1.20.19

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

UP TO

$142

OF COUPON S INSIDE

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • $4.00 • EARLY EDITION

JOINING FORCES TO FIGHT DECLINE Two big social service agencies team up to reach beyond policing, exhort churches in crime-plagued neighborhoods to get involved

$11.02

TOOTHPASTE (4 OZ.)

$3.25

CAN OF TUNA

$3.35

DEODORANT STICK

Immigrants lament costs for items at for-profit lockups BY MICHELLE CONLIN AND KRISTINA COOKE Reuters

help those veering into trouble get back on the right path. More need to work with police and social service agencies to stem the violence that has put the city of St. Louis on the map as one of the most dangerous places in the U.S. Abating that culture of violence is the goal of an ambitious new program led by two of the largest social service agencies serving north St. Louis. For the first time, Better Family Life and the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis are teaming up to combat decades of neighborhood decline and urging ministers to commit to the effort. The two agencies will officially open a joint office on Monday, in a storefront off Martin Luther King Drive. The location was selected to be close to those

NEW YORK • Detained in a California lockup with hundreds of other immigrants seeking asylum, Duglas Cruz faced a choice. He could content himself with a jailhouse diet that he said left him perpetually hungry. Or he could labor in the prison’s kitchen to earn money to buy extra food at the commissary. Cruz went to work. But his $1-a-day salary at the privately run Adelanto Detention Facility did not stretch far. A can of commissary tuna sold for $3.25. That is more than four times the price at a Target store near the small desert town of Adelanto, about two hours northeast of Los Angeles. Cruz stuck with ramen noodles at 58 cents a package, double the Target price. A miniature deodorant stick, at $3.35 and more than three days’ wages, was an impossible luxury, he said. “If I bought that there wouldn’t be enough money for food,” Cruz said. Tuna and deodorant would seem minor worries for detainees such as Cruz. Now 25, he sought asylum after fleeing gangs trying to recruit him in his native Honduras, a place where saying “no” can mean execution. But immigration attorneys say the pricey commissary

See COMMUNITY • Page A8

See ICE • Page A9

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The Rev. Rodrick Burton, pastor of the New Northside Missionary Baptist Church, leads a prayer following Bible study on Wednesday at the church’s conference and family center in the 5900 block of Goodfellow Boulevard in St. Louis’ North Pointe neighborhood.

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Rev. Rodrick Burton of New Northside Missionary Baptist Church loves to minister to his congregation, lifting them up during Sunday services and at Wednesday Bible study. That lift, though, is weighing on him more and more as gun violence takes its toll on his congregation. “I’ve been pastor here for six years and had four members murdered,” Burton said. “For the most part, churches have been involved in dealing with the aftereffects of the violence, ministering to those whose loved ones have been killed.” That has to change, he said. More churches have to become greater players in the community, and

“We are not able to arrest our way out of it. … I need you all. The police have very limited tools. If churches are involved, it makes my job easier.” St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden

THINGS ARE HEATING UP Jake Murray, with Hats-N-Stuff Sports Merchandise of University City, lays out Cardinals team T-shirts on Friday as he stocks the company’s booth at the Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch. The annual charity fundraiser, at which Cardinals players appear and sign autographs for fans, will run from Saturday through Monday. > IN SPORTS • Mike Shildt talks about meeting Goldschmidt, Miller for the first time. B1

An actress and professor

Trade issues scare farmers

Courtney Bailey Parker relishes her dual roles

China battle, shutdown weigh on decisions

STL LIFE • B1

BUSINESS • C1

Washington U. course returns to explore Kanye West Tax credit bottleneck stymies developers

• C1

SLU beats St. Joseph for sixth straight win

• D1

Let’s put Humpty Dumpty together again, for good TODAY

• B1

• A2

Seeing Redbirds

22°/17° PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

35°/33° CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D9

Begins in Two Weeks!

1 M POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Vol. 141, No. 20 ©2019

FABULOUS FOX JANUARY 29 thru

FEBRUARY 10 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

UP TO

$142

OF COUPON S INSIDE

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

CARDINALS’ WINTER WARM-UP

Trump offers protections in exchange for wall funds

FANS GET FACE TIME

PRESIDENT’S PROPOSAL ‘Dreamers’ would get three-year reprieve but not path to citizenship DEMOCRATS: ‘A NONSTARTER’ House plans vote to end shutdown, put onus on Senate, Trump to act WASHINGTON POST

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump offered Democrats on Saturday three years of deportation protections for some immigrants in exchange for $5.7 billion in border wall funding, a proposal immediately rejected by Democrats and derided by conservatives as amnesty. Aiming to end the 29-day partial government shutdown, Trump outlined his plan in a White House address in which he sought to revive negotiations with Democrats, who responded that they would not engage in immigration talks until he reopened the government. Trump proposed offering a reprieve on his attempts to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and temporary protected status for immigrants from some Latin American and African nations, in exchange for building hundreds of miles of barriers on the southern U.S. border and hiring thousands of new law enforcement agents to be deployed there. “This is a common-sense compromise both

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Dylan Howard, 13, of Phoenix, snaps a selfie with new Cards reliever Andrew Miller after getting Miller’s autograph Saturday at the Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch. The event continues Sunday and Monday.

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Among the first to get an autograph from new Cardinals player Paul Goldschmidt on Saturday afternoon was Jacob Miller. Along with his parents, Jacob was near the front of a line snaking its way through a downtown hotel ballroom set up for autograph sessions with members of the Redbirds.

The autograph opportunities are the highlight of the Winter Warm-Up, the annual fundraiser for Cardinals Care, the charitable arm of the team. Jacob, of Marion, Ill., held out a bat, which got a quick squiggle from Goldschmidt. The boy and the new Cardinal both gave a wide smile as Jacob’s proud dad snapped a cellphone photo. A pretty sweet gift for Jacob’s 10th birthday. And a family tradition. “This is our fifth year coming to

COVERAGE • Read the latest from the Warm-Up. D1

Winter Warm-Up,” said Jeff Miller, 40, “and we come every year on his birthday. We love baseball, and we love making memories with him.” Jacob, standing next to his dad and mom, JoEllen, appeared a bit shy and a bit awestruck. Wearing a Goldschmidt shirt, in the Cardinals’ new powder blue, the kid celebrating another year of Cardinal Nation is amassing an

See TRUMP • Page A8

LAWSUITS DELAYED • Federal courts are running out of money, hindering judicial process. A8 WORKING FOR PENNIES • Immigrants lament costs for items at for-profit lockups. A9

See WARM-UP • Page A6

McCONNELL DEFERS • Despite criticism, Senate leader sees no reason to go against president. A13

PHOTOS • See a gallery of fun shots. STLtoday.com

JOINING FORCES TO FIGHT DECLINE Two big social service agencies team up to reach beyond policing, exhort churches to get involved

Women’s march draws crowd Bundled-up protesters turn out here, across country INSIDE • A3

An actress and professor

Trade issues scare farmers

Courtney Bailey Parker relishes her dual roles

China battle, shutdown weigh on decisions

STL LIFE • B1

BUSINESS • C1

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The Rev. Rodrick Burton, pastor of the New Northside Missionary Baptist Church, leads a prayer following Bible study on Wednesday at the church’s conference and family center in the 5900 block of Goodfellow Boulevard in St. Louis’ North Pointe neighborhood.

BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Rev. Rodrick Burton of New Northside Missionary Baptist Church loves to minister to his congregation, lifting them up during Sunday services and at Wednesday Bible study. That lift, though, is weighing on him more and more as gun violence takes its toll on his congregation. “I’ve been pastor here for six years and had four members murdered,” Burton said. “For the most part, churches have been involved in dealing with the aftereffects of the violence, ministering to those whose loved

Begins in Two Weeks!

ones have been killed.” That has to change, he said. More churches have to become greater players in the community, and help those veering into trouble get back on the right path. More need to work with police and social service agencies to stem the violence that has put the city of St. Louis on the map as one of the most dangerous places in the U.S. Abating that culture of violence is the goal of an ambitious new program led by two of the largest social service agencies serving north St. Louis. For the first time, Better Family Life and the Urban League of See COMMUNITY • Page A4

Gunnarsson’s goal gives Blues 3-2 win over Senators

• D1

Washington U. course returns to explore Kanye West

• B1

Missouri tax credit bottleneck stymies developers TODAY

• C1

Seeing Redbirds

22°/17° PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

35°/33° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D9

2 M POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Vol. 141, No. 20 ©2019

FABULOUS FOX JANUARY 29 thru

FEBRUARY 10 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com


M 1 SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM BOTTOM LINE

DO SOME DINING

UPCOMING CHATS

General Motors is cutting 14,000 jobs and may idle three assembly plants as it reacts to declining sales. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher talk it over. stltoday.com/watch

Our Great Taste event will feature food from dozens of the 100 best restaurants around St. Louis. Tickets are going fast. stltoday.com/go

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

PEOPLE

Let’s put Humpty Dumpty together again, for good

Banksy piece makes Welsh town a ‘go-to place,’ art dealer says

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the summer of 1875, Nicholas A. Mortell stood alone. Mortell, a lawyer by trade, was one of 66 Missourians elected to a Constitutional Convention in Jefferson City. Among the key issues? What to do about St. Louis. Since pretty much its inception, the city of St. Louis has been in conflict with the county by the same name that surrounds it. In the 19th century, the city had nearly all the power, and many elected officials wanted to keep it that way. Its leaders proposed a split, creating the separate entities that survive today. At the time, a few elected officials wanted to go the other way and unite the city and the county as a way to end their constant squabbling. Mortell was in that camp. “I am in favor of total consolidation of St. Louis County, but I am not in favor of dividing it, splitting and hacking it in this manner,” the St. Louis lawyer said at the time. “I vote no.” The ayes had it. The statewide constitutional convention created the opportunity for the city and county to vote on the split, and to create a unique city-county form of government in the city of St. Louis. That happened a year later. The vote failed. It was overturned in court. St. Louis has been a house divided ever since. In 2020, that might change. Sometime in coming days or weeks, the nonprofit organization Better Together is expected to announce plans to put an initiative on the statewide ballot to do what Mortell wanted to do more than a century ago. Call it consolidation, merger or marriage. Call it whatever you want. The plan, in the works since 2013, is actually a recreation of St. Louis with one boundary that unites the city and the county. And before they’ve seen the details, nearly every mayor in the St. Louis region not named Lyda Krewson has already panned the plan.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

Nicholas A. Mortell was an elected representative from St. Louis to Missouri’s constitutional convention in 1875. He thought St. Louis and St. Louis County should be united.

“I think it should be renamed ‘Better Without Us,’” longtime Florissant Mayor Tom Schneider told the Post-Dispatch. Schneider, of course, is the same mayor who tried and failed not long ago to coerce his municipal court into erasing his son’s old criminal conviction. It’s hard to let go of power. From 1875 to 2019, that’s what the issue of consolidation or separation has been about: power. Back then, the city had it and wanted to keep it from the county. Eventually, hordes of city residents fled to the county, setting up their own enclaves, more than 90 of them (down to 88 recently), so that they didn’t have to share the power, or some of their tax revenue. All that power grabbing led to a giant sucking sound leaving St. Louis as a region. As the county was carved up, the power dissipated, both for the city and the region as a whole. Now the city and county each have broken budgets and dysfunctional governmental bodies. The economic power of St. Louis is dwindling. Regional leaders want St. Louis to reclaim the city’s great place as the Gateway to the West. Here’s how St. Louis Blues owner Tom

Stillman put it a couple of years ago: “We can continue with more than 100 jurisdictions, often working at crosspurposes, or we can unite and work together to build a stronger community and a brighter future.” It’s time to put Humpty Dumpty back together again. It won’t be easy. Mayors will say no. Cross-state columnists will take potshots. The region’s historic racial chasms will tremble like the New Madrid fault. Black municipal mayors will suggest that consolidation of power will hurt racial equity, but that will ignore the conclusions of the “Forward Through Ferguson” report, which called for massive consolidation of police departments and municipal courts, used by cash-strapped cities for too long as a fundraising source. In fact, wrote Will Ross, a Better Together task force member, in 2017, “Stronger regional governance would … ultimately enable the African-American community to seek solutions of the magnitude to the problems that affect us. Contrary to some opinions, rather than being lessened by regionalism, we will be stronger, focused, and committed to a strategic vision where everyone is a winner in the St. Louis region.” Others will oppose a statewide vote, but, that, too, ignores the history of how St. Louis got here in the first place, in a statewide constitutional convention that set the stage for a local vote that ended up being overturned in court anyway. And that was before the creation of all the municipalities that are, by their very nature, political creatures of the state. Amid similar circumstances in 1875, Mortell took to the floor of the Missouri Capitol and pleaded for unity. The Irish immigrant told his fellow representatives, including Joseph Pulitzer, that it was his “first-born conviction” to oppose the division that ultimately mapped the decline of St. Louis. After more than a century of splitting and hacking, it’s time to take Mortell’s advice. A greater St. Louis awaits.

A British art dealer says he has bought a mural stenciled by street artist Banksy on a garage wall in Wales for more than $129,000. The artwork in Port Talbot shows a child playing in falling ash from a dumpster fire, an apparent reference to the steel town’s air pollution. The work appeared in December on a steelworker’s garage. John Brandler of Brandler Galleries in eastern England said Friday that the mural will stay in place for at least two years. “I want to make Port Talbot a go-to place rather than a go-from place,” he said. ‘Close’ actress grateful for Netflix option • Noomi Rapace is in awe of the power of the Netflix audience. The Swedish actress, who stars in the female bodyguard film “Close,” which is now available on the streaming service, says that the company is making choices based on what its audience wants. She said she’s learned in meetings that many of their subscribers are women, who are also picking the movies at home. It’s one of the reasons why “Close” ended up at Netflix, as opposed to getting a theatrical release. In the early stages of production, director Vicky Jewson heard from more than a few companies that female-driven content isn’t commercial enough.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Arte Johnson is 90. Director David Lynch is 73. Guitarist Paul Stanley is 67. Actor Lorenzo Lamas is 61. Actor Rainn Wilson is 53. Drummer Questlove is 48. Actor Evan Peters is 32. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.; Reps. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, and Nanette Diaz Barragan, D-Calif. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Gillibrand; Sen. John Kennedy, R-La.; Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif. THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) To be announced

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Associated Press

LAW & ORDER

LOTTERY

OVERLAND > Suspect sought in fatal shooting • A second former Kirkwood High School football player has been linked by police to the fatal shooting on Monday of another student. The Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis said Friday night that it is searching for Tabyus Mace, 18, of Kirkwood, as a “person of interest” in the death of Justice Johnson. Mace is described as 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds. He is believed to still be in the Kirkwood area, police said. Johnson, of Herculaneum, was shot to death about 7:15 p.m. Monday at the McDonald’s in the 10400 block of Page Avenue in Overland. “Tabyus Mace was identified by witnesses and was seen inside the Jeep Commander involved immediately following the murder,” the Major Case Squad said in a news release. On Thursday, Joseph R. Jordan III, of Kirkwood, was charged with tampering with evidence in connection with Johnson’s death. Police said the Jeep was registered to him and he allegedly wiped it down and tried to hide it afterward. Both Johnson and Mace played on the Kirkwood High football team in 2017 and Jordan was on the squad that won the state championship in 2016,

according to social media posts. Anyone with information about Mace’s whereabouts is asked to contact the Overland Police Department at 314-4281212 or CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. O’FALLON, MO. > Officer fatally shoots armed man • An armed man was fatally shot by O’Fallon police during a mental health check in a residential neighborhood Friday morning. Dale Weich, 64, was shot about 11:45 a.m. in the 1000 block of Mission Hills Drive in O’Fallon. No officers were injured. An officer was visiting Weich along with a mental health professional for a mental health follow-up, according to O’Fallon police. During the interaction, Weich produced a handgun, and the officer shot him, police said. Police said Friday afternoon the veteran officer feared for his life and the life of the mental health professional. Weich was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. O’Fallon police would not release more details on the shooting.

Linda Weich was married to Dale Weich for 33 years before their divorce about a year and a half ago, she said. The couple had two sons who are now 32 and 29 years old. “He was an excellent father to my sons,” she said Friday. Linda Weich said her ex-husband had begun to experience “problems” in the past year and family members had been discussing getting him “evaluated,” though she did not elaborate. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Shots fired on school parking lot • A shooter fired from a car at people in another car in the parking lot of Hazelwood East High School about 2:30 p.m. Friday, St. Louis County police officials said. No one was hurt. The car with the shooter left the scene before police arrived. The other car that was shot at attempted to flee, but crashed into a “fixed object on the parking lot,” police said. The car was found in the back parking lot, unoccupied. Police confirmed that car had been reported stolen from the Spanish Lake area on Friday morning. Police do not have a suspect in custody.

MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 02-43-48-62-64 Mega ball: 24 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $68 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $129 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.6 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 11-24-33-34-38 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $144,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 786 Evening: 216 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 7710 Evening: 4590

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 13-20-26-27-31 Evening: 24-25-30-32-44 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $7 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 697 FB: 4 Evening: 596 FB: 1 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 0511 FB: 7 Evening: 2110 FB: 4

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous >>> stltoday.com/newstips

CONTACT US

INSIDE Arts ...................... B7 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... B8 Business ................. C1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4

Obituaries ........... A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... C5 Travel .................... B9 Weather ................ D9

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

CUSTOMER SERVICE: 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

Customer service hours

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

6:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 7–10 a.m. on holidays. service@stltoday.com

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggestedaverageweeklyretailpricesforhomedeliverywithfulldigitalaccessare: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thu-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/24/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/8/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 10/20/19, 11/3/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/15/19, 12/22/19 and timing of these charges may affect length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201

314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


M 2 SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM BOTTOM LINE

DO SOME DINING

UPCOMING CHATS

General Motors is cutting 14,000 jobs and may idle three assembly plants as it reacts to declining sales. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher talk it over. stltoday.com/watch

Our Great Taste event will feature food from dozens of the 100 best restaurants around St. Louis. Tickets are going fast. stltoday.com/go

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

PEOPLE

Let’s put Humpty Dumpty together again, for good

Banksy piece makes Welsh town a ‘go-to place,’ art dealer says

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the summer of 1875, Nicholas A. Mortell stood alone. Mortell, a lawyer by trade, was one of 66 Missourians elected to a Constitutional Convention in Jefferson City. Among the key issues? What to do about St. Louis. Since pretty much its inception, the city of St. Louis has been in conflict with the Mortell county by the same name that surrounds it. In the 19th century, the city had nearly all the power, and many elected officials wanted to keep it that way. Its leaders proposed a split, creating the separate entities that survive today. At the time, a few elected officials wanted to go the other way and unite the city and the county as a way to end their constant squabbling. Mortell was in that camp. “I am in favor of total consolidation of St. Louis County, but I am not in favor of dividing it, splitting and hacking it in this manner,” the St. Louis lawyer said at the time. “I vote no.” The ayes had it. The statewide constitutional convention created the opportunity for the city and county to vote on the split, and to create a unique city-county form of government in the city of St. Louis. That happened a year later. The vote failed. It was overturned in court. St. Louis has been a house divided ever since. In 2020, that might change. Sometime in coming days or weeks, the nonprofit organization Better Together is expected to announce plans to

put an initiative on the statewide ballot to do what Mortell wanted to do more than a century ago. Call it consolidation, merger or marriage. Call it whatever you want. The plan, in the works since 2013, is actually a recreation of St. Louis with one boundary that unites the city and the county. And before they’ve seen the details, nearly every mayor in the St. Louis region not named Lyda Krewson has already panned the plan. “I think it should be renamed ‘Better Without Us,’” longtime Florissant Mayor Tom Schneider told the Post-Dispatch. Schneider, of course, is the same mayor who tried and failed not long ago to coerce his municipal court into erasing his son’s old criminal conviction. It’s hard to let go of power. From 1875 to 2019, that’s what the issue of consolidation or separation has been about: power. Back then, the city had it and wanted to keep it from the county. Eventually, hordes of city residents fled to the county, setting up their own enclaves, more than 90 of them (down to 88 recently), so that they didn’t have to share the power, or some of their tax revenue. All that power grabbing led to a giant sucking sound leaving St. Louis as a region. As the county was carved up, the power dissipated, both for the city and the region as a whole. Now the city and county each have broken budgets and dysfunctional governmental bodies. The economic power of St. Louis is dwindling. Regional leaders want St. Louis to reclaim the city’s great place as the Gateway to the West. Here’s how St. Louis Blues owner Tom Stillman put it a couple of years ago: “We can continue with more than 100 jurisdictions, often working at crosspurposes, or we can unite and work together to build a stronger community and a brighter future.” It’s time to put Humpty Dumpty back

together again. It won’t be easy. Mayors will say no. Cross-state columnists will take potshots. The region’s historic racial chasms will tremble like the New Madrid fault. Black municipal mayors will suggest that consolidation of power will hurt racial equity, but that will ignore the conclusions of the “Forward Through Ferguson” report, which called for massive consolidation of police departments and municipal courts, used by cash-strapped cities for too long as a fundraising source. In fact, wrote Will Ross, a Better Together task force member, in 2017, “Stronger regional governance would … ultimately enable the African-American community to seek solutions of the magnitude to the problems that affect us. Contrary to some opinions, rather than being lessened by regionalism, we will be stronger, focused, and committed to a strategic vision where everyone is a winner in the St. Louis region.” Others will oppose a statewide vote, but, that, too, ignores the history of how St. Louis got here in the first place, in a statewide constitutional convention that set the stage for a local vote that ended up being overturned in court anyway. And that was before the creation of all the municipalities that are, by their very nature, political creatures of the state. Amid similar circumstances in 1875, Mortell took to the floor of the Missouri Capitol and pleaded for unity. The Irish immigrant told his fellow representatives, including Joseph Pulitzer, that it was his “first-born conviction” to oppose the division that ultimately mapped the decline of St. Louis. After more than a century of splitting and hacking, it’s time to take Mortell’s advice. A greater St. Louis awaits. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

A British art dealer says he has bought a mural stenciled by street artist Banksy on a garage wall in Wales for more than $129,000. The artwork in Port Talbot shows a child playing in falling ash from a dumpster fire, an apparent reference to the steel town’s air pollution. The work appeared in December on a steelworker’s garage. John Brandler of Brandler Galleries in eastern England said Friday that the mural would stay in place for at least two years. “I want to make Port Talbot a go-to place rather than a go-from place,” he said. ‘Close’ actress grateful for Netflix option • Noomi Rapace is in awe of the power of the Netflix audience. The Swedish actress, who stars in the female bodyguard movie “Close,” which is now available on the streaming service, says that the company is making choices based on what its audience wants. She says she has learned that many of their subscribers are women, who are also picking the movies at home. It’s one of the reasons why “Close” ended up at Netflix, as opposed to getting a theatrical release. Director Vicky Jewson heard from more than a few companies that femaledriven content isn’t commercial enough.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Arte Johnson is 90. Director David Lynch is 73. Guitarist Paul Stanley is 67. Actor Lorenzo Lamas is 61. Actor Rainn Wilson is 53. Drummer Questlove is 48. Actor Evan Peters is 32. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.; Reps. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, and Nanette Diaz Barragan, D-Calif. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Vice President Mike Pence; Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Sen. John Kennedy, R-La.; Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif.; Gillibrand

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Mother charged in death of 2-year-old who fell from vehicle • The mother whose 2-year-old died after falling from her vehicle Friday afternoon was charged Saturday with first-degree child endangerment by the St. Louis County prosecutor’s office. Ebony Roby, 25, of the 6100 block of Otto Avenue, was being held in lieu of $50,000 bail, Roby St. Louis County police said in a news release. Roby’s son, Elijah Roby, died Friday after being hit by a car on Jennings Station Road near Interstate 70, police said. Police have not explained how the child fell from the vehicle. After Elijah was hit, his mother picked him up, put him back in her car and drove to a Shell gas station nearby to call 911. Elijah was taken to a hospital in critical condition but was later declared dead. The driver who struck the child cooperated with investigators, police said. EAST ST. LOUIS > Man is shot by deputy • A driver pulled over for what was described

as a routine traffic stop in East St. Louis was shot around midnight Saturday by a St. Clair County sheriff’s deputy, the department said Saturday. The driver of the vehicle stopped on a parking lot at 18th Street and Ridge Avenue. The driver, a 42-year-old man, was transported to a hospital with serious injuries. Trooper Joshua Korando, a spokesman for Illinois State Police’s District 11, said in an email that the driver is expected to survive. State police are investigating the shooting at the request of the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department. Neither the driver nor the deputy was identified Saturday. Korando’s email said a sheriff’s deputy tried to stop a vehicle near 27th Street and Missouri Avenue for a traffic violation. During a short chase, a tire on the fleeing car blew, causing it to stop near Ridge and 18th. “The deputy reportedly shot the driver as he attempted to flee on foot from the traffic stop and in the process of fleeing placed the deputy in fear for his life,” the email said. The sheriff’s department said it is aware of a video of the shooting that has been posted on Facebook but had no further

comment. The video shows a man get out of the vehicle after police order him to come out with his hands visible. The man then begins to run from the car, apparently drops something and is shot as he tries to pick up whatever he dropped. Five gunshots can be heard on the video. The deputy, described as a seven-year officer who has been with the sheriff’s department for two years, has been placed on administrative leave pending completion of the investigation. SHILOH > Police identify woman found dead • Police have identified a woman found dead in Shiloh on Friday as Jill Renee Carroll, 39. Police said she had no permanent address. Shiloh police said Carroll was reported missing in O’Fallon, Ill., and was last seen in the 2400 block of Lebanon Avenue. Police searched a wooded lot in the area and found Carroll’s body about 6:30 p.m. Friday. Police said her body showed no obvious signs of a crime. An autopsy is set for Sunday. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call Shiloh police 618973-5816.

CORRECTIONS • Scott Wirtz, a victim last week of a suicide bombing in Syria, attended All Souls School in Overland. A story in Saturday’s main news section was incorrect. The school closed in 2002.

• Singer-songwriter John Hartford, who grew up in University

City, died in 2001 at the age of 63. The year of his death was incorrect in Joe Holleman’s column Saturday.

Associated Press

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Saturday: Not available Powerball: n/a Power play: n/a Estimated jackpot: $129 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 02-43-48-62-64 Mega ball: 24 Megaplier: 3 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $82 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday: 10-18-27-33-34-41 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.7 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 02-12-19-25-36 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $164,000 PICK-3 Midday: 580 Evening: 531 PICK-4 Midday: 8660 Evening: 0480

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 01-07-14-23-43 Evening: 24-27-34-41-43 LOTTO Saturday: 16-23-34-41-43-51 Extra shot: 03 Estimated jackpot: $7 million PICK-3 Midday: 819 FB: 7 Evening: 454 FB: 3 PICK-4 Midday: 1035 FB: 1 Evening: 3042 FB: 5

CONTACT US

INSIDE Arts ...................... B7 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... B8 Business ................. C1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4

THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.; Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss.; Gillibrand

Obituaries ........... A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... C5 Travel .................... B9 Weather ................ D9

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

CUSTOMER SERVICE: 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

Customer service hours

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

6:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 7–10 a.m. on holidays. service@stltoday.com

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggestedaverageweeklyretailpricesforhomedeliverywithfulldigitalaccessare: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thu-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/24/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/8/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 10/20/19, 11/3/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/15/19, 12/22/19 and timing of these charges may affect length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201

314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


M 3 SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM BOTTOM LINE

DO SOME DINING

UPCOMING CHATS

General Motors is cutting 14,000 jobs and may idle three assembly plants as it reacts to declining sales. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher talk it over. stltoday.com/watch

Our Great Taste event will feature food from dozens of the 100 best restaurants around St. Louis. Tickets are going fast. stltoday.com/go

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

PEOPLE

Let’s put Humpty Dumpty together again, for good

Banksy piece makes Welsh town a ‘go-to place,’ art dealer says

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the summer of 1875, Nicholas A. Mortell stood alone. Mortell, a lawyer by trade, was one of 66 Missourians elected to a Constitutional Convention in Jefferson City. Among the key issues? What to do about St. Louis. Since pretty much its inception, the city of St. Louis has been in conflict with the Mortell county by the same name that surrounds it. In the 19th century, the city had nearly all the power, and many elected officials wanted to keep it that way. Its leaders proposed a split, creating the separate entities that survive today. At the time, a few elected officials wanted to go the other way and unite the city and the county as a way to end their constant squabbling. Mortell was in that camp. “I am in favor of total consolidation of St. Louis County, but I am not in favor of dividing it, splitting and hacking it in this manner,” the St. Louis lawyer said at the time. “I vote no.” The ayes had it. The statewide constitutional convention created the opportunity for the city and county to vote on the split, and to create a unique city-county form of government in the city of St. Louis. That happened a year later. The vote failed. It was overturned in court. St. Louis has been a house divided ever since. In 2020, that might change. Sometime in coming days or weeks, the nonprofit organization Better Together is expected to announce plans to

put an initiative on the statewide ballot to do what Mortell wanted to do more than a century ago. Call it consolidation, merger or marriage. Call it whatever you want. The plan, in the works since 2013, is actually a recreation of St. Louis with one boundary that unites the city and the county. And before they’ve seen the details, nearly every mayor in the St. Louis region not named Lyda Krewson has already panned the plan. “I think it should be renamed ‘Better Without Us,’” longtime Florissant Mayor Tom Schneider told the Post-Dispatch. Schneider, of course, is the same mayor who tried and failed not long ago to coerce his municipal court into erasing his son’s old criminal conviction. It’s hard to let go of power. From 1875 to 2019, that’s what the issue of consolidation or separation has been about: power. Back then, the city had it and wanted to keep it from the county. Eventually, hordes of city residents fled to the county, setting up their own enclaves, more than 90 of them (down to 88 recently), so that they didn’t have to share the power, or some of their tax revenue. All that power grabbing led to a giant sucking sound leaving St. Louis as a region. As the county was carved up, the power dissipated, both for the city and the region as a whole. Now the city and county each have broken budgets and dysfunctional governmental bodies. The economic power of St. Louis is dwindling. Regional leaders want St. Louis to reclaim the city’s great place as the Gateway to the West. Here’s how St. Louis Blues owner Tom Stillman put it a couple of years ago: “We can continue with more than 100 jurisdictions, often working at crosspurposes, or we can unite and work together to build a stronger community and a brighter future.” It’s time to put Humpty Dumpty back

together again. It won’t be easy. Mayors will say no. Cross-state columnists will take potshots. The region’s historic racial chasms will tremble like the New Madrid fault. Black municipal mayors will suggest that consolidation of power will hurt racial equity, but that will ignore the conclusions of the “Forward Through Ferguson” report, which called for massive consolidation of police departments and municipal courts, used by cash-strapped cities for too long as a fundraising source. In fact, wrote Will Ross, a Better Together task force member, in 2017, “Stronger regional governance would … ultimately enable the African-American community to seek solutions of the magnitude to the problems that affect us. Contrary to some opinions, rather than being lessened by regionalism, we will be stronger, focused, and committed to a strategic vision where everyone is a winner in the St. Louis region.” Others will oppose a statewide vote, but, that, too, ignores the history of how St. Louis got here in the first place, in a statewide constitutional convention that set the stage for a local vote that ended up being overturned in court anyway. And that was before the creation of all the municipalities that are, by their very nature, political creatures of the state. Amid similar circumstances in 1875, Mortell took to the floor of the Missouri Capitol and pleaded for unity. The Irish immigrant told his fellow representatives, including Joseph Pulitzer, that it was his “first-born conviction” to oppose the division that ultimately mapped the decline of St. Louis. After more than a century of splitting and hacking, it’s time to take Mortell’s advice. A greater St. Louis awaits. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

A British art dealer says he has bought a mural stenciled by street artist Banksy on a garage wall in Wales for more than $129,000. The artwork in Port Talbot shows a child playing in falling ash from a dumpster fire, an apparent reference to the steel town’s air pollution. The work appeared in December on a steelworker’s garage. John Brandler of Brandler Galleries in eastern England said Friday that the mural would stay in place for at least two years. “I want to make Port Talbot a go-to place rather than a go-from place,” he said. ‘Close’ actress grateful for Netflix option • Noomi Rapace is in awe of the power of the Netflix audience. The Swedish actress, who stars in the female bodyguard movie “Close,” which is now available on the streaming service, says that the company is making choices based on what its audience wants. She says she has learned that many of their subscribers are women, who are also picking the movies at home. It’s one of the reasons why “Close” ended up at Netflix, as opposed to getting a theatrical release. Director Vicky Jewson heard from more than a few companies that femaledriven content isn’t commercial enough.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Arte Johnson is 90. Director David Lynch is 73. Guitarist Paul Stanley is 67. Actor Lorenzo Lamas is 61. Actor Rainn Wilson is 53. Drummer Questlove is 48. Actor Evan Peters is 32. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.; Reps. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, and Nanette Diaz Barragan, D-Calif. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Vice President Mike Pence; Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Sen. John Kennedy, R-La.; Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif.; Gillibrand

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Mother charged in death of 2-year-old who fell from vehicle • The mother whose 2-year-old died after falling from her vehicle Friday afternoon was charged Saturday with first-degree child endangerment by the St. Louis County prosecutor’s office. Ebony Roby, 25, of the 6100 block of Otto Avenue, was being held in lieu of $50,000 bail, Roby St. Louis County police said in a news release. Roby’s son, Elijah Roby, died Friday after being hit by a car on Jennings Station Road near Interstate 70, police said. Police have not explained how the child fell from the vehicle. After Elijah was hit, his mother picked him up, put him back in her car and drove to a Shell gas station nearby to call 911. Elijah was taken to a hospital in critical condition but was later declared dead. The driver who struck the child cooperated with investigators, police said. EAST ST. LOUIS > Man is shot by deputy • A driver pulled over for what was described

as a routine traffic stop in East St. Louis was shot around midnight Saturday by a St. Clair County sheriff’s deputy, the department said Saturday. The driver of the vehicle stopped on a parking lot at 18th Street and Ridge Avenue. The driver, a 42-year-old man, was transported to a hospital with serious injuries. Trooper Joshua Korando, a spokesman for Illinois State Police’s District 11, said in an email that the driver is expected to survive. State police are investigating the shooting at the request of the St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department. Neither the driver nor the deputy was identified Saturday. Korando’s email said a sheriff’s deputy tried to stop a vehicle near 27th Street and Missouri Avenue for a traffic violation. During a short chase, a tire on the fleeing car blew, causing it to stop near Ridge and 18th. “The deputy reportedly shot the driver as he attempted to flee on foot from the traffic stop and in the process of fleeing placed the deputy in fear for his life,” the email said. The sheriff’s department said it is aware of a video of the shooting that has been posted on Facebook but had no further

comment. The video shows a man get out of the vehicle after police order him to come out with his hands visible. The man then begins to run from the car, apparently drops something and is shot as he tries to pick up whatever he dropped. Five gunshots can be heard on the video. The deputy, described as a seven-year officer who has been with the sheriff’s department for two years, has been placed on administrative leave pending completion of the investigation. SHILOH > Police identify woman found dead • Police have identified a woman found dead in Shiloh on Friday as Jill Renee Carroll, 39. Police said she had no permanent address. Shiloh police said Carroll was reported missing in O’Fallon, Ill., and was last seen in the 2400 block of Lebanon Avenue. Police searched a wooded lot in the area and found Carroll’s body about 6:30 p.m. Friday. Police said her body showed no obvious signs of a crime. An autopsy is set for Sunday. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call Shiloh police 618973-5816.

CORRECTIONS • Scott Wirtz, a victim last week of a suicide bombing in Syria, attended All Souls School in Overland. A story in Saturday’s main news section was incorrect. The school closed in 2002.

• Singer-songwriter John Hartford, who grew up in University

City, died in 2001 at the age of 63. The year of his death was incorrect in Joe Holleman’s column Saturday.

Associated Press

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Saturday: 05-08-41-65-66 Powerball: 20 Power play: 3 Estimated jackpot: $129 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 02-43-48-62-64 Mega ball: 24 Megaplier: 3 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $82 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday: 10-18-27-33-34-41 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.7 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 02-12-19-25-36 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $164,000 PICK-3 Midday: 580 Evening: 531 PICK-4 Midday: 8660 Evening: 0480

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 01-07-14-23-43 Evening: 24-27-34-41-43 LOTTO Saturday: 16-23-34-41-43-51 Extra shot: 03 Estimated jackpot: $7 million PICK-3 Midday: 819 FB: 7 Evening: 454 FB: 3 PICK-4 Midday: 1035 FB: 1 Evening: 3042 FB: 5

CONTACT US

INSIDE Arts ...................... B7 Bill McClellan ........ B1 Books .................... B8 Business ................. C1 Editorial .............. A20 Horoscopes ......... EV4

THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.; Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss.; Gillibrand

Obituaries ........... A26 Puzzles ............. EV3-4 Sports calendar .... D2 Stocks ................... C5 Travel .................... B9 Weather ................ D9

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

CUSTOMER SERVICE: 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

Customer service hours

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

6:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 7–10 a.m. on holidays. service@stltoday.com

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggestedaverageweeklyretailpricesforhomedeliverywithfulldigitalaccessare: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thu-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/24/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/8/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 10/20/19, 11/3/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/15/19, 12/22/19 and timing of these charges may affect length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

Local news: Marcia Koenig............................... 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown ....................................... 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand.............................. 314-340-8201

314-340-8664

FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

Features: Amy Bertrand ..................................314-340-8284

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


SATURDAY’S BEST

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

Civilian from St. Louis among dead in Syrian suicide bombing BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE AND DAVID HUNN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Scott Andrew Wirtz’s family thought he was invincible. As a youth, he was fearless. As a brother and a son, his personality filled the room. And as a SEAL, he didn’t talk about serving his country. He just did it. “He was the ultimate hero,” said Matt Shadow, one of Wirtz’s many cousins and extended family members in the St. Louis area. A decorated Navy SEAL and operations support specialist with the Defense Intelligence Agency, Wirtz was “the person that always wanted to serve his country and was doing all of these great things,” said Shadow, 38, of St. Louis. “Anyone who serves in the service especially at that level, you have to have that state of mind of ‘I’m going all in for what I love, my passion,’ and that was him.” Wirtz, 42, of St. Louis, was identified Friday by the U.S. Department of Defense as one of four Americans killed in a suicide bombing by Islamic State in Syria. He was a civilian assigned to the Defense Intelligence Agency as an operations support specialist, guiding on-the-ground intelligence gathering as a part of the Islamic Statetargeted Operation Inherent Resolve. Wirtz served eight years in the Navy and as a Navy SEAL, leaving the service as a petty officer second class in 2005, and getting a job with the Defense Intelligence Agency in February 2017, according to the agency. He had completed three deployments for the agency in the Middle East, and won multiple awards and decorations for his service, including the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Rifle Marksmanship Ribbon, Pistol Expert Medal, and, with the intelligence agency, the Secretary of Defense Medal for the Global War on Terrorism. A St. Louis native, Wirtz attended All Souls Catholic Church in University City and graduated from De Smet Jesuit High School in St. Louis in 1995, said Lisa Wirtz-Hampton, his aunt. She remembers her nephew was fearless. As a youngster, he built a 6-foot skateboard ramp that he used for tricks and, out of high school, he took a job hanging acoustic tile that

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Scott Andrew Wirtz, 42, of St. Louis, formerly a Navy SEAL, died on Wednesday after a suicide bombing in Syria.

required him to be suspended upside down, she said in a text message. Shadow and Wirtz grew up together for a time in Bridgeton, where they became as close as brothers, Shadow said. The two are members of a large, close-knit family. Wirtz’s laugh was often “the best, the loudest and fullest” in the room at gatherings, Shadow said. “He was very fun loving,” he said. After graduating from De Smet, where was as a running back on the football team, Wirtz went straight into the Navy, Shadow said. Their grandfather served in the Navy in World War II. Wirtz didn’t talk about his desire serve his country, he just did it, Shadow said. “He was always the type of person who wanted to serve his country,” Shadow said. “He had that mindset from the get-go, ‘This is what I want to do and so this is what I’m doing.’” When Wirtz visited home, he did not talk much about his military service, Shadow said. He was focused on spending time with family and friends. “He was always more about other people than he was about himself,” Shadow said. “People who don’t know Navy SEALS, they don’t necessarily think of someone who is full of laughter and love, but he was the kindest, most loving person. “He would do anything for anybody, especially for his family and

his brothers that he served with. He was a true warrior with the heart of a teddy bear.” In his free time, Wirtz pursued a number of adrenaline-pumping hobbies, including training with top mixed martial arts fighters, motorcycle riding and underwater spear fishing. He traveled to every continent and lived several years in Thailand, Wirtz-Hampton said. “He loved the adrenaline rush whether driving in his Jeep or motorcycle riding. ... He told me once that the most beautiful place on earth was Bali, Indonesia,” said Wirtz-Hampton, whose brother is Wirtz’s father. . “Our families’ hearts our broken. His mom and dad lost their only child. My brother lost not only a son but to me, his best friend.” Wirtz was not married. Funeral services had not yet been arranged, Shadow said. Wirtz’s father and stepmother, of Lake Saint Louis, and mother had left the St. Louis area for Delaware to receive their son’s remains. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said he was notified of Wirtz’s death by the Pentagon early Friday. “Scott died bravely serving our nation in a dangerous part of the world and for that we are grateful,” Parson said. “I want to thank his family for his service and we also ask all Missourians to join in prayer for the family and other brave men and women that are serving our country.” The defense department also identified two other Americans who died in the attack, Army Special Forces soldier Jonathan R. Farmer, 37, of Boynton Beach, Fla., and Navy Chief Cryptologic Technician Shannon M. Kent, 35, of upstate New York. All three died on Wednesday after a suicide bomber detonated an improvised explosive device in Mabij, Syria. The fourth American was not identified. The attack, which killed at least 16, was the deadliest assault on U.S. troops in Syria since American forces entered the country in 2015. The defense department said the incident is under investigation, but provided no other information. Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

Metro transit security chief out BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Metro Transit’s top two security officials were ousted Friday amid what the operation’s new chief executive said is an effort to coordinate better with local police departments in protecting MetroLink passengers. Sources said Richard Zott, Metro’s public safety chief since 2012, and Jason Davis, his top assistant, are both leaving. Taulby Roach, who took over Jan. 1 as president of Metro’s parent agency — the Bi-State Development Agency — confirmed he had made a change in Metro’s security management. He said he has tapped Scott Grott, MetroLink’s general manager, to be in charge of security on an interim basis along with his other duties. Roach said he would seek to hire someone with public safety expertise and “how it applies in a transit environment” to fill the role on a permanent basis. As for Zott’s and Davis’ employment status, Roach said, “I can’t discuss specific personnel issues.” Zott and Davis could not be reached for comment. The move comes after friction in recent years between Bi-State/Metro and St. Louis County police over how to patrol MetroLink amid a spate of highprofile violent crimes. County Executive Steve Stenger also has clashed on other issues with Roach’s predecessor at Bi-State, John Nations, who resigned. Roach, a longtime transit consultant for St. Clair County, was hired in November by Bi-State’s board. St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson and St. Clair County Board Chairman Mark Kern and either Stenger or a Stenger aide sat in on meetings of the board’s executive search committee. Regarding security, Roach said Friday that “we need to pivot in a new direction (and) part of it is to recast and coordinate better with our professional police departments.” St. Louis County police oversee a MetroLink law enforcement task force that also includes St. Louis police and the St. Clair County sheriff’s department. In addition, Metro maintains its own contingent of security officers and contracts with private security guards. Roach said in addition to strengthening relationships with police departments, he wants to retool Metro’s security operations. Metro security officers will be told to be more “engaging” with customers “so they not only feel safe on the train” but also “comfortable on the train.” That’s among the likely recommendations of a consulting firm hired by the East-West Gateway Council of Governments to review MetroLink security practices. The firm, New York-based WSP USA Inc., is expected to submit its final report to Gateway’s board next month. Before joining Bi-State/Metro, Zott was special agent in charge of the U.S. Defense Department’s criminal investigative service for the Midwest region. Davis, the former assistant chief of security, is a former St. Louis police officer. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

“Absolutely

The No. 1 Show in the world.”

—Kenn Wells, former lead dancer of English National Ballet

I’ve reviewed about 4,000 shows. None can compare to what I saw tonight.” —Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic

“Absolutely the greatest of the great!

It must be experienced.” —Christine Walevska, “Goddess of the Cello”, watched Shen Yun 5 times

“The highest and the best of what humans can produce.” —Olevia Brown-Klahn, singer and musician

— —Broadway World

Can Not Be Seen in China

FEB 8–10

Stifel Theatre Formerly Peabody Opera House

Tickets

ShenYun.com/STL 844-4-TIXNOW 484-9669


LOCAL

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A3

Women’s March here draws thousands BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Thousands of bundled-up marchers braved a wintry mix of frigid air, drizzle and snow flurries in downtown St. Louis on Saturday to support women’s and gender equality and to protest President Donald Trump. The third annual Women’s March on St. Louis, which included many men as well, began in Aloe Plaza across from Union Station. Hundreds carried homemade signs and chanted as they headed east on Market Street and ended at Poelker Park to hear speeches. Similar rallies were held Saturday in Washington and dozens of other cities across the country as part of a movement launched the day after Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. This year’s crowd was smaller than the previous two years probably because of the dreary weather, though some said Saturday said the cold didn’t bother them. Some marchers said that they had also joined the two previous events in downtown St. Louis or in other cities and that the demonstration reflected a surge of activism since Trump’s ascension to the White House. That’s true for Lisa Adams, 49, of St. Peters, and her friend Diane Lokey, 56, of Florissant, who held signs Tuesday that said “Turn the Orange Pinocchio Off” and “Liar and Thief.” They said they became politically active after the 2016 presidential election and were worried about various policies affecting women’s rights, health care and Social Security. Adams and Lokey said that Trump didn’t represent American values and that his rhetoric and policies had supercharged long-standing divisions in the United States. “He’s a racist, hateful man,” Adams said of the president. “Caging children is disgusting. We don’t need a wall. I feel bad for the federal employees, but no way should we give him a nickel for the wall.” “It’s a very dark time in this country,” Lokey said. Several marchers carried signs highlighting immigration and

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Participants in the Women’s March for Action on Saturday walked from Union Station down Market Street and ended up at Poelker Park on Tucker Boulevard. For the first time this year, vendors held an “action fair” after the march for community organizations that help women.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Women rally at Freedom Plaza during the Women’s March in Washington on Saturday.

Trump’s desire to build a wall along the U.S. southern border. Others said they were marching primarily to show support for women and girls in their lives. Brian Keller, 46, an elementary teacher in Webster Groves, walked with his 9-year-old daughter, Elena, who carried a sign saying,

“Little girls with dreams become women with vision.” “I march for her,” Keller said of his daughter. “I want to make sure she knows I support her.” Emmett Ryan, 20, a transgender man from Florissant, brought his 4-year-old dog, Idgey, a boxer, who sported a pink

polka-dot sweater. Ryan, a selfdescribed feminist, said he was concerned about Missouri laws that fail to provide equal protections for transgender people in the workplace. “We can literally get fired for being gay or trans,” said Ryan, who said it was his third time joining the women’s march in St. Louis. “As long as there is injustice toward people who aren’t (cisgender) white men, we’ll be here.” Julie Connoyer, 57, and her husband, Tim Eckels, 63, of Elsah, said they were marching Saturday to pay homage to the suffragettes who marched for voting rights a century ago. After Trump’s victory, they said, they helped form a group of activists in Elsah aimed at engaging and educating voters. Eckels said the women’s marches across the country sent a message “that we’re a country of compassion. We care about making a future for our children — I have two daughters — I want their future to be a secure one where rights of all people are re-

spected, where our environment is clean and safe and where we all have health care.”

RALLY IN WASHINGTON In Washington, an estimated 100,000 protesters packed several blocks around Freedom Plaza, just east of the White House, in a daylong rally. The march itself took about an hour and only moved about four blocks west along Pennsylvania Avenue past the Trump International Hotel before looping back to Freedom Plaza. Organizers submitted a permit application estimating up to 500,000 participants even though it was widely expected that the turnout would be smaller. The original plan was to gather on the National Mall. But with the forecast calling for snow and freezing rain and the National Park Service no longer plowing snow because of the shutdown, organizers changed the march’s location and route. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

“Absolutely

The No. 1 Show in the world.”

—Kenn Wells, former lead dancer of English National Ballet

I’ve reviewed about 4,000 shows. None can compare to what I saw tonight.” —Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic

“Absolutely the greatest of the great!

It must be experienced.” —Christine Walevska, “Goddess of the Cello”, watched Shen Yun 5 times

“The highest and the best of what humans can produce.” —Olevia Brown-Klahn, singer and musician

— —Broadway World

Can Not Be Seen in China

FEB 8–10

Stifel Theatre Formerly Peabody Opera House

Tickets

ShenYun.com/STL 844-4-TIXNOW 484-9669


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S BEST

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Culture decayed since Roe, Luetkemeyer says Missouri U.S. representative says scientific research is advancing the anti-abortion view BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WA S H I N GTO N • U.S. Rep.

Blaine Luetkemeyer told Missourians attending the 46th March for Life here that American culture has gone “downhill” since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion. “When you devalue life ... you devalue our culture,” Luetkemeyer, R-St. Elizabeth, told about 150 Missourians who gathered with Republican officeholders from Missouri hours before the 46th anniversary March for Life attracted tens of thousands to the National Mall. “And from that you can see that we continue to spiral downhill.” Speaking of efforts to constrain abortion rights under President Donald Trump, Luetkemeyer said he believed that those who oppose abortion have a powerful ally, as research expands knowledge on reproduction. “Science seems to be on our side,” he told the group, which included families with young children who had ridden all night on buses from St. Louis and other Missouri points to come to the rally. “Science keeps proving every day what we have been saying.” That message will get a strong retort on Saturday. Following Friday’s massive March for Life rally here, a women’s march is scheduled, a reprise of a huge gathering to protest Trump’s election two years ago. That Saturday march will focus heavily on a woman’s right to choose an abortion guaranteed under the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. The organizers of the women’s march have faced controversy through one leader’s affiliation and defense of Nation of Islam

SALWAN GEORGES • Washington Post

Crowds listen intently at the March for Life rally in Washington on Friday.

Minister Louis Farrakhan, who spouts anti-Semitic views. Some abortion rights politicians have withdrawn support as a result. But the organizers are also united on a series of principles, including this one on abortion rights: “We do not accept any federal, state or local rollbacks, cuts or restrictions on our ability to access quality reproductive health care services, birth control, HIV/ AIDS care and prevention, or medically accurate sexuality education. This means open access to safe, legal, affordable abortion and birth control for all people, regardless of income, location or education.” The back-to-back conflicting rallies are symbolic of what

is now a standoff in Congress on abortion. The Democratcontrolled House has tried to loosen U.S. restrictions on the use of foreign aid for abortions, but the Senate now has more than 50 members who always, or frequently, vote for measures restricting abortion, including Democrats Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania. Luetkemeyer and Reps. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, and Jason Smith, R-Salem, are among several members of the Missouri congressional delegation who have signed onto new abortion restriction legislation for this Congress. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., told the Missouri marchers that while

Trump may have been late to the anti-abortion movement, no president had done more legislatively and administratively to restrict it. That began, he said, with an administrative reversal of former President Barack Obama’s lifting of a prohibition of using U.S. foreign aid for abortions. Trump also has had two Supreme Court Justices confirmed — Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — who abortion rights groups say could tip the court against Roe v. Wade in future decisions. But Blunt also acknowledged that a “Nancy Pelosi-led House” will make it harder to pass legislation restricting abortion, and that many of the battles on

Trump, Pence tout anti-abortion policies at march WASHINGTON POST

WA S H I N GTO N • President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence surprised thousands of protesters demonstrating against abortion on the National Mall by making unannounced speeches at Friday’s March for Life. Pence and his wife, Karen Pence, strode onstage to the delighted cheers of a roaring crowd carrying anti-abortion posters and banners. Then Pence concluded his remarks with a second surprise: Trump, who addressed the march by video feed last year, had again prepared videotaped remarks for the marchers. “When we look into the eyes of a newborn child, we see the beauty and the human soul and the majesty of God’s creation. We know that every life has meaning,” Trump said in his video, before listing his administration’s anti-abortion actions and vowing to reject any legislation passed by the new Democratcontrolled House that “weakens” the campaign to prevent abortion access. He said he signed a letter to Congress on Friday announcing his intent to veto any such law. Pence gave a similar list of anti-abortion actions, including Trump’s appointment of conser-

vative judges to powerful appellate courts across the country, and his reinstatement of the Mexico City policy that bans U.S. government funding for any foreign aid organization linked to abortion. And Pence, too, spoke with religious overtones: “Listen to the truth,” he said, then cited one of the anti-abortion movement’s favorite biblical verses. “Know that He who said, ‘Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you’ also said ‘I will never forsake you.’” Daniel Pierini, 16, was among those cheering, thrilled to hear Pence describe the president’s reinstatement of the Mexico City policy, which he supports. “I like how he explained what the president had done so far for the prolife movement,” he said, adding that he is a fan of Trump and Pence except for their opposition to rights for transgender Americans, because he has transgender friends. Standing with classmates from his Christian school in Forest Hills, Pa., Pierini said his own mother had a troubled pregnancy — a doctor told her that she was at risk of a miscarriage or could die from carrying her pregnancy to term, Pierini said — but she chose not to abort, and give birth to him. Now, he hopes, the Supreme Court with two conservative justices appointed by Trump

will overturn the Roe v. Wade decision that made abortion legal nationwide. Since the March for Life began in 1974, the year after the Roe v. Wade decision, the crowd has been largely youthful, including Catholic school students who ride buses from all over the country to attend the march. In recent years, march organizers said they have tried to welcome a broader group of people who oppose abortion. In addition to the march’s Catholic core, an Evangelicals for Life conference now draws a sizable contingent. Other groups march in step, like Secular Pro-Life and Democrats for Life of America. However, last year, when Trump addressed the crowd, some complained that the polarizing president distanced those who aren’t fans of Trump from the anti-abortion movement. In this shifting environment, the march leaders picked science as their theme this year — under the headline, “Unique from Day One: Pro-Life is Pro-Science.” March for Life president Jeanne Mancini and other leaders of the movement said before the march that they wanted to include a politically diverse audience of anyone who opposes abortion — which, according to polling, includes at least a quar-

ter of Democratic voters. Mancini touted the equal balance in speakers this year, two Republican congressmen and two Democrats (one a state legislator). But on Friday, Trump and Pence spoke again. And again, some said they were unhappy to associate the anti-abortion movement with a president they dislike. “I think the most dangerous thing we ever did is make this a partisan issue. It’s a human rights issue,” said Destiny Herndon-De La Rosa, 35, president of a group called New Wave Feminists that brought about 50 marchers to the event. She gave birth as a teenager, she said, so she understands the plight of women considering abortion. She came from Dallas to attend the march and said her group will participate in both the March for Life and the Women’s March the following day, a march that demonstrates against Trump and Republican policies. “We really want to challenge the GOP to be consistently pro-life,” she said. “What about children at the border? ... They’re doing a lot of things that are anti-life.” She would like to see more Democrats who oppose abortion rights elected to office, she said. When Pence began speaking, she and her group walked out.

Snow is on its way back — this time with a frigid, stiff wind BY BLYTHE BERNHARD AND NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The second winter storm to pummel St. Louis in as many weeks could be even worse for travelers compared with last weekend’s delays of up to 10 hours, state transportation officials said. While snowfall isn’t expected to be as thick, the latest storm will bring colder temperatures — dropping to single digits with the wind chill — making for a more challenging cleanup over the three-day holiday weekend. Blustery wind could undo the snowplows’ progress. And road treatments to prevent snow and ice build-up are not as effective when the temperature drops below 25 degrees, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation. But road crews should win the race against the thermometer, MoDOT official Bob Becker said at a news conference Friday. “These roads will get slick at some point, (but) with a lot less accumulation we should have a better handle on this one,” Becker said. Last weekend’s storm included

five straight hours with more than 1 inch of snowfall, a longer period of heavy snow than the department has ever recorded, Becker said. Snow totals reached 12 inches in some parts of the St. Louis region. The current storm shouldn’t drop more than 5 inches of snow, officials said. With a winter weather advisory in effect from 6 a.m. until 9 p.m. Saturday, the National Weather Service warned St. Louis residents to stay home if possible. “Conditions are expected to change pretty rapidly,” said Kevin Deitsch, warning coordination meteorologist for the weather agency. Storm forecasters are considered essential employees who are working without pay in the partial federal government shutdown. Rain will fall early in the morning, turning to snow between 6 and 10 a.m. that should continue into the afternoon with accumulations between 3 and 5 inches. The temperature will slowly drop through the day, and wind of 1525 mph with gusts up to 40 mph will drop wind chills to about 15 degrees by late afternoon. Blustery wind may continue through Saturday night. Sunday

should be sunny and less windy but even colder, with a high near 23 degrees. Wind chills will drop the temperature to single digits in much of Missouri. Illinois State Police also sent out a winter weather alert advising drivers to stay off the roads this weekend. There were 384 weather-related crashes across the state last weekend, police reported. Snowplows will work through Saturday night to get the roads cleared of snow before the bitter cold sets in. If necessary, the trucks can switch to treated salt that works at lower temperatures, Becker said. Organizers of the St. Louis Women’s March on Saturday plan to persevere through the bitter cold and snow. “Ladies, put on your coats and lace up those boots,” read the news release for the third annual march through downtown that starts at 10 a.m. outside Union Station. Organizers said hot drinks, warming stations and winter gear will be available to marchers. And several mainstay restaurants and businesses in St. Louis neighborhoods planned to stay open over the weekend, despite

expecting fewer customers than normal. Cafe Natasha on South Grand Boulevard had far fewer reservations than usual, owner Hamishe Bahrami said. The restaurant saw about one-third of its usual business last weekend. “I told them (the staff) not to come in because most of our reservations were canceling one after the other,” Bahrami said. She said restaurants that stay open during inclement weather are balancing safety concerns with a desire to serve dedicated customers. “St. Louis has so many great restaurants that are just in our neighborhoods and backyards – if you can walk to them, please help support them,” she said. John D. McGurk’s Irish Pub in Soulard closed early last Friday and opened late Saturday because of the storm, said Julie Laffler, events manager. “It was pretty quiet, which was unusual for us,” she said. Laffler said she doesn’t a remember a storm that bad in the nine years. “It’s very rare we call it quits.” Staff were remaining cautious going into the weekend but “we’re hoping for the best,” Laffler said.

the issues will occur through Trump’s administrative acts. Several speakers noted that Missouri voters replaced a staunch pro-abortion rights senator, Claire McCaskill, with the abortion opponent, Republican Josh Hawley. “Our entire delegation, our entire Republican delegation, is very out front on these issues,” Blunt said. “We increased, you know, the pro-life delegation from Missouri (in the U.S. Senate) by 100 percent. This is a delegation that is willing and eager to fight for the same cause you are here for.” Maggie Bick, a board member of both the national and Missouri Right to Life boards, said that Luetkemeyer’s claim that Roe has led to a decline in the culture is “a good reminder for all of us.” Luetkemeyer’s comments are reminiscent of those Hawley made 13 months ago that blamed human sex trafficking on the “sexual revolution” of the 1960s. Devoid of McCaskill, the Missouri delegation is shifting rightward on cultural issues. It now only has two abortion rights members, Democrats William Lacy Clay of St. Louis and Emanuel Cleaver of Kansas City. Hawley was unable to attend the meeting and rally Friday because he was moving his family to suburban Virginia. But Tom Lacey, a 93-year-old retired aeronautical engineer from Weldon Spring Heights, was here. A veteran of the Battle of the Bulge, he has been riding to the March for Life annually since it began more than four decades ago. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

Former DEA agent found dead in St. Louis County jail He was being held on suspicion of domestic violence, sources said BY CHRISTINE BYERS AND ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • A former assis-

tant special agent in charge of the DEA St. Louis Division was found dead in the St. Louis County jail infirmary early Friday, the Post-Dispatch has learned. Larry “Jay” Reavis, 51, of Des Peres, was pronounced dead at 9:42 a.m. Des Peres police arrested him Thursday on suspicion of domestic violence, sources said. He was last seen conscious, but shaking, in a cell in the jail infirmary in Clayton about 8:30 a.m. Workers assumed he was experiencing alcohol withdrawal, sources said. There were no signs of trauma to the body and it did not appear to be a suicide, according to sources. It’s unclear why Reavis was being held in the infirmary. Acting Director Julia Childrey of the St. Louis County Justice Center said she had no comment regarding Reavis’ death, but would provide information when it becomes available. A St. Louis County daily activity report listed Reavis as having been arrested, but an employee at the Des Peres Police Department said the “command staff” was “gone for the day,” and told a reporter to call back Monday. Clayton police Lt. Al Thuet said his department responded to a medical call from the jail at 9:31 a.m. Friday. “During the course of the investigation, a male was deceased,” Thuet said. Clayton police are now conducting an investigation into the circumstances leading up to the inmate’s death, Thuet said, which is standard procedure. Thuet said he would not release any additional information. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

“We are not able to arrest our way out of it. … I need you all. The police have very limited tools. If churches are involved, it makes my job easier.” St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Tydrell Stevens (standing right), workforce development specialist with the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, practices formal introductions with Dylan Hart on Thursday at an office in St. Louis operated in conjunction with Better Family Life. Stevens was preparing to take the men to a job interview at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Agencies team up to work out of most violent part of town POLICE FOCUS AREA ve r

Bellefontaine Cemetery

Ri

F W.

Kin g

shi

ghw ay

t an

Go o df ellow

iss

lor 70

Na Bri tura dge l

ML

eve nte r

K

Delmar

Va nd

Metropolitan St. Louis are teaming up to combat decades of neighborhood decline and urging ministers to commit to the effort. The two agencies will officially open a joint office on Monday, in a storefront off Martin Luther King Drive. The location was selected to be close to those living in the troubled area. And it’s symbolic, said Michael McMillan, CEO of the Urban League. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stressed the importance of service to community, so it’s fitting to launch the efforts on the street bearing his name, he said. “Working together, there are not that many things we don’t do,” McMillan said. “We have to work harder and smarter and be more collaborative than competitive.” By working out of the same office in the most violent part of town, the agencies can get a deeper understanding of gaps in service, and strengthen areas they already focus on, such as employment and housing. “For the two largest social service community empowerment organizations in the AfricanAmerican community to come together, that is huge for us,” McMillan said. James Clark, vice president of Better Family Life, said more people need to step up. Otherwise, the most challenging parts of town eventually will drag down all of St. Louis. “No singular organization can effectively address it,” Clark said. “We have multigenerational family dysfunction, communities that have been underserved, and our neighborhoods are in crisis.” The agencies are focusing on an area dubbed “the rectangle” by Police Chief John Hayden. Last year, shortly after becoming the new chief, Hayden said he would beef up police resources in that area, which takes in eight neighborhoods. In 2017, two-thirds of the city’s 205 homicides and about half of the violent assaults happened in that part of town. Hayden said Thursday that violent crime in the area was down 19 percent in 2018 over the year before, but no amount of increased police presence will pull a neighborhood out of its decline. “We are not able to arrest our way out of it,” Hayden said at meeting held at Better Family Life as pastors in the rectangle learned more about the collective efforts underway. “If we love on this hurt community, violent crime will come down,” Hayden said. “I need you all. The police have very limited tools. If churches are involved, it makes my job easier. It will benefit us all.” The chief also praised the sustained efforts of the social service agencies, pointing out the expansion of Urban League’s Save our Sons job readiness program, headquartered in Ferguson, into the targeted area, and Better Family Life’s de-escalation program to intervene in ongoing conflicts before they erupt into

vie w

COMMUNITY • FROM A1

1 MILE

(Right to left) Johnnie Cotton, Mark Amador, Darius Davis and other men listen to a presentation on Thursday about working as a patient transporter at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The men are in the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis’ Save Our Sons job readiness program.

Tydrell Stevens (right), workforce development specialist with Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, helps Dylan Hart tie his tie on Thursday at an office operated in conjunction with Better Family Life in the Fountain Park neighborhood in St. Louis. James Clark, vice president of Better Family Life, said of decline in the area: “We have multigenerational family dysfunction ... and our neighborhoods are in crisis.”

violence. The program is receiving national attention with other cities trying their own version. There are 112 churches in the rectangle, bordered by Goodfellow Boulevard, Vandeventer Avenue, West Florissant Avenue and King Drive. Some places of worship are more active than others in their community outreach. Clark said the effort to reduce crime must include “restoring the neighborhood church as a focal point.” “As we empower the church, and the church becomes more relevant, families will have an anchor in the neighborhood,” Clark said. The churches are going to be asked to host weekly neighborhood meetings and become gathering places for residents when they need resources but do not know where to turn.

“A place where when a mother cannot feed her children, she can walk to the local church,” Clark said. “A place where a mother’s daughter who needs a tutor can go for help, a place where when a young man doesn’t adhere to a curfew, Mom can walk him to the church to get help.” Already, churches are stepping up to offer more free meals, hold clothing drives, house job fairs and provide space for mental health counselors. Work is underway to create scout troops for boys and girls. Bishop Steven G. Thompson, senior pastor at Leonard Missionary Baptist Church, is one of the clergy members committed to the new effort. “The church for ages has been the backbone of the community,” he said. “If we don’t get vitally

involved, the neighborhoods are going to be worse than they are.” In January 2018, there was a fatal shooting in front of the church, on North Compton Avenue. “It’s one thing to hear about this stuff somewhere else, but when it’s right on your doorstep, it’s: ‘Hey, something’s got to be done. It’s getting closer to you.’”

‘ANOTHER WAY’ Timothy Watson was baptized at the church in 1966 and is now a deacon. He grew up in the neighborhood and went to the old Vashon High School. “To see how the community turned to all this gun violence and we don’t care who we shoot. This is not how the neighborhood was,” Watson said. “There has always been crime and probably will be forever. But it has to

Post-Dispatch

slow down.” The church’s current outreach includes giving away food and clothes every Saturday, following a morning prayer. In the winter, they make pots of chili and pass out gloves and hats. Being more present in the neighborhood introduces church members to “the guys that got grills in their mouths. Tattoos. Driving the nice cars. We get to meet the community. We do what it takes to make it feel like somebody out there still cares.” Watson hopes other churches in the rectangle will do the same. “I’d like to see churches adopting families, going into their homes and helping them get jobs and doing whatever they can,” Watson said. “If you leave people out here alone and desolate with no hope, they are going to continue to live the way they live. They don’t see any other way out. My objective is to show them another way.” Thompson said that for too long, society has relied on the threat of incarceration to address neighborhood problems. The possibility of a prison sentence is not necessarily a deterrent, he said. “Sometimes I think it’s the gesture of kindness that is going to do more,” said Thompson, who will host an interfaith service at his church on Monday, the federal holiday honoring King. Burton, with New Northside, agreed. “After the crack epidemic, and the huge law enforcement response in dealing with it, neighborhoods emptied out, left behind broken families, parents in jail, children raising themselves,” Burton said. “We continue dealing with the fallout from that.” The key is a balance of resources, which must include police, he said. “I’m praying to God this isn’t the last planned police effort,” Burton said. Thompson, like other pastors involved in the new effort, said the service to community King talked about, often from a pulpit, must be led by the churches. “Sunday is when we worship. But after benediction, that’s when service starts,” Thompson said. “That’s for our outreach efforts. For our neighborhood. “For our fellow man.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

After May riots, state to close maximum-security prison BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

J E F F E R S O N C I T Y • Eight

months after hundreds of inmates rampaged through a short-staffed maximum-security prison in northwest Missouri, the facility is being shuttered as part of Gov. Mike Parson’s reshaping of state government. On Friday, the governor and Missouri Department of Corrections Director Anne Precythe said mothballing the 1,440-inmate Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron will result in no layoffs and could provide savings to pay for long-needed

LOCAL DIGEST KIRKWOOD > Plan for closed grocery site gets initial approval • The Kirkwood City Council gave initial approval Thursday night to plans for the redevelopment of the former Shop ’n Save property at 10461 Manchester Road. A final vote is set for Feb. 7. Plans by developer Nolan Real Estate Interests LLC for the 8.6-acre site include a two-story, drive-thru enclosed self-storage facility with a resident manager’s apartment and 7,500 square feet of retail space on the first floor and multitenant retail building and a restaurant with drive-thru at the front of the property on Manchester Road. The Shop ’n Save closed in November. It was one of numerous stores closed or sold to Schnuck Markets by Supervalu Holdings Inc. This site is on Kirkwood’s border with Warson Woods and Huntleigh. While Mayor Tim Griffin admitted that the project “would not have been my first choice for the property, the market research and facts presented have been compelling.” He said he supported the plan. “I think the chance of this building sitting vacant is very good, and we don’t want that,” Griffin said. ARNOLD > Council rejects business’s request to add outdoor storage • The City Council on Thursday night rejected a rezoning request that would have allowed outdoor storage at I-55 Store It at 3401 Robinson Road. The five-acre property, east of Interstate 55 and Richardson Road, operates as a mini-warehouse storage facility. Nik Bauman of I-55 Store It said he gets three to five calls per week from people who need a place to store their boats, campers and trailers. “We’re trying to fill a need for the community,” he said. But Andrew Sutton, chairman of the beautification commission, said outdoor storage would not be the best use of the site. “We’ve made incredible strides to making the city better and better,” he said. “If we allow this, we’re taking a step backward.” Although the planning commission recommended approval for the zone change, the council rejected it 6-1. In other action, Tim Seidenstricker was appointed to the council to fill the unexpired term of David Owens, who died in December. His term will expire on April 15. Seidenstricker is a patient service representative for Zoll Medical Group. He has a bachelor’s degree in theology from Concordia University Wisconsin.

GOT A STORY TIP? Have the scoop on a local news story? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. Tips are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips

raises for the state’s 11,000 prison workers. “This was all a business decision at the end of the day,” Parson told reporters during a news conference in his office, adding that no other prisons are being eyed for closure. The decision to close Crossroads is part of Parson’s $30 billion budget proposal, which includes numerous changes to other state agencies in what he calls an attempt to streamline government. Precythe said one factor in deciding to close the prison is a drop in the number of inmates in the 21 prisons across the state.

The current population of 30,196 inmates is down from a high of more than 33,000 just a few years ago. The decrease, she said, is partly because of changes to the state’s criminal code that went into effect in 2017, which have led to fewer people being sentenced to prison. The state also has launched a $5 million pilot program aimed at keeping inmates from returning to prison after they serve their sentences. Parson has earmarked an additional $1 million for the program in his budget proposal. “We are very confident that we’re going to be able to sustain

this new level of population,” Precythe said. The estimated $20.6 million saved from the closure will allow for additional salary increases over the 3 percent that Parson is proposing in his budget. Precythe said correctional officers would receive an additional 1 percent increase for every two years of service in an attempt to reward senior employees. The average salary for Missouri prison guards — $31,300 — is among the lowest in the nation. The low pay has led to a high turnover rate and was blamed for the riot that occurred in

May. The disturbance started when 209 inmates refused to return to their housing units. They were upset that staffing shortages had left less time for recreation and other programming. In order to keep the facility operating, Corrections’ officials had resorted to busing officers from other prisons. After six hours of unrest, in which dining halls, the kitchen and storage areas sustained an estimated $1.3 million in damage, the prison was brought back under control. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

NOW THROUGH MONDAY

R E K H I N T G U L J R N I . T D R AY A M

FLOORING SALE! ** PAY NO TAX *

12 Months Interest Free! Textured Plush Carpet

Saxony Plush Carpet

Top of the Line

65oz Plush Carpet

$ 99 $ 99 $ 99

2

sq. ft.

3

4

sq. ft.

Reg. $5.99

Reg. $3.99

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

sq. ft.

Reg. $7.99

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Last Chance at These Prices!

We Take Up & Haul Away Old Carpet. Move Regular Furniture FREE!

CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS Mon & Fri 9-9 Tue - Thur 9-8 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5 www.EdwardsCarpet.com

** Tax will be added then a discount equal to the tax will be deducted*On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details. Previous sales excluded. Glue down excluded.


LOCAL

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

After May riots, state to close maximum-security prison BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

J E F F E R S O N C I T Y • Eight

months after hundreds of inmates rampaged through a short-staffed maximum-security prison in northwest Missouri, the facility is being shuttered as part of Gov. Mike Parson’s reshaping of state government. On Friday, the governor and Missouri Department of Corrections Director Anne Precythe said mothballing the 1,440-inmate Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron will result in no layoffs and could provide savings to pay for long-needed

LOCAL DIGEST KIRKWOOD > Plan for closed grocery site gets initial approval • The Kirkwood City Council gave initial approval Thursday night to plans for the redevelopment of the former Shop ’n Save property at 10461 Manchester Road. A final vote is set for Feb. 7. Plans by developer Nolan Real Estate Interests LLC for the 8.6-acre site include a two-story, drive-thru enclosed self-storage facility with a resident manager’s apartment and 7,500 square feet of retail space on the first floor and multitenant retail building and a restaurant with drive-thru at the front of the property on Manchester Road. The Shop ’n Save closed in November. It was one of numerous stores closed or sold to Schnuck Markets by Supervalu Holdings Inc. This site is on Kirkwood’s border with Warson Woods and Huntleigh. ARNOLD > Council rejects business’s request to add outdoor storage • The City Council on Thursday night rejected a rezoning request that would have allowed outdoor storage at I-55 Store It at 3401 Robinson Road. The five-acre property, east of Interstate 55 and Richardson Road, operates as a mini-warehouse storage facility. Nik Bauman of I-55 Store It said he gets three to five calls per week from people who need a place to store their boats, campers and trailers. “We’re trying to fill a need for the community,” he said. But Andrew Sutton, chairman of the beautification commission, said outdoor storage would not be the best use of the site. “We’ve made incredible strides to making the city better and better,” he said. “If we allow this, we’re taking a step backward.” Although the planning commission recommended approval, the council rejected the zoning change 6-1. In other action, Tim Seidenstricker, a patient service representative for Zoll Medical Group, was appointed to the council to fill the unexpired term of David Owens, who died in December. His term will expire on April 15. KANSAS CITY > Affirmative action proposed for marijuana licensing • Two state lawmakers from Kansas City want to give businesses owned by women and minorities a slight edge in entering Missouri’s new medical marijuana market. Rep. Barbara Washington and Sen. Kiki Curls, both Democrats, have introduced bills to give minority- and women-owned businesses a 10 percent bonus when the state scores license applications. Supporters say affirmative action is appropriate since studies have shown that marijuanarelated arrests have typically fallen disproportionately on minority users, even though white people use marijuana at about the same rate. Efforts by Washington and Curls face big hurdles because Republicans have large majorities in both chambers. “I don’t think anybody should get a leg up one way or the other,” said Rep. Nick Schroer, R-O’Fallon, who has introduced other medical marijuana legislation. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services probably won’t decide who gets licenses until the end of 2019.

raises for the state’s 11,000 prison workers. “This was all a business decision at the end of the day,” Parson told reporters during a news conference in his office, adding that no other prisons are being eyed for closure. The decision to close Crossroads is part of Parson’s $30 billion budget proposal, which includes numerous changes to other state agencies in what he calls an attempt to streamline government. Precythe said one factor in deciding to close the prison is a drop in the number of inmates in the 21 prisons across the state.

The current population of 30,196 inmates is down from a high of more than 33,000 just a few years ago. The decrease, she said, is partly because of changes to the state’s criminal code that went into effect in 2017, which have led to fewer people being sentenced to prison. The state also has launched a $5 million pilot program aimed at keeping inmates from returning to prison after they serve their sentences. Parson has earmarked an additional $1 million for the program in his budget proposal. “We are very confident that we’re going to be able to sustain

this new level of population,” Precythe said. The estimated $20.6 million saved from the closure will allow for additional salary increases over the 3 percent that Parson is proposing in his budget. Precythe said correctional officers would receive an additional 1 percent increase for every two years of service in an attempt to reward senior employees. The average salary for Missouri prison guards — $31,300 — is among the lowest in the nation. The low pay has led to a high turnover rate and was blamed for the riot that occurred in

May. The disturbance started when 209 inmates refused to return to their housing units. They were upset that staffing shortages had left less time for recreation and other programming. In order to keep the facility operating, Corrections’ officials had resorted to busing officers from other prisons. After six hours of unrest, in which dining halls, the kitchen and storage areas sustained an estimated $1.3 million in damage, the prison was brought back under control. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

NOW THROUGH MONDAY

R E K H I N T G U L J R N I . T D R AY A M

FLOORING SALE! ** PAY NO TAX *

12 Months Interest Free! Textured Plush Carpet

Saxony Plush Carpet

Top of the Line

65oz Plush Carpet

$ 99 $ 99 $ 99

2

sq. ft.

3

4

sq. ft.

Reg. $5.99

Reg. $3.99

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

sq. ft.

Reg. $7.99

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Includes 8 lb Pad and Installation

Last Chance at These Prices!

We Take Up & Haul Away Old Carpet. Move Regular Furniture FREE!

CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

STORE HOURS Mon & Fri 9-9 Tue - Thur 9-8 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5 www.EdwardsCarpet.com

** Tax will be added then a discount equal to the tax will be deducted*On Approved Credit, 1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details. Previous sales excluded. Glue down excluded.


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S BEST

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Hillsboro mayor resigns in disgust over police flap

170 dogs taken from puppy breeder, kennel facility in St. Charles County

BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY ERIN HEFFERNAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES COUNTY • A St. Charles County puppy

breeder and kennel facility was shut down this month after inspectors found it was dangerous for both people and about 170 dogs found on the property. Love N Care Pet Farms, at 104 Laura Hill Road near St. Peters, failed inspections with both animal control, and building and code enforcement inspectors, causing the county to evacuate the property and revoke the facility’s kennel license Jan. 4. Investigators found exposed wires, expired pet medications, dogs left in the flooded enclosures in the rain with insufficient shelter and enclosures covered in animal waste, creating a foul smell. Records were in disarray, and the business was unable to provide documentation of vaccinations, prescription medications and other health visits on site, according to county reports. Inspectors also had a confrontation with a groomer employed at the business who is facing animal cruelty charges in Lincoln County. The breeder posted on social media Jan. 5 that it was closed until further notice due to electrical issues, but it was still advertising puppy litters for sale Wednesday. But by Friday morning, the breeder’s Facebook account appeared to have been deleted. Love N Care is run by Bobby and Sandy Coyler and offered grooming and pet boarding, and sold puppies and adult dogs. The business did not immediately respond to requests for comment Thursday and Friday.

SICKLY DOG FOUND The searches of Love N Care started when a resident found a sickly Maltese covered in waste roaming around the area near the facility. It was taken to the county Pet Adoption Center. Animal control officers suspected it may have come from the breeder, which had been the subject of complaints and had been flagged in multiple inspections for not properly cleaning animal waste, according to St. Charles County records. The breeder denied that the sickly dog belonged there, and said no Maltese dogs were missing. Animal control officers inspected several prefabricated buildings and large outdoor enclosures, and listed issues ranging from improper food storage and leaking roofs to precarious extension cords and missing smoke alarms. The property was evacuated after building and code enforcement inspectors checked it Jan. 4. There were 89 adult dogs (including four pregnant dogs), 83 puppies and 12 dogs that were boarding at the facility, inspectors estimated. “It wasn’t that the dogs all looked sickly. It was the state of the facility that was the biggest concern,” said Hope Woodson, director of the St. Charles County Department of Public Health. “I want to be clear these aren’t minor violations that would cause us to do this,” Woodson said. “They have to be major. Our top concern is the safety of the dogs.” Owners declined to have the dogs taken to the county Pet Adoption Center, and began loading the animals into vehicles. The county did not know where the dogs were taken after the property was evacuated. The business’ Facebook account posted this month that puppies were being kept at the owners’ personal home.

St. Charles County inspectors captured photos, including this image of a pregnant dog in her enclosure, of conditions at the Love N Care Pet Farm. The facility was evacuated Jan. 4.

cursing at animal control officers, who eventually contacted St. Charles County police, county records state. Animal control officers also were concerned when Hogarth-Dove pulled a dog out of a cage and held it by its legs, according to a county report. Hogarth-Dove Animal control officers later learned that Hogarth-Dove was charged in November with two counts of animal abuse and six counts of animal neglect or abandonment in Lincoln County. Lincoln County deputies and the Missouri Humane Society said Hogarth-Dove’s dogs appeared to be starving and some had bites that appeared to be from fighting, according to the sheriff’s office. The sheriff’s office obtained a search warrant for Hogarth-Dove’s property in the 100 block of Bear Creek Trail. Along with the Humane Society, they seized 32 dogs, several birds, a rabbit and the remains of a dead horse. Hogarth-Dove was out on a $15,000 bail when Love N Care was evacuated. In October, she was charged with manufacture of a controlled substance, a felony. Her bail had been reduced from $20,000 to $10,000 in that case. St. Charles County animal control officers continue to investigate reports of poor conditions at Love N Care. The county gave the owners a seven-day extension to bring the facility into compliance, extending their deadline to Jan. 28. Erin Heffernan • 314-340-8145 @erinheff on Twitter eheffernan@post-dispatch.com

HILLSBORO • Porn in patrol cars. Missing heroin. Rape kits stored in a moldy refrigerator. Untrained officers on patrol. Crimes without documentation. Those were among the factors included in a report from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department that Mayor Joe Phillips says led him to consider disbanding the city’s police department and contract with the sheriff’s department for police services. But on Friday, he said those factors don’t seem to be enough to convince some people that it’s time to look elsewhere for police services — and many of them have been attacking him and his family on social media and elsewhere because of it. So, he tendered his resignation after serving 12 years as an alderman and one year as mayor. “They say I’m just trying to railroad them out of a job even though my job is to carry out the desires of the board,” he said. “I’m just fed up just trying to do what’s right for the city and the citizens and having constant blowback. “No matter what, we’re not going to appease everybody, but I’m tired of putting forth the effort when I don’t know if it will ever be appreciated or if it’s just fruitless. Enough’s enough.” The move caps a tense week in the county seat. Some members of the department’s eight-man force filed a grievance against the police chief and deputy police chief alleging misconduct and theft earlier this month. That prompted city leaders to suspend the top brass and call in the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department to investigate. Police Chief Steve Hutt has since resigned, and the deputy chief was terminated. Meanwhile, sheriff’s deputies found the department in disarray and issued a report to city leaders, which became public Thursday. The board voted to allow Phillips and the city administrator to negotiate a contract for police services with the sheriff’s department, which drew the ire of some, Phillips said. In his resignation, he wrote: “It is with a heavy heart, yet equal relief, that I tender my resignation as mayor effective immediately.” “I feel that I can no longer subject myself and my family to continued ridicule from those who are solely looking to benefit themselves,” he wrote. This is the second mayor to resign in the community of about 2,800 in the past two years. Phillips was serving out the remainder of Mayor Dennis Bradley’s term after Bradley was accused of getting into a fight with a sheriff’s deputy who once arrested his son. Phillips said he believed most of the people criticizing him were spouses, family and friends of the six remaining officers who may be out of a job should the sheriff’s department not hire them. “If these employees would have spoken up years ago, we may not be in the situation we’re in today,” he said.

ANIMAL CRUELTY CHARGE During the inspection and evacuation, a Love N Care groomer, Michele Hogarth-Dove, began yelling and

plus tax, re based on strictions apply d valid Janu ouble occupancy, ary-Febru ary 2019

Experience what sets us apart • You will see a Doctor of Audiology at every visit • We partner with your physician to diagnose and treat your hearing concerns • We return your phone call the same day • We run on time, every time • We sell and support most brands, including Phonak, Resound, Siemens, Starkey, Widex and Unitron • We guarantee most hearing aids with a 3 year manufacturer warranty. • We offer a wide range of technology to fit different lifestyle and financial needs • We provide financing options

"Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make"

314-647-EARS (3277) 6651 Chippewa, Ste. 217 315 • St. Louis, 63109 For more information, please visit www.southcityhearing.com

Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A Doctor of Audiology


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 2 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

Fans, gear abound at annual event WARM-UP • FROM A1

impressive array of autographed bats. At previous Warm-Ups, he got signatures from Yadier Molina and Stephen Piscotty (who played last year with the Oakland A’s). For Goldschmidt, this weekend marks his first Winter Warm-Up event as a Cardinal. The six-time All-Star was acquired early last month from Arizona, bringing star power to a lineup that fans and owners hope means deep play into the postseason in 2019. The Cardinals have a history of big names at first base, including Mark McGwire and Albert Pujols, players who both have left behind bitter fans for different reasons. Earlier in the day, Randy Luna, of Trenton, Mich., stepped away from one of the autograph tables with Dexter Fowler’s signature across the toes of cleats once worn by the player. It’s one of a dozen autographs Luna plans to get over the threeday event, which continues Sunday and Monday. In all, he paid $950 to get the signatures (costs vary by player). Luna, 43, became a Cardinals fan when McGwire came to town and remained loyal to the team as Pujols developed into a star. He has been coming to Winter Warm-Ups since 2011. “It’s a great way to interact with players, get a little personal time with them,” Luna said. The Fowler cleats will go into a display case with shoes worn by Molina, McGwire and Jedd Gyorko. Fans filled the ballroom with bats, shoes, baseball cards, posters, shirts — almost anything that would hold a Sharpie signature. And for those who came empty-handed, no problem. Just outside the ballroom at the Hyatt Regency were items for sale including Goldschmidt T-shirts for $38, along with flipflops, Fredbird bobble heads and, of course, baseballs.

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“Dex!” yells Joshua Hughes, of Raymond, Ill., who gets in line for an autograph from Dexter Fowler at the Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up on Saturday downtown. Hughes runs an organization called STL Red Coats, which collects coats for children in need.

Cole Brune, of Wentzville, walked through the ballroom carrying a bat freshly signed by Carlos Martinez. Cole’s father, Clint, seemed more excited about the signature than his 8-year-old son. “My wife bought us tickets for Christmas. It’s our first year here. It’s good fun,” said Clint, 35. Cole nodded. The father-son duo also nabbed autographs from Kolten Wong, Alex Reyes, Paul DeJong and Fowler. Among the others signing Saturday were former players Jim Edmonds and St. Louis natives Kerry Robinson and Scott Cooper. The Winter Warm-Up includes a children’s play area with a bouncy house, vendor booths with sports memorabilia for sale and auctions, both si-

lent and live. On Saturday, an auctioneer encouraged fans to “bid with their heart.” An American flag made of bats and balls went for $3,200, a glitter painting of Adam Wainwright brought in $650 and one fan paid $500 to be a “broadcaster for the day” on Fox Sports Midwest. On Sunday, those scheduled to sign autographs include Wainwright, Michael Wacha, Miles Mikolas and manager Mike Shildt. Broadcasters Mike Shannon, John Rooney, Rick Horton and Al Hrabosky will be among those taking on an emcee role. For more information on the Winter Warm-Up, go to cardinals.com/WWU. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

“It’s sort of heavy,” said Phillip Schultz, of Belleville, who poses for a photo wearing St. Louis Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina’s 2018 Gold Glove. The award was on display Saturday at the Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up. The event includes a children’s play area with a bouncy house, vendor booths with sports memorabilia for sale and auctions.

MORE FROM WINTER WARM-UP Great expectations • Fans playfully grill Mozeliak, get first look at the Cardinals’ new stars Hochman • Cards-Cubs rivalry heats up on cold day with Bryant taking potshots at St. Louis Frederickson • Family partners with Mozeliak, Cardinals to fight retinal disease SPORTS • D1

plus tax, re based on strictions apply d valid Janu ouble occupancy, ary-Febru ary 2019

Experience what sets us apart • You will see a Doctor of Audiology at every visit • We partner with your physician to diagnose and treat your hearing concerns • We return your phone call the same day • We run on time, every time • We sell and support most brands, including Phonak, Resound, Siemens, Starkey, Widex and Unitron • We guarantee most hearing aids with a 3 year manufacturer warranty. • We offer a wide range of technology to fit different lifestyle and financial needs • We provide financing options

"Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make"

314-647-EARS (3277) 6651 Chippewa, Ste. 217 315 • St. Louis, 63109 For more information, please visit www.southcityhearing.com

Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A Doctor of Audiology


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

WARNING: This product contains nicotine. Nicotine is an addictive chemical.

More than one million smokers have joined the community. Make the switch.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FROM A1

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Tydrell Stevens (standing right), workforce development specialist with the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, practices formal introductions with Dylan Hart on Thursday at an office in St. Louis operated in conjunction with Better Family Life. Stevens was preparing to take the men to a job interview at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Agencies team up to work out of most violent part of town (Right to left) Johnnie Cotton, Mark Amador, Darius Davis and other men listen to a presentation on Thursday about working as a patient transporter at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The men are in the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis’ Save Our Sons job readiness program.

COMMUNITY • FROM A1

Ri ve r

vie w

POLICE FOCUS AREA Bellefontaine Cemetery

Kin g

shi

ghw ay

nt

Go o df ellow

a iss

lor

F W. 70

Na Bri tura dge l

ML

eve nte r

K

Delmar

Va nd

living in the troubled area. And it’s symbolic, said Michael McMillan, CEO of the Urban League. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stressed the importance of service to community, so it’s fitting to launch the efforts on the street bearing his name, he said. “Working together, there are not that many things we don’t do,” McMillan said. “We have to work harder and smarter and be more collaborative than competitive.” By working out of the same office in the most violent part of town, the agencies can get a deeper understanding of gaps in service, and strengthen areas they already focus on, such as employment and housing. “For the two largest social service community empowerment organizations in the AfricanAmerican community to come together, that is huge for us,” McMillan said. James Clark, vice president of Better Family Life, said more people need to step up. Otherwise, the most challenging parts of town eventually will drag down all of St. Louis. “No singular organization can effectively address it,” Clark said. “We have multigenerational family dysfunction, communities that have been underserved, and our neighborhoods are in crisis.” The agencies are focusing on an area dubbed “the rectangle” by Police Chief John Hayden. Last year, shortly after becoming the new chief, Hayden said he would beef up police resources in that area, which takes in eight neighborhoods. In 2017, two-thirds of the city’s 205 homicides and about half of the violent assaults happened in that part of town. Hayden said Thursday that violent crime in the area was down 19 percent in 2018 over the year before, but no amount of increased police presence will pull a neighborhood out of its decline. “We are not able to arrest our way out of it,” Hayden said at meeting held at Better Family Life as pastors in the rectangle learned more about the collective efforts underway. “If we love on this hurt community, violent crime will come down,” Hayden said. “I need you all. The police have very limited tools. If churches are involved, it makes my job easier. It will benefit us all.” The chief also praised the sustained efforts of the social service agencies, pointing out the expansion of Urban League’s Save our Sons job readiness program, headquartered in Ferguson, into the targeted area, and Better Family Life’s de-escalation program to intervene in ongoing conflicts before they erupt into violence. The program is receiving national attention with other cities trying their own version. There are 112 churches in the rectangle, bordered by Goodfellow Boulevard, Vandeventer Avenue, West Florissant Avenue and King Drive. Some places of worship are more active than others in their community outreach. Clark said the effort to reduce crime must include “restoring the neighborhood church as a focal point.” “As we empower the church, and the church becomes more relevant, families will have an

1 MILE

Tydrell Stevens (right), workforce development specialist with Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, helps Dylan Hart tie his tie on Thursday at an office operated in conjunction with Better Family Life in the Fountain Park neighborhood in St. Louis. James Clark, vice president of Better Family Life, said of decline in the area: “We have multigenerational family dysfunction ... and our neighborhoods are in crisis.”

anchor in the neighborhood,” Clark said. The churches are going to be asked to host weekly neighborhood meetings and become gathering places for residents when they need resources but do not know where to turn. “A place where when a mother cannot feed her children, she can walk to the local church,” Clark said. “A place where a mother’s daughter who needs a tutor can go for help, a place where when a young man doesn’t adhere to a curfew, Mom can walk him to the church to get help.” Already, churches are stepping up to offer more free meals, hold clothing drives, house job fairs and provide space for mental health counselors. Work is underway to create scout troops for boys and girls. Bishop Steven G. Thompson, senior pastor at Leonard Missionary Baptist Church, is one of the clergy members committed to the new effort. “The church for ages has been

the backbone of the community,” he said. “If we don’t get vitally involved, the neighborhoods are going to be worse than they are.” In January 2018, there was a fatal shooting in front of the church, on North Compton Avenue. “It’s one thing to hear about this stuff somewhere else, but when it’s right on your doorstep, it’s: ‘Hey, something’s got to be done. It’s getting closer to you.’”

‘ANOTHER WAY’ Timothy Watson was baptized at the church in 1966 and is now a deacon. He grew up in the neighborhood and went to the old Vashon High School. “To see how the community turned to all this gun violence and we don’t care who we shoot. This is not how the neighborhood was,” Watson said. “There has always been crime and probably will be forever. But it has to slow down.” The church’s current outreach

includes giving away food and clothes every Saturday, following a morning prayer. In the winter, they make pots of chili and pass out gloves and hats. Being more present in the neighborhood introduces church members to “the guys that got grills in their mouths. Tattoos. Driving the nice cars. We get to meet the community. We do what it takes to make it feel like somebody out there still cares.” Watson hopes other churches in the rectangle will do the same. “I’d like to see churches adopting families, going into their homes and helping them get jobs and doing whatever they can,” Watson said. “If you leave people out here alone and desolate with no hope, they are going to continue to live the way they live. They don’t see any other way out. My objective is to show them another way.” Thompson said that for too long, society has relied on the threat of incarceration to address

Post-Dispatch

neighborhood problems. The possibility of a prison sentence is not necessarily a deterrent, he said. “Sometimes I think it’s the gesture of kindness that is going to do more,” said Thompson, who will host an interfaith service at his church on Monday, the federal holiday honoring King. Burton, with New Northside, agreed. “After the crack epidemic, and the huge law enforcement response in dealing with it, neighborhoods emptied out, left behind broken families, parents in jail, children raising themselves,” Burton said. “We continue dealing with the fallout from that.” The key is a balance of resources, which must include police, he said. “I’m praying to God this isn’t the last planned police effort,” Burton said. Thompson, like other pastors involved in the new effort, said the service to community King talked about, often from a pulpit, must be led by the churches. “Sunday is when we worship. But after benediction, that’s when service starts,” Thompson said. “That’s for our outreach efforts. For our neighborhood. “For our fellow man.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Lawsuits against government are delayed Federal courts have remained open, but funds and attorneys are running low BY DENISE LAVOIE Associated Press

RICHMOND, VA. • During the

longest-ever government shutdown, the federal judiciary has remained open, allowing the wheels of justice to keep turning in most criminal cases. But many civil cases have come to a halt because the U.S. Department of Justice doesn’t have enough attorneys working to handle them. Judges have granted the government delays after the Justice Department explained that without funding, its attorneys are barred from working on cases except in limited circumstances, including “emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property.” Among the cases that have been put off: • A lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump’s administration’s asylum ban on immigrants who illegally cross the southern border. • A lawsuit aimed at preventing offshore drilling tests in the Atlantic Ocean. • A wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the family of a man who was shot to death after the 2016 takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. “It was disappointing to hear

that it was being put on hold,” said Jeanette Finicum, the widow of Robert “LaVoy” Finicum, an Arizona rancher killed by police during the armed occupation of the Malheur refuge. The family’s suit names the United States, the FBI, Oregon State Police and others as defendants, alleging that he was “deliberately executed by a preplanned government ambush.” The shutdown’s impact on the courts may worsen. So far, federal courts have been able to operate by using revenue from various fees charged to lawyers, defendants and litigants, as well as other non-earmarked funds. But that money is expected to run out on Friday. After that, judges would continue working with pay, but thousands of court employees would probably be furloughed or told to work without pay. Each judicial district would decide which employees are essential. Criminal cases, because of constitutional requirements for speedy trials, would probably be given priority, potentially causing longer delays for civil cases. Charles Tiefer, a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, said delays in cases in which the government is being sued generally favor the

government. “As the old saying goes, ‘Justice delayed is justice denied,’” Tiefer said. “During delays, the attention of the witnesses is lost, the progress of the case is arrested and the case just loses its priority,” he said. In some cases, judges have pushed back, refusing to grant the government’s request for a “stay,” a temporary halting of a judicial proceeding. In at least five lawsuits filed over the 2020 census, judges have denied the government’s requests, including a lawsuit alleging the Trump administration’s plan to add a citizenship question to the census is aimed at undercounting minorities and immigrants. In that case, a federal judge in Maryland said he expected the government’s attorneys “will find the means” to stick to the previously set schedule. “The financial matter that is the basis for Defendants’ request is a dispute internal to the Government,” Judge George Hazel wrote. In November, after a federal judge in California blocked the Trump administration from enforcing a ban on asylum for immigrants who illegally cross the southern border, government at-

torneys hurriedly asked a federal appeals court, then the U.S. Supreme Court, to suspend the order, terming illegal border crossings an “ongoing and increasing crisis.” But on Dec. 26, four days after the government shutdown began in a stalemate over the president’s demand for $5.7 million to build a U.S.-Mexico border wall, the Justice Department asked to put their appeal of the judge’s ruling on hold, “in light of the lapse of funding” for the department. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted the request. “The fact that they sought a stay shows that the claimed emergency — which they argued all the way up to the Supreme Court — is largely manufactured,” said Baher Azmy, legal director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, one of the groups suing the government. Another case that could be slowed by the shutdown is a lawsuit filed by environmental groups over the issuance of permits to allow five companies to conduct seismic air gun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. Environmental groups say the blasts —conducted in preparation for potential offshore drilling — can harm marine life. Ten East Coast states have asked to join the law-

Democrats, conservatives balk at border proposal TRUMP • FROM A1

parties should embrace,” Trump said. He added: “The radical left can never control our borders. I will never let it happen.” But the initial reaction to the offer from Democrats and conservative border hawks was hostile, raising doubt that it would be enough to break an impasse that has resulted in 800,000 federal workers’ being furloughed or forced to work without pay and numerous government agencies, including the Department of Homeland Security, operating at minimal staffing levels. The shutdown has become the longest in U.S. government history. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., dismissed the proposal as a “nonstarter” and vowed that Democrats would pass legislation this week to reopen the government, putting the onus on the Republican-led Senate to follow suit. “The president must sign these bills to reopen government immediately and stop holding the American people hostage with this senseless shutdown,” Pelosi said. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., also said he opposed the plan. Moving ahead on Trump’s plan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced that he would put the legislation on the Senate floor for a vote next week. And Trump heralded the package as a bipartisan, “compassionate response” that would offer humanitarian relief on the border and curb illegal immigration while allowing the government to reopen. McConnell laid out his plan in a private call with GOP senators late Saturday afternoon. There was little dissent, according to an official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss private deliberations. In addition to its immigration provisions, the package — which McConnell could move to advance as early as Tuesday, although a Thursday vote appears more likely — would reopen all parts of the government that are closed. It also would provide emergency funding for U.S. areas hit by hurricanes, floods and other natural disasters. The package would also include an extension of the Violence Against Women Act.

AIDES CITE GOOD-FAITH EFFORT Senior White House aides cast the proposal as a good-faith effort from the president to incorporate ideas from Democrats during weeks of talks with a negotiating team led by Vice President Mike Pence and senior adviser Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law. In a briefing for reporters after Trump’s remarks, the aides acknowledged that the bill faces a difficult path in the Senate, where it would require 60 votes

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

President Donald Trump attends a naturalization ceremony Saturday in the Oval Office.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., takes questions from reporters Saturday on Capitol Hill. She dismissed President Donald Trump’s latest budget proposal as a “nonstarter.”

to overcome a filibuster. But they predicted that ordinary Americans would view the plan as a compromise and pressure lawmakers to make the deal. The shutting down of some 25 percent of the federal government was triggered by Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion to build more than 200 miles of new wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Pelosi has called the wall “immoral,” and Democrats are refusing to offer more than $1.3 billion, maintaining current funding levels for border barriers and fences. Democrats also frequently point out that Trump long claimed that Mexico would pay for the wall. Trump’s offer would not provide the path to permanent legal status — or citizenship — for DACA beneficiaries that many Democrats have sought in any immigration deal that dramatically ramps up border security. The DACA program, which began in 2012 under President Barack Obama, has provided renewable work permits to more than 700,000 undocumented young immigrants, known as Dreamers, who were brought into the country when they were children. Trump appealed to rank-andfile Democratic lawmakers, hoping to peel them away from lead-

ership, but many issued statements of opposition moments after his 13-minute speech. Trump’s proposal also was pilloried by some of the most influential border hawks, including conservative author and commentator Ann Coulter, who said in a tweet that the proposal was “amnesty.” Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, a longtime anti-immigration voice in the House, blasted Trump’s offer, and the conservative news website Breitbart noted that most of the border would remain without a wall under the plan. Pence vehemently disputed the suggestion that the plan was a betrayal of Trump’s hard-line border agenda. “This is not an amnesty bill,” he said, noting the deportation protections were temporary under the plan.

McCONNELL REVERSES COURSE Some congressional Republicans tried to bolster the president. “This bill takes a bipartisan approach to reopening the closed portions of the federal government,” McConnell said in a statement. Yet McConnell’s decision to advance the bill to the Senate floor in the coming days marks a reversal of his promise not to hold votes on leg-

islation that did not already have explicit support from the White House and Democratic leaders. The calculus for the majority leader changed as the shutdown has dragged on, people familiar with his thinking said, pointing to Pelosi’s letter to Trump on Wednesday suggesting he postpone his Jan. 29 State of the Union address until the government reopens. That moment, the sources said, convinced McConnell that Pelosi would not negotiate without further incentives. McConnell spoke to Trump that afternoon, asking the president to add legislative sweeteners for Democrats, and Trump agreed, the official said. Saturday’s offer also marks a reversal for Trump, who had indicated for weeks that he would not include DACA in the talks. Trump had said he was hoping the Supreme Court would hear an appeal to a lower court’s injunction on his attempt to end the program; a high court ruling in his favor would give him more leverage. But the Supreme Court signaled Friday that it might not take the case, meaning Trump cannot end the program for the time being. On TPS, Trump has declared an end to a program that has of-

suit to try to stop the blasting. The government has asked a judge to temporarily exempt it from responding to the state of South Carolina’s motion to join the lawsuit because of the shutdown’s limitation on its attorneys. But last week, the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management modified its shutdown plan and said it would bring back 40 employees to work on processing a second set of seismic permits. A judge on Friday barred the bureau from working on additional permits during the shutdown. “It’s amazing how they can find government employees to work on things that appear to be a Trump administration priority when they can’t find employees to work on matters that are more important to the average citizen in the country,” said Catherine Wannamaker, a senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, one of the groups suing the administration. The shutdown also prompted a federal judge in North Carolina to postpone a trial in a lawsuit accusing Smithfield Foods of creating unreasonable nuisances for neighbors of its industrial-scale hog farms. The judge said the trial must be put off because jury pay could not be guaranteed during the shutdown.

fered hundreds of thousands of immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan the right to remain in the United States after they were uprooted from their home countries during natural disasters and other emergencies. But that move also has been enjoined by federal courts. White House aides said the president’s proposal was an echo of a bipartisan bill called the “Bridge Act,” previously offered by Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., that would have provided a threeyear renewal of DACA-style protections from deportation — a period in which it was hoped lawmakers would pass a comprehensive immigration bill that included a permanent solution. But Trump’s proposal was far smaller in scope, covering fewer immigrants, and Democrats said his plan was akin to trading “permanent” border wall for “temporary” protections for immigrants that Trump could reverse in a second term. Asked about that criticism, Pence replied: “I read that turn of phrase.” He then changed the subject. Durbin issued a statement saying he opposed the offer. After his speech, Trump joined a call with House Republicans, stressing his desire to finalize a deal with Democrats, according to an official on that call. Kevin McAleenan, the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, also detailed to Republican lawmakers the administration’s case for a wall, as well as for additional border security resources to “stop the flow of crime, drugs and trafficking coming over the southern border,” the official said. Other Trump aides said they think the president has the legal authority to declare a national emergency at the border, which could allow him to redirect Pentagon funding to a build a border wall, but they said Trump preferred a negotiated solution. At the White House on Saturday morning, Trump continued to point to a new “caravan” of Central American migrants crossing into Mexico from Guatemala, which was featured on “Fox & Friends,” a show the president watches regularly. “If we had a wall, we wouldn’t have a problem,” Trump told reporters.

NEW CITIZENS SWORN IN Ahead of his afternoon remarks from the White House, Trump oversaw a naturalization ceremony in the Oval Office for five new Americans, who recited the Oath of Allegiance, led by Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. They had come to the United States from Iraq, Bolivia, Britain, South Korea and Jamaica. The image of the new citizens raising their hands in the Oval Office was meant to underscore Trump’s support of foreigners who enter the country through legal immigration programs, even as his administration has supported policies to slash overall immigration. “Each of you worked hard for this moment,” Trump told them. “You followed the rules, upheld our laws, and contributed to the strength and success and vitality of our nation.”


FROM A1

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

“Either work for a few cents an hour or live without basic things like soap, shampoo, deodorant and food.” Wilhen Hill Barrientos, an ICE detainee

For-profit lockups deny they charge too much for items ICE • FROM A1

goods are part of a broader strategy by private prisons to harness cheap inmate labor to lower operating costs and boost profits. Immigrants and activists say facilities such as Adelanto, owned by Boca Raton, Fla.-based Geo Group Inc., the nation’s largest for-profit corrections company, deliberately skimp on essentials, even food, to coerce detainees to labor for pennies an hour to supplement meager rations. Geo Group spokesperson Pablo Paez called those allegations “completely false.” He said detainees are given meals approved by dietitians, the labor program is strictly voluntary, and wage rates are federally mandated. The company said Geo Group contracts with outside vendors to run its commissaries, whose prices “are in line with comparable local markets.” It also said Geo Group makes a “minimal commission” on commissary items, most of which goes into a “welfare fund” to purchase recreational equipment and other items for detainees. Relatives can send money electronically to fund their loved ones’ commissary accounts, for fees that can reach as high as 10 percent of the amount deposited, some families report. But for many immigrant detainees, scrubbing toilets or mopping floors is the only way they say they can earn enough to stay clean and fed. You “either work for a few cents an hour or live without basic things like soap, shampoo, deodorant and food,” detainee Wilhen Hill Barrientos, 67, said in a class-action lawsuit filed last year by the Southern Poverty Law Center against Nashville, Tenn.-based CoreCivic Inc., the nation’s second-largest for-profit prison operator. In the complaint, Barrientos said guards told him to “use his fingers” when he asked for toilet paper at the Stewart Detention Center, located in rural Lumpkin, Ga. Detainees are challenging what they say is an oppressive business model in which the companies deprive them of essentials to force them to work for sub-minimum wages, money that is soon recaptured in the firms’ own commissaries. “These private prison companies are profiting off of what is essentially a company-store scenario,” said the SPLC’s Meredith Stewart, a lead attorney on the class action. Immigrant rights groups have filed similar lawsuits against CoreCivic and Geo Group in California, Colorado, Texas and Washington. Government watchdogs and lawmakers are taking notice too. In November, 11 U.S. senators, including 2020 presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, sent letters to Geo Group and CoreCivic lambasting the “perverse profit incentive at the core of the private prison business,” which has benefited from a crackdown on illegal immigrants under President Donald Trump. The senators cited a December 2017 report from the U.S. Office of the Inspector General documenting problems at lockups contracted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The inspector general found spoiled,

REUTERS PHOTOS

ICE detainees are seen at the Adelanto immigration detention center in Adelanto, Calif. The facility is run by the Geo Group Inc.

Immigrants sit in a cell for incoming ICE detainees at the Adelanto immigration detention center.

moldy and expired food, and cited detainees’ complaints that hygiene products were “not provided promptly or at all,” the report said. The lawmakers have demanded Geo Group and CoreCivic respond to allegations of detainee mistreatment. Geo Group said a comprehensive, detailed response is underway. The company told Reuters that Geo Group has “already taken steps to remedy areas where our processes fell short of our commitment to high-quality care.” CoreCivic spokeswoman Amanda Gilchrist said the company disagrees with the senators’ assertions, and that it provides “all daily needs” of detainees. She said CoreCivic follows all federal standards for ICEcontracted facilities, including management of the outside vendors that run its commissaries, prices for commissary products, and fees charged to families for depositing funds into detainees’ commissary accounts.

BULL MARKET IN IMMIGRANT DETENTION The U.S. for-profit prison industry has exploded over the past two decades. In 2016, 128,300 people — roughly 1 in 12 U.S. prisoners — were incarcerated in private lock-ups. That is an increase of 47 percent from 2000, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Geo Group and CoreCivic together manage over half of private prison contracts in the United States, with combined revenues of nearly $4 billion in 2017. ICE is the No. 1 customer by revenue for both companies. Trump’s immigration polices have been a boon for the industry, which spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on his election and inauguration. In fiscal 2019, the number of people in ICE detention has averaged 45,200 daily, according to agency spokesman Vincent Picard. That is up nearly 19 percent from fiscal 2017. Both Geo Group and CoreCivic have added hundreds of immigration detention beds

over the past year. Stock prices for the two companies are up about 30 percent since Trump’s election. The government pays private prison companies fees ranging from roughly $60 to $130 daily for the care and feeding of each detainee. At CoreCivic’s Stewart Detention Center in Georgia, which houses about 1,700 undocumented immigrants, ICE pays a per diem of $62.03 for each detainee housed there. CoreCivic’s revenue from Stewart alone was $38 million last year, court records show. Detainee Barrientos, the lead lawsuit plaintiff, said in court documents he worked 7 days a week at the facility to purchase hygiene products and phone cards to call family members in Guatemala. Those basics can add up. Reuters viewed a copy of the center’s commissary price list. It shows detainees are charged $11.02 for a 4 oz. tube of Sensodyne toothpaste, available on Amazon.com for $5.20.

Dove soap priced at $2.44 at the commissary is available for just over a dollar at Target. A 2.5 oz tube of Effergrip denture cream that sells for $4.99 at Walmart is $7.12 at the commissary. Fees are pricey too. Vioney Gutierrez, a former detainee at Geo Group’s Adelanto facility in California, said 10 percent of the money her family spent to fund her commissary account was consumed by fees. “When my daughter put in $40, I got $36,” said Gutierrez, 37. A native of Mexico, she said she spent six months at Adelanto in 2018 after asking for asylum at a port of entry. She is currently out on bond and staying with family in Oregon while she awaits the outcome of her deportation case. Geo Group said its inmate commissary account services are provided by a third-party vendor, and that it does not profit from those transactions. At Adelanto, Gutierrez said it cost $1 a minute to make calls to Mexico, and even more to places further afield, prices that keep many detainees from communicating with their families. Geo Group said ICE contracts with a third-party telecom vendor and that the company plays “no role whatsoever in communications services.” High commissary prices have long been a complaint of prison reformers. But for immigrant detainees, many of whom borrowed money or drained savings to reach the United States, the prices are particularly prohibitive. Cruz, the Honduran detainee, spent eight months at Adelanto last year before an immigrant rights organization paid the $10,000 bond for his release. He is now in Texas awaiting the outcome of his case. In his final months at Adelanto, Cruz said he resorted to bartering, trading shoes he wove out of plastic bags for ramen and cookies.

30% OFF

THE REGULAR PRICE OF THE ENTIRE LINE OF

STANTON PATTERN CARPETS AND

HALL & STAIR RUNNERS Alexander

Hundreds of patterns & colors to choose from. Also available in special order area rugs. HURRY! SALE ENDS SOON.

Brentwood 2714 Breckenridge Industrial Ct. Chesterfield 14816 Clayton Rd. Off Manchester, 1 block west of Hanley

1 block east of Baxter

314-647-6060 | Mon-Fri 9-5:30 | Sat 9-5

636-391-6800 | Mon-Fri 9-8 | Sat 9-5 mid-westfloor.com

National Wood Floor Association


GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

$11.02

$3.25

$3.35

TOOTHPASTE (4 OZ.)

CAN OF TUNA

DEODORANT STICK

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

“Either work for a few cents an hour or live without basic things like soap, shampoo, deodorant and food.” Wilhen Hill Barrientos, ICE detainee

Detained immigrants lament cost of items at for-profit lockups BY MICHELLE CONLIN AND KRISTINA COOKE Reuters

NEW YORK • Detained in a California lockup with hundreds of other immigrants seeking asylum, Duglas Cruz faced a choice. He could content himself with a jailhouse diet that he said left him perpetually hungry. Or he could labor in the prison’s kitchen to earn money to buy extra food at the commissary. Cruz went to work. But his $1-a-day salary at the privately run Adelanto Detention Facility did not stretch far. A can of commissary tuna sold for $3.25. That is more than four times the price at a Target store near the small desert town of Adelanto, about two hours northeast of Los Angeles. Cruz stuck with ramen noodles at 58 cents a package, double the Target price. A miniature deodorant stick, at $3.35 and more than three days’ wages, was an impossible luxury, he said. “If I bought that there wouldn’t be enough money for food,” Cruz said. Tuna and deodorant would seem minor worries for detainees such as Cruz. Now 25, he sought asylum after fleeing gangs trying to recruit him in his native Honduras, a place where saying “no” can mean execution. But immigration attorneys say the pricey commissary goods are part of a broader strategy by private prisons to harness cheap inmate labor to lower operating costs and boost profits. Immigrants and activists say facilities such as Adelanto, owned by Boca Raton, Fla.-based Geo Group Inc., the nation’s largest for-profit corrections company, deliberately skimp on essentials, even food, to coerce detainees to labor for pennies an hour to supplement meager rations. Geo Group spokesperson Pablo Paez called those allegations “completely false.” He said detainees are given meals approved by dietitians, the labor program is strictly voluntary, and wage rates are federally mandated. The company said Geo Group contracts with outside vendors to run its commissaries, whose prices “are in line with comparable local markets.” It also said Geo Group makes a “minimal commission” on commissary items, most of which goes into a “welfare fund” to purchase recreational equipment and other items for detainees. Relatives can send money electronically to fund their loved ones’ commissary accounts, for fees that can reach as high as 10 percent of the amount deposited, some families report. But for many immigrant detainees, scrubbing toilets or mopping floors is the only way they say they can earn enough to stay clean and fed. You “either work for a few cents an hour or live without basic things like soap, shampoo, deodorant and food,” detainee Wilhen Hill Barrientos, 67, said

REUTERS PHOTOS

ICE detainees are seen at the Adelanto immigration detention center in Adelanto, Calif. The facility is run by the Geo Group Inc.

in a class-action lawsuit filed last year by the Southern Poverty Law Center against Nashville, Tenn.-based CoreCivic Inc., the nation’s second-largest for-profit prison operator. In the complaint, Barrientos said guards told him to “use his fingers” when he asked for toilet paper at the Stewart Detention Center, located in rural Lumpkin, Ga. Detainees are challenging what they say is an oppressive business model in which the companies deprive them of essentials to force them to work for sub-minimum wages, money that is soon recaptured in the firms’ own commissaries. “These private prison companies are profiting off of what is essentially a company-store scenario,” said the SPLC’s Meredith Stewart, a lead attorney on the class action. Immigrant rights groups have filed similar lawsuits against CoreCivic and Geo Group in California, Colorado, Texas and Washington. Government watchdogs and lawmakers are taking notice too. In November, 11 U.S. senators, including 2020 presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, sent letters to Geo Group and CoreCivic lambasting the “perverse profit incentive at the core of the private prison business,” which has benefited from a crackdown on illegal immigrants under President Donald Trump. The senators cited a December 2017 report from the U.S. Office of the Inspector General documenting problems at lockups contracted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The inspector general found spoiled, moldy and expired food, and

cited detainees’ complaints that hygiene products were “not provided promptly or at all,” the report said. The lawmakers have demanded Geo Group and CoreCivic respond to allegations of detainee mistreatment. Geo Group said a comprehensive, detailed response is underway. The company told Reuters that Geo Group has “already taken steps to remedy areas where our processes fell short of our commitment to high-quality care.” CoreCivic spokeswoman Amanda Gilchrist said the company disagrees with the senators’ assertions, and that it provides “all daily needs” of detainees. She said CoreCivic follows all federal standards for ICEcontracted facilities, including management of the outside vendors that run its commissaries, prices for commissary products, and fees charged to families for depositing funds into detainees’ commissary accounts.

BULL MARKET IN IMMIGRANT DETENTION The U.S. for-profit prison industry has exploded over the past two decades. In 2016, 128,300 people — roughly 1 in 12 U.S. prisoners — were incarcerated in private lock-ups. That is an increase of 47 percent from 2000, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Geo Group and CoreCivic together manage over half of private prison contracts in the United States, with combined revenues of nearly $4 billion in 2017. ICE is the No. 1 customer by revenue for both companies. Trump’s immigration polices have been a boon for the in-

dustry, which spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on his election and inauguration. In fiscal 2019, the number of people in ICE detention has averaged 45,200 daily, according to agency spokesman Vincent Picard. That is up nearly 19 percent from fiscal 2017. Both Geo Group and CoreCivic have added hundreds of immigration detention beds over the past year. Stock prices for the two companies are up about 30 percent since Trump’s election. The government pays private prison companies fees ranging from roughly $60 to $130 daily for the care and feeding of each detainee. At CoreCivic’s Stewart Detention Center in Georgia, which houses about 1,700 undocumented immigrants, ICE pays a per diem of $62.03 for each detainee housed there. CoreCivic’s revenue from Stewart alone was $38 million last year, court records show. Detainee Barrientos, the lead lawsuit plaintiff, said in court documents he worked 7 days a week at the facility to purchase hygiene products and phone cards to call family members in Guatemala. Those basics can add up. Reuters viewed a copy of the center’s commissary price list. It shows detainees are charged $11.02 for a 4 oz. tube of Sensodyne toothpaste, available on Amazon.com for $5.20. Dove soap priced at $2.44 at the commissary is available for just over a dollar at Target. A 2.5 oz tube of Effergrip denture cream that sells for $4.99 at Walmart is $7.12 at the commissary. Fees are pricey too. Vioney

Gutierrez, a former detainee at Geo Group’s Adelanto facility in California, said 10 percent of the money her family spent to fund her commissary account was consumed by fees. “When my daughter put in $40, I got $36,” said Gutierrez, 37. A native of Mexico, she said she spent six months at Adelanto in 2018 after asking for asylum at a port of entry. She is currently out on bond and staying with family in Oregon while she awaits the outcome of her deportation case. Geo Group said its inmate commissary account services are provided by a third-party vendor, and that it does not profit from those transactions. At Adelanto, Gutierrez said it cost $1 a minute to make calls to Mexico, and even more to places further afield, prices that keep many detainees from communicating with their families. Geo Group said ICE contracts with a third-party telecom vendor and that the company plays “no role whatsoever in communications services.” High commissary prices have long been a complaint of prison reformers. But for immigrant detainees, many of whom borrowed money or drained savings to reach the United States, the prices are particularly prohibitive. Cruz, the Honduran detainee, spent eight months at Adelanto last year before an immigrant rights organization paid the $10,000 bond for his release. He is now in Texas awaiting the outcome of his case. In his final months at Adelanto, Cruz said he resorted to bartering, trading shoes he wove out of plastic bags for ramen and cookies.

30% OFF

THE REGULAR PRICE OF THE ENTIRE LINE OF

STANTON PATTERN CARPETS AND

HALL & STAIR RUNNERS Alexander

Hundreds of patterns & colors to choose from. Also available in special order area rugs. HURRY! SALE ENDS SOON.

Brentwood 2714 Breckenridge Industrial Ct. Chesterfield 14816 Clayton Rd. Off Manchester, 1 block west of Hanley

1 block east of Baxter

314-647-6060 | Mon-Fri 9-5:30 | Sat 9-5

636-391-6800 | Mon-Fri 9-8 | Sat 9-5 mid-westfloor.com

National Wood Floor Association


SATURDAY’S BEST

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

2 charged in MetroLink killing of county employee BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Two men are fac-

ing murder charges stemming from the August shooting death of a St. Louis County Health Department employee near a MetroLink station on South Grand Boulevard. Antreion Betts, 19, and Armani McKinley, 20, both of St. Louis, were charged late Thursday with second-degree murder (also called felony murder), first-degree robbery and two counts of armed criminal action in the death of Craig LeFebvre, 48. According to the charges, a man they were robbing fired his own gun “in response to the robbery” and struck LeFebvre. McKinley was grazed. McKinley and Betts are accused under a law that allows murder charges to be filed against participants in a robbery when someone dies. LeFebvre was struck Aug. 21 while standing 50 to 75 yards away from the robbery. LeFebvre, a spokesman for the St. Louis County Health Department since 2007, didn’t own a car and always used public transportation, his brother said. Charges say that a man reported being robbed of cash and property by McKinley and others with McKinley. The robbery victim told police that while the others rifled through his pockets, McKinley pointed a gun at him and racked it several times. The robbery victim said he fired his

Craig LeFebvre, a spokesman for the St. Louis County Health Department, in an undated photo from the agency. He was shot and killed at a bus stop near the Grand MetroLink station in August.

gun and unintentionally struck LeFebvre. Police reviewed surveillance video from the station, which showed the robbery victim’s interaction with McKinley and his group shortly before the shooting, charges say. The video shows McKinley passing what looks like a gun to another person just after the shooting. The robbery victim told police his cellphone, cash, bus pass and an identification card were taken, charges said. Betts’ fingerprints were found on the robbery victim’s property. Betts is also facing charges in another MetroLink shooting. He and Antoine La’Ron Jones, 23, are charged in the Sept. 12 shooting at the Delmar MetroLink station in which a woman was shot in the leg as she used her body to shield two young children from

Shutdown has those near toxic Superfund sites living on edge

gunfire at the station. Bail for McKinley and Betts was set at $1 million cash each. The robbery victim, Devin E. Smith, 30, of the 5500 block of Mable Avenue in St. Louis, was charged with unlawful gun possession nine days after LeFebvre’s death because he has a 2016 felony conviction for unlawful use of a weapon, charges say. Smith pleaded guilty to the charge Dec. 19 and is scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 1. LeFebvre, through his work with the health department, was an advocate for victims of gun violence.

CRIME ON METROLINK MetroLink has seen a more than 20 percent drop in ridership on the light rail and bus systems in the last five years. Officials have acknowledged that high-profile crimes may be playing a role in

that decline. In addition to LeFebvre’s death and the woman shot at the Delmar station, a MetroLink passenger in October tried to crawl away from attackers who stomped and punched him but was pulled back onto a train. In March 2017, a man was fatally shot at the Busch Stadium station platform when a gun went off as the train came to a stop. The following month, another man was killed at the University of Missouri-St. Louis South Station during a suspected robbery attempt. Metro’s executive director Jessica Mefford-Miller told the Post-Dispatch last year that she believes perception of security on the light-rail system has factored into declining ridership. She said riders also may quit riding because of panhandlers, smokers, fare skippers or disruptive passengers. On Friday, Metro Transit’s top two security officials were ousted amid what the operation’s new chief executive said is an effort to coordinate better with local police. A statement Friday from a Bi-State spokeswoman said improving safety of riders and employees is its highest priority. “In order to do that Metro Transit will be making major changes and details of those changes will be announced in the coming weeks,” the statement said. “With the help of the three professional police departments — the St. Louis Metropolitan

Police Department, St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department and the St. Louis County Police Department, we are working to rebuild public confidence in our system.” A study underway on crime and security on MetroLink for the East-West Gateway Council of Governments is expected to completed in February. In November, Lurae Stuart, a transit security expert leading the study, said at a panel discussion that better deploying uniformed officers on trains over platforms could help reduce crime. Stuart also said her team believes perception of crime is worse than the reality on MetroLink, despite occasional high-profile incidents that every transit system has. Ray Mundy, director of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, echoed those sentiments, saying that fear of crime is often greater than reality. Public transit, he said, “has tremendous benefits for mobility and job opportunities, but it also brings a certain degree of mobility to a criminal element.” “Statistically, you should have no fear of riding Metro, but the actuality of it is that (crime) does happen so you need to be careful,” he said. Mark Schlinkmann of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Micro Hearing Aid Concealed. Virtually Invisible. Extraordinary.

BY DINO GRANDONI Washington Post

About a week after the start of the partial government shutdown last month, Dawn Chapman and Karen Nickel emailed Environmental Protection Agency officials about what the lapse in funding meant for them and other residents of Bridgeton who live near a nuclear waste dump. The two activists said they were told they would no longer be able to reach officials they normally spoke with at the EPA’s regional office near Kansas City. They worried about what would happen if there were an accident at the nearby landfill contaminated with radioactive waste dating to the World War II-era Manhattan Project. As recently as November, a surface fire broke out near the nuclear dump. Steven Cook, a top-level official at the EPA’s Office of Land and Emergency Response, assured them that the agency’s emergency spill line would still be manned throughout the shutdown. But, he added in an email Chapman provided to The Post, “Please be mindful that we may be limited in our ability to provide a substantive response depending on the issue involved.” Communities living near toxic Superfund sites like West Lake Landfill feel on edge and in the dark during the shutdown that has paralyzed normal functions at agencies including the EPA. The shutdown is cramping efforts by EPA officials to revitalize the nearly 40-yearold Superfund program — designed to clean up more than 1,300 hazardous sites around the country — and put many residents waiting years for a federal response at ease. “It’s so crazy that a site can be listed like ours, and then overnight we lose contact with the federal agency responsible for overseeing it,” Chapman said in an interview. “It’s like they have officially just gone away.” The shutdown threatens to fray already strained relations between affected communities and the federal government, which residents often see as too sluggish in its cleanup efforts. “In the world of Superfund, the community relationships with the agency are always a big issue,” said Peter deFur, an environmental consultant working on Superfund issues. During the shutdown, the agency is unable to move forward with federally managed cleanups or plan new ones. Work can continue on cleanup projects led by states or companies, but only “up to the point that additional EPA direction or funding is needed,” said EPA spokesman John Konkus. Agency employees also cannot hold or attend meetings with community members to let them know what is going on. One of those communities left wondering is the heavily African-American and Hispanic city of East Chicago, Ind., where the site of a former public housing complex is laden with lead. The EPA had to cancel a public hearing this month on its $26.5 million plan to dig up and haul out contaminated soil. “It does not make any sense to cancel it and not reschedule it,” said Thomas Frank, an East Chicago environmental activist. “That doesn’t make sense. There are people in the community that would benefit from getting their voices heard.” And the effects of the shutdown will stretch past the point at which President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats end their impasse over border wall funding. Before the shutdown, the agency was forced to siphon money away from its limited budget to contain some sites and prevent conditions from getting worse while the government is off the job. “You’re putting further stress on the limited pot of money and the ability to clean up sites,” said Mathy Stanislaus, who oversaw the Superfund program during the Barack Obama administration. Throughout the shutdown, EPA officials have repeatedly emphasized that it can act in the event of a disaster at a Superfund site. The agency’s shutdown contingency plan says that emergency responders have the legal authority to do so and that the agency would evaluate more than 800 Superfund sites to identify potential threats to human health, such as acid leaks into drinking water supply.

(actual size)

ONLY

(actual tual size)

$798 $798 $2,021 *

ONLY

*

original

LIMITED TIME ONLY January 17th - 25th, 2019 GET STARTED WITH A

FREE HEARING SCREENING + DEMONSTRATION

Schedule a FREE hearing screening with our Beltone Factory trained specialists. Get a 30 Day Trial when you stop into Beltone and try a new pair of hearing aids.

Brentwood | Florissant | Chippewa | Lemay Ferry | Tesson Ferry | O’Fallon MO St. Charles | Festus | Washington | Farmington | Cape Girardeau | Poplar Bluff Warson Woods | Troy | Creve Coeur | Sikeston | Dexter | Kennett | O’Fallon IL Edwardsville | Granite City | Alton | Carbondale | Mt. Vernon | Marion | Du Quoin Harrisburg | Fairfield | Jerseyville | Staunton | Nashville | Belleville

SCHEDULE TODAY SCHEDULE TODAY

<<Phone Number>> 1-888-879-4250

*FOR ONE HEARING AID


NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

A SOLEMN PROCESSION

M 2 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

President Donald Trump (left) and other dignitaries stand at attention Saturday as a U.S. Navy team carries the remains of Scott Wirtz at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. Wirtz, 42, of St. Louis, a civilian employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency and former Navy SEAL, was killed Wednesday in a suicide bomb attack in Manbij, Syria.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Snow, ice blanket Midwest as storm heads to New England BY COREY WILLIAMS Associated Press

DETROIT • People throughout

parts of the Midwest woke Saturday to a heavy and steady snowfall that forced the cancellation of hundreds of airline flights and made driving dangerous. More than 460 flights were canceled Saturday morning at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport in Chicago and about 50 flights were canceled at Chica-

go’s Midway International Airport. The snow was part of a wall of hazardous weather that trekked from the Dakotas and across the Great Lakes states, headed toward New England. The storm brought snow, ice and strong wind, followed by deep cold. After dumping up to 10 inches of snow on the Midwest, the storm was expected to wallop the Northeast. The highest snowfall totals

Trump ‘appreciates’ Mueller’s statement on report’s accuracy

were expected in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, which could see up to 18 inches. Amtrak canceled some trains Saturday from Chicago to Washington and New York and between New York and Boston and Pennsylvania on Sunday. In Nebraska, authorities closed Omaha’s Eppley Airfield on Friday afternoon after a Southwest Airlines plane slid off an iceslicked runway. No one was injured.

Farther east, the National Weather Service in Albany, N.Y., said snow could fall at a rate of 1 to 3 inches an hour, creating “difficult to impossible travel conditions” in areas. The storm prompted the cancellation of a Special Olympics competition in upstate New York. In New York City, the worst of the storm was expected from Saturday afternoon through Sunday afternoon, with snow accumulations of 3-6

inches, followed by rain that could turn to ice as temperatures drop later Sunday. Singledigit temperatures could last into Monday. After the storm system, some areas of the Midwest were expecting high winds and bitter cold. In Iowa, temperatures in the teens Saturday were expected to drop below zero overnight, producing wind chills as low as 20 below by Sunday morning.

Micro Hearing Aid Concealed. Virtually Invisible. Extraordinary.

BY MARY CLARE JALONICK AND ERIC TUCKER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Special counsel Robert Mueller’s office has issued a rare public statement disputing the accuracy of BuzzFeed News’ report that President Donald Trump’s former attorney told Mueller that Trump had directed the lawyer to lie to Congress. “It was a total phony story, and I appreciate the special counsel coming out with a statement last night. I think it was very appropriate that they did so,” Trump told reporters at the White House on Saturday. BuzzFeed, citing two unidentified law enforcement officials, reported that Trump had directed lawyer Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about a Moscow real estate project and that Cohen had told Mueller the president had personally instructed him to lie about the timing of the deal. The report said Mueller’s investigators had learned about Trump’s directive “through interviews with multiple witnesses from the Trump Organization and internal company emails, text messages, and a cache of other documents.” The report said Cohen had acknowledged Trump’s instructions when he was interviewed by the Mueller team. The statement by Mueller’s office on Friday night doesn’t cite any specific errors. Spokesman Peter Carr said that “BuzzFeed’s description of specific statements to the special counsel’s office, and characterization of documents and testimony obtained by this office, regarding Michael Cohen’s congressional testimony are not accurate.” What the statement didn’t say was important, too. It didn’t say Mueller had no evidence that Trump had sought to influence Cohen — just that BuzzFeed’s description of such statements was inaccurate. Nor did it spell out which reported statements were inaccurate and in what way. Further, it offered no details about how BuzzFeed had mischaracterized any evidence that Mueller has collected. BuzzFeed spokesman Matt Mittenthal said the publication stood by its reporting and urged readers to “stay tuned” as they worked to determine what Mueller was denying. Ben Smith, editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed News, also said the publication stood by its reporting and the sources who informed it. “We urge the special counsel to make clear what he’s disputing,” Smith said. Immediately after the special counsel’s statement was issued, Trump retweeted several posts that called the story fake news. The extraordinary statement from Mueller’s office came after congressional Democrats had pledged to investigate whether the report was true. The Associated Press had not independently confirmed the report. Any evidence that Trump directed a witness to lie to investigators would place him in the greatest political and legal jeopardy yet. Cohen pleaded guilty in November to lying to Congress to cover up that he was negotiating the Trump Tower project on Trump’s behalf during the heat of his presidential campaign. The charge was brought by Mueller and was the result of Cohen’s cooperation with that probe. Cohen admitted that he lied when he told lawmakers he had never agreed to travel to Russia in connection with the Moscow project and when he said that he’d decided by the end of January 2016 that the “proposal was not feasible for a variety of business reasons and should not be pursued further.” He was sentenced to three years in prison for crimes that included arranging the payment of hush money to conceal his boss’ alleged sexual affairs, telling a judge that he had agreed time and again to cover up Trump’s “dirty deeds” out of “blind loyalty.” Lanny Davis, a Cohen adviser, declined to comment. Cohen is scheduled to testify publicly before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Feb. 7. The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, said Friday that he expected Cohen to talk to that committee in February. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

(actual size)

ONLY

(actual tual size)

$798 $798 $2,021 *

ONLY

*

original

LIMITED TIME ONLY January 17th - 25th, 2019 GET STARTED WITH A

FREE HEARING SCREENING + DEMONSTRATION

Schedule a FREE hearing screening with our Beltone Factory trained specialists. Get a 30 Day Trial when you stop into Beltone and try a new pair of hearing aids.

Brentwood | Florissant | Chippewa | Lemay Ferry | Tesson Ferry | O’Fallon MO St. Charles | Festus | Washington | Farmington | Cape Girardeau | Poplar Bluff Warson Woods | Troy | Creve Coeur | Sikeston | Dexter | Kennett | O’Fallon IL Edwardsville | Granite City | Alton | Carbondale | Mt. Vernon | Marion | Du Quoin Harrisburg | Fairfield | Jerseyville | Staunton | Nashville | Belleville

SCHEDULE TODAY SCHEDULE TODAY

<<Phone Number>> 1-888-879-4250

*FOR ONE HEARING AID


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

Scotsman Coin and Jewelry Three Day Buying Event THREE BUYING LOCATIONS Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday Only

Wildwood Wildwood Hotel, 2801 Fountain Place. Festus Holiday Inn, 1802 Gamel Cemetery Rd. Creve Coeur Scotsman’s Store, 11005 Olive Blvd.

COINS & PAPER MONEY

STAMPS & POLITICAL

Everything and anything you have, U.S. and foreign, gold, silver, and platinum, bring it all in to one of our three buying locations for INSTANT CASH!

If you own stamps or political items and want to sell, we are the place to visit. YOU WILL GET MORE. (Festus location only)

Is your collection too much to carry? We can meet you at your home or bank. Call 314.210.4443

STERLING SILVER flatware, serving pieces, silver dishes, spoons, forks, knives, complete sets and more. Bring us your sterling silver for INSTANT CASH!

Our bonus locations are open for Three Days Only! Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday January 21st through 23rd, 9am - 5pm FREE APPRAISALS – You’ll never know how much cash we’ll pay you unless you stop by.

DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, AND WATCHES 10k to 24k gold, Tiffany, Yurman, and all diamonds -- plus pocket and wrist watches such as Rolex, Omega, and Hamilton. We really need diamonds 1ct and higher. WILDWOOD HOTEL - WILDWOOD 2801 Fountain Place - Wildwood, MO 63040 Next to Wildwood Theatres HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS - FESTUS 1802 Gamel Cemetery Road - Festus, MO 63028 Next to Lowe’s

Must be 21 or older Valid ID Required Purchases available for police review All purchases photographed

11005 Olive at Graeser between Lindbergh gh and 1-270 St. Louis, MO 63141 Hours: M-F 8am – 5pm | Sat 8am – 4pm Serving St. Louis since 1959

sc scoins.com /coinandjewelry


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

BAREFOOT CELLARS MOSCATO This Moscato is full of sweet peach and apricot flavors that finish crisp with hints of lemon. California, 1.5 L, $8.47

BELVINO PINOT GRIGIO A crisp, light- to medium-bodied Pinot Grigio, Belvino features a hint of peach in the middle and of elderflower on the finish.

$8.49

with coupon Italy, 1.5 L, $9.99

LOW HANGING FRUIT PINOT NOIR With aromas of ripe red fruit, this medium-bodied Pinot features flavors of raspberry and cherry, with a hint of oak on the finish.

$7.64

With the busy holiday season behind us, it’s finally time to relax. We’ve got all the beer, wine and spirits you need to share with friends and family in 2019.

TITO’S HANDMADE VODKA Made in old-fashioned pot stills, Tito’s is carefully controlled for an extremely clean taste.

with coupon California, 1.5 L, $8.99

WOODBRIDGE MONDAVI CABERNET Aged in barrels to lend a nuance of oak, this Cabernet features cassis and berry flavors.

4 HANDS DIVIDED SKY RYE IPA Thanks to a fusion of three different hops with rye that pours a deep golden color, this IPA features a powerful depth of flavor.

California, 1.5 L, $8.77

1.75 L, $26.99 6-12oz cans, $7.49

JACK DANIEL’S BLACK The world’s favorite Tennessee whiskey is made from pure spring water and 100% whole natural grains.

4 HANDS INCARNATION IPA Brewed with Mosaic hops, Incarnation features tons of tropical flavor in its hazy, orange-gold body.

1.75 L, $36.99

6-12oz cans, $7.99

JAMESON IRISH WHISKEY This triple-distilled blend is matured in bourbon and sherry casks for a clean and mellow flavor.

BOTA BOX REDVOLUTION RedVolution is a lush, smooth wine with a full-bodied flavor; the finish is juicy and fruit-forward. California, 3L Box, $14.99

BOULEVARD PALE ALE Look for a bitter hoppy taste with a caramel, bready current holding it all together.

BLACK BOX CABERNET Fill your palate with notes of blackberry and chocolate with this full-bodied Cabernet.

12-12oz bottles, $12.99

Chile, 3L Box, $15.99

1.75 L, $32.09

DEWAR’S Subtle and refined, Dewar’s is a blend of up to 40 malt and grain whiskies resulting in perfect balance.

SCHLAFLY HEFEWEIZEN This light, unfiltered wheat beer is exquisitely balanced with a tiny hint of spice.

FRANZIA CHARDONNAY Semi-dry with a medium body, Franzia Chardonnay is crisp with a clean finish.

6-12oz bottles, $6.99

1.75 L, $33.99

5L Box, $13.99

TANQUERAY GIN A unique quadruple-distillation process assures this time-honored recipe is always of the highest quality.

PETER VELLA MERLOT Peter Vella produces a light, fresh-tasting Merlot with delicate raspberry and cherry flavor.

URBAN CHESTNUT URBAN UNDERDOG This American lager combines Herbrucker, Mittelfruh, Cascade, and Willamette hops.

1.75 L, $33.99

8-16oz cans, $14.99

WINERY DIRECT® SAVINGS COUPON

$

California, f , 5L Box,, $13.99

>69A1 *,*5,)+*/0*,);,)+*/

15% OFF WINE Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More WINE Coupon or in combination with the Mix 6 Discount. Coupon valid in MO locations only. Not valid on %!#DF&EI %E!:H@I#I &! 8#BFD#!( &!8#!I2 CH#!# @%%BF:@=B#. 3'#! D@BF8 *,*5,)+*/0*,);,)+*/. >@BF8 F<0 IG&!# @<8 &<BF<#. 9F?FG &<# &<BF<# :&8# %#! C#= &!8#!. -&! F<0IG&!# %E!:H@I#I2 ?EIG %!#I#<G :&E%&< @G GF?# &" %E!:H@I#. 3<#0GF?#0EI# :&E%&<.

$

3<BF<# 4&8# /7)/

Save 15% on your purchase of 750ml and/or 1.5L WINERY DIRECT® WINE when you buy 6 or more.

40000009529

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 1/16/2018 through 1/23/2018 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2018 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


NATION

01.20.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

McConnell defers to Trump in shutdown Despite criticism, Senate majority leader sees no reason to go against the president BY LISA MASCARO AND ADAM BEAM associated Press

WASHINGTON • One of Sen-

ate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s guiding principles is: “There’s no education in the second kick of a mule.” Now, deep into a government shutdown he cautioned President Donald Trump against, McConnell is not about to let himself be kicked again. The Republican leader has been conspicuously deferential to Trump since the shutdown began. He’s waiting on the president and Democrats to make a deal to end it. The result is an unusually inactive profile for the GOP leader who’s often the behind-the-scenes architect of intricate legislative maneuvers to resolve bitter partisan stalemates. Democrats complain publicly — and some Republicans grumble privately — that the Senate is not fulfilling its role as a coequal branch of government, a legislative check on the executive. They worry about ordinary Americans facing hardship waiting for a resolution to the standoff over Trump’s demand for money to build the border wall with Mexico. But McConnell, R-Ky., who is up for re-election in 2020 in a state where Trump tends to be more popular than he is, sees no other choice than to stand back and let the president who took the country into the shutdown decide how he wants to get out of it. McConnell said the “solution to the problem” is for the president, who he reminds is the only one who can sign a bill into law, to reach an agreement with Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer. “There’s no way around that,”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An electronic billboard, sponsored by the Democratic Coalition, shown Jan. 12 in Nicholasville, Ky. Sen. Mitch McConnell, up for re-election in 2020, sees no other choice than to stand back and let President Donald Trump, a fellow Republican who took the country into the shutdown, decide how he wants to get out of it.

he told reporters this past week. Democrats wonder whatever happened to the mastermind of earlier legislative logjams. After all, the 30-year veteran of the Senate devised the way out of a debt ceiling crisis when Tea Party Republicans challenged President Barack Obama; he brokered the deal with Vice President Joe Biden to avert the so-called “fiscal cliff.” “A few years ago, Leader McConnell remarked, ‘Remember me? I’m the guy that gets us out of shutdowns,’” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, unearthing an interview McConnell did some years ago. “Well, Leader McConnell, now’s the time ... allow a vote on legislation and reopen the government.” McConnell has plenty of solutions at the ready, allies say. But he sees no value in trying to execute a deal that Trump may

not ultimately endorse. It’s not only a waste of time, in his view, it potentially exposes Republican senators up for re-election in 2020, including himself, as sideways to Trump’s wishes. “Everyone is demanding that McConnell ‘do something.’ What?” asked GOP strategist Scott Jennings, a longtime McConnell ally. “What is McConnell — or anyone else — going to tell Trump? Hey man, give up on the wall? That’s crazy.” Jennings said rather than being seen as weak leader, the opposite is true: McConnell is showing strength by protecting Republicans from taking votes on bills that put them or the president on the spot as they try to force Democrats’ hand. “He’s not going to undercut the president of his own party,” he said. No sense being on the other side twice. Days before the

shutdown, McConnell started executing the plan Republicans had largely agreed upon. The strategy was simple: Give Trump a runway to take the case to the American people — including during his State of the Union address — before the next round of voting in February, according Republicans familiar with the plan. All systems were go until the morning of final passage, but Trump opposed it. McConnell was frustrated. “He wasn’t very happy about it to say the least,” said retiring GOP Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas. “He’s a very crafty individual... very strategic... Mitch, if something doesn’t work, he finds a way to make it work.” But this time, McConnell is not providing the way out. Yes, he’s appearing at White House negotiating sessions. His staff meets for bipartisan talks

with others. McConnell talks most every day to by phone to Trump. Asked about the senator’s role during the shutdown, the president heaped on praise: “He’s really been fantastic.” Yet the leader, who was required to sit still as a child battling polio, is nothing if not a patient person. And so he waits. Not all Republicans embrace the strategy. Some are growing anxious that Senate is essentially idle while hundreds of thousands of federal employees go without pay, wreaking havoc on their households and putting the broader economy at risk. “Right now, it’s the Senate that really isn’t doing anything, I think we should do something,” said Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., who is trying to build support for his bill to pay federal employees, including TSA airport security screeners, who are forced to work without paychecks. “I’m very sympathetic with the fact that we do need the president to sign something — so what’s the point of bringing something up that’s DOA — but we certainly can show some leadership here,” he said. “We could bring that up for votes.” As #MitchShutdown billboards dot the Kentucky countryside, McConnell, who will likely want Trump by his side as he runs for re-election, has given no indication he’s feeling the heat. Trump won Kentucky in 2016 with nearly 63 percent of the vote, some 400,000 more votes than McConnell in his last Senate election. In 2018 Kentucky voters again embraced Trump in re-electing GOP Rep. Andy Barr, the congressman who was in a tight race until Trump visited, beginning a surge in Barr’s favor.

Outpouring of generosity for TSA workers, others without pay BY KEVIN MCGILL associated Press

The partial government shutdown is a double-whammy for Cara and Philip Mangone, a married couple from Philadelphia. Both are agents with the Transportation Safety Administration, both working full time at the Philadelphia airport. They don’t know when they might again start drawing their paychecks. Part-time jobs are out of the question — they work opposite shifts timed to make sure one of them is always home with their kids, ages 2 and 5. So donations of food and diapers have been a real help as savings are being stretched thin. “Every penny that we don’t have to spend is helpful,” Cara Mangone said Wednesday as she picked up donated goods being distributed at the airport by fellow members of the American Federation of Government Employees. The shutdown has brought an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. Food, financial help, haircuts and toiletries are among the donated goods and services. TSA screeners start at about $24,000 a year, and most make between $26,000 and $35,000, less than many other government employees, although some earn more because of seniority, overtime or level of management responsibility. On Wednesday, donations of diapers, juice, garbage bags, canned soup and boxes of ramen noodles were being unloaded onto luggage carts at the valet drop-off curb at Orlando (Fla.) International Airport, to be distributed to TSA workers there the next day. “I just wanted to support the federal workers who are furloughed because of the inaction of our government leaders,” said Brian Couch, wearing a Kansas City Chiefs ball cap as he dropped off his donation. The airport in Pittsburgh provided a free lunch to TSA work-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flip burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane Wednesday at Salt Lake City International Airport. Airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during the government shutdown when they’re not getting paid.

ers on what should have been their payday last week. “Our Operation Thank You free lunch program initially was only Fridays but because we’re hearing from several food vendors who want to donate, it’s possible it will be increased to more days,” airport spokesman Bob Kerlik said in an email. At Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, spokeswoman Elise Durham said some concession operators there were also donating free lunches to TSA workers and the airport was providing complimentary parking for those workers who need it. Some travelers wanted to get in on the act, but TSA rules don’t allow that. “There are people trying to donate gift cards to us at the checkpoints,” Cara Mangone

said. “We can’t accept it.” Businesses large and small are trying to help. The Ruby Slipper, a New Orleans-based restaurant chain with several locations in the city and on the Gulf Coast, said on its Facebook page that it has served some 3,000 free meals since offering help to unpaid federal employees more than two weeks ago. At the Top Knot Beauty Company in the New Orleans suburb of Metairie, owner Jennifer Delage has been offering free haircuts to federal employees. She said other businesses have followed suit with free or discounted services. “That was the main goal,” Delage said. “To inspire others to pay it forward.” Such sentiments are evident all over the country — and beyond.

PIZZAS ACROSS THE BORDER Canadian air traffic controllers have been taking up donations to have pizzas delivered to their American counterparts at locations around the U.S. Pizzas have been bought for controllers at 84 U.S. facilities. “We’ve stopped tracking the number of pizzas,” said Tania Calverley, director of communications for the Canadian Air Traffic Controllers Association. “We’re certainly well over 400.” FREE RIDES The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority has announced that all federal employees will be able to ride public transit for free by showing their government IDs. “We want to ... assist those

who are hurting by taking a little weight off of their shoulders during this time,” Robbie Makinen, CEO and President of the authority, said in a news release about the program, which began Tuesday.

BRIDGE LOANS Some financial institutions are offering low-interest, or even no-interest loans, to unpaid workers. Webster Bank in Connecticut said it would offer no-interest loans to any federal workers who are working and not being paid during the shutdown. In announcing the assistance program on Tuesday, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont said he hopes other banks will offer similar programs. The loans are to be repaid after the workers receive back pay.

on hundreds of vitamins and supplements *Of equal of lesser price. Balance® Rewards card required for promotional pricing. Offer good in store and at Walgreens.com 12/30/18 thru 2/23/19 with card. Cannot be mixed and matched with buy 1 get 1 50% off vitamins offer. Includes select Nature Made, Nature’s Bounty, Finest Nutrition, select Walgreens brand, and joint or heart supplements. Excludes Nature Made Prenatal, Children’s Vitamins and Olly vitamins and supplements. Subject to availability. For details, visit stores or Walgreens.com.

mix & match


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

No-cost birth control, now the norm, faces court battle Supreme Court may ultimately decide whether Trump administration limits to company plans will stand BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Millions of

American women are receiving birth control at no cost to them through workplace health plans, the result of the Affordable Care Act, which expanded access to contraception. The administration of President Donald Trump sought to allow more employers to opt out because of religious or moral objections. But its plans were put on hold by two federal judges, one in Pennsylvania and the other in California, in cases that could eventually reach the Supreme Court. The judges blocked the Trump policy from going into effect while legal challenges from state attorneys general continue. Here’s a look at some of the issues behind the confrontation over birth control, politics and religious beliefs:

TURNING POINT — THE ACA Well into the 1990s many states did not require health insurance plans to cover birth control for women. “Plans were covering Viagra, and they weren’t covering birth control,” said Alina Salganicoff, director of women’s health policy with the nonpartisan Kaiser

Family Foundation. By the time President Barack Obama’s health law passed in 2010, employers and insurers largely began covering birth control as an important part of health care for women. The ACA took that a couple of steps further. It required most insurance plans to cover a broad range of preventive services, including vaccinations and cancer screenings, but also women’s health services. And it also required such preventive services to be offered at no charge. Employers and insurers were required to cover at least one of each class of birth control approved by the Food and Drug Administration. That included costly long-acting contraceptives, generally more effective than birth control pills. It’s estimated that 55 million to more than 62 million women now receive birth control at no cost, with only a small share paying for contraception. “The irony I find about this battle is that in the period of time this policy has been in effect, teen pregnancies have gone way down and the number of abortions has gone way down,” said Kathleen Sebelius, Health and Human Services secretary under Obama. While those rates were already

going down before the health law, the trend does continue.

RELIGIOUS, MORAL EXEMPTIONS The Obama administration originally exempted a narrow group of employers — houses of worship— from the birth control coverage requirement. After opposition from religious institutions and social conservatives, the Obama administration created an “accommodation.” Women employees of religiousaffiliated social service organizations, universities and hospitals could continue to get birth control as part of their health care coverage but their employer would not have to pay. The Supreme Court broadened that work-around to include smaller private companies with a religious objection. That didn’t go far enough for social and religious conservatives, a core component of Trump’s political base. Some religious organizations see Obama’s “accommodation” as morally objectionable because it facilitates contraception. “It still forces religious people to provide a health plan that includes things that violate their religion,” said Mark Rienzi, senior lawyer for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which led

opposition to the Obama policies. The Trump administration’s regulations broadened the religious exemption to any employer with an objection based on religious beliefs and created a new exemption for certain employers with moral objections. The administration made Obama’s workaround optional for employers and instituted other changes. “It’s definitely not a tweak,” Sebelius said. An employer can say, “I don’t believe in birth control, and I’m not going to provide it,” she added. Sebelius explained that Congress through the ACA clearly intended health plans to cover women’s health services. All HHS did was spell out how that would be done. If the Trump administration wants to change that, it would have to repeal the law, she added, not just change a regulation. Rienzi said the Trump administration hadn’t pulled its policy “out of nowhere.” U.S. laws traditionally have protected people with religious and moral objections to government policies.

WHAT’S NEXT? The Obama-era policy remains in place for now, with U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone in

Philadelphia placing a national hold on the Trump administration rules. More than a dozen states are trying to reverse Trump’s policy, including California, New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The Justice Department hasn’t revealed its next move. It could ask federal appeals courts or the Supreme Court to lift the injunctions from lower-court judges and allow the Trump rules to go into effect while the cases continue. The issue could eventually end up before the Supreme Court, which has become more conservative since the last time it considered the ACA’s birth control coverage requirement. The Trump administration estimates that up to 126,400 women could be affected, having to find other ways to cover birth control if the rule is put into place. But women’s rights groups say there’s no real way to know. “The majority of employers want to cover birth control,” said Mara Gandal-Powers, a senior lawyer with the National Women’s Law Center. “We know that there are dozens of employers and entities that sued the Obama administration. But one of the problems with the (Trump administration) rule is that there is no master list of employers who object to birth control.”

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BEST WINDOW • FACTORY DIRECT • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE FINANCING

40%

Trio Virado

OFF

Sunday, February 24, 2019 4:00 PM 7:00 PM

560 Music Center E. Desmond Lee Concert Hall 560 Trinity Avenue

SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 02/17/19

A fresh new collaboration of three of the most distinguished artists on their instruments of flute, viola, and guitar. Amy Porter, Juan-Miguel Hernandez and João Luiz are artists widely sought after. Joining together, they form a concert trio experience with emotion and love of music that radiates electricity.

$200 OFF

314-429-7000 25+ y

millswindow.com

WINDOWS

EA RS

Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 02/17/19

TICKETS/DONATIONS: stlclassicalguitar.org or 314-567-5566

Co-Presented with Washington University Department of Music

ONE DAY UNIVERSITY

PRESENTS

SERIOUSLY. SHE IS A

®

LIVE EVENT

ROCKSTAR. Saturday, March 23 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM Chaminade College Preparatory School 425 South Lindbergh Blvd

THE FINEST PROFESSORS TEACH THEIR MOST POPULAR CLASSES Her name is Heather Berlin - and you’ve probably never heard of her. Unless, of course you’ve taken her courses at the Icahn School of Medicine, where she is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. In which case, you would 100% agree that Professor Berlin is fascinating to learn from. And, even if you never set foot on the Icahn School of Medicine campus, you have an opportunity to take a class with Professor Berlin and two other “rockstars” from Holy Cross College and Georgetown, right here in St. Louis. Join us on March 23rd and remember what it’s like to be inspired, invigorated and thrilled with the joy of learning. Full Price: $159

$119

Next 50 registrants use promo code SL119

One Day University Class Schedule History

Three Turning Points that Changed American History 9:30 AM 10:35 AM

Edward O’Donnell / Holy Cross College Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching

Psychology

The Human Brain: What We Know (and what we don’t) 10:50 AM 11:55 AM

Heather Berlin / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York Academy of Sciences Award

Music

Three Musical Masterpieces that Changed America 12:10 PM 1:15 PM

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University Teacher-Scholar Award

Register online at OneDayU.com or call 800-300-3438


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ADVERTISEMENT

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Want Help For Your neuropatHY or pain? Keep reading... Introducing Neuropathy and Pain Relief are you in pain or have numbness and tingling in your feet or hands? do you have pain in your low back, hip or shoulder? Have you tried everything to get relief ? are you contemplating surgery? tried injections? Had surgery and are still in pain? Been told to "just live with it?" our neuro-laserplex healing system is both high-tech and gentle, and most important, proven to be safe and effective at relieving pain, numbness and tingling. You will see we have excellent therapeutic treatment for advanced neuropathy and pain relief and expedited healing times.

Here are some questions people typically ask about what happens here at the Neuropathy and Pain Relief Institute. Is There Anything That Can Be Done for Neuropathy and Severe Pain? Consistently people come in and tell dr. Birkenmeier they have been “everywhere” looking for relief. after a proper evaluation and treatments different than they had elsewhere, they start feeling better… so the “proof is in the pudding” as they say.

Pain relief without shots.

1. Consultation with Dr. Birkenmeier 2. Neuropathy & Pain Examination 3. Laser Treatment to Start the Relief Process. (where applicable) BONUS: Copy of Dr. Birkenmeier’s Book. (limited supply)

Call Today

only $

47

314-485-2790

“pain in my lower back and not being able to stand for any length of time brought me to the neuropathy and pain relief institute.. He (dr. Birkenmeier)

Call today:

has helped by the treatments he has given me and i didn’t have to have shots.

314-485-2790

i’m able to stand without bending over when i walk, i’m not in pain. His staff is wonderful and the honesty and concern of dr. Birkenmeier. i’m glad i found him in the newspaper that i kept for about a month.” - Vivian l., age 69

What treatments are used? after 15 years of treating patients with neuropathy and pain, specific combinations of treatments are found to be highly successful. these include lasers that stimulate healing at a deep level, decompression therapy to give more space for the nerves to flow, and other instruments that stimulate and

if you currently are suffering with the following and finally want relief: Neuropathy Tingling Numbness Burning Feet & Hands

Pain Hip Lower Back Shoulder Neck Leg

help support the relief process. Specific procedures and recommendations can only be given after a proper evaluation by dr. Birkenmeier, but rest assured, all of the details are discussed prior to any treatment.

Is treatment successful? Yes, treatment is successful for a large majority of people. Many people who come in for treatment get significant relief from their ongoing neuropathy, numbness, tingling, and pain… even really bad cases.

Off medications and sleeping much better. “nerve damage, causing leg numbness. i had trouble sleeping, sitting in a chair for long periods of time and was on strong medication which had me constantly drowsy. after 17 treatments, i can say i improved about 70%, off medications, sleeping much better, and can sit without discomfort….look forward to a better

Arthritis, Car Accidents, Stenosis and Slipped Disk(s).

lifestyle. i am happy with my improvement at this time. i just wish i had come to the institute much sooner.” al S., age 69

How does someone know if the treatments are right for them? a thorough evaluation to find out if the person’s case looks like other cases that felt better with treatment is the only way to know. Bottom line, if dr. Birkenmeier cannot help a person, he will refer them to the correct provider to get help.

Is there a guarantee? unfortunately, in healthcare there are no guarantees. realistically, there are too many factors that go into a person’s health. the best thing to do is properly evaluate the person, treat them with time-tested, effective treatments

Where are you located? We are located at 12152 tesson Ferry road, St. louis Missouri 63128 in South County.

for a period of time while closely monitoring the progress, then re-evaluate to see their progress.

Do you work with insurance? Yes, our office works with insurance, even Medicare. as you know in today’s world of insurance, policies and coverage may vary, so we check into all of that in detail prior to getting treatment. the most important thing is determining what specific treatments will provide the best results and that can only be determined by a proper evaluation.

Walking without pain.

our goal is to help you get relief from your neuropathy and pain using advanced treatments for lasting results. our purpose is to help people get well and stay that way.

“Severe pain in the left foot brought me to the neuropathy and pain relief institute. Helped to stand and walk without pain. Sleep better.” - Wayne d., age 74

Playing tennis again. “His therapy has made walking easier. also starting to play tennis again. i can now walk very far without difficulty. Swelling is reduced. i would refer a friend to dr. Birkenmeier.” - ron d., age 64

BONUS: Personal Copy of Dr. Birkenmeier’s New Book (limited supply)


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • A16

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

People with dementia Political, theological still want to worship walls ruin chance at Faith leaders engage using multisensory techniques BY ADELLE M. BANKS Religion News Service

RICHLANDTOWN, PA. • The seven

women, most in wheelchairs, sat in a semicircle facing stained-glass windows and an altar topped with a cross and a statuette of Jesus holding a lamb. Underneath the draped table was an ark-shaped container brimming with small stuffed animals. “Spirit Alive,” a weekly multisensory worship service for people with mid- to late-stage dementia, was about to begin at a United Church of Christ-affiliated skilled nursing center 50 miles north of Philadelphia. The Rev. Jamie Moyer carried out the day’s theme of creation by leading “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands,” holding up pictures of colorful flowers and passing out the soft toys, with each woman choosing one to hold. The 45-minute service, held at each of Phoebe Ministries’ four nursing homes, is one example of how faith leaders are moving beyond traditional worship services to provide a spiritual space for people with dementia. Experts say retirement communities and congregations need to incorporate ways of not only caring physically for people with dementia but also helping them to continue to have a quality of life that may include a spiritual dimension. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 5.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s. Experts predict twice as many Americans 65 and older will have the disease by 2040. A 2014 review of studies of older adults with dementia found that those involved in spiritual and religious practices had a better quality of life. Phoebe Ministries’ own research has shown that residents with dementia involved with the Spirit Alive program are more engaged during worship and reported feeling closer to God. The day before Moyer’s specialized sermon on creation, Rabbi Beth Janus pulled out her guitar in a meeting room of an Elkins Park synagogue about an hour away and sang and strummed songs she hoped might spark memories around the table. Joining her for the “Jewish Music for the Mind and Soul” program were a husband with his wife, who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s a couple of years before, and another woman with dementia accompanied by her caretaker. The first woman sang along occasionally with selections that included Hebrew songs, the spiritual “Go Down Moses” and “Sunrise, Sunset” from “Fiddler on the Roof”; she sometimes accompanied Janus’

guitar with a blue egg-shaped shaker. The other woman didn’t open her mouth to sing but watched Janus intently for much of the hour and a half they spent together around a table decorated with a wine glass, a multiwick candle and other emblems of Havdalah, the ceremony marking the end of Shabbat. Susan McFadden, professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, said other scholars had studied religion and dementia and found that sustaining a connection with worship and congregational life is a key contributor to quality of life for people with dementia because they can still feel valued. “They get greeted by people; they get hugs,” said McFadden, co-author of “Aging Together: Dementia, Friendship and Flourishing Communities.” “The music, the Scripture, all of that is still going to be meaningful to them.” Some facilities encourage the use of visual arts as they work with residents with cognitive challenges. “Art is a way, particularly for people with dementia, to express themselves when they’ve lost their words,” said the Rev. Rebecca Church, director of pastoral services at Wesley Manor, a United Methodist-affiliated retirement community in Louisville, Ky. While some facilities have made efforts to find innovative ways to meet the needs of people of faith who have dementia, some congregations also have stepped up to assist. In the Houston area, for example, the interfaith nonprofit CarePartners organized “Gathering Place” programs for more than 1,000 people affected by memory loss at 50 churches and synagogues in 2017. While caregivers get a few hours of respite, the midday program offers their loved ones with mild to moderate dementia a chance to socialize over lunch and with games, music and exercise. Houses of worship also are prominent on a national registry of “Memory Cafés,” monthly gathering spaces for people with Alzheimer’s. The organization Faith United Against Alzheimer’s suggests hosting those on its online resource, “Creating Dementia Friendly Faith Communities.” McFadden, a frequent speaker on aging and dementia at churches and conferences, expects there will be expanding innovation by faith communities and clergy as baby boomers — who tend to be more vocal than the previous generation — start receiving diagnoses. “They are going to be demanding responses from organizations like congregations,” she predicted. “They’re going to stand up and they’re going to say, ‘Don’t ignore us. We need this.’”

beloved community building community. That may be at the root of our political stalemates. Let’s be honest and admit that in many ways we have already built a wall — not necessarily along the southern border, but between political ideologies. We have created walls of separation between our city and county. We have maintained theological silos that isolate us from other denominations and faiths. We’re distanced from those who disagree with us. These sorts of responses have been driven by corrosive fear and anxiety. When anxiety emerges, it feels like a thundering storm or blustery blizzard. When it subsides, it leaves many with a broken sense of spirituality and faith. It has cut off healing and reconciliation, spoiling opportunities to build the sort of beloved community the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others imagined. In such a community, there will never have been a shutting down of hope, grace or peace. There is potential that the legacy of the current government shutdown could be the recasting of spiritual hope within us. Instead of distancing ourselves from others, we might consider embracing difference. Instead of being isolated by change, we might seek new ways of building community. We might listen more and shout less. Instead of being fearful, with might become curious. Instead of pursuing things we think may bring us comfort, we might begin to quiet ourselves before the gracious gift of God. That is my prayer. That prayer is formed by listening to the faith stories of people who have faced all sorts of spiritual blizzards. I have heard stories of people excluded by church because of race, sexual orientation, gender or mental illness. In hope, they overcame rejection and became amazing and confident leaders. I have been comforted by the witness of countless saints who faced death with serene confidence and peace. I have been humbled by stories of those who endured horrific sexual abuse by clergy, yet who somehow clung to faith. Their stories of faith foster hope, which is perhaps why Jesus said we do not live by bread (and milk) alone.

CHRISTOPHER KEATING Woodlawn Chapel Presbyterian Church

Milk consumption in America has been in steady decline for decades, though you would not have guessed that during last week’s snowfall. Like thousands of others, I ran to the store to grab the basics of survival: milk, eggs, bread, dog chewies. By the time I got there, the milk case was empty. The bread aisle looked as though wartime rationing was in place. The only eggs remaining were high-priced organics, but people were grabbing them just in case. Thankfully, the store had stocked up on wine and toilet paper. Apparently, news of impending snow leads us all to believe we will be living our last days like Leonardo DiCaprio’s character in “The Revenant.” Driven by anxiety, we rush around piling supplies into grocery carts as if we were preparing for a Yukon expedition. An ounce of prevention, after all. When a crisis looms, grabbing a gallon of milk is a sign of hope. After 20 years of living in St. Louis, none of this is a surprise to me. The threat of being shuttered in place by a snow-apocalypse seeps into our psyche. It drives our decision making while also giving people from places like Wisconsin, Minnesota and upstate New York a reason to smirk at our antics. Folks, they tell us, you’ll be fine. Yet the notion of pending doom is characteristic of many parts of our lives lately. Our news cycles reinforce these anxious feelings of hopelessness. While crime rates continue to fall, most Americans believe violent crime has been increasing. Likewise, government figures show that most undocumented immigrants didn’t enter from Mexico. The majority entered legally and then overstayed their visa. That’s not to say that immigration issues don’t need attention, but it does lend some credence to looking for lasting solutions instead of reaching for a quick fix. When we perceive we are under threat, we run to the store to buy milk and eggs. Any indication that we are under threat initiates anxiety. It seems to me that instead of being overwhelmed by crisis, a better response would be to be about the hard work of

Keating serves as pastor of the Woodlawn Chapel Presbyterian Church (PCUSA) in Wildwood. He is a regular Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday.com/ religion.

ST. LOUIS NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION

COIN SHOW 55th Annual Coin Show February 8,9,10- 2019 Setup - February 7th

Friday Saturday Sunday

10:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. 10:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. 10:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.

Dealer Set Up Thursday 3 p.m. - 7 p.m. $1.00 Registration Fee Early Bird Badges $35.00 110 DEALERS

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

Call: 314-426-5500 For Special Show Room Rates Hilton St. Louis Airport Hotel 10330 Natural Bridge Road • St. Louis, Missouri 63134 (Three minutes from Airport) Free “Validated”Parking

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 2/1/2019

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

Neuropathy? Call now to reserve your seat at a seminar near you to learn from Dr Wise’s 15 years of experience and see if you qualify for Neuropathy Reversal Treatment!

636-487-0988 Dr. Wise is Board Certified in the treatment of Neuropathy.

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

Get Relief with No Surgery, Shots, or Addictive and Dangerous Medications! 100% Non-Invasive – No Side Effects! We offer a scientific, 4-step, proven approach that heals your nerves and reverses your symptoms from the comfort of your home by:

Do you suffer from

The 1st ten callers will receive a Free copy of Dr. Wise’s Neuropathy Reversal report!

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 2/1/2019

• • • •

Increasing nerve blood supply Nerve repair & re-educating Increasing blood flow in feet or hands Increasing balance & mobility

For More Information www.stlouiscoinclub.com

Saturday & Sunday, January 26-27 10am-4pm Saint Charles Convention Center 1 Convention Center Plaza, Saint Charles, MO 63303 Adults $11 on Sat, $10 Sun on-site, Cash only, Kids Under 12 Free! Admission Good for Both Days

Huge Operating Model Railroads! 300+ Tables of Trains For Sale! Trains Kids Can Ride! - Door Prizes! Awesome Lego Layout - Free Parking! Use Coupon Code N11 to Save $1 on Admission At Transhow.com/StCharles


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Catholic teens at rally mock elderly Native American Kentucky diocese apologizes, promises investigation and action ASSOCIATED PRESS

COVINGTON, KY. • A Roman Catholic

diocese in Kentucky is condemning the actions of some students from its all-male high school mocking a Native American man after a rally in Washington. In a joint statement to the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington and Covington Catholic High School apologized to Nathan Phillips, an Omaha tribe elder and Vietnam veteran who attended the Indigenous Peoples March in Washington on Friday. The march coincided with the March for Life, which drew thousands of anti-abortion protesters, including a group from Covington Catholic High School in Park Hills, Ky. Videos circulating online show a youth staring at and standing extremely close to

SURVIVAL MEDIA AGENCY VIA AP

A teenager (center left) wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat confronts a Native American man at a rally Friday in Washington. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington in Kentucky says teens who mocked the elderly man are from its high school.

an elderly Native American who is singing and playing a drum. Other youths, some wearing clothing with Covington logos,

surround them, laughing and shouting. Many of the youths are also wearing “Make America Great Again” hats.

Laquan McDonald cases spur call for political action in Chicago and U.S. BY SARA BURNETT Associated Press

CHICAGO • Activists and others who were disappointed by the outcome of two historic cases involving the killing of black teenager Laquan McDonald by a white Chicago police officer see a way forward — by turning tragedy into political power. A judge sentenced former Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke on Friday to less than seven years in prison for Laquan’s death in 2014. Video of Van Dyke firing 16 shots at Laquan as he walked away from the officer prompted protests, a U.S. Justice Department investigation of the Chicago Police Department and the firing of the police superintendent, among other changes. It also was a key piece of evidence in Van Dyke’s trial, when a jury last year found him guilty of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery. The judge’s sentence of six years and nine months — less than half of the penalty sought by prosecutors — means the 40-year-old could be released in just over three years. It came a day after a different judge acquitted three other Chicago police officers accused of lying about the shooting to protect Van Dyke. Activist William Calloway, who helped force Mayor Rahm Emanuel to release police video of the shooting, said he and others were “heartbroken” by the judges’ decisions but wouldn’t give up seeking changes. “If you’re a black Chicagoan, don’t protest. Don’t take to the streets,” he said. “It’s time we take to the polls.” Calloway is trying to defeat a fiveterm alderman in local elections next month to win a seat on the Chicago City Council. He has criticized the incumbent and other black aldermen for not doing enough to

CHICAGO TRIBUNE VIA AP

Ex-Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke reads a statement at his sentencing hearing Friday in Chicago.

change the culture of a police force that has long had a reputation of racial bias and condoning police brutality. Laquan’s shooting already has been a major factor in Chicago politics. The charges against Van Dyke were announced in 2015, the same day City Hall — under a judge’s order — released the video. The case was widely seen as the reason the county’s top prosecutor, Anita Alvarez, was voted out of office a few months later, and it’s thought to be a factor in Emanuel’s decision not to seek a third term next month. The impact has extended to communities outside Chicago, said Rashad Robinson, president of the national civil rights organization Color Of Change. The group worked with Chicagoarea activists to unseat Alvarez, with a “Bye, Anita” campaign. It’s also helped elect new district attorneys in places including Philadelphia and St. Louis County, where a white officer wasn’t charged with the 2014

killing of Michel Brown, a black and unarmed 18-year-old, in Ferguson. Color of Change opened an office in downtown Ferguson to support Wesley Bell, who last fall was the first African-American to be elected St. Louis County circuit attorney. Bell’s first action after taking office was to remove three veteran assistant prosecutors, including one who played a role in presenting evidence to a grand jury in the case. He has also made policy changes, such as ending prosecutions for most marijuana possession cases. “The killing of Laquan and that video is one of the many catalysts that have sparked this current movement we’re in of prosecutor accountability,” Robinson said. “Our metric of success as a movement can’t solely be based on whether or not police officers go to prison, but that the culture of policing changes in this country.” Changes implemented in Chicago include a requirement that the city release video of fatal police shootings within 60 days. The city has also changed how police shootings are investigated. The Police Department accelerated a program to equip all officers with body cameras. And the fact that Van Dyke was charged and convicted is historic — no other Chicago officer has faced the same fate in a half-century. The other three officers are believed to be the first to be charged with covering up a police-involved shooting. Even as Laquan’s great uncle lamented the length of the sentence, he noted the significance. “If they’d have sentenced him to one minute, it is a victory,” the Rev. Martin Hunter said. “It sets a precedent and it sends a strong message to unjust police officers that now you can and will go to jail if you’re caught lying, if you’re caught breaking the law.”

Church officials said the students’ behavior was opposed to the church’s teachings on the dignity and respect of the human person. Officials said they were investigating and would take appropriate action, up to and including expulsion. Phillips holds an annual ceremony honoring Native American veterans at Arlington National Cemetery. State Rep. Ruth Buffalo, a North Dakota state lawmaker and member of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, said she was saddened to see students showing disrespect to an elder who is also a U.S. military veteran at what was supposed to be a celebration of all cultures. “The behavior shown in that video is just a snapshot of what indigenous people have faced and are continuing to face,” Buffalo said. U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., sharply criticized what she called a display of “blatant hate, disrespect and intolerance.” “This Veteran put his life on the line for our country,” she tweeted Saturday. “Heartbreaking.”

NATION DIGEST Florida governor ousts elected officials Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis’ assertion of his authority to remove elected officials has Democrats wondering whether he was targeting their party and who might be next. DeSantis suspended Palm Beach County Elections Supervisor Susan Bucher, after his decision to remove Broward Sheriff Scott Israel. The ouster of the two Democrats followed the decision by the previous governor, Rick Scott, to remove another Democrat, Broward Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes. Republicans defended Bucher’s suspension as the necessary removal of a bungling administrator, while Democrats expressed concern that the Republican governor was abusing his authority to override the choices of voters. Trophy hunters expo sells illegal animal products • Photos and video taken at a recent trophy hunting convention show products including boots, chaps and belts of elephant hide, and furniture crafted from body parts of threatened big-game animals. Vendors at the Safari Club International event held last week in Reno, Nev., also were recorded hawking vacations to shoot captive-bred lions raised in pens. The camera footage was released Friday by the Humane Society of the United States. Both federal and state laws restrict the commercial sale of hides from African elephants, which are protected under the Endangered Species Act. Couple who fell to deaths in Yosemite were drunk • A couple from the San Francisco Bay area who died after falling from a popular overlook at Yosemite National Park were intoxicated at the time, according to autopsy reports. Vishnu Viswanath, 29, and his wife, Meenakshi Moorthy, 30, died Oct. 25 after plunging about 800 feet from Taft Point. They were citizens of India who were living in the U.S. The sheriff’s department is still investigating how they fell. Spy satellite heads into space • A rocket carrying a U.S. spy satellite lifted off Saturday from California, propelling the National Reconnaissance Office satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base. Details of the mission, dubbed NROL-71, were not released. The launch had been repeatedly delayed since late last year for various reasons including a hydrogen leak, high winds and a problem with ground communication equipment. Florida mayor resigns over his texts • Gulf Breeze, Fla., Mayor David Landfair resigned on Friday, after being sworn in in December. Landfair said he had engaged in “inappropriate texting with an adult woman.” He did not go into details. From news services

ST. LOUIS NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION

COIN SHOW 55th Annual Coin Show February 8,9,10- 2019 Setup - February 7th

Friday Saturday Sunday

10:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. 10:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. 10:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.

Dealer Set Up Thursday 3 p.m. - 7 p.m. $1.00 Registration Fee Early Bird Badges $35.00 110 DEALERS

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

Call: 314-426-5500 For Special Show Room Rates Hilton St. Louis Airport Hotel 10330 Natural Bridge Road • St. Louis, Missouri 63134 (Three minutes from Airport) Free “Validated”Parking

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 2/1/2019

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

Neuropathy? Call now to reserve your seat at a seminar near you to learn from Dr Wise’s 15 years of experience and see if you qualify for Neuropathy Reversal Treatment!

636-487-0988 Dr. Wise is Board Certified in the treatment of Neuropathy.

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

Get Relief with No Surgery, Shots, or Addictive and Dangerous Medications! 100% Non-Invasive – No Side Effects! We offer a scientific, 4-step, proven approach that heals your nerves and reverses your symptoms from the comfort of your home by:

Do you suffer from

The 1st ten callers will receive a Free copy of Dr. Wise’s Neuropathy Reversal report!

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 2/1/2019

• • • •

Increasing nerve blood supply Nerve repair & re-educating Increasing blood flow in feet or hands Increasing balance & mobility

For More Information www.stlouiscoinclub.com

Saturday & Sunday, January 26-27 10am-4pm Saint Charles Convention Center 1 Convention Center Plaza, Saint Charles, MO 63303 Adults $11 on Sat, $10 Sun on-site, Cash only, Kids Under 12 Free! Admission Good for Both Days

Huge Operating Model Railroads! 300+ Tables of Trains For Sale! Trains Kids Can Ride! - Door Prizes! Awesome Lego Layout - Free Parking! Use Coupon Code N11 to Save $1 on Admission At Transhow.com/StCharles


NEWS

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Produced by the Niche Department of the Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis, LLC

ST. LOUIS’ BEST BRIDAL

Engagements &Weddings stlouisbestbridal.com Spread the exciting word! Fill out the engagement form online, attach a photo and we do the rest! It’s easy and free. You also receive a package with a special T-shirt to help plan the special occasion.

Recently married? Just tell us about it within a year of your wedding and attach your photo. Announcing that big occasion is free, too!

( WEDDINGS )

Rowold

& Harp

Kingery

Jordan Nicole Rowold and Jared Allen Harp were married the afternoon of Oct. 20, 2018, by Dr. Sammy Simmons at Immanuel Baptist Church in Benton, Ill. A reception was held at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Mt. Vernon, where Short Circuit Entertainment provided music. The bride is the daughter of Steve and Janet Rowold of New Baden, Ill., and the groom’s parents are Richard and Maria Harp of Benton. Maid of honor was Jessica Zobrist. Bridesmaids were Alyssa Williams, Abby Dugan, Paige Brennan, Hannah Meyer and Casey Jackson with Eden Harp as junior bridesmaid. Josh Harp was best man and Zach Tate, Bryce Doughty, Adam Johnston, Andrew Mitchell and Thomas Simpson attending as groomsmen. Noah Morlan was junior groomsman. Flower girl was Olivia Bergkoetter and ring bearer was Stricker Shurtz. Bryson Potts, Derek Reeves, Walter Kosowki and Justin Gesell seated guests. After the newlyweds honeymooned in Mexico, they live now in Benton. The bride graduated from Wesclin High School in 2013, Southeast Missouri State University in 2016 and Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes-Jewish College in 2017. She is a labor and delivery nurse at Memorial Hospital in Carbondale, Ill. Mr. Harp graduated from Benton High School in 2008, Rend Lake College in 2010 and Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 2013. He is a civil engineer for Illinois Department of Transportation in Carbondale. !

& Herzog

Rachel Nicole Kingery and Alec Nathaniel Herzog were united in marriage Friday, Nov. 2, 2018, at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, University City. Monsignor Richard Hanneke was celebrant. A reception was held at Stone House of Saint Charles. Parents of the bride are Michael and Amy Jo Kingery of Effingham. The groom’s parents are Jim and Anne Herzog of Saint Louis and the late Regina Herzog. The bride chose her sister, Rebecca Bouldin, and Kristin Widmar, her friend, as matrons of honor. Bridesmaids were Yasmin Bahena and Clarissa LeVasseur, friends of the couple. Luna Wood, the bride’s goddaughter, was flower girl. The groom chose his brother, Erik Herzog, as best man. Groomsmen were their friends, Tyler Leising and Hugo Gonzalez, and Zak Spies, friend of the groom. Nick Bujnak, another friend, seated guests. Ring bearer was Eli Herzog, cousin of the groom. Readers were Tyler Phelps and Angela Helmuth, the bride’s godparents; Brian Cluskey, a friend, and Amanda Radasch, cousin of the groom. The newlyweds graduated from high school in 2012, the bride from Henry-Senachwine High School and the groom from St. Mary’s High School. Both are 2016 graduates of Saint Louis University. She is an applications developer at U.S. Bank, St. Louis, while her husband is an engineer at The Boeing Company in St. Louis. After a honeymoon touring Florence, Rome and the Amalfi Coast of Italy, the couple makes their home in St. Charles. !

(ENGAGEMENTS)

Benden

& Cooper

Karalyn Benden and Stephen Cooper announce their engagement. The future bride is the daughter of Denis and Shelley Benden of St. Charles. Her fiance’s parents are Edward Cooper and Sandra Basler, each of Highland, Ill. The couple lives in Glen Carbon. They plan to be married July 11, 2019, at Riviera Maya, Mexico. !

Sauer

Krystal Mikuleza and Noe Barrera announce their engagement and plans to be married on July 18, 2020. The couple lives in Granite City. !

& Freiner

Martin

Taylor Freiner and Jessica Sauer announce their engagement and summer wedding date. Ms. Sauer, of Fenton, is the daughter of Russ and Cindy Sauer of Fenton. Barry and Lisa Freiner of south St. Louis County are parents of the groom-to-be. The future bride, who studied elementary education at Maryville University, Town and Country, teaches fourth grade at Rockport Heights Elementary in Fox C-6 School District. Mr. Freiner graduated from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and now is a software developer for Maritz. The Fenton residents plan a July 27, 2019, wedding. !

McBride

& Moore

Czerniewski

& Eckert

Jenifer Czerniewski and Michael Eckert announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Richard and Donna Czerniewski of Perry, Mo., while her fiance’s parents are Michael and Donna Eckert of Troy, Mo. The newlyweds-to-be, who reside in Wentzville, plan to be married June 22, 2019 !

Av aila

Don’t miss our next BRIDAL SHOW!

for th

& Thornton

Denise Martin and Michael Thornton announce their engagement and future wedding date of Aug. 31, 2019. !

Kevin Moore and Kimberly McBride announce their engagement and upcoming spring wedding. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Gail and Bob Wuebbels of Hillsboro while the future groom’s parents are Verna Rayfield of Bloomsdale and Bill Moore of south St. Louis. The couple resides in Cape Coral, Fla., and plans to be married May 11, 2019. !

F R E E! G I Fe T first

& Barrera

Mikuleza

ble

Fre e ti cke ts!

at Sav vi F orm alw ear loc ati on s*

B BRIDAL SHOW

es 100 brid

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20

NOON - 3:30 P.M.

Saint Charles Convention Center

The

B We d de si nt gs S TART H E

COURTESY OF

ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL WIN A

FUNJET TRIP for 2

THESE BEST BRIDAL BUSINESSES AND MORE ARE READY TO HELP PLAN YOUR WEDDING!

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 Chics and a Photobooth 612 North Event Space AGE Entertainment Andre’s Banquets & Catering Bed, Bath and Beyond Belleza Bridal and Hair Salon Cedar Creek New Haven Cedar Lake Cellars Ces and Judy’s Catering Championship Catering Clarice’s Bridal Color Street by Sandi Bognar COMPLETE Weddings + Events Concetta’s Cyrano’s Café and Wine Bar

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

David’s Bridal Diamond Resorts Dillard’s Wedding Registry “Dinner 4 Two” by Royal Prestige Favazza’s on the Hill Fish Eye Fun Frew’s Bridal and Formal Wear Grand Opera House Hampsa Aesthetics Hermann Hill Weddings Jilly’s Cupcake Bar and Café JM3 DJs Kenrick’s Catering Lawrence Florist Mary Kay by Jessica Schultz

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bride-to-be, preregistering online for wedding couple to enter FREE!

www.stlbestbridal.com/showoffer ®

Men’s Wearhouse Mia Grace Bridal Orlando’s Event Centers Parties and Props Photo Elegance Platinum Limousine Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel Robller Vineyard & Winery Savvi Formalwear Schnucks Florist & Gifts St. Charles Convention Center St. Charles County Parks St. Louis Post-Dispatch Strike A Pose Tan-Tar-A Resort

• • • • • • • • • • • •

The Christy The Franklin Room Tin Roof TKO DJs TopGolf Tower Studios Travel Haus of St. Louis Trotter Photo Twisted Lilies Vital Performance Chiropractic Wedding Gallery White Traditions Bridal House

$5 entrance fee (cash only) per person on the day of the show or complimentary tickets available at area Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last.

RE


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Iceland’s northern lights make for dazzling sight, but risky driving

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Hakimian Brothers ONLY THE FINEST ORIENTAL RUGS

Trusted Name in St. Louis Over 50 Years

STORECLOSING ASSOCIATED PRESS

The northern lights appear in the sky over Bifrost, Iceland, in 2017. Police say sleepdeprived tourists shouldn’t be dividing their attentions between the road and the sky.

BY EGILL BJARNASON Associated Press

AKUREYRI, ICELAND • Police in Ice-

land have a warning for visitors: Beware our roads in the winter. Spending a clear winter night under an Arctic sky lit up by spectacular streaks of color from the northern lights is an often-cited “bucket list” experience among the reasons more people are visiting Iceland, especially its northern region. The remote region on the edge of the Arctic Circle is one of the best places in the world to spot the colorful phenomenon. But police say many foreign visitors lack the experience and expertise to handle Iceland’s wintry road conditions. They are increasingly worried about visitors scanning the sky for the northern lights and not looking at the road, which may be icy, twisty or narrow — or all three at once. “The weather in Iceland changes every five minutes, so to speak, and road conditions change accordingly,” said superintendent Johannes Sigfusson of the Akureyri Police Department, the largest in the northern region. “The risk is compounded in the middle of the night, when an inexperienced driver is deprived of sleep and with one eye on the sky.” Of the 18 people who died in traffic crashes in Iceland in 2018, half of them were foreigners, continuing a trend that started the year before, when more foreigners than residents died for the

first time. The aurora borealis, or northern lights, occur when a magnetic solar wind slams into the Earth’s magnetic field and causes atoms in the upper atmosphere to glow. The lights appear quite suddenly and the intensity varies — the most amazing are bright green with streaks of purple and yellow. Northern lights sightings depend on a mix of luck and effort. The Icelandic Met Office operates a 9-scale northern lights forecast every day, based on solar winds in the past three days, that pinpoints the best spots in the country each night to try to see the lights. But traveling away from city lights is most often necessary, and that has led some drivers to take hazardous mountain roads. Police say they have encountered sleep-deprived drivers cruising into the night, as well as vehicles driving without lights on to prevent light pollution. Police say some accidents even happen on main roads, when tourists hit the brakes quickly because of a sudden northern lights sighting and then get hit from behind. It doesn’t help that, in Icelandic winters, the sun in Akureyri can rise as late as 11:39 a.m. and set as early as 2:43 p.m., meaning that tourists are spending most of their day driving in the dark. Authorities note that the capital, Reykjavik, Akureyri and other areas have tourism companies that offer nightly northern lights bus tours near-daily in the winter so tourists can leave the driving to professionals who know the roads.

SALE

LAST 2 WEEKS! NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED EVERY INCREDIBLE RUG IS NOW

60%~80% REDUCED IN PRICE

IT’S YOUR YEAR TO HEAR

Happy new EARS Were conversations mumbled or hard to understand at your last family gathering? It’s YOUR YEAR to HEAR. Find out if New Technology will help you! Don’t drop the ball. Call now and wear the best hearing aid for 30 days in the new year. • • • •

Don’t ignore your hearing problem any longer! Receive incredible extended Holiday discounts. Free Hearing Test. (your problem may be just wax) Try ANY hearing aid for 30-days.

Insurance may cover full or partial payments!

Hall of Famer

Whitey Herzog (patient for over 25 years)

Call today and you’ll receive a FREE hearing evaluation and 30-day Risk Free Trial!

!$#%$" NOW BUY 2 AND SAVE! N

1,25000

$

OFF MSRP

outhwestern Hearing Centers

FULLY DIGITAL NUEAR ITC NOW ONLY $

79500

You Tube

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist. *Fits a mild loss.

All shapes and sizes are still available, new and antique, traditional and contemporary. Looking forward to seeing you in our store before our doors close forever.

EACH*

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8119 (618) 206-5940 (636) 203-9842

Our multi-million dollar inventory of fine handmade oriental rugs from Persia and neighboring countries must all be sold in just a matter of weeks.

OPEN EVERYDAY: MON-SUN 10-6 314. 725. 3600 7911 Clayton RD. CLAYTON, MISSOURI


WORLD

01.20.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

Shah’s last palace, a secluded refuge in Iran, is now a museum ary raided the palace with other demonstrators. “When you do something consciously and with an ideology, you go until the end despite pressures,” he said. The compound dates to Iran’s Qajar dynasty in the 1800s, when the monarchy chose to build a summer palace on a mountainside. As Tehran grew during its oil boom years of the 1960s, the shah’s Marmar Palace near the city’s vast Grand Bazaar became increasingly untenable for the monarch to live in as political tensions against his rule grew. That included a failed 1965 assassination attempt by a member of his guard who was close to religious dissidents. Instead, the royal family found refuge at the Niavaran Palace. The shah’s third wife, Queen Farah, had been an architecture student. She spent mil-

BY AMIR VAHDAT AND MOHAMMAD NASIRI associated Press

TEHRAN, IRAN • The shah of Iran’s last refuge before fleeing his country in 1979 was a palatial estate nestled against the Alborz Mountains — a place no Iranian ever dreamed of visiting. Today, it costs them about $1. The Niavaran Palace, a complex of mansions on a 27-acre plot, now welcomes the public to marvel at the luxuries the shah enjoyed as Iran’s monarch for nearly four decades. As Iran reflects on Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi’s departure from the country 40 years ago this month, the palace has taken on even more meaning for those visiting and working there. “We did what we did consciously. We were following an ideology,” said Jamal Shahosseini, who as a young revolution-

lions of dollars renovating the compound’s palaces. A wing of one palace became a private art gallery of pieces she purchased known as the Window to the World. The shah would walk the grounds or speed along its roads in one of his many sports cars. A pilot, he’d fly helicopters in and out as well, staying off the streets as tension rose. All that spending, and long circulating rumors of embezzlement surrounding the Pahlavi dynasty, helped fuel anger against the monarchy. From abroad, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, whom the shah had forced into exile early on, called for a revolution. As 1979 came, the pressure became unbearable for the shah, who at the time was secretly battling the cancer that would ultimately kill him in exile. On Jan. 16, 1979, the shah left

ARMSTRONG Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Installation starting at

$3,98000

the palace for the last time by helicopter, looking out over a Tehran he never would see again. On Feb. 11, 1979, the day the revolution took hold, protesters pushed past the remaining Imperial Guards at the compound. Among them was Shahosseini, now a 63-year-old guard at the museum. He remembers scrawling graffiti over the walls, ranging from “Viva Khomeini” to “Death to the Shah.” “It was controlled by the Imperial Guards when we arrived. We gave them plain clothes while they were shivering with fear,” he told The Associated Press. “They thought we were Communists trying to capture the palace. We told them that we were not Communists but were Khomeini’s supporters from the Niavaran neighborhood. Then we conquered the palace.” Today, visitors to the complex can walk the halls of the shah’s

former residence and see the clothes and items they left behind. In one room, the shah’s dress uniform stands on a headless mannequin, complete with a ceremonial sword sheath. Two paintings also still remain showing the shah and his queen. Another building in the complex includes some of the shah’s many luxury automobiles, including three Rolls-Royce and five Mercedes-Benz automobiles, six motorcycles and a snowmobile. Other museums in Iran have more. For Fardin Asgari, 28, a visitor born long after the revolution and Iran’s bloody eight-year war with Iraq, the takeaway from the French-style furniture and luxury surroundings was that “the people viewed the shah as a dictator.” “They wanted to a have popular and elected government, not a dictatorship,” he said.

BY THIS TIMe TONIGHT

This Could Be Your New Bathroom Fits Your Existing Tub Space in

*Save

50% off

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

1-DAY!

Labor or Installation!

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused.

NO MESS INSTALLATION!

Offer Expires on 1/31/2019

TODAY 7:00 AM CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

SAVE BIG

Aprilaire Humidifer

SAve $50

on a Complete furnace Maintenance Inspection

314-236-3352 TONIGHT 4:00 PM

Air Purification with “ Air Scrubber Plus”

SAve $100

618-215-7379 • 314-236-9874 OFF the regular price. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

$42.00 Off

The regular price of a complete furnace system. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

Get RESULTS by attacking pet and cooking odors, air pollutants, VOC’s (chemical odors), smoke, bacteria, viruses, mold spores, in your home so that your Family can breathe easier! Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

Incredible Financing! Lifetime Warranty! Full Senior Discounts! *Offer available with purchase of any complete bath or shower system. Offer cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on previous sales, financing available to those who qualify, see store for details. Expires January 31, 2019

Give us A DAY and we’ll give you a new beautiful shower with luxurious new fixtures in your choice of colors and styles - installed by experts at a price you can afford. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call us today! Enjoy your new shower TONIGHT!

g n i s i c r e x e l l i t Are you s

? 9 9 9 1 s ’ t i e lik

Remember life before Y2K? To watch a movie at home, you had to “be kind and rewind.” To surf the web, you endured the beeps and crackles of dial-up. And if you wanted to get fit, you pulled on your Jane Fonda tights and headed to the gym five times a week. You’ve upgraded your computer, your VCR and your wardrobe. But what about your exercise habits?

20 Minutes to Fitness makes it possible to get fit in just ONE 20-minute session a week. • Our workout is safe for people of all ages and fitness levels. • It can be adjusted to meet your needs and limitations. • A fitness coach remains at your side the entire time. • Our staff includes physical therapists and other fitness professionals.

The results

Which would you choose?

• Our load-bearing workouts help prevent osteoporosis by reducing bone loss and increasing bone density. • You’ll build strength, improve cardio health, burn fat and receive many other health benefits.

Call us today in Clayton (314-863-7836) or Chesterfield (636-536-1504) to schedule a visit. Your first workout and consultation are free!

Typical fitness center WEEKLY TIME COMMITMENT STRENGTH-TRAINING PROTOCOL

3 to 5 hours

20 minutes

Based on number Medically based and designed to reach muscle exhaustion of reps

EQUIPMENT

Free weights or machines

MedX Physical Therapy Equipment

WORK OUT ATTIRE

Sweats and Lycra

Come as you are. Train in street clothes, if you like*

None

Personal coach stays at your side during every workout

SUPERVISION

*You may want to loosen your tie, or wear shorts under your skirt.

2 0 M I N U TE S , O N C E A WE E K!

20MinutesToFitness.com Clayton I Chesterfield I Sarasota I Tampa


NEWS

01.20.2019 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

Total lunar eclipse to meet supermoon on Sunday night Moon, Earth and sun line up for only time this year and next It begins with the partial phase about 9:34 p.m. St. Louis time Sunday. That’s when Earth’s shadow will begin to nip at the moon. Totality — when Earth’s shadow completely blankets the moon — will last 62 minutes, beginning at 10:41 p.m. If the skies are clear, the entire eclipse will be visible in North and South America, as well as Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts. The rest of Europe, as well as Africa, will have partial viewing before the moon sets. During totality, the moon will look red because of sunlight scattering off Earth’s atmosphere. That’s why an eclipsed moon is sometimes known as a blood moon. In January, the full moon is also sometimes known

BY MARCIA DUNN associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL , FLA. •

Here comes a total lunar eclipse and supermoon, all wrapped into one. The moon, Earth and sun will line up this weekend for the only total lunar eclipse this year and next. At the same time, the moon will be closer to Earth and appear slightly bigger and brighter than usual — a supermoon. “This one is particularly good,” Rice University astrophysicist Patrick Hartigan said. “It not only is a supermoon and it’s a total eclipse, but the total eclipse also lasts pretty long. It’s about an hour.” The whole eclipse starts Sunday night or early Monday, depending on location, and will take about three hours.

as the wolf moon or great spirit moon. So informally speaking, the upcoming lunar eclipse will be a super blood wolf — or great spirit — moon. In the U.S., the eclipse will begin relatively early Sunday evening, making it easier for children to stay up and enjoy the show. Plus the next day is a federal holiday, with most schools closed. But the weather forecast for much of the U.S. doesn’t look good. Parents “can keep their kids up maybe a little bit later,” said, Hartigan, who will catch the lunar extravaganza from Houston. “It’s just a wonderful thing for the whole family to see because it’s fairly rare to have all these things kind of come together at the same time. “The good thing about this is

ARMSTRONG Heating and Air Conditioning System!

Installation starting at

$3,98000

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Earth casts its shadow on the moon during a complete lunar eclipse seen from Jakarta, Indonesia, on Aug. 28. Sunday evening, North and South America will be able to see the only total lunar eclipse of 2019.

that you don’t need any special equipment,” he added. Asia, Australia and New Zealand are out of luck. But they had prime viewing last year, when two total lunar eclipses occurred. The next total lunar eclipse won’t be until May 2021.

As for full-moon supermoons, this will be the first of three this year. The upcoming supermoon will be about 222,000 miles away. The Feb. 19 supermoon will be a bit closer, and one in March will be the farthest.

BY THIS TIMe TONIGHT

This Could Be Your New Bathroom Fits Your Existing Tub Space in

*Save

50% off

(Based on a 2 ton system) 4SCU13LB124P PROMO PD 4 A80UH1E070B12

1-DAY!

Labor or Installation!

Installation includes new flue pipe for furnace only and flushed line set. Any upgrades will be an additional charge. Existing electrical, gas line shutoff and union will be reused.

NO MESS INSTALLATION!

Offer Expires on 1/31/2019

TODAY 7:00 AM CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

SAVE BIG

Aprilaire Humidifer

SAve $50

on a Complete furnace Maintenance Inspection

314-236-3352 TONIGHT 4:00 PM

Air Purification with “ Air Scrubber Plus”

SAve $100

618-215-7379 • 314-236-9874 OFF the regular price. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

$42.00 Off

The regular price of a complete furnace system. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

Get RESULTS by attacking pet and cooking odors, air pollutants, VOC’s (chemical odors), smoke, bacteria, viruses, mold spores, in your home so that your Family can breathe easier! Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires on 1/31/2019

Incredible Financing! Lifetime Warranty! Full Senior Discounts! *Offer available with purchase of any complete bath or shower system. Offer cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on previous sales, financing available to those who qualify, see store for details. Expires January 31, 2019

Give us A DAY and we’ll give you a new beautiful shower with luxurious new fixtures in your choice of colors and styles - installed by experts at a price you can afford. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call us today! Enjoy your new shower TONIGHT!

g n i s i c r e x e l l i t Are you s

? 9 9 9 1 s ’ t i e lik

Remember life before Y2K? To watch a movie at home, you had to “be kind and rewind.” To surf the web, you endured the beeps and crackles of dial-up. And if you wanted to get fit, you pulled on your Jane Fonda tights and headed to the gym five times a week. You’ve upgraded your computer, your VCR and your wardrobe. But what about your exercise habits?

20 Minutes to Fitness makes it possible to get fit in just ONE 20-minute session a week. • Our workout is safe for people of all ages and fitness levels. • It can be adjusted to meet your needs and limitations. • A fitness coach remains at your side the entire time. • Our staff includes physical therapists and other fitness professionals.

The results

Which would you choose?

• Our load-bearing workouts help prevent osteoporosis by reducing bone loss and increasing bone density. • You’ll build strength, improve cardio health, burn fat and receive many other health benefits.

Call us today in Clayton (314-863-7836) or Chesterfield (636-536-1504) to schedule a visit. Your first workout and consultation are free!

Typical fitness center WEEKLY TIME COMMITMENT STRENGTH-TRAINING PROTOCOL

3 to 5 hours

20 minutes

Based on number Medically based and designed to reach muscle exhaustion of reps

EQUIPMENT

Free weights or machines

MedX Physical Therapy Equipment

WORK OUT ATTIRE

Sweats and Lycra

Come as you are. Train in street clothes, if you like*

None

Personal coach stays at your side during every workout

SUPERVISION

*You may want to loosen your tie, or wear shorts under your skirt.

2 0 M I N U TE S , O N C E A WE E K!

20MinutesToFitness.com Clayton I Chesterfield I Sarasota I Tampa


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 01.20.2019 • A20 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Compassion or tough love? Blight problem in St. Louis means making tough choices on tax delinquencies.

S

for bankruptcy, it’ll be yet another year t. Louis faces unenviable, tough or more before possession changes choices when it comes to forehands. That’s a long time for leaky roofs closing on vacant properties and other deteriorating conditions to whose owners are far in arrears render a once-salvageable building on their taxes. Often erring on the side unrecoverable. of compassion for strapped property Reducing that crucial interim was the owners, officials have tended to wait driving force behind a 2017 local ballot years longer than the law requires before referendum, Prop NS, that allows the foreclosing. sale of bonds to finance the stabilization The result is that many properties of vacant houses in the LRA inventory. sit unoccupied and unused, steadily Vollmer describes his job as walkdeteriorating to the point where they ing a “tightrope” between taking poor become unsalvageable. Compassion is people’s property and protecting the commendable, but very often, tough love is the better answer. As the Post-Dispatch’s Jacob Barker recently reported, the St. Louis revenue collector’s office could play a key role in stemming or prolonging St. Louis’ blight problem. Vacancy rates have gone from bad to abysmal in the 50 years since the St. Louis Land CRISTINA M. FLETES • Post-Dispatch Reutilization Mercedes Reeves, 5, is under the watchful eye of her grandmother, Authority Sheree Moore, as she plays in the shadow of vacant homes that came into surround Moore’s longtime home on Maffitt Avenue. existence as quality of life for those who live nearby. the nation’s first city-run land bank. He acknowledges that some people game When the authority was created in the the system to evade their full tax debt early 1970s, there were an estimated while paying just enough to stave off 12,600 tracts of tax-delinquent, foreclosure. abandoned property in St. Louis. Tax LRA Director Laura Costello correctly delinquencies have gone way down — to questions whether this lag time is helpabout 5 percent of the city’s roughly ing in a city drowning in dilapidated, 122,000 parcels — but the number of vacant structures. Such eyesores drag vacant properties has swollen to at least down the city’s image, deter repopula25,000. More than half are privately tion and pose major risks to neighboring owned. residents. A property doesn’t have to be vacant Vollmer is correct to prioritize keepto be tax delinquent, nor does a taxing people in their houses and making delinquency mean a property is vacant. sure that all properties generate the But either condition warns of trouble maximum revenue for city coffers. There ahead. Currently, the city typically waits comes a point, though, when the priorthree years before initiating forecloity must shift to protecting the rights of sure proceedings on a tax-delinquent others. It’s hard to argue with compasproperty, says Tom Vollmer, the deputy sion, but it’s even harder to argue that collector, even though state law requires maintaining the status quo is yielding only a one-year grace period. successful results. Foreclosure proceedings take a full year to conclude, and if the owner files

Disclosable donors Senate bill will test lawmakers’ commitment to clean up Jefferson City.

I

n case Missouri lawmakers missed the unmistakable walkaway message from the Nov. 6 election, we will restate it clearly for them: Missouri voters want cleaner, more transparent government. They want to put an end to the domination of Jefferson City by special interest groups. They want legislators to be elected based on the power of their ideas, not the microscopic gerrymandering of districts to predetermine their partisan makeup. Hoping to capitalize on overwhelming voter support for the “Clean Missouri” amendment on Nov. 6, state Sen. Scott Sifton, D-Affton, proposes to go one step further by lifting the veil that currently prevents Missourians from knowing the extent to which big donations influence the awarding of major state contracts. The donations Sifton is specifically targeting in his Transparency in Government Contracting Act (Senate Bill 148) are those that go to “dark money” political organizations. Although dark money has had pernicious effects on state and national politics for years, most Missouri voters were probably oblivious to it until Gov. Eric Greitens’ 16-month term in office ended in scandal last year. Millions of dollars in donations from invisible sources poured into Greitens-controlled dark money organizations. The extent of those donations’ influence on his advocacy as governor might never be known because investigations into potential influence-peddling fizzled with his resignation in June 2018. But that doesn’t mean dark money and pay-to-play governance are gone from Jefferson City. Without legislation to

uncloak the legally protected secret-donor web, there’s little to stop lawmakers and state executives from continuing down the corrupt trail Greitens blazed. “Taxpayers don’t know whether government business is being affected by the corrupting influence of secret, dark money,” Auditor Nicole Galloway said in a statement endorsing Sifton’s bill.“This bill would bring transparency to the contract process by making sure Missourians know when taxpayer dollars are being used in state contracts that go to dark money contributors.” Sifton’s bill would require individuals or entities engaged in contracts worth $5,000 or more to report the political contributions they make to 501(c )(4) dark money organizations. All donations of $500 or more would be covered under his measure, and reporting requirements are retroactive to the 12 months preceding the awarding of the contract. The general public would have access to those reports. Big donors accustomed to the quid pro quo of donations in exchange for special legislative favors no doubt will hate this bill and expend no small effort to kill it. They reportedly panicked when investigations into Greitens’ fundraising practices threatened to reveal donor identities. If the GOP-dominated Senate and House truly wanted to honor the voters’ call for cleaner, more transparent governance, they’d embrace this bill and quickly send it to Gov. Mike Parson’s desk. But given Clean Missouri’s tepid reception so far in Jefferson City, we won’t be holding our breath.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Older generations fortunate to have lived when we did As a member of an older generation called the prehistoric age, I enjoyed Bill McClellan’s nostalgic column “Farewell to a Late Twentieth Century Man” (Jan. 13). He was right on several points. Political correctness has paralyzed free speech. The end of the 20th century with the Y2K scare was a milestone of sorts, although the techies’ prediction of disaster proved wrong. The election of Wesley Bell is certainly one of several meteor strikes to challenge life as we knew it. Of course, we of the older generations are fortunate to have lived when we did. As someone much wiser than I wrote, the current generation is drowning in information and starving for knowledge. Walt Beiter • Chesterfield

Plenty of homeowners don’t have a wall or fence A reader whose letter was published Jan. 13 opined that “a wall is the first step in securing our borders” and “anyone who does not understand that needs help.” I wonder if he means that the millions of Americans who do not have a fence or a wall around their yards for aesthetic reasons, or because their homeowner associations do not allow them, need help. Or the millions of Americans who, in lieu of having fences or walls, choose to instead rely on technology like home alarms and cameras. Do they need help? I don’t think these Americans need help; they’ve made wise decisions. Our president and Congress can make a wise decision by considering the many ways to secure our southern border that do not include costly, unsightly barriers. Russ Vanderbeek • Ballwin

No more government ‘by the people’ in Missouri Missouri voters in November approved Amendment 1, commonly known as “Clean Missouri.” The major part of the amendment designates legislative emails as open records. The Republican-controlled Missouri House arrogantly ignored the will of the voters on Tuesday, rendering the voters’ passage of Amendment 1 essentially null and void. Although disappointing, this comes as no great surprise. The Republican Legislature has consistently shown that they feel they are a body to themselves, with no responsibility to listen to the views of Missouri citizens. Abraham Lincoln said at Gettysburg: “Government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” It has perished from Missouri. George Warfield • St. Charles

Working class can end the president’s bullying America’s workers are suffering increased pain every day from President Donald Trump’s shutdown. The president says the government could actually be reopened in less than an hour if he is given the $5.7 billion he wants to build a border wall. He says he will continue the shutdown for “months or even years” until his demands are met. As usual, President Trump is acting as a bully to get his way. I think it’s time for the president to learn that bullying doesn’t replace compromise and actually governing. It may come as a shock to him, but he was

elected president, not king. Here’s how to teach him this lesson: The TSA union, whose members are being forced to work for no pay, should announce that if the shutdown isn’t ended within three days, on the fourth day all union workers will call in sick. Federal workers can’t strike legally, but they can call in sick. Just the mere threat of shutting down all air traffic in the U.S. would be extraordinarily chaotic. President Trump would face incredible pressure from the corporate world to end his shutdown. Congress would also feel the heat and put additional pressure on the White House. It shouldn’t take long for Trump to throw in the towel and seek a shutdown-ending compromise. It’s time for America’s working class to deliver an unmistakable message to the president that they’ve had enough of his bullying. It’s time that Trump learn that America’s strength is built on the wellbeing of its people, not on the size of his enormous ego. Lois Klayman • St. Louis County

Four-day school week is good for students, parents As stated in the article “Warrenton schools latest to go to 4-day weeks” (Jan. 14), schools should move to a four-day school week in order to improve attendance, reduce disciplinary behavior, advance academics and reduce financial cost. Four-day school weeks have already proved successful. According to the Chattooga County School District in Georgia, four-day weeks decreased disciplinary referrals by 73 percent. In return, students appeared more rested, relaxed and focused in class, allowing students to have a better balance of their time. Call me lazy, but I can use that precious time working to help my family economically, studying on the subject I’m struggling with, and doing homework on Monday. Students also do volunteer activities for school or in pursuit of additional educational goals, helping to improve the school image. It’s true, some students won’t take advantage of this time, but most of the students are finding time for themselves and are increasing their job hours to acquire money for their own future. St. Louis-area schools should adopt a four-day week. It’s best for students, teachers, parents and the economy. Nhu Nguyen • St. Peters

Helping convince Major League Soccer to come to St. Louis Major League Soccer just added Austin, Texas, as the 27th franchise to the league. This means only one more franchise will be awarded for play to start in 2021. If you are in favor of having an MLS team here, you might wonder how you can help. I have a suggestion: The MLS gurus will be watching what kind of a crowd will watch the U.S. women at Busch Stadium, as part of the team’s preparation for the Women’s World Cup in France. Buy some tickets and come to the stadium. Another — and obvious — idea is to attend St. Louis FC games. If every game is a sellout, that sends a strong message to the decision makers at MLS. Mike Muschick • Chesterfield Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1 50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

FAREWELL TO THE ‘FULTON FLASH’ • The Tonya Harding-Nancy Kerrigan rivalry tells one story of Olympic gold competition. The death of Helen Ste-

phens should remind everyone that competition can be keen, yet fair. Stephens, the “Fulton Flash” from mid-Missouri, sped to two gold medals in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Her commitment to fast-paced, fair competition upheld the true nature of sports. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Metro government — again I have seen the future. It looks a lot like the past. KEVIN HORRIGAN

Experts tell us that it takes about 12 trees to make a ton of newsprint and that 100 average-sized newspapers weigh about 4.8 pounds. That means that over the years I killed the equivalent of the Mark Twain National Forest writing about municipal governance issues in St. Louis. More or less. Now, six months after I shuffled off to Del Boca Vista, comes news that the Operation Overlord of city-county merger efforts is about to begin. The Post-Dispatch reported two Sundays ago that Better Together STL, a creature of Rex Sinquefield Inc., is about to launch a $25 million effort that would allow Missouri voters to return St. Louis to the bosom of St. Louis County for the first time since the year General Custer rode into the valley of the Little Big Horn. Maybe this will solve the problem once and for all. Somehow I doubt it. Many, many people hate this idea for many, many

reasons. Some of these reasons are excellent. Some are tacky and racist and parochial. There are a few people who really like the idea, political science nerds for the most part. Many others aren’t crazy about it, but believe it’s a bitter pill that must be swallowed. St. Louis (the region) is sucking wind, and one possible reason is municipal fragmentation. The very words “municipal fragmentation” make eyes glaze over. It’s total spinach, a topic that should come with a headline: “Read this. It’s important, dammit.” Some parts of this story are ironic. For example, it’s odd that it was the city that made the effort to dump the county back in 1876, not wanting to be responsible for lightly populated areas out in the sticks. One of the leaders of this visionary effort was a young Republican state representative named Joseph Pulitzer, who two years later would found a newspaper that’s been complaining about it for decades. As the county began growing, it became obvious to city leaders that they’d screwed up. They began making efforts to modify the

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson speaks at a joint news conference with St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger in 2017. The two voiced their positions following a released report of a city-county merger study by the Better Together organization.

Great Divorce decree. They all flopped,so in 1962 someone had the bright idea to let voters statewide amend the state constitution and put the city and county back together. It failed by a margin of 3-to-1. There is nothing new under the sun, except for all the money Sinquefield will throw at it this time around. I remember having the facts of life explained to me by the late George Wendel of the St. Louis University’s Center for Urban Programs. Wendel and Terry Jones of the University of MissouriSt. Louis had interesting academic sidelines explaining and/or polling on the question. “It fails big in the county

and almost as big in the city,” Wendel told me about one of his polls. Affluent suburbs want nothing to do with the city’s problems. In the city, and in less affluent county suburbs, politicians don’t want their political power diluted. It’s like, “Sure we’ve got problems. We can’t pay our bills, crime is out of sight and the housing is falling down. But I’ve got a job with benefits so bug off.” Mayors in county municipalities wax eloquently about local pride in residents’ knowing that if a cat gets stuck in a tree, one of their lightly trained and underpaid cops will come get it down and then go back to his speed trap.

The Manchurian President? If Trump isn’t a Kremlin asset, he’s doing an Oscar-worthy impersonation of one. when he says he didn’t know about that at the time, he certainly knows now. But there’s another element to all this that creates the nagging sense it’s something more than admiration or gratitude. Ponder what we all know so well The 1962 film “The Manchurian about this president’s personality: Candidate” imagines a plot by his incessant chest-thumping, his Russia and China to subvert the need to always look tougher than U.S. government by brainwashing the next guy, his utter refusal to ever a prominent American prisoner of bend for any adversary. Except one. war in an effort to assassinate the Think about the kinds of criticism leading presidential nominee and Trump endures regarding Russia: get a communist asset elected in that he’s weak, that someone else his place. (Putin) is stronger than he is. It’s the It’s good stuff for a night on the one kind of criticism Trump’s fragile couch with popcorn. But a real-life ego can’t abide. Except in this one subversion of the U.S. government instance. likely wouldn’t Think of all the involve hypnosis. world leaders, That might work for including allies, smoking cessation, whom Trump has but probably not for savaged any time it assassinations. served his personal In real life, the needs. It would plot would probably serve his needs entail things like greatly to criticize lucrative business Putin. One good deals. Or comproTrumpian tonguemising information lashing would put to obtained during rest this “weakness” overseas visits. Or theme that has to be — depending on the driving him crazy. personality of the And yet he won’t target — plain oldfashioned flattery. FANDANGO MOVIE CLIPS do it. Once you remind The film came Angela Lansbury and Laurence Harvey in the 1962 film “The yourself that Trump out at the height of Manchurian Candidate.” will attack, belittle the Cold War and, and betray anyone watching it now, who threatens his towering sense Add to this the fact that Trump’s you can feel in every frame the chill of Self, the question looms: Why foreign-policy decisions sound like toward what was then Soviet Rusdoes he refuse to stand up to Putin, a Putin wish-list: softening Russian sia. Of course, many who felt it in despite the damage it’s doing to his sanctions, ordering U.S. troops out real time are still around. People of Syria and — most of all — publicly “brand” not to? in their late 60s or older today are I’m still hesitant to embrace the undermining NATO. old enough to have been politically notion that Russia “has something” The revelation last week that aware in 1962. on Trump, be it carrot or stick. It Heck, many of them are currently Trump has also been telling people sounds too much like an old blackin his administration he wants to serving in Congress. completely pull out of NATO is more and-white movie. Plus, much of And yet, there’s been a truly chilling than any movie. Surely there what he’s done can be explained, bizarre silence from President Donquite believably, as mere incompeald Trump’s party about established is no geopolitical goal more chertence. facts that, until recently, would have ished by the Kremlin. What makes it difficult to comYou don’t have to buy into an seemed less believable than your pletely shelve the Manchurian Angela Lansbury-esque conspiracy average Hollywood thriller. possibility, though, is Trump’s own theory to wonder if Putin is exercisAdding in revelations of the past narcissism, which he confirms on ing undue influence over Trump. week, we now know: Twitter almost daily. There are all kinds of forms of influ• Trump’s son, son-in-law and Trump puts himself first, always. campaign manager met in 2016 with ence that fall far short of hypnosis, Supplication to Putin hurts him. blackmail or even lucrative business a Kremlin-linked Russian hoping to Which makes it hard to imagine why get dirt on Hillary Clinton — and the deals. he would keep doing it — unless It could be genuine admiration on president himself later concocted something else threatens to hurt Trump’s part for a leader who has the public lie that the meeting was him worse. “strongman” attributes he likes — about child adoptions. and official powers he envies. • Trump fired FBI Director James Or it could be genuine gratitude Comey in 2017 because, as Trump kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com himself admitted on national televi- for Russia’s social media campaign @kevinmcdermott to push the 2016 election to Trump. sion, he hoped to thwart the official 314-340-8268 Even if Trump is telling the truth investigation of Russia’s election KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

meddling. • In a 2017 White House meeting, Trump improperly revealed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister regarding the war on terrorism. • With Russian leader Vladimir Putin at his side in Helsinki and the whole world watching, Trump backed Putin’s denial of the unanimous U.S. intelligence conclusion that Russia interfered with our election. • After a private meeting with Putin, Trump confiscated his translator’s notes and ordered the linguist not to disclose details of the conversation even to members of his own administration.

A big part of this is racial, of course, but most of it is economic. Folks don’t want to pay for other people’s problems. This “common good” thing has its limits. Another interesting thing about the most recent proposal: Sinquefield’s minions may try to put this on the ballot through initiative petition. The Legislature could put it on the ballot itself, avoiding the hassle and expense of hiring a company to collect at least 161,000 signatures across the state. Having the Legislature do it would mean nasty hearings and difficult choices for local lawmakers: Antagonize the voters? Or antagonize Rex and big corporate donors?

When the going gets tough, punt. One more interesting tidbit: Six years ago, then-Mayor Francis Slay and then-County Executive Charlie A. Dooley announced with some fanfare that the two jurisdictions were going to merge their economic development agencies. The idea, pushed by local business groups, was to market the city and the county to prospective employers as a single region. The resulting entity was called the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership. It was to be a kind of preview to the efficiencies that would result from city-county merger. Some preview. As the Post-Dispatch reported last month, the partnership became a playground for cronies of Steve Stenger, who succeeded Dooley as county executive in 2015. Otis Williams, the city’s top development official, was often cut out of the conversations. Behold the future of metro government.Without new leadership, it will look an awful lot like the past. Kevin Horrigan, a retired member of the Post-Dispatch editorial board, is a freelance writer in St. Louis. kfhorrigan@gmail.com

Some find it all too easy to denigrate women R. Kelly accusations bring out people trying to defend the indefensible. superfluous evidence of how we often refuse to know difLEONARD ficult things. At another level, PITTS though, there is something Miami Herald here unique to the AfricanAmerican experience. Perhaps you heard it in the word “they.” Maybe you caught it at “y’all.” This is a column about some If you are unclear on who black people. “they” and “y’all” are, welcome Not all, thank goodness. Not to America. Hope you enjoy even most. Disney World. Those of us who But if you watched the aren’t here on tourist visas, stunning recent Lifetime those of us who documentary, are people of color, “Surviving R. Kelly,” know all too well which detailed what those words decades of sexual refer to. Namely, assault accusations the great white against the singer, world that so often surely you wondered conspires against about some of the us as we vote, seek black people you work, demand saw continuing to justice or simply try profess undying love to go about our day, and support even as R. Kelly unmolested. the charges against When the larger their idol grew world conspires against you so steadily more sickening. Like often and in so many different the girl outside the courthouse ways, it becomes easy — almost in 2008 where he was on trial a reflex — to see conspiracy on child pornography charges, whenever accusations are who declares with definitive leveled against people like defiance,“He’s not guilty at you, especially famous ones. all. They just want to bring him “They” want to get Bill Cosby down and kill his image.” “They.” We’ll get back to that and Michael Jackson.“Y’all” are trying to bring Mike Tyson in a moment. down. For now, let us just note But as Public Enemy once that her sentiment was starkly said,“Some blacks act devil, at odds with the testimony too.” So some black people of woman after traumatized need to get past the idea that woman, describing hells of mind control,physical violence, each of us is obligated to defend isolation and child molestation. any one of us against any and all accusations regardless of One recounts being hit because she was not a Chicago Bulls fan, evidence. That’s not racial solidarity. No, it’s an abdication of others explain how they had our right and responsibility to to ask permission to go to the exercise judgment. bathroom or have a meal, yet It is also a betrayal of every others describe the notorious woman who came forward in sex tape on which Kelly is seen that documentary. Most were — allegedly — urinating upon a just as much black as Kelly, 14-year-old girl. so you’d think they’d have an Nor is all that love and supequal claim on African-Amerport simply an artifact of the ican compassion and regard. past. In the days since the documentary aired, some black But for some of us, his celebrity trumps their humanity. Some people have been online busily of us still find it all too easy to trying to defend the indefendoubt and denigrate women — sible. especially women of color. To wit: As one of the women, Jer“R. Kelly is a victim. Them honda Pace, put it,“Nobody … hoes just wanted fame and cares about the black women money from him.” that speak out. Especially the And: “Everybody throwing black community.” She has a stones, condemning this man point. as if they have no sin at all.” And for that, some black And: “Y’all keep attacking people should be ashamed. our black men usher Bill Cosby Morgan freeman now R Kelly.” Leonard Pitts Jr. At one level, this is little lpitts@miamiherald.com more than a reminder that the Copyright The Miami Herald word “fan” likely originated Distributed by Tribune Content Agency from the word “fanatic” — and


WORLD

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Freed by court, Pakistani Christian woman still on edge Despite being acquitted of blasphemy, she lives in seclusion, worried about being targeted by angry mobs BY KATHY GANNON Associated Press

ISLAMABAD • Aasia Bibi, a Pakistani Christian acquitted of blasphemy, still lives the life of a prisoner, nearly three months after her release from death row, awaiting a final ruling on her fate. She spends her days in seclusion for fear of being targeted by angry mobs clamoring for her death. In her hideout, she longs for her children, who were taken to Canada for their safety. Pakistani security forces guarding Bibi, 54, prevent her from opening a window in her hiding place, let alone going outside, a friend said. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court is weighing a petition by Islamist extremists and right-wing religious parties that rallied against her acquittal and demand her execution. Her case goes to the core of one of Pakistan’s most controversial issues — the blasphemy law, often used to settle scores or intimidate followers of Pakistan’s minority religions, including minority Shiite Muslims. A charge of insulting Islam can bring the death penalty. Just making an accusation is sometimes enough to whip up vengeful mobs, even if the courts acquit defendants. A provincial governor who defended Bibi was shot and killed, as was a government minority minister who dared question the blasphemy law. Bibi’s ordeal began on a hot day in 2009, with a row with fellow farmworkers after two Muslim women refused to drink water from the same container as a Christian. They demanded she convert, and she refused. Five days later, a mob accused her of blasphemy. She was convicted and sentenced to death in 2010 for insulting the Prophet Muhammad. After eight years on death row, the Supreme Court acquitted her on Oct. 31. At the time, her lawyer Saif-ul Malook, who has since been driven into exile

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this 2010 photo, Aasia Bibi, a Pakistani Christian woman, listens to officials at a prison in Sheikhupura near Lahore, Pakistan. Bibi still lives the life of a prisoner, although she was freed from death row by the country’s top court.

fearing for his life, argued that the many inconsistencies in the testimony of her accusers vindicated her. Bibi had always maintained she was innocent. But the acquittal sparked nationwide protests, spearheaded by the radical Tehreek-e-Labbaik party, which sees the protection of the prophet as its single-point agenda. The party’s leaders — Khadim Hussein Rizvi and Mohammad Afzal Qadri — are in jail, charged with inciting violence, including with calls for Bibi’s public hanging and for the death of the three judges who acquitted her. They also called for mutiny in the powerful army and the overthrow of Prime Minister Imran Khan’s new government. As street protests by extremists calling for Bibi’s death swelled, Khan’s government pledged she would remain in the country until the Supreme Court reviews the petition against her acquittal. From her secret location, which authorities maintain is for her own protec-

tion, Bibi is not allowed by Pakistan’s security forces to give interviews. Even her friends and those few who have access to her are afraid to be identified and agreed to talk to a reporter only on condition of anonymity. One of her friends says Bibi’s husband, Ashiq Masih, who was wounded by a gunshot fired by a protester calling for Bibi’s death, is with her in hiding. Her two daughters, Eisham, 20 and Esha, 19, were spirited out of Pakistan. Bibi’s hiding place is comfortable enough, but it’s still a jail of sorts, the friend said, adding that Bibi’s only hope is that someday the family will be reunited abroad. However, it’s unclear when the review of Bibi’s acquittal will be completed. Bibi’s friends say she has hoped it would be done before Supreme Court Chief Justice Saqib Nisar retires at the end of the week. Nisar and his successor, Asif Saeed Khan Khosa, were part of the three-member panel that acquitted Bibi. In their decision, a 52-page judgment, they cited both Pakistan’s statute law and Islam’s holy book, the Quran, to justify the acquittal.

Malook, the defense lawyer, told The Associated Press by phone from the United States that he is confident the petition would be thrown out. But he fears it could take months, even years, if the court is reluctant to decide. “I have read the arguments for the review, there is nothing there,” he said. “It will be thrown out.” Arguing for the petitioners, attorney Ghulam Mustafa Chaudhry is just as confident. He told the AP that he too is pressing for an early decision. Without offering any details, Chaudhry said he has a strong case for overturning Bibi’s acquittal. Malook says his life in self-imposed exile has been devastating for his family and that he wants to return to his home in the eastern city of Lahore. “My daughter calls, and she weeps, my wife calls and she weeps,” he said. “I think now I would rather be killed in my country than live in this situation.” Bibi’s friend worries about her health and the heart disease she has suffered from for the past five years. “She is receiving medication for her heart, but she is still in pain,” the friend said.

FEB 8-10

WELCOMES THE

St. Charles Convention Center LADUE NEWS

FREE PARKING FRI 11-5 • SAT 10-5 • SUN 10-4

Huge Sale On Top Manufacturers

Huge Savings On Gear

Left to right – Joni Karandjeff (luncheon vice chair); Eva Frazer, MD (luncheon chair); Marian Nunn (vice president); Gwendolyn Packnett, PhD (president)

Dave Sinclair Lincoln Putting Championship • SSM Health Wellness Zone • 19 19th Hole KP & LD Drive Championships • Whisky, Gin & Vodka Tastings • First Tee JR. Golf Area

All Attendees Receive Restrictions Apply. Details on Website.

26

Front Door Bonus Rounds! With paid admission. While supplies last

Presented by

Great Enter-to-Win Prizes

• 13 rounds to courses from Lake of the Ozarks Golf Trail • Old Kinderhook Round • Oak Terrace Resort & Spa 4-some Rangefinder Golf Vacation • Fore Honor Golf & Events Center 4-some $10 Off Game Play Coupon Lesson Zone Kids Day Sat. stlouisgolfexpo.com VIP Pass On Sale!

HAVING TROUBLE WITH HIGH PROPERTY TAXES?

WE CAN HELP! 314-454-0505 info@PARresidential.com • The largest property tax consulting firm in the metro area • Over $9 Million in tax savings since 2009!

Nominations are now being accepted The purpose of the Women of Achievement Award is to recognize and honor women of diverse cultures, roles and accomplishments who have demonstrated commitment to the betterment of the St. Louis region through significant volunteer contributions. A committee of community leaders will choose ten honorees to be recognized at the Women of Achievement luncheon on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Clayton. Nomination forms are now available. Deadline for nomination is midnight on Monday, January 21, 2019. Nominations online preferred. Visit www.woastl.org for criteria and nomination form. For questions call (314) 896-4962.

Presenting Sponsors:

NO SAVINGS, NO FEE! New Life Evangelistic Center is providing emergency supplies, food, shelter and training programs for the homeless. Please send your tax deductible gift to:

NLEC PO Box 473 St. Louis, MO 63166 For more information go to the Facebook page @newlifestl or online at nlecstl.org and tune in to NLEC TV 24.2


WORLD

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

DIGEST U.S. airstrike in Somalia kills 52

came shortly after the African Union in an unprecedented move asked Congo to delay announcing the final election results, citing “serious doubts” about the vote.

The U.S. military said Saturday that it had carried out its deadliest airstrike in Somalia in months, killing 52 al-Shabab extremists after a “large group” mounted an attack on Somali forces. The U.S. Africa Command said the airstrike took place near Jilib in Middle Juba region. There were no reports of Americans killed or wounded. The U.S. statement did not say whether any Somali forces were killed or wounded by the al-Qaida-linked extremists. Al-Shabab asserted via its Shahada news agency that its attack on two Somali army bases had killed at least 41 soldiers. Spanish rescuers hope to reach tot in deep hole • Authorities in southern Spain said Saturday they hoped to soon reach the spot where they believe a 2-year-old boy is trapped after falling into a deep borehole six days ago. Angel Garcia, the leading engineer coordinating the search-and-rescue operation, said that they hope to get there sometime Sunday. Garcia said a drill is perforating a hole, after which two or three experts will be lowered in a cage so they can begin digging a horizontal tunnel to the location where they believe the toddler is. There has been no contact made with Julen Rosello, who fell into the 360-foot-deep, 10-inch-wide hole last Sunday during a family outing northeast of Malaga. The only sign of him search-and-rescue teams have found so far is hair that matched his DNA. Journalist is killed by shrapnel in Libya • A freelance journalist who contributed to The Associated Press and other news organizations was killed Saturday in the Libyan capital, a colleague said. Mohamed Ben Khalifa, who was in his 30s, was hit by shrapnel while accompanying a militia patrolling the Qaser Bin Ghashir area south of Tripoli, said Hamza Turkia, also a freelance journalist. The militia came under attack by another armed group, Turkia said. Model who cited evidence of Russian meddling drops claim • A Belarusian model and self-styled sex instructor who claimed last year to have evidence of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election said Saturday that she apologizes

Hungarian workers protest labor law changes • Dozens of anti-government protests have taken place in Hungary to protest labor law changes that sharply increased the overtime hours that employers can request from workers. Saturday’s rallies drew hundreds of people to each event. The labor law changes were approved in December by lawmakers from Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s Fidesz party, and also include other measures seen as detrimental to employees.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Lithuanian Orthodox believer bathes Saturday in an icy lake near Vilnius, Lithuania. Water that is blessed by a cleric on the feast of Epiphany is considered holy and pure until next year’s celebration and is believed to have special powers of protection and healing.

to a Russian tycoon for the claim and won’t say more about the matter. Nastasia Vashukevich’s statement appears to head off any chance of her speaking to U.S. investigators looking into possible collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump’s campaign.

Sunday the election of Felix Tshisekedi as president, rejecting challenges by runner-up Martin Fayulu, who had alleged fraud. Tshisekedi, son of the late, charismatic opposition leader Etienne Tshisekedi, is set to be inaugurated Tuesday. The declaration

Migrants missing as ship sinks in Mediterranean • A vessel that went down off the Libyan coast has left at least 117 migrants missing in what could be the deadliest disaster in the Mediterranean in more than a year, the U.N. migration agency said Saturday, citing reports from rescued migrants. The account of the sinking, about 50 nautical miles off the Libyan coast, came from three survivors rescued by the Italian navy. An International Organization for Migration spokesman said two children, including a 2-month-old, were among those presumed dead. From news services

German farmers rally for climate-friendly agriculture • Thousands of farmers from across Germany and their supporters have protested at Berlin’s landmark Brandenburg Gate, calling for climate-friendly agriculture and healthy food. Organizers say 170 tractors drove in from farms around the country to join 35,000 other protesters for the Saturday demonstration under the motto “we are fed up with the agricultural industry.” The protest was called to coincide with the German capital’s “Green Week” agricultural fair, and Agriculture Minister Julia Kloeckner’s meetings with dozens of countries about more international cooperation on agricultural issues. Congo certifies Tshisekedi as president • Congo’s Constitutional Court declared early

FEB 8-10

WELCOMES THE

St. Charles Convention Center LADUE NEWS

FREE PARKING FRI 11-5 • SAT 10-5 • SUN 10-4

Huge Sale On Top Manufacturers

Huge Savings On Gear

Left to right – Joni Karandjeff (luncheon vice chair); Eva Frazer, MD (luncheon chair); Marian Nunn (vice president); Gwendolyn Packnett, PhD (president)

Dave Sinclair Lincoln Putting Championship • SSM Health Wellness Zone • 19 19th Hole KP & LD Drive Championships • Whisky, Gin & Vodka Tastings • First Tee JR. Golf Area

All Attendees Receive Restrictions Apply. Details on Website.

26

Front Door Bonus Rounds! With paid admission. While supplies last

Presented by

Great Enter-to-Win Prizes

• 13 rounds to courses from Lake of the Ozarks Golf Trail • Old Kinderhook Round • Oak Terrace Resort & Spa 4-some Rangefinder Golf Vacation • Fore Honor Golf & Events Center 4-some $10 Off Game Play Coupon Lesson Zone Kids Day Sat. stlouisgolfexpo.com VIP Pass On Sale!

HAVING TROUBLE WITH HIGH PROPERTY TAXES?

WE CAN HELP! 314-454-0505 info@PARresidential.com • The largest property tax consulting firm in the metro area • Over $9 Million in tax savings since 2009!

Nominations are now being accepted The purpose of the Women of Achievement Award is to recognize and honor women of diverse cultures, roles and accomplishments who have demonstrated commitment to the betterment of the St. Louis region through significant volunteer contributions. A committee of community leaders will choose ten honorees to be recognized at the Women of Achievement luncheon on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Clayton. Nomination forms are now available. Deadline for nomination is midnight on Monday, January 21, 2019. Nominations online preferred. Visit www.woastl.org for criteria and nomination form. For questions call (314) 896-4962.

Presenting Sponsors:

NO SAVINGS, NO FEE! New Life Evangelistic Center is providing emergency supplies, food, shelter and training programs for the homeless. Please send your tax deductible gift to:

NLEC PO Box 473 St. Louis, MO 63166 For more information go to the Facebook page @newlifestl or online at nlecstl.org and tune in to NLEC TV 24.2


NEWS

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

® ® ® ®

®

®

What to do with

ELECTRONIC CUTTERS The new arsenal of cutting machines goes beyond basic paper crafting. Make stamps, cut leather, and create stencils with the latest tools on the market.

The Brother stamp starter kit includes all the essentials for creating your own block stamp. $30; brother-usa.com

projects LESLIE POYZER • photographs BLAINE MOATS • words NATALIE DAYTON

STAMPED MIRROR

FLUTTERY CHARGERS Vinyl butterfly cutouts morph plain chargers into eye-catchers, right. In your cutter’s design platform, upload butterfly images. We used three different images and resized them to fit our charger’s outer ring. Place white vinyl onto cutting mat and set cutting settings to vinyl. Cut according to design platform’s instructions. Remove the negative space off the vinyl. Cover with vinyl transfer tape and carefully remove from mat. Cut the transfer tape around each vinyl butterfly. Remove backing and set design into place on charger rim. Smooth using scraper, and remove the transfer tape.

Give a tribal vibe to your wood mirror frame, above, by creating your own stamp using the new Brother ScanNCut machine. Measure mirror frame to know what size to create your stamp. Draw a triangle in the Brother Design Center, then use the circle tool to draw circles inside the triangle. Place the stamp material on the cutting mat and set blade to the proper settings. Cut design according to Design Center directions (A). Place stamp onto acrylic stamp block. Prep block paint by squeezing a bit onto waxed paper. Roll brayer over the paint repeatedly (B) until paint makes a snappy sound. (This will prevent over-inking.) Apply paint to stamp, and stamp pattern onto mirror, reinking after each use. Allow paint to dry before hanging.

DO IT BETTER For each project that involves heavy materials, make a test cut to ensure the settings are correct and your pattern looks right before proceeding with your final product.

Turn acrylic blocks into personalized place cards by cutting out removable white vinyl in your guests’ names. Next dinner party, simply remove old vinyl and cut new names.

Handwash only.

A A

B B

LEATHER NAPKIN RINGS Sure, we all know an electronic cutter cuts paper, but the new Cricut Maker cuts leather, fabric, even balsa wood, too. Can you say game changer? For the floral napkin rings, above, download the flower image with interlocking arrow at BHG.com/FreePatterns and import into your Cricut Design Space canvas. Copy and paste the flower three times (you will need four flowers for one napkin ring). Press the “Make It” button on your Cricut and change cutting settings to thick leather. Place the deep-cut knife blade into cutter. Fit leather (we used a piece from Cricut’s line of materials) onto a strong-grip mat and tape down the four edges of the leather for added security. Send through cutter (A). Remove the cut flowers from the mat using a weeding tool (B). Link the flowers to make a ring by passing the arrow through the center of the adjacent flower, front to back.

Get the patterns!

YOU CAN DO IT For more personal style ideas for your home and garden, subscribe to Do It Yourself™ magazine at magazine.store for $9.99 for 4 issues.

To download the custom patterns used in this story and get how-to for a table runner, visit BHG.com/FreePatterns.

ENT ER TO WIN !

VIP Hockey Experience for engaged couples 20 couples will receive special access to a private St. Louis Blues practice, lunch and additional prizes! ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL WIN

AN ALL-INCLUSIVE TRIP FOR 2 TO MEXICO ENTER THRU FEBRUARY 10: STLtoday.com/contest SPONSORS


A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019 PRESENTED BY

A ST. LOUIS THING

THE POST-DISPATCH

TRIVIA NIGHT

Test your knowledge of FEB.8,2019 @ all things St. Louis at this MOOLAH SHRINE one-of-a-kind St. Louis CENTER trivia night to support DOORS OPEN – 6 PM 100 Neediest Cases. TRIVIA STARTS – 7 PM

READER EXCLUSIVE: Be the FIRST to reserve your table of 8! $280/TABLE OF 8. TICKETS INCLUDE: • An opportunity to meet your favorite Post-Dispatch columnists • Complimentary Schlafly Beer all night • Gift bag • Raffle • Silent auction • Surprises throughout the night SPONSORED BY

SPACE IS LIMITED

Visit: STLtoday.com/ourevents

Call today to connect with a WINTER CLEARANCE SALE SENIOR LIVING ADVISOR Ductless Heating & Cooling

INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE

FURNACE,AIRCONDITIONER,ANDMATCHINGCOIL

UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS — Learn the different types of senior care available LOCAL KNOWLEDGE — Our Advisors have the local knowledge to help you hand-pick communities in your area SIMPLIFY — Your dedicated Advisor will simplify your search and help schedule tours EXPERIENCE — Our Advisors help thousands of families understand their options every day SUPPORT — Our team is happy to provide additional support from movers to attorneys and much more

There’s no cost to you! St. Louis (314) 202-6110 Southern IL (618) 206-5955 Missouri (636) 203-9884 !We’re paid by our partner communities

A Place for Mom has helped over a million find families fi nd senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options.

From As Low As

2599

$

INSTALLED Price shown above includes the following equipment shown on this ad; model#ACpepa13na018bn,Furnace#pepg8maa024070,Coil#cecnpvp1814.Removalof oldequipment.Directreplacement/installnewequipmentatsameandeasilyaccessiblelocation,connectedtopresent:gassupply,electricsupply,fluepipe,condensatedrain thermostatwire,refrigerantlines, andfunctional/reusableexistingductwork.Outsideunitonthegroundoralowsidewallrack.Crawlspaces,attics,andnoteasilyaccessible locations loactionswillbeatanextracharge.Whenadditionalmaterials,accessories,orsuppliesareneeded,ifauthorizedbypurchaser,willbedoneatanextracharge.Other restrictions and limitations may apply.This offer includes $1500 discount andmaynotbecombinedwithanyotherdiscounts,coupons,orspecialoffers.

CALL NOW Joan Lunden former host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.

314-802-4130 •• 618-364-4186 618-364-4186 314-802-4130 Expires 2/3/2019 Expires 01/09/2018

Indoor Comfort Team may not offer services in all areas where this ad is distributed. Final installation cost varies and is based on purchasers equipment selection and installation required terms and conditions. Additional brands, sizes and efficiencies are available.


NATION

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

U.S. lettuce industry, wary of E. coli, wants FDA back to work BY JOEL ACHENBACH Washington Post

It’s the peak of the leafy greens growing season in Yuma, Ariz., where irrigated valleys are lush and verdant amid cactus-covered mountains. This is America’s salad paradise, which produces most of the fall and winter lettuce consumed in the United States. Locals credit excellent soil, abundant sunshine and a steady supply of labor, thanks to Mexicans with work visas who cross the border checkpoint and ride buses to the fields. But these are anxious times for the leafy-greens industry, and the partial federal government shutdown and furloughing of many Food and Drug Administration officials has

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A worker harvests romaine lettuce in Salinas, Calif., in 2007. Three times in the past year, the lettuce industry has been roiled by foodborne illness outbreaks.

deepened the distress. Three times in the past year, the industry has been roiled by foodborne illness outbreaks linked to

across the country and left five dead, was linked to romaine grown in the Yuma area. The romaine lettuce di-

U.S.-grown romaine lettuce contaminated with a toxic strain of E. coli bacteria. The biggest outbreak, which sickened 210 people

Walk In Showers AFTER

Before

“We cannot afford to get bounce-back from people who are unable to check their email because they’re furloughed,” McEntire said. Without improvements in the system, food safety lawyer Bill Marler said, “we’re just going to limp from outbreak to outbreak, from litigation to litigation. We’ll be having the same conversation this spring or next winter.” Frank Yiannas, FDA deputy commissioner for food policy and response, said the agency continued to investigate the most recent romaine-linked outbreak, which was traced to central California. He said the agency was also maintaining heightened surveillance of romaine. What the agency isn’t doing during the shutdown, according to industry leaders and researchers, is playing an active role in reforms to curb future outbreaks. On Tuesday, about 150 FDA inspectors and technical staffers returned to work without pay to conduct inspections of facilities across the country, according to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. The recalled inspectors, who remain unpaid, will work on “high risk inspections” that “could potentially include leafy greens, including romaine lettuce,” the FDA said. “All our work is important, but only some of the FDA’s work is permitted to continue during a lapse in funding, which may include some activities with industry and other groups,” the FDA said.

sasters have exposed the complexity of the food system, in which a head of lettuce goes through so many facilities and is potentially mixed with so much other leafy produce that it can be impossible to trace the origin of a salad. The outbreaks remain mysterious. The FDA’s investigations have produced plausible theories, but nothing conclusive about how, when and where the bacteria contaminated the lettuce. That’s a source of consternation for the $2 billion leafy-greens industry, which desperately wants to avoid a repeat of what happened last year and is counting on the FDA for help. But because of the federal shutdown, the agency has barely been in the game. “Our colleagues and I are kind of on hold, waiting for the FDA to come back into action,” said Paula Rivadeneira, an assistant professor who specializes in food safety at the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension in Yuma. “We need them to open their doors and get back to business.” During the shutdown, the FDA isn’t allowed to participate in conference calls or webinars with state officials, industry leaders and research scientists, said Jennifer McEntire, vice president for food safety at United Fresh Produce Association. She said the lack of FDA help had had a “ripple effect” as outside experts are forced to try to do their work without FDA data.

D O N AT E YO U R C A R

• St. Louis Local • Veteran Owned - VA Certified

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri

10% OFF SHOWERS - JANUARY ONLY

* 100% Tax Deductible

314-758-0594•618-857-3458

* Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycle & RVs

Huge Hearing Aid Savings Complimentary Hearing Exams New 2019 Technology Sneak Peek Preview

Close-out Savings on 2018 Models Test Study Participants Needed

INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

RENEW YOUR KITCHEN

MAKE YOUR KITCHEN, BATHROOM OR BAR LOOK LIKE NEW AGAIN!

We Have Limited Quantities of All Clearance Items! 24 CHANNELS ME-3 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY • BTE and custom styles • Feedback Cancellation • Noise Reduction • Directional Microphones • Advanced Options: Alerting tones, Programmable Telecoil and Direct Audio Input

rice Ever s !

$895 Valid on model Audiotone Pro CIC

While s e Supplit Las

Call:(314) 499-1300

SAVE up to $595

HURRY! Limited Quantities Available! CustomDigital Hearing Aids! PLowest Now Only

WheelsForWishes.org

Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. Promo Code: May not be combined with other offers. IR-SALE0101 Does not apply to prior sales. Offer valid THIS MONTH ONLY.

KITCHEN CABINET REFINISHING • TUB AND TILE REFINISHING Make your tile, countertops and floors look like granite for a fraction of the cost.

CONTEMPORARY REFINISHING

30 DAY TRIAL ††If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Promo Code: IR-SALE0101

Call now (314)520-0857 www.contemporaryrefinishing.com Member Better Business Bureau

Participate in our

Hearing Technology Test Study • Do you wear hearing aids? • Are you always increasing the volume on your TV or radio? • Do you often ask others to repeat themselves? • Are you trying to guess what people are saying or read lips?

Candidates Accepted 3 Days Only Next Tuesday – Thursday As a thank you for participating in this study, you will receive a wireless T.V. Headset!*

Fine Jewelry, Platinum, Gold, Silver & Diamonds

Sell Your Jewelry Highest Prices Paid for High End Jewelry • • • • •

Appointments Are Limited!

*Must enroll and complete onsite test study to qualify for free gift. The following rules apply: Must complete hearing test and show a 40dB loss. One headset per household applies. Cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. New customers only. Expires 1/31/2019.

Promo Code: IR-SALE0101

Candidates Accepted 3 Days Only Next Tuesday - Thursday

Antique & Estate Jewelry Modern Fine Jewelry Sterling Silver Jewelry Native American Jewelry Certified Diamonds

Appo intm Are Li ents mited !

As a thank you for participating in this study, you will receive a Wireless T.V. Headset!*

You can register to participate at: www.FreeTvHeadsets.com Enter the Promo Code IR-SALE0101 *Must enroll and complete onsite test study to qualify for free gift. The following rules apply: Must complete hearing test and show a 40dB loss. One headset per household applies. Cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. New customers only. Expires 1/31/2019.

NEW LOCATION! Edwardsville, IL 618-433-3363 Arnold 636-875-7645 Arsenal 314-325-3194 Ballwin 636-875-7633

Chesterfield 636-334-9812 Columbia, MO 573-207-3125 Creve Coeur 314-312-2999

Crystal City 636-875-7638 Florissant 314-403-7639 O’Fallon, MO 636-203-7053

South County 314-488-2711 St. Charles 636-235-9169 St. Peters 636-487-5570

www.Miracle-Ear.com/Online-Booking

Tesson Ferry 314-325-3167 Swansea, IL 618-433-3633 Union 636-321-3119 Waterloo, IL 618-433-3628

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117


WORLD

01.20.2019 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A25

Fireball at illegal Mexico pipeline tap kills at least 73 Dozens more are injured; bodies are found charred

BY MARK STEVENSON associated Press

TLAHUELILPAN, MEXICO • Forensic experts at-

tempted to separate and count charred heaps of corpses in central Mexico on Saturday after a massive fireball erupted at an illegal pipeline tap, killing at least 73 people. More than 85 other people were missing. Just a few feet from where the pipeline passed through an alfalfa field, the dead seem to have fallen in heaps, perhaps as they stumbled over each other or tried to help one another in the moments after a geyser of gasoline shot into the air Friday. The leak was caused by an illegal pipeline tap in the small town of Tlahuelilpan, about 62 miles north

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Forensic experts work at the site of an gasoline pipeline explosion in Tlahuelilpan, Mexico, on Saturday. A massive fireball engulfed people scooping up fuel spilling from a pipeline ruptured by thieves in central Mexico, killed dozens and burning many more.

Walk In Showers AFTER

Before

but the risk, the danger, the loss of human lives,” he said. He also called on townspeople to give testimony not only about Friday’s events in Hidalgo state, but about the entire black market chain, including who punctures the pipelines, who informs locals about collecting fuel in containers, and how fuel is then put to personal use or sold. The war against fuel theft was a theme repeated by people in Tlahuelilpan, which is crossed by pipelines and situated just a few miles from a refinery. Another pipeline burst into flames earlier Friday in the neighboring state of Queretaro as a result of another illegal tap. Pemex said the fire near the city of San Juan del Rio was “in an unpopulated area and there is no risk to human beings.” In December 2010, authorities also blamed oil thieves for a pipeline explosion in a central Mexico near the capital that killed 28 people, including 13 children. That blast affected 5,000 residents in an area six miles wide. Lopez Obrador launched the offensive against illegal taps soon after taking office Dec. 1, deploying 3,200 marines to guard pipelines and refineries. His administration also shut down pipelines to detect and deter illegal taps, relying more on delivering fuel by tanker truck. There aren’t enough trucks, however, and long lines at gas stations have plagued several states.

of Mexico City, according to state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex. Video footage showed dozens of people in an almost festive atmosphere gathered in a field where a duct had been breached by fuel thieves. Footage then showed flames shooting high into the air against a night sky and the pipeline ablaze. Screaming people ran from the explosion, some themselves burning. On Saturday, several of the dead lay on their backs, their arms stretched out in agony. Some seemed to have covered their chests in a last attempt to protect themselves from the flames; another few blackcharred corpses seemed to embrace each other in death. Lost shoes were scattered around the scorched field, as were plastic jugs and jerry cans that the victims had carried to gather spilling fuel. The tragedy came just three weeks after new President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador launched an offensive against fuel theft gangs that have drilled dangerous, illegal taps into pipelines an astounding 12,581 times in the first 10 months of 2018, an average of about 42 per day. In a news conference Saturday, Lopez Obrador vowed to continue the fight against the $3 billion-peryear illegal fuel theft industry. “We are going to eradicate that which not only causes material damages, it is not only what the nation loses by this illegal trade, this black market of fuel,

D O N AT E YO U R C A R

• St. Louis Local • Veteran Owned - VA Certified

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri

10% OFF SHOWERS - JANUARY ONLY

* 100% Tax Deductible

314-758-0594•618-857-3458

* Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycle & RVs

Huge Hearing Aid Savings Complimentary Hearing Exams New 2019 Technology Sneak Peek Preview

Close-out Savings on 2018 Models Test Study Participants Needed

INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

RENEW YOUR KITCHEN

MAKE YOUR KITCHEN, BATHROOM OR BAR LOOK LIKE NEW AGAIN!

We Have Limited Quantities of All Clearance Items! 24 CHANNELS ME-3 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY • BTE and custom styles • Feedback Cancellation • Noise Reduction • Directional Microphones • Advanced Options: Alerting tones, Programmable Telecoil and Direct Audio Input

rice Ever s !

$895 Valid on model Audiotone Pro CIC

While s e Supplit Las

Call:(314) 499-1300

SAVE up to $595

HURRY! Limited Quantities Available! CustomDigital Hearing Aids! PLowest Now Only

WheelsForWishes.org

Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. Promo Code: May not be combined with other offers. IR-SALE0101 Does not apply to prior sales. Offer valid THIS MONTH ONLY.

KITCHEN CABINET REFINISHING • TUB AND TILE REFINISHING Make your tile, countertops and floors look like granite for a fraction of the cost.

CONTEMPORARY REFINISHING

30 DAY TRIAL ††If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Promo Code: IR-SALE0101

Call now (314)520-0857 www.contemporaryrefinishing.com Member Better Business Bureau

Participate in our

Hearing Technology Test Study • Do you wear hearing aids? • Are you always increasing the volume on your TV or radio? • Do you often ask others to repeat themselves? • Are you trying to guess what people are saying or read lips?

Candidates Accepted 3 Days Only Next Tuesday – Thursday As a thank you for participating in this study, you will receive a wireless T.V. Headset!*

Fine Jewelry, Platinum, Gold, Silver & Diamonds

Sell Your Jewelry Highest Prices Paid for High End Jewelry • • • • •

Appointments Are Limited!

*Must enroll and complete onsite test study to qualify for free gift. The following rules apply: Must complete hearing test and show a 40dB loss. One headset per household applies. Cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. New customers only. Expires 1/31/2019.

Promo Code: IR-SALE0101

Candidates Accepted 3 Days Only Next Tuesday - Thursday

Antique & Estate Jewelry Modern Fine Jewelry Sterling Silver Jewelry Native American Jewelry Certified Diamonds

Appo intm Are Li ents mited !

As a thank you for participating in this study, you will receive a Wireless T.V. Headset!*

You can register to participate at: www.FreeTvHeadsets.com Enter the Promo Code IR-SALE0101 *Must enroll and complete onsite test study to qualify for free gift. The following rules apply: Must complete hearing test and show a 40dB loss. One headset per household applies. Cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. New customers only. Expires 1/31/2019.

NEW LOCATION! Edwardsville, IL 618-433-3363 Arnold 636-875-7645 Arsenal 314-325-3194 Ballwin 636-875-7633

Chesterfield 636-334-9812 Columbia, MO 573-207-3125 Creve Coeur 314-312-2999

Crystal City 636-875-7638 Florissant 314-403-7639 O’Fallon, MO 636-203-7053

South County 314-488-2711 St. Charles 636-235-9169 St. Peters 636-487-5570

www.Miracle-Ear.com/Online-Booking

Tesson Ferry 314-325-3167 Swansea, IL 618-433-3633 Union 636-321-3119 Waterloo, IL 618-433-3628

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

OBITUARIES Altvater, Nancy Octavia Bakewell - University City Bakewell - see Altvater Becker, Irmgard "Ish" - Formerly of St. Louis Beckham, Julia - St. Louis Beres - see Stadnyk Binns-Robinson, Linda S. - St. Louis Bonham, Clarence Burt "CB" - Ballwin, MO Branson,Bill C. MG USA Retired - St. Louis Brotherton - see Schicker Campbell, Donald I. - St. Louis Cunetto, Jill Sharkey - Ballwin, MO Davis - see Schicker DeBoer, Delora Ann - St. Louis Dietrich, Barbara - St. Louis Doelling, Lorraine Esther - Milwaukee, WI Duncker, Sandra Seyferth - Brentwood Elbert, Mary Ann - Eureka, MO Friedewald, Beverly - St. Louis Haenchen, Frieda - St. Louis Hennekes, Paul - Dardenne Prairie, MO Hoormann, Catherine Gibbons - St. Louis

Altvater, Nancy Octavia Bakewell died on January 6, 2019, twelve days after the passing of Donald Altvater, her beloved husband of t w e n t y - s e v e n yea rs . Na n cy departed peacefully, surrounded by family, her four black cats, and devoted caregivers. Nancy was the eighth and youngest child of Edward L. Bakewell and Mildred Anderson B a k e w e l l of S t . L o u i s . H e r brothers were Anderson, Alexander, Edward Jr., Nicolas, and Peter Bakewell. Her sisters were Mildred Muckerman and Joan Bland. Nancy spent her childhood in the outskirts of St. Louis, in what would later become Huntleigh Village. Except for a brief time in Chicago, Nancy was a lifelong resident of St. Louis. Known foremost for her striking physical beauty, Nancy was often likened to the movie star Elizabeth Taylor. She considered herself a nonconformist, and loved to wear dangling earrings and outfits with flair. To her last day, she was always dressed, coiffed, and accessorized with great care. An avid reader, highly inquisitive, and effortlessly outgoing, Nancy loved to engage in lively conversation with individuals of all walks of life. To all who knew her, she was a force of nature, an indomitable spirit. If you were a family member or friend who faced obstacles in life, whether at work or in relationships, Nancy would move mountains to find a solution and make things happen. From an early age, Nancy showed a tender heart for the less fortunate. Among other community service activities, she spent time with shut-ins and amputees living in blighted areas. These experiences laid the foundation for the visiting nurses business she started years later, which served elderly residents of Ladue. Although she lacked formal business training, Nancy had a keen sense of entrepreneurship and developed an agency with a staff of 350 registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and home aides. She eventually sold the business to a Texas firm. Nancy's tender-heartedness and generosity were never more evident than in her love of animals. She had a succession of cherished Chihuahuas and sleek black cats. She also adopted numerous dogs that had either been abandoned or whose owners could no longer keep them. The term "pampered" barely describes the care and attention Nancy lavished on her pets. Nancy is predeceased by her first husband William Lawton of Virginia and two of their sons, David Lawton (age five) and Frank B. Lawton (age 47). She is also predeceased by her second husband of five years, Stanley Hampton, M.D., a noted allergist. Nancy is survived by her sons William J . Lawton, Jr. (David) of St. Louis and Stephen N. Lawton (Pamela) of Santa Cruz, California, daughter-in-law Madonna (Frank, deceased) of St. Louis, five flourishing grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her step-children Christopher Altvater (Martha), Enid McIntosh (Christopher), Katherine Altvater and the late Donald O. Altvater, and six fine grandchildren. At Nancy's request, no services will be held. Contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Missouri, 1201 Macklind Avenue, MO, 63110. Contributions may also be made to the Carmelite Monastery of St. Louis, 9150 Clayton Road, St. Louis, MO 63124, in memory of her son Frank. Condolences may be extended online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Celebrations of Life

Jones, Richard D. "Rick" - Wildwood, MO Kelly, Thomas Anthony "Irish" / "Lep" - Des Peres Kemper, Clarence W. Jr. - Manchester Kincaid - see Schicker Lawton - see Altvater Leppo, Norman Bailie - St. Louis Lester, Charles - Ellisville, MO Maglione, Grace L. - St. Louis Markus, Vivian D. - St. Louis McLain, Geraldine "Gerry" - Chesterfield Millman, William J. - St. Louis Minney, Dorothy Jean - St. Louis Nash, Joseph Gerard "Joe" - St. Louis Neff - see Schicker Obremski, Dolores Ann - O'Fallon, MO Paoli, Margaret Victoria - St. Louis Pettigrew, Mary L. - St. Louis Poese, Frances B. - St. Charles Poindexter, Russell L. - St. Charles Rothery, Sean Patrick - St. Louis Rudberg, Paul Andrew, III - St. Charles

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Ryan, Patrick M. - St. Louis Saffo, Rosemary Carol - St. Louis Schicker, William "Bill" - St. Louis Schuchmann, Harold "Hal" - St. Louis Sgroi, Edna M. - Boynton Beach, FL Simpson, Josephine Hickey - St. Louis Somerville, Eula M. - Ballwin Stadnyk, Stella Alexandria - Chesterfield Stube, Jeff - Florissant Swingle, Jerrel Lynn - O'Fallon, MO Thiel - see Schicker Thorne, William Bruce - St. Louis Thurman, Mary L. "Lu" - St. Louis Todt - see Schicker Vandevender - see Stadnyk Van Gels, Ina R. - St. Louis Vlatkovich, John G. - St. Louis Voit, Rolland L. "Bud" - Kirkwood, MO Zavaglia, Angelo James - Maryville, IL, formerly of Collinsville, IL

Bonham, Clarence Burt "CB"

Duncker, Sandra Seyferth

passed away, Monday, January 14, 2019. CB was born on September 25, 1950, in St. Joseph, MO, to the late Ovid C. and Sarah A. "Peggy" Bonham. Beloved husband of Patricia Bonham (nee Copenhaver); dear father of Sarah (George) Saffold, Rachel (Jeff) Minor, and Emily (Tom) Bollinger; dear grandfather of Maxwell, Spencer Saffold, Abigail, Hannah, Haley, Nora Minor, and Olivia Bollinger. Brother of Beth (John) Bonham-Houlihan, Ethel (Phil) Brown, and Bob Bonham. Beloved family member and friend to many. Services: Memorial service at Living Word United Methodist Church, 17315 Manchester Road, Wildwood, Tuesday, January 22, 2019, 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the church, Bonhomme Lions Club, or a charity of your choice. Memorial visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday 4-9 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

On Wednesday, January 2, 2019. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Rd., Ladue, on Friday, January 25, 2019 at 10 a.m. A Lupton Chapel Service.

Branson, Bill C. MG USA Retired passed away Jan. 13, 2019 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of 71 years of J u a n it a (nee Wol fe) Branson. Dear father of Mariann (John) Kelly and Julya (George) Adamakos. Proud grandfather of Michael Torrente, Marc (Michelle) Torrente and Stephanie A d a m a k o s . Ch eris h ed great grandfather of Parker. Dearest brother, uncle, cousin and friend of many. Bill is preceded in death by his infant son, Rex Branson. Bill graduated from the St. Louis College of Mortuary Science and enjoyed a long career of over 60 years with Hoffmeister Mortuaries as a Funeral Director, Embalmer, Manager and Vice President. He enlisted in the Missouri National Guard in 1949 and was active duty and in the reserves for over 38 years. He rose through the ranks and became a Major General in the U.S. Army Reserve. After his retirement he established the Dignity Memorial Homeless Veterans Burial Program in St. Louis and expanded it nationwide to thirty-two other states. Bill was honored as the 2016 Missouri Athletic Club Veteran of the Year. Services: Visitation to be held Mon., Jan. 21, 2019 from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa and Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. until the funeral starting at 11:00 a.m. Interment will follow in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to The St. Louis Fisher House or The Alzheimer's Association. On behalf of Bill, his family would like to thank his wonderful caregivers from The Glen at Aberdeen Heights and SSM Hospice Care. For an extended biography please visit: www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

Elbert, Mary Ann (nee Jenkins), Friday, January 18, 2019. Dear wife of Daryl Elbert; dear mother of Chloe Elbert; dear daughter of Kathy Jenkins (nee Connally) and the late James Jenkins; dear daughter-in-law of Donald and Rose Elbert; dear sister of Amy and Kerry Jenkins; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, niece, cousin and friend to many. Services: Memorial visitation Tuesday, January 22, 3-8 P.M. at Collier's Funeral Home 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. St. Ann. Service: Wednesday, January 23, 10 A.M. Mass at Most Sacred Heart Parish Eureka, Mo. In lieu of flowers, plant a flower in Mary's Honor this spring or donate to a charity of your choice. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Friedewald, Beverly passed away January 17, 2019. Visitation will held from 10 a.m.-12 noon on Tuesday, Jan 22 at Valhalla Chapel, with funeral services at 12 noon. www.valhallafunerals.net

Haenchen, Frieda (nee Walika), Saturday, January 12, 2019, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved wife of the late George F Haenchen; loving mother and mother-in-law of Greg (Lynn), Richard (Debbie), Mark (Debbie) Haenchen and Christine (Bill) Hoffman; dear grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, cousin, and friend of many. Services: Funeral from HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant, 9:30 a.m. Monday, January 21st to St Rose Philippine Duchesne Catholic Church for a 10 a.m., Mass. Interment St. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday, January 20th. In lieu of flowers donations to Cardinal Ritter Senior Services or Cardinal Glennon Children's Foundation in memory of Frieda would be appreciated.

Hennekes, Paul 96, Fri. 1/4. Mass Tues 1/22, 10:30am at Assumption Church, O'Fallon. Visit: Mon 1/21, 4-8pm HutchensStygar, St. Charles. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Hoormann, Catherine Gibbons

(nee Chism) born in Louisville, KY, of St. Louis, MO, passed away on Tuesday, January 15, 2019, at 101 years young. Beloved wife Campbell, Donald I. of the late Raphael B. Hoormann; cherished daughter of the late 73, on Thurs., Jan. 17, 2019. Donald donated his re- Silas J. Chism and Louise J. Gibbons; loving mother of Judy mains to Washington University. No services sched- Hoormann, Marty (Steve) Campbell, and the late Ginny Hoormann; devoted grandmother of Tom and McKenzie uled. Condolences may be left at Campbell, and friend to everyone she met. www.kriegshausermortuary.com. Katie served in WWII in the Red Cross, was a foster parent to 13 babies, faithful promoter of the Miraculous Medal and was Cunetto, Jill Sharkey presently the oldest (surviving) alumna of Presentation 61, passed Tuesday, January 8, 2019, from cancer. She leaves Academy of Louisville. Her devotion to the Blessed Mother her husband, Jack Cunetto; daughters Alison (fiance Michael never wavered. Carroll); Caitlin (partner Chris Cesca); Jack's daughter, Angela Services: Visitation will be held on Monday, January 21 from 1-8 and grandson Chase. Mother June Schwartz, South Hutchinson, p.m. at Stygar Florissant Chapel at 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., KS; Sister Cindy (Michael) Johnston, Wichita; two sister-in-laws; 63033. The Funeral Mass will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, January several nieces and nephews. Nearly 40 years with AT&T. 22 at St. Ferdinand Catholic Church, 1765 Charbonier Rd., 63031. Celebration of life and burial at a later date. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Little Sisters of the Poor Chicago Province, 80 W Northwest Hwy, Palatine, IL 60067 or the Miraculous Medal DeBoer, Delora Ann Association, 1811 W. St. Joseph St., Perryville, MO 63775. born September 17, 1932, and lifetime resident of St. Louis, t r a n s i t i o n e d p e a c e f u l l y on Jones, Richard D. "Rick" J a n u a ry 15, 2 0 19 . O u r d ea r cousin, and friend to many. She passed away Friday, December 14, 2018 at the age of 68. had an outstanding career in the Beloved husband of fifty years to Linda Jones (nee Vires); loving St. Louis Public School System father of Kristin (Dan) Sprague and the late Ricky Jones; dear where she was an administrator, son of Gerald and the late Betty Jones; proud grandfather of c o u n s e l o r , a n d t e a c h e r . Andrew, Davis and Julia Kelpe; Courtney, Camryn and Justin D on a t ion s w el come t o Th e Sprague; dear brother of Sandi Gundaker, Toni (Marc) Cohen M emory & Agin g P roject a t and the late Michael Jones; much loved brother-in-law of Washington University. St. Louis Sharon Burke, Don Vires and Charlie (Janine) Vires; dear uncle, Crematorium. cousin, and friend to many. Rick was a member of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 562 Becker, Irmgard "Ish" for 45 years. 91, died peacefully on December Services: Memorial service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Dietrich, Barbara 1 4 , 2 0 1 8 , i n Ch a rl ot t e, N C . Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Predeceased by husband of 70 (nee Kimerle) passed away peacefully on January 16th with her Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. Interment will be held years, H en ry B ecker . She is loving family surrounding her following her battle with liver privately. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to survived by five children: Carla cancer. Her kind and loving personality will be missed by all American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society. Parks, Paula Corbett, Kurt Beck- who knew her. Barbara was born in St. Louis and lived there her Memorial visitation Saturday, January 26th from 11 a.m. er, Lisa McGuff and Eric Becker. whole life. She attended Buder Grade School, Southwest High until time of service. Friends may sign the family's online Also known as Grandma, Nana, School and Washington University. Barbara was a devoted wife, guestbook at Schrader.com. Oma to eleven grandchildren and mother and grandmother. She is survived by her husband Martin; son Bill; daughters Karen Kirkwood and Suzanne six great grandchildren. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, she Barrall; grandchildren Tyler, Lorna, Emma, Grace, Sutter, Lilly Kelly, Thomas Anthony "Irish" / "Lep" graduated from Maplewood High and brother Richard Kimerle and sister Linda Stewart. 83, Fortified with the Sacraments Barbara was a long time and active member of Southminster School and was a Secretary at of Holy Mother Church on Ladue High School for 25 years. Presbyterian Church in Crestwood. Among many positions January 15, 2019. Beloved A loving mother, always involved in her children's activities, there, she served as an Elder and president of the women's husband of Loretta (nee she provided a wonderful life for the entire family. Ish treasured association. Her church and church friends were very special to McIntire) Kelly for 60 years; time with family and vacations including a summer family her. She dearly loved her family and took great pride in the cherished father of Thomas Kelly, lives of her children. Spending time with them and her grandreunion in Estes Park, Colorado, July 2018. Kathleen Kelly, Margaret (Pete) Services: Memorial service for Henry and Irmgard Becker is children was her greatest joy. Other interests included world Hewitt, and Colleen (Jim) scheduled at Jefferson Barrack's Cemetery May 24th, 2019 at travel, bird watching where she had identified over 800 species, Clogston; loving grandfather of 1:30 p.m. Memorials may be sent to Hospice Care Charlotte, gardening, playing bridge and volunteering her time to help Joe (Abby), Ryan (Megan), Jessie others. Many words come to mind about Barbara such as an 7845 Little Ave., Charlotte, NC 28226. (Mandy), Tom (Maureen), Matt angel, non-judgmental, an open heart for others, very giving, a (Jenny), Mark (Stephanie), Kelly strong faith in God, outgoing and many more. (Jeff), Camille (Bobby), Cathie, Beckham, Julia Services: Visitation will be at Southminster Presbyterian and Rachel; precious great88, on January 12, 2019 from natural causes. Loving wife of the Church, 10126 East Watson Road, Crestwood, MO 314-843-1133 late Captain Homer Spiotta who served as Captain in the on Friday, January 25th from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. A memorial grandfather of 17. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and Florissant Police Department. Cherished aunt of 9 loving nieces service will be held at the same location on Saturday, January friend to many. Tom was preceded in death by his parents, and nephews Steven, Catherine, Sharon, Elizabeth, Elinore, 26th from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions Michael and Margaret (nee O'Sullivan), and brothers Joseph and Michael Francis. Tom was born in Listowel, County Kerry, Beverly, Jennifer, Carl, and Joseph can be made to Evelyn's House, BJC Hospice, 1000 N. Mason Services: Visitation Tuesday, January 22, 2019, Jay B. Smith Road, Creve Coeur, MO 63141, bjchospice.org specify for Ireland on August 16, 1935. He arrived in the United States aboard the RMS Franconia on April 9, 1952 and quickly settled Funeral Home Maplewood, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Service 12:30 Evelyn's house in memory of Barbara Dietrich. in University City, MO. Tom was a United States Army veteran p.m. - 12:45 p.m. Burial at Jefferson Barracks National and a member of Teamsters Local 682 for 30 years. He retired Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: from Welsch Heating & Cooling in 1995. Doelling, Lorraine Esther Humane Society of Missouri, 1201 Macklind Ave., St Louis, MO 63110. (nee Faller) 93, passed away on Tu es., Jan. 8, 2019 in Services: VISITATION will be held Monday, January 21, 2019 Milwaukee, WI. Wife of the late Arvin Doelling; mother of Chris from 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester (Don) Stone, Richard (Rita) Doelling, Nan (John) Doelling and Rd. FUNERAL MASS will be held Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at Binns-Robinson, Linda S. 11:00 a.m. at St. Clement of Rome Catholic Church, 1510 Bopp Andrea (Mike) Bielamowicz. Thur., Jan, 17 , 2019. Visitation Kutis Affton Chapel 10151 Services: Visitation and funeral service at SHEPARD FUNERAL Rd. Interment to follow at Jefferson Barracks National Gravois Fri., Jan. 25, 4-8pm. Funeral mass Sat. 10 am St. Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170, St. Louis Justin Martyr Catholic Church (11910 Eddie & Park Rd., 63126) Alzheimer's Foundation of America. (314-426-6000), Friday, Jan. 25, from 10:30-11:30 a.m. B u ria l fol l ow s a t Memorial Park Cemetery. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com “What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

OBITUARIES Accardi, Antonio "Tony" - St. Louis Altvater, Nancy Octavia Bakewell - University City Bakewell - see Altvater Becker, Irmgard "Ish" - Formerly of St. Louis Beckham, Julia - St. Louis Beres - see Stadnyk Binns-Robinson, Linda S. - St. Louis Boehmer, Rachel - Ballwin Bonham, Clarence Burt "CB" - Ballwin, MO Branson,Bill C. MG USA Retired - St. Louis Brotherton - see Schicker Campbell, Donald I. - St. Louis Cunetto, Jill Sharkey - Ballwin, MO Davis - see Schicker DeBoer, Delora Ann - St. Louis Dietrich, Barbara - St. Louis Doelling, Lorraine Esther - Milwaukee, WI Duncker, Sandra Seyferth - Brentwood Elbert, Mary Ann - Eureka, MO Friedewald, Beverly - St. Louis Greenberg, Phyllis Trugman - St. Louis Haenchen, Frieda - St. Louis Hennekes, Paul - Dardenne Prairie, MO Hoormann, Catherine Gibbons - St. Louis Jones, Richard D. "Rick" - Wildwood, MO

Celebrations of Life

Kargus, James George Sr. - St. Louis Kelly, Thomas Anthony "Irish" / "Lep" - Des Peres Kemper, Clarence W. Jr. - Manchester Kincaid - see Schicker Lawton - see Altvater Leppo, Norman Bailie - St. Louis Lester, Charles - Ellisville, MO Lindsay, Ann Stickney - Manchester, MA Maglione, Grace L. - St. Louis Markus, Vivian D. - St. Louis McLain, Geraldine "Gerry" - Chesterfield Meyer, Mary - Dellwood, MO Millman, William J. - St. Louis Minney, Dorothy Jean - St. Louis Nash, Joseph Gerard "Joe" - St. Louis Neff - see Schicker Obremski, Dolores Ann - O'Fallon, MO Paoli, Margaret Victoria - St. Louis Pettigrew, Mary L. - St. Louis Poese, Frances B. - St. Charles Poindexter, Russell L. - St. Charles Potts, Frances Virginia - St. Louis Rothery, Sean Patrick - St. Louis Rudberg, Paul Andrew, III - St. Charles Ryan, Patrick M. - St. Louis

Beckham, Julia

Dietrich, Barbara (nee Kimerle) passed away peacefully on January 16th with her loving family surrounding her following her battle with liver cancer. Her kind and loving personality will be missed by all who knew her. Barbara was born in St. Louis and lived there her whole life. She attended Buder Grade School, Southwest High School and Washington University. Barbara was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She is survived by her husband Martin; son Bill; daughters Karen Kirkwood and Suzanne Barrall; grandchildren Tyler, Lorna, Emma, Grace, Sutter, Lilly and brother Richard Kimerle and sister Linda Stewart. Barbara was a long time and active member of Southminster Presbyterian Church in Crestwood. Among many positions there, she served as an Elder and president of the women's association. Her church and church friends were very special to her. She dearly loved her family and took great pride in the lives of her children. Spending time with them and her grandchildren was her greatest joy. Other interests included world travel, bird watching where she had identified over 800 species, gardening, playing bridge and volunteering her time to help others. Many words come to mind about Barbara such as an angel, non-judgmental, an open heart for others, very giving, a strong faith in God, outgoing and many more. Services: Visitation will be at Southminster Presbyterian Church, 10126 East Watson Road, Crestwood, MO 314-843-1133 on Friday, January 25th from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. A memorial service will be held at the same location on Saturday, January 26th from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Evelyn's House, BJC Hospice, 1000 N. Mason Road, Creve Coeur, MO 63141, bjchospice.org specify for Evelyn's house in memory of Barbara Dietrich.

Binns-Robinson, Linda S.

Accardi, Antonio "Tony"

Altvater, Nancy Octavia Bakewell

Boehmer, Rachel 39, Jan. 17, 2019. Funeral Mass at St. Alban Roe Catholic Church, Tues., 10 a.m. Visit. at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Mon. 4-8 p.m. For more info, see Schrader.com.

Bonham, Clarence Burt "CB"

passed away, Monday, January 14, 2019. died on January 6, 2019, twelve CB was born on September 25, 1950, in St. Joseph, MO, to the days after the passing of Donald late Ovid C. and Sarah A. "Peggy" Bonham. Beloved husband of Altvater, her beloved husband of Patricia Bonham (nee Copenhaver); dear father of Sarah t w e n t y - s e v e n yea rs . Na n cy (George) Saffold, Rachel (Jeff) Minor, and Emily (Tom) Bollinger; departed peacefully, surrounded dear grandfather of Maxwell, Spencer Saffold, Abigail, Hannah, by family, her four black cats, Haley, Nora Minor, and Olivia Bollinger. Brother of Beth (John) Bonham-Houlihan, Ethel (Phil) Brown, and Bob Bonham. and devoted caregivers. Nancy was the eighth and Beloved family member and friend to many. youngest child of Edward L. Services: Memorial service at Living Word United Methodist Bakewell and Mildred Anderson Church, 17315 Manchester Road, Wildwood, Tuesday, January B a k e w e l l of S t . L o u i s . H e r 22, 2019, 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be b r o t h e r s w e r e A n d e r s o n , made to the church, Bonhomme Lions Club, or a charity of your Alexander, Edward Jr., Nicolas, choice. Memorial visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and and Peter Bakewell. Her sisters Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, were Mildred Muckerman and Joan Bland. Nancy spent her Monday 4-9 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line childhood in the outskirts of St. Louis, in what would later guestbook at Schrader.com. become Huntleigh Village. Except for a brief time in Chicago, Nancy was a lifelong resident of St. Louis. Branson, Bill C. MG USA Retired Known foremost for her striking physical beauty, Nancy was passed away Jan. 13, often likened to the movie star Elizabeth Taylor. She considered 2019 at the age of 90. herself a nonconformist, and loved to wear dangling earrings Beloved husband of 71 and outfits with flair. To her last day, she was always dressed, years of J u a n it a (nee Wol fe) coiffed, and accessorized with great care. Branson. Dear father of Mariann An avid reader, highly inquisitive, and effortlessly outgoing, (John) Kelly and Julya (George) Nancy loved to engage in lively conversation with individuals of Adamakos. Proud grandfather of all walks of life. To all who knew her, she was a force of nature, Michael Torrente, Marc (Michelle) an indomitable spirit. If you were a family member or friend T o r r e n t e a n d S t e p h a n i e who faced obstacles in life, whether at work or in relationships, A d a m a k o s . Ch eris h ed great Nancy would move mountains to find a solution and make grandfather of Parker. Dearest things happen. brother, uncle, cousin and friend From an early age, Nancy showed a tender heart for the less of many. Bill is preceded in death fortunate. Among other community service activities, she spent by his infant son, Rex Branson. time with shut-ins and amputees living in blighted areas. These Bill graduated from the St. Louis College of Mortuary Science experiences laid the foundation for the visiting nurses business and enjoyed a long career of over 60 years with Hoffmeister she started years later, which served elderly residents of Ladue. Mortuaries as a Funeral Director, Embalmer, Manager and Vice Although she lacked formal business training, Nancy had a keen President. sense of entrepreneurship and developed an agency with a staff He enlisted in the Missouri National Guard in 1949 and was of 350 registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and home active duty and in the reserves for over 38 years. He rose aides. She eventually sold the business to a Texas firm. through the ranks and became a Major General in the U.S. Army Nancy's tender-heartedness and generosity were never more Reserve. After his retirement he established the Dignity evident than in her love of animals. She had a succession of Memorial Homeless Veterans Burial Program in St. Louis and cherished Chihuahuas and sleek black cats. She also adopted expanded it nationwide to thirty-two other states. Bill was numerous dogs that had either been abandoned or whose honored as the 2016 Missouri Athletic Club Veteran of the Year. owners could no longer keep them. The term "pampered" Services: Visitation to be held Mon., Jan. 21, 2019 from 4:00 barely describes the care and attention Nancy lavished on her p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 pets. Chippewa and Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. until the funeral Nancy is predeceased by her first husband William Lawton of starting at 11:00 a.m. Interment will follow in Jefferson Barracks Virginia and two of their sons, David Lawton (age five) and National Cemetery with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, Frank B. Lawton (age 47). She is also predeceased by her memorials may be made to The St. Louis Fisher House or The second husband of five years, Stanley Hampton, M.D., a noted Alzheimer's Association. allergist. Nancy is survived by her sons William J . Lawton, Jr. On behalf of Bill, his family would like to thank his (David) of St. Louis and Stephen N. Lawton (Pamela) of Santa wonderful caregivers from The Glen at Aberdeen Cruz, California, daughter-in-law Madonna (Frank, deceased) of Heights and SSM Hospice Care. For an extended St. Louis, five flourishing grandchildren, and five great-grand- biography please visit: www.hoffmeistercolonial.com. children. She is also survived by her step-children Christopher Altvater (Martha), Enid McIntosh (Christopher), Katherine Altvater and the late Donald O. Altvater, and six fine Campbell, Donald I. grandchildren. 73, on Thurs., Jan. 17, 2019. Donald donated his reAt Nancy's request, no services will be held. Contributions mains to Washington University. No services schedmay be made to the Humane Society of Missouri, 1201 Macklind uled. Condolences may be left at Avenue, MO, 63110. Contributions may also be made to the www.kriegshausermortuary.com. Carmelite Monastery of St. Louis, 9150 Clayton Road, St. Louis, MO 63124, in memory of her son Frank. Cunetto, Jill Sharkey Condolences may be extended online at 61, passed Tuesday, January 8, 2019, from cancer. She leaves www.luptonchapel.com her husband, Jack Cunetto; daughters Alison (fiance Michael A SERVICE OF Carroll); Caitlin (partner Chris Cesca); Jack's daughter, Angela THE LUPTON CHAPEL and grandson Chase. Mother June Schwartz, South Hutchinson, KS; Sister Cindy (Michael) Johnston, Wichita; two sister-in-laws; several nieces and nephews. Nearly 40 years with AT&T. Becker, Irmgard "Ish" Celebration of life and burial at a later date. 91, died peacefully on December 1 4 , 2 0 1 8 , i n Ch a rl ot t e, N C . DeBoer, Delora Ann Predeceased by husband of 70 born September 17, 1932, and years, H en ry B ecker . She is lifetime resident of St. Louis, survived by five children: Carla t r a n s i t i o n e d p e a c e f u l l y on Parks, Paula Corbett, Kurt BeckJ a n u a ry 15, 2 0 19 . O u r d ea r er, Lisa McGuff and Eric Becker. cousin, and friend to many. She Also known as Grandma, Nana, had an outstanding career in the Oma to eleven grandchildren and St. Louis Public School System six great grandchildren. where she was an administrator, Born in St. Louis, Missouri, she counselor, and teacher. graduated from Maplewood High D on a t ion s w el come t o Th e School and was a Secretary at M emory & Agin g P roject a t Ladue High School for 25 years. Washington University. St. Louis A loving mother, always involved in her children's activities, Crematorium. she provided a wonderful life for the entire family. Ish treasured time with family and vacations including a summer family reunion in Estes Park, Colorado, July 2018. Services: Memorial service for Henry and Irmgard Becker is scheduled at Jefferson Barrack's Cemetery May 24th, 2019 at SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE 1:30 p.m. Memorials may be sent to Hospice Care Charlotte, 7845 Little Ave., Charlotte, NC 28226.

THEM GREAT

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits

Saffo, Rosemary Carol - St. Louis Schicker, William "Bill" - St. Louis Schuchmann, Harold "Hal" - St. Louis Sgroi, Edna M. - Boynton Beach, FL Shrum, Kenneth W. - St. Louis Simpson, Josephine Hickey - St. Louis Sinise, Henry - Manchester, MO Somerville, Eula M. - Ballwin Stadnyk, Stella Alexandria - Chesterfield Stube, Jeff - Florissant Swingle, Jerrel Lynn - O'Fallon, MO Terrell, Barbara Ann - Maryland Heights Thiel - see Schicker Thorne, William Bruce - St. Louis Thurman, Mary L. "Lu" - St. Louis Tissot, Frank - Florissant Todt - see Schicker Vandevender - see Stadnyk Van Gels, Ina R. - St. Louis Vietmeier, Carl - St. Louis Vlatkovich, John G. - St. Louis Voit, Rolland L. "Bud" - Kirkwood, MO Wetzel, Craig - Woodson Terrace, MO Young, Arthur F. "Art" - St. Louis Zavaglia, Angelo James - Maryville, IL, formerly of Collinsville, IL

88, on January 12, 2019 from natural causes. Loving wife of the late Captain Homer Spiotta who served as Captain in the Florissant Police Department. Cherished aunt of 9 loving nieces and nephews Steven, Catherine, Sharon, Elizabeth, Elinore, Beverly, Jennifer, Carl, and Joseph Services: Visitation Tuesday, January 22, 2019, Jay B. Smith Funeral Home Maplewood, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Service 12:30 p.m. - 12:45 p.m. Burial at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Humane Society of Missouri, 1201 Macklind Ave., St Louis, MO 63110.

Thur., Jan, 17 , 2019. Visitation Kutis Affton Chapel 10151 Gravois Fri., Jan. 25, 4-8pm. Funeral mass Sat. 10 am St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church (11910 Eddie & Park Rd., 63126)

24, passed Fri., Jan. 18, 2019. Son of Jasper Accardi and Carrie Baker (nee White). Vis. Jan. 22nd from 4-8 p.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home in Maplewood. Funeral Mass Jan. 23rd, 10:00 a.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, St. Louis. For more info, go to jaybsmith.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

STLtoday.com/obits

Doelling, Lorraine Esther (nee Faller) 93, passed away on Tu es., Jan. 8, 2019 in Milwaukee, WI. Wife of the late Arvin Doelling; mother of Chris (Don) Stone, Richard (Rita) Doelling, Nan (John) Doelling and Andrea (Mike) Bielamowicz. Services: Visitation and funeral service at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170, St. Louis (314-426-6000), Friday, Jan. 25, from 10:30-11:30 a.m. B u ria l fol l ow s a t Memorial Park Cemetery. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Duncker, Sandra Seyferth On Wednesday, January 2, 2019. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Rd., Ladue, on Friday, January 25, 2019 at 10 a.m. A Lupton Chapel Service.

Elbert, Mary Ann (nee Jenkins), Friday, January 18, 2019. Dear wife of Daryl Elbert; dear mother of Chloe Elbert; dear daughter of Kathy Jenkins (nee Connally) and the late James Jenkins; dear daughter-in-law of Donald and Rose Elbert; dear sister of Amy and Kerry Jenkins; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, niece, cousin and friend to many. Services: Memorial visitation Tuesday, January 22, 3-8 P.M. at Collier's Funeral Home 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. St. Ann. Service: Wednesday, January 23, 10 A.M. Mass at Most Sacred Heart Parish Eureka, Mo. In lieu of flowers, plant a flower in Mary's Honor this spring or donate to a charity of your choice. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Friedewald, Beverly passed away January 17, 2019. Visitation will held from 10 a.m.-12 noon on Tuesday, Jan 22 at Valhalla Chapel, with funeral services at 12 noon. www.valhallafunerals.net

Greenberg, Phyllis Trugman August 1, 1933 - January 19, 2019, passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family after a heroic battle with cancer. Beloved wife of Burton M. Greenberg for over 64 years, devoted mother and mother-in-law to Karen Alaine Wasserman (Andrew), James Greenberg, M.D. (Kelly) and John Greenberg (D eb b ie) , loving a n d cherished grandmother t o Julia Wasserman, Michael Wasserman, Benton Greenberg, Madeline Greenberg, Anderson Greenberg ("Mazik"), Carrington Greenberg, Jason Greenberg and Elizabeth Greenberg; dear daughter of the late William and the late Adele Trugman, dear sister of Jack Trugman (Joan). Devoted custodian of Popeye (English Bulldog) and Annabelle (American Eskimo). Phyllis was a graduate of Washington University and a dedicated teacher and formulative influence on second grade students for many years at the Blackberry Elementary School, followed by her management of the Ladue BASK program at Conway School for over 25 years. Her home on Hermitage Hill Road for almost a half century was an oasis for generations of out-of-town students of Washington University, where she plied them to their delight with her gourmet dishes. To paraphrase the Bard, the good that Phyllis did will live after her. She will be missed terribly by all whom she touched. Our heartfelt thanks go out to the outstanding nurses at Missouri Baptist Hospital, who overstated their shifts to care for Phyllis, her principal care physician, Christopher Lynch, M.D., as well as her homecare providers, Lisa, Micki, and Haley. Services: Visitation Monday, January 21, 1:00 p.m. at United Hebrew Temple, 13788 Conway Rd. Funeral service at 1:30 p.m. Interment at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Rd. Memorial donations in Phyllis' name may be made to United Hebrew Congregation, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) or a charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. Berger Memorial Service.

Haenchen, Frieda (nee Walika), Saturday, January 12, 2019, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved wife of the late George F Haenchen; loving mother and mother-in-law of Greg (Lynn), Richard (Debbie), Mark (Debbie) Haenchen and Christine (Bill) Hoffman; dear grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, cousin, and friend of many. Services: Funeral from HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant, 9:30 a.m. Monday, January 21st to St Rose Philippine Duchesne Catholic Church for a 10 a.m., Mass. Interment St. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday, January 20th. In lieu of flowers donations to Cardinal Ritter Senior Services or Cardinal Glennon Children's Foundation in memory of Frieda would be appreciated.


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Kemper, Clarence W. Jr.

McLain, Geraldine "Gerry"

age 71, passed away on Friday, January 11, 2019. He died peacefully with his children by his side. Clarence was born on March 20, 1947, in Lancaster, PA. He was the son of Clarence W. and Dorothy Kemper (Wolf.) He graduated from Garden Spot High School and, later, Penn State University. Upon graduation, he enlisted in the United States Air Force. While serving as a nuclear engineer, he travelled to places such as Okinawa, Japan. On June 8, 1968, he married Paula Sue Gerhard. He and Paula had two children, Eric and Kristin, while Clarence was stationed in Limestone, ME. Upon receiving an honorable discharge from the Air Force, he began a lengthy career in the parking industry which included employment with Cincinnati Time, Amano Cincinnati, Inc. and SKIDATA, Inc. His career enabled him to also live in Maryland, Kentucky, New Jersey and Missouri. He retired from the industry in December, 2015, as General Manager of the St. Louis Trading Area for SKIDATA. In 2012, he met Rose Marie Ford whom he married in 2016. Clarence enjoyed meeting people, travelling, history and anything connected to aviation. Clarence is predeceased by his parents and first wife, Paula Sue Kemper, nee Gerhard.Clarence leaves behind his loving wife, Rose Marie Kemper; his son, Eric Kemper (Jodi Stewart) and two grandchildren, Ryan and Emily; his daughter, Kristin Flood (Matt) and two grandchildren, Ethan and Jacob. He is also survived by his brother, Ron Kemper(Betsy Dombach), his sister, Susie Kemper (Terry Kohl), his nephew, Steve Kemper (Arria) and his niece, Kathy DesAutels (Jordan.) Services: A memorial service will be held on February 8th at 2:00pm at Bonhomme Presbyterian Church Chapel, 14820 Conway Road, Chesterfield, MO. There will also be a Celebration of Clarence's Life in Lancaster, PA in the summer of 2019. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent in his name to: The American Cancer Society.

(nee Peach), Born January 15, 1938, amidst stories and laughter, exited this life with the same love and courage that defined her entire life at Surrey Place January 17, 2019. After having to repeatedly steal more chairs for her visitors, the Peach, Unger, McLain, and Dwyer Clans all received her in Heaven after being fortified with the Catholic Sa cra men t s a n d cros s in g a bridge of Prayers. She is survived by her sons James and Matthew, daughter-In-Law Elizabeth (Libby), nieces Tracey, Allison, Jennifer, nephews Stephen and John, and her grandchildren Elise, Brenna, and Nickolas. Services: Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic Church, Chesterfield, Monday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish Cemetery (House Springs). Visitation at church 10 a.m. until time of Mass. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Millman, William J.

Born in 1921, to the late Frank and Mary (Goldon) Millman, he was a lifelong resident of the St. Louis area until moving to New Jersey in 2017. He passed away peacefully at the home of his son, Gregory, January 8, 2019. Predeceased after 65 years of wedded bliss by Celeste (nee Dollard) Millman, he was the dear father of Gregory (Martine) and James Millman, beloved grandfather of Bridget, Tayler (Matt) D'Rion, Anna (Allan) An, Magdalen, Chazz, William, Leppo, Norman Bailie Joseph, Gregory Blaise, Tristan, and Asher Millman, and the late On Monday St. Louis lost one of Beau Millman, and great grandfather of Jaxton, Chase and its most remarkable residents. Shane D'Rion. His stepfather, George Wright, and sister, Frances Norman Bailie Leppo died on Kneffel, predeceased him. January 14 of complications from He bravely served in the Fifteenth Division of the U.S. Army Air a fall. Born in San Francisco in Forces in World War II. After graduation from St. Louis 1927, he moved to St. Louis in University he worked at B.C. MacDonald from 1953 until 1990, 1960. Norman worked in the retiring as Chief Financial Officer. A founding parishioner at St. Clare's Parish in Ellisville, he corporate construction world until he started his own business attended daily Mass for decades at the Passionist Nuns Chapel, in the 70's. Even though he was a assisted by friends and neighbors when he could no longer native Californian, Norman loved drive. St. Louis and became a citizen Services: Visitation will be Monday, January 21 5:30-7:30 p.m. leader in many respects. Never a at The Pointe in Ballwin, MO. Funeral Mass at St. Clare of Assisi bystander when there was work Catholic Church, Tuesday, January 22, at 11:00 a.m. with to be done, Norman became involved in the Olivette Chamber of interment to follow at Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Commerce and was its president from 1985-1987. He also donations to the Passionist Nuns of St. Louis, 15700 Clayton served as a leader of the Saint Louis Counts for a number of Road, Ellisville, MO preferred. years during this period. He loved the St. Louis zoo and the Missouri Botanical Garden and was an active member of each Minney, Dorothy Jean for all the years he lived here. p a s s e d a w a y p ea cefu l l y o n Even more important to him than his civic engagement was his January 16, 2019 in the company love for the natural world. A lifelong fisherman, Norman joined of family. "Dottye", as she was the Missouri Smallmouth Alliance and, in his years as a member affectionately known, was born of the Board of Directors in the early 2000's, guided this on February 24, 1929 in St. Louis organization in becoming a key player in the world of to Nancy Schaefer (Clarkson) and environmental preservation in Missouri. He was also extremely Robert Schaefer. involved in the Conservation Federation of Missouri, serving on Dottye will be remembered for several committees and earning the President's Award in 2012 her kind heart and generosity. at the age of 84. She graduated from Harris Stowe N o r ma n w a s a ma n o f e x c e p t i o n a l r e s i l i e n c e a n d Teachers' College in 1948. An determination. He suffered the loss of his beloved wife in 1979, avid and lifelong bowler, she had yet found a way to live the rest of his life serving his community many friends and fond and doing his part to advance conservation. After he retired, he memories of bowling trips. A served as a volunteer gardener on a horticultural team for Forest Park Forever for over 15 years. As an enduring gift to the devoted mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, she park he purchased almost 10,000 Spanish bluebell bulbs, spent countless hours raising and nurturing her "kids." Those left to cherish her memory include her daughter Nancy planting many of them himself in front of the Boathouse and under the trees that border the Grand Basin. He had (Henry Voges), son Joseph, grandchildren Dustin, Rich (Voges), astonishing energy for a man of his age. Even at 90, he tended Stephanie (Lewellen-Minney), and Jennifer (Justin Langan), his home garden and pursued his love of fishing as far as great-grandson Carter (Lewellen-Minney), sister Betty McCloskey (Schaefer), nieces and nephews, great-nieces and Canada and Mexico. Norman is survived by his daughter Suzanne, son-in-law Jim nephews, cousin Carol (Larry Smith), friends Jean, Mary, Sally Novak and grandson Grant Novak; daughter Nancy, grandson and others, as well as her beloved cat, Missy. Ryan Spence and his wife Morgan plus their two precious sons She is preceded in death by her cherished husband, Joseph R. Brody and Johnny; and by his son Daniel, his wife Vickie and Minney, brothers Robert and James Schaefer. their son Marcus Leppo. They encourage anyone wishing to Services: A private graveside service is planned for Jefferson make a donation in Norman's memory to contribute to Forest Barracks National Cemetery. There will be no public viewing. Park Forever or the Conservation Federation of Missouri. And Valhalla Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements. In they invite everyone to drive through Forest Park in April and lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Needy Paws admire the river of blue flowers Norman planted. He would be Rescue, 814 Hi Crest Drive, St. Louis, MO 63125, or delighted to know that his fellow St. Louisans were enjoying his needypaws.org. www.valhallafunerals.net legacy.

Nash, Joseph Gerard "Joe" Lester, Charles 87, January 16, 2019. Visit. at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thursday, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., with Funeral Service at 11:30 a.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

Maglione, Grace L.

Wednesday, December 26, 2018. Beloved son of Mary Rose and the late Charles N a s h ; d ea r brother of Chuck Nash; loving uncle of Katye Laine Nash and Nicholas Nash; dear nephew, godchild, cousin, and friend. Services: Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, January 25, 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass Saturday, January 26, 11 a.m. at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church (Hampton and Pernod). Inurnment Resurrection Cemetery. Masses or memorials to the Gene Slay Girls and Boys Club preferred.

(nee Andrews) Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Anthony J. Maglione; loving mother of Sharon (Joseph) Thomas-Minnella, Sandy (and the late Emmett) Maglione-Salmons, Anna-Marie (Arthur K.) Oestereich, John (Margo) Maglione, and the late Antoinette "Gail" Maglione; dear grandma of 7 and greatgrandma of 9. Dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, and friend. She was business manager for Teamsters Local 688, member of St. Louis Genealogy Society, and Sarah Barton Murphy Chapter of DAR. Obremski, Dolores Ann Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, January 22, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass Jan. 11, 2019. Svc: Vis. Tues., Jan. 22, Baue, O'Fallon, 4Wednesday, 10 a.m. at St. Maragret Mary Alacoque Catholic 8pm; Wed., Jan. 23, Assumption Catholic Church, O'Fallon, 10-11am, Funeral Mass to follow at 11am. Visit baue.com. Church. Service will conclude at church. Interment J.B. National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Shriners Hospital or Sarah Paoli, Margaret Victoria Barton Murphy Chapter of DAR, appreciated. (nee Kelly), passed away, Monday, January 14, 2019. Beloved mother of Scott (Liz) and Eric (Becky) Paoli. Dear Markus, Vivian D. sister of Horst and Zelda. Loving Aunt of Trace. Beloved grandmother of 7 and friend to many. (nee Hearst), January 15, 2019. Service at KUTIS AFFTON Services: Funeral services will be private. In lieu of flowers, Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, January 26, 1 p.m. Private contributions may be made to Missouri Humane Society. interment. “A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Pettigrew, Mary L. Mary L. Pettigrew left this world on January 5, 2019. She was the daughter of Marguerite (Wies) and Walter Pettigrew, and was born and raised in St. Louis, MO. She graduated from Southwest High School, and obtained degrees from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and the University of Colorado, Denver. Her life and career adventures drew her to Denver, CO, Hartford, CT and Corrales, NM. She is survived by her brother and sister-in-law, Walter and Kasandra Pettigrew of Bentonville, AR; her niece and nephew, Yancey Pettigrew and Alisha Gourley; great-nieces, Lacey, Keeley and Pippa Pettigrew; and great-nephew, Jaxon Pettigrew. She is also survived by her closest friend, Stephen Acree of St. Louis, MO; cousins from the Wies side of the family in Illinois and Florida; as well as many friends she made along her life's journey. Her cremated remains will be scattered in New Mexico. Please visit our online guestbook for Mary at www.FrenchFunerals.com.

Poese, Frances B. 86, of St. Charles, December 30, 2018. Services: Memorial Service at Baue 620 Jefferson St. on Tuesday, January 22 at 1:30 pm. Visit Baue.com

Poindexter, Russell L. of St. Charles, 3/14/1926-1/15/2019 Visitation: Wednesday, 1/23, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Services: Wednesday, 1/23, 12 p.m. at Paul F/H

Rudberg, Paul Andrew, III January 16, 2019, age 62. Services: Vis. Sun., Jan. 20, Baue Cave Springs, 4-8pm. Mass Mon., Jan. 21, St. Robert Bellarmine, 2pm. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Ryan, Patrick M. Wed., Jan. 16, 2019. Memorial Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, Thurs., Jan. 24, 6-9 p.m. with Memorial Service at 6:30 p.m. Service concludes at Funeral Home.

Saffo, Rosemary Carol fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Wednesday, January 16, 2019. Loving sister of Diana (Ken) Bono; dear aunt of Kenneth (Marcella, nee Donkin) Bono, Jr. and Jeffrey (Vinita, nee Wyrick) Bono; dear great-aunt of Nicolas John Bono, Mya Mackenzie Bono, Kenneth Joseph Bono, III, Seeley Robert Bono and Fiona Elizabeth Bono; our dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., 63110 on Monday, January 21, 9 a.m. until time of Mass at 10 a.m. Memorials may be made to Ronald M cD on a l d House Charities. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL.

Schicker, William "Bill" followed the love of his life, Mary Lou (nee Helmsing), to eternal life on Thursday, January 17, 2 0 19 . B il l is s u rvived b y his brother Donald (Dee); dear brother-in-law Dan Helmsing; eight children, Jan Davis (Ben), Joe Schicker (Mary Ellen), Bari Neff (Bob), Julie Kincaid (Randy), Lisa B rot h ert on (Mike), John Schicker (Stacy), Michelle Todt (Michael) and Tricia Thiel (John); grandchildren Patrick Davis, Heather Davis, Cara Davis, Kelly Davis, George Schicker, Kyle Schicker (Marissa), Mattie Neff, Kelsie Neff, Daniel Neff, Katie Loescher (Jason), Dennis Kohut, Emily Mueller (Brian), Michael Brotherton, Melissa Brotherton, Matthew Brotherton, Alec Schicker, Ben Schicker, Sam Schicker, Katie Todt, Courtney Todt Podkowa (Rick), Meme Todt, William Todt, Alexander Todt, Anna Thiel and JJ Thiel; great-grandchildren Rainey Davis, Boston Davis and Rowan Schicker; niece and nephews; and many other relatives and dear friends whom he loved as family. A devout Catholic faith manifest itself daily in Bill's life, especially his long-lasting service and piety at St. Vincent de Paul, his profound belief in human dignity, and his relationships as a compassionate father, grandfather, friend, employer and mentor. At the age of seventeen, Bill began his career at McMahon washing cars and serving as the porter for the new car department. After returning from his service in the United States Navy, he progressed at the dealership from porter to sales person to General Manager, until in 1975 he bought into McMahon Ford Company (now known as Schicker Automotive), the first of many dealerships he would acquire over his illustrious career. Bill considered his employees as family and his customers as friends. He was consistently and enthusiastically dedicated to serving his community, those in need, and the retail automotive industry. He often chose to forego recognition for his kindness as he treated the opportunity to help others as a privilege. Throughout his career he served as a board member of Guardian Angel Settlement House, Director of Backstoppers, St. Mary's High School Alumni Board, President of the Board of Alderman of the City of Shrewsbury, board member of Citizen's National Bank, President of the St. Louis Metro Ford Dealers Association, President of the Missouri Auto Dealers Association, member of the Executive Committee for the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, member of the Ford Community Relations Committee, Co-Founder of the St. Louis Chapter of Legatus International, Commissioner of the St. Louis County Police Department, member of the University of Missouri St. Louis Chancellor's Council and Director of the National Automobile Dealers Association, representing Missouri in the state capitol. He was honored as Time Magazine's Quality Dealer of the Year, was presented the JC Penney Golden Rule Award for Family Volunteering by General Colin Powell, named Catholic Family Services Volunteer Family of the Year, and winner of the Ford, Motor Company "Hero of the Planet" award. Bill was an affiliate of the Congregation of the Mission Vincentian Fathers and Brothers. Services: A memorial Mass will be celebrated for the life of Bill on Friday, January 25, 2019, at 10:00 a.m. at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis at 4431 Lindell Boulevard. Please, in lieu of flowers, a donation can be made on Bill's behalf to one of the following charities: St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Backstoppers, St. Mary's High School, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital or Guardian Angel Settlement Association. A Kutis Funeral Home Service.

Schuchmann, Harold "Hal" on Fri., Jan. 18, 2019, at age 91. Beloved husband of the late Leota Schuchmann; among the survivors are his three daughters, Shearl (Edward) Stangel and Christine Schuchmann both of St. Louis County and Teri (Kathy) D o x s e e of Alexandria, VA; 5 g r a n d c h i l d r e n a n d 2 g r e a tgrandchildren. Services: Visitation will be held Tues., Jan. 22 from 4-8 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Funeral service Wed., Jan. 23, 12 noon at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Manchester and Ballas Rd. with visitation one hour prior to service at church. Interment St. Paul's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Alzheimer's Association. www.boppchapel.com

Sgroi, Edna M. (nee Hiatt) p a s s ed a w a y peacefully a t B oyn t on Beach Rehabilitation Center, Boynton Beach, Florida, on Sunday, January 6, 2019. at age 96. Services: A ceremony of remembrance will be held in the chapel at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri on April 15, 2019 at 11:15 a.m. To leave a condolence & to view the full obituary, please visit www.scobeecombsbowdenfuneralhome.com.

Simpson, Josephine Hickey Josephine passed away on 1/4/19. She was know for being The First Lady of Washington University Athletics, serving as an Administrative Assistant for 47 years, a liaison for the 1996 and 2000 Presidential Debates, and many NCAA Championship events. In 2005, she was elected into the Washington University Hall of Fame. She is survived by nieces: Kate Bastian(Clay), Mary Caroline Hearn, Margaret Simpson(Leanne), nephews: Thomas Simpson, and Edward Simpson(Rhonda). Also, great nieces and nephews: Brittany, Lucy, Peter, Meredith, Cole, and Jack. Services: Private service held.

Somerville, Eula M. (nee Fassold), baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Wednesday, January 16, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Charles W. Somerville; dearest mother of Elizabeth "Betty" (Glenn) Geeser and Joseph (Lynn) Somerville; dear grandmother of Ainslie (Nicholas) Gordon, Brett (Rachel) Geeser, Joseph (Kristen) Somerville, Katherine (Nathan) Heise and Charles Somerville; greatgrandmother of 6. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday, 11:45 a.m. to Holy Infant Catholic Church, Ballwin for 12:00 p.m. Mass. Visitation Monday 5-7 p.m. Friends may sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com.

Rothery, Sean Patrick August 18, 1976 - January 8, 2019 of St. Louis. Services: Funeral Mass at Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, 1919 South 7th Street, St. Louis, Saturday February 2, 11:00 a.m. More information at www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES Hennekes, Paul 96, Fri. 1/4. Mass Tues 1/22, 10:30am at Assumption Church, O'Fallon. Visit: Mon 1/21, 4-8pm HutchensStygar, St. Charles. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Hoormann, Catherine Gibbons (nee Chism) born in Louisville, KY, of St. Louis, MO, passed away on Tuesday, January 15, 2019, at 101 years young. Beloved wife of the late Raphael B. Hoormann; cherished daughter of the late Silas J. Chism and Louise J. Gibbons; loving mother of Judy Hoormann, Marty (Steve) Campbell, and the late Ginny Hoormann; devoted grandmother of Tom and McKenzie Campbell, and friend to everyone she met. Katie served in WWII in the Red Cross, was a foster parent to 13 babies, faithful promoter of the Miraculous Medal and was presently the oldest (surviving) alumna of Presentation Academy of Louisville. Her devotion to the Blessed Mother never wavered. Services: Visitation will be held on Monday, January 21 from 1-8 p.m. at Stygar Florissant Chapel at 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd., 63033. The Funeral Mass will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, January 22 at St. Ferdinand Catholic Church, 1765 Charbonier Rd., 63031. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Little Sisters of the Poor Chicago Province, 80 W Northwest Hwy, Palatine, IL 60067 or the Miraculous Medal Association, 1811 W. St. Joseph St., Perryville, MO 63775.

Jones, Richard D. "Rick" passed away Friday, December 14, 2018 at the age of 68. Beloved husband of fifty years to Linda Jones (nee Vires); loving father of Kristin (Dan) Sprague and the late Ricky Jones; dear son of Gerald and the late Betty Jones; proud grandfather of Andrew, Davis and Julia Kelpe; Courtney, Camryn and Justin Sprague; dear brother of Sandi Gundaker, Toni (Marc) Cohen and the late Michael Jones; much loved brother-in-law of Sharon Burke, Don Vires and Charlie (Janine) Vires; dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Rick was a member of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 562 for 45 years. Services: Memorial service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. Interment will be held privately. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society. Memorial visitation Saturday, January 26th from 11 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com.

Kargus, James George Sr. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Friday, January 18, 2019 in his 90th year. Beloved husband of Dorothy Krehbiel, the late Mary Lou Kargus (nee Kopmann) and the l a t e Ros e M a ry K a r g u s (n ee Brush); dear father of James (Carol) Kargus, Gary (Ruth) Kargus, Rick (JoAnn) Kargus, Kathy (Gene) Buxton, Mark (Diann) Kargus, #1 ½ son Mike (Maryanne) DiNapoli, and #2 ½ son Dan (Teresa) DiNapoli; loving grandfather of Janice Kargus, Shelly Kargus, Katie (Tom) Becker, Rob (Jen) Kargus, Maria (Jeff) Bonney, Anna (Brian) Beilstein, Caroline Kargus, Tyler Kargus, Joshua Kargus, Ryan Buxton, Kyle Buxton, Connor Kargus and Maddie Kargus; loving great-grandfather of 10; dear brother of Audrey Berkley (nee Kargus) and the late Robert Kargus and Mary Dieckmann (nee Kargus); our brother-in-law, uncle, great uncle, cousin and friend. James was a 4th Degree Honor Guard and past Grand Knight of the DeSmet Council #742 Knights of Columbus and he served in the Coast Guard during the Korean War. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Matthias Catholic Church, 796 Buckley Rd., St. Louis, MO 63125 at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, January 23. Visitation Tuesday, January 22 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 at Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd., St. Louis, MO 63125. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Society of St. Vincent de Paul St. Louis, 1310 Papin St., St. Louis, MO 63103 or Degreef Hospice House, 10024 Kennerly Rd., St. Louis, MO 63128 are appreciated. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Kelly, Thomas Anthony "Irish" / "Lep" 83, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on January 15, 2019. Beloved husband of Loretta (nee McIntire) Kelly for 60 years; cherished father of Thomas Kelly, Kathleen Kelly, Margaret (Pete) Hewitt, and Colleen (Jim) Clogston; loving grandfather of Joe (Abby), Ryan (Megan), Jessie (Mandy), Tom (Maureen), Matt (Jenny), Mark (Stephanie), Kelly (Jeff), Camille (Bobby), Cathie, and Rachel; precious greatgrandfather of 17. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Tom was preceded in death by his parents, Michael and Margaret (nee O'Sullivan), and brothers Joseph and Michael Francis. Tom was born in Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland on August 16, 1935. He arrived in the United States aboard the RMS Franconia on April 9, 1952 and quickly settled in University City, MO. Tom was a United States Army veteran and a member of Teamsters Local 682 for 30 years. He retired from Welsch Heating & Cooling in 1995. Services: VISITATION will be held Monday, January 21, 2019 from 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd. FUNERAL MASS will be held Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. at St. Clement of Rome Catholic Church, 1510 Bopp Rd. Interment to follow at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

Kemper, Clarence W. Jr. age 71, passed away on Friday, January 11, 2019. He died peacefully with his children by his side. Clarence was born on March 20, 1947, in Lancaster, PA. He was the son of Clarence W. and Dorothy Kemper (Wolf.) He graduated from Garden Spot High School and, later, Penn State University. Upon graduation, he enlisted in the United States Air Force. While serving as a nuclear engineer, he travelled to places such as Okinawa, Japan. On June 8, 1968, he married Paula Sue Gerhard. He and Paula had two children, Eric and Kristin, while Clarence was stationed in Limestone, ME. Upon receiving an honorable discharge from the Air Force, he began a lengthy career in the parking industry which included employment with Cincinnati Time, Amano Cincinnati, Inc. and SKIDATA, Inc. His career enabled him to also live in Maryland, Kentucky, New Jersey and Missouri. He retired from the industry in December, 2015, as General Manager of the St. Louis Trading Area for SKIDATA. In 2012, he met Rose Marie Ford whom he married in 2016. Clarence enjoyed meeting people, travelling, history and anything connected to aviation. Clarence is predeceased by his parents and first wife, Paula Sue Kemper, nee Gerhard.Clarence leaves behind his loving wife, Rose Marie Kemper; his son, Eric Kemper (Jodi Stewart) and two grandchildren, Ryan and Emily; his daughter, Kristin Flood (Matt) and two grandchildren, Ethan and Jacob. He is also survived by his brother, Ron Kemper(Betsy Dombach), his sister, Susie Kemper (Terry Kohl), his nephew, Steve Kemper (Arria) and his niece, Kathy DesAutels (Jordan.) Services: A memorial service will be held on February 8th at 2:00pm at Bonhomme Presbyterian Church Chapel, 14820 Conway Road, Chesterfield, MO. There will also be a Celebration of Clarence's Life in Lancaster, PA in the summer of 2019. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent in his name to: The American Cancer Society.

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

Celebrations of Life

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Leppo, Norman Bailie

McLain, Geraldine "Gerry"

On Monday St. Louis lost one of its most remarkable residents. Norman Bailie Leppo died on January 14 of complications from a fall. Born in San Francisco in 1927, he moved to St. Louis in 1960. Norman worked in the corporate construction world until he started his own business in the 70's. Even though he was a native Californian, Norman loved St. Louis and became a citizen leader in many respects. Never a bystander when there was work to be done, Norman became involved in the Olivette Chamber of Commerce and was its president from 1985-1987. He also served as a leader of the Saint Louis Counts for a number of years during this period. He loved the St. Louis zoo and the Missouri Botanical Garden and was an active member of each for all the years he lived here. Even more important to him than his civic engagement was his love for the natural world. A lifelong fisherman, Norman joined the Missouri Smallmouth Alliance and, in his years as a member of the Board of Directors in the early 2000's, guided this organization in becoming a key player in the world of environmental preservation in Missouri. He was also extremely involved in the Conservation Federation of Missouri, serving on several committees and earning the President's Award in 2012 at the age of 84. N o r ma n w a s a ma n o f e x c e p t i o n a l r e s i l i e n c e a n d determination. He suffered the loss of his beloved wife in 1979, yet found a way to live the rest of his life serving his community and doing his part to advance conservation. After he retired, he served as a volunteer gardener on a horticultural team for Forest Park Forever for over 15 years. As an enduring gift to the park he purchased almost 10,000 Spanish bluebell bulbs, planting many of them himself in front of the Boathouse and under the trees that border the Grand Basin. He had astonishing energy for a man of his age. Even at 90, he tended his home garden and pursued his love of fishing as far as Canada and Mexico. Norman is survived by his daughter Suzanne, son-in-law Jim Novak and grandson Grant Novak; daughter Nancy, grandson Ryan Spence and his wife Morgan plus their two precious sons Brody and Johnny; and by his son Daniel, his wife Vickie and their son Marcus Leppo. They encourage anyone wishing to make a donation in Norman's memory to contribute to Forest Park Forever or the Conservation Federation of Missouri. And they invite everyone to drive through Forest Park in April and admire the river of blue flowers Norman planted. He would be delighted to know that his fellow St. Louisans were enjoying his legacy.

(nee Peach), Born January 15, 1938, amidst stories and laughter, exited this life with the same love and courage that defined her entire life at Surrey Place January 17, 2019. After having to repeatedly steal more chairs for her visitors, the Peach, Unger, McLain, and Dwyer Clans all received her in Heaven after being fortified with the Catholic Sa cra men t s a n d cros s in g a bridge of Prayers. She is survived by her sons James and Matthew, daughter-In-Law Elizabeth (Libby), nieces Tracey, Allison, Jennifer, nephews Stephen and John, and her grandchildren Elise, Brenna, and Nickolas. Services: Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic Church, Chesterfield, Monday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish Cemetery (House Springs). Visitation at church 10 a.m. until time of Mass. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Meyer, Mary (nee Wierciszewski), Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Thomas Meyer, Jr.; dearest mother of Patricia (Donald) Taylor, Thomas (Eileen) Meyer, III and Ronald Meyer; dear grandmother of 6; great-grandmother of 4; daughter of the late Stella and Frank Wierciszewski; sister of Helen Hopkins and the late Pauline Kmiecik, Julia Kobermann and Aloysius Wierciszewski; our dear aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Funeral Thursday, January 24, 8:45 a.m. from Stygar Florissant Chapel, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd. (Florissant), to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, 120 N. Elizabeth Ave. (Ferguson), Mass 9:15 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to the Alzheimers Association. Visitation Wednesday, 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Millman, William J.

Born in 1921, to the late Frank and Mary (Goldon) Millman, he was a lifelong resident of the St. Louis area until moving to New Jersey in 2017. He passed away peacefully at the home of his son, Gregory, January 8, 2019. Predeceased after 65 years of wedded bliss by Celeste (nee Lester, Charles Dollard) Millman, he was the dear 87, January 16, 2019. Visit. at Schrader Funeral Home, father of Gregory (Martine) and Ballwin, Thursday, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., with Funeral James Millman, beloved Service at 11:30 a.m. For more info, see Schrader.com grandfather of Bridget, Tayler (Matt) D'Rion, Anna (Allan) An, Magdalen, Chazz, William, Lindsay, Ann Stickney Joseph, Gregory Blaise, Tristan, and Asher Millman, and the late Beau Millman, and great grandfather of Jaxton, Chase and Biddeford Pool, Maine Shane D'Rion. His stepfather, George Wright, and sister, Frances Ann Stickney Lindsay, died on January 16, 2019, at Edgewood Kneffel, predeceased him. He bravely served in the Fifteenth Division of the U.S. Army Air Retirement Community in North Forces in World War II. After graduation from St. Louis Andover, Mass. She was 100 University he worked at B.C. MacDonald from 1953 until 1990, years old. She was born in St. Louis, MO, retiring as Chief Financial Officer. A founding parishioner at St. Clare's Parish in Ellisville, he on July 16, 1918, to Eleanor (nee Dozier) and Stuart Stickney. Her attended daily Mass for decades at the Passionist Nuns Chapel, father was the treasurer for the assisted by friends and neighbors when he could no longer Stickney Hoelscher Cigar Compa- drive. ny and her maternal grandfather Services: Visitation will be Monday, January 21 5:30-7:30 p.m. ran a baking company that even- at The Pointe in Ballwin, MO. Funeral Mass at St. Clare of Assisi tually became Nabisco. She at- Catholic Church, Tuesday, January 22, at 11:00 a.m. with tended the Rossman School in St. Louis. In 1930 she moved with interment to follow at Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, her mother and stepfather to New York City. She graduated donations to the Passionist Nuns of St. Louis, 15700 Clayton from the Nightingale-Bamford School, then spent a year at Miss Road, Ellisville, MO preferred. Child's Graduate House in Florence, Italy. She later attended the Traphagen School of Design in New York, where she produced Minney, Dorothy Jean intricate and beautiful drawings for her fashion design courses. p a s s e d a w a y p ea cefu l l y o n In 1941 Ann and two friends ran the Weekend Bookshop on January 16, 2019 in the company Madison Avenue on Manhattan's Upper East Side. A March 1942 of family. "Dottye", as she was story in the St. Louis Post Dispatch describes Ann deftly hanaffectionately known, was born dling a shoplifter: "(Miss Stickney) had to run after a woman on February 24, 1929 in St. Louis who slipped out the door with three expensive books. Miss to Nancy Schaefer (Clarkson) and Stickney caught up with her on Madison and retrieved the books Robert Schaefer. after asking if the woman wouldn't like them wrapped." Dottye will be remembered for On June 3, 1944, she married Peter McNair Lindsay, a Navy her kind heart and generosity. lieutenant, in Manhattan, during a wartime leave. They had met She graduated from Harris Stowe as babies in St. Louis and both their families summered in Teachers' College in 1948. An Biddeford Pool, Maine. In fact, Ann's mother had been a bridesavid and lifelong bowler, she had maid in Peter's parents' wedding there in 1916. They spent all many friends and fond their summers and most of their later years in that same Maine memories of bowling trips. A village, where they had lifelong friends spanning generations. After the war, Ann and Peter saw the world in two-year incre- devoted mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, she ments, courtesy of the Navy, as they were stationed in Newport, spent countless hours raising and nurturing her "kids." RI; Yokosuka, Japan; and Philadelphia, Pa. In 1964 they left the Those left to cherish her memory include her daughter Nancy Navy and settled in Beverly Farms, Mass. Ann was a voracious (Henry Voges), son Joseph, grandchildren Dustin, Rich (Voges), reader, a mushroom hunter and an avid craftsperson. Her crafts Stephanie (Lewellen-Minney), and Jennifer (Justin Langan), included needlepoint, knitting, sewing, and making terrariums. great-grandson Carter (Lewellen-Minney), sister Betty She was a great gardener, a gifted artist, and painter. But most McCloskey (Schaefer), nieces and nephews, great-nieces and of all, Ann hooked rugs she designed herself. She and a group nephews, cousin Carol (Larry Smith), friends Jean, Mary, Sally of Beverly Farms women met weekly for years, calling them- and others, as well as her beloved cat, Missy. selves the "happy hookers." She loved to travel and spend time She is preceded in death by her cherished husband, Joseph R. with her many friends. She was a snappy dresser with great Minney, brothers Robert and James Schaefer. style. She had a keen sense of humor and a sharp tongue. Her Services: A private graveside service is planned for Jefferson grandchildren kept a secret notebook of "Grandma's Best Barracks National Cemetery. There will be no public viewing. Lines," none of which can be repeated here. She was open Valhalla Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements. In minded and easily adjusted to modern times. When invited to lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Needy Paws her first same-sex wedding she insisted "Someone must get me Rescue, 814 Hi Crest Drive, St. Louis, MO 63125, or to the wedding, I don't want them to think I disapprove!" and needypaws.org. www.valhallafunerals.net then added "and I'm dying to see what the brides will wear." She was delighted by her 100th birthday party this past sumNash, Joseph Gerard "Joe" mer in Maine which was attended by more than 100 of her Wednesday, December 26, 2018. friends and family. Beloved son of Mary Rose and She was predeceased by her husband Peter and daughter Susan the late Charles N a s h ; d ea r and is survived by two sons: Andrew and wife Jan Lindsay of brother of Chuck Nash; loving Ipswich, Mass; and Peter and wife Kate Binzen of Decatur, Ga. uncle of Katye Laine Nash and Also survived by four grandchildren: Jackson, Barbara, Jacob Nicholas Nash; dear nephew, and Claire; and a great-grandson, Benjamin. She is also survived godchild, cousin, and friend. by her beloved nephew, Webster Tilton. Services: Visitation at Kutis Private services will be held this summer in Maine. ArrangeAffton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, ments by the Campbell Funeral Home, 525 Cabot Street, BeverFriday, January 25, 4-8 p.m. ly. In lieu of flowers, please consider donations to the Lawrence Memorial Mass Saturday, General Hospital and Essex County Greenbelt. Online January 26, 11 a.m. at St. Joan of condolences at www.campbellfuneral.com Arc Catholic Church (Hampton and Pernod). Inurnment Resurrection Cemetery. Masses or memorials to the Maglione, Grace L. (nee Andrews) Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Gene Slay Girls and Boys Club preferred. Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Anthony J. Maglione; loving mother of Sharon (Joseph) Thomas-Minnella, Obremski, Dolores Ann Sandy (and the late Emmett) Maglione-Salmons, Anna-Marie Jan. 11, 2019. Svc: Vis. Tues., Jan. 22, Baue, O'Fallon, 4(Arthur K.) Oestereich, John (Margo) Maglione, and the late Antoinette "Gail" Maglione; dear grandma of 7 and great- 8pm; Wed., Jan. 23, Assumption Catholic Church, O'Fallon, grandma of 9. Dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, and 10-11am, Funeral Mass to follow at 11am. Visit baue.com. friend. She was business manager for Teamsters Local 688, member Paoli, Margaret Victoria of St. Louis Genealogy Society, and Sarah Barton Murphy (nee Kelly), passed away, Monday, January 14, 2019. Chapter of DAR. Beloved mother of Scott (Liz) and Eric (Becky) Paoli. Dear Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay sister of Horst and Zelda. Loving Aunt of Trace. Beloved Ferry Rd., Tuesday, January 22, 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass grandmother of 7 and friend to many. Wednesday, 10 a.m. at St. Maragret Mary Alacoque Catholic Services: Funeral services will be private. In lieu of flowers, Church. Service will conclude at church. Interment J.B. contributions may be made to Missouri Humane Society. National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Shriners Hospital or Sarah Pettigrew, Mary L. Barton Murphy Chapter of DAR, appreciated. Mary L. Pettigrew left this world on January 5, 2019. She was the daughter of Marguerite (Wies) and Walter Pettigrew, and Markus, Vivian D. was born and raised in St. Louis, MO. She graduated from (nee Hearst), January 15, 2019. Service at KUTIS AFFTON Southwest High School, and obtained degrees from the Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, January 26, 1 p.m. Private University of Missouri, Columbia, and the University of interment. Colorado, Denver. Her life and career adventures drew her to Denver, CO, Hartford, CT and Corrales, NM. She is survived by her brother and sister-in-law, Walter and Kasandra Pettigrew of Bentonville, AR; her niece and nephew, Yancey Pettigrew and Alisha Gourley; great-nieces, Lacey, Keeley and Pippa Pettigrew; and great-nephew, Jaxon SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND Pettigrew. She is also survived by her closest friend, Stephen Acree of St. Louis, MO; cousins from the Wies side of the family SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES in Illinois and Florida; as well as many friends she made along her life's journey. Her cremated remains will be scattered in New Mexico. Please visit our online guestbook for Mary at www.FrenchFunerals.com.

STLtoday.com/obits


OBITUARIES

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Mary Oliver • The Pulitzer Prizewinning poet, whose rapturous odes to nature and animal life brought her critical acclaim and popular affection, has died. She was 83. Bill Reichblum, Ms. Oliver’s literary executor, said she died Thursday (Jan. 17, 2019) at her home in Hobe Sound, Fla. The cause of death was lymphoma. Her poetry books included “White Pine,” “West Wind” and the anthology “Devotions,” which came out in 2017. She won the Pulitzer in 1984 for “American Primitive” and the National Book Award in 1992 for “New and Selected Poems.” In 1998, she received the Lannan Literary Award for lifetime achievement. John C. Bogle • The man who simplified investing for the masses by launching the first index mutual fund, and founded Vanguard Group, died Wednesday (Jan. 16, 2019) in Bryn Mawr, Pa., the company said. He was 89. No cause of death was reported. He had been diagnosed with an erratic heartbeat as a young man, had his first of six heart attacks at 31 and underwent a heart transplant at 66. Mr. Bogle did not invent the index fund, but he expanded access to no-frills, low-cost investing in 1976 when Vanguard introduced the first index fund for individual investors, rather than institutional clients. Alfred K. Newman • One of the Navajo Code Talkers who used their native language to outsmart the

Oliver

Bogle

Boone

Japanese in World War II has died in New Mexico at age 94. Navajo Nation officials said Mr. Newman died Jan. 13 (2019) at a nursing home in Bloomfield, N.M. He was among hundreds of Navajos who served in the Marine Corps. Mr. Newman served in 194345 in the 1st Battalion, 21st Marine Regiment and 3rd Marine Division and saw duty at Bougainville Island, Guam, Iwo Jima, Kwajalein Atoll, Enewetak Atoll, New Georgia and New Caledonia. Shirley Boone • The philanthropist and longtime wife of singer Pat Boone died on Jan. 11 (2019) in Beverly Hills, Calif., where she lived. She was 84. Shirley and Pat Boone had been married for 65 years. During that time, Shirley Boone helped to establish Mercy Corps, which has become an international charitable organization dedicated to addressing economic, environmental, social and political problems. She also published writings, hosted TV shows and recorded music. Shirley Boone is the daughter of country singer Red Foley, a country singer of the 1930s and 1940s. Millicent Young • A member of a pioneering group of women who

Perelman

flew military planes in the United States during World War II has died. Ms. Young, of Colorado Springs, Colo., a member of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs, died Jan. 12 (2019) of complications related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, her son Bill Young said. She was 96. WASPs flew bombers and other warplanes to free up male pilots for combat service overseas. They served as civilian employees but were granted veteran status in 1977. Of the about 1,000 women chosen for the job, fewer than 30 are still believed to be alive, said Bill Young, who wrote a book about the program. Barbara Proctor • The first African-American woman to own and operate an advertising agency has died. Ms. Proctor died Dec. 19 (2018) at the Fairmont Care facility in Chicago. She was 86 and had recently suffered a fractured hip and had dementia, according to her son, Morgan. Harvard Business School called Ms. Proctor “the first woman in the United States to open an agency specializing in advertising to the black community.” The company was called Proctor and Gardner Advertising. But there was only

one founder behind it — Barbara Proctor, maiden name Gardner. By 1976 — six years after she launched it — Proctor and Gardner was dubbed the biggest black-owned agency in the nation. In the mid-1990s, after economic downturns and growing competition, her agency filed for bankruptcy. Raymond Perelman • The businessman who built a fortune buying and selling factories, and became one of the Philadelphia region’s greatest philanthropists, has died. He was 101. He died Monday (Jan. 14, 2019), his son Ronald Perelman said. In 2011, Mr. Perelman donated $225 million to the University of Pennsylvania medical school. Other gifts include $15 million to the Philadelphia Museum of Art; $6 million to the Center for Jewish Life at Drexel University; $5 million for a plaza at Drexel; and $5 million for the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. Lester Wunderman • The advertising executive who perfected the strategy of reaching customers in their mailboxes, in their periodicals through magazine inserts and on the telephone with 1-800 numbers, forever altering the way companies do business through direct marketing, died Jan. 9 (2019) at his home in New York City. He was 98. His son, Marc Wunderman, confirmed the death and said he did not know the cause. Mr. Wunderman advised that

businesses should collect detailed information on their audiences and target their advertising campaigns specifically to them. Francine du Plessix Gray • The writer whose novels and biographies often examined the lives of women, and who published an acclaimed memoir that explored her complicated personal history as a Russian-French child who came of age in America, died Jan. 13 (2019) at a hospital in New York. She was 88. The cause was complications from congestive heart failure, said a son, Luke Gray. Ms. Du Plessix Gray arrived in the U.S. at 10 in 1941, not knowing a word of English. Her father had been killed while fighting for the French resistance. Her mother remarried a magazine designer and she grew up surrounded by high fashion, glamour and what she later recognized as the monstrous egos of mother and her stepfather, which she wrote about in a prizewinning 2005 memoir, “Them.” She eventually joined the staff of the New Yorker magazine and taught at Columbia, Yale and other universities. Her novels included the bestselling “Lovers and Tyrants” (1976). Du Plessix Gray’s nonfiction books included studies of Catholic radicals, the rise of Hawaii as a sugar empire and military “fortress,” and women in the Soviet Union. She wrote biographies of several influential French women. From news services

STLTODAY.COM/WEATHER • • • •

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Stadnyk, Stella Alexandria

Thorne, William Bruce

(nee Barabash), baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Sunday, January 6, 2019. Loving wife of the late Harry G. Stadnyk; beloved mother of Harriet (Jerry) Beres, Harry W., D.D.S. (Ilona) Stadnyk, Sharon (Frank) Va n d even d er and Sheldon, M.D. (Elisa) Stadnyk. Grandmother of 14; great-grandmother of 27; great-great-grandmother of 1. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester, Monday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery, Wildwood. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Vincent DePaul Society. Memorial visitation at church 10 a.m. until time of Mass. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com.

68, passed away on Tuesday, January 15, 2019. William was b orn J u n e 8, 1950 in Mount Vernon, IL to Mr. and Mrs William T. Thorne and Doris (nee Barton). He married Kathryn (nee Burle) on May 19, 1972. Beloved father of Marcianna Williams (Scott Dugger), Jennifer T o r r e z (Rick) a n d Elizabeth Th orn e-Sh a n ks (Jeremy Chapman); cherished grandfather of 8 and great-grandfather of 1; loving brother of Elaine Thorne-Stinnett (Danny) and brother-in-law of Linda Thorne. William had many nieces, nephews and many adopted children. Services: Memorial Service Monday, January 21, 2019, 6:30 p.m. at ORTMANN'S, 9222 Lackland Rd., Overland, MO 63114. Visitation from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday. Ortmann Funeral Home www.osfuneralhomes.com

Current weather conditions 18-hour forecast The latest radar imagery Much more

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Voit, Rolland L. "Bud"

age 89, of Kirkwood, MO, passed away January 17, 2019. Bud was born in Warren, OH, to Esther (Wulf) and Louis Voit. At the age of 17 he joined the Navy, serving for a time in northern Japan m a i n t a i n i n g a i r c r a f t r a d io equipment. Married Joyce Lee of Lakewood OH October 18, 1952. B u d a n d J o y c e ra is ed t h ree children in Lakewood enjoying family and opportunities in "The Valley". Bud had a successful career with manufacturing interests in the Cleveland area but in mid-life chose to pursue a University degree. Bud received a Bachelor of Science degree in Geology from Utah State University in 1978 and after working in the mineral industry in Wyoming returned to complete a Masters Degree in 1985. They moved to the Saint Louis area in 1985. Bud worked for the D efen s e M a p p in g Agency, retiring from professional employment in 1994. Throughout this time Bud and Joyce Stube, Jeff enjoyed many memorable trips through Europe, the British Thurman, Mary L. "Lu" Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Tuesday, Isles, Russia, China, and Hawaii. Bud achieved a notable goal by January 15, 2019. Beloved son of Ron Stube and Lee Anne Stube (nee Dreyer) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother walking rim-to-rim through the Grand Canyon with family to (nee Scaggs). Loving brother of Steve Stube. Dear cousin, neph- Church, Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late celebrate his 75th birthday. Bud was always busy with projects, Jack Thurman; dear mother of Kimberley (Michael) Mayer and ew, and friend to many. wood working, music, volunteering, helping where ever he saw Services: Memorial Mass at St. Sabina Catholic Church, Lisa Bostic; dear grandmother of Mike (Tracey) Mayer, Michelle a need. He always had a smile and warm greeting. Bud is Florissant, Saturday, January 26, 2019, 10:00 a.m. In lieu of (Shawn) O'Connell, Melissa (Charles) Miles, Nik (Gina) Brym, Dan survived by, and will be greatly missed and fondly remembered flowers, contributions may be made to Humane Society of Brym, Matt Mayer, and Monika (Lee) Reinertson. Dear great- by, his wife of 66 years, Joyce Voit, children Deborah (Tim) grandmother of Michael and Maria Mayer, Zach Brym, Jack Missouri. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Vogt, Steve (Terry) Voit, Diane (Martin Culley) Voit. Preceded in O'Connell, Norah Brym, Carson Miles, Sawyer Brym, and Crematory, Ballwin. Friends may sign the family's on-line Dominic Miles. Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, death by parents Esther Moyer and Louis Voit, sister Gretchen guestbook at Schrader.com. Smith No services are planned. Contributions in Bud's name and friend. Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay may be made to the Clyde Hardy Scholarship Endowment, Utah Swingle, Jerrel Lynn Ferry Rd., on Tuesday, January 22, 9:30 a.m. to St. Simon the State University. January 12, 2019, age 90. Services: Gathering Thu., Jan. Apostle Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Service concludes at 24, 11am-12pm, Service to follow at 12pm, Dardenne church. Contributions to ASPCA greatly appreciated. Zavaglia, Angelo James Presbyterian Church. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com Visitation Monday 3-8 p.m. 77, of Maryville, IL, formerly of Collinsville, IL, went to be with Jesus on Monday, January 14, Van Gels, Ina R. 2019, at Barnes-Jewish Hospital beloved mother and wife, who in St. Louis, MO. was feared by all and loved by Services: Visitation will be from many, passed away January 11, 3 : 0 0 p . m . t o 8 : 0 0 p . m. o n 2019 surrounded by her family. Monday, January 21, 2019, at Survivors include her husband of Christ Church, 339 Frank Scott 56 years, John Van Gels; two Parkway E, Fairview Heights, IL sons: Christopher (Kimberly) Van 62208 and from 9:30 a.m. to Gels and Richard (Lynne) Van 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January Gels; thirteen grandchildren: 22, 2019. Funeral service will be Nicolle Lattina, Ashley,Trinity, 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday at the Trent, Wolfgang, Kaylin, Rylan, C o l l y n , N o l a n , G r a c e l y n , church with Pastor Chris White officiating. Burial will be in Lake Brooklin, Addilyn Van Gels, and View Cemetery, Fairview Heights, IL. In lieu of flowers, memoriJ o h n P l y s ; o n e s i s t e r : P a t als may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Stewart; one brother: James Dominick; and one sister-in-law: (JDRF) or the Collinsville Education Scholarship Foundation Mary Ellen (nee Foster) Dominick. She was preceded in death by (CESF) and will be received at the visitation or by mail to Barry her parents: Elmer and Ruth (nee Hamilton) Dominick; one son: Wilson Funeral Home, 2800 N. Center St., Maryville, IL 62062. James Van Gels; one brother: Malcolm Dominick; and one See barrywilsonfuneralhome.com for a complete obituary. brother-in-law: Robert Stewart. Florists Always recognized as a hard worker, she was a Special School District bus driver for many years, worked in various retail and retired as the manager at Amy's Card Shop. Dierbergs Florist Services: Visitation will be held on Friday, January 25th at Order 24 Hours Bellerive Chapel, 740 North Mason Road, Creve Coeur, 63141 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Funeral Ceremony at 12 noon, with Dierbergs.com Entombment to follow in Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. She was a very generous soul and supported many charities. Schnucks Florist Any memorial contributions may be made to some of her 65 Metro Locations favorite charities, including the Humane Society of St Louis, 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 The St. Louis Area Foodbank or Missouri Baptist Hospital. She will be dearly missed for her strong will, uncanny Cemeteries/Mausoleums wisdom and caring heart. www.valhallafunerals.net

Vlatkovich, John G. 8/5/26. Beloved employee/owner at Erker Catering Co. for 65 years. Loved his ponies, big band music and old time radio comedy hour. God Bless.

6 Grave plots in Memorial Park Cemetery at Lucas & Hunt & Hwy 70. Call 636-456-2861


A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES Poese, Frances B. 86, of St. Charles, December 30, 2018. Services: Memorial Service at Baue 620 Jefferson St. on Tuesday, January 22 at 1:30 pm. Visit Baue.com

Poindexter, Russell L. of St. Charles, 3/14/1926-1/15/2019 Visitation: Wednesday, 1/23, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Services: Wednesday, 1/23, 12 p.m. at Paul F/H

Potts, Frances Virginia Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, January 18, 2019. Daughter of the late Frank and Frances (Hutter) Potts. Sister of Patricia (Tom) Filla, and the late Shirley Behrendt, Rev. Thomas Potts, Srs. Celeste and Wonda Potts, S.S.N.D., Frank, James, Alvin and Vernon Potts. Our dear aunt, cousin, and friend of many. Services: Visitation on Thursday, January 24 at 9:00 until Mass at 10:00 at St. Ferdinand Catholic Church, 1765 Charbonier Rd. (Florissant). Interment entrusted to Buchholz Mortuary at Calvary Cemetery. Masses preferred.

Rothery, Sean Patrick August 18, 1976 - January 8, 2019 of St. Louis. Services: Funeral Mass at Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, 1919 South 7th Street, St. Louis, Saturday February 2, 11:00 a.m. More information at www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Rudberg, Paul Andrew, III January 16, 2019, age 62. Services: Vis. Sun., Jan. 20, Baue Cave Springs, 4-8pm. Mass Mon., Jan. 21, St. Robert Bellarmine, 2pm. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Ryan, Patrick M. Wed., Jan. 16, 2019. Memorial Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, Thurs., Jan. 24, 6-9 p.m. with Memorial Service at 6:30 p.m. Service concludes at Funeral Home.

Saffo, Rosemary Carol fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Wednesday, January 16, 2019. Loving sister of Diana (Ken) Bono; dear aunt of Kenneth (Marcella, nee Donkin) Bono, Jr. and Jeffrey (Vinita, nee Wyrick) Bono; dear great-aunt of Nicolas John Bono, Mya Mackenzie Bono, Kenneth Joseph Bono, III, Seeley Robert Bono and Fiona Elizabeth Bono; our dear cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., 63110 on Monday, January 21, 9 a.m. until time of Mass at 10 a.m. Memorials may be made to Ronald M cD on a l d House Charities. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL.

Schicker, William "Bill" followed the love of his life, Mary Lou (nee Helmsing), to eternal life on Thursday, January 17, 2 0 19 . B il l is s u rvived b y his brother Donald (Dee); dear brother-in-law Dan Helmsing; eight children, Jan Davis (Ben), Joe Schicker (Mary Ellen), Bari Neff (Bob), Julie Kincaid (Randy), Lisa B rot h ert on (Mike), John Schicker (Stacy), Michelle Todt (Michael) and Tricia Thiel (John); grandchildren Patrick Davis, Heather Davis, Cara Davis, Kelly Davis, George Schicker, Kyle Schicker (Marissa), Mattie Neff, Kelsie Neff, Daniel Neff, Katie Loescher (Jason), Dennis Kohut, Emily Mueller (Brian), Michael Brotherton, Melissa Brotherton, Matthew Brotherton, Alec Schicker, Ben Schicker, Sam Schicker, Katie Todt, Courtney Todt Podkowa (Rick), Meme Todt, William Todt, Alexander Todt, Anna Thiel and JJ Thiel; great-grandchildren Rainey Davis, Boston Davis and Rowan Schicker; niece and nephews; and many other relatives and dear friends whom he loved as family. A devout Catholic faith manifest itself daily in Bill's life, especially his long-lasting service and piety at St. Vincent de Paul, his profound belief in human dignity, and his relationships as a compassionate father, grandfather, friend, employer and mentor. At the age of seventeen, Bill began his career at McMahon washing cars and serving as the porter for the new car department. After returning from his service in the United States Navy, he progressed at the dealership from porter to sales person to General Manager, until in 1975 he bought into McMahon Ford Company (now known as Schicker Automotive), the first of many dealerships he would acquire over his illustrious career. Bill considered his employees as family and his customers as friends. He was consistently and enthusiastically dedicated to serving his community, those in need, and the retail automotive industry. He often chose to forego recognition for his kindness as he treated the opportunity to help others as a privilege. Throughout his career he served as a board member of Guardian Angel Settlement House, Director of Backstoppers, St. Mary's High School Alumni Board, President of the Board of Alderman of the City of Shrewsbury, board member of Citizen's National Bank, President of the St. Louis Metro Ford Dealers Association, President of the Missouri Auto Dealers Association, member of the Executive Committee for the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, member of the Ford Community Relations Committee, Co-Founder of the St. Louis Chapter of Legatus International, Commissioner of the St. Louis County Police Department, member of the University of Missouri St. Louis Chancellor's Council and Director of the National Automobile Dealers Association, representing Missouri in the state capitol. He was honored as Time Magazine's Quality Dealer of the Year, was presented the JC Penney Golden Rule Award for Family Volunteering by General Colin Powell, named Catholic Family Services Volunteer Family of the Year, and winner of the Ford, Motor Company "Hero of the Planet" award. Bill was an affiliate of the Congregation of the Mission Vincentian Fathers and Brothers. Services: A memorial Mass will be celebrated for the life of Bill on Friday, January 25, 2019, at 10:00 a.m. at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis at 4431 Lindell Boulevard. Please, in lieu of flowers, a donation can be made on Bill's behalf to one of the following charities: St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Backstoppers, St. Mary's High School, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital or Guardian Angel Settlement Association. A Kutis Funeral Home Service.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Celebrations of Life

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Simpson, Josephine Hickey

Van Gels, Ina R.

Josephine passed away on 1/4/19. She was know for being The First Lady of Washington University Athletics, serving as an Administrative Assistant for 47 years, a liaison for the 1996 and 2000 Presidential Debates, and many NCAA Championship events. In 2005, she was elected into the Washington University Hall of Fame. She is survived by nieces: Kate Bastian(Clay), Mary Caroline Hearn, Margaret Simpson(Leanne), nephews: Thomas Simpson, and Edward Simpson(Rhonda). Also, great nieces and nephews: Brittany, Lucy, Peter, Meredith, Cole, and Jack. Services: Private service held.

beloved mother and wife, who was feared by all and loved by many, passed away January 11, 2019 surrounded by her family. Survivors include her husband of 56 years, John Van Gels; two sons: Christopher (Kimberly) Van Gels and Richard (Lynne) Van Gels; thirteen grandchildren: Nicolle Lattina, Ashley,Trinity, Trent, Wolfgang, Kaylin, Rylan, Collyn, Nolan, Gracelyn, Brooklin, Addilyn Van Gels, and John Plys; one sister: Pat Stewart; one brother: James Dominick; and one sister-in-law: Mary Ellen (nee Foster) Dominick. She was preceded in death by her parents: Elmer and Ruth (nee Hamilton) Dominick; one son: James Van Gels; one brother: Malcolm Dominick; and one brother-in-law: Robert Stewart. Always recognized as a hard worker, she was a Special School District bus driver for many years, worked in various retail and retired as the manager at Amy's Card Shop. Services: Visitation will be held on Friday, January 25th at Bellerive Chapel, 740 North Mason Road, Creve Coeur, 63141 from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Funeral Ceremony at 12 noon, with Entombment to follow in Bellerive Gardens Cemetery. She was a very generous soul and supported many charities. Any memorial contributions may be made to some of her favorite charities, including the Humane Society of St Louis, The St. Louis Area Foodbank or Missouri Baptist Hospital. She will be dearly missed for her strong will, uncanny wisdom and caring heart. www.valhallafunerals.net

Sinise, Henry age 94, met his Lord and Savior on January 15, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Jeanne (nee DeHaan); dear father of Richard ( N a n c y ) Sinise, Jill (John) Sch w en d ema n n and the late Robert Sinise; loving grandfather of Kim (Ross), Michael (Karly), Amanda (Ryan) and the late Matthew; cherished great-grandpa of Bianca, Declan, Aryauna, Anthony, Miller and baby coming in J u n e 2019; fon d brother, brother-in-law, uncle and devoted friend to many in St. Louis and Chicago. Hank served his country in WWII in India. He was a dedicated tax accountant, serving as Director of Federal Taxes with Sears in Chicago for 30 years. Services: Visitation Monday morning, 9:30 a.m. at the BradyGill Funeral Home, 16600 S. Oak Park Ave., Tinley Park, until time of prayers at 10:30 a.m. to St. Stephen Church, Mass 11:30 a.m. Interment Mt. Greenwood Cemetery with Military Honors. In lieu of flowers, the Sinise family request contributions to be made to the Alzheimer's Research Foundation, 3152 Little Road, Suite 146, Trinity, FL. 34655 to honor Henry and Jeanne Sinise. (708) 614-9900 or www.bradygill.com.

Somerville, Eula M. (nee Fassold), baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Wednesday, January 16, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Charles W. Somerville; dearest mother of Elizabeth "Betty" (Glenn) Geeser and Joseph (Lynn) Somerville; dear grandmother of Ainslie (Nicholas) Gordon, Brett (Rachel) Geeser, Joseph (Kristen) Somerville, Katherine (Nathan) Heise and Charles Somerville; greatgrandmother of 6. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday, 11:45 a.m. to Holy Infant Catholic Church, Ballwin for 12:00 p.m. Mass. Visitation Monday 5-7 p.m. Friends may sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com.

Vietmeier, Carl 57, St Louis. Visit. Tues, 1/22, 4-8 p.m., Alexander White Mullen Funeral Home. Service: Wed., 1/23, 11 a.m. Interment Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. www.alexanderstlouis.com

Vlatkovich, John G. 8/5/26. Beloved employee/owner at Erker Catering Co. for 65 years. Loved his ponies, big band music and old time radio comedy hour. God Bless.

Voit, Rolland L. "Bud"

age 89, of Kirkwood, MO, passed away January 17, 2019. Bud was born in Warren, OH, to Esther (Wulf) and Louis Voit. At the age of 17 he joined the Navy, serving for a time in northern Japan m a i n t a i n i n g a i r c r a f t r a d io equipment. Married Joyce Lee of Lakewood OH October 18, 1952. B u d a n d J o y c e ra is ed t h ree children in Lakewood enjoying Stadnyk, Stella Alexandria family and opportunities in "The (nee Barabash), baptized into the Valley". Bud had a successful Hope of Christ's Resurrection, career with manufacturing interests in the Cleveland area but in Sunday, January 6, 2019. Loving mid-life chose to pursue a University degree. Bud received a w i f e o f t h e l a t e H a r r y G . Bachelor of Science degree in Geology from Utah State Stadnyk; beloved mother of University in 1978 and after working in the mineral industry in Harriet (Jerry) Beres, Harry W., Wyoming returned to complete a Masters Degree in 1985. They D.D.S. (Ilona) Stadnyk, Sharon moved to the Saint Louis area in 1985. Bud worked for the ( F r a n k ) V a n d e v e n d e r a n d D efen s e M a p p in g Agency, retiring from professional Sheldon, M.D. (Elisa) Stadnyk. employment in 1994. Throughout this time Bud and Joyce Grandmother of 14; great-grand- enjoyed many memorable trips through Europe, the British mother of 27; great-great-grand- Isles, Russia, China, and Hawaii. Bud achieved a notable goal by mother of 1. walking rim-to-rim through the Grand Canyon with family to Services: Funeral Mass at St. celebrate his 75th birthday. Bud was always busy with projects, J o s e p h C a t h o l i c C h u r c h , wood working, music, volunteering, helping where ever he saw Manchester, Monday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Cross a need. He always had a smile and warm greeting. Bud is Cemetery, Wildwood. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be survived by, and will be greatly missed and fondly remembered made to St. Vincent DePaul Society. Memorial visitation at by, his wife of 66 years, Joyce Voit, children Deborah (Tim) church 10 a.m. until time of Mass. A service of the Vogt, Steve (Terry) Voit, Diane (Martin Culley) Voit. Preceded in SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may death by parents Esther Moyer and Louis Voit, sister Gretchen sign the family's online guestbook at Schrader.com. Smith No services are planned. Contributions in Bud's name may be made to the Clyde Hardy Scholarship Endowment, Utah State University. Stube, Jeff

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Tuesday, January 15, 2019. Beloved son of Ron Stube and Lee Anne Stube Wetzel, Craig (nee Scaggs). Loving brother of Steve Stube. Dear cousin, neph- 57, Woodson Terrace. Visitation: Mon, 1/21 from 4-8, ew, and friend to many. Alexander White Mullen. Service: Tues, 1/22 at 1 p.m. Services: Memorial Mass at St. Sabina Catholic Church, Burial Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. www.alexanderstlouis.com Florissant, Saturday, January 26, 2019, 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Humane Society of Young, Arthur F. "Art" Missouri. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Asleep in Jesus, Crematory, Ballwin. Friends may sign the family's on-line Wednesday, January 16, guestbook at Schrader.com. 2019. Beloved husband of Margaret Young (nee Ehrhardt) Swingle, Jerrel Lynn and the late Eunice Young (nee January 12, 2019, age 90. Services: Gathering Thu., Jan. Ziegler); dear father of David 24, 11am-12pm, Service to follow at 12pm, Dardenne (Tom Tiberio) Young, Julie Young, Presbyterian Church. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com Jon Young, Laura (Steve) Streckfuss, and Paul Young; dear grandfather of Derek (Tara), Terrell, Barbara Ann Ruthie, Jennifer (Nicholas), Kelly, Visitation Tuesday, January 22, 10 a.m. until serv. 12 noon and Steve. Dear brother of Ken, at Collier's Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh. Int. J.B. Nat'l Harvey and the late Alice and Cem. colliersfuneralhome.com Edith. Uncle, cousin, and friend of many. Proud Navy veteran and President of Missouri District of Thorne, William Bruce 68, passed away on Tuesday, Walther League from 1947 to 1950. Active in offices of Our January 15, 2019. William was Redeemer, Hope, and Timothy Lutheran Churches, and LCMS b orn J u n e 8, 1950 in Mount World Mission. After retirement, he took up volunteering, Vernon, IL to Mr. and Mrs William including the American Red Cross and St. Mary's Health Center. T. Thorne and Doris (nee Barton). Services: Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, He married Kathryn (nee Burle) Tuesday, January 22, 4-8 p.m. Funeral at Timothy Lutheran Church, Wednesday, with visitation at 9 a.m. followed by on May 19, 1972. Beloved father of Marcianna service at 10 a.m. Interment Our Redeemer Cemetery. Williams (Scott Dugger), Jennifer T o r r e z (Rick) a n d Elizabeth Zavaglia, Angelo James Th orn e-Sh a n ks (Jeremy 77, of Maryville, IL, formerly of Chapman); cherished grandCollinsville, IL, went to be with father of 8 and great-grandfather Jesus on Monday, January 14, of 1; loving brother of Elaine 2019, at Barnes-Jewish Hospital Thorne-Stinnett (Danny) and brother-in-law of Linda Thorne. in St. Louis, MO. William had many nieces, nephews and many adopted Services: Visitation will be from children. 3 : 0 0 p . m . t o 8 : 0 0 p . m. o n Services: Memorial Service Monday, January 21, 2019, 6:30 Monday, January 21, 2019, at p.m. at ORTMANN'S, 9222 Lackland Rd., Overland, MO 63114. Christ Church, 339 Frank Scott Visitation from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday. Parkway E, Fairview Heights, IL Ortmann Funeral Home www.osfuneralhomes.com 62208 and from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January Schuchmann, Harold "Hal" Thurman, Mary L. "Lu" 22, 2019. Funeral service will be on Fri., Jan. 18, 2019, at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday at the (nee Dreyer) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother age 91. Beloved husband Church, Thursday, January 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late church with Pastor Chris White officiating. Burial will be in Lake of the late Leota Jack Thurman; dear mother of Kimberley (Michael) Mayer and View Cemetery, Fairview Heights, IL. In lieu of flowers, memoriSchuchmann; among the Lisa Bostic; dear grandmother of Mike (Tracey) Mayer, Michelle als may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation survivors are his three daughters, (Shawn) O'Connell, Melissa (Charles) Miles, Nik (Gina) Brym, Dan (JDRF) or the Collinsville Education Scholarship Foundation Shearl (Edward) Stangel and Brym, Matt Mayer, and Monika (Lee) Reinertson. Dear great- (CESF) and will be received at the visitation or by mail to Barry Christine Schuchmann both of St. grandmother of Michael and Maria Mayer, Zach Brym, Jack Wilson Funeral Home, 2800 N. Center St., Maryville, IL 62062. Louis County and Teri (Kathy) See barrywilsonfuneralhome.com for a complete obituary. O'Connell, Norah Brym, Carson Miles, Sawyer Brym, and D o x s e e of Alexandria, VA; 5 Dominic Miles. Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, g r a n d c h i l d r e n a n d 2 g r e a tand friend. grandchildren. Florists Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Services: Visitation will be held Ferry Rd., on Tuesday, January 22, 9:30 a.m. to St. Simon the Tues., Jan. 22 from 4-8 p.m. at Dierbergs Florist Apostle Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Service concludes at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Order 24 Hours Rd., Kirkwood. Funeral service Wed., Jan. 23, 12 noon at St. church. Contributions to ASPCA greatly appreciated. 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Paul's Lutheran Church, Manchester and Ballas Rd. with visita- Visitation Monday 3-8 p.m. Dierbergs.com tion one hour prior to service at church. Interment St. Paul's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Tissot, Frank Schnucks Florist the Alzheimer's Association. www.boppchapel.com 93, passed Jan. 18, 2019. Services: Visit. Wed., 1/23 from 3:3065 Metro Locations 7:30 p.m. Service Thurs., 1/24, 10:00 a.m., Hutchens Mortuary, 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Florissant. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Sgroi, Edna M. (nee Hiatt) p a s s ed a w a y peacefully a t B oyn t on Beach Cemeteries/Mausoleums Rehabilitation Center, Boynton Beach, Florida, on Sunday, January 6, 2019. at age 96. 6 Grave plots in Memorial Park Cemetery at Lucas & Hunt & Hwy 70. Call 636-456-2861 Services: A ceremony of remembrance will be held in the chapel at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri on April 15, 2019 at 11:15 a.m. To leave a condolence & to view the full obituary, please visit SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND www.scobeecombsbowdenfuneralhome.com. SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

Shrum, Kenneth W. of St. Louis. 9/22/1927 - 1/16/2019. Gathering: 1/27, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Mem. Serv. 1/27, 1 p.m. at Paul Funeral Home. www.paulfuneral.com

STLtoday.com/obits

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits


NATION

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

‘OH MY GOD! RUN!’

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

100 years ago, a deadly wave of molasses tore through Boston

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION

The scene in Boston’s North End on Jan. 15, 1919, after a massive tank holding molasses ruptured. The ensuing flood of 2.3 million gallons killed 21 and injured 150. Within seconds, two city blocks were inundated. Engineers later concluded the walls of the tank were too thin.

BY ROBERT S. DAVIS Washington Post

It was promising to be an uncharacteristically warm winter day in Boston. The temperature on Jan. 15, 1919, had soared to 40 degrees from 2 degrees earlier in the week, prompting many downtown workers to head outdoors. Shortly after noon in the city’s bustling North End, as Model T Fords chugged by and elevated trains screeched above Commercial Street, a group of firefighters sat down for a game of cards in a firehouse near a massive tank that stored molasses used in the production of industrial alcohol. As the firefighters puzzled over their hands, they heard a strange staccato sound. The rivets on the 50-foot-high storage tank began to shoot off, and a dull roar followed. At the noise, firefighter Paddy Driscoll whipped around. “Oh my God!” he exclaimed as he saw the dark torrent spilling out. “Run!” The Great Molasses Flood was underway. The syrup swamped one of Boston’s busiest neighborhoods, killing 21 and injuring 150. “Midday turned to darkness as the 2.3 million gallons of molasses engulfed the Boston waterfront like a black tidal wave, 25 feet high and 160 feet wide at

the outset,” Stephen Puleo recounted in his book “Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919,” which vividly captures details of the disaster, including the chilling reactions of Driscoll and others to the tank rupture. Boston police patrolman Frank McManus spotted the 26 million-pound wall of goop and shouted to the dispatcher, “Send all available rescue vehicles and personnel immediately — there’s a wave of molasses coming down Commercial Street!” By now traveling at 35 mph, the wave of sugary doom tore through the North End with enough power to crumple small structures, blast a truck through a fence, knock the firehouse off its foundation and rip away a beam supporting the elevated train tracks. Within seconds, two city blocks were inundated — and the death toll began to climb. City workers who were taking advantage of the warmth to eat lunch outside drowned where they sat. Two 10-year-olds who were collecting firewood near the molasses tank were swept away. Others suffocated as their homes and basements quickly filled. “I was in bed on the third floor of my house when I heard a deep rumble. ... I awoke in several feet of molasses,” Martin Cloughtery told the Boston Globe in 1919. “A

pile of wreckage was holding me down, and a little way from me I saw my sister. I struggled out from under the wreckage and pulled my sister toward me and helped her on to a raft. I then began to look for my mother.” Even animals didn’t escape. “A score of Public Works Department horses were either smothered in their stalls by the flood of molasses or so severely injured as their stable collapsed that they were shot by policemen to end their suffering,” the Globe wrote in 1919. “Here and there struggled a form — whether it was animal or human being was impossible to tell,” the Boston Post wrote. “Only an upheaval, a thrashing about in the sticky mass, showed where any life was.” Scientific American magazine in 2013 explained why a wave of molasses can be much deadlier than a wave of water. “The dense wall of syrup surging from its collapsed tank initially moved fast enough to sweep people up and demolish buildings, only to settle into a more gelatinous state that kept people trapped.” Rescuers and sailors from the U.S. combat ship Nantucket descended on the scene in droves, but struggled in the muck, which stained the waters of Boston Harbor brown for several days. The search for survivors be-

came a search for answers: Why did the tank rupture, and were there signs beforehand? The second part of that question was easily answered. During the summer of 1918, one of the hottest on record in Boston, North End residents began noticing leaks at the tank. After an employee reported a leak, the company acted — by painting over the gray shell of the tank with a rust-brown color. “The sticky liquid now blended, chameleon-like, with the fresh coat of paint, indiscernible from the tank’s wall,” Puleo wrote. Litigation swiftly followed the disaster, and the lawsuit and trial against the tank’s owner, U.S. Industrial Alcohol, would last six years and grow to one of the most exhaustive in the state’s history. The trial produced three theories about the cause of the rupture: structural failure of the tank, fermentation of the molasses that led to an eruption and sabotage via a bomb. The company steadfastly blamed anarchists. A court-appointed auditor disagreed, and in 1925 ruled that the company was to blame for the disaster. U.S. Industrial Alcohol would later pay the flood victims and their families $628,000 — the equivalent of $9.2 million today. Today, studies have offered grim insight into why the tank

collapsed. In a 2015 issue of Civil and Structural Engineer Magazine, engineer Ronald Mayville concluded that the walls of the tank were too thin, a flaw that builders at the time should have known. “No one disputed they underdesigned the tank walls,” he told the Boston Globe. Back in the Boston of 1919, the city grieved as more bodies were found, some so battered and glazed by molasses that identification proved difficult. Four months later, the last body attributed to the flood was discovered under the wharf. “Boston is appalled at the terrible accident,” Mayor Andrew J. Peters said in 1919. Over time, however, the Great Molasses Flood has become less of a catalyst for outrage and more of a quirky footnote in history. “The flood today remains part of the city’s folklore, but not its heritage,” Puleo wrote. “The substance itself” — molasses — “gives the entire event an unusual, whimsical quality.” But for years after the flood, the memories of it resided not just in North Enders’ minds, but in their noses. “The smell of molasses,” journalist Edwards Park wrote in 1983, “remained for decades a distinctive, unmistakable atmosphere of Boston.”

Judge voids Alabama law protecting Confederate monuments BY JAY REEVES associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. • A judge has overturned an Alabama law meant to prevent the removal of Confederate monuments from public property, ruling the act infringed on the rights of citizens in a mostly black city who are “repulsed” by a memorial in a city park. The 10-page ruling issued late Monday by Jefferson County Circuit Judge Michael Graffeo said a 2017 state law barring the removal or alteration of historical monuments wrongly violated the free speech rights of local communities. The law can’t be enforced, Graffeo ruled, but the state attorney general’s office said it would appeal. The state sued the city of Birmingham after officials tried to remove a 52-foottall obelisk that was erected to honor Confederate veterans in a downtown park in 1905. Rather than toppling the stone marker, the city built a 12-foottall wooden box around it. Birmingham’s population of 210,000 is more than 70 percent black, and the judge said it was indisputable that most citizens are “repulsed” by the memorial. He rejected the state’s claims that lawmakers had the power to protect historical monuments statewide. Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin told The Associated Press he was happy

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Men walk past a Confederate monument in Linn Park in downtown Birmingham, Ala., in 2016. A judge has overturned an Alabama law that prevents the removal of Confederate monuments from public property. The state attorney general says he will appeal.

with the ruling. “We were not even a city during the Civil War,” he said. But Woodfin, citing the state’s plan

to appeal, said the monument can’t be taken down immediately. “We’ll weigh our options,” he said. The law includes a $25,000 pen-

alty for removing or altering a historical monument, but the judge said the penalty was unconstitutional. The city hasn’t had to pay while the lawsuit worked its way through court. The ruling came hours after the inauguration of Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, who signed the law and opened her campaign last year with a commercial that prominently showed Confederate monuments. “We can’t change or erase our history, but here in Alabama we know something that Washington doesn’t. To get where we are going means understanding where we have been,” Ivey said in the ad. Supporters of the law contend it protects not just Confederate memorials but historical markers of any kind, but rebel memorials have been an issue nationwide since a white supremacist gunman killed nine worshippers in a black church in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. State Sen. Gerald Allen, the Tuscaloosa Republican who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement that the law was meant to “thoughtfully preserve the entire story of Alabama’s history for future generations.” “The attorney general’s office is confident that the Memorial Preservation Act is constitutional, and I look forward to the attorney general’s appeal of Judge Graffeo’s ruling,” Allen said.


NATION

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Tony Mendez • The forgery artist and master of disguise for the CIA has died. Mr. Mendez was 78 when he died Saturday (Jan. 19, 2019) at an assisted-living center in Frederick, Md. He had Parkinson’s disease, said his wife, fellow CIA veteran Jonna Mendez. Mr. Mendez, a 25-year veteran of the spy agency, was in the business of geopolitical theater. Pulling techniques from magicians, movie makeup artists and even the television show “Mission: Impossible,” he changed one person into another, transforming agents into characters with backstories, costumes and documents that helped them evade detection and avoid capture in foreign countries. Disguising himself as an Irish moviemaker, Mendez successfully smuggled six State Department employees out of Tehran during the 1979-1981 Iran hostage crisis, passing them off as a Canadian movie crew in a daring mission that formed the basis of the Oscar-winning movie “Argo” (2012). Mr. Mendez was portrayed by actor-director Ben Affleck in the movie. A painter of impressionistic landscapes and outdoor scenes, Mr. Mendez was working as a draftsman when he was recruited by the CIA in 1965, and ran an art studio after he retired. Douglas M. Costle • An early architect of the Environmental Protection Agency who became the regulatory agency’s top administrator and helped initiate the “Superfund” program to clean up hazardous-waste sites, died Jan. 13 (2019) at his home in McLean, Va. He was 79. He had complications from strokes, said his wife, Betsy Costle. After working for the Justice Department’s civil rights division in the mid-1960s, Mr. Costle was named to a White House advisory council with the aim of reorganizing the executive branch. He was instrumental in outlining

1977. Of the about 1,000 women chosen for the job, fewer than 30 are still believed to be alive, said Bill Young, who wrote a book about the program.

Oliver

Bogle

the scope of an independent agency designed to coordinate efforts to enforce environmental laws to prevent pollution and protect citizens’ health. President Richard Nixon formally launched the EPA by executive order in December 1970. Mr. Costle was a consultant to the agency during its infancy and later directed the state environmental protection commission in Connecticut before returning to Washington. He was named EPA director in 1977 by President Jimmy Carter. “Clear air is not an aesthetic luxury,” Mr. Costle said upon taking office. “It is a public health necessity.” Mary Oliver • The Pulitzer Prizewinning poet, whose rapturous odes to nature and animal life brought her critical acclaim and popular affection, has died. She was 83. Bill Reichblum, Ms. Oliver’s literary executor, said she died Thursday (Jan. 17, 2019) at her home in Hobe Sound, Fla. The cause of death was lymphoma. Her poetry books included “White Pine,” “West Wind” and the anthology “Devotions,” which came out in 2017. She won the Pulitzer in 1984 for “American Primitive” and the National Book Award in 1992 for “New and Selected Poems.” In 1998, she received the Lannan Literary Award for lifetime achievement. John C. Bogle • The man who simplified investing for the masses by launching the first index mutual fund, and founded Vanguard Group, died Wednesday (Jan. 16, 2019) in Bryn Mawr, Pa., the

Costle

Doom

company said. He was 89. No cause of death was reported. He had been diagnosed with an erratic heartbeat as a young man, had his first of six heart attacks at 31 and underwent a heart transplant at 66. Mr. Bogle did not invent the index fund, but he expanded access to no-frills, low-cost investing in 1976 when Vanguard introduced the first index fund for individual investors, rather than institutional clients. Alfred K. Newman • One of the Navajo Code Talkers who used their native language to outsmart the Japanese in World War II has died in New Mexico at age 94. Navajo Nation officials said Mr. Newman died Jan. 13 (2019) at a nursing home in Bloomfield, N.M. He was among hundreds of Navajos who served in the Marine Corps. Mr. Newman served in 194345 in the 1st Battalion, 21st Marine Regiment and 3rd Marine Division and saw duty at Bougainville Island, Guam, Iwo Jima, Kwajalein Atoll, Enewetak Atoll, New Georgia and New Caledonia. Millicent Young • A member of a pioneering group of women who flew military planes in the United States during World War II has died. Ms. Young, of Colorado Springs, Colo., a member of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs, died Jan. 12 (2019) of complications related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, her son Bill Young said. She was 96. WASPs flew bombers and other warplanes to free up male pilots for combat service overseas. They served as civilian employees but were granted veteran status in

Barbara Proctor • The first African-American woman to own and operate an advertising agency has died. Ms. Proctor died Dec. 19 (2018) at the Fairmont Care facility in Chicago. She was 86 and had recently suffered a fractured hip and had dementia, according to her son, Morgan. Harvard Business School called Ms. Proctor “the first woman in the United States to open an agency specializing in advertising to the black community.” The company was called Proctor and Gardner Advertising. But there was only one founder behind it — Barbara Proctor, maiden name Gardner. By 1976 — six years after she launched it — Proctor and Gardner was dubbed the biggest black-owned agency in the nation. In the mid-1990s, after economic downturns and growing competition, her agency filed for bankruptcy. Lester Wunderman • The advertising executive who perfected the strategy of reaching customers in their mailboxes, in their periodicals through magazine inserts and on the telephone with 1-800 numbers, forever altering the way companies do business through direct marketing, died Jan. 9 (2019) at his home in New York City. He was 98. His son, Marc Wunderman, confirmed the death and said he did not know the cause. Mr. Wunderman advised that businesses should collect detailed information on their audiences and target their advertising campaigns specifically to them. Reggie Young • The session guitar player, whose signature licks defined hit records from Elvis, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and

many more, has died. He was 82. Friend and fellow Nashville Cats session musician David Briggs said Mr. Young died Thursday (Jan. 17, 2019) at his home in Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Young started his career in Memphis, Tenn., where he was an in-demand session player working with acclaimed producer Chips Moman, and opened for the Beatles with the Bill Black Combo in 1964. At Moman’s American Studio in Memphis, he played the signature sitar intro on “Hooked on a Feeling,” by B.J. Thomas, and played guitar on “Son of a Preacher Man” by Dusty Springfield, “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond and “Suspicious Minds” by Elvis Presley. In the 1970s he became part of the Nashville Cats session players. Mr. Young added guitar to No. 1 records including “Luckenbach, Texas,” by Jennings, “Pancho and Lefty” by Nelson and Merle Haggard and “Always On My Mind,” by Nelson. When the Highwaymen super group formed with Nelson, Jennings, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson, Mr. Young played on their No. 1 records and even toured with them. His first-ever album is due out this month through London-based record label Ace. Lorna Doom • The L.A. punk bassist, who was part of the posse of Hollywood punks who sparked a West Coast music movement in the 1970s, has died. Ms. Doom’s death Saturday (Jan. 19, 2019) at age 61 was confirmed by her longtime friend and former Germs bandmate Don Bolles. The cause was cancer. Born Teresa Ryan, Ms. Doom became an icon of the U.S. punk explosion despite having to learn her instrument after joining the band. The Germs’ primal first album, “G.I.,” in 1978 set the tone for the U.S. hardcore punk movement. From news services

‘OH MY GOD! RUN!’

100 years ago, a deadly wave of molasses tore through Boston

BY ROBERT S. DAVIS Washington Post

in 2013 explained why a wave of molasses can be much deadlier than a wave of water. “The dense wall of syrup surging from its collapsed tank initially moved fast enough to sweep people up and demolish buildings, only to settle into a more gelatinous state that kept people trapped.” Rescuers and sailors from the U.S. combat ship Nantucket descended on the scene in droves, but struggled in the muck, which stained the waters of Boston Harbor brown for several days. The search for survivors became a search for answers: Why did the tank rupture, and were there signs beforehand? The second part of that question was easily answered. During the summer of 1918, one of the hottest on record in Boston, North End residents began noticing leaks at the tank. After an employee reported a leak, the company acted — by painting over the gray shell of the tank with a rust-brown color. “The sticky liquid now blended, chameleon-like, with the fresh coat of paint, indiscernible from the tank’s wall,” Puleo wrote. Litigation swiftly followed the disaster, and the lawsuit and trial against the tank’s owner, U.S. Industrial Alcohol, would last six years and grow to one of the most exhaustive in the state’s history. The trial produced three theories about the cause of the rupture: structural failure of the tank, fermentation of the molasses that led to an eruption and sabotage via a bomb. The company steadfastly blamed anarchists. A court-appointed auditor disagreed, and in 1925 ruled

It was promising to be an uncharacteristically warm winter day in Boston. The temperature on Jan. 15, 1919, had soared to 40 degrees from 2 degrees earlier in the week, prompting many downtown workers to head outdoors. Shortly after noon in the city’s bustling North End, as Model T Fords chugged by and elevated trains screeched above Commercial Street, a group of firefighters sat down for a game of cards in a firehouse near a massive tank that stored molasses used in the production of industrial alcohol. As the firefighters puzzled over their hands, they heard a strange staccato sound. The rivets on the 50-foot-high storage tank began to shoot off, and a dull roar followed. At the noise, firefighter Paddy Driscoll whipped around. “Oh my God!” he exclaimed as he saw the dark torrent spilling out. “Run!” The Great Molasses Flood was underway. The syrup swamped one of Boston’s busiest neighborhoods, killing 21 and injuring 150. “Midday turned to darkness as the 2.3 million gallons of molasses engulfed the Boston waterfront like a black tidal wave, 25 feet high and 160 feet wide at the outset,” Stephen Puleo recounted in his book “Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919,” which vividly captures details of the disaster. Boston police patrolman Frank McManus spotted the 26 million-pound wall of goop and shouted to the dispatcher, “Send

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION

The scene in Boston’s North End on Jan. 15, 1919, after a massive tank holding molasses ruptured. The ensuing flood of 2.3 million gallons killed 21 and injured 150. Within seconds, two city blocks were inundated. Engineers later concluded the walls of the tank were too thin.

all available rescue vehicles and personnel immediately — there’s a wave of molasses coming down Commercial Street!” By now traveling at 35 mph, the wave of sugary doom tore through the North End with enough power to crumple small structures, blast a truck through a fence, knock the firehouse off its foundation and rip away a beam supporting the elevated train tracks. Within seconds, two city blocks were inundated — and the death toll began to climb. City workers who were taking advantage of the warmth to eat lunch outside drowned where they sat. Two 10-year-olds who were collecting firewood near the molasses tank were swept away.

Others suffocated as their homes and basements quickly filled. “I was in bed on the third floor of my house when I heard a deep rumble. ... I awoke in several feet of molasses,” Martin Cloughtery told the Boston Globe in 1919. “A pile of wreckage was holding me down, and a little way from me I saw my sister. I struggled out from under the wreckage and pulled my sister toward me and helped her onto a raft. I then began to look for my mother.” “Here and there struggled a form — whether it was animal or human being was impossible to tell,” the Boston Post wrote. “Only an upheaval, a thrashing about in the sticky mass, showed where any life was.” Scientific American magazine

that the company was to blame for the disaster. U.S. Industrial Alcohol would later pay the flood victims and their families $628,000 — the equivalent of $9.2 million today. Today, studies have offered grim insight into why the tank collapsed. In a 2015 issue of Civil and Structural Engineer Magazine, engineer Ronald Mayville concluded that the walls of the tank were too thin, a flaw that builders at the time should have known. “No one disputed they underdesigned the tank walls,” he told the Boston Globe. Back in the Boston of 1919, the city grieved as more bodies were found, some so battered and glazed by molasses that identification proved difficult. Four months later, the last body attributed to the flood was discovered under the wharf. “Boston is appalled at the terrible accident,” Mayor Andrew J. Peters said in 1919. Over time, however, the Great Molasses Flood has become less of a catalyst for outrage and more of a quirky footnote in history. “The flood today remains part of the city’s folklore, but not its heritage,” Puleo wrote. “The substance itself” — molasses — “gives the entire event an unusual, whimsical quality.” But for years after the flood, the memories of it resided not just in North Enders’ minds, but in their noses. “The smell of molasses,” journalist Edwards Park wrote in 1983, “remained for decades a distinctive, unmistakable atmosphere of Boston.”

SEND FLOWERS Beautiful Memorials

AND GIFTS, OR CREATE A MEMORIAL WEBSITE

At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

STLtoday.com/obits


A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

HEARING LOSS... Or maybe just EARWAX TM

VIDEO EAR INSPECTION Performed by BOARD CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL Jerry Retired Veteran “Heartland Hearing helped maximize my hearing, where others could not.”

Do you have sticker shock... TM Even after advertised discounts are applied? If so call for a second opinion today. COMPARE & SAVE HUNDREDS MAYBE EVEN THOUSANDS

We will beat any competitors’ price on exact or similar model! Bring your quote to us before you buy!

CUSTOM FULL SHELL 1 WEEK ONLY ON SALE

Read the latest in print or on your device. Find the e-Edition of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch online or through the app.

$

295

Retail Price $790 Class A Corrects loss up to 35/40dB

Save 60%

CUSTOM CANAL 1 WEEK ONLY ON SALE

$

595

Retail Price $1390

Call for an appointment today! Hurry, call now to schedule your appointment THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD THIS WEEK ONLY!

COME IN AND HEAR DIGITAL SOUND QUALITY IN OUR OFFICE

Class A Corrects loss up to 35/40dB

Save 60%

You asked for small... when SoundLens™ is placed in your ear canal it becomes virtually INVISIBLE. Uses Natural Ear Shape

Download the Post-Dispatch e-Edition in the app store

STLtoday.com/eedition

Combines your natural ear shape and state-of-the-art 100% Digital technology.

Hands-Free Operation No volume control for easy handling.

Place it in your ear and hear better! SATISFACTION GUARANTEED No one may notice when you wear SoundLens™

SEEING IS BELIEVING.

Custom Canal

SoundLens™

Ask ABOUT our 30 Day TRIAL Period Financing Available 0% INTEREST FOR 1 YEAR! (NO DOWN PAYMENT) 0% Interest for 1 year with Hearing Aid Financing Subject to credit approval. No interest for 365 days. See in store for details.

FREE FREE

AUDIOMETRIC TESTING

VIDEO EAR INSPECTION

Find out what you are hearing and what you’re not.

You SEE exactly what we SEE.

The benefits of hearing aids vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise, environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper fit. That’s why it’s important to have a thorough evaluation to measure what you’re hearing and what you’re not.

We’ll look into your ear canal with our new MedRX Video Ear Camera. You’ll watch the TV screen and we’ll explain to you what you’re seeing. We’ll do a complete inspection of your ear canal and your ear drum. If there is any amount of wax blockage you’ll know immediately.

(618) 206-5697 (314) 236-3348

ROYCE R. LAMARR, BC-HIS

9 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SOUTH COUNTY 314-325-8777 SWANSEA 618-857-3305 FARMINGTON 573-567-3970 COLUMBIA 573-303-9198

JEFFERSON CITY 573-233-1015 ALTON 618-380-4123 CHESTERFIELD 636-387-4118 CREVE COEUR 314-325-1888 FULTON 636-536-1555

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH THE REGION AWARDS NOMINATION APPLICATION The 22nd Annual FOCUS St. Louis® What’s Right with the Region Awards will be held on Thursday, May 16, 2019, at Sheldon Concert Hall. This regional celebration will highlight 20 outstanding success stories from our community. Submit your nomination today!

NOMINEE IS (check one) □ an individual

□ an initiative □ a nonprofit organization □ a company

Nominee Nominee Address □ H □ W Nominee City Nominee Phone

State

ZIP

Website

Nominee Email Nominee Contact Person Nominee Contact Phone Nominee Contact Email

I would like to nominate in the following category (check one): □ Demonstrating Innovative Solutions □ Fostering Creativity for Social Change □ Improving Equity and Inclusion □ Promoting Stronger Communities □ Emerging Initiatives

Please attach one additional page to answer the following questions: 1. Give a general description of the nominee and identify the problem or project this nominee addresses. 2. What are the nominee’s primary objectives? Provide specific examples of this nominee’s activities and methods to meet stated objectives. 3. Outline partnerships and/or collaborations with a brief explanation of how they function. 4. How has the community changed because of the nominee’s efforts? What is the impact? Is this accomplishment sustainable? 5. What makes the nominee’s work otherwise worthy of recognition?

Submitter Name Submitter Address □ H □ W Submitter City

State

ZIP

Submitter Phone Submitter Email DEADLINE: Monday, February 4, 2019

Or nominate online at

Email to Becky Rasmussen at beckyr@focus-stl.org www.focus-stl.org! Fax to: (314) 622-1279 Mail to: FOCUS St. Louis, 815 Olive St. Suite 110, St. Louis, MO 63101


STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • B

STLLIFE

ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

I GET TO SPEND A GREAT DEAL OF MY WORKDAY READING GREAT PIECES OF LITERATURE AND THEATER AND ENGAGING WITH STUDENTS ABOUT IT. SO I’M CONSTANTLY FILLING MY MIND WITH STUFF THAT MATTERS TO ME AS AN ARTIST.

” COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Courtney Bailey Parker prepares for a rehearsal with the rest of the cast and crew for “District Merchants” at the Jewish Community Center.

DUAL ROLE COURTNEY BAILEY PARKER IS A PROFESSOR WITH STAGE PRESENCE BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Courtney Bailey Parker has become adept at playing dual roles. She’s an assistant professor of English and theater studies at Greenville University, about an hour northeast of St. Louis in Greenville, Ill. She’s also an actor who’s making a name for

Family history takes some twists

herself on the local theater scene. Either role would be enough for most people to handle. But Parker seems to relish the challenge of balancing parallel careers. “I got the job at Greenville and then started to find out how fascinating the St. Louis theater scene really is,” says Parker, who lives in Tower Grove South with her husband, visual artist

B.J. Parker. “Being a professor is a job that’s well-suited to being paired with acting,” she says. “I get to spend a great deal of my workday reading great pieces of literature and theater and engaging with students about it. So I’m constantly filling my mind with stuff that matters to me as an artist.” Parker has turned in memorable

Popular Washington U. course returns to explore Kanye West

BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Leslie Paul Bauer was born in 1907, the third child of Lloyd and Vivian Bauer, who had met in art school in New York. His father died while Leslie was a small child, and for reasons unclear, Vivian sent him to live with her parents in British Columbia. His two older brothers, Lloyd and Lionel, and his younger sister, Rita, stayed with their mother. When Leslie was 14, his mother wrote to her parents. Leslie saw the return address in San Francisco. He rode his horse to the train station, sold the horse and used the proceeds to go find his family. The four siblings became a vaudeville act. They called themselves the Foley Four. Vivian had remarried. Her new husband was Tom Foley, and the Bauer See MCCLELLAN • Page B2

performances as Curley’s wife (the character has no proper name) in SATE’s 2017 production of “Of Mice and Men” and as defense attorney Cunningham in Mustard Seed Theatre’s recent staging of Stephen Adly Guirgis’ “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.” Her latest role is in “District See PARKER • Page B6

A smarter way to use social media AISHA SULTAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

the headlines coming — his association with President Donald Trump, his comments about slavery being a choice, his use of a photo of Whitney Houston’s drug-filled bathroom for an album cover and his issues with

A fourth-grader’s parents prohibited her from making a Facebook profile, so she circumvented their rules and created her own social network. Her mother, who is protective of her kids’ privacy and didn’t want their names used, was shocked when her daughter asked them to join a knockoff “Facebook.” They had recently given her an iPhone with limited functionality. The 9-year-old made a template of her own profile page in the Notes app, added photos to it, and invited her parents and sister to join and comment. But wait — it gets better. The grade-school sisters realized a four-person social media universe can quickly get dull. So they invented characters who also commented on their

See KANYE • Page B6

See SULTAN • Page B2

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Students at Washington University watch a presentation Monday in Jeffrey McCune’s class, “The Politics of Kanye West,” on the campus in St. Louis.

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Kanye West is known for stirring the pot, but 2018 may have been over the top even by his standards. The controversial rapper, singer, songwriter and fashion designer kept

IRELAND JEDI, THRONES AND GIANTS TRAVEL • B10

STLLIFE

1 M


B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

ON OUR RADAR GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

Mustachio and Zora are a bonded pair of littermates who have lived together for more than seven years. They want nothing more than to be adopted as a pair. Zora is the social butterfly who loves to give hugs and little licks to your face while she nuzzles your shoulder. Mustachio can usually be found lounging on his favorite bed or snuggled up to his sister. They’re soft and fluffy, and they can’t wait to find their forever home, together. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Socety’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

Sylvester is a 4-year-old Staffordshire terrier mix with super short legs, soulful eyes and a huge heart. Sylvester loves to go for walks, sniffing and snorting along the way with his tail constantly wagging. Not only is Sylvester handsome, he’s also smart. He already knows “sit” and “down,” and since he’ll do just about anything for a yummy snack, teaching him even more tricks will be tons of fun. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters in St. Louis.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make quick pickles, or as he calls them, “quickles.” stltoday.com/food

SCREEN TO STAGE For these stars, making the transition between stage and screen is no sweat. stltoday.com/go

NEW ON DVD

January is Adopt a Rescued Bird month, the perfect time to give a forever home to a feathered friend like Candy. Candy is a young adult Barred Rock hen who would love to become a part of your flock. She is friendly toward her human pals, and she’s fun to watch as she forages for insects and tasty treats on the ranch grounds. Candy currently lives with another chicken and a guinea hen and could be introduced into an existing flock. To adopt • Apply in person at Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union.

MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “First Man”; “The Hate U Give”; “Johnny English Strikes Again”; “Here and Now”; “American Renegades” Coming Jan. 29 • “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”; “Hunter Killer”; “The Wife”; “Boy Erased”; “Indivisible”; “Suspiria”; “Slice”

TELEVISION Coming Tuesday • “Fuller House,” Season 3; “Killjoys,” Season 4

GARDENING Q&A

Prune viburnum bush after it blooms in spring

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BY CHIP TYNAN Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • I have a cranberry viburnum bush that is about 4 years old and has never bloomed or gotten berries. It seems healthy and is growing nicely. Can you tell me what the problem might be or what I can do to make it bloom? A • Knowing the exact name of your viburnum may provide a clue to this mystery. There are two types commonly referred to as the “cranberry bush.” One is the European cranberrybush (Viburnum opulus), and the other is the American cranberrybush (Viburnum opulus var. americanum), which is also known as the highbush cranberry. Both are spring bloomers that flower on old wood. If you have been pruning your shrub any time from the time buds are set in late summer up to spring flowering, you’ve not only been removing flower buds but also preventing berry formation. The proper time to prune these shrubs for size control is immediately after blooming occurs, usually mid- to late May in this area. Among both species, there are cultivated forms that have sterile flowers, and therefore little or no fruit set. One cultivar of the European cranberrybush, Viburnum opulus “Nanum,” is particularly noteworthy in that it is not only fruitless but also only rarely flowers. It is a dwarf form with a very dense, compact, mounding habit and a mature size mostly in the 2-foot-by-3foot range, though occasionally larger. If untimely pruning is not the case with your shrub, then it is possible that you are growing this variety. Cranberry viburnums tolerate most soil types and light exposures. Partial afternoon shade is preferred in hot, dry sites. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63110. Check his blog at mobot.org/gardeninghelp/hilight.asp.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Test viability of leftover flower and vegetable seeds. Wrap 10 seeds in a damp paper towel. Keep moist and warm. Check for germination in a week. If fewer than half sprout, order fresh seeds. • Store wood ashes in fireproof and watertight containers. Apply only a single dusting to lawns and alkaline-loving plants. Too much ash can raise soil pH to unhealthy levels. • Paint tool handles bright colors to make them easier to locate in the garden. • Use plant-friendly traction sand as an alternative to ice-melters on slippery walks and pathways.

Last week’s pets • A cat named Dexter is still available for adoption. A dog named Blake and a bunny named Love have been adopted. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

Family history full of song and dance MCCLELLAN • FROM B1

kids decided to borrow his name. The Foley Four sounded better, apparently, than the Bauer Four. The brothers danced. The sister sang. They toured the country. Leslie later said they played in all 48 states. Eventually, the oldest of the brothers, Lionel, dropped out. One day he just disappeared. The siblings figured Lionel, whom they called Skid, as in Skid Row, had succumbed to his demons. The remaining siblings broke up. Leslie found a new partner, Stan Francis. They were a song-and-dance team. They performed in Detroit on New Year’s Eve, 1927. Wilhelmina and Virginia DeVivo, who performed as the Bennett Sisters, were on the same program. Wilhelmina, known as Billie, said she heard Leslie tap-dancing before she saw him, and she fell in love with the sound of his dancing. Within a year, they were married, and Leslie became part of the sisters’ act. They toured. Leslie and Billie had three children. Their youngest child was born in 1939. He was named Lionel, after Leslie’s brother, but he was called Skip. That year, 1939, marked a turning point in the family history. They left the stage. Live performances could not compete with movies. By the way, the big movie that year was “Gone With the Wind.” The title could have referred to song-and-dance acts. Actually, Leslie had already tried to transition from the stage. He opened a dance studio in Fort Wayne. But times were tough, and dance classes were a luxury few could afford. In 1940, the family moved to St. Louis. Billie had an uncle here. Leslie got a job as a clerk at a

BAUER FAMILY PHOTOS

LEFT: The Foley Four (from left) Margarite “Rita,” Lloyd, Lionel and Leslie. RIGHT: Virginia DeVivo (left) and Wilhelmina “Billie” DeVivo (right) performed as the Bennett Sisters. Leslie Bauer (center) joined the act after marrying Billie.

grocery downtown. The family lived in Baden. Leslie died in 1962. By then, Skip was married. He was a union electrician. He and his wife, Patricia, had five children. They raised their family in Florissant. Skip and his kids had some scrapbooks and photos as reminders of the colorful family history, but there was very little contact with the extended family. Lloyd, Skip’s uncle, had come to St. Louis for Leslie’s funeral, but that was it. A couple of years ago, one of Lloyd’s granddaughters, Tara, who lives in Connecticut, became interested in genealogy. She took a DNA test and posted it on a genealogy website. She was contacted by a Bob Foley from Chicago. I think we’re related, he said. Foley? Well, yes, 100 years ago the widowed Vivian Bauer had married a Tom Foley, but there had been no children from that marriage. The Bauer

kids had used the name Foley, but only as a stage name. But Bob Foley knew some of the old stories, and his DNA matched the DNA from Lloyd’s granddaughter. What was going on? It turned out that Lionel, the brother known as Skid, had not succumbed to his demons. Instead, when he left the Foley Four, he assumed the identity of his stepfather’s invalid brother, Robert Foley. Why? How? Who knows? In his new identity as Robert Foley, he became a union organizer in Chicago. He had a reputation as a tough guy. His grandson, Bob Foley, was amazed. His tough-guy grandfather had been a tap dancer? There was also a matter of cultural identity. The Foleys of Chicago thought of themselves as Irish. They celebrated St. Patrick’s Day. Now they learned they were really German. And Skip, who will be 80 this year, has learned that the

uncle he was named after was an enigma. I met Skip and one of his daughters, Kim Acsay, for coffee this week. Kim showed me a notebook, a journal of sorts, that Tara sent her this month. It belonged to Leslie and detailed the family’s hectic performance schedule from August 1925 to December 1926. The final months of the Foley Four. There were also poems Leslie had written. One was about religious tolerance. Another was about the lure of the Broadway lights. “These are gifts from my grandfather,” she said. Yes, they are, I would say. For that matter, the newly revealed family history is a gift, and if somebody wants to say our ancestors were more interesting than we are, they will get no argument from me. Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

Kids must know how to manage privacy SULTAN • FROM B1

updates. When one of the characters got a little snippy, their mom intervened with a reminder on how to be nice online. She showed me their fake Facebook on her phone, and I thought it was ingenious. We marveled at how much her young daughters had absorbed about how social media works without any real exposure to it. Sharing thoughts, photos and experiences and getting “likes” are an embedded part of the culture. Even if you think you are raising a tech-sheltered child, they know more than you think at a younger age than you might prefer. Media literacy educator Diana Graber says many adults approach the vexing issue of kids and tech from a limited perspective — mostly based in fear. It’s understandable that parents worry about the risks technology exposes our children to — from cognitive, social and emotional impacts to personal safety concerns.

Graber is often asked “What’s the right age for my kid to get a cellphone?” In her new book, “Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship With Technology,” she provides a list of questions for parents to consider about their child before handing over such a powerful device. Children should know how to manage their online reputation, think critically about the information they will encounter, and make safe and healthy relationships. Plus, they should be able to unplug from their devices when needed and know how to manage their privacy. That’s a lot to expect from a tween whose brain still has years to develop and mature. She stays away from offering a specific age, especially since every family circumstance is different. Her response is, “Are you comfortable that your child has these skills?” And are you sure you understand the stakes involved? Her book addresses all the potential pitfalls that

make parents anxious about children’s tech use. But just as importantly, she offers a way to discuss and encourage the possibilities for all the good things happening online. Children are drawn to communicate with their peers, and this is how the majority of their generation communicates. “They have to participate,” she said. “They can’t just hide out.” She describes possible digital on-ramps at different ages to help bring kids up to speed. When children explore online unguided, they are being indoctrinated to norms you may not want them to have so young, she said. One of her most helpful suggestions is to teach children the value in producing meaningful content rather than just consuming it. She has been engaging students in weekly lessons on cyber civics for the entire three-year duration of middle school. Each lesson builds upon the concepts and skills from previous years. They tackle real-life scenarios rather

than just hearing lectures designed to scare them. It’s an approach and curriculum more schools should adopt. It takes those three years to revisit the same concepts in more nuanced ways. “Hopefully after three years, they get it,” she said. “If we educate a whole generation, everything will change.” Part of the challenge for adults is keeping up with how rapidly technology evolves. In less than half a generation, the demographics of where I discovered social networking have flipped. I told my teenage daughter that when I first created a Facebook account a decade ago, my youngest brother, then in his late teens, informed me that Facebook was for college students and that old people didn’t belong on it. “That’s funny,” she said with a laugh. “Now Facebook is just for old people.” Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

HOME

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

PHOTOS BY TIM VIZER

Sandy Stolberg refers to her décor as a mix of French-Bohemian and Hollywood Regency and notes that it is always evolving. Rusty, the coat of armor in the corner, was purchased from a farmer who had it by his mailbox. Two chairs on either side of the couch are identical to those found in the Abraham Lincoln home in Springfield, Ill., and have been in her family for decades.

Stolberg’s admiration for layering her décor is evident in the layers of silver platters that adorn the kitchen backsplash.

AT HOME WITH SANDY STOLBERG

Stolberg created this hall of mirrors using pieces found at estate sales and in antiques stores.

Frugal style fills Belleville home BY JIM WINNERMAN Special to the Post-dispatch

A variety of pillows decorate the bed in the master bedroom. Artificial flowers in a corner add color to the home and are found in every room. The painting over the bed is a favorite and was purchased for a few dollars at Goodwill.

SANDY STOLBERG

This “time-share” acrylic print of Bellevile’s Skyview Drive-In hangs on the back of a door.

Age • 55 Occupations • Marketing consultant Home • Belleville Pets • Two cats. James Brown got his name because he “feels so good.” Will Ferrell is a rescued feral cat.

“I created my own mini Hall of Mirrors,” says Sandy Stolberg, an admirer of the mirror-bedecked world-famous corridor in the Palace of Versailles in France. Stolberg’s version is along a bedroom hallway she has filled with large, elaborately framed mirrors of different sizes. However, Stolberg’s passage showcases a creative characteristic not found in Versailles. Some of her mirrors are marked by lipstick kisses, applied and signed by girlfriends at the end of parties in her home. Stolberg refers to her taste in décor as a mix of French-Bohemian, an eclectic style of decorating, and Hollywood Regency, a fashion that emphasizes rich textures and contrasting colors. Perhaps it was her college degree in theater education and the associated courses in set design that triggered her interest in décor. Or it may have been her interior designobsessed mother. Maybe

it was several marketing positions working for Ralph Lauren and Tommy Hilfiger, where part of her job was to ensure store displays were perfect. “I enjoy a ‘layered’ look,” Stolberg says, likening the approach to how a woman’s makeup is a mixture of complementary colors that overlay one another. Rugs of different patterns and colors arranged at different angles on the living room floor overlap and are three-deep in places. Larger pieces of furniture display overlapping framed artwork on their top surfaces, propped up against the wall. Layers of different sizes of silver trays tilted at 90-degree angles are stacked in front of one another to become a kitchen backsplash. The layered approach also characterizes the master bedroom. Eight pillows of different patterns and shapes lay atop three throws of different fabrics draped across the bed. End tables of various heights are “layered” near the headboard. Four wooden chairs in the home are particularly noteworthy as they have been handed down through seven generations of her family, which Stolberg says arrived in the Belleville area in the mid-1800s. The chairs are also duplicates of four others she observed on a tour of President Abraham Lincoln’s home in Springfield, Ill. “I can just imagine Lincoln walking around and asking “whatever happened to the other four chairs we had?” she says, laughing. Stolberg likes art that “evokes emotion,” she says. Her pictures and paintings, which range in styles from the early 1800s to modern day, are characterized by bright colors and frequently include the image of a person. “I enjoy studying a scene and imagining what is happening to the person,” she says. “My space and taste in fashion is always evolving,” she continues. “I cannot imagine ever saying ‘I am done.’” In fact, a colorful photographic image of the Skyview Drive-In in Belleville, by local artist Jeffrey Sass, will soon leave for another home. “It is ‘time-share’ art a friend purchased and generously shares with me,” she says. “It travels between our homes every few years.” Despite the profusion of art throughout the home, Stolberg is a frugal decorator who insists a person need not be wealthy to display good taste. Framed black-and-white photographs of Parisian scenes from the 1930s are pages discovered in a calendar at a dollar store, the same place she purchased the frames. Much of Stolberg’s décor comes with an intriguing history of where it was found and why it was purchased. But none of the stories can match that associated with the bullet-ridden, 6-foot coat of armor standing in a living room corner with a cluster of Mardi Gras beads hanging from its clasped hands. “‘Rusty’ was owned by a farmer who had it by his mailbox,” Stolberg says. “When he came home after a night of drinking, he was startled by the stoic figure which would not answer repeated requests to identify himself. The gentleman pulled out his gun and shot it.”

Since 1893

Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

FURNITURE REPAIRED FURNITURE REFINISHED 5 Year Workmanship Guarantee Quality Craftsmanship • Refinishing Reupholstery • Antique Restoration Repair • Custom Made Draperies Custom Made Furniture New Furniture • Antiques

314-832-1555 www.zollingerfurniture.com

4821 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63116 Just east of 3400 S. Kingshighway

The dining room is enhanced by framed artwork. Pictures and paintings are characterized by bright colors and range in style from the early 1800s to modern day.

We accept


STL LIFE

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

The mobile app iNaturalist allows “citizen-scientists” to document wildlife. The app lets users log sightings of plants and animals, and confirm other users’ identifications.

Apps let everyone help track insect populations nature preserves. As alarm over the situation grows, so does the importance and popularity of citizenscientist projects involving insects. Other efforts to engage people in insect-watching include National Moth Week, a global event to promote the understanding and enjoyment of moths and raise awareness about biodiversity. It’s slated to run from July 20-28 this year. And there are important local programs, such as the New York Botanical

BY KATHERINE ROTH Associated Press

More challenging than birdwatching and not nearly as popular, insectwatching — noting and sharing exactly what one sees and where — is nevertheless on the rise. Concern about dwindling native insect populations is one reason why. And new technology has made it easier to log insect sightings and become part of wide-reaching “citizenscientist” projects. A worldwide project called “Never Home Alone: The Wild Life of Homes,” for example, aims to photograph and catalog the insects, spiders and other tiny creatures that share our homes. It was created by Rob Dunn, author of “Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live” (Basic Books, 2018). In the equally global City Nature Challenge, meanwhile, cities compete for how many sightings residents can log. The idea is to see which city can make the most observations of nature (of any sort, not just insects), find the most species and engage the most people. The first year, it was just San Francisco versus Los Angeles. The second year, 16 cities joined in. Last year, 68 cities around the world took part. Over 100 cities internationally, including St. Louis, have signed up to participate this year. Both challenges — and many others like them — make use of the everevolving iNaturalist app and iNaturalist.org, a joint initiative by the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society. “It gets people and communities to make observing all forms of nature part of their lifestyle,” says Scott Loarie, co-director of iNaturalist, based at the

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN

The New York Botanical Garden is leading the New York City EcoFlora project. In the first year, 2017, organizers asked participants to look for monarch butterflies on milkweed one month.

California Academy of Sciences. iNaturalist lets you log sightings of all kinds of plants and animals, and confirm other peoples’ identifications. A more kid- and novice-friendly version, Seek by iNaturalist (without the social networking component), helps identify species on the spot. Both apps, inspired by birdwatching apps, have helped newcomers pay closer attention to insects. “If you think about the roughly 2 million living things that are named, about half of them are insects. So if we really want to get a handle on the diversity in the world, and changes under way, we need to start paying closer attention to insects,” says Loarie. “When you look at birdwatching, it’s super-popular. We asked ourselves why that isn’t happening with insects or plants, and what we could do to help the situation,” he says. “With birdwatching, one person goes out and says, ‘Oh, it’s a warbler.’ It’s really tough for a regular person to just go out and identify insects. iNaturalist

uses photo-sharing and networks to help them tap into that naturalist’s sense of curiosity,” he says. Loarie says the app has more than a million registered users worldwide, hundreds of thousands of whom are active users. “We get tens of thousands of photos a day,” he says. It’s a much more detailed and useful tool than the so-called windshield test. Most baby boomers can remember road trips of their childhood when a drive through the countryside resulted in a car windshield or front grille covered in splattered bugs. That happens a lot less these days, a realization that tipped off entomologists early on to what seems a marked decline in insect populations. A number of recent studies have shown precipitous declines in some invertebrate populations. The number of monarch butterflies in the country has declined by 90 percent in the last 20 years, according to one study. Another study found a 76 percent decrease in flying insects in the past few decades in German

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

A man uses the mobile app iNaturalist to document wildlife on Yerba Buena Island in the San Francisco Bay Area. More than 100 cities, including St. Louis, are signed up to participate in a City Nature Challenge created by the app this year.

Garden’s monthly, citywide EcoQuest Challenge, part of the New York City EcoFlora Project. Each month, the challenge involves a different plant, often in combination with an insect. In the first year, 2017, organizers asked participants to look for monarch butterflies on milkweed one month. “We give people links with lots of references,” says Brian Boom, vice president for conservation strategy at the Botanical Garden. “It’s been quite successful, and since we’ve started, we’ve

enrolled over a thousand people who have made 57,000 observations, many of which involve insects.” He says there has long been a widespread “invertebrate blindness. Most people probably don’t have a positive relationship with insects. Except for maybe bees, people either see past them or consider them unworthy of notice.” He cites the great entomologist Edward O. Wilson, who once called insects “these little things that run the world.”


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

STL LIFE

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

SECRET LEAVES PAPERWORKS Artist • Sharon Derry Age • 58 Family • Husband Michael Martin; one studio dog, Eden; and one cat, Snowpea, who is something of an art critic Home • Southampton What she makes • Cards, stationery, tags, art prints, journals and books using paper and ephemera from bygone days Where to buy • Maker’s Marque pop-up shows and at secretleavespaperworks.com How much • $2 for gift cards, $4 and up for greeting cards, journals from $12 to $48 and one-of-a-kind prints from $120

PHOTOS COURTESY SHARON DERRY

MADE IN ST. LOUIS

ARTIST’S STATIONERY EVOKES A BYGONE ERA A small notebook features a black-and-red fox from a vintage zoological image printed on brown kraft paper. BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-dispatch

Imagine holding a rich, solid envelope, your name and address lettered with precision. Lift the flap, and a riot of pattern lines the flap and meets your eye. Extract the card within and feel its history in the paper, writ in every crease, in each foxed place, through scratched notations and symbols. Notice the dragonfly,

the Victorian anatomical drawing of a heart or the child in the carte de visite staring back at you. The message matters. The medium tells its own tale. The card, by artist Sharon Derry, will probably be framed, a small piece of art, bought inexpensively and held dear. Derry markets her custom invitations, journals, books, cards, gift tags and more through her Secret Leaves Paperworks

website, reaching customers from around the world and down the street. She participates in the Maker’s Marque pop-up shows at Parker’s Table, where her artwork reaches a wide audience. Miscellany and memory • Trained in both printmaking and photography at Washington University School of Art, Derry creates paper works using

the images and detritus of the past. Derry’s unique discoveries fill her Southampton studio surely as any Victorian naturalist stocked his or her cabinet of curiosities. Although she is an avid collector, haunting estate sales, poking into small shops and searching for old paper, she often receives unsolicited gifts. “People give me things. I find things — intact butterfly

An old notebook, with nearly indecipherable handwriting, provides a background for a fierce owl holding its prey, curated from an antique ornithological print. Derry merged the owl with the text, rendering the bird inscrutable.

wings. Insect exoskeletons. Robin’s eggs dropped from nests — and nests. A cow skull,” she says. “I like weird things. I keep them tucked away.” Mapping the wild cave • Derry rarely knows the history of her finds, but five years ago, her past came calling. “When my father died in 2012, I inherited the topographical maps, mostly from the 1950s, that he used to explore and map wild caves. They’re incredibly beautiful, mostly pale pink and green. The line work shows just the topography,” she says. She often uses maps as journal covers or in cards. Unlike many artists working in paper ephemera, Derry doesn’t scan her papers and manipulate a digital image; she prints directly on the papers so each large print is a unique work of art. How hasn’t decided yet how she will use her father’s spare maps. Keeping art personal • Derry has made art at Secret Leaves Paperworks for more than 20 years. “I sold my first cards at Celadon and at Left Bank Books in the Central West End,” she says. “I opened an Etsy store and pursued the retail route but found people wanted custom designs, especially for weddings and special

events.” She switched her business model to more custom work than retail or direct sales, a move that allowed her to plan her time more productively. Special invitations • “For invitations, I do small runs, typically under 100 invitations,” she says. “Once, I did an invitation for a surprise wedding. When the guests showed up for a party, they ended up at a wedding. The wording was tricky on that one,” she says. She designed a special wedding set for her niece, featuring berry images she curated from antique botanical prints. “I did the invitation, the envelopes, the response card and envelope and the stamps,” she says. It was a labor of love. Derry discovered weddings need more than just invitations. “I designed a guest book for a couple in Scotland and one for a couple in Texas that incorporated their engagement pictures, done in my style.” What is hidden is revealed • “Right now I’m working on making prints with big papers, 11 inches by 14 inches, pulled from large leather-bound handwritten ledgers from a business in New Orleans. They date from 1898 to 1917. You cannot mimic the patina of age, the words handwritten with pen and ink in beautiful letter. When I print these papers with an image which allows the words and marks to show through, they’re almost magical,” she says. The process integrates old and new — an image created for print on computers transposed on an original handwritten paper. Write me a letter • “I’ve sold packets I call ‘Write me a letter’ from the beginning of Secret Leaves. Each packet contains two sheets of art — vintage stationary, a decorated envelope, stamps — some functional, some not — the theory being when you need to write a special personal letter, you have what you need all in one place,” she says.


ARTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Course’s popularity took professor off guard KANYE • FROM B1

mental health, just to name a few. So it’s not surprising that Jeffrey McCune, a Washington University associate professor, is following his popular 2017 course “The Politics of Kanye West: Black Genius and Sonic Aesthetics” with a sequel: “The Politics of Kanye West: Black Genius and Monster Aesthetics.” The new course kicked off Jan. 14 with a racially diverse group mirroring what one might see in the audience at one of West’s concerts. This semester, 100 students are enrolled. The first course drew national attention from Billboard, “Entertainment Tonight,” E! News, Complex, “The Real,” the Guardian and more. In 2017, 75 students had enrolled in the course, and there was a waiting list for more. “Kanye West continues to be a figure of great interest to both my students and to the world, and this year has been a year of unfolding more complex layers to Mr. West,” says McCune, who teaches African and African-American studies and women, gender and sexuality studies at the university. “And I think it really gives an opportunity to really think about what it might mean to think of Kanye West as doing performance art.” In saying that, McCune believes most of West’s shenanigans last year — wearing a Make America Great Again cap for a meeting with Trump at the White House, the slavery rant in TMZ’s newsroom — are provocative pieces of performance art. “At the moment when Kanye returned to the American public wearing the MAGA hat, it become clear to me he’s a provocateur and performance artist who takes the everyday and mundane and makes it extraordinary and controversial,” says McCune, who, like West, is from Chicago. He says that, when West voiced his support for President Trump, fan reaction was different from when he bullied Taylor Swift or married Kim Kardashian. Many found the political endorsement hard

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Jeffrey McCune lectures to undergraduates in his class, “The Politics of Kanye West,” on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

Freshman Sparkle Whitaker listens to a lecture.

to accept. “In the past, the stakes weren’t as high,” McCune says. The comments struck a chord with people who already felt their wellbeing was threatened by Trump. McCune never expected the course to take off — much less attract so much attention off-campus. “It took me off guard,” he says, “but the media afforded me the opportunity to teach the public while simultaneously teaching the world.” When West re-entered the public consciousness — both through his politics and his producing albums by Nas, Pusha T, Teyana Taylor and Kid

Cudi — McCune decided to revisit the course. “It was indicative of a continued fascination with Kanye as a figure, the opportunity to watch an icon rise and fall in front of us repeatedly, when one might have thought the energy around Kanye was waning,” he says. “It was clear his words were as important as his music. One might argue his words in this particular moment became more important than the music.” In bringing back the course, it was clear to McCune that he’d have to cover more than just the “genius” of West — he’d need to address the perception of West as a

McCune presents an early performance by Kanye West.

monster. He opened the class by playing West’s song “Monster.” “I’m always interested in how ‘monster’ is attached to black (people’s) bodies,” McCune says. Topics on the course syllabus: • All of the Lights, or Racial Icons and the Politics of “Poopity Scoop” • “I Been Losing My Mind a Long Time”: Kanye, Madness, and Freedom • Father Stretch My Hands, or How Hip-Hop Takes us to Church • “No one man should have all that power,” or Black Masculinity and Vulnerability • “I don’t feel that she’s mine enough”: Kanye and

the Treatment of Women • I Love Kanye, I Hate Kanye, or How to Reflect on a Cultural Icon McCune is working to schedule a class visit by a major recording artist, along with appearances by a selection of St. Louis artists. His goal is to teach a course that’s comparable to courses on greats like Mozart and Langston Hughes and to show that hip-hop warrants academic attention. “I thought it sounded interesting and socially woke, and I like to be in the know,” says 20-yearold student Kelcie Ford, who’s studying psychology. “And hip-hop hasn’t

really been taught until recently. I like seeing it go into places where it can be seen as marginalized or unimportant. And if you can understand how pop culture works, it can help you in life decisions.” Craig Hirsch, 18, enrolled simply because he’s a fan of West. As soon as he heard about the class, he knew he had to take it. He’s studying economics and strategy. Christian Baker, 21, hopes to learn more about the intersection of rap, religion and politics. He says the course brings him deeper into his own research as a religious studies major. At some point, McCune wants to teach a course on black women in hip-hop culture, as well as one on the politics of hip-hop. His dream course would be one on the late R&B superstar Luther Vandross. McCune is finishing the first draft of his book “On Kanye,” which looks at West as living art and what his music and politics teaches us about the world and about ourselves. Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

Actor and professor is ‘a rising star and someone to watch’ PARKER • FROM B1

‘DISTRICT MERCHANTS’

Merchants,” the New Jewish Theatre presentation that begins performances Thursday. “I’ve found that the three shows that I’ve had the opportunity to work on are all very ensemblebased, which is what I prefer,” Parker says. “District Merchants” is a reworking of “The Merchant of Venice” in which playwright Aaron Posner transposes the Shakespeare classic to Washington, D.C., in the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Parker portrays legally astute heiress Portia, who becomes involved in a conflict between Jewish moneylender Shylock (Gary Wayne Barker) and black businessman Antoine DuPre (J. Samuel Davis), a character based on Antonio in Shakespeare’s version. The play explores the dynamic between the African-American and Jewish communities while putting a different spin on Portia, Parker says. In this telling, her suitor, Benjamin (based on Bassanio and played by Rob White), is a lightskinned black man passing for white. “One of the hard things about playing Portia is that she does these very unlikable things, because she’s got racist tendencies that she didn’t even know she had,” Parker says. “So it’s nice how a romantic relationship can help her confront that and correct her own racism by way of love. My story is just one small

When • Thursday through Feb. 10 Where • Wool Studio Theatre, Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive How much • $42-$45 More info • newjewishtheatre.org

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Courtney Bailey Parker runs lines for “District Merchants” with Rob White in a dressing room at the Jewish Community Center. The play opens Jan. 24 at the JCC’s Wool Studio Theater.

plot point in this much larger play, but I think it’s a really beautiful story.” Jacqueline Thompson, director of “District Merchants,” describes Parker as “a rising star and someone to watch.” “Courtney understands language in a way that is almost like satin when she speaks,” says Thompson, who also directed Parker in “Of Mice and Men.” “How she comprehends the text, and how she internalizes the text, and her delivery of the text is so

smooth. And she’s a smart actor. She comes into the space already having done the pre-work, and she brings that intelligence and that warmth and that openness into the space — which, as a director, I appreciate.” Parker has also impressed the theater community with her scholarly expertise, acting as a dramaturg — a literary editor who consults with authors and edits texts — on SATE’s production of John Wolbers’ “Doctor

Faustus, or the Modern Prometheus.” Although the play was inspired by the Faust tragedies of 16th-century English playwright Christopher Marlowe, it diverges from tradition by depicting the title character as a woman. “Courtney’s feedback was incredibly valuable, because she had done so much research on both versions of Marlowe’s ‘Faustus,’” Wolbers says. “She was a wealth of knowledge, and she was really able to give the piece

that extra polish that comes from an academic background.” Parker was born in Tucker, Ga., and grew up in Newnan, Ga. — both suburbs of Atlanta. She began college at New York University, switching to Mercer University after her freshman year and earning a bachelor’s degree in English. She holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English from Baylor University. She joined the faculty of Greenville University in 2016 and became a St. Louis resident

two years later. Parker became interested in theater at an early age. “I can remember being in church plays and elementary-school plays,” she says. “I was very interested in musical theater and stuff that was playing on Broadway. And in my freshman year of college at NYU, I took a theater studies class that began with Aristotle’s ‘Poetics’ and, I think, ended with ‘Angels in America.’ It was invigorating, and it changed my outlook on theater as a field.” In St. Louis, Parker says, she’s found a home for her talents. “One of the things that resonate with me,” she says, “is that I feel like the people that I’ve encountered, the people that I’ve worked with, are all truly responsible storytellers. And I want to create art in a community that has a sense of longevity about it. “Because if you’re not creating art for your community, who are you really creating it for?” Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com


ARTS

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7 ‘CANFIELD DRIVE’

THEATER REVIEW

When • 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays, 7 p.m. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Jan. 23; through Jan. 27 Where • Washington University’s Edison Theatre, 6465 Forsyth Boulevard How much • $15-$45 More info • theblackrep.org

Black Rep’s ‘Canfield Drive’ is extraordinary portrait of tragedy BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

In the aftermath of the fatal 2014 shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown, Ferguson became an unavoidable media destination. The situation was eminently newsworthy, with optics that cried out to be documented — including standoffs between protesters and police. But often, the coverage was more about exploiting the spectacle than explaining its causes. “Canfield Drive,” the extraordinary Black Rep production running

through Jan. 27, takes a kaleidoscopic approach to the controversial conflict. Balancing insightful drama and irreverent comedy, playwrights Kristen Adele Calhoun and Michael Thomas Walker explore the context of the Brown shooting, addressing issues of race and class and questioning the role of the media in framing the narrative. Thought-provoking, well-researched and surprisingly funny, the play directed by Ron Himes is much more than a rehash of an event that some folks

PETER SPACK

From left: Christopher Hickey, Eric Conners and Kristen Adele in “Canfield Drive.”

would just as soon consign to the back of their minds. “Canfield Drive” is largely based on interviews that Walker and Calhoun conducted to gain perspective on Ferguson from various angles. But the heart of the play is the evolving relationship between two

journalists: liberal Imani Duncan-Ward (played by Calhoun, billed as Kristen Adele) and conservative Brad O’Connor (Christopher Hickey). As a black woman, Duncan-Ward empathizes with the protesters. As a white man, O’Connor struggles to

understand them. Only when DuncanWard is forced to cope with a personal crisis, and O’Connor experiences firsthand the humiliation of police scrutiny, can the ideological antagonists begin to stand on common ground.

Himes keeps things moving and elicits terrific performances from a cast that also includes Eric Conners and Amy Loui. No play can provide all the answers that an audience might seek. But “Canfield Drive” comes about as close as possible to making sense of a tragedy while providing a memorable theatrical experience. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

‘This Is Us’ returns and offers some relief BY ELAHE IZADI Washington Post

FINAL DAYS

Closing February 3 slam.org/graphicrevolution

#GraphicRevolution

Organized by the Saint Louis Art Museum with support from the Edward L. Bakewell Jr. Endowment for Special Exhibitions. Financial assistance provided by the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Nestlé Purina PetCare Company; and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Rosa Lee Lovell, American, 1935–1969; Figure Group Series (detail), 1969; screenprint; sheet: 24 13/16 × 29 5/16 inches; Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Mr. William Lovell 127:1971 © Rosa Lee Lovell

STL MEDICAL REPORT

PRESENTED BY

SLUCARE SURGEONS SAVING LIMBS WITH DELICATE MICROSURGERY THE HISTORY OF MICROSURGERY

Using super powerful microscopes and the tiniest of stitches, plastic surgeons with SLUCare Physician Group are reconstructing and saving limbs in intricate, life-changing procedures that are becoming more routine.

Dr. Xu and Dr. Bruce Kraemer, chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, both trained at the renowned Buncke Clinic in San Francisco, a leading center for microsurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery and hand surgery.

Specialized microscopes 20 to 40 times more powerful than the human eye help surgeons restore form and function to patients who need complex reconstructive procedures, either because of a traumatic injury, cancer or a congenital defect. Microsurgery can be the difference between saving or losing a limb, says Dr. Kyle Xu, a SLUCare plastic surgeon who practices at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital. “We’re improving people’s quality of life,” he says.

The Buncke Clinic was founded by Dr. Harry Buncke, known as the “father” of microsurgery for techniques he pioneered in the 1960s. It’s now led by his son, Dr. Greg Buncke, who continues to train surgeons from around the world in the latest microsurgical techniques. Dr. Harry Buncke’s work led to a surgical first when he replanted a rabbit’s ear in 1964. Five years later, he was one of two doctors who performed the first successful microvascular transplant using tissue from a patient’s abdomen to fill a large skull defect. Today, microsurgical techniques are used in various specialties, but for plastic surgery patients, these advancements can be the difference between saving or losing a limb. That was the case for a recent patient of Dr. Xu who suffered a devastating injury to her leg in a traffic accident.

Surgeon performing microsurgery.

As the field of microsurgery evolves, surgeons are perfecting new uses for the technology that allows them to reconnect blood vessels and nerves less than 2 mm in diameter using surgical thread thinner than an eyelash. In plastic surgery, it means specialists such as Dr. Xu can successfully reattach a severed finger, reconstruct a breast after cancer surgery, or transplant a block of tissue from elsewhere on a patient’s body to cover a devastating wound that otherwise might have led to amputation.

“Her leg was severely injured and the tissue was completely mutilated,” Dr. Xu says. “In order to save the leg, we had to perform a transplant. We transplanted her own back muscle to her leg by reconnecting blood vessels. She’s doing very well now. She’s starting to walk again, and she’s so happy.”

F E B R U A RY 1 - 2

We’re improving people’s quality of life.

By Lori Rose Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer

MENDELSSOHN’S SCOTTISH FEATURING SCRIABIN’S PIANO CONCERTO

Kyle Xu, MD SLUCare Plastic Surgeon

the chronic swelling in the extremities that sometimes develops in patients whose lymph nodes have been damaged or removed due to trauma or cancer surgery. It’s called “super” microsurgery because the lymphatic vessels are even tinier — less than .5 millimeters in diameter. But using the latest technology, Dr. Xu can bypass the tiny channels that move lymph fluids around the body. If the channels are no longer functioning, he can transplant healthy lymph nodes from another part of the body. “We were fortunate enough to woo Dr. Xu back to St. Louis,” Dr. Kraemer says. “He’s bringing the newest and latest technology and will be able to help more people suffering from these maladies.”

“Magnificent, with a sense of playfulness and stylistic flair seldom encountered.” – The Wall Street Journal on Kirill Gerstein

TICKETS START AT $25! F E B R U A RY 8 - 1 0

STÉPHANE’S SERENADE FEATURING EINE KLEINE AND BRAHMS 2 F E B R U A RY 1 5 - 1 6

DENÈVE CONDUCTS PROKOFIEV M A RC H 2 - 3

MAHLER’S NINTH

“SUPER” MICROSURGERY Dr. Xu, who joined SLUCare last year after completing his fellowship at the Buncke Clinic, is the first in the area to use “super” microsurgery to treat lymphedema. Lymphedema is

It’s been seven long weeks, Randall Pearson said about his campaign during Tuesday’s episode of “This Is Us.” But it’s also how we’ve felt about the status of his relationship. Before the NBC drama took a midseason break seven weeks ago, the show hinted that things between Randall and Beth could be beyond repair. Back then, Beth (Susan Kelechi Watson) and Randall (Sterling K. Brown) had a big fight over his political ambitions, with Beth no longer supporting his run for city council. Add to that an ominous future scene, and many viewers worried about a breakup. Well, rest easy (at least for now). Randall and Beth finally made up. During Tuesday’s episode, he apologized for not being more present in his family’s life. Then Beth issued quite the mea culpa, saying she should have had his back: “You are a man who cares too much and tries too hard. It’s who you’ve always been. It’s who I married. A great man. I will not let you forget who you are.” Make Randall Pearson great again, indeed. And then, against all odds, Randall won the election. Yay! ... Yay? Now we gotta spend Lord knows how long and how many seasons watching him be a councilman. Are we the only ones who’ve been over this

storyline? Who’s at home watching this show, thinking, “Just what I wanted to see: politicians injected into my escapist TV time!”? Anyway, we also received more relief as another relationship gained stronger footing. Zoe (Melanie Liburd) and Kevin (Justin Hartley) are in love and will be moving in together. Here are the other things we learned Tuesday: • Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) knew that his brother didn’t die during the war in Vietnam. Why did Jack hide that fact for all those years? The teaser for next week’s episode promises to delve into that. • Zoe thinks it’s perfectly acceptable to dump your partner of two-plus years via email. She (understandably) has trust issues, but we’re now discovering how they’ve manifested in ways that led to Beth’s warning to Kevin that her cousin “breaks” men. • Beth’s past is incredibly mysterious, and we want to know everything. She cried when recalling how, as a college student, the smell of eucalyptus oil on a shoe clerk’s hand sent her into hysterics. “My dad used to use it on his hands,” she said. “I get it,” Randall tells her. “I know you do,” she responds. You know who doesn’t get it? Us. Hopefully that’ll end soon. We’re getting a Beth-focused episode this season, with Phylicia Rashad playing her mother. It can’t come soon enough.

PRESENTED BY

For more information about SLUCare plastic surgery, visit slucare.edu/plastic-surgery.

FLEISHMANHILLARD

314-534-1700 slso.org


ARTS

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7 ‘CANFIELD DRIVE’

THEATER REVIEW

When • 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays, 7 p.m. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Jan. 23; through Jan. 27 Where • Washington University’s Edison Theatre, 6465 Forsyth Boulevard How much • $15-$45 More info • theblackrep.org

Black Rep’s ‘Canfield Drive’ is extraordinary portrait of tragedy BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

In the aftermath of the fatal 2014 shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown, Ferguson became an unavoidable media destination. The situation was eminently newsworthy, with optics that cried out to be documented — including standoffs between protesters and police. But often, the coverage was more about exploiting the spectacle than explaining its causes. “Canfield Drive,” the extraordinary Black Rep production running

through Jan. 27, takes a kaleidoscopic approach to the controversial conflict. Balancing insightful drama and irreverent comedy, playwrights Kristen Adele Calhoun and Michael Thomas Walker explore the context of the Brown shooting, addressing issues of race and class and questioning the role of the media in framing the narrative. Thought-provoking, well-researched and surprisingly funny, the play directed by Ron Himes is much more than a rehash of an event that some folks

PETER SPACK

From left: Christopher Hickey, Eric Conners and Kristen Adele in “Canfield Drive.”

would just as soon consign to the back of their minds. “Canfield Drive” is largely based on interviews that Walker and Calhoun conducted to gain perspective on Ferguson from various angles. But the heart of the play is the evolving relationship between two

journalists: liberal Imani Duncan-Ward (played by Calhoun, billed as Kristen Adele) and conservative Brad O’Connor (Christopher Hickey). As a black woman, Duncan-Ward empathizes with the protesters. As a white man, O’Connor struggles to

understand them. Only when DuncanWard is forced to cope with a personal crisis, and O’Connor experiences firsthand the humiliation of police scrutiny, can the ideological antagonists begin to stand on common ground.

Himes keeps things moving and elicits terrific performances from a cast that also includes Eric Conners and Amy Loui. No play can provide all the answers that an audience might seek. But “Canfield Drive” comes about as close as possible to making sense of a tragedy while providing a memorable theatrical experience. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

THEATER REVIEW

‘The Wolves’ is unlike anything you’ve seen BY CALVIN WILSON • St. Louis Post-dispatch

FINAL DAYS

Closing February 3 slam.org/graphicrevolution

#GraphicRevolution

Organized by the Saint Louis Art Museum with support from the Edward L. Bakewell Jr. Endowment for Special Exhibitions. Financial assistance provided by the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Nestlé Purina PetCare Company; and Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Rosa Lee Lovell, American, 1935–1969; Figure Group Series (detail), 1969; screenprint; sheet: 24 13/16 × 29 5/16 inches; Saint Louis Art Museum, Gift of Mr. William Lovell 127:1971 © Rosa Lee Lovell

STL MEDICAL REPORT

PRESENTED BY

SLUCARE SURGEONS SAVING LIMBS WITH DELICATE MICROSURGERY THE HISTORY OF MICROSURGERY

Using super powerful microscopes and the tiniest of stitches, plastic surgeons with SLUCare Physician Group are reconstructing and saving limbs in intricate, life-changing procedures that are becoming more routine.

Dr. Xu and Dr. Bruce Kraemer, chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, both trained at the renowned Buncke Clinic in San Francisco, a leading center for microsurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery and hand surgery.

Specialized microscopes 20 to 40 times more powerful than the human eye help surgeons restore form and function to patients who need complex reconstructive procedures, either because of a traumatic injury, cancer or a congenital defect. Microsurgery can be the difference between saving or losing a limb, says Dr. Kyle Xu, a SLUCare plastic surgeon who practices at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital. “We’re improving people’s quality of life,” he says.

The Buncke Clinic was founded by Dr. Harry Buncke, known as the “father” of microsurgery for techniques he pioneered in the 1960s. It’s now led by his son, Dr. Greg Buncke, who continues to train surgeons from around the world in the latest microsurgical techniques. Dr. Harry Buncke’s work led to a surgical first when he replanted a rabbit’s ear in 1964. Five years later, he was one of two doctors who performed the first successful microvascular transplant using tissue from a patient’s abdomen to fill a large skull defect. Today, microsurgical techniques are used in various specialties, but for plastic surgery patients, these advancements can be the difference between saving or losing a limb. That was the case for a recent patient of Dr. Xu who suffered a devastating injury to her leg in a traffic accident.

Surgeon performing microsurgery.

As the field of microsurgery evolves, surgeons are perfecting new uses for the technology that allows them to reconnect blood vessels and nerves less than 2 mm in diameter using surgical thread thinner than an eyelash. In plastic surgery, it means specialists such as Dr. Xu can successfully reattach a severed finger, reconstruct a breast after cancer surgery, or transplant a block of tissue from elsewhere on a patient’s body to cover a devastating wound that otherwise might have led to amputation.

“Her leg was severely injured and the tissue was completely mutilated,” Dr. Xu says. “In order to save the leg, we had to perform a transplant. We transplanted her own back muscle to her leg by reconnecting blood vessels. She’s doing very well now. She’s starting to walk again, and she’s so happy.”

‘THE WOLVES’

F E B R U A RY 1 - 2

We’re improving people’s quality of life.

MENDELSSOHN’S SCOTTISH FEATURING SCRIABIN’S PIANO CONCERTO

Kyle Xu, MD SLUCare Plastic Surgeon

the chronic swelling in the extremities that sometimes develops in patients whose lymph nodes have been damaged or removed due to trauma or cancer surgery. It’s called “super” microsurgery because the lymphatic vessels are even tinier — less than .5 millimeters in diameter. But using the latest technology, Dr. Xu can bypass the tiny channels that move lymph fluids around the body. If the channels are no longer functioning, he can transplant healthy lymph nodes from another part of the body. “We were fortunate enough to woo Dr. Xu back to St. Louis,” Dr. Kraemer says. “He’s bringing the newest and latest technology and will be able to help more people suffering from these maladies.”

“Magnificent, with a sense of playfulness and stylistic flair seldom encountered.” – The Wall Street Journal on Kirill Gerstein

TICKETS START AT $25! F E B R U A RY 8 - 1 0

STÉPHANE’S SERENADE FEATURING EINE KLEINE AND BRAHMS 2 F E B R U A RY 1 5 - 1 6

DENÈVE CONDUCTS PROKOFIEV M A RC H 2 - 3

MAHLER’S NINTH

“SUPER” MICROSURGERY Dr. Xu, who joined SLUCare last year after completing his fellowship at the Buncke Clinic, is the first in the area to use “super” microsurgery to treat lymphedema. Lymphedema is

Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 • Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter • calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

WHEN • Through Feb. 3 WHERE • Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves HOW MUCH • $46-$71 MORE INFO • repstl.org

By Lori Rose Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer

Nine teenage girls come to fascinating life in “The Wolves,” playwright Sarah DeLappe’s acclaimed, Pulitzer-nominated comedy-drama about the shifting emotional dynamics of an indoor soccer team. Directed by Melissa Rain Anderson, the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis production runs through Feb. 3. The play mostly consists of scenes of the players warming up for games. DeLappe employs overlapping dialogue in a manner similar to that of filmmaker Robert Altman (“M*A*S*H”), and invites the audience to pick up on clues as to what’s happened before in order to understand what’s happening now. “The Wolves” demands to be leaned into, which enhances its sense of immediacy. As the players get ready for action, their banter often lands on offbeat subjects — perhaps the most unlikely being the Khmer Rouge, a 1970s group of Communist guerrillas. But the talk also turns to matters closer to home, such as pregnancy and abortion, that make for gossip to exercise by. Although the players are identified only by numbers, each has a slightly different personality. But DeLappe doesn’t reduce them to stereotypes — the characters come across as being capable of change, however subtle. Long after you think you have the team captain pegged, for example, she shows up with a radically different hairdo. Of course, there’s a world beyond the warmup sessions. And late in the story, something happens that forces the players to come to grips with the ephemeral nature of their lives. Anderson gets strong performances from a cast that includes Maya J. Christian, Colleen Dougherty, Cecily Dowd, Esmeralda Garza, Mary Katharine Harris, CeCe Hill, Rachael Logue, Cassandra Lopez and Keaton Whittaker as the teammates and Nancy Bell as a discombobulated soccer mom. DeLappe has an original voice that cries out to be heard, and “The Wolves” is an experience unlike anything you’ve seen before.

PRESENTED BY

For more information about SLUCare plastic surgery, visit slucare.edu/plastic-surgery.

FLEISHMANHILLARD

314-534-1700 slso.org


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOOKS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

BEST-SELLERS

FICTION

NONFICTION

Here are the best-selling books from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended Jan. 12.

Author of famed ‘Cat Person’ has more stories to tell

Book about chess isn’t aimed at players

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Turning Point” • Danielle Steel 2. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 3. “The New Iberia Blues” • James Lee Burke 4. “The Reckoning” • John Grisham 5. “Fire & Blood” • George RR Martin 6. “Every Breath” • Nicholas Sparks 7. “Verses for the Dead” • Preston/Child 8. “Long Road to Mercy” • David Baldacci 9. “Target: Alex Cross” • James Patterson 10. “The Winter of the Witch” • Katherine Arden

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 2. “Everyday Millionaires” • Chris Hogan 3. “Girl, Wash Your Face” • Rachel Hollis 4. “It’s Not Supposed to Be This Way” • Lysa TerKeurst 5. “Educated” • Tara Westover 6. “The Clean Plate” • Gwyneth Paltrow 7. “Best Self” • Mike Bayer 8. “Homebody” • Joanna Gaines 9. “The Truths We Hold” • Kamala Harris 10. “The First Conspiracy” • Meltzer/Mensch

MASS MARKET 1. “Leverage in Death” • JD Robb 2. “Strawberry Hill” • Catherine Anderson 3. “Accidental Heroes” • Danielle Steel 4. “The Family Gathering” • Robyn Carr 5. “Safe and Sound” • Fern Michaels 6. “The Bishop’s Pawn” • Steve Berry 7. “A Dog’s Way Home” (movie tie-in) • W. Bruce Cameron 8. “Cowboy Brave” • Carolyn Brown 9. “The Black Hills” • William W. Johnstone 10. “Origin” • Dan Brown

TRADE PAPERBACK 1. “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” • Heather Morris 2. “The House Next Door” • James Patterson 3. “A Dog’s Way Home” (movie tie-in) • W. Bruce Cameron 4. “The Plant Paradox Quick and Easy” • Steven R Gundry 5. “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” • Gail Honeyman 6. “Sapiens” • Yuval Noah Harari 7. “The Easy 5-Ingredient Ketogenic Diet Cookbook” • Jen Fisch 8. “Less” • Andrew Sean Greer 9. “Instant Loss Cookbook” • Brittany Williams 10. “The Gown” • Jennifer Robson Here are the best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended Jan. 13. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books.

ADULTS 1. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 2. “A Woman’s Guide to Cannabis” • Nikki Furrer 3. “Whose Boat Is This Boat?” • Staff of “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” 4. “13 Days in Ferguson” • Ron Johnson 5. “The Overstory” • Richard Powers 6. “Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You” • Lin-Manuel Miranda 7. “The View From Flyover Country” • Sarah Kendzior 8. “Crazy Rich Asians” • Kevin Kwan 9. “The Power” • Naomi Alderman 10. “Autonomous” • Annalee Newitz

CHILDREN/ YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow” • Jessica Townsend 2. “Dog Man: Brawl of the Wild” • Dav Pilkey 3. “Black Enough: Stories of Being Young & Black in America” • Ibi Zoboi 4. “The Hate U Give” • Angie Thomas 5. “High” • David and Nic Sheff 6. “Lovely Beasts”• Kate Gardner 7. “Children of Blood and Bone” • Tomi Adeyemi 8. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Meltdown” • Jeff Kinney 9. “What If It’s Us” • Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera 10. “Superheroes Are Everywhere” • Kamala Harris

MFA student’s other works never match that of viral short story BY EMILY GOULD Special to the Washington Post

Several hundred debut shortstory collections are published each year, and of those, many are the result of years spent in a fiction MFA program, which typically culminates in the production of a thesis collecting a student’s strongest work. Recent MFA graduate Kristen Roupenian’s “You Know You Want This” seems like one of them. Unlike most collections, this book has had the benefit — or misfortune, depending on your point of view — of having come into being because one of its stories, “Cat Person,” went viral as no New Yorker short story has since that magazine’s publication of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” in 1948. That story, too, confused readers who mistook it for reportage rather than fiction, and arrived with perfect timing to galvanize conversations about desires that its readers had been accustomed to thinking of as private. Some of “Cat Person’s” readers responded thoughtfully. Many women were grateful to have a name for the experience of realizing you don’t want to have sex with someone, then having sex with him anyway, which one of the characters in the story experiences vividly. Many, many other readers responded with latently or overtly sexist idiocy. Roupenian has just published a follow-up piece in the New Yorker explaining how bad this felt. She has not (yet) been asked to write about how it felt to sell this collection and a follow-up for more than $1 million, or how it feels that HBO is making a TV show out of the collection. Presumably that feels OK, though of course it might also feel bad. Critics should avoid writing about the circumstances of a book’s publication and focus on the work itself, but for a

‘You Know You Want This’ Stories by Kristen Roupenian Published by Gallery/Scout Press, 240 pages, $24.99

couple of reasons it’s hard to do that with “You Know You Want This.” Pretending that it’s a collection like any other is impossible; I wouldn’t be writing this review if everything in the previous paragraphs wasn’t true. The other reason it seems important to describe this book’s path to publication is that it explains why, instead of sighing and moving on and focusing on its strengths, I felt absolutely enraged by its weaknesses. It does nobody any good, least of all the author, to pretend that the other stories in this collection are anywhere near as noteworthy or polished as “Cat Person.” They are student work, and they trumpet their influences baldly. There are nods — more like full-body bows — to Angela Carter, as in a story about a fairy-tale princess who rejects all her suitors and takes to her bed with a magical lover whom everyone else perceives as a mirror, a bucket and an old thigh bone. Worst of all is when the

metaphor turns out to be magical, as in “The Matchbox Sign.” A couple is torn apart by a woman’s delusions of having a parasite under her skin, which in the final scene leaps out of a wound and “slaps wetly on the bed, a six-inch-long tube of knobbed white flesh, lined with a thousand shivering legs that wave like seaweed in the unfamiliar air.” It then — sorry! — dives into her lover’s face and swims “toward his heart.” The end. Roupenian is great with those grisly, gory details; she writes them with wit and humor and glee. It’s as if they provide a needed release from the strictures of reality, of the tedious work of making meaning. Horror is great, ambiguity is fine, but they both need to be deployed in the service of something besides themselves. There are other stories here that almost rise to the level of “Cat Person,” like “Nice Guy,” which does the same closethird-person, flickering-shiftsbetween-arousal-and-revulsion thing, but from a male perspective. But my favorite is the final story in the collection, “The Biter,” which is about a girl who discovers a love of biting in preschool. Later, as an adult, she must find a socially acceptable way to get away with assuaging her craving for flesh; when she accidentally stumbles on a predatory man, she discovers that she can bite with impunity. It made me say “ew” out loud while I was reading it, but I didn’t feel like that “ew” moment was used (as with the white worm) for no reason. This story’s ending, which I won’t spoil, lands. Its moral seems to be: Take advantage of the flaws in the system, as long as they’re not going anywhere. Good for the biter, I guess. Emily Gould is the author of the forthcoming “Perfect Tunes.”

James Lee Burke’s new novel is engaging, emotional mystery BY JEFF AYERS Associated Press

James Lee Burke’s novels have mysteries that light the fuse of the story, but the almost poetic prose by the University of Missouri graduate sets his novels apart. In “The New Iberia Blues,” a boy that detective Dave Robicheaux knew almost 25 years ago left town to pursue his dream of becoming a Hollywood film director. Desmond Cormier found success and moves back with awards and respect. Robicheaux meets him not to congratulate him, but to inquire about the body of a young woman who was found murdered near his property. Cormier says he has no idea what happened, but Robicheaux has his doubts. Soon another suspect becomes

“The New Iberia Blues” A novel by James Lee Burke Published by Simon & Schuster, 464 pages, $27.99

the prime candidate when one of Robicheaux’s friends says he saw a man jump off a train and run away. He regrets not reporting it sooner, and it becomes clear that he witnessed the escape of an inmate named Hugo Tillinger, who was in prison for murder and arson. Tillinger had claimed he was innocent, and an organization known for helping prisoners overturn their convictions was looking into his case. The woman who met with Tillinger is Robicheaux’s murder victim. It seems like an open-and-shut case, but evidence and motive are never that transparent. This time, Burke’s story is not about the mystery itself, but more about the lyrical journey into Robicheaux’s past and present that will keep the readers in awe.

“The Grandmaster: Magnus Carlsen and the Match That Made Chess Great Again” By Brin-Jonathan Butler Published by Simon & Schuster, 224 pages, $26

BY DENNIS J. MCGRATH Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

If you can forgive the author and publisher for a misleading subtitle, you might enjoy “The Grandmaster: Magnus Carlsen and the Match That Made Chess Great Again.” It’s a rare book about chess that’s not aimed at chess players. There is no game analysis and no board diagrams. And while the “Match” in the subtitle is the World Chess Championship held in New York City in 2016, that event serves as the backdrop for the book rather than its focus. The slim volume is the result of an assignment. The publisher asked the author to explore why defending world champion Magnus Carlsen — perhaps the coolest, hippest champion in chess history — wasn’t a household name, how he became the highest-rated player ever, and how long he could remain on top. Brin-Jonathan Butler chooses to answer those questions by cataloging the oddballs, prodigies, celebrities who are hooked on the game, hustlers and other eccentrics who frequent chess clubs or chesscentric corners of public parks. He’s a lively writer, and by profiling these characters he delivers an entertaining romp through the U.S. chess world. Bobby Fischer, of course, takes center stage, but Butler also presents others who are familiar to chess players but who won’t be to most readers — like Judit Polgár. One of the best chess players in the world in the early 2000s, Polgár and her two sisters were raised as part of an experiment by her father, who believed geniuses are made, not born. As for the book’s title, it never really fulfills its promise. You’ll learn precious little about Magnus Carlsen or how he became so great. And it’s simply not true that the 2016 match “made chess great again.” I covered the match for the Star Tribune, and while it featured some wonderful games, it did nothing to alter the course of chess history or to elevate the game’s popularity. Besides, those of us who play chess, awed by its infinite depth, complexity and beauty, know that chess has always been great.

FICTION

Author’s debut novel, ‘Sugar Run,’ is heartfelt MESHA MAREN

BY OLINE H. COGDILL Associated Press

Flawed people and a forceful look at an area ravaged by an economic downturn and a rising opioid epidemic meld in the character-driven “Sugar Run,” Mesha Maren’s novel debut. At 35, Jodi McCarty is getting her first taste of freedom when she’s released from prison after being convicted at 17 for shooting her girlfriend, Paula Dulett. Before Paula, the only person who had been kind to Jodi was her grandmother, Effie. The aimless cross-country trek, including a dip into Mexico with Paula, was the closest to happiness Jodi had known, savoring the “delicious, unfamiliar risk” of each day. The couple supported themselves with petty crimes and Paula’s skills as a poker player. Paula’s intoxicating talks about how a good poker hand is a “sweet

When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard How much • Free More info • 314-994-3300

“Sugar Run” A novel by Mesha Maren Published by Algonquin, 320 pages $26.95

sugar run” has Jodi remembering her West Virginia home and

how she wants to return to the landscape of “flashing mountain creeks that appear out of nowhere after a good rain.” The relationship with Paula — and its violent end — preys on Jodi’s mind as she begins her new life, hoping she can fulfill her dream of settling on the land once owned by her grandmother. Then Jodi meets and falls for Miranda Matheson Golden, who is separated from her husband, a country music star “of receding fame.” Along with Miranda’s three sons, the new couple heads for West Virginia, where Jodi remembers “even the air around her had felt right.” Along the way,

Jodi hopes to find Paula’s younger brother, Ricky, who was abused as a child. “Sugar Run” gains its strength from Maren’s uncompromising storytelling and her insistence on showing even the most painful realities, especially when Jodi finds her grandmother’s land “ripe with disuse.” Maren seamlessly moves “Sugar Run” from 1988 as she describes the deteriorating romance between Jodi and Paula and the present as the newly released Jodi, who always considered herself a victim and is now desperately trying to make better choices with her life and her heart. Jodi is constantly weighed down by her past — and her future with the complicated and unstable Miranda. Jodi fears her grandmother was correct — “the future was only a parallel of the past.” Jodi’s salvation will be if she can rise against her past.


TRAVEL

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

Here’s what you need to know about alcohol on planes BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT Special to the Washington Post

PHOTOS BY MARK JOHANSON • Chicago Tribune

Maintaining a triangular body formation is key for novice ice climbers.

Learning to ice climb — and chill out BY MARK JOHANSON Chicago Tribune

BANFF, ALBERTA • I’m not even

halfway up an ephemeral ice wall in Banff National Park before I find myself, quite literally, on a slippery slope. To my right is a sinewy gorge known as Johnston Canyon and the snow-covered hiking path from which I came. To my left are stunning pillars of frozen river water that blanket a craggy 100-foot cliff. I, of course, am precariously affixed to said cliff, and I’m clinging for dear life. I’ve come to this unspoiled spot to take a stab at ice climbing, but I’m beginning to feel like some reject from the Marvel Universe with my hands and feet sporting spiky weapons that I’m not quite sure how to use. “Kick your crampon into the ice like you’re angry,” my teacher, Larry Shiu, screams from down below. I do as I’m told, and frozen water crystals tumble into the riverbed. My newly firm attachment means I’m now closer to the radiatorlike wall, but I refuse to let the fingertingling temperature get to me. I need to focus on the task at hand: hook my ice ax into a higher perch and continue my vertical march upward. Shiu tells me to think of the ax like a fly-fishing rod. “Flick your wrist,” he shouts as I sink the tool into the blue-gray ice, allowing me the leverage I need to push onward and upward. I quickly gain confidence and race to the top where, harnessing the power of my newly weaponized extremities, I pause to take in the full panorama. My journey into — and up — this stunning canyon began a few days back with a flight to Calgary, an oil-rich city of 1.2 million in the province of Alberta. As my plane landed, all I could see was a dense cloud of white, as if a marshmallow puff of snow had been smushed up against the once-golden prairie. It took a 75-mile drive west to find the Canada of lore, where toothy Rocky Mountain peaks poke out over evergreen forests and fairy-tale turquoise lakes. Banff is Canada’s oldest national park and a playground for climbers, boasting dozens of pristine ice routes, most of which are easily accessed from local roads. Add one of the longest seasons (December to early April) and most ideal climates for ice climbing, and you begin to understand why the area is regarded by many as the best place in the world to try this increasingly popular sport. A 2017 report from the Outdoor

HOW MUCH IT TOO MUCH?

Larry Shiu, a teacher with Yamnuska Mountain Adventures, keeps extra ropes and carabiners on his harness.

Foundation found that outdoor climbing was one of the five fastestgrowing adventure sports, with ice climbing forming a sizable chunk of that growth (thanks, in part, to cheaper and more widely available equipment). Its popularity has soared by more than 20 percent over the past three years, and there’s even talk of making it an official sport in the Winter Olympics. I’ve come to Banff to see what all the fuss is about on a two-day experiential course with Yamnuska Mountain Adventures (prices starting at $150 a day). But things aren’t going as glowingly as planned. “I’ve got good news and bad news,” Shiu tells me after my first day on the ice. “The good news is that you’re stronger than you look. The bad news is that your technique is crap.” I commiserate with a classmate that evening over dinner at the Chiniki Cultural Centre, a museum/ restaurant of the Chiniki First Nation people. As we chow down on some hearty fry bread “tacos” topped with elk meat, my classmate shows me a post she’s just put on Instagram. In it, I’m dangling off the ice wall with the kind of body posture people might assume if they were using a toilet. It seems my technique really is crap. I rest my head for the night in a plush bed at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel, a castlelike affair built in the 1880s to lure vacationers westward along the Canadian Pacific Railway, before heading out to the ice the following day, determined to right my wrongs. Johnston Canyon is a sharply hewn river valley lined with quaking aspens and lanky lodgepole pines. To get back to the ice wall, I have to crunch snow for about 45 minutes, walking like a cowboy to avoid

daggering my pant leg with the razor-sharp crampons on my boots. Along the way, I ask Shiu what went wrong yesterday, explaining that I seem to be much more adept at rock climbing. “Rock climbing is usually easier to pick up because you just use your feet and hands to grab and go,” he explains. “In ice climbing, you have to figure out how to swing your ax and kick your crampons into the ice, so there’s a bigger learning curve.” Shiu suggests that I work on maintaining a perfect triangle on the ice, with my feet spread wide and my ice tool above my head in the center. “This is the most stable body position,” he says. “When you get the three points fixed, you have one more ice tool that is free to swing higher and build your next triangle.” With that in mind, I harness up and give it a go. Instead of straining my Popeye muscles to race up the wall, as I did the day before, I focus on slow, controlled movements. A few climbs in, I’m feeling much less crappy. I realize after a successful second day that I’m so used to a city life that requires speed for efficiency that it was initially hard for me to slow down. But ice climbing isn’t about speed; it’s about carefully calculated moves. It’s this wonderfully meditative mind game where speed can be your enemy. Ice climbing is also about trusting the unknown, another thing I’m not terribly great at. You have to trust that a tiny crampon spike will support your weight and that a piece of frozen water isn’t minutes from melting in the afternoon sun. If you can suspend your disbelief for a few hours, your reward is not only an intimate connection with nature, but also the chance to be a D-list superhero, at least for a while.

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever. Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

On a Delta Air Lines flight from Newark to Minneapolis, a passenger seated near Stephanie Wolkin downed five mini-bottles of vodka in rapid succession. By the time the plane landed, the intoxicated passenger had become violently ill, and Wolkin, a retired union worker from St. Paul, Minn., had earned 10,000 frequent-flier miles the hard way. A majority of passengers drink when they fly, according to a new survey by Fractl, a marketing agency in Delray Beach, Fla. More than eight in 10 passengers say they have consumed alcohol while waiting at the airport, and that number increases to more than 90 percent once in the air. Millennials are 10 percent more likely to be intoxicated on a flight than older passengers, according to the survey. Alcohol has fueled some of the most horrific in-flight incidents in recent years, including loud confrontations, bloody brawls and sexual assaults. This summer, Irish discount airline Ryanair publicly called for restrictions on alcohol sales at airports and a ban on alcohol sales before 10 a.m. Few people actually talk about alcohol on planes beyond the physiological effects of consuming a few beers inside a pressurized aluminum tube. How much should you drink on board? What should you do when someone next to you is drinking to excess? And have we reached a point where we should limit — or ban — alcoholic beverages on board? Los Angeles psychiatrist Brian Cassmassi remembers a red-eye flight to Europe shortly after he obtained his doctoral degree. About halfway there, the flight attendants asked if there was a doctor on board. “A female passenger had become inebriated from drinking two small airline alcohol bottles and taking her prescribed Ambien,” Cassmassi recalls. “She was combative toward the flight attendants and other passengers seated near her. I helped to restrain her and calm her in the galley until we made an emergency landing.”

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664

Cassmassi thinks one or two mini-bottles on a flight are usually fine, but it depends on the passenger. Flight crews have to monitor their behavior carefully to ensure they’re not overdoing it, he says. While actual blood alcohol concentration remains the same during flights as it is on land, people can feel the effects more readily because of slightly decreased oxygen levels in the blood, according to Cassmassi. “Airplanes keep the cabin pressure about 4 percent lower than normal pressure at sea level, which slightly lowers oxygen intake,” he explains. “With that dip in oxygen for fuel, the brain is more susceptible to the effects of certain substances like alcohol.” Among airlines, alcohol availability runs from an outright ban to free drinks. Middle Eastern carriers such as Royal Brunei Airlines, Saudi Arabian Airlines and EgyptAir fly alcohol-free. Other airlines don’t serve adult beverages on domestic flights (Turkish Airlines and many Chinese airlines, for example). A majority of airlines still serve alcohol, but may charge you for it, except in business and first class, where drinks are still included. Flight attendants undergo alcohol training using the traffic light system that bars and restaurants use to categorize patrons: green for social drinkers behaving within social norms, yellow for lower inhibitions and inappropriate behavior, and red for impaired motor functions. When passengers shift to yellow, they cut them off. But when the drinks start flowing at 36,000 feet, flight attendants are outnumbered, and it falls to passengers to ensure that other passengers are not overindulging. “Modern manners dictate that before drinking yourself straight into the airsickness bag, you must consider all other passengers alongside you, because they have fewer options than you do,” says Sharon Schweitzer, an etiquette expert who runs the consulting firm Access to Culture. But what if your fellow passenger doesn’t see it that way? I remember sitting next to a young woman on a Southwest Airlines flight recently. Whenever the flight attendant came within shouting distance, she ordered a white wine and drained it in several gulps. Two chardonnays into the conversation, she started to exhibit all kinds of yellow-light behavior. Almost the moment I thought, “What am I going to do now?” a stern-faced flight attendant materialized next to me. The passenger instinctively tilted her plastic cup toward her, but the crew member slowly shook her head. “I’m sorry,” the attendant said in a not-sorry tone. “We can’t serve you any more.” The woman then fell asleep on my shoulder. I could have handled that situation differently, experts say. The steps for defusing disagreements involving alcohol on planes are identical to those for defusing any conflict. First, ask the passenger to slow down on the drinking. You can hint at that by saying: “Could I get you a glass of water? I hear alcohol dehydrates you on a plane.” If that doesn’t work, ask a flight attendant if you can sit somewhere else. Finally, talk to a crew member privately about the passenger’s behavior. At the very least, they can cut the drunk passenger off, which will make the rest of the flight a little more bearable. Christoper Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the

SIU-Carbondale offers trips to Greece, Egypt FROM STAFF REPORTS

Southern Illinois University Carbondale is once again taking travelers on a journey to Egypt and Greece (separate programs). There will be three free public presentations to learn more about the trip, all at the St. Louis County Library, Main Branch, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard, at 1 p.m. Jan. 26, 27 and Feb. 2 (all are the same program). A team of professors leads students and members of the community (families and senior citizens welcome) through Egypt, and through Greece, mixing site visits, museums and fun activities. In Egypt, the group tests theories of pyramid construction by building a model pyramid, learns to carve and paint hieroglyphic tablets, and re-creates a mummification ritual. In Greece, the group re-creates the trial of Socrates in an ancient council chamber, makes sundials on the beach, runs a short race in an Olympic stadium and performs an ancient play in an ancient theater with costumes and masks you make yourselves. Can be taken for college credit. All the details are at ancientlegacies.org.


TRAVEL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

JEDI, THRONES AND GIANTS Ireland’s beautiful landscapes surpass what you see in movie and TV scenes BY SUSAN HEGGER Special to the Post-Dispatch

T

he young boy, possibly 8 or so, sat crosslegged in the middle of the white stone “beehive” hut. He spoke quietly but intently to a young girl, probably his sister, sitting directly across from him. Suddenly, a woman stepped into the iglooshaped structure. “We have to go; it’s time to start heading down,” she said to the boy, who was decked out in a brown robe. “But, Mom,” wailed the junior Jedi. “We’re reenacting a scene!” Fortunately, Mom wasn’t heartless enough to yell “cut.” So she nodded and stepped back outside. A few minutes later, the two Star Wars aficionados traipsed after her, undoubtedly reveling in the excitement of visiting Luke Skywalker’s secret retreat and reliving a moment from “The Last Jedi.” The young American was the only Jedi I spotted on Skellig Michael that day; the robe, of course,

PHOTOS BY SUSAN HEGGER

The monastery on Skellig Michael was reportedly built in the sixth century, pillaged by Vikings in the ninth century and abandoned in the 12th century.

Dark Hedges, a tree tunnel of birch trees, was used as a road to King’s Landing in the popular TV show “Game of Thrones.”

The Carrick-a-rede rope bridge is 66 feet long and 98 feet high above the rocks. From the bridge, one can see the Larrybane quarry, another “Game of Thrones” site.

04B08D BD0@+4 ED+C+GBC

F> C7&QR 0(&9)& ,> #==<R;&7,=> 3,7- :=((&>! 0'R;,#& 4,>R ,!(,&3 (')77/79 )-*/$,%%%4&,)363)+/79 */-,0%%%)')$+)7 (&,$,730&$" $(,2/)' (&0803/07$",!2/3/79 $.&(&/$,$%%%&,#&,$68,73$ 1 (&/5,$ We saw these boats from the road, heading back to Westport from Kylemore Abbey, and just had to stop. Ireland is just full of these suddenly seen picturesque moments.

was a dead giveaway. But I suspect that others also came primarily to see Luke Skywalker’s hideaway, an astonishing monastery, reportedly built in the sixth century, pillaged by Vikings in the ninth century and ultimately abandoned in the 12th century. Me? I was there for both. And I was lucky to be on the top of this rather forbidding rock jutting from the sea. Much like Rey, we overcame several daunting obstacles to visit this UNESCO World Heritage Site. First, only 180 people are allowed on the island each day. Boats to Skellig Michael run from March to October out of the small town of Portmagee on the Ring of Kerry in western Ireland. The boats are small, each holding about 12 passengers. Reservations are essential. I went through four boat companies before I found three seats available any time in the four-day window we had in Kenmare — and I was searching a month and half in advance. Having tickets, though, is just the first step. The second hurdle is the CONTINUED ON B11

7;.0!.- 6". -=>1.;8 =* 9> /C98D9> 09596!=> 6";=4(" 9> .%5!6!>( B4C6!-B.1!9 <;.8.>696!=>3 B-6;9!&A? *R%;6&;A H? MON" ! ISLO<' +". A=1(. '.8 7.;.8 ),$, '.8 7.;.8 2=91 '.8 7.;.8? @: #&)&) C<&#R ,9 (,',7R!PPPDR9R;5R A=6; 9R&7 7=!&A

DC@ES LNKP"I$P"IOO =; R'&,(

=>97&QR&(&9)&1&(7&,;7;&5R(P#=' . . . the best way to see America! • Canadian Rockies • National Parks • New England • Alaska • California . . . and many more! Priced from $1,695

TRAVEL SHOW

Join America by Rail Tour Directors Patti Rogers and Ned Kilmer for a couple hours of fun learning about our escorted rail tours! You’ll see life aboard the train and experience many of our great destinations. Our hosts will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Refreshments will be served. Receive a $50 savings coupon and enter to win a $1,000 Future Tour Credit.

Friday., February 8 ~ 2:00 p.m. Spazio Westport, 12031 Lackland Rd., Maryland Heights 63146 RSVP required, space is limited. Call 1-888-777-6605 by 6:00 p.m. Friday, February 1.

America by Rail 1- 888-777-6605 5030 Northwind Dr., Suite 101, East Lansing, MI 48823

0(7&,; B;&5R( &>! .;6,9R9 MOMJ CP /;R>73==! /(5!P C7P 4=6,9? 2F ILNKK 333P&(7&,;7;&5R(P#='


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

PHOTOS BY SUSAN HEGGER

The Giant’s Causeway, made up of thousands of basalt columns, was created by volcanic activity more than 60 million years ago. CONTINUED FROM B10

weather, especially the condition of the ocean. If the seas are choppy, it’s a no-go. We had a sunny day, but the captain told us that stormy weather had forced the cancellation of most trips the week before us. He estimated his boat goes out only about 90 times a year. The third obstacle is the island itself. Visitors need to be in good condition to mount the 600 steps — no railings! — to the top. And, of course, what goes up must come down. We brought our trusty hiking poles, and they helped with both the ascent and descent. Luckily, the Force was most definitely with us that day. The sun beamed and the waters were calm as we sailed first around Little Skellig, where we could marvel at the thousands and thousands of gannets that made it their home. (We were too late for the puffins.) Then we sailed around Skellig Michael itself before we disembarked, basically by jumping from the boat onto a concrete landing, with an assist from one of the crew. Fortunately, the roughhewn steps to the top were dry. Once at the top, a docent regaled us with the history of the monastery. Ultimately, though, I wanted time to see the small cemetery; to explore the primitive, stone “beehive” huts, which housed the monks’ cells, church and oratorio (similar beehives can be seen on the Dingle peninsula); and just to ogle at this incredible scene. No wonder its strange, stark beauty captivated the makers of “Star Wars.”

ANYBODY SEEN JON SNOW? The road to King’s Landing, aka Dark Hedges, was devilishly hard to find. We were in the middle of nowhere in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, driving on narrow country lanes that we joked were just a cow and half wide. Google Maps kept directing us to a particular road, unaware of its closure due to roadwork. We detoured repeatedly and were rerouted repeatedly until finally we saw several cars parked on the side of

Visitors to Skellig Michael, an old Christian monastery, must climb 600 steps to reach the top.

Dun Aengus, an ancient ring fort, was built on the edge of 300-foot cliffs on the island of Inishmore. The walls to the fort are on the left.

a road. This has to be it, I thought. Why else would there be so many cars? We walked about a quarter mile up Bregagh Road, and there it was: an avenue of tall beech trees, their twisty, gnarly limbs forming a tree tunnel. Couples, individuals and groups meandered the roughly half-mile stretch of road (now closed to traffic), soaking up the mysterious ambiance and admiring the eerie arch of branches. The Stuart family originally planted the trees in the 18th century to make a dramatic impression as visitors approached their Gracehill manor house. But since its use as a location in “Game of Thrones,” Dark Hedges has become wildly popular. (Indeed, tourism authorities in Northern Ireland have built on the popularity of “GoT” and have helpfully erected signs identifying “GoT” locations. Websites also list various “GoT” locations, and tour companies offer “GoT” itineraries.) The next day, as we drove the scenic Causeway Coastal route, we veered off to see Ballintoy harbor. It was a steep ride down a narrow road, and as we neared the bottom, I gasped. I had seen this

picturesque harbor before — in a dramatic photograph in a gallery near our bed-and-breakfast in Portrush. As we wandered about taking our own photos, I discovered a sign identifying the harbor as the spot where Theon Lovejoy returned to the Iron Islands, his home. We didn’t visit Larrybane quarry, where viewers first meet Brienne of Tarth, but we could see it from the Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge (which itself can be seen in the distance in that “GoT” scene). The original bridge was built in 1755 and connected the mainland to an island with a salmon

fishery (now closed). The current bridge is 66 feet across and 98 feet above the rocks and water. And, yes, it sways as you cross — and that’s a big part of the excitement. Once you cross, there’s not much to explore. Much of the trail on the island was closed when we were there. The coast around the rope bridge is free to explore, but there’s a small charge to cross the bridge. Guidebooks and information at the ticket booth caution against people with vertigo or fear of heights from crossing. Frankly, the warnings seemed a little exaggerated to me. I thought that scariest part was the steep, open metal staircase leading down to the bridge. Strangely, one of the most otherworldly places we visited — Giant’s Causeway in County Antrim, Northern Ireland — is not a location in “Game of Thrones” (or “Star Wars,” for that matter). Created by volcanic action, the causeway is made up of about 40,000 massive black basalt columns extending into the sea. The name comes from a legend, which tells of a contest pitting the rather puny Irish giant Finn MacCool against a big Scottish giant who lived on Staffa, an island of basalt columns we had visited a couple of years ago. Staffa and the causeway are apparently part of the same geological formation, and we were impressed that the connection is immortalized in legend. Those in a hurry can take a bus from the visitors center to the causeway. In a little less of a hurry? Walk the half mile or so from

the visitors center to the causeway. But those with time — like us — should opt for the red trail, a cliffside path with spectacular overhead views of the causeway. The path then drops down and about midway down, one can detour to see various other formations, like the “organ,” basalt columns that evoke organ pipes. It was while we were exploring this tangent of the red trail that we got drenched by a sudden, violent storm. We tried to shelter under a rock overhang, but when the rain showed no signs of abating, we decided to take our chances and leave. As suddenly as it appeared, the storm ended. By the time we reached the causeway, the dark clouds had moved out to sea.

THE OLD OLD WORLD Ireland’s dramatic landscapes and volatile weather make it easy for the island to conjure up and beguile us with distant planets, fantasy worlds and Celtic legends. But when it comes to the mysterious and enigmatic, Ireland doesn’t need fiction. There’s plenty of mystery and awe in the remains of its own ancient past. About 45 minutes north of Dublin is Newgrange, a Neolithic passage tomb built around 3200 B.C., making it older than the Egyptian pyramids or Stonehenge. (It can be visited only on a guided tour. Timed tickets are sold at the visitors center.) At the entrance is a large stone, decorated with stone spirals, a common motif. The passage into the tomb is low and

The Uragh stone circle on the Beara peninsula is thousands of years old.

Presley Tour’s

TRAVEL SHOW

narrow; we ducked and held our purses and cameras in front of us so they wouldn’t scrape the walls. Once inside the inner chamber, we saw three niches where the communal burials were. Geometric carvings adorned some stones. The “highlight” came when the guide turned off the lights, and we were in complete, utter darkness. Then she flipped a switch, and we experienced what it would be like inside the tomb, which is believed to have also been used for rituals, on the winter solstice. On that day alone, the light of the rising sun enters the passage and illuminates the inner chamber for 17 minutes. In County Clare, in the famed Burren, a lunar-like limestone plateau, we visited the Poulnabrone dolmen, a portal tomb in use between 5,200 and 5,800 years ago. The tomb sits on a high spot, so it is easily seen from the road, and it exerts a primitive attraction. What made the site special, at least for me, was the setting: the austere limestone “pavement” that emphasized the loneliness and the solitude of the tomb. (Incidentally, the famous Cliffs of Moher are on the edge of the Burren region.) Among its various stops, the renowned Ring of Kerry drive has three stone ring forts to visit — Staigue (near Sneem), Cahergall and Leacanabuaile (both near Cahersiveen). These are circular fortresses, mainly dating back 300 to 600 A.D. Also called fairy forts, they are thought to have been defensive structures built around farmsteads. All three on the Ring of Kerry are worth visiting; each is a little different. One of the most amazing stone forts, though, is Dun Aengus on the island of Inishmore, one of the Aran islands. In part that’s because of its age (built about 1100 B.C. and occupied until roughly 1000 A.D.) and size (consisting of several concentric walls). But mostly, it’s because of its breathtaking location — right smack on the edge of 300-foot cliffs. The day we were there was gray and a little drizzly. It didn’t take much wind to let you know you could be swept right off the cliffs and knocked onto the rocks below. Maybe that’s why I got a little dizzy as I neared the precipice. Skellig Michael, Newgrange, Poulnabrone dolmen, Dun Aengus, the Ring of Kerry— all these were places that we had long planned to visit. Like Giant’s Causeway and Carrick-a-rede, they were part of a detailed itinerary. Sometimes, though, serendipity strikes, and you come upon something by surprise. Driving the Ring of Beara, we saw a sign for a stone circle. We drove, drove and drove some more — we were on the verge of giving up — when we came upon a small parking lot and an honor box for the 2 euro entry fee. Despite the rain, I grabbed the camera and headed up a hilly path, in search of the circle. My two companions stayed in the car. Finally, I came upon what I later learned was the Uragh stone circle and my jaw dropped: five stones in a tight circle, one megalith about 10 feet tall. In the background, framed by the stones, a waterfall roared.

Spec ia 2018 - 2019 Intellectual Adventures in

l Low

EGYPT

GREECE

Giza, Luxor, Aswan, and 4-night Nile Cruise

Athens, Delphi, The Greek Islands of Samos and Kos, and the West Coast of Turkey

Dec. 25, 2018 - Jan. 5, 2019 May 21 - June 1, 2019

e r Pr

ices!

June 2 - 15, 2019

Egypt Extensions: Alexandria / Petra, Jordan / Sharm El-Sheik

TRAVEL EXPERIENCES OF A LIFETIME • • • •

Holiday Inn South County Center 6921 S Lindbergh Blvd St Louis, MO

January 26, 2019, 2pm Join us to preview our 2019 tours. www.presleytours.com 800.621.6100

37th Annual Programs Open to everyone First-class: 4- and 5-star accomodations throughout the trip Each program offers unique hands-on learning experiences Adventures can earn college credit

For more information, please attend any ONE of these slide presentations: For additional information call:

(314) 496 - 4480 Please visit our website:

www.ancientlegacies.org View the videos!

Saturday, Jan. 26 • Sunday, Jan. 27 • Saturday, Feb. 2 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. St. Louis County Library Main Branch (Highway 40 and Lindbergh, across from Plaza Frontenac)


TRAVEL

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

BRING IT ON HOME: GREECE Who and where • Rhett and Shelley Oldham of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., attending a live performance of “Electra” by Sophocles in Epidauros, Greece. The trip • They spent two weeks in Greece traveling to Athens, Delphi, Nafplio, Olympia, Mycenae and Thessaloniki gathering information for the world history class Rhett teaches. Travel tip • “The hardest part of creating an itinerary in Greece is determining what to see and what to leave out. There is so much history everywhere, but definitely plan on spending time at the beach as well. When renting a car, you will need an international driver’s license, but I would not recommend driving in Athens,” Rhett says.

fR in

MARCH 13, 2019 @ ST. LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail.com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re looking for interesting, well-composed, well-lighted photos.

PRESENTED BY

Explore the Science Center

ee

e m o h

e ot u q

after hours while tasting from 50 of the best restaurants in town featured in Ian Froeb’s STL100 List!

Stairlifts and Ramps “Solutions to Maintain a Safe and Comfortable Home.”

TICKETS ON SALE NOW EVENT SPONSORS

veteran-owned and va certified

CALL TODAY AND RECEIVE $50 OFF! 314-325-3151 | 618-857-3446 | 636-893-1349

$

UP TO

Visit STLtoday.com/ourevents for tickets & more info!

2,300 IN SAVINGS

1

PER STATEROOM ON SELECT 2019 AMAWATERWAYS SAILINGS.

MarketPlace!

AAA TRAVEL

ATTEND THE AAA TRAVEL MARKETPLACE & YOU MAY RECEIVE: • FREE admission and informative presentations from select AAA-preferred travel providers • Limited time special offers on a variety of other land and cruise vacations • Exclusive Member Benefits • AND MORE!

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2019 9am – 2pm Holiday Inn SW Route 66 10709 Watson Road St. Louis, MO 63127

Roa dsi

429 CA RD

065

DEC EXPIRATIO ND 09 13 ATE R YA NN W. JO

MA

CALL: (866) 222-7587 CALL: 000-000-0000 CLICK: CLICK:AAA.com/TravelShow AAA.com/TravelShow VISIT: 00000 Xxxxxxxxxxx Xx VISIT: Your nearest AAA TravelXX office Xxxxxxxxx, XXXXX

1.80de & Batt 0.2 ery Se AAA 22.4 rvice .co 357 m

CLU BC OD E

12 3 HN

SO

45

11 67

Yea Me r mb er

812

N

AAA TRAVELS WITH YOU

1 Featured AmaWaterways savings is based on double occupancy for the July 28, 2019, Magnificent Europe sailing on the AmaStella. Up to $2,300 savings consists of up to $1,500 per stateroom AmaWaterways “Booking Savings,” $200 per stateroom AAA Exclusive savings and $600 per stateroom AAA Member Benefit Savings. The AmaWaterways Booking Savings Offer is valid on select 2019 sailings only for new bookings made between January 26 – February 9, 2019 and vary from $500 to $1,500 per stateroom with savings varying depending on departure date and cruise destination booked. Contact your AAA Travel Agent for full details. Ship’s Registry: Switzerland. $200 AAA Exclusive savings ($100 per person savings) is valid on select 2019 sailings only for new bookings made between January 26 – February 9, 2019. AAA Member Benefit Savings applies to all 2019 sailings, is for new bookings only, and is based on double occupancy. $300 savings per stateroom ($150 savings per person) plus Welcome Amenity is applicable to cruises less than 14 nights; $600 discount per stateroom ($300 savings per person) plus Welcome Amenity is applicable to cruises of 14 nights or more. Welcome Amenity for Europe river Cruises: One bottle of wine (age restrictions may apply) and one box of chocolates per stateroom.

Offers subject to change without notice. Restrictions apply. Offers may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Travel Show will take place January 26, 2019 from 9am – 2pm. Certain restrictions may apply. AAA members must make advance reservations through AAA Travel to obtain Member Benefits and savings. Member Benefits may vary based on departure date. Rates are accurate at time of printing and are subject to availability and change. Not responsible for errors or omissions. Automobile Club of Missouri acts as an agent for the various travel providers featured at the sale. © 2019 Automobile Club of Missouri. All Rights Reserved.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • C

With no progress, farmers worry about trade issues

Cruelest month is less cruel this year Led by Target, Costco, retail rebounds a bit in January, but other stores struggle Retailers can sail through December on hype and hope, but they face the cold hard realities of business each January. So it was for leading department stores Macy’s, Kohl’s and Nordstrom, each of which saw its shares fall 5 percent or more on the day it reported holiday sales. Macy’s took the biggest hit, plummeting 18 percent on Jan. 10 after a disappointing sales report. That reaction, the biggest one-day drop in 27 years, indicates that the legendary department store hasn’t yet found its place in a shifting retail landscape. A recent report from investment bank UBS says Macy’s “has disadvantages vs. peers around price, product and service.” This month also saw children’s chain Gymboree and discounter Shopko follow a

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

long parade of other retailers into bankruptcy court. Gymboree plans to close all its stores, while Shopko plans to shut at least 100. Still, the retail news isn’t as uniformly gloomy as in some recent Januaries. Target wowed investors with a 5.7 percent increase in holiday sales. Costco and Bed Bath & Beyond also posted strong results. After a few seasons when competition from Amazon seemed to hurt almost every traditional retailer, the industry is separating

into haves and have-nots. We’re seeing a division between chains that have figured out a viable online strategy and those that haven’t. Jason Long, a retail consultant with Shift Marketing Group in St. Louis, says Costco, Home Depot, Target and Walmart all have built strong online businesses by leveraging the strengths of their stores. More than 60 percent of Home Depot’s online orders are delivered to a store, he said. “You have weeded out the weakest players, and now you are kind of left with the stronger ones, the retailers who are delivering value to the customer,” Long said. Home Depot’s appliance sales benefited from the decline of Sears, and Walmart and

China tariff battle, unsettled deals, shutdown weigh on decisions BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

qualify. So are his lenders. “They have yet to start reviewing applications for the 2018 year,” he said he’s heard. “Four of our projects are on hold waiting for the backlog to get caught up a little bit.” A bottleneck of what some suspect is over 200 applications for state historic tax credits has stretched what had typically been up to a

Even with a tumultuous 2018 growing season behind them — a year characterized by trade disputes that affected major agricultural products nationwide — many farmers have not been able to rest easy over the winter. That’s because key trade disputes are still very much alive, with no resolution in sight for retaliatory tariffs from China, enacted in response to President Donald Trump’s initial restrictions on steel and other select Chinese imports. Elsewhere, even though the outline of a revised North American Free Trade Agreement was announced months ago between the U.S., Mexico and Canada, that deal has yet to be ratified by Congress. “Obviously our relationship with China, that’s the No. 1 topic from the policy side that affects my bottom line and will until we re-establish that relationship,” said Brian Martin, a corn and soybean farmer from Centralia, Mo. Based on the latest outlook, farmers could be in for a long and nervous wait until that might happen. “Who knows? My crystal ball broke a long time ago,” said Jon Doggett, the Washington-based CEO of the National Corn Growers Association, commenting on the uncertainty that surrounds trade talks. Remarks from Doggett and others came as the NCGA, headquartered in Chesterfield, held a summit on soil health in St. Louis Tuesday and Wednesday. But in certain sessions and on the sidelines, simmering concern over trade policy was a hot topic of discussion, with multiple farmers citing it as one of the top challenges they currently face — if not the biggest. During updates about how federal policies are being felt on the farm, Doggett fielded multiple questions about trade at the conference. Going forward, he said it is hard to

See HISTORIC • Page C4

See FARMERS • Page C4

See NICKLAUS • Page C3

WANT TAX CREDITS? WAIT IN LINE

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Jeff Hugget (second from left), a developer with Dominium Development of Minneapolis, leads a group tour of the interior of the Arcade Building in downtown St. Louis in June 2014. The property, whose tenants now include Webster University, is one that benefited from historic tax credits.

Bottleneck of about 200 applications puts developers of rehab projects in a difficult position

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jassen Johnson, the developer behind a host of historic rehabs in the area around midtown, submitted an application for Missouri historic tax credits to help finance one of his projects last January. He submitted another project in March and another in June. He’s still waiting to hear if the projects will

From Ballwin to the Bay: Daly climbs to the top

NOMINATE YOUR TOP WORKPLACE

High school dropout perseveres, becomes respected president of San Francisco Federal Reserve

• Participation is free and open to any organization with 50 or more employees in the greater St. Louis area: public, private, nonprofit, and government entities are all eligible.

BY HEATHER LONG Washington Post

By the time she was 16, Mary C. Daly was a high school dropout in a St. Louis suburb who believed her best option in life was to become a bus driver. “I only knew what was right in front of me,” said Daly, a native of Ballwin. “My aspiration was to get a full-time job.” Today, Daly, 56, is president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, making her one of the most powerful shapers of economic policy in the United States. In this position, which she started in October, Daly helps set interest rates. Low rates spur people to spend and borrow more

• Nominations are due Feb. 15. The Top Workplaces section publishes in the Post-Dispatch in June. • To nominate a business or organization, go to stltoday.com/ nominate or call 314-561-9028.

NICK OTTO • For the Washington Post

See FED • Page C2

Mary C. Daly was a popular choice to succeed Janet Yellen in San Francisco.

BUSINESS

1 M

16,200 SF Medical Office Building for Sale Up to 4,050 SF for Lease in West County 15421 Clayton Rd, St. Louis MO 63011 For More Information: Matt Ruck | 314-994-4445 Hunter Alexander | 314-994-2320 Where Can We Help You?

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES, WORLDWIDE

www.naidesco.com


BUSINESS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Ballwin native shapes policies for U.S. economy FED • FROM C1

and high rates cause loans and economic activity to slow. Right now U.S. interest rates are roughly at a level that neither helps nor hurts the economy, but Wall Street and President Donald Trump are anxious how much higher the Fed will go. Daly voted for the last rate hike in December. Her journey from high school dropout to central bank leader is, in many ways, a quintessential story of grit and hard work paying off. But Daly believes she wouldn’t be where she is today if it weren’t for Betsy Bane, a mentor who told Daly to get a GED and paid for her first semester at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Bane told her, “Don’t give up just because people say nobody like you has ever done it.” These days, as Daly sits in a top floor office with jaw-dropping views of San Francisco Bay, she ponders how different life would be if she didn’t attend college. “I think about that every day,” said Daly, whose father, a postal worker, and mother, a homemaker, didn’t get beyond a high school education. Daly is a trailblazing Fed leader. Most of her peers are men with Ivy League degrees. By contrast, Daly is a petite gay woman who attended state schools, has a skateboard and welds metal sculptures in her spare time. A top goal for Daly in her position is boosting the number of Americans with college degrees and mentoring others coming up the ladder behind her. Only 37 percent of Americans ages 25 to 29 have a college degree, a low figure, she argues, given that more jobs will require a bachelor’s degree than a high school diploma by 2020. The likelihood of a child growing up to be better off than his or her parents has declined sharply, according to research by Harvard scholar Raj Chetty and others. “One of the reasons my story is unusual is because it’s not very frequent, but we should make it more frequent,” said Daly, her voice rising with enthusiasm. “As adults, we all have to look around — and I try to look around everywhere — and just mentor people.” The official mandate of a Fed leader is to keep unemployment low and inflation stable, mainly by setting interest rates. The Fed’s leadership consists of seven governors based in Washington, and appointed by the president, and 12 regional bank presidents such as Daly who sit in different parts of the country and are appointed by local selection committees. Daly’s district includes much of the West — Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. As a Ph.D. economist, Daly is happy to discuss the health of the U.S. economy and her detailed forecast of what’s ahead. She predicts “solid” growth for 2019 that’s a little slower than last year and sees “nothing in the data” suggesting an imminent recession. On interest rate hikes, she’s leaning toward pausing for a while to see how the economy progresses, a view that many of her Fed colleagues have also articulated in recent days as uncertainty has risen about the markets, trade and the government shutdown.

‘ALIVE BUT MAYBE NOT WELL’ However, she says the U.S. economy faces deeper problems than interest rates alone can solve. The American Dream is “alive, but maybe not well,” Daly said in a podcast she co-hosted in 2017. Today’s high-paying jobs typically require a college degree, which few low-income students obtain. “For the American Dream to be revitalized, we have to be more intentional about educating our population,” Daly said in an interview this month. “Right now, we’re leaving a lot of talent on the table. We’re just leaving people less educated than they could be.” From her years studying the job market, Daly knows the No. 1 factor that can increase a person’s wages and career prospects is a bachelor’s degree, not community college. More broadly, she argues the nation needs more college-educated people to boost economic growth and productivity. “The four-year degree is where you see the big payoff,” she said. “I would like us to have a national discussion about how important it is to have a more educated population for our potential growth going forward and our productivity.” Historically, Fed leaders have focused on monetary policy and bank regulation, but Daly is part of a growing group of regional Fed presidents who believe the long-term health of the U.S. economy depends on “upskilling” U.S. workers and revitalizing communities that have been left behind. They want to work on initiatives to address these big issues. Raphael Bostic, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, launched the Center for Workforce and Economic Opportunity, focused on jobs for low-income workers, and Eric Rosengren, president of the Boston Fed, started the Working Cities Challenge to incentivize old manufacturing towns to create a plan for their future. Daly’s latest initiatives include a “first gen” campaign highlighting how many people at the San Francisco Fed were the first in their families to graduate college, and a new podcast, Zip Code Economies, that aims to put a face on mobility issues. She also believes she can have a big impact by jump-starting conversations as she travels around her district to meet with business leaders, universities and

NICK OTTO • For the Washington Post

Mary C. Daly, president of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, meets with staffers at her office.

community organizations. On a recent visit to Idaho, she spoke with corporate leaders about the importance of more college-educated workers. The group immediately began brainstorming ideas, such as contributing to their employees’ college savings, much like they do with 401(k) retirement plan matching. Wherever she goes, Daly encourages mentoring and ways to simplify college applications, especially for financial aid. She says she knows the benefits firsthand.

Best of St. Charles 4 years in a row. Bommarito St. Peters

0% aPR fOR 72 MONthS*

ON SeleCt MOdelS INCludINg 2018 eSCaladeS, 2018 xt5s aNd 2018 Ct6s *0% for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Offers good thru 1/31/19..

2019 xt5 StaNdaRd

ultRa-lOw MIleage leaSeS fOR well-qualIfIed leSSeeS

$

399 / 39 / $4,069

PeR MONth

MONthS

due at SIgNINg

afteR all OffeRS No security deposit required. tax, title, license extra. Mileage charge of $.25 per mile over 32,500 miles

Bommarito CADILLAC BommaritoCadillac.com SALES 636-928-2300 Saturday full service available 7am-3pm by appointment only.

LOCATION 4190 I-70 North Outer Road St. Peters, MO 63376

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF LISA BROWN JACOB BARKER BRYCE GRAY MARK SCHLINKMANN DAVID NICKLAUS

Business editor Economic development Energy and environment Transportation and real estate Business columnist

314-340-8127 314-340-8291 314-340-8307 314-340-8265 314-340-8213

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

THE BOTTOM LINE General Motors is cutting 14,000 jobs and may idle three assembly plants as it reacts to declining sales of car models like the Chevy Impala. David Nicklaus says it’s a belated move to catch up with consumers’ shift toward SUVs, but Jim Gallagher worries that the move may be short-sighted. stltoday.com/watch

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW Dow Jones

Nasdaq

S&P 500

+710.40

+185.75

+74.45

24,706.35

7,157.23

2,670.71

SOURCE: Reuters

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

OVERCOMES FAMILY PROBLEMS Daly was a good student as a child (except for spelling), but she says at some point her family “just sort of imploded,” making it impossible to focus on school, so she dropped out at age 15. Her dad lost his job, a hardship for the family, and her parents ultimately divorced. Daly moved in with friends while her siblings went to live with her grandparents, who ran a doughnut shop where Daly did everything from icing doughnuts to delivering treats to help out and earn money. Even after she dropped out, Daly’s school guidance counselor didn’t give up on her. As fate would have it, the counselor was having dinner with a friend named Betsy Bane, who had a Ph.D. in psychology and was teaching at a local university. When Bane heard about Daly, she was intrigued and told the counselor to give Daly her number. To Bane’s surprise, Daly called her. “She was 15 when I first met her. Just in survival mode. She was supporting herself and treading water, but she was clearly articulate and very bright,” said Bane, who advised Daly to get a GED. Daly eventually earned her GED at age 17, taking the test without studying much and “getting the highest score of anybody,” Bane recalled. Bane then suggested college. Bane offered to pay for the first semester and remembers writing a check for $216. Daly earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She later earned her master’s degree in economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her doctorate from Syracuse University in New York. When Daly was named president of the San Francisco Fed — the second woman in the bank’s 105-year history to hold the post, after Janet Yellen — Daly sent Bane an email to thank her. “To be a small part of what Mary accomplished is really something special,” said Bane, now 75. She added that there are “a lot of little diamonds” in America no one notices. Cheers rang through the San Francisco Fed the day Daly was named to the post, and the following morning many staff members gathered in the lobby to applaud Daly again, recalled Fernanda Nechio, an economist and researcher at the bank. Daly came to the bank in 1996, was mentored by Yellen and moved up the ranks to become research director before being named president. Nechio said she thinks there is so much admiration for Daly because she “felt like someone we could look up to.” Several years ago, in an effort to increase diversity at the bank, Daly sent letters to hundreds of colleges to spread the word about the bank’s research-assistant program for recent college graduates looking to gain experience before doing a Ph.D. Then, she personally called everyone accepted into the program, a process she described as putting out the “welcome mat,” to let people know there is a place for them at the Fed, regardless of their background. Since then, the percentage of female research assistants at the San Francisco Fed has increased from 20 percent to a 50 percent split with men. Nechio had a similar experience with Daly, who was one of the first people she met when she started. “She just came to introduce herself,” said Nechio, who grew up in Brazil and was the first in her family to attend college. Her parents dropped out of school by age 14, but Nechio went on to earn her Ph.D. at Princeton and joined the Fed in 2009. Daly was not officially assigned to mentor Nechio, but she would give her feedback on presentations and make sure she knew who to ask for help or research collaborations. “We just clicked,” Nechio said. “Showing this is a profession that is not a ‘boys club’ is really important.”


BUSINESS

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

MOUND CITY MONEY

EMPLOYMENT CHANGE IN METRO ST. LOUIS

From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business. stltoday.com/moundcitymoney

Based on seasonally adjusted December totals

St. Louis job market posts strongest year since 2015 • Strong hiring in November and December resulted in a gain of 18,700 jobs last year in metro St. Louis, the best number in three years. Seasonally adjusted figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that the metro area gained 5,000 jobs in December and 3,300 jobs in November, up from an early estimate that showed no jobs added in November. Hiring last year was led by health care firms, which added 5,400 jobs, manufacturers, which added 3,800, and the leisure and hospitality industry, which added 3,500. Social-assistance agencies added 2,500 jobs, and financial services firms added 2,300. Figures for specific industries are not seasonally adjusted, and all the numbers will be revised in March. On the negative side, the mining and construction industries shrank by 1,100 jobs last year. Retailers shed 400 jobs and government shed 300. The 18,700-job gain was more than double the 7,800 jobs added in 2017, and was the St. Louis area’s strongest performance since it added 28,100 jobs in 2015. The 2018 figure amounts to an employment increase of 1.4 percent, compared with a national figure of 1.8 percent. The BLS figures also show that average hourly wages rose 6.4 percent in the St. Louis area last year, but that figure looks suspiciously high — it’s double the national increase — and may be revised downward. The BLS also reported Friday that Missouri’s unemployment rate rose to 3.1 percent in December from 3.0 percent in

Spending was up over the holidays

UNION MEMBERSHIP RATE Percentage of wage and salary workers

In thousands 30 20 10 0 -10 -20 -30 -40 -50

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

18,700

Missouri

Illinois

U.S.

20%

13.8%

NICKLAUS • FROM C1

15

Target sold more toys after Toys R Us disappeared. All the retail reports, good and bad, should be viewed against the backdrop of last year’s strong economy. Mastercard reported that overall holiday sales rose 5.1 percent in 2018, the strongest performance in six years. “The consumer feels really good about the economy right now,” Long says. “People opened up their pocketbooks a lot more this holiday season.” That’s why reports from companies like Macy’s and Kohl’s, where comparable-store sales were up a little more than 1 percent, were seen as disappointments. Nordstrom’s department store sales rose just 0.3 percent, although its Nordstrom Rack division did better. Long thinks the department stores probably have more pain ahead of them. Many of the chains still have too many stores, and even their good locations need a makeover to accommodate changing consumer tastes. Cosmetics are selling well, as consumers want to look good for their social-media selfies, but department stores devote too much space to slow-moving apparel lines. Some chains, such as bankrupt Sears and struggling J.C. Penney, probably don’t have the money to both redesign stores and build a viable commerce business. Others, including Kohl’s and Macy’s, may be able to recreate the excitement they once generated among shoppers, but their margin for error shrinks with each passing year. “If they can only comp 0 or 1 percent over the holidays in one of the strongest consumer economies we’ve had in a while, what happens when the economy inevitably softens in the future?” Long asks. We’ll probably learn the answer in some future January, and it won’t be pretty.

10

9.4%

5 ’00

’02

’04

’06

’08

’10

’12

’14

’16

’18

’08 ’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Post-Dispatch

November. Illinois’ jobless rate rose to 4.3 percent from 4.2 percent. The metro St. Louis unemployment rate was 3.3 percent in November; it will be updated Jan. 30. Union membership rises in Missouri, bucking national trend • The defeat of a “right to work” law wasn’t Missouri unions’ only victory in 2018: They also added 25,000 members, bucking a national trend. The gain meant that 9.4 percent of all Missouri workers were union members last year, up from 8.7 percent in 2017. Nationally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday that union membership fell to 10.5 percent from 10.7 percent. Over the last 15 years, however, union membership has fallen faster in Missouri than in the nation. Missouri’s unionization rate in 2003 was 13.2 percent, slightly above the U.S. average. In Illinois, union membership fell to 13.8 percent in 2018 from 15.0 percent the year before. The number of union members fell by 41,000. Nationally, 33.9 percent of government workers were union members. The private sector’s unionization rate was just one-fifth as high at 6.4 percent.

St. Louis’s Most Affordable Office Space

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Post-Dispatch

The BLS said union workers’ median weekly earnings were $1,081, compared with $860 for nonunion workers. Missouri union membership totals 251,000, according to the new report. An additional 32,000 Missourians are represented by unions but are not members. The state’s right-to-work law, which voters rejected in August, would have made dues payments optional for those nonmembers. Duke University settles retirement plan lawsuit for $10.65 million • Schlichter Bogard & Denton, a St. Louis law firm that has made a national name for itself suing employers over excessive retirement plan fees, said Wednesday that it has reached a $10.65 million settlement with Duke University. The settlement covers two lawsuits against the Durham, N.C., school. The first, filed in 2016, alleged excessive fees and the second, filed last year, accused Duke of improperly using assets of its 403(b) retirement plan to pay university employees. In addition to paying $10.65 million, Duke agreed to no longer make such employee payments, hire an independent consultant to review record keeping costs and make it easier for employees to transfer money out of frozen annuity accounts. Jerry Schlichter, the firm’s managing partner, said the changes would “enable Duke employees and retirees to improve their ability to build their retirement assets for years to come.” Schlichter’s firm has filed more than 30 excess-fee lawsuits since 2006 and has now reached 15 settlements on behalf of 401(k) and 403(b) participants. Its efforts have been credited with bringing down retirement plan fees nationwide. In 2015, the firm won a 9-0 U.S. Supreme Court decision in a case involving California utility Edison International.

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

2 PRIME LOCATIONS 3 SUITES LEFT!

skobusch@bommarito.net

From 500 to 1,100 sq. ft.

314-731-7025

Ask For Stacie Kobusch Today!

• Flexible Lease Terms Move In Ready • Primary Access to Hwy. 270, Hwy. 70, Hwy. 170 & Hwy. 40 • St. Louis' Best - Prices From $10.75 sq. ft. and $447.00 Per Month • Full Service Includes All Utilities • Minutes From St. Louis International Airport • Conveniently Located Near Post Offices • Carpeted Offices Wall To Wall • Door to Door Mail Service • Includes Janitorial Services • 24/7 Digital Video Surveillance • Great Hwy. and Major Artery Visibility • Call Today for Details And Appointment • 24/7 - On Call Management Team $ave Money On Your Next Office Space

Deposit & Loan Guide

Alliance Credit Union

Synchrony Bank

6 mo CD Min

0.86

5

10,000 1,000

12 mo CD Min

18 mo CD Min

1.31

1.81

2.06

2.31

2.51

3.01

1,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

1,000

24 mo CD Min

36 mo CD Min

60 mo CD Min

1.20

NA

NA

2.65

2.75

NA

0

NA

NA

2,000 2,000

2.80

2.85

3.10

2,000 2,000 2,000

Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.

By Sabrina Karl Certificates of deposit are generally pretty up CD, not only will you be hit with an early straightforward: You choose a term and the withdrawal fee, but you’ll miss out on the bank pays you a fixed interest rate as long higher rates you would have earned in later as you keep your funds there until maturity. years.

But some banks will throw a specialty CD or two onto their menu. One is the step-up CD, and its name can sometimes confuse. So let’s dig into what step-up certificates are, and what they’re not.

Shopper beware that there are also bumpup and raise-your-rate CDs. With these, you can choose to raise your CD’s APY to the bank’s current (presumably higher) rate, usually once or twice during the term.

Step-up and rising rate CDs are usually the same thing. Both pay pre-established interest rates that increase at intervals throughout the term. For instance, a five-year stepup CD may pay 0.5% in Year 1, then 1.0% in Year 2, and so forth until it pays 2.5% in Year 5.

Also note that some banks have begun interchanging these terms. So while the definitions above are traditionally true, you may see a CD marketed as a step-up when actually it’s a bump-up.

Step-up CDs are typically advertised with their highest rate highlighted, so be sure That means your true earnings are a blend- to read the fine print on what the blended ed rate that averages the various tiers. In rate will be. It’s likely you can earn more the example above, the CD would pay an by shopping diligently among the fixed-rate certificates. In any case, be sure you underactual rate of 1.5% over five years. stand exactly what it is you’re looking at. Of course, if you cash out early on a stepRate Criteria: Rates effective as of 01/15/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.

Bank-issued, FDIC-insured 1-year

2-year

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

Call or visit your local financial advisor today.

FDI-1867H-A

(636) 561-5441

APY*

Minimum deposit $1,000.00

* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 01/16/2019. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC).

STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

3-year

2.55 % 2.70 % 3.00%

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling.

www.synchronybank.com

What is a step-up or rising rate CD?

Compare Our CD Rates “I’m so glad I found you!”

800-869-3813

Savings Update

- 2 LOCATIONS -

Come in and find out why our clients say,

636-343-7005 www.alliancecu.com

60-month is for new money only.

NA

Phone / Website

TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE, CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492

BUSINESS CENTERS

“Bommarito - We Make Office Space Affordable!”

3 mo CD Min

3.01 1.24

*See Bommarito Leasing Representative For Full Details.

HAZELWOOD - 320 Brookes Dr. WEST COUNTY - 13610 Barrett Office Dr. Bommarito.com

Int Chking Money Acct Mkt Acct Min Min

Institution

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Heather Aehle Financial Advisor

Katie Warchol, AAMS® Financial Advisor

1001 Craig Rd Ste 101 Creve Coeur, MO 63146 314-809-1944

101 S Hanley Road, Suite 475 Clayton, MO 63105 314-862-1592

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


BUSINESS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Process for historic tax credits ‘train wreck’ HISTORIC • FROM C1

90-day review process to one that is taking over a year in some cases, creating uncertainty for a development community that has come to rely on the credits to finance many projects. “It’s a train wreck,” said Deb Sheals, a historic preservation consultant in Columbia, Mo. “You can’t wait a year. I’ve got clients who are trying to do good things for their hometowns by investing in their downtown, and it’s taken a year to get an answer.” Missouri has long had one of the largest state historic tax credit programs in the country, ranking well above any other state in the number of projects and the amount of money invested, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. St. Louis developers, with a vast stock of turn-of-the-20thcentury buildings to choose from, have especially benefited from the credits. Between 2002 and 2016, the $3.16 billion invested in local projects that used the credits was the most in the country, according to the National Trust, ranking above even far larger old cities such as New York and Philadelphia. As a result, developers and the banks that lend to them have come to rely on the credits, which reimburse up to 25 percent of qualified project expenses after it’s complete. And there’s still plenty of empty old buildings in town that need rehabbing. Though Missouri legislators last year lowered the cap on how many historic credits can be issued a year to $90 million from $140 million, that change isn’t causing the hold-up. Rather than the Department of Economic Development, which actually issues the tax credits, the slowdown is in the State Historic Preservation Office that reviews applications to ensure designs comport with historic preservation standards. It first reviews a project on the front end — often allowing developers to borrow money based on a promise of credits at a project’s completion — and on the back end, to ensure the developer maintained the historic elements of a building as promised. “I am aware of it,” Missouri Department of Natural Resources Director Carol Comer, whose department includes the preservation office, said Thursday. “We’re addressing the problem.” Due to staff turnover, the state historic preservation office was down to just one professional reviewer in recent months. It has since hired another and an administrative staffer in an effort to get the office back up to full strength, which developers and historic preservation advocates say is usually three to four project reviewers plus some administrative support staff. “Hopefully we’ll have another reviewer on board in the next few weeks,” said Mike Sutherland, deputy division director for the Missouri parks department, which oversees the office. “We’ve been working pretty hard to get back to fully staffed, and we’re just about to that point.”

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The renovation of the Cupples 9 building, located at 900 Spruce Street in downtown St. Louis, was completed in September 2012 using historic tax credits granted by Missouri’s Tax Credit Review Commission.

LISA BROWN • lbrown@post-dispatch.com

The Missouri Theatre building in midtown was redeveloped as the Angad Arts Hotel in 2017. The hotel recently opened, and the developer is seeking reimbursement of tax credits.

In the meantime, the backup is having an effect. The $67.8 million “Delmar Divine” plan, announced in 2017, to turn the empty St. Luke’s Hospital on Delmar Boulevard into affordable apartments for social services professionals is waiting for its application to be processed so it can finalize its financing package. “The one thing we are still waiting on is our tax credit approval,” Craig Heller, representing the development team made up of former Build-A-Bear Workshop CEO Maxine Clark and Clayco development affiliate CRG, told a St. Louis board last month during a hearing on the project’s request for property tax abatement. The review delays are also on the back end of the process, after projects are complete and awaiting the issuance of tax credits. Citing the delay in obtaining state historic tax credits, a development group that includes Lutheran Messiah Church and its nonprofit consultant Rise Com-

munity Development this month sought a six month loan extension from a city development agency that issued bonds to finance the rehab of 12 properties in the Fox Park and Tower Grove East neighborhoods.

‘UNDUE BURDEN’ The project, which is complete, is still paying around $22,000 in interest a month on its construction loan while it waits for the state historic tax credits to be issued. That’s the last piece its lenders and investors are waiting on before signing off on a permanent loan, which would cost around a tenth of the interest the developers are paying now, said Mark Stroker, Director of Real Estate Development at Rise. “It creates an undue burden in terms of what it costs to put these things together,” he said. Rise and its partners are working to “beg, plead and cajole our investors to fund that installment without the benefit of actually having the credits, and that’s a leap for them.”

Lawrence Group CEO Steve Smith said he just submitted his final application to receive reimbursement on the recently completed Angad Arts Hotel, a $65 million rehab of the former Missouri Theatre office building in Grand Center. “I’ve already been in communication with my lenders to say, we’re really not sure how long it’s going to take,” Smith said. Some of the issue was the state’s practice of hiring architects to become historic preservation reviewers. In a good economy and in a state government known for paying its workers less than other states, finding someone with that professional degree was difficult. Sutherland, at the state parks division, said his office recently did some research and found that it was only a long-standing practice — not a requirement — that plan reviewers be architects. Most other states with historic tax credit programs don’t require that, and he said they were able to draw more interest in the positions from historic preservation professionals by removing the architecture degree requirement. While those in the industry agree the staff turnover and lack of hiring was an issue, they also suspect former Gov. Eric Greitens, a vocal critic of the state’s tax credit programs, sought to slow the review process and added to the backup. “I think they didn’t want to see the program work,” Sheals, the Columbia consultant said. If they slowed the administrative review, they hoped, “people would just give up and go away.” One internal policy change Greitens added was a final administrative sign-off above the plan reviewer by a deputy administrator. Sutherland, hired in mid-2017 by the Greitens ad-

Shutdown has added to woes for farmers FARMERS • FROM C1

know what to expect, and indicated that it’s possible farmers may need to brace for high-impact tariffs spiraling into the following year. “I think we will be in this time next year before we see that decision again,” said Doggett, referring to President Donald Trump administration’s move to issue two rounds of relief payments to farmers in a bid to negate economic harm from tariffs on products from soybeans to pork. Securing a second round of payments — which, for soybeans, brought government compensation to $1.65 per bushel — was no sure thing, said Doggett, who gave “a lot of credit” to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue for bringing them to fruition. Doggett said that agricultural spending measures can often be opposed by Mick Mulvaney, the White House’s director of the Office of Management and Budget. With Mulvaney now doubling as Trump’s acting chief of staff, Doggett said there are concerns in the agriculture community about what might happen with him as a dominant influence in the president’s orbit — particularly with a steep deficit already jeopardizing spending. “We’re going to have a trillion-dollar deficit this year. It’s going to be hard,” said Doggett, sizing up the chances of continued tariff relief from the government, if trade tension grinds on. If it creeps into 2020, he added that things may be made even more unpredictable amid the political “silly season” of a presidential election

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Starkey offloads soybeans in Brownsburg, Ind., in September. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced Jan. 8 an extension of a deadline for farmers to apply for payments to offset losses because of the China trade dispute.

year. But those in the agriculture industry face big decisions and spillover effects far sooner. While soybean farmers have already been stung by the dispute with their largest foreign market, Chinese tariffs on that commodity and others have had farreaching consequences. “Until the Chinese start buying soybeans like they were before, some of those acres are going to go into corn and that will affect the price for corn,” Doggett said. He added that corn farmers, meanwhile, are also hurt by the erosion of China as a “huge market for ethanol.” While some farmers are worried about continued tariff troubles, others are hopeful that trade relationships can be fixed by

the time they need to sell their harvested crops from storage bins. “I’m hopeful that a trade deal will happen with China,” said Joshlin Yoder, a corn and soybean farmer from Leonard, Mo., who agreed that “trade is obviously the No. 1” issue he faces. “I’m optimistic that in the next two, three, four months, I’ll be able to sell at a better price than they currently are.” On this side of the Pacific Ocean, at least one major trade agreement was seemingly reached months ago, but the “new NAFTA” — officially called the USMCA, or U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement — has not been solidified. The agreement is not a done deal until formally ratified by Congress — a step Doggett described as “our

ministration, said he does sign off on the historic reviews but the added time is “not significant” and he relies on the opinions of the experts in the office. Asked whether there had been an administrative slowdown of application processing under the last administration, Sutherland said: “our role is to carry out the policy that the policymakers have made” and he’s currently doing all he can to resolve the backlog. The office has authorized overtime and even some seasonal work by retired employees with expertise in the program’s requirements, Sutherland said. One of them should start soon. The industry is hopeful that Gov. Mike Parson’s administration, which is close to proposing new rules for historic tax credit reviews as required by last year’s legislation lowering the cap, is more open to the program. Missouri Preservation Executive Director Bill Hart, whose organization advocates for the program, said he has spoken with Parson’s staff about the backlog and issues at the historic preservation office. “I see a light at the end of the tunnel,” Hart said. “I think the current administration has done a lot of things to help stabilize” the program. Even so, it could take some time to get back to normal. And on top of everything, the federal government shutdown means National Park Service employees who also participate in the historic review are now off the job. “The wheels of government turn very slow,” Sheals said. “But we’re in a huge hole here.” Jack Suntrup of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

biggest legislative battle.” The old agreement remains in place until both chambers of Congress ratify a replacement. With Mexico ranking as the largest foreign market for U.S. corn, Doggett said that the prospect of pulling out of NAFTA without a new agreement in place “scares the heck out of us.” Trade, though, is not the only source of drama from Washington that affects farmers. The ongoing government shutdown also has ramifications. Tariff relief payments, for example, are on hold for some farmers while the gears of the federal workforce are at a halt. “Those checks are not going to be able to come,” said Brent Hoerr, a farmer from Palmyra, Mo., who attended the soil health conference and has kept some of his crop stored away. “I’m going to be waiting.” It also affects farmer loan applications and crop reports that help growers develop strategies for planting and marketing, according to people like Martin. “Some guys are trading in the dark or maybe going to sit on the sidelines until that information is provided,” he said. “All of that is woven into the fabric of how we do business,” added Doggett. “As much as people in agriculture complain about government, when government isn’t around, it impacts their lives and not in a good way.” Whether thrown curveballs by Mother Nature or by government policy, Hoerr says that all farmers like him can do is try to “control the controllable” and seek to minimize their dependence on any one thing. But it’s often hard for farmers to fully buffer themselves. “It seems like every crisis, there’s a direct link to agriculture,” he said. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


MARKET WATCH

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

TICKER

First Data Corp VF Corp lululemon athletica Goldman Sachs Grp Canopy Growth Corp Fst Republic Bank Suzaon Papele Celu Bank of America Citigroup Align Technology Inc Spotify Technology Comerica Inc Edwards Life Sci M&T Bank Huazhu Group ADS

FDC VFC LULU GS CGC FRC SUZ BAC C ALGN SPOT CMA EW MTB HTHT

15 BEST MID-CAP STOCKS

DIV

YLD

52-WEEK P/E HIGH LOW

FRIDAY CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... 2.04 ... 3.20f ... .72 ... .60 1.80 ... ... 2.40f ... 4.00 .34e

... 2.5 ... 1.6 ... .7 ... 2.0 2.9 ... ... 3.0 ... 2.4 1.0

12 40 61 8 ... 20 ... 11 9 59 dd 11 56 13 29

22.95 82.34 152.07 202.54 43.52 96.02 23.60 29.30 63.12 220.09 133.66 81.19 168.41 165.59 34.93

5.67 10.88 19.91 25.61 5.27 11.53 2.77 3.27 6.43 21.84 13.14 7.88 15.61 14.78 3.10

26.62 97.00 164.79 275.31 59.25 106.75 24.22 33.05 80.70 398.88 198.99 102.66 175.00 197.37 49.60

14.73 67.18 74.90 151.70 25.26 79.42 18.31 22.66 48.42 177.93 103.29 63.69 119.93 133.78 24.90

32.8 15.2 15.1 14.5 13.8 13.6 13.3 12.6 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.7 10.2 9.8 9.7

44.7 17.8 33.7 26.5 66.0 19.3 7.3 25.4 25.6 10.5 25.1 23.8 16.8 19.4 26.4

COMPANY

|9632 24.5 6431| -3.8 |9999421 86.3 876521| -20.3 9 | 8765 41.4 7| 643 9.0 |9997642 72.9 654321| -5.3 875| -17.4 932| -21.9 0 864| -14.0 |981 32.1 753| -7.0 76543| -10.4

TICKER

Valhi Inc Bank OZK Roan Resources Inc Newmark Group Inc Rite Aid Corp Coupa Software Inc Visteon Corp Rowan Cos plc Gannett Co Liberty Oilfield Svc RMR Group Inc Nutanix Inc Lending Tree Inc Knight-Swift Transp Okta Inc

DIV

VHI OZK ROAN NMRK RAD COUP VC RDC GCI LBRT RMR NTNX TREE KNX OKTA

COMPANY

TICKER

Tesla Inc Newmont Mining Edison Intl Alnylam Pharmaceutic DR Horton Inc Atlassian Corp plc Lennar Corp A CarMax Inc Sprint Corp Qualcomm Inc

DIV

YLD

P/E

TSLA ... NEM .56 EIX 2.45f ALNY ... DHI .50 TEAM ... LEN .16 KMX ... S ... QCOM 2.48

... 1.8 4.5 ... 1.3 ... .4 ... ... 4.5

dd 387.46 244.59 24 42.04 29.06 12 71.00 45.50 dd 153.99 60.27 14 52.74 32.39 dd 98.21 47.74 8 72.17 37.29 14 81.67 55.24 4 6.62 4.81 dd 76.50 48.56

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

YLD P/E

.08 .88f ... .36 ... ... ... .40 .64 .05p 1.40 ... ... .24 ...

10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS 52-WEEK HIGH LOW

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

2.3 2.7 ... 3.5 ... ... ... 3.3 5.7 ... 2.1 ... ... .7 ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

31 9.24 1.63 10 53.70 21.02 ... 16.30 7.89 15 15.62 8.63 2 2.44 .60 dd 84.53 33.85 15 139.45 56.59 21 20.87 7.77 cc 12.23 8.37 18 23.90 12.32 11 98.00 51.80 ... 64.87 29.34 dd 404.40 183.25 21 51.94 23.27 dd 77.91 26.20

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 3.45 32.06 11.15 10.33 0.97 76.66 76.33 12.12 11.25 15.23 67.08 52.16 288.46 32.64 77.90

1.12 5.91 2.04 0.62 0.16 11.67 10.61 1.64 1.50 2.00 8.72 6.70 36.31 3.99 9.49

48.1 22.6 22.4 6.4 19.2 18.0 16.1 15.6 15.4 15.1 14.9 14.7 14.4 13.9 13.9

84.5 9731| -40.7 47.9 976| -44.0 28.0 875321| -26.9 6.4 953| -34.6 36.5 9876321| -60.9 40.5 9 | 996 104.4 25.5 9765421| -47.4 48.9 8764321| -29.9 26.5 64| -5.1 15.3 95| -34.0 21.7 |541 3.2 43.0 |963 36.6 42.2 86532| -22.8 36.1 876| -28.0 42.7 |9996 185.3

COMPANY

TICKER

Avalon GloboCare Cp VirnetX Holding Cerecor Inc Blue Apron Holdings Millendo Therap Mercer Intl Alder BioPharm Maxwell Technol Nymox Pharmaceutical Maiden Holdings Attunity Ltd Empire Resorts Matinas BioPharma Profire Energy Inc Intelg Sys

COMPANY

302.26 -45.00 -13.0 -5.5 | 0.0 31.77 -3.11 -8.9 -5.2 87543| -18.4 54.88 -4.44 -7.5 -2.3 765| -9.4 83.12 -6.00 -6.7 31.3 986421| -35.6 37.18 -2.42 -6.1 10.6 971| -26.8 90.67 -4.98 -5.2 11.8 |9997 69.4 44.10 -2.31 -5.0 13.2 98653| -36.4 61.92 -3.07 -4.7 5.0 75421| -7.6 6.07 -0.30 -4.7 4.8 7| 652 9.5 55.27 -2.23 -3.9 0.8 865432| -15.9

TICKER

Organogenesis Hold PG&E Corp Spectrum Brands Hld Signet Jewelers Immunmedc IAMGold Corp Acceleron Pharma Ligand Pharm Prestige Brands Hecla Mng

DIV

YLD P/E

ORGO ... ... PCG 2.12f 29.3 SPB 1.68 3.0 SIG 1.48 5.8 IMMU ... ... IAG 1.52f 53.7 XLRN ... ... LGND ... ... PBH ... ... HL .01e .4

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

... 310.90 1 49.42 5 126.66 dd 71.07 dd 27.33 dd 6.52 dd 59.59 15 278.62 2 46.44 dd 4.50

9.47 5.07 50.55 24.97 12.86 2.75 32.53 98.56 26.25 2.17

... dd dd dd dd 13 dd dd dd dd cc dd ... 1 cc

52-WEEK FRIDAY HIGH LOW CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

4.15 6.44 5.74 4.20 18.00 19.14 20.87 6.27 4.60 9.10 25.51 30.98 1.48 5.30 20.42

2.22 1.64 1.20 0.33 2.59 3.17 2.58 0.55 0.41 0.28 4.30 2.42 0.19 0.35 3.50

2.02 2.10 2.50 .65 6.77 9.36 9.44 1.77 1.25 1.20 6.51 6.31 .32 1.36 4.26

5.60 5.52 5.10 1.40 11.19 14.77 13.41 2.92 2.26 1.59 24.69 14.02 1.12 2.11 21.30

65.7 42.3 30.8 30.8 30.1 27.3 23.8 23.2 22.2 21.4 21.1 20.9 20.6 19.9 19.7

100.0 |9986543 107.5 119.0 |9654321 45.6 59.4 |997542 86.1 112.4 986| -59.5 45.1 931| -37.4 52.6 |53 2.9 36.8 864321| -25.1 35.8 97631| -51.1 69.9 87643| -33.8 17.8 9954| -76.6 38.9 9 | 986543 275.0 55.8 9732| -46.6 86.7 7653| -16.7 44.5 2|1 0.5 80.2 9 | 986543 302.7

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

30.35 7.23 55.22 25.41 13.31 2.83 40.99 117.90 27.87 2.41

-79.8 -58.9 6.3 -28.5 -25.7 -22.3 -12.7 -12.5 -11.2 -11.1

-119.65 -10.36 3.25 -10.14 -4.60 -0.81 -5.94 -16.79 -3.51 -0.30

YLD P/E

AVCO ... ... VHC ... ... CERC ... ... APRN ... ... MLND ... ... MERC .50 3.4 ALDR ... ... MXWL ... ... NYMX ... ... MHLD .20m 12.6 ATTU ... ... NYNY ... ... MTNB ... ... PFIE ... ... INS ... ...

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

DIV

125.8 |9986543 455.6 -68.2 9975321| -85.6 6.3 976541| -53.9 -15.5 976432| -52.3 -11.5 7| 5421 13.1 -21.4 97631| -51.1 -1.2 64321| -6.8 -11.0 86531| -25.9 -6.8 931| -37.4 0.0 964321| -43.4

COMPANY

TICKER

Nautilus Inc Yangtze River Port Wins Finance Hldgs Legacy Reserves Inc Jounce Therapeutics Lexicon Pharma Proteostasis Tehrep Greenpro Capital Cp Casa Systems Inc Menus N.V.

NLS YERR WINS LGCY JNCE LXRX PTI GRNQ CASA MRUS

DIV ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

YLD P/E ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

10 17.20 ... 12.44 ... 165.00 dd 10.54 ... 29.25 dd 13.97 7 10.38 ... 22.70 28 34.21 ... 26.74

10.04 2.61 20.98 1.15 2.66 6.02 1.71 2.20 11.26 11.00

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 7.02 2.47 26.00 1.73 3.80 5.96 3.12 3.70 11.20 12.90

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR -37.0 -28.2 -26.8 -22.1 -21.2 -21.0 -20.6 -19.6 -18.6 -18.4

-4.13 -0.97 -9.50 -0.49 -1.02 -1.58 -0.81 -0.90 -2.56 -2.90

-31.6 86532| -11.4 -42.2 999874| -60.5 13.0 9999941| -80.6 28.1 97651| -23.1 32.4 999984| -72.5 -6.0 983| -24.3 -23.3 98621| -26.2 -19.4 99763| -38.3 -6.2 9865432| -27.9 -2.8 98765421| -31.7

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500 HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

AES Corp AFLAC s AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz Acuity AdobeInc AdvAuto AMD AffilMgrs Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE Alexion lf AlignTech Allegion Allergan AlliData AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenol Anadarko AnalogDev Ansys Anthem Aon plc Apache AptInv Apple Inc ApldMatl ArchDan Arconic AristaNetw Assurant Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD BB&T Cp

.55f 1.04 2.04f 1.28f 4.28f

12 16.28 9.86 15.55 +.16 +1.0 15 48.19 41.41 47.70 +2.01 +4.4 6 39.29 26.80 30.96 +.09 +.3 30 74.92 55.58 71.42 +2.41 +3.5 15 125.86 77.50 89.50 +2.26 +2.6 cc 459.75 216.00 333.74 +9.94 +3.1 23 175.64 132.63 150.45 +4.22 +2.9 26 84.68 43.71 48.65 +2.11 +4.5 14 173.01 103.48 120.57 -1.03 -.8 51 277.61 179.34 247.51 +9.96 +4.2 29 186.15 102.15 167.61 +8.19 +5.1 cc 34.14 9.04 20.77 +.50 +2.5 8 216.99 88.47 108.57 +6.46 +6.3 73 75.11 60.42 71.93 +1.55 +2.2 24 175.17 148.44 158.62 +1.83 +1.2 47 83.08 57.18 65.79 +2.69 +4.3 8 74.83 57.28 64.86 +.72 +1.1 12 134.87 71.89 76.63 -.78 -1.0 28 130.53 109.04 124.26 +3.92 +3.3 41 140.77 92.56 117.05 +5.92 +5.3 59 398.88 177.93 220.09+21.84 +11.0 ... 94.30 73.85 83.51 +1.44 +1.8 24 197.00 125.84 160.22+10.96 +7.3 10 276.00 142.58 172.52 +5.05 +3.0 21 46.05 36.84 42.95 +.99 +2.4 13 104.47 77.00 85.70 +2.25 +2.7 27 1273.89 970.11 1098.26+41.07 +3.9 33 1291.44 977.66 1107.30+42.83 +4.0 15 71.86 46.49 48.31 -.59 -1.2 cc 2050.501265.93 1696.20+55.64 +3.4 24 70.95 51.89 67.24 +1.69 +2.6 6 59.08 28.81 33.97 +2.17 +6.8 18 81.05 62.71 76.09 +1.65 +2.2 14 114.55 87.54 100.48 +1.93 +2.0 dd 65.05 36.16 44.16 +2.50 +6.0 62 168.58 130.37 164.67 +3.27 +2.0 40 98.18 76.04 92.61 +1.97 +2.2 9 183.90 95.69 121.11 +7.67 +6.8 9 106.27 69.36 79.86 +3.30 +4.3 30 81.92 63.14 72.36 +1.81 +2.6 18 210.19 163.31 203.88 +3.32 +1.7 32 97.56 74.95 82.49 +.99 +1.2 17 76.70 40.40 48.67 +1.02 +2.1 23 103.59 76.62 91.36 +1.30 +1.4 44 190.45 136.80 161.71 +6.96 +4.5 15 300.57 215.52 266.12 +9.48 +3.7 50 166.55 133.41 154.41 +7.16 +4.9 20 50.03 24.56 32.09 +1.24 +4.0 27 47.66 37.97 46.99 +1.57 +3.5 16 233.47 142.00 156.82 +4.53 +3.0 10 62.40 28.79 35.71 +.93 +2.7 18 52.06 39.16 44.26 +1.10 +2.5 dd 31.17 15.63 20.34 +.66 +3.4 34 313.37 187.08 232.08+13.98 +6.4 48 111.43 82.31 96.38 +3.80 +4.1 dd 159.94 101.55 141.73 +4.99 +3.6 36 153.51 107.61 135.18 +3.53 +2.7 17 896.03 590.76 844.32+21.44 +2.6 31 191.91 152.65 184.09 +5.50 +3.1 28 123.67 82.89 96.57 +1.96 +2.1 13 56.31 40.68 49.29 +3.68 +8.1

2.92 .34f .52 .24 1.20 .66f 4.40 1.28 1.34f 3.88f .84 2.88 2.28 1.34 1.84 3.44f 1.90f .40 2.68f 1.56 1.28 3.36f 1.82 3.60 1.60f .56f 5.80f .92 1.20f 1.92 3.00 1.60 1.00 1.52 2.92 .80 1.34 .24 2.40f 3.16 5.88 2.26 1.62f

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split.

NAME

DIV

PE

BallCorp s BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter s BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrghtFn n BrMySq BrownFB s CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CF Inds s CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celanese Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm n Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt s Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy s Clorox CocaCola CognizTch ColgPalm Comcast s Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil

.40 .60 1.12 .76 3.08f

26 11 13 33 98 28 18 19 16 10 34 11 36 29 cc 50 29 38 17 11 dd 24 40 31 17 11 34 44 13 12 dd 14 12 13 10 27 18 21 6 28 58 24 cc 17 ... 11 14 28 20 9 9 28 25 90 21 26 17 11 12 19 54

1.80 13.20f 1.00 8.22f .68 3.80 1.64f .66f 1.24 .20 .72 1.20 2.00 2.80a 1.53f .88 2.00 .28f 1.40 1.60 1.90 2.00 3.44 2.16 1.11 2.16 4.48 2.90e .87f .72 2.12 2.05f 1.32 1.80 1.28f 1.40 3.84 1.56 .80 1.68 .76 2.40f .85 1.22f

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

50.98 33.05 58.99 78.38 265.87 224.07 84.37 388.67 594.52 29.81 394.28 58.22 132.82 39.44 67.55 70.05 59.58 124.56 50.43 61.59 56.51 101.20 197.08 53.82 76.24 83.88 28.85 47.40 48.10 106.50 75.75 81.67 72.70 173.19 119.29 107.29 148.98 29.72 24.20 72.40 396.64 133.88 530.68 157.50 69.49 128.00 82.86 217.34 49.47 80.70 48.23 116.82 167.70 50.84 85.10 77.91 44.00 102.66 39.43 163.11 80.24

34.71 22.66 43.67 61.05 208.62 184.75 47.72 249.17 360.79 22.45 292.47 32.46 107.84 25.04 28.52 44.30 44.57 87.87 37.45 41.38 35.70 78.83 149.38 40.48 48.43 60.14 20.95 35.49 32.04 69.90 42.17 55.24 45.64 112.06 82.91 58.59 97.61 24.81 13.97 48.78 250.10 100.22 247.52 119.54 44.87 55.62 66.33 147.38 37.35 48.42 27.62 83.70 113.57 41.45 59.47 57.41 30.43 63.69 20.22 93.31 50.18

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

50.26 +2.14 +4.4 29.30 +3.27 +12.6 52.66 +4.58 +9.5 70.63 +3.82 +5.7 242.08+13.21 +5.8 204.48 +8.19 +4.2 58.71 +2.20 +3.9 337.42 +4.21 +1.3 419.45+21.54 +5.4 25.63 -.15 -.6 364.73+11.83 +3.4 40.62 +1.42 +3.6 121.52 +2.37 +2.0 37.69 +2.13 +6.0 36.43 +2.87 +8.6 50.12 +2.13 +4.4 45.91 -.95 -2.0 95.09 +3.70 +4.0 44.55 +2.02 +4.7 49.24 +1.27 +2.6 44.18 -.22 -.5 88.67 +3.04 +3.6 183.43 +2.88 +1.6 50.88 +1.15 +2.3 67.36 +2.14 +3.3 65.52 -.29 -.4 25.62 +1.44 +6.0 46.62 +2.17 +4.9 35.49 +.45 +1.3 84.97 +4.03 +5.0 49.05 +1.46 +3.1 61.92 -3.07 -4.7 54.88 +2.48 +4.7 136.60 +5.36 +4.1 97.81 +3.05 +3.2 86.27 -1.13 -1.3 126.62 +6.64 +5.5 29.44 +.06 +.2 15.83 -.44 -2.7 54.06 +.18 +.3 291.40 -3.14 -1.1 114.37 +1.83 +1.6 513.24 +6.29 +1.2 133.59 +4.07 +3.1 68.36 +1.21 +1.8 74.74 +4.10 +5.8 80.35 +3.30 +4.3 184.91 +7.12 +4.0 45.03 +1.54 +3.5 63.12 +6.43 +11.3 35.43 +2.80 +8.6 108.74 +2.60 +2.4 154.37 +1.02 +.7 47.61 +.27 +.6 67.82 +2.90 +4.5 62.63 +.53 +.9 36.21 +.58 +1.6 81.19 +7.88 +10.7 21.57 -.04 -.2 124.87 +4.42 +3.7 67.90 +1.51 +2.3

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.19 GlbBdAdv 8.21 +.01 ReltvValA m 5.10 +.11 AMG YacktmanI d 19.66 +.33 AQR MgdFtsStratI 8.14 -.10 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 11.36 +.30 American Century EqIncInv 8.28 +.19 GrInv 30.71 +.91 HeritageA m 16.71 +.52 IntlGrA m 10.60 +.19 SelA m 65.13 +1.98 UltraInv 43.82 +1.30 American Funds AMCpA m 29.89 +.82 AmrcnBalA m 25.81 +.43 AmrcnHiIncA m 9.93 +.06 AmrcnMutA m 39.22 +.74 BdfAmrcA m 12.55 -.04 CptWldGrIncA m 45.24 +.98 CptlIncBldrA m 58.10 +.58 CptlWldBdA m 19.31 -.08 EuroPacGrA m 47.72 +1.10 FdmtlInvsA m 55.65 +1.49 GlbBalA m 30.96 +.34 GrfAmrcA m 46.12 +1.36 IncAmrcA m 21.35 +.25 IntlGrIncA m 30.76 +.58 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.18 -.03 InvCAmrcA m 35.84 +.84 NewWldA m 60.62 +1.38 NwPrspctvA m 40.10 +.92 SmCpWldA m 50.38 +1.02 TheNewEcoA m 41.57 +1.09 TxExBdA m 12.80 WAMtInvsA m 43.31 +1.05 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.02 Artisan IntlInstl 28.70 +.61 IntlSmMdInv 12.15 +.23 IntlValueInstl 33.31 +1.01 SmCpInvs 29.32 +1.24 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 10.53 -.02 CorPlusBdInstl 10.84 -.02 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.58 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m9.76 +.22 EqDivInstl 19.80 +.47 GlbAllcIncInstl 17.99 +.19 GlbAllcIncInvA m17.88 +.18 GlbAllcIncInvC m16.03 +.16 HYBdInstl 7.40 +.04 LowDurBdInstl 9.45 StrIncOpIns 9.63 StratMuOpIns 11.39 +.02 TtlRetInstl 11.23 -.02 CGM Rlty 27.63 +.45 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 12.89 +.09

+.5 +.6 +6.7

+1.1 +3.0 +12.7

+1.9 MS 2 +3.3 IB +8.2 LV 1

+3.2

+13.9

+8.2 LV

-2.1

-8.3

+6.1

+11.4

+4.8 +8.0 +8.4 +5.3 +7.4 +8.4

+12.5 +8.9 LV 1 +16.4 +10.9 LG 3 +12.7 +7.1 MG 3 +6.4 +0.7 FG 4 +15.1 +10.6 LG 4 +18.1 +11.9 LG 2

+7.1 +3.7 +3.9 +4.6

+15.3 +9.6 LG +9.9 +7.0 MA +9.3 +3.1 HY +13.7 +8.8 LV +1.7 +2.1 CI +11.1 +5.1 WS +7.3 +4.1 IH +2.6 +1.0 IB +9.1 +2.6 FG +14.7 +9.3 LB +7.5 +3.4 IH +16.8 +10.4 LG +9.2 +5.6 AL +8.3 +0.6 FB +.8 +1.0 CS +13.7 +8.6 LB +11.9 +3.0 EM +13.4 +7.5 WS +13.4 +6.1 SW +16.1 +8.5 LG +2.1 +3.6 MI +14.8 +9.3 LB

+5.7 +3.1 +.3 +5.9 +6.4 +3.7 +7.9 +3.5 +5.3 -.2 +5.7 +5.7 +6.5 +7.4 +7.1 +.4 +5.4 +.1

+4.6

+5.2 +7.6 +7.3 +12.5

+7.3 +4.4 +9.0 +20.3

+.2 +.1

+2.1 +2.8 +1.7

+8.8 +5.9 +3.4 +3.4 +3.3 +3.9 +.2 +.4 +.5 +.4

1

-1.9 +5.1 LV

4

3 1 1 1 2 4 2 3 3 4 2 3 1 3 4 4 1 2 1 4 3 1

+3.9 MU +1.6 +0.1 +3.2 +8.2

FG FR FB SG

2 2 1 1

+2.7 CI +2.9 CI +1.5 CS

3 3 1

+8.1 +13.0 +6.1 +5.8 +5.0 +8.5 +1.6 +3.0 +3.3 +2.1

-6.5 +8.1 +2.7 +2.4 +1.7 +4.1 +1.5 +2.3 +4.4 +2.8

EE LV IH IH IH HY CS NT MI CI

2 2 4 4 4 3

+9.2

+10.3

+7.1 LB

5

+1.7

+5.3

+3.4 NE

1

2 4

NAME

FRI NAV

Causeway IntlValInstl d 14.55 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 174.59 LgCpGrI 46.86 Columbia DivIncIns 20.63 GlbDivOppA m 17.01 SelM/CValA m 9.71 DFA EMktCorEqI 20.20 EMktSCInstl 19.55 EmMktsInstl 27.07 EmMktsValInstl 28.15 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.57 GlbEqInstl 21.57 GlbRlEsttSec 10.56 InflProtSecIns 11.37 IntlCorEqIns 12.46 IntlRlEsttScIns 4.80 IntlSmCoInstl 16.93 IntlSmCpValIns 17.70 IntlValInstl 17.03 ItmGovtFIIns 12.13 LgCpIntlInstl 21.20 OneYearFIInstl 10.28 RlEsttSecInstl 34.63 ShTrmExQtyI 10.58 TAUSCorEq2Instl 17.36 TMdUSMktwdVl 28.44 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.86 USCorEq1Instl 22.14 USCorEqIIInstl 20.52 USLgCo 20.59 USLgCpValInstl 34.67 USMicroCpInstl 20.26 USSmCpInstl 32.74 USSmCpValInstl 33.39 USTrgtedValIns 22.02 Davis NYVentureA m 26.73 Delaware Inv ValInstl 20.74 Dodge & Cox Bal 98.09 GlbStk 11.88 Inc 13.33 IntlStk 39.54 Stk 186.34 DoubleLine CorFII 10.65 LowDurBdI 9.92 TtlRetBdI 10.40 TtlRetBdN b 10.39 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 31.75 FltngRtInstl 8.87 Edgewood GrInstl 31.11 FPA Crescent d 31.41 NewInc 9.87 USVal 9.50 Federated InsHYBdIns d 9.54 StratValDivIns 5.42 TtlRetBdInstl 10.48

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.30 +6.9 +4.47 +9.5 +1.21 +8.1

+0.2 FV

3

+10.8 +5.5 LG +16.7 +12.5 LG

+6.8

5 2

+.53 +4.9 +.34 +5.8 +.36 +9.1

+13.5 +7.8 +10.5

+9.4 LV 1 +1.7 WS 4 +5.2 MV 2

+.32 +.24 +.44 +.43 +.01 +.52 +.16 -.07 +.19 +.03 +.19 +.17 +.31 -.06 +.35 +.01 +.68

+14.8 +12.6 +15.6 +18.4 +1.6 +13.0 +7.6 +2.0 +9.4 +7.5 +9.1 +7.5 +10.5 +.7 +9.1 +1.2 +7.5 +1.6 +14.1 +13.3 +1.2 +14.8 +14.3 +14.7 +14.0 +14.6 +13.4 +13.4 +13.4

+3.4 +4.1 +3.5 +3.5 +1.9 +6.0 +7.5 +1.5 +2.0 +4.6 +2.9 +1.6 +0.8 +2.0 +1.7 +0.8 +9.2 +1.6 +7.7 +7.5 +0.9 +8.6 +7.6 +9.9 +7.6 +6.3 +6.0 +4.6 +5.0

+.50 +.81 +.01 +.62 +.58 +.58 +.98 +.46 +.84 +.85 +.63

+4.9 +4.3 +5.0 +4.8 +.2 +7.4 +5.6 +.3 +6.5 +5.0 +6.3 +6.3 +7.0 -.4 +6.1 +.1 +5.9 +.1 +8.0 +8.1 +.1 +7.7 +8.1 +6.6 +7.9 +9.6 +10.1 +11.3 +11.0

EM EM EM EM IB WS GR IP FB GR FQ FA FV GI FB UB SR CS MB LV IB LB MB LB LV SB SB SV SV

3 4 2 1 1 3 1 2 4 5 2 4 4 1 2 2 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 2 5 2 3 2 3

+.95 +9.1

+13.6

+7.8 LB

5

+.39 +5.9

+13.4

+9.0 LV

1

+2.04 +.30 +.01 +.85 +5.96

+5.2 +7.7 +.5 +7.1 +7.8

+12.1 +14.4 +3.4 +10.1 +16.7

+6.8 +5.6 +2.8 +0.8 +8.8

MA WS CI FV LV

2 4 2 4 2

-.01 +.01 -.02 -.03

+.4 +.3 -.2 -.2

+2.8 +2.4 +2.2 +1.9

+3.0 +1.9 +3.0 +2.7

CI CS CI CI

2

+.95 +6.4 +2.3 +1.06 +8.1

1 1

+15.0 +10.2 MG 3 +6.3 +3.3 BL 1 +19.4 +14.0 LG

1

+.75 +6.4 -.01 +.31 +7.5

+8.6 +2.5 +4.2

+4.7 MA 4 +1.7 CS 1 +3.2 LB 5

+.07 +4.4 +.06 +3.8 -.01 +.5

+8.8 +7.6 +2.9

+4.5 HY +7.2 LV +2.6 CI

2 2 3

NAME

DIV

PE

ConEd ConstellA CooperCo Corning Costco Coty CrwnCstle Cummins DR Horton DTE DXC Tch n Danaher Darden DaVita Inc Deere DeltaAir Dentsply DevonE DiambkEn DigitalRlt Discover DiscIncA DiscIncC DishNetw h Disney DollarGen DollarTree DomEngy Dover DukeEngy DukeRlty E-Trade eBay s EOG Rescs EastChem Eaton Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElectArts EliLilly EmersonEl Entergy Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EssexPT EsteeLdr EverestRe EversrceE Exelon Expedia h ExpdIntl ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp Facebook Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FidNatInfo FifthThird FstRepBk FirstEngy Fiserv s Flowserve Fluor FootLockr FordM Fortinet Fortive n FBHmSec FrankRes FrptMcM Gallaghr Gap Garmin Gartner GenDynam GenElec GenMills GenMotors GenuPrt GileadSci GlobPay s GoldmanS Goodyear Graingr HCA Hldg HCP Inc HP Inc Hallibrtn Hanesbds s HarleyD

2.86 2.96f .06 .72 2.28 .50 4.50f 4.56f .50 3.53 .76 .64 3.00

16 10 85 dd 32 ... cc 42 14 20 70 27 20 14 25 9 dd 17 16 51 12 14 13 10 15 17 13 14 16 21 22 18 13 dd 11 16 33 12 56 20 dd 21 38 18 99 44 46 42 8 22 13 54 20 22 13 21 27 15 28 24 10 22 20 9 20 8 37 cc 28 32 4 cc ... 14 11 8 28 11 21 39 18 dd 13 dd 21 8 38 8 7 22 20 17 7 cc 8 13

3.04f 1.40f .35 .32 .50 4.04 1.60

1.76f 1.16 3.34 1.92f 3.71 .86f .56 .88 2.48f 2.64 1.84f 2.45f 2.58f 1.94 3.64f 1.56 9.12 2.16 7.44 1.72f 5.60f 2.02 1.38 1.28 .90f 3.44 3.28 .64 1.60f 1.72f 2.60 4.08 1.28 .88f .72 1.52f .76 .84 1.38 .60a .28 .88f 1.04f .20 1.64 .97 2.12 3.72 .04m 1.96 1.52 2.88 2.28 .04 3.20f .64 5.44 .35p 1.48 .64 .72 .60 1.48

FRI NAME NAV Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 92.88 AsstMgr20% 12.89 AsstMgr50% 17.04 AsstMgr70% 20.46 BCGrowth 90.54 BCGrowth 13.66 BCGrowthK 90.66 Balanced 21.74 BalancedK 21.74 Cap&Inc 9.56 ChinaRegion 31.37 Contrafund 11.88 ContrafundK 11.88 ConvertibleSecs 26.53 CptlApprec 31.75 DivGro 27.08 DiversIntl 33.16 DiversIntlK 33.08 EmergMketsOpps17.44 EmergingAsia 38.74 EqDividendInc 23.56 EqIncome 54.36 ExMktIdxInPr 58.28 FltngRtHiInc 9.42 FourinOneIdx 42.65 Frdm 2015 12.23 Frdm 2020 15.23 Frdm 2025 13.29 Frdm 2030 16.47 Frdm 2035 13.78 Frdm 2040 9.63 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 12.01 GlobalexUSIdx 11.72 GrDiscv 33.47 GroCo 17.60 GroCo 15.54 GroCoK 17.61 Growth&Inc 35.95 IntlDiscv 38.12 IntlGr 14.18 IntlIdxInstlPrm 38.30 IntlVal 9.09 IntrmMuniInc 10.28 InvmGradeBd 10.89 InvmGradeBd 7.69 LowPrStk 46.50 LowPrStkK 46.45 Magellan 9.67 MidCapStock 32.67 NasdCmpIdx 92.87 NewMktsInc 14.74 OTCPortfolio 10.76 OTCPortfolioK 10.91 Overseas 42.98 Puritan 20.56 PuritanK 20.54 SCValue 14.02 ShTrmBd 8.53 SmCpOpps 12.54 StkSelorAllCp 41.44 TotalBond 10.29 TtlMktIdxF 75.66 TtlMktIdxInsPrm 75.63 USBdIdxF 11.25 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.25 Value 9.61 Worldwide 24.49 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 28.68 NewInsC m 24.59 NewInsI 29.37 StgInc 11.98 StgIncC m 11.78 StgIncI 11.98 TotalBondI 10.28 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 20.12 ConsumerStaples72.93 Energy 37.50 HealthCare 23.92 MedTech&Devcs 50.26 NaturalRes 25.03 Swre&ITSvcs 17.48 Technology 14.16 First Eagle GlbA m 53.54 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.24 FdrTFIncA1 m 11.60 GlbBdA m 11.51 GlbBdAdv 11.46 Gr,IncA m 22.15 GrA m 96.27 IncA1 m 2.24 IncAdv 2.22 IncC m 2.27 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.39 MutBeaconA m 14.31 MutBeaconC m 14.33 MutBeaconZ 14.44 MutEuropeanC m18.52 MutGlbDiscvA m28.00 MutGlbDiscvZ 28.58 MutZ 25.75 RisingDivsA m 58.33 UtlsA1 m 18.56 GE RSPUSEq 49.14 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 51.07 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 46.60 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b17.41 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 67.26 IntlInstl 35.63 Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 20.26 Hartford CptlApprecA m 32.14

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

NAME

DIV

1.20 9 59.38 .10 50 37.37 2.28f 21 133.97 9 47.82 .12 65 43.08 1.76 21 96.84 .20 dd 49.08 .64 6 15.03 12 111.36 1.60 26 88.08 cc 423.21 .92f dd 32.58 9 35.12 .56 24 42.04 .20 dd 17.29 .20 ... 17.70 4.44 13 184.20 .78 33 28.11 1.40 15 39.25 .88f 61 86.04 .44 24 37.76 1.48a 19 67.75 3.20f 25 186.91 2.20 16 115.61 4.80 28 360.88 12 61.18 1.60f 11 70.19 .64f 26 292.76 23 363.20 3.12 52 87.67 2.40 15 83.34 3.44f 46 71.99 .76 51 53.48 2.12f 1 49.42 3.80 12 163.59 1.92 19 122.07 1.64 13 32.46 1.28f 10 79.69 3.16 15 131.13 3.04 20 212.80 2.24 27 76.02 58 93.70 .72f 13 74.84 .70 14 20.26 3.71 32 122.51 .28 33 98.33 .76 17 95.93 1.44f 17 46.47 4.56 18 111.25 3.20f 12 123.97 2.95f 20 92.64 .32 cc 213.40 2.80 17 127.43 2.16f 10 75.59 1.92 27 68.95 2.87 23 96.90 .69e 26 73.69 3.60 10 127.14 1.80 18 56.68 6.80 22 234.90 .36 15 35.21 77 86.84 2.48 dd 76.50 .04p 22 39.79 2.12f 16 116.49 2.50 16 147.79 .08 13 18.60 .88f 17 102.17 3.47 24 229.75 2.71f 36 66.91 cc 179.49 2.22 22 70.64 26 420.29 .56 13 20.21 1.50f 35 78.54 1.48f 57 118.13 1.12 22 79.91 3.88f 24 209.38 72 42.95 1.85f 27 312.65 .90 23 104.35 2.80 15 135.65 2.00 28 217.31 cc 177.67 3.40f 32 106.54 20 333.74 cc 161.19 2.00 26 80.35 .52 20 60.22 2.52 8 62.70 .64 19 49.57 3.58 18 127.22 3.44 30 479.64 8.00 23 191.49 1.52 14 115.98 .88 24 68.39

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

43.69 +1.95 +4.7 32.20 +.56 +1.8 115.60 -.40 -.3 29.59 +.04 +.1 40.34 +.04 +.1 83.14 +2.44 +3.0 30.45 +1.34 +4.6 10.91 +.52 +5.0 46.20 +5.19 +12.7 62.98 +1.33 +2.2 339.10 +1.51 +.4 21.09 +.69 +3.4 18.57 +1.02 +5.8 31.77 -3.11 -8.9 12.52 +.28 +2.3 12.68 +.20 +1.6 176.09 +.38 +.2 26.65 +.26 +1.0 26.14 +.46 +1.8 80.45 +4.41 +5.8 23.39 +1.20 +5.4 47.52 +.14 +.3 169.05 +5.47 +3.3 91.16 +5.51 +6.4 267.75+11.70 +4.6 47.53 +1.34 +2.9 58.73 +2.14 +3.8 156.93 +8.10 +5.4 351.50+12.77 +3.8 67.03 +.81 +1.2 76.00 -.51 -.7 63.19 +3.39 +5.7 49.27 +1.17 +2.4 7.23 -10.36 -58.9 125.25 +6.15 +5.2 105.43 +3.57 +3.5 30.07 +.57 +1.9 62.98 +3.54 +6.0 91.90 +.78 +.9 162.49 +4.51 +2.9 69.90 +2.61 +3.9 91.12 +.47 +.5 41.17 +.72 +1.8 16.37 +1.16 +7.6 110.07 +1.91 +1.8 86.40 +2.96 +3.5 45.97 +.63 +1.4 42.53 -.35 -.8 73.79 +4.29 +6.2 95.30 +2.61 +2.8 85.67 +.90 +1.1 144.90 +2.66 +1.9 96.61 +6.36 +7.0 50.10 +4.08 +8.9 64.70 +2.34 +3.8 91.42 +.37 +.4 64.42 +2.74 +4.4 92.26 +4.52 +5.2 51.94 +.06 +.1 203.13 +2.43 +1.2 26.59 -1.99 -7.0 63.28 -.41 -.6 55.27 -2.23 -3.9 33.50 +1.20 +3.7 87.04 +2.54 +3.0 111.57 +6.14 +5.8 11.55 +.05 +.4 81.26 +4.01 +5.2 165.41 +6.24 +3.9 64.65 +.36 +.6 175.51 -.55 -.3 61.69 +1.90 +3.2 418.84+10.21 +2.5 15.70 +.92 +6.2 76.26 +1.61 +2.2 117.84 +3.03 +2.6 60.87 +2.49 +4.3 164.75 +8.90 +5.7 38.68 +.38 +1.0 282.04 +8.88 +3.3 93.01 +1.80 +2.0 109.35 +2.93 +2.8 188.64+12.66 +7.2 173.05 +3.26 +1.9 89.24 +1.71 +2.0 230.99+15.72 +7.3 152.51 +4.96 +3.4 44.73 +2.99 +7.2 47.98 +4.16 +9.5 40.23 -.44 -1.1 37.74 +1.17 +3.2 112.67 -1.39 -1.2 398.53 +2.60 +.7 173.96 +1.61 +.9 70.07 +.05 +.1 48.01 +1.67 +3.6

Smucker SnapOn SouthnCo SwstAirl StanBlkDk Starbucks s StateStr Stryker SunTrst Symantec Synchrony Synopsys Sysco TE Connect TJX TakeTwo Tapestry Target Technip TexInst Textron ThermoFis 3M Co Tiffany Torchmark TotalSys TractSupp TransDigm Travelers TripAdvis 21stCFoxA 21stCFoxB Twitter Tyson UDR UltaBeauty UndrArm s UnAr C wi UnionPac UtdContl UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp UtdTech UtdhlthGp UnivHlthS UnumGrp VF Corp ValeroE VarianMed Ventas Verisign Verisk VerizonCm VertxPh ViacomB Visa s Vornado VulcanM WEC Engy WalMart WalgBoots WsteMInc Waters Wellcare WellsFargo Welltower WDigital WstnUnion WestRck Weyerhsr Whrlpl WmsCos WillisTwW Wynn XcelEngy Xilinx Xylem YumBrnds ZimmerBio ZionsBcp Zoetis

3.40 3.80f 2.40 .64 2.64 1.44 1.88f 2.08f 2.00 .30 .84

13 16 22 9 19 30 11 28 10 9 8 46 25 23 12 dd 23 12 14 25 27 30 27 25 6 22 26 24 16 81 21 21 dd 11 48 29 35 ... 11 10 17 6 12 18 21 17 1 40 22 79 30 43 37 7 cc 6 46 41 22 23 56 13 20 cc 31 12 17 4 10 12 19 dd 10 37 27 22 47 30 33 20 13 39

133.38 189.46 49.43 66.52 176.62 68.98 114.27 179.84 75.08 29.20 40.59 103.40 75.98 108.23 113.28 139.91 55.50 90.39 34.97 120.75 72.87 253.91 259.77 141.64 93.60 100.39 97.65 377.67 150.55 69.00 50.15 49.65 47.79 81.51 42.98 322.49 24.96 23.28 165.63 97.85 135.53 190.74 58.50 144.15 287.94 139.63 58.19 97.00 126.98 130.29 65.70 176.76 125.99 61.58 194.92 34.58 151.56 77.59 141.20 75.48 109.98 86.31 95.49 220.20 324.99 66.31 74.75 106.96 21.37 71.55 38.39 187.47 33.67 164.99 203.63 54.11 95.18 82.44 94.13 134.55 59.19 96.57

104.79 +2.60 +2.5 167.76 +7.43 +4.6 47.22 +.61 +1.3 51.57 +3.05 +6.3 136.88 +4.17 +3.1 64.70 +.97 +1.5 71.30 +4.29 +6.4 167.55 +8.06 +5.1 60.72 +4.95 +8.9 20.11 +.23 +1.2 26.28 +.26 +1.0 91.49 +3.78 +4.3 62.68 -.36 -.6 81.25 +2.79 +3.6 49.16 +1.70 +3.6 108.26 -.77 -.7 37.08 +.73 +2.0 70.68 +1.07 +1.5 24.08 +1.48 +6.5 99.42 +.83 +.8 49.40 +1.39 +2.9 240.66 +.66 +.3 195.86 +3.65 +1.9 89.82 +4.00 +4.7 81.98 +1.90 +2.4 87.94 +4.45 +5.3 89.48 +4.17 +4.9 355.89 +6.39 +1.8 124.01 +3.54 +2.9 59.04 +3.02 +5.4 48.74 -.01 48.35 -.05 -.1 33.27 +.40 +1.2 60.96 +3.13 +5.4 41.68 +1.53 +3.8 291.50 +7.39 +2.6 20.49 +.82 +4.2 18.55 +.69 +3.9 158.34 +5.13 +3.3 85.59 +5.52 +6.9 101.60 +3.69 +3.8 123.32 +5.87 +5.0 50.22 +2.78 +5.9 113.90 +3.95 +3.6 265.50+17.83 +7.2 131.97 +6.24 +5.0 34.45 +2.08 +6.4 82.34+10.88 +15.2 82.59 +4.12 +5.3 127.84 +2.19 +1.7 61.04 +.92 +1.5 164.44 +6.51 +4.1 115.70 +3.69 +3.3 57.09 -.93 -1.6 194.70 +6.54 +3.5 30.08 +.64 +2.2 138.50 +.44 +.3 66.39 +1.25 +1.9 103.61 +1.99 +2.0 70.86 +1.42 +2.0 97.73 +2.89 +3.0 72.43 +.72 +1.0 94.47 +.82 +.9 206.94 +8.70 +4.4 264.36+16.94 +6.8 50.01 +2.14 +4.5 73.04 +1.58 +2.2 39.20 -.83 -2.1 18.26 +.74 +4.2 41.42 +.47 +1.1 25.08 +.87 +3.6 127.06 +3.97 +3.2 26.40 +1.36 +5.4 158.66 +4.67 +3.0 115.18 +1.63 +1.4 50.70 +1.41 +2.9 93.52 +2.60 +2.9 71.21 +1.89 +2.7 92.36 +1.42 +1.6 105.34 +1.06 +1.0 47.05 +3.06 +7.0 84.59 -1.31 -1.5

76.51 +.58 +.8 164.15 +4.94 +3.1 269.63 +8.17 +3.1 30.63 +.58 +1.9 213.59 +3.08 +1.5 7.53 +.29 +4.0 107.61 +.23 +.2 150.56+11.02 +7.9 37.18 -2.42 -6.1 112.98 +1.12 +1.0 62.62 +1.54 +2.5 107.45 +2.19 +2.1 109.02 +1.03 +1.0 57.37 +1.30 +2.3 164.61 +6.33 +4.0 48.11 -.45 -.9 40.83 +.12 +.3 27.14 +.78 +3.0 106.89 +2.79 +2.7 107.25 +.61 +.6 66.37 +3.83 +6.1 27.71 +.59 +2.2 25.92 +.74 +2.9 29.80 +1.65 +5.9 111.04 -1.61 -1.4 113.53 -2.53 -2.2 94.66 -2.62 -2.7 68.77 -1.08 -1.5 80.69 +2.83 +3.6 85.60 +.99 +1.2 28.42 +.88 +3.2 50.66 +2.78 +5.8 31.00 +.59 +1.9 101.05 +4.40 +4.6 81.20 +4.30 +5.6 71.87 +1.65 +2.3 154.50 +4.93 +3.3 54.88 -4.44 -7.5 168.41+15.61 +10.2 92.52 +1.82 +2.0 116.59 +.41 +.4 63.68 +1.66 +2.7 86.29 +.47 +.5 104.24 +7.59 +7.9 374.67 +3.24 +.9 70.12 +2.57 +3.8 259.93+10.50 +4.2 127.54 +1.60 +1.3 216.69 +3.52 +1.7 67.67 +1.68 +2.5 46.08 +.29 +.6 118.48 +4.26 +3.7 69.29 +.89 +1.3 92.33 +2.60 +2.9 72.99 +1.27 +1.8 158.64 -5.09 -3.1 45.39 +.79 +1.8 80.65 +.32 +.4 150.04 +6.24 +4.3 59.35 +4.51 +8.2 176.91 +5.92 +3.5 125.91 +2.50 +2.0 105.84 +2.31 +2.2 27.00 +1.94 +7.7 96.02+11.53 +13.6 38.87 +.50 +1.3 77.82 +3.72 +5.0 43.10 +1.55 +3.7 38.53 +1.89 +5.2 58.37 +2.22 +4.0 8.58 -.24 -2.7 70.50 -2.77 -3.8 73.03 +3.52 +5.1 43.06 +.20 +.5 31.54 +1.21 +4.0 12.56 +1.01 +8.7 74.41 +1.71 +2.4 26.01 +.77 +3.1 67.90 +1.33 +2.0 129.74 +.63 +.5 168.58 +5.70 +3.5 9.06 +.12 +1.3 43.47 +1.67 +4.0 38.61 +1.43 +3.8 97.93 +1.77 +1.8 69.18 +1.02 +1.5 114.59 +3.80 +3.4 202.54+25.61 +14.5 20.58 -.69 -3.2 305.39+20.89 +7.3 134.54 +5.40 +4.2 29.88 +.87 +3.0 21.75 +.58 +2.7 32.25 +1.55 +5.0 14.84 +1.14 +8.3 37.43 +.88 +2.4

HarrisCorp 2.74f 25 175.50 123.24 142.78 +5.87 +4.3 HartfdFn 1.20 16 59.20 40.54 46.68 +2.22 +5.0 Hasbro 2.52 56 109.60 76.84 88.85 +1.93 +2.2 HelmPayne 2.80f dd 75.02 44.56 54.14 +.71 +1.3 HSchein s 31 91.35 62.56 79.30 -.46 -.6 Hershey 2.89 24 111.81 89.10 108.14 +1.55 +1.5 Hess 1.00 dd 74.81 35.59 52.81 +1.54 +3.0 HP Ent n .45e 35 19.48 12.09 14.68 +.44 +3.1 Hilton .60 37 88.11 63.76 73.08 +1.19 +1.7 Hologic dd 45.17 35.10 44.12 +1.23 +2.9 HomeDp 4.12 20 215.43 158.09 179.58 +.17 +.1 HonwllIntl 3.28f 41 167.72 123.48 141.85 +4.49 +3.3 Hormel s .84f 23 46.26 31.71 43.84 +1.30 +3.1 HostHotls 1.00a 43 22.47 15.94 17.52 -.22 -1.2 Humana 2.00 25 355.88 260.00 295.56+12.09 +4.3 HuntJB .96 14 131.74 88.38 106.11 +8.63 +8.9 HuntBncsh .56 13 16.60 11.12 13.59 +.96 +7.6 HuntgtnIng 3.44f 19 276.69 173.80 200.29 +5.77 +3.0 IdexxLab s 56 256.22 166.70 200.87 +7.96 +4.1 IHS Mark 30 55.99 43.07 51.61 +1.83 +3.7 IPG Photon 22 264.11 104.64 132.51 +4.63 +3.6 ITW 4.00 25 179.07 117.75 136.67 +6.36 +4.9 Illumina 77 372.61 207.51 312.75 +5.68 +1.8 Incyte dd 96.44 57.00 78.42 +3.77 +5.1 IngerRd 2.12 22 107.08 79.63 96.11 +1.15 +1.2 Intel 1.20 18 57.60 42.04 49.19 +.26 +.5 IntcntlExc s .88e 18 82.65 66.92 75.63 +2.53 +3.5 IBM 6.28 9 171.13 105.94 123.82 +2.36 +1.9 IntFlav 2.92 38 157.40 122.11 138.06 +3.11 +2.3 IntPap 1.90 15 66.94 37.55 45.68 +.44 +1.0 Interpublic .84 14 26.01 19.61 22.25 -.03 -.1 Intuit 1.88 45 231.84 150.43 213.87 +7.72 +3.7 IntSurg s 79 581.12 380.00 542.55+37.23 +7.4 Invesco 1.16 8 38.43 15.38 18.84 +1.46 +8.4 IronMtn 2.44f 31 37.11 30.22 35.64 +.81 +2.3 JPMorgCh 2.24f 12 119.33 91.11 104.59 +4.68 +4.7 JackHenry 1.48 28 163.68 112.78 130.87 +4.14 +3.3 JacobsEng .68f 23 82.24 55.17 62.51 +2.04 +3.4 JohnJn 3.60 18 148.99 118.62 130.69 +.94 +.7 JohnContl n 1.04 22 41.53 28.30 32.73 +.55 +1.7 JnprNtwk .72 15 30.80 23.61 28.32 +.19 +.7 KLA Tnc 3.00 12 123.96 80.65 95.73 +1.70 +1.8 KC Southn 1.44f 19 120.34 90.55 110.52 +7.98 +7.8 Kellogg 2.24 14 74.98 55.11 59.43 +.85 +1.5 Keycorp .56 10 22.40 13.66 16.85 +.89 +5.6 Keysight 81 70.40 42.13 69.58 +2.34 +3.5 KimbClk 4.00 25 123.50 97.10 116.87 -.33 -.3 Kimco 1.12 17 17.96 13.16 16.55 +.68 +4.3 KindMorg .80 18 19.83 14.62 18.01 +.90 +5.3 Kohls 2.44 12 83.28 57.89 69.95 +2.68 +4.0 KraftHnz n 2.50 13 80.67 41.60 47.53 +1.92 +4.2 Kroger s .56f 11 32.74 22.85 29.43 +1.00 +3.5 L Brands 2.40 10 53.39 23.71 27.33 +.87 +3.3 3.20 18 223.73 158.76 183.29 +7.71 +4.4 L-3 Tch LKQ Corp 15 43.86 22.74 26.25 -.07 -.3 LabCp 16 190.36 119.38 137.70 +5.78 +4.4 LamResrch 4.40 14 234.88 122.64 147.55 +3.44 +2.4 LambWst n .80f 22 83.86 52.92 70.88 +1.41 +2.0 LeggPlat 1.52 19 49.22 33.48 39.61 +1.27 +3.3 LennarA .16 8 72.17 37.29 44.10 -2.31 -5.0 LincNat 1.32 8 86.68 48.07 59.16 +3.92 +7.1 LockhdM 8.80f 34 363.00 241.18 282.87 +5.14 +1.9 Loews .25 13 53.59 42.06 47.53 +.95 +2.0 Lowes 1.92 21 117.70 81.16 94.98 -2.32 -2.4 LyonBas A 4.00 7 121.95 77.52 87.86 +1.86 +2.2 M&T Bk 4.00 13 197.37 133.78 165.59+14.78 +9.8 MGM Rsts .48 8 38.41 21.62 28.56 +.56 +2.0 MSCI Inc 2.32 35 184.22 131.26 165.97+11.14 +7.2 Macerich 3.00f 25 69.73 40.90 46.28 +.83 +1.8 Macys 1.51 8 41.99 22.47 25.79 +.37 +1.5 MarathnO .20 dd 24.20 12.57 16.10 -.01 -.1 MarathPt s 1.84 10 88.45 54.29 66.09 +1.22 +1.9 MarIntA 1.64 24 149.21 100.62 109.05 -.37 -.3 MarshM 1.66 23 89.59 74.30 84.06 +2.91 +3.6 MartMM 1.92 26 241.33 150.75 180.47 +2.48 +1.4 Masco .48 16 46.45 27.03 32.22 -.34 -1.0 MasterCrd 1.32f 47 225.35 156.80 202.00 +6.10 +3.1 Mattel .60 89 18.88 9.09 12.44 +.19 +1.6 MaximIntg 1.84 21 74.94 46.64 53.61 +.75 +1.4 McCorm 2.28f 20 156.00 98.34 139.44 -.68 -.5 McDnlds 4.64f 28 190.88 146.84 182.57 +.20 +.1 McKesson 1.56 10 178.86 106.11 126.67 +4.51 +3.7 Medtrnic 2.00 53 100.15 76.41 87.30 +2.46 +2.9 Merck 2.20f 28 80.19 52.83 75.87 +.97 +1.3 MetLife 1.68 10 55.21 37.76 45.31 +1.59 +3.6 MettlerT 41 697.26 500.74 602.10+25.14 +4.4 MKors 10 75.96 35.68 37.92 Microchp 1.46f cc 104.20 60.70 77.64 +.51 +.7 MicronT 3 64.66 28.39 35.76 -.25 -.7 Microsoft 1.84 45 116.18 83.83 107.71 +4.91 +4.8 MidAApt 3.84f 18 104.98 85.16 100.14 +3.91 +4.1 Mohawk 9 281.48 109.35 126.62 +.95 +.8 MolsCoorB 1.64 10 85.37 54.17 63.62 +.28 +.4 Mondelez 1.04 21 46.54 37.42 43.36 +1.13 +2.7 MonstrBv s 34 70.21 47.61 55.58 +1.21 +2.2 Moodys 1.76 29 187.98 129.26 159.40+10.43 +7.0

MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSolu Mylan NV NRG Egy Nasdaq NOilVarco Navient NektarTh NetApp Netflix s NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource s Nielsen plc NikeB s NobleEngy Nordstrm NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia OReillyAu OcciPet Omnicom ONEOK Oracle PG&E Cp PNC PPG s PPL Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PayPal n Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RangeRs RJamesFn Raytheon RltyInco RedHat RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut Rollins s Roper RossStrs s RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SLGreen SVB FnGp Salesforce Schlmbrg Schwab SeagateT SealAir SempraEn Sherwin SimonProp SkywksSol SmithAO s

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Heartland SelValInv m 24.28 +.68 +7.1 +14.6 +6.6 MV 1 Hodges Retail m 34.75 +1.60 +17.0 +13.8 +3.1 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 23.45 +.81 +9.0 +13.8 +6.5 LV 4 DiversDivA m 18.34 +.37 +4.9 +8.3 +6.5 LV 2 EqandIncA m 9.70 +.24 +6.4 +9.5 +5.4 MA 5 HYMuniA m 9.81 +.2 +3.7 +6.4 HM 3 IntlGrA m 29.73 +.70 +6.2 +6.3 +1.6 FG 2 IVA WldwideI d 16.71 +.29 +4.9 +7.2 +3.6 IH 1 Ivy GlbGrA m 40.51 +.95 +6.2 +9.7 +4.2 WS 2 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.05 -.01 +.4 +2.7 +2.9 CI 1 CoreBondI 11.25 -.03 -.2 +1.7 +2.2 CI 2 CoreBondR6 11.27 -.03 -.1 +1.9 +2.4 CI 1 EqIncI 16.67 +.46 +5.2 +13.4 +8.8 LV 1 MCapValA m 34.89 +1.17 +8.2 +10.2 +6.6 MB 3 MCapValL 35.70 +1.20 +8.2 +10.7 +7.1 MB 3 USLCpCrPlsI 25.49 +.79 +7.3 +13.9 +8.7 LB 4 USRsrchEnhEqR6 25.23 +.74 +7.1 +14.1 +9.0 LB 2 Janus Henderson BalancedT 31.95 +.48 +3.3 +10.5 +6.9 MA 1 EnterpriseT 117.29 +3.11 +7.7 +18.1 +11.4 MG 1 FlexibleBondT 9.94 -.03 +.2 +1.4 +1.8 CI 4 GlobalLifeSciT 54.46 +1.23 +8.4 +10.8 +10.3 SH 1 John Hancock BdR6 15.28 -.02 +.6 +3.3 +3.2 CI 3 DiscpValI 19.09 +.53 +6.6 +12.9 +6.7 LV 4 DiscpValMCI 19.00 +.59 +8.4 +10.8 +7.2 MB 4 DiscpValR6 19.12 +.54 +6.6 +13.1 +6.8 LV 4 FdmtlLgCpCorA m40.87 +1.45 +10.4 +12.1 +7.5 LB 5 IntlGrI 24.59 +.38 +3.8 +9.4 +5.3 FG 3 MltMgLsBlA b 13.56 +.19 +4.6 +8.7 +4.4 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 13.92 +.26 +5.8 +10.3 +5.1 AL 3 Lazard EMEqInstl 17.22 +.39 +7.2 +14.6 +1.5 EM 3 GlbLtdInfrsIns 13.89 -.02 +2.8 +11.0 +10.6 XO 1 IntlStratEqIns 13.62 +.29 +5.7 +7.9 +2.3 FG 1 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 17.93 +.10 +2.8 +6.3 +4.4 TV 4 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.25 +.03 +2.8 +6.5 +2.5 MU 4 GrY 15.30 +.35 +7.0 +17.1 +12.3 LG 3 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 14.03 +.39 +6.4 +13.2 +7.8 LV 2 BdDebA m 7.64 +.03 +2.5 +7.6 +4.2 MU 5 FltngRtF b 8.83 +1.9 +5.3 +3.3 BL 4 ShrtDurIncA m 4.15 +.4 +2.7 +1.9 CS 1 ShrtDurIncC m 4.17 +.2 +2.0 +1.3 CS 3 ShrtDurIncF b 4.15 +.4 +2.8 +2.1 CS 1 ShrtDurIncI 4.14 +.2 +2.8 +2.1 CS 1 MFS GrA m 94.74 +2.82 +7.3 +16.8 +11.2 LG 1 InstlIntlEq 23.42 +.37 +4.6 +9.7 +3.0 FG 1 TtlRetA m 17.88 +.30 +4.1 +7.7 +5.3 MA 3 ValA m 37.61 +1.17 +6.5 +11.4 +7.1 LV 4 ValI 37.82 +1.18 +6.5 +11.7 +7.4 LV 4 Mairs & Power BalInv 89.53 +1.59 +3.2 +9.4 +5.6 MA 1 GrInv 112.53 +3.37 +5.7 +13.5 +7.4 LB 1 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 20.39 +.59 +7.9 +15.3 +10.3 MG 2 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 14.52 +.25 +4.3 +6.9 +2.0 PJ 1 ChinaInv 15.43 +.54 +7.4 +15.0 +4.8 CH 5 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 33.81 +.54 +9.4 +17.9 +8.6 MG 3 GrLegacy d 36.05 +1.00 +8.7 +17.6 +9.1 SG 4 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.39 -.02 +.1 +1.8 +2.3 CI 1 TtlRetBdM b 10.39 -.03 +.1 +1.6 +2.1 CI 2 TtlRetBdPlan 9.78 -.02 +.1 +1.9 +2.4 CI 1 Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.35 +.03 +1.6 +8.1 -1.6 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 11.35 +.17 +5.5 +8.2 +1.5 FB 2 StkIdx 30.87 +.87 +6.6 +14.6 +9.9 LB 2 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 16.90 -.01 +.4 +4.7 +7.1 HM 2 HYMuniBdI 16.90 -.01 +.4 +4.9 +7.3 HM 2 IntermDrMnBdI 9.15 +.5 +2.2 +3.4 MI 1 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 28.67 +.76 +6.7 +10.0 +5.0 MA 4 IntlInv 22.03 +.49 +7.7 +9.0 +0.9 FB 5 Inv 75.33 +2.90 +10.3 +15.4 +8.2 LB 5 SelInv 38.46 +1.55 +12.4 +8.3 +4.4 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat13.98 +.29 +6.7 +9.8 +4.5 SW 3 LgCpStrats 13.37 +.26 +5.7 +9.5 +5.1 WS 2 StratOpps 7.11 +.13 +5.2 +6.8 +3.3 IH 2 Oppenheimer CptlIncA m 9.82 +.10 +1.9 +4.5 +3.0 CA DevMktsA m 40.35 +.75 +4.2 +13.8 +1.9 EM DevMktsY 39.75 +.74 +4.2 +14.1 +2.2 EM GlbA m 79.54 +2.35 +5.7 +11.9 +5.7 WS GlbAllcA m 16.83 +.20 +2.6 +5.5 +2.3 IH GoldSpecMnralA m14.40 -.30 +1.7 +18.2 -1.1 SP IntlGrY 36.59 +.42 +4.0 +4.6 +0.3 FG LtdTrmGvtA m 4.31 -.01 +.1 +.7 +0.8 GS MnStrA m 42.53 +1.45 +7.3 +12.0 +8.1 LB 4 Osterweis StrInc 11.01 +.06 +2.1 +6.8 +3.5 HY 2 PGIM Investments TtlRetBdZ 13.93 -.03 +.3 +3.4 +3.3 CI 3 PIMCO AlAstAllAthIns 8.09 +.02 +2.1 +8.3 +1.0 TV AlAstInstl 11.24 +.07 +2.3 +9.4 +2.9 TV CmdtyRlRtStrIns 5.92 +.12 +6.9 +5.2 -8.0 BB 3 HYInstl 8.58 +.05 +3.8 +7.9 +4.2 HY 2 IBdUSDHI 10.70 +.03 +.7 +4.6 +4.9 IB 1 IncA m 11.86 +.7 +6.0 +5.0 MU IncC m 11.86 +.7 +5.2 +4.2 MU IncI2 11.86 +.7 +6.3 +5.3 MU IncInstl 11.86 +.7 +6.4 +5.4 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 9.98 +.9 +4.5 +4.2 TW LowDrInstl 9.72 +.4 +1.6 +1.2 CS 4 RlRetInstl 10.60 -.05 +.6 +2.5 +1.3 IP ShrtTrmIns 9.79 +.02 +.4 +2.5 +1.8 UB 3

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR TtlRetA m 9.92 -.03 +.1 +2.1 +2.0 CI 3 TtlRetIns 9.92 -.03 +.1 +2.5 +2.4 CI 2 PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 42.09 +1.12 +9.9 +19.6 +12.4 MG 4 Gr 37.60 +1.10 +8.3 +18.1 +11.8 LG 4 Stk 30.66 +.86 +6.6 +15.4 +10.4 LB 4 Parnassus CorEqInv 40.96 +1.11 +5.1 +13.6 +9.1 LB 1 Pioneer Am 26.04 +.63 +5.2 +14.1 +8.8 LB 1 CorEqA m 17.11 +.52 +7.4 +13.0 +7.7 LB 4 Principal DiversIntlIns 11.41 +.21 +6.5 +7.6 +2.0 FB 4 Putnam DiversIncA m 6.79 +.04 +3.0 +5.8 +2.1 NT 3 EqIncA m 22.70 +.67 +7.3 +13.1 +7.6 LV 2 GlbUtlsA m 12.12 +.07 +3.0 +9.4 +5.7 SU 4 IncA x 6.73 -.03 +.3 +3.2 +2.2 CI 1 SustLeadersA m 79.85 +2.50 +7.2 +17.9 +10.6 LG 3 Royce LowPricedStkSvc m6.89 +.10 +8.8 +12.7 +1.7 SB 2 SmlrCoGrSvc m 7.30 +.18 +9.1 +13.0 +5.0 SG 4 SpecEqInvm d 18.45 +.20 +5.9 +13.1 +4.2 SV 2 Schwab HC 23.96 +.42 +4.4 +11.0 +9.8 SH 3 IntlIdx 18.46 +.26 +5.3 +8.3 +1.6 FB 2 SP500Idx 40.85 +1.15 +6.6 +14.7 +9.9 LB 2 Schwab1000Idx 59.64 +1.69 +6.9 +14.6 +9.5 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 46.69 +1.30 +7.1 +14.7 +9.4 LB 2 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 10.34 -.02 +.2 +2.6 +2.7 CI 2 State Farm Gr 75.74 +1.34 +4.0 +12.6 +7.6 LB 4 T. Rowe Price BCGr 104.11 +3.31 +8.4 +19.3 +13.0 LG 1 Comm&TeInv 101.06 +2.11 +8.0 +18.7 +12.1 SC 1 CptlAprc 27.89 +.59 +5.1 +11.6 +9.2 MA 1 DivGr 43.66 +1.11 +5.3 +14.4 +9.8 LB 1 EMBd d 11.40 +.16 +3.8 +7.3 +4.4 EB 3 EMStk d 40.40 +1.02 +7.8 +17.5 +6.0 EM 2 EmergEurope d 13.83 +.28 +6.6 +14.3 -4.3 MQ 4 EqIdx500 d 71.23 +2.00 +6.6 +14.5 +9.7 LB 2 EqInc 29.02 +.66 +6.3 +13.5 +6.2 LV 4 FinclSvcs 24.50 +1.02 +8.6 +15.5 +8.0 SF 1 GrStk 61.93 +1.92 +8.4 +17.7 +11.7 LG 2 HY d 6.36 +.03 +3.5 +8.0 +3.7 HY 4 HlthSci 73.53 +2.09 +9.7 +12.6 +12.3 SH 2 InsLgCpGr 38.61 +1.19 +8.2 +21.6 +13.5 LG 1 InsMdCpEqGr 51.96 +1.48 +7.6 +16.2 +11.2 MG 2 IntlDiscv d 58.49 +.66 +5.4 +10.1 +5.7 FR 3 IntlStk d 15.87 +.26 +6.0 +9.9 +3.4 FG 2 IntlValEq d 12.75 +.19 +5.6 +4.5 -1.0 FV 4 LatinAmerica d 24.20 +.41 +10.1 +23.3 +2.8 LS 4 MdCpGr 81.95 +2.26 +7.3 +15.5 +10.7 MG 2 MdCpVal 25.91 +.34 +6.2 +12.5 +7.1 MV 3 NewHorizons 52.38 +1.60 +8.7 +21.2 +11.9 MG 1 NewInc 9.15 -.02 +.1 +1.8 +2.2 CI 3 OverseasStk d 9.84 +.15 +5.8 +9.0 +1.8 FB 3 RlEstt d 26.51 +.64 +7.0 +4.5 +7.5 SR 5 Rtr2015 13.45 +.15 +3.5 +8.2 +4.7 TD 3 Rtr2020 20.32 +.27 +4.0 +9.2 +5.2 TE 3 Rtr2025 16.14 +.25 +4.6 +10.1 +5.7 TG 3 Rtr2030 23.45 +.41 +5.2 +10.9 +6.0 TH 3 Rtr2035 17.16 +.32 +5.5 +11.5 +6.3 TI 3 Rtr2040 24.40 +.49 +5.9 +12.0 +6.5 TJ 2 Rtr2045 16.62 +.35 +6.2 +12.2 +6.5 TK 2 Rtr2050 14.01 +.29 +6.1 +12.1 +6.5 TN 2 ShrtTrmBd 4.65 +.1 +1.4 +1.1 CS 2 SmCpStk 45.17 +1.27 +9.4 +16.9 +8.3 SG 2 SmCpVal d 43.30 +1.06 +8.7 +15.6 +6.4 SB 2 SpectrumInc 12.05 +.04 +1.8 +5.1 +3.0 MU 4 SummitMnIntrInv11.73 +.01 +.5 +1.5 +2.8 MI 3 TFInc 9.89 -.01 +.3 +1.8 +3.6 ML 3 USTrsLngTrm 12.06 -.14 -1.4 +.5 +4.3 GL 4 Val 32.39 +.78 +6.0 +11.4 +7.0 LV 4 TCW EMIncIns 7.96 +.10 +3.8 +8.2 +3.9 EB 2 TtlRetBdI 9.64 -.03 -.2 +1.5 +2.3 CI 1 TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 10.50 -.03 -.2 +1.5 +2.2 CI 2 EqIdxIns 19.49 +.54 +7.1 +14.8 +9.4 LB 2 IntlEqIdxIns 17.83 +.25 +5.3 +8.4 +1.8 FB 2 LgCpGrIdxIns 29.26 +.84 +7.1 +17.0 +11.9 LG 3 LgCpValIdxIns 18.36 +.50 +6.7 +12.3 +7.4 LV 2 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.23 +.01 +.4 +1.0 +1.6 MS 2 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 24.05 +.53 +4.6 +9.9 +5.2 WS MidCpStkA m 22.05 +.73 +7.1 +17.0 +10.1 MB MnBdA m 11.04 +.2 +1.3 +3.2 ML Torray Torray 46.33 +1.36 +6.6 +9.4 +6.4 LV 4 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal d 25.96 +.35 +4.3 +8.3 +3.4 FV 1 USAA Gr 27.70 +.67 +7.3 +15.5 +11.1 LG 4 Inc 12.56 -.02 +.3 +3.3 +2.8 CI 4 PrcMtlsMnral 11.44 -.38 -1.9 +13.9 -3.4 SP 1 TEIntermTrm 13.15 +.4 +2.0 +3.1 MI 1 VALIC Co I StkIdx 39.35 +1.11 +6.6 +14.4 +9.6 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 246.78 +6.94 +6.6 +14.7 +10.0 LB 2 500IdxInv 246.77 +6.94 +6.6 +14.6 +9.8 LB 2 BalIdxAdmrl 34.39 +.56 +4.2 +9.6 +6.7 MA 1 BalIdxIns 34.40 +.57 +4.2 +9.6 +6.7 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 11.65 +.5 +1.9 +3.2 MF 1 CptlOppAdmrl 142.15 +3.83 +7.7 +18.0 +12.1 LG 4 DevMIdxAdmrl 12.65 +.20 +5.8 +8.9 +2.1 FB 2 DevMIdxIns 12.67 +.20 +5.8 +8.9 +2.1 FB 2 DivGrInv 25.62 +.67 +4.7 +12.8 +9.3 LB 1 EMStkIdxInAdm 33.57 +.55 +5.7 +14.4 +3.1 EM 3 EMStkIdxIns 25.53 +.42 +5.7 +14.5 +3.1 EM 2 EngyAdmrl 89.70 +2.07 +10.5 +12.0 -2.8 EE 1 EqIncAdmrl 69.90 +1.49 +5.2 +13.2 +8.9 LV 1 EqIncInv 33.35 +.71 +5.2 +13.1 +8.8 LV 1 ExplorerAdmrl 85.14 +2.43 +9.5 +18.4 +8.0 SG 2 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 83.05 +2.26 +9.7 +15.3 +7.1 MB 1 ExtMktIdxIns 83.04 +2.25 +9.7 +15.3 +7.1 MB 1 ExtMktIdxInsPls204.94 +5.56 +9.7 +15.3 +7.1 MB 1 FAWexUSIAdmr 30.01 +.50 +5.8 +10.3 +2.3 FB 2 FAWexUSIIns 95.13 +1.57 +5.8 +10.4 +2.3 FB 2

84.32 236.62 283.18 36.56 245.16 21.68 117.60 194.18 52.74 121.00 96.75 110.86 124.00 79.64 175.26 61.32 65.89 46.54 140.78 125.10 81.93 34.89 31.55 49.71 120.20 118.45 116.65 77.19 109.06 91.35 29.48 66.46 46.99 133.53 112.45 89.85 162.91 71.00 175.00 151.26 119.84 79.70 90.79 138.69 458.64 72.75 267.41 158.80 264.88 70.53 47.40 139.77 78.16 101.96 89.30 199.71 63.88 98.55 218.62 61.14 274.66 135.68 110.83 34.67 106.75 39.88 82.79 56.86 62.09 59.40 13.48 94.37 88.34 73.62 45.96 20.25 79.03 35.68 70.77 161.21 230.00 18.51 60.69 45.52 107.75 89.54 129.25 275.31 36.07 372.06 147.42 30.27 27.08 57.86 23.33 56.50

+2.62 +.06 +.21 +.37 +2.33 +.35 +2.34 +.45 +.45 +.11 +.86 +.40 +.40 +.39 +.90 +.80 +.47 +.46 +.36 +.86 +.64 +1.65 +1.58 +.01 +.86 +.12 +.18 +.18 +.27 +.27 +.21 +.20 +.19 +.98 +.55 +.48 +.54 +1.03 +.45 +.28 +.54 +.14 +.01 -.02 -.01 +.97 +.97 +.33 +.77 +2.52 +.23 +.34 +.33 +.62 +.42 +.42 +.18

71.12 150.37 216.47 26.11 175.79 5.91 98.85 124.40 32.39 94.25 49.19 91.84 82.38 48.25 128.32 45.08 33.93 20.37 85.19 96.56 54.36 20.60 19.08 23.22 97.68 85.54 78.78 61.53 65.83 71.96 24.30 40.41 26.01 82.04 67.40 64.46 125.74 45.50 119.93 73.91 73.69 55.39 71.95 88.68 335.29 54.97 214.03 121.47 201.09 52.76 35.57 98.52 59.10 77.53 64.65 133.14 40.52 69.36 123.02 47.37 150.94 106.41 92.12 22.12 79.42 29.34 62.76 35.88 29.78 38.17 7.41 43.55 62.89 35.27 27.34 9.60 63.29 24.25 57.01 111.57 143.87 6.66 36.42 30.56 85.80 60.32 94.81 151.70 18.67 223.25 88.51 21.48 19.22 24.70 11.57 31.36

+.32 +1.22 -.01 +2.12 +2.11 -.04 -.04 +.26 +.65

+6.6 +1.6 +3.7 +5.2 +7.8 +7.7 +7.8 +5.3 +5.3 +5.6 +6.4 +7.9 +7.9 +5.7 +7.0 +7.0 +4.8 +4.7 +6.2 +4.7 +7.4 +6.7 +9.7 +2.6 +5.7 +3.3 +3.8 +4.2 +5.0 +6.0 +6.4 +5.7 +5.8 +7.7 +9.9 +10.0 +9.9 +7.4 +4.5 +5.8 +5.4 +5.7 +.5 +.2 +.4 +7.2 +7.2 +7.8 +7.2 +7.9 +3.5 +8.1 +8.0 +5.1 +4.8 +4.8 +6.7 +.1 +8.7 +7.8 +.6 +7.2 +7.1 -.1 -.1 +10.5 +6.0

+14.7 +4.4 +7.6 +9.7 +18.8 +20.1 +18.9 +10.3 +10.4 +8.7 +14.4 +16.4 +16.5 +9.9 +12.8 +11.7 +6.0 +6.2 +16.0 +14.8 +11.6 +12.4 +15.3 +5.7 +11.2 +8.4 +9.0 +9.6 +11.2 +12.1 +12.1 +10.3 +10.3 +17.2 +19.4 +20.0 +19.6 +13.6 +5.8 +9.2 +8.4 +4.5 +1.8 +2.7 +3.0 +10.8 +10.9 +14.1 +14.5 +17.9 +7.5 +19.7 +20.0 +8.0 +10.0 +10.1 +10.3 +1.2 +12.9 +14.2 +3.3 +14.8 +14.8 +1.6 +1.6 +10.7 +12.8

+10.0 +2.9 +4.5 +5.3 +12.8 +13.7 +12.9 +6.9 +7.0 +5.1 +4.6 +11.0 +11.1 +3.2 +7.7 +7.6 +1.6 +1.7 +3.5 +6.6 +7.1 +6.5 +7.1 +3.0 +6.4 +4.8 +5.1 +5.4 +6.0 +6.4 +6.4 +2.0 +2.0 +11.4 +13.1 +13.4 +13.2 +7.6 +1.3 +3.8 +1.7 -0.3 +2.7 +2.7 +2.5 +6.2 +6.3 +9.9 +7.1 +12.3 +4.6 +13.4 +13.6 +3.7 +7.0 +7.1 +5.5 +1.1 +5.4 +8.5 +2.8 +9.4 +9.4 +2.3 +2.3 +5.1 +6.1

LB XY CA MA LG LG LG MA MA HY CH LG LG CV LG LB FG FG EM PJ LV LV MB BL AL TD TE TG TH TI TJ FB FB LG LG LG LG LB FG FG FB FV MI CI CI MV MV LG MG LG EB LG LG FG MA MA SV CS SB LG CI LB LB CI CI MV WS

2 2 4 5 2 1 2 1 1 5 2 3 3 2 5 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 4 4 4 4 5 5 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 2 2 3 3 5 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 2 4 2 1 5 2 2 2 2 2 4 1

+.88 +.75 +.90 +.04 +.04 +.04 -.01

+8.2 +8.2 +8.2 +2.3 +2.3 +2.4 +.7

+15.6 +14.8 +15.9 NA +4.9 +5.9 +3.2

+9.3 +8.5 +9.6 NA +2.4 +3.5 +2.7

LG LG LG MU MU MU CI

4 4 4

+.11 +1.37 +1.24 +.83 +2.06 +.62 +.53 +.39

+13.4 +6.0 +13.3 +8.5 +6.3 +11.0 +7.4 +5.5

+7.4 +3.0 +7.8 +12.6 +22.2 +7.7 +23.6 +21.9

+5.8 +4.7 -4.6 +11.3 +17.0 -5.1 +15.1 +13.5

SH CC EE SH SH EE ST ST

5 3 2 1 1 3 1 5

+.97 +5.2 -.01

+8.8

+4.2 IH

4

+2.1 +4.4 MC +1.4 +3.3 ML +5.6 +1.9 IB +5.9 +2.2 IB +9.2 +1.4 WS +15.6 +10.5 LG +10.2 +3.7 CA +10.3 +3.9 CA +9.5 +3.1 CA +1.5 +3.0 SL +10.7 +5.0 XM +9.8 +4.2 XM +11.0 +5.3 XM +3.7 -1.3 ES +7.7 +2.9 WS +7.9 +3.2 WS +8.8 +4.4 XM +13.9 +7.9 LB +11.5 +9.7 SU

3 4 1 1 5 4 2 2 3 1

+1.41 +6.7

+14.6

+8.8 LB

1

+1.06 +8.3

+12.0

+5.1 SB

4

+1.23 +9.2

+12.9

+5.7 SB

4

-1.8

-6.5

-1.9

4

+.06 +.06 +.37 +2.73 +.03 +.03 +.03 -.01 +.26 +.26 +.26 +.35 +.63 +.64 +.51 +1.44 +.16

+.2 +.2 +2.4 +2.4 +6.8 +7.0 +5.2 +5.2 +5.0 +.2 +3.6 +3.5 +3.6 +4.0 +4.8 +4.8 +4.6 +5.4 +2.4

4 3 2

+1.97 +8.6 +.44 +5.6

+17.4 +12.0 LG +5.4 -0.8 FB

+.14 +4.6

+10.8

+4.0 FG

+.90 +6.7

+12.8

+6.9 LB

3 2

2 5

2

36.74 22.90 95.28 26.04 23.75 72.98 24.27 8.23 29.22 52.00 216.32 15.12 12.45 29.06 10.65 10.85 145.10 22.44 20.53 62.09 17.11 43.04 127.79 75.96 223.63 39.36 49.79 124.46 217.64 56.83 65.85 50.26 42.40 5.07 108.45 94.37 25.30 53.43 77.90 140.82 59.36 70.22 35.30 13.66 95.94 70.74 36.28 33.20 64.67 78.44 73.41 119.08 84.59 40.42 55.21 70.73 50.79 75.61 46.19 180.48 20.64 54.74 48.56 27.90 78.95 95.63 9.22 69.11 144.27 47.25 115.31 54.87 281.89 12.39 60.26 87.10 51.35 141.46 29.81 245.59 73.76 89.48 156.68 146.13 76.77 177.70 102.37 34.99 37.83 35.38 30.22 100.49 355.28 145.78 60.12 40.34

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

1.56f 1.76 .78 1.35 2.56 .13 3.08 .08 .68 5.44 2.20 .64 .52 1.24 24.00 3.08f .36 .36 1.20 1.29

3.20 3.64 1.48 2.94f 3.60 .40 1.04 2.04 3.20 3.17f

2.41f .80 1.00f 2.64f 1.12 2.21 2.08f 1.76 1.85

1.72f 1.68e 2.00 .76 1.82f 1.36 4.60 1.36 2.40 3.00 1.52 1.44 .84 1.44 .96 1.04e .66f

FRI NAME NAV GNMAAdmrl 10.23 GNMAInv 10.23 GlbEqInv 27.95 GrIdxAdmrl 74.04 GrIdxIns 74.04 GrandIncAdmrl 72.57 HCAdmrl 85.52 HCInv 202.80 HYCorpAdmrl 5.64 HYTEAdmrl 11.17 HiDivYldIdxInv 32.54 InTrBdIdxAdmrl 11.01 InTrInGdAdm 9.40 InTrTEAdmrl 13.96 InTrTrsAdmrl 10.86 InflPrtScAdmrl 24.51 InflPrtScIns 9.99 InsIdxIns 242.64 InsIdxInsPlus 242.66 InsTrgRt2020Ins 21.75 InsTtlSMIInPls 57.96 IntlGrAdmrl 84.12 IntlGrInv 26.45 IntlValInv 33.89 LTInGrdAdm 9.54 LTTEAdmrl 11.39 LfStrCnsrGrInv 19.15 LfStrGrInv 31.63 LfStrModGrInv 25.77 LgCpIdxAdmrl 61.85 LtdTrmTEAdmrl 10.89 MCpGrIdxAdm 56.07 MCpVlIdxAdm 53.26 MdCpIdxAdmrl 185.51 MdCpIdxIns 40.98 MdCpIdxInsPlus 202.10 MorganGrAdmrl 87.07 PrmCpAdmrl 129.34 PrmCpCorInv 24.90 PrmCpInv 124.81 RlEstIdxAdmrl 112.57 RlEstIdxInstl 17.42 SCpGrIdxAdm 58.45 SCpValIdxAdm 53.80 STBdIdxAdmrl 10.29 STBdIdxIns 10.29 STBdIdxInsPlus 10.29 STInfPrScIdAdmr24.09 STInfPrScIdIns 24.10 STInfPrScIdxInv 24.06 STInvmGrdAdmrl 10.44 STInvmGrdIns 10.44 STInvmGrdInv 10.44 STTEAdmrl 15.74 STTrsAdmrl 10.44 SeledValInv 24.62 SmCpIdxAdmrl 69.59 SmCpIdxIns 69.59 SmCpIdxInsPlus 200.86 StarInv 24.80 StrEqInv 29.70 TMCapApAdm 137.04 TMSmCpAdm 60.93 TrgtRtr2015Inv 14.22 TrgtRtr2020Inv 29.61 TrgtRtr2025Inv 17.70 TrgtRtr2030Inv 32.22 TrgtRtr2035Inv 19.76 TrgtRtr2040Inv 34.09 TrgtRtr2045Inv 21.40 TrgtRtr2050Inv 34.44 TrgtRtr2055Inv 37.38 TrgtRtrIncInv 13.00 TtBMIdxAdmrl 10.42 TtBMIdxIns 10.42 TtBMIdxInsPlus 10.42 TtBMIdxInv 10.42 TtInBIdxAdmrl 21.74 TtInBIdxIns 32.62 TtInBIdxInv 10.87 TtInSIdxAdmrl 26.84 TtInSIdxIns 107.32 TtInSIdxInsPlus 107.34 TtInSIdxInv 16.04 TtlSMIdxAdmrl 66.52 TtlSMIdxIns 66.53 TtlSMIdxInv 66.50 TxMgBalAdmrl 30.69 USGrAdmrl 93.89 ValIdxAdmrl 40.56 ValIdxIns 40.55 WlngtnAdmrl 66.37 WlngtnInv 38.43 WlslyIncAdmrl 60.29 WlslyIncInv 24.89 WndsrAdmrl 66.43 WndsrIIAdmrl 58.94 WndsrIIInv 33.22 Victory RSPtnrsA m 22.51 Virtus VontobelEMOppI 10.48 WCM FocIntGrIns d 14.64 Weitz ValInv 38.88 sHickory 43.32 Wells Fargo CommonStkA f 19.26 Western Asset CorBdI 12.27 CorPlusBdI 11.28 CorPlusBdIS 11.28 Mgd Mns A m 15.83 iShares S&P500IdxK 317.15

WK CHG -.03 -.03 +.62 +2.06 +2.05 +2.00 +2.19 +5.19 +.03 -.01 +.67 -.03 -.01 +.01 -.05 -.14 -.05 +6.83 +6.83 +.26 +1.62 +1.22 +.38 +.51 -.03 -.01 +.16 +.58 +.35 +1.74 +1.89 +1.40 +5.60 +1.24 +6.10 +2.52 +3.65 +.65 +3.52 +2.31 +.35 +1.76 +1.48 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.04 -.05 -.04 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.02 +.53 +2.00 +2.00 +5.78 +.37 +.87 +3.81 +1.49 +.12 +.34 +.25 +.51 +.35 +.66 +.44 +.71 +.77 +.08 -.03 -.03 -.03 -.03 +.04 +.05 +.01 +.43 +1.71 +1.71 +.25 +1.86 +1.86 +1.86 +.43 +2.92 +1.15 +1.14 +1.16 +.67 +.45 +.19 +1.96 +1.53 +.86

91.32 135.29 42.38 44.28 106.41 47.37 57.87 144.75 46.05 17.43 21.78 79.14 56.01 69.84 41.49 92.81 32.03 60.15 18.20 87.70 43.27 194.51 176.87 73.04 69.68 75.58 58.27 268.40 111.08 34.08 34.12 33.75 22.04 49.77 32.88 191.70 12.50 11.41 121.22 60.44 89.89 94.28 43.14 100.48 208.48 109.37 26.77 67.18 68.81 101.42 46.55 105.40 90.60 46.09 144.07 23.31 111.02 59.48 82.52 58.48 81.78 59.07 78.39 167.94 187.06 43.02 49.58 33.83 16.42 35.20 20.52 99.40 20.36 134.50 90.06 41.51 62.27 60.65 75.88 96.99 38.08 70.20

- PCT RETURN RNK YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR -.1 +1.4 +2.3 GI 1 -.1 +1.3 +2.2 GI 1 +6.5 +13.3 +6.6 WS 3 +7.2 +15.4 +10.6 LG 4 +7.2 +15.4 +10.6 LG 4 +6.4 +14.3 +10.0 LB 2 +6.4 +8.6 +10.4 SH 3 +6.5 +8.5 +10.4 SH 3 +4.1 +7.3 +4.3 HY 2 +.3 +3.2 +4.8 ML 1 +5.4 +13.0 +9.1 LV 2 +1.7 +2.7 CI 1 +.3 +2.3 +2.9 TW 1 +.5 +1.9 +3.1 MI 1 -.4 +.7 +1.8 GI 1 +.1 +1.9 +1.4 IP 3 +.2 +2.0 +1.4 IP 2 +6.6 +14.7 +10.0 LB 2 +6.6 +14.7 +10.0 LB 2 +3.4 +8.4 NA TE 3 +7.2 +14.9 +9.5 LB 2 +6.2 +14.8 +5.0 FG 3 +6.2 +14.6 +4.8 FG 3 +5.6 +10.1 +1.1 FV 1 -.1 +3.8 +5.0 TW 5 +.3 +2.5 +4.3 ML 2 +2.6 +6.5 +4.5 CA 2 +5.2 +10.8 +6.1 AL 3 +3.9 +8.6 +5.3 MA 3 +6.7 +14.8 +9.8 LB 2 +.4 +1.2 +1.4 MS 1 +8.9 +14.0 +8.5 MG 2 +8.0 +12.2 +7.3 MV 3 +8.5 +13.1 +7.9 MB 2 +8.5 +13.1 +7.9 MB 2 +8.5 +13.1 +7.9 MB 2 +8.1 +16.2 +11.1 LG 3 +6.9 +18.1 +12.7 LG 3 +6.4 +16.0 +11.3 LB 3 +6.9 +18.0 +12.6 LG 3 +6.5 +6.3 +8.1 SR 2 +6.5 +6.4 +8.2 SR 2 +10.4 +16.5 +7.1 SG 3 +9.8 +14.2 +7.2 SV 1 -.1 +1.1 +1.2 CS 1 -.1 +1.1 +1.2 CS 1 -.1 +1.1 +1.2 CS 1 +.3 +1.4 +0.6 IP 1 +.3 +1.4 +0.6 IP 1 +.3 +1.3 +0.5 IP 1 +.1 +1.9 +1.7 CS 2 +.1 +1.9 +1.8 CS 2 +.1 +1.8 +1.6 CS 3 +.1 +1.1 +0.9 MS 1 -.2 +.8 +0.8 GS 1 +9.5 +10.9 +4.6 MV 5 +10.1 +15.3 +7.2 SB 1 +10.1 +15.3 +7.2 SB 1 +10.1 +15.3 +7.2 SB 1 +4.5 +9.7 +5.9 MA 3 +9.4 +12.9 +7.6 MB 3 +6.8 +14.9 +9.8 LB 2 +9.4 +16.2 +8.4 SB 1 +2.6 +7.0 +4.5 TD 1 +3.4 +8.3 +5.1 TE 3 +4.1 +9.2 +5.5 TG 3 +4.5 +10.0 +5.8 TH 3 +5.0 +10.8 +6.0 TI 3 +5.5 +11.7 +6.3 TJ 3 +5.9 +11.9 +6.4 TK 3 +5.9 +11.9 +6.4 TN 3 +5.9 +11.9 +6.4 TL 3 +2.0 +5.3 +3.7 RI 1 -.2 +1.6 +2.2 CI 2 -.2 +1.6 +2.2 CI 2 -.1 +1.6 +2.2 CI 2 -.2 +1.5 +2.1 CI 2 +.3 +3.2 +3.8 IB 1 +.2 +3.2 +3.9 IB 1 +.2 +3.2 +3.8 IB 1 +5.8 +10.2 +2.2 FB 2 +5.8 +10.2 +2.3 FB 2 +5.8 +10.2 +2.3 FB 2 +5.7 +10.1 +2.2 FB 2 +7.1 +14.9 +9.4 LB 2 +7.1 +14.9 +9.5 LB 2 +7.1 +14.7 +9.3 LB 2 +3.5 +8.1 +6.4 CA 1 +8.0 +16.1 +11.9 LG 1 +6.3 +14.2 +9.2 LV 1 +6.2 +14.3 +9.2 LV 1 +3.5 +10.3 +7.0 MA 2 +3.5 +10.2 +6.9 MA 2 +1.9 +6.5 +5.3 CA 1 +1.9 +6.4 +5.2 CA 1 +8.4 +12.8 +6.7 LV 5 +6.8 +12.3 +7.1 LV 3 +6.7 +12.2 +7.0 LV 3

+.69 +9.0

+14.3

+3.0 SB

3

+.14 +5.2

+9.9

+3.7 EM

2

+.24 +4.4

+12.2

+6.5 FG

1

+.88 +6.0 +.95 +7.8

+8.8 +6.6

+4.4 LG 5 +1.0 MB 4

+.55 +9.6

+14.1

+6.3 MB 2

+.6 +.8 +.9 +.3

+2.9 +3.6 +3.7 +1.8

-.02 -.02 -.01

+8.95 +6.6

+3.3 +3.7 +3.7 +3.6

CI CI CI ML

2 4 4 3

+14.7 +10.0 LB

2


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

176 AUTO COURT, O’FALLON, IL 62269 SALES: (618) 589-8744 SERVICE: (618) 641-0005 NEW JEEP Everyone Qualifies Price

WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT $

30,458

MSRP $32,940 DEALER DISCOUNT $2,482 #890003

NEW JEEP

WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT S $

Everyone Qualifies Price

35,976

MSRP $39,140 DEALER DISCOUNT $3,164 #890034

NEW JEEP

WRANGLER SPORT

Everyone Qualifies Price

30,790 32,015

$

MSRP $33,815 DEALER DISCOUNT $3,025 #89957

NEW RAM 1500

EXPRESS CREW CAB 4X2

Everyone Qualifies Price

$

MSRP $42,625 DEALER DISCOUNT $5,360 REBATE $5,250 #89642

TOTAL SAVINGS $10,610

NEW RAM 1500

EXPRESS CREW CAB $ 4X4 2” MOPAR LIFT

37,454

MSRP $54,805 DEALER DISCOUNT $10,101 REBATE $7,250 #89108

Everyone Qualifies Price

TOTAL SAVINGS $17,351

NEW JEEP Everyone Qualifies Price

WRANGLERUNLIMITED JL SPORT S PACKAGE $ #890007

35,103

MSRP $39,140 DEALER DISCOUNT $4,037

NEW JEEP

WRANGLER JL SAHARA MSRP $43,985 DEALER DISCOUNT $5,142

Everyone Qualifies Price

38,843

$

#890029

NEW JEEP WRANGLER

UNLIMITED SAHARA MOAB SPECIAL EDITION $ MSRP $52,695 DEALER DISCOUNT $5,358

Everyone Qualifies Price

47,337

#89957

NO Financing Required • NO Trade Required You WILL Qualify for Our Prices

176 AUTO COURT, O’FALLON, IL 62269 SALES: (618) 589-8744 SERVICE: (618) 641-0005 WWW.AUFFENBERG.COM PLUS TAX, TITLE & LICENCE. PLUS DOC FEE. ‡

$3,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 24 mo, with approved credit. *$3,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 48 mo, with approved credit. *$4,000 down, first payment due at signing, does not include ttl and acq, 10,000 miles per year, 48 mo, with approved credit.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • D

Shildt feels ‘buzz’ as fans will meet the new Cardinals BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AP

SLU STAYS ON TOP Billikens pull away to win with 23-0 run in the second half

As Cardinals manager Mike Shildt readies his writing hand for several hours of autograph signing this weekend at his first Winter WarmUp, he shares a ripple of anticipation with the fans gathering Saturday for the introduction of the team’s marquee additions. It will be his first time meeting All-Stars Paul Goldschmidt and Andrew Miller in person, too. “There’s a rightful buzz,” Shildt said. The Cardinals’ annual three-day fanfest opens Saturday in the Hyatt Regency at the Arch, and there isn’t much of a warm-up to the Warm-Up. They’re going straight to the headliners. Both Miller and Goldschmidt will have their first public appearances as Cardinals on Saturday. John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, will also field questions from fans Saturday morning in an annual session that this year could veer more toward players the Cardinals haven’t signed. The Winter Warm-Up, often described by Mozeliak as the “unofficial kickoff of the season,” arrives before the Hot Stove season has come to a boil. Three of the best free agents available remain unsigned, See CARDINALS • Page D3

Blues goalies are splitting duties for now BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SLU ATHLETICS

St. Louis U. guard Dion Wiley signals a 3-pointer. He made six of them in the win over St. Joseph’s and scored a career-high 20 points.

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS U.

68 ST. JOSEPH’S 57

> UP NEXT: 7 p.m. Wednesday at Duquesne

On the first day that St. Louis University stood alone atop the Atlantic 10 standings, a board went up in the team’s locker room showing the league standings. A coincidence, to be sure. The Billikens went out to defend their first-place status for the first time since the 2013-14 season on Friday night and found themselves in a typically tight game seven minutes into the second half. But after scoring two points and making one of 12 shots coming out of the break, SLU erupted for 23 consecutive points and ran away for a 68-57 win over St. Joseph’s

at Chaifetz Arena. The momentum changed after the Hawks cut SLU’s 11-point lead to one, prompting a timeout called by coach Travis Ford. “It was one of the more intense discussions we’ve had this year,” Ford said. “I thought we were playing — I can’t think of a better word — soft. I’m getting upset now just thinking about it. That’s not who we are.” Dion Wiley contributed three 3-pointers to the run and Javon Bess had two, re-

flecting SLU’s offense for the game. Wiley had six 3s and scored a career-high 20 points, and Bess had five 3s and 20 points. The Billikens (5-0 in the A-10, 14-4 overall) posted their sixth consecutive win by holding St. Joseph’s (1-5, 8-10) to 29.5 percent shooting. Charlie Brown Jr., the team’s and league’s leading scorer, made one of 11 shots and scored nine points. Wiley, who is a graduate transfer from Maryland, entered the game having made 26 percent of his 3s. He returned to the rotation at the start of January after missing a month with a bruised thigh. “It feels great, to be honest,” he said. See SLU • Page D4

> MEN’S BASKETBALL INSIDE: Mizzou’s freshman point guard is learning on the fly. D4

In the ever-evolving flow of a hockey season, there are few absolutes. Plans change. So do lineups. But it sure looks like interim coach Craig Berube is going with a time-share system in goal with Jake Allen and Jordan Binnington. “Right now it is, I would say so,” Berube said Friday. “I’m going to use both of them right now. I truly believe that’s the way to go. Then we’ve got the break coming up and it gets really busy again, so we’ll need both of them ready.” Over the Blues’ past seven games, dating back to the team’s 4-3 home loss to the New York Islanders on Jan. 5, Berube has started Binnington four times and Allen three times. In those seven games, Binnington is 3-0-1 in his starts while Allen is 1-2. But the minimum you ask of a goalie is that he gives your team a chance to win in any given game, and Berube said both goalies are meeting that standard. “That’s what we’re looking for,” he said. See BLUES • Page D5

Scherzer reconnects with MU Three-time Cy Young winner has number retired BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • There will be

MIZZOU ATHLETICS PHOTO

Max Scherzer attends the retirement ceremony for his Mizzou jersey number on Friday in Columbia, Mo.

many great stories to tell about the career that led Max Scherzer to Cooperstown on the day he’s enshrined in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. How he got his No. 31 is not one of them. In 2003, he arrived at the University of Missouri from St. Louis as a college freshman. The story begins and ends there. “When I showed up to the locker

room that was the number assigned to me,” he said. That was that. More than 15 years later, Scherzer returned to campus Friday night — the place he calls “ground zero” for his pitching career — to receive the latest accolade as one of the most celebrated athletes to wear Mizzou’s black and gold. Thanks to a revised and relaxed athletics department policy, MU got around to an honor that might seem long See SCHERZER • Page D3

MAX SCHERZER High school: Parkway Central College: Mizzou, 2004-2006 Drafted: 2006, 11th pick by Arizona Cy Young Awards: 2013 AL; 2016 NL; 2017 NL MLB CAREER STATS (Arizona, Detroit and Washington) Win-loss ................................159-82 ERA ...........................................3.22 WAR ......................................... 54.5 Strikouts................................ 2,449 Shutouts ....................................... 5 All-Star game selections............... 6

SPORTS

1 M

Have A Heart, Heat A Home! 19th

Rise & Shine® for Heat

Volunteers Wanted: Official Greeters Sign-up at www.Heatupstlouis.org

AD MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH AN

February 15th, 6:00-10:30 A.M. | Serving Missouri & Illinois GRANT


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • D

WINTER WARM-UP Continues through Monday • Hyatt Regency St. Louis At The Arch • Follow along at STLtoday.com

FRESH BEGINNINGS

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“He’s going to be a good player here,” said Jack Kingston, who wore his new jersey to get an autograph of Cardinals first baseman Paul Goldschmidt at the Winter Warm-Up.

Cardinals fans get first look at new teammates

Cards-Cubs rivalry gets a winter warm-up

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After introducing one new All-Star added to the team and talking about keeping the other All-Star acquired this winter, the inevitable question from a fan Saturday about the superstar who hasn’t been added anywhere confronted John Mozeliak, and “candidly” he expected it sooner. “How soon,” a fan began after introducing himself, “can we expect to get Bryce Harper in a Cardinals’ uniform?” For the record, that was the third question asked.

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See CARDINALS • Page D7

Mo’s mission to fight blindness marches on

I’d like to think that if Instagram was a thing 50 years ago, this is how Bob Gibson would’ve used it. Not to post photos of his meals or sunsets, but to spit virtual venom at “stupid players and losers.” During a playful exchange at the Cubs’ version of Winter WarmUp, Kris Bryant publicly said to the interviewer, former Cubs AllStar Ryan Dempster: “Who would want to play in St. Louis? Boring.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See HOCHMAN • Page D6

The story about the little boy and his boat stuck with Cardinals president of baseball operations John Mozeliak. It hit him in the heart when he first heard it, during a lunch with a determined father who became a friend. He has returned to it often during his support and advocacy for a cause he knew nothing about until a letter changed his life. And he referenced it again See FREDERICKSON • Page D6

Mozeliak confident Ozuna will be ready for spring training, will visit slugger in Dominican Republic. D6 • Andrew Miller has a chip on his shoulder after struggling last year. D7

Blues hold off Senators Gunnarsson scores winner in 3rd period BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Home has been where the hurt is for the Blues this season, a home of self-inflicted pain that has effectively spelled the difference between success and failure for the team this season. So on Friday, the question for Blues interim coach Craig Berube was what needed to change for his team to have more success at Enterprise Center the rest of the season as the team tries to fight its way back from the brink.

BLUES

MU dominates in win at Texas A&M

3 SENATORS 2 BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

> 3 p.m. Monday at Kings, NBCSN > Perron sits out with injury. D8

COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS • About

“I’d say composure is a big thing at home,” he said. “We don’t handle adversity very well at home. That’s one area where we have to get better. You’re not always going to come out at home and dominate a team or be the better team.” The Blues have been no strangers to adversity, and they served up a heaping helping early in the third period where a woefully mismanaged power play led See BLUES • Page D8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Vince Dunn is surrounded by Robert Bortuzzo (left) and Brayden Schenn after scoring.

an hour before tipoff Saturday at Texas A&M’s Reed Arena, MIZZOU 66 the Missouri basketball team had a familTEXAS A&M 43 iar-looking partici> 8 p.m. Wednesday at pant in their pregame warm-up. He stood Arkansas, SEC Net. about 6-foot-5, bald head, ear buds plugged in, tunes jamming. Stationed along the baseline, he chatted nonstop with the players as they shot, passed and rebounded. Home or away, Cuonzo Martin never See MU • Page D4

SPORTS

2 M

Have A Heart, Heat A Home! 19th

Rise & Shine® for Heat

Volunteers Wanted: Official Greeters Sign-up at www.Heatupstlouis.org

AD MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH AN

February 15th, 6:00-10:30 A.M. | Serving Missouri & Illinois GRANT


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 01.20.2019 • D

WINTER WARM-UP Continues through Monday • Hyatt Regency St. Louis At The Arch • Follow along at STLtoday.com

FRESH BEGINNINGS

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

“He’s going to be a good player here,” said Jack Kingston, who wore his new jersey to get an autograph of Cardinals first baseman Paul Goldschmidt at the Winter Warm-Up.

Cardinals fans get first look at new teammates

Cards-Cubs rivalry gets a winter warm-up

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After introducing one new All-Star added to the team and talking about keeping the other All-Star acquired this winter, the inevitable question from a fan Saturday about the superstar who hasn’t been added anywhere confronted John Mozeliak, and “candidly” he expected it sooner. “How soon,” a fan began after introducing himself, “can we expect to get Bryce Harper in a Cardinals’ uniform?” For the record, that was the third question asked.

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See CARDINALS • Page D7

Mo’s mission to fight blindness marches on

I’d like to think that if Instagram was a thing 50 years ago, this is how Bob Gibson would’ve used it. Not to post photos of his meals or sunsets, but to spit virtual venom at “stupid players and losers.” During a playful exchange at the Cubs’ version of Winter WarmUp, Kris Bryant publicly said to the interviewer, former Cubs AllStar Ryan Dempster: “Who would want to play in St. Louis? Boring.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See HOCHMAN • Page D6

The story about the little boy and his boat stuck with Cardinals president of baseball operations John Mozeliak. It hit him in the heart when he first heard it, during a lunch with a determined father who became a friend. He has returned to it often during his support and advocacy for a cause he knew nothing about until a letter changed his life. And he referenced it again See FREDERICKSON • Page D6

Mozeliak confident Ozuna will be ready for spring training, will visit slugger in Dominican Republic. D6 • Andrew Miller has a chip on his shoulder after struggling last year. D7

Blues get big home win Gunnarsson scores winner in 3rd period BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Home has been where the hurt is for the Blues this season, a place of self-inflicted pain that has effectively spelled the difference between success and failure for the team this season. The Blues have not only felt it, but they’ve heard it. Earlier this season, they had a run of ugly, multi-goal losses — 6-1 to Pittsburgh, 7-2 to Calgary, 6-1 to Vancouver, 8-4 to Winnipeg, just to name some low points —

BLUES

MU dominates in win at Texas A&M

3 SENATORS 2 BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

> 3 p.m. Monday at Kings, NBCSN > Perron sits out with injury. D8

COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS • About

that ended with cascades of boos from the fans who bothered to stick out to the end. On Saturday, after a 3-2 win over Ottawa, there was noise of a different kind, a full-throated roar after the team shook off a potentially disastrous shorthanded goal to start the third period and pulled out a victory. “It hasn’t been great on home ice this year,” center Brayden Schenn said. “That’s a step in See BLUES • Page D8

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Vince Dunn is surrounded by Robert Bortuzzo (left) and Brayden Schenn after scoring.

an hour before tipoff Saturday at Texas A&M’s Reed Arena, MIZZOU 66 the Missouri basketball team had a familTEXAS A&M 43 iar-looking partici> 8 p.m. Wednesday at pant in their pregame warm-up. He stood Arkansas, SEC Net. about 6-foot-5, bald head, ear buds plugged in, tunes jamming. Stationed along the baseline, he chatted nonstop with the players as they shot, passed and rebounded. Home or away, Cuonzo Martin never See MU • Page D4

SPORTS

3 M

Have A Heart, Heat A Home! 19th

Rise & Shine® for Heat

Volunteers Wanted: Official Greeters Sign-up at www.Heatupstlouis.org

AD MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH AN

February 15th, 6:00-10:30 A.M. | Serving Missouri & Illinois GRANT


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 1/19 vs. Senators 6 p.m. FSM

Monday 1/21 at Kings 3 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 1/23 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/2 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball Wednesday 1/23 at Duquesne 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 vs. Davidson 1 p.m. CBSSN

Sunday 1/20 at St. Bona. 12 p.m.

Wednesday 1/23 vs. Dayton 11 a.m.

M 1 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

Patriots jump on headline underdog status subhed AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Chiefs are favored by three in Sunday’s game

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Saturday 1/19 at Texas A&M 2:30 p.m. SEC Network

Women’s basketball Wednesday 1/23 at Arkansas 8 p.m. SEC Network

Monday 1/21 at South Carolina 6 p.m. ESPN2

Thursday 1/24 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. SEC Network

UPDATE

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Sunday 1/20 at Iowa 12 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/23 vs. Wisconsin 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/26 at Maryland 11 a.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/30 at Minnesota 8 p.m. BTN

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Saturday 1/19 vs. Murray State 7 p.m.

Women’s basketball Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 7:45 p.m.

Saturday 1/19 vs. Murray State 2 p.m.

Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 5:15 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Sat. 1/19: vs. Utica, 7:05 p.m. Fri. 2/1: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m.

ON THE AIR ON THE AIR BASKETBALL BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Providence at Marquette, CBSSN 11 a.m. College: Florida at Georgia, KMOV (4) ESPNU State at Boston College, 11 a.m. College: Michigan at Wisconsin, ESPN 11:30 a.m. College women: Virginia Tech at North Carolina State, FSM 11 College: North Miami, 12 a.m. p.m. IllinoisCarolina at Iowa, at BTN, KFNSESPN2 (590 AM) 11 a.m. Girls high school:Penn Northwestern (Ind.) vs. Indianapolis N. Central, FS2 1 p.m. College women: State at Maryland, ESPN2 11 a.m. College women: Navy at Army, 1 p.m. Louisiana StateCBSSN at Alabama, SEC Network 11 a.m. College: Tulsa at Fordham Central Florida, ESPNU 1 p.m. College women: at Dayton, CBSSN 11:30 Richmond at Davidson, NBCSN 1 p.m.a.m. College: College women: Houston at Wichita State, ESPNU 12 p.m. ArkansasNorth at Mississippi, Network 1:30 p.m. College: College women: Carolina atSEC Miami, FSM 12 p.m. College: Cincinnati at Wichita KMOV (4) College women: Ohio State atState, Michigan, BTN 12 p.m. College: North Carolina State at NotreFS1 Dame, KPLR (11) College women: Butler at Creighton, 12 p.m. College: Indiana at Purdue, KTVI (2)City, NBA G League: Santa Cruz at Oklahoma 13 p.m. College: Kansas at West Virginia, ESPN SIU Carbondale vs. Bradley, ESPNU, KATZ (1600 AM) 13 p.m. College: Alabama at Tennessee, Missouri State at Drake,ESPN2 KXFN (1380 AM, 106.5 FM), KYROschool: (1280 AM) 1 p.m. High Zionsville (Ind.) vs. Warren Central (Ind.), FS2 31 p.m. p.m. College: Duquesne at Washington, NBCSN College: Pittsburgh atGeorge Syracuse, FSM 31 p.m. p.m. College women: Texas A&M at Georgia, ESPN2 College: Loyola-Chicago at Indiana State, ESPNU 3 p.m. College women: Florida SEC Network 1:30 p.m. College: Rhode Island at at LaMississippi, Salle, NBCSN 31:30 p.m. College women: La Salle at Saint Joseph’s, CBSSN p.m. College: Navy at Army, CBSSN 4 p.m. College women: West Virginia at Baylor, FS1 2:30 p.m. College: Missouri at Texas A&M, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 5 p.m.p.m. NBA: College women: at(30) Nebraska, ESPN2 2:30 Thunder at Minnesota 76ers, KDNL NBA: Hornets FSM 35 p.m. p.m. College: UCLAat atPacers, Southern California, KMOV (4) College: Louisville Colorado at ESPNU 35 p.m. p.m. College: atUtah, Georgia Tech, KPLR (11) 6:30 p.m. High school: IMG Academy (Fla.) vs. Oak Hill Academy (Va.), ESPN 3 p.m. College: Kentucky at Auburn, ESPN FOOTBALL 3 p.m. College: Texas Christian at Kansas State, ESPN2 2 p.m. NFC championship: Rams at Saints, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) 3 p.m. College: Wake Forest at Virginia Tech, FSM Plus 5:30 p.m. AFC championship: Patriots at Chiefs, KMOV (4), 3 p.m. College: Northern Iowa at Valparaiso, FSM KRAP (107.1 FM, 1350 AM), WXOS (101.1 FM) 3 p.m. College: Southern Methodist at Memphis, ESPNU GOLF 3:30 p.m. College: St. John’s at Butler, KTVI (2) 10 a.m. Latin America Amateur Championship: final round, ESPN2 3:30 p.m. PGA College: DaytonTour: at St.Bahamas Bonaventure, 11 a.m. Web.com GreatNBCSN Abaco, first round, GOLF 4 p.m. College: Pennsylvania at Temple, 1 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions,CBSSN final round, GOLF p.m. College: Virginia at of Duke, ESPN final round, KSDK (5) 25 p.m. LPGA: Tournament Champions, 52 p.m. p.m. College: Texas Tech at Baylor, PGA: Golf Desert Classic, final ESPN2 round, GOLF 5HOCKEY p.m. College: South Carolina at LSU, SEC Network 5 p.m.a.m. College: StateKSDK at Iowa 11:30 Capitals Oklahoma at Blackhawks, (5) State, ESPNU 5:30 p.m. College: Massachusetts at VCU, 3 p.m. AHL: Milwaukee at Chicago, NHLNBCSN Network 6 p.m. NBA: Mavericks at Pacers, FSM Plus 4 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan State, BTN 7 p.m. College:at DePaul SetonNHL Hall, FS1 6 p.m. Coyotes MapleatLeafs, Network 76:30 p.m.p.m. College: College: Notre Houston at South Florida, Dame at Wisconsin, ESPNU BTN 7 p.m. College: SIU Edwardsville vs. Murray State, WSIE (88.7 FM) SOCCER 7:30 a.m. p.m. English NBA: Lakers at Rockets, KDNL (30) 7:25 Premier League: Huddersfield vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 7:30 p.m. College: PennFCState at Minnesota, BTN Berlin, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Nuremberg vs. Hertha 7:30 p.m. College:Premier Mississippi State at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 9:55 a.m. English League: Fulham vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 9 p.m. High school: Tournament of Champions 10:50 a.m. Bundesliga: Schalke vs. Wolfsburg, FS2 final: Sunrise Christian (Kan.) vs. McEachern (Ga.) or Shadow Mtn. (Ariz.), CBSSN TENNIS 9 p.m. College: Air Force at Nevada, ESPNU 6 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, Tennis Channel FOOTBALL 8 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2 2 p.m. College: East-West Shrine Game, NFL Network 2 a.m. (Mon.) Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2 4 p.m. College: NFLPA Collegiate Bowl, FS1 11 p.m. High school: Polynesian Bowl, CBSSN GOLF 10 a.m. Latin America Amateur Championship, ESPNews 1ASSOCIATED p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, GOLF PRESS 2 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. PGA: Desert Classic, GOLF 6 p.m. Champions: Mitsubishi Electric Championship, GOLF 12:30 a.m. (Sun.) Asian Tour: Singapore Open, GOLF GYMNASTICS 2:30 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Penn State, BTN HOCKEY 4 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Minnesota, FS2 4:30 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan State, BTN 6 p.m. Blues vs. Senators, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. Rangers at Bruins, NHL Network 6:15 p.m. College: Western Michigan at St. Cloud State, FS2 MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 7 p.m. UFC Fight Night: Cejudo vs. Dillashaw, prelims, ESPN MOTORCYCLE RACING 10 p.m. Motocross: Monster Energy Supercross-Anaheim, NBCSN SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Wolverhampton vs. Leicester, NBCSN 7:55 a.m. Serie A: AS Roma vs. Torino, ESPNews 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayer Leverkusen vs. Borussia Monchengladbach, FS1 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. SC Freiburg, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Crystal Palace, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester United vs. Brighton, CNBC 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Chelsea, KSDK (5) 11:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Leipzig vs. Borussia Dortmund, FS1 1:30 p.m. Women’s Friendly: France vs. United States, FS1 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open: Round of 16, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open: Round of 16, ESPN2 TRACK AND FIELD 11 a.m. Big Ten: Indoor Invitational, BTN

DIGEST

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New England quarterback Tom Brady is in the AFC championship game for the eighth year in a row. ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, MASS. • It may have been hard to hear him over the noise of the New England fans celebrating an eighth straight trip to the AFC title game, but Tom Brady is feeling disrespected. That’s right: The three-time NFL MVP and five-time Super Bowl champion told a national TV audience after demolishing the Los Angeles Chargers in the playoffs, “I know everyone thinks we (stink) and can’t win any games. “We’ll see,” Brady said with a roguish look in his eyes. “Could be fun.” There hasn’t been an NFL dynasty like the Patriots — at least since the merger — with Brady and coach Bill Belichick leading the franchise to 10 straight AFC East titles and 15 in 16 years, resulting in eight trips to the Super Bowl and five NFL crowns. And yet as they prepare to travel to Kansas City to take on the Chiefs in Sunday’s AFC championship game, Brady is right about one thing: The Patriots are a 3-point underdog, and that’s an unusual position for them. “We’re going against a team that’s the No. 1 seed in the league,” Brady said after the team’s final practice Friday. “I’m sure there’s a lot of people that are thinking they’re going to win. Everyone can have their own opinion. We cerASSOCIATED PRESS tainly have an opinion, and we’ve got to go out there and execute our best in order to accomplish that.” Players have long found their motivation wherever they can, whether it’s the oddsmakers or experts or comments from the opposing team that go up on the locker room bulletin board for all

headline

to see. Heading into the NFC title game, some banter about gumbo has turned into a rallying cry for the Los Angeles Rams. You’d think the Patriots would struggle to rustle up slights to motivate themselves. But it’s just another thing they’ve mastered. Responding to the public perception — or at least that of the oddsmakers — receiver Julian Edelman tweeted a Chiefs hype video lauding quarterback Patrick Mahomes as the best player in the league. Edelman made no secret what he thought of that, adding a hashtag: “#BetAgainstUs”; he is also selling T-shirts with the slogan squeezed into the shape of the Patriots logo. Special teams star Matthew Slater said he wasn’t motivated as much by being an underdog in this game as other times he was doubted in his life. “I’m not supposed to be playing in this league anyways,” he said, “so we’ve got plenty of motivation.” Defensive back Jason McCourty was a sixth-round draft pick — just like Brady. And, just like Brady, he hasn’t forgotten. “You’ve just always had that chip on your shoulder, and no matter what you go through in life, especially with football, there’s just always someone or something,” McCourty said. “I think that type of mindset, no matter if you’re 16-0, you’re rolling through the playoffs, no matter what the situation is, there’s always going to be somebody that’s doubting you or saying something about you. I think for certain guys individually, it may be something that kind of gives you that extra kick.”

2. LA Rams

2. New England

2:05 Sunday, KTVI-2

5:40 Sunday, KMOV-4

1. New Orleans

1. Kansas City

Feb. 3, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4) • Atlanta

NFL NOTEBOOK Cowboys, Linehan agree to part ways Scott Linehan is out as offensive coordinator of the Dallas Cowboys, less than a week after coach Jason Garrett sent mixed messages about the future for the oftcriticized assistant. Garrett, in a statement released by the team Friday, described the move as a mutual decision after he and Linehan had some open and positive discussions this week. Linehan is a former St. Louis Rams head coach who just completed his fifth season in Dallas. He had one more season left on his contract. “This was very much a mutual decision, and there was a great deal of common ground and shared understanding between both of us during our meetings,” Garrett said. The Cowboys rebounded after a 3-5 start to win the NFC East. They beat the Seattle Seahawks in a home wild-card game before a 30-22 loss at the Los Angeles Rams last weekend. CAPTION_JUMP Chiefs’ Berry set to go against Pats • Chiefs safety Eric Berry sounded confident Friday that he’ll be on the field when Kansas City hosts the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game Sunday night. The three-time All-Pro has been a full participant in practice this week after dealing with a heel injury but needs the OK from coach Andy Reid to take the field. “I feel pretty good. Just talk to Coach and see what he wants to do and go from there,” Berry said. “It would mean a lot not just for me and my family and my teammates, but the organization.” Former Bengals QB Schonert dies • Quarterback Turk Schonert, who came off the bench and led the Cincinnati Bengals to an opening victory during their first Super Bowl season, has died suddenly near his home in South Carolina. The Bengals were informed of Schonert’s death, which came Thursday two days after his 62nd birthday. Schonert relieved a struggling Ken Anderson and rallied Cincinnati to a 27-21 victory over Seattle in the 1981 opener. Anderson started the next game, and the Bengals went on to a 12-4 mark and reached the Super Bowl, losing to San Francisco. OtherROUNDUP news • New Orleans GOLF Saints tight end Ben Watson will be inactive ASSOCIATED PRESSagainst the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC championship game Sunday, ESPN.com reports. The team listed Watson, who has appendicitis, as questionable on Friday. ... The Chicago Bears hired former Pittsburgh Steelers cornerback Deshea Townsend as defensive backs coach. ... New Cleveland Browns coach Freddie Kitchens added seven assistants to his staff, including Tosh Lupoi, Alabama’s defensive coordinator last season. From news services

DIGEST Cody Allen is joining the Angels

knee, hit a career-high 19 home runs last season but slumped to .236 with 49 RBIs in 93 games after batting After seven seasons with the Cleveland Indians, Cody a career-best .330 with 18 homers and 80 RBIs in 136 Allen is looking to rebound with a new team. games in 2017. Allen and the Los Angeles Angels have agreed to a $8.5 million, one-year contract, a person familiar with Ambush win in KC • The St. Louis Ambush (5-5) broke the negotiations told The Associated Press on Friday. open a tie game with a 4-1 third-quarter outburst and The agreement includes $2.5 million in available went on to an 8-5 win over the Kansas City Comets (4-5) bonuses. in Major Arena Soccer League action in suburban Kansas A 30-year-old righthander, Allen had spent his entire City. career with Cleveland and is the franchise’s leader in Douglas Dos Santos and Zach Reget had two goals saves with 149. He struggled last season, posting a career-high 4.70 ERA while going 4-6 with 27 saves in 70 apiece to pace St. Louis, which hosts Utica City FC (7-2) Saturday in a 7:05 p.m. match at Family Arena. appearances. He split the closer’s role after Cleveland Stefan St. Louis, Justin Stinson and Pepe Junqueira traded for Brad Hand on July 19. Allen was 2-2 with six also scored Friday for the Ambush. saves and five blown saves his last 19 appearances and had only two save opportunities — which he converted — Wisconsin coach’s deal extended • Wisconsin renewed in his final 13 regular-season games. football coach Paul Chryst’s five-year contract through Allen has a 2.98 career ERA and had five straight January 2024. seasons of a sub-3.00 ERA from 2013-17. He joins an Chryst is entering his fifth season with the Badgers, Angels bullpen that was third in the American League in who wrapped up a relatively disappointing season at 8-5 innings pitched (632) but 12th in saves (35) last season. (5-4 Big Ten) with a dominating 35-3 win in the Pinstripe Blake Parker led Los Angeles in saves with 14 but was Bowl over Miami. Chryst is 42-12 at Wisconsin. not offered a contract following the season. The Angels, entering their first season with Brad NASCAR pioneer dies • Glen courtly and Ausmus as manager, starters Matt HarveyCONTACT and editors, use first initialWood, AND lastthe name@post-dispatch.com US To e-mail HOW TO SUBMITsigned A LETTER For general information call famed 314-340-8222 innovative patriarch of the Wood Brothers Racing Trevor Cahill earlier in the offseason. MAIL Must include team who had been the oldest living member of the Roger Hensley Assistant Managing Editor | Sports 314-340-8301 name, address Sports Sound Off Garcia can earn NASCAR Hall of Fame, died Friday. He was 93. Garcia contract disclosed • Avisail up for verification. Cameron Hollway Deputy Sports Editor 314-340-8392 St. Louis Post-Dispatch Wood Brothers announced the death of its team to $6 million as part of his one-year contract with the 900 North Tucker Boulevard Letters may be Don Reed founder Deputy Sports Editor saying | Nights he died in Stuart, 314-340-8313 on social media, Va., Tampafor Bay Rays. St. Louis, MO 63101 edited length Mike Smith Assistant Sports Editor | Online 314-340-8137 after a long illness. The team announced the deal Friday, an agreement and clarity. Mike Reilly Sports Editor | Nights 314-340-8178 WoodAssistant Brothers is the longest continuous Cup team in that guarantees $3.5 million this season. He can earn $250,000 each for 350, 400, 450,Chris 500,Gove NASCAR. High School Sports 314-744-5725 550 and 600 plate appearances, and $1 million for 650. Associated Press FAXGarcia, 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com • HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com coming• off arthroscopic surgery on his right


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 1/21 at Kings 3 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 1/23 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/2 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/5 at Panthers 6 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball

Wednesday 1/23 Saturday 1/26 vs. Davidson at Duquesne 1 p.m. 7 p.m. CBSSN

Wednesday 1/23 Sunday 1/20 at St. Bonaventure vs. Dayton 11 a.m. 12 p.m.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Anisimova’s streak ends U.S. teen’s trail of upsets is ended by Petra Kvitova

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Wednesday 1/23 at Arkansas 8 p.m. SEC Network

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 vs. LSU 5 p.m. SEC Network

Monday 1/21 at South Carolina 6 p.m. ESPN2

Thursday 1/24 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. SEC Network

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Sunday 1/20 at Iowa 12 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/23 vs. Wisconsin 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/26 at Maryland 11 a.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/30 at Minnesota 8 p.m. BTN

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 7:45 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 3:30 p.m.

Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 5:15 p.m.

Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 1 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 2/1: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sat. 2/2: vs. Orlando, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR ASSOCIATED PRESS BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Providence at Marquette, CBSSN 11 a.m. College: Florida State at Boston College, ESPNU 11:30 a.m. College women: Virginia Tech at North Carolina State, FSM Noon College: Illinois at Iowa, BTN, KFNS (590 AM) 1 p.m. College women: Penn State at Maryland, ESPN2 1 p.m. College women: Louisiana State at Alabama, SEC Network 1 p.m. College women: Fordham at Dayton, CBSSN 1 p.m. College women: Houston at Wichita State, ESPNU 1:30 p.m. College women: North Carolina at Miami, FSM 2 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Michigan, BTN 2 p.m. College women: Butler at Creighton, FS1 2 p.m. G League: Santa Cruz at Oklahoma City, NBA 3 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Bradley, ESPNU, KATZ (1600 AM) 3 p.m. College: Missouri State at Drake, KXFN (1380 AM, 106.5 FM), KYRO (1280 AM) 3 p.m. College: Duquesne at George Washington, NBCSN 3 p.m. College women: Texas A&M at Georgia, ESPN2 3 p.m. College women: Florida at Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. College women: La Salle at Saint Joseph’s, CBSSN 4 p.m. College women: West Virginia at Baylor, FS1 5 p.m. College women: Minnesota at Nebraska, ESPN2 5 p.m. NBA: Hornets at Pacers, FSM 5 p.m. College: Colorado at Utah, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. High school: IMG Academy (Fla.) vs. Oak Hill Academy (Va.), ESPN FOOTBALL 2 p.m. NFC championship: Rams at Saints, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) 5:30 p.m. AFC championship: Patriots at Chiefs, KMOV (4), KRAP (107.1 FM, 1350 AM), WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 10 a.m. Latin America Amateur Championship: final round, ESPN2 11 a.m. PGA Web.com Tour: Bahamas Great Abaco, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, final round, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. PGA: Golf Desert Classic, final round, GOLF HOCKEY 11:30 a.m. Capitals at Blackhawks, KSDK (5) 3 p.m. AHL: Milwaukee at Chicago, NHL Network 4 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan State, BTN 6 p.m. Coyotes at Maple Leafs, NHL Network 6:30 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Wisconsin, BTN SOCCER 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Huddersfield vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: FC Nuremberg vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Fulham vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 10:50 a.m. Bundesliga: Schalke vs. Wolfsburg, FS2 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2 2 a.m. (Mon.) Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2

DIGEST U.S. women’s soccer team has streak snapped Kadidiatou Diani scored twice and France ended the U.S. national women’s soccer team’s 28-game unbeaten streak with a 3-1 victory Saturday in Le Havre, France. The top-ranked United States had not lost since falling 1-0 to Australia in 2017, The Americans were 25-0-3 over the span. Marie-Antoinette Katoto also scored for third-ranked France. It has won eight straight matches. It was the first of 10 matches the United States will play before the World Cup. The Americans are the defending champions and could meet France again in the tournament’s quarterfinals. France went up in the ninth minute on Diani’s goal off a cross from Delphine Cascarino. Diani scored again in the 57th minute to make it 2-0. The 23-year old plays for Paris Saint-Germain. Katoto, Diani’s PSG teammate, added a goal in the 78th minute. Mallory Pugh scored for the United States in the final moments. (AP) Former skating champ Coughlin dies • John Coughlin, a two-time U.S. pairs champion, died by suicide in Kansas City, Mo. He was 33. The Kansas City Police Department said in an email Saturday that officers responded to a call of a suicide at a house in the Country Lanes Estates neighborhood in Kansas City just before 5 p.m. Friday and found Coughlin’s body. Sgt. Jacob Becchina declined to give specifics on the death. Coughlin won national pairs championships with two partners. He teamed with Caitlin Yankowskas in 2011 and with Caydee Denney the next year. (AP) Mizzou wrestling clinches MAC title • With a 32-15 win Saturday over visiting Central Michigan, the fifth-ranked Missouri wrestling team clinched the Mid-American Conference regular-season title. The Tigers (13-0, 6-0) have won either a regular-season or conference championship in eight consecutive seasons dating back to their final season in the Big 12. With four of the last five regularseason championships in the MAC, Missouri has won its last 33 duals. Central Michigan is 2-4 and 1-2. The Tigers won seven of 10 matches Saturday, getting pins from John Erneste (133 pounds), Jaydin Eierman (141), Jarrett Jacques (157), a technical fall from Francis Howell product Connor Flynn (165) and decisions from Brock Mauller (149), Luke Fortuna (174) and Wyatt Koelling (197). (News sources) Man United wins seventh in a row • Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s recordbreaking start to life as Manchester United coach continued as Paul Pogba and Marcus Rashford struck against Brighton on Saturday to secure a seventh successive win in all competitions. In the process of claiming a seventh consecutive victory, Solskjaer became the first United coach to win his first six league games, with Pogba’s penalty and a Rashford stunner seeing off Chris Hughton’s Brighton 2-1. (AP)

Amanda Anisimova makes a backhand return to Petra Kvitova during their fourth-round match. ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

It took two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova being on top of her game to bring a very abrupt ending to 17-year-old Amanda Anisimova’s run of upsets at the Australian Open. The 28-year-old Kvitova wanted no part of another loss to Anisimova, who beat her last year at Indian Wells and was the youngest American since Jennifer Capriati in 1993 to make it this far at Melbourne Park. It took 59 minutes to win 6-2, 6-1 on Sunday. Kvitova was the model of consistency that the two other seeded players previously vanquished by Anisimova — No. 24 Lesia Tsurenko and No. 11 Aryna Sabalenka — were not. Kvitova broke Anisimova’s serve five times — including the opening game — and never faced a break point. She got 86 percent of her first serves into play, and won all but five of the points when she did. She’s now on a nine-match winning streak, her four wins here come after a title run in Sydney last week, and is into the Australian Open quarterfinals for the first time since 2012. Up next will be either five-time major winner Maria Sharapova,

or local hope Ashleigh Barty. That fourth-round meeting was the next match on Rod Laver Arena. It’s no concern of Kvitova’s who wins that one. “Doesn’t matter who I’m going to face in the quarterfinals,” she said. “I’m there — and that’s (what’s) important.” Among other matches on Day 7, 17-time major winner Rafael Nadal was playing 2010 Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych, and six-time Australian Open champion Roger Federer was taking on 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas. Kvitova had to miss the Australian Open in 2017 because of injuries to her left hand she sustained in a home invasion the previous month at her place in the Czech Republic. She lost in the first round here last year. Anisimova beat her 6-2, 6-4 in 70 minutes in their only previous meeting, but Kvitova came out ready this time. She took the first three points of the match to immediately have Anisimoa under pressure, facing triple breakpoint. The teenager saved two, but Kvitova’s powerful backhand service return had her scrambling and the first game was gone. Anisimova won the first two points on Kvitova’s serve, but the former Wimbledon champion of 2011 and ’13 responded by win-

ning the next four to hold. A double-fault gave Kvitova three break points in the next game, and she forced an error on the backhand side to convert it. So quickly, it was 3-0. Anisimova was still taking big swings at the ball and hitting cleanly, but the lefthanded Kvitova was consistently in the right place to hit winners — including two important forehands down the line. The first set was over in 32 minutes and Anisimova could only shrug, like she was asking what was happening. In contrast to the first game, Anisimova held serve to open the second set. But that was her last. She was still in the contest in the fifth game when she was one point from holding again, but Kvitova won 10 straight points to take the match away from her again. “It’s always pressure out there when you’re the favorite. You never know how the younger players are playing,” Kvitova said. “They’re here with nothing to lose, they’re fearless. “I started pretty well (and) the nerves went a little bit out for me,” she added. “I’m really enjoying the time on court, and playing tennis.”

Lowry rallies to win in Abu Dhabi ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES • Shane Lowry made

birdie on the last hole to finish off a wire-to-wire victory in the Abu Dhabi Championship. If only it were that simple. His three-shot lead to start the final round Saturday was gone in three holes. When he walked off the 11th green with his fourth bogey of the round, Lowry found himself trailing Richard Sterne by four shots with seven holes to play. The 31-year-old Irishman showed plenty of fight the rest of the way and delivered his best full swing when he needed it. Lowry hit 3-wood onto the green at the par-5 18th and two-putted for birdie and a 1-under 71 for a oneshot victory. Lowry won for the first time since he captured the World Golf Championship at Firestone in the summer of 2015. “I completely thought I was gone, to be honest,” Lowry said. “I just tried to put him under as much pressure as I could. But I didn’t think I had that in me.” Sterne, who closed with a 69, applied plenty of pressure by opening with four birdies in five holes to take a one-shot lead, and Lowry started to falter around the turn with a pair of bogeys that dropped him four shots behind. Lowry thought about the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont, where he took a four-shot lead into the final round and closed with a 76 as Dustin Johnson surged to victory. “The one thing I got from Oakmont is I laid down and I didn’t show any fight there, and I did that today,” Lowry said. “I felt

after the 11th hole I was getting myself in the same situation that I got myself in at Oakmont. But I kind of had a quick word with myself and told myself to just kick on now and just see what I can do for the next seven holes.” Sterne, who shot 31 on the front nine, came back with bogeys on the 14th and 16th, and Lowry holed a 12-foot par putt on No. 17 that he feels won him the tournament. The Irishman had a big advantage going to the 562-yard closing hole because Sterne had only a 5-wood in his bag, not enough club to get home in two. “The shot he hit into 18 was world class,” Sterne said. “It was just out of reach with my 5-wood. ... I tried it and it didn’t come off.” Lowry started the tournament by tying the course record with a 62. He ended it by hanging on for dear life, and delivering clutch moments at the end with his putter on the 17th and his 3-wood on the 18th. Lowry finished at 18-under 270 for his fourth career victory on the European Tour. The timing worked out well for the Irishman. The victory allowed him to crack the top 50 — at least No. 41 — and takes him to the top of the Race to Dubai. That assures him a spot in two World Golf Championships over the next two months — Mexico City and the Match Play in Texas — and improves his chances of staying in the top 50 by the end of March to get into the Masters. Brooks Koepka closed with a 70 and tied for ninth, assuring that Justin Rose — who is playing the PGA Tour in California this weekend — will remain at No. 1 in the world.

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

GOLF ROUNDUP Mickelson shoots 66 to maintain 2-shot lead Phil Mickelson made three long birdie putts on the back nine Saturday to hold onto his twostroke lead going into the final round of the Desert Classic in La Quinta, Calif. Making his first start of the year, Mickelson shot a bogeyfree 6-under 66 on the Stadium Course at PGA West. He topped the leaderboard for the third straight day after matching his career-low score with an opening 60 at La Quinta Country Club and shooting 68 Friday on PGA West’s Nicklaus Tournament Course. “It’s so fun,” Mickelson said. “I just love being in contention, having a chance to win, being in the final group, feeling the nerves, feeling that excitement, the opportunity.” Adam Hadwin was second after a 65 on the Nicklaus layout. The Canadian has three straight top-six finishes in the event. He was second in 2017 after a thirdround 59 at La Quinta and tied for third last year. Ko surges into tie for lead • Lydia Ko shot 30 on the front nine to catch the leaders and stayed bogey-free for a 5-under 66 to share the lead with Eun-Hee Ji going into the final round of the Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Ji also shot 66 at Tranquilo Golf Club at Four Seasons. They were at 13-under 200. Associated Press

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

FAX 314-340-3070 • E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com • HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 1/21 at Kings 3 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 1/23 at Ducks 9 p.m. FSM

Saturday 2/2 at Blue Jackets 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/5 at Panthers 6 p.m. FSM

St. Louis U. • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Men’s basketball

Women’s basketball

Wednesday 1/23 Saturday 1/26 vs. Davidson at Duquesne 1 p.m. 7 p.m. CBSSN

Wednesday 1/23 Sunday 1/20 at St. Bonaventure vs. Dayton 11 a.m. 12 p.m.

M 3 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Anisimova’s streak ends U.S. teen’s trail of upsets is ended by Petra Kvitova

Mizzou • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Men’s basketball Wednesday 1/23 at Arkansas 8 p.m. SEC Network

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 vs. LSU 5 p.m. SEC Network

Monday 1/21 at South Carolina 6 p.m. ESPN2

Thursday 1/24 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. SEC Network

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Sunday 1/20 at Iowa 12 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/23 vs. Wisconsin 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/26 at Maryland 11 a.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/30 at Minnesota 8 p.m. BTN

SIUE • siuecougars.com | 855-748-3849 Men’s basketball Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 7:45 p.m.

Women’s basketball Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 3:30 p.m.

Thursday 1/24 at Southeast Missouri 5:15 p.m.

Saturday 1/26 at Tenn.-Martin 1 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 2/1: vs. Florida, 7:35 p.m. Sat. 2/2: vs. Orlando, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR ASSOCIATED PRESS BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Providence at Marquette, CBSSN 11 a.m. College: Florida State at Boston College, ESPNU 11:30 a.m. College women: Virginia Tech at North Carolina State, FSM Noon College: Illinois at Iowa, BTN, KFNS (590 AM) 1 p.m. College women: Penn State at Maryland, ESPN2 1 p.m. College women: Louisiana State at Alabama, SEC Network 1 p.m. College women: Fordham at Dayton, CBSSN 1 p.m. College women: Houston at Wichita State, ESPNU 1:30 p.m. College women: North Carolina at Miami, FSM 2 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Michigan, BTN 2 p.m. College women: Butler at Creighton, FS1 2 p.m. G League: Santa Cruz at Oklahoma City, NBA 3 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Bradley, ESPNU, KATZ (1600 AM) 3 p.m. College: Missouri State at Drake, KXFN (1380 AM, 106.5 FM), KYRO (1280 AM) 3 p.m. College: Duquesne at George Washington, NBCSN 3 p.m. College women: Texas A&M at Georgia, ESPN2 3 p.m. College women: Florida at Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. College women: La Salle at Saint Joseph’s, CBSSN 4 p.m. College women: West Virginia at Baylor, FS1 5 p.m. College women: Minnesota at Nebraska, ESPN2 5 p.m. NBA: Hornets at Pacers, FSM 5 p.m. College: Colorado at Utah, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. High school: IMG Academy (Fla.) vs. Oak Hill Academy (Va.), ESPN FOOTBALL 2 p.m. NFC championship: Rams at Saints, KTVI (2), WXOS (101.1 FM) 5:30 p.m. AFC championship: Patriots at Chiefs, KMOV (4), KRAP (107.1 FM, 1350 AM), WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 10 a.m. Latin America Amateur Championship: final round, ESPN2 11 a.m. PGA Web.com Tour: Bahamas Great Abaco, first round, GOLF 1 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. LPGA: Tournament of Champions, final round, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. PGA: Golf Desert Classic, final round, GOLF HOCKEY 11:30 a.m. Capitals at Blackhawks, KSDK (5) 3 p.m. AHL: Milwaukee at Chicago, NHL Network 4 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan State, BTN 6 p.m. Coyotes at Maple Leafs, NHL Network 6:30 p.m. College: Notre Dame at Wisconsin, BTN SOCCER 7:25 a.m. English Premier League: Huddersfield vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: FC Nuremberg vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 9:55 a.m. English Premier League: Fulham vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 10:50 a.m. Bundesliga: Schalke vs. Wolfsburg, FS2 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2 2 a.m. (Mon.) Australian Open: round of 16, ESPN2

DIGEST U.S. women’s soccer team has streak snapped Kadidiatou Diani scored twice and France ended the U.S. national women’s soccer team’s 28-game unbeaten streak with a 3-1 victory Saturday in Le Havre, France. The top-ranked United States had not lost since falling 1-0 to Australia in 2017, The Americans were 25-0-3 over the span. Marie-Antoinette Katoto also scored for third-ranked France. It has won eight straight matches. It was the first of 10 matches the United States will play before the World Cup. The Americans are the defending champions and could meet France again in the tournament’s quarterfinals. Mallory Pugh scored for the U.S. in the final moments. (AP) Ambush lose at home • Visiting Utica City FC of New York (8-2) built an 8-1 lead and went on to an 8-5 victory over the St. Louis Ambush in Major Arena Soccer League action Saturday night at Family Arena. Coming off an 8-5 win in Kansas City on Friday, the Ambush (5-6) had goals Saturday from Justin Stinson, Hewerton Moreira, Pepe Junqueira, Zach Reget and JT Thomas. (News sources) Mizzou wrestling team clinches MAC title • With a 32-15 win over visiting Central Michigan, the fifth-ranked Missouri wrestling team clinched the Mid-American Conference regular-season title. The Tigers (13-0, 6-0) have won either a regular-season or conference title in eight consecutive seasons dating back to their final season in the Big 12. With four of the last five regular-season championships in the MAC, Missouri has won its last 33 duals. Central Michigan is 2-4 and 1-2. The Tigers won seven of 10 matches Saturday, getting pins from John Erneste (133 pounds), Jaydin Eierman (141), Jarrett Jacques (157), a technical fall from Francis Howell product Connor Flynn (165) and decisions from Brock Mauller (149), Luke Fortuna (174) and Wyatt Koelling (197). (News sources) Former skating champ Coughlin dies • John Coughlin, a two-time U.S. pairs champion, died by suicide in Kansas City, Mo. He was 33. The Kansas City Police Department said in an email Saturday that officers responded to a call of a suicide at a house in the Country Lanes Estates neighborhood in Kansas City just before 5 p.m. Friday and found Coughlin’s body. Sgt. Jacob Becchina declined to give specifics on the death. Coughlin won national pairs championships with Caitlin Yankowskas in 2011 and with Caydee Denney the next year. (AP) Man United wins seventh in a row • Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s recordbreaking start to life as Manchester United coach continued as Paul Pogba and Marcus Rashford struck against Brighton on Saturday to secure a seventh successive win in all competitions. In the process of claiming a seventh consecutive victory, Solskjaer became the first United coach to win his first six league games, with Pogba’s penalty and a Rashford stunner seeing off Chris Hughton’s Brighton 2-1. (AP)

Amanda Anisimova makes a backhand return to Petra Kvitova during their fourth-round match. ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

It took two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova being on top of her game to bring a very abrupt ending to 17-year-old Amanda Anisimova’s run of upsets at the Australian Open. The 28-year-old Kvitova wanted no part of another loss to Anisimova, who beat her last year at Indian Wells and was the youngest American since Jennifer Capriati in 1993 to make it this far at Melbourne Park. It took 59 minutes to win 6-2, 6-1 on Sunday. Kvitova was the model of consistency that the two other seeded players previously vanquished by Anisimova — No. 24 Lesia Tsurenko and No. 11 Aryna Sabalenka — were not. Kvitova broke Anisimova’s serve five times — including the opening game — and never faced a break point. She got 86 percent of her first serves into play, and won all but five of the points when she did. She’s now on a nine-match winning streak, her four wins here come after a title run in Sydney last week, and is into the Australian Open quarterfinals for the first time since 2012. Up next will be local hope Ashleigh Barty, who beat fivetime major winner Maria

Sharapova 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 in an evening match. Barty opened the deciding set by breaking Sharapova’s serve, helped by two of Sharapova 10 double-faults in the match. “Doesn’t matter who I’m going to face in the quarterfinals,” she said. “I’m there — and that’s (what’s) important.” Among other late matches on Day 7, 17-time major winner Rafael Nadal was playing 2010 Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych, and six-time Australian Open champion Roger Federer was taking on 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas. Kvitova had to miss the Australian Open in 2017 because of injuries to her left hand she sustained in a home invasion the previous month at her place in the Czech Republic. She lost in the first round here last year. Anisimova beat her 6-2, 6-4 in 70 minutes in their only previous meeting, but Kvitova came out ready this time. She took the first three points of the match to immediately have Anisimoa under pressure, facing triple breakpoint. The teenager saved two, but Kvitova’s powerful backhand service return had her scrambling and the first game was gone. Anisimova won the first two points on Kvitova’s serve, but the former Wimbledon champion of

2011 and ’13 responded by winning the next four to hold. A double-fault gave Kvitova three break points in the next game, and she forced an error on the backhand side to convert it. So quickly, it was 3-0. Anisimova was still taking big swings at the ball and hitting cleanly, but the lefthanded Kvitova was consistently in the right place to hit winners — including two important forehands down the line. The first set was over in 32 minutes and Anisimova could only shrug, like she was asking what was happening. In contrast to the first game, Anisimova held serve to open the second set. But that was her last. She was still in the contest in the fifth game when she was one point from holding again, but Kvitova won 10 straight points to take the match away from her again. “It’s always pressure out there when you’re the favorite. You never know how the younger players are playing,” Kvitova said. “They’re here with nothing to lose, they’re fearless. “I started pretty well (and) the nerves went a little bit out for me,” she added. “I’m really enjoying the time on court, and playing tennis.”

Lowry rallies to win in Abu Dhabi ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES • Shane Lowry made

birdie on the last hole to finish off a wire-to-wire victory in the Abu Dhabi Championship. If only it were that simple. His three-shot lead to start the final round Saturday was gone in three holes. When he walked off the 11th green with his fourth bogey of the round, Lowry found himself trailing Richard Sterne by four shots with seven holes to play. The 31-year-old Irishman showed plenty of fight the rest of the way and delivered his best full swing when he needed it. Lowry hit 3-wood onto the green at the par-5 18th and two-putted for birdie and a 1-under 71 for a oneshot victory. Lowry won for the first time since he captured the World Golf Championship at Firestone in the summer of 2015. “I completely thought I was gone, to be honest,” Lowry said. “I just tried to put him under as much pressure as I could. But I didn’t think I had that in me.” Sterne, who closed with a 69, applied plenty of pressure by opening with four birdies in five holes to take a one-shot lead, and Lowry started to falter around the turn with a pair of bogeys that dropped him four shots behind. Lowry thought about the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont, where he took a four-shot lead into the final round and closed with a 76 as Dustin Johnson surged to victory. “The one thing I got from Oakmont is I laid down and I didn’t show any fight there, and I did that today,” Lowry said. “I felt

after the 11th hole I was getting myself in the same situation that I got myself in at Oakmont. But I kind of had a quick word with myself and told myself to just kick on now and just see what I can do for the next seven holes.” Sterne, who shot 31 on the front nine, came back with bogeys on the 14th and 16th, and Lowry holed a 12-foot par putt on No. 17 that he feels won him the tournament. The Irishman had a big advantage going to the 562-yard closing hole because Sterne had only a 5-wood in his bag, not enough club to get home in two. “The shot he hit into 18 was world class,” Sterne said. “It was just out of reach with my 5-wood. ... I tried it and it didn’t come off.” Lowry started the tournament by tying the course record with a 62. He ended it by hanging on for dear life, and delivering clutch moments at the end with his putter on the 17th and his 3-wood on the 18th. Lowry finished at 18-under 270 for his fourth career victory on the European Tour. The timing worked out well for the Irishman. The victory allowed him to crack the top 50 — at least No. 41 — and takes him to the top of the Race to Dubai. That assures him a spot in two World Golf Championships over the next two months — Mexico City and the Match Play in Texas — and improves his chances of staying in the top 50 by the end of March to get into the Masters. Brooks Koepka closed with a 70 and tied for ninth, assuring that Justin Rose — who is playing the PGA Tour in California this weekend — will remain at No. 1 in the world.

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

GOLF ROUNDUP Mickelson shoots 66 to maintain 2-shot lead Phil Mickelson made three long birdie putts on the back nine Saturday to hold onto his twostroke lead going into the final round of the Desert Classic in La Quinta, Calif. Making his first start of the year, Mickelson shot a bogeyfree 6-under 66 on the Stadium Course at PGA West. He topped the leaderboard for the third straight day after matching his career-low score with an opening 60 at La Quinta Country Club and shooting 68 Friday on PGA West’s Nicklaus Tournament Course. Adam Hadwin was second after a 65 on the Nicklaus layout. Lehman overtakes Toms • Tom Lehman rallied to win the PGA Tour Champions’ seasonopening Mitsubishi Electric Championship, taking advantage of David Toms’ closing three-putt bogey. Lehman closed with his second straight 7-under 65 for a one-stroke victory over Toms in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. Ko surges into tie for lead • Lydia Ko shot 30 on the front nine to catch the leaders and stayed bogey-free for a 5-under 66 to share the lead with Eun-Hee Ji going into the final round of the Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Ji also shot 66 at Tranquilo Golf Club at Four Seasons. Associated Press

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

FAX 314-340-3070 • E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com • HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

MU honors Scherzer by retiring number 4. Dallas

24

5. Seattle

22

2. LA Rams

30

4. Dallas

22

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D3

Shildt set for the Warm-Up 2. New England 41

2. New England

2. LA Rams

5. LA Chargers

28

4. Baltimore

17

5. LA Chargers

23

his tickets, at $25, sold out. gathers players, and Shildt 5:40 Sunday, KMOV-4 2:05 Sunday, KTVI-2 Miller, likewise. All proceeds sees that as a chance to talk with them and continue from the 1. autograph including 26-year-old1. hot1. New Orleans 20 1. New Orleans Kansas City Kansas City ticket 31 3. Chicago 15 3. Houston a clubhouse 7culshot stars Manny Machado sales go to the team’s chari- to foster ture that is, as he said, full of and Bryce Harper. The free- table arm, Cardinals Care. 6. Philadelphia 14 6. Indianapolis 13 “continual collaboration. As of Friday, the team had agent market has frozen for B1 SCHERZER • FROM D1 6. Philadelphia 16 6. Indianapolis 21” “Our guys are ready to go, some autograph tickets availthe second consecutive winFeb. 3, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4) • Atlanta ter, and more than 100 free able to walk-ups for Matt almost to a man,” Shildt said. overdue: The baseball program reagents remain. The Cardinals Carpenter ($60), Paul DeJong “Good spirits. Good spots, tired the No. 31 worn for three years made their trade for Gold- ($40), Carlos Martinez ($50), mentally and physically. on the back of the pitching sensation. schmidt in early December Adam Wainwright ($75) and There’s just really an exciteThe three-time Cy Young Award NFC CHAMPIONSHIP AFC CHAMPIONSHIP ment about getting this going.” and signed Miller on the eve others. winner and six-time Major League Originally a kink in the of Christmas, and while the All-Star owned the Mizzou mound Cardinals haven’t bowed out contract the Cardinals inher- STAFFS ANNOUNCED; from 2004-06 before embarking on of the market, they have re- ited with Goldschmidt lim- CRUZ RETURNS one of baseball’s best active pitchpositioned themselves and ited what he could sign, and The Cardinals finalized the ing careers. Before Friday night’s can wait for some final moves the team fashioned special announcement of their miceremony at Mizzou’s Memorial and perhaps shorter-term photo cards that fans would nor-league coaching staffs Stadium, Scherzer credited his three deals closer to spring training. get autographed. With Gold- Friday, and the lists are dotyears at MU as the launch pad. The only Harper expected schmidt’s help that has been ted with former Cardinals, “When you get to this point and to arrive this weekend is the changed so that he’ll be able including longtime backup the recognition comes you have to to sign baseballs, photos, catcher Tony Cruz. Cruz, winter storm by that name. take a step back and be appreciative The Cardinals announced helmets, whatever in his first who served as Yadier Moliof all the people who had an impact their Warm-Up events will go formal engagement with fans. na’s backup for four of his five on you,” Scherzer, 34, said. “That’s on as scheduled, but officials Shildt, who is set to sign Sun- seasons with the team, joins what I reflect on the most, the relaremain in touch with the Na- day and talk with fans from Oquendo, Swauger, and longtionships and the hard work when I tional Weather Service to stay the main stage that after- time manager Johnny Rodriwas here that led to this. This is reaware of possible worsen- noon, has some idea what to guez as new members of the ally the ground zero of what it took ing conditions. Michael Hall, expect as he signs. to become a major league baseball minor-league field instruc“Long lines,” he laughed. tor group headed by DeJohn. the Cardinals’ vice presiplayer.” dent of Cardinals Care and “Some longer than others.” Scherzer, taken by the DiamondSwauger will be DeJohn’s POST-DISPATCH Shildt met this past week assistant field coordinacommunity relations, said backs in the first round of the 2006 Max Scherzer pitches for Mizzou the concern was that poor with his major-league staff tor. Oquendo left the majordraft, wore Nos. 39 and 37 his first in a game against the University of weather would create “haz- in Jupiter, Fla., and with help league staff earlier this winter seven seasons in the big leagues in Texas in May 2006. He led the Big 12 ardous travel” for fans. The from minor-league instruc- for a role on the minor-league Arizona and Detroit but finally re- Conference in earned run average Cardinals Caravans, which tors Jose Oquendo, Mark side, and his official title will united with No. 31 when he signed that season. will visit six states in four DeJohn, and Chris Swauger be “roving” instructor. Rohis seven-year, $210 million deal Arena’s rafters.) days, also continued, taking continued discussions about driguez, who has managed with the Nationals in 2015. Scherzer, who left Mizzou before reliever Jordan Hicks some- the focuses and schedules of at Class AA and Class A for But he’s always worn his Mizzou where Friday he never went spring training, which opens the Cardinals, will work with fandom, most memorably in 2013. completing his degree, had given up in his route to the majors — Feb. 12. Shildt said “funda- Oquendo as a minor-league After the Tigers football team beat on the possibility years ago. mentals were on the table” infield instructor. “Education is the most important Class AAA Memphis. Georgia on Oct. 12 that year, ScherTickets to the Warm-Up, for discussion — how to imzer attended a news conference be- thing here,” he said Friday. “The fact The coaching staffs for which are still available to prove them, how to work the Cardinals’ nine affiliates fore his next day’s start against the they’re still retiring my number in walk-up customers, went on them, how to schedule them. – including two in the DoRed Sox in the American League spite of that, that’s a huge honor and sale the day after Thanks- While in Jupiter, he was able minican Summer League for Championship Series. He wore a something I’ll always be grateful for.” It’s no secret Scherzer was among giving, so weather has rarely to talk in person with Miles the second consecutive seasweatshirt with the numbers “41Mikolas, DeJong, John Gant son – feature five new mandampened sales, Hall said. 26” emblazoned across his chest the former Mizzou players who loband others. But this week- agers. Ben Johnson, a former The standings, however … — the score of the Mizzou football bied for former assistant coach and close friend Tony Vitello to land the “The big ones have always end will be a smorgasbord of farmhand for the Cardinals game earlier that day. come following a World Se- opportunities to meet with and a Memphis-area native, Former Mizzou baseball coach head-coaching job in 2016 when ries appearance,” Hall said. players, “maybe grab a meal will replace Stubby Clapp as Tim Jamieson recalled that image Jamieson resigned. Instead, the job went to Steve Bieser, Southeast “That has really seemed to or find a chance just to talk,” manager of the Class AAA Friday. time. be the skew in attendance. Shildt said. “He loves this place,” Jamieson Missouri State’s coach at the CAPTION_JUMP Redbirds. Other managCAPTION_JUMP He has been in touch with ers announced Friday were A determining factor is what said. “He always has. That’s proba- Vitello is now in his second year as the team did the year before. almost all of the players on Joe Kruzel, new to Class AA bly one of the biggest reasons we got Tennessee’s head coach. Mizzou’s administration has We see that spike early if the the 40-man roster, and he Springfield; Dann Bilardello, him. He was in love with the place since turned over to new leaders, team makes that runPRESS in the mentioned Friday the long returning to Class A Palm before he gotPRESS here.” ASSOCIATED ASSOCIATED postseason. There is some conversations he’s been able Beach; Erick Almonte, proOnce he was there, the kid from and there’s hope within the proif there’s an acquisition, a to have already with Gold- moted to Class A Peoria; Jose Parkway Central broke out as a gram and the athletics department new player, or if some kind schmidt and Miller, just not Leon, new to Class A State sophomore in 2005, when he led that any frost between Scherzer and of news that could be an- in person. The Cardinals College; Roberto Espinoza, the Big 12 in ERA and set the school the school will melt with time — if it nounced at the Warm-Up. rolled out an offseason pro- returning to rookie-level record with 131 strikeouts. Injuries hasn’t already. Bieser was among the Remember Mark McGwire at gram for players that involved Johnson City; Joshua Lopez, slowed his junior year, but he still led first to arrive to Friday’s ceremony. the main stage? You couldn’t feedback on their training new to Gulf Coast League the league in ERA and guided the Ti- The team intentionally made Scherand suggested areas where Cardinals; and Fray Peniche zer’s ceremony part of its annual find an empty spot.” gers to an NCAA regional crown. Autograph tickets for they could improve. Play- and John Matos, returning to In 2011, Mizzou voted Scherzer preseason banquet and fundraiser. “I just try to stay as positive as I Goldschmidt, priced at $100, ers were also given analyti- Dominican teams. into its Intercollegiate Athletics Hall sold out within a day. Dex- cal data about their strengths Derrick Goold of Fame, but the school’s stringent can with the team and relay as much ter Fowler’s first appearance and weaknesses. Meant to @dgoold on Twitter criteria for number retirements kept as I can back to the program as I at the Warm-Up also means draw fans, the Warm-Up also dgoold@post-dispatch.com his 31 off the wall at Taylor Stadium, can,” Scherzer said. “They’re in good where the Tigers feature the retired hands here. They have a good coachnumbers of Phil Bradley (15), Gene ing staff, a good strength staff and McArtor (33) and John “Hi” Sim- the facilities here are just unbelievmons (34). After retiring a seventh able now.” Jamieson, who remains part of football player’s number in 2003 — Brock Olivo’s No. 27 — Mizzou Sterk’s administration as a mentor to raised the criteria for number retire- coaches, believes Scherzer and Mizment, requiring former athletes to zou can maintain a healthy relationwin national player of the year hon- ship that’s positive for the school ors in their respective sport, along and its living legend. “Hopefully this creates more of with earning their undergraduate an awareness that he pitched here,” degree. Over the last year, though, athlet- Jamieson said. “I think there’s still ics director Jim Sterk and his staff people who aren’t aware of that. It’s have revised that policy and broad- different because (Mizzou) has to ened the requirements. Former ath- prove over time they have the same letes must now meet at least four of ability to develop people, but it al10 criteria to be considered for num- ways speaks well of your track record ber retirement, deputy AD Nick Joos if you have successful players in the said. Candidates must also be 10 big leagues.” “I know they want to develop a years out of school and inducted into Mizzou’s Hall of Fame. The school better relationship with Max, for also plans to retire the numbers of both sides,” he said. “That’s good for two former men’s basketball play- Max to do that. It’s certainly good for ers, Joos said. (He declined to say these guys here.” CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com which players, though Derrick Chie- Dave Matter Setup begins in earnest Friday at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch for the annual Cardinals Winter vous’ No. 3 and Anthony Peeler’s 44 @dave_matter on Twitter Warm-Up. The annual fundraiser, at which Cardinal players make offseason appearances for are conspicuously absent in Mizzou dmatter@post-dispatch.com charity, will run from Saturday through Monday. CARDINALS •• FROM FROMD1 B1 CARDINALS

jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd

jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd jeyd

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

American teenager rolls into the fourth round At 17, Anisimova NFL NOTEBOOK upsets No. 11 seed and hopes for more ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

M E L B O U R N E , AU ST R A L I A • All of 17, never the winner of

a Grand Slam match until this week, Amanda Anisimova is making quite a first impression at the Australian Open. Anisimova showed precisely why there are those who consider her a possible future star, producing one spectacular shot after another Friday to upset 11th-seeded Aryna Sabalenka of Belarus 6-3, 6-2 and reach the fourth round. “I want to win this tournament,” Anisimova said, tapping her right index finger on a table for emphasis at her post-match news conference. “Right now.” She is the youngest American to get this far at Melbourne Park since Jennifer Capriati in 1993 — and at any Grand Slam tournament since Serena Williams at the 1998 French Open. Pretty heady company. “I can’t believe that this is

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amanda Anisimova serves to 11th-seeded Aryna Sabalenka during their third-round match at the Australian Open on Friday.

happening right now,” Anisimova said. Believe it, kid. She captured a ton of attention on Day 5, when defending champion Caroline Wozniacki was knocked out by

2008 champion Maria Sharapova 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. Another American woman, 35th-ranked Danielle Collins, joined Anisimova in earning a debut trip to the round

of 16 at a major with a 6-3, 6-2 victory over No. 19 Caroline Garcia. Up next for Collins will be three-time major champion and former No. 1 Angelique Kerber, who needed less than an hour to overwhelm 240th-ranked Australian wild-card entry Kimberly Birrell 6-1, 6-0. Anisimova’s first trip to Australia, and third appearance in the main draw at a major, now progresses to Week 2 and a matchup against two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, who beat Belinda Bencic 6-1, 6-4. On a rainy afternoon that saw the roofs closed on the three main courts, and play delayed on smaller arenas, Sharapova advanced to face No. 15 Ash Barty of Australia, while 2017 U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens beat No. 31 Petra Martic 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) and now meets Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia. Serena Williams will continue her bid for an eighth Australian title and an Open-era record 24th Grand Slam singles title overall when she plays Dayana Yastremska later Saturday on Rod Laver Arena. In the men’s draw, top-ranked Novak Djokovic has a night

match against rising Canadian Denis Shapovalov. Earlier, Roger Federer dispatched one youngster and set his sights on another. The 37-year-old Federer, seeking a third consecutive title in Melbourne, dismissed 21-year-old Taylor Fritz of the U.S. Federer now takes on 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece, who eliminated Nikoloz Basilashvili. Also advancing was the man Federer beat in last year’s final, Marin Cilic. He overcame two match points — opponent Fernando Verdasco double-faulted one of them away — and erased a two-set hole to win a contest that lasted more than four hours. Cilic, the 2014 U.S. Open champ, now faces No. 22 Roberto Bautista-Agut, who beat No. 10 Karen Khachanov. Rafael Nadal beat 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur and now gets 2010 Wimbledon runner-up Tomas Berdych. Frances Tiafoe, an American who turns 21 on Sunday, got to the fourth round at a major for the first time by defeating Andreas Seppi. Tiafoe now meets No. 20 Grigor Dimitrov, who is being coached by Andre Agassi.


FOOTBALL

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

4. Dallas

24

5. Seattle

22

3. Chicago

15

6. Philadelphia

16

2. LA Rams

30

4. Dallas

22

1. New Orleans

20

6. Philadelphia

14

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D3

2. New England 41 2. LA Rams

2. New England

2:05 Sunday, KTVI-2

5:40 Sunday, KMOV-4

1. New Orleans

1. Kansas City

5. LA Chargers

28

1. Kansas City

31

6. Indianapolis

13

4. Baltimore

17

5. LA Chargers

23

3. Houston 6. Indianapolis

7 21

Feb. 3, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4) • Atlanta

NFC CHAMPIONSHIP

AFC CHAMPIONSHIP

Goff, Rams are looking to take next big step

Chiefs need defense to continue turnaround

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Saints quarterback Drew Brees (right) greets Los Angeles Rams quarterback Jared Goff after a game in 2016 in New Orleans. ASSOCIATED PRESS

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIF. • Although Jared Goff is uncomfortable being overly nosy when he’s around the NFL’s best quarterbacks, he kept a close eye on Drew Brees while they were together at the Pro Bowl in Orlando last year. The most prolific passer in NFL history had no problem sharing aspects of his mental approach and game-day preparation with Goff, who was eager for knowledge a few weeks after taking a loss in his first career playoff game for the Los Angeles Rams. “I wasn’t going to pry too deeply,” Goff said. “But I’d ask him a few questions as far as his warmup, and things he does throughout the week.” While Goff admires Brees, Tom Brady and the other top quarterbacks of this era, he is more interested in the mental mechanics of their game than in their arms, achievements or trophies. Goff wants to know how they prepare, and he seeks out tips on film study, game-morning arm exercises — anything he can put into his own evolving approach to the game. “The thing about Jared is that he’s always looking to get better,” Rams coach Sean McVay said. “He doesn’t look at our record or his success and think he’s made it.” Goff’s rough rookie season has vanished into history as he heads into his first NFC championship game with the Rams (14-3) against Brees and the New Orleans Saints (14-3) on Sunday. While McVay clearly deserves much of the credit for Goff’s swift evolution from a struggling No. 1 overall pick into an above-average NFL passer, Goff’s adaptability and eagerness to learn are just as important as his arm strength. “I think I rely on a lot of the successes I’ve had, and understand that I didn’t do that on accident,” Goff said. “It’s part of my process, and part of what I do routinely.” The same quarterback who went 0-7 as a rookie starter while getting sacked 26

times is now a two-time Pro Bowl selection at the helm of an elite NFL offense. The Rams have won their first back-toback division titles since the 1970s during his two full seasons as their starter, and they earned their first playoff victory in 14 years last weekend. “You talk about a guy who stays evenkeeled,” Rams receiver Brandin Cooks said. “He operates with such a quieted mind, no matter what’s going on. The ebbs and flows of the game, he seems to stay even-keeled, and when you have that from your quarterback, that’s special.” Despite his impressive success over the past two seasons, Goff still has more to prove than the other three quarterbacks playing this Sunday. Brees and Brady have accomplished nearly everything possible behind center, while Patrick Mahomes just completed a spectacular season that has left him the league MVP favorite. Brees was happy to speak with Goff at last year’s Pro Bowl even while knowing they were likely to be rivals atop the NFC for the next few seasons. Brees remembered Doug Flutie’s willingness to mentor him in San Diego. “I want to make sure that I pay it forward, just like those guys did with me,” the 40-year-old Brees said. Brees praises Goff as an outstanding passer and an emerging leader. “You watch what they do with their offense, there’s a lot of moving parts, and I think he handles it very, very well,” Brees said. Goff was fourth in the NFL with 4,688 yards passing this season, and his 32 TD passes were sixth. But in the Rams’ final five regular-season games, Goff averaged just 228.2 yards per game with six TD passes against six interceptions and nine sacks. McVay rejects the notion Goff had a slow finish to the regular season,. “I think everybody wants to make a big deal of the way that he was playing,” McVay said. “I think in large part it’s because he was playing at such an elite level, he almost became a victim of his own success.”

Chiefs cornerback Charvarius Ward (right) breaks up a pass intended for Raiders wide receiver Jordy Nelson in a 35-3 victory for Kansas City to end the regular season. ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY • The only defense the

Kansas City Chiefs played most of this season was, well, in defense of their own defense, which gave up so many yards and points that it became a running joke around the league. Yes, the Chiefs scored in bushels. They also allowed points in bunches. The fact that they spent most of the season coughing up 30 points and 400plus yards per game came despite the fact that they excelled at sacking the quarterback. They finished with 52 of them, tied for the NFL lead, thanks primarily to the trio of Chris Jones, Dee Ford and Justin Houston. Yet things began to change in Week 17, when the Chiefs shut down the Oakland Raiders in a game they needed to win to secure the No. 1 seed in the AFC. And when critics claimed that the Raiders were playing for nothing, the Chiefs backed it up with a defensive gem in the divisional round against the Colts. Now, that suddenly stingy defense gets its biggest test Sunday against Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. At stake: A trip to the Super Bowl, the first for the Chiefs in 49 years. So what changed? How did a Swiss cheese defense that was torched by the Patriots for 43 points in a Week 6 loss in Foxborough suddenly turn into a steel curtain, and just in the nick of time? “In the last couple of games, the three things we’ve done is we’ve limited the explosive plays, we’ve done a really solid job of tackling and we’ve had one defensive penalty in two weeks,” Chiefs defensive coordinator Bob Sutton said. “Those three things allow you to function and go.” Take each one in order. In the Chiefs’ four losses this season, they allowed four plays of 40-plus yards and 21 plays of at least 20 yards. Seven of those came in a particularly dismal defensive performance against the Rams, who ultimately won a 53-50 shootout at

the Coliseum in Los Angeles. But the Chiefs didn’t allow a single play over 15 yards against Oakland, and didn’t allow the Colts a play over 30 yards. In fact, Indianapolis didn’t score on offense until late in the fourth quarter. Their success in limiting big plays is, at least in part, a byproduct of improved tackling. Then there are the penalties. After leading the league in total penalties and defensive penalties this season, their defense has been flagged just once over the past two games. “Most points that are produced in a drive usually result from an explosive play and/or a penalty in the drive,” Sutton explained. “The common thing when you look back and say, ‘Hey how’d they get down the field?’ It’s usually you had a (pass interference) here or you gave up a 20-yard run here or whatever it was. So, if you can manage those and do a relatively good job on those things, you put yourself in a good position to play. I think the guys that have played have done a good job.” Ah, there’s the caveat: The guys who have played have done a good job. The Chiefs have been missing pieces on defense the entire season, and often they have been crucial playmakers. They’re healthy now and Eric Berry, their star safety and arguably the team’s emotional leader, is poised to play Sunday against New England. The Patriots are under no preconceptions the defense they marched up and down the field against in Week 6 will show up on Sunday. Bill Belichick said this week that there is little to glean from that win, while Brady was quick to heap praise on a defense playing its best all year. “We’ve played them quite a bit over the years,” the Patriots quarterback said. “They’ve had some incredible units that we’ve played against. They’ve got playmakers at each level. ... It’s a great challenge for us. I don’t think you can take anything for granted.”

NFL NOTEBOOK Harbaugh, Ravens close on contract extension Ravens coach John Harbaugh is nearing a contract extension that secures his future beyond next season, multiple media outlets reported Saturday. The team announced in late December that Harbaugh would return as coach in 2019, the final year of his contract, and that the two sides were working on a new deal. But Harbaugh became the subject of possible trade speculation as the Ravens made their playoff push, and even after the team’s wild-card-round loss to the Los Angeles Chargers. Harbaugh, 56, was reluctant to talk about his coaching status, but he said after the season-ending defeat that he expected to return to Baltimore for his 12th season. “I have every expectation, every plan, to be here as long as they want me here, and I believe I’ll be here,” he said. “I think that’s been made clear by them, to me, over the last few weeks. “I love everybody in the

general manager Eric DeCosta, who took over for Ozzie Newsome this month. (The Baltimore Sun)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coach John Harbaugh led the Ravens to the AFC North title this season but they lost 23-17 to the Chargers in a wild-card game.

organization; they’re great people. I expect to go forward with that as long as that’s what they want to do. I do believe that’s what they want to do. Let’s roll.” The Ravens have made the playoffs seven times in Harbaugh’s 11 seasons, including a victory in Super Bowl XLVII. He helped lead

them this past season to their first AFC North title since 2012. Players hailed his coaching throughout a season marked by a quarterback change and an offensive makeover. Harbaugh is the winningest coach in franchise history and the fourth-longest tenured in the NFL. This will be his first season under

Redskins hire Kaczor • The Washington Redskins have named Nate Kaczor special teams coach to replace Ben Kotwica, who took the same position with the Atlanta Falcons. The Redskins also lost longtime inside linebackers coach Kirk Olivadotti, according to a person with knowledge of the team’s plans, who will now coach linebackers for the Green Bay Packers. Washington will begin interviewing replacements next week. Kaczor held the same title with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the past three seasons, and the 2019 will be his 12th as an NFL assistant coach. He also had stints with the Tennessee Titans and Jacksonville Jaguars. (The Washington Post) Jaguars sign Wilson • Jacksonville re-signed safety Jarrod Wilson to a three-year contract. Wilson was set to become a

restricted free agent on March 13. Wilson started the final two games this season, filling in for injured starter Ronnie Harrison. Harrison, a rookie and a thirdround draft pick from Alabama, stepped into a starting role in place of waived veteran Barry Church. Wilson has appeared in 47 games with two starts in his three-year career. (AP) Newton, Miller among finalists • Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton and Denver Broncos linebacker Von Miller are among five finalists for the NFL Players Association’s Alan Page Community Award. Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Geno Atkins, New York Jets left tackle Kelvin Beachum and Los Angeles Rams left tackle Andrew Whitworth are also finalists for the award, which annually recognizes players for exceptional community service in their team cities and hometowns. Philadelphia defensive end Chris Long won the award last year. (AP)


D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

M 1 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

Billikens pull away Pinson learning on the fly ill heydj ill heydj ill heydj ill heydj

with second-half run

MU needs more print_subheadline from the freshman in point guard role

SLU • • FROM FROMD1 B1 SLU

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA , MO. • There’s nothing easy about playing point guard as a college freshman. Missouri’s Xavier Pinson is proof of that. The former three-star prospect from Chicago began the season as senior Jordan Geist’s understudy and has seen his role and minutes shift from game to game. A week ago he was MU’s ASSOCIATED PRESS most promising player on the Missouri’s Xavier Pinson (left) defends the inbounds pass during a court in an otherwise forgettable game against Oral Roberts last month. Coach Cuonzo Martin is looking loss to Tennessee. He scored a for Pinson to show more intensity on defense. career-high 14 points, got to the free throw line eight times and won’t tolerate on the floor, it’s MISSOURI AT TEXAS A&M didn’t turn the ball over in 20 casual play on the defensive end, When • 2:30 p.m. Saturday especially from his point guard. Where • Reed Arena, College minutes. Five days later, Pinson got re- On the offensive end, Pinson av- Station, Texas acquainted with the bench for erages 5.1 points in 15 minutes Series • Texas A&M leads 18-17. the entire second half at South while shooting 39.3 percent from Last meeting, MU 62, Texas A&M Carolina after just a couple of 3-point range. His 30 assists are 48. Feb. 13, 2018 second to Geist, but he’s turned TV, radio • SEC Network, KTRS (550 brief shifts. Pinson didn’t look happy when it over 26 times, third-most on AM) he was pulled from the floor after the team. He’s cut back on the Records • MU is 9-6,CAPTION_JUMP 0-3 SEC; Texas his second turnover on a reckless high-degree-of-difficulty passes A&M is 7-8, 1-3. entry pass — a scene that looked that sometimes sail behind the About Missouri • The Tigers have familiar to last season when cheerleaders along the baseline, lost all three of their SEC games by freshman point guard Blake Har- but Martin is looking for less siz- double digits and fell to Alabama ris played 11 scoreless minutes at zle and more substance from his 70-60 Wednesday at home. MU’s South Carolina, then promptly ball-handler. three-game losing streak matches “Offensively, it’s just having their longest under second-year quit the team and transferred to confidence and facilitating more coach Cuonzo Martin. … Freshman North Carolina State. Unlike Harris, Pinson didn’t let than anything,” Martin said. guard Javon Pickett has been his disappointment turn him into “He’s a confident player with the MU’s leading scorer in two of the flash pass, but now he (needs to last three games, scoring 13 in a former Tiger. But besides the drama between be) simplistic with his game. He Wednesday’s loss after his careerJeremiah Tilmon and the offi- can shoot the ball. We need him high 21 points Sunday at South cials’ whistles, point guard depth to be aggressive pushing the ball Carolina. … Sophomore center is one area Cuonzo Martin needs up the floor and making simple Jeremiah Tilmon finally avoided to see develop as the Tigers settle decisions. It’ll come. I think it’s foul trouble against Alabama and into the grind of conference play. just a matter of time.” finished with eight points and If anyone understands Pin- seven rebounds in 27 minutes. Missouri (9-6, 0-3 Southeastern Conference) takes a three-game son’s plight it’s sophomore guard About Texas A&M • The Aggies losing streak into Saturday’s Mark Smith. Illinois handed went through a four-game losing 3 p.m. game at Texas A&M (7-8, Smith the keys to the starting streak in November but after a unit during his freshman season five-game winning streak have 1-3). “I think we have to get more last year, and after some early lost four of their last five games, production out of ‘X’ … to try success he struggled to handle including conference defeats to take Geist off the ball some to the point guard duties. Smith against Arkansas, Kentucky help him out,” Martin said after transferred to Mizzou in the off- and Auburn. … A&M coach Billy Wednesday’s 70-60 loss to Ala- season. Kennedy has had to replace six “It’s tough. It was a little fast of his top seven players from last bama. For Pinson, Wednesday sig- for him, like you saw. But he’s re- year’s Sweet 16 team, including naled progress. He played 10 ally settled in,” Smith said. “You senior guard Admon Gilder, who minutes, hit his only shot, a saw the flashes, the passes he has to sit out this season while 3-pointer, and led a rare fast can make. I think he does a re- recovering from blood clots. … break with an assist to Javon ally good job of controlling the Sophomore guard T.J. Starks is the Pickett. He also turned the ball game. Defensively he’s work- Aggies’ top returning player and over twice, once on a travel un- ing on locking in. I’m not saying leads A&M with 13.8 points and 3.5 der the basket as he tried to he’s not locked in all the time but assists a game. … Savion Flagg, a draw a foul. At 6-foot-2 and 170 like when the team needs pres- 6-7 sophomore forward, averages pounds, the rookie needs a full sure on the ball (he’s) going to do 13.5 points and 8.1 rebounds. offseason in the weight room be- that and create some havoc, like Dave Matter fore he’s ready for heavy minutes he did in the Tennessee game. He against SEC defenders. The skill did that a couple times and got a the ball once he becomes eligible has been on display in snippets. couple a turnovers. “He’s just learning bit by bit. next season. Incoming freshman He won the team’s dunk contest He’s doing a great job taking in Mario McKinney from Vashon during its preseason exhibition. But for now, Martin’s looking everything. I can tell personally High should push for time, too. For now, Mizzou’s point guard for xx other qualities to measure that every day I play with ‘X’ he’s of the present sees steady growth growth, starting with, Martin getting better.” It wasn’t long ago when Geist from the future. said, his mentality on defense. “He’s coming along,” Geist “It’s having a presence defen- was trying to earn minutes in sively. He’ll get (the physical) Mizzou’s backcourt, but after said. “It’s a long road, especially winning over Martin’s staff last at point guard. It’s hard because part,” Martin said Friday, puff- BOX ing out his chest. “But it’s being year, he’s become the team’s top you have to be the leader and the coach on the floor. You just have strong and sound in what he’s scorer, playmaker and leader. A year from now, after Geist’s to learn a lot and take in the game doing. It’s OK to be whatever stature you are but you have to eligibility has expired, Pinson a lot.” have that fight on the defensive figures to earn an expanded role, Dave Matter though Evansville transfer Dru @dave_matter on Twitter side of the ball.” If there’s one thing Martin Smith should see time handling dmatter@post-dispatch.com

“I’ve been going through a bit FG FT Reb JOSEPH’S Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS of a struggle since I came back. SAINT Brown 40 1-11 6-6 2-5 2 3 9 37 4-14 0-0 1-12 0 4 10 I couldn’t make anything. I got Funk Longpre 5 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 in the gym and did extra work Bynum 40 5-15 6-8 1-6 8 2 18 Clover 21 3-6 0-0 0-1 0 3 6 with coaches and some players, Lodge 28 3-4 0-2 1-7 1 2 6 17 2-7 3-3 3-5 0 3 8 and they always believe in me Edwards Holston 13 0-4 0-0 1-2 0 1 0 so I stayed with it.” Totals 200 18-61 15-19 9-38 11 18 57 SLU has been in the routine Percentages: FG.295, FT.789. 3-point goals: 6-30, .200. Team rebounds: 3. Team of building double-digit leads Turnovers: 8. Blocked shots: 2. Turnovers: None. and then watching them dis- 8. Steals: 8. TechnicalFGfouls: FT Reb appear in the second half. The ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Foreman 11 1-3 0-0 0-2 0 3 2 same thing happened against French 37 5-10 0-2 4-11 0 2 10 Bess 39 6-12 3-4 0-7 0 0 20 St. Joseph’s, which pulled Goodwin 33 2-7 3-7 5-8 4 5 7 within a point with 14 minutes Isabell 31 2-11 4-5 1-8 8 2 8 Wiley 30 6-12 2-3 0-3 0 1 20 left. Thatch 13 0-1 1-2 0-2 1 2 1 4 0-0 0-0 0-1 2 1 0 An array of strong individ- Jacobs Hankton 3 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 0 0 ual performance helped SLU Totals 200 22-57 13-23 10-43 16 16 68 Percentages: FG.386, FT.565. 3-point jump-start the offense. goals: 11-29, .379. Team rebounds: 1. Team Hasahn French added 10 Turnovers: 10. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 10. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. points and 11 rebounds, and Saint Joseph’s 25 32 — 57 34 34 — 68 Tramaine Isabell Jr. contributed St. Louis U. eight points, eight rebounds Atlantic 10 standings and eight assists. Team Conf All Strk 5-0 14-4 W6 Bess was again stellar of- St. Louis U. George Mason 4-1 10-8 W2 fensively and defensively while Davidson 3-1 12-5 L1 3-1 12-5 W1 playing in front of 11 NBA VCU Duquesne 3-1 12-5 W3 scouts. He played down the Dayton 3-1 11-6 L1 Rhode Island 2-2 9-7 W1 message that Ford delivered Geo. Washington 2-2 6-11 W1 2-2 6-11 L1 during the timeout before the St. Bona. Richmond 1-3 7-10 L1 23-0 run. La Salle 1-3 3-13 L3 Joseph’s (Pa.) 1-5 8-10 L1 “He just said to stick to what St. Fordham 0-4 9-8 L5 we do,” Bess said. “Just be the Massachusetts 0-4 7-10 L5 No. 1 defensive team in the country. That’s what we want fense, which appears to be the defense of choice against the to do.” It was a tough night for SLU’s Billikens this conference seadepth. It was announced before son. They started the game by rethe game that freshman guard Ingvi Gudmundsson had with- lying heavily on 3-pointers in drawn from the university and the first half, and it was a significant weapon from the outwas returning to Iceland. He FOOTBALL set. Bess and Wiley each made had played only five minutes NOTEBOOK three as the Billikens opened a this season. 34-25 lead at the half. However, Demarius Jacobs, ASSOCIATED PRESS French scored easily on the who has provided some minutes off the bench, suffered first two possessions, but the what appeared to be an ankle Hawks shut down the SLU ininjury in the first half and was side game after that. The Billikens attempted 15 3s in the first unable to return. “I was very concerned be- half and only 12 shots inside the cause he was saying some arc. St. Joe’s, meanwhile, could things that weren’t good,” Ford said. “But I heard he should be not find the target, making two of 15 3-pointers and shooting OK.” St. Joseph’s also lost another 29 percent before intermission. player to injury when starting However, the Hawks had only forward Anthony Longpre ap- two turnovers, which was the peared to hit his head on the main reason they were as close floor in the first half and didn’t as nine to start the second half. return. The Hawks were already Stu Durando without two of their top six @studurando on Twitter players. sdurando@post-dispatch.com SLU again faced a zone de-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

SLU ATHLETICS

Hasahn French of St. Louis U. looks to pass under pressure from Markell Lodge (left) and Jared Bynum of St. Joseph’s.

NOTEBOOK

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

Massinburg, No. 16 Buffalo beat E. Michigan Eric Paschall scored 17 points and posted 8 rebounds for the Wildcats. Tyrique Jones contributed 21 points and 11 rebounds for the Musketeers.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CJ Massinburg ended a fourgame slump by scoring 31 points, leading No. 16 Buffalo to a 77-65 win over Eastern Michigan on Friday night. Nick Perkins scored 21, and the Bulls (17-1, 5-0 Mid-American Conference) extended what’s become their best start in school history. Buffalo has also won 20 straight home games, which ranks as the third-longest streak in the nation. Perkins and Massinburg formed an inside and outside scoring threat by combining to score 32 of Buffalo’s 41 points in the first half in a game Buffalo never trailed. Massinburg hit four of seven 3-point attempts for 17 points in the first 20 minutes. Massinburg is Buffalo’s leading scorer but had a combined 52 points in his past four outings. Paul Jackson led Eastern Michigan with 12 points, but finished hitting just five of 17 attempts. James Thompson scored 11 points and added 12 rebounds for the Eagles (8-10, 2-3) who lost their fifth straight game to Buffalo, including an 81-69 loss at Ypsilanti two weeks ago. No. 19 Maryland 75, Ohio State 61 • Anthony Cowan Jr. scored 20 points, and Maryland won its seventh straight game, beating Ohio State. Bruno Fernando added 13

ST. LOUIS U. 68, ST. JOSEPH’S 57

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Buffalo guard CJ Massinburg dunks against Eastern Michigan on Friday. He scored 31 points, 17 of them in the first 20 minutes of the game.

points on 5-of-6 shooting and had 15 rebounds for the Terrapins (16-3, 7-1 Big Ten), who shot 58.1 percent from the field. Aaron Wiggins and Darryl Morsell each scored 11, and Jalen Smith had 10. Maryland went 11 of 17 (64.7 percent) from 3-point range. C.J. Jackson scored 15 points

for the Buckeyes (12-5, 2-4), who lost their fourth straight. Duane Washington Jr. scored 14 and Kaleb Wesson had 11. No. 22 Villanova 85, Xavier 75 • Phil Booth scored 22 points, and Villanova escaped a sometimesclose contest to beat Xavier.

UConn self-imposes penalties for violations under Ollie • The University of Connecticut announced Friday that it is selfimposing penalties, including the loss of a scholarship for the 2019-20 season, for violations of NCAA rules by its basketball program under former coach Kevin Ollie. UConn fired Ollie after a 1418 season a year ago, and later detailed numerous NCAA violations it said were committed during his tenure. The NCAA investigated and sent the school a notice in September detailing allegations that included unethical conduct by Ollie, who it said provided false or misleading information about video calls to a recruit from two former UConn stars, Hall of Famer Ray Allen and San Antonio Spurs guard Rudy Gay. UConn said Friday it accepts responsibility for the violations, but put the blame for them squarely on Ollie. UConn is hoping that by penalizing itself it can avoid any further sanctions from the NCAA, but says it understands that the Committee on Infractions can do as it sees fit.

1. Duke (14-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 4 Virginia, Saturday. 2. Michigan (17-0) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Saturday. 3. Tennessee (15-1) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Saturday. 4. Virginia (16-0) idle. Next: at No. 1 Duke, Saturday. 5. Gonzaga (17-2) idle. Next: at Portland, Saturday. 6. Michigan State (16-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Maryland, Monday. 7. Kansas (15-2) idle. Next: at West Virginia, Saturday. 8. Texas Tech (15-2) idle. Next: at Baylor, Saturday. 9. Virginia Tech (14-2) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Saturday. 10. Nevada (17-1) idle. Next: vs. Air Force, Saturday. 11. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: at Boston College, Sunday. 12. Kentucky (13-3) idle. Next: at No. 14 Auburn, Saturday. 13. North Carolina (13-4) idle. Next: at Miami, Saturday. 14. Auburn (13-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 12 Kentucky, Saturday. 15. Marquette (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Providence, Sunday. 16. Buffalo (17-1) beat E. Michigan 77-65. Next: at N. Illinois, Tuesday. 17. N.C. State (14-3) idle. Next: at Notre Dame, Saturday. 18. Mississippi (13-3) idle. Next: vs. Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Maryland (16-3) beat Ohio St. 75-61. Next: at No. 6 Michigan St., Monday. 20. Oklahoma (13-4) idle. Next: at Texas, Saturday. 21. Houston (17-1) idle. Next: at South Florida, Saturday. 22. Villanova (14-4) beat Xavier 85-75. Next: at Butler, Tuesday. 23. Iowa (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. 24. Mississippi State (13-3) idle. Next: at Vanderbilt, Saturday. 25. Indiana (12-5) idle. Next: at Purdue, Saturday.


COLLEGE SPORTS

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 01.20.2019

Illini confidence will be tested Coming off victory, they face 15-3 Iowa BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • There are no secrets in Big Ten basketball. When a team does something like Illinois’ 27-point drubbing of a 13-win Minnesota team on Wednesday, other teams take note. It was an apparent sign, in a small sample size, of a young team that appeared to have finally put together a complete game and a much-needed conference victory. Now, Illinois (5-12, 1-5) wants to add another brick to the foundation at noon Sunday at No. 23 Iowa (15-3, 4-3), which has won four straight, including wins over Ohio State, Northwestern and Nebraska — three teams that have beaten the Illini this season. Few, if any, coaches doubt Illinois’ talent or the system coach Brad Underwood has in place. Many opposing coaches have expressed some surprise at Illinois’ record. A victory over a 13-win Minnesota team shifts the perception of the Illini to a team that has turned the corner with an ability to close out games. “To see that definitely makes a statement,” Illinois senior Aaron Jordan said. “It kind of gives us confidence going out there. Everybody saw that. They’re watching it, and they’re working hard trying to prepare for it.”

ILLINOIS AT IOWA When • Noon Sunday Where • Carver-Hawkeye Arena, Iowa City, Iowa TV/radio • BTN, KFNS (590 AM) Records • Illinois 5-12, Iowa 15-3 Of note • Iowa has won four straight games, including three — Ohio State, Nebraska and Northwestern — against teams that Illinois has lost to this season. According to KenPom, Illinois plays with the most tempo in the Big Ten, and Iowa is second in the conference. The Hawkeyes beat Illinois in both games last season.

Underwood isn’t worried about how other teams perceive his squad. He worries about how they look at themselves. Still, it would be hard for an opposing coach not to take note of the close losses this season — games that came down to one shot at the end or a second-half lead slipping away. “I think we’ve been close in so many games that everybody may look at us and say, ‘It’s kind of a matter of time,’” Underwood said. Stacking wins won’t come easy against the Hawkeyes. Iowa has won the last three games without standout Tyler Cook (Chaminade Prep), who averages 17.1 points and 8.3 rebounds. The Hawkeyes are hardly a oneman show. Luka Garza, Joe Wieskamp and Jordan Bohannon score in double figures. Garza and Bohannon, in particular, gave the Illini fits last season. Bohannon aver-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iowa’s Tyler Cook (Chaminade Prep) averages 17.1 points and 8.3 rebounds.

aged 27 points and Garza averaged 19.5 in Iowa’s two wins over Illinois. Underwood is devising his game plan around the idea that the 6-foot-9 senior will play Sunday. If Cook plays, he brings the ability to get to the free-throw line, attempting nearly twice as many (119) as anyone else on the team. Fouling has been a problem for the Illini this season, but Wednesday’s win was different from past losses where teams

marched to the free-throw line. “I thought we were the aggressors against Minnesota,” Underwood said. “We have to try to establish that mentality again. It’s crazy how it works that when you’re aggressive, you foul less. When you’re passive, you’re reaching and a step late. Iowa is very, very good at putting pressure on you — like Minnesota is — in transition.” Even though the Illini are coming off convincing win, freshman Giorgi Bezhanishvili said they enjoyed only briefly before turning their attention to Iowa. The Illini want to make winning a trend in the second half of the season. With 14 regularseason games left, they are moving forward as a unit, despite a challenging first half of the season that may have broken other teams. “We work every day, and that showed our work a little bit, that win,” Bezhanishvili said. “Our record doesn’t show it, but that one win showed that we’re working and getting better. We have to get more and more wins, and that’s the process.” Now Illinois hopes to reap the rewards of close losses and a tough schedule. “Not everyone goes through that, but the fact that we did, we use that to our advantage,” Jordan said. “That’s going to benefit us in the future.” Said Underwood: “We continue to fight. You’re probably right. It would have broken a lot of teams, but not this one. This one keeps establishing some leadership, establishing some inner confidence because they keep working, and that’s all a coach can ask for.”

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK Rypien, Stick shine in East-West Shrine Game Brett Rypien displayed some of his pedigree in the East-West Shrine Game in St. Petersburg, Fla. Rypien and Easton Stick each threw a touchdown pass to help the West beat the East 21-17 on Saturday. Rypien, a Boise State product and nephew of Super Bowl MVP Mark Rypien, was 10 of 14 for 134 yards. Scouts from a number of NFL teams talked with Rypien during a week of workouts preceding the game. “Overall it was a great week,” Rypien said. “I thought I came down here and did what I needed to do as far as what I wanted to show the scouts.” Stick, from North Dakota State, completed 5 of 8 passes for 51 yards. Purdue’s David Blough had two touchdowns and 149 yards on 10-of-15 passing for the East. West’s Darrin Hall Jr. of Pitt was the leading rusher with 77 yards on 12 carries.

LAURA MCKENZIE • The Bryan-College Station Eagle

Texas A&M’s Jay Jay Chandler (0) and John Walker III (24) double team Missouri’s Jordan Geist in the first half Saturday at Reed Arena.

Tigers stay hot after robust pregame warm-up MU • FROM D1

visits the floor during this time before games. Instead, the Tigers coach stays hidden in the sanctuary of the locker room, letting his assistants monitor the pre-game routine. But you know what they say about desperate times. With his team stuck in a three-game losing streak, it was time for Martin to call an audible. His presence on the court might seem trivial to the casual observer. His players noticed. “He wants us to do stuff (pregame) that we can actually do in the game,” center Jeremiah Tilmon later said. “Instead of taking shots just to be shooting, he had us working out on stuff. That helped. I got a good sweat going before the game.” The pre-game dialogue continued a conversation that began shortly after Wednesday’s home loss to Alabama. “He pushed the big guys all week in practice,” forward Kevin Puryear said. “It showed today.” Whatever works. With their blood pumping at a different rate by tipoff, the Tigers smothered the Aggies over the next 40 minutes, stringing together a milestone defensive effort in a 66-43 victory. Mizzou dominated so much on both ends, A&M coach Billy Kennedy all but waved a white flag midway through the second half and benched his best players for reserves and walk-ons. “Sometimes you have to fall on your face to see,” Martin said. “In order for us to be success-

MISSOURI 66, TEXAS A&M 43 FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Puryear 25 4-8 0-0 1-10 0 2 8 Tilmon 27 5-8 4-4 1-6 0 1 14 Geist 35 6-7 1-1 0-5 5 2 17 Pickett 20 3-7 1-2 0-2 1 3 7 Ma.Smith 24 5-9 0-0 0-4 2 3 13 Watson 23 1-6 2-2 1-1 2 3 5 Suggs 18 0-3 0-1 0-3 2 4 0 Santos 14 0-1 0-0 0-2 0 3 0 Nikko 13 1-3 0-0 3-5 1 1 2 Mi.Smith 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 25-52 8-10 6-38 13 22 66 Percentages: FG.481, FT.800. 3-point goals: 8-20, .400. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 12. Blocked shots: 1. Turnovers: 12. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb TEXAS A&M Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Mekowulu 19 1-5 1-6 3-4 0 1 3 J.Walker 16 1-4 0-0 0-5 1 1 3 Chandler 25 3-7 4-4 0-2 1 3 11 Mitchell 24 2-9 0-0 2-3 0 1 4 Flagg 36 1-7 2-2 1-7 1 0 5 Nebo 23 4-5 4-8 3-5 0 2 12 Starks 18 0-7 2-4 1-1 1 2 2 Mahan 16 1-5 0-1 0-3 1 2 3 Collins 12 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 0 0 French 11 0-1 0-0 0-1 3 2 0 Totals 200 13-50 13-25 10-32 9 14 43 Percentages: FG.260, FT.520. 3-point goals: 4-22, .182. Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 11. Blocked shots: 5. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 8. Technical fouls: None. Missouri 36 30 — 66 Texas A&M 21 22 — 43 A: 6,396.

ful, we have to defend, rebound and play hard. I thought we did that.” From start to finish. In a game the Tigers led for more than 34 minutes, their first win of 2019 not only broke a three-game losing streak but marked their first victory in six tries at Reed Arena since both schools left the Big 12 for the Southeastern Conference. “We needed this one,” Tilmon said. “Bad.” Mizzou (10-6, 1-3 SEC) got it done with a strong shooting night — MU outscored A&M 28-10 in the paint and shot 48.1 percent overall — but this was more about sweltering defense.

Texas A&M shot just 26 percent from the field, the lowest for a Missouri opponent in a conference game since a win over the Aggies in the 2013 SEC tournament. Texas A&M’s 43 points were MU’s fewest allowed under Martin in any game and the program’s fewest allowed in a conference game since a 78-36 win at Mississippi State on Feb. 13, 2013. In a half-full arena of just 6,396 fans, the Aggies (7-9, 1-4) went into the game as one of the nation’s worst 3-point shooting teams, and they lived up to that reputation, making just 4 of 22 shots from deep. “Missouri did a really good job closing gaps,” said a dejected Kennedy, who opened his postgame press conference apologizing to Aggies fans for his team’s effort. “We’re shooting the ball so poorly people don’t guard us on the perimeter. So they sit in the lane.” That was MU’s plan from the start. Or, in Martin’s terms, “We did a great job building a wall.” A&M’s top two scorers spent most of the day running headfirst into said wall. T.J. Starks and Savion Flagg combined for just seven points, making only one field goal on 14 attempts. Martin got notable defensive performances from Puryear, who pulled down 10 rebounds, nine on the defensive end, against one of the country’s best offensive rebounding teams, and walk-on Ronnie Suggs, who supplied endless energy on the perimeter in 18 scoreless but invaluable minutes off the bench.

Nobody was happier outside the Missouri locker room than Tilmon, who scored 14 points and collected just one foul in 27 minutes, a feat so rare he even got some teasing from one of the officials who called it “a world record.” Fouls sabotaged his first two SEC games, but on Saturday Tilmon credited his running dialogue with one of the officials for staying on the floor. “He kept saying, ‘I’m going to work with you. Just work with me. Keep your hands up. Move your feet. Don’t be banging,’” Tilmon said. With Tilmon and Puryear causing damage in the frontcourt, Jordan Geist and Mark Smith supplied 17 and 13 points from the backcourt, respectively, combining for seven 3-pointers on 12 attempts. Geist rediscovered his stroke after a rough start to league play and at one point late in the first half rimmed in a contested 3 from the corner that also drew a foul for a four-point play. “When you see it bouncing up there and it goes in, you know it’s one of those days,” Geist said. “And you keep shooting them.” As always, though, with Martin it came back to defense. Leading 36-21 at halftime, the Tigers tightened the screws in the halfcourt to start the second half: More than nine minutes elapsed before A&M’s first field goal slipped through the nets. By then, Mizzou’s first conference win was all but settled.

Northern Illinois hires Hammock • Northern Illinois has hired former star running back Thomas Hammock as its head coach. Hammock is taking over at his alma mater after spending 16 seasons as a college and NFL assistant — the past five as the Baltimore Ravens’ running backs coach. He becomes the first African-American head football coach at NIU. Hammock fills a vacancy that opened last week when Rod Carey left for Temple after leading the Huskies to a 52-30 record and six bowl games in seven seasons. Hammock ran for 2,432 yards at NIU from 1999-2002 and was first-team, all-MAC two times. He was a Huskies assistant from 2005-06 and worked at Minnesota and Wisconsin before joining the Ravens’ staff in 2014. DB Gibbs to Vols • Former Georgia defensive back Deangelo Gibbs is transferring to Tennessee. Gibbs, who is listed as 6-foot-1 and 205 pounds, played seven games for Georgia as a sophomore this past season and made seven tackles. Gibbs isn’t a graduate transfer, so it is expected that he will have to sit out the 2019 season before playing for Tennessee. Also at Tennessee, former quarterback Tee Martin is returning to his alma mater as an assistant coach. Georgia adds Warren to staff • Georgia coach Kirby Smart has hired Charlton Warren from Florida as defensive backs coach. Warren spent the 2018 season as Florida’s cornerbacks coach after coaching defensive backs and special teams at Tennessee in 2017. Iowa State gets new OC • Iowa State rehired Tom Manning as its offensive coordinator on Friday. Manning, who spent last season on the staff of the Indianapolis Colts, is returning to Ames to run the Cyclones offense under fourthyear coach Matt Campbell. Manning was Iowa State’s coordinator in 2016 and 2017. Associated Press


SPORTS

01.20.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D5

Allen, Binnington dividing x xxworkload xx xx x

NUMBERS

OF THE DAY

xxx.

xx

headline ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues goaltender Jake Allen protects the net as Boston Bruins left wing Peter Cehlarik tries to get his stick on the puck in the first period Thursday night in Boston.

The final numbers on Allen might not have been pretty against Boston on Thursday night — four goals allowed on 26 shots in a 5-2 Blues loss. But he was spectacular in the opening period, keeping the Blues in the game when the Bruins had at least a half dozen prime scoring opportunities. “It was a bad start for us,” forward Ryan O’Reilly said. “We didn’t get off the right way. Obviously, (Allen) stepped up huge. He gave us a chance to win that game and it’s disappointing.” Allen has had two strong games this month against Washington, both wins. But his overall play in the new year hasn’t been great — he has a 2.88 goals-against average in five games. Nonetheless, he has avoided his January swoon of the past two seasons. At least so far. Last January, Allen had a 4.93 goals against average. Two Januarys ago, it was 4.06. Carter Hutton stole starts from Allen last January, to the point where he became the de facto starter until being sidelined by a neck injury in March. Things haven’t reached that stage with Binnington, at least not yet. Make no mistake, Allen’s home and road numbers are factoring into the equation. “Yeah, for sure, it does,” Berube said. “We think about it. That goes into the process of where we’re starting guys and what’s going on.” In 21 home games this season, Allen has a 3.65 goals-against average and an .878 save percentage. In 15 road games, it’s 2.33 goalsagainst and a .920 save percentage. Even after allowing the four goals in Boston, Allen’s goals-against average on the road ranks third in the league. His save percentage on the road is ASSOCIATED PRESS 10th. This is for all goalies with at least 10 road appearances this season. Given Berube’s comments about those home and road splits mattering, look for lots of Binnington at Enterprise Center, beginning with Sat-

headline

Steen could be back before All-Star break ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY JIM THOMAS • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

subhed

B1 BLUES • FROM D1

BLUESROUNDUP NOTEBOOK

urday’s contest against Ottawa. And more of Allen on the road, where the Blues play 21 of their remaining 36 games. Berube is right about the schedule getting busier after the break. Entering Saturday’s NHL games, no team in the entire NHL has played fewer games than St. Louis. Florida has played the same number, 46, but everyone else has played more. There will be nine weeks remaining in the regular season coming out of the break, and the Blues have eight sets of back-to-backs in that span. In comparison, heading into the break they will have played only six sets of games on back-to-back nights in the first 16 weeks. So no matter who’s hot, or who’s not, Berube and the Blues will need two goalies down the stretch. Right now, every point matters because as improbable as it sounds, they are in the playoff picture despite their 2021-5 record. Again, with games in hand on everyone in the Western Conference, the Blues entered the weekend only four points out of the second wild-card position. “Players are all watching, they all see where we’re at,” Berube said. “And they all believe we can keep winning and get in, so there’s a good feel around here for sure.” The Blues could’ve been even closer because there were points for the taking in the final two games of the road trip. David Perron’s third-period goal got the Blues a point Tuesday in Brooklyn against the New York Islanders, but another goal in regulation or, of course, overtime would’ve made it two. Despite the 5-2 final in Boston, the Blues were in position to take control after Carl Gunnarsson’s second-period goal gave them a 2-1 lead. But a road trip that started out so promising fizzled at the end. “Could’ve been better,” defenseman Vince Dunn said. “Obviously, we wanted to end it off on a better note. But overall I think we’ve been pretty

BLUES VS. OTTAWA

With just three games remaining before the AllStar break and the Blues’ open-date period, time is running out for four injured players to get back in the lineup before February. But interim coach Craig Berube said veteran forward Alexander Steen is close to returning. “Steen skated today,” Berube said Friday. “We’ll know tomorrow on him, (get) a real good idea if he can play here soon or not.” It has been a rough year on the injury front for Steen, 35, a veteran of 14 NHL seasons and a Blues alternate captain. He missed six games in November with an upper-body injury. After returning for two games, he suffered a concussion and was sidelined for two more. He returned from the concussion in early December, made it through a month of play, then suffered a shoulder injury Jan. 7 at Philadelphia in a mid-ice collision with the Flyers’ Radko Gudas. The hope was that Steen could return at some point during the just-completed four-game road trip. For now, he remains on injured reserve, having missed the last six games. Steen is one of four injured Blues forwards, which has thinned out the team up front and led to several call-ups from San Antonio. Like Steen, Robert Thomas (shoulder) and Tyler Bozak (concussion) also are on injured reserve. In addition, Zach Sanford currently is going through the concussion protocol after getting slammed into the boards Tuesday by Casey Cizikas of the New York Islanders. He was scheduled for additional evaluation Friday. “I think they’re making progress, all of them,” Berube said. Thomas, in fact, did some early skating at Enterprise Center, where the Blues held an optional practice Friday. Bozak has missed seven games with his concussion. Thomas has missed four games since crashing into the boards and suffering his shoulder injury Jan. 10 against Montreal, a game in which he scored his fifth goal of the season. When asked if any of the players could return before the break begins next Thursday, Berube said: “That’s a good question, but I wouldn’t count them all out.”

When, where • 6 p.m. Saturday, Enterprise Center TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Senators • After an eight-game winless streak, Ottawa (19-24-5) has now won four of five with Friday’s 4-1 win at Carolina. For the second game in a row, the Blues face a team playing the tail end of a back-to-back. The Senators are 2-5-2 in the second game of back-to-backs this THE 7-11 IS OPEN season. The Boston game marked the third time in nine Ottawa can score: Mark Stone has 22 contests this month that the Blues have gone with goals, Matt Duchene has 20 and Ryan seven defensemen and 11 forwards, and the first Dzingel, 19. St. Louisan Brady Tkachuk time they’ve lost with that alignment under Berube. has 11 goals as a rookie. Former Blue “I felt that my best lineup was seven ‘D,’ so that Magnus Paajarvi scored his fourth goal was part of the reason (against Boston),” Berube of the season Friday but is minus-20. said. “The other reason is I’ve got guys who can The Senators are allowing a league-high play lots of minutes (at forward), and they like lots 3.83 goals a game. Sidelined with a WILD_ART of minutes. So I can rotate them in and out. concussion since Dec. 21, Craig Anderson “(Oskar) Sundqvist’s minutes are up, (Ivan) Baris expected to start in goal. He’s 14-13-3, bashev’s minutes are up. Probably played a couple with a 3.58 GAA. of my top guys too much, but that was toward the Jim Thomas end of the game, too, when I had them out there with the goalie out for quite a bit of time.” Barbashev logged a season-high 15 minutes, 12 good on the road, and from that trip seconds. Sundqvist has hit a season-high for ice those are some important points that time in five of the past nine games, hitting a new we got.” season high of 20:01 against Boston. Sundqvist was TOPwith 25 FARED The way the West is going this year, one of sixHOW BluesTHE forwards 20 minutes-plus of 1. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. 90 points might get you into Lord ice time Thursday. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date. Stanley’s tournament. If the Blues In a rarity, Ryan O’Reilly’s 24 minutes was more 2. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. play at the same pace they did on the than any Next: Blues vs.defenseman. Teamxyxy, Date just-completed trip for the rest of the 3. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. BLUENOTES Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date season, garnering five of a possible 4. Teamxyxy (xx-xx)his beat/lost to teamxyxypoints xx-xx. eight points, they will finish with exDavid Perron extended career-high vs. Teamxyxy, actly 90 points. streak toNext: 13 games (six Date goals, 10 assists) with an 5. Teamxyxy “We have something, a little bit, to assist on(xx-xx) O’Reilly’s second-period goal Thursday Top 25 Schedule beat/lost to look forward to,” Dunn said. “We can against Boston. It’s the streak in teamxyxy xx-xx. Next:longest Saturday’scurrent Games 2 Michigan at Wisconsin, 11 a.m. in Teamxyxy, kind of see ourselves getting a little bit the NHL vs. and is tiedDate for theNo. sixth-longest streak No. 3 Tennessee vs. Alabama, 1 p.m. Teamxyxy closer to that playoff spot. I know the No. 7 Kansas at West Virginia, 1 p.m. franchise6.history. (xx-xx) beat/lost to No. 13 North Carolina at Miami, 11 a.m. attitude is a lot better in this dressing • Don’t look now, butNext: defenseman Carl GunnarsNo. 17 N.C. State at Notre Dame, 1 p.m. teamxyxy xx-xx. No. 18 Mississippi vs. a Arkansas, Noonin room now. Obviously with the wins son, whovs. has averaged just nine points season Teamxyxy, Date No. 20 Oklahoma at Texas, 1 p.m. it helps with the confidence of every7. Teamxyxy his previous four years with the Blues, is 1riding a No. 25 Indiana at Purdue, p.m. 9 Virginia Tech vs. (xx-xx) beat/lost to (oneNo.goal, one.” four-game point streak three assists). teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: Wake Forest, 3 p.m. No. 12Flynn Kentuckywas at No. placed on And right now, Berube thinks he has • San Antonio forward vs. Teamxyxy, Date Brian 14 Auburn, 3 p.m. two goalies who can boost that confiwaivers Friday by the Blues, according to Pierre 8. Teamxyxy 1 Duke vs. No.and 4 Virginia, 5 p.m.as(xx-xx) beat/lost dence. LeBrun of TSN. Flynnto hadNo. one goal eight No. 8 Texas Tech at Baylor, 5 p.m. teamxyxy xx-xx.season Next: No. sists in 21 games this for San Antonio. 21 Houston at South Florida, 7 p.m. Jim Thomas vs. Teamxyxy, Date

@jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES

No. 24 Mississippi State at

Vanderbilt, 7:30 p.m. Jim Thomas9. • @jthom1 on Twitter • jthomas@post-dispatch.com Teamxyxy (xx-xx)

beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date 10. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date 11. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date 12. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date 13. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date. 14. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date 15. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. HONOR for the Statesmen, averagedNext: 16.9 vs. Teamxyxy, DateROLL 16. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. points a game after transferring Drury junior Hailey Diestelkamp Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date and helping the 28-3 Pioneers (Owensville) was honored by 17. Teamxyxy beat/lost to teamxyxy defend their Class 5 championboth(xx-xx) the Great Lakes Valleyxx-xx. ConNext: vs. Teamxyxy, Date ship last year. A three-time allference and NCAA D-II as 18. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx.its state honoree, she was a secondplayer Date of the week after she averNext: vs. Teamxyxy, team Post-Dispatch All-Metro aged(xx-xx) 24.5beat/lost points,to12.5 rebounds, 19. Teamxyxy teamxyxy xx-xx. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Dateand 2.5 assists in league selection as a senior. 7.5 steals 20. Teamxyxy to teamxyxy xx-xx. wins(xx-xx) overbeat/lost Indianapolis and No. Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date STILL PERFECT 17 Lewis. Drury (15-0, 5-0) is 21. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy xx-xx. rankedDate No. 2 in the nation. St. Louis boasts one of theNext: hotvs. Teamxyxy, • McKendree swept the xx-xx. GLVC test basketball teams in the WILD_ART 22.naTeamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lost to teamxyxy Next: vs. Teamxyxy, Date and diving honors. swimming tion. Teamxyxy (xx-xx) beat/lostRey to teamxyxy xx-xx. Junior Sydney (Columbia) The Missouri Baptist 23. men,

Barnes is having a big year for Indiana State Junior guard leads Missouri Valley in scoring average BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Indiana State junior Jordan Barnes finds himself among some pretty heady company these days. A three-year starter at CBC, the 5-foot-11 guard leads the Missouri Valley Conference in scoring this season, carrying a 17.6-a-game average into Saturday’s league matchup with visiting Loyola of Chicago. ATLANTIC 10 his first career Barnes posted double-double earlier week, conf. this overall scoring 15 points pulling w and l w l xx x xx x x down a career-high 11 rebounds xx x xx Iowa. x xHe in a loss at Northern xx x xx thex 39th x also recently became xx xx pass x the x in school historyx to xx x xx x did x 1,000-point mark. And he xx x xxthe fourthx x so in his 77th game, xx xx x x fastest in Sycamorex history. xx x xx x x Barnes, who is also among the xx x xx x x league leaders inx assists (3.5), xx xx x x steals (1.4), free-throw percentxx x xx x x age (86 percent), 3-pointers xx x xx x (2.6) x and minutes (33.9), xx x xxis trying x x to become just the fourth Indiana xx x x x x State player to lead the MVC in St. Louis U. up next scoring average. One of the oth7 p.m. Wednesday at Duquesne the legendary Larry Bird, 1ers p.m.isSaturday vs. Davidson, CBSSN who led the league in scoring in

major player. Last year’s honor went to Loyola’s Clayton Custer. Also included on the list is Illinois State senior Milik Yarbrough, who began his college career at St. Louis University.

BACK HOME St. Louis University announced this week that a pair of local standouts — soccer player Anna Lawlor (Summit) and basketball player Jaidah Stewart (Kirkwood) — have transferred and will continue their athletic careers as Bil- ranked No. 3 in NAIA, improved likens. to 20-0 overall and to 12-0 atop After suffering a season-end- the American Midwest Confering injury in the regular-season ence with a 90-65 rout of visitAREA CONFERENCE STANDINGS opener at Oklahoma State, Law- ing St. Louis College of Pharlor will have four years of eligibil- macy on Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS xx x xx x x BIG TEN MISSOURI VALLEY ity. The defender from St. Louis Eleven players scored for the Indiana State’s Jordan Barnes xx x xx x x overall Scott Gallagher was the Post- Spartans, who got 16 points tries to get the ball conf. over Missouri conf. overall xx x xx x x w and l Ryan w l Dispatch All-Metro player of the from reserve Hasaan State’s Josh Webster w DeCarolis l w l xx x xx x x xx x xx xx Charles West), 15 x from xx x x year following both her sopho(St. Pablo Kreklow in a game Jan. 8. x x xx x x x x xx LAST GAMES more and senior xx x xx x seasons in high Hernandez, 13 points and 13x rex Illinois up next xx x xx x x A-10: Umass-VCU, 5:30; Fordham-G. 1977, 1978 and 1979. school. She earned All-America bounds from James McKelvin xx p.m. Sunday Mason, 6pm xx x xx12 points x x and all-state 12 honors three times (Hazelwood East) and x It has been 40 years since Bird at Iowa, BTN xxreserve John Yeager x xx(Lutheran x x Big Ten: St.-Minn, 7p.m. x and company helped putPenn Indiand was the 8Missouri Gatorade fro p.m. Wednesday xx x xx x x MVC: UNI-Valpo, xx State on the basketball ana map3pmplayer of the year in 2018. South). vs. Wisconsin, BTN xx x xx x x x going 33-0 before OVC: SEMO-EKU, by losing to6pm; TennTechStewart, a 5-foot-9 guard, The balanced Missouri Baptist xx x xx x x xx Jville,Michigan 7pm, Murray-SIUE, 7pm to town after a semes- attack Magic Johnson and returns is led by senior Kai Woodx xx x xx x x SEC: SC-LSU, 5pm, Miss St-Vandy, State in the NCAA champion- ter at the University of Houston, fall, who’s averagingx 14.4 points x xx x x x 7:30 ship where she played in one game a xx game while converting nearly xx game. That history-making x x x x squad will be honored Saturday and scored two points. She will 48 percent of his 3-pointers, sex SIUC up next in be eligible at semester break next nior Hernandez, who’s scoring xx Terre Haute, Ind.x x Sunday vs. Bradley, ESPNU xxEarlier this week, x xx x was x Barnes season and will have 3½ years of at3ap.m. 12.3-a-game clip, and junior 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Northern Iowa xx x xx x x named to the Lou Henson Award eligibility. guard Jahmouri Robinson (CarMissouri State up next xx x xxList.x The x Mid-Season Watch Stewart, who began her prep dinal Ritter), who leads the team 3 p.m. Sunday at Drake xx x xx is xgiven x award, started in 2010, career at Webster Groves and in8assists and isvs. tied with McKelp.m. Wednesday Loyola (Chi.), CBSSN xx x xx topx midx annually to the nation’s scored more than 1,500 points vin for the lead in steals.

was the female honoree after winning the 200 backstroke, placing second in the 50 freestyle and helping the Bearcats’ 400 medley relay take first in a narrow loss to No. 10 Lindenwood. VALLEY OnOHIO the men’s side, sophomore Alexander Skinner was conf. honored overall after Eastfirst-place finishes w l inw thel xx freestyle, 200 freestyle x xx xandx 100 xx free relay. x xx x x 400 xx Webster University x xx men’s x x • The xx xx x re-x basketball team set xa school xx with 42 assists, x xx x x cord including xx from junior reserve x x x x nine JorWest w l dan Clay (Vashon), win al 130-122 xx x xx x x league win at Greenville College xx x xx x x onxxWednesday. Webster (11-4) x xx x x and Greenville (10-5) are tied at xx x xx x x 7-1xxatop the St. Louisx Intercollexx x x giate xx Athletic Conference. x x x x JoeSIUE Lyonsup next 7:45 p.m. Thursday @joelyonspd on twitter at Southeast Missouri jlyons@post-dispatch.com 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Tenn.-Martin


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

Points for Murray State point guard Ja Morant Saturday at SIUE, a Vadalabene Center opponent scoring record. He’s projected as the No. 2 NBA draft pick by NBAdraft.net.

40

NUMBERS OF THE DAY

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Years ago on Jan. 19 since Notre Dame ended UCLA’s 88-game win streak with a 71-70 win in South Bend, Ind. UCLA led 70-59 with 3:32 to play before the Irish stormed back.

45

Badgers upset Michigan Wisconsin hands No. 2 Wolverines their first loss of season

No. 1 Duke beats No. 4 Virginia RJ Barrett scored 30 points, Zion Williamson had 27 and Duke beat Virginia 72-70 on Saturday night to give the Cavaliers their first loss of the season. The Blue Devils (15-2, 4-1 ACC) avoided their first two-game losing streak at home since 2016. DeAndre Hunter scored 18 points, and Ty Jerome and Kyle Guy had 14 apiece for the Cavaliers (16-1, 4-1), who entered as the nation’s last unbeaten after No. 2 Michigan was upset at Wisconsin earlier in the day. No. 3 Tennessee 71, Alabama 68 • Grant Williams scored 21 points, and No. 3 Tennessee rallied past Alabama for its 12th straight win. Admiral Schofield had 12 points and 11 rebounds for Tennessee, and he made the basket that put the Vols ahead for good with 2:12 left.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MADISON, WIS. • Ethan Happ and the

Wisconsin Badgers finally closed out a tight game. Against No. 2 Michigan, too. Happ had 26 points and 10 rebounds as Wisconsin handed the Wolverines their first loss of the season, breaking away in the final minute for a 64-54 victory Saturday. Fans rushed the floor after the Badgers (12-6, 4-3 Big Ten) finished off the upset. The victory came after Wisconsin dropped back-to-back games that came down to the stretch. “This group’s mentality, even with the struggles we’ve had, has always been a fighter’s mentality,” Badgers coach Greg Gard said. Wisconsin briefly took the lead Monday night in Maryland after trailing by as many as 21 points in the second half, only to see the game slip away in the final seconds. Likewise, the Badgers took Purdue to overtime Jan. 11 at home before struggling down the stretch with turnovers. But against Michigan (17-1, 6-1), it all came together for them. The Wolverines closed within 57-54 on Isaiah Livers’ 3-pointer with just under a minute to play. Michigan put on a fullcourt press that the Badgers broke, and Ignas Brazdeikis was whistled for a flagrant foul on Happ, who was across the court from the ball. Happ, shooting 49 percent from the line coming in, hit the first shot as an incensed Michigan coach John Beilein argued with the officials, but missed the second. On the ensuing Wisconsin possession, Happ put back his own miss for a 60-54 lead, then hit a streaking Nate Reuvers following a Michigan turnover for a dunk that sealed it. Beilein said he wasn’t given an explanation on the flagrant foul but seemed mystified by the call. Beilein said he told the referees Michigan was going to foul. “I’ve got to be schooled up on that,” Beilein said. “Apparently it’s something new to me that I have to be educated on.” Gard, however, said it was a point of emphasis following last season for fouls where there’s no play on the ball. For Happ, the final sequence was a bit of redemption. In a 59-52 loss to Minnesota on Jan. 3, the Gophers intentionally fouled Happ down the stretch, and he finished 1 of 7 from the line. Against the Boilermakers, he committed a key turnover toward the end. Along with Happ’s scoring and rebounding, he did the little things well, teammate Brad Davison said. That included diving on the floor midway

ROUNDUP

No. 9 Virginia Tech 87, Wake Forest 71 • Nickeil Alexander-Walker scored 24 points and Virginia Tech used a 14-4 first-half run to pull away from Wake Forest. Ty Outlaw added 14 points and Ahmed Hill 12 for the Hokies (15-2, 4-1). No. 12 Kentucky 82, No. 14 Auburn 80 • Tyler Herro made two free throws with 24 seconds left and Immanuel Quickley added another to help Kentucky survive a big rally from Auburn. The Wildcats (14-3, 4-1 SEC) rebounded after losing a 17-point second-half lead to finish off a showdown between two top teams. No. 13 North Carolina 85, Miami 76 • Cameron Johnson scored 22 points, including 3-pointers on consecutive possessions in the closing minutes, and North Carolina won a seesaw game against Miami. There were 18 lead changes, the last with 17 minutes to go. Murray State 82, SIUE 72 • NBA prospect Ja Morant scored a career-best 40 points and dished out 11 assists as Murray State pulled away in the closing minutes from a scrappy SIUE bunch. Morant was 21-for-21 from the free throw line, an OVC record. Tyrese Williford led the Cougars with a career-high 33 points. Eastern Kentucky 85, SEMO 83 • JacQuess Hobbs dribbled the length of the court and hit a 5-foot floater as time expired to lift Eastern Kentucky to a win over Southeast Missouri State in Richmond, Ky. Nick Mayo finished with 24 points, becoming the first EKU player to top 2,000 career points. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ dunks over Michigan’s Jon Teske Saturday in Madison, Wis. Happ had a game-high 26 points in Wisconsin’s 64-54 upset victory over No. 2 Michigan.

through the second half to secure a loose ball and call a timeout. “It’s our All-American,” Davison said. “I don’t know how many All-Americans dive on the floor for loose balls. But ours does.” Both teams came in averaging less than 10 turnovers a game, and Wisconsin finished near its average with 11. But Michigan turned it over 16 times for the game and managed just six points over the final 3:30. Jon Teske led Michigan with 15 points, while Jordan Poole added 14.

The foul on Happ wasn’t the only thing that didn’t go Brazdeikis’ way. The freshman came in averaging 15.6 points a game but was held scoreless in 23 minutes, missing all five of his shots. He also was limited by foul trouble, including two in the first half. On one, he tried a behindthe-back pass in the lane while driving toward the hoop, but was called for a charge. “He got himself into foul trouble, and it’s very typical what happens to freshmen,” Beilein said.

WOMEN SIUE 71, Murray State 54 • Nakiah Bell scored 17 points, and the Cougars posted their third consecutive win. Allie Troeckler added 15 points and nine rebounds. From wire services

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Duke (15-2) beat No. 4 Virginia 72-70. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tuesday. 2. Michigan (17-1) lost to Wisconsin 64-54. Next: vs. Minnesota, Tuesday. 3. Tennessee (16-1) beat Alabama 71-68. Next: at Vanderbilt, Wednesday. 4. Virginia (16-1) lost to No. 1 Duke 72-70. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Tuesday. 5. Gonzaga (17-2) at Portland, late. Next: at Santa Clara, Thursday.

W. Virginia’s late rally stuns No. 7 Kansas ASSOCIATED PRESS

MORGANTOWN, W.VA. • Kansas

coach Bill Self left his postgame news conference, saw West Virginia’s Bob Huggins down a hallway and stopped for a handshake. “Go win the rest of them,” Self said. Wishful thinking, perhaps. But Huggins will gladly take this one over his friend in what has become a forgettable season. Jermaine Haley hurried up the court and hit a layup with 8.5 seconds left, completing a late rally that lifted West Virginia over No. 7 Kansas 65-64 on Saturday. The Mountaineers (9-9, 1-5 Big 12) scored the final seven points to break a five-game losing streak. West Virginia has fallen on hard times since being ranked No. 13 in the AP preseason poll. But three defensive stops down the stretch made a difference against the Jayhawks and gave the Mountaineers a reason to think there’s time this season to turn things around. “It’s just a matter of being mentally tough enough to do the right things,” Huggins said. “I’m just happy to win. This isn’t

where we thought we’d be.” Haley hit all five of his field-goal tries and tied a season high with 13 points despite playing with a bandage on his injured left wrist. Huggins said he has implored Haley to drive to the basket. The junior college transfer listened. “I know everybody has been waiting on me to attack and get a little bit more aggressive,” Haley said. “The more minutes I play, the more comfortable I get.” Dedric Lawson and Marcus Garrett made layups 29 seconds apart to give the Jayhawks (15-3, 4-2) their largest lead at 64-58 with 2:34 left. But Kansas didn’t score again. Wes Harris responded with a 3-pointer for West Virginia and Derek Culver’s layup cut the deficit to 6463 with 1:26 remaining. Culver then grabbed a rebound, but threw the ball straight to Garrett with 54 seconds left. West Virginia got another chance after Lagerald Vick’s airball. Haley rushed, drove past Quentin Grimes and made the go-ahead layup. Vick missed a 3-point try from the corner as time ran out, and West Virginia fans stormed the court.

6. Michigan State (16-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Maryland, Monday. 7. Kansas (15-3) lost to West Virginia 65-64. Next: vs. Iowa State, Monday. 8. Texas Tech (15-3) lost to Baylor 73-62. Next: at Kansas State, Tuesday. 9. Virginia Tech (15-2) beat Wake Forest 87-71. Next: at No. 13 North Carolina, Monday. 10. Nevada (17-1) vs. Air Force, late. Next: vs. Colorado State, Wednesday. 11. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: at Boston College, Sun. 12. Kentucky (14-3) beat No. 14 Auburn 82-80. Next: vs. No. 24 Mississippi State, Tuesday. 13. North Carolina (14-4) beat Miami 85-76. Next: vs. No. 9 Virginia Tech, Monday. 14. Auburn (13-4) lost to No. 12 Kentucky 82-80. Next: at South Carolina, Tuesday. 15. Marquette (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Providence, Sunday. 16. Buffalo (17-1) idle. Next: at Northern Ill., Tuesday. 17. N.C. State (15-3) beat Notre Dame 77-73. Next: at Louisville, Thursday. 18. Mississippi (14-3) beat Arkansas 84-67. Next: at Alabama, Tuesday. 19. Maryland (16-3) idle. Next: at No. 6 Michigan St., Mon. 20. Oklahoma (13-5) lost to Texas 75-72. Next: at Oklahoma State, Wednesday. 21. Houston (18-1) beat South Florida 69-60. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday. 22. Villanova (14-4) idle. Next: at Butler, Tuesday. 23. Iowa (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

West Virginia’s Jermaine Haley (10) goes up while defended by Kansas’ Quentin Grimes.

24. Mississippi State (14-3) beat Vanderbilt 71-55. Next: at No. 12 Kentucky, Tuesday. 25. Indiana (12-6) lost to Purdue 70-55. Next: at Northwestern, Tuesday.

AREA CONFERENCE STANDINGS ATLANTIC 10

St. Louis U. George Mason Davidson VCU Dayton Duquesne Rhode Island George Washington St. Bonaventure Richmond La Salle St. Joseph’s (Pa.) Fordham Massachusetts

BIG TEN conf. w l 5 0 5 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 3 1 3 2 2 2 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 5 0 5 0 5

overall w l 14 4 11 8 13 5 13 5 12 6 12 5 10 7 6 11 6 12 7 11 3 14 8 10 9 9 7 11

St. Louis U. up next 7 p.m. Wednesday at Duquesne 1 p.m. Saturday vs. Davidson, CBSSN

Michigan State Maryland Michigan Purdue Iowa Minnesota Wisconsin Nebraska Indiana Ohio State Northwestern Illinois Rutgers Penn State

MISSOURI VALLEY conf. w l 7 0 7 1 6 1 5 2 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 2 5 1 5 1 6 0 8

overall w l 16 2 16 3 17 1 12 6 15 3 14 4 12 6 13 5 12 6 12 5 11 7 5 12 8 9 7 12

Illinois up next 12 p.m. Sunday at Iowa, BTN 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. Wisconsin, BTN

Valparaiso Loyola (Chicago) Illinois State Evansville Northern Iowa Drake SIU Carbondale Missouri State Indiana State Bradley

conf. w l 5 1 5 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 0 5

OHIO VALLEY overall w l 12 7 12 7 11 8 9 10 8 11 13 5 9 9 8 10 10 8 8 10

SIUC up next 3 p.m. Sunday vs. Bradley, ESPNU 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Northern Iowa Missouri State up next 3 p.m. Sunday at Drake 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. Loyola (Chi.), CBSSN

Murray State Jacksonville State Austin Peay Belmont Eastern Illinois Morehead State Eastern Kentucky Tennessee Tech Tenn. State SEMO SIUE Tennessee-Martin

SOUTHEASTERN conf. w l 6 0 6 0 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 3 2 4 2 4 2 4 1 5 1 5 0 6

overall w l 15 2 14 5 13 6 13 4 11 8 7 12 9 10 6 13 5 13 6 13 5 13 5 12

SIUE up next 7:45 p.m. Thursday at Southeast Missouri 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Tenn.-Martin

Tennessee LSU Kentucky Mississippi South Carolina Auburn Mississippi State Alabama Florida Missouri Arkansas Georgia Texas A&M Vanderbilt

conf. w l 5 0 4 0 4 1 4 1 4 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 3 1 4 1 4 1 4 0 5

overall w l 16 1 14 3 14 3 14 3 9 8 13 4 14 3 11 6 10 7 10 6 10 7 9 8 7 9 9 8

Missouri up next 8 p.m. Wednesday at Arkansas, SEC Net. 5 p.m. Saturday vs. LSU, SEC Network


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 3

Points for Murray State point guard Ja Morant Saturday at SIUE, a Vadalabene Center opponent scoring record. He’s projected as the No. 2 NBA draft pick by NBAdraft.net.

40

NUMBERS OF THE DAY

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Years ago on Jan. 19 since Notre Dame ended UCLA’s 88-game win streak with a 71-70 win in South Bend, Ind. UCLA led 70-59 with 3:32 to play before the Irish stormed back.

45

Badgers upset Michigan Wisconsin hands No. 2 Wolverines their first loss of season

No. 1 Duke beats No. 4 Virginia RJ Barrett scored 30 points, Zion Williamson had 27 and Duke beat Virginia 72-70 on Saturday night to give the Cavaliers their first loss of the season. The Blue Devils (15-2, 4-1 ACC) avoided their first two-game losing streak at home since 2016. DeAndre Hunter scored 18 points, and Ty Jerome and Kyle Guy had 14 apiece for the Cavaliers (16-1, 4-1), who entered as the nation’s last unbeaten after No. 2 Michigan was upset at Wisconsin earlier in the day. No. 3 Tennessee 71, Alabama 68 • Grant Williams scored 21 points, and No. 3 Tennessee rallied past Alabama for its 12th straight win. Admiral Schofield had 12 points and 11 rebounds for Tennessee, and he made the basket that put the Vols ahead for good with 2:12 left.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MADISON, WIS. • Ethan Happ and the

Wisconsin Badgers finally closed out a tight game. Against No. 2 Michigan, too. Happ had 26 points and 10 rebounds as Wisconsin handed the Wolverines their first loss of the season, breaking away in the final minute for a 64-54 victory Saturday. Fans rushed the floor after the Badgers (12-6, 4-3 Big Ten) finished off the upset. The victory came after Wisconsin dropped back-to-back games that came down to the stretch. “This group’s mentality, even with the struggles we’ve had, has always been a fighter’s mentality,” Badgers coach Greg Gard said. Wisconsin briefly took the lead Monday night in Maryland after trailing by as many as 21 points in the second half, only to see the game slip away in the final seconds. Likewise, the Badgers took Purdue to overtime Jan. 11 at home before struggling down the stretch with turnovers. But against Michigan (17-1, 6-1), it all came together for them. The Wolverines closed within 57-54 on Isaiah Livers’ 3-pointer with just under a minute to play. Michigan put on a fullcourt press that the Badgers broke, and Ignas Brazdeikis was whistled for a flagrant foul on Happ, who was across the court from the ball. Happ, shooting 49 percent from the line coming in, hit the first shot as an incensed Michigan coach John Beilein argued with the officials, but missed the second. On the ensuing Wisconsin possession, Happ put back his own miss for a 60-54 lead, then hit a streaking Nate Reuvers following a Michigan turnover for a dunk that sealed it. Beilein said he wasn’t given an explanation on the flagrant foul but seemed mystified by the call. Beilein said he told the referees Michigan was going to foul. “I’ve got to be schooled up on that,” Beilein said. “Apparently it’s something new to me that I have to be educated on.” Gard, however, said it was a point of emphasis following last season for fouls where there’s no play on the ball. For Happ, the final sequence was a bit of redemption. In a 59-52 loss to Minnesota on Jan. 3, the Gophers intentionally fouled Happ down the stretch, and he finished 1 of 7 from the line. Against the Boilermakers, he committed a key turnover toward the end. Along with Happ’s scoring and rebounding, he did the little things well, teammate Brad Davison said. That included diving on the floor midway

ROUNDUP

No. 9 Virginia Tech 87, Wake Forest 71 • Nickeil Alexander-Walker scored 24 points and Virginia Tech used a 14-4 first-half run to pull away from Wake Forest. Ty Outlaw added 14 points and Ahmed Hill 12 for the Hokies (15-2, 4-1). No. 12 Kentucky 82, No. 14 Auburn 80 • Tyler Herro made two free throws with 24 seconds left and Immanuel Quickley added another to help Kentucky survive a big rally from Auburn. The Wildcats (14-3, 4-1 SEC) rebounded after losing a 17-point second-half lead to finish off a showdown between two top teams. No. 13 North Carolina 85, Miami 76 • Cameron Johnson scored 22 points, including 3-pointers on consecutive possessions in the closing minutes, and North Carolina won a seesaw game against Miami. There were 18 lead changes, the last with 17 minutes to go. Murray State 82, SIUE 72 • NBA prospect Ja Morant scored a career-best 40 points and dished out 11 assists as Murray State pulled away in the closing minutes from a scrappy SIUE bunch. Morant was 21-for-21 from the free throw line, an OVC record. Tyrese Williford led the Cougars with a career-high 33 points. Eastern Kentucky 85, SEMO 83 • JacQuess Hobbs dribbled the length of the court and hit a 5-foot floater as time expired to lift Eastern Kentucky to a win over Southeast Missouri State in Richmond, Ky. Nick Mayo finished with 24 points, becoming the first EKU player to top 2,000 career points. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ dunks over Michigan’s Jon Teske Saturday in Madison, Wis. Happ had a game-high 26 points in Wisconsin’s 64-54 upset victory over No. 2 Michigan.

through the second half to secure a loose ball and call a timeout. “It’s our All-American,” Davison said. “I don’t know how many All-Americans dive on the floor for loose balls. But ours does.” Both teams came in averaging less than 10 turnovers a game, and Wisconsin finished near its average with 11. But Michigan turned it over 16 times for the game and managed just six points over the final 3:30. Jon Teske led Michigan with 15 points, while Jordan Poole added 14.

The foul on Happ wasn’t the only thing that didn’t go Brazdeikis’ way. The freshman came in averaging 15.6 points a game but was held scoreless in 23 minutes, missing all five of his shots. He also was limited by foul trouble, including two in the first half. On one, he tried a behindthe-back pass in the lane while driving toward the hoop, but was called for a charge. “He got himself into foul trouble, and it’s very typical what happens to freshmen,” Beilein said.

WOMEN SIUE 71, Murray State 54 • Nakiah Bell scored 17 points, and the Cougars posted their third consecutive win. Allie Troeckler added 15 points and nine rebounds. From wire services

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Duke (15-2) beat No. 4 Virginia 72-70. Next: at Pittsburgh, Tuesday. 2. Michigan (17-1) lost to Wisconsin 64-54. Next: vs. Minnesota, Tuesday. 3. Tennessee (16-1) beat Alabama 71-68. Next: at Vanderbilt, Wednesday. 4. Virginia (16-1) lost to No. 1 Duke 72-70. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Tuesday. 5. Gonzaga (18-2) beat Portland 89-66. Next: at Santa Clara, Thursday.

W. Virginia’s late rally stuns No. 7 Kansas ASSOCIATED PRESS

MORGANTOWN, W.VA. • Kansas

coach Bill Self left his postgame news conference, saw West Virginia’s Bob Huggins down a hallway and stopped for a handshake. “Go win the rest of them,” Self said. Wishful thinking, perhaps. But Huggins will gladly take this one over his friend in what has become a forgettable season. Jermaine Haley hurried up the court and hit a layup with 8.5 seconds left, completing a late rally that lifted West Virginia over No. 7 Kansas 65-64 on Saturday. The Mountaineers (9-9, 1-5 Big 12) scored the final seven points to break a five-game losing streak. West Virginia has fallen on hard times since being ranked No. 13 in the AP preseason poll. But three defensive stops down the stretch made a difference against the Jayhawks and gave the Mountaineers a reason to think there’s time this season to turn things around. “It’s just a matter of being mentally tough enough to do the right things,” Huggins said. “I’m just happy to win. This isn’t

where we thought we’d be.” Haley hit all five of his field-goal tries and tied a season high with 13 points despite playing with a bandage on his injured left wrist. Huggins said he has implored Haley to drive to the basket. The junior college transfer listened. “I know everybody has been waiting on me to attack and get a little bit more aggressive,” Haley said. “The more minutes I play, the more comfortable I get.” Dedric Lawson and Marcus Garrett made layups 29 seconds apart to give the Jayhawks (15-3, 4-2) their largest lead at 64-58 with 2:34 left. But Kansas didn’t score again. Wes Harris responded with a 3-pointer for West Virginia and Derek Culver’s layup cut the deficit to 6463 with 1:26 remaining. Culver then grabbed a rebound, but threw the ball straight to Garrett with 54 seconds left. West Virginia got another chance after Lagerald Vick’s airball. Haley rushed, drove past Quentin Grimes and made the go-ahead layup. Vick missed a 3-point try from the corner as time ran out, and West Virginia fans stormed the court.

6. Michigan State (16-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 19 Maryland, Monday. 7. Kansas (15-3) lost to West Virginia 65-64. Next: vs. Iowa State, Monday. 8. Texas Tech (15-3) lost to Baylor 73-62. Next: at Kansas State, Tuesday. 9. Virginia Tech (15-2) beat Wake Forest 87-71. Next: at No. 13 North Carolina, Monday. 10. Nevada (18-1) beat Air Force 67-52. Next: vs. Colorado State, Wednesday. 11. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: at Boston College, Sun. 12. Kentucky (14-3) beat No. 14 Auburn 82-80. Next: vs. No. 24 Mississippi State, Tuesday. 13. North Carolina (14-4) beat Miami 85-76. Next: vs. No. 9 Virginia Tech, Monday. 14. Auburn (13-4) lost to No. 12 Kentucky 82-80. Next: at South Carolina, Tuesday. 15. Marquette (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Providence, Sunday. 16. Buffalo (17-1) idle. Next: at Northern Ill., Tuesday. 17. N.C. State (15-3) beat Notre Dame 77-73. Next: at Louisville, Thursday. 18. Mississippi (14-3) beat Arkansas 84-67. Next: at Alabama, Tuesday. 19. Maryland (16-3) idle. Next: at No. 6 Michigan St., Mon. 20. Oklahoma (13-5) lost to Texas 75-72. Next: at Oklahoma State, Wednesday. 21. Houston (18-1) beat South Florida 69-60. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday. 22. Villanova (14-4) idle. Next: at Butler, Tuesday. 23. Iowa (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

West Virginia’s Jermaine Haley (10) goes up while defended by Kansas’ Quentin Grimes.

24. Mississippi State (14-3) beat Vanderbilt 71-55. Next: at No. 12 Kentucky, Tuesday. 25. Indiana (12-6) lost to Purdue 70-55. Next: at Northwestern, Tuesday.

AREA CONFERENCE STANDINGS ATLANTIC 10

St. Louis U. George Mason Davidson VCU Dayton Duquesne Rhode Island George Washington St. Bonaventure Richmond La Salle St. Joseph’s (Pa.) Fordham Massachusetts

BIG TEN conf. w l 5 0 5 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 3 1 3 2 2 2 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 5 0 5 0 5

overall w l 14 4 11 8 13 5 13 5 12 6 12 5 10 7 6 11 6 12 7 11 3 14 8 10 9 9 7 11

St. Louis U. up next 7 p.m. Wednesday at Duquesne 1 p.m. Saturday vs. Davidson, CBSSN

Michigan State Maryland Michigan Purdue Iowa Minnesota Wisconsin Nebraska Indiana Ohio State Northwestern Illinois Rutgers Penn State

MISSOURI VALLEY conf. w l 7 0 7 1 6 1 5 2 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 2 5 1 5 1 6 0 8

overall w l 16 2 16 3 17 1 12 6 15 3 14 4 12 6 13 5 12 6 12 5 11 7 5 12 8 9 7 12

Illinois up next 12 p.m. Sunday at Iowa, BTN 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. Wisconsin, BTN

Valparaiso Loyola (Chicago) Illinois State Evansville Northern Iowa Drake SIU Carbondale Missouri State Indiana State Bradley

conf. w l 5 1 5 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 0 5

OHIO VALLEY overall w l 12 7 12 7 11 8 9 10 8 11 13 5 9 9 8 10 10 8 8 10

SIUC up next 3 p.m. Sunday vs. Bradley, ESPNU 7 p.m. Wednesday vs. Northern Iowa Missouri State up next 3 p.m. Sunday at Drake 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. Loyola (Chi.), CBSSN

Murray State Jacksonville State Austin Peay Belmont Eastern Illinois Morehead State Eastern Kentucky Tennessee Tech Tenn. State SEMO SIUE Tennessee-Martin

SOUTHEASTERN conf. w l 6 0 6 0 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 3 2 4 2 4 2 4 1 5 1 5 0 6

overall w l 15 2 14 5 13 6 13 4 11 8 7 12 9 10 6 13 5 13 6 13 5 13 5 12

SIUE up next 7:45 p.m. Thursday at Southeast Missouri 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Tenn.-Martin

Tennessee LSU Kentucky Mississippi South Carolina Auburn Mississippi State Alabama Florida Missouri Arkansas Georgia Texas A&M Vanderbilt

conf. w l 5 0 4 0 4 1 4 1 4 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 3 1 4 1 4 1 4 0 5

overall w l 16 1 14 3 14 3 14 3 9 8 13 4 14 3 11 6 10 7 10 6 10 7 9 8 7 9 9 8

Missouri up next 8 p.m. Wednesday at Arkansas, SEC Net. 5 p.m. Saturday vs. LSU, SEC Network


SPORTS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Florida Ottawa Detroit Metropolitan NY Islanders Columbus Washington Pittsburgh Carolina NY Rangers New Jersey Philadelphia

GP 48 47 48 49 47 46 48 48 GP 47 47 47 46 47 47 47 47

W 36 29 27 27 24 18 19 18 W 28 28 27 25 22 20 18 18

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 10 2 74 193 137 19-5-0 17-5-2 16 2 60 166 133 13-10-1 16-6-1 16 5 59 141 125 17-6-1 10-10-4 17 5 59 150 143 13-9-2 14-8-3 17 6 54 137 140 14-6-3 10-11-3 20 8 44 142 166 9-6-5 9-14-3 24 5 43 152 181 12-9-4 7-15-1 23 7 43 136 161 10-12-4 8-11-3 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away 15 4 60 142 119 13-7-3 15-8-1 16 3 59 153 144 14-9-2 14-7-1 15 5 59 157 141 13-8-3 14-7-2 15 6 56 163 137 13-8-2 12-7-4 20 5 49 126 140 13-8-4 9-12-1 20 7 47 136 162 13-6-5 7-14-2 22 7 43 138 161 13-5-4 5-17-3 23 6 42 134 167 10-10-3 8-13-3

Div 12-3-0 7-6-2 12-6-2 9-5-4 8-6-3 9-5-3 6-8-2 4-8-4 Div 13-5-1 11-5-1 9-4-2 7-5-1 7-7-2 4-7-3 6-8-1 4-8-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Colorado Dallas Minnesota Blues Chicago Pacific Calgary San Jose Vegas Edmonton Anaheim Vancouver Arizona Los Angeles

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 47 31 14 2 64 165 130 49 28 17 4 60 153 129 47 21 18 8 50 159 152 48 23 21 4 50 122 126 47 23 21 3 49 131 137 46 20 21 5 45 128 142 49 16 24 9 41 145 183 GP W L OT Pts GF GA 48 30 13 5 65 176 137 49 28 14 7 63 175 149 49 28 17 4 60 147 131 47 23 21 3 49 136 148 48 20 19 9 49 116 143 48 21 21 6 48 138 151 46 21 22 3 45 122 133 48 19 25 4 42 109 140

Home 18-6-2 16-8-0 9-6-5 14-8-2 12-9-3 11-13-2 8-10-6 Home 15-4-5 17-4-4 15-4-3 12-10-1 10-7-8 10-9-3 9-12-2 11-13-1

Away Div 13-8-0 10-6-0 12-9-4 7-5-0 12-12-3 4-5-3 9-13-2 4-6-1 11-12-0 8-4-1 9-8-3 6-7-3 8-14-3 9-4-3 Away Div 15-9-0 8-5-1 11-10-3 10-4-3 13-13-1 11-4-2 11-11-2 7-9-1 10-12-1 5-6-3 11-12-3 6-5-3 12-10-1 8-7-1 8-12-3 8-8-1

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Friday Montreal 4, Columbus 1 Florida 3, Toronto 1 Ottawa 4, Carolina 1 Islanders 2, Washington 0 Detroit at Calgary, late Pittsburgh at Arizona, late Buffalo at Vancouver, late Thursday Boston 5, Blues 2 NY Islanders 4, New Jersey 1 NY Rangers 4, Chicago 3 Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 2 Anaheim 3, Minnesota 0 Winnipeg 5, Nashville 1 Los Angeles 2, Dallas 1 Saturday Anaheim at New Jersey, noon Los Angeles at Colorado, 2 p.m. Ottawa at Blues, 6 p.m. Rangers at Boston, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Montreal, 6 p.m. San Jose at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Dallas, 6 p.m. Florida at Nashville, 7 p.m. Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Pittsburgh at Vegas, 9 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Sunday Washington at Chicago, 11:30 a.m. Anaheim at Islanders, 2 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Arizona at Toronto, 6 p.m. Carolina at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. Monday Nashville at Colorado, 2 p.m. Blues at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Minnesota at Vegas, 5 p.m. San Jose at Florida, 6 p.m.

Berglund glad he’s not playing

Friday

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Philadelphia Boston Brooklyn New York Southeast Miami Charlotte Washington Orlando Atlanta Central Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland

W 34 30 27 24 10 W 21 21 19 19 14 W 32 29 20 10 9

L 13 16 18 23 34 L 22 23 26 26 30 L 12 15 24 35 37

Pct .723 .652 .600 .511 .227 Pct .488 .477 .422 .422 .318 Pct .727 .659 .455 .222 .196

GB — 3½ 6 10 22½ GB — ½ 3 3 7½ GB — 3 12 22½ 24

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 7-3 1-9 L10 5-5 4-6 6-4 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 7-3 4-6 1-9 1-9

Str W-1 W-3 W-2 W-3 L-5 Str L-2 W-2 W-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-3 L-1 W-2 L-9 L-2

Home 19-4 19-4 17-5 12-11 4-14 Home 11-12 15-8 14-8 12-12 8-11 Home 20-4 15-6 13-10 5-16 5-17

Away 15-9 11-12 10-13 12-12 6-20 Away 10-10 6-15 5-18 7-14 6-19 Away 12-8 14-9 7-14 5-19 4-20

Conf 22-8 20-13 18-10 17-12 6-25 Conf 11-16 17-12 12-17 13-12 10-21 Conf 21-7 22-8 14-16 7-18 7-22

Home 18-6 16-7 15-6 16-6 11-10 Home 19-4 14-7 19-7 13-8 15-8 Home 18-6 14-9 15-9 14-10 7-17

Away 9-14 9-12 6-18 4-18 8-16 Away 11-10 12-11 8-12 13-13 6-16 Away 13-8 10-11 10-12 9-12 4-18

Conf 20-14 16-12 12-15 12-19 13-15 Conf 18-9 16-14 14-16 14-12 11-17 Conf 19-10 17-14 17-14 13-18 7-20

Boston 122, Memphis 116 Brooklyn 117, Orlando 115 Detroit 98, Miami 93 San Antonio 116, Minnesota 113 Utah 115, Cleveland 99 Golden State at Clippers, late New Orleans at Portland, late Thursday Washington 101, New York 100 Charlotte 114, Sacramento 95 Philadelphia 120, Indiana 96 Toronto 111, Phoenix 109 Denver 135, Chicago 105 Lakers 138, Okla. City 128, OT Saturday Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest San Antonio Houston New Orleans Dallas Memphis Northwest Denver Oklahoma City Portland Utah Minnesota Pacific Golden State LA Clippers LA Lakers Sacramento Phoenix

W 27 25 21 20 19 W 30 26 27 26 21 W 31 24 25 23 11

L 20 19 24 24 26 L 14 18 19 21 24 L 14 20 21 22 35

Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m.

Pct GB .574 — .568 ½ .467 5 .455 5½ .422 7 Pct GB .682 — .591 4 .587 4 .553 5½ .467 9½ Pct GB .689 — .545 6½ .543 6½ .511 8 .239 20½

L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 4-6 1-9 L10 7-3 4-6 7-3 8-2 5-5 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 2-8

Str W-2 L-1 L-1 L-2 L-4 Str W-1 L-2 W-1 W-6 L-2 Str W-6 L-4 W-2 L-1 L-2

Dallas at Indiana, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 6 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m. Lakers at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m. Sunday Charlotte at Indiana, 5 p.m. Clippers at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

Irving, Celtics top Grizzlies

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrik Berglund (left), who played 10 seasons for the Blues, has no regrets about leaving the Sabres this season. “I just knew I had to go home to find myself again,’’ he said. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrik Berglund tells Sweden’s Hockeypuls.se he feels at peace and has no regrets after abruptly ending his hockey career by walking away from the Buffalo Sabres a little over two months into the season. “I just knew I had to go home to find myself again,” Berglund told the publication in speaking for the first time since the Sabres terminated the final three and a half years left on his contract last month. The Sabres acted after suspending Berglund on Dec. 15 when he failed to report for the game at Washington. Berglund was interviewed at his home in Vasteras, Sweden. The story was published in Swedish on Friday and translated by Google.

Berglund says he lost some of his passion for hockey last summer after being traded to Buffalo by the Blues. Berglund was the Blues’ first-round draft pick in 2006 and spent 10 seasons in St. Louis. He says he had difficulty handling the move and eventually became tired of trying to hide his frustrations. Berglund says his emotions had nothing to do with playing in Buffalo, and he apologized to the Sabres for letting them down. Berglund provided no indication about his plans. He added he’s not concerned about walking away from the remainder of his five-year, $19.25 million contract. “My contract, and all the money I gave up means nothing,” Berglund said. “I can give up that amount at any time to feel good inside.”

Islanders 2, Capitals 0

Goals against

NY Islanders 0 0 2 — 2 Washington 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Backstrom, WSH, (hooking), 0:10; Cizikas, NYI, (tripping), 8:17. Second period: None. Penalties: Pelech, NYI, (holding), 0:57; Dowd, WSH, (tripping), 16:13. Third period: 1, NY Islanders, Bailey 11 (Barzal, Pelech), 5:08. 2, NY Islanders, Clutterbuck 4 (Pelech, Cizikas), 7:34. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 11-9-5: 25. Washington 7-8-4: 19. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 2; Washington 0 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 14-8-1 (19 shots-19 saves). Washington, Holtby 17-11-2 (25-23). A: 18,605. Referees: Marc Joannette, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Andrew Smith.

Name Lehner Campbell Bishop Rask Halak Khudobin Fleury Vasilevskiy McElhinney Rittich Rinne Andersen DeSmith Saros Price Greiss Dubnyk Koskinen Kuemper Gibson Howard Jones Mrazek Hutton Nilsson Markstrom Quick Hellebuyck Holtby Ullmark Varlamov Copley Murray Bobrovsky Korpisalo Domingue Smith

Montreal 1 1 2 — 4 Columbus 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Montreal, Tatar 15 (Weber, Chaput), 6:44. Penalties: Bjorkstrand, CBJ, (slashing), 12:44; Stenlund, CBJ, (hooking), 20:00. Second period: 2, Montreal, Tatar 16 (Gallagher, Danault), 8:27. Penalties: Kotkaniemi, MTL, (hooking), 4:17; Anderson, CBJ, (hooking), 11:58; Domi, MTL, (holding), 12:55. Third period: 3, Columbus, Bjorkstrand 7 (Jones, Nash), 5:17. 4, Montreal, Armia 5 (Domi, Weber), 17:46. 5, Montreal, Armia 6 (Petry, Domi), 18:48. Penalties: None. Shots: Montreal 9-7-10: 26. Columbus 15-10-10: 35. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Columbus 0 of 2. Goalies: Montreal, Price 19-13-4 (35 shots-34 saves). Columbus, Korpisalo 9-3-2 (25-22). A: 18,892. Referees: Wes McCauley, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Devin Berg.

Senators 4, Hurricanes 1 Ottawa 1 3 0 — 4 Carolina 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Ottawa, Paajarvi 4 (Smith, Ceci), 15:47. Penalties: Borowiecki, OTT, (interference), 4:17; Dzingel, OTT, (tripping), 7:59; Ferland, CAR, Major (fighting), 18:48; Borowiecki, OTT, Major (fighting), 18:48; Ferland, CAR, served by Williams, (roughing), 18:48. Second period: 2, Ottawa, Ryan 10 (Dzingel, Duchene), 7:26. 3, Ottawa, Stone 22 (Tierney), 7:39. 4, Carolina, Foegele 6, 11:24. 5, Ottawa, Wolanin 3 (Ceci, Tkachuk), 16:25. Penalties: None. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Shots: Ottawa 8-11-7: 26. Carolina 10-12-12: 34. Power-plays: Ottawa 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Nilsson 7-11-1 (34 shots-33 saves). Carolina, Mrazek 9-10-2 (26-22). A: 15,598. Referees: Pierre Lambert, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Bryan Pancich.

Panthers 3, Maple Leafs 1 Toronto 1 0 0 — 1 Florida 2 0 1 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Hainsey 4 (Rielly, Kapanen), 1:49. 2, Florida, Hoffman 23 (Bjugstad, Yandle), 9:02. 3, Florida, Matheson 3 (Trocheck, Huberdeau), 14:59. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (hooking), 4:27; Dadonov, FLA, (high sticking), 5:13. Second period: None. Penalties: Johnsson, TOR, (hooking), 15:38. Third period: 4, Florida, Vatrano 14 (Pysyk), 18:14. Penalties: Gardiner, TOR, (cross checking), 2:15. Shots: Toronto 4-8-9: 21. Florida 13-9-7: 29. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 1; Florida 0 of 3. Goalies: Toronto, Sparks 6-3-1 (28 shots-26 saves). Florida, Luongo 9-11-1 (21-20). A: 16,741.

FROM NEWS SERVICES

Kyrie Irving scored 20 of his 38 points in the third quarter and the host Boston Celtics held off the Memphis Grizzlies 122-116 on Friday night. Marcus Smart had 20 points and Al Horford finished with 18 for the Celtics, who have won two straight since a threegame losing streak. Irving also had 11 assists and seven rebounds for Boston, which beat the Grizzlies for the seventh consecutive time but had to hang on down the stretch. Memphis trailed only 111-108 with 3:13 left, but the Celtics responded with a 10-2 run.

NOTEBOOK Lakers’ Rondo progresses • The Los An-

NHL SUMMARIES

Canadiens 4, Blue Jackets 1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston’s Kyrie Irving goes to the basket past Memphis’ JaMychal Green on Friday night. Irving scored 38 points, lifting the Celtics to a 122-116 homecourt victory.

Team NYI LAK DAL BOS BOS DAL VGK TBL CAR CGY NSH TOR PIT NSH MTL NYI MIN EDM ARI ANA DET SJS CAR BUF OTT, VAN VAN LAK WPG WSH BUF COL WSH PIT CBJ CBJ TBL CGY

GAA 2.11 2.13 2.38 2.42 2.46 2.46 2.48 2.48 2.50 2.50 2.51 2.53 2.53 2.58 2.60 2.62 2.64 2.65 2.68 2.68 2.71 2.72 2.74 2.75 2.76 2.80 2.80 2.82 2.85 2.86 2.88 2.91 2.91 2.93 2.95 2.99 3.00

W-L-OT 14-7-3 6-9-0 15-12-2 14-8-3 13-8-2 8-9-2 26-12-4 19-6-2 11-6-1 17-4-4 17-12-3 21-10-1 12-8-4 11-5-1 19-13-4 13-8-1 17-16-3 14-8-1 9-11-3 16-15-8 13-12-5 22-8-4 9-10-2 14-14-3 7-11-1 18-12-5 8-11-3 21-13-1 17-10-2 10-3-3 12-11-5 10-4-3 13-6-1 19-13-1 9-3-2 16-4-0 13-9-1

Points leaders Name Kucherov Gaudreau Rantanen McDavid MacKinnon Kane Point Marner Wheeler Scheifele Monahan Draisaitl Pastrnak Tkachuk Lindholm Crosby Stamkos Ovechkin Tavares Landeskog Panarin Marchand Giroux Burns Aho Kessel Eichel Stone Malkin

Team TBL CGY COL EDM COL CHI TBL TOR WPG WPG CGY EDM BOS CGY CGY PIT TBL WSH TOR COL CBJ BOS PHI SJS CAR PIT BUF OTT PIT

G 22 28 21 29 27 27 30 19 9 25 25 24 27 24 21 20 24 33 29 28 18 18 14 9 21 18 16 22 14

A 54 43 50 41 41 38 33 41 51 33 33 32 28 31 34 35 30 19 23 24 34 34 38 43 30 33 35 28 36

P 76 71 71 70 68 65 63 60 60 58 58 56 55 55 55 55 54 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 51 51 51 50 50

geles Lakers medical staff has cleared Rajon Rondo to participate in full-contact practices as he recovers from hand surgery last month. Rondo tore a ligament in his right ring finger Dec. 25 in Oakland and had surgery to repair the injury three days later. It was the second operation he had on that hand this year. He also broke the third metacarpal bone on his right hand Nov. 14 and had surgery to repair that injury Nov. 15. Bulls’ Carter to miss significant time • The Chicago Bulls expect prized rookie center Wendell Carter Jr. to miss eight to 12 weeks because of a left thumb injury. The team said Friday that surgery has been recommended for Carter, who was hurt Tuesday against the Lakers.

NBA SUMMARIES Nets 117, Magic 115

Jazz 115, Cavaliers 99

Brooklyn: Graham 2-8 1-1 6, Kurucs 1-2 0-0 2, Allen 2-6 2-3 6, Russell 16-25 0-0 40, Harris 4-13 0-0 11, Hollis-Jefferson 1-7 0-0 2, Carroll 5-9 0-2 10, Davis 3-3 2-2 8, Dinwiddie 6-11 5-7 20, Napier 4-13 0-0 12. Totals 44-97 10-15 117. Orlando: Isaac 4-10 1-2 9, Gordon 9-13 2-2 23, Vucevic 7-20 1-1 16, Augustin 7-10 1-2 17, Fournier 6-16 3-3 16, Iwundu 2-3 1-1 6, Bamba 4-6 0-0 9, Briscoe 3-6 0-0 6, Ross 5-10 2-3 13. Totals 47-94 11-14 115. Brooklyn 25 29 32 31 — 117 Orlando 32 35 28 20 — 115 3-point goals: Brooklyn 19-46 (Russell 8-12, Napier 4-11, Dinwiddie 3-7, Harris 3-8, Graham 1-5, Carroll 0-3), Orlando 10-26 (Gordon 3-4, Augustin 2-4, Iwundu 1-1, Bamba 1-2, Fournier 1-2, Vucevic 1-3, Ross 1-5, Briscoe 0-2, Isaac 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 41 (Allen 10), Orlando 49 (Vucevic 17). Assists: Brooklyn 24 (Russell 7), Orlando 26 (Vucevic 6). Total fouls: Brooklyn 19, Orlando 18. A: 17,840 (18,846).

Cleveland: Hood 1-6 2-2 4, Osman 3-7 0-0 7, Zizic 7-12 1-2 15, Sexton 4-12 5-6 15, Burks 3-11 0-1 6, Blossomgame 4-4 3-4 11, Frye 1-5 2-3 4, Payne 5-9 4-4 14, Dellavedova 4-8 1-1 10, Clarkson 4-13 2-3 13. Totals 36-87 20-26 99. Utah: Ingles 4-6 0-0 9, Favors 4-11 4-4 12, Gobert 8-10 3-3 19, Mitchell 9-15 4-5 24, O’Neale 6-8 0-0 16, Crowder 4-11 1-1 11, Udoh 0-2 0-0 0, Cavanaugh 1-3 0-0 2, Niang 3-5 0-0 8, Korver 3-5 0-0 7, Allen 2-9 2-2 7, Mitrou-Long 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-85 14-15 115. Cleveland 20 17 23 39 — 99 Utah 29 32 32 22 — 115 3-point goals: Cleveland 7-24 (Clarkson 3-6, Sexton 2-2, Osman 1-3, Dellavedova 1-3, Payne 0-2, Burks 0-2, Hood 0-2, Frye 0-4), Utah 13-37 (O’Neale 4-5, Niang 2-4, Mitchell 2-5, Crowder 2-8, Korver 1-3, Ingles 1-3, Allen 1-6, Cavanaugh 0-1, Favors 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 37 (Zizic 10), Utah 48 (Gobert 15). Assists: Cleveland 16 (Payne, Dellavedova 3), Utah 33 (Ingles 8). Total fouls: Cleveland 19, Utah 22. Technicals: Ingles. A: 18,306 (18,306).

Spurs 116, T’Wolves 113 Pistons 98, Heat 93 Miami: McGruder 4-8 0-0 11, J.Johnson 3-7 0-0 7, Whiteside 4-6 0-8 8, T.Johnson 5-12 3-4 16, Winslow 6-17 0-2 15, Jones Jr. 1-2 0-0 2, Olynyk 1-3 1-3 3, Adebayo 4-4 1-1 9, Ellington 0-1 0-0 0, Wade 10-14 0-1 20, Waiters 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 39-77 5-19 93. Detroit: Bullock 7-13 2-3 19, Griffin 10-24 9-11 32, Drummond 0-1 0-0 0, Jackson 3-8 2-2 9, Brown 1-3 0-0 2, S.Johnson 5-7 0-0 12, Pachulia 1-3 0-0 2, Galloway 0-5 0-0 0, Calderon 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Kennard 8-17 2-2 22. Totals 35-82 15-18 98. Miami 17 22 30 24 — Detroit 30 23 12 33 — 3-point goals: Miami 10-29 (McGruder 3-5, Winslow 3-7, T.Johnson 3-8, J.Johnson 1-3, Ellington 0-1, Waiters 0-1, Wade 0-2, Olynyk 0-2), Detroit 13-33 (Kennard 4-8, Bullock 3-8, Griffin 3-9, S.Johnson 2-3, Jackson 1-2, Galloway 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 45 (Whiteside 10), Detroit 42 (Griffin 11). Assists: Miami 25 (Wade 8), Detroit 23 (Griffin 9). Total fouls: Miami 20, Detroit 20. A: 17,228 (20,491).

93 98

Celtics 122, Grizzlies 116 Memphis: Temple 3-8 0-0 8, Jackson Jr. 8-16 5-7 23, Gasol 1-10 2-2 4, Conley 9-18 4-4 26, Holiday 5-12 2-2 14, Casspi 5-7 0-0 12, Green 4-6 2-2 12, Noah 0-2 2-2 2, Mack 6-13 1-1 15, Carter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-92 18-20 116. Boston: Tatum 0-6 2-2 2, Morris 4-12 0-0 8, Horford 8-10 0-0 18, Irving 14-21 6-9 38, Smart 7-9 0-0 20, Hayward 2-7 4-6 8, Brown 4-7 2-2 12, Theis 0-0 0-0 0, Yabusele 0-0 0-0 0, Baynes 2-6 2-2 6, Rozier 3-8 1-1 10. Totals 44-86 17-22 122. Memphis 24 38 29 25 — 116 Boston 35 23 38 26 — 122 3-point goals: Memphis 16-35 (Conley 4-9, Casspi 2-2, Green 2-2, Mack 2-3, Jackson Jr. 2-3, Holiday 2-5, Temple 2-7, Gasol 0-4), Boston 17-38 (Smart 6-8, Irving 4-6, Rozier 3-7, Horford 2-3, Brown 2-4, Baynes 0-1, Tatum 0-2, Hayward 0-2, Morris 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 39 (Gasol 11), Boston 52 (Baynes 12). Assists: Memphis 33 (Gasol 12), Boston 29 (Irving 11). Total fouls: Memphis 22, Boston 20. Technicals: Mack, Irving. A: 18,624 (18,624).

San Antonio: Gay 9-14 4-5 22, Aldridge 8-20 9-12 25, Gasol 1-2 1-2 3, Forbes 3-9 2-2 10, White 6-8 1-1 15, Cunningham 2-2 0-0 4, Bertans 4-5 0-1 11, Poeltl 2-2 0-0 4, Mills 1-6 0-0 3, Belinelli 5-14 6-6 19. Totals 41-82 23-29 116. Minnesota: Wiggins 7-12 0-2 17, Gibson 5-9 4-6 14, Towns 8-17 6-6 23, Teague 4-8 6-8 15, Okogie 3-7 3-3 10, Tolliver 0-2 2-2 2, Saric 1-5 0-0 2, Dieng 2-5 0-0 5, Bayless 1-3 0-0 2, Rose 6-16 11-11 23. Totals 37-84 32-38 113. San Antonio 28 30 30 28 — 116 Minnesota 31 27 32 23 — 113 3-point goals: San Antonio 11-24 (Bertans 3-4, Belinelli 3-8, White 2-2, Forbes 2-4, Mills 1-5, Gay 0-1), Minnesota 7-26 (Wiggins 3-5, Dieng 1-1, Teague 1-3, Okogie 1-4, Towns 1-6, Tolliver 0-2, Saric 0-2, Rose 0-3). Fouled out: Towns. Rebounds: San Antonio 41 (Aldridge 9), Minnesota 44 (Gibson 11). Assists: San Antonio 24 (Mills 8), Minnesota 21 (Teague, Rose 6). Total fouls: San Antonio 25, Minnesota 28. Technicals: San Antonio coach Spurs (Defensive three second), Minnesota coach Timberwolves (Defensive three second), Teague. A: 17,222 (19,356).

Leaders Prior to Friday’s games Scoring Harden, HOU Curry, GOL Davis, NOR Durant, GOL Leonard, TOR James, LAL Embiid, PHL George, OKC Antetokounmpo, MIL Lillard, POR Griffin, DET Walker, CHA Beal, WAS Booker, PHX LaVine, CHI Irving, BOS Towns, MIN Thompson, GOL Westbrook, OKC

G 41 34 40 45 36 34 43 43 41 46 41 44 45 33 39 39 44 45 36

FG 420 337 421 439 347 340 384 389 401 394 356 383 418 286 316 339 356 385 303

FT 411 156 294 303 237 180 336 220 264 279 237 199 167 162 190 113 189 86 136

PTS 1450 1014 1176 1270 995 928 1156 1145 1082 1203 1046 1108 1119 808 890 889 978 983 784

AVG 35.4 29.8 29.4 28.2 27.6 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.4 26.2 25.5 25.2 24.9 24.5 22.8 22.8 22.2 21.8 21.8


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WINTER WARM-UP

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Mozeliak to visit Ozuna

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Molina defends the city’s honor HOCHMAN • FROM D1

On trip to Dominican, Cards exec will check on injury rehab BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As part of a planned visit to the Dominican Republic to mark a milestone for the organization’s future, Cardinals executive John Mozeliak intends to make a side trip next week to check in on an essential part of the team’s present. Outfielder Marcell Ozuna, who had surgery on his right shoulder earlier this offseason to address pain that limited him all of last season, has assured the team he will “be ready” for spring training. He has elected to house his rehab work in the Dominican instead of Jupiter, Fla., and that has left the team to check in remotely on Ozuna’s progress toward a throwing program. Mozeliak added that he couldn’t confirm whether Ozuna had started hitting. “I think he’ll be ready to go in spring. I’m not overly concerned,” said Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, who is headed to the Dominican to attend the first graduation at the team’s new academy. “He’s going to spend the remainder of his offseason in the Dominican Republic, which is not ideal in terms of our medical staff being able to get a firm grasp of where he’s at. … Hopefully, I can get a sense of where he is. Candidly, with three weeks remaining before we go (to spring training), there’s not a lot you can do. He has promised me he will be ready, so I guess I’ll have to take him at his word.” As the Cardinals near the report date for spring, Ozuna and reliever Luke Gregerson stand out as medical uncertainties. Reliever Brett Cecil has slimmed down, Mozeliak said, and will have no limitations entering spring. Gregerson’s offseason “has not been perfect.” The veteran righthander was limited by shoulder and knee troubles in 2018, and arm issues have persisted during his throwing this winter. Mozeliak said Gregerson is “trying to put the pieces back together a little bit.” The Cardinals began the offseason by reaching out to all players on the 40-man roster with information about their performance and suggested improvements or workouts they could incorporate in the winter. Mozeliak said the team wanted to share “accountability” with the player — and not go months between one season’s end and spring’s start without conversation. Of chief interest to the team was assuring that injured players, like Ozuna, stick with a rehab and strengthening program that wouldn’t limit them in February. Ozuna reported to spring training a year ago unable to throw at full strength because of an impingement in his shoulder, and what started as a limited throwing program leaked into the season, when he struggled to throw hard. Ozuna said his arm would go numb for stretches. The soreness also sapped him of power.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals pitcher Carlos Martinez holds Jenston Smith, 16 months old, while his mom snaps a photo Saturday at Winter Warm-Up at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch.

Asked if the Cardinals could handle Ozuna repeating last year’s production and sore-shoulder issues, Mozeliak said: “I think it would be good enough for this current team. If he’s better, even better. “Last year he was injured quite a bit and wouldn’t even opt out of the lineup, so he’s going to show up and he’s going to be a positive contributor,” Mozeliak said. “The question would be how much, but I don’t know if being in Jupiter vs. being in the Dominican would’ve changed the outcome of that.”

‘HUGE’ YEAR FOR REYES Rookie pitcher Alex Reyes and Mozeliak agreed on the adjective to describe the importance of this coming season for the longtime prospect who hopes to have health on his side. “Huge,” they said. “My first comment on Alex Reyes should be: It’s a huge season for him,” Mozeliak elaborated. “In other words, when you’ve had two lost years, the clock is ticking.” Reyes, 24, missed 2017 recovering from elbow surgery, and four innings into 2018 his shoulder came undone. Another surgery ended his season. Reyes threw off a mound twice this past week — his first throws from the rubber since surgery. By Feb. 1, the Cardinals intend to have a feel for whether he can start spring training with the other pitchers or be on a slower throwing program than others. The Cardinals intend to prepare Reyes as a starter so that he can handle multiple innings, but his role will be dictated by team need and his readiness. Mozeliak said the team does not want to reach the end of the year and have Reyes shoulder only 50 innings. The Cardinals intend to get him the workload necessary to be a factor in 2019 and as a starter in 2020.

“I would love to be a starter — that’s what I’ve been doing my whole career,” Reyes said. “But whatever the team needs, whatever is going to land me on that 25man roster is what I’m willing to do.”

FOWLER: STOCK IN BONDS No longer encumbered by a foot injury that lingered or a “rut” that sank his season, Dexter Fowler has returned to full baseball activity and recently got an encouraging text from his mentor, Barry Bonds. “He goes, ‘It’s perfect. Your swing is perfect,’” Fowler said, recalling the message. “Any time you have one of the greatest to ever play the game say your swing is perfect, you’re doing something right.” Fowler had sent Bonds video of his swing work and asked for feedback after the two had spent some time working this winter. The Cardinals right fielder had to return to a protective boot around his foot in October, and that delayed his offseason workouts by a month, though it didn’t cut into the time he usually spends hitting in the offseason. EXTRA BASES Kolten Wong returned home to Hawaii this offseason and saw the damage from volcanic lava that blazed across the island, about 25 miles from his boyhood home, and he stressed that the extent of the destruction wasn’t conveyed by coverage. “TV does a really good job of playing down such a traumatic event like that,” he said. ... Justin Williams, the outfielder acquired from Tampa Bay in the Tommy Pham trade, arrived at Winter Warm-Up with a splint on his right hand. He fractured fingers punching a television in mid-December — a lashing out that he said was “personal.” A member of the 40-man roster, he will be late to spring training.

It all started with a boy named Jack and a boat FREDERICKSON • FROM D1

Thursday, one day before a baseball executive with no known family history of blindness was honored for spending the last decade fighting to save strangers’ sight. Let’s start with the boat. It belonged to Jack Morris. Jack, now 15, was 3 when his parents, Jason and Leslie Morris, took him to get glasses. But curbs kept catching Jack’s shoes. Bushes along the sidewalk still jumped out at him. When his peers scurried up steps on Halloween, Jack stuck close to mom and dad. It got worse at night. It was not until his parents bought Jack, then 5, a wooden model ship that the magnitude of Jack’s obstacle became known. The kit came with glow-in-thedark paint. The father and son rushed into the bathroom, closed the door and waited in the shadows. “Wow, look at that,” the father said as the boat began to glow. “What?” the son replied, not noticing the change. A blitz of tests led to a phone call on Dec. 31, 2008. Jack had been diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited retinal disease. There is no known treatment or cure. Doctors warned that Jack could continue to lose his vision over time. A devastated family decided to act. Jason and Leslie Morris attended a Foundation Fighting Blindness meeting and eventually decided to launch the St. Louis chapter’s first Dining in the Dark dinner. They discovered a powerful partner at Busch Stadium. If everything went according to plan during the 10th annual Dining in the Dark on Friday night at the Ritz Carlton, the dinner will have raised more than 3 million dollars since its inception in 2010. The formula is simple. Celebrate a prominent name in town. Raise awareness. Most importantly, raise money. The event, which asks participants to wear blackout blindfolds for a portion of the meal, increases awareness of the impact of retinal diseases. The dollars donated help fund sight-saving research. The combination is powerful. “When I finally took the blindfold off, it took a second for my eyesight to come back,” Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong said after he and center fielder Harrison

PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE MORRIS FAMILY

Jack Morris and his father, Jason Morris, with the Cardinals’ John Mozeliak.

Bader were honorary co-chairs at this year’s dinner. “I had a realization,” DeJong said. “I’m thankful I can take it off.” The Morris family credits Mozeliak. “John Mozeliak is an extraordinary human being with a heart of gold,” Leslie Morris said. “His involvement with the FFB has allowed us to raise this kind of money.” He credits them. “Jason, Leslie, their family deserves a lion’s share of the credit, if not all of it,” Mozeliak said. FedEx deserves an assist. That’s how Jason Morris sent his introductory letter to Mozeliak. Knowing he needed to make a splash if the first dinner was not going to become the last, he took a big swing and asked Mozeliak to be the first honoree. Mozeliak, then a general manager, played ball. “You get a lot of requests,” Mozeliak recalled. “What should you respond to? What should you say yes to? His letter, it needed a response. So, I took the meeting.” Over a lunch, Jason Morris told a story about a boat that glowed for him, but not for his son. “That struck a chord with me,” said Mozeliak, a father of two. Jason Morris made Mozeliak a promise about being the first face of what, at the time, remained a mysterious event. “I won’t embarrass you,” he pledged. Mozeliak was interested, but he wanted to meet Jack. He invited the father and son to a Cardinals game. He taught Jack how to keep score and had ice cream delivered to the suite. When the Cardinals fell behind, Jason Morris saw a subtle shift in Mozeliak’s

mood. He was not missing a pitch, even while interacting with his son. It was his first glimpse of Mozeliak’s competitive nature. It wouldn’t be the last. Mozeliak agreed to be an honoree. Then he surprised Jason Morris with a promise of his own. A single-season contract had been extended. “I’m going to help you,” Mozeliak said. Strangers became partners, then friends. Jason Morris has mastered one of the best Mozeliak impressions you can find. Having said that, Mozeliak can list off Jack’s accomplishments with pride. He praises the MICDS student’s “unbelievable energy” despite significantly impaired vision that is strong on the peripherals and in the middle, but dark in between. Jason Morris says it’s like his son is looking through a scuba mask on land. Yet Jack is a class president and wrestler who can surf and play guitar. Dining in the Dark, backed by Mozeliak’s name and network, has had years that more than quadrupled the $100,216 raised at the inaugural event. Mozeliak has recruited Matt Holliday, Trevor Rosenthal and Matt Carpenter as previous honorees. He has landed big donors and made big donations. The constant competitor is always looking for new leads. “We are making headway,” Mozeliak said. “Our fundraising has been validated by there being trials for specifically (Jack’s) mutation. It’s remarkable.” A research project FFB recently donated $10 million toward received approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The treatment helped save and restore the vision of a young girl who had been told she would lose her sight. This news inspires. “Jack’s vision, currently, is OK,” Jason Morris said. “And we are very hopeful by the time it would be something that is a major issue, the Foundation Fighting Blindness, as a result of great work by people like Mo, is going to have a solution for him. That’s our push, to find that answer before he needs it. Before he really needs it.” Mozeliak has helped push for a decade and counting. He’s not about to stop now. “You are always trying to leave something better than you found it,” he said. “That’s a good way of knowing if you helped.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

So boring. I always get asked, ‘Where would you like to play? Where would you not like to play?’ St. Louis is on the list of places I don’t like to play. It is rough.” Dempster laughed and said, “When I was getting traded, and they were like, ‘Hey, how about St. Louis?’ I’m like, ‘Zero chance in hell.’” So on Saturday, Yadier Molina posted a few photos on Instagram of Bryant and Dempster — including one of Dempster allowing a homer to the Cardinals’ Lance Berkman. And under the photos, the Cardinals’ catcher wrote: “All stars, elite players and leaders of their teams do not speak bad about any city. There should be respect and you should play and compete with respect ... only stupid players and losers make comments like the ones made by bryant and dempster.” It was many things. It was awesome. It was petty. It was funny. It was silly. It was, most importantly, everything that makes Yadi Yadi — he’s unabashedly passionate about his team and town. And it ignited the Cards-Cubs rivalry in the middle of January. The stakes have seldom been higher for the Cardinals — they’ve missed the playoffs for three consecutive seasons, the first time since 1997-99. They acquired an MVP candidate and an AllStar, game-altering reliever. And the Cubs, after winning it all in 2016, have been bounced from the postseason the past two Octobers. But the Cards have more to prove. And yes, we’re talking about silly social media posts here. But if anything, it showed how fired up some of these Cardinals are heading into spring training. And fans should love that. In an era of bro-hugs and gushing mutual respect, it should stoke your winter fire that Yadier Molina, the thumping heart of the Cardinals, might actually feel about the Cubs what you feel about the Cubs. And Yadi took to Instagram Saturday to defend the city from verbal attack from enemies afar. He even made a hashtag: #QuevivaStlouis And perhaps the biggest impact of Molina’s post? It pumped up Marcell Ozuna. In October, Cards president of baseball operations John Mozeliak was candid about accountability with players such as Ozuna, preparing their bodies properly in the offseason. “We can show you where the water is, but we can’t make you drink,” Mozeliak said at the time. “I think in his case he’s going to have to take that very seriously.” On Saturday at Winter WarmUp, Mozeliak shared he didn’t know whether Ozuna, recovering from shoulder surgery, had begun hitting yet — and that Mozeliak wished Ozuna was spending the offseason near the Cards’ complex in Florida, not home in the Dominican Republic. But Mozeliak will visit Ozuna next week in the DR, and Mozeliak said he’s received verbal assurance from Ozuna that “he’ll be ready” for 2019. It is, after all, kind of a big year for everyone involved, from the Cards to the free-agent-to-be. But on Saturday, Ozuna sure sounded ready and hungry for Cubs pitching. He chimed in on Yadi’s Instagram post, saying the following about those Cubs: “From outside they speak and talk like (a) Tiger but at the end they (are) gonna be like (a) little cat.” Unsure whether this was an ancient proverb or an Ozuna original, I Googled the phrase, which took me to a video called “6 Things Your Cat Is Saying to You.” So we’ll see in spring training if Ozuna’s shoulder is recovered and properly strengthened for the season, but at least it’s nice to know the Cards’ projected cleanup hitter is fired up. Also fired up? Matt Carpenter, who responded to the Molina Instagram with the fire emoji. Who else responded? By deadline Saturday night, nearly 4,000 comments were on Molina’s Instagram — and Yadi himself responded to some of the negative ones with emotional emojis or messages. On Saturday afternoon, while Dexter Fowler — the Cards outfielder and former Cub — was signing autographs at Winter Warm-Up, “I was like, ‘Why is my phone blowing up?’” Fowler shared. “My wife and my daughter are home sick, so I was like, ‘Oh, I hope it was nothing (with them).’ I look at it and it’s Yadi, (Adam) Wainwright, everybody, they’re all just texting. I get 50 text messages, and I’m like, ‘What is going on?’... “I think it’s good for the rivalry. These are going to be some fun games. I’m looking forward to the Cardinals fans coming out and showing up. ... Yadi is a fiery guy, which is awesome. I love it.” As for the division, Fowler said of the NL Central: “You have the Brewers, and I know the Reds picked up some people. It’s a good division, a really good division. Every game is going to be a battle. I love it. Playing meaningful games all the time is awesome.” The last Cubs-Cards game was meaningless. It was Sept. 30 at Wrigley Field, the final game of the regular season, and the Cards had been eliminated from playoff contention the day before. First Cards-Cubs game this season? May 3. And this year, the final three games of the season are Cards-Cubs at Busch Stadium. They’ll be meaningful.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 1

BOYS BASKETBALL • ST. CHARLES WEST 55, ST. CHARLES 54

FRIDAY’S RESULTS

Warriors start fast, hang on to end five-game skid against rival Pirates BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. CHARLES • Josh Anderson

counted the days. And hours. And minutes. And even seconds. The St. Charles West senior winger couldn’t wait for another shot at rival St. Charles after the Warriors dropped a one-point thriller in the season opener back in November. “I was so pumped up,” Anderson said. He certainly played like it. Anderson scored a game-high 26 points as West extracted a measure of revenge with a nail-biting 55-54 win over St. Charles in a Gateway Athletic Conference North Division showdown Friday before an overflow crowd at St. Charles High. West broke a five-game losing streak to its rival and captured its first win in the series since a 67-46 triumph on Feb. 19, 2016. “It’s a fantastic feeling,” West coach Pat Steinhoff said “We really felt like we should have had the first one. That made getting this one even more important.” West led until the final three seconds of the first meeting. St. Charles senior Cameron Teson sank a pair of foul shots with 3 seconds left for that 58-57 triumph Thanksgiving week. The properly inspired Warriors led from start to finish Friday, building a 17-point lead in the second quarter and a 10-point cushion late in the third period before holding off a late rally. “This is so much fun, I wish we could do it again,” Anderson said. St. Charles West senior Trent Champagne added 18 points to the winning attack. The Warriors (11-6, 4-1) have won three in a row and four of five. St.

MICHAEL GULLEDGE • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

St. Charles West’s Josh Anderson puts up a shot against St. Charles on Friday.

Charles (9-7, 3-1) has lost four of six. Anderson’s 3-pointer early in the final period put the visitors up 49-41. St. Charles battled back, but could get no closer than the final score. Teson recorded a 3-point play with less than a second remaining to round out the final score. West came out with a point to prove from the opening whistle, bolting to 7-0 lead. “Our guys were tough and were not going to give up,” Steinhoff said. “This is going to make the next few days awfully fun.” West now has bragging right after its first win over St. Charles in 1,064 days. “Great rivalry,” Anderson said. “We love playing them and I’m sure they love playing us.” The teams could meet again in the postseason. Both teams are in Class 4 District 7. West bolted out to a 13-2 lead on the strength of the outside shooting of Champagne and Anderson. Brendan Sportsman capped off

the early St. Charles West blitz with a steal and layup. The Warriors stretched the advantage to 24-7 on a coast-to-coast layup by Champagne, who scored 33 points in the earlier meeting between the teams. St. Charles closed the half on a 14-3 run over the final 4:21. Magnus Kloepper’s trey with a six seconds left brought the Pirates to within 27-21 at the break. The Pirates had to battle through some early foul trouble. Teson, who is averaging 14 points per game, picked up his second foul just 3:54 into the contest. He finished with 12 points, but only had three in the opening half. Braden Wiggs, who led St. Charles with 17 points, fueled a late charge with his first 3-pointer of the season midway through the final period. His stick-back with 8 seconds left trimmed the deficit to 54-51. But Champagne hit one of two foul shots two seconds later to seal the victory.

BOYS BASKETBALL • ALTON 64, TRINITY 62

Redbirds reach Belleville East final with comeback victory over Titans (9-5) in the title game at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The Red Devils defeated Soldan in the other semifinal and will be shooting for their third consecutive title at Belleville East. Trinity fell to 13-1. “The game consists of momentum,” Titans coach Jeff McCaw said. “The first half, we played well. The second half, Alton came out (with) high energy and outscored us by 14 points in the third quarter (23-9). But you need these games in order to manage these situations. Throughout the course of the season, we’ve been winning by 15, 20 points. I like to see games that are decided by one or two plays.” After Rivers’ basket put Alton ahead 64-62, Trinity senior Isaiah Williams missed a jumper that was rebounded by Alton senior Donovan Clay, who hit Rivers with a long pass. Rivers was intentionally fouled as he went for the layup, but he missed both free throws with 1.1 seconds remaining. The Titans stole the inbound pass and called timeout with 0.3 seconds left. Junior Rashad Weekly’s shot from inside halfcourt was short and off the mark. Rivers led Alton with 15 points and three 3-pointers, while senior Malik Smith had 14 points and junior Moory Woods had 11 points, six rebounds and three steals. The Redbirds shot 47 percent from the field (27-for-47). Ryan Kalkbrenner, a 7-foot junior, and senior Marcus Washington paced Trinity with 16 points apiece. Williams had 15 points and four 3-pointers, including two from about 30 feet, and junior Terrell Rush had 11 points. Kalkbrenner also had nine rebounds and five blocks. He had just

BY DAVID WILHELM Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

BELLEVILLE • Alton boys basketball coach Eric Smith might have difficulty with his instructions being heard Saturday when his Redbirds play in the championship game of the Belleville East Classic. Many of his players could be fitted for hearing aids after a raucous postgame locker room celebration Friday, the result of a stunning come-from-behind 64-62 victory over previously unbeaten Trinity in the tournament semifinals. Alton trailed 39-24 at halftime but outscored the Titans 40-23 in the second half by going 17-for-28 from the field. Senior Josh Rivers’ driving layup with 16 seconds to play gave the Redbirds their deciding basket. “Coach (Eric Smith) told us we had to play a lot harder. That was about it,” Rivers said. “We had to keep our head in the game and share the ball. This is a big win. It tells us a lot. We’ve got to keep playing hard and working hard at practice.” Smith remained calm on the exterior as he tried to describe the significance of the victory in a season that has been compromised by player suspensions. A few feet away from Smith, music was blasting from the Redbirds’ locker room as his players were basking in the festive moment. “The frustrating part is we’ve played really good teams really well, but we hadn’t won any of those games,” Smith said. “A lot of what we’ve done up to this point doesn’t have to change a whole lot. If we’re unselfish, play hard and guard people, we’ll be OK.” Alton (12-8) will play Chaminade

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL WEST FRANKFORT MID-WINTER TOURNAMENT Seventh place Christopher vs. Anna-Jonesboro, 10 a.m. Fifth place Eldorado vs. Cairo, 11:30 a.m. Third place Carterville vs. Marion, 1 p.m. Championship West Frankfort vs. Herrin, 2:30 p.m. RICK MCGRAW INVITATIONAL At Litchfield Seventh place Civic Memorial (6-14) vs. Litchfield (12-5), 2:30 p.m. Fifth place ME Lutheran (12-9) vs. Roxana (9-11), 4 p.m. Third place Greenville vs. Hillsboro, Ill., 5:30 p.m. Championship Taylorville vs. Nokomis, 7 p.m. BENTON INVITATIONAL Mounds Meridian vs. Benton, 10 a.m. Sesser-valier vs. Hamilton County, 11:30 a.m. Carlyle (5-15) vs. Pinckneyville (13-0), 1 p.m. Mounds Meridian vs. Sesser-Valier, 5:30 p.m. Hamilton County (0-2) vs. Carlyle (5-15), 7 p.m. Pinckneyville vs. Benton, 8:30 p.m. OKAWVILLE INVITATIONAL DuQuoin (2-5) vs. Gibault (10-11), 6 p.m. Madison (9-9-1) vs. Okawville (12-7), 7:30 p.m. NASHVILLE INVITATIONAL Fifth place Brentwood Academy (Tenn.) vs. Granite City, 5 p.m.

Third place Mater Dei vs. Breese Central, 6:30 p.m. Championship Mascoutah vs. Nashville, 8 p.m. SUPERMAN CLASSIC At Massac County Seventh place Vienna vs. Fort Campbell (Ky.), 1 p.m. Consolation final Graves County (Ky.) vs. Massac County, 2:30 p.m. Third place McCracken County vs. Goreville, 4 p.m. Championship Charleston vs. Carbondale, 5:30 p.m. 55TH SPARTA MID-WINTER CLASSIC Seventh place Red Bud vs. Trico, 4 p.m. Fifth place Waterloo vs. TBD, 5:30 p.m. Third place Alton Marquette vs. TBD, 7 p.m. Championship Freeburg vs. Murphysboro, 8:30 p.m. BELLEVILLE EAST CLASSIC Seventh place Althoff vs. Normandy, 4:30 p.m. Third place Trinity vs. Soldan, 6 p.m. Championship Chaminade vs. Alton, 7:30 p.m. SALEM INVITATIONAL Consolation semifinals Mount Vernon (12-6) vs. Triad (8-11), 11:30 a.m. Centralia (Ill.) (7-9) vs. Salem (10-9), 1 p.m.

five second-half points as Alton swarmed him with double-teams. “Besides just yelling and screaming, we really didn’t change anything,” Smith said of his team’s defense on Kalkbrenner and the rest of the Titans in the second half. “Our kids just made a little bit more of an effort to focus on some of the things we talked to them about leading into the game. We didn’t have the approach we wanted at the beginning.” Alton’s first-half woes revolved around the loss of Clay, who picked up his second foul with 6:10 to play in the second quarter. The Redbirds trailed 17-15 at the time, but the Titans closed the quarter with a 22-9 run as Clay watched from the bench. “I don’t think you can print what I was feeling,” Smith said. The Redbirds began to make a run in the third quarter, which ended with Trinity leading 48-47. Woods popped a 3-pointer with 6:36 to play in the game, giving Alton its first lead since it was 15-13 in the the first quarter. Alton led 60-56 when Rivers scored with 2:02 to play, but Williams’ NBA-range 3-pointer and a basket by Washington put the Titans ahead 61-60 at the 1:07 mark. Woods then scored for Alton, and Washington hit a free throw to make it 62-62 with 42.4 seconds left. The Redbirds isolated Rivers, who drove the lane for his deciding basket. Trinity shot 46 percent (26-for56) and had 19 turnovers. “It was a great game,” McCaw said. “I like to be in games like this because they’re so far and few between. ... I thought we played lousy, but it still was a good game. And maybe Alton played one of their better games.”

Seventh place TBD vs. TBD, 4 p.m. Consolation final TBD vs. TBD, 7 p.m. Third place Effingham vs. Thornton Fractional North, 5:30 p.m. Championship East St. Louis vs. Teutopolis, 8:30 p.m. FRONTENAC INVITATIONAL At Frontenac (Kan.) Sevent place Riverton (Kan.) vs. Wichita Independent, 2:30 p.m. Consolation final Pacific vs. Frontenac (Kan.), 5:30 p.m. Third place Fort Scott vs. Providence Academy, 2:30 p.m. Championship Nevada vs. Webb City, 5:30 p.m. 35TH TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS At Missouri State University Seventh place Springfield Catholic vs. Parkview, 2:30 p.m. Consolation final Belleville West vs. Rainier Beach (Wash.), 4 p.m. Third place Memphis East vs. TBD, 7 p.m. Championship Sunrise Christian (Kan.) vs. TBD, 9 p.m. DENVER MILLER TOURNAMENT At Kirkwood Seventh place University City (8-7) vs. Hazelwood East (6-9), 11:30 a.m. Third place Ladue (9-5) vs. Eureka (9-5), 1 p.m.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

BOYS BASKETBALL Pacific 26 20 7 6 59 Riverton (Kan 9 6 7 9 31 P (6-8): Cowsert 17, Fleming 10, Harris 9, Sauvage 8, D. Myers 7, Iliff 3, Racer 3, Evans 2. FG 22 (6), FT 9-14. Cahokia 16 9 12 9 46 Edwardsville 13 13 13 19 58 C (2-14): Brown 19, Harrison 8, Rogers 8, Baker 4, Johnson 4, Higgins 3. FG 19 (4), FT 4-5. E (5-12): Tuggle 16, B. Weller 13, Robinson 10, Robertson 7, Hairston 5, Hemken 4, Young 2, Stopka 1. FG 21 (5), FT 11-16. FZ South 22 4 13 21 60 Timberland 12 8 14 19 53 F (11-2): Bellinger 24, Patton 14, Schwepker 12, Nunn 6, Stephens 4. FG 21 (6), FT 12-19. T (7-8): B. Busateri 17, Martin 15, Davison 8, Markovich 6, Hiatt 3, L. Busateri 2, Lyerla 2. FG 17 (3), FT 16-22. Red Bud 15 7 8 7 37 Freeburg 11 18 12 10 51 R (1-17): Amman 12, Wiegard 11, Kueker 6, Van Dorn 6, Birkner 2. FG 16 (4), FT 1-8. F (13-6): Diecker 14, Ervie 10, C. Smith 8, Brueggemann 6, Range 5, O. Smith 4, Blomenkamp 2, Haas 2. FG 19 (3), FT 10-12. Wood River 11 13 11 15 50 Bayless 7 11 12 6 36 W (7-14): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. B (2-12): Herndon 19, Bradley 8, Johnson 5, Patton 4. FG 11 (3), FT 11-20. Greenville 12 10 15 18 55 Taylorville 13 21 20 13 67 G (12-9): McCullough 12, Nelson 12, Green 9, Ephron 6, Gray 6, Frey 5, Manhart 3, Brauns 2. FG 21 (7), FT 6-10. T (8-0): J. Livingston 31, Bergschneider 11, N. Livingston 10, Kettelkamp 6, Odam 5, Ess 4. FG 27 (6), FT 7-8. Lebanon 1 10 13 4 28 Pana 19 9 28 17 73 L (0-17): Krumsieg 10, White 8, Shaw 4, Fairlie 2, Hill 2, Morris 2. FG 11 (2), FT 4-8. P (8-12): Lauff 14, Armstrong 13, Kile 12, Lamb 8, Schmitz 7, L. Holthaus 6, Ambrose 5, Edmiston 4, Kuhn 3, Funnerman 1. FG 30 (6), FT 7-12. Bellvl. West 15 19 22 7 63 Springfield C 10 14 28 5 57 B (18-1): Brazil III 21, Shumpert 10, Mosby 9, Randolph Jr. 9, Liddell 7, Williams 5, Romious 2. FG 20 (7), FT 16-25. S: Branham 24, Howell 8, Manzardo 8, O’Reilly 5, W. Squibb 4, Morrison 3, Riley 3, Galligos 2. FG 20 (5), FT 12-18. Gibault 7 13 13 18 51 Madison 14 15 22 13 64 G (10-12): Huels 19, J. Sweeney 12, Doerr 9, Adams 6, Kohnz 5. FG 20 (5), FT 6-10. McKinley 15 7 16 6 44 Metro 8 14 13 15 50 Mc (9-6): Norman 14, Hightower 11, Sims 5, Burgess 3, Byrd 3, Adger 2, Jones 2, Ringo 2, Williams 2. FG 18 (2), FT 6-10. Me (5-11): Carlock 23, Isom 22, Lakey 4, Wright 1. FG 15 (3), FT 17-28. CSOMB 15 12 15 15 57 Sumner 9 16 17 19 61 C (1-10): Quinn 31, Bunting 11, King-Lee 9, Breuer 3, Flynn 3. FG 25 (2), FT 5-13. S (3-13): Taylor 28, Henderson 13, Sanders 11, Gandy 2, Harrison 2, Knox 2, Perkins 2, Johnson 1. FG 24 (4), FT 9-20. Wellsville 10 12 12 15 49 New Haven 17 13 16 13 59 W (1-4): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. N (10-5): Groner 18, Gerlemann 13, M. Lewis 11, Rethemeyer 8, Eichelberger 7, Patterson 2. FG 22 (5), FT 10-15. Effingham 10 6 18 16 50 E. St. Louis 12 22 16 20 70 E. (15-5): Hargrove Jr. 17, Anderson 12, Leflore 12, Rice 12, T. Jones 8, Robinson 4, Calhoun 3, Basquine 2. FG 28 (9), FT 5-7. Mascoutah 12 14 10 14 62 Mater Dei 11 15 11 13 56 Ms (14-6): Green 20, Keys 13, Rhodes 10, Johnson 6, Jowett 6, Bryant 5, Moll 2. FG 23 (4), FT 12-23. Mt (13-7): Schadegg 19, Haake 14, Schuchman 10, Napovanice 6, Dant 4, Goebel 3. FG 18 (8), FT 12-14. Pittsfield 12 15 15 4 46 Jerseyville 21 14 13 16 64 J (10-12): Hall 19, Jackson 19, Shalley 10, Medford 5, Carey 4, Rogers 3, Darr 2, Srebel 2. FG 23 (6), FT 12-26. De Smet 30 11 9 17 67 Vianney 9 10 17 13 49 D (14-3): Skoff 20, Asleson 15, Walker 13, Redmond 7, Goodwin 6, Keita 4, Western 2. FG 22 (6), FT 17-24. V (4-12): Kleinheider 18, Schueler 11, Wilson 5, Dyer 4, Ducey 3, Lattimore 3, Terschluse 3, Hayes 1, Luthy 1. FG 12 (9), FT 16-19. Eureka 11 7 21 20 59 Pky. South 12 10 9 12 45 E (10-5): Taggart 24, Parker 10, AsherSanders 7, Edwards 6, Burke 4, Sanders 4, M. Brown 2, Laudel 2. FG 21 (8), FT 9-15. P (5-10): Skidmore 14, Sommer 13, Esker 9, Ellebrecht 3, Sutton 3, Pelton 2, Winkel 1. FG 17 (6), FT 5-17. Columbia 18 12 26 9 65 Canton 9 13 7 8 37 Co (12-6): O’Connor 16, Khoury 14, Peterson 14, S. Horner 9, J. Holmes 6, N. Horner 4, B. Holmes 2. FG 23 (5), FT 14-19. Ca: Brant 11, Passmore 6, Smith 6, Emery 5, Owens 5, Cannon 2, Link 2. FG 15 (4), FT 3-4. Haz. West 6 14 17 12 49 Summit 16 14 15 19 64 H (6-8): Cooper 9, Sykes III 9, Jones Jr. 8, M. Wilson 6, Mitchell 5, Griffin 4, Gray 2, Harris 2, Sanders 2, Young 2. FG 20 (4), FT 5-12. S (9-5): J. Thomas 17, Coughlin 13, Humphrey 8, Jennings 7, Vaughan 7, Garnatz 6, Broten 3, J. Thomas 3. FG 20 (6), FT 18-23. Webster 17 17 19 18 71 Jackson 12 13 18 17 60 W (13-0): Womack 19, Jones 18, Wright 17, Simpson 11, King 4, Adams 2. FG 24 (5), FT 18-23. Affton 26 9 10 16 61 Fox 18 7 22 15 62 A (4-9): Olliges 16, K. Recht 14, Hercules 9, Rolwes 8, Westbrook 7, C. Recht 6, T. Johnston 1. FG 22 (4), FT 13-20. FH Central 20 14 11 19 64 Holt 13 10 16 10 49 F (9-5): Anderson 16, Coleman 15, Estrada 15, Lewis 7, Scott 6, Dent 5. FG 22 (4), FT 16-23. H (9-7): Ashford 32, Ryan 18, Mclemore 10, Winner-Johnson 6, Looney 5, Goldstein 4. FG 25 (5), FT 20-31. Crossroads 5 6 5 13 29 Maplewood-RH 21 20 19 9 69 C (0-10): Caradine 21, Chester 3, Thomas 2. FG 9 (3), FT 5-7. M (8-8): Brunson 32, Becton 19, Sykes 6, Posley 4, Roberson 4, Stewart 2, Works 2. FG 32 (2), FT 3-6. FH North 15 13 13 16 57 Howell 23 30 18 11 82 H (14-2): Dalton 22, Thompson 12, Schulte 11, Boehm 10, Schark 7, Lohmar 5, Maddox 4, Engelhard 3, Fortner 3, Simmons 3, Williams 2. FG 29 (12), FT 12-17. FZ West 12 7 13 22 54 Troy 17 12 9 22 60 T (3-12): Nett 15, King 13, Deters 12, St. Pierre 9, Ludwig 8, Juergensmeyer 3. FG 19 (6), FT 16-22. Marquette 19 8 14 18 59 Lafayette 19 9 14 12 54 M (12-4): Harris 17, White 17, Montgomery 14, Hansen 6, Barshow 5. FG 21 (8), FT 9-12. FZ North 8 15 19 20 62 Liberty 12 18 21 12 63 F (5-8): Bampton 14, Fitzpatrick 12, Lee 11, Watson 8, Alkhaldi 6, Cross 6, Lewis 3, Grimes 2. FG 19 (6), FT 18-26. L (11-3): Catchings 34, Hoeber 9, McKeithen 8, Keller 7, Hilgartner 3, Betton 2. FG 25 (5), FT 8-20. Northwest-CH 6 14 14 11 45 Pky. North 14 11 17 19 61 N (3-11): Patient 14, Watson 8, Mitchelle 7, Davis 5, Luca 5, Fortner 4, Lee 2. FG 14 (3), FT 14-23. P (3-11): Petty 16, Taylor 12, Wilson 10, Powell 7, Howell 6, Mitchell 5, Neely 3, May 2. FG 21 (4), FT 15-18. JohnBurroughs 16 17 5 12 50 Principia 2 3 8 9 22 J (8-5): Hardwick 16, B. Miller 8, Mumford 6, Baldwin 4, D. Miller 4, Pittmann 4, Roberts 3, Chun 2, Gurley 2, Ryan 1. FG 20 (4), FT 6-15. P (3-10): Towle 12, Hoffman 5, Legard 3, Ellis 2. FG 7 (1), FT 7-14. Borgia 12 10 12 21 55 St. Mary’s 10 21 9 12 52

HALL OF FAME CLASSIC At Father Tolton Scott City vs. California, 11:30 a.m. Cape Girardeau Central vs. Fulton, 1 p.m. Lutheran Norh vs. Helias, 2:30 p.m. Hancock (7-4) vs. Boonville (1-0), 5:30 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES O’Fallon Christian (10-7) at Whitfield (10-5), noon Columbia (11-6) vs. Payson Seymour (1-0), at Abingdon-Avon, 1:30 p.m. Vashon (11-3) vs. Christ The King NY, at Springfield, 2 p.m. Brentwood (5-5) vs. Granite City (9-8), at Nashville, 5 p.m. Wellsville (1-3) at North Callaway (10-3), 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL 33RD HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT Consolation semifinals Taylorville vs. Althoff, postponed Breese Central vs. Hillsboro, Ill., postponed Consolation final TBD vs. TBD, postponed Fifth place Teutopolis vs. Belleville West, postponed Third place Highland vs. O’Fallon, postponed Championship Belleville East vs. Civic Memorial, postponed CARBONDAL MID-WINTER CLASSIC Mount Vernon (4-14) vs. Chester (11-6), 10 a.m. Marion (9-14) vs. Massac County (4-2), 11:30 a.m. Carterville (10-3) vs. Carbondale (4-14), 1 p.m. HALL OF FAME SHOOTOUT At Father Tolton South Callaway (5-1) vs. St. Clair (9-5), 10 a.m. Skyline (0-1) vs. Father Tolton (6-8), 7 p.m.

S (8-10): Collins 15, Hamilton 8, Parker 8, Miller 6, Rasas 5, Hughes 4, Brown 3, Danser 3. FG 18 (4), FT 12-19. New Athens 6 2 11 10 29 Dupo 13 18 8 9 48 N (7-10): Range 11, Schneider 7, Boone 6, Page 2, Shevlin 2, Lintker 1. FG 12 (2), FT 3-8. D (9-11): Kyle 13, Swims 13, Chadduck 11, Touchette 9, Calhoun 2. FG 18 (5), FT 7-14. Fath.McGivney 18 11 12 11 52 Valmeyer 12 22 14 13 61 V (8-13): Reinhardt 27, Rowald 18, Touchette 5, Greer 3, Fausz 2, McCarthy 2, Miller 2, Weber 2. FG 17 (6), FT 21-26. Nokomis 19 11 14 11 55 Hillsboro, Il 12 5 15 2 34 N (14-4): Sabol 22, Tosetti 9, Wright 9, Mascher 6, Bruder 5, Stewart 4. FG 22 (5), FT 6-9. H (11-9): Carroll 8, Bertolino 6, Gregg 5, Pruett 4, Tuetken 4, Lemon 3, Vogel 3, Matoush 1. FG 15 (2), FT 2-8. Soldan 5 6 20 21 52 Chaminade 12 14 22 17 65 S (12-5): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. C (9-5): Kasubke 31, Vickers 19, Case 7, Reed Jr 6, Handy 2. FG 26 (1), FT 12-20. Bre. Central 10 4 7 11 32 Nashville 16 14 16 14 60 B (11-7): S. Thomas 11, Kampwerth 8, Wempe 7, Haag 2, E. Jansen 2, Martin 2. FG 10 (1), FT 11-14. N (20-2): Bultman 22, Parker 14, Anderson 9, Harre 7, Bergmann 4, Maschhoff 2, Pelczynski 2. FG 24 (3), FT 9-11. Highland 17 10 9 12 48 Collinsville 10 17 13 14 54 H (18-4): LaPorta 16, Feldman 13, Torre 8, Kruse 5, Etter 4, Willis 2. FG 19 (4), FT 6-9. C (18-3): Taylor 20, Harrison 17, Molton 7, Jones 4, Baker 3, Smith 3. FG 21 (2), FT 10-17.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Lift For Life 0 8 9 8 25 Gateway STEM 10 23 10 13 56 L (6-5): Shabazz 9, Sanford 7, T. Vilsaint 4, Lee 2, S. Vilsaint 2, Ward 1. FG 10 (0), FT 5-9. Hancock 10 8 17 10 45 Brentwood 7 18 10 5 40 H (5-8): Stroup 16, Fujarte 9, Stewart 8, Moultrie 6, Moore 4, Haynes 2. FG 21 (1), FT 2-12. B (1-6): Diemeke 15, Clay 12, Tonis 8, Hill 5. FG 17 (4), FT 2-5. Centralia IL 11 16 11 13 51 Pana 9 18 11 15 53 C (8-13): Smith 14, N. Edson 10, Tomianovich 10, Fults 8, Hutton 4, R. Edson 3, Panega 2. FG 21 (5), FT 4-8. P (17-6): Schoonover 22, Hamilton 10, Ashcraft 8, Freeman 3, Hocq 3, Keller 3, Weideman 3, S. Denton 1. FG 22 (4), FT 5-11. Metro 16 8 5 14 43 Visitation 8 11 9 9 37 M (13-5): Burt 20, Scott 8, Goldman 6, Jackson 6, Hudson 3. FG 14 (3), FT 12-14. V (4-13): Greiner 11, Bader 10, Ott 10, Nunez 6. FG 15 (5), FT 2-4. FZ West 5 15 12 9 41 Troy 19 11 10 10 50 T (10-3): DeClue 17, O. Mennemeyer 13, Wenzel 8, Sachs 6, Bova 2, Caldwell 2, K. Mennemeyer 2. FG 17 (8), FT 8-14. Oakville 9 14 14 14 51 Pky. Central 17 26 18 12 73 O (8-7): Kuntze 15, Elguezabal 10, Dickneite 6, FitzWilliam 6, Minor 6, Gicante 4, Montandon 3, Auer 1. FG 18 (0), FT 15-21. P (11-4): O. Stephens 19, Cooke 13, Hilton 12, Coleman 11, Kelly 11, Moore 4, Marshall 2, Emch 1. FG 27 (7), FT 12-18. St.Chas. West 7 2 2 10 21 St. Charles 6 9 10 8 33 S (6-8): Schneider 11, E. Booker 10, Davis 5, Summerfield 5, Hollowell 2. FG 11 (6), FT 5-7. Howell 14 10 9 15 48 FH North 13 17 6 15 51 H (7-8): T. Russell 16, Thompson 16, Wilkenson 7, S. Russell 3, Brown 2, Machado 2, Mathewson 2. FG 18 (3), FT 9-16. F (12-4): G. Delarue 12, Stock 9, Willson 9, I. Delarue 7, O’leary 6, Stevens 4, Pugh 2, Teasley 2. FG 16 (3), FT 16-21. O’Fallon 11 7 12 9 39 Civic Mem. 8 15 12 10 45 C (21-4): Niemeier 10, Tyus 10, Buhs 9, Hall 8, Woelfel 4, Zupan 3, J. Christeson 1. FG 14 (3), FT 14-24. JohnBurroughs 7 14 14 19 54 Principia 12 6 13 13 44 P (8-5): Rather 18, Fredrickson 15, Kibbe 4, McMullin 4, Boyman 3. FG 16 (5), FT 7-9. Cahokia 13 7 9 34 63 Haz. West 17 21 10 22 70 H (7-6): Matthews 41, Carter 8, Blackson 7, Burrus 7, Wells 5, Morris 2. FG 22 (6), FT 20-29. Carlinville 11 12 16 13 52 Staunton 8 7 17 15 47 C (18-2): Olroyd 18, Stewart 12, DeNeve 8, Tieman 5, Seal 4, Stayton 3, Reels 2. FG 14 (4), FT 20-37. S (16-8): Cadieraro 17, Bruhn 15, Scanzoni 6, Davis 5, Bandy 3, Masinelli 1. FG 16 (5), FT 10-20. Lindbergh 6 14 7 14 41 Marquette 13 10 6 20 49 L (7-7): FG 0 (0), FT 0-0. M (8-6): Brown 12, Fitzgerald 12, Price 12, Watkins 9, Deves 2, McGinnis 2. FG 12 (0), FT 25-44. Eureka 8 14 4 19 45 Pattonville 15 14 13 11 53 E (6-7): Hillyer 18, Herbert 8, Thurman 6, Archambault 5, Oligschlaeger 3, Rust 3, Clubb 2. FG 11 (5), FT 18-22. P (8-7): Danfort 19, Benedict 13, Richardson 7, Dixon 5, Smith 5, Mack 4. FG 19 (3), FT 12-16. Pky. North 7 17 12 13 49 Westminster 7 10 18 8 43 P (12-3): Davis 23, Williams 10, A. Jordan 8, Rhodes 5, Bryan 3. FG 19 (5), FT 6-10. W (9-5): Keys 14, Vick 10, McKee 7, Beachy 4, Highmark 4, Lottmann 2, Sanden 2. FG 19 (3), FT 2-6. Mehlville 4 9 18 11 42 Ritenour 16 3 5 4 28 M (2-10): Silies 17, Benson 6, Canady 6, Seiler 6, VanDover 5, Rapp 2. FG 15 (5), FT 7-14. Ladue 22 6 16 14 58 Pky. South 9 14 12 12 47 L (10-5): Collins 16, Peete 13, Minkler 11, Clancy 8, R. Hamilton 5, Hay 3, Smith 2. FG 24 (2), FT 8-11. Gillespie 9 9 5 9 32 Southwestern 15 9 17 14 55 G (9-14): Jarman 12, Schmidt 11, Bertolino 3, Link 2, Niemeyer 2, Taylor 2. FG 13 (2), FT 4-7. S (18-5): Smith 15, Gallaher 14, Weible 8, Hopkins 7, Burns 4, Hall 2, Lowis 2, Bouillon 1, W. Keith 1, Novack 1. FG 20 (4), FT 11-20.

GIRLS SWIMMING Fort Zumwalt East 103, Ritenour 67 200 medley relay: 1. Ritenour, 2:16.53; 200 freestyle: 1. Emma Gulovsen, Fort Zumwalt East, 2:02.27; 200 individual medley: 1. Lane, Ritenour, 2:39.03; 50 freestyle: 1. Clark, Ritenour, 27.53; 100 butterfly: 1. Emma Gulovsen, Fort Zumwalt East, 1:06.16; 100 freestyle: 1. Frost, Ritenour, 1:02.73; 500 freestyle: 1. Lane, Ritenour, 6:35.03; 200 freestyle relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt East, 1:55.48; 100 backstroke: 1. Frost, Ritenour, 1:09.35; 100 breaststroke: 1. Rachel Springer, Fort Zumwalt East, 1:21.22; 400 freestyle relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt East, 4:30.08; KIRKWOOD INVITATIONAL Team scores: 1. Marquette 515, 2. Kirkwood 396, 3. Parkway South 338, 4. Lafayette 271, 5. Francis Howell 146, 6. Villa Duchesne 92

NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES Waterloo (5-13) at Valmeyer (2-15), 10 a.m. Trico (2-9) vs. Marissa (19-4), at Coulterville, 11 a.m. Calvary at Alton (5-13), 1 p.m. East St. Louis (7-12) at Chicago Marshall, 2:30 p.m. Wellsville (1-4) at North Callaway (4-10), 5 p.m.

HOCKEY Marquette (17-1-1) vs. Summit (10-4-2), at Brentwood Ice, 7:45 p.m. Ladue (11-3-2) vs. Clayton (8-9), at Webster Rink, 8:45 p.m. Northwest-CH (9-8-1) vs. Lindbergh (7-9-1), at South County , 9:15 p.m. FH North (0-17) vs. John Burroughs (1-15-1), at Brentwood Ice, 9:30 p.m. Seckman (8-8) vs. Parkway South (9-8-1), at Queeny Park, 9:45 p.m.

WRESTLING Alton, Cahokia at Belleville East, 9 a.m. PHL TOURNAMENT, 8 a.m. Teams: Affton, Gateway Science Academy, Gateway STEM, Lift For Life , Miller Career, Roosevelt, Sumner SEMO CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT At Farmington, 9 a.m. Teams: Cape Girardeau Central, Cape Notre Dame, Dexter, Farmington, Hillsboro, Jackson, Kennett, New Madrid County Central, North County, Park Hills Central, Poplar Bluff, Potosi, Sikeston, Ste. Genevieve, Valle Catholic, Windsor (Imperial) MICDS ERIC LEWIS INVITATIONAL, 10 a.m. Teams: Cahokia, Chaminade, De Smet, Francis Howell North, Hazelwood West, John Burroughs, Kirkwood, Ladue, MICDS, Oak Park, Pacific, Principia, Ritenour, SLUH, St. Charles, St. Charles West, Union, Westminster


01.20.2019 • Sunday • M 2

WINTER WARM-UP

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Miller has ‘chip on shoulder’ Reliever confident ’18 was aberration BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Lefthanded reliever Andrew Miller appeared in just 37 games last year with Cleveland, posting a 4.24 earned-run average as his season was curtailed by three stints on the disabled list — shoulder impingement, hamstring strain and knee inflammation. As he addressed the media Saturday at the Cardinals’ Winter WarmUp, new Redbird Miller said he intended to “show that last year isn’t who I am.” “I’ve got a little bit of a chip on my shoulder,” said the 33-year-old Miller. “Last year I did not pitch well. I didn’t pitch frequently. I didn’t pitch to my standards. Certainly, I heard plenty of times this off-season that I’m old. I don’t think I’m that old. I think I can go out and prove that I’m still the guy I was for the last five or six years.” In 2017, Miller had a 1.44 ERA for the Indians, and the year before, spent with Cleveland and the New York Yankees, the 6-foot-7 Miller had a ridiculously low 0.686 WHIP (walks and hits per inning) and a 1.45 ERA. He was the American League Championship Series Most Valuable Player, fanning 14 and allowing three hits and no walks in 7 2/3 scoreless innings. In the recent off-season, Miller saw Dr. David Altchek, an orthopedic surgeon and the medical director for the New York Mets, and obtained a clean bill of health, in part to expedite the free-agent process for Miller and his agent. “From a free-agent standpoint we (tried) to be as proactive as possible to show that I was healthy and I was doing all of these things to take care of that,” Miller said. “So ... being up front and proactive, I think, paid off. We used Dr. Altchek just because he’s certainly a recognizable name that is respected in the industry. “I feel great. I’m ready to go,” Miller said. “You’re going to hear that from everybody that they’re in the best shape of their life. I feel like I’ve put in a lot of hard work. I’ve got a plan in place. It was a little frustrating there for a while finding that plan. I wish it would have come a little bit quicker.” John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations, had been tracking Miller virtually from the end of the 2018 season. “When you’re exploring the free-agent market, a lot of times you look at what

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Flanked by Chris Hrabe (left) of KMOX and Cardinals executive John Mozeliak, reliever Andrew Miller is introduced at Winter Warm-Up.

you just did and you get excited about that, and then sometimes you look at who might have more upside from what they just did,” Mozeliak said. “Given the time he missed, given the feedback and due diligence we did on his medical, we felt confident he was going to be the Andrew Miller of two years ago and not the Andrew Miller of last year. “He’s also someone that wants to compete for a winning club. He had other places to go, but ... I think he was also excited to compete in our division because of the teams and the lineups we face. That was a great selling point to us because he wants the ball. And the one thing that makes him a little bit more unique than most relievers is he truly doesn’t care where he pitches. He wants high leverage and when it matters most, whether that’s in the fourth inning, seventh inning or ninth. That’s a nice Swiss army knife for the manager.” Miller has 53 saves for his career. Jordan Hicks had six as a rookie. Both probably will be closing early in the season, but

Mozeliak said, “I have always been sort of a believer that it is best to have someone that gets that (ninth) inning. The closer by committee has had mixed results in our industry. I’m not a big fan of that. But ... with how you mix in Andrew Miller, that will be more of the interesting puzzle. Ultimately I hope we have someone we can count on for that ninth.” For the first time since 2010, Miller will be a National Leaguer, having spent time in the interim with Boston, the Yankees and Cleveland. Given that his multipleinnings use has expanded in recent years, he might even have to bat in this league. But Miller said, “If I’ve got to bat, we’ve got big problems. I’m not much of hitter. I prefer you don’t go look up my history.” It was researched. He is four for 74 with 38 strikeouts and no walks in his career and has batted twice (both strikeouts) in the past seven seasons. “(But) I was on deck to face (Chicago Cubs lefthander) Aroldis Chapman in the (2016) World Series,” Miller said, proudly. “The team had that sort of confidence in

me.” Mostly, though, Miller is here to deal with the top lefthanded hitters in the NL Central Division. “I think there’s a handful of particularly good lefthanded hitters in our division,” said Miller, smiling, referring to Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo, Cincinnati first baseman Joey Votto and Milwaukee outfielder Christian Yelich, the 2018 league Most Valuable Player. Rizzo hit .414 against the Cardinals in 2018. Votto has a lifetime .317 average and .983 OPS against the Cardinals. Yelich’s OPS against the Cardinals in 2018 was 1.030, and he knocked in 15 runs in 16 games. “Absolutely, it’s fun,” Miller said of those potential skirmishes. “There is nothing more rewarding than getting a chance to prove yourself against the best, and that’s what those guys are.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Mozeliak fields questions about extensions, pitching, signings CARDINALS • FROM D1

The Cardinals opened their annual Winter Warm-Up fanfest and fundraiser at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch on Saturday with the first public introductions of their two most significant and highly lauded additions of winter, first baseman Paul Goldschmidt and lefty Andrew Miller. Goldschmidt, a six-time All-Star, noted the number of No. 46 jerseys that fans wore to the event — his jersey before he’s ever worn his new jersey. Miller, a two-time All-Star, was presented his No. 21 jersey for the first time by Mozeliak before the team’s president of baseball operations hosted his usual question-andanswer session with the fans. The first question was about extending Goldschmidt, and Mozeliak agreed “that’s our plan.” The second question was about rookie pitcher Alex Reyes’ role, which Mozeliak answered carefully as Reyes sat nearby signing autographs. The third was about Harper, predictably. As much as the Cardinals or Yankees or Phillies or Nationals have done this season to restock and fortify their rosters, the glacial pace of the free-agent market has left two wunderkinds unsigned: Manny Machado and Harper. That tilts the focus to moves not made — or not yet made. Mozeliak declined to discuss specific free agents, answering the fan instead by implying it wasn’t soon at all. What is soon for the Cardinals? A reckoning. The addition of Goldschmidt, signed through 2019, and pivoting away from long-term deals desired by Machado, Harper and others has put the Cardinals’ focus squarely on this coming season, for better or worse. “We met in October (and) we talked about the importance of winning now,” Mozeliak said. “And you know, we do have a very good baseball team. We just decided to make it better. And by doing so, we added someone like Paul Goldschmidt. The fact that we only have him under control for one year? That was a gamble we were willing to take. That’s for the 2019 season. Ultimately, the way you should think about the 2019 Cardinals is just that: 2019. And in terms of what 2020 looks like or 2021, I assure you we’ll think about that and work through that, but winning does matter this year.” The first day of the three-day Warm-Up was as much a lighting of the fuse on the roster as a showcase of new stars. Also signing on Saturday were Reyes, who after two seasons lost to injury has a “huge” season ahead to prove his place. Carlos Martinez held a 16-month-old for a picture and later discussed how he had to “clean my mind” of last season to focus on reestablishing himself as one of the National League’s top starters. Veteran outfielder Dexter Fowler cancelled a trip to a friend’s wedding in

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Fredbird documents the Cardinals’ first baseman Paul Goldschmidt as he signs autographs at the Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up.

Mexico and made his first appearance at Warm-Up because he felt “like I owed” the fans. The Cardinals have committed to Fowler in right field — the position Harper plays — and Fowler has talked about the importance of reciprocating that pledge. He’s coming back from the worst season of his career, and whatever urgency the Cardinals have placed on 2019 he shares. “You get a chance to win a championship and it’s addictive. Winning is addictive. I want to get back there,” Fowler said. “Obviously, if your expectations are here and you don’t make it and you don’t go as far as you want, you try to wipe that slate clean and learn from it and build on it. I think that’s what we’re going to do. We brought those guys in and hopefully (we’ll) win something and they’ll want to stay.” There are more than 100 free agents still available in the market, and the Cardinals will have a chance to augment their pitching staff with a move closer to spring training or during it. A consideration for the team is its 40-man roster because any free-agent signing could jar loose a young player — making a signing the equivalent of a trade. A pitcher willing to sign a minor-league deal is more palatable for the Cardinals because they’ll have injuries that could free up roster spots later in spring training. Still, the perception of making bargain moves when blockbusters are available can lead to questions from fans, as it did Saturday for Mozeliak. He also fielded some fun ones. A fan pointed out how a snowstorm preceded 1982 and 2011 along

with significant moves in the offseason, and whether this year’s snowstorm and Goldschmidt was a harbinger. “That was my strategy,” Mozeliak grinned. Luke McMinn, 12, of Breese, Ill., got the microphone and skipped the question. “I have a proposal,” he said. “I found a backup catcher: Josh Thole.” Thole is from Breese. As soon as he was done explaining how difficult it is to sign a backup when Yadier Molina intends to play every day, Mozeliak received the question the Cardinals will have to face eventually, in this market or next year’s: Will they ever offer an eightor 10-year deal again? Mozeliak said the answer is “obviously going to be maybe.” The chill in this market says teams are more reluctant than ever to do so, even when rare, young talent is available. “When you look at 10-year deals, how many in your mind have been successful?” Mozeliak said. “It’s a limited sample size but it’s hard to find that as the winning approach. If you’re playing with these types of dollars, is that a risk you want to take? … I think maybe the bigger difference from 15 to 20 years ago (is) teams will sometimes just say, ‘I’m going to do this internally or not do it all.’” The vice owners have placed on the free-agent market plays to the Cardinals’ benefit. In consecutive seasons, the Cardinals have poached a middle-order hitter from a team sliding out of contention — Miami last year and Arizona, for Goldschmidt, this. Goldschmidt expressed

some concern about the sluggish freeagent market because “we’re doing a disservice to fans,” and yet this same kind of market could greet him a year from now. That gives the Cardinals some leverage when it comes to offering an extension because Goldschmidt could have riches and certainty without the waiting. That only adds to the gravity of 2019. “I think whatever you let it put on there,” Goldschmidt said. “For me, hopefully you’ll see, I just try to take it day by day. Game by game. I’m not looking past today or past tomorrow. Definitely not past this season.” Mozeliak mentioned to the fans that the Cardinals pushed to make the deal for Goldschmidt when they learned he was available, and alternatives would mean moving targets, possibly to Harper or maybe to Machado or another free agent. After getting Goldschmidt, the approach shifted to selling him on sticking around. Mozeliak called the Warm-Up the Cardinals’ “first impression.” Same goes for the roster. This is the fans’ first impression of this team. Sell them on it. “I look back at this offseason and I felt the strategy that we had in place was sound,” Mozeliak said from the stage. “We have a good team. I think all of you should be excited about the product that we’re going to put out there this year because I think we got good, and then we got better.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

Mickelson maintains Desert lead He birdies four of last five a day after matching career low

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Phil Mickelson hits from the rough on the 10th hole during the second round of the Desert Classic golf tournament on the Nicklaus Tournament Course at PGA West on Friday in La Quinta, Calif. ASSOCIATED PRESS

LA QUINTA, CALIF.• Phil Mickelson birdied four of his last five holes Friday in the Desert Classic to take a two-stroke lead into the weekend in his first event of the year. A day after matching his career-low score with 12-under 60 at La Quinta Country Club, the 48-year-old Mickelson had a 68 on PGA West’s Nicklaus Tournament Course to reach 16 under. “I struck the ball every bit as well, I just didn’t putt anywhere close to as well as I did yesterday,” said Mickelson, the tournament winner in 2002 and 2004. Lefty will play the final two rounds on PGA West’s Stadium Course. “I’m starting to drive the ball a lot longer and straighter than I have in a while and so that sets up nicely for that course,” Mickelson said. “I feel like I can play aggressively with the way I’m hitting it off the tee.” Curtis Luck was second after a 66 on the Nicklaus layout. The 22-year-old Australian rebounded from a bogey on the par-3 eighth with a closing birdie on the par-4 ninth. “Just like yesterday, very solid, lot of greens, a lot of fairways,” said Luck, the 2016 U.S. Amateur champion. “Just missed a couple of short ones today, unfortunately. But putting’s been great.” Adam Hadwin and Steve Marino were 13 under, and defending champion Jon Rahm was another stroke back with Wyndham Clark and Joey Garber. Mickelson birdied the par-4 fifth and sixth holes, the par-5 seventh and closed with another on No. 9. On his opening nine, he birdied the par-5 11th and par-3 12th, then gave back the strokes with a double bogey after hitting into the water on the par-4 18th.

GOLF ROUNDUP Lowry keeps lead in Abu Dhabi Shane Lowry kept up his brilliant scoring on the par-3 holes at the Abu Dhabi Championship in shooting a 5-under 67 in the third round to extend his lead to three strokes on Friday. For the third straight day, the Irishman made birdie on the each of the short Nos. 7, 12, and 15 holes to strengthen his bid for a first victory in 3 1/2 years. His last win was in 2015 at the WGC Bridgestone Invitational. “I’ve been hitting some lovely iron shots,” said Lowry, who was 17-under 199 overall. Richard Sterne of South Africa was the only player within four strokes of Lowry after a round of 69, which included his first and only bogey of the week. Sterne chipped in for eagle at the par-5 10th hole for one of the best shots of a breezy day at Abu Dhabi Golf Club. Ian Poulter sent a 3-wood approach to 10 feet and rolled in the putt for eagle at No. 18 for a 69 to lift him into third place outright at 12 under, five shots off the lead. He will play in the next-to-last group with former winner Pablo Larrazabal (68, for 11 under). Three-time major champion Brooks Koepka, who has a chance to return to No. 1 in the world this week, mixed five birdies with three bogeys for a 70 and was eight strokes behind alongside Lee Westwood (73). Dustin Johnson was 13 shots off the lead after a 72. Another shot back was Tommy Fleetwood (72), whose hopes of a third straight title in Abu Dhabi looked to be over.

“It really wasn’t as hard a shot as I made it look,” Mickelson said about his approach on 18. “I had a decent lie after dropping off the cart path, but I had the ball a little bit below my feet and a slight uphill lie, which the tendency on those shots is to pull it

Henderson leads LPGA opener • Brooke Henderson of Canada kept out of trouble and kept bogeys off her card on her way to a 4-under 67 and a two-shot lead in the Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., the winners-only start to the LPGA Tour season. Henderson had the only bogey-free round at Tranquilo Golf Club at Four Seasons. Ariya Jutanugarn, the No. 1 player in women’s golf who captured every major award last season, made two bogeys, including the par-3 closing hole. She mixed in six birdies over an 11-hole stretch and it added up to a 67, leaving her two shots back and tied for second along with Lydia Ko (68) and Eun-Hee Ji (67). Toms leads PGA Tour Champions • David Toms shot his second straight 7-under 65 to take a four-stroke lead in the PGA Tour Champions’ season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship in Hawaii. The 52-year-old Toms had eight birdies and a bogey on another windy day at Hualalai. He won the U.S. Senior Open last year for his first Champions title after winning 13 times on the PGA Tour. Joe Durant, tied for the first-round lead with Toms, had a 69 to drop into a tie for second with Tom Lehman with a round left. Lehman shot 65. Associated Press

and I just didn’t adjust for that very well and I pulled it right in the water.” Mickelson is making his first tour start since early October and first competitive appearance since beating Tiger Woods in Las Vegas in November in a one-day,

made-for-TV event. He won the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship last year for his 43rd PGA Tour title and first since the 2013 British Open. “There’s two areas that guys tend to decline when they hit about mid 40s or so forth,” Mickelson said. “One is speed and one is putting. The last two years I’ve done a good job of improving my putting. I’ve actually putted better the last few years than I ever have in my career. The last thing is speed, because if I have speed with the driver then I can worry more about accuracy.” Hadwin had a 66 at La Quinta, the course where the Canadian shot 59 two years ago. “I’m playing some extremely good golf again here in the desert and just got to keep moving forward,” Hadwin said. Marino had a hole-in-one on the seventh hole at La Quinta in a 65. “There was like probably 15 people behind the green, but it was weird, they didn’t really go bananas,” Marino said. “So we thought it was in, but it wasn’t like a hundred percent sure and luckily we went up there and it was in the hole.” Rahm had a 66 on the Nicklaus Course. He also will play the final two days on the Stadium Course. “It’s still a very, very difficult golf course and you have to hit it good,” Rahm said. “Hopefully, I just keep the mojo that I had last year going.” Clark shot 67 on the Nicklaus layout, and Garber had a 64 at La Quinta. Top-ranked Justin Rose was tied for 28th at 8 under after a 68 on the Nicklaus layout. He’s the first No. 1 player to play the tournament since the world ranking began in 1986.


HOCKEY

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Perron out with injury BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

David Perron, the hottest player not just on the Blues but in the NHL, got cooled off on Saturday. Perron, who has a point in a league-high 13 consecutive games, sat out the game with Ottawa with an upper-body injury. Interim coach Craig Berube said Perron’s status was day-to-day but didn’t divulge anything else about the injury. “It’s a tough loss,” Berube said. Perron’s streak is the fifth longest in the league this season and matches the longest by a Blue since 2013. It also matches the sixth-longest in franchise history. Though Perron had gotten most of those points on a line with Ryan O’Reilly and a combination of left wings, Berube was prepared to break up the pairing before even knowing Perron would miss the game. O’Reilly skated between Pat Maroon and Vladimir Tarasenko in a reunion of a line that was together for the first four games of the season, producing just two goals. “They actually played pretty well (at the start of the season),” Berube said. “They just didn’t get a lot of success. The puck didn’t go in. They looked pretty good.” Perron’s missed game also did something that the rest of the league had been unable to do. Under NHL rules, the missed game

meant his point streak, for statistical purposes, had come to an end, though it would still be considered a “personal” streak.

BOZAK SKATES Tyler Bozak, out since Jan. 7 with a concussion, took part in the morning skate, the second time he’s been out with his teammates since falling to the ice and hitting his head against the Islanders on Jan. 5. He was hoping to get into a game before the All-Star break. “Obviously with concussions, you don’t know how long it’s going to be, or you might feel good one day and then feel bad the next, but I’ve been taking strides in the right direction,” he said. “It’s really nice to get on the ice with the guys. I’m starting to feel really good, so I’m hoping to get into a game here before the break. Hopefully just keep progressing and obviously not something I’m going to rush back. Sometimes like that with kids makes you think extra about it and I want to make sure I’m ready. Hopefully it’s in the next couple games.” Bozak said it was the second concussion of his NHL career. He skated with the team on Jan. 9 but didn’t feel good afterward and shut it down until a short skate on Friday. “I’ve seen guys that have had a bunch and I’ve had buddies whose careers have ended be-

cause of them,” he said. “I reach out to those guys when stuff like this happens and try and get advice. Obviously the one thing you hear from everyone is to make sure you take your time and make sure you’re ready because that’s the most important thing.” One thing Bozak has in reserve is if he isn’t quite ready to go this week in Southern California, the Blues have nine days off after that with the All-Star break and their off week. In other concussion news, the Blues put forward Zach Sanford on injured reserve after he got a concussion on Tuesday vs. the Islanders. That move created a roster spot for Alexander Steen to be activated.

SIX AND OUT Berube went with six defensemen on Saturday and Joel Edmundson was the odd man out for the second time this season and was a healthy scratch. The last time Edmundson was scratched, Berube said it was because he wasn’t being aggressive enough. This time, he just pointed at numbers. “We have seven healthy D so I have to make a decision,” he said. “So I made a decision and it’s not easy.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Binnington has another win for Blues BLUES • FROM D1

to a shorthanded goal off the skate of ex-Blue Magnus Paajarvi that tied the game one minute in. What had been a chance to expand their lead now served up an even game and a situation that cried out for composure. The Blues kept their cool, and held their breath, and got a goal from one of the team’s least likely heroes, Carl Gunnarsson, with 7:44 to go for a 3-2 win on Saturday at Enterprise. Jordan Binnington remained undefeated, stopping 28 of 30 shots. Gunnarsson, with goals in backto-back games and points in his past five games, put in a shot after Pat Maroon dug out a puck from under the glove of Ottawa goalie Craig Anderson, which Ryan O’Reilly kept alive and served up a backhand pass to Gunnarsson. Ottawa challenged the play for goalie interference after lengthy discussions with the referees and a discussion among the officiating crew. They went to the video and the call stood, giving the Blues the lead back. Ottawa, coming off a 4-1 win at Carolina on Friday in the first stop of the annual fathers’ trip, took a 1-0 lead 4:34 into the game. Fourteen seconds after Mackenzie MacEachern’s first NHL penalty – let history reflect it was a holding call – Ottawa’s Mikkel Boedker won a battle for the puck behind the Blues goal, backhanded it out to a charging Nick Paul, who had a step in front of Jaden Schwartz, and took a shot that limped past Binnington for the goal. The Blues evened the game just over three minutes later. Jan. 19 is an anniversary for Tarasenko, who debuted on that day – and scored twice – in 2013. This time, O’Reilly won a faceoff and, from his knee on the dot, passed back to Tarasenko in the slot, who needed a few touches to control the puck and then ripped a shot to the shortside past Anderson. It was the 16th goal of the season for Tarasenko, his fourth in five games and extended his point streak against the Sentators to seven games. The second period saw a collection of unfinished chances before Vince Dunn finally put the Blues ahead with 2:32 to go in the period. Dunn kept the puck in the Blues zone after an errant drop pass by Brayden Schenn – the Blues might want to try fewer of those – and got the puck back on the point, where his shot nicked the stick

M 2 • SUnDAy • 01.20.2019

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Colorado Dallas Minnesota Blues Chicago Pacific Calgary San Jose Vegas Anaheim Vancouver Edmonton Arizona Los Angeles

GP 48 49 48 49 47 47 49 GP 49 50 49 49 49 47 47 49

W 31 28 22 24 23 21 16 W 31 28 28 21 22 23 21 19

L OT Pts GF GA 15 2 64 167 134 17 4 60 153 129 18 8 52 166 153 21 4 52 126 128 21 3 49 131 137 21 5 47 131 144 24 9 41 145 183 L OT Pts GF GA 13 5 67 182 141 15 7 63 178 155 17 4 60 147 131 19 9 51 119 145 21 6 50 142 154 21 3 49 136 148 22 4 46 124 136 26 4 42 110 147

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ottawa Blues

1 1

0 1

1 1

First period O: Paul 1 (Boedker), 4:34. B: Tarasenko 16 (O’Reilly), 7:50. Penalties: MacEachern, STL, (holding), 2:20. Second period B: Dunn 5 (Schenn, Bortuzzo), 17:28. Penalties: Jaros, OTT, (tripping), 19:53. Third period O: Paajarvi 5 (DeMelo, Smith), 1:00 (sh). B: Gunnarsson 2 (O’Reilly, Maroon), 12:16. Penalties: None. Shots on goal Ottawa 6 14 10 Blues 11 15 12 Power-plays Ottawa 0 of 1; Blues 0 of 1. Goaltenders Ottawa, Anderson 14-14-3 (38 shots-35 saves). Blues, Binnington 4-0-1 (30-28). A: 17,690. Referees: Dan O’Rourke, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Ryan Galloway.

— —

2 3

30 38

of Ottawa’s Bobby Ryan into the top corner past Anderson. It was the second goal in four games for Dunn and his fifth on the season, tying him for second among Blues defensemen after Colton Parayko, who has eight. Parayko had the other big play by a defenseman in the period, saving a puck off the goal line for the third time in four games. This time, just over eight minutes into the period, Binnington got his skate on a shot by Cody Ceci and deflected it away. Parayko and Brady Tkachuk, whose dad Keith was watching from a suite with the rest of the Ottawa parents, were tied up in the crease, and the battle was for who would get his stick on it first. Parayko won that

fight, sweeping the puck away from danger just before it got to the goal line. The Blues had two breakaway chances in the period that didn’t produce a goal. The first had Oskar Sundqvist and Jordan Kyrou on a two-on-one, with Kyrou’s backhand shot being stopped by Anderson. Just over a minute later, MacEachern was sprung for a breakaway and, with a chance for his first NHL goal, he could get off only a weak backhand shot right into Anderson. The Blues had 1:54 of power play to start the third but not only never got set up, they let Ottawa get set up in their end. The Blues finally got the puck out of their own end, only to have Ottawa’s Dylan Demelo shoot the puck almost the length of the ice to Zack Smith, whose crossing pass to Paajarvi hit his skates and caromed past Binnington. It was the second goal in as many games, and fifth of the season, for Paajarvi, who the Blues lost on a waiver claim almost a year ago. After he scored on Friday night in Carolina, Paajarvi fell during his celebration. This time, he kept his footing. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Florida Ottawa Detroit Metropolitan NY Islanders Columbus Washington Pittsburgh Carolina NY Rangers Philadelphia New Jersey

GP 49 47 49 50 48 46 49 49 GP 47 47 47 47 47 48 48 48

W 37 29 27 27 24 18 19 18 W 28 28 27 26 22 21 19 18

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 10 2 76 199 140 20-5-0 17-5-2 12-3-0 16 2 60 166 133 13-10-1 16-6-1 7-6-2 17 5 59 143 128 17-7-1 10-10-4 12-6-2 18 5 59 152 148 13-10-2 14-8-3 9-5-4 18 6 54 140 144 14-6-3 10-12-3 8-6-3 20 8 44 142 166 9-6-5 9-14-3 9-5-3 25 5 43 154 184 12-9-4 7-16-1 6-8-2 24 7 43 140 167 10-12-4 8-12-3 4-8-4 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 15 4 60 142 119 13-7-3 15-8-1 13-5-1 16 3 59 153 144 14-9-2 14-7-1 11-5-1 15 5 59 157 141 13-8-3 14-7-2 9-4-2 15 6 58 166 139 13-8-2 13-7-4 7-5-1 20 5 49 126 140 13-8-4 9-12-1 7-7-2 20 7 49 139 164 13-6-5 8-14-2 4-7-3 23 6 44 139 169 10-10-3 9-13-3 4-8-1 23 7 43 140 164 13-6-4 5-17-3 6-8-1

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday Blues 3, Ottawa 2 Anaheim 3, New Jersey 2 Colorado 7, Los Angeles 1 NY Rangers 3, Boston 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 2 Tampa Bay 6, San Jose 3 Dallas 4, Winnipeg 2 Florida at Nashville, late Columbus at Minnesota, late Pittsburgh at Vegas, late Calgary at Edmonton, late

Friday Montreal 4, Columbus 1 Florida 3, Toronto 1 Ottawa 4, Carolina 1 NY Islanders 2, Washington 0 Calgary 6, Detroit 4 Pittsburgh 3, Arizona 2, OT Vancouver 4, Buffalo 3 Sunday Washington at Chicago, 11:30 a.m. Anaheim vs. NY Islanders at

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mikko Rantanen scored two of Colorado’s franchise record-tying six second-period goals, Semyon Varlamov stopped 30 shots and the Avalanche routed the Los Angeles Kings 7-1 on Saturday in Denver. Colorado had six goals in a period for the first time since March 3, 1999, at Florida. Gabriel Landeskog, Tyson Barrie, Sheldon Dries and Colin Wilson

also scored in the decisive period. Dries’ short-handed goal made it 5-0 and chased goalie Jonathan Quick. Carl Soderberg got things rolling with a goal in the first period as Colorado returned home in fine fashion following a 1-4 trip. Ilya Kovalchuk ended Varlamov’s shutout bid with a powerplay goal in the final period. It wasn’t all positive for the Avalanche, who announced Rantanen was out for the third period with a lower-body injury. He’s

among the NHL’s scoring leaders with 73 points. In addition, veteran defenseman Erik Johnson took a puck off his jaw early in the first period. He went to the locker room for treatment and was later ruled out. Bruins’ Rask injured • Boston goalie Tuukka Rask suffered a concussion on a hard collision with Rangers forward Filip Chytil and was helped off the ice late in the opening period Saturday.

Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 2 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Arizona at Toronto, 6 p.m. Carolina at Edmonton, 8:30 Monday Nashville at Colorado, 2 p.m. Blues at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Minnesota at Vegas, 5 p.m. San Jose at Florida, 6 p.m.

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 7, Kigns 1

Ducks 3, Devils 2

Los Angeles 0 0 1 — 1 Colorado 1 6 0 — 7 First period: 1, Colorado, Soderberg 16 (Barrie), 9:57. Penalties: Kopitar, LA, (tripping), 7:40; Brown, LA, (delay of game), 19:58. Second period: 2, Colorado, Landeskog 29 (MacKinnon, Barrie), 0:32 (pp). 3, Colorado, Barrie 6 (Calvert, Kerfoot), 2:27. 4, Colorado, Rantanen 22 (MacKinnon, Landeskog), 7:18 (pp). 5, Colorado, Dries 3 (Calvert), 8:34 (sh). 6, Colorado, Rantanen 23, 14:35. 7, Colorado, Wilson 9 (Soderberg, Compher), 15:49. Penalties: Kopitar, LA, (slashing), 6:22; Cole, COL, (tripping), 8:17; Cole, COL, (tripping), 19:18. Third period: 8, Los Angeles, Kovalchuk 9 (Kopitar, Doughty), 7:52 (pp). Penalties: Iafallo, LA, (roughing), 4:29; Calvert, COL, Major (fighting), 6:00; Phaneuf, LA, Major (fighting), 6:00; Calvert, COL, served by Andrighetto, (slashing), 6:00; Cole, COL, (slashing), 7:33; Forbort, LA, (hooking), 11:54; Phaneuf, LA, (slashing), 12:05; Forbort, LA, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:38; Dries, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:38. Shots: Los Angeles 5-18-8: 31. Colorado 16-10-14: 40. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 4; Colorado 2 of 6. Goalies: Los Angeles, Campbell 6-9-0 (18 shots-16 saves), Quick 8-12-3 (22-17). Colorado, Varlamov 13-11-5 (31-30). A: 18,043.

Anaheim 2 0 1 — 3 New Jersey 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, New Jersey, Johansson 7 (Butcher, Bratt), 6:50. 2, Anaheim, Sprong 7 (Henrique, Ritchie), 9:10. 3, Anaheim, Terry 1 (Sprong, Lindholm), 10:38 (pp). Penalties: New Jersey bench, served by Bastian (delay of game), 9:10; Santini, NJ, (tripping), 13:02; Fowler, ANA, (hooking), 15:31. Second period: None. Penalties: Manson, ANA, Major (fighting), 7:16; Bastian, NJ, Major (fighting), 7:16; Larsson, ANA, (interference), 11:50; Ritchie, ANA, (tripping), 15:53. Third period: 4, Anaheim, Grant 3 (Terry), 5:11. 5, New Jersey, Bratt 4 (Butcher), 19:04. Penalties: Fowler, ANA, (cross checking), 15:04. Shots: Anaheim 7-3-4: 14. New Jersey 8-14-9: 31. Power-plays: Anaheim 1 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 4. Goalies: ANA, Gibson 17-15-8 (31 shots-29 saves). NJD, Blackwood 5-4-0 (14-11). A: 15,231.

San Jose 1 1 1 — 3 Tampa Bay 2 2 2 — 6 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Joseph 12 (Miller, Cirelli), 3:32. 2, Tampa Bay, Killorn 11, 17:51. 3, San Jose, Kane 18 (Thornton, Meier), 19:39 (pp). Penalties: Killorn, TB, (holding stick), 8:24; Palat, TB, (interference), 18:24. Second period: 4, San Jose, Kane 19 (Donskoi, Simek), 0:58. 5, Tampa Bay, Gourde 12 (Stamkos, Palat), 7:29. 6, Tampa Bay, Hedman 7 (Kucherov), 12:01 (pp). Penalties: Ryan, SJ, (slashing), 3:14; Labanc, SJ, (cross checking), 10:00; Couture, SJ, (tripping), 11:44. Third period: 7, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 25 (Kucherov, McDonagh), 5:08. 8, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 26 (Point, Hedman), 14:15 (pp). 9, San Jose, Sorensen 10 (Heed, Labanc), 19:23. Penalties: Kane, SJ, (roughing), 13:14; McDonagh, TB, (closing hand on the puck), 15:48. Shots: San Jose 16-13-10: 39. Tampa Bay 7-13-6: 26. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 3; Tampa Bay 2 of 4. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 22-9-4 (26 shots-20 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 20-6-2 (39-36). A: 19,092.

Rangers 3, Bruins 2 NY Rangers 1 1 1 — 3 Boston 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Boston, Heinen 6 (Forsbacka Karlsson), 17:28. 2, NY Rangers, Chytil 9, 18:32. Penalties: Fast, NYR, (holding), 1:03; Lindgren, NYR, major (high sticking), 6:19. Second period: 3, NY Rangers, Zibanejad 16 (Zuccarello, Skjei), 5:22. Penalties: Bergeron, BOS, (high sticking), 0:24; Grzelcyk, BOS, (slashing), 13:42; Shattenkirk, NYR, (tripping), 13:59. Third period: 4, Boston, Marchand 19 (Pastrnak, Bergeron), 3:24. 5, NY Rangers, Zibanejad 17 (Zuccarello, Shattenkirk), 9:05 (pp). Penalties: Chara, BOS, (delay of game), 8:03; McQuaid, NYR, served by Kreider, (roughing), 15:27; McQuaid, NYR, (roughing), 15:27; Wagner, BOS, (roughing), 15:27. Shots: NY Rangers 7-7-6: 20. Boston 10-6-13: 29. Power-plays: NY Rangers 1 of 3; Boston 0 of 5. Goalies: NY Rangers, Lundqvist 15-12-7 (29 shots-27 saves). Boston, Rask 14-8-3 (7-6), Halak 13-9-2 (13-11). A: 17,565.

Flyers 5, Canadiens 2 Philadelphia 0 2 3 — 5 Montreal 0 0 2 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: None. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 12 (Gostisbehere, Couturier), 17:01. 2, Philadelphia, van Riemsdyk 12 (Hagg, Konecny), 18:34. Penalties: Kotkaniemi, MTL, (tripping), 7:09; Voracek, PHI, (interference), 13:33. Third period: 3, Philadelphia, Patrick 8 (Laughton, Simmonds), 7:06. 4, Montreal, Domi 16 (Tatar, Lehkonen), 7:36. 5, Philadelphia, Patrick 9 (Gostisbehere, Voracek), 9:32. 6, Montreal, Kulak 3 (Drouin, Gallagher), 16:00. 7, Philadelphia, Raffl 3 (Couturier), 19:08. Penalties: Drouin, MTL, (tripping), 1:37. Shots: Philadelphia 1-13-10: 24. Montreal 12-10-13: 35. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 2; Montreal 0 of 1. Goalies: Philadelphia, Hart 6-5-1 (35 shots-33 saves). Montreal, Niemi 8-5-1 (23-19). A: 21,302.

Stars 4, Jets 2

Six-goal second period lifts Avalanche to romp

Away Div 13-9-0 10-7-0 12-9-4 7-5-0 12-12-3 4-5-3 9-13-2 5-6-1 11-12-0 8-4-1 9-8-3 6-7-3 8-14-3 9-4-3 Away Div 15-9-0 8-5-1 11-11-3 10-4-3 13-13-1 11-4-2 11-12-1 5-6-3 11-12-3 6-5-3 11-11-2 7-9-1 12-10-1 8-7-1 8-13-3 8-8-1

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Lightning 6, Sharks 3

The Senators’ Chris Tierney swipes at the puck as a shot by Nick Paul gets past Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington for a goal in the first period.

Home 18-6-2 16-8-0 10-6-5 15-8-2 12-9-3 12-13-2 8-10-6 Home 16-4-5 17-4-4 15-4-3 10-7-8 11-9-3 12-10-1 9-12-3 11-13-1

Winnipeg 0 0 2 — 2 Dallas 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Dallas, Ritchie 3 (Seguin, Klingberg), 7:53 (pp). Penalties: Spezza, DAL, (holding), 3:07; Trouba, WPG, (hooking), 6:54; Lemieux, WPG, Major (fighting), 18:46; Carrick, DAL, Major (fighting), 18:46. Second period: 2, Dallas, Comeau 5 (Benn, Lindell), 0:22. 3, Dallas, Faksa 8 (Lindell, Polak), 13:36. Penalties: Kulikov, WPG, (high sticking), 2:34; Morrow, WPG, (boarding), 5:43; Wheeler, WPG, (tripping), 8:48; Polak, DAL, (tripping), 11:23; Morrow, WPG, (high sticking), 14:50; Benn, DAL, (illegal check to head), 19:45. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Lemieux 6 (Appleton), 3:25. 5, Winnipeg, Connor 19 (Wheeler), 3:46. 6, Dallas, Seguin 18 (Radulov, Klingberg), 18:15 (pp). Penalties: Hintz, DAL, (slashing), 5:46; Scheifele, WPG, (holding), 14:37; Hintz, DAL, (holding), 15:35; Laine, WPG, (hooking), 16:52; Faksa, DAL, (delay of game), 19:00. Shots: Winnipeg 4-8-17: 29. Dallas 11-17-11: 39. Power-plays: Winnipeg 0 of 6; Dallas 2 of 7. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 21-14-1 (39 shots-35 saves). Dallas, Bishop 16-12-2 (29-27). A: 18,532. Referees: Jon Mclsaac, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, James Tobias.

SCORING LEADERS Through Friday’s games Player, team N. Kucherov, TBL M. Rantanen, COL J. Gaudreau, CGY C. McDavid, EDM N. MacKinnon, COL P. Kane, CHI B. Point, TBL M. Marner, TOR B. Wheeler, WPG S. Monahan, CGY M. Scheifele, WPG L. Draisaitl, EDM M. Tkachuk, CGY E. Lindholm, CGY S. Crosby, PIT D. Pastrnak, BOS G. Landeskog, COL S. Stamkos, TBL A. Ovechkin, WSH J. Tavares, TOR P. Kessel, PIT A. Panarin, CBJ B. Marchand, BOS J. Eichel, BUF C. Giroux, PHI B. Burns, SJS S. Aho, CAR E. Malkin, PIT M. Stone, OTT M. Giordano, CGY C. Atkinson, CBJ M. Rielly, TOR J. Huberdeau, FLA D. Larkin, DET M. Duchene, OTT R. O’Reilly, STL N. Backstrom, WSH J. Guentzel, PIT J. Skinner, BUF A. Barkov, FLA

GP 48 48 49 46 48 48 48 47 47 49 47 47 49 49 44 48 48 48 47 47 47 45 47 45 47 49 47 47 48 47 46 47 46 49 39 46 46 47 48 46

G 22 23 28 29 27 27 30 19 9 26 25 24 24 21 20 27 29 24 33 29 19 18 18 16 14 9 21 14 22 10 27 13 12 20 20 17 12 24 30 17

A 54 50 44 41 43 38 33 41 51 33 33 32 32 35 36 28 25 30 19 23 33 34 34 36 38 43 30 37 28 39 21 35 36 27 26 29 34 21 14 27

P 76 73 72 70 70 65 63 60 60 59 58 56 56 56 56 55 54 54 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 51 51 50 49 48 48 48 47 46 46 46 45 44 44

GOALTENDING LEADERS Through Friday’s games GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE Minimum 10 games played Name Team GPI MINS GA AVG Laurent Brossoit, WPG 12 716 24 2.01 Robin Lehner, NYI 25 1423 50 2.11 Jack Campbell, LOS 16 872 31 2.13 Mackenzie Blackwood, NJD 11 540 21 2.33 Ben Bishop, DAL 30 1740 69 2.38 Tuukka Rask, BOS 25 1438 58 2.42 Jaroslav Halak, BOS 25 1440 59 2.46 Anton Khudobin, DAL 21 1096 45 2.46 Marc-Andre Fleury, VGS 42 2494 103 2.48 Andrei Vasilevskiy, TAM 27 1620 67 2.48 Thomas Greiss, NYI 26 1389 58 2.5 Curtis McElhinney, CAR 18 1078 45 2.5 David Rittich, CGY 28 1533 64 2.5 Pekka Rinne, NAS 35 1959 82 2.51 Frederik Andersen, TOR 32 1898 80 2.53 Casey DeSmith, PIT 27 1468 62 2.53 Juuse Saros, NAS 19 975 42 2.58 Brian Elliott, PHI 14 787 34 2.59 WINS Name Team GPI MINS W L OT Marc-Andre Fleury, VGS 42 2494 26 12 4 Martin Jones, SAN 35 2049 22 8 4 Frederik Andersen, TOR 32 1898 21 10 1 Connor Hellebuyck, WPG 36 2109 21 13 1 Sergei Bobrovsky, CBJ 33 1860 19 13 1 Carey Price, MON 37 2166 19 13 4 Andrei Vasilevskiy, TAM 27 1620 19 6 2 Jacob Markstrom, VAN 35 2122 18 12 5 Devan Dubnyk, MIN 38 2156 17 16 3 Braden Holtby, WAS 32 1828 17 11 2 Pekka Rinne, NAS 35 1959 17 12 3 David Rittich, CGY 28 1533 17 4 4 Louis Domingue, TAM 20 1203 16 4 0 John Gibson, ANA 41 2301 16 15 8 Jake Allen, STL 36 1953 15 15 4 Ben Bishop, DAL 30 1740 15 12 2 Thomas Greiss, NYI 26 1389 14 8 1 Robin Lehner, NYI 25 1423 14 7 3 Tuukka Rask, BOS 25 1438 14 8 3 Mike Smith, CGY 25 1401 14 9 1 SAVE PERCENTAGE Minimum 10 games played Name Team GPI MINS GA SA SvPct L. Brossoit, WPG 12 716 24 421 .943 J. Campbell, LOS 16 872 31 457 .932 M. Blackwood, NJD 11 540 21 300 .930 R. Lehner, NYI 25 1423 50 697 .928 A. Vasilevskiy, TAM 27 1620 67 889 .925 C. Petersen, LOS 11 621 27 355 .924 F. Andersen, TOR 32 1898 80 1039 .923 A. Khudobin, DAL 21 1096 45 581 .923 R. Miller, ANA 10 508 23 294 .922 B. Bishop, DAL 30 1740 69 873 .921 SHUTOUTS Name Team GPIMINS SO W L OT Marc-Andre Fleury, VGS 42 2494 6 26 12 4 Jaroslav Halak, BOS 25 1440 3 13 8 2 Keith Kinkaid, NJD 34 1917 3 13 14 6 Mikko Koskinen, EDM 25 1360 3 14 8 1 Matt Murray, PIT 22 1238 3 14 6 1 Carey Price, MON 37 2166 3 19 13 4 Pekka Rinne, NAS 35 1959 3 17 12 3 Andrei Vasilevskiy, TAM 27 1620 3 19 6 2 Ben Bishop, DAL 30 1740 2 15 12 2 Mackenzie Blackwood, NJD 11 540 2 5 3 0 Casey DeSmith, PIT 27 1468 2 12 8 4 Aaron Dell, SAN 16 893 2 6 6 3 John Gibson, ANA 41 2301 2 16 15 8 Thomas Greiss, NYI 26 1389 2 14 8 1 Braden Holtby, WAS 32 1828 2 17 11 2 Robin Lehner, NYI 25 1423 2 14 7 3 Jonathan Quick, LOS 22 1307 2 8 11 3 Juuse Saros, NAS 19 975 2 11 5 1 Mike Smith, CGY 25 1401 2 14 9 1 Linus Ullmark, BUF 19 1106 2 10 4 3


HOCKEY

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS

Perron out with injury BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

David Perron, the hottest player not just on the Blues but in the NHL, got cooled off on Saturday. Perron, who has a point in a league-high 13 consecutive games, sat out the game with Ottawa with an upper-body injury. Interim coach Craig Berube said Perron’s status was day-to-day but didn’t divulge anything else about the injury, other than to say he probably would not be making the upcoming road trip. “It’s a tough loss,” Berube said. Perron’s streak is the fifth longest in the league this season and matches the longest by a Blue since 2013. It also matches the sixth-longest in franchise history. Though Perron had gotten most of those points on a line with Ryan O’Reilly and a combination of left wings, Berube was prepared to break up the pairing before even knowing Perron would miss the game. O’Reilly skated between Pat Maroon and Vladimir Tarasenko in a reunion of a line that was together for the first four games of the season, producing just two goals. “They actually played pretty well (at the start of the season),” Berube said. “They just didn’t get a lot of success. The puck didn’t go in. They looked pretty good.” Perron’s missed game also did something that the rest of the

league had been unable to do. Under NHL rules, the missed game meant his point streak, for statistical purposes, had come to an end, though it would still be considered a “personal” streak.

BOZAK SKATES Tyler Bozak, out since Jan. 7 with a concussion, took part in the morning skate, the second time he’s been out with his teammates since falling to the ice and hitting his head against the Islanders on Jan. 5. He was hoping to get into a game before the All-Star break. “Obviously with concussions, you don’t know how long it’s going to be, or you might feel good one day and then feel bad the next, but I’ve been taking strides in the right direction,” he said. “It’s really nice to get on the ice with the guys. I’m starting to feel really good, so I’m hoping to get into a game here before the break. Hopefully just keep progressing and obviously not something I’m going to rush back. Sometimes like that with kids makes you think extra about it and I want to make sure I’m ready. Hopefully it’s in the next couple games.” Bozak said it was the second concussion of his NHL career. He skated with the team on Jan. 9 but didn’t feel good afterward and shut it down until a short skate on Friday. “I’ve seen guys that have had

a bunch and I’ve had buddies whose careers have ended because of them,” he said. “I reach out to those guys when stuff like this happens and try and get advice. Obviously the one thing you hear from everyone is to make sure you take your time and make sure you’re ready because that’s the most important thing.” One thing Bozak has in reserve is if he isn’t quite ready to go this week in Southern California, the Blues have nine days off after that with the All-Star break and their off week. In other concussion news, the Blues put forward Zach Sanford on injured reserve after he got a concussion on Tuesday vs. the Islanders. That move created a roster spot for Alexander Steen to be activated.

SIX AND OUT Berube went with six defensemen on Saturday and Joel Edmundson was the odd man out for the second time this season and was a healthy scratch. The last time Edmundson was scratched, Berube said it was because he wasn’t being aggressive enough. This time, he just pointed at numbers. “We have seven healthy D so I have to make a decision,” he said. “So I made a decision and it’s not easy.”

Binnington has another win for Blues BLUES • FROM D1

the right direction and a big win before a couple games on the road here before the break.” “We won the last one here too,” interim coach Craig Berube said. “That’s two in a row at home. That’s a winning streak.” Two games does represent the longest home win streak for the team this season, and while the Blues won’t get a chance to try for a three-game streak until Feb. 9, the win on Saturday was a significant one for a team that can’t afford to let winnable games slip away. The unlikely hero was defenseman Carl Gunnarsson, who scored the game-winning goal with 7:44 to play. Well, maybe a few days ago he would have been unlikely, but all of a sudden, Gunnarsson has become a goal-scoring machine. Offense is not the first thing that comes to mind with the veteran defenseman, but his goal Saturday was his second in as many games and gave him points in his past five games. “It felt great,” Gunnarsson said. “It wasn’t a perfect game. We fought it out. (Jordan) Binnington was great back there and we found a way. Two points. That’s all that matters right now.” What made it possible was something the team has had trouble with at home all season, namely, that when things go wrong, the team has fallen apart. On Saturday, the team dealt with it. The Blues took a 2-1 lead into the third period and had almost a full power play carrying over from the second, but nothing went well with a man advantage and ex-Blue Magnus Paajarvi scored a short-handed goal, with the puck bouncing in off his skate a minute into the third. Earlier this season, this was a lead-in to disaster. “Obviously it was disappointing,” center Ryan O’Reilly said, “but I think we’re starting to be more consistent, not deviate and sell the farm. We’re sticking with it. Everyone is not thinking about it, just kind of respond, ‘OK, what’s next here? Let’s get our feet going, let’s win some battles again.’ You could see we stuck with it and we showed great maturity there.” It took a while, but the Blues retook the lead, though not without some additional delay. Pat Maroon, playing possibly his best game of the season, dug out a puck from under the glove of Ottawa goalie Craig Anderson, O’Reilly

Mikko Rantanen scored two of Colorado’s franchise record-tying six second-period goals, Semyon Varlamov stopped 30 shots and the Avalanche routed the Los Angeles Kings 7-1 on Saturday in Denver. Colorado had six goals in a period for the first time since March 3, 1999, at Florida. Gabriel Landeskog, Tyson Barrie, Sheldon Dries and Colin Wilson

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Colorado Dallas Minnesota Blues Chicago Pacific Calgary San Jose Vegas Anaheim Vancouver Edmonton Arizona Los Angeles

GP 48 50 48 49 48 47 49 GP 49 50 49 49 49 47 47 49

W 31 28 22 24 24 21 16 W 31 28 28 21 22 23 21 19

L OT Pts GF GA 15 2 64 167 134 18 4 60 155 133 18 8 52 166 153 21 4 52 126 128 21 3 51 133 138 21 5 47 131 144 24 9 41 145 183 L OT Pts GF GA 13 5 67 182 141 15 7 63 178 155 17 4 60 147 131 19 9 51 119 145 21 6 50 142 154 21 3 49 136 148 22 4 46 124 136 26 4 42 110 147

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Senators’ Chris Tierney swipes at the puck as a shot by Nick Paul gets past Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington for a goal in the first period. Ottawa Blues

1 1

0 1

1 1

First period O: Paul 1 (Boedker), 4:34. B: Tarasenko 16 (O’Reilly), 7:50. Penalties: MacEachern, STL, (holding), 2:20. Second period B: Dunn 5 (Schenn, Bortuzzo), 17:28. Penalties: Jaros, OTT, (tripping), 19:53. Third period O: Paajarvi 5 (DeMelo, Smith), 1:00 (sh). B: Gunnarsson 2 (O’Reilly, Maroon), 12:16. Penalties: None. Shots on goal Ottawa 6 14 10 Blues 11 15 12 Power-plays Ottawa 0 of 1; Blues 0 of 1. Goaltenders Ottawa, Anderson 14-14-3 (38 shots-35 saves). Blues, Binnington 4-0-1 (30-28). A: 17,690. Referees: Dan O’Rourke, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Ryan Galloway.

— —

2 3

30 38

kept the play alive and served up a backhand pass from behind the goal to Gunnarsson, who had crept in for the shot. It wasn’t the prettiest of shots, but Gunnarsson gladly accepted it. “The forwards were reaching for pucks down there like crazy,” Gunnarsson said, “and that kind of made their team kind of sink in there and open it up. I saw my chance and got a little lucky on that shot and it went in. We’ll take it.” Ottawa coach Guy Boucher thought the play should have been blown dead after Anderson covered the puck – “That’s a clear, clear, clear, clear save,” Boucher said — and all he could do was challenge the play for goalie interference, which there wasn’t, so

the goal stood. Gunnarsson’s was the second goal of the game for a Blues defenseman — Vince Dunn had one that put the Blues up 2-1 — and another defenseman, Colton Parayko, made one of the game’s biggest saves as he cleared a puck off the goal line for the third time in four games. This time, just over eight minutes into the second period, Binnington got his skate on a shot by Cody Ceci and deflected it away. Parayko and Brady Tkachuk, whose dad Keith was watching from a suite with the rest of the Ottawa dads on their annual fathers trip, were tied up in the crease, and Parayko got his stick to it first, sweeping the puck away from danger an inch or so from the line. “I was like ‘here we go’ “ Tkachuk said, “and all of sudden I look down and I started to see his stick come across. A couple more inches and it’s a goal. It happens, but it definitely would have been nice to score there.” Parayko’s save helped Binnington limit Ottawa to just two goals as he won for the fourth time in five starts and still doesn’t have a regulation loss. He stopped 28 of 30 shots and wasn’t forced into a whole lot of dramatics. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

also scored in the decisive period. Dries’ short-handed goal made it 5-0 and chased goalie Jonathan Quick. Carl Soderberg got things rolling with a goal in the first period as Colorado returned home in fine fashion following a 1-4 trip. Ilya Kovalchuk ended Varlamov’s shutout bid with a powerplay goal in the final period. It wasn’t all positive for the Avalanche, who announced Rantanen was out for the third period with a lower-body injury. He’s

among the NHL’s scoring leaders with 73 points. In addition, veteran defenseman Erik Johnson took a puck off his jaw early in the first period. He went to the locker room for treatment and was later ruled out. Bruins’ Rask injured • Boston goalie Tuukka Rask suffered a concussion on a hard collision with Rangers forward Filip Chytil and was helped off the ice late in the opening period Saturday.

Home 18-6-2 16-9-0 10-6-5 15-8-2 13-9-3 12-13-2 8-10-6 Home 16-4-5 17-4-4 15-4-3 10-7-8 11-9-3 12-10-1 9-12-3 11-13-1

Away Div 13-9-0 10-7-0 12-9-4 7-5-0 12-12-3 4-5-3 9-13-2 5-6-1 11-12-0 8-4-1 9-8-3 6-7-3 8-14-3 9-4-3 Away Div 15-9-0 8-5-1 11-11-3 10-4-3 13-13-1 11-4-2 11-12-1 5-6-3 11-12-3 6-5-3 11-11-2 7-9-1 12-10-1 8-7-1 8-13-3 8-8-1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Montreal Buffalo Florida Ottawa Detroit Metropolitan NY Islanders Columbus Washington Pittsburgh Carolina NY Rangers Philadelphia New Jersey

GP 49 47 49 50 48 47 49 49 GP 47 48 47 47 47 48 48 48

W 37 29 27 27 24 19 19 18 W 28 28 27 26 22 21 19 18

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 10 2 76 199 140 20-5-0 17-5-2 12-3-0 16 2 60 166 133 13-10-1 16-6-1 7-6-2 17 5 59 143 128 17-7-1 10-10-4 12-6-2 18 5 59 152 148 13-10-2 14-8-3 9-5-4 18 6 54 140 144 14-6-3 10-12-3 8-6-3 20 8 46 146 168 9-6-5 10-14-3 9-5-3 25 5 43 154 184 12-9-4 7-16-1 6-8-2 24 7 43 140 167 10-12-4 8-12-3 4-8-4 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 15 4 60 142 119 13-7-3 15-8-1 13-5-1 17 3 59 154 146 14-9-2 14-8-1 11-5-1 15 5 59 157 141 13-8-3 14-7-2 9-4-2 15 6 58 166 139 13-8-2 13-7-4 7-5-1 20 5 49 126 140 13-8-4 9-12-1 7-7-2 20 7 49 139 164 13-6-5 8-14-2 4-7-3 23 6 44 139 169 10-10-3 9-13-3 4-8-1 23 7 43 140 164 13-6-4 5-17-3 6-8-1

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday Blues 3, Ottawa 2 Anaheim 3, New Jersey 2 Colorado 7, Los Angeles 1 NY Rangers 3, Boston 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 2 Tampa Bay 6, San Jose 3 Dallas 4, Winnipeg 2 Florida 4, Nashville 2 Minnesota 2, Columbus 1 Pittsburgh at Vegas, late Calgary at Edmonton, late

Friday Montreal 4, Columbus 1 Florida 3, Toronto 1 Ottawa 4, Carolina 1 NY Islanders 2, Washington 0 Calgary 6, Detroit 4 Pittsburgh 3, Arizona 2, OT Vancouver 4, Buffalo 3 Sunday Washington at Chicago, 11:30 a.m. Anaheim vs. NY Islanders at

Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 2 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 3 p.m. Arizona at Toronto, 6 p.m. Carolina at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. Monday Nashville at Colorado, 2 p.m. Blues at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Minnesota at Vegas, 5 p.m. San Jose at Florida, 6 p.m.

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 7, Kigns 1

Stars 4, Jets 2

Los Angeles 0 0 1 — 1 Colorado 1 6 0 — 7 First period: 1, Colorado, Soderberg 16 (Barrie), 9:57. Penalties: Kopitar, LA, (tripping), 7:40; Brown, LA, (delay of game), 19:58. Second period: 2, Colorado, Landeskog 29 (MacKinnon, Barrie), 0:32 (pp). 3, Colorado, Barrie 6 (Calvert, Kerfoot), 2:27. 4, Colorado, Rantanen 22 (MacKinnon, Landeskog), 7:18 (pp). 5, Colorado, Dries 3 (Calvert), 8:34 (sh). 6, Colorado, Rantanen 23, 14:35. 7, Colorado, Wilson 9 (Soderberg, Compher), 15:49. Penalties: Kopitar, LA, (slashing), 6:22; Cole, COL, (tripping), 8:17; Cole, COL, (tripping), 19:18. Third period: 8, Los Angeles, Kovalchuk 9 (Kopitar, Doughty), 7:52 (pp). Penalties: Iafallo, LA, (roughing), 4:29; Calvert, COL, Major (fighting), 6:00; Phaneuf, LA, Major (fighting), 6:00; Calvert, COL, served by Andrighetto, (slashing), 6:00; Cole, COL, (slashing), 7:33; Forbort, LA, (hooking), 11:54; Phaneuf, LA, (slashing), 12:05; Forbort, LA, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:38; Dries, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 16:38. Shots: Los Angeles 5-18-8: 31. Colorado 16-10-14: 40. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 4; Colorado 2 of 6. Goalies: Los Angeles, Campbell 6-9-0 (18 shots-16 saves), Quick 8-12-3 (22-17). Colorado, Varlamov 13-11-5 (31-30). A: 18,043.

Winnipeg 0 0 2 — 2 Dallas 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Dallas, Ritchie 3 (Seguin, Klingberg), 7:53 (pp). Penalties: Spezza, DAL, (holding), 3:07; Trouba, WPG, (hooking), 6:54; Lemieux, WPG, Major (fighting), 18:46; Carrick, DAL, Major (fighting), 18:46. Second period: 2, Dallas, Comeau 5 (Benn, Lindell), 0:22. 3, Dallas, Faksa 8 (Lindell, Polak), 13:36. Penalties: Kulikov, WPG, (high sticking), 2:34; Morrow, WPG, (boarding), 5:43; Wheeler, WPG, (tripping), 8:48; Polak, DAL, (tripping), 11:23; Morrow, WPG, (high sticking), 14:50; Benn, DAL, (illegal check to head), 19:45. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Lemieux 6 (Appleton), 3:25. 5, Winnipeg, Connor 19 (Wheeler), 3:46. 6, Dallas, Seguin 18 (Radulov, Klingberg), 18:15 (pp). Penalties: Hint