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FRIDAY • 01.13.2017 • $1.50

FORECAST:

ICE

‘Dire’ Missouri budget shortfall projected

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State is on track to overspend by $456 million BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • A new

probably will stay north of a line roughly from West Plains, Mo., to Cape Girardeau. Most of Missouri and 13 Illinois counties east of St. Louis are under Thursday’s ice storm warning. All told, Kramper said, the area can expect about 1 inch of rain, frozen and wet. “Freezing rain is the most difficult weather to deal with,” said Mark Croarkin, Missouri Department of Transportation

analysis of state finances shows Missouri lawmakers and Gov. Eric Greitens face a “dire” budget situation. According to a report issued Thursday, projections show the state is on track to spend $456 million more than it receives in the fiscal year beginning July 1. With little appetite for raising taxes among the Republicans who control state government, that means cuts are likely on the way. “We will balance it, but we have a pretty difficult task ahead,” said Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick, R-Shell Knob, who chairs the House Budget Committee. “There’s a lot of uncertainty right now,” added Sen. Dan Brown, R-Rolla. He oversees budget matters in the Senate. The report also shows that slower-than-anticipated revenue growth will leave the state nearly $40 million in the red when the current fiscal year ends on June 30. Greitens, a political newcomer, is expected to address that shortfall by cutting current spending in the coming days. Such action would come after then-Gov. Jay Nixon made $51 million in cuts last month. But deeper cuts will be needed in the budget that dictates spending during the next fiscal year. Although revenue from income taxes and other sources is expected to rise by 3.8 percent, that won’t be enough to offset rising costs of programs like Medicaid, which provides health

See ICE • Page A8

See BUDGET • Page A10

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Melvin Williams watches as his St. Louis Street Department salt truck is filled on Thursday at the Hampton Avenue headquarters before a predicted ice storm threatens weekend road travel in the metro area.

St. Louis area braces for three-day glazing DOWNLOAD THE POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP • What’s opened and what’s closed • Latest traic conditions • Updated weather forecasts Download at stltoday.com/apps

FROM STAFF REPORTS

ST. LOUIS • Highway crews treated roadways, the Missouri National Guard mustered out and school cancellations piled up as the region braced Friday for a three-day icing that could thicken to a damaging threequarters of an inch in some places. The National Weather Service calls for a slight chance for freezing rain Friday morning, rising to 90 percent by midday with tem-

Justice Dept. will investigate FBI director’s conduct

peratures hovering around freezing into Saturday afternoon. Periods of freezing rain and rain are expected through Sunday, when temperatures will rise to near 40. By Monday, the high is expected near 60. Jim Kramper, of the Weather Service, said the forecast is for a quarter- to a half-inch of ice in and around St. Louis city, and three-quarters of an inch from western St. Charles County to the west and southwest. Statewide, Kramper said, ice accumulations

MSD, city near accord to demolish hundreds of vacant structures

Republican health care bill is vague on details

BY MATT ZAPOTOSKY AND SARI HORWITZ Washington Post

BY ALAN FRAM Associated Press

The Justice Department inspector general will review broad allegations of misconduct involving FBI Director James Comey and how he handled the probe of Hillary Clinton’s email practices, the inspector general announced Thursday. The investigation will be wide ranging — encompassing Comey’s various letters and public statements on the matter and whether FBI or other Justice Department employees leaked nonpublic information, according to Inspector General Michael Horowitz. The inspector general’s announcement drew praise from those on both

WASHINGTON

See FBI • Page A10

TODAY

32°/30°

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District introduced an ordinance to its board of trustees Thursday to enter into an agreement with St. Louis’ Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority. The city and MSD say they plan to identify areas where demolishing vacant property could add attractive green space to neighborhoods and help

• Under mounting pressure from Donald Trump and rank-and-file Republicans, congressional leaders are talking increasingly about chiseling an early bill that dismantles President Barack Obama’s health care law and begins to supplant it with their own vision of how the nation’s $3 trillion-a-year medical system should work. Yet even as Republicans said they will pursue their paramount 2017 goal aggressively, leaders left plenty of wiggle room Thursday about exactly what they will do. Their caution underscored persistent divisions over

See MSD • Page A6

See HEALTH • Page A10

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • P-D

BY JACOB BARKER AND WALKER MOSKOP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • More than a year after an-

nouncing a proposal to supplement the city’s budget to demolish abandoned properties, the region’s sewer district and the city are finally moving forward with a program. The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer

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M 1 FRIDAY • 01.13.2017 • A2

Utilities seek weakened ethics rules TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Not all rules are created equal. That’s the message James Owen hopes resonates with Gov. Eric Greitens as the new Republican governor sets his sights on reducing the regulatory burden on Missouri businesses. Owen is the head of the Oice of Public Counsel for the state of Missouri. Or, at least, he will be as long as Greitens lets him keep his job. The position serves as the representative of consumers when utilities bring cases before the Public Service Commission. When Ameren Missouri, for instance, seeks a rate hike, Owen’s job is to make sure the monopoly utility company isn’t asking for more than the law allows. The PSC process is chock full of the sorts of rules that monopoly utility companies hate. But most of those rules are designed to protect the senior citizen who lives next door from having an increasing amount of money taken out of their fixed income to pay higher rates for water or gas or electricity. In November, before Greitens was elected, the PSC began a rule-making process that could change one of the rules that makes it harder for utility compa-

nies or the political appointees who make up the commission to collude on higher rates that would allow utility executives to pocket unfair profits. Owen was appointed to his job by the director of the Department of Economic Development, during the administration of former Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat. He’s hoping his new boss, the governor, sees an interesting juxtaposition between his first executive order on ethics, and the second one he signed calling for a review of all state regulations in Missouri. Greitens ran for office promising to clean up the “culture of corruption” in Jeferson City. His first executive order is more symbolic than anything, but it sets an example for clean government, banning his staf members from taking gifts from lobbyists or from ever being allowed to lobby the executive branch as long as he is governor. The point of those moves is to reduce the perception of a conflict between those trying to change laws to benefit their clients and those involved in the implementation of those laws. But the real ethical conflicts in Jeferson City are much deeper than a steak dinner between a lobbyist and a gubernatorial employee. PSC appointments are plumb assignments — the job pays six figures — that often go to the most politically connected. Daniel Hall, the current chairman of the PSC, is a former longtime aide to Nixon. The other four commissioners are all for-

mer state senators. Many of the commissioners eventually find themselves working for the very utilities they regulate after their terms are completed. It’s why regulations exist to make sure that interactions between the utility companies and the commissioners are transparent. The rule that regulates such interactions is called an “ex-parte” rule and that is precisely the one commissioners are seeking to weaken. In other words, they want to pass a new rule that will make it harder for consumers to keep an eye on the ethical — or not-soethical — behavior between commissioners and utility executives. Owen wants this rule to remain as it is, or better yet be made even stronger. That’s why he is intrigued about the possibilities of Greitens’ executive order requiring a top-to-bottom review of any rules in Missouri state agencies. “In looking over the executive order, it is clear this will allow for additional review of the anti-consumer ex parte rule being proposed and hopefully ensures at least two public hearings on it. Just last week, our oice filed a motion for multiple public hearings to be held to hear customer input on this proposed rule. This is a step in the right direction,” Owen says. “I think this might be a positive thing for Missouri ratepayers.” Here’s what happens when the rubber of rule-making leaves its mark on the ethically questionable road: The commissioners who are supposed

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

‘IT’S NOT THE HEAT ...’ AND OTHER ST. LOUIS WEATHER TRUISMS

With an almost 40-year career and more than 50 feature films, there are bound to be some that shine over others.

Like that bad joke your uncle tells you, these things about St. Louis weather are old hat for natives.

THIS DAY IN 1997 BALLOON VOYAGE Steve Fossett departed from Busch Stadium aboard a hot air balloon to travel around the world. Fossett was forced to land early in India after being denied flight over Libya. Fossett’s journey, however, set a record for the farthest solo flight of a hot air balloon.

hey don’t think 1,200-acre tract should be named after former Gov. Jay Nixon

HEADS UP

Relatives of the late Carl Jones said the parcel should be named after Jones, not Nixon, because of the Middlebrook farmer’s ties to the land and the manner in which he was killed. In June 2010, Jones, 63, was shot to death outside of the Town and Country Supermarket in Ironton. Police said the shooter, Thomas Hennessey Jr., 54, of Dedham, Maine, left the scene but was then fatally shot by an Ironton police oicer as he fled. Troy Jones told the Post-Dispatch that his father and Hennessey, the former owner of the parkland, had been in a long-running legal fight over an easement on the property. Jones’ granddaughter Kayleena launched an online petition saying the park should be named after Jones. As of noon Thursday, the petition had 983 supporters. Romine said he and Fitzwater decided to name it Proitt Mountain to honor one of the region’s pioneer families. Fitzwater agreed. “A park should be named to honor someone of historical significance and ties to the area. Our bills will correct this wrong,” he said. It was not clear Thursday why the legislation spells the mountain as “Proitt.” Other designations spell it as “Proit.” A request for clarification was not immediately returned by Romine’s oice. The legislation is Senate Bill 294.

SNOW DAY IN THE PARK If area schools cancel classes, it’s not too cold, and there is a significant amount of snow on the ground, the St. Charles County Parks and Recreation Department is ofering snow day activities at Quail Ridge Park in Wentzville during January and February. Guests of all ages can join in a snowman building contest, scavenger hunt, and snow relays from 11 a.m. -2 p.m.

at the popular hillside near the entrance to the park. Prizes will be awarded to the winners of each activity. Additionally, a warming fire will be available for participants and spectators. For more information about the St. Charles County Parks Snow Day program, call 636-949-7535. To submit items, email them to headsup@postdispatch.com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS COLORING AND COFFEE When • 10 a.m. Friday; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Where • Six Mile Regional Library branch, 2145 Johnson Road in Granite City How much • Free More info • Call 4526238, ext 755. Program ofers for a relaxing mix of coloring, chatting and cofee for adults. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

POWERBALL Wednesday: 01-03-13-16-43 Powerball: 24 Power play: 2 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $121 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $137 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 06-07-10-35-42 Lucky ball: 09

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 01-17-20-35-40 Evening: 08-33-34-35-36 LOTTO Thursday: 13-15-23-29-44-47 Extra shot: 22 Estimated jackpot: $7.75 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 112 FB: 2 Evening: 281 FB: 2 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 1239 FB: 9 Evening: 2341 FB: 3

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 03-10-12-15-34-38 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.7 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 07-24-25-37-39 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $99,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 578 Evening: 982 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 1566 Evening: 2641

Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ................ B1 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A12 Movies .................. Go! Obituaries ........... A16

WHAT’S WRONG WITH JAKE ALLEN? In our Net Front Presence podcast, Tom Timmermann and Jef Gordon look at the struggles of the Blues goalie.

WHAT’S UP

GOP lawmakers want to rename state park

JEFFERSON CITY • Two Republican state lawmakers want to reverse plans to name Missouri’s newest state park for former Gov. Jay Nixon. Angry that a 1,200-acre tract in Reynolds County was named after Nixon just before he left oice Monday, state Sen. Gary Romine of Ste. Genevieve and Rep. Paul Fitzwater of Potosi have filed legislation that would change the name to Proitt Mountain State Park. Romine says his motivation is two-fold. First, he thinks Nixon is being selfish in having a park named after him. And Romine believes the former Democratic chief executive upset people in the region when he used millions of dollars in lead mining settlement money to transform land in Missouri into state parks. “This is tantamount to a slap in the face of my constituents,” Romine said. “Nixon must think pretty highly of himself to think he could get by with naming a park after himself after he misused the funds meant for remediation and restoration of the lead belt area. It’s a double whammy.” Nixon argued that expanding the park system will help draw tourism spending to the state. In the weeks before he left office, Nixon oversaw the opening of four additional parks and said visitors to the state topped 20 million in 2016. The naming of the wilderness area after Nixon also riled the family of a man killed in a 2010 dispute related to the property.

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

OVERRATED OR NOT? RANKING MERYL STREEP

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

to rule in a quasi-judicial capacity hold private meetings with the utilities they are regulating, as happened in 2007, without consumers having a voice. Or a sitting commissioner accepts campaign donations from the utility while running for another elected position, as happened in 2010. The potential result? Rates go up. Consumers lose. Insiders win. Greitens ran as an outsider, and the ex parte rules under consideration under the Public Service Commission are his chance to prove it. The way Owen reads it, the executive order on regulation should, at the very least, require public hearings before the PSC changes its existing rule. “I note this executive order is looking to prohibit regulations afecting ‘Missouri citizens or customers of the State, or the competitive environment in Missouri’. A rule freezing out consumers from communication between utility companies and the body who regulates them fits that description,” Owen says. “The Office of Public Counsel hopes that we can offer any assistance possible in the review of the rule.” The governor’s executive order on ethics, at least in spirit, should demand that nothing be done to make it easier for chummy utility insiders to send Grandma’s electric bill up, and up and up.

Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... C2 Stocks ................... B3 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A19

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The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $7.71, Sunday-Friday $7.53, Monday-Friday $6.04, Thursday-Sunday $6.04, Sat-Mon $5.20, Fri-Sun $5.20, Sun-Mon $4.50, Sat-Sun Only $4.50, Sunday Only $3.65. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 314-340-8888 to arrange pick up of your paper at one of our local distribution centers. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 10/16/16, 11/24/16, 12/15/16, 01/15/17, 04/16/17, 06/25/17, 07/16/17, 08/27/17, 09/10/17, 10/15/17, 11/23/17 12/25/17, 01/14/18, 04/15/18, 06/24/18 and timing of these charges may afect the length of the subscription.

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LOCAL

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

Rice loses city appeal, must close homeless shelter BY DOUG MOORE St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The Rev. Larry

Rice has until April 1 to shut down his downtown homeless shelter, a city appeals board ruled Thursday. The decision came after a three-hour hearing held to rule on Rice’s appeal of a cease-and-desist notice he received from the city in November. “I don’t know if anything we would have said today would have made a difference,” said the Rev. Raymond Redlich, vice president for the shelter, formally known as New Life Evangelistic Center. Redlich said New Life would appeal the ruling, taking the case to circuit court. The city Board of Building Appeals voted 7-0 that Rice should shut the doors to the shelter he has operated at 14th and Locust streets since 1976. But members agreed the shelter should be allowed to operate through the rest of winter. “This gives the city and New Life plenty of advance notice this is going to happen and to find something for these people,” said board chairman Gene Cullmann. New Life provides shelter to at least 200 people per night and has been doing so while operating without an occupancy permit since May 12, 2015. The permit had allowed Rice to provide shelter for up to 35 people. The permit was revoked because of a series of building code violations, and because the center was housing six times more people per night than allowed. In trying to obtain a new permit, Rice argued he was exempt from gathering neighbor signatures required for shelters because he operates a religious center. He lost a legal challenge in September, but an appeal is pending in court. His attorneys argue that until that legal remedy is exhausted, New Life should be able to remain open and continue working to fix various building code violations. The long list of code violations was highlighted during the first part of Thursday’s hearing. Seven building inspectors lined up in front of the board ready to answer questions on the reports they submitted, which showed that New Life had 34 building code violations in August 2015, 20 of them labeled as “major.” As of Thursday, the center was still operating with 24 violations, 16 of them major, said Chris Schlumm, building inspection manager. The appeals board voted down a motion to give New Life two weeks to get permits and 60 days to complete all repairs that don’t need a permit. “New Life’s position is very arrogant,” said interim city counselor Mike Garvin. “They have been dragging their feet through the whole process. They love the status quo.” It was only after New Life received its ceaseand-desist notice that it began seeking signatures for a new permit, Garvin noted in the hearing. It was also after the notice was served that the shelter applied for a permit to operate as a church, which would have allowed part of the center to be operating lawfully. Rice runs a TV studio out of the center, broadcasting his church services. New Life attorney Todd A. Lubben questioned the timing of the church permit application being denied a day before the appeal on the cease-and-desist notice. “A coincidence,” said building commissioner Frank Oswald. Doug Moore • 314-340-8125 @dougwmoore on Twitter dmoore@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Woman lied about trading sex to avoid ticket Authorities spent 160 man-hours checking facts before she confessed BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-dispatch

A woman who reported to authorities that she performed a sexual favor to avoid a ticket after being pulled over in Jeferson County has confessed she fabricated the story, police say. There was no sexual favor, and in fact, she wasn’t pulled over that day, according to Jefferson County Sheriff David L. Marshak. He said authorities spent more than 160 manhours investigating her claim before she admitted fabricating the story. The woman, Brenda L. Hawkins, of Arnold, was charged Thursday with making a false report. She was being held in lieu of $1,000, cash-only bail. Marshak described Hawkins’ allegation as an excuse she made to a friend to cover up

she provided a sexual favor to avoid a ticket from the oicer. Authorities did not describe the alleged sex act. Marshak said his department became involved in the investigation because Hawkins claimed she did not know which police agency the oicer was from. Marshak said if the allegations were true, it could have been an oicer from his agency, the Missouri Highway Patrol or Arnold police, or someone impersonating a law enforcement oicer. He said investigators conducted interviews, reviewed videos and data, and checked for evidence, including trace fiber examinations, before learning the truth when Hawkins confessed.

some type of peculiar behavior, and said that it grew out of control. He did not ofer further detail. “At this time when law enforcement officers around this country are attempting to build Hawkins trust and relationships with the community, this individual attempted to erode that trust for personal reasons,” Marshak said in a statement. “As a result of these lies, these false allegations cost our taxpayers thousands of dollars, and lost time on other criminal investigations involving real victims.” Hawkins, 53, reported the allegation on the evening of Dec. 30, saying a law enforcement oicer stopped her earlier in the day at Highway 141 and Interstate 55 in Arnold. She said

Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Ohio man convicted of sex traicking 54-year-old found guilty of using a St. Charles hotel as a brothel for teen prostitution BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A federal jury here convicted an Ohio man Thursday of a series of sex trafficking charges after he was caught prostituting teens from a St. Charles hotel, prosecutors said. Kyle Maurice Parks, 54, of Columbus, was convicted of one count of sex trafficking of a minor, two counts of attempted sex trafficking of a minor and six counts of inter-

state transportation with intent to commit prostitution. P ro s e c u to rs s a y P a r k s brought three 17-year-olds and one 15-year-old, as well as two adults, on a road trip from Ohio, and posted advertisements on Backpage.com after they arrived on Dec. 2, 2015. Several of the victims took calls and engaged in sex acts, and Parks kept most of the money, prosecutors said. Assistant U.S. Attorney Howard Marcus said in opening arguments that Parks also

have meant five years in prison for Parks, but his client declined the deal. “Against his lawyer’s advice, we proceeded to trial. And that’s it,” Hogan said. Hogan said Parks now faces roughly 30 years in prison. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

side business setting up vending machines for owners. But, Hogan said, Parks was confronted with photos, documents and records, including a phone call with explicit talk “that implicated him in promoting prostitution.” “When asked to explain by the prosecutor,” Hogan said, Parks dismissed it as “locker room talk.” The lawyer said that at a hearing in open court last year, testimony showed Hogan had negotiated a plea that would

ONE DAY

Texas man accused of importing illegal HGH ST. LOUIS • A man from Houston has been indicted on federal charges here, accused of illegally funneling human growth hormone from China and Mexico to a doctor in St. Louis County and others. George Patino, 56, was named in February on an indictment that was sealed until his arrest in southern Texas last week. He is charged with conspiracy, possession with the intent to distribute HGH for any use other than the treatment of a human disease or other recognized medical condition, and introducing an adulterated or misbranded drug into interstate commerce. The indictment says that Patino, also known as Giorgio Paticciano Patino, operated a wholesale business that obtained unapproved HGH from Mexico or China, then smuggled it into the U.S. by mail. It says that an unidentified Missouri doctor contacted a Patino associate in March 2014 seeking HGH for male patients “who wanted increased energy, strength, endurance and athletic ability.” The associate told the doctor that because of “heat” from the U.S., including the Food and Drug Administration, the doctor couldn’t use a credit card and would have to directly deposit funds in Patino’s bank account, the indictment claims. From March 30, 2014, through July 1, 2015, Patino supplied HGH for about 40 of the doctor’s patients, the indictment says. The drugs were misbranded, because they contained labels in Spanish, not English, and were not manufactured by a facility licensed or registered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the indictment says. Dispensing HGH to improve athletic performance “exposes the patient to numerous health risks, including liver and kidney tumors, liver and prostate cancer, heart attacks and high blood pressure,” the indictment says. Patino was named in court during the April sentencing hearing of a St. Louis County doctor, Michael “Ted” Mimlitz, on one count of distributing misbranded drugs. Mimlitz was sentenced to two years of probation and fined $30,000. He also forfeited $59,500, representing some of the proceeds from the sale of the drug. Mimlitz was a longtime obstetrician-gynecologist before becoming involved with a west St. Louis County clinic that specialized in treating men who complained of a lack of energy or decreased strength and endurance. Patino is scheduled to be in court here in St. Louis Jan. 20 for his arraignment. Patino, once known online as the “King of Viagra,” was sentenced to three years behind bars in 2008 for his role in a conspiracy to sell fake versions of drugs to counter impotence, according to news reports.

ran a brothel in Columbus, where he sold liquor, drugs and the girls. Parks was caught after Ohio police, searching for a “highrisk runaway” from a juvenile facility there, tracked her phone to a Red Roof Inn in St. Charles. Police there found several teens, and arrested Parks when the girl showed up with another at the police station. Defense lawyer Joe Hogan said Parks told jurors that he was a club owner and had a

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

MSD’s interest in demolition program is in reducing runof from rooftops and pavement MSD • FROM A1

VACANT BUILDINGS

nudge redevelopment. While the city and MSD are holding off on publicly identifying areas where extra demolitions might occur, sewer district spokesman Lance LeComb said there should be more details on some of the first targeted areas by next month. “There’s so many low-hanging fruit, it would be, particularly for the first 100 homes, it should be fairly easy to come to an agreement on which ones would come down,” LeComb said. MSD’s interest in the program, announced in December 2015, stems from its mandate under a 2012 court order to cut sewage releases into area waterways. One way to do that is to reduce stormwater runof from rooftops and pavement, which ultimately flows into the same pipes that handle sewage within St. Louis. Heavy rains can overwhelm the treatment system and force raw sewage into the Mississippi River and its tributaries. Meanwhile, the number of vacant properties in St. Louis has been increasing since the recession. According to data from a St. Louis building survey, vacant properties hit 7,184 in 2016, up more than 2,000 since the beginning of the decade. As its population fell by more than half over the last half-century, the city has long struggled to keep up with deteriorating and abandoned housing stock left by people moving to the suburbs. Last year, 377 buildings were demolished, excluding things such as garages and signs, about half the total in the early 2000s. Demolitions are up from a low of 235 in 2013 but as budgets have tightened, the city has far less money to spend on them. St. Louis Building Commissioner Frank Oswald, whose office oversees the city’s demolition eforts, said there just aren’t enough resources to keep up with the number of abandoned buildings, and he hopes the MSD money will help supplement the city’s efforts. Preliminary budgets call for keeping city demoli-

Ward Vacant buildings 1 485 2 408 3 4 5 266 6 95 7 91 27 8 18 2 9 294 10 45 70 11 60 22 1 21 12 3 3 13 23 4 26 14 16 15 42 18 5 19 28 16 3 64 17 223 17 6 18 526 24 44 100 19 8 282 20 7 10 23 743 21 9 15 22 SOURCE: 20 14 16 6 Post-Dispatch 23 25 analysis of St. Louis 24 60 13 73 demolition permit data. 25 12 55 346 26 676 27 11 28 11

By St. Louis wards

1,090 1,242

1,050

DEMOLITIONS IN THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS, 1990-2016 800 Buildings demolished* *Excludes demolitions of nonprimary structures (garages, fences, etc.) and permits where no completion date is listed.

600

400

200

0

1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014

tion spending flat next year at $1 million, he said. “On the north side, you’re going to have substantial areas where MSD is working with our planning people to basically turn some of these areas into permanent green spaces,” Oswald said. MSD says it plans to use up to $13.5 million for building demolition, but also for sodding and other green infrastructure to soak up rainwater. It’s targeting areas within the north and eastern portions of St. Louis, where neighborhoods that struggle most with abandoned property are located. The sewer district estimates it can spend $2 million to $3 million annually on demolitions.

MSD hopes the program can ultimately pay to knock down about 1,000 abandoned buildings over several years, LeComb said. The Environmental Protection Agency, which sued MSD in 2007 to force action on sewage overflows, gave the green light to the sewer district’s property demolition plan in the spring. It has taken more time than expected to sync up MSD’s eforts with the city, LeComb said. “We’ve probably let perfect stand in the way of good too much.” But St. Louis Planning and Urban Design Director Don Roe said work has started to try and make sure the MSD money goes as far as possible.

Baby it’s cold outside

“These are buildings that are in tough shape,” Roe said. “We’re looking at where we get the greatest effectiveness, and part of that is by where they are clustered so we can make an impact on both the environmental needs for MSD and the social and economic needs.” The program will be a small piece of a $4.7 billion capital spending campaign that began in 2012 and will stretch to the late 2020s agreed to under the consent decree with EPA. Vacant properties are a constant complaint from constituents, Alderman Jefrey Boyd said. His ward in northwest St. Louis has about 1,050 vacant buildings, the third-most in the city. He lamented that $3 million pledged to vacant property demolition from a use tax passed by voters 15 years ago has been reduced over the years. “It is absolutely not enough, and I am frustrated that we are not getting as much as we were promised when we voted for that use tax,” Boyd said. While he wants to see a more comprehensive plan to save more of the city’s historic brick housing stock before it gets to the point of needing to be razed, he’s glad for the extra money and said MSD has been good about communicating with his constituents. “I’m not sure why it’s taken so long, but I do appreciate the process,” Boyd said. In the 4th Ward, though, Alderman Sam Moore is not thrilled about MSD’s plans. His ward, encompassing the Greater Ville and Ville neighborhoods, has the most vacant structures in the city: 1,242 at the end of 2016. Since the late ’80s, more than 2,000 structures have been demolished in his ward, more than any other. Many properties could be saved, he said. “Come in with some development if you want to help our community,” Moore said. “I have all this African-American history that’s being destroyed by demolition.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

12-year-old girl disappears after heading to bus stop FROM STAFF REPORTS

S T. LO U I S • Police are searching for a missing St. Louis girl who left for her school bus stop early Wednesday and hasn’t been seen since. Kameill Taylor, 12, left for the bus s to p a b o u t 6:10 a.m. from her home in the 5300 block Kameill of Labadie Avenue, near Union Boulevard, police said. The girl was to meet a friend and then walk to a bus stop a few blocks away at Maffitt Avenue and Union, her mother told police. But Kameill never showed up at her friend’s house and never arrived at Carr Lane Middle School. Her mother said this is unusual behavior for Kameill. “She loved going to school,” said Shonta Taylor, 31. “She was bubbly and energetic. She was not wild or the kind of girl who would get in trouble.” She was chosen student of the month for December, and her photo was taken there Monday to go along with the honor. Taylor and family members have been searching alleys, vacant houses and the route Kameill was to have walked to the bus stop. Police have been canvassing the area, Taylor said. “It’s like my baby vanished,” she said. Kameill is about 5 feet 7 inches, 160 pounds and has medium-length braided hair. She was wearing black and purple Nike Air Jordan tennis shoes, black scrub-style pants and a black polo shirt with a dark-colored plaid coat. She carried a brightcolored plaid book bag. Authorities asked anyone with information about Kameill’s whereabouts to call 911.

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Federal panel releases report, urges an efort to learn more

ease chronic pain and might help some people sleep, but it may also raise the risk of developing schizophrenia and trigger heart attacks. Those are among the conclusions about marijuana reached by a federal advisory panel in a report released Thursday. The experts also called for a national efort to learn more about marijuana and other cannabinoids. The current lack of scientific information “poses a public health risk,” said the report, from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. Patients, health care professionals and policymakers need more evidence to make sound decisions, it said. For marijuana users or those considering it, “there’s very little to guide them” on amounts and health risks, said Dr. Marie McCormick of the Harvard School of Public Health, who headed the committee. Several factors have limited research. While the federal government has approved some medicines containing ingredients found in marijuana, it still classifies pot as illegal and imposes restrictions on research. So scientists have to jump through bureaucratic hoops that some find daunting, the report said. A federal focus on paying for studies of potential harms has also hampered research into possible health benefits, the report said. The range of marijuana products available for study has also been re-

stricted, although the government is approving more suppliers. The report lists nearly 100 conclusions about marijuana and its similarly acting chemical cousins, drawing on studies published since 1999. Committee members cautioned that most conclusions are based on statistical links between use and health, rather than direct demonstrations of cause and efect. The review found strong evidence that marijuana can treat chronic pain in adults and that similar compounds ease nausea from chemotherapy, with varying degrees of evidence for treating muscle stiffness and spasms in multiple sclerosis. Limited evidence says marijuana or the other compounds can boost appetite in people with HIV or AIDS and ease symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, the report concluded. But it said there’s not enough research to say whether they’re effective for treating cancers, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, or certain symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, or helping people beat addictions. There may be more evidence soon: A study in Colorado is investigating the use of marijuana to treat PTSD in veterans. The committee concluded: • Strong evidence links marijuana use to the risk of developing schizophrenia and other causes of psychosis, with the highest risk among the most frequent users. • Some work suggests a small increased risk for developing depressive disorders, but there’s no evidence either way on whether it affects the course or symptoms of such

disorders or the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder. • There’s a strong indication that using marijuana before driving increases the risk of a traic accident but no clear link to workplace accidents or injuries or death from a marijuana overdose. • There’s limited evidence for the idea that pot hurts school achievement, raises unemployment rates or harms social functioning. • For pregnant women who smoke pot, there’s a strong indication of reduced birth weight but only weak evidence of any efect on pregnancy complications or an infant’s need for admission to intensive care. There’s not enough evidence to show whether it afects the child later, such as with sudden infant death syndrome or substance use. • Some evidence suggests there’s no link to lung cancer in marijuana smokers. But there’s insuicient evidence to support or rebut any link to developing cancers of the prostate, cervix, bladder or esophagus. • Substantial evidence links pot smoking to worse respiratory symptoms and more frequent episodes of chronic bronchitis. • There’s a weak suggestion that smoking marijuana can trigger a heart attack, especially for people at high risk of heart disease. But there’s no evidence either way on whether chronic use afects a person’s risk of a heart attack. • Some evidence suggests a link between using marijuana and developing a dependence on or abuse of other substances, including alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs.

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LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

St. Louis area braces for winter storm

Franks robbery tied to woman’s carjacking, prosecutors say BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

layer isn’t deep enough.” Chip Tynan, gardening expert at the Missouri Botanical Garden, said a quarterinch of ice will bring down weak branches. “I’ll be very happy if that’s all we get, but anything like a half-inch or greater isn’t going to be a pretty sight,” Tynan said. “A lot will depend upon the wind. Icy branches whipping around will bring down more branches and power lines.” On that score, the forecast is merciful. The Weather Service calls for winds of 9 mph or less during the storm watch. Like clockwork, shoppers scurried to buy groceries Thursday, especially what grocers call the “French toast” list — milk, eggs and bread. Paul Simon, spokesman for Maryland Heights-based Schnuck Markets Inc., said frozen pizzas and peanut butter also are popular. The supermarket chains added staff Thursday to keep shelves stocked. In the 2006 ice storm, the widespread downing of wires meant that one-fifth of the afected customers still were without power five days later. The last major ice storm in the two-state area was in January 2009, when ice accumulations of 1 inch or more in far southeastern Missouri and Illinois ripped down whole trees and electric wires serving more than 125,000 customers. Public services and travel were greatly hampered. For a time, more than 3,500 people were living in temporary shelters in the Bootheel. Three weeks after the storm, more than 2,000 customers, most of them on rural routes, still were without power.

ST. LOUIS • One of the carjackers who robbed a woman leaving Christmas Mass in downtown St. Louis also robbed a newly elected state legislator of his car, gun and cellphone days earlier, prosecutors allege. The woman was carjacked at gunpoint at 12:50 a.m. Christmas Day as she and a friend left Mass at Christ Church Cathedral, in the 1200 block of Locust Regans Street. Within days, two men — Tavion Regans and William Nelson, both 20 — were charged with robbery, armed criminal action and tampering with a motor vehicle. Nelson Now authorities say Regans is one of two men who robbed State Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. at gunpoint Dec. 19 on the parking lot of the Schlafly Tap Room, 2100 Locust Street. Green Regans was already being held without bail for the Christmas Day robbery when the St. Louis circuit attorney filed additional charges against him on Sunday in the Franks case. Bail in the Franks robbery was set at $80,000, cash only. Regans had a diferent accomplice in the Franks holdup, according to police. Maurice Green, also 20, was arrested Saturday and charged Sunday with first-degree robbery and armed criminal action. His bail in the Franks case is also $80,000, cash only. Regans, of the 1500 block of Biddle Street, already had pending criminal cases for robbery and tampering. Green, of the 8000 block of Busiek Avenue in Berkeley, was on probation for a 2015 burglary case in St. Louis County at the time of the robbery, authorities said. When Franks was robbed, he was days away from being sworn in as a new state legislator. Franks said he had been at the Tap Room for a holiday party and was returning a phone call while sitting in his car. “I looked up and the guy had a gun and he told me to get out,” he said. “I got out and he pointed a gun at me and told me, ‘Get the hell out of here.’” Franks was unharmed in the robbery, but the robbers made of with his Toyota Camry, two cellphones and a black .40-caliber Smith and Wesson gun he stored in the console. Franks identified Regans as the man who ordered him at gunpoint to get out of his car. Franks’ car was recovered the next day by Ferguson police. The woman robbed after leaving Mass on Christmas told police she and a friend had walked to her Hyundai Tucson and got inside to drive home. Police say Regans and Nelson walked up and ordered the car’s owner to get out at gunpoint. Both women obliged. Regans and Nelson jumped into the Tucson and drove of, police say. Hours later, Regans and Nelson were seen driving in the Tucson, police say. Police arrested them as they tried to escape. Nelson, of the 1000 block of North 17th Street, was also charged with resisting arrest and leaving the scene of a motor vehicle accident. Earlier in December, the wife of Gov.-elect Eric Greitens was robbed in the parking lot of a cafe in the Central West End.

Kim Bell, Lisa Brown, Kurt Erickson, Tim O’Neil, Mark Schlinkmann and Leah Thorsen of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Patrick Frazier of St. Charles loads his trunk and back seat with seasoned oak irewood purchased Thursday from El-Mel Inc. Lawn and Garden in St. Charles before the ice storm expected Friday.

ICE • FROM A1

maintenance engineer for the St. Louis district. Missouri and Illinois highway crews pre-treated roads with salt brine Thursday and plan to spread salt Friday morning. Croarkin said his department called up crews from southeast Missouri to help, and warned out-of-practice drivers that the area hasn’t had a big “ice event” in a while. Joe Monroe, operations engineer for the Illinois Department of Transportation in Collinsville, said preparations assume an ice storm like the one in December 2006 that cut power to nearly 500,000 area electric customers, which made it hard to refuel salt trucks. The department is ready this time with generators to keep the pumps running. St. Louis streets commissioner Kent Flake said the diference in a few degrees will mean the diference between a weekend of rain or a major ice storm. Choosing prudence, many school districts and private schools announced they will be closed on Friday, including the St. Louis Community College system. So did numerous day care and senior centers and some businesses. Also canceled was former Cardinals’ manager Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation Wine & Whiskers event, which was to have been held Friday at Busch Stadium. The St. Charles Area Transit System canceled the Friday afternoon schedule for its Interstate 70 commuter shuttle, and may cancel morning runs if conditions warrant. St. Peters canceled trash pickup for Friday. The University of Missouri-Columbia urged students not to return early for the spring semester that begins Tuesday. Gov. Eric Greitens, in his fourth day in oice, activated the Missouri Guard, saying, “We’re getting ahead of this event.” Adjutant Gen. Stephen Danner said 280 soldiers already were mustered on Thursday, and more than 500 can be ready for action Friday. Ameren has called in all of its 1,000 linerepair and tree-trimming crew members to prepare for 16-hour work shifts as needed, said Kevin Anders, assistant vice president of operations. He said the workers will be given supplies suicient for three days of recovery work. “It will be all hands on deck beginning (Friday) morning,” said Anders. He said Ameren also has made preliminary contact with neighboring utilities to bring in additional help. Kramper, of the Weather Service, said the forecast is for ice rather than snow or rain because the air near the ground is colder than southerly winds aloft bringing in the precipitation. He described the

Customers at Schnucks in St. Charles had slim pickings Thursday in the bread aisle before Friday’s expected ice storm.

ICE SAFETY TIPS • Assume all wet, dark areas on pavement are slippery. • Wear boots with non-slip rubber and grooved soles. • Wear sunglasses during the day and don’t obstruct vision with clothes. • Bend knees slightly, keep weight over your front leg and take short steps. • Don’t walk with your hands in your pockets. • Walk along the grassy edge of sidewalks or driveways for better traction, and use hand railings. • Go slowly and don’t carry anything heavy. If you fall backward: Tuck your chin to your chest and slap the ground with your palms and forearms to protect your head, wrists and elbows. If you fall sideways: Allow your forearm to hit the ground irst, lift your head to the opposite shoulder and let yourself roll out. If you fall forward: Try to land on your side and then follow instructions for falling sideways. If you have struck your head or think you have broken a bone, ask for help before moving. SOURCE: Julia Henderson-Kalb, occupational therapy instructor at St. Louis University

atmosphere as a layer cake of alternating cold and warm air flows. “Cold air has slipped in along the ground, but you go up 5,000 or 6,000 feet and it’s warmer,” Kramper said. “So even if precipitation aloft starts out as snow, it melts into droplets in the warm air. If the cold air near the ground is deep enough, it freezes into sleet. In this case, the cold

LAW & ORDER

The crime cost the government more than $270,000, Assistant U.S. Attorney Tom Albus has said in court. He said Geary initially worked as an outside contractor and paid kickbacks to Pedretti for each job he received. Geary was later hired, and recruited Graham to take his place, Albus said.

ST. LOUIS > Man slain on Goodfellow • Maulik Patel, 31, was found dead of multiple gunshot wounds outside his vehicle on Goodfellow Boulevard near Interstate 70 just after 10 p.m. Wednesday, police said. They said he was driving north when someone shot at him from a vehicle. Patel got out was shot in the 4800 block of Goodfellow. He lived in the 1500 block of Beckham Ridge Court in west St. Louis County. ST. LOUIS > Infant died of abuse • A 4-month-old girl’s death this week resulted from “chronic abuse,” the medical examiner’s oice said. Her parents were under investigation. Dorian Whitlock was pronounced dead at a hospital after being found unresponsive about 8 a.m. Tuesday in the 3900 block of North Florissant Avenue, authorities said. Police arrested her mother, 22, and father, 25, but prosecutors declined to ile charges pending further investigation, oicials said. ST. LOUIS > Two accused of VA fraud • Prosecutors said David Graham, 24, of De Soto, and Tony Pedretti, 43, of Whiting, Ind., have

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis ireighters chase hidden hot spots after extinguishing a ire that severely damaged a home in the 5700 block of Waterman Boulevard on Thursday.

been added as defendants in a criminal case accusing former employees and contractors of stealing from the John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis.

Both men, now in custody, were indicted Jan. 4 on a felony charge of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. A former employee and contractor, Scott Geary, 54, of De

Soto, has pleaded guilty of a felony, admitting he conspired with a VA oicial to bill for unnecessary work. He could receive ive years in prison at sentencing March 15.

ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Probation ordered for indecent exposure • Gary Robert Halter, 22, of Dardenne Prairie, has been sentenced to two years on probation for exposing himself to women in O’Fallon, Mo., and St. Charles in 2015. Halter, of the 900 block of Sill Ridge Drive, pleaded guilty Monday to eight counts of misdemeanor sexual misconduct. Associate Judge Elizabeth Swann issued a suspended imposition of sentence and put him on probation with Halter special conditions. According to court documents, Halter admitted exposing himself to women and masturbating at the Gold’s Gym, at 2601 Highway K in O’Fallon, and at Lindenwood’s St. Charles campus, where he also grabbed the buttocks of women on two occasions.


NATION

01.13.2017 • FriDAy • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPATCH • A9

Defense choice sees Russia as threat danger from Iran appear to coincide with Trump’s, he broke with the presidentelect in voicing support for leaving the nuclear deal with Tehran intact. “I think it is in an imperfect arms control agreement — it’s not a friendship treaty,” he said. “But when America gives her word, we have to live up to it and work with our allies.”

WASHINGTON POST

Retired Marine Gen. James Mattis, Donald Trump’s pick to be the next U.S. defense secretary, placed Russia first among principal threats facing the United States in a confirmation hearing Thursday, arguing for greater American support for European allies to counter what he said were Moscow’s attempts to shatter the North Atlantic security alliance. Mattis, a respected combat leader who made his name in the wars following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, cautioned that sustained cuts to military budgets and personnel meant the U.S. military is no longer strong enough to easily outmatch Russia and other adversaries. Mattis’ remarks at the hearing provide some of the first hints about how the Trump administration, which has not put forward comprehensive national security plans, may alter the posture of the world’s most advanced military at a time of institutional strain and uncertainty about the future. His comments also signal a possible divergence in viewpoint with the presidentelect, who has questioned long-standing security commitments and voiced his willingness to partner with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Mattis is not the only appointee to express disagreement with Trump. Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., whom Trump has tapped to lead the CIA, pushed back in his confirmation hearing Thursday on Trump’s support for waterboarding during the campaign. Pompeo said he would reject presidential orders to torture detainees. The conflicting statements from the men who will be Trump’s most senior advisers increase uncertainty about what actions the new administration will take as military leaders continue to battle Islamic State and grapple with growing challenges from China and North Korea. Mattis’ seeming diferences with Trump and those with the president-elect’s pick to be secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, who unlike Mattis has suggested that he might

‘I WILL ALWAYS COMPLY’ Defense Secretary-designate James Mattis

support renegotiating President Barack Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran, could lead to a fractious approach to foreign policy and interagency feuding in the next administration. Several hours after Mattis’ testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Senate voted 81 to 17 to waive a measure requiring defense secretaries to have been out of military service for seven years. Mattis retired in 2013. Later in the day, the House Armed Services Committee approved a similar measure along party lines, 34 to 28. The full House must also vote on that measure.

CALL SIGN ‘CHAOS’ Although some of the president-elect’s other Cabinet picks have come under intense questioning in their own confirmation hearings, Mattis encountered virtually no challenges from lawmakers to his suitability for the top Pentagon job. The 66-year-old veteran, known for his use of the call sign “Chaos” during overseas deployments, has earned a reputation as a scholarly, plain-spoken officer with an impressive combat record. His blunt style has brought controversy at times, as have his hawkish views on confronting threats in the Middle East. Iran remains “the primary source of turmoil” in the Middle East, Mattis told lawmakers on Thursday, with its support for regional militant cells, its ballistic missile capability, its maritime provocations and cyber initiatives. Although Mattis’ hawkish views on the

Pompeo, meanwhile, promised the Senate Intelligence Committee, “I will always comply with the law,” despite any orders to the contrary from Trump. As a presidential candidate, Trump endorsed a return to waterboarding, while also repeatedly disparaging the judgment of U.S. intelligence analysts. A day after Trump appeared to equate the actions of intelligence leaders with Nazi tactics, Pompeo lavished praise on the CIA and its estimated 21,000 employees and said he would not shirk from his duty to present unvarnished facts to the White House and the agency’s congressional overseers. “I have watched them walk through fire to do their jobs,” Pompeo said of the CIA’s workforce, which he called “the finest intelligence agency the world has ever known.” He promised the panel that he would “speak truth to power” while ensuring that the CIA’s analysts and oicers are unfettered by political considerations. Pompeo’s chances of confirmation are high: He has strong support in the Republican Party, and Democrats do not have the numbers, either on the Senate Intelligence Committee or in the full Senate, to mount a bid-killing opposition against him by themselves. Pompeo would inherit a politically difficult job: act as liaison between the country’s intelligence analysts and a president who has repeatedly derided their work. Trump only recently acknowledged intelligence findings that Russia was behind a series of hacks and leaks of emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair-

U.S. says Fiat Chrysler diesels can cheat emissions testing

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The U.S. alleges that Fiat Chrysler failed to disclose that some of its diesel engine vehicles emit more pollution than allowed.

BY TOM KRISHER AND MICHAEL BIESECKER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • The U.S. government accused Fiat Chrysler on Thursday of failing to disclose software in some of its pickups and SUVs with diesel engines that allows them to emit more pollution than allowed under the Clean Air Act. The Environmental Protection Agency issued a “notice of violation” to the company that covers about 104,000 vehicles including the 2014 through 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram pickups, all with 3-liter diesel engines. The California Air Resources Board took similar action. “Failing to disclose software that affects emissions in a vehicle’s engine is a serious violation of the law, which can result in harmful pollution in the air we breathe,” said Cynthia Giles, EPA assistant administrator for enforcement and compliance. Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne denied any wrongdoing, saying the EPA was blowing the issue out of proportion. “We have done in our view nothing that is illegal,” he said Thursday on a conference call. “We will defend our behavior in the right environment.” Marchionne said he was told by company lawyers that the Justice Department is investigating the company in concert with the EPA, raising the likelihood of an ongoing criminal probe. He said the company halted production of Grand Cherokees and Rams with diesel engines in September but will continue to sell models manufactured before then that are still on dealers’ lots. The company said it intends to present its case to the incoming Trump administration. “We will work with the new leadership to get this issue through,” Marchionne said. A spokesman for President-elect

Donald Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The White House said Thursday that the EPA makes enforcement decisions independently and that outgoing President Barack Obama wasn’t involved in the decision to cite the company. If found liable, Fiat Chrysler could face more than $4.5 billion in potential fines for violations of the Clean Air Act. The EPA said it will continue to investigate the “nature and impact” of the eight software functions identified through an intensive testing program launched after Volkswagen was caught in a 2015 cheating scandal involving its “Clean Diesel” line of vehicles. Regulators were not yet defining the software found in the Fiat Chrysler vehicles as so-called “defeat devices” intended to cheat on government emissions tests. However, the agency said that numerous discussions with Fiat Chrysler over the past year had not produced any suitable explanation for why the company had failed to disclose the software, which regulators said caused the vehicles to emit less pollution during testing than during regular driving. “This is a clear and serious violation of the Clean Air Act,” Giles said. “When companies break the law, Americans depend on EPA to step in and enforce.” On Thursday, California regulators also announced they were citing Fiat Chrysler for 11 violations under that state’s strict air quality standards. Fiat Chrysler said in a statement that its emissions control systems “meet the applicable requirements” and that it spent months giving information to the EPA to explain its emissions technology and proposed a number of actions including software changes to address the agency’s concerns. Regulators said owners of the afected models do not yet need to take any action and that they should continue driving their vehicles. Fiat Chrysler shares tumbled 20 percent $9.12 Thursday morning as the

EPA action was reported, wiping out about $3 billion of the company’s market value. The shares recovered a bit to $9.91 by early afternoon but still were down nearly 11 percent. Shares of Cummins Inc. also fell just over 2 percent to $137.59. Though the company manufactures some diesel engines for Fiat Chrysler, the company said Thursday it did not make the engines in the Jeep and Ram models cited by the EPA. The announcement comes one day after Fiat rival Volkswagen pleaded guilty in federal court to criminal charges related to widespread cheating involving emissions tests, agreeing to pay a record $4.3 billion penalty. Six high-ranking VW executives have been charged in the scandal, which prompted a nationwide recall of more than a halfmillion afected cars and SUVs. In the Volkswagen case, prosecutors alleged that top oicials at the company approved of the cheating scheme, repeatedly lied to U.S. regulators and then orchestrated a mass attempted coverup that included deleting computer files and emails. EPA regulators made no such allegations against Fiat Chrysler on Thursday, though they said their investigation is in the early stages and is ongoing. This isn’t the first time the company has run afoul of a federal agency. In 2015, Fiat Chrysler was slapped with $175 million in penalties by the National Highway Traic Safety Administration for mishandling recalls and failing to report safety data. Marchionne, who clearly was agitated on a conference call with reporters, expressed confidence that the EPA will find no evidence of an illegal “defeat device” in the Jeeps and Rams. He said some of the computer software on the engines was not disclosed because it’s standard among automakers and disclosure wasn’t previously required. But he said the EPA changed the rules after the Volkswagen case.

man, John Podesta. The president-elect still doubts that Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the actions to boost Trump’s chances of winning — as intelligence agencies concluded. During Thursday’s hearing, Pompeo told senators that he considered the intelligence community’s report on Russia to be “sound” as an analytical product. “It’s pretty clear about what took place about Russian involvement in efforts to hack information,” Pompeo continued, saying he was “very clear-eyed” about the intelligence report’s findings and promising to relay his take “not only to the president but to the team around him.”

‘HOLISTIC’ HOUSING SOLUTIONS In yet another confirmation hearing Thursday, Ben Carson detailed his vision for the Department of Housing and Urban Development: one that integrates government assistance programs with “holistic” solutions and greater involvement of businesses and faith groups. Carson, speaking before a generally friendly Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, repeatedly suggested that the private sector should play a larger role in addressing poverty and systemic inequities, investing in “human capital” as a means of both increasing quality of life and profits. “The programs that have been enacted in HUD over the years, you know, they’re good programs,” Carson said. “But in and of themselves they’re not bringing about the elevation of large numbers of people. And that’s what we’re looking for. We don’t want it to be a way of life, we want it to be a Band-Aid and a springboard to move forward.” In another instance, Carson said he would like to work with faith and business groups to help people whose residences are now worth less than their mortgages. “The place where there is a lot of money is the private sector. What we have to concentrate on is helping the private sector to recognize that, in the long run, the private sector does better when we develop our people,” Carson said.

DIGEST Biden given Medal of Freedom President Barack Obama awarded Vice President Joe Biden with the highest civilian honor Thursday, commemorating an “extraordinary man with an extraordinary career in public service.” A teary-eyed Biden accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom at a ceremony at the White House dedicated to honoring the outgoing vice president. Obama said he is bestowing the honor on Biden for “faith in your fellow Americans, for your love of country and a lifetime of service that will endure through the generations.” Biden praised his wife and children for their support throughout his career, and praised the Obama family for their dedication to country and service. “I was part of the journey of a remarkable man who did remarkable things,” Biden said. U.S. imposes sanctions on Syria • The Obama administration imposed sanctions Thursday on 18 Syrian government oicials, Syria’s military and a tech company in response to the use of chemical weapons by President Bashar Assad’s government. The State Department slapped sanctions on the Organization for Technological Industries, which it accused of helping Syria’s ballistic missile program. The tech company’s primary mission is importing advanced strategic technologies for surface-to-surface missile and rocket programs in Syria, the department said in a statement. A U.N.-authorized investigation into chemical weapons attacks in Syria concluded that Assad’s forces conducted two chlorine gas attacks. Those occurred after a much deadlier sarin gas attack in the Damascus suburbs in 2013 that the U.S. and Western countries blamed on Assad’s forces. Rural Americans unhealthier than urbanites • Rural Americans are more likely to die from heart disease, cancer and the three other leading causes of death than their urban counterparts, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those ive top causes of death — heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease and stroke — accounted for 62 percent of the total 1.6 million deaths in the United States in 2014. Among rural Americans, more than 70,000 of the deaths were potentially preventable, the study found, including 25,000 from heart disease and 19,000 from cancer. About 15 percent of the U.S. population lives in rural areas. These 46 million people tend to be older, poorer and sicker than urban Americans, with higher rates of cigarette smoking, high blood pressure and obesity and lower rates of physical activity. ‘Indianans’ oicially become ‘Hoosiers’ • The federal government is now oicially referring to Indiana residents as Hoosiers. U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly and Todd Young said Thursday morning that the Government Publishing Oice has changed the designation of Indiana natives to Hoosiers in the new federal government style guide. The Hoosier designation replaces the term Indianan. The change comes after members of Indiana’s congressional delegation sent a letter last year to the oice’s style board chairman saying that Indiana residents “have always called ourselves Hoosiers.” The letter urged the style board chairman to consider including Hoosier in the next style manual. From news services


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Missouri faces ‘dire’ budget hole BUDGET • FROM A1

insurance for poor people. Without paring back on spending, the budget would be $456.3 million out of whack. “It’s pretty dire,” Brown said. “I know this isn’t going to be an easy year to craft a balanced budget,” added Rep. Marsha Haefner, R-St. Louis. The revenue estimate is based on an analysis by nonpartisan state budget experts and outside consultants. It provides the basis for the governor and legislative leaders to build Missouri’s $27 billion spending blueprint. In a prepared statement, Greitens did

not specifically address what he plans to cut in order to balance this year’s budget. Nor did he address which programs he will target for reductions in the next fiscal year. Greitens, who has not previously held elected office, has postponed his budget address until February. “For too long, government hasn’t been fiscally responsible or accountable. That changes now, as we begin to fix the mistakes of the past and fight for you,” the governor’s statement reads. Along with trying to cut Medicaid costs, Fitzpatrick also said lawmakers will target the cost of legal settlements, which have topped an estimated $17 million this year, largely due to sexual harassment and dis-

crimination cases arising out of the Missouri Department of Corrections. “We’re going to be looking closely at that,” Fitzpatrick said. Budget writers also will be looking at the number and amount of tax credits being issued by the state. Lawmakers have already introduced nearly two dozen tax credit programs that will mean less money in state cofers if they are approved. “We need to stop carving out sales tax exemptions,” Fitzpatrick said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Comey breached policy before election FBI • FROM A1

sides of the political aisle, for diferent reasons, and once again put Comey on the hot seat. Democrats and Clinton herself have blamed Comey for the Democratic candidate’s loss, arguing that the renewed inquiry and the FBI director’s public missives on the eve of the election blunted her momentum. Comey also has been criticized for months by former Justice Department oicials for violating the department’s policy of avoiding any action that could afect a candidate close to an election. President-elect Donald Trump has notably declined to commit to keeping the FBI director. Brian Fallon, a former Clinton campaign spokesman, praised the investigation Thursday. “This is highly encouraging and to be expected given Director Comey’s drastic deviation from Justice Department protocol,” Fallon said. “A probe of this sort, however long it takes to conduct, is utterly necessary in order to take the first step to restore the FBI’s reputation as a nonpartisan institution.” Lawmakers and others had called previously for the inspector general to investigate the FBI’s pre-election actions when it came to the Clinton probe, alleging that Comey bucked long-standing policies with his communications about the case and that information seemed to have leaked inappropriately — perhaps to former New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani, a Trump supporter.

COMEY ‘GRATEFUL’ Horowitz said in a news release that he will explore the circumstances surrounding the actions of Comey and others, though he will not relitigate whether anyone should have faced charges. “The review will not substitute the OIG’s judgment for the judgments made by the FBI or the Department regarding the substantive merits of investigative or prosecutive decisions,” the news release said, using an acronym for the Office of the Inspector General. In a statement, Comey said: “I am grateful to the Department of Justice’s IG for taking on this review. He is professional and independent and the FBI will cooperate fully with him and his office. I hope very much he is able to share his conclusions and observations with the public because everyone will benefit from thoughtful evaluation and transparency regarding this matter.” The FBI’s investigation into whether Clinton mishandled classified information by using a private email server when she was secretary of state has long been controversial and politically charged. Perhaps most notably, Comey on Oct. 28 — after previously announcing publicly that he was recommending no charges in the case — sent a letter to congressional leaders telling them that agents had resumed the Clinton probe after finding potentially relevant information in an unrelated case — the investigation of disgraced former congressman Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of top Clinton aide Huma Abedin. The day before, senior Justice Department leaders had warned Comey not to send the letter, because it violated two long-standing department policies against discussing an ongoing investiga-

DIGEST O’FALLON, MO. > Critics launch court challenge of trash deal • The City Council’s selection of the apparent high bidder to operate the city trash transfer station was legally lawed, two critics allege in a court challenge. Mary Laulo, a member of the city public works advisory committee, and her husband, Wilbur Laulo, have asked a judge to disqualify Republic Services — the winning company in the process — and two rival companies also submitting bids. The Laulos complain that although city rules required the companies to deal only with the city purchasing agent through the entire process, three council members have said publicly they had contact with one or more irms before the contract was inalized Nov. 10. The Laulos also say Republic shouldn’t have been allowed to submit a bid because of a pending environmental lawsuit by the Missouri attorney general’s oice against the company concerning the irm’s Bridgeton Landill. Allowing Republic to seek the O’Fallon contract, they contended, violated bid speciications requiring companies to comply with all state laws and regulations.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FBI Director James Comey testiies on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington. He and others will be investigated for the FBI’s actions leading up to the 2016 election.

tion and taking any overt action on an investigation so close to an election. At the time, it was less than two weeks before the election, and early voting had begun. Conversely, Comey has notably declined to talk about any possible investigations of Trump or his campaign, as recently as this week rebuffing requests from legislators to confirm agents were looking into any such matters. That has drawn charges of hypocrisy from Democrats, though it is in line with normal practices. The inspector general did not say he would investigate Comey’s comments on Trump or any matters related to Russian interference in the election. In the Clinton case, Comey sent a second letter to Congress, just days before the election, declaring that the investigation was complete and he was not changing the decision he had made in July to recommend no charges. But the damage — in the minds of Clinton supporters, at least — had been done. Horowitz wrote that he will explore “allegations that Department or FBI policies or procedures were not followed” in connection with both letters. When he is finished, his oice will likely issue a lengthy report detailing what it has found, as it has done in other high-profile matters, though it is also possible he could recommend criminal charges for anyone found to have broken the law. The probe could take a significant amount of time. Horowitz wrote that his inquiry would extend back to at least July — when Comey announced he was recommending the Clinton case be closed without charges. He wrote that he would explore “allegations that Department and FBI employees improperly disclosed nonpublic information” — potentially a reference to Giuliani, who appeared to claim at one point that he had insider FBI knowledge. Horowitz also wrote that he would explore whether FBI Deputy Director An-

drew McCabe should have been recused from the case. McCabe’s wife ran for a Virginia senate seat and took money from the PAC of Virginia Gov. Terry McAulife, a fierce Clinton ally. Eforts to reach McCabe were not immediately successful. Giuliani has previously said he would cooperate with an inspector general investigation, though he said he had talked to only former FBI oicials and was not the recipient of any leaks. He did not return a message Thursday. Reps. John Conyers, Jr., D- Mich., and Elijah Cummings, D-Md., who called for the inspector general investigation related to Giuliani, said in a joint statement: “Our citizens must be able to trust that the FBI, our chief federal law enforcement agency, is non-partisan and does not insert itself into the electoral process. We are pleased that the Inspector General is following up on our request to investigate and review these allegations and look forward to receiving a full review of these matters.” Horowitz wrote that he would delve more deeply into the FBI publishing, just days before the election, 129 pages of internal documents from a years-old probe into former President Bill Clinton’s pardon of fugitive Democratic donor Marc Rich. And he said he would also probe whether Peter Kadzik, the Justice Department’s Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Afairs “improperly disclosed non-public information to the Clinton campaign and/ or should have been recused from participating in certain matters.” Kadzik used to be the lawyer for Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, and Wikileaks released hacked emails showing communications between the two men about the State Department’s review of Clinton emails for Freedom of Information Act purposes. Kadzik declined to say whether he would cooperate with the inspector general’s probe.

City oicials declined to comment on the suit, iled Dec. 22. St. Charles County Circuit Judge Jon Cunningham has set a hearing for Jan. 20. The council last year overrode two vetoes of Mayor Bill Hennessy in approving the 10-year contract. (Mark Schlinkmann)

the week here in the House: to advance key regulatory reform ideas as a change of pace from the outgoing administration.” (Adam Aton)

WASHINGTON, D.C. > House passes Wagner’s Wall Street bill • As Presidentelect Donald Trump promises to cut inancial regulations, Missouri’s Congressional Republicans are sharpening the ax. The House on Thursday passed a bill by Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, that would constrain Wall Street regulators from setting new rules before identifying speciic goals and undertaking a cost-beneit analysis. It would also require regulators to routinely review whether rules are functioning as intended — and, if not, nix them. The legislation could make it harder for the Securities and Exchange Commission, which regulates inancial markets and investments, to create new rules while making it easier for opponents to challenge them. The bill passed the House on a 243-184 vote. It goes to the Senate next. Wagner, a third-term congresswoman who chairs a subcommittee on inancial oversight, said the bill “its perfectly with the theme of

ST. LOUIS > City voters to decide whether to dissolve oice • A two-part plan to dissolve the recorder of deeds oice and use the savings to buy police body cameras will appear on the city’s April 4 ballot. The idea originated from an alliance between state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, a Democrat, and Republican activist Rex Sinqueield. The plan allows voters to amend the city charter to allow the assessor’s oice to absorb the recorder of deeds oice. Both Nasheed and Sinqueield believe the merger would free up roughly $1 million annually — enough to launch a citywide body camera program, according to their estimates. To pass, 60 percent of city voters would have to vote for the plan. Next, the savings would have to be realized, and then the police department and the police union would have to agree to launch a body camera program before the city’s roughly 800 uniformed patrol oicers would start wearing them. (Koran Addo)

GOP leaders look to early health care bill; details vague HEALTH • FROM A1

how to recraft a law they’ve tried erasing since its 2010 enactment, plus their desire to avoid panicking the 20 million people who’ve gained coverage under Obama’s overhaul or unsettling health insurance markets. In an interview with conservative radio host Mike Gallagher, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said the initial repeal and replace legislation will be “the primary part of our health care policy” and would be followed by other bills. Later, he told reporters at the Capitol that while Republicans will work quickly, “We’re not holding hard deadlines, only because we want to get it right.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said the early repeal bill would “begin to make important progress.” He said Republicans “plan to take on the replacement challenge in manageable pieces, with step-by-step reforms.” He set no timetable. “Repealing and replacing Obamacare is a big challenge. It isn’t going to be easy,” McConnell added. The leaders spoke a day before the House plans to give final approval to a budget that would shield the forthcoming repeal-and-replace bill from a Democratic filibuster in the Senate. Stripping Democrats of their ability to endlessly delay that bill — a tactic that takes 60 votes to thwart — is crucial for Republicans, who have just a 52-48 edge in the Senate. That chamber approved the budget early Thursday by a near party-line 51-48 vote, drawing a Twitter thumbs-up from Trump. “Congrats to the Senate for taking the first step to #RepealObamacare — now it’s onto the House!” the president-elect tweeted. Trump, who enters the White House next Friday, has pressed Republicans in recent days to act quickly on annulling and reshaping Obama’s law. GOP leaders seem to be taking his urgings to heart, though some have suggested his desire for speed doesn’t match Congress’ vintage lack of agility. Asked how quickly lawmakers could send Trump a bill, No. 2 Senate Republican leader John Cornyn of Texas said, “The most important thing is when do you get 218 votes in the House and 51 votes in the Senate,” the majorities needed for passage. “He’s not a creature of this place so there’s always a bit of a learning curve,” said the No. 3 Senate GOP leader, John Thune of South Dakota. Obama’s law, which he considers a trophy of his soon-to-end presidency, has provided health care subsidies and Medicaid coverage for millions who don’t get insurance at work. It has required insurers to cover certain services such as family planning and people who are already ill and curbed rates the sick and elderly can be charged. GOP leaders hope to use their first bill to void and rewrite as much of Obama’s law as they can, but so far they’ve provided little detail. Cornyn said in a brief interview Wednesday that the early legislation will “push some of the responsibility and resources down to the states and give them more flexibility,” such as for Medicaid. Republicans want to end the fines that enforce the statute’s requirements that many individuals buy coverage and that larger companies provide it to workers — mandates that experts say were needed to stabilize insurers’ rates. They also want to erase the taxes the law imposed on higher-income people and the health care industry, eliminate its subsidies that help people buy policies and pare back its Medicaid expansion. But they face internal disagreements over policy, such as how to pay for their new statute and how to protect consumers and insurers during what may be a two- or three-year phase-out of Obama’s overhaul. They also must heed Senate rules forbidding provisions that don’t directly affect taxes and spending from being safeguarded from filibusters. That means repealing important parts of the law — like the requirement that insurers ofer coverage to all customers including the most ill — would have to await later bills that would need Democratic support. Democrats have so far solidly opposed the GOP effort. But one influential conservative health care authority warned Thursday that it would be best to work with them. “Bipartisan support for whatever is assembled is the best way, and probably the only way, to ensure that what passes in 2017 is accepted by the public” in a way Obama’s law was not, James Capretta, a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute who formerly worked for President George W. Bush, wrote Thursday in National Review Online.


WORLD

01.13.2017 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A11

Ivana Trump stalked by Czech spies In eastern Mosul, small Secret police knew many details, including husband’s political aims

signs of progress as Iraqi forces rout Islamic State

BY MSTYSLAV CHERNOV associated Press

MOSUL, IRAQ • Small stalls

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Librarian Marcela Strouhalova manages Communist-era secret police iles on Czechoslovakian-born Ivana Trump, irst wife of Donald Trump, at the Security Service Archive in Prague, Czech Republic.

BY KAREL JANICEK associated Press

PRAGUE • Nearly 30 years ago,

Donald Trump was confident he would win the U.S. presidential election — as an independent in 1996, according to recently uncovered files from Czechoslovakia’s Communist-era secret police. Czechoslovakia was the home nation of Trump’s first wife, Ivana, a model, athlete and businesswoman who became the mother of his three oldest children: Donald Jr., Ivanka and Eric. A year before the 1989 collapse of communism in many parts of Europe, details about Ivana Trump’s 1988 visit back to her homeland were recorded in a classified police report. The Oct. 22, 1988, report claimed that Trump refused to run for president in 1988 — despite alleged pressure to do so — because he felt, at 42, he was too young. But the secret report said he intended to run in the 1996 U.S. presidential race as an independent, when he would be 50. “Even though it looks like a utopia, D. TRUMP is confident he will succeed,” the police report said, based on information from an unspecified source who talked to Ivana Trump’s father, Milos Zelnicek, about her visit.

It was unclear where the alleged “pressure” was coming from. The report is interesting because, in the United States, there was little public knowledge that Trump would consider a presidential run until a 1988 interview on “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” “I would never want to rule it out totally,” he said then. “I think I’d win,” he added. “I wouldn’t go in to lose.” But Trump didn’t create an exploratory committee until about a decade later, when he launched a bid for the Reform Party nomination ahead of the 2000 presidential election. He dropped that efort about four months later. Trump’s first wife was born Ivana Zelnickova in 1949 in the Czechoslovak city of Gottwaldov, the former city of Zlin that just had been renamed by the Communists, who took over the country in 1948. She married Trump, her second husband, in 1977. As she kept traveling home across the Iron Curtain on a regular basis, Ivana became a tempting target for the powerful, deeply feared Czechoslovak secret police agency known as the StB. “The State Security was constantly watching (Czechoslovak citizens living abroad),” said Libor Svoboda, a historian from

the Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes in Prague. “They were coming here, so they used agents to follow them. They wanted to know who they were meeting, what they talked about. It was a sort of paranoia. They were afraid that these people could work for foreign intelligence agencies. They used the same approach toward their relatives as well.” The StB’s specific file on Ivana had a registry number but it is not available. Historians believed it was destroyed. But other documents from the Security Service Archive in Prague, especially a file on her father, who used to visit her in the United States, showed they were both closely watched by spies and informers. Svoboda said there’s no indication of a secret police file on Donald Trump. He didn’t travel to Czechoslovakia under communism, unlike his children, who used to spend summer vacations there. Due to such attention, the secret police reports contain detailed information about Ivana Trump’s trips to Czechoslovakia, including dates, telephone numbers she called, people she met, what they discussed and other details about her life with her husband.

and carts have sprung up outside the bombed-out buildings in eastern Mosul, selling meat and vegetables, cigarettes and cellphones to the thousands of civilians still living in neighborhoods where the Iraqi military has driven out the Islamic State group. As the grinding military operation enters its fourth month, about a third of the northern city is under government control. While more than 100,000 people have fled the fighting, many have remained despite no electricity or running water. Zaid Khaled sells frozen chicken from a stall in the main traffic circle in the Zahour neighborhood. Every morning, he takes a bus to the easternmost edge of Mosul to buy the poultry in a market. Because there’s no power, he must sell his whole supply each day or lose money. “Slowly, as people are able to go back to work, life will return to normal, step by step,” he said. On the edge of the neighborhood, hundreds of people must cross a makeshift bridge to buy food and water or reach medical aid. Isam Fathi Younis lives just a few blocks from the front line. He wheeled his elderly mother across the bridge Thursday in search of a doctor after she began to have trouble breathing. His family waited in their home for days before fighting subsided enough to venture out on the streets, he said. On Tuesday, Lt. Gen. Talib Shaghati told The Associated Press the whole city could be recaptured from Islamic State in another three months or less. When the operation began in October, Iraqi leaders had predicted they would retake the city before 2017 began, but progress has been slow amid fierce counterattacks from the extremists.

Although buses, taxis and private cars have begun to clog the streets, armored military vehicles wind through the traffic in a reminder that the battle is not far away. One group of soldiers carried a metal chair — a seemingly ordinary object until a closer look revealed that culike restraints had been welded to its arms and legs. The soldiers said they recovered it from an Islamic State prison. “They used this for torture,” said special forces Col. Ali Kenani. “The clamp was used to hold a finger like this,” he said, slipping his hand into the vise on the end of one of the arms. “Finding things like this in Mosul is normal.” Shoppers and merchants said the signs of life returning to some of the streets were precarious: Markets like this one still get hit by mortar rounds, and the entire city is without essential government services. Khaled, the young man selling chicken, said that three days ago, a shell landed a block from where he was standing and killed three people. The Iraqi military enforces a strict curfew at sundown. The uncertain security situation and the limited access to food and water in Mosul still forces thousands of people to flee each week. Hundreds of people were massed Thursday in far eastern Mosul, undergoing a strict screening process before being shuttled to nearby displacement camps. Anwar Ali Hussein initially fled to a nearby neighborhood after airstrikes and mortar rounds began hitting the streets outside her home. She tried to wait out the fighting, but the few safe districts quickly filled up. “In each house, it was 20 people or more,” she said, “and there was never enough food. Only people with lots of money can afford to buy from the markets inside Mosul now.”

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 01.13.2017 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

‘Straight to pistols’ International attention turns to the city’s dreadful homicide problem.

O

Chicago, analysts found that over a sixn Tuesday, digital editions of year period, 46 percent of gun homicides the acclaimed British newspacould be traced to a social network made per the Guardian featured this up of 6 percent of the city’s population. headline on their home pages: “In what we think of as the ‘most “America’s worst spot for gun violence dangerous places,’ very, very few people isn’t in Chicago or Baltimore.” are actually at any meaningful risk for The Guardian’s remarkable analysis violent offending,” David Kennedy of the of gun killings in 2015 by census tracts John Jay College of Criminal Justice told showed the worst spot for gun violence the Guardian. “Most of the folks in those in America is along a four-mile stretch places are in no way a part of of Natural Bridge Avenue in the problem.” St. Louis. Of the more than But those who are at risk 73,000 U.S. census tracts, Often cops — young black males with only 63 had more than five know who easy access to guns — are at gun killings in 2015. Eight the players extreme risk. Sometimes it’s of them are in St. Louis, and about drugs or turf. Poverty five of them lie along Natural are. They plays a key role. Sometimes Bridge. can’t get it’s mere disrespect. VioFor all of President-elect witnesses to lence, some researchers Donald Trump’s attention say, may spread like a virus to Chicago’s 762 homicides cooperate. within the affected network. in 2016, the fact is that St. The “No one wants to fight out Louis’ homicide rate is twice community here any more,” one young as high on a per-capita basis. Chicago spreads 762 killings assumes that man told the Guardian. “It’s straight to pistols — that’s among 2.7 million people. police have just what time it is.” St. Louis spreads 188 among given up. Often cops know who 320,000. the players are. They can’t Yes, if you allocate the get witnesses to cooperate. city’s homicides among the The community assumes larger city-county populathat police have given up. The circle goes tion, things don’t look quite so bleak. That point is lost on people who don’t live round. Last year, Mayor Francis Slay rolled here. City officials present crime statistics in out an ambitious plan to address some of the least-damaging way. Politicians argue these problems. The city still had as many homicides in 2016 as it did in 2015. about “crime plans.” The Guardian’s Now the race is on to replace Slay, and report emphasizes what cops already crime is a big, vague issue. The stories know: The nation’s homicide surge is, for in the Guardian don’t do St. Louis any the most part, isolated and intractable. favors, but they can help candidates and Homicides are most likely to occur residents alike understand what they’re not just within small geographical areas, up against. but among small networks of people. In

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police oicers work the scene where a man was shot on Hamilton near Natural Bridge avenues, on Oct. 19, 2016. Twenty-one evidence markers, indicating multiple gun shots, were placed in the street.

Airport vulnerability he Fort Lauderdale attack exposed the gaping security hole that TSA needs to address.

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ince the Transportation Security Administration was created in 2001 after the 9/11 attacks, its most high-profile focus has been on protecting airline passengers against domestic terrorism. Safety in nonboarding areas of airports has not been the TSA’s chief concern. Maybe that should change. The attack that killed five people at the Fort Lauderdale airport on Jan. 6 highlighted vulnerabilities that remain at airports despite the heightened security. The attack also launched a necessary national discussion about what place firearms should have in air travel, if any, and safeguards for transporting them in checked baggage. Don’t be fooled into believing rhetoric that the Second Amendment trumps all other considerations. Airport and airliner safety must remain the chief concern, even if it means imposing inconveniences on gun owners seeking to transport weaponry and ammunition. TSA regulations for travelers with firearms are straightforward. Unloaded firearms must be in a locked, hard-sided container and transported as checked baggage. They must be declared upon check-in at a ticket counter, and only the passenger may have the key or combination to the container. Small-arms ammunition must be packed securely and transported in checked baggage. It can be carried in the same hard-sided case as the firearm. Some airlines have imposed additional restrictions or requirements, such as limiting the number of guns in a single

case, or specifying types of acceptable gun cases. On international flights, airlines may limit ammunition by weight. Safety experts say carrying firearms and ammunition together exposes a gaping hole in airport security and makes sitting ducks of passengers in baggage claims sections that are outside the secured areas of most airports. Another danger is that firearms containers are placed with regular luggage in baggage claim in most cases, and that no identification verification is required. Esteban Santiago, the suspected Fort Lauderdale shooter, was captured on video grabbing his checked bag from a luggage carousel at the airport and walking to the bathroom. He allegedly pulled bullets and a 9 mm pistol from his bag, loaded the weapon and left the bathroom to fire into the crowd. The threat of random violence in public venues is the unpleasant reality today, whether it’s at a marathon, a seaside boulevard in France, a Florida nightclub or a ballgame at Busch stadium. Metal detectors and purse checks are now commonplace. We’ve all become accustomed to delays and hassles. We accept that the need for public security sometimes means sacrificing rights. Making airports more secure should become a priority for the TSA and Congress. The National Rifle Association is unlikely to sit still for efforts to restrict people from transporting firearms on airliners, but it’s time for common-sense measures to ensure that this gaping hole in airport security doesn’t open a new door for terrorists to inflict mass tragedy.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Treat teams like the businesses they are: Let customers pay In your Jan. 9 editorial you state: “Sports, tourism and cultural amenities benefit the entire metropolitan region.” What is this claim based on? The editorial board is keen to tout scientific consensus when attempting to persuade readers about climate change. It’s rare to see consensus among economists, but on this subject they seem to agree. According to Temple University sports economist Michael Leeds,“If you ever had a consensus in economics, this would be it. There is no impact.” Victor Matheson, a sports economist at College of the Holy Cross, says,“A good rule of thumb that economists use is to take what stadium boosters are telling you and move that one decimal place to the left, and that’s usually a good estimate of what you’re going to get.” Some economists believe sports venues can actually depress economic activity, at least when it comes to tax revenues. Government support for major sports teams usually comes in the form of tax breaks. Since many people have a limited entertainment budget, the money they spend to attend sporting and other events at publicly funded venues would otherwise have been spent elsewhere, at businesses that pay their taxes. Major league sports teams are businesses; their customers should pay for their products, not taxpayers. Mark Sletten • St. Jacob

Just because art ofends us is not reason enough to remove it I have a high regard for people who dedicate their lives to protecting and serving. And I find David Pulphus’ depiction of police officers in his work “Untitled #1” as animals, especially as pigs, very offensive. But what I find more ofensive is that Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., removed it from a congressional wall. This is not an expression of First Amendment rights, as he claims. It is censorship, by no less than a government oicial, plain and simple. Art can be soothing. Art can be introspective. Art can be challenging. And art can be ofensive. But I think what so many people find ofensive about this piece is that it challenges their point of view. And particularly in these cases, it is critical that we listen to what the artist is trying to say. We should not remove it from our sight because we may find it ofensive. There are diferent points of view in the world. Many do not align with mine or may not align with yours. And that’s fine. But what Pulphus is depicting in his painting is a point of view that is held by a large portion of people in our communities and country. So, it is even more vital that we listen and earnestly try to understand that perspective and why so many people are saying it. That is the conversation it should invoke. That is the strength of art. Robert Merz • St. Louis

Despite what Trump believes, he must disavow Russia and Putin For some considerable time, Presidentelect Donald Trump and his appointees have been saying nice things about Russian “dictator” Vladimir Putin. Now we learn that Mr. Putin had directed that an extensive program be implemented to help Trump win the election. My advice to Trump now is that he publicly disavow and deplore Putin’s attack on our electoral process, and announce that he will consider an appropriate response after his inauguration. Trump can continue to assert that he does not believe Russia’s actions were decisive, but if he does not respond forcefully, he will

continue to be dogged by questions about his acceptance of the attack on the sovereignty of our beloved country. John P. Gratz • Chesterield

Term limits keep lawmakers from sharing the lessons of governing In Tony Messenger’s Jan. 5 column (“Veteran of Missouri tax credit fight wishes Greitens success”), we get a perfect example of the problems with term limits. Messenger writes about Jason Crowell, a former Missouri state senator who is back in private law practice after being termlimited out of the Senate. He tells us that Crowell, as a freshman senator in 2005, was among those behind cuts to Medicaid at a time when the state was facing a huge budget deficit, bringing widespread criticism and reducing health care services for many in need. Apparently since then, Crowell began researching the state’s tax credit programs and the problems they cause for state revenues. Had he known in 2005 what he knows now, he says,“about the tax credit situation, there might have been more balance” in the 2005 budget cuts. Now Crowell says,“My time is gone.” This is unfortunate because this is the kind of institutional knowledge that we need in state government. We shouldn’t be kicking people out of office with automatic term limits right when they are beginning to learn the hard lessons of governing. Rod Hansen • St. Louis

Residents of Liberal, Mo., don’t have a legitimate political gripe Regarding “Welcome to conservative Liberal, Mo.” (Jan. 8): So the residents of Liberal, Mo., are tired of being at the mercy of Missourians who don’t share their values? “We’ve lived with Kansas City and St. Louis ruling us a lot of the times,” one resident grumbles. While another bemoans,“People in the city don’t know what it’s like to live out here.” In case they didn’t know,for the last 16 years the Missouri Senate has been under Republican majority.That is also true for the last 14 years for the Missouri House of Representatives.Currently,only eight Senate seats of 34 are filled by Democrats and only 45 of 163 in the House.So what grounds do these residents have complaining about Democrats and us city dwellers? On the other hand, as an urbanite, I think I have a legitimate gripe that Donald Trump is about to become president of the United States, given the fact that nearly 3 million more people voted for Hillary Clinton, and this fact alone is due to an Electoral College that favors rural America. Robert Bailey • Maplewood

A return to conditions before Obamacare could be disaster I cannot believe that there is such a push to get rid of Obamacare.I’ve been denied coverage in the past because of pre-existing conditions.I don’t want to go back to a world where anyone can be denied. Republicans love saying how people have not kept their doctors under Obamacare. Yet they never mention examples of people this has happened to. It makes me wonder if their claim is true. What they probably forget is that before Obamacare, 45,000 Americans died prematurely due to their lack of coverage, according to a 2009 Harvard Medical School study that this paper once reported on. Recently, this paper quoted Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., as saying that Republicans will have to own any heath care problems that result from Obamacare being repealed. She is 100 percent right about that. Adam Decker • Chester Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/ letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

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01.13.2017 • FRIDAY • M 1

100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

A LAW TO PREVENT BLINDNESS • Over one-fifth of the children in the Missouri School for the Blind have lost their sight from neglect soon after birth.The Commission for the Blind has drawn up a law that every midwife shall cleanse the eyes and drop into each eye two drops of one percent solution of silver nitrate within two hours of birth. Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Right to work will improve economic conditions for Missourians State needs the competitive boost this legislation can bring, and right players are in place to make it happen. STACY WASHINGTON

One of the first campaign promises that Gov. Eric Greitens will seek to fulfill is the passage of right-to-work legislation. Union members are frightened by the prospect. During his tenure, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon consistently opposed such legislation, partnering with Republican legislators from heavily unionized districts to prevent a veto override. Greitens, the newly inaugurated Republican governor, supports right to work. “I support it because it would stop companies and union bosses from taking a cut of your paycheck to support their political organization, it’s just common sense. That money is your money — and you should decide how you want to spend it.” States that have passed

right-to-work legislation have experienced a rapid growth in jobs and opportunities, while forced unionization states have experienced losses. Michigan and Indiana made national news when they underwent the arduous process of passing worker freedom legislation. In “An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of States,” by Art Laffer, Stephen Moore, Rex Sinquefield and Travis Brown, they write: “The rightto-work states enjoyed a jobs growth rate more than three times that of the forced-union states.” Job growth was up 6.8 percent in right-to-work states and 1.9 percent in states without right to work, they wrote. With Missouri ranking 42nd in job growth, 48th in economic growth and 41st in income growth, the only way to go is up for economic indicators under a pro-growth right-towork business environment. Since 2011, St. Louis has lost the headquarters of 26 companies for varying reasons, ranging from

relocations, buyouts, bankruptcies, mergers and takeovers, with a devastating impact on population and jobs. In order to attract corporations, Missouri must improve economic conditions that employers look at when considering a corporate relocation. A study by Stan Greer of the National Institute for Labor Relations Research finds that “living expenses for employees in non-right-to-work states are overall 4.4 percent higher than the national average. Living costs in right-to-work states are 7.1 percent more affordable than the national average.” Additionally, right to work increases real earnings. When adjusted for differences in living costs, the Bureau of National Affairs Union Membership and Earnings Data Book shows employees make more money in right-to-work states. This legislation makes it more difficult for unions to take their membership for granted. Instead of collecting dues irrespective of their performance on behalf of

workers, unions are held accountable to members who are part of the union by choice. Gary Casteel, the secretary treasurer of the United Auto Workers Union, said in 2014: “This is something I’ve never understood, that people think right to work hurts unions. To me, it helps them. You don’t have to belong if you don’t want to. So if I go to an organizing drive, I can tell these workers, ‘If you don’t like this arrangement, you don’t have to belong.’ Versus, ‘If we get 50 percent of you, then all of you have to belong, whether you like to or not.’ I don’t even like the way that sounds, because it’s a voluntary system, and if you don’t think the system’s earning its keep, then you don’t have to pay.” He’s right. Any worker who dislikes actions his union is taking can opt out. A union is going to pay closer attention to the concerns of members in states where workers can leave if they are unhappy. What happens once right to

work is passed? Will unions go the way of the dinosaurs? Not quite. Union membership has grown in some states that passed right-to-work legislation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that after passage of right to work in Indiana, union membership decreased and then rebounded after unions actively addressed the concerns of members. Change is difficult and can be a frightening prospect, especially when doomsday “Chicken Littles” continually harp on the horrors that will befall Missourians under right to work. The legislation Greitens seeks does not prevent workers from unionizing. It will increase the level of attention paid to workers by their unions and will attract more businesses to Missouri. It’s past time that our state became more competitive. Stacy Washington Stacyontheright@gmail.com Twitter: @StacyOnTheRight

Tillerson’s foreign policy: Lawmakers’ misplaced anger

Russia irst Putin has done what Cold War couldn’t: built a U.S. government blind to abuses. months of cyberwarfare what his Soviet predecessors failed to do in 45 years of the DANA MILBANK Cold War: creating a pliable American govWashington Post ernment, willing to overlook human rights abuses in the interest of commerce. Trump on Wednesday tweeted that the leaked intelligence report was “one last shot at me” and asked: “Are we living In New York on Wednesday, Presidentin Nazi Germany?” But his liaison with elect Donald Trump dismissed as “crap” Russia feels more Eastern Bloc than Third the intelligence reports suggesting RusReich. Trump has a slate of pro-Russia sia has compromising information on advisers talking about a more conciliatory him. approach to Putin, and their statements Trump knows this because, as he have echoed Kremlin statements. Trump tweeted, Russia called it “A COMPLETE acknowledged that “I think it was Russia” AND TOTAL FABRICATION.” And if that did the election hacking, but rather Vladimir Putin’s government says somethan regard it as an act of war, he praised thing, it must be true. the outcome: “It shouldn’t be done,” he But whether or not Russia has such said, but “look at what was learned from blackmail potential may be beside the that hacking.” point. Trump and his incoming adminTillerson offered a few welcome istration are already doing exactly what departures from his would-be boss’s posiPutin wants. As Trump was giving his first post-elec- tions: He embraced the Magnitsky law punishing human rights abuses and said tion news conference in Trump Tower, his Russia’s annexation of Crimea would not nominee for secretary of state was testifying in Washington — and Rex Tillerson, the be recognized. He was more supportive of NATO than Trump former Exxon Mobil has been. chief, showed why he But Tillerson earned Putin’s Order didn’t mention of Friendship award. the election hackIt was early in the ing in his opening nine-hour hearing statement, and, in when Tillerson said response to Rubio, he might recommend he said he would revoking President “have concerns” Barack Obama’s with legislation actions punishimposing mandaing Russia for its tory sanctions on cyberattack during those who commit the American eleccyberattacks on the tion, which Tillerson United States. acknowledged was Other responses probably approved by were equally Putin. unnerving. Tillerson Sen. Marco Rubio, told Sen. Robert R-Fla., followed that Menendez, D-N.J., with a blunt question: that he had not yet “Is Vladimir Putin a discussed Russia war criminal?” with Trump, and “I would not use he asserted that that term,” the Russian Order of FriendAP “to my knowledge, Exxon never directly ship laureate replied. lobbied against Rubio offered to Rex Tillerson sanctions.” Con“help” Tillerson gressional lobbying reach that conclusion, records show Exxon lobbied on many Rusdescribing his targeting of schools and markets in Syria that have killed thousands sia sanctions bills. Asked by Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., of civilians, and his earlier attacks on about how he would avoid being underChechnya, where he killed 300,000 civilmined as chief diplomat by the president’s ians using cluster munitions and bombs “quickly drafted, not vetted” tweets on that kill by asphyxiation.“You are still not prepared to say that Vladimir Putin and his world affairs, Tillerson replied,“I have his cellphone number.” military ... have conducted war crimes?” “We’ll hope for the best there — unless “I would want to have much more inforyou have anything else to add,” Young said. mation before reaching a conclusion,” the Tillerson didn’t. nominee replied. The nominee didn’t rule out the creation Rubio went on to ask about the broadly of a registry of Muslims. He declined to held view that Putin has approved the killsay that China is one of the world’s worst ing of “countless” opponents, dissidents human rights violators. He wouldn’t critiand journalists. cize drug raids in the Philippines that have “I do not have sufficient information to killed 6,200. And he said he couldn’t make make that claim,” Tillerson replied. a “true determination” whether Saudi “Do you think that was coincidental?” Arabia violates human rights. Rubio pressed. It was grim to see an incoming AmeriTillerson said “these things happen” to can secretary of state avert his gaze from “people who speak up for freedom,” but he human rights abuses in Russia and across would need to know more. the globe.Rubio said it“demoralizes”bilRubio was angry.“None of this is classilions of people.“That cannot be who we are fied, Mr. Tillerson,” he said.“These people in the 21st century,” Rubio told Tillerson. are dead.” But apparently it already is. It was a big moment for the man Trump called Lil’ Marco. But it’s ominous Dana Milbank that there aren’t more like him and John dana.milbank@washpost.com McCain speaking up now. Washington Post Putin has managed to achieve in a few

over portrait misses the point he real controversy is why a promising young artist views his community and the police in this way. have apparently not pricked the consciousness of the “art critics.” The depiction in the painting is implicitly understood among Every year, each congressional representaAfrican-Americans but less so by whites. tive holds an art contest for students, with A 2015 Pew Research Group poll showed a the prize being a yearlong exhibition in the wide chasm between blacks and whites in Capitol. It typically does not cause a murperception of police treating people equally. mur. The chasm between these two perspectives The unanimous winner for 2016’s comis caused by a long, brutal and oppressive petition in Missouri’s 1st district was David history. David’s painting meticulously illusPulphus, a quiet, gentle, unassuming stutrates that gulf. dent. David’s painting,“Untitled #1,” hung David’s expression is not the serene setfor six months in peace. ting one might observe in a Monet. There In December, his painting became are no sunscapes and lily pads but rather an troublesome for law enforcement, conseraccurate portrayal of this young achieving vative publications and some politicians. American’s experiences with police. His The painting featured two officers with work is a constitutionally protected expresboar heads and human bodies drawing their sion of free speech. The recent incidents firearms. The other officers in the paintsend a message to African-American youth ing were fully human. There was also an to not bother with pursuing African-American male being excellence because even if crucified in a cap and gown. It their work is recognized, it portrayed police and commuwill be removed by those who nity relations as we saw them cannot understand it and who during the Ferguson crisis. see themselves as the excluOn Jan. 6, in an expression sive arbiters of Americanism. of privilege, disrespect and This is sad because history has free-speech suppression, proven the mark of a declining Rep.Duncan Hunter,R-Calif., civilization is the persecution removed the painting. Four of intellectualism and art. days later, the Congressional When Hunter, Lamborn Black Caucus ceremoniously and their colleagues removed re-installed it. That day, Rep. David’s painting, they illegally Doug Lamborn, R-Colo., and dangerously silenced free removed the painting, declarspeech for their own comfort. ing it “flagrantly” disrespectThey should be arrested by the ful to police officers “across same police whom the paintthe country.” Rep. Duncan Hunter ing offended. Furthermore, Their actions challenge Congress should censure the representatives democracy’s essence and highlight the for their un-American acts in the Capitol privilege that white people in positions of building. They privileged their feeling above power wield: immunity. It is unimaginable what makes America great: the freedom of that either of us could enter the Capitol expression. building and remove the statue of slavery In the United States certain groups have advocate John C. Calhoun without being achieved untouchable status with regard to accosted and likely arrested. The represencriticism. Citizens may not suggest policing tatives are demonstrating that rules and needs reform without their love of country laws only apply to certain citizens — not being questioned. There has been a public including them. The misplaced anger of shift from constructively analyzing police these “authorities” fails to address critical action to shaming anyone who dares to issues pertinent to conditions in AfricanAmerican communities, police-community share one’s human experience. These elected officials’ behavior is a clear relations, and constitutional rights. display of privilege. African-Americans get Art imitates life, but no critic has asked the fundamental question the painting begs: the message; freedom of expression is only for police-worshipping privileged citizens. Why would a young student with hope, The representatives will likely not be punpromise and purpose perceive our commuished because law enforcement and elected nity and the police in such a manner? officials have far more restraint for white The officials did not take into account the “protesters” than for black resisters. role militarization of policing has played in David’s only comment is “the art speaks African-American communities (including Ferguson and St. Louis) or the way “stop and for itself.” It has spoken loudly. Now, who frisk” and pretext stops invade the privacy of will protect American civilization including African-American citizens. These are things our Constitution and democracy? that we have personally experienced. Etefia Umana is a St. Louis freelance writer. David Pulphus Thepolice-involvedshootingsofunarmed is the student whose artwork became the focus of and legally armed African-Americans also controversy between various members of Congress.

BY ETEFIA UMANA AND DAVID PULPHUS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This painting by David Pulphus was chosen to hang in a hallway on Capitol Hill.


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877-385-0847

Call for Rates

Professional service - low costs.

3.768%

Phone / Website

www.JBTHomeLoans.com

Rate: 3.750

20 yr fixed

3.500 0.000

$0

5%

3.513

Points: 0.000

15 yr fixed

3.000 0.000

$0

5%

3.015

Fees: $0

5/1 ARM

2.875 0.000

$0

5%

3.573 www.LenderCity.com

% Down: 5%

10 Year Fixed, 2.75%/0 points. Low closing costs.

NMLS# 193390

877-385-6586

MC.0002150

Legend: The rate and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 1/11/17. © 2017 Bankrate, LLC . http://www.interest.com. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank, (D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $424,101. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Lock Days: 30-60. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Bankrate, LLC . does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates and fees in this table. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. Bankrate, LLC . does not own any financial institutions. Some or all of the companies appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. If you are seeking a mortgage in excess of $424,100, recent legislation may enable lenders in certain locations to provide rates that are different from those shown in the table above. Sample Repayment Terms – ex. 360 monthly payments of $5.29 per $1,000 borrowed ex. 180 monthly payments of $7.56 per $1,000 borrowed. We recommend that you contact your lender directly to determine what rates may be available to you. To appear in this table, call 800-509-4636. To report any inaccuracies, call 888-509-4636. • http://stltoday.interest.com

Help Wtd (H2B)

4727 Firewood/Fuel

6095 Legal Notices

9000 Legal Notices

9000 Legal Notices

Seasoned Oak Gateway Tree Care, LLC is NOTICE OF APPLICATION and Hickory NOTICE OF APPLICATION hiring laborer to climb TO Delivered & Stacked. FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT trees, cut, remove and ESTABLISH AND OPERATE A 23 yrs of Service. OF A BANK BRANCH trim trees. Drag brush, NEW BRANCH 573-513-6510 f eed int o chipper ma Midland States Bank, an chine, rake and clean up First Bank, 1 1 9 0 1 Olive chartered, comground and leftover de- Sporting Equipment 6240 Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mis- Illinois mer cial member bank bris. Lifting required up to souri, intends to apply to with its main office locat50 lbs. On the job training. the Fe de ral Re s e rve ed at 1201 Network No education or experiBoard for permission to Centre Drive, Effingham, ence required. $15.95/hr. e s tablis h a branch at Illinois 62401, intends to $23.93 O.T. 7am-3:30pm, JAN. 14-15 3 1 0 1 Zinfandel Drive, apply to the Federal ReM-F, Some O.T. & weekSAT. 9-5 & SUN. 9-3 Rancho C o r d o v a , serve Board for permisends may be available. 6 FARMINGTON Sacramento County, Cali- sion to establish a branch positions available for CIVIC CENTER fornia, 9 5 6 7 0 . The ac- a t 4 3 2 1 M a n c h e s t e r temporary, full time work (2 Black Knight Dr) counts from the existing Avenue, Unit A, St. Louis, 04/01/2017-12/01/2017. INFO: (563) 927-8176 branch located at 2 8 8 0 Missouri 63110. The FedJefferson County area www.rkshows.com Sunrise Blvd., Suite 100, eral Reserve considers a jobsites. Transportation Rancho Cordova, Sacra- number of factors in deprovided to and from area mento County, California ciding whether to approve jobsites from a central Jefwill be relocated to the application including ferson County area pick Legal Notices 9000 95742, the above-listed address. t h e r e c o r d o f up location. Contact Vicki performance of applicant The Federal Reserve by calling 636-600-1396 considers a numbe r of banks in helping to meet or email resume to vhutDEPARTMENT OF factors in deciding wheth- local credit needs. chens@gatewaytreecare. HOMELAND SECURITY e r to a p p ro v e th e com Apply at Arnold Job You are invited to submit application including the Center @ 636-287-8909, FEDERAL EMERGENCY record of performance of comments in writing on refer to JO#12107123 . MANAGEMENT AGENCY applicant banks in helping this application to the Assistance finding and Federal Reserve Bank of securing board & lodging Proposed Flood Hazard to meet local credit needs. St. Louis, P.O. Box 442, is available. Employer will Determinations for the make all deductions re- City of O'Fallon, St. You are invited to submit St. Louis, Missouri 63166quired by law from each C h a r l e s C o u n t y , comments in writing on 0442. Comment s may paycheck as well as for Missouri, and Case No. this notice to the Federal also be submitted electroRe s e rve Bank of S t . n i c a l l y t o optional employer pro- 1 6 - 0 7 - 1 7 3 6 P . Th e comments.applications@s vided housing at approx. Department of Homeland Louis, P.O. Box 442, St. $300.00/mo, optional ad- Security's Federal Emer- Louis, Missouri, 63166- tls.frb.org. The comment vance against pay up to g e n c y Ma n a g e me n t 0 4 4 2 . Comments may period will not end before $75.00/day at the end of Agency (FEMA) solicits also be submitted electro- January 28, 2017. The each work day at no inter- technical information or nically to comments. applic Board's procedures for processing applications est for the first 2 weeks, if comments on proposed ations@stls.frb.org. The ay be found at 12 necessary. Workers will flood haz ard de te rmi- comment period will not m end before 1 5 calendar C . F . R . P a r t 2 6 2 . be reimbursed by check nations for the Flood Indays from the date of this P r o c e d u r e s f o r for transportation (inclu- s u ra n c e R a t e Ma p processing protested apding meals & necessary (FIRM), and where applic- publication and may be plications may be found somewhat longer. The lodging) to the place of able, the Flood Insurance employment if the worker Study (FIS) report for your Board's procedures for at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Fedcompletes 50% of the em- community. These flood processing applications eral Reserve Board's proma y b e fo u n d a t 1 2 ployment period. Return hazard determinations cedures, or if you need transportation will be pro- may include the addition C . F . R . P a r t 2 6 2 . more information about Pro c e d u re s fo r vided if the worker com- or modification of Base protested ap- h o w t o s u b m i t y o u r pletes the employment Flood Elevations, base processing plications may be found c o m m e n t s o n t h e period or is dismissed flood de pths , S pe cial at 1 2 C.F.R. 262.25. To application, contact David early by the employer. Flood Hazard Area boun- obtain a copy of the Fed- Hubbard, Senior ManagEmployer will provide, at d a r i e s o r z o n e no charge, all tools, sup- designations, or the regu- eral Reserve Board's pro- er, at (314) 444 7303. cedures, or if you need The Federal Reserve will plies and equipment re- latory f l o o d w a y. The more information about consider your comments quired to perform the job. FIRM and, if applicable, Possible bonus based on the FIS report have been h o w to s u b mit yo u r and any request f or a public meeting or formal c o mme n t s o n t h e performance. EOE revised to reflect these application, contact David hearing on the application f l o o d h a z a rd Hubbard, Senior Manag- if they are received in determinations through is- e writing by the Reserve r, at (3 1 4 ) 4 4 4 -7 3 03. suance of a Letter of Map The Federal Reserve will Bank on or before the last Re vis ion ( L O M R ) , in your comments day of the comment periaccordance with Title 44, consider od. and any request for a Part 6 5 of the Code of meeting or formal Fe de ral Re gulations. public on the application These determinations are hearing if they are received in the basis for the floodplain Munsch Outdoor Mainte- management measures writing by the Reserve nance Co., Inc., St. Louis, that your community is Bank on or before the last MO. Daily transp. will be required to adopt or show day of the comment period. p r o v i d e d t o and f r om evidence of having in efworksite to the following fect to qualify or remain counties: St. Louis & St. qualified for participation Charles. 5 Landscape La- in the National Flood NOTICE OF FILING OF borer pos. avail. Temp, A DECLARATION OF Insurance Program. For F T p o s . f r o m 4/ 1/ 17CANDIDACY FOR more information on the 12/1/17, 7A-3:30P, 40 proposed flood hazard DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC hrs/wk, OT varies, M-F, WATER SUPPLY DISTRICT determinations and inSchedule Varies, Some NO. 2 OF ST. CHARLES formation on the statutory weekends may be req’d. 90-day period provided for COUNTY, MISSOURI Workers will be paid appe als , ple as e vis it weekly at $13.20/hr, FEMA's website at www.f Notice is hereby given $19.80/hr OT. Will oper- e m a.gov/plan/prevent/ th a t a ll p e rs o n s ate power equipment, use interested in filing a Decfhm/bfe, or call the FEMA hand tools, mow, rake, laration of Candidacy for Map Information e X trim, prune, blow, dig, and change (FMIX) toll free at Director of Public Water p l a n t f lower s, shr ubs- 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877S upply District No. 2 of /trees. Post-Accident Drug S t . C harle s C ounty, Test ing; Pre-hire back - 336-2627). Mis s o u ri fro m S u b ground check req’d, Able district #1 may do so at to lift 60lbs, no exp. req’d the offices of the said Diswill train. Employer may trict, located at 100 Water make payroll deductions Drive, O'Fallon, Missouri at employees request. 63368 between the hours The employer will provide of 8:00 am and 4:30 pm, workers at no charge all Monday through Friday, tools, supplies and equipon and between the dates ment req’d to perform the listed herein. In addition, job. Initial transp. (incluthe office will be open for ding meals &, to the exFiling on January 1 7 th, tent necessary, lodging) 2017 until 5:00 pm. to the place of employment will be provided, or Filing of a Declaration of its cost to workers reimCandidacy begins at 8:00 bursed, if the worker comam December 1 3 , 2 0 1 6 pletes ½ the employment and closes at 5 :0 0 p m period. Return transp. will January 17th, 2017. be provided if the worker completes the employDone by the order of the ment per iod or is dis314-621-6666 Board of Directors, Public missed early by the emWater Supply District No. ployer . Plea se inquire 2 of St. Charles County, stltoday.com/ about the job opportunity Missouri. or send applications, indiclassiieds cations of availability, an/s/Denis Raab d/or resumes directly to óóóóóóóóó 9632 Lackland Rd., St. Denis Raab, President Louis, MO 63114, 314878-1941 or to the nearSeal: est MO SWA, Missouri Attest: Career Center - St Louis County Deer Creek, 3256 /s/ Kim Cantrell Laclede St at ion Road óóóóóóóóóó Suite 103, St. Louis, MO Kim Cantrell, Clerk 63143, (314) 877-0001. To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or Refer to JO#12107028

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Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques 800-365-0820, ext. 6666.

Antiques Wanted Restaurant Bus. Opps. 4905 Pizza Place and Catering Business for Sale. $95K. Great Location. Call (314)368-1065 Tony

Farm Implements/ Supplies

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Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

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'54 A.C. D-19 12K lbs, gas, PS, front grader blade, 4 bottom plow, 4 row corn cult ivat or , $6900 Bob 314-712-5737

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Huge Bellefontaine Estate Auction Sat., Jan. 14, 9 a.m. & Wed., Jan 18, 9 a.m. 11873 Bellefontaine Rd 63138 Classic vehicles incl Packard 180, Willy's Jeepsters, Hudson Jet & Mercedes. Antique furn, vntg fan coll., Industrial and mid-century. 2 houses and garages completely full! ALL items sell, without reserve, to the highest bidder.

1st Golden Doodles, Labradoodles, Woodles, Shih-poos, Cavapoos,Chihuahuas, & Other Cuties. 636-240-3647 lovencarepets.org

AMERICAN BULLDOG PUPPIES Johnson bloodline NKC 8 wks $750 314-265-5281

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LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA Yellow & Black. See parents, calm. shots, wormed, health guar. 618.883.2137 www.sieverskennels.com 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

All interested citizens will have an opportunity to g i v e w r i t t e n a n d or al comment. Senior citizens are encouraged to attend and comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the government before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator P.O. Box 9, St . Pet er s Missouri, 63376, Ph: 477-6600 or 278-2244 extension 1670. Owner Skaggs Description 3908 Line Street Approximate Acreage .765 Recommended Zoning R-1 Single Family Residential District Det ailed legal descr ipt ions o f t hese properties are available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard, St . Peters, MO. D o n e b y or der o f t he Board of Aldermen. /s/Patricia E. Smith Patricia E. Smith, City Clerk

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Board of Aldermen of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold an official public hearing at 6 :3 0 p.m. on Thursday, January 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 at St. Peters City Hall to review and determine if the Old Town Re de ve lopme nt Project is making satisfactory progress as per the approved plans and the St . Pe te rs Route 3 7 0 Project is making satisfactory progress as per the approved plans. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comments. City Hall is located at the inte rs e ction of Mexico Road and St. Peters Cen t r e Boulevard. Persons with disabilities n e e d in g a s s is ta n c e should contact he City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-2782244.

Public & Self Storage 9003

PUBLIC NOTICE: To Enf orce Warehouse Lien for Default in Payment of Rent. Goods Belonging to the People in Said Lockers Consisting of: Household Goods, F u r n i t u r e a n d Miscellaneous Items will be Sold on TUESDAY January 24th, 2017 AT 10:00 AM.

Barnes, Timothy #630 Buck, Michael #226 Harlan, Takira #557 Huggins, Eddie #622 Johnson, Monique #441 Jones, Tarrell #509 McIntyre, Anthony#561 Pierce, Kevin #433 Powers, Antar #402 Robinson, William #534 Shigemura, Brian #648 Shigemura, Brian #652 Stezen, Nino #420 Sylia, Samantha #582 SUBJECT TO SETTLEMENT BY TENANT PRIOR TO SALE: (CASH ONLY)

To place your ad, call at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. 5005 Dogs

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on February 1, 2017, at the St. Peters Justice Center. The Justice Center is located at the intersection of S u e m a n d y Drive and Grand Teton Drive (1020 Grand Teton Drive). The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the zoning classification for the newly annexed property briefly described below.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

9005

INVITATION TO BID #17-002 TREES AND SHRUBS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the rezoning as described below or an alternate zoning category.

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids to furnish and deliver trees and shrubs. Specifications are available at w .o .m . Bid Opportunities.

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244.

Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly m a r k e d “ Trees and Shrubs“to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 10:00 A.M. CST, January 31, 2017. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room.

Petition 17-02 Ink Spot Troy LLC requests an amended Commercial Planned District (CPD) to allow the additional use of a tattoo and piercing facility on a 2.12 +/- acre parcel. The subject site is located on the west side of Church Street, north of Mexico Road (419 South Church Street). LOCATION MAP

The Cit y of O ’ F a l l o n r eser ves t he r ight t o reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to sel a bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

LeGAL DeSCRIPTION

INVITATION TO BID A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the #17-003 HOLIDAY City of St. Peters Planning Department. LIGHTS FOR CELEBRATION OF Bids/Proposals 9005 Bids/Proposals 9005 Bids/Proposals 9005 LIGHTS CITY OF O’FALLON, NOTICE TO NOTICE TO BIDDERS: Sealed bids for Webster MISSOURI CONTRACTORS DISTRICT-WIDE Re clamation Proje ct,

HVAC & ROOFING The City of O’Fallon, MisMODERNIZATION souri is soliciting sealed PROJECT FY17 (BI) bids to furnish and deliver holiday light s f or the Celebr at ion o f Light s. The Rockwood School Specifications are avail- District invites you to submit a bid according a b l e a t w w w . ofallon.mo.us under Bid to Rockwood School District's DISTRICT-WIDE Opportunities. HV A C & ROOFING Interested vendors should M O D E R N I Z A T I O N submit sealed bids clearly P R O J E C T F Y 1 7 (BI) marked “Holiday Lights s p e c i f i c a t i o n s. For further project details and f or Cel ebr at i on of Lights“ to the City of O’- information regarding the Fallon attn, Julie Moeller- mandatory Pre-Bid meeting 100 North Main Street, ing, e t c . , ple as e vis it ht t p: / / f indr f p.c o m , or O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 10:00 A.M. CST, January www .rsdmo.org or call the Construction Secre2 5 , 2017. Bids will be tary at 636-733-3270. publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The Cit y of O ’ F a l l o n r eser ves t he r ight t o NOTICE TO BIDDERS: reject any and all bids and DISTRICT WIDE ROOF waive any informality. The IMPROVEMENT FY17 City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best The Rockwood School bidder as determined by District invites you to the City in its sole discre- submit a bid according to Rockwood School tion. District's DISTRICT-WIDE R O O F I MP ROV EMENT FY17 specifications. For further project details and information regarding the mandatory Pre-Bid meeting , e t c . , p l e a s e visit t t p : / / f in d r f p.c o m , or INVITATION TO BID hwww.rsdmo.org or call #17-004 RIFLE the Construction Secretary at 636-733-3270. GRADE BALLISTIC

VESTS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

NOTICE TO BIDDERS: Middle TuckThe City of O’Fallon, Mis- Wildwood pointing Project FY17 souri is soliciting sealed bids to furnish and deliver The Rockwood School rifle grade ballistic vests District invites you to for the Police Department. submit a bid according Specifications are avail- to Rockwood School a b l e a t w w w . District's W i l d w o o d ofallon.mo.us under Bid Middle Tuck-pointing Opportunities. P r o j e c t F Y 1 7 Interested vendors should s pec i f i c at i ons . F o r submit sealed bids clearly further project details and marked “Rifle Grade Bal- information regarding the mandatory Pre-Bid meetlistic Vests“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moel- ing , e t c . , p l e a s e visit ht t p: / / f indr f p.c o m , or lering 100 Nor t h Main www.rsdmo.org or call St r eet , O ’ F a l l o n , M O Foresight Services 6186 3 3 6 6 b y 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. CST, January 24, 2017. 654-8919. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. T h e Cit y of O ’ F a l l o n r eser ves t he r ight t o reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to sel a bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

Pet listings in Classified they’re the cat’s meow.

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

OWNER: The Board of R a n d o l p h C o u n t y , Governors for the Mis s ouri, Proje ct No. Missouri State University Y1 7 0 1 - 0 1 w i l l b e Sealed bids for the DRIVE received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1 :3 0 PM, AND PARKING LOT IM- 1/26/2017. For specific PROVEMENTS, MT GROVE project information and CAMPUS will be received orde ring plans , go to: at the Office of Planning, http:// oa.mo.gov/facilities Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on JANUARY The Kirkwood School Dis24, 2017 and then publicly trict R-7 is seeking qualifiopened and read aloud. ed bids for multiple 2017 With each proposal, a Mainte nance projects. cer t if ied check or bid Please visit our website bond properly executed @ ht t p: / / www. by the bidder in the kirkwoodschools.org and amount of five percent click on RFPs within the (5%) of the bid shall be Links section submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at www.plans.missouristate. edu. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. M S U is an A A / E O institution.

S ealed bids for C B O C Renovations, St. James Missouri Veteran's Home, S t . Jame s , Mis s ouri, Project No. U1503-02 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 2/16/2017. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http:// oa.mo.gov/facilities

The St. Louis County Library is accepting proposals for Signage Fabrication and Installation. For instructions, please visit the Library's web sit e (http://www.slcl.org/about/ bid-opportunities). Bids a re d u e a n d will b e ope ne d at 2 : 0 0 p. m. , CST, on Thursday, March 2, 2017, in the Administrative Conference Room at St. Louis County Library H e a d q u a rte rs i n a publicly held meeting. The Library reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive formalities in the best interest of the district.

Today’s Classified section:

Stuff. Homes. Rides. Jobs. In print and online.

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/ classiieds

I N F RONT OF EACH RESPECTIVE LOCKER TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER

Pets & Stuff Dogs

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ESTABLISH ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF NEWLY ANNEXED PROPERTY

THE SECOND ATTIC MINI STORAGE 8440 ST CHARLES ROCK ROAD ST LOUIS, MO 63114 (314)423-4700

mrclarkauction.com for terms, details, photos. 314-650-7317

12 Cane Corso puppies with tails docked,very intelligent & Loyal, $1000. (314)609-4573

9000 Bids/Proposals

5005

• POODLES: 2 Mini black& white Females, 1 Parti Female and 1 black, brown&white Male, All Ready Now. • MALTESE:- 3Female & 2Males, ready Jan. 9 Male $300 Female $500 All have 1st Shots. Call (618)335-7237

Got stuff to sell? We’ve got buyers. 314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

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NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Erratic, violent escalation for suspect in airport killings He was charged with abusing girlfriend, yelled at thin air ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA • Este-

ban Santiago stood alone in the cold one day last month outside Mom & Pop’s liquor store in Anchorage. He was waving his arms and having a terrible argument in the parking lot. “He’d just be talking to himself … screaming as if he was having a battle with himself,” said Naomi Harden, a clerk at the store across the street from the motel where Santiago lived. Last week, Santiago got off a one-way flight from Anchorage at the airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., arriving with a single piece of checked luggage: a Walther 9 mm semi-automatic handgun in a case. He took the gun out in a bathroom, loaded it and opened fire in the baggage claim area, killing five people and wounding six, police say. After emptying two magazines, Santiago lay down on the floor and was arrested, authorities say. He now faces a possible

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pictured is the apartment in Anchorage, Alaska, where Florida airport shooting suspect Esteban Santiago at one time lived with his girlfriend.

death sentence if convicted. Investigators are trying to establish the motive for the attack. Santiago, 26, an Iraq War veteran, was usually a quiet and solitary figure, those who knew and worked with him said. But over the past year, he grew increasingly violent, interviews and records show. And in recent weeks Santiago was seen screaming into the night from his motel window, Harden said.

Santiago grew up in Penuelas, Puerto Rico, a once-thriving middle-class town of 20,000 where people worked in petrochemical plants that have since closed. Those who knew him described an intelligent and patriotic boy who joined the Puerto Rico Army National Guard in 2007. Santiago served about a year in Iraq in 2010 as part of an engineering battalion.

OBITUARIES Ashcraft, Jestene - St. Louis Bohrer, Stephen P. - St. Louis Bushmann, Kenneth J. - St. Louis Castro, Nadyne Ann - St. Louis Ferrell, Michael Steven - Columbia, IL,

Michelle Quinones, a former girlfriend, told ABC that Santiago wasn’t feeling right when he returned from the war and sought help in Puerto Rico. “We had let Veterans (officials) know that he was having some mental problems,” she said, without giving details. She said it didn’t help, and they broke up. In 2014, Santiago and his brother, Bryan Santiago, moved to Anchorage for a new start. Esteban joined the Alaska National Guard and started dating a new woman, Gina Peterson. Bryan eventually returned to Puerto Rico. In Anchorage, Esteban and Peterson’s relationship grew, and they had a child. The couple shared a small, rear-facing apartment on an alley in a bluecollar neighborhood. Over the year that followed, though, Santiago became more violent than his friends or family ever remembered him being. In an argument with Peterson in February, he smashed through the locked bathroom door, breaking the door frame and hinges, according to court documents. He yelled at her threateningly, and she told police he tried

Celebrations of Life

Kelam, Robert R. - St. Louis Kuehn, Dorothy M. - St. Louis Laxton, Mary A. - St. Louis Meyer, Nancy L. - St. Charles Reiss, Eddie - Louisville, KY

Kelam, Robert R.

to strangle her. Police found no sign of injury, but Santiago was charged with criminal mischief and assault. Santiago was ordered to take a 12-week anger management class. He never submitted proof that he completed it, said Anchorage prosecutor Seneca Theno. After another domestic violence incident, Santiago moved to a motel. In November, Bryan Santiago got a call from Peterson. Esteban had been having mental problems, she told him. He had gone to the FBI oice in Anchorage with a loaded magazine on him and a gun in his vehicle, authorities said. He brought his newborn with him into the oice. Santiago told the agents that he believed he was being influenced by the Islamic State group. He said he was having terroristic thoughts and believed the U.S. government was trying to control his mind, according to authorities. Agents seized the weapon, and police took him to get a mental health evaluation. The doctors did not think he needed to be committed, and after four days he was released.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Rutten, Wilma E. - St. Louis Session, Charles J. - St. Louis Shoemaker, Bennie - St. Louis Sinovich, John Nikolas "Big John" - Bridgeton Tebeau, Robert A. - Florissant

Shoemaker, Bennie

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Mon., Jan. 9, 2017. Resurrection, Wednesday, Beloved husband of Martha "Marty" Kelam (nee January 11, 2017. Dear husband Speer) for 30 years; dearest father of Clair (Phil) Crannick, of Carol J. Shoemaker (nee: Robert Jr. (Jennifer), Tom (Jackie), Tim (Ellen), Jon (Vikki) and Koessel); dear father of Greg Cindy (Judd) Knight; loving grandfather and great grandfather; (Pam) Shoemaker; our dear dear brother of Leonard (Doris), Barbara (Roger) Roth, Ronald grandfather, brother, brother-in(Jackie) and Karen (Richard) Marquard; son-in-law of Bobbie law, uncle, great-uncle and Speer; brother-in-law of Curtis (Betty) Speer; dear uncle, cousin friend. and friend. Mr. Shoemaker retired from Services: Memorial visitation at Queen of All Saints Catholic the Saint Louis Fire Department Church (Christopher Rd) Tue., Jan. 17, 9am until Mass at after 30 years of service. If de9:45am. Inurnment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of sired, please make expressions of flowers, memorials to SIDS or St. Jude Children's Research sympathy in his memory to the Hospital appreciated. KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY. Backstoppers. Services: Funeral from Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Monday, January 16, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. to Kuehn, Dorothy M. St. George Catholic Church, 4980 Heege Road, 63123 for Mass (nee Mueller), Wednesday, January 11, 2017. Beloved wife of the of Christian Burial at 9:00 a.m. Interment Ashcraft, Jestene (nee Seawel) on Monday, January 9, 2017 in Alabaster, Alaba- late Raymond A. Kuehn; dear mother of Paul and James (Carol) with full military honors will follow in Jefma. Beloved wife of the late Clifford Ashcraft; beloved mother Kuehn; dear grandmother of David and Daniel (Ashleigh) Kuehn; ferson Barracks National Cemetery. Visitaour dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt and cousin. of the late Douglas Ashcraft; beloved Grandmom and tion at Hoffmeister South County on SunServices: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, day from 3-8 p.m. Please share memories Gran-Gran. Monday, January 16, 9:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Ceme- and offer condolences at Services: Visitation Monday, January 16, 10:00 a.m. at Bopp tery. Dorothy was a member of Boy Scouts of America and hoffmeistersouthcounty.com Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road in Kirkwood. Interment SunTrinity UCC. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Alzheimer's set Burial Park in Affton at 11:00 a.m. www.boppchapel.com. Association, Boy Scouts of America and Trinity UCC. Sinovich, John Nikolas "Big John" Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m. Bohrer, Stephen P. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Saturday January 7, 2O17. Loving husband of Suzanne Bohrer Wednesday, January 11, 2017. Laxton, Mary A. (nee Frahm); loving father of Joshua (Cindy) and Shannon "Sam" Beloved husband of the late LaVerne M. Sinovich (nee Bohrer; dear son of the late Alphonse "Ollie" and Elizabeth "Liz" (nee Kinnard) Sun., Jan. 8, 2017. Forys); dearest father of Susan Prentice, Mary Jane (John) Beloved wife of the late Joseph F. Laxton; dear mother of Heidger, Janice (Dirk) Dietz, Cindy (Keith) Ward, Ann Sinovich, (nee Benz) Bohrer; dear grandfather of Brianna, Zachary and Larry, Peggy, Susan, Cathy and Alice; our dear grandmother, and Therese (Mike) Leonard; dear brother of LaVerne Wolken, Griffin. Stephen was a member of the lnternational Association of great grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Mary Ann Ludvik, George Sinovich, and the late Rosemary Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel 5255 Diecutting and Diemaking. Springmeier, Frank Sinovich and Millie Weiss; our dear grandServices: Visitation will be held on Saturday January 14, 2017 Lemay Ferry Rd. Tue., Jan. 17 at 11am. Interment Park Lawn father, great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, Cemetery. Visitation Mon. 4-8pm. from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. at Hoffmeister South County cousin and friend to many. Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd. 63125. Memorial service will be Mr. Sinovich was a member of the I.B.E.W. Local 1, owner held on Saturday, 3:00 p.m. in the funeral home chapel. ln lieu operator of Big John Electric Company and a 40 year member Meyer, Nancy L. of flowers, please make donations to the American of the Kiwanis Club of Bridgeton. (nee: Haake), age 58, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Diabetes Association or to the Humane Society of Services: Funeral Monday, January 16, 9:00 a.m. from Thursday, January 12, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit Missouri. Share your condolences at COLLIER'S Funeral Home, 3400 N. Lindbergh (St. Ann) to Holy baue.com www. hoffmeistersouthcounty.com Spirit Church, 3130 Parkwood Ln., Maryland Heights, Mass 9:30 am. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Memorial contributions Reiss, Eddie may be given to the American Diabetes Association or the Bushmann, Kenneth J. December 14th, 1953 - January 10th, 2017 Kiwanis Club of Bridgeton, PO Box 638, Bridgeton, 63044. Tuesday, January 10, 2017. Beloved husband of Joan Resident of Louisville, Kentucky for last 11 years. Son of the late Visitation Sunday, 3-8 p.m. B u s h m a n n (nee L en n on ) ; dear father of Steve (Maureen) Bushmann, Diana (Erik) Ringwald and Amy Delvin and Raye Reiss; brother of Frank, the late Michael and Wasson; dear brother of Gene (Janice), Les (Cynthia), Shirley Kathy Reiss; uncle of Tammy Lynn, Jamie, Jennifer (Killoren), Tebeau, Robert A. (Bob), Judy and Pat (Clark); our dear grandfather of 8; soon to Hanna and Sarah; great-uncle of Walker Killoren; friend to 88, January 12, 2017. Visitation Saturday, January 14, 9-10:30 Theresa, Karen and Vic; nephew, cousin and friend of many. be great-grandfather, brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and a.m. with Funeral Mass to follow at 10:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart Eddie is loved by many and will be greatly missed. friend. Catholic Church, Florissant, MO. www.hutchensmortuary.com Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, January 16, 10:15 a.m. to Queen of All Rutten, Wilma E. Florists Saints Church, 6603 Christopher Rd. (63129) for 11 a.m. Mass. (nee Swerczek), Monday, Jan. 9, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Member of the Knights of John W. Rutten; dear mother of John W. (Donna) Rutten, II, Columbus. In lieu of flowers, contributions to The Gary SiDierbergs Florist James (Diana) Rutten, Michael Rutten and Tamara Runge; dear Order 24 Hours nise Foundation, P.O. Box 50008, Studio City, CA 91614grandmother of 8; dear sister of Ronald (Patricia) Swerczek and 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 5001 appreciated. Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m. Vern (Patricia) Swerczek, dear aunt and friend. Dierbergs.com Services: Visitation 2:00-5:00 p.m., Sun., Jan. 15 at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant. Procession beginning Castro, Nadyne Ann 10:00 a.m. Monday, Jan. 16 going to St. Martin dePorres Church, Jan. 5, 2017. Memorial Gathering and Service Changed to Schnucks Florist Hazelwood, for 10:30 a.m. Mass. Interment Sacred Heart CemeJan. 15 at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes 65 Metro Locations tery. Masses appreciated. South County. Details at ziegenheinfuneralhome.com 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Ferrell, Michael Steven 61, of Columbia, IL, January 11, 2017. Visitation Monday, January 16, 2017, 4:00 p.m. until funeral service at 6:00 p.m. at LAWLOR Funeral Home, Columbia, IL.

Caring Gestures From a beautiful memorial to a prepared dish or tray, every gesture is appreciated. Let us help.

schnucks.com

Session, Charles J., Sr. President and founder of Session Fixture Co., Inc. was called home by the Lord on January 9, 2017. He was an astounding man. A man of integrity, he ran his life and business according to the golden rule: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Loved and respected by all who knew him, Charlie was genuine, sincere, caring and patient. At age 18, in East St. Louis, IL, he began his business buying and s e l l i n g u s e d r e s t a u r a n t eq u ip men t a n d cu l t iva t in g relationships. As his business grew he moved to South St. Louis County at the corner of Lemay Ferry and Butler Hill. Due to his efforts, the building that houses Session Fixture Company is on the Historical Registry with St. Louis County. In 2002, he added the new building at 6044 Lemay Ferry Rd to accommodate for the growth of the company. In December 2016, the company broke ground for a new warehouse in Arnold, MO. In total, Charles Session was in business for 55 years. Session Fixture Company will continue to grow in success with his children, grandchildren and beyond because of the legacy he left behind. Loving husband of Carol Session (nee Mask); loving father of Tracie (Dave) Williams, Christen (Shawn) Marquis and the late Charles "Joe" Session and Lisa Session - Murphy; loving grandfather of Justin, David (Nikki), Samantha, Richi and Lilly; greatgrandfather of Chloe and Aubrey; dear brother of Oscar (Carolyn) and Tony (Donna) Session, Delores (the late Donald) Jackson and Blanche (the late Cecil) Randolph; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd, on Mon. Jan. 16, 9:30 for 10 am Mass at St. Simon the Apostle Catholic Church. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Jude or Paralyzed Veterans, appreciated. Visitation Sunday 3- 7 pm.

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL


WORLD

01.13.2017 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A17

St. Petersburg defends transfer of landmark to church BY IRINA TITOVA associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA • In the lat-

est scandal involving the powerful Russian Orthodox Church, authorities in St. Petersburg on Thursday defended a controversial decision to give a city landmark cathedral to the church. Museum experts and locals in Russia’s former imperial capital were rattled by the governor’s announcement this week that he was transferring St. Isaac’s Cathedral to the church. An online petition against that decision had tens of thousands of signatures by Thursday. The neoclassical church, completed in the 19th century, has been an important museum since Russia’s 1917 Bolshevik Revolution and is now the city’s third most-visited site. Some museum experts are concerned that the Orthodox Church will neglect its exhibits, which include a rare Foucault pendulum. Mikhail Mokretsov, deputy governor of Russia’s second-largest city, on Thursday vowed that the city hall will make sure that tourists get unfettered access to the site. He said the city will retain its ownership of the cathedral and will shoulder maintenance costs while the church will

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters against the transfer of St. Isaac’s Cathedral to the Russian Orthodox Church hold up the Constitution of the Russian Federation on Thursday in front of the cathedral in St. Petersburg, Russia.

get operational rights. Church spokesman Vladimir Legoyda on Thursday assured the public that visi-

tors will not even notice the difference when the church begins to operate St. Isaac’s.

French nationalism at heart of Le Pen’s presidential campaign

“Nobody is going to limit the access to the cathedral,” he told reporters. “It’s in the church’s interests to preserve museum heritage.” Although St. Isaac’s was built as an Orthodox cathedral, except for a brief period it was always owned by the government. Opposition lawmakers and activists plan to protest Friday against the decision, which they see as part of a growing trend toward social conservatism in Russia. The Russian Orthodox Church has played an active part in President Vladimir Putin’s eforts to consolidate Russian society by appealing to traditional values as opposed to Western liberalism. The church’s attempts to expand its influence have sometimes caused controversy, however. On Wednesday, a senior Orthodox cleric in Siberia, the Metropolitan of Novosibirsk, Tikhon, lashed out at the local opera and ballet theater for staging the classic Christmas ballet, “The Nutcracker,” which he insisted was based on an “occult subject.” In 2015, Tikhon protested against Wagner’s opera “Tannhauser.” Several months later the Russian culture minister fired the theater’s director and the opera was removed from the theater’s repertoire.

DIGEST

She laments ‘massive migration’ as source of woes

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Palestinians chant slogans during a demonstration Thursday against the chronic power cuts in the Jabaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip.

Thousands protest power cuts in Gaza Strip

ASSOCIATED PRESS

French National Front party presidential candidate Marine Le Pen delivers her New Year’s address to the media in Paris on Jan. 4. She seeks closer ties with Russia and wants to sever ties with the European Union.

BY ELAINE GANLEY associated Press

PARIS • France — as envisioned by far-right leader Marine Le Pen — should be its own master and have no globalization issues, European Union membership or open borders. It would join the United States and Russia in a global battle against Islamic militants. Francs, not euros, would fill the pockets of French citizens. Borders would be so secure that illegal immigration would no longer fuel fears of terrorist attacks or drain public cofers. It’s a vision that holds increasing appeal for voters once put of by the image of Le Pen’s anti-immigration National Front party as a sanctuary for racists and anti-Semites. It has made Le Pen a leading candidate in France’s presidential election this spring. A series of deadly extremist attacks, 10 percent unemployment and frustration with mainstream politics in France have helped make the party she has worked to detoxify a potentially viable alternative. Early polls place her as one of the top two contenders. The other is former Prime Minister Francois Fillon, a conservative who would slash the ranks of civil servants and trim state-funded health care — an untouchable area for Le Pen, whose campaign slogan is “In the Name of the People.” Le Pen believes her chance of victory has been bolstered by Britain’s decision to leave the European Union and by Donald Trump’s U.S. presidential victory. She speaks with confidence of winning, saying “I will” change France. “This page in the history of the world is turning. We will give back to nations reasoned protectionism, economic and cultural patriotism,” she said. On Thursday, Le Pen showed up at Trump Tower in New York and was seen sipping cofee in a basement cofee shop, leading to speculation she was looking to create a bond with the U.S. president-elect. However, no such meeting was on his agenda. Like Trump, Le Pen, 48, a mother of three and lawyer by

training, envisions improved relations with Russia, which she and other National Front oicials have visited. But she takes it further. “I want an alliance to emerge between France, the United States and Russia to fight Islamic fundamentalism, because it’s a gigantic danger weighing on our democracies,” she said last week. “Terrorism is a pistol in the hand of the guilty,” and she says only an alliance can defeat it. For Le Pen and her supporters, “massive migration,” notably from Muslim North Africa, is supplanting French civilization and is at the root of many of France’s modern woes. “On est chez nous” (“We’re in our land”) is a mantra at National Front rallies. Le Pen insists she has no problem with followers of Islam but wants people who espouse radical political ideas in the guise of religion to be put on trial and expelled before they install Sharia, or Islamic law, in France. Traditional Muslim dress, which many in France consider a gateway to radicalization, could disappear from public view should Le Pen win the presidency. The National Front’s No. 2, Florian Philippot, says Le Pen’s platform calls for extending a 2004 law banning “ostensible” religious symbols such as Muslim headscarves from French classrooms to include the streets. Le Pen took over leadership of the National Front in 2011 from her father, party co-founder Jean-Marie Le Pen. Her makeover included sidelining him. His party membership was revoked last year after he repeated an anti-Semitic reference that had drawn a court conviction. But the slogan “French First” — coined by the elder Le Pen in 1985 — remains alive under Marine Le Pen. Newcomers to France would have to spend several years paying a stipend before availing themselves of free school and health care, Le Pen has said, benefits she considers a draw for immigrants. A National Front statement this month linked a lack of shelter for French homeless with the “massive migrant flux.”

Nonna Mayer, a leading expert on the party, said Le Pen has “gone halfway in changing the party,” ridding it of its longtime anti-Semitic image but making Islam the enemy. “At the heart of the party of Marine Le Pen ... there is something which is not really compatible with the values of democracy,” she said. “It’s the idea that one must keep housing, social benefits, family stipends, employment to the French.” Le Pen emphatically rejects the label of extremist, proudly calling herself “a patriot.” The words “democracy” and “democratic” roll of her tongue. Yet her entourage includes onetime members of an extreme-right movement once noted for its violence. A former leader of the hard-core Identity Bloc in Nice, Philippe Vardon, joined National Front ranks and quickly won a councilor spot. Under Le Pen, the National Front was France’s big winner in the 2014 European Parliament election, taking more seats than any other French party. But she wants to do away with the 28-nation EU, which she claims has stolen national sovereignty, and ditch the euro currency, which she describes as a “knife in the ribs” of nations, ruining economies. Her EU exit formula is “very simple:” Try immediately to negotiate a return of borders, national currency and “economic patriotism” to protect French jobs and industry and allow the French to pass laws unadulterated by directives from Brussels. Six months later, she would call a referendum and counsel remaining in a “new Europe” if negotiations are fruitful or advise bailing out as Britain has done. “My program cannot be put into place if we remain subjugated by European diktats,” she said. “I see the grand return of nationalism.” Le Pen is expected to present her full presidential agenda during a Feb. 4-5 convention. But she set the tone with her New Year’s greeting, a “wish of combat” to defeat political adversaries that she contends represent the interests of banks, finance and the media.

Thousands of people took to the streets on Thursday to protest chronic power cuts in the Hamasruled Gaza Strip, in one of the largest unauthorized protests in the territory since the Islamic militant group took power a decade ago. Hamas has shown little tolerance for dissent, and it moved quickly to contain Thursday’s demonstration. Police ired in the air to disperse a crowd of stone-throwing protesters and blocked journalists from the area. A day earlier, Hamasrun authorities arrested a local comedian who made a viral video lamenting the power shortages during the cold winter season. Hamas forces blocked journalists from ilming Thursday’s gathering, and an Associated Press journalist was briely detained at gunpoint until he handed over his mobile phones to plainclothes security men. Venezuela jails another opposition igure • Venezuelan oicials jailed a second opposition igure Thursday as tension mounted in the economically struggling South American country. Oicials rearrested former Gen. Raul Baduel, saying he had been conspiring to overthrow the government. Baduel was once a high-ranking member of the administration of late President Hugo Chavez but later became critical of the socialist party. Baduel was freed from prison in 2015 after serving six years on corruption charges. On Wednesday, oicials arrested substitute lawmaker Gilber Caro from a hard-line opposition party on weapons charges. U.S. ends preferential policy on Cuban refugees • The Obama administration said Thursday it is ending the controversial “wet-foot, dry-foot” policy — essentially turning the clock on decades of preferential treatment for Cuban refugees — and making those who arrive without visas subject to deportation. The so-called “wet-foot” part of the policy was implemented after the 1994 rafter crisis that brought some 35,000 Cubans to U.S. shores. The change, which took efect immediately, brought to a halt the practice that gave Cubans who arrive at U.S. borders without visas automatic entry to the United States. Israeli leader slams peace conference • Israel’s prime minister said Thursday that an upcoming conference in Paris aimed at reviving peace talks with the Palestinians was “rigged” and that Israel was not bound by anything decided there.

Dozens of countries are set to attend the conference on Jan. 15, where they may endorse an international framework for peace between Israel and the Palestinians. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vehemently opposes such a move, saying it would undermine the negotiating process. Haitians remember quake victims • Many Haitians lit candles and ofered prayers Thursday to remember relatives and neighbors who died in a catastrophic earthquake that struck near the Caribbean nation’s capital seven years ago. Haiti’s government has said more than 300,000 people died in the disaster, but the exact toll is unknown because there was no systematic efort to count bodies in the chaotic days following the quake. Some 1.5 million people were displaced. Interim President Jocelerme Privert’s government announced that Jan. 12 will be a national day of “relection and awareness on the vulnerability of Haiti” when it comes to disasters and improving risks. Rights group criticizes Egypt’s record • Egypt has banned public criticism of the government, Human Rights Watch said Thursday, with hundreds of people disappearing at the hands of security forces and detainees routinely tortured. In its “World Report 2017,” the New York-based advocacy group said President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi’s government has also taken “unprecedented” steps to criminalize human rights work and cripple independent civil society groups. El-Sissi led the military’s 2013 ouster of the Islamist Mohammed Morsi, Egypt’s irst freely elected president, whose year in oice proved divisive. El-Sissi has repeatedly said that Egypt should not be judged by Western standards and that the right to education, housing and health care is just as important as freedom of expression. Poachers decapitated lions, police say • South African police say poachers have decapitated and chopped the paws of three male lions, apparently for use in traditional medicine. Police spokesman Moatshe Ngoepe said Thursday that the lions were fed poisoned meat at a game lodge in Limpopo province before they were mutilated. Police say the poachers reached the park by cutting through three fences. Staf found the carcasses Wednesday. Traditional healers in the region pay top prices for rare ingredients. From news services


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ST. LOUIS BLUES

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Baltimore reaches agreement with U.S. to reform policing BY JULIET LINDERMAN AND ERIC TUCKER Associated Press

• More than a year and a half after the Justice Department launched an investigation into discriminatory policing in Baltimore, the city’s police department on Thursday agreed to a set of sweeping, court-enforceable reforms designed to repair the systemic problems that have long plagued the department. The Justice Department agreement mandates changes in the most fundamental aspects of daily police work, including stops, searches and arrests. The consent decree marks the culmination of months of negotiations with the federal government and is meant to correct constitutional violations identified in a scathing report released last year. The filing, in the waning days of U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s tenure, is meant as a capstone moment for an administration that has made civil rights enforcement a priority and that has pursued similar agreements with other large American police forces. “Through this agreement, we are moving forward together to work to heal the tension in the relationship between the Baltimore Police Department and the community that it serves,” Lynch said at a news conference. The agreement is intended to remain in place long after Lynch leaves office, though civil liberties advocates are concerned that U.S. Sen. Jef Sessions, an Alabama Republican who’s been nominated to replace her, may not enforce consent decrees with the same vigor. “It is binding,” Lynch said in moving to address those concerns, “and it will live on past this adminisB A LT I M O R E

SABOURIN GOAL Get your Blues gear now for the season!

VISIT YOUR ST. LOUIS STORE ONLINE any time of day at

thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 A.M. - 5 P.M. The National League Hockey had been in St. Louis only two seasons, but the success of the Blues — with two West Division championships — made them the talk of the town. Garry Sabourin (11) of the Blues raises his stick in celebration as his shot sails past Los Angeles Kings goalie Gerry Desfjardins at The Arena on June 7, 1969. Photo by Gene Pospheshil of the Post-Dispatch staff.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right) on Thursday announces Baltimore’s sweeping overhaul of its practices outlined in an agreement with the Department of Justice.

tration.” A hearing will allow for public comment on the agreement before it’s approved by a federal judge. The Justice Department began investigating the Baltimore force following the April 2015 death of Freddie Gray, a young black man who was fatally injured while in the custody of officers. Its report last August found that oicers were routinely stopping large numbers of people in poor, black neighborhoods for dubious reasons and unlawfully arresting residents merely for speaking out in ways police deemed disrespectful. The death shed light on the department’s many deficiencies, including its officers’ unfair and often brutal treatment of African-Americans living in the city’s most vulnerable neighborhoods. But it also illuminated systemic failures that touched on all aspects of local government: lack of jobs, educational opportunities and decent, safe housing have long contributed to conditions for vast inequality in this city. The consent decree discourages the arrests of citizens for offenses such as loitering or littering, requiring a supervisor to sign off on any request to take

someone into custody for a minor infraction, and also mandates basic training for making stops and searches. In addition, it commands officers to use deescalation techniques, thoroughly investigate sexual assault claims and send specially trained units to distress calls involving people with mental illness. Police will not be able to stop someone just because the person is in a high-crime area, or just because the person is trying to avoid contact with an oicer, according to the document. The agreement also lays out policies for transporting prisoners, a likely acknowledgment of the death of Gray, who sufered a grievous spinal cord injury in the back of a police van. The consent decree requires officers to ensure that prisoners are protected with seat belts and to check on them periodically. Police Commissioner Kevin Davis promised his oicers that they, too, will benefit from the reforms. “I have no doubt that wh e n we eve n t u a l ly emerge from this consent decree, we will be better crime fighters and have a greater, more respectful and trustful relationship with our community.”

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NEWS

01.13.2017 • FriDay • M 1

WEATHER • Low 24, High 32• Winds ENE 5-15 mph

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A19 National Extremes High: 87° Cotulla, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: -35° Cotton, Minnesota

Freezing rain developing today Overrunning moisture along with a weak upper-level disturbance will lead to areas of sleet and freezing rain developing across the St. Louis area today into tonight. Freezing rain is expected to become rain on Saturday and Sunday as warmer air gradually moves in. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

26°

29°

31°

Mostly cloudy Chance of sleet Chance of and frz. rain freezing rain

BEDTIME

30° Chance of freezing rain

20s

31 32 20 27 22 28 19 13 23 28 16 23 31

36 34 29 31 30 32 28 27 30 32 25 31 34

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rain freezing rain freezing rain freezing rain freezing rain freezing rain freezing rain mostly cloudy freezing rain freezing rain mostly cloudy freezing rain rain

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

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18 30 12 20 22 14 28 16 17 8 20 20

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Flood Stage

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SATURDAY

SUNDAY

30°/36°

31°/40°

Freezing rain to rain

Chance of mainly rain

- 2.40 - 0.22 - 0.70 - 1.09 - 1.23 + 0.10 + 0.69 + 1.01 + 2.67 + 2.01

MONDAY

mostly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chance of showers

Kansas City 19 / 28

Joplin 28 / 32

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Jan. 12th No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 3,557 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 24 Month (Total) 395 Season 1817 1531 Year Ago Flood Stage

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 14.89 18 12.59 Peoria 14 10.04 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.90 Sullivan 16 - 2.73 Valley Park 24 6.22 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.01 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 27.53 Maps and weather data provided by:

Britain’s Prince William has comforted a young girl who lost a parent and spoken out about his feelings when his mother, Princess Diana, died two decades ago. During a visit to the charity Child Bereavement UK in London on Wednesday, William was seen speaking quietly to a 9-year-old girl, Aoife, about the loss of her father. “Do you know what happened to me? You know I lost my mummy when I was very young, too. I was 15 and my brother was 12. So we lost our mummy when we were young as well,” he told her, according to the Daily Telegraph. Lorna Ireland, a parent at the event, said William told her 12-year-old son that as a teenager, he was “very angry and found it very diicult to talk about” Diana’s death. “It was very personal, and it was very special,” she said of William’s comments. William is a royal patron to the charity, which was also supported by Diana. This year marks 20 years since Diana died in a car crash in Paris in August 1997. The Diana Award, a charity, will remember her life with events including the launch of an international award for young people. Earl Spencer, Diana’s brother, will host an exhibition at the family’s home and a fundraising event later in the year. Tanya Tucker hospitalized after fall • Tanya Tucker is postponing tour dates after fracturing a vertebrae and injuring a rib during a fall while on tour. A statement from her publicist says Tucker was also diagnosed with bronchitis while in a hospital in Texas. The statement says Tucker Tucker is receiving breathing treatments and physical therapy but will not need surgery. The “Delta Dawn” singer rescheduled three tour dates in Kansas and Oklahoma. But Tucker, 58, said in a statement that she’s “mad” the accident happened and will make it up to fans. Tucker’s hits include “Soon” and “Strong Enough to Bend.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actress Frances Sternhagen is 87. Comedian Rip Taylor is 83. Actor Charlie Brill is 79. Actor Billy Gray is 79. Actor Richard Moll is 74. Actor Kevin Anderson is 57. Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfuss is 56. Country singer Trace Adkins is 55. Actress Penelope Ann Miller is 53. Actor Patrick Dempsey is 51. Actress Traci Bingham is 49. Writer-producer Shonda Rhimes is 47. Actress Nicole Eggert is 45. Actor Orlando Bloom is 40. Actor Liam Hemsworth is 27. From news services

Current Level

24-Hr Change

+ 0.55 + 0.28 - 1.04 + 0.02 + 0.01 + 0.25 - 0.01

60s 70s

60s

70s

38°/60° 49°/55°

Ice

Slight chance of showers

Chicago 12 / 24

Kirksville 13 / 27

Very unhealthy

Prince William speaks of anger at Diana’s death 20 years ago

60s Snow

50s

TUESDAY

80s

Springfield 20 / 31

St. Louis 24 / 32 Carbondale 30 / 34 Poplar Bluff 33 / 35

SUN & MOON

Last Jan 19 Sunrise

New Jan 27

First Feb 3

Full Feb 10

7:18 AM Sunset

5:02 PM

Moonrise 6:44 PM Moonset 8:01 AM

Looking to the southeast around 9 p.m. tonight you will see six bright stars that form the Winter Circle. The stars are Capella, Pollux, Procyon, Sirius, Rigel, and Aldebaran.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

354.36 354.80 494.47 656.65 705.19 649.64 907.12 840.10 598.00 405.93 600.70 443.17

- 0.43 + 0.07 + 0.06 + 0.01 + 0.03 - 0.01 - 0.02 - 0.02 - 0.21 - 0.04 + 0.01 - 0.05

- 1.78 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Hawaii High: 86°

Jet Stream

Scattered showers are expected across portions of the southern Plains, lower Mississippi Valley, and Tennessee Valley in association with a stalled frontal boundary. Parts of the Ohio Valley, Ozarks, Missouri Valley, and south-central Plains will see freezing rain at times. A low pressure system will bring wet weather to parts of the Desert Southwest and southern California.

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PEOPLE

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Albany, N.Y. 34 Albuquerque 34 Anchorage 6 Atlanta 53 Atlantic City 47 Baltimore 47 Billings 1 Biloxi, Ms. 58 Birmingham 59 Bismarck -23 Boise 12 Boston 39 Buffalo 24 Burlington, Vt. 29 Charleston, S.C. 51 Charleston, W.V. 42 Charlotte 50 Cheyenne 13 Chicago 12 Cincinnati 29 Cleveland 23 Colorado Spgs. 15 Concord, N.H. 37 Dallas 43 Daytona Beach 61 Denver 16 Des Moines 5 58 Destin, Fl. 19 Detroit 43 El Paso 31 Evansville -25 Fairbanks -25 Fargo 27 Flagstaff 61 Fort Myers 10 Great Falls -7 Green Bay 37 Hartford 69 Honolulu 65 Houston 26 Indianapolis 60 Jackson, Ms. 35 Juneau 69 Key West 46 Las Vegas 45 Little Rock 46 Los Angeles 33 Louisville

35 57 21 71 51 52 19 71 72 14 21 41 27 32 77 44 70 37 24 39 26 39 38 47 75 36 21 74 26 72 36 -6 7 39 81 28 9 40 84 78 36 74 37 77 54 49 61 38

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Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow partly cloudy rain showers partly cloudy rain

12 40 16 51 24 30 4 54 52 -4 11 16 18 8 52 37 45 18 22 32 20 20 4 42 61 22 15 58 20 50 35 -12 -2 28 61 10 5 13 68 64 29 56 36 69 44 42 45 36

25 56 23 66 33 32 23 70 73 15 20 27 30 20 66 46 48 40 31 40 32 39 25 51 73 40 29 72 32 68 43 0 15 41 79 30 23 28 84 76 37 76 40 77 59 57 67 47

mostly cloudy windy snow mostly cloudy rain and snow rain and snow windy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain cloudy partly cloudy cloudy rain cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy mostly cloudy rain snow sunny rain mostly sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy sunny cloudy sunny showers

Today L H

City

50 Macon 69 McAllen, Tx. 45 Memphis 67 Miami 7 Milwaukee Minneapolis -11 Missoula, Mt. -7 57 Mobile Montgomery 54 47 Nashville New Orleans 62 New York City 41 Norfolk, Va. 52 Oklahoma City 28 Omaha 11 Orlando 60 Palm Springs 46 Philadelphia 44 Phoenix 52 Pittsburgh 29 Portland, Me. 36 Portland, Or. 15 Providence 40 Raleigh 52 Rapid City 4 Reno 21 Richmond, Va. 53 Sacramento 36 St. Petersburg 62 Salt Lake City 24 San Antonio 65 San Diego 50 San Francisco 42 Santa Fe 28 Savannah 51 Seattle 26 61 Shreveport -6 Sioux Falls 29 Syracuse 49 Tallahassee 62 Tampa 46 Tucson 32 Tulsa 49 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 67 22 Wichita Wilmington, De. 44 52 Yuma

75 85 52 77 21 8 9 76 77 51 75 43 56 31 24 79 60 50 66 35 38 33 45 69 25 35 57 53 74 33 77 59 54 53 78 37 76 15 30 76 78 69 33 53 77 29 50 62

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Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy freezing rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

50 68 49 67 18 1 -4 53 51 49 58 25 38 31 15 60 49 27 51 25 6 25 17 39 6 21 33 34 62 20 64 48 42 34 52 31 60 4 11 51 62 46 32 32 67 26 26 50

72 83 64 76 30 19 7 73 76 64 74 33 40 34 31 76 64 31 64 35 23 35 28 44 30 36 40 54 75 33 75 62 55 51 67 40 73 25 27 75 77 60 37 32 75 32 32 65

partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy flurries cloudy rain mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny snow mostly cloudy cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers rain rain and snow mostly cloudy freezing rain rain and snow mostly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

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H

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70 34 39 40 75 74 25 32 28 78 52 11 72 66 33 35

84 41 57 64 89 84 37 35 37 90 69 24 80 73 40 37

sunny cloudy sunny sunny showers partly cloudy mostly sunny rain and snow rain and snow showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

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Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

31 60 31 77 41 61 18 32 39 66 45 23 21 70 54 39

35 65 41 88 54 74 39 41 56 88 74 24 24 78 81 64

partly cloudy cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy rain and snow partly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny

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- 0.07 - 0.07 - 0.83 - 0.82 - 0.60

30s

30s

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MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 8.38 Jefferson City 23 5.02 21 4.52 Hermann 20 Washington 2.21 25 8.80 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 12.49 Louisiana 15 14.38 Dam 24 25 17.27 Dam 25 26 17.32 Grafton 18 15.86 M.Price, Pool 419 418.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 7.42 St Louis 30 8.55 Chester 27 11.35 Cape Girardeau 32 15.38

T-storms

20s

40s

Alaska Low: -20°

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

24-Hr Change

40s

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RIVER STAGES

Trace 0.31” 0.99” 0.31” 0.99”

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PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

50° 31° 40° 23° 70° -17° 39° 19°

30s

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ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (12:13 a.m.) Low (12:58 p.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1936) Record Low (1918) High Last Year Low Last Year

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30 34 24 32 33 28 34 28 28 21 31 31

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4-DAY FORECAST

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

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TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

Rain

30s

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Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

22 34 31 77 49 74 64 18 31 72 63 36 25 27 32 29

26 41 36 83 55 80 94 30 34 88 66 52 27 38 37 37

sunny mostly cloudy cloudy thunderstorms rain partly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers

Knitters are channelling pink power Pussyhat Project targets women who plan to attend post-inauguration protests BY LEANNE ITALIE associated Press

NEW YORK • A cozy little

cat-eared hat has captured the hearts of knitters around the world in a pink-colored show of solidarity with thousands who plan to attend women’s marches in the nation’s capital and elsewhere Jan. 21. The caps are at the center of the Pussyhat Project, thought up by Los Angeles friends and knitters Jayna Zweiman and Krista Suh in the aftermath of the November election. The two, with help from their knitting instructor, came up with the DIY project and swept social media with a call for knitters, crocheters and sewers to get busy and donate their creations to crowds expected at the Women’s March in Washington the day after President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration. So far, the project has taken in more than 60,000 handmade hats, with many more created by rogues doling them out to friends and family or planning to keep their own heads warm on the National Mall and more than 200 sister demonstrations. “We’ve been selling pink yarn like crazy,” said Angie Paulson, who works at a knitting shop, the Yarnery, in St. Paul, Minn. “We can’t keep it on the shelves.” The hats are, in part, a response to Trump’s caughton-camera remarks about grabbing women’s genitalia, using the loaded P-word. The project’s co-founders want to take back the term pussy while infusing the traditionally “feminine” color of pink with strength in support of women’s rights. Amy Nowacoski, 43, made herself a hat to wear either on the National Mall or a march in New York. She considers the hat a kind of merit badge among knitters. “It’s, ‘Yay, of course I did the pussy hat. You?’ There’s a lot of that in the knitting world,” Nowacoski said. Zweiman and Suh thought marchers in Washington — in

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Angie Paulson, who works at the Yarnery shop in St. Paul, Minn., wears one of the hats she made.

January — would need warm head gear and also might enjoy a unifying element. The two, Hillary Clinton supporters, launched the project just before Thanksgiving weekend, using social media to spread the pattern created by Kat Coyle, who owns the Little Knittery in Los Angeles. “It was just so perfect, not just because of Trump’s comments but because of the shame and emotion in the fight for women’s rights,” Zweiman said of the design. Added Suh: “What surprised me about all of this was the depth of emotion of people who are participating. People are reaching out to us, talking about how this project has lifted them out of a depression, that it’s been their way to channel their grief and anger.” Zweiman and Suh estimate that creators are making an average of about eight hats each. Some have included little notes attached to their hats before dropping them at designated locations around the country for distribution at the Washington march. Other knitters have tweaked the oicial hat pattern, coming up with their own cat-ear designs. “It’s really been just incredible,” Suh said. “The process

Santa Fe, N.M., has been knitting since she was a Brownie. She had one of the hats on her needles Tuesday. She plans to wear it as she marches in Santa Fe on the big day. “The hat is a push back at all the insults Donald Trump has made to women,” she said of why she chose to get involved. “Also, I just enjoy knitting.” Crystal Howard, 45, of New York, also made a hat. She plans to march in her city wearing her creation. “I haven’t knit or crocheted since I was probably 12,” Howard said. “More than ever, women and those who support women have to be vigilant as we are being rocked to our core. If I help to educate and inspire others to take action, then I’ve done my part.”

of making the hats and preparing for the march and really including everyone, everywhere who wants to participate but may not be able to march has been so much of this project.” The oicial pattern calls for a specific brand of worsted hand-dyed wool in fuchsia. Tobias Feder, who owns the Uruguay-based company, Malabrigo Yarn, said he has been swamped by requests for the color and about eight other shades of pink. “Our inventory on pinks was wiped out fairly fast,” he said by telephone. “We restocked as fast as we could and are now shipping some, but it is probably too late.” No worries, some knitters said. Other pinks will do. Cheryl Rofer, 73, in

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WORLD

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Hungary’s Roma struggle to keep warm BY ALEX KULI Associated Press

ALSOZSOLCA, HUNGARY • When there’s fire-

wood to be chopped, Ferenc Vadasz cuts class. It may not sound like a good reason to skip school, but the ninth-grader says a well-stocked woodpile is the only thing that keeps families from freezing in Alsozsolca, an impoverished village in northeast Hungary, during a vicious cold spell that has caused more than 70 deaths across Europe. Like thousands of other homes in the region, Ferenc’s three-room house lacks plumbing and modern heating, and fighting the cold is a daily struggle for the family, members of Hungary’s Roma minority. Ferenc and his mother chatted with the school principal outside the house this week, where a single stove provides heat for their family of five. Principal Tibor Derdak says more than 20 percent of pupils do not go to school when families need boys or young men to chop or gather wood. Derdak said when people cannot afford firewood, they venture into forests to gather trees or sticks, an ofense punishable by up to two years in prison, though police sometimes turn a blind eye. Some resort to drastic measures. Last winter,

one young man arrived at school with soaking trousers after he waded across the freezing Sajo River to collect wood, said Erika Gal, who works in the school’s administration. “He put scraps of wood between his teeth so he could bite on them to relieve the pain because he was so cold,” she said. “It was like in a World War II movie.” Poverty is a generational problem for many Roma families, Derdak said. Before communism collapsed in 1989, residents worked at local factories or mines, which closed after communism ended and the

markets collapsed. Today, many Roma, who are believed to number at least half a million in Hungary alone — work in low-paid public sector jobs, where they earn around 53,000 forints ($183) a month. Hungary’s Interior Ministry says it is providing a month’s worth of free firewood to 185,000 needy families and has published a list of heated shelters. Opposition lawmakers, however, have criticized the government for not doing more to prevent scores of cold-related deaths this winter. “Free firewood helps, but it is not enough for us to

AP

The freeze that’s keeping much of Europe in its grip is hitting hard for impoverished communities, particularly the Roma.

avoid these kinds of tragedies,” said Ildiko Major Szucs, a spokeswoman for the far-right Jobbik party. “It is embittering to know that such a situation can exist in Hungary in the 21st century.”

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RECRUITING VETERANS FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH IN OBESITY AND WEIGHT LOSS The VA St. Louis Health Care System is recruiting U.S. military Veterans for a VA sponsored research study. The study aims to improve understanding of the brain’s control of food intake and its impact on weight loss. To participate you must be between ages of 25-60years, body mass index of 30-45, and not have diabetes. Study visits include brain imaging, metabolic testing, and potential weight loss counseling. All participants will receive payment for their time commitment. For more information, please call 314-652-4100 ext 54824 or 314-289-7690. Study: Insulin Resistance and Reward Signaling in Obesity Principal Investigator: Julia P. Dunn, MD, VA Staff Physician, VA IRB # 1170634


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 01.13.2017 • B

DOWNTOWN HOTEL RIGHT ON SCHEDULE Other projects across area move ahead; some stall BY TIM BRYANT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A rendering of Hotel Indigo at the Arch

Some are moving ahead, as promised. Some have changed. A few have stalled. Among St. Louis projects in the news last year are hotel, residential and entertainment projects downtown, plus apartment and commercial projects in the Grove.

Some would transform some of the city’s historic gems, including Union Station and the Union Trust building. Others promise to add energy to already-thriving commercial districts. Here are updates on some of the projects that made headlines in 2016:

conversion in early April of the historic Union Trust building downtown as a boutique hotel and apartments. Restoration St. Louis will renovate the building at 705 Olive Street as a 136-room Autograph hotel, a Marriott brand, with apartments on the top two floors of the 14-story structure. The $55

HOTEL ST. LOUIS Final planning is underway to begin

See PROJECTS • Page B4

Rally downtown for wages Hardee’s CEO Puzder, choice for labor chief, is target of protest

Colombian startup inds support, sales in St. Louis Ecologically friendly paper plates attract Arch Grant attention DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

About 50 fast food workers gathered to protest the nomination of Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. CEO Andy Puzder on Thursday outside the current headquarters of the fast food chain in downtown St. Louis.

About 50 people protested Thursday outside of the headquarters of Hardee’s in downtown St. Louis, calling for a $15 minimum wage and blasting the nomination of the burger chain’s CEO as the next U.S. labor secretary. Organizers for Show Me 15 said the protest, which included fast food cooks and cashiers, was one of two dozen planned across the country at Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. oices, restaurants and U.S. Department of Labor branches. Both the Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. chains are owned by CKE Restaurants, which is led by president and CEO Andy Puzder, a

former St. Louis lawyer picked by President-elect Donald Trump to head the Labor Department. Hardee’s has been based in St. Louis since 2001 but is moving its corporate headquarters to Nashville, Tenn., in March. The company notified state officials this month that 24 St. Louis corporate employees who are not relocating to Nashville are being laid of. Protesters gathered at 11 a.m. outside an office building at 100 North Broadway in downtown St. Louis, where Hardee’s is based. Then they marched a couple of blocks away to a Hardee’s restaurant, which had a sign See WAGES • Page B5

> Job market heats up for fast food workers. B5

Maryland will lead Ascension Healthcare Longtime CEO Henkel is retiring BY SAMANTHA LISS • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Maryland

Robert Henkel, the longtime leader of Ascension Healthcare, is stepping down from his post this summer to retire. Patricia Maryland, chief operating oicer of Ascension Healthcare, has been promoted and will replace Henkel, efective July 1, the health system announced Thursday. Ascension Healthcare operates more than 141 hospitals and 2,500 facilities in 24 states and Washington, D.C. It’s a subsidiary of Edmundson-based Ascension, the nation’s largest Catholic and largest nonprofit health care system.

Henkel See ASCENSION • Page B5

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Puzder in November in Bedminster, N.J. Trump nominated Puzder for secretary of labor.

See NICKLAUS • Page B5

Fox Park eyes small manufacturers Plan is to provide space for companies that don’t need huge warehouse footprints BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For 100 years, hats, bar stools and restaurant booths could be traced back to the six-story factory where they were made in St. Louis’ Fox Park neighborhood. After its last commercial tenant moved out in recent years, the hum of machines no longer fills the floors built for a past era of manufacturers. The structure’s new owners, though, hope the silence will be only temporary.

Their plan to keep the old factory on Texas Avenue churning out goods and gadgets well into the 21st century? Make it a place for where viable companies are made, too. They’re calling their venture Brick City Makes, and they want to fix up the 87,000-square-foot factory as industrial office suites for a new generation of nimble manufacturers: One-machine shops that don’t need huge warehouse footprints, but may need See FOX PARK • Page B4

INDUSTRIAL ECOSYSTEM Two nonprofits are teaming up to develop a hub for young manufacturing companies in a Fox Park warehouse. 44 44

Jeferson

BY LISA BROWN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two years ago next month, Claudia Barona and Andrés Benavides moved 2,500 miles to pursue their entrepreneurial dream. A $50,000 Arch Grant brought the Colombian couple to St. Louis, a place neither had visited before entering the competition for startup funding. They knew they would face barriers of language, culture and immigration laws, but their business plan depended on expanding into the vast U.S. market. A middle-sized, centrally located city looked like a good entry point. They knew little about St. Louis except that it was in an agricultural area and that a local group was, for some reason, handing money to entrepreneurs. The agricultural connections were an advantage. Their company, Lifepack, sells paper plates that are ecologically friendly in two ways: They’re made from agricultural waste, and they contain seeds that will sprout a vegetable or flower garden when planted after use. Lifepack was invited to participate in Yield Lab, an agribusiness accelerator program in Creve Coeur. It introduced the founders to a variety of helpful people, including executives at big companies such as Anheuser-Busch and Monsanto. As for Arch Grants, the group that brought them here, Barona and Benavides quickly learned that it was about much more than money. For starters, Arch Grants engaged a lawyer for the eight-month process of getting a visa that would let them work in the U.S. Then there were the details of building a new life in an unfamiliar place: housing, a car, health insurance, a school for their

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Manufacturer incubator 2528 Texas Ave.

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BUSINESS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Monsanto inks deal with Israeli ag irm BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

An Israeli company that opened a St. Louis oice last year has inked a licensing deal with Monsanto giving the seed giant access to its algorithms for gene and trait research. NRGene, which bases its U.S. operations in Cortex’s CIC@CET building, develops data analysis tools to help plant researchers. Monsanto and NRGene on Thursday announced a multi-year, non-

exclusive license of its GenoMAGIC platform. Financial details weren’t disclosed. “Partnering with companies like Monsanto — combined with our recent achievements, including being the first to map the wheat genome — are significant milestones on our roadmap to become the worldwide leader of genomic big data solutions,” Dr. Gil Ronen, NRGene chief executive, said in a statement. A Monsanto spokesman said the platform would initially be used for research into commodity crop traits, such as corn,

soy and cotton. Paul Chomet, a former Monsanto scientist who runs the NRGene oice in St. Louis, is currently the only employee here. But he said the company plans to add three sales and customer relationship managers to its St. Louis oice this year. NRGene is one of at least four Israeli agriculture technology companies that have opened St. Louis area oices recently. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

MEDICAL RESEARCH ROUNDUP Following is a list of some of the medical research grants awarded to scientists in the area.

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The scientist • Mark Schnitzler, professor of surgery/internal medicine The grant • $247,751 from Mid-America Transplant Foundation The study • To identify and eliminate inancial barriers to increase the supply of organs available for transplantation.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The scientist • Michael S. Gafrey, assistant professor of psychiatry The grant • $3.1 million from the National Institutes of Health

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NEW 2017

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

The grant • $1.5 million from the National Institutes of Health The project • Focusing on vitamin D’s efects in the Renin Angiotensin System, which is involved in regulation of blood pressure, and whether vitamin D deiciency induces high blood pressure in a mouse model of insulin resistance and in human patients with type 2 diabetes. The scientist • Dr. Kristin Guilliams, assistant professor of neurology and pediatrics The grant • $876,000 from the National Institutes of Health The project • Using MRI to measure the brain’s supply and demand for oxygen in children with and without sickle cell disease, and studying how the brain’s oxygen use changes and if this noninvasive imaging of oxygen use can predict which children with sickle cell experience strokes. The scientist • Robert Carney, professor of psychiatry, and psychological and brain sciences The grant • $711,000 from the National Institutes of Health The project • Clinical trial of patients with depression and heart disease to determine whether taking a special formulation of omega-3 with an antidepressant will result in more improvement in depression and other cardiac risk factors than taking the antidepressant with a placebo. The scientist • Kerri Morgan, assistant professor of occupational therapy and neurology The grant • $200,000 from the Nielsen Foundation The project • People with spinal cord injuries will participate in a 12-week exercise intervention at Paraquad Health and Wellness Center or a one-hour education session about the National Council on Health, Physical Activity and Disability and then maintain their typical physical activity on their own for 12 weeks. The long-term goal is to improve outcomes of people with spinal cord injuries once they leave rehabilitation by identifying strategies to promote health and support exercise in the community.

Carlson

Martin

Shinkle

Lux

DeBarry

2 or More At This Price

PreMiuM PluS & nAvigATiOn

348

$

*

A MONTH

NEW 2017

INFINITI

2 or More At This Price

Q60

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

360

$

Biedermann Shaw

*

A MONTH

NEW 2017

INFINITI ALL WHEEL DRIVE

QX60 2 or More At This Price

460

The scientist • Jill Firszt, professor of otolaryngology, audiology and communication sciences

The scientist • Dr. Carlos BernalMizrachi, associate professor of medicine, cell biology and physiology

Groves

Q50

INFINITI

The grant • $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health

The project • This multi-center clinical trial will address the deicits of people with asymmetric hearing loss, where one ear is deaf and one ear has mild to moderate hearing loss, and explore whether cochlear implantation should be considered as a potential treatment.

Tifany Jackson has been named executive director of Room at the Inn, which provides emergency shelter for homeless women and families. Jackson, a licensed master social worker with more than 18 years of experience in the social service field, is the agency’s first Jackson executive director. Founded in 1993 and sponsored by the Sisters of Divine Providence, Room at the Inn serves about 150 people a year using a collaborative, interfaith efort of congregations and organizations throughout the region. Jackson has worked with Beyond Housing, the Haven of Grace, the Salvation Army and Redevelopment Opportunities for Women. She is also an adjunct instructor for the School of Social Work at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

ALL WHEEL DRIVE 2 or More At This Price

The scientist • Dr. Jefrey Haspel, assistant professor of medicine

The grant • $2.3 million from the National Institutes of Health

Jackson named director of Room at the Inn

A MONTH

The project • Determining whether developmental changes in brain function underlie disruptions in emotion processing and how they can be used to better predict which children will develop depression.

The project • Researchers found that a gene called bmal1, which helps to produce circadian rhythms, may also afect asthma by controlling the lung’s response to common respiratory viruses. This study will use animal models and analyze airway cells donated from asthmatic patients to ind ways to harness circadian rhythms through bmal1 to make people less prone to develop asthma and make patients with asthma less susceptible to viruses that trigger attacks.

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

$

*

A MONTH

*39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 miles available. $995 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 security deposit. For qualified buyers. See dealer for details. Offers expire 1/31/17.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

Bommarito INFINITI WEST COUNTY

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400 BommaritoINFINITI.com

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF ROLAND KLOSE JACOB BARKER LISA BROWN TIM BRYANT JIM GALLAGHER BRYCE GRAY SAMANTHA LISS DAVID NICKLAUS

Business editor Economic development Retail, consumer products and marketing Real estate and construction Personal inance and corporate afairs Energy and environment Business of health Business columnist

314-340-8128 314-340-8291 314-340-8127 314-340-8206 314-340-8390 314-340-8307 314-340-8017 314-340-8213

To e-mail a staf member, use the irst initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

New Frontier Bank named Kevin Heneghan as president, chief executive and senior lender. Dr. Tanvira Alam joined obstetrics and gynecology at the SSM Health Medical Group in O’Fallon, Mo. Ready by 21 St. Louis added Tasha Pettis Bonds as manager of community voice and leadership and Julia Brucks as manager of operations and continuous improvement. Castle Contracting hired Matthew Groves and Brian Carlson as project directors. Patricia J. Martin joined Littler as oice managing shareholder. Midas Hospitality promoted Chris Shinkle to senior director of development. Dr. Paul Lux joined the hip and knee service of Washington University Orthopedics. Geotechnology Inc. hired Steve DeBarry as chief inancial oicer. Keri Livingstone joined Bank Star as loan operations manager. BJC Medical Group hired Christine Testa, a board-certiied adult nurse practitioner, for the Heart Care Group. Dr. Gary A. Hagens was named chief medical oicer at HSHS St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. The Building Owners and Managers Association of Metropolitan St. Louis announced the following new oicers for 2017: president, Melissa Wolf, director of property management services, Newmark Grubb Zimmer; vice president, Michelle Biedermann, real estate manager, CBRE Asset Services; treasurer, Patrick Shaw, associate vice president, director of engineering and maintenance, Cushman Wakeield.

U.S. oil industry expected to boost spending, hiring BLOOMBERG

The oil industry is expected to boost spending for the first time in three years after slashing almost half a million jobs globally during the downturn, according to industry consultant Graves & Co. More than threeq u a r te rs o f t h e 440,131 oil jobs eliminated around the world through the end of 2016 came from the oilfield service providers, drilling contractors and equipment makers, said John Graves, whose Houston firm assists in oil and gas deals with audits and due diligence. He has

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oil rigs drilling in McKenzie County, N.D., in January 2015. A pickup in oil prices is leading to more rigs and the hiring of workers.

tracked announcements of layofs from all parts of the oil industry since the downturn began in the middle of 2014. Roughly a third of the cuts came in the U.S., Graves estimates. Oil companies are starting to hire

ba c k wo rke rs a s they add rigs to the shale patch in North America to take advantage of oil prices above $50 a barrel. A f te r u n p r e c edented spending cuts over the past two years, explorers are forecast to

boost capital expenditures by 7 percent this year, David Anderson, an analyst at Barclays, wrote Monday in a note to investors. The number of U.S. workers employed in the oil and gas extraction industry has increased slightly after hitting a five-year low in July, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. crude benchmark, has nearly doubled since closing at a low in February last year. Explorers in the U.S. have already added more than 100 rigs since September.

BUSINESS CALENDAR SATURDAY SMALL BUSINESS • SCORE presents this seminar on starting and managing your own business. • 8:15 a.m.-3 p.m., Fontbonne University, 6800 Wydown Boulevard, Anheuser-Busch Hall, Room 202, St. Louis • $60 preregistered, $70 at door. Register: http://conta. cc/2j2zTcX

WEDNESDAY COMPETITIVE BIDDING • The St. Louis chapter of the International Facility Management Association presents this program on the art of competitive bidding and negotiation. • 5 -7 p.m., Nestlé Purina PetCare, 801 Chouteau Avenue, St. Louis • Free to members and one guest, $35 for nonmembers. Register: http://ifmastl.org/ meetinginfo.php


MARKET WATCH

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks fell Thursday as banks slid following a slip in interest rates. The Nasdaq composite finished down for the first time in 2017. Phone company stocks and real estate companies rose as the lower bond yields made them a bit more appealing to investors.

Fiat Chrysler

10

60

8

50

6

O

N D 52-week range

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

40

J

Dow Jones industrials

19,840

Close: 19,891.00 Change: -63.28 (-0.3%)

O

N D 52-week range

15

J $65.56

16 O

N D 52-week range

$9.31

$23.64

Vol.: 27.5m (1.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $24.6 b

2,260

Close: 2,270.44 Change: -4.88 (-0.2%)

CHICAGO BOT

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 17 Jan 17 Mar 17

358.25 1032 426.25

+1 +29 +7.50

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

19,500

2,250

Feeder cattle

19,000

2,200

Live cattle

18,500

2,150

Milk

18,000

2,100

Jan 17 Feb 17 Feb 17 Jan 17 Jan 17

130.32 117.47 65.95 16.79 266.05

-1.73 -1.65 +.35 +.05 +5.95

Copper ICE

J

A

S

O

D

J

2,050

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 17

72.34 149.60 29.09

-.80 +1.90 +.09

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Feb 17 Feb 17 Feb 17 Feb 17

53.01 1.6108 167.56 3.386

Cotton Coffee

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

N

NYSE

NASD

3,398 3,504 1184 1769 81 13

1,739 1,838 944 1857 86 22

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 19929.29 9174.00 658.77 11214.58 5550.67 2271.78 1683.96 23759.68 1372.84

LOW 19770.47 9046.52 653.61 11136.19 5496.82 2254.25 1661.09 23564.41 1346.81

CLOSE 19891.00 9144.47 657.77 11204.15 5547.49 2270.44 1678.29 23738.88 1361.07

CHG. -63.28 -41.85 +0.71 -22.63 -16.16 -4.88 -8.62 -69.40 -12.23

%CHG. WK -0.32% t -0.46% s +0.11% t -0.20% t -0.29% s -0.21% s -0.51% t -0.29% t -0.89% t

MO QTR s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s t s

YTD +0.65% +1.11% -0.28% +1.33% +3.05% +1.41% +1.07% +1.34% +0.29%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod Isle of Capri LMI Aerospace Lee Ent

T 33.43 43.89 41.01 +.40 +1.0 -3.6 +25.3 16 1.96 Lowes AEGN 16.00 26.14 22.80 -.81 -3.4 -3.8 +40.0 28 ... Mallinckrodt plc DOX 50.06 61.33 58.74 +.08 +0.1 +0.8 +14.7 17 0.78 MasterCard AEE 41.50 54.08 51.96 -.24 -0.5 -1.0 +23.9 19 1.70 ARII 35.43 51.10 46.62 -.52 -1.1 +2.9 +19.6 10 1.60 McDonald’s BUD 98.28 136.08 105.94 +.79 +0.8 +0.5 -8.4 3.19e Monsanto Co ARCH 59.05 86.47 76.05 +.80 +1.1 -2.6+8939.0 ... Olin BAC 10.99 23.39 22.92 -.15 -0.7 +3.7 +52.3 18 0.30f BDC 36.51 81.33 76.82 -.69 -0.9 +2.7 +94.1 14 0.20 Panera Bread BA 102.10 160.07 158.29 -1.11 -0.7 +1.7 +25.8 21 5.68f Peak Resorts BBW 10.01 15.85 13.10 -.45 -3.3 -4.7 +24.7 20 ... Perficient CAL 21.27 36.61 31.11 -.32 -1.0 -5.2 +32.1 16 0.28 CASS 45.05 74.83 68.42 -1.78 -2.5 -7.0 +39.6 32 0.92f Post Holdings CNC 47.36 75.57 62.71 +1.03 +1.7 +11.0 +1.4 15 ... ReinsGrp CHTR 214.06 300.15 297.19 -2.35 -0.8 +3.2 +54.2 ... Reliv C 34.52 61.63 59.23 -.73 -1.2 -0.3 +28.9 16 0.64 CBSH 35.66 59.22 57.28 -.89 -1.5 -0.9 +56.1 22 0.90b Spire Inc EPC 67.94 88.00 75.60 +.16 +0.2 +3.6 +2.8 29 ... Stifel Financial EMR 41.25 58.28 57.47 -.10 -0.2 +3.1 +35.8 22 1.92f Supervalu Inc. ENR 28.86 53.41 48.28 +.20 +0.4 +8.2 +56.4 22 1.10f Target Corp. EFSC 25.01 43.65 40.15 -.65 -1.6 -6.6 +50.3 19 0.44 ESE 31.50 58.75 57.35 -.70 -1.2 +1.2 +77.7 28 0.32 UPS B ESRX 64.46 86.74 71.86 -.23 -0.3 +4.5 -16.1 15 ... US Bancorp FELP 1.07 8.33 7.00 -.21 -2.9 +8.2+241.7 dd 0.68m US Steel FF 9.77 16.58 13.41 -.38 -2.8 -3.5 +37.0 9 0.24a GM 26.69 38.16 37.51 -.44 -1.2 +7.7 +30.5 6 1.52 Verizon HD 109.62 139.00 135.07 -.63 -0.5 +0.7 +10.1 22 2.76 WalMart HBP 3.01 7.00 6.42 -.23 -3.5 -2.9 +99.7 5 ... Walgreen Boots ISLE 10.62 25.05 24.21 -.38 -1.5 -1.9 +83.2 15 ... LMIA 7.01 10.21 9.11 -.10 -1.1 +5.7 -5.3 dd ... Wells Fargo LEE 1.15 3.92 3.10 -.05 -1.6 +6.9 +93.3 9 ... World Point Term.

62.62

83.65 71.58 +.32 +0.4

+0.6

48.61

85.83 51.62 +1.18 +2.3

+3.6 -22.6

MA

78.52 108.93 108.71 +.90 +0.8

+5.3 +19.9 32 0.88f

MCD

110.33 131.96 122.10 +1.22 +1.0

+0.3 +6.7 23 3.76f

MON

83.73 114.26 107.33 -1.12 -1.0

OLN

12.29

-0.2 19

Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

+2.0 +19.9 22

2.16

+5.1 +70.4 38

0.80

PNRA 178.99 224.15 213.82 -1.04 -0.5

+4.3 +15.0 36

27.98 26.91

5.55

-.15 -2.6

14.15

22.66 17.58

50.93

SKIS

2.60

PRFT POST

6.01

PreciousMetals CHG

CLOSE

1198.90 16.78 980.90

Gold Silver

+3.30 ... +8.70

3.84

...

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.51 .59 .80 1.18 1.86 2.36 2.96

... ... ... -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 ...

.22 .45 .59 1.03 1.52 2.09 2.88

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

-.10 -0.6

+0.5 +7.0 22

...

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.54 -0.04

...

89.00 83.68 +1.58 +1.9

+4.1 +43.2 75

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.61

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.57 -0.01 2.46

4.31

-.03 -0.7

-0.8 +52.4 13 1.64f -7.1

-4.2

57.92

71.21 64.60

-.05 -0.1

+0.1 +12.0 19 2.10f

SF

25.00

52.88 49.84

-.74 -1.5

-0.2 +39.5 20

...

4.23

-.20 -4.5

-9.4 -25.4

...

6.17

SVU

3.94

TGT

65.50

84.14 71.25

-.36 -0.5

-1.4 +2.1 12

2.40

UPS

87.30 120.44 113.91

-.27 -0.2

-0.6 +28.0 20

3.12

USB

37.07

52.68 51.43

-.36 -0.7

+0.1 +32.6 16 1.12f

39.14 32.82 -2.38 -6.8

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

...

SR

6.15

LAST

0.55

55.37

...

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.36 percent on Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

-2.2 dd

76.96 129.28 124.81 +.53 +0.4

7

-0.6+419.1 dd

0.20

VZ

43.79

56.95 52.68 +.22 +0.4

-1.3 +21.4 15 2.31f

WMT

60.20

75.19 67.97

-.56 -0.8

-1.7 +9.8 15 2.00f

WBA

71.50

88.00 83.92

-.51 -0.6

+1.4 +6.0 18

1.50

WFC

43.55

58.02 54.50

-.30 -0.5

-1.1 +12.4 13

1.52

WPT

11.80

17.65 16.37

-.06 -0.4

-1.1 +34.4 16

1.20

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

.63 .38 .38

3.75 3.50 3.50

...

Barclays US High Yield 5.84 +0.01 9.01 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.84 -0.03 3.92

Barclays US Corp

3.33

10-Yr. TIPS

... 3.58

.37 -0.01

.66

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2270.44 11521.04 7292.37 22829.02 4863.97 46060.98 19134.70 63953.93 15418.16 8375.02

CHG

CHG

YTD

-4.88 -125.13 +1.88 -106.33 -24.74 +127.33 -229.97 +1507.67 -73.38 -54.20

-0.21% -1.07% +0.03% -0.46% -0.51% +0.28% -1.19% +2.41% -0.47% -0.64%

+1.41% +0.35% +2.09% +3.77% +0.03% +0.92% +0.11% +6.19% +0.85% +1.89%

BommaritoAUDI WEST COUNTY 636-391-7228

2017 Audi A3

www.audiwestcounty.com

2017 Audi Q3

quattro

326

.0630 .7446 .3134 1.2208 .7594 .1444 1.0576 .0147 .2608 .008663 .045632 .0168 .0726 .000841 .9852

Missouri's #1 Automotive Group - There Can Only Be One #1

Manchester Road East Of Clarkson

$

PREV

.0632 .7494 .3149 1.2163 .7619 .1449 1.0626 .0147 .2614 .008724 .045897 .0168 .0742 .000851 .9899

NEW YORK

...

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUDI RETAILER

+.76 +.0179 +2.32 +.162

1.40

-.44 -1.6

X

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

MNK

RGA

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

LOW

RELV

$17.38

Interestrates Interestrates 52-WK LO HI

J

Vol.: 10.0m (4.0x avg.) PE: 14.5 Mkt. Cap: $1.41 b Yield: 0.6%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

N D 52-week range

ExchangeRates

DATE

2,300

Hogs

O

$9.04

PE: ... Yield: ...

20,000

17,500

14

J

Futures

S&P 500

KBH

Close: $16.65 0.05 or 0.3% The homebuilder reported solid quarterly results, but its profit margins fell and its forecasts disappointed investors. $18

$25

Vol.: 16.8m (4.0x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $18.63 b Yield: 1.7%

2,320

2,200

10 DAYS

KB Home

MU

Close: $22.31 -0.48 or -2.1% Chipmakers and technology companies took some of the largest losses on the market Thursday.

20

$32.41

$11.32

Vol.: 95.6m (7.8x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $15.2 b Yield: 0.1%

20,000

Micron Technology

HES

Close: $58.85 -2.99 or -4.8% The energy company will take a $3.8 billion charge in the fourth quarter and will spend more on exploration and production in 2017. $70

Close: $9.95 -1.14 or -10.3% Federal regulators accused the company of installing an illegal device in some of its vehicles to cheat government emissions tests. $12

$5.45

19,680

Hess

FCAU

quattro

368

$

$0

DOWN

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

$0

DOWN

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

2017 Audi Q5

399

$

$0

DOWN

PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS*

*36 month closed end lease, 10,000 miles per year, more miles available. Audi A3, Q3 and Q5 include loyalty or acquisition program incentive. $0 cash down on A3, Q3 and Q5. Taxes, title, license and fees not included. Offers expire 1/31/17

BUSINESS DIGEST Air bag recall keeps growing • Ford Motor Co. on Thursday added more than 816,000 vehicles in North America to the growing Takata air bag inlator recall. Ford’s latest callback covers the 2005-2009 and 2012 Mustang and the 2006-2009 and 2012 Ford Fusion, Lincoln Zephyr and Lincoln MKZ. Also included are the 20072009 Ford Ranger and Edge, the 2007-2009 Lincoln MKX, the 20062009 Mercury Milan and the 2005 and 2006 Ford GT. The Takata recall is the nation’s largest ever, afecting 17 automakers in the U.S. Just Tuesday, Honda Motor Co. added 772,000 more Honda and Acura vehicles to its Takata air bag recall. Among models recalled are the 2005-2006 Acura MDX, 20052012 Acura RL, 2008-2012 Honda Accord, 2006-2011 Honda Civic, 2007-2012 Honda Fit and 2010-2012 Honda Insight. To see if their vehicles are part of the recall, owners can go to nhtsa.gov/recalls and enter their 17-digit vehicle identiication number. In a related development Thursday, Takata was close to reaching a $1 billion settlement with the Justice Department over its handling of defective air bags, several news services reported, citing unnamed sources. U.S. property foreclosures at 10-year low in 2016 • Foreclosure proceedings afected nearly a million U.S. homes and other real estate last year, down 14 percent from 2015 and down 70 percent from the worst of the housing crisis in 2009, a report released Thursday showed. Altogether in the United States last year, about 379,000 owners lost their property to banks under

foreclosure, down from 1.05 million in 2009 at the height of the mortgage and housing crisis, according to the report by ATTOM Data Solutions, formerly called RealtyTrac. Another 479,000 properties were under the early stages of foreclosure, which do not always lead to repossession. That is down from a peak of 2.14 million in the early stages in 2009. Mortgage rates slide again • Longterm U.S. mortgage rates fell this week, the second week of declines after snapping a nine-week run of increases. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the rate on 30-year ixed-rate loans eased to an average 4.12 percent from 4.20 percent last week. That was still sharply higher than a 30-year rate that averaged 3.65 percent for all of 2016, the lowest level recorded from records going back to 1971. A year ago, the benchmark rate stood at 3.92 percent. The average for a 15-year mortgage declined to 3.37 percent from 3.44 percent last week. Lowe’s to reorganize stores, shrink workforce • Lowe’s Cos. Inc., the No. 2 U.S. home improvement chain, is expected to cut “less than 1 percent” of its workforce in the near future, CNBC reported on Thursday. The company is also said to change its store staing model and reshule the roles and responsibilities of some of its staf, CNBC reported. Lowe’s had about 180,000 full-time and 90,000 part-time employees as of Jan. 29, 2016. The company was not immediately available for comment.

CVS ofers cheaper alternative to EpiPen • CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan’s EpiPen at about a sixth of the price, months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to consumers. The drugstore chain says it will charge $109.99 for a two-pack of the authorized generic version of Adrenaclick, a lesser-known treatment compared to EpiPen, which can cost more than $600. CVS Health Corp., the nation’s second-largest drugstore chain, says it cut the price it charges for the generic version of Adrenaclick nearly in half. The lower price is available at all CVS stores. The chain runs about 9,600 retail pharmacies in the U.S., including several inside Target stores. U.S. weekly jobless claims rise less than expected • The number of Americans iling for unemployment beneits rose less than expected last week and the underlying trend remained consistent with a tightening labor market that is starting to spur faster wage growth. Initial claims for state unemployment beneits increased 10,000 to a seasonally adjusted 247,000 for the week ended Jan. 7, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Claims for the prior week were revised to show 2,000 more applications received than previously reported. Last week’s data included the New Year holiday. Claims tend to be volatile around this time of the year because of diferent timings of the various holidays. Claims have luctuated in a 233,000-275,000 range since mid-November. From news services

Wall Street falls before earnings and on U.S. policy uncertainty REUTERS

NEW YORK • The three ma-

jor U.S. stock indexes closed lower on Thursday as investors waited for fourth-quarter corporate earnings and details of President-elect Donald Trump’s economic policy eight days ahead of his inauguration. While stocks pared losses as the session wore on, all but four of the S&P 500’s 11 sectors ended lower, with financials leading the decline a day ahead of the first major earnings reports in that sector. The S&P had risen 6.4 percent since the Nov. 8 election. Trump on Wednesday dashed investor hopes for new details on his policy plans in his first news conference since the election, instead lashing out at U.S. spy agencies and media companies for what he called a “phony” Russia dossier and repeated promises to reform health care policies. On top of policy uncertainty, the market is missing stock buyback support in the quiet period ahead of earnings and individuals are putting more money into bonds than stocks, according to Jeffrey Kleintop, chief global investment strategist at Charles Schwab in Boston. “Companies can’t buy shares, and individuals all of a sudden stopped buying since

the election. That could be the reason we’re seeing a little bit of a gap down today,” said Kleintop, but the dip could be temporary if earnings beat expectations. Kleintop cited Investment Company Institute’s data on Wednesday showing the biggest cash flows to bond funds from stock funds since the election. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 63.28 points, or 0.32 percent, to close at 19,891. The S&P 500 dropped 4.88 points, or 0.21 percent, to 2,270.44. The Nasdaq Composite dipped 16.16 points, or 0.29 percent, to 5,547.49. The S&P had fallen as much as 0.9 percent earlier in the session, and its financial index finished off 0.74 percent, as yields on long-dated bonds fell. Brad McMillan, chief investment oicer for Commonwealth Financial in Waltham, Mass., said the stock market’s continued proximity to its postelection peak was a positive sign. “The fact we’re still bouncing along the ceiling means to me that everybody’s still pretty optimistic,” said McMillan. “The population is confident. They’re willing to spend and they’re making more money and able to spend. That’s good news,” he said.


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Peabody secures funds to exit Chapter 11 $1.5 billion from group of banks will cover secured lenders, provide ‘irm foundation’ REUTERS

Peabody Energy Corp. said on Thursday that a group of banks, including ailiates of Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, has pledged a combined $1.5 billion in loans to help the coal producer exit bankruptcy in the coming months. The cash will be used to

cover claims by Peabody’s secured lenders and provide “a strong foundation” for its capital structure when it emerges from the roughly $8 billion Chapter 11 bankruptcy it filed last April, according to court documents. Affiliates of Credit Suisse AG and Macquarie Group Ltd. are also part of the group that has signed on to the new fi-

nancing. Peabody, with 6.3 billion tons of proven and probable coal reserves, joined other U.S. coal producers in bankruptcy last year when falling prices left it unable to service billions of dollars in debt taken on to finance expansion in Australia. The St. Louis company expects to exit Chapter 11 in the second quarter of this year with

Tenants are expected to outgrow Fox Park facilities

a plan, supported by most of its creditors, to cut more than $5 billion of debt and raise new capital through a $750 million private placement and a $750 million rights ofering. Peabody has not yet explained how it will guarantee about $1 billion in future mine cleanup costs previously covered by “self-bonding,” a federal program that exempt large miners

Downtown hotel on schedule PROJECTS • FROM B1

FOX PARK • FROM B1

room to grow, can sign up for space in the building while they find their footing in the marketplace. And while there, young companies can plug into a network of other manufacturers and design professionals, both within the building and throughout the region’s industrial ecosystem. “This kind of fulfills a unique role,” said Tom Pickel, executive director of the DeSales Community Housing Corporation. “There really hasn’t been that kind of focus on the manufacturing sector.” Rehabbing a building as an industrial incubator is a new venture for DeSales, a nonprofit community development corporation that has mostly stuck to housing rehabs and rental management as a way to improve the Fox Park and Tower Grove East neighborhoods where it operates. “We’re a residential organization, but we just didn’t think it was the right strategy for the building,” Pickel said. Retired St. Louis Economic Development Partnership CEO Denny Coleman has discussed the plan with Pickel. Not only was Coleman head of regional economic development agencies for decades, he’s familiar with the neighborhood. He grew up across the street from the Brick City Makes building, and he was the first director of the DeSales community development organization back in the ’70s. “This incubator, I think, fits very well into that strategy of calling attention to the fact that we have a very strong history and legacy in terms of manufacturing,” Coleman said. DeSales is teaming with Marc Bowers of St. Louis Makes, a local manufacturing trade group that will offer training programs in business and design along with networking events. Through St. Louis Makes, companies in Brick City can connect with others throughout the region, Bowers said, hopefully helping them find businesses with the specialized equipment or design expertise they need. Bowers pointed out that the location is just minutes from the Cortex technology district, where Tech Shop recently opened a lab where entrepreneurs can rent access to top-notch design software, 3-D printers and other specialized equipment. In the other direction, the downtown startup scene and the professional services based there are just a fiveminute drive away. “We’re still part of the innovation community,” Bowers said. “We’re just building a new beachhead.” But, he was emphatic that companies will have to be somewhat mature before they rent space in the building, and they will have

to provide their own equipment. “This is not an incubator; this is not an accelerator,” Bowers said. It is meant to be affordable, though. Pickel said starting rent for the smallest suite of about 1,300 square feet would be about $1,000 a month. In all, 37 spaces that are as large as 2,500 square feet could be built out within the building. As they grow, companies can lease extra space but will hopefully grow large enough to move out. “Do they stay there for the rest of their lives? We hope not,” Bowers said. Pickel is still putting together the financing for the $11 million project, but he said the group is already meeting with interested companies. Meanwhile, he has applied for New Markets Tax Credits and is scouting out other programs to help build the financing package. St. Louis’ economic development arm, the St. Louis Development Corp., was awarded $75 million in the federal credits late last year and has fairly broad discretion about what ventures get funding. “This really ought to be in the sweet spot for an organization like the St. Louis Development Corp.,” Pickel said. If all goes well, Brick City Makes could begin construction in the coming months and open spaces for tenants by the beginning of next year. Other cities have incubatorlike concepts for manufacturers. There’s Industrial Council of Nearwest Chicago and in Cleveland, there’s WIRE-Net. Bowers and Pickel visited Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., for instance, to get a sense of how that organization operates. But in Brooklyn, the goal is more about preserving afordable production space, a problem St. Louis doesn’t have. And overall, there hasn’t been too much attention paid to this type of economic development around the country, said Todd Swanstrom, who studies urban policy at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. “It’s been on the side of urban economies, not at the center of urban economies,” he said. That said, manufacturing in urban economies “is real,” and more and more it includes smaller, niche producers rather than the heavy industry of the 20th century, he said. In that sense, it’s a good experiment for a nonprofit community development organization like DeSales to take on. “Hopefully, a facility like this is more than the sum of its parts,” Swanstrom said. “Hopefully the companies working in this facility talk to each other and generate new ideas.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

million project will include a rooftop bar, a ballroom and a valet parking drop-of area on what is now a parking lot on the building’s north side. Hotel and apartment parking will be in the city-owned garage across Olive from the Union Trust. Restoration St. Louis has a deal with the city to lease about 200 parking spots. The developer plans to bring back elements of the Union Trust, designed by famed Chicago architect Louis Sullivan. Amy Gill, Restoration St. Louis’ chief executive, said the company is piecing together surviving bits of the original arched entry with the goal of replicating Sullivan’s design. “It’s like doing a giant puzzle and seeing if we can make all the pieces fit,” she said. Two long-gone Sullivan elements — exterior gargoyles and large round second-floor windows — will not return. But enough original crown molding has been found to restore the 1893 building’s elevator lobbies, Gill said. Gill said she is eager to begin Hotel St. Louis construction, which will take a year. “Financing is done, and we’re rocking and rolling,” she said.

HOTEL INDIGO Interior demolition began weeks ago at the LaSalle building, which will be Hotel Indigo at the Arch when it opens by the middle of 2018. ViaNova Development, of Chattanooga, Tenn., is doing the $11 million project, which encompasses the LaSalle, at 501 Olive, and the adjoining Paradowski building at 303 North Broadway. Neil Kapadia, a ViaNova principal, said the LaSalle should be “cleared out” in February. “From there, it’s full speed ahead … and beginning construction,” he said. Financing, including 10 years of tax abatement from the city, is complete, Kapadia said. Hotel plans include a ground-floor restaurant and a rooftop bar on the 13-story LaSalle portion of the project.

FORMER MERCANTILE LIBRARY Except for the Hotel Indigo site, developer Brian Hayden owns the block bounded by North Broadway and Olive, Sixth and Locust streets. The block includes the Millennium Center, the former Mercantile Library and other buildings of five or six floors. Hayden already has rehabbed the Millennium Center as a mixture of oices and apartments. In August, he

described for the Post-Dispatch his intention to redo the other buildings on the block as apartments with parking at their front doors. Ramps inside the now-vacant buildings would let residents to drive to their apartments on what, in effect, would be indoor streets. The interior ramps would have to be constructed. Hayden said each floor could have features to signify a theme — rocks to simulate a desert and fake snow to set a winter scene — for examples. He said the apartments could be ready in 2018. A city building permit issued Dec. 13 outlines a $327,000 project that indicates construction of parking on several floors. Efforts this week to reach Hayden for comment were unsuccessful.

UNION STATION Its owner, Lodging Hospitality Management, remains a few weeks from picking the operator of the $45 million aquarium planned for a summer 2018 opening. Steve O’Loughlin, LHM’s president, said the plan has gone through “a lot of iterations” but still includes a large shark tank and other features disclosed when the company announced the project in August. LHM is still discussing the aquarium project with potential operators, he said. “We just have to pick a horse and we’ll get going,” O’Loughlin said. “We’re close.” Other Union Station plans announced in August remain on schedule. Work will begin by the end of January on an additional 30,000 square feet of meeting space and construction of 28 hotel rooms — down from the previously announced 32 — in the station’s clock tower. Both projects should be completed in June, O’Loughlin said. Already done are a fire-andlight show and boardwalk at the small lake beneath the station’s train shed. Union Station opened in 1894 and for decades was among the nation’s busiest passenger rail terminals. It closed in 1978 when Amtrak relocated its St. Louis station. LHM bought the station in 2012. O’Loughlin said LHM’s plan still includes a 200-foot-tall observation wheel announced two years ago. The wheel, planned for part of what is now a parking lot, will be next to the train shed and an area of food-and-drink outlets in remodeled shipping containers. O’Loughlin said those projects will open at about the same time as the aquarium.

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS Highlights from our real estate and development blog. STLtoday.com/buildingblocks New owners plan rehab of Bouras Mop building • The new owners of a 100-year-old factory on the edge of the Lafayette Square neighborhood plan to rehab the structure into 50 apartments. The Bouras Mop Co. building at 1322 Dolman Street won rezoning from St. Louis Planning Commission last week to accommodate the $10 million project. Earlier eforts to redevelop the vacant structure near the corner of Park Avenue and Truman Parkway were unsuccessful. Developers who bought it almost ive years ago had planned a similar project that never materialized. The new project includes no groundloor commercial space, according to the city planning report, but planners note that the “unusual coniguration” of ground-loor windows may make street-level commercial diicult. In

any case, planners supported the project because of the potential to add another 50 households to a longunused building. Also included are 63 parking spaces on a lot behind the building. Proposing the latest rehab is an entity called Vinson ONE LLC, which acquired the building in September from Nick and Sophia Karakas. Documents submitted to the city say Victor Alston is the property’s owner. He and others ailiated with the latest project appear to be ailiated with Asprient Properties, which has rehabbed a number of buildings into apartments in recent years. Asprient was behind the Soulard IceHouse project and Park Lux in the DeBaliviere Place neighborhood. Alston has identiied himself as an owner of Asprient, whose principals have been tight-lipped about future plans in the past. Also listed as part of the mop factory ownership group is Anshul Sathyan, who said he was a project manager at Asprient Properties on his LinkedIn page.

from setting aside cash or collateral to ensure mined land is returned to its natural setting, as required by law. The practice came under scrutiny following Chapter 11 filings by U.S. coal producers that held a total of $3.6 billion in self-bonds as of July, raising concerns that taxpayers could some day be stuck with the cost of cleaning up mined land.

4101 MANCHESTER Spencer Development’s plan to build a seven-story building of apartments, stores and oices on a city-owned parking lot in the Grove moved ahead Tuesday when an aldermanic committee approved the project for 10 years of tax abatement. Stores, 30 apartments and oices with an outdoor terrace are part of the $6.25 million project to construct a glassand-concrete building at 4101 Manchester Avenue. Sale of the site to Spencer could occur this month.

LIBERTY BELL OIL CO. BUILDING Plans appear to be on hold for a food truck park next to the vacant building at 1430 South Vandeventer Avenue, also in the Grove. Efforts to reach the developer were unsuccessful. A neighborhood oicial said the project might proceed with a new primary tenant in addition to the food truck park. Paramount Property Development, which owns the Liberty Bell building, has proposed food truck parking on the site with a joint commissary in the building.

SENN BIERWERKS The University City development advanced Monday when the City Council approved the site plan for the project at Olive Boulevard and North and South Road. Proposed are a brewery, tasting room and restaurant that would boost a branding program University City officials call Olive Link. It’s an effort to bring more business and activity to the street’s fourmile stretch between Interstate 170 and Skinker Boulevard, in St. Louis.

APOGEE OFFICE BUILDING The project in Clayton is stalled. A Crest Management ailiate, developer of the proposed 14-story building, had hoped to begin construction last year. In June, the owner of an adjacent office building expressed opposition to Apogee’s size and proposed parking requirement. Crest Management wants to build the tower at 8125 Forsyth Boulevard and use the existing parking garage adjoining the site. Jared Novelly, head of Crest Management, declined last week to discuss Apogee details but said the project is “at the back of the line” for consideration by Clayton’s Architectural Review Board. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com @tbry51 on Twitter

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE NOTES Emails and calls to Asprient principals weren’t returned. (01.10) Landscaper moving to Overland from Creve Coeur • Quiet Village Landscaping, which specializes in native plants, will move from space it leases in Creve Coeur to property it bought in Overland. The move to 9810 Page Avenue from 11135 Olive Boulevard will be done by the end of February. Hilliker Corp., which handled the deal for the previous owner of the Overland site, said Quiet Village paid $545,000 for the property through its Current Investments LLC, represented by Savoy Properties. Founded in 2001 by Dennis Evans, Quiet Village has 40 full-time employees and focuses on native plants to promote conservation. He said in a statement the new location will provide room for the company’s landscape designers and storage of heavy equipment and lawn equipment. (01.12)

L3 Corp. represented parties in these transactions: • At Home Stores LLC in the lease of 102,973 square feet of retail space at Manchester Meadows, Manchester, from RPAI Town and Country Manchester LLC. • Kay Jewelers in the lease of 2,000 square feet of retail space at 1702 Homer Adams Parkway, Alton, from MKSK Holdings I LLC. • Ollie Properties LLC in the purchase of 8,000 square feet of retail space at 3304 Nameoki Road, Granite City, from PTR Holdings LLC. Pace Properties represented: • Farm & Home in the lease of 67,355 square feet of retail space at 5991 Mid Rivers Mall Drive, Cottleville, from MidRivers Investment Group LP, represented by CBRE. • Dick’s Sporting Goods in the lease of 45,085 square feet of retail space at Fairview City Centre, Fairview Heights, from Kimco Realty Corp. • McAlister’s Deli in the purchase of the 5,128-square-foot retail building at 2180 North Highway 67, Florissant, from Noles Properties. • MOD Pizza in the lease of 2,804 square feet of retail space at Dorsett Village, Maryland Heights, from USR-Desco Dorsett Village LLC, represented by Desco Group. Sansone Group represented 1795 Clarkson Leasing LLC in the lease of 6,570 square feet of oice space at 1795 Clarkson Road, Chesterield, to Fidelity Associates LLLP. Send items to bizrealestate@post-dispatch.com.


01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

BUSINESS

Ascension has 2,500 facilities

Colombian couple ind support, sales here

ASCENSION • FROM B1

Henkel has served Ascension since its formation in 1999. In 2004, Henkel was tapped to serve as chief operating oicer of Ascension Health. In 2012, Ascension became the parent organization, led by Tony Tersigni, and Henkel assumed the position of CEO of Ascension health care division. “Bob Henkel has been one of the most influential and important leaders of Ascension and the entire health care industry,” Tony Tersigni, CEO of Ascension, said in a statement. Ascension’s board chair, Rev. Dennis Holtschneider, is stepping down from the board to take on a new leadership role within the organization. Holtschneider will join Ascension as executive vice president and will have oversight of Ascension’s subsidiaries Ascension Information Services and Ascension Ministry Center. He also will oversee Ascension’s strategy and advocacy work.

Holtschneider is currently president of DePaul University in Chicago. He previously announced his intention to step down at the end of the 2016-2017 school year. Maryland, who will succeed Henkel, was first appointed to chief operating officer of Ascension Healthcare in 2013. Prior to that she served as the chief executive of Ascension’s operations in Michigan, overseeing St. John Providence Health System in Warren, Mich. Prior to her time within Ascension she served as a president of St. Vincent Indianapolis Hospital and chief operating officer of St. Vincent Health. Her extensive background includes 15 years at the famed Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Maryland has a bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics from Alabama State University and a master’s degree in biostatistics from University of California, Berkeley. She also holds a doctorate in public health from the University of Pittsburgh.

NICKLAUS • FROM B1

daughter and much more. “These people picked us up at the airport and they had a house with furniture all arranged,” Barona recalls. “The Arch Grants people still help us all the time.” The business connections also have been helpful. Lifepack’s products are available at the Missouri Botanical Garden gift shop and various farmers’ markets. The company sold about $150,000 worth of goods last year in Colombia and the U.S. So far, all the plates are produced in Colombia. Barona said she has turned down restaurants that wanted to buy the products, simply because Lifepack doesn’t have enough production capacity. The couple plan to launch a Kickstarter campaign this spring to raise enough money, perhaps $20,000, to start

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

small-scale production in St. Louis. They employ single mothers in Colombia and hope to do similar socially conscious hiring here, perhaps providing jobs for disabled people or veterans. Later, they’d like to expand into consumer-products packaging, which is what the conversations with A-B and Monsanto were about. Imagine, for example, being able to plant a beer carton in your yard and grow milkweed that would attract monarch butterflies. Benavides says the packaging business may start in Europe, because he’s found a Swedish manufacturer that will do an initial production run. That would make Lifepack a three-continent company, something few fiveyear-old startups would attempt. Meanwhile, he and Barona

Protesters want $15 minimum wage

want to develop a mobile app for consumers to track where Lifepack plates have been planted and post photos of the resulting plants. It’s a lot of initiatives for a two-person company. “We are a young company, but we are also kind of a difficult business,” Benavides admits. Their mentors here don’t think so. “They have done lot to make a commitment to St. Louis,” says Ben Burke, Arch Grants’ director of entrepreneurship. “We want them to stay here.” “They’ve had some sales traction, which is great,” adds Matt Plummer, a Yield Lab principal. “I think the St. Louis community overwhelmingly supports this international company trying to expand in the U.S.” David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Job market heats up for fast food workers BY LESLIE PATTON • Bloomberg

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

DeMont Draggs (left) and Jermaine White (right) protest the nomination of Hardee’s CEO Andy Puzder with about 50 fast food workers on Thursday outside the current headquarters in downtown St. Louis.

WAGES • FROM B1

saying it was temporarily closed. Some protesters carried signs that said “Andy Puzder is paid more in a day than his workers make in a year.” Another sign said “Workers against Puzder.” Fast food workers across the country, organized by the group Fight for $15, have held protests for several years seeking to raise the hourly minimum wage to $15. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour and Missouri’s minimum rose by a nickel to $7.70 an hour on Jan. 1. “I feel like we should get paid more,” said Terrence Dixon, 32, a cook at a Hardee’s in Bridgeton who makes $8.50 an hour. Dixon, who marched at the rally and spoke in favor of a higher minimum wage, said he has five children and can’t support them on his wages. “With $15 an hour, it could help me take care of my responsibilities and make my kids be successful in life,” he said. Frances Holmes, 54, who works at McDonald’s in Webster Groves as a cashier and cook, also spoke out against Puzder at the rally. She said it’s no longer the case that mostly high school-aged students staf fast food restaurants for extra spending

money. “There are parents and grandparents working there, and we work hard,” Holmes said. “It’s no longer just a kids’ job. I support a $15 minimum wage because it would make lives for low-wage workers so much better.” Puzder has been a critic of raising the federal minimum wage. On his blog last year, andy.puzder.com, Puzder said dramatically raising the minimum wage would lead to fewer job opportunities for youths. Puzder’s comments on the use of robots in the workplace have also drawn ire. In a Business Insider article last year, Puzder said machines are “always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slipand-fall or an age, sex or race discrimination case,” according to the publication. One protester at the rally downtown Thursday carried a sign that said: “I am not a robot.” Through a company representative, Puzder declined to comment for this story. In a statement last month, CKE Restaurants said Puzder “has led CKE for the past sixteen years and during that time has transformed

the company into an internationally prominent and growing business, creating and preserving thousands of jobs in the process. As someone who runs two of the nation’s most popular restaurant franchises, Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s, Andy has distinguished himself as a tireless advocate for economic policies that create jobs and opportunities.” Matt Haller, senior vice president of public afairs at the International Franchise Association, a Washington, D.C.-based industry group whose members include large restaurant chains, said in a statement that the protests “distract from the real issues at hand for our nation’s leaders — how to create economic growth at all levels, which is the only real solution to income inequality in America.” Puzder resigned from the IFA’s board after he was nominated by Trump. Puzder’s U.S. Senate confirmation hearing, which was scheduled for Thursday, was postponed this week — and may not be held until February, several news organizations have reported. Lisa Brown • 314-340-8127 @lisabrownstl on Twitter lbrown@post-dispatch.com

Lisa Aragon just couldn’t get the headhunter to take no for an answer. Five times in a month, she turned down enticements, including higher pay and four weeks of paid vacation. Aragon doesn’t work in Silicon Valley or on Wall Street. She is a manager at a Wendy’s in Albuquerque, N.M. In 20 years, Aragon had never been pursued as aggressively as she had by the recruiter from the Pilot Flying J chain of truck stops, a major franchisee of fast food restaurants. “I told him, ‘I’m happy where I’m at,’” said Aragon, 41, who already looked forward to quarterly bonuses and a bump for her work as a trainer. “There’s no need for change right now.” In today’s tight labor market, restaurants are embroiled in a full-on food fight over workers. The rank-and-file is winning referral bonuses, free meals and days of, and the scarcity of candidates may be raising the minimum wage without help from lawmakers. While good news for workers, it may not be for companies and customers. Restaurants will either have to raise prices or accept falling margins. Some stores’ service is sufering. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.7 percent in December, near a nine-year low. With its insatiable appetite for new workers, the fast food business serves as a leading indicator of a labor shortage. In September, annual turnover for restaurant workers jumped to 113 percent, the highest since industry-tracker People Report began collecting data in 1995. Andrew Puzder, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for U.S. labor secretary, will be acutely aware of the phenomenon. A foe of raising the minimum wage, he is chief executive of CKE Restaurants Inc., which owns the Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. burger chains. Further intensifying demand for lower-skilled employees, Trump has promised to curb illegal immigration. “It’s a hot job market,” said Michael Harms, executive director of operations at Dallas-based TDn2K, People Report’s parent. “Every employee, whether they’re 17 years old or 40 years old, has options.” Aragon’s boss is already pulling out all the stops to keep employees. Over the last year, Eddie Rodriguez, who operates 177 Wendy’s in Florida, New Mexico and Texas, raised hourly pay by nearly a dollar, to an average $9.05. Rodriguez gave referral bonuses of up to $250 to employees who found prospects. He offered more flexible schedules and used his own headhunters to find staf for his corporate oice in Pompano Beach, Fla. He also makes sure he doesn’t take anyone for granted. “Today’s employee, they want to feel wanted,” Rodriquez said. Customers, however, may feel less appreciated. Rodriguez can’t find enough employees for the lunchtime rush, which means it takes longer to get a cheeseburger. Diners are also being kept waiting at Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., which is trying to hire about 600 “crew members” for its U.S. restaurants. To be able to pay more, the company, for the first time since 2014, is considering raising prices in some parts of the country. Chipotle is already paying an average $10 an hour. (For those inside the Federal Reserve looking out for evidence that the tightening labor market is sparking inflation, this could be exhibit A.) Chief Executive Steve Ells in a December conference call complained that the lack of well-trained workers has resulted in napkins left on tables, untidy drink stations and slower meals. “We took our eye off the ball on the customer service side,” Ells told investors.


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 01.13.2017

Amazon to add 100,000 U.S. jobs in next 18 months REUTERS

NEW YORK • Amazon.com Inc. on Thursday said it plans to create more than 100,000 jobs in the United States, from software development to warehouse work, becoming the latest company to boast about a hiring spree since Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election in November. The world’s largest online retailer will grow its full-time U.S. workforce by more than 50 percent to over 280,000 in the next 18 months, it said in a press release. Amazon is spending heavily on new warehouses so it can stock goods closer to customers and fulfill orders quickly and cheaply. The new hires, from Florida to Texas and California, will be key to the company’s promise of two-day shipping to members of its Amazon Prime shopping club, which has given it an edge over rivals. In Illinois, Amazon has fulfillment centers in Edwardsville, Joliet and Romeoville, with more under construction in Monee, Aurora and Waukegan. More than 7,000 full-time jobs will be created in Illinois when construction is complete this year, the company said. It has no fulfillment centers in Missouri. BGC Partners analyst Colin Gillis said hiring was expected. “Amazon continues to meaningfully grow above e-commerce rates and continues to take share from traditional retailers,” he said. The new jobs will extend beyond Amazon’s Seattle headquarters to communities across the United States, CEO Jef Bezos said in the release. Amazon did not break down what share of jobs would go to corporate roles versus fulfillment work. A spokesman for Trump’s

In this photo from Amazon, employee Desmond Strong labels and ships a GrillPartsPro grill cover from the new fulfillment center in Edwardsville. The shipment was made days after Amazon welcomed employees to the new fulfillment center.

transition team gave the president-elect partial credit for the announcement. “The president-elect met with heads of several of the tech companies and urged them to keep their jobs and production inside the United States,” spokesman Sean Spicer told reporters.

Job creation has become a hot-button political issue since the Nov. 8 election. Ford Motor Co. last week reversed plans for a $1.6 billion factory in Mexico and said it would add 700 jobs in Michigan after receiving criticism from Trump. The president-elect on

azon founder acquired in 2013, to influence politicians and federal tax policy. The newspaper said Bezos had no role in directing news coverage.

Wednesday said he will be “the greatest jobs producer that God ever created.” Trump as candidate last year criticized Amazon, saying the tech giant was “getting away with murder tax-wise.” Trump also accused Bezos of using The Washington Post, which the Am-

The Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Nutella maker ights criticism on palm oil Ferrero takes public stand with ads defending ingredient against cancer claim REUTERS

ALBA, ITALY • The $44 billion palm oil industry, under pressure in Europe after authorities listed the edible oil as a cancer risk, has found a vocal ally in the food sector: the maker of Nutella. Italian confectionery firm Ferrero has taken a public stand in defense of an ingredient that some other food companies in the country are boycotting. It has launched an advertising campaign to assure the public about the safety of Nutella, its flagship product which makes up about a fifth of its sales. The hazelnut and chocolate spread, one of Italy’s best-known food brands and a popular breakfast treat for children, relies on palm oil for its smooth texture and shelf life. Other substitutes, such as sunflower oil, would change its character, according to Ferrero. “Making Nutella with-

out palm oil would produce an inferior substitute for the real product, it would be a step backward,” Ferrero’s purchasing manager Vincenzo Tapella told Reuters. He is featured in a TV commercial aired in Italy over the past three months that has drawn criticism from some politicians. Any move away from palm oil would also have economic implications as it is the cheapest vegetable oil, costing around $800 a ton, compared with $845 for sunflower oil and $920 for rapeseed oil, another possible substitute. Ferrero uses about 204,000 tons of palm oil a year, so replacing it with those substitutes could cost the firm an extra $8 million to $22 million annually, at those prices. The company declined to comment on these calculations. The European Food Safety Authority said in May that palm oil generated more of a potentially

carcinogenic contaminant than other vegetable oils when refined at temperatures above 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit). It did not, however, recommend consumers stop eating it and said further study was needed to assess the level of risk. High temperatures are used to remove palm oil’s

natural red color and neutralize its smell, but Ferrero says it uses an industrial process that combines a lower temperature and extremely low pressure to minimize contaminants. The process takes longer and costs 20 percent more than high-temperature refining, Ferrero said. But it said this had

allowed it to bring levels of the contaminant so low that scientific instruments find it hard to trace the chemical.

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WINTER WARM-UP Cardinals pitchers and catchers report to Jupiter, Fla., in just over a month. But first, fans will make their annual trek to the Winter Warm-Up this weekend to mingle with players, coaches and front office personnel. SPORTS

MINNEAPOLIS: FOODIE DESTINATION Two of the chefs making a splash there — Paul Berglund and Jorge Guzman — grew up in St. Louis. A&E

#DEARPRESIDENTTRUMP INCOMING REFLECTIONS We asked readers what they would say to President-elect Donald Trump, and you responded. Check out the range of views this Sunday NEWS

St. Louis-area members of Congress share their views on President-elect Donald Trump in advance of his inauguration. NEWS


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 01.13.2017 • C

MU FOOTBALL RECRUITING

The 21 players that make up Mizzou’s 2017 recruiting class hail from 13 states.

FAR AND WIDE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO

Odom’s MU staf missed on thin in-state talent but found options across the country BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • When Missouri

coach Barry Odom unveils his second recruiting class in a few weeks, the casual fan might have trouble distinguishing most of the prospects. A thin pool of in-state recruits pushed Odom’s staff

beyond the state border to fill the 2017 class, a strategy Odom planned before the bulk of area prospects committed elsewhere. Odom continues to assign assistant coaches to recruit regions of the country, but his staff also recruits for their specific position group. That’s led to a more national approach for this year’s

class. Odom’s staf has crisscrossed the map from New Mexico to Michigan to New York to land commitments. “That’s something we’re trying to build on and use,” Odom said last month. Defensive line coach “Brick Haley is one of the best in the country. For him to walk in and show (recruits) who he’s coached and what he’s done,

that can help us out. It’s the same with coach (Josh) Heupel coaching the quarterback position. We’re more position specific going forward.” Three of MU’s 21 commitments have already signed financial aid agreements and will enroll in classes for the winter See MU • Page C3

> National Signing Day • Wednesday, February 1. > The recruits • Info on each of Mizzou’s commitments. C3

One year later, Chargers fans feel our pain JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Just when the wounds were beginning to heal, Rams fans here were reminded just how cruel and greedy the National Football League can be. “I just felt empty for San Diego,” said Dave Hall, a former St. Louis Rams equipment assistant. Happy Anniversary, St. Louis. Exactly one year after NFL owners voted 30-2 to let Stan Kroenke move the Rams to Los Angeles, the Chargers announced that they were bolting San Diego for a short drive north to the city of Angels. If one city can appreciate San Diego’s pain, it’s St. Louis. “I don’t think the St. Louis people are over it yet,” Hall said. “I don’t think they’re mad at the Rams players so much as they’re

Blues’ road schedule intensiies Must win two of every three road games, says Hitchcock

Red Coats are group you can warm up to BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES • By Ken Hitchcock’s count, the Blues need to take two of the three games on their West Coast swing, and then continue that clip on the road for the rest of the regular season. The Blues opened the second half of the season in Los Angeles Thursday in third place in the Central Division with 47 points. At the start of the night, their lead was just four points over Nashville and Winnipeg and five points over Dallas. The Blues, however, have more road games to close out the season than any of those teams, with 25 of their 41 away from Scottrade Center. Nashville has 21 road games remaining, while Dallas has 20 and Winnipeg 18. “If we expect to win and get in the playofs,

Blues goalie Jake Allen got the starting job for Thursday night’s late game at Los Angeles. The game was not over at press time for this edition. Visit stltoday.com/sports for full coverage.

See BLUES • Page C6

> 9:30 p.m. Saturday at San Jose, FSM

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Adams, Cardinals reach one-year deal

See ORTIZ • Page C5

I had to ask. How did a former Navy sailor turned Illinois state investigator wind up in this motley crew? Joshua Hughes traced it back to an empty seat and a camouflage backpack. “It’s like the heavens opened,” he joked during his explanation of what occurred during last year’s Winter Warm-Up. Before he wore a bow tie and a red blazer to every Cardinals event he can attend, a military connection sparked a conversation with a group of strangers. A shared passion for Cardinals baseball sped along the new friendships. Now Hughes is a full-blown Red Coat, and he has a simple request: Would you consider donating a warm one? See FREDERICKSON • Page C3

years of big-league service. Martinez, the staf leader at 16-9, is due for the biggest jump, perhaps as high as RosenThe Cardinals reduced by one their list of thal scaled the previous year. He, Wacha and Siegrist all were paid $539,000 last players who can file for arbitration by season. agreeing to terms with first baseman On Friday, players and clubs will Matt Adams on a $2.8 million contract submit requested salary figures for for this year. 2017 arbitration-eligible players. BeAdams made $1.65 million last seafore cases actually go to an arbitrator son as a first-time arbitration player. next month, the two sides often settle He hit .249 with 16 homers, four of in the middle. them as a pinch hitter. Adams The lefthanded-hitting Adams Only four players remain who can file for arbitration, and all are pitchers: righthand- doesn’t appear to have a full-time role for ers Carlos Martinez, Trevor Rosenthal and this season’s club although he is a .284 hitMichael Wacha and lefthanded reliever Kevin ter against righthanded pitching and a career Siegrist. Rosenthal, who made $5.5 million last .330 pinch-hitter with seven homers. year, is a second-time arbitration player while Rick Hummel Martinez, Wacha and Siegrist are first-time @cmshhummel on Twitter eligibles, meaning that they have at least three rhummel@post-dispatch.com BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Youth is served Sean McVay is the youngest coach in NFL history. C5

PROVIDED BY JOSHUA HUGHES

Red Coats member Joshua Hughes (left) with Cardinals shortstop Aledmys Diaz.

SPORTS

1 M

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 01.13.2017 • C

MU FOOTBALL RECRUITING

The 21 players that make up Mizzou’s 2017 recruiting class hail from 13 states.

FAR AND WIDE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO

Odom’s MU staf missed on thin in-state talent but found options across the country BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • When Missouri

coach Barry Odom unveils his second recruiting class in a few weeks, the casual fan might have trouble distinguishing most of the prospects. A thin pool of in-state recruits pushed Odom’s staff

beyond the state border to fill the 2017 class, a strategy Odom planned before the bulk of area prospects committed elsewhere. Odom continues to assign assistant coaches to recruit regions of the country, but his staff also recruits for their specific position group. That’s led to a more national approach for this year’s

that can help us out. It’s the same with coach (Josh) Heupel coaching the quarterback position. We’re more position specific going forward.” Three of MU’s 21 commitments have already signed financial aid agreements and will enroll in classes for the winter

class. Odom’s staf has crisscrossed the map from New Mexico to Michigan to New York to land commitments. “That’s something we’re trying to build on and use,” Odom said last month. Defensive line coach “Brick Haley is one of the best in the country. For him to walk in and show (recruits) who he’s coached and what he’s done,

See MU • Page C3

> National Signing Day • Wednesday, February 1. > The recruits • Info on each of Mizzou’s commitments. C3

One year later, Chargers fans feel our pain JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Just when the wounds were beginning to heal, Rams fans here were reminded just how cruel and greedy the National Football League can be. “I just felt empty for San Diego,” said Dave Hall, a former St. Louis Rams equipment assistant. Happy Anniversary, St. Louis. Exactly one year after NFL owners voted 30-2 to let Stan Kroenke move the Rams to Los Angeles, the Chargers announced that they were bolting San Diego for a short drive north to the city of Angels. If one city can appreciate San Diego’s pain, it’s St. Louis. “I don’t think the St. Louis people are over it yet,” Hall said. “I don’t think they’re mad at the Rams players so much as they’re

Red Coats are group you can warm up to

Flustered Blues fall to Kings Goalie Allen pulled again after giving up 3 goals on 15 shots

BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES • It should be shake-up time

soon, if the Blues aren’t there already. The season is only at the midway point, two months away from the NHL trading deadline, but a team that had been treading water the past month looked Thursday night in Los Angeles like a club in disarray. The Blues were blitzed 5-1 by the Kings at Staples Center, falling behind 4-0 for the second second consecutive game before getting on the board. By then it was way too late for an ofense that put just 22 shots on goal and went nearly 20 minutes without one during the game. There are concerns across the board, but none more alarming than in net, where starting goaltender Jake Allen was pulled for the third time in his last five starts after giving See BLUES • Page C6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kings center Jef Carter (left) checks Blues right winger Vladimir Tarasenko during the first period Thursday in Los Angeles.

KINGS

5 BLUES

1

> 9:30 p.m. Saturday at San Jose, FSM

Adams, Cardinals reach one-year deal

See ORTIZ • Page C5

I had to ask. How did a former Navy sailor turned Illinois state investigator wind up in this motley crew? Joshua Hughes traced it back to an empty seat and a camouflage backpack. “It’s like the heavens opened,” he joked during his explanation of what occurred during last year’s Winter Warm-Up. Before he wore a bow tie and a red blazer to every Cardinals event he can attend, a military connection sparked a conversation with a group of strangers. A shared passion for Cardinals baseball sped along the new friendships. Now Hughes is a full-blown Red Coat, and he has a simple request: Would you consider donating a warm one? See FREDERICKSON • Page C3

years of big-league service. Martinez, the staf leader at 16-9, is due for the biggest jump, perhaps as high as RosenThe Cardinals reduced by one their list of thal scaled the previous year. He, Wacha and Siegrist all were paid $539,000 last players who can file for arbitration by season. agreeing to terms with first baseman On Friday, players and clubs will Matt Adams on a $2.8 million contract submit requested salary figures for for this year. 2017 arbitration-eligible players. BeAdams made $1.65 million last seafore cases actually go to an arbitrator son as a first-time arbitration player. next month, the two sides often settle He hit .249 with 16 homers, four of in the middle. them as a pinch hitter. Adams The lefthanded-hitting Adams Only four players remain who can file for arbitration, and all are pitchers: righthand- doesn’t appear to have a full-time role for ers Carlos Martinez, Trevor Rosenthal and this season’s club although he is a .284 hitMichael Wacha and lefthanded reliever Kevin ter against righthanded pitching and a career Siegrist. Rosenthal, who made $5.5 million last .330 pinch-hitter with seven homers. year, is a second-time arbitration player while Rick Hummel Martinez, Wacha and Siegrist are first-time @cmshhummel on Twitter eligibles, meaning that they have at least three rhummel@post-dispatch.com BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Youth is served Sean McVay is the youngest coach in NFL history. C5

PROVIDED BY JOSHUA HUGHES

Red Coats member Joshua Hughes (left) with Cardinals shortstop Aledmys Diaz.

SPORTS

2 M

discover why we’re

more than a sporting goods store

NOW OPEN

14260 Manchester Rd. | Manchester, MO 63011

academy.com/manchester

1574 W. Hwy. 50 | O’Fallon, IL 62269 academy.com/ofallon


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 1/14 at San Jose 9:30 p.m. FSM

Sunday 1/15 at Anaheim 8 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 1/17 vs. Ottawa 7 p.m. FSM

Thursday 1/19 vs. Washington 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 1/14 at Arkansas 5 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 1/18 at Alabama 6 p.m. ESPNU

Saturday 1/21 vs. Mississippi 2:30 p.m. SEC Network

Wednesday 1/25 at Mississippi St. 6 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Saturday 1/14 at George Mason 1:30 p.m. NBCSN

Tuesday 1/17 vs. St. Bona. 8 p.m. TV TBA

Sunday 1/22 at Dayton 1 p.m. CBSSN

Wednesday 1/25 vs. Massachusetts 7 p.m. FSM

Illinois men’s basketball • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 1/14 vs. Maryland 5 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 1/17 at Purdue 6 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/21 at Michigan 1:15 p.m. BTN

Wednesday 1/25 vs. Iowa 8 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 1/20: vs. Harrisburg, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 1/22: vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 6 p.m. College women: St. John’s at Georgetown, FS1 6 p.m. College: Toledo at Central Michigan, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Detroit Mercy at Oakland, ESPNU 7 p.m. NBA: Celtics at Hawks, ESPN 7 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Rockets, FSM 8 p.m. High school: Tournament of Champions semifinal: Findlay Prep (Nevada) vs. Sierra Canyon (Calif.), CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Rider at Manhattan, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Pistons at Jazz, ESPN 9:30 p.m. High school: Tournament of Champions semifinal: Montverde (Fla.) vs. Decatur (Ga.) Greenforest or Memphis (Tenn.) East, CBSSN BOXING 8 p.m. Super welterweights: Lara vs. Foreman, SPIKE GOLF 12:30 p.m. PGA: Diamond Resorts Invitational, Day 1, GOLF 2 p.m. Latin America Amateur Championship, second round, ESPN2 6 p.m. PGA: Sony Open in Hawaii, second round, GOLF 4 a.m. (Sat.) European PGA: BMW South African Open, third round, GOLF GYMNASTICS 6 p.m. College: Georgia vs. Auburn, SEC Network 7:30 p.m. College: LSU vs. Alabama, SEC Network HOCKEY 6 p.m. Blackhawks at Capitals, NHL Network 8 p.m. College: Michigan at Minnesota, BTN WRESTLING 6 p.m. College: Rutgers at Penn State, BTN

DIGEST Sikeston’s Thatch Jr. commits to play at SLU Junior guard Fred Thatch Jr. from Sikeston High has committed to play at St. Louis University, he announced on Twitter on Thursday, joining Carte’are Gordon of Webster Groves as class of 2018 players to choose the Billikens. A 6-foot-3 guard, Thatch was named the Class 4 Missouri player of the year as a sophomore, when he averaged 20.7 points and 10 rebounds. Recruiting web sites indicate that he also was pursued by Missouri, Tulsa, Arkansas and Creighton. (Stu Durando) Mets’ Duda avoids arbitration • First baseman Lucas Duda and the New York Mets avoided arbitration when they agreed to a $7.25 million, one-year contract, a small raise after an injury-plagued season. Duda, who hit 57 home runs from 2014-15, missed four months last year and was limited to 47 games because of a stress fracture in his lower back. He returned Sept. 18 as a part-time player and finished with a .229 batting average, seven homers and 23 RBIs in 153 at-bats. Other signings • Righthander Trevor Bauer and the Cleveland Indians agreed to a $3.55 million, one-year contract, more than double the $1,697,500 he earned last year. ... Third baseman Conor Gillaspie and the San Francisco Giants agreed to a $1.4 million, oneyear contract, a raise from his $1 million salary last year. (AP) Florida State’s Rudolph to enter draft • Travis Rudolph, the wide receiver who led Florida State in receiving the past two seasons, will forego his final season of eligibility to enter the NFL draft. Rudolph had 56 catches for 840 yards and seven touchdowns this season. He had a touchdown in four straight games at just one point late in the year, joining Kelvin Benjamin and Rashad Greene as the only Florida State receivers in the last 10 seasons to do that. (AP) Fruhmorgen leaves Clemson • Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said that one-time starting ofensive lineman Jake Fruhmorgen is leaving the program. Fruhmorgen, a 6-foot-5, 290 pound sophomore from Tampa, Fla., started the first eight games at right tackle for the national champion Tigers. However, he left the team after its win at Florida State in late October and did not return. (AP) Djokovic gets tough draw • Six-time Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic drew a diicult first round opponent in Fernando Verdasco, while Roger Federer’s fall in the rankings complicated his chances at Melbourne Park as he ended up in same quarter as topranked Andy Murray, No. 5 Kei Nishikori and No. 10 Thomas Berdych. Six-time women’s champion Serena Williams, aiming for an Open-era record 23rd Grand Slam singles title, drew a challenging first-round opponent in Belinda Bencic and also had No. 9 Johanna Konta, No. 17 Caroline Wozniacki and No. 6 Dominika Cibulkova in her quarter. (AP) MLS won’t take break • Major League Soccer will play again during World Cup qualifying but with a reduced schedule. Three games each are scheduled during the June and September international fixture periods and two in October, the league said. National teams have the right to players during those dates, meaning clubs may be without stars. The U.S. hosts Trinidad and Tobago on June 8 and plays at Mexico three days later. (AP)

MEDIA VIEWS

LA glut of Rams, Chargers on TV Times columnist: ‘Dreadful news for Los Angeles’ DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you think NFL ratings were bad for the Rams in Los Angeles this season, wait until they have another team there next fall. The Rams returned to the market this season after spending 21 years in St. Louis, but several times played in the least-watched pro telecast of the weekend in LA. TV viewership figures were abysmal for the Rams in their home market despite the gleam — albeit short — of their “honeymoon” return year. Now with the San Diego Chargers joining the Rams in LA next season, fans there will be inundated by Rams and Chargers telecasts unless some kind of compromise is reached. That’s because NFL rules require that all teams’ games be shown in their home market (provided ticket sale quotas are met for home contests). So Los Angeles, which has gone from usually having the “best game available” on Sundays for more than two decades to being force-fed the Rams this season, now is in line to have the Chargers vastly increase their presence on television there. San Diego previously had designated LA as a secondary market, meaning that its road games were shown there. But now Los Angeles sets up for a full dose of Rams and Chargers on TV. And the numbers for those teams there were ugly this season. The Rams made 12 appearances on Fox’s local affiliate and those telecasts were seen in 8.3 percent of LA home with a TV, according to Nielsen. Nine Chargers games were shown there and averaged a 6.6 rating. Neither rivaled the 10 Oakland Raiders games that were show in Los Angeles — those averaged a 9.0 rating. Many in LA certainly were angered by the Rams cluttering the TV schedule. Now the Chargers’ arrival is being met by some with anger. To wit, here is the lead on Los Angeles Times sports columnist Bill Plaschke’s piece Thursday: “Every relationship is built on honesty, so the San Diego Chargers should hear this as their moving vans are chugging up the 5 Freeway on their noble mission of greed. We. Don’t. Want. You.” He went on to call the Chargers’ move “pretty much dreadful news for Los Angeles.” Tom Hofarth of the Los Angeles Daily News made a succinct point before the Chargers’ move was announced: “From our TV vantage point, LA NFL fans have nothing really to look forward to if ... the Chargers decide to come into town. ... Two teams in LA only exacerbate the need for DirecTV’s “NFL Sunday Ticket” so games of national interest aren’t regularly blacked out. Otherwise, the NFL has to be more creative in (TV scheduling) ... to avoid that Sunday morning/ afternoon congestion that otherwise chokes of the No. 2 TV market in the country.” He added for his Southern California readers: “You might also picture this: The citizenry of St. Louis, which still managed to average a 19.7 rating for 12 Rams home games a year ago, thanking us for freeing up their Sunday choices.” The Rams had a dreadful year on and off the field this season, and fans were staying away in droves by the end, The Chargers will be playing in a 30,000-seat soccer stadium until moving in with the Rams in a new palatial stadium set to open in 2019.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bre Priest, wearing a T-shirt mocking the San Diego Chargers’ move to Los Angeles that was announced Thursday, gives the thumbs down sign.

Blues’ TV ratings are on the rise The college football season is over. There are only three weekends left of meaningful NFL postseason games (forget the Pro Bowl). It still is a month until Cardinals pitchers and catchers report to spring training. And area major college basketball ... well, never mind. For St. Louisans who are casual hockey fans, January is the time to turn their full attention to the Blues — who are having an up-and-down season on the ice. But for hard-core fans that attention already had turned, as evidenced by the television ratings. The team’s rating on Fox Sports Midwest, which shows the bulk of the Blues’ games, is up 26 percent over the same stage last year. FSM’s first 36 Blues telecasts this season were seen in 4.4 percent of homes with a TV in the market. That is according to Nielsen, which measures viewership, and is the second-best rating Fox Sports Midwest has had at that point in the 21 seasons it has shown the Blues (they were at 4.5 in 2014-15). Last season the figure for the same number of telecasts was 3.5. The Blues rank third nationally among U.S.-based teams in local ratings, behind No. 1 Bufalo and runner-up Pittsburgh. They also have had four games shown on NBCSN, the cable outlet of NBC Sports, and those have done even better than FSM — a 4.8 rating, up 20 percent from last season. That also ranks third nationally for NBCSN, with Bufalo and Pittsburgh being 1-2 there, too. NBCSN has been boosted locally by a very attractive schedule. It has had two Blues games against the archival Chicago Blackhawks, including the season opener, and two against the Boston Bruins — for whom former Blues captain David Backes now plays. And as previously reported, the Blues recently drew their second-best regular-season rating for a single game in records dating to 1995 — a 15.5 figure for the Winter Classic. That was the outdoor contest at Busch Stadium on Jan. 2 in which they beat the Blackhawks 4-1 in a game shown nationally on NBC and locally on KSDK (Channel 5). KPLR (Channel 11) drew a 17.5 figure for Wayne Gretzky’s home debut as a Blue in 1996. Dan Caesar

The short term certainly is far from ideal for the NFL, and the long-term chances of success are questionable. Per the Washington Post: “I don’t think anyone should try to judge until the new stadium opens,” a high-ranking official with one NFL team said. “That’s when we’ll find out. Don’t judge things with the interim setup and the temporary arrangements. That stadium is what sold people on (Rams owner Stan Kroenke’s) plan. We’re optimistic that it will turn out well.”

NEW ROUND FOR 1380 It was 25 years ago this month that all-sports radio arrived in St. Louis. And seemingly fitting for the topsy-turvy ride the format has had in town, the station at which it made its local debut is in a new format after having been of the air. It was January 1992 when the 1380 spot on the AM dial introduced the format to St. Louis, changing its call letters from KGLD to KASP — as in “All Sports Programming.” The lineup included many names still prominent on the local scene: Kevin Slaten, Bob Ramsey, Mike Claiborne, Howard Balzer, Jay Randolph Jr., Earl Austin Jr. and Rick Wallace. It lasted just 13 months, but 1380 has been in and out of the jock-talk format ever since and almost every big name in the local all-sports radio business has worked there. The peak was in 2008. Under the leadership of general manager John Helmkamp and a powerhouse lineup, the upstart station upended long-established KFNS (590 AM) in sports-talk ratings. But the run didn’t last long and the station has had a variety of incarnations since, the most rollicking coming in 2013. That’s when Grand Slam Sports owned 590 and 1380 — the latter of which now is KXFN. Both stations were switched from sports — 590 to “man talk” and 1380 to femaleoriented content. The latter move lasted less than a year, and the whole thing blew up in 2014 when executive Dan Marshall and onair host Brian McKenna had an instudio fist fight following remarks made on 1380 that questioned McKenna’s personal integrity and made derogative, racial comments about another person on the air. The 1380 signal eventually was taken over by Scott Gertken, who simulcast his talkstl.com programming there in 2015 before joining forces with Randy Markel and they purchased 590 out of court-ordered receivership. Markel started broadcasting his sports lineup on 1380 before moving it to 590, leaving 1380 silent for a while. But it has been resurrected again. Allaccess.com, a website that covers the radio business, reports that it was bought from the courtordered receiver for $190,000 by Salem Media Group, a Christian broadcasting company. The station is in the “health and wellness” format.

‘MIKE & MIKE’ NO MORE? Sports Illustrated’s Richard Deitsch reports that ESPN is breaking up the long-running “Mike and Mike” show, with Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic, that airs in morning drive time on ESPN Radio (WXOS, 101.1 FM locally) and is simulcast on EPSN2 television. The move would allow Greenberg to be host on a TV show that would be on in mornings on ESPN. No word on what would happen to Golic. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

homas eagles his inal hole to join ‘59 Club’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

Clemson’s Watson wins award • Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson has been named the first repeat winner of the Manning Award, which is presented by the Sugar Bowl to the nation’s top college quarterback after the postseason. (AP)

M 1 • FRIDAY • 01.13.2017

HONOLULU • Fresh off his vic-

tory on Maui, Justin Thomas became the seventh player to join the “59 Club” on the PGA Tour when he made a 15-foot eagle putt on his last hole Thursday at the Sony Open for an 11-under 59. Thomas thought his hopes at a 59 were over when his drive on the par-5 ninth hole at Waialae Country Club was a foot from clearing a fairway bunker on the left and rolled back into the sand. He figured he couldn’t reach the green until realizing Daniel Berger hit a 4-iron from the bunker onto the green. Thomas figured “this wasn’t a time to lay up.” He hit 5-iron clean and pure, and it settled 15 feet below the

cup. Wasting little time over the putt, he poured it in for 59 and lightly pumped his fist. The excitement came from Berger and Jordan Spieth, and only when Thomas looked at their reaction did it begin to sink in. “I got more excited from seeing them get excited,” he said. T h o m a s, a 2 3 -yea r- o l d with enormous power for his 145-pound frame, never hit more than a 7-iron into the par 4s at Waialae on a perfect day for scoring — very little breeze, fast fairways and soft greens. His only bogey came on his second hole, the par-3 11th, when his tee shot went into a bunker and he missed an 18-foot par putt. Just four days ago, Thomas closed birdie-birdie for a 69 to win the SBS Tournament of

Champions at Kapalua. He started his round Thursday at Waialae by pitching in from 35 yards for an eagle on the short 10th hole. And he was of. Hudson Swafford was second after a 62. Rory Sabbatini shot 63 and eight players were in at 64. McIlroy starts strong • Rory McIlroy made an impressive start to 2017 with a new set of clubs, shooting a 5-under 67 Thursday in the first round of the SA Open to put himself a stroke off the lead. McIlroy rolled in seven birdies at the Glendower Golf Club. South African players Trevor Fisher Jr. and Keith Horne shared the lead after rounds of 66.


SPORTS

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Notre Dame rallies to end Miami’s home win streak

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame forward V.J. Beachem scores the go-ahead basket late in the second half in the Irish’s victory at Miami.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

V.J. Beachem sank the go-ahead basket and made the clinching steal as No. 20 Notre Dame rallied from a four-point deficit in the final 2½ minutes to beat host Miami 67-62 on Thursday night. The Fighting Irish (15-2, 4-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) outscored Miami 10-1 down the stretch to earn their sixth straight victory. Their four league wins have been by a total of 18 points. Miami (11-4, 1-2) had its 21game home winning streak snapped. The Fighting Irish were down 61-57 with 2:30 left, but Beachem’s reverse layup put them ahead 63-61 with 1:04 to go. After Ja’Quan Newton made one of two free throws for Miami, Steve Vasturia drove for a layup with 8 seconds remaining. Following a timeout, Beachem made a steal on the inbounds play, and Matt Farrell’s two free throws iced the victory. Notre Dame won despite shooting a season-low 37 percent, with Miami blocking a season-high 12 shots. Farrell led the Irish with 15 points and six assists, and Beachem had 13 points. Mizzou women lose • Sophie Cunningham’s season-high 32 points weren’t enough for Mizzou in Baton Rouge, La., where the Tigers lost their third straight Southeastern Conference game, falling to Louisiana State 80-71. Missouri (11-7, 1-3 SEC) led 34-31 at halftime but fell behind for good midway through the third period when LSU (143, 3-1) opened with a 16-6 run. Mizzou shot 61 percent but had 27 turnovers. (Dave Matter)

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Baylor (15-1) idle. Next: at No. 25 Kansas State, Saturday. 2. Kansas (15-1) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 3. Villanova (16-1) idle. Next: at St. John’s, Saturday. 4. UCLA (16-1) at Colorado, late. Next: at Utah, Saturday. 5. Gonzaga (15-0) vs. Loyola Marymount, late. Next: vs. No. 21 St. Mary’s, Saturday. 6. Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: vs. Auburn, Saturday. 7. Duke (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 14 Louisville, Saturday. 8. Creighton (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Truman State, Saturday. 9. Florida State (16-1) idle. Next: at No. 11 North Carolina, Saturday. 10. West Virginia (14-2) idle. Next: at Texas, Saturday. 11. North Carolina (15-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Florida State, Saturday. 12. Butler (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Xavier, Saturday. 13. Oregon (15-2) idle. Next: vs. Oregon State, Saturday. 14. Louisville (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 7 Duke, Saturday. 15. Xavier (13-3) idle. Next: at No. 12 Butler, Saturday. 16. Arizona (15-2) vs. Arizona State, late. Next: at No. 25 Southern Cal, Thursday. 17. Purdue (14-3) at Iowa, late. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday. 18. Wisconsin (14-3) beat Ohio State 89-66. Next: vs. Michigan, Tuesday. 19. Virginia (12-3) idle. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. 20. Notre Dame (15-2) beat Miami 67-62. Next: at Virginia Tech, Saturday. 21. Saint Mary’s (14-1) at Portland, late. Next: at No. 5 Gonzaga, Saturday. 22. Cincinnati (14-2) beat SMU 66-64. Next: at East Carolina, Sunday. 23. Florida (13-3) idle. Next: vs. Georgia, Saturday. 24. Minnesota (15-3) idle. Next: at Penn State, Saturday. 25. Kansas State (13-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 1 Baylor, Saturday. 25. Southern Cal (15-2) at Utah, late. Next: at Colorado, Sunday.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

Tigers’ recruits come from all over MU • FROM C1

MIZZOU COMMITMENTS

semester, which starts Tuesday. The other 18 recruits, and any more Mizzou picks up the next three weeks, can begin signing national letters of intent Feb. 1. The 21 high school and junior college players who have pledged verbal commitments to Mizzou attend schools in 15 different states. That’s more states represented than any other class across the Southeastern Conference. The Tigers have just one commitment from a player who attends high school in Missouri, wide receiver Da’Ron Davis from Lee’s Summit North. Jafar Armstrong, a receiver from the Kansas City area, lives in Missouri but attends high school in Kansas, at Bishop Miege in Shawnee Mission. While next year’s in-state class is loaded with priority recruits, Missouri ofered scholarships to only six 2017 players from Missouri high schools, plus a few more from just outside the state border in Kansas and Illinois. Four of the six in-state players with MU ofers have pledged commitments elsewhere: St. Louis University High athlete Tony Adams (Illinois), Trinity offensive lineman Larry Boyd (Illinois), Pattonville ofensive lineman Marquis Hayes (Oklahoma) and Columbia-Battle receiver Jaevon McQuitty (Nebraska). Park Hill defensive lineman Chester Graves is uncommitted and expected to attend a junior college. “I know some fans and some rival fans have knocked the Tigers for not having success locally, but when you take a step back and look, there might have been three or four (in-state) guys they would like to have, but it’s just not one of those years that’s going to be a make-or-break year with local players,” said Jeremy Crabtree, ESPN.com senior recruiting writer. “Are those guys the war daddies, the must-get guys that we traditionally see Missouri get? No. They’re good players but not at that level.” In other words, there’s not a Sheldon Richardson or Blaine Gabbert or Dorial Green-Beckham in the state this year, a fivestar phenom who can name his school of choice. Just beyond the Missouri-Illinois border, East St. Louis receiver Jef Thomas might fit that description, but Thomas eliminated Missouri from consideration in recent weeks. If anything, Missouri’s string of local misses forced the Tigers to look farther for players in places where they couldn’t use one of their most valuable sales pitches: proximity. “It’s important to geographically hold your own or better,”

Football student-athletes who have committed to the Missouri recruiting class of 2017. Commitments are non-binding until players sign beginning Feb. 1, unless they are early enrollees and on campus. Athlete Pos. Hometown Rating JUNIOR COLLEGE Nathaniel Anderson DE Prattville, Ala. 3 stars Rashad Brandon DT Jersey City, N.J. 3 stars x-Yasir Durant OL Philadelphia, Pa. 3 stars HIGH SCHOOL Jafar Armstrong WR Kansas City, Mo. 3 stars Joshuah Bledsoe DB Spring, Texas 3 stars Larry Borom OL Bloomield Hills, Mich. 2 stars Jamal Brooks LB Bessemer, Ala. 3 stars Logan Christopherson TE Lemont, Ill. 3 stars x-Pompey Coleman OL Indianapolis, Ind. 3 stars Case Cook OL Carrollton, Ga. 3 stars DaRon Davis WR Kansas City, Mo. 4 stars Reyondous Estes QB East St. Louis 2 stars Elijah Gardiner WR Kemp, Texas 3 stars Aubrey Miller LB Memphis, Tenn. 3 stars x-Isaiah Miller RB Baldwin, Fla. 3 stars Terry Petry CB Missouri City, Texas 3 stars Larry Rountree RB Raleigh, N.C. 3 stars Adam Sparks CB Geismar, La. 3 stars Chris Turner DE Hammond, La. 2 stars Jordan Ulmer S Bellevue, Mich. 2 stars Hyrin White OL DeSoto, Texas 3 stars Ratings, on a 5-star scale, by Rivals.com. x-Early enrollee, on campus already

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

East St. Louis quarterback Reyondous Estes committed to the Tigers.

said recruiting analyst Danny Heitert, who publishes his instate rankings every year in the STC Grid Report. “That is because it’s just logical that your best chances with good players are the ones close by, whose parents and guardians still want to physically see these players play.” “Now,” he added, “at the end of the day, what counts is good players from wherever.” Missouri hopes that’s the epitaph for the 2017 class. The Tigers collected multiple verbal high school commitments from Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan and a class-high four from Texas, plus one each from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina and Tennessee. “They’ve done a good job in Texas, and you sprinkle that in with the success they’ve had in the Southeast states, it’s a solid approach,” Crabtree said. “I’m excited to see what happens moving forward in the next couple classes.” Of all the local targets on Mizzou’s radar, Thomas was the player Heitert believes could have sent a jolt through Odom’s class. “The reason he’s so valuable

to Missouri — and someone else can do this job — but he would be a final piece of an ofensive puzzle that will be hard for people to solve,” Heitert said. Instead, the Tigers expect to land three receiver commitments: Elijah Gardiner from Kemp, Texas, and the two Kansas City pledges, Armstrong and Davis. They won’t deliver the same star power as Thomas — Illinois, Louisville, Miami and Tennessee appear to be his top choices for now — but both Kansas City targets could figure into the ofense sooner than later. Davis also could project as a defensive back or, Crabtree said, maybe running back. On Davis, Heitert said, “Very similar to (former MU receiver) Jimmie Hunt at the same stage. Strong, physical, athletic and fast enough that it’s not a problem.” “You’re going to have a hard time finding someone that’s a bigger Jafar Armstrong fan than me,” Crabtree added. “He’s legitimately blossomed. He demands the ball.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Red Coats friends get together to gather warm coats for others FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

Fans of the Cardinals once again will descend upon the Hyatt Regency for autographs and an opportunity to meet their favorite players when the 21st annual Winter Warm-Up starts Saturday. Reveling in every moment of the madness will be a small but rather noticeable (and noisy) group of men. They’ll be dressed to the nines in red. Casey Rogers accents his look with a red pigtail wig. Kyle Reed wears a red cowboy hat, his tribute to Gussie Busch. Hughes switches it up a bit, opting for a red blazer and black pants, a tip of the cap to Cardinals Hall of Famers. Perhaps you have encountered the Red Coats. The seven friends are spread across Illinois and southern Missouri, but they have become regulars at Winter WarmUp, opening day and the Cardinals Hall of Fame induction ceremonies. If they’re at Busch Stadium, you can find them in the standing-room section down the thirdbase line. Just look for the commotion. There was no grand scheme when the friends started dressing up for games two years ago. Jeremiah Nickels’ idea of buy-

PROVIDED BY JOSHUA HUGHES

Red Coats (left to right) members Joshua Hughes, Tommy Cahalan, Casey Rogers, Jeremiah Nickels, Caleb Cantrell and Kyle Reed.

ing red suits off the Internet came after

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Call for an Appointment Today, Perform Like You are 20, Tomorrow!

Rogers’ wig won him some attention on a Fox Sports Midwest broadcast. Nickels’ brother attends but refuses to dress up, so the rest of the group refers to him as their plainclothes security guard. Yes, it’s goofy. The men share hobbies: watching Cardinals baseball and drinking beer. They lacked a greater purpose. That brings us back to the empty seat and that backpack. At Winter Warm-Up for the first time and hoping to find a place to sit and listen to Cardinals radio broadcaster John Rooney’s presentation, Hughes noticed the backpack of Red Coats member Caleb Cantrell. The former Navy man plopped down and thanked the National Guard member for his service. Soon, Hughes was introduced to the rest of the gang. “He ate it up,” Reed remembers. Hughes settled on a blazer. He started participating in the group text messages that feature running commentary during road games. And it was Hughes who wondered aloud during a Tony La Russa autograph session this summer if he and his fun-loving new friends could do something bigger. A brainstorm produced an idea that aligned with their look: Red Coats for

Kids’ Coats. “I knew we could do more than be seven idiots who are dressing up at games,” Hughes said. “We are there to have fun. But we can also do something with it. There are a lot of people out there that could use some help.” The grassroots effort, which started in October and ended in December, produced 525 new and gently-used clean coats. The haul was delivered to charities near the members’ homes in the Metro East and Springfield, Mo., along with the St. Louisbased Haven of Grace, a residential shelter for homeless women and children. “The donations were crazy,” Nickels said. “To have 500-plus coats in only about a month and a half of planning, it worked out pretty well.” Hughes convinced stores near his home in Astoria, Ill., to display donation boxes. His wife put up with stacks of winter wear in the kitchen. His kids accompanied him during deliveries. Nickels and Cantrell, who live in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., set up bins at a church and a car dealership. Reed and the Springfield-based Cardinals dropped three bulging trash bags filled with coats, scarves and gloves of at their local Salvation Army. “Hopefully it doubles next year,” Hughes said. “Seven hundred fifty is going to be my goal. But if we can get 1,000 coats?” All of this stemmed from one Winter Warm-Up conversation. “You can sit down and talk to people and relate,” Reed said of the three-day event. “It connects generations. It bridges the gap. Everybody has their own story. But they all start out the same way. When I was a kid ...” When Reed was a kid, he and his grandpa used to ride around in a golf cart while listening to Cardinals games on a transistor radio. Hughes was barely more than a kid when Mark McGwire hit home run No. 62. He watched it from Norfolk, Va., from the forecastle of the USS Kearsarge. There’s no telling where conversations like these can lead Cardinals fans. Kids in need of a coat were warmer this winter thanks to this one. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 2

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Notre Dame rallies to end Miami’s home win streak

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame forward V.J. Beachem scores the go-ahead basket late in the second half in the Irish’s victory at Miami.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

V.J. Beachem sank the go-ahead basket and made the clinching steal as No. 20 Notre Dame rallied from a four-point deficit in the final 2½ minutes to beat host Miami 67-62 on Thursday night. The Fighting Irish (15-2, 4-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) outscored Miami 10-1 down the stretch to earn their sixth straight victory. Their four league wins have been by a total of 18 points. Miami (11-4, 1-2) had its 21game home winning streak snapped. The Fighting Irish were down 61-57 with 2:30 left, but Beachem’s reverse layup put them ahead 63-61 with 1:04 to go. After Ja’Quan Newton made one of two free throws for Miami, Steve Vasturia drove for a layup with 8 seconds remaining. Following a timeout, Beachem made a steal on the inbounds play, and Matt Farrell’s two free throws iced the victory. Mizzou women lose • Sophie Cunningham’s season-high 32 points weren’t enough for Mizzou in Baton Rouge, La., where the Tigers lost their third straight Southeastern Conference game, falling to Louisiana State 80-71. Missouri (11-7, 1-3 SEC) led 34-31 at halftime but fell behind for good midway through the third period. (Dave Matter) SIUE falls in OT • The Cougars made up a 12-point deficit in the final three minutes of regulation but Austin Peay rebounded in the extra period for an 83-81 road win behind 26 points from Josh Robinson (St. Mary’s High). Burak Eslik led SIUE with 20 points.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Baylor (15-1) idle. Next: at No. 25 Kansas State, Saturday. 2. Kansas (15-1) idle. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 3. Villanova (16-1) idle. Next: at St. John’s, Saturday. 4. UCLA (17-1) beat Colorado 104-89. Next: at Utah, Saturday. 5. Gonzaga (16-0) beat Loyola Marymount 93-55. Next: vs. No. 21 Saint Mary’s, Saturday. 6. Kentucky (14-2) idle. Next: vs. Auburn, Saturday. 7. Duke (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 14 Louisville, Saturday. 8. Creighton (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Truman State, Saturday. 9. Florida State (16-1) idle. Next: at No. 11 North Carolina, Saturday. 10. West Virginia (14-2) idle. Next: at Texas, Saturday. 11. North Carolina (15-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Florida State, Saturday. 12. Butler (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 15 Xavier, Saturday. 13. Oregon (15-2) idle. Next: vs. Oregon State, Saturday. 14. Louisville (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 7 Duke, Saturday. 15. Xavier (13-3) idle. Next: at No. 12 Butler, Saturday. 16. Arizona (16-2) beat Arizona State 91-75. Next: at No. 25 Southern Cal, Thursday. 17. Purdue (14-4) lost to Iowa 83-78. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday. 18. Wisconsin (14-3) beat Ohio State 89-66. Next: vs. Michigan, Tuesday. 19. Virginia (12-3) idle. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. 20. Notre Dame (15-2) beat Miami 67-62. Next: at Virginia Tech, Saturday. 21. St. Mary’s (15-1) beat Portland 74-33. Next: at No. 5 Gonzaga, Saturday. 22. Cincinnati (14-2) beat SMU 66-64. Next: at East Carolina, Sunday. 23. Florida (13-3) idle. Next: vs. Georgia, Saturday. 24. Minnesota (15-3) idle. Next: at Penn State, Saturday. 25. Kansas State (13-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 1 Baylor, Saturday. 25. Southern Cal (15-3) lost to Utah 86-64. Next: at Colorado, Sunday.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

Tigers’ recruits come from all over MU • FROM C1

MIZZOU COMMITMENTS

semester, which starts Tuesday. The other 18 recruits, and any more Mizzou picks up the next three weeks, can begin signing national letters of intent Feb. 1. The 21 high school and junior college players who have pledged verbal commitments to Mizzou attend schools in 15 different states. That’s more states represented than any other class across the Southeastern Conference. The Tigers have just one commitment from a player who attends high school in Missouri, wide receiver Da’Ron Davis from Lee’s Summit North. Jafar Armstrong, a receiver from the Kansas City area, lives in Missouri but attends high school in Kansas, at Bishop Miege in Shawnee Mission. While next year’s in-state class is loaded with priority recruits, Missouri ofered scholarships to only six 2017 players from Missouri high schools, plus a few more from just outside the state border in Kansas and Illinois. Four of the six in-state players with MU ofers have pledged commitments elsewhere: St. Louis University High athlete Tony Adams (Illinois), Trinity offensive lineman Larry Boyd (Illinois), Pattonville ofensive lineman Marquis Hayes (Oklahoma) and Columbia-Battle receiver Jaevon McQuitty (Nebraska). Park Hill defensive lineman Chester Graves is uncommitted and expected to attend a junior college. “I know some fans and some rival fans have knocked the Tigers for not having success locally, but when you take a step back and look, there might have been three or four (in-state) guys they would like to have, but it’s just not one of those years that’s going to be a make-or-break year with local players,” said Jeremy Crabtree, ESPN.com senior recruiting writer. “Are those guys the war daddies, the must-get guys that we traditionally see Missouri get? No. They’re good players but not at that level.” In other words, there’s not a Sheldon Richardson or Blaine Gabbert or Dorial Green-Beckham in the state this year, a fivestar phenom who can name his school of choice. Just beyond the Missouri-Illinois border, East St. Louis receiver Jef Thomas might fit that description, but Thomas eliminated Missouri from consideration in recent weeks. If anything, Missouri’s string of local misses forced the Tigers to look farther for players in places where they couldn’t use one of their most valuable sales pitches: proximity. “It’s important to geographically hold your own or better,”

Football student-athletes who have committed to the Missouri recruiting class of 2017. Commitments are non-binding until players sign beginning Feb. 1, unless they are early enrollees and on campus. Athlete Pos. Hometown Rating JUNIOR COLLEGE Nathaniel Anderson DE Prattville, Ala. 3 stars Rashad Brandon DT Jersey City, N.J. 3 stars x-Yasir Durant OL Philadelphia, Pa. 3 stars HIGH SCHOOL Jafar Armstrong WR Kansas City, Mo. 3 stars Joshuah Bledsoe DB Spring, Texas 3 stars Larry Borom OL Bloomield Hills, Mich. 2 stars Jamal Brooks LB Bessemer, Ala. 3 stars Logan Christopherson TE Lemont, Ill. 3 stars x-Pompey Coleman OL Indianapolis, Ind. 3 stars Case Cook OL Carrollton, Ga. 3 stars DaRon Davis WR Kansas City, Mo. 4 stars Reyondous Estes QB East St. Louis 2 stars Elijah Gardiner WR Kemp, Texas 3 stars Aubrey Miller LB Memphis, Tenn. 3 stars x-Isaiah Miller RB Baldwin, Fla. 3 stars Terry Petry CB Missouri City, Texas 3 stars Larry Rountree RB Raleigh, N.C. 3 stars Adam Sparks CB Geismar, La. 3 stars Chris Turner DE Hammond, La. 2 stars Jordan Ulmer S Bellevue, Mich. 2 stars Hyrin White OL DeSoto, Texas 3 stars Ratings, on a 5-star scale, by Rivals.com. x-Early enrollee, on campus already

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

East St. Louis quarterback Reyondous Estes committed to the Tigers.

said recruiting analyst Danny Heitert, who publishes his instate rankings every year in the STC Grid Report. “That is because it’s just logical that your best chances with good players are the ones close by, whose parents and guardians still want to physically see these players play.” “Now,” he added, “at the end of the day, what counts is good players from wherever.” Missouri hopes that’s the epitaph for the 2017 class. The Tigers collected multiple verbal high school commitments from Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan and a class-high four from Texas, plus one each from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina and Tennessee. “They’ve done a good job in Texas, and you sprinkle that in with the success they’ve had in the Southeast states, it’s a solid approach,” Crabtree said. “I’m excited to see what happens moving forward in the next couple classes.” Of all the local targets on Mizzou’s radar, Thomas was the player Heitert believes could have sent a jolt through Odom’s class. “The reason he’s so valuable

to Missouri — and someone else can do this job — but he would be a final piece of an ofensive puzzle that will be hard for people to solve,” Heitert said. Instead, the Tigers expect to land three receiver commitments: Elijah Gardiner from Kemp, Texas, and the two Kansas City pledges, Armstrong and Davis. They won’t deliver the same star power as Thomas — Illinois, Louisville, Miami and Tennessee appear to be his top choices for now — but both Kansas City targets could figure into the ofense sooner than later. Davis also could project as a defensive back or, Crabtree said, maybe running back. On Davis, Heitert said, “Very similar to (former MU receiver) Jimmie Hunt at the same stage. Strong, physical, athletic and fast enough that it’s not a problem.” “You’re going to have a hard time finding someone that’s a bigger Jafar Armstrong fan than me,” Crabtree added. “He’s legitimately blossomed. He demands the ball.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Red Coats friends get together to gather warm coats for others FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

Fans of the Cardinals once again will descend upon the Hyatt Regency for autographs and an opportunity to meet their favorite players when the 21st annual Winter Warm-Up starts Saturday. Reveling in every moment of the madness will be a small but rather noticeable (and noisy) group of men. They’ll be dressed to the nines in red. Casey Rogers accents his look with a red pigtail wig. Kyle Reed wears a red cowboy hat, his tribute to Gussie Busch. Hughes switches it up a bit, opting for a red blazer and black pants, a tip of the cap to Cardinals Hall of Famers. Perhaps you have encountered the Red Coats. The seven friends are spread across Illinois and southern Missouri, but they have become regulars at Winter WarmUp, opening day and the Cardinals Hall of Fame induction ceremonies. If they’re at Busch Stadium, you can find them in the standing-room section down the thirdbase line. Just look for the commotion. There was no grand scheme when the friends started dressing up for games two years ago. Jeremiah Nickels’ idea of buy-

PROVIDED BY JOSHUA HUGHES

Red Coats (left to right) members Joshua Hughes, Tommy Cahalan, Casey Rogers, Jeremiah Nickels, Caleb Cantrell and Kyle Reed.

ing red suits off the Internet came after

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$199 OFFICE VISIT Visit Includes Test Dose, Testosterone & PSA Test See results in our ofice or your visit is FREE! Same day solutions for all Erectile & Premature issues. Private and Discreet Treatments for Men’s Sexual Health by licensed Missouri Physicians.

777 South New Ballas Rd., Ste. 119w, St. Louis, MO 63141

www.stlmensclinic.com

314.282.8080

What Can I Expect From Treatment? There are more treatment options available today than what most men realize.The key is to work with a practitioner who understands the differences between these various therapies. St Louis Men’s Clinic are specialists in treating E.D. and other performance issues, and they will devise a personalized treatment plan that works for you! We Can Help We know how frustrating sexual dysfunction can be to a man.

Call for an Appointment Today, Perform Like You are 20, Tomorrow!

Rogers’ wig won him some attention on a Fox Sports Midwest broadcast. Nickels’ brother attends but refuses to dress up, so the rest of the group refers to him as their plainclothes security guard. Yes, it’s goofy. The men share hobbies: watching Cardinals baseball and drinking beer. They lacked a greater purpose. That brings us back to the empty seat and that backpack. At Winter Warm-Up for the first time and hoping to find a place to sit and listen to Cardinals radio broadcaster John Rooney’s presentation, Hughes noticed the backpack of Red Coats member Caleb Cantrell. The former Navy man plopped down and thanked the National Guard member for his service. Soon, Hughes was introduced to the rest of the gang. “He ate it up,” Reed remembers. Hughes settled on a blazer. He started participating in the group text messages that feature running commentary during road games. And it was Hughes who wondered aloud during a Tony La Russa autograph session this summer if he and his fun-loving new friends could do something bigger. A brainstorm produced an idea that aligned with their look: Red Coats for

Kids’ Coats. “I knew we could do more than be seven idiots who are dressing up at games,” Hughes said. “We are there to have fun. But we can also do something with it. There are a lot of people out there that could use some help.” The grassroots effort, which started in October and ended in December, produced 525 new and gently-used clean coats. The haul was delivered to charities near the members’ homes in the Metro East and Springfield, Mo., along with the St. Louisbased Haven of Grace, a residential shelter for homeless women and children. “The donations were crazy,” Nickels said. “To have 500-plus coats in only about a month and a half of planning, it worked out pretty well.” Hughes convinced stores near his home in Astoria, Ill., to display donation boxes. His wife put up with stacks of winter wear in the kitchen. His kids accompanied him during deliveries. Nickels and Cantrell, who live in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., set up bins at a church and a car dealership. Reed and the Springfield-based Cardinals dropped three bulging trash bags filled with coats, scarves and gloves of at their local Salvation Army. “Hopefully it doubles next year,” Hughes said. “Seven hundred fifty is going to be my goal. But if we can get 1,000 coats?” All of this stemmed from one Winter Warm-Up conversation. “You can sit down and talk to people and relate,” Reed said of the three-day event. “It connects generations. It bridges the gap. Everybody has their own story. But they all start out the same way. When I was a kid ...” When Reed was a kid, he and his grandpa used to ride around in a golf cart while listening to Cardinals games on a transistor radio. Hughes was barely more than a kid when Mark McGwire hit home run No. 62. He watched it from Norfolk, Va., from the forecastle of the USS Kearsarge. There’s no telling where conversations like these can lead Cardinals fans. Kids in need of a coat were warmer this winter thanks to this one. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


FOOTBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

6. MIAMI 3. PITTSBURGH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 01.13.2017

12 30

4. HOUSTON

4. GREEN BAY

7:15 Saturday, KMOV (4)

3:40 Sunday, KTVI (2)

1. NEW ENGLAND

4. HOUSTON

14

3. PITTSBURGH

3. SEATTLE 3:35 Saturday, KTVI (2)

2. KANSAS CITY

2. ATLANTA

27

Bills’ Lynn could become Chargers’ next coach Thursday began with the Chargers choosing a new city. It ended with them closing in on a head coach. The newest Los Angeles franchise is currently in negotiations with Bufalo Bills interim head coach and ofensive coordinator Anthony Lynn, a source said Thursday evening. This is the latest layer to an atmospheric rise for the 48-yearold, who began 2016 as Bufalo’s running backs coach, became its ofensive coordinator in September and then interim coach in late December. Before that, he put in his time. Lynn entered the NFL as an undrafted rookie running back, one with stout size at 6-foot-3 out of Texas Tech. He bounced around from the Broncos in 1993, 49ers from 1995 to 1996 and then the Broncos for the next three years. In the 1997-98 and 1998-99 seasons, he won Super Bowls, the first of which was played in San Diego. He worked as a running backs coach for the Jaguars, Cowboys, Browns, Jets and Bills for 12-plus seasons prior to last season’s opportunity to replace Greg Roman, who was fired two games into the year. Lynn then replaced a fired Rex Ryan for the final game of the season. The Chargers dismissed Mike McCoy on Jan. 1 after a four-year tenure. (The San Diego UnionTribune) Rollins improves for Packers • Cornerback Quinten Rollins practiced for a second straight day for the Green Bay Packers, a sign that their secondary could be getting closer to full strength ahead of the divisional-round playof game Sunday against the Dallas Cowboys. Rollins missed last week’s wildcard win over the New York Giants. He is recovering from a neck injury while also being monitored in the NFL’s concussion protocol after getting hurt two weeks ago in Detroit. Rollins was limited on Thursday. He has played in 13 games this season, making 10 starts. Also Thursday, receiver Jef Janis returned to practice after missing one day with a quadriceps problem. He was limited. The speedy Janis is a mainstay on special teams, though he may need to play more ofense against Dallas if top receiver Jordy Nelson isn’t available. As expected, Nelson (ribs) missed practice again Thursday to focus on rehab. (AP) Cardinals re-sign Mauro • The Arizona Cardinals re-signed defensive tackle Josh Mauro to a two-year contract Thursday. Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. The 6-foot-6, 282-pound former Stanford lineman played 15 games this season, setting career highs with 13 starts and 42 tackles. He has played three seasons with the Cardinals after joining the team in 2014 from Pittsburgh’s practice squad. (AP) Dolphins promote Burke • Miami Dolphins linebackers coach Matt Burke has been promoted to defensive coordinator as a replacement for Vance Joseph, the Denver Broncos’ new head coach. Burke joined the Dolphins in 2016 and coached an injuryplagued unit led by Kiko Alonso. Burke was also linebackers coach for the Lions (2009-13) and Bengals (2014-15). He was an assistant with the Titans from 2004 to 2008. He takes over a unit that allowed a franchise-record 6,122 yards even though the Dolphins won 10 games and made the playofs for the first time in eight years. They lost in the first round to Pittsburgh. (AP) Joseph replaces Donald • Minnesota Vikings nose tackle Linval Joseph has been picked as an injury replacement on the NFC Pro Bowl team, for Aaron Donald of the Los Angeles Rams. This will be the first Pro Bowl for Joseph in his seven-year career. Joseph had four sacks and three forced fumbles this season. Also, New York Jets defensive lineman Leonard Williams is replacing injured Oakland pass rusher Khalil Mack in the Pro Bowl. Williams, who led the Jets with seven sacks and 25 quarterback hits in his second NFL season, was initially selected as a first alternate to the AFC team. (AP)

3. SEATTLE

26

5. NY GIANTS

13

4. GREEN BAY

38

2:05 Jan. 22, KTVI (2)

12:05 Sunday, KSDK (5)

NFL NOTEBOOK

6

1. DALLAS

5:40 Jan. 22, KMOV (4)

5. OAKLAND

6. DETROIT

Feb. 5, 5:30 p.m., KTVI (2) • Houston

Bryant faces Packers again Dallas receiver’s non-catch in 2014-15 playofs vs. Green Bay still a hot topic

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cowboys WR Dez Bryant (top) grabs a pass against Packers CB Sam Shields on Jan. 11, 2015. The referees ruled that Bryant hadn’t made the catch.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRISCO, TEXAS • Dez Bryant still gets stopped all the time by people who are sure the officials blew the replay on the Dallas receiver’s famous catch that wasn’t in a playof loss at Green Bay in January 2015. And the 2014 All-Pro figures if the Cowboys go on to win the Super Bowl as the top seed in the NFC, that play will be what fans want to talk to him about. Even if he wins another Super Bowl next year. And so on. “Even if we were to win four or five Super Bowls, people still going to be like, ‘He still caught it,’” Bryant said Thursday. “That’s what it’s going to be.” The Cowboys (13-3) get a divisional-round rematch with the Packers on Sunday, this time at home. And while Bryant knew from the moment Green Bay (116) beat the New York Giants last weekend in the wild-card round that the disputed play would dominate the conversation, he’s playing the part that coach Jason Garrett would prefer. “I don’t even care,” Bryant said

when asked if that moment was his first thought after the Packers won. “That was 2014. There’s no extra motivation, there’s no nothing. If there’s any motivation it’s just to prepare better than the last time.” The most notable change for the Cowboys since then is at quarterback, with rookie Dak Prescott winning 11 straight games in the regular season to take Tony Romo’s job once Dallas’ 10-year starter was ready to return from a preseason back injury. Back then, Romo gambled on fourth-and-2 from the Green Bay 32 with 4½ minutes remaining. Bryant made a leaping grab over Sam Shields around the 2 and lunged for the end zone. What happened with the ball will be debated forever, some saying Bryant had control throughout the catch, others saying the ground jarred it loose briefly. Referee Gene Steratore had the only opinion that mattered, and he ruled upon review after the play was called a reception that Bryant didn’t control the ball all the way through the catch. Two

years later, people are still dissecting the replay. Garrett isn’t among them. “There’s a guy named Dean Blandino up in New York,” Garrett said, referring to the NFL’s head of officials. “He’s a great guy to ask. He’s a great conversationalist and he’s very informed in these situations. If you get a chance, reach out to him.” The Cowboys trailed 26-21 when they turned it over on downs after the reversal, and Aaron Rodgers led a clock-killing drive that covered the final four minutes. The Green Bay quarterback took three knees to end the game, offering another reason that the catch didn’t cost the Cowboys the victory. “There’s a lot of emotion that goes into that play and that moment,” said tight end Jason Witten, the first to greet Bryant in the end zone when the Cowboys thought they had a first down inside the Green Bay 1. “What a play by him. What’s a catch, what’s not a catch. I just don’t think any one moment like that can define any of us. Certainly we all reflect on it and look

back on it. It probably hardened us some. Know what? Nobody cares. We’re two years later. But it’s a great example of just the margin at this point and this time of the season.” Witten remembers the following offseason being filled with “catch, no catch” talk, even among the kindergarten friends of his younger son. “And I’m thinking to myself, you know, these guys are watching a little too much football to already have an understanding of that,” he said. Prescott was a junior at Mississippi State then, so he understandably dismissed it as “irrelevant” this week. Of course, he had a hand in that by replacing the one who threw the pass with the best rookie season in franchise history. After about five questions, Bryant had his fill as well. “Hey, man, we’re not going to talk about the catch,” he said. “Yeah, of course it was tough. It was heartbreaking. It ended our season.” And that will always be part of the debate as well.

Chiefs look to silence Steelers’ Bell Pittsburgh running back’s unique style makes job diicult for linemen ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, MO. • Prevailing wisdom says the easiest way to hold a star running back in check in the NFL is to simply keep him from getting started. That doesn’t really work against Le’Veon Bell. He willingly stops. Or at least hesitates. Then, when his patience has allowed the Pittsburgh offensive line to pry open the slightest of creases, the fourthyear running back has an uncanny ability to slip through it from a near-standstill, befuddling just about every defense trying to stop him. “He has a unique style about him, that delay to get to the line of scrimmage,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. “It’s been efective for him. He’s really the only one that does it, so it’s unique.” That’s something the Chiefs, who are preparing to face Bell and the Steelers in the divisional round on Sunday, struggled to do when the teams met in Pittsburgh in early October. In his first game back from a three-game suspension, Bell gashed the Chiefs for 144 yards on just 18 carries. And to add insult to embarrassment, he also caught five passes for 34 yards, an efort that went widely under-the-radar only because Ben Roethlisberger was busy throwing five TD passes. It was only a precursor of bigger things. As the Steelers were putting together a seven-game winning streak to finish the season and head into the playoffs, Bell was putting together one of the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell carries the ball during the second half of the AFC wild-card game against the Dolphins on Sunday.

best stretches in NFL history. He ran for 835 yards over a six-week period before sitting out Week 17, and then rolled up 167 yards rushing and two touchdowns in last weekend’s wild-card romp over the Miami Dolphins. Much of that success was due to his unique running style, one that caused CBS analyst Phil Simms to dub him “The Great Hesitator” — and one that runs counter to conventional wisdom. Take the handof. Hit the hole hard. Run to daylight.

That’s the simple progression coaches from Pop Warner to high school to college have taught running backs for years. The idea is to minimize idle time in the backfield, pressure defensive fronts to react quickly to where a play is developing, and take away any chance of a tackle for loss. But the style Bell has adopted is more like this: stop, consider the options, pick one. Then go. “It’s different,” said Chiefs safety Eric Berry. “A lot of people focus on coaching technique,

but it’s a little easier to diagnose technique and figure out what it is. When you have a unique style, along with technique, it’s a little diicult.” It is particularly diicult for the defensive linemen. Once upon a time their job in run defense was to penetrate the backfield and make a play. These days they are coached to hold the line — remain what coaches call “gap sound.” The reasoning behind that is it clogs up the middle, cuts down on running lanes and makes it harder to pop a big play. But with Bell’s patience, holding the line becomes a much more diicult task. Things are bound to break down sooner or later, and that’s when Bell darts upfield to do his damage. “In your own brain,” Chiefs defensive coordinator Bob Sutton said, “you’re saying, ‘If he’s not hitting that thing downhill, we ought to be able to get him on the ground quick.’ But he accelerates very well, he has great strength and body balance. You lose track of some of those things.” Then there’s the fact that injuries have robbed the Chiefs of some of their best run defenders. Top tackler Derrick Johnson ruptured his Achilles tendon and is out for the season, and fellow linebacker Josh Mauga and defensive linemen Jaye Howard and Allen Bailey are also on injured reserve. “This is going to be an all-day job,” Sutton said. “We’re going to have to be really disciplined up front. When you play really, really good players, you need everybody every play.”


FOOTBALL

01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

Rams hire McVay Chargers will move from long-time home as new head coach Fans in San Diego angry after 56 years of support

Washington OC becomes youngest ever NFL coach

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chris Githens (left) kicks a pile of Chargers memorabilia in front of the team’s headquarters in San Diego after the move to Los Angeles was announced. THE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

SAN DIEGO • The Chargers announced Thursday morning that they are moving to Los Angeles after 56 years in San Diego. Team owner Dean Spanos made the move official with a post on Chargers. com. The team will join the Los Angeles Rams in a $2.66 billion stadium that Rams owner Stan Kroenke is building in Inglewood. “After much deliberation, I have made the decision to relocate the Chargers to Los Angeles, beginning with the 2017 NFL season,” Spanos wrote. “San Diego has been our home for 56 years. It will always be part of our identity, and my family and I have nothing but gratitude and appreciation for the support and passion our fans have shared with us over the years.” Spanos then touted the move to Los Angeles as the beginning of an “exciting era” for the team. “LA is a remarkable place, and while we played our first season there in 1960 and have had fans there ever since, our entire organization knows that we have a tremendous amount of work to do,” he wrote. “We must earn the respect and support of LA football fans. We must get back to winning. And, we must make a meaningful contribution, not just on the field, but of the field as a leader and champion for the community.” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement that he empathizes with Chargers fans but that the team did everything it could to find a stadium solution in San Diego. “For more than a decade, the San Diego Chargers have worked diligently toward finding a local stadium solution, which all sides agreed was required,” Goodell said. “Relocation is painful for teams and communities. It is especially painful for fans, and the fans in San Diego have given the Chargers strong and loyal support for more than 50 years, which makes it even more disappointing that we could not solve the stadium issue.” County Supervisor Ron Roberts, who worked aggressively with Mayor Kevin Faulconer to keep the Chargers in San Diego the last two years, criticized the team and predicted San Diego would still prosper without them. “The Chargers will stand next to Donald Sterling in the Hall of Shame,” said Roberts, comparing the team to the infamous former owner of the Clippers who moved the NBA team from San Diego to Los Angeles. He later was banned from the NBA for making racist comments. “It hurts, but we will move on without them. San Diego is a great community

and we are not dependent on the Chargers,” added Roberts, who teared up as he spoke at a City Hall news conference. The Chargers must pay the league a $550 million relocation fee, which would rise to $650 million if the team chooses to cover the payment with installments over 10 years. The team will change its logo to feature the letters L and A, arranged similarly to the logo of the Los Angeles Dodgers. It will also have a lightning bolt. The team said the new logo is part of a larger campaign called “Fight for LA” that is intended to convey the commitment of the Spanos family and the entire Chargers organization to earn the respect and loyalty of Los Angeles football fans. Until the Inglewood stadium opens in 2019 on the former site of Hollywood Park race track, the Chargers’ temporary home will be StubHub Center in Carson, which is a venue built for soccer that is much smaller than typical NFL stadiums at 30,000 seats. Charger fans were disheartened Wednesday night when websites broke early news of the decision, especially with recent talk suggesting the team might stay in San Diego and try to work out a stadium deal. On Thursday morning, some fans headed toward Chargers Park in Murphy Canyon where they heaped team gear in a pile. One Chargers flag was seen burning. City Councilman Chris Ward said it wouldn’t have been appropriate for the city to spend taxpayer money to keep the team. “The Chargers have not earned a place in line ahead of the thousands of hard working San Diegans who have supported them for decades,” Ward said. “It is a sad day for fans and unfortunate that the Chargers commitment to our city was ultimately contingent on receiving hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars, but now we can finally move forward as a community.” The lack of a modern football stadium in San Diego — and the additional revenues generated by such elaborate facilities — prompted the departure of the team, which has been one of the region’s most popular and recognizable civic institutions. The decision to move comes two months after San Diego voters rejected a tax increase for a combined stadium and convention center annex the Chargers proposed for downtown. Measure C was supported by 43.6 percent of voters, far less than the two-thirds required for approval.

Washington Redskins ofensive coordinator Sean McVay, 30, replaces Jef Fisher as the Los Angeles Rams’ head coach. ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES • The Los Angeles Rams have made Sean McVay the youngest head coach in NFL history. The Rams on Thursday hired McVay, who turns 31 years old on Jan. 24. The Washington Redskins’ offensive coordinator replaces Jef Fisher, who was fired 13 games into the Rams’ homecoming season in Los Angeles, and interim head coach John Fassel. The Rams finished 4-12 in their 13th consecutive nonwinning season. “The accomplishments and success that he has had in less than a decade in our league are impressive,” Rams owner Stan Kroenke said in a statement. “We are confident in his vision to make this team a consistent winner and we will all continue to work together to achieve our ultimate goal, bringing a Rams Super Bowl championship home to Los Angeles.” McVay spent the past three seasons as Jay Gruden’s ofensive coordinator with the Redskins. He has been an assistant since 2010 in Washington, where he worked with Gruden and Bill Callahan to build a prolific ofense led by quarterback Kirk Cousins. McVay’s most important task is likely to be the transformation of No. 1 overall pick Jared Gof into a star after his rough rookie campaign behind a struggling offensive line. “Really happy for Sean McVay!” Cousins tweeted. The Rams made the eye-catching move on the same day that the Chargers announced their relocation to Los Angeles to share the Rams’ $2.6 billion stadium. The Chargers are still without a coach, and the Rams grabbed some of their headlines by snagging one of the most interesting names on the coaching market. “I am incredibly honored by this opportunity,” McVay said in a statement, thanking Kroenke and Rams chief operating oicer Kevin Demof. “Collectively, we are committed to building a championship-caliber team, and I’m excited to start that process and make our fans proud.” McVay wowed the Rams’ top brass during two recent interviews, but he is an unorthodox choice for the franchise, which hasn’t taken many extraordinary risks during Kroenke’s tenure. While McVay is respected as an up-and-coming NFL mind, he has understandably meager experience, including none as a head coach at any level of football. But perhaps risks are in order to snap the Rams out of their 12-year playoff drought. They’ve made the playofs just

four times in the last 27 years, all during a five-year span in St. Louis from 19992003, and they haven’t had a winning record in Los Angeles since 1989. Los Angeles has a young roster, but McVay is still younger than Rams defensive lineman William Hayes. McVay doesn’t inherit an enormous amount of elite talent beyond Pro Bowl defensive lineman Aaron Donald and other topflight defensive players, but the Rams are eager to build a winning team heading into their new stadium in Inglewood, which they will share with the Chargers beginning in 2019. “He’s brought a lot to this football team, as far as offensively, and done a good job calling plays and utilizing the people that we have,” Gruden said recently. Lane Kiin was 31 years old when the Oakland Raiders hired him in January 2007. That hire didn’t go well, and McVay faces plenty of diicult work in his new job. The Rams’ offense has finished last in the NFL for two consecutive seasons. Goff threw seven interceptions and five touchdown passes while getting sacked 26 times in his half-season as their starter, while top running back Todd Gurley had a dismal second NFL season behind the same struggling ofensive line. McVay could be well-equipped for the job of tutoring Gof: In Cousins’ two seasons under McVay as the Redskins’ starting quarterback, he twice broke the venerable franchise’s records for yards passing and completions. Washington averaged 403 yards per game this season, while the Rams didn’t have a 400-yard ofensive game all year long. Although McVay is a coaching youngster, he played receiver at Miami (Ohio), and he comes from a football family. His grandfather, John, spent 21 seasons in the San Francisco 49ers’ front oice as a top executive involved in building several outstanding teams. McVay is widely expected to assemble a veteran staf around him. The Rams have repeatedly been linked to Wade Phillips, the respected defensive coordinator and former head coach. He is out of contract after the 69-year-old veteran led the Denver Broncos’ Super Bowl-winning unit last season. Phillips’ son, Wes, has been McVay’s tight ends coach in Washington. McVay held that job before becoming Gruden’s ofensive coordinator in 2014. The Redskins are left looking for two new coordinators on Gruden’s staf after McVay’s departure and defensive coordinator Joe Barry’s firing a week ago.

One year after vote on Rams’ move, San Diego also jilted ORTIZ • FROM C1

mad at the Rams’ administration, Stan Kroenke and Kevin Demof.” Unable to sucker local politicians into building him a new stadium, Chargers owner Dean Spanos turned his back on one of the most loyal fan bases in the NFL to get a bite out of the fertile LA market. In time, Spanos will learn what Kroenke and his laughable Rams learned this past season: LA doesn’t have much patience for losers. The fans who loved the Rams the most in St. Louis couldn’t help but empathize with San Diego fans. Although separated by 1,800 miles, longtime St. Louis Rams and San Diego Chargers fans were united by a shared disappointment. Nobody likes to be snubbed, whether by a sports team, family member or a casual friend. Sports franchises love to make fans believe that they’re all part of the same team, all one happy

family, pulling on the same rope. That’s how they get you to hand over your hard-earned cash for hats, jerseys, T-shirts and expensive personal seat licenses. That’s how they get communities to build sports palaces with taxes and bond issues while the owners cash in on your fanaticism and childhood memories. They are a family until team owners find richer markets to milk. For more than two decades, the Rams had become an entrenched part of the daily fabric from July until January for many families here in St. Louis. Die-hard fans viewed them as part of the family while Kroenke viewed the Rams as a business. Even the biggest and best cities in America have felt this betrayal, so there shouldn’t be any shame or stigma attached to it. The Los Angeles Dodgers left Brooklyn, and the San Francisco Giants left New York. The Indianapolis Colts abandoned Baltimore under the cover of darkness, and then the Cleveland Browns headed to Baltimore

to become the Ravens. And after 56 years in San Diego, the Chargers announced that they are returning to Los Angeles. The news out of San Diego was a sad reminder for fans still grieving the loss of a Rams franchise that had spent 22 years in St. Louis before returning to its former home. “I just kind of felt empty for those guys out there,” Hall said. “I still feel empty for our fans because I know how bad (it felt). We lost the St. Louis football Cardinals in ’87, and I worked for the St. Louis football Cardinals too in the press box.” Hall, who is the athletics director at Barat Academy, spent much of his free time for 22 years from July to January as an assistant to the equipment manager with the Rams. His job with the Rams was a true labor of love. Hall is still in mourning one year after the NFL voted to move the Rams. “I worked for them, and I was a fan,” he said. “I’m still not over it. A year ago, I was preparing for

them to move, packing up stuf.” In the week leading up to the NFL’s relocation vote last year, Hall was busy packing up equipment. He remembers holding out hope even though it seemed quite obvious that the move was imminent. “We were busy packing everything up at the Dome and out here in Rams Park,” he recalls. “And something we hadn’t done in years past was pack everything up in the equipment room and put it in the indoor facility. “We knew why we were doing that but it wasn’t told to us until about this week when the NFL meetings announced that the Rams were leaving. We were loading everything in the indoor facility and putting it into diferent sections in the indoor facility, and then the movers came and took it away weeks later.” The Chargers’ equipment guys will be busy in San Diego this offseason preparing for a much shorter drive north on Interstate 5. The drive to Los Angeles may be shorter, but the pain will be

similar for Chargers and St. Louis Rams fans. Qualcomm Stadium will sit empty on Sundays next fall, just as the Dome sat empty this fall. I took a stroll around the entire Dome on Thursday. In a little more than an hour, I saw fewer than a dozen people on a chilly afternoon. Then I headed to the convention center, where a mural of local sports teams still features a Rams player along with a Cardinals player and a Blues player with smaller figures of a St. Louis University basketball player, a soccer player and a horse race. “Welcome to the Dome at America’s Center,” read the small billboard atop the Broadway South entrance. Then the billboard message changed to “Patience.” On the one-year anniversary of the NFL’s relocation vote, St. Louis fans were reminded that they aren’t alone as they patiently adjust to losing their NFL franchise. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Boston Ottawa Florida Toronto Tampa Bay Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Columbus Washington Pittsburgh NY Rangers Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey NY Islanders

GP 43 45 40 43 39 43 41 41 GP 40 41 41 42 44 41 42 39

W 26 22 22 19 18 20 16 17 W 28 27 26 28 22 19 16 15

L 11 18 14 16 13 19 16 18 L 8 9 10 13 16 15 18 16

OT 6 5 4 8 8 4 9 6 OT 4 5 5 1 6 7 8 8

Pts 58 49 48 46 44 44 41 40 Pts 60 59 57 57 50 45 40 38

GF 133 111 103 100 120 122 95 103 GF 135 120 142 146 129 109 95 107

GA 108 110 103 114 116 129 114 119 GA 90 86 118 107 137 111 124 119

Home 15-4-2 9-10-0 13-6-4 10-8-3 10-7-2 12-7-2 9-8-3 7-10-3 Home 16-4-1 16-5-1 18-2-2 13-7-1 14-6-3 13-4-1 10-6-3 11-8-4

Away 11-7-4 13-8-5 9-8-0 9-8-5 8-6-6 8-12-2 7-8-6 10-8-3 Away 12-4-3 11-4-4 8-8-3 15-6-0 8-10-3 6-11-6 6-12-5 4-8-4

Div 10-1-4 12-5-0 6-5-1 7-7-5 8-4-1 9-3-2 4-8-3 4-8-3 Div 6-3-0 7-5-4 10-5-0 10-5-0 4-4-1 3-7-2 5-4-2 4-5-2

GF 124 130 117 116 122 109 79 GF 112 115 123 117 110 102 86

GA 107 86 123 112 133 127 130 GA 96 113 118 121 128 105 128

Home 17-4-4 14-4-0 16-5-4 12-5-5 11-9-1 11-6-4 5-13-1 Home 14-5-1 14-5-2 9-8-2 12-10-0 15-6-2 12-6-1 7-10-2

Away Div 10-8-1 9-6-1 12-5-5 7-3-2 5-10-1 9-6-2 7-11-2 9-8-1 9-12-2 9-4-1 6-11-4 8-8-3 8-12-0 5-11-0 Away Div 11-10-1 8-6-2 8-8-6 10-2-4 12-7-5 6-4-3 11-9-2 9-7-1 5-13-3 8-5-1 8-11-3 7-5-0 5-12-4 4-7-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Blues Nashville Winnipeg Dallas Colorado Paciic San Jose Anaheim Edmonton Calgary Vancouver Los Angeles Arizona

GP 44 40 41 42 44 42 39 GP 42 43 43 44 44 41 40

W 27 26 21 19 20 17 13 W 25 22 21 23 20 20 12

L 12 9 15 16 21 17 25 L 15 13 15 19 19 17 22

OT 5 5 5 7 3 8 1 OT 2 8 7 2 5 4 6

Pts 59 57 47 45 43 42 27 Pts 52 52 49 48 45 44 30

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday Philadelphia 5, Vancouver 4, SO Tampa Bay 4, Buffalo 2 Ottawa 4, Pittsburgh 1 Nashville 2, Boston 1 Minnesota 7, Montreal 1 Detroit at Dallas, late Anaheim at Colorado, late New Jersey at Edmonton, late Blues at Los Angeles, late Wednesday Florida 2, NY Islanders 1 Montreal 7, Winnipeg 4 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 Calgary 3, San Jose 2

Friday Toronto at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Calgary, 8 p.m. Winnipeg at Arizona, 8 p.m. Saturday Philadelphia at Boston, noon Nashville at Colorado, 2 p.m. NY Islanders at Carolina, 6 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Detroit, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Montreal, 6 p.m.

Columbus at Florida, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 7 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Vancouver, 6 p.m. Blues at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

Claude Giroux scored the only goal in the shootout to lift the Philadelphia Flyers to a 5-4 win over the visiting Vancouver Canucks on Thursday night. Travis Konecny, Sean Couturier, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare and Brayden Schenn scored in regulation for the Flyers, who won for just the third time in their last 10 games. Markus Granlund scored twice in regulation, and Daniel Sedin and Brandon Sutter each had a goal for Vancouver, which lost its third straight. Michal Neuvirth made 11

saves in the third period and overtime and stopped all three shots in the shootout in relief of Steve Mason, who was lifted after allowing four goals on 24 shots. Neuvirth denied Granlund, Bo Horvat and Loui Eriksson in the tiebreaker.

NOTEBOOK Rask injured, leaves game • Boston goaltender Tuukka Rask went to the locker room after taking a slap shot near his right jaw and neck. Nashville defenseman Roman Josi shot the puck that appeared to hit the All-Star goalie at the edge of his mask.

NHL SUMMARIES Lightning 4, Sabres 2

Wild 7, Canadiens 1

Buffalo 1 0 1 — 2 Tampa Bay 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Moulson 9 (Girgensons, Fedun), 2:58. 2, Tampa Bay, Palat 8 (Johnson, Drouin), 5:37 (pp). Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 3:54; Kane, BUF, (hooking), 5:12; Killorn, TB, (slashing), 11:08. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 9 (Nesterov, Namestnikov), 5:18. 4, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 17 (Hedman, Palat), 12:58. Penalties: Bishop, TB, served by Peca, (high sticking), 13:20; Hedman, TB, Major (fighting), 20:00; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 20:00. Third period: 5, Buffalo, Kane 11 (Eichel, Falk), 10:30. 6, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2 (Filppula, Boyle), 19:42 (pp). Penalties: Kucherov, TB, (slashing), 0:44; Bishop, TB, served by Bournival, (delay of game), 10:41; Paquette, TB, Major (fighting), 15:27; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 15:27; Gionta, BUF, (roughing), 15:27; Kane, BUF, served by Deslauriers, (high sticking), 17:43; Kane, BUF, served by Deslauriers, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 17:43; Kane, BUF, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:43. Shots: Buffalo 6-9-11: 26. Tampa Bay 9-8-12: 29. Power-plays: Buffalo 0 of 4; Tampa Bay 2 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Nilsson 7-4-4 (28 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 10-10-2 (26-24). A: 19,092. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

Montreal 0 0 1 — 1 Minnesota 1 3 3 — 7 First period: 1, Minnesota, Folin 1 (Staal, Brodin), 2:34. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Staal 14 (Coyle, Dumba), 6:35. 3, Minnesota, Schroeder 3 (Suter, Spurgeon), 7:14. 4, Minnesota, Niederreiter 10 (Dumba, Koivu), 17:58. Penalties: Radulov, MTL, major (high sticking), 13:51. Third period: 5, Minnesota, Zucker 10 (Spurgeon, Granlund), 3:31 (pp). 6, Minnesota, Suter 6 (Staal, Dumba), 6:06 (pp). 7, Minnesota, Niederreiter 11 (Haula, Pominville), 14:26. 8, Montreal, Plekanec 6 (Barberio, Andrighetto), 19:51 (pp). Penalties: Danault, MTL, (hooking), 1:32; Weber, MTL, (slashing), 4:51; Stewart, MIN, served by Schroeder, (cross checking), 17:59; Stewart, MIN, (roughing), 17:59; Byron, MTL, (roughing), 17:59. Shots: Montreal 8-6-7: 21. Minnesota 6-8-10: 24. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 1; Minnesota 2 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 20-7-4 (24 shots-17 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 22-7-3 (21-20). A: 19,104. Referees: Chris Lee, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Brian Mach.

Senators 4, Penguins 1 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 Ottawa 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Ryan 8 (Brassard, Wideman), 5:29 (pp). 2, Ottawa, Hoffman 12 (Turris, Karlsson), 9:26 (pp). Penalties: Hagelin, PIT, (slashing), 3:44; Ottawa bench, served by Neil (too many men on the ice), 6:19; Oleksy, PIT, (hooking), 9:19; Kuhnhackl, PIT, (holding), 16:43. Second period: 3, Ottawa, Pyatt 6 (Karlsson, Pageau), 12:50. 4, Pittsburgh, Sheary 11 (Malkin, Cole), 19:53. Penalties: Wideman, OTT, (tripping), 6:09; Borowiecki, OTT, (tripping), 16:02. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Stone 13 (Brassard, Smith), 8:59. Penalties: Bonino, PIT, (hooking), 12:31; Schultz, PIT, (interference), 17:51; Oleksy, PIT, Penalty Shot (misconduct), 18:03. Shots: Pittsburgh 8-14-8: 30. Ottawa 15-9-9: 33. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Ottawa 2 of 5. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 13-4-1 (33 shots-29 saves). Ottawa, Condon 10-6-3 (30-29). A: 17,769. Referees: Wes McCauley, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

Flyers 5, Canucks 4, SO Vancouver 1 3 0 0 — 4 Philadelphia 1 2 1 0 — 5 Philadelphia won shootout 1-0. First period: 1, Vancouver, Sedin 11 (Stecher, Sedin), 9:21 (pp). 2, Philadelphia, Konecny 7 (Weise, Couturier), 14:30 (pp). Penalties: Manning, PHI, major (high sticking), 5:31; Del zotto, PHI, major (high sticking), 8:41; Tryamkin, VAN, (slashing), 13:01; Manning, PHI, (slashing), 18:33; Del zotto, PHI, (high sticking), 19:51. Second period: 3, Vancouver, Granlund 10 (Tanev, Horvat), 1:51. 4, Philadelphia, Bellemare 2 (Read), 9:21. 5, Philadelphia, Couturier 8 (Voracek, Cousins), 9:39. 6, Vancouver, Granlund 11 (Megna, Sutter), 10:01. 7, Vancouver, Sutter 12 (Stecher, Megna), 12:46. Penalties: Eriksson, VAN, (interference), 7:16; Schenn, PHI, (interference), 17:02; Chaput, VAN, (slashing), 19:56. Third period: 8, Philadelphia, Schenn 14 (Simmonds, Giroux), 0:57 (pp). Penalties: Tryamkin, VAN, (holding), 8:50; Couturier, PHI, (hooking), 14:01. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Vancouver 0 (Granlund NG, Horvat NG, Eriksson NG), Philadelphia 1 (Cousins NG, Giroux G, Voracek NG). Shots: Vancouver 13-11-10-4: 38. Philadelphia 8-12-14-1: 35. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 8; Philadelphia 2 of 4. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 12-10-3 (35 shots-31 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 15-14-6 (24-20), Neuvirth 5-2-0 (14-14). A: 19,757. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Mark Shewchyk.

Bortuzzo returns to Blues’ lineup BLUES • FROM C1

Flyers pull of shootout win ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo (left) congratulates Patrik Berglund after Berglund scored on Monday.

Predators 2, Bruins 1 Boston 0 1 0 — 1 Nashville 0 2 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Arvidsson, NSH, (slashing), 10:31; Blidh, BOS, Major (interference), 15:31. Second period: 1, Nashville, Watson 4, 1:02. 2, Boston, Krug 3, 8:08 (pp). 3, Nashville, Forsberg 10 (Ellis, Ekholm), 17:36. Penalties: Mcquaid, BOS, Major (fighting), 4:59; Grant, NSH, Major (fighting), 4:59; Johansen, NSH, (hooking), 6:20. Third period: None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (interference), 2:24. Shots: Boston 10-13-13: 36. Nashville 6-9-4: 19. Power-plays: Boston 1 of 3; Nashville 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Mcintyre 0-3-1 (16 shots-14 saves), Rask 21-9-3 (3-3). Nashville, Saros 4-3-1 (36-35). A: 17,113. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

we’re going to have to win two of three for the rest of the year on the road — that has to be the goal,” Hitchcock said. “We’re going to go into some really uncomfortable barns and have to collect points.” That task seems daunting for a club that has played 16 road games this season and, with a record of 5-10-1, has won just one out of every three. Particularly daunting considering that when breaking down the schedule even further, 21 of the next 31 are on the road. That’s why Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk appreciates how Hitchcock is approaching it. “I think it can be (daunting) if you look at it the wrong way,” Shattenkirk said. “For us, that’s a good way to look at it, set kind of short-term goals. With 21 out of our next 31 on the road, if we look too far ahead on that, we might be looking past these early ones. Right now, playing three in four against three really tough teams, it’s definitely grabbed our attention. We know how important this game can be to set up the next two.”

STICKING WITH ALLEN After pulling goaltender Jake Allen in Tuesday’s 5-3 loss to Boston, the Blues stuck with him as the starter Thursday against Los Angeles. “You know what, you’ve just got to make decisions that if he’s your guy, he’s your guy,” Hitchcock said. “It’s easy to stick with people when things are going well. Things aren’t going well for Jake, he knows he’s going to be better, he knows he has to be better, he can be better and let’s give him the opportunity.”

Allen allowed three goals on 11 shots against the Bruins and was yanked at the start of the second period. Backup Carter Hutton gave up just one goal on the 27 shots he faced, earning praise from both Hitchcock and Allen afterward, but the club chose to stay the course. “I just think that when you’ve made a declaration that this is your starting goalie, to ask a guy to sit on it for an extended period of time doesn’t help you,” Hitchcock said. “You might as well get right back in the saddle and get going again.”

PIETRANGELO MOVES OVER Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo, a mainstay on the right side since joining the Blues, shifted to the left side Thursday against LA, making room for Colton Parayko in the top pair. That allowed the Blues to put Jay Bouwmeester and Shattenkirk together in the second pair, moves that Hitchcock believed would make the Blues more mobile. “Our feeling is right now that we need to be better transition,” Hitchcock said. “These are our four best transition defensemen, playing them all together. I’m not sure whether this is going to be the defined combination as we work through the games. But these are the four guys that we want to see in those top four positions. So whether they’re interchangeable — ‘Bouw’ plays both sides, ‘Shatty’ can play both sides — but between these four guys we want to see if we can get to where these guys are helping each other.” Pietrangelo hasn’t played much on the left side in the NHL, though he did get some valuable experience playing his offside

with Team Canada at the World Cup of Hockey in Toronto last September. “It’s a little bit different but I’ve had a couple of practices just to get the feel for it and I think I’ll be OK,” said Pietrangelo, who was playing in his 500th NHL game Thursday. “A little bit of an adjustment early on, but nothing me and (Parayko) can’t handle.” Parayko pointed out that while he and Pietrangelo haven’t played much five on five, they have established some communication playing together on the Blues’ No. 2 power-play unit. “I think so,” Parayko said. “Even little situations like that, you see tendencies in players and that could be key. I’m looking forward to it, it’s exciting, he’s obviously a great player. Getting an opportunity like that is pretty special for me.”

BORTUZZO BACK Defenseman Robert Bortuzzo returned to the lineup Thursday night after missing 16 games with a lower-body injury. It was just the 12th game of the season for Bortuzzo, who was alongside Joel Edmundson in the Blues’ third pairing. “For myself, it hasn’t been fun, sitting out and watching, but I’m looking forward to getting back in there,” Bortuzzo said. “I was paired with ‘Eddie’ in practice and obviously we played a lot together last year. We’re both pretty excited, familiar with each other and have similar styles in terms of skating and how we play defensively. So it should be good. I’m looking forward to it.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Leaders Prior to Thursday’s games POINTS Team Connor McDavid EDM Sidney Crosby PIT Patrick Kane CHI Brent Burns SJS Evgeni Malkin PIT Vladimir Tarasenko STL Artemi Panarin CHI Tyler Seguin DAL Phil Kessel PIT Cam Atkinson CBJ Mark Scheifele WPG Nikita Kucherov TBL Joe Pavelski SJS Jakub Voracek PHI Brad Marchand BOS Nikolaj Ehlers WPG Nicklas Backstrom WSH Jeff Carter LAK Patrik Laine WPG Victor Hedman TBL Alex Ovechkin WSH Auston Matthews TOR Max Pacioretty MTL Ryan Kesler ANA Leon Draisaitl EDM Nick Foligno CBJ Eric Staal MIN Claude Giroux PHI Alexander Wennberg CBJ

G 14 26 12 17 17 20 17 15 13 20 19 16 15 13 15 14 11 22 21 7 21 21 19 16 15 14 13 10 8

GOALS AGAINST Devan Dubnyk Braden Holtby Jimmy Howard Tuukka Rask Sergei Bobrovsky Carey Price Peter Budaj Matt Murray Martin Jones Chad Johnson Antti Raanta Thomas Greiss Cam Ward Scott Darling Mike Condon Roberto Luongo Corey Crawford Anders Nilsson John Gibson Pekka Rinne Craig Anderson Cam Talbot Robin Lehner Henrik Lundqvist James Reimer

W-L-OT 21-7-3 20-8-4 5-7-1 21-9-3 26-6-2 20-6-4 18-11-3 13-3-1 21-13-2 15-9-1 10-4-0 9-6-2 16-12-6 11-4-2 9-6-3 13-10-5 16-8-3 7-3-4 16-10-7 15-11-6 12-6-1 20-12-6 9-12-5 18-9-1 6-6-3

Team MIN WSH DET BOS CBJ MTL LAK PIT SJS CGY NYR NYI CAR CHI PIT, OTT FLA CHI BUF ANA NSH OTT EDM BUF NYR FLA

A 34 19 33 27 27 23 25 26 28 20 20 23 24 26 23 24 27 15 16 30 14 14 16 19 20 21 22 25 27

P 48 45 45 44 44 43 42 41 41 40 39 39 39 39 38 38 38 37 37 37 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 GAA 1.80 1.90 1.96 1.97 2.00 2.12 2.13 2.18 2.24 2.26 2.28 2.29 2.31 2.31 2.32 2.34 2.35 2.37 2.38 2.42 2.46 2.51 2.53 2.55 2.59

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Philadelphia’s Sean Couturier scores past Vancouver’s Ryan Miller as Alex Biega looks on.


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Boston Ottawa Florida Toronto Tampa Bay Bufalo Detroit Metropolitan Columbus Washington Pittsburgh NY Rangers Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey NY Islanders

GP 43 45 40 43 39 43 41 42 GP 40 41 41 42 44 41 43 39

W 26 22 22 19 18 20 16 17 W 28 27 26 28 22 19 16 15

L 11 18 14 16 13 19 16 19 L 8 9 10 13 16 15 18 16

OT 6 5 4 8 8 4 9 6 OT 4 5 5 1 6 7 9 8

Pts 58 49 48 46 44 44 41 40 Pts 60 59 57 57 50 45 41 38

GF 133 111 103 100 120 122 95 105 GF 135 120 142 146 129 109 97 107

GA 108 110 103 114 116 129 114 124 GA 90 86 118 107 137 111 127 119

Home 15-4-2 9-10-0 13-6-4 10-8-3 10-7-2 12-7-2 9-8-3 7-10-3 Home 16-4-1 16-5-1 18-2-2 13-7-1 14-6-3 13-4-1 10-6-3 11-8-4

Away 11-7-4 13-8-5 9-8-0 9-8-5 8-6-6 8-12-2 7-8-6 10-9-3 Away 12-4-3 11-4-4 8-8-3 15-6-0 8-10-3 6-11-6 6-12-6 4-8-4

Div 10-1-4 12-5-0 6-5-1 7-7-5 8-4-1 9-3-2 4-8-3 4-8-3 Div 6-3-0 7-5-4 10-5-0 10-5-0 4-4-1 3-7-2 5-4-2 4-5-2

GF 124 130 118 116 114 122 80 GF 119 112 126 117 107 110 86

GA 107 86 128 112 129 133 134 GA 114 96 120 121 106 128 128

Home 17-4-4 14-4-0 16-5-4 12-5-5 12-6-4 11-9-1 5-14-1 Home 14-5-2 14-5-1 10-8-2 12-10-0 13-6-1 15-6-2 7-10-2

Away Div 10-8-1 9-6-1 12-5-5 7-3-2 5-11-1 9-6-2 7-11-2 9-8-1 6-11-4 8-8-3 9-12-2 9-4-1 8-12-0 5-11-0 Away Div 9-8-6 10-2-4 11-10-1 8-6-2 12-7-5 6-4-3 11-9-2 9-7-1 8-11-3 7-5-0 5-13-3 8-5-1 5-12-4 4-7-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Blues Nashville Dallas Winnipeg Colorado Paciic Anaheim San Jose Edmonton Calgary Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 44 40 42 42 43 44 40 GP 44 42 44 44 42 44 40

W 27 26 21 19 18 20 13 W 23 25 22 23 21 20 12

M 2 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

L 12 9 16 16 17 21 26 L 13 15 15 19 17 19 22

OT 5 5 5 7 8 3 1 OT 8 2 7 2 4 5 6

Pts 59 57 47 45 44 43 27 Pts 54 52 51 48 46 45 30

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday Los Angeles 5, Blues 1 Philadelphia 5, Vancouver 4, SO Tampa Bay 4, Buffalo 2 Ottawa 4, Pittsburgh 1 Nashville 2, Boston 1 Minnesota 7, Montreal 1 Dallas 5, Detroit 2 Anaheim 4, Colorado 1 Edmonton 3, New Jersey 2, OT Wednesday Florida 2, NY Islanders 1 Montreal 7, Winnipeg 4 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 Calgary 3, San Jose 2

Friday Toronto at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Calgary, 8 p.m. Winnipeg at Arizona, 8 p.m. Saturday Philadelphia at Boston, noon Nashville at Colorado, 2 p.m. NY Islanders at Carolina, 6 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Detroit, 6 p.m. NY Rangers at Montreal, 6 p.m.

Columbus at Florida, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 7 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Blues at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Vancouver, 6 p.m. Blues at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

Flyers pull of shootout win ASSOCIATED PRESS

Claude Giroux scored the only goal in the shootout to lift the Philadelphia Flyers to a 5-4 win over the visiting Vancouver Canucks on Thursday night. Travis Konecny, Sean Couturier, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare and Brayden Schenn scored in regulation for the Flyers, who won for just the third time in their last 10 games. Markus Granlund scored twice in regulation, and Daniel Sedin and Brandon Sutter each had a goal for Vancouver, which lost its third straight. Michal Neuvirth made 11

saves in the third period and overtime and stopped all three shots in the shootout in relief of Steve Mason, who was lifted after allowing four goals on 24 shots. Neuvirth denied Granlund, Bo Horvat and Loui Eriksson in the tiebreaker.

NOTEBOOK

Road schedule intensiies Blues must win two of every three away games, says Hitchcock BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LOS ANGELES • By Ken Hitch-

cock’s count, the Blues need to take two of the three games on their West Coast swing, and then continue that clip on the road for the rest of the regular season. The Blues opened the second half of the season in Los Angeles Thursday in third place in the Central Division with 47 points. At the start of the night, their lead was just four points over Nashville and Winnipeg and five points over Dallas. The Blues, however, have more road games to close out the season than any of those teams, with 25 of their 41 away from Scottrade Center. Nashville has 21 road games remaining, while Dallas has 20 and Winnipeg 18. “If we expect to win and get in the playofs, we’re going to have to win two of three for the rest of the year on the road — that has to be the goal,” Hitchcock said. “We’re going to go into some really uncomfortable barns and have to collect points.” That task seems daunting for a club that has played 16 road games this season and, with a record of 5-10-1, has won just one out of every three. Particularly daunting considering that when breaking down the schedule even further, 21 of the next 31 are on the road. That’s why Blues defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk appreciates how Hitchcock is approaching it. “I think it can be (daunting) if you look at it the wrong way,” Shattenkirk said. “For us, that’s a good way to look at it, set kind of short-term goals. With 21 out of our next 31 on the road, if we look too far ahead on that, we might be looking past these early ones. Right now, playing three in four against three really tough teams, it’s definitely grabbed our attention. We know how important this game can be to set up the next two.”

Rask injured, leaves game • Boston goaltender Tuukka Rask went to the locker room after taking a slap shot near his right jaw and neck. Nashville defenseman Roman Josi shot the puck that appeared to hit the All-Star goalie at the edge of his mask.

STICKING WITH ALLEN After pulling goaltender Jake Allen in Tuesday’s 5-3 loss to Boston, the Blues stuck with him as the starter Thursday against Los Angeles. “You know what, you’ve just got to make decisions that if he’s your guy, he’s your guy,” Hitchcock said. “It’s easy to stick with people when things are going well. Things aren’t going well for Jake, he knows he’s going to be better, he knows he has to be better, he can be better and let’s give him the opportunity.” Allen allowed three goals on 11 shots against the Bruins and was yanked at the start of the second period. Backup Carter Hutton gave up just one goal on the 27 shots he faced, earning praise from both Hitchcock and Allen afterward, but the club chose to stay the course. “I just think that when you’ve made a declaration that this is your starting goalie, to ask a guy to sit on it for an extended period of time doesn’t help you,” Hitchcock said. “You might as well get right back in the saddle and get going again.”

PIETRANGELO MOVES OVER Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo, a mainstay on the right side since joining the Blues, shifted to the left side Thursday against LA, making room for Colton Parayko in the top pair. That allowed the Blues to put Jay Bouwmeester and Shattenkirk together in the second pair, moves that Hitchcock believed would make the Blues more mobile. “Our feeling is right now that we need to be better transition,” Hitchcock said. “These are our four best transition defensemen, playing them all together. I’m not sure whether this is going to be the defined combination as we work through the games. But these are the four guys that we want to see in those top four positions. So whether they’re interchangeable — ‘Bouw’ plays

both sides, ‘Shatty’ can play both sides — but between these four guys we want to see if we can get to where these guys are helping each other.” Pietrangelo hasn’t played much on the left side in the NHL, though he did get some valuable experience playing his offside with Team Canada at the World Cup of Hockey in Toronto last September. “It’s a little bit different but I’ve had a couple of practices just to get the feel for it and I think I’ll be OK,” said Pietrangelo, who was playing in his 500th NHL game Thursday. “A little bit of an adjustment early on, but nothing me and (Parayko) can’t handle.” Parayko pointed out that while he and Pietrangelo haven’t played much five on five, they have established some communication playing together on the Blues’ No. 2 power-play unit. “I think so,” Parayko said. “Even little situations like that, you see tendencies in players and that could be key. I’m looking forward to it, it’s exciting, he’s obviously a great player. Getting an opportunity like that is pretty special for me.”

BORTUZZO BACK Defenseman Robert Bortuzzo returned to the lineup Thursday night after missing 16 games with a lower-body injury. It was just the 12th game of the season for Bortuzzo, who was alongside Joel Edmundson in the Blues’ third pairing. “For myself, it hasn’t been fun, sitting out and watching, but I’m looking forward to getting back in there,” Bortuzzo said. “I was paired with ‘Eddie’ in practice and obviously we played a lot together last year. We’re both pretty excited, familiar with each other and have similar styles in terms of skating and how we play defensively. So it should be good. I’m looking forward to it.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

NHL SUMMARIES Lightning 4, Sabres 2

Wild 7, Canadiens 1

Buffalo 1 0 1 — 2 Tampa Bay 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Buffalo, Moulson 9 (Girgensons, Fedun), 2:58. 2, Tampa Bay, Palat 8 (Johnson, Drouin), 5:37 (pp). Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 3:54; Kane, BUF, (hooking), 5:12; Killorn, TB, (slashing), 11:08. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 9 (Nesterov, Namestnikov), 5:18. 4, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 17 (Hedman, Palat), 12:58. Penalties: Bishop, TB, served by Peca, (high sticking), 13:20; Hedman, TB, Major (fighting), 20:00; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 20:00. Third period: 5, Buffalo, Kane 11 (Eichel, Falk), 10:30. 6, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2 (Filppula, Boyle), 19:42 (pp). Penalties: Kucherov, TB, (slashing), 0:44; Bishop, TB, served by Bournival, (delay of game), 10:41; Paquette, TB, Major (fighting), 15:27; Foligno, BUF, Major (fighting), 15:27; Gionta, BUF, (roughing), 15:27; Kane, BUF, served by Deslauriers, (high sticking), 17:43; Kane, BUF, served by Deslauriers, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 17:43; Kane, BUF, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:43. Shots: Buffalo 6-9-11: 26. Tampa Bay 9-8-12: 29. Power-plays: Buffalo 0 of 4; Tampa Bay 2 of 5. Goalies: Buffalo, Nilsson 7-4-4 (28 shots-25 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 10-10-2 (26-24). A: 19,092. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Evgeny Romasko. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Pierre Racicot.

Montreal 0 0 1 — 1 Minnesota 1 3 3 — 7 First period: 1, Minnesota, Folin 1 (Staal, Brodin), 2:34. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Minnesota, Staal 14 (Coyle, Dumba), 6:35. 3, Minnesota, Schroeder 3 (Suter, Spurgeon), 7:14. 4, Minnesota, Niederreiter 10 (Dumba, Koivu), 17:58. Penalties: Radulov, MTL, major (high sticking), 13:51. Third period: 5, Minnesota, Zucker 10 (Spurgeon, Granlund), 3:31 (pp). 6, Minnesota, Suter 6 (Staal, Dumba), 6:06 (pp). 7, Minnesota, Niederreiter 11 (Haula, Pominville), 14:26. 8, Montreal, Plekanec 6 (Barberio, Andrighetto), 19:51 (pp). Penalties: Danault, MTL, (hooking), 1:32; Weber, MTL, (slashing), 4:51; Stewart, MIN, served by Schroeder, (cross checking), 17:59; Stewart, MIN, (roughing), 17:59; Byron, MTL, (roughing), 17:59. Shots: Montreal 8-6-7: 21. Minnesota 6-8-10: 24. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 1; Minnesota 2 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 20-7-4 (24 shots-17 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 22-7-3 (21-20). A: 19,104. Referees: Chris Lee, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Brian Mach.

Flyers 5, Canucks 4, SO Vancouver 1 3 0 0 — 4 Philadelphia 1 2 1 0 — 5 Philadelphia won shootout 1-0. First period: 1, Vancouver, Sedin 11 (Stecher, Sedin), 9:21 (pp). 2, Philadelphia, Konecny 7 (Weise, Couturier), 14:30 (pp). Penalties: Manning, PHI, major (high sticking), 5:31; Del zotto, PHI, major (high sticking), 8:41; Tryamkin, VAN, (slashing), 13:01; Manning, PHI, (slashing), 18:33; Del zotto, PHI, (high sticking), 19:51. Second period: 3, Vancouver, Granlund 10 (Tanev, Horvat), 1:51. 4, Philadelphia, Bellemare 2 (Read), 9:21. 5, Philadelphia, Couturier 8 (Voracek, Cousins), 9:39. 6, Vancouver, Granlund 11 (Megna, Sutter), 10:01. 7, Vancouver, Sutter 12 (Stecher, Megna), 12:46. Penalties: Eriksson, VAN, (interference), 7:16; Schenn, PHI, (interference), 17:02; Chaput, VAN, (slashing), 19:56. Third period: 8, Philadelphia, Schenn 14 (Simmonds, Giroux), 0:57 (pp). Penalties: Tryamkin, VAN, (holding), 8:50; Couturier, PHI, (hooking), 14:01. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Vancouver 0 (Granlund NG, Horvat NG, Eriksson NG), Philadelphia 1 (Cousins NG, Giroux G, Voracek NG). Shots: Vancouver 13-11-10-4: 38. Philadelphia 8-12-14-1: 35. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 8; Philadelphia 2 of 4. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 12-10-3 (35 shots-31 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 15-14-6 (24-20), Neuvirth 5-2-0 (14-14). A: 19,757. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Mark Shewchyk.

Predators 2, Bruins 1 Boston 0 1 0 — 1 Nashville 0 2 0 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Arvidsson, NSH, (slashing), 10:31; Blidh, BOS, Major (interference), 15:31. Second period: 1, Nashville, Watson 4, 1:02. 2, Boston, Krug 3, 8:08 (pp). 3, Nashville, Forsberg 10 (Ellis, Ekholm), 17:36. Penalties: Mcquaid, BOS, Major (fighting), 4:59; Grant, NSH, Major (fighting), 4:59; Johansen, NSH, (hooking), 6:20. Third period: None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (interference), 2:24. Shots: Boston 10-13-13: 36. Nashville 6-9-4: 19. Power-plays: Boston 1 of 3; Nashville 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Mcintyre 0-3-1 (16 shots-14 saves), Rask 21-9-3 (3-3). Nashville, Saros 4-3-1 (36-35). A: 17,113. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Scott Cherrey.

Ducks 4, Avalanche 1 Anaheim 2 1 1 — 4 Colorado 1 0 0 — 1 First period: 1, Anaheim, Silfverberg 13, 3:52. 2, Colorado, Mackinnon 11, 5:24. 3, Anaheim, Rakell 17 (Getzlaf, Bieksa), 6:15. Penalties: Grigorenko, COL, (interference), 12:42. Second period: 4, Anaheim, Kesler 17 (Theodore, Cogliano), 6:03. Penalties: Mcleod, COL, Major (fighting), 2:42; Cramarossa, ANA, Major (fighting), 2:42; Kesler, ANA, (tripping), 10:41. Third period: 5, Anaheim, Perry 8 (Fowler, Rakell), 18:24. Penalties: Silfverberg, ANA, (high sticking), 6:34; Vatanen, ANA, (tripping), 10:11. Shots: Anaheim 14-10-8: 32. Colorado 8-11-15: 34. Power-plays: Anaheim 0 of 1; Colorado 0 of 3. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 17-10-7 (34 shots-33 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 6-15-0 (31-28). A: 14,589.

Oilers 3, Devils 2, OT New Jersey 1 1 0 0 — 2 Edmonton 0 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, New Jersey, Zajac 9 (Palmieri, Cammalleri), 18:06. Penalties: Cammalleri, NJ, (tripping), 4:28; Severson, NJ, (hooking), 8:31; Letestu, EDM, (tripping), 14:55; Russell, EDM, Major (fighting), 20:00; Palmieri, NJ, Major (fighting), 20:00. Second period: 2, Edmonton, Sekera 5 (Draisaitl, Larsson), 0:16. 3, New Jersey, Santini 1 (Hall, Parenteau), 19:09. Penalties: Larsson, EDM, (roughing), 4:11; Kassian, EDM, (tripping), 14:00. Third period: 4, Edmonton, Maroon 17 (Draisaitl, Mcdavid), 12:36. Penalties: Hall, NJ, served by Wood, major (high sticking), 2:45; Kassian, EDM, (roughing), 2:45. Overtime: 5, Edmonton, Draisaitl 16 (Klefbom, Mcdavid), 1:50. Penalties: None. Shots: New Jersey 6-7-4-1: 18. Edmonton 9-9-12-4: 34. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 3; Edmonton 0 of 4. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 12-14-7 (34 shots-31 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 21-12-6 (18-16). A: 18,347. Referees: Jon Mclsaac, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Mark Wheler. Pollock. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, John Grandt.

Senators 4, Penguins 1 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 Ottawa 2 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Ottawa, Ryan 8 (Brassard, Wideman), 5:29 (pp). 2, Ottawa, Hoffman 12 (Turris, Karlsson), 9:26 (pp). Penalties: Hagelin, PIT, (slashing), 3:44; Ottawa bench, served by Neil (too many men on the ice), 6:19; Oleksy, PIT, (hooking), 9:19; Kuhnhackl, PIT, (holding), 16:43. Second period: 3, Ottawa, Pyatt 6 (Karlsson, Pageau), 12:50. 4, Pittsburgh, Sheary 11 (Malkin, Cole), 19:53. Penalties: Wideman, OTT, (tripping), 6:09; Borowiecki, OTT, (tripping), 16:02. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Stone 13 (Brassard, Smith), 8:59. Penalties: Bonino, PIT, (hooking), 12:31; Schultz, PIT, (interference), 17:51; Oleksy, PIT, Penalty Shot (misconduct), 18:03. Shots: Pittsburgh 8-14-8: 30. Ottawa 15-9-9: 33. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Ottawa 2 of 5. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 13-4-1 (33 shots-29 saves). Ottawa, Condon 10-6-3 (30-29). A: 17,769. Referees: Wes McCauley, Garrett Rank. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Michel Cormier.

Stars 5, Red Wings 2 Detroit 2 0 0 — 2 Dallas 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, Dallas, Korpikoski 6 (Benn, Sharp), 3:39. 2, Detroit, Nyquist 5 (Zetterberg, Vanek), 14:09 (pp). 3, Detroit, Zetterberg 8 (Mantha, Nyquist), 15:42. Penalties: Eakin, DAL, (hooking), 6:55; Ritchie, DAL, (high sticking), 10:51; Dallas bench, served by Seguin (too many men on the ice), 13:03; Faksa, DAL, (high sticking), 13:10. Second period: 4, Dallas, Ritchie 9 (Faksa), 3:31. 5, Dallas, Klingberg 6 (Shore), 15:53. 6, Dallas, Johns 4 (Oduya, Spezza), 16:42. Penalties: Mantha, DET, (boarding), 0:47. Third period: 7, Dallas, Eaves 15, 18:54. Penalties: Spezza, DAL, (tripping), 14:22. Shots: Detroit 11-6-16: 33. Dallas 4-12-5: 21. Power-plays: Detroit 1 of 5; Dallas 0 of 1. Goalies: Detroit, Mrazek 9-11-4 (20 shots-16 saves). Dallas, Niemi 9-7-4 (33-31). A: 18,532. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Shane Heyer.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blues goalie Carter Hutton (left) blocks a shot by Kings right winger Devin Setoguchi as defenseman Robert Bortuzzo defends Thursday.

Blues muster just 22 shots on goal BLUES • FROM C1

up three goals on just 15 shots. Backup Carter Hutton relieved him, but gave up a goal on the second shot he saw, as the onslaught continued. Jake Muzzin and Tanner Pearson each finished with two goals, as the Blues dropped the first game of a three-game road trip. The club will be of Friday before playing a back-to-back set in San Jose and Anaheim over the weekend. By then, the Blues will be playing to hold onto third place in the Central Division. Their lead shrunk to two points, 47-45, over fourth-place Nashville Thursday following the Predators’ win over Boston. The Blues were eager to get on the road following a season-long six-game homestand that ended 3-3. But after saying they were ready to hit the reset button on a road record that stood at 5-10-1 before Thursday, they were ready to hit it again after the first period. The Blues stuck with Allen Thursday, but that’s going to be more diicult to do moving forward after another demoralizing appearance Thursday. After allowing three goals on 11 shots in the first period of Tuesday’s loss to Boston, Allen gave up two goals on 12 shots in the opening frame against LA — and both were stoppable. The Blues’ Jori Lehtera didn’t help the team’s chances for a

strong start when he took an offensive-zone, high-sticking penalty that drew blood on the Kings’ Derek Forbort, leading to a four-minute double-minor. On LA’s first shot of the manadvantage, Muzzin put a 38-foot slap shot on net from Allen’s right side that beat him far-side for a 1-0 lead just 3:18 into the game. The power-play goal was the 10th given up by the Blues’ sixth-ranked penalty-killing unit in the last 32 attempts. The Blues had what turned out to be their only chance to stay in the game midway through the first period when LA was whistled for back-to-back minors. But their own power play failed to muster a single shot on net in four minutes of man-advantage time. LA added a second goal late in the first period for a 2-0 lead and the rout was on. Allen had repeated this week that he wanted to be the backbone of the team, but the Kings’ second goal was a backbreaker. Trevor Lewis skated into the offensive zone, and with Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo backing off, Lewis squeezed an innocent wrist shot from the top of the circle through Allen’s left arm. Unlike Tuesday against Boston, Allen did come out for the second period, but he didn’t last long. LA continued to skate with ease up and down the ice and the Kings’ third goal was a per-

fect example of that. Anze Kopitar fed ahead to Marian Gaborik, who dropped it for Muzzin. And on just LA’s second shot of the period, Muzzin netted his second goal of the night, a slap shot that chased the goalie from the game. Allen tossed his stick and blocker with some gusto and sat with his mask on before finally trading it for a baseball hat. It marked the fifth time this season that he’s been pulled for a poor performance and the third time in his last five games. In those outings, he’s given up nine goals on a total of 40 shots. Hutton gave up a goal to Pearson on the second shot he faced, and the Blues trailed 4-0 for the second straight game. Just as they did Tuesday, the Blues finally got on the board at that point with 12:31 left in the second period. Paul Stastny picked up his 10th of the season on a goal that needed video review to prove that there was no distinct kicking motion or goaltender inference. The Blues had just two shots on goal in the second period and at one point went 19:41 without one. They now have just 39 shots on goal combined in their last two games, including Tuesday when they also had a two-shot first period. The Blues couldn’t make it to the third period Thursday against LA without giving up another, as Pearson posted his second of the game with 11.3 seconds left for a 5-1 deficit.


01.13.2017 • Friday • M 1

GIRLS BASKETBALL

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

GIRLS BASKETBALL

WORTH THE WAIT Columbia ends Breese Central’s 56-game conference streak BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, ILL. • Co-

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Ally Frazier (32) of Festus pulls down a rebound in front of Kelsey Boyd (23) of Hillsboro during a game on Thursday.

Fast start helps Festus blitz past rival Hillsboro BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

HILLSBORO, MO. • The

Jeferson County girls basketball matchup between host Hillsboro and Festus had the makings of a game with plenty of sizzle Thursday. After all, the teams had a combined 20 wins and just three losses heading into the showdown. But Festus quickly took control and rolled to a 5324 Jefferson County Athletics Association win. “This feels so good because no one from Festus likes Hillsboro,” Festus senior Jordan Oetting said. “You never want to take a loss to them because that’s our biggest rival.” Festus (9-2 overall, 1-0 conference) got off to its strong start behind senior Alex Tinnin. She scored six quick points in leading the Tigers to a lead that would grow to 21-6 by the end of the first quarter, much to the delight of coach Ron Rhodes. “If we can shoot the ball well and put it in the hole, we’re tough to beat,” Rhodes said. “Alex Tinnin had a phenomenal ballgame. She had six quick points that really got us going and she’s not really a scorer.” While Festus started strong, the Tigers’ defense clamped down on Hillsboro senior Lexi Close, the area’s leading scorer heading into the game. She had four quick points and finished with eight. “We concentrated on her and made sure that we always knew what side of the floor she was going

to,” Rhodes said. “We sort of cheated to her side all of the time. The kids really responded. The girls realized that this game was probably for conference. They knew they wanted this one and they came in here and played really well.” Festus led 33-12 at halftime, and an 11-game Hillsboro win streak was all but over. Hillsboro (12-2, 0-1 JCC) seemed stuck in neutral from the start and the situation never really improved, according to Hawks coach Joe Fehlker. “That was tough because we really did not play well the first quarter and it’s tough to play from behind against a team like that,” Fehlker said. “Festus didn’t have anybody that jumped out. It seemed like everybody made shots.” The win is Festus’ fourth in a row over Hillsboro, dating back to 2013. That fact wasn’t lost on Oetting. “I’ve never lost to Hillsboro,” Oetting said. “They are such a big rival, so it’s special to keep wining against them.” Jordan Oetting and her sister — sophomore Jenna Oetting — led Festus with 11 points each. Tinnin and senior Ashley Fallert added eight points each for the Tigers. The scoring spread was something Rhodes said he was most proud in the win. The team’s ball movement was the highlight in the win, Rhodes said. “We did make some extra passes tonight,” Rhodes said. “That’s big this time of year, so I’m very happy, very happy.”

lumbia High senior forward Madelyne Juenger had heard enough about what she calls, “Big Bad Breese Central.” “ T h ey ’ve h a d o u r number for a long time,” Juenger said. Not anymore. Juenger’s steal and layup with 19 seconds left lifted Columbia to a thrilling 46-44 upset of traditional power Central on Thursday in a Cahokia Conference showdown. The Cougars had won 56 successive league games. Their last loss was a 42-40 setback at Columbia on Jan. 12, 2011. The impressive streak covered five-plus seasons and 1,824 calendar days. “Tip your cap to Columbia,” Central coach Nathan Ruether said. “They definitely deserved to win the game tonight. They were the better team.” Juenger’s basket broke a 44-44 tie and nailed down one of the biggest wins in the history of the program. “ O u r g i rl s n eve r stopped believing,” Columbia coach Scott Germain said. “Breese Central has been on top of the mountain for so long and everyone was trying to get to where they are. They’re the team and program that everyone wants to be.” The Eagles (14-6, 6-1) used a strong defensive effort down the stretch to take the game away from the Cougars (10-10, 6-1). They recorded three steals in the final 1 minute 15 seconds, including a key theft by sophomore Sophia Bonaldi, who finished with a game-high 15 points. “This wasn’t as much for us as it was for the players before us and (Germain),” Bonaldi said. “This is so important for them.” Central has won the outright Cahokia Conference title each of the last 10 seasons. They may have to share that crown this time around. The teams split their two meetings this year. Both

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Columbia coach Scott Germain (center) led the Eagles girls basketball team against Breese Central on Thursday.

have three league games remaining. “This is good for our confidence for the rest of the season,” said Juenger, who will play soccer at Southern Indiana University. Central took a 44-42 lead on a 3-point by play Oliva Wesselmann with 2:13 remaining. Columbia senior Courtn ey We i l ba c h e r a n swered with a pair of free throws to set the stage for Juenger’s game-winning basket. In a perfectly timed move, Juenger stepped in front of a pass and sailed in ahead of the field for the layup. “I was just telling myself to slow down and make sure I made it,” said Juenger, who finished with 14 points. Breese Central used its aggressive defense and patient offense to build a 32-25 lead midway through the third period. Junior Carson Newkirk, who finished with a teamhigh 11 points, started a 6-0 run that gave the visitors some breathing room. But the Eagles responded with a 6-0 blitz of their own in the final 5:29 of the third quarter to

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Columbia’s Madelyne Juenger (left) drives around Breese Central’s Carson Newkirk to the basket at Columbia.

climb to within one point. The Cougars, behind a Newkirk basket, built a 3935 cushion with 4:22 left in the contest. Juenger then took over with a five-point explosion to give her team a 40-39 lead — its first advantage since the first period. Columbia turned up the heat defensively down the stretch, forcing the Cougars into numerous errors. “Way too many turnovers,” Ruether said. “They played hard and we’re obviously more prepared

than we were.” Germain was on cloud nine after the landmark triumph. “I thought he was going to cry,” Bonaldi said. The Eagles are hoping the win can kick-start them on a successful postseason path. “ We h a d a g r e a t practice and we came i n h e re fo c u s e d , e s p e c i a l l y o n d e fe n s e , which was the differe n c e ,” J u e n ge r s a i d . “Our defense was unbelievable tonight.”

MORE COVERAGE AND SCHEDULES ONLINE AT STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM Check out our schedules for complete tournament brackets and rescheduled games from this week.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Summit 7 6 18 14 45 Lift For Life 9 12 7 6 34 S (4-7): Coughlin 17, Peat 13. FG 16 (4), FT 9-14. L (5-10): Dabney 12. FG 12 (6), FT 4-7. Haz. Central 15 19 14 14 62 McCluer 13 20 12 10 55 H (9-6): C. Williams 20, Wright 15. FG 22 (3), FT 15-23. McCluer North 13 15 12 27 67 Haz. West 13 13 21 13 60 H (3-9): Thornton 23, McClellan 13, Walton 12. FG 21 (4), FT 14-22. O’Fallon 17 23 13 17 70 Ladue 10 9 9 37 65 O (11-5): Norleet 15, Hodge 13, Orr 10. FG 27 (5), FT 11-27. Conluence 28 20 17 19 84 Lovejoy 13 16 19 11 59 L (3-13): Wallace 35. FG 22 (4), FT 11-26. Webster 19 17 12 14 62 Smith-Cotton 7 14 24 14 59 W (10-2): Ramey 21, Ford 16, Potts 16. FG 23 (3), FT 13-17. Metro 2 5 8 8 23 Soldan 23 16 22 10 71 M (2-12): Davie 10. FG 7 (1), FT 8-17. S (9-5): J. Little 17, Wooten 14, J. Little 13, Bishop 10. FG 31 (8), FT 1-7. Carnahan 20 27 11 18 76 Sumner 12 8 15 4 39 C (7-8): Williams 16, Gibson 15, Brookins 13, Wright 12, Clay 11. FG 27 (6), FT 16-25. S (2-7): Troupe 17, Pierce 10. FG 16 (0), FT 7-10.

DuBourg 2 10 5 13 30 St. Mary’s 21 27 22 10 80 S (13-1): Sakamoto 19, Mitchell 11. FG 37 (4), FT 2-5. MS-Berkeley 18 6 19 16 59 Afton 18 12 17 7 54 A (8-4): Williams 17, Gordon 12, Little 12. FG 18 (7), FT 11-14. St. Pius X 13 12 7 28 60 Brentwood 15 22 20 21 78 S (4-11): Krodinger 20, Thornton 10. FG 20 (10), FT 10-17. B (5-6): C. Hill 17, Sappington 16, Jones 15, Tate 13, Harris 10. FG 28 (4), FT 18-25. Kirkwood 7 15 12 23 57 Jennings 12 16 19 17 64 K (6-5): Gunn 13, Lien 11, Loyd 11. FG 20 (9), FT 8-15. J (13-2): Younge 32, R. Johnson 10. FG 25 (3), FT 11-19. Marissa 8 11 12 10 41 Chester 13 15 14 12 54 M (8-7): K. Smith 22. FG 17 (4), FT 3-4. DuQuoin 11 9 7 13 40 Nashville 13 15 23 7 58 D (2-4): Vogel 12. FG 15 (3), FT 7-14. N (12-5): Kemp 19, Heggemeier 13, Brink 11. FG 23 (5), FT 7-14.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Duchesne 13 0 8 19 40 FH North 8 12 15 11 46 D (3-12): Schroeder 24. FG 15 (0), FT 10-15. Miller Career 20 22 19 11 72 McKinley 3 10 7 0 20 Mi (10-3): Z. Hodges 12, Seltzer 12, Howard

11, Wicks 10. FG 28 (5), FT 11-19. MICDS 13 21 8 14 56 Visitation 13 9 9 8 39 M (13-1): J. Brooks 15, L. Hughes 10. FG 17 (6), FT 16-23. V (7-7): Torrey 18, Spence 11. FG 16 (3), FT 4-8. Afton 9 0 4 10 23 MS-Berkeley 5 12 11 9 37 A (8-4): Brown 10. FG 9 (3), FT 2-9. McCluer North 11 10 8 11 40 Haz. East 2 3 10 6 21 H (3-10): Gross 8. FG 6 (1), FT 8-17. Riverview 9 7 7 5 28 Haz. West 18 24 15 6 63 R (3-9): Dukes 11. FG 10 (2), FT 6-12. H (6-3): Chappel 24, King 12, Meeks 11. FG 22 (5), FT 14-22. Eureka 11 9 7 10 37 Jef City 8 15 11 15 49 E (8-5): Archambault 10. FG 16 (3), FT 2-4. A. Marquette 4 8 11 11 34 Mount Olive 12 13 10 19 54 M (18-2): Niehaus 20, Murphy 14, Henke 12. FG 17 (1), FT 19-26. In. Word 18 27 21 9 75 Nerinx Hall 17 9 10 5 41 N (7-5): Graf 10. FG 11 (3), FT 16-25. St. Joseph’s 12 13 19 11 55 Cor Jesu 12 19 23 15 69 C (9-6): Erbs 19, Sullivan 18, Erusha 14, Zoellner 12. FG 25 (11), FT 8-12. New Athens 13 20 10 12 55 Dupo 9 2 5 7 23 N (12-6): Ragland 12. FG 21 (1), FT 12-21. Sparta 11 10 17 14 52 Gibault 6 10 8 14 38 G (9-9): Ladyman 10. FG 14 (4), FT 6-10.

North Tech 9 15 16 2 42 Althof 9 24 22 23 78 A (15-7): Reimer 21, Vaught 18, Martz 14, Kaltwasser 12. FG 30 (8), FT 10-14. Kennedy 5 3 8 8 24 Notre Dame 15 6 12 11 44 K (3-12): Burjoski 13. FG 7 (2), FT 8-16. N (48): Boemer 12, Lato 11. FG 18 (5), FT 3-12. Pky. Central 10 11 15 6 42 Oakville 7 6 11 10 34 P (9-2): G. Stephens 13, O. Stephens 12, Cooke 10. FG 16 (0), FT 10-17. O (5-7): Walters 12. FG 13 (1), FT 7-14. St.Chas. West 5 12 3 16 36 Borgia 17 10 15 11 53 B (8-2): Moss 24, Gettemeier 20. FG 19 (8), FT 7-19. Jeferson 9 19 9 1 38 St. Pius X 18 9 16 19 62 S (8-7): Cook 24, Mickley 15, Linderer 13. FG 21 (3), FT 17-30. Waterloo 7 17 17 18 59 Jerseyville 21 8 12 21 62 W (7-9): Finnerty 20, Luedeman 12, Whiteside 10. FG 23 (0), FT 13-28. Festus 21 12 11 9 53 Hillsboro 6 6 7 5 24 F (9-2): J. Oetting 11, J. Oetting 11. FG 18 (4), FT 13-21. Edwardsville 25 22 19 16 82 Alton 8 5 8 8 29 E (18-0): Martin 22, M. Silvey 21, Pranger 16. FG 38 (2), FT 4-10. Lebanon 17 23 16 3 59 Marissa 6 1 6 13 26 L (18-0): K. Bass 17, E. Reinneck 17. FG 27 (4), FT 1-4.

Bellvl. East 17 19 19 18 73 Granite City 8 8 19 18 53 G (4-9): Moore 21, Garrett 17. FG 19 (4), FT 11-21. E. St. Louis 13 15 6 9 43 O’Fallon 12 15 9 27 63 O (12-5): Durk 23, Lane 13, Stubbleield 10. FG 20 (3), FT 20-27. Bellvl. West 16 16 11 7 55 Collinsville 16 8 16 10 58 C (7-7): Buehne 19, Fischer 15, Frerker 12. FG 19 (8), FT 12-20. Red Bud 6 5 6 6 23 Freeburg 6 10 16 16 48 R (11-9): Richards 11. FG 10 (1), FT 2-10. F (5-11): Oliver 15, Mirly 10. FG 14 (3), FT 17-23. Breese C. 13 13 6 12 44 Columbia 7 13 11 15 46 C (14-6): Bonaldi 15, Juenger 14. FG 16 (0), FT 14-21.

GIRLS SWIMMING NANCY BRANDT INVITATIONAL 1. Eureka 440, 2. Webster Groves 339, 3. Ladue 309, 4. Parkway North 279, 5. Oakville 198, 6. Summit 179, 7. Afton 97, 8. Mehlville 88 200 medley relay: 1. Eureka (Megan McCSalley, Maddie Seiler, Lily Harrello, Ciara Hynes), 1:56.16; 2. Ladue, 1:57.38; 3. Oakville, 2:04.59 200 freestyle: 1. Kendra Howard, Webster Groves, 2:00.39; 2. Megan Battles, Parkway North, 2:09.03; 3. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 2:09.08

200 individual medley: 1. Katherine Kempf, Webster Groves, 2:21.42; 2. Allison Streb, Oakville, 2:22.03; 3. Sophie Fredman, Ladue, 2:24.54 50 freestyle: 1. Abby Fite, Parkway North, 25.62; 2. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 26.18; 3. Haley O’Brien, Webster Groves, 27.46 Diving: 1. Ally Weis, Eureka, 482.20; 2. Morgan Arnold, Parkway North, 249.20; 3. Izzy Orsay, Ladue, 246.25 100 butterly: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 1:00.43; 2. Parker Hagemann, Webster Groves, 1:02.74; 3. Bailey Brown, Oakville, 1:05.45 100 freestyle: 1. Katherine Kempf, Webster Groves, 56.22; 2. Abby Fite, Parkway North, 56.83; 3. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 57.46 500 freestyle: 1. Meagan Sotolar, Parkway North, 5:52.27; 2. Alyssa Lutker, Parkway North, 6:07.05; 3. Lily Ragan, Webster Groves, 6:22.44 200 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue (Taylor Korte, Riley Deutsch, Leda Liang, Paige Mitchell), 1:46.14; 2. Webster Groves, 1:46.77; 3. Parkway North, 1:52.91 100 backstroke: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 59.7; 2. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 1:02.04; 3. Allison Streb, Oakville, 1:02.52 100 breaststroke: 1. Sophie Fredman, Ladue, 1:14.36; 2. Maddie Seiler, Eureka, 1:14.88; 3. Bailey Brown, Oakville, 1:19.94 400 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue (Paige Mitchell, Riley Deutsch, Leda Liang, Taylor Korte), 3:50.41; 2. Webster Groves, 3:51.22; 3. Eureka, 3:57.02

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES * All times subject to change due to weather conditions in the greater St. Louis area. GIRLS BASKETBALL 37TH LADY CAT INVITATIONAL at Union Seventh place, Saturday Game 6 loser vs Union, 1 p.m. Consolation inal, Saturday Game 6 winner vs Cuba, 2:30 p.m. Third place, Saturday Helias vs Eureka, 4 p.m. Championship, Saturday Sullivan vs Jeferson City, 5:30 p.m. 31ST HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT First round, Monday Carlyle vs Highland, 10 a.m. Hillsboro, Illinois vs Althof, 11:30 a.m. Salem, Illinois vs O’Fallon , 1 p.m. Taylorville vs Mater Dei, 2:30 p.m. Wesclin vs Teutopolis, 4 p.m. Triad vs Okawville, 5:30 p.m. Nokomis vs Belleville West, 7 p.m. Breese Central vs Nashville, 8:30 p.m. ALTON SHOOTOUT Saturday Collinsville vs Hazelwood Central, 10 a.m. Francis Howell vs Alton, 11:30 a.m. Festus vs Jerseyville, 1 p.m.

Hardin Calhoun vs St. Joseph’s, 2:30 p.m. Belleville East vs Incarnate Word, 4 p.m. Arlington (Tenn.) vs Parkway N., 5:30 p.m. Washington vs Civic Memorial, 7 p.m. ST. LOUIS MLK SHOWCASE at Miller Career, Sunday unless noted Hogan Prep vs Soldan, Noon Harlan vs St. Charles, 1:20 p.m. Lincoln Prep vs North Lawndale, 2:40 p.m. Ladue vs Fairdale (Ky.), 4 p.m. Kenwood Aca. vs Charleston, 5:20 p.m. Whitney Young vs Edwardsville, 6:40 p.m. Hogan Prep vs Fairdale (Ky.), 10 a.m. Mon. Soldan vs North Lawndale, 11:30 a.m. Mon. Lincoln Prep vs Harlan, 1 p.m. Monday. Bolingbrook vs Lee (Alabama), 2:30 p.m. Mon. Haz.Central vs Whitney Young, 4 p.m. Mon. Kenwood Aca. vs Miller Career, 5 p.m. Mon.

BOYS BASKETBALL DC WILCUTT TOURNAMENT at CBC Seventh place Haz. East vs North Tech, 3:30 p.m. Friday. Consolation inal Carnahan vs STL Christian, 5 p.m. Friday. Third place

Soldan vs Northwest Aca., 6:30 p.m. Friday. Championship Ritenour vs CBC, 8 p.m. Friday. 46TH WASHINGTON TOURNAMENT Seventh place, Monday Francis Howell Central vs St. Clair, 12 p.m. Consolation inal, Monday Union vs Borgia, 1:30 p.m. Third place 3 p.m. Monday. Championship 4:30 p.m. Monday. DENVER MILLER TOURNAMENT at Kirkwood Seventh place Duchesne vs Hazelwood West, 5 p.m. Mon. Consolation inal Eureka vs McCluer North, TBD Third place Kirkwood vs Ladue, 5:30 p.m. Monday Championship Jennings vs O’Fallon , 7 p.m. Monday FLYER INVITATIONAL at Lindbergh Seventh place Lift For Life vs TBD, 4 p.m. Wed. 1/25.

Consolation inal Summit vs TBD, 5:30 p.m. Wed. 1/25. Third place 7 p.m. Wednesday, 1/25. Championship 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, 1/25. 50th Litchield Invitational Pool A Roxana vs Mount Zion, 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Roxana vs ME Lutheran, 7 p.m. Monday. ME Lutheran vs Mount Zion, 6 p.m. Tues. Pool B Lebanon, Ill. vs Civic Mem., 4 p.m. Sat. Lebanon, Ill. vs Greenville, 2:30 p.m. Mon. Greenville vs Civic Memorial, 6 p.m. Tues. Pool C Wood River vs Taylorville, 2:30 p.m. Sat. Pana vs Wood River, 4 p.m. Monday. Pana vs Taylorville, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Pool D Hillsboro, Ill. vs Litchield, 7 p.m. Sat. Nokomis vs Litchield, 5:30 p.m. Monday. Hillsboro, Ill. vs Nokomis, 7:30 p.m. Tues. 35TH NASHVILLE INVITATIONAL Mascoutah vs Nashville, 6:30 p.m. Monday. Breese Central vs Mater Dei, 8 p.m. Mon.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Deion Norleet (right) of O’Fallon takes the ball inside against Tate Hotz of Ladue during a semiinal in the Denver Miller Tournament on Thursday.


01.13.2017 • Friday • M 2

GIRLS BASKETBALL

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

GIRLS BASKETBALL

WORTH THE WAIT Columbia ends Breese Central’s 56-game conference streak BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, ILL. • Co-

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Ally Frazier (32) of Festus pulls down a rebound in front of Kelsey Boyd (23) of Hillsboro during a game on Thursday.

Fast start helps Festus blitz past rival Hillsboro BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

HILLSBORO, MO. • The

Jeferson County girls basketball matchup between host Hillsboro and Festus had the makings of a game with plenty of sizzle Thursday. After all, the teams had a combined 20 wins and just three losses heading into the showdown. But Festus quickly took control and rolled to a 5324 Jefferson County Athletics Association win. “This feels so good because no one from Festus likes Hillsboro,” Festus senior Jordan Oetting said. “You never want to take a loss to them because that’s our biggest rival.” Festus (9-2 overall, 1-0 conference) got off to its strong start behind senior Alex Tinnin. She scored six quick points in leading the Tigers to a lead that would grow to 21-6 by the end of the first quarter, much to the delight of coach Ron Rhodes. “If we can shoot the ball well and put it in the hole, we’re tough to beat,” Rhodes said. “Alex Tinnin had a phenomenal ballgame. She had six quick points that really got us going and she’s not really a scorer.” While Festus started strong, the Tigers’ defense clamped down on Hillsboro senior Lexi Close, the area’s leading scorer heading into the game. She had four quick points and finished with eight. “We concentrated on her and made sure that we always knew what side of the floor she was going

to,” Rhodes said. “We sort of cheated to her side all of the time. The kids really responded. The girls realized that this game was probably for conference. They knew they wanted this one and they came in here and played really well.” Festus led 33-12 at halftime, and an 11-game Hillsboro win streak was all but over. Hillsboro (12-2, 0-1 JCC) seemed stuck in neutral from the start and the situation never really improved, according to Hawks coach Joe Fehlker. “That was tough because we really did not play well the first quarter and it’s tough to play from behind against a team like that,” Fehlker said. “Festus didn’t have anybody that jumped out. It seemed like everybody made shots.” The win is Festus’ fourth in a row over Hillsboro, dating back to 2013. That fact wasn’t lost on Oetting. “I’ve never lost to Hillsboro,” Oetting said. “They are such a big rival, so it’s special to keep wining against them.” Jordan Oetting and her sister — sophomore Jenna Oetting — led Festus with 11 points each. Tinnin and senior Ashley Fallert added eight points each for the Tigers. The scoring spread was something Rhodes said he was most proud in the win. The team’s ball movement was the highlight in the win, Rhodes said. “We did make some extra passes tonight,” Rhodes said. “That’s big this time of year, so I’m very happy, very happy.”

lumbia High senior forward Madelyne Juenger had heard enough about what she calls, “Big Bad Breese Central.” “ T h ey ’ve h a d o u r number for a long time,” Juenger said. Not anymore. Juenger’s steal and layup with 19 seconds left lifted Columbia to a thrilling 46-44 upset of traditional power Central on Thursday in a Cahokia Conference showdown. The Cougars had won 56 successive league games. Their last loss was a 42-40 setback at Columbia on Jan. 12, 2011. The impressive streak covered five-plus seasons and 1,824 calendar days. “Tip your cap to Columbia,” Central coach Nathan Ruether said. “They definitely deserved to win the game tonight. They were the better team.” Juenger’s basket broke a 44-44 tie and nailed down one of the biggest wins in the history of the program. “ O u r g i rl s n eve r stopped believing,” Columbia coach Scott Germain said. “Breese Central has been on top of the mountain for so long and everyone was trying to get to where they are. They’re the team and program that everyone wants to be.” The Eagles (14-6, 6-1) used a strong defensive effort down the stretch to take the game away from the Cougars (10-10, 6-1). They recorded three steals in the final 1 minute 15 seconds, including a key theft by sophomore Sophia Bonaldi, who finished with a game-high 15 points. “This wasn’t as much for us as it was for the players before us and (Germain),” Bonaldi said. “This is so important for them.” Central has won the outright Cahokia Conference title each of the last 10 seasons. They may have to share that crown this time around. The teams split their two meetings this year. Both

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Columbia coach Scott Germain (center) led the Eagles girls basketball team against Breese Central on Thursday.

have three league games remaining. “This is good for our confidence for the rest of the season,” said Juenger, who will play soccer at Southern Indiana University. Central took a 44-42 lead on a 3-point by play Oliva Wesselmann with 2:13 remaining. Columbia senior Courtn ey We i l ba c h e r a n swered with a pair of free throws to set the stage for Juenger’s game-winning basket. In a perfectly timed move, Juenger stepped in front of a pass and sailed in ahead of the field for the layup. “I was just telling myself to slow down and make sure I made it,” said Juenger, who finished with 14 points. Breese Central used its aggressive defense and patient offense to build a 32-25 lead midway through the third period. Junior Carson Newkirk, who finished with a teamhigh 11 points, started a 6-0 run that gave the visitors some breathing room. But the Eagles responded with a 6-0 blitz of their own in the final 5:29 of the third quarter to

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Columbia’s Madelyne Juenger (left) drives around Breese Central’s Carson Newkirk to the basket at Columbia.

climb to within one point. The Cougars, behind a Newkirk basket, built a 3935 cushion with 4:22 left in the contest. Juenger then took over with a five-point explosion to give her team a 40-39 lead — its first advantage since the first period. Columbia turned up the heat defensively down the stretch, forcing the Cougars into numerous errors. “Way too many turnovers,” Ruether said. “They played hard and we’re obviously more prepared

than we were.” Germain was on cloud nine after the landmark triumph. “I thought he was going to cry,” Bonaldi said. The Eagles are hoping the win can kick-start them on a successful postseason path. “ We h a d a g r e a t practice and we came i n h e re fo c u s e d , e s p e c i a l l y o n d e fe n s e , which was the differe n c e ,” J u e n ge r s a i d . “Our defense was unbelievable tonight.”

MORE COVERAGE AND SCHEDULES ONLINE AT STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM Check out our schedules for complete tournament brackets and rescheduled games from this week.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Summit 7 6 18 14 45 Lift For Life 9 12 7 6 34 S (4-7): Coughlin 17, Peat 13. FG 16 (4), FT 9-14. L (5-10): Dabney 12. FG 12 (6), FT 4-7. St. Louis Chr 0 9 7 5 21 Maplewood-RH 14 15 13 12 54 M (5-8): Grady- Liska 22. FG 21 (4), FT 8-10. Haz. Central 15 19 14 14 62 McCluer 13 20 12 10 55 H(9-6):C.Williams20,Wright15.FG22(3),FT15-23. FH Central 68 Union 75 F (4-9): Robinson 19, Garthe 16, Cissell 12, Stone 10. FG 26 (5), FT 11-24. McCluer North 13 15 12 27 67 Haz. West 13 13 21 13 60 H (3-9): Thornton 23, McClellan 13, Walton 12. FG 21 (4), FT 14-22. O’Fallon 17 23 13 17 70 Ladue 10 9 9 37 65 O (11-5): Norleet 15, Hodge 13, Orr 10. FG 27 (5), FT 11-27. Conluence 28 20 17 19 84 Lovejoy 13 16 19 11 59 L (3-13): Wallace 35. FG 22 (4), FT 11-26. Webster 19 17 12 14 62 Smith-Cotton 7 14 24 14 59 W (10-2): Ramey 21, Ford 16, Potts 16. FG 23 (3), FT 13-17. Metro 2 5 8 8 23 Soldan 23 16 22 10 71 M (2-12): Davie 10. FG 7 (1), FT 8-17. S (9-5): J. Little 17, Wooten 14, J. Little 13, Bishop 10. FG 31 (8), FT 1-7. Carnahan 20 27 11 18 76 Sumner 12 8 15 4 39 C (7-8): Williams 16, Gibson 15, Brookins 13, Wright 12, Clay 11. FG 27 (6), FT 16-25. S (27): Troupe 17, Pierce 10. FG 16 (0), FT 7-10.

DuBourg 2 10 5 13 30 St. Mary’s 21 27 22 10 80 S (13-1): Sakamoto 19, Mitchell 11. FG 37 (4), FT 2-5. MS-Berkeley 18 6 19 16 59 Afton 18 12 17 7 54 A (8-4): Williams 17, Gordon 12, Little 12. FG 18 (7), FT 11-14. St. Pius X 13 12 7 28 60 Brentwood 15 22 20 21 78 S (4-11): Krodinger 20, Thornton 10. FG 20 (10), FT 10-17. B (5-6): C. Hill 17, Sappington 16, Jones 15, Tate 13, Harris 10. FG 28 (4), FT 18-25. Kirkwood 7 15 12 23 57 Jennings 12 16 19 17 64 K (6-5): Gunn 13, Lien 11, Loyd 11. FG 20 (9), FT 8-15. J (13-2): Younge 32, R. Johnson 10. FG 25 (3), FT 11-19. MICDS 26 13 5 9 53 Lindbergh 12 17 13 8 50 M (10-5): M. Roper 16, Spence 16. FG 15 (6), FT 17-24. L (7-3): Levi 22, Lahm 11. FG 23 (0), FT 4-10. Marissa 8 11 12 10 41 Chester 13 15 14 12 54 M (8-7): K. Smith 22. FG 17 (4), FT 3-4. DuQuoin 11 9 7 13 40 Nashville 13 15 23 7 58 D (2-4): Vogel 12. FG 15 (3), FT 7-14. N (12-5): Kemp 19, Heggemeier 13, Brink 11. FG 23 (5), FT 7-14.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Duchesne 13 0 8 19 40 FH North 8 12 15 11 46 D (3-12): Schroeder 24. FG 15 (0), FT 10-15. MICDS 13 21 8 14 56 Visitation 13 9 9 8 39 M (13-1): J. Brooks 15, L. Hughes 10. FG 17 (6), FT 16-23. V (7-7): Torrey 18, Spence 11. FG 16 (3), FT 4-8.

Miller Career 20 22 19 11 72 McKinley 3 10 7 0 20 Mi (10-3): Z. Hodges 12, Seltzer 12, Howard 11, Wicks 10. FG 28 (5), FT 11-19. Afton 9 0 4 10 23 MS-Berkeley 5 12 11 9 37 A (8-4): Brown 10. FG 9 (3), FT 2-9. McCluer North 11 10 8 11 40 Haz. East 2 3 10 6 21 H (3-10): Gross 8. FG 6 (1), FT 8-17. Riverview 9 7 7 5 28 Haz. West 18 24 15 6 63 R (3-9): Dukes 11. FG 10 (2), FT 6-12. H (6-3): Chappel 24, King 12, Meeks 11. FG 22 (5), FT 14-22. Jennings 19 16 20 7 62 Normandy 0 0 2 2 4 J (3-9): Caldwell 14, Gary 12, Scott 10. FG 26 (1), FT 9-20. N (0-10): Jackson 4. FG 1 (0), FT 2-6. Eureka 11 9 7 10 37 Jef City 8 15 11 15 49 E (8-5): Archambault 10. FG 16 (3), FT 2-4. A. Marquette 4 8 11 11 34 Mount Olive 12 13 10 19 54 M (18-2): Niehaus 20, Murphy 14, Henke 12. FG 17 (1), FT 19-26. In. Word 18 27 21 9 75 Nerinx Hall 17 9 10 5 41 N (7-5): Graf 10. FG 11 (3), FT 16-25. Whitield 24 12 16 7 59 Ursuline 14 8 10 13 45 W (10-6): Blackwell 28, Moore 11. FG 19 (9), FT 1221. U (4-8): Sorensen 13, Effer 10. FG 18 (2), FT 5-18. Wood River 2 4 3 16 25 Carlinville 19 12 12 14 57 W (2-16): Brantley 10. FG 7 (2), FT 9-16. C (12-8): Zachary 14, R. Olroyd 11. FG 25 (0), FT 7-10. St. Joseph’s 12 13 19 11 55 Cor Jesu 12 19 23 15 69 C (9-6): Erbs 19, Sullivan 18, Erusha 14, Zoellner 12. FG 25 (11), FT 8-12.

Kennedy 5 3 8 8 24 Notre Dame 15 6 12 11 44 K (3-12): Burjoski 13. FG 7 (2), FT 8-16. N (48): Boemer 12, Lato 11. FG 18 (5), FT 3-12. New Athens 13 20 10 12 55 Dupo 9 2 5 7 23 N (12-6): Ragland 12. FG 21 (1), FT 12-21. D (0-18): Jones 6. FG 10 (3), FT 0-0. North Tech 9 15 16 2 42 Althof 9 24 22 23 78 A (15-7): Reimer 21, Vaught 18, Martz 14, Kaltwasser 12. FG 30 (8), FT 10-14. DuBourg 5 15 8 16 44 Rosati-Kain 11 0 13 11 35 D (6-8): Droege 25. FG 14 (3), FT 13-23. R (2-10): M. Jones 15. FG 14 (3), FT 4-8. Pky. Central 10 11 15 6 42 Oakville 7 6 11 10 34 P (9-2): G. Stephens 13, O. Stephens 12, Cooke 10. FG 16 (0), FT 10-17. O (5-7): Walters 12. FG 13 (1), FT 7-14. St.Chas. West 5 12 3 16 36 Borgia 17 10 15 11 53 B (8-2): Moss 24, Gettemeier 20. FG 19 (8), FT 7-19. Jeferson 9 19 9 1 38 St. Pius X 18 9 16 19 62 J (5-9): Weik 12. FG 13 (2), FT 10-12. S (8-7): Cook 24, Mickley 15, Linderer 13. FG 21 (3), FT 17-30. Triad 12 12 10 5 39 Mascoutah 3 14 7 7 31 T (9-6): Johnson 11, Chigas 10. FG 16 (5), FT 2-5. M (4-14): Brooks 12, Kelly 10. FG 12 (4), FT 3-4. Waterloo 7 17 17 18 59 Jerseyville 21 8 12 21 62 W (7-9): Finnerty 20, Luedeman 12, Whiteside 10. FG 23 (0), FT 13-28. Festus 21 12 11 9 53 Hillsboro 6 6 7 5 24 F (9-2): J. Oetting 11, J. Oetting 11. FG 18 (4), FT 13-21.

Edwardsville 25 22 19 16 82 Alton 8 5 8 8 29 E (18-0): Martin 22, M. Silvey 21, Pranger 16. FG 38 (2), FT 4-10. A (1-15): Clanton 9. FG 11 (7), FT 0-4. Lebanon 17 23 16 3 59 Marissa 6 1 6 13 26 L (18-0): K. Bass 17, E. Reinneck 17. FG 27 (4), FT 1-4. Bellvl. East 17 19 19 18 73 Granite City 8 8 19 18 53 G (4-9): Moore 21, Garrett 17. FG 19 (4), FT 11-21. E. St. Louis 13 15 6 9 43 O’Fallon 12 15 9 27 63 O (12-5): Durk 23, Lane 13, Stubbleield 10. FG 20 (3), FT 20-27. Bellvl. West 16 16 11 7 55 Collinsville 16 8 16 10 58 B (12-7): Darough 16. FG 10 (0), FT 0-0. C (7-7): Buehne 19, Fischer 15, Frerker 12. FG 19 (8), FT 12-20. Sparta 11 10 17 14 52 Gibault 6 10 8 14 38 G (9-9): Ladyman 10. FG 14 (4), FT 6-10. Red Bud 6 5 6 6 23 Freeburg 6 10 16 16 48 R (11-9): Richards 11. FG 10 (1), FT 2-10.F (511): Oliver 15, Mirly 10. FG 14 (3), FT 17-23. Breese C. 13 13 6 12 44 Columbia 7 13 11 15 46 C (14-6): Bonaldi 15, Juenger 14. FG 16 (0), FT 14-21.

GIRLS SWIMMING NANCY BRANDT INVITATIONAL 1. Eureka 440, 2. Webster Groves 339, 3. Ladue 309, 4. Parkway North 279, 5. Oakville 198, 6. Summit 179, 7. Afton 97, 8. Mehlville 88 200 medley relay: 1. Eureka (Megan McCSalley, Maddie Seiler, Lily Harrello, Ciara Hynes), 1:56.16; 2. Ladue, 1:57.38; 3.

Oakville, 2:04.59 200 freestyle: 1. Kendra Howard, Webster Groves, 2:00.39; 2. Megan Battles, Parkway North, 2:09.03; 3. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 2:09.08 200 individual medley: 1. Katherine Kempf, Webster Groves, 2:21.42; 2. Allison Streb, Oakville, 2:22.03; 3. Sophie Fredman, Ladue, 2:24.54 50 freestyle: 1. Abby Fite, Parkway North, 25.62; 2. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 26.18; 3. Haley O’Brien, Webster Groves, 27.46 Diving: 1. Ally Weis, Eureka, 482.20; 2. Morgan Arnold, Parkway North, 249.20; 3. Izzy Orsay, Ladue, 246.25 100 butterly: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 1:00.43; 2. Parker Hagemann, Webster Groves, 1:02.74; 3. Bailey Brown, Oakville, 1:05.45 100 freestyle: 1. Katherine Kempf, Webster Groves, 56.22; 2. Abby Fite, Parkway North, 56.83; 3. Ciara Hynes, Eureka, 57.46 500 freestyle: 1. Meagan Sotolar, Parkway North, 5:52.27; 2. Alyssa Lutker, Parkway North, 6:07.05; 3. Lily Ragan, Webster Groves, 6:22.44 200 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue (Taylor Korte, Riley Deutsch, Leda Liang, Paige Mitchell), 1:46.14; 2. Webster Groves, 1:46.77; 3. Parkway North, 1:52.91 100 backstroke: 1. Lily Harrell, Eureka, 59.7; 2. Megan McSalley, Eureka, 1:02.04; 3. Allison Streb, Oakville, 1:02.52 100 breaststroke: 1. Sophie Fredman, Ladue, 1:14.36; 2. Maddie Seiler, Eureka, 1:14.88; 3. Bailey Brown, Oakville, 1:19.94 400 freestyle relay: 1. Ladue (Paige Mitchell, Riley Deutsch, Leda Liang, Taylor Korte), 3:50.41; 2. Webster Groves, 3:51.22; 3. Eureka, 3:57.02

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES * All times subject to change due to weather conditions in the greater St. Louis area. GIRLS BASKETBALL 37TH LADY CAT INVITATIONAL at Union Seventh place, Saturday Game 6 loser vs Union, 1 p.m. Consolation inal, Saturday Game 6 winner vs Cuba, 2:30 p.m. Third place, Saturday Helias vs Eureka, 4 p.m. Championship, Saturday Sullivan vs Jeferson City, 5:30 p.m. 31ST HIGHLAND TOURNAMENT First round, Monday Carlyle vs Highland, 10 a.m. Hillsboro, Illinois vs Althof, 11:30 a.m. Salem, Illinois vs O’Fallon , 1 p.m. Taylorville vs Mater Dei, 2:30 p.m. Wesclin vs Teutopolis, 4 p.m. Triad vs Okawville, 5:30 p.m. Nokomis vs Belleville West, 7 p.m. Breese Central vs Nashville, 8:30 p.m. ALTON SHOOTOUT Saturday Collinsville vs Hazelwood Central, 10 a.m. Francis Howell vs Alton, 11:30 a.m. Festus vs Jerseyville, 1 p.m.

Hardin Calhoun vs St. Joseph’s, 2:30 p.m. Belleville East vs Incarnate Word, 4 p.m. Arlington (Tenn.) vs Parkway N., 5:30 p.m. Washington vs Civic Memorial, 7 p.m. ST. LOUIS MLK SHOWCASE at Miller Career, Sunday unless noted Hogan Prep vs Soldan, Noon Harlan vs St. Charles, 1:20 p.m. Lincoln Prep vs North Lawndale, 2:40 p.m. Ladue vs Fairdale (Ky.), 4 p.m. Kenwood Aca. vs Charleston, 5:20 p.m. Whitney Young vs Edwardsville, 6:40 p.m. Hogan Prep vs Fairdale (Ky.), 10 a.m. Mon. Soldan vs North Lawndale, 11:30 a.m. Mon. Lincoln Prep vs Harlan, 1 p.m. Monday. Bolingbrook vs Lee (Alabama), 2:30 p.m. Mon. Haz.Central vs Whitney Young, 4 p.m. Mon. Kenwood Aca. vs Miller Career, 5 p.m. Mon.

BOYS BASKETBALL DC WILCUTT TOURNAMENT at CBC Seventh place Haz. East vs North Tech, 3:30 p.m. Friday. Consolation inal Carnahan vs STL Christian, 5 p.m. Friday. Third place

Soldan vs Northwest Aca., 6:30 p.m. Friday. Championship Ritenour vs CBC, 8 p.m. Friday. 46TH WASHINGTON TOURNAMENT Seventh place, Monday Francis Howell Central vs St. Clair, 12 p.m. Consolation inal, Monday Union vs Borgia, 1:30 p.m. Third place 3 p.m. Monday. Championship 4:30 p.m. Monday. DENVER MILLER TOURNAMENT at Kirkwood Seventh place Duchesne vs Hazelwood West, 5 p.m. Mon. Consolation inal Eureka vs McCluer North, TBD Third place Kirkwood vs Ladue, 5:30 p.m. Monday Championship Jennings vs O’Fallon , 7 p.m. Monday FLYER INVITATIONAL at Lindbergh Seventh place Lift For Life vs TBD, 4 p.m. Wed. 1/25.

Consolation inal Summit vs TBD, 5:30 p.m. Wed. 1/25. Third place 7 p.m. Wednesday, 1/25. Championship 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, 1/25. 50th Litchield Invitational Pool A Roxana vs Mount Zion, 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Roxana vs ME Lutheran, 7 p.m. Monday. ME Lutheran vs Mount Zion, 6 p.m. Tues. Pool B Lebanon, Ill. vs Civic Mem., 4 p.m. Sat. Lebanon, Ill. vs Greenville, 2:30 p.m. Mon. Greenville vs Civic Memorial, 6 p.m. Tues. Pool C Wood River vs Taylorville, 2:30 p.m. Sat. Pana vs Wood River, 4 p.m. Monday. Pana vs Taylorville, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Pool D Hillsboro, Ill. vs Litchield, 7 p.m. Sat. Nokomis vs Litchield, 5:30 p.m. Monday. Hillsboro, Ill. vs Nokomis, 7:30 p.m. Tues. 35TH NASHVILLE INVITATIONAL Mascoutah vs Nashville, 6:30 p.m. Monday. Breese Central vs Mater Dei, 8 p.m. Mon.

PAUL KOPSKY • STLhighschoolsports.com

Deion Norleet (right) of O’Fallon takes the ball inside against Tate Hotz of Ladue during a semiinal in the Denver Miller Tournament on Thursday.


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Philadelphia Brooklyn Southeast Atlanta Charlotte Washington Orlando Miami Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Chicago Detroit

W 25 24 18 11 8 W 22 20 19 16 11 W 28 19 20 19 18

L 13 15 22 25 30 L 16 19 19 24 29 L 10 18 19 21 22

Pct .658 .615 .450 .306 .211 Pct .579 .513 .500 .400 .275 Pct .737 .514 .513 .475 .450

GB — 1½ 8 13 17 GB — 2½ 3 7 12 GB — 8½ 8½ 10 11

L10 5-5 7-3 2-8 5-5 1-9 L10 8-2 4-6 6-4 3-7 1-9 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 5-5 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-8 Str W-7 L-3 L-1 L-4 L-3 Str L-2 W-1 L-1 L-3 L-1

Home 13-6 12-6 12-8 7-14 7-13 Home 10-7 12-7 15-6 7-13 5-13 Home 18-3 11-9 15-5 12-8 10-9

Away 12-7 12-9 6-14 4-11 1-17 Away 12-9 8-12 4-13 9-11 6-16 Away 10-7 8-9 5-14 7-13 8-13

Conf 14-5 17-7 10-13 7-13 3-20 Conf 15-7 13-13 14-12 9-15 5-16 Conf 20-6 13-13 13-12 15-13 11-14

L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-3 Str W-1 W-3 W-2 W-1 W-2 Str W-2 W-5 W-1 L-2 L-1

Home 14-5 16-3 14-7 10-11 7-11 Home 13-7 15-6 11-8 8-11 8-13 Home 17-3 15-6 8-10 10-11 7-10

Away 17-3 15-7 10-10 6-13 4-16 Away 11-9 9-10 7-15 7-12 5-13 Away 16-3 12-8 8-12 5-17 5-16

Conf 18-4 20-7 16-8 6-18 7-18 Conf 16-10 13-9 13-16 9-14 6-17 Conf 22-5 18-9 11-13 8-18 4-21

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W San Antonio 31 Houston 31 Memphis 24 New Orleans 16 Dallas 11 Northwest W Utah 24 Oklahoma City 24 Portland 18 Denver 15 Minnesota 13 Paciic W Golden State 33 LA Clippers 27 Sacramento 16 LA Lakers 15 Phoenix 12

L 8 10 17 24 27 L 16 16 23 23 26 L 6 14 22 28 26

Pct .795 .756 .585 .400 .289 Pct .600 .600 .439 .395 .333 Pct .846 .659 .421 .349 .316

GB — 1 8 15½ 19½ GB — — 6½ 8 10½ GB — 7 16½ 20 20½

Thursday Denver 140, Indiana 112 New Orleans 104, Brooklyn 95 New York 104, Chicago 89 San Antonio 134, LA Lakers 94 Dallas vs. Phoenix at Mexico City, late Detroit at Golden State, late Wednesday Philadelphia 98, New York 97 Boston 117, Washington 108 Minnesota 119, Houston 105 Oklahoma City 103, Memphis 95 LA Clippers 105, Orlando 96 Portland 102, Cleveland 86 Friday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Memphis at Houston, 7 p.m. Miami at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Orlando at Portland, 9 p.m. Cleveland at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Saturday LA Lakers at LA Clippers, 2:30 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 4 p.m. San Antonio vs. Phoenix at Mexico City, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m. Orlando at Utah, 8 p.m.

Nuggets win in London to snap skid

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana’s Thaddeus Young and Denver’s Nikola Jokic battle for the ball London. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nikola Jokic had 22 points and 10 rebounds and the Denver Nuggets emphatically ended a five-game losing streak with a 140-112 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Thursday night in the NBA’s Global Games series at O2 Arena in London. Wilson Chandler added 21 points, and Danilo Gallinari had 18 for the Nuggets. They outscored the Pacers 39-20 in the third quarter, shooting 73.7 percent in the period to put it away. Denver trailed only once, when Kevin Seraphin gave the Pacers a 31-30 lead early in the second quarter, and finished with a season high in scoring. C.J. Miles had 20 points, and Jeff Teague added 14 points and nine assists for Indiana. The Pacers had won five in a row, scoring at least 120 points in each victory. Wearing knee-high socks adorned with the Union Jack and London skyline, Gallinari made three 3-pointers in the first 3:08 to set the tone. Denver made six of its first 10 3-point attempts and finished 15 for 32 from the perimeter. Kenneth Faried added 15 points for Denver. He punctuated the Nuggets’ dominance with an alley-oop from Ja-

meer Nelson that brought the sellout crowd of 18,689 fans to its feet with 8:55 remaining. The game marked the fifth consecutive year the NBA has held a regular-season game in London and the seventh overall. After conceding their only lead, Indiana held Denver within four points for much of the second quarter, but three careless fouls and a succession of converted free throws pushed the Nuggets back out on top.

NOTEBOOK Pelicans’ Davis out • New Orleans star Anthony Davis didn’t suit up for Thursday night’s game against Brooklyn because of an injured left hip. Davis bruised his hip in the Pelicans’ 110-96 win over the New York Knicks on Monday. He went through some training during the pregame warmups in Brooklyn, but didn’t shoot. Porzingis sits again • Kristaps Porzingis was out again for the New York Knicks with a sore left Achilles tendon, while rookie Paul Zipser made his first career start for short-handed Chicago. Porzingis continues to have problems with an injury that sidelined him for three games recently.

M 1 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

AMERICA’S LINE

NFL

NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Saturday • Divisional Playoffs FALCONS ................4..... 5................Seahawks PATRIOTS .............. 16 ....16....................Texans

Injury Report

Sunday • Divisional Playoffs CHIEFS...................1.5.....1...................Steelers COWBOYS...............4....4.5................. Packers NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hornets .....................4.5 ........................76ERS RAPTORS................... 15............................Nets HAWKS ......................2.5 ........................Celtics BUCKS .......................7.5........................... Heat ROCKETS.................... 7...................... Grizzlies T’WOLVES..................PK..................... Thunder BLAZERS .................... 7.......................... Magic JAZZ...........................8.5 ...................... Pistons Cavaliers ...................6.5 ........................KINGS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog OAKLAND.................. 18........................Detroit PRINCETON..............16.5 ...................... Brown PENN .......................... 2............................. Yale MANHATTAN.............. 1........................... Rider Toledo .......................1.5............... C MICHIGAN NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS .......... -$145/+$125........Blackhawks RANGERS ..........-$140/+$120 ...... Maple Leafs PANTHERS ........ -$135/+$115............Islanders HURRICANES .... -$175/+$155................Sabres LIGHTNING.........-$110/-$110 .......Blue Jackets Jets.................... -$145/+$125............ COYOTES FLAMES.............-$160/+$140 ................ Devils Grand Salami: Over/under 37.5 goals. TENNIS • Odds To win the Australian Open Novak Djokovic............................................ 7/5 Andy Murray................................................8/5 Stan Wawrinka .......................................... 10/1 Rafael Nadal ...............................................12/1 Milos Raonic ...............................................15/1 Roger Federer............................................20/1 Kei Nishikori............................................... 25/1 Nick Kyrgios............................................... 35/1 Grigor Dimitrov..........................................40/1 Marin Cilic..................................................50/1 Tomas Berdych..........................................60/1 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.....................................70/1 Dominic Thiem ..........................................70/1 Alexander Zverev ......................................80/1 Lucas Pouille............................................100/1 Gael Monfils.............................................100/1 Bernard Tomic.........................................100/1 David Ferrer............................................. 150/1 John Isner ................................................ 150/1 Jack Sock..................................................200/1 Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP Trevor Bauer and RHP Dan Otero to one-year contracts. National League NEW YORK — Agreed to terms with 1B Lucas Duda on a one-year contract and LHP Adam Wilk on a minor league contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with 1B Matt Adams on a one-year contract. Frontier League GRIZZLIES — Traded OF Brandon Thomas to York (Atlantic) for a player to be named. WASHINGTON — Signed RHP Davis Adkins. WINDY CITY — Signed C Larry Balkwill to a contract extension. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA — Re-signed DT Josh Mauro to a two-year contract. BALTIMORE — Named Greg Roman senior offensive assistant and tight ends coach. Promoted tight ends coach Richard Angulo to assistant offensive line coach. DETROIT — Signed LB Brandon Chubb to a reserve/future contract. LA RAMS — Named Sean McVay coach. MIAMI — Promoted Matt Burke to defensive coordinator. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA — Recalled F Laurent Dauphin and Brendan Perlini from Tucson (AHL). Named John Knebel executive vice president of corporate partnerships and premium seating. NASHVILLE — Recalled D Alexandre Carrier from Milwaukee (AHL). NY ISLANDERS — Recalled D Scott Mayfield from Bridgeport (AHL). Placed D Travis Hamonic on the injured reserve list. NY RANGERS — Recalled F Pavel Buchnevich from Hartford (AHL). BLUES — Activated D Robert Bortuzzo from injured reserve. USA Hockey USAH — Announced the retirement of executive director Dave Ogrean, effective in August. SOCCER Major League Soccer PORTLAND — Signed F Victor Arboleda, D Rennico Clarke and G Kendall McIntosh. Re-signed F Jack Barmby. United Soccer League LA GALAXY II — Named Mike Munoz coach. COLLEGE DELAWARE — Named Sara Matthews women’s volleyball coach. IOWA — Announced wide receivers coach Bobby Kennedy and running backs/special teams coach Chris White will be leaving the program. KANSAS — Named Doug Meacham offensive coordinator. MIAMI — Announced junior F Michael Gilmore will no longer be a part of the men’s basketball program. SAN JOSE STATE — Named Joe Bernardi offensive line coach, Alonzo Carter running backs coach, Kevin Cummings wide receivers coach, Bojay Filimoeatu linebackers coach, Ryan Gunderson quarterbacks coach and Andrew Sowder offensive coordinator and tight ends coach. STEPHEN F. AUSTIN — Named Josh Lawson linebackers coach. TEXAS — Suspended men’s sophomore basketball G Tevin Mack indefinitely for an unspecified violation of team rules. TULANE — Named Garrett Broom assistant athletics director for development. WEST TEXAS A&M — Named J.T. Haddan assistant head coach and defensive line coach, Miles Kochevar defensive coordinator and defensive backs, Ryan McDonough offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach, Michael Collins special teams coordinator, Chris Pauling defensive graduate assistant, Dan McDonald and Deontrae Cooper offensive graduate assistants, and Patric Youngman defensive graduate assistant.

Ohio Valley EAST Belmont Tenn. St. Jacksonville St. Tenn. Tech Morehead St. E. Kentucky WEST Murray St. SEMO Tenn.-Martin E. Illinois SIUE Austin Peay

Conf 4-0 3-1 3-1 3-1 2-2 1-3 Conf 3-1 2-2 1-3 1-3 0-3 0-3

All 10-4 12-5 11-8 7-12 6-11 8-11 All 9-9 7-12 11-8 9-8 5-12 4-13

SEC Kentucky Florida So. Carolina Georgia Mississippi St. Alabama Vanderbilt Arkansas Auburn Mississippi LSU Texas A&M Tennessee Missouri

Conf 4-0 4-0 3-0 3-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 0-3

All 14-2 13-3 13-3 11-5 11-4 9-6 8-8 12-4 11-5 10-6 9-6 9-6 8-8 5-10

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT: definitely will not play; DNP-did not practice; LIMITED: Limited participation in practice; FULL: Full participation in practice): Saturday SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at ATLANTA FALCONS — Seahawks: DNP: TE Jimmy Graham (not injury related), RB Thomas Rawls (not injury related). LIMITED: S Jeron Johnson (knee), DT Tony McDaniel (concussion), RB C.J. Prosise (shoulder). Falcons: None announced. HOUSTON TEXANS at NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Texans: LIMITED: G Jeff Allen (ankle), DE Jadeveon Clowney (elbow/wrist), LB Brian Cushing (ankle), S Quintin Demps (hamstring), WR DeAndre Hopkins (knee), CB Jonathan Joseph (calf), LB Whitney Mercilus (knee), LB John Simon (chest). FULL: CB A.J. Bouye (groin), T Chris Clark (ankle), TE Ryan Griffin (quad), S Andre Hall (foot), LB Brian Peters (foot), QB Tom Savage (concussion). Patriots: DNP: RB LeGarrette Blount (illness). LIMITED: WR Malcolm Mitchell (knee). FULL: WR Danny Amendola (ankle), QB Tom Brady (thigh), CB Cyrus Jones (knee), WR Matthew Slater (foot). Sunday PITTSBURGH STEELERS at KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Steelers: DNP: RB Le’Veon Bell (not injury related), LB Anthony Chickillo (ankle), TE Ladarius Green (concussion), DE Ricardo Mathews (ankle), QB Ben Roethlisberger (foot), RB Fitzgerald Toussaint (concussion), LB Vince Williams (shoulder). LIMITED: S Sean Davis (shoulder), DE Stephon Tuitt (ankle). Chiefs: LIMITED: LB Tamba Hali (knee), LB Justin Houston (knee). GREEN BAY PACKERS at DALLAS COWBOYS — Packers: DNP: WR Jeff Janis (quad), WR Jordy Nelson (ribs), LB Julius Peppers (not injury related), RB James Starks (concussion), C/G JC Tretter (knee). LIMITED: CB Quinten Rollins (neck/concussion). FULL: WR Randall Cobb (ankle), LB Jayrone Ellitt (hand), G T.J. Lang (foot), LB Blake Martinez (knee), LB Clay Matthews (shoulder), LB Nick Perry (hand). Cowboys: LIMITED: CB Moris Claiborne (groin), DE Tyrone Crawford (shoulder), LB Justin Durant (elbow), DE DeMarcus Lawrence (back), DT Terrell McClain (ankle), T Tyron Smith (knee), DT Cedric Thornton (ankle).

8.

COLLEGES

9.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Area schools THURSDAY’S SCORES Women’s basketball Missouri Baptist 78, Williams Baptist 75 Lewis 70, UMSL 68

10.

FRIDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Washington at Emory, 5 p.m. W: Wichita State at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Greenville JV at Jefferson, 6:30 p.m. M: Washington at Emory, 7 p.m.

12.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

14.

11.

13.

National scores 15.

East Bryant 77, Wagner 66 Jacksonville 82, NJIT 81 LIU Brooklyn 60, CCSU 49 La Salle 87, Rhode Island 75 Mount St. Mary’s 77, Fair. Dickinson 70 Northeastern 92, Drexel 75 Sacred Heart 87, St. Francis Brooklyn 75 Siena 81, Quinnipiac 74 St. Francis (Pa.) 77, Robert Morris 57 Towson 83, Delaware 56 South Belmont 84, Morehead St. 78 Coll. Charles. 53, J. Madison 51 Elon 96, Hofstra 80 Florida G.C. 78, Kennesaw St. 75 Georgia Tech 75, Clemson 63 Lipscomb 94, Stetson 68 Louisiana Tech 79, Charlotte 73 Mid. Tennessee 69, Marshall 57 North Florida 73, SC-Upstate 65 Northwestern St. 86, Nicholls 81 Notre Dame 67, Miami 62 Old Dominion 54, Southern Miss. 50 Sam Houston 70, New Orleans 68 Tennessee St. 63, E. Kentucky 49 UAB 72, W. Kentucky 54 UNC-Greensboro 83, ETSU 79 UNC-Wilmington 101, William & Mary 77 VMI 79, W. Carolina 78 Midwest CS Bakersfield 88, Rio Grande 81 Cincinnati 66, SMU 64 Green Bay 78, Wright St. 61 Ill.-Chicago 59, Cleveland St. 54 Milwaukee 68, N. Kentucky 58 Murray St. 83, E. Illinois 72 Valparaiso 78, Youngstown St. 62 Wisconsin 89, Ohio St. 66 Southwest Cent. Arkansas 89, Houston Bapt. 78 Oral Roberts 94, S. Dakota St. 88 SE Louisiana 56, Abilene Christian 50 UTSA 68, FAU 63 Far West Montana 89, N. Colorado 68 Sacramento St. 88, S. Utah 83 Weber St. 91, Idaho 66

16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

UConn (15-0) idle. Next: at SMU, Saturday. Baylor (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. Maryland (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Michigan, Thursday. Mississippi State (17-0) vs. Florida, late. Next: at Alabama, Monday. South Carolina (14-1) beat Georgia 66-63. Next: at LSU, Sunday. Notre Dame (16-2) beat Pittsburgh 86-54. Next: at Tennessee, Monday. Florida State (16-2) beat No. 9 Louisville 72-65. Next: at Clemson, Sunday. Washington (16-2) idle. Next: at Arizona, Friday. Louisville (15-4) lost to No. 7 Florida State 72-65. Next: vs. No. 14 Miami, Sunday. Oregon State (15-1) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Sunday. Ohio State (14-5) idle. Next: at Purdue, Sunday. Duke (15-2) beat North Carolina 70-58. Next: at No. 23 N.C. State, Sunday. Stanford (13-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. Miami (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 9 Louisville, Sunday. Virginia Tech (15-1) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Monday. Texas (11-4) idle. Next: at No. 18 West Virginia, Saturday. UCLA (11-4) idle. Next: vs. No. 10 Oregon State, Friday. West Virginia (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Texas, Saturday. Arizona State (12-3) idle. Next: vs. Washington State, Friday. South Florida (13-2) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Saturday. DePaul (14-4) idle. Next: vs. Butler, Friday. Oklahoma (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. N.C. State (13-5) lost to Syracuse 85-75. Next: vs. No. 12 Duke, Sunday. California (13-3) idle. Next: at Colorado, Friday. Kansas State (13-4) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Saturday.

GOLF EURO | SA Open

Men’s standings Atlantic 10 VCU Richmond Dayton La Salle George Mason Rhode Island St. Bona. St. Joseph’s (Pa.) Duquesne Massachusetts Davidson Geo. Washington Fordham St. Louis U.

Conf 4-0 4-0 3-1 3-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 0-4

All 14-3 10-6 12-4 9-5 12-5 10-6 10-6 8-7 9-8 11-6 8-7 9-8 7-10 4-12

Big Ten Michigan St. Maryland Purdue Wisconsin Nebraska Minnesota Northwestern Illinois Iowa Penn St. Indiana Michigan Rutgers Ohio St.

Conf 4-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 1-3 1-3 0-4 0-4

All 12-6 15-2 14-3 14-3 9-7 15-3 13-4 12-5 10-7 10-7 11-6 11-6 11-6 10-7

Mo. Valley Wichita St. Illinois St. Missouri St. SIU C’dale Bradley Drake Loyola (Chi.) Evansville Indiana St. N. Iowa

Conf 5-0 5-0 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 2-3 1-4 0-5 0-5

All 15-3 13-4 12-6 10-8 8-10 5-12 12-6 10-8 6-11 5-11

Thursday at Glendower Golf Club, Johannesburg Purse: $1.1 million; Yardage: 7,594. Par: 72 First Round Keith Horne, South Africa 66 Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa 66 Jordan Smith, England 67 Jbe Kruger, South Africa 67 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 67 Rory McIlroy, N. Ireland 67 Dean Burmester, South Africa 67 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 68 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 68 Oliver Fisher, England 68 Mark Foster, England 68 Jens Fahrbring, Sweden 68 Shaun Norris, South Africa 69 Justin Walters, South Africa 69 Laurie Canter, England 69 Jeff Winther, Denmark 69 Graeme Storm, England 69 Joel Stalter, France 69 Steven Tiley, England 69 Brett Rumford, Australia 69 Simon Dyson, England 69 Richard S Johnson, Sweden 69 Ulrich Van Den Berg, South Africa 69 Daniel Brooks, England 69 Colin Nel, South Africa 69 Sebastian Soderberg, Sweden 69 Also Peter Uihlein, United States 70 Charlie Bolling, United States 77

BOXING Schedule Friday At Hialeah (Fla.) Park Racing & Casino (Spike), Erislandy Lara vs. Yuri Foreman, 12, for Lara’s WBA Super World-IBO junior middleweight titles; Anthony Dirrell vs. Norbert Nemesapati, 10, super middleweights. Saturday At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), James DeGale vs. Badou Jack, 12, for Jack’s WBC World super middleweight title and DeGale’s IBF World super middleweight title; Jose Pedraza vs. Gervonta Davis, 12, junior lightweights; Ievgen Khytrov vs. Immanuwel Aleem, 10, middleweights. Jan. 20 At Bally’s Atlantic City (N.J.) Hotel and Casino (SHO), Adam Lopez vs. Danny Roman, 12, super bantamweights. Jan. 25 At Phitsanuloke, Thailand, Wanheng Menayothin vs. Melvin Jerusalem, 12, for Menayothin’s WBC strawweight title.

Save up to $

NBA SUMMARIES Nuggets 140, Pacers 112

Pelicans 104, Nets 95

Spurs 134, Lakers 94

Indiana: George 2-12 4-4 10, Robinson 4-10 0-0 8, T.Young 2-5 0-0 4, Turner 4-13 0-0 9, Teague 5-7 4-5 14, Miles 7-13 0-0 20, Niang 1-1 0-0 2, Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Seraphin 5-6 0-0 10, Jefferson 2-5 0-0 4, Brooks 6-10 0-0 14, J.Young 2-3 0-0 5, Ellis 4-9 4-4 12. Totals 44-94 12-13 112. Denver: Chandler 8-13 3-3 21, Gallinari 7-11 0-0 18, Jokic 7-12 6-6 22, Mudiay 3-7 1-2 9, Harris 6-11 3-3 16, Barton 3-10 2-2 9, Hernangomez 2-2 0-0 4, Faried 6-8 3-3 15, Nurkic 1-1 1-2 3, Nelson 4-7 0-0 11, Miller 0-1 0-0 0, Murray 3-6 2-2 8, Beasley 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 52-91 21-23 140. Indiana 29 27 20 36 — 112 Denver 30 37 39 34 — 140 3-pointers: Indiana 12-29 (Miles 6-7, Brooks 2-5, George 2-6, Turner 1-1, J.Young 1-2, Teague 0-1, T.Young 0-2, Robinson 0-2, Ellis 0-3), Denver 15-32 (Gallinari 4-6, Nelson 3-6, Jokic 2-3, Chandler 2-5, Mudiay 2-5, Harris 1-1, Barton 1-2, Miller 0-1, Murray 0-3). Rebounds: Indiana 34 (Turner 6), Denver 48 (Jokic 10). Assists: Indiana 26 (Teague 9), Denver 37 (Jokic, Mudiay 7). Fouls: Indiana 15, Denver 16. A: 18,689 (20,000).

New Orleans: Hill 5-10 2-2 14, Jones 10-17 3-9 24, Asik 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 7-15 3-4 21, Hield 2-9 0-0 5, Cunningham 2-6 0-0 4, Motiejunas 0-7 1-2 1, Ajinca 0-0 0-0 0, Galloway 0-6 1-1 1, Moore 2-5 0-0 5, Evans 10-15 7-7 29. Totals 38-90 17-25 104. Brooklyn: Booker 4-9 0-2 8, Lopez 9-18 1-2 20, Whitehead 2-7 0-0 4, Bogdanovic 4-11 0-0 10, Harris 6-10 1-2 15, Hamilton 3-9 0-0 6, Dinwiddie 0-5 0-0 0, LeVert 4-8 1-2 10, Hollis-Jefferson 2-8 0-0 4, Kilpatrick 6-12 3-3 18. Totals 40-97 6-11 95. New Orleans 35 16 22 31 — 104 Brooklyn 31 26 22 16 — 95 3-pointers: NO 11-32 (Holiday 4-6, Hill 2-4, Evans 2-4, Moore 1-2, Jones 1-2, Hield 1-6, Galloway 0-2, Motiejunas 0-3, Cunningham 0-3), BKN 9-42 (Kilpatrick 3-6, Harris 2-6, Bogdanovic 2-7, LeVert 1-5, Lopez 1-6, Booker 0-1, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Whitehead 0-2, Hamilton 0-4, Dinwiddie 0-4). Rebounds: NO 50 (Jones 12), BKN 50 (Booker 12). Assists: NO 16 (Holiday 4), BKN 22 (Dinwiddie, Booker, Hollis-Jefferson 4). Fouls: NO 16, BKN 20. Technicals: BKN team. A: 14,352 (17,732).

L.A. Lakers: Young 3-6 0-0 8, Deng 1-5 0-0 3, Randle 8-13 6-7 22, Mozgov 0-4 0-0 0, Russell 4-13 0-0 9, Ingram 3-7 2-4 9, Robinson 2-2 0-0 4, Zubac 4-7 0-0 8, Black 2-3 1-2 5, Huertas 0-6 2-2 2, Calderon 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-7 5-6 10, Clarkson 6-11 2-4 14. Totals 35-85 18-25 94. San Antonio: Leonard 10-13 8-9 31, Aldridge 5-11 2-2 13, Gasol 9-9 4-5 22, Parker 6-10 1-1 13, Green 1-4 0-0 3, Bertans 2-5 0-0 5, Anderson 2-3 2-2 7, Lee 1-3 2-2 4, Dedmon 2-3 2-2 6, Mills 2-5 1-2 6, Murray 3-5 2-2 10, Simmons 6-8 0-0 12, Ginobili 0-2 2-2 2. Totals 49-81 26-29 134. L.A. Lakers 24 30 21 19 — 94 San Antonio 36 36 34 28 — 134 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 6-19 (Young 2-4, Russell 1-3, Williams 1-3, Ingram 1-3, Deng 1-3, Huertas 0-1, Clarkson 0-2), San Antonio 10-21 (Leonard 3-5, Murray 2-2, Anderson 1-1, Aldridge 1-1, Mills 1-3, Green 1-3, Bertans 1-4, Simmons 0-1, Ginobili 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 29 (Randle 6), San Antonio 46 (Dedmon 12). Assists: L.A. Lakers 22 (Randle 5), San Antonio 31 (Parker, Gasol 6). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 25, San Antonio 20. Technicals: L.A. Lakers defensive three second, L.A. Lakers team.

LATE WEDNESDAY

Knicks 104, Bulls 89

Blazers 102, Cavaliers 86

Chicago: Zipser 2-6 2-2 7, Gibson 4-7 4-5 12, Lopez 5-10 0-0 10, Carter-Williams 1-8 1-1 3, Wade 9-20 4-6 22, McDermott 0-5 2-2 2, Portis 1-4 0-0 2, Felicio 6-9 1-2 13, Grant 5-10 2-3 14, Rondo 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 35-88 16-21 89. New York: Thomas 2-9 0-0 4, Anthony 10-19 1-2 23, Noah 6-10 0-0 12, Rose 7-15 3-3 17, Lee 3-8 0-0 6, Kuzminskas 8-15 1-1 19, O’Quinn 5-7 2-2 12, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Jennings 1-4 2-3 5, Baker 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 44-92 9-11 104. Chicago 22 29 14 24 — 89 New York 24 30 22 28 — 104 3-pointers: Chicago 3-18 (Grant 2-4, Zipser 1-3, Rondo 0-2, McDermott 0-2, Wade 0-2, Carter-Williams 0-2, Portis 0-3), New York 7-23 (Holiday 2-4, Kuzminskas 2-4, Anthony 2-6, Jennings 1-4, Thomas 0-1, Lee 0-4). Rebounds: Chicago 43 (Gibson 9), New York 47 (Noah 15). Assists: Chicago 20 (Rondo 8), New York 21 (Anthony 6). Fouls: Chicago 12, New York 17. Technicals: Gibson. A: 19,812 (19,812).

Cleveland: James 5-12 8-9 20, Love 5-15 4-4 17, Thompson 4-6 1-2 9, Irving 4-16 2-2 11, Liggins 1-5 0-0 2, Jefferson 1-2 1-1 3, Frye 1-6 1-2 4, Felder 0-6 2-4 2, Jones 1-2 2-2 5, Shumpert 3-5 0-2 6, Korver 1-5 0-0 2, McRae 2-2 0-0 5. Totals 28-82 21-28 86. Portland: Harkless 5-10 2-2 13, Aminu 5-16 1-1 11, Plumlee 2-6 0-2 4, Lillard 5-15 3-3 14, McCollum 11-20 0-0 27, Layman 0-1 1-2 1, Vonleh 0-1 2-2 2, Davis 2-3 0-0 4, Napier 0-2 0-0 0, Crabbe 9-11 3-4 24, Connaughton 0-1 0-0 0, Turner 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 40-93 12-16 102. Cleveland 20 21 20 25 — 86 Portland 27 22 24 29 — 102 3-pointers: CLE 9-30 (Love 3-9, James 2-5, Frye 1-1, McRae 1-1, Jones 1-2, Irving 1-2, Jefferson 0-1, Shumpert 0-1, Felder 0-1, Korver 0-3, Liggins 0-4), POR 10-30 (McCollum 5-10, Crabbe 3-5, Harkless 1-2, Lillard 1-4, Layman 0-1, Napier 0-1, Turner 0-2, Aminu 0-5). Rebounds: CLE 48 (James 11), POR 51 (Aminu 12). Assists: CLE 14 (James 4), POR 29 (Turner 11). Fouls: CLE 20, POR 17. A: 19,393 (19,980).

500* Beat the February 1st

ON EVERY us ORDER pl 2017 Price Increases

Leaders Prior to Thursday’s games SCORING AVG. G FG FT Westbrook, OKC 40 407 345 Davis, NOR 37 388 281 Harden, HOU 41 342 363 Thomas, BOS 35 306 278 DeRozan, TOR 38 385 287 Cousins, SAC 37 348 273 Lillard, POR 36 306 237 James, CLE 35 337 175 Durant, GOL 39 355 229 Butler, CHI 38 292 320 Curry, GOL 39 318 181 Leonard, SAN 36 284 225 Irving, CLE 33 289 128 McCollum, POR 41 365 137 Anttknmpo, MIL 36 302 209 Walker, CHA 38 313 146 Wall, WAS 36 303 177 Beal, WAS 34 265 135 George, IND 31 242 140 Lowry, TOR 38 268 190

PTS 1240 1078 1174 988 1071 1037 940 913 1013 950 965 866 784 973 839 878 821 765 696 852

AVG 31.0 29.1 28.6 28.2 28.2 28.0 26.1 26.1 26.0 25.0 24.7 24.1 23.8 23.7 23.3 23.1 22.8 22.5 22.5 22.4

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SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMERICA’S LINE

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Toronto Boston New York Philadelphia Brooklyn Southeast Atlanta Charlotte Washington Orlando Miami Central Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Chicago Detroit

W 25 24 18 11 8 W 22 20 19 16 11 W 28 19 20 19 18

L 13 15 22 25 30 L 16 19 19 24 29 L 10 18 19 21 23

Pct .658 .615 .450 .306 .211 Pct .579 .513 .500 .400 .275 Pct .737 .514 .513 .475 .439

GB — 1½ 8 13 17 GB — 2½ 3 7 12 GB — 8½ 8½ 10 11½

L10 5-5 7-3 2-8 5-5 1-9 L10 8-2 4-6 6-4 3-7 1-9 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 5-5 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-8 Str W-7 L-3 L-1 L-4 L-3 Str L-2 W-1 L-1 L-3 L-2

Home 13-6 12-6 12-8 7-14 7-13 Home 10-7 12-7 15-6 7-13 5-13 Home 18-3 11-9 15-5 12-8 10-9

Away 12-7 12-9 6-14 4-11 1-17 Away 12-9 8-12 4-13 9-11 6-16 Away 10-7 8-9 5-14 7-13 8-14

Conf 14-5 17-7 10-13 7-13 3-20 Conf 15-7 13-13 14-12 9-15 5-16 Conf 20-6 13-13 13-12 15-13 11-14

Home 14-5 16-3 14-7 10-11 7-11 Home 13-7 15-6 11-8 8-11 8-13 Home 18-3 15-6 8-10 10-11 7-11

Away 17-3 15-7 10-10 6-13 5-16 Away 11-9 9-10 7-15 7-12 5-13 Away 16-3 12-8 8-12 5-17 5-16

Conf 18-4 20-7 16-8 6-18 8-18 Conf 16-10 13-9 13-16 9-14 6-17 Conf 22-5 18-9 11-13 8-18 4-22

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W San Antonio 31 Houston 31 Memphis 24 New Orleans 16 Dallas 12 Northwest W Utah 24 Oklahoma City 24 Portland 18 Denver 15 Minnesota 13 Paciic W Golden State 34 LA Clippers 27 Sacramento 16 LA Lakers 15 Phoenix 12

L 8 10 17 24 27 L 16 16 23 23 26 L 6 14 22 28 27

M 2 • FrIDAy • 01.13.2017

Pct .795 .756 .585 .400 .308 Pct .600 .600 .439 .395 .333 Pct .850 .659 .421 .349 .308

GB — 1 8 15½ 19 GB — — 6½ 8 10½ GB — 7½ 17 20½ 21½

L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 Str W-1 W-3 W-2 W-1 W-2 Str W-3 W-5 W-1 L-2 L-2

Thursday Denver 140, Indiana 112 New Orleans 104, Brooklyn 95 New York 104, Chicago 89 San Antonio 134, LA Lakers 94 Dallas 113, Phoenix 108 Golden State 127, Detroit 107 Wednesday Philadelphia 98, New York 97 Boston 117, Washington 108 Minnesota 119, Houston 105 Oklahoma City 103, Memphis 95 LA Clippers 105, Orlando 96 Portland 102, Cleveland 86 Friday Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Memphis at Houston, 7 p.m. Miami at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Orlando at Portland, 9 p.m. Cleveland at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Saturday LA Lakers at LA Clippers, 2:30 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 4 p.m. San Antonio vs. Phoenix at Mexico City, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m. Orlando at Utah, 8 p.m.

Nuggets win in London to snap skid

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana’s Thaddeus Young and Denver’s Nikola Jokic battle for the ball London.

NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog Saturday • Divisional Playoffs FALCONS ................4..... 5................Seahawks PATRIOTS .............. 16 ....16....................Texans Sunday • Divisional Playoffs CHIEFS...................1.5.....1...................Steelers COWBOYS...............4....4.5................. Packers NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hornets .....................4.5 ........................76ERS RAPTORS................... 15............................Nets HAWKS ......................2.5 ........................Celtics BUCKS .......................7.5........................... Heat ROCKETS.................... 7...................... Grizzlies T’WOLVES..................PK..................... Thunder BLAZERS .................... 7.......................... Magic JAZZ...........................8.5 ...................... Pistons Cavaliers ...................6.5 ........................KINGS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog OAKLAND.................. 18........................Detroit PRINCETON..............16.5 ...................... Brown PENN .......................... 2............................. Yale MANHATTAN.............. 1........................... Rider Toledo .......................1.5............... C MICHIGAN NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CAPITALS .......... -$145/+$125........Blackhawks RANGERS ..........-$140/+$120 ...... Maple Leafs PANTHERS ........ -$135/+$115............Islanders HURRICANES .... -$175/+$155................Sabres LIGHTNING.........-$110/-$110 .......Blue Jackets Jets.................... -$145/+$125............ COYOTES FLAMES.............-$160/+$140 ................ Devils Grand Salami: Over/under 37.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP Trevor Bauer and RHP Dan Otero to one-year contracts. National League NEW YORK — Agreed to terms with 1B Lucas Duda on a one-year contract and LHP Adam Wilk on a minor league contract. CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with 1B Matt Adams on a one-year contract. Frontier League GRIZZLIES — Traded OF Brandon Thomas to York (Atlantic) for a player to be named. WASHINGTON — Signed RHP Davis Adkins. WINDY CITY — Signed C Larry Balkwill to a contract extension. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA — Re-signed DT Josh Mauro to a two-year contract. BALTIMORE — Named Greg Roman senior offensive assistant and tight ends coach. Promoted tight ends coach Richard Angulo to assistant offensive line coach. DETROIT — Signed LB Brandon Chubb to a reserve/future contract. LA RAMS — Named Sean McVay coach. MIAMI — Promoted Matt Burke to defensive coordinator. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA — Recalled F Laurent Dauphin and Brendan Perlini from Tucson (AHL). Named John Knebel executive vice president of corporate partnerships and premium seating. NASHVILLE — Recalled D Alexandre Carrier from Milwaukee (AHL). NY ISLANDERS — Recalled D Scott Mayfield from Bridgeport (AHL). Placed D Travis Hamonic on the injured reserve list. NY RANGERS — Recalled F Pavel Buchnevich from Hartford (AHL). BLUES — Activated D Robert Bortuzzo from injured reserve. USA Hockey USAH — Announced the retirement of executive director Dave Ogrean, effective in August. SOCCER Major League Soccer PORTLAND — Signed F Victor Arboleda, D Rennico Clarke and G Kendall McIntosh. Re-signed F Jack Barmby. COLLEGE IOWA — Announced wide receivers coach Bobby Kennedy and running backs/special teams coach Chris White will be leaving the program. KANSAS — Named Doug Meacham offensive coordinator. MIAMI — Announced junior F Michael Gilmore will no longer be a part of the men’s basketball program. SAN JOSE STATE — Named Joe Bernardi offensive line coach, Alonzo Carter running backs coach, Kevin Cummings wide receivers coach, Bojay Filimoeatu linebackers coach, Ryan Gunderson quarterbacks coach and Andrew Sowder offensive coordinator and tight ends coach. TEXAS — Suspended men’s sophomore basketball G Tevin Mack indefinitely for an unspecified violation of team rules.

Nikola Jokic had 22 points and 10 rebounds and the Denver Nuggets emphatically ended a five-game losing streak with a 140-112 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Thursday night in the NBA’s Global Games series at O2 Arena in London. Wilson Chandler added 21 points, and Danilo Gallinari had 18 for the Nuggets. They outscored the Pacers 39-20 in the third quarter, shooting 73.7 percent in the period to put it away. Denver trailed only once, when Kevin Seraphin gave the Pacers a 31-30 lead early in the second quarter, and finished with a season high in scoring. C.J. Miles had 20 points, and Jeff Teague added 14 points and nine assists for Indiana. The Pacers had won five in a row, scoring at least 120 points in each victory. Wearing knee-high socks adorned with the Union Jack and London skyline, Gallinari made three 3-pointers in the first 3:08 to set the tone. Denver made six of its first 10 3-point attempts and finished 15 for 32 from the perimeter. Kenneth Faried added 15 points for Denver. He punctuated the Nuggets’ dominance with an alley-oop from Ja-

meer Nelson that brought the sellout crowd of 18,689 fans to its feet with 8:55 remaining. The game marked the fifth consecutive year the NBA has held a regular-season game in London and the seventh overall. After conceding their only lead, Indiana held Denver within four points for much of the second quarter, but three careless fouls and a succession of converted free throws pushed the Nuggets back out on top.

NOTEBOOK Pelicans’ Davis out • New Orleans star Anthony Davis didn’t suit up for Thursday night’s game against Brooklyn because of an injured left hip. Davis bruised his hip in the Pelicans’ 110-96 win over the New York Knicks on Monday. He went through some training during the pregame warmups in Brooklyn, but didn’t shoot. Porzingis sits again • Kristaps Porzingis was out again for the New York Knicks with a sore left Achilles tendon, while rookie Paul Zipser made his first career start for short-handed Chicago. Porzingis continues to have problems with an injury that sidelined him for three games recently.

COLLEGES Area schools THURSDAY’S SCORES Women’s basketball Missouri Baptist 78, Williams Baptist 75 Lewis 70, UMSL 68 FRIDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Washington at Emory, 5 p.m. W: Wichita State at SIU Carbondale, 6 p.m. W: Greenville JV at Jefferson, 6:30 p.m. M: Washington at Emory, 7 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

National scores East Bryant 77, Wagner 66 Jacksonville 82, NJIT 81 LIU Brooklyn 60, CCSU 49 La Salle 87, Rhode Island 75 Mount St. Mary’s 77, Fair. Dickinson 70 Northeastern 92, Drexel 75 Northwestern 69, Rutgers 60 Sacred Heart 87, St. Francis Brooklyn 75 Siena 81, Quinnipiac 74 St. Francis (Pa.) 77, Robert Morris 57 Towson 83, Delaware 56 South Belmont 84, Morehead St. 78 Coll. Charles. 53, J. Madison 51 Elon 96, Hofstra 80 Florida G.C. 78, Kennesaw St. 75 Georgia Tech 75, Clemson 63 Lipscomb 94, Stetson 68 Louisiana Tech 79, Charlotte 73 Mid. Tennessee 69, Marshall 57 North Florida 73, SC-Upstate 65 Northwestern St. 86, Nicholls 81 Notre Dame 67, Miami 62 Old Dominion 54, Southern Miss. 50 Sam Houston 70, New Orleans 68 Tennessee St. 63, E. Kentucky 49 UAB 72, W. Kentucky 54 UNC-Greensboro 83, ETSU 79 UNC-Wilmington 101, William & Mary 77 VMI 79, W. Carolina 78 Midwest Austin Peay 83, SIU-Edwardsville 81 CS Bakersfield 88, Rio Grande 81 Cincinnati 66, SMU 64 Green Bay 78, Wright St. 61 Ill.-Chicago 59, Cleveland St. 54 Iowa 83, Purdue 78 Milwaukee 68, N. Kentucky 58 Murray St. 83, E. Illinois 72 Valparaiso 78, Youngstown St. 62 Wisconsin 89, Ohio St. 66 Southwest Cent. Arkansas 89, Houston Bapt. 78 Oral Roberts 94, S. Dakota St. 88 SE Louisiana 56, Abilene Christian 50 UTEP 88, FIU 87 UTSA 68, FAU 63 Far West Arizona 91, Arizona St. 75 BYU 85, San Francisco 75 Cal St.-Fullerton 87, Cal Poly 74 California 69, Washington 59 Chicago St. 70, Utah Valley 61 E. Washington 92, Idaho St. 85 Gonzaga 93, Loyola Mary. 55 Montana 89, N. Colorado 68 New Mexico St. 81, Grand Canyon 69 North Dakota 90, Montana St. 85 Pacific 79, Pepperdine 74 Sacramento St. 88, S. Utah 83 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 74, Portland 33 Santa Clara 59, San Diego 57 UC Irvine 66, UC Santa Barbara 62 UMKC 84, Seattle 68 Utah 86, Southern Cal 64 Weber St. 91, Idaho 66

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

How the top 25 fared 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

NFL ASSOCIATED PRESS

LIMITED: CB Moris Claiborne (groin), DE Tyrone Crawford (shoulder), LB Justin Durant (elbow), DE DeMarcus Lawrence (back), DT Terrell McClain (ankle), T Tyron Smith (knee), DT Cedric Thornton (ankle).

13.

Injury Report NEW YORK (AP) — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT: definitely will not play; DNP-did not practice; LIMITED: Limited participation in practice; FULL: Full participation in practice): Saturday SEAHAWKS at FALCONS — Seahawks: DNP: TE Jimmy Graham (not injury related), RB Thomas Rawls (not injury related). LIMITED: S Jeron Johnson (knee), DT Tony McDaniel (concussion), RB C.J. Prosise (shoulder). Falcons: None announced. TEXANS at PATRIOTS — Texans: LIMITED: G Jeff Allen (ankle), DE Jadeveon Clowney (elbow/wrist), LB Brian Cushing (ankle), S Quintin Demps (hamstring), WR DeAndre Hopkins (knee), CB Jonathan Joseph (calf), LB Whitney Mercilus (knee), LB John Simon (chest). FULL: CB A.J. Bouye (groin), T Chris Clark (ankle), TE Ryan Griffin (quad), S Andre Hall (foot), LB Brian Peters (foot), QB Tom Savage (concussion). Patriots: DNP: RB LeGarrette Blount (illness). LIMITED: WR Malcolm Mitchell (knee). FULL: WR Danny Amendola (ankle), QB Tom Brady (thigh), CB Cyrus Jones (knee), WR Matthew Slater (foot). Sunday STEELERS at CHIEFS — Steelers: DNP: RB Le’Veon Bell (not injury related), LB Anthony Chickillo (ankle), TE Ladarius Green (concussion), DE Ricardo Mathews (ankle), QB Ben Roethlisberger (foot), RB Fitzgerald Toussaint (concussion), LB Vince Williams (shoulder). LIMITED: S Sean Davis (shoulder), DE Stephon Tuitt (ankle). Chiefs: LIMITED: LB Tamba Hali (knee), LB Justin Houston (knee). PACKERS at COWBOYS — Packers: DNP: WR Jeff Janis (quad), WR Jordy Nelson (ribs), LB Julius Peppers (not injury related), RB James Starks (concussion), C/G JC Tretter (knee). LIMITED: CB Quinten Rollins (neck/ concussion). FULL: WR Randall Cobb (ankle), LB Jayrone Ellitt (hand), G T.J. Lang (foot), LB Blake Martinez (knee), LB Clay Matthews (shoulder), LB Nick Perry (hand). Cowboys:

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

UConn (15-0) idle. Next: at SMU, Saturday. Baylor (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. Maryland (16-1) idle. Next: vs. Michigan, Thursday. Mississippi State (18-0) beat Florida 82-49. Next: at Alabama, Monday. South Carolina (14-1) beat Georgia 66-63. Next: at LSU, Sunday. Notre Dame (16-2) beat Pittsburgh 86-54. Next: at Tennessee, Monday. Florida State (16-2) beat No. 9 Louisville 72-65. Next: at Clemson, Sunday. Washington (16-2) idle. Next: at Arizona, Friday. Louisville (15-4) lost to No. 7 Florida State 72-65. Next: vs. No. 14 Miami, Sunday. Oregon State (15-1) idle. Next: at Southern Cal, Sunday. Ohio State (14-5) idle. Next: at Purdue, Sunday. Duke (15-2) beat North Carolina 70-58. Next: at No. 23 N.C. State, Sunday. Stanford (13-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. Miami (14-3) idle. Next: at No. 9 Louisville, Sunday. Virginia Tech (15-1) idle. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Monday. Texas (11-4) idle. Next: at No. 18 West Virginia, Saturday. UCLA (11-4) idle. Next: vs. No. 10 Oregon State, Friday. West Virginia (14-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Texas, Saturday. Arizona State (12-3) idle. Next: vs. Washington State, Friday. South Florida (13-2) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Saturday. DePaul (14-4) idle. Next: vs. Butler, Friday. Oklahoma (13-4) idle. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. N.C. State (13-5) lost to Syracuse 85-75. Next: vs. No. 12 Duke, Sunday. California (13-3) idle. Next: at Colorado, Friday. Kansas State (13-4) idle. Next: at Oklahoma State, Saturday.

GOLF EURO | SA Open Thursday at Glendower Golf Club, Johannesburg Purse: $1.1 million; Yardage: 7,594. Par: 72 First Round Keith Horne, South Africa 66 Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa 66 Jordan Smith, England 67 Jbe Kruger, South Africa 67 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 67 Rory McIlroy, N. Ireland 67 Dean Burmester, South Africa 67 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 68 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 68 Oliver Fisher, England 68 Mark Foster, England 68 Jens Fahrbring, Sweden 68 Shaun Norris, South Africa 69

Justin Walters, South Africa Laurie Canter, England Jeff Winther, Denmark Graeme Storm, England Joel Stalter, France Steven Tiley, England Brett Rumford, Australia Simon Dyson, England Richard S Johnson, Sweden Ulrich Van Den Berg, South Africa Daniel Brooks, England Colin Nel, South Africa Sebastian Soderberg, Sweden Also Peter Uihlein, United States Charlie Bolling, United States

Nuggets 140, Pacers 112

Pelicans 104, Nets 95

Mavericks 113, Suns 108

Indiana: George 2-12 4-4 10, Robinson 4-10 0-0 8, T.Young 2-5 0-0 4, Turner 4-13 0-0 9, Teague 5-7 4-5 14, Miles 7-13 0-0 20, Niang 1-1 0-0 2, Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Seraphin 5-6 0-0 10, Jefferson 2-5 0-0 4, Brooks 6-10 0-0 14, J.Young 2-3 0-0 5, Ellis 4-9 4-4 12. Totals 44-94 12-13 112. Denver: Chandler 8-13 3-3 21, Gallinari 7-11 0-0 18, Jokic 7-12 6-6 22, Mudiay 3-7 1-2 9, Harris 6-11 3-3 16, Barton 3-10 2-2 9, Hernangomez 2-2 0-0 4, Faried 6-8 3-3 15, Nurkic 1-1 1-2 3, Nelson 4-7 0-0 11, Miller 0-1 0-0 0, Murray 3-6 2-2 8, Beasley 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 52-91 21-23 140. Indiana 29 27 20 36 — 112 Denver 30 37 39 34 — 140 3-pointers: Indiana 12-29 (Miles 6-7, Brooks 2-5, George 2-6, Turner 1-1, J.Young 1-2, Teague 0-1, T.Young 0-2, Robinson 0-2, Ellis 0-3), Denver 15-32 (Gallinari 4-6, Nelson 3-6, Jokic 2-3, Chandler 2-5, Mudiay 2-5, Harris 1-1, Barton 1-2, Miller 0-1, Murray 0-3). Rebounds: Indiana 34 (Turner 6), Denver 48 (Jokic 10). Assists: Indiana 26 (Teague 9), Denver 37 (Jokic, Mudiay 7). Fouls: Indiana 15, Denver 16. A: 18,689 (20,000).

New Orleans: Hill 5-10 2-2 14, Jones 10-17 3-9 24, Asik 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 7-15 3-4 21, Hield 2-9 0-0 5, Cunningham 2-6 0-0 4, Motiejunas 0-7 1-2 1, Ajinca 0-0 0-0 0, Galloway 0-6 1-1 1, Moore 2-5 0-0 5, Evans 10-15 7-7 29. Totals 38-90 17-25 104. Brooklyn: Booker 4-9 0-2 8, Lopez 9-18 1-2 20, Whitehead 2-7 0-0 4, Bogdanovic 4-11 0-0 10, Harris 6-10 1-2 15, Hamilton 3-9 0-0 6, Dinwiddie 0-5 0-0 0, LeVert 4-8 1-2 10, Hollis-Jefferson 2-8 0-0 4, Kilpatrick 6-12 3-3 18. Totals 40-97 6-11 95. New Orleans 35 16 22 31 — 104 Brooklyn 31 26 22 16 — 95 3-pointers: NO 11-32 (Holiday 4-6, Hill 2-4, Evans 2-4, Moore 1-2, Jones 1-2, Hield 1-6, Galloway 0-2, Motiejunas 0-3, Cunningham 0-3), BKN 9-42 (Kilpatrick 3-6, Harris 2-6, Bogdanovic 2-7, LeVert 1-5, Lopez 1-6, Booker 0-1, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Whitehead 0-2, Hamilton 0-4, Dinwiddie 0-4). Rebounds: NO 50 (Jones 12), BKN 50 (Booker 12). Assists: NO 16 (Holiday 4), BKN 22 (Dinwiddie, Booker, Hollis-Jefferson 4). Fouls: NO 16, BKN 20. Technicals: BKN team. A: 14,352 (17,732).

Dallas: Barnes 10-17 1-2 22, Nowitzki 7-15 1-1 18, Curry 4-5 1-1 12, D.Williams 9-15 1-3 23, Matthews 7-14 0-0 18, Finney-Smith 0-2 2-2 2, Powell 3-7 4-4 10, Mejri 2-2 0-0 4, Barea 1-8 0-0 2, Harris 0-3 2-4 2, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-89 12-17 113. Phoenix: Warren 4-11 0-0 8, Chriss 4-6 2-2 13, Chandler 5-8 4-6 14, Bledsoe 2-4 7-7 11, Booker 14-20 5-7 39, Tucker 1-5 0-0 2, Bender 1-3 2-2 5, Len 3-4 1-2 7, Knight 2-9 1-1 5, Ulis 0-3 0-0 0, Barbosa 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 38-78 22-27 108. Dallas 32 25 31 25 — 113 Phoenix 29 30 17 32 — 108 3-pointers: Dallas 15-34 (D.Williams 4-5, Matthews 4-8, Curry 3-4, Nowitzki 3-5, Barnes 1-4, Finney-Smith 0-1, Anderson 0-1, Harris 0-1, Barea 0-5), Phoenix 10-18 (Booker 6-7, Chriss 3-4, Bender 1-2, Knight 0-1, Tucker 0-2, Warren 0-2). Rebounds: Dallas 32 (Mejri 7), Phoenix 47 (Chandler 19). Assists: Dallas 29 (D.Williams 12), Phoenix 15 (Bledsoe 5). Total fouls: Dallas 20, Phoenix 23. Technicals: Dallas def. three sec., Dallas team, Barea, Phoenix def. three sec., Phoenix team, Bledsoe. A: 19,874 (22,300).

Knicks 104, Bulls 89

Spurs 134, Lakers 94

Warriors 127, Pistons 107

Chicago: Zipser 2-6 2-2 7, Gibson 4-7 4-5 12, Lopez 5-10 0-0 10, Carter-Williams 1-8 1-1 3, Wade 9-20 4-6 22, McDermott 0-5 2-2 2, Portis 1-4 0-0 2, Felicio 6-9 1-2 13, Grant 5-10 2-3 14, Rondo 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 35-88 16-21 89. New York: Thomas 2-9 0-0 4, Anthony 10-19 1-2 23, Noah 6-10 0-0 12, Rose 7-15 3-3 17, Lee 3-8 0-0 6, Kuzminskas 8-15 1-1 19, O’Quinn 5-7 2-2 12, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Jennings 1-4 2-3 5, Baker 0-0 0-0 0, Holiday 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 44-92 9-11 104. Chicago 22 29 14 24 — 89 New York 24 30 22 28 — 104 3-pointers: Chicago 3-18 (Grant 2-4, Zipser 1-3, Rondo 0-2, McDermott 0-2, Wade 0-2, Carter-Williams 0-2, Portis 0-3), New York 7-23 (Holiday 2-4, Kuzminskas 2-4, Anthony 2-6, Jennings 1-4, Thomas 0-1, Lee 0-4). Rebounds: Chicago 43 (Gibson 9), New York 47 (Noah 15). Assists: Chicago 20 (Rondo 8), New York 21 (Anthony 6). Fouls: Chicago 12, New York 17. Technicals: Gibson. A: 19,812 (19,812).

L.A. Lakers: Young 3-6 0-0 8, Deng 1-5 0-0 3, Randle 8-13 6-7 22, Mozgov 0-4 0-0 0, Russell 4-13 0-0 9, Ingram 3-7 2-4 9, Robinson 2-2 0-0 4, Zubac 4-7 0-0 8, Black 2-3 1-2 5, Huertas 0-6 2-2 2, Calderon 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-7 5-6 10, Clarkson 6-11 2-4 14. Totals 35-85 18-25 94. San Antonio: Leonard 10-13 8-9 31, Aldridge 5-11 2-2 13, Gasol 9-9 4-5 22, Parker 6-10 1-1 13, Green 1-4 0-0 3, Bertans 2-5 0-0 5, Anderson 2-3 2-2 7, Lee 1-3 2-2 4, Dedmon 2-3 2-2 6, Mills 2-5 1-2 6, Murray 3-5 2-2 10, Simmons 6-8 0-0 12, Ginobili 0-2 2-2 2. Totals 49-81 26-29 134. L.A. Lakers 24 30 21 19 — 94 San Antonio 36 36 34 28 — 134 3-pointers: LAL 6-19 (Young 2-4, Russell 1-3, Williams 1-3, Ingram 1-3, Deng 1-3, Huertas 0-1, Clarkson 0-2), SA 10-21 (Leonard 3-5, Murray 2-2, Anderson 1-1, Aldridge 1-1, Mills 1-3, Green 1-3, Bertans 1-4, Simmons 0-1, Ginobili 0-1). Rebounds: LAL 29 (Randle 6), SA 46 (Dedmon 12). Assists: LAL 22 (Randle 5), SA 31 (Parker, Gasol 6). Total fouls: LAL 25, SA 20. Technicals: LAL def. three sec., LAL team.

Detroit: Harris 8-15 1-2 18, Morris 9-17 2-2 21, Drummond 5-6 2-4 12, Jackson 5-11 3-3 14, Caldwell-Pope 0-0 0-0 0, Hilliard 2-12 2-4 6, Johnson 3-5 0-0 8, Baynes 2-2 0-0 4, Ellenson 1-1 0-0 3, Marjanovic 5-7 3-3 13, Smith 2-7 0-0 4, Udrih 1-5 2-2 4. Totals 43-88 15-20 107. Golden State: Durant 10-15 2-2 25, Green 0-4 2-2 2, Pachulia 3-6 1-2 7, Curry 9-17 3-3 24, Thompson 9-15 1-4 23, West 1-4 0-0 2, Looney 1-1 0-0 2, Varejao 1-2 0-1 2, McGee 4-5 0-0 8, Livingston 5-7 0-0 10, McCaw 0-0 0-0 0, Iguodala 3-5 0-0 8, Clark 4-8 3-4 14. Totals 50-89 12-18 127. Detroit 30 28 19 30 — 107 Golden State 37 23 41 26 — 127 3-pointers: Detroit 6-28 (Johnson 2-3, Ellenson 1-1, Harris 1-4, Jackson 1-6, Morris 1-6, Smith 0-2, Udrih 0-2, Hilliard 0-4), Golden State 15-29 (Thompson 4-5, Clark 3-4, Durant 3-5, Curry 3-9, Iguodala 2-3, West 0-1, Green 0-2). Rebounds: Detroit 40 (Marjanovic 11), Golden State 37 (Green 9). Assists: Detroit 20 (Udrih 4), Golden State 39 (Green 13). Total fouls: Detroit 19, Golden State 14. A: 19,596 (19,596).

PGA | Sony Open

500* Beat the February 1st

ON EVERY us ORDER pl 2017 Price Increases

Draperies • Blinds Shades • Shutters Call Now for a COMPLIMENTARY “in Home” Design Consultation!

636-875-7644 • 314-269-0083 *see decorator for details

70 77

Thursday at Waialae Country Club, Honolulu Purse: $6 mill.; Yards: 7,044; Par 70 (35-35) First Round a-denotes amateur Justin Thomas 30-29 — 59 -11 Hudson Swafford 29-33 — 62 -8 Rory Sabbatini 30-33 — 63 -7 Russell Henley 32-32 — 64 -6 Russell Knox 33-31 — 64 -6 Gary Woodland 34-30 — 64 -6 Tony Finau 32-32 — 64 -6 Cameron Smith 31-33 — 64 -6 Jamie Lovemark 31-33 — 64 -6 Billy Hurley III 33-31 — 64 -6 Shawn Stefani 32-32 — 64 -6 Richy Werenski 32-33 — 65 -5 Jason Dufner 33-32 — 65 -5 Vijay Singh 34-31 — 65 -5 Daniel Berger 33-32 — 65 -5 Jordan Spieth 33-32 — 65 -5 Jon Curran 33-32 — 65 -5 Michael Thompson 32-33 — 65 -5 Charles Howell III 33-32 — 65 -5 Satoshi Kodaira 30-35 — 65 -5 Sean O’Hair 32-34 — 66 -4 Will MacKenzie 34-32 — 66 -4 Soren Kjeldsen 34-32 — 66 -4 Stewart Cink 32-34 — 66 -4 Jim Herman 32-34 — 66 -4 Brian Stuard 34-32 — 66 -4 Jason Bohn 34-32 — 66 -4 Boo Weekley 33-33 — 66 -4 Ryan Palmer 34-32 — 66 -4 Daniel Summerhays 34-32 — 66 -4 Brian Harman 34-32 — 66 -4 Ollie Schniederjans 33-33 — 66 -4 Ben Martin 35-31 — 66 -4 Webb Simpson 32-34 — 66 -4 Justin Rose 34-32 — 66 -4 Hideki Matsuyama 32-34 — 66 -4 Scott Piercy 33-33 — 66 -4 Michael Kim 35-32 — 67 -3 Kevin Na 35-32 — 67 -3 Y.E. Yang 35-32 — 67 -3 Bill Haas 34-33 — 67 -3 Hideto Tanihara 34-33 — 67 -3 Brandon Hagy 34-33 — 67 -3 Ricky Barnes 32-35 — 67 -3 Chez Reavie 33-34 — 67 -3 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 34-33 — 67 -3 David Lingmerth 34-33 — 67 -3 Branden Grace 33-34 — 67 -3 Pat Perez 34-33 — 67 -3 Tim Wilkinson 34-33 — 67 -3 Luke List 34-33 — 67 -3 Miguel Tabuena 33-34 — 67 -3 Henrik Norlander 35-32 — 67 -3 Sung Kang 34-34 — 68 -2 Mackenzie Hughes 34-34 — 68 -2 Robert Streb 34-34 — 68 -2 James Hahn 35-33 — 68 -2 Morgan Hoffmann 34-34 — 68 -2 Whee Kim 35-33 — 68 -2 Andres Gonzales 34-34 — 68 -2 Hyung-Sung Kim 34-34 — 68 -2 Ryan Brehm 32-36 — 68 -2 John Huh 33-35 — 68 -2 David Hearn 32-36 — 68 -2 Marc Leishman 34-34 — 68 -2 Greg Chalmers 36-32 — 68 -2 Nick Taylor 35-33 — 68 -2 William McGirt 35-33 — 68 -2 Vaughn Taylor 34-34 — 68 -2 Rod Pampling 34-34 — 68 -2 J.T. Poston 33-35 — 68 -2 Yusaku Miyazato 34-34 — 68 -2 Jared Sawada 34-34 — 68 -2 Cameron Percy 33-36 — 69 -1 Ben Crane 34-35 — 69 -1 J.J. Henry 36-33 — 69 -1 Matt Every 34-35 — 69 -1 Smylie Kaufman 34-35 — 69 -1 Billy Horschel 32-37 — 69 -1 Bryson DeChambeau 32-37 — 69 -1 Xander Schauffele 33-36 — 69 -1 Trey Mullinax 37-32 — 69 -1 a-Brent Grant 33-36 — 69 -1 Brian Gay 34-35 — 69 -1 Peter Malnati 36-33 — 69 -1 Fabian Gomez 35-34 — 69 -1 Kevin Tway 35-34 — 69 -1 Zach Johnson 34-35 — 69 -1 Carl Pettersson 34-35 — 69 -1 Steven Alker 35-34 — 69 -1 Miguel Angel Carballo 34-35 — 69 -1 Seamus Power 33-36 — 69 -1 Kelly Kraft 34-35 — 69 -1 Harris English 38-32 — 70 E Wesley Bryan 34-36 — 70 E Jerry Kelly 34-36 — 70 E Chad Collins 34-36 — 70 E Keegan Bradley 34-36 — 70 E Kevin Kisner 34-36 — 70 E David Toms 36-34 — 70 E Brandt Snedeker 36-34 — 70 E Kyle Reifers 37-33 — 70 E Harold Varner III 34-36 — 70 E Daisuke Kataoka 35-35 — 70 E Tag Ridings 38-32 — 70 E Colt Knost 38-32 — 70 E Tyrone Van Aswegen 36-34 — 70 E Jonas Blixt 36-34 — 70 E John Senden 35-35 — 70 E Scott Brown 35-35 — 70 E K.J. Choi 36-34 — 70 E Anirban Lahiri 36-34 — 70 E Zac Blair 35-35 — 70 E John Peterson 35-35 — 70 E Mark Hubbard 34-36 — 70 E a-John Oda 35-35 — 70 E Ryan Blaum 38-32 — 70 E J.J. Spaun 34-36 — 70 E Bob Estes 37-34 — 71 +1 Steve Marino 36-35 — 71 +1 Chris Kirk 34-37 — 71 +1 Troy Merritt 37-34 — 71 +1 Kyle Stanley 35-36 — 71 +1 Patrick Rodgers 36-35 — 71 +1 Parker McLachlin 35-36 — 71 +1 Ken Duke 35-36 — 71 +1 Jimmy Walker 38-33 — 71 +1 Chad Campbell 35-36 — 71 +1 Fred Funk 35-36 — 71 +1 Hiroshi Iwata 35-36 — 71 +1 Nicholas Lindheim 37-34 — 71 +1 Kevin Hayashi 36-35 — 71 +1 Cheng Tsung Pan 36-35 — 71 +1 Bud Cauley 34-38 — 72 +2 Cody Gribble 35-37 — 72 +2 Seung-Yul Noh 36-36 — 72 +2 Spencer Levin 36-36 — 72 +2 Bryce Molder 33-39 — 72 +2 Camilo Villegas 35-37 — 72 +2 Johnson Wagner 37-35 — 72 +2 John Chin 38-34 — 72 +2 Tadd Fujikawa 37-36 — 73 +3 Paul Casey 37-36 — 73 +3 Derek Fathauer 43-33 — 76 +6

Save up to $

NBA SUMMARIES

69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69


DIY DECOR

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

January 13, 2017

P2 BACK

The Perfect Artwork for Your Home Sponsored Content by Windo Van Go

It’s time to freshen up your decor with new window treatments that will make your room warm and inviting. There are a variety of window treatments to choose, each offering its own set of advantages.

SHUTTERS Shutters are great insulators and give owner’s maximum lexibility on usage. A simple tilt of the louver can control light and privacy. "Plantation Shutters are a product you buy once and will love forever" says Julie Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go. "They add so much style to your room and their function is unmatched by any other window treatment.”

the bottom to close for privacy and leave the top open for light. These shutters come in vinyl, composite and wood. Vinyl and composite are designed to look like wood but are

“S

hutters are a great investment, enhance the beauty of a home and provide an extra edge when selling.” - Philippe Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go

more maintenance free than wood. They come in various whites and off whites. Wood shutters

Plantation shutters are one of the few treatments that allow

WindoVanGoSTL.com 636-394-3411

(Continued on Page 2)

Winter Decor On a Budget Content and photos by Greenshoot Media

The winter season is one of the busiest times in terms of entertaining at home. Homes turn into a hotspots for guests this time of year with get-togethers, family gatherings and winter parties. Given the cold weather outside, guests will likely be spending the majority of their visits indoors. That’s why winter interior decorating can be one of the most fun parts of the season. Impress guests with creativity, inspire friends and family members to design their own homes in innovative ways, and do so on a budget. (Continued on Page 2)

HOT ON THE MARKET

PRISTINE EQUESTRIAN ESTATE Must be liquidated due to death. 25 acre fully developed ranch with all the amenities. 6K sq/ft log home, indoor riding arena, in-ground pool, 7 acre lake, too much to list. CALL FOR DETAILS 865-441-6685

2224 DIVOT LADUE SCHOOLS! $649,000

VILLAGE OF PROVENCE ST CHARLES, MO NEW PRICE $389,900

4 Beds, 4.5 Baths, 4,200 sq.ft. total living area LINDA ROBBEN ERIN WHITEHEAD 314-265-2444 636-236-2032 stlouisluxuryrealestatelindarobben.com CONSORTHOMES.COM

15285 PIKE 9154 LOT #4 BOWLING GREEN, MO 63334 THE VILLAGES AT MONTRACHET 3 BED, 3 BATH, 3,007 SQFT $490,524 WITH $15,000 IN SAVINGS 20.270+/-AC

WILLOWBROOKE CREVE COEUR MO NEW PRICE $455,900

BLACK & ASSOCIATES LLC TROY, MO (636) 462-SOLD WWW.BLACKANDASSOCIATESLLC.COM

3717 sq ft 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 1.5 Story

MOVE IN READY

BEV SHARAMITARO 636-397-1843 bsharamitaro@mckelveyhomes.com

ERIN WHITWEHEAD 314-993-2600 CONSORTHOMES.COM

Place your listing today 314-621-6666 homes@post-dispatch.com

HAWKINS RIDGE ST LOUIS, MO $389,900

LOT #206 2 BEAVER CREEK DRIVE THE VILLAGES OF PROVENCE ST. CHARLES, MO $468,385 WITH $15,000 IN SAVINGS $675,000

THE ENCLAVE AT RIDGEPOINTE 516 MAPLEVIEW, U CITY, OPEN SUNDAY, JAN. 15, 1-3PM! INVENTORY HOME $358,634 $650,000

MOVE IN READY!

3717 sq ft, 1.5 Story, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths 4 BEDS, 2 FULL & 2 HALF BATHS

MLS#16027020 4 Beds, 3.5 Baths, 3,820 sq.ft. total living area OPEN 11-5 or by Appointment

ANDREW FOX 314-845-1881 CONSORTHOMES.COM

TRACY K. GERAGHTY 314-831-7227 tgeraghty@mckelveyhomes.com

LINDA ROBBEN 636-265-2646 314-265-2444 stlouisluxuryrealestatelindarobben.com www.KempHomes.com

THE SUSIE O. JOHNSON TEAM 636-936-3443 www.SusieOJohnson.com


P2 The Perfect Artwork for Your Home (Continued from Page 1)

come in a variety of paint colors and many rich stains. Shutters come in 2 1/2, 3 1/2 and 4 1/2 louver sizes and offer various frame styles for every window. Shutters can also be made for specialty windows such as arches, angled windows, French doors and sliders. “Shutters are a great investment” says Philippe Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go. “They enhance the beauty of a home and provide an extra edge when selling.”

FAUX AND REAL WOOD BLINDS Two-inch and two and a half inch blinds are still a very popular choice as a window treatment. These blinds are durable, reasonable and easy to clean. Using this style in a room offers maximum lexibility to control the light and privacy. Faux blinds are typically white or off white, but also come in stained colors. Real wood comes in many painted colors and rich stains.

UPHOLSTERED CORNICES Cornices are a tailored decorative window treatment that gives the customer just enough softness and color. Cornices can be straight or come with decorative cut outs, and always include a color-coordinated cording. Window shades can be easily tucked up under cornices.

HONEYCOMB SHADES Honeycomb shades are making a big comeback. They are used primarily for windows with limited needs for light and privacy. These shades can be lowered to keep the sun out or at night for privacy. When pulled up, they tuck up tight and are barely visible. Made of a durable polyester fabric and come both light iltering and light blocking, honeycomb shades come in many stylish colors with various lifting systems including continuous cord loop, cordless and motorized. Special features can be purchased including top down bottom up shades—giving privacy at the bottom of the window. A sheer fabric can then be added at the top giving two shades in one. Honeycomb shades are great for arches and done vertically for sliders.

SCREEN SHADES/BAMBOO SHADES Screen shades have given roller shades a new life. These shades were made popular by restaurants and lofts attempting to keep the sun out while allowing some view inside. Typically, they are made of a durable vinyl which allow for easy care and cleaning. Screen shades also come in an exterior version, great for outdoor patios and screen porches. Bamboo shades offer viewing out while keeping sun outside. These shades are mostly done in warm, wood colors and textures.

Windo Van Go has been in business for 26 years and prides itself in offering quality products at excellent prices. They do all of their own work to ensure a smooth purchase from start to inish. Windo Van Go makes selecting window treatments easy and convenient by visiting their clients at their homes providing samples, colors and pictures. Current promotions include free sales tax (8% value) on all plantation shutters; free cordless option on all honeycomb shades; and $25 off on all cornice orders.

WindoVanGoSTL.com 636-394-3411

WINTER DECOR ON A BUDGET (Continued from Page 1)

GET CRAFTY A local arts and crafts store can be the best place to ind winter decorations at affordable prices. These stores often have the materials for building wreaths, snow globes or ornaments, and even offer classes on home decorating.

Impress guests with creativity and inspire friends and family all on a budget.

Candles serve as a great design point for various arts and crafts designs. Wrap cylindrical candles with ribbons in the style and colors of your choice. Decorative accents such as candle toppers and votive holders are complementary pieces that can make a home design look and smell great.

what look is to be achieved overall. Online research on popular social media sharing sites and home improvement video resources are great places to ind design ideas. Watching the professionals work their magic can help give anyone the knowledge and conidence to pull off any design goals.

RESEARCH LIKE A PRO Between local interior designers and craft shops, there are many sources available for tracking down information and advice on wintertime decorating. Before seeking professional guidance, have an idea of what designs are inspiring and

CENTER OF ATTENTION The key to any beautiful table design is the centerpiece. The materials used can make all the difference. Wintertime offers plenty of options from nature such as pine cones, cranberries or winter plants.

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

63074

St. Ann (MO) LOCATED SOUTH OF LAMBERT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ST. LOUIS COUNTY HISTORY

NEIGHBORHOODS

SCHOOLS

The City of St. Ann began to function as a municipality on April 13, 1948. Charles F. Vatterott, the developer and builder of most of the residential and commercial properties in St. Ann, started the community as a housing project for families of workers employed in nearby defense plants. It was one of the few defense housing projects in the country to develop into a permanent town.

St. Ann is a suburban community located in northwest St. Louis County. The city offers a wide variety of municipal services with low residential tax burden. The city has one of most expansive parks systems in the area.

The city is served by two school districts, Pattonville School District and Ritenour School District.

7,387 HOUSING UNITS

98,893

1948

BECAME A MUNICIPALITY

48% OWNER OCCUPIED

1957

MEDIAN YEAR HOMES BUILT

$

MEDIAN HOME VALUE

ST. ANN CITY HALL | 10405 ST. CHARLES ROCK RD. | ST. ANN, MO 63074 | (314) 427-8009

COPY AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF STANNMO.ORG, 2016 CENSUS BUREAU AND 2016 BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS CONSUMER EXPENDITURE SURVEY COMPILED BY EASI AND ADMALL.COM


P3 buying a home? know what all you’ll be paying for each month Sponsored content by John Gormley When you decide to buy a new home, a good irst step is to determine how much mortgage you can afford. After talking to a St. Louis Realtor® or using an online mortgage calculator, you may ind a payment amount that’s well within your monthly budget. A big part of the cost of buying a home is the mortgage interest rate. And mortgage interest rates are suddenly on the rise -- and they’re likely to go up again. When considering a home purchase, any mortgage interest rate increase is signiicant, as increases affect monthly payments and, in turn, how much house a buyer can afford. For example, if you’re purchasing a home and your mortgage is $200,000, with a 3.4 percent interest rate on a 30year ixed mortgage the principal and interest would be $886.96. Paying a 4.5 percent interest rate for 30 years pushes the principal and interest to $1,013.37, an increase of $126.41 monthly. That might not sound like much, but it translates to $1,516.92 extra annually and an additional $45,507.60 over the life of the loan. WHERE THE MONEY GOES Your monthly payment is typically made of four components: principal, interest, taxes, and insurance -often referred to as PITI.

• Principal. Principal is the amount you originally borrow. Early in your mortgage’s term, your payments will be applied mostly to the loan’s interest. As the loan progresses, you’ll pay off more principal. • Interest. Interest is money the lender charges to take the risk on your loan. The interest rate on your loan has a direct correlation to the size of your payment. That is, a higher interest rate leads to higher monthly payments. For most homebuyers, higher interest rates reduce the amount of money they can borrow, and lower interest rates increase it. • Taxes. Property taxes can account for a signiicant amount of your monthly payment. These taxes for local schools, city and county services, and other local entities are based on the tax rate for each of those taxing authorities and the appraised value of your property. Instead of a large tax bill coming due at the end of the year, many property owners pay their property tax as part of their monthly payment. • Insurance. There are two types of insurance coverage that may be included in your monthly payment. The irst type, property insurance, protects your home and possessions from ire, theft, and other events your policy outlines. The second

amorTIzaTIon breaks IT down An amortization schedule shows how much of your monthly loan payment is being applied toward interest costs and how much to reduce the outstanding balance of your loan. The amortization chart details the month-by-month progression of your mortgage payments from mostly covering interest to mostly covering principal. Many lenders allow you to pay extra each month to pay off principal early and pay less interest over the length of the mortgage.

John Gormley is CEO of the St. Louis Realtors®, an 8,000-member professional organization representing all aspects of real estate in the Greater St. Louis region. type of insurance is private mortgage insurance (PMI). When a homebuyer does not put down at least 20 percent on the home, most lenders require PMI. This insurance offers the lender some protection in the event the borrower is unable to repay the loan. PMI coverage can be dropped once you attain 20 percent equity in the home.

add IT all uP So, how much mortgage can you afford? Factor in the principal, interest, taxes and insurance to get closer to a true picture of the cost of owning your home. There’s also utilities, maintenance and perhaps even the cost of your commute. Your St. Louis Realtor® can be a great resource to help you understand these components plus other costs of homeownership. He or she can show you homes within your price range and other criteria, such as within a certain commute time based on the time you need to arrive at work.

TakIng resPonsIbIlITy for Taxes and Insurance While these four components make up a typical monthly payment, some lenders allow homeowners to pay taxes and insurance on their own. In this scenario, you’ll have a lower monthly payment, but you must make sure you have the money available to pay property taxes and insurance when those bills come due.

To ind your St. Louis Realtor®, or to learn more about our local real estate market, visit stlrealtors.com.

T O P A G E N T S A N D A F F I L I AT E S

516 Mapleview, U City, MO 63130

Op n. Sun en 15 da , 1 y, -3p m!

Ja

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 1-3pm 407 Morning Meadow Drive, Lake St. Louis, MO 63367 E!

EN OP

US HO

$650,000

MOVE IN READY! Gorgeous Lake St. Louis ranch with 3 bdrm/2 bth and 2239 sq ft of living area located in Meadowbrook Subdivision. Tons of windows, vaulted ceilings, shiny hard wood loors and 2 beautiful ireplaces w/loor to ceiling stone mantles. Finished walkout w/ dry bar area for entertaining, spare bedroom and full bath. Huge yard, 3 car garage and handyman’s workshop.

MLS # 16027020 | 4 Bedrooms | 3.5 Bathrooms | 3,820 Square Feet Total Living Area *Location* close to major highways, walking distance Clayton Shops/Restaurants! Walk in closets, Open loor plan, 2 master ensuites makes this a rare U city ind! Beautiful coffered ceilings, can lighting, ceiling fans, built in speakers throughout the home. Upgraded chefs delight in the kitchen. Breakfast bar, granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances, built in wine cooler, ton of cabinet space, large pantry completes this culinary dream kitchen. Fire place in Hearth Room and Living Room. Finished basement for additional room to spread out with family. Extra bedroom/sleeping room in lower level or ofice. 9 foot pour in basement, lots of natural light ills this inished basement. New sprinkler system in 2014. You will enjoy entertaining on the large deck that is extended off the hearth room/breakfast room.10 minutes to the airport. 10-15 minutes to area hospitals (Mercy, MO Bap, St. Mary’s, SLU, Barnes) Close to Wash U- ride your bike to school/work!

Shari Wynn

LINDA ROBBEN 314-265-2444

9889 Clayton Road St. Louis, MO 63124

www.stlouisluxuryrealestatelindarobben.com

Rent Houses South

Rent Illinois

ec l ia

List Price $2500 Towards Closing Costs

ild

Sp $1500 Of

South County

0350 Farms/Acreage BA, Liv. Rm., Din. Missouri

2 BR, 1 R m , 2 C ar Garage , Mehlville School District. O ne O wne r Home in Excellent Condition w/ Updates. Must See to app re c ia te . $ 1 2 1 , 4 0 0 . (636)584-7440

Farms/Acreage Illinois 1145

1155

202 Acre Farm located off HWY 100 West of Washington MO. 2 Story Home 5 BR, 1 BA (needs updating), 2 Barns w/Shop, Machine Shed, Other Out Buildings, Pond, Etc. . (636)667-3512

Pristine Equestrian Estate must be liquidated due to death. 25 acre fully developed ranch with all the amenities. 6K sq/ft log home, indoor riding arena, in-ground pool, 7 acre lake, too much to list. Call for details 865-441-6685.

2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

2245

m

50% Of

Manufactured Mobile Homes For Sale

1215

NEW TO THE MARKET! 3 Bed/2 Bath, All Electric, C/A, New Carpet, Freshly Painted, Vaulted Ceilings Kitchen: Lots of cabinets & appliances. Nice size Bdrms & walk-in closets. Laundry rm. Deck! LIKE NEW! ONLY $22,900 To view additional Tee Kay Homes: mhvillage.com. Set up in park. OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE! Pymts to fit your budget! 636-498-5100

Rent Apts/Flats Unfurnished South

Rent Apts/Flats Furnished Downtown

Manufactured/Mobile 1210 Homes For Rent

2230

3 bedroom, freshly painted, remodeled bathroom, offstreet parking, w/d hookups. $675/mo + $675 sec.dep. 314-267-0792 or 314-922-0963

Rent Clayton

2105

5024 Christy Blvd. St. Louis, Mo. 63116 1BR, 1 BA, C/A Appl. $450 Efthim Co Rltrs 781-0010

For sale by owne r, 1 0 7 acres m/l, Monroe Co., IL, wooded bluff property w/ roads throughout, great hunting property, beautiful view. For more information call 618-282-4113.

Rent Suburban Northwest

Westport/Lindbergh/Page 1 MONTH FREE Near I-64, 270, 170 or 70 Clean, safe, quiet building, great landlord. 1BR $545 special. w/d, storage locker, off-street prkg. Q 314-995-1912Q

Options up to $10,000 with the Purchase of $10,000 in Upgrades

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

2205

4841 Sigel Ave. St. Louis MO 63116 3BR, 1.5 BA, C/A, Appl. $850 Efthim Co Rltrs 781-0010

Rent Suburban West

Y Hoour m Dr e ea

CannonBuilders.com

Bu

y or nt ve In

Give Shelly A Call (636) 462-1544

2120

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $110.50/wk Call 314-421-2980 *********

Jennifer Smerek

Nick@NickDalba.com www.stcharlesrealestatesearch.com

2325

Heart of Clayton 1 bedroom ($700 a mo.) 2 bedrooms, ($800 a mo.) Call for more info 314-423-9200

Better Pay. Better Boss. Better Hours. Better Hurry! Find the job that’s right for you.

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/jobs

Rent Florissant

Cell: 314-574-8304

2450

2145

6408 Cates Ave. University City, Mo. 63130 2Br, 1Bth, C/A, Appl. $675 Efthim Co Rltrs 781-0010

Give Holli A Call (636) 462-4619

Nickolas A. Dalba, Jr.

NMLS# 260971 • 314-889-0667 jsmerek@gershman.com

Rent Apts/Flats Furnished Southwest

Now Booking Free Informational Sessions Come out and see our Inventories and Displays A Sales Oice Open Every Day Except Fridays

NMLS# 260167 • 314-889-0680 swynn@gershman.com

2385

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 877-390-0454, Mon-Fri 9-5, sky022@ metroplexinc.com Apply online at: skylinetowersapts.com 3113 Washington, Alton

Rent O’Fallon Area

2535

For LeaseExceptional Property! New roof 2 0 1 6 . Freshly painted. New stainless cookt op, microwave & dis hwas he r. Exte rior, deck & fence all power washed. Almost one half acre level lot. Backs to trees. Large rooms. Liv. rm., din. rm., great rm. 3 bdrms, 2 ba. Almost 2200 sf. Gas fireplace. 2 car gar. $1,950/mo. Re/Max One 636-938-3530 Ellen Elam 314-420-5845

Rent Richmond Heights 2570

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs. For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs. For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com

LET US GUIDE YOU

Rent Shrewsbury

2590

7326 LANSDOWNE St. Louis, Mo. 63119 2 BR, 1 BA, Appl., No pets. $950. Efthim Co Rltrs 781-0010

Rent University City

2640

Download the YOUR NEXT HOME app Up-to-date home listings for sale and rent in the greater St. Louis area Powerful search tools, extensive mapping capabilities and fast response time

1433 Nixon

2Bdrm Duplex, C/A bsmt, W/D Hookup $625/mo 314-616-4897

STLtoday.com/homes 314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

Call Terra Ritchie 314-456-9951 www.investors-title.com.


P4 Add Light With DIY Decor Sponsored Content and Photos by Family Features When your home decor needs an upgrade, but expensive, ready-made items aren’t in your budget, DIY projects can be an easy and affordable solution for revitalizing rooms in your home. One simple way to enhance the character of a room is with lighted elements. Add a glistening, on-trend look with a lighted canvas, which features twinkling lights that dance on shimmering glitter to lend a glam look to any room. The project, designed by crafting experts at

Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores, can be adapted to any palette; just change out the color of the glitter to match the hues in your favorite room. For a charming, subtle accent, this frosted jar and doily not only adds quaint lair – the jar also provides a soft glow of light. It’s perfect nestled on a shelf or sitting atop a dresser with similarly styled items. Find more creative ideas to bring a touch of light to your home decor at joann.com.

GLITTER AND LIGHTS CANVAS

Crafting time: 3-5 hours Skill level: Intermediate Supplies and Tools: Foam brush 18-by-24-inch canvas Decoupage medium Ultra-ine to coarse gold glitter Craft knife 3 packages battery-operated warm white LED moon lights Duct tape Protected work surface Use foam brush to cover entire canvas with layer of decoupage medium. Working 12 inches from canvas, dust canvas with glitter. Apply glitter so bottom is fully covered, fading into less glitter at top to create an ombre effect. Apply additional layers of glitter to achieve a thick consistency at bottom. Mix types of glitters to create dimension. Apply thin layer of decoupage medium over entire canvas to seal glitter. Tip: Ensure base layer is completely dry before applying top coat to avoid smearing glitter. Poke small hole in back of canvas with craft knife. Push tip of moon light through hole and secure in place with duct tape. Repeat, adding holes and lights over entire canvas. Continue ombre effect by placing more lights at bottom of canvas and less toward top. Apply layers of duct tape to hold lights securely in place on canvas.

FROSTED BALL JAR WITH DOILY

Crafting time: 1-2 hours Skill level: Intermediate Supplies and Tools: Ball jar (1-quart) Frosted glass spray Doily (8- to 10-inch diameter) Spray adhesive Hemp twine 1/8-inch ribbon Battery-powered tea light Follow manufacturer’s directions and spray Ball jar completely with frosted glass spray. Allow to dry completely. Spray working side of doily with adhesive. Press doily to jar, smoothing out any wrinkles. Allow to dry thoroughly. Use twine and ribbon to embellish top. Place batterypowered tea light inside.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 01.13.17–01.19.17 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

LUKAS GRAHAM IS MUCH MORE THAN ITS HIT ‘7 YEARS’

ICE IS NICE 5 WAYS TO HAVE SOME FROZEN FUN THIS WINTER. By Valerie Shremp Hahn

OFFBEAT ‘PATERSON’ IS POETRY IN MOTION

DISHES ARE ENERGETIC AT VIETNAM STYLE IN THE LOOP


THE BIG SCREEN

01.13.17–01.19.17

16 Turning a corner Adam Driver is delightful as an easygoing bus driver in the ofbeat “Paterson.” BY CALVIN WILSON

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18

Tickets are $10 at the door day of show only. No advance ticket sales.

18 Honorable tribute Detail-focused “Patriots Day,” starring Mark Wahlberg, traces the manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombers in 2013. BY CALVIN WILSON SATURDAY, JAN. 28

19 Familiar territory Writer, director and star Ben Aleck misses the target with “Live by Night.” BY CALVIN WILSON 19 Impassioned film Martin Scorsese’s “Silence” gets to the essence of spirituality. BY CALVIN WILSON

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit

FEB. 24-26

FUEL

ScottradeCenter.com

24 Youthful energy VietNam Style in the Delmar Loop specializes in sizzling steak platters as well as more familiar Vietnamese fare. BY IAN FROEB

Mystery Player Jersey Night VS. A wrestler carved by ice sculptor John Russell at Ice Visions in Kirkwood gets rinsed upon completion.

TUESDAY, JAN. 31 Presented by

First 10,000 fans will receive a Blues mystery player jersey courtesy of Scottrade! stlouisblues.com/promotions

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

COVER STORY 13 Bundle up Ice is cool — as long as it isn’t falling from the sky. We found five ways to have some frozen fun this winter. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR presented by 24•7

BILLY CURRINGTON FRIDAY, MAR. 24 ON SALE TODAY AT 10 AM!

THURSDAY, MAR. 9 ON SALE TODAY AT 11 AM!

MUSIC+CLUBS

INA GARTEN: THE BAREFOOT CONTESSA WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18

JAN. 27-29

JAN. 20-22

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com

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TICKETMASTER 800.745.3000

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314.622.5454

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4 Best Bets Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including the Cardinals Winter Warm-Up at the Hyatt Regency, “An American in Paris” at the Fox” and the Red Hot Chili Peppers at Scottrade Center. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

314.499.7676

6 Wildly unpredictable The music of Big Thief, performing as part of the Art of Live Festival, is “like a wild animal.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON 7 Frequent visitors Greensky Bluegrass returns to St. Louis this weekend for its fourth concert here in a year. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON 11 Real issues St. Louis rapper Nato Caliph dives into his own struggles on his seventh album, “God.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

STAYING IN 27 TV scoops Reporting from the Television Critics Association meeting in LA, Gail has news about “The Good Fight,” “Carpool Karaoke” and more. BY GAIL PENNINGTON

ON THE COVER ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

SUNDAY, FEB. 19

01.13.17–01.19.17 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

FEB. 9-12

LUKAS GRAHAM IS MUCH MORE THAN ITS HIT ‘7 YEARS’

OFFBEAT ‘PATERSON’ IS POETRY IN MOTION

DISHES ARE ENERGETIC AT VIETNAM STYLE IN THE LOOP

ICE IS NICE 5 WAYS TO HAVE SOME FROZEN FUN THIS WINTER. By Valerie Shremp Hahn

SEE+DO 12 A big risk A parent plots to get her daughter into a better school in the Black Rep’s production of “Lines in the Dust.” BY JUDITH NEWMARK

A figure of a high school wrestler by ice sculptor John Russell of Ice Visions in Kirkwood. PHOTO BY ROBERT COHEN, POST-DISPATCH

6 Beyond ‘7 Years’ Lukas Graham knows its hit song is special, but there’s plenty more to ofer fans. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

COPYRIGHT 2017 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go


WINNER! 4 TONY AWARDS

Here’s what we’re looking forward to in the coming week

INCLUDING BES T MUSICAL RE VIVAL “Celebrating my birthday with some of my favorite foods. It’s a long list.” •

“I have a respurrvation at the Mauhaus Cat Café. It’s like Christmas is finally here!” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com

“David Robertson, Gil Shaham and the SLSO on Friday night. It promises to be a great evening.” •

“Got to catch ‘All My Sons’ at the Rep.” •

Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • digital marketing manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event & sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof • Post-Dispatch vice president of advertising, 314-340-8529, dbischof@post-dispatch.com

“I think we’ll check out the Loop Ice Carnival — sounds like lots of fun! That is, if an ice storm doesn’t keep us at home. Not quite so much fun.” •

CONTRIBUTORS Debra D. Bass • feature writer Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Gail Pennington • television critic Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • arts writer

“Catching some of the Golden Globe winners at theaters.” •

Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise “I am going to ‘Hell’ (thanks to Theatre Nuevo).” •

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101 stltoday.com/apps

@gostl

@gostlouis

“Bingeing on Amazon’s ‘Sneaky Pete’ (Friday), with Giovanni Ribisi as a con man and Bryan Cranston (who co-created) as the villain.” •

PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS

CONTACT US Tell us about upcoming events ae@post-dispatch.com • events.stltoday.com

THE BEST ROCK MUSICAL EVER! ROLLING STONE

@gostl

JANUARY 27 - 29 OVERHEARD ONLINE On the Pageant, rated No. 7 concert venue by Pollstar magazine BILL HANNEGAN, VIA FACEBOOK: “A lot of St. Louisans doubted Joe Edwards when he built the Pageant. I wonder if his trolley will enjoy similar success. … Joe does seem to have the Midas touch!” ➙ On the new Hi-Pointe Drive-In JOHN LAMWERSIEK, VIA FACEBOOK: “Waited for over an hour in line for a burger and milkshake (Saturday) afternoon. I received my burger first then waited another 20 minutes for the milkshake.” ➙ JASON DUNKER, VIA FACEBOOK: “Neat. It has even LESS parking than Naugles and Del Taco had.” ➙ ELLSWORTH WARE, VIA FACEBOOK: “Ahhh, Naugles at 3 in the morning. Thanks for the memories.”

Get our free app for daily Best Bets, reviews and more ➙ stltoday.com/apps

800-745-3000 TICKE TMAS TER.COM

01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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production, which stars Gabrielle Greer, Andrew Michael Neiman, Brock Russell and Larissa White. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

SATURDAY Snowman Softball Tournament WHEN 7:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday • WHERE Central Fields, Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free to watch • MORE INFO stlmardigras.org

After last week’s ceremonious Twelfth Night kickof, Mardi Gras festivities continue this weekend with the sixth annual Snowman Softball Tournament. More than 90 teams will compete, snow or shine, for titles in the women’s (Saturday) and men’s (Sunday) divisions — and for the coveted Bud Light Beer Drinking Trophy, which goes to the team that buys the most beer. Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

New World Symphony

BEST

BETS FRIDAY TeamBackPack’s ‘Of the Map’ WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Bootleg at Atomic Cowboy, 4140 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH $5 • MORE INFO ticketweb.com

TeamBackPack’s “Of the Map” lineup of events kicks of Friday night at the Bootleg at Atomic Cowboy with performances by Looprat, Najii Person, Dante Wolfe, Domino Efect, Riley B, Kody Kool, J’Demul and more. St. Louis rapper Mvstermind is hosting. There will also be a freestyle competition with cash prizes. TeamBackPack is a hip-hop platform, movement and media event/production company looking to change the way hip-hop music and culture is consumed. The event also aims to expose hiphop talent that is often overlooked. Events run through Monday. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

events are ✔ These Editor’s Picks

WHEN 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$111 • MORE INFO 314534-1700; stlsymphony.org

director ✔ Music David Robertson will lead the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra on a brief four-concert tour of Spain next month. This weekend, the symphony will perform the first of the two programs it will be taking overseas. It’s a diverse one, with John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances” to open, Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9, “From the New World” to close and, in the middle, the extraordinary violinist Gil Shaham as soloist in the Korngold Violin Concerto. There are three opportunities to hear it; it should be the SLSO at its best. BY

BY GABE HARTWIG

Mvstermind, Looprat, Anthony Lucius WHEN 9 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $10-$12 • MORE INFO metrotix.com

✔ Mvstermind’s ascent as St.

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Closer’ WHEN Friday through Jan. 22; 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. Sundays • WHERE .ZACK Performing Arts Incubator, 3224 Locust Street • HOW MUCH $25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

In this episodic drama by British playwright Patrick Marber, the Theatre Lab explores the web of relationships among four people whose love afairs, rivalries, seductions

THURSDAY Brothers Osborne WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20-25 • MORE INFO thepageant.com

Osborne arrive at the Pageant hot on the heels of an upset ✔ Brothers win as vocal duo of the year from the Country Music Association and with their debut album, “Pawn Shop,” making all kinds of best-of-2016 lists. The latest single from their album, “It Ain’t My Fault,” went out to radio stations this week. Read more about Brothers Osborne in Sunday’s A&E section. BY AMANDA ST. AMAND

and betrayals draw them into one another’s lives — as well as their bodies and hearts. A biting look at modern love, the play includes very strong language and sexual references, along with unexpected tenderness and vulnerability. Tom Martin directs the

Louis’ favorite new rapper continues with a headlining show Saturday night at the Old Rock House. His new EP is titled “Cusp.” The Old Rock House show, part of the Art of Live Festival, follows Mvstermind’s headlining gig late last year at Delmar Hall. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

STL Motorcycle Show WHEN 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE The Dome at America’s Center, 701 Convention Plaza • HOW MUCH $10 adults, free 15 and under with paid adult admission • MORE INFO

stlmotorcycleshow.com

Motorcycle stunt riders and brothers Pat and Phil Smage, who made it to the semifinals of NBC’s “America’s Got Talent,” will take the stage for five shows this weekend at the Third Annual STL Motorcycle Show in St. Louis. Also performing are local bike athletes STL Sprockets, known for “breakdancing on a bike.” When you’re not gawking at the performers onstage, you can check out hundreds of new motorcycles and ATVs on the showroom floor, including 30 motorcycles competing in a custom bike show. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

MONDAY ‘Gentlemen of Vision’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Monday; doors open at 6:30 p.m. • WHERE .ZACK Performing Arts Incubator, 3224 Locust Street • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-2894150; cinemastlouis.org

Cinema St. Louis starts a new film series, Films @ SLIFF.ZACK, with the documentary “Gentlemen of Vision.” Directed by Jim Kirchherr and Frank Popper, the 2016 film is a profile of a step team whose members are drawn from North County schools. The film is co-presented by Midrash St. Louis. There will be a postfilm discussion with filmmakers and GOV founder Marlon Wharton and a performance by members of the team. The series will feature documentaries, American independent films, restorations and international films. The inaugural screening is free, but tickets for upcoming films will be $13 general admission, $10 for Cinema St. Louis members and students. BY CALVIN WILSON

FAST FORWARD “Constellations,” Jan. 20-Feb. 4 at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis: A man and a woman connect, in diferent ways and with diferent consequences, through time and space • Oscar nominations, Jan. 24: Will the accolades continue for “La La Land”? See which films the Academy will honor for this year’s Oscars • “A St. Louis Thing: The PostDispatch Trivia Night,” Feb. 9 at the Missouri History Museum: Grab your smartest friends for a trivia night featuring Joe Holleman, Gail Pennington, Jesus Ortiz and more P-D writers • Cajun Cookof, Feb. 11 at Soulard Market Park: Enjoy samples of New Orleans-inspired cuisine, learn a few cooking tips from the pros and see which chefs’ dishes come out on top

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ events.stltoday.com stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: JON GITCHOFF

T.J. Osborne of Brothers Osborne performs at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre in 2016.


Michelle Paillou of St. Louis takes a picture of Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright at the 2016 Cardinals Winter Warm-up.

the audience. BY DANIEL NEMAN

THURSDAY Phong Nguyen WHEN 7 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

SATURDAY Cardinals Care Winter Warm-Up WHEN 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday • WHERE Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch, 315 Chestnut Street • HOW MUCH $40 for ages 16 and up, $10 ages 5 to 15, under 5 free, some players require autograph donation tickets to benefit Cardinals Care • MORE INFO cardinals.com/winterwarmup

a player’s autograph, find a ✔ Get deal on a collectible at the Cardinals Care Store and get a chance to tour the Cardinals locker room, which is only open to the public for the 21st Annual Winter Warm-Up. The event benefits Cardinals Care, the baseball team’s foundation that supports kids and community agencies. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

TUESDAY

title piece. BY JUDITH

‘An American in Paris’

NEWMARK

WHEN Tuesday through Jan. 29 • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$88 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

P H O T O : J . B . F O R B E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

post-war Paris, ✔ Ina young American vet pursuing a career as a painter falls in love with a beautiful, mysterious ballerina. Inspired by the classic 1951 movie starring Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron, director/ choreographer Christopher Wheeldon creates a fresh dance vocabulary for the stage, then pairs it with a timeless Gershwin score that includes “I Got Rhythm,” “But Not for Me,” and of course, the

stltoday.com/go

WEDNESDAY Chris Bohjalian WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

can ✔ Sleepwalking be dangerous, even deadly, in Chris Bohjalian’s new novel. When a mom goes missing, the police and her daughters try uncover the whole nightmare (including an unconscious desire for sex) in “The Sleepwalker.” Bohjalian can always be counted on to present an interesting, contemporary story. BY JANE HENDERSON

Red Hot Chili Peppers, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Jack Irons WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Scottrade Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $49-$99 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Red Hot Chili ✔ The Peppers return to St. Louis, in what oicially can be billed as the year’s first bigevent concert next week at Scottrade Center. The band is out there with “The Getaway,” its first album since 2011’s “I’m With You.” This is one of those concerts for which you don’t want to be late. Among the opening acts is LouFest veteran Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Ina Garten: The Barefood Contessa WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $46.50-$66.50 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Celebrity cook and cookbook author Ina Garten has been on your television since 2002, but she is making her first-ever trip to St. Louis. She will engage in a casual and wide-ranging conversation with Feast magazine’s Catherine Neville before taking questions from

More than one modern author has imagined new adventures for Huck Finn or Tom Sawyer. But Phong Nguyen, a professor at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg, chose the character of Joe Harper for his debut novel. Joe is a hobo some 20 years after knocking around with Tom, and he’s looking for a cave to die in. But if he actually succeeds, the book wouldn’t be called “The Adventures of Joe Harper.” Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen (“The Sympathizer”) plugged Nguyen’s novel as “captivating” and “imaginative.” BY JANE HENDERSON

‘Hell’ WHEN 8 p.m. nightly, Thursday through Jan 29 • WHERE The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive • HOW MUCH $15-$20 • MORE INFO artful.ly/theatre-nuevo

A devised theater piece — one created by the troupe performing it — such as “Hell” could go in a lot of diferent directions. In this case, Theatre Nuevo artists explore religious and personal notions of hell through music, movement and original text. Drawing on various beliefs held by people from Christians to Buddhists to Mayans, “Hell” looks at damnation and redemption, hand in hand. Theatre Nuevo founder Anna Skidis Vargas directs.

WITH MAJOR SUPPORT FROM

JANUARY 27 - 29 AT T H E C H A S E PA R K P L A Z A PREMIER TASTING–TRULY A CELLAR MAKER'S DREAM! Enjoy an amazing selection of hard-to-find wines including library releases, magnums and vertical tastings, plus a Riedel wine stem, gourmet menu from Michael Brightman’s With Love Catering and more!

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2017 | 7 TO 10 PM JANUARY 28 & 29 | NOON – 5:00 P.M. GENERAL ADMISSION Discoveries abound on the bustling Main Floor with more than 700 wines to taste, samples from nearly 35 food booths plus craft beer selections. Includes a commemorative wine glass.

VIP RESERVE ROOM Take your tasting experience to the next level and expand your palate! The VIP Reserve Room boasts a delicious buffet created by Schnucks’ Culinary Arts Team, dessert by Bissinger’s Handmade Chocolatier and more than 240 of the highest caliber wines available in St. Louis. PLUS a Riedel stem, silent auction and access to the Main Floor.

BY JUDITH NEWMARK

www.foodandwinestl.org • The Rep Box Office [314] 968-4925 Participating Schnucks Locations Download our mobile app presented by Missouri Wines to preview wines and plan your day.

01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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SHAZAM ST. LOUIS TOP 10

MOST-SHAZAMED SONGS FOR JAN. 10 1 “Location” (Khalid) 2 “Castro” (Yo Gotti) 3 “Caroline” (Aminé) 4 “Deja Vu” (J. Cole) 5 “Bad and Boujee” (Migos feat. Lil Uzi Vert) 6 “I Don’t Wanna Live Forever” (ZAYN feat. Taylor Swift) 7 “24k Magic” (Bruno Mars) 8 “Black Beatles” (Rae Sremmurd feat. Gucci Mane) 9 “Bad Things” (Machine Gun Kelly & Camila Cabello) 10 “Party” (Chris Brown feat. Gucci Mane & Usher) Adrianne Lenker

Q&A

Beyond ‘7 Years’ Danish band Lukas Graham knows its hit song is special, but there’s plenty more to ofer fans BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

R

ising Danish pop band Lukas Graham knew it had a winner on its hands while recording “7 Years.” “I knew it was something special,” says frontman Lukas Forchhammer of the breakthrough hit from the band’s selftitled debut album. “But three-Grammynominations special? I wasn’t aware of that.” Indeed, when Grammy nominations were announced in December, Lukas Graham scored three nominations: song of the year, record of the year and best pop duo/group performance for “7 Years.” “I wasn’t expecting this, if I have to be honest,” he says. “If I was egotistical, I’d say, ‘Yes, I was expecting it.’ “It wasn’t just one nomination or two. It was three. And two of them are in big catego-

6

ries. Just being nominated is a big thing.” The nomination for song of the year means the most to Forchhammer because “it commemorates the writing and craftsmanship behind the song.” When the awards are given out Feb. 12, he expects to lose to the “big, powerful, lovely ladies” in his categories — Beyoncé and Adele. But that’s OK with him. “At the end of the day, it’s nice to be considered.” Forchhammer, classically trained with the Copenhagen Boys’ Choir, says “7 Years” resonated in such a big way because of its lullaby feel and its relatability. “The song reflects on real things in real life. And it doesn’t sound like anything else out there.” He wrote it in 3½ hours, which is the case

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

WHAT Lukas Graham • WHEN 8 p.m. Monday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $26.50 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

Big hief singer says band’s music is ‘like a wild animal’ Indie rock band Big Thief is one of several acts on tap at the Art of Live Festival, Thursday through Sunday at Of Broadway, the Ready Room and the Old Rock House. Big Thief’s new debut album is “Masterpiece.” Adrianne Lenker (guitar, vocals) talked about the band. How would you describe the music of Big Thief? I would say it’s like a wild animal. It’s unpredictable. We don’t always know what’s going to happen at our shows. What was it like pulling together “Masterpiece”? We got to a point where we needed a record ... though none of us had any money. So we scrounged up the change we could, borrowed here and there, and gathered as much gear as we could from friends. We recorded for 12 days. It was a really beautiful and fulfilling process. Did any pressure come with an album titled “Masterpiece”? That never crossed my mind, how other people would receive it. There’s no way to predict how people will receive something. What’s the direction of the second album — a continuation of the first, or is it diferent? It’s both. It’s connected because those questions have unfolded more, and there’s new layers of questions on this record. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON WHAT Big Thief with Sam Evian at Art of Live Festival • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH $10 • MORE INFO ticketfly.com

Find more music events, photos and concert news ➙ stltoday.com/music stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: DANNY CLINCH (LUKAS GRAHAM); HANDOUT (LENKER)

Lukas Forchhammer (front) and Lukas Graham

with most of the songs he writes, particularly when he’s in a good space. “It depends on where you are in the world,” he says. “Distractions are why songs don’t get finished.” Forchhammer was in the studio working on music when his pianist started playing notes that sparked what would become “7 Years.” “The song ran out of my head and onto a piece of paper,” he says. “It’s about growing up and getting older and realizing what you want out of life — your dreams and ambitions and being in a good place.” Lukas Graham followed with “Mama Said” and “You’re Not There” with little worry over whether songs would click the way “7 Years” did. “I don’t look at it as following it up. It’s not a series of punches like a boxing match. I look at them as individual pieces of art and entertainment,” he says. But there’s still a challenge of having a song so huge as a band’s signature hit. “It inevitably swallows its children because people are so focused on ‘7 Years,’” Forchhammer says. “That song is very much about life and hope and family and dreams and ambitions, and people are aware there are more songs like that to come from a guy like me. But the song is a good window into the way I write songs.” With his band’s live show, fans can expect to hear more than just the band’s hit song. “It’s a hard-hitting, impactful show with a hell of a lot of energy,” he says. “If you think ‘7 Years’ is the sound of the live show, you’re in for a surprise.”


THE SHELDON CONCERT HALL

Greensky Bluegrass says its concerts are more like rock shows

crappy albums. And a lot of bands who make great albums are crappy live. There are songs that are 10-minute jams, but there are also supersensitive, BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM sparse songs. The juxtaposition and sides of those things.” reensky dichotomy in our songs is The LouFest show Bluegrass has a what we do really well.” thing for St. Louis. stands out for members For Friday night’s of Greensky Bluegrass. It The band returns this show, fans will have had came after a run of clubs weekend for its fourth time to actually enjoy and allowed the band to concert here in a year. the album irst, so the do one last big outdoor A year ago, Greensky band can introduce songs gig. The band also enjoyed Bluegrass headlined a more freely. the festival’s pair of shows at the Old Greensky diversity. Rock House as part of Bluegrass “Sometimes the Art of Live Festival, is looking followed by a well-received you go to a forward to festival and you gig in September at playing the see a bunch of LouFest in Forest Park. Pageant. “It’s a bluegrass bands Friday night, the band Anders Beck great room, and it’s or a bunch of jam — with a new album, always interesting to move bands, and that’s cool,” “Shouted, Written Beck says. “But at LouFest, around to bigger venues Down & Quoted” — is in cities,” Beck says. it’s diferent fans for difat the Pageant. And with this comes a ferent cultures of people. “We do like St. Louis, bigger show, from the proand we like playing music,” It’s not just a bluegrass duction to the sound to the festival.” He adds that says Greensky Bluegrass’ lighting. Beck says most the festival is a good repAnders Beck (dobro). people would not associresentation of St. Louis. “And it turns out we like ate that with bluegrass, On “Shouted, Written playing music in St. Louis. but that’s what they do. Down & Quoted,” Beck “We’ve played a bunch “It’s as much a rock says, the main thing was of times and played a ’n’ roll show as it is a to evolve musically. bunch of great places, bluegrass show. People “This album is a little and St. Louis is doing a will get to see that. And more about bringing great job of supporting that’s one of the reasons the vibe of the live show music. That’s something we can come back to St. into the studio,” he says. we’re grateful for as Louis twice a year. We “So there’s a little more musicians who travel the really embrace improvisaof the distortion, more country, that’s something tion in our band. Every efects on the instruments worth mentioning.” show is diferent from the that happen live that St. Louis fans always last time you saw it.” we haven’t tried in the give Greensky Bluegrass The band embraces the studio. And I think we what Beck calls a fun vibe. song side of performing, accomplished that.” “It’s a rowdy party Beck explains, rather than The band also wanted atmosphere but not just getting lost in the jam. to showcase some to a fault,” he says. “We have really good of the examples of “They’re always paying songwriters in the band. juxtaposition in the music. attention to the music. I’m not one of them.” One of them is “there’s It’s a good listening good songs, but we jam. audience. It sounds like WHAT Greensky Bluegrass, And we’re a live band who those things might be Front Country • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Pageant, plays a ton of shows but mutually exclusive, but 6161 Delmar Boulevard • still spend lots of time they’re not. St. Louis is HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE making albums. A lot of one of those places where INFO ticketmaster.com bands you see live make people present both

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

G

stltoday.com/go

2016 • 2017 SEASON

Anat Cohen Quartet January 14 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by RubinBrown Welcomed by 88.7 The Sound

Dale & Ray featuring Dale Watson and Ray Benson January 18 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by The Engelhardt Family Foundation Co-presented with KDHX

Art Garfunkel: In Close-Up January 22 at 8 p.m. For Patron Tickets Call: 314.533.9900 Sponsored by Dick & Patti Marriott, Missy & Greg Hill and Michael & Carol Staenberg

Call MetroTix at 314.534.1111 or visit THESHELDON.ORG

St. Louis County Library’s

Black History Celebration 2017

presents

Bernice King Daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King.

Friday, January 27 7:00 P.M. Doors open at 6:00 p.m. (Seating is limited; early arrival is highly recommended.)

St. Louis County Library Headquarters–Main Reading Room 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • St. Louis, MO 63131 • 314-994-3300 Program sites are accessible. Upon two weeks’ notice, accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities. Call 314-994-3300 or visit www.slcl.org

01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Join us to learn about and celebrate the achievements of this American hero!

Familycelebration Saturday JAN 14 and Monday JAN 16

10am–2pm (See website for complete schedule) | FREE SUNDAY, FEB 26

2pm Matinee BLANCHE M. TOUHILL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER on the UMSL Campus, St. Louis

314-516-4949 or 866-516-4949 touhill.org National Tour info: turnaroundartists.org

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GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

Bring your family to the Museum for movement workshops with Mama Lisa, a performance by Dre Hilton, and peace-inspired make-and-takes. The irst 150 kids ages 12 and under to arrive at the Museum each day will receive an MLK story book to take home. This program is intended for families. Availability for groups of 10 or more is extremely limited. Groups must call (314) 454-3114 to discuss options for attending.

Missouri History Museum

Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park

314.746.4599 | mohistory.org

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24/7 PeacockLoopDiner.com 6261 Delmar in The Loop

Perfect for intimate weddings, rehearsal dinners, brunches and guestroom accomodations. Contact the Moonrise Hotel’s event specialists 314-685-3418 or Sales@MoonriseHotel.com

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01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room ticketmaster.com • Marleyfest with the Murder City Band, 9 p.m. Feb. 11, $12.

Of Broadway etix.com

• Slothrust, 8 p.m. March 11, $12.

• Stoney LaRue, 8 p.m. Feb. 2, $16.

Chaifetz Arena ticketmaster.com

• Lily and Madeleine, 8 p.m. Feb. 19, $12.

• A Perfect Circle, 8 p.m. April 20, $39.50-$65, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday. Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • We Are Warm, Pirate Signal, Star Wolfe, 8 p.m. Feb. 4, $5. • Shark Dad, Monster Eats Manhattan, Jon Heisserer, 8 p.m. Feb. 24, $5. • My Posse in Efect: A Tribute to the Beastie Boys, 8 p.m. April 15, $12-$15. Family Arena metrotix.com • “Southern Uprising Tour” with Travis Tritt, the Charlie Daniels Band, Marshall Tucker Band and the Outlaws, 5:30 p.m. Sept. 30, $50-$100, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. The Firebird ticketly.com • Michael Ian Black, 7 and 10 p.m. Feb. 18, $25. • El Ten Eleven, 8 p.m. March 10, $12-$15, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

“WOMEN OF THE BLUES” • JAN. 6 • BB’S JAZZ, BLUES AND SOUPS 1 Greg Edick and Vicky Michaels, both of St. Louis 2 Vanessa Isom (left) of St. Louis and Arie Walker of Madison 3 Jack Nelson of St. Louis and Countess Williams of Chicago 4 Dominique Owens and Thomas Reynolds, both of St. Louis 5 Paulie Gibson (left) and Travis Wolfangel, both of St. Louis 6 Lucy and Tom Murphy of Columbus, Ohio ONE NATION CLASSIC • JAN. 8 • BUSCH STADIUM 7 Anna Lopatin (left) of Troy, Ill., and Christine Lauer of St. Louis 8 Elizabeth and Aaron Reeves of Kennett, Mo. 9 Taylor Brown and Stephanie Muller, both of St. Charles 10 From left: Courtney Lybarger, Taylor Lybarger and Seth Belford, all of Edwardsville 11 Tammy and Jef Williams of Staunton 12 Justin and Allee Miller of St. Louis

• Foreigner’s 40th Anniversary Tour with Cheap Trick, Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience, 7 p.m. Aug. 16, $29.95-$99.95, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Last Podcast on the Left, 8 p.m. March 4, $20.

• Charlie Wilson’s “In It to Win It” tour with Fantasia, Johnny Gill and Solero, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 24, $44-$94, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

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• Green Day, Catish and the Bottlemen, 7 p.m. Aug. 14, $30-$89.50, on sale at noon Friday.

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• Ha Ha Tonka, 8 p.m. May 19, $15. The Pageant ticketmaster.com • K-Ci and JoJo, Nikko Smith, 8 p.m. Feb. 12, $35-$55. • Celebration Day: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin, 8 p.m. Feb. 24-25, $22.50-$25. • Kris Kristoferson, 8 p.m. March 31, $50. • Simple Plan’s 15th Anniversary Tour with Set It Of, Seaway, 7 p.m. April 7, $30.50-$33.50. • Mastodon, Eagles of Death Metal, Russian Circle, 7:30 p.m. April 27, $40-$47.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday. • Explosions in the Sky, 8 p.m. April 28, $26-$30, on sale at 9 a.m. Friday. Peabody Opera House • Billy Currington, 7:30 p.m. March 9, $25-$75, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday. • Brit Floyd’s “Immersion World Tour 2017,” 8 p.m. March 24, $29.50$59.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Scottrade Center Ticketmaster.com • Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, Joe Walsh, 8 p.m. May 12, sold out.

Find iParty photos from this event and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/iparty

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

Find more concert announcements, music events and party pix ➙ stltoday.com/music stltoday.com/go

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF

TICKET TRACKER

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre livenation.com


Getting personal

heads down. We should all be proud of what we come from, but we don’t all have a sense of pride.” The Blender St. Louis rapper Nato Caliph dives “Access” features rapper Truck North into his own struggles on seventh album, ‘God’ of the Roots Crew and questions how African-Americans can get access to BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM things such as proper schooling, better food options, higher wages and more. “I’ve done songs about her before; it’s St. Louis hip-hop “How do we get to a better place? not done disparagingly,” he says.“I want artist Nato CaHow do we get those things that we’re people to understand I would never disliph released his missing?” he says. “Truck delivered an parage a black woman.But I had to adseventh album, awesome verse.” dress a bigger issue,and I want people to “God,” on ChristRappers Rec Riddles and Ackurate are know there are two sides of every story. mas Day, and he’s featured on the song“Acceptance.” There were things being said behind as thought-provoking as ever. Caliph’s approach to music difers closed doors,and this was my fingerHe also gets more personal than from what’s popular and commerprint,my way of explaining.” ever, addressing his separation from cial; he has always walked his He says his wife has heard his wife. It’s most evident on the song own path. the song and understands his “Life.” “I pride myself in being my need to make it. “This is the most private song I’ve own artist,” he says. “When The project links to “Preever put out,” he says. “It was very people try to compare me, quel to God,” an EP Caliph hard. But I didn’t cry because I wanted it’s never to the same person. released in 2015. Caliph, a to do it.” Nato Caliph But if six people say I sounded member of the Nation of God The song follows “Love,” which he like Rakim, then maybe I sound like I’m and Earth movement, says “it led into says is about “that infatuation stage, biting Rakim. This means I’m more me this story telling the bigger picture that everything-is-good stage” of a than anybody else.” of who God is. There is no mystery to relationship. He points out how things go in and God. It’s right here in your face.” “It’s the equivalent of a new-car out of style, including his type of rap, The album, available on iTunes and smell, and it’s when things are going often called “conscious rap” — made by Spotify and for purchase and streaming great,” says Caliph (born Shedrick Kelrappers who are more concerned with on natocaliph.com, reflects “what God ley). “Then immediately after that, societal or political issues than with is to me and who God is. These are the there’s ‘Life.’ That’s when the new-car smoking weed, drinking and guns. things that make up me as a person.” smell wears of. That’s when the hard“Conscious rap fell of, but now it’s Another song on the album that ships come in.” creeping back in,” he says.“It’s more means a lot to Caliph is “Garth,” about The song also features Foo Foo Rena, trendy to say things that are intelligent a beloved uncle who helped him with Tank the Machine and Black Spade, now. But Nato Caliph had already been his rites of passage as a man. and his two older children are heard there. I’m not hopping on bandwagons.” There’s also “Noble,” featuring playing in the background. Caliph is planning an album release Domino Efect, on which he attempts Caliph doesn’t like to talk much about the song. He’d rather his fans lis- to instill pride. “A lot of times we (Afri- event for “God.” He’s performing Jan. 21 at the S.L.U.M. Fest Awards at Delcan-Americans) walk around with our ten to it; it speaks for itself, he says. mar Hall. Read more about the awards next week in Go! Magazine. stltoday.com/blender @kevincjohnson @blenderpd @kevincjohnson

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01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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BEST RESTAURANTS TAURANTS

Don’t miss the latest headlines, reviews, photo galleries and more from Go! Magazine. Like us on Facebook. facebook.com/gostlouis

Check out the best dresses, suits and beards from Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards. stltoday.com/go

From a bustling Webster Groves gem to a sausage-slinging truck, Ian Froeb ranks his favorite new restaurants of 2016. stltoday.com/ofthemenu

John Contini and Evann De-Bose in the Black Rep’s production of “Lines in the Dust”

A mother’s risk A parent plots to get her daughter into a better school in Black Rep’s ‘Lines in the Dust’ BY JUDITH NEWMARK / THEATER CRITIC / JNEWMARK@POST-DISPATCH.COM

D

enitra, the heroine of Nikkole Salter’s drama “Lines in the Dust,” faces a confounding problem. Her daughter is about to enter high school. Denitra wants to give her a good education, but she can’t aford to move to a neighborhood with firstrate public schools or to pay tuition at a private one. A charter school ofers a glimmer of hope, but admission is strictly by lottery. When her daughter doesn’t win one of the coveted slots, Denitra realizes she will have to enroll her child at the

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same overcrowded, underfinanced, underperforming New Jersey high school that she herself attended. And that’s just not acceptable, she decides. “Denitra’s greatest fear is re-creating her own problem — insuicient education — in her daughter’s life,” says Salter, whose drama opens Friday at the Black Rep. The company’s founder, Ron Himes, directs. “This young mother knows that even though she did really well in high school, she was unprepared when she graduated. In fact, she was already behind! Her 4.0 average was diferent from a 4.0 at a good school.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

high school, the program that autho“Now they’re stuck in the same rized Salter’s education was kaput. economically challenged neighborPrevailing on a personal connection hood where Denitra grew up. She feels with a high school administrator, Salter shorted, and she feels desperate. She managed to enroll her sister at her own has to do something.” alma mater. What she decides to do breaks the Despite a rough transition as her law. It’s risky: If she fails, not only will sister — a top student in their neighher daughter lose an opportunity, but borhood school — adjusted to tougher Denitra could lose more. Still, Salter standards, it all worked out. But Salter says, she understands why her heroine (played here by Evann De-Bose) is will- wonders what would have happened if she hadn’t been there to help. What if ing to risk it. she hadn’t known the right adminis“In my opinion, education is the trator to approach? most important part of the American Access to a good education, she is dream,” says the Obie-winning playconvinced, should be more than wright and actress, who lives in luck, persuasive relatives or the Bloomfield, N.J., with her right address. Court cases husband, a safety engineer. around the country — she Her best-known, awardcites examples in Conwinning play, “In the Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Ohio, tinuum,” deals with women Kentucky and Washington, in California and Zimbabwe Salter D.C. — have challenged residency facing HIV and AIDS. It’s requirements that bar children from been performed around the world, attending good public schools near their including a 2009 production at the homes because they don’t live inside the Black Rep. Currently, Salter is writing “right” district lines. a screen adaptation of Claude Brown’s Some kids — the children of wealthy Harlem masterpiece, “Manchild in the or well-positioned families, children Promised Land.” who shine in fields from science to “The possibilities of rising above football — will do OK, no matter what, your status are very slender without Salter says. “But what if you are just a (a good education),” she says. “I would regular kid?” she asks. “Don’t you need lie wholeheartedly, if I had to, to get a a good education too? child into a good school. We’re talking “Public education is based on the about someone’s future. I would do idea that we invest in everybody. But anything.” right now, we only invest in some In fact, she did. people. That’s a class system — a caste Describing herself as a “direct bensystem that says, ‘This is ours; you go eficiary” of the 60-year-old Brown v. get your own.’ Board of Education ruling, which held “Yet we know that education is the that separate never was equal, around 25 years ago Salter left her local school for a one thing that equalizes opportunity. If we won’t ofer that, let’s go back to better school in another neighborhood. having kings and queens! A good eduThriving there, she embarked on a difcation isn’t supposed to be a privilege.” ferent kind of life course — one that led her to Howard University as an underWHAT “Lines in the Dust” • WHEN Friday through grad, to New York University for an MFA Jan. 29 • WHERE Washington University’s Edison Theatre, 6465 Forsyth Boulevard • and ultimately to an impressive career. But Salter has a much younger sister. HOW MUCH $35-$40; $10 for student rush • MORE INFO 314-534-3807; theblackrep.org By the time her sister was ready for

Find more events, reviews and blogs by our critics ➙ stltoday.com/arts stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : P H I L L I P H A M E R ( “ L I N E S I N T H E D U S T ” ) ; H A N D O U T ( S A LT E R )

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Ice sculptures stand in front of Fitz’s Root Beer after the 2016 Loop Ice Carnival on Delmar Boulevard.

ICE CAPADES As long as it’s not falling from the sky, ice is pretty cool. Here are 5 ways to have some frozen fun. Brace yourselves, St. Louis. Ice is coming. ❡ Run out for your bread and milk, if you must. Watch for the TV reporters’ live shots in front of street department salt piles. Prepare to slide past stop signs — you may not have come to a complete stop anyway. ❡ Or maybe we just need to chill out. ❡ Because whether or not ice glazes the streets, the month of January gives us plenty of chances to celebrate the ice. ❡ You can play putt-putt on ice obstacles. Melt ice cubes with real (or chocolate) coins frozen inside. Wait expectantly at the end of an ice chute to collect a chilled adult beverage. Cup your mittens over your ears as sculptors take chainsaws to ice. Cup your mittens over your ears again as motorcycles race on ice. (In case you’re wondering, Vanilla Ice’s closest stop to us is Feb. 10 in Rockford, Ill. Ice Cube doesn’t have any appearances scheduled.) ❡ Ice is cool. Don’t let these opportunities slide by. By Valerie Schremp Hahn / vhahn@post-dispatch.com

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01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Lily Crabtree of Richmond Heights glides down a slide made of ice at the 2016 Loop Ice Carnival.

WHEN 8 p.m.-midnight Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday • WHERE 6000-6600 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free; $10 for zip line, $5 for Ferris wheel • MORE INFO 314-727-8000; visittheloop.com

SCHLAFLY CABIN FEVER FESTIVAL

LOOP ICE CARNIVAL Now in its 12th year, the Loop Ice Carnival gets bigger as organizers dream up new ice-centric activities to get people out on what would be an otherwise slow weekend. The carnival kicks of at 8 p.m. Friday with a Snow Ball Party at the Moonrise Hotel, where admission is a $5 donation or two nonperishable food items. The fun continues Saturday, with Frozen Bun Runs at 10 a.m. and activities up and down Delmar Boulevard through the evening: human “dog-sled” races, frozen turkey bowling, fire performers, ice-sculpting demonstrations by Kirkwood-based Ice Visions (along with dozens of ice sculptures), a putt-putt pub crawl featuring holes made of ice, and an icecube giveaway, where 1,000 ice cubes will each have a dollar coin inside, and 9,000 more will have chocolate coins.

New this year will be a Ferris wheel, to be set up on the old Church’s Chicken parking lot at Skinker and Delmar boulevards. “I think you’ll get an amazing view, one that you’ve never seen before,” says Jessica Bueler, director of marketing for the Loop Special Business District. If the temperature is too cold, there could be issues with the wheel’s hydraulics, so a carousel may take its place, she says. The festival has seen all kinds of weather in its 12 years, from 60-degree days to below-freezing days. “For the warmer days, it’s sort of a double-edged sword,” Bueler says. “More people come out, but the sculptures melt a lot faster. But the one thing we’ve never had is a big snowfall the day of the carnival or the night before. We know one of these days it will happen.”

The folks at Schlafly Bottleworks have come up with a tempting way to bust you out of your Snuggies: unlimited beer. A ticket to the Cabin Fever Festival gets you a commemorative glass and unlimited tastings of 40 beers, from Gingerbread Warmer to Milk Chocolate Stout. The “fire and ice”-themed party also includes fire pits, live music by Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players, an ice cask bar and ice sculptures. Food will be available for purchase. WHEN Noon-4 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Schlafly Bottleworks, 7260 Southwest Avenue, Maplewood • HOW MUCH $30 in advance online, $35 at the door • MORE INFO 314-241-2337; schlafly.com/bottleworks

MAGIC HOUSE VISITING ARTIST SERIES: ICE SCULPTURE

One weekend each month, the Magic House provides an opportunity to learn from a visiting artist. This year, visitors can look forward to a storyteller, an illustrator and a bookmaker. But this month, it seems fitting that the museum is featuring ice sculptor David Van Camp. He and carver John Russell, of Ice Visions, also will provide the sculptures for the Loop Ice Carnival. Business has been crazy at Ice Visions since early December

OPENS TUESDAY! JANUARY 17-29 14

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

— they carved about 170 ice sculptures in the first couple of weeks of the month, then got to rest a bit around Christmas, then carved about 60 more for New Year’s. In early January, they’re in Ice Carnival mode. Van Camp isn’t sure what he’s going to carve for the Magic House demonstration, but he enjoys that time as a chance to relax a bit and not worry about churning out a big order. “People like to ask questions while you’re carving, and you can stop and chat with people,” he says. “The younger kids, they raise their hands, but they don’t ask a question. They’ll say, ‘My uncle has a chainsaw.’” He thinks the most fascinating thing about carving ice is you can get completely diferent results from the same standard block of carving ice, which is usually about 300 pounds and 40 by 20 by 10 inches.

“When you line up in competitions, everyone has the same block of ice and various tools, but they’re kind of the same,” he says, “and the next thing you know you have really cool masterpieces of diferent designs.” WHEN 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 21 • WHERE Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH Free with museum admission • MORE INFO 314-822-8900; magichouse.org

FETE DE GLACE If it’s January and you’re a city founded by a French-Canadian fur trader, it only makes sense to host an ice-sculpting competition and name it Fete de Glace. For 19 years, ice sculptors have brought chisels, chainsaws and even household irons to St. Charles to create sea dragons, dinosaurs and Darth Vaders. There are two diferent competitions: In the morning, teams of two create sculptures from

Artist Bill Melson during the individual competition at the 2015 Fete de Glace

presented by

&

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P H O T O S : R O B E R T O R O D R I G U E Z ( L O O P I C E C A R N I VA L ) ; L A U R I E S K R I VA N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( F E T E D E G L A C E ) ; H A N D O U T ( I C E R A C I N G )

WHEN 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Jan. 28 • WHERE 100 and 200 blocks of North Main Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO historicstcharles.com

ive blocks of ice. In the afternoon, individuals carve from one block. Visitors can warm up at outdoor ire pits and sip hot chocolate while watching the artists work. As in the Loop, local business owners started the festival to get people out of the house and to their stores and restaurants. “They love it,” organizer Ann Walters says of the merchants. “They love the inlux of people coming down here.” Visitors are encouraged to stay a few hours to watch the blocks of ice transform. Terrence Hamner of St. Louis has won four team events at the Fete de Glace, and whether he competes this year depends on how he feels after breaking a rib this month; a 150-pound piece of ice shifted on him as he was trying to move it in his freezer, he says. But his work must go on: He’ll also provide the sculptures at the Schlaly Cabin Fever Festival. The hub of his business, called Ice Cuisine, is a 12-by-24-foot freezer on the back lot of his home. When he works in his freezer, the ice is consistent and doesn’t change because of the sun, luctuating temperatures or wind. At an ice-carving competition, it just might. “You have to be more cautious of what you’re doing,” he says. “You have to anticipate what you’re doing. Each year, after the competition, I have to think about what you’re doing the next year.” This year, he says, he hopes to carve a Pokemon igure.

MOTORCYCLES ON ICE: XTREME INTERNATIONAL ICE RACING Ice and motorcycles — what could go wrong? Audiences whipped into a frenzy by this sport don’t seem to mind the possible answers to that question. XIIR is a professional tour where racers modify Speedway bikes for the ice. How do they modify them? By adding hundreds of metal studs to the tires. And there are no brakes. During each event, there’s a total of 20 to 25 races, and the heats consist of four riders racing for four laps. The main event consists of six riders for six laps. Anthony Barlow, 44, leads the series that will race at the arena. A Wentzville resident, he came to the United States from England in 1998 with $250 and a suitcase and went on to win the world ice racing championships. “Everybody comes to watch a good race, but let’s be honest,” he says. “Everybody comes to watch the crashes.” He’s sufered some injuries and considers himself old for the sport. “Every now and again, someone gets injured. It’s a bit like bull riding, really. You fall of, and you get back on again.” Xtreme International Ice Racing

“The Producers + Spamalot + The Book of Mormon. Squared!” –New York Magazine

RAIN: A Tribute to the Beatles March 5

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Jan. 28 • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $10-$25 • MORE INFO familyarena.com/events

Fabulousfox.com

Roundabout Theatre Company’s

Cabaret • March 7-19 Motown the Musical • March 21-26 The Illusionists • March 31 - April 2

Fox Box Office 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com

Dirty Dancing- The Classic Story on Stage • May 12-14

FEBRUARY 7-19 stltoday.com/go

Rent • May 19-21 01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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RENT

THIS!

TOP REDBOX RENTALS FOR JAN. 2 1 “Jason Bourne” (Universal) 2 “The Secret Life of Pets” (Universal) 3 “Sully” (Warner) 4 “Storks” (Warner) 5 “The Magnificent Seven” (Sony) 6 “War Dogs” (Warner) 7 “Suicide Squad” (Warner) 8 “Blair Witch” (Lionsgate) 9 “Bad Moms” (Universal) 10 “Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life” (Lionsgate)

OUR MOVIE RATINGS ★ Skip it ★★ So-so ★★★ Good ★★★★ Excellent

Poetry in motion Adam Driver is delightful as an easygoing bus driver in the ofbeat ‘Paterson’ ★★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

P

aterson (Adam Driver) is a bus driver in Paterson, N.J., who writes poetry every chance he gets. But he’s not interested in becoming famous, or even at least in getting published. That’s a source of mild frustration for his wife Laura (Golshifteh Farahani), who thinks he has what it takes to be a literary star. Although Paterson appreciates the praise, he resists

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sharing his work with anyone but her. Behind the wheel he seems to find a kind of peace, listening in on passengers’ conversations but never interrupting. Paterson maintains a nightly ritual that involves walking Marvin the bulldog, leaving him outside a neighborhood bar and chatting with a bartender (Barry Shabaka Henley) over a drink. Sometimes the conversation involves other customers.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

At home, Paterson spends a lot of time just listening to Laura, who does enough talking for both of them. One of her latest projects is becoming a country singer, and he encourages her without being overly enthusiastic. Paterson doesn’t seem to get truly worked up about anything, even his poetry. But that’s part of his charm. His life may not be wonderful, but it’s doable. The most important thing is that it inspires him to put pen to paper. “Paterson” is not particularly eventful — but that’s the point. With his latest film, writer-director Jim Jarmusch (“Stranger Than Paradise”) celebrates everyday life — its routine, its comforts, and yes, its boredom. It’s hard

to imagine another filmmaker having the confidence to just go with such an ofbeat idea. Paterson is that rarity on movie screens these days: a regular guy. This is not a film for fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But it’s a perfect vehicle for Driver, who endearingly captures the hangdog humility of his character. It’s a portrayal that might encourage more people to write poetry. And as the quirky but cheerful Laura, Farahani is just right. Not every film has to be about stuf blowing up, as “Paterson” triumphantly proves. WHAT “Paterson” • RUN TIME 1:58 • RATING R • CONTENT Language

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PHOTO: BLEECKER STREET MEDIA

Adam Driver and Golshifteh Farahani in “Paterson”


A ST. LOUIS THING: From left: Janelle Monae, Taraji P. Henson and Octavia Spencer in “Hidden Figures”

14. ‘MET Opera: Nabucco’ Fathom Events, $1,940,000, 900 locations, $2,156 average, $1,940,000, 1 week. 15. ‘Fantastic Beasts and where to Find Them’ Warner Bros., $1,923,459, 1,188 locations, $1,619 average, $229,180,032, 8 weeks.

AT THE BOX OFFICE The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Jan. 6 through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore: 1. ‘Hidden Figures’ 20th Century Fox, $22,800,057, 2,471 locations, $9,227 average, $25,754,235, 3 weeks. 2. ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ Disney, $22,063,570, 4,157 locations, $5,308 average, $477,364,924, 4 weeks. 3. ‘Sing’ Universal, $20,712,365, 3,955 locations, $5,237 average, $214,512,010, 3 weeks.

4. ‘Underworld: Blood Wars’ Sony, $13,688,751, 3,070 locations, $4,459 average, $13,688,751, 1 week. 5. ‘La La Land’ Lionsgate, $10,132,213, 1,515 locations, $6,688 average, $51,788,800, 5 weeks. 6. ‘Passengers’ Sony, $8,816,213, 3,400 locations, $2,593 average, $80,909,256, 3 weeks. 7. ‘Why Him?’ 20th Century Fox, $6,901,730, 2,904 locations, $2,377 average, $48,961,283, 3 weeks. 8. ‘Moana’ Disney, $6,384,485, 2,549 locations, $2,505 average, $225,365,667, 7 weeks.

9. ‘Fences’ Paramount, $4,813,606, 2,368 locations, $2,033 average, $40,776,870, 4 weeks. 10. ‘Assassin’s Creed’ 20th Century Fox, $4,178,643, 2,642 locations, $1,582 average, $49,884,426, 3 weeks. 11. ‘Manchester by the Sea’ Roadside Attractions, $2,517,794, 1,057 locations, $2,382 average, $33,858,151, 8 weeks. 12. ‘A Monster Calls’ Focus Features, $2,080,051, 1,523 locations, $1,366 average, $2,171,543, 3 weeks. 13. ‘Lion’ The Weinstein Co., $2,073,433, 600 locations, $3,456 average, $9,866,152, 7 weeks.

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16. ‘Collateral Beauty’ Warner Bros., $1,291,048, 1,402 locations, $921 average, $29,846,313, 4 weeks. 17. ‘Jackie’ Fox Searchlight, $1,048,643, 353 locations, $2,971 average, $9,245,194, 6 weeks. 18. ‘Arrival’ Paramount, $865,796, 381 locations, $2,272 average, $94,128,318, 9 weeks. 19. ‘Dangal’ UTV Communications, $807,311, 237 locations, $3,406 average, $11,151,900, 3 weeks. 20. ‘Oice Christmas Party’ Paramount, $802,911, 953 locations, $843 average, $54,065,262, 5 weeks. ASSOCIATED PRESS

FEBRUARY 9 (5:30 - 10:30 PM) AT THE MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM $50 per person TICKETS INCLUDE: • meet & greet with St. Louis Post-Dispatch writers • open bar and hor d’oeuvres from 5:30-6:30 pm • complimentary beer all night • VIP gift bag • valet parking • rafle • silent auction • surprises throughout the night

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Honorable tribute Detail-focused ‘Patriots Day’ traces the 2013 manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombers ★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ommy Saunders (Mark Wahlberg) takes pride in being a Boston police sergeant, so he considers it an insult when he’s assigned duty at the annual marathon. Saunders has no problem with the event itself — his issue is with having to wear a uniform that looks too much like the getup of a crossing guard. But there’s no getting out of the assignment — which turns out to be more challenging

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than he could have foreseen. Pandemonium breaks out when bombs go of near the finish line, propelling shrapnel through the legs of some bystanders and causing others to flee for their lives. Even as Saunders fears for the safety of his wife, Carol (Michelle Monaghan), he snaps into action to help gather information that might be helpful in tracking down the perpetrators. The bombers turn out to be Tamerlan Tsarnaev (Themo

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

Melikidze) and his younger brother Dzhokhar (Alex Wolf), who executed their deadly mission with coldblooded eiciency but whose plan to escape capture is a work in progress. The city comes to a standstill as FBI operative Richard DesLauriers (Kevin Bacon) and Boston police commissioner Ed Davis (John Goodman) initiate a dragnet. But Tamerlan’s wife Katherine (Melissa Benoist) refuses to cooperate. “Patriots Day” vividly evokes the manhunt for the terrorists responsible for the April 2013 bombing attack at the Boston Marathon. Working from a screenplay that he co-wrote with Matt Cook (“Triple 9”) and Joshua

Zetumer, director Peter Berg (“Deepwater Horizon”) delivers a fast-moving drama with impressive attention to detail. But considering the sheer breadth of material involved, the story might have been better told as a television miniseries. In a fine ensemble cast, Wahlberg acquits himself well as the fictional Saunders. And Benoist (“Supergirl”) is a revelation as a woman whose steely determination allows no room for remorse. Far from being exploitative, “Patriots Day” honors the Bostonians who responded to terrorism with strength. WHAT “Patriots Day” • RUN TIME 2:13 • RATING R • CONTENT Violence, graphic

injury images, language and drug use

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Mark Wahlberg in “Patriots Day”


Adam Driver (left) and Andrew Garfield in “Silence”

Zoe Saldana and Ben Aleck in “Live by Night”

Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ gets to the essence of spirituality ★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

eventeenthcentury Japan was no place for a Portuguese Jesuit priest. Spreading the word of Catholicism could quickly lead to a brutal death at the behest of intolerant feudal lords. Yet neither Father Sebastiao Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) nor Father Francisco Garrpe (Adam Driver) can be dissuaded from venturing into that dangerous territory. That’s how determined they are to track down their mentor, Father Cristavao Ferreira (Liam Neeson). Ferreira’s fate is a mystery that they can’t get out of their minds. Nothing has been heard from him for a disturbingly long time, and

P H O T O S : PA R A M O U N T P I C T U R E S ( “ S I L E N C E ” ) ; WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S ( “ L I V E B Y N I G H T ” )

S

his silence haunts them. In Japan, the priests find that many of the villagers are devoted to Christ but are terrified of openly embracing their faith. For them, the arrival of Rodrigues and Garrpe is a sign of hope. But the priests must proceed cautiously, spending much of their time in hiding. As a consequence, finding Ferreira will be much more diicult than they anticipated. Then there’s the matter of whether Ferreira wants to be found. The rumor is that he has forsaken his faith and has taken a Japanese wife. But just how strong is Rodrigues’ faith? Ultimately, he must come to grips with who he really is.

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“Silence” is one of director Martin Scorsese’s least commercial films — an exploration of the meaning and purpose of faith and a meditation on the trials that people will endure to hold onto it. Based on a book by Shusaku Endo and cowritten by Scorsese and Jay Cocks (“The Age of Innocence”), the film nods to arthouse cinema and may try the patience of the average moviegoer. But the dilemma of the priests, who are forced to choose between faith and survival, is nonetheless compelling. Garfield and Driver rise to the challenge of portraying characters who are not so much heroic as they are driven by a sense of mission. This may not be Scorsese’s best film, but it’s unquestionably his most impassioned. WHAT “Silence” • RUN TIME 2:41 • RATING R • CONTENT

Disturbing violent content

Aleck misses the target with ‘Live by Night’ ★★½ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

oe Coughlin (Ben Aleck) has no problem with committing crimes, as long as he’s in charge. As a veteran of World War I, he knows his way around, and his problem with authority extends to his relationships with mob bosses. But Coughlin’s so good at being a crook that he’s in constant demand as a henchman. Even for a guy as smart as he is, things occasionally have a way of going wrong. Fortunately, his dad (Brendan Gleeson) is an influential cop, which helps in getting out of jams. On the surface, it doesn’t seem to bother Coughlin that his father views him as a

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disappointment. But you get the sense that deep in his heart he knows he let the old man down. Coughlin breaks his rule of avoiding the mob when he gets the opportunity to run a bootlegging operation in Florida — and meets a Cuban émigré (Zoe Saldana) who turns out to be the girl of his dreams. It’s not long before Coughlin becomes so comfortable in his power that he’s not afraid to go head to head with the KKK. Life is good. And that means that something is bound to go wrong. Based on a novel by Dennis Lehane, “Live by Night” aspires to be a crime drama with

historical resonance — but with limited success. Directing from his own screenplay, Aleck (“Argo”) has trouble maintaining momentum. As a result, this tale of questionable ambition plays like several short films strung together rather than a cohesive story. Still, it’s worth seeing for Aleck’s charismatic performance and for its vision of America as a land of greed, violence and political expediency that some moviegoers will find all too familiar. In 2007, Aleck made his feature directorial debut with “Gone Baby Gone,” which also was based on a Lehane book — and a more confident film than “Live by Night.” WHAT “Live by Night” • RUN TIME 2:09 • RATING R • CONTENT Violence, language

and sexuality/nudity

01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


ALSO IN THEATERS

‘Almost Christmas’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:52 • Director David E. Talbert does right by essentially rolling the cameras and letting Mo’Nique do her thing as an eccentric, motormouth aunt in this otherwise standard family holiday fare. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Assassin’s Creed’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:48 • Director Justin Kurzel and his “Macbeth” actors Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard teamed up again, inspired not by Shakespeare but by a video game. Striking medieval scenes help counter more hokey ones. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘The Bye Bye Man’ PG-13 • 1:36 • Three college students unwittingly unleash a supernatural entity. With Carrie-Anne Moss, Faye Dunaway and Douglas Smith. Written by Jonathan Penner, based on a short story by Robert Damon Schneck. Directed by Stacy Title. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Collateral Beauty’ ★★½ PG-13 • 1:34 • Will Smith stars in this flawed but uplifting drama about a depressed ad executive whose colleagues stage an unusual intervention. Directed by David Frankel. CW ‘Elle’ ★★★★ R • 2:10 • Isabelle Huppert is fantastic in this tale of a businesswoman and her unique reaction to being sexually

20

assaulted. Directed by Paul Verhoeven (“Basic Instinct”). In French with English subtitles. CW ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:12 • Eddie Redmayne stars as a creature-collecting wizard in this extension of the “Harry Potter” franchise. It’s a terrific film in its own right. Directed by David Yates. CW ‘Fences’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:18 • Denzel Washington and Viola Davis star in this well-acted but stagy adaptation of the prize-winning August Wilson play about an embittered ex-baseball player. Directed by Washington. CW ‘Jackie’ ★★★★ R • 1:39 • Natalie Portman is brilliant in this drama about the JFK assassination and its impact on his widow. Also starring Billy Crudup and Peter Sarsgaard. Directed by Pablo Larrain (“Neruda”). CW ‘La La Land’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:08 • Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling are terrific in this hugely entertaining modern-day musical set in Los Angeles. Directed by Damien Chazelle. CW ‘Lion’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:58 • Dev Patel, Rooney Mara and Nicole Kidman star in this drama about a man who was separated from his family as a child, and his eforts to retrace his path. Directed by Garth Davis. CW ‘Loving’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:03 • Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton star in this fact-based drama about a couple who defy the laws against interracial marriage. Inspirational

Lucas Till in “Monster Trucks”

but not preachy, and one 2016’s best films. Directed by Jef Nichols (“Take Shelter”). CW ‘Manchester by the Sea’ ★★★★ R • 2:17 • Casey Aleck is brilliant in writer-director Kenneth Lonergan’s unforgettable drama about a man who’s haunted by his past. One of the best films of 2016. With Michelle Williams. CW ‘Moana’ ★★★ PG • 1:36 • Disney’s newest heroine is a smart Pacific Islander voiced by Auli‘i Cravalho, who gets help saving her people and land from demigod Maui (voiced by Dwayne

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

Johnson). JODY MITORI ‘Monster Trucks’ PG • 1:44 • Determined to escape the town where he grew up, a high school senior builds a vehicle from salvaged parts and encounters an unusual subterranean creature, who quickly becomes an ally. With Lucas Till, Jane Levy and Barry Pepper. Written by Derek Connolly. Directed by Chris Wedge. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Moonlight’ ★★★½ R • 1:51 • Barry Jenkins

(“Medicine for Melancholy”) directed this compelling drama that traces the trajectory of

one man’s life from childhood to maturity. The ensemble cast includes Mahershala Ali, Naomie Harris and André Holland. CW ‘Oice Christmas Party’ ★ R • 1:45 • The comic talents of Jennifer Aniston and Jason Bateman are wasted in this foul-mouthed, holiday-themed comedy. Directed by Josh Gordon and Will Speck (“The Switch”). CW ‘Passengers’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:51 • Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt are space travelers who fall in love under challenging circumstances in

this flawed sci-fi flick from director Morten Tyldum (“The Imitation Game”). CW ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 2:13 • Felicity Jones stars in this thrilling prequel to the 1977 space adventure that got the “Star Wars” franchise started. Directed by Gareth Edwards. CW ‘Sing’ ★★ PG • 1:50 • Animated movie featuring an “American Idol”-like competition is at its best when animals are singing pop hits. Too much time is spent on underdeveloped characters, including an optimistic koala trying

to save his business. JM ‘Sleepless’ R • 1:35 • Jamie Foxx plays a Las Vegas undercover police oicer caught between crooked cops and a gangstercontrolled casino underground. With Michelle Monaghan, Dermot Mulroney and Gabrielle Union. Directed by Baran “Bo” Odar. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Trolls’ ★★★½ PG • 1:40 • Anna Kendrick

and Jefrey Tambor lend their voices to this animated comedy. FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM

‘Underworld: Blood Wars’ R • 1:31 • Kate Beckinsale returns as a Vampire death dealer, simultaneously battling the Lycan clan and the Vampire faction that betrayed her. With Theo James, Lara Pulver and Charles Dance. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Why Him?’ ★★ R • 1:51 • A send-up of California tech culture, with fish-out-of-water Midwestern parents (Bryan Cranston, Megan Mullally), their daughter (Zoey Deutch) and her computer nerd boyfriend (James Franco). Directed by John Hamburg. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

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P H O T O : PA R A M O U N T P I C T U R E S

‘Allied’ ★★★½ R • 2:00 • Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard bring old-fashioned glamour to this tale of spies who fall in love during World War II. Directed by Robert Zemeckis (“Flight”). CALVIN WILSON


“ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST PICTURES.” “A JOYOUS FILM ABOUT LOVE AND DREAMS.”

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Rogue One: A Star Wars Story The

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Moana (PG) 10:30 AM 1:15 3:50

! Sleepless (R) No VIP after 6PM 9:45 AM 12:20 2:45 5:15 7:45 10:20 11:55 ! Underworld: Blood Wars (R) No VIP after 6PM 9:40 AM 12:10 2:30 4:55 7:25 9:50 12:15 AM ! Hidden Figures (PG) No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 1:00 2:00 4:10 5:10 7:15 8:15 10:20 11:20 ! Live by Night (R) No VIP after 6PM 10:00 AM 1:00 4:15 7:30 10:45 ! A Monster Calls (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 10:15 AM 9:50 12:30 AM

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! Underworld: Blood Wars (R) No VIP after 6PM 10:20 AM 12:40 3:00 5:20 7:40 10:00 ! Hidden Figures (PG) No VIP after 6PM 10:35 AM 1:30 4:25 7:20 10:15 ! Live by Night (R) No VIP after 6PM 10:10 AM 1:10 4:10 7:10 10:10 ! A Monster Calls (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM Why Him? (R) 9:10 PM Passengers (PG-13) 1:30 4:15 7:20 10:05 ! Patriots Day (R) No VIP after 6PM 10:15 AM 1:15 4:15 7:15 10:15 Sing (PG) 11:20 AM 1:55 4:30 7:05 9:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 10:15 AM 1:15 4:15 7:15 10:15 La La Land (PG-13) 10:30 AM 1:25 4:20 7:15 10:10 Moana (PG) 10:30 AM 1:10 3:50 6:30

! Silence (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:15 AM 3:10 6:50 10:35 Why Him? (R) 9:25 12:10 AM Assassin’s Creed (PG-13) 9:25 12:10 AM Passengers (PG-13) 9:50 AM 12:45 3:40 6:40 9:40 ! Patriots Day (R) No VIP after 6PM 9:30 AM 10:30 AM 12:40 1:40 3:45 4:45 7:00 8:00 10:20 11:20 Sing (PG) 9:45 AM 10:35 AM 12:45 1:15 3:30 6:30 9:15

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(LANDMARK) Lindbergh & Clayton 314-994-3733

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1320 Central Park Dr. O’Fallon www.wehrenberg.com

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OFF THE

MENU

The House Special Sizzling Steak, served with filet mignon, a sunny-side-up egg, French pork liver pate, a grilled pork patty and mackerel in tomato sauce, at VietNam Style

Sizzling with energy VietNam Style in the Delmar Loop specializes in sizzling steak platters as well as more familiar Vietnamese fare ★★ BY IAN FROEB / RESTAURANT CRITIC / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

V

ietNam Style begins working on your senses before you sit down — before you step inside, even. The front door of this small restaurant on the eastern end of the Delmar Loop has been stltoday.com/ofthemenu

24

painted a bright pink. The interior walls are pink and a cool green that Pantone probably named Whisper Willow, Spring Awakening or Hush. The speakers pump high-BPM pop. No, you haven’t wandered by mistake into a tween-targeted

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@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

fast-fashion emporium, but your momentary confusion is understandable. Three-month-old VietNam Style isn’t simply a new restaurant, but a young one. It exudes a brash, why-not energy. Married owners Thao Truong and Yun Vu will both turn 27 soon. Truoung immigrated to the United States from Vietnam only eight years ago. Vu, whom she has known since middle school, followed later. Not only have they now opened their first restaurant, but Truong is close to obtaining an MBA from Maryville

OUR FOOD RATINGS ★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ Extraordinary

University. The centerpiece of VietNam Style’s menu, which is overseen by Vu (with help from Truong’s mother, Thanh Nguyen), is also new: bo ne dac biet, or the house special sizzling steak. Truong told me this dish has become popular in Vietnam over the past five years. The full version of bo ne dac biet ($12.95) arrives in a cast-iron platter shaped like a cow. As promised, the steak is sizzling. You might hear it before you see it, though. Crowded into the platter with the steak and its onion garnish is a scoop of pork-liver pate, a pork patty (like a miniature ham steak), a sardine in tomato sauce and a sunny-side-up egg. A small salad and either rice or French bread are served on the side. When VietNam Style opened, filet mignon was the default steak for the bo ne dac biet. Now sirloin tip is. You can upgrade to filet mignon for $3.95. I did, and while the thin slices didn’t deliver the buttery softness of a plump steakhouse cut, they were tender — impressively so, as they were cooked on the well side of medium. The seasoning, which Truong told me is a secret, gives the meat a hint of garlic and a fleeting sweetness. The pork-liver pate is relatively mild in its liver flavor, and the texture is spreadably smooth. With it, the pork patties and the French bread, you could build an ersatz banh mi; the bread is banh-mi standard, light and exceptionally crisp. The sardine is, well, a sardine. (Except when it’s mackerel; the menu changes occasionally.) I liked it, but it will win no converts among the sardine-averse. If you count yourself among them, order the bo ne tu chon ($8.50), which lets you customize the basic sizzling steak with whichever of the bo ne dac biet’s other components that you want. (Among these is cream cheese,

Find more restaurant news and reviews ➙ stltoday.com/dining stltoday.com/go

PHOTOS: ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

THE LATEST FROM STLTODAY.COM/OFFTHEMENU The Clayton breakfast and lunch cafe Half & Half will open a second location at 220 West Lockwood Avenue in Webster Groves, owners Mike and Liz Randolph announced this week. Mike Randolph believes community is a key part of the Half & Half formula. “A big part of our success in Clayton has been repeat customers,” he says. The new Half & Half will feature the same menu as the Clayton original, though as at that restaurant, the kitchen will have the freedom to develop specials for weekend brunch. The Webster Groves location will also continue Half & Half’s focus on cofee with “a walk-up cofee window so you don’t have to wade through the crowd.” Randolph, who also operates the Delmar Loop restaurants Público and Randolfi’s Italian Kitchen, projects a spring opening. BY IAN FROEB


BUY 1 GET 1

The dining room of VietNam Style

50% OFF (With purchase of any dinner entrée and two beverages)

Valid ValidMonday Mondaythru thruThursday Thursday only. only. Equal Equal or or lesser lesser value. value. Cannot combine any other coupon, special Cannot combine with with Any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. Expires 7/11/16. Pages 9/11/16 discount or promotion. Expires Ad 2/08/17.

KIDS EAT FREE! (With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult adultdinner dinnerentree entreeand andaabeverage. beverage.Kids Kids meal meal up up to to a a$9/= $9/=value valueper perentrée. entrée.No NoCash CashValue. Value. Must Must present present paper Cannotcombine combinewith withany anyother otheroffers. offers. paper coupon. Cannot Expires 7/11/16. Ad Pages Expires 2/08/17. 9/11/16

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which was supposed to accompany my bo ne dac biet, but the kitchen had run out.) VietNam Style also ofers versions of its sizzling platters with scallops and squid. On one visit, goat was available, and the meat’s strong natural flavor paired well with the “secret” sauce. The rest of the menu features more familiar fare. The broth in the classic pho tai ($9.95) is an antidote to winter, tipped more strongly toward its beef essence than ginger, star anise or other traditional seasonings and aromatics. As in the bo ne cad biet, filet mignon ensures that the beef remains tender even as it cooks through in the hot broth. Pho ga ($8.95) brings a lighter chicken broth with a more complex, warming spice profile. This compensated for chicken that, in my bowl, was underseasoned and dry. Vu doesn’t shy away from strong flavors. Bun ga nuong ($8.95), a rice-noodle bowl with bean sprouts, lettuce and an egg roll, stars chicken heavily seasoned with lemongrass, its bracingly verdant citrus flavor like Lemon Drops for grown-ups. For the com tam suon trung ($7.95), Vu shellacks a very thin pork chop with a honey-lemongrass glaze. The honey isn’t sweet in the conventional

sense; instead, it draws out the pork’s natural sweetness to complement the lemongrass. Vu can’t resist tweaking that American favorite, crab rangoon. Listed on the menu as Viet-style cheese wraps ($4.50), the fried wonton pinwheels boast not only the usual crab-flecked cream cheese but, in the center, half of a hard-boiled quail egg. VietNam Style’s youthful energy doesn’t yet extend to its service, which is friendly but a little flustered. On a slow day, a single server is quickly stretched thin by more than a couple tables. One busy weekend lunch saw the arrival of my table’s three entrees staggered over 10 minutes. These are the issues you expect from a small restaurant with a small staf in its early months. I expect, as VietNam Style ages, it will work out these hiccups. I hope it doesn’t lose its youthful spirit. It’s a necessary reminder that what we too easily lump together as “Vietnamese food” is not some set, calcified menu but a dynamic, living cuisine. WHERE VietNam Style, 6100 Delmar Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-405-8438; facebook.com/ vietnamstyleloop • MORE INFO Vietnamese cuisine, featuring sizzling-steak platters • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary stltoday.com/go

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

This Eagle Season An Eagle Watching Hotspot!

Escape to Historic Elsah Located between Alton and Graton on the Meeting of the Great Rivers National Scenic Byway

Take advantage of great overnight deals at the Green Tree Inn or Maple Leaf Cottage Inn and be sure to visit the Elsah General Store to get your Eagle Watcher’s Card!

www.escapetoelsah.com

01.13.17-01.19.17 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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st. louis’ best bridal

RECENTLY REVIEWED WHERE 7036 Clayton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-932-7818; boundary-stl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Catrinas ★★ WHERE 1027 Century Drive, Edwardsville • MORE INFO 618-692-5522 • MENU Mexican and Mexican-inspired fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday

Club Taco ★½ WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl. com • MENU Tacos with a variety of fillings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314240-5544; kalbitacoshack. com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday Kounter Kulture ★★½ WHERE 3825 Watson Road • MORE INFO 314-781-4344; kounterkulturestl.com • MENU A small, carryoutonly dinner menu drawing on Pacific Asian cuisines • HOURS 4:30-9:30 p.m. Monday-Friday; 4:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday,

Local Chef Kitchen ★★ WHERE 15270 Manchester Road, Ballwin • MORE INFO 636-220-3212; localchefstl. com • MENU An oftchanging selection of dishes featuring locally raised produce • HOURS 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday

Louie’s Wine Dive ★★ WHERE 16 South Bemiston Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-875-9373; louieswinedive.com • MENU Contemporary American fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Mariscos el Gato ★★ WHERE 2818 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314449-1220; facebook.com/ mariscoselgato1 • MENU Mexican cuisine, with an emphasis on seafood • HOURS Lunch and dinner

daily; closed Wednesday

BRIDAL SHOW The Best Weddings Start Here

Mellow Mushroom ★

! IAN W TION A VAC

WHERE 3811 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Sunset Hills • MORE INFO 314-473-1135; mellowmushroom.com • MENU Pizza, sandwiches and salads • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

FOR 2

*

Sunday, Janurary 15 Noon to 3:30 p.m.

St. Charles Convention Center

Melo’s Pizzeria ★★ WHERE 2438 McNair Avenue • MORE INFO 314-833-4489; melospizzeria.com • MENU Pizza cooked in a wood-fired oven • HOURS 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, 4:30-8 p.m. Thursday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 4:30-8 p.m. Friday

Midtown Sushi and Ramen ★★ WHERE 3674 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314328-2452; midtown-sushi.com • MENU Sushi, ramen and more traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday

The Muddled Pig Gastropub ★★ WHERE 2733 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-781-4607; themuddledpig.com • MENU Contemporary American pub fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySaturday, brunch Sunday

Nathaniel Reid Bakery ★★★ WHERE 11243 Manchester Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1019; nrbakery. com • MENU Cakes, pastries, croissants and other baked goods • HOURS 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday

Olive + Oak ★★★½ WHERE 102 West Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-736-1370; oliveandoakstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare • HOURS Dinner daily

Endless Inspirations

Parigi ★★★ WHERE 8025 Bonhomme Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-899-9767; parigistl. com • MENU Elegant versions of classic Italian dishes • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner MondaySaturday, brunch Sunday Peno ★★½ WHERE 7600 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-899-9699; penosoulfood.com • MENU Pizza, pasta and other rustic southern Italian fare • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Sunday, lunch Saturday, brunch Sunday

The Preston ★★½ WHERE Chase Park Plaza Hotel, 212 North Kingshighway • MORE INFO 314-633-7800; theprestonstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare, with an emphasis on small plates • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast MondaySaturday, brunch Sunday

Scarlett’s Wine Bar ★½ WHERE 4253 Laclede Avenue • MORE INFO 314797-8223; facebook.com/ scarlettswinebar • MENU A wine bar with pizza, cheese and charcuterie plates

GET OUR FREE APP! Get easy access to Ian Froeb’s STL 100 and more reviews in our new app, free in the App Store at Google Play. stltoday.com/apps

and other fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Standard Brewing Co. ★ WHERE 12322 Dorsett Road, Maryland Heights • MORE INFO 314-5482270; standardbrewingstl. com • MENU Burgers, pizza and more classic brewpub fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Twisted Tree Steakhouse ★★½ WHERE 10701 Watson Road, Sunset Hills • MORE INFO 314-394-3366; twistedtreesteakhouse.com • MENU Steaks, prime rib and seafood • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Vista Ramen ★★★ WHERE 2609 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314797-8250; vistaramen. com • MENU Ramen and seasonal small plates with influences from various Asian cuisines • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday

Weber Grill Restaurant ★½ WHERE 1147 St. Louis Galleria, Richmond Heights • MORE INFO 314-930-3838; webergrillrestaurant.com • MENU Steaks, burgers and more grilled fare • HOURS Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily, brunch Sunday

ONE LUCKY COUPLE WILL

WIN A FUNJET VACATION for 2* First 100 brides-to-be receive a FREE GIFT! FREE SHOW PASSES & TICKET INFO Bride-to-be receives a Free Ticket for the wedding couple

by pre-registering online

www.stlbestbridal.com Complimentary tickets are available at area Savvi Formalwear locations, while supplies last. Everyone else pays a $5 entrance fee (cash only) the day of the show.

Yolklore ★★ WHERE 8958 Watson Road, Crestwood • MORE INFO 314-270-8538; yolklore. com • MENU Fast-casual breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch daily

SHOW SPONSORS

BY IAN FROEB *Must be present and a registered with St. Louis’ Best Bridal at the Jan. 15, 2017 St. Louis’ Best Bridal Show.

26

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 01.13.17-01.19.17

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O : D AV I D C A R S O N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Boundary ★★½

Camarones ala diabla (spicy shrimp) at Mariscos El Gato


OVERHEARD

ON TV

“My question is, if you die when you’re fat, are you a fat ghost? Or do they go flattering back to a fl attering time?” CARRIE FISHER in the documentary “Bright Lights” on HBO

of the things you love from that show but with a more premium sensibility.” The episode airing on CBS will difer in a couple of ways. “One version will be 49 minutes and 10 seconds, and the other version would be 42 minutes and whatever we are allowed on network,” co-creator Robert King said. He added that one version “is cleaner for network TV that doesn’t lose any content.”

Christine Baranski (left) and Cush Jumbo talk about “The Good Fight” at the TCA Winter Press Tour.

‘CARPOOL KARAOKE’ HEADING TO APPLE MUSIC

Growing stream Tube Talk CBS touts new series, ‘he Good Fight’

and ‘Carpool Karaoke,’ for digital customers

P H O T O : C B S ( “ T H E G O O D F I G H T ” ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( F I S H E R ) ; N B C ( M E Y E R S )

BY GAIL PENNINGTON / TV CRITIC / GPENNINGTON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

LOS ANGELES CBS All Access, preparing to introduce its first scripted series, “The Good Fight,” already had “a fantastic 2016,” CBS Interactive president Marc DeBevoise says. The stand-alone streaming network ($5.99 a month, or $9.99 commercial-free) has more than a million subscribers and is growing, DeBevoise said at the winter edition of the Television Critics Association press tour in Los Angeles. “Our audience skews slightly female, 60/40 female/male. But in contrast stltoday.com/tubetalk

@gailpennington

to most of the television networks out there, we’re extremely young,” DeBevoise said. “The average age is in the low 40s. Two-thirds of our audience is under 49, and 30 percent or greater is millennials each month.” “The Good Fight,” a spinof of “The Good Wife,” debuts Feb. 19 on the CBS network before moving to All Access. Previously, All Access aired “Big Brother: Over the Top,” with “Star Trek: Discovery” to come in May. The streaming network also ofers 8,500 episodes of CBS shows past and present, plus live streams including the NFL. Rather than a spinof, DeBevoise called “The Good Fight” a “new edition” of “The Good Wife,” with “many @tubetalkpd

Find weekly TV picks, live chats and celeb news ➙ stltoday.com/tv

The planned spinof of James Corden’s “Carpool Karaoke” won’t air on CBS or in syndication. Instead, it’s the first original series exclusively for streaming service Apple Music. Corden is an executive producer, along with “Late Late Show” executive producer Ben Winston and St. Louisan Eric R. Pankowski, a 1995 graduate of Ladue High School. Pankowski was a CBS executive who took over “Arsenio” toward the end of its run. A premiere date for “Carpool Karaoke” hasn’t been set. Sixteen celebrities will be paired with 16 hosts for driving singalongs. FUQUA PUTS TWIST ON ‘TRAINING DAY’

When Antoine Fuqua and Will Beall teamed up to turn Fuqua’s 2001 movie “Training Day” (which won an Oscar for star Denzel Washington) into a TV series, they thought of “Fargo.” That is, they thought of what Noah Hawley did with FX’s “Fargo,” taking the Coen brothers’ movie and creating a series that “exists in the same universe as the film” but doesn’t remake it. The movie “Training Day” is “its own thing, this iconic, classic crime story,” Beall said. The series, arriving Feb. 2, is more fun, with a lighter tone, he said. Newcomer Justin Cornwell stars as a young oicer sent to root out ques-

“Meryl Streep was given the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award at the Golden Globes and used her acceptance speech to criticize Donald Trump. That’s right, the all-time queen of American drama was criticized by Meryl Streep.” SETH MEYERS on “Late Night With Seth Meyers”

tionable tactics in the Los Angeles Police Department’s Special Investigations Section. His new partner is rogue police Detective Frank Rourke, played by Bill Paxton. Switching the race of the main characters helps to diferentiate the series from the movie, but that wasn’t consciously planned, Fuqua said. “It wasn’t a racial conversation,” he said. But “when we found out Bill had interest, it was like, that’s a good idea. Switch it and do that.” Paxton, who was the patriarch on “Big Love,” is an evangelist for the series and might still be talking about it somewhere, if the panel hadn’t come to an end. The morally dubious character “kind of plays to all of my strengths,” Paxton said. “I like to be entertaining. Frank Rourke, if he’s anything, he is at least entertaining.” CW HANDS OUT EARLY RENEWALS

Renewal-crazy CW has given early fall pickups to seven series, including cult favorite “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.” Also renewed for fall were “Arrow,” “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow,” “The Flash,” “Jane the Virgin,” “Supergirl” and “Supernatural.” (Omitted: “Frequency.”) “Over the past several seasons, The CW has built a schedule of proven performers,” CW Entertainment president Mark Pedowitz said. “Early pickups of these seven series now allow our producers to plan ahead for next season and gives us a solid base to build on for next season, with original scripted series to roll out all year long.”

MORE FROM #TCA17 Gail Pennington is attending the Television Critics Association winter press tour in Los Angeles. Look for her reports at stltoday.com/tubetalk, facebook.com/ tubetalkpd and twitter.com/gailpennington.

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CAR TALK

NEW VEHICLES

4

SERVICE & AFTERMARKET

PREOWNED VEHICLES

47 53

9

5

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

TO ADVERTISE PLEASE CALL YOUR ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH MEDIA SPECIALIST OR CONTACT MICHELLE SNEATHEN AT 314.340.3086.

wINTER

COLD

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ONLY AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS AND TRIMS. RESIDENCY RESTRICTIONS APPLY. MAY NEED TO FINANCE THROUGH SPECIFIC FINANCIAL INSTITUTION. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX TITLE AND LICENSE FEES MAY APPLY. SEE DEALER FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. MUST TAKE RETAIL. DELIVERY BY 1/31/17.

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See Us For All Your Automotive Needs

YOUR AUTOMOTIVE SUPERSTORE

618-656-6070 2 Miles North of I-270 on Hwy. 159

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CASSENS

4


COLD TEMPS FREEZE AUTO LOCKS ON VAN

CAR TALK

By Ray Magliozzi - Automotive Writer @ cargazing.com In that case, you can have someone remove the inside door panels and spray the linkage with a desiccant, like WD-40. You can try it on one door irst, to see if it helps.

Dear Car Talk: “Our 2008 Hyundai Entourage van, which we purchased new, has always had electric door locks that will not function in cold weather. Not sure of the exact temperature, but once winter rolls around, we have to manually unlock the doors; we can’t open the locks with the remote. I took it to the dealer when this irst occurred and got some mumbo-jumbo, but no solution. I should have been more persistent, but now it is too late. Other than buying warm gloves, do you have any suggestions?” - David

Another possibility is the problem is electronic and the signal to each door’s unlocking motor (solenoid) is not getting through. That could be because of a bad connection somewhere that opens up only in cold weather. We know wires, like everything else, shrink when they get cold, right, David? If you don’t believe things shrink when they get cold, check the next time you go swimming in the ocean.

How ‘bout a heated garage? Actually, you’re lucky you can’t open the doors, David. A lot of Entourage owners from the 2008 era complained their sliding rear doors would open on their own -- sometimes at highway speeds! I think Hyundai tried to convince those owners that was part of the ‘’James Bond’’ package.

So it could be a random wiring or connection problem, or there also could be something wrong with the body-control module, which is a computer that operates things like the power door locks. If absolutely nothing happens when you hit the ‘’unlock’’ button and you can manually unlock the doors with no more effort than usual, that would suggest something more central and electronic is causing the problem.

As for your door locks, there are several possibilities. One is the linkage itself is getting frozen. Moisture is always present inside the doors, since those cavities are not airtight. So that moisture could be freezing the linkage that connects the ‘’locking button’’ on the inside of your door to the lock mechanism itself.

If it’s mechanical, it’s probably worth trying to ix. If it’s electronic (and there were a number of issues with this vehicle’s electronics), you’ll have to decide if you’re willing to pay a mechanic to try to track it down. And then compare that expense to the cost of a heated garage.

Is it dificult to unlock the car manually? Or do you see the locks ‘’straining’’ to open when you press ‘’unlock’’? If so, that suggests the problem is mechanical; perhaps a bound-up or frozen linkage.

© 2017 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Got a question about cars? E-mail by visiting the Car Talk website at cartalk.com. 04

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PRE-OWNED VEHICLES

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SALE PRICE

13,990

2012 Nissan Maxima 3.5 Sedan

SALE PRICE

15,990

9,990

2013 Hyundai Veloster

SALE PRICE

$

11,490

2007 Lexus IS 250

SALE PRICE

12,990

#26760A

SALE PRICE

#P8752

SALE PRICE

9,990

2012 GMC Terrain SLE-1 #95156B

SALE PRICE

$

11,990

2013 VW Jetta 2.5L

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

12,990

2015 Mazda 3 i Sport

13,990

SALE PRICE

$

13,990

2010 Chevrolet Camaro

SALE PRICE

16,990

SALE PRICE

19,490

SALE PRICE

10,490

SALE PRICE

10,990

#78045A

#77586B

$

$

11,990

SALE PRICE

$

13,490

SALE PRICE

#26565N

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

2013 Ford F-150 SuperCrew

#78100A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

10,990

2010 Acura TL 3.7 #94533D

SALE PRICE

$

12,990

2011 Mini Cooper S Countryman #26717B

$

13,490

SALE PRICE

$

14,990

$

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

13,490

2008 Lexus GS 460 # 95454A

SALE PRICE

$

15,490

2012 BMW 550i #77627A

#36507

19,990

$

#75452A

2015 Buick Encore

#10756A

8,990

2011 Ford Edge SE

#8959A

14,990

$

$

2014 Mazda CX-5 Touring

#77606A

$

$

11,990

2011 Kia Sportage

2012 GMC Sierra 1500 Extended

SALE PRICE

$

2011 Mazda CX-7 Grand Touring

#38131B

SALE PRICE

8,990

2012 Hyundai Sonata

2012 Honda Civic EX

SALE PRICE

$

#10773A

2010 Chevrolet Traverse

#P8431A

$

$

2014 Hyundai Sonata

#38178B

8,990

#36090A

$

2009 Dodge Journey SXT SUV

$

2013 Mazda 2 Sport

#P8740

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

#8894A

2011 Ford Explorer XLT

$

7,490

#38263A

2011 Toyota Venza V6 AWD Crossover

$

#27125B

2010 Buick Lucerne

#39052A

$

$

SALE PRICE

#27057B

# P8717

$

$

2007 Honda Civic Si Coupe

#95427A

#95424A

#P8651

$

7,490

2010 Ford Edge Limited

#P8751

$

$

2004 Lexus RX 330

20,990

SALE PRICE

$

28,990

*Excludes model year 2007 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2009 Chevrolet Cobalt LT

#27174A

West County Pre-Owned Center

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED VEHICLES

2005 Honda Accord

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 13

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

01-13-17

RIDES.COM


StCharlesHyundai.com 2013 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS Stk. #67315-1

$11,397

2007 JEEP COMPASS 2WD Sport Stk. #46370-1

$5,995

866-314-5747 2005 TOYOTA CELICA GT

2006 SATURN ION

$5,397

Stk. #94191-2

2007 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L Stk. #94307-1

$7,797

Stk. #67527-1

$8,997

Stk. #46318-1

$8,997

$9,997

$9,997

$8,797

2008 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX Stk.#46172-1

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

2013 HYUNDAI SONATA SE Stk. #66031-1

$4,397

2012 CHEVROLET SONIC LS HATCHBACK

2010 CADILLAC CTS Stk. #67429-1

Stk. #45989-2

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT

2010 NISSAN MURANO 2WD S Stk. #46608-1

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

866-314-5747

StCharlesHyundai.com

2013 NISSAN LEAF S

370

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

$5,995

Stk. #94644

$8,297

70 270 40/64

2006 BUICK LUCERNE CXL Stk. #46636-1

$5,995

2009 FORD ESCAPE 2WD XLT Stk. #47268-1

2008 HONDA ACCORD EX-L

$9,597

Stk. #46490-1

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA LIMITED Stk. #66461-2

14

$8,397 RIDES MAGAZINE

2013 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS

$8,997

Stk. #46303-1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

01-13-17

RIDES.COM

$9,797

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX 2WD LT Stk. #67223-1

$11,297


2008 KIA SPORTAGE 2WD V6 Stk. #45515-1

$7,995

2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS AWD Stk. #66878-1

$7,997

2008 TOYOTA RAV4 Limited V6 Stk. #46465-1

$8,397

2016 NISSAN VERSA S Stk. #66214-2

$10,897

2008 DODGE DURANGO 4WD Stk. #66956-1

$6,997

2004 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER Stk. #45328-1

$8,597

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA Stk. #67293-1

$9,597

2016 NISSAN VERSA S Stk. #45820-1

15

$10,897

RIDES MAGAZINE

2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2WD Limited Stk. #54753-1

$11,497

2009 HYUNDAI SONATA LIMITED Stk. #66172-1

$7,997

2008 SATURN VUE AWD XR V6 Stk. #46425-2

$8,395

2004 OLDSMOBILE SILHOUETTE S