1.19.16

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

TuEsday • 01.19.2016 • $1.50

SARACINO QUITS POST Move spurred by backlash over letters from Stenger, Belmar supporting relative in drug case

By CHRIsTINE ByERs St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLayTON • A high-level aide John Saracino

Steve Stenger

Chief Jon Belmar

FLOOD FATALITIES Two accidents over swollen creeks happened minutes apart

for St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger resigned Monday, less than a week after it became public that he had asked Stenger and the county police chief to write letters to a federal judge in support of his drugdealing nephew. John Saracino — a former county police board member and now a top aide to Stenger — stepped down Monday, leaving an annual salary of $130,000. His nephew, Michael Saracino II, 27, was sentenced in December to two years in federal prison after he pleaded guilty to a drug conspiracy charge connected to a marijuana distribution network. The Post-Dispatch first reported Wednesday that Police Chief Jon Belmar and Stenger wrote separate letters of support to U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry as she weighed the sentence for Michael Saracino II. In a letter dated Monday, Saracino wrote to Stenger: “It has been an honor to serve as a member of your administration; however, I do not want my continued presence to distract from the important work you are doing for the citizens of St. Louis County. Therefore, I have decided to resign my position efective immediately.” In a prepared statement, John Saracino said there was “nothing shameful” in the letters and that he stands by his actions in requesting the letters of support on behalf of his nephew. see saRaCINO • Page a8

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Melvin Dodge, 27, a volunteer ireighter in Crocker, Mo., explains last week how he witnessed a car loating downstream in Tavern Creek on Dec. 26. Dodge said he saw its taillights as it went around the bend in the distance. Rushing water was lowing over Highway U and the low-water bridge. Dodge later learned the car was carrying ive international soldiers from Fort Leonard Wood. All ive soldiers drowned.

Deaths of seven in Pulaski County challenge perceptions about risks

A memorial picture of the ive international soldiers who drowned last month sits on the counter of the Z Loft Hotel last week in St. Robert, Mo.

By JEssE BOGaN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CR OCKER , MO. • Life along Tavern Creek in Pulaski County is getting back to normal. Cattle break ranks from the meandering herd to slurp from the trickling stream. An eagle flaps overhead, near steep, rocky ravines jutting skyward from the edge of the grassy flood plain. The topography makes the area nature’s perfect rain catcher. Storms turn the serene landscape into a swirling, dangerous mess that shoots flash floods right over the Highway U bridge. Like so many other people who live here, Melvin

Photos of Ron Gray, 53, of Dixon, Mo., and his girlfriend, Sandy Tilley, 50, of St. James, Mo., are spread out for display last week by Gray’s mother, Wanda.

Lee Dodge knows this. That’s why a little after 8 p.m. Dec. 26, he was concerned when he saw a car zip by in front of him on Highway U, heading toward the bridge. As the St. Louis region wrestled with the inconvenience of closed interstate highways and damaged homes and businesses, this rural county in southcentral Missouri, which includes sprawling Fort Leonard Wood, shouldered about half of the state’s death toll from recent flooding. Seven fatalities happened just minutes and miles apart. The two incidents see FLOOd • Page a5

Fatal shooting of girl, 14, suspected to be accident

Loop shops hurt by trolley work to get aid

By JEssICa BOCK • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By LEaH THORsEN aNd sTEVE GIEGERICH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

sT. LOuIs • Jamyha Luss was at a friend’s house

Sunday afternoon when two boys stopped to visit. One of them had a gun. It’s unclear what happened next, but police say Jamyha, 14, was fatally shot in the back. Both of the boys fled the home in the Wells-Goodfellow neighborhood before police arrived. St. Louis police continued their investigation on Monday, identifying as a person of interest a boy, 14, who turned himself in to authorities see sHOOTING • Page a5

uNIVERsITy

CITy

Costs associated with the Loop Trolley now include $100,000 in forgivable loans to Delmar Boulevard businesses that saw a downturn due to its construction. The University City City Council last week approved

Jamyha Luss Fatally shot at friend’s home; a boy, 14, has turned himself in

kicking in $50,000 to fund the loans to struggling shops. That’s in addition to the $50,000 already put up by the Loop Special Business District. The loans are erased after three years if the businesses are still operating on Delmar. So far, five businesses have been awarded a total of $52,000, oicials said.

With virtual lessons, snow days are go days By JEssICa BOCK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Like most teenagers, Abbie Meyer’s preferred way to spend a snow day is not doing homework, but in recent years, a weather-related closing of her high school hasn’t necessarily guaranteed a break. Instead, her school was one of the first in the St. Louis region to experiment with holding class virtually rather than calling school off completely when ice or snow makes getting there hazardous. And the plan for this winter is the same, with Meyer and other students at Gibault Catholic High School in Waterloo possibly spending snow days logging see sNOW • Page a8

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M 1 TUESDAY • 01.19.2016 • A2

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Pro football writer Jim Thomas fields your questions about the playofs, Stan Kroenke or that NFL team that St. Louis used to have.

The Moon Man is cutting down his broadcasting schedule. Some snicker at his convolutions of the language. We embrace them. Test your knowledge of these Shannonisms.

What do Miss Janet and the Red Rocker have in common? They are each on Kevin C. Johnson’s concert calendar. See the other shows he’s highly anticipating.

JOE’S ST. LOUIS

WHAT’S UP

Sticking it to Kroenke, Sam’s style

THIS DAY IN 2011

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COURT AWARD The parents of two teenage Collinsville girls killed in a car crash caused by a speeding Illinois state trooper are awarded $8 million from the Illinois Court of Claims.

EVENTS RAM-IFICATIONS • Radio sports jock Randy Karraker, one of the more impassioned Rams supporters during the recent fight to keep the team, has moved on to a next phase of action. In a Facebook post on Monday, Karraker (cohost of “The Fast Lane” on WXOS-FM 101.1), said he called Sam’s Club on Sunday and canceled his membership. When asked for a reason, Karraker said Karraker he told the employee on the phone about the Rams moving to Los Angeles. “She asked if I’d like a free six-month extension,” Karraker wrote, saying he replied that he would do so only if Stan Kroenke “reCarney turns the franchise to St. Louis.” According to Karraker, the woman said, “I doubt that will happen.” Fellow radioman John Carney, of KTRS-AM 550, weighed in on Karraker’s post, writing that he also thought of canceling his membership. “Instead, I figured I’d stay with Sam’s and just move items to other parts of the store,” Carney wrote. BOARD TRADE • Karl Grice, the person who actually designed the MathewsDickey Boys’ and Girls’ Club building, has been elected as chairman of that organization’s board of directors. Grice is a MathewsDickey alumnus and Sumner High grad and holds two master’s degrees from Washington University. He Grice started Grice Group Architects in 1984 and has also served on the boards of the St. Louis Zoo Associa-

WEIGHT LOSS SESSION When • 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Where • Barnes-Jewish West County Hospital campus, Medical Oice Building 3, 1020 North Mason Road, Creve Coeur More info • 314-362-2652 If you or someone you know is struggling with weight loss, the FDA recently approved a new weight-loss therapy. Find out if you are a candidate for this 12-month program, and register for a free information session at barnesjewishwestcounty.org/non-surgical-weight-loss. Registration is required.

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

In this 1941 photo, haze from coal-smoke pollution wipes out the view in St. Louis. A blog by Webster University journalism students looks at the crusade to clean St. Louis air of coal smoke.

tion, Forest Park Forever and Laumeier Sculpture Park. “I believe that service to society is a benefit to all of us, bringing out the best so we can give our best,” said Grice, who succeeds the Rev. Earl Nance Jr. as chairman. In other directorship moves, Jack Raymond succeeds Sherman George as vice chairman; Robert Minkler Jr. was reelected as treasurer; and Tamee Reese continues as secretary. OSCAR PARTY • When the Academy Awards show is broadcast Feb. 28, keep in mind that the co-producer is none other than hometowner Reginald Hudlin. Hudlin, an East St. Louis/Centreville native, is teaming with David Hill to put on the 88th-annual Oscars extravaganza. Hudlin and his brother, Warrington Hudlin Jr., came to Tinseltown’s attention in 1990 when they directed Kid ’n

Play in “House Party,” and then two years later helmed “Boomerang” with Eddie Murphy. Reginald Hudlin was nominated for an Oscar in 2012, when he was one of the producers of Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” The Hudlins’ father, Warrington Hudlin Sr., was a longtime insurance agent in East St. Louis. SMOG BLOG • The debut entry in “Environmental Echo,” a blog by the journalism students of Webster University professor Don Corrigan, highlights the crusade to clean St. Louis air of coal smoke — an efort that won the Post-Dispatch a Pulitzer Prize in 1941. Corrigan is an environmental writer and publishes several community newspapers. He started with the blog with Holly Shanks. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

DIABETES SYMPOSIUM When • 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 30 Where • Morris University Center, 6 Hairpin Drive, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville How much • Free More info • RSVP by Jan. 25 to Jennifer Koehne at jekoehn@siue.edu or by calling 618-650-5164. Students and faculty at SIUE School of Pharmacy invite the community to its 10th Annual Diabetes Patient Education Symposium for patients and caregivers of those with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Topics will include personalized medicine, diabetes technology, myths and healthy eating. A vendor fair from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. will include a free lunch, information of community services, free A1c and cholesterol testing and counseling sessions with pharmacists, nurses and dietitians. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $50 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $30 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Monday: 02-12-26-41-48 Lucky ball: 04

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

Co-owner pins Harry’s closure on Ballpark Village Restaurant on Market will be latest on list of high-proile venues to shut their doors BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The downtown restaurant/bar casualties just keep coming. On the heels of Mike Shannon’s Steaks and Seafood (closing Jan. 30), Prime 1000, the Dubliner and Joe Buck’s shuttering, comes word that Harry’s Restaurant & Bar will close after a celebration Jan. 29-30. Harry’s co-owner Tim Pieri confirmed to the Post-Dispatch that the sprawling complex at 2144 Market Street will close after nearly two decades. Harry’s includes a dining area along with a patio and the Horizon at Harry’s nightclub. The news also was posted to the venue’s Facebook page. Pieri cited a familiar scenario: “It’s the economy, the highway closing, Ballpark Village. Downtown is just a dead area right now, unfortunately. Obviously, the sad part is nobody is talking about it. Iconic places are going out of business, and nobody cares. “Ballpark Village was the nail in the

coin. It shut down Washington Avenue and took 70 percent of our business. We thought it would be more like 10 or 20 percent. It took the people left who were coming to downtown.” He said the closing of Highway 40 (Interstate 64) for construction in various stages between 2007 and 2009 afected Harry’s because “St. Louisans are creatures of habit. When it was closed for 2½ years, they went elsewhere.” Pieri thinks there’s a downward swing that will continue until downtown books more conventions and brings crime under control. “People are afraid to come downtown,” he said. The last couple of years have been especially rough for Harry’s, and the venue did everything it could to keep it going, including special parties. “It was good, but it was a short-term goal rather than a long-term goal,” Pieri said. Horizon at Harry’s, which opened in 2012, had become the primary source of revenue at Harry’s. The club focused on EDM and party DJs. The fine-dining aspect was fizzling, leading to the restau-

rant’s move to casual dining. Pieri said he is working on his next venture, though he hasn’t revealed details. It may or may not be downtown, and it most likely will be on a smaller scale than Harry’s. “Smaller is better,” he said. “There’s lower overhead, and it looks busier. A bigger place doesn’t look as busy.” On Jan. 29, Harry’s will celebrate with a return by the first band to perform at Harry’s, Shrinking Violets, along with several DJs who’ve performed there over the years. Happy hour starts at 4 p.m. that day, with the band and DJs at 9 p.m. Jan. 30 is a night to reminisce and drink with Harry’s stafers, DJs and Harry Belli, beginning at 6 p.m. “A lot of people haven’t been here in so long and just want to come down,” Pieri said. “This was the place to be. People met there, got engaged there, and it’s definitely a landmark in St. Louis.”

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Monday Midday: 31-35-41-43-44 Evening: 08-16-35-37-38 LOTTO Monday: 10-17-19-32-38-47 Extra shot: 05 Estimated jackpot: $21 million PICK-3 Monday Midday: 930 FB: 5 Evening: 051 FB: 8 PICK-4 Monday Midday: 1957 FB: 1 Evening: 9107 FB: 1

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

INSIDE Business ................ A7 Editorial .............. A10 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Joe Holleman ........ A2 Letters to editor .. A10 Obituaries ........... A12

LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.3 million SHOW ME CASH Monday: 09-11-27-29-31 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $116,000 PICK-3 Midday: 730 Evening: 989 PICK-4 Midday: 9331 Evening: 7222

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01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

LOCAL

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Four-alarm ire engulfs vacant building west of downtown

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis ireighters battle a four-alarm blaze Monday at a two-story building near the intersection of 19th Street and Washington Avenue.

Developer had obtained inancing for project there a week ago BY TIM O’NEIL st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Fire extensively damaged a vacant two-story building west of downtown Monday that was to have been renovated into apartments. The fire, at 1900-1916 Washington Avenue, broke out shortly before 1:30 p.m. About 80 St. Louis firefighters battled the four-alarm blaze with high ladders and a ring of pumpers to pour water onto flames bursting through the roof and windows. Brisk wind from the west blew smoke into downtown. No one was injured. Fire Capt. Garon Mosby said the first units to arrive entered the building but were ordered out as the “fast-moving” fire spread quickly inside. Mosby said it was too early to learn a cause for the blaze. He said the building utilities had been shut off, and said it was possible that vagrants had set fires inside to keep warm. But he and police commanders said no one had seen anyone flee the building. Rothschild Development Co. owns it and planned to renovate it into 34 apartments with an open interior courtyard. It was built in 1919 as the Gordon Buell Building and had storefront shops on the first

St. Louis ireighter Patrick Schumm (left) has his air tank changed Monday by driver Chris Clark. No one was injured in the ire, and Capt. Garon Mosby said it was too soon to know the cause.

floor and warehouse space on the second. Pete Rothschild said his company had obtained financing for its plan only a week ago after having worked on the project for several years. The company has owned the building since 2005. It previously developed the Tudor Building on the opposite side of the block.

Michael Schwartz, its development director, said there was a “50-50” chance the brick building could be spared, despite the extensive damage. It was 17 degrees Monday afternoon. Firefighters used shovels to throw rock salt onto Washington as the street became covered with ice. Sara Geiger, a witness, said she was working across the

street when the fire began. “I was filling out paperwork and saw the smoke and heard the sirens,” she said. “We went out, and the firefighters started to force open the front door. The smoke and flames came rushing out, and they stepped back.” Tim O’Neil • 314-340-8132 @timoneilpd on Twitter toneil@post-dispatch.com

Fast-food robber killed by police had history of holdups BY KIM BELL AND CHRISTINE BYERS st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The man police

shot and killed Sunday during an armed robbery at a fast-food restaurant had a history of such robberies as well as sodomy, according to court records. Sources identified the man as Crayton “Big Wes” West, 52, of the 5400 block of Arlington Avenue, and his mother confirmed that she had gone to identify his body Monday. West was killed by a St. Louis police sergeant who confronted him inside the Kentucky Fried Chicken near Grand Boulevard and Gravois Avenue at about 6 p.m. Sunday, authorities said. Police say West had robbed the business and pointed a weapon at the sergeant. The encounCrayton ter was captured West on surveillance cameras inside the restaurant. The department has not yet released the footage, and police refused to identify the sergeant. West is listed on Missouri’s sex offender registry for a July 1980 robbery in which he sodomized a boy, 16. West was 18 at the time. Details of that crime and the sentence that followed were not immediately available Monday, in part because oices were closed for the Martin Luther King Day holiday. Court records and Post-Dispatch news stories from 1987 show that West was sentenced to 60 years in prison for a string of fast-food restaurant rob-

beries in St. Louis. He used a cap pistol to rob seven restaurants over a 10-day stretch in October 1986. The suspect was dubbed “the fat robber” based on his description. When West was arrested, he was 6-foot-3 and weighed about 225 pounds, but police said he appeared to be heavier. After he was caught, he told police he had robbed the restaurants to pay his utility bills and meet his car payments, according to a Post-Dispatch article. People had been threatened in some of those holdups, but no one was hurt. Witnesses gave police a description of the getaway car, and West was captured when police stopped a car fitting that description. His mother, Ruth West, said she had viewed his body Monday and confirmed that she was told he had been shot by police. She said her son left her home Sunday morning. She tried calling him throughout the day, but her calls went to voicemail. She said she heard news reports of the police shooting and had been worried it might be him. She said her son was living with her since his release from prison in January 2014. She said he wasn’t married and had an adult son. She said her son was on parole and was supposed to be working. He had been depressed lately because the jobs paid so poorly, she said. He worked for a temporary service, but the better offers were far from his mother’s home and he lacked a car for transportation, she said. “He was struggling since he’s been out,” she said. “Sometimes I’d have to talk to him when he

was getting kind of depressed.” Ruth West said her son had to be tested for drugs with his parole officer, and at least one urine test showed that he been taking drugs, she said. She wasn’t sure what kind of drugs. She said he was sent to a rehab facility for a few months and also to jail for violating his parole. Other times, she thought he was doing better, particularly when he told her he was taking classes and hoped to graduate soon. She didn’t know details. She said she wanted to see footage of the shooting before judging what had happened. For now, she said, “I am not questioning nothing. It’s not going to bring my son back.” Instead, she said, she wants him to “rest in peace.”

ROBBERY, THEN SHOOTING Authorities say West entered the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant with a gun to rob the place. An employee, who would not give her name, told the PostDispatch she saw a man with a gun reaching over the counter, and a manager pressed a panic alarm button. There were several people inside the restaurant at the time. One witness flagged down a police sergeant at a gas station across the street from the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant to report the holdup, authorities said. That witness was on the phone with a 911 operator when he saw the sergeant, Lt. Col. Lawrence O’Toole said at a news conference at police headquarters Sunday night.

The sergeant was on normal patrol but had been monitoring a memorial march for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the area. The sergeant drove over to the Kentucky Fried Chicken and saw the suspect inside the restaurant as he approached the door, O’Toole said. The gunman raised his handgun toward the sergeant, who ordered him to drop it. The sergeant fired his weapon when the man did not drop his, O’Toole said. Police said they found cash West had taken in the robbery on him, police said. No oicers were injured. The sergeant, 42, has at least 13 years on the force, O’Toole said. Some sergeants have been selected to wear body cameras as part of a pilot program the police department is conducting, but the sergeant involved in Sunday’s shooting was not equipped with one, sources said. The police department’s Force Investigation Unit is investigating. The oicer was put on leave. The shooting drew some activists who had been attending the nearby King memorial. The gathering was also to talk about the future of the Black Lives Matter movement. Some of those who showed up at the shooting scene chanted and complained about police shootings of black men. West is black, and the officer who shot him white. Jesse Bogan of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > Local woman disqualiied as winner of Louisiana Marathon • A St. Louis woman who won the Louisiana Marathon on Sunday was later disqualiied for receiving assistance during the run, according to a report. The Advocate of Baton Rouge reports that Mandy West, an account executive with Nike, received liquids and nutrition from a bike rider several times during the race. West inished the race in 2 hours and 49 minutes. The second-place female inisher, Amany Ishaq inished in 3:07:58. Ishaq was declared the winner after West was disqualiied. The incident has generated a spirited discussion of race rules in online reader comments posted with the Advocate’s story. Last year, the woman who crossed the inish line irst at the Go! St. Louis marathon was disqualiied for jumping into the race near the end. (Blythe Bernhard) CARBONDALE, ILL. > Eclipse is expected to be tourism boon • Tourism oicials in Southern Illinois say they’re already preparing for the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse, which is expected to draw thousands of visitors. It’s the irst total solar eclipse over the United States’ mainland since 1979, and the eclipse will reach its point of greatest duration — about two minutes and 40 seconds — a few miles south of Carbondale. Southern Illinois University oicials are projecting 30,000 to 50,000 visitors on campus for the eclipse, The Southern Illinoisan newspaper reported. The school even has created an eclipse planning committee and put Bob Baer, who directs public astronomy observations through SIU’s physics department, in charge. “It’s a really, really big project. It’s hard to overstate how big of a project it is,” he said. “It is probably the biggest event that will be at SIU in most people’s lifetime.” Tourism oicials in nearby Williamson County are working to market the region and make sure local businesses are aware of potential increased visitors. Shannon D. Johnson, CEO of the county’s tourism bureau, said it’s important to prepare for the eclipse’s popularity. “It is deinitely more than any of us could have possibly fathomed,” Johnson said. Scientists from around the world are interested too. Baer said the school has been coordinating with NASA, the Adler Planetarium in Chicago and other universities. A similar eclipse will happen again, but not until April 8, 2024. (Southern Illinoisan)

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Man is found fatally shot • A man was found shot to death Monday morning in the 4100 block of St. Ferdinand Avenue, police say. The victim was discovered about 10:45 a.m. Monday by police responding to calls for a shooting in the city’s Greater Ville neighborhood, near Bishop P.L. Scott Avenue. Homicide detectives are handling the case. The victim has not been identiied. Police had no details on a suspect or the circumstances that led to the shooting. LESTERVILLE, MO. > Woman’s body found near Black River • A Hillsboro woman found dead last week near the Black River in southeast Missouri had been missing since November. KFVS-TV in Cape Girardeau, Mo., reports that the victim has been identiied as Sharon Nelson, 63. The Reynolds County Sherif’s Department is investigating her death as a homicide. Her body was found Wednesday morning about 100 yards from the river near Lesterville in an area that had been looded in recent weeks. Heavy rain over three days in late December led to signiicant looding in Missouri and Illinois. Sherif Tom Volner says persons of interest have been identiied in the case. The cause of death wasn’t immediately released. O’FALLON, MO. > Armed robber hits pharmacy • Police were seeking a woman with a handgun in connection with an armed robbery at a medical building pharmacy Monday afternoon in the 5000 block of WingHaven Boulevard. The suspect is described as a female of unknown race who was armed with a handgun. She was wearing a gray coat with what might have been fur trim. Police said no one was injured in the incident and they don’t know if she left on foot or in a car. Anyone with information is asked to call O’Fallon police at 636-240-3200.


01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 2

LOCAL

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Four-alarm ire engulfs vacant building west of downtown

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis ireighters battle a four-alarm blaze Monday at a two-story building near the intersection of 19th Street and Washington Avenue.

Developer had obtained inancing for project there a week ago BY TIM O’NEIL st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Fire extensively damaged a vacant two-story building west of downtown Monday that was to have been renovated into apartments. The fire, at 1900-1916 Washington Avenue, broke out shortly before 1:30 p.m. About 80 St. Louis firefighters battled the four-alarm blaze with high ladders and a ring of pumpers to pour water onto flames bursting through the roof and windows. Brisk wind from the west blew smoke into downtown. No one was injured. Fire Capt. Garon Mosby said the first units to arrive entered the building but were ordered out as the “fast-moving” fire spread quickly inside. Mosby said it was too early to learn a cause for the blaze. He said the building utilities had been shut off, and said it was possible that vagrants had set fires inside to keep warm. But he and police commanders said no one had seen anyone flee the building. Rothschild Development Co. owns it and planned to renovate it into 34 apartments with an open interior courtyard. It was built in 1919 as the Gordon Buell Building and had storefront shops on the first

St. Louis ireighter Patrick Schumm (left) has his air tank changed Monday by driver Chris Clark. No one was injured in the ire, and Capt. Garon Mosby said it was too soon to know the cause.

floor and warehouse space on the second. Pete Rothschild said his company had obtained financing for its plan only a week ago after having worked on the project for several years. The company has owned the building since 2005. It previously developed the Tudor Building on the opposite side of the block.

Michael Schwartz, its development director, said there was a “50-50” chance the brick building could be spared, despite the extensive damage. It was 17 degrees Monday afternoon. Firefighters used shovels to throw rock salt onto Washington as the street became covered with ice. Sara Geiger, a witness, said she was working across the

street when the fire began. “I was filling out paperwork and saw the smoke and heard the sirens,” she said. “We went out, and the firefighters started to force open the front door. The smoke and flames came rushing out, and they stepped back.” Tim O’Neil • 314-340-8132 @timoneilpd on Twitter toneil@post-dispatch.com

Fast-food robber killed by police had history of holdups BY KIM BELL AND CHRISTINE BYERS st. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The man police

shot and killed Sunday during an armed robbery at a fast-food restaurant had a history of such robberies as well as sodomy, according to court records. Sources identified the man as Crayton “Big Wes” West, 52, of the 5400 block of Arlington Avenue, and his mother confirmed that she had gone to identify his body Monday. West was killed by a St. Louis police sergeant who confronted him inside the Kentucky Fried Chicken near Grand Boulevard and Gravois Avenue at about 6 p.m. Sunday, authorities said. Police say West had robbed the business and pointed a weapon at the sergeant. The encounCrayton ter was captured West on surveillance cameras inside the restaurant. The department has not yet released the footage, and police refused to identify the sergeant. West is listed on Missouri’s sex offender registry for a July 1980 robbery in which he sodomized a boy, 16. West was 18 at the time. Details of that crime and the sentence that followed were not immediately available Monday, in part because oices were closed for the Martin Luther King Day holiday. Court records and Post-Dispatch news stories from 1987 show that West was sentenced to 60 years in prison for a string of fast-food restaurant rob-

beries in St. Louis. He used a cap pistol to rob seven restaurants over a 10-day stretch in October 1986. The suspect was dubbed “the fat robber” based on his description. When West was arrested, he was 6-foot-3 and weighed about 225 pounds, but police said he appeared to be heavier. After he was caught, he told police he had robbed the restaurants to pay his utility bills and meet his car payments, according to a Post-Dispatch article. People had been threatened in some of those holdups, but no one was hurt. Witnesses gave police a description of the getaway car, and West was captured when police stopped a car fitting that description. His mother, Ruth West, said she had viewed his body Monday and confirmed that she was told he had been shot by police. She said her son left her home Sunday morning. She tried calling him throughout the day, but her calls went to voicemail. She said she heard news reports of the police shooting and had been worried it might be him. She said her son was living with her since his release from prison in January 2014. She said he wasn’t married and had an adult son. She said her son was on parole and was supposed to be working. He had been depressed lately because the jobs paid so poorly, she said. He worked for a temporary service, but the better offers were far from his mother’s home and he lacked a car for transportation, she said. “He was struggling since he’s been out,” she said. “Sometimes I’d have to talk to him when he

was getting kind of depressed.” Ruth West said her son had to be tested for drugs with his parole officer, and at least one urine test showed that he been taking drugs, she said. She wasn’t sure what kind of drugs. She said he was sent to a rehab facility for a few months and also to jail for violating his parole. Other times, she thought he was doing better, particularly when he told her he was taking classes and hoped to graduate soon. She didn’t know details. She said she wanted to see footage of the shooting before judging what had happened. For now, she said, “I am not questioning nothing. It’s not going to bring my son back.” Instead, she said, she wants him to “rest in peace.”

ROBBERY, THEN SHOOTING Authorities say West entered the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant with a gun to rob the place. An employee, who would not give her name, told the PostDispatch she saw a man with a gun reaching over the counter, and a manager pressed a panic alarm button. There were several people inside the restaurant at the time. One witness flagged down a police sergeant at a gas station across the street from the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant to report the holdup, authorities said. That witness was on the phone with a 911 operator when he saw the sergeant, Lt. Col. Lawrence O’Toole said at a news conference at police headquarters Sunday night.

The sergeant was on normal patrol but had been monitoring a memorial march for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the area. The sergeant drove over to the Kentucky Fried Chicken and saw the suspect inside the restaurant as he approached the door, O’Toole said. The gunman raised his handgun toward the sergeant, who ordered him to drop it. The sergeant fired his weapon when the man did not drop his, O’Toole said. Police said they found cash West had taken in the robbery on him, police said. No oicers were injured. The sergeant, 42, has at least 13 years on the force, O’Toole said. Some sergeants have been selected to wear body cameras as part of a pilot program the police department is conducting, but the sergeant involved in Sunday’s shooting was not equipped with one, sources said. The police department’s Force Investigation Unit is investigating. The oicer was put on leave. The shooting drew some activists who had been attending the nearby King memorial. The gathering was also to talk about the future of the Black Lives Matter movement. Some of those who showed up at the shooting scene chanted and complained about police shootings of black men. West is black, and the officer who shot him white. Jesse Bogan of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > Local woman disqualiied as winner of Louisiana Marathon • A St. Louis woman who won the Louisiana Marathon on Sunday was later disqualiied for receiving assistance during the run, according to a report. The Advocate of Baton Rouge reports that Mandy West, an account executive with Nike, received liquids and nutrition from a bike rider several times during the race. West inished the race in 2 hours and 49 minutes. The second-place female inisher, Amany Ishaq inished in 3:07:58. Ishaq was declared the winner after West was disqualiied. The incident has generated a spirited discussion of race rules in online reader comments posted with the Advocate’s story. Last year, the woman who crossed the inish line irst at the Go! St. Louis marathon was disqualiied for jumping into the race near the end. (Blythe Bernhard) CARBONDALE, ILL. > Eclipse is expected to be tourism boon • Tourism oicials in Southern Illinois say they’re already preparing for the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse, which is expected to draw thousands of visitors. It’s the irst total solar eclipse over the United States’ mainland since 1979, and the eclipse will reach its point of greatest duration — about two minutes and 40 seconds — a few miles south of Carbondale. Southern Illinois University oicials are projecting 30,000 to 50,000 visitors on campus for the eclipse, The Southern Illinoisan newspaper reported. The school even has created an eclipse planning committee and put Bob Baer, who directs public astronomy observations through SIU’s physics department, in charge. “It’s a really, really big project. It’s hard to overstate how big of a project it is,” he said. “It is probably the biggest event that will be at SIU in most people’s lifetime.” Tourism oicials in nearby Williamson County are working to market the region and make sure local businesses are aware of potential increased visitors. Shannon D. Johnson, CEO of the county’s tourism bureau, said it’s important to prepare for the eclipse’s popularity. “It is deinitely more than any of us could have possibly fathomed,” Johnson said. Scientists from around the world are interested too. Baer said the school has been coordinating with NASA, the Adler Planetarium in Chicago and other universities. A similar eclipse will happen again, but not until April 8, 2024. (Southern Illinoisan)

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Man is found fatally shot • A man was found shot to death Monday morning in the 4100 block of St. Ferdinand Avenue, police say. The victim was discovered about 10:45 a.m. Monday by police responding to calls for a shooting in the city’s Greater Ville neighborhood, near Bishop P.L. Scott Avenue. Homicide detectives are handling the case. The victim has not been identiied. Police had no details on a suspect or the circumstances that led to the shooting. LESTERVILLE, MO. > Woman’s body found near Black River • A Hillsboro woman found dead last week near the Black River in southeast Missouri had been missing since November. KFVS-TV in Cape Girardeau, Mo., reports that the victim has been identiied as Sharon Nelson, 63. The Reynolds County Sherif’s Department is investigating her death as a homicide. Her body was found Wednesday morning about 100 yards from the river near Lesterville in an area that had been looded in recent weeks. Heavy rain over three days in late December led to signiicant looding in Missouri and Illinois. Sherif Tom Volner says persons of interest have been identiied in the case. The cause of death wasn’t immediately released. ST. LOUIS > Double shooting leaves one dead • Two people were shot, one fatally, in the 5000 block of West Florissant Avenue in north St. Louis about 9:35 p.m. Monday. One person was shot in the head and died at the scene, St. Louis police report. Another person was shot and taken to a hospital. Police did not have a description of a suspect. Homicide investigators were at the scene, which is near Bellefontaine Cemetery, in the city’s Mark Twain neighborhood.


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

Shooting victim happy to return home

Missouri casino operators seek tweaks to credit rules ASSOCIATED PRESS

C I T Y • An 18-month-old Missouri law that allows casinos to issue credit to well-heeled patrons is working as intended, casino operators say, but a few tweaks could make it even more useful. Under provisions that went into efect in July 2014, seven of the state’s 13 casinos now offer lines of credit to customers who qualify to borrow at least $10,000 and have the ability to pay it back within 30 days. The current threshold can turn off some credit-worthy gamblers who might want only a few thousand dollars and don’t want to jump through hoops to prove they’re qualified for $10,000, said Troy Stremming, vice president of government relations and public affairs for Pinnacle Entertainment. “It’s something we’re going to be speaking to legislators about,” Stremming said. “I can’t speak for other gaming companies, but it is certainly something Pinnacle properties will be pursuing.” Pinnacle owns Ameristar casinos in Kansas City and St. Charles, along with River City Casino in St. Louis, the state’s three highest-grossing gambling venues. Stremming declined to say how many people have taken advantage of the offering or how much has been borrowed, calling that proprietary information. The credit measure was aimed at aluent patrons who don’t want to carry large sums of cash or dip into their bank accounts for gambling money. The seven casinos that offer credit are in Kansas City or St. Louis, where professional sports teams and entertainment venues pull people from across the country.

KANSAS

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

An emotional Chris Sanna ofered a few words of thanks Monday to those responsible for rehabbing his home in House Springs. He returned home for the irst time after being shot and paralyzed in a robbery in September after attending a Cardinals game. The home was modiied for his use by donors to the Gary Sinise Foundation’s RISE (Restoring Independence Supporting Empowerment) program.

LEFT • Chris Sanna visits Monday with volunteers and vendors who rehabbed his home. The donated items and workers helped make his home accessible for wheelchairs. “They’ve given me the opportunity to live my life like my legs worked.” BELOW • Patriotic decorations welcome Army veteran Chris Sanna home.

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LOCAL

01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A5

For a moment, witness thought car made it FLOOD • FROM A1

reinforced and challenged local perceptions of who is at grave risk during such events. Dodge, 27, a volunteer firefighter who works in a mess hall on post, knew the rain was bad that night. But he didn’t know the area would get whopped by 6 inches in one day, followed by 3 inches the next. He didn’t know the sedan he saw go by was full of “elite” military oicers from the other side of the world, traveling blindly through the Ozarks to their doom. For all Dodge knew, they were locals who had learned the bridge was somehow back open. He was hoping so because it was the most direct way home. Dodge followed the car from a mile or so behind. When he came down the long, winding hill leading to the Highway U bridge over Tavern Creek, he was puzzled. He didn’t see anybody. For a moment, he thought the car made it across, which was impossible. The water was running at least 2 feet over the bridge, and there was a logjam out in the middle of it. Looking left, Dodge said he reached for the phone quicker than he could tell his wife next to him what he saw — the sedan he’d been following was now a rudderless boat, getting forced way downstream by the floodwater. “They had their brake lights engaged,” Dodge said. “It was like they were trying to stop. There was no stopping in that.”

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Soggy clothes and shoes are piled in the back seat of a car at a salvage yard last week in Crocker, Mo. Five international soldiers from Fort Leonard Wood were in the car when it was swept into Tavern Creek last month. The men had been shopping for their families at an outlet mall.

died in Waynesville, the Pulaski County seat, during a torrential downpour. In recent weeks, Ron Gray had even tried to pull a man and his teenage daughter out of the exact same crossing near where he would later drown. He’d been in his big diesel truck then, not his girlfriend’s Neon. Gray, who worked on post as a civilian employee, had one teenage son. His girlfriend, Sandy Tilley, 50, of St. James, Mo., a mother of three, also died. They were supposed to move in together soon.

FLOODED WILDERNESS Colleagues from the Crocker Fire Protection District were soon on the scene. The rain continued to pour. Their $110,000 annual budget didn’t include money for dry suits. Still, the volunteers broke into teams and walked both sides of the bank. Lightning occasionally gave them a full view of the wild scene. Station Capt. Jason Ishmael reported to the search commander that water was raging down Tavern Creek in 3- to 4-foot waves, later describing them as “like you see in the ocean.” It was extreme for a creek that mainly dries up in the summer. The search teams knew they had a short window to rescue any survivors. But they weren’t having any luck finding anything or anybody. As a few hours wore on in the cold, flooded wilderness, the night after Christmas, some of the volunteers started to doubt whether Dodge really saw what he’d reported. If wrong, he’d be scrubbing the shop floor forever for this one. Then Ishmael had a hard time believing what he saw when he finally shined a flashlight on what turned out to be a gold Impala, submerged in the water, three-fourths of a mile downstream from the Highway U bridge. “The vehicle was rising up and down in the water,” he said. The way the water was roiling, it didn’t seem odd that the front seats were vacant, with two dead men in the back. The following day, responders were surprised when a third and fourth body were discovered outside the vehicle. It wasn’t un-

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til Dec. 29 that a helicopter spotted the fifth and final occupant, six miles downstream, Ishmael said. The strong current had sucked of much of the clothing from the body. The five victims were international military trainees from Egypt, Algeria, Malaysia and Jordan.

‘YOU CAN’T SEE THE WATER’ Crocker’s assistant fire chief, Jef Porter, said that it had been about 20 years since somebody died at the Tavern Creek bridge. He said flash flooding makes the water there rise and fall in a hurry. If a vehicle goes over, it usually gets hung up close, in the brush. Unlike another nearby bridge, there isn’t a raised lip on the edge, nor guardrail. There are yellow warning signs, though, about impassable water. Gauges show how deep the water is when it runs over the bridge. None of that seemed to help the five military oicers. “The way the land lays in there, you can’t see the water until you are in it, unless you are

from here,” Porter said. Pulaski County resident Tim Dent, who lives next to a temperamental river, saw it another way. “These guys are used to fighting war with guns,” he said. “They aren’t thinking about water.” But right about the same time the foreign officers went in the floodwater over Highway U, another emergency call was made from about 10 miles away, on Highway O. This time a Dodge Neon was swept of a low-water bridge over typically tiny Jones Creek. M i ss i n g wa s Ron Gray, 53, of Dixon, Mo., an Army veteran who loved to push his Mercury outboard Wanda Gray engine to the limits on the nearby Gasconade River. He also loved and knew the land. His last meal was deer meat and frog legs, said his mother, Wanda Gray. “It seems so out of character, it doesn’t seem real,” she said of the incident. “He knew that creek can get up fast.” In 2013, everybody heard about a young woman and child who

AN ELITE GROUP The five military officers who perished were among about 450 international students from dozens of countries hosted by Fort Leonard Wood each year. They train months at a time in the fields of chemical, engineering and military policing. In a memorial service, post commander Army Maj. Gen. Kent Savre described the men as an “elite group of officers” who had to cross “thousands of miles of ocean” to train in Missouri. “Yet we have so much in common,” he said. “They were sons and brothers. They were husbands and fathers. They were scholars, soldiers and leaders. They were comrades and brothers in arms. And just like many of us in this room, they were here to better themselves in order to protect and defend their nations.” The victims were: • Maj. Mohammad Hassan Ibrahim, 32, of Egypt, a chemical corps company commander, who was married with two daughters. His brother, also in the Egyptian military, was recently killed in service, a colleague said. • Capt. Ahmed Abdelghani, 29, of Egypt, was described in memorial service literature as a distinguished chemical officer

Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

PULASKI COUNTY DROWNINGS Seven people died in Pulaski County floodwater on Dec. 26. They hit the water within minutes of each other and just 10 miles apart.

Fort Leonard Wood

Tavern Creek

44

Rolla

The ive soldiers were traveling in this Chevrolet Impala on Dec. 26 when it was swept of Highway U in Crocker, Mo., during heavy rain. Two other people drowned in a separate incident that day.

and the only oicer in his family. • Capt. Hasman Hussin, 33, of Malaysia, was considered one of the best engineers in the Malaysian military. • Capt. Ahmed Moussouni, 32, of Algeria, was married with one son. • Maj. Akram Abu Al-Rub, 38, of Jordan, an engineer, was married with three children. He had looked forwarded to the training yet hoped the time away would quickly pass, according to posts on social media. He arrived in Missouri in early December and posed for pictures outside the state Capitol building in Jeferson City. A colleague said the major was from a rural area in Jordan, earned about $600 a month and hoped to save money during training for an operation for his deaf son. At the time of the accident, the oicers had been on holiday block leave, which shuts training down on post for two weeks during the Christmas season. They were coming home from Lake of the Ozarks. Sales receipts indicate they shopped at an outlet mall at Osage Beach hours before the accident. Adidas and Gymboree were two stops, according to the contents of the destroyed Impala, still parked last week at a tow yard here. The trunk and back seat area were piled with frozen shirts, mostly for children. There was a pair of pink boots and other small shoes. A new white dress with a bow on the back, toddler size, was stained with river water. In a bag, there was a necklace, perhaps a gift for a spouse, and lots of fragrant lotions scattered around. At the foot of the front passenger seat lay a religious CD about the meaning of life.

2 local 133 residents drowned

Dixon

Crocker 5 international soldiers drowned

Jone s Cr eek

U O Gasconade River

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Post-Dispatch

Crocker Fire Protection District Assistant Chief Jef Porter (left) and Station Capt. Robert Ishmael talk last week in Crocker, Mo., about the night they were called out last month for a car in the water at Tavern Creek.

John Farris speaks in St. Robert, Mo., last week about the ive international soldiers who drowned on Dec. 26. The men stayed at Farris’ hotel, the Z Loft, while they were training at Fort Leonard Wood.

Police believe fatal shooting of girl, 14, is accidental; boy, 14, turns himself in SHOOTING • FROM A1

Monday afternoon. At this point, investigators believe the shooting was accidental, according to a police source. Jamyha was a student at Gateway Middle School and lived most of her life with her grandmother Shirley Wright and her four siblings because her parents are incarcerated. She lived in the 5500 block of Palm Street, less than a mile from the friend’s home where she was shot.

Jamyha went over to her friend’s house on Friday to spend the weekend there, Wright said. Jamyha was close with the friend and spent a lot of time at her house. The home is near Martin Luther King Drive and Union Boulevard, in the 5300 block of Patton Avenue. Wright said the friend told her that she had told the boys, one of whom had a gun under his shirt, that she wasn’t allowed to have company. She went upstairs to the bathroom, heard a shot and

found Jamyha on the couch, Wright said. Grief counselors and a crisis response team will be available on Tuesday at Gateway Middle School, said Patrick Wallace, spokesman for St. Louis Public Schools. “She was really a fun person. Everybody loved her,” Wright said. “If you met her, you just automatically liked her.” On Sunday, Marie Black, a woman who lives at the home, said the girl had spent the night

there with Black’s daughter, as she often does on weekends. But Black, 47, was at work at the time of the shooting and said she didn’t know how the girl was shot. Jamyha’s middle name is for her other grandmother, Hortense Luss. She said Jamyha liked basketball and going to the movies, and was a good student who didn’t have problems at school. “She was just a sweet 14-yearold,” Hortense Luss said. Last week, an Alton boy, 11,

was shot and killed while waiting for a ride to basketball practice. The gunman was firing at someone else over a grudge that simmered on social media. In December, a 15-year-old boy shot a 3-year-old boy once in the chest inside his home in north St. Louis County, killing the toddler. Police have not said publicly whether that shooting was accidental or intentional. Jessica Bock • 314-340-8228 @jessicabock on Twitter jbock@post-dispatch.com


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

KING DAY

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

Leaders at King rally call for action Divisions keep city from being economically strong, one says BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LO U I S • The Old Courthouse downtown serves as a central part of America’s history. It’s where the slave Dred Scott fought for his freedom. It’s part of a national park that includes the Gateway Arch, a symbol of the country’s westward expansion. And since the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the courthouse also has become home to an annual celebration of the civil rights leader, whose birth is observed as a federal holiday on the third Monday of January. Like in years past, speaker after speaker stepped to the microphone on Monday morning, quoting the oftquoted King. The program was a mix of prayer, Scripture readings, speeches and music. But recent events have recast the program as a call to action for the region. Last year’s observation came five months after black teenager Michael Brown was killed by a white Ferguson police officer. This year, the gathering came six days after the NFL announced it was moving the Rams from St. Louis to Los Angeles. Mavis Thompson, the city’s license collector, stressed that she was not a fan of Rams owner Stan Kroenke but turned to a quote he made in his push for relocating his team: “St. Louis lags, and will

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Alphie Smith (center), carrying a portrait of the slain civil rights leader, leads a Martin Luther King Day march Monday. Hundreds of people made their way along Market Street from the Old Courthouse for the annual celebration.

Thomas Banks of Caseyville mimes a sermon by Jamal H. Bryant called “Make It Stop.” Speeches followed performances at the Old Courthouse on Monday.

continue to lag, far behind in the economic drivers that are necessary for sustained success of an NFL franchise.” Thompson said the region has too much division, with too few people working together to make St. Louis an economic powerhouse. “We gotta wake up!” she shouted to the crowd gathered in the Old Courthouse rotunda. Comptroller Darlene Green, an opponent of the stadium financing plan to keep the Rams in St. Louis, said the city should not “ kowtow to special interests” by taking money away from neighborhoods and giving it to rich NFL team owners.

Doing so robs the future of our young people, she said. “Black lives matter. That is our battle cry today,” said Green in a passionate speech, calling for body cameras for all police oicers and better gun laws to keep the city and country safer. Lt. Col. Ronnie L. Robinson, a deputy chief with the St. Louis Police Department, said the unrest that came out of Ferguson and from other police shootings stems from those no longer willing to “stand by and accept injustice, no jobs, police harassment.” “As law enforcement, we have to do better,” Robinson said. But police cannot do it alone, he said. “We need your help. We need everyone to get involved. We are going to engage the community. I promise you that.” Robinson served as the final speaker at what organizers called a celebration of King’s legacy. The crowd was smaller than prior years, possibly due to frigid temperatures. Still, a large group lined up after the ceremony to march more than 30 blocks to Washington Tabernacle Baptist Church for an interfaith service. It’s the first church King spoke at in St. Louis. Robinson, who was 8 years old when King died, said his heart hurt when he found out his childhood hero was gone. But it was a variation of a quote attributed to Gandhi in which the deputy chief turned to to end his remarks: “Be the change in the world you want to see.” Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

TWEET WITH THE WEATHERBIRD • Got a question? Ask the Weatherbird • twitter.com/Weatherbird

With Confederate lag gone, King Day rally shifts focus ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBIA, S.C. • For

the first time in 17 years, civil rights leaders gathered Monday at the South Carolina Statehouse to pay homage to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. without the Confederate flag casting a long shadow over them. The rebel banner was taken down over the summer after police said a white man shot nine black church members to death during a Bible study in Charleston. Following the massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Republican Gov. Nikki Haley reversed course and made it a priority for lawmakers to pass legislation to remove the flag. “Isn’t this a great day? It’s so nice to be standing here and not looking at that flag,” said Ezell Pittman, who attended most of the King Day anti-flag rallies since they started in 2000. “I always had faith it would come down. I hate it took what it did, but was real happy to see it go.” Across the country, the 30th anniversary of the holiday to honor the civil rights leader assassinated in 1968 was remembered in diferent ways. In Michigan, people delivered bottled water to residents of Flint amid the city’s drinking water crisis. In Atlanta, an overflow crowd listened to the nation’s housing secretary talk about the 50th anniversary of King’s visit to Chicago to launch a campaign for fair housing. Rallies against police brutality in Minnesota and California briefly shut down traffic on two bridges. South Carolina NAACP President Lonnie Randolph said the flag’s removal was tangible evidence the state cares about civil rights when pushed hard enough. But he warned there would

be other fights ahead. “I promise you, the people that gather in this building — your building — will do something this year to cause us to return to ensure freedom, justice and equality is made possible for all people,” Randolph said. Randolph promised to keep coming to the Statehouse until King’s dream comes to its full meaning in a state where there are wide gaps in education achievement between school districts in rich, white communities and poorer, black ones. About 1,000 people gathered at the Statehouse on a clear, cold day, drawn in part by appearances by all three main Democratic presidential candidates — Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley. In the nation’s capital, President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama followed the King Day theme of community service by planting vegetable seeds at a District of Columbia elementary school to honor the civil rights leader and celebrate the first lady’s initiative against childhood obesity. Elsewhere, an overflow crowd showed up at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta to celebrate King’s legacy at an annual commemorative service. In Minneapolis, activists braved frigid temperatures as they marched onto a Mississippi River bridge that connects Minneapolis and St. Paul to protest the deaths of two black men shot by police last year in the Twin Cities. A St. Paul oicer was placed on leave while the police department investigates allegations that he made a post on Facebook urging drivers to run over protesters. In California, protesters from a Black Lives Matter group shut down one side of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

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M 1 TUESDAY • 01.19.2016 • A7

We may love cheap oil, Health oicials scramble but it lusters markets to thwart new bird lu with plan made last year

Investors read price as barometer of global economy

FROM NEWS SERVICES DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this 2014 photo, an oil worker rides his bicycle by the oil refinery near Tehran, Iran.

consumers have more money left after filling their tanks. Right now, Mr. Market is fixated on the bad demand-side implications. “If this market continues to be correlated to oil, then this probably isn’t done yet,” says William O’Grady, of Confluence Investment Management in Webster Groves. “Oil prices probably have more to fall.” What would it take to end the linkage between oil and stocks? Better news out of China obviously would help. A Federal Reserve policy meeting is likely to grab investors’ attention next week. Stocks may rally if the Fed sends a signal that it will be slower to raise interest rates. Finally, we’re in the thick of earnings season, when companies report their fourthquarter results and provide clues about 2016.“Expectations are pretty low for earnings,” Lissner says. “If companies just meet targets, that would be viewed as a positive.” Conversely, some negative earnings surprises might add to the gloom. Economists are saying that the U.S. economy grew less than 1 percent in the fourth quarter as measured by gross domestic product. Other indicators, including job growth, remain solidly in positive territory. “Although the economy is weak, the symptoms of a full-blown recession are not evident,” O’Grady says. Unless that changes, we should soon leave this topsy-turvy world in which cheap oil can be consumers’ friend but investors’ enemy. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

BLUES GEOGRAPHY

PART 3 OF 6

Cheap oil is good for consumers and ultimately for the U.S. economy, but you wouldn’t know that from watching the stock market lately. Each new low in the price of crude oil seems to spread panic on Wall Street. As West Texas Intermediate fell from $45 in November to $35 in December to $29 in January, it somehow became everyone’s favorite barometer for global economic conditions. A few weeks ago, stocks were rallying based on strong job growth and a budget agreement in Washington. That good news seems to be forgotten now. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index is down 8 percent in the first two weeks of 2016, its worst-ever start to a year, and down 11 percent since early November. We aren’t in a full-fledged bear market, which is defined as a 20 percent decline, but we’re more than halfway there. Energy companies make up just 6.5 percent of the S&P 500, but they are pulling the rest of the market down with them. Profits for the index as a whole fell last year for the first time since 2009, largely because it was so hard to make money in the oil patch. The market’s concerns about oil go beyond earnings, though. “It’s not just the drop in oil that is behind this, it’s the cause of the drop in oil,” says Michael Lissner, partner at Acropolis Investment Management in Chesterfield. He’s referring to China. A plunge in the Chinese stock market and a devaluation of the yuan have focused investors’ attention on China’s slowing economy, but good statistics there are hard to find. A slower-growing China needs less oil. When traders see falling oil prices, they read them as more bad news about the Chinese economy. This reading is, of course, incomplete. Oil prices are also being pushed down by supply-side factors, from Iran’s re-entry into global markets to Saudi Arabia’s determination to maintain market share. Since the U.S. is a net importer of oil, that’s all good. Airlines get cheaper fuel, and

CHICAGO • U.S. farm and health oicials are racing to assess the threat that a type of bird flu never before seen in the country poses to humans and poultry, employing emergency plans drawn up in the wake of a devastating outbreak in birds last year. The federal government sprang into action on Friday after confirmation overnight that the virus had hit an Indiana turkey farm, alerting other states to the danger and putting workers who might have been exposed to the virus under surveillance. Last year’s outbreak led to the deaths of more than 48 million chickens and turkeys, either killed by the virus or culled to contain it. No cases were reported in humans. Strains similar to the new virus, known as H7N8, have on rare occasions made people ill and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state oicials aim to reduce the risk of human infection. They also want to blunt the impact on the poultry industry, which sufered billions of dollars in losses in last year’s

outbreak. Egg supplies shrank, and prices surged to record highs. “We are hopeful that as we respond very quickly to this virus that we can get it contained and hopefully not see an extensive outbreak like we did last year,” said T.J. Myers, an associate deputy administrator for the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Even if the response is fast, the government’s ability to contain the disease is far from certain. Officials have never dealt with this strain before, and wild birds are thought to spread the disease to farms through feces dropped from the air, making infections diicult to prevent. U.S. oicials have taken to heart lessons from last year’s outbreak, when USDA workers could not always kill infected flocks fast enough to contain the virus. Workers are now trying to cull sick flocks within 24 hours of diagnoses, following a goal the agency set in the autumn. Reuters and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Reports cite inequality as focus needed at economic forum World leaders will meet this week for conference ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAVOS, SWITZERLAND • The world’s

political and business elite are being urged to do more than pay lip service to growing inequalities around the world as they head off for this week’s World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resort of Davos. Two reports published Monday, from Oxfam and public relations firm Edelman, warned that the widening gap between the haves and have-nots since the global financial crisis is undermining a decades-long effort to reduce global poverty and fueling the rise of populist politicians. According to Oxfam, the scale of the problem is increasingly stark: just 62 people, it says, own the same wealth as half the planet. The compares with 388 people just five years ago, when the global economy was just emerging from its deepest recession since World War II. The theme of this year’s Davos gathering is the “fourth industrial revolution” — caused by fast and broad innovations in areas such as robotics, driverless cars, 3-D printing and biotechnology. WEF founder Klaus Schwab said it could widen the gap between rich and poor. “Those who are entrepreneurs, who have talents, will push innovation — will gain from the revolution — and those who are on the other side, particularly in

service positions, will lose,” Schwab said. While the wealth of the poorest half of the world’s population — more than 3.6 billion people — has fallen by a trillion dollars, or 41 percent, since 2010, Oxfam said in its report that the wealth of the super-elite has risen by around half a trillion dollars. Oxfam said it’s time for leaders to do more than just acknowledge the problem, especially if they want to hit poverty-reduction targets. According to Edelman, inequalities within society are already driving political change and that could put a break on economic potential. In its survey of trust levels around the world, it found the largest-ever gap between the views of highly educated people and those with less schooling, driven by a disparity in income. It noted that the U.S. has the biggest disparity in trust within its population, followed by Britain and France. Edelman’s online survey of 33,000 plus respondents in 28 countries, was conducted between Oct. 13 and Nov. 16, 2015. “We are now observing the inequality of trust around the world,” said Richard Edelman, the president and CEO of Edelman. “This brings a number of potential consequences including the rise of populist politicians, the blocking of innovation and the onset of protectionism and nativism.”

YOUR BLUES AND THEIR GOVERNMENTS ALEXANDER

EEN

BUSINESS DIGEST

Hockey is an international sport and NHL rosters are composed of players from a great number of nationalities throughout the world. The St. Louis Blues are no different than other teams in the NHL, as the Blues have a roster that represents ive different countries, including several provinces in Canada, the United States, Russia, Finland and Sweden.

Steen still enjoys trips back home more than any other place he goes, and we asked whether the different governing styles of Canada, the United States and Sweden had any noticeable impact on every day ‘regular’ life. Steen has a unique insight into this, as his father served as a Winnipeg Councillor for the Elmwood-East Kildonan Ward for several years.

Before they became NHL stars, players grew up in a variety of cultures, with different languages, customs and systems. What many of those young players may not have noticed at the time is that their countries’ politics and governments worked in ways unique to their homelands. Now, as adults who have played and lived in many different countries, they may relect on how governments differ.

“Home is home,” he says. “Just getting to taste home cooking and experience the culture of Sweden … the difference between here and there is more culture than government, I think. People dress different, the food is different, the lifestyle is different, you walk more. Everything is kind of more central-based, so you take your car into the downtown area and you walk around for the whole day. You don’t drive everywhere. You ride your bikes everywhere. It’s a little closer, tighter.”

In many instances, players ind themselves with ties to several countries, including Alexander Steen, who was born in Winnipeg, Canada, lives in St. Louis and considers Sweden his home. Steen grew up in a hockey family as his father Thomas was a long-time NHL star with the Winnipeg Jets. Like many hockey families, traveling overseas and throughout the U.S. and Canada was pretty commonplace.

ACTIVITY: YOUR BLUES AND THEIR GOVERNMENTS Alexander can call three different countries home. There is a saying, “All politics is local.” Research your local politics. Do you have a city or county council person? Who are the people in your state and national Congressional delegations? Alexander says “the difference between here and there is more culture than government.” Can you think of instances where the government may affect the culture? For more Mapping Your Blues activities, go to nie.post-dispatch.com/blues

Steen’s dad Thomas, who inished playing in the NHL in 1995, was born in Sweden, so the family would try to get back home as much as possible when Alexander was younger. “We traveled a lot back then,” he remembers. “We would travel back to Sweden every summer and probably mix in about two other trips in a year to different places. We were in Naples, Florida a lot when I was growing up. I really enjoyed playing mini golf and eating at some of the restaurants that they didn’t have in Canada at the time.” Just 31, Steen isn’t thinking about retirement any time soon, but he could see himself settling down in Sweden when that time comes. “I don’t know, it’ll be tough,” he says. “I think it will be somewhere in Sweden. I miss the culture too much. But the longer I’ve been here in St. Louis the harder it would be to just pick up, pack my bags and leave this place.” BY MIKE KERN

Next week: Jori Lehtera

Bray to step down from consumer group • Former Missouri Sen. Joan Bray is stepping down from the consumer advocacy group she helped revive a decade ago. Bray, who represented University City as a Democrat for 18 years in the Missouri Legislature, will retire as executive director of the Consumers Council of Missouri. She helped reinvigorate the long dormant group in 2005 and served on the board until taking over as executive director in 2013. The Consumers Council advocates for ratepayer-friendly utility policies and also monitors health care and personal finance issues in Jeferson City and other levels of government. The group is conducting a search for a new leader, and Bray expects to stay in her position until the board chooses a new leader. Berkshire ups Phillips 66 holdings • Berkshire Hathaway is continuing this month a string of Phillips 66 stock purchases, and Warren Bufett’s conglomerate now controls 12.9 percent of the Houston-based oil refinery. Berkshire filed documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday that disclosed purchases of another 1.6 million Phillips 66 shares. Bufett’s company has now bought nearly 7.5 million shares of Phillips 66 this month. It’s possible the buying may continue because Phillips 66 share prices haven’t increased above the range where Berkshire has been buying. Berkshire first revealed owning over

10 percent of Phillips 66 stock in August when it disclosed a stake of 55 million shares. This month’s purchases are the first Berkshire made since September. The Wood River Refinery in Metro East is jointly owned by Phillips 66 and Canadian energy company Cenovus Energy Inc. Keeping ahead of robots • Four out of 10 young people believe machines will be able to do their jobs within a decade, an international survey published on Monday has found. And nearly half of young workers surveyed in Western countries said their education did not prepare them to do their jobs. Almost 80 percent globally said they had to learn new skills not taught them in school and that rapid technology change — the threat of being overtaken by robots or smart systems — required constant learning of fresh skills to compensate. The study surveyed around 1,000 young people each in Australia, Brazil, Britain, China, France, Germany, India and the United States, as well as South Africa. The survey was commissioned by commissioned by Indian business and software services firm Infosys. Globally, while almost two-thirds of those queried said they felt positive about their job prospects, those in developing markets Brazil, China, India and South Africa were far more optimistic than their peers in developed markets. From staf and wire reports

U.S. FINANCIAL MARKETS WERE CLOSED MONDAY IN OBSERVANCE OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Construction on Delmar made it hard for shoppers to ind parking TROLLEY • FROM A1

Construction on the 2.2-mile trolley line between University City and Forest Park began in earnest this spring. In the Loop, the trolley will share Delmar with cars, similar to a bus, pulling out of traffic at designated stops. For months, Delmar was ripped up along the main drag of the Loop, making it difficult for customers to find parking and navigate the construction zone. The bulk of the major work on the road wrapped up in November, a couple of weeks ahead of schedule. The trolley’s cost originally was estimated to be $43 million, but has climbed to $51 million. The 18 percent spike is attributed, in part, to street paving and landscaping costs. The St. Louis County Council last month approved a $3 million allocation that will allow trolley developers to qualify for matching federal funds required to push the project toward completion. That money is coming from a voter-approved sales tax to finance transportation projects. Supporters say the trolley is spurring development, including millions of dollars in improvements to the Gotham apartments at Hamilton Avenue and Delmar Boulevard, and will be a boon for businesses when it brings in visitors. They also say that even with the additional costs, the trolley is being built for significantly less than streetcar lines in other cities. Critics say the trolley duplicates existing mass transit — a MetroLink line runs between Forest Park and Delmar Loop stations — and that the project’s cost is too high. One business owner blamed the trolley project for forcing him to close last year, saying customers stayed away because the construction made it a nightmare to get there. Under the loan program, the maximum amount each business can get is $12,000. The amount allocated to each business varies based on demand for the loans and percent of demonstrated loss of revenue, according to University City. Three businesses have received $12,000 each: Sunshine Daydream, a Grateful Dead-inspired shop with wares including tie-dyed shirts and incense; Sole and Blues, which sells clothing, shoes and accessories; and Phoenix Rising, a gift shop. Rocket Fizz Soda Pop and Candy Shop got $4,000. And a $12,000 forgivable loan to Baked T’s, a clothing printing shop, has been approved but not distributed. “Part of the attraction of the Loop is the foot traffic,” said Dan Raskas, who owns Baked T’s with his wife, Debbie. “The biggest impact that we saw from the construction was that the foot traffic was much less than it has been in the past.” He said they will put much of the forgivable loan toward promoting the business, which has been in the Loop for more than five years. He also anticipates more traffic snarls when the trolley’s overhead lines eventually are installed. “Anything we can do to make it more convenient for customers to come to the Loop is a positive thing,” Raskas said of the trolley, adding that it will bring people there without consuming parking spots. Michael Rohrbacker, co-owner of

QUALIFYING FOR FORGIVABLE LOANS Businesses that want the money must meet the following guidelines for the loan program, which is modeled after a similar program in St. Paul and Minneapolis during the construction of a light-rail line: • Be independently owned with four or fewer locations with no more than $2 million in annual gross sales. • Located on Delmar Boulevard in University City and, in most cases, be in its current location for more than three HUY MACH • hmach@post-dispatch.com years so revenue can be analyzed for Construction workers with Right Way trends to better link a loss of revenue to Traic Control pour concrete last the construction time frame. But each November to set the westbound tracks of application is being evaluated on a casethe Loop Trolley along Delmar Boulevard by-case basis, including businesses with in University City. less than three years at a Loop location. • Focus on retail services. • Be current with all St. Louis County and University City taxes, fees and other bills associated with the business and property. • Must demonstrate “a decline in revenue” due to the construction of the Loop Trolley. • Each business signed a commitment letter to repay the loan if it leaves the Loop before three years. SOURCE: University City Department of Community Development

Rocket Fizz, said the construction isn’t solely to blame for the slowdown in Loop business last year. It’s his view that poor weather hindered construction as it simultaneously tamped down the sidewalk traic that sustains Loop shops and eateries. Rohrbacker said he and his partners began looking into a forgivable loan as word of the program spread along Delmar Boulevard late last year. “I’m glad the city is doing this,” Rohrbacker said. “It beats going to the bank.” He is also willing to give the trolley a chance to prove itself as an asset to his and other Loop businesses, saying it will be a “nostalgia boost.” Eforts to reach other business owners who secured loans were not successful. All are in the 6300 block of Delmar Boulevard, except for Sunshine Daydream, which is at 6608 Delmar. Fund reserves from an economic development retail sales tax are being used for the program, according to a document submitted to the City Council by the city’s community development department. “If people look long-term, they will think this is a good use,” said Joe Edwards, who owns several businesses in the Loop and is chairman of the board for the Loop Trolley Transportation Development District, of using those funds to help businesses. He said none of the money for loans is coming from the city’s general-revenue fund. The money can cover basic business expenses such as payroll, inventory, utilities, taxes, marketing and covering rent or mortgage payments. The loans are a smart economic move, said Dan Wald, treasurer of Loop Business Improvement District, which is a special taxing district designed to improve the Loop retail area. He believes businesses weren’t prepared for the reality of trolley construction after nearly a decade hearing about the trolley in the abstract. “The bottom line is that it’s a good, proactive thing,” Wald said. “It’s easier to keep a tenant than to replace one so anything you can do is positive.” Andrea Riganti, University City’s community development director, initially would not tell the Post-Dispatch which businesses received the loans.

“For privacy considerations for our retailers, we will be respectful of releasing names,” she wrote in an email to the Post-Dispatch on Friday in response to questions about who received the forgivable loans. She then apparently contacted businesses that had received loans before sending another email reiterating her refusal to release the information requested by the newspaper until checking with the city attorney. “You did not disclose the type of article to be written (which I acknowledge is not required with a public information request) which has greatly concerned businesses contacted with a ‘heads up.’ I will honor these business’ (sic) request to ensure this information is an open record before responding to you,” Riganti wrote. A few hours later, she released the names of the businesses that received the loans and their amounts in response to a formal open-records request. She said the businesses’ applications and financial information had been turned over to a “third-party reviewer” and had not been retained by the city. University City Councilwoman Paulette Carr was among the yes votes to allocate the $50,000 for the loans. But she and other council members questioned why taxpayers are compensating businesses harmed by a quasi-public project. She said several Loop merchants have told her that business has dropped by half since the work began on the trolley. “They’ve already been damaged,” the councilwoman said. “The question is whether they can hang on until the construction ends. They may have taken down the (traffic) cones. But I don’t think a lot of these businesses are out of the woods yet.” Carr’s misgivings about the project — she was not a member of the council when the trolley was approved — have since given way to resignation. “It’s here,” she said. “Now we have to do what we can.” Leah Thorsen • 314-340-8320 @leahthorsen on Twitter lthorsen@post-dispatch.com Steve Giegerich • 314-725-6758 @stevegiegerich on Twitter sgiegerich@post-dispatch.com

quired 176 days.

on to laptops, pulling up assignments and participating online. So-called “elearning days” began two years ago as a way to reduce interruptions and inconveniences when ice or snow forced administrators to close school. The first school year they tried it — 2013-14 — also happened to be one for the books when it came to snow days. Gibault students realized the benefits of the e-learning program when their school year ended several days earlier than most other area schools. “At first, we were all a little hesitant, but it really paid off when we didn’t have to stay in school an extra week at the end of the year like everyone else,” said Meyer, a senior. As more schools move toward equipping every student with a computer or iPad, using the technology to conduct a virtual class becomes possible. Gibault is a private school not held to the same regulations as public districts. But public schools in Illinois may soon have the option to conduct e-learning days instead of snow days, as well. Legislators have approved a measure to test the feasibility of such a program for public schools in the state. Three schools in the Chicago suburbs will begin a pilot program in January for virtual learning days. In Missouri public schools, there is no law that allows for the combination of virtual and regular classroom instruction to be used for attendance purposes, according to a spokeswoman with the Missouri education department. The state requires students to attend 174 days and 1,044 hours, with some exceptions, and allows six makeup days. Illinois school districts must plan five “emergency” days into the re-

SNOW DAYS THAT COUNT Here’s how an e-learning day at Gibault works: Students log on to the system remotely on school-provided laptops. Teachers take attendance by noting which students sign in. Each teacher repurposes the material they would have covered in class that day to an online format. For example, a class discussion on an assigned reading can be conducted through students writing on an online interactive board. Students can listen to recorded lectures. Teachers are available to answer student questions as they work on assignments. The goal for teachers is to create lessons that are meaningful and purposeful, and avoid busy work or activities that are unrelated to the current unit or lesson, said Erin Allen, who teaches honors English classes at Gibault. If students don’t complete the assignment, they face the same repercussions as they would on a regular school day. “When we get back to school, I’m not going back and covering that same information,” Allen said. “It counts as a school day, and we’re moving on.” One of the longest strings of consecutive snow days in recent years happened when students were due to return from holiday break two years ago. Blizzard-like conditions combined with bitter cold temperatures led to three days of cancellations at most schools in early January 2014. Many students and teachers had to make up the days in May, delaying the start of summer vacation. Like Gibault, Lutheran High School North in north St. Louis County thought an alternative supported by technology was a good idea. Tim Brackman, principal at Lutheran North, said he could tell students were a little worried they would never have a snow day again.

County oicial resigns, saying request was ‘misconstrued’ SARACINO • FROM A1

The statement continued: “Over the last few years, since being charged, my nephew has had time to see the justice system play out. It was during this time that he began his own process of healing, knowing that he must be responsible for his actions. On behalf of my brother, I asked Mr. Stenger and Chief Belmar to consider writing a letter on my nephew’s behalf. It never crossed my mind that this would be so grossly misconstrued.” Saracino II, one of 13 defendants in the case, pleaded guilty July 7 of conspiracy to distribute, and possession with intent to distribute, more than 1,000 kilograms of marijuana. Sentencing guidelines called for 46 months to 57 months, although other factors, including any cooperation with investigators, could have lowered his sentence. The plea agreement is sealed.

SEALED RECORDS In his statement, Saracino notes that the letters were “openly and honestly transmitted and fully accessible to the public and the media.” The letters were under federal seal as part of Saracino II’s sentencing. The Post-Dispatch asked Perry to lift the seal on the letters. Saracino said he must resign, “in the circumstances,” and “with a heavy heart indeed, but with gratitude for this wonderful and rewarding opportunity to be of public service.” Stenger issued a prepared statement as well. “It was with reluctance and regret that I accepted John Saracino’s resignation today,” it read. “I thank John for his service and wish him well. Because this is a personnel matter, I cannot discuss it further.” Belmar said John Saracino and his brother, Michael Saracino, asked him to write a letter. Stenger said John Saracino asked him. The family owns three St. Louis area restaurants. Belmar’s Nov. 17, 2015, letter used county police letterhead. Stenger’s Oct. 8, 2015, letter was on plain paper but carried his oice address. The St. Louis County police board chairman said Friday that the board would consider whether Belmar had violated department policy when he wrote the letter of support. Members of the St. Louis County Police Department worked with federal agencies, including the FBI, in the investigation of Saracino II and others. Gabe Crocker, president of the St. Louis County Police Association, the oicers union, was highly critical of Belmar’s letter, saying it could “increase an already growing demand” for a no-confidence vote in the chief. The chief’s letter to the judge says, in part, “With regard to Michael’s ofense, I will offer no excuse, but to say that I believe that he has the benefit of having a strong family surrounding him … I remain confident that whatever decision you render in this matter, it is the right decision and you enjoy my full support.” Stenger’s letter included the passage: “Based on my experience with Michael and his family, I respectfully request that you grant him leniency in your sentencing for the crimes he has committed.”

‘A LOT OF SUPPORT’

Principals of both schools say e-learning does not mean that they will never invoke a traditional snow day. The elearning days work best when teachers have time to prepare and adapt their lessons for virtual instruction. So, snow or ice closing school for a second day is better suited for e-learning than a surprise cancellation at 6 a.m. At Lutheran North, each of the 290 students has an iPad, thanks to a grant from the Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis. Students pay an annual technology fee and are allowed to keep the device when they graduate. “It allows them to wake up and do their homework in their pajamas if they want to. And the day is still shorter than a typical school day,” Brackman said. In most cases, if students don’t have Wi-Fi, they have somewhere they can go that does, so Internet access hasn’t been a major issue, Brackman said. Meyer says if weather predictions cause the principal to alert students to an e-learning day the night before, she and other students often log on right away and begin work as teachers post assignments. That way, they can complete the work and still enjoy a day of. “I try to get as much done as possible so I can go out and enjoy the snow,” she said. “Or stay inside under a blanket and watch a movie.

Letters sent on behalf of Michael Saracino II included those from a priest and from family members. Attorney Scott Rosenblum mentioned the letters three times during the December sentencing hearing before U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry, according to a transcript obtained by the Post-Dispatch. He argued that his client, Saracino II, should be sentenced to home confinement because the letters, along with other documentation, showed Saracino II had had an “epiphany” and changed his life for the better. Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Casey also mentioned the letters in arguing that Saracino II get prison time for his role in the assault of a man and the firebombing of a 72-yearold widow’s home in south St. Louis County in 2013. The target of the firebombing was supposed to be the house next door. “In none of the letters did they mention or take into account the victims here, because there are victims,” Casey said. “This isn’t just movement of dope. There are people that were hurt here, property that was damaged and destroyed and none of the letters spoke to them. So I think I should speak to them … It’s eye-opening to me that in none of those letters were either of the victims mentioned.” Casey said the widow was a war bride who came to America with her G.I. husband. He said she lost everything in the fire, including pictures of her husband and mementos from her two sons and grandchildren. “Mr. Saracino shouldn’t be allowed to live in his house when this woman can’t live in hers,” he said. Judge Perry also referred to the letters when leveling her decision. “You know, every day I send people to jail who had terrible upbringings, who had no support. It’s a lot easier to understand how people with that kind of background commit these kind of crimes. And I have read these letters. It sounds like, you know, you have many good qualities and you have a lot of support, but as Mr. Casey pointed out, you committed a real crime that deserves real punishment.” Saracino II has not reported to federal prison. He got married Saturday on Captiva Island, Fla. The judge gave him permission to attend the wedding ceremony, said Rosenblum.

Jessica Bock • 314-340-8228 @jessicabock on Twitter jbock@post-dispatch.com

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

Virtual learning days reduce interruptions from snow SNOW • FROM A1

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

Administrators and teachers modeled North’s virtual learning program for snow days after Gibault’s. They began using it last year, but because it was a mild winter, the only day students used it was during the unrest in Ferguson when a grand jury announced its decision not to indict the police oicer who shot and killed Michael Brown.

SCHOOLWORK IN PAJAMAS


NEWS

01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

Doctors urged to help cure Play of vivid characters the overuse of antibiotics THEATER REVIEW

demands more clarity BY JUDITH NEWMARK st. Louis Post-dispatch

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD associated Press

The three actors in “Sunset Baby,” a drama by Dominique Morisseau making its debut here at the Black Rep, portray characters who mostly know what they want. Kenyatta Shakur (Ron Himes) wants a relationship with his daughter Nina, although he barely knows her. Once a leader in the black liberation movement, he has been in prison for most of her life. His late wife, a brilliant but disturbed woman, raised Nina on her own the best she could. She also willed Nina the letters that she wrote (but never mailed) to her husband — letters of considerable value to scholars, publishers and, especially, to Kenyatta. Damon (Lawd Gabriel), Nina’s well-read criminal boyfriend, wants to take her to Europe or South America, far from the squalor of Brooklyn. Of course he would also need to provide for his little boy, the son of his ex-girlfriend. And Nina (Erin Renée Ro b e r ts) ? T h e m os t opaque of Morisseau’s characters, Nina freely admits her faults. “I think I’m dead in here,” she cries, her hand over her heart. She’s so wounded, she can barely recognize any impulse beyond survival. Yet she wants to make Damon happy, even if that means feigning her response to him. She wants a parent to love her, even if that means defending her dead, troubled mother to the actual father who has arrived, unexpectedly, in her bleak little apartment. As they strive to get what they’re after, all three actors limn their characters in astute, frank, physical terms — with an emphasis

VOTE

Drugs remain overprescribed for viruses they won’t help; often, better ix is over-the-counter medicine

WASHINGTON • It’s cold season, and its

PHOTO BY LAWD GABRIEL

Erin Renée Roberts plays Nina in “Sunset Baby” at the Black Rep.

‘SUNSET BABY’ When • Through Jan. 31; 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays Where • Washington University’s Edison Theatre, 6445 Forsyth Boulevard How much • $20-$30; $15 for students More info • 314-534-3810; theblackrep.org

on frankness. There’s not much modesty here, in language, attire or action. “Sunset Baby” deals with family life, but it’s not family entertainment. Gabriel and Roberts are especially effective in a scene of a quarrel that resolves — or not? — in lovemaking. Himes, literally upright from heel to head, portrays Shakur as a man of determination, whether he’s making a video journal (for Nina) or attempting to share a civilized evening of wine and cheese with her. But Himes is the only performer whose words are consistently loud and clear enough for the Edison Theatre, where “Sunset Baby” is playing. Himes also directs the drama. This is never an ideal arrangement (and was not the original one; Himes, always the director, stepped into the role after

another actor had to bow out). Did that mean that he was unable to give Gabriel and Roberts the direction they needed, in terms of diction and volume? Perhaps so, particularly in the Edison — a sometimes difficult house. This time, the result is that many lines just get lost, making the story hard to follow. Roberts holds the stage like a dancer, eloquent whether Nina is primping at her dressing table or darting across the stage in a last-ditch effort to straighten up. Gabriel, tall and commanding, spreads a virile force-field over both Nina and her father. But it would help a lot to know exactly what each has to say. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

miserable victims trudge in seeking antibiotics because of mucus turned green, or a cough that has nagged for weeks. Despite years of warnings, doctors still overprescribe antibiotics for acute respiratory infections even though most are caused by viruses that those drugs cannot help. Now doctors are getting new tips on how to avoid unnecessary antibiotics for these common complaints — and to withstand patients demanding them. Sure bronchitis sounds scary. So describe it as a chest cold. And no, color changes don’t mean it’s time for an antibiotic. “Antibiotics are terrific. Thank God we have them for really bad things. But we need to be judicious in the way we use them,” said American College of Physicians President Dr. Wayne J. Riley, an internal medicine professor at Vanderbilt University. Rather than sending patients of with little advice about what to do while their bodies fight of a virus, how about a prescription instead for some overthe-counter or home remedies that just might ease the cough or the pain? “We’re calling for the symptomatic prescription pad,” Riley said, describing information sheets that suggest simple aids like humidifiers and plenty of fluid, have a space to scribble directions for an OTC drug — and tell patients when to return if they’re not getting better. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a sample on its website. Antibiotics are losing their efectiveness, and inappropriate prescribing is one factor. Repeated exposure can lead germs to become resistant to the drugs. The CDC estimates that drug-resistant bacteria cause 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths each year in the U.S. Another reason not to use them unnecessarily: side efects. Antibiotics are implicated in 1 of 5 emergency-room visits for bad drug reactions, CDC says. Particularly troubling is an increase in severe diarrhea caused by C-diff, the Clostridium difficile bug that can take hold in the gut after antibiotics kill off other bacteria. CDC has seen improvement from pediatricians in antibiotic prescribing, but overuse remains a big problem for adults,

especially with respiratory illnesses, said Dr. Lauri Hicks, who heads CDC’s “Get Smart” antibiotic education campaign. Monday’s guidelines, from CDC and the American College of Physicians, move beyond simple statements that antibiotics don’t work for viruses like the common cold or the flu. They lay out how doctors begin deciding if antibiotics are warranted for some other common respiratory complaints, explain that decision to patients and ofer guidance on symptom relief. Among the advice, published in Annals of Internal Medicine: • Acute bronchitis is airway inflammation, irritation that makes you cough, sometimes as long as six weeks. The guidelines say not to perform special testing or prescribe antibiotics unless pneumonia is suspected, something often accompanied by a fast heartbeat, fever or abnormal breathing sounds. Over-the-counter symptom relief includes cough suppressants such as dextromethorphan; mucus-thinning expectorants such as guaifenesin; and antihistamines or decongestants. • Sore throats are hugely common, but adults are far less likely than children to have the strep throat that requires an antibiotic. A rapid strep test is available if patients have suspicious symptoms such as persistent fever, night sweats or swollen tonsils. Pain-relieving options for adults include aspirin, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, and throat lozenges. • Sinus infections can be painful but usually clear up without antibiotics even if bacteria are to blame. The guidelines say antibiotics should be reserved for patients with no signs of improvement after 10 days, severe symptoms such as fever higher than 102, or what’s called double-sickening, when someone starts to recover and then gets worse. Possible symptom relievers include decongestants, nasal sprays, saline nasal irrigation and pain medications. Riley often has to explain how to tell if cold relievers contain a sedating antihistamine, and that nasal sprays clear congestion but that using them for too many days can trigger rebound symptoms. Often, his patients say an over-the-counter drug isn’t working when in fact, they didn’t take it as directed. “There isn’t a right answer that works for everybody,” Hicks said.

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Life rafts seen, but still no sign of missing Marines in Hawaii

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Authorities searching the area where two Marine helicopters crashed of Hawaii have found some life rafts that were carried aboard the aircraft, but still no sign of the 12 crew members who were on board. The Coast Guard said Monday that three of the four life rafts conirmed to have been aboard the helicopters have been recovered and eforts were being made to recover the fourth. Some of the rafts were inlated, but it was unclear how they came to be inlated, Coast Guard Chief Petty Oicer Sara Mooers said. There is no indication that anyone had been aboard the rafts. The search for the Marines entered its fourth day Monday, with plans to search into the night. Conditions have improved since the start of the search. Meanwhile, the family of missing Marine Kevin Roche, 30, of St. Louis, plans to ly to Hawaii to be on hand for the search. Their supporters have set up a GoFundMe page to help the Roche family get there. Various agencies have been searching above water, below water and along the shoreline since the Coast Guard was notiied late Thursday by a civilian who saw the aircraft lying and then saw a ireball. The transport helicopters were part of the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing at Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

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Family alleges police ‘iring squad’ in man’s death • The family of a black man shot and killed by San Francisco police in an incident early in December that was captured on video is demanding a federal civil rights investigation, their attorney announced Monday. John Burris, who is representing Mario Woods’ family, said San Francisco police have engaged in a pattern of excessive force and illegal stops and detentions of Latinos and African-Americans that warrants a probe by the U.S. Department of Justice. He cited two other deadly police shootings and recently uncovered racist text messages between oicers. Burris said he also asked the Justice Department on Jan. 6 to investigate the ive oicers who shot Woods for possible criminal charges after they acted like a “iring squad.” Police were responding to a stabbing report in the city’s gritty Bayview neighborhood when they encountered and surrounded Mario Woods, 26. Five oicers shot and killed him after he appeared to raise an 8-inch knife and approach an oicer, according to police. Woods’ family has disputed that account. Suspect in shelter worker’s death surrenders • A homeless man suspected of killing a shelter worker and wounding another a day after he was evicted has

surrendered to police. The suspect, John Brock, 32, had been taken by police to a hospital Saturday after he was thrown out of the Philadelphia shelter for being intoxicated and breaking curfew. He returned early Sunday and shot two employees he had targeted, homicide Capt. James Clark said Monday. Edward Barksdale, 43, died after being shot ive times, while Edward Barham, 26, was in stable condition Monday after being shot in the hip. The shooting occurred at the Station House Homeless Facility in North Philadelphia. Victim’s sister hopes settlement brings justice • The sister of a man fatally shot by a University of Cincinnati police oicer who pulled him over for lacking a front license plate said she hopes a $5.3 million settlement will help prevent another family from losing a loved one. The settlement with the university, which was announced Monday, gives the family of Samuel DuBose $4.85 million and promises free undergraduate tuition for his 12 children. It also provides for a memorial commemorating DuBose, an apology from the university and the family’s involvement in a community advisory committee on police reform. “Ultimately, Sam’s death will serve a reminder of just how inal it is to pull a gun. And hopefully oicers will think twice about pulling a gun,” said Terina Allen, DuBose’s sister, who spoke on behalf of the family. DuBose, 43, was shot and killed behind the wheel of his car on July 19 after Oicer Ray Tensing stopped him near campus for missing a front license plate, which is required by Ohio law. Tensing was charged with murder and pleaded not guilty. Cold will linger in Midwest • The Arctic air mass that froze water pipes in Minnesota this weekend is sticking around in some parts of the upper Midwest. El Niño brought about a mild winter at the beginning, but a blast of dangerously cold temperatures moved east across the Northern Plains and Great Lakes on Sunday. Temperatures bottomed out at 36 degrees below in Fosston in northwest Minnesota. It was so cold in western Minnesota that traic lights went dark Sunday morning in Montevideo when a transformer blew, and in northern Minnesota, one homeowner’s bid to thaw pipes caused a ire that led to $37,000 in damage, WDIO-TV reported. Meanwhile, parts of Illinois were in the single digits Monday, the second day with such frigid air. It was the same in southern Indiana, where oicials trying to stem the spread of a bird lu virus in turkey farms ran into problems culling the birds when hoses that sprayed a poultry-sufocating foam froze. From news services


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

TUESDAY AY • 01.19.2016 • A10

he ayatollah and you

GETTING REAL Our view • Failure to comply with Real ID Act invites big headaches. approaching for mandatory compliance. We are When it comes to securing the nation from potentwo years away from a nightmare scenario in which tial terrorist attacks, some Americans want it both travelers relying on Missouri or Illinois drivers ways. They demand high levels of security and licenses might not be able to enter federal buildings want to hold President Barack Obama personally or board airplanes. responsible for any domestic terrorist incidents Officials at Lambert-St. Louis and Kansas City that occur on his watch. Yet they are loath to international airports say travelers should expect embrace the personal sacrifices that such security no sudden changes, and would receive at least entails. The bottom line: You can’t have it both four months’ notice before new restrictions apply. ways. No one wants to push this issue to Security comes at a price, whether the point where Missourians have it’s the humiliation of partially to carry passports just to board disrobing at airports or increased We are two domestic flights. federal surveillance of phones and years away Which means the Legislature Internet communications. It’s all must get off the dime. In 2009, invasive and always disconcertfrom a lawmakers were in a cantankerous ing. And none of us will ever know nightmare mood and determined that Real whether these procedures are scenario ID opened too many ways for the actually working because a terrorist federal government to get into our attack thwarted or deterred by extra in which business. They didn’t like the idea security measures is a nonevent. travelers of federal computers storing birth It’s only the successful attacks that relying on certificate data, and they feared prove where the holes exist in our that Real ID was a first step toward security procedures. So there’s a Missouri creation of a national identification natural tendency to push back and or Illinois card. Gov. Jay Nixon signed a law ask: Is all this hassle really necesdrivers banning Missouri from complying sary? with the Real ID Act. The issue now confronts Missoulicenses This gesture of legislative defirians head-on. In 2005, Congress might not ance now looks exceedingly reckless passed the Real ID Act to ensure be able to in retrospect. Mr. Nixon is calling nationwide conformity with meafor the law’s change so Missouri can sures to prevent state-issued ID enter federal begin updating its IDs with federally cards from being counterfeited or buildings compliant watermarks, codes and altered. The goal was to stop wouldor board seals. Two bills now pending in the be terrorists from falsifying their Legislature would give Missourians identities to gain access to airliners airplanes. the choice of having a compliant or or secure facilities. Congress passed noncompliant ID. the law, and then-President George Far too much time has been W. Bush signed it, at a time when the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks were still fresh on everyone’s wasted fighting a Quixotic battle against a perceived federal bogeyman. It’s time for Missouri mind. to get right with federal law and update state IDs Most states have complied with Real ID requirewith modern security elements designed to keep ments or are transitioning toward compliance. us all safer. Otherwise, that plane’s going to leave Missouri, Illinois, Minnesota, New Mexico without us. and Washington have refused. For years, that hasn’t been a problem, but now the deadline is

Our view • It pays to keep up with diplomatic developments in Iran. Americans don’t necessarily have to be directly affected by a major international news event to understand its relevance to their lives. Anyone who lived through the turmoil of Iran’s revolution in 1978, the ransacking of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and the 444day captivity of more than 60 American hostages should grasp the notion that we ignore international events at our peril. The prospect has loomed for years that Iran was getting close to building its own nuclear weapons, a scenario that Israel and Saudi Arabia viewed as a threat to their very existence. At the very least it would portend decades of unprecedented regional instability. With that in mind, President Barack Obama authorized a dual program of harsh international trade and banking sanctions against Iran along with negotiations to sharply curtail Iran’s nuclear ambitions. The weekend yielded major dividends on those efforts with the release of five American prisoners in exchange for seven Iranians. Without the relationships built over the past 14 months of patient talks — discussions that put limits on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the lessening of sanctions — that sort of exchange could not have happened. Mr. Obama has endured years of harsh criticism. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu excoriated the Iran negotiations in a rare speech to a joint session of Congress. Domestic critics warned that U.S.-led international sanctions would have no effect on Tehran. The critics were wrong. That said, Iran’s penchant for mischief-making remains. It still supports an insurgency

that has immersed Yemen in civil war. Iranian-backed Hezbollah militiamen continue helping prop up Bashar Assad’s bloody dictatorship in Syria — contributing mightily to the refugee deluge that has caused political upheaval across Europe. And the nuclear deal, at best, only postpones rather than eliminates Iran’s bomb-making capability. As we know from the North Korean example, landmark nuclear-arms accords can fall apart. Whereas North Korea has remained insular and distrustful of the outside world, Iran badly wants to re-engage economically and bolster its status as a regional power. To ensure that the Iran deal doesn’t sour as did the non-proliferation treaty negotiated with North Korea in 1994, international diplomacy with Iran must be sustained, regardless of who occupies the White House next year. So why should you care? For one, it could affect your pocketbook. Iran is about to resume international oil exports under this deal, which means the price you pay at the pump is likely to continue plummeting. The opposite effect would likely occur if U.S.-Iranian relations deteriorate again. The presidential campaign already includes lots of debate about Iran. Conservative candidates are pledging to scrap this deal and return America to its previous, confrontational posture. We know from the past decades of war in Iraq and Afghanistan exactly how costly military confrontation can be. In the absence of diplomacy, the prospect of war with Iran can only grow. This is where your vote — your informed vote — can make a big difference in what happens next with Iran.

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS County residents make negative assumptions about city living I fear the letter writer from Ballwin against a proposed borough structure for our region represents too many county residents (“Borough government wouldn’t provide same service,” Jan. 15). Their thinking is based on negative assumptions from lacking actual city-living experience. After 20 years of living in the city, I can describe dealings with city government, police department, fire department and neighbors that are just as good and likely better than her positive dealings in Ballwin. Key is the Citizens Service Bureau, which I’ve found to be 100 percent successful at getting things done. Can we please be more positive as a region and realize we have some good things that should be shared to the benefit of all? At the very least, open your mind and don’t think that city equals bad. Darren Kunkelmann • St. Louis

More important news than football Please quit with the stories about Rams fans being upset. This is no longer news, if it ever was, and most certainly should not continue to be on the front page of the paper. People need to move on. There are plenty of real issues in this world that should be of concern to folks, and football isn’t one. I want to read about news when I open my paper, and I am sure I’m not the only one. Diane Leahart • St. Louis

More money for Corps of Engineers means more flooding Regarding “Professor’s river conclusions are all wrong” (Jan. 11): Gary R. Dyhouse repeats his attack of last summer on Professor Nicholas Pinter and myself, after it has been pointed out that Pinter is not a co-author on any of my papers, including those on underestimated flood risk. Nor is Pinter mentioned in Tony Messenger’s column (“Pied Piper of failed river policies saw this flood coming,” Jan. 1), which Dyhouse is commenting on.

Most peculiar is his charge that I have used inaccurate stage and discharge data in my risk calculations; instead, my paper exclusively uses oicial stage data provided by his own agency. In his accusation that I have not allowed anyone to review my papers, Dyhouse confuses the internal review process used by government agencies with the external review processes used by scientific journals. Papers submitted to scientific journals are assigned to an editor, who then selects referees whose identities are rarely disclosed to the author. Referees are generally selected based on reputation and publication record, are not from the author’s own institution, and are not his recent co-authors or consultants, who could have conflicts of interest. Apparently, Dyhouse feels that the St. Louis District of the Army Corps of Engineers is underutilized in the scientific review process: perhaps the above provides an explanation. Flooding is a serious and growing problem in our area, and we should not have needed another tragic example of underestimated flood risk. The series of denials and personal attacks issued by the corps since the prophetic warnings of Charles Belt (Science, 1975) regarding river constriction and flooding should alarm all thoughtful citizens. The consequence of the corps’ approach is clear: Give them more funding, you’ll get more floods. Bob Criss • University City

Politicians put personal ideology into abortion restrictions Prior to undergoing an abortion at the only clinic permitted to offer the procedure in the state of Missouri, every person receives a copy of the state-mandated “Missouri Informed Consent Booklet” to review during their 72-hour waiting period. The booklet begins: “The life of each human being begins at conception. Abortion will terminate the life of a separate, unique, living human being.” This instance of politicians injecting personal ideology into legislation further disenfranchises the systematically disenfranchised.

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This statement is not fact. Regardless of personal perspectives on abortion, the above quotation is not medically accurate. Thus, when a doctor hands this booklet to a patient, he or she is simultaneously complying with state law and violating medical ethics. I accept that personal ideological diference exist; however, I vehemently disagree with politicians employing their privileged positions as justification for disguising opinions as facts. Essentially, those rendered superior by the system of injustice under which we live assume the right to manipulate language in a way that furthers the very power structures enabling them to do so. Perhaps the most linguistically and morally confounding component of the Missouri Informed Consent Booklet, however, is the c-word: “consent.” Consent denotes the right of all individuals to freely dictate their own decisions. Thus, legislators’ decision to manipulate what should be an immutable definition into a malleable tool of structural violence stems from a strategic efort to preserve systematic injustice. As the legislative session reignites, let’s demand that politicians do a better job of preserving the integrity of our laws and the dignity of our peers. Sarah Nesbitt • Clayton

Obama’s leadership gets favorable marks across the globe In responding to letters condemning President Obama’s foreign policy, I did some basic research. For the second year running, a Gallup poll rates U.S. leadership more highly than that of other big powers. The survey of 1,000 respondents in each of 134 countries and Hong Kong gave the U.S. top marks, with 45 percent approval, followed by Germany (41 percent), the EU (39 percent), China (29 percent) and Russia (22 percent). The U.S. rating was four percentage points below its peak of 49 percent in 2009, after Barack Obama took oice, but well above its low point of 34 percent in the last year of George W. Bush’s administration, when U.S. leadership was outranked even by China.

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diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

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MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Cultural institutions make life in St. Louis worth living I enjoyed the feature Sunday about great institutions that make life in St. Louis worth living. I must point out, though, that there are a few you missed. How about the symphony, for instance? I would also put in Opera Theatre of St. Louis. Finally, a new institution that is adding a lot to the cultural life in town is the Missouri Chamber Music Festival. Without such cultural institutions as these, we would be truly lost in the wilderness of a largely philistine society. Ian Cruickshank • University City

Follow Boston paper’s lead in fixing delivery problems Perhaps the writers at the Post-Dispatch should follow the lead of their colleagues at the Boston Globe in delivering papers. At this point, that’s the only way the paper will be delivered on time or at all. After many phone calls and messages to your paper, I can only assume that the people at the Post-Dispatch simply don’t care whether the paper is delivered at all. Donna Gietschier • Florissant

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According to Pew Research, Obama’s global image is mostly positive. Across the 40 countries polled, a median of 65 percent say they have confidence in Obama to do the right thing in world afairs. A median of 27 percent lack confidence in the American leader. Overall, Obama remains much more popular globally than his predecessor. Among our allies in Western Europe, his approval rating is above 70 percent, and in Australia, above 80 percent. It is only in Israel where Obama’s rating has sufered as a result of the Iranian-world powers nuclear agreement. Clearly the GOP and many conservatives see President Obama’s foreign policy as abject failure. However, in doing so they truly are outliers in the world as a whole. The reports above tell a vastly different story. Gary Pace • Waterloo

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TOD ROBBERSON trobberson@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRANK REUST freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 DEBORAH PETERSON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


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Rev. Dr. Keith D. Herron of St. Louis County says, “It’s time Missourians reconsider the use of the death penalty as a just means of punishment.”

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Inaction over Chicago police reform Laquan McDonald shooting • When it comes to police brutality, action is dangerous and inaction is safe. BY SUSAN BANDES

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has a famous rule: “Never let a crisis go to waste.” He got what he wanted. The crisis with Chicago police is a golden opportunity for reform. But the only way to avoid wasting it is to pivot away from blaming individual cops and toward reforming a broken system that rewards exactly the type of inaction he displayed by turning his eyes away from the shocking film in which Laquan McDonald is gunned down by Chicago police. Officer Jason Van Dyke has been indicted for first-degree murder and all the direct blame has been on him. But to really understand the persistence of police brutality, focus on the eight cops who stood and watched a cold-blooded killing, five of whom turned in nearly identical yet wildly inaccurate reports exonerating their fellow officer. Or the top brass who signed off on these reports, even after seeing the video they

blatantly contradicted. Or the City Council, which paid $5 million in hush money without asking to see the video. Or the mayor’s lawyers, who did see the video — and insisted on keeping it under wraps. The public wants to know: Why did nobody speak up? The answer is: because when it comes to police brutality, action is dangerous and inaction is safe. Chicago has a long sorry history of rewarding inaction and punishing action, and both the cops and the politicians know it. Consider the story of Frank Laverty, who joined the Chicago Police Department in 1968 and became a homicide detective. But he derailed his career by blowing the whistle on the department’s illegal practice of keeping secret files of evidence never disclosed to defense attorneys. Laverty disclosed one of these files to stop an innocent man from being tried for capital murder, and then received death threats from his fellow officers. Of all those involved in this disgraceful incident, only one officer was charged with a disciplinary

infraction: Laverty himself, for failing to work within the chain of command. He ended up demoted to collecting urine samples from police recruits. This happened at the infamous Area Two, the precinct in which John Burge and his men tortured at least 117 suspects. Each complaint was dismissed as meritless, until finally in 1989 a group of civil rights attorneys received an anonymous note from someone with intimate knowledge of the police conduct — someone who plausibly claimed to be a detective. But he didn’t go public, he said, because he didn’t want to suffer the same fate as Frank Laverty. This chain of events helps explain why a police officer, even one of good conscience, might help cover up a criminal act by a fellow cop. At the Chicago P.D., only the disloyal have anything to fear. The chances of being disciplined or even denied promotion are statistically minuscule while the risks of disloyalty are enormous. This is true all the way

up the chain of command and beyond. A good story usually has villains with evil motives and some kind of change at the end. But the story of Chicago police brutality and corruption is far more banal. When we look for villains, we miss the real story. Sometimes there is a genuine hero like Frank Laverty or a villain like John Burge. But reform isn’t stymied by a few bad cops. It’s stymied by the complicity of all those who ignore it. Complicity throughout the city — by the attorney general, the City Council and now the mayor. Even inaction by the courts, which far too often turn a blind eye to police perjury. In this case, some have pointed to motives for the cover-up, such as the mayor’s tough 2014 reelection race. But looking away is the traditional Chicago response to police brutality in any season because it is confined to neighborhoods where poor, marginalized people reside — people without influence. For the rest of the

city, it is usually invisible. When the occasional story of brutality surfaces, it becomes too easy to believe assurances that the police had to defend themselves, or that what happened was an aberration. This is where we get to the most uncomfortable layer of inaction: our own. Few of us would explicitly condone murder or torture by those sworn to protect us. But we don’t have to approve of it. We just have to look the other way. The videos contradicting the official story have changed the game. They have sparked outrage and created another Rahmian “crisis” that shouldn’t go to waste, even if the mayor becomes a casualty of his own doctrine. Lasting change will come only when the official city incentives are changed — when laziness in the face of outrageous conduct becomes a liability instead of a strategy for getting through the day. Susan Bandes is a professor of law at DePaul University and a 2015 Public Voices Fellow of The Oped Project.

he choice for Democrats: evolution or revolution

NIKKI HALEY’S RIGHTEOUS GAMBLE ASSOCIATED PRESS

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks to the crowd at the Kemp Forum on Jan. 9 in Columbia, S.C.

Politics • S.C. governor, a possible vice presidential candidate, chooses ‘establishment lane’ of GOP. KATHLEEN PARKER Washington Post

CHARLESTON, S.C. • By broad

consensus, the winner of Thursday night’s GOP debate was Donald Trump, followed by Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, with most of the post-game commentary focused on “the fight” between Cruz and Trump. Oh, how we love a good fight. But the real fight was revealed a couple of nights earlier when South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley gave the Republican Party’s response to President Obama’s State of the Union address. She pulled no punches and brought the fight to her own party. Nice and prettylike. Rather than exclusively critiquing Obama’s presidency as many expected, Haley turned her sights on the angry tenor of GOP politics and our dysfunctional government, for which she said Republicans are partly responsible. “There is more than enough blame to go around,” she said.“We as Republicans need to own that truth. ... We need to accept that we’ve played a role in how and why our government is broken. And then we need to fix it.” Whoo-hoo. Sorry, but sometimes it takes a girl. Noting that we live in anxious times, she nonetheless urged her fellow Republicans to resist the “siren call of the angriest voices.” Gosh, wonder who she meant? To a certain kind of Republican, this was pure heresy. But it was also brave, necessary and true — especially if the GOP is to survive or ever hope to reclaim the White House. Haley’s gentle cri de coeur

neatly exposed the battle lines. On one side are those who deploy anger, bias, nativism and fear. On the other are those who want to reshape the GOP into a party that’s based on ideals of inclusiveness and respect for others (like, maybe, a first-generation Indian-American daughter of Sikh immigrants), exercises caution through reformed immigration policies without demonizing swaths of people, and recognizes that winning hearts and minds begins with civility and communication. “Some people think that you have to be the loudest voice in the room to make a difference. That’s just not true,” Haley said.“Often, the best thing we can do is turn down the volume. When the sound is quieter, you can actually hear what someone else is saying. And that can make a world of difference.” Haley confirmed on NBC’s “Today Show” the following morning that she was, indeed, referring to Trump, who shouldn’t take it personally. During the debate on Thursday, Trump said he is happy to wear the mantle of anger because he is angry, and he assured the audience that he and Haley, who was beaming in the crowd, are good friends. That’s nice. But what’s clear is that Haley, who is widely considered a likely vice presidential candidate, had decided that she didn’t need a Trump alliance and was choosing the “establishment lane” of the party, or, as some prefer, the “rational lane.” In other words, she signaled her support for Marco Rubio, Chris Christie, John Kasich and Jeb Bush. But which is it? What does Haley know that we don’t know? As unlikely as it seems at this juncture that any of these but Rubio has a reasonable shot at the nomination,

we might assume that she’s banking on Rubio. This would be a dream ticket for Republicans. A bilingual Cuban (check Hispanic vote), a woman (check), both first-generation Americans, coverage in two crucial states, South Carolina and Florida, and perhaps most important, a younger generation of leadership without the baggage of the establishment. They would completely collapse the smallish Republican tent of older, white males and build a rainbow-hued edifice of diversity in which race and religion are not the first questions on anyone’s mind. Haley, whom I’ve known for several years, is a polished politician, make no mistake. She doesn’t accidentally do anything, such as fumble the most important speech of her career. I also know from previous conversations that she has been changed by her time in office, altered by her experiences dealing with the horrific murders of nine African-Americans in a Charleston church and by her subsequent decision to remove the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds. The latter was a calculated political risk — and her speech a gamble that truth wins in the end. This truth includes the lesson of South Carolina after the shootings, when the state’s people embraced one another in love and dedication to a shared, higher purpose of unity, forgiveness and racial reconciliation. Haley’s point: If we can do this as a state, we can do this as a nation. It’s a worthy goal and a battle worthy of its opponents. Kathleen Parker kathleenparker@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

Politics • Clinton and Sanders ofer the party a clear choice. EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

CHARLESTON, S.C. • Hill-

ary Clinton wrapped herself so tightly in President Obama’s mantle at Sunday night’s debate that it was a wonder she could walk off the stage. She lauded the Affordable Care Act to the heavens, rejecting the notion that it left too many Americans still without health insurance. She defended Obama’s initiatives to rein in Wall Street, dismissing contentions that they did not go far enough. She highlighted his success in seizing Syria’s chemical weapons. She praised the way he “led us out of the Great Recession.” And she attacked her chief rival for the Democratic nomination, independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, for allegedly being insufficiently loyal to the president.“Senator Sanders called him weak, disappointing,” she said.“He even, in 2011, publicly sought someone to run in a primary against President Obama.” There was considerable irony in all of this. Eight years ago, the primary fight here between Clinton and Obama was bitter and tinged with racial overtones. This year, with the possibility that Sanders could win both Iowa and New Hampshire, Clinton is counting on South Carolina’s large AfricanAmerican population to serve as a firewall. If there is anything not to like about the Obama legacy, apparently she hasn’t heard of it. Sanders made the case that he has been, and remains, a supporter of the president. And he turned the tables, putting Clinton very much on the defensive when the subject turned to Wall Street excesses. “I don’t mean to just point the finger at you,” he said, pointing his finger at Clinton,“you’ve received over $600,000 in speaking fees from Goldman Sachs in one year.” Clinton’s response — that “hedge-fund billionaires” are running ads against her and that “I’m the one they don’t want to be up against” — probably failed to convince many listeners that she is more antagonistic toward Wall Street than Sanders, who frequently rails about all the executives who need to be sent to prison. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, the third candidate on the Gaillard Center stage, delivered a performance that was smooth, knowledgeable and, as things now stand, irrelevant. Focus was on the contest between the two leaders in the polls, Clinton and Sanders, who offer Democrats a clear choice: evolution or revolution. The difference is evident

in the two candidates’ positions on health care. Clinton proposes building on the foundation of Obamacare, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Medicaid and Medicare to further expand coverage. Sanders advocates a new single-payer system, akin to those in other major industrialized countries, that would be truly universal and provide health care as a right. Clinton recalled that in the fight over passage of the Obamacare legislation, efforts to include even one “public option” — government-run plan — had to be abandoned. To “start over again, pushing our country back into that kind of a contentious debate, I think is the wrong direction,” she said. In other words, let’s have evolutionary change. Sanders noted that there are still 29 million Americans without health insurance. He argued that a single-payer system, which he describes as “Medicare for all,” would not only provide coverage for everyone but also dramatically reduce medical costs. He said the issue is “whether we have the guts to stand up to the private insurance companies and all of their money, and the pharmaceutical industry. That’s what this debate should be about.” Translation: We need a political revolution. On issue after issue, Clinton proposes incremental solutions that take into account our political system as it is: sharply divided along ideological lines and warped by gerrymandering and virtually unfettered campaign contributions. Sanders proposes dramatic solutions that will only be possible when power is wrested from “big money” interests that refuse to do “what the American people want them to.” In that sense, Democrats are being asked to make a classic heads-vs.-hearts decision. With Republicans controlling both houses of Congress, Clinton would ordinarily have a huge advantage. Given what’s happening in the GOP campaign, however, this doesn’t much look like an ordinary election cycle. Sanders got a couple of the biggest cheers Sunday night, but for most of the evening the crowd seemed to be on Clinton’s side. In interviews afterward, several South Carolina political veterans predicted that Clinton would win the primary here, perhaps comfortably. But the loyal Democrats I spoke with also wished there was more passion in Clinton’s appeal to go along with the pragmatism. To convince people to eat their vegetables this year, you might have to add a little hot sauce. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


OBITUARIES

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Dale Griin • The drummer for British glam-rock stalwarts Mott the Hoople has died at age 67. He died Sunday (Jan. 17, 2016), Peter Purnell, of Mott’s label Angel Air Records, told the BBC. He had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease a decade ago. Purnell called Mr. Griin “one of the nicest, friendly and talented

men I have ever known.” A native of Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, in England, he was a founding member of the group, which took its name from a British novel of the 1960s and featured singer Ian Hunter and guitarist Mick Ralphs. In 1972, they scored their biggest hit with the David Bowie-penned and -produced

raucous anthem “All the Young Dudes.” Bowie sang backing vocals on the track. Bowie had also suggested the band record his song “Sufragette City,” but they passed on the ofer. Bowie went on to record the song himself. The group’s songs also included “All the Way From Memphis” and “Roll Away the Stone.” The band

made eight albums during its existence. The band split by the mid-’70s, and Mr. Griin later worked as a producer for BBC live music sessions, with artists including Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark and Pulp. Mott the Hoople reformed in

Robben, Jennie

To Our Readers

2009, but Mr. Griin was already ill and appeared only during encores, his place otherwise taken by Martin Chambers, of the Pretenders. His death comes a week after the death of Bowie, who was 69. Mr. Griin is survived by his longtime partner, Jean Smith. From news services

Scott, Jane

Honor

To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index

Death Notice Index

Davis, William "Skip" James - St. Louis Duncan, Richard H. - St. Louis Essman, Marlyn Rose - St. Louis

Nixon, Joan A. - St. Louis Robben, Jennie - St. Louis

Henry, Elaine (Hornsey) - Wildwood, formerly Potosi Klevorn - see McGuire Koester, Dolores Marie - formerly of St. Louis

Scott, Jane - St. Charles

McGuire, Steven T. Sr. - St. Louis Moore, Elmer L. - St. Peters

Willis, Merle Shulman - St. Louis Wright - see Treu

Schmidt, Vivian Goodrich - Bartlesville, OK Tellatin, Margaret L. - St. Louis Treu, Geraldine - St. Louis

Walters, Jack L. - High Ridge, MO

Expressing your thoughtfulness respectfully & gracefully Davis, William "Skip" James

Essman, Marlyn Rose

314-352-7575 wkf.com

entered into rest on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016 age 84. Beloved husband for 62 years of Shirley A. Duncan (nee Morris). Beloved father of James "Jay" R. (Kristi) Duncan and Jeffrey D. (Martha) Duncan. Dear grandfather of 6 and great grandfather of 2. Dear brother, brother-inlaw, uncle, friend and an avid Scouter for many years. Memorials to the USO or American Cancer Society are appreciated. Services: Visitation Wed. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129) from 4 - 8 pm. Visitation Thurs. at Concord Trinity United Methodist Church, 5275 S. Lindbergh Blvd. (63126) from 9 am to funeral service time of 10 am Thursday. Interment J. B. National Cemetery. On line condolences at ziegenheinfuneralhome.com.

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47, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sun. Jan. 17. Beloved daughter of Jim and Joan Scott (Nee Maher); loved sister of Julie Scott, Joe (Amy) Scott and the late Jill Scott; devoted aunt of Hannah and Nathan Scott; loving niece, godmother, cousin and friend. Services: The Stygar Family of Funeral Service is carting for Jane's family. Funeral Wed., Jan. 20 at 9:15 a.m. from STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles) to St. Joseph Catholic Church, 1355 Motherhead Road, (Cottleville) for a 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Ste. Philippine Cemetery. Visitation Tues., Jan 19 from 3:00 until 8:00 p.m. Contributions suggested to American Cancer Society or Humane Society of Missouri. www.stygar.com

Tellatin, Margaret L.

Henry, Elaine (Hornsey)

55 yrs. old, passed away suddenly on Jan. 15, 2016. Loving husband of Janice (nee O'Connor) Davis; devoted and loving father of Denise Davis and Erik Davis; son, brother, brother-in-law, uncle and friend to many. Services: Visitation Weds., Jan. 20th 4-8 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant with a Prayer Service there Thurs., Jan. 21st at 11 a.m. Interment St. Ferdinand Cemetery. Online guestbook www.hutchensmortuary.com

Duncan, Richard H.

(nee Conigliaro) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sun., Jan. 17, 2016. Beloved wife of Bernard W. "Ben" Robben for 54 years; dearest mother of Cynthia Marie (Robert) Henning, Kevin W. (Catherine) and Keith B. Robben; loving grandmother, greatgrandmother, sister-in-law, aunt, niece, cousin, Godmother and friend. Jennie sang with the AnheuserBusch Choral Group and St. louis Gateway Singers. She was a member of CPAAA and a 4th Degree Ladies Auxiliary St. Louis Assembly #565. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road Thur., Jan. 21 at 9:30 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to American Diabetes Assn. appreciated. Visitation Wed. 4-8 p.m.

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Schmidt, Vivian Goodrich

January 17, 2016 Beloved wife of Alyn V. Essman; dear mother and mother-in-law of Sharyn Essman and Judy (Todd) Taylor; dear grandmother of Bennett and Isabelle Essman, Aliyah, Joshua and Jordan Taylor and Jannis Topfer; dear sister of Priscilla Ayers; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. From the time she went door-todoor with a tin can collecting contributions for the United Jewish Appeal, Marlyn Essman recognized the importance of participating in and giving to the community. She devoted her adult life to philanthropic endeavors that touched children, seniors, animals, cultural institutions, and the Jewish community. One of the numerous fundraising campaigns she spearheaded raised millions of dollars to rescue thousands of refugees from the disintegrating Soviet Union. When she was called upon by local and national Jewish leadership, Marlyn participated in every way possible, committing countless hours to helping those in need. Still, her community efforts were not confined solely to local and national Jewish organizations. Born and raised in St. Louis, Marlyn devoted her entire adult life to philanthropic and community activities for the benefit of a broad spectrum of cultural and educational institutions, including the St. Louis Zoo, the St. Louis Art Museum, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, and the MathewsDickey Boys' & Girls' Club. She was a passionate and determined advocate for those in need, and she inspired others in her community to do the same. The intelligence and wisdom she brought to community organizations raised the bar for community service in the St. Louis Metropolitan area. Not satisfied to rest on her achievements, Marlyn made sure that, when the time came to pass the baton, she taught her children and grandchildren the same values that had been so important to her. Marlyn's list of achievements and recognition's included the St. Louis Woman of Achievement Award; an honorary Doctor of Arts and Letters from the University of Missouri-St. Louis; the Jewish Community Center's President's Award; and the Mathews-Dickey Boys' & Girls' Club Woman of the Year Award. Marlyn set an example for her family and for her community of the depth and breadth of true charity. She will be greatly missed. Services: Funeral service Tuesday, January 19th, 2:30 p.m. at Congregation Shaare Emeth, Ladue and Ballas Roads. Visitation Tuesday 2:00 PM. Interment Chevra Kadisha Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to the St. Louis Zoo, #1 Government Drive, 63110 or Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Road. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

68 of Wildwood, formerly of Potosi. Is survived by husband, Delbert "Del" Henry; children, Meredith (Eric) Rakey; Brett (Bonnie) Henry; siblings: Margaret Williams, Jeanette Allen, Carmen Wilberg, Edward Hornsey, James Hornsey; grandchildren: Madeline, Elliana, Evelyn, Andrew, Devon, Kelly and Austin. Elaine was Past Director of Tri County Birthright, Eureka and a current Board Member. Services: Visitation 3:00 PM Wednesday and 8:30 AM Thursday at Moore Funeral Home 105 Clark Street, Potosi. Funeral Mass at St. James Catholic Church 11:00 AM, Thursday. In lieu of flowers, memorials are to be directed to Tri County Birthright, Eureka.

Koester, Dolores Marie 78, died 12/19/15 in Atlanta, GA. Survived by Kim Cooper (Terry), Jill Stover (Stephen), Jenny Cooper (Keith), Mark Koester, 12 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by her son, Walter Keith Koester. Graveside service to be held January 23rd at 4:00 pm, Mountain View Park Cemetery in Marietta, GA. Donations to ASPCA or American Diabetes Assoc. appreciated.

McGuire, Steven T. Sr. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday, January 18, 2016. Beloved husband of Mary Lee McGuire (nee Klevorn); dear father of Jennifer (Robert Jr.) Ryan and Steven T. McGuire Jr.; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thursday, January 21, 9:30 a.m. to Annunciation Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions appreciated to The American Cancer Society. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Moore, Elmer L. on Sunday January 17, 2016 at the age of 95. For service information call 636-936-1300 or visit www.stygar.com

Nixon, Joan A. (nee Boswell) Monday, January 18, 2016. Beloved aunt of Sharon (Butch) Morris and Daniel (Kris) Zangraft; great-aunt of Karl and Katie Zangraft; beloved sister of the late Betty Dillinger. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. on Wednesday, January 20, 4 p.m. until service at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Stray Rescue, appreciated.

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80, of Bartlesville, Oklahoma died January 17, 2016 of natural causes. Vivian was born on October 14, 1935 in East Orange, NJ with her identical twin sister, Mary, to Laurence B. and Lois S. Goodrich. She graduated from Oneonta (NY) High School in 1952 and received a B.S. in Science Education from Cornell University in 1956 and an M.S. in 1959. Vivian married William (Bill) J. Schmidt Jr. of Westwood, NJ on Sept. 8, 1956 in Oneonta, NY. Their first home was in Petersburg, VA where Bill was stationed at Fort Lee. Vivian taught elementary school in Matoaca, VA for one year until they moved back to Ithaca, NY to pursue advanced degrees. In 1959, Vivian and Bill moved to Warren, OH where she taught high school biology and physical science. In 1960 they moved to Fort Wayne, IN where they began their family. Long interested in government and politics, Vivian joined the League of Women Voters in 1965 and was a member in Ft. Wayne, St. Louis, MO and Bartlesville, OK. In Ft. Wayne she learned about government and serving the public, and developed the confidence to run for public office. In 1971, she became the second woman to be elected to the Fort Wayne City Council. In 1980, she was elected by her peers to serve as Council President. She served as Councilwoman-at-Large for 10 years, until she and Bill moved to St. Louis in 1982. Vivian was then appointed by Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan to chair the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners, an office she held until 2000. In 2001, Vivian and Bill moved to Bartlesville to be closer to their son, daughter-in-law, and infant grandson. Vivian was appointed in 2003 as Democratic Party representative to the Board of Election Commissioners of Washington County, OK. She also served four-year terms on the Bartlesville Board of Adjustment and Metropolitan Area Planning Commission. Vivian was delighted with the increasing number of women elected to the U.S. Congress and worked for many years to encourage and help women run for elected office. She was also a member of the Board of Directors of the Colonial Estates Homeowners Association and wrote its newsletter from 2002-2009. Vivian was preceded in death by her parents and twin sister, Mary Goodrich Leggitt. Survivors include her husband, William J. Schmidt Jr., of the home; daughter Elizabeth Schmidt Hine, DVM, son-in-law Steven S. Hine, and granddaughter Catherine Lois, of Bartlesville; son William J. Schmidt III, daughter-inlaw Tina Trotter Schmidt, and grandson Charles William of Fulshear, TX; niece Margaret Leggitt Atzeni and great-niece Laura Elizabeth of Red Oak, TX; nephew Richard I. Leggitt, wife Teresa, and daughter Marissa of Milpitas, CA; great-nephew John L. Griffin-Leggitt of Missoula, MT. Vivian’s life was active and filled with service to others. She loved her family, her dogs and calico cats, her award-winning garden, traveling the world, politics, and books: especially biographies of founding Americans and American history. She contributed to organizations working to save the planet, in particular the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Sierra Club. Vivian also donated to the League of Women Voters and the Unitarian-Universalist Church. Services: Vivian’s memorial service will be officiated by Jason Elmore at 2pm, Saturday, March 12, 2016 at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Bartlesville, 428 S. Seneca Ave. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the aforementioned organizations, the Animal Rescue Foundation of Bartlesville, or the Washington County SPCA. Arrangements are under the direction of the Arnold Moore & Neekamp Funeral Home. Online condolences may be left at www.honoringmemories.com.

/obituaries

(nee Frost) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, January 15, 2016. Beloved wife of the late August F. Tellatin; dear mother of Stephen (Barbara), James (Janet), John (Vicki) and Gregory (Tish) Tellatin; dear grandmother of Heather, Michael, Angela, Ariel, Devin and Samantha; dear great-grandmother of Avery, Quinn, Tyler and Gweneth; our dear aunt, great-aunt and friend. A special thanks to all the dear neighbors on Brockwood Drive. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday, January 20, 10-11 a.m. then to Assumption Church for 11:30 a.m. Memorial Mass. Interment National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Assumption St. Vincent Depaul Society.

Treu, Geraldine Sat., Jan. 16, 2016. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 20 with Service 10 a.m. Thurs., Jan. 21 at Hutchens Mortuary. Burial Valhalla Cemetery.

Walters, Jack L. 71, of High Ridge, MO. Vis. Tue. 4-9 p.m. All Gods Children Camp. Service Wed. 10 a.m. All Gods Children Camp. Chapel Hill Mortuary

Willis, Merle Shulman January 18, 2016. Beloved wife of Jim Willis; dear mother and mother-in-law of Jason (Jane) Rosenthal, Dan (Rebecca) Rosenthal and Jennifer (Brent) Mills; dear grandmother of Elizabeth, Katherine, Victoria, Kevin, Abigail, Brandon and Carly; dear greatgrandmother of four; dear sister-inlaw of Kevin (Nancy) Willis and Kathy (Jeff Golusky) Willis. Services: Funeral service Wednesday, January 20th, 1:30 PM at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Boulevard, 63132. Visitation begins at 1 PM. Interment follows at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery, 9125 Ladue Road, 63124. Memorial contributions preferred to the National Kidney Foundation, 1001 Craig Road, Suite 480, 63146. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

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NEWS

01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Clinton plays up ties to Obama

Is pot to blame for dumb teens?

Democrat appeals to black voters to fend of surge by rival Sanders BY KEN THOMAS AND LISA LERER associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. • Facing fresh campaign anxieties,

Studies suggest weed may not be at fault PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

PHILADELPHIA • Scientists

have linked teenage marijuana use with a host of undesirable outcomes: diiculty in paying attention, weaker memory and lower verbal ability and intelligence. But is the drug itself to blame? Two long-term studies of twins published Monday suggest that other factors are at fault, at least as far as vocabulary skills are concerned. In one study, children who went on to become marijuana users were not as bright to begin with as their abstinent peers. And in both studies, drug-using teens fared no worse on IQ tests than their nonusing twins in the same household, suggesting that some other factor was to blame, the authors wrote. Something in the family environment perhaps, or simply the fact that kids who gravitate toward pot use may be less motivated to try hard in school. Results of the two studies, described in a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, surely will not settle the debate. In interviews, two of the authors cautioned that even if marijuana does not directly impair intelligence in the developing brain, there are plenty of other reasons that teenagers should steer clear of weed. The studies did not measure executive function — an umbrella term that covers the ability to focus and organize, among other skills — and previous research suggests that pot use can weaken it. And despite the push to legalize marijuana in some states, it remains illegal for teens, said the University of Pennsylvania’s Adrian Raine, who helped design the studies with the University of Southern California’s Laura A. Baker, the paper’s senior author. “We’re only talking about verbal ability,” said Raine, a professor of criminology, psychiatry and psychology at Penn. “There’s more to life than verbal ability.” Joshua D. Isen, a co-author of the paper, cautioned that teen use of the drug also is associated with poorer performance in school. “I’d think marijuana use could be a symptom of a larger problem,” said Isen, a University of Minnesota postdoctoral fellow. It is difficult to study how pot affects kids because it would be unethical (and illegal) to undertake the gold-standard study, a randomized controlled trial in which one group would be given an illegal substance and compared to another group. The paper’s authors acknowledged as much, calling their work “quasi-experimental.”

VIRGIL SHIPLEY • Mount Vernon News via aP

Investigators work Monday at a home in Danville, Ohio, after Danville police Oicer Thomas Cottrell was found shot to death Sunday night.

Suspect arrested in oicer’s death Body found shortly after Ohio man’s ex-girlfriend called police to warn them they were in danger BY MITCH STACY associated Press

COLUMBUS, OHIO • A man whose

ex-girlfriend reported that he was armed and looking to kill police was in custody on Monday suspected in the death of an officer whose body was found behind the municipal building of a small Ohio town, authorities said. The body of Danville Officer Thomas Cottrell was found late Sunday night, about 20 minutes after the ex-girlfriend of Herschel Ray Jones called dispatchers to report that oicers in Danville were in danger, Knox County Sherif David Shafer said. Shaffer said dispatchers tried to make contact with Cottrell after receiving the tip around 11:20 p.m., but couldn’t reach him. The sheriff’s office then searched the village and found Cottrell’s body, Shafer said. His service weapon and cruiser were missing. Officials did not immediately say how Cottrell died. But Chief Jim Gilbert, the chief deputy of the Franklin County Sherif’s oice, tweeted early Monday: “Prayers for Ohio’s first fallen oicer for 2016 a Danville PD Oicer was shot/killed this evening in Knox County.” Jones was taken into custody around 1:30 a.m. following a short foot chase after he was spotted running from a home in Danville, which is about 60 miles northeast of Columbus. Knox County Prosecutor Chip McConville said he expects a murder charge will be filed against Jones, but he didn’t know how soon that could happen. The Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation was still collect-

ing evidence Monday, and Cottrell is scheduled for an autopsy Tuesday in nearby Licking County. Jones was being held Monday for violating the conditions of his release from prison last year. McConville said that’s enough to hold him until he is formally charged. “There are a lot of things that have to happen before we make any charging decisions,” McConville said. Calls to numbers listed to Jones or family members in Knox County rang unanswered or were not in service Monday. Jones, 32, has a lengthy criminal history and in one case tried to claim he was legally insane, according to court records. Knox County court records show Jones has multiple convictions for breaking and entering, burglary, receiving stolen property and carrying a concealed weapon dating back to 2001. In a 2011 case, he pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity before changing his plea to guilty. Ohio prison records show Jones served nearly four years for the 2011 convictions on charges of receiving stolen property and possession of chemicals for manufacture of drugs. He was released in April. The president of the Ohio Fraternal Order of Police called Cottrell’s killing an assassination. Cottrell was one of six oicers in Danville. “We ask all Ohioans to pray for peace and healing for Officer Cottrell’s family, friends and co-workers,” Jay McDonald said in a written statement. “His assassination is the latest reminder of how dangerous police work is and how the police are targeted for violence,” McDonald said.

GLENN FREY

Hillary Clinton is attaching herself to President Barack Obama, hoping to overcome liberal enthusiasm for Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont with a full-throated embrace of her one-time rival and boss. Central to that strategy: shoring up her standing with African-American voters who helped elect Obama as the first black president and who could determine her fate if she falters in the first-to-vote contests of Iowa and New Hampshire. Clinton, Sanders and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley marked Martin Luther King Jr. Day on the steps of the South Carolina statehouse. The event was replete with Obama’s influence: as Clinton’s two main challengers marched to the capitol, hundreds of faithful chanted the president’s campaign mantra, “Fired up. Ready to go!” “(King) was counting on all of us to keep going after he was gone, to be a part of what President Obama calls the ‘Joshua Generation,’ carrying forward the holy work the heroes of the civil rights movement began,” Clinton said. Clinton’s alignment with Obama, who remains popular with Democrats, was on full display at Sunday night’s final debate before the Iowa caucuses. Presenting herself as his heir-apparent, Clinton warned that Sanders’ universal health care plan threatened to reopen a contentious debate with Republicans that could undermine the so-called “Obamacare” law. “To start over again with a whole new debate is something that I think would set us back. The Republicans just voted last week to repeal the Afordable Care Act, and thank goodness, President Obama vetoed it and saved Obamacare for the American people,” Clinton said. Sanders countered that his “Medicare for all” proposal was the natural evolution to the health care law, reminding Clinton that he played a role in its passage. “I’m on the committee that wrote the Afordable Care Act,” he said. When Sanders noted bluntly that he hadn’t taken campaign contributions from Wall Street banks or lucrative speaking fees from Goldman Sachs — unlike Clinton — the former secretary of state tried to turn it into an attack on Obama. And she resurrected comments Sanders had made about Obama before his re-election, suggesting the president would have benefited from a primary challenge. “He’s criticized President Obama for taking donations from Wall Street and President Obama has led our country out of the Great Recession,” Clinton said. “Senator Sanders called him weak, disappointing. He even, in 2011, publicly sought someone to run in a primary against President Obama.” Clinton aides said Sanders, a self-identified democratic socialist who casts himself as above politics as usual, was undermining Obama’s achievements by questioning the efectiveness of his party. “The fact that he keeps saying that Democrats can’t do things is just wrong,” said Clinton campaign strategist Joel Benenson. “Democrats have gotten things done and they’ve done it under a Democratic president who happens to be named Barack Obama.” The rhetoric was a notable shift from several months ago, when Clinton frequently stressed that she was not running for Obama’s third term. Republicans are taking careful note of the new strategy and hope to use Clinton’s ties to Obama to undercut her with skeptical independents in the general election, should she win the nomination. Sanders’ team says there’s little daylight between the senator and Obama and notes one major diference. “There’s only one candidate on that stage who ran against Barack Obama for president, and it wasn’t Bernie Sanders,” said Tad Devine, a top Sanders adviser. Sanders’ strategy aims to capitalize on strong finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire to propel him in the two remaining contests in February: Nevada and South Carolina. Polls show Clinton with a big lead in South Carolina, helped by black voters, but the state’s electorate has shifted in the past based on the outcome in the early voting. Black voters make up more than half of the electorate in South Carolina’s Feb. 27 primary and the question remains whether Sanders, 74, a white senator from Vermont, can find new support among black voters against Clinton, whose husband was commonly referred to metaphorically as the nation’s first black president before Obama’s rise. Obama has no plans to endorse a candidate in the Democratic primary.

Eagles co-founder dies; part of duo behind top-selling ‘Hotel California’ C O P D ? Volunteers are needed to participate in COPD research studies testing investigational medications for COPD.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

To Qualify:

NEW YORK • Glenn Frey, who co-

founded the Eagles and with Don Henley became one of history’s most successful songwriting teams with such hits as “Hotel California” and “Life in the Fast Lane,” has died. Mr. Frey, who was 67, died of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia, the band said on its website. He died on Monday (Jan. 18, 2016) in New York. He had fought the ailments for the past several weeks, the band said. “The Frey family would like to thank everyone who joined Glenn to fight this fight and hoped and prayed for his recovery,” a statement on the band’s website said. Mr. Frey, a guitarist, and drummer Henley formed the Eagles in Los Angeles in the early 1970s, along with guitarist Bernie Leadon and bassist Randy Meisner. They would become a top act over the decade, embodying the melodic California sound. An Eagles greatest hits collection from the mid-1970s and “Hotel California” are among the best-selling albums in history. Mr. Frey was born in Detroit and was raised in its suburbs. His solo hits include “The Heat Is On” and “Smuggler’s Blues.” Mr. Frey was lead vocalist on the

Over 40 years of age COPD with shortness of breath upon exertion Current or Former smoking history Qualiied volunteers receive investigational study drug and related testing at no cost and compensation for time and travel. To learn more, please call (314) 514-8509 www.clinicalresearchcenter.com

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Glenn Frey of the Eagles performs in 2010 at Muhammad Ali’s Celebrity Fight Night XVI in Phoenix. The Eagles co-founder died Monday at 67.

Eagles’ breakthrough hit, “Take It Easy,” a song mostly written by Jackson Browne that came out in 1972. His other showcases included “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” “Already Gone” and “New Kid in Town.” The Eagles split up in 1980 but reunited in 1994 and were one of the

world’s most popular concert acts. The band, which for years was made up of Mr. Frey, Henley, Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmit, was supposed to have been honored at the Kennedy Center last month. The appearance was postponed because of Mr. Frey’s health problems.

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NEWS

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

WEATHER • LOW 11, HIGH 23 > WINDS ESE 5-10 MPH

PEOPLE

Accumulating snow tonight

Lee, Pinkett Smith will take part in #OscarsSoWhite boycott

Snow will spread into the region later today into tonight in association with a low pressure system passing to the south. Generally, snow accumulations of 2-4 inches are expected across the St. Louis area by early Wednesday morning. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

14°

18°

22°

20°

Mostly cloudy

Cloudy

Chance of snow

Snow

4-DAY FORECAST

WEDNESDAY

H

35 31 26 29 29 37 30 21 29 35 25 24 32

W

sleet mostly cloudy snow cloudy snow sleet snow snow snow sleet snow snow cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

20 12 12 12 14 21 18 6 13 19 13 12 18

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

23°/34° 24°/30° 20°/34°

Cloudy

Cloudy, slight Mostly cloudy Mostly sunny chance of snow

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

THURSDAY

20°/30°

L

H

W

2 10 0 4 5 1 9 1 6 -5 5 2

18 28 16 19 19 19 22 18 20 14 20 18

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy snow mostly cloudy

Chicago 0 / 16

Kirksville 6 / 21 Kansas City 18 / 30

Springfield 5 / 20

St. Louis 11 / 23 Carbondale 10 / 28

Joplin 21 / 37

Poplar Bluff 14 / 33

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 18° 5° 40° 24° 72° -19° 58° 36°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.00” 0.62” 1.44” 0.62” 1.44”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Jan. 15th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 2,124 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 55 Month (Total) 579 Season 1738 Year Ago 2400

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TEMPERATURES High (3:22 p.m.) Low (7:24 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1880) Record Low (1930) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

Full Jan 23 Sunrise

Last Jan 31

New Feb 8

7:16 AM Sunset

First Feb 15 5:08 PM

Moonrise 1:32 PM Moonset 2:53 AM

Looking to the southeast around 7 p.m. tonight you will see the waxing crescent moon just above the star Aldebaran. The moon will pass in front of this star tonight. This is called an occultation. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.74 23 11.29 Jefferson City 21 15.13 Hermann 20 11.60 Washington 25 18.87 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 12.02 Louisiana 15 12.18 Dam 24 25 18.08 Dam 25 26 17.71 Grafton 18 15.12 M.Price, Pool 419 413.90 M.Price, Tail. 21 14.93 St Louis 30 20.22 Chester 27 24.17 Cape Girardeau 32 30.04

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 19.52 18 18.95 Peoria 14 21.06 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.97 Sullivan 16 1.45 Valley Park 24 17.97 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 3.14 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.99

- 0.35 - 0.45 - 0.66 - 0.79 - 0.68 + 0.18 - 0.04 - 1.35 - 1.76 - 0.98 + 0.20 - 1.19 - 1.50 - 0.95 - 0.98

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.21 - 0.69 - 0.71 - 0.09 - 0.74 - 1.23 0.00

‘American Pie’ singer reportedly arrested • A jail supervisor says “American Pie” singer Don McLean has been arrested on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge in Maine. Cpl. Brad Woll says McLean was arrested and posted $10,000 bail early Monday at the Knox County Jail. The singer-songwriter, 70, lives in Camden, Maine. Woll says he did not know if McLean had a lawyer. A message seeking comment was left through the singer’s website. A phone number listed under his name went unanswered. McLean’s original manuscript and notes to “American Pie” sold at auction for $1.2 million in April. The 1971 hit was about the deaths of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper in a plane crash on Feb. 3, 1959 — “The Day the Music Died.”

24-Hr Change

356.64 - 0.65 366.96 - 0.84 526.72 - 1.10 659.37 + 0.07 717.03 - 0.56 684.95 - 0.21 921.16 - 0.70 856.31 - 0.42 614.12 - 0.38 409.60 - 0.12 609.97 - 0.39 456.24 - 0.22

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Estimated ticket sales in millions for Friday through Monday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Rentrak. 1. “Ride Along 2” $41.5 2. “The Revenant” $39.0 3. “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” $32.6 4. “13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi” $19.7 5. “Daddy’s Home” $12 6. “Norm of the North” $9.3 7. “The Forest” $7 8. “The Big Short” $6.5 9. “Sisters” $5.5 10. “The Hateful Eight” $4.4 Associated Press

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Extremes High: 74° Harlingen, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Pinkett Smith

Lee

people has thanked David Bowie for helping open up a conversation about death. Bowie, 69, died of cancer Jan. 10, and Dr. Mark Taubert says it helped him speak to one dying cancer patient about how to have “a good death.” In a blog on the British Medical Journal website, Taubert said Bowie’s story “became a way for us to communicate very openly about death.” Taubert’s blog was reposted on social media Sunday by Bowie’s son, Duncan Jones. Bowie did not go public about his illness, but made a inal album, “Blackstar,” that meditated on life and mortality. Taubert said Bowie’s inal acts “had a profound efect on me and many people I work with.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actress Tippi Hedren is 86. Actress Shelley Fabares is 72. Country singer Dolly Parton is 70. Singer Martha Davis is 65. Singer Dewey Bunnell is 64. Actress Katey Sagal is 62. Comedian Paul Rodriguez is 61. Actor Paul McCrane is 55. Actor Shawn Wayans is 45. Actress Drea de Matteo is 44. Actress Bitsie Tulloch is 35. Actress Jodie Sweetin is 34. Rapper Mac Miller is 24. From news services

Bowie sparks cancer conversation • A British doctor who works with terminally ill

BOX OFFICE

- 1.99

Maps and weather data provided by:

Though Spike Lee was given an honorary Academy Award at the Governors Awards in November, the “Chi-Raq” director said Monday he will not attend the Oscars next month because of the lack of diversity among nominees. “We cannot support it. and (I) mean no disrespect to my friends, host Chris Rock and producer Reggie Hudlin, president (Cheryl Boone) Isaacs and the Academy,” Lee posted on Instagram. “But, how is it possible for the second consecutive year all 20 contenders under the acting category are white?” The hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trended on social media last week after it was announced that all 20 contenders for acting awards are white. Actress Jada Pinkett Smith, whose husband is actor Will Smith, also announced Monday she will boycott the Oscars, which are scheduled to air Feb. 28 on ABC.

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Low: -31° Cotton, Minnesota

40s Rain

30s 10s

0s 10s

30s 50s

20s

20s

40s

20s

20s

T-storms

10s

10s

20s 30s 30s

50s 60s

20s

40s

40s

Snow

30s 50s

70s

30s

The Top Workplaces in Greater St. Louis will be revealed.

40s

50s 60s

Wintry Mix

50s 60s

70s

Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -33°

Hawaii High: 86°

A low pressure system will bring snow to portions of the north-central Plains, Missouri Valley, and Midwest. Parts of the southern Plains and Ozarks could see a little rain. Another storm system will bring more wet weather to the Pacific Northwest, Great Basin, and north-central California. Cold and breezy conditions are expected throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 12 Albuquerque 29 Anchorage 24 Atlanta 20 Atlantic City 13 Baltimore 13 Billings 20 Biloxi, Ms. 34 Birmingham 19 Bismarck 6 Boise 31 Boston 15 Buffalo 13 Burlington, Vt. 6 Charleston, S.C. 26 Charleston, W.V. 7 Charlotte 15 Cheyenne 24 Chicago 0 Cincinnati 5 Cleveland 6 Colorado Spgs. 31 Concord, N.H. 9 Dallas 39 Daytona Beach 35 Denver 26 Des Moines 3 36 Destin, Fl. 8 Detroit 39 El Paso 8 Evansville -10 Fairbanks -9 Fargo 21 Flagstaff 42 Fort Myers 23 Great Falls -9 Green Bay 15 Hartford 65 Honolulu 41 Houston 3 Indianapolis 25 Jackson, Ms. 33 Juneau 57 Key West 43 Las Vegas 24 Little Rock 54 Los Angeles 9 Louisville

22 50 28 39 27 26 37 53 41 21 45 25 21 17 44 21 35 36 16 19 19 41 20 62 53 42 14 54 21 65 26 6 11 45 63 36 12 26 81 68 17 51 38 66 58 41 63 25

W

Tomorrow L H W

windy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny windy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny snow rain windy snow showers snow showers sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy snow mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

17 31 21 26 17 17 23 43 31 9 31 19 17 13 26 9 21 22 13 14 9 25 12 37 36 24 10 40 13 36 22 -9 6 21 42 22 1 17 66 54 14 41 34 59 44 38 55 19

29 50 33 46 37 34 37 64 48 24 42 32 25 25 51 31 42 38 26 29 24 48 27 55 62 43 23 61 25 66 33 1 21 46 69 31 19 33 80 72 27 60 37 71 63 48 66 32

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City

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy partly sunny rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy snow flurries mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny snow sunny snow very cold mostly cloudy sunny sunny snow flurries sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow

City

Today L H

20 Macon 53 McAllen, Tx. 18 Memphis 51 Miami -3 Milwaukee Minneapolis -10 Missoula, Mt. 22 27 Mobile Montgomery 25 10 Nashville New Orleans 37 New York City 16 Norfolk, Va. 18 Oklahoma City 29 Omaha 9 Orlando 39 Palm Springs 50 Philadelphia 15 Phoenix 47 Pittsburgh 4 Portland, Me. 11 Portland, Or. 42 Providence 15 Raleigh 14 Rapid City 15 Reno 34 Richmond, Va. 13 Sacramento 50 St. Petersburg 47 Salt Lake City 28 San Antonio 45 San Diego 53 San Francisco 52 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 26 Seattle 41 32 Shreveport 2 Sioux Falls 10 Syracuse 27 Tallahassee 41 Tampa 40 Tucson 26 Tulsa 14 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 51 24 Wichita Wilmington, De. 14 49 Yuma

45 76 37 65 14 9 29 52 47 32 57 28 29 49 20 57 68 27 68 17 20 46 27 32 34 53 28 56 56 39 69 64 58 43 46 45 57 17 21 52 58 72 41 27 66 34 26 74

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny windy sunny mostly cloudy snow sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain sunny rain sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy snow snow showers sunny sunny partly cloudy rain sunny partly cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy

25 59 35 52 10 7 27 39 31 24 49 22 19 26 9 37 51 18 49 8 15 41 18 15 15 32 14 47 46 32 50 58 51 25 26 41 51 8 16 29 39 41 27 18 52 20 17 50

51 79 46 72 21 20 33 63 53 38 66 36 37 46 28 66 69 35 69 23 27 47 33 38 37 51 36 59 63 38 69 67 59 45 54 46 65 24 25 59 64 71 41 35 70 39 35 75

partly cloudy mostly sunny rain partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny snow showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy drizzle mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

85 38 50 68 90 82 28 31 32 85 70 33 75 86 45 31

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

30 60 31 73 41 58 25 37 35 71 49 3 10 66 60 45

40 66 35 90 52 79 51 39 48 86 75 15 20 73 76 68

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny snow showers snow partly cloudy showers partly cloudy

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

71 25 38 50 77 75 9 16 21 69 52 14 65 72 37 21

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

7 27 15 70 35 72 59 7 6 64 55 34 9 42 21 16

16 38 22 79 49 82 89 20 21 84 57 45 24 48 29 23

partly sunny partly cloudy sunny rain partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Will your organization get a shout out?

Sign up to participate. stltoday.com/nominate


01.19.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

stltoday.com/rides

T H E E A S I E S T WAY T O F I N D A V E H I C L E

Acura

4025 Chevrolet 4065 Dodge 4085 Honda 4120 Honda 4120 Mazda 4185 Nissan/Datsun 4220 Chevrolet Trucks 4330 Sport Utilitiy 4390 '14 Honda Civic LX: '15 Chevy Malibu LT: '13 Dodge Dart SXT: One '14 Chevy 1500 3LZ: '14 Nissan Versa Note: '13 Acura RDX '08 Mazda6: '07 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4 Door, 35K Miles, Blue23K Miles, Owner Clean Crew Cab, High Hatchback, One Owner BOMMARITO White, 16K Mi., Loaded, One Owner tooth, Camera, Honda Leather, Moonroof, GM Certified, $17,995 Carfax, Remote Clean Carfax, Keyless Country, 4x4, 26K HONDA Certified, Don Brown Chevrolet Vehicle Start, Entry, Call Today, Miles, One Owner, Local Trade, Clean Carfax, 86K Clean Carfax, LoadModern Steel Metallic, 1-866-604-8625 Call Today, GMCertified, $41,995 SUPERSTORE $14,999 #H152201A $28,990 $13,990 #P8480 ed, Miles, $10,990 #P8469 Don Brown Chevrolet '15 Chevy Impala Lmtd 1-888-204-9202 1-866-604-8625 LTZ: Sunroof, Heated $18,522 #360522A $8,777 #31507A '08 Chevy Cobalt 2LT: Leather, 18K Miles, JANUARY Black, GM Certified, 4 Dr, Sunroof, Leather, $18,995 59K Miles, $8,995 CLEARANCE '08 Dodge Avenger SXT: '12 Honda Civic LX: Don Brown Chevrolet Don Brown Chevrolet Audi One Owner Clean Carfax, 47K Miles, Black, 4040 Pontiac CERTIFIED 4250 1-866-604-8625 '10 Dodge Journey XT: 1-866-604-8625 '09 Mazda3: FWD, Alloys One Owner, Lease FWD, V6, Black, 79K '15 Chevy Sonic LTZ: RED TAG '15 Audi A3 1.8T: Return, Honda Wheels, Call Today, '12 Silverado LT Miles, #H152006B Touring, One Owner '02 Firebird: 5 Door, 20K Miles, Premium (S Tronic), Certified Used Vehicle, SALES EVENT Value Priced $10,699 GM Certified, $13,995 Crew Cab, 4WD, $6,990 #75871A One Owner Clean Clean Carfax, Urban Titanium Color, T-Tops, RWD, 93K Don Brown Chevrolet Carfax, Heated Lthr $14,299 #X2739 44K Mi., $30,990 $8,663 #31629A 1-866-604-8625 Miles, Power, LARGEST Seats, Bluetooth, '15 Chevy Sonic LT: $27,470 #P8325 $6,613 #38192A HONDA 4 Door, Black, 13K '12 Ford Edge Miles, GM Certified, CERTIFIED $12,995 '12 Civic LX: Coupe, Pano Roof, Nav, LoFord SELECTION 4110 '11 Silverado LTZ Don Brown Chevrolet '08 Mazdaspeed3: Milano Red, Only 29K cal Trade, $24,790 1-866-604-8625 Miles, Honda Certified '08 Pontiac G6 GT: Crew Cab, 4WD, IN MIDWEST! '14 Audi SQ5 6 Spd, One Owner '10 Ford Focus SEL: Used, Balance of 4 Door Sedan, FWD, 3.5L White Diamond, '05 Chevy Corvette: Premium, 36K 7 Yr/100K Powertrain V6, 4 Speed Clean Carfax, Loaded, Auto, 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty, One Owner, Automatic With $34,920 Miles, Has It All! White, Loaded, Pow$10,978 #31491A Clean Carfax, 57K Warranty Overdrive Lease Return, er, Nice, $43,990 $13,999 #X2752 $5,990 #26207B Miles, '15 Pilot EXL: $23,987 #38442A '13 Ford Escape $10,111 #38106A 4x4, Heated Leather, 4WD Roof, Auto, Rear Camera, '14 Silverado 1500: '10 Mazda 3 Bluetooth, 24K Miles, '14 Honda Civic: $18,990 '15 Audi A4 2.0T: Double Cab, 8K $32,999 #H160597A Hatchback, 18K Hybrid, Silver, '04 Pontiac Grand Premium (Tiptronic) One Owner, Honda Miles, W/T, Clean, '09 Ford Focus: Sedan, AWD, Heated Leather '12 Chevy Cruze Miles, Auto, 1 Am GT: Red, '11 Pilot EXL: Certified, Blue, Only 67K Miles! Seats, Call Today, $24,977 #360139A 4WD, Dk Cherry Pearl, Eco: Loaded, One Only 13K Miles, Owner, $14,990 Only $7,999 #H160631A Chromes, MRoof, '12 Ford Escape XLT: Heated Dual Pwr Lthr $18,999 #X2745 Only At $11,490 #P8297 Owner, Clean Car4 Door, 4 Cyl, Black, Loaded, Seats, Remote Start Bommarito Honda! 90K Miles, $12,995 Moonroof, 67K Miles, fax, At The Big Corner! $6,992 #38210A Don Brown Chevrolet $23,299 #H160424A 270 & Lindbergh $11,972 #38168A 1-866-604-8625 '12 Mazda Mazda3: Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '15 GMC Terrain SLE2: '14 Honda Civic: '14 Accord EXL: '15 Audi A4 2.0T: Hybrid, Modern Steel, Grand Touring, 2 Dr Coupe, Nav, 4 Cyl, Black, 18K Miles, Premium (Triptonic), '14 Dodge 1500 SLT: Only 6K Miles, Modern Steel, 40K Mi, GM Certified, $22,995 Moonroof, Loaded, '06 Pontiac Grand Prix Sunroof/Moonroof, Quad Cab, 4x4, V8, One Owner, Honda Dual Pwr Htd Lthr, Moon12 Focus Hatchback, Don Brown Chevrolet '13 Chevy Cruze LS: GT: 17" Aluminum One Owner Clean HEMI, 19K Miles, One Certified, #X2688 One Owner, roof, Loaded, 1-866-604-8625 Red, 111,205 Miles, Auto, One Owner Clean Wheels, Supercharged, Carfax, Call Today, Owner, $27,995 Reduced $18,499 $22,499 #X2704 Clean Carfax, Carfax, FWD, OnStar, '09 GMC Acadia SLT-2: $14,985 #P5644 Call Today, $30,990 #P8296 Don Brown Chevrolet Only $7,999 #H160102B

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'08 ChevyImpala SS, Leather, Roof, $12,990

Buick

4055

'07 Buick LaCrosse CX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, 3.8L V6, Premium Sound System, Keyless Entry, FWD, Bucket Seats, $5,990 #38084A

'07 Buick Lucerne CXS: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today,

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Loaded, Leather, 1 Owner, GM Certified, $15,729 #P5631

$12,990 #36097A

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Honda

4120

'10 Insight EX: Loaded, Clean Carfax, 59K Miles, $9,878 #31299A

'05 Honda S2000: 64K Mi, Local Car, $17,990

'14 Chevy Impala 2LZ: Loaded, V6, 18K Mi, Mnroof, $26,547 #38303A

'12 Honda Fit: Sport, Black, 42K Miles, FWD, Auto, FWD, 5 Door Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, $14,499 #H152022B

'15 Chevy Impala LT: Limited, Sunroof, 13K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '10 Chevy Impala LS: FWD, 3.5L V6, Bucket Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today!

'14 Honda CRZ EX: Navigation, Red, 6K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Honda Certified, Hybrid, $17,499 #X2689

$10,990 #36101A '09 Buick LaCrosse CXL: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $9,990 #36100A

'15 Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $19,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'05 Buick LaCrosse CX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Keyless Entry, Call Today, $6,990 #75943A

'13 Chevy Malibu LS: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $14,867 #38355A

'05 Buick LaCrosse CX: One Owner Clean Carfax, 3.8L V6, Premium Sound,

'10 chevy Malibu LTZ: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today,

$4,990 #38084A

'12 Buick Regal: Premium, 4 Door, Sunroof, 25K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '09 Buick Lucerne CX: FWD, Flex Fuel, Heated Leather Seats, OnStar, Call Today,

$9,900 #77137A

'14 Chevy Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, GM Certified, 29K Miles, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'13 Chevy Curze LS: Auto, Loaded, GM Certified, $11,860 #38408A

'07 Honda Accord EX-L: 40K Miles, V6, Automatic, $12,990

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$9,990 #36091A

Cadillac

4060

'12 Cadillac CTS: AWD, 3.6L V6, Performance Coupe, Black, 37K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Cadillac CTS: Luxury, 3.0L V6, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today,

'15 Malibu LTZ 34K Miles, GM Certified, Leather, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Chrysler

4070

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$13,999 #H160172M

$4,990 #P8436C

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$8,990 #36125A

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$10,990 #26008B

'13 Chevy Impala LTZ: Loaded, Clean Carfax, $15,727 #38220B

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'04 Honda Accord EX: Pwr Seat, Gray, Alloys, Moonroof, $4,999 #H160567A

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'08 Honda Accord LX: New Timing Belt & New Water Pump, Clean Carfax, Call Today! $9,990 #26079A

'07 Honda Civic: Coupe, 69K Miles, Auto, Certified, $10,990

'09 Honda Civic : Sedan, Auto, Local Trade, $10,990

'12 Honda Civic EX: Nav, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $14,441 #29928A

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$20,490 #P8388

$12,990 #P8474

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'12 CTS Performance AWD, Has It All! $30,790

Hyundai

'12 SRX: Performance, White w/Sable, 23K, AWD, $33,480 '08 CTS: 27K Miles, White Diamond, One Owner, $17,990 '05 Escalade EXT: 29K Miles, AWD, $22,990

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'08 XLR-V: 14K Miles, Black, One Of A Kind!! Call Today! '13 XTS: Luxury, Black, 23K Mi., Roof & Navigation, $36,990

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Ininiti

4130

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Jeep

4145

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'12 Jeep Cherokee LTD: 4WD, Roof, Nav, $29,990 '15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Summit Edition, 13K Miles, Nav, Camera, 4WD, Bluetooth, Lthr, $43,499 #H150619A

Chevrolet

'11 Jeep Wrangler: White, Hardtop, Loaded, Lifted, $28,776 #38047A

4155

'05 Kia Optima EX: One Owner Clean Carfax, Power, $6,471 #38287A

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'13 Kia Rio LX: 29 Great MPG, Local Trade, $11,490

Lincoln

4065

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Mercedes Benz

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4260

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Saab

4275

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4345 '05 GMC Canyon Z71: One Owner, 69K Miles, $13,990

'12 GMC Sierra Crew Cab, White, Chromes, 4WD, $32,990

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4280

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Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '14 Nissan Frontier: 4WD, Short Bed, Crew Cab, Backup Camera, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $27,990 #75795A

Bommarito St. Peters NEW ARRIVALS!!

1-866-2449085 '14 Ford Explorer, Quad Seats, 4WD, Leather '11 Nissan Murano SL, AWD, Dual Roofs, $22,990 '12 Ford Escape XLT, Certified, Local Trade

4170

'13 Lincoln MKT: AWD, Navigation, White, Sunroof, $30,490

'07 Toyota Camry XLE: Gray, 4 Door Sedan, 102K Miles, $9,799 #H151091A

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'08 Buick Enclave CX: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today! $10,990 #26196A

'13 Toyota Corolla S: 4 Door, Red, Alloys, Spoiler, Only 36K Miles, Call Today, $13,499 #X2776

'07 Toyota Camry Solara: Convertible, Heated Leather Seats, 4 New Tires, $8,990 #26216A

'13 VW EOS: 17K Miles, Local Trade, VW Certified, $24,490 '15 Mercedes Benz SLK250 Cabriolet, 3K, Auto, Nav., Call! '10 BMW 328i, Convertible, Nav, Auto, 43K, $23,990

Volkswagen

4310

'12 VW CC VW Certified, Auto, Black, $15,990

'10 Cadillac Escalade: Premium, 53K Mi, Nav, Roof, AWD, $40,990 '07 Saturn Sky: 33K miles, Local Trade, Certified, $14,490

Sport Utilitiy

4390 '12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Chromes, Loaded, Mocha, $21,121 #360334A

4190

2014 SLK 250 Convertible, Black, 5k Miles, 1 Onwer $37,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'13 VW CC: Sport, Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Navigation/GPS, Call Today, $15,990 #75893B

'03 Chevy Tahoe Z71: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Heated Leater Seats, Sunroof/ Moonroof, CALL! $8,990 #P8295A

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: 11K Miles, 4 Cyl, 3 To Choose, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Traverse 2LT: AWD, Rear Buckets, 32K Miles, GM Certified, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT: 4x4, Black, 36K Miles, GM Certified, $43,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'13 Cad Escalade ESV Premium, 30K, Loaded, Certified, $52,990

'09 Nissan Altima, Auto, Leather, Roof,

'15 Mercedes SLK 250 Cabrio, 3K Miles, $42,490

'09 Jeep Wrangler X: 69K Miles, Manual, V6, Mercury $18,990

'14 Kia Soul: 5 Door Plus, 33K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'11 CTS-V: Coupe, Every Option, 24K, Cer-

Range Rover/Land Rover

Powertrain Warranty, Hurry In . . . Won't Last! $12,299 #X2777

4195

'08 Mercury Grand Marquis GS: V8, 76K Miles, One Owner, Warranty, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Mini Cooper

4207

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Nissan/Datsun

4220

'14 Nissan Altima S: 4 Door, 2.5L, 33K Miles, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '12 Nissan Altima: Only 21K Miles, 2.5S, High Quality At Low Payment, One Owner, Balance Of Fact Wrnty, $13,699 #H160595A

'12 VW Beetle 2.0T: Silver/Black, Only 35K Miles, Fun Car! $12,999 #H151940B

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'03 VW New Beetle GLS: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today! $6,990 #26464A

'14 VW Passat: Wolfsburg Edition, Black, 34K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Volvo '07 Nissan Altima: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Snroof/Mnroof, Call Today, $7,990 #94570B

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'12 CTS-V: Coupe, 13K Mi, One Owner, Every Option!! Call Today!

GMC Trucks

Saturn

'12 Mazda 6i Touring Certified, Alloys, Auto, $16,290

'15 GMC Yukon XL: Denali, 5K Miles, Every Option, $69,990

$11,990 #75135B

'13 Escalade ESV: Premium, 30K, AWD, $52,990

'10 Pontiac Vibe: Hatchback, Built By Toyota, Black, 92K Miles, Clean Carfax, $8,999 #H160329B

4340

'14 Ford F-150 XLT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 32K Miles, One Owner, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'14 Mazda 6i Touring Scion 4283 One Owner, Certified, $20,990 '06 Scion XB: 4387 5 Spd, Loaded, One Crossovers Owner, 58K Miles, '09 Honda CR-V EX, '12 Hyundai Sonata $9,221 #31662A '06 Mazda Miata, 4WD, 62K Mi., Hybrid, Awesome Automatic, Full Sunroof, Certified, MPG! $15,490 Power, 53K., $16,790 $13,490 Toyota 4300 '11 Sonata LTD '14 Toyota Corolla LE: '13 VW GTI 4 Dr, Black, 37K Miles, Loaded, Priced to '13 Mazda Miata One Owner, $13,995 Sedan, Manual, Sell Fast, $9,990 Don Brown Chevrolet Hard Top, 4K Mi., Red, Certified, 1-866-604-8625 Just Arrived, '11 Toyota Camry LE: $23,490 Blue, Only 61K Miles, High $23,990 Quality, Low Price,

'11 Kia Soul: Hatchback, FWD, Alloy Wheels, Call Today,

'12 CTS: Lux, AWD, Roof, Opulent Blue, $26,990

'07 Mazda Mazda3 s: Sedan, Heated Leather Seats, Stick Shift, Call Today,

4125

'14 Accent GLS, 4 Dr, Auto, 41K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

Kia

GO ON VACATION SUPPORT EDUCATION

'12 Mazda6 i: Sport, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified, Call Today,

Ford Trucks

$5,495 #94578B

'10 Escalade: Premium, AWD, 53K Miles, Loaded, $40,990 '13 XTS: Luxury Collection: Sunroof, Nav, 23K Mi, $35,990

'04 Mazda Mazda3: FWD, Low Miles, 5 Speed Stick Shift, Tinted Glass, Call Today! $5,490 #10364A

$13,490 #8705A

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'12 CTS: Luxury AWD, Navigation, $23,490

'06 Mazda Mazda6: Hatchback, Auto, Loaded, Power, $5,955 #31581A

1-866-604-8625

'14 Nissan Versa: FWD, Spoiler, Tinted Glass, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $10,990 #P8485

'14 Nissan Versa Note: Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Today, $11,490 #P8470

'06 Cadillac Escalade EXT: AWD, Loaded, $14,981 #360511AA

'12 Ford Escape: Limited, 78K Miles, FWD, Heated Lthr Sts, $14,796 #P5564

$26,490 #94005A

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'13 Avalanche LTZ Black Diamond Edition, 4WD Loaded, $42,990

'02 Avalanche: Z71, Loaded, Power, $8,988 #31315B

'11 Chevy 1500 LT: Reg Cab, V8, Long Bed, Warranty, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

'11 GMC Terrain SLT: AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, One Owner, $19,742 #31381A

'14 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, AWD, 31K Miles, V6, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '11 Honda CRV EX: 4WD, Tango Red Pearl, Only 81K Miles, Moonroof, One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,899 #H160225B

'11 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, 8 Passenger, Dark Cherry Pearl, Lthr, Moonroof, 67K Miles, Remote Start, Honda Certified, $23,299 #H160424A

'05 Honda Pilot EXL: 4WD, Lthr, Moonroof, Gray Metallic, 167K Miles, #H160468A Only $7,699

'08 Honda Pilot VP: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,490 #77045C

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited: White, Leather, $16,920 '13 Infiniti JX35: Infiniti Certified, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $32,990 #94386A

'11 Kia Sorento: FWD, Bucket Seats, Heated Seats, Warranty, Premium Sound, $13,500 #36223B

'06 Lexus RX330, Power Sunroof, FWD, $9,490 '11 Mazda CX-7: Sport, One Owner, Clean Carfax, 44K Miles, $15,844 #31052A '14 Nissan Murano S: V6, Alloys, 36K Miles, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625 '06 Nissan Murano S: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Call Today, $9,900 #94768A

'13 Toyota Venza: Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, $23,453 #360511A '11 Toyota 4Runner: 4x4, V6, Ltd, 60K Miles, $29,499 #H160430A

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Mini vans

'13 Chevy Suburban: Z71, Black, Loaded, Lthr, One Owner, $32,664 #38264A

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4315

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AWD, Sunroof, DVD, 87K Miles, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'15 Chevy Captiva 2LS: Sport, 25K Miles, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-604-8625

'11 Chevy Equinox LS: Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified, $15,428 #38438A '13 Chevy Suburban LT: Black, Leather, DVD, Loaded, $35,989 #38113A,

'13 Chevy Suburban LT: Loaded, Leather, DVD, Black, $35,989 #38113A

4420

'09 Chrysler Town & Country: Loaded, $9,494 #38317A

'00 Honda Odyssey: 7 Passenger Van, High Miles, Clean, Current State Safety & Emissions Tested, #H160468A Value Priced $2,999!

'09 Honda Odyssey EXL: Nav + Res (DVD), Slate Metallic, 96K Miles, Lthr, Roof, Pwr Doors, One Owner Clean Carfax, $15,499 #H160252A

'04 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Heated Leather Seats, DVD Entertainment System, Sunroof, $5,990 #75086A

'08 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Call today, $12,990 #95048A

'07 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Call Today, $8,990 #94641B


WORLD

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

New fears after Americans nabbed in Iraq Government’s ability to control Shiite militias questioned ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD • The abduction of

three Americans from a Baghdad apartment over the weekend is the latest in a series of brazen kidnappings undermining confidence in the Iraqi government’s ability to control statesanctioned Shiite militias that have grown in strength as Iraqi security forces battle the Islamic State group. Witnesses said men in uniform carried out the kidnapping in broad daylight Saturday, 100 yards from a police station. “Gunmen in military uniforms came in five or six SUVs, they entered the building and then left almost immediately,” said Mohammad Jabar, 35, who runs a shop down the street from the three-story apartment building where the Americans had been invited by their Iraqi interpreter.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iraqi security forces fan out Monday across Baghdad in the area where three Americans were reported kidnapped Saturday. Abductions are on the rise in the Iraqi capital, and militias are suspected in many cases.

“A few hours later we heard that three foreigners had been kidnapped by these gunmen,” Jabar said. The three were abducted in Dora, a neighborhood that is home to Shiites and Sunnis. However, they were then taken to Sadr City, a vast and densely

populated Shiite district to the east, and there “all communication ceased,” an Iraqi intelligence oicial told The Associated Press. The oicial spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to reporters. A similar scene unfolded in September, when masked men

Help begins in Germany for U.S. prisoners freed by Iran ASSOCIATED PRESS

L ANDSTUHL , GERMANY •

Three U.S. congressmen traveled Monday to the medical center in Germany where three Americans, released by Iran as part of a prisoner swap, are being treated. Former U.S. Marine Amir Hekmati, Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian and Idaho pastor Saeed Abedini arrived late Sunday at the U.S. military’s Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. Rezaian, who was freed Saturday after almost 18 months of incarceration in an Iranian prison, met with Washington Post editors Monday for the first time since his release, the Post reported. “I want people to know that physically I’m feeling good,” said Rezaian, wearing a sweatshirt and blue jeans provided to him on board the plane that flew the released prisoners to freedom. “I know people are eager to hear from me, but I want to process this for some time.” Post Executive Editor Martin Baron and Foreign Editor Douglas Jehl said Rezaian “looked good” during their two-hour meeting at the Landstuhl medical center near the Ramstein Air Base, according to the Post. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., posted photos of Hekmati on Twitter, as well as a message from Hekmati thanking President Barack Obama for “making my freedom and reunion with my family possible.” Kildee told reporters before meeting the men that “this is an incredible facility.” The center offers “the entire spectrum of services that might be required for somebody, particularly my constituent (Hekmati),” he said. “Think about a person who spent four-and-a-half years, much of it in solitary confinement,” Kildee said. “Re-entering into the world as a free person will take more than just a deep breath. It will take a little bit of help, and that starts here.”

COURTESY OF THE HEKMATI FAMILY VIA AP

Amir Hekmati (second from right), his family and Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., pose for a photo Monday in Germany, where Hekmati is being treated after his release from an Iranian prison. From left are Hekmati’s brother-in-law Ramy Kurdi and sister Sarah Hekmati, Kildee, Hekmati and his sister Leila Hekmati.

MARTIN BARON • Washington Post via AP

From left, Jason Rezaian, his wife, Yeganeh Salehi, his mother, Mary Rezaian, and brother Ali Rezaian gather for a photo Monday at the U.S. military’s Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany.

Kildee said the three would return to the U.S. “as soon as possible.” Rep. Robert Pittenger, R-N.C., who became involved in efforts to win Abedini’s release on behalf of evangelical constituents, said the release of the three, as well as a fourth who stayed in Iran, had come at a heavy price. They were exchanged for pardons or charges dropped against seven Iranians held by the United States. A fifth American, student Matthew Trevithick, who had been

detained in Iran for roughly 40 days, was released separately. “We need to be prudent as we look forward and how we can better protect Americans without committing ourselves in ways that will cause greater threat to their security,” Pittenger said. Rep. Jared Huffman, D-Calif., expressed thanks to the U.S. State Department for its eforts. Huffman is Rezaian’s congressman and has been active in efforts to get him released.

Baghdad International Airport. There were no immediate claims of responsibility. Besides Shiite militias, the perpetrators of kidnappings in Iraq have included the Islamic State group, as well as criminal gangs demanding ransom payments. The kidnapping of the Americans comes at a time of deteriorating security around the Iraqi capital. Last week two Iraqi journalists were killed within sight of a police checkpoint in Diyala province north of Baghdad. The sophistication of the recent kidnappings suggests those responsible are operating with some degree of impunity, said Nathaniel Rabkin, managing editor of Inside Iraqi Politics, a political risk assessment newsletter. “You kidnap 26 Qataris out in the desert, that’s not like four or five yahoos out in the south. ... That’s a pretty well-run operation. It must be some relatively established group that did it,” he said.

in military uniforms abducted 18 Turkish workers from a construction site in a Shiite neighborhood. The workers were released later that month. In December, gunmen driving SUVs raided a camp for falconry hunting in Iraq’s overwhelmingly Shiite south, kidnapping 26 Qataris, who are still being held. Baghdad authorities said in a statement that the three Americans were kidnapped from a “suspicious apartment” without elaborating. But a resident of the building where the Americans were reportedly seized said they were taken from a second-story apartment that he described as a well-known brothel. A police major general also said the apartment was a brothel. The U.S. Embassy confirmed Sunday that “several” Americans went missing in Iraq, after local media reported that three Americans had been kidnapped in the Iraqi capital. A Baghdad police colonel, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said that the Americans are employed as contractors at

The Washington Post contributed to this report.

DIGEST 5 soldiers are killed in French Alps avalanche An avalanche in the French Alps swept away a military unit training in the backcountry, killing ive soldiers from the French Foreign Legion and injuring several others Monday, oicials said. The Savoie prefecture conirmed the deaths, and said 11 people out of a group of about 50 were struck by the avalanche. It said the soldiers were training away from prepared ski runs in Valfrejus in the Savoie region. Jean-Claude Rain, mayor of Modane, the nearest town, said the soldiers were out for an allday backcountry skiing session when the avalanche hit. The prefecture said six people were injured, two of them seriously. The deadly avalanche comes just days after a school group also skiing in the Alps was swept away, killing three people, including two students. U.N. whistleblower cleared of charges • The United Nations’ internal justice system has cleared a whistleblower who leaked information to French authorities in 2014 about a U.N. investigation into accusations that French soldiers in Central African Republic had sexually abused some children they were sent to protect. U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said Monday that the Oice of Internal Oversight Services had written to Anders Kompass “and they’ve conirmed that the cases against him are now closed.” U.N. oicials had accused Kompass, a Swede who was the operations director for the Oice of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, of breaching policy by not redacting the children’s names. Soldiers killed by extremists returned to Kenya • The bodies of at least four Kenyan soldiers slain by Somali Islamic extremists arrived in the Kenyan capital on Monday. The victims’ caskets, draped in Kenyan national lags, were received late Monday at Nairobi’s Wilson Airport by defense and

army oicials who witnessed a military honor guard. “This is a very somber moment for the Kenya Defense Forces and I think for the country at large,” Kenyan Defense Secretary Raychelle Omamo told reporters at the airport. Kenyan oicials haven’t said how many soldiers were killed when Islamic extremist ighters attacked a base for African Union peacekeepers in southwestern Somalia on Friday. Al-Shabab, which claimed responsibility for the attack, said about 100 Kenyans were killed, and that armaments and military vehicles were seized following the attack. Tighter security in place for Burkina Faso • In the wake of a weekend attack that killed at least 29 people, security was beefed up across Burkina Faso’s capital Monday as businesses and banks reopened. The West African nation also announced a joint efort with neighboring Mali in the ight against Islamic extremists in the West African region. “Please go ahead and search my bag. We want to be protected, and there is no way to refuse this,” said Fati Doussa, to security guards as he visited a bank to get some cash. Metal detectors have been placed at banks. The attack at the Splendid Hotel in Ouagadougou was the irst of its kind in Burkina Faso, a largely Muslim country that had managed to avoid the kinds of jihadi attacks that have hit neighboring Mali since 2012. At the site Monday, forensic experts and investigators from France and Burkina Faso, dressed in white, illed the brown dusty street, gathering evidence in secured areas near the hotel and the Cappuccino Cafe. Military forces ended the siege Saturday. Burkina Faso’s security minister, Simon Compaore, said Sunday that 32 people were dead, including an American missionary with ties to a St. Louis nonproit organization. From news services

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 01.19.2016 • B

CARDINALS WINTER WARM-UP

Stastny is cage-free CARDINALS His better vision helps the Blues defeat the Penguins

COULD BE A BIT EDGY Unfamiliar role Underdog status won’t hurt team, DeWitt says Loss lingers Matheny points to ouster by the Cubs in playofs BY DERRICK GOOLD • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One of the biggest applause lines Cardinals manager Mike Matheny delivered during his forum with the fans Monday at the Winter Warm-Up wasn’t an answer at all but a question he posed. When asked about the National League Central and specifically about the young talent being nurtured and collected by the Chicago Cubs, Matheny interrupted. “Who’s that?” he said. Clapping and laughter were all the response he needed. Throughout the Cardinals’ three-day fanfest this past weekend at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch, the Cubs kept coming up, whether it was the players the Cardinals lost to them this winter, the series the Cardinals lost to them this past October, or the superiority the Cardinals could lose to them in the inevitable preseason predictions. Often they weren’t even mentioned by name, just called “the team up north.” That’s fitting. After all, See CARDINALS • Page B4

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Troy Brouwer reacts after scoring in the third period Monday night against Pittsburgh.

BLUES PENGUINS

5 2

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paul Stastny can see again. A facial injury required him to wear a caged mask the past two games, bringing him back to his college days at the University of Denver. Stastny went back to a visor for Monday’s game against Pittsburgh. He said the cage took away his peripheral vision and noted that with the visor he felt like a new player.

> 7 p.m. Wednesday at Detroit, NBCSN > Bouwmeester back after missing four games. B6

A few hours later, Stastny had the numbers to prove it, with a goal and three assists in the Blues’ 5-2 victory over the Penguins in front of a crowd of 19,312, marking the third consecutive sellout at Scottrade Center. The win closed a four-game homestand with a record of 3-1. The club will now head on the road for a three-game trip that will take them into the NHL All-Star break. Stastny’s linemates Alexander Steen and See BLUES • Page B6

SHANNON WON’T WORK ANY ROAD GAMES. B5 > Cardinals see power potential in Jedd Gyorko. B4

Wainwright, Leake put Cards in good position

ON GOLF • BY DAN O’NEILL • @wwdod on Twitter • doneill@post-dispatch.com

he current No. 1 and former No. 1 are both in the ield at Abu Dhabi

DUKING IT OUT IN THE DESERT

I

t’s January in St. Louis, hard to get your arms around golf. Maybe if we spend $10 million HOK could draw us a picture. Better yet, maybe we should turn our attention to the Persian Gulf. The Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship tees it up Thursday in the United Arab Emirates. With European Tour ramifications, the event has some credibility. But it also has a “silly season” feel, in a Hero World Challenge sort of way. You almost expect Mr. Roarke and Tattoo to be there, greeting players as they arrive on “da plane.” There will be unusual photoops, exotic backgrounds, a $2.7 million purse and a healthy number of top players. But what makes Abu Dhabi doubly compelling this week is what makes this golf season especially intriguing – the possibilities. Never mind the presence of talent like Henrik Stenson, Rickie Fowler and Justin Rose. Never mind 10 major championship winners and 126 players from 26 countries. The golfing press is going Don King on this. This is Jordan Spieth vs. Rory McIlroy, the “Duke-out in the Desert.” No question, it’s cosmetic and presumptuous. There won’t be any lines drawn in the Abu Dhabi sand. Events in January aren’t where gauntlets get thrown, statements get made or rivalries get cemented. One should never confuse the Abu Dhabi Golf Club See GOLF • Page B2

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

New pitcher Mike Leake tries on a Cardinals jersey Monday at the Winter Warm-up. JORDAN SPIETH

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

RORY MCILROY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gritty John Lackey jumped to the archrival Chicago Cubs via free agency after leading the Cardinals rotation in 2015. Reliable Lance Lynn had Tommy John surgery after winning 60 games during the last four seasons. The loss of two top-end hurlers would haunt most teams. But Cardinals manager Mike Matheny believes his starting pitching is not just all right, it’s Wainwright. “Whenever you have a healthy JEFF GORDON Adam Wainwright, that’s a differSt. Louis ence-maker right off the top,” MaPost-Dispatch theny said at the Winter Warm-Up. “Hopefully you think that replacing Lackey with me is OK,” Wainwright said. “I like to think that’s a decent trade. But you also add Mike Leake in the situation. So we lose Lackey and Lance Lynn, two great innings-eating pitchers that are just quality big-league pitchers, but in my mind you added two pretty good ones as well.” Wainwright is back in his No. 1 role after spending most of last season rehabilitating his Achilles tendon tear. His return, plus the addition of Leake See GORDON • Page B4

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

TUESDAY • 01.19.2016 • B

CARDINALS WINTER WARM-UP

Stastny is cage-free CARDINALS His better vision helps the Blues defeat the Penguins

COULD BE A BIT EDGY Unfamiliar role Underdog status won’t hurt team, DeWitt says Loss lingers Matheny points to ouster by the Cubs in playofs BY DERRICK GOOLD • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One of the biggest applause lines Cardinals manager Mike Matheny delivered during his forum with the fans Monday at the Winter Warm-Up wasn’t an answer at all but a question he posed. When asked about the National League Central and specifically about the young talent being nurtured and collected by the Chicago Cubs, Matheny interrupted. “Who’s that?” he said. Clapping and laughter were all the response he needed. Throughout the Cardinals’ three-day fanfest this past weekend at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch, the Cubs kept coming up, whether it was the players the Cardinals lost to them this winter, the series the Cardinals lost to them this past October, or the superiority the Cardinals could lose to them in the inevitable preseason predictions. Often they weren’t even mentioned by name, just called “the team up north.” That’s fitting. After all, See CARDINALS • Page B4

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Troy Brouwer reacts after scoring in the third period Monday night against Pittsburgh.

BLUES PENGUINS

5 2

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paul Stastny can see again. A facial injury required him to wear a caged mask the past two games, bringing him back to his college days at the University of Denver, but Stastny went back to a visor for Monday’s game against Pittsburgh. He said the cage took away his peripheral vision and noted that with the visor he felt like a new player.

> 7 p.m. Wednesday at Detroit, NBCSN > Bouwmeester back after missing four games. B6

A few hours later, Stastny had the numbers to prove it, a four-point night with a goal and three assists in the Blues’ 5-2 victory over the Penguins. “The game moves so fast that every split second makes a diference,” Stastny said. In addition to Stastny, linemates Alexander Steen and Troy Brouwer, along with goaltender Brian Elliott, made the diference Monday. Steen and Brouwer also scored for See BLUES • Page B6

SHANNON WON’T WORK ANY ROAD GAMES. B5 > Cardinals see power potential in Jedd Gyorko. B4

Wainwright, Leake put Cards in good position

ON GOLF • BY DAN O’NEILL • @wwdod on Twitter • doneill@post-dispatch.com

he current No. 1 and former No. 1 are both in the ield at Abu Dhabi

DUKING IT OUT IN THE DESERT

I

t’s January in St. Louis, hard to get your arms around golf. Maybe if we spend $10 million HOK could draw us a picture. Better yet, maybe we should turn our attention to the Persian Gulf. The Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship tees it up Thursday in the United Arab Emirates. With European Tour ramifications, the event has some credibility. But it also has a “silly season” feel, in a Hero World Challenge sort of way. You almost expect Mr. Roarke and Tattoo to be there, greeting players as they arrive on “da plane.” There will be unusual photoops, exotic backgrounds, a $2.7 million purse and a healthy number of top players. But what makes Abu Dhabi doubly compelling this week is what makes this golf season especially intriguing – the possibilities. Never mind the presence of talent like Henrik Stenson, Rickie Fowler and Justin Rose. Never mind 10 major championship winners and 126 players from 26 countries. The golfing press is going Don King on this. This is Jordan Spieth vs. Rory McIlroy, the “Duke-out in the Desert.” No question, it’s cosmetic and presumptuous. There won’t be any lines drawn in the Abu Dhabi sand. Events in January aren’t where gauntlets get thrown, statements get made or rivalries get cemented. One should never confuse the Abu Dhabi Golf Club See GOLF • Page B2

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

New pitcher Mike Leake tries on a Cardinals jersey Monday at the Winter Warm-up. JORDAN SPIETH

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

RORY MCILROY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gritty John Lackey jumped to the archrival Chicago Cubs via free agency after leading the Cardinals rotation in 2015. Reliable Lance Lynn had Tommy John surgery after winning 60 games during the last four seasons. The loss of two top-end hurlers would haunt most teams. But Cardinals manager Mike Matheny believes his starting pitching is not just all right, it’s Wainwright. “Whenever you have a healthy JEFF GORDON Adam Wainwright, that’s a differSt. Louis ence-maker right off the top,” MaPost-Dispatch theny said at the Winter Warm-Up. “Hopefully you think that replacing Lackey with me is OK,” Wainwright said. “I like to think that’s a decent trade. But you also add Mike Leake in the situation. So we lose Lackey and Lance Lynn, two great innings-eating pitchers that are just quality big-league pitchers, but in my mind you added two pretty good ones as well.” Wainwright is back in his No. 1 role after spending most of last season rehabilitating his Achilles tendon tear. His return, plus the addition of Leake See GORDON • Page B4

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 1/20 at Detroit 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 1/22 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

Sunday 1/24 at Chicago 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/2 at Nashville 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 1/20 vs. Georgia 6 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/23 at Texas A&M 3 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 1/27 at Kentucky 8 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/30 vs. Mississippi St. 7:30 p.m. SEC Network

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

V. Williams out in Round 1 Player ranked 47th pulls of the upset ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Tuesday 1/19 at Indiana 6 p.m. ESPN

Saturday 1/23 at Minnesota 7:30 p.m. BTN

Thursday 1/28 vs. Ohio St. 8 p.m. BTN

Sunday 1/31 vs. Wisconsin 6:30 p.m. BTN

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 1/20 Saturday 1/23 at Massachusetts vs. Davidson 11 a.m. 7 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 1/27 at Dayton 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 1/30 vs. Duquesne 5 p.m. KDNL (30.2)

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Friday 1/22: at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m. Friday 1/29: vs. Chicago, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5 p.m. College women: Rutgers at Michigan State, BTN 5:30 p.m. College: Butler at Providence, FS1 6 p.m. College: Illinois at Indiana, ESPN, WQQX (1490 AM) 6 p.m. College: Kansas at Oklahoma State, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Florida, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: South Carolina at Mississippi, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Tulsa at East Carolina, ESPNews 6 p.m. College: Tulane at Connecticut, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Dayton at St. Bonaventure, KDNL (DT-30.2, Charter 182) 7 p.m. College: Northwestern at Maryland, BTN 7 p.m. NBA: Minnesota at New Orleans, NBA 7:30 p.m. College: Georgetown at Xavier, FS1 8 p.m. College: LSU at Texas A&M, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Houston at Southern Methodist, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Loyola (Chicago) at Evansville, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Alabama at Auburn, SEC Network 8 p.m. NBA: Indiana at Phoenix, FSM 10 p.m. College: Fresno State at San Diego State, ESPNU BOXING 10 p.m. Welterweights: Jamal James vs. Javier Molina, FS1 HOCKEY 7 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FA Cup: Bristol City vs. West Bromwich Albion, FS1 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open, second round, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open, second round, ESPN2 2 a.m. (Wed.) Australian Open, second round, ESPN2

DIGEST Federer wants names in reported scandal Roger Federer has heard enough speculation about match-ixing in tennis. If players are suspected of corruption, he wants names. Federer was responding to reports by BBC and BuzzFeed News published Monday that tennis authorities have suppressed evidence of match-ixing and overlooked suspected cases involving players ranked in the top 50, including Grand Slam singles and doubles winners. The reports said that none of these players had faced sanctions and more than half would be playing at this year’s Australian Open, which started Monday. The players weren’t identiied by name. “I would love to hear names,” Federer said after beating Nikoloz Basilashvili of Georgia 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. “Then at least it’s concrete stuf and you can actually debate about it. Was it the player? Was it the support team? Who was it? Was it before? Was it a doubles player, a singles player? Which Slam?” “It’s super serious and it’s super important to maintain the integrity of our sport,” Federer added. “So how high up does it go? The higher it goes, the more surprised I would be.” ATP chairman Chris Kermode appeared at a news conference to reject the assertion that match-ixing had gone unchecked in the sport, saying the Tennis Integrity Unit remained “constantly vigilant and not complacent” when it comes to tackling corruption. Ledecky breaks own record in 800 freestyle • Katie Ledecky broke her own world record in the women’s 800-meter freestyle Sunday night, inishing in 8 minutes, 6.68 seconds in the Arena Pro Swim Series in Austin, Texas. The American, 18, smashed her mark of 8:07.39 set at the 2015 world championships in Russia. Ledecky has dominated the event since 2013 and owns nine of the top 10 times in history. She wasn’t challenged Sunday night. American Becca Mann was second, but far back at 8:24.49. Portland State linebacker dies • Portland State is mourning the death of a freshman linebacker. AJ Schlatter died Sunday night, the school said. James Schlatter said in a Facebook tribute to his son, 20, that the death came after a tonsillectomy Friday. U.S. Olympic basketball • LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony are a step closer to a fourth Olympics, and Stephen Curry is in position for his irst. The NBA stars were among 30 players selected Monday as inalists for the 12-man roster. The other candidates for Rio are: former Chaminade star Bradley Beal and John Wall (Washington); Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook (Oklahoma City); Chris Paul, Blake Griin and DeAndre Jordan (Clippers); Kawhi Leonard and LaMarcus Aldridge (San Antonio); Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala and Harrison Barnes (Golden State); Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love (Cleveland); Dwight Howard and James Harden (Houston); Anthony Davis (New Orleans); Paul George (Indiana); DeMarcus Cousins and Rudy Gay (Sacramento) Jimmy Butler (Chicago); Mike Conley (Memphis); DeMar DeRozan (Toronto); Andre Drummond (Detroit); Kenneth Faried (Denver); and Gordon Hayward (Utah). Associated Press

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

Eighth-seeded Venus Williams tried to rally, winning two games and getting another break-point chance after falling a set and 5-0 behind, before her 16th trip to the Australian Open finished in a first-round loss to Johanna Konta. The 35-year-old, seven-time major winner trudged of the court at Rod Laver Arena, waving to the crowd on the second day of the tournament Tuesday following a surprising 6-4, 6-2 loss to the No. 47-ranked Konta, a Sydney-born British player who was making her debut in the main draw at the Australian Open after losing twice previously in qualifying. Williams had a career comeback last season, winning three titles, finding some consistency after a long struggle with illness and finishing the year in the top 10 for the first time since 2010. She reached the quarterfinals at the Australian and U.S. Opens — the first and last majors of the year. It was the eighth time she’s lost in the first round of a Grand Slam tournament and the third in Australia, where she reached the quarterfinals in her first appearance in 1998 and lost the final to her youngest sister, Serena, in 2003. Konta was really going for her groundstrokes in a high-risk, highreward approach that kept Williams, who had wrapping on her left leg, on the defensive. “When the draw came out and I saw who I was playing I was like ‘Well, OK, I just hope to stay out there more than an hour,’” Konta said in a post-match TV interview, apparently as surprised as anyone after her straight sets win over Williams. Also on Tuesday, No. 3 Garbine Muguruza needed exactly an hour to beat Estonian qualifier Anett Kontaveit 6-0, 6-4; No. 11 Timea Bacsinszky advanced over Katerina Siniakova 6-3, 7-5; and No. 15 Madison Keys, a semifinalist last year, had to save set points in the first before beating Zarina Diyas 7-6 (5), 6-1. No. 21 Ekaterina Makarova, who beat Venus Williams in the first round in 2014, opened with a 6-3, 6-0 win over Maddison Inglis. On the men’s side, No. 13 Milos Raonic followed up his win over Roger Federer in the final of the Brisbane International tuneup event with a 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 win over Lucas Pouille, and No. 32 Joao Sousa beat Mikhail Kukushkin 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. In first-round play Monday night, Roger Federer advanced to the second round, setting a record. The No. 3-seeded Swiss star appeared in a record 65th consecutive major, an impressive run that started at the Australian Open in 2000. Federer had little trouble beating Nikoloz Basilashvili of Georgia 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. Federer, who has won four Australian Open titles among his 17 majors, faces Alexandr Dolgopolov

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venus Williams hits a forehand return to Johanna Konta during their irst-round match Tuesday at the Australian Open.

in the second round and could face No. 27 Grigor Dimitrov in the third. The 34-year-old Federer hasn’t won a Grand Slam title since Wimbledon in 2012. A resurgent Eugenie Bouchard continued her injury comeback with a first-round win. The 37thranked Bouchard of Canada beat Aleksandra Krunic of Serbia 6-3, 6-4 to advance to a second-round matchup against No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska. Fifth-seeded Maria Sharapova eased to a 6-1, 6-3 win over Nao Hibino. Sharapova, who pulled out of the Brisbane International with a left forearm injury, appeared to show no side efects from the ailment in her 73-minute win over the Japanese player. Her only stumble came while serving for the match when she was broken by Hibino, but Sharapova broke back in the next game to clinch the match. “I haven’t played many matches in many weeks, it was great to come out here and start my season,” Sharapova said. Nineteen-year-old wild-card entry Noah Rubin got the biggest win of his career, upsetting 17thseeded Benoit Paire of France 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) for his first Grand Slam victory. The No. 328th-ranked Rubin received a wild card into the main draw as part of a reciprocal agreement between the U.S. and Australian tennis associations. The Long Island, N.Y., native had only played one previous Grand Slam match, a straight-sets loss to Argentina’s Federico Delbonis in the first round of the 2014 U.S. Open. Paire,who made a sartorial statement by wearing one red and one black shoe, had 61 winners compared to just 22 for the American, but also 72 unforced errors. Afterward, the Frenchman didn’t have kind words for his opponent. “I played against a not good player, but I was very bad today so that’s it, I lost,” he said. “I didn’t know him and after this match, I said, yes, he’s not a good player.”

AT A GLANCE A look at Monday’s opening day of the Australian Open: Weather • Sunny with a high of 95. Attendance • Day, 46,889; night, 23,281; total, 70,170. Seeded men’s results • No. 1 Novak Djokovic def. Chung Hyeon, No. 3 Roger Federer def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, No. 6 Tomas Berdych def. Yuki Bhambri, No. 7 Kei Nishikori def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, No. 9 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga def. Marcos Baghdatis, No. 12 Marin Cilic def. Thiemo de Bakker, No. 14 Gilles Simon def. Vasek Pospisil, No. 15 David Goin def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, No. 17 Benoit Paire lost to Noah Rubin, No. 19 Dominic Thiem def. Leonardo Mayer, No. 22 Ivo Karlovic lost to Federico Delbonis, No. 24 Roberto Bautista def. Martin Klizan, No. 26 Guillermo Garcia-Lopez def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, No. 27 Grigor Dimitrov def. Paolo Lorenzi, No. 29 Nick Kyrgios def. Pablo Carreno. Seeded women’s results • No. 1 Serena Williams def. Camila Giorgi, No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska def. Christina McHale, No. 5 Maria Sharapova def. Nao Hibino, No. 6 Petra Kvitova def. Luksika Kumkhum, No. 10 Carla Suarez def. Viktorija Golubic, No. 12 Belinda Bencic def. Alison Riske, No. 13 Roberta Vinci def. Tamira Paszek, No. 16 Caroline Wozniacki lost to Yulia Putintseva, No. 17 Sara Errani lost to Margarita Gasparyan, No. 22 Andrea Petkovic lost to Elizaveta Kulichkova, No. 23 Svetlana Kuznetsova def. Daniela Hantuchova, No. 24 Sloane Stephens lost to Wang Qiang, No. 25 Samantha Stosur lost to Kristyna Pliskova, No. 26 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova lost to Lauren Davis, No. 27 Anna Karolina Schmiedlova lost to Darya Kasatkina, No. 28 Kristina Mladenovic def. Dominika Cibulkova. Associated Press

Abu Dhabi is fodder for golf fans GOLF • FROM B1

with Augusta National, Oakmont, Royal Troon or Baltusrol — the host sites of this year’s four majors. Relatively new to the No. 1 ranking in golf, Spieth will be making his Abu Dhabi debut, coming off an 8-stroke win in Hawaii two weeks ago. Currently No. 3, McIlroy has been an Abu Dhabi regular but never a winner. In 2014, a year in which he would win the British Open and PGA championships consecutively, McIlroy started by finishing second at Abu Dhabi to Pablo Larrazabal. That’s “Larrazabal,” two “r”s, one “z.” Last year, arriving with No. 1 status, McIlroy was second to Gary Stal, a Frenchman who currently checks in at No. 136 on the rankings billboard. Point is, what happens in Abu Dhabi pretty much stays in Abu Dhabi. In terms of separating men from boys, it’s not a standard that resonates. Moreover, we all know better. The mere fact two premier players enter the same championship doesn’t guarantee they will arm-wrestle for the trophy. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson have been considered top rivals over the past two decades. Since 1996, they have combined to win 19 major championships. In those 19 wins, the adversary also finished top five only six times. The only time Woods and Mickelson have finished 1-2 in a major was the 2002 U.S. Open at Bethpage. Woods had a four-shot

lead going into the final round and won by three over Mickelson, who played in the second-to-last pairing. All that said, the big picture doesn’t matter. Golf fans can anticipate a Spieth-McIlroy showdown at Abu Dhabi, they can discuss how they match up, and that’s half the fun. An “Abu Dhabi Donnybrook” is possible — that puts juice into this week and the weeks to follow. And yes, those conversations have room for Fowler, Stenson or Rose, they can accommodate Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Bubba Watson, Patrick Reed and so on. The PGA Tour used to be a small pond with one big catfish. But with Woods on the sidelines, with his future uncertain, things are not so one-dimensional. There is a real contest going on, an unpredictability, and McIlroy is especially germane. A year ago he was Spieth, the player people talked about. Coming off the consecutive majors, owning four majors at age 25, McIlroy was Woods in waiting, the chosen one. Things changed rapidly. Directly in the headlights, McIlroy backed off. He started slowly in 2015, got injured playing soccer and got pushed out by the Spieth Spectacular. But of all the names on golf’s war room board, none has more credibility. If he is healthy, focused and motivated, the 26-year old from Northern Ireland is a dangerous man, and Spieth is the first to say so.

Speaking of McIlroy, Spieth told the Associated Press: “In a season that he considered lost, (McIlroy) still came back and ended up winning the Race to Dubai, the final event. It proves what a player he is. I’m sure there’s very few people working harder than he is to make this season his best season yet, which is scary. Hopefully, I can help prevent that to an extent.” On the flip side, McIlroy knows Spieth has his hands full this year, operating under the hot lamps of examination and expectation, wearing a top ranking and a $22 million season everywhere he goes. It takes one to know one. “It will feel completely different for Jordan,” McIlroy recently told The Telegraph. Case in point, Spieth already has been zinged by the attention. When he recently signed a massive endorsement deal with Coke, those who link sugary soft drinks to childhood obesity dropped the “role model” card. That’s the kind of scrutiny that will follow the 22-year-old Spieth all year. This week’s event is another example. Halfway around the world or not, this will be the first time the elephants are in the room, the former No. 1 and the latest No. 1. Perhaps they won’t go head to head, perhaps months from now no one will remember. But in a cold January in St. Louis, it would be fun to see them go at it. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 1/20 at Detroit 7 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 1/22 at Colorado 8 p.m. FSM

Sunday 1/24 at Chicago 6 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 2/2 at Nashville 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 1/20 vs. Georgia 6 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/23 at Texas A&M 3 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 1/27 at Kentucky 8 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/30 vs. Mississippi St. 7:30 p.m. SEC Network

M 2 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

V. Williams out in Round 1 Player ranked 47th pulls of the upset ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illini men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Tuesday 1/19 at Indiana 6 p.m. ESPN

Saturday 1/23 at Minnesota 7:30 p.m. BTN

Thursday 1/28 vs. Ohio St. 8 p.m. BTN

Sunday 1/31 vs. Wisconsin 6:30 p.m. BTN

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 1/20 Saturday 1/23 at Massachusetts vs. Davidson 11 a.m. 7 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 1/27 at Dayton 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 1/30 vs. Duquesne 5 p.m. KDNL (30.2)

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS AMBUSH Friday 1/22: at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m. Friday 1/29: vs. Chicago, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5 p.m. College women: Rutgers at Michigan State, BTN 5:30 p.m. College: Butler at Providence, FS1 6 p.m. College: Illinois at Indiana, ESPN, WQQX (1490 AM) 6 p.m. College: Kansas at Oklahoma State, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Florida, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: South Carolina at Mississippi, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Tulsa at East Carolina, ESPNews 6 p.m. College: Tulane at Connecticut, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Dayton at St. Bonaventure, KDNL (DT-30.2, Charter 182) 7 p.m. College: Northwestern at Maryland, BTN 7 p.m. NBA: Minnesota at New Orleans, NBA 7:30 p.m. College: Georgetown at Xavier, FS1 8 p.m. College: LSU at Texas A&M, ESPN 8 p.m. College: Houston at Southern Methodist, ESPNU 8 p.m. College: Loyola (Chicago) at Evansville, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Alabama at Auburn, SEC Network 8 p.m. NBA: Indiana at Phoenix, FSM 10 p.m. College: Fresno State at San Diego State, ESPNU BOXING 10 p.m. Welterweights: Jamal James vs. Javier Molina, FS1 HOCKEY 7 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, NBCSN SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FA Cup: Bristol City vs. West Bromwich Albion, FS1 TENNIS 6 p.m. Australian Open, second round, Tennis Channel 8 p.m. Australian Open, second round, ESPN2 2 a.m. (Wed.) Australian Open, second round, ESPN2

DIGEST Federer wants names in reported scandal Roger Federer has heard enough speculation about match-ixing in tennis. If players are suspected of corruption, he wants names. Federer was responding to reports by BBC and BuzzFeed News published Monday that tennis authorities have suppressed evidence of match-ixing and overlooked suspected cases involving players ranked in the top 50, including Grand Slam singles and doubles winners. The reports said that none of these players had faced sanctions and more than half would be playing at this year’s Australian Open, which started Monday. The players weren’t identiied by name. “I would love to hear names,” Federer said after beating Nikoloz Basilashvili of Georgia 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. “Then at least it’s concrete stuf and you can actually debate about it. Was it the player? Was it the support team? Who was it? Was it before? Was it a doubles player, a singles player? Which Slam?” “It’s super serious and it’s super important to maintain the integrity of our sport,” Federer added. “So how high up does it go? The higher it goes, the more surprised I would be.” ATP chairman Chris Kermode appeared at a news conference to reject the assertion that match-ixing had gone unchecked in the sport, saying the Tennis Integrity Unit remained “constantly vigilant and not complacent” when it comes to tackling corruption. Ledecky breaks own record in 800 freestyle • Katie Ledecky broke her own world record in the women’s 800-meter freestyle Sunday night, inishing in 8 minutes, 6.68 seconds in the Arena Pro Swim Series in Austin, Texas. The American, 18, smashed her mark of 8:07.39 set at the 2015 world championships in Russia. Ledecky has dominated the event since 2013 and owns nine of the top 10 times in history. She wasn’t challenged Sunday night. American Becca Mann was second, but far back at 8:24.49. Portland State linebacker dies • Portland State is mourning the death of a freshman linebacker. AJ Schlatter died Sunday night, the school said. James Schlatter said in a Facebook tribute to his son, 20, that the death came after a tonsillectomy Friday. U.S. Olympic basketball • LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony are a step closer to a fourth Olympics, and Stephen Curry is in position for his irst. The NBA stars were among 30 players selected Monday as inalists for the 12-man roster. The other candidates for Rio are: former Chaminade star Bradley Beal and John Wall (Washington); Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook (Oklahoma City); Chris Paul, Blake Griin and DeAndre Jordan (Clippers); Kawhi Leonard and LaMarcus Aldridge (San Antonio); Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala and Harrison Barnes (Golden State); Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love (Cleveland); Dwight Howard and James Harden (Houston); Anthony Davis (New Orleans); Paul George (Indiana); DeMarcus Cousins and Rudy Gay (Sacramento) Jimmy Butler (Chicago); Mike Conley (Memphis); DeMar DeRozan (Toronto); Andre Drummond (Detroit); Kenneth Faried (Denver); and Gordon Hayward (Utah). Associated Press

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA •

Eighth-seeded Venus Williams tried to rally, winning two games and getting another break-point chance after falling a set and 5-0 behind, before her 16th trip to the Australian Open finished in a first-round loss to Johanna Konta. The 35-year-old, seven-time major winner trudged of the court at Rod Laver Arena, waving to the crowd on the second day of the tournament Tuesday following a surprising 6-4, 6-2 loss to the No. 47-ranked Konta, a Sydney-born British player who was making her debut in the main draw at the Australian Open after losing twice previously in qualifying. “When the draw came out and I saw who I was playing I was like ‘Well, OK, I just hope to stay out there more than an hour,’” Konta said in a post-match TV interview, apparently as surprised as anyone after her straight sets win over Williams. Andy Murray opened with a 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 win over Alexander Zverev, and remains very much a round-by-round proposition at Melbourne Park, where he has lost the final four times. He had Amelie Mauresmo, a new mother, back in his coaching corner for the match and was happy not to get any midmatch news from home. He has said he’ll leave immediately, regardless of the stage of the tournament, if his wife, Kim, goes into labor in London with their first child. “I’m more excited than nervous now,” Murray said of the pending arrival. “I don’t have any news because I’ve just come of the court. I’m hoping my phone hasn’t been buzzing in my bag. But Kim will message my team if anything’s going on during the matches, and I’ll see what happens.” Also on Tuesday, No. 3 Garbine Muguruza needed exactly an hour to beat Estonian qualifier Anett Kontaveit 6-0, 6-4; No. 11 Timea Bacsinszky advanced over Katerina Siniakova 6-3, 7-5; and No. 15 Madison Keys, a semifinalist last year, had to save set points in the first before beating Zarina Diyas 7-6 (5), 6-1. No. 21 Ekaterina Makarova opened with a 6-3, 6-0 win over Maddison Inglis. On the men’s side, No. 13 Milos Raonic followed up his win over Roger Federer in the final of the Brisbane International tuneup event with a 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 win over Lucas Pouille, and No. 32 Joao Sousa beat Mikhail Kukushkin 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. In first-round play Monday night, Roger Federer advanced to the second round, setting a record. The No. 3-seeded Swiss star appeared in a record 65th consecutive major, an impressive run that started at the Australian Open in 2000. Federer had little trouble beating Nikoloz Basilashvili of Georgia 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. Federer, who has won four Australian Open titles among his 17

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venus Williams hits a forehand return to Johanna Konta during their irst-round match Tuesday at the Australian Open.

majors, faces Alexandr Dolgopolov in the second round and could face No. 27 Grigor Dimitrov in the third. The 34-year-old Federer hasn’t won a Grand Slam title since Wimbledon in 2012. Eugenie Bouchard continued her injury comeback with a first-round win. The 37th-ranked Bouchard of Canada beat Aleksandra Krunic of Serbia 6-3, 6-4 to advance to a second-round matchup against No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska. Fifth-seeded Maria Sharapova eased to a 6-1, 6-3 win over Nao Hibino. Sharapova, who pulled out of the Brisbane International with a left forearm injury, appeared to show no side efects from the ailment in her 73-minute win over the Japanese player. Her only stumble came while serving for the match when she was broken by Hibino, but Sharapova broke back in the next game to clinch the match. “I haven’t played many matches in many weeks, it was great to come out here and start my season,” Sharapova said. Nineteen-year-old wild-card entry Noah Rubin got the biggest win of his career, upsetting 17thseeded Benoit Paire of France 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) for his first Grand Slam victory. The No. 328th-ranked Rubin received a wild card into the main draw as part of a reciprocal agreement between the U.S. and Australian tennis associations. The Long Island, N.Y., native had only played one previous Grand Slam match, a straight-sets loss to Argentina’s Federico Delbonis in the first round of the 2014 U.S. Open. Paire,who made a sartorial statement by wearing one red and one black shoe, had 61 winners compared to just 22 for the American, but also 72 unforced errors. Afterward, the Frenchman didn’t have kind words for his opponent. “I played against a not good player, but I was very bad today so that’s it, I lost,” he said. “I didn’t know him and after this match, I said, yes, he’s not a good player.”

AT A GLANCE A look at Monday’s opening day of the Australian Open: Weather • Sunny with a high of 95. Attendance • Day, 46,889; night, 23,281; total, 70,170. Seeded men’s results • No. 1 Novak Djokovic def. Chung Hyeon, No. 3 Roger Federer def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, No. 6 Tomas Berdych def. Yuki Bhambri, No. 7 Kei Nishikori def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, No. 9 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga def. Marcos Baghdatis, No. 12 Marin Cilic def. Thiemo de Bakker, No. 14 Gilles Simon def. Vasek Pospisil, No. 15 David Goin def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, No. 17 Benoit Paire lost to Noah Rubin, No. 19 Dominic Thiem def. Leonardo Mayer, No. 22 Ivo Karlovic lost to Federico Delbonis, No. 24 Roberto Bautista def. Martin Klizan, No. 26 Guillermo Garcia-Lopez def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, No. 27 Grigor Dimitrov def. Paolo Lorenzi, No. 29 Nick Kyrgios def. Pablo Carreno. Seeded women’s results • No. 1 Serena Williams def. Camila Giorgi, No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska def. Christina McHale, No. 5 Maria Sharapova def. Nao Hibino, No. 6 Petra Kvitova def. Luksika Kumkhum, No. 10 Carla Suarez def. Viktorija Golubic, No. 12 Belinda Bencic def. Alison Riske, No. 13 Roberta Vinci def. Tamira Paszek, No. 16 Caroline Wozniacki lost to Yulia Putintseva, No. 17 Sara Errani lost to Margarita Gasparyan, No. 22 Andrea Petkovic lost to Elizaveta Kulichkova, No. 23 Svetlana Kuznetsova def. Daniela Hantuchova, No. 24 Sloane Stephens lost to Wang Qiang, No. 25 Samantha Stosur lost to Kristyna Pliskova, No. 26 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova lost to Lauren Davis, No. 27 Anna Karolina Schmiedlova lost to Darya Kasatkina, No. 28 Kristina Mladenovic def. Dominika Cibulkova. Associated Press

Abu Dhabi is fodder for golf fans GOLF • FROM B1

with Augusta National, Oakmont, Royal Troon or Baltusrol — the host sites of this year’s four majors. Relatively new to the No. 1 ranking in golf, Spieth will be making his Abu Dhabi debut, coming off an 8-stroke win in Hawaii two weeks ago. Currently No. 3, McIlroy has been an Abu Dhabi regular but never a winner. In 2014, a year in which he would win the British Open and PGA championships consecutively, McIlroy started by finishing second at Abu Dhabi to Pablo Larrazabal. That’s “Larrazabal,” two “r”s, one “z.” Last year, arriving with No. 1 status, McIlroy was second to Gary Stal, a Frenchman who currently checks in at No. 136 on the rankings billboard. Point is, what happens in Abu Dhabi pretty much stays in Abu Dhabi. In terms of separating men from boys, it’s not a standard that resonates. Moreover, we all know better. The mere fact two premier players enter the same championship doesn’t guarantee they will arm-wrestle for the trophy. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson have been considered top rivals over the past two decades. Since 1996, they have combined to win 19 major championships. In those 19 wins, the adversary also finished top five only six times. The only time Woods and Mickelson have finished 1-2 in a major was the 2002 U.S. Open at Bethpage. Woods had a four-shot

lead going into the final round and won by three over Mickelson, who played in the second-to-last pairing. All that said, the big picture doesn’t matter. Golf fans can anticipate a Spieth-McIlroy showdown at Abu Dhabi, they can discuss how they match up, and that’s half the fun. An “Abu Dhabi Donnybrook” is possible — that puts juice into this week and the weeks to follow. And yes, those conversations have room for Fowler, Stenson or Rose, they can accommodate Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Bubba Watson, Patrick Reed and so on. The PGA Tour used to be a small pond with one big catfish. But with Woods on the sidelines, with his future uncertain, things are not so one-dimensional. There is a real contest going on, an unpredictability, and McIlroy is especially germane. A year ago he was Spieth, the player people talked about. Coming off the consecutive majors, owning four majors at age 25, McIlroy was Woods in waiting, the chosen one. Things changed rapidly. Directly in the headlights, McIlroy backed off. He started slowly in 2015, got injured playing soccer and got pushed out by the Spieth Spectacular. But of all the names on golf’s war room board, none has more credibility. If he is healthy, focused and motivated, the 26-year old from Northern Ireland is a dangerous man, and Spieth is the first to say so.

Speaking of McIlroy, Spieth told the Associated Press: “In a season that he considered lost, (McIlroy) still came back and ended up winning the Race to Dubai, the final event. It proves what a player he is. I’m sure there’s very few people working harder than he is to make this season his best season yet, which is scary. Hopefully, I can help prevent that to an extent.” On the flip side, McIlroy knows Spieth has his hands full this year, operating under the hot lamps of examination and expectation, wearing a top ranking and a $22 million season everywhere he goes. It takes one to know one. “It will feel completely different for Jordan,” McIlroy recently told The Telegraph. Case in point, Spieth already has been zinged by the attention. When he recently signed a massive endorsement deal with Coke, those who link sugary soft drinks to childhood obesity dropped the “role model” card. That’s the kind of scrutiny that will follow the 22-year-old Spieth all year. This week’s event is another example. Halfway around the world or not, this will be the first time the elephants are in the room, the former No. 1 and the latest No. 1. Perhaps they won’t go head to head, perhaps months from now no one will remember. But in a cold January in St. Louis, it would be fun to see them go at it. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL

01.19.2016 • TUESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

Anderson eager for NCAA ruling Booster insists student-athletes in his internship program didn’t get special privileges BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • The NCAA’s Committee on Infractions won’t release its full report on the Missouri basketball program’s violations for several more weeks, maybe months, but a sense of relief has already washed over Tigers coach Kim Anderson. Mizzou and the NCAA’s joint investigation began 19 months ago and led to a series of self-imposed sanctions mostly for impermissible benefits that boosters gave MU players while former coach Frank Haith ran the program. Anderson was not made aware of the investigation until after he was hired in April 2014. “Guys, this has been going for a long time,” Anderson told reporters Monday. “I just want it over with. I just want it over with so I can coach basketball and I can manage my team the way I want to manage my team and I can do what I need to do to be a good basketball coach.” The season could be over before Missouri learns if the NCAA will add any further sanctions to

the school’s self-imposed penalties, which include a postseason ban, scholarship reductions and recruiting restrictions. The NCAA investigation and impending sanctions further complicate the rebuilding process for Anderson, who in 2014 inherited a team with only four returning scholarship players and a dangerously low Academic Progress Rate. The team’s multiyear APR for 2013-14 of 941 was second-lowest in the Southeastern Conference and 11 points from being subject to penalties, including scholarship reductions. With the Tigers trying to recover from last year’s 9-23 season, Anderson faces another set of obstacles with the sanctions. “I’m just going to tell you, it hasn’t been fun,” said Anderson, whose Tigers (8-9, 1-3 Southeastern Conference) resume play with Wednesday’s 6 p.m. tipoff against Georgia (9-6, 2-3) at Mizzou Arena. “I can sit up here and make excuses and I can tell you things, but I think it’s better that we move on,” Anderson added.

New details emerged Monday about the internship program that led to self-sanctions. Mizzou booster Mark Tuley, identified last week by the PostDispatch as the unnamed Representative No. 1 in MU’s list of violations, explained to the Columbia Daily Tribune how he employed multiple Mizzou players as interns at T3 Solutions, a company in Martinez, Ga., during the summer of 2013 and 2014 — with the understanding that MU’s compliance department approved of the internships. Tuley shared with the Tribune correspondence from MU that revealed his 2013 interns as Mizzou players Jordan Clarkson and Tony Criswell and team manager Ricky Bolton Jr., Haith’s nephew, and the 2014 interns as players Cam Biedscheid, incoming freshman Jakeenan Gant and student manager Patrick Holman. Biedscheid, the 2012 PostDispatch All-Metro player of the year from Cardinal Ritter, left Mizzou’s team shortly before the 2014-15 season. Among the documents Tuley shared with the Tribune was

an email from Mizzou associate athletics director of compliance Mitzi Clayton to Anderson from May 2014, informing the coach that players would be returning to Tuley’s internship. “I reiterated to Mark that the (student-athletes) can be paid only for work actually performed and he assured me that they were earning their pay only for hours worked,” the email to Anderson stated. Tuley told the Tribune that MU advised him he couldn’t give the players special privileges, but he disputed that they performed less work than interns who weren’t athletes. Missouri asserts the players were compensated for work not performed during the internship, in violation of NCAA rules. As part of its self-sanctions, Mizzou permanently disassociated Tuley, a 2000 MU graduate, and prohibited him from receiving tickets, making donations and otherwise representing the university. Also, the school sanctioned itself for not fully vetting Tuley’s internship program or requesting follow-up documen-

Ferrell, Hoosiers worry Illini But horne may return at center, giving Illinois a lift BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

BLOOMINGTON, IND. • When Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell arrived at Indiana four seasons ago, he was a jitterbug freshman with a cool nickname just trying to fit in. Now a senior, Ferrell has become the straw that stirs the Hoosiers’ Kool-Aid. Illinois coach John Groce went so far Monday as to say if the Big Ten season ended today, Ferrell just might be the league’s MVP. Ferrell will be at the controls Tuesday night when Illinois visits an Indiana team that has won 10 straight and Monday moved back into the Top 25. “We certainly don’t vote at this point but at this juncture, but with Indiana 5-0 in the league you could make the case that he’d have a chance to be the player of the year in the league,” Groce said. “At least he’s in that breath.” Ferrell is averaging 17.1 points a game, but since shooting guard James Blackmon Jr., went out with knee surgery on the eve of league play, Ferrell has raised his totals to 19.8 points and 5.8 assists. He frequently draws the toughest defensive assignment, which is why it won’t be a surprise if he’s on Illinois’ Kendrick Nunn or Malcolm Hill. “He’s having a great year,” Groce said. “He’s great in the guts of the game. He plays both ends of the floor, has the ability to make guys better and with his speed and quickness and ability to shoot the deep ball, he puts you in a lot of predicaments.” No. 25 Indiana leads the Big Ten in scoring and in field goal shooting and is among the top three teams in rebounding. Rebounding is a major area of concern for the Illini, although Groce said there’s a chance center Mike Thorne Jr., could return Tuesday night or Saturday at Minnesota. He has missed the last 11 games after surgery to repair a meniscus tear in his knee. On Monday, Groce was still upset about Illinois’ play in a weekend loss to Nebraska, a game in which Illinois’ poor shot selection resulted in 11-of-37 3-point shooting. “Guys know their roles but we had some guys play outside their roles the other day,” Groce said. “We have to play a lot smarter. We have talked to them about it. We’ve shown film. They know what a good

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana’s Yogi Ferrell, here defending Wisconsin’s Bronson Koenig, is averaging 17.1 points a game and is among the Big Ten’s top players.

TUESDAY’S GAME

Indy before moving to La Lumiere School in LaPorte, Ind. He’s the first basketball recruit from the state of Indiana to play at Illinois since Scott Hafner in 1984. Groce made it clear he’ll continue to recruit the state. “I’m from Indiana and I recognize the state has good coaches and good players and we’ll certainly recruit there,” he said.

ILLINOIS vs. INDIANA When • 6 p.m. Where • Assembly Hall, Bloomington, Ind. TV, radio • ESPN, WQQX (1490 AM) Records • Illinois 9-9 overall, 1-4 in Big Ten; No. 25 Indiana 15-3, 5-0 Of note • Illinois has a seven-game road losing streak; Illinois has won 16 of its last 25 against Indiana dating to Feb. 25, 2003.

shot is and I expect us to be better with that.” Tuesday night is special for Illini freshman Jalen Coleman-Lands, who is playing college basketball for the first time in his home state and will do so against an Indiana program that recruited him heavily. “They were the first team to offer me (a scholarship),” ColemanLands said. “That happened when I was in the eighth grade. This is going to be a big game for my family because it’s close to home.” Coleman-Lands is from Indianapolis and attended high school in

Notes • Indiana’s Blackmon is probably out for the rest of the season after surgery on his right knee. Blackmon, who was Indiana’s No. 2 scorer averaging 15.8 points a game, was injured in a noncontact drill in practice just before the Big Ten opener. Robert Johnson has taken Blackmon’s spot in the starting lineup but it’s the “big three” of Ferrell, forward Troy Williams and freshman big man Thomas Bryant who are leading the team in scoring. Indiana got a lift from its bench in Saturday’s victory over Minnesota when Illinois State transfer Nick Zeisloft hit five 3s in a row and scored 15 points and Michigan transfer Max Bielfeldt added 10 points. ... Illini junior Hill (Belleville East) is closing in on becoming the 47th player in school history to score 1,000 points. He is 46 points shy of the milestone.

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tation. “I think it’s been portrayed as I’m the guy that pretty much did what he wanted and didn’t consult the University of Missouri,” Tuley told the Tribune, “which doesn’t work, because they got in touch with compliance day one.” Reached Monday, Tuley declined to disclose any correspondence from MU but further disputed that he acted on his own. “Doesn’t sound like a ‘rogue booster’ (in the Tribune report), does it?” he said via text message. Missouri declined to comment on Tuley’s assertions. “The University of Missouri stands behind its collaborative investigation with the NCAA and the findings of fact in this case,” MU senior associate AD for strategic communications Ryan Bradley said in a prepared statement. “Supporting details will be included in the final summary disposition report. We are moving forward.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

ROUNDUP No. 19 Iowa State knocks of No. 1 Oklahoma Georges Niang scored 22 points, Monte Morris added 20 and No. 19 Iowa State beat top-ranked Oklahoma 82-77 on Monday night, its first win over a No. 1 team since toppling Wilt Chamberlain’s Kansas Jayhawks in 1957. Morris had a jumper, a key rebound and two free throws in the final 21 seconds for the host Cyclones (14-4, 3-3 Big 12), who were actually slight favorites at home. It was the third time a No. 1 team lost in the state of Iowa this season. Northern Iowa beat North Carolina and Iowa beat Michigan State. Oklahoma’s Isaiah Cousins hit a 3 with 41 seconds left to tie the score at 75. But Morris drilled a step-back jumper for the lead, and Abdel Nader’s free throws with 3.1 seconds to go put it out of reach. Buddy Hield scored 27 points and Cousins had 26 for the Sooners (15-2, 4-2), who could make a case for retaining the top spot with a win Saturday at No. 13 Baylor. Oklahoma is No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25 for the first time since the final two weeks of the 1989-90 season. The Sooners took the top spot in style, getting all 65 firstplace votes from the national media panel. They are the first unanimous No. 1 since Kentucky did it for 12 polls last season. This is the sixth time Oklahoma has been No. 1, moving the Sooners into a tie for 29th place on the all-time list with Memphis, Missouri and Seton Hall. Syracuse 64, No. 20 Duke 62 • Tyler Roberson had 14 points and a career-high 20 rebounds, and Syracuse beat No. 20 Duke, the Blue Devils’ third straight loss. Trevor Cooney, Malachi Richardson and Duke transfer Michael Gbinije all scored 14 points for Syracuse (13-7, 3-4 Atlantic Coast Conference), which improved to 3-1 since coach Jim Boeheim returned from his nine-game suspension. Marshall Plumlee had 19 points and 17 rebounds to lead Duke (14-5, 3-3), which has its longest losing streak since the 2006-07 team dropped its final four games. Grayson Allen finished with 18 points and Brandon Ingram added 13 points and 11 boards for Duke. Freshman Luke Kennard, who scored a season-best 30 two days earlier against Notre Dame, failed to score and was 0 for nine, missing all seven of his 3-point attempts.

NOTEBOOK Oregon State suspends player four games • Oregon State forward Jarmal Reid was suspended at least four games Monday, a day after sticking out his leg and tripping a referee late in a loss against Utah. After coach Wayne Tinkle announced the suspension, which was airmed by the Pac-12 Conference, Reid apologized for his actions. “I’m well aware that my actions not only embarrassed my family, but also the university and the Oregon State basketball program,” Reid said in a statement. “I was not raised to act in that manner that was displayed on that play. I’m well aware that I made a mistake that has damaged my image. My actions are inexcusable and I am willing to accept any and all consequences that are to follow.” Tinkle said Reid’s conduct over the next two weeks will determine if additional discipline will be taken. Associated Press

AP POLL team w-l 1. Oklahoma (65) 15-1 2. N. Carolina 16-2 3. Kansas 15-2 4. Villanova 16-2 5. Xavier 16-1 6. West Virginia 15-2 7. Maryland 16-2 8. SMU 17-0 9. Iowa 14-3 10. Texas A&M 15-2 11. Michigan St. 16-3 12. Arizona 15-3 13. Baylor 14-3 13. Virginia 13-4 15. Miami 13-3 16. Providence 15-3 17. Louisville 14-3 18. Butler 13-4 19. Iowa St. 13-4 20. Duke 14-4 21. Southern Cal 15-3 22. Purdue 15-3 23. Kentucky 13-4 24. South Carolina 16-1 25. Indiana 15-3

USA TODAY POLL pts 1,625 1,515 1,499 1,403 1,321 1,278 1,259 1,179 1,167 994 950 801 649 649 645 609 608 439 411 375 338 322 276 252 210

pv 2 5 1 6 7 11 3 10 16 15 4 18 22 13 8 12 21 23 17 9 — 24 14 19 —

Other votes: Pittsburgh 184, Clemson 53, Wichita St. 38, Valparaiso 30, Notre Dame 14, Dayton 9, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 8, Gonzaga 5, Hawaii 3, Utah 3, Monmouth (NJ) 1, Navy 1, Oregon 1, UALR 1.

> How the top 25 fared. B7

team 1. Oklahoma (26) 2. N. Carolina (4) 3. Kansas (1) 4. Villanova 5. Maryland 6. Xavier 7. West Virginia 8. Texas A&M 9. Iowa 10. Michigan St. 11. Arizona 12. Duke 13. Virginia 14. Miami 15. Baylor 16. Louisville 17. Providence 18. South Carolina 19. Kentucky 20. Pittsburgh 21. Iowa State 22. Purdue 23. Indiana 24. Butler 25. Southern Cal

w-l 15-1 16-2 15-2 16-2 16-2 16-1 15-2 15-2 14-3 16-3 15-3 14-4 13-4 13-3 14-3 14-3 15-3 16-1 13-4 15-2 13-4 15-3 15-3 13-4 15-3

pts 763 727 700 674 629 616 585 532 494 461 438 360 340 319 306 288 269 231 206 179 173 167 162 156 103

pv 2 5 1 7 3 8 10 14 19 4 16 6 11 9 22 20 12 15 13 17 18 24 25 23 —

Other votes: Gonzaga 35, Clemson 29, Dayton 29, Oregon 20, Valparaiso 16, Wichita State 16, UConn 12, Saint Mary’s 10, Michigan 6, UALR 5, California 5, Washington 5, LSU 3, Monmouth 3, Seton Hall 2, UAB 1.


CARDINALS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

Cards see power potential in Gyorko Inielder could bring versatility to bench BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Many times in their injurypocked 2015 season, the Cardinals had mostly cap guns when they sought firepower off the bench. This year and beyond, they have committed, in a sense, nearly $40 million to fix that. Brandon Moss, who has averaged some 24 homers a year for the last four years but had only four here when he battled some hip surgery afterefects, may well be a lefthanded-hitting bench player if he is not the first baseman. He will be paid $8.25 million in any event this year. Righthanded-hitting infielder Jedd Gyorko, acquired from San Diego for outfielder Jon Jay, has averaged 16 homers a year for his first three seasons in the big leagues and he, even more likely than Moss, could be coming of the bench. Gyorko is signed at fairly large money for the next four years. Gyorko plays three positions, not counting some brief flings at first base, and his lifetime bigleague batting average is just .236, which is 102 points shy of what he has hit against the Cardinals. But, to the notion that he has more power than most infielders who primarily are second basemen, Gyorko, addressing the media at the Cardinals’ Winter

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

New Cardinals inielder Jedd Gyorko hit 16 home runs last season for the San Diego Padres.

Warm-Up on Monday, said, “I guess you can let the numbers do the talking. I think that (power) part of the game is what I need to make a diference. You’ve got to have something that changes the game and that’s the element I can bring.” Moss said something similar the other day although Gyorko said, “He’s probably got more power than I have.” Whether or not that is true, if the Cardinals have Gyorko and either Moss or Matt Adams on the bench, they have a chance to turn around a game late with one swing. For now, price is no object, as Gyorko is due some $30 million by the Cardinals for the next

four seasons when they inherited a contract the Padres gave him. He will make $4 million, then $6 million, then $9 million, then $13 million, with the Padres having kicked in a small portion. Despite his modest overall average, Gyorko has hit .342 with five homers and 16 runs batted in for 18 games against the Cardinals, who generally have one of the best stafs in the league. “Every time he walked in there, he put up a good at-bat,” said Cardinals manager Mike Matheny. “I’ve always enjoyed playing here,” said Gyorko, 27. “It’s one of the places I would always circle. The fans always bring the best

Cards will have an unfamiliar role

out of you, every single day. “Great atmosphere. As baseball players, we like to be around baseball people and I don’t think you’re going to find anywhere in the country that has more baseball people than St. Louis. I’m looking forward to it.” So far, it’s been advertised that Gyorko will fill in for second baseman Kolten Wong, shortstop Jhonny Peralta and third baseman Matt Carpenter, all of whom played 150 or more games last year. Gyorko, a second-round draft pick in 2010, had been more or less a regular second baseman for San Diego, but he acknowledged his potential versatility “is definitely going to be more important in my career than it has up to this point. It sounds like I’m going to be moving around a little bit, which is fine. “We’re still going to talk a little more about what the opportunities are going to be but I’m pretty comfortable with anywhere on the infield. I feel I could go out there and play any of the positions at any time.” Matheny said that, in addition to his power potential — Gyorko had 23 homers in 2013 and 16 last year though he spent some time in the minors — that Gyorko was a strong defender. “But that potentially potent bat — whether he’s going to come of the bench or he’s going to give a guy a rest — is going to take some of the pressure of our

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

CARDINALS • FROM B1

every question about the rivals ultimately has to do with direction and which team stays up. Since Houston fled the NL Central before 2013, the southernmost team has always been northernmost in the standings. The Cardinals have won three consecutive division titles, and Matheny has yet to enter a season as manager when his club wasn’t a favorite to win the Central. The Cubs, fortified by the additions of former Cardinals Jason Heyward and John Lackey, have positioned themselves this season to assert geographic order on the standings. That leaves the Cardinals in a role they haven’t had in a while: underdog. “I would imagine we could get up there and talk about it in front of our guys and use it as some kind of motivational speech, but that’s kind of a waste of time,” Matheny said. “I think the message is usually making sure the guys don’t buy into it. When you start getting a lot of people telling you what you can’t do … if you begin to cave into (it) and believe that stuf, I think at that point it is somebody’s responsibility to stand up and point out the obvious. The obvious to us, whether it’s last year or going into this year, is we believe in what we have. “If you sense that we need what’s going on out there to drive us and push us, so be it,” Matheny continued. “Right now I see a lot of guys shrugging their shoulders and saying, ‘This is who we are and we can’t wait to get out there and show it.’” In four seasons as manager, Matheny has a 375-273 record, the best in the NL over those years. He is the first manager to pilot the Cardinals to four consecutive playoff appearances in club history, and he has done so after taking the job with no managerial experience at any level. Matheny acknowledges that he has learned on the job how to better run a game, but he was hired by the Cardinals for his ability to reach a clubhouse. In 2015, Matheny galvanized a team that had lots its ace, its No. 3 hitter, its planned cleanup hitter, and its setup man to injuries. He built confidence internally, while

externally describing how the Cardinals overcame perception. At one point, late in the year, the Cardinals had the best record in baseball and a healthy lead on No. 2, and Matheny insisted that few outside the clubhouse believed they were any good. Sometimes doubt can drive. If steered carefully. “I think the general rule is really important – your message to your team is that you have to ignore the compliments and the criticism,” said Hall of Fame manager Tony La Russa, who would use an usagainst-the-world approach at times. “Somebody compliments and looks at what you’ve got and then all of sudden you lose an edge and you walk around like, ‘Hey, it’s over.’ And that’s bad. Then if you pay attention to the criticism then you may get a little chip on your shoulder for a little while but pretty soon, deep down, you believe any of it (and) you lose an edge. Quite often you can surprise the experts because they’re just guessing.” Throughout the three days of the 20th annual Winter WarmUp, which shared a weekend with the Cubs’ fanfest up north, so many of these phrases came up with the Cardinals. A teammate said Adam Wainwright is returning to full strength “with a chip” on his shoulder after missing most of last year. Wainwright agreed with the diagnosis. General manager John Mozeliak said the club does not get distracted by another team’s headlines but assured fans several times he sees what’s happening with “the team up north.” Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. said, “It never hurts to be underdog. We’ve been underdogs and won world championships.” The Cardinals’ biggest ofseason acquisition, $80 million righthander Mike Leake, spent the first 5½ years of his career with Cincinnati and described the Cardinals as annually the “main threat of the division.” The Cubs and Cardinals now “are the main fighters.” Brandon Moss, who played a time in Pittsburgh, had to take a moment to even process the idea of the Cardinals not being the favorite. “I love when people go ahead

and give the division to someone before the season even starts,” Moss said. “Has this organization, this team, ever been an underdog? I doubt it. This year, they are. People want to go and give it to the Cubs, and by all means, they’re a great team. We’re a pretty dang good team, too.” That will be a message delivered often this spring. While many of the Cardinals signed their way through the weekend and wound their way through the backways of the Hyatt Regency, there was little time to interact. That comes in Florida. Pitchers and catchers officially report Feb. 17, though a handful are already there. The first oicial full-squad workout is Feb. 23, and that morning Matheny, his staf, and other officials will gather the team for the annual address. Even this weekend, several players spoke about how Matheny’s talk “helps us focus.” Someone will inevitably mention the team should expect to win the World Series. The Cubs will be mentioned. But not because of where the Cardinals expect to see them, it’s because of where the Cardinals last saw them. The loss at Wrigley Field in the division series this past postseason still lingers, Matheny said. That’s is fuel for a message. After all, it’s the same in the clubhouse as it was on stage with the fans applauding. It’s not always the questions he asks or the answers he gives. It’s the response he gets. “There are some teams out there who have never been in a certain position before and you don’t know how they’re going to handle it,” Matheny said. “Our club has been in at least similar water. … I’m going to tell you something that they have and it kind of goes back through a lot of things we’ve talked about. I’m sensing an edge to this club already. I don’t know if you guys are getting that in here or if that is coming through in their interviews, but there is an edge to this club. You take talent and mix that kind of fire and heads up.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cards rotation should be a formidable ivesome GORDON • FROM B1

Cardinals manager Mike Matheny signs autographs Monday at the annual Winter Warm-Up.

players, where they’re realizing, ‘I’m going to take this day (of), but that guy’s pretty good,’” said Matheny. Gyorko has played here often enough to know that Busch is not a home run haven. But, “it’s better than Petco (in San Diego), that’s for sure,” said Gyorko, who has batted .228 at Petco Park. “You try not to think about it. You just try to hit the ball hard. But there are certain times when you get to the ball pretty good and when it’s caught, it can be pretty demoralizing.” Gyorko got a jolt last season when, struggling, he was sent to Class AAA El Paso for three weeks in June. After bashing four homers in 16 games, Gyorko returned to hit .264 with San Diego over the final three months with 14 of his 16 homers. “I wouldn’t call it a wakeup call,” said Gyorko. “It was more figuring out what the problems were and correcting them, figuring out where my swing was. I could go on for days but it was just minor mechanics. I’ve simplified things a lot. “It wasn’t an easy year. I didn’t see (a trade) coming. I was surprised, for sure.” But a good surprise. “Any time you join a team that won 100 games, that’s OK,” said Gyorko.

in free agency, positions the Cardinals to win the National League arms race. Baseball success starts on the mound and no team can match this squad’s top-end quality, near-term depth and long-term promise. “I think it’s (number) ones and twos,” Leake said. “I think we have the chance to be the best rotation. It’s a bunch of young guys with Wainwright. I think we can be as good as we work to be.” Wainwright won 92 games during a five-year span before getting hurt last season. Leake, a former eighth overall draft pick, won 64 games in his first six big-league seasons. Together with Michael Wacha (17-7, 3.38 earned-run average last season), Carlos Martinez (14-7, 3.01 ERA) and Jaime Garcia (10-6, 2.43) they present a most formidable fivesome. “You hate to lose a Lance, just such a horse, a guy who I believe still has maybe some of his best pitching ahead of him,” Matheny said. “We believe Mike is going to be a guy that comes in here, just like what we said about Lance ... we’re going to see some strong production from him. I like everything he brings to the table. “And then obviously with Michael and Carlos taking a step further in their career, anybody would put them right there in the middle of their rotation at any point.” Wainwright is feeling fresh after pitching just 331/3 regular-season and playoff innings. His swift recovery allowed him to finish last season as a reliever, then train normally this winter. “You hate to say that missing time helped you because you just want to be out there helping your team,” Wainwright said. “But honestly, my arm greatly benefited from that year, last year, having some time to rest, it did.” Garcia also is feeling strong after actually getting through a season without sufering another injury. “I’m good to go, man,” he said. “I’m prepared myself to be better than what the Cardinals expect me to be.” After suffering an unusual stress reaction shoulder injury in 2014, Wacha returned to full strength last season and made 30 starts, gaining quite an education in the process. “You learn a lot during a season in your first full season for sure, about the ups and downs,” he said. “Obviously you’re going to go through streaks where you are pitching well and where you’re not pitching well. It’s about how you can get through that and compete through that.” Martinez stayed in Jupiter, Fla., over the winter, preparing for his second full season as a starting pitcher. The team hopes his supervised train-

ing regimen will help him avoid the shoulder fatigue that shelved him late last season and forced him to miss the playofs. “It’s getting better,” Martinez said. “I think I have like 90 percent of my arm. I will be better in spring training. I’ll be ready for the season.” Depth also should be a strength this season. Tyler Lyons should make the club as a lefty relief specialist or as a multi-inning middle reliever and fill-in starter. That would leave fellow lefties Tim Cooney and Marco Gonzales at the top of the Memphis rotation in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League — unless one of them makes the Cardinals as a third bullpen lefty. Cooney was impressive last season at Memphis and in his first six big-league starts. Had he not sufered a seasonending bout of appendicitis, he would have returned to the majors in September. “I definitely proved, at least to myself, that I know that I can pitch at the big-league level and I can have success here,” Cooney said. “There is not really that doubt, ‘Can I do it?’” Gonzales ofered significant late-season help two seasons back, but he spent much of last season dealing with a shoulder impingement. A winter of rest and rehabilitation has him back to full strength. “I learned a lot of lessons last year,” Gonzales said. “I learned a lot about my body, the way my shoulder works and the work I need to put in to move forward and be healthy.” Beyond Cooney and Gonzales, the Cardinals have potential ace Alex Reyes in development. But for his ill-timed 50game drug suspension, Reyes would have come to spring training with an opportunity to turn heads. Instead, he will have to wait until late May to resume his climb. “I feel like my change-up has been the separation, my change-up has been the pitch that helped me throughout this last year,” Reyes said. “My curveball has been pretty good. Just being able to command it is what we’ve been working on. I’m excited for next season.” Once again the Cardinals should be able to find strength in numbers. All of these pitchers could have a positive impact. “We know we have a good staff,” said Martinez, who chatted up reporters at the Winter Warm-Up without the aide of an interpreter. “We have a good team right now. We are the Cardinals. I’m a believer in all my teammates. We can get into the championship.” Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 1

Shannon drops road games Broadcaster had already cut back on traveling last season

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

Dickerson says Rams will love LA ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • Eric Dickerson can’t wait to

BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

On the heels of longtime Cardinals player and broadcaster Mike Shannon announcing that he would be closing his downtown restaurant Jan. 30, Shannon said Monday night he will further reduce his broadcast schedule and not do any road games for the club this season. Shannon, who will be starting his 45th season in the broadcast booth in March and will turn 77 in July, did fewer than one-third of the road games last year, although he did broadcast in the playoffs. Confirming he still will do spring training games and postseason games, Shannon said, “It’s just time. This will be the first time I can really enjoy my summer. I’ve never been able to do something in the summer because of the road games. It was time to move on.” President Bill DeWitt III confirmed Monday night that the decision was Shannon’s alone. “He still feels energized,” said DeWitt. “It’s a fairly common thing for a legendary broadcaster to (do) home games only, so we felt that Mike certainly deserved to be given the opportunity to make that choice.’” Rick Horton, who had done some radio last season along with television games on Fox Sports Midwest, will replace Shannon on KMOX radio for all the road games, joining John Rooney, Shannon’s normal partner. Mike Claiborne also will be involved, on radio. Shannon, said DeWitt, has a contract that renews every year if both sides are in agreement. “Mike is newly married,” said DeWitt, “and you know Mike loves life. But he certainly wants to stay involved. He’ll probably be a little more active in some of our ancillary services, like maybe to emcee an event or do a voice-over for a market program.” Though Shannon is cutting back, he said he still was looking forward to this season and others. “I’m going to go on and on and on,” he said. “I’m probably looking more forward to this year than any other.” Shannon said part of his reason for saying that was that the Cardinals seem to have been dismissed nationally because of the rise of the Chicago Cubs. “You know what that’s setting up for,” said Shannon “I can’t wait for spring training.”

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Broadcaster Mike Shannon says he is looking forward to this season, but also to the chance to have more free time in the summer.

While DeWitt said that Shannon deserved the right to make this decision, Shannon rhapsodized about the DeWitt ownership group. “I think the world of the DeWitts,” said Shannon. “I wish them nothing but success. They’re there every day. They live it. They die, just like the players do. And they’re in it for the long haul.” This was the second big announcement involving Shannon in the last two days. First, it was the imminent closing of the downtown restaurant, which had been a staple for 30 years, 10 of them in the current Market Street location. His other two restaurants, in Edwardsville and at Lambert St. Louis Airport, will

draw even more focus now, Shannon said. “We had 30 great years (downtown). And it’s time to celebrate those 30 years, I firmly believe that,” Shannon said. “Everybody wants to blame this or that. There’s no blame.” What happens to the popular postgame “Live at Shannon’s” radio show that originated at his downtown restaurant remains to be seen, although DeWitt speculated that some facsimile might be revived at another locale, such as Ballpark Village. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Cards boost security measures More cameras, upgrade to control room planned BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

How to streamline and strengthen security measures at Busch Stadium for the coming season was already a chief concern this winter, and then a few hours after the Paris attacks in November, Busch Stadium hosted an international soccer game that underscored the need. “It hit home that we’re in a diferent world,” Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III said. “We have to make sure that there are no loopholes or weak links in our security.” The Cardinals, as mandated by Major League Baseball, enhanced security measures at the ballpark this past season with metal detectors at every game, and the team also hired two vaporwake trained security dogs to work at the stadium and around Ballpark Village. This year, increased measures will include more cameras in and around the ballpark, and an upgraded control room to handle the additional information. In September, a Cardinals fan was shot after leaving a game during what police described as a robbery. DeWitt said the team has also worked with the city to improve lighting and increase staing around the ballpark as a preventative measure. “We’re not shy about mentioning we’ve got hundreds of security cameras around the ballpark both in and out,” DeWitt said. “If people want to get nuts, it’s going to be on camera.” Other changes at the ballpark include the debut this season of a larger, high-definition scoreboard, one that

will usurp the entire surface area of the scoreboard that had previously been up, including the ad space on the sides. The Cardinals have also increased the number of 6 p.m. starts for this season, upping the number of weekday 6 p.m. starts to nine already scheduled. The team has been surveying fans to see whether they prefer 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. starts, and they have found the fan base split. Players have expressed a preference for the earlier game, DeWitt said. They continue to seek a happy medium, the president said.

STEP FOR MARTINEZ Carlos Martinez made some giant strides last year in his first year as a rotation member. But perhaps not one nearly as big as the one he took when, even with Spanish-speaking shortstop Jhonny Peralta standing by as a potential interpreter, Martinez, reluctant to do so, conducted his first lengthy, solo news conference Monday. After some 7 minutes, 24 seconds of questions, all in English, and Martinez answers, all in English, the righthander laughed and said, “Wow.” Then the 24-year-old hugged Cardinals communications manager Melody Yount, proud of his accomplishment. Earlier, Martinez had said, “I try every day to learn a couple of words. That’s why I’m here right now. I just try to speak a lot with my teammates, with Mike (Matheny) and everybody. Just try to learn some words every day.” Martinez’s 2015 season ended early because of shoulder problems, and he has spent much of the ofseason at the team’s Jupiter, Fla., complex. “It’s getting better,” Martinez said. “I think I have like 90 percent of my arm. And it will be better in spring training.” Martinez threw 179 2/3 innings last

season, up 80 from the year before. “It was hard for me because I never threw too many innings,” said Martinez, who was sidelined when the Cardinals could have used him in the playofs. “I wanted to compete in the playofs to help the Cardinals,” he said. “It was really hard for me.” Addressing his emotions, which occasionally can steer him sideways, and how he tries to control them, Martinez said, “I’m from the Dominican and all Dominicans have a lot of emotions. When I have problems on the mound, I just (step) off the mound and take a little breath and keep going again.”

FAN BALLOT REVEALED The 2006 World Series champions, who are set to be feted all season as part of the 10th anniversary of Busch Stadium III, could have a presence in the Cardinals Hall of Fame’s class of 2016. DeWitt announced Monday the eight names that will be on the fan ballot, and for the first time Chris Carpenter, Scott Rolen, and Jason Isringhausen are eligible for the vote. The other five names are Joe Torre, Mark McGwire, Edgar Renteria, Keith Hernandez and Matt Morris. The fans will elect two players from that list during online voting that will begin and extend through March. The top two vote-getters will be inducted with one legacy pick by the Red Ribbon Committee and a fourth member of the class selected by ownership. Rick Hummel of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

take his two youngest children to their first Los Angeles Rams game this fall alongside the same fans who cheered him to the greatest singleseason rushing performance in NFL history. And if the current Rams need advice on the tricky transition from Missouri to Southern California, the Hall of Fame running back has plenty. “You’re not in St. Louis anymore,” Dickerson said with a laugh. “For all you young guys: It’s diferent. This is Hollywood.” Dickerson and former quarterback Jim Everett know all about the challenges and opportunities presented to professional athletes in Los Angeles, and they say the attention will be magnified during the Rams’ high-profile return season after 21 years away. If the Rams handle it well — and if they win — they’ll absolutely love LA. “It’s the best to play here,” Everett said. “This is a sports mecca.” With Kobe Bryant retiring from a terrible Lakers team and the Dodgers lacking a true superstar beyond quiet Clayton Kershaw, Rams running back Todd Gurley, receiver Tavon Austin and defensive linemen Aaron Donald and Robert Quinn are about to become some of the most popular guys in a town that loves a celebrity. Although the Rams played home games down the road in Anaheim when Dickerson and Everett starred, they dealt with the opportunities and temptations presented in the nation’s entertainment capital and second-largest media market. “This is a diferent animal, being in Los Angeles,” Dickerson said. “It just feels different, and I know what it’s like to put that uniform on. Being in LA, there’s nothing like it. It’s the glitz. It’s the glamour. It’s the beautiful girls. It’s the weather. But you’ve got to take your job serious, first of all. You’re a football player first, and all that other stuf comes secondary.” Everett settled in Southern California after his NFL career, and the Rams’ starting quarterback from 1986-93 greeted Rams executives at their official return last week in Inglewood. He has never stopped signing autographs with an “LA Rams” postscript. “When I was playing, we had the Lakers with Magic Johnson, we had the Dodgers, and LA loves champions,” Everett said. “There’s high standards, and the Rams are taking a big bite of the pie by moving here. They understand that level of expectation is going to go way up for all of us.” Dickerson spent the Rams’ return week in Orlando playing in the inaugural Diamond Resorts Invitational celebrity golf tournament, a $500,000 event supporting Florida Hospital for Children. Dickerson finished just behind former Raiders running back Marcus Allen and well behind winner Mardy Fish, the former tennis pro. But Dickerson’s thoughts were never far from the Rams. Although he made frequent appearances in St. Louis to support the franchise, he firmly believes the Rams never should have left — and he can only shake his head at what might have been. “Imagine the Rams playing in LA when they were the ‘Greatest Show on Turf,’” Dickerson said, referring to the Super Bowl-winning St. Louis team. “They would have had to go from practice to the studios to do movies. Everybody loves athletes. Actors want to be athletes, and athletes want to be actors. I hope it becomes like that again.” The Rams have some work to do first: They haven’t had a winning record since 2003.

NFL NOTEBOOK Rams report heavy ticket demand The Rams have begun taking deposits for season tickets to their irst season back in Los Angeles since 1994. The team reported heavy traic Monday on a website set up to take $100 refundable deposits for the chance to buy tickets when they become available. The Rams say their irst deposit came from Lakers great and Dodgers co-owner Magic Johnson. The Rams are expected to play just seven regular-season home games next season, with an eighth shifted to London. Meanwhile, the Rams and San Diego Chargers held their irst meeting to discuss sharing a stadium that is under construction in Inglewood. The Chargers have a one-year option to reach a lease agreement and become a tenant of the stadium whose construction is being headed by Rams owner Stan Kroenke. A very brief statement says the two sides have agreed not to publicly discuss details of the negotiations. Eagles hire Peterson • The Eagles are sort of going back to their glory days. Doug Pederson, who helped groom Donovan McNabb for the starting quarterback job and a successful playof run, was hired Monday to be Philadelphia’s coach. Pederson was Kansas City’s ofensive coordinator under Andy Reid for the past three seasons. Panthers’ Allen doubtful • Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera says defensive end Jared Allen has a broken bone in his foot and is doubtful for Sunday’s NFC championship game against Arizona. Associated Press

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Tigers, Upton reach deal, report says The Detroit Tigers agreed to terms with free-agent outielder Justin Upton on a six-year contract Monday night, USA Today reported, citing a source. The deal, $133 million for six years, won’t become oicial until Upton passes his physical. Upton will become the third highest-paid free-agent position player this winter behind Jason Heyward (eight years, $184 million

with the Chicago Cubs) and Chris Davis (seven years, $161 million with the Baltimore Orioles). Gordon enjoys success • Dee Gordon put his signature on a $50 million, ive-year contract with the Miami Marlins as more than a dozen relatives watched from the front row at a news conference Monday. “My family stuck with me through the hard times,” Gordon said. “I’m glad they’re here for the good times.”

The 5-foot-11 Gordon is a frustrated basketball player who switched to baseball in college. Last season he led the NL in batting (.333), hits (205) and stolen bases (58), won a Gold Glove at second base and made the All-Star team. Royals complete deal with Cain • The Royals inalized their $17.5 million, two-year deal with Lorenzo Cain, buying out the All-Star outielder’s inal two years of arbitration. Cain will receive $6.5 million

this season and $11 million next season. Rangers bring back Lewis • Colby Lewis declared that he will be ready for opening day after knee surgery. The Rangers signed him Monday to a one-year deal for $6 million to be in their starting rotation. Lewis led the Rangers with 17 wins and 204 2/3 innings last season. From news services

NFL PLAYOFFS DIVISIONAL ROUND Jan. 16 New England 27, Kansas City 20 Arizona 26, Green Bay 20, OT Jan. 17 Carolina 31, Seattle 24 Denver 23, Pittsburgh 16 CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday AFC: New England at Denver, 2:05 p.m., KMOV (4) NFC: Arizona at Carolina, 5:40 p.m., KTVI (2) SUPER BOWL • Sunday, Feb. 7 in Santa Clara, Calif. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4)


SPORTS

01.19.2016 • TuEsday • M 2

Shannon drops road games Broadcaster had already cut back on traveling last season

sT. LOuIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

Dickerson says Rams will love LA ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • Eric Dickerson can’t wait to

BY RICK HUMMEL st. Louis Post-dispatch

On the heels of longtime Cardinals player and broadcaster Mike Shannon announcing that he would be closing his downtown restaurant Jan. 30, Shannon said Monday night he will further reduce his broadcast schedule and not do any road games for the club this season. Shannon, who will be starting his 45th season in the broadcast booth in March and will turn 77 in July, did fewer than one-third of the road games last year, although he did broadcast in the playoffs. Confirming he still will do spring training games and postseason games, Shannon said, “It’s just time. This will be the first time I can really enjoy my summer. I’ve never been able to do something in the summer because of the road games. It was time to move on.” President Bill DeWitt III confirmed Monday night that the decision was Shannon’s alone. “He still feels energized,” said DeWitt. “It’s a fairly common thing for a legendary broadcaster to (do) home games only, so we felt that Mike certainly deserved to be given the opportunity to make that choice.’” Rick Horton, who had done some radio last season along with television games on Fox Sports Midwest, will replace Shannon on KMOX radio for all the road games, joining John Rooney, Shannon’s normal partner. Mike Claiborne also will be involved, on radio. Shannon, said DeWitt, has a contract that renews every year if both sides are in agreement. “Mike is newly married,” said DeWitt, “and you know Mike loves life. But he certainly wants to stay involved. He’ll probably be a little more active in some of our ancillary services, like maybe to emcee an event or do a voice-over for a market program.” Though Shannon is cutting back, he said he still was looking forward to this season and others. “I’m going to go on and on and on,” he said. “I’m probably looking more forward to this year than any other.” Shannon said part of his reason for saying that was that the Cardinals seem to have been dismissed nationally because of the rise of the Chicago Cubs. “You know what that’s setting up for,” said Shannon “I can’t wait for spring training.”

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Broadcaster Mike Shannon says he is looking forward to this season, but also to the chance to have more free time in the summer.

While DeWitt said that Shannon deserved the right to make this decision, Shannon rhapsodized about the DeWitt ownership group. “I think the world of the DeWitts,” said Shannon. “I wish them nothing but success. They’re there every day. They live it. They die, just like the players do. And they’re in it for the long haul.” This was the second big announcement involving Shannon in the last two days. First, it was the imminent closing of the downtown restaurant, which had been a staple for 30 years, 10 of them in the current Market Street location. His other two restaurants, in Edwardsville and at Lambert St. Louis Airport, will

draw even more focus now, Shannon said. “We had 30 great years (downtown). And it’s time to celebrate those 30 years, I firmly believe that,” Shannon said. “Everybody wants to blame this or that. There’s no blame.” What happens to the popular postgame “Live at Shannon’s” radio show that originated at his downtown restaurant remains to be seen, although DeWitt speculated that some facsimile might be revived at another locale, such as Ballpark Village. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Cards boost security measures More cameras, upgrade to control room planned BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

How to streamline and strengthen security measures at Busch Stadium for the coming season was already a chief concern this winter, and then a few hours after the Paris attacks in November, Busch Stadium hosted an international soccer game that underscored the need. “It hit home that we’re in a diferent world,” Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III said. “We have to make sure that there are no loopholes or weak links in our security.” The Cardinals, as mandated by Major League Baseball, enhanced security measures at the ballpark this past season with metal detectors at every game, and the team also hired two vaporwake trained security dogs to work at the stadium and around Ballpark Village. This year, increased measures will include more cameras in and around the ballpark, and an upgraded control room to handle the additional information. In September, a Cardinals fan was shot after leaving a game during what police described as a robbery. DeWitt said the team has also worked with the city to improve lighting and increase staing around the ballpark as a preventative measure. “We’re not shy about mentioning we’ve got hundreds of security cameras around the ballpark both in and out,” DeWitt said. “If people want to get nuts, it’s going to be on camera.” Other changes at the ballpark include the debut this season of a larger, high-definition scoreboard, one that

will usurp the entire surface area of the scoreboard that had previously been up, including the ad space on the sides. The Cardinals have also increased the number of 6 p.m. starts for this season, upping the number of weekday 6 p.m. starts to nine already scheduled. The team has been surveying fans to see whether they prefer 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. starts, and they have found the fan base split. Players have expressed a preference for the earlier game, DeWitt said. They continue to seek a happy medium, the president said.

STEP FOR MARTINEZ Carlos Martinez made some giant strides last year in his first year as a rotation member. But perhaps not one nearly as big as the one he took when, even with Spanish-speaking shortstop Jhonny Peralta standing by as a potential interpreter, Martinez, reluctant to do so, conducted his first lengthy, solo news conference Monday. After some 7 minutes, 24 seconds of questions, all in English, and Martinez answers, all in English, the righthander laughed and said, “Wow.” Then the 24-year-old hugged Cardinals communications manager Melody Yount, proud of his accomplishment. Earlier, Martinez had said, “I try every day to learn a couple of words. That’s why I’m here right now. I just try to speak a lot with my teammates, with Mike (Matheny) and everybody. Just try to learn some words every day.” Martinez’s 2015 season ended early because of shoulder problems, and he has spent much of the ofseason at the team’s Jupiter, Fla., complex. “It’s getting better,” Martinez said. “I think I have like 90 percent of my arm. And it will be better in spring training.” Martinez threw 179 2/3 innings last

season, up 80 from the year before. “It was hard for me because I never threw too many innings,” said Martinez, who was sidelined when the Cardinals could have used him in the playofs. “I wanted to compete in the playofs to help the Cardinals,” he said. “It was really hard for me.” Addressing his emotions, which occasionally can steer him sideways, and how he tries to control them, Martinez said, “I’m from the Dominican and all Dominicans have a lot of emotions. When I have problems on the mound, I just (step) off the mound and take a little breath and keep going again.”

FAN BALLOT REVEALED The 2006 World Series champions, who are set to be feted all season as part of the 10th anniversary of Busch Stadium III, could have a presence in the Cardinals Hall of Fame’s class of 2016. DeWitt announced Monday the eight names that will be on the fan ballot, and for the first time Chris Carpenter, Scott Rolen, and Jason Isringhausen are eligible for the vote. The other five names are Joe Torre, Mark McGwire, Edgar Renteria, Keith Hernandez and Matt Morris. The fans will elect two players from that list during online voting that will begin and extend through March. The top two vote-getters will be inducted with one legacy pick by the Red Ribbon Committee and a fourth member of the class selected by ownership. Rick Hummel of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

take his two youngest children to their first Los Angeles Rams game this fall alongside the same fans who cheered him to the greatest singleseason rushing performance in NFL history. And if the current Rams need advice on the tricky transition from Missouri to Southern California, the Hall of Fame running back has plenty. “You’re not in St. Louis anymore,” Dickerson said with a laugh. “For all you young guys: It’s diferent. This is Hollywood.” Dickerson and former quarterback Jim Everett know all about the challenges and opportunities presented to professional athletes in Los Angeles, and they say the attention will be magnified during the Rams’ high-profile return season after 21 years away. If the Rams handle it well — and if they win — they’ll absolutely love LA. “It’s the best to play here,” Everett said. “This is a sports mecca.” With Kobe Bryant retiring from a terrible Lakers team and the Dodgers lacking a true superstar beyond quiet Clayton Kershaw, Rams running back Todd Gurley, receiver Tavon Austin and defensive linemen Aaron Donald and Robert Quinn are about to become some of the most popular guys in a town that loves a celebrity. Although the Rams played home games down the road in Anaheim when Dickerson and Everett starred, they dealt with the opportunities and temptations presented in the nation’s entertainment capital and second-largest media market. “This is a diferent animal, being in Los Angeles,” Dickerson said. “It just feels different, and I know what it’s like to put that uniform on. Being in LA, there’s nothing like it. It’s the glitz. It’s the glamour. It’s the beautiful girls. It’s the weather. But you’ve got to take your job serious, first of all. You’re a football player first, and all that other stuf comes secondary.” Everett settled in Southern California after his NFL career, and the Rams’ starting quarterback from 1986-93 greeted Rams executives at their official return last week in Inglewood. He has never stopped signing autographs with an “LA Rams” postscript. “When I was playing, we had the Lakers with Magic Johnson, we had the Dodgers, and LA loves champions,” Everett said. “There’s high standards, and the Rams are taking a big bite of the pie by moving here. They understand that level of expectation is going to go way up for all of us.” Dickerson spent the Rams’ return week in Orlando playing in the inaugural Diamond Resorts Invitational celebrity golf tournament, a $500,000 event supporting Florida Hospital for Children. Dickerson finished just behind former Raiders running back Marcus Allen and well behind winner Mardy Fish, the former tennis pro. But Dickerson’s thoughts were never far from the Rams. Although he made frequent appearances in St. Louis to support the franchise, he firmly believes the Rams never should have left — and he can only shake his head at what might have been. “Imagine the Rams playing in LA when they were the ‘Greatest Show on Turf,’” Dickerson said, referring to the Super Bowl-winning St. Louis team. “They would have had to go from practice to the studios to do movies. Everybody loves athletes. Actors want to be athletes, and athletes want to be actors. I hope it becomes like that again.” The Rams have some work to do first: They haven’t had a winning record since 2003.

NFL NOTEBOOK Rams report heavy interest for season tickets The Rams have begun taking deposits for season tickets to their irst season back in Los Angeles since 1994. The team reported heavy traic Monday on a website set up to take $100 refundable deposits for the chance to buy tickets when they become available. The Rams say their irst deposit came from Lakers great and Dodgers co-owner Magic Johnson. The Rams are expected to play just seven regularseason home games next season, with an eighth shifted to London. Meanwhile, the Rams and San Diego Chargers held their irst meeting to discuss sharing a stadium that is under construction in Inglewood. The Chargers have a one-year option to reach a lease agreement and become a tenant of the stadium whose construction is being headed by Rams owner Stan Kroenke. A very brief statement says the two sides have agreed not to publicly discuss details of the negotiations. Eagles hire Pederson • The Eagles are sort of going back to their glory days. Doug Pederson, who helped groom Donovan McNabb for the starting quarterback job and a successful playof run, was hired Monday to be Philadelphia’s coach. Pederson was Kansas City’s ofensive coordinator under Andy Reid for the past three seasons. Panthers’ Allen doubtful • Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera says defensive end Jared Allen has a broken bone in his foot and is doubtful for Sunday’s NFC championship game against Arizona. Associated Press

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Tigers, Upton reach deal, report says The Detroit Tigers agreed to terms with free-agent outielder Justin Upton on a six-year contract Monday night, USA Today reported, citing a source. The deal, $133 million for six years, won’t become oicial until Upton passes his physical. Upton will become the third highest-paid free-agent position player this winter behind Jason Heyward (eight years, $184 million

with the Chicago Cubs) and Chris Davis (seven years, $161 million with the Baltimore Orioles). Gordon enjoys success • Dee Gordon put his signature on a $50 million, ive-year contract with the Miami Marlins as more than a dozen relatives watched from the front row at a news conference Monday. “My family stuck with me through the hard times,” Gordon said. “I’m glad they’re here for the good times.”

The 5-foot-11 Gordon is a frustrated basketball player who switched to baseball in college. Last season he led the NL in batting (.333), hits (205) and stolen bases (58), won a Gold Glove at second base and made the All-Star team. Royals complete deal with Cain • The Royals inalized their $17.5 million, two-year deal with Lorenzo Cain, buying out the All-Star outielder’s inal two years of arbitration. Cain will receive $6.5 million

this season and $11 million next season. Rangers bring back Lewis • Colby Lewis declared that he will be ready for opening day after knee surgery. The Rangers signed him Monday to a one-year deal for $6 million to be in their starting rotation. Lewis led the Rangers with 17 wins and 204 2/3 innings last season. From news services

NFL PLAYOFFS DIVISIONAL ROUND Jan. 16 New England 27, Kansas City 20 Arizona 26, Green Bay 20, OT Jan. 17 Carolina 31, Seattle 24 Denver 23, Pittsburgh 16 CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday AFC: New England at Denver, 2:05 p.m., KMOV (4) NFC: Arizona at Carolina, 5:40 p.m., KTVI (2) SUPER BOWL • Sunday, Feb. 7 in Santa Clara, Calif. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 5:30 p.m., KMOV (4)


NHL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016 NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE

Blues get Bouwmeester back But Bortuzzo is out; Benoit makes debut BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Andre Benoit became the 10th defenseman used by the Blues when he made his debut Monday against Pittsburgh. Benoit, 32, was recalled Sunday because of the uncertain status of Jay Bouwmeester and Robert Bortuzzo. It turned out that Bouwmeester was available, after missing four games with a concussion, and Bortuzzo was not, after sustaining a lower-body injury in Saturday’s 4-3 overtime win over Montreal. “I feel good,” Bouwmeester said. “Any time you miss a little time, things seem like they go a little faster. We picked it up pretty quick.” Bouwmeester, who was averaging the second-most ice time on the club (23 minutes, 8 seconds) before his injury, rejoined defensive partner Alex Pietrangelo. “Obviously I play pretty much the whole game with him,” Pietrangelo said. “Big impact on the game on both ends of the ice, so anytime you get a player of that caliber back, it’s just going to make your team better.” But while Bouwmeester was back in the lineup Monday, the

CHRIS LEE • Post-Dispatch

Blues right winger Ty Rattie collides with Pittsburgh defenseman Ian Cole.

Blues were without Bortuzzo. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock would not provide any information on the injury, but the belief is that Bortuzzo was hurt after blocking a shot Saturday. Goaltender Brian Elliott referenced it after the game. “Bobby Bortuzzo, point blank, sacrificed the body right in front of me, made a huge block,” Elliott said. The timetable of the defenseman’s absence isn’t known. Hitchcock would only say that “it’s a loss for us.”

In the meantime, the Blues plugged Benoit into the lineup, making Chris Butler a healthy scratch. Benoit, a 5-foot-11, 191-pound left-shot defenseman, signed a free-agent contract with the club last summer. He has played the first half of the season with the team’s American Hockey League affiliate, the Chicago Wolves, for whom he had 25 points in 37 games. “It’s been going well,” said Benoit, who has played in 179 NHL games, most recently with Buffalo. “I was able to get a lot of my confidence back, playing in the AHL this year. Hopefully I can take that with me and play well here.” Benoit earned the call-up over Petteri Lindbohm. “He’s played the best of any of them down there the last three weeks or so,” Hitchcock said, “and deserved the call-up.”

BLUENOTES In addition to Butler, Blues forward Dmitrij Jaskin was a healthy scratch for the second consecutive game. ... Carl Gunnarsson (upper-body injury) skated Monday and is expected to travel with the club on its three-game road trip. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Atlantic Florida Detroit Tampa Bay Boston Montreal Ottawa Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Islanders NY Rangers Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina Columbus

GP 46 45 45 44 46 45 45 43 GP 45 45 45 45 46 43 47 46

W 26 23 24 23 23 21 18 16 W 34 24 24 21 22 20 20 17

L 15 14 17 16 19 18 23 20 L 8 15 16 17 19 15 19 25

OT 5 8 4 5 4 6 4 7 OT 3 6 5 7 5 8 8 4

Pts 57 54 52 51 50 48 40 39 Pts 71 54 53 49 49 48 48 38

GF 121 111 119 133 128 125 105 108 GF 149 123 129 110 101 98 111 116

GA 105 116 107 116 118 138 122 122 GA 97 112 120 113 110 114 129 146

Home 13-7-2 11-8-5 12-8-2 10-11-2 12-8-2 11-6-4 9-14-2 7-8-5 Home 18-3-1 15-7-3 16-5-2 11-7-4 9-10-3 11-5-5 10-8-5 8-9-4

Away 13-8-3 12-6-3 12-9-2 13-5-3 11-11-2 10-12-2 9-9-2 9-12-2 Away 16-5-2 9-8-3 8-11-3 10-10-3 13-9-2 9-10-3 10-11-3 9-16-0

Div 8-5-0 9-4-2 8-5-2 11-6-1 10-3-1 7-7-2 5-9-1 0-5-5 Div 10-3-1 9-3-2 6-4-4 4-4-2 6-6-1 7-4-3 7-7-3 7-7-2

GF 140 154 126 113 131 116 119 GF 118 122 124 111 88 116 115

GA Home Away Div 110 20-5-1 11-8-3 7-6-1 124 17-5-0 12-7-5 8-3-1 123 16-8-3 11-7-4 10-5-1 106 14-8-2 8-7-6 9-7-4 130 10-10-3 13-11-0 10-3-1 123 13-6-3 7-11-5 5-9-2 131 12-8-1 9-14-2 6-11-1 GA Home Away Div 99 14-7-1 14-6-2 9-5-0 133 12-7-3 10-10-2 10-1-2 117 8-12-0 15-6-2 6-4-1 127 9-8-4 10-9-6 6-3-3 105 13-8-4 6-10-3 6-4-4 131 14-9-0 6-11-3 4-8-2 136 13-9-1 6-14-4 6-7-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Chicago 48 Dallas 46 Blues 49 Minnesota 45 Colorado 47 Nashville 45 Winnipeg 46 Paciic GP Los Angeles 44 Arizona 44 San Jose 43 Vancouver 46 Anaheim 44 Calgary 43 Edmonton 47

W 31 29 27 22 23 20 21 W 28 22 23 19 19 20 19

L 13 12 15 15 21 17 22 L 13 17 18 17 18 20 23

OT 4 5 7 8 3 8 3 OT 3 5 2 10 7 3 5

Pts 66 63 61 52 49 48 45 Pts 59 49 48 48 45 43 43

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday Blues 5, Pittsburgh 2 Edmonton 4, Florida 2 Colorado 2, Winnipeg 1 Buffalo at Arizona, late Ottawa at San Jose, late Sunday Vancouver 2, NY Islanders 1, SO Philadelphia 2, Detroit 1, SO Pittsburgh 5, Carolina 0 Tampa Bay 3, Florida 1 Washington 5, NY Rangers 2 Chicago 5, Montreal 2 Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2

Tuesday Calgary at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Vancouver at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 6 p.m. Boston at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 7 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Blues at Detroit, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m.

Oilers keep Panthers reeling

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Edmonton’s Andrej Sekera battles Florida’s Jonathan Huberdeau for the puck. The Oilers beat the host Panthers 4-2.

FROM NEWS SERVICES

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Pittsburgh’s Bryan Rust tries to hop clear of a teammate’s shot as he screens the goalie in the second period.

Stastny has goal, three assists in win BLUES • FROM B1

Troy Brouwer also scored for the Blues. The Blues split the season series with Pittsburgh at one game apiece, following the Penguins’ 4-3 overtime victory on Nov. 25 at Consol Energy Center. There were a combined 14 goals in the two games and until Stastny netted his with 8 minutes, 22 seconds remaining in regulation, neither team had held a two-goal lead. Stastny’s goal gave the Blues a 4-2 lead, and Kevin Shattenkirk’s empty-net goal wrapped up the scoring. Stastny assisted on Shattenkirk’s ninth goal of the season for a four-point night. The Blues were clinging to a 3-2 lead before Stastny took a wrist shot from the top of the circle, beating Pittsburgh backup goalie Jeff Zatkoff for his fifth goal of the season. He now has 18 assists for 23 points in 31 games this season. Brouwer’s ninth goal of the season gave the Blues a 3-2 lead just 2:50 into the third period. Both he and Steen had a goal and an assist. So after being outshot 47-22 by Montreal and winning, the Blues were outshot 38-25 by Pittsburgh and were victorious Monday, thanks to 36 more saves from Brian Elliott. It was a close game before the Blues netted three goals in the third period. Two Russian superstars traded highlight-reel goals less than two minutes apart in the second period, sending the game to the third tied at 2-2. First, Evgeni Malkin handed Pittsburgh its first lead of the

Pittsburgh Blues

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1 1

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First period B: Steen 14 (Stastny), 12:00. P: Kunitz 8 (Letang, Crosby), 18:03. Penalties: Daley, Pit (holding), 18:19. Second period P: Malkin 20 (Hagelin, Letang), 15:56. B: Tarasenko 25 (Edmundson, Fabbri), 17:14. Penalties: Stastny, StL (delay of game), 3:05; Kunitz, Pit (roughing), 5:12; Edmundson, StL (roughing), 5:12; Lehtera, StL (interference), 6:14. Third period B: Brouwer 9 (Stastny, Parayko), 2:10. B: Stastny 5 (Brouwer, Bouwmeester), 11:38. B: Shattenkirk 9 (Steen, Stastny), 19:44 (en). Penalties: Kunitz, Pit (delay of game), 3:40; Tarasenko, StL (closing hand on puck), 17:41. Shots on goal Pittsburgh 14 17 7 Blues 9 8 8 Power-plays Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Blues 0 of 2. Goaltenders Pittsburgh, Zatkoff 3-5-1 (24 shots-20 saves). Blues, Elliott 9-5-4 (38-36). A: 19,312. Referees: Wes McCauley, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Kiel Murchison.

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game, scoring his 20th goal of the season on one of his patented breakaway moves. Malkin skated around Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester, who was back in the lineup Monday after missing four games with a concussion. Then in the clear, Malkin went backhand, forehand and goal for a 2-1 advantage with 4:04 left in the second period. Oh yeah, watch this, Tarasenko said. Taking a pass from Joel Edmundson at the blue line, Tarasenko entered the offensive zone and appeared as though he might pull up and turn the puck inside. That caused Penguins defenseman Ben Lovejoy to pause, and when he did, Tarasenko continued to curl around Lovejoy, protecting the puck on the outside the entire time, and then flipped to his forehand for the shot. Tarasenko’s 25th goal of the

season, which tied the score 2-2 with 2:46 left in the middle frame, ended a season-long fivegame stretch without one. The Blues continue to strike back quickly after falling behind, with Tarasenko’s goal marking the third time in the past two games. In Saturday’s 4-3 overtime victory over Montreal, they responded with goals just 1:07 and 44 seconds after the Canadiens had taken leads of 2-1 and 3-2. Tarasenko’s goal tied the score Monday for the second time, as the clubs also traded goal in the first period. Steen, who was it was learned underwent three root canals after teammate Kevin Shattenkirk inadvertently hit him in the face with a stick against Carolina, put the Blues ahead 1-0. On the goal, Zatkoff came out of the crease to poke-check the puck. Brouwer met the netminder at the puck and whacked it with a backhand to keep it free. Stastny then fed a pass to Steen, who had only a defenseman — former Blue Ian Cole — between him and the mesh. He buried his 14th goal of the season with eight minutes remaining. But Pittsburgh responded late in the period, with Chris Kunitz picking up his eighth goal of the season. Teammate Kris Letang, who was a game-time decision with a hand injury, sprung Kunitz on a breakaway, and he beat Elliott for a 1-1 score with 1:57 to play. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Taylor Hall snapped a scoring drought with two goals, Cam Talbot stopped 30 shots and the visiting Edmonton Oilers added to Florida’s slide by beating the Panthers 4-2 on Monday night. Teddy Purcell had a goal and two assists for Edmonton, which led 3-0 after two periods and then withstood a Florida rally in the final 20 minutes. Jordan Eberle also scored for the Oilers. Hall, who also had an assist, scored just one goal in his previous 14 games. Reilly Smith and Quinton Howden scored early in the third period for Florida, which has dropped four straight since winning 12 in a row. Al Montoya gave up three goals on the first seven shots he faced, and the Panthers had their club-record home winning streak snapped at seven games. Since the win streak, the Panthers have been outscored 16-5.

NOTEBOOK Power play powers Blackhawks • For a team that has had as much success as the Chicago Blackhawks have had over the last seven seasons, it’s somewhat surprising its power play has been inconsistent. Despite their talent over the years, the ’Hawks have had a love-hate relationship with scoring on the power play. Take last season, when the ’Hawks were 19th in the league after converting 17.6 percent of their power-play opportunities. Now the ’Hawks are on an 11-game winning streak and a big reason for it is their robust power play. For the season, the Hawks have converted 22.6 percent of their man advantages, good for third in the league. That’s their best rate and highest ranking in the Joel Quenneville era. Over the 11 games, the ’Hawks have converted nine of 34 power-play opportunities (26.5 percent).

NHL SUMMARIES Oilers 4, Panthers 2 Edmonton 2 1 1 — 4 Florida 0 0 2 — 2 First period: 1, Edmonton, Hall 17 (Purcell), 5:50. 2, Edmonton, Eberle 11 (Nugent-Hopkins, Pouliot), 17:52. Penalties: Hendricks, Edm, major (fighting), 4:16; Gudbranson, Fla, major (fighting), 4:16; Pouliot, Edm (holding), 11:15; Nurse, Edm (holding), 19:10. Second period: 3, Edmonton, Hall 18 (Purcell, Draisaitl), 4:19. Penalties: Sekera, Edm (interference), 1:44; Jagr, Fla (tripping), 12:21; Edmonton bench, served by Yakupov (too many men), 13:22. Third period: 4, Florida, Smith 13, 2:45. 5, Florida, Howden 4 (Thornton, Campbell), 5:35. 6, Edmonton, Purcell 10 (Hall), 18:32. Penalties: None. Shots: Edmonton 6-9-9: 24. Florida 9-14-10: 33. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 1; Florida 0 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 9-13-3 (33 shots-31 saves). Florida, Montoya 7-2-1 (24-20). A: 14,897. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: David Brisebois, John Grandt.

Avalanche 2, Jets 1 Colorado 0 2 0 — 2 Winnipeg 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Colorado bench, served by Skille (too many men), 5:51; Little, Wpg (tripping), 11:39. Second period: 1, Colorado, Soderberg 9 (Holden, Comeau), 1:16. 2, Colorado, Iginla 13 (Soderberg, Tanguay), 19:42 (pp). Penalties: Wheeler, Wpg (interference), 18:48. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Armia 2 (Perreault, Ehlers), 19:18. Penalties: Barrie, Col (tripping), 15:21. Shots: Colorado 10-16-8: 34. Winnipeg 12-9-16: 37. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 2. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 16-12-3 (37 shots-36 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 11-7-1 (34-32). A: 15,294. Referees: Chris Lee, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Mark Wheler.

LATE SUNDAY

Kings 3, Ducks 2 Los Angeles 0 3 0 — 3 Anaheim 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: King, LA (interference), 1:06; Brown, LA (slashing), 14:58; McNabb, LA, major (fighting), 18:48; Maroon, Ana, major (fighting), 18:48; Stewart, Ana (cross-checking), 19:25. Second period: 1, Los Angeles, Lecavalier 2 (Carter, Martinez), :57 (pp). 2, Anaheim, Rakell 9 (Theodore, Bieksa), 1:30. 3, Los Angeles, Toffoli 22 (Kopitar, Muzzin), 15:44. 4, Los Angeles, Kopitar 13 (McNabb, Lucic), 17:40. Penalties: Schenn, LA, major (fighting), 8:17; Stewart, Ana, major (fighting), 8:17; Muzzin, LA (slashing), 8:40. Third period: 5, Anaheim, Perron 5 (Getzlaf), 5:33. Penalties: Gibson, Ana, served by Vatanen (delay of game), 19:40. Shots: Los Angeles 7-12-7: 26. Anaheim 5-11-16: 32. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 2; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 25-10-2 (32 shots-30 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 9-7-2 (26-23). A: 17,227. Referees: Mike Leggo, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Shane Heyer.

Flyers 2, Red Wings 1 Philadelphia 0 0 1 0 — 2 Detroit 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: White, Phi match penalty (match), 2:20; DeKeyser, Det (interference), 16:09. Second period: 1, Detroit, Kronwall 3 (Ericsson, Datsyuk), 18:25. Penalties: Gudas, Phi (holding), 8:17; Medvedev, Phi (roughing), 10:17; Abdelkader, Det (roughing), 10:17. Third period: 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 13 (Voracek, Simmonds), 4:24. Penalties: Laughton, Phi (hooking), 4:39; Quincey, Det (interference), 7:13; Green, Det (delay of game), 10:00; Kronwall, Det (tripping), 10:24; Smith, Det (hooking), 19:55; Simmonds, Phi (goaltender interference), 19:58. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Philadelphia 2 (Simmonds NG, Giroux G, Voracek G), Detroit 1 (Nyquist NG, Datsyuk G, Richards NG). Shots: Philadelphia 11-5-14-1: 31. Detroit 10-13-4-3: 30. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 5; Detroit 0 of 4. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 10-5-2 (30 shots-29 saves). Detroit, Mrazek 16-8-4 (31-30). A: 20,027. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Dave Jackson. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Steve Miller.


NHL

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

M 2 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016 NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE

Blues get Bouwmeester back But Bortuzzo is out; Benoit makes debut BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Andre Benoit became the 10th defenseman used by the Blues when he made his debut Monday against Pittsburgh. Benoit, 32, was recalled Sunday because of the uncertain status of Jay Bouwmeester and Robert Bortuzzo. It turned out that Bouwmeester was available, after missing four games with a concussion, and Bortuzzo was not, after sustaining a lower-body injury in Saturday’s 4-3 overtime win over Montreal. “I feel good,” Bouwmeester said. “Any time you miss a little time, things seem like they go a little faster. We picked it up pretty quick.” Bouwmeester, who was averaging the second-most ice time on the club (23 minutes, 8 seconds) before his injury, rejoined defensive partner Alex Pietrangelo. “Obviously I play pretty much the whole game with him,” Pietrangelo said. “Big impact on the game on both ends of the ice, so anytime you get a player of that caliber back, it’s just going to make your team better.” But while Bouwmeester was back in the lineup Monday, the

CHRIS LEE • Post-Dispatch

Blues right winger Ty Rattie collides with Pittsburgh defenseman Ian Cole.

Blues were without Bortuzzo. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock would not provide any information on the injury, but the belief is that Bortuzzo was hurt after blocking a shot Saturday. Goaltender Brian Elliott referenced it after the game. “Bobby Bortuzzo, point blank, sacrificed the body right in front of me, made a huge block,” Elliott said. The timetable of the defenseman’s absence isn’t known. Hitchcock would only say that “it’s a loss for us.”

In the meantime, the Blues plugged Benoit into the lineup, making Chris Butler a healthy scratch. Benoit, a 5-foot-11, 191-pound left-shot defenseman, signed a free-agent contract with the club last summer. He has played the first half of the season with the team’s American Hockey League affiliate, the Chicago Wolves, for whom he had 25 points in 37 games. “It’s been going well,” said Benoit, who has played in 179 NHL games, most recently with Buffalo. “I was able to get a lot of my confidence back, playing in the AHL this year. Hopefully I can take that with me and play well here.” Benoit earned the call-up over Petteri Lindbohm. “He’s played the best of any of them down there the last three weeks or so,” Hitchcock said, “and deserved the call-up.”

BLUENOTES In addition to Butler, Blues forward Dmitrij Jaskin was a healthy scratch for the second consecutive game. ... Carl Gunnarsson (upper-body injury) skated Monday and is expected to travel with the club on its three-game road trip. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Atlantic Florida Detroit Tampa Bay Boston Montreal Ottawa Bufalo Toronto Metropolitan Washington NY Islanders NY Rangers Pittsburgh New Jersey Philadelphia Carolina Columbus

GP 46 45 45 44 46 46 46 43 GP 45 45 45 45 46 43 47 46

W 26 23 24 23 23 22 19 16 W 34 24 24 21 22 20 20 17

L 15 14 17 16 19 18 23 20 L 8 15 16 17 19 15 19 25

OT 5 8 4 5 4 7 4 7 OT 3 6 5 7 5 8 8 4

Pts 57 54 52 51 50 51 42 39 Pts 71 54 53 49 49 48 48 38

GF 121 111 119 133 128 129 107 108 GF 149 123 129 110 101 98 111 116

GA 105 116 107 116 118 141 123 122 GA 97 112 120 113 110 114 129 146

Home 13-7-2 11-8-5 12-8-2 10-11-2 12-8-2 11-6-4 9-14-2 7-8-5 Home 18-3-1 15-7-3 16-5-2 11-7-4 9-10-3 11-5-5 10-8-5 8-9-4

Away 13-8-3 12-6-3 12-9-2 13-5-3 11-11-2 11-12-2 10-9-2 9-12-2 Away 16-5-2 9-8-3 8-11-3 10-10-3 13-9-2 9-10-3 10-11-3 9-16-0

Div 8-5-0 9-4-2 8-5-2 11-6-1 10-3-1 7-7-2 5-9-1 0-5-5 Div 10-3-1 9-3-2 6-4-4 4-4-2 6-6-1 7-4-3 7-7-3 7-7-2

GF 140 154 126 113 131 116 119 GF 118 123 127 111 88 116 115

GA Home Away Div 110 20-5-1 11-8-3 7-6-1 124 17-5-0 12-7-5 8-3-1 123 16-8-3 11-7-4 10-5-1 106 14-8-2 8-7-6 9-7-4 130 10-10-3 13-11-0 10-3-1 123 13-6-3 7-11-5 5-9-2 131 12-8-1 9-14-2 6-11-1 GA Home Away Div 99 14-7-1 14-6-2 9-5-0 135 12-8-3 10-10-2 10-1-2 121 8-13-0 15-6-2 6-4-1 127 9-8-4 10-9-6 6-3-3 105 13-8-4 6-10-3 6-4-4 131 14-9-0 6-11-3 4-8-2 136 13-9-1 6-14-4 6-7-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Chicago 48 Dallas 46 Blues 49 Minnesota 45 Colorado 47 Nashville 45 Winnipeg 46 Paciic GP Los Angeles 44 Arizona 45 San Jose 44 Vancouver 46 Anaheim 44 Calgary 43 Edmonton 47

W 31 29 27 22 23 20 21 W 28 22 23 19 19 20 19

L 13 12 15 15 21 17 22 L 13 18 19 17 18 20 23

OT 4 5 7 8 3 8 3 OT 3 5 3 10 7 3 5

Pts 66 63 61 52 49 48 45 Pts 59 49 49 48 45 43 43

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday Blues 5, Pittsburgh 2 Edmonton 4, Florida 2 Colorado 2, Winnipeg 1 Buffalo 2, Arizona 1 Ottawa 4, San Jose 3 (SO) Sunday Vancouver 2, NY Islanders 1, SO Philadelphia 2, Detroit 1, SO Pittsburgh 5, Carolina 0 Tampa Bay 3, Florida 1 Washington 5, NY Rangers 2 Chicago 5, Montreal 2 Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2

Tuesday Calgary at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Vancouver at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 6 p.m. Boston at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 7 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Blues at Detroit, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m.

Oilers keep Panthers reeling

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Edmonton’s Andrej Sekera battles Florida’s Jonathan Huberdeau for the puck. The Oilers beat the host Panthers 4-2.

FROM NEWS SERVICES

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Pittsburgh’s Bryan Rust tries to hop clear of a teammate’s shot as he screens the goalie in the second period.

Stastny has goal, three assists in win BLUES • FROM B1

the Blues, giving that group a total of eight points. Elliott made 36 more saves, giving him a combined 82 in his past two victories. The win in front of a crowd of 19,312 — the third consecutive sellout at Scottrade Center — closed out a four-game homestand with a record of 3-1. The club will now head on the road for a three-game trip that will take the season into the NHL AllStar break. The Blues split the season series with Pittsburgh one game apiece, following the Penguins’ 4-3 overtime victory Nov. 25 at Consol Energy Center. There were a combined 14 goals in the two games and until Stastny netted his with 8 minutes, 22 seconds remaining in regulation, neither team had held a two-goal lead. “We’re up a goal, we’re down a goal,” Elliott said. “It’s trying to stay even keeled and the guys did a good job tonight.” The Blues took a 3-2 lead on Brouwer’s ninth goal of the season just 2:10 into the third period. Stastny whacked a puck into the slot, where Brouwer settled it and slung it past Pittsburgh backup goalie Jef Zatkof. “It came surprisingly flat, to be honest with you, when it bounced,” Brouwer said. “Hopefully I get a bunch of it and I did.” Stastny then made it 4-2 with a wrist shot from the top of the circle, beating Zatkof for his fifth goal of the season. Kevin Shattenkirk added an empty-netter, and with Stastny setting him up, the center had his third assist and fourth point of the game. It was his first four-point game since Dec. 2, 2009, with Colorado. Steen and Brouwer each finished with a goal and an assist. “We talked a little bit before the game that the last few games we’ve been a little big stagnant, so we wanted to be a diferencemaker tonight and we were,” Brouwer said.

Pittsburgh Blues

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First period B: Steen 14 (Stastny), 12:00. P: Kunitz 8 (Letang, Crosby), 18:03. Penalties: Daley, Pit (holding), 18:19. Second period P: Malkin 20 (Hagelin, Letang), 15:56. B: Tarasenko 25 (Edmundson, Fabbri), 17:14. Penalties: Stastny, StL (delay of game), 3:05; Kunitz, Pit (roughing), 5:12; Edmundson, StL (roughing), 5:12; Lehtera, StL (interference), 6:14. Third period B: Brouwer 9 (Stastny, Parayko), 2:10. B: Stastny 5 (Brouwer, Bouwmeester), 11:38. B: Shattenkirk 9 (Steen, Stastny), 19:44 (en). Penalties: Kunitz, Pit (delay of game), 3:40; Tarasenko, StL (closing hand on puck), 17:41. Shots on goal Pittsburgh 14 17 7 Blues 9 8 8 Power-plays Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Blues 0 of 2. Goaltenders Pittsburgh, Zatkoff 3-5-1 (24 shots-20 saves). Blues, Elliott 9-5-4 (38-36). A: 19,312. Referees: Wes McCauley, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Kiel Murchison.

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It was a close game before the Blues netted three goals in the third period. Two Russian superstars traded highlight-reel goals less than two minutes apart in the second period, sending the game to the third tied at 2-2. First, Evgeni Malkin handed Pittsburgh its first lead of the game, scoring his 20th goal of the season on one of his patented breakaway moves. Malkin skated around Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester, who was back in the lineup Monday after missing four games with a concussion. Then in the clear, Malkin went backhand, forehand and goal for a 2-1 advantage with 4:04 left in the second period. Oh yeah, watch this, Tarasenko thought. Taking a pass from Joel Edmundson at the blue line, Tarasenko entered the offensive zone and appeared as though he might pull up and turn the puck inside. That caused Penguins defenseman Ben Lovejoy to pause, and when he did, Tarasenko continued to curl around Lovejoy, protecting the puck on the outside, and then flipped to his forehand for the shot. “The battle of the Russians

there,” Stastny said. “I think once Malkin had that nice goal, then Vladi got upset. He took it in his own end and basically did the same thing a little nicer, a little more power move and a nice shot.” Tarasenko’s 25th goal of the season, which tied the score 2-2 with 2:46 left in the middle frame, ended a season-long fivegame stretch without one. The Blues had a quick answer for the third time in their last two games. In Saturday’s 4-3 overtime victory over Montreal, they responded with goals just 1:07 and 44 seconds after the Canadiens had taken leads of 2-1 and 3-2. “Tarasenko’s goal was, again, as timely as it could be, because we were being outplayed, our goalie was standing on his head and to score that goal, that’s a great sign for us,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. The Blues and Penguins traded goals in the first period. Steen, who was it was learned underwent three root canals after Shattenkirk inadvertently hit him in the face with a stick against Carolina, put the Blues ahead 1-0. But Pittsburgh responded with Chris Kunitz picking up his eighth goal of the season with 1:57 left in the period. After that, Elliott allowed just one goal on the last 25 shots he faced, picking up his fourth win in his last five decisions. “He’s just working,” Hitchcock said. “He’s battling, he’s working, he’s competing. He’s competing at a very, very high level now. He’s taking advantage of a situation that was thrust upon him, but his competitive level’s as high as I’ve seen it right now. It’s really good to see.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Taylor Hall snapped a scoring drought with two goals, Cam Talbot stopped 30 shots and the visiting Edmonton Oilers added to Florida’s slide by beating the Panthers 4-2 on Monday night. Teddy Purcell had a goal and two assists for Edmonton, which led 3-0 after two periods and then withstood a Florida rally in the final 20 minutes. Jordan Eberle also scored for the Oilers. Hall, who also had an assist, scored just one goal in his previous 14 games. Reilly Smith and Quinton Howden scored early in the third period for Florida, which has dropped four straight since winning 12 in a row. Al Montoya gave up three goals on the first seven shots he faced, and the Panthers had their club-record home winning streak snapped at seven games. Since the win streak, the Panthers have been outscored 16-5.

NOTEBOOK Power play powers Blackhawks • For a team that has had as much success as the Chicago Blackhawks have had over the last seven seasons, it’s somewhat surprising its power play has been inconsistent. Despite their talent over the years, the ’Hawks have had a love-hate relationship with scoring on the power play. Take last season, when the ’Hawks were 19th in the league after converting 17.6 percent of their power-play opportunities. Now the ’Hawks are on an 11-game winning streak and a big reason for it is their robust power play. For the season, the Hawks have converted 22.6 percent of their man advantages, good for third in the league. That’s their best rate and highest ranking in the Joel Quenneville era. Over the 11 games, the ’Hawks have converted nine of 34 power-play opportunities (26.5 percent).

NHL SUMMARIES Oilers 4, Panthers 2

Sabres 2, Coyotes 1

Edmonton 2 1 1 — 4 Florida 0 0 2 — 2 First period: 1, Edmonton, Hall 17 (Purcell), 5:50. 2, Edmonton, Eberle 11 (Nugent-Hopkins, Pouliot), 17:52. Penalties: Hendricks, Edm, major (fighting), 4:16; Gudbranson, Fla, major (fighting), 4:16; Pouliot, Edm (holding), 11:15; Nurse, Edm (holding), 19:10. Second period: 3, Edmonton, Hall 18 (Purcell, Draisaitl), 4:19. Penalties: Sekera, Edm (interference), 1:44; Jagr, Fla (tripping), 12:21; Edmonton bench, served by Yakupov (too many men), 13:22. Third period: 4, Florida, Smith 13, 2:45. 5, Florida, Howden 4 (Thornton, Campbell), 5:35. 6, Edmonton, Purcell 10 (Hall), 18:32. Penalties: None. Shots: Edmonton 6-9-9: 24. Florida 9-14-10: 33. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 1; Florida 0 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 9-13-3 (33 shots-31 saves). Florida, Montoya 7-2-1 (24-20). A: 14,897. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: David Brisebois, John Grandt.

Buffalo 0 2 0 — 2 Arizona 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: McCabe, Buf, double minor (high-sticking), 4:27; Buffalo bench, served by Varone (too many men), 13:59. Second period: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 14 (Ristolainen, R.O’Reilly), 10:07 (pp). 2, Buffalo, McGinn 10 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 17:35 (pp). Penalties: Hanzal, Ari (tripping), 8:07; Murphy, Ari (kneeing), 9:55; Schaller, Buf (tripping), 13:10; Chipchura, Ari (hooking), 16:11. Third period: 3, Arizona, Vermette 7 (Doan, Rieder), 8:04. Penalties: McGinn, Buf (interference), 5:53. Missed Penalty Shot: Kane, Buf, 1:18 second. Shots: Buffalo 9-15-4: 28. Arizona 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: Buffalo 2 of 3; Arizona 0 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 12-12-2 (27 shots-26 saves). Arizona, Domingue 7-3-3 (28-26). A: 11,134. Referees: Dave Lewis, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Matt MacPherson. LATE SUNDAY

Avalanche 2, Jets 1

Kings 3, Ducks 2

Colorado 0 2 0 — 2 Winnipeg 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Colorado bench, served by Skille (too many men), 5:51; Little, Wpg (tripping), 11:39. Second period: 1, Colorado, Soderberg 9 (Holden, Comeau), 1:16. 2, Colorado, Iginla 13 (Soderberg, Tanguay), 19:42 (pp). Penalties: Wheeler, Wpg (interference), 18:48. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Armia 2 (Perreault, Ehlers), 19:18. Penalties: Barrie, Col (tripping), 15:21. Shots: Colorado 10-16-8: 34. Winnipeg 12-9-16: 37. Power-plays: Colorado 1 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 2. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 16-12-3 (37 shots-36 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 11-7-1 (34-32). A: 15,294. Referees: Chris Lee, Dan O’Halloran. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Mark Wheler.

Los Angeles 0 3 0 — 3 Anaheim 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: King, LA (interference), 1:06; Brown, LA (slashing), 14:58; McNabb, LA, major (fighting), 18:48; Maroon, Ana, major (fighting), 18:48; Stewart, Ana (cross-checking), 19:25. Second period: 1, Los Angeles, Lecavalier 2 (Carter, Martinez), :57 (pp). 2, Anaheim, Rakell 9 (Theodore, Bieksa), 1:30. 3, Los Angeles, Toffoli 22 (Kopitar, Muzzin), 15:44. 4, Los Angeles, Kopitar 13 (McNabb, Lucic), 17:40. Penalties: Schenn, LA, major (fighting), 8:17; Stewart, Ana, major (fighting), 8:17; Muzzin, LA (slashing), 8:40. Third period: 5, Anaheim, Perron 5 (Getzlaf), 5:33. Penalties: Gibson, Ana, served by Vatanen (delay of game), 19:40. Shots: Los Angeles 7-12-7: 26. Anaheim 5-11-16: 32. Power-plays: Los Angeles 1 of 2; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 25-10-2 (32 shots-30 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 9-7-2 (26-23). A: 17,227. Referees: Mike Leggo, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Shane Heyer.


SPORTS

01.19.2016 • TueSday • M 1

Curry, Warriors pummel Cavaliers

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 26 15 Boston 22 20 New York 21 22 Brooklyn 11 31 Philadelphia 5 38 Southeast W L Atlanta 25 17 Miami 23 18 Orlando 20 20 Washington 19 21 Charlotte 19 22 Central W L Cleveland 28 11 Chicago 24 16 Indiana 22 19 Detroit 22 19 Milwaukee 18 25

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stephen Curry scored 35 points in three quarters, Andre Iguodala added 20 and the Golden State Warriors returned to the floor where they won the NBA championship last season and embarrassed the host Cleveland Cavaliers 132-98 on Monday night. The Warriors built a 30-point lead in the first half and bounced back from a shocking loss in Detroit over the weekend by winning their fifth straight over Cleveland. Only a late flurry of points helped the Cavs avoid their worst home loss in franchise history. LeBron James led Cleveland with 16 points. Curry made seven 3-pointers — his last put the Warriors ahead by 40 late in the third quarter — and the reigning league MVP seemed right at home in Quicken Loans Arena, where the Warriors clinched their first title since 1975 last June. On Sunday, Curry said he hoped the visitors’ locker room “still smells a little bit like champagne.” Walker scores 52 for Hornets • Kemba Walker scored a franchise-record 52 points and the host Charlotte Hornets won in double overtime, beating the Utah Jazz 124-119.

NOTEBOOK Ex-Bulls assistant Bach dies • Johnny

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Golden State’s Stephen Curry soars for 35 points in a 132-98 rout of the Cavaliers.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 36 6 Memphis 24 19 Dallas 24 19 Houston 22 20 New Orleans 13 27 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 30 12 Utah 18 23 Portland 19 25 Denver 16 25 Minnesota 13 29 Paciic W L Golden State 38 4 LA Clippers 26 14 Sacramento 17 23 Phoenix 13 29 LA Lakers 9 34

Bach, whose defensive expertise as an assistant coach to Phil Jackson helped the Chicago Bulls win three NBA titles from 1991 to 1993, has died. He was 91. Bach was the head coach of the Golden State Warriors from 1983-86 before joining the Bulls as an assistant. He also worked as an assistant for Charlotte, Detroit and Washington. He returned to the Bulls in 2003 and retired in 2006. “Johnny was a true treasure in the world of basketball,” Chicago executive vice president of basketball operations John Paxson said in a statement. “He was the classic ‘old school’ coach who came to work each and every day with energy and enthusiasm for the game he loved.’’

Pct .634 .524 .488 .262 .116 Pct .595 .561 .500 .475 .463 Pct .718 .600 .537 .537 .419

Pct .857 .558 .558 .524 .325 Pct .714 .439 .432 .390 .310 Pct .905 .650 .425 .310 .209

GB — 4½ 6 15½ 22 GB — 1½ 4 5 5½ GB — 4½ 7 7 12

GB — 12½ 12½ 14 22 GB — 11½ 12 13½ 17 GB — 11 20 25 29½

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 Str W-2 L-1 L-3 L-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 W-2

Home 12-6 11-10 12-8 7-15 3-16 Home 15-7 15-8 12-9 9-13 15-8 Home 15-2 16-7 13-6 14-7 12-7

Away 14-9 11-10 9-14 4-16 2-22 Away 10-10 8-10 8-11 10-8 4-14 Away 13-9 8-9 9-13 8-12 6-18

Conf 18-8 16-13 15-15 8-19 0-25 Conf 16-11 11-12 10-15 14-12 11-12 Conf 19-6 15-11 15-9 13-10 12-15

L10 10-0 7-3 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 1-9 L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str W-11 W-3 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-2 L-4 L-3

Home 24-0 16-7 12-7 13-10 8-9 Home 20-5 12-9 10-9 8-12 6-17 Home 19-0 14-7 10-11 9-11 5-13

Away 12-6 8-12 12-12 9-10 5-18 Away 10-7 6-14 9-16 8-13 7-12 Away 19-4 12-7 7-12 4-18 4-21

Conf 19-3 13-12 15-10 16-11 10-17 Conf 21-4 10-17 15-15 11-20 7-16 Conf 24-2 15-11 9-17 9-18 3-24

Monday New York 119, Philadelphia 113,2OT Portland 108, Washington 98 Charlotte 124, Utah 119,2OT Memphis 101, New Orleans 99 Chicago 111, Detroit 101 Atlanta 98, Orlando 81 Toronto 112, Brooklyn 100 Golden State 132, Cleveland 98 Dallas 118, Boston 113, OT Houston at LA Clippers, late Sunday Minnesota 117, Phoenix 87 San Antonio 112, Dallas 83 Oklahoma City 99, Miami 74 Denver 129, Indiana 126 Houston 112, LA Lakers 95 Tuesday Milwaukee at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver, 8 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Wednesday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Utah at New York, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 9:30 p.m.

NBA SUMMARIES LATE SUNDAY

Hawks 98, Magic 81

Bulls 111, Pistons 101

Trail Blazers 108, Wizards 98

Warriors 132, Cavaliers 98

Orlando: Harris 2-7 2-2 6, Frye 1-4 0-0 2, Vucevic 4-10 2-3 10, Payton 7-14 0-3 16, Fournier 2-11 0-0 6, Hezonja 3-14 4-4 10, Gordon 5-9 7-8 18, Nicholson 0-3 0-0 0, Napier 2-4 0-0 5, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Dedmon 2-2 0-0 4, Appling 1-3 0-0 2, Marble 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-87 15-20 81. Atlanta: Bazemore 1-5 0-0 2, Millsap 6-9 1-3 13, Horford 7-10 0-0 15, Teague 5-10 1-1 14, Korver 2-5 0-0 5, Sefolosha 4-8 2-2 10, Splitter 5-7 0-0 10, Schroder 3-8 0-0 6, Holiday 0-3 1-2 1, Scott 5-6 0-0 12, Hardaway Jr. 2-5 2-2 8, Muscala 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-80 7-10 98. Orlando 17 21 21 22 — 81 Atlanta 24 27 21 26 — 98 3-point goals: Orlando 6-22 (Payton 2-2, Fournier 2-4, Gordon 1-2, Napier 1-3, Nicholson 0-1, Appling 0-1, Harris 0-2, Frye 0-2, Hezonja 0-5), Atlanta 9-19 (Teague 3-3, Scott 2-2, Hardaway Jr. 2-3, Horford 1-2, Korver 1-3, Schroder 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2, Holiday 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 50 (Vucevic 11), Atlanta 54 (Millsap 12). Assists: Orlando 21 (Payton 5), Atlanta 31 (Schroder 8). Total fouls: Orlando 13, Atlanta 20. A: 17,460 (18,729).

Chicago: Snell 1-4 0-0 3, Gibson 4-9 0-0 8, Gasol 13-18 4-5 31, Rose 9-17 1-1 20, Butler 5-13 6-8 16, Brooks 3-7 0-0 6, McDermott 4-6 0-0 11, Mirotic 3-6 2-4 10, Portis 0-1 0-0 0, Moore 2-3 1-2 6. Totals 44-84 14-20 111. Detroit: Morris 8-16 2-2 18, Ilyasova 8-16 0-0 19, Drummond 5-9 3-10 13, Jackson 8-20 2-3 19, Caldwell-Pope 6-13 1-1 14, Johnson 2-7 4-4 8, Jennings 1-6 0-0 2, Baynes 4-6 0-0 8, Tolliver 0-2 0-0 0, Hilliard 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-95 12-20 101. Chicago 26 30 27 28 — 111 Detroit 32 21 26 22 — 101 3-point goals: Chicago 9-21 (McDermott 3-4, Mirotic 2-2, Moore 1-2, Rose 1-2, Gasol 1-3, Snell 1-3, Brooks 0-1, Portis 0-1, Butler 0-3), Detroit 5-26 (Ilyasova 3-8, Caldwell-Pope 1-1, Jackson 1-5, Tolliver 0-2, Johnson 0-2, Jennings 0-2, Morris 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Gasol 12), Detroit 61 (Drummond 16). Assists: Chicago 28 (Brooks 10), Detroit 18 (Jackson 6). Total fouls: Chicago 16, Detroit 16. Technicals: Caldwell-Pope 2, Drummond. Ejected — Caldwell-Pope. A: 18,935 (22,076).

Portland: Aminu 3-8 0-0 8, Vonleh 1-3 0-0 2, Plumlee 5-11 0-1 10, Lillard 7-16 0-1 16, McCollum 9-16 1-1 25, Crabbe 6-9 0-0 14, Leonard 7-10 0-0 18, Davis 1-4 4-7 6, Henderson 3-5 0-1 7, Harkless 1-1 0-0 2, Connaughton 0-1 0-0 0, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-84 5-11 108. Washington: Oubre Jr. 0-2 0-0 0, Dudley 4-8 0-2 10, Gortat 7-10 2-3 16, Wall 4-17 0-0 9, Temple 6-10 3-4 18, Beal 4-8 5-6 16, Nene 4-6 0-0 8, Sessions 3-5 4-4 10, Neal 5-9 1-1 11, Eddie 0-2 0-0 0, Blair 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-77 15-20 98. Portland 32 27 35 14 — 108 Washington 17 40 19 22 — 98 3-point goals: Portland 17-31 (McCollum 6-10, Leonard 4-7, Crabbe 2-2, Aminu 2-4, Lillard 2-6, Henderson 1-2), Washington 9-21 (Temple 3-5, Beal 3-5, Dudley 2-4, Wall 1-3, Sessions 0-1, Oubre Jr. 0-1, Eddie 0-2). Fouled out: Crabbe. Rebounds: Portland 53 (Plumlee 11), Washington 39 (Gortat 13). Assists: Portland 25 (Plumlee 7), Washington 25 (Wall 10). Total fouls: Portland 24, Washington 16. Technicals: Wall. A: 17,236 (20,308).

Golden State: Barnes 4-8 2-2 12, Green 5-10 4-7 16, Bogut 2-4 0-2 4, Curry 12-18 4-4 35, K.Thompson 5-11 4-4 15, Iguodala 7-8 2-2 20, Ezeli 2-3 0-0 4, Barbosa 3-6 2-2 8, Livingston 2-2 0-0 4, Clark 2-7 0-0 6, Rush 1-3 0-0 3, Speights 1-4 2-2 4, J.Thompson 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 46-85 21-27 132. Cleveland: James 7-16 2-2 16, Love 1-5 0-0 3, Mozgov 3-6 0-0 6, Irving 3-11 1-1 8, Smith 6-9 2-6 14, Dellavedova 4-8 0-0 11, T.Thompson 0-1 2-2 2, Shumpert 4-6 2-3 10, Varejao 2-4 1-2 5, Jefferson 1-1 3-4 6, Jones 3-5 1-1 8, Cunningham 3-5 3-4 9. Totals 37-77 17-25 98. Golden State 34 36 34 28 — 132 Cleveland 21 23 23 31 — 98 3-point goals: Golden State 19-40 (Curry 7-12, Iguodala 4-5, Green 2-4, Barnes 2-5, Clark 2-5, Rush 1-2, K.Thompson 1-5, Barbosa 0-2), Cleveland 7-19 (Dellavedova 3-4, Jefferson 1-1, Irving 1-3, Jones 1-3, Love 1-3, Cunningham 0-1, Shumpert 0-1, James 0-3). Fouled out: Ezeli, Shumpert. Rebounds: Golden State 47 (Green 7), Cleveland 46 (Love 6). Assists: Golden State 33 (Green 10), Cleveland 22 (Dellavedova 6). Total fouls: Golden State 25, Cleveland 25. Technicals: Golden State defensive three second, James. Flagrant fouls: Smith. Ejected— Smith. A: 20,562 (20,562).

Grizzlies 101, Pelicans 99 New Orleans: Cunningham 2-5 2-2 7, Davis 6-12 9-11 21, Asik 4-4 0-0 8, Cole 5-12 0-0 10, Gordon 2-7 4-4 10, Anderson 6-14 0-0 14, Holiday 9-13 4-4 23, Ajinca 2-5 0-0 4, Gee 0-2 2-2 2. Totals 36-74 21-23 99. Memphis: Allen 2-5 2-2 6, Randolph 3-9 2-2 8, Gasol 6-13 4-8 16, Conley 6-12 0-0 15, Lee 6-11 2-3 16, Chalmers 0-1 3-4 3, Je.Green 5-12 5-6 16, Barnes 5-9 4-4 16, Carter 0-1 0-0 0, Ja.Green 2-2 1-1 5. Totals 35-75 23-30 101. New Orleans 26 25 25 23 — 99 Memphis 24 25 23 29 — 101 3-point goals: New Orleans 6-19 (Gordon 2-4, Anderson 2-5, Holiday 1-2, Cunningham 1-3, Davis 0-2, Cole 0-3), Memphis 8-19 (Conley 3-5, Lee 2-4, Barnes 2-6, Je.Green 1-3, Carter 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 41 (Davis 8), Memphis 46 (Gasol 10). Assists: New Orleans 19 (Holiday 9), Memphis 27 (Conley 10). Total fouls: New Orleans 22, Memphis 25. Technicals: New Orleans defensive three second, Memphis defensive three second 2. A: 18,119 (18,119).

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite

Points Open Current

Hornets 124, Jazz 119

Knicks 119, 76ers 113

Utah: Hayward 12-24 6-6 36, Lyles 2-7 0-0 5, Gobert 6-7 2-5 14, Neto 2-8 2-2 8, Hood 4-17 1-1 11, Burke 10-23 2-3 25, Johnson 1-4 1-1 3, Booker 5-11 2-2 12, Withey 1-1 0-0 2, Ingles 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 44-104 16-20 119. Charlotte: Hairston 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 5-8 6-6 19, Zeller 4-9 6-8 14, Walker 16-34 14-15 52, Batum 4-12 0-0 10, Kaminsky 7-12 2-3 17, Lin 4-6 0-0 9, Daniels 1-4 0-0 3, Hawes 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-88 28-32 124. Utah 28 15 21 31 13 11 — 119 Charlotte 29 23 21 22 13 16 — 124 3-point goals: Utah 15-45 (Hayward 6-12, Burke 3-9, Neto 2-6, Hood 2-10, Lyles 1-2, Ingles 1-2, Johnson 0-1, Booker 0-3), Charlotte 14-27 (Walker 6-11, Williams 3-4, Batum 2-5, Kaminsky 1-1, Lin 1-1, Daniels 1-3, Hairston 0-1, Hawes 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 54 (Gobert 14), Charlotte 61 (Walker, Batum 9). Assists: Utah 27 (Hayward 9), Charlotte 20 (Walker 8). Total fouls: Utah 28, Charlotte 18. Technicals: Charlotte defensive three second. A: 17,459 (19,077).

Philadelphia: Covington 3-9 2-3 11, Noel 8-14 2-4 18, Okafor 10-17 0-2 20, Smith 8-28 0-2 16, Sampson 1-4 0-0 2, Holmes 1-1 0-0 2, Jera.Grant 2-3 4-5 9, Thompson 4-9 0-3 11, McConnell 3-7 0-0 6, Landry 1-2 0-0 2, Canaan 4-8 5-6 16. Totals 45-102 13-25 113. New York: Anthony 7-28 3-7 19, Porzingis 7-11 0-0 16, Lopez 6-11 4-4 16, Calderon 2-8 2-2 8, Afflalo 8-17 7-7 25, Thomas 4-7 4-5 12, Galloway 4-4 0-0 8, Jeri.Grant 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-4 3-3 7, O’Quinn 2-2 0-0 4, Vujacic 1-4 0-0 2, Amundson 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 43-97 25-30 119. Philadelphia 29 18 16 33 11 6 — 113 New York 29 23 24 20 11 12 — 119 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-28 (Canaan 3-5, Thompson 3-6, Covington 3-7, Jera.Grant 1-1, Sampson 0-1, McConnell 0-2, Smith 0-6), New York 8-20 (Afflalo 2-4, Calderon 2-4, Porzingis 2-4, Anthony 2-6, Williams 0-1, Vujacic 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 69 (Noel 13), New York 59 (Porzingis 12). Assists: Philadelphia 27 (Smith 16), New York 26 (Anthony 7). Total fouls: Philadelphia 25, New York 19. Technicals: New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763).

TENNIS Underdog

Sunday AFC Championship 3 3 BRONCOS NFC Championship PANTHERS 3 3 Cards NBA Favorite Points Underdog HEAT 5.5 Bucks PELICANS 5 T’Wolves Pacers 6.5 SUNS Thunder 8.5 NUGGETS Patriots

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog PROVIDENCE 1.5 Butler CONNECTICUT 15 Tulane MISSISSIPPI PK S Carolina FLORIDA 11 Mississippi St OHIO U 5 W Michigan AKRON 5.5 E Michigan BALL ST 1.5 Kent St Buffalo 2 MIAMI-OHIO Toledo 1.5 BOWLING GREEN Kansas 9 OKLAHOMA ST INDIANA 12 Illinois Dayton 2.5 ST. BONA OAKLAND 14 No Kentucky Tulsa 7.5 E CAROLINA GEORGIA ST 11.5 Ga Southern PITTSBURGH 8.5 NC State VIRGINIA 9.5 Clemson NO ILLINOIS 3.5 C Michigan MARYLAND 13 Northwestern XAVIER 9.5 Georgetown SMU 13 Houston EVANSVILLE 14.5 Loyola-Chicago Alabama 2 AUBURN TEXAS A&M 8.5 Lsu Unlv 3 UTAH ST SAN DIEGO ST 8 Fresno St Added Game FAIRFIELD 1.5 St. Peter’s NHL Favorite Odds Underdog FLYERS -$145/+$125 Maple Leafs Capitals -$155/+$135 BLUE JACKETS RANGERS -$180/+$160 Canucks DEVILS -$135/+$115 Flames LIGHTNING -$225/+$185 Oilers CANADIENS -$110/-$110 Bruins Blackhawks -$120/even PREDATORS KINGS -$140/+$120 Stars Grand Salami: Over/under 42.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with OF Lorenzo Cain on a two-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Re-signed RHP Colby Lewis to a one-year contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Signed 2B Dee Gordon to a five-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed LB Carl Bradford, DT William Campbell, TE Mitchell Henry, WR Jamel Johnson, DT Christian Ringo, G Matt Rotheram, OT Jeremy Vujnovich and WR Ed Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Named Brian Schottenheimer quarterbacks coach and Shawn Terlecky defensive quality control coach. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Doug Pederson coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Assigned F Steve Downie to Springfield (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled F Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Recalled D Esa Lindell from (AHL). Placed D Jordie Benn on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 16. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Re-assigned D Aaron Ness and F Zach Sill to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE ARIZONA — Named Marcel Yates defensive coordinator. CENTRAL METHODIST — Named Marty Steward defensive coordinator. OREGON STATE — Suspended senior F Jarmal Reid a minimum of four games for tripping a referee during a Jan. 17 game at Utah. PENN STATE — Named Tim Banks codefensive coordinator and safeties coach.

Australian Open Results Monday | At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $30.18 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Men First Round Austin Krajicek, United States, def. Wu Di, China, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3. Federico Delbonis, Argentina, def. Ivo Karlovic (22), Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 2-1, retired. Kei Nishikori (7), Japan, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4. Daniel Brands, Germany, def. Victor Estrella Burgos, Dominican Republic, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 4-6, 6-1. David Goffin (15), Belgium, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Dominic Thiem (19), Austria, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 7-6 (0). Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Kyle Edmund, Britain, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, 7-5, 6-1, 6-2. Gilles Simon (14), France, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Marin Cilic (12), Croatia, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7 (4), 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-6 (1). Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (26), Spain, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Renzo Olivo, Argentina, def. Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, 7-6 (8), 2-6, 1-6, 6-4, 6-4. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, def. Borna Coric, Croatia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, def. Inigo Cervantes, Spain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 5-7, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Chung Hyeon, South Korea, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Noah Rubin, United States, def. Benoit Paire (17), France, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5). Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, def. Yoshihito Nishioka, Japan, 7-6 (5), 6-1, 6-4. Denis Kudla, United States, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-1, 0-0, retired. Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 6-7 (5), 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, retired. Grigor Dimitrov (27), Bulgaria, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Omar Jasika, Australia, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 3-6, 6-0, 6-4. Nick Kyrgios (29), Australia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 6-2, 7-5, 6-2. Andreas Seppi (28), Italy, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (10). Quentin Halys, France, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5. Marco Trungelliti, Argentina, def. Jozek Kovalik, Slovakia, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 7-5. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. Roberto Bautista Agut (24), Spain, def. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 2-6, 6-2. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (9), France, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. Women First Round Petra Kvitova (6), Czech Republic, def. Luksika Kumkhum, Thailand, 6-3, 6-1. Nicole Gibbs, United States, def. Klara Koukalova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 2-6, 6-1. Daria Gavrilova, Australia, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Carla Suarez Navarro (10), Spain, def. Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4. Margarita Gasparyan, Russia, def. Sara Errani (17), Italy, 1-6, 7-5, 6-1. Anna-Lena Friedsam, Germany, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-1. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. Maria Sakkari, Greece, def. Wang Yafan, China, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-4, 7-5. Wang Qiang, China, def. Sloane Stephens (24), United States, 6-3, 6-3. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1. Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Oceane Dodin, France, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Lauren Davis, United States, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (26), Russia, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Kristina Mladenovic (28), France, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova (27), Slovakia, 6-3, 6-3. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Christina McHale, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def. Caroline Wozniacki (16), Denmark, 1-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 7-6 (2), 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova (23), Russia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2. Belinda Bencic (12), Switzerland, def.

Alison Riske, United States, 6-4, 6-3. Roberta Vinci (13), Italy, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-4, 6-2. Irina Falconi, United States, def. Anna Tatishvili, United States, 6-4, 3-6, 8-6. Han Xinyun, China, def. Mariana DuqueMarino, Colombia, 6-2, 2-1, retired. Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Teliana Pereira, Brazil, 6-2, 6-1. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, def. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-4. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def. Magda Linette, Poland, 6-3, 6-0. Ana Konjuh, Croatia, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 0-6, 6-4, 6-3. Elizaveta Kulichkova, Russia, def. Andrea Petkovic (22), Germany, 7-5, 6-4. Timea Babos, Hungary, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-7 (4), 7-5, 7-5. Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Nao Hibino, Japan, 6-1, 6-3. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Sam Stosur (25), Australia, 6-4, 7-6 (6).

AREA COLLEGES

TUESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE No games scheduled

GOLF Holes in One Wolf Hollow • Jim Franz, hole No. 9, 125 yards, 9-wood, Jan. 14.

BASKETBALL NBA LEADERS

FG 163 186 202 188 178 206 189 179 271 304

Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Kanter, OKC Faried, DEN Parker, SAN Gortat, WAS Favors, UTA Towns, MIN Drummond, DET Rebounds Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Cousins, SAC Love, CLE Gasol, CHI Pachulia, DAL Davis, NOR Gortat, WAS Assists Rondo, SAC Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Rubio, MIN Jack, Bro Green, GOL Lillard, POR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS

FG 387 342 318 277 356 300 353 310 281 294 303 287 285 292 303 264 293 324 223 296

G 40 38 35 39 32 38 37 40 34 33

OFF 215 142 123 121 76 95 88 148 70 93 G 38 42 39 35 36 32 40 36 42 41

FT 205 365 209 233 188 176 257 238 129 172 279 261 239 182 223 199 99 89 138 140

PTS 1165 1161 926 828 945 888 1015 978 697 776 905 880 894 820 854 831 810 836 632 790

FGA 228 305 334 336 333 390 361 342 518 583 DEF 404 369 296 318 279 316 312 282 291 229

TOT 619 511 419 439 355 411 400 430 361 322

AST 439 405 376 333 307 236 293 253 280 272

AVG 29.9 27.6 26.5 25.9 25.5 24.7 24.2 23.9 23.2 22.8 22.6 22.6 21.8 21.6 20.8 20.8 20.8 20.4 20.4 20.3 PCT .715 .610 .605 .560 .535 .528 .524 .523 .523 .521 AVG 15.5 13.4 12.0 11.3 11.1 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.6 9.8 AVG 11.6 9.6 9.6 9.5 8.5 7.4 7.3 7.0 6.7 6.6

1.

Oklahoma (15-2) lost to No. 19 Iowa State 82-77. Next: at No. 13 Baylor, Saturday.

2.

2.

North Carolina (16-2) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Wednesday.

3.

3.

Kansas (15-2) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Tuesday.

4.

4.

Villanova (16-2) idle. Next: at Seton Hall, Wednesday.

5.

5.

Xavier (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Georgetown, Tuesday.

6.

6.

West Virginia (15-2) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Wednesday.

7.

7.

Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Tuesday.

8.

8.

SMU (17-0) idle. Next: vs. Houston, Tuesday.

9.

9.

Iowa (14-3) idle. Next: at Rutgers, Thursday.

10.

10. Texas A&M (15-2) idle. Next: vs. LSU, Tuesday.

11.

11. Michigan State (16-3) idle. Next: vs. Nebraska, Wednesday.

12.

12. Arizona (15-3) idle. Next: at Stanford, Thursday.

13.

13. Baylor (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Kansas State, Wednesday.

14.

13. Virginia (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Clemson, Tuesday.

15.

15. Miami (13-3) idle. Next: at Boston College, Wednesday.

16.

16. Providence (15-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Butler, Tuesday.

17. 18.

18. Butler (13-4) idle. Next: at No. 16 Providence, Tuesday.

19.

19. Iowa State (14-4) beat No. 1 Oklahoma 82-77. Next: at TCU, Saturday.

20.

20. Duke (14-5) lost to Syracuse 64-62. Next: at N.C. State, Saturday.

21.

21. Southern Cal (15-3) idle. Next: at Oregon, Thursday. 22. Purdue (16-3) beat Rutgers 107-57. Next: vs. Ohio State, Thursday. 23. Kentucky (13-4) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday. 24. South Carolina (16-1) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Tuesday.

Houston: Ariza 5-8 2-2 13, Capela 6-8 2-2 14, Howard 6-11 2-3 14, Terry 1-4 0-0 2, Harden 10-17 7-10 31, Jones 1-7 0-0 2, Lawson 4-7 3-3 12, Brewer 2-8 0-0 4, Thornton 4-11 2-2 10, Harrell 5-7 0-2 10, McDaniels 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 44-91 18-24 112. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 2-5 0-0 5, Randle 5-10 2-3 12, Hibbert 3-6 2-2 8, Clarkson 8-17 0-0 16, Williams 7-12 5-6 20, Russell 5-10 0-0 12, Bass 2-4 4-4 8, Kelly 1-8 1-2 3, Brown 4-8 0-0 10, Huertas 0-2 0-0 0, Black 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 37-82 15-19 95. Houston 32 28 34 18 — 112 L.A. Lakers 36 21 18 20 — 95 3-point goals: Houston 6-21 (Harden 4-7, Ariza 1-3, Lawson 1-3, Jones 0-1, Terry 0-2, Brewer 0-2, Thornton 0-3), L.A. Lakers 6-16 (Russell 2-4, Brown 2-5, Bryant 1-1, Williams 1-2, Clarkson 0-1, Huertas 0-1, Kelly 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 58 (Howard 15), L.A. Lakers 44 (Randle 11). Assists: Houston 21 (Lawson, Harden 5), L.A. Lakers 25 (Bryant 9). Total fouls: Houston 19, L.A. Lakers 16. A: 18,997 (18,997).

Nuggets 129, Pacers 126 Indiana: George 6-12 4-4 19, Allen 2-3 0-0 4, J.Hill 4-5 1-2 9, Ellis 10-17 2-5 24, Robinson III 2-8 3-4 8, Turner 11-13 3-6 25, Miles 2-5 7-8 12, Young 7-11 1-1 15, S.Hill 2-5 0-0 6, Budinger 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 48-82 21-30 126. Denver: Gallinari 6-11 10-10 23, Faried 5-7 3-5 13, Jokic 6-11 5-6 18, Mudiay 4-10 2-8 10, Harris 8-12 3-3 20, Arthur 3-8 0-0 7, Foye 4-8 2-4 12, Lauvergne 2-5 0-0 5, Barton 8-17 2-2 21, Kilpatrick 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 46-91 27-38 129. Indiana 30 36 25 35 — 126 Denver 30 24 30 45 — 129 3-point goals: Indiana 9-19 (George 3-7, S.Hill 2-2, Ellis 2-3, Robinson III 1-3, Miles 1-4), Denver 10-26 (Barton 3-6, Foye 2-4, Arthur 1-1, Lauvergne 1-2, Harris 1-3, Jokic 1-3, Gallinari 1-4, Mudiay 0-1, Kilpatrick 0-2). Fouled out: Gallinari. Rebounds: Indiana 42 (Turner 7), Denver 57 (Faried 9). Assists: Indiana 27 (Young 7), Denver 25 (Foye, Mudiay 6). Total fouls: Indiana 29, Denver 26. A: 11,104 (19,155).

WOMEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

1.

17. Louisville (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Wednesday.

Through Sunday Scoring G 39 42 35 32 37 36 42 41 30 34 40 39 41 38 41 40 39 41 31 39

Brooklyn: Jo.Johnson 9-12 1-1 22, Young 4-11 3-3 11, Lopez 13-22 3-5 29, Sloan 4-10 4-4 13, Ellington 1-5 2-2 4, Bogdanovic 3-6 2-2 9, Larkin 4-6 0-0 8, Reed 1-2 0-0 2, Robinson 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 39-76 17-19 100. Toronto: Ja.Johnson 3-7 0-0 8, Scola 1-6 2-2 4, Valanciunas 3-11 0-0 6, Lowry 10-13 4-6 31, DeRozan 12-25 6-8 30, Patterson 5-10 0-0 12, Joseph 1-4 0-0 2, Ross 5-5 0-0 12, Biyombo 3-3 1-2 7, Powell 0-1 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-85 13-18 112. Brooklyn 29 20 35 16 — 100 Toronto 19 33 29 31 — 112 3-point goals: Brooklyn 5-14 (Jo.Johnson 3-4, Bogdanovic 1-3, Sloan 1-4, Brown 0-1, Ellington 0-2), Toronto 13-24 (Lowry 7-9, Ross 2-2, Ja.Johnson 2-3, Patterson 2-6, Scola 0-1, Powell 0-1, DeRozan 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 44 (Lopez 10), Toronto 42 (Valanciunas 12). Assists: Brooklyn 24 (Jo.Johnson 7), Toronto 24 (Lowry 8). Total fouls: Brooklyn 18, Toronto 17. A: 19,800 (19,800).

MEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

MONDAY RESULTS Women’s basketball Bellarmine 65, Southern Indiana 61 William Jewell 68, Rockhurst 49 Men’s basketball Bellarmine 80, Southern Indiana 65 Rockhurst 86, William Jewell 78

Curry, GOL Harden, HOU Durant, OKC Cousins, SAC James, CLE Lillard, POR Westbrook, OKC George, IND Griffin, LAC Davis, NOR DeRozan, TOR Butler, CHI Thomas, BOS Anthony, NYK Wiggins, MIN Lowry, TOR K. Thompson, GOL McCollum, POR Bledsoe, PHX Wall, WAS FG Percentage

Raptors 112, Nets 100

Rockets 112, Lakers 95

22. 23. 24. 25.

UConn (16-0) idle. Next: vs. UCF, Wednesday. South Carolina (17-0) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. Notre Dame (17-1) beat No. 18 Tennessee 79-66. Next: vs. Syracuse, Thursday. Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Wednesday. Texas (16-1) idle. Next: at TCU, Wednesday. Ohio State (13-4) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday. Arizona State (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday. Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Thursday. Mississippi State (17-2) beat Mississippi 79-51. Next: at Georgia, Thursday. Oregon State (14-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. Stanford (14-4) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Friday. Texas A&M (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 23 Missouri, Thursday. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday. South Florida (12-4) idle. Next: at Memphis, Wednesday. Miami (17-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Florida State, Sunday. Louisville (14-5) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Monday. Tennessee (11-6) lost to No. 3 Notre Dame 79-66. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. Oklahoma (12-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. UCLA (12-5) idle. Next: vs. California, Friday. Michigan State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Tuesday. Florida (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. Missouri (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 13 Texas A&M, Thursday. DePaul (13-6) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Friday. West Virginia (15-4) idle. Next: at TCU, Sunday.

25. Indiana (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday.

HOCKEY

Monday’s Div. I scores East Albany (NY) 80, Binghamton 59 Boston U. 87, Loyola (Md.) 84, OT Mass.-Lowell 93, Vermont 82 Monmouth (NJ) 85, Siena 69 New Hampshire 99, Maine 91 Purdue 107, Rutgers 57 Stony Brook 77, Hartford 43 Southwest Arkansas St. 76, UALR 73 Sam Houston 87, Nicholls St. 76 Texas Tech 76, TCU 69 Midwest Cleveland St. 70, Ill.-Chicago 53 Valparaiso 96, Youngstown St. 65 Wright St. 77, Detroit 76 South Beth.-Cook. 62, Morgan St. 50 Coppin St. 70, Florida A&M 66 Norfolk St. 75, NC A&T 68 SC State 68, Md.-E. Shore 63 SE Louisiana 98, Lamar 70 Savannah St. 64, Delaware St. 47 Southern U. 67, MVSU 54 Syracuse 64, Duke 62 Texas South. 69, Grambling St. 54 Far West No major team scores reported from the Far West.

Through Sunday Goal Scoring Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Alex Ovechkin Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Tyler Seguin Dallas Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Matt Duchene Colorado Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Mike Hoffman Ottawa Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Max Pacioretty Montreal Daniel Sedin Vancouver Jonathan Toews Chicago Brent Burns San Jose Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Brock Nelson NY Islanders Kyle Palmieri New Jersey Patrice Bergeron Boston Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Corey Perry Anaheim Jeff Skinner Carolina Shane Doan Arizona Taylor Hall Edmonton Leo Komarov Toronto Brad Marchand Boston James Neal Nashville Artemi Panarin Chicago Zach Parise Minnesota Brandon Saad Columbus Patrick Sharp Dallas Justin Williams Washington Mats Zuccarello NY Rangers

NHL Leaders GP 48 44 46 46 46 46 43 44 41 45 43 44 46 46 48 43 45 45 46 44 45 44 47 35 46 43 39 45 48 36 45 46 45 45

G 29 27 26 25 24 22 22 22 20 20 19 19 19 19 19 18 18 18 18 17 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16

Assists Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Erik Karlsson Ottawa John Klingberg Dallas Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jamie Benn Dallas Nicklas Backstrom Washington Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington P.K. Subban Montreal Henrik Sedin Vancouver Tyler Seguin Dallas Artemi Panarin Chicago Taylor Hall Edmonton Alexander Steen St Louis Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Tomas Plekanec Montreal Joe Thornton San Jose Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Jonathan Huberdeau Florida Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Bobby Ryan Ottawa Brent Seabrook Chicago Ryan Suter Minnesota Power Play Goals Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas Justin Faulk Carolina Alex Ovechkin Washington Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Patrice Bergeron Boston Shane Doan Arizona Loui Eriksson Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Shea Weber Nashville Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Max Pacioretty Montreal Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Short Handed Goals Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Paul Byron Montreal Eric Fehr Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Artem Anisimov Chicago Cam Atkinson Columbus Jamie Benn Dallas Jason Chimera Washington Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Blake Comeau Colorado Cody Eakin Dallas Adam Henrique New Jersey Bryan Little Winnipeg Matt Nieto San Jose Zack Smith Ottawa Jonathan Toews Chicago Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Mika Zibanejad Ottawa Power Play Assists Name Team Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Kris Letang Pittsburgh Alexander Steen St Louis P.K. Subban Montreal Mikkel Boedker Arizona Brent Burns San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS John Klingberg Dallas Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Tyson Barrie Colorado Patrice Bergeron Boston Patrick Kane Chicago Torey Krug Boston Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Victor Rask Carolina Brent Seabrook Chicago Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Jason Spezza Dallas Short Handed Assists Name Team Jeff Petry Montreal Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Jamie Benn Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Paul Byron Montreal Zdeno Chara Boston Vernon Fiddler Dallas Curtis Lazar Ottawa Torrey Mitchell Montreal Drew Stafford Winnipeg Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Tommy Wingels San Jose Aleksander Barkov Florida Francois Beauchemi Colorado Pierre-Edouard Bel Philadelphia Jordie Benn Dallas T.J. Brodie Calgary J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Alex Burmistrov Winnipeg Brent Burns San Jose John Carlson Washington Jeff Carter Los Angeles Casey Cizikas NY Islanders Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Andrew Cogliano Anaheim Sean Couturier Philadelphia

GP 48 45 46 45 46 42 45 46 44 46 48 46 48 43 40 43 44 46 43 36 43 45 44 44 48 45

A 40 37 32 31 30 29 29 29 28 28 27 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

GP 48 46 47 44 44 45 44 35 44 46 45 44 45 46 43 44

PP 14 12 12 10 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7

GP 45 34 34 39 47 45 46 45 44 46 46 44 45 40 44 48 45 44

SH 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

GP 42 45 34 48 46 44 43 43 43 46 45 42 44 48 43 44 45 48 38 46

PPA 16 15 14 14 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

GP 43 45 46 44 34 42 46 40 35 44 45 43 35 46 35 43 34 41 45 43 34 39 45 44 44 37

SHA 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


SPORTS

01.19.2016 • TueSday • M 2

Curry, Warriors pummel Cavaliers

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 26 15 Boston 22 20 New York 21 22 Brooklyn 11 31 Philadelphia 5 38 Southeast W L Atlanta 25 17 Miami 23 18 Orlando 20 20 Washington 19 21 Charlotte 19 22 Central W L Cleveland 28 11 Chicago 24 16 Indiana 22 19 Detroit 22 19 Milwaukee 18 25

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stephen Curry scored 35 points in three quarters, Andre Iguodala added 20 and the Golden State Warriors returned to the floor where they won the NBA championship last season and embarrassed the host Cleveland Cavaliers 132-98 on Monday night. The Warriors built a 30-point lead in the first half and bounced back from a shocking loss in Detroit over the weekend by winning their fifth straight over Cleveland. Only a late flurry of points helped the Cavs avoid their worst home loss in franchise history. LeBron James led Cleveland with 16 points. Curry made seven 3-pointers — his last put the Warriors ahead by 40 late in the third quarter — and the reigning league MVP seemed right at home in Quicken Loans Arena, where the Warriors clinched their first title since 1975 last June. On Sunday, Curry said he hoped the visitors’ locker room “still smells a little bit like champagne.” Walker scores 52 for Hornets • Kemba Walker scored a franchise-record 52 points and the host Charlotte Hornets won in double overtime, beating the Utah Jazz 124-119.

NOTEBOOK Ex-Bulls assistant Bach dies • Johnny

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Golden State’s Stephen Curry soars for 35 points in a 132-98 rout of the Cavaliers.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 36 6 Memphis 24 19 Dallas 24 19 Houston 22 20 New Orleans 13 27 Northwest W L Oklahoma City 30 12 Utah 18 23 Portland 19 25 Denver 16 25 Minnesota 13 29 Paciic W L Golden State 38 4 LA Clippers 26 14 Sacramento 17 23 Phoenix 13 29 LA Lakers 9 34

Bach, whose defensive expertise as an assistant coach to Phil Jackson helped the Chicago Bulls win three NBA titles from 1991 to 1993, has died. He was 91. Bach was the head coach of the Golden State Warriors from 1983-86 before joining the Bulls as an assistant. He also worked as an assistant for Charlotte, Detroit and Washington. He returned to the Bulls in 2003 and retired in 2006. “Johnny was a true treasure in the world of basketball,” Chicago executive vice president of basketball operations John Paxson said in a statement. “He was the classic ‘old school’ coach who came to work each and every day with energy and enthusiasm for the game he loved.’’

Pct .634 .524 .488 .262 .116 Pct .595 .561 .500 .475 .463 Pct .718 .600 .537 .537 .419

Pct .857 .558 .558 .524 .325 Pct .714 .439 .432 .390 .310 Pct .905 .650 .425 .310 .209

GB — 4½ 6 15½ 22 GB — 1½ 4 5 5½ GB — 4½ 7 7 12

GB — 12½ 12½ 14 22 GB — 11½ 12 13½ 17 GB — 11 20 25 29½

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 Str W-2 L-1 L-3 L-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 W-2

Home 12-6 11-10 12-8 7-15 3-16 Home 15-7 15-8 12-9 9-13 15-8 Home 15-2 16-7 13-6 14-7 12-7

Away 14-9 11-10 9-14 4-16 2-22 Away 10-10 8-10 8-11 10-8 4-14 Away 13-9 8-9 9-13 8-12 6-18

Conf 18-8 16-13 15-15 8-19 0-25 Conf 16-11 11-12 10-15 14-12 11-12 Conf 19-6 15-11 15-9 13-10 12-15

L10 10-0 7-3 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 8-2 4-6 5-5 4-6 1-9 L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str W-11 W-3 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-2 L-4 L-3

Home 24-0 16-7 12-7 13-10 8-9 Home 20-5 12-9 10-9 8-12 6-17 Home 19-0 14-7 10-11 9-11 5-13

Away 12-6 8-12 12-12 9-10 5-18 Away 10-7 6-14 9-16 8-13 7-12 Away 19-4 12-7 7-12 4-18 4-21

Conf 19-3 13-12 15-10 16-11 10-17 Conf 21-4 10-17 15-15 11-20 7-16 Conf 24-2 15-11 9-17 9-18 3-24

Monday New York 119, Philadelphia 113,2OT Portland 108, Washington 98 Charlotte 124, Utah 119,2OT Memphis 101, New Orleans 99 Chicago 111, Detroit 101 Atlanta 98, Orlando 81 Toronto 112, Brooklyn 100 Golden State 132, Cleveland 98 Dallas 118, Boston 113, OT Houston at LA Clippers, late Sunday Minnesota 117, Phoenix 87 San Antonio 112, Dallas 83 Oklahoma City 99, Miami 74 Denver 129, Indiana 126 Houston 112, LA Lakers 95 Tuesday Milwaukee at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver, 8 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Wednesday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Utah at New York, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Chicago, 7 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 9:30 p.m.

NBA SUMMARIES Hawks 98, Magic 81

Bulls 111, Pistons 101

Trail Blazers 108, Wizards 98

Warriors 132, Cavaliers 98

Mavericks 118, Celtics 113

Orlando: Harris 2-7 2-2 6, Frye 1-4 0-0 2, Vucevic 4-10 2-3 10, Payton 7-14 0-3 16, Fournier 2-11 0-0 6, Hezonja 3-14 4-4 10, Gordon 5-9 7-8 18, Nicholson 0-3 0-0 0, Napier 2-4 0-0 5, Smith 1-5 0-0 2, Dedmon 2-2 0-0 4, Appling 1-3 0-0 2, Marble 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-87 15-20 81. Atlanta: Bazemore 1-5 0-0 2, Millsap 6-9 1-3 13, Horford 7-10 0-0 15, Teague 5-10 1-1 14, Korver 2-5 0-0 5, Sefolosha 4-8 2-2 10, Splitter 5-7 0-0 10, Schroder 3-8 0-0 6, Holiday 0-3 1-2 1, Scott 5-6 0-0 12, Hardaway Jr. 2-5 2-2 8, Muscala 1-2 0-0 2, Mack 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-80 7-10 98. Orlando 17 21 21 22 — 81 Atlanta 24 27 21 26 — 98 3-point goals: Orlando 6-22 (Payton 2-2, Fournier 2-4, Gordon 1-2, Napier 1-3, Nicholson 0-1, Appling 0-1, Harris 0-2, Frye 0-2, Hezonja 0-5), Atlanta 9-19 (Teague 3-3, Scott 2-2, Hardaway Jr. 2-3, Horford 1-2, Korver 1-3, Schroder 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2, Holiday 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 50 (Vucevic 11), Atlanta 54 (Millsap 12). Assists: Orlando 21 (Payton 5), Atlanta 31 (Schroder 8). Total fouls: Orlando 13, Atlanta 20. A: 17,460 (18,729).

Chicago: Snell 1-4 0-0 3, Gibson 4-9 0-0 8, Gasol 13-18 4-5 31, Rose 9-17 1-1 20, Butler 5-13 6-8 16, Brooks 3-7 0-0 6, McDermott 4-6 0-0 11, Mirotic 3-6 2-4 10, Portis 0-1 0-0 0, Moore 2-3 1-2 6. Totals 44-84 14-20 111. Detroit: Morris 8-16 2-2 18, Ilyasova 8-16 0-0 19, Drummond 5-9 3-10 13, Jackson 8-20 2-3 19, Caldwell-Pope 6-13 1-1 14, Johnson 2-7 4-4 8, Jennings 1-6 0-0 2, Baynes 4-6 0-0 8, Tolliver 0-2 0-0 0, Hilliard 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-95 12-20 101. Chicago 26 30 27 28 — 111 Detroit 32 21 26 22 — 101 3-point goals: Chicago 9-21 (McDermott 3-4, Mirotic 2-2, Moore 1-2, Rose 1-2, Gasol 1-3, Snell 1-3, Brooks 0-1, Portis 0-1, Butler 0-3), Detroit 5-26 (Ilyasova 3-8, Caldwell-Pope 1-1, Jackson 1-5, Tolliver 0-2, Johnson 0-2, Jennings 0-2, Morris 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Gasol 12), Detroit 61 (Drummond 16). Assists: Chicago 28 (Brooks 10), Detroit 18 (Jackson 6). Total fouls: Chicago 16, Detroit 16. Technicals: Caldwell-Pope 2, Drummond. Ejected — Caldwell-Pope. A: 18,935 (22,076).

Portland: Aminu 3-8 0-0 8, Vonleh 1-3 0-0 2, Plumlee 5-11 0-1 10, Lillard 7-16 0-1 16, McCollum 9-16 1-1 25, Crabbe 6-9 0-0 14, Leonard 7-10 0-0 18, Davis 1-4 4-7 6, Henderson 3-5 0-1 7, Harkless 1-1 0-0 2, Connaughton 0-1 0-0 0, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-84 5-11 108. Washington: Oubre Jr. 0-2 0-0 0, Dudley 4-8 0-2 10, Gortat 7-10 2-3 16, Wall 4-17 0-0 9, Temple 6-10 3-4 18, Beal 4-8 5-6 16, Nene 4-6 0-0 8, Sessions 3-5 4-4 10, Neal 5-9 1-1 11, Eddie 0-2 0-0 0, Blair 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-77 15-20 98. Portland 32 27 35 14 — 108 Washington 17 40 19 22 — 98 3-point goals: Portland 17-31 (McCollum 6-10, Leonard 4-7, Crabbe 2-2, Aminu 2-4, Lillard 2-6, Henderson 1-2), Washington 9-21 (Temple 3-5, Beal 3-5, Dudley 2-4, Wall 1-3, Sessions 0-1, Oubre Jr. 0-1, Eddie 0-2). Fouled out: Crabbe. Rebounds: Portland 53 (Plumlee 11), Washington 39 (Gortat 13). Assists: Portland 25 (Plumlee 7), Washington 25 (Wall 10). Total fouls: Portland 24, Washington 16. Technicals: Wall. A: 17,236 (20,308).

Boston: Crowder 3-13 6-7 12, Johnson 1-1 0-0 3, Sullinger 3-12 6-7 12, Thomas 8-19 4-4 20, Bradley 6-16 3-4 19, Turner 2-4 0-0 4, Smart 8-13 2-4 20, Olynyk 6-11 0-0 17, Jerebko 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 40-94 21-26 113. Dallas: Parsons 6-11 0-0 16, Nowitzki 8-21 12-13 31, Pachulia 1-4 3-4 5, Williams 7-17 4-4 20, Matthews 5-12 2-2 15, Harris 3-5 0-0 9, Felton 6-13 1-1 14, Powell 2-4 0-0 4, Barea 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 40-93 22-24 118. Boston 16 23 33 26 15 — 113 Dallas 29 23 18 28 20 — 118 3-point goals: Boston 12-30 (Olynyk 5-6, Bradley 4-8, Smart 2-4, Johnson 1-1, Sullinger 0-1, Turner 0-1, Jerebko 0-2, Crowder 0-3, Thomas 0-4), Dallas 16-34 (Parsons 4-6, Harris 3-4, Nowitzki 3-5, Matthews 3-8, Williams 2-5, Felton 1-3, Pachulia 0-1, Barea 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 55 (Sullinger 11), Dallas 59 (Pachulia 19). Assists: Boston 24 (Turner 8), Dallas 23 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Boston 30, Dallas 21. A: 19,866 (19,200).

Hornets 124, Jazz 119

Knicks 119, 76ers 113

Golden State: Barnes 4-8 2-2 12, Green 5-10 4-7 16, Bogut 2-4 0-2 4, Curry 12-18 4-4 35, K.Thompson 5-11 4-4 15, Iguodala 7-8 2-2 20, Ezeli 2-3 0-0 4, Barbosa 3-6 2-2 8, Livingston 2-2 0-0 4, Clark 2-7 0-0 6, Rush 1-3 0-0 3, Speights 1-4 2-2 4, J.Thompson 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 46-85 21-27 132. Cleveland: James 7-16 2-2 16, Love 1-5 0-0 3, Mozgov 3-6 0-0 6, Irving 3-11 1-1 8, Smith 6-9 2-6 14, Dellavedova 4-8 0-0 11, T.Thompson 0-1 2-2 2, Shumpert 4-6 2-3 10, Varejao 2-4 1-2 5, Jefferson 1-1 3-4 6, Jones 3-5 1-1 8, Cunningham 3-5 3-4 9. Totals 37-77 17-25 98. Golden State 34 36 34 28 — 132 Cleveland 21 23 23 31 — 98 3-point goals: Golden State 19-40 (Curry 7-12, Iguodala 4-5, Green 2-4, Barnes 2-5, Clark 2-5, Rush 1-2, K.Thompson 1-5, Barbosa 0-2), Cleveland 7-19 (Dellavedova 3-4, Jefferson 1-1, Irving 1-3, Jones 1-3, Love 1-3, Cunningham 0-1, Shumpert 0-1, James 0-3). Fouled out: Ezeli, Shumpert. Rebounds: Golden State 47 (Green 7), Cleveland 46 (Love 6). Assists: Golden State 33 (Green 10), Cleveland 22 (Dellavedova 6). Total fouls: Golden State 25, Cleveland 25. Technicals: Golden State defensive three second, James. Flagrant fouls: Smith. Ejected— Smith. A: 20,562 (20,562).

Utah: Hayward 12-24 6-6 36, Lyles 2-7 0-0 5, Gobert 6-7 2-5 14, Neto 2-8 2-2 8, Hood 4-17 1-1 11, Burke 10-23 2-3 25, Johnson 1-4 1-1 3, Booker 5-11 2-2 12, Withey 1-1 0-0 2, Ingles 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 44-104 16-20 119. Charlotte: Hairston 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 5-8 6-6 19, Zeller 4-9 6-8 14, Walker 16-34 14-15 52, Batum 4-12 0-0 10, Kaminsky 7-12 2-3 17, Lin 4-6 0-0 9, Daniels 1-4 0-0 3, Hawes 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-88 28-32 124. Utah 28 15 21 31 13 11 — 119 Charlotte 29 23 21 22 13 16 — 124 3-point goals: Utah 15-45 (Hayward 6-12, Burke 3-9, Neto 2-6, Hood 2-10, Lyles 1-2, Ingles 1-2, Johnson 0-1, Booker 0-3), Charlotte 14-27 (Walker 6-11, Williams 3-4, Batum 2-5, Kaminsky 1-1, Lin 1-1, Daniels 1-3, Hairston 0-1, Hawes 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 54 (Gobert 14), Charlotte 61 (Walker, Batum 9). Assists: Utah 27 (Hayward 9), Charlotte 20 (Walker 8). Total fouls: Utah 28, Charlotte 18. Technicals: Charlotte defensive three second. A: 17,459 (19,077).

Philadelphia: Covington 3-9 2-3 11, Noel 8-14 2-4 18, Okafor 10-17 0-2 20, Smith 8-28 0-2 16, Sampson 1-4 0-0 2, Holmes 1-1 0-0 2, Jera.Grant 2-3 4-5 9, Thompson 4-9 0-3 11, McConnell 3-7 0-0 6, Landry 1-2 0-0 2, Canaan 4-8 5-6 16. Totals 45-102 13-25 113. New York: Anthony 7-28 3-7 19, Porzingis 7-11 0-0 16, Lopez 6-11 4-4 16, Calderon 2-8 2-2 8, Afflalo 8-17 7-7 25, Thomas 4-7 4-5 12, Galloway 4-4 0-0 8, Jeri.Grant 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-4 3-3 7, O’Quinn 2-2 0-0 4, Vujacic 1-4 0-0 2, Amundson 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 43-97 25-30 119. Philadelphia 29 18 16 33 11 6 — 113 New York 29 23 24 20 11 12 — 119 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-28 (Canaan 3-5, Thompson 3-6, Covington 3-7, Jera.Grant 1-1, Sampson 0-1, McConnell 0-2, Smith 0-6), New York 8-20 (Afflalo 2-4, Calderon 2-4, Porzingis 2-4, Anthony 2-6, Williams 0-1, Vujacic 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 69 (Noel 13), New York 59 (Porzingis 12). Assists: Philadelphia 27 (Smith 16), New York 26 (Anthony 7). Total fouls: Philadelphia 25, New York 19. Technicals: New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Grizzlies 101, Pelicans 99 New Orleans: Cunningham 2-5 2-2 7, Davis 6-12 9-11 21, Asik 4-4 0-0 8, Cole 5-12 0-0 10, Gordon 2-7 4-4 10, Anderson 6-14 0-0 14, Holiday 9-13 4-4 23, Ajinca 2-5 0-0 4, Gee 0-2 2-2 2. Totals 36-74 21-23 99. Memphis: Allen 2-5 2-2 6, Randolph 3-9 2-2 8, Gasol 6-13 4-8 16, Conley 6-12 0-0 15, Lee 6-11 2-3 16, Chalmers 0-1 3-4 3, Je.Green 5-12 5-6 16, Barnes 5-9 4-4 16, Carter 0-1 0-0 0, Ja.Green 2-2 1-1 5. Totals 35-75 23-30 101. New Orleans 26 25 25 23 — 99 Memphis 24 25 23 29 — 101 3-point goals: New Orleans 6-19 (Gordon 2-4, Anderson 2-5, Holiday 1-2, Cunningham 1-3, Davis 0-2, Cole 0-3), Memphis 8-19 (Conley 3-5, Lee 2-4, Barnes 2-6, Je.Green 1-3, Carter 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 41 (Davis 8), Memphis 46 (Gasol 10). Assists: New Orleans 19 (Holiday 9), Memphis 27 (Conley 10). Total fouls: New Orleans 22, Memphis 25. Technicals: New Orleans defensive three second, Memphis defensive three second 2. A: 18,119 (18,119).

AMERICA’S LINE NFL Favorite

Points Open Current

TENNIS Underdog

Sunday AFC Championship 3 3 BRONCOS NFC Championship PANTHERS 3 3 Cards NBA Favorite Points Underdog HEAT 5.5 Bucks PELICANS 5 T’Wolves Pacers 6.5 SUNS Thunder 8.5 NUGGETS Patriots

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog PROVIDENCE 1.5 Butler CONNECTICUT 15 Tulane MISSISSIPPI PK S Carolina FLORIDA 11 Mississippi St OHIO U 5 W Michigan AKRON 5.5 E Michigan BALL ST 1.5 Kent St Buffalo 2 MIAMI-OHIO Toledo 1.5 BOWLING GREEN Kansas 9 OKLAHOMA ST INDIANA 12 Illinois Dayton 2.5 ST. BONA OAKLAND 14 No Kentucky Tulsa 7.5 E CAROLINA GEORGIA ST 11.5 Ga Southern PITTSBURGH 8.5 NC State VIRGINIA 9.5 Clemson NO ILLINOIS 3.5 C Michigan MARYLAND 13 Northwestern XAVIER 9.5 Georgetown SMU 13 Houston EVANSVILLE 14.5 Loyola-Chicago Alabama 2 AUBURN TEXAS A&M 8.5 Lsu Unlv 3 UTAH ST SAN DIEGO ST 8 Fresno St Added Game FAIRFIELD 1.5 St. Peter’s NHL Favorite Odds Underdog FLYERS -$145/+$125 Maple Leafs Capitals -$155/+$135 BLUE JACKETS RANGERS -$180/+$160 Canucks DEVILS -$135/+$115 Flames LIGHTNING -$225/+$185 Oilers CANADIENS -$110/-$110 Bruins Blackhawks -$120/even PREDATORS KINGS -$140/+$120 Stars Grand Salami: Over/under 42.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with OF Lorenzo Cain on a two-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Re-signed RHP Colby Lewis to a one-year contract. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Signed 2B Dee Gordon to a five-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed LB Carl Bradford, DT William Campbell, TE Mitchell Henry, WR Jamel Johnson, DT Christian Ringo, G Matt Rotheram, OT Jeremy Vujnovich and WR Ed Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Named Brian Schottenheimer quarterbacks coach and Shawn Terlecky defensive quality control coach. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Doug Pederson coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Assigned F Steve Downie to Springfield (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled F Phil Di Giuseppe from Charlotte (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Recalled D Esa Lindell from (AHL). Placed D Jordie Benn on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 16. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Re-assigned D Aaron Ness and F Zach Sill to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE ARIZONA — Named Marcel Yates defensive coordinator. CENTRAL METHODIST — Named Marty Steward defensive coordinator. OREGON STATE — Suspended senior F Jarmal Reid a minimum of four games for tripping a referee during a Jan. 17 game at Utah. PENN STATE — Named Tim Banks codefensive coordinator and safeties coach.

Australian Open Results Monday | At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $30.18 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Men First Round Austin Krajicek, United States, def. Wu Di, China, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3. Federico Delbonis, Argentina, def. Ivo Karlovic (22), Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 2-1, retired. Kei Nishikori (7), Japan, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4. Daniel Brands, Germany, def. Victor Estrella Burgos, Dominican Republic, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 4-6, 6-1. David Goffin (15), Belgium, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Dominic Thiem (19), Austria, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 7-6 (0). Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Kyle Edmund, Britain, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, 7-5, 6-1, 6-2. Gilles Simon (14), France, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Marin Cilic (12), Croatia, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7 (4), 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-6 (1). Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (26), Spain, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Renzo Olivo, Argentina, def. Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, 7-6 (8), 2-6, 1-6, 6-4, 6-4. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, def. Borna Coric, Croatia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, def. Inigo Cervantes, Spain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 5-7, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Chung Hyeon, South Korea, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Noah Rubin, United States, def. Benoit Paire (17), France, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5). Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, def. Yoshihito Nishioka, Japan, 7-6 (5), 6-1, 6-4. Denis Kudla, United States, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-1, 0-0, retired. Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 6-7 (5), 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, retired. Grigor Dimitrov (27), Bulgaria, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Omar Jasika, Australia, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 3-6, 6-0, 6-4. Nick Kyrgios (29), Australia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 6-2, 7-5, 6-2. Andreas Seppi (28), Italy, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (10). Quentin Halys, France, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5. Marco Trungelliti, Argentina, def. Jozek Kovalik, Slovakia, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 7-5. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. Roberto Bautista Agut (24), Spain, def. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 2-6, 6-2. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (9), France, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. Women First Round Petra Kvitova (6), Czech Republic, def. Luksika Kumkhum, Thailand, 6-3, 6-1. Nicole Gibbs, United States, def. Klara Koukalova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 2-6, 6-1. Daria Gavrilova, Australia, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Carla Suarez Navarro (10), Spain, def. Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4. Margarita Gasparyan, Russia, def. Sara Errani (17), Italy, 1-6, 7-5, 6-1. Anna-Lena Friedsam, Germany, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-1. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. Maria Sakkari, Greece, def. Wang Yafan, China, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-4, 7-5. Wang Qiang, China, def. Sloane Stephens (24), United States, 6-3, 6-3. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1. Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Oceane Dodin, France, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Lauren Davis, United States, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (26), Russia, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Kristina Mladenovic (28), France, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova (27), Slovakia, 6-3, 6-3. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Christina McHale, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def. Caroline Wozniacki (16), Denmark, 1-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 7-6 (2), 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova (23), Russia, def.

Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2. Belinda Bencic (12), Switzerland, def. Alison Riske, United States, 6-4, 6-3. Roberta Vinci (13), Italy, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-4, 6-2. Irina Falconi, United States, def. Anna Tatishvili, United States, 6-4, 3-6, 8-6. Han Xinyun, China, def. Mariana DuqueMarino, Colombia, 6-2, 2-1, retired. Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Teliana Pereira, Brazil, 6-2, 6-1. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, def. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-4. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def. Magda Linette, Poland, 6-3, 6-0. Ana Konjuh, Croatia, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 0-6, 6-4, 6-3. Elizaveta Kulichkova, Russia, def. Andrea Petkovic (22), Germany, 7-5, 6-4. Timea Babos, Hungary, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-7 (4), 7-5, 7-5. Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Nao Hibino, Japan, 6-1, 6-3. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Sam Stosur (25), Australia, 6-4, 7-6 (6).

Raptors 112, Nets 100 Brooklyn: Jo.Johnson 9-12 1-1 22, Young 4-11 3-3 11, Lopez 13-22 3-5 29, Sloan 4-10 4-4 13, Ellington 1-5 2-2 4, Bogdanovic 3-6 2-2 9, Larkin 4-6 0-0 8, Reed 1-2 0-0 2, Robinson 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 39-76 17-19 100. Toronto: Ja.Johnson 3-7 0-0 8, Scola 1-6 2-2 4, Valanciunas 3-11 0-0 6, Lowry 10-13 4-6 31, DeRozan 12-25 6-8 30, Patterson 5-10 0-0 12, Joseph 1-4 0-0 2, Ross 5-5 0-0 12, Biyombo 3-3 1-2 7, Powell 0-1 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-85 13-18 112. Brooklyn 29 20 35 16 — 100 Toronto 19 33 29 31 — 112 3-point goals: Brooklyn 5-14 (Jo.Johnson 3-4, Bogdanovic 1-3, Sloan 1-4, Brown 0-1, Ellington 0-2), Toronto 13-24 (Lowry 7-9, Ross 2-2, Ja.Johnson 2-3, Patterson 2-6, Scola 0-1, Powell 0-1, DeRozan 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 44 (Lopez 10), Toronto 42 (Valanciunas 12). Assists: Brooklyn 24 (Jo.Johnson 7), Toronto 24 (Lowry 8). Total fouls: Brooklyn 18, Toronto 17. A: 19,800 (19,800).

MEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

1.

1.

Oklahoma (15-2) lost to No. 19 Iowa State 82-77. Next: at No. 13 Baylor, Saturday.

2.

2.

North Carolina (16-2) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Wednesday.

3.

3.

Kansas (15-2) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Tuesday.

4.

Villanova (16-2) idle. Next: at Seton Hall, Wednesday.

5.

Xavier (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Georgetown, Tuesday.

6.

West Virginia (15-2) idle. Next: vs. Texas, Wednesday.

7.

Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: vs. Northwestern, Tuesday.

8.

SMU (17-0) idle. Next: vs. Houston, Tuesday.

9.

Iowa (14-3) idle. Next: at Rutgers, Thursday.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. Michigan State (16-3) idle. Next: vs. Nebraska, Wednesday.

11.

BASKETBALL

12. Arizona (15-3) idle. Next: at Stanford, Thursday.

12.

NBA LEADERS

13. Baylor (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Kansas State, Wednesday.

13.

13. Virginia (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Clemson, Tuesday.

14.

15. Miami (13-3) idle. Next: at Boston College, Wednesday.

15.

16. Providence (15-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 18 Butler, Tuesday.

16.

G Curry, GOL 39 Harden, HOU 42 Durant, OKC 35 Cousins, SAC 32 James, CLE 37 Lillard, POR 36 Westbrook, OKC 42 George, IND 41 Griffin, LAC 30 Davis, NOR 34 DeRozan, TOR 40 Butler, CHI 39 Thomas, BOS 41 Anthony, NYK 38 Wiggins, MIN 41 Lowry, TOR 40 K. Thompson, GOL 39 McCollum, POR 41 Bledsoe, PHX 31 Wall, WAS 39

FG 387 342 318 277 356 300 353 310 281 294 303 287 285 292 303 264 293 324 223 296

FT 205 365 209 233 188 176 257 238 129 172 279 261 239 182 223 199 99 89 138 140

PTS 1165 1161 926 828 945 888 1015 978 697 776 905 880 894 820 854 831 810 836 632 790

AVG 29.9 27.6 26.5 25.9 25.5 24.7 24.2 23.9 23.2 22.8 22.6 22.6 21.8 21.6 20.8 20.8 20.8 20.4 20.4 20.3

FG Percentage FG 163 186 202 188 178 206 189 179 271 304

Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Kanter, OKC Faried, DEN Parker, SAN Gortat, WAS Favors, UTA Towns, MIN Drummond, DET

FGA 228 305 334 336 333 390 361 342 518 583

PCT .715 .610 .605 .560 .535 .528 .524 .523 .523 .521

Rebounds Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Howard, HOU Whiteside, MIA Cousins, SAC Love, CLE Gasol, CHI Pachulia, DAL Davis, NOR Gortat, WAS

G 40 38 35 39 32 38 37 40 34 33

OFF 215 142 123 121 76 95 88 148 70 93

DEF 404 369 296 318 279 316 312 282 291 229

TOT 619 511 419 439 355 411 400 430 361 322

AVG 15.5 13.4 12.0 11.3 11.1 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.6 9.8

Assists Rondo, SAC Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Rubio, MIN Jack, Bro Green, GOL Lillard, POR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS

G 38 42 39 35 36 32 40 36 42 41

AST 439 405 376 333 307 236 293 253 280 272

AVG 11.6 9.6 9.6 9.5 8.5 7.4 7.3 7.0 6.7 6.6

17. Louisville (14-3) idle. Next: vs. Florida State, Wednesday. 18. Butler (13-4) idle. Next: at No. 16 Providence, Tuesday.

17. 18.

19. Iowa State (14-4) beat No. 1 Oklahoma 82-77. Next: at TCU, Saturday.

19.

20. Duke (14-5) lost to Syracuse 64-62. Next: at N.C. State, Saturday.

20.

21. Southern Cal (15-3) idle. Next: at Oregon, Thursday.

21.

22. Purdue (16-3) beat Rutgers 107-57. Next: vs. Ohio State, Thursday.

22.

23. Kentucky (13-4) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday.

23.

24. South Carolina (16-1) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Tuesday.

24.

25. Indiana (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday.

25.

Monday’s Div. I scores East Albany (NY) 80, Binghamton 59 Boston U. 87, Loyola (Md.) 84, OT Mass.-Lowell 93, Vermont 82 Monmouth (NJ) 85, Siena 69 New Hampshire 99, Maine 91 Purdue 107, Rutgers 57 Stony Brook 77, Hartford 43 Midwest Cleveland St. 70, Ill.-Chicago 53 Iowa St. 82, Oklahoma 77 Valparaiso 96, Youngstown St. 65 Wright St. 77, Detroit 76 South Beth.-Cook. 62, Morgan St. 50 Coppin St. 70, Florida A&M 66 Hampton 80, NC Central 79 Jackson St. 60, Prairie View 57 Norfolk St. 75, NC A&T 68 SC State 68, Md.-E. Shore 63 SE Louisiana 98, Lamar 70 Savannah St. 64, Delaware St. 47 Southern U. 67, MVSU 54 Steph. F. Austin 82, New Orleans 58 Syracuse 64, Duke 62 Texas South. 69, Grambling St. 54 Southwest Alcorn St. 73, Ark.-Pine Bluff 65 Arkansas St. 76, UALR 73 Sam Houston 87, Nicholls St. 76 Texas Tech 76, TCU 69 Far West No major team scores reported from the Far West.

Rockets 112, Lakers 95 Houston: Ariza 5-8 2-2 13, Capela 6-8 2-2 14, Howard 6-11 2-3 14, Terry 1-4 0-0 2, Harden 10-17 7-10 31, Jones 1-7 0-0 2, Lawson 4-7 3-3 12, Brewer 2-8 0-0 4, Thornton 4-11 2-2 10, Harrell 5-7 0-2 10, McDaniels 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 44-91 18-24 112. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 2-5 0-0 5, Randle 5-10 2-3 12, Hibbert 3-6 2-2 8, Clarkson 8-17 0-0 16, Williams 7-12 5-6 20, Russell 5-10 0-0 12, Bass 2-4 4-4 8, Kelly 1-8 1-2 3, Brown 4-8 0-0 10, Huertas 0-2 0-0 0, Black 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 37-82 15-19 95. Houston 32 28 34 18 — 112 L.A. Lakers 36 21 18 20 — 95 3-point goals: Houston 6-21 (Harden 4-7, Ariza 1-3, Lawson 1-3, Jones 0-1, Terry 0-2, Brewer 0-2, Thornton 0-3), L.A. Lakers 6-16 (Russell 2-4, Brown 2-5, Bryant 1-1, Williams 1-2, Clarkson 0-1, Huertas 0-1, Kelly 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 58 (Howard 15), L.A. Lakers 44 (Randle 11). Assists: Houston 21 (Lawson, Harden 5), L.A. Lakers 25 (Bryant 9). Total fouls: Houston 19, L.A. Lakers 16. A: 18,997 (18,997).

WOMEN HOW THE TOP 25 FARED

10. Texas A&M (15-2) idle. Next: vs. LSU, Tuesday.

Through Sunday Scoring

LATE SUNDAY

UConn (16-0) idle. Next: vs. UCF, Wednesday. South Carolina (17-0) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday. Notre Dame (17-1) beat No. 18 Tennessee 79-66. Next: vs. Syracuse, Thursday. Baylor (18-1) idle. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. Maryland (16-2) idle. Next: at Wisconsin, Wednesday. Texas (16-1) idle. Next: at TCU, Wednesday. Ohio State (13-4) idle. Next: at Michigan, Thursday. Arizona State (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Arizona, Friday. Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: at Mississippi, Thursday. Mississippi State (17-2) beat Mississippi 79-51. Next: at Georgia, Thursday. Oregon State (14-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. Stanford (14-4) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Friday. Texas A&M (13-5) idle. Next: vs. No. 23 Missouri, Thursday. Florida State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Virginia, Thursday. South Florida (12-4) idle. Next: at Memphis, Wednesday. Miami (17-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 14 Florida State, Sunday. Louisville (14-5) idle. Next: at Syracuse, Monday. Tennessee (11-6) lost to No. 3 Notre Dame 79-66. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Thursday. Oklahoma (12-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Wednesday. UCLA (12-5) idle. Next: vs. California, Friday. Michigan State (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Rutgers, Tuesday. Florida (15-3) idle. Next: vs. Alabama, Thursday. Missouri (15-3) idle. Next: at No. 13 Texas A&M, Thursday. DePaul (13-6) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Friday. West Virginia (15-4) idle. Next: at TCU, Sunday.

HOCKEY NHL Leaders Through Sunday Goal Scoring Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Alex Ovechkin Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Tyler Seguin Dallas Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Matt Duchene Colorado Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Mike Hoffman Ottawa Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Max Pacioretty Montreal Daniel Sedin Vancouver Jonathan Toews Chicago Brent Burns San Jose Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Brock Nelson NY Islanders Kyle Palmieri New Jersey Patrice Bergeron Boston Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Corey Perry Anaheim Jeff Skinner Carolina Shane Doan Arizona Taylor Hall Edmonton Leo Komarov Toronto Brad Marchand Boston James Neal Nashville Artemi Panarin Chicago Zach Parise Minnesota Brandon Saad Columbus Patrick Sharp Dallas Justin Williams Washington Mats Zuccarello NY Rangers

GP 48 44 46 46 46 46 43 44 41 45 43 44 46 46 48 43 45 45 46 44 45 44 47 35 46 43 39 45 48 36 45 46 45 45

G 29 27 26 25 24 22 22 22 20 20 19 19 19 19 19 18 18 18 18 17 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16

Assists Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Erik Karlsson Ottawa John Klingberg Dallas Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Jamie Benn Dallas Nicklas Backstrom Washington Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington P.K. Subban Montreal Henrik Sedin Vancouver Tyler Seguin Dallas Artemi Panarin Chicago Taylor Hall Edmonton Alexander Steen St Louis Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Tomas Plekanec Montreal Joe Thornton San Jose Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Jonathan Huberdeau Florida Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Bobby Ryan Ottawa Brent Seabrook Chicago Ryan Suter Minnesota Power Play Goals Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas Justin Faulk Carolina Alex Ovechkin Washington Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Patrice Bergeron Boston Shane Doan Arizona Loui Eriksson Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Shea Weber Nashville Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Ryan O’Reilly Buffalo Max Pacioretty Montreal Joe Pavelski San Jose Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles Short Handed Goals Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Paul Byron Montreal Eric Fehr Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Artem Anisimov Chicago Cam Atkinson Columbus Jamie Benn Dallas Jason Chimera Washington Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Blake Comeau Colorado Cody Eakin Dallas Adam Henrique New Jersey Bryan Little Winnipeg Matt Nieto San Jose Zack Smith Ottawa Jonathan Toews Chicago Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Mika Zibanejad Ottawa Power Play Assists Name Team Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Kris Letang Pittsburgh Alexander Steen St Louis P.K. Subban Montreal Mikkel Boedker Arizona Brent Burns San Jose Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS John Klingberg Dallas Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Tyson Barrie Colorado Patrice Bergeron Boston Patrick Kane Chicago Torey Krug Boston Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Victor Rask Carolina Brent Seabrook Chicago Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Jason Spezza Dallas Short Handed Assists Name Team Jeff Petry Montreal Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Jamie Benn Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Paul Byron Montreal Zdeno Chara Boston Vernon Fiddler Dallas Curtis Lazar Ottawa Torrey Mitchell Montreal Drew Stafford Winnipeg Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Tommy Wingels San Jose Aleksander Barkov Florida Francois Beauchemi Colorado Pierre-Edouard Bel Philadelphia Jordie Benn Dallas T.J. Brodie Calgary J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Alex Burmistrov Winnipeg Brent Burns San Jose John Carlson Washington Jeff Carter Los Angeles Casey Cizikas NY Islanders Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders Andrew Cogliano Anaheim Sean Couturier Philadelphia

GP 48 45 46 45 46 42 45 46 44 46 48 46 48 43 40 43 44 46 43 36 43 45 44 44 48 45

A 40 37 32 31 30 29 29 29 28 28 27 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 25 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

GP 48 46 47 44 44 45 44 35 44 46 45 44 45 46 43 44

PP 14 12 12 10 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7

GP 45 34 34 39 47 45 46 45 44 46 46 44 45 40 44 48 45 44

SH 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

GP 42 45 34 48 46 44 43 43 43 46 45 42 44 48 43 44 45 48 38 46

PPA 16 15 14 14 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

GP 43 45 46 44 34 42 46 40 35 44 45 43 35 46 35 43 34 41 45 43 34 39 45 44 44 37

SHA 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BOYS BASKETBALL CLASSIC • VASHON 71, CBC 70

MONDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL

JUST ENOUGH

Chaminade 10 12 10 27 69 DeMatha Catho 12 13 9 25 72 C (16-5): Tatum 40, Cook 11. FG 18 (4), FT 29-33. D: Fultz 20, Harvey 13, Gardner 12, Darling 11. FG 26 (7), FT 13-16.

McKinney delivers with layup, Cadets let 25-point lead slip away BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

Mario McKinney crashed the glass and delivered Vashon a signature win. The lone freshman on the roster, McKinney rebounded Darren Huntley’s errant jumper and put it in off the glass with just over a second remaining to complete an incredible come-from-behind win as Vashon nipped CBC 71-70 on Monday at the Remembering the Dream Martin Luther King Jr. Classic at the Danis Fieldhouse on the campus of St. Louis U. High. The No. 3 small school in the STLhighschoolsports. com rankings, Vashon (114) trailed by 25 points with 6 minutes and 42 seconds to play in the third quarter. From that point on, the Wolverines outscored the Cadets 47-21. “They thought they put us away but we kept fighting,” McKinney said. “This is the biggest win we’ve had so far.” Vashon got contributions and clutch baskets from all over the place. McKinney scored seven points. Senior forward Damion Taylor had nine points and six rebounds. Junior Casey Cody-Jackson had 13 points, two steals and three blocks. Junior point guard Daniel “Peanut” Farris had 16 points, four rebounds and four steals. Farris was particularly effective in the second half as he hit a pair of 3-pointers that helped propel Vashon on the comeback trail. “In the second half we needed him to be aggressive and he did that. He stepped up and made some huge baskets,” Vashon

M 1 • TUESDAy • 01.19.2016

McCluer North 16 10 16 9 51 Ritter 15 11 7 17 50 R (6-3): Wash 19, Stewart 14, Haynes 12. FG 16 (6), FT 12-21.

McCluer North 16 10 13 17 56 Ritter 12 16 20 16 64 R (10-6): B. Jackson 19, Wooten 17, B. Mosby 10. FG 26 (4), FT 8-14.

Kenwood Acade 6 13 10 18 47 Kirkwood 9 10 18 20 57 Ki (11-3): Roundtree 21, Buford 11. FG 17 (2), FT 21-29.

Vashon 11 13 20 27 71 CBC 21 21 15 13 70 V (11-4): D. Farris 16, Cody-Jackson 13, Taylor 11. FG 26 (5), FT 14-25. C (11-7): Orf 15, Willis 15, Clark 14, Catchings 11. FG 21 (3), FT 25-37.

Bolingbrook 7 6 15 11 39 In. Word 10 17 19 15 61 I (11-4): Britzmann 15, Hof 11, Morris 11. FG 19 (6), FT 17-24.

Haz. Central 10 14 6 17 47 SLUH 9 17 8 24 58 H (14-2): Dobbs 20, Sneed 20. FG 15 (0), FT 17-24. S (10-5): McKissic 15, Nester 13. FG 18 (5), FT 17-23. Wood River 5 6 15 8 34 Mount Zion 21 15 32 4 72 W (5-14): Marks 10. FG 12 (2), FT 8-12. M: Kernan 15, Davis 13, Cox 11, Smith 10. FG 29 (9), FT 5-8. A. Marquette 12 3 14 12 Quincy ND 6 13 10 22 A (12-4): Boone 20. FG 9 (4), FT 19-24. Q: Bottorf 13. FG 20 (1), FT 10-12.

GORDON RADFORD • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

coach Tony Irons said. “He’s been doing that a lot for us this year.” Vashon converted on offense, but had to dig down defensively to make any headway. It took CBC (11-7, No. 3 LS) out of its comfort zone as star point guard Jordan Barnes had to give up the ball. The Wolverines sent multiple, long-armed defenders at the Indiana State-bound Barnes and he, in turn, would find an open teammate. But by doing that, CBC’s offense became out of sync. Barnes is the primary ball handler and decision maker for the Cadets. “We didn’t value the basketball,” CBC coach Justin Tatum said. “We thought it was over and Vashon never gave up. I tip my cap to the V.”

Barnes finished with nine points, six rebounds, four steals, three assists and one block. Senior guard Christian Willis scored 15 points and had four rebounds and three steals. Senior post Duane Clark had 14 points and six rebounds. Junior guard Sam Orf had his best game of the season as he finished with 15 points, six rebounds and several plays that left the capacity crowd oohing. Like the rest of the Cadets, his second half did not match the brilliance of the first. CBC led 42-24 at the break. “With them sending two or three defenders at me, we had to give the ball to someone else. As a team we just weren’t able to take care of the ball,” Barnes said.

CBC led 57-44 after the third quarter. Vashon grabbed the momentum and tied the game at 67 with 1:57 to play when Cody-Jackson buried a jumper. McKinney hit a reverse layup with 1:37 left to give Vashon its first lead of the game 69-67. Barnes gave the Cadets a 70-69 lead when he hit one of two free throws with 28.5 seconds to play. McKinney then delivered the final blow for the Wolverines. Irons was not surprised the 6-foot freshman came through under pressure. “One thing you know you’re going to get out of him is effort and energy. We tease him all the time, he’s one of our best rebounders. At practice he goes after every ball,” Irons said.

Luth. South 19 7 14 13 53 MilwaukeeLuth 7 11 7 12 37 L (8-5): Member-Meneh 28, Lawson 13. FG 19 (0), FT 15-28.

Pattonville 13 11 12 21 57 St. Mary’s 11 17 15 21 64 P (7-7): Williams 27, Dudley 10, Henderson Jr. 10. FG 21 (6), FT 9-12. S (11-6): Burkes 21, Rasas 17, King 12. FG 21 (5), FT 17-26.

Lebanon 16 17 2 4 39 Taylorville 21 22 19 19 81 L (7-8): Guthrie 20, Schieppe 15. FG 12 (5), FT 10-12. T (3-2): Barry 13, Ruppert 11, Heimsness 10. FG 33 (10), FT 5-12.

CBC sophomore Kale Catchings (center) and CBC senior Duane Clark (50) guard Vashon junior Daniel Farris under the basket during a game at the second annual MLK Basketball Classic on Monday.

South Miami 17 17 12 15 61 North Tech 7 9 9 16 41 N (4-10): Jackson 13. FG 13 (1), FT 14-23.

41 51

Cahokia 19 7 8 15 49 Pittsield 6 9 13 10 38 C (6-10): Bell 15, Davis 11. FG 20 (2), FT 7-16. P: Ashburn 13, Persmett 11. FG 15 (2), FT 6-9. Madison 8 6 11 14 39 Wesclin 18 13 19 16 66 M (3-8): Kennedy 16. FG 17 (3), FT 2-3. W (7-10): J. Stephens 17, Ottensmeier 14, Steenbergen 12, Combs 10. FG 25 (10), FT 6-12. Mascoutah 9 11 9 15 44 Breese C. 20 8 14 24 66 M (4-14): Mayberry 24, Weiss 10. FG 16 (2), FT 10-12. B (16-2): Kohrmann 16, Strieker 12, Schneider 11, Schulte 10. FG 25 (8), FT 8-11. Collinsville 13 17 11 18 59 Jerseyville 15 10 3 25 53 C (7-9): Maden 14, Flora 13, Midgett 13. FG 18 (6), FT 17-26. J (7-10): Kanallakan 23, Z. Ridenhour 18. FG 18 (8), FT 9-13.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Lee (Alabama) 11 11 15 12 49 Civic Mem. 17 12 13 14 56 C (12-8): Troeckler 26. FG 19 (4), FT 14-29.

Carterville 18 17 13 7 Collinsville 14 4 17 12 Co (8-10): Smith 19. FG 17 (4), FT 9-10.

55 47

Mater Dei 13 10 18 15 56 Carlyle 6 7 11 9 33 M (11-8): Beckmann 16, Winkler 13, Gerdes 12, Toennies 11. FG 18 (4), FT 16-25. C (2-21): Isaak 8, Michael 8. FG 13 (3), FT 4-14. North Lawndale 10 16 18 17 St. Charles 17 8 12 13 S (10-4): Wilson 11. FG 16 (3), FT 15-26.

61 50

Mt Vernon 3 10 3 12 28 Edwardsville 26 17 18 9 70 M (4-7): Hayes 11. FG 9 (6), FT 4-9. E (17-1): Pranger 21, Silvey 15, Waters 12. FG 28 (6), FT 8-9. Cahokia 15 10 10 8 43 Lift For Life 13 7 14 14 48 C (0-10): Jefries 11. FG 16 (2), FT 9-14. L (7-7): Hall 15, Jones 11. FG 15 (1), FT 17-43. Hermann 20 12 15 9 56 Chamois 5 4 8 5 22 H (13-2): Stiers 16, Grosse 13. FG 24 (5), FT 3-6. C: M. Nolte 9. FG 7 (4), FT 4-5. Brussels 23 23 14 10 70 Greenield 9 4 8 7 28 B (15-5): Kiel 16, Stephens 12. FG 28 (3), FT 11-19. Herculaneum 32 25 15 16 88 Valley Park 15 13 17 21 66 H (9-4): Metcalf 25, Fischer 14, Partney 14. FG 33 (5), FT 17-27. V (7-7): Scott 15, D. Hayes 14, Kreitler 14, Schmidt 11. FG 29 (4), FT 4-17. Festus 5 16 18 14 53 Union 6 16 16 8 46 F (9-4): Frazier 15, Fallert 13, J. Oetting 10. FG 19 (6), FT 9-14. Fox 8 13 15 8 Hillsboro 10 3 8 7 F (10-3): Farrell 19. FG 16 (2), FT 10-15. H (3-11): Close 9. FG 9 (4), FT 6-6.

44 28

O’Fallon 10 7 9 20 46 Triad 9 14 15 19 57 O (12-7): Durk 13, Cash 11. FG 18 (7), FT 3-9. T (16-2): Thompson 27, Burroughs 14. FG 12 (3), FT 30-34.

BOYS BASKETBALL • ILLINOIS NOTEBOOK

Lancers standout picks Illinois BY ADAM ZUVANICH STLhighschoolsports.com

Javon Pickett knew when he was 11 years old that he wanted to attend the University of Illinois, having rooted for the Fighting Illini when he and his family watched them play football against Missouri in St. Louis. The Belleville East junior now has the opportunity to do that – on a basketball scholarship, no less – and he’s jumping at the chance. Pickett, a 6-foot-4 shooting guard who is one of the St. Louis area’s leading scorers this season, said he gave a verbal commitment to Illinois while attending its Big Ten Conference basketball game Saturday against Nebraska. “I just figured it was time for me to go ahead and do it so they can bring in some other good players, and this way I wouldn’t be wasting anybody’s time,” Pickett said Monday. “That’s where I wanted to go ever since I was younger, so I might as well do it now.” Pickett, whose verbal commitment is non-binding until he signs a national letter of intent as a senior, said he’s also received scholarship offers from schools such as Drake, Illinois State, Southern Illinois Edwardsville, St. Louis University and Tennessee State. He said he already had developed a bond with the coaches for the Fighting Illini, and said the Champaign campus feels like home when he visits. There is another famil-

iarity factor in the form of Malcolm Hill, the junior Illinois guard who is averaging 18.1 points per game this season. Like Pickett, Hill played for the Lancers and the Southwestern Illinois Jets AAU team. “To see what they’ve done with him from high school to now, I feel like they did a tremendous job,” Pickett said. “Just to see a kid from the same school, same area, same AAU team as me being successful, I just figured they could do the same with me.” Belleville East coach Abel Schrader said Pickett has grown stronger and more confident since his sophomore season, when he averaged 14.3 points and 6.4 rebounds for a Lancers team that finished 8-19. This season, Belleville East is 12-4, and Pickett is the area’s fifth-leading scorer with 23.4 points per game while also grabbing a team-high 6.8 rebounds per game.

TAKE YOUR PICK Belleville East is hosting one of seven tournaments this week that involve area Illinois teams. The Belleville East Classic, which starts Tuesday and concludes Saturday, is a six-team event featuring nine games. Belleville East (12-4) and St. Louis U. High (10-5) are ranked seventh and sixth, respectively, in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings for large schools, while Althoff (14-2) is the No. 1 small school. Saturday night’s game between Althof and SLUH figures to be the marquee

GORDON RADFORD • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

SLUH junior BJ Wilson (21) and SLUH senior David Jackson tangle with a Hazelwood Central defender during a game at the second annual MLK Basketball Classic on Monday.

BOYS BASKETBALL • AREA RANKINGS LARGE SCHOOLS Rank team Record 1. Chaminade 16-5 2. Edwardsville 13-3 3. Hazelwood Central 14-2 4. CBC 11-7 5. Webster Groves 13-1 6. SLUH 10-5 7. Belleville East 12-4 8. Parkway West 11-2 9. Vianney 10-6 10. Ft. Zumwalt South 13-2

LW 1 4 2 3 5 6 9 8 7 10

matchup of the tournament, which also includes Belleville West (5-9), Columbia (13-1) and McCluer (5-7). The host Lancers face Columbia on Tuesday, SLUH on Friday and McCluer on Saturday. “They all have the opportunity to be really good games and good basketball,” Schrader said. The same could be said of this week’s other tournaments. The 49th Litchfield Invitational and 98th Macoupin County Tournament started Saturday and conclude a week later, while the Benton Invitational, Nashville Invitational Tournament and Okawville Invitational started Monday. The Triad Mid-Winter Classic, which includes Gateway STEM (1-7), Granite City (8-8), Highland (9-8) and Riverview Gardens (5-9), tips of Tuesday along with the Belleville East event. Civic Memorial (12-4) is the No. 1 seed in the Litchfield tourney, which also includes second-seeded Metro-East Lutheran (173). The Knights, who are ninth in the small-school rankings, have won five consecutive games and are ranked eighth in the latest Class 1A poll conducted by the Associated Press. The tournaments hosted

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank team 1. Althof 2. Jennings 3. Vashon 4. Breese Central 5. Okawville 6. Mater Dei 7. Westminster 8. Whitield 9. ME Lutheran 10. Cardinal Ritter

Record 14-2 12-2 11-4 15-2 15-3 11-3 11-2 12-3 17-3 10-6

LW 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 NR

by Nashville (10-6) and Okawville (15-3) also feature some of Illinois’ best small-school squads. The Nashville event includes Breese Central (15-2) and Mater Dei (11-3) teams that are fourth and sixth, respectively, in the STLhighschoolsports.com smallschool rankings, and they face each other at 8 p.m. Friday. The field also includes Mascoutah (4-13) and Teutopolis, which is ranked fifth in Class 2A. Gibault (12-6), Madison (3-7) and Wesclin (610) are among the teams playing in the showcase tournament at Okawville, which is third in the latest 1A rankings and fifth in the STLhighschoolsports.com small-school rankings.

BACK ON SCHEDULE Alton athletics director Jef Alderman said the Redbirds’ Southwestern Conference home game against East St. Louis, originally scheduled for Jan. 12, will now be played at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9. The schools agreed to postpone the game after the Jan. 11 shooting death of Romell L. Jones, an 11-year-old Alton boy who was shot at the Alton Acres housing complex while waiting outside for a ride to basketball practice.

TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL -49TH LITCHFIELD INVITATIONAL Pool A Greenville vs Civic Memorial, 7:30 p.m. Pool B Nokomis vs Metro-East Lutheran, 7:30 p.m. Pool C Taylorville vs Pana, 6 p.m. Pool D Mount Zion vs Roxana, 6 p.m. -ST. JAMES TOURNAMENT First round Newburg vs Sullivan, 7:30 p.m. Blair Oaks vs St. James, 6 p.m. -NASHVILLE INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT Mater Dei vs Teutopolis, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Mascoutah vs Nashville, 8 p.m. Tuesday. -OKAWVILLE INVITATIONAL Vandalia vs Gibault, 6 p.m. Madison, Illinois vs Okawville, 7:30 p.m. -TRIAD MID-WINTER CLASSIC Pool A Marion vs Triad, 6 p.m. Pool B Granite City vs Riverview Gardens, 6 p.m. -BELLEVILLE EAST CLASSIC First round Belleville West vs McCluer, 6 p.m. Columbia vs Belleville East, 7:30 p.m. Other area games: Windsor at Grandview, 5:30 p.m. Ritenour at Hazelwood East, 5:30 p.m. Miller Career vs. Metro, at Vashon, 6 p.m. Parkway South at Mehlville, 6 p.m. Hazelwood West at Pattonville, 6 p.m. Vashon at Northwest Academy, 6 p.m. McKinley vs. Collegiate, at Gateway STEM, 6 p.m. Lovejoy at Sandoval, 6 p.m. Valmeyer at Valley Park, 6:30 p.m. Brentwood at Maplewood-RH, 6:30 p.m. Ste. Genevieve at De Soto, 6:30 p.m. Trinity at Jennings, 6:45 p.m. DuBourg at Cardinal Ritter, 6:45 p.m. Lutheran North at MICDS, 7 p.m. Summit at Lindbergh, 7 p.m. Zumwalt South at Zumwalt East, 7 p.m. Eureka at Vianney, 7 p.m. Lafayette at Seckman, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 7 p.m. Clopton at Barat, 7 p.m. Zumwalt West at Howell Central, 7 p.m. Webster Groves at Parkway North, 7 p.m. Westminster at Lutheran South, 7 p.m. Howell North at Timberland, 7 p.m. Ladue at John Burroughs, 7 p.m. Liberty at Winield, 7 p.m. Red Bud vs. Murphysboro, at Sparta, 7 p.m. Chamois at Hermann, 7:30 p.m. Crystal City at Festus, 7:30 p.m. Jeferson at Fredericktown, 7:30 p.m. Patriots at Christian Academy, 7:30 p.m. Marissa at Dupo, 7:45 p.m. Warrenton at St. Charles, 8 p.m. Freeburg at Sparta, 8:30 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL -30TH HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT Consolation quarterinal Taylorville vs Nokomis, 4 p.m. Wesclin vs Nashville, 5:30 p.m. Quarterinal Belleville West vs Highland, 7 p.m. Salem, Ill. vs Hillsboro, Ill., 8:30 p.m. -37TH MACOUPIN COUNTY TOURNAMENT Pool A North Mac vs Carlinville, 5 p.m. Pool B Bunker Hill vs Mount Olive, 6:30 p.m.

Staunton vs Gillespie, 8 p.m. OTHER AREA GAMES: McKinleyvs.Collegiate,atGatewaySTEM,4:30p.m. Riverview Gardens at Conluence, 4:30 p.m. Tower Grove Chr at Bayless, 5 p.m. Crystal City at Hancock, 5 p.m. Lafayette at Seckman, 5:30 p.m. Borgia at O’Fallon Christian, 5:30 p.m. Zumwalt West at Howell Central, 5:30 p.m. Zumwalt South at Zumwalt East, 5:30 p.m. McCluer at Lutheran North, 5:30 p.m. Howell North at Timberland, 5:30 p.m. Francis Howell at Troy, 5:30 p.m. Liberty at Winield, 5:30 p.m. Hazelwood East at Ritenour, 5:45 p.m. Sumner at Gateway STEM, 6 p.m. University City at Parkway Central, 6 p.m. ME Lutheran at Alton Marquette, 6 p.m. McCluer North at Incarnate Word, 6 p.m. MICDS at Cardinal Ritter, 6 p.m. Patriots at Christian Academy, 6 p.m. North Callaway at South Callaway, 6 p.m. Grandview at Trinity, 6:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North at Holt, 6:30 p.m. Warrenton at St. Charles, 6:30 p.m. Whitield at Ladue, 6:30 p.m. Rosati-Kain at DuBourg, 6:30 p.m. Orchard Farm at Montgomery County, 6:30 p.m. Notre Dame at Luth. St. Charles, 6:45 p.m. Lindbergh at Oakville, 7 p.m. Clayton at Summit, 7 p.m. De Soto at Afton, 7 p.m. Waynesville at Union, 7 p.m. Paciic at Parkway West, 7 p.m. Visitation at Sullivan, 7 p.m. Mehlville at Parkway South, 7 p.m. Pattonville at Hazelwood West, 7 p.m. Parkway North at Webster Groves, 7 p.m. Windsor at John Burroughs, 7 p.m. Northwest-CH at Marquette, 7 p.m. Belleville West at Highland, 7 p.m. Granite City at Alton, 7:30 p.m. Columbia at Jerseyville, 7:30 p.m. Dupo at Steeleville, 7:30 p.m.

HOCKEY Seckman vs. Priory, at Webster Rink, 6:50 p.m. Timberlandvs.Duchesne,atLindenwood,8:30p.m. JohnBurroughsvs.Clayton,atQueenyPark,9p.m.

WRESTLING St. Charles West at Orchard Farm, 5 p.m. Hazelwood West at Parkway West, 5 p.m. Hazelwood West vs. MICDS, at Pky. West, 5 p.m. MICDS at Parkway West, 5 p.m. Warrenton at Union, 5 p.m. Warrenton vs. Sullivan, at Union, 5 p.m. Webster Groves at De Smet, 5 p.m. Webster Groves vs. Priory, at De Smet, 5 p.m. Priory at De Smet, 5 p.m. McCluer North at Fort Zumwalt West, 6 p.m. Summit at Northwest-CH, 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING Parkway West at Ladue, 4 p.m. Holt, St. Charles W. at Hazelwood W., 4 p.m. Pattonville at Ritenour, 4 p.m. Webster Groves at Kirkwood, 4 p.m. John Burroughs, Luth. North at Principia, 4 p.m. Afton at Parkway Central, 4:15 p.m. Normandy, University City at McCluer South-Berkeley, 4:15 p.m. Parkway South at Mehlville, 4:15 p.m. Lafayette at Marquette, 4:15 p.m. Oakville at Eureka, 4:15 p.m. Summit at Parkway North, 4:15 p.m. Westminstervs.St.Joseph’satChaminade,4:30p.m. Ursuline vs. Visitation at Principia, 6:30 p.m.

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Tuesday • 01.19.2016 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable. South deals. NORTH ♠8 6 4 3 ♥10 6 5 3 ♦A Q ♣A K 3 WEST EAST ♠Q 5 ♠K 7 ♥K 8 ♥Q 7 2 ♦10 9 2 ♦J 8 7 6 5 4 3 ♣Q J 10 8 7 2 ♣9 SOUTH ♠A J 10 9 2 ♥A J 9 4 ♦K ♣6 5 4 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ Pass 3NT* Pass 4♠ All pass *Raise to 4♠, balanced with at least four spades Opening lead: Queen of ♣ This was the final deal of last year’s Venice Cup, held in India, for the world championship of women’s bridge. The USA was trailing France in a close match. Both tables reached four spades, after different auctions, and the USA needed to make four spades at one table while defeating it at the other to win the world championship. Both Wests led the queen of clubs. The French declarer won with dummy’s ace and led a spade to her jack, losing to the queen. West con-

tinued with the jack of clubs, covered by dummy’s king and rufed by East. East shifted to a low heart and declarer had no winning choice from that point, ending up down one. The USA had a chance! Alas for the USA, the American declarer chose the same line of play and also went down one. The Venice Cup went to France. Declarer can always succeed by playing a spade to the ace at trick two and continuing with the jack of spades. Another winning line would be to take a club discard on the diamonds before playing a spade to the jack. Before criticizing too harshly, note that these declarers only failed because of the 6-1 club split. Saving the diamond entry for later would have saved an entry for subsequent spade and heart plays. Three of the four other expert declarers, in other events, also failed to make four spades. (01/19/16)

Across 1 Something a software developer develops 4 Perp pursuer ?7 Bully’s response 13 ___ Majesty 14 Monomaniacal mariner 16 Hullabaloo 17 Item on a chairlift 18 “Ain’t happening” 19 They may be involved in close shaves 20 How a lot of Generation X’s music was released 22 Buddy of “The Beverly Hillbillies” 24 “… ___ lack thereof” 25 Lures 27 Gets the picture 28 Palindromic bird 29 Verdi opera based on a Shakespeare play

30 Grecian subject of a Keats poem 31 At the home of 32 They often line up near WRs on a football field 33 Open-mouthed 35 Slime 36 Invites to one’s home 38 Sprinted 39 Two cents, so to speak 42 Neurotic condition, for short 43 Completely 45 Spanish “that” 46 Not for sure 48 Hallucination producer 49 Absolutely ate up 51 Just-made 52 Dandelion, e.g. 53 “O” follower 54 MouthHealthy. org grp. 55 Capital on the Red River

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

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CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME January 19 WORD — IMPENDS (IMPENDS: im-PENDS: Is about to occur.) Average mark 18 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 23 or more words in IMPENDS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — MALARIAL aria maar aril mail lair malar lama malaria lamia mall liar marl lira mill llama alar rail alarm rill amir RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

57 1990s Senate majority leader Trent 58 “The Jazz Singer” star 60 “The Greatest Generation” subj. 62 Punch line? 64 Iris part 65 Child’s punishment, maybe 66 Diamond stat 67 Like sailing ships 68 Amal Clooney ___ Alamuddin 69 ___ ed

If Jan. 19 is your birthday • This year you will be far more charming than you have been in many years. In fact, people who disliked you will decide that they were wrong. If you are single, your innate mischievousness emerges, making you an incredibly fun person to be around. If you are attached, you’ll ind that your relationship with your sweetie heats up signiicantly. Gemini talks too much for your liking. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ You rarely are at a loss for words, but today ofers a situation that could leave you speechless. You’ll see the implications of what is happening, while the other party involved might not. Tonight: Meet up with a pal. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ You might be juggling your inances with care, yet you still might see them fall apart right before your very eyes. Tonight: Avoid prejudging, and watch what happens. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ Take a walk behind the scenes and make a decision if you want more from a certain aspect of your life. Don’t hesitate to zero in on that. Your ingenuity emerges again as your strong suit. Tonight: As you like it. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★ You might be taken aback by everything that is going on around you. As a result, if you are feeling overwhelmed by situations and uproar, you will ind that you go into your own world. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Stay in touch with what the majority want as well as what you want. It is possible that a conlict exists, but it is resolvable. Focus on success and mutuality. Tonight: All smiles.

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Down 1 Tonsil-checking sounds 2 Twinings product in an orange box 3 Elton John’s dedicatee for “Candle in the Wind 1997” 4 Classic board game with a Peppermint Forest 5 “Well, whaddya know!” 6 Web ___ 7 One at a multiplex 8 Mathematician Turing and others 9 Nickname on the 1960s-’80s Red Sox 10 Don Juan types 11 “Tuesdays With ___” (Mitch Albom best-seller) 12 Fake

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Puzzle by David Levinson Wilk

15 Moves like a buoy in the ocean … or a hint to the shaded parts of this puzzle? 21 Rank above maj. 23 2014 Jennifer Lawrence/Bradley Cooper film 25 “The lady ___ protest too much” 26 Soak, in dialect

31 Dupe 34 Out of bed 35 1980 one-woman comedy produced by Lorne Michaels 37 Frigid 40 Was 41 “There, look what I did!” 44 Fond du ___, Wis. 46 Stuck

47 Hat for Frank Sinatra 48 Didn’t stand up straight 50 Singer Yoko 52 Complete 56 “Victory is mine!” 59 Drunkard 61 Suffix with Manhattan or Brooklyn 63 Repair

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1215

WORD SCRIMMAGE

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Someone from a distance has an enormous efect on your decisions and actions. When this person plays devil’s advocate, you open up to many new possibilities. Tonight: Be entertained.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You could decide to let others run with the ball, as it will give you more time for what you want. A tendency to be excessive might emerge later in the afternoon. Tonight: Go along with a suggestion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Your determination marks your actions and thoughts. Whatever you need to get done, whether it is for you or for others, will be high on your agenda. Tonight: Better a late dinner than no dinner. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ You express a playfulness and creativity that others often don’t know how to respond to. Recognize that on some level you bypass others with this combo, which creates a communication gap. Tonight: You can’t be restrained. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ You might feel pressured to perform at a higher level. Though the pressure might not feel comfortable to you, the results might justify moving in this direction, especially if it involves your personal life. Tonight: Make dinner fun and memorable.

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picture, especially if your thoughts and consequential decisions could impair others and not just you. Tonight: A must appearance.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★★ One-on-one relating opens doors and allows you to see your world diferently. Sometimes you tend to impose your values on others. It would be best to refrain from making judgments. Tonight: Be with a favorite person.

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WORDY GURDY

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ Be aware of the big

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

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HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

01.19.2016 • TueSday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

‘Boy crazy’ senior wants to study abroad

Dear Holding • If you had described your granddaughter as emotionally mature and responsible, I would give it my blessing. However, because you didn’t, in my opinion she should continue her schooling closer to home and pursue her interest in language arts when she’s further along in her education and less boy crazy. Dear Abby • My girlfriend has no issue with nudity. She worked herself through her master’s

degree in finance as an exotic dancer. She has a phenomenal figure, eats healthy and works out often. Last year we bought a home in a small residential community, complete with a pool. We installed a fence and spent a lot of money on landscaping to give us privacy from our neighbors. We live in Florida and spend a lot of time in our pool, especially on weekends. My girlfriend doesn’t like to wear a swimsuit, and I have no issues with it. At a neighborhood event recently, one of our neighbors politely asked her if she wouldn’t mind covering up when in the pool. She said her kids, and I’m sure her hubby, can see into our yard from their second story. My girlfriend apologized for their inconvenience, but told them she wouldn’t be changing her habits in her home to stop another family from gawking. I see both sides of this. I agree she shouldn’t feel compelled to wear a suit to swim in our own pool (or lounge by it). But I can

also see the neighbor’s side. The preteen boys and husband can get an eyeful just about every weekend, and I don’t think a few tan lines are worth a feud with the neighbors. Any suggestions for my dilemma? — SWIMSUIT ETIQUETTE Dear S.E. • I, too, can see both sides of this. However, you and your girlfriend have done as much as you can to protect her privacy. You can’t be responsible for your neighbor’s husband’s and children’s voyeurism. I don’t think your girlfriend should feel compelled to change her lifestyle because they act like Peeping Toms. I do think it would be healthier for all concerned if your neighbor had a talk with her “boys” regarding their family’s standards when it comes to naturism and respecting the privacy of others. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Snowball is missing. 2. Hand is not showing. 3. Roof is not as wide. 4. Window is larger. 5. Tree is taller. 6. Ear lap on hat is missing.

Dear Abby • Our granddaughter, “Kim,” is a senior in high school. She wants to study in Europe next year to improve her skills in a second language. Neither she nor her parents can afford the $20,000 or more this will cost. She is also “boy crazy.” Another worry is the threat of terrorism and her safety. Kim’s grandmother and I see more negatives than positives in this possibility. Please advise us whether we should voice our opinion and what your opinion is. — HOLDING BACK FOR NOW

MISS MANNERS

TV TUESDAY

Bride who won lottery wants shower

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • A member of my family hit the lottery for a sizable sum. She is getting married and would like a shower, not for the gifts, but to celebrate the occasion. Do you have any suggestions how she can feel special but also suggest the gift of money so she could make a donation to a favorite charity? Gentle Reader • Your relative won the lottery, and she is contemplating asking her friends to let her direct their money? Let us leave aside the vulgarity of suggesting her own shower and endeavoring to seem generous by using other people’s money. But she promises you that for someone who just struck it rich to ask others to give even more, for whatever purpose, will only enrage them. If any bride should hang back and wait for others to volunteer honoring her, it is your

fortunate relative. Dear Miss Manners • I was adopted at birth. Since the adoption was privately arranged, my parents had my original birth certificate, and I knew my mother’s maiden name. My parents (now both deceased) never had any problem with me asking about my birth mother or trying to find her. In my 40s, I located her, and we became friends. She had since married and adopted two children. She told me she was not telling her children about me because, although they knew they were adopted, she didn’t want them to get the idea that they weren’t her “real” children. I didn’t mind and didn’t try to contact them. I sent her a small gift recently and was surprised that she didn’t email me to let me know it had arrived. When I emailed her to ask her, I got a reply from her daugh-

ter, saying that her mother had passed away a few months ago, and did I want the gift back, and how did I know her? I prefer to tell the truth when it doesn’t hurt anyone other than me, but I’m not sure if I should in this case. Your thoughts? Gentle Reader • That you know your mother’s preference was to keep this information from her other children, and that she was in a better position than you to know whether knowing this would cause hurt. In any case, it seems to Miss Manners that you have an obligation to honor those wishes. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106. Miss Manners’ son, Nicholas Ivor Martin, and her daughter, Jacobina Martin, contribute to this column.

Auto Folding Umbrella

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FOX New Girl: Grandfa- Brooklyn The Grind- Fox 2 News at 9:00pm 2 Jury Duty. thered (N) Nine-Nine er (N) (N) (cc) (N) (N) CBS NCIS: Deja Vu. A storm NCIS: New Orleans: Un- Limitless Brian goes to 4 causes power outages. documented. (N) (cc) Quantico. (N) (cc) (N) NBC Hollywood Game Night: Chicago Med Airplane Chicago Fire The city 5 Way-ans to Go! (N) (cc) stowaways are injured. prepares for a tornado. (N) (N) American Experience: Frontline Dangers of PBS Finding Your Roots 9 Maya Rudolph, Shonda Bonnie & Clyde. (N) (cc) vitamins and suppleRhimes. (N) ments. (N) (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM/The The Flash Joe and Iris Pulse (N) (cc) get to know Wally. (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Mablean

Judge Mablean

DC’s Leg- DC Films Presents ends of Tomorrow

Republic of Doyle Jake Larry Rice Forensic tries to locate a hustler. Files (cc) (cc)

ABC Marvel’s Captain Amer- Marvel’s Agent Carter: The Lady in the Lake; A 30 ica: 75 Heroic Years View in the Dark. An unusual homicide. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) Criminal Minds The MYTV Criminal Minds A miss- Criminal Minds The 46 ing child reappears BAU tracks a remorseful BAU investigates a after a year. killer. triple homicide.

NHL “Jersey” Raschel Throw

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • TUeSDAy • 01.19.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Is recovery from foot drop possible? Dear Dr. Roach • I am a 64-year-old woman. I have been an avid exerciser and runner since 1980. I am in excellent health and take no medications, except for a low-dose rheumatoid arthritis medication, methotrexate. Over a month ago, I developed a throbbing pain that radiated down the left side of my leg, the top of my foot and my big toe. The left side of my leg was numb down to my big toe. Then I noticed the foot drop. An MRI and X-ray showed that my back is in excellent shape, and a rehab doctor said the pain is not back-related. The pain continued for weeks. I could not sleep. Finally, doctors determined that it must be a nerve problem. I was put on painkillers so I can sleep. I am now scheduled for a nerve study with a neurologist. What will this study do for my “foot drop”? Running is not only exercise for me, but a social thing. The training and racing with friends is a big part of my life. I continue to walk, weight-train and stretch. Not having control over this situation is trying and frustrating. In your experience has anyone overcome “foot drop”? — D.F.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

Answer • Foot drop is caused by damage to a nerve. This damage can occur at many sites, including the back, which is why the MRI was important to get. The area of numbness you describe and the foot drop itself suggest that the peroneal nerve is being compressed, which most commonly happens where the nerve wraps around the fibula, the smaller of the two leg bones. If that is the case — which can be supported by the nerve studies (electromyography, or EMG, and nerve conduction velocity) — then your doctor will recommend ways to reduce pressure on the nerve and likely will recommend a splint to keep the foot from dropping. The prognosis depends on how much weakness you have. If there is no muscle activity at all, it is unlikely to recover, whereas if there is some strength, muscle function is likely to recover.

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen Readers • High blood pressure is one of the most common ailments for the general population. The booklet on it describes what it does and how it’s treated. Readers can order a copy by writing: Dr. Roach Book No. 104, 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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