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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • $1.50

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

SNOW FUN Some dispute ‘Ballpark Village efect’ on eateries BY TIM BRYANT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Maybe it’s just a matter of the new things replacing the old. That, area restaurant owners say, could explain why a number of mainstays of the downtown St. Louis dining scene are throwing in the towel. Among recent and surprising casualties are Harry’s Restaurant & Bar and Mike Shannon’s Steaks and Seafood, two longtime downtown establishments. Harry’s, at 2144 Market Street, and Shannon’s, at 620 Market, plan to close at the

Illinois election board to decide fate of 3 judges Protesters claim they’re taking unethical action by avoiding a retention vote BY TIM O’NEIL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BELLEVILLE • Is a judge act-

ing unethically if he maneuvers to keep his job by choosing to run in a partisan election, thus avoiding the higher vote threshold required for retention in a nonpartisan vote? A small band of sign-waving protesters who marched outside the St. Clair County Building here Tuesday morning made that complaint. The protesters, spurred by local Republican leaders, oppose the strategy of Circuit Judges John Baricevic, Robert Haida and Robert LeChien. They made plans to resign their posts and run in a partisan election to get them back, which requires only a majority vote. Otherwise, they would have to file for retention — the standard route for Illinois circuit judges to stay on the bench — which requires approval of 60 percent of the voters. The Illinois State Board of Elections is to meet Wednesday in Chicago to consider a formal complaint by Belleville City Clerk Dallas Cook, a Republican, who wants the board to force the three judges to seek retention. Cook also is seeking to unseat Circuit Clerk Kahalah Clay, a Democrat. Both face no opposition in their respective

Robert Haida

See CLOSURES • Page A6

Immigration clash heads to high court BY MARK SHERMAN Associated Press

John Baricevic WASHINGTON • The Su-

preme Court stepped into a boiling political dispute Tuesday over immigration, setting up a likely decision in the middle of a presidential campaign marked by harsh rhetoric about immigrants. The justices agreed to review whether President Barack Obama, acting without congressional approval, has the power to shield from deportation as many as 5 See OBAMA • Page A10

See JUDGES • Page A6

Robert LeChien

Flaking out

TODAY

Brothers Liam, 3, and Eamon Finnegan, 5, make snow angels in their backyard Tuesday in the 500 block of McKinley Street in Warrenton. Just a couple of inches of snow spread over the St. Louis area Tuesday evening, but the timing of the storm made for a very rough commute. STORY • A4

Gurley named NFL rookie of year

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32°/23° CLOUDY

SPORTS • B1

WEATHER A16

AUDIT BLASTS RECORDER OF DEEDS Carpenter has for decades resisted recommendations BY NICHOLAS J.C. PISTOR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

REPORT SAYS CARPENTER: Used improper bidding practices Spent $2,378 on rugs for her private oice Misspent at least $10,000 Drove a cityassigned take-home car 10,000 miles less than she reported Failed to track employee vacation time Keeps an unaccounted and unexplained $38,000 in an escrow account

Sarah Palin endorses Trump

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Time for Cards’ Reyes to grow up

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BRENTWOOD TRAVEL’S 26TH ANNUAL

ST. LOUIS • A state audit released on Tuesday delivered a stinging rebuke of Sharon Carpenter and her “irresponsible handling” of the city’s Recorder of Deeds oice. Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway confirmed previous media reports that Carpenter’s office used improper bidding practices and inappropriately used public money, including spending $2,378 on rugs for her private office. The audit found Carpenter misspent at least $10,000, failed to maintain a usage log for a cityassigned, take-home vehicle, drove the car 10,000 miles less than she reported, failed to track employee vacation time, and keeps an unaccounted and unexplained $38,000 in an escrow account. The audit says Carpenter, a fixture in city politics, has ignored pleas for change over several audits dating to 1987. Because of that, Galloway said that her office will perform another

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M 1 WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THAT’S A WRAP

CAN YOU GIVE MERMAID A HOME?

10 QUESTIONS: MOZELIAK ON THE CARDS

In a new Prep School video, food writer Daniel Neman shows how to make crepes, the delicious, versatile French wraps that are surprisingly easy to create.

Mermaid is an adorable mutt but comes from a property where she was severely neglected. If you’re looking to give a sweet rescue dog a second chance, come meet Mermaid!

Rosenthal in the rotation? Carpenter still leading of? Adams in the everyday lineup? See what GM John Mozeliak had to say at the Cardinals’ Winter Warm-Up.

UM curators adopt ‘safe space’ tactic in their presidential search

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 1986 MISSOURI LOTTERY BEGINS The Missouri Lottery begins sales in a party-like atmosphere of champagne, celebrations and large crowds across the state.

HEADS UP HOMELESS COUNT The Community Council of St. Charles County needs volunteers to help with its annual Point in Time Homeless Count on Jan. 27. During the count, the council takes a one-day “snapshot” of what homelessness looks like in the community by identifying and counting the number of people in shelters, living in places not meant for human habitation, living in local motels, and living on the streets. Training is required for anyone who has not participated in the count in previous years. Times are 11:30 a.m. Thursday or Monday at the Community Council, 427 Spencer Road, St. Peters, Mo. 63376. For more details, call 636-978-2277 Ext. 409 or go to communitycouncilstc.org.

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The University of Missouri Board of Curators has decided to adopt the Melissa Click philosophy. When in doubt, shut the public out. Click, of course, is the University of Missouri-Columbia communications assistant professor who earned notoriety during the fall hunger strike by MU student Jonathan Butler and associated protests of black students ailiated with the group Concerned Student 1950. It was Nov. 9, the day university system President Timothy M. Wolfe resigned so that Butler would begin eating again, and dozens of protesters had gathered on the quad surrounding the Concerned Student 1950 tent city. Click stood in the way as freelance photographer Tim Tai, also a university student, sought to report on the protests. She asked for “some muscle” to keep journalists away from what some of the protesters wanted protected as a “safe space.” It was not a good moment for Click, and since then, there have been numerous calls for her resignation, mostly from the Missouri Legislature, but also from at least one curator, David Steelman. Now Steelman and the curators are tasked with finding a replacement for Wolfe, whose resignation was sudden and unexpected. But the rules of openness that they want so badly to enforce on the university’s campus don’t seem to apply to them. As has been par for the course in most of the recent searches for president, including the one that chose Wolfe, the curators have decided to create a “safe space” so they can work in secret. This is not becoming of a state university, but it’s a growing trend across the nation. The argument, in Missouri and at most public universities that decide to close their presidential searches, is that the top candidates won’t apply if they are subject to public disclosure. “The best candidates probably have a job,” Steelman told me in explaining his vote to close the process. “If word gets out that they are looking for another one,

In this frame from a video made by Mizzou student Mark Schierbecker, Melissa Click (right), an assistant professor of communications at University of Missouri, orders the student videographer out of the area during a protest on Nov. 9, 2015.

To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS they become a lame duck.” That argument hasn’t been a problem for Missouri’s second-largest public university. In both of its last two presidential searches, Missouri State University has held a public process, at least revealing the last two or three finalists, and hosting those finalists on campus for a series of public interviews. One of those former MSU presidents, Mike Nietzel, is now a top adviser to Gov. Jay Nixon, who appointed most of the current UM curators. Such a process is required by law in several states, including bordering Iowa and Tennessee. If Steelman’s wife would have had her way, that would be the law in Missouri, also. In 2003, state Sen. Sarah Steelman, a Republican from Rolla, proposed changes to the state’s public records law, known as the Sunshine Law, that would have required public bodies to release the names of three finalists at least eight days before making a final decision. As it relates to the Board of Curators, that change would have applied to the hiring of a president, chief counsel and secretary to the board. David Steelman let out a hearty laugh when I reminded him of that legislation. “I always supported my wife’s eforts on the Sunshine Law,” said the attorney. “She’d probably be with you on this one.” The proposed change to the Sunshine

Law never made it through the full Senate, but there is an opportunity for Steelman and his fellow curators to honor its spirit. While they settled on a “largely closed” process, there is still a chance they could vote to release finalists’ names, Steelman said. He said his research was clear that the closed process led to the best possibility of having a “broad” applicant pool, but he’d be open to releasing some names near the end of the process. Curators could make that decision in February, he said. They would do well to remember how the university got to its current dilemma. When black students targeted Wolfe for resignation, their larger, more important complaint had to do with making sure that they were included in the process of governance at a university that has a less than exemplary history in that department. In demanding that Wolfe step down, the Concerned Student 1950 list of demands also asked that future chancellors and presidents be chosen by a “collective of students, staf, and faculty of diverse backgrounds.” In closing the presidential search process, it’s almost as if the curators posted Click at the door as the new head of security. They might need to call in some more muscle. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

FITNESS CENTER OPEN HOUSE When • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday and 9-11 a.m. Monday Where • Fitness Center in the Field House at Jeferson College, 1000 Viking Drive in Hillsboro More info • 636-481-3106 Jeferson College is hosting an open house for its newly renovated Fitness Center. Attendees can see the new state-of-the-art fitness equipment, sample healthy refreshments, talk with wellness staff and vendors, and win prizes. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 02-17-31-39-47 Mega ball: 09 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $30 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.3 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 12-22-24-31-33 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $135,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 470 Evening: 585 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 1498 Evening: 1903

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

Illinois’ Senate race may be heavy on national security ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO • Fighting to hold on to his political career, U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk turned a recent Republican luncheon into a crash course on the Islamic State group, complete with a map of Syria he brought with him to western Illinois. He pointed out Russian maneuvers and Islamic State territory, called for more U.S. airstrikes and touted his eforts to keep extremists from entering the U.S. as refugees. “I want you to send a national security hawk to the Senate,” the former Navy intelligence oicer told the crowd. Like other Republicans up for election nationwide, Kirk is making national security a prime focus of his bid for a second term. It’s a strategy that has historically worked well for the GOP, particu-

larly at times when voters are on edge about the country’s safety, as many are now. But Democratic U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth could flip the script if the two candidates face of, as expected, in November. A former Army helicopter pilot, Duckworth lost both legs when the Black Hawk she was co-piloting was shot down in Iraq in 2004. She later was awarded the Purple Heart. Democrats nationally see Duckworth as one of their best chances to win a seat this fall in the U.S. Senate, where the party needs to pick up four seats to regain control if a Democrat wins the race for president. Duckworth not only neutralizes Kirk on national security issues, they say, she one-ups him. “We’re eager to have this debate,” said

Duckworth spokesman Matt McGrath, adding that Kirk has been wrong on critical foreign policy and national security questions, “often with disastrous results.” Kirk campaign manager Kevin Artl said the former congressman is proud of his record, from his 23-year career with the Navy to his work in the U.S. House and Senate, where he’s been one of the staunchest opponents of Iran. “Sen. Kirk has demonstrated his leadership on national security,” Artl said. “It creates a critical debate on who has the right vision and strategy for this unique time that we’re in.” Kirk and Duckworth are considered the heavy favorites to win their respective primaries, due to both strong name recognition and substantial fundraising advantages.

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A12 Obituaries ........... A14 People ................. A16

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 03-04-05-12-24 Evening: 03-15-20-31-44 LOTTO Monday: 10-17-19-32-38-47 Extra shot: 05 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $21 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 021 FB: 0 Evening: 775 FB: 2 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 1433 FB: 3 Evening: 4686 FB: 3

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................... A9 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A16

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Features: Jody Mitori ...................................... 314-340-8240

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS:476-580. Postmaster send address changes to: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday through Sunday $7.20, Sunday through Friday $7.11, Monday through Friday $5.38, Thursday through Sunday $5.61, Sat-Sun-Mon Only $4.94, Fri-Sat-Sun Only $4.94, Sun-Mon Only $4.24, Sat-Sun Only $4.24, Sunday Only $3.49. All prices include applicable sales tax, delivery and premium editions delivered on 6/21/15, 6/28/15, 7/4/15, 8/2/15, 8/30/15, 9/5/15, 9/6/15, 10/25/2015,11/26/15, 12/25/15, 1/31/16, 4/24/16, 6/26/16, 7/17/16, 7/31/16, 9/18/16, 10/23/16, 11/24/16, 12/18/16 and may afect your subscription paid through date.

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Local news, Business: Adam Goodman...........314-340-8258 News: Ron Wade ...............................................314-340-8229 Online: Bob Rose............................................... 314-340-8333 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


M 2 WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

THAT’S A WRAP

CAN YOU GIVE MERMAID A HOME?

10 QUESTIONS: MOZELIAK ON THE CARDS

In a new Prep School video, food writer Daniel Neman shows how to make crepes, the delicious, versatile French wraps that are surprisingly easy to create.

Mermaid is an adorable mutt but comes from a property where she was severely neglected. If you’re looking to give a sweet rescue dog a second chance, come meet Mermaid!

Rosenthal in the rotation? Carpenter still leading of? Adams in the everyday lineup? See what GM John Mozeliak had to say at the Cardinals’ Winter Warm-Up.

UM curators adopt ‘safe space’ tactic in their presidential search

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 1986 MISSOURI LOTTERY BEGINS The Missouri Lottery begins sales in a party-like atmosphere of champagne, celebrations and large crowds across the state.

HEADS UP HOMELESS COUNT The Community Council of St. Charles County needs volunteers to help with its annual Point in Time Homeless Count on Jan. 27. During the count, the council takes a one-day “snapshot” of what homelessness looks like in the community by identifying and counting the number of people in shelters, living in places not meant for human habitation, living in local motels, and living on the streets. Training is required for anyone who has not participated in the count in previous years. Times are 11:30 a.m. Thursday or Monday at the Community Council, 427 Spencer Road, St. Peters, Mo. 63376. For more details, call 636-978-2277 Ext. 409 or go to communitycouncilstc.org.

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The University of Missouri Board of Curators has decided to adopt the Melissa Click philosophy. When in doubt, shut the public out. Click, of course, is the University of Missouri-Columbia communications assistant professor who earned notoriety during the fall hunger strike by MU student Jonathan Butler and associated protests of black students ailiated with the group Concerned Student 1950. It was Nov. 9, the day university system President Timothy M. Wolfe resigned so that Butler would begin eating again, and dozens of protesters had gathered on the quad surrounding the Concerned Student 1950 tent city. Click stood in the way as freelance photographer Tim Tai, also a university student, sought to report on the protests. She asked for “some muscle” to keep journalists away from what some of the protesters wanted protected as a “safe space.” It was not a good moment for Click, and since then, there have been numerous calls for her resignation, mostly from the Missouri Legislature, but also from at least one curator, David Steelman. Now Steelman and the curators are tasked with finding a replacement for Wolfe, whose resignation was sudden and unexpected. But the rules of openness that they want so badly to enforce on the university’s campus don’t seem to apply to them. As has been par for the course in most of the recent searches for president, including the one that chose Wolfe, the curators have decided to create a “safe space” so they can work in secret. This is not becoming of a state university, but it’s a growing trend across the nation. The argument, in Missouri and at most public universities that decide to close their presidential searches, is that the top candidates won’t apply if they are subject to public disclosure. “The best candidates probably have a job,” Steelman told me in explaining his vote to close the process. “If word gets out that they are looking for another one,

In this frame from a video made by Mizzou student Mark Schierbecker, Melissa Click (right), an assistant professor of communications at University of Missouri, orders the student videographer out of the area during a protest on Nov. 9, 2015.

To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch. com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS they become a lame duck.” That argument hasn’t been a problem for Missouri’s second-largest public university. In both of its last two presidential searches, Missouri State University has held a public process, at least revealing the last two or three finalists, and hosting those finalists on campus for a series of public interviews. One of those former MSU presidents, Mike Nietzel, is now a top adviser to Gov. Jay Nixon, who appointed most of the current UM curators. Such a process is required by law in several states, including bordering Iowa and Tennessee. If Steelman’s wife would have had her way, that would be the law in Missouri, also. In 2003, state Sen. Sarah Steelman, a Republican from Rolla, proposed changes to the state’s public records law, known as the Sunshine Law, that would have required public bodies to release the names of three finalists at least eight days before making a final decision. As it relates to the Board of Curators, that change would have applied to the hiring of a president, chief counsel and secretary to the board. David Steelman let out a hearty laugh when I reminded him of that legislation. “I always supported my wife’s eforts on the Sunshine Law,” said the attorney. “She’d probably be with you on this one.” The proposed change to the Sunshine

Law never made it through the full Senate, but there is an opportunity for Steelman and his fellow curators to honor its spirit. While they settled on a “largely closed” process, there is still a chance they could vote to release finalists’ names, Steelman said. He said his research was clear that the closed process led to the best possibility of having a “broad” applicant pool, but he’d be open to releasing some names near the end of the process. Curators could make that decision in February, he said. They would do well to remember how the university got to its current dilemma. When black students targeted Wolfe for resignation, their larger, more important complaint had to do with making sure that they were included in the process of governance at a university that has a less than exemplary history in that department. In demanding that Wolfe step down, the Concerned Student 1950 list of demands also asked that future chancellors and presidents be chosen by a “collective of students, staf, and faculty of diverse backgrounds.” In closing the presidential search process, it’s almost as if the curators posted Click at the door as the new head of security. They might need to call in some more muscle. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

FITNESS CENTER OPEN HOUSE When • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday and 9-11 a.m. Monday Where • Fitness Center in the Field House at Jeferson College, 1000 Viking Drive in Hillsboro More info • 636-481-3106 Jeferson College is hosting an open house for its newly renovated Fitness Center. Attendees can see the new state-of-the-art fitness equipment, sample healthy refreshments, talk with wellness staff and vendors, and win prizes. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 02-17-31-39-47 Mega ball: 09 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $30 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.3 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 12-22-24-31-33 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $135,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 470 Evening: 585 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 1498 Evening: 1903

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

Richmond Heights residents bemoan complex BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

RICHMOND HEIGHTS • Residents got

one more chance Tuesday night to convince the Richmond Heights City Council that 203 proposed luxury apartments between Dale Avenue and Highway 40 (Interstate 64) would be a bad thing. Developer Joe Cyr, who said he’s helped build $300 million worth of developments in the St. Louis area, wants to put a $34 million, mixed-use, luxury apartment project at Dale Avenue and Boland Place. The complex, which would also include 3,500 square feet of retail space on the ground level, would replace a church and a brick school that’s been vacant for 14 years. Residents who spoke up Tuesday night said they don’t want another apart-

ment complex or more traffic in their neighborhood. Some said they think the apartments could easily deteriorate into lower-quality or low-income housing if the property managers fail to attract enough tenants. “I think we know that this is going to be a competitive marketplace,” resident Derek Bolden said at a City Council meeting Tuesday night, citing complexes going up nearby in Clayton, Maplewood and elsewhere. “What if they can’t get that building filled? What happens then?” But the residents’ concerns are at odds with city oicials’ wishes to redevelop and revitalize parts of Dale Avenue, which they consider “underutilized” and in need of new and better stores, restaurants and places to live. “Is there any development that won’t

generate traffic? Or do we just leave it empty for the rest of time?” said Councilman Ed Notter. To appease his opponents, Cyr told the council he planned this project expecting it will be fully leased in 13 months, and no more than two years. He said recent studies indicate that luxury apartments “of this quality” are in demand in the area. “We don’t go into a project unless we think it will be leased up in 13 months,” he said. As for traic, a study and analysis commissioned by the developer concluded that traic is “not expected to be noticeably worse.” The apartment project would add 1,335 daily car trips, according to the study, which was conducted on one day. After hearing public comments for two meetings, the council is expected to decide on the project at the Feb. 1 meeting.

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A12 Obituaries ........... A14 People ................. A16

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 03-04-05-12-24 Evening: 03-15-20-31-44 LOTTO Monday: 10-17-19-32-38-47 Extra shot: 05 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $21 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 021 FB: 0 Evening: 775 FB: 2 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 1433 FB: 3 Evening: 4686 FB: 3

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................... A9 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A16

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Features: Jody Mitori ...................................... 314-340-8240

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS:476-580. Postmaster send address changes to: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday through Sunday $7.20, Sunday through Friday $7.11, Monday through Friday $5.38, Thursday through Sunday $5.61, Sat-Sun-Mon Only $4.94, Fri-Sat-Sun Only $4.94, Sun-Mon Only $4.24, Sat-Sun Only $4.24, Sunday Only $3.49. All prices include applicable sales tax, delivery and premium editions delivered on 6/21/15, 6/28/15, 7/4/15, 8/2/15, 8/30/15, 9/5/15, 9/6/15, 10/25/2015,11/26/15, 12/25/15, 1/31/16, 4/24/16, 6/26/16, 7/17/16, 7/31/16, 9/18/16, 10/23/16, 11/24/16, 12/18/16 and may afect your subscription paid through date.

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Local news, Business: Adam Goodman...........314-340-8258 News: Ron Wade ...............................................314-340-8229 Online: Bob Rose............................................... 314-340-8333 Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

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What made the difference? RETIREMENT IN REVERSE

A husband worries.

A widow thrives!

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Jennings schools chief reported to be inalist for Kansas job BY ELISA CROUCH st. Louis Post-dispatch

Roy, a 65-year old homeowner in Oklahoma1, wonders if he and his wife’s combined Social Security income of $1,585 per month will be enough for them to live on.

Margaret, a widow from North Carolina, had to think twice about treating herself to a meal out. Now, her credit cards are paid off and she has extra money in the bank.

Better read this if you’re 62 or older and own a home... More than 1 million seniors have taken advantage of this “retirement secret.” Americans are living longer. And, home prices are up. In October of 2011, the U.S. Median Sales Price of Existing Homes was $160,800 according to the National Association of Realtors.2 As of October 2015, the Median Sales Price of Existing Homes in the U.S. was $219,600, a 36.8% increase since October of 2011. For many senior citizens, their home is their single biggest asset, oten accounting for more than 50% of their total net worth. With the cost of basic necessities such as food on the rise and many retirees worried about outliving their savings, it’s no wonder why more and more seniors are using HECM reverse mortgages to turn their home equity into extra cash for retirement. However, there are still millions of homeowners who could beneit from this governmentinsured loan but may simply In 1988, President Reagan signed the not be aware of FHA Reverse Mortthis “retirement gage bill into law. secret.” Some people think that reverse mortgages sound “too good to be true.” You keep on living in your home, get cash out of it, and have no monthly loan payments.

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NOMONTHLYMORTGAGE PAYMENTS?3 EXTRA CASH? It’s true, no monthly mortgage payments are required with a reverse mortgage;3 the homeowners simply have to comply with the terms of the loan, which include living in the home as their primary residence, paying for routine maintenance, property taxes, homeowner’s insurance and, if required, their HOA fees. Reverse mortgages took hold when President Ronald Reagan signed the FHA mortgage bill into law over 25 years ago to help senior citizens remain in their homes. hey’re simply an efective way for folks 62 and older to get the cash they need for a more comfortable retirement. Unfortunately, many homeowners who could beneit from a reverse mortgage don’t even bother to get more information due to rumors they’ve heard. hat’s a shame because reverse mortgages are helping many seniors live a better life. If you’re a homeowner age 62 or older, you owe it to yourself to learn more. Interested homeowners can contact American Advisors Group, the nation’s No. 1 Reverse Mortgage Lender, for a FREE information kit.

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Tiffany Anderson, the superintendent credited with transforming the Jennings School District, is one of two finalists to lead the school system in Topeka, Kan. According to the Topeka Capital-Journal, interviews for the job are Tuesday and Wednesday. Since Anderson took the superintendent’s position in Jennings in 2012, she has a reputation as a visionary who does what needs to be done for students who have many needs and burdens. During her tenure, Jennings, which touches the Normandy and Riverview Gardens school districts, has gone from the brink of failure to a district that regained full accreditation this year. Anderson has received national attention for her successes. More than 85 percent of children in Jennings schools live in poverty. Under Anderson’s direction, Jennings schools have worked to give children more academic rigor while at the same time, address the symptoms of poverty. There’s a food pantry and a foster home for homeless children. Jennings Junior High opened a College Prep option and a strings instrumental club. Teachers and counselors throughout the district are being trained to better understand the role trauma plays in behavior. If Anderson is offered the job and accepts, she would be working closer to

KTVI

Tifany Anderson

home. She has been commuting each week to St. Louis County from Overland Park, Kan., where her husband is an OB-GYN and son is in high school. Jennings enrolls about 2,600 children. The Topeka school district has about 14,200 students. According to the Capital-Journal, the other finalist is an administrator in Nebraska. Anderson could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com

Ferguson-Florissant school case elicits concerns from judge BY ROBERT PATRICK st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A federal trial that could radically alter elections in the Ferguson-Florissant School District ended Tuesday, but any resolution of the case is still months away. The ACLU, on behalf of the NAACP and three residents, claims that the district is violating the Voting Rights Act with atlarge elections. They say blacks are underrepresented on the school board in a district where nearly 80 percent of the students are black. They blame historical discrimination as well as “present-day circumstances,” Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU, said. Not all students, schools and parts of the district are represented equally, Rothert said. Cindy Ormsby, a lawyer for the district, said that board members represent the entire district “border to border” and favor at-large elections as the best way to achieve proportional representation for blacks. And she said that in 2013, blacks represented 51 percent of the voting age population, and she expected that number to be even higher now. Ormsby said, “... It’s self-evident that they have an equal opportunity to elect the candidates of their choice.”

Ormsby accused the ACLU and the NAACP of attacking the district “for simply complying with the state of Missouri’s election laws.” The trial was held in front of U.S. District Judge Rodney Sippel, not a jury, which allowed for some freewheeling discussion during closing arguments Tuesday. At times, Sippel stopped lawyers to challenge their conclusions and ask his own questions. “Whatever we do here is going to be real and based on what’s really going on,” he said at one point. He also worried whether, in a district where the black voting population was increasing, he might “institutionalize a remedy” that would have the eventual efect of preserving white majorities. He asked lawyers whether remedies in other cases had a “sunset” date. At the end of the hearing, Sippel gave litigants until April 8 to file post-hearing briefs and their proposals on how he should rule. They will then have until April 22 to respond to the filings. The case may have broader impacts, as at-large elections are enshrined in state law, and Sippel pointed out that there are a lot of school districts in north St. Louis County. “Why is Ferguson-Florissant unique?” he asked. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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COTTLEVILLE > Community college president moving on • Ronald Chesbrough, the president of St. Charles Community College since 2011, is resigning to accept a similar job at a four-year college in upstate New York. Chesbrough, 59, will become president of Cazenovia College in Cazenovia, N.Y. near Syracuse in July. He will continue in his current job until the end Chesbrough of his contract June 30, said Heather McDorman, a spokeswoman for the community college. She said the college’s board has yet to devise a process for illing Chesbrough’s post. Before coming to the community college, Chesbrough had been vice president for student afairs at Nebraska’s Hastings College. (Mark Schlinkmann) WENTZVILLE > Ex-aldermen to challenge mayor • Former Alderman Chris Gard signed up Tuesday to run against Mayor Nick Guccione in the April 5 election. Gard submitted his name for the ballot on the inal day candidates can ile for the coming election. In other recent ilings, state Rep. Ron Hicks registered to run against St. Peters Mayor Len Pagano. Hicks had announced his candidacy previously. (Mark Schlinkmann)

aldermen and mayor agreed Monday night that the new city facilities should be developed according to an $8 million plan, by far the least expensive of four options proposed in an architect’s feasibility study. “We’ll be taking a inal vote to proceed on Feb. 1, just in case if we need to tweak anything,” Mayor Richard Magee said. “But we’re all for this option.” The preferred plan includes a irehouse to the south of the present city complex. Estimates show that to inance the needed bonds, an additional debt service levy of 39 cents would be needed for 20 years. This would be in addition to the city’s present property tax, which was 50.5 cents on residences in 2015. Other building options ran as high as $14.4 million, including retaining the historic irehouse and providing a “new government complex,” with 28,604 square feet of development. The preferred plan is described as a “new irehouse, minor building renovations and limited site work,” with 22,018 square feet. Under a tentative schedule, the bond issue as well as a ire sales tax proposal of 0.25 cents would both be on the city ballot on Aug. 2. The bond issue would need four-sevenths approval. The sales tax, projected to bring in $65,000 in annual revenue, would need a simple majority. The sales tax in the city is now 8.363 percent. (Special to the PostDispatch)

GLENDALE > Oicials select least costly option for new city complex • Glendale’s

STLTODAY.COM/WEATHER Current weather conditions, an 18-hour forecast, the latest radar imagery and much more


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

A LIGHT COAT OF WHITE

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

A pedestrian crosses the street at Washington Avenue and Seventh Street on Tuesday as snow begins to fall in downtown St. Louis.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Kristen Trudo, 23, of Los Angeles, was in the Grove on Tuesday and said she had never been outside when snow was falling. Since this was her irst real snow, she said she had to go out and play in it as she frolicked at Manchester and Kentucky avenues.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

The couple of inches of snow that spread over the St. Louis area made for a rough commute Tuesday evening, at least for those in cars. For those on foot, specifically members of the Happy’s Running Club in south St. Louis, it made for a beautiful journey. “I love it. I prefer it,” said Bennett Keefer, 27, who lives a block away from the Royale restau-

rant and bar at 3132 South Kingshighway, where the club meets on Tuesday evenings for a 5K run. “The fresh-fallen snow ... it looks awesome.” A winter weather advisory that took effect at noon Tuesday remains in place until 6 a.m. Wednesday. Snow began falling in parts of the region on Tuesday afternoon. The National Weather Service office in Weldon Spring said it could continue through much of Tuesday night.

“It’s slick out,” said Kyleigh Elliott of Warrenton as she hurried to return a laundry basket to the Warrenton Coin Laundry on Tuesday. Snowfall could amount to 2 to 3 inches, with higher amounts to the north and southeast of the St. Louis area.

The region’s snowfall could amount to 2 to 3 inches, with higher amounts to the north and southeast of the St. Louis area. Areas across central and northeastern Missouri and west-central Illinois, for example, might see 3 to 4 or more inches of snow. “You definitely want to give yourself a lot of extra time to travel in tomorrow’s commute, if it continues to snow all through the night,” said Shaunda White of the Missouri Department of

Transportation. “If it stops earlier, maybe the morning rush won’t be afected as much.” A two-vehicle accident on westbound Interstate 70 on the Blanchette Bridge about 4:30 p.m. tied up traffic as law enforcement blocked off a couple of lanes to tend to it, she said. Just before 7 p.m., all westbound lanes of 270 at Lilac Avenue were closed because of another twovehicle accident. Fifteen minute commutes home from downtown

St. Louis took up to an hour, and even longer to the suburbs. St. Louis County road crews pre-treated the county-maintained major roads and bridges with rock salt, and crews in St. Louis had been out brining the streets since midnight Monday. The temperature on Tuesday hit 24 degrees. Wednesday’s high will be a bit warmer, at 30, but it won’t climb above freezing until Thursday, when the forecast calls for 35 degrees.

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McCaskill wants program to target use of narcotics She has hearing in Jeferson City, saying state is top seller of opioids in Midwest BY JACK SUNTRUP st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., held a Senate field hearing on opioid abuse Tuesday in the only state without a prescription drug monitoring program: Missouri. Proponents in the state House have passed bills in recent years that would allow the state to track who is prescribed opioid painkillers, which, proponents say, would make it easier for doctors to notice “red flags” among patients. But the proposal in the past has languished in the Senate. Its chief opponent is Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, who cites privacy concerns as the reason for not wanting to establish a program. Opioids are narcotics such as Vicodin and OxyContin that are prescribed to treat pain but are also addictive. McCaskill said that many people who become addicted to prescription painkillers end up using heroin because it is cheaper. In Missouri, hospital treatment for commonly prescribed opioid painkillers increased 137 percent over the last decade, according to a study by the Missouri Hospital Association. McCaskill said at the hearing, “Prescription drug abuse and heroin use is a major public health crisis that afects every community across this nation and has unfortunately claimed the lives of many Americans.” Missouri ranks first in the amount of prescription opioids sold in the Midwest, she said. “We need a prescription drug monitoring program to prevent doctor shopping, control of prescription drug abuse, and to outline drug use and abuse trends to aid public health initiatives,” McCaskill said. McCaskill held the field hearing for the U.S. Special Committee on Aging.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., in 2014. She said Tuesday: “Prescription drug abuse and heroin use is a major public health crisis that afects every community across this nation ...”

No other U.S. senators were present. McCaskill also spoke about drug addiction as it relates to older people. Maurice Redden, a St. Louis University geriatric psychiatrist, said that the negative efects of painkiller use can be magnified among the elderly. In addition, elderly patients often take multiple prescriptions. “This increases the risk of drug interactions, which can complicate medical problems,” he said. He said that social isolation and poor support systems can also increase the likelihood that older adults would abuse opioids. McCaskill said she would seek statistics on drug treatment programs for the elderly after doctors at the hearing couldn’t identify any existing programs in Missouri. Jack Suntrup • 314-430-8304 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

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sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

Two pregnant Illinois women catch Zika virus BY BLYTHE BERNHARD st. Louis Post-dispatch

Two pregnant women from Illinois contracted the mosquito-borne Zika virus while traveling in Honduras and Haiti, the Illinois health department announced Tuesday. Zika has been linked to potentially fatal birth defects in Brazil, where authorities are investigating a spike in newborns with microcephaly, or underdeveloped brains. The virus is circulating via mosquitoes in the Caribbean, Central America and South America. The women are being monitored by doctors. The virus is not spread from person to person. “There is virtually no risk to Illinois residents since you cannot contract Zika virus from another person, but only through the bite of an infected mosquito,” said Dr. Nirav Shah, the health department’s director, in a statement. “But since this is a time of year when people travel to warmer climates and countries where Zika virus is found, we are urging residents, especially pregnant women, to take preventive measures when traveling in afected countries and check health travel advisories.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a health warning for travel to countries where the Zika virus is circulating, including Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname and Venezuela. The warning also includes Puerto Rico. Pregnant women are advised not to travel to those locations. Health oicials in Jamaica have advised women to delay pregnancy for six to 12 months. The Zika virus usually causes only mild

LAW & ORDER ALTON > Crash kills itness center owner • A man killed in a single-vehicle crash over the weekend was identiied by authorities Tuesday as Eric D. Dixon, 31, a chiropractor and itness trainer who owned a business in Edwardsville. Madison County Coroner Steve Nonn’s oice said Dixon was not wearing a seat belt Sunday afternoon when his 2004 Jeep Cherokee ran of the 2800 block of Seminary Street and into Dixon Black Creek. The irst call for help came in at 3:57 p.m. Dixon was pronounced dead at 5:04 p.m. An autopsy showed he died of blunt trauma to the chest and abdomen, the coroner’s oice said. Toxicology tests were pending. Dixon held a doctorate from the Logan College of Chiropractic and owned Accelerate: Health and Fitness. He was from Jerseyville but more recently lived in Edwardsville. ST. LOUIS > Man slain while driving • Someone in another car fatally shot D’Andre Robinson, 39, as he drove in the 2300 block of Hebert Street, in the Old North neighborhood, about 10:25 p.m. Monday, police said. Robinson lived in the 700 block of Garesche Avenue in Jennings. He tried to lee when shots came from a vehicle that pulled alongside his but his vehicle crashed into a utility pole. Police said they did not know of a motive or suspect. ST. LOUIS > Heroin may igure in killing • Heroin found in a car may have been at the root of a shooting that killed the driver and left one of three passengers wounded about 9:25 p.m. Monday in an alley behind the 5000 block of West Florissant Avenue, police said. Antoine Bland, 21, and the others drove to that area, near Bellefontaine Cemetery, to meet two other men, oicials said. Bland was shot in the neck after getting out of the car. The gunman, who got into the car and tried to drive it away, exchanged shots with a passenger, 22, who was hit in the head and buttocks but was expected to survive, police said. The two others in the car were not hurt. It was not clear whether the killer, who then led on foot, was wounded. Bland lived in the 1500 block of Eton Lane. ST. LOUIS > Shooting victim is identiied • Police said Tuesday that a man found shot to death in the Greater Ville neighborhood was Lenny Hogan, 29, of the 1700 block of Cochran Place. He was discovered about 10:45 a.m. Monday in the 4000 block of St. Ferdinand Avenue by police responding to calls for a shooting. Hogan, whose body was lying next to a stopped car, has been a passenger in the vehicle when he was shot several times, police said. The driver also was shot but ran. Police had not found him. LAKE SAINT LOUIS > Three held after holdup • Three St. Louis men were charged Tuesday in a holdup of a Shell-Circle K convenience store near Interstate 70 about 3 a.m. Sunday, police said. De’Von M. Herron, 19, and Kyle J. Berry, 17, allegedly Berry went inside while Anthony Crudup, 17, waited in their vehicle. Herron pointed a handgun at an employee and told her to open the cash register, police said. They got away with $56 and several packages of cigarillos, Herron authorities said, but were

symptoms including fever, rash, joint pain and eye redness. Since October, Brazil has reported more than 3,500 cases of microcephaly in infants compared to less than 150 in all of 2014. Many of the mothers are believed to have contracted the virus while pregnant. The Zika virus was found in the placentas from two women who miscarried and the brains of two newborns who died. The newborns had microcephaly. Researchers in Brazil are working on a vaccine to prevent Zika, but there is no treatment available. Hawaii health officials say a baby recently born with microcephaly at an Oahu hospital was infected with the Zika virus in utero. In reporting the laboratory confirmation from the CDC, the Hawaii health department said the child’s mother probably had a Zika infection while living in Brazil during the spring. The virus was first discovered in a monkey in the Zika forest of Uganda in 1947. It is native to tropical Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. But infections have exploded recently in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is spread through bites from the Aedes mosquito, which also spreads other tropical diseases, such as chikungunya and dengue fever. The breed of mosquito is known to circulate in the southern U.S. At least 28 Americans have been diagnosed with Zika since 2007, all of them travelers who are believed to have caught the virus overseas. In addition, a person in Puerto Rico who had not traveled was diagnosed with the illness last month. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

arrested within the hour by St. Peters police. Each man was charged with robbery and armed criminal action, and jailed in lieu of $70,000 bail. Court records say Herron lives Crudup in the 2900 block of North Taylor Avenue, Crudup in the 4600 block of Palm Street and Berry in the 4500 block of Elmbank Avenue. According to court records, they also were suspects in three other robberies from Friday to Sunday. CHESTERFIELD > Pizza manager charged • Andrea J. Kohlberg, 28, a Domino’s pizza store manager, stole $14,849 by falsifying driver records over a sixmonth period last year, police here said. Kohlberg, of Paciic, was charged Jan. 12 with felony stealing. Bail was set at $25,000. Oicials said Kohlberg, who worked at the store Kohlberg at 14764 Clayton Road, was caught in an internal investigation. She confessed pocketing the diference after inlating the mileage for driver reimbursements, police said. MARYLAND HEIGHTS > One-day worker accused of stealing • A woman hired from a Craigslist ad to be an accountant for a irm worked just one day and bilked the company out of nearly $15,000 over the following months, police said in court documents. Prosecutors charged Angela Renee Phan last week with identity theft, a felony. Bail Phan was set at $50,000 for Phan, 35, of the 6600 block of Devonshire Avenue in St. Louis. Court documents say she worked for Triplematic Dispensers, at 2024 Congressional Drive, for one day, but do not explain why she left. Oicials said Phan confessed using account and routing numbers from her paycheck to make fraudulent transactions totaling $14,720. JEFFERSON COUNTY > Man remains missing after almost a month • Authorities are asking for the public’s help in inding a man who disappeared almost a month ago. Tyler Adams, 24, was reported missing from the 7800 block of Jim Webber Road in northern Jeferson County southeast of Eureka on Dec. 21. He was last seen wearing brown khaki pants and a white T-shirt. He is Adams about 6 feet tall and 150 pounds. Authorities asked anyone with information to call the Jeferson County Sherif’s Department at 636-797-5515. BENTON, ILL. > Threats lead to twoyear sentence • A Chicago man has been sentenced to two years in federal prison for making bomb threats in his “war on SIU,” the U.S. attorney’s oice said Monday. Derrick Dawon Burns, 22, pleaded guilty in August to four counts of willfully making a bomb threat and admitted sending four letters threatening Southern Illinois University Carbondale, students, staf, campus police and the FBI between Oct. 10, 2012, and Oct. 1, 2013. Three letters were titled “The War on SIU,” and charging documents say Burns threatened to blow up buildings and rape and decapitate female students, among other things. One letter prompted the university to evacuate three dorms and another demanded $50 million.


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

Beer and drink sales have risen 4.5 percent in city CLOSURES • FROM A1

end of the month. Harry’s and Shannon’s have been around for about two and three decades, respectively. Others that have closed in recent months include The Dubliner, at 1025 Washington Avenue, which ended a nine-year run in November; Prime 1000, at 1000 Washington; and Joe Buck’s, at 1000 Clark Avenue. When Harry’s announced its demise this week, co-owner Tim Pieri pointed the finger at a highprofile competitor, just a few blocks east. Pieri said Ballpark Village, the entertainment complex developed by Baltimore-based Cordish Co. for the Cardinals, sapped his restaurant of 70 percent of its business and “was the nail in the coin.” But other restaurateurs and downtown business people aren’t so sure. Dan Kopman, co-founder of Schlafly Beer, lamented on Tuesday the imminent losses of Harry’s and Shannon’s. “It’s sad to lose these sorts of institutions,” said Kopman, who helped start the Schlafly Tap Room downtown in 1991. But he reserved judgment on the Ballpark Village efect. St. Louis has “an unbelievable assortment” of dining and entertainment choices across the area, and attributing a business closure to a single circumstance is diicult, he said. “It’s easy to jump to conclusions,” Kopman added. He noted that as some longestablished downtown places closed, new places opened. One chef and restaurateur willing to venture downtown is Gerard Craft, whose fast-casual concept Porano Pasta is set to open Tuesday at 634 Washington. Craft said downtown’s challenges were what drew him there. “There is this fear, I think, of going downtown,” he said. “The

more people told me not to go downtown, I really, really wanted to go downtown. It’s the heart of the city. If we don’t put some energy into it and make something happen, (nothing will).” Craft said Ballpark Village wasn’t a major concern as he readied Porano Pasta’s debut. “There are always going to be concerns,” he said. “Those are good. They give you something to fight for.” Tony Lombardo, a partner in three downtown restaurants, said Ballpark Village was not the bogeyman as some portrayed it. He said it hurt nearby “beer bars” but had helped his upscale restaurants — Carmine’s, at 20 South Fourth Street, and Lombardo’s Trattoria, at 201 South 20th Street. Lombardo said some customers came downtown to dine at his restaurants, then went to Ballpark Village for entertainment. He said his third downtown eatery, Angelo’s Taverna, at 316 Market, also did well even though its casual dining competed with Ballpark Village. Jim Watry, Ballpark Village’s chief operations officer, did not return a call seeking comment.

CITYWIDE GROWTH Overall, St. Louis’ restaurant and bar market appears to be growing. For the entire city, food and drink sales at eating and bar establishments — which include fast-food chains — rose 4.5 percent in first nine months of 2015, according to data from the Missouri Department of Revenue. Data on food and drink sales downtown alone were not available. Downtown’s problem may be that the growth is happening in the city’s central corridor from the Gateway Arch westward, Kopman said. Within that corridor lies the Central West End and the Grove entertainment district along Manchester Avenue. Department of Revenue fig-

ures show sales in the Central West End Business Community Improvement District have increased several years in a row. Sales also are rising in the Grove. The data for business districts include sales from all businesses, not just food and drinking establishments. The department doesn’t publish business district figures that are broken down by the type of establishment. Brooks Goedeker, executive director of Park Central Development, the area’s community development corporation, said the Grove succeeded by evolving. “We’re always looking for the next small win we can have,” said Goedeker, whose organization administers the Grove’s community improvement district. “We tell ourselves we’re never stopping. We’re always trying to improve it.” Coming soon will be a series of lights strung above Manchester. Goedeker said plastic cylinders illuminated from within by color-changing LED lights would begin to go up in February. Money from Grove businesses and sales tax income from the community improvement district will pay for the $350,000 project, he said. Goedeker said he rooted for downtown to thrive. “We believe when downtown does well, we also do well,” he said. “It’s not a competition. We definitely need a vibrant and productive downtown.” Shannon, the longtime Cardinals player and broadcaster, announced Saturday that his restaurant would close. He said having the business for decades had been “a celebration.” “It was everything that I wanted it to be, a place that people could enjoy before and after the games,” Shannon told the Post-Dispatch in a Sunday story.

audit this year. “I’m frustrated Recorder Carpenter continues to defend past actions, despite repeated findings of mismanagement,” Galloway said Tuesday. “It’s a disservice to the citizens of St. Louis when these opportunities for necessary change are dismissed.” The audit rated the overall performance of the recorder’s oice as “poor,” the lowest possible rating. In a statement on Tuesday, Carpenter said the audit was the most negative she has seen in 35 years, and said it “appears that the findings were developed to meet preconceived determinations.” “The one thing to conclude from this audit is that all public funds are accounted for — no funds found missing,” Carpenter said. Carpenter, a Democrat, was first elected recorder in 1980. She remained in oice until 2014, when she resigned over violating the state’s nepotism law for paying her great-nephew $12,255 for contract work. Still, Carpenter sought re-election and was returned to oice a few months later by city voters. Upon her return, a benefits loophole allowed Carpenter to collect her full salary while also receiving pension benefits from the same oice. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon requested the audit after it was

revealed that Carpenter’s chief deputy was involved in bidding that gave companies linked to James Treis, the deputy’s son, contracts for $100,000 in oice renovation work. Peggy Treis Meeker, the chief deputy, was fired during Carpenter’s brief hiatus from oice. Meeker was involved in the 2013 bidding process that netted Superior Building Group, where James Treis is listed as president, more than $100,000 in work. A 2009 renovation paid more than $200,000 to another company where Treis worked as a “senior project manager.” Carpenter noted to the auditor’s oice that she isn’t related to Treis. “The recorder knows the previous chief deputy’s son, but has had rare contact with him,” the recorder’s oice said in the audit. “The recorder had an excellent working relationship with the former chief deputy professionally but that was the extent.” A 2014 city counselor review noted: “Meeker stated that Carpenter told her to ‘get Jimmy to put in a bid’ and that Meeker then told Treis what kind of renovations they wanted completed. Meeker stated that the work was not advertised for bidding, that she did not inform anyone else about the project, and that she did not solicit bids from anyone.” The state audit found that the deputy recorder had a conflict,

Lobbyist gift ban heads to full House for vote BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Lobbyists would be barred from handing out free tickets to baseball games, buying meals and offering other freebies to elected officials under the latest piece of an ethics overhaul moving through the Missouri House. State Rep. Justin Alferman said his proposal is designed to “alleviate some of the undue influence of lobbyists in Jeferson City.” “It bans individual lobbyist gifts to lawmakers,” the Hermann Republican told members of a House committee. The proposal, unanimously endorsed by the panel Tuesday and sent to the full House for further debate, is among a handful of proposals being pushed by Republicans heading into the 2016 election season. Along with a gift ban, the Legislature is considering imposing a waiting period for lawmakers wanting to go into lobbying to address the possibility that a member could be writing legislation one day, and then benefiting from that work as a lobbyist the next. Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon also is seeking laws to clean up the culture of the capital city, but Republicans aren’t going along with one of his main goals: limiting campaign contributions. The Legislature is under fire after two members left last year amid accusations of inappropriate relationships with college students serving as interns in the Capitol. A year ago, former House Speaker John Diehl, R-Town and Country, banned lobbyists

from buying meals at committee hearings. If approved, lobbyist-sponsored junkets would end unless lawmakers pay their own way. In 2015, a handful of state representatives and senators reported receiving over $4,300 each for airfare, lodging and meals for a trip to Israel. Records show Senate Minority Leader Joe Keaveny, D-St. Louis, was among those taking a spouse on the trip. The ban could mean a big break in the cost of lobbying for people such as Bill Gamble, a longtime capital lobbyist who represents a roster of special interests, including dentists, doctors, sheriffs, Wal-Mart, Kraft and Washington University. Reports filed with the Missouri Ethics Commission show Gamble’s firm spent more than $38,000 wining and dining lawmakers in the past year. A similar ban that failed to win final approval last year imposed a $25 limit on gifts. This year’s version bans all gifts and meals, except plaques to lawmakers who get awards. It would allow lobbyists to buy meals when all members of the General Assembly and all statewide oicials are invited. Former state Rep. Jeanette Mott Oxford, D-St. Louis, who now serves as a lobbyist for Empower Missouri, praised the attempt to rein in lobbyists. “I think it’s a very good idea,” Mott Oxford said. “The public would prefer we just not receive gifts.” The legislation is House Bill 2166. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Ian Froeb and Walker Moskop of the PostDispatch contributed to this story. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com

Recorder is accused of inancial mismanagement AUDIT • FROM A1

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

along with a level of responsibility for the project, and didn’t act in accord with good management practices. It also found that escrow accounts managed by the recorder’s office are not balanced against the city’s records. “This allows errors to go undetected, and has led to $38,000 identified with no record of where these funds belong, or who they belong to,” the audit found. And then there is the car. The Post-Dispatch reported last year that Carpenter asked the city for a $700 monthly vehicle allowance. She later rescinded the request after reports surfaced that her husband had two accidents while driving her previous city vehicle without Carpenter in the car. The audit found that Carpenter didn’t keep a detailed vehicle usage log on that car — even though a previous state audit recommended she do so. Fueling documents showed that the vehicle was driven 5,460 miles during an 18-month period, although Carpenter reported usage of 10,000 miles beyond that. In the audit, the recorder’s office said Carpenter overestimated the mileage and paid more in state in federal taxes, then noted: “The recorder is no longer provided a city vehicle.” Nicholas J.C. Pistor • 314-436-2239 @nickpistor on Twitter npistor@post-dispatch.com

Bill requires second parent to be notiied about abortion BY ALEX STUCKEY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Abortion

opponent Sam Lee fears a scenario where a parent first learns of his or her daughter’s abortion through a phone call from the emergency room. What if the child had an adverse reaction to medication used during the abortion, Lee asked, or suffered from heavy bleeding because of a botched procedure? That’s why Lee, president of Campaign Life Missouri, told a House committee Tuesday he’s in favor of both parents knowing if their minor child is seeking an abortion. “Parents have the right and obligation to know what’s going on with their children, particularly when they’re making a lifechanging” decision, Lee said. The House Committee on Children and Families heard testimony Tuesday on a measure, sponsored by Rep. Rocky Miller, R-Lake Ozark, that would require the parent of a daughter younger than 18 seeking an abortion to notify in writing the other “custodial parent or guardian” of the abortion. Under current law, a physician must get informed written consent from one parent or guardian. There would be some exceptions to this change, such as a parent or guardian who is a sex ofender or has been found guilty of child abuse. Despite the exceptions, abor-

tion rights proponents argue this change could put a young woman’s life in danger. M’Evie Mead, Missouri director of organizing for Planned Parenthood, said not all teenagers come from homes where they can speak openly with both parents. They could be facing violent or abusive relationships, she said, and can trust only one parent with knowledge about an unplanned pregnancy. She also noted that, in the case of incest, this new law could force the teen to notify her rapist about the pregnancy and the subsequent abortion. “I don’t think this bill would do anything to further the health and safety of teens in state,” Mead said. “It could put them in danger.” But Miller said he didn’t introduce this measure to put young women in harm’s way. “I just think it would be healthier for the minor child in a lot of cases if both parents were aware of what’s going on and can talk about it,” he said. Miller tried and failed last year to pass this measure, but it could have a better chance this year as the 2016 election approaches and Republican lawmakers continue to investigate allegations that Planned Parenthood sold fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood has vehemently denied these allegations and Attorney General Chris Koster found no evidence of wrongdoing in Missouri. The bill is House Bill 1370.

hree judges who want to avoid retention vote say their action is legal JUDGES • FROM A1

party primaries on March 15. Cook was one of the dozen demonstrators who stood on the steps of the county building in 20-degree chill. Mary Thurman, secretary of the county GOP, praised Cook for filing his complaint with the election board. She accused the judges “of trying to deceive the public. What they are doing is absolutely unethical.” Inside his courtroom a short time later, Baricevic, the circuit’s chief judge, said he, Haida and LeChien “are absolutely convinced that our action is legal and ethical.” The state election board is set to vote during its meeting, which begins at 10:30 a.m. Working in the judges’ favor is that a hearing examiner, lawyer David Herman, of Springfield, has recommended that the board reject Cook’s complaint. Here’s how the situation unfolds: Circuit judges in Illinois

are first elected as partisan candidates, then typically seek retention every six years — a system similar to one used by sitting judges in St. Louis and St. Louis County. Illinois circuit judges keep their jobs by getting at least 60 percent approval. Baricevic, Haida and LeChien submitted resignations that would not be efective until Dec. 4, 2016, and then filed as candidates in the March Democratic primary for the coming vacancies in the jobs they still perform. None has opposition for party nomination, and no Republican has filed to challenge Haida. If Baricevic and LeChien defeat GOP opponents on Nov. 8, all three would return to the bench two days after their resignations took efect. Baricevic presumably faces Republican attorney Ronald Duebbert of Belleville. County Associate Judge Laninya Cason filed to be LeChien’s Republican opponent. In 2006, former Circuit Judge

Lloyd Cueto followed the same strategy and kept his job by winning as a Democratic candidate with a 56 percent voter majority — less than what retention would have required. Cook noted Cueto’s move, complaining in Tuesday’s protest: “It happened before and nobody stopped it. If this has to go to the Illinois Supreme Court, that’s where we will take it.” If the judges prevail Wednesday, Cook will have until Monday to file an appeal with the Circuit Court in Belleville.

PAST SCANDAL LOOMS Both sides say the scandal involving former judges Michael Cook and Joe Christ looms over the judicial elections. Christ, a new associate judge, died of a cocaine overdose on March 10, 2013, at Judge Cook’s family hunting lodge. Judge Cook later was sentenced to two years in federal prison for possession of heroin and for being a drug user in possession of a firearm. (Dal-

las Cook said he is not related to Judge Cook.) Thurman said during the rally Tuesday that the three judges fear voter outrage over the scandal. Baricevic said the scandal does figure into their thinking, but not for the reason Thurman expressed. Baricevic said Dallas Cook and others, including local radio personality Bob Romanik, have promised vigorous campaigns to unseat the judges. Citing state Supreme Court rules on judicial conduct, Baricevic said he and his colleagues would be unable to defend themselves from “smear campaigns” if they sought retention. “Retentions used to be lowkey events,” he said. “Then the Chamber of Commerce began dumping money on campaigns against Democratic judges. If we run for retention, we can’t talk about it. That inability to respond would result in a reduction of votes. Certainly we are concerned. We like our jobs.”

In pleadings to the state election board, Dallas Cook and the three judges cited the Illinois Constitution. Cook said the retention system was designed to replace partisan politics in keeping or ousting sitting judges. Its section on the state judiciary outlines how judges may seek retention and how vacancies are filled by general election or appointment. The judges note the constitution says they “may” seek retention. In his report to the state board, Herman writes, “Given a permissive reading of the term “may,” (the constitution) is interpreted to mean that although a sitting judge may file a declaration of candidacy to succeed himself, he is not required to.” Herman also notes there is no prohibition against a sitting judge seeking election to a judgeship. Thus, he endorses their strategy as legal. Tim O’Neil • 314-340-8132 @timoneilpd on Twitter toneil@post-dispatch.com


01.20.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

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M 1 WedneSday • 01.20.2016 • a8

Ameren tries to aid Noranda Adversaries become allies as smelter struggles

Molten aluminum is poured in the Noranda aluminum smelting plant in New Madrid, Mo., in 2014. Noranda’s struggles could weaken the coalition of Missouri consumer and industrial interests that ight electricity price hikes and utility-friendly legislation.

By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ameren Missouri and its largest customer, Noranda Aluminum, aren’t known for getting along in Jeferson City. But the St. Louis utility, faced with the closure of a Southeast Missouri aluminum smelter that buys roughly 10 percent of its power, said Tuesday that it is working with state lawmakers to help the company that has stymied many of the Ameren’s legislative initiatives. In return, sources tell the Post-Dispatch, Ameren is seeking changes in Missouri utility law that would give it more certainty when it files for rate increases. While no bill has been filed yet, the sources say Ameren Missouri wants a regulatory regime similar to that of Illinois, where its sister utility is allowed near-automatic, annual rate increases in exchange for more investment in the electric grid. Such a change would give the Missouri Public Service Commission less discretion over the utility’s rate structure and require it to approve rate adjustments if utilities meet certain criteria. Ameren declined to comment on whether it was seeking legislation similar to the Illinois “formula rate” rules. But Ameren CEO Warner Baxter told the Post-Dispatch this summer that the utility would

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@postdispatch.com

be “relentless” in advocating for regulatory changes with Missouri lawmakers. He said at the time there was no specific policy proposal on the table yet. Noranda’s struggles could weaken the coalition of Missouri consumer and industrial interests that fight electricity price hikes and utility-friendly legislation. During past legislative sessions, big business and consumer groups united to limit Ameren-backed regulatory changes that they argued would raise power costs. Noranda has been one of the coalition’s more prominent contributors to legislative campaigns. Ameren disclosed it was working with its longtime adversary a week after Noranda announced an electric outage had idled two of three aluminum production lines at its smelter in the Missouri Bootheel. Rather than restart

the production lines while low aluminum prices persist, Noranda said it would lay off nearly 500 of the 850 workers at the smelter by February. After that, Noranda will curtail the smelter’s remaining operations by March 12 unless it can “secure a substantially more sustainable power rate for the smelter.” Noranda, based in Franklin, Tenn., told the PostDispatch last week it was pushing for a “legislative solution.” In a disclosure to investors Tuesday, Ameren said it had been working with Noranda and legislators before the outage and layofs. “Ameren Missouri has been working, well in advance of recent events, with Noranda, legislators and other stakeholders on a potential legislative solution to support Noranda’s operations,” the utility said in a regulatory filing. With much of Noranda already idled, Ameren will try to

sell the excess power on the wholesale electricity market. Because the utility expects wholesale power prices to remain below Noranda’s rate through the rest of 2016, customers may have to make up the diference. Customers could see an impact from Noranda’s woes when the Missouri Public Service Commission next adjusts Ameren’s rates. Last week, Ameren filed notice with the PSC that would let it file for a rate increase by March. M issouri regulators cut Noranda’s electric rate during Ameren’s last rate case, effectively costing the average Ameren household about $1 a month. Ameren fought Noranda’s rate cut proposal then, arguing other customers shouldn’t subsidize the smelter. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

2 Metro East hospitals seek to form ailiation Community Memorial to stay in Staunton; Maryville-based Anderson would run it By SaManTHa LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Anderson Hospital and Community Memorial Hospital have signed a letter of intent to form an affiliation, Illinois records show. An application to Illinois state health regulators states that the purpose of the affiliation is to “maintain” services in Staunton, home to Community Memorial’s 25-bed facility. And, together, the two can improve “financial performance” and “excel” in the future. After the transaction is complete, Maryville-based Anderson Hospital will assume all current financial assets and liabilities of Community Memorial, the application states. The two have entered into a

due diligence period to determine the deal’s exact structure. “Our hometown health care will be stronger and better with this affiliation, and it will provide additional access to Anderson’s advanced diagnostics, specialty care and resources to better serve our patients,” Sue Campbell, Community Memorial Hospital’s CEO, said in an online statement. Staunton, 40 miles northeast of St. Louis, has a population of just over 5,000, according to the Census Bureau. The application does outline some elements of the deal if it were to extend by the due diligence period. Community Memorial Hospital would keep its name but agree to joint branding. The Anderson Board would

oversee operations at the Staunton facility and have “ultimate authority” on “significant” matters. Community Memorial would nominate two individuals to serve on Anderson’s board, which would ultimately approve capital and operating budgets after an initial review by Community Memorial’s board. The Community Memorial board would remain intact or transition to an advisory committee if the two decide to move forward with a merger, the application states. Anderson would offer “employment to all current employees providing services at Staunton, subject to customary Anderson background screening,” the application states. The two hospitals are about 25

miles apart. Anderson Hospital is the larger facility, with 154 beds and revenue of $150.5 million for the year ended Dec. 31, 2013. The hospital reported a surplus of about $10 million for that same year, according to filings with the Internal Revenue Service. Community Memorial operates just 25 beds and an overwhelming amount of patients, or 86 percent, admitted to the hospital in calendar year 2014 had Medicare coverage, according to records with the state. The hospital reported a surplus of $209,000 on about $15 million in revenue for the calendar year ended Dec. 31, 2013, according to filings with the IRS. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

St. Luke’s, Cleveland Clinic form partnership By SaManTHa LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Luke’s Hospital in Chesterfield is partnering with the renowned Cleveland Clinic for cardiac care that will steer patients, research and the latest technology to the local hospital. Hospital officials announced the deal Tuesday at the west St. Louis County hospital and described the relationship as an exclusive ailiation with the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute. The five-year deal includes access to clinical trials, new technology, reviews of complex cases and continuing medical education, hospital oicials said. Cleveland Clinic, considered one of the best hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, has so far partnered with 18 other health systems across the country. Cleveland Clinic will act as a consultant for the 493-bed hospital in Chesterfield, said St. Luke’s CEO Christine M. Candio, and the hospital will pay Cleveland Clinic a fee for its “expertise and guidance.” One benefit for patients, Candio said, is that St. Luke’s specialists can consult with Cleveland Clinic physicians to obtain a second opinion. Industry experts say this ailiation will further strengthen the quality of care at St. Luke’s. “The Cleveland Clinic has been a leader nationally in standing up for greater transparency of health system practices, performance and prices,” said Louise Probst, executive director of the St. Louis Area Business Health Coalition. And, St. Luke’s, one of the last remaining independent hospitals in the region, now belongs to a larger network for cardiac care, said Dr. Joseph G. Cacchione, chairman of strategic operations for the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute. Cleveland Clinic also will operate as a group purchasing organization, which will help the hospital obtain the latest technology at a lower cost. Cleveland Clinic plans to contract directly with payers and employers to create incentives for employees to seek out cardiac care at one of these network hospitals. For an employee whose employer contracts directly with the Cleveland Clinic, it could mean no copays and no obligation to meet a deductible, Cacchione said. The Cleveland Clinic became interested in St. Luke’s because of its culture, quality and low rate of employee turnover. Cacchione said after reviewing the organization there was a “striking match” to Cleveland Clinic in terms of quality and culture.

Carnage continues in oil stocks, but S&P steady ReUTeRS

neW yORK • Wall Street ended flat after a choppy session on Tuesday as falling oil prices led to more carnage in energy stocks and an economic report showed slower growth in China. Declining U.S. crude pulled down materials stocks as well as the S&P energy sector, which slumped 2.17 percent. Oil at 12-year lows is stoking fears on Wall Street of deeper losses for energy companies and the potential that some may fail to pay their debts. That has decimated oil stocks, helping push the S&P 500 down 8 percent since the start of the year. China’s growth in 2015 was the slowest in 25 years but in line with expectations, a report showed. That raised hopes that Beijing would cushion the slowdown with more stimulus policies, but it wasn’t enough to satisfy U.S. investors. “You have a tremendous amount of fear and uncertainty in the markets, and we’ll need to see more than one good economic data point to overcome that,” said David Carter, chief investment oicer at Lenox Wealth Advisors in New York. At the end of a volatile session, a last-minute rally left the S&P 500 up 0.05 percent, barely above a 52-week low hit on Friday. Heading into the close, traders noted a higher-thannormal level of “market on close” buy orders, which are designed to be priced at the day’s closing price. “That got some people thinking, ‘Maybe I should buy,” said Michael Matousek, head trader at U.S. Global Investors in San Antonio. “You’re going to have a lot of value players looking at the 52-week low and start nibbling.” The Dow Jones industrial average ended up 0.17 percent at 16,016.02 points. The S&P 500 gained 1 point to end at 1,881.33. The Nasdaq Composite fell 0.26 percent to 4,476.95. After the bell, Netflix surged 8 percent after the streaming service’s fourth-quarter subscriber additions topped expectations thanks to strong international growth.

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MARKET WATCH

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS What started as a good morning for stocks ended up as a dud. The S&P 500 eked out a slim gain. It rose as much as 1.1 percent during the morning before diving as much as 0.8 percent in the afternoon. It clawed back in the final half hour of trading.

Bank of America

14

O

N D 52-week range

15,840

17,600

2,080

16,800

2,000

N D 52-week range

40

J $21.49

Corn

10 DAYS

Wheat

S

O

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,281 2,701 985 1886 6 469

4,718 5,325 1025 2105 11 701

D

1,840

J

J

A

S

O

N

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 16171.96 6770.87 593.38 9406.35 4550.57 1901.43 1281.00 19541.28 1017.83

LOW 15900.25 6593.00 583.56 9226.82 4430.77 1864.60 1253.77 19115.19 985.21

CLOSE 16016.02 6657.20 591.87 9301.75 4476.95 1881.33 1263.14 19286.30 994.87

CHG. +27.94 -31.86 +9.08 +2.13 -11.47 +1.00 -6.69 -48.93 -12.86

%CHG. WK +0.17% t -0.48% t +1.56% s +0.02% t -0.26% t +0.05% t -0.53% t -0.25% t -1.28% t

MO QTR t t t t s t t t t t t t t t t t t t

Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 16

367.75 883.50 474.50

+4.50 +4.50 +.75

CLOSE

CHG

+2.25 +1.75 +.83 -.46 +3.40

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 16

62.47 115.65 25.88

+1.06 +.75 -.12

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Feb 16 Feb 16 Feb 16 Feb 16

28.46 1.0262 90.87 2.091

J

Cotton

YTD -8.09% -11.34% +2.43% -8.30% -10.59% -7.96% -9.68% -8.89% -12.41%

Sugar

D

CHG

156.55 129.30 62.85 13.72 197.35

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

N

CLOSE

DATE

Copper

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

Aegion

AEGN

15.31

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

22.41 16.85 +.21 +1.3 -12.7 +5.2 13

LMIA

9.09

... Laclede Group

LG

49.07

Lee Ent

LEE

1.36

Mallinckrodt

MNK

52.01 134.26 64.43 -1.37 -2.1 -13.7 -36.6

Monsanto Co

MON

81.22 126.00 90.86

OLN

15.18

AHPI

0.96 46.58

61.46 52.94

-.20 -0.4

-3.0 +14.4 19 0.78f

Ameren

AEE

37.26

46.81 43.45

-.06 -0.1

+0.5

American Railcar

ARII

33.02

60.42 38.16 -2.72 -6.7 -17.5 -11.1

7

1.60

Belden Inc

BDC

39.24

95.56 39.84 -1.91 -4.6 -16.4 -47.9 54

0.20

10.74

23.00 12.43

-.06 -0.5 -.12 -0.5

1.90

-.01 -0.6 -11.1 -32.0 dd

... LMI Aerospace

DOX

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

.99

TKR

Allied Health

... Olin 0.28 Panera Bread

Caleres

CAL

23.22

33.83 24.26

CassInfo

CASS

43.00

59.09 51.24 +1.14 +2.3

-0.4 +1.3 26 0.88f PeabdyE rs

Centene

CNC

50.93

83.00 62.51 +1.60 +2.6

-5.0 +14.0 22

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

37.66

47.11 39.04

-8.2 +5.8 14 0.90b

Edgewell

EPC

71.08 107.38 72.27

Emerson

EMR

42.17

62.75 43.14 +.05 +0.1

Energizer Holdings

ENR

30.33

44.52 30.23

-.39 -1.3 -11.2

Enterprise Financial EFSC

18.90

30.73 26.12

-.30 -1.1

Esco Technologies

ESE

32.17

39.98 32.28

-.47 -1.4 -10.7

Express Scripts

ESRX

68.06

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FCLF

8.50

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Foresight Energy

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1.72

18.73

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FF

9.11

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2.81

Isle of Capri

9.76

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...

...

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21.43 12.27

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...

Peak Resorts

SKIS

5.12

5.27

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14.90

7.97

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POST

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78.79

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-5.7

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0.37

Stereotaxis

STXS

Stifel Financial

SF

SunEdison

SUNE

2.36

... SunEdison Semi

SEMI

5.09

... WldPntTm

WPT

11.79

0.65

1.40

-.20 -0.2

-1.0

9

.85 +.05 +6.5 +46.2 -30.8

...

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...

59.93 34.68

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...

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-3.7 -30.3 14

1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Foresight gets new debt deadline • Foresight Energy says its bondholders have given the St. Louis coal miner more time to try to reach a new deal before they demand repayment. Foresight and owners of nearly $600 million of its debt have extended through Thursday an agreement that keeps its creditors from forcing Foresight to buy back the bonds. Foresight said last month the creditors had agreed not to redeem the bonds until Jan. 18 while Foresight negotiated a new settlement with them. In December, a Delaware court opinion found that Ohio coal miner Murray Energy’s March deal to buy a big stake in Foresight amounted to a change in control at the company, giving creditors the right to demand repayment on their bonds. Lenders who own an additional $675 million in Foresight debt have also indicated they are entitled to repayment. Foresight stock inished Tuesday at $1.62, down 14 cents, or 8 percent. New Walmart format to open • The irst of two planned Walmart Neighborhood Markets in St. Peters is slated to open Jan. 27. The Bentonville, Ark.-based chain announced plans for the irst of its smaller format stores in the St. Louis region last July. The 41,000-square-foot store at 45 Sutters Mill Road will carry only a fraction of the merchandise of a standard 182,000-square-foot Walmart Supercenter. The smaller format stores sell fresh produce, groceries and pharmacy items. Another Walmart Neighborhood Market is slated to open soon at a second St. Peters store, located at 3031 Mid Rivers Mall Drive. Last week, the store chain’s parent, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., announced plans to close hundreds of stores, but none of the closures are in the St. Louis area. Wal-Mart is ending its Walmart Express small store format, launched in 2011, that averaged about 12,000 square feet of space. Walmart is closing four Walmart Express stores in Missouri. J.C. Penney returns to white goods • Department store operator

J.C. Penney Co. Inc. said it would start selling home appliances in February, re-entering the business after a gap of more than 30 years. The chain will sell kitchen and laundry appliances in a range of price points from GE, Hotpoint, LG Electronics Inc. and Samsung Electronics in 22 pilot stores in San Antonio, San Diego, and Tampa, Fla., starting Feb. 1. Appliances were popular shopping items this holiday season. Best Buy reported a 13.4 percent rise in appliance sales at comparable stores in the nine weeks ended Jan. 2. J.C. Penney also said it plans to make appliances available at its online store starting this spring. Waste Connections buys Progressive • Waste Connections Inc. is buying Canada’s Progressive Waste Solutions Ltd. for about $2.67 billion in a deal that will make the combination the third-biggest waste management services provider in North America. The all-stock deal, structured as a reverse merger, will allow Waste Connections, based in The Woodlands, Texas, to move its tax domicile to Canada with its shareholders owning about 70 percent of the combined company. The transaction is the latest in a string of deals where U.S. companies have acquired foreign companies through reverse mergers to avoid higher tax rates at home. The $24.55 per share ofer represents a premium of 4.4 percent to the last closing price of Progressive Waste’s U.S.-listed stock. With proforma revenue of about $4.1 billion, the combination will command a market share of about 7 percent, Barclays analyst Jon Windham wrote in a note to clients. The combined company and its larger rivals — Waste Management Inc. and Republic Services Inc. — will corner nearly half of the market share of the North American waste disposal market, the analyst said. Windham, however, said he did not expect “signiicant regulatory hurdles” to the deal. From staf and wire reports

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.0743 .6906 .2461 1.4177 .6865 .1519 1.0923 .0148 .2518 .008515 .054667 .0127 .0595 .000828 .9977

.0715 .6861 .2480 1.4245 .6872 .1520 1.0892 .0148 .2527 .008520 .054935 .0126 .0592 .000826 .9943

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

CHG

CLOSE

1089.90 14.11 828.70

Gold Silver

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.06 percent Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-1.60 +.23 +3.00

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.24 .37 .46 .87 1.49 2.06 2.83

+0.01 +0.02 ... +0.02 +0.03 +0.02 +0.01

.01 .06 .15 .49 1.30 1.84 2.45

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS .38 .13 .13

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Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.61

... 2.28

Bond Buyer Muni Idx

4.21

... 4.12

Barclays USAggregate

2.42 -0.05 1.98

Barclays US High Yield 9.49 +0.27 6.59 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.99 +0.03 3.44

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1.48 +0.01 1.53

Barclays US Corp

3.59 -0.03 2.85

GlobalMarkets

...

4 0.68m

-.26 -2.2 -14.8 +1.5 11 ...

34.34 14.91

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3.75 123.45

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J $41.04

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Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

Amdocs

N D 52-week range

Vol.: 27.2m (2.1x avg.) PE: 16.2 Mkt. Cap: $50.85 b Yield: 2.3%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

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ICE

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25

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CHICAGO MERC

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15,200

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16,000

30 O

Vol.: 15.9m (1.7x avg.) PE: 13.3 Mkt. Cap: $36.15 b Yield: 1.2%

Soybeans

MS

Close: $26.26 0.29 or 1.1% The investment bank said it turned a profit in the fourth quarter on better results from its wealth management business. $40 35

$34.61

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 1,881.33 Change: 1.00 (0.1%)

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Close: 16,016.02 Change: 27.94 (0.2%)

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Vol.: 184.4m (2.1x avg.) PE: 10.7 Mkt. Cap: $148.27 b Yield: 1.4%

Dow Jones industrials

6 2

Morgan Stanley

DAL

Close: $45.96 1.46 or 3.3% Lower fuel costs helped the airline post a bigger fourth-quarter profit. Delta expects fuel to get even cheaper in the first quarter. $55

$8

16

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Delta Air Lines

CHK

Close: $3.08 -0.48 or -13.5% The oil and natural gas company fell as commodity prices continued to slip.

$18

$14.01

17,200

Chesapeake Energy

BAC

Close: $14.24 -0.22 or -1.5% The bank reported its fourth-quarter results and said it is struggling to increase revenue.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 1881.33 9664.21 5876.80 19635.81 4272.26 40809.25 17048.37 38057.02 12002.24 8223.76

CHG

CHG

YTD

+1.00 +142.36 +96.88 +398.36 +82.69 +204.46 +92.80 -512.11 +60.07 +124.68

+0.05% +1.50% +1.68% +2.07% +1.97% +0.50% +0.55% -1.33% +0.50% +1.54%

-7.96% -10.04% -5.86% -10.40% -8.66% -5.05% -10.43% -12.21% -7.75% -6.74%

IRS on the line looking for money? It’s a scam Callers seek immediate payment and often threaten charges BY ANDREW TAYLOR associated Press

WASHINGTON • The Treasury

Department has a message for taxpayers getting calls from the IRS demanding immediate payment: Hang up. Those aggressive, threatening calls are coming from phone scammers. And they are successful, too, costing more than 5,000 victims more than $26.5 million since October 2013. About 900,000 scammer contacts were reported during that period. The callers fraudulently claim to be IRS officials and demand that taxpayers immediately send them payment. They often have some per-

sonal information about the person they’re calling and threaten criminal charges unless immediate payment is made. “This scam has proven to be the largest of its kind that we have ever seen,” said J. Russell George, Treasury Department inspector general for tax administration. “It is critical that all taxpayers continue to be wary of unsolicited telephone calls and emails from individuals claiming to be IRS and Treasury employees.” The agency has responded with public service announcements reminding people that the IRS sends letters rather than calling taxpayers. “If someone unexpectedly

calls claiming to be from the IRS and uses threatening language if you do not pay immediately, that is a sign that it is not the IRS calling, and your cue to hang up,” George said. The agency recommends taxpayers who are contacted by phone scammers fill out an “IRS impersonation scam” form on the Treasury inspector general website, treasury.gov/ tigta, or call Treasury oicials at 1-800-366-4484. Meanwhile, tax filing season opened Tuesday, and the IRS says its systems are running smoothly. It says 9 of 10 taxpayers should receive their refunds within three weeks of filing their returns.

Hedge fund invests in Macy’s as possible takeover target BY SIMONE FOXMAN Bloomberg

Greenlight Capital, the hedge fund firm led by David Einhorn, made a new investment in Macy’s in the fourth quarter, arguing the retailer could become a takeover target, according to a letter to investors that was obtained by Bloomberg. A private equity firm and a real estate investment trust could team up to buy the company and “unlock the value” of its land and buildings, Greenlight said in the letter, which was dated Tuesday. Shares of Macy’s rose 2.3 percent to close at $38.76.

In discussing a real estate deal, Einhorn echoes remarks from activist investor Starboard Value, which has been pushing for Macy’s to tap its properties since July. While Macy’s rejected that idea last year, the math may have changed after the shares lost more than half their value from a July high of $72.80, the New York-based hedge fund firm wrote. “Even if this doesn’t happen, the shares are cheap,” wrote Greenlight, which established its position at an average price of $45.69. The retailer’s real estate, including its flagship store in

Manhattan, is worth $21 billion, according to Starboard’s analysis. That’s more than the value of the company’s outstanding stock, which stands at $12.2 billion. Greenlight’s main fund lost 20.2 percent in 2015, its second-worst year since Einhorn started the fund in 1996. Even after that loss, Einhorn has made an average of 16.5 percent a year for the fund’s investors, the firm said in the letter. “We have never had a year where so little went right,” the firm wrote in the letter. “While we had a few shorts that did well, we couldn’t seem to find winning longs.”


NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016 ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Endorsement from Palin buoys Trump campaign BY JILL COLVIN Associated Press

AMES, IOWA • Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump received a key endorsement Tuesday from conservative heavyweight Sarah Palin. The former Alaska governor and former running mate of Sen. John McCain in his 2008 bid for the White House, is endorsing the billionaire businessman, according to a statement released by his campaign. “I am greatly honored to receive Sarah’s endorsement,” Trump said in a statement. “She is a friend, and a highquality person whom I have great respect for. I am proud to have her support.” Palin was scheduled to appear with Trump at a rally at an agricultural center at Iowa State University later Tuesday and will also be joining Trump at two events on Wednesday, including a rally in Tulsa, Okla. The endorsement comes less than two weeks ahead of the critical lead-of Iowa caucus, where Trump is locked in a dead heat with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. In the statement announcing the endorsement, Trump’s campaign described Palin as a conservative who “helped launch the careers of several key future leaders of the Republican Party and conservative movement.” The statement also quoted Cruz as once saying he “would not be in the United States Senate were it not for Gov. Sarah Palin. ... She can pick winners.” Campaigning in New Hampshire on Tuesday, Cruz responded to Palin’s endorsement of Trump, saying that “regardless of what Sarah intends to do in 2016, I will remain a big, big fan of Sarah Palin.” Trump’s national political director Michael Glassner previously worked with Palin, who was a virtual newcomer to the national political arena when McCain named her as his running mate. She has since risen to prominence as one of the most outspoken conservatives in the party. She signed on as a Fox News commentator after resigning as Alaska’s governor in 2010, a job she held until

Lower courts have sided with the states OBAMA • FROM A1

million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally and make them eligible to work without fear of being rounded up. Underscoring the political dimension, the case will be argued in April and decided by late June, about a month before both political parties gather for their nominating conventions. If Obama prevails against opponents led by Republican governors, there would be roughly seven months left in his presidency to implement plans that would afect the parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, as well as some people who arrived in the United States before they turned 16. “We are confident that the policies will be upheld as lawful,” White House spokeswoman Brandi Hoine said after the court’s announcement Tuesday. At issue is the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans program, which Obama said in late 2014 would allow people who have been in the United States more than five years and who have children who are in the country legally to “come out of the shadows and get right with the law.” He also announced the expansion of a program that afects people who came here illegally as children. That earlier program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is not being challenged and has resulted in more than 720,000 young immigrants’ being granted permission to live and work in the United States. When he announced the measures 14 months ago, Obama said he was acting under his own authority because Congress had failed to overhaul the immigration system. The Senate did pass legislation on a bipartisan vote, but House Republicans refused to put the matter to a vote. Texas quickly led a legal challenge to Obama’s program on behalf of 26 states and has won every round in court so far. Most recently, in November, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the states, prompting the appeal to the Supreme Court. Texas actually asked the Supreme Court not to hear the case challenging those rulings, but state Attorney General Ken Paxton said he was pleased the justices will examine the president’s constitutional power to intercede without congressional approval. “In deciding to hear this case, the Supreme Court recognizes the importance of the separation of powers,” Paxton said. The U.S. solicitor general, Donald Verrilli Jr., said in his Supreme Court filing that allowing the lower court rulings to stand would force millions of people “to continue to work of the books, without the option of lawful employment to provide for their families.” The administration said Texas and the other states lacked the right to challenge the plan in federal court. The lower courts decided that Texas did have the right, or standing, to sue because at least 500,000 people living in Texas would qualify for work permits and thus become eligible for drivers licenses, the costs of which are subsidized by the state. “Texas would incur millions of dollars in costs,” the state said in its brief. The justices also said they would consider whether, if the states can pursue their lawsuit, Obama exceeded his authority under federal laws and the Constitution. Some court observers saw in the court’s decision to look at Obama’s power under the Constitution a potentially ominous sign. “It suggests that the court is willing to engage President Obama’s entire use of executive orders,” said Jefrey Rosen, president and CEO of the nonpartisan National Constitution Center. Still, Democratic officials and immigrants’ advocates praised the court’s action. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid of Nevada said that “law-abiding men and women continue to live in constant fear of being separated from their children. These families must be allowed to step out of the shadows and fully contribute to the country that they love and call home.” The future of the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally has been much discussed by Republican and Democratic presidential candidates. Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton has pledged to go further than Obama to protect large groups of immigrants from deportation. Republican Donald Trump has proposed deporting all people who are living in the U.S. illegally, an idea embraced by some other GOP candidates and dismissed by others.

N ASSOCIATED PRESS

Donald Trump and Sarah Palin shown here in 2011 in New York City. Palin’s endorsement of Trump on Tuesday may help Trump fend of Ted Cruz in the Iowa caucuses Feb. 1.

last year. Asked Tuesday morning about his thoughts on Palin’s endorsement, as rumors of her potential backing swirled, Trump said, “I’m a big fan of Sarah Palin.” While Trump said he doesn’t typically put much stock in endorsements, he said, “I think it could very well result in votes.” Earlier Tuesday, Trump received another endorsement from the daughter of the late Western movie star John Wayne. Standing in front of a life-size, rifle-toting model of the actor in full cowboy gear, Trump accepted the endorsement of Aissa Wayne at the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset, Iowa. Aissa Wayne said the country needed a strong and courageous leader like her father, noting that John Wayne would be ofering his endorsement if he were still alive.

Cruz dons face paint in appeal to Iowa’s backers of guns

YOUTUBE VIA AP

This image shows Ted Cruz in a video where he is endorsed by “Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • It’s an image football fans in Iowa are

likely to see this weekend: Ted Cruz, his face smeared with black greasepaint, sitting in a Louisiana duck blind with a borrowed shotgun. His Republican presidential campaign said Tuesday that it was spending $700,000 to air a gun-friendly ad during the NFL conference championship games. Cruz, 45, has made the defense of Second Amendment rights a cornerstone of his presidential campaign, touting his past legal work fighting against gun control laws. But records suggest the politician’s passion for the issue emerged relatively recently in his life, coinciding with his ascent in Republican circles in Texas. Cruz was in Louisiana last week to tape a campaign video with Phil Robertson, the gray-bearded patriarch of reality TV’s “Duck Dynasty” clan. The junior senator from Texas, clad in camouflaged overalls, is shown squeezing of a couple of rounds toward the gray sky. It was not clear whether the candidate struck any ducks. Looking into the camera, Robertson says his selection criteria for endorsing a candidate include “would they kill a duck, put ’em in a pot and make ’em a good duck gumbo.” He then tells Cruz, “You’re one of us, my man.” In his three years in the Senate, Cruz’s voting record has earned an A+ rating from the National Rifle Association. Fiery criticism of President Barack Obama’s eforts to tighten background checks for gun purchases is a staple of Cruz stump speeches: The candidate quipped that back in Texas the term “gun control” means that you “hit what you’re aiming at.” Cruz’s campaign said he purchased a Louisiana hunting license before the recent video shoot with Robertson, though the state’s wildlife department refused last week to confirm that. Records from Iowa show he also bought licenses in 2013 and 2015 at the Hole N’ the Wall Lodge, site of an annual pheasant hunt hosted by home-state U.S. Rep. Steve King, typically attended by aspiring GOP presidential contenders. King has since endorsed Cruz and is now a national co-chairman of his campaign.

Renuva offers a specialized treatment program called CoreCareTM for patients who suffer from neuropathy.


NATION

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

MEDICARE IS CHANGING

What’s new for beneiciaries BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR associated Press

WASHINGTON • Whether it’s

coverage for end-of-life counseling or an experimental payment scheme for common surgeries, Medicare in 2016 is undergoing some of the biggest changes in its 50 years. Grandma’s Medicare usually just paid the bills as they came in. Today, the nation’s flagship health care program is seeking better ways to balance cost, quality and access. The effort could redefine the doctor-patient relationship, or it could end up a muddle of wellintentioned but unworkable government regulations. The changes have been building slowly, veiled in a fog of acronyms and bureaucratic jargon. So far, the 2016 change getting the most attention is that Medicare will pay clinicians to counsel patients about options for care at the end of life. The voluntary counseling would have been authorized earlier by President Barack Obama’s health care law but for the outcry fanned by former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, who charged it would lead to “death panels.” Hastily dropped from the law, the personalized counseling has been revived through Medicare rules. But experts who watch Medicare as the standards-setter for the health system are looking elsewhere in the program. They’re paying attention to Medicare’s attempts to remake the way medical care is delivered to patients, by fostering teamwork among clinicians, emphasizing timely preventive services and paying close attention to patients’ transitions between hospital and home. Primary care doctors, the gatekeepers of health care, are the focus of much of Medicare’s efort. Patrick Conway, Medicare’s chief medical officer, says that nearly 8 million beneficiaries — about 20 percent of those in traditional Medicare — are now in “Accountable Care Organiza-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Glendon Bassett does a cardio workout recently at the Family YMCA in Hot Springs, Ark. Bassett, a retired chemical engineer, says he can vouch for the teamwork approach Medicare is promoting. This year, a primary care team at SAMA Healthcare in El Dorado, Ark., prevented what Bassett feared would turn into an extended hospitalization. It started with a swollen leg.

tions.” ACOs are recently introduced networks of doctors and hospitals that strive to deliver better quality care at lower cost. “Five years ago there was minimal incentive to coordinate care,” said Conway. “Physicians wanted to do well for their patients, but the financial incen-

tives were completely aligned with volume.” Under the ACO model, clinical networks get part of their reimbursement for meeting quality or cost targets. The jury’s still out on their long-term impact. Still, a major expansion is planned for 2016, and beneficia-

ries for the first time will be able to pick an ACO. Currently they can opt out if they don’t like it. “We’re all trying to understand where is that threshold when things will flip,” said Kavita Patel, a Brookings Institution health policy expert who also practices as a primary care doctor. It could be like the switch from snail mail and interoice memos to communicating via email, she says, but “I’m not sure we have reached critical mass.” Glendon Bassett, a retired chemical engineer, says he can vouch for the teamwork approach that Medicare is promoting. This year, a primary care team at SAMA Healthcare in El Dorado, Ark., prevented what Bassett feared would turn into an extended hospitalization. It started with a swollen leg. SAMA is part of Medicare’s Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative, an experiment in seven regions of the country that involves nearly 400,000 beneficiaries and a much larger number of patients with other types of insurance. The insurers pay primary care practices a monthly fee for care coordination, and the practices also have the opportunity to share in any savings to Medicare. The primary care teams at SAMA consists of a doctor, a nurse practitioner, three nurses and a care coordinator. The coordinator shepherds patients to avoid gaps in care. The nurses can be an early warning system for the doctor. Bassett said he had a history of circulatory problems in his legs, but this was diferent. “It was scary,” he said. “Within a week’s time it turned from red to dark.” He thought about the emergency room, but he got in right away to see the nurse practitioner working with Dr. Gary Bevill, his longtime physician. The nurse fetched other clinicians to look at Bassett’s swollen right leg. He was immediately given antibiotics. And the doctor referred him to a cardiologist for

an outpatient procedure that has since improved his circulation. While the medical treatment may have followed fairly standard protocols, Bassett believes the team approach prevented serious consequences. “If I hadn’t seen the nurse practitioner when I did, I feel like I would have been in the hospital,” he said. Bassett has since moved to Hot Springs, in another part of the state, but stays in touch. Medicare is weighing whether to expand the primary care model. Conway said more data were needed.

HIP AND KNEE SURGERY Joint replacements are the most common surgical procedure for Medicare beneficiaries. Starting in April, hospitals in 67 metro areas and communities will be responsible for managing the total cost of hip and knee replacements. The experiment covers a 90day window from the initial doctor’s visit, through surgery and rehabilitation. At stake for the hospitals are potential financial rewards and penalties. Medicare’s goal is to improve quality while lowering cost. But hospitals worry about financial consequences, and advocates for patients say there’s a potential to skimp on care. “What we are discovering with all this change is that trying to get to value over volume is very diicult to do,” said Herb Kuhn, who heads the Missouri Hospital Association.

HOSPICE FLEXIBILITY Patients choosing Medicare’s hospice benefit at the end of their lives have traditionally had to give up most curative care. Under Medicare’s new Care Choices model, patients with a terminal illness will be able to receive hospice services without giving up treatment. A cancer patient could continue to get chemo, for example. Seventy hospices were set to start the experiment Jan. 1, and another 70 will join in two years.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • A12

SUCCESS IS THE BEST REVENGE J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Our view • Stop lamenting the Rams and get to work on riverfront investment plans. operates it, may be able to develop new convention Anyone who took the money set aside for a new roof business. The fall is prime convention season, and and invested it in Powerball tickets has an idea what the CVC was unable to bid for some large conventhe St. Louis Regional Convention and Sports Comtions because Hall 6 (as the stadium is known around plex Authority is facing. the convention center) was in football configuration. Having taken $16.2 million in public money earBut big conventions often must be booked five years marked for the Edward Jones Dome and invested it or more in advance, so it’s going be a while. in a plan to build a new football stadium on the north Moreover, to attract conventions, the building riverfront, the RSA now finds itself a little short. must be scrupulously maintained. It still owes about $100 million on the refinanced In a fair world, the NFL and/or the Rams would bonds used to build the dome in the early 1990s. remunerate the Some $4 million RSA for all or part of the $24 million of what it spent on the RSA gets each the stadium plan. year from the state Rams’ owner Stan of Missouri and Kroenke must pay St. Louis city and the league $550 county is reserved million in relocafor maintaining tion fees. The and upgrading stadium task force, the building. That headed by former money stops when Anheuser-Busch the bonds are paid InBev executive off in 2021. The Dave Peacock, RSA estimated in notes that the big 2014 that the facilrelocation fee was ity would continue easier to demand to need $5 million because the Rams to $9 million a year in upkeep until at CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com were walking away from a viable plan least 2029. Hall 6 at America’s Center, where football players used to in St. Louis. The wounds are roam, is also a good place for robotics conventions. With the “Leaving the St. still fresh from the Rams gone, St. Louis must double-down on its commitment to Louis region worse National Football conventions. in both finances League’s decision and reputation doesn’t seem like a legacy that the last week to spurn the stadium proposal here and NFL would want to claim,” Mr. Peacock said. allow the St. Louis Rams to move to Los Angeles. But But the NFL is not known for giving away money. sooner, rather than later, the 11 RSA commissioners, A more realistic scenario would involve a bond issue along with Gov. Jay Nixon, who pushed the RSA to invest in the new stadium project, must demonstrate for maintenance needs. A thoughtfully constructed proposal would exercise options the RSA acquired that they are reliable stewards of taxpayers’ money. for properties on the proposed stadium site. That Things get worse: As the Post-Dispatch’s David means a creative redevelopment plan, ideally involvHunn and Nicholas J.C. Pistor reported Sunday, the ing parks, trails and amenities complementing the city relied on $4.2 million a year generated by Rams Gateway Arch. games to offset most of its $6 million annual obligaObtaining approval for those bonds will be tricky. tion to the RSA bonds. The county pays its $6 million Having bypassed the Legislature and voters in the bid share from its hotel tax, and the state pays its $12 million share from general revenue — most of it offset to build a stadium, the governor and Mayor Francis Slay will face a major selling job. But if the region is by sales taxes and income taxes on Rams players and serious about not being defined by Stan Kroenke, it’s visiting teams. a job that must be done. Long term, the RSA, which owns the dome, and the Convention and Visitors Commission, which

“Leaving the St. Louis region worse in both finances and reputation doesn’t seem like a legacy that the NFL would want to claim.’’ -Dave Peacock

County Executive Steve Stenger on election night, Nov. 4, 2014, at the Sheraton Clayton Plaza Hotel in Clayton, after the final vote tally showed that he won the election. Behind Stenger is John Saracino (left), an aide, and Peter Stenger, his brother.

St. Louis County’s Special Favors Unit Our view • Saracino resignation still doesn’t ix what went wrong. John Saracino, a top aide to St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, resigned on Monday, perhaps to deflect controversy over intervention by his boss and county Police Chief Jon Belmar with a federal judge considering sentencing Mr. Saracino’s drugdealing nephew. He was correct to resign. But none of those involved seem to understand what they’ve done wrong, which is why this issue isn’t going away. In December, Mr. Saracino asked a big personal favor from Mssrs. Stenger and Belmar: Would they help out his nephew, Michael Saracino II, who was awaiting sentencing for a drug conspiracy conviction? The two men wrote letters to U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry vouching for the strong familysupport network surrounding the nephew and urging leniency in his sentencing. There was no question the two were writing as senior public officials. Nobody has yet acknowledged that his actions were inappropriate for the cause of impartial justice and for the integrity of their respective offices. What’s sorely lacking here are statements of genuine contrition. John Saracino said in a prepared statement Monday that there was “nothing shameful” in the letters. He stood by his decision to ask Mr. Stenger and Chief Belmar to intervene. Mr. Stenger, too, stood by his decision to write the letter and dismissed a police union leader’s complaints as sour grapes. Mr. Belmar defended his letter as an act of compassion for the Saracino family. They almost certainly would

not have gone to these lengths had the defendant been an inner-city drug dealer linked to a kidnapping and the firebombing of a 72-year-old widow’s house, as Michael Saracino’s gang was. He received special treatment because his family of prominent restaurateurs is well-connected. Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Casey said it best in his counterargument to Judge Perry: “In none of the letters did they mention or take into account the victims here, because there are victims. This isn’t just movement of dope. There are people that were hurt here, property that was damaged and destroyed and none of the letters spoke to them.” Michael Saracino, 27, received a two-year prison sentence for involvement in a 13-member drug ring engaged in multi-state trafficking of more than 1,000 kilograms of marijuana. The start of his prison term was postponed because of his marriage Saturday in Florida. The sunny climes must have been a nice way for him to spend his weekend while St. Louis residents huddled to ward off the cold. Again, do other violent drug-conspiracy convicts receive such treatment? The only reason the public knows the sordid details behind this case, which was sealed from public view, is because of diligent digging by Post-Dispatch reporters Christine Byers and Robert Patrick. Otherwise, John Saracino might still have a job, and the Special Favors Unit of the St. Louis County government might still be doing business as usual.

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Ban on development in flood plains is a good idea The efforts of the cities of Maryland Heights and St. Peters to promote housing development in Mississippi and Missouri River flood plains is misguided, if not just plain stupid. The loss of over 20 lives in Missouri and millions of dollars in damage from the last flood would logically encourage people to move out of flood plains, but, according to Post-Dispatch reporter Mark Schlinkmann, the city of St. Peters is trying to convince St. Charles County to lift a ban on residential development in the Mississippi River flood plain (“RB plans big expansion at controversial St. Peters site,” Jan. 15). Business parks built in flood plains in Maryland Heights and St. Peters have had a diicult time getting businesses to move in and are turning to residential development. The city of Maryland Heights is foolishly supporting these eforts, while St. Charles County, with vast experience in sound flood plain management, is wisely supporting its ban on residential development in the flood plain. St. Charles County was the site of one of the largest residential flood plain buyout programs in the country in 1993 and saved millions of dollars just two years later during the 1995 flood. I encourage the city oicials of St. Peters and Maryland Heights to read “Protecting Our Resources: St. Charles County’s Strategy for Floodplain Management” to help

understand why this ban is a good idea. I support St. Charles County’s flood plain restrictions on residential development and would encourage St. Louis County to enact the same type of restrictions. It is also time for St. Louis-area planners to look at flood plain management as a region, not on a levee district-by-levee district approach. We cannot continue to dump water on whoever cannot afford to build the highest levee. Greg Poleski • Bellefontaine Neighbors

Gerson ignores Republicans’ demonization of president I read Michael Gerson’s commentary “Obama promised hope; he brought rage” (Jan. 17) and felt only sadness in his petty, twisted words. The country was in great need for hope in 2008 during the biggest economic crisis this country has faced in a generation. President Obama at least tried to reach out to the other party in the early years in hopes of bridging diferences between the parties to help our country move forward. We recall how downright hostile the Republicans were to any olive branch from the sitting president. We also recall the lack of respect from one South Carolina congressman during an Obama speech in 2009 that truly set the awful tone for the next seven years. When Gerson quotes polls about Americans’ distrust for government, he fails to

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mention the approval rating of Congress (less than 20 percent every year since 2010, which coincides with the Republican takeover of Congress). Gerson could more deftly argue that the 19 percent of Americans who trust that government is doing the right thing are the same group that has a favorable view of Congress. Despite his attempt to connect this distrust to the liberalism of Obama, he fails to notice the 48 percent approval rating of the president. Lastly, Gerson accuses and criticizes the president for politically attacking his rivals yet remains quiet about the continued demonization of Obama by the political right. The president is providing a counterweight to the hatred and anger coming out of right wing talk radio and from Congress itself. Christopher Farrar • Edwardsville

NBA team is not a realistic solution for St. Louis Regarding the letter “Bring an NBA team to St. Louis” (Jan. 16): While the National Basketball Association may look toward expanding, there is not a very good chance a team could end up in St. Louis, even after the Rams leaving. St. Louis has had two NBA franchises, the Spirits and the Hawks, and were not able to keep either team from leaving. Kansas City, Louisville, Nashville and Seattle are all thought to be better candidates to get a franchise over St. Louis, so it would

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR

diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days. Additional letters are posted online at STLtoday.com/letters.

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Even El Chapo could find a friendly welcome in St. Louis County So we have a well-connected drug smuggler, arsonist and drug dealer allowed to do business in St. Louis County because he is connected with the St. Louis County police chief and county executive. We have a federal judge that seals the requests from these officials from the public. So I have to say, if El Chapo is moved to the United States, retains defense lawyer Scott Rosenblum and moves to St. Louis County, and befriends the county executive and police chief, he would be a free man in, let’s say, two days. Good job, judge, police chief and county executive. You all are a true example of justice in America. Larry J. Smith • St. Louis

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be quite hard to convince the NBA to give us an expansion team before any of those markets. St. Louis is not well-known as a basketball town, so it is questionable that there will even be enough fan support to sustain a successful NBA franchise in our market. Besides, with a large following for soccer in the St. Louis area, and Major League Soccer’s inclination for expanding to 28 teams, it is far more likely that our city would acquire, with the proper ownership and stadium funding, an MLS franchise over an NBA expansion team. Colin Thierry • St. Louis County

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TOD ROBBERSON trobberson@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRANK REUST freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 DEBORAH PETERSON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


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Mark Milton of Glendale says, “We can talk about ways to unite people in the city and county. We can talk about healing racial divides. We can talk about attracting other professional sports teams to the region. I say we start by inviting and encouraging other successful St. Louisans to come home. We need you to help rebuild our city and region.”

Enough with the angry rants from the political extremes The conversation • Readers must demand solutions instead of settling for complaints about society’s problems.

Read and talk about this letter and more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

Trump’s rivals help him hijack the GOP Politics • Republican race is really a battle between the demagogic and the selish. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

BY TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

We’ve heard a lot of angry talk from the political extremes during the current presidential campaign. Much harder to come by is the voice of the centrist, whose lack of self-righteous outrage too often gets misinterpreted as shouldershrugging apathy. Centrists are the large grouping of American voters who care deeply, but who don’t see heat and fury as the best way to address our society’s ills. I count myself among them. By way of introduction, I’m the new editorial page editor of the PostDispatch. Which is not to suggest that I am somehow the voice of the newspaper. No single editor or writer represents our editorial position. We are all merely contributors to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. The editorials you read in this newspaper are unsigned because they represent the opinions of this institution. We strive for editorial consistency, which is why readers won’t necessarily see a dramatic swing in editorial policy simply because a new editorial page editor is in place. So why does it matter where I stand politically? The people shaping this newspaper’s editorial voice take very seriously the words of Joseph Pulitzer that we print as The Platform at the bottom of each day’s editorial page. Note the part about never belonging to any party and being “drastically independent.” Being a centrist doesn’t mean not taking sides. It means fairly weighing the strongest arguments. We should leave no ambiguity on these pages where we stand once we’ve taken a stand, but also should be fair to those who disagree. I’ve often told aspiring journalism students that my best training for this line of work was the year I spent on my high school debate team. Debaters learn to argue passionately no matter which side

Being a centrist doesn’t mean not taking sides. It means fairly weighing the strongest arguments. - Tod Robberson

— the pro or the con — they’re representing. Your goal as a debater is to make the judge believe you’re absolutely committed to the cause you’re defending, even if, two hours later, you’ll be standing before a different judge making the exact opposite argument. Our goal must be to persuade and convince, not beat the opponent into intellectual submission. Persuasion necessarily entails trying to see the argument from the other’s point of view. Whatever the hotly debated issue, be it gun control, abortion or immigration, the pro and con arguments are unquestionably heartfelt and passionate. But they’re not necessarily the only arguments or even the best ones. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has lofty goals of

universal, government-paid health care. But his position crumbles on the question of workability since his congressional backing would be close to nil. Donald Trump wants to build a border wall and deport all 11 million undocumented migrants living in the United States. No matter how much his supporters agree with him, it’s a pipe dream. It’ll never happen because it’s logistically and financially impossible. He loses the argument. We receive dozens of commentary submissions each week for the op-ed page. A few writers have been surprised when I’ve sent their work back to them with a simple request: Please don’t just describe a problem or declare that something’s wrong. Venture a solution. The easy job is complaining about a problem. The hard part is coming up with fixes. Washington is in perpetual gridlock because too few are willing to venture solutions, and too many are building their careers by pointing out the flaws of their opponents’ ideas. Both Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama offered up workable, if imperfect, solutions to tackle serious problems facing this country. Mr. Bush offered up comprehensive immigration reform. Mr. Obama sought health care reform. Opponents ranted. They shot down the immigration plan. They declared war on Obamacare. But at no time did they venture better solutions. That’s what has to change in our political system. Give solutions a chance. When readers see pieces such as the one we recently published by Gene and Cole McNary offering a road map to unify St. Louis County’s 90 municipalities, my hope is that they’ll see these ideas not as an invitation to a fight but rather as the start of a conversation aimed at addressing problems. So, let the conversation begin.

he GOP needs both Trump and Cruz to fall Politics • For the party’s sake, Republicans need a viable option to the two candidates.

MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

The outbreak of hostilities between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz may not be edifying, but it is clarifying. Cruz represents the arrival of tea party ideology at the presidential level. He espouses a “constitutionalism” that would disqualify much of modern government, and a belief that Republican elites are badly, even mainly, at fault for accommodating cultural and economic liberalism. Trump has adopted an ethnonationalism in which the constraints of “political correctness” are lifted to express frankly nativist sentiments: that many illegal immigrants are criminals and rapists who threaten American jobs, and that Muslims are foreign, suspicious and potentially dangerous. These approaches can overlap, but they are not identical. Cruz is attacking Trump as a “fake conservative” on gun and property rights and as a New York liberal on cultural matters. For his part, Trump defends those portions of the welfare state that benefit the working class, opposing cuts in Social Security and an increase in the retirement age. Cruz is the conservative true believer. Trump is the wrecking ball of political convention. They are not only two strong personalities; they demonstrate two different tendencies within the right. Trump’s attacks on Cruz have begun drawing both blood and protests from ideological conservatives.“Either cut the crap,” warns radio host Mark Levin, “your accusations ... that Cruz is Canadian, a criminal, owned by the banks, etc. ... or you will lose lots and lots of conservatives.” Levin and others registered no protest when Trump denigrated women, minorities and the disabled. Attacking a favored conservative is evidently a different matter. But this is Trump’s greatest political talent — exploiting weaknesses like a dentist probing and drilling the most sensitive spot. Trump’s questions about Cruz’s Canadian roots are not primarily about constitutional interpretation. The issue is simpler: Why would voters who support the forced expulsion of 11 million undocumented people want a president born north of the border?

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump, left, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during the Fox Business Network Republican presidential debate at the North Charleston Coliseum on Jan. 14, in North Charleston, S.C.

Trump’s mention of undisclosed Wall Street contributions highlights the contrast between Cruz’s outsider brand and insider resume. And Cruz’s seriously Denmark-like proposal for a valueadded tax — as Marco Rubio pointed out in the recent Republican debate — may be disqualifying for many economic conservatives. In a Trump-Cruz battle, I would not bet against Trump. Much of the Republican donor class is convinced that Cruz is the political equivalent of Barry Goldwater, in part because of his very conservative social views. A Trump-Clinton contest, however, is beginning to appear more winnable (particularly as Hillary Clinton appears more awkward and inept).“Donors,” one leading Republican figure told me,“are trying hard to get comfortable with Trump.” And Trump, without doubt, has improved his skills as a candidate. But here is the problem. Donors, analysts and media are naturally drawn to the horse-race aspect of politics: establishment vs. anti-establishment, insider vs. outsider. But Trump is proposing a massive ideological and moral revision of the Republican Party. Re-created in his image, it would be the anti-immigrant party; the party that blows up the global trading order; the party that undermines the principle of religious liberty; the party that encourages an ethnic basis for American identity and gives strength and momentum to prejudice. We are already seeing the disturbing

normalization of policies and arguments that recently seemed unacceptable, even unsayable. Trump proposes the forced expulsion of 11 million people, or a ban on Muslim immigration, and there are a few days of outrage from responsible Republican leaders. But the proposals still lie on the table, eventually seeming regular and acceptable. But they are not acceptable. They are not normal. They are extreme, and obscene and immoral. The Republican nominee — for the sake of his party and his conscience — must draw these boundaries clearly. Ted Cruz is particularly ill-equipped to play this role. He is actually more of a demagogue than an ideologue. So he has changed his views on immigration to compete with Trump — and raised the ante by promising that none of the deported 11 million will ever be allowed back in the country. Instead of demonstrating the humane instincts of his Christian faith — a faith that motivated abolition and the struggle for civil rights — Cruz is presenting the crueler version of a pipe dream. For Republicans, the only good outcome of Trump vs. Cruz is for both to lose. The future of the party as the carrier of a humane, inclusive conservatism now depends on some viable choice beyond them. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

“I will gladly accept the mantle of anger.” Thus did Donald Trump react last week to South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, who in her Republican response to the State of the Union address bravely called on Americans to resist the temptation “to follow the siren call of the angriest voices.” And nobody wears the mantle of anger as well as Trump. The rest of the Republican presidential contenders, acolytes in anger all, seem happy to help him on with the cloak, to hem the sleeves and let out the waist until the fury fits perfectly. Republicans like to blame Trump for hijacking the party, but equally to blame are the others in the race for letting it happen — and continuing to do so, now just two weeks from the Iowa caucuses. Thursday night’s debate was another depressing development: Any of four men on the stage — Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush, Chris Christie or John Kasich — could have been a viable alternative to the fear and demagoguery offered by Trump and Ted Cruz. Instead, they cluttered the stage and quarreled among themselves, offering little beyond faint echoes of Trump’s rage. A crystallizing moment came when each was asked about Trump’s plan to bar Muslims from immigrating. Kasich: “I’ve been for pausing on admitting the Syrian refugees.” Christie: “I said right from the beginning that we should take no Syrian refugees of any kind.” Rubio: “Donald tapped in to some of that anger that’s out there about this whole issue.” Cruz: “I understand why Donald made the comments he did and I understand why Americans are feeling frustrated and scared and angry.” Bush alone expressed outrage at Trump’s proposal (“all Muslims — seriously?”) but he had no chance to draw an extended contrast with Trump in the seven-way competition for air time. The GOP race is typically described as a struggle between the outsiders and the establishment. Really it’s a battle between the demagogic (Cruz and Trump) and the selfish (Rubio, Bush, Christie, Kasich). The latter candidates, blinded by certainty in their own magnificence, refuse to clear the field so that one of them can take on the demagogues. (Ben Carson, the other man on the stage, appeared to have wandered, bewildered, into the debate.) The polling shows the dilemma: Trump averages about a third of the GOP vote, Cruz a fifth. The four others together are about a quarter — enough to give voters a viable alternative to Trump and Cruz, if only they could put country before self. Worse, they seem content to echo and imitate Trump. Haley, in the audience for Thursday’s debate in South Carolina, got little support for her noble call for tolerance. “Our military is a disaster. Our health care is a horror show,” Trump said when asked to respond to Haley.“We have no borders. ... Our country is being run by incompetent people. And yes, I am angry.” So was Bush: “The simple fact is that the world has been torn asunder.” And Rubio: “If we don’t get this election right, there may be no turning back for America.” Christie spoke of Obama’s governing as “a dictatorship,” called the president “a petulant child” and described “the world being on fire.” But none could equal Trump’s formula for frightening.“It’s not fear and terror, it’s reality,” Trump said.“Our country’s a mess and we can’t let all these people come into our country and break our borders.” Trump turned his conspiracy theories on Cruz (“if you become the nominee, who the hell knows if you can even serve?”), and when Cruz tried to fight Trump in kind by insinuating his “New York values” are too liberal, Trump shut him down by invoking the smell of death in New York after the 9/11 attacks. There is, as Cruz was the latest to learn, no way to best Trump in demagoguery. So if Trump’s other rivals are only going to ape his paranoia and rage, why would voters accept an imitation if they can have the original? A better solution is to present an alternative, which the other Republicans can’t do because they’re fighting among themselves. When Rubio and Cruz were having a valuable argument about taxes, Christie broke in to “interrupt this debate on the floor of the Senate” and told Rubio: “You blew it.” Similarly, after Cruz and Rubio were having an important debate about immigration, Bush dismissed the bickering of “backbench senators” who “bend with the wind.” And while his rivals quarreled over trifles, Trump got one step closer to the nomination. Dana Milbank dana.milbank@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016

To Our Readers

Danter, Marie C.

Graves, Herbert Jr.

Parsons, Christopher

(nee Dominguez), Called by God to her final resting place on January 15, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Charles E. Danter; devoted mother of Matthew (Carol), Michael (Christine), Mark and Anne Marie Danter; loving grandmother to Lindsey and Michael Dennison, Jacquelyn, Andrew, Nicholas and Elise Danter; loving sister of Dorothy Burke, Nancy Myers and the late Arnold Dominguez. Longtime parishioner and volunteer at Seven Holy Founders parish. Services: Visitation will be held at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, St. Louis, MO 63123 on Friday, January 22, 2016 from 4:00 - 8:00 pm. Visitation will also be held on Saturday, January 23, 2016, 9:00 - 9:45 am at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5120 Wilson Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, with funeral Mass to follow at 9:45 am. Memorials in Marie's memory may be made to the Alzheimer's Association, 9370 Olive Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132, www.alz.org/donate.

Departed this life January 15th, 2016 after a courageous battle with cancer. He was a devoted husband of Marie A. Graves. He was born, raised, and educated in the St. Louis community. He was retired from the United States Post Office, and was also a member of the Teamsters Local 600. He was a long time member of Washington Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church. After retirement he worked as a tour guide for over 12 years at the Museum of Transportation in St Louis County. He was a veteran of the Korean Conflict, serving as a combat engineer and received several medals for outstanding service; he was also 32nd degree Mason and Shriner. Services: Funeral service will be held at Washington Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church, 3200 Washington, St. Louis, Missouri 63103, Friday, January 22nd, visitation at 9 a.m. Funeral service begins at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Peregrine Society can be made.

passed away, Sunday, January 17, 2016 at the age of 22. Beloved son of Dr. Michael and Kristi Parsons; loving brother of Ashley (James) Guilford, Taylor and Connor Parsons; dear grandson of Glenda Hayden and the late LeRoy Parsons and Dallas (Judy) DeVries and the late Maylo Zakariasen; loving nephew, cousin and friend to many. Christopher was a 2012 graduate of Lafayette High School and currently a fourth year nursing student the University of Missouri, Columbia. His hobbies included skiing, scuba diving, sailing, fishing and he enjoyed serving as a counselor with the Youth Rally Camp. Services: Memorial Service at St. John Church, 15800 Manchester Road, Ellisville, Friday, 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to www.youthrally.org. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Durland, Nelson

Haines, Joan Francis

Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church Sunday, January 17, 2016. Dear son of the late William N. and Dorothy E. Durland (nee: Smith). Dear brother of Harold C. (Jen) Folts. Our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Nelson was the owner of Rookies Sports Bar and Grill at 6825 Parker Road, near 370. Services: Funeral Friday, January 22, 9:15am from BUCHHOLZ Spanish Lake Mortuary, 1645 Redman Ave, to St. Angela Merici Catholic Church, 3860 N. Highway 67, Florissant for a 10am Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Online guestbook at www.buchholzmortuary.com. VISITATION THURS, 4-7PM.

(nee Brandt) Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Sunday, January 17, 2016 at the age of 92 years old. Adoring late parents, John F. and Cornelia (nee Kohmann) Brandt, late sisters, Marion (Joseph) Willet, Maxine Brandt, Antionette (John) Tierney. Beloved wife of the late Albert K. Haines. Cherished mother of Allen K. (Rita) Haines, Sr., Richard A. (Kelly) Haines; loving grandmother of Allen (Jennifer Doyce) Haines, Jr., Ryan (Michelle) Haines, Maria'h (Clay) King, Aaron (Debbie) Haines, Jennifer Rose (Brian) McCormac, Nicholas (Kristen) Haines; stepgrandmother of Jordin (Patrick) O'Connor, dearest great-grandmother of eleven and step great-grandmother of nine, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, great-great-aunt and friend. Services: In celebration of Joan's life a Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, January 23, 2016, 11:00AM at Our Lady of the Rosary Catholic Church, 11725 Bellefontaine Road, St. Louis, MO 63138. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be sent to the Saint Louis Zoo, in Joan Haines' memory www.stlzoo.org.

To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index

Death Notice Index

Alsop, Felicia "Lisa" - St. Louis Altenbach, Fred Lawrence "Skip" - Fenton Anselmo, Frances C. - Saint Charles Bain, Alton D. "Al" - Bridgeton Barker, Theresa - St. Louis Beck, Richard J. "Dick" - Town & Country Brauch - see Buschmann Buschmann, Patricia "Pat" - St. Louis Caskanett, Richard C. "Rick" - St. Louis Coleman, Lois L. - St. Louis Collins - see White Curran - see White Danter, Marie C. - St. Louis Durland, Nelson - St. Louis Feit, Martin Ray "Marty" - St. Louis Finke, Wesley Ben "Wes" - St. Louis Foggi - see White Folts - see Durland, Nelson Gilles - see Helton Goldbeck, Norman F. - Washington, MO Graves, Herbert Jr. - St. Louis Griffin - see White Haines, Joan Francis - St. Louis Helton, Dorothy A. "Dottie" - St. Louis Hoette, William E. - Florissant Lanfersieck, Robert A. "Bob" - Arnold Lee, Benjamin F. Jr. - St. Louis Manguso - see White Mayfield, June - St. Charles

Morrell, Robert Anthony - Wentzville Munie - see Buschmann Newenhaus - see White

McKenzie, Homer "Shorty The Barber" - St. Charles

Withers, Jerry O. - Ballwin Yanker, Henry "Bud" W. - St. Louis

Parsons, Christopher - Wildwood

Rath, Kenneth F. - St. Louis Roche, Daniel W. - Manchester

Rousseau, William A. - St. Louis Rowan, Margy L. - Wentzville Ruess, Theresa M. (Barton) - St. Louis Sanders, Robert W. "Bob" - St. Charles Saunders - see White Schoech, Dorothy M. - St. Louis

Schuchardt, Wilbert G. - St. Louis Scott, Jane - St. Charles Seibel - see Altenbach Shea, John M. - Waterloo, IL

Simms - see White Steinmeyer, Shirley May - St. Louis Tyler, Mary G. - St. Louis VanCardo, Dolores A. - St. Louis

Venable, Nancy Lee - Florissant Watson - see Altenbach Weise, Erminia "Minnie" - St. Louis Westphale, Donald Joseph - Manchester

White, John E. - St. Charles White, Peter E. - St. Louis Wilson, Gerald "Jerry" D. - Berkley

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully

Feit, Martin Ray "Marty" 314-352-7575 wkf.com

Alsop, Felicia "Lisa"

Bain, Alton D. "Al"

January 18, 2016. Loving wife of Daniel; cherished mother of Jacob and Brody; loving daughter of Joan (Tim) Diffley and the late Marvin Levy; dear step-sister of Molly Xenakis, Maggie Brown and Michael Diffley; dear sister-in-law of Joan Alsop, Paula Alsop and Patricia Hernandez; dear aunt, niece, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral service Thursday, January 21st, 1:30 PM at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Boulevard, 63132. Visitation begins at 1 PM. Private interment. Memorial contributions preferred to St. Luke's Hospice, 111 South Woods Mill Road, 63017 or Blackout Melanoma, 745 Craig Road, 63141. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Buschmann, Patricia "Pat"

Aug. 17, 1926 - Jan. 17, 2016. Visitation Thurs., Jan. 21, 4-8 p.m. with Funeral Fri., 12:30 p.m. at SHEPARD FUNERAL CHAPEL, 9255 Natural Bridge Rd. at I-170 (314-426-6000). More info at www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

(nee Truhlar) Went peacefully home to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, on January 18, 2016. Beloved wife of 54 years to the late Bob Buschmann; mother of Tom (Barb) Buschmann, Terri Brauch (fiancé Tom Dempewolf), Kathy (Jim) Munie and Mary Ann Buschmann; grandmother of Julie, Eric, Samantha, Ethan, Amy, Matthew and the late Jay; great-grandmother of Lucas. Thank you for the compassionate care provided by her BJC doctors and staff, and the staff of The Riverview Care Center. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, January 22, 9:30 a.m. to St. Mark Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. If desired memorial contributions to the National Stroke Association, www.stroke.org. Visitation Thursday, January 21, 4-7 p.m.

Altenbach, Fred Lawrence "Skip"

Barker, Theresa (nee McVeigh) January 18, 2016. Beloved wife of the late George E. Barker. Loving mother of Alan (Cathy), Glenn (Cindy) and Kenneth (Teresa) Barker; grandmother of David & Jessica Barker, Thomas Barker and Jason & Brittany Barker. Our dear great-grandmother, aunt, great-aunt, cousin & friend. Mrs. Barker was passionate about birds and a member of Webster Groves Nature Society. O'SULLIVAN-MUCKLE MORTUARY Service.

Beck, Richard J. "Dick"

passed away, Tuesday, January 12, 2016. Loving husband of Mary Ann Watson Altenbach (nee Seibel); dear father of Lori Watson and Randy (Jennifer) Watson; loving grandfather of Jacob and Anna Watson; brother of Mary D. (RJ) Johnson; son-in-law of Emily Seibel; brother-in-law of Charles (Sue) Seibel and James (Joan) Seibel; uncle and great-uncle and a friend to many. Fred was a proud Mason of Crestwood Anchor Lodge #443. Services: Celebration of life gathering at the FAMILY CENTER at SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Saturday, January 23, 2016 from 3-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to National Kidney Foundation or Shriners Hospitals for Children - St. Louis. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Anselmo, Frances C. (nee: Schmidt) of Saint Charles, MO, died on Sunday, January 17, 2016, at the age of 83. Beloved daughter of the late Frank and Edna Schmidt; devoted mother of Donald (Darlene) Newman, Dino Anselmo, Mario Anselmo, and Trina Anselmo; cherished grandmother of April Newman, Donald Newman III, Heather Newman, Mical Anselmo, Alex Anselmo, Kelsey (Joe) Russo, and Nicholas Anselmo; treasured great-grandmother of Olive Russo; dear sister of Gwendolyn (Rick) Smith; loving step-daughter of Mary Schmidt, and survived by many nieces, nephews, extended family and friends. She is preceded in death by her brother Karl Schmidt and daughter-in-law Peggy Anselmo. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where friends visitation will be held Friday, January 22, 2016 from 4:008:00 pm. Funeral Service on Saturday, January 23, 2016, 12:00 pm at Baue Funeral and Memorial Center. Interment St. Charles Memorial Gardens. Memorials to VFW National Home. Visit Baue.com

Fortified by his Catholic faith, died peacefully on Wed Jan 13, 2016, at age 87. Devoted husband for 56 years of the late Mary Jeanne (nee Padberg). Loving father of Michelle (Bob) Osterholt, Mary (Ed) Olson, and Michael (Andrea) Beck. Dear grandfather of Craig, Megan, and Jenna Osterholt, Grace, Michael, and Julia Olson, Alayna, Lauren and Jack Beck. Brother of the late Jack A. Beck and Mary Anne Kacin. Brother-in-law of Zoe Gorman and Gena Padberg. Dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Dick attended St. Louis University High and Washington University. He worked as a civil engineer at FruinColnon Corporation for 38 years and was involved in many construction projects in St. Louis and Illinois. Dick will be remembered for his integrity and great sense of humor. Services: Visitation and Funeral Mass will be held Sat. Jan. 23 at St. Clement of Rome Church, 1510 Bopp Rd. Saint Louis, MO 63131. Visitation at 10:00 a.m. with mass to follow at 11:30 a.m. Memorial contribution may be made to St. Clement of Rome Church for mass requests or other.

We can assist you! Call us at 314-340-8600 or visit us online: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

Finke, Wesley Ben "Wes"

Caskanett, Richard C. "Rick" baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection on Sunday, January 17, 2016. Beloved husband of Janice K. Caskanett (nee Smith); loving father of Jenny (Keith) Matlock and Susan (Doug) Moss; cherished grandpa of Emily, Grant, Abby, Lauren, Megan and Ryan; dearest brother of Tom (Pat) Caskanett and Judy (Don) Schober; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Rick was passionate about cars, member of many clubs and was a beloved friend to many car enthusiasts. He will be deeply missed by those who knew and loved him. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. on Friday, January 22, 8:30 a.m. to Mary Mother of the Church for 9 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Contributions to American Diabetes and/or American Heart Association appreciated. Visitation Thursday 4-8 p.m.

Coleman, Lois L. (nee Roderique) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, January 19, 2016. Beloved wife of the late James A. Coleman; dear mother of Dale (late Trudy) Coleman, Pam (Todd) McConnell, Debbie Coleman, Ronald Coleman, Mark (Annette) Coleman and Dana (Anne) Coleman; our dear grandmother of 9, great-grandmother of 8, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, greataunt and friend. Services: Funeral from COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd., (St. Ann) Friday, January 22, 9:30 a.m. to Holy Spirit Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass, 3130 Parkwood Lane. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Contributions to American Cancer Society appreciated. Visitation Thursday 3-8 p.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Reflect Honor ...on their life with the story of your loved one in our obituaries.

January 18, 2016. Beloved husband of Nancy Feit; dear father and father-in-law of Stacey Feit and Corey (Jenna Lew) Feit; dear grandfather of Riav and Soliea Feit; dear son of the late Sol and the late Edna Feit; dear brother and brother-in-law of Leslie (Allen) Berger and Denny (Amy) Feit; dear brother-in-law of Jerrold (Susie) Comensky; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Graveside service Thursday, January 21st, 10:00 AM at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Road. Memorial contributions of your choice preferred. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

Helton, Dorothy A. "Dottie" (nee Brake) The world has lost a sweet sole but heaven has gained an Angel, Monday, January 18, 2016 at the age of 83. Beloved wife of the late Ernest Helton; dearest mother of Sandi (Nick) Gilles and Jim Helton; loving grandmother of Tim (Katie) VonderHaar and Connor Gilles; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Friday, January 22, 9 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the charity of your choice in her memory appreciated. Visitation Thursday 4-8 p.m.

Hoette, William E.

89, on Sat., Jan. 16, 2016. Beloved husband of Carolyn W. Finke; devoted father of Beth Mueller (the late Harry McClaren), Wesley Scott Finke (Janet) and Jane Frederick (Paul). Loving and adored grandfather ("Partner") of Buck Mueller, Ryan, Drew, Melanie, Carly, and Jack Finke. Great granddad of Blake and Brandt Mueller and Amelia Rogers. Wes attended Blewett High School in St. Louis where he graduated at midterm in order to join the US Marine Corps; serving his country in World War II. He also served as camp bugler. After the war, Wes returned to St. Louis and earned his degree from Central Methodist University. He joined business with his father, becoming a real estate broker and appraiser. He was a past president of the Appraisal Institute. Wes was a charter member and elder of Southminster Presbyterian Church. He was also a charter member of the Crestwood-Sunset Rotary Club, where he had perfect attendance record for more than 55 years. He was a past president of Rotary and a Paul Harris Fellow. Besides his family, his passion for 50 years was the sport of badminton. He won his first national title at the age of 60. He was a member of the Missouri Athletic Club for more than 50 years where he was inducted into the Athlete's Hall of Fame for Racquet Sports. Services: Memorial Service, 1 p.m. Saturday, January 23, at Southminster Presbyterian Church, 10126 East Watson Rd, Crestwood, MO 63126. If desired, memorials may be made to Southminster Presbyterian Church. Boppchapel.com

Monday, January 18, 2016. Beloved husband of the late Rose Hoette; dear father of Gary Hoette, Joyce (Lou) Lamberti, Jean (Joe) Otten and Nancy (Ken) Vortmeier; dear grandfather of Jim (Alice) Hoette, Dave (Holly) Hoette, Diana (Jeremy) Winn, Matt and Nick Lamberti, Joe (Lesley) and Stefanie Otten, Nathan and Elizabeth Vortmeier; dear great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many, including his friends and staff at the Villas at Riverwood. Services: Funeral from HUTCHENS Mortuary 9:30 a.m. Sat., Jan. 23 to St. Rose Philippine Duchesne for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 22. Memorials to American Diabetes Assn. or charity of your choice.

Lanfersieck, Robert A. "Bob" Saturday, January 16, 2016. Service Sat., Jan. 23, 11 a.m. at COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh Blvd. (St. Ann). Visitation Friday 3-8 p.m. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

of Washington, MO, on Monday, January 18, 2016 at the age of 85 years. He is survived by his wife, Gloria Goldbeck of Washington, MO. Mr. Goldbeck had owned the Shell Station on N. Hanley Rd., in Hazelwood, MO for many years. Services: Funeral Mass: Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 11 AM at St. Francis Borgia Church in Washington. Burial in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis. Visitation at the Oltmann Funeral Home, 508 E. 14th St., Washington, MO 63090 on Thursday from 9-10:30 AM.

January 13, 2016. Dear relative and friend. Visitation at KUTIS CITY Chapel, 2906 Gravois, Thursday, 5-8 p.m. Funeral Friday, 11 a.m.

Roche, Daniel W.

baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Sunday, January 17, 2016 at the age of 85. Beloved husband of 59 years to Charlene Roche (nee Smith); dear father of Kevin and Donna Kaye; son of the late Edward F. and Catherine (nee Walsh) Roche; brother of Leo J. (Nova), Joseph F. (Dorothy) Roche, the late Dorothy M. (Dally) Keeling, Edward D., Catherine B., Rita M., James P. (Mary El) and Michael A. (Vernell) Roche; survived by numerous nieces and nephews. Services: Family will receive friends at 9:30 a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, 8707 West Main Street, Belleville, IL. Burial is private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to American Cancer Society.

Rousseau, William A. passed away January 15, 2016. Loving husband of the late Dorothy Rousseau and husband of Delores Scott for the last 13 years; dear father of Sandy Sharp and Janet Schultz; beloved grandfather of 5 and great-grandfather of 9. Mr. Rousseau was an aeronautical engineer for the McDonnell Douglas Corporation for many years before his retirement. Services: Memorial services will be 11 a.m., Friday, January 22, at Kirkwood United Church of Christ, 1603 Dougherty Ferry Rd, Kirkwood, MO 63122.

Rowan, Margy L. (nee Ecoff), of Wentzville, MO, died on Monday, January 18, 2016, at the age of 86. Loving wife of the late James Rowan; beloved daughter of the late Frank and Mildred Ecoff; devoted mother of Judy Naff, Jim (Kelly) Rowan, and Jean (Todd) Goldstein; cherished grandmother of 11; treasured great-grandmother of 5; and also survived by many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her daughters Susan and Gail Rowan, and 3 brothers and 1 sister. Services: The family is being served by the BAUE Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held on Friday, January 22, 2016 4:00-8:00 pm. Funeral Mass Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:00 am St. Theodore Catholic Church. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Alzheimer's Association. Visit Baue.com

Ruess, Theresa M. (Barton) Wife of the late Lawrence Ruess. Beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister and aunt. A true angel that will be missed.

Lee, Benjamin F. Jr. 87, January 17, 2016. Dear husband, Dear father to Donna Burroughs, Bonny Stauffer, Jim Lee, John Lee, and the late Robert Lee, Jo Ann Lee and Michael Lee, dear grandfather of 5; great grandfather of 4; dear brother, uncle and friend. Services: Visitation Thurs, Jan 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant, MO, burial 2pm at Jefferson Barracks with military honors. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Missouri Veterans Home. www.hutchensmortuary.com

Mayfield, June

Goldbeck, Norman F.

Rath, Kenneth F.

(nee Cappel), age 85, of St. Charles, MO, died on Monday, January 18, 2016. Contact (636) 9401000 or visit baue.com

McKenzie, Homer "Shorty The Barber" 1932-2016. Visit 1/22, 4-7 Paul Funeral Home, Memorial Service: 1/22, 7pm Paul Funeral Home. www.paulfuneral.com

Morrell, Robert Anthony Age 54, of Wentzville, MO, died on Sunday, January 17, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

Caring Gestures From a beautiful memorial to a prepared dish or tray, every gesture is appreciated. Let us help.

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NEWS

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

HIV testing uncommon in teens despite guidelines ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO • Fewer than 1 in 4 high school students who’ve had sex have ever been tested for HIV, a troubling low rate that didn’t budge over eight years, government researchers say. Young adults fared slightly better, although testing rates have declined in black women. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and an influential preventive health panel recommend routine HIV testing at least once for teens and adults. They also advise at least yearly screening for high-risk patients including those with multiple sex partners, gay or bisexual boys and men

Sanders, Robert W. "Bob"

and injection drug users. The American Academy of Pediatrics has similar advice targeting teens only. Nearly half of U.S. high school students have had sex, often without using condoms, which can help prevent the spread of HIV, which causes AIDS. About 15 percent report having had at least four sex partners. Some teens underestimate their HIV risk or have doctors who are unaware of the recommendations, according to the CDC researchers who did the study. The health agency says inadequate sex education is another challenge; in a report last month, it said fewer than half of U.S. high schools

Shea, John M.

White, Peter E.

died 1/18/2016, born 8/26/1949. Private services will be held at a later date. Quernheim Funeral Home, Waterloo, IL.

January 15, 2016. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved husband of Lisa White (nee Saunders). Loving father of Molly White. Dear son of the late John E. "Jack" and Rose White. Dear brother of Ed Curran, Kathleen (James) Griffin, Jeanice "Peanut" (James) Manguso, Denice "Fatty" (Ray) Simms. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin & friend. Services: Mass will be celebrated 10:00 a.m., Monday, January 25, 2016 at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, 1115 Florissant Rd., St. Louis, MO 63121. Visitation 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, January 24th at O'SULLIVAN MUCKLE MORTUARY, 13996 Olive Blvd., Chesterfield, MO 63017. In lieu of flowers, donations to Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church preferred. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery.

Steinmeyer, Shirley May

died Saturday, January 16, 2016, at the age of 85. Beloved husband of Loma Jean Sanders; cherished son of the late Wilbern E. and Judith A. Sanders; devoted father of Beverly Sanders, Denise McGrath, and the late Robert W. Sanders II; loving grandfather of Kelly (Eric) Struckmann, Lori Sanders, Bobby Sanders, their mother Cathy Sanders, and Jimmy McGrath; cherished great-grandfather of Aubrey Struckmann and one on the way. Bob retired from Monsanto as a Research Chemist after more than 30 years of employment, and was later employed by Protein Technologies Int'l, Ralston Purina, retiring in 1990. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Memorial Service - Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 2:00 p.m., with Gathering to follow from 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. Visit Baue.com

Schoech, Dorothy M. (nee Lehenbauer), asleep in Jesus, on Monday, January 18, 2016. She was born on October 20, 1922 in Linn, KS to Rev. Carl and Hedwig (Knoernschild) Lehenbauer. On June 5, 1946 she married Rev. Theodore G. Schoech who preceded her in death on July 25, 1995. A graduate of St. John's College of Winfield, KS Dorothy was employed as a legal secretary and was involved in many church activities. She is survived by her four children, Philip (Rita Sweeney) Schoech, Thomas Schoech, Jeanette (John) Vogrin, Angela (Thomas) Coward; four grandchildren, Melissa Vogrin, Nicole Vogrin, John Schoech, Rebecca Vogrin; three sisters-in-law, several nieces and nephews and many friends. In addition to her husband, Dorothy was preceded in death by one grandchild, Andrew Schoech as well as five sisters and four brothers. Services: Memorial visitation will be at Chapel of The Cross Lutheran Church, 11645 Benham Rd. on Friday, January 22, 11 a.m. until Memorial Service at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Concordia Seminary-Schoech Scholarship Endowment Fund, 801 Seminary Place, St. Louis, MO 63105 or to the Chapel of The Cross Lutheran Church, 11645 Benham Rd., St. Louis, MO 63136. KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY service.

Schuchardt, Wilbert G. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Monday, January 18, 2016 at the age of 89. Beloved husband of the late Carol J. Schuchardt (nee Laury); dear father of Susan (Joseph) Miklovic, Scott (Maggie) Schuchardt, Christopher (Dona Laurie) Schuchardt Sr., Sally (Omar) Alami, Curt (Anthoula) Schuchardt and Eric (Julie) Schuchardt; dear grandfather of Joshua (Mary), Ann (John), Margaret (Brian), Jacob (Tessa), Leah (Jonathan), Emily, Adam, Christopher Jr., Patrick, Jonathan, Abigail, Kathryn, Daniel, Philip, Nathan, John Paul, Noah, Anna, Maria and Mark; dear great grand-father of 8, brother, brother-in-law, uncle, greatuncle, cousin and dear friend to many. Services: Funeral Friday 9:30am from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS 7027 Gravois to St. George Church for 10:00am Mass. Interment: National Cemetery VISITATION: THURSDAY 4-8PM.

Scott, Jane

47, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sun. Jan. 17. Beloved daughter of Jim and Joan Scott (Nee Maher); loved sister of Julie Scott, Joe (Amy) Scott and the late Jill Scott; devoted aunt of Hannah and Nathan Scott; loving niece, godmother, cousin and friend. Services: The Stygar Family of Funeral Service is caring for Jane's family. Funeral Wed., Jan. 20 at 9:15 a.m. from STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles) to St. Joseph Catholic Church, 1355 Motherhead Road, (Cottleville) for a 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Ste. Philippine Cemetery. Visitation Tues., Jan 19 from 3:00 until 8:00 p.m. Contributions suggested to American Cancer Society or Humane Society of Missouri. www.stygar.com

and middle schools teach CDC-recommended sexual health education including HIV-related topics. Other CDC data show there’s been an overall decline in HIV cases nationwide in recent years. About 50,000 people are diagnosed each year with HIV and 1 in 4 new infections occur in those aged 13 to 24. The new study was published online Tuesday in Pediatrics. Led by CDC health scientist Michelle Van Handel, the researchers analyzed 2005-13 national health surveys involving high school students, and 2011-13 surveys involving adults ages 18 to 24.

Passed away on Monday, January 18, 2016 at the age of 92. Beloved daughter of the late Dr. John H. and May Steinmeyer; Dear sister of Carol (Roger) Wakefield, Donald (Gloria) Steinmeyer, David (Martha) Steinmeyer and the late Harold (Winifred) and the late Robert (Anne) Steinmeyer); Dear aunt of Sharon (Harry) Prah, Deborah (Richard) Lucero, Sandra (Juve) Lopez, Pamela (Stanley) Braun, Robyn (Keith) Hilliard, John F. (Kendra) Steinmeyer, John D. (Kathy) Steinmeyer, Eric Steinmeyer and Laura Morris, Cherished great-aunt of Jennifer (Ted) Ruger, Heidi (Chris) Richter, Steven (Danielle) Lopez, Alex (Casey) Lopez, Jennifer (Eric) Krajewski, Elke (Jacob) Avellana, Emma, Jackson, Bailey, David, and Aaron Steinmeyer, Andrew and Tanner Morris, Evan and Jeremy Braun, great-great-aunt of eight, beloved cousin and loyal friend. Employed for 40 years at J.D. Street, Shirley was active in Desk & Derrick and a steadfast volunteer at The Lutheran Church of Webster Gardens. Services: Funeral Service Friday, January 22nd, 11:00 am at The Lutheran Church of Webster Gardens, 8749 Watson Rd., Webster Groves, MO 63119. Visitation at Webster Gardens from 10:00 am until time of service. Entombment at Sunset Memorial Park, Affton, MO. Memorials may be made in Shirley's name to The Lutheran Church of Webster Gardens or the Missouri Lions Eye Research Foundation, Columbia Missouri. Family and friends may sign the online guestbook at www.gerberchapel.com

Tyler, Mary G. [nee Fangman], Jan 16, 2016. Visitation Fri Jan 22 at Valhalla, 11-1pm, Funeral at 1 pm, Interment private. valhallafunerals.net

VanCardo, Dolores A. (nee Lenhard) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, January 19, 2016. Beloved wife of John A. VanCardo; our dear sister-in-law, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd. on Friday, January 22, 12:15 p.m. to St. Ambrose Catholic Church for 1 p.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Contributions to American Diabetes Association, appreciated. Visitation Thursday 5-8 p.m.

Venable, Nancy Lee on Wednesday December 30, 2015 For service information call 636-936-1300 or www.stygar.com

Weise, Erminia "Minnie" 100, passed away peacefully at her residence on Jan. 18, 2016. Funeral Mass Jan. 21, 2016, 10:00 am at St. Mary Magdalen Catholic Church, Brentwood. Vis. Jan. 20, 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm at JAY B. SMITH Funeral Home Maplewood Chapel, 7456 Manchester. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Tributes at www.jaybsmith.com

Wilson, Gerald "Jerry" D. age 72, died on Monday, January 18, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Withers, Jerry O. 88, January 18, 2016. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Thurs. 5-8 p.m. For more info see Schrader.com.

Yanker, Henry "Bud" W.

age 79, passed away peacefully surrounded by the ones he laughed with, lived for, and loved on Sunday, January 17, 2016 at his home in St. Louis, MO. Beloved husband and best friend of Gloria (Oldani) Yanker for 40 years; cherished father of Maggie Yanker (Philip Leffel), Dawn Johnson (Ben), Lori Hessler (Rick), Scott Yanker (Carol), Mark Yanker (Eleanor), and Kevin Yanker (Lisa). Best Poppi to Henry, Jack, Baby Johnson, and Winslow. #1 Grandpa to Hannah, Lindsey, Madison, Carlye, Grant, Zachary, Rachal, Drew, and Jordan. Brother of Ronald Yanker (Sandy). Dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin, friend, and golf buddy. Bud touched the lives of many people with his smile, generosity, and maintained his trademark sense of humor all the way to the end. Services: Visitation from 10-11 a.m. and Funeral Mass at 11 a.m., Friday, January 22, 2016 at St. Ambrose Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Memorial Contributions to: Salvation Army or Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill, 2315 Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Share online condolences stlouiscremation.com.

Westphale, Donald Joseph

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Odis Hearon Journeyman Wireman 39 Years Retired January 10, 2016 Services Were Held Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

More egg-laying chickens are found to have H7N8 virus Latest outbreak of avian lu in Indiana afects 156,000 birds housed where ill turkeys once lived

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A worker at a farm in Dubois, Ind., is sprayed Sunday as part of the decontamination process at the farm, where poultry was found to be infected with the H7N8 virus. All of the infected birds must be euthanized.

BY RICK CALLAHAN associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS • Animal

health officials investigating a bird flu outbreak in southwestern Indiana have ordered 156,000 chickens at one of 10 affected commercial poultry farms to be euthanized, raising the total number of birds to be killed above 400,000. The egg-laying chickens were housed at one of the 10 commercial farms where turkeys had been infected with the H7N8 virus and were at a high risk of contracting it themselves, Indiana State Board of Animal Health spokeswoman Denise Derrer said Tuesday. The H7N8 strain is different from the H5N2 virus that led to the deaths of 48 million birds last summer. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the Indiana outbreak had been a test of whether officials were ready for future bird flu outbreaks and showed the need to stay on guard year-round. “It is a wake-up call. It was a good opportunity to see if we’re responding the way we should and I think we did,” he said Tuesday at a renewable fuels summit in Iowa. All of the turkey farms where the virus has been found are in Dubois County, a county about 70 miles west of Louisville, Ky., that is Indiana’s top poultry producer. The first infection was confirmed last week at a 60,000-turkey farm with connections to major

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

Indiana-based producer Farbest Farms, which has contract growers in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. But the nine other farms contract with several companies, Derrer said, and officials are investigating whether the virus might have been spread by workers with those companies traveling among farms or whether it was wild birds, wind patterns or other methods. All of Stephen Sander’s 23,000 turkeys that he was raising on contract for Perdue Farms had to be killed; they’re piled up and composting in three barns. Sander, 57, has been raising turkeys for a quarter-century on his Tip Top Turkey Farm. He said Tuesday that losing so many birds had been upsetting but that outbreaks were one of the risks livestock farmers took. “Grain farmers can have a drought, and it hurts them,” Sander said. “It’s the same for any business — something could happen and you have to go with the flow. But it still hurts.” State and federal workers, low-level prison inmates and workers at the farms have been euthanizing more than 245,000 turkeys — plus the chickens — to prevent the virus’ spread. They’ve finished the job at seven of the 10 afected farms, Derrer said, and are racing to finish at the three others before a winter storm that could bring several inches of snow arrives overnight.

“The weather’s going to get worse overnight, with the wet snow coming in, so they’re putting the pedal to metal,” she said. Cold weather is still posing problems for crews using a suffocating foam to kill the birds, she said, adding that even though water was freezing in hoses, most of the birds have been killed using that foam. Carbon dioxide gas and a device that delivers a fatal head injury are also being used. No additional cases of the H7N8 strain have been found in the 6-plus-mile control zone around the first farm, she said Tuesday. Indiana’s state veterinarian has also created a precautionary “surveillance zone” that extends another six miles beyond the control area and officials are testing farms and backyard flocks, too. “We’re trying to be really aggressive on testing in that extended area to make sure there’s no virus still floating around out there that’s going to pop up later. We’re trying to do the best we can,” she said. Everyone euthanizing the birds is wearing protective suits, face masks, gloves and plastic booties, Derrer said. The state Department of Health and local health officials are monitoring everyone who’s had contact with the birds for 10 days to make sure they don’t develop flu symptoms; the USDA has said no human infections from the viral strain have been detected.

COPD? Volunteers are needed to participate in COPD research studies testing investigational medications for COPD.

To Qualify: 88, of Manchester, MO, baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Sunday, January 17, 2016. Born February 28, 1927 in St. Louis, MO. Beloved husband for 64 years of Margaret Westphale (nee Heil); dear father of Donna Clark, Margery (the late Michael) Barnicle, Nancy (George) Cunio, Chuck Westphale, Glenn (Susan) Westphale, Jeffrey Westphale, Carolyn (Frank) McCormick, Eileen (John Morisaki) Westphale, and Mark (Laura) Westphale. Loving grandfather of Amanda and Alex Clark, Kathryn Westphale, Theresa Barnicle, Christina and Olivia Cunio, Liam and Maeve McCormick, and Allison and Reagan Westphale. Dear uncle, cousin, and friend of many. Don graduated from high school in St. Louis and was a WWII U.S. Army veteran. He was employed by Laclede Gas Company for 36 years. Don had a great love of sports and was active in coaching. Services: Memorial Mass at Christ Prince of Peace Catholic Church, Manchester, Saturday, 11:00 a.m. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery, Manchester. If desired, contributions may be made to Mercy Health Foundation St. Louis. Memorial visitation at the church, Saturday 10:00 a.m. until time of Memorial Mass. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Benjamin F. Lee, Jr Journeyman Wireman 62 Years Retired January 17, 2016 Visitation, Thurs, Jan 21 11 am-1pm Funeral immediately following Hutchens Mortuary 675 Graham Rd Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

Jonathan Billings

8/8/62-1/20/15 Still my hero and the angel on my shoulder. Always.... Cherie

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White, John E. age 66 on Sunday Jan. 17, 2016. For information on services call 636-936-1300 or go to www.stygar.com

Bellerive Her it age Gardens, Cr eve Coeur, MO, 3 prime burial spaces for sale. Sec. H, lot 393, In The Pines, retail $3995, selling for $2000. 636-9781196.

Pete L. Manos • The man who rose during a fourdecade career at Giant Food from accounting clerk to president, chairman and chief executive, before the grocery chain was sold in 1998, died Jan. 7, 2016, at a hospital in Annapolis, Md. He was 79. The cause was respiratory failure, said a niece, Cheryle Caldwell. Founded in Washington in 1936 and later headquartered in Landover, Md., Giant became the dominant food chain in the capital area, with 150 stores in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Mr. Manos was widely admired among employees for what was described as his common touch — like his cashiers, he wore a badge with his name, “Pete” — and for his attention to the everyday needs and experiences of grocery shoppers. Washington Post

Over 40 years of age COPD with shortness of breath upon exertion Current or Former smoking history Qualiied volunteers receive investigational study drug and related testing at no cost and compensation for time and travel. To learn more, please call (314) 514-8509 www.clinicalresearchcenter.com

How to sell your valuable jewelry with conidence: Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

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NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEATHER • LOW 18, HIGH 28 > WINDS VAR/E 3-6 MPH

Astronaut ights mold invasion, nurses zinnia to full bloom

Cloudy and cold Considerable cloudiness along with light winds and colder than average temperatures can be expected across the region today. Highs will be in the upper 20s. Another storm system is forecast to pass mainly to the south of the St. Louis area on Thursday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

20°

24°

26°

24°

Cloudy

Cloudy

Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

4-DAY FORECAST

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

21°/32°

23°/31°

SATURDAY

Cloudy, slight chance of snow

Cloudy

SUNDAY

20°/34° 24°/42° Mostly sunny

Increasing clouds

NASA VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

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26 25 20 22 21 25 19 15 20 23 14 18 23

39 32 30 30 30 37 31 26 31 36 29 28 37

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mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

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14 21 11 15 16 14 19 14 16 9 16 13

24 32 20 24 25 24 29 24 26 20 26 23

cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy

Chicago 11 / 20

Kirksville 15 / 26 Kansas City 19 / 31

Springfield 16 / 26

Joplin

St. Louis 18 / 28 Poplar Bluff 27 / 36

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.03” 0.65” 1.51” 0.65” 1.51”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Jan. 19th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 512 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 46 Month (Total) 625 1784 Season 2422 Year Ago

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24° 13° 40° 24° 75° -14° 56° 30°

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TEMPERATURES High (3:11 p.m.) Low (1:09 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1952) Record Low (1940) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

Full Jan 23 Sunrise

Last Jan 31

New Feb 8

7:15 AM Sunset

First Feb 15 5:09 PM

Moonrise 2:22 PM Moonset 3:56 AM

On this date in 1930, astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. was born. Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong were the first humans to walk on the moon. You can see the moon in the southeast around 8 p.m. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.43 23 10.65 Jefferson City 21 14.56 Hermann 20 11.07 Washington 25 18.23 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 15.13 Louisiana 15 14.35 Dam 24 25 17.43 Dam 25 26 14.83 Grafton 18 14.70 M.Price, Pool 419 414.60 M.Price, Tail. 21 11.12 St Louis 30 16.88 Chester 27 22.13 Cape Girardeau 32 28.46

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 18.79 18 18.38 Peoria 14 20.21 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.87 Sullivan 16 0.44 Valley Park 24 15.19 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.86 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 38.83

- 0.31 - 0.64 - 0.57 - 0.53 - 0.54 + 3.11 + 2.17 - 0.65 - 2.88 - 0.42 + 0.70 - 3.81 - 3.34 - 2.04 - 1.58

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.73 - 0.57 - 0.85 - 0.10 - 1.01 - 2.78 - 0.28

24-Hr Change

355.85 - 0.79 366.10 - 0.86 525.35 - 1.37 659.38 + 0.01 716.34 - 0.69 684.77 - 0.18 920.28 - 0.88 855.83 - 0.48 613.72 - 0.40 409.55 - 0.05 609.51 - 0.46 455.98 - 0.26

- 1.26

Maps and weather data provided by:

BY MARCIA DUNN Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. • The International Space Carbondale 21 / 32

25 / 37

A zinnia tended by astronaut Scott Kelly blossoms in the sun at the International Space Station. NASA hopes the crew can grow vegetables in the station’s small greenhouse.

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Station now has a bright pop of orange, thanks to commander Scott Kelly’s green thumb. Kelly showed of his gardening results — a thriving zinnia with a beautiful orange-yellow bloom — over the weekend. He posted photos of the flower on his Twitter account. “Yes, there are other life forms in space!” Kelly said in a tweet. Last month, Kelly had to fight of mold that threatened to kill all the flowers in the space station’s mini-greenhouse. Mission Control gave him free rein, and he managed to save some of the crop. This type of autonomous gardening will be necessary during Mars expeditions, Kelly noted. In a nod to last year’s blockbuster movie “The Martian,” Kelly said, “I’m going to have to channel my inner Mark Watney.” Watney is the fictitious astronaut-botantist who ends up stranded alone on Mars and grows potatoes in order to survive. The space station’s plant-growing experiment previously saw a bumper

crop of red romaine lettuce last summer. The space station crew got to sample a few leaves. While this is the first zinnia known to bloom in space, it’s not the first space flower. In 2012, space station astronaut Donald Pettit memorably coaxed blooms out of a zucchini plant, blogging about his informal experiment in “Diary of a Space Zucchini.” He also nurtured Space Sunflower and Space Broccoli. The Russians hold claim to the first flower in space, aboard the Soviet Salyut space stations of the 1970s and 1980s. These new space zinnias aren’t just for looks: NASA said they’re a good precur-

sor to tomato plants, targeted to launch in 2018. NASA’s little greenhouse is known as Veggie, short for Vegetable Production System. It flew to the space station in 2014. Red romaine lettuce was the first crop from the Veggie plant growth facility, installed in May 2014. Kelly and Astronaut Kjell Lindgren snacked on the second crop of lettuce in July 2015; the first crop was sent back to Earth for analysis. The next hothouse crop, coming up soon on a SpaceX supply flight, will include Chinese cabbage and more lettuce. The Orlando Sentinel contributed to this report.

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__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Extremes High: 79° McAllen, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS | ST. LOUIS BLUES | ST. LOUIS RAMS | UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI | ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY AND MORE

Low: -34° Embarrass, Minnesota

SEASON LONG SPORTS COVE SEASON LONG SE SPORTS COVERAGESP SEASON LONG SPORTS COVE Rain

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GET TO KNOW

40s

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Jeremy Rutherford BLUES LEAD BEAT WRITER

AUTHOR OF “100 THINGS BLUES FANS SHOULD KNOW & DO BEFORE THEY DIE”

60s

70s

Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -33°

Hawaii High: 85°

A weak low pressure system will bring snow to the Ohio Valley and central Appalachians and rain to parts of the Deep South and lower Mississippi Valley. Portions of the central and northern Rockies will see periods of snow. Dry conditions along with colder than average temperatures can be expected across the north-central Plains and Midwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 14 Albuquerque 30 Anchorage 21 Atlanta 27 Atlantic City 19 Baltimore 18 Billings 25 Biloxi, Ms. 45 Birmingham 32 Bismarck 8 Boise 32 Boston 19 Buffalo 18 Burlington, Vt. 9 Charleston, S.C. 22 Charleston, W.V. 9 Charlotte 20 Cheyenne 24 Chicago 11 Cincinnati 13 Cleveland 10 Colorado Spgs. 26 Concord, N.H. 9 Dallas 36 Daytona Beach 36 Denver 26 Des Moines 12 41 Destin, Fl. 12 Detroit 38 El Paso 21 Evansville -6 Fairbanks 7 Fargo 21 Flagstaff 41 Fort Myers 25 Great Falls 2 Green Bay 16 Hartford 67 Honolulu 54 Houston 12 Indianapolis 43 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 59 Key West 44 Las Vegas 34 Little Rock 53 Los Angeles 19 Louisville

29 50 31 45 37 33 39 63 48 25 43 32 23 21 49 28 40 40 20 26 21 48 25 51 63 44 25 60 23 67 32 4 22 45 70 32 18 33 80 69 25 60 36 71 60 43 65 32

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partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow partly sunny showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow showers partly cloudy sunny snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow snow showers mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny snow windy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny snow cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow

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Tomorrow L H W

16 26 19 39 20 21 19 54 42 12 28 21 16 10 34 20 27 20 14 17 14 24 13 44 41 22 19 57 14 40 21 -7 10 20 51 19 8 19 66 57 15 51 33 63 42 35 51 21

26 45 26 49 35 35 34 66 55 19 44 29 25 21 55 35 46 35 28 32 26 40 25 54 70 38 28 66 27 57 33 3 14 41 75 36 23 30 81 70 30 67 35 74 60 46 72 36

partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy showers sunny sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms showers cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy very cold cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy

City

Today L H

26 Macon 60 McAllen, Tx. 32 Memphis 52 Miami 10 Milwaukee 8 Minneapolis 26 Missoula, Mt. 41 Mobile Montgomery 32 23 Nashville New Orleans 50 New York City 23 Norfolk, Va. 18 Oklahoma City 25 Omaha 10 Orlando 38 Palm Springs 51 Philadelphia 19 Phoenix 49 Pittsburgh 9 Portland, Me. 11 Portland, Or. 42 Providence 18 Raleigh 15 Rapid City 18 Reno 33 Richmond, Va. 12 Sacramento 46 St. Petersburg 45 Salt Lake City 31 San Antonio 49 San Diego 57 San Francisco 48 Santa Fe 23 Savannah 25 Seattle 41 50 Shreveport 12 Sioux Falls 19 Syracuse 26 Tallahassee 39 Tampa 39 Tucson 26 Tulsa 19 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 53 18 Wichita Wilmington, De. 18 49 Yuma

51 79 39 70 20 20 37 65 55 36 67 34 34 43 26 66 71 36 69 23 26 48 34 35 36 51 33 59 63 37 66 65 57 44 54 49 59 24 25 60 64 69 40 33 69 37 36 74

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partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny snow showers sunny rain sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy flurries partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

42 62 36 59 12 13 19 54 48 30 56 24 27 30 20 44 52 23 48 14 10 42 20 25 22 28 23 45 54 21 51 54 48 20 38 43 51 19 14 41 50 39 33 22 58 28 22 50

57 80 48 72 27 24 30 67 64 41 68 33 38 42 28 74 73 35 70 27 25 51 31 45 30 54 38 61 69 35 70 68 59 39 61 53 62 26 22 67 72 68 40 36 72 34 35 74

mostly cloudy mostly sunny rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy cloudy showers showers rain showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny rain sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy rain thunderstorms cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow sunny sunny

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Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

72 34 41 45 78 76 14 21 21 74 45 16 66 70 35 21

85 41 50 67 90 84 28 32 33 84 65 26 78 91 44 35

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

31 58 31 76 42 59 27 29 35 66 47 5 10 64 61 43

40 64 43 91 52 76 56 40 49 89 72 16 21 72 74 67

partly sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy snow partly cloudy showers sunny

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

12 27 9 72 32 72 57 7 18 70 55 32 20 39 22 15

17 39 29 82 51 82 88 27 22 87 66 48 25 46 36 27

sunny sunny snow showers showers partly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy snow

SEASON LONG SPORTS COVERAGE

Home or away, rest assured there’s a St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalist covering your game. So if you miss the game or want to learn more about what REALLY happened, you know where to ind us. RICK HUMMEL

B BENJAMIN HOCHMAN

B BEN FREDERICKSON

D DERRICK GOOLD

J JEFF GORDON

DAVE MATTER

JIM THOMAS

JJEREMY RUTHERFORD

STU ST DURANDO

BASEBALL WRITER

SPORTS COLUMNIST

ONLINE SPORTS COMMENTARY

HALL OF FAMER

AP SPORTS EDITORS TOP 10 COLUMNIST AND WRITER

AP SPORTS EDITORS TOP 10 WRITER

CARDINALS LEAD BEAT WRITER

ONLINE SPORTS COLUMNIST

MIZZOU BEAT WRITER

RAMS LEAD BEAT WRITER

BLUES LEAD BEAT WRITER

SLU BEAT WRITER

AP SPORTS EDITORS TOP 10 BEAT WRITER

LONGEST RUNNING STL JOURNALIST WRITTEN SPORTS BLOG

AP SPORTS EDITORS TOP 10 BEAT WRITERS

21 YEARS OF COVERING RAMS

AUTHOR OF “100 THINGS BLUES FANS SHOULD KNOW & DO BEFORE THEY DIE”

COVERING ST. LOUIS SPORTS FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS

In print, online and always on time. From local colleges to the pros, we were there and will continue to be there, for you.


NEWS

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

PEOPLE Ken Burns to give Jeferson Lecture Documentary moviemaker Ken Burns will deliver the 2016 Jeferson Lecture in the Humanities, according to the National Endowment for the Humanities, which produces the event. Burns will deliver the lecture May 9 at Washington’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. He will talk about race in America, a topic that he has explored through nearly 40 years of directing and producing historical documentaries including “The Civil War” miniseries and, making its debut on PBS in April, a movie about baseball legend Jackie Robinson. The Jeferson Lecture is the highest honor the federal government bestows for intellectual achievement in the humanities. Meanwhile, Robinson’s widow said Major League Baseball had yet to fully honor her husband’s legacy. “There is a lot more that needs to be done and that can be done in terms of the hiring, the promotion” of minorities in the sport, Rachel Robinson said Monday. She took part in a Q&A session at the Television Critics Association winter meeting in Pasadena, Calif. TV director Alexander admits child porn • A television director with credits on “Law & Order” and other shows has pleaded guilty to child pornography charges in New York. Westchester County District Attorney Janet DiFiore says Jason “Jace” Alexander, 51, pleaded guilty Tuesday to promoting a sexual performance by a child and possessing an obscene performance by a child. Hawking to challenge ‘ordinary people’ • “Genius by Stephen Hawking,” a six-part series, will be presented and narrated by the famed physicist. Each episode will challenge groups of “ordinary people” to think like history’s greatest scientiic minds to solve humanity’s stubborn questions, PBS said. The program will air this year on PBS stations and the National Geographic Channel. A date was not announced.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Arte Johnson is 87. Director David Lynch is 70. TV host Bill Maher is 60. Actor James Denton is 53. Country singer John Michael Montgomery is 51. Actor Rainn Wilson is 50. Country singer Brantley Gilbert is 31. Actor Evan Peters is 29. From news services

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A17

Calls for boycott over diversity throw Oscars into turmoil BY JAKE COYLE associated Press

NEW YORK • Growing

calls for a boycott of the Academy Awards over the lack of diversity among this year’s Oscar nominees are forcing stars to choose sides and threatening to throw the movie industry’s biggest night of the year into turmoil. The backlash over the second straight year of all-white acting nominees is also putting heavy pressure on the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences to diversify its overwhelmingly white male membership. The furor grew on Tuesday when the Rev. Al Sharpton said he would lead a campaign encouraging people not to watch the Feb. 28 telecast. On Monday, Spike Lee, this year’s Oscar honoree for lifetime achievement, and Jada Pinkett Smith announced they would boycott the ceremony. Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who has led eforts to diversify the academy, responded late Monday evening with a forceful statement saying that those previous measures weren’t enough. Isaacs, the academy’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Comedian Chris Rock speaks Monday at an event celebrating the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Riverside Church in New York. Rock, who is scheduled to host the Oscars Feb. 28, has unveiled a new promotion for the broadcast, calling the ceremony “The White BET Awards.”

pressed frustration with the academy. “This institution doesn’t reflect its president and it doesn’t reflect this room,” Oyelowo said. “I am an academy member, and it doesn’t reflect me and it doesn’t reflect this nation.” O t h e r s ta rs b e ga n weighing in. George Clooney, in comments to Variety, said that after earlier progress by the industry, “you feel like we’re moving

in the wrong direction.” He noted that movies such as “Creed,” “Straight Outta Compton,” “Beasts of No Nation” and “Concussion” may have deserved more attention from the academy. “But honestly, there should be more opportunity than that,” Clooney said. “There should be 20 or 30 or 40 films of the quality that people would consider for the Oscars. By the way, we’re talking

Conservation groups demand an end to occupation of refuge

NATION DIGEST

first African-American president, said that “it’s time for big changes” and that she would review membership recruiting to bring about “muchneeded diversity” in the academy’s ranks. At a Los Angeles gala honoring Boone Isaacs on Monday night, actor David Oyelowo — who was famously snubbed last year for his performance as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in “Selma” — ex-

Armed protest draws more support from outside Oregon BY TERRENCE PETTY associated Press

PORTLAND, ORE. • With

the armed takeover of a national wildlife refuge in southeastern Oregon in its third week, Ammon Bundy and his group are still trying to muster up broad community support — without much luck. Bundy has drawn a lot of attention to the dissatisfaction of ranchers and local townsfolk with federal land-use policies in the West. But the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge has also begun to result in opposition from others who use public lands — birders, hunters and hikers, among others. On Tuesday, several hundred people rallied in Portland — about 300 miles north of the remote refuge in southeastern Oregon — to demand Bundy end the occupation and to point out that federal management makes it possible for all kinds of people to enjoy public lands. P ro te s te rs c h a n te d “Birds, Not Bullies,” a reference to the Malheur refuge’s establishment

in 1908 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds. The rally was organized by Oregon Wild, Portland Audubon and the Center for Biological Diversity. “This occupation represents a threat to public lands,” said Bob Sallinger with the Audubon Society. “These are not political statements. These are crimes.”

‘I LOVE OUR FREE LANDS’ In Boise, more than 100 people attended a similar protest Tuesday in front of the Idaho Capitol. Ann Finley, a member of the Great Old Broads for Wilderness, said that the refuge is a special place. “I love our free lands, and we’re out here today stepping out and saying those lands should remain public,” Finley said. Conservation groups have also shown up at the refuge itself to demand that Bundy and his followers leave, and last weekend got into a shouting match with Bundy’s group. Bundy has had trouble winning many friends who aren’t militants, or even

finding a place where he could spell out his views to people living near the refuge. His plans to hold a community meeting at the local fairground tanked when Harney County said he couldn’t hold it there. Still, Bundy isn’t giving up. On Monday night, Bundy held a meeting at a hot springs resort near Crane, Ore., where he tried to persuade 30 or so ranchers to stop paying the federal government to graze their cattle on public lands. It does not appear he persuaded many to follow his advice. Bundy’s most fervent supporters — those holed up inside headquarters of the wildlife refuge — continue to be militants from outside Oregon. Bundy has demanded federal lands in Harney County be handed over to locals. While many area residents want Bundy and his group to leave, they also back his views on federal land policies. Bundy’s game plan may be to continue to try to win local support and to draw as much attention as possible to his complaints against the federal government.

2016 SANDRA AND MENDEL ROSENBERG

SUNDAY AFTERNOON FILM SERIES St. Louis Premiere:

The Port of Last Resort Written and directed by Joan Grossman and Paul Rosdy USA, 1999, 80 minutes

SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2016 • 1:00 PM Holocaust Museum and Learning Center Theater Jewish Federation of St. Louis Kopolow Building 12 Millstone Campus Drive, 63146

This award-winning documentary focuses on the story of nearly 20,000 European Jewish refugees who fled to Shanghai from 1938 to 1941. Shanghai, a free port that did not require papers for entry, became the "last resort" for many Jews seeking a safe haven from the Nazis. Writer, director and award-winning media artist Joan Grossman will be present to introduce the film and facilitate a post-screening discussion. Please RSVP by calling 314-442-3711 or by emailing AGoldfeder@JFedSTL.org. *All screenings are free of charge and begin at

1:00 pm at the Jewish Federation of St. Louis Kopolow Building, 12 Millstone Campus Drive

VIEW OUR ENTIRE FILM SERIES, SCREENING THE LAST SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH, ONLINE AT HMLC.ORG/FILMSERIES. For more information, call 314-442-3714 or email DReich@JFedSTL.org.

No sign of missing Marines of Hawaii The Coast Guard has found the fourth life raft from two Marine helicopters that crashed of Hawaii, but no sign has emerged of any of the 12 missing crew members. All the rafts have been recovered, all empty, Marine Capt. Timothy Irish said. The Coast Guard suspended on Tuesday night its search for the Marines. Carson volunteer dies in crash in Iowa • A volunteer for Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson died Tuesday after being hospitalized with injuries sufered in a car accident in western Iowa that hurt three other campaign workers. Carson was in South Carolina at the time of the accident and suspended his campaign events. The crash occurred when a van carrying three Carson volunteers and a paid stafer lipped onto its side on an icy road and was struck by another vehicle. The others in the van were treated at a hospital in Atlantic, Iowa. An oicial for a hospital in Omaha, Neb., said Braden Joplin, 25, died late Tuesday afternoon. Colorado theater shooter is transferred again • Colorado theater shooter James Holmes has been transferred to another prison, but oicials have not said where or why. Holmes had recently been in the San Carlos Correctional Facility in Pueblo. Before that he was in the Colorado State Penitentiary in Canon City. Palin’s son charged with assault • Track Palin, 26, is charged with assault, interfering with the report of a domestic violence crime and possessing a weapon while intoxicated in connection with an incident Monday night at his parents’ home in Wasilla, Alaska, where he lives. His girlfriend told authorities she was punched in the face by Palin, who is the oldest child of Sarah Palin, the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee and a conservative icon. Bus driver was tired before fatal crash • A Greyhound bus driver said he was fatigued before the vehicle plowed into safety barrels on a northern California highway and lipped on its side early Tuesday, killing two women and sending at least eight other people to a hospital, authorities said.

about African-Americans. For Hispanics, it’s even worse. We need to get better at this. We used to be better at it.” A 2012 Los Angeles Times study found that the academy was 94 percent white and 77 percent male. UC L A’s l a te s t a n nual Hollywood Diversity Report concluded that women and minorities are substantially underrepresented in front of and behind the camera, even while audiences show a strong desire for movies with diverse casts. Hispanics and African-Americans go to the movies more often than whites do. UCLA surveyed movie and TV executives and found that 96 percent are white. In his comments Monday, Lee said the Oscars’ problems ultimately reside with “the gate keepers” who have the power to green-light projects. Isaacs enlisted Chris Rock, who famously called Hollywood “a white industry” a year ago, as host of this year’s ceremony. The backlash all but ensures Rock’s opening monologue will, for many, be the most anticipated event of the show.

The bus, carrying 20 passengers, hit the barrels and then rolled onto the center divider of Highway 101 in San Jose, a major commuting thoroughfare, said Lanesha Gipson, a Greyhound spokeswoman. Air Force racks up drone crashes • A record number of Air Force drones crashed in major accidents last year, documents show. Driving the increase was a surge in mishaps involving the Air Force’s newest and most advanced “hunterkiller” drone, the Reaper, which has become the Pentagon’s favored weapon for surveillance and airstrikes against Islamic State, al-Qaida and other militant groups. Man reputed to be 117 has died • A California man whose family says he was 117 years old has died. He may have been the oldest person on Earth when he died. Daughter Delane Sims said that Andrew Hatch died Monday at her home in Oakland. Hatch was believed to have been born in 1898 in Louisiana but had no birth certiicate, a common occurrence among poor black children at the time. Guinness World Records currently recognizes 116-year-old Susannah Mushatt Jones, 116, of Brooklyn, N.Y., as the oldest person alive. Snowmobilers found; mother dead, son injured • Sherif’s oicials found a woman dead of exposure and her son, 18, sufering from frostbite Tuesday, ending a three-day search for a family of three that went missing amid a series of mishaps while snowmobiling in the Medicine Bow Mountains of Wyoming. Searchers had found the father in good condition Monday after he went for help and became separated from the other two. Oicials weren’t identifying the family, from Cheyenne. Petco drops animal supplier • Petco, one of the biggest pet retailers in the country, severed its relationship with a Pennsylvania smallanimal dealer amid a federal investigation into conditions at the facility where it keeps thousands of hamsters, guinea pigs, rabbits and other species. Petco said in a statement Tuesday that Holmes Chinchilla Ranch and Other Small Animals Inc. is no longer a supplier after the retailer concluded “they did not meet our animal care standards.” From news services


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

U.S., Iran are worlds apart despite swap Major foreign policy issues remain weighty obstacles for long term BY TRACY WILKINSON Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON • The glow of goodwill that followed a surprise prisoner swap and the lifting of international sanctions on Iran’s nuclear program over the weekend is already being tempered by the somber realization that the Islamic Republic is not likely to change course significantly on other pressing conflicts with the West. Recent events marked an improvement in relations between Washington and Tehran after decades of open hostilities, and a victory, if only a temporary one, for moderates in Iran. For the first time, there is an open diplomatic channel through which the two countries can communicate, and an especially personal one between Secretary of State John F. Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. They are said to be on a first-name basis, speaking almost daily by telephone and more frequently when there are fires to put out. But it is highly unlikely that the momentum on the nuclear agreement will translate into substantial foreign policy shifts for Iran, particularly when it

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iranians use ATMs in downtown Tehran, Iran, last year. Iran said Tuesday that it had successfully transferred some of its billions of dollars’ worth of frozen overseas assets after the implementation of the nuclear deal with world powers.

comes to other intractable conflicts in the region, U.S. officials say. The two countries remain worlds apart on numerous issues, and that chasm will not be bridged easily. The first test comes Jan. 25 when world powers are scheduled to resume talks aimed at ending the civil war in Syria. Iran steadfastly backs Syrian President Bashar Assad, putting it squarely on the opposite side of the U.S., Saudi Arabia and most of the West.

Oicials in the administration of President Barack Obama say they are keeping expectations low. “Iran is not going to change dramatically in the next year or two years,” said a senior administration oicial who was not authorized to speak publicly. “If Iran does act in a more constructive fashion, it would be a positive development in resolving diicult issues. If they don’t, we will continue to enforce our sanctions and continue to have very strong diferences.”

Congo drafts new legislation on adoption, reviews pending cases BY SALEH MWANAMILONGO Associated Press

KINSHASA, CONGO • Congo has drafted new adoption legislation and reviewed cases pending since it halted international adoptions in 2013, the government said Tuesday. Among the recommendations is that international adoptions will be allowed only if solutions in Congo are lacking, both in the family and public, government spokesman Lambert Mende said. The new law also states that those seeking to adopt must present themselves before a tribunal in Congo and adoptions will be considered only from countries with good diplomatic relations with Congo, he said. The law obliges the government “to fight against human traicking as well as other risks to which children may be exposed when taken from their natural environment for permanent care in another country,” said Mende. Authorities in Congo put a halt to international adoptions in 2013, saying their adoption system was beset by corruption

and falsified documents. The adoptions had been legally approved by the Congolese courts, but then the government suspended the issuing of exit permits, causing heartache and frustration for families around the world. In November, Congolese authorities approved exit permits for about 72 children — 14 for children adopted by Americans and about 58 for children adopted by Canadian and European families. But more than 1,000 children whose adoptions had been approved remain in Congolese orphanages and foster homes pending the completion of the new adoption law. The Congo embassy in Washington says the draft law will be voted on in March. “The government has completed its review of all international adoption applications that have been pending since the establishment of a moratorium in 2013,” Francois Balumuene, Congo’s ambassador to the United States, said in a statement. “Adoptive parents will be informed of decisions made on these cases by their respective embassies soon.”

Critics of the nuclear deal predict that, with tens of billions of dollars about to pour into its coffers because of the agreement, Iran may further antagonize the West by using that money to finance terrorism and pro-Assad military operations. “The changes in Iranian behavior that we have seen are tied to the fact they wanted the $100 billion,” Dennis Ross, a former longtime Middle East negotiator and now counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said in an interview. He was referring to the frozen Iranian assets released by sanctions relief; the exact amount of those monies is unclear. “If you are looking for signs of potential change in Syria or Iraq, you won’t see it anytime soon,” Ross added. “The resistance ideology — as represented by the supreme leader and the (hard-line) Revolutionary Guard — is not going to change.” The Obama administration’s decision to place new sanctions on Iran on Sunday, targeting 11 people and companies involved in that country’s ballistic-missile program, angered the government in Tehran. The new sanctions, a response to Iran’s launch of ballistic missiles last fall in apparent contravention of U.N. resolutions, are separate from those related to Iran’s nuclear program. They were announced shortly after three freed American prisoners, returning homeward, cleared Iranian airspace.

DIGEST Islamic State executioner dead The extremist militia Islamic State conirmed on Tuesday the death of one of its executioners, a Kuwaiti-born British national nicknamed “Jihadi John” by Western media. He was killed in a U.S. drone strike Nov. 12 in the Islamic State stronghold of Raqqa, Syria, the group said in its English-language propaganda magazine Dabiq. The Pentagon said on Nov. 13 that it had a “great deal of conidence” that Mohammed Emwazi, who became infamous from beheading videos in which he spoke with a London accent, was “evaporated” in a strike against a car. Emwazi irst surfaced in a video in the beheading of U.S. journalist James Foley in August 2014. Anti-Islamic State meeting excludes Canada • Canada has been excluded from a meeting of defense ministers in Paris this week to discuss the ight against Islamic State militants. U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter didn’t mention Canada last week in a speech in Fort Campbell, Ky., when he said he would meet defense ministers from nations who are playing a signiicant role in the coalition. Carter previously said ministers from the Netherlands, France, Australia, Germany, Italy and the U.K. would take part in the talks Wednesday. The U.S. has asked coalition members to boost their military contributions in Iraq and Syria against Islamic State after the deadly terrorist attack in Paris in November. But new Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has vowed to remove Canada’s six ighter jets from the mission. EU wants ingerprints of convicted foreigners • The European Union wants to collect ingerprints and information about all foreigners convicted of crimes in the 28-nation bloc to help ight terrorism and cross-border crime. The data would be stored on the criminal records computer ECRIS, which gives judges and prosecutors access to suspects’ backgrounds. Currently, information about convicted foreigners is kept only in national records. Authorities have to request it individually. Convicted EU citizens are on the ECRIS database, but their ingerprints are not stored. Nigeria sufers attacks on oil, gas lines • Attacks on strategic oil and gas installations are costing Nigeria $2.4 million daily, a Cabinet minister said Tuesday as the military hunted a militant and warned it would hold community leaders responsible for the “economic sabotage.” The attacks began Friday in the southern Niger Delta after a court issued an arrest warrant for former warlord Government “Tompolo” Ekpemupolo in connection with $17.4 million that has gone missing from government cofers. Pakistan ofers to host Iran-Saudi talks • Pakistan’s prime minister ofered

Tuesday to host talks between Iran and Saudi Arabia aimed at resolving disputes between the Middle Eastern rivals. Nawaz Sharif met Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in Tehran, a day after meeting Saudi Arabia’s King Salman in Riyadh. After his meeting with Rouhani, Sharif said Iran had expressed an interest in improving relations with Saudi Arabia and would appoint a focal person for future talks. Kurds raze villages, rights group says • Iraqi Kurdish forces are deliberately destroying Arab villages under their control, according to an Amnesty International report released Wednesday. The human rights group said these actions could amount to war crimes. Kurdish forces, the report says, bulldozed, blew up and burned down thousands of homes in Arab villages recaptured from the Islamic State group. Honduras gets help to ight corruption • Honduras and the Organization of American States have approved a new legal team of international investigators, prosecutors and judges to ight corruption in the Central American country. The mission approved on Tuesday mirrors a team set up in Guatemala with the help of the U.N. that since 2007 has investigated key cases, including a customs kickback scheme that put the former president and vice president in jail. U.N. cites death, slavery in Iraq • The United Nations released a report this week detailing the “staggering civilian death toll in Iraq” over the past two years. It found that nearly 19,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed since Islamic State’s insurgency lared at the beginning of 2014, while some 3.2 million Iraqis have been displaced. The report also estimated that some 3,500 Iraqis continue to be held captive as the jihadists’ “slaves,” including many women and girls from the persecuted Yazidi sect who have been abducted and forced into sexual slavery. France pushes migrants away from port road • Authorities are shrinking the huge migrant camp in Calais, in northern France, pushing tent dwellers back 110 yards to distance them from the road leading to the port, a jumping of point to sneak to Britain. Bulldozers moved in this week to clean the terrain after hundreds of migrants began moving deeper into the squalid camp. The move continued Tuesday. Colombia, rebels want U.N. observers • Colombia’s government and the country’s largest rebel group jointly requesting Tuesday that the United Nations establish an international observer mission to monitor a disarmament process that could end in a matter of weeks Latin America’s longest-running guerrilla conlict. From news services

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Mizzou targets Texas

WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • B

TIME TO GROW UP

Odom’s hiring relects emphasis on recruiting Lone Star State DEMONTIE CROSS MU defensive coordinator TEXAS TIES > Coached at Sam Houston State and TCU.

JOSH HEUPEL MU ofensive coordinator TEXAS TIES > Via Oklahoma: Heupel played and coached for the Sooners.

JOE JON FINLEY Tight ends coach

Cardinals prospect Reyes hopes to put his hi of-ield f-ield mistakes behind him for good

TEXAS TIES > Arlington native; Baylor staf; played, coached for Oklahoma. Father coached H.S. ball in Texas.

CHRIS WILSON BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A

JACOB HANSEL • Wisconsin TimberRattlers

Alex Reyes was suspended 50 games after a second positive test for marijuana.

MU’s defensive line coach TEXAS TIES > Richardson, Texas native; played and coached for Oklahoma.

lex Reyes needed to be here, mingling with the major leaguers he hopes to join for good this season. Surrounded by the fans who have eagerly eagerly charted his rise. Bathed in the spotlight of Sunday’s baseball writers’ dinner, where he was recognized as his organization’s co-pitcher of the year. “Wow. This is amazing,” Reyes told a crowded ballroom at the Marriott Grand Hotel, his words carrying across KMOX airwaves. For Fo the Cardinals’ top pitching prospect, pros this was a grand finish to his first Winter Warm-Up, a weekend that ofered ofered an appetizer of everything that awaits. And everything he could screw up. That morning, on the fourth floor of the Hyatt Regency, the 21-year-old huddled with his agent, Brian Mejia, and club oicials, oicials, then issued to media members an in-person apology. His words echoed the statement he sent out in November, after Major League Baseball suspended him 50 games following his second positive test for marijuana. “I’m honestly disappointed in myself,” Reyes said. “It was a huge mistake I’m learning about. I’m learning how to get past it. It’s been tough dealing with the problems and everything. I’m looking forward to next season, and just putting this behind me and turning the chapter on this.”

COLUMBIA, MO. • DeMontie Cross wasn’t on Missouri’s football staff when the Tigers decided to redraw their out-of-state recruiting map and shift focus away from Texas and toward more traditional Southeastern Conference states. Mizzou has since gone retro and made the Lone Star State a priority under new coach Barry Odom. Cross, Odom’s new defensive coordinator, is fully on board. “You know, I wasn’t here to understand why (the change) happened,” Cross said earlier this month. “I know that historically Texas has been good to Missouri. You have (Texas) A&M there, so you have somewhat of an SEC connection there. It makes sense, but it has to make sense to Coach Odom. If it does, then we’ll recruit it like crazy and we’ll go down there and we’ll stick our heels in the ground and go get them.” Cross should know. The former Mizzou safety and St. Louis native spent the last three seasons coaching at

See FREDERICKSON • Page B5 Se

See MIZZOU • Page B4

Stastny, Brouwer, Steen getting results Line combined for eight points Monday in only their third game together

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Gurley selected rookie of the year in NFL Fisher expects even more next season BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The answer, it may turn out, is playing them together, as the Blues will do again Wednesday when they travel to Detroit for the first of a three-game road trip that will take the team into the All-Star break. The offensive outburst came in the line’s third game together, after Stastny returned from a serious facial injury.

Named to the Pro Bowl last month, the honors continue to roll in for Rams running back Todd Gurley. He was named NFL rookie of the year, and also the NFL offensive rookie of the year Tuesday by the Pro Football Writers of America. Gurley is the first Rams player to win ofensive rookie of the year since quarterback Sam Bradford in 2010. The Rams haven’t had a player named overall rookie of the year since running back Jerome Bettis with the Los Angeles Rams in 1993. Gurley finished third in the NFL in rushing this season with 1,106 yards, and scored 10 touchdowns. The No. 10 overall draft pick from the University

See BLUES • Page B5

See RAMS • Page B4

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LEE OF THE POST-DISPATCH AND ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paul Stastny (left), Alexander Steen (center) and Troy Brouwer have a “tremendous amount of hockey sense,” Ken Hitchcock says.

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Had the worm — or in this case, the puck — not turned soon for Blues forward Paul Stastny and Troy Brouwer, the two had a plan. “We were talking before the game, both of us have been fighting for goals lately ...” Brouwer said. “We thought we might try

> 7 p.m. Wednesday at Detroit, NBCSN

wrong-handed sticks for a little while.” It didn’t come to that, however, as Stastny and Brouwer each scored in the Blues’ 5-2 win over Pittsburgh on Monday. Stastny added three assists for a four-point game, and with two points apiece from Brouwer and Alexander Steen, their line combined for eight.

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 1/20 at Detroit 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 1/22 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

Sunday 1/24 at Chicago 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/2 at Nashville 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 1/20 vs. Georgia 6 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/23 at Texas A&M 3 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 1/27 at Kentucky 8 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/30 vs. Mississippi St. 7:30 p.m. SEC Network

Illini men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 1/23 at Minnesota 7:30 p.m. BTN

Thursday 1/28 vs. Ohio St. 8 p.m. BTN

Sunday 1/31 vs. Wisconsin 6:30 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 2/3 at Rutgers 5:30 p.m. BTN

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 1/20 Saturday 1/23 at Massachusetts vs. Davidson 11 a.m. 7 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 1/27 at Dayton 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 1/30 vs. Duquesne 5 p.m. KDNL (30.2)

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Friday 1/22: at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m. Friday 1/29: vs. Chicago, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 10:30 a.m. College women: Texas Tech at Oklahoma, FSM 5:15 p.m. College: Central Florida at South Florida, ESPNews 5:30 p.m. College: Nebraska at Michigan State, BTN 6 p.m. College: Missouri vs. Georgia, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 6 p.m. College: Wake Forest at North Carolina, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Texas at West Virginia, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: Temple at La Salle, CBSSN 7 p.m. College: St. Louis U. vs. Davidson, FSM, WXOS (101.1 FM) 7 p.m. College: DePaul at Marquette, FS1 7 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Indiana State, KATZ (1600 AM) 7 p.m. College: Missouri State at Drake, WQQX (1490 AM) 7 p.m. College women: Kansas State at Kansas, FSM Plus 7 p.m. NBA: Golden State at Chicago, ESPN 7:15 p.m. College: Kansas State at Baylor, ESPNews 7:30 p.m. College: Minnesota at Michigan, BTN 8 p.m. College: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Vanderbilt at Tennessee, SEC Network 8 p.m. College: Villanova at Seton Hall, CBSSN 9:30 p.m. NBA: Atlanta at Portland, ESPN 10 p.m. College: UCLA at Oregon State, ESPNU FOOTBALL Noon College: NFLPA Collegiate Bowl practice, ESPNU 3 p.m. College: NFLPA Collegiate Bowl practice, ESPNU GOLF 9:30 p.m. European PGA: Abu Dhabi Championship, first round, GOLF HOCKEY 7 p.m. Blues at Detroit, NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FA Cup: Leicester City vs. Tottenham Hotspur, FS1 1:50 p.m. FA Cup: Liverpool vs. Exeter City, FS2 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open, second round, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open, second round, ESPN2 2 a.m. (Thu.) Australian Open, second round, ESPN2

DIGEST NASCAR extends Chase format to Xfinity, trucks NASCAR is expanding its Chase format to include its feeder series, meaning the champions from the Xfinity and Truck Series will now be crowned in a four-driver shootout at the season finale. The format announced Tuesday by NASCAR Chairman and CEO Brian France mostly mirrors the playof-style setup used to determine the Sprint Cup champion the last two years. That system has 16 drivers race through three rounds of eliminations to establish a field of four in which the highest finisher in the finale wins the championship. The Xfinity and Camping World Truck Series will use a seven-race Chase to decide their champions. The Cup series uses a 10-race format. All three series will crown a champ at Homestead-Miami Speedway. However, all three will begin at diferent tracks: Chicago (Sprint Cup), Kentucky (Xfinity) and New Hampshire (Trucks). More area players taken in MLS draft • Three former Billikens were taken during rounds three and four of the Major League Soccer Superdraft on Tuesday. Vince Cicciarelli was taken in the third round by the Columbus Crew; Faik Hajderovic (Mehlville) was a fourthround pick by Sporting Kansas City; and Tyler David was selected in the fourth round by the Vancouver Whitecaps. In the third round, with the 54th overall pick, the Seattle Sounders selected University of Nebraska Omaha midfielder Emir Alihodzic (Mehlville). Born in Bosnia, he was a four-year starter and the first UNO player drafted into MLS. In the fourth round, at No. 65 overall, Creighton goalkeeper Connor Sparrow (Vianney) went to Real Salt Lake. Named the Big East goalkeeper of the year as a senior after going 19-4 last fall, Sparrow set a program record for winning percentage .797 (37-9-4). (Joe Lyons) SEC faring well financially • According to tax returns acquired by USA Today, and reported by Yahoo sports, the SEC made $527.4 million in revenue from Sept. 1, 2014 through Aug. 31, 2015, the first year of the SEC Network. It was also the first year of the College Football Playof. USA Today notes the half-billion-plus is an increase of more than 60 percent from what the conference received in the last year of the BCS and the final year without the network. It was reported in the spring that the conference’s members were getting over $30 million each in the fiscal year. The allotment per team was about $6 million more than the Big 12’s teams were receiving from the conference. The increases in revenue were cited as a main factor in the impetus for Missouri and Texas A&M to move from the Big 12 to the SEC for the 2012-2013 season. Chen finalizes deal with Marlins • Lefthander Wei-Yin Chen has finalized an $80 million, five-year contract with the Miami Marlins. The deal was struck last week with Chen, who can opt out after 2017 and has an option for 2021. Settlement reached in MLB.TV dispute • Just as a trial was to begin, Major League Baseball and its fans reached agreement Tuesday to expand the menu of online packages for televised games. According to lawyers for fans who filed the class-action lawsuit in 2012, MLB will ofer unbundled Internet packages for the next five years, including single-team packages for $84.99 next season. They said that’s a 23 percent drop from the cheapest version previously available. From news services

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M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016

Hines to see more time for SLU Former walk-on guard scored 14 points against George Mason BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The decision to pursue college basketball at St. Louis University started well for Aaron Hines, whose determination landed him a spot as a walk-on with the Billikens last season. The 6-foot guard put in his time on the scout team but never saw game action. But there were perks, such as the opportunity to participate in SLU’s Bahamas tour in August. It was a trip that changed the course of Hines’ season. At a team dinner the first night on the island, coach Jim Crews announced that the former Parkway North standout would receive a scholarship for the 2015-16 season. “I was totally surprised. It caught me way of guard,” Hines said. “It was joy. Words couldn’t even explain it really.” Hines started all three games in the Bahamas, but he resumed more of a walk-on role when the season started. That was until Sunday, when Crews dramatically altered the player rotation and reinserted Hines in the starting lineup. He scored 14 points with three assists and no turnovers in 26 minutes, prompting Crews to say that Hines will continue to see significant time when the Billikens face Davidson on Wednesday night at Chaifetz Arena. “He has a good attitude. He’s a guy who listens well and wants to do well,” Crews said. “He’s usually one of the first ones at practice every day. He’s earned it. He’s playing, oh yeah, absolutely.” Hines had told SLU coaches his goal was to earn a scholarship, and he’s working on doing even more as SLU continues its search for an identity. He is a good fit on a team that is relying more and more on its guards. The Billikens have seven guards, so working into the rotation has been a matter of perseverance. Hines has worked his way from the bottom of the pecking order to a solid position near the top, it would seem. His playing time has come at the expense of some previously regular players as the Billikens struggle for wins. But Hines hopes to maintain his minutes. “There are no mixed feelings,” he said. “I knew that I had to keep working hard for my opportunity and to take advantage. ... I don’t know if I proved anything or not. I just wanted to prove that I belong at this level.” Hines averaged 19.9 points

ASSOCIATED PRESS

St. Louis University’s Aaron Hines (10) goes up for a shot against George Mason in a game Sunday at Chaifetz Arena.

as a senior at Parkway North. He opted to attend John Wood Community College for one year before contacting SLU coaches about his interest. His production at the JC did not indicate great things as he averaged 5.8 points. Unable to get into a game last season, Crews said he opted to redshirt Hines. This season started with Hines receiving seven minutes in the first 15 games. Then came SLU’s disastrous first half at Duquesne. Crews had Hines play the entire second half of that game until he fouled out with a minute left. He also fouled out against George Mason. But he finally made his first collegiate field goal. Hines entered the game 0-for-8 and missed his first four shots. He missed a layup a minute into the game. Then another two minutes later. And two more later in the first half. “I was like, ‘Wow,’” he said. “It had been a while since I’d been out there and I was kind of getting the dust of.” He fared better in the second half, making 3 of 5 shots, including a 3-pointer to break the drought. He made all of his free throws and led the Billikens in scoring over the final 20 minutes. The Billikens will need a lot more out of everybody if they’re going to compete with Davidson, which won last season’s meeting by 35 points. SLU will need to tighten up on defense after allowing George Mason to score 92 points, a record for Chaifetz Arena. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

SLU VS. DAVIDSON

When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • Chaifetz Arena TV, radio • Fox Sports Midwest, WXOS (101.1 FM) All-time series • Davidson leads 1-0 Records • SLU 6-11, 1-4; Davidson 11-5, 3-2 About the Billikens • SLU center Brett Jolly, who was suspended for the George Mason game, did not practice Monday and Tuesday and is not likely to play. Asked if there was an update on his status, coach Jim Crews said, “Not yet.” ... Center Austin Gillmann didn’t practice Tuesday and was wearing a boot on his left foot. ... Freshman Jermaine Bishop was named the A-10 co-rookie of the week after averaging 18 points and 3.5 assists in two games. About the Wildcats • Davidson is the top scoring team in the Atlantic 10, averaging 81.4 points. Jack Gibbs is the league’s top scorer at 25.7 ppg. He is coming of a 43-point game. ... Starter Jake Belford recently announced his departure from the team due to multiple concussions. And guard Brian Sullivan has missed games recently due to concussion symptoms. ... Coach Bob McKillop picked up his 500th win earlier in the season in his 800th game.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Freshman helps Cowboys rout Jayhawks FROM NEWS SERVICES

Freshman Jawun Evans had 22 points, eight assists and six rebounds to help Oklahoma State upset No. 3 Kansas 86-67 on Tuesday night. The Cowboys beat Kansas in Stillwater, Okla., for the third straight time and the fifth in seven years. Jef Newberry scored 13 points and Jeffrey Carroll added 11 for the Cowboys, who had lost four straight. Oklahoma State shot 50 percent from the field, made 11 of 21 3-point attempts and outrebounded the Jayhawks 38-31. Frank Mason III scored 14 points and Perry Ellis added 13 for Kansas (15-3, 4-2 Big 12), which has lost two of its past three and fell out of a tie for the Big 12 lead. Oklahoma State made 23 of 26 free throws while Kansas made just 13 of 24. The Cowboys (10-8, 2-4) nearly knocked off then-No. 2 Oklahoma six days earlier, but they missed a last-second shot and lost 74-72. S. Carolina rallies for win • Michael Carrera scored 19 points, Laimonas Chatkevicius added 17 and No. 24 South Carolina rallied to beat Mississippi 77-74 in overtime on Tuesday night. South Carolina (17-1, 4-1 Southeastern Conference) trailed 64-53 with 5:17 remaining in regulation. Stefan Moody led the Rebels (12-6, 2-4) with 24 points.

NOTEBOOK Coach K not happy • The Atlantic Coast Conference’s “Sportsmanship Week” didn’t get off to the best start with questions about a lack of postgame handshakes by Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, which may have crystallized the Blue Devils’ mounting frustrations.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Oklahoma (15-2) idle. Next: at No. 13 Baylor, Saturday. 2. North Carolina (16-2) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Wednesday. 3. Kansas (15-3) lost to Oklahoma State 86-67. Next: vs. Texas, Saturday. 4. Villanova (16-2) idle. Next: at Seton Hall, Wednesday. 5. Xavier (16-2) lost to Georgetown 81-72. Next: vs. Seton Hall, Saturday. 6. West Virginia (15-2) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Wednesday. 7. Maryland (17-2) beat Northwestern 62-56. Next: at No. 11 Michigan State, Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas’ Cheick Diallo (13) knocks the ball away from Oklahoma State’s Leyton Hammonds but the Cowboys got the last laugh.

After Duke’s third straight loss, a 64-62 defeat against Syracuse on Monday night, Krzyzewski skipped a few Orange players during the handshake line — a move that was caught by television cameras and almost immediately went viral on social media. Duke spokesman Jon Jackson said Tuesday that the school had no plans to comment on what happened with the handshakes. Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim defended Krzyzewski on his radio show Tuesday, ESPN.com reported, citing Syracuse.com. Boeheim said Krzyzewski unintentionally missed a few handshakes after the game because he was distracted by some Duke fans who were yelling at Syracuse’s players. The handshakes — or lack of them — appeared to be an indication of how frustrating it’s been lately for the 20th-ranked Blue Devils (14-5, 3-3 ACC). This is the lowest they’ve been ranked in two years, and they are on their longest losing streak since 2007.

8. SMU (18-0) beat Houston 77-73. Next: at Temple, Saturday. 9. Iowa (14-3) idle. Next: at Rutgers, Thursday. 10. Texas A&M (15-2) beat LSU 71-57. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. 11. Michigan State (16-3) idle. Next: vs. Nebraska, Wednesday. 12. Arizona (15-3) idle. Next: at Stanford, Thursday. 13. Baylor (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Kansas State, Wednesday. 13. Virginia (14-4) beat Clemson 69-62. Next: vs. Syracuse, Saturday. 15. Miami (13-3) idle. Next: at Boston College, Wednesday. 16. Providence (16-3) beat No. 18 Butler 71-68. Next: at No. 4 Villanova, Saturday. 17. Louisville (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Wednesday. 18. Butler (13-5) lost to No. 16 Providence 71-68. Next: at Creighton, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (14-4) idle. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 20. Duke (14-5) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Saturday. 21. Southern Cal (15-3) idle. Next: at Oregon, Thursday. 22. Purdue (16-3) idle. Next: vs. Ohio State, Thursday. 23. Kentucky (13-4) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday. 24. South Carolina (17-1) beat Mississippi 77-74, OT. Next: at Tennessee, Saturday. 25. Indiana (16-3) beat Illinois 103-69. Next: vs. Northwestern, Saturday.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

01.20.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

Nothing to laugh about as Illini lose big Hot-shooting Indiana lays a 34-point defeat on Illinois, much to the disgust of Groce BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

NO. 25 INDIANA 103, ILLINOIS 69 FG FT Reb ILLINOIS Min M-A M-A O-T A Finke 24 1-3 0-0 2-2 1 Tate 24 1-1 0-0 0-0 5 Coleman-Lands 28 2-6 0-0 1-1 1 Hill 30 6-11 7-8 1-5 1 Nunn 27 3-11 2-3 0-5 2 Williams 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Lewis 17 2-4 2-2 0-0 1 Morgan 5 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 Jordan 14 3-5 0-0 1-1 1 Thorne Jr 16 1-6 7-11 2-9 1 Austin 6 2-3 0-1 0-0 0 Liss 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Totals 200 22-51 18-25 7-25 13 Percentages: FG.431, FT.720. 3-point goals: 7-18, .389. Team rebounds: 2. Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 15. Steals: 5. Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb INDIANA Min M-A M-A O-T A Williams 25 8-11 3-3 1-4 5 Hartman 23 2-3 2-2 1-5 1 Bryant 19 3-5 2-2 3-4 0 Johnson 25 5-12 0-0 0-7 6 Ferrell 31 5-10 1-2 0-1 9 Bielfeldt 17 6-9 2-4 3-8 3 Zeisloft 17 3-9 0-0 0-1 0 Anunoby 12 4-4 0-0 2-3 1 Burton 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Morgan 9 0-0 0-0 2-2 1 Niego 10 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 Taylor 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 Tharp 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 Priller 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 Totals 200 37-65 10-13 12-38 27 Percentages: FG.569, FT.769. 3-point goals: 19-36, .528. Team rebounds: 0. Blocked shots: 3. Turnovers: 11. Steals: 9. Technical fouls: None. Illinois 25 44 — Indiana 42 61 — A: 17,472. Officials: Tom Eades, Terry Oglesby, Mark Whitehead.

BLOOMINGTON, IND. • There was a

moment in the first half Tuesday when a burst by Illinois made Hoosier fans think they might be in for a real battle. A 10-0 Illini run had closed Indiana’s lead to 22-21 with just over seven minutes to go, and there was an uneasy tension inside the vast Assembly Hall. But over those next seven minutes everything changed. And before it was over, Indiana turned into the Harlem Globetrotters while Illinois morphed into the Washington Generals. Indiana made Illinois look like the victim of a practical joke, making a schoolrecord 19 3-pointers while sprinkling in an assortment of breakaway dunks, alleyoops, backdoor cuts and circus shots. Indiana’s 103-69 rout gave Illinois its most lopsided defeat since a 109-74 loss on Jan. 2, 1991, also at Indiana. How bad did it get for Illinois, which has now lost eight consecutive road games? As Indiana was scoring at will in the second half, it made 16 of its first 19 shots. When Illini coach John Groce saw that the Hoosiers were shooting 84.2 percent, he came unhinged during a timeout. Groce had assistant coach Jamall Walker address the team while he stalked to the scorers table, guzzled from a bottle of water and then screamed at his team when it returned to the bench. By the time Groce showed up for his postgame news conference, he had regained his composure, but with Illinois now 9-10 overall and 1-5 in the Big Ten, he sounded like a coach with many more questions than answers. “We were atrocious defensively in the second half,” Groce said. “I know they are hard to guard, but I didn’t like the look of our guys. Our offense was better in the second half, but our defense was so bad it didn’t matter. “Guys have to value (defense) as much as they value making shots. I didn’t like our body language at all. They hung their heads. Some messages need to be sent.” The loudest messages were sent by Indiana, which leads the Big Ten in scoring, field goal shooting and 3-point shooting and increased its margins against the Illini. Senior point guard Yogi Ferrell had 16 points and nine assists and became the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana’s Thomas Bryant dunks against Illinois’ Michael Finke during the first half of Tuesday night’s blowout win for the Hoosiers.

school’s all-time assists leader (553, surpassing Michael Lewis’ 545). Troy Williams scored 21 points and Indiana made 19 of 36 3s (52.8 percent). It was also a big night for Max Bielfeldt, the Peoria, Ill., native who never got a scholarship ofer from Illinois even though his family is a major donor to the school. Bielfeldt ended up at Michigan, then transferred to Indiana as a fifth-year senior. He had 16 points and eight rebounds Tuesday.

After Illinois used a 10-0 run to close Indiana’s lead to 22-21 with a little over seven minutes left in the half, Indiana took over. The Hoosiers needed just three minutes to push their lead to 33-23, but Groce felt Illinois came unraveled for the rest of the half. “We encouraged them to stay the course with the game plan, but we played too much hero ball,” Groce said. “We were not nearly disciplined enough

Mark Fox said. “They’re just a young group that keeps getting better and better. Obviously they’ve got a couple guys who have proven they can score. Clark obviously scored a lot on us and has been playing well. They look more comfortable with each other and what they’re doing just two weeks later than what they were the first time we played. They keep getting better, which is a credit to Coach Anderson and their players for staying engaged.”

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • It doesn’t take a doctorate

in advanced statistics to diagnose the problem in most of Missouri’s losses this season. “We have to quit spotting teams 10 points and then trying to catch up,” Tigers coach Kim Anderson said this week. Yes, that would be a sound strategy going forward. In seven of Mizzou’s nine losses, Anderson’s team trailed by 13 points or more in the first half. In five of those defeats, the Tigers (8-9, 1-3 Southeastern Conference) almost immediately trailed by a sizable margin before scoring in double figures. Northwestern led Mizzou 28-9 in November. Last month, Arizona jumped to a 15-4 lead. In MU’s conference opener Georgia surged ahead 10-0 in the opening minutes. The Tigers haven’t been immune to quick deficits at home: Arkansas charged out of the Mizzou Arena locker room last week and led 16-4 after just six minutes of action. What causes the sluggish starts? “I wish I had the answer,” Anderson said. “I know I’m getting paid to have the answer. We’ve tried a lot of diferent things. The way you warm up to what you eat to even scripting plays. … When we get out there, sometimes the other team takes something away and we have to adjust. That just comes with playing.” The Tigers can avenge one of the most recent instant meltdowns with Wednesday’s visit from Georgia (9-6, 2-3), a 6 p.m. tip-of on SEC Network and a rematch of the Bulldogs’ 77-59 win on Jan. 6 in Athens. Georgia, last seen getting drubbed Saturday at home by Texas A&M 79-45, is winless away from Athens. “We feel like in Georgia they had us on our

BARNETT JOINS TIGERS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

South Carolina guard PJ Dozier pushes the ball down court against Missouri guard K.J. Walton Saturday in Mizzou’s 81-72 loss.

heels the whole game,” junior guard Wes Clark said, “so we just need to come out with a great start and get things moving.” The 33-point loss to Arkansas notwithstanding, Mizzou’s two previous SEC games showed some subtle signs of promise. The Tigers dominated Auburn in their only league win — the same Auburn team that upset Kentucky on Saturday — and had their most promising road performance Saturday at South Carolina, a nine-point loss that was mostly competitive. As dismal as the last week has been for Mizzou — on top of two losses came self-sanctions for NCAA violations that happened under former coach Frank Haith — the Tigers should have some hope heading into Wednesday’s home game. For one, Clark is playing the best of his career, as long as he stays out of foul trouble. He scored a career-high 26 points Saturday. Freshman forward Kevin Puryear had one of his best games against Georgia with 19 points. “They played well in many parts of the game at South Carolina,” Georgia coach

2016 FUELED BY PHILLIPS 66

JANUARY 28-31

Sophomore transfer Jordan Barnett from CBC by way of the University of Texas has enrolled at Mizzou and joined the program, the team said Tuesday. The 2013-14 Post-Dispatch AllMetro player of the year will have to sit out the rest of this season per NCAA transfer rules plus the first semester of the 2016-17 season. He’ll become eligible a year from now, at the start of the 2017 spring semester. The 6-7, 215-pound Barnett appeared in only four games for the Longhorns this season, Barnett scoring 13 points in 24 minutes. “We’re excited to have Jordan join our Mizzou Basketball family,” Anderson said. “He’s an outstanding basketball player, but most importantly, he’s an exceptional young man from here in the state of Missouri from a good family. Over the course of his college career, Jordan has shown his potential in both the classroom and on the court. We know he is eager to represent his home state on the biggest stage.” “I wanted to come back home to play,” Barnett said. “I‘ve been around Mizzou a lot growing up, so I’m very familiar with the school. It really feels fitting that I’d be back here. I am excited to play for Kim Anderson, because I know he is a good person and a great coach.” As a freshman last season, Barnett played in 21 of 34 games and averaged 1.9 points and 1.3 rebounds in 8.5 minutes per game. Ranked the nation’s No. 70 player by Rivals.com in the 2014 recruiting class, Barnett powered CBC to the Class 5 MSHSAA championship as a senior and averaged 20.8 points and 8.2 rebounds. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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before the end of the half. They panicked a little bit. Guys took bad shots and tried to make plays that weren’t there. We turned it over and let them create a 17-point halftime lead.” Malcolm Hill (Belleville East) led Illinois with 20 points. Kendrick Nunn, who made three of 11 shots, scored 10. The game marked the return of Illini center Mike Thorne Jr., who had missed 11 games after knee surgery. Thorne wore a heavy brace on his left knee. He played 16 minutes and finished with nine points and nine rebounds. “He was great on the glass,” said Groce, who did not let players speak to reporters. “His conditioning isn’t where it needs to be yet, but that’s not his fault. He has practiced a day and a half. He didn’t finish well around the basket … but he’s figuring out how to play with the knee brace. All in all, above average for sure.” Illinois planned to return to Champaign by bus late Tuesday night. Next up is another road game at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Minnesota.

Early deicits have been a problem for MU Tigers host Georgia in SEC rematch at Mizzou Arena

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MIZZOU VS. GEORGIA

When • 6 p.m. Wednesday Where • Mizzou Arena TV, radio • SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) Records • Mizzou 8-9, 1-3; Georgia 9-6, 2-3 All-time series • Tied 4-4 … last meeting, Georgia won 77-59 on Jan. 6 About the Tigers • Mizzou has lost two straight games and six of its last nine. Junior guard Wes Clark is coming of a career-high 26-point performance at South Carolina. Over his last seven games, when Clark plays at least 23 minutes, he’s averaged 18.5 points. … The Tigers need one more win to match last year’s total. … Senior forward Ryan Rosburg had his best ofensive game of the season Saturday with 12 points of the bench, two of his careerhigh. … Sophomore guard Namon Wright rejoined the starting lineup at South Carolina and scored nine points in a season-high 32 minutes. … Sophomore forward D’Angelo Allen continues to give the Tigers a spark of the bench, with eight points and six rebounds in 14 minutes. About the Bulldogs • Mark Fox’s team is coming of its most lopsided loss in his seven seasons as coach, a 34-point home defeat to Texas A&M on Saturday. … The Bulldogs rank No. 2 in the SEC and No. 13 in Division I in field goal percentage defense, holding opponents to 37.9 percent. … UGA is one of only two Division I teams that’s played only one team with an RPI higher than 200. The Bulldogs’ strength of schedule ranks No. 12 by ESPN’s BPI rating and No. 15 by the NCAA’s RPI. … Sophomore forward Yante Maten leads UGA with 15.9 points per game. Mizzou had problems guarding him inside two weeks ago when Maten scored 15 points against the Tigers. … Junior guard J.J. Frazier is UGA’s top perimeter scorer (15 points per game) and led the Bulldogs with 16 points against Mizzou. Dave Matter


FOOTBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Mizzou recruiting heavily in Texas MIZZOU • FROM B1

Texas Christian University, a surging Big 12 Conference program that along with Baylor has closed the gap on University of Texas’ stranglehold on the state’s elite recruits. There are plenty of prospects scattered throughout the state for Mizzou to get back into the market, Cross said. “Having recruited there all those years and now having spent some time at TCU, there’s not a doubt in my mind there’s players there that can play and can help us win now,” said Cross, who’s recruited the Houston area throughout his career as an assistant at TCU and other schools. “We’ve just got to get together as a staf and whatever Coach Odom decides is what we’ll attack.” Odom’s plan of attack becomes clearer with each of his staf additions. Strains of crimson run through several of his coaches’ credentials — as in Oklahoma Sooner crimson. The Big 12 powerhouse has recruited Texas for decades, and Odom has hired four former Sooner players who also coached at their alma mater: • Ofensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Josh Heupel quarterbacked the Sooners to the 2000 national title, then coached EYES ON TEXAS the position at OU from 2006- Before Mizzou joined the SEC, 14, the last four the state of Texas was crucial years as co-coor- recruiting territory for the Tigers dinator. under coach Gary Pinkel. MU • Defensive line shifted its focus away from Texas coach Chris Wil- after leaving the Big 12, only to son, from Rich- see new coach Barry Odom make ardson, Texas, Texas a renewed priority. Here’s p l a ye d l i n e - a look back at Mizzou’s 15 signing backer at OU and classes under Pinkel, with the coached there number of Texas recruits listed from 2005-09. along with the top impact • Tight ends starters from each class. coach Joe Jon 2015 • 0 Finley, a native of Arlington, Texas, 2014 • 2 none played tight end 2013 • 4 WR J’Mon Moore for the Soon- 2012 • 6 RB Russell ers and coached Hansbrough there alongside DT Rickey Hatley Heupel in 2012- 2011 • 9 S Ian Simon 13. He spent last season on Bay- 2010 • 9 QB James Franklin, RB Henry Josey lor’s staff as a WR Bud Sasser quality control coach. In Finley’s 2009 • 7 RB Kendial Lawrence introductory DE Michael Sam news release, 2008 • 12 TE Michael Egnew Odom cited his LB Zaviar Gooden deep connecDE Jacquies Smith tions to Texas, including his 2007 • 5 DT Dominique Hamilton family ties: His father, Mickey 2006 • 10 WR Danario Alexander Finley, won 221 CB Kevin Rutland games as a high LB Sean school coach in Weatherspoon Texas spanning four decades. 2005 • 7 QB Chase Daniel • Jon Cooper, DT Ziggy Hood an All-Big 12 2004 • 8 DE Stryker Sulak center at Oklahoma and former 2003 • 6 WR Brad Ekwerekwu S Nino Williams Sooners graduate assistant, has 2002 • 6 LB Marcus Bacon joined Odom’s DE Brian Smith staff in an un- 2001 • 5 WR Thomson Omboga specified coachS Jason Simpson ing role. More Odom staffers have ties to Texas and the Big 12 region: Safeties coach Ryan Walters has coached at Oklahoma and North Texas; cornerbacks coach Greg Brown played at Texas-El Paso; and ofensive line coach Glen Elarbee coached at University of Houston and Oklahoma State. Since taking over as Mizzou’s head coach last month, Odom has talked about redirecting Mizzou’s recruiting focus to familiar roots in Texas, a process former coach Gary Pinkel had started last year before he announced his resignation. From 2001-2011, Mizzou signed an average of 7.6 Texas recruits each year, adding nine or more Texas prospects four times as members of the Big 12. The staf’s philosophy changed when MU left the Big 12 for the SEC as the staf moved more resources into Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. Those eforts produced middling results at best, while Texas was all but forgotten. The Tigers signed just two Texas players in 2014 and none last year. National signing day is Feb. 3 and Mizzou has secured just one oral commitment from Texas since Odom’s hire — four-star Dallas pass-rusher Marvin Terry — but the staf has clearly made a push back into the country’s second-most populous state. Rivals.com recruiting analyst Jason Howell said the trend became obvious in recent weeks when more Texas players picked up sudden interest from Mizzou, including four-star Houston running back Rakeem Boyd, who committed to Texas A&M in August. “Missouri has some coaches with ties to the area, who know the lay of the land and have relationships there,” Howell said. “People know the Missouri brand from the Big 12 days.” Rivals.com’s national database shows 19 Texas players with Mizzou offers. Three have pledged commitments to MU: Terry, Dallas defensive back DeMarcus Acy and Houston linebacker Trey Bolden, who has already enrolled at MU. The Tigers have also lost three 2016 Texas pledges since Pinkel stepped down. There’s another factor that could favor MU’s return to Texas. Since conference realignment shook up college football’s map in 2012, the University of Texas’ monopoly on the state’s top players has crumbled. In 2010, the Longhorns signed 11 of the state’s top 17 recruits as rated by Rivals.com. Among the state’s 43 four- and five-star recruits for 2016, Texas has just four pledges — fewer than Baylor and Texas A&M, both with six. Houston and Louisiana State are next with three each. Overall, Big 12 schools edged the SEC for those top Texas recruits 15-14 as of Tuesday. “It’s not one of those things where if Texas offers that’s what’s going to happen,” Howell said. “There’s definitely more of an open market.” “Texas A&M being in the conference not only helps Texas A&M but it opens the door for other SEC teams,” he added. “You see Alabama all over the place. LSU is very much in the state of Texas.” And now — once again — Missouri, too. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

Arizona running game has been lacking lately Another big test next vs. Panthers’ No. 4 run defense ASSOCIATED PRESS

TEMPE, ARIZ. • The Arizona Cardinals’ once robust running game has all but vanished in recent weeks. Now the team has to try to rediscover it while facing the punishing defense of the Carolina Panthers. In last Saturday’s 26-20 overtime victory over Green Bay, the Cardinals managed just 40 yards rushing in 19 attempts, an anemic average of 2.1 yards a carry. David Johnson gained 35 yards in 15 tries, an average of 2.3 per attempt. Arizona’s longest running play of the game was 8 yards. “I think they had a good scheme against us from the two weeks before that when we played them, they were ready for us,” Johnson said Tuesday after the Cardinals’ walk-through practice. Arizona coach Bruce Arians placed the blame squarely on the ofensive line and not on his rookie running back. “Getting their (behind) kicked up front,” Arians said. “It’s not anything David is doing. There’s just not a lot of holes there and we have to do a better job. It’s a tough challenge this week.” When the Cardinals face Carolina in the NFC championship game Sunday, they will go against a defense that ranked fourth against the run in the regular season, allowing 88.4 yards a game. Arians said Star Lotulelei and Kawann Short are the best pair of defensive tackles Arizona has seen all season. “The linebackers are great,” Arians said, “but (the tackles) help make them great.” Lotulelei and Short are great players, Cardinals left guard Mike Iupati said. “They’re big, fast, strong.” And they help make linebacker Luke Kuechly the great player he is. Kuechly, Arians said, has “got great instincts.” “He’s really fast,” the coach said. “What he really is, he’s a great pass defender. People see all the tackles, but they do a great job of keeping him clean to make the tackles,” The absence of defensive end Jared Allen, who is doubtful for the game with a broken foot, won’t have that much impact, the Cardinals coach said. “They’ve got good depth,” Arians said. “Mario Addison gave us problems last year and I’m not sure there’s a dropoff there.” Rest assured that the Arizona ofensive

ASSOCIATED PRESS

David Johnson had 35 yards rushing on 15 attempts and the entire team just 40 yards in a playof win over the Packers.

linemen will hear a lot this week about their run blocking from Arians and offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin, who specializes in coaching those positions. Iupati, named to the Pro Bowl for the fourth time in his six NFL seasons, is considered one of the best run blockers in the league. “We’ve got to execute better,” he said. “We’ve got to block better, block longer, extend your guys. It’s no secret. ... Us Oline guys, we know what we’ve got to do. We’ve just got to go out there and open holes for David or whoever’s in the backfield and protect the quarterback.” Most of the season, the Cardinals’ ground game has been humming along nicely, with Chris Johnson the featured back until he went down with a seasonending injury in Arizona’s 19-13 win at San Francisco on Nov. 29. David Johnson stepped in and, if anything, the running game got better. He gained 99 yards in his first start (at St. Louis), 92 in his second (against Minnesota) and a breakout 187 yards in 29 carries at Philadelphia. But he’s had only 39 yards, 25 yards and 35 yards in the three games since. Johnson, a third-round draft pick out of Northern Iowa, knows that the running game has been crucial to the success of the Cardinals, who had the top-ranked ofense in the NFL in the regular season. “When we’re able to run the ball, it keeps our ofense on the field and it just overall helps our whole team,” Johnson said.

Gurley was third in the NFL in rushing yards

DEAN RUTZ • Seattle Times/TnS

Rams running back Todd Gurley jumps over Seattle Seahawks safety Earl Thomas at CenturyLink Field in Seattle on Dec. 27.

RAMS • FROM B1

of Georgia compiled those totals even though he missed the first two games of the season as he completed rehab from knee surgery, and then missed the season finale at San Francisco with turf toe. Throw in the fact that he had only a cameo role in his NFL debut in Game 3 against Pittsburgh and Gurley posted his numbers basically in 12 games. With the benefit of a full ofseason of training and conditioning, not to mention spring practices and training camp, the Rams are expecting even bigger things from Gurley in 2016. “We’ve said that all along,” coach Jef Fisher said. “You come back of this injury, and that first year back you can see the light and things. But with an ofseason program and strength and conditioning, he should be a diferent running back next year.” The Rams had the PFWA defensive rookie of the year in 2014 in defensive tackle Aaron Donald. That honor went this year to Kansas City cornerback Marcus Peters. Gurley became the first rookie in NFL history to rush for 125 yards-plus in four consecutive games. Those just happened to be his first four starts in the NFL,

starting with a 146-yard outing Oct. 4 in Arizona. Next came 159 yards at Green Bay, followed by 128 yards against Cleveland and 133 yards Nov. 1 against San Francisco. His 566 yards rushing in those first four starts is the most for a rookie in the Super Bowl era. As the season progressed, and the Rams’ passing game continued to struggle, opposing defenses made the going tougher for Gurley. He had only one additional 100-yard outing, gaining 140 yards on 16 carries against Detroit. But even Gurley conceded near the end of the season that his rookie success was somewhat unexpected. “I didn’t expect to do this well, but at the end of the day it didn’t really surprise me,” Gurley said, after earning his Pro Bowl berth. “I put in the hard work and my teammates helped me come back and do a great job.” Gurley was joined on the PFWA’s allrookie team by right tackle Rob Havenstein. The all-rookie squad also included former University of Missouri player Mitch Morse, as a center for Kansas City. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

NFL NOTEBOOK Randle El regrets playing football Ten years after he threw one of the most celebrated passes in Pittsburgh Steelers history, Antwaan Randle El has trouble walking down stairs. “I have to come down sideways sometimes, depending on the day,” Randle El, 36, said. “Going up is easier actually than coming down.” Randle El was an electric athlete, versatile enough to run a route on one play and throw a beautiful spiral on the next, as he did in Super Bowl XL when he found Hines Ward for a 43-yard touchdown on a wide-receiver reverse pass. That his body has begun to betray him before his 40th birthday is hard to fathom. The crazy thing is that Randle El can feel his mind slipping, too. “I ask my wife things over and over again, and she’s like, ‘I just told you that,’” Randle El said. “I’ll ask her three times the night before and get up in the morning and forget. Stuf like that. I try to chalk it up as I’m busy, I’m doing a lot, but I have to be on my knees praying about it, asking God to allow me to not have these issues and live a long life. I want to see my kids raised up. I want to see my grandkids.” Randle El didn’t hesitate when asked if he regrets playing football. “If I could go back, I wouldn’t,” he said. “I would play baseball. I got drafted by the Cubs in the 14th round, but I didn’t play baseball because of my parents. They made me go to school. Don’t get me wrong, I love the game of football. But right now, I could still be playing baseball.” Ray Rice coaching in collegiate bowl • Former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice is serving as an assistant coach this week at the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl Saturday in Carson, Calif. Rice has not played in the NFL since being suspended at the start of the 2014 season for domestic violence. Rice is serving as assistant running backs coach for Mike Martz, the former Rams coach. Martz is head coach of the National Team and Mike Holmgren is in charge of the American Team. Roethlisberger doesn’t need surgery • Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger’s ailing right shoulder will not require surgery, but he will take some time of in the next few weeks to let the injury heal. Packers coach laments lack of a big target • Coach Mike McCarthy intends to keep calling the ofensive plays for the Green Bay Packers. But he has two vacancies on his staf after running backs coach Sam Gash and tight ends coach Jerry Fontenot were ired on Tuesday. Now if quarterback Aaron Rodgers can just get back a healthy complement of receivers for the 2016 season, the Packers could have an easier time moving the ball. The process of iguring out what went wrong in 2015 started this week for McCarthy after the Packers lost to Arizona 26-20 in overtime in the NFC playofs. Nelson’s absence wasn’t the only problem. Rodgers didn’t play up to his typical, two-time NFL MVP standards. Injuries battered the ofensive line. McCarthy also saw a hole up the middle. “I’ve said this for a long time, everyone wants to talk about passing game, speed of receivers,” McCarthy said. “Philosophically to me ... to have a successful passing game you have to have big targets that can turn through the middle of the ield, whether it’s a tight end, whether it’s a big receiver.” Patriots put Mayo on injured reserve • The New England Patriots have placed veteran linebacker Jerod Mayo on injured reserve after he sufered a shoulder injury in the team’s divisional round win over the Kansas City Chiefs. From news services

NFL PLAYOFFS DIVISIONAL ROUND Jan. 16 New England 27, Kansas City 20 Arizona 26, Green Bay 20, OT Jan. 17 Carolina 31, Seattle 24 Denver 23, Pittsburgh 16 CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday AFC: New England at Denver, 2:05 p.m., KMOV (4) NFC: Arizona at Carolina, 5:40 p.m., KTVI (2) SUPER BOWL • Sunday, Feb. 7 in Santa Clara, Calif. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4)


01.20.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

SPORTS

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Williams and Sharapova move on

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

Stastny, Brouwer, Steen clicking after short time BLUES • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams plays a backhand return to Hsieh Su-Wei during their second-round match Wednesday.

But Nadal sufers early exit at hands of fellow Spaniard ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA • Serena Williams has had so

much success for such a long time that even in a secondround match she can set a record at the season’s first Grand Slam event. The six-time and defending champion beat No. 90-ranked Hsieh Su-Wei 6-1, 6-2 on Wednesday at Rod Laver Arena, an all-time record 79th main draw match at the Australian Open. She closed with an ace, her seventh, finishing in precisely an hour. “It all started here — this is where I played my first Grand Slam right on this court and I’m still going, it’s such an honor,” said Williams, who has a 70-9 win-loss record at Melbourne Park since her debut in 1998. “I love it every time I come here.” She hit 26 winners, including one around the post that she thought may have been a first for her, at age 34. “My first one, I think,” she said. “I was like, ‘Yay. Never too late.’” She faces a potential quarterfinal match against Maria Sharapova, which would be a rematch of the 2015 final. Sharapova reached the third round with a 6-2, 6-1 win over Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the first match completed on day three, when light rain caused an hour-long delay getting started on the outside courts. The fifth-seeded Sharapova won the 2008 Australian title and has lost three finals at Melbourne Park. She dropped two service games in the first set, including once when serving at 5-1, but was otherwise consistent except for some over-hit ground strokes.

“To come back here and play my first match on Rod Laver is always very special as you always get those first little jitters out of the way,” she said. Kateryna Bondarenko earned one of her biggest wins since returning from retirement after having a baby in 2013, beating two-time major winner and No. 23-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-1, 7-5. The 92nd-ranked Bondarenko is playing only her second Grand Slam tournament since returning to the tour in 2014. Seventh-seeded Kei Nishikori, the 2014 U.S. Open finalist, advanced to the third round in the men’s draw with a 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3 win over Austin Krajicek. In Tuesday’s late matches, Fernando Verdasco handed Rafael Nadal his earliest career loss at the Australian Open with a 7-6 (8-6), 4-6, 3-6, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 defeat that knocked out the Spaniard in the first round. Women’s second seed Simona Halep paid the price for a recent Achilles tendon injury, losing to qualifier Zhang Shuai 6-4, 6-3 as the 133rd-ranked Chinese player won her first match at a Grand Slam event after 15 attempts over seven years. “I did everything I could today, it was all I could do,” Halep said. “I had no pain, I’m OK but disappointed.” Nadal, the 2009 champion, had reached the Melbourne Park final in two of his last three appearances. “The match is five sets, he was playing amazing in the last set,” Nadal said. “He had a lot of success, all the balls hitting full power in the fifth.” The 45th-ranked Verdasco rallied from a break down in the final set of a contest lasting nearly four and three-quarter hours — 35 minutes shorter than an epic 2009 semifinal at the event won by Nadal over his compatriot and longtime rival.

AT A GLANCE A look at the Australian Open on Tuesday: Seeded men’s results • No. 2 Andy Murray def. Alexander Zverev, No. 4 Stan Wawrinka def. Dmitry Tursunov, No. 5 Rafael Nadal lost to Fernando Verdasco, No. 8 David Ferrer def. Peter Gojowczyk, No. 10 John Isner def. Jerzy Janowicz, No. 11 Kevin Anderson lost to Rajeev Ram, No. 13 Milos Raonic def. Lucas Pouille, No. 16 Bernard Tomic def. Denis Istomin, No. 18 Feliciano Lopez def. Daniel Evans, No. 20 Fabio Fognini lost to Gilles Muller, No. 21 Viktor Troicki def. Daniel Munoz-De La Nava, No. 23 Gael Monfils def. Yuichi Sugita, No. 25 Jack Sock def. Taylor Fritz, No. 30. Jeremy Chardy def. Ernests Gulbis, No. 31 Steve Johnson def. Aljaz Bedene, No. 32 Joao Sousa def. Mikhail Kukushkin. Seeded women’s results • No. 2 Simona Halep lost to Zhang Shuai, No. 3 Garbine Muguruza def. Anett Kontaveit, No. 7 Angelique Kerber def. Misaki Doi, No. 8 Venus Williams lost to Johanna Konta, No. 9 Karolina Pliskova def. Kimberly Birrell, No. 11 Timea Bacsinszky def. Katerina Siniakova, No. 14 Victoria Azarenka def. Alison Van Uytvanck, No. 15 Madison Keys def. Zarina Diyas, No. 18 Elina Svitolina def. Victoria Duval, No. 19 Jelena Jankovic def. Polona Hercog, No. 20 Ana Ivanovic def. Tammi Patterson, No. 21 Ekaterina Makarova def. Maddison Inglis, No. 29 IrinaCamelia Begu lost to Johanna Larsson, No. 30 Sabine Lisicki def. Petra Cetkovska, No. 31 Lesia Tsurenko lost to Varvara Lepchenko, Barbora Strycova def. No. 32 Caroline Garcia. Stat of the day • 2 — The number of times in his career Rafael Nadal has lost in the first round of a Grand Slam tournament, the first being Wimbledon in 2013.

The three had just one point in the first two games — a goal by Stastny — as they felt each other out. “We’re getting more and more comfortable,” said Stastny, who wore a cage mask for two games before switching back to a visor Monday. “I think we just work for each other. I think we’ve had chances and today they started falling.” Finally, they’re falling for Stastny, who has 10 points (two goals, eight assists) in his last nine games with at least one point in seven of those nine. For the season, he is up to five goals and 23 points in 31 games. “It’s good to see him get some points,” Brouwer said. “He prides himself on being an ofensive player and being our No. 1 centerman and he needs to do that. It gives him some confidence.” Stastny hasn’t clicked with leading goal-scorer Vladimir Tarasenko as the Blues might have hoped, but there appears to be some chemistry between Stastny and Brouwer, who now has nine goals and 19 points in 49 games. The two set each other up for their goals in Monday’s game. “You know where he’s going to be,” Stastny said. “I think those little plays where he drives middle and kind of brings both guys to him. It’s stuff like that where it forces you not to dump it. I think sometimes you kind of slow down and you let him pick up the speed and I think that creates a lot of chances.” Not to be left out is Steen, who scored his 14th goal of the season Monday and registered his team-leading 27th assist. With 41 points, he’s just five behind Tarasenko. It’s impressive, especially considering that Steen has played the past two games after undergoing three root canals, the result of being inadvertently hit in the mouth by the stick of teammate Kevin Shattenkirk. “And he’s not even wearing a cage,” Brouwer said. “I thought

he would have a little more protection, but no ... he’s a tough guy. He’s not going to sit out games if he doesn’t have to. Guys admire him for that and that’s part of the reason why he wears a letter (A) for us.” Realistically, the line could have two players — Stastny and Steen — both wearing cages. There are none of those, but there are three cagey veterans. “I think when you have experienced players that think on the same wavelength, they’re going to have success because they’re the sum of parts,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “There isn’t exceptional speed, but there’s a tremendous amount of hockey sense. I think this is two games in a row for Paul where he’s played at a high level and I think that helps when the center’s playing at this level. “I think there’s some real continuity. They’re very smart in their positional play, so they play a really strong pressureposition game. They create turnovers. That’s where they get their odd-man rushes from and then down low, they’re strong. They’re strong on the puck, they protect it, they buy space and time, hard to play against. They get scoring chances in two diferent veins. It helps a lot to have a line like that that sets that kind of competitive tone.” The production has come at a key time for the Blues, who will follow-up their pit-stop in the Motor City with trips to Colorado and Chicago. “We knew with four games left and going into a tough road trip, a tough opponent (Monday), we needed to get some wins to make sure that we keep pace with the teams ahead of us,” Brouwer said. “I like the potential of our line and I think when we get some more guys back, I think our lineup will round out even more and we’re going to have three and four good, solid lines and ‘Hitch’ can count on any one of them.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Associated Press

Two strikes on Cards’ Reyes FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Now that certain states have allowed marijuana, this topic can quickly turn into a political debate. And tokers and teetotalers alike can agree the disconnect between punishments for major and minor leaguers break the law of common sense. Major leaguers, protected by the collective bargaining agreement, pay fines. Minor leaguers miss games. But Reyes doesn’t seem interested in becoming a spokesman for change. When asked if it was unfair for marijuana to be treated differently from other substances, primarily alcohol, he replied: “I can’t touch on that topic.” Good call. The righty can throw 100 mph fastballs and pretty good curves. Let someone else become the Ricky Williams of MLB. Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. called Reyes a “great kid” who “knows he made a mistake” and “paid the price.” General manager John Mozeliak’s most candid comments about Reyes came during question-and-answer with fans, prompted by a man in the audience who mistakenly thought the suspension involved a performance-enhancing substance. “Well, look,” Mozeliak replied. “My takeaway on the Reyes thing is, don’t smoke dope, right? Pretty simple message. This isn’t Colorado.” The crowd laughed. Mo’s humor faded fast. “From a company standpoint, you don’t want to see your young

players making these mistakes,” he continued. “And I can’t tell you how much money, energy and time we spend on trying to avoid these pitfalls. “That’s part of growing up. You have to realize, when we are signing Latin players, a lot of times they are 16 years old. A lot of times, when we draft high school players, they are 18 years old. So, think about that bandwidth of 16 to 21, or to 23, and think about when you were that age, and think about the decisions that you were making at that time. “Guess what? We are not all perfect. We all make mistakes. The key is, will people respond, make changes and hopefully not (let it) happen again? In his case, he can’t let it happen again. Because the next one is 100 games, and that’s far more punitive than 50. So, he better grow up from this.” The good news for Reyes is this can disappear. If his second offense is his last, no one will remember he started this season in prospect camp instead of majorleague spring training. Shelby Miller, for example, was not defined by a 2011 suspension after two alcohol-fueled altercations during his Class AA days. “Time heals all,” said catcher Michael Ohlman, who played with Reyes in Class AA. “He made a mistake. It happens. He’s not going to be the first, or the last.” True. But for Reyes, the innocence has expired. Another setback would prove he prioritizes marijuana use over pitching for

the Cards. That would be a big problem. Talent factors into the amount of leash an up-and-comer receives. Reyes has a ton of it, but every leash must end at some point. The Cards might not be looking to add depth at catcher if they had not tired of Cody Stanley’s propensity for PEDs. Marijuana and steroids are not the same, yet both pose serious risks for minor leaguers who would like to be promoted. If Reyes wants to resume his marijuana use in the majors, and attempt to dodge the legal ramifications he could face in Missouri, MLB will only be able to slap his wrist when he fails tests. He will have plenty of money to pay the fines. He should at least be able to hold off until then, until the world he previewed this weekend is the one he lives in full-time. Later Sunday night, after Reyes finished his acceptance speech and returned to the row of minor-leaguers seated near the back of the stage, former Cardinal David Eckstein, 2006 World Series MVP, gestured toward the baby faces. “These guys, especially these young guys over here, that are making your ways up, it’s diferent here,” Eckstein said. “I promise you. It’s not like this everywhere else. You better enjoy the time you have right now, and try to do the best you can.” If Reyes didn’t realize this before, he has no excuse for not knowing now. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Alexander Steen scores past Pittsburgh defenseman Ian Cole after Penguins goalie Jef Zatkof got caught out of the net during the first period Monday night.

BLUES AT RED WINGS When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • Joe Louis Arena, Detroit TV, radio • NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues sent defenseman Chris Butler to the AHL on Tuesday, an indication that one of their injured defensemen, Carl Gunnarsson or Robert Bortuzzo, is close to returning. (Both are on the three-game trip that leads into the All-Star break.) Andre Benoit, who was called up Sunday from Chicago and played Monday, is still with the team. … The Blues lost to Detroit 4-3 in overtime Nov. 22 at Scottrade Center. … Brian Elliott faced 38 shots Monday against Pittsburgh, the third time this season he has faced that many. He’s 3-0 with a 2.31 goals-against average in those games. … D Joel Edmundson has four assists over his past six games. He had two assists in his first 28 games. Red Wings • Detroit has won five of its past seven but has dropped two of its past three. The Red Wings have been of since losing to Philadelphia in a shootout

Sunday. They have the third-best record in the Eastern Conference going into Tuesday’s play, but despite a record of 23-14-8 have been outscored by three goals. They’re the only team among the top 13 in points in the league with a negative goal diference. ... C Dylan Larkin is tied for second among rookies with 14 goals and is third in assists with 16. Four of his goals have been game-winners. ... Henrik Zetterberg leads the team with 23 assists. ... G Petr Mrazek has a .931 save percentage, fifthbest in the league, and a 2.10 goals-against average. Injuries • Blues — D Carl Gunnarsson (upper body, questionable; G Jake Allen (lower body), D Robert Bortuzzo (lower body), F Magnus Paajarvi (upper body), F Steve Ott (hamstring) and F Jaden Schwartz (ankle), out. Red Wings — D Niklas Kronwall (knee), F Drew Miller (knee), F Johan Franzen (concussion), out. Tom Timmermann


01.20.2016 • WEDNESDAY • M 2

SPORTS

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Williams and Sharapova move on

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B5

Stastny, Brouwer, Steen clicking after short time BLUES • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams plays a backhand return to Hsieh Su-Wei during their second-round match Wednesday.

But Nadal sufers early exit at hands of fellow Spaniard ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA • Serena Williams has had so

much success for such a long time that even in a secondround match she can set a record at the season’s first Grand Slam event. The six-time and defending champion beat No. 90-ranked Hsieh Su-Wei 6-1, 6-2 on Wednesday at Rod Laver Arena, an all-time record 79th main draw match at the Australian Open. She closed with an ace, her seventh, finishing in precisely an hour. “It all started here — this is where I played my first Grand Slam right on this court and I’m still going, it’s such an honor,” said Williams, who has a 70-9 win-loss record at Melbourne Park since her debut in 1998. “I love it every time I come here.” She hit 26 winners, including one around the post that she thought may have been a first for her, at age 34. “My first one, I think,” she said. “I was like, ‘Yay. Never too late.’” She faces a potential quarterfinal match against Maria Sharapova, which would be a rematch of the 2015 final. Sharapova reached the third round with a 6-2, 6-1 win over Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the first match completed on day three, when light rain caused an hour-long delay getting started on the outside courts. The fifth-seeded Sharapova won the 2008 Australian title and has lost three finals at Melbourne Park. She dropped two service games in the first set, including once when serving at 5-1, but was otherwise consistent except for some over-hit ground strokes.

“To come back here and play my first match on Rod Laver is always very special as you always get those first little jitters out of the way,” she said. Roger Federer also moved into the third round, with a 6-3, 7-5, 6-1 win over Alexandr Dolgopolov. Federer improved his career record against the Ukrainian player to 3-0 without facing a break point in the 93-minute match. Seventh-seeded Kei Nishikori, the 2014 U.S. Open finalist, advanced to the third round in the men’s draw with a 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3 win over Austin Krajicek. Kateryna Bondarenko earned one of her biggest wins since returning from retirement after having a baby in 2013, beating two-time major winner and No. 23-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-1, 7-5. In Tuesday’s late matches, Fernando Verdasco handed Rafael Nadal his earliest career loss at the Australian Open with a 7-6 (8-6), 4-6, 3-6, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 defeat that knocked out the Spaniard in the first round. Women’s second seed Simona Halep paid the price for a recent Achilles tendon injury, losing to qualifier Zhang Shuai 6-4, 6-3 as the 133rd-ranked Chinese player won her first match at a Grand Slam event after 15 attempts over seven years. Nadal, the 2009 champion, had reached the Melbourne Park final in two of his last three appearances. “The match is five sets, he was playing amazing in the last set,” Nadal said. “He had a lot of success, all the balls hitting full power in the fifth.” The 45th-ranked Verdasco rallied from a break down in the final set of a contest lasting nearly four and three-quarter hours — 35 minutes shorter than an epic 2009 semifinal at the event won by Nadal over his compatriot and longtime rival.

AT A GLANCE A look at the Australian Open on Tuesday: Seeded men’s results • No. 2 Andy Murray def. Alexander Zverev, No. 4 Stan Wawrinka def. Dmitry Tursunov, No. 5 Rafael Nadal lost to Fernando Verdasco, No. 8 David Ferrer def. Peter Gojowczyk, No. 10 John Isner def. Jerzy Janowicz, No. 11 Kevin Anderson lost to Rajeev Ram, No. 13 Milos Raonic def. Lucas Pouille, No. 16 Bernard Tomic def. Denis Istomin, No. 18 Feliciano Lopez def. Daniel Evans, No. 20 Fabio Fognini lost to Gilles Muller, No. 21 Viktor Troicki def. Daniel Munoz-De La Nava, No. 23 Gael Monfils def. Yuichi Sugita, No. 25 Jack Sock def. Taylor Fritz, No. 30. Jeremy Chardy def. Ernests Gulbis, No. 31 Steve Johnson def. Aljaz Bedene, No. 32 Joao Sousa def. Mikhail Kukushkin. Seeded women’s results • No. 2 Simona Halep lost to Zhang Shuai, No. 3 Garbine Muguruza def. Anett Kontaveit, No. 7 Angelique Kerber def. Misaki Doi, No. 8 Venus Williams lost to Johanna Konta, No. 9 Karolina Pliskova def. Kimberly Birrell, No. 11 Timea Bacsinszky def. Katerina Siniakova, No. 14 Victoria Azarenka def. Alison Van Uytvanck, No. 15 Madison Keys def. Zarina Diyas, No. 18 Elina Svitolina def. Victoria Duval, No. 19 Jelena Jankovic def. Polona Hercog, No. 20 Ana Ivanovic def. Tammi Patterson, No. 21 Ekaterina Makarova def. Maddison Inglis, No. 29 IrinaCamelia Begu lost to Johanna Larsson, No. 30 Sabine Lisicki def. Petra Cetkovska, No. 31 Lesia Tsurenko lost to Varvara Lepchenko, Barbora Strycova def. No. 32 Caroline Garcia. Stat of the day • 2 — The number of times in his career Rafael Nadal has lost in the first round of a Grand Slam tournament, the first being Wimbledon in 2013.

The three had just one point in the first two games — a goal by Stastny — as they felt each other out. “We’re getting more and more comfortable,” said Stastny, who wore a cage mask for two games before switching back to a visor Monday. “I think we just work for each other. I think we’ve had chances and today they started falling.” Finally, they’re falling for Stastny, who has 10 points (two goals, eight assists) in his last nine games with at least one point in seven of those nine. For the season, he is up to five goals and 23 points in 31 games. “It’s good to see him get some points,” Brouwer said. “He prides himself on being an ofensive player and being our No. 1 centerman and he needs to do that. It gives him some confidence.” Stastny hasn’t clicked with leading goal-scorer Vladimir Tarasenko as the Blues might have hoped, but there appears to be some chemistry between Stastny and Brouwer, who now has nine goals and 19 points in 49 games. The two set each other up for their goals in Monday’s game. “You know where he’s going to be,” Stastny said. “I think those little plays where he drives middle and kind of brings both guys to him. It’s stuff like that where it forces you not to dump it. I think sometimes you kind of slow down and you let him pick up the speed and I think that creates a lot of chances.” Not to be left out is Steen, who scored his 14th goal of the season Monday and registered his team-leading 27th assist. With 41 points, he’s just five behind Tarasenko. It’s impressive, especially considering that Steen has played the past two games after undergoing three root canals, the result of being inadvertently hit in the mouth by the stick of teammate Kevin Shattenkirk. “And he’s not even wearing a cage,” Brouwer said. “I thought

he would have a little more protection, but no ... he’s a tough guy. He’s not going to sit out games if he doesn’t have to. Guys admire him for that and that’s part of the reason why he wears a letter (A) for us.” Realistically, the line could have two players — Stastny and Steen — both wearing cages. There are none of those, but there are three cagey veterans. “I think when you have experienced players that think on the same wavelength, they’re going to have success because they’re the sum of parts,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. “There isn’t exceptional speed, but there’s a tremendous amount of hockey sense. I think this is two games in a row for Paul where he’s played at a high level and I think that helps when the center’s playing at this level. “I think there’s some real continuity. They’re very smart in their positional play, so they play a really strong pressureposition game. They create turnovers. That’s where they get their odd-man rushes from and then down low, they’re strong. They’re strong on the puck, they protect it, they buy space and time, hard to play against. They get scoring chances in two diferent veins. It helps a lot to have a line like that that sets that kind of competitive tone.” The production has come at a key time for the Blues, who will follow-up their pit-stop in the Motor City with trips to Colorado and Chicago. “We knew with four games left and going into a tough road trip, a tough opponent (Monday), we needed to get some wins to make sure that we keep pace with the teams ahead of us,” Brouwer said. “I like the potential of our line and I think when we get some more guys back, I think our lineup will round out even more and we’re going to have three and four good, solid lines and ‘Hitch’ can count on any one of them.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Associated Press

Two strikes on Cards’ Reyes FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

Now that certain states have allowed marijuana, this topic can quickly turn into a political debate. And tokers and teetotalers alike can agree the disconnect between punishments for major and minor leaguers break the law of common sense. Major leaguers, protected by the collective bargaining agreement, pay fines. Minor leaguers miss games. But Reyes doesn’t seem interested in becoming a spokesman for change. When asked if it was unfair for marijuana to be treated differently from other substances, primarily alcohol, he replied: “I can’t touch on that topic.” Good call. The righty can throw 100 mph fastballs and pretty good curves. Let someone else become the Ricky Williams of MLB. Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. called Reyes a “great kid” who “knows he made a mistake” and “paid the price.” General manager John Mozeliak’s most candid comments about Reyes came during question-and-answer with fans, prompted by a man in the audience who mistakenly thought the suspension involved a performance-enhancing substance. “Well, look,” Mozeliak replied. “My takeaway on the Reyes thing is, don’t smoke dope, right? Pretty simple message. This isn’t Colorado.” The crowd laughed. Mo’s humor faded fast. “From a company standpoint, you don’t want to see your young

players making these mistakes,” he continued. “And I can’t tell you how much money, energy and time we spend on trying to avoid these pitfalls. “That’s part of growing up. You have to realize, when we are signing Latin players, a lot of times they are 16 years old. A lot of times, when we draft high school players, they are 18 years old. So, think about that bandwidth of 16 to 21, or to 23, and think about when you were that age, and think about the decisions that you were making at that time. “Guess what? We are not all perfect. We all make mistakes. The key is, will people respond, make changes and hopefully not (let it) happen again? In his case, he can’t let it happen again. Because the next one is 100 games, and that’s far more punitive than 50. So, he better grow up from this.” The good news for Reyes is this can disappear. If his second offense is his last, no one will remember he started this season in prospect camp instead of majorleague spring training. Shelby Miller, for example, was not defined by a 2011 suspension after two alcohol-fueled altercations during his Class AA days. “Time heals all,” said catcher Michael Ohlman, who played with Reyes in Class AA. “He made a mistake. It happens. He’s not going to be the first, or the last.” True. But for Reyes, the innocence has expired. Another setback would prove he prioritizes marijuana use over pitching for

the Cards. That would be a big problem. Talent factors into the amount of leash an up-and-comer receives. Reyes has a ton of it, but every leash must end at some point. The Cards might not be looking to add depth at catcher if they had not tired of Cody Stanley’s propensity for PEDs. Marijuana and steroids are not the same, yet both pose serious risks for minor leaguers who would like to be promoted. If Reyes wants to resume his marijuana use in the majors, and attempt to dodge the legal ramifications he could face in Missouri, MLB will only be able to slap his wrist when he fails tests. He will have plenty of money to pay the fines. He should at least be able to hold off until then, until the world he previewed this weekend is the one he lives in full-time. Later Sunday night, after Reyes finished his acceptance speech and returned to the row of minor-leaguers seated near the back of the stage, former Cardinal David Eckstein, 2006 World Series MVP, gestured toward the baby faces. “These guys, especially these young guys over here, that are making your ways up, it’s diferent here,” Eckstein said. “I promise you. It’s not like this everywhere else. You better enjoy the time you have right now, and try to do the best you can.” If Reyes didn’t realize this before, he has no excuse for not knowing now. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blues’ Alexander Steen scores past Pittsburgh defenseman Ian Cole after Penguins goalie Jef Zatkof got caught out of the net during the first period Monday night.

BLUES AT RED WINGS When • 7 p.m. Wednesday Where • Joe Louis Arena, Detroit TV, radio • NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) Blues • The Blues sent defenseman Chris Butler to the AHL on Tuesday, an indication that one of their injured defensemen, Carl Gunnarsson or Robert Bortuzzo, is close to returning. (Both are on the three-game trip that leads into the All-Star break.) Andre Benoit, who was called up Sunday from Chicago and played Monday, is still with the team. … The Blues lost to Detroit 4-3 in overtime Nov. 22 at Scottrade Center. … Brian Elliott faced 38 shots Monday against Pittsburgh, the third time this season he has faced that many. He’s 3-0 with a 2.31 goals-against average in those games. … D Joel Edmundson has four assists over his past six games. He had two assists in his first 28 games. Red Wings • Detroit has won five of its past seven but has dropped two of its past three. The Red Wings have been of since losing to Philadelphia in a shootout

Sunday. They have the third-best record in the Eastern Conference going into Tuesday’s play, but despite a record of 23-14-8 have been outscored by three goals. They’re the only team among the top 13 in points in the league with a negative goal diference. ... C Dylan Larkin is tied for second among rookies with 14 goals and is third in assists with 16. Four of his goals have been game-winners. ... Henrik Zetterberg leads the team with 23 assists. ... G Petr Mrazek has a .931 save percentage, fifthbest in the league, and a 2.10 goals-against average. Injuries • Blues — D Carl Gunnarsson (upper body, questionable; G Jake Allen (lower body), D Robert Bortuzzo (lower body), F Magnus Paajarvi (upper body), F Steve Ott (hamstring) and F Jaden Schwartz (ankle), out. Red Wings — D Niklas Kronwall (knee), F Drew Miller (knee), F Johan Franzen (concussion), out. Tom Timmermann


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Florida Detroit Tampa Bay Boston Ottawa Montreal Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders New Jersey Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina Columbus

GP 46 45 46 45 46 47 46 44 GP 46 46 45 47 45 44 47 47

W 26 23 25 24 22 23 19 17 W 35 25 24 23 21 20 20 17

L 15 14 17 16 18 20 23 20 L 8 16 15 19 17 16 19 26

OT 5 8 4 5 6 4 4 7 OT 3 5 6 5 7 8 8 4

Pts 57 54 54 53 50 50 42 41 Pts 73 55 54 51 49 48 48 38

GF 121 111 125 137 129 129 107 111 GF 155 132 123 105 110 100 111 119

GA 105 116 111 117 141 122 123 124 GA 100 122 112 112 113 117 129 152

Home 13-7-2 11-8-5 13-8-2 10-11-2 11-6-4 12-9-2 9-14-2 7-8-5 Home 18-3-1 17-5-2 15-7-3 10-10-3 11-7-4 11-6-5 10-8-5 8-10-4

Away 13-8-3 12-6-3 12-9-2 14-5-3 11-12-2 11-11-2 10-9-2 10-12-2 Away 17-5-2 8-11-3 9-8-3 13-9-2 10-10-3 9-10-3 10-11-3 9-16-0

Div 8-5-0 9-4-2 8-5-2 12-6-1 7-7-2 10-4-1 5-9-1 0-5-5 Div 11-3-1 6-4-4 9-3-2 6-6-1 4-4-2 7-4-3 7-7-3 7-8-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Dallas Blues Minnesota Colorado Nashville Winnipeg Paciic Los Angeles San Jose Arizona Vancouver Anaheim Calgary Edmonton

GP 49 46 49 45 47 46 46 GP 44 44 45 47 44 44 48

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016

W 32 29 27 22 23 20 21 W 28 23 22 19 19 20 19

L 13 12 15 15 21 18 22 L 13 18 18 17 18 21 24

OT 4 5 7 8 3 8 3 OT 3 3 5 11 7 3 5

Pts 68 63 61 52 49 48 45 Pts 59 49 49 49 45 43 43

GF 144 154 126 113 131 117 119 GF 118 127 123 113 88 118 119

GA 111 124 123 106 130 127 131 GA 99 121 135 130 105 135 142

Home 20-5-1 17-5-0 16-8-3 14-8-2 10-10-3 13-7-3 12-8-1 Home 14-7-1 8-12-1 12-8-3 9-8-4 13-8-4 14-9-0 13-9-1

Away 12-8-3 12-7-5 11-7-4 8-7-6 13-11-0 7-11-5 9-14-2 Away 14-6-2 15-6-2 10-10-2 10-9-7 6-10-3 6-12-3 6-15-4

Div 8-6-1 8-3-1 10-5-1 9-7-4 10-3-1 5-10-2 6-11-1 Div 9-5-0 6-4-1 10-1-2 6-3-3 6-4-4 4-8-2 6-7-3

Tuesday New Jersey 4, Calgary 2 NY Rangers 3, Vancouver 2, OT Toronto 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 6, Columbus 3 Boston 4, Montreal 1 Tampa Bay 6, Edmonton 4 Chicago 4, Nashville 1 Dallas at Los Angeles, (late) Monday Ottawa 4, San Jose 3, SO Edmonton 4, Florida 2 Blues 5, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 2, Winnipeg 1 Buffalo 2, Arizona 1 Wednesday Blues at Detroit, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Vancouver at Boston, 6 p.m. Ottawa at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Arizona, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 26 15 Boston 22 20 New York 21 22 Brooklyn 11 31 Philadelphia 5 38 Southeast W L Atlanta 25 17 Miami 23 19 Orlando 20 20 Washington 19 21 Charlotte 19 22 Central W L Cleveland 28 11 Chicago 24 16 Indiana 22 19 Detroit 22 19 Milwaukee 19 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 36 6 Memphis 24 19 Dallas 24 19 Houston 22 21 New Orleans 14 27 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 30 12 Utah 18 23 Portland 19 25 Denver 16 25 Minnesota 13 30 Paciic W L Golden State 38 4 LA Clippers 27 14 Sacramento 17 23 Phoenix 13 29 LA Lakers 9 34

Pct .634 .524 .488 .262 .116 Pct .595 .548 .500 .475 .463 Pct .718 .600 .537 .537 .432

Pct .857 .558 .558 .512 .341 Pct .714 .439 .432 .390 .302 Pct .905 .659 .425 .310 .209

GB — 4½ 6 15½ 22 GB — 2 4 5 5½ GB — 4½ 7 7 11½

GB — 12½ 12½ 14½ 21½ GB — 11½ 12 13½ 17½ GB — 10½ 20 25 29½

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 4-6 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 Str W-2 L-2 L-3 L-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 W-3

Home 12-6 11-10 12-8 7-15 3-16 Home 15-7 15-9 12-9 9-13 15-8 Home 15-2 16-7 13-6 14-7 12-7

Away 14-9 11-10 9-14 4-16 2-22 Away 10-10 8-10 8-11 10-8 4-14 Away 13-9 8-9 9-13 8-12 7-18

Conf 18-8 16-13 15-15 8-19 0-25 Conf 16-11 11-13 10-15 14-12 11-12 Conf 19-6 15-11 15-9 13-10 13-15

L10 10-0 7-3 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 1-9 L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str W-11 W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 L-4 L-3

Home 24-0 16-7 12-7 13-10 9-9 Home 20-5 12-9 10-9 8-12 6-17 Home 19-0 15-7 10-11 9-11 5-13

Away 12-6 8-12 12-12 9-11 5-18 Away 10-7 6-14 9-16 8-13 7-13 Away 19-4 12-7 7-12 4-18 4-21

Conf 19-3 13-12 15-10 16-12 11-17 Conf 21-4 10-17 15-15 11-20 7-17 Conf 24-2 16-11 9-17 9-18 3-24

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Kane, Blackhawks win 12th in a row FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Patrick Kane had a goal and an assist, and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the host Nashville Predators 4-1 Tuesday night for their franchise-record 12th straight win. Chicago tied the Florida Panthers’ recent streak for the longest this season in the NHL. The Blackhawks have four games left before the All-Star break to chase the NHL record of 17 straight wins by the 1992-93 Pittsburgh Penguins. Rookie forward Richard Panik had a goal and an assist, Artem Anisimov also scored and Artemi Panarin added two assists for Chicago. Andrew Desjardins scored into an empty net. Corey Crawford won his ninth straight as the Blackhawks took the season series 3-1 with a game remaining against their Central Division rivals.

NOTEBOOK Tkachuk ranked high in draft • Matthew Tkachuk, the son of former Blue Keith Tkachuk, is the top-ranked North American skater in the NHL’s Central Scouting Bureau’s midterm ranking of players eligible for the 2016 NHL draft. T ka c h u k , a 6 - fo o t -1 , 195-pound left winger, is playing junior hockey with the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League and has 15 goals and 48 assists in 33 games and is a plus-25. He was on the U.S. team at the world junior championships and tied for the team lead with 11 points as the Americans won the bronze medal. Tkachuk was a unanimous choice for the top ranking, according to Dan Marr, head of the scouting bureau. “Matthew is

Wednesday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Utah at New York, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m.

Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Detroit at New Orleans, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Sacramento, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blackhawks’ Artem Anisimov celebrates after scoring in the irst period Tuesday night. Chicago beat Nashville 4-1.

unique in that he brings a skilled and physical package combination to game situations in which he consistently contributes and impacts,” Marr told NHL.com. The St. Louis area has four other players in the top 40: forward Clayton Keller (eighth) of Swansea, center Logan Brown (14th) of Chesterfield and son of former Blue Jeff Brown, center Luke Kunin (16th) of Chesterfield and center Trent Frederic (39th) of St. Louis. (Tom Timmermann) Scott will play in All-Star game • From Arizona to Newfoundland to Nashville, Tenn,, John Scott will be an NHL All-Star after all. Scott was voted as the Pacific Division captain for the NHL’s new All-Star 3-on-3 tournament, but his status was thrown into limbo when the Arizona Coyotes traded him to the Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens demoted him to their American Hockey League team in St. John’s, Newfoundland, with no plans to bring him back.

Being in the minors would have made Scott ineligible to be an NHL All-Star, but the league announced Tuesday that it decided to let him participate after reviewing the “unique circumstance” and considering Scott’s desire to play. “I am looking forward to enjoying a fun and unique experience at All-Star weekend in Nashville with my family,” said Scott, whose wife is expecting twins. “While being voted to the All-Star Game by the fans was not something I expected to happen, I am excited to participate in the All-Star events with my fellow players.” Scott had just one assist in 11 games this season, and the slow-footed 33-year-old’s candidacy was part of an online movement centered on the new 3-on-3 format and watching him try to keep up with the best players in the league. While it was originally a joke at Scott’s expense, he embraced the spotlight when fans cast him into it.

Maple Leafs 3, Flyers 2

Rangers 3, Canucks 2

Lightning 6, Oilers 4

Blackhawks 4, Predators 1

Toronto 1 1 1 — 3 Philadelphia 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Read 7 (Medvedev, Couturier), 11:06 (pp). 2, Toronto, Polak 1 (Boyes, Holland), 13:19. Penalties: Phaneuf, Tor, major (fighting), 8:24; Schenn, Phi, major (fighting), 8:24; Lupul, Tor (hooking), 9:12; Bellemare, Phi (tripping), 17:13. Second period: 3, Toronto, Lupul 10 (Phaneuf, Kadri), 15:10. Penalties: Polak, Tor (roughing), 11:16; White, Phi (roughing), 11:16; Bellemare, Phi (goaltender interference), 11:16; Holland, Tor (hooking), 16:18. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 8, 12:59. 5, Toronto, Hunwick 1 (Parenteau, Bozak), 19:52. Penalties: Bellemare, Phi (holding), 2:26; Kadri, Tor (interference), 13:08. Shots: Toronto 12-14-9: 35. Philadelphia 13-8-12: 33. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Philadelphia 1 of 3. Goalies: Toronto, Reimer 8-7-4 (33 shots-31 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 10-11-6 (35-32). A: 19,319. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Andy McElman, Tony Sericolo.

Vancouver 1 1 0 0 — 2 NY Rangers 0 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Vancouver, Baertschi 8 (Horvat), 9:02. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, NY Rangers, Stepan 9 (Nash, Kreider), 4:18. 3, Vancouver, Burrows 6 (Etem, Vey), 16:11. Penalties: Biega, Van (cross-checking), 8:43. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 17 (Yandle, Nash), 11:46. Penalties: Nash, NYR (slashing), :59. Overtime: 5, NY Rangers, J.Miller 10 (McDonagh, Stepan), 3:54. Penalties: None. Shots: Vancouver 11-6-2-1: 20. NY Rangers 17-13-16-3: 49. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 1; NY Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies: Vancouver, R.Miller 11-12-7 (49 shots-46 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 21-12-4 (20-18). A: 18,006. Referees: Chris Rooney, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Jonny Murray.

Edmonton 2 0 2 — 4 Tampa Bay 2 2 2 — 6 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Nesterov 3 (Killorn, Sustr), 3:57. 2, Edmonton, Kassian 1 (Pakarinen), 5:25. 3, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 19 (Johnson, Killorn), 16:57. 4, Edmonton, Letestu 7 (Nurse), 19:26 (sh). Penalties: Condra, TB (cross-checking), 11:14; Schultz, Edm (holding), 18:15. Second period: 5, Tampa Bay, Palat 4 (Namestnikov, Stamkos), 6:09. 6, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 10 (Palat, Stamkos), 17:12. Penalties: Kassian, Edm (roughing), 7:31; Johnson, TB (hooking), 7:31; Killorn, TB (roughing), 7:31; Stamkos, TB (tripping), 10:20; Davidson, Edm (hooking), 19:14. Third period: 7, Edmonton, Draisaitl 11 (Hall, Kassian), 2:10. 8, Edmonton, Pakarinen 4, 4:29. 9, Tampa Bay, Boyle 9 (Coburn, Brown), 7:42 (sh). 10, Tampa Bay, Killorn 8 (Kucherov), 19:33 (en). Penalties: Condra, TB (high-sticking), 6:02. Shots: Edmonton 11-5-10: 26. Tampa Bay 10-11-10: 31. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 4; Tampa Bay 0 of 2. Goalies: Edmonton, Nilsson 10-11-2 (30 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 7-4-0 (26-22). A: 19,092. Referees: Jean Hebert, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: David Brisebois, John Grandt.

Chicago 1 2 1 — 4 Nashville 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Chicago, Anisimov 16 (Panarin, Kane), 19:38. Penalties: Garbutt, Chi (elbowing), 2:51. Second period: 2, Chicago, Panik 2 (Rasmussen), 2:43. 3, Nashville, Ellis 6 (Salomaki, Ekholm), 3:08. 4, Chicago, Kane 30 (Panarin, Keith), 4:08. Penalties: Neal, Nas (tripping), 17:27. Third period: 5, Chicago, Desjardins 6 (Hjalmarsson, Teravainen), 19:23 (en). Penalties: Kane, Chi (hooking), :58; van Riemsdyk, Chi (hooking), 12:13; Josi, Nas (tripping), 16:44. Shots: Chicago 10-12-5: 27. Nashville 12-11-16: 39. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 2; Nashville 0 of 3. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 27-10-2 (39 shots-38 saves). Nashville, Rinne 16-15-7 (26-23). A: 17,122. Referees: Francis Charron, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen: Jay Sharrers, Pierre Racicot.

Washington 2 3 1 — 6 Columbus 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Columbus, Rychel 1 (Karlsson, R.Bourque), 9:30. 2, Washington, Backstrom 14 (Oshie, Ovechkin), 12:15. 3, Washington, Chimera 13 (Johansson), 15:52. Penalties: Backstrom, Was (interference), 3:02. Second period: 4, Washington, Ovechkin 28 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 3:16 (pp). 5, Washington, Backstrom 15 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 4:47 (pp). 6, Columbus, Jenner 16 (Wennberg, Jones), 9:35 (pp). 7, Washington, Burakovsky 5 (Kuznetsov, Williams), 10:25. Penalties: Falk, Clm, double minor (high-sticking), 3:03; Stanton, Was (holding), 9:15; Johansson, Was (holding), 11:27; Latta, Was, minor-major (roughing, fighting), 11:27; Falk, Clm, minor-major (holding, fighting), 11:27. Third period: 8, Columbus, Murray 4 (Rychel, Jones), 5:07. 9, Washington, Johansson 13 (Kuznetsov), 19:27 (en). Penalties: None. Missed Penalty Shot: Ovechkin, Was, 10:40 third. Shots: Washington 5-14-9: 28. Columbus 12-11-12: 35. Power-plays: Washington 2 of 2; Columbus 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 30-5-2 (35 shots-32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 11-13-1 (27-22). A: 12,291.

Monday New York 119, Philadelphia 113,2OT Portland 108, Washington 98 Charlotte 124, Utah 119,2OT Memphis 101, New Orleans 99 Chicago 111, Detroit 101 Atlanta 98, Orlando 81

Toronto 112, Brooklyn 100 Golden State 132, Cleveland 98 Dallas 118, Boston 113, OT LA Clippers 140, Houston 132, OT

Bucks maintain their mastery of injury-depleted Miami Heat

NHL SUMMARIES

Capitals 6, Blue Jackets 3

Tuesday Milwaukee 91, Miami 79 New Orleans 114, Minnesota 99 Oklahoma City at Denver, (late) Indiana at Phoenix, (late)

Devils 4, Flames 2 Calgary 1 1 0 — 2 New Jersey 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, New Jersey, Larsson 2 (Boucher, Kalinin), 5:12. 2, Calgary, Monahan 14 (Gaudreau, D.Hamilton), 9:16 (pp). Penalties: Ruutu, NJ (interference), 8:48. Second period: 3, New Jersey, Stempniak 11 (Cammalleri, Henrique), :57. 4, New Jersey, Boucher 2 (Kennedy, Severson), 1:14. 5, Calgary, Russell 3 (Gaudreau, Giordano), 15:55 (pp). Penalties: Wideman, Cal (hooking), 2:32; Ferland, Cal (hooking), 11:26; Schlemko, NJ (hooking), 13:49; Henrique, NJ (slashing), 15:27; Kalinin, NJ (holding), 18:14. Third period: 6, New Jersey, Greene 4 (Stempniak, Larsson), 18:59 (en). Penalties: None. Shots: Calgary 9-8-11: 28. New Jersey 10-12-4: 26. Power-plays: Calgary 2 of 4; New Jersey 0 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Hiller 5-5-1 (25 shots-22 saves). New Jersey, C.Schneider 20-14-5 (28-26). A: 14,319. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Mark Shewchyk.

Bruins 4, Canadiens 1 Boston 1 1 2 — 4 Montreal 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Boston, Talbot 2, 13:08. Penalties: Desharnais, Mon (delay of game), 16:33; K.Miller, Bos (slashing), 19:35. Second period: 2, Montreal, Barberio 1 (P.Subban, Desharnais), 8:48. 3, Boston, Bergeron 18 (Pastrnak, Seidenberg), 16:49. Penalties: Markov, Mon (elbowing), 5:18; Bergeron, Bos (hooking), 11:29. Third period: 4, Boston, Pastrnak 4 (Rinaldo), 12:14. 5, Boston, Marchand 17 (Eriksson), 18:37 (en). Penalties: Marchand, Bos (closing hand on puck), 2:56; P.Subban, Mon (holding stick), 5:13; Seidenberg, Bos (interference), 16:11; Vatrano, Bos (tripping), 19:53. Shots: Boston 10-7-7: 24. Montreal 9-16-14: 39. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 3; Montreal 0 of 5. Goalies: Boston, Rask 16-13-4 (39 shots-38 saves). Montreal, Condon 12-12-4 (23-20). A: 21,288. Referees: Marc Joannette, Greg Kimmerly. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

LATE MONDAY

Sabres 2, Coyotes 1 Buffalo 0 2 0 — 2 Arizona 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: McCabe, Buf, double minor (highsticking), 4:27; Buffalo bench, served by Varone (too many men), 13:59. Second period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 14 (Ristolainen, R.O’Reilly), 10:07 (pp). 2, Buffalo, McGinn 10 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 17:35 (pp). Penalties: Hanzal, Ari (tripping), 8:07; Murphy, Ari (kneeing), 9:55; Schaller, Buf (tripping), 13:10; Chipchura, Ari (hooking), 16:11. Third period: 3, Arizona, Vermette 7 (Doan, Rieder), 8:04. Penalties: McGinn, Buf (interference), 5:53; Bogosian, Buf, minor-major-game misconduct (roughing, fighting), 20:00; Ristolainen, Buf, misconduct, 20:00; Doan, Ari, minor-misconduct (unsportsmanlike conduct), 20:00; Vermette, Ari, misconduct, 20:00; Ekman-Larsson, Ari, misconduct, 20:00; Duclair, Ari (roughing), 20:00. Missed Penalty Shot: Kane, Buf, 1:18 second. Shots: Buffalo 9-15-4: 28. Arizona 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: Buffalo 2 of 3; Arizona 0 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 12-12-2 (27 shots-26 saves). Arizona, Domingue 7-3-3 (28-26). A: 11,134. Referees: Dave Lewis, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Matt MacPherson.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miami Heat guard Tyler Johnson fouls Milwaukee Bucks guard Michael Carter-Williams during the irst half Tuesday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perhaps Dwyane Wade taught Khris Middleton too well last summer. Middleton scored 22 points, Greg Monroe added 15 points and 10 rebounds and the Milwaukee Bucks clamped down defensively on Wade and short-handed Miami throughout, beating the Heat 91-79 on Tuesday night in Miami. Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 14 points for Milwaukee, which has now beaten Miami five consecutive times. Hassan Whiteside scored 23 points and grabbed 18 rebounds for Miami, which has dropped two straight and trailed by at least 22 in each of those games. Chris Bosh scored 23 and Luol Deng added 11 for the Heat. The Heat were without four injured players, including point guards Goran Dragic and Beno Udrih. The offense struggled mightily without them, as Miami shot a season-low 36.5 percent. And Wade, playing through shoulder pain, finished with only two points in 21 minutes. It was

only the third time in Wade’s 973-game career, including playoffs, that he logged at least 20 minutes and didn’t score more than two points. Wade and Middleton crossed paths over the summer and worked out together.

NOTEBOOK Surgery for Noah • Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah has undergone surgery to repair his dislocated left shoulder. The 2014 NBA defensive player of the year, Noah is expected to miss four to six months. Barring a quick recovery or deep playof run, he might have played his last game for the Bulls given his expiring contract. Leuer can’t play • Jon Leuer was held out of the Phoenix Suns’ game Tuesday night with back spasms. Leuer was injured during warmups before Phoenix hosted the Indiana Pacers, and the team announced his absence at tipof. He played 21 minutes in a reserve role Sunday night at Minnesota in the Suns’ most recent game.

NBA SUMMARIES Bucks 91, Heat 79 Milwaukee: Antetokounmpo 5-10 4-4 14, Parker 4-7 1-2 9, Monroe 6-13 3-3 15, Carter-Williams 3-5 1-2 7, Middleton 8-20 4-4 22, Bayless 4-7 0-0 11, Henson 4-5 1-1 9, Vaughn 0-2 0-0 0, O’Bryant 2-2 0-0 4, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Ennis 0-2 0-0 0, Copeland 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-74 14-16 91. Miami: Deng 4-10 2-2 11, Bosh 7-15 7-7 23, Whiteside 8-9 7-11 23, Johnson 0-6 3-4 3, Wade 1-6 0-0 2, Richardson 1-8 1-2 3, Green 2-10 0-0 6, Winslow 1-5 0-0 2, Stoudemire 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 27-74 20-26 79. Milwaukee 19 30 26 16 — 91 Miami 18 21 18 22 — 79 3-point goals: Milwaukee 5-12 (Bayless 3-6, Middleton 2-4, Vaughn 0-1, Copeland 0-1), Miami 5-22 (Bosh 2-2, Green 2-5, Deng 1-2, Wade 0-1, Winslow 0-3, Johnson 0-4, Richardson 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 45 (Monroe 10), Miami 48 (Whiteside 18). Assists: Milwaukee 19 (Middleton 7), Miami 13 (Wade 4). Total fouls: Milwaukee 19, Miami 14. Technicals: Milwaukee defensive three second, Wade, Miami defensive three second. A: 19,886 (19,600).

Pelicans 114, T’Wolves 99 Minnesota: Prince 1-1 0-0 3, Garnett 1-2 1-2 3, Towns 7-17 5-5 20, Rubio 5-7 4-4 15, Wiggins 7-17 7-10 21, Payne 2-2 2-4 6, Muhammad 5-10 3-4 13, LaVine 2-5 0-0 4, Martin 1-5 0-0 2, Dieng 3-4 2-2 8, Bjelica 2-6 0-0 4, Miller 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-76 24-31 99. New Orleans: Cunningham 4-6 0-0 11, Davis 13-22 8-10 35, Asik 1-4 0-0 2, Evans 6-11 1-1 13, Gordon 4-9 0-0 11, Gee 2-2 3-3 7, Anderson 1-6 4-4 7, Holiday 7-14 3-4 19, Cole 3-6 1-1 7, Ajinca 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 42-83 20-23 114. Minnesota 38 22 15 24 — 99 New Orleans 25 26 31 32 — 114 3-point goals: Minnesota 3-14 (Prince 1-1, Towns 1-1, Rubio 1-2, Muhammad 0-2, Martin 0-2, Bjelica 0-2, Wiggins 0-4), New Orleans 10-23 (Cunningham 3-4, Gordon 3-7, Holiday 2-3, Davis 1-2, Anderson 1-4, Cole 0-1, Evans 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 46 (Towns 13), New Orleans 45 (Asik 8). Assists: Minnesota 18 (LaVine, Rubio 4), New Orleans 21 (Holiday 9). Total fouls: Minnesota 21, New Orleans 24. Technicals: Minnesota defensive three second. A: 14,255 (16,867).

LATE MONDAY

Clippers 140, Rockets 132 Houston: Ariza 6-11 4-4 18, Capela 3-7 1-4 7, Howard 11-16 14-18 36, Beverley 0-2 0-0 0, Harden 5-12 8-13 20, Jones 4-10 2-7 10, Lawson 0-2 1-2 1, Brewer 4-8 0-0 8, Thornton 9-15 0-0 23, Harrell 0-0 2-2 2, McDaniels 0-0 0-0 0, Terry 2-5 1-2 7. Totals 44-88 33-52 132. L.A. Clippers: Mbah a Moute 2-2 1-2 5, Pierce 4-9 1-3 12, Jordan 6-7 4-8 16, Paul 8-15 7-9 28, Redick 11-19 9-9 40, Aldrich 3-5 2-2 8, Crawford 8-15 0-0 17, Johnson 4-12 0-0 11, Rivers 1-5 0-0 3, Prigioni 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 47-91 24-33 140. Houston 21 31 28 42 10 — 132 L.A. Clippers 33 26 35 28 18 — 140 3-point goals: Houston 11-32 (Thornton 5-9, Terry 2-5, Ariza 2-5, Harden 2-7, Beverley 0-1, Jones 0-2, Brewer 0-3), L.A. Clippers 22-37 (Redick 9-12, Paul 5-7, Pierce 3-5, Johnson 3-7, Rivers 1-2, Crawford 1-3, Prigioni 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 65 (Howard 26), L.A. Clippers 51 (Jordan 15). Assists: Houston 31 (Harden 8), L.A. Clippers 28 (Paul 12). Total fouls: Houston 28, L.A. Clippers 30. Technicals: Harden, Paul, Redick, L.A. Clippers defensive three second 2. A: 19,060 (19,060).

Mavericks 118, Celtics 113 Boston: Crowder 3-13 6-7 12, Johnson 1-1 0-0 3, Sullinger 3-12 6-7 12, Thomas 8-19 4-4 20, Bradley 6-16 3-4 19, Turner 2-4 0-0 4, Smart 8-13 2-4 20, Olynyk 6-11 0-0 17, Jerebko 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 40-94 21-26 113. Dallas: Parsons 6-11 0-0 16, Nowitzki 8-21 12-13 31, Pachulia 1-4 3-4 5, Williams 7-17 4-4 20, Matthews 5-12 2-2 15, Harris 3-5 0-0 9, Felton 6-13 1-1 14, Powell 2-4 0-0 4, Barea 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 40-93 22-24 118. Boston 16 23 33 26 15 — 113 Dallas 29 23 18 28 20 — 118 3-point goals: Boston 12-30 (Olynyk 5-6, Bradley 4-8, Smart 2-4, Johnson 1-1, Sullinger 0-1, Turner 0-1, Jerebko 0-2, Crowder 0-3, Thomas 0-4), Dallas 16-34 (Parsons 4-6, Harris 3-4, Nowitzki 3-5, Matthews 3-8, Williams 2-5, Felton 1-3, Pachulia 0-1, Barea 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 55 (Sullinger 11), Dallas 59 (Pachulia 19). Assists: Boston 24 (Turner 8), Dallas 23 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Boston 30, Dallas 21. A: 19,866 (19,200).


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL STANDINGS

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Florida Detroit Tampa Bay Boston Ottawa Montreal Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Rangers NY Islanders New Jersey Pittsburgh Philadelphia Carolina Columbus

GP 46 45 46 45 46 47 46 44 GP 46 46 45 47 45 44 47 47

W 26 23 25 24 22 23 19 17 W 35 25 24 23 21 20 20 17

L 15 14 17 16 18 20 23 20 L 8 16 15 19 17 16 19 26

OT 5 8 4 5 6 4 4 7 OT 3 5 6 5 7 8 8 4

Pts 57 54 54 53 50 50 42 41 Pts 73 55 54 51 49 48 48 38

GF 121 111 125 137 129 129 107 111 GF 155 132 123 105 110 100 111 119

GA 105 116 111 117 141 122 123 124 GA 100 122 112 112 113 117 129 152

Home 13-7-2 11-8-5 13-8-2 10-11-2 11-6-4 12-9-2 9-14-2 7-8-5 Home 18-3-1 17-5-2 15-7-3 10-10-3 11-7-4 11-6-5 10-8-5 8-10-4

Away 13-8-3 12-6-3 12-9-2 14-5-3 11-12-2 11-11-2 10-9-2 10-12-2 Away 17-5-2 8-11-3 9-8-3 13-9-2 10-10-3 9-10-3 10-11-3 9-16-0

Div 8-5-0 9-4-2 8-5-2 12-6-1 7-7-2 10-4-1 5-9-1 0-5-5 Div 11-3-1 6-4-4 9-3-2 6-6-1 4-4-2 7-4-3 7-7-3 7-8-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Dallas Blues Minnesota Colorado Nashville Winnipeg Paciic Los Angeles San Jose Arizona Vancouver Anaheim Calgary Edmonton

GP 49 46 49 45 47 46 46 GP 44 44 45 47 44 44 48

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016

W 32 29 27 22 23 20 21 W 28 23 22 19 19 20 19

L 13 12 15 15 21 18 22 L 13 18 18 17 18 21 24

OT 4 5 7 8 3 8 3 OT 3 3 5 11 7 3 5

Pts 68 63 61 52 49 48 45 Pts 59 49 49 49 45 43 43

GF 144 154 126 113 131 117 119 GF 118 127 123 113 88 118 119

GA 111 124 123 106 130 127 131 GA 99 121 135 130 105 135 142

Home 20-5-1 17-5-0 16-8-3 14-8-2 10-10-3 13-7-3 12-8-1 Home 14-7-1 8-12-1 12-8-3 9-8-4 13-8-4 14-9-0 13-9-1

Away 12-8-3 12-7-5 11-7-4 8-7-6 13-11-0 7-11-5 9-14-2 Away 14-6-2 15-6-2 10-10-2 10-9-7 6-10-3 6-12-3 6-15-4

Div 8-6-1 8-3-1 10-5-1 9-7-4 10-3-1 5-10-2 6-11-1 Div 9-5-0 6-4-1 10-1-2 6-3-3 6-4-4 4-8-2 6-7-3

Tuesday New Jersey 4, Calgary 2 NY Rangers 3, Vancouver 2, OT Toronto 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 6, Columbus 3 Boston 4, Montreal 1 Tampa Bay 6, Edmonton 4 Chicago 4, Nashville 1 Dallas at Los Angeles, (late) Monday Ottawa 4, San Jose 3, SO Edmonton 4, Florida 2 Blues 5, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 2, Winnipeg 1 Buffalo 2, Arizona 1 Wednesday Blues at Detroit, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Vancouver at Boston, 6 p.m. Ottawa at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Arizona, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 26 15 Boston 22 20 New York 21 22 Brooklyn 11 31 Philadelphia 5 38 Southeast W L Atlanta 25 17 Miami 23 19 Orlando 20 20 Washington 19 21 Charlotte 19 22 Central W L Cleveland 28 11 Chicago 24 16 Indiana 23 19 Detroit 22 19 Milwaukee 19 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 36 6 Memphis 24 19 Dallas 24 19 Houston 22 21 New Orleans 14 27 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 31 12 Utah 18 23 Portland 19 25 Denver 16 26 Minnesota 13 30 Paciic W L Golden State 38 4 LA Clippers 27 14 Sacramento 17 23 Phoenix 13 30 LA Lakers 9 34

Pct .634 .524 .488 .262 .116 Pct .595 .548 .500 .475 .463 Pct .718 .600 .548 .537 .432

Pct .857 .558 .558 .512 .341 Pct .721 .439 .432 .381 .302 Pct .905 .659 .425 .302 .209

GB — 4½ 6 15½ 22 GB — 2 4 5 5½ GB — 4½ 6½ 7 11½

GB — 12½ 12½ 14½ 21½ GB — 12 12½ 14½ 18 GB — 10½ 20 25½ 29½

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 4-6 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 Str W-2 L-2 L-3 L-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 W-3

Home 12-6 11-10 12-8 7-15 3-16 Home 15-7 15-9 12-9 9-13 15-8 Home 15-2 16-7 13-6 14-7 12-7

Away 14-9 11-10 9-14 4-16 2-22 Away 10-10 8-10 8-11 10-8 4-14 Away 13-9 8-9 10-13 8-12 7-18

Conf 18-8 16-13 15-15 8-19 0-25 Conf 16-11 11-13 10-15 14-12 11-12 Conf 19-6 15-11 15-9 13-10 13-15

L10 10-0 7-3 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 1-9 L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str W-11 W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-5 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 L-5 L-3

Home 24-0 16-7 12-7 13-10 9-9 Home 20-5 12-9 10-9 8-13 6-17 Home 19-0 15-7 10-11 9-12 5-13

Away 12-6 8-12 12-12 9-11 5-18 Away 11-7 6-14 9-16 8-13 7-13 Away 19-4 12-7 7-12 4-18 4-21

Conf 19-3 13-12 15-10 16-12 11-17 Conf 22-4 10-17 15-15 11-21 7-17 Conf 24-2 16-11 9-17 9-18 3-24

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Kane, Blackhawks win 12th in a row FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Patrick Kane had a goal and an assist, and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the host Nashville Predators 4-1 Tuesday night for their franchise-record 12th straight win. Chicago tied the Florida Panthers’ recent streak for the longest this season in the NHL. The Blackhawks have four games left before the All-Star break to chase the NHL record of 17 straight wins by the 1992-93 Pittsburgh Penguins. Rookie forward Richard Panik had a goal and an assist, Artem Anisimov also scored and Artemi Panarin added two assists for Chicago. Andrew Desjardins scored into an empty net. Corey Crawford won his ninth straight as the Blackhawks took the season series 3-1 with a game remaining against their Central Division rivals.

NOTEBOOK Tkachuk ranked high in draft • Matthew Tkachuk, the son of former Blue Keith Tkachuk, is the top-ranked North American skater in the NHL’s Central Scouting Bureau’s midterm ranking of players eligible for the 2016 NHL draft. T ka c h u k , a 6 - fo o t -1 , 195-pound left winger, is playing junior hockey with the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League and has 15 goals and 48 assists in 33 games and is a plus-25. He was on the U.S. team at the world junior championships and tied for the team lead with 11 points as the Americans won the bronze medal. Tkachuk was a unanimous choice for the top ranking, according to Dan Marr, head of the scouting bureau. “Matthew is

Wednesday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Utah at New York, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m.

Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Detroit at New Orleans, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Sacramento, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blackhawks’ Artem Anisimov celebrates after scoring in the irst period Tuesday night. Chicago beat Nashville 4-1.

unique in that he brings a skilled and physical package combination to game situations in which he consistently contributes and impacts,” Marr told NHL.com. The St. Louis area has four other players in the top 40: forward Clayton Keller (eighth) of Swansea, center Logan Brown (14th) of Chesterfield and son of former Blue Jeff Brown, center Luke Kunin (16th) of Chesterfield and center Trent Frederic (39th) of St. Louis. (Tom Timmermann) Scott will play in All-Star game • From Arizona to Newfoundland to Nashville, Tenn,, John Scott will be an NHL All-Star after all. Scott was voted as the Pacific Division captain for the NHL’s new All-Star 3-on-3 tournament, but his status was thrown into limbo when the Arizona Coyotes traded him to the Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens demoted him to their American Hockey League team in St. John’s, Newfoundland, with no plans to bring him back.

Being in the minors would have made Scott ineligible to be an NHL All-Star, but the league announced Tuesday that it decided to let him participate after reviewing the “unique circumstance” and considering Scott’s desire to play. “I am looking forward to enjoying a fun and unique experience at All-Star weekend in Nashville with my family,” said Scott, whose wife is expecting twins. “While being voted to the All-Star Game by the fans was not something I expected to happen, I am excited to participate in the All-Star events with my fellow players.” Scott had just one assist in 11 games this season, and the slow-footed 33-year-old’s candidacy was part of an online movement centered on the new 3-on-3 format and watching him try to keep up with the best players in the league. While it was originally a joke at Scott’s expense, he embraced the spotlight when fans cast him into it.

Maple Leafs 3, Flyers 2

Rangers 3, Canucks 2

Lightning 6, Oilers 4

Blackhawks 4, Predators 1

Toronto 1 1 1 — 3 Philadelphia 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Read 7 (Medvedev, Couturier), 11:06 (pp). 2, Toronto, Polak 1 (Boyes, Holland), 13:19. Penalties: Phaneuf, Tor, major (fighting), 8:24; Schenn, Phi, major (fighting), 8:24; Lupul, Tor (hooking), 9:12; Bellemare, Phi (tripping), 17:13. Second period: 3, Toronto, Lupul 10 (Phaneuf, Kadri), 15:10. Penalties: Polak, Tor (roughing), 11:16; White, Phi (roughing), 11:16; Bellemare, Phi (goaltender interference), 11:16; Holland, Tor (hooking), 16:18. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 8, 12:59. 5, Toronto, Hunwick 1 (Parenteau, Bozak), 19:52. Penalties: Bellemare, Phi (holding), 2:26; Kadri, Tor (interference), 13:08. Shots: Toronto 12-14-9: 35. Philadelphia 13-8-12: 33. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Philadelphia 1 of 3. Goalies: Toronto, Reimer 8-7-4 (33 shots-31 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 10-11-6 (35-32). A: 19,319. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Andy McElman, Tony Sericolo.

Vancouver 1 1 0 0 — 2 NY Rangers 0 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Vancouver, Baertschi 8 (Horvat), 9:02. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, NY Rangers, Stepan 9 (Nash, Kreider), 4:18. 3, Vancouver, Burrows 6 (Etem, Vey), 16:11. Penalties: Biega, Van (cross-checking), 8:43. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Zuccarello 17 (Yandle, Nash), 11:46. Penalties: Nash, NYR (slashing), :59. Overtime: 5, NY Rangers, J.Miller 10 (McDonagh, Stepan), 3:54. Penalties: None. Shots: Vancouver 11-6-2-1: 20. NY Rangers 17-13-16-3: 49. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 1; NY Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies: Vancouver, R.Miller 11-12-7 (49 shots-46 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 21-12-4 (20-18). A: 18,006. Referees: Chris Rooney, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Jonny Murray.

Edmonton 2 0 2 — 4 Tampa Bay 2 2 2 — 6 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Nesterov 3 (Killorn, Sustr), 3:57. 2, Edmonton, Kassian 1 (Pakarinen), 5:25. 3, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 19 (Johnson, Killorn), 16:57. 4, Edmonton, Letestu 7 (Nurse), 19:26 (sh). Penalties: Condra, TB (cross-checking), 11:14; Schultz, Edm (holding), 18:15. Second period: 5, Tampa Bay, Palat 4 (Namestnikov, Stamkos), 6:09. 6, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 10 (Palat, Stamkos), 17:12. Penalties: Kassian, Edm (roughing), 7:31; Johnson, TB (hooking), 7:31; Killorn, TB (roughing), 7:31; Stamkos, TB (tripping), 10:20; Davidson, Edm (hooking), 19:14. Third period: 7, Edmonton, Draisaitl 11 (Hall, Kassian), 2:10. 8, Edmonton, Pakarinen 4, 4:29. 9, Tampa Bay, Boyle 9 (Coburn, Brown), 7:42 (sh). 10, Tampa Bay, Killorn 8 (Kucherov), 19:33 (en). Penalties: Condra, TB (high-sticking), 6:02. Shots: Edmonton 11-5-10: 26. Tampa Bay 10-11-10: 31. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 4; Tampa Bay 0 of 2. Goalies: Edmonton, Nilsson 10-11-2 (30 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 7-4-0 (26-22). A: 19,092. Referees: Jean Hebert, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: David Brisebois, John Grandt.

Chicago 1 2 1 — 4 Nashville 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Chicago, Anisimov 16 (Panarin, Kane), 19:38. Penalties: Garbutt, Chi (elbowing), 2:51. Second period: 2, Chicago, Panik 2 (Rasmussen), 2:43. 3, Nashville, Ellis 6 (Salomaki, Ekholm), 3:08. 4, Chicago, Kane 30 (Panarin, Keith), 4:08. Penalties: Neal, Nas (tripping), 17:27. Third period: 5, Chicago, Desjardins 6 (Hjalmarsson, Teravainen), 19:23 (en). Penalties: Kane, Chi (hooking), :58; van Riemsdyk, Chi (hooking), 12:13; Josi, Nas (tripping), 16:44. Shots: Chicago 10-12-5: 27. Nashville 12-11-16: 39. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 2; Nashville 0 of 3. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 27-10-2 (39 shots-38 saves). Nashville, Rinne 16-15-7 (26-23). A: 17,122. Referees: Francis Charron, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen: Jay Sharrers, Pierre Racicot.

Washington 2 3 1 — 6 Columbus 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Columbus, Rychel 1 (Karlsson, R.Bourque), 9:30. 2, Washington, Backstrom 14 (Oshie, Ovechkin), 12:15. 3, Washington, Chimera 13 (Johansson), 15:52. Penalties: Backstrom, Was (interference), 3:02. Second period: 4, Washington, Ovechkin 28 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 3:16 (pp). 5, Washington, Backstrom 15 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 4:47 (pp). 6, Columbus, Jenner 16 (Wennberg, Jones), 9:35 (pp). 7, Washington, Burakovsky 5 (Kuznetsov, Williams), 10:25. Penalties: Falk, Clm, double minor (high-sticking), 3:03; Stanton, Was (holding), 9:15; Johansson, Was (holding), 11:27; Latta, Was, minor-major (roughing, fighting), 11:27; Falk, Clm, minor-major (holding, fighting), 11:27. Third period: 8, Columbus, Murray 4 (Rychel, Jones), 5:07. 9, Washington, Johansson 13 (Kuznetsov), 19:27 (en). Penalties: None. Missed Penalty Shot: Ovechkin, Was, 10:40 third. Shots: Washington 5-14-9: 28. Columbus 12-11-12: 35. Power-plays: Washington 2 of 2; Columbus 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 30-5-2 (35 shots-32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 11-13-1 (27-22). A: 12,291.

Monday New York 119, Philadelphia 113,2OT Portland 108, Washington 98 Charlotte 124, Utah 119,2OT Memphis 101, New Orleans 99 Chicago 111, Detroit 101 Atlanta 98, Orlando 81

Toronto 112, Brooklyn 100 Golden State 132, Cleveland 98 Dallas 118, Boston 113, OT LA Clippers 140, Houston 132, OT

Bucks maintain their mastery of injury-depleted Miami Heat

NHL SUMMARIES

Capitals 6, Blue Jackets 3

Tuesday Milwaukee 91, Miami 79 New Orleans 114, Minnesota 99 Oklahoma City 110, Denver 104 Indiana 97, Phoenix 94

Devils 4, Flames 2 Calgary 1 1 0 — 2 New Jersey 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, New Jersey, Larsson 2 (Boucher, Kalinin), 5:12. 2, Calgary, Monahan 14 (Gaudreau, D.Hamilton), 9:16 (pp). Penalties: Ruutu, NJ (interference), 8:48. Second period: 3, New Jersey, Stempniak 11 (Cammalleri, Henrique), :57. 4, New Jersey, Boucher 2 (Kennedy, Severson), 1:14. 5, Calgary, Russell 3 (Gaudreau, Giordano), 15:55 (pp). Penalties: Wideman, Cal (hooking), 2:32; Ferland, Cal (hooking), 11:26; Schlemko, NJ (hooking), 13:49; Henrique, NJ (slashing), 15:27; Kalinin, NJ (holding), 18:14. Third period: 6, New Jersey, Greene 4 (Stempniak, Larsson), 18:59 (en). Penalties: None. Shots: Calgary 9-8-11: 28. New Jersey 10-12-4: 26. Power-plays: Calgary 2 of 4; New Jersey 0 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Hiller 5-5-1 (25 shots-22 saves). New Jersey, C.Schneider 20-14-5 (28-26). A: 14,319. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Scott Cherrey, Mark Shewchyk.

Bruins 4, Canadiens 1 Boston 1 1 2 — 4 Montreal 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Boston, Talbot 2, 13:08. Penalties: Desharnais, Mon (delay of game), 16:33; K.Miller, Bos (slashing), 19:35. Second period: 2, Montreal, Barberio 1 (P.Subban, Desharnais), 8:48. 3, Boston, Bergeron 18 (Pastrnak, Seidenberg), 16:49. Penalties: Markov, Mon (elbowing), 5:18; Bergeron, Bos (hooking), 11:29. Third period: 4, Boston, Pastrnak 4 (Rinaldo), 12:14. 5, Boston, Marchand 17 (Eriksson), 18:37 (en). Penalties: Marchand, Bos (closing hand on puck), 2:56; P.Subban, Mon (holding stick), 5:13; Seidenberg, Bos (interference), 16:11; Vatrano, Bos (tripping), 19:53. Shots: Boston 10-7-7: 24. Montreal 9-16-14: 39. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 3; Montreal 0 of 5. Goalies: Boston, Rask 16-13-4 (39 shots-38 saves). Montreal, Condon 12-12-4 (23-20). A: 21,288. Referees: Marc Joannette, Greg Kimmerly. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

LATE MONDAY

Sabres 2, Coyotes 1 Buffalo 0 2 0 — 2 Arizona 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: McCabe, Buf, double minor (highsticking), 4:27; Buffalo bench, served by Varone (too many men), 13:59. Second period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 14 (Ristolainen, R.O’Reilly), 10:07 (pp). 2, Buffalo, McGinn 10 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 17:35 (pp). Penalties: Hanzal, Ari (tripping), 8:07; Murphy, Ari (kneeing), 9:55; Schaller, Buf (tripping), 13:10; Chipchura, Ari (hooking), 16:11. Third period: 3, Arizona, Vermette 7 (Doan, Rieder), 8:04. Penalties: McGinn, Buf (interference), 5:53; Bogosian, Buf, minor-major-game misconduct (roughing, fighting), 20:00; Ristolainen, Buf, misconduct, 20:00; Doan, Ari, minor-misconduct (unsportsmanlike conduct), 20:00; Vermette, Ari, misconduct, 20:00; Ekman-Larsson, Ari, misconduct, 20:00; Duclair, Ari (roughing), 20:00. Missed Penalty Shot: Kane, Buf, 1:18 second. Shots: Buffalo 9-15-4: 28. Arizona 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: Buffalo 2 of 3; Arizona 0 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 12-12-2 (27 shots-26 saves). Arizona, Domingue 7-3-3 (28-26). A: 11,134. Referees: Dave Lewis, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Matt MacPherson.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miami Heat guard Tyler Johnson fouls Milwaukee Bucks guard Michael Carter-Williams during the irst half Tuesday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perhaps Dwyane Wade taught Khris Middleton too well last summer. Middleton scored 22 points, Greg Monroe added 15 points and 10 rebounds and the Milwaukee Bucks clamped down defensively on Wade and short-handed Miami throughout, beating the Heat 91-79 on Tuesday night in Miami. Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 14 points for Milwaukee, which has now beaten Miami five consecutive times. Hassan Whiteside scored 23 points and grabbed 18 rebounds for Miami, which has dropped two straight and trailed by at least 22 in each of those games. Chris Bosh scored 23 and Luol Deng added 11 for the Heat. The Heat were without four injured players, including point guards Goran Dragic and Beno Udrih. The offense struggled mightily without them, as Miami shot a season-low 36.5 percent. And Wade, playing through shoulder pain, finished with only two points in 21 minutes. It was

only the third time in Wade’s 973-game career, including playoffs, that he logged at least 20 minutes and didn’t score more than two points. Wade and Middleton crossed paths over the summer and worked out together.

NOTEBOOK Surgery for Noah • Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah has undergone surgery to repair his dislocated left shoulder. The 2014 NBA defensive player of the year, Noah is expected to miss four to six months. Barring a quick recovery or deep playof run, he might have played his last game for the Bulls given his expiring contract. Leuer can’t play • Jon Leuer was held out of the Phoenix Suns’ game Tuesday night with back spasms. Leuer was injured during warmups before Phoenix hosted the Indiana Pacers, and the team announced his absence at tipof. He played 21 minutes in a reserve role Sunday night at Minnesota in the Suns’ most recent game.

NBA SUMMARIES Bucks 91, Heat 79

Pacers 97, Suns 94

Milwaukee: Antetokounmpo 5-10 4-4 14, Parker 4-7 1-2 9, Monroe 6-13 3-3 15, Carter-Williams 3-5 1-2 7, Middleton 8-20 4-4 22, Bayless 4-7 0-0 11, Henson 4-5 1-1 9, Vaughn 0-2 0-0 0, O’Bryant 2-2 0-0 4, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Ennis 0-2 0-0 0, Copeland 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-74 14-16 91. Miami: Deng 4-10 2-2 11, Bosh 7-15 7-7 23, Whiteside 8-9 7-11 23, Johnson 0-6 3-4 3, Wade 1-6 0-0 2, Richardson 1-8 1-2 3, Green 2-10 0-0 6, Winslow 1-5 0-0 2, Stoudemire 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 27-74 20-26 79. Milwaukee 19 30 26 16 — 91 Miami 18 21 18 22 — 79 3-point goals: Milwaukee 5-12 (Bayless 3-6, Middleton 2-4, Vaughn 0-1, Copeland 0-1), Miami 5-22 (Bosh 2-2, Green 2-5, Deng 1-2, Wade 0-1, Winslow 0-3, Johnson 0-4, Richardson 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 45 (Monroe 10), Miami 48 (Whiteside 18). Assists: Milwaukee 19 (Middleton 7), Miami 13 (Wade 4). Total fouls: Milwaukee 19, Miami 14. Technicals: Milwaukee defensive three second, Wade, Miami defensive three second. A: 19,886 (19,600).

Indiana: George 5-12 8-9 19, Allen 2-5 0-0 4, Mahinmi 0-0 0-0 0, Ellis 7-19 6-6 20, Robinson III 3-4 3-4 10, Miles 3-11 2-5 9, Young 4-10 2-3 11, Turner 7-11 1-1 15, J.Hill 3-7 1-2 7, Budinger 0-3 2-4 2, S.Hill 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-83 25-34 97. Phoenix: Tucker 3-9 4-4 12, Morris 1-4 0-0 2, Chandler 0-3 3-4 3, Knight 8-22 3-3 21, Booker 9-16 8-8 32, Len 2-6 2-2 6, Brown 1-4 1-1 3, Teletovic 2-7 2-3 7, Goodwin 2-7 4-4 8, Warren 0-1 0-0 0, Weems 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 28-81 27-29 94. Indiana 25 19 27 26 — 97 Phoenix 17 18 26 33 — 94 3-point goals: Indiana 4-20 (Robinson III 1-1, Young 1-2, George 1-5, Miles 1-7, S.Hill 0-1, Budinger 0-1, Ellis 0-3), Phoenix 11-35 (Booker 6-11, Tucker 2-6, Knight 2-9, Teletovic 1-4, Weems 0-1, Len 0-1, Brown 0-1, Goodwin 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 54 (George 8), Phoenix 59 (Chandler 14). Assists: Indiana 14 (Young 5), Phoenix 15 (Tucker 5). Total fouls: Indiana 23, Phoenix 23. Technicals: Phoenix defensive three second 2. A: 16,802 (18,055).

Pelicans 114, T’Wolves 99

Thunder 110, Nuggets 104

Minnesota: Prince 1-1 0-0 3, Garnett 1-2 1-2 3, Towns 7-17 5-5 20, Rubio 5-7 4-4 15, Wiggins 7-17 7-10 21, Payne 2-2 2-4 6, Muhammad 5-10 3-4 13, LaVine 2-5 0-0 4, Martin 1-5 0-0 2, Dieng 3-4 2-2 8, Bjelica 2-6 0-0 4, Miller 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-76 24-31 99. New Orleans: Cunningham 4-6 0-0 11, Davis 13-22 8-10 35, Asik 1-4 0-0 2, Evans 6-11 1-1 13, Gordon 4-9 0-0 11, Gee 2-2 3-3 7, Anderson 1-6 4-4 7, Holiday 7-14 3-4 19, Cole 3-6 1-1 7, Ajinca 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 42-83 20-23 114. Minnesota 38 22 15 24 — 99 New Orleans 25 26 31 32 — 114 3-point goals: Minnesota 3-14 (Prince 1-1, Towns 1-1, Rubio 1-2, Muhammad 0-2, Martin 0-2, Bjelica 0-2, Wiggins 0-4), New Orleans 10-23 (Cunningham 3-4, Gordon 3-7, Holiday 2-3, Davis 1-2, Anderson 1-4, Cole 0-1, Evans 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 46 (Towns 13), New Orleans 45 (Asik 8). Assists: Minnesota 18 (LaVine, Rubio 4), New Orleans 21 (Holiday 9). Total fouls: Minnesota 21, New Orleans 24. Technicals: Minnesota defensive three second. A: 14,255 (16,867).

Oklahoma City: Durant 10-23 7-8 30, Ibaka 2-8 0-0 4, Adams 5-7 0-2 10, Westbrook 10-22 6-9 27, Roberson 1-2 0-0 2, Kanter 10-14 5-7 25, Waiters 2-10 0-0 5, Payne 0-9 0-0 0, Singler 1-1 4-4 7, Collison 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-97 22-30 110. Denver: Gallinari 10-21 3-5 27, Faried 6-13 5-6 17, Jokic 2-4 2-2 6, Mudiay 5-14 3-7 13, Harris 3-8 3-4 11, Arthur 0-3 4-4 4, Lauvergne 6-6 0-0 12, Foye 1-5 1-2 3, Barton 1-6 4-4 6, Kilpatrick 1-3 2-2 5. Totals 35-83 27-36 104. Oklahoma City 25 32 27 26 — 110 Denver 31 22 26 25 — 104 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 6-28 (Durant 3-9, Singler 1-1, Waiters 1-4, Westbrook 1-6, Ibaka 0-2, Payne 0-6), Denver 7-20 (Gallinari 4-9, Harris 2-4, Kilpatrick 1-3, Mudiay 0-1, Foye 0-1, Jokic 0-1, Arthur 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 63 (Durant 12), Denver 58 (Faried 15). Assists: Oklahoma City 30 (Westbrook 12), Denver 21 (Mudiay 9). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 28, Denver 25. A: 12,844 (19,155).


SPORTS

01.20.2016 • WedneSday • M 1 AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite

Points Open Current

Underdog

Sunday Patriots

AFC Championship 3 3

BRONCOS

PANTHERS

NFC Championship 3 3

Cards

NBA Favorite Points Underdog MAGIC 10 76ers WIZARDS 3 Heat RAPTORS 3 Celtics Cavaliers 12.5 NETS KNICKS [5] Jazz ROCKETS 3 Pistons Warriors 6 BULLS THUNDER 10 Hornets MAVERICKS 8.5 T’Wolves Kings 7 LAKERS Hawks 2 BLAZERS []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity of the injury. COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog C Florida 3 S FLORIDA MICHIGAN ST 14 Nebraska W VIRGINIA 12 Texas NOTRE DAME 11.5 Virginia Tech N CAROLINA 16 Wake Forest VIRGINIA COMM 13 Duquesne p-Temple 9 LaSalle FORDHAM 4.5 George Mason Georgia 2.5 MISSOURI Davidson 8 SAINT LOUIS SO ILLINOIS 3 Indiana St Illinois St 9 BRADLEY DRAKE 1.5 Missouri St Wichita St 7 NORTHERN IOWA MARQUETTE 7.5 DePaul BAYLOR 9 Kansas St MICHIGAN 16.5 Minnesota St. Joseph’s 10.5 PENN Colorado St 3.5 AIR FORCE Vanderbilt 2.5 TENNESSEE Villanova 7 SETON HALL Miami-Florida 15 BOSTON COLLEGE LOUISVILLE 9 Florida St WYOMING 3.5 Nevada BOISE ST 17.5 San Jose St WASHINGTON 2 Colorado CAL-SANTA BARB 3 Long Beach St CAL-IRVINE 14 CS-Fullerton OREGON ST 2.5 Ucla Added Game S DAKOTA 4.5 W Illinois p- Palestra. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$120/even Blues AVALANCHE -$165/+$145 Sabres DUCKS -$125/+$105 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 15.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Baltimore LHP Zack Dotson (Bowie-EL) 100 games, N.Y. Mets 3B Eudor Garcia (Columbia-SAL) 80 games and free agent 1B Tyler Williams 50 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Promoted Sean Brown to chief financial officer, Jeff Lantz senior director of communications, James Dispanet controller, Michelle Heystek senior accountant and Cory Bernstine manager of strategy and analytics. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Named Julio Vinas manager of Charlotte (IL); Ryan Newman manager of Birmingham (SL); Joel Skinner manager of Winston-Salem (Carolina); Cole Armstrong manager of Kannapolis (SAL), Tommy Thompson manager, Matt Zaleski pitching coach and Willie Harris hitting coach of Great Falls (Pioneer); and Aaron Rowand minor league outfield and baserunning coordinator. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with LHP David Huff on a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Signed RHP Al Alburquerque. Designated INF-OF Efren Navarro for assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES — Agreed to terms with SS Didi Gregorius and RHP Nathan Eovaldi on one-year contracts. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Signed RHP Joe Blanton to a one-year contract. MIAMI MARLINS — Agreed to terms with LHP Wei-Yin Chen on a five-year contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with C Chris Stewart on a two-year contract. Claimed RHP A.J. Schugel off waivers from Seattle. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Named Joe Lockhart executive vice president of communications. Promoted Cynthia Hogan to executive vice president of public policy and government affairs. BALTIMORE RAVENS — Signed DE DeAngelo Tyson to a reserve/future contract. DENVER BRONCOS — Placed S Omar Bolden on injured reserve. Signed CB Taurean Nixon. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Fired tight ends coach Jerry Fontenot and running backs coach Sam Gash. Signed DE B.J. McBryde. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed TE Ross Travis, LB Tyrell Adams, OL Michael Liedtke, RB Darrin Reaves, DT Jimmy Staten, WRs Da’Ron Brown and Fred Williams and OTs Reid Fragel and Laurence Gibson to reserve/future contracts. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed QB Zac Dysert and TE Dominique Jones to reserve/future contracts. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed LB Jerod Mayo on injured reserve. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Jim Schwartz defensive coordinator, Jeff Stoutland offensive line coach and Dave Fipp special teams coach. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed OT Matt Feiler, C B.J. Finney, TE Xavier Grimble, WR Shakim Phillips, DBs Jordan Dangerfield and Isaiah Frey and RBs Rajion Neal and Abou Toure to reserve/future contracts. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed RB Brandon Cottom, DT Justin Hamilton, C Drew Nowak, DE Will Pericak, CBs Stanley Jean-Baptiste and Trovon Reed and WRs George Farmer, Deshon Foxx, Antwan Goodley and Douglas McNeil to reserve/future contracts. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Named Nate Kaczor special teams coordinator, Mark Duffner linebackers coach, Jay Hayes defensive line coach and Jon Hoke defensive backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed D Jon Merrill on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 16. Activated F Michael Cammalleri from injured reserve. COLLEGE INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS ASSOCIATION — Named Chris Eriksson championships and rankings coordinator. FURMAN — Named Caroline Kingsdorf associate athletic director for finance. HOFSTRA — Agreed to terms with women’s soccer coach Simon Riddiough on a multiyear contract extension. HOLY CROSS — Named Kirsten Britton associate director of athletics for facilities, operations and events. LA SALLE — Named Paul Macht men’s and women’s water polo coach. UNC GREENSBORO — Announced men’s basketball G Justin Jordan has transferred from Milwaukee.

TENNIS Australian Open Results Tuesday | At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $30.18 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Lucas Pouille, France, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4. Joao Sousa (32), Portugal, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Stephane Robert, France, def. Bjorn Fratangelo, United States, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. Sam Groth, Australia, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. John Millman, Australia, def. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 3-6, 5-7, 7-6 (2), 5-0, retired. Feliciano Lopez (18), Spain, def. Daniel Evans, Britain, 6-1, 6-0, 6-4. Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-2, 4-6 6-1, 6-4. Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Fabio Fognini (20), Italy, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (7), 6-7 (5), 7-6 (1). Rajeev Ram, United States, def. Kevin Anderson (11), South Africa, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (4), 6-3, 3-0, retired. Jeremy Chardy (30), France, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 13-11. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Donald Young, United States, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2. Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 2-6, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5, 6-1. John Isner (10), United States, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 6-3, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Jordan Thompson, Australia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-1, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2.

Tim Smyczek, United States, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Steve Johnson (31), United States, def. Aljaz Bedene, Britain, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Gael Monfils (23), France, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Marco Cecchinato, Italy, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-5, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (7), 8-6. Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Rafael Nadal (5), Spain, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2. David Ferrer (8), Spain, def. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Brian Baker, United States, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5). Bernard Tomic (16), Australia, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Taro Daniel, Japan, 7-6 (2), 7-5, 5-7, 6-7 (5), 6-1. Jack Sock (25), United States, def. Taylor Fritz, United States, 6-4, 3-6, 0-6, 6-3, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-4, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-2. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. James Duckworth, Australia, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-4. Stan Wawrinka (4), Switzerland, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 7-6 (2), 6-3, retired. Viktor Troicki (21), Serbia, def. Daniel Munoz de la Nava, Spain, 4-6, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Women First Round Ekaterina Makarova (21), Russia, def. Maddison Inglis, Australia, 6-3, 6-0. Annika Beck, Germany, def. Priscilla Hon, Australia, 6-0, 6-3. Garbine Muguruza (3), Spain, def. Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, 6-0, 6-4. Madison Keys (15), United States, def. Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, 5-7, 6-2, 7-5. Laura Siegemund, Germany, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 6-4, 7-5. Timea Bacsinszky (11), Switzerland, def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5. Vania King, United States, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Tatjana Maria, Germany, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-4, 6-3. Jelena Jankovic (19), Serbia, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-3, 6-3. Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Venus Williams (8), United States, 6-4, 6-2. Elina Svitolina (18), Ukraine, def. Victoria Duval, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4. Karolina Pliskova (9), Czech Republic, def. Kimberly Birrell, Australia, 6-4, 6-4. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic,def. Caroline Garcia (32), France, 6-2, 6-4. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Jarmila Wolfe, Australia, 6-0, 4-2, retired. Naomi Osaka, Japan, def. Donna Vekic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-2. Ana Ivanovic (20), Serbia, def. Tammi Patterson, Australia, 6-2, 6-3. Sabine Lisicki (30), Germany, def. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Lesia Tsurenko (31), Ukraine, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-3. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Andreea Mitu, Romania, 6-3, 6-4. Zheng Saisai, China, def. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 6-1, 6-2 Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def. Storm Sanders, Australia, 6-4, 6-2. Alize Cornet, France, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1, 6-0. Danka Kovinic, Montenegro, def. Samantha Crawford, United States, 6-2, 6-4. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. IrinaCamelia Begu (29), Romania, 6-3, 6-2. Madison Brengle, United States, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Angelique Kerber (7), Germany, def. Misaki Doi, Japan, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (6), 6-3. Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Lara Arruabarrena, Spain, def. Maryna Zanevska, Ukraine, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-3. Zhang Shuai, China, def. Simona Halep (2), Romania, 6-4, 6-3. Victoria Azarenka (14), Belarus, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, 6-0, 6-0.

BASKETBALL Tuesday’s Div. I College Basketball Major Scores East Dayton 85, St. Bon. 79 NC State 78, Pittsburgh 61 Providence 71, Butler 68 St. Peter’s 77, Fairfield 71 UConn 60, Tulane 42 South Florida 81, Mississippi St. 78 Georgia St. 69, Ga. Southern 66, OT Liberty 55, Longwood 53 Maryland 62, Northwestern 56, OT South Carolina 77, Mississippi 74, OT Texas A&M-CC 89, Northwestern St. 79 Tulsa 84, East Carolina 69 Virginia 69, Clemson 62 Wofford 89, Tenn. Wesleyan 66 Midwest Akron 92, E. Michigan 88 Buffalo 77, Miami (Ohio) 60 Georgetown 81, Xavier 72 Green Bay 99, Chicago St. 66 Indiana 103, Illinois 69 Kent St. 76, Ball St. 68 N. Illinois 75, Cent. Michigan 70 N. Kentucky 90, Oakland 73 Ohio 82, W. Michigan 64 SE Missouri 84, Hannibal-LaGrange 61 Toledo 81, Bowling Green 74 Far West No major team scores reported from the Far West. Southwest Abilene Christian 75, McNeese St. 67 Houston Bapt. 72, Cent. Arkansas 61 Oklahoma St. 86, Kansas 67 Texas A&M 71, LSU 57

Standings Through Monday Atlantic 10 VCU Dayton Saint Joseph’s St Bonaventure George Washington Davidson Rhode Island Duquesne Richmond Fordham Massachusetts George Mason St. Louis U. La Salle

Conf. 5 0 5 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4

Overall 13 5 15 3 14 3 12 5 14 4 11 5 11 7 12 6 10 7 10 6 8 9 7 11 6 11 5 10

Big Ten Indiana Iowa Maryland Purdue Ohio St. Michigan Michigan St. Northwestern Nebraska Penn St. Wisconsin Illinois Minnesota Rutgers

Conf. 6 0 5 0 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 2 4 1 5 0 6 0 6

Overall 16 3 14 3 16 2 16 3 12 7 13 5 16 3 15 4 11 8 11 8 10 9 9 10 6 12 6 13

Conf. 6 0 5 1 5 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 4 1 5 1 5 0 6

Overall 12 5 16 3 16 3 10 8 9 10 7 11 10 9 8 10 3 16 5 13

Conf. 3 3 2 2 2 3 1 4 1 5 0 6 Conf. 5 0 5 0 5 1 3 2 3 3 2 3

Overall 6 12 10 9 8 10 8 12 4 14 3 16 Overall 14 4 13 6 13 6 9 8 7 14 11 9

Conf. 5 0 4 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 1 3 1 3 0 5

Overall 15 2 17 1 11 6 12 6 13 4 9 8 9 6 10 7 9 8 8 8 12 6 10 6 8 9 7 10

Missouri Valley Wichita St Evansville SIU Carbondale Indiana St. Illinois St. Missouri St. Northern Iowa Loyola (Chicago) Bradley Drake

Ohio Valley WEST Eastern Illinois Tenn.-Martin Murray St. Austin Peay SIU Edwardsville SEMO WEST Tennessee St. Belmont Tennessee Tech Morehead St. Jacksonville St. Eastern Kentucky

SEC Texas A&M South Carolina LSU Florida Kentucky Arkansas Georgia Vanderbilt Tennessee Auburn Ole Miss Alabama Missouri Mississippi St.

HIGH SCHOOLS: TUESDAY’S RESULTS

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1.

UConn (16-0) idle. Next: vs. UCF, Wednesday.

2.

South Carolina (17-0) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday.

3.

Notre Dame (17-1) idle. Next: vs. Syracuse, Thursday.

4.

Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday.

5.

Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Wednesday.

6.

Texas (16-1) idle. Next: at TCU, Wednesday.

7.

Ohio State (13-4) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday.

8.

Arizona State (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday.

9.

Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Thursday.

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

Please notify STLhighschoolsports.com via email at stats@stltoday.com or on Twitter at @STLhssports of any postponements or time changes to Wednesday’s games. BOYS BASKETBALL

13. Texas A&M (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 23 Missouri, Thursday.

Luth. North 16 13 17 15 61 MICDS 15 20 17 19 71 M (11-5): M. Roper 23, Mitchell 14, Buchanan 12. FG 23 (4), FT 21-31. Ladue 13 17 17 13 60 JohnBurroughs 9 13 12 11 45 L (10-6): Rogers 34. FG 23 (8), FT 6-9. J (6-7): Smith 15, Milbourn 12, Goldfarb 11. FG 16 (1), FT 12-21. Pky. South 11 22 15 15 63 Mehlville 9 4 8 14 35 P (8-6): Sommer 13. FG 25 (4), FT 9-25. M (7-7): Yaeger 9. FG 12 (1), FT 10-13. Mater Dei 9 14 13 11 47 Teutopolis 13 12 11 8 44 M (12-3): Pollmann 16. FG 14 (4), FT 15-18. T: B. Mette 24. FG 17 (4), FT 6-9. Webster 18 16 20 14 68 Pky. North 10 9 4 13 36 W (14-1): Ramey 20, Gordon 12. FG 29 (4), FT 6-10. P (4-10): Allen 13. FG 12 (1), FT 11-17. Mascoutah 2 8 9 7 26 Nashville 11 10 17 12 50 M (4-15): Mayberry 10. FG 10 (2), FT 4-5. N (13-6): Bultman 16, Newman 13, Heggemeier 11. FG 20 (4), FT 6-7. Vandalia 12 6 8 27 53 Gibault 18 17 27 20 82 G (13-6): J. Rueter 19, Davis 18, Deterding 13, Kessler 10. FG 28 (6), FT 20-25.

14. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

10. Mississippi State (17-2) idle. Next: at Georgia, Thursday. 11. Oregon State (14-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. 12. Stanford (14-4) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Friday.

MICDS 11 14 18 16 59 Ritter 10 16 8 11 45 M (10-3): T. Baur 23, Thompson 21. FG 23 (3), FT 1015. R (6-4): Haynes 13, Tomlin 12. FG 17 (6), FT 5-9. Pky. North 20 16 15 15 66 Webster 4 14 17 18 53 P (14-1): Davis 13, Pimentel 13, Johnson 11, Stovall 11, Belcher 10. FG 25 (4), FT 12-20. W (9-5): Waelterman 11, Moran 10. FG 16 (2), FT 19-31. Windsor 4 10 4 11 29 JohnBurroughs 18 7 10 14 49 J (8-4): Gill 23. FG 19 (2), FT 9-18. Wesclin 7 8 3 13 31 Nashville 11 5 8 11 35 W (8-13): Haukapp 9. FG 11 (6), FT 3-6. U. City 2 13 14 7 36 Pky. Central 14 15 12 13 54 U (9-7): Reed 10. FG 14 (3), FT 4-19. P (9-3): G. Stephens 27. FG 19 (4), FT 12-24. Mehlville 19 12 6 18 55 Pky. South 21 15 20 13 69 P (8-7): Steins 27, Ganninger 11, Kramer 11. FG 25 (3), FT 16-22.

15. South Florida (12-4) idle. Next: at Memphis, Wednesday. 16. Miami (17-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Florida State, Sunday. 17. Louisville (14-5) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Monday. 18. Tennessee (11-6) idle. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. 19. Oklahoma (12-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 20. UCLA (12-5) idle. Next: vs. California, Friday. 21. Michigan State (14-4) beat Rutgers 59-48. Next: at No. 5 Maryland, Saturday. 22. Florida (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 23. Missouri (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 13 Texas A&M, Thursday.

Granite City 11 9 7 17 44 Alton 12 13 7 11 43 G (4-12): Moore 21, Garrett 12. FG 18 (5), FT 3-6. New Athens 10 13 18 15 56 Waterloo 12 4 12 21 49 N (17-3): Lance 16, Marlow 15, Ragland 13. FG 19 (2), FT 16-25. W (8-9): Finnerty 16, Luedmann 13. FG 19 (0), FT 11-18. North Mac 14 2 4 13 33 Carlinville 6 8 12 10 36 N: Starks 11. FG 14 (0), FT 5-12. C (7-15): Schmidt 9. FG 13 (1), FT 9-17. Bunker Hill 4 6 10 9 29 Mount Olive 22 24 12 14 72 B (2-16): Allman 8, Schwegel 8. FG 13 (2), FT 1-3. M (20-3): Henke 21, Niehaus 13, Murphy 12. FG 27 (3), FT 15-24. Staunton 6 6 10 4 26 Gillespie 14 19 21 4 58 S (1-19): Welch 8. FG 10 (0), FT 6-14. G (14-6): B. Jarman 12, Niemeyer 10. FG 23 (3), FT 9-12.

GIRLS SWIMMING Parkway Central 139, Afton 30 (x-state-qualifying performance) 200 medley relay: 1. Parkway Central A, 2:20.54; 2. Parkway Central C, 2:20.86 200 freestyle: 1. Emily Kaiser, Parkway Central, 2:27.87; 2. Isabella Gluzman, Parkway Central, 2:31.60 200 individual medley: 1. Katy McCormick, Parkway Central, 2:46.90; 2. Pamela Petterchak, Afton, 2:53.06 50 freestyle: 1. Shelby Ripp, Parkway Central, 28.23; 2. Kate McNeal, Parkway Central, 30.89 1-meter diving: 1. Marissa Brady, Parkway Central, 186.65; 2. Emily Ortmann, Parkway Central, 145.90 100 butterfly: 1. Claire Huang, Parkway Central, 1:16.51; 2. Susie LaFever, Parkway Central, 1:16.67 100 freestyle: 1. Kate McNeal, Parkway Central, 1:07.33; 2. Emily Kaiser, Parkway Central, 1:07.62 500 freestyle: x-1. Madison Brown, Parkway Central, 5:17.93; 2. Olivia Gottlieb, Parkway Central, 6:07.18 200 freestyle relay: 1. Parkway Central A, 1:57.51; 2. Parkway Central B, 2:05.42 100 backstroke: 1. Olivia Gottlieb, Parkway Central, 1:15.26; 2. Pamela Petterchak, Afton, 1:18.16 100 breaststroke: 1. Annemarie Campbell, Parkway Central, 1:31.23; 2. Emma Barnes,

Parkway Central, 1:36.04 400 freestyle relay: 1. Parkway Central B, 4:27.58; 2. Parkway Central A, 4:29.49 Other area scores Westminster 103, St. Joseph’s 84 Kirkwood 136, Webster Groves 47

WRESTLING -WOOD RIVER 36, ROXANA 33 113: Drew Sobol, Wood River, pin Akeman, :42 132: Foiles, Roxana, pin Chris Staggs, 1:26 145: Hunter Morales, Wood River, dec. Carpenter, 7-0 170: Huf, Roxana, dec. Erslon, 18-11 195: Zack Kincade, Wood River, pin Holmes, :37 220: Nyswonger, Roxana, pin Adam Copeland, 1:54 285: Jon Wright, Wood River, pin Robinson, 3-2 Won by forfeit Roxana: Katzmarek (106), Henseler (126), Maguire (138) Wood River: Austin Hammond (120), Zac Blasioli (152), Lee (182) Double forfeit: 160 -WOOD RIVER 42, CARLYLE 28 132: Anderson, Carlyle, pin Chris Staggs, :33 145: Doerr, Carlyle, major dec. Hunter Moreales, 13-1 160: Jake Erslon, Wood River, pin Hanke, 5:34 170: Pruitt, Carlyle, pin Lindquist, 1:02 182: Marlow, Carlyle, pin Lee, 1:14 195: Zack Kincaide, Wood River, pin Useni, :53 220: Adam Copeland, Wood River, pin Allen, :22 285: Jon Wright, Wood River, pin Husman, 1:39 Won by forfeit Wood River: Drew Sobol (113), Austin Hammond (120), Zac Blasioli (152) Carlyle: Bone (138) Double forfeit: 106, 126 -ROXANA 54, CARLYLE 21 132: Foiles, Roxana, pin Anderson, 1:12 138: Maguire, Roxana, pin Bone, 1:47 145: Doerr, Carlyle, dec. Carpenter, 8-3 170: Huf, Roxana, pin Pruitt, 1:57 195: Berry, Carlyle, pin Holmes, :53 285: Robinson, Roxana, pin Husman, :46 Won by forfeit Roxana: Katzmarek (106), Akewman (113), Henseler (126), Cherry (152), Hyswonger (220) Carlyle: Hanke (160), Doerf (182) Double forfeit: 120

24. DePaul (13-6) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Friday. 25. West Virginia (15-4) idle. Next: at TCU, Sunday.

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE

AREA COLLEGES BOYS BASKETBALL

TUESDAY RESULTS No basketball games WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Lake Land at SWIC, 5:30 p.m. W: SLU at St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. W: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 6 p.m. W: Fontbonne at MacMurray, 6 p.m. W: Moberly at Jefferson, 6 p.m. M: Indiana State at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: Missouri State at Drake, 7 p.m. M: Lake Land at SWIC, 7:30 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Lewis & Clark, 7:30 p.m. W: SEMO at SIU Edwardsville, 8 p.m. M: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at MacMurray, 8 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL Leaders Through Monday Goal Scoring Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Alex Ovechkin Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Tyler Seguin Dallas Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Matt Duchene Colorado Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Mike Hoffman Ottawa Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Max Pacioretty Montreal Daniel Sedin Vancouver Jonathan Toews Chicago Brent Burns San Jose Taylor Hall Edmonton Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Brock Nelson NY Islanders Kyle Palmieri New Jersey Patrice Bergeron Boston Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Corey Perry Anaheim Jeff Skinner Carolina Shane Doan Arizona Leo Komarov Toronto Brad Marchand Boston James Neal Nashville Artemi Panarin Chicago Zach Parise Minnesota Brandon Saad Columbus Patrick Sharp Dallas Justin Williams Washington Mats Zuccarello NY Rangers Assists Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Erik Karlsson Ottawa John Klingberg Dallas Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jamie Benn Dallas Nicklas Backstrom Washington Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington P.K. Subban Montreal Henrik Sedin Vancouver Tyler Seguin Dallas Taylor Hall Edmonton Artemi Panarin Chicago Alexander Steen St Louis Joe Thornton San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Tomas Plekanec Montreal Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Jonathan Huberdeau Florida Kris Letang Pittsburgh Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Bobby Ryan Ottawa Brent Seabrook Chicago Ryan Suter Minnesota Power Play Goals Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas Justin Faulk Carolina Alex Ovechkin Washington Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Patrice Bergeron Boston Shane Doan Arizona Loui Eriksson Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Shea Weber Nashville Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Jarome Iginla Colorado Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Max Pacioretty Montreal Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Short Handed Goals Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Paul Byron Montreal Eric Fehr Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Zack Smith Ottawa Artem Anisimov Chicago Cam Atkinson Columbus Jamie Benn Dallas Jason Chimera Washington Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Blake Comeau Colorado Cody Eakin Dallas Adam Henrique New Jersey Bryan Little Winnipeg Matt Nieto San Jose Jonathan Toews Chicago Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Mika Zibanejad Ottawa Power Play Assists Name Team Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Kris Letang Pittsburgh Alexander Steen St Louis P.K. Subban Montreal Mikkel Boedker Arizona Brent Burns San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS John Klingberg Dallas Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Tyson Barrie Colorado Patrice Bergeron Boston Patrick Kane Chicago Torey Krug Boston Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Victor Rask Carolina Brent Seabrook Chicago Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Jason Spezza Dallas Short Handed Assists Name Team Jeff Petry Montreal Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Jamie Benn Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Paul Byron Montreal Zdeno Chara Boston Vernon Fiddler Dallas Curtis Lazar Ottawa Torrey Mitchell Montreal Drew Stafford Winnipeg Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Tommy Wingels San Jose Aleksander Barkov Florida Francois Beauchemi Colorado Pierre-Edouard Bel Philadelphia Jordie Benn Dallas T.J. Brodie Calgary J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Alex Burmistrov Winnipeg

GP 48 44 46 46 47 47 44 44 42 45 45 43 46 46 48 44 47 45 45 46 44 46 44 47 36 43 39 45 48 36 45 46 45 45 GP 48 46 46 46 46 42 45 46 44 46 47 48 49 44 43 37 40 43 44 46 43 46 35 45 45 48 45

G 29 27 26 25 25 22 22 22 20 20 20 19 19 19 19 18 18 18 18 18 17 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 A 40 38 32 31 30 29 29 29 28 28 27 27 27 26 26 25 25 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

GP 48 46 47 44 45 45 44 36 44 47 45 45 47 46 46 44 44

PP 14 12 12 10 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7

GP 46 34 35 39 45 47 45 46 45 44 47 46 44 46 41 48 46 45

SH 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

GP 42 46 35 49 46 45 44 43 43 46 45 43 44 48 43 45 45 48 39 46

PPA 16 16 14 14 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

GP 43 45 46 44 34 42 46 41 35 44 46 44 36 47 35 43 34 41 46

SHA 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

-98TH MACOUPIN COUNTY TOURNAMENT Pool B Mount Olive vs Piasa Southwestern, 6 p.m. Staunton vs North Mac, 7:30 p.m. -BENTON INVITATIONAL Carlyle vs Sesser-Valier, 6 p.m. Meridian vs Pinckneyville, 7:30 p.m. Hamilton County vs Benton, 9 p.m. -OKAWVILLE INVITATIONAL Madison, Illinois vs Okawville, 7 p.m. -ST. JAMES TOURNAMENT First round Newburg vs Sullivan, 7:30 p.m. Blair Oaks vs St. James, 6 p.m. -BELLEVILLE EAST CLASSIC First round Belleville West vs McCluer, 6 p.m. Columbia vs Belleville East, 7:30 p.m. -TRIAD MID-WINTER CLASSIC Pool A: Gateway STEM vs Marion, 6 p.m. Pool B: Riverview Gardens vs Highland, 7:30 p.m. Other area games: Hancock at Grandview, 5 p.m. Trico vs. Freeburg, at Sparta, 5:30 p.m. Parkway Central at University City, 6 p.m. Lafayette at Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Clayton at Pattonville, 6 p.m. Whitfield at Brentwood, 6:30 p.m.

DuBourg at Bayless, 6:30 p.m. Zumwalt South at Zumwalt East, 7 p.m. Marquette at Northwest-CH, 7 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 7 p.m. Fox at Hillsboro, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 7 p.m. Oakville at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Holt, 7 p.m. Bourbon at Herculaneum, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -30TH HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT Consolation semifinal Teutopolis vs Mater Dei, 5 p.m. Nashville vs Taylorville, 6:30 p.m. Other area games: Lift For Life at Crossroads, 5 p.m. Washington at Zumwalt South, 5:30 p.m. Luth. St. Charles at O’F Christian, 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 5:30 p.m. Edwardsville at St. Joseph’s, 5:30 p.m. Vashon at Soldan, 6 p.m. Ursuline at Cor Jesu, 6 p.m. McCluer S-Berkeley at McCluer, 6 p.m. Elverado vs. Marissa, at Coulterville, 6:15 p.m. Trinity at Wright City, 6:30 p.m. Borgia at Duchesne, 6:45 p.m. Eureka at Pacific, 7 p.m. Orchard Farm at Afton, 7 p.m. Westminster at John Burroughs, 7 p.m.

WRESTLING Cleveland at Miller Career, 4:30 p.m. Quad meet at Ladue, 5 p.m. Lutheran North at Hancock, 5 p.m. Liberty at MICDS, 5 p.m. Winfield at MICDS, 5 p.m. Lutheran South at MICDS, 5 p.m. Pattonville at Ritenour, 5 p.m. Fox at Lafayette, 5 p.m. Marquette vs. Fox, at Lafayette, 5 p.m. Eureka at Parkway South, 5 p.m. Northwest-CH at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Seckman at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Seckman vs. Northwest-CH, at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Kirkwood at Webster Groves, 6 p.m. CBC at Vianney, 6 p.m. Troy at Howell North, 6 p.m. Oakville at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Howell Central, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West at Timberland, 7 p.m. Marquette at Lafayette, 7 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING FZ East, Timberland, Washington at RecPlex, 3:30 p.m. Incarnate, Rosati-Kain at Westminster, 4 p.m. University City at Hazelwood East, 4 p.m. Rosati-Kain at Kennedy, 6:30 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL • AREA LEADERS Points Pts Jayson Tatum, Chaminade 543 Isaiah Ford, Afton 304 Teddy Fifer, ME Lutheran 292 Mark Rogers, Ladue 362 Javon Pickett, Belleville East 375 Zeke Moore, Riverview Gardens 324 Koby Klaus, Grandview 344 David Holden, Greenville 408 Kamau Kinder, Festus 293 Blake Marks, Wood River 422 Aaron Cook, Westminster 288 Adam Mennemeyer, Troy 308 Kyle Smith, Marissa 350 Nic Hagel, Steeleville 320 Noah Frederking, Okawville 382 Ryan Briscoe, Duchesne 293

Avg 28.6 25.3 24.3 24.1 23.4 23.1 22.9 22.7 22.5 22.2 22.2 22.0 21.9 21.3 21.2 20.9

Rebounds Caleb Strauss, Warrenton AJ Epenesa, Edwardsville Carte’Are Gordon, Vianney Michael Thompson, Parkway N. Kyler Jones, Miller Career Mark Rogers, Ladue R. Henderson Jr., Pattonville Jevon White, St. Pius X Gaven Pinkley, Hillsboro Montez McMath, Lift for Life Vincent Phillips, Metro Jack Kurz, Priory L. Kelley-Wolf, Windsor James Reed, St. Pius X Kai Collier, FZ South Jamel Warren, Hancock Brian Deterding, Gibault Craig Theiss, De Soto

Avg 16.5 12.7 12.1 11.8 11.7 10.7 10.7 10.4 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.2 9.9 9.9 9.8 9.8 9.7 9.7

No 198 190 194 154 152 160 150 156 164 164 143 143 159 138 147 137 174 145

3-Point Field Goals Tracy Gentry, Roxana Oliver Stephen, Edwardsville Brian Hutson, Cleveland Teddy Fifer, ME Lutheran Marvin Bateman, Althof Zeke Moore, Riverview Gardens Justin Bailey, Piasa SW Clif Degroot, Westminster Kyle Smith, Marissa Matt Nester, SLUH S. Cofman, Bunker Hill Kamau Kinder, Festus Tonio Morrow, Lift for Life Khari Jackson, Lovejoy Drew Besand, Hillsboro

No Avg 63 3.50 56 3.50 44 3.38 40 3.33 43 3.31 46 3.29 45 3.21 41 3.15 50 3.13 45 3.00 38 2.92 36 2.77 44 2.75 38 2.71 43 2.69

Assists No Sam Rhoads, Valley Park 113 Mark Smith, Edwardsville 125 Zach Bush, University City 104 Yuri Collins, St. Mary’s 101 Marquise Chairs, East St. Louis 84 Kamau Kinder, Festus 78 Koby Klaus, Grandview 87 Jacob Rueter, Gibault 98 Darius Rice, Jennings 78 Corey Shepherd, Hazelwood East 79 Joey Cacciatore, Bayless 69 Nigel Ferrell, Lift for Life 78 Jaden Henderson, Berkeley 58 Hasaan Decarolis, SC West 62 Kyle Smith, Marissa 76

Avg 9.42 7.81 7.43 6.31 6.00 6.00 5.80 5.44 5.20 4.94 4.93 4.88 4.83 4.77 4.75

Free-Throw Pct. Noah Moss, Triad Nic Hagel, Steeleville

Avg 87.1 87.0

No 74 67

Att 85 77

Jayson Tatum, Cham. 130 X. Sneed, Hazelwood C. 93 D. Holden, Greenville 117 B. Weiss, Mascoutah 86 Mark Smith, Edwardsville 65 N. Pollmann, Mater Dei 68 J. Pickett, Belleville East 80 Zeke Moore, Riverview 54 Kenny Berry, Granite City 76 C. Teson, St. Charles 60 C. Shepherd, Hazelwood E.70 H. Decarolis, SC West 60 Koby Klaus, Grandview 98

150 108 140 104 79 83 99 67 95 75 88 76 125

86.7 86.1 83.6 82.7 82.3 81.9 80.8 80.6 80.0 80.0 79.5 78.9 78.4

Steals No Chris Colley, Edwardsville 73 Aaron Cook, Westminster 59 Bobby Sanders, Jennings 48 Darius Rice, Jennings 55 Sam Rhoads, Valley Park 42 Jeramy Shaw, Valley Park 40 Javonte Perkins, Miller 42 Marquise Chairs, East St. Louis 45 Zac Ridenhour, Jerseyville 54 Derrick Henderson, North Tech 40

Avg 4.56 4.54 3.69 3.67 3.50 3.33 3.23 3.21 3.18 3.08

Blocked Shots Gaven Pinkley, Hillsboro Andrew Voss, Timberland Rick Hill, De Smet Tahj Telfair, Kirkwood Chris Jordan, FZ South L. Kelley-Wolf, Windsor Vincent Phillips, Metro Carte’Are Gordon, Vianney Khalib Becton, Maple-RH Jack Kurz, Priory

No 58 46 44 46 48 48 41 42 34 36

Avg 3.63 3.54 3.38 3.29 3.20 3.00 2.93 2.63 2.62 2.57

M. Null, Jeferson B. Henke, Mt Olive K. Schmelter, Cor Jesu KK Steins, Parkway S. A. Ponce, Highland S. Thompson, Triad D. Fuhring, St. James S. Kluesner, Lutheran SC K. Fischer, Collinsville J. Niehaus, Mt Olive

70 65 95 94 114 134 90 85 72 85

77.1 76.9 76.8 76.6 76.3 76.1 75.6 75.3 75.0 74.1

Steals No Chrishana Wilson, Gateway 61 Jordyn White, Luth. North 64 L. Member-Meneh, Luth. S 63 Kendra Bass, Lebanon 87 Izzy Farrell, Fox 56 Courtney Kernich, Mt Olive 93 Sami Serra, Afton 60 Renetha Dickson, Luth. N 59 Alina Lance, New Athens 86 Marshelle Franklin, Brentwood 53

Avg 5.08 4.92 4.85 4.83 4.67 4.65 4.62 4.54 4.53 4.42

Blcoked Shots No Brooke Flowers, Metro 107 Celeste Akoro, O’Fallon 86 Kali Myers, Pacific 64 S. Kluesner, Lutheran SC 62 Sophia Rivera, Brentwood 49 Monique Manuel, Summit 43 Kelly McLaughlin, St. Joe 40 Megan Jensen, Borgia 34 Kathryn Martenet, Parkway W. 33 Allie Troeckler, Civic M. 54

Avg 7.13 4.78 4.27 4.13 4.08 3.31 2.86 2.83 2.75 2.70

GIRLS BASKETBALL • AREA LEADERS Points L. Member-Meneh, Luth. South H. Diestelkamp, Owensville Holly Forbes, North County Allie Troeckler, Civic M. Renetha Dickson, Luth. N Chrishana Wilson, Gateway Taylor Baur, MICDS Geena Stephens, Parkway C. Lakeita Chappel, Haz. West April Turner, Hancock Alison Gill, John Burroughs Sophie Thompson, Triad Devin Fuhring, St. James

Pts 320 216 326 441 286 264 247 227 285 222 202 362 302

Avg 24.6 24.0 23.3 22.1 22.0 22.0 20.6 20.6 20.4 20.2 20.2 20.1 20.1

Rebounds Lejla Memisevic, Valley Park Kelly McLaughlin, St. Joseph’s Markia Davis, McCluer Elle Russell, St. Pius X Dasia Batteast, McKinley Asia Cunningham, Bayless Chrishana Wilson, Gateway Peyton Ward, Winfield Brooke Flowers, Metro Kirstin Sparks, Grandview Brianna Watkins, Haz. West Machela Cook, St. Pius X Mackenzie Kellogg, Wesclin Emily Montgomery, Troy Dana Link, Crystal City Alex LaPorta, Highland Jada Poland, FZ West

No 79 198 84 167 142 151 148 135 179 155 165 155 220 132 98 208 146

Avg 19.8 14.1 14.0 13.9 12.9 12.6 12.3 12.3 11.9 11.9 11.8 11.1 11.0 11.0 10.9 10.4 10.4

3-Point Field Goals Jamika Jones, McCluer Kyra Hardesty, Washington Caitlyn Demaree, Principia Shauna Rinehart, St. James Madi Peyton, Holt B. Muenstermann, Jerseyville Karli Carr, Gillespie Sophie Thompson, Triad Caroline Rogers, Pacific Kavita Krell, Lindbergh

No 7 29 42 33 38 51 52 48 39 31

Avg 3.50 3.22 3.00 3.00 2.92 2.83 2.74 2.67 2.60 2.58

Assists Kirstin Sparks, Grandview Courtney Reimer, Duchesne Elle Holden, Grandview Jordan Bilyeu, Lindbergh Tyra Brown, Pattonville Kyra Hardesty, Washington Jordan Oetting, Festus Makayla Wallace, Kirkwood Mackenzie Null, Jeferson Krista Richardson, De Soto Katie Everding, Mehlville Mel Taouil, Holt Carlie Sanders, Hillsboro Danielle Berry, Howell Zuri Jackson, Soldan

No 106 114 95 33 67 51 60 74 75 59 54 62 65 63 54

Avg 8.15 7.60 7.31 6.60 6.09 5.67 5.45 5.29 5.00 4.92 4.91 4.77 4.64 4.50 4.50

Free-Throw Pct. M. Nekola, Mascoutah K. Vaught, Althof K. Farmer, Columbia R. Pranger, Edwardsville Marta Durk, O’Fallon

Att 81 87 76 86 111

Avg 88.9 82.8 80.3 77.9 77.5

No 72 72 61 67 86

54 50 73 72 87 102 68 64 54 63

GIRLS SWIMMING • AREA LEADERS 50 Freestyle Bailey Grinter, Edwardsville Autumn Looney, St. Charles Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Laney Thomas, Lafayette Abby Fite, Parkway North Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Marina Pursley, Timberland LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Jessica Nichols, Hazelwood West

Time 22.95 24.67 24.72 24.81 24.92 25.18 25.20 25.31 25.33 25.44

100 Backstroke Bailey Grinter, Edwardsville Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West Maddie Pearl, Kirkwood Madison Brown, Parkway Central Katiana Porporis, Marquette Megan McFarland, Lafayette Mikayla Kempf, Webster Groves Kendall Hansen, Lafayette Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Lauren Massot, Westminster

Time 55.93 57.10 58.37 59.26 59.48 1:00.00 1:00.82 1:00.96 1:01.56 1:01.65

100 Breaststroke Katiana Porporis, Marquette Colleen Young, Lindbergh Annika Hofer, Parkway Central Caroline Caton, Edwardsville Carlie Manczuk, Parkway North Shelby Ripp, Parkway Central Erin Kelly, Kirkwood Katie Jackson, John Burroughs Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Megan Ross, MICDS

Time 1:07.06 1:09.41 1:09.95 1:11.19 1:11.48 1:11.57 1:11.61 1:11.69 1:11.74 1:11.88

100 Butterfly Kate May, Edwardsville Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West

Time 55.81 56.92

Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Alexandra Woody, Summit Madison Brown, Parkway Central Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Katie Knapp, Nerinx Hall Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Riley Deutsch, Ladue

58.46 59.35 1:00.90 1:00.90 1:00.97 1:00.98 1:01.03 1:01.25

100 Freestyle Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Kate May, Edwardsville LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Autumn Looney, St. Charles Laney Thomas, Lafayette Marina Pursley, Timberland Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Abby Fite, Parkway North Katiana Porporis, Marquette

Time 52.35 52.59 53.27 53.80 53.93 54.49 54.60 55.02 55.12 55.36

200 Freestyle Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Kate May, Edwardsville Alyssa Lemon, Marquette Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Sophia Marusic, JohnBurroughs Maria Newton, Parkway West Brigid Andrews, Villa Duchesne Payton Hagar, Marquette Cate Behl, Lafayette

Time 1:54.80 1:55.04 1:56.80 1:58.63 1:58.91 1:58.98 1:59.28 1:59.38 2:00.00 2:00.25

200 Individual Medley Kate May, Edwardsville Katiana Porporis, Marquette Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Madison Brown, Parkway Central Autumn Looney, St. Charles

Time 2:07.33 2:07.99 2:13.15 2:13.37 2:13.46

Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Lydia Welty, Clayton LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Colleen Young, Lindbergh Sophia Marusic, JohnBurroughs

2:13.47 2:13.81 2:14.47 2:14.51 2:15.76

500 Freestyle Victoria Brady, Edwardsville Madison Nguyen, Francis Howell Alyssa Lemon, Marquette Madison Brown, Parkway Central Brigid Andrews, Villa Duchesne Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Maria Newton, Parkway West Lydia Welty, Clayton Maddie Mather, Cor Jesu

Time 5:12.17 5:12.66 5:13.14 5:17.93 5:20.15 5:20.31 5:20.77 5:20.78 5:22.28 5:23.94

Diving (six dives) Ashley Yarbrough, Marquette Megan Hetzler, Parkway South Elle Christie, Lafayette T.J. Duckett, Zumwalt North Sarah Mink, Eureka

Points 299.4 267.2 258.6 257.25 254.15

200 Freestyle Relay Edwardsville Lafayette Visitation Marquette Webster

Time 1:37.75 1:41.48 1:44.23 1:44.38 1:44.40

200 Medley Relay Edwardsville Lafayette Parkway West Parkway. Central Kirkwood

Time 1:47.99 1:52.37 1:52.64 1:54.04 1:54.57


SPORTS

01.20.2016 • WedneSday • M 2 AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite

Points Open Current

Underdog

Sunday Patriots

AFC Championship 3 3

BRONCOS

PANTHERS

NFC Championship 3 3

Cards

NBA Favorite Points Underdog MAGIC 10 76ers WIZARDS 3 Heat RAPTORS 3 Celtics Cavaliers 12.5 NETS KNICKS [5] Jazz ROCKETS 3 Pistons Warriors 6 BULLS THUNDER 10 Hornets MAVERICKS 8.5 T’Wolves Kings 7 LAKERS Hawks 2 BLAZERS []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity of the injury. COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog C Florida 3 S FLORIDA MICHIGAN ST 14 Nebraska W VIRGINIA 12 Texas NOTRE DAME 11.5 Virginia Tech N CAROLINA 16 Wake Forest VIRGINIA COMM 13 Duquesne p-Temple 9 LaSalle FORDHAM 4.5 George Mason Georgia 2.5 MISSOURI Davidson 8 SAINT LOUIS SO ILLINOIS 3 Indiana St Illinois St 9 BRADLEY DRAKE 1.5 Missouri St Wichita St 7 NORTHERN IOWA MARQUETTE 7.5 DePaul BAYLOR 9 Kansas St MICHIGAN 16.5 Minnesota St. Joseph’s 10.5 PENN Colorado St 3.5 AIR FORCE Vanderbilt 2.5 TENNESSEE Villanova 7 SETON HALL Miami-Florida 15 BOSTON COLLEGE LOUISVILLE 9 Florida St WYOMING 3.5 Nevada BOISE ST 17.5 San Jose St WASHINGTON 2 Colorado CAL-SANTA BARB 3 Long Beach St CAL-IRVINE 14 CS-Fullerton OREGON ST 2.5 Ucla Added Game S DAKOTA 4.5 W Illinois p- Palestra. NHL Favorite Odds Underdog RED WINGS -$120/even Blues AVALANCHE -$165/+$145 Sabres DUCKS -$125/+$105 Wild Grand Salami: Over/under 15.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Baltimore LHP Zack Dotson (Bowie-EL) 100 games, N.Y. Mets 3B Eudor Garcia (Columbia-SAL) 80 games and free agent 1B Tyler Williams 50 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Promoted Sean Brown to chief financial officer, Jeff Lantz senior director of communications, James Dispanet controller, Michelle Heystek senior accountant and Cory Bernstine manager of strategy and analytics. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Named Julio Vinas manager of Charlotte (IL); Ryan Newman manager of Birmingham (SL); Joel Skinner manager of Winston-Salem (Carolina); Cole Armstrong manager of Kannapolis (SAL), Tommy Thompson manager, Matt Zaleski pitching coach and Willie Harris hitting coach of Great Falls (Pioneer); and Aaron Rowand minor league outfield and baserunning coordinator. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with LHP David Huff on a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Signed RHP Al Alburquerque. Designated INF-OF Efren Navarro for assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES — Agreed to terms with SS Didi Gregorius and RHP Nathan Eovaldi on one-year contracts. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Signed RHP Joe Blanton to a one-year contract. MIAMI MARLINS — Agreed to terms with LHP Wei-Yin Chen on a five-year contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with C Chris Stewart on a two-year contract. Claimed RHP A.J. Schugel off waivers from Seattle. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Named Joe Lockhart executive vice president of communications. Promoted Cynthia Hogan to executive vice president of public policy and government affairs. BALTIMORE RAVENS — Signed DE DeAngelo Tyson to a reserve/future contract. DENVER BRONCOS — Placed S Omar Bolden on injured reserve. Signed CB Taurean Nixon. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Fired tight ends coach Jerry Fontenot and running backs coach Sam Gash. Signed DE B.J. McBryde. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed TE Ross Travis, LB Tyrell Adams, OL Michael Liedtke, RB Darrin Reaves, DT Jimmy Staten, WRs Da’Ron Brown and Fred Williams and OTs Reid Fragel and Laurence Gibson to reserve/future contracts. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed QB Zac Dysert and TE Dominique Jones to reserve/future contracts. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed LB Jerod Mayo on injured reserve. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Jim Schwartz defensive coordinator, Jeff Stoutland offensive line coach and Dave Fipp special teams coach. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed OT Matt Feiler, C B.J. Finney, TE Xavier Grimble, WR Shakim Phillips, DBs Jordan Dangerfield and Isaiah Frey and RBs Rajion Neal and Abou Toure to reserve/future contracts. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed RB Brandon Cottom, DT Justin Hamilton, C Drew Nowak, DE Will Pericak, CBs Stanley Jean-Baptiste and Trovon Reed and WRs George Farmer, Deshon Foxx, Antwan Goodley and Douglas McNeil to reserve/future contracts. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Named Nate Kaczor special teams coordinator, Mark Duffner linebackers coach, Jay Hayes defensive line coach and Jon Hoke defensive backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed D Jon Merrill on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 16. Activated F Michael Cammalleri from injured reserve. COLLEGE INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS ASSOCIATION — Named Chris Eriksson championships and rankings coordinator. FURMAN — Named Caroline Kingsdorf associate athletic director for finance. HOFSTRA — Agreed to terms with women’s soccer coach Simon Riddiough on a multiyear contract extension. HOLY CROSS — Named Kirsten Britton associate director of athletics for facilities, operations and events. LA SALLE — Named Paul Macht men’s and women’s water polo coach. UNC GREENSBORO — Announced men’s basketball G Justin Jordan has transferred from Milwaukee.

TENNIS Australian Open Results Tuesday | At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $30.18 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Lucas Pouille, France, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4. Joao Sousa (32), Portugal, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Stephane Robert, France, def. Bjorn Fratangelo, United States, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. Sam Groth, Australia, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. John Millman, Australia, def. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 3-6, 5-7, 7-6 (2), 5-0, retired. Feliciano Lopez (18), Spain, def. Daniel Evans, Britain, 6-1, 6-0, 6-4. Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-2, 4-6 6-1, 6-4. Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Fabio Fognini (20), Italy, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (7), 6-7 (5), 7-6 (1). Rajeev Ram, United States, def. Kevin Anderson (11), South Africa, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (4), 6-3, 3-0, retired. Jeremy Chardy (30), France, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 13-11. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Donald Young, United States, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2. Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 2-6, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5, 6-1. John Isner (10), United States, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 6-3, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Jordan Thompson, Australia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-1, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2.

Tim Smyczek, United States, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Steve Johnson (31), United States, def. Aljaz Bedene, Britain, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Gael Monfils (23), France, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Marco Cecchinato, Italy, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-5, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (7), 8-6. Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Rafael Nadal (5), Spain, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2. David Ferrer (8), Spain, def. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Brian Baker, United States, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5). Bernard Tomic (16), Australia, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Taro Daniel, Japan, 7-6 (2), 7-5, 5-7, 6-7 (5), 6-1. Jack Sock (25), United States, def. Taylor Fritz, United States, 6-4, 3-6, 0-6, 6-3, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-4, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-2. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. James Duckworth, Australia, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-4. Stan Wawrinka (4), Switzerland, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 7-6 (2), 6-3, retired. Viktor Troicki (21), Serbia, def. Daniel Munoz de la Nava, Spain, 4-6, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Women First Round Ekaterina Makarova (21), Russia, def. Maddison Inglis, Australia, 6-3, 6-0. Annika Beck, Germany, def. Priscilla Hon, Australia, 6-0, 6-3. Garbine Muguruza (3), Spain, def. Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, 6-0, 6-4. Madison Keys (15), United States, def. Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, 5-7, 6-2, 7-5. Laura Siegemund, Germany, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 6-4, 7-5. Timea Bacsinszky (11), Switzerland, def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5. Vania King, United States, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Tatjana Maria, Germany, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-4, 6-3. Jelena Jankovic (19), Serbia, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-3, 6-3. Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Venus Williams (8), United States, 6-4, 6-2. Elina Svitolina (18), Ukraine, def. Victoria Duval, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4. Karolina Pliskova (9), Czech Republic, def. Kimberly Birrell, Australia, 6-4, 6-4. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic,def. Caroline Garcia (32), France, 6-2, 6-4. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Jarmila Wolfe, Australia, 6-0, 4-2, retired. Naomi Osaka, Japan, def. Donna Vekic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-2. Ana Ivanovic (20), Serbia, def. Tammi Patterson, Australia, 6-2, 6-3. Sabine Lisicki (30), Germany, def. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Lesia Tsurenko (31), Ukraine, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-3. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Andreea Mitu, Romania, 6-3, 6-4. Zheng Saisai, China, def. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 6-1, 6-2 Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def. Storm Sanders, Australia, 6-4, 6-2. Alize Cornet, France, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1, 6-0. Danka Kovinic, Montenegro, def. Samantha Crawford, United States, 6-2, 6-4. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. IrinaCamelia Begu (29), Romania, 6-3, 6-2. Madison Brengle, United States, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Angelique Kerber (7), Germany, def. Misaki Doi, Japan, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (6), 6-3. Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Lara Arruabarrena, Spain, def. Maryna Zanevska, Ukraine, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-3. Zhang Shuai, China, def. Simona Halep (2), Romania, 6-4, 6-3. Victoria Azarenka (14), Belarus, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, 6-0, 6-0.

BASKETBALL Tuesday’s Div. I College Basketball Major Scores East Dayton 85, St. Bon. 79 NC State 78, Pittsburgh 61 Providence 71, Butler 68 St. Peter’s 77, Fairfield 71 UConn 60, Tulane 42 South Auburn 83, Alabama 77 Florida 81, Mississippi St. 78 Georgia St. 69, Ga. Southern 66, OT Liberty 55, Longwood 53 Maryland 62, Northwestern 56, OT South Carolina 77, Mississippi 74, OT Texas A&M-CC 89, Northwestern St. 79 Tulsa 84, East Carolina 69 Virginia 69, Clemson 62 Wofford 89, Tenn. Wesleyan 66 Southwest Abilene Christian 75, McNeese St. 67 Houston Bapt. 72, Cent. Arkansas 61 Oklahoma St. 86, Kansas 67 SMU 77, Houston 73 Texas A&M 71, LSU 57 Far West UNLV 80, Utah St. 68 Midwest Akron 92, E. Michigan 88 Buffalo 77, Miami (Ohio) 60 Evansville 74, Loyola (Chi.) 66 Georgetown 81, Xavier 72 Green Bay 99, Chicago St. 66 Indiana 103, Illinois 69 Kent St. 76, Ball St. 68 N. Illinois 75, Cent. Michigan 70 N. Kentucky 90, Oakland 73 Ohio 82, W. Michigan 64 SE Missouri 84, Hannibal-LaGrange 61 Toledo 81, Bowling Green 74

Standings Atlantic 10 VCU Dayton Saint Joseph’s St Bonaventure George Washington Davidson Rhode Island Duquesne Richmond Fordham Massachusetts George Mason St. Louis U. La Salle

Conf. 5 0 5 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4

Overall 13 5 15 3 14 3 12 5 14 4 11 5 11 7 12 6 10 7 10 6 8 9 7 11 6 11 5 10

Big Ten Indiana Iowa Maryland Purdue Ohio St. Michigan Michigan St. Nebraska Northwestern Penn St. Wisconsin Illinois Minnesota Rutgers

Conf. 6 0 5 0 6 1 4 2 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 4 2 4 1 5 0 6 0 6

Overall 16 3 14 3 17 2 16 3 12 7 13 5 16 3 11 8 15 5 11 8 10 9 9 10 6 12 6 13

Conf. 6 0 6 1 5 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 4 1 5 1 6 0 6

Overall 12 5 17 3 16 3 10 8 9 10 7 11 10 9 3 16 8 11 5 13

Conf. 3 3 2 2 2 3 1 4 1 5 0 6 Conf. 5 0 5 0 5 1 3 2 3 3 2 3

Overall 6 12 10 9 8 10 8 12 4 14 3 16 Overall 14 4 13 6 13 6 9 8 7 14 11 9

Conf. 6 0 4 1 4 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 1 3 0 5 1 4

Overall 16 2 17 1 12 6 11 7 13 4 9 8 9 8 9 6 10 7 9 8 12 6 8 9 7 10 10 7

Missouri Valley Wichita St Evansville SIU Carbondale Indiana St. Illinois St. Missouri St. Northern Iowa Bradley Loyola (Chicago) Drake

Ohio Valley WEST Eastern Illinois Tenn.-Martin Murray St. Austin Peay SIU Edwardsville SEMO WEST Tennessee St. Belmont Tennessee Tech Morehead St. Jacksonville St. Eastern Kentucky

SEC Texas A&M South Carolina Florida LSU Kentucky Arkansas Auburn Georgia Vanderbilt Tennessee Ole Miss Missouri Mississippi St. Alabama

HIGH SCHOOLS: TUESDAY’S RESULTS

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1.

UConn (16-0) idle. Next: vs. UCF, Wednesday.

2.

South Carolina (17-0) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday.

3.

Notre Dame (17-1) idle. Next: vs. Syracuse, Thursday.

4.

Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday.

5.

Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Wednesday.

6.

Texas (16-1) idle. Next: at TCU, Wednesday.

7.

Ohio State (13-4) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday.

8.

Arizona State (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday.

9.

Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Thursday.

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

Please notify STLhighschoolsports.com via email at stats@stltoday.com or on Twitter at @STLhssports of any postponements or time changes to Wednesday’s games. BOYS BASKETBALL

13. Texas A&M (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 23 Missouri, Thursday.

Luth. North 16 13 17 15 61 MICDS 15 20 17 19 71 M (11-5): M. Roper 23, Mitchell 14, Buchanan 12. FG 23 (4), FT 21-31. Ladue 13 17 17 13 60 JohnBurroughs 9 13 12 11 45 L (10-6): Rogers 34. FG 23 (8), FT 6-9. J (6-7): Smith 15, Milbourn 12, Goldfarb 11. FG 16 (1), FT 12-21. Pky. South 11 22 15 15 63 Mehlville 9 4 8 14 35 P (8-6): Sommer 13. FG 25 (4), FT 9-25. M (7-7): Yaeger 9. FG 12 (1), FT 10-13. Mater Dei 9 14 13 11 47 Teutopolis 13 12 11 8 44 M (12-3): Pollmann 16. FG 14 (4), FT 15-18. T: B. Mette 24. FG 17 (4), FT 6-9. Webster 18 16 20 14 68 Pky. North 10 9 4 13 36 W (14-1): Ramey 20, Gordon 12. FG 29 (4), FT 6-10. P (4-10): Allen 13. FG 12 (1), FT 11-17. Mascoutah 2 8 9 7 26 Nashville 11 10 17 12 50 M (4-15): Mayberry 10. FG 10 (2), FT 4-5. N (13-6): Bultman 16, Newman 13, Heggemeier 11. FG 20 (4), FT 6-7. Vandalia 12 6 8 27 53 Gibault 18 17 27 20 82 G (13-6): J. Rueter 19, Davis 18, Deterding 13, Kessler 10. FG 28 (6), FT 20-25.

14. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

10. Mississippi State (17-2) idle. Next: at Georgia, Thursday. 11. Oregon State (14-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. 12. Stanford (14-4) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Friday.

MICDS 11 14 18 16 59 Ritter 10 16 8 11 45 M (10-3): T. Baur 23, Thompson 21. FG 23 (3), FT 1015. R (6-4): Haynes 13, Tomlin 12. FG 17 (6), FT 5-9. Pky. North 20 16 15 15 66 Webster 4 14 17 18 53 P (14-1): Davis 13, Pimentel 13, Johnson 11, Stovall 11, Belcher 10. FG 25 (4), FT 12-20. W (9-5): Waelterman 11, Moran 10. FG 16 (2), FT 19-31. Windsor 4 10 4 11 29 JohnBurroughs 18 7 10 14 49 J (8-4): Gill 23. FG 19 (2), FT 9-18. Wesclin 7 8 3 13 31 Nashville 11 5 8 11 35 W (8-13): Haukapp 9. FG 11 (6), FT 3-6. U. City 2 13 14 7 36 Pky. Central 14 15 12 13 54 U (9-7): Reed 10. FG 14 (3), FT 4-19. P (9-3): G. Stephens 27. FG 19 (4), FT 12-24. Mehlville 19 12 6 18 55 Pky. South 21 15 20 13 69 P (8-7): Steins 27, Ganninger 11, Kramer 11. FG 25 (3), FT 16-22.

15. South Florida (12-4) idle. Next: at Memphis, Wednesday. 16. Miami (17-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Florida State, Sunday. 17. Louisville (14-5) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Monday. 18. Tennessee (11-6) idle. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. 19. Oklahoma (12-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. 20. UCLA (12-5) idle. Next: vs. California, Friday. 21. Michigan State (14-4) beat Rutgers 59-48. Next: at No. 5 Maryland, Saturday. 22. Florida (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. 23. Missouri (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 13 Texas A&M, Thursday.

Granite City 11 9 7 17 44 Alton 12 13 7 11 43 G (4-12): Moore 21, Garrett 12. FG 18 (5), FT 3-6. New Athens 10 13 18 15 56 Waterloo 12 4 12 21 49 N (17-3): Lance 16, Marlow 15, Ragland 13. FG 19 (2), FT 16-25. W (8-9): Finnerty 16, Luedmann 13. FG 19 (0), FT 11-18. North Mac 14 2 4 13 33 Carlinville 6 8 12 10 36 N: Starks 11. FG 14 (0), FT 5-12. C (7-15): Schmidt 9. FG 13 (1), FT 9-17. Bunker Hill 4 6 10 9 29 Mount Olive 22 24 12 14 72 B (2-16): Allman 8, Schwegel 8. FG 13 (2), FT 1-3. M (20-3): Henke 21, Niehaus 13, Murphy 12. FG 27 (3), FT 15-24. Staunton 6 6 10 4 26 Gillespie 14 19 21 4 58 S (1-19): Welch 8. FG 10 (0), FT 6-14. G (14-6): B. Jarman 12, Niemeyer 10. FG 23 (3), FT 9-12.

GIRLS SWIMMING Parkway Central 139, Afton 30 (x-state-qualifying performance) 200 medley relay: 1. Parkway Central A, 2:20.54; 2. Parkway Central C, 2:20.86 200 freestyle: 1. Emily Kaiser, Parkway Central, 2:27.87; 2. Isabella Gluzman, Parkway Central, 2:31.60 200 individual medley: 1. Katy McCormick, Parkway Central, 2:46.90; 2. Pamela Petterchak, Afton, 2:53.06 50 freestyle: 1. Shelby Ripp, Parkway Central, 28.23; 2. Kate McNeal, Parkway Central, 30.89 1-meter diving: 1. Marissa Brady, Parkway Central, 186.65; 2. Emily Ortmann, Parkway Central, 145.90 100 butterfly: 1. Claire Huang, Parkway Central, 1:16.51; 2. Susie LaFever, Parkway Central, 1:16.67 100 freestyle: 1. Kate McNeal, Parkway Central, 1:07.33; 2. Emily Kaiser, Parkway Central, 1:07.62 500 freestyle: x-1. Madison Brown, Parkway Central, 5:17.93; 2. Olivia Gottlieb, Parkway Central, 6:07.18 200 freestyle relay: 1. Parkway Central A, 1:57.51; 2. Parkway Central B, 2:05.42 100 backstroke: 1. Olivia Gottlieb, Parkway Central, 1:15.26; 2. Pamela Petterchak, Afton, 1:18.16 100 breaststroke: 1. Annemarie Campbell, Parkway Central, 1:31.23; 2. Emma Barnes,

Parkway Central, 1:36.04 400 freestyle relay: 1. Parkway Central B, 4:27.58; 2. Parkway Central A, 4:29.49 Other area scores Westminster 103, St. Joseph’s 84 Kirkwood 136, Webster Groves 47

WRESTLING -WOOD RIVER 36, ROXANA 33 113: Drew Sobol, Wood River, pin Akeman, :42 132: Foiles, Roxana, pin Chris Staggs, 1:26 145: Hunter Morales, Wood River, dec. Carpenter, 7-0 170: Huf, Roxana, dec. Erslon, 18-11 195: Zack Kincade, Wood River, pin Holmes, :37 220: Nyswonger, Roxana, pin Adam Copeland, 1:54 285: Jon Wright, Wood River, pin Robinson, 3-2 Won by forfeit Roxana: Katzmarek (106), Henseler (126), Maguire (138) Wood River: Austin Hammond (120), Zac Blasioli (152), Lee (182) Double forfeit: 160 -WOOD RIVER 42, CARLYLE 28 132: Anderson, Carlyle, pin Chris Staggs, :33 145: Doerr, Carlyle, major dec. Hunter Moreales, 13-1 160: Jake Erslon, Wood River, pin Hanke, 5:34 170: Pruitt, Carlyle, pin Lindquist, 1:02 182: Marlow, Carlyle, pin Lee, 1:14 195: Zack Kincaide, Wood River, pin Useni, :53 220: Adam Copeland, Wood River, pin Allen, :22 285: Jon Wright, Wood River, pin Husman, 1:39 Won by forfeit Wood River: Drew Sobol (113), Austin Hammond (120), Zac Blasioli (152) Carlyle: Bone (138) Double forfeit: 106, 126 -ROXANA 54, CARLYLE 21 132: Foiles, Roxana, pin Anderson, 1:12 138: Maguire, Roxana, pin Bone, 1:47 145: Doerr, Carlyle, dec. Carpenter, 8-3 170: Huf, Roxana, pin Pruitt, 1:57 195: Berry, Carlyle, pin Holmes, :53 285: Robinson, Roxana, pin Husman, :46 Won by forfeit Roxana: Katzmarek (106), Akewman (113), Henseler (126), Cherry (152), Hyswonger (220) Carlyle: Hanke (160), Doerf (182) Double forfeit: 120

24. DePaul (13-6) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Friday. 25. West Virginia (15-4) idle. Next: at TCU, Sunday.

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE

AREA COLLEGES BOYS BASKETBALL

TUESDAY RESULTS No basketball games WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Lake Land at SWIC, 5:30 p.m. W: SLU at St. Joseph’s, 6 p.m. W: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 6 p.m. W: Fontbonne at MacMurray, 6 p.m. W: Moberly at Jefferson, 6 p.m. M: Indiana State at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: Missouri State at Drake, 7 p.m. M: Lake Land at SWIC, 7:30 p.m. M: St. Louis CC at Lewis & Clark, 7:30 p.m. W: SEMO at SIU Edwardsville, 8 p.m. M: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at MacMurray, 8 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL Leaders Through Monday Goal Scoring Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Alex Ovechkin Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Tyler Seguin Dallas Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Matt Duchene Colorado Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Mike Hoffman Ottawa Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Max Pacioretty Montreal Daniel Sedin Vancouver Jonathan Toews Chicago Brent Burns San Jose Taylor Hall Edmonton Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Brock Nelson NY Islanders Kyle Palmieri New Jersey Patrice Bergeron Boston Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Corey Perry Anaheim Jeff Skinner Carolina Shane Doan Arizona Leo Komarov Toronto Brad Marchand Boston James Neal Nashville Artemi Panarin Chicago Zach Parise Minnesota Brandon Saad Columbus Patrick Sharp Dallas Justin Williams Washington Mats Zuccarello NY Rangers Assists Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Erik Karlsson Ottawa John Klingberg Dallas Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jamie Benn Dallas Nicklas Backstrom Washington Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington P.K. Subban Montreal Henrik Sedin Vancouver Tyler Seguin Dallas Taylor Hall Edmonton Artemi Panarin Chicago Alexander Steen St Louis Joe Thornton San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Tomas Plekanec Montreal Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Jonathan Huberdeau Florida Kris Letang Pittsburgh Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Bobby Ryan Ottawa Brent Seabrook Chicago Ryan Suter Minnesota Power Play Goals Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas Justin Faulk Carolina Alex Ovechkin Washington Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Patrice Bergeron Boston Shane Doan Arizona Loui Eriksson Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Shea Weber Nashville Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Jarome Iginla Colorado Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Max Pacioretty Montreal Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Short Handed Goals Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Paul Byron Montreal Eric Fehr Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Zack Smith Ottawa Artem Anisimov Chicago Cam Atkinson Columbus Jamie Benn Dallas Jason Chimera Washington Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Blake Comeau Colorado Cody Eakin Dallas Adam Henrique New Jersey Bryan Little Winnipeg Matt Nieto San Jose Jonathan Toews Chicago Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Mika Zibanejad Ottawa Power Play Assists Name Team Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Kris Letang Pittsburgh Alexander Steen St Louis P.K. Subban Montreal Mikkel Boedker Arizona Brent Burns San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS John Klingberg Dallas Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Tyson Barrie Colorado Patrice Bergeron Boston Patrick Kane Chicago Torey Krug Boston Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Victor Rask Carolina Brent Seabrook Chicago Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Jason Spezza Dallas Short Handed Assists Name Team Jeff Petry Montreal Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Jamie Benn Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Paul Byron Montreal Zdeno Chara Boston Vernon Fiddler Dallas Curtis Lazar Ottawa Torrey Mitchell Montreal Drew Stafford Winnipeg Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Tommy Wingels San Jose Aleksander Barkov Florida Francois Beauchemi Colorado Pierre-Edouard Bel Philadelphia Jordie Benn Dallas T.J. Brodie Calgary J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Alex Burmistrov Winnipeg

GP 48 44 46 46 47 47 44 44 42 45 45 43 46 46 48 44 47 45 45 46 44 46 44 47 36 43 39 45 48 36 45 46 45 45 GP 48 46 46 46 46 42 45 46 44 46 47 48 49 44 43 37 40 43 44 46 43 46 35 45 45 48 45

G 29 27 26 25 25 22 22 22 20 20 20 19 19 19 19 18 18 18 18 18 17 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 A 40 38 32 31 30 29 29 29 28 28 27 27 27 26 26 25 25 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

GP 48 46 47 44 45 45 44 36 44 47 45 45 47 46 46 44 44

PP 14 12 12 10 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7

GP 46 34 35 39 45 47 45 46 45 44 47 46 44 46 41 48 46 45

SH 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

GP 42 46 35 49 46 45 44 43 43 46 45 43 44 48 43 45 45 48 39 46

PPA 16 16 14 14 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

GP 43 45 46 44 34 42 46 41 35 44 46 44 36 47 35 43 34 41 46

SHA 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

-98TH MACOUPIN COUNTY TOURNAMENT Pool B Mount Olive vs Piasa Southwestern, 6 p.m. Staunton vs North Mac, 7:30 p.m. -BENTON INVITATIONAL Carlyle vs Sesser-Valier, 6 p.m. Meridian vs Pinckneyville, 7:30 p.m. Hamilton County vs Benton, 9 p.m. -OKAWVILLE INVITATIONAL Madison, Illinois vs Okawville, 7 p.m. -ST. JAMES TOURNAMENT First round Newburg vs Sullivan, 7:30 p.m. Blair Oaks vs St. James, 6 p.m. -BELLEVILLE EAST CLASSIC First round Belleville West vs McCluer, 6 p.m. Columbia vs Belleville East, 7:30 p.m. -TRIAD MID-WINTER CLASSIC Pool A: Gateway STEM vs Marion, 6 p.m. Pool B: Riverview Gardens vs Highland, 7:30 p.m. Other area games: Hancock at Grandview, 5 p.m. Trico vs. Freeburg, at Sparta, 5:30 p.m. Parkway Central at University City, 6 p.m. Lafayette at Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Clayton at Pattonville, 6 p.m. Whitfield at Brentwood, 6:30 p.m.

DuBourg at Bayless, 6:30 p.m. Zumwalt South at Zumwalt East, 7 p.m. Marquette at Northwest-CH, 7 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 7 p.m. Fox at Hillsboro, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 7 p.m. Oakville at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Holt, 7 p.m. Bourbon at Herculaneum, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -30TH HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT Consolation semifinal Teutopolis vs Mater Dei, 5 p.m. Nashville vs Taylorville, 6:30 p.m. Other area games: Lift For Life at Crossroads, 5 p.m. Washington at Zumwalt South, 5:30 p.m. Luth. St. Charles at O’F Christian, 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 5:30 p.m. Edwardsville at St. Joseph’s, 5:30 p.m. Vashon at Soldan, 6 p.m. Ursuline at Cor Jesu, 6 p.m. McCluer S-Berkeley at McCluer, 6 p.m. Elverado vs. Marissa, at Coulterville, 6:15 p.m. Trinity at Wright City, 6:30 p.m. Borgia at Duchesne, 6:45 p.m. Eureka at Pacific, 7 p.m. Orchard Farm at Afton, 7 p.m. Westminster at John Burroughs, 7 p.m.

WRESTLING Cleveland at Miller Career, 4:30 p.m. Quad meet at Ladue, 5 p.m. Lutheran North at Hancock, 5 p.m. Liberty at MICDS, 5 p.m. Winfield at MICDS, 5 p.m. Lutheran South at MICDS, 5 p.m. Pattonville at Ritenour, 5 p.m. Fox at Lafayette, 5 p.m. Marquette vs. Fox, at Lafayette, 5 p.m. Eureka at Parkway South, 5 p.m. Northwest-CH at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Seckman at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Seckman vs. Northwest-CH, at Mehlville, 5 p.m. Kirkwood at Webster Groves, 6 p.m. CBC at Vianney, 6 p.m. Troy at Howell North, 6 p.m. Oakville at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Howell Central, 7 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West at Timberland, 7 p.m. Marquette at Lafayette, 7 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING FZ East, Timberland, Washington at RecPlex, 3:30 p.m. Incarnate, Rosati-Kain at Westminster, 4 p.m. University City at Hazelwood East, 4 p.m. Rosati-Kain at Kennedy, 6:30 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL • AREA LEADERS Points Pts Jayson Tatum, Chaminade 543 Isaiah Ford, Afton 304 Teddy Fifer, ME Lutheran 292 Mark Rogers, Ladue 362 Javon Pickett, Belleville East 375 Zeke Moore, Riverview Gardens 324 Koby Klaus, Grandview 344 David Holden, Greenville 408 Kamau Kinder, Festus 293 Blake Marks, Wood River 422 Aaron Cook, Westminster 288 Adam Mennemeyer, Troy 308 Kyle Smith, Marissa 350 Nic Hagel, Steeleville 320 Noah Frederking, Okawville 382 Ryan Briscoe, Duchesne 293

Avg 28.6 25.3 24.3 24.1 23.4 23.1 22.9 22.7 22.5 22.2 22.2 22.0 21.9 21.3 21.2 20.9

Rebounds Caleb Strauss, Warrenton AJ Epenesa, Edwardsville Carte’Are Gordon, Vianney Michael Thompson, Parkway N. Kyler Jones, Miller Career Mark Rogers, Ladue R. Henderson Jr., Pattonville Jevon White, St. Pius X Gaven Pinkley, Hillsboro Montez McMath, Lift for Life Vincent Phillips, Metro Jack Kurz, Priory L. Kelley-Wolf, Windsor James Reed, St. Pius X Kai Collier, FZ South Jamel Warren, Hancock Brian Deterding, Gibault Craig Theiss, De Soto

Avg 16.5 12.7 12.1 11.8 11.7 10.7 10.7 10.4 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.2 9.9 9.9 9.8 9.8 9.7 9.7

No 198 190 194 154 152 160 150 156 164 164 143 143 159 138 147 137 174 145

3-Point Field Goals Tracy Gentry, Roxana Oliver Stephen, Edwardsville Brian Hutson, Cleveland Teddy Fifer, ME Lutheran Marvin Bateman, Althof Zeke Moore, Riverview Gardens Justin Bailey, Piasa SW Clif Degroot, Westminster Kyle Smith, Marissa Matt Nester, SLUH S. Cofman, Bunker Hill Kamau Kinder, Festus Tonio Morrow, Lift for Life Khari Jackson, Lovejoy Drew Besand, Hillsboro

No Avg 63 3.50 56 3.50 44 3.38 40 3.33 43 3.31 46 3.29 45 3.21 41 3.15 50 3.13 45 3.00 38 2.92 36 2.77 44 2.75 38 2.71 43 2.69

Assists No Sam Rhoads, Valley Park 113 Mark Smith, Edwardsville 125 Zach Bush, University City 104 Yuri Collins, St. Mary’s 101 Marquise Chairs, East St. Louis 84 Kamau Kinder, Festus 78 Koby Klaus, Grandview 87 Jacob Rueter, Gibault 98 Darius Rice, Jennings 78 Corey Shepherd, Hazelwood East 79 Joey Cacciatore, Bayless 69 Nigel Ferrell, Lift for Life 78 Jaden Henderson, Berkeley 58 Hasaan Decarolis, SC West 62 Kyle Smith, Marissa 76

Avg 9.42 7.81 7.43 6.31 6.00 6.00 5.80 5.44 5.20 4.94 4.93 4.88 4.83 4.77 4.75

Free-Throw Pct. Noah Moss, Triad Nic Hagel, Steeleville

Avg 87.1 87.0

No 74 67

Att 85 77

Jayson Tatum, Cham. 130 X. Sneed, Hazelwood C. 93 D. Holden, Greenville 117 B. Weiss, Mascoutah 86 Mark Smith, Edwardsville 65 N. Pollmann, Mater Dei 68 J. Pickett, Belleville East 80 Zeke Moore, Riverview 54 Kenny Berry, Granite City 76 C. Teson, St. Charles 60 C. Shepherd, Hazelwood E.70 H. Decarolis, SC West 60 Koby Klaus, Grandview 98

150 108 140 104 79 83 99 67 95 75 88 76 125

86.7 86.1 83.6 82.7 82.3 81.9 80.8 80.6 80.0 80.0 79.5 78.9 78.4

Steals No Chris Colley, Edwardsville 73 Aaron Cook, Westminster 59 Bobby Sanders, Jennings 48 Darius Rice, Jennings 55 Sam Rhoads, Valley Park 42 Jeramy Shaw, Valley Park 40 Javonte Perkins, Miller 42 Marquise Chairs, East St. Louis 45 Zac Ridenhour, Jerseyville 54 Derrick Henderson, North Tech 40

Avg 4.56 4.54 3.69 3.67 3.50 3.33 3.23 3.21 3.18 3.08

Blocked Shots Gaven Pinkley, Hillsboro Andrew Voss, Timberland Rick Hill, De Smet Tahj Telfair, Kirkwood Chris Jordan, FZ South L. Kelley-Wolf, Windsor Vincent Phillips, Metro Carte’Are Gordon, Vianney Khalib Becton, Maple-RH Jack Kurz, Priory

No 58 46 44 46 48 48 41 42 34 36

Avg 3.63 3.54 3.38 3.29 3.20 3.00 2.93 2.63 2.62 2.57

M. Null, Jeferson B. Henke, Mt Olive K. Schmelter, Cor Jesu KK Steins, Parkway S. A. Ponce, Highland S. Thompson, Triad D. Fuhring, St. James S. Kluesner, Lutheran SC K. Fischer, Collinsville J. Niehaus, Mt Olive

70 65 95 94 114 134 90 85 72 85

77.1 76.9 76.8 76.6 76.3 76.1 75.6 75.3 75.0 74.1

Steals No Chrishana Wilson, Gateway 61 Jordyn White, Luth. North 64 L. Member-Meneh, Luth. S 63 Kendra Bass, Lebanon 87 Izzy Farrell, Fox 56 Courtney Kernich, Mt Olive 93 Sami Serra, Afton 60 Renetha Dickson, Luth. N 59 Alina Lance, New Athens 86 Marshelle Franklin, Brentwood 53

Avg 5.08 4.92 4.85 4.83 4.67 4.65 4.62 4.54 4.53 4.42

Blcoked Shots No Brooke Flowers, Metro 107 Celeste Akoro, O’Fallon 86 Kali Myers, Pacific 64 S. Kluesner, Lutheran SC 62 Sophia Rivera, Brentwood 49 Monique Manuel, Summit 43 Kelly McLaughlin, St. Joe 40 Megan Jensen, Borgia 34 Kathryn Martenet, Parkway W. 33 Allie Troeckler, Civic M. 54

Avg 7.13 4.78 4.27 4.13 4.08 3.31 2.86 2.83 2.75 2.70

GIRLS BASKETBALL • AREA LEADERS Points L. Member-Meneh, Luth. South H. Diestelkamp, Owensville Holly Forbes, North County Allie Troeckler, Civic M. Renetha Dickson, Luth. N Chrishana Wilson, Gateway Taylor Baur, MICDS Geena Stephens, Parkway C. Lakeita Chappel, Haz. West April Turner, Hancock Alison Gill, John Burroughs Sophie Thompson, Triad Devin Fuhring, St. James

Pts 320 216 326 441 286 264 247 227 285 222 202 362 302

Avg 24.6 24.0 23.3 22.1 22.0 22.0 20.6 20.6 20.4 20.2 20.2 20.1 20.1

Rebounds Lejla Memisevic, Valley Park Kelly McLaughlin, St. Joseph’s Markia Davis, McCluer Elle Russell, St. Pius X Dasia Batteast, McKinley Asia Cunningham, Bayless Chrishana Wilson, Gateway Peyton Ward, Winfield Brooke Flowers, Metro Kirstin Sparks, Grandview Brianna Watkins, Haz. West Machela Cook, St. Pius X Mackenzie Kellogg, Wesclin Emily Montgomery, Troy Dana Link, Crystal City Alex LaPorta, Highland Jada Poland, FZ West

No 79 198 84 167 142 151 148 135 179 155 165 155 220 132 98 208 146

Avg 19.8 14.1 14.0 13.9 12.9 12.6 12.3 12.3 11.9 11.9 11.8 11.1 11.0 11.0 10.9 10.4 10.4

3-Point Field Goals Jamika Jones, McCluer Kyra Hardesty, Washington Caitlyn Demaree, Principia Shauna Rinehart, St. James Madi Peyton, Holt B. Muenstermann, Jerseyville Karli Carr, Gillespie Sophie Thompson, Triad Caroline Rogers, Pacific Kavita Krell, Lindbergh

No 7 29 42 33 38 51 52 48 39 31

Avg 3.50 3.22 3.00 3.00 2.92 2.83 2.74 2.67 2.60 2.58

Assists Kirstin Sparks, Grandview Courtney Reimer, Duchesne Elle Holden, Grandview Jordan Bilyeu, Lindbergh Tyra Brown, Pattonville Kyra Hardesty, Washington Jordan Oetting, Festus Makayla Wallace, Kirkwood Mackenzie Null, Jeferson Krista Richardson, De Soto Katie Everding, Mehlville Mel Taouil, Holt Carlie Sanders, Hillsboro Danielle Berry, Howell Zuri Jackson, Soldan

No 106 114 95 33 67 51 60 74 75 59 54 62 65 63 54

Avg 8.15 7.60 7.31 6.60 6.09 5.67 5.45 5.29 5.00 4.92 4.91 4.77 4.64 4.50 4.50

Free-Throw Pct. M. Nekola, Mascoutah K. Vaught, Althof K. Farmer, Columbia R. Pranger, Edwardsville Marta Durk, O’Fallon

Att 81 87 76 86 111

Avg 88.9 82.8 80.3 77.9 77.5

No 72 72 61 67 86

54 50 73 72 87 102 68 64 54 63

GIRLS SWIMMING • AREA LEADERS 50 Freestyle Bailey Grinter, Edwardsville Autumn Looney, St. Charles Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Laney Thomas, Lafayette Abby Fite, Parkway North Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Marina Pursley, Timberland LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Jessica Nichols, Hazelwood West

Time 22.95 24.67 24.72 24.81 24.92 25.18 25.20 25.31 25.33 25.44

100 Backstroke Bailey Grinter, Edwardsville Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West Maddie Pearl, Kirkwood Madison Brown, Parkway Central Katiana Porporis, Marquette Megan McFarland, Lafayette Mikayla Kempf, Webster Groves Kendall Hansen, Lafayette Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Lauren Massot, Westminster

Time 55.93 57.10 58.37 59.26 59.48 1:00.00 1:00.82 1:00.96 1:01.56 1:01.65

100 Breaststroke Katiana Porporis, Marquette Colleen Young, Lindbergh Annika Hofer, Parkway Central Caroline Caton, Edwardsville Carlie Manczuk, Parkway North Shelby Ripp, Parkway Central Erin Kelly, Kirkwood Katie Jackson, John Burroughs Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Megan Ross, MICDS

Time 1:07.06 1:09.41 1:09.95 1:11.19 1:11.48 1:11.57 1:11.61 1:11.69 1:11.74 1:11.88

100 Butterfly Kate May, Edwardsville Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West

Time 55.81 56.92

Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Alexandra Woody, Summit Madison Brown, Parkway Central Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Katie Knapp, Nerinx Hall Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Riley Deutsch, Ladue

58.46 59.35 1:00.90 1:00.90 1:00.97 1:00.98 1:01.03 1:01.25

100 Freestyle Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Kate May, Edwardsville LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Autumn Looney, St. Charles Laney Thomas, Lafayette Marina Pursley, Timberland Sarah Nelson, St. Dominic Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Abby Fite, Parkway North Katiana Porporis, Marquette

Time 52.35 52.59 53.27 53.80 53.93 54.49 54.60 55.02 55.12 55.36

200 Freestyle Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Kate May, Edwardsville Alyssa Lemon, Marquette Gabriela Vieira, Parkway West Kristen Petersen, Parkway West Sophia Marusic, JohnBurroughs Maria Newton, Parkway West Brigid Andrews, Villa Duchesne Payton Hagar, Marquette Cate Behl, Lafayette

Time 1:54.80 1:55.04 1:56.80 1:58.63 1:58.91 1:58.98 1:59.28 1:59.38 2:00.00 2:00.25

200 Individual Medley Kate May, Edwardsville Katiana Porporis, Marquette Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Madison Brown, Parkway Central Autumn Looney, St. Charles

Time 2:07.33 2:07.99 2:13.15 2:13.37 2:13.46

Emma Brabham, Francis Howell Lydia Welty, Clayton LeiLani Mansy, Eureka Colleen Young, Lindbergh Sophia Marusic, JohnBurroughs

2:13.47 2:13.81 2:14.47 2:14.51 2:15.76

500 Freestyle Victoria Brady, Edwardsville Madison Nguyen, Francis Howell Alyssa Lemon, Marquette Madison Brown, Parkway Central Brigid Andrews, Villa Duchesne Sophia Marusic, John Burroughs Franceska Petrosino, Lafayette Maria Newton, Parkway West Lydia Welty, Clayton Maddie Mather, Cor Jesu

Time 5:12.17 5:12.66 5:13.14 5:17.93 5:20.15 5:20.31 5:20.77 5:20.78 5:22.28 5:23.94

Diving (six dives) Ashley Yarbrough, Marquette Megan Hetzler, Parkway South Elle Christie, Lafayette T.J. Duckett, Zumwalt North Sarah Mink, Eureka

Points 299.4 267.2 258.6 257.25 254.15

200 Freestyle Relay Edwardsville Lafayette Visitation Marquette Webster

Time 1:37.75 1:41.48 1:44.23 1:44.38 1:44.40

200 Medley Relay Edwardsville Lafayette Parkway West Parkway. Central Kirkwood

Time 1:47.99 1:52.37 1:52.64 1:54.04 1:54.57


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DRIVING WITH DAN:

2017 Hyundai Elantra Size is in the eye of the.. uh.. calculator In the car business, “small” is a relative term. The heavy hitters in the small-car segment — Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla — are classified as “midsize” by the EPA. The reason: the feds combine the total cubic footage of passenger room and cargo room to arrive at a segment-defining number. If the combined total is at least 110 cubic feet, but less than 120, the car gets a “midsize” rating. Corolla and Civic surpass the “midsize” minimum by half a cube and 2.9 cubes, respectively. The new 2017 Hyundai Elantra Dan Wiese sedan, with 95.8 cubic Automotive Writer feet of passenger space and 14.4 cubic feet of trunk space, surpasses it, too ... barely. Having run out of fingers, we used a calculator and arrived at a total of 110.2 cubic feet — a fifth of a cube over the minimum, resulting in a “midsize” EPA rating. We’ll take the fifth, too, and continue to think of Elantra as a compact, even though it’s an inch wider and 0.8 inches longer on the same 106.3-inch wheelbase it rode when it was “small.” From a styling standpoint, Elantra already looked good and now it looks better, raiding, as it does, the closet of the recently — and handsomely — redesigned Sonata. The big, bold Sonataesque grille looks good on this new small ... uh, midsize ... uh, car, which is offered in SE, Limited and Eco trims. Powering SE and Limited is a 2.0liter, naturally aspirated four that makes 147 hp and 132 lb.-ft. of torque. That’s just 2 and 2 better, respectively, than the engine it replaces, but fuel economy improves by about 6 percent with the

The redesigned 2017 Hyundai Elantra gets two new engines and a new look. SUSPENSION : Front: independent Mac strut; rear: torsion beam

2017 HYUNDAI ELANTRA TYPE: Compact five-passenger sedan

BRAKES: Front disc/rear drums, ABS, traction control, stability control

DRIVE FORMAT: Front-wheel drive BASE PRICE: Manual: $17,985; Automatic: $18,985

EPA MPG: 2.0L automatic: 28 city/37 hwy/32 combined; 2.0L manual: 26/36/29; 1.4L turbo: N/A (Hyundai estimate:35 mpg combined city/hwy)

ENGINES: 2.0-liter I-4; 1.4-liter turbo I-4 HORSEPOWER: 2.0L: 147 at 6200 rpm; 1.4L turbo: 128 at 5500 rpm

WHEELBASE: 106.3 inches LENGTH: 179.9 inches

TORQUE: 2.0L: 132 lb.-ft. at 4500 rpm; 1.4L turbo: 156 lb.-ft. at 1400 rpm

CURB WEIGHT: Manual: 2,767 lbs.; automatic: 2,811 lbs.

REQUIRED FUEL: Both engines: regular

new engine, which mates to a choice of six-speeds — manual (SE only) or automatic. Eco gets a 1.4-liter turbo four that makes 128 hp and an impressive 156 lb.-ft. of grunt. Managed exclusively by a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic, Hyundai anticipates combined city/hwy fuel economy of a lofty 35 mpg. This sixth-generation Elantra may be small (we think), but it’s big on available

TRANSMISSION: 2.0L: six-speed manual (SE trim only) or six-speed automatic; 1.4L turbo: seven-speed dual clutch automatic

TRUNK: 14.4 cu. ft.

perks, including smart cruise control, blind-spot warning, lane-keep assist, rear cross-traffic alert, passive emergency braking that can spot cars and pedestrians and a 7-inch touch screen for audio, 8-inch with navigation. Eco won’t arrive until spring, but if

SE and Limited aren’t already at your nearest Hyundai store, they will be in about 20 minutes.

WHERE BUILT: Montgomery, Ala., and Ulsan, South Korea

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer living in St. Louis. He also is a regular automotive contributor to Fox 2 KTVI-TV St. Louis. You can e-mail him at: drivingwithdan@gmail.com

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'15 Chevy Impala LT: Limited, Sunroof, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '10 Chevy Impala LS: FWD, 3.5L V6, Bucket Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today!

$10,990 #36101A

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

R E Auctions

1234 Buick

REAL ESTATE AUCTION Fri, Jan 22 at 12PM 1232 N Florissant Rd, St. Louis, MO Viewing 1hr prior 2br, 1ba brick home w/full basement. adamsauctions.com

ADAM'S AUCTIONS 618-234-8751 Home Improvement

4020

WE BUY CARS Cash Paid Today 636-940-9969 fastlanecars.com

Acura

4025

'13 Acura RDX White, 16K Mi., Local Trade, $28,990

Audi

4040

'15 Audi A3 1.8T: Premium (S Tronic), One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Lthr Seats, Bluetooth, $27,470 #P8325

'14 Audi SQ5 Premium, 36K Miles, Has It All! $43,990

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium (Tiptronic) AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $11,490 #P8297

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium (Triptonic), Sunroof/Moonroof, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $30,990 #P8296

'12 Audi A6: 3.0 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Navigation/ GPS, Call Today! $30,490 #25731B

BMW

'03 Buick LaSabre: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today,

4050 '12 BMW 750 Stk #T337 $34,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '12 BMW 750Li 36K Miles, AWD, DVD, Black, $43,490

2010 BMW X5M Loaded, AWD, 4.4L, Too Many Features to Mention, #K25149 $32,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838 '06 BMW 325i: Sunroof/Moonroof, FWD, Leather, Low Miles, Call Today!

$10,990 #26008B

4055

'07 Buick LaCrosse CX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, 3.8L V6, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, FWD, Bucket Seats, $5,990 #38084A

$12,990 #36097A

'09 Buick LaCrosse CXL: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $9,990 #36100A

'05 Buick LaCrosse CX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $6,990 #75943A

'05 Buick LaCrosse CX: One Owner Clean Carfax, 3.8L V6, Premium Sound, $4,990 #38084A

'12 Regal Sedan, GM Cert. Warranty, stk# C151857A $13,995 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Buick Regal: Premium, 4 Door, Sunroof, 25K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '09 Buick Lucerne CX: FWD, Flex Fuel, Heated Leather Seats, OnStar, Call Today,

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

4065

'15 Chevy Impala LT: 2.5L, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Chevy Cruze LT: 5 Speed, 29K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Malibu LT: 23K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Impala Lmtd LTZ: Sunroof, Heated Leather, 18K Miles, Black, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Sonic LTZ, loaded, GM Cert. Warranty, stk# C10317P $13,741 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 2012 Chevy Sonic LT Stk# 42305-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'15 Chevy Sonic LTZ: 5 Door, 20K Miles, GM Certified, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Sonic LT: 4 Door, Black, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Chevy Sonic LT, electronic traction control, 28 mpg, stk# U3668P $8,999 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '11 Chevy Camaro LS: Coupe, V6, Black, 73K Miles, Wrnty, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

$9,990 #36091A

Cadillac

'05 Chevy Corvette: White, Loaded, Power, Nice, 4060 $23,987 #38442A

2010 Cadillac SRX 3.0L 6 cyl, Check out the Pics #580175 $13,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838 '12 Cadillac CTS: AWD, 3.6L V6, Performance Coupe, Black, 37K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Cadillac CTS: Luxury, 3.0L V6, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today,

$20,490 #P8388

'15 Escalade, 13K miles, stk# T355, $73,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

Bommarito St. P e te rs Cadillac 1-866-2449085 '12 CTS: Luxury AWD, Navigation, $23,490 '10 Escalade: Premium, AWD, 53K Miles, Loaded, $40,990 '13 XTS: Luxury Collection: Sunroof, Nav, 23K Mi, $35,990 '12 CTS Performance AWD, Has It All! $30,790 '10 CTS Wagon: V6, Leather, Automatic, $15,990

'05 Escalade EXT: 29K Miles, AWD, $22,990 '08 XLR-V: 14K Miles, Black, One Of A Kind!! Call Today! '13 XTS: Luxury, Black, 23K Mi., Roof & Naviga tion, $36,990

'07 Buick Lucerne CXS: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today,

'12 CTS: Lux, AWD, Roof, Opulent Blue, $26,990

$8,990 #36125A

'13 Escalade ESV: Premium, 30K, AWD, $52,990

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/homes

2008 Cadillac Escalade Every Option You Would Want! #238581 $16,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838 2007 Cadillac Escalade ESV Loaded, AWD, Dual DVD, Leather, Roof, & More! Stk #361079 $19,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838

Chevrolet '10 Buick LaCrosse CXL: FWD, Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today!

'08 CTS: 27K Miles, White Diamond, One Owner, $17,990

Buick

4060

$4,990 #P8436C

3212

Schellenger Remodeling Basements Bathrooms, Decks, Room Additions, Doors, Windows, Baseboards, Crown Moldings, & Oak St air s. 30 yr s . Experience. Call Gary at (314)570-6904

Antique/Classic Special Interest

4055

Cadillac

'12 CTS-V: Coupe, 13K Mi, One Owner, Every Option!! Call Today! '11 CTS-V: Coupe, Every Option, 24K, Cer-

'15 Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Malibu LS Sedan, Gas Saver! stk# C151690A $15,989 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Malibu LT, GM Certified Warranty, stk# C10300FIT $15,703 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

2012 Chevy Cruze LS Stk #42139-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2014 Chevy Cruze LTZ Stk #94029 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Chevy Cruze Eco: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $11,972 #38168A

$9,990 #75882A

'15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Leather, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Chevy HHR LT: FWD, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Premium Sound, Low Miles, Call Today! $9,990 #10408A

'07 HHR 2LT, Sunroof, Leather, Local Trade $6,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Impala Limited LT pkg., V6, fwd, 19xxx miles, stk# C10325P $16,402 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Impala LTZ, V6 Sedan, 6xxx miles, GM Cert. Warranty, stk# C160703A $24,979 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'08 ChevyImpala SS, Leather, Roof, $12,990

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Loaded, Clean Carfax, $15,727 #38220B

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202 JANUARY CLEARANCE CERTIFIED RED TAG SALES EVENT

$6,990 #75949A

'13 Fusion SE: Tuxedo Black, Only 43K Miles, Will Sell Fast, $13,999 #H160172M

'06 Fusion SE, 32 mpg hwy, 2.3L, 5-speed manual, stk#UH4317EP $5,998 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2006 Ford Mustang Convertible #41853-1 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'06 Mustang Premium, 6-disc cd/mp3 player, 4L, v6, stk# UH4292EP $8,999 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2004 Ford Taurus SEL Stk #41920-5 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '15 Pilot EXL: 4x4, Heated Leather, Rear Camera, Bluetooth, 24K Miles, $32,999 #H160597A '11 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Dk Cherry Pearl, Heated Dual Pwr Lthr Seats, Remote Start Moonroof, 67K Miles, $23,299 #H160424A '14 Accord EXL: 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, Modern Steel, 40K Mi, Dual Pwr Htd Lthr, Moonroof, Loaded, $22,499 #X2704 '14 Civic: Hybrid, 4 Dr, Alabaster Silver, Only 4,530 Mi, 47 MPG, Push Button Start, Rear & Side Cameras, $18,499 #X2694 '13 Civic LX's: 7 To Choose From, 32K Mi, Bluetooth, Black, Rear Camera, $13,999 #X2683

'13 Chevy Malibu LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $14,867 #38355A

'14 CR-Z: Coupe, Milano Red, Nav, Only 6K Miles, Dealer Service Loaner, $17,499 #X2689 '14 Accord: Sport, Crystal Black Pearl, 41K Miles, $18,699 #2706 '14 Civic LX's: 5 To Choose From, Bluetooth, Rear Camera, Starting at $14,999 #H152201A

'10 chevy Malibu LTZ: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $9,900 #77137A

'12 CIVIC LX's Sedans & Coupes 10 To Choose From, Auto, Cruise, Pwr Pkg, Low Miles, Starting at $12,999 #X2769 Largest Selection of Certified Civic's in the Midwest!!

'14 Chevy Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, GM Certified, 29K Miles, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'13 Chevy Curze LS: Auto, Loaded, GM Certified, $11,860 #38408A

Chrysler

Honda

4120

'10 Insight EX: Loaded, Clean Carfax, 59K Miles, $9,878 #31299A

4070

'13 Chrysler 300 C: AWD, Sunroof, V8, 37K Miles, One Owner, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

2012 Chrysler 200 Stk #94147-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '14 Chrysler 200 LX: Auto, FWD, Remote Keyless Entry, Power Windows, Call Today,

'05 Honda S2000: 64K Mi, Local Car, $17,990

'12 Honda Fit: Sport, Black, 42K Miles, FWD, Auto, FWD, 5 Door Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, $14,499 #H152022B

$12,990 #P8474

2011 Chrysler 300 LTD Stk# 41932-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '07 PT Cruiser Stk# T351 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '04 Chrysler PT Cruiser, CD player with 6 speakers, 29 mpg hwy, stk# UH4296EP $3,999 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

Dodge

4085

'13 Dodge Dart SXT: One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Vehicle Start, Call Today, $13,990 #P8480

'08 Dodge Avenger SXT: One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Alloys Wheels, Call Today, $6,990 #75871A

'13 Chevy Cruze LS: Auto, One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, OnStar, Premium Sound,

'08 Ford Focus SES: Clean Carfax, Leather, FWD, Call Today,

4120 Honda

2008 Malibu LS Stk #42308-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'06 PT Cruiser, Stk# T368 $4,990

'12 Cruze LT Pkg., auto transmission, GM Cert. Warranty, Stk# C10318P $13,574 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

4110 Honda

'12 Ford Focus SEL: Hatchback, FWD, Spoiler, Alloy Wheels Bucket Seats, Call Today! $11,490 #25537B

'14 Charger SE, 28k mi., V6, 5 spd auto, w/od, prem. wheels, 1 owner, stk# 17057 $17,995 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Ford

'14 Honda CRZ EX: Navigation, Red, 6K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Honda Certified, Hybrid, $17,499 #X2689

'11 Honda CR-Z, 35 mpg, cd player (reads mp3 format), stk# UH4369P $9,998 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 2010 Honda Accord 3.5 EXL Stk #65433-1 $11,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2003 Honda Accord 2.4EX Stk# 42406-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 Honda Accord EX-L: 40K Miles, V6, Automatic, $12,990

'10 Honda Accord EX: Cpe, 62K Mi, FWD, Clean Carfx $13,974 #31441A

'08 Honda Accord: FWD, Tinted Glass, $11,411 #360500A

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2012 Ford Focus Titanium #65131-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 Ford Focus SEL: Loaded, Auto, Clean Carfax, 57K Miles, $10,111 #38106A

'09 Ford Focus: Sedan, Blue, Only 67K Miles! Only $7,999 #H160631A Only At Bommarito Honda! At The Big Corner! 270 & Lindbergh

12 Focus Hatchback, Red, 111,205 Miles, Clean Carfax, Only $7,999 #H160102B

'07 Honda Accord SE: Auto, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $9,492 #31601A

'12 Honda Accord SE: Special Edition! Heated Leather, Power Seat, Alloys & More! Selling Fast, Only 1 Remain!! Reduced!! $16,299 #2741

'11 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Dr, V6, Loaded, Very Clean 1 Owner, Belize Blue, Timing Belt Replaced, #X2652A Only $8,999

'13 Accord EXL: Blue, Heated Pwr Seats, Moonroof, Camera, Bluetooth, Loaded, 39K Miles, Honda Certified , $19,999 #H160210A

'14 Honda Accord EXL: 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, 40K Miles, Honda Certified, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertain Warranty, $22,499 #X2704

'12 Civic LX: Coupe, Milano Red, Only 29K Miles, Honda Certified Used, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, One Owner, Lease Return, $13,999 #X2752

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Silver, One Owner, Honda Certified, Only 13K Miles, $18,999 #X2745

'14 Honda Civic: Hybrid, Modern Steel, Only 6K Miles, One Owner, Honda Certified, #X2688 Reduced $18,499

'13 Honda Civic LX: Black, 40K Miles, Auto, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $14,399 #H160106A

'13 Honda Civic EX: 37K Miles, Auto, FWD, Alloys, Silver, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera Honda Certified, $15,999 #X2761

'09 Honda Civic LX-S: FWD, Premium Sound, Alloys Wheels, Spoiler, Call Today! $10,500 #25725B

2013 Hyundai Sonata GLS Stk #65841-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyyundai Sonata GLS #94240 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #94272 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Sonata GLS #65682-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, Awesome MPG! $15,490

'11 Sonata LTD Loaded, Priced to Sell Fast, $9,990

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE: 4 Door, Alloys, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '09 Hyundai Sonata GLS: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Tinted Glass, Call Today, $7,990 #8773A

Ininiti '12 Honda Civic EX-L: Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $11,990 #P8404

2006 Honda Odyssey EXL #94106-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 CRV LX: Black, FWD, Only 22K Miles, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, $18,999 #H152229A '12 ACCORD SE: Heated Lthr, Alloy Wheels, Power Seat, Special Edition, Alabaster Silver, Last 1 Remaining! $16,299 #X2741 '13 Pilot: Touring, 4WD, Silver, Nav/GPS, Rear DVD, Reduced! NOW $31,999 #X2702

'12 Honda Accord EXL: V6, 34K Mi, Dual Heatd Pwr Lthr Seats, Moonroof, Honda Certified, 2 To Choose, #X2674 & X2720 $18,499

'04 Honda Accord EX: Pwr Seat, Gray, Alloys, Moonroof, $4,999 #H160567A

'02 Honda Accord EX: FWD, Low Miles, Sunroof/Moonroof, $4,990 #10541A

'08 Honda Accord LX: New Timing Belt & New Water Pump, Clean Carfax, Call Today! $9,990 #26079A

'13 Honda Civic LX, 1.8 vtec, stk# C10258R $13,586 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'07 Honda Civic: Coupe, 69K Miles, Auto, Certified, $10,990

'09 Honda Civic : Sedan, Auto, Local Trade, $10,990

'12 Honda Civic EX: Nav, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $14,441 #29928A

'08 Civic EX: Cpe, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Power, $8,454 #38125A

'12 Honda Civic EX: 35K Mi, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Honda Certified, Polished Metal Metallic, X2737 Reduced To $14,299

'14 Honda Civic LX: 4 Door, 35K Miles, Bluetooth, Camera, Honda Certified, Modern Steel Metallic, $14,999 #H152201A

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

Hyundai

2012 Hyundai Veloster #94098 $13,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Stk #65745-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Veloster Stk #66102-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2005 Hyundai Tuscon GL Stk #65664-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Accent Stk# 65502-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Accent GS Stk# 94277 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS Stk# 94223 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS #94205 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS #94261 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS Stk #94241 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Elantra: 51K Mi, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, $12,731 #290003A

4130

'09 G37 S po rt Co nve rtible , 50K Mile s , $22,490

'07 M35X, V6, 5 spd auto, awd, stk# C151745B $9,499 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

2009 Infiniti G37x Stk #45236-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2007 Infiniti M35x #66327-2 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

4125

'14 Accent GLS, 4 Dr, Auto, 41K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

4125 Kia

2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #65896-1 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 Civic EX's: 4 To Choose From Going Fast Moonroof, Bluetooth, Alloy's, 34MPG, Starting $14,499! #X2767

'07 Civic EX 69K Miles , Auto matic, $10,990

4110

'13 Focus, 1500 miles, stk# T303-1, $16,990

4120 Hyundai

'12 Honda Civic LX: 47K Miles, Black, One Owner, Lease Return, Honda Certified Used Vehicle, Urban Titanium Color, $14,299 #X2739

'10 Infiniti G37: AWD, 58K Miles, Certified, $19,790

'06 Infiniti M35x: Clean Carfax, AWD, Navigation/GPS, Heated & Cooled Leather Seats, $9,490 #94472A

Jaguar

4140

'04 XJ8 Stk #T346 $9990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Jeep

4145

'14 Grand Cherokee Limited: 4WD, Leather, 40K Mi, V6, One Owner, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Jeep Patriot: Sport, FWD, 33K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'12 Jeep Cherokee LTD: 4WD, Roof, Nav, $29,990

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Summit Edition, 13K Miles, Nav, Camera, 4WD, Bluetooth, Lthr, $43,499 #H150619A

'05 Grand Cherokee Laredo, 3.7 V6, cruise control, 6 speakers, stk# UH4350EP $6,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '91 Jeep Wrangler, Stk# T358 $6,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '10 Wrangler Sport, 4wd, V6, 68xxx miles, stk# C151635A $16,889 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Wrangler Unlimited SP convertible, 6k mi., V6, 5spd, auto, awd/4wd, prem. wheels, stk# 16768A $31,999 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

4155

'13 Kia Optima's: (3) To Choose From Starting At $13,999! X2781 Black, 36K Miles

'13 Kia Rio LX: 29 Great MPG, Local Trade, $11,490

'11 Kia Soul: Hatchback, FWD, Alloy Wheels, Call Today, $11,990 #75135B

'14 Kia Soul: 5 Door Plus, 33K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Lincoln

4170

'13 Linc o ln MKT: AWD, Navig atio n, White , S unro o f, $30,990

'96 Lincoln Town Car, Stk# T371 $4,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Mazda

4185

'08 Mazda6: Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, 86K Miles, $8,777 #31507A

'09 Mazda3: Touring, One Owner Clean Carfax, $8,663 #31629A

'08 Mazdaspeed3: 6 Spd, One Owner Clean Carfax, $10,978 #31491A

'08 MAZDA 5 Green, stk #T325 $7,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '12 Mazda Mazda3: Grand Touring, Moonroof, Loaded, One Owner, $14,985 #P5644

'06 Mazda Mazda6: Hatchback, Auto, Loaded, Power, $5,955 #31581A

'04 Mazda Mazda3: FWD, Low Miles, 5 Speed Stick Shift, Tinted Glass, Call Today! $5,490 #10364A

'12 Mazda6 i: Sport, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified, Call Today, $13,490 #8705A

'07 Mazda Mazda3 s: Sedan, Heated Leather Seats, Stick Shift, Call Today, $5,495 #94578B

'12 Mazda 6i Touring Certified, Alloys, Auto, $16,290

'14 Mazda 6i Touring One Owner, Certified, $20,990

'06 Mazda Miata, Automatic, Full Power, 53K., $13,490

'13 Mazda Miata Hard Top, 4K Mi., Just Arrived, $23,990

2012 Sonata Hybrid Stk# 66236-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Jeep Wrangler Mercedes Benz 4190 X: 69K Miles, Man'12 Mercedes Benz E350 ual, V6, Stk# T338 $18,990 $23,990

2013 Hyundai Sonata GLS Stk #66337-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

2013 Hyundai Sonata Stk #65841-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #94159 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #94102 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Sonata GLS Stk #94263 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE #94281 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Jeep Wrangler: White, Hardtop, Loaded, Lifted, $28,776 #38047A

Kia

4155

'14 Kia Optima, Silver, Stk# T359 $14,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '05 Kia Optima EX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Power, $6,471 #38287A

2007 M Class Stk #40507-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2014 SLK 250 Convertible, Black, 5k Miles, 1 Onwer $37,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2003 SL Convertible Stk#45159-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'15 Mercedes SLK 250 Cabrio, 3K Miles, $42,490

Mercury

4195

'08 Mercury Grand Marquis GS: V8, 76K Miles, One Owner, Warranty, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625


Classified Mercury

4195 Nissan/Datsun

'00 Grand Marquis, white, stk# T366, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

Mini Cooper

4207

'07 MINI Cooper S: Convertible, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Leather Seats, Call Today! $8,990 #10357A

Misc. Autos

4210

1-866-2449085 '14 Ford Explorer, Quad S e ats , 4WD, Leathe r '12 Honda Pilo t Touring RES & NAV, 4WD, $29,990 '09 Honda Ac c o rd EX-L V6, Nav, Auto, 39K Mile s $16,990 '15 GMC Yukon XL: Denali, 5K Mile s , Eve ry Optio n, $69,990 '13 VW EOS: 17K Mile s , Loc al Trade , VW Ce rtifie d, $24,490 '15 Me rc e de s Be nz SLK250 Cabriole t, 3K, Auto, Nav., Call! '08 Ford Mus tang Pre mium 57K Miles , Manual $13,990 '10 Cadillac Escalade: Pre mium, 53K Mi, Nav, Ro of, AWD, $40,990 '07 S aturn Sky: 33K mile s , Loc al Trade , Ce rtifie d,

Mitsubishi

4215

2008 Eclipse GS #66399-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Nissan/Datsun

4220 Pontiac

2012 NIssan Rogue S AWD #41972-1 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2014 Nissan Sentra SR #93998SL $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94054SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 Nissan Versa Note #94048SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

Bommarito St. Pe te rs NEW ARRIVALS!!

4220

'09 Cube, 1.8s, 4 cyl., 1.8L, 28 mpg, cd player, stk# UH4388EP $8,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '02 Ford F-150 XL, carfax one owner, 4.6 liter, V8, stk# F6313P $6,966 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

2011 Nissan Alltima 2.5S #65782-2 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Nissan Altima S: 4 Door, 2.5L, 33K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2010 Nissan Altima 3.5 SR #65863-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2008 Nissan Altima 2.5S Stk #42427-1 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

'12 Nissan Altima: Only 21K Miles, 2.5S, High Quality At Low Payment, One Owner, Balance Of Fact Wrnty, $13,699 #H160595A

'07 Nissan Altima: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Snroof/Mnroof, Call Today, $7,990 #94570B

M 1

2015 Nissan Versa Note Stk #94049SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94052SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94050SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'02 Firebird: T-Tops, RWD, 93K Miles, Power, $6,613 #38192A

'08 Pontiac G6 GT: 4 Door Sedan, FWD, 3.5L V6, 4 Speed Automatic With Overdrive $5,990 #26207B

'09 Pontiac G6 GT, trip computer, abs, sharp car! stk# UH4378EP $6,998 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'04 Pontiac Grand Am GT: Red, Chromes, MRoof, Loaded, $6,992 #38210A

'06 Pontiac Grand Prix GT: 17" Aluminum Wheels, Supercharged, Call Today, $6,490 #94861B

2015 NIssan Versa Note #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai 2015 Nissan Versa Note S Stk #41830 $13,241 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 NIssan Versa Note SL Stk# 94042SL $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk #94055SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SV #94056SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2015 Nissan Versa Note SV Stk# 94051SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SL Stk #94057SL $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Nissan Versa: FWD, Spoiler, Tinted Glass, Call Today,

4250 Toyota

2008 Pontiac G8 Stk #66279-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan /Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 Pontiac Vibe: Hatchback, Built By Toyota, Black, 92K Miles, Clean Carfax, $8,999 #H160329B

Range Rover/Land Rover

'14 Nissan Versa Note: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $11,490 #P8470

'14 Nissan Versa Note: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $10,990 #P8469

4300 Chevrolet Trucks

'07 Toyota Camry XLE: Gray, 4 Door Sedan, 102K Miles, $9,799 #H151091A

'11 Toyota Camry: Hybrid, One Owner Clean Carfax, Navigation/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, $13,490 #10047A

2010 Toyota Corolla S #66156-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '13 Toyota Corolla S: 4 Door, Red, Alloys, Spoiler, Only 36K Miles, Call Today, $13,499 #X2776

2009 Toyota RAV4 Sport Stk #93911-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 Toyota Camry Solara: Convertible, Heated Leather Seats, 4 New Tires, $8,990 #26216A

Volkswagen

4310

2010 VW Tiguan SE Stk #65660-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 VW CC VW Certified, Auto, Black, $15,990

'08 Land Rover LR2: Roof & Leather, $11,490

'13 VW CC: Sport, Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Navigation/GPS, Call Today, $15,990 #75893B

'13 Land Rover, Range Rover, Stk# T322 $72,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Saab

4275

'05 Saab 9-3 Arc: Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today,

2012 VW Beetle 2.5L Stk# 93913-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'12 VW Beetle 2.0T: Silver/Black, Only 35K Miles, Fun Car! $12,999 #H151940B

$5,990 #P8144D

Saturn

'09 VW Jetta TDI: 56K Miles, FWD, Local Trade, 4280 $11,984 #29886A

'07 Ion 2, 35 mpg hwy, 4 cyl - 2.2L, stk# UH4372EP, $6,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '01 Saturn SC2: Coupe, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, FWD, Spoiler, Call Today! $4,990 #10456A

Scion

4283

'06 Scion XB: 5 Spd, Loaded, One Owner, 58K Miles, $9,221 #31662A

Toyota

4330 Sport Utilitiy

'02 Avalanche: Z71, Loaded, Power, $8,988 #31315B

'11 Chevy 1500 LT: Reg Cab, V8, Long Bed, Warranty, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Chevy 1500 3LZ: Crew Cab, High Country, 4x4, 26K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $41,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2005 Chevy Silverado1500 Extended Cab, AWD #192456 $10,995 Image Auto Sales '08 Chevy Cobalt 2LT: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Leather, 59K Miles, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '05 Colorado, Stk# T335 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '09 Chevy Silverado LT, Crew Cab Duramax, 6.6L turbo diesel, 4wd, stk# C152012A $31,556 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Silverado 1500 LT Ext Cab, 4wd, stk# C150300A $29,998 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'12 Silverado LT Crew Cab, 4WD, 44K Mi., $30,990

'11 Silverado LTZ Crew Cab, 4WD, White Diamond, $34,920

4260

$11,990 #P8486

'14 Nissan Versa: FWD, Spoiler, Tinted Glass, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $10,990 #P8485

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

'08 VW Jetta: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $8,990 #8766A

'03 VW New Beetle GLS: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today!

'05 Silverado 1500, 8 cyl., 4.8L, steel chrome wheels, stk# UH4163P $7,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 2005 Dodge Dakota SLT Stk #41341-2 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2001 Dodge Ram Laramie 2500 Diesel #820860 $12,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838 2004 Dodge Ram 1500 stk #582931 $11,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838

Ford Trucks

'15 Ford F150 Lariat, Stk# T372 $44,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '01 Ford F-150, 112k mi, Red, $6,990, #T316

$6,990 #26464A

'14 VW Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, Black, 34K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'14 Ford F-150 XLT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 32K Miles, One Owner, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2006 Ford F-250 XLT Superduty Diesel Stk# A74365 $16,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838

4315

'13 Volvo XC60: One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Leather, Call Today $26,490 #94005A

2002 Volvo S40 Nicely Equipped! Stk# 873551 $3,995 Image Auto Sales (866)464-4838

GMC Trucks

4345

'05 GMC Canyon Z71: One Owner, 69K Miles, $13,990 '12 GMC Sierra Crew Cab, White, Chromes, 4WD, $32,990

'13 Sierra Crew 4WD, Leather, Chromes, Z-71, $30,990

'15 Sierra 1500 SLE Z71, V8, 4x4, 6K miles, nav., all weather pkg., all terrain pkg., stk# 28802A $37,949 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '14 Nissan Frontier: 4WD, Short Bed, Crew Cab, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $27,990 #75795A

2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0 Stk #94161 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866) 672-4020 '11 Titan Pro-4X, 28k mi., awd/4wd, towing, all wthr. pkg., 1 owner, stk# 29173A $22,998 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Toyota Trucks

4385

'12 Tundra Crew Cab LTD, 4wd, V8, htd. seats, navi., sunroof, all wthr pkg., 56k mi., stk# 16914 $34,487 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Crossovers

4387

'13 VW GTI Sedan, Manual, Red, Certified, $23,490

Sport Utilitiy

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'13 Chevy Suburban: Z71, Black, Loaded, Lthr, One Owner, $32,664 #38264A

'15 Buick Encore: Convenience Pkg, AWD, 29K Miles, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Equniox LTZ: AWD, V6, Sunroof, Navigation, 9K Miles, GMCertified, $30,995 Don Brown Chevrolet '03 Chevy Tahoe: Z71, 4WD, clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $8,990 #P8295A

'15 Chevy Captiva 2LS: Sport, 25K Miles, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Chevy Equinox LT, FWD, 16xxx mi., stk# C10099P $19,311 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'11 Chevy Equinox LS: Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $15,428 #38438A

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: 11K Miles, 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Suburban LT, htd lthr seats, prem audio, nav., 4x4, V8, stk# 16994 $48,890 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'13 Chevy Suburban LT: Black, Leather, DVD, Loaded, $35,989 #38113A,

'13 Chevy Suburban LT: Loaded, Leather, DVD, Black, $35,989 #38113A

2005 Chevy Suburban LS Excellent Condition, Must See! #138334 $11,995 Image Auto Sales

'07 Chevy Tahoe LT: Leather, Moonroof, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $18,522 #360522A

'15 Chevy Traverse 2LT: AWD, Rear Buckets, 32K Miles, GM Certified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '14 Dodge Journey R/T, 3.6, V6, fwd, stk# C160029A $20,402 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '10 Dodge Journey XT: FWD, V6, Black, 79K Miles, #H152006B Value Priced $10,699

'13 Ford Edge SEL, V6, 6 speed, auto, navi., rearview cam., all wthr pkg., 56k mi., stk# 28789A $18,998 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 2008 Ford Edge Limited #42203-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

'12 Ford Edge Pano Roof, Nav, Local Trade, $24,790

2013 Ford Escape SE #42407-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Ford Escape 4WD Roof, Auto, $18,990 '12 Ford Escape XLT: 4 Door, 4 Cyl, Black, 90K Miles, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 GMC Terrain SLE2: 4 Cyl, Black, 18K Miles, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2007 GMC Acadia Stk #41174-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '09 GMC Acadia SLT-2: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, 87K Miles, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 2005 GMC Envoy #42223-1 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '05 GMC Envoy XL, carfax one owner, 4.2 liters in-line 6, stk# U1585A $6,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '08 GMC Sierra 1500 Work Truck, 6 cyl 4.3L, vinyl seats, CD player reads mp3, stk# UH4225Q $8,994 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '13 GMC Terrain SLT, fwd, loaded, GM Cert. Warranty, stk# C10320P $22,333 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'11 GMC Terrain SLT: AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $19,742 #31381A

4390

'12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Chromes, Loaded, Mocha, $21,121 #360334A

'08 Buick Enclave CX: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $10,990 #26196A

'03 Chevy Tahoe Z71: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Heated Leater Seats, Sunroof/ Moonroof, CALL! $8,990 #P8295A

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Black, 36K Miles, GM Certified, $43,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Cadillac Escalade 4x4 Black, Only 13xxx Miles, Stk #T355 $69,990 Search St. Louis area jobs and find the one that’s right for you at STLtoday.com/monster

JANUARY 20, 2016

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '13 Cad Escalade ESV Premium, 30K, Loaded, Certified, $52,990

'06 Cadillac Escalade EXT: AWD, Loaded, $14,981 #360511AA

'12 Ford Escape: Limited, 78K Miles, FWD, Heated Lthr Sts, $14,796 #P5564

'14 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, AWD, 31K Miles, V6, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Honda CRV EX: 4WD, Tango Red Pearl, Only 81K Miles, Moonroof, One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,899 #H160225B

STLTODAY.COM

C3

4420 Legal Notices

9000

4390 Mini vans

2010 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited Stk #65848-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited: White, Leather, $16,920 '05 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS, 25 mpg hwy, carfax one owner, stk# UH4412EP $4,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '13 Infiniti JX35: Infiniti Certified, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $32,990 #94386A

'11 Kia Sorento: FWD, Bucket Seats, Heated Seats, Warranty, Premium Sound, $13,500 #36223B

'06 Lexus RX330, Power Sunroof, FWD, $9,490

'11 Mazda CX-7: Sport, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 44K Miles, $15,844 #31052A

'08 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call today, $12,990 #95048A

'07 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $8,990 #94641B

2003 Toyota Dienna XLE Stk #41770-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2011 Kia Sedona LX #66446-5 Call for Price St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai

2003 Toyota Sequoia SR5 Stk# 42278-1 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Toyota Sienna SE, 8 passenger, V6, fwd, stk# C160587A $22,994 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Sienna SE 8 Passenger, 23xxx Miles, Toyota Certified, 5 Door, V6, FWD, Stk #16738 $28,649 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

Vans

4430

'11 Ford Transit Connect XLT, cargo van, abs, rear fog lights, stk# U4245P, $8,999 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'07 Me rc ury Marine r Pre mie r, 4WD, 67K Franchise Opportunities 4865 Mile s , Le athe r, Snyder's-Lance Equity Route for sale in the $12,990 Arnold/Festus area. Contact: Tim Handrahan

'14 Nissan Murano S: V6, Alloys, 36K Miles, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '06 Nissan Murano S: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Call Today,

314-603-7384 Snyder's-Lance Equity Route for sale South County, Columbia/Waterloo, IL area. Contact: Tim Handrahan

S ealed bids for Cooling Tower Replacement, St. Louis Psychiatric, Rehabilitation Center St. Louis, Missouri, Project No. M1614-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 2/11/2016. For specific project information and orde ring plans , go to h t t p : / / w w w . oa.mo.gov/fmdc/dc/list.ht m

S ealed bids for Parapet and Roof Replacement, Harry S Truman State Office Building Jefferson City, Missouri, Project No. O1 3 0 3 - 0 1 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1 :3 0 PM, 2/11/2016. For specific project information and orde ring plans , go to http://www.oa.mo.gov/fmd c/dc/list.htm

Bids/Proposals

9005

BID 4168

FIVE (5) NEW DIGITAL COLOR COPY MACHINES The City of St. Charles, Missouri is seeking sealed bids for five (5) new digital color copiers. Bid documents can be downloaded at stcharlescitymo .g o v/bids.aspx. Bids are to be returned to the Purchasing Office prior to 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 3, 2016. All bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at 2:00 p.m. in Conference Room A on the 4th floor of City Hall. For additional information, contact the Purchasing Office at 636940-4668. The City reserves the right to reject any or all bids. The City of St. Charles is an EOE; and fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statutes and regulations in all programs and activities. For more information, or to obtain a Title VI Complaint Form, call the City Clerk's Office at 636-949-3282.

314-603-7384

$9,900 #94768A

Firewood/Fuel 2005 Nissan Xterra S Stk #64892-1 $6,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '12 Toyota FJ Cruiser, 4wd, 4dr., V6, 4.0L, 17" alloys, stk# 29168A $24,989 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234

'15 Toyota 4Runner SR5, 19k mi., V6, 4.0L, 5 speed auto, warranty, all weather pkg., 4wd, stk# 17040, $32,998 ACKERMAN TOYOTA 866-925-9234 '11 Toyota 4Runner: 4x4, V6, Ltd, 60K Miles, $29,499 #H160430A

6270

SCAFFOLDING: Approx. 80 pcs., 22 screw jacks, 8 wheels, $3500; Call (618)779-8936

Legal Notices

Mini vans

4420

'08 Chrysler Town & Cntry, blue, 126k mi, loaded, stk# T361 $8,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '09 Chrysler Town & Country: Loaded, $9,494 #38317A

'00 Honda Odyssey: 7 Passenger Van, High Miles, Clean, Current State Safety & Emissions Tested, #H160468A Value Priced $2,999!

'09 Honda Odyssey EXL: Nav + Res (DVD), Slate Metallic, 96K Miles, Lthr, Roof, Pwr Doors, One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,499 #H160252A

'04 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Heated Leather Seats, DVD Entertainment System, Sunroof, $5,990 #75086A

Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques

To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-8020 ext.6666 Antiques Wanted

6290

Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Estate Sale

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for ONC A L L TRA F F I C ENGINEERING DESIGN SERVICES, ST. LOUIS, MO. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 P.M., CT, February 10, 2016 at Board of Public Ser vice, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from website www.stl-bps.org, under the On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or contact Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. 25% MBE and 5% WBE participation goals.

9000 CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

CROPLAND FOR RENT

The Missouri Department o f C o n s e r v a t i o n will accept cash rent bid proposals to farm 3 separate tracts that includes ap'15 Toyota Highlander proximately 600 acres of LE, 3.5L, v6, awd, 15k cropland on the August A. mi., all weather pkg., Busch Conservation Area Toyota Certified, stk# and 300 acres of cropland 16862 $31,489 on W e l d o n Spring ACKERMAN TOYOTA Conservation Area 866-925-9234 approximately, and 130 acres on Howell Island '12 Toyota Rav4 LTD: Con ser vat ion Area, 4 4WD, Only 62K Miles, miles SW of W e l d o n Silver, Toyota Quality, Spring, Missouri. Leather, Bluetooth, Proposals will be Reduced to $17,999! accepted until 3:00 p.m. #H151066A on January 27, 2016. For additional information and pr oposal forms cont act: Alex Ruff, '10 Sequoia SR5 August A Busch Conservation Area, 2360 4.6L V8, 6 Spd, Very Hwy D, St. Charles, MisRare 4x4/AWD, New souri 63304, Phone 636Tires, Heated Seats, 300-1953 ext. 4108 betTowing, Leather, Stk ween 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 #17047 $22,494 p.m., Monday through FriACKERMAN TOYOTA day. 866-925-9234

'04 Toyota Sequoia SR5, Auto, White, Just Arrived, $10,990

CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE

6095

SEASONED FIREWOOD Delivered & stacked satisfaction guar. (573) 768-1780 or (573) 517-1497 Seasoned Oak and Hickory Delivered & Stacked. 23yrs of Service. 573-513-6510

'13 Toyota Venza: Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, $23,453 #360511A Tools and Hardware

4340

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

4300 Volvo

'14 Toyota Corolla LE: 4 Dr, Black, 37K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Toyota Camry LE: Blue, Only 61K Miles, High Quality, Low Price, Powertrain Warranty, Hurry In . . . Won't Last! $12,299 #X2777

'14 Silverado 1500: Double Cab, 8K Miles, W/T, Clean, $24,977 #360139A

WEDNESDAY

REQUEST FOR CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS The Cit y of St . Louis, Board of Public Service, intends to PRE-QUALIFY CONTRACTORS to bid as PRIME CONTRACTOR for INSTALLATION SERVICES F O R V I D E O CA MERA SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS, ST. LOUIS, MO. T h e Request for Contractor Qualif icat ion package may be obtained from the Board of Public Service website, www.stl-bps.org under the On Line Plan Room - Plan Room, or by calling the Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. Statements of Contractor Qualifications due by 4:30 PM, CT, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2016 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St . Louis, MO 63103. Statements of Contractor Qualifications will not be accepted after that time.

NORTH CAROLINA GUILFORD COUNTY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION 14 JT 388 (High Point)

Personals

9125

T.R.N., A minor female juvenile born October 15, 2009 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Do You Want a Poem? I will write one for you. To your love? To a friend? You choose it, I'll write it. Call John at ODE, 314-821-7786

NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PROCESS OF PUBLICATION

GLYNNA J. text or contact your trucker buddy. (712)314-4464

IN THE MATTER OF:

TO: BRIAN CRAWLEY, put at ive f at her of t he above juvenile, and ANY UNKNOWN FATHER of the above juvenile TAKE NOTICE that a Petition seeking to terminate the parental rights of BRIAN CRAWLEY and ANY UNKNOWN FATHER of the above juvenile was filed with the Clerk of Superior Court, Juvenile Division, High Point, Guilford Co., NC on December 15, 2015. You must answer this Petition within 40 days of January 13, 2016, exclusive of that date. You are entitled to attend any hearing affecting your rights. You are entitled to appointed counsel if you cannot afford to hire one. The mother of the juvenile is PRASAFANY UNAY MINETTE OUTLAW. Attorney Danielle Caldwell (336-553-0036) has been provisionally appointed to represent BRIAN CRAWLEY, and you should contact your at t or ney immediately. Unknown Father must call the Juvenile Clerk at 336822-6700 immediately. This t he 13th day of January, 2016. ________________Aman d a L. Fields, Deputy County Attorney PO Box 3427, Greensboro, NC 27402

6307

63033 - 1/18 - 1/29 12562 Spring Trail Dr. 8a-6p. Appliances, furniture, household goods, art, misc, very nice things

Garage Sales Call 314-621-6666 or

'05 Honda CR-V LX, 800-365-0820 for our 4wd, carfax one owner, Garage Sale Package. 29 mpg hwy, stk# UH1558A $8,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 Garage Sales '15 Honda Pilot EX-L, 24k 6325 MISSOURI mi., 4wd, sunroof, all whthr pkg., lthr., 63118 To place a good bargain box or better bargain box ad, 1 ownr, V6, auto, TOCO Resale Shop, stk# 29156A $32,989 2714 Cherokee St., STL, visit bargainbox.STLtoday.com ACKERMAN TOYOTA NOW OPEN! 866-925-9234 314-300-8994 '11 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, 8 Passenger, Dark Cherry Pearl, Lthr, MoonBargain Box 6340 6340 Bargain Box roof, 67K Miles, Remote Used Mattresses, excelOrgan, good condition. Start, lent condition, all sizes, 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes Honda Certified, $25-$100. Call $23,299 #H160424A Call 573-443-1108 573-443-1108

Bargain Box Items For $350 or Less

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

The NISS NISSAN SS Store

JANUARY 20, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito NISSAN

Missouri’s

NISSAN Dealer!

17 Consecutive Years††

SUPERSTORES ENDS MONDAY, HURRY! ACT NOW! SALE Jan. 25 AT 9PM TH

0 % APR AVAILABLE FOR 72** MONTHS ON ALL NISSANS 2015 NISSAN SENTRA

2015 NISSAN ALTIMA

2015 NISSAN ROGUE

2015 NISSAN PATHFINDER

AUTOMATIC SV MSRP $19,495

SPECIAL EDITION MSRP $24,780

ROGUE MSRP $24,440

PATHFINDER MSRP $30,885

60 AVAILABLE

101 AVAILABLE

25 AVAILABLE

25 AVAILABLE

$ $ $ , , , 15 900 19 900 21 900 25,900

$

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

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MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE. Sentra Model #12115, Vin. #684114. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE. Altima Model #13115, Vin. #900532. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE. Altima Model #22715, Vin. #588843. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE. Altima Model #21115, Vin. #708172. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

A

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• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES

†Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. See dealer for details. ††Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration. Nissan North American, ‘98, ‘99, ‘00, ‘01, ‘02, ‘03, ‘04, ‘05, ‘06, ‘07, ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11, ‘12, ‘13, ‘14, ‘15 Calendar Year to Date results for Missouri. **0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. Special financing in lieu of rebates. Deferred payments on finance deals only. See sales consultant for details. *Bommarito advantage offer with every new Nissan purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 1/25/16.

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2016 Honda

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219

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0 LX $ $ 0 159 $ ODYSSEY 0 LX $ $ 0 319 Honda % 2016 ACCORD

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I-270 & N. LINDBERGH, 12 MINUTES FROM 40 & I-270 • www.BommaritoHonda.com Welcome All Illinois Shoppers To Simplify Your Buying Experience, Bommarito Honda Will Process Your Illinois Sales Tax, Title Fees And License Plates *Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. †Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Honda purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 1/31/16.

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STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016 • L

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

STEW SEASON Simmering cuts of meat in sauce makes it tender and gratifying BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There is a simple seasonal-culinary formula for this time of year. Winter = stew. When days are cold and nights are long, there is nothing more warming and satisfying than a steaming hot bowl of stew. Or two. It makes everything seem right with the world. I feel sorry for our friends in warmer climes. They don’t get to enjoy the glories of stew. Oh, they may cook up some fish or a couple of clams simmered in a sauce and call it stew, but that isn’t really the same thing. Stew is hearty. Stew is filling. Stew gratifies your soul. On the other hand, it also drains your pocketbook. Stew used to be inexpensive. That was sort of the point — it was a good way to use the cheapest cuts of meat. Even the toughest of meats becomes meltingly tender when it is slowly simmered in a sauce for at See STEW • Page L4

Recipes • Lamb Tagine With Green Olives and Lemon (top), Veal Stew in Mustard Sauce (above) and Carbonnade a la Flamande (Beef and Onions Braised in Beer). Page L4

Urine trouble at this dog-welcoming restaurant DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There is no other way to put this: The dog peed on the floor. And then the restaurant employee who came to clear off the table stepped in it. Dog-friendly restaurants are much harder to find in this country than in, say, chien-loving France. But they are around, here and there, and they are a great idea in theory. Until a dog pees

123RF.COM

EDIBLES & ESSENTIALS VEGGIE BURGER TASTES GREAT, HAS NICE TEXTURE PAGE L3

on the floor. I was at the dog-welcoming Urban Chestnut Brewing Company for a friend’s birthday recently, and the place was packed. Most of the folks were there to participate in a big adult coloring event. Lots of fun for all, lots of beer and more than a few dogs. As I believe is clear by now, one of the dogs did what doggies do. It was kind of impressive, actually, that such a small animal could produce such a large puddle. I fleetingly wondered whether the dog had been drinking some of the beer.

I am not the sort of person who gets freaked out by such things. I have been to bars where there have been worse things on the floor. But most of my fellow revelers at the birthday party — and probably most of my fellow humans — get a little queasy at the thought. And admittedly, even I found the sight unappetizing. I could not help but think that someone was going to drop one of the restaurant’s truly excellent french fries on the floor, calculate that five seconds had not elapsed, and See NEMAN • Page L4

TIPS TO MAKE FRESH, DELICIOUS GNOCCHI — ITALY’S DIMINUTIVE DUMPLINGS PAGE L5 LET’S EAT

JANUARY 30-31, 2016 The Chase Park Plaza Hotel

1 M

BUY TICKETS TODAY! One-Day Admission Tickets On Sale at most Schnucks Courtesy Centers. For more information, visit foodandwinestl.org ©2016 Schnucks


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 01.20.2016

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 JODY MITORI assistant managing editor/features • jmitori@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8240 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

France’s crisp alpine white

Mini Heart Cookies tasty, crispy

BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

Just in time for Valentine’s Day comes this box of chocolate-flavored, heart-shaped cookies, and they are great. They are from Trader Joe’s, and what makes them special is the fact that they begin with chocolate shortbread, which is then covered with a thin layer of dark chocolate, topped with colorful nonpareils, those tiny round sprinkles. They’re crispy too, which somehow makes them even better. Size • 10 ounces Price • $2.99 Available • Trader Joe’s

If you think white wines are boring, try one from Savoie, France’s alpine country close to its eastern border with Switzerland. These distinctive whites are frequently made from a grape varietal called Jacquère and are often dry, crisp and pristine with a brisk snap. There is a group of villages within the Savoie appellation, and a village name can be added to a label if the wine meets certain strict standards. One of those villages is Apremont. Below is a comparison between an Apremont wine and one from Gard, a large area within the Languedoc-Roussillon region in southern France.

BERNARD & CHRISTOPHE RICHEL 2014 APREMONT SAVOIE AOC

RÉSERVE DE LA SAURINE 2014 GARD IGP

Bought • Whole Foods Market, 1601 South Brentwood Boulevard, in January for $12.99 Description • This white is almost as clear as water, but it packs a surprisingly zesty punch. Made from 100 percent Jacquère, the Apremont is pure, lively and just delightful. It has a lovely floral aroma and tastes of refreshing grapefruit, lime and other citrus flavors. A high acid wine with only 11.5 percent level of alcohol, the Apremont is perfect with oysters and other shellfish.

Bought • Whole Foods Market, 1601 South Brentwood Boulevard, in January for $8.99 Description • This white, which comes from the Mediterranean coast of southern France, is categorized as an Indication Géographique Protégée (IGP) or “country” wine, which is a level below below Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC). Made from grenache blanc, this is a soft, everyday white that’s uncomplicated and easy to drink. It would pair with fish and other light entrees.

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

— Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Versatile crepes easy to make Don’t think of them as pancakes; they are so much more versatile than pancakes. In a new Prep School video, Daniel Neman shows how to make crepes, the delicious French wraps — they can be sweet or savory — that are surprisingly easy to make.

stltoday.com/food

Are you ready for chicken breasts that aren’t bone dry?

DINNER IN 20 MINUTES

Sumac-Grilled Fish has exotic lair BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

This is fast and easy fish, with an exotic flair. Find ground sumac at Mediterranean markets. Serve with rice.

THE WASHINGTON POST

SUMAC-GRILLED FISH Yield: 4 servings

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY ELIZABETH KARMEL Associated Press

We’ve all suffered through cardboard-dry chicken breasts. We do it because periodically we commit (or recommit or re-recommit) to healthy eating. And boneless, skinless chicken breasts are a fine and filling lean protein well suited to the job. Except for one thing: Because boneless, skinless chicken breasts are so lean, they overcook and dry out heartbreakingly fast. Doesn’t seem to matter whether I grill them or bake them or saute them. I always end up with dry, chewy and unpleasant chicken breasts. No wonder everyone gets irritable when they’re trying to eat healthy. But I have a secret for cooking chicken breasts that produces moist, tender meat every time. In fact, it’s so foolproof and effortless, you don’t even need to watch the clock. Though the chicken takes just 30 minutes to cook, you can let it go for as long as an hour and you won’t risk ruining it in the slightest. The secret? Poaching the breasts in a blend of stock, wine and seasonings. But my poaching technique is slightly different than what you’re used to. And that’s what makes it so forgiving. First, I use a flavor-packed

wine-infused stock to poach instead of water. The flavor difference is big. Second, I use mostly residual heat to cook the meat. As in, I bring the chicken stock, wine and aromatics to a boil, then add the raw boneless, skinless chicken breasts. I bring the liquid back to a boil, turn off the heat, put a lid on the pot, then let the chicken cook. That’s it. This method allows the chicken to cook slowly, absorbing the seasonings and letting the wine in the broth deepen the flavor of the meat. The chicken is never tough and doesn’t taste “boiled,” which sometimes happens when you put raw chicken in cold water and boil it. I started poaching chicken in this manner to use in chicken salad. Moist chicken just tastes better in salad than grilled or baked. And because the chicken is so juicy, you need less mayonnaise when you prepare it this way. But now I make poached chicken breasts for many other dishes — on a green salad; sliced and tossed with pasta; chopped and mixed into soup; mixed with barbecue sauce for an easy “pulled” chicken wrap; etc. However you use the chicken, be sure to season it with salt before serving, as there is no added salt in the poaching liquid.

WINE-POACHED CHICKEN BREASTS Yield: 6 servings 1 ½ quarts low-sodium chicken stock or broth 3 cups white wine 3 medium carrots, cut into 2-inch chunks 3 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch chunks 2 medium yellow onions, halved 4 cloves garlic, smashed 4 sprigs fresh thyme 6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1. In a large (at least 6-quart) stock pot or Dutch oven over medium-high, combine the chicken stock, wine, carrots, celery, onions, garlic and thyme. Bring to a boil, then gently add the chicken breasts one at a time. If the chicken breasts aren’t entirely covered by liquid, add a bit more stock or water. Return the liquid to a boil. 2. As soon as the liquid boils, turn of the heat and cover the pot. Allow the breasts to poach for 30 minutes, then use tongs or a slotted spoon to remove from the liquid. Chicken can be used immediately, or refrigerated for up to 3 days. 3. The poaching liquid can be saved for another use. It can be frozen, then thawed and boiled before reusing. Per servings: 150 calories; 3g fat; 85mg cholesterol; 55mg sodium; no carbohydrate; no fiber; no sugar; 27g protein.

1 ½ to 2 pounds striped bass or catfish fillets ¼ cup olive oil 2 limes 1 ½ teaspoons fine sea salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon ground turmeric ¼ cup ground sumac 4 cloves garlic ¼ cup walnut pieces 1 packed cup flat-leaf parsley leaves ¼ cup packed fresh mint leaves 1. Position an oven rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element; preheat the broiler. 2. Use cooking oil spray to grease a baking dish or rimmed baking sheet large enough to hold all the fish in a single layer. Rinse the fillets and pat them dry with paper towels. Brush them (all over) with 2 tablespoons of the oil. Cut the limes in half, then squeeze 2 of the halves over the fish. 3. Stir together ½ teaspoon of the sea salt, ¼ teaspoon of the pepper and all of the turmeric and sumac in a small bowl; coat the fish on both sides with the mixture. Place the fillets in the prepared baking dish or on the prepared baking sheet. 4. Coarsely chop the garlic, then transfer it to a food processor along with the walnuts, parsley and mint. Squeeze a tablespoon of juice from a third lime half, then pour in the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Add the remaining teaspoon of sea salt and ¼ teaspoon of pepper. Pulse to a coarse, gremolata-like consistency (not a paste). 5. Uncover the fillets. Broil (top rack) for 6 to 9 minutes, turning the pan front to back halfway through the cooking, until the fillets are opaque, fragrant and slightly crisped/browned on top. 6. Transfer the fish to a platter. Immediately spoon some of the walnut topping down the center of each fillet. Squeeze the remaining lime half over the fish, and serve right away. Per serving: 350 calories; 32g protein; 4g carbohydrates; 23g fat; 4g saturated fat; 135mg cholesterol; 930mg sodium; 1g fiber; no sugar Adapted from “Joon: Persian Cooking Made Simple,” by Najmieh Batmanglij

FOOD FEEDBACK We love hearing from our readers. Here are a few of your latest helpful comments and questions. »» TED COLLINS: The column about getting kroenke was perfect. I will have to remember the term when that unfortunate time happens. Very funny and a great tribute to our owner. »» DIANE BANIAK, on our story about food from 1900-1910: My 89-year-old mom gave me my grandmother’s cookbook from the 1930s. I sometimes explore through it, looking for one of the pages with splatters on it, and choose a recipe from that page knowing it must have been a favorite of hers.


LET’S EAT

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

EDIBLES & ESSENTIALS VEGGIE BURGERS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUESTS

Edibles & Essentials chefs worked to make veggie burger just right

Yield: 4 burgers 1 to 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 4 ounces shitake mushrooms, sliced ½ large (4-inch) yellow onion, inely minced ½ stalk celery, inely minced 1 clove garlic, crushed and peeled ½ cup cooked black beans, cooled ½ cup cooked lentils, cooled (see notes) ½ cup cooked quinoa, cooled 2 teaspoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon sea salt ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ¼ teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon black pepper ½ cup Panko bread crumbs 1 egg 4 brioche or onion buns Garnish: Cheese, tomato, onion, lettuce or pickle, optional Notes: Use Le Puy green or brown lentils for this recipe. 1. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in an 8or 9-inch skillet or similar sauté pan over medium-high heat until the oil just shimmers. Add sliced mushrooms and cook until they are soft. Remove the mushrooms from the pan and allow to cool completely. 2. Turn heat to medium-low and add the onions and celery, using an additional tablespoon of oil if needed. Cook until the onions are translucent. Stir as needed. Add the garlic and cook until the garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Allow the onions, celery and garlic to cool completely. 3. In a large bowl mix the cooked vegetables along with the black beans, lentils, quinoa, sugar, salt, paprika, cumin and pepper. 4. In small batches, using the pulse function of the food processor, process the vegetable mixture to a course meal. Place the mixture back into a mixing bowl and fold in the bread crumbs and egg. Mix well. 5. Shape into 4 equal portions. These patties may be held in the refrigerator for 24 hours. 6. To prepare the vegetable burgers, preheat a nonstick sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and cook each burger for 2 to 3 minutes per side. 7. Place each burger on a freshly toasted brioche bun or onion roll with desired garnish. Per serving: 478 calories; 15g fat; 6g saturated fat; 97mg cholesterol; 15g protein; 73g carbohydrate; 10g sugar; 10g iber; 1,019mg sodium; 53mg calcium.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cletes@post-dispatch.com

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

EDIBLES & ESSENTIALS MARKET & CAFÉ

Q • I’d like the recipe for the

5815 Hampton Avenue 314-328-2300; Ediblesandessentials.com

veggie burger at Edibles & Essentials. The patties are brown and crispy on the outside and the texture isn’t mushy like so many veggie burgers. —Bill Lamberton, Princeton Heights

to order including steaks and meat cut in house, fresh salads, sandwiches, sausage and cheese boards, appetizers and more prepared in the café’s kitchen. Happily, this seasoned chef and former culinary school instructor also stocked a small market with interesting provisions guaranteed to please discriminating home cooks.

A • When Chef Matt Borchardt opened his first café in October, he didn’t stop with an inventive large and small plates menu for lunch, dinner and for Saturday brunch. He added a case of take-home selections packaged

This triple-treat approach works well for Borchardt, who graciously greets patrons and shares his culinary knowledge when asked. “I wanted a simple, charming space with a special ambience — quaint, yet sophisticated — with high-quality, good food. We have a full liquor license as well, so you can enjoy a glass of wine in the cafe or take home craft beers and bottles of wine or hard liquor.” By the way, there’s no corkage fee for Edible & Essentials’ retail wines at the café. At the café, customer favorites include his signature-fried

ribs, the house chili and banh mi tacos served street-style in a double corn tortilla. Customers love this fusion take on the classic Vietnamese pork and pickled vegetable sandwich. Sous chef Joe Stamer oversees the kitchen, which makes everything except the breads from scratch, including dressings, pickled vegetables, mustards and the aioli for their popular sandwiches. To develop their popular veggie burger, the two chefs tested more than a dozen small batch recipes to come up with a burger that tastes great and maintains a nice texture.

TO REQUEST A RECIPE Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name to reciperequest@post-dispatch.com.

Recipe adapted for home kitchens by the PostDispatch.

Nothing plain about it: How to make vanilla extract at home

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Inspired Food Culture | feasteats.com

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CHEESE

SEED DRESSING cup mayonnaise cup sour cream cup olive oil Tbsp apple cider vinegar Tbsp Dijon mustard juice of 1 lemon Tbsp poppyseeds

To

| 8 to 10 |

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NBOW VEGETABLE-HERB SLAW head red cabbage (about 4 cups), inely shredded small head Napa cabbage (about 3 cups) inely shredded cups inely shredded carrots cups jicama, peeled and matchstick-sized sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste cup thinly sliced scallions cup loosely packed, roughly chopped fresh parsley

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Preparation – Poppyseed dressing | combine mayonnaise, sour cream, oil, vinegar, mustard and

juice in a medium bowl; whisk to blend. Stir in poppyseeds until evenly distributed. cover and er to refrigerator for 1 hour. heat Preparation – rainbow vegetable-herb Slaw | combine red and green cabbage, carrots and jicama large bowl; add half of the poppyseed dressing and toss until coated, adding more as needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve | add scallions and parsley to slaw; toss to incorporate and check seasoning again. Serve

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A DOUBLE OVEN MAKES THINGS EASIER, but if you have a single ov in, but leave the sauce of. Once the pork is out and resting, reheat the nacho bar for haltime: People love something new and piping hot on

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underestimate the power of a fresh, crunchy slaw, because it’s as vibrant as it is multipurpose. one works wonderfully alongside any dish, but it really shines against the Spice-Rubbed Pulled in sandwiches.

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ainbow vegetable-herb Slaw with Poppyseed dressing

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hot items. Beter yet, bake your wings in the morning before throwing your pulled pork 400˚F for 15 to 20 minutes until hot, toss in the sauce and inish up the bake time. Save the midgame, and close out with a sweet second half of whoopie pies and ice cream sandwiches.

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COCONUT CILANTRO DIP 1 Tbsp olive oil 3 Tbsp inely diced shallot 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tsp grated fresh ginger 2 Tbsp rice wine vinegar 1 ¼ cup Greek yogurt or sour cream 2⁄3 cup full-fat coconut milk juice of 2 limes 1 bunch fresh cilantro, roughly chopped TO SERVE ¼ cup crushed peanuts 2 scallions, white and green parts, cut in thin rings ¼ cup roughly chopped fresh cilantro leaves 2 to 3 limes, in wedges

Preparation – gochujang hot wings | Preheat oven to 400°F.

lipped baking sheets with heavy-duty aluminum foil, up and over sides. add wing pieces and olive large bowl; toss until coated. Divide onto prepared pans, leaving space between pieces. Season rously with salt and pepper. roast for 45 to 50 minutes until wings are browned and crispy. wings roast, in a medium bowl combine gochujang, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, chile garlic sugar and mustard powder; whisk to blend. When wings are cooked through, remove from and toss in gochujang mixture until coated, working in batches as needed. remove foil from ing sheets and place wings back on hot pans, spreading out in a single layer. Place back in oven sauce has heated and wings have begun to caramelize, about 8 minutes, watching carefully so don’t burn.

THE

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| 8 to 10 | UJANG HOT WINGS lbs chicken wings, separated, tips discarded Tbsp olive oil sea salt and freshly ground black pepper cup gochujang cup soy sauce Tbsp rice wine vinegar Tbsp chile garlic paste Tbsp granulated sugar tsp Coleman’s mustard powder cup peanuts, crushed scallions, white and green parts, cut in thin rings cup fresh cilantro leaves, roughly chopped limes, in wedges

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ochujang hot wings with cooling coconut-cilantro dip ochujang, a Korean hot sauce similar to but sweeter than Sriracha, is a perfectly unexpected choice hot wings. You’ll ind it in any well-stocked grocery store.

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immediately on Spice-Rubbed Oven Pulled Pork Sandwiches or as a side.

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ABEL URIBE • Chicago Tribune BY LEAH ESKIN Chicago Tribune

Preparation – coconut cilantro dip | in a medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil. shallot and cook until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. add garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. remove from heat and stir in vinegar.

bowl of a food processor or blender, add yogurt or sour cream and coconut milk. add lime cilantro and shallot mixture; blend until smooth and mixture is freckled with cilantro leaves. er to jar refrigerate at least 1 hour. Serve | Pile wings on a plater and garnish with crushed peanuts, scallions and cilantro leaves; lime wedges alongside. Serve with coconut cilantro dip.

ered greek “Salad” Spread atziki is one of those things you can’t make too ahead or you risk wateriness, so don’t make until the day of the party, and be sure to really squeeze that cucumber dry. Dress the vegetables lightly – just enough to coat, no more – to them crisp and beautiful all day long.

| 10 to 12 | KI English cucumber, peeled and seeded cups Greek yogurt clove garlic, sliced juice of 2 lemons Tbsp olive oil Tbsp fresh dill Tbsp fresh mint leaves tsp kosher salt, more to taste freshly ground black pepper, to taste US AND SALAD LAYERS Tbsp white wine vinegar Tbsp olive oil 8-oz containers plain hummus sea salt and freshly ground black pepper oz cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise head romaine letuce, cored, outer leaves removed, chopped in ribbons cup pited and halved lengthwise kalamata olives English cucumber, peeled, seeded, ½-inch dice red or orange sweet pepper, seeded, ½-inch dice Tbsp thinly sliced pepperoncini, to serve small red onion, in paper-thin rings, to serve cup loosely packed, roughly chopped parsley leaves Tbsp roughly chopped fresh mint leaves oz feta cheese

1 ½ tsp inely chopped fresh oregano leaves pita chips or warmed pita breads sliced into wedges

| Preparation – tzatziki | grate cucumber on largest holes of a box grater and place in mesh strainer; press irmly to squeeze out any excess water and set aside. in the bowl of a food processor, combine yogurt, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, dill and mint leaves; process until smooth and combined. Place in small bowl, stir in strained cucumber and kosher salt and season to taste with pepper and more salt as needed. Place in refrigerator until ready to use. | Preparation – hummus and Salad layers | Place vinegar and olive oil in a small jar, cover tightly with lid, and shake until emulsiied; season to taste with salt and pepper and set aside. in a shallow baking dish (about 9-by-11 inches), spread hummus on botom in even layer. Spoon tzatziki over top and spread in an even layer. in a large bowl, combine tomatoes, letuce, olives, cucumber and pepper; add a small amount of the vinegar and oil dressing and toss to coat vegetables; add a litle more dressing as needed and season with salt and pepper. Using your hands, layer salad evenly over top of the tzatziki.

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| to Serve | Distribute desired amount of pepperoncinis and red onion rings over top, then sprinkle with parsley and mint leaves. crumble feta over top, sprinkle on oregano and season with more salt and pepper, to taste. Serve immediately alongside pita chips or warmed pita breads.

Food is central to the experience of what we collectively call "the holidays." For the next few weeks, we will be gathering together to share time with friends and loved ones, and delicious food and drink will be the centerpiece. Here, we present celebration-worthy recipes developed by Shannon Weber and cocktails from Mat Seiter, all designed to surprise and delight you as well as your guests. Head to feasteats.com for even more recipes and also a video series to help you navigate some of the less familiar dishes. From the team here at Feast, we wish you good cheer and great eating this holiday season.

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Vanilla suffers typecasting as ordinary. In software, it’s vanilla versus custom. In finance, it’s vanilla versus exotic. In the bedroom, it’s vanilla versus kinky. But vanilla hardly counts as plain. Consider her bio: Vanilla comes from Mexico, and though she has traveled as far as Madagascar, she can only fruit naturally back home. Consider her habits: She unfurls a tiny green-white flower for a single day, during which she is visited by her suitor, a rare bee — or perhaps a hummingbird. Vanilla doesn’t kiss and tell. Chemists can copy vanillin — the one-note blast at the center of the flavor. But no one can conjure the full symphony — some 400 subtle scents — that make up true vanilla. That’s not plain; it’s plainly astounding.

VANILLA EXTRACT Yield: 6 (4-ounce) bottles 15 Bourbon or Madagascar vanilla beans (see note) 1 bottle (750 milliliters) vodka Note: Grocery stores often sell vanilla beans in packages of 1 or 2. For bulk beans, try online. One good source is vanillaqueen.com 1. Use a small sharp knife to slit the vanilla beans lengthwise. Slip the beans into the bottle of vodka. Close and store in a cool dark cupboard. (Consider sliding the bottle back into its paper bag.) 2. Let rest 3 (or more) weeks. Shake a few times per week. 3. Set a sieve lined with cheesecloth over a quartsize measuring cup. Strain extract. Pour strained extract into small glass (preferably dark) bottles. If you like, add a length of vanilla bean to each small bottle. Leave as is, or get fancy with the labeling. 4. You can continue to add vodka to your original bottle for a time; eventually the beans will have given their all.


LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.20.2016

Beer makes Belgian stew superb STEW • FROM L1

least a couple of hours. But the price of even the cheapest, most fibrous cuts of meat has soared in recent years. Stew was originally a peasant food, but if there were any peasants anymore they couldn’t afford it. Still, when the temperature drops so much it makes your bones ache, nothing is as welcome as a steaming bowl of stew. I made three, beginning with one of my favorite dishes of all time, veal stew with mustard sauce and currants. This is more than a stew, this is a religious experience on a plate. You begin with veal, which in itself is tender and delicious (but it’s only relatively tender; it still needs to be cooked for a while). Grainy mustard adds an irresistible bite, and its faint harshness is counteracted by the sweetness that comes from carrots and the delicate pop of currants. A bit of vinegar is all that is needed to give the meal a subtle sweet and sour depth. I make it at least once a year, and I like to serve it on buttered egg noodles. Next up is Carbonnade à la Flamande, a Belgian stew made by braising beef and onions in beer. At its heart, it is like beef bourguinon, but with hops. I have had Carbonnade à la Flamande at many restaurants and have cooked many versions of it myself, but I have never found a version that even comes close to the deceptively simple one created by Julia Child. Others are far more complex in preparation, but none has the same depth of flavor. The redoubtable Ms. Child’s version is made from little more than beef, onions, beef stock, garlic and beer. What makes hers so superior is the beer.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Carbonnade à la Flamande, a Belgian stew, is made by braising beef and onions in beer.

The beer simmers for a couple of hours, and that makes its flavor more intense. I have made it with Belgian beer, which is traditional for the Belgian dish, but when the sauce is reduced the beer’s floral quality becomes overly flowery. I have made it with Guinness stout, which is recommended by some chefs, but that only intensifies the beer’s bitterness. Child chooses a Pilsner, the relatively light flavor of which

becomes just strong enough as it simmers to stand up to the hearty beef and onions. It is superb. Finally, I made a Lamb Tagine With Green Olives and Lemon. A tagine is a stew that is typically made in a tagine, an earthenware Moroccan pot sort of shaped like an upside-down funnel. I made mine in a Dutch oven because I do not have a tagine; they are kind of pricey for something I might only use once or twice a year.

The Dutch oven worked fine, but then again anything would work well for a dish as spectacular as this. What makes it stand out is the combination of spices in which the lamb marinates: ginger, paprika, coriander, cumin, black pepper, cayenne pepper, cloves, cinnamon and saffron, plus lemon zest and plenty of garlic. Once the lamb cubes have soaked up all of those flavors, it is simmered to a delicate

tenderness, along with carrots and onions. Then, when the dish is nearly done, it is given a shocking jolt of additional flavor from briny olives, plus cilantro, parsley and lemon juice. It is a powerfully flavorful dish, a little hot and very spicy. On a blustery day, it is the kind of stew that warms you from the inside out. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

CARBONNADE A LA FLAMANDE (BEEF AND ONIONS BRAISED IN BEER)

VEAL STEW IN MUSTARD SAUCE

LAMB TAGINE WITH GREEN OLIVES AND LEMON

Yield: 6 servings

Yield: 6 servings

Yield: 8 servings

1½ pounds boneless lean veal, such as round, trimmed of fat and cut into 2-inch cubes 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 cup chopped onion 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced 3 carrots, peeled and sliced ½ cup dried currants 2 cups veal stock, chicken stock or a combination of chicken and beef stocks 2 tablespoons grainy mustard ½ teaspoon black pepper 2 teaspoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons cold water 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

½ cup extra-virgin olive oil 5 garlic cloves, minced 2 (2½-inch) strips of lemon zest 2 teaspoons ground ginger 2 teaspoons sweet paprika 2 teaspoons ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ¼ teaspoon ground cloves Pinch of safron threads, crumbled 1 (3-inch) cinnamon stick 1 tablespoon kosher salt 3½ pounds boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups water 6 large carrots, thinly sliced 1 onion, cut into ¼-inch dice 2 cups pitted green Picholine olives, rinsed 1 cup lat-leaf parsley, chopped 1 cup cilantro, chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3 pounds beef chuck or rump roast 2 to 3 tablespoons rendered pork fat or cooking oil (not olive) 1½ pounds (6 cups) onions, sliced thin Salt and pepper 4 garlic cloves, mashed 1 cup beef stock

2 to 3 cups Pilsner beer 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 6 sprigs parsley 1 bay leaf ½ teaspoon dried thyme ½ tablespoon cornstarch or arrowroot 2 tablespoons wine vinegar

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Cut the beef into slices about 2 inches by 4 inches across and ½ inch thick. Dry on paper towels. Put rendered fat or oil in the skillet and heat until almost smoking. Brown the beef slices quickly, a few at a time, and set them aside. 2. Reduce heat to medium. Stir the onions into the fat in the skillet, adding more fat if necessary, and brown the onions lightly for about 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat, season with salt and pepper, and stir in the garlic. 3. Arrange half the browned beef in a Dutch oven or casserole and lightly season with salt and pepper. Spread half the onions over the beef. Repeat with the rest of the beef and onions. 4. Heat the stock in the browning skillet, scraping up coagulated cooking juices. Pour it over the meat. Add enough beer so the meat is barely covered. Stir in the brown sugar. Tie together the parsley, bay leaf and thyme in a piece of cheesecloth to make an herb bouquet and bury in the pot, or simply stir in the herbs. Bring pot to a simmer on top of the stove. Then cover the pot and place in the lower third of the preheated oven. Regulate heat so liquid remains at a very slow simmer for about 2½ hours or until the meat is forktender. 5. Remove herb bouquet or the parsley and bay leaf. Drain the cooking liquid out of the casserole into a saucepan and skim of fat. Beat together the cornstarch and vinegar, and then stir this mixture into the cooking liquid. Simmer for 3 to 4 minutes. Taste and carefully correct seasoning. You should have about 2 cups of sauce. Pour the sauce back over the meat. The stew may be prepared in advance to this point. 6. When ready to serve, cover the pot and simmer slowly for 4 to 5 minutes until the meat is thoroughly heated through. Serve with parsley potatoes or buttered noodles. Per serving: 684 calories; 37g fat; 15g saturated fat; 223mg cholesterol; 58g protein; 20g carbohydrate; 10g sugar; 2g iber; 179mg sodium; 68mg calcium. Recipe from “Mastering the Art of French Cooking,” by Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck

1. Wash the veal cubes and pat dry. Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Brown the veal on all sides, removing the cubes with a slotted spoon when browned. This will have to be done in a few batches. 2. Reduce the heat to medium-low, add the onion and garlic, and sauté, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. Return the veal to the pan and add the carrots, currants, stock, mustard and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat so the stew is just simmering and cook the stew, covered, for 1½ hours or until the meat is fork-tender. 3. Mix together the cornstarch and cold water and stir into the stew. Allow it to simmer for 2 minutes to thicken. Stir in the vinegar. Per serving: 219 calories; 8g fat; 3g saturated fat; 69mg cholesterol; 19g protein; 17g carbohydrate; 11g sugar; 2g iber; 230mg sodium; 38mg calcium. Recipe from “The Gourmet Gazelle Cookbook,” by Ellen Brown

Animals banned from dining rooms NEMAN • FROM L1

pop it unknowingly into his mouth. Coincidentally, not a half-hour before at that same party, a colleague asked if I had been to another locally famous restaurant. I said I had, and he said he was never going back because the first time he was there he saw a cockroach crawl across the cash register. That only left him imagining what is in the kitchen. That’s not a problem for me, I told him. When I lived in Texas, the best Mexican restaurants all had the occasional cockroach on the wall. That’s how you knew it was good. I fully understand that dog urine on the floor does not necessarily translate to anything particularly unsavory on the plate. I don’t see how the poodle puddle in the dining room would possibly interact with the food from the kitchen, other than that part about the french fry and the five-second rule. But what does the Department of Health have to say about it? We may never know. I called the City of St. Louis Department of Health 12 times — that’s 12 times — and left 12 messages, but none of them was ever returned. I started to feel like the floor of

a dog-friendly restaurant. So I checked the state codes of both Missouri and Illinois and learned that it is not legal in either state to have dogs or other animals inside a dining room of any restaurant. The only exceptions to the rule are service animals for the disabled and police dogs on patrol. I also called the owners of Urban Chestnut a few times, but I never heard back from them, either. Perhaps they do not know about the law banning animals from restaurant dining rooms. I would be happy to inform them, and once they had this information I am certain they would gladly change their policy. No one wants a Bavarian pretzel with a side of canine urine. And I doubt any restaurant would want to be perceived as selling it. But mistakes happen, and so do accidents. If a dog does manage to find its way into a restaurant and makes a little mess on the restaurant floor, be sure to report it to the local Department of Health. Yeah. Good luck with that. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

1. In a large bowl, mix the olive oil, garlic, lemon zest, ginger, paprika, coriander, cumin, black pepper, cayenne, cloves, safron, cinnamon stick and salt. Add the lamb and toss to coat. Refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours. 2. Put the lamb and spices into a tagine or medium enameled cast-iron casserole; discard the lemon zest. Add the water, carrots and onion, and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook over low heat until the lamb is very tender, about 2 hours. 3. Spoon of any fat from the broth. Stir in the olives, season with salt and cook for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the parsley, cilantro and lemon juice. Serve with couscous. Per serving: 478 calories; 31g fat; 8g saturated fat; 107mg cholesterol; 13g protein; 13g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 3g iber; 2,018mg sodium; 82mg calcium. Recipe from Food & Wine

Making labneh, the strained yogurt of the Middle East BY LEAH ESKIN Chicago Tribune

Milk turns to yogurt, yogurt turns to labneh. It’s the way of bacteria. As cow or goat or sheep’s milk thickens from fresh to fermented, it gets creamier, tangier and long-lastier. The glass of milk is downed with a single cookie. The ball of labneh, rolled in herbs and packed in oil, can cure for months. Give it a whirl: Line a strainer with cheesecloth, and set it over a deep bowl. Stir ½ teaspoon salt into a 2-pound tub of plain whole yogurt; pour into the lined strainer. Slide this setup into the fridge, and let it drip. In two hours, you’ll have strained yogurt — “Greek” to the grocery store. In eight hours, you’ll have soft labneh, lush as sour cream. In 12 hours, you’ll have firm labneh, smooth as cream cheese. (You’ll also have a bowl of watery whey — bane of the yogurt industry.) Spoon up labneh with fruit, spread it on a sandwich or swirl it into a bright green dip. It offers a creamy, tangy, lingering taste of lovely.

FRIED CAULIFLOWER Yield: 6 as an appetizer Herbed labneh ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley ¼ cup chopped fresh dill ¼ cup chopped fresh chives ¼ cup chopped fresh mint ½ clove garlic, grated on a rasp grater 1 cup labneh (or plain whole milk Greek yogurt) Kosher salt Fried caulilower Canola oil, for frying 1 head caulilower, broken into lorets Kosher salt 1. Combine herbs, garlic and labneh (or yogurt) in the food processor, and puree until bright green and smooth. Season well with salt. 2. Heat about 2 inches oil in a heavybottomed pot over medium-high heat to 375 degrees. Fry caulilower in batches until the exterior is dark golden brown and crisp, 5 to 8 minutes. Drain briely on paper towels. Salt well, and serve with the herbed labneh. Adapted from “Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking” by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook.


LET’S EAT

01.20.2016 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

How to make light, lufy gnocchi BY JAMES P. DEWAN Chicago Tribune

As our thoughts turn again to starchy sides — as they are wont to do — can’t we for once have some dadblasted gnocchi? As good as it is, gnocchi’s like that crazy Uncle Shadrach you’re always meaning to invite for the holidays but can’t ever seem to remember because — well, you haven’t really got a reason. Today, then, let’s call old Uncle Shadrach and have him over for some fresh, delicious gnocchi.

After letting the cooked potatoes cool slightly, peel and pass through a ricer or food mill onto a loured surface.

While potatoes are still warm, add lour, salt and egg. Cut ingredients together with a bench scraper, or mix by hand until dough comes together.

Cut the inished dough into four pieces. Roll each piece into a long rope about the thickness of your thumb. Cut them into lengths of about 3/4-inch.

Serve the gnocchi with your favorite sauce. Here, they are coated with fresh sage and butter and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL TERCHA • Chicago Tribune

WHY YOU NEED TO LEARN THIS Like their kissing cousin, pasta, Italy’s diminutive dumplings pair well with a thousand sauces. Tomato, cream, pesto, even a simple butter melted with fresh sage all pair perfectly well. And, like so many other things, once you get the hang of it, you’ll never look back.

THE STEPS YOU TAKE First of all, if you’re new to gnocchi, they’re light little things, smaller than the tip

potato gnocchi, as that seems to be the most common variety, and it makes a good entry point. As with anything containing just a few ingredients, the type and quality of those ingredients have increased importance. Let’s take a look. The potato. If you fancy yourself a potato enthusiast, you know that there’s

of your thumb (and twice as tender). They’re often described as having a “pillowy” texture, and indeed, I can imagine a tiny mouse resting its itty-bitty noggin on one of these plush creations. There are heaps and piles of gnocchi styles out there in the great big world. For the time being, though, we’ll stick with

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a potato spectrum that leads from the starchy (like a russet) to the waxy (like a new red). As a rule, we want starchier, rather than waxier, potatoes. This is because the waxier the potato, the more moisture it contains, and the more moisture there is, the more flour we’re going to need to get the dough to hold together. Now, we’ve got nothing against flour. It’s just that, the more flour you have in your gnocchi, the denser and doughier it’s going to be. And good gnocchi should be so light they practically float off your plate, like the yeasty, buckwheat blini of an orbiting Soviet cosmonaut. (Note to self: Find more current cultural references.) The flour. All-purpose is fine. The question is, how much? If you look at 10 gnocchi recipes, you’ll find 10 different potato/flour ratios. Three-quarters of a cup per pound of potatoes is reasonable to start. As you make gnocchi more and more frequently and get used to the process of making the dough, you can gradually lower the amount of flour. And less flour means more potatoey flavor. The salt. You’ve got to season your dough. Otherwise your gnocchi will be blander than a Lawrence Welk Christmas special. (Note to self: Reread previous note to self.) A good amount would be about ½ teaspoon per pound of dough. The egg. The egg adds moisture and structure, making the dough easier to handle and the gnocchi less likely to disintegrate in the water. It also makes it denser, which is why lots of cooks leave it out altogether. I say leave it in, though, at least your first few times making gnocchi. Then, as with lessening the flour, you can gradually eliminate the egg as well. The amounts used below will make 4 to 8 servings, depending on if you want it for an appetizer or the main course.

LET’S TALK METHOD 1. Remember, the idea is to keep the moisture out, so baking works really well. Bake 2 pounds of russets in a 400-degree oven until they can be easily pierced with a skewer or knife, 40 to 60 minutes. Let cool slightly, then peel and pass through a ricer or food mill onto a floured surface. 2. While potatoes are still warm, add 1 ½ cups flour, 1 teaspoon salt and 2 beaten egg yolks or 1 beaten egg. Cut ingredients together with a bench scraper or mix by hand until dough comes together. 3. Knead the dough briefly, keeping it dusted in flour to prevent sticking. The finished dough should be as soft and smooth as the freshly talcumed rump of a newborn baby. (Tip: To test if the gnocchi will hold together while cooking, form one piece. Drop it into boiling water. If it breaks up, mix a little more flour into the dough.) Cut the dough into four pieces and cover three while you work with the first piece. 4. Smoosh the dough into a generally oblong shape. Place both palms on the dough and, moving your hands forward and back while at the same time moving them away from each other, roll the dough into a long rope about the thickness of your aforementioned thumb. Cut them into lengths of about ¾-inch, and place on a floured sheet pan while you roll the remaining dough. 5. Roll each gnocco (singular of gnocchi) down the tines of a floured fork to make the little ridges that are characteristic of gnocchi and that help the sauce cling to them. 6. Boil the gnocchi in lots of salted water. When they float to the top, remove them to a colander with a slotted spoon, then toss with your favorite pasta sauce and serve immediately.


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016


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Wednesday • 01.20.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable. East deals. NORTH ♠Void ♥J 10 3 ♦10 9 6 3 ♣Q 10 9 6 5 3 WEST EAST ♠9 8 7 2 ♠K J 10 6 5 ♥7 4 2 ♥A 8 ♦8 4 2 ♦Q 7 5 ♣A 8 2 ♣K J 7 SOUTH ♠A Q 4 3 ♥K Q 9 6 5 ♦A K J ♣4 The bidding: EAST SOUTH WEST NORTH 1♠ Dbl Pass 2♣ Pass 2♥ Pass 3♥ Pass 4♥ All pass Opening lead: Two of ♥ When declarer can’t see a road to success in his contract, it’s often a good idea to cash all of his winners, including his last trump (in a trump contract). This will sometimes create an impossible situation for the defenders. East won the opening trump lead with the ace and continued the suit. South won this in his hand with the king and rufed a low spade with dummy’s last trump. Declarer led a diamond to his jack for a winning finesse, and drew the last trump. It looked like he had three sure losers remaining, but he tried the efect of cashing both of his diamond win-

ners and his last two trumps, leaving this position: NORTH ♠Void ♥Void ♦Void ♣Q 10 9 6 WEST EAST ♠9 ♠K J ♥Void ♥Void ♦Void ♦Void ♣A 8 2 ♣K J 7 SOUTH ♠A Q 4 ♥Void ♦Void ♣4 East still had to discard and chose his low club. South exited with a club to dummy’s 10, losing to the jack. East cashed the king of clubs, but declarer discarded his low spade. East was forced to lead a spade from the king and South took the finesse for his contract. Well done! (01/20/16) tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

Across 1 Xbox alternative 4 Salinger’s “For ___ — With Love and Squalor” 8 Assail with expletives 14 Elect (to) 15 Do perfectly 16 Off the ship 17 *Colorful North American waterfowl 19 Symbol of busyness 20 Rioter’s haul 21 *Fleet operator 22 *Class determinant in boxing 26 Gamboling spots 27 New Age Grammy winner 28 Aussie hoppers 29 “___ luck!” 30 New beginning?

WORD GAME January 20 WORD — THEREON (THEREON: thair-ON: On or upon this, that or it.) Average mark 25 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 34 or more words in THEREON? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — IMPENDS send ides side mend sine mien snide mind snip mine snipe pied sped pine spend deism spied denim spin dime spine dine semi RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

31 Inner: Prefix 32 ___ bran 33 Part of a student’s address 34 Cul-de-sac … or what either part of the answer to each starred clue is? 36 Very loud, on a score 39 Law grads, briefly 40 “The stars” 41 Not 100% 42 What a back door may open to 45 Helluva party 46 Christmas ___ 47 Big brand of sports equipment 48 *Top on official stationery 50 *Observe closely

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A P P H E R S K I O N D E C O T E T E S H A S O I F F N E W A D A J O L A R E M A S

C O L I C Y

C A N D Y L A N D

W H S O O L T E

O P H A B O G O E B S S O U G A P R A I N L S D E E D A N O N W E N D

S C R S E E E R N E N A L A C I W I O T N E

A Y S M E L A M O R A Z O R S N O R A S T I T C H E Z G O O I N P U T L E S A D O R E D A N A D A L O T T I O O F V R B I E S E X

52 Entry on a sports schedule 53 “You’ve got that all wrong!” 54 *Swimmer with a prehensile tail 58 Is a bad winner 59 ___-Seltzer 60 Asset for a gunfighter 61 Kitt who sang “Santa Baby” 62 Central Park’s ___ Boathouse 63 Stores for GIs

Down 1 Bowl over 2 Facebook had one in 2012, for short 3 “See?!” 4 Fund 5 Sweet white wine from Bordeaux 6 Input jack abbr. 7 Member of a fraternal group 8 Let a hack do the driving 9 ___-friendly 10 Food item often caramelized 11 Old political council 12 Concert venues 13 Mother ___ 18 1977 hit by 55-Down 21 Understanding sounds 22 Nota ___ 23 Linear, for short 24 It’s not much

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016

If Jan. 20 is your birthday • This year you become more aware of others and their needs. You have become more sensitive and caring. Your inner circle grows as a result. If you are single, you might meet someone in your day-to-day travels. If you are attached, the two of you act like new lovers. Clearly, you enjoy each other’s company. Gemini is always full of ideas. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Your creativity continues to dominate, but you’ll communicate your thoughts more incisively. Conversations could go in many diferent directions. You will ind out what works for you in no time. Tonight: Pretend that it is the weekend. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ Others make demands that might distract you from some thoughts about inances. You need to deal with these money issues, but honor a need for a change of pace. Tonight: Balance your checkbook before you head out. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ You see past the obvious, but you aren’t always ready to share these thoughts. As a result, others ind you to be most unpredictable and capable of doing anything. Tonight: Ready for some adventure? CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ You could be more demanding than you realize. On some level, a close friend or associate might feel drained by your initial reaction. Tonight: Not to be found. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Others seek you out. At the present moment, you seem to prefer the company of many people all at once. Tonight: Where people are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★ Others often look to you for leadership. You know when you have had enough and want

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Paula Gamache

25 Olive oil and nuts have this 29 Put on 31 Vortex in the sink 32 Ambitious and unscrupulous 35 Middle ___ 36 It can easily go up in flames 37 Pet pest 38 Took to the hills

39 Propellerless craft 42 Exact satisfaction for 43 New Orleans university 44 Property claim holder 45 Unit of sound named for an inventor 46 Van Gogh’s brother

48 Novelist Mario Vargas ___ 49 Place to kick a habit 51 Literary collection: Abbr. 54 Mule of song 55 Grp. that sang 18-Down 56 ___ Flags 57 Printing measures

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1216

WORD SCRIMMAGE

to head in a diferent direction. How you handle a demanding situation could change radically in a few days. Tonight: Till the wee hours. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Your ability to think fast and come up with several novel ideas emerges. Your understanding of others’ predicaments will add to your mental resilience. Tonight: Say “yes.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Work with individuals rather than a group of people. You could be confused about what to do and when. Listen to your inner voice if you feel ify about verbalizing a problem. Tonight: Downtime with a loved one.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You’ll hear a lot of information all at once. You could be surprised by how overwhelming it is. Detach, and listen to what is ofered and nothing more. Tonight: An opportunity appears that seems too good to be true. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Security, both emotionally and inancially, becomes more important to you in the next few weeks. You could ind that an element of unpredictability surrounds you. Reach out to someone at a distance. Tonight: Stick to your usual routine. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You feel energized, though you also might feel scattered. Don’t worry — you will bounce back quickly. You could be surprised by what someone says or does. You won’t be able to suppress your reaction. Tonight: Go for what you want.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ You might need some downtime. You could be doing a lot of processing in your mind. Be ready to take a risk if it feels comfortable, but don’t lost sight of the inancial implications involved. Tonight: Happy to be close to home. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

01.20.2016 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Wife fears losing her family for love

Dear In Turmoil • Consider VERY carefully what a new life with Yuri will cost you, because it’s going to be emotionally expensive. Right now you are part of a community, with standing in that community. If you leave it, all of that will be gone, and you will likely be shunned. While running away with your lover may seem romantic,

I would be very surprised if it didn’t spell the end of your relationship with your children and grandchildren. A decision like this should not be taken lightly; it needs to be made rationally. If you are “going nuts,” you are NOT thinking rationally, so please, discuss this with a counselor more familiar with Orthodox custom than I. Dear Abby • My ex sent our children letters from prison. I didn’t give them the letters because he was abusive. In one of them he asked our daughter to forgive him and not punish him forever. Abby, her father had abused her, and he’s asking for her to stop punishing HIM? She was going to kill herself because of what he did to her. My daughter went through several years of intense counseling and still battles depression, so there is no way I’ll permit him to have contact with her or my other children. I have had no contact with him since we split up several years ago. My lawyer

mailed the divorce papers and that was that. Should I write him a letter and tell him what I think? — NOWHERE IN TEXAS Dear Nowhere • No, your lawyer should. One of the hallmarks of abusers is that they tend to blame their victims for their actions. The statement in your ex’s letter accusing your daughter of “punishing him” with her silence is troubling. She’s under no obligation to forgive her abuser. When he is finally released from prison, one of the conditions may be that he must have no contact with minors. And if by then your children are no longer minors, one can only hope that they have become mature enough to protect themselves emotionally — and physically, if necessary — from their father. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Arm is moved. 2. Leg is moved. 3. Sleeve is shorter. 4. Golf tee is missing. 5. Steering wheel is missing. 6. Hill is added.

Dear Abby • I live in Israel, and for the past five years I’ve been having an afair with a great guy I’ll call Yuri. I married very young to a man who is kind and very Orthodox. I love my children and grandchildren. Yuri thinks we should leave our spouses and make a fresh start. (I’m not Orthodox and neither is he.) I am afraid if I do, I may lose my children and grandchildren. On the other hand, I can’t survive without Yuri. I have always had lovers since I discovered how Orthodox my husband is — it’s a survival thing. I am going nuts. What should I do? — IN TURMOIL IN ISRAEL

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Grandma won’t stop complaining

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Hi, Carolyn • I’m a wife and mom of two elementary-age boys. My mom lives near us and is a hard person to be around. She is negative, especially to my kids, and complains constantly. I want to have a relationship with her that isn’t based on negativity but I don’t know how. We invited her to an event last night with my family, and she made snarky comments about what my kids were wearing and snapped at them, among other things. It ruined a special evening for me. I feel guilty that I don’t enjoy the time we have with her since she is getting older. People tell me how lucky I am to have my parents close by, but my tolerance for the negativity is getting lower. How can I find some joy in this relationship and also help foster a good relationship with my kids and their grandmother? — S.

Answer • It ruined your special evening? How do you think your kids felt under Grandma’s attacks? I understand your concerns — negativity’s hard to manage, grandparents aren’t around forever, check — but I am mystified by your priorities. No. 1 has to be your children’s emotional health, and you barely graze it here — as a last-line “also,” and only about their relationship with their grandma. What about their self-worth after having such nastiness routinely directed at them at such an impressionable time? How you feel matters, but it’s a distant second. And how a typical grandparent scenario is supposed to play out isn’t even on the radar screen of what matters. So here’s a clippable list of suggested priorities with a relentlessly negative grandparent:

(1) How your kids feel. (2) [This item intentionally left blank to make a point.] (3) How you feel. (4) How the grandparent deserves to be treated. (5) How this whole grandparent thing is supposed to work. One practical application, for example, is that when she says something nasty about what your kids are wearing, you say, calmly, “What an unkind thing to say to children. You owe them an apology.” And when she refuses, “That’s your prerogative — and mine is to end this outing. Kids, stay with Dad, I’m taking Grandma home.” That tells your boys that they deserve civil treatment and that you have their backs when they don’t get it. I can’t think of a more important show of parental love. tellme@washpost.com

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Second Chance: One Fox 2 News at 9:00pm FOX American Idol Hope2 fuls audition in Atlanta. More Notch. (8:01) (N) (N) (cc) (N) (cc) (cc) CBS 2 Broke 4 Girls (N) (cc)

Mike & Molly (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds: Drive. Code Black: First Date. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

NBC The Mysteries of Laura Law & Order: Special 5 Laura is in danger. (N) Victims Unit (N) (cc) (cc)

Chicago P.D. The unit targets a cocaine supplier. (N)

PBS Nature Animals lure in NOVA Antarctica’s 9 their next meal. (N) (cc) under-ice landscape. (N) (cc)

Earth’s Natural Wonders (Part 2 of 3) (cc)

CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM/The Arrow Oliver seeks Supernatural Lucifer Pulse (N) (cc) revenge for Darhk’s at- offers Sam a way out. tack. (N) (cc) (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Mablean

Judge Mablean

Murdoch Mysteries Larry Rice Forensic Murdoch meets DetecFiles (cc) tive Guillaume.

ABC The Middle The Gold- Modern 30 (N) bergs (N) Family MYTV Law & Order A groom 46 is killed after his wedding. (cc)

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.20.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Steroid is potent treatment for PMR Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a 62-year-old male in generally good physical and mental health. I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at age 21. I had bowel resection surgery, but have no debilitating symptoms now, except some diarrhea flare-ups. My question is regarding polymyalgia rheumatica. I was diagnosed with this just two weeks ago. I’ve been on 10 mg of prednisone since, which has helped a lot, but I still have stiffness and very minor pain most mornings. My symptoms started about two months ago, relatively suddenly, first in one hip and then it spread to both hips and both shoulders. A dozen 200-mg ibuprofen didn’t help during the day, until I saw my doctor. Could this be related or connected to my Crohn’s, since they both are inflammatory conditions? Is there another treatment option besides prednisone? How long might I have to take it? How might it afect my Crohn’s, or my high blood pressure? What can cause or trigger PMR? Why not get cortisone injections? If prednisone is an anti-inflammatory, and so is ibuprofen, why isn’t ibuprofen efective? Lastly, does longterm prednisone use greatly increase my risk of other illnesses or infections? — J.O.H.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • That’s a lot of questions. The cause of PMR is not known, and no trigger has been identified. People with certain HLA subtypes (there are many human leukocyte antigen subtypes — they are proteins on white blood cells) are at high risk for PMR, and others put people at high risk for Crohn’s disease. The combination of the two is unusual. Yours is not a classic case of PMR, which usually is much worse in the upper arms and shoulders than in the hips, much worse in the morning and dramatically improves with low-dose prednisone (10-20 mg). Although ibuprofen does relieve some kinds of inflammation, it’s in the class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which is inefective in PMR. Prednisone, a glucocorticoid steroid, is a much more potent anti-inflammatory. A blood test, the ESR, almost always is high in people with PMR. Although prednisone dramatically improves PMR, it needs to be taken for one to two years (sometimes longer) in most people and can cause many side effects. Steroid shots are usually not practical since many joints are afected. High blood pressure and diabetes are common with oral or injection steroids. Infection risk is also increased, so it’s wise to make sure your immunizations are up to date, to take ANY sign of infection seriously and to see your doctor promptly.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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