owner, 8K Miles $41,205 #28758L

2018 Audi Q7: Prestige, 8K Miles, AWD, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $59,000 #28823L

'18 Audi Q5: 2.0T Premium Plus, Quattro, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, 6K Miles $42,205#28649L

'17 XT5: Luxury, AWD, 13K, Bronze $37,990 '13 CTS-V: Coupe, 28K, Black, Auto $41,990 '15 Escalade: Luxury, Nav, Roof, AWD $48,490 '18 Escalade: ESV, Luxury, 35K, Black $61,490

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

'03 Ford F-250 Lariat: Super Duty, Crew Cab, 4-Speed Auto, $8,990 #C18154C

'11 Ford F150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, Loaded. $19,990 #44028B

'11 Ford Ranger: XLT, RWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $11,990 #44219A

15 BMW X5 35d: AWD, 30K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, $37,765 #P9574

'17 BMW X3: SDrive28I $26,591 Stock #P07078 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Buick Envision: Premium II, Galaxy Silver, AWD, $39,765 #P9356

'15 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, White, 14K Miles $30,990 #C9648

'12 Cadillac SRX: Luxury, 50K Miles, 1 Owner $17,990 #C19046A

'16 Cadillac SRX: Performance Collection, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $29,776 #P6641

'15 Cadillac Escalade: ESV, Premium, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 41K Miles $48,005 #80283A

'17 Cadillac XTS: $22,695 Stock #P06963 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevrolet Traverse LT. FWD, 3rd Row Seating, Heated Front Seats $14,990 #44292A

Sport Utility

Chevrolet Trucks Mazda

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, $46,808 #P9619

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $43,205 #P9665

Porsche

Toyota '14 Audi RS 7: Prestige, 49K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax #P9510 $58,765

'16 GMC Sierra 1500: SLT, 4WD, Crew Cab, 36K Miles, Clean Carfax, $36,000 #P9669

Pontiac

Range Rover/Land Rover Kia

GMC Trucks

'18 Golf: SE, 4K, Auto, Like New $21,490

Infiniti

'18 XT5: Premium, Luxury, Dark Granite $37,990 '14 Ford Mustang: GT, Loaded, Clean Carfax, Auto, $20,776 #35520A

'11 Tiguan: AWD, Red, Just Arrived $9,990

'11 Honda Accord: SE, White, Automatic, Local Trade $9,990 #M18524A

'15 ATS: Luxury, AWD, 28K $25,490 '07 Ford Mustang: GT, Red, M/T, Loaded, Very Clean $9,990 #P6648

'10 CC: Sport, Manual, Leather $9,990

'18 Jetta: 5K, Auto, Gray $15,490

'16 Chevy Malibu: LT, 29K Miles, FWD, Certified, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $16,876 #P6624

'18 Chevy Impala: LT, Certified, $21,149 Stock #P07052 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '04 Chevy Malibu: 4 Door Sedan, LT, Stock #180970A Call Us DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Malibu: $12,036 Stock #181172A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Camaro: Certified, 2 Door Coupe, 2SS, $31,714 Stock #181193A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'07 EOS: Auto, Silver, Local Trade $8,490

Hyundai

'15 Kia Soul Plus: 41K Miles, Black, 1 Owner, Auto $13,490 #B9360A

'16 Chevy Cruze: Limited, LT, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $11,476 #42807B

VOLKSWAGEN'S

'14 Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, Auto, Heated Seats $10,990

Lexus '18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6K Miles, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $41,107650 #P9238

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

Ford Trucks

1-866-244-9085 '06 Honda Civic: Si Coupe, Black, Manual $8,990 #B9612

'17 Chevy Corvette: Grand Sport, 29K Miles, White, w/ Black, Wheels, $54,990 #B9462

Misc. Autos

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus: 30K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD $47,000 #29075A

'16 Audi Q5: Premium Plus, 18K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $34,000 #29047A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: 7K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, AWD, $42,963 #28849L

'14 Chevrolet Equinox: LS, FWD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $11,992 #P6427B

'16 Chevrolet Traverse: FWD, LS, Certified $19,228 Stock #181117A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe: LT, Z-71, Black, 41K Miles, 4WD, $41,890 #C9505A

'16 Chevy Suburban: LTZ, Black, Loaded, 22" Chromes $42,990 #M19023A

'13 Chevy Equinox: LT, Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $9,960 #44099A

'05 Chevy Suburban Z71: Black, Loaded, Very Clean. $6,776 #P6637A

'13 Chevy Equinox: Loaded, Very Clean. $10,776 #420054B

'18 Chevy Tahoe: LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certified $41,557 #P6600

'15 Chevy Traverse: LTZ, Loaded, Full Power, Leather, $21,990 #44255AA

'11 Chevy Equinox: LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $9,990 #P6616A

'17 Chevy Equinox: FWD, LT, $19,601 Stock #P07059 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Chevy Tahoe: 4WD, LT, Certified, $42,784 Stock #P07028 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Dodge Durango: LTD, Nav, AWD, 36K Miles, Sunroof, $29,490 #B9555A

'17 Dodge Durango: Citadel, 21K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $38,490 #C18161A

'18 Ford Expedition: Max LTD, Black, 23K Miles, 4WD $57,990 #B9437

'13 Ford Escape: SEL, Leather, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $12,990 #P6692A

'14 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, Chrome Wheels, Loaded $33,990 #C19032B

Continued on Page B10 STLtoday.com/homes


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Continued from Page B9

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

Sport Utility

'16 GMC Yukon Denali: 4WD, Quicksilver Metallic $47,765 P9606

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 8K Miles, Certified, Carfax 1 Owner $38,000 #97205L

'11 Jeep Liberty: Limited, 4WD, Clean Carfax, 74K Miles $12,990 #P6627

'18 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, AWD, $27,461 Stock #P07065 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'16 Volkswagen Touraeg: Executive, 32K Miles, AWD, Certified, $29,490 #V18546A

'18 GMC Acadia: $30,070 Stock #P07054 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $41,300 #98056L

'14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: SRT8, 73K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax $35,000 #P9680

Sport Utility '12 GMC Terrain: SLE-2, AWD, $11,490 #M9595A

'07 Hummer H3: Loaded, Full Power, Only 74K Miles $13,269 #35204A

'18 GMC Terrain: 4K Miles, White $22,990 #B9076B

'11 GMC Terrain: SLE-2, AWD, 75K Miles, White $13,990 #V19240A

'10 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: Loaded, Full Power $7,992 #420175B

'13 GMC Acadia Denali: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $17,990 #44155A

'17 Nissan Rogue: SL, 17K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, $23,990 #V18623A

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, 6K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Certified $36,300 #97175L

'15 GMC Yukon: Denali, White, GM Certified, Loaded $42,446 #420141B

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Certified, 11K Miles, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $38,000 #97016L

'15 GMC Yukon SLT: 49K Miles, AWD, Clean Carfax, 1 owner, $39,005 #80190A

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 4K Miles, $41,300 #98048L

'17 Toyota Sienna: XLE, 8 Pass, Red, 23K Miles $27,990 #V8997A

'16 Subaru Crosstrek: LTD, 47K Miles, Crystal White, Local Trade $21,490 #V19030B

Vans

'18 Mazda CX-9: Signature, Clean Carfax, 2K Miles, AWD, $38,205 #12129L

'16 Jeep Patriot: Sport, SE, 22K Miles, FWD, Carfax 1 Owner $14,990 #M18646A

'16 GMC Yukon: XL Denali, 47K Miles, 4WD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner $47,963#80333A

'17 Nissan Murano: $29,708 Stock #P07003 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'10 Mazda CX-7: iSport, Black, Auto, Local Trade $8,990 #M18500A

'16 Jeep Cheroke: Trailhawk, 8K Miles, 4WD, Black, Leather $28,990 #V18665B

'18 Dodge Journey: Crossroad, AWD, $22,823 Stock #P07053 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 Mazda 5: Touring, Red, Just Arrived $8,490 #M9657

'14 Nissan Pathfinder: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, Auto, Heated Seats, $18,990 #44111A

'16 Mazda CX-3: Touring, White, 13K Miles, Certified, $20,490 #M9530

'18 Infiniti QX60: AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, 20K Miles $34,765 #P9551

Mini vans '18 Dodge Grand Caravan: 32K Miles, 2WD, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, $19,990 #P6601

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $39,765 #79760A

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $41,300 #98023L

'07 Volvo XC90: AWD, Silver w/Black Leather $8,990 #B9607A

'18 Mercedes-Benz GLE 43: AMG, 11K Miles, Nav, Pano Roof, White $65,990 #C18080A

'16 Land Rover Discovery: Sport, 26K Miles, 4WD, White w/Tan $32,990 #B9388

'18 Infiniti QX60: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 22K Miles, AWD, $35,765 #P9500 '15 Hyundai Tuscon: LTD, Pano Roof, Nav, AWD, 25K Miles $21,990 #B9593

'12 Mercedes Benz ML350: 4matic, Pano Roof, Auto $15,990 #V18547A

'18 Chevy Express Cargo Van, 24K Miles, Certified, RWD, $24,222 #P6649

'12 Toyota Highlander: SE, FWD, 103K Miles, Blue $16,490 #V18543A

'18 Mazda CX-9: Signature, AWD, Clean Carfax, 3K Miles, $37,205 #12248L

STLtoday.com/jobs

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

'18 Chevy Express Passenger Van: Certified Pre-Owned $27,615 Stock #P07038 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

SUNDAYCOUPONS THEY JUST MAKE CENTS Whether you use a couple or couple dozen every week, you end up with more groceries in your cart and change in your pocket. And that Sunday newspaper you just bought? It has paid for itself. Now that is what we call savvy shopping. SUBSCRIBE TODAY at STLtoday.com/subscribe

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Cloudy and not as cold WIND SSE 10-20 mph

Rain early then colder WIND WNW 10-20 mph

Colder with low clouds WIND NW 8-16 mph

Mostly cloudy

Partly sunny and colder WIND S 7-14 mph

Snow showers possible WIND NNW 8-16 mph

45°

26°

WIND NW 8-16 mph

30° 22° 33°

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 39/22 39/16 Bloomington Urbana 37/25 38/26

Kirksville 43/17

Quincy 43/20

Decatur 40/25

Springfield 57 41/24 Effingham 70 55 41/28

35

Columbia 46/20 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 45/26 City 43/32 55 47/21 Union 46/23 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 46/21 44/31 Farmington 43/29 Cape Girardeau 46/34 Springfield 49/20 Poplar Bluff West Plains 46/31 55 45/23

Kansas City 45/17

Joplin 53/19

70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

13.43 -0.62 13.48 +0.37 14.79 -0.24 11.70 -0.47 18.38 +0.06

16 11.52 -0.97 15 12.09 -0.17 25 19.47 -0.10 26 19.98 -0.13 18 16.07 -0.09 419 416.88 -0.19 21 13.25 +0.27 30 18.20 +0.79 27 21.45 +1.07 32 26.76 +0.77 20 18 14

12.89 11.89 13.04

-0.27 -1.08 -0.29

Forecast Temperature

50

30 20

35 30

39

37

34

34

34

10

37

0

W

4.51 -0.09 5.11 +0.05 16.25 +1.32

15

6.16 -0.44

40

37.37 +0.84 354.60 358.37 495.67 657.70 709.55 661.14 915.86 842.88 600.33 410.40 608.45 446.27

T

Average High

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

F

S

19

23

9

7

S

M

30 26

33

+0.30 +0.31 +0.66 +0.12 -0.23 -0.07 -0.23 -0.11 -0.09 +0.17 +0.43 +0.06

Average Low

22

26 19

33

35

W

T

36

28 19 11

7 T

F

S

Winnipeg 9/-4

Seattle 48/46

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

Montreal 9/6

Billings 35/25

Toronto 26/23 Minneapolis Chicago 22/6 36/29

ALMANAC

San Francisco 59/45

Statistics through 5 p.m. Monday Temperature High/low 23°/7° Normal high/low 40°/24° Last year high/low 69°/36° Record high 75° (1986) Record low -8° (1970) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Mon. Trace Month to date (normal) 1.74” (1.66”) Year to date (normal) 1.74” (1.66”) Record for this date 2.10” (1906)

Pollen Yesterday

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Absent Absent Absent Low - 1817

Source: St. Louis County

Heating Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

Monday Month to date Normal month to date Since July 1 Normal since July 1

50 642 701 2502 2462

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

21° 8 a.m.

27° noon

31° 4 p.m.

34° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

7:15 a.m. 7:14 p.m.

5:11 p.m. 8:29 a.m.

S

M

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Jan 27

Feb 4

Feb 12

Feb 19

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Washington 35/30

Kansas City 45/17

El Paso 54/28

Atlanta 47/42

Chihuahua 67/31 Monterrey 82/50

-10s -0s Cold front

0s

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

Houston 72/41

Miami 74/69

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

City

Stationary front

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

22/12/s 41/23/pc 26/24/c 47/42/pc 69/37/r 32/23/s 52/48/pc 41/30/c 28/19/s 51/45/pc 46/36/pc 43/33/pc 36/29/sn 41/38/pc 35/32/pc 65/32/r 69/59/pc 31/15/sn 34/8/sn 62/60/r 30/28/c 26/13/s 83/68/s 72/41/sh 40/36/r 45/17/r 54/35/s 55/35/r

32/31/i 43/27/s 34/31/sn 62/37/r 54/28/r 44/42/r 60/29/r 46/30/pc 46/43/c 68/59/c 53/30/r 52/51/c 30/7/c 46/22/r 47/28/r 49/33/s 75/67/sh 44/23/pc 21/12/c 67/41/r 40/23/r 41/39/r 84/69/s 50/30/r 39/19/r 33/22/pc 57/39/s 40/27/r

Showers

T-storms

City

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

66/44/s 48/44/pc 51/40/r 74/69/pc 34/23/sn 22/6/sn 54/50/pc 51/47/pc 70/62/c 29/26/s 52/24/r 32/9/sn 71/59/pc 31/26/s 64/39/s 33/29/pc 23/10/s 46/43/r 57/34/s 31/20/pc 67/39/r 66/46/s 59/45/s 48/46/r 74/61/pc 57/32/s 35/30/s 46/20/i

69/49/s 50/25/r 43/25/r 80/72/pc 28/13/sn 19/2/pc 65/35/r 54/25/r 67/36/r 42/40/r 45/28/s 28/19/pc 79/67/c 45/43/r 64/41/s 46/29/r 39/35/c 54/41/r 59/37/pc 35/29/c 57/32/pc 68/49/s 60/47/s 53/44/r 79/67/pc 62/35/s 49/47/r 44/26/s

National Extremes

Monday in the 48 contiguous states High: 83 Fort Stockton, Texas Low: -42 Togo, Minn.

WORLD FORECAST

City

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Denver 31/15

New York 29/26

Detroit 30/28

Los Angeles 66/44

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

45

37

19

T

15 16 24

TEMPERATURE TRENDS

Daily Temperature 40

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Mon. Change

Location

Much of the eastern third of the nation will be dry and cold today. A storm will accompany a surge of warmer air over the Central states with rain from the Gulf coast to Missouri and snow from Nebraska and Iowa to Minnesota and northern Michigan. Gusty winds are forecast to buffet the Southwest while rain skirts the coastal Northwest.

26° 19° 33° 19°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK Low pressure crossing the Midwest will cause periods of rain today which will end this evening before it turns brisk and cold. Watch for icy spots. Clouds for tomorrow and Thursday.

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

36/29/sn 59/51/sh 60/39/s 92/71/pc 53/24/s 32/22/s 90/69/pc 69/51/s 79/74/pc 40/32/pc 67/55/s 59/38/s 89/61/s 42/31/pc 47/37/sh 90/68/s

36/27/c 59/50/c 63/40/s 90/70/s 50/23/s 31/21/pc 81/69/c 71/60/pc 81/71/sh 42/38/c 66/59/s 58/44/c 89/62/s 39/30/pc 54/42/sh 91/68/s

City

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Today Wednesday Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

74/43/s 9/6/pc 9/-2/pc 76/67/c 82/57/pc 68/52/sh 36/32/sn 94/80/pc 47/36/r 83/73/pc 91/61/pc 45/26/s 85/74/pc 50/38/s 26/23/pc 43/41/r

74/42/s 33/29/sn 12/0/c 80/70/pc 82/58/pc 66/49/pc 36/29/pc 92/78/s 50/37/r 82/73/sh 92/59/pc 44/19/s 82/72/t 55/39/s 40/26/r 48/37/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


, E D I S T U O D L O C HEY IT’S HEARTH keep you warm! N A C I R E M A t Le

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Tuesday • 01.22.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠Q J 3 ♥J 10 7 4 ♦A 10 8 3 2 ♣A WEST EAST ♠10 8 7 6 5 ♠Void ♥Q 3 2 ♥9 8 6 5 ♦J 7 6 ♦Q 5 ♣K 4 ♣Q J 9 8 7 3 2 SOUTH ♠A K 9 4 2 ♥A K ♦K 9 4 ♣10 6 5 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST Pass 3♣ 1NT Dbl 3♠ Pass 4♣ Pass Pass 5♠ 4NT Pass Pass 6♠ All pass 5NT Opening lead: King of ♣ North’s three club bid asked for a five-card major, enabling North-South to find their five-three spade fit despite the one no trump opening. North-South were using Key Card Blackwood, so the five-spade response showed two key cards (aces in this case) plus the queen of spades. The five no trump bid asked for specific kings and the sixspade bid denied a side-suit king. South won the opening club lead with dummy’s ace and led the queen of spades. The

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD discard from East was a bit unnerving, but declarer recovered quickly. The ace and king of hearts were followed by a club ruff in dummy and a heart ruff in hand. The fall of the queen of hearts was irrelevant. South cashed the ace and king of diamonds before ruffing his last club with dummy’s jack of spades. This was the position: NORTH ♠Void ♥J ♦10 8 3 ♣Void WEST EAST ♠10 8 7 6 Irrelevant ♥Void ♦Void ♣Void SOUTH ♠A K 9 ♥Void ♦9 ♣Void South led dummy’s jack of hearts and discarded his remaining diamond. West had to ruff and lead a trump back into declarer’s ace-king-nine. Well done! (01/22/19)

Across

1 Relative of Alt on a keyboard 5 Be part of, as a play 10 Pullup muscles, briefly 14 Cookie with its name on it 15 One agreeing with everything you say 16 Sheltered at sea 17 Proper attire for taking fingerprints? 19 Enter 20 Dramatic “You too?” 21 Mauna ___ 22 Bat for hitting practice fly balls 23 Red, white and blue team 24 Proper attire for picking up a series of clues? 27 Part of mph 28 Took a load off

29 Hicks and Judge of Major League Baseball 30 Conveyance for Calvin and Hobbes 32 Sushi garnish 34 Accomplished 35 Wearers of 17-, 24-, 50and 59-Across? 40 Whose tomb was opened in 1923 41 Stop (up) 42 Weaponizes 44 Psychological wound 47 Cry made with a fist pump 49 Job listing abbr. 50 Proper attire for detaining a perp? 53 More of an ___ than a science 54 Barely beat (out)

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME January 22 WORD — COSTUME (COSTUME: KOS-toom: A set of clothes for a particular occasion or season.) Average mark 20 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 26 or more words in COSTUME? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — AIRBRUSH bursar airbus bush rash sahib rush sari bash shirr bias shrub brash surah briar hair bris hubris brush burr RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

55 56 58 59 62 63 64 65 66 67

Massage Vittles Sign gas Proper attire for shadowing a suspect? Reynolds of “Boogie Nights” Gary who played Buddy Holly Wedge, for one “Planet of the ___” “You can skip me” Outbox folder

Down

1 Cousin of a pollock 2 Unvarnished identity 3 Pull-off spot 4 Former senator Trent 5 ___ loss 6 Parrot with a showy crest 7 George who played Sulu on “Star Trek” 8 It can’t be improved upon 9 WSJ competitor 10 Alternative to John F. Kennedy 11 Basketball Hall of Famer Mourning 12 Model Chrissy who wrote the best-seller “Cravings” 13 Titles with tildes 18 Sticks (out)

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HH You might feel as though you want to take a back seat in a touchy situation. Before coming to a conclusion, listen more; however, don’t hesitate to ask a question or two. Tonight: Nap, then decide.

If Jan. 22 is your birthday • This year, because of an openness to new ideas and the support of several close friends, you will be able to manifest more of what you desire. If you’re single, a friendship could develop into a fairly intense romance. If you’re attached, you and your partner make a strong team and will zero in on a goal that you have as a couple. Virgo fusses to no end.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Use the daylight hours to the max. You find a meeting to be significant and important to your well-being. You also discover how much support you have from your immediate circle regarding a new venture. Tonight: Do not burn the midnight oil. Go to bed early.

ARIES (March 20-April 19) HHHH You naturally choose the correct action. Because you take a risk without hesitation, some people observing you might feel as though the wind is knocked out of their sails. However, they admire your clarity. Tonight: Do not push. Call it an early night. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Once again, you’d prefer working from home. If possible, follow through on that thought. Because this need keeps rearing its head in your life, you also might want to consider developing a home-based business. Tonight: As you eye options, brainstorm with a dear friend. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You might be taken aback by a close associate and his or her willingness to suddenly trust and take a leap of faith. You admire this person and show it. Goodwill and honesty build an stronger bond between you and this person. Tonight: Order in. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Observe a tendency to go overboard in some area of your life. You might go out of your way to please someone, or you might go on a spending spree to ease some tension. Tonight: Ready to recycle and have some fun. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your spirit naturally encourages taking risks and having fun along the way. Remember that not every risk that feels good will pay off. In the near future, be more discerning. Tonight: Catch up on paperwork.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Your playful manner draws the attention of others. Optimism surrounds a meeting at work or within your community. Your energy might not be stable. Tonight: Celebrate a change of plans.

Puzzle by Ross Trudeau

22 Thrash about 23 Co. with brown trucks 25 New Jersey river or bay 26 Black cat running across your path, it’s said 31 Ones far from the honor roll 33 Caboose, e.g. 36 Like summers in Washington, D.C.

37 Balance sheet heading 38 Word with comfort or feature 39 Reappearance above water, as for a submarine 43 Wino, e.g. 44 Sports org. since 1946 45 Became uncomfortable, as some underwear

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 1218

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Allow optimism to lead you, but follow through on details and reach out for more advice. If done well, your research could define the path to a successful project. Tonight: A force to behold. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH One-on-one relating allows greater flow and insight. As a result, your perspective and plans could veer in a new direction. Tonight: Go with the good times. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Defer to a key person in your life. You might not agree, but the difference in opinions might not be as critical as you think it is. A friend has some important information or possibly a bit of gossip for you. Tonight: Leave stress behind. Hook up with a loved one.

46 “An Inconvenient Truth” author 48 Distort 51 Put into categories 52 Arkansas River city 57 “No guarantees” 59 “Freeze! ___!” 60 Jewish cries 61 Prop for Wile E. Coyote

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Dig into work. Don’t allow distractions to play a role. You will note how much you accomplish in such a brief time. Clear out as much as you can. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

01.22.2019 • Tuesday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Giving a ring without a proposal

Dear She Deserves Better • I doubt it. If Jane would like to be married and is open about your relationship, don’t be surprised if she tells you she would rather have a proposal and a wedding than a diamond and a legal document. Dear Abby • My husband’s parents forgot his birthday — again. Last year, he laughed it off. This

year, it wasn’t so funny. It’s especially hurtful because they not only remember his other adult siblings’ birthdays, but throw parties or dinners for them to which we are invited. Would I be out of line to send them a reminder next year? — CALENDAR GIRL IN ILLINOIS Dear Calendar Girl • Why do I think there is more to this story than you have mentioned? Your husband may have done — or not done — something that upset his parents, and this may be their passive-aggressive way of punishing him. Do not “remind” them of the birthday. They are well aware of when it is. Instead, plan a celebration for him with some of his friends, and make the occasion a happy one with no mention of his parents. Dear Abby • Please explain why DJs or bands think it’s appropriate to blast their music at occasions like weddings, dinners or any gathering to the point that the

guests have to shout at each other. I thought music was supposed to be in the background, to be enjoyed during a meal or conversation, then raised a LITTLE louder for dancing, since dancers want to hear the music. I was at a golf tournament recently, and we asked the DJs to turn the volume down because the players were still golfing. They did, but when players started coming in, the music got louder and louder until it was blasting. — TOO LOUD IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Dear Too Loud • This may happen because of the size of the room or the mood the musicians are attempting to create. However, unless music is being played in a dance club, increasing the volume to the point that attendees cannot comfortably carry on a conversation is intrusive. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

MISS MANNERS

Lights-out method to disperse guests? No Dear Miss Manners • In college, I lived in a townhouse with several housemates. One night, when a party we were hosting had gone on too long for my taste, I went down to the basement and turned off all the circuit breakers. It had its intended effect; the house was cleared of guests within minutes. A few minutes after that, one of my housemates came down to the basement to see what happened. He was very amused when he shined his flashlight on my grinning face. Gentle Reader • Please stop grinning. Yes, you got away with it. But Miss Manners begs you to stop thinking of this as cute before you turn off someone’s lifesaving medical device. Dear Miss Manners • When salad is eaten after the main course, should the salad fork go outside or inside the table fork? Assum-

ing the salad is presented after the main (meat) course, what is the proper setting? Gentle Reader • Maybe your hosts are just used to seeing tables set that way because restaurants can produce salad before the main course. The reverse sequence is proper for a private event, where dinner is already in the works. But maybe your hosts are just trying to drive you crazy. People love to ridicule etiquette for the supposedly Heraclean problem of choosing which fork to use, when the answer couldn’t be more simple: Start at the outside and work your way in. So the salad fork goes inside when it is to be used after the meat course. Dear Miss Manners • My fiance and I are in a quandary over how to make our wedding accessible to everyone, as my family lives in the southeast United States, and

his family lives in southeast Australia. In this situation, is there a courteous way we could have two modest, dignified ceremonies within a few weeks of each other? Gentle Reader • The emotional impact of attending a wedding comes from witnessing people enter the state of matrimony, not from watching a married couple run through something they have done before. If your church recognizes a religious service, in addition to a civil service, that would be a solution. Otherwise, Miss Manners recommends that the second event be a frank celebration instead of a mock wedding. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

Differences: 1. Back of chair is higher. 2. Earring is smaller. 3. Man is facing the other way. 4. Cards are missing. 5. Thumb is not showing. 6. Hairband is moved.

Dear Abby • My girlfriend, “Jane,” and I have been in love for three years. We’re both in our 30s. Jane and her daughter have lived with me long enough to know that I want to be a part of — and contribute to — the rest of their lives. Jane knows I never want to be married, but that I am committed to her. I know how to make sure she is taken care of in the event that I pass away, and I’m in the process of making that a reality. I would like to give her a special diamond. Is there a way to give her the moment she deserves without asking her to marry me? — SHE DESERVES BETTER

TV TUESDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

7:00

1/22/19

7:30

8:00

8:30

FOX Lethal Weapon A truck The Gifted: teMpted. 2 filled with fine art is Lauren fights off her robbed. dark side. (N)

9:00

9:30

FOX 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

CBS Big Brother: Celebrity FBI: A New Dawn. An NCIS: New Orleans Gre4 Edition (N) (cc) alt-right provocateur is gorio goes under cover murdered. (N) at a club. (N) NBC Ellen’s Game of Games This Is Us The Pearsons New Amsterdam: 5 (N) (cc) reckon with Jack’s se- Anima Sola. (9:01) (N) crets. (N) (cc) PBS Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis 9 Gates, Jr. (N) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

The Big Burn: American Frontline Black lung Experience (cc) disease among coal miners. (N) (cc) The Flash: Seeing Red. Roswell, New Mexico: Nora is severely injured. So Much for the Afterglow. (N) (cc) (N) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC The Con30 ners (N)

The Kids blackish: Splitting The Rookie: Redwood. Are Alright Waltz in A Up Togeth- The vice president visMinor. (N) er (N) (N) its. (N)

ION Criminal Minds: Bro- Criminal Minds Victims Criminal Minds Kevin 46 ken. The team’s stalker of the BAU’s stalker thinks Garcia has a love gets closer. turn up. interest.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.22.2019

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

How many IBS remedies are too many? FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • I have dealt with irritable bowel syndrome for over 40 years. I have had less cramping and loose stools when I quit drinking milk. However, now over the past few years I have had mild constipation and very frequent bloating. I take dicyclomine, 10 mg, before meals and bedtime, that helps a little with spasms. When bloating is more constant, I take Phazyme, Tums and Pepto-Bismol, along with 150-mg ranitidine, which helps a little. I am concerned that I am taking too many types of pills to control it. I have been getting acid reflux lately and feel pressure in the stomach and up under the breast bone with a lot of burping. My question is if it is OK to take all of these pills within a couple of hours, or is there a better alternative? I wore a heart monitor for a month because of irregular heartbeats and heavy heart beat. Incidences were recorded, but it wasn’t severe enough to be concern with right now. I feel the problem was caused by the pressure of bloating. — J.F.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • Irritable bowel syndrome is a common (10 to 15 percent of adults) disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, manifested by abdominal pain or discomfort and bloating, along with changes in bowel movements, such as diarrhea or constipation. Abdominal discomfort is typically relieved by a bowel movement in IBS. Primary treatment for IBS is an appropriate diet and relationship with food. Stopping milk, for example, seemed to have helped you a lot. It is possible other dietary changes may reduce the need for medication, and a meeting with a gastroenterologist and a nutritionist dietician may be have a dramatic effect on your symptoms. Many foods (known as FODMAPs, for “fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols”) can worsen symptoms, and learning how to reduce these takes more space than I have in 10 columns. Dicyclomine is an antispasmodic that helps some people with IBS. Phazyme is a brand of simethicone, an anti-gas agent; Tums is an antacid; Pepto-Bismol is an antidiarrheal and antimicrobial; and ranitidine partially suppresses stomach acid. None of these is specific for irritable bowel syndrome, and all are generally considered safe with few serious adverse effects. I’m not sure how many of your symptoms are due to acid reflux (acid going backward from the stomach, up into the esophagus) and how many are due to IBS. I agree with you that you may not need all these medications. Try tapering them off, especially if you are able to find some dietary treatment.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics