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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017 • $1.50

RENOVATING SCOTTRADE CENTER City and business leaders envision upgrades totaling $138 million, using municipal and state funds, to keep the facility competitive

In 1978, a bite mark was used to solve a murder BUT DID IT?

Brown

Prante

BY PATRICK E. GAUEN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Beneath championship banners Tuesday, a Zamboni resurfaces the hockey ice at Scottrade Center in preparation for Thursday’s St. Louis Blues game against the Carolina Hurricanes. City leaders and team executives said Tuesday that taxpayers should help renovate the building.

WOOD RIVER • Lawyers for John N. Prante, behind bars for more than 34 years in the beating and strangulation of a young woman here, are pressing for a DNA analysis to test his unwavering claim of innocence. He was directly linked to the victim only by what was believed to be a bite mark on her skin, using a comparison now regarded as junk science. DNA testing was not available then. The case has been featured on national crime TV shows and in a book co-authored by the prosecutor. Lawyers Joshua Tepfer, of the Exoneration Project, at the University of Chicago, and Dana Delger, of the Innocence Project Inc. in New York City, said they have mailed a motion to the Madison County Circuit Court seeking a See SLAYING • Page A8

“he Scottrade Center is no longer competitive.”

“We have to take care of our building.”

“We must stay competitive.”

BLUES CHAIRMAN TOM STILLMAN

ST. LOUIS MAYOR FRANCIS SLAY

BOARD OF ALDERMEN PRESIDENT LEWIS REED

BY MIKE FAULK AND KORAN ADDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Under a proposal expected to be submitted to the Board of Aldermen this week, the city’s contribution would come from current sales taxes generated at Scottrade as well as a new 1 percent sales tax on Blues tickets. “The Scottrade Center is no longer competitive,” said Blues Chairman Tom Stillman, adding that NCAA and concert promoters have warned that they will stop coming to St. Louis without upgrades to

City schools appear likely to regain full accreditation BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

compete with facilities in Indianapolis, Kansas City, Nashville, Tenn., and elsewhere. “We’re going to need the city to invest alongside the Blues ownership,” Stillman said. The city’s contributions would fund new seating throughout the stadium, a new scoreboard hung in the center of the stadium, sound system and lighting upgrades,

BY YLAN Q. MUI AND STEVEN OVERLY Washington Post

BY SEAN SULLIVAN AND MIKE DEBONIS Washington Post

President-elect Donald Trump took aim at the U.S. auto industry Tuesday as he continued an intervention into corporate America that aims to bolster job growth but is also vulnerable to exaggerations and oversimplifications. On Twitter on Tuesday morning, Trump singled out General Motors for assembling some of its Chevrolet Cruze models in Mexico and selling them in the United States,

House Republicans scrapped plans to weaken an independent ethics watchdog on the first day of the 115th Congress after a backlash from President-elect Donald Trump and others, as a new period of Republican-led governance started taking shape on a tumultuous note. In a complete reversal, the House GOP moved to withdraw proposed changes they approved the day before to oicial rules that

Missouri’s top education officials are recommending that the St. Louis city school district regain full accreditation next week. The Missouri Board of Education will convene Tuesday in Jeferson City to vote on the district’s accreditation. If the board approves an upgrade, St. Louis Public Schools will be the second district that the board has upgraded this school year based mainly on sustained improvement and stable leadership. In December, the State Board voted to provisionally re-accredit Riverview Gardens, which is a step below full accreditation. The provisionally accredited St. Louis Public Schools is among 10 of Missouri’s 517 districts that lack full accreditation, considered the state’s basic seal of approval. An upgrade would not affect the budget for St. Louis Public Schools as it did for Riverview Gardens, which will no longer lose money

See ETHICS • Page A7

See SCHOOLS • Page A8

ST. LOUIS • City leaders and St. Louis Blues executives are seeking taxpayer help to pay for a $138 million renovation of Scottrade Center. The city would fund the initial $67.5 million in improvements in the proposal, which was rolled out in a Tuesday morning news conference.

Trump’s swipe at GM not so clear-cut

See FORD • Page A7

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GM should “make in the U.S.A. or pay big border tax!”

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M 1 WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017 • A2

Stadiums highlight city’s regional ills TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The scoreboard says that St. Louis defeated Chicago in the annual Winter Classic staged Monday on a temporary ice rink installed at Busch Stadium. Defeating a team from the Windy City made the nationally televised victory that much sweeter for Blues fans who braved the wet, chilly January air. For as long as there have been sports teams in the two Midwestern cities, they have been rivals. Whether it’s the Blues and the Blackhawks of the National Hockey League or the Cardinals and Cubs of Major League Baseball, fans and athletes of the two cities love to compete against each other. But the most important rival St. Louis faces, Blues Chairman Tom Stillman said Tuesday, is not the city five hours north on Interstate 55. It’s Nashville, Tenn. It’s Indianapolis. It’s Louisville, Ky. Those are the cities competing economically with St. Louis and taking away convention and tourism business from the region, Stillman said. It will get worse, he and a passel of civic and business leaders said, unless the city invests more than $60

million tax dollars in a $138 million facelift for the Scottrade Center. “The ability to attract these events is very much at risk,” Stillman said of the NCAA events, concerts and other events that often fill the downtown arena to the rafters with out-of-towners spending money on restaurants and hotels. The face of the Blues’ ownership group has interesting timing. On one hand, he couldn’t have picked a better time to take advantage of the euphoria of Blues fans who witnessed St. Louis pull of yet another successful national sports event in the widely praised Winter Classic. Stillman knows how to garner some goodwill. He stood outside Busch Stadium on Saturday and Monday shaking hands like a regular guy, personally welcoming customers to the NHL’s showcase event. But the news conference at which Stillman stood alongside St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and a man who hopes to replace him, Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed, came the day after Gov.elect Eric Greitens repeated his stance that public funding for sports stadiums amounts to “welfare for millionaires.” “I have completely ruled out state funding for stadiums,” Greitens said Monday. A day later, Stillman said in an interview that he is hoping to get Greitens on board to help pay for the Scottrade renovations. He said there have been “ongoing con-

versations” with St. Louis County and the state of Missouri, neither of which were discussed at the news conference in which Stillman and the civic leaders pitched a plan to commit taxpayer funds to help modernize the city-owned arena. Nashville. Indianapolis. Louisville. Stillman and the other civic leaders who mentioned those cities might not have been trying to make a point about regionalism, but it came through anyway. Each of those cities was once, as St. Louis is today and has been since 1875, a city separated from a county that is very much a part of its metro area. Long ago, the leaders of each of those cities realized that economically, they were better of united than divided. Nashville merged its city-county government in 1963, Indianapolis followed in 1970, and Louisville did the same in 2003. Now each of those cities, once dwarfed by St. Louis, is being pointed to by leaders here as the competition. They’re on their way up, while the city’s disunity holds it back. The regional division rears its ugly head every time the concept of investing in the region’s future is discussed, whether it’s sports stadiums, convention centers, mass transit or roads. “The bottom line is that cities and regions invest in their assets,” said Frank Viverito, president of the St. Louis Sports Commission.

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Added Ginger Imster, executive director of Arch Grants: “We’re often slow to scale up what works in our region.” Six months ago, Louisville lawyer Ed Glasscock was in St. Louis to talk to leaders about how much more diicult it was to make regional decisions — and get cooperation from the state and others — before his city and county united. “We lost credibility,” Glasscock said, pointing out that city and county leaders were often at odds. “You have so many challenges from the outside, you don’t need to be fighting internally. You’ve got to be sure everybody’s on the same page.” When it comes to investment in St. Louis, everybody is most clearly not on the same page. Whether it’s an attempt to lure Major League Soccer — an efort currently on life support — or modernize Scottrade Center, the lack of regional unity makes such projects more difficult and expensive, as city residents foot the bill for a region. Stillman is aware of the diference in regional governance in the cities that he says are competing with St. Louis for regional and national sports events. I asked him if it made progress more diicult. “I’m sure it does,” he said. “But at this point, we have what we have.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

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A Utah dad’s video shows one of his 2-year-old twins saving the other. See the video at stltoday.com/watch

Missouri Supreme Court upholds suspension of Lincoln County judge FROM STAFF REPORTS

LINCOLN COUNTY • The Missouri

Supreme Court has ordered a sixmonth unpaid suspension for Lincoln County Presiding Circuit Judge Chris Kunza Mennemeyer, citing “serious violations” of the Code of Judicial Conduct and state Constitution. Mennemeyer did not contest the penalty, which was recommended in September by the Commission on Retirement, Removal and Discipline. The commission had found that she improperly delayed criminal cases during a dispute with the public defender’s oice, leading to extra months in jail for some defendants. It also said she tried to coerce and intimidate public defenders, including the filing of an unfounded disciplinary complaint. In a decision announced Tuesday, the Supreme Court wrote that, “… it is clear that (the judge) intentionally delayed the appointment of public defenders to subvert the rights of indigent defendants,” and that “their right to be heard according to law was delayed.” The disciplinary inquiry acknowl-

edged Mennemeyer’s limited experience. A 1997 law school graduate, she had never handled a jury trial when she was elected in 2012 Mennemeyer as the county’s only circuit judge. The dispute, over whether public defenders needed her approval to represent probation case defendants, began the following year. The suspension will start Feb. 1; Mennemeyer will keep her job and pension. Her lawyer, Paul D’Agrosa, previously said that while some allegations were in dispute, she felt it was in her “best interests to move on” without a fight. Russell Faria, convicted by a jury in Mennemeyer’s court of murdering his wife, later won a new trial because the judge had refused to allow evidence against an alternate suspect, Pamela Hupp. Faria was acquitted by a diferent judge, and Hupp is awaiting trial in a related murder that occurred later in St. Charles County.

WHAT’S UP THIS DAY IN 1861 DIVISIVE GOVERNOR Southern-sympathizing Gov. Claiborne Jackson was sworn into oice in Jeferson City. St. Louisans, who felt more in sync with the North during the Civil War, began meeting at the Old Courthouse to counteract Jackson’s decisions.

HEADS UP FINANCIAL TIPS To get your financial house in order as the new year gets underway, First Bank ofers some tips for credit card users: • Take every credit card out of your wallet until you have retired the total dollar amount of the debt. • Set up a 2017 holiday budget. Add up your holiday expenses from 2016 and divide the total by the number of pay periods you have each year. Set up a payroll deduction for this amount and put the funds into a special savings account. • Don’t carry holiday debt from one year to the next. Resolve to spend only what you can aford and don’t go overboard. • Always pay the monthly minimums. If possible, pay extra on the card that has the highest interest rate. • Consider consolidating debt to one credit card with a low interest rate and pay as much as possible each month. Banks often ofer special balance transfer rates to encourage

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consolidation. • If you’re slipping behind, seek assistance from the Consumer Credit Counseling Service. This not-for-profit service operates oices in every city, and phone numbers can be found in local white pages. • If you don’t feel comfortable contacting CCCS, contact your creditors. Talk with them to negotiate an acceptable payment schedule. Most creditors are willing to work with you and will appreciate your honesty and integrity. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch.com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

EVENTS SUPER HERO NIGHT When • 6-9 p.m. Saturday Where • The Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road How much • $20; $15 for members More info • magichouse.org or 314-822-8900 The Magic House is hosting Super Hero Night, at which families are invited to dress up like their favorite superheroes for a superhero-themed evening filled with activities. Guests will have the opportunity to enjoy a pizza party, show of their superpowers at a photo booth, create their own superhero mask and meet Supergirl, Batman, Spider-Man and other superheroes. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

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LOCAL

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

Duckworth takes oice

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

New start for retiring Joyce, Gardner as circuit attorney BY JOEL CURRIER st. Louis Post-dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vice President Joe Biden (right) administers the Senate oath of oice to Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., as her husband, Bryan Bowlsbey, and her mother, Lamai Duckworth, watch during a mock swearing-in ceremony for photographers Tuesday on Capitol Hill. The oicial ceremony also took place Tuesday.

UP NEXT: MISSOURI LEGISLATURE

10 numbers to know BY KURT ERICKSON st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Members of the Missouri House and Senate gather for the start of their annual legislative session at noon Wednesday. It will be the 99th Legislature. Here are 10 numbers of interest:

163 • Number of members in the House. Republicans control the chamber with 117 members, compared to 46 for Democrats. 34 • Number of members in the Senate. Republicans control the chamber with 24 members, but that number will change after a special election to replace Sen. Mike Parson, a Bolivar Republican who will become lieutenant governor on Monday. 45 • Number of new members in both chambers. The House has 39 new members; 20 of those are Republicans, while 19 are Democrats. The Senate has six new members. Four of the new senators previously served in the House. An additional new member will be chose in the Senate to replace Parson. $35,914 • Amount of money lawmakers earn per year. Legislative leaders in the House and Senate earn $38,414. $113 • Amount of money lawmakers receive for each day of the legislative session to cover food and lodging costs. That’s up from $79 per day a decade ago. 4 • Typical number of days lawmakers are in session per week. The Legislature generally is of on Fridays. 588 • Number of bills introduced by lawmakers during a presession iling period that started on Dec. 1. 10 • Number of bills proposed that would make Missouri a rightto-work state. 6 • Number of months lawmakers must currently wait before they can become lobbyists. Gov.-elect Eric Greitens wants to make the cooling-of period considerably longer. 2 • Number of bills proposed that would lengthen the lawmakerlobbyist cooling-of period by as much as ive years.

ST. LOUIS • New St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner is spending her first days on the job talking to prosecutors and unloading boxes while her predecessor, Jennifer Joyce, leaves town in a packed 40foot RV in search of 70-degree days and quiet campgrounds. Gardner, elected as St. Louis’ first African-American circuit attorney in November, went about her first business day in office Tuesday with little fanfare. The new sign outside her office door and the framed St. Louis University law diploma on the wall behind her desk are about the only outward signs that she had moved in. “I’m humbled that the citizens of the city of St. Louis chose me to represent them,” Gardner said in an interview Tuesday. “It shows the city has come together and wants a change in how we address the violent crime.” She succeeds Joyce, the city’s longest-serving elected prosecutor whose fourth straight term ended New Year’s Eve. “I really love St. Louis,” Joyce said in a wide-ranging interview last week. “I’ve lived here all my life but I’m ready to have a little bit change of scenery. I would like to not think about crime 24 hours a day.” Among Gardner’s first moves is hiring Christopher Hinckley, a former St. Louis prosecutor turned casino lawyer, as chief warrant officer, a position held for years by Ed Postawko. Gardner said she also hired former public defenders Annette Llewellyn and Robert Steele as top assistants. She says she hasn’t fired anyone but is reorganizing what she called a “topheavy” oice under Joyce by reassigning positions and capping her inner circle to three people. Gardner, 41, worked as a prosecutor in Joyce’s oice from 2005-10 and was finishing her second term as the 77th District representative in the Missouri House when she won the Democratic primary in August over three opponents. Two challengers in the primary still work as prosecutors in the office. She ran unopposed in the November general election. Gardner said Tuesday she may tweak the office’s policy of sending prosecutors to homicide scenes and helping staff get up to speed on changes in the state’s criminal code that took effect Jan. 1. She

also is looking at reversing the office’s policy of withholding details on trial recommendations from defendants as part of plea negotiaGardner tions. Such a move, she said, might expedite cases and thus reduce pretrial jail time. She also wants to expand diversion programs in some cases. “We can’t have a one-sized-fitsall way of looking at things,” she said, while thanking Joyce “for her dedication to this oice and years of service. It’s a hard job that she’s handled with grace.” Joyce, a St. Louis University Law School graduate, worked in the circuit attorney’s oice as a prosecutor from 1994 until she was elected top prosecutor in 2000. She succeeded Dee Joyce Hayes who served for eight years.

GUNS ON THE STREET Joyce said she is proud of her leadership but cognizant that her departure comes amid rising violent crime and while restrictions on guns in Missouri have all but evaporated. “I don’t feel like (the city is) safer,” said Joyce, 54. “I feel a higher level of brazenness with the amount of guns on the streets.” Joyce doesn’t think St. Louis is doomed to its high crime fate. But she worries that Missouri’s gun laws will make fighting crime harder on police and prosecutors. Joyce says she regrets her confrontational style with judges in her early years when it came to arguing for tougher prison sentences for violent criminals. “I know I was pretty obnoxious in their eyes.” St. Louis Circuit Judge Ed Sweeney, a former St. Louis prosecutor whom Joyce called a mentor, said one of her mistakes early on was her blanket approach to demanding stif sentencing instead of evaluating defendants case by case. “I have no doubt she was 100 percent dedicated to advocating what she thought was the most effective sentences and policies that would serve the citizens by making the streets safer,” Sweeney said. Sweeney also said Joyce’s push for a specialized gun-crime court — also supported by Mayor Francis Slay and Police Chief Sam Dotson — lacked direction and solid statistical research. The judges balked at the plan in 2013 and ultimately adopted a diferent proposal to expedite gun cases through the courts. Joyce’s darkest days as prosecu-

tor came in 2015 when one of her younger prosecutors, Bliss Worrell, covered up a veteran city police officer’s beating of a handcuffed man. Joyce said she is proud of how her employees outed the prosecutor and helped federal authorities prosecute Worrell. “That was probably the worst thing that ever happened to me as circuit attorney,” she said. “I was appalled.”

FERGUSON’S LESSONS Joyce insists she has led her office with integrity and hasn’t shied from controversy, whether investigating the priest sex abuse scandal that rocked the Catholic Church in the early 2000s or going after bad cops. She applauds one major policy change born of the 2014 fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson: that the prosecutor’s office review all police shootings instead of police investigating them internally. “There is a sea change now in what is expected from us by the public,” Joyce said. “Where (Ferguson) changed me is on things like video … The public does not trust prosecutors or police and they think we’re together on this, and so they believe that if we don’t put the video out there, we must be hiding something and it couldn’t be farther from the truth. “We are actually trying to hold that police oicer accountable. You either have to release that information or you have to do a damn good job explaining to the public why you’re not releasing it.” Video was central to the murder case of ex-St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, whom Joyce charged last year five years after the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith. Police union officials blasted her; activists criticized her for waiting five years to take action. Joyce says she hopes Gardner is “very careful” about how she handles police shootings because critics are quick to assign motives and second-guess decisions in such high-profile cases. Gardner has said she would consider using special prosecutors in such cases. “I’m not worried because I know Kim Gardner,” Joyce said. “I think that it’s going to be a bumpy road for the first year or so, as it was under my administration, but I think, ultimately, Kim has what she needs to be successful. She’s got a good heart and she cares about the city.” Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Missouri job growth about half of totals pledged for incentives Nixon has said tax breaks were needed to spur recovery ASSOCIATED PRESS

JEFFERSON CITY • Jobs were vanishing by the thousands when Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon took oice in the midst of the greatest recession in decades. So when an agricultural company decided to build a soybean processing facility in southeast Missouri, Nixon pounced on the potential of 50 new jobs, proclaiming that it was “precisely the kind of nextgeneration growth that will help Missouri lead the country’s economic recovery.” Nixon’s March 4, 2010, press release praising DuPont Pioneer Hi-Bred marked the first of what would become about 200 gubernatorial announcements or ceremonies touting business deals projected to cumulatively create about 48,000 jobs in exchange for up to $2 billion of state incentives. As the Democratic governor prepares to leave oice Jan. 9, those businesses have reported hiring a little over 21,400 employees while the state so far has distributed about $166 million of incentives to them, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the state Department of Economic Development. While the report card is incomplete — Nixon’s deals will likely lead to more jobs and incentives paid out even after he’s left oice — Missouri’s experience highlights the extent to which states are willing to use targeted tax breaks to attract jobs, and the diiculty in determining whether the incentivized promises ultimately pan out. “When firms apply for incentives, they tend to propose more jobs than are actually created,” said Dagney Faulk, research director at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Ball State University in Indiana. State and national unemployment rates have fallen by half from their high in 2009, and the economy is growing modestly as measured by the gross domestic product. “The bottom line is the economy’s in a lot better place,” Nixon said in an interview. The AP’s analysis didn’t include projects that Nixon didn’t publicize. But figures provided by the state show that even with those projects, fewer than half of the promised jobs have been created so far. Missouri provides income tax credits and lets companies keep a portion of employee withholding taxes for new jobs.

The state also provides job-training funds to businesses and community development grants to build infrastructure needed by companies. The Pioneer Hi-Bred facility in New Madrid County is among the successes, with a current payroll of about 70 fulltime employees. Some of the biggest gains have come in the automotive industry. Nixon called a special legislative session in 2010 to enact incentives to save Ford Motor Co.’s plant in Claycomo, near Kansas City. That plant now is Ford’s highest-volume facility worldwide — producing more than 400,000 trucks and vans in 2015 — and has doubled its payroll to more than 7,400 workers. Ford has received about $29 million of its roughly $100 million of potential incentives, according to state figures. General Motors has received about $31 million for a Wentzville assembly plant that makes GMC Canyon and Chevy Colorado pickups. Numerous auto parts suppliers also have gotten state aid. Nixon said the resurgence of Missouri’s automobile industry would not have happened without state incentives. “If people think that Ford plant in Claycomo would still be open … they don’t understand the world that you live in as governor,” Nixon said. The largest incentives deal in Missouri history — up to $1.3 billion for a pledge of 16,000 jobs over a decade — is scheduled to produce its first fruits in February when health care technology firm Cerner Corp. opens the initial phase of a Kansas City office complex with 3,000 employees. Department of Economic Development Director Mike Downing said Nixon “has met with a lot more companies” than any of the six other Missouri governors he’s worked for since joining the agency in 1982. Sometimes that’s led to embarrassment — none more glaring than when Nixon announced in July 2010 that a littleknown Chinese-owned firm called Mamtek would employ more than 600 people at a new Moberly facility making artificial sweetener. A little over a year later, the partially completed facility was abandoned and the city defaulted on $39 million of bonds issued for the project. Mamtek CEO Bruce Cole later pleaded guilty to securities fraud and theft.

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.04.2017

Man shot wife, himself in Dutchtown murder-suicide Police found them dead Saturday, but details still unclear BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A man fatally shot his wife, then himself in what police are calling a murder-suicide discovered Saturday in the city’s Dutchtown neighborhood. Police on Tuesday identified the victims as Stacey Aubuchon, 28, and James Aubuchon, 32. The Aubuchons lived in the 4400 block of South Spring Avenue, in the city’s Dutchtown

neighborhood. Officers found them dead in their home there about 12:40 p.m. Saturday after a child in the home contacted a family member, who called police. It’s not clear exactly when they died. The Aubuchons had been married about seven years, according to Stacey Aubuchon’s mother, Kathy Schohn of Cambria, Ill. Schohn was reeling from the death of her daughter and struggling Tuesday to understand why it happened. Schohn said she had no indication that James Aubuchon was physically abusive, although Stacey Aubuchon had complained to her mother that James had been increasingly crit-

Stacey Aubuchon

ical in recent months. “After Thanksgiving, she said he started to talk mean to her,” Schohn said. He would call his wife stupid and say he wanted a

divorce, Schohn said. “She didn’t know how much more she could take and was thinking about packing up and leaving,” Schohn said of her daughter. James Aubuchon kicked his wife out of the home twice since August, and she went to live briefly with her sister once and with Schohn another time, Schohn said. But he would call Stacey Aubuchon days later and say he missed her and wanted her back home, and she would return, Schohn said. “He’s never raised his voice in front of us, never showed that side,” Schohn said. “To me, there were no signs.”

Schohn said James Aubuchon had two children from a previous relationship; he had custody of them, a boy about 8 and a girl about 10, and they lived with the couple at the home on South Spring. It wasn’t clear whether one or both was home at the time of the murder-suicide. James and Stacey Aubuchon worked to repair cars in a garage on their property. Funeral arrangements were pending. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Police ID stabbing victim • The man stabbed to death by an intruder last week in the Dogtown neighborhood was Jonathan DeTurk, 36, of the 1000 block of Art Hill Place, police said Tuesday. He was found dead inside a home there about 4:45 p.m. Friday with multiple wounds. A woman, 25, sufered what police said were minor puncture wounds and was taken to a hospital. Homicide detectives said a man entered the residence, stabbed both with a knife and led. LINCOLN COUNTY > Woman faces prison for manslaughter • Paulette Lee Eaker, 53, convicted of voluntary manslaughter for using her SUV to run down and kill her boyfriend, will be sentenced Feb. 10. On Dec. 14, a jury found Eaker guilty of manslaughter as an alternative to a tougher second-degree murder charge sought by prosecutors. Eaker, of the irst block of Chapman Lane, west of Winield, also was convicted of leaving the scene of an accident. Authorities said Eaker told them she hit and killed William Solomon Horstman, Eaker 52, because he wouldn’t move out of her way. A witness said the two argued earlier in the day. Eaker told investigators that after she hit Horstman, she saw him in her mirror, crawling back to his vehicle. Horstman He was found unconscious inside his vehicle on the side of a road near his home on Graves Lane. He died of blunt force trauma to his head and chest, including 20

broken ribs and massive brain bleeding. Police said the autopsy showed that Horstman was not facing Eaker’s SUV when he was struck. The jury recommended a 15-year prison term on the manslaughter conviction and four years for the other charge. ST. LOUIS > Man charged with making terrorist threat • A Paciic, Mo., man has been charged with making a terrorist threat after he reportedly told a Planned Parenthood employee there were multiple bombs in the building in the Central West End on New Year’s Eve. John Patrick Ryan, 64, was charged Sunday with one felony count of making a terrorist threat. Ryan told an employee walking into the clinic at 4251 Forest Park Avenue that there were multiple bombs inside the building, according to charging documents. The documents said Ryan knew he was lying to the employee but did it to frighten her and to cause the clinic to close. Ryan was released from the city jail Tuesday after he posted a $1,500 bond. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Fire death accidental • Authorities said the death of Herman Williams Sr., 64, in a house ire in the Spanish Lake area on Dec. 22 was accidental. He was found in a bedroom of his ranch-style brick home at 11518 Criterion Avenue. A relative said Williams had been sufering from early signs of dementia. Spanish Lake Fire Chief Richard Swain said “all indications point to the kitchen” and that the victim was known to leave pots unattended while cooking.

FRANKLIN COUNTY > Man accused of making threats • Patrick Sean Howard, 56, has been charged with assault and other crimes for allegedly pointing a gun at his wife’s head on Dec. 28, then pouring gasoline on a grandchild’s crib and threatening to light it. Howard was held in lieu of $50,000 cash-only bail. Franklin County Sherif Steve Pelton said in a prepared statement that deputies were called to the home in the 5700 block of Willow Ford Road, south of Robertsville, about 11 p.m., but Howard had led. He was arrested the next day. BELLEVILLE > Man found dead • A man identiied as Richard Kelley was found dead Tuesday morning lying along a street here, the St. Clair County coroner’s oice said. No cause of death was given. Police said they were sent to the 7400 block of Westchester Drive at 4:48 a.m. The scene is near Emge Junior High School, which is closed for the holidays until Wednesday. No other details were available. NORMANDY > Public works director charged • Rodney C. Jarrett, the Normandy public works director, used a city vehicle to stop a driver and demand his driver’s license, according to a charge accusing Jarrett of impersonating a police oicer. Jarrett, 63, of Berkeley, was named Thursday on one misdemeanor count. Herman L. Pruitt told the Post-Dispatch last year that he was driving on Bermuda Road in Normandy on Sept. 7 when he stopped for a Ford F-150 truck with lashing lights. Jarrett accused Pruitt of running or rolling through a stop sign and asked for the man’s license, according to Pruitt and court

DIGEST

documents. Jarrett warned Pruitt to watch the stop signs and let him go, Pruitt said, but Pruitt complained, which led to a St. Louis County police investigation and the charge. Jarrett, a Normandy city employee for nearly four decades, was put on leave after the incident. His main job responsibilities include code enforcement, streets, parks and sanitation — but not stopping vehicles, the city said. ST. LOUIS > Man charged in chase • One man has been charged with resisting arrest and three men are in custody after a police pursuit New Year’s Eve that began with shots ired at oicers and ended with a crash. Shortly before 10 p.m. oicers approached a car near Gasconade Street and Oregon Avenue that matched the description of a car reportedly taken in an armed robbery about 30 minutes earlier. Oicers were within 10 feet of the car when a man inside pulled a gun and ired multiple shots at them, according to police. The car left at a high rate of speed. The driver ran several traic lights before crashing into another car. The police report did not include crash details. Four men inside the car were taken into custody. The driver, Renard Jones, 19, of the 8800 block of Lowell Street, was charged Sunday with one felony count of resisting arrest. Jones was released from the city jail Tuesday after posting a $10,000 bond, according to court documents. Police said Tuesday they expect to ile charges against the three other suspects, two 18-year-olds and one 19-year-old.

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JEFFERSON CITY > Free Uber rides, free parking Monday • City council members approved a plan Tuesday that will allow free rides with the ridesharing company Uber on the day Gov.elect Eric Greitens takes oice. Residents spoke in favor of the

proposal sponsored by Councilman Rick Mihalevich, saying the one-day trial period would be convenient for visitors and generate employment for locals. The council also approved free parking on Monday, in designated areas. Some speakers said they worried about public safety. Uber drivers receive background checks through the company, including criminal history and driving records going back seven years. The mobile app required to summon a ride provides GPS tracking of all rides. Drivers also carry vehicle insurance. Uber provides up to $1 million of liability insurance per driver. It is unclear whether coverage includes property and physical damage. About 150 drivers are ready to serve riders within a 20-mile radius of the capital city on Inauguration Day. Some Uber cars will be identiied with the “U” logo sticker, a lobbyist representing the company said Tuesday. City oicials recommended the temporary service run for 24 hours, starting at 8 a.m. (Ashley Lisenby)

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JEFFERSON CITY > State lawmaker to become a top aide to Greitens • Rep. Caleb Jones, R-Columbia, is the latest in a series of personnel moves being rolled out by Republican Eric Greitens, who will be sworn in as governor on Jan. 9. Jones, who has served in the House since 2011, is expected to become deputy chief of staf. “We’re excited to have Caleb Jones join our team. He’s a great conservative leader who will help us to take Missouri in a new direction,” said Greitens’ senior advisor Austin Chambers in a

prepared statement. The 36-year-old Republican practices law in Columbia and previously worked in Washington, D.C., for U.S. Rep. Kenny Hulshof of Sikeston. He also served as a special assistant in the U.S. Department of Agriculture during the Bush administration. “For me, this was about answering Governor-elect Greitens’ call to service and joining an administration that will have a real positive impact on Missouri families,” Jones said. Jones will serve under Michael Roche, a longtime Anheuser-Busch attorney who earlier was announced as Greitens’ chief of staf. Other top hires include former state Senate stafer Jennae Neustadt as legislative director and St. Louis lawyer Will Scharf as policy director. (Kurt Erickson)

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ST. LOUIS > Murders tied 2015 pace • Murders in the city neither increased nor decreased last year as the 188 cases in 2016 tied with 2015, the police department said Tuesday. St. Louis maintained the highest level in 20 years. The 2015 number had represented an 18.2 percent increase from the 159 murders in 2014. The city’s record high was 267 during the “crack wars” of 1993; the lowest mark since then was 74, counted in 2003. (Post-Dispatch staf)

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ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

IN A FOG The Malcolm W. Martin statue overlooks a hazy, gray St. Louis skyline, as seen from Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park in east St. Louis on Tuesday. Temperatures are expected to turn much colder beginning Wednesday, but the skies will be clearer.

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Council member stalls measure to blight Jamestown site BY STEVE GIEGERICH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • The new council member representing north St. Louis County has put final passage of legislation to blight the site of the former Jamestown Mall on hold pending the release of details on future development of the site. Democrat Rochelle Walton Gray said, “I just need to see what (the county) is trying to do” with property that has deteriorated radically since the last store in the mall closed its doors in 2014. The parcel falls inside Walton Gray’s North County district. Walton Gray said she has yet to

see an 82-page document outlining a redevelopment plan analogous to the conversion of the former Northwest Plaza into the mixed-use facility that now goes under the name of the Crossings at Northwest. The document, delivered to other council members in November, outlines four preliminary proposals for “mixed-use village center(s) that can easily adapt to changing economic needs and pressures” on the site of the demolished mall. “That plan has been shared with the public, it has been shared with the County Council for at least 45 days,” said County Executive Steve Stenger. “Everyone, including the council

person, including the public, is able to view that with a simple request. … This is something we want to be interactive with the public.” A measure to formally blight the property was on the Tuesday night council agenda until Walton Gray announced her intention to stall the legislation at an afternoon public hearing on the issue. The county charter requires the council to hold two public hearings before blighting a property. The first hearing was last month, before Walton Gray took oice on Sunday. A former state legislator, Walton Gray told a reporter after the hearing that she is seeking guar-

antees that the site will continue to funnel property tax revenue to the Hazelwood schools and other publicly supported North County agencies. “It has to be comparable with the rest of the county,” Walton Gray said. Residents at Tuesday’s public hearing voiced support for mixed-use development on the 148-acre site that was once a regional shopping hub. But first the county must blight a property that over the past three years has become infested with mold, marred by graffiti and fallen into general disrepair. A 2016 engineering study also revealed sink holes in the park-

ing lot. The ownership structure of the former mall has complicated rehabilitation of the property. At its closing, the shopping center was technically owned by five companies. The St. Louis Economic Development Partnership has bought out three owners and is negotiating to purchase property rights from a fourth owner. Sources say eminent domain has not been ruled out as a tactic to secure the fifth parcel. Steve Giegerich • 314-725-6758 @stevegiegerich on Twitter sgiegerich@post-dispatch.com

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01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

House Republicans back of gutting ethics oice after Trump backlash

ASSOCIATED PRESS

House Speaker Paul Ryan, of Wisconsin, shakes hands with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, of California, Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington after he was re-elected to his leadership post, as the 115th Congress convened.

ETHICS • FROM A1

would rein in the Oice of Congressional Ethics. Instead, the House will study changes to the oice with an August deadline. The about-face came hours after Trump took to Twitter to slam House Republicans for voting behind closed doors Monday night in favor of immediately weakening the independent ethics oice. The vote defied House GOP leaders and complicated Trump’s “drain the swamp” campaign mantra. “With all that Congress has to work on, do they really have to make the weakening of the Independent Ethics Watchdog, as unfair as it … may be, their number one act and priority. Focus on tax reform, health care and so many other things of far greater importance!” Trump wrote on Twitter Tuesday morning, hours before the new Congress convened. He added the hashtag “DTS” — shorthand for “drain the swamp.” Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., a recent chairman of the House Ethics Committee, said that members of the House GOP leadership mentioned Trump’s opposition to the ethics oice changes at the brief, closeddoor meeting in the Capitol basement, giving weight to reversing Monday night’s decision. “That should be a consideration,” Dent said, explaining how leaders framed the thinking. Democrats and other watchdog groups were also critical of the Monday night vote. A coalition of more than a dozen organizations and activists expressed their frustration in a Tuesday morning letter to House Democratic and Republican leadership. Members also faced a barrage of angry phone calls from constituents. “I can tell you the calls we’ve gotten in my district oice and here in Washington surprised me, meaning the numbers of calls. People are just sick and tired,” Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., said of the simmering outrage over the proposed change. “People are just losing confidence in the lack of ethics and honesty in Washington.” In a statement, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said, “Republicans should remember the strength of public outrage they faced in the space of 12 hours as they scheme to do lasting damage to the health and economic security of millions and millions of hard-work-

ing families.” But Rep. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, was adamant in defending his Monday night vote for the changes in the ethics committee. “Nearly a decade since its creation, complaints received and investigated by the Office of Congressional Ethics have resulted in no major disciplinary actions while costing taxpayers over $10 million,” he said in a statement issued by his office. “Reforming the office is necessary to ensure that its future investigations of representatives and staf are handled in a manner consistent with Constitutional due process rights, and in a way that protects the confidentiality of witnesses as well as those who are wrongly accused.” Congress members who backed the changes reportedly cited an 8-year-old ethics investigation into Missouri Rep. Sam Graves as an example of why they needed to rein in the independent ethics watchdog. Graves’ fellow lawmakers eventually exonerated him but not before the congressman had spent significant time and money defending himself against what he complained at the time were “frivolous, anonymous allegations.” On Tuesday, the House passed a rules package that did not include the proposed changes to the ethics oice. It did contain a controversial provision that will impose fines on members using electronic devices to take photographs, record audio or video or conduct livestreams on the House floor. The provision was a response to House Democrats staging a sit-in last summer aimed at forcing votes on gun control legislation. The changes would have renamed the ethics office as the Office of Congressional Complaint Review and ensured that the office would not have been allowed to employ a spokesman, investigate anonymous tips or refer criminal wrongdoing to prosecutors without the express consent of the House Ethics Committee. GOP leaders are eager to wield their House and Senate majorities to rapidly advance an ambitious conservative agenda, as Trump prepares to take office in under three weeks. But the fresh signs of discord threatened to slow their march. Both House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., opposed changing the ethics office when

rank-and-file Republicans decided to defy them with a vote Monday. By Tuesday morning, both leaders seemed resigned to accepting it. Then, by early Tuesday afternoon, things had changed. According to several people in the private meeting Tuesday, McCarthy convened the gathering and laid out options for proceeding: Either Republicans could decide among themselves to change course on the ethics changes, or the matter would be hashed out on the House floor, where members would have their views publicly recorded. With that, he asked if there was any objection. While some members maintained that the House should act immediately to rein in the ethics oice, the vast majority agreed to eliminate the proposal and move on. “Essentially it was: We can handle it here, or we can handle it on the floor,” said one person present who spoke on the condition of anonymity. Republicans are under intense pressure to unify behind common goals in the era of Trump, after being plagued for years by infighting in Congress and on the campaign trail. They have identified a list of legislative priorities beginning with the repeal of the Afordable Care Act that they hope will energize most of the GOP. But they could face significant speed bumps. Tuesday proceeded as a day of ceremonial rituals and consequential business on Capitol Hill. Members of the new House and Senate were sworn in during the afternoon. Republicans will hold a 52-48 advantage over Democrats in the Senate; their edge in the House will be 241-194. House lawmakers re-elected Ryan as House speaker Tuesday afternoon, with the vast majority of Democrats voting for Pelosi. In the Senate, the first bill introduced Tuesday was budget legislation that contains instructions for committees in both chambers to begin dismantling the Affordable Care Act. The bare-bones spending outline gives members of four committees until Jan. 27 to produce bills that each save $1 billion over a decade by slashing elements of President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. Chuck Raasch of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Tribune News Services contributed to this report.

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Automakers say Trump tweets were of-target FORD • FROM A1

reiterating his threat to impose punitive tarifs on imports. Shortly afterward, Trump celebrated an announcement by Ford that it was canceling a $1.6 billion factory in Mexico and using some of the money to expand production in Michigan. “Instead of driving jobs and wealth away, AMERICA will become the world’s great magnet for INNOVATION & JOB CREATION,” Trump tweeted. But the business decisions that Trump has criticized and the deals he has trumpeted are not so straightforward. After his election win, Trump touted a deal to save jobs at a furnace factory in Indiana but inflated the number of jobs preserved. He later claimed credit for a big Japanese investment in the U.S. economy that was in the oing well before his election. On Tuesday, in his tweet about GM — whose chief executive Mary Barra sits on Trump’s jobs council — Trump attacked the automaker for selling Chevrolet Cruzes assembled in Mexico to U.S. car dealers and warned that the company should “make in the U.S.A. or pay big border tax!” But almost all of the 190,000 Cruzes sold in the United States last year were made at a factory in Lordstown, Ohio, the company said. Last year, GM introduced a hatchback model that is made in Mexico and is largely sold in international markets. GM spokesman Pat Morrissey said the hatchback was available in the United States but that only 4,500 were sold here. GM sold 25,000 Cruze hatchbacks outside the country. “The hatchback is a very small volume vehicle,” Morrissey said. “There’s just not a lot of demand for it.” The Cruze sedan manufactured in Ohio has suffered from weak demand as well. In November, GM announced it would eliminate the factory’s third shift, cutting 1,245 salaried and hourly workers in the process. The jobs will end this quarter. The plant currently employs about 4,500. “We are not reducing a shift based on quality or performance,” wrote Scott Brubaker, chairman of United Auto Workers Local 1714, one of the two that represent the factory, in a message to members posted on the union website. “Unfortunately, the market dictates our livelihoods and this is a business that changes based on consumer demand.” Meanwhile, Ford’s decision to abandon a new factory in Mexico was not a unilateral victory for Trump’s nascent administration. The presidentelect had criticized Ford during his campaign for shifting production of the Focus to the new facility south of the border. On Tuesday, Ford announced that it would invest a little less than half the money saved from canceling that project into producing electric and self-driving vehicles at facilities in Michigan and Illinois. The Michigan plant alone employs about

3,500 workers, and Ford said their jobs will stay in place. The decision is also expected to create about 700 U.S. jobs, and Ford Chief Executive Mark Fields called it a “vote of confidence” in Trump’s economic agenda in an interview on Fox Business News. However, the production of the Ford Focus will not return to America. Ford said demand for small vehicles has waned considerably in the U.S. in recent years as low fuel costs make SUVs and trucks more palatable to consumers. Ford determined that the new plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, was no longer necessary and instead would shift production of the Ford Focus to an existing factory in Hermosillo, Mexico, said Joseph Hinrichs, president of Ford in the Americas. The change in plans was made recently and without consulting people connected to Trump, Hinrichs said. Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford shared the news with Trump in a phone call Tuesday morning, though the details of that call were not immediately available. “When it’s a close judgment call, maybe people are tilting more toward the side of U.S. production, not necessarily because they anticipate any specific policy change but because they don’t know what the policy environment is going to be like and they’re afraid to find out,” said Alan Cole, an economist at the Tax Foundation. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement, the United States does not impose tarifs on products imported from Mexico and Canada, but renegotiating the long-standing treaty was one of Trump’s key campaign promises. Since his election, he has attempted to claim credit for saving or creating thousands of U.S. jobs, but the details of the deals were more complex. Trump boasted that telecom giant Sprint was bringing back 5,000 American jobs. Instead, the company is working with third-party vendors who manage its call centers to move work to the United States. Trump claimed he had stopped Ford from moving a Kentucky plant to Mexico. The automaker said it had never planned to shut down the factory but replace production of the Lincoln MKC with more Ford Escapes. And after Trump announced that more than 1,000 jobs would remain in Indiana, workers at the Carrier plant there found out the actual number was closer to 800. Trump’s tweet Tuesday about GM does not make clear whether he is calling for targeted tax to punish individual companies that shift production out of the United States or for a blanket tarif on imports. Trump has repeatedly called for slapping a 35 percent tariff on Mexican products, but there is no framework for a broadbased border tax in his proposal to overhaul the corporate tax code.


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.04.2017

Leaders want $138 million for Scottrade SCOTTRADE • FROM A1

renovated locker rooms, renovated concessions stands and new administrative offices. Various entryways and facades would also get makeovers. City and Blues officials also are planning to ask state legislators for $70.5 million for further renovations in a second phase, the timeline for which is still being finalized. But that request comes as Gov.-elect Eric Greitens has publicly opposed taxpayer stadium funding and called it “welfare for millionaires.” A spokesman for Greitens, who takes oice Monday, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. City officials and Blues executives have been talking for more than a year about how to pay for renovations at Scottrade. The city’s $67.5 million would be raised in a tax-exempt bond issue and would be spent in the next three years under the plan. Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed said a bill would be introduced this week and could get a committee hearing as early as next week. Blues owners intend to contribute $50 million out of pocket over the next 20 to 30 years for additional improvements beyond the other renovations, Blues Chief Executive Chris Zimmerman said. Blues executives and city officials are asking for the state contribution to come in $6 million annual installments. However, Blues officials said that request hasn’t been finalized. Zimmerman said they’re asking for a higher amount from Jefferson City because the state gets a larger share than the city of the annual sales taxes generated by the Blues. Stillman said the stadium generates $14 million total in sales tax annually, with about $6 million going to the city and $8 million to the state. Included in the $138 million in renovations is $10.3 million already spent recently by the Blues to improve water systems and the video production and control room, as well as to install wireless internet in the arena. However, those costs could end up being reimbursed by the state or the city. Records filed with the Mis-

TIMELINE OF ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Blues Chief Executive Chris Zimmerman speaks at a press conference Tuesday at the Scottrade Center asking city taxpayers to help fund renovations at the facility.

RENOVATING SCOTTRADE CENTER Cost: $138 million City funding: The initial improvements over the irst three years would be paid for by the city through the issuance of $67.5 million in tax-exempt bonds. The bonds would be paid of using about $4 million of the annual city sales tax money already generated at Scottrade as well as a new 1 percent tax on Blues tickets. Remaining funding: The city and the Blues intend to ask the state for about $70 million, coming in annual installments of roughly $6 million. It is unclear whether the Legislature or Gov.-elect Eric Greitens would support that request.

souri Ethics Commission show the Blues and the Kiel Center Partners have hired 14 lobbyists to represent their interests before the Legislature in 2017. That’s a comparatively high number among professional sports teams in Missouri. The St. Louis Cardinals baseball team has seven lobbyists. Three lobbyists are registered to represent the Kansas City Chiefs. Formerly called the Kiel Center, the downtown arena is owned by the city of St. Louis and leased to the Blues, who operate and manage the facility. It opened in 1994 and cost $170 million at the time with $62.4 million in tax-exempt financing. Slay said Scottrade has generated $100 million in tax revenue for the city since it was opened nearly 23 years ago. Now, he added, “We have to take care of our building.” Over the life of the building, private owners have contributed $237 million to building maintenance and improvements, Stillman said. He said combined losses for Blues ownership groups “over the years” were about $500 million.

“The Blues have not exactly been a get-rich-quick proposition over the years,” said Stillman, whose ownership group bought the team in 2012 for an estimated $132 million. Forbes Magazine estimates the team’s current worth at $310 million, ranking 23rd out of 30 NHL teams. Forbes estimates the team’s annual revenue at $129 million, with an operating profit of $3.2 million. Oicials said the stadium directly generates $132 million in spending in the city annually. “These events (at Scottrade) make us money,” Slay said. “The Scottrade Center has been the gift that has kept on giving.” Among events Scottrade may be vying to host in the coming years, officials said: NCAA wrestling tournaments, the NHL All Star game, NCAA men’s basketball regional tournaments, figure skating competitions and the NCAA Frozen Four. Reed stressed that the facility has already paid for police officers and transportation needs but hasn’t had a major upgrade since it was opened. “We must stay competitive,” he

said. In addition to the cityfunded renovations, connections between the Peabody and Scottrade would also be improved through a combination of private and state financing. A new roof, new escalators and elevators, a water cooling system and security upgrades would also be funded under that portion of the plan. The public’s costs would be fixed, meaning any cost overruns on projects would fall to the private ownership group. Tuesday’s news conference came one day after Greitens said he had ”completely ruled out state funding for stadiums.” Greitens’ opposition to state tax credits for a proposed Major League Soccer stadium in St. Louis may eventually nix the city’s efort for a team, ownership group vice chairman Dave Peacock said. Meanwhile, America’s Center and the Dome need about $350 million in renovations, St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission President Kitty Ratclife has said. America’s Center is owned by the city while the Dome is owned jointly by the city, county and state. Last week St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger said a specific proposal for the Dome and America’s Center had not yet been submitted by Ratclife’s organization.

judge’s order for new testing. Specifically, they want to compare Prante’s DNA to semen found in the victim, scrapings from under her fingernails, blood left at the scene and any evidence on socks and wire used to bind her. In addition, they want to use a national fingerprint database to look for matches to two prints on a coffee carafe that authorities said the killer clearly had touched; those prints did not match Prante. He was sentenced in 1983 to 75 years in prison for the murder of Karla L. Brown. Prante is held in the Pinckneyville Correctional Center and listed as eligible for parole in 2019, and for release in 2022. Authorities didn’t decide until two years after the 1978 killing, when the unsolved case received a fresh look, that a mark seen in autopsy photos of Brown’s right collarbone area represented a bite. Officials exhumed her body but decomposition had thwarted a better look. Two experts told a jury that the marks in the photos were a bite and consistent with Prante’s teeth, although they could not call it an exact match. A dentist testified that less than 1 percent of people have teeth that could have left the mark. But two defense experts said at the trial it was not clear whether the mark was a bite at all, and insisted that meaningful comparisons with people’s teeth were impossible. The motion by Tepfer and Delger says there have been more than two dozen verified cases of wrongful convictions or indictments based on bite mark testimony, some involving the key prosecution witnesses against Prante: Drs. Lowell Levine and Homer Campbell. Among those now rejecting the reliability of bite mark comparisons are the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the Texas Forensic Science Com-

mission and the accrediting organization for forensic dentists.

BITE MARK WAS KEY Investigators looked at other suspects first but zeroed in on Prante after experts said the teeth of the others were incompatible with the marks. He was arrested in 1982. Then-Madison County State’s Attorney Don W. Weber built his prosecution in 1983 on the bite mark and testimony of several of Prante’s friends, who said he told them details about seeing the crime scene — which authorities said was not possible unless he was the killer. A former girlfriend testified that Prante sometimes bit her shoulder during sex, and had once told her he killed a woman. There were no witnesses to Brown’s death nor other physical evidence against Prante. Oicials alleged that Prante, then 28, was drinking and smoking marijuana at a friend’s house in Wood River around noon on June 21, 1978, and noticed Brown, 22, moving into a house next door, at 979 East Acton Street. Brown was a student at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Prante, a Navy veteran with no significant criminal record, was an unemployed barge worker. Weber speculated that Brown, whose fiance was at work, may have spurned a sexual advance from Prante and he reacted with rage. She was found bound and nude from the waist down, with her upper body bent over into a 10-gallon container of water in her basement. She had been badly beaten and sexual assault was presumed, although not verified. Although the formal cause of death was listed as strangulation, a diferent forensic pathologist said after the exhumation that she thinks Brown really died of drowning. Jurors deliberated for under seven hours before finding Prante guilty. A confusing aspect of the

evidence was a lab report that both Type A and Type O blood were found at the scene. Brown and Prante both were Type A, raising the question of whether someone with Type O was the killer. But experts have said that characteristics of one blood type can sometimes be found in another. An attempt by a different defense lawyer to get a judge to order a DNA test for blood on a couch cushion in Brown’s basement was rejected in 1993 as coming too late in the appeals process. Illinois later passed a law to accommodate post-conviction forensic testing. Prante’s latest lawyers said he has been uncommonly resolute in denying the crime, to the point of refusing a plea deal that would have foreclosed the risk of receiving a death sentence. Their motion, provided to the Post-Dispatch, includes doubts raised by memory expert Nancy Franklin about the reliability of what witnesses said Prante had told them years before. Franklin warns that time fades memories and increases the risk of subconsciously conflating recollections with things learned from others or from news reports. And the lawyers cite a DNA expert calling the evidence “ripe” for DNA analysis now. The motion seeks only testing, not a new trial. But it suggests that if tests on multiple pieces of evidence were to point to someone else, it would be “overwhelming evidence of Prante’s innocence.” The defense will pay the testing cost, the motion says. Mark Von Nida, the circuit court clerk, said Tuesday the motion had not yet arrived in the mail there. He said his office still has the Brown murder evidence “safely locked away” in a vault. A spokeswoman for State’s Attorney Tom Gibbons said Tuesday that he received a copy of the motion and would review it before deciding whether to oppose it.

2006 • A special commission issues recommendations to ix failing St. Louis Public Schools. 2007 • The Missouri Board of Education revokes the district’s accreditation. A Special Administrative Board is appointed to run the school district. 2008 • Kelvin Adams begins work as district superintendent after being hired by the Special Administrative Board. 2012 • State School Board grants the district provisional accreditation. 2017 • State education leaders recommend the district be fully accredited.

SCHOOLS • FROM A1

According to published reports, Prante trial witnesses Levine and Campbell were at the forefront of some of the cases in which bite-mark analysis was discredited. Levine had been a key witness against Keith Allen Harward, who was exonerated by DNA testing last year after 33 years in prison for a rape and murder in Virginia. Levine issued a statement saying, in part: “This case should persuade all my colleagues to agree with the need for more scientific research and investigation” of bite-mark evidence. In 2015, the 1987 murder conviction of Steven Chaney was overturned in Dallas under a 2013 Texas state law that allows reconsideration of cases built upon scientific methods later discounted. At issue was bite-mark testimony from Campbell and another forensic dentist, Dr. Jim Hales. Hales had told the jury there was only a “one to a million chance” that Chaney did not bite the victim, but years later filed an affidavit saying bite marks cannot be reliably matched to specific teeth. In Waco, Texas, Campbell testified in a 1986 bite-mark case against a man who then went to prison for a rape and murder. Hale had difered that time, saying he thought it was an accused accomplice who left the mark. DNA testing in 2000 that helped free the two men showed that both experts had been wrong.

under the state’s transfer law. But an upgrade would help remove the stigma that can accompany a lack of full accreditation. It also would likely increase pressure on state and district leaders to decide how to transition the district’s governance from its current threemember appointed board back to its seven-member elected board. Margie Vandeven, Missouri commissioner of education, stressed in an interview that the district’s governance situation is not tied to its accreditation status. “And yet we understand that there is a general interest in seeing that elected board come back into governing the district,” Vandeven said. “What we will continue to do is to figure out a way for a smooth transition.” She said she doesn’t currently have an opinion on how soon that transition should happen. The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education made its recommendation Tuesday even though the city district technically scored just about half a percentage point outside the fully accredited range on the state’s annual report card of schools last year. When factoring in the difference between last year’s state test results and the previous year’s, St. Louis Public Schools scored well within the fully accredited range for the past two years. Vandeven commended the combined leadership of the district’s Superintendent Kelvin Adams and the appointed board. The two together have been frequently credited for turning the district around in the past decade despite chronic enrollment declines and other challenges, such as teaching vacancies and high student mobility. Full accreditation would mean the district has accomplished what the state wanted it to back in 2007. At that time, the state stripped the district of its accreditation because of its poor academic performance and ineffective governance. Since then, academic performance has improved, but slowly. Last year, 37 percent of district students who took state tests scored at least proficient in English, and 26 percent scored at least proficient in math. “We all know that accreditation means that they’re meeting minimum state standards. There’s still a lot of work to be done, we recognize that,” Vandeven said. “But at this point, we feel confident with the recommendation.” The state education department systematically considers several factors in addition to test scores when considering changes in accreditation status. For example, St. Louis Public Schools has raised its four-year graduation rate to 71.5 percent last year from 67.7 percent in 2013, and its attendance rate to 87.9 percent last year from 79.5 percent in 2013. In 2006, a commission headed by longtime civil rights advocate Frankie Freeman and former Washington University Chancellor William Danforth prescribed a three-member, appointed transitional board to steer the district back to stability. In 2008, that board hired Adams, who is credited with returning the district to provisional accreditation status in 2012. Even before the appointed board was formed, the commission pressed the state Legislature to give instructions on how to transition back from an appointed board. State law says nothing about how district control should be handed back to the elected board. Victor Lenz, vice president of the state School Board, has said there’s a general wish among board members to hold of on transition talks until after the April election, when the next mayor and three of seven St. Louis School Board members will be chosen. The elected board has been meeting for almost a decade without any governing powers or duties. The State Board of Education last voted for the appointed board to continue until at least 2019.

Patrick E. Gauen • 314-340-8154 @pgauen on Twitter pgauen@post-dispatch.com

Kristen Taketa @Kristen_Taketa on Twitter ktaketa@post-dispatch.com

Post-Dispatch reporter Kurt Erickson contributed to this story from Jeferson City. Mike Faulk 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

Convicted man’s lawyers want DNA test of evidence SLAYING • FROM A1

State leaders applaud work, progress at city schools

Weber, the former prosecutor, responded by email to a reporter’s query Tuesday, calling eforts on Prante’s behalf “intellectual malpractice.” “I already convinced 12 people beyond a reasonable doubt and feel no obligation to respond to a bunch of misguided liberal do-gooders who think every investigation is like a TV reality show,” Weber wrote.

DISCREDITED SCIENCE


NEWS

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1 ADVERTISEMENT

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If You’re Suffering from a Leaky Bladder, Do This One Thing Dr. Victor Marchione shows why adult diapers and padded underwear are becoming a thing of the past. Wilkesboro, North Carolina

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Participants REDUCED Nightly Frequency and Leakage 79% (From 7.3 to 1.5 episodes)

Number of urination accidents

Carrie B suffered from bladder problems for about 10 years. What started off as a small leak whenever she sneezed or laughed, ended up with her losing so much control of her bladder, she had to cut down on going out. She tried drugs, but they came with nasty side effects, so she gave up on them and tried adult diapers. She hated the rustle of the diapers and was very conscious of the unmistakable odor of stale urine. Nothing seemed to work for Carrie until she did this one thing.

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Trump’s N. Korea options: Diplomacy, sanctions, force Country won’t succeed on missile aimed at U.S., he vows BY MATTHEW PENNINGTON associated Press

WASHINGTON • Donald

Trump says he is confident North Korea won’t develop a nuclear-tipped missile that could strike the United States. But his options for stopping the reclusive communist country are slim: diplomacy that would reward Pyongyang; sanctions, which haven’t worked; and military action that no one wants. For more than two decades, Republican and Democratic administrations have tried carrots and sticks to steer North Korea away from nuclear weapons. Each has failed. As Trump prepares to take oice Jan. 20, stakes are rising. Pyongyang may already be able to arm short-range and mid-range missiles with atomic warheads, threatening U.S. allies South Korea and Japan, and American forces in each country. On Sunday, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said preparations for launching an intercontinental ballistic missile “reached the final stage.” Trump tweeted the following day: “It won’t happen!” Some experts believe the North is likely to have the capability to strike the U.S. mainland before Trump’s four-year term is up. The president-elect has given conflicting signals about what he plans to do, while stressing that China, North Korea’s traditional ally, must exert greater pressure on its unpredictable neighbor. Some of his options:

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man watches a TV news program in October of last year – showing a missile launch conducted by North Korea – at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea.

was seeking to use uranium for weapons, the arrangement collapsed. Six-nation nuclear negotiations hosted by China have been on ice since North Korea withdrew in 2009. P re s i d e n t B a ra c k Obama’s administration attempted to restart them in 2012, early in Kim’s rule, by offering food aid for a nuclear and missile freeze. Within weeks, the North tried to launch a longrange rocket. The effort was abandoned. Since then, the U.S. has resorted to “strategic patience” — demanding North Korea recommit to denuclearization before holding talks. Pyongyang has refused, demanding the U.S. end military exercises with South Korea and negotiate a peace treaty to formally end the 1950-53 Korean War. American officials fear the North only would want talks to ease its isolation.

DIPLOMACY In June, Trump called for dialogue with North Korea and suggested a talk with Kim over a hamburger. If only talking with the secretive, hereditary rulers in Pyongyang were so simple. No sitting U.S. president has ever done so. Diplomacy with the North is a delicate dance and agreements have proved temporary. Three U.S. administrations, going back to President Bill Clinton, have persuaded the North to disarm in exchange for aid. Each efort eventually failed, and there is deep skepticism in Congress about trying again. A 1994 deal would have given North Korea nuclear power reactors and normalized ties with Washington. North Korea’s plutonium production paused for several years. But after it emerged the North also

SANCTIONS International sanctions have tightened since North Korea conducted its first of five nuclear tests in 2006. But the country has adeptly circumvented restrictions on sensitive technology and money flows and used its capabilities to develop weapons. Additional U.S. sanctions, beefed up last year, punish foreign companies and banks dealing with North Korea. They, too, haven’t been effective because the North’s international isolation makes it less susceptible to such pressure than a major economy such as Iran, which curbed its nuclear program in 2015 after being battered by oil, trade and financial sanctions. China’s role is critical. It dominates trade with the North and has resisted sanctions that could de-

stabilize Pyongyang, fearing the possibility of a U.S.-allied, unified Korea emerging. When the U.N. Security Council punished Pyongyang for another nuclear test in September, the primary goal was closing a loophole that enabled China to import North Korean coal at record levels. The last several U.S. administrations entered office determined to break Beijing’s partnership with Pyongyang. None succeeded.

MILITARY Using military force against North Korea is extremely risky. Even before it developed nuclear weapons, the North maintained the ability to strike Seoul, South Korea’s capital, with a potentially devastating artillery barrage. Although doing so would invite a blistering U.S. response, it’s hardly a scenario any American commander-inchief wants. Clinton considered a strike on the North’s nuclear facilities after it announced it would reprocess fuel from a nuclear reactor, providing it plutonium for bombs. Diplomacy appeared to win out that time with the 1994 agreement. A military strike would be harder to pull off now. North Korea has expanded its nuclear and missile programs significantly, meaning more targets would have to be hit. Regional support would be questionable. In a recent paper, former U.S. negotiator Joel Wit said the escalation risk meant neither South Korea nor Japan would likely support a military strike. It could draw China into the conflict. China joined North Korea against U.S.-led forces 60 years ago.

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NATIONAL DIGEST 4 pesticide fatalities investigated in Texas A criminal investigation is underway into an accidental poisoning involving a professional-grade pesticide that left four children dead and an Amarillo, Texas, woman in critical condition, police said Tuesday. Authorities are looking into why the family had the pesticide pellets, called Weevil-cide, which is only supposed to be sold to people with professional licenses or certiication. The father told irst responders through a Spanish language interpreter that he had spread the pellets under the family’s mobile home after obtaining the product from a friend, Amarillo Fire Capt. Larry Davis said. Davis said the product is not available for sale to the public. Judge rules for immigrants in tuition suit • A judge says the Georgia university system must allow immigrants to pay in-state tuition if they’ve been granted temporary permission by the federal government to stay in the U.S. Georgia’s state colleges and universities require veriication of “lawful presence” in the U.S. for in-state tuition. A lawyer for 10 young immigrants

who meet all the other requirements and who have been granted deferred action status argued in a petition iled in April that the federal Department of Homeland Security has said people who have qualiied for the program are “lawfully present.” Teen may be charged in racist video case • A Pennsylvania prosecutor is pursuing ethnic intimidation and harassment charges against a 14-year-old Saucon Valley white student accused of making a racist video of a black student eating chicken. Prosecutor John Morganelli told a news conference Tuesday in Easton he will bring the charges in juvenile court. The student recorded a high school student eating chicken wings and, in narrating the piece, used a slur and made references to “being broke and on welfare.” The video was shared on social media. Morganelli calls it “reprehensible.” The black 16-year-old student was accused of assaulting the white student in retaliation. His attorney told The Morning Call he recently accepted a form of probation in juvenile court. Dog euthanized after attacking family • Oicials say a dog that attacked a

Florida family who tried to put a sweater on it has been euthanized. Hillsborough County spokeswoman Kara Walker told the Tampa Bay Times Tuesday that the pit bull mix named Scarface was put down because it posed a high risk to the public and because it sufered severe stab wounds during the attack. Tampa police say the dog bit a 52-year-old woman who was trying to dress it Friday, and that her husband was attacked while trying to pull it of her. Police say the couple’s 22-year-old son was attacked while trying to stop the dog by stabbing it in the neck and head. One of last remaining Shakers dies • Sister Frances Carr, one of the last remaining members of a nearly extinct religious society called the Shakers, has died. She was 89. Carr died Monday at her home in the Shaker community at Sabbathday Lake, Maine, after a brief battle with cancer, said the group, which is down to two members. Shakers’ numbers declined because members are celibate and the group stopped taking orphans like Carr, who arrived as a 10-year-old. From news services


M 1 WEdnEsday • 01.04.2017 • a10

Stores go ‘smart’ in latest lure To compete with internet, retailers try technological advances By annE d’InnOCEnZIO Associated Press

LAS VEGAS • Tomorrow’s retail stores want to take a page from their online rivals by embracing advanced technology — everything from helpful robots to interactive mirrors to shelves embedded with sensors. The goal: Use these real-world store features to lure shoppers back from the internet, and maybe even nudge them to spend more in the process. Amazon’s new experimental grocery store in Seattle, opening in early 2017, will let shoppers buy goods without needing to stop at a checkout line. Sensors track items as shoppers put them into baskets or return them to the shelf. The shopper’s Amazon account gets automatically charged. “Amazon, for good or bad, has been setting the path,” said Robert Hetu, research director at Gartner Research. “Each retailer is going to have to respond in some way. But it’s not one-size-fitsall.” Kroger, Neiman Marcus and Lowe’s are among the companies already experimenting with futuristic retail stores. Robots, for instance, could help guide shoppers to the right aisle, while augmented reality apps could help you see how a particular shade of paint will look in the living room — or how you might look in a pair of jeans. Many of these technologies are being showcased at the CES gadget show this week in Las Vegas. Here are five technologies coming to a store near you.

sMaRT sHELVEs Web retailers have plenty of data on their customers. Some of these online technologies can even track shoppers from site to site to lure them back with what’s known as retargeting ads — promos targeted to what that shopper has looked at before, but didn’t actually buy. Smart shelves with sensors promise the same kind of in-depth consumer behavior analytics at retail stores. At a Kroger store in Cold Spring, Ohio, shelves currently show digitized price tags and information about the products. The next step is to tie that to individual shoppers. For example, for a shopper who prefers gluten-free products, the price tags could light up in the aisle where all

Golden arches losing luster as Starbucks’ value keeps climbing BLOOMBERG

SOFTBANK ROBOTICS AMERICA VIA AP

SoftBank Robotics’ humanoid robot called Pepper, waving at right, could greet and gear messages to shoppers. It’s one technological advance that retailers are exploring.

the gluten-free options are. The company says this will all be done with the customer’s permission.

ROBOTs Amazon and other retailers have long used robots in warehouses to help package and ship orders. But what about interacting with shoppers? Home improvement retailer Lowe’s is testing robots in one of its San Jose, Calif., stores, and plans to roll them out to 10 more stores in the state this year. Besides scanning shelves for inventory, the robots can guide customers to specific products in both English and Spanish.

embracing virtual reality and augmented reality to help shoppers figure out ways to decorate homes or apartments. With such technologies, shoppers wear a headset to picture how something might look in 3-D, in some cases overlaid on top of their real kitchen or living room. Home Depot’s augmented reality app lets customers upload a picture of the room on their phone and thumb through thousands of paint and stain colors until they arrive at one that’s right.

sELF-CHECKOUT

High-end clothing stores are testing interactive mirrors in dressing areas, a key place where shoppers decide whether to buy or not. Neiman Marcus has installed these outside fitting rooms at 20 stores to ofer shoppers a 360-degree view of what an outfit looks like. Shoppers can make sideby-side comparisons without having to try them all on. They can also share video with friends for feedback.

Stores have been pushing self-service kiosks for years to lower labor costs and speed up checkout lines. Shortly after Amazon announced its checkout-less store in Seattle, Panasonic Corp. unveiled an unstafed bagging system at a Lawson convenience store in Japan. Shoppers place a “smart” basket with their items on a machine at checkout. The system calculates the bill and automatically bags the items. Shoppers now have to scan items they put into the basket, though wireless tags coming in February will eliminate that step. Shoppers have to manually pay using cash or card.

VIRTUaL, aUGMEnTEd REaLITy

AP Business Writer Yuri Kageyama in Tokyo contributed to this report.

InTERaCTIVE MIRRORs

Home improvement retailers have been

Starbucks is poised to overtake McDonald’s as the world’s most valuable restaurant chain, and the cofee giant could ultimately have a staggering 50,000 locations. That’s the prediction of Nomura analyst Mark Kalinowski, who named Starbucks his top restaurant stock for 2017 in a report on Tuesday. He estimates that the company will increase its worldwide restaurant count by 8.4 percent this year and boost same-store sales by more than 5 percent. There’s more room for growth in the beverage industry — and less competition — giving Starbucks an edge over McDonald’s and other more food-focused rivals, Kalinowski said. The coffee chain’s new upscale Reserve brand also could eventually generate $3 billion in sales, helped by pricier drinks. “It is only a matter of time before Starbucks overtakes McDonald’s as the largest market cap restaurant stock, although likely not in 2017,” said Kalinowski, an influential restaurant analyst who previously worked at Janney Montgomery Scott and was known for his McDonald’s franchisee surveys. Starbucks’ stock is coming off a weak 2016. It fell 7.5 percent last year, dragged down by concerns about slowing growth. Chief Executive Officer Howard Schultz also announced plans to step down, giving jitters to investors. The overall industry isn’t expected to have a bright 2017, according to a prediction by NPD Group. U.S. restaurants will see “little to no traic growth” this year, the research company said in a separate report Tuesday. Though Starbucks has set a goal of having 37,000 cafes open by 2021, up from about 25,000 last year, Kalinowski sees potential for a much larger operation. “Well beyond 2021, we would not be surprised to see Starbucks exceed the 50,000-store level,” he said. That would vault the company past the current total of Subway Restaurants, which currently has the most locations of any chain. Shares of Starbucks closed unchanged Tuesday at $58.10. McDonald’s fell $2.10, or 1.7 percent, to close at $119.62.

U.S. ines TransUnion, Equifax for deceit over credit scores

TOP PLAYERS

Firms were accused of misrepresenting cost, value of credit scores

OF THE DECADE: #9 DAVID ECKSTEIN

REUTERs

Two leading credit reporting agencies were ordered Tuesday to pay more than $23.2 million in fines and restitution for deceiving consumers about the usefulness and cost of credit scores they bought. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said the payments also resolve charges that TransUnion and Equifax Inc. lured consumers into enrolling in credit services advertised as free or costing only $1, but that could cost more than $200 a year. TransUnion will reimburse $13.93 million to consumers and pay a $3 million civil fine, while Equifax will reimburse $3.8 million and pay a $2.5 million civil fine, the CFPB said. Both companies will also modify their marketing practices, including by obtaining consent to enroll in credit-related services where fees kick in after free trials, and making it easier for consumers to cancel products they do not want. The CFPB said the wrongful conduct had occurred at TransUnion since July 2011 and at Equifax between July 2011 and March 2014, and violated the Dodd-Frank

financial reform law. Many lenders rely on credit scores from TransUnion, Equifax and rival Experian when lending money. But the CFPB said TransUnion and Equifax falsely represented that the credit scores they sold to consumers were the same scores that lenders used. “Credit scores are central to a consumer’s financial life and people deserve honest and accurate information about them,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said in a statement. Neither Chicago-based TransUnion nor Atlanta-based Equifax admitted or denied wrongdoing. TransUnion spokesman David Blumberg and Equifax spokeswoman Ines Gutzmer said their respective companies believe they have complied with applicable laws, and are committed to better educating consumers about their credit. Experian was not charged. A spokesman for the CFPB had no immediate additional comment. TransUnion, Equifax and Experian are among the 10 companies about which the CFPB receives the most consumer complaints. Several large banks and mortgage lenders are also on that list. In 2015, the credit reporting agencies agreed to improve how they fix mistakes and address disputes, under a separate settlement with 31 state attorneys general.

The MVP of the 2006 World Series and the 5-foot-6 mighty mite was equal to the task defensively even though there were concerns his arm might not be strong enough. Eckstein makes the All-Star team and wins the World Series MVP award in Busch’s irst season.

PAGE 98

9. DAVID ECKSTEIN

David Eckstein’s pregame ritual includes vigorous jumps outside the dugout.

T

he Most Valuable Player of the 2006 World Series, this 5-foot-6 mighty mite was equal to the task defensively even though there were concerns his arm might not be strong enough. At bat, he was the Cardinals’ leadoff man for three seasons, from 2005-07, hitting .297 in that time but .320 for his two seasons in Busch III and .302 for his one year at the older Busch. That included a memorable, walkoff grand slam to beat the Atlanta Braves. Eckstein had a .357 on-base percentage as a Cardinal and batted .364 in the 2006 World Series.

98

99

CELEBRATE THE TOP 25 PLAYERS from the past 10 years at Busch Stadium now by ordering the new book Busch Stadium: A Decade of Cardinals Excellence. • SEASON RECAPS • 10 BIGGEST MOMENTS • TOP 25 PLAYERS OF THE DECADE • HUNDREDS OF PHOTOS

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY! ____________ BUSCH STADIUM: A DECADE OF CARDINALS EXCELLENCE book @ $34.95 each (ships March, 2016) ____________ + 8.679% Sales Tax ____________ + Shipping $10.95 per copy ____________ Total NAME ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

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MARKET WATCH

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS U.S. stocks broke a three-day losing streak Tuesday and ushered in the New Year with broad gains. Energy companies, banks and technology companies made some of the largest gains and lower-risk investments like utility companies lagged the rest of the market.

Southwestern Energy

Ford

FCAU

Close: $9.55 0.43 or 4.7% The automaker is partnering with Google to develop a connected car system.

15

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10 5

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20,000

Dow Jones industrials

19,840

Close: 19,881.76 Change: 119.16 (0.6%)

D

D $9.64

130 120

$11.02

$14.22

S&P 500

2,240

Close: 2,257.83 Change: 19.00 (0.8%)

CHICAGO BOT

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

CLOSE

CHG

Mar 17 Jan 17 Mar 17

355.75 986.75 406.50

+3.75 -9.75 -1.50

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

2,250

Feeder cattle

19,000

2,200

Live cattle

2,150

Milk

18,000

2,100

130.20 114.87 63.50 17.39 248.10

-.25 -1.18 -2.65

18,500

Jan 17 Feb 17 Feb 17 Dec 16 Jan 17

Copper ICE

A

S

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2,050

D

J

A

S

O

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DATE

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CHG

71.78 137.40 29.00

+1.13 +.35 -.25

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Feb 17 Feb 17 Feb 17 Feb 17

52.33 1.6218 167.67 3.327

-1.39 -.0491 -5.15 -.397

Cotton

NYSE

NASD

3,633 2,587 2283 735 149 7

1,819 1,483 1822 1024 130 26

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 19938.53 9170.17 660.03 11176.91 5452.57 2263.88 1680.29 23692.34 1375.08

LOW 19775.93 8980.34 653.04 11094.29 5397.99 2245.26 1659.04 23479.42 1355.39

CLOSE 19881.76 9023.86 657.32 11154.35 5429.08 2257.83 1669.90 23614.73 1365.49

CHG. +119.16 -20.04 -2.29 +97.46 +45.96 +19.00 +9.32 +188.87 +8.36

%CHG. WK +0.60% t -0.22% t -0.35% t +0.88% s +0.85% t +0.85% t +0.56% t +0.81% t +0.62% t

YTD +0.60% -0.22% -0.35% +0.88% +0.85% +0.85% +0.56% +0.81% +0.62%

Sugar

MO QTR s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod Isle of Capri LMI Aerospace Lee Ent

T 33.43 43.89 43.02 +.49 +1.2 AEGN 16.00 26.14 24.04 +.34 +1.4 DOX 50.06 61.33 58.19 -.06 -0.1 AEE 41.50 54.08 52.38 -.08 -0.2 ARII 35.43 51.10 45.80 +.51 +1.1 BUD 98.28 136.08 104.54 -.90 -0.9 ARCH 59.05 86.47 74.99 -3.06 -3.9 BAC 10.99 23.39 22.53 +.43 +1.9 BDC 36.51 81.33 76.73 +1.96 +2.6 BA 102.10 160.07 156.97 +1.29 +0.8 BBW 10.01 15.85 14.35 +.60 +4.4 CAL 21.27 36.61 32.61 -.21 -0.6 CASS 45.05 74.83 73.12 -.45 -0.6 CNC 47.36 75.57 58.31 +1.80 +3.2 CHTR 214.06 294.87 285.77 -2.15 -0.7 C 34.52 61.30 60.59 +1.16 +2.0 CBSH 35.66 59.22 57.65 -.16 -0.3 EPC 67.94 88.00 75.00 +2.01 +2.8 EMR 41.25 58.28 56.95 +1.20 +2.2 ENR 28.86 53.41 46.01 +1.40 +3.1 EFSC 25.01 43.65 42.65 -.35 -0.8 ESE 31.50 58.75 57.35 +.70 +1.2 ESRX 64.46 87.87 69.40 +.61 +0.9 FELP 1.07 8.33 6.75 +.28 +4.3 FF 9.77 16.58 13.95 +.05 +0.4 GM 26.69 37.74 35.15 +.31 +0.9 HD 109.62 139.00 134.31 +.23 +0.2 HBP 3.01 7.00 6.48 -.13 -2.0 ISLE 10.62 24.79 24.83 +.14 +0.6 LMIA 7.01 10.21 8.80 +.18 +2.1 LEE 1.15 3.92 2.85 -.05 -1.7

+1.2 +28.0 17 +1.4 +20.4 29 -0.1 +6.8 16 -0.2 +23.1 20 +1.1 +0.3 10 -0.9 -13.2 -3.9+8318.7 +1.9 +31.1 18 +2.6 +54.7 14 +0.8 +9.3 21 +4.4 +11.3 21 -0.6 +21.8 17 -0.6 +41.8 35 +3.2 -14.8 14 -0.7 +41.3 +2.0 +14.4 17 -0.3 +42.9 22 +2.8 -7.6 28 +2.2 +18.8 22 +3.1 +30.9 21 -0.8 +49.5 20 +1.2 +54.4 28 +0.9 -21.7 14 +4.3+122.3 dd +0.4 +20.0 9 +0.9 +5.9 6 +0.2 +2.6 22 -2.0 +88.3 5 +0.6 +78.8 15 +2.1 -15.2 dd -1.7 +80.1 8

1.96f ... 0.78 1.70 1.60 3.19e ... 0.30f 0.20 5.68f ... 0.28 0.92f ... ... 0.64 0.90b ... 1.92f 1.10f 0.44 0.32 ... 0.68m 0.24a 1.52 2.76 ... ... ... ...

TKR

52-WK LO HI

83.65 70.95

Mallinckrodt plc

MNK

48.61

85.83 51.73 +1.91 +3.8

MasterCard

MA

78.52 108.93 105.39 +2.14 +2.1

McDonald’s

MCD

110.33 131.96 119.62 -2.10 -1.7

Monsanto Co

MON

83.73 114.26 105.31 +.10 +0.1

+0.1 +8.6 23

2.16

Olin

OLN

12.29

26.93 25.98 +.37 +1.4

+1.4 +50.1 37

0.80

Panera Bread

PNRA 178.99 224.15 203.55 -1.54 -0.8

-0.8 +5.1 34

...

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

Perficient

PRFT

Post Holdings

POST RGA

-0.2

-5.8 19

+3.8 -34.3

-1.7 +4.9 23 3.76f

-2.7

-7.0 dd

0.55

14.15

22.66 17.70 +.21 +1.2

+1.2

-0.4 22

...

50.93

89.00 81.95 +1.56 +1.9

+1.9 +29.6 74

...

76.96 129.28 124.50 -1.33 -1.1 3.84

55.37

4.43

-.21 -4.5

71.21 64.35

-.20 -0.3

Stifel Financial

SF

25.00

52.88 49.93

-.02

Supervalu Inc.

SVU

3.94

Target Corp.

TGT

65.50

UPS B

UPS

87.30 120.44 115.08 +.44 +0.4

US Bancorp

USB

37.07

52.68 51.46 +.09 +0.2

+0.2 +21.9 16 1.12f

US Steel

X

6.15

39.14 34.71 +1.70 +5.1

+5.1+308.0 dd

6.17

4.65

-.02 -0.4

84.14 72.75 +.52 +0.7

-0.3 +9.1 19 2.10f ... +15.4 20 -0.4 -31.0

7

...

Tesla stores closed, at least temporarily • Embroiled in a legal dispute over its direct-toconsumer business model, Tesla closed all three of its Missouri stores over the holiday weekend after its licenses to sell cars in the state expired. Tesla’s irst Missouri location, in University City, opened in 2013, followed by two stores in the Kansas City area. All three stores, which employ between 10 and 25 people each, closed Sunday, a Tesla spokesperson said. The closures may be temporary, however. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based electric automaker has requested that the Missouri Court of Appeals allow it to continue to sell cars in Missouri while it appeals a lower court’s ruling. The Court of Appeals may rule on granting Tesla’s request for a stay on Wednesday, the company said. The Missouri Auto Dealers Association sued the Missouri Department of Revenue in 2015, alleging Tesla’s direct-toconsumer model violates state law. A Cole County judge sided with the trade association in August, ruling that Tesla is not a franchisee and its motor vehicle dealer licenses should not be renewed by the state.

+0.4 +21.3 20

3.12

0.20

VZ

43.79

56.95 54.58 +1.20 +2.2

WMT

60.20

75.19 68.66

Walgreen Boots

WBA

71.50

88.00 82.96 +.20 +0.2

+0.2

-2.5 19

1.50

Wells Fargo

WFC

43.55

58.02 56.00 +.89 +1.6

+1.6 +3.2 14

1.52

World Point Term.

WPT

11.80

17.65 16.61 +.06 +0.4

+0.4 +29.7 16

1.20

Delek acquires rest of Alon USA • Reiner Delek U.S. Holdings Inc. said Tuesday it has agreed to buy the shares of Alon USA Energy Inc. that it does not already own for $464 million. The combined company, with an enterprise value of about $2.8 billion, will focus on the Permian Basin in Texas with its reining system having access to about 207,000 barrels per day or 69 percent of Permian crude. Delek is ofering 0.504 of its shares for each outstanding share of Alon USA, valuing the company at roughly $868 million. The deal is expected to close in the irst half of 2017. From staf and wire reports

3.75 3.50 3.50

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.52 .64 .88 1.22 1.94 2.45 3.05

+0.02 +0.03 +0.07 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 -0.02

.14 .48 .61 1.05 1.76 2.27 3.02

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

.63 .38 .38

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.69 -0.04

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.61

...

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.65

... 2.62

Barclays US High Yield 6.10

... 8.76

Moodys AAA Corp Idx

4.00 -0.01 4.03

Barclays US Corp

3.40

10-Yr. TIPS

... 3.70

.46 -0.01

.72

+0.7 +1.3 13 2.40f

Verizon

-.46 -0.7

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

LAST

...

WalMart

Seat belt failures prompt probe • U.S. safety regulators are investigating complaints that the front passenger seat belts can fail in about 313,000 Hyundai midsize cars. The investigation posted Tuesday by the National Highway Traic Safety Administration covers the Hyundai Sonata from the 2013 model year. The agency says it has two complaints that the seat belts detached. One injury was reported due to the problem. The investigation will determine whether a recall is needed.

+10.40 +.42 +37.70

TREASURIES

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

...

57.10

...

The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 2.45 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-1.1 +46.6 13 1.64f -4.5 +22.8

SR

Factory activity hits 2016 high in December • U.S. manufacturing activity expanded for the fourth straight month in December, as new orders and production jumped in a positive sign for economic growth. The Institute for Supply Management says its manufacturing index came in at 54.7 last month, up from 53.2 in November and the highest reading of 2016. Anything over 50 signals growth. U.S. factories are steadily rebounding from a rough patch hit in late 2015 and early 2016. The decline in energy prices caused cutbacks in orders for equipment and pipelines, while a stronger dollar and slower economic growth abroad hurt exports. The ISM manufacturing index has topped 50 for nine of the last 10 months.

Silver

...

+2.1 +5.2 31 0.88f

+2.2 +19.0 15 2.31f -0.7 +15.3 15 2.00f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

Construction spending up in November • U.S. builders boosted spending on construction projects for a second straight month in November, pushing activity to the highest level in more than a decade. Construction spending rose 0.9 percent in November after a 0.6 percent increase in October, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. The increase relected solid gains in home construction, nonresidential building and government construction activity. The gains in all three categories pushed total construction to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1.18 trillion, the highest point since April 2006 when a housing boom fueled building. Economists believe construction will continue to show gains in 2017, relecting a strong job market with unemployment at the lowest point in nine years.

CHG

CLOSE

1160.40 16.36 939.30

Gold

1.40

-.15 -2.7

6.20

5.40

-.17 -0.2

Spire Inc

BUSINESS DIGEST

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

62.62

RELV

.0631 .7185 .3062 1.2286 .7443 .1439 1.0460 .0147 .2595 .008503 .048207 .0163 .0730 .000835 .9769

Interestrates Interestrates

LOW

ReinsGrp

PREV

.0627 .7220 .3065 1.2236 .7446 .1438 1.0410 .0146 .2587 .008498 .047381 .0164 .0723 .000828 .9735

Platinum

Lowes

Reliv

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

-1.65

Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 17

D

Coffee

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

O

PE: 45.1 Yield: ...

ExchangeRates

DATE

19,500

Hogs

D $133.50

Vol.: 20.6m (0.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $273.55 b

Futures

2,280

O N 52-week range

$89.37

Vol.: 40.5m (1.2x avg.) PE: 7.0 Mkt. Cap: $49.14 b Yield: 4.8%

2,300

J

110

D

20,000

17,500

$140

12 O N 52-week range

FB

Close: $116.86 1.81 or 1.6% Technology stocks did better than the rest of the market on Tuesday.

13 11

Vol.: 8.8m (0.9x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $14.59 b Yield: 0.1%

PE: ... Yield: ...

2,200

10 DAYS

O N 52-week range

$5.45

$15.59

Vol.: 23.4m (1.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.94 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

6

Facebook

F

Close: $12.59 0.46 or 3.8% The car maker said it cancelled plans for a $1.6 billion factory in Mexico and will instead invest in a U.S. factory. $14

$10

$20

$5.30

19,680

Fiat Chrysler

SWN

Close: $9.97 -0.85 or -7.9% Natural gas companies fell as futures for that fuel plunged.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2257.83 11584.24 7177.89 22150.40 4899.33 46123.36 19114.37 61813.83 15403.03 8316.18

CHG

CHG

YTD

+19.00 -14.09 +35.06 +149.84 +16.95 +428.26 -30.77 +2225.13 +115.44 +96.31

+0.85% -0.12% +0.49% +0.68% +0.35% +0.94% -0.16% +3.73% +0.76% +1.17%

+0.85% +0.90% +0.49% +0.68% +0.76% +1.05% ...% +2.63% +0.76% +1.17%

Icahn to give up Trump Taj Mahal casino license, with conditions BY WAYNE PARRY associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. • Billionaire investor Carl Icahn plans to surrender the casino license for his shuttered Trump Taj Mahal casino and wants to make sure that anyone who buys it can’t use it as a casino. New Jersey gambling regulators revealed Tuesday that the casino petitioned the state Division of Gaming Enforcement on Dec. 22 for permission to surrender the license. The company also filed a deed restriction last month in state Superior Court prohibiting any future purchaser from using the premises as a casino — unless he or she pays an unspecified fee. The moves seem to undercut a suspicion among former Taj Mahal workers that Icahn plans to reopen the casino in the spring, with or without a union

contract. It closed Oct. 10 after a 3½-month strike by Local 54 of the Unite-HERE casino workers union, which wanted its health insurance and pension benefits that were terminated in bankruptcy court restored. In its request for permission to surrender its casino and liquor licenses, Icahn’s Trump Taj Mahal Associates says it complied with state requirements on securing unopened liquor, gambling equipment and business records; made provisions to pay off unclaimed casino winnings; and reduced its security staffing to “warehouse mode.” The future of the Taj Mahal, which President-elect Donald Trump opened in 1990 but lost control of in a casino bankruptcy, has been a hotly debated topic in Atlantic City, particularly as the seven surviving casinos are slowly seeing their businesses stabilize with less local competi-

tion. Since 2014, five casinos have shut down — The Atlantic Club, the Showboat (which reopened last year as a non-casino hotel), Revel (which plans to reopen this spring under the name Ten), Trump Plaza and the Taj Mahal. The New Jersey legislature last month passed a bill intended to punish Icahn for closing the Taj Mahal. It would strip the casino license for five years from any owner who shut down an Atlantic City casino after January 2016, meaning it would only apply to Icahn at this point. Republican Gov. Chris Christie has not indicated whether he will sign or veto the measure. Deed restrictions applied to each of those casinos, though Showboat purchaser Bart Blatstein was able to work out a deal with Icahn to resolve his company’s deed restriction on the Showboat’s use.

U.S. malls saw more holiday traic in 2016 Stores beneited, but so did cinemas and restaurants CHICAGO TRIBUNE

An overwhelming majority of Americans made at least one trip to the mall this holiday season, but that doesn’t mean they were all shopping. Of the 70 percent of U.S. adults who went to a mall or shopping center during the holidays, slightly more than a quarter of them skipped the stores, according to a survey by the International Council of Shopping Centers. Nearly half of people who went to a mall said they went to a restaurant and 26 percent said they went to a movie, the council said in a news release Tuesday. Online shopping can be more

CRISTINA M. FLETES • P-d

Jane Shields, of St. Louis, inquires about the price of an item at Geranium in West County Center on Dec. 26.

convenient than trekking to the mall, and traditional department-store anchors aren’t the draw they once were. Many malls have been adding entertainment options to keep people coming back, from upscale bowling alleys and movie theaters to high-tech takes on the traditional Christmas photo with Santa, such as a virtual North Pole sleigh ride.

Millennials spent the largest share of their total shoppingcenter holiday spending on experiences, about 25 percent, compared with about 20 percent for consumers overall, the council said. But consumers also spent more on gifts. Shoppers this year spent an average of $711 on gifts and other holiday items such as decorations, up about 16 percent over last year, according to the survey. It was also about 4 percent more than they said they planned to spend in a survey conducted earlier this season. “Consumer confidence continued to improve into December, and we saw this optimism reflected in the holiday spending numbers,” Tom McGee, the council’s president and CEO, said in the news release. “The strong holiday shopping season suggests a positive environment for retail sales overall.”


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

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NATION

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

Quick decisions meant life or death in storms At least 6 die as heavy rains, apparent tornadoes cause havoc throughout the South BY JAY REEVES associated Press

As an apparent tornado bore down on them, seven people in a mobile home in southeast Alabama made a life-or-death decision: Three ran into one bathroom for shelter and four ran in the opposite direction to another room seeking safety. The three, including Lawana Henrich, survived without a scratch, according to Coroner Robert Byrd. But a big hardwood tree that slammed into the mobile home killed the four others, including Henrich’s daughter and sister, Byrd said. The tree toppled over during a wave of severe weather that brought heavy rain and strong winds to the Southeast, and it couldn’t have hit in a worse spot when it fell Monday night near Rehobeth, Ala. “It was dead center,” Byrd said. “You think, ‘What’s the chance of four people being so close in one area?’ But they were.” Those four, plus a man who drowned in the Florida Panhandle and a woman in Georgia, died as a line of severe thunderstorms moved across the Southeastern United States from Texas. Teams of surveyors were headed out Tuesday to assess apparent tornado damage at three sites in southeastern Alabama

THE CLARION-LEDGER VIA AP

Crews work to remove downed trees and debris on Highway 49 South in Covington County, Miss., near Collins on Monday. Severe storms have caused damage and killed at least six people throughout the South.

and southwestern Georgia, said Mark Wool, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Tallahassee, Fla. Wool said authorities believe a tornado is responsible for damage that left the four people dead in Alabama, but he said the weather service won’t be able to

say for sure until experts visit the site. Byrd, coroner in Houston County, Ala., said Michelle Lewis, 53, died along with her niece, 27-year-old Amanda Blair. Lewis was Henrich’s sister and Blair was Henrich’s daughter, Byrd said; both victims lived in

the trailer where they died, he said. Byrd said the storm also killed two family friends, Terina Brookshire, 51, of Hartford, Ala., and Carla Lambart, 53, who was originally from Opp, Ala. Byrd said Henrich, her husband and another man survived

without injuries. In Albany, Ga., authorities reported the death of a woman but had no details. Her identity has not been released. Fire Chief Ron Rowe said Tuesday the approximately 1-mile-wide “violent” storm happened about 11 p.m. Monday, 30 minutes or so after a tornado warning was issued for the area. In addition to the woman’s death, Rowe said Tuesday that more than 1,000 homes suffered damage, including four that caught fire. In Florida, the Walton County Sherif’s Oice said the body of William Patrick Corley, 70, was found Monday afternoon following flooding near the Shoal River in Mossy Head. Authorities said Corley’s car was partially submerged and his body was floating face-down nearby. Rains in recent weeks have eased drought conditions across parts of the Southeast, according to reports from the National Drought Mitigation Center in Lincoln, Neb. Despite the rain and storms, large parts of north Alabama and north Georgia remain in “exceptional drought” — the most severe category — according to the center’s most recent report on the drought issued last week. A new report is due out Thursday.

Trump ills vacancies, ields policy questions His pick as U.S. trade representative has been critical of GOP’s embrace of free trade BY STEVE PEOPLES associated Press

NEW YORK • President-elect Donald Trump pressed to

fill senior posts in his administration on Tuesday even as new questions emerged about his priorities at home and abroad. His inauguration less than three weeks away, Trump tapped as U.S. trade representative a former Ronald Reagan aide who has condemned Republicans’ commitment to free trade. The incoming president indicated that Robert Lighthizer, who is expected to take a hard line against China, would represent “the United States as we fight for

good trade deals that put the American worker first.” The new administration’s specific plans for crafting new trade deals, spokesman Sean Spicer said, “will come in time.” While several hundred high-level White House posts remain unfilled, just a handful of Cabinet-level vacancies remain, specifically in the departments of Agriculture and Veterans Afairs, as well as a director of national intelligence. Trump’s private meetings Tuesday included one with Leo MacKay, a senior executive at a military contractor who previously served in the Department of Veterans Afairs under President George W. Bush. “The president-elect is up on the issues,” said MacKay,

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SESSIONS OPPOSED Meanwhile, Trump’s choice for attorney general — Sen. Jef Sessions — has run into strong opposition from law school professors across the U.S. A group of more than 1,100 professors sent a letter to Congress on Tuesday urging the Senate to reject the Alabama Republican’s nomination. The letter, signed by professors from 170 law schools in 48 states, is also scheduled to run as a full-page newspaper ad aimed at members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which will be holding confirmation hearings for Sessions on Jan. 10-11. “We are convinced that Jef Sessions will not fairly enforce our nation’s laws and promote justice and equality in the United States,” states the letter, signed by prominent legal scholars including Laurence H. Tribe of Harvard Law School, Geofrey R. Stone of the University of Chicago Law School, Pamela S. Karlan of Stanford Law School and Erwin Chemerinsky of the University of California, Irvine School of Law. The professors — from every state except North Dakota and Alaska, which has no law school — highlight the rejection of Sessions’s nomination to a federal judgeship more than 30 years ago. The law professors wrote that some of them have concerns about Sessions’ prosecution of three civil rights activists for voter fraud in Alabama in 1985, his support for building a wall along the nation’s southern border and his “repeated opposition to legislative eforts to promote the rights of women and members of the LGBTQ community.” While tending to his Cabinet Tuesday, the presidentelect and his senior advisers also worked to craft a domestic and international agenda while huddled behind closed doors in his Manhattan skyscraper. He signaled Tuesday that he would not bless all of the GOP’s priorities on Capitol Hill, however, openly questioning the timing of the House Republican push to gut an independent ethics board just as the new Congress gathered in Washington. Vice president-elect Mike Pence and Trump’s pick for secretary of state, ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, were planning separate visits with lawmakers on Wednesday. The Washington Post contributed to this report.

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a senior vice president at Lockheed Martin Corp., citing “first-class health care” for veterans as one of his priorities. Omarosa Manigault, a memorable contestant in the first season of “The Apprentice,” is expected to join Trump’s White House staf, according to two people familiar with the decision. Her job is expected to focus on public engagement. Manigault was one of Trump’s most prominent African-American supporters during the campaign and has been working with his transition team. This will be her second tour of duty at the White House — she worked in the oice of Vice President Al Gore during Bill Clinton’s administration.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 01.04.2017 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Facts vs. fairy tales Missouri lawmakers face a grim year of budget reality.

T

taxes on income generated in other states. he first regular session of the 99th Another would be to do as most other Missouri General Assembly constates have done and eliminate the state venes at noon Wednesday. The tax deduction for federal tax payments. Legislature is back. Between now Together those options would earn the and adjournment on May 12, things could state $650 million a year. get pretty grim. It’s doubtful that a Republican governor There’s a big hole in the current state and Legislature would enact tax reforms budget because state revenue this year that would cost corporations and wealthy isn’t growing as fast as lawmakers anticiindividuals more money. The operating pated when they passed the fiscal 2017 mythology in Jefferson City for the past budget last spring. The first thing the new decade has been that tax incentives and governor, Eric Greitens, will have to do tax cuts create growth that leads to more after he’s sworn in next Monday is whack revenue. The state’s revenue problems more spending. suggest that the benefits of trickle-down Things will get worse as Greitens and economics have been lawmakers work on next oversold. year’s budget, which is due This year, with a in May. A half-percent cut Republican in the in the state income tax rate We hate to governor’s office, one will begin phasing in, which bring this of the first things the will peel at least $80 milLegislature wants to do lion off next year’s general up again, is enact a right-to-work revenue budget and at least because law. Another myth is half a billion dollars more by it lies in that if paying union 2022. That means less for dues becomes optional, everything the state does, the face of businesses will flock to but particularly education the GOP the state. Tax cuts, right and social services, which orthodoxy to work and tort reform account for most general — limiting the right of revenue spending. that now jurors to assess damages Nevertheless, lawmakers governs in personal injury cases are lining up to offer more tax Missouri, but — are the three legs of a breaks for special interests, very shaky stool. ranging from country clubs the reason We hate to bring this to homeless shelters to propthat the state up again, because it flies erty developers. Greitens is is in economic in the face of the GOP expected to take aim at Misorthodoxy that now souri’s five dozen tax credit trouble is governs Missouri, but programs. They’ve been not because the reason that the state enacted over the years for a it spends too is in economic trouble variety of good causes, but is not because it spends they cost the state between much, but too much, but because $500 million and $600 milbecause its its taxes are too low. lion a year, depending on taxes are too Wealthier taxpayers how many previously issued who have gobbled up credits are redeemed. low. most of the gains of the Each tax credit program past three decades are has its supporters. Some of skating. them have very powerful In 1980, following the supporters, including major lead of anti-tax crusader Mel Hancock of campaign donors. Banks, which buy and Springfield, voters passed a constitutional sell the credits, make a profit on them, as amendment limiting the amount of revdo law firms that advise clients on their enue the state can collect to 5.6 percent of use. Missourians’ total personal income, the Corporations and wealthy individuals same amount that funded state governlike them because they can buy a dollar’s ment in 1981. The Hancock Amendment worth of tax credits on the open market said anything more than a reasonable 5.6 for 90 to 94 cents and use them to offset a percent would have to be refunded. dollar’s worth of state tax liability. That’s By law, every year the state auditor must a significant tax savings. In some cases, report on the state’s compliance with the what is spent on state tax credits can be Hancock Amendment. In April, Auditor deducted from federal income taxes. Missouri’s last two governors, Democrat Nicole Galloway reported that Missourians now pay about 3.9 percent of their Jay Nixon and Republican Matt Blunt, personal income to the state, 30 percent both appointed commissions to study the less than they did in 1981. If the state cost and benefits. The data were mixed. Most of the programs continued unabated. abided by the Hancock limits, it would have $4 billion more to invest in halting its If Greitens wants to limit tax credits, race to the bottom. especially big ones like historic preservaInstead, the Legislature and the new tion and low income housing credits, he’ll governor believe in economic fairy tales. have a big fight on his hands. We repeat: It could be a grim year. He has other options. One would be to enact a combined reporting law, requiring multistate corporations to pay Missouri

Things will get worse as Greitens and lawmakers work on next year’s budget, which is due in May. A halfpercent cut in the state income tax rate will begin phasing in, which will peel at least $80 million of next year’s general revenue budget and at least half a billion dollars more by 2022.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Politicians in Washington bow down to Israelis’ bidding With all the criticism about the United Nations sanctioning Israel, with the United States abstaining, it is apparent that the tail continues to wag the dog when it comes to the Israeli/U.S. relationship. Doesn’t anyone wonder why most of the rest of the world voted to condemn Israel for building more settlements and only the U.S. for years has prevented sanctions from occurring? There is no doubt that the American Israel Public Afairs Committee and the Zionists in Israel control the political climate in Washington, D.C. It doesn’t matter which party, as long as money is given by AIPAC and other Israeli organizations to support the politicians, these people will stand ready with hands out and bow down to the Israelis’ bidding. It now appears that Donald Trump will be joining this same group of politicians. I thought Trump was going to put America first. That is hard to do when you have a country like Israel crying in its soup because it, at least temporarily, has stopped controlling the dog. When will America wake up and realize that Israel is a terrorist state? Richard E. Browning • Paciic

Editorial excuses an attack on democracy in Israel First of all, the editorial “Next steps for Israel” (Dec. 28) lacks historical perspective. Israel gained control of the West Bank after Jordan attacked Israel in 1967. Unlike Russian occupation of Crimea or Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, Israel gained the territory in a defensive war. Prior United Nations resolutions did not stipulate return of all the territory since the 1949 border was a cease-fire line, not a negotiated boundary. Second, the editorial does not mention any Palestinian actions that have led to the current stalemate. The lack of peace is a direct result of the constant stream of Jew hatred and violence from the Palestinian territories, including shootings, stabbings, arson, car attacks and missiles. In the Palestinian press, schools, mosques and social media, Palestinians are urged to kill Jews, who are compared to pigs, dogs and vermin. The Palestinians refuse to accept a Jewish state no matter what its size. Finally, the editorial concludes that friends stage interventions to steer loved ones away from a reckless course. Obviously this refers to the Obama administration allowing a resolution that makes a peace settlement more diicult. If the world is going to set borders, the Palestinians do not need to negotiate. There are no consequences of Palestinian terrorism and hatred. It gives ammunition to those calling to boycott, sanction and divest from Israel, attacking Israel economically. Palestinians may demand that Israeli soldiers and politicians face prosecution. The world faces many problems, among them a bloody Syrian war and Iranian nuclear weapons. Instead of working on these problems, the U.N. has chosen to attack the only democracy in the Middle East. It is shameful that the Obama administration allowed or abetted this action and shameful that the PostDispatch excuses it. Laura Goldmeier • Creve Coeur

selfish expression of the writer’s and perpetrator’s personal feeling with no regard to the deep dark reality of the terror and torture brought into this young woman’s life by this man. Who speaks for her? Hall implies that somehow Jefrey Ferguson’s remorse erases the pain, sufering and death he brought into a young and innocent life that night. That killer should have remorse unless he is a monster. He should also be ready to accept the consequence of a choice he made for his guilty self and an innocent other. My thoughts go out to those who have the courage to proceed with the execution of the death sentence. I am sorry that has become their job because of people like Ferguson. The right thing for the rest of us to do is to make a clear statement to the world that there are lines we do not cross in respect for the life God has given each of us. That takes courage, too. I do not willingly choose to be someone who has to advocate for the death of another. That is something criminals like this man have forced on the rest of us. But I do willingly choose to stand strong for those who have brutally sufered at the hands of very sinful men and women. God gives our leaders the responsibility to preserve a moral balance in this wobbly world. Too bad so many our our elected oicials, judges and citizens do not have the moral strength and understanding to make that happen. I only know I am not going to choose to be like them. Nancy Matlock • St. Louis County

Democrats’ plans come up short again and again It looks like the Democrats are at Plan E now to keep the presidency. Plan A: Win. Hillary Clinton lost the Electoral College by a significant margin. Plan B: Recount in swing states. Oops, the recount found more votes for Donald Trump in Wisconsin and found more votes than voters in some Detroit precincts. Tell me again that there is no voter fraud. Plan C: Pressure electors to change the vote they pledged to cast for Trump. Oops, more Clinton electors changed their votes than did Trump electors. Plan D: Attack Trump’s business empire, hoping he will not take oice. Good luck with that. Plan E: Blame Russia. Clinton lost. Get over it. Gary Duf • Swansea

Remembers a kind act from Debbie Reynolds Quite a few years ago, I attended the Muny Theater performance of “Irene” starring Debbie Reynolds. It rained and the performance stopped. While the stage was being mopped, Reynolds came onstage, sat on a stool and gave an impromptu performance of songs and chatter. It was unexpected, which she didn’t have to do, but she didn’t want the audience to sit and wait idly. She was so gracious and entertained all of us. I have always remembered her kind act. Libby Sorkin Routman • St. Louis County

Takes courage to proceed with death sentence

AP

I am shocked by Jim Hall’s commentary “Gov. Nixon should commute all death sentences” (Dec. 28). He was very explicit about giving his Christian viewpoint as reasoning for his argument. I now feel compelled to offer mine as a Christian as well. Somehow this whole issue has become a

Debbie Reynolds

Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

01.04.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

A GOOD PARK INVESTMENT • The bill pending in the Board of Aldermen for the purchase of the Christian Brothers’ College grounds for a city park is to come up today. Aside from the fact that the property is ofered to the city at a fair price, the proposition should be approved because the land is desirable in every way for park purposes. Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Have fake news purveyors no shame? No, child sexual exploitation is not legal in California. TOD ROBBERSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Twitter followers of a certain local critic of this newspaper might have seen a number of apoplectic posts last week linking to a story about a California law that allows victims of child sex trafficking to receive help rather than prosecution. Only that’s not how the headline in the Twitter post portrayed this new law. The less-than-credible Washington Examiner headline screamed,“California Democrats legalize child prostitution.” The even bigger headline on Twitter, posted by our local conservative critic, screamed,“Dear SEN @ claircmc R U going 2 contact CAL Senators & do anything about this?” Another Twitter post, with the same link, said,“WOW — sadly, this is NOT FAKE NEWS — Calif to legalize child prostitution. Talk about ‘DEPLORABLE’.” Yet another by the same conservative tweeter stated,“Here is a story that U will never see reported by @ AP or @stltoday PostDispatch.” She’s right about that last part. You won’t see it reported in any credible news outlet because the story is so badly distorted as to qualify as fake news. It’s sad that some news consumers are gullible enough to believe it. Sadder that some are gullible enough to recirculate it via Twitter alongside criticism of this newspaper for keeping this explosive news item

under wraps. The Washington Examiner’s website said that,“beginning on Jan. 1, prostitution by minors will be legal in California. Yes, you read that right. SB 1322 bars law enforcement from arresting sex workers who are under the age of 18 for soliciting or engaging in prostitution, or loitering with the intent to do so. So teenage girls (and boys) in California will soon be free to have sex in exchange for money without fear of arrest or prosecution.” Wow. Let’s get outraged! Oh, wait a moment. In California, as in Missouri, an adult having sex with a minor constitutes statutory rape. Rape is rape, regardless of whether the rapist tosses money on the bed afterward. The minor is not the perpetrator of a crime. The minor is a victim. And the last time I checked, even conservatives don’t believe that it’s right to prosecute crime victims. The criminals are the adults, not the kids. But the implication from this fake-news headline is that we need to be putting kids in jail for being sex-trafficked. And it’s those nanny-state Democrats in California who want to legalize child prostitution. This story makes a political issue out of a crime that destroys lives. Kids don’t get involved with sex traffickers because they think it’s a fun alternative to flipping burgers or bagging groceries.Some are kidnapped and forced into the business. Others are runaways from abusive parents. Others are seeking refuge from having already been sexually abused. Predators are everywhere

AP Comet Ping Pong pizza shop, in Washington, D.C. For conspiracy theorists, “pizzagate” didn’t end when a man brought a gun to a Washington restaurant in a misguided attempt to rescue child sex slaves, instead, the shooting fired up further belief in the baseless claims.

on the lookout for exactly this kind of child. They lure victims with promises of a good meal, warm shelter and a willingness to listen to the child’s problems. Not long afterward, the child’s photo appears on websites such as Backpage with promises of extraspecial massages and “real VIP treatment.” Children don’t post these web advertisements. Criminal adult sex traffickers do, and they create conditions of enslavement that make it virtually impossible for children to escape once they’re trapped in it. If you have a child in your home, just stop and look at her or him for a moment. Would any kids this

Trump and Conway’s transition of contradictions In 10 days, she goes from praising Obama’s handling of the transition to questioning his patriotism. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Three weeks ago, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway sat on stage in a hotel ballroom in Washington and praised President Obama’s handling of the transition. “I was always raised to respect the office of the presidency and its current occupant, and I think that I have done that over the course of my adult life,” she said. She added that Obama “has been incredibly supportive and gracious ... in wanting this peaceful transfer of power in our great democracy.” Ten days later, Conway took exactly the opposite position. She suggested that the current occupant of the presidency does not sufficiently love America — and was not supporting a peaceful transition. Her reason: Obama hadn’t silenced talk, based on findings of the CIA and FBI, that Russia meddled in the election to aid Trump. “If you want to shut this down and you actually love the country enough to have this peaceful transition in our great democracy between the Obama administration and the Trump administration, there are a couple people in pretty prominent positions, ones named Obama, ones named Hillary Clinton, since it’s people trying to fight over her election still, they can shut this down,” Conway asserted on Fox News. How did she go, in the space of 10 days, from praising Obama’s handling of the transition to questioning his patriotism? It would appear Conway shares her boss’s epistemological views: The definition of truth is the last thing to come out of one’s mouth. Conway ended her speech three weeks ago with a plea for others to follow Obama’s example of national unity. She invoked Trump’s victory speech pledging to be “president for all

Americans,” not just those who voted for him. That was admirable, but here’s what Trump tweeted Dec. 31: “Happy New Year to all, including to my many enemies and those who have fought me and lost so badly they just don’t know what to do. Love!” To have some hope of unity there needs to be some measure of honesty. You can’t praise Obama’s handling of the transition and then accuse him of not loving America. You can’t promise to be the president for all Americans and then taunt the 54 percent of Americans who didn’t vote for you.

AP Kellyanne Conway

In that same appearance three weeks ago, Conway made a powerful case against taking a job in the White House. Asked about a recent tweet in which she said “West Wing welcome mat is out” but “mom of four is not in most job descriptions,” Conway elaborated: “My children are 12, 12, 8 and 7, which is bad idea, bad idea, bad idea, bad idea for Mom going inside,” she said. Though she said she would do whatever Trump wanted, she said she told male colleagues “there are limits” to a mother’s role.“They say I ‘may have four

kids, but.’ I said there’s nothing that comes after the ‘but’ that makes any sense to me. So don’t even try.” She said the choice was different for fathers, noting that she told male colleagues “the question isn’t would you take the job” but “would you want your wife to? Would you want the mother of your children to?” Though she liked the notion of helping women feel “less guilty about balancing life and career,” she mocked the idea that she could work in the White House and still slip out to help the kids with homework. Two weeks later, the announcement came that Conway would be working in the White House after all, as counselor to the president. Lately there are reports that her husband, George Conway, is on the shortlist to be solicitor general, the top Justice Department litigator. Now that Conway is Washington-bound, she’s picking a fight with local private schools with a familiar campaign of contradictions. She spoke to the New York Post last week for an item reporting her fear that “establishment elites in Washington, D.C., are so prejudiced against President-elect Donald Trump that she won’t be able to get her kids into private school.” The item went on: “While in D.C. on Wednesday with her kids looking at schools,” Conway said friends’ inquiries were met with “silence and sighs.” But my Post colleague Valerie Strauss followed up with Conway and discovered that Conway was in Florida with Trump on the Wednesday she was supposedly with her kids looking at D.C. schools, which were closed for winter recess. And the “silence and sighs”? The allegedly negative reaction was experienced by precisely one colleague on exactly one call, unsolicited by the Conways. Dana Milbank dana.milbank@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

young, this innocent, ever willingly submit their bodies for some disgusting stranger to ravage? Of course not. The Washington Examiner, along with misguided Twitter followers, are seeking some kind of political gain out of children’s sexual victimization. Why? This law also is not news. It was passed last year and signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in September, when he accurately declared,“There is no such thing as a child prostitute.” The Examiner is trying to hype it as an explosive new development only because the law took effect on Jan. 1. As the law’s sponsor, state Sen. Holly J. Mitchell, a Democrat from

Los Angeles, stated,“The law is supposed to protect vulnerable children from adult abuse, yet we brand kids enmeshed in sex-forpay with a scarlet ‘P’ and leave them subject to shame and prosecution. This is our opportunity to do what we say is right in cases of sex trafficking: Stop the exploiters and help the exploited.” The law cracks down on adults. It eliminates criminal penalties for minors who are exploited. It requires law enforcers to report the commercial sexual exploitation of juveniles so that the victims can receive counseling and protection. It helps get the kids back home or places them in court-supervised foster care. If someone wanted to play the Examiner’s low-life game, a nice screamer Twitter posting could say,“Pro-exploitation conservatives denounce efforts to save children from predators.” (Perhaps post it alongside fake news about child sex trafficking at Comet Ping Pong in Washington?) But let’s not go there. You won’t see this kind of nonsense in the Post-Dispatch or any other reputable newspaper because we don’t play games with the facts. People have every right to read outraged tweets or seek information from bogus sources like the Washington Examiner. But, please, don’t ever let those uninformed alarmists confuse you into believing their online musings constitute real news.

trobberson@post-dispatch.com Twitter: @trobberson 314-340-8382

To live as if we are loved It is not an easy thing to quiet the voices of self-condemnation. return to his family as a servant, but his father, seeing him from afar, MICHAEL GERSON “ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed Washington Post him.” Taken seriously (which does not mean literally), that parable represented a spiritual revolution. God as parent. A distant abstraction as Many of us have a traumatic child“Our father,” and our mother as hood memory of losing our mother’s hand in a grocery or department well. No one can damage themselves beyond hope. store and feeling, for a panicky Even if we reach the shores of our moment, that we may never be own Australia — a place of relative found again. For Saroo Brierley, the comfort, success and respect — a separation was real and lasting — a sense of rootlessness can grow. story so extraordinary and harrowComfort can suddenly feel like ing that it carries an excellent movie complacency. Succalled “Lion.” cess can seem empty No big cats were or horribly fragile. employed in making Respect can become a the film. Rather, at treadmill of expectathe age of 5, Saroo tions. If we take an gets separated from hour for introspechis brother, boards tion, fully examining an empty train, falls our flaws and failures, asleep and eventually we generally decide ends up a thousand never to do it again. It miles away in an unfais uncomfortable to miliar part of India. be naked and helpless, He becomes a street with our humanness child — there are showing. plenty of them in this If we must prove sometimes merciless our worth, it is posworld — vulnerable Saroo Brierley sible to be worthless. to sexual trafficking. If we earn love, it is conditional Instead, he is placed in a Dickensian and fickle. That is the substance, in orphanage, plucked up by an intermany cases, of depression. A relentnational adoption, and finally lands less voice of self-judgment.“My in a loving Australian home. thoughts,” said the poet and priest Not really finally. As an accomGeorge Herbert,“are all a case of plished young man, Saroo begins to knives/ Wounding my heart.” feel restless, rootless and homeless It is possible, even as accomand starts an obsessive search (on plished, sophisticated adults, to slip Google Earth) for the small village a parent’s hand and wonder if we he only recalls in flashing images. will ever be found again. “Every day,” explains Saroo,“my Some will scoff, because they mother screams my name.” I won’t have not yet reached this point in ruin the ending, but suffice it to say their lives. Others conclude that this there is Kleenex involved. Nicole sense of homelessness is rooted in Kidman, the real-life mother of two human nature but corresponds to adopted children, plays the role of nothing real in the world. But many Saroo’s Australian mum with parhave found comfort in that ancient ticular charm and fierce affection. story of a missing child, promising Full disclosure: One reason the a parent’s unconditional love: “You story spoke to me is that my wife are my beloved, on you my favor was plucked from a South Korean rests.” orphanage at the age of 6, placed on It is not an easy thing — maybe a jumbo jet and delivered to a lovthe work of a lifetime — to live as if ing American, Midwestern home. we are loved. To quiet the voices of But “Lion” raises broader issues of self-condemnation. To live outside identity — ethnic and otherwise — the tiny cosmos of our own desires. that are implicated in most human To extend the grace we have been stories. shown. To act on a vision of humanIf we feel homeless, not just in ity in which all are equally loved by the world but in the universe, the God. search for home becomes a spiritual A path determined by these quest.“Spiritual” does not always resolutions may lead to unexpected mean religious. On the evidence of the movie, Saroo’s remarkable quest places, maybe not to a sty, but perhaps to a stable and a star.“To was not. But the questions raised by the end of the way of the wandering the film — “Who am I?”“Where do star,” wrote G.K.Chesterton.“To the I belong?” — have nearly universal things that cannot be and that are/ resonance. The most powerful summation of To the place where God was homeless/ And all men are at home.” the Christian faith is the story of a lost child, this one choosing to leave Michael Gerson home, squandering his inheritance michaelgerson@washpost.com and eventually wallowing in a sty Copyright The Washington Post with pigs. He suspects he can only


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

OBITUARIES Adelman, Terry Irwin - St. Louis Anderson, Lucy P. - St. Louis Banton, William C. II, MD, MPH., B. Gen., MC, USAF Ret. - St. Louis Barbieri, Richard D., Jr. - St. Louis Behrmann, Diane V. - St. Louis Beyersdorfer, Shirley Ann - St. Louis Bloch, Mariel Mariam - New York, NY, Paris, France, and St. Louis, MO Bove, Phyllis - St. Louis Camilleri - see Roth Dankenbring, Ernest M. - St. Louis Deven, Frances M. - St. Louis Everett, Sharon V. - Chesterfield Fredericks, Henry Jacob "Buz" - St. Louis Geiss, Roberta Jean - St. Louis Gerards, Joan Lillian - O'Fallon, MO Hall, Larry L. - St. Charles

Celebrations of Life

Hanschmidt, Edward J. - St. Louis Hansen, Deanna J. - St. Louis Hempe - see Tappella Hendricks, Betty Janet - St. Charles Hoehn, Donald L. - Glencoe Kiefer - see Hanschmidt Kirtley, William "Ed" - Kirkwood Kriegshauser, Herman L. - St. Louis Limpert, Wilma L. - Arnold Lizenby, Charles Ernest - St. Louis Martin, Margaret "Peggy" A. - St. Louis McMullen, Geraldine - St. Peters Medley - see Hanschmidt Mertz, Betty J. - Ellisville Meyer, Gerald Elmer - St. Louis Moore, Paul R. Jr. - St. Louis Neels, Denise - Festus Nichols, Harry J., J.D. - St. Louis

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Niemann, Herman A. "Herm" - Highland Petersen - see Martin Rellergert, Ludmilla "Mode" - St. Louis Ries, Robert E. - Marlton, NJ formerly of St. Louis Riley, Evelyn Marie Groth - Cape Girardeau Roth, Agnes Z. - St. Louis Schulte, Anna Marie - St. Louis Schury, Rodney - St. Louis Schwaegel, Mary - Collinsville Sieving, William Jerome - St. Louis Smith, Donald Edward - Valley Park Talisnik, Harry - St. Louis Tappella, Richard C. - St. Louis Taylor, Gentry - St. Louis Teal, Billy G. - St. Louis Thurman, Gary - Eureka Williams, Patricia V. - Hazelwood Zahn, Louise Mary - St. Louis

Bloch, Mariel Miriam

Adelman, Terry Irwin

of New York, NY, Paris, France, and St. Louis, MO passed away Friday, December 30, 2016 at the age of 4 years old. Cherished daughter of Vincent and Meredith Bloch; dear sister of Scarlett Rose Bloch; beloved grandchild of J e a n - E t i e n n e a n d L il ia n e Bloch, and Frederick and Mary Drakesmith; treasured niece of Matthew Drakesmith, Bradley Drakesmith, and Coralie (Michel) Bloch-Lavergne. Despite the many hardships that Mariel faced during her long struggle with leukemia, she was the happiest child. She delighted at the smallest pleasures in life and was a constant reminder to those around her to do the same. She loved Peppa Pig, Central Park, Elmo, feeding the ducks, her music and dance "teachers", Alice in Wonderland, swimming in her grandparents' pool, jumping in muddy puddles, the market, the beach, and spaghetti with parmesan. Mariel experienced so much love in her short life. She will always be in the hearts of those who loved her. Funeral services will be respectfully private. Mariel's forever wish was to return to Paris. A memorial service will be held in France in the coming weeks. In lieu of flowers, the family has established the Mariel Bloch Memorial Fund (Giving Account #1111065) with Fidelity Charitable to honor Mariel. All funds will be used to support childhood cancer research, which is currently vastly underfunded. Those seeking to make a donation should mail their check to Fidelity Charitable (with the fund name in the memo line) with a completed donation form located at the following web address: https://www.fidelitycharitable.org/docs/Contribution.pdf. Donations are tax deductible.

January 2, 2017. Beloved husband of Christelle Adelman-Adler; dear father and father-in-law of Daniel (Kate Estwing) and John Adelman; dear son of the late Leon and the late Wilma Stankey Adelma n ; dear brother-in-law of George (Nancy) Adler; our dear cousin and friend. Judge Adelman was a retired U.S. Magistrate Judge, Eastern District of Missouri. Judge Adelman served 23 years on the Federal bench and prior to that, 20 years as an Assistant U.S. Attorney, and 12 years as the First Assistant. He loved his job, St. Louis Cardinals baseball, his family and his friends. Services: Visitation Thursday, January 5th, 10:00 a.m. at BERGER MEMORIAL Chapel, 9430 Olive Blvd. followed by funerBove, Phyllis, al service at 11:00 a.m. Interment Chevra Kadisha Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to Hillel at Washington Uni- 70, Jan. 2, 2017, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother versity in St . Louis, 6 3 0 0 Fors yt h B l v d. , 6 3 10 5. Visit Church. Survived by brother Wayne Bove; dear sister-in-law, cousin, aunt and friend to many. bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. Services: Visitation Fri., Jan 6, 9-10 a.m. at St. Ann Catholic Church, 7530 Natural Bridge Road, Normandy, followed by 10 Anderson, Lucy P. a.m. Mass. Burial at St. Ferdinand Cemetery, Florissant. The on Monday, January 2, 2017. Services: Funeral at Kutis family is being served by HUTCHENS Mortuary. South County Chapel on Friday, January 6, 9:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 6-9 p.m.

Banton, William C. II, MD, MPH., B. Gen., MC, USAF Ret., Sunrise, November 9, 1922, Washington DC, Sunset, December 31, 2016, in St. Louis, MO, at home, among his loving family. He is survived by his wife and steadfast companion of over 59 years, Milagros R o ma n Banton, MD; children: William, Stephen (Linda), Barbara (Eli), Rich a rd , M ich a el (Pat), and Michelle (Ed); ten grandchildren, three great grandchildren, brother in-law Gonzalo T. Roman, MD (Liwanag), cousins, nieces, nephews, and other extended family. Services: Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Rd., Ballwin, Thursday 4 - 8 p.m. Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, kindly send contributions to FisherHouse.org. Funeral Mass at Christ Prince of Peace Catholic Church, 415 Weidman Rd., Manchester, Friday 11:00 a.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Barbieri, Richard D., Jr. passed away peacefully on January 1, 2017. He was surrounded by loved ones and was a devoted husband to Cheryl (nee Adams); father to Richard III, Cara (Constantino) DiFranco, Joseph (Andria) and Matthew (Frances); proud Papa to Isabella, Mary, Sophia, Constantino, Richard, Giuliana, Salvatore, Layla, and Joseph, brother, brother-in-law, son-inlaw, uncle, cousin, and best friend to many. He was affectionately known as Big Rich for his physical size and the size of his heart. Services: Visitation Thur., Jan. 5, 5 -9 p.m. and Memorial Serv. Fri. Jan. 6, 11 am both at The Crossing Church, 1800 Bowles Ave, 63026. In lieu of flowers, contributions to MD Anderson Cancer Center, appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Beyersdorfer, Shirley Ann Friday, December 30, 2016. Memorial service to be held in the Chapel at Friendship Village, 12505 Village Circle Dr. 63127. Saturday, January 7, 9 a.m. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE

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Fredericks, Henry Jacob "Buz"

Passed from this world on January 1st, 2017 at the age of 91. Son of Henry Jacob Fredericks of Belleville, IL a n d M a ry E l iz a b et h (n ee P i e r o n ) of O'Fallon, IL. Brother of Robert Pierre "Pete" Fredericks (deceased) a n d L ou is e Kern Sch mid t (deceased). B u z attended Immaculate Conception Dankenbring, Ernest M. School and Roosevelt High School Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, in St. Louis. Monday, January 2, 2017. In 1943, during WWII, he joined Beloved husband of the late Marie Dankenbring (nee the U.S. Army Air Corps and was awarded the Air Medal for Joseph); dearest father of Raymond Dankenbring (Donna participating in aerial combat over Europe. Wallace) and Rosemarie (the late Frank) Weiler; loving grandThereafter, he attended Saint Louis University Law School and father of Tina (Dylan) Goss, Derek (Laura) Dankenbring, Tonya graduated in 1950 with a JD degree. Buz married Marjorie (nee (Jeff) Moore, and Jason (Jennifer) Weiler; dear great-grandKiely) and is the father of Joseph, James, Elizabeth Papagianis, father of Lou Lou, Kayla, Derek, Sophia, Brooks, Brendon, by adoption William Michael and self-appointed guardian of Camden, and Eli; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Izabella Jerome a minor and granddaughter of Deborah Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Fredericks (nee Rose). Dear grandfather, great grandfather, Lemay Ferry Rd, on Friday, January 6, 9 a.m. Interment J.B. brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to In 1953, Buz was appointed Chief Trial Circuit Attorney by American Heart Association or American Lung Association Edward Dowd, and later First Assistant Circuit Attorney by appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4 -8 p.m. Thomas Eagleton followed by appointments as a Special Assistant Circuit Attorney. In 1980 Buz was appointed Assistant Deven, Frances M. United States Attorney and engaged in Civil and Criminal (nee Holdenried) age 77, on Tuesday, January 3, 2017. litigation that included the Southern District of Florida and the Beloved wife of the late Donald Deven for over 52 years; loving U.S. Virgin Islands. He was granted voluntary retirement in mother of Donna (George) Kellum and Randal (Kelly) Deven; 2005 at his young age of 80 years. cherished meemaw of Marissa (Mark) Colona, Ashley (Tyler) He also engaged in the private practice of Law with Mark Schepers, Cassandra (Bryan) Pierce, Spencer, Zack, Kaitlyn, and E a gl et on , Air Force General G l e n n o n M o r a n , S a mu a l Kelsey Deven; and great-grandma (g.g.); our dear sister, sister- Goldenhersh (Goldenhersh, Fredericks and Newman) and Melvin in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Friedman (Friedman & Fredericks). Buz is profiled in Marquis' Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Who's Who in America and Who's Who in the Law (2000-1 Ed.) Lemay Ferry Rd, Fri., Jan. 6, 11 am with services concluding and was licensed to practice in Circuit Courts, Courts of Appeal at KUTIS. In Lieu of flowers contributions to the charity of and US Supreme Court. your choice appreciated. Visitation Thurs. 3 - 8 pm. Services: Visitation at 8:45 am with Mass of Christian Burial at 9:15 am, on Friday, January 6, at St. Gabriel the Archangel Catholic Church, 6303 Nottingham. Burial to follow at Jefferson Everett, Sharon V. (nee Van Voorn), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, remember St. Patrick Catholic Church, 405 S. Church St., Wentzville, Saturday, December 31, 2016. Beloved mother of Cheryl (John Paul) Reagan and Kristin Cox; MO 63385. Condolences may be left at dearest grandmother of Chelsea, Bryce, Chloe and Pearse www.hoffmeistercolonial.com Reagan and Tom, McKenzie and Tyler Cox; former spouse and Geis, Roberta Jean dear friend of John Everett; special niece of Mary Margaret (Jerry) Breeden; our dear niece, cousin and friend of many. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Monday, Services: Memorial Mass at Ascension Catholic Church, January 2, 2017. Dearest cousin of Joy (Joe) Fleisch. Retired Chesterfield, Saturday, 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Cross after 40 years from Southwestern Bell. Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to American Services: Funeral at St. Bernadette Catholic Church, 68 Cancer Society. Memorial visitation at the church, Saturday Sherman Ave., 63125, Thursday, January 5, 11:00 a.m. Pri9:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral vate interment. A KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE. Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. Gerards, Joan Lillian (nee: Schroeder), age 81, of O 'Fallon, M O , died on Saturday, December 31, 2016. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Hall, Larry L. age 75, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Monday, December 26, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Behrmann, Diane V. (nee Earley) Peacefully passed away Sept. 22, 2016 at age of 69. Beloved mother of Christopher (Carly) Behrmann; loving wife Thomas Behrmann; grandmother of Noah & Ryan Behrmann; daughter of Violet & the late Emile Earley; sister of Dennis (Shelia) & Mark Earley. Loving aunt, great aunt, cousin, sister-in-law & friend to everyone. Diane was an active member of St. John's United Church of Christ & member of Concord Garden Club. She had a passion for gardening & painting. She never met a stranger & was quick with a joke. Services: A provate memorial "Celebration of life service" conducted by Pastor Steve Westbrook was held on December 28. Memorials may be sent to St. John's United Church of Christ, 11333 St. John's Church Rd, St. Louis, MO 63123. A service of KUTIS AFFTON Chapel.

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STLtoday.com/archives “It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

Hanschmidt, Edward J. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Monday, January 2, 2017. Beloved husband of Eileen Hanschmidt (nee Kiefer); dear father of Michael (Angie) Hanschmidt, Tina (Greg) Medley, and the late Timothy and Edward J. Hanschmidt; loving grandfather of Christina and Allyson Medley and Gavin Hanschmidt; dear son of the late Edward and Lorraine Hanschmidt; dear brother of Robert (Alice) Hanschmidt, Janice (Bill) Hunt, and Joyce (Dan) Sindelar; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd, Friday, January 6, 9:30 am to St. Simon the Apostle Catholic Church for 10 am Mass. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Contributions to Make a Wish foundation would be appreciated. Visitation Thursday 4 - 9 pm.


01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

OBITUARIES Hansen, Deanna J.

Celebrations of Life

Neels, Denise

(Hutnuk), Festus, entered into rest Jan 2, 2017 at her Festus residence. She was a pre-kindergarten teacher at Imma n u el Lutheran Church, Festus, member of Our Lady Catholic Church and belonged to St Louis Street Rod Asc. Beloved wife of Steven M. Neels, Sr; dear mother of Steven Jr and Amanda Neels; dear daughter of Pete and Lillian H u t n y k ; d ea r s is t er of Pete Hendricks, Betty Janet (Linda) H u t n yk Jr. and Tracy (nee: Schuttenberg), age 83, of St. Charles, MO, died on (Mike) Brumfield. Thursday, December 29, 2016. Contact (636) 940-1000 or Services: Mass Thurs, Jan 5, 2017, 10 a.m., Our Lady Catholic visit baue.com Church, 1550 St Mary Lane, Festus. Interment Concord Cemetery, Bloomsdale. Visitation Wed 4-8 p.m., M A H N Hoehn, Donald L. FUNERAL HOME, 515 Collins, Festus 63028. Memorials may be passed away, Saturday, December 31, 2016. Beloved husband of made to St Jude Children's Hospital. Geraldine A. Hoehn (nee Supinski); dear father of Sheila Barker and Douglas Hoehn; dear step-father of Gene Bauer, Mary Ann Nichols, Harry J., J.D. (Larry) Bartman, Jeffrey Bauer, Joseph Bauer, Timothy Bauer age 87. Fortified with the and Christina (Martin) Benoit; dear grandfather of 13 and greatSacraments of the Holy Mother grandfather of 8; dear brother of Robert (Carrie) Hoehn. Our Church, Sunday, January 1, 2017. dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Beloved husband of June (nee Services: Visitation Saturday 1-4 p.m. at the SCHRADER Funeral Birsinger) for 63 years; loving Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, father of Ann (John V.) Harrison Ballwin, MO. If desired, contributions may be made to and Lynn (Keith E.) Link; dear American Cancer Society. Friends may sign the family's grandfather of Kelly (Richard) on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. Stoltz, Eric Link, and Svetlana (Ashton) L eD ee; dear greatKirtley, William "Ed" grandfather of Isabel Stoltz, Josephine Stoltz, Hank Link, and 88, of Kirkwood, MO, entered into rest on Sat. Dec. 31, 2016 Charlotte LeDee; dear brother-inServices: Visitation, Thurs. Jan. 5, 2017 4pm - 8 pm. Service, law, cousin, uncle, great uncle, Fri. 11am CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, Kirkwood, MO and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Anselm Catholic Church, 530 S. Mason Rd., Sat., Jan. 7, 10 am. Kriegshauser, Herman L. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Memorial contributions fortified with the Sacraments of preferred to Lawyers for Life, 10004 Bellefontaine Road, St. Holy Mother Church, 84, on Sat. Louis, MO 63137, or The Daily Worldmissionnaires, 20 Dec. 31, 2016. Archbishop May Drive, St. Louis, MO 63119. Vis. at Bopp Chapel, Beloved husband of 57 years of 10610 Manchester, Kirkwood, Fri. 2-8 pm. www.boppchapel.com the late Blanche J ea n n e Kriegshauser (nee Rechtien), dear Niemann, Herman A. "Herm" father of Herman L. "Trey" (Michelle), Jr., Douglas E., and 82, on Sun., Jan. 1, 2017. Services: Vis, Wed. Jan. 4, 9 till time Keith M. (Karen) Kriegshauser, of Funeral Service at 11 am at Evangelical UCC, Highland, IL. dear grandfather of Sarah L. and Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery, St. Louis. Spengel-Boulanger FH Adam M. Kriegshauser, dear son of the late Herman F. and Rellergert, Ludmilla "Mode" M a r g a r e t A . ( n e e L y n c h ) (nee Wibbenmeyer) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Kriegshauser, dear brother of Mother Church, Mon., Jan. 2, 2017. Beloved wife for 62 years of Margaret K. (William C. Jr.) Stude, and the late Richard E. the late Aloysius C. Rellergert. Dear mother of Judy (Robert) (Jacqueline) Kriegshauser, dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin, step- Glasscock, Linda, Mark, Lois and the late Mary H. Rellergert grandfather, step-great-grandfather, and friend of many. (Mitch Taylor survives). Dear grandmother of Charles, Eric, Services: Visitation and funeral Mass will be held Thurs. Jan. Laura, Emma, Mary, Louie, Carl, Patricio, Kay, Erin and Leo. 5 at St. Clare of Assisi Catholic Church, 15642 Clayton Rd., Dear step-grandmother of Kristine (Robert) and James. Dear Ellisville. Visitation at 4 p.m. with the Mass to follow at 6 p.m. step-great grandmother of Blake and Karli. Dear sister of late Interment Resurrection Cemetery on Fri. Jan. 6 at 10 a.m. Lidwina, Regina, Talida, Olivia, Pia, Robert, Cletus, Gerald and Please meet at cemetery office, 6901 Mackenzie Rd. 63123. Edgar. Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great aunt, cousin and KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS friend to many especially "The Gang". Mrs. Rellergert was a long time member and quilter of St. Bernadette Catholic Church. If desired, please make expresLimpert, Wilma L. ( n e e B l o o d w o r t h ) F r i d a y sions of sympathy to Feed My People. Services: Funeral from Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 December 30, 2016. L o v i n g mo t h e r o f J effrey Lemay Ferry Road, St. Louis, MO on Fri., Jan. 6 at 11:00 a.m. to (Rhonda) Stokes and Mark (Lisa St. Bernadette Catholic Church for Mass of Christian Burial at Gers t n er) L imp ert ; sister of 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Willard (Mary) Bloodworth and Visitation at Hoffmeister South County Chapel on Janet Kazee; loving grandmother Thurs., Jan. 5 from 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Condolences may of Christina Goffredo, Jaston, be offered at www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com. C h r i s t o p h e r a n d J e f f r e y J r. Ries, Robert E. Stokes, Samantha and Jacob Limpert; great grandmother of 92, of Marlton, NJ, passed away peacefully on Monday, Jordon Limpert, Kailee and Lana January 2, 2017, at Virtua W. Jersey Hospital, Marlton. Goffredo; dear life long friend of Preceded by his loving wife of 67 years, Jane E. Ries Dorothy Helms. (nee Bode), who passed away on December 18, 2016. He is surServices: A celebration of Wilma's life was held with her vived by his dear younger brother, Gilbert P. Ries of Lesterville, family and close friends at her home. Please share your Missouri; his children Michael S. Ries (Lynn), Paul R. Ries, Karen condolences at www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com A. Ries (Soren Uhlig), and Steven T. Ries (Leslie); four grandchildren, Kristin, Robert, Christian and Lindsay, and several nieces and nephews. Lizenby, Charles Ernest Mr. Ries was a U.S. Army WWII Veteran, serving his country in Passed away, Saturday, December 17, 2016. Beloved husband of Carol Lizenby (nee Hoefl); loving the European Theater of Operations (ETO), Third Army. He father of Denise, Michael, and Charles (Maria) Lizenby retired after 32 years of service as Vice President of Sales and Jr.; adoring grandfather of Danielle Lizenby and Jacquelyn Marketing for CE Glass, Pennsauken, NJ. Services: Funeral services will be held privately at the con(David) Flieg; loving brother of Peggy Johnson, Lois Klein, and the late Emma Grobelnik; dear brother in law, uncle, cousin, and venience of the family. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Robert's memory to the Disabled American Veterans, friend of many. Services: Memorial service at Manchester United Methodist PO Box 14301 Cincinnati, OH 45250-0301; or to the Canine Church, 129 Woods Mill Road, Manchester, Saturday, January 7, Companions for Independence, P.O. Box 446, Santa Rosa, CA 2017, at 11:00 a.m. Interment PRIVATE. In lieu of flowers, 95402-0446. Arrangements are under the care and direction contributions may be made to Manchester United Methodist of the Mathis Funeral Home, Medford, NJ. Church. Memorial visitation at the church, Saturday, 10 a.m. until time of service. A service of SCHRADER Funeral Home Riley, Evelyn Marie Groth and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on line passed away January 1, 2017, havguestbook at Schrader.com. ing spent the last two weeks of her remarkable life in the loving care of her daughters and daughMartin, Margaret "Peggy" R. ter-in-law, and steeped in the (nee Boman), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother deep affection of her family and Church, Sunday, January 1, 2017. Dear mother of Danielle and friends. the late David Petersen; dear grandmother of Alyssa; dear sister Born in St. Louis on December of Sharon (Ray) Bush, Ellen (Joe) Kvaternik and Barbara (John) 3, 1928, she married James Walsh Richmond; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to Riley Thanksgiving Day 1951, and many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gratogether they raised three vois, Friday, January 6, 9:30 a.m. to St. Mark Church for 10 a.m. children: James Walsh Riley, Jr. Mass. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Contributions can be made (Michaele) of Cape Girardeau; to the education fund to benefit Mrs. Martin's beloved Bridget Ann Gilbert (John) of Webgranddaughter, Alyssa. Please make contributions payable ster Groves; and Mary Beth Booker (Tom) of St. Charles. She to Alyssa Petersen. Visitation Thursday, 3 p.m. - 9 p.m. was the very proud grandmother of ten grandchildren and five great grandchildren. McMullen, Geraldine Evelyn was preceded in death by her husband; by her parents, (nee: Mack), of St. Peters, MO, died on Saturday, December 31, Isabelle and Lee Groth; her sister, Dolores Groth Hall; and two 2016, at the age of 83. brothers, Mel Groth and Ralph Groth. She is survived by her Loving wife of the late Frank B. McMullen, Sr.; beloved brother Lee Groth of Cape Girardeau. daughter of the late Clarence Mack and Clara Scoffield; devoted A member of St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Cape Girardeau, she mother of Joyce (the late Lloyd) Dixon, Jerry McMullen, Bill loved the Holy Trinity: God the Father, the Holy Spirit - and her (Charlotte) McMullen, Judy Shives, and Kenneth (Sandra) beloved Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. She also loved life. She McMullen; cherished grandmother of 20; treasured great-grand- prayed every day in gratitude for her life, faith, family, friends, mother of 36; dear great-great-grandmother of 4; loving sister and for being born in the United States of America. of Juanita and Lina; dear mother-in-law of Edie McMullen and An accomplished cook, seamstress, card player and knitter, Eva McMullen. She is preceded in death by her sons, Danny Eu- her original Knits By Evelyn were treasured purses, scarves, gene McMullen and Frank Benjamin McMullen, Jr., her sweaters and newborn caps. granddaughters, Cheyenne Shives, Amanda Dixon, and Ella She never complained in illness, but instead expressed empaGrace Burns, her sisters, Betty Lade and Shirley Robertson, and thy and compassion and offered prayers for persons who suffer her step-father William Scoffield. through chemotherapy and severe illness. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Words cannot express the amount of pride her family feels, Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where nor the esteem and affection in which she will be forever held. visitation will be held on Wednesday, January 4, 2017 4:00-7:00 pm. Funeral Service Thursday, January 5, 2017, 2:00 pm Baue Services: Visitation will be at St. Vincent de Paul Church in Cape Girardeau Friday, January 6 from 4:30 pm - 8:00 pm with Funeral and Memorial Center Chapel. Interment St. Charles a Funeral Mass Saturday at 11:00 am. Final resting will be with Memorial Gardens. Memorials may be made to the her husband Jim at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Paralyzed Veterans of St. Charles, Missouri. Visit Baue.com Louis (private service). Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society's Mertz, Betty J. Hope Lodge, St. Louis. (nee Starck), passed away, Monday, January 2, 2017. Beloved wife of Wilbert "Willie" Mertz. Loving mother of Cheri Roth, Agnes Z. (Ken) Fisher and Kevin (Lori) Mertz. Devoted grandmother of (nee Recar) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Scott (Natalie), Matt (Kati) and Jennifer (fiance Joe Zinkl) Fisher, Rachel (Mike) Manion and Aaron Mertz. Loving great-grand- Church Monday, January 2, 2017. Beloved wife of the late mother of Samantha and Cayden Fisher. Dear sister of Ralph William A. Roth; dear mother of Marilyn (Charles) Camilleri and (Karen) Starck, Joe Starck, Shirley Krausch and the late Leroy the late Carol (surviving William) Chrisman; dear grandmother (Phyllis) Starck & Marie (Jerry) Hayhurst. Dear aunt, cousin and of Todd Chrisman, Jeffrey Camilleri, Brad Chrisman, Laura Fellows and Carrie Russell; our dear great-grandmother, aunt friend of many. Services: Funeral service at St. John United Church of Christ, and friend. 332 Old Sulphur Spring Rd., Manchester, 63021, Thursday, Janu- Services: Visitation at Nazareth Living Center, Friday, January 5, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. Interment St. John United Church of ary 6, 9:00 a.m. until funeral Mass at 10:00 a.m. Interment Christ Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made Mount Olive Cemetery. KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE. to St. John United Church of Christ. Visitation at the SCHRADER Schulte, Anna Marie Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, January 4, 2017 from 2-8 p.m. (nee End), 85 of St. Louis on Jan. 1, 2017. Visit Fri. 10 a.m.-12 and at the church, Thursday 10 a.m. until the time of servp.m. St. Martin of Tours Church Lemay. Funeral to follow at 12 ice. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at pm. Burial in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Schrader.com. Mon., Jan. 2, 2017. Dear mother of Laura Hubeli; dear sister of Wendy Carroll; beloved daughter of the late Dean and Irene Hansen; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Deanna was a professional pianist, singer and songwriter. She was an avid baseball Cardinal fan and loved the Riverbend Subdivision, especially the Kids. Services: at the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Fri., Jan. 6, 10 a.m. Interment Bellerive Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations to garysinisefoundation.org. Visitation from 4-8 p.m. Thursday.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Schury, Rodney Asleep in Jesus, Sun. Dec. 25, 2016. Beloved husband of Ruth Schury; dear son of the late Rev. Edwin and Mabel Schury; dear cousin and friend. Services: Visitation and funeral service will be held at Epiphany Lutheran Church, 4045 Holly Hills Blvd. 63116. Visitation on Wed. Jan. 4 from 3:30-7:30 p.m. and Thurs. Jan. 5 from 9-10 a.m. with the service to follow at 10:00 a.m. Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery. Contributions to Epiphany Lutheran Church or a charity of your choice appreciated. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS

Schwaegel, Mary 99, passed away on January 2, 2017. Services: Visitation on Fri. Jan. 6, 4-8pm at Herr Funeral Home, Collinsville. Funeral Sat., Jan. 7, 10am at SS. Peter & Paul Catholic Church in Collinsville.

Sieving, William Jerome on Sun., Jan. 1, 2017. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel, on Thurs, Jan 5, from 11:00 am until service time at 1:00 pm. Interment J.B. National Cemetery

Smith, Donald Edward passed away, Sunday, January 1, 2017. Loving husband of the late Patricia M. Smith (nee Cary); dearest father of Jeffrey Smith and Andrew (Lyvonne) Smith; dear brother of Jacqueline (Tom) Green; brother-in-law of Gayle Groom and Earl (Barbara) Cary; our dear uncle and friend of many. Don was a long time employee of the City of Valley Park. Services: Funeral service at Valley Park United Methodist Church, 436 Valley School Drive, Valley Park, MO Friday, 9:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to American Cancer Society. Visitation at the FAMILY CENTER at SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Thursday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Talisnik, Harry January 2, 2017. Beloved husband of Sarah Talisnik; dear father and father-in-law of Michael Henry (Terry) Talisnik and Evelyn Ann (Bob) Misner; dear grandfather of Rachel Ann Misner; dear uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Graveside funeral Friday, January 6th, 1:30 p.m. at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road, 63017. Memorial contributions preferred to The Holocaust Museum and Learning Cen t er, 12 M il l s t on e Campus D r ., 63146. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Tappella, Richard C. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Monday January 2, 2017. Loving husband for 61 years to Katherine Tappella (nee Miriani); dear father of Gary (Marcia) Tappella and Laurie (Michael) Hempe; dear grandfather of Greg (Trisha Rick) Tappella, Adam (Elizabeth) Tappella and Jamie Tappella; dear great-grandfather of Keaton Rick Tappella and Nora Tappella; dear brother of Mary Tappella; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd, on Sat. Jan. 7, 9:30 am to St. Mark Catholic Church for 10 am Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contribution to White House Retreat, St. Louis University High School, the National Kidney Foundation or the American Heart Association appreciated. Vis. Fri. 4 - 8 pm.

Taylor, Gentry Passed away Monday, January 2, 2017. Beloved husband of Elaine Taylor (nee Hampton); loving father of Janet (Randy) Maxey, Brian (Bo) Taylor and the late Mark Taylor; dear grandfather of 7; dear brother of Troyana Kehoe and Robert Taylor; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. Gentry was the owner of Gentry's Barber Shop. Every day he walked two miles to and from the shop for the 50 years he owned the place. He had a passion for collecting and trading Lionel trains. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Wednesday, January 4, 4:00 p.m. until the funeral services at 7:30 p.m. Private interment at a later date.

Teal, Billy G. Tuesday, January 3, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Orene Teal (nee Bentley); dear father of Mike, Cindy and the late Susan Teal; dear grandfather of Brett and Clint Teal; dear great-grandfather of Aydin Teal; dear brother of Ailene Sullivan, Ruby Errante and Jack Teal. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Friday, January 6, 11 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-9 p.m.

Thurman, Gary passed away, Saturday, December 31, 2016 at the age of 59. Beloved husband of Anita Thurman (nee Goehring); dear father of Sarah and Hannah Thurman; brother of Nancy (Norm) Mitchell; loving uncle, brother-in-law, cousin and friend to many. Gary's best times were spent with Hannah at the car and NHRA races and mountain biking with Sarah. He loved his Harley and lived by the motto, "Life is not about the destination, it's about the journey." Services: Memorial Service at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 500 Meramec Blvd., Eureka, Friday, 4:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Leukemia and Lymphoma Society or The Alzheimer's Association. Visitation at the Church from 2:00 p.m. until the time of the service.

Williams, Patricia V. of Hazelwood, MO, died Friday December 30, 2016, at age 77. Loving wife of John Williams; beloved daughter of Jack and Josephine Fuchs; devoted mother of Darrell (Mary) Williams and Douglas (Veronica) Williams; cherished grandmother of Jessica, Tiffany, Travis, Sierra, and Savanna. Services: Visitation Thursday, January 5, 2017 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Funeral Service Friday, January 6, 2017 at 12 p.m. at Baue Funeral Home and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street. St. Charles, MO 63301. Memorials to American Heart Association. Visit baue.com

Zahn, Louise Mary (nee Eversgerd), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Tuesday, January 3, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Sylvester W. Zahn. Dear mother of Catherine Bodine, Philip, Richard and Lorraine Zahn, Deborah Smith, Alan Zahn and Christina Williams. Dear mother-in-law, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt and friend. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, 10:30 a.m. to Holy Infant Catholic Church for 11:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Our Lady Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Thursday 5-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Fraternal Notices Please be advised of the death of

Bro. Larry Torry Honorary Member, Deceased 12/30/16 Visitation Thurs. 12/15/16, 9 am Funeral was held on January 3, 2017 Thomas R. McNeil Jr., Business Manager William A. Brennell, President

Florists

Meyer, Gerald Elmer 12/23/16, age 88. Husband to the late Jackie, father of Fred, Deb and Paula; grandfather of 6, great-grandfather of 4. Mem. Serv. Thurs. Jan. 5, 2- 5 pm, St. Louis Cremation, 2135 Choteau.

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

Dierbergs Florist

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Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

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65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557


NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

JUDGE TERRY ADELMAN

Retired U.S. magistrate was ‘one of a kind’ BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.04.2017

Syrian attack sparks water crisis Supplies to Damascus cut of for nearly two weeks after ighting BY PHILIP ISSA Associated Press

BEIRUT • Residents of Damascus are ST. LOUIS • As a U.S. Magistrate Judge, Terry I.

Adelman often presided over cases his lifelong friend and then-Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Reap prosecuted. The judge sometimes ruled against Reap. Win or lose, Reap could always count on Judge Adelman, “the smartest man he ever met,” to be fair, he said. “As a judge he could not have been better,” Reap said. “Every opinion was completely thought-out and well-crafted, and he considered every fact, every perspective. He understood that not everything was black and white, that sometimes criminal justice was gray. “The public got their money’s worth out of him, and then some.” A respected judge and family man known for his fairness and his keen wit, Judge Adelman died Monday (Jan. 2, 2017) at St. Louis University Hospital of complications from pneumonia. He was 71 and lived in St. Louis. A magistrate with the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Missouri for 23 years, Judge Adelman presided over a number of prominent cases including the redistricting of the St. Louis County Council, a federal indictment of a former CIA oicer accused of leaking confidential information, and the embezzlement of millions by a ClaytonAdelman based funeral home company. But Judge Adelman was equally known for his love of family and community, near-encyclopedic memory and fervent passion for Cardinals baseball, his son John recalled. Judge Adelman was a good-natured and kind man who took pride in his Shaw neighborhood community, where the family has lived since 1976, his son said. “I can remember a time in my youth when I would be perplexed at how many people would come up and say how great a person my dad was,” he said. “I get it now. He was friends with everyone. He knew everyone he was around by name and would always greet them as friends. Everyone got his full attention and respect.” Judge Adelman was born in 1945 in East St. Louis, the only child of first-generation American citizens. In 1963, he became the first in his family to graduate high school. He met his wife while at St. Louis University. They married in 1974. Christelle Adelman-Adler also studied law at SLU and became a Missouri state public defender before entering private practice. Judge Adelman received his law degree from St. Louis University in 1970. He would return to the university in 1991 as an adjunct professor, co-teaching a seminar in white-collar crime. Judge Adelman was a public defender in the city of St. Louis for two years before he became an assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of Missouri in 1972. He became lead assistant U.S. attorney in 1980 and held the position until he became a magistrate judge in December 1992. He served as chief U.S. magistrate judge from November 2001 to September of 2008, and retired in April 2015. Reap, 71, met Judge Adelman in law school. The two became lifelong friends and worked alongside each other for most of their careers. “He was the best of my best friends,” Reap said. “I realized he was a one of a kind individual even back then, kind and brilliant and hardworking. It’s hard to quantify how great of a person he was.” The two worked together as public defenders, “learning on the fly” and often going door-todoor to interview witnesses, Reap said. Judge Adelman later prosecuted a number of cases involving mail fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court referenced in its Enron decision, Skilling v. United States, Reap said. Judge Adelman, Reap said, “didn’t do anything by rote. When you deal with 500 to 1,000 matters a year, you can get jaded, but he always took every case as a unique, most important case to everybody that was involved, and he gave it the due respect the litigants wanted.” John Adelman said he had fond memories of his father coaching his little league baseball team and leading his Boy Scout troop for several years. Judge Adelman also served on the school board at his sons’ school, St. Margaret of Scotland. The judge was a lifelong Cardinals fan whose favorite retirement present was a baseball signed by Yadier Molina, along with a picture of Molina signing the ball. Part of his love for the sport was the strategy involved, his son said. “He loved it because it’s an intellectual game,” John said. Judge Adelman also loved to watch “Jeopardy,” John said. The two watched the show together as recently as Thanksgiving evening. “I could only ever beat him by being faster than him at answering,” John said. “He was someone who seemed to know everything. He had a knack for remembering every detail, from case law, to details about friends’ lives to baseball history and random trivia.” Judge Adelman had such a good reputation that both prosecution and defense teams would agree to waive other legal options and allow Judge Adelman to decide their case, John said. “I remember once being out to dinner and one of the busboys was someone he had supervised,” John said. “He came over to my dad and thanked him for giving him a chance to stay out of jail, work and get drug treatment. I think everyone would agree that my dad was extremely fair, and knowledgeable, and hard working, and he loved his job.” In addition to his wife, and son John of New York City, survivors include another son, Dan Adelman of St. Louis. Visitation will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Berger Memorial Chapel, 9430 Olive Boulevard. Services will follow at 11 a.m. and internment will be at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

scrambling for clean water after the government attacked rebels who were holding the city’s main water source in a nearby valley. Attacks led to an accidental outage that has stretched on for nearly two weeks. The cutof is a major challenge to the government’s effort throughout the nearly 6-year-old civil war to keep the capital as insulated as possible from the efects of the conflict. “I have stopped cleaning the house, washing dishes or clothes. We no longer take showers,” said Mona Maqssoud, a 50-year-old resident of Damascus. She said residents have relied on water tankers that come by occasionally and give 5 gallons of water to each house, but that hasn’t been enough. “We begged the drivers (to return) to our neighborhood, but they refused.” The cutof, since Dec. 22, is the longest Damascus has seen, say residents, who are accustomed to intermittent outages. The opposition has long controlled Wadi Barada, the valley northwest of Damascus through which the river of the same name flows to the capital. The Barada River and its source, the Ain alFijeh spring, supply 70 percent of the water for Damascus and its environs. The government and the opposition had previously had an understanding to keep water services running. But that ended when forces of President Bashar Assad and his allies, the Lebanon Hezbollah guerrilla force, attacked the valley, home to some 100,000 people. The two sides blame each other for the cutof. An activist-run media collective in the Barada Valley said government and Russian aircraft bombed the Ain el-Fijeh water processing facility, puncturing its fuel depots and contaminating

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This frame grab from video shows Syrian residents illing up buckets and gallons of spring water from a pipe on the side of the road, in Damascus, Syria.

the water stream. The collective said the plant’s electrical control systems had been destroyed as well. Images showed the roof of the facility collapsed into its main water basin. An activist with the group, Abu Mohammed alBardawi, said it would take at least two months to get the facilities working again. Damascus officials said they were forced to shut off the water after opposition forces poured gasoline into the river. The government denied attacking the water processing facility, saying it would not set out to harm its own population. Still, it would not be the first time its strikes hit its own facilities: government strikes hit pumping stations in the northern city of Aleppo in April, September and November. The battle for resources has always been an undercurrent to the war. The government, in particular, has advertised its eforts to keep electricity and water flowing to areas under its control, while it blocks the U.N. and other relief agencies from supplying opposition zones. But rarely has that struggle been so starkly felt inside the capital. Damascus, the seat of Assad’s power, has been spared from the widespread destruction felt in other parts of the country, though rebels on the outskirts occasionally fire mortar rounds into the

Displaced Iraqis relish return to phones after militant rule

city. Hundreds of thousands of Syrians have flocked to the capital seeking its relative security, swelling its population to 4 million from 2 million, according to the U.N. For its residents, the water cuts are a grueling reminder of the war beyond. “If this goes on, I will rent a room at a hotel just to take a shower,” said a 60-year-old woman carrying a pair of buckets back to her apartment on the sixth-floor of a walk-up building. Like many others in the capital, she was filling her basins from distribution points at a parks and mosques. The local press is reporting soaring prices for unregulated private water. Residents are making adjustments to cope. Some are now flushing their toilets with bottled water. Others are dining on disposable tableware as an alternative to doing the dishes. Ground wells around Damascus, even at maximum capacity, can only cover about a third of the minimum water demand of around 600,000 cubic meters a day, according to UNICEF spokeswoman Juliette Touma. The agency has rehabilitated some 200 wells around the capital since 2011, partially insuring the government against its own Barada Valley campaign. This year, UNICEF funded $50 million in Syrian water projects.

DIGEST Selie emerges of suspected killer from massacre in Turkey An eerie video emerged Tuesday of a man believed to be the attacker who killed 39 people in a mass shooting at a nightclub, showing him taking a selie as he silently toured Istanbul’s most famous square. The camera never left the man’s unsmiling face as he walked through Taksim Square during the 44-second clip that was broadcast on staterun Anadolu television and other Turkish media. It wasn’t immediately clear if the video was made before or after the New Year’s massacre at the Reina nightclub or how it was obtained. The gunman, who hasn’t been publicly identiied, is still at large.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Displaced Iraqis, who led ighting between Iraqi security forces and Islamic State militants, wait to charge mobile phones and lanterns.

BY HAMZA HENDAWI Associated Press

SEWDINAN CAMP, IRAQ • Iraqis who escaped Islamic State rule during the battle for Mosul are indulging in a newfound freedom — the right to check their phones. When the Iraqi offensive to retake the northern city began in mid-October, its Islamic State rulers warned residents that anyone caught with an active mobile phone would be killed for spying. Many destroyed their SIM cards, and at least one terrified resident flushed his phone down the toilet. Others hid their devices where the militants were unlikely to look — under women’s clothes at the bottom of a wardrobe or in bird coops on the roofs of their homes. For many, the phones came in handy later, when they were able to phone the military to coordinate their escape. After arriving in camps for the displaced, they were able to reach out to loved ones and return to social media after a virtual two-year blackout.

‘SO ISOLATED’ Sahm Yassin, a primary school teacher, was one of those who took the risk and hid his phone. Before he fled Mosul about a week ago, he used it sparingly, walking under cover of darkness to high ground where he could get a signal strong enough to call family in Baghdad. “We were so isolated from the outside world, but I still needed to let them know that we, especially my elderly mother, are OK,” said Yassin. “It’s a great feeling, I missed being in touch with everyone,” he said after retrieving his phone from one of the camp’s “power vendors” — displaced Iraqis with small generators who recharge phones for 500 dinars (about 45 cents). The camp does not provide electricity. Islamic State seized Mosul, the country’s second largest city, in

the summer of 2014, when the extremists swept across western and northern Iraq. Ten weeks into the offensive, the militants still hold most of the city. On taking the city, Islamic State implemented a radical interpretation of Islamic teachings, including a ban on smoking. Men were required to grow beards and women in public had to cover themselves from head to toe. The group initially allowed the use of mobile phones in Mosul under a set of intrusive restrictions. Militants at checkpoints and on foot patrols routinely checked people’s phones, looking for suspicious numbers, music or photos, which were also banned. A few months later, the militants destroyed all the mobile towers, but residents said that on higher ground they could still pick up a weak signal from the nearby Kurdish region. Phone cards were available in Mosul for a short period after Islamic State took the city. Later, users relied on relatives and friends for phone-to-phone credit transfers. One major Iraqi provider built new signal towers south of the city last fall, while another ran TV and radio advertisements showing tollfree numbers residents could call to report emergencies or provide information about the militants. Islamic State leaders grew increasingly paranoid after the U.S.backed Iraqi ofensive to retake the city began in October, residents said. Anyone found with an active phone was presumed to be a spy and shot dead on the spot. But those who held onto their devices were able to call the military on hotline numbers broadcast by local media in order to organize their escape. The military would advise them of the best route out and deploy drones or helicopter gunships to protect them.

Inmates who killed rivals will be transferred • Brazilian authorities said Tuesday that the inmates responsible for the killings of 60 rivals at two prisons in the Amazon region will be transferred to high security federal institutions in addition to being prosecuted. Many of those slain were beheaded or dismembered in the worst bloodshed at a prison of the South American country since 1992. Amazonas state public security secretary Sergio Fontes said the transfers will begin as soon as investigations into the incidents are inished. U.N. observers criticized for dancing with rebels • United Nations observers are in hot water in Colombia over a video showing them dancing with leftist rebels while deployed to watch over the guerrillas as part of a peace deal. The short video shot by Spanish news agency EFE from inside a jungle camp in northern Colombia shows two men wearing blue vests with U.N. insignia dancing hip-to-hip with female guerrillas. The images drew sharp rebuke from opponents of the peace deal between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. Israelis slam low rate of soldier prosecutions • An Israeli advocacy group on Tuesday criticized what it called an “exceptionally low” prosecution rate by the Israeli military in cases of violence committed by soldiers against Palestinians. The report by Yesh Din, a human rights group often critical of the Israeli military, said the army opened 186 criminal investigations into suspected ofenses against Palestinians in 2015, but just four of those investigations yielded indictments. The Israeli military did not respond to requests for comment. Imprisoned Iranian activist ends hunger strike • An imprisoned Iranian human rights activist ended a 71-day hunger strike Tuesday as his detained wife won a temporary release from prison. Arash Sadeghi was to be taken to a hospital, his lawyer Amir Raisian said, while Amnesty International said he would be fed intravenously. His wife, Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee, was temporarily freed for several days, the semi-oicial ISNA news agency reported. Sadeghi is serving a 15-year sentence over charges including “spreading propaganda against the system” and “insulting the founder of the Islamic Republic,” according to Amnesty. The group has said Sadeghi’s charges stem in part from his communication with them. From news services


NEWS

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

Minnesota sex ofender program is constitutional

WEATHER • LOW 20, HIGH 30 • WINDS NW 8-17 MPH Much colder, light snow tonight Much colder temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area today with highs only in the upper 20s to around 30. An upper-level disturbance will bring light snow to the region later tonight into Thursday morning. The cold air will stick around through this weekend. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

22°

26°

28°

23°

Sunny

Partly cloudy

Becoming mostly cloudy

Cloudy

U.S. court says sex ofenders can be held indeinitely

4-DAY FORECAST

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

20°/24°

12°/24°

H

35 34 26 31 28 31 24 22 28 31 22 30 34

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

21 26 15 20 16 19 15 12 17 19 12 18 21

W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

BY STEVE KARNOWSKI associated Press

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

13°/30° 14°/30°

AM light snow Partly cloudy Mostly sunny Mostly sunny

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

L

H

W

16 24 14 18 19 13 22 14 14 10 17 18

23 32 19 24 25 20 30 22 24 16 24 24

sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Chicago 14 / 19

Kirksville 12 / 22 Kansas City 15 / 24

Springfield 17 / 24

St. Louis 20 / 30 Carbondale 24 / 32

Joplin 19 / 31

Poplar Bluff 27 / 37

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 49° 38° 40° 24° 68° -12° 39° 29°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.05” 0.26” 0.18” 0.26” 0.18”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Jan. 3rd No tree, grass, or weed pollen present Mold - 10,056 (moderate) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 20 Month (Total) 71 Season 1493 Year Ago 1245

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (12:15 a.m.) Low (3:59 p.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1939) Record Low (1879) High Last Year Low Last Year

SUN & MOON

First Jan 5

Full Jan 12

Sunrise

Last Jan 19

7:19 AM Sunset

New Jan 27 4:53 PM

Moonrise 11:15 AM Moonset 11:34 PM

Today the Earth is at perihelion. This means the Earth is at its closest point to the sun in the Earth’s orbit. The Earth is actually farthest from the sun in its orbit in July.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 10.46 23 6.87 Jefferson City 21 6.44 Hermann 20 4.02 Washington 25 10.72 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 12.62 Louisiana 15 11.82 Dam 24 25 20.33 Dam 25 26 20.17 Grafton 18 16.08 M.Price, Pool 419 417.70 M.Price, Tail. 21 9.74 St Louis 30 11.89 Chester 27 14.61 Cape Girardeau 32 19.12

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 14.53 18 12.16 Peoria 14 10.90 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 2.98 Sullivan 16 - 2.53 Valley Park 24 8.96 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.10 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 29.43

- 0.11 - 0.16 - 0.29 - 0.37 - 0.45 - 0.05 - 0.05 + 0.02 - 0.05 0.00 0.00 - 0.09 + 0.04 + 0.52 + 0.57

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 0.20 - 0.23 - 0.05 + 0.01 - 0.02 + 0.13 - 0.01

Current Level

24-Hr Change

355.74 355.12 494.99 657.08 705.43 650.57 907.67 840.14 599.93 406.07 600.92 443.43

+ 0.14 - 0.20 + 0.06 - 0.05 + 0.03 - 0.04 + 0.01 - 0.01 - 0.16 0.00 + 0.03 - 0.01

+ 0.19

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

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TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 88° McAllen, Texas

Low: -25° Jordan, Montana

30s Rain

10s -0s 0s

30s

0s

20s

40s

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T-storms

10s 30s

20s

50s 40s 60s

50s

30s

30s

40s

40s

50s 60s

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Snow

Wintry Mix

70s

60s

80s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -22°

Hawaii High: 84°

A complex storm system will bring wet weather to portions of the central Rockies, Intermountain West, Great Basin, Pacific Northwest, and north-central California. Snow showers are expected throughout parts of the Great Lakes and interior sections of the Northeast. Arctic air will continue to move out of Canada and settle farther southward with the coldest temperatures expected across the northern Plains. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 33 Albuquerque 32 Anchorage 9 Atlanta 48 Atlantic City 43 Baltimore 39 Billings -16 Biloxi, Ms. 52 Birmingham 43 Bismarck -19 Boise 17 Boston 39 Buffalo 32 Burlington, Vt. 35 Charleston, S.C. 55 Charleston, W.V. 41 Charlotte 49 Cheyenne 5 Chicago 14 Cincinnati 27 Cleveland 27 Colorado Spgs. 11 Concord, N.H. 36 Dallas 29 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 9 Des Moines 6 55 Destin, Fl. 24 Detroit 40 El Paso 26 Evansville 14 Fairbanks -14 Fargo 23 Flagstaff 69 Fort Myers -16 Great Falls 8 Green Bay 36 Hartford 65 Honolulu 44 Houston 21 Indianapolis 44 Jackson, Ms. 16 Juneau 73 Key West 44 Las Vegas 32 Little Rock 51 Los Angeles 30 Louisville

40 52 21 53 57 52 7 62 51 -6 27 49 34 39 69 42 61 11 19 30 29 33 43 46 75 22 17 65 25 66 32 19 0 43 80 6 11 48 80 55 26 50 30 82 60 41 61 34

W

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City

Tomorrow L H W

22 29 mostly cloudy rain partly cloudy 34 51 mostly cloudy 7 17 sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy 34 52 partly cloudy mostly cloudy 23 38 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 25 35 cloudy -9 11 blowing snow partly cloudy 40 57 mostly sunny partly sunny mostly cloudy 31 51 partly cloudy mostly cloudy -13 -2 very cold 9 15 partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy 28 36 partly cloudy snow showers 20 23 snow showers mostly cloudy 22 27 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 44 60 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 23 30 snow mostly cloudy 33 48 mostly cloudy -7 9 very cold snow 8 15 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 15 25 snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy 16 22 cloudy mostly cloudy 3 14 snow mostly cloudy 22 31 partly cloudy 31 42 drizzle partly cloudy mostly cloudy 55 73 partly cloudy -1 9 snow showers snow 7 14 mostly cloudy partly cloudy 47 62 mostly sunny partly sunny mostly cloudy 15 22 cloudy partly cloudy 43 67 partly cloudy 21 27 cloudy sunny snow showers -4 12 snow mostly cloudy -16 -4 very cold partly cloudy 30 40 mostly cloudy 60 76 mostly sunny showers -10 13 mostly cloudy very cold mostly cloudy -2 6 very cold mostly cloudy 24 32 partly cloudy 66 79 mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy 45 59 mostly cloudy 15 21 cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy 34 54 partly cloudy 22 32 mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy 70 80 sunny partly cloudy 47 63 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 28 39 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy 53 63 showers 21 29 snow showers partly cloudy

City

Today L H

51 Macon 59 McAllen, Tx. 34 Memphis 70 Miami 10 Milwaukee -2 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. -7 52 Mobile Montgomery 51 35 Nashville New Orleans 53 New York City 41 Norfolk, Va. 49 Oklahoma City 20 Omaha 5 Orlando 66 Palm Springs 49 Philadelphia 44 Phoenix 46 Pittsburgh 35 Portland, Me. 37 Portland, Or. 26 Providence 40 Raleigh 51 Rapid City -9 Reno 33 Richmond, Va. 45 Sacramento 48 St. Petersburg 67 Salt Lake City 28 San Antonio 42 San Diego 49 San Francisco 51 Santa Fe 25 Savannah 55 Seattle 21 40 Shreveport -5 Sioux Falls 36 Syracuse 53 Tallahassee 68 Tampa 41 Tucson 19 Tulsa 42 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 67 12 Wichita Wilmington, De. 42 50 Yuma

60 71 40 82 15 3 7 61 59 39 59 52 63 37 18 78 65 55 66 36 42 33 50 63 4 45 62 53 73 37 55 62 56 49 70 34 50 6 37 68 74 67 36 55 81 28 54 69

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy very cold mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy snow partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy very cold rain and snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

38 58 28 64 5 -7 -22 39 36 25 46 26 35 20 6 56 52 25 48 16 24 26 26 33 -8 32 30 41 60 23 42 53 46 29 46 22 34 -5 20 44 58 43 19 28 63 16 23 51

58 72 39 78 14 2 1 59 57 36 61 34 44 31 15 75 66 38 68 24 32 32 36 45 10 39 43 51 71 24 66 63 52 46 62 32 46 4 26 66 70 68 30 37 77 24 36 72

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy very cold very cold partly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy very cold rain and snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny snow partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy very cold mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

82 43 58 60 88 84 45 40 37 85 66 19 85 77 47 37

partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy haze rain and snow snow partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

29 67 38 79 39 57 25 32 31 65 46 32 5 73 55 48

39 72 50 90 54 72 44 41 53 85 79 34 16 81 80 77

partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow showers snow showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

70 42 45 40 75 77 23 35 27 70 51 -6 70 66 40 28

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

27 33 31 78 35 73 57 34 30 65 64 37 36 24 31 32

30 44 36 94 52 85 86 46 31 75 79 57 38 35 38 36

snow showers mostly cloudy rain and snow sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy mostly sunny cloudy snow

MINNEAPOLIS • Minnesota’s program for keeping sex ofenders confined after they complete their prison sentences is constitutional, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday, reversing a lower-court judge who said it violates offenders’ rights because hardly anyone is ever released. A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the state, which argued that the program is both constitutional and necessary to protect citizens from dangerous sexual predators who would otherwise go free. The appeals court sent the case back to the lower court. Seven ofenders are currently free on provisional releases from the Minnesota Sex Offender Program, and only one has been permanently discharged, even though the program is more than 20 years old. That led U.S. District Judge Donovan Frank in 2015 to declare the program unconstitutional and order changes to make it easier for people to get on a pathway for release. As of Tuesday, 721 people were being held under the program. The appeals court ruled that Frank erred in finding the program uncon-

stitutional, saying he held the state to an overly high standard when he declared the program shocked the conscience. The panel concluded that the plaintifs failed to demonstrate that any of the state’s actions or shortcomings in the program “were egregious, malicious, or sadistic as is necessary to meet the conscience-shocking standard.” Dan Gustafson, lead attorney for the plaintifs in the class-action lawsuit, said they’re “really disappointed” and are considering an appeal to either the full 8th Circuit or to the U.S. Supreme Court. He said Frank’s ruling had given them some hope that they weren’t just being “warehoused.” The Minnesota case has been closely watched by lawyers, government officials and activists in the 20 states with similar programs. While civilly committed offenders in California, Wisconsin, New Jersey and other states are allowed to re-enter society after completing treatment, Minnesota has the highest per capita lockup rate, and its courts didn’t order the unconditional release of anyone from its program until August. Eric Janus, a professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul and an expert on the program, said it appears the

PEOPLE Megyn Kelly leaving Fox News for NBC Megyn Kelly, the Fox News star who’s had a contentious relationship with President-elect Donald Trump, said Tuesday that she’s leaving the network for NBC News, where she will host a daytime talk show, a weekend newsmagazine and contribute to breaking news coverage. NBC News made the announcement Tuesday, ending months of speculation over whether she would re-up with Fox or start a new chapter in her career. Her contract with Fox expires this summer. It was initially unclear when she would leave the Fox airwaves and appear on NBC. Kelly’s departure deprives Fox News of its second-mostwatched host, behind only Bill O’Reilly, and a hole at 9 p.m. in its prime-time lineup. “While I will greatly miss my colleagues at Fox, I am delighted to be joining the NBC News family and taking on a new challenge,” Kelly said in a message on Twitter on Tuesday. Kelly became one of Fox’s hottest properties and a lashpoint in the presidential campaign after Trump objected to her questioning in the irst Republican presidential debate a year and a half ago. He tweeted angry messages about her and boycotted another Fox debate after the network refused to replace her as one of the debate moderators. She also became a central igure in the downfall of former Fox News chief Roger Ailes, telling in-house investigators of inappropriate conduct by Ailes that supported women who had made similar accusations. Details about Kelly’s new jobs at NBC will be revealed in upcoming months, said Andrew Lack, chairman of the NBC Universal News Group. Scarborough says he did not attend Trump’s party • MSNBC host Joe Scarborough says he was at President-elect Donald Trump’s Mar-A-Lago estate in Florida during a New Year’s Eve party to talk to Trump, but didn’t attend the festivities. The former Republican congressman battled reporters over the weekend on Twitter who said he attended the party. A photo shows him standing with Trump near revelers. Scarborough said Tuesday

Megyn Kelly

on “Morning Joe” that he talked to Trump for about 15 minutes, but “away from the party.” He said in a tweet Sunday that the photo was taken at a spot the U.S. Secret Service directed him to ahead of his meeting with Trump, in which they discussed a possible interview. He said he and co-host Mika Brzezinski were at the estate about 7 p.m. and left before “any ‘partying’ began.” Springsteen questions Trump’s itness for oice • “The Boss” is questioning whether President-elect Donald Trump is ready to take oice. During an interview on Marc Maron’s “WTF” podcast released Monday, Bruce Springsteen said he

8th Circuit used the lower “rational basis” standard, which gives the state more leeway in designing and implementing the program, when it decided that the program is constitutional. He said he doesn’t think that leaves Frank any room to still find the program unconstitutional. “I would say it’s not a complete death-knell” for the critics of the program, Janus said, noting the possibility of further appeals. “But this is a very serious setback.” Gov. Mark Dayton welcomed the decision while insisting it wouldn’t stop his efforts to improve the program, including seeking funding for less-restrictive facilities. “That means we can continue to make the reforms that we have started and at affordable costs to our state budget,” Dayton said. The program is run by the Minnesota Department of Human Services. Its commissioner, Emily Piper, called the program “an important tool to protect public safety and deliver court-ordered treatment to sex offenders. … Now it’s time for the Legislature to provide the resources we need to run this program so we can continue to keep our communities safe.”

questions whether Trump “is simply competent enough to do this particular job.” Springsteen is a highproile Democrat and appeared with Hillary Clinton on the campaign trail. Springsteen says he understands how Trump got elected. He says the Republican played workingclass fears over a changing economy, increasing diversity and the Islamic State group. He tells Maron that he has “felt disgust” over elections before, “but never, never the kind of fear that you feel now.” Springsteen says he plans to do his best to play a “very, very small part” in trying to ensure America maintains its ideals.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actress Barbara Rush is 90. Actress Dyan Cannon is 78. Country singer Kathy Forester is 62. Actress Ann Magnuson is 61. Country singer Patty Loveless is 60. Actor Julian Sands is 59. Actor Dave Foley is 54. Actress Dot Jones is 53. Actor Rick Hearst is 52. Actress Julia Ormond is 52. Country singer Deana Carter is 51. Actor Jeremy Licht is 46. Actor Damon Gupton is 44. Actress Jill Marie Jones is 42. From news services

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Clintons to attend Trump inauguration ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Falling in line with tra-

dition, Bill and Hillary Clinton plan to attend Donald Trump’s inauguration. It’s a decision that will put Hillary Clinton on the inaugural platform as her bitter rival from the 2016 campaign assumes the office she long sought. The Clintons announced their decision to attend the Jan. 20 inauguration shortly after former President George W. Bush’s oice said Tuesday he would attend along with former first lady Laura Bush. The Bushes are “pleased to be able to

witness the peaceful transfer of power — a hallmark of American democracy — and swearing-in of President Trump and Vice President Pence,” Bush’s office said in a statement. It is traditional for former presidents and their spouses to attend the inauguration. Former President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, earlier said they plan to attend Trump’s inaugural. Former President George H.W. Bush, 92, and his wife, Barbara, do not plan to attend the inauguration due to the former president’s age and health, his oice said.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017 • B

CLOSING IN ON CANTON? Warner, Bruce are inalists for Pro Football Hall of Fame

Watching Rams stink goes from fun to boring BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Here’s how the Rams finished their first season back in Los Angeles: They were trailing a bad Arizona Cardinals team by 38 points with 34 seconds left in their seventh consecutive

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

loss when their third-string quarterback fumbled on the game’s final play. It was a perfect ending, so ugly it was beautiful. I would be lying if I said I watched it. I’ve been an outspoken proponent of hate-watching the Rams since they relocated. I’m not here to tell you to stop. But I

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams quarterback Kurt Warner looks to pass to Marshall Faulk in the 2002 Super Bowl against New England.

See FREDERICKSON • Page B6

Is this the year for quarterback Kurt Warner? The former Super Bowl champion and NFL most valuable player with the St. Louis Rams was among 15 modern-era finalists announced Tuesday for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. This is Warner’s third

year as a finalist. New to the finalist list this year is another star of those Greatest Show on Turf teams, wide receiver Isaac Bruce. The list also includes the late Don Coryell, the offensive innovator who coached the “Cardiac Cards” St. Louis football Cardinals teams of the mid-1970s. The rest of the modernera finalist list consists of

See NFL • Page B6

Blues need more of same

SEC BASKETBALL PREVIEW

BRINGING UP Tigers take four-game losing streak into conference opener against LSU

THE REAR

Classic performance had right formula BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

C ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Willie Jackson (right) fouls Arizona’s Rawle Alkins on Dec. 10, in Columbia, Mo.

> 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. LSU, SEC Network > Kentucky freshman Monk leads SEC in scoring. B4 > Team-by-team previews, preseason rankings. B4

The Winter Classic was touted by some as a once-in-a-lifetime event. It would be a big help for the Blues if the way they played wasn’t. The Blues proved again Monday that it can be done, that they do have it in them to play a winning style against a top club. Against the Blackhawks, one of the best third-period teams in the league, they took control of the game in the final 20 minutes and, against a team that was 191-3 when either ahead or tied after two periods, put together one of the team’s biggest feelgood wins since, well, they beat the Blackhawks in Game 7 of the playofs last season. The Blues didn’t just outscore the Blackhawks 3-0 in the third period at Busch Stadium on Monday, they outshot them 12-6, and the game’s possession stats began to swing noticeably in the Blues’ favor from early in the second period on. “That’s how we need to play,” said forward Patrik Berglund, who got the goal that evened the score at 1-1. “We need to check and make the right decisions and if we do that, we will be really successful this year. But we’ve been going too much back and forth and that is our problem this year. But if we can find a way to put a couple of games

OLUMBIA, MO. • There’s

nothing Kim Anderson can do to erase the Missouri basketball team’s first two months of the season, but to salvage his third year on the bench, he’s tried convincing his team the season starts anew this week. The Tigers finished nonconference play 5-7 — only three other high-major conference teams are under .500 — and trudge into their Southeastern Conference opener on a four-game losing streak. Heading into Wednesday’s 8 p.m. tipoff against Louisiana State (8-4, 0-1 SEC) at Mizzou Arena, Anderson has pressed the reset button on the season and reminded his players their record is back to 0-0. Anderson understands it’s a coaching cliché, but he’s running short of motivational tactics. “People probably don’t want to hear this, but as you look back on the nonconference (games), certainly we didn’t accomplish what we would have liked to, but I think you can realistically say it wasn’t like we got blown out by 35 points every game,” Anderson said. “We competed. We had some games where we didn’t play well and certainly there were some teams on our schedule we should have beaten and we didn’t. There’s nothing I can do about that now. I’ve talked to our guys that this is an opportunity for a new start. I’m sure a lot of coaches are saying the same thing today. We just are going

See BLUES • Page B3

>7 p.m. Thursday vs. Carolina, FSM

See MIZZOU • Page B4

Putting the student in student-athlete SLU’s Kemph is an excellent example of how system should work JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Every once in a while, you hear about a kid who makes you feel good about amateur athletics, a young star who puts a genuine

emphasis on the the student part of student-athlete. If you haven’t heard of Jackie Kemph, do yourself a favor and watch one of her St. Louis University women’s basketball games this season. Midway through her junior year, the talented guard is already SLU’s all-time assists leader. And she’s well on her way to becoming the Billikens’ all-time

leading scorer. She’s as competitive as any athlete in St. Louis — amateur or pro, men or women. Equally impressive, I challenge you to find a more committed student-athlete in the state, whether at SLU, Mizzou or any other school. With all due respect to the brilliant Vladimir Tarasenko, ASSOCIATED PRESS

See ORTIZ • Page B5

SLU guard Jackie Kemph figures to own several school records.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017 • B

CLOSING IN ON CANTON? Warner, Bruce are inalists for Pro Football Hall of Fame

Watching Rams stink goes from fun to boring BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Here’s how the Rams finished their first season back in Los Angeles: They were trailing a bad Arizona Cardinals team by 38 points with 34 seconds left in their seventh consecutive

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

loss when their third-string quarterback fumbled on the game’s final play. It was a perfect ending, so ugly it was beautiful. I would be lying if I said I watched it. I’ve been an outspoken proponent of hate-watching the Rams since they relocated. I’m not here to tell you to stop. But I

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams quarterback Kurt Warner looks to pass to Marshall Faulk in the 2002 Super Bowl against New England.

See FREDERICKSON • Page B6

Is this the year for quarterback Kurt Warner? The former Super Bowl champion and NFL most valuable player with the St. Louis Rams was among 15 modern-era finalists announced Tuesday for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. This is Warner’s third

year as a finalist. New to the finalist list this year is another star of those Greatest Show on Turf teams, wide receiver Isaac Bruce. The list also includes the late Don Coryell, the offensive innovator who coached the “Cardiac Cards” St. Louis football Cardinals teams of the mid-1970s. The rest of the modernera finalist list consists of

See NFL • Page B6

Blues need more of same

SEC BASKETBALL PREVIEW

BRINGING UP Tigers take four-game losing streak into conference opener against LSU

THE REAR

Classic performance had right formula BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

C ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s Willie Jackson (right) fouls Arizona’s Rawle Alkins on Dec. 10, in Columbia, Mo.

nothing Kim Anderson can do to erase the Missouri basketball team’s first two months of the season, but to salvage his third year on the bench, he’s tried convincing his team the season starts anew this week. The Tigers finished nonconference play 5-7 — only three other high-major conference teams are under .500 — and trudge into their Southeastern Conference opener on a four-game losing streak. Heading into Wednesday’s 8 p.m. tipoff against Louisiana State (8-4, 0-1 SEC) at Mizzou Arena, Anderson has pressed the reset button on the season and reminded his players their record is back to 0-0. Anderson understands it’s a coaching cliché, but he’s running short of motivational tactics. “People probably don’t want to hear this, but as you look back on the nonconference (games), certainly we didn’t accomplish what we would have liked to, but I think you can realistically say it wasn’t like we got blown out by 35 points every game,” Anderson said. “We competed. We had some games where we didn’t play well and certainly there were some teams on our schedule we should have beaten and we didn’t. There’s nothing I can do about that now. I’ve talked to our guys that this is an opportunity for a new start. I’m sure a lot of coaches are saying the same thing today. We just are going

n Kim A derso n

> 8 p.m. Wednesday vs. LSU, SEC Network > Kentucky freshman Monk leads SEC in scoring. B4 > Team-by-team previews, preseason rankings. B4

OLUMBIA, MO. • There’s

The Winter Classic was touted by some as a once-in-a-lifetime event. It would be a big help for the Blues if the way they played wasn’t. The Blues proved again Monday that it can be done, that they do have it in them to play a winning style against a top club. Against the Blackhawks, one of the best third-period teams in the league, they took control of the game in the final 20 minutes and, against a team that was 191-3 when either ahead or tied after two periods, put together one of the team’s biggest feelgood wins since, well, they beat the Blackhawks in Game 7 of the playofs last season. The Blues didn’t just outscore the Blackhawks 3-0 in the third period at Busch Stadium on Monday, they outshot them 12-6, and the game’s possession stats began to swing noticeably in the Blues’ favor from early in the second period on. “That’s how we need to play,” said forward Patrik Berglund, who got the goal that evened the score at 1-1. “We need to check and make the right decisions and if we do that, we will be really successful this year. But we’ve been going too much back and forth and that is our problem this year. But if we can find a way to put a couple of games See BLUES • Page B3

> 7 p.m. Thursday vs. Carolina, FSM

See MIZZOU • Page B4

Putting the student in student-athlete SLU’s Kemph is an excellent example of how system should work JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Every once in a while, you hear about a kid who makes you feel good about amateur athletics, a young star who puts a genuine

emphasis on the the student part of student-athlete. If you haven’t heard of Jackie Kemph, do yourself a favor and watch one of her St. Louis University women’s basketball games this season. Midway through her junior year, the talented guard is already SLU’s all-time assists leader. And she’s well on her way to becoming the Billikens’ all-time

leading scorer. She’s as competitive as any athlete in St. Louis — amateur or pro, men or women. Equally impressive, I challenge you to find a more committed student-athlete in the state, whether at SLU, Mizzou or any other school. With all due respect to the brilliant Vladimir Tarasenko, ASSOCIATED PRESS

See ORTIZ • Page B5

SLU guard Jackie Kemph figures to own several school records.

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SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 1/5 vs. Carolina 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 1/7 vs. Dallas 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 1/10 vs. Boston 7 p.m. NBCSN

Thursday 1/12 at Los Angeles 9:30 p.m. FSM

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

Day wants shorter swing

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 1/4 vs. LSU 8 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/7 at Georgia Noon SEC Network

Tuesday 1/10 vs. Auburn 6 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/14 at Arkansas 5 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 1/4 at La Salle 6 p.m.

Sunday 1/8 vs. Davidson 1 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 1/11 at Duquesne 6 p.m.

Saturday 1/14 at George Mason 1:30 p.m. NBCSN

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 1/7 at Indiana 4 p.m. ESPNU

Wednesday 1/11 vs. Michigan 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/14 vs. Maryland 5 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 1/17 at Purdue 6 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 1/20: vs. Harrisburg, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 1/22: vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Rutgers at Michigan State, BTN 5:30 p.m. College: Villanova at Butler, FS1 6 p.m. College: St. Louis U. at La Salle, WXOS (101.1 FM) 6 p.m. College: Georgia Tech at Duke, ESPN2 6 p.m. College women: Baylor at West Virginia, FS2 6 p.m. College women: Iowa State at Texas Tech, FSM 6 p.m. College: Auburn at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Georgetown at Providence, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: South Carolina at Georgia, ESPNU 7 p.m. NBA: Bulls at Cavaliers, ESPN 7 p.m. College: Iowa State at Baylor, ESPNews 7 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Indiana State, KATZ (1600 AM) 7:30 p.m. College: Penn State at Michigan, BTN 7:30 p.m. College: Creighton at St. John’s, FS1 8 p.m. College: Missouri vs. LSU, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 8 p.m. College: Missouri State at Illinois State, FSM, KZQZ (1430 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 8 p.m. College: Oregon at Washington, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Temple at Southern Methodist, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Tulsa at Houston, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Warriors, ESPN 9:30 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Clippers, FSM Plus 10 p.m. College: San Diego State at Nevada, ESPN2 10 p.m. College: Boise State at UNLV, CBSSN 10 p.m. College: New Mexico at Utah State, ESPNU HOCKEY 2 p.m. IIHF World Junior Championship: semiinal, United States vs. Russia, NHL Network 6:30 p.m. IIHF World Junior Championship: semiinal, Canada vs. Sweden, NHL Network 7 p.m. Rangers at Flyers, NBCSN SOCCER 1:55 p.m. English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs. Chelsea, NBCSN

DIGEST Serena Williams starts year with a victory Serena Williams ended four months on the sideline with lashes of form and occasional bouts of frustration in a 6-3, 6-4 win over Pauline Parmentier on Tuesday in the irst round of the ASB Classic in Auckland, New Zealand. Williams, who rested various injuries after her semiinal exit at the U.S. Open, waited an extra day to make her irst appearance of 2017 because rain Monday had forced the postponement of her match. It was wind rather than rain that troubled the second-ranked Williams, with a swirling breeze on the open-air center court at the Auckland Tennis Center making it diicult to serve. She only needed 74 minutes to beat No. 69-ranked Parmentier, serving eight aces — including one on match point — but also prolonged the match with a series of unforced errors, including four double-faults. “You always feel rusty going out there for your irst match,” Williams said. “I deinitely felt that rust, but mentally I knew how to get it back and get in there.” No. 19 Caroline Wozniacki also made a brief but impressive performance on center court, beating American Nicole Gibbs 6-1, 6-0 in just 50 minutes. Wozniacki looked sharp and conident, living up to her third seeding behind Serena and Venus Williams. U.S. goes to Hopman Cup inal • American teammates CoCo Vandeweghe and Jack Sock combined for a 3-0 win over Spain at the Hopman Cup and secured a spot in the inal in Perth, Australia. The U.S. team opened the tournament with a 3-0 win over Czech Republic, and followed it up with another sweep. Vandeweghe beat Lara Arruabarrena 6-2, 6-4 and Sock had a 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 win over Feliciano Lopez in the singles matches before teaming up to win the mixed doubles 4-3 (3), 3-4 (2), 4-3 (2). Elsewhere in tennis • Top-ranked Andy Murray extended his winning streak to a career-best 25 matches by defeating Jeremy Chardy of France 6-0, 7-6 (2) in his irst match of the year at the Qatar Open. In Brisbane, Australia, Rafael Nadal beat Alexandr Dolgopolov 6-3, 6-3 in his return from a wrist injury that curtailed the end of his 2016 season. In the women’s draw, Garbine Muguruza, Karolina Pliskova and Elina Svitolina are already through to the quarterinals. And Destanee Aiava, a 16-year-old high school senior. became the irst player born in the 2000s to win a main draw match in an elite WTA event when she beat Bethanie Mattek-Sands 2-6, 6-3, 6-4 in a irst-round match that spanned two days. Around baseball • The Cincinnati Reds agreed to a $3 million, one-year contract with righthander Drew Storen, their irst move to improve a terrible bullpen. Storen went 4-3 with a 5.23 ERA in 57 appearances last season for Toronto and Seattle, which primarily used him in roles other than closer. He had three saves in four chances. ... The Arizona Diamondbacks traded outielder Peter O’Brien to the Kansas City Royals for minor league righthander Sam Lewis. Drafted as a catcher, O’Brien converted to the outield last season. The 26-year-old hit .141 with ive home runs and nine RBIs in 28 games with the Diamondbacks. Associated Press

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CONTACT US

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Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

Jason Day launches a tee shot during the inal round of The Players Championship last May. Day is playing this week after back problems led to the longest break of his career.

No. 1 player hoping to avoid back injuries ASSOCIATED PRESS

KAPALUA, HAWAII • Jason Day

would love nothing more than a long year, and that might start with a shorter swing. Day is coming off a longest break of his career, and while he arrived on Maui for the SBS Tournament of Champions as the No. 1 player in the world, he didn’t bring much momentum with him. He last played Sept. 23 at the Tour Championship, withdrawing from the second round with a back injury. Two weeks earlier, he withdrew from the final round of the BMW Championship with back pain. “I picked up a club twice in those three months and I worked hard on my rehab, especially the back,” Day said Tuesday at Kapalua. “Obviously, that’s kind of been plaguing me through my career with regards to having too many withdrawals. But I’m doing everything I possibly can ... and I feel pretty good. I feel fit, and I’m looking forward to a good, solid year.” Day said his swing became longer last year, which meant more turn in his upper body and more swing. Not many others go at it as hard as Day with nearly every club in the bag, from a towering 5-iron, a 9-iron he gouges out of the rough or tee shots that rank

him among the top power players in the game. But it might have come at a cost. “If you have a lot more turn, a lot more speed and then unwinding, it’s a lot more balance through the ball, and that can obviously wreak havoc on your back, as well,” he said. “I feel good. I’m not saying that I’m obviously clear and I’m out of the woods, but I’m definitely cautiously optimistic about how things are progressing.” When he returned to practice, he tried to shorten the swing. That might help him with his core, though he could lose distance, and Day was OK with that. The question is whether he can keep the swing more compact. “I think I’ve got enough distance right now to be able to get away with it,” he said. “I’ve just got to keep staying on top of it. It’s very, very difficult for me to shorten it right now, because just every time I turn, the hands, they want to keep it going and going and going.” Day also believes a longer swing that generates more speed led to a thumb injury in 2014, which he feared more than the back. The 29-year-old Australian has managed to do well with injuries, whether to his thumb or his back. He first felt the thumb injury during the Match Play Championship in 2014, which he won in a 23-hole final against Victor Dubuisson. The first serious back pain of the year was at the Match Play in Austin, Texas, when he felt it

spasm toward the end of his first match against Graeme McDowell. Day wasn’t certain he would be able to return the next day. He got therapy, showed up the next day and drove the first green on the 381-yard opening hole at Austin Country Club and kept playing until he had the trophy. Day said the facet joint occasionally will lock up in his back and start to spasm, and it could take him as many as two weeks before he has it under control and he can play again. The problem at the end of the year during the FedEx Cup playoffs was that he didn’t have enough time for it to get better. So now he starts a new year, with new hope for health, and expectations that he can be just as powerful with his game. Day held the No. 1 spot ever since that victory at the Match Play, mainly because Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy were too far behind to catch him and no one else played well enough. When he won The Players, it was Day’s seventh victory in 10 months, most against strong fields. Only three other players have gone an entire calendar year at No. 1 — Nick Faldo in 1993, Greg Norman in 1996 and Tiger Woods eight times. “I’d like to go a full year and then just slowly build on that,” Day said. “I know what I need to do. I just need to keep working hard and practicing, and hopefully the results come with the process.”

Watson puts color back in play Lefty is using pink ball in Hawaii, considering green for Masters ASSOCIATED PRESS

KAPALUA, HAWAII • Bubba

Watson gazed toward the blue Pacific on the first tee at Kapalua and unleashed a big drive with his pink golf ball. Next up probably will be a lime green ball. The two-time Masters champion is even thinking of a twotone ball. “If we’re going to challenge ourselves, let’s challenge ourselves to make something that’s really of the wall, that’s still playable,” Watson said. “Companies I want to be with are ones that let me have an influence and let me in on the decision-making.” That company is South Koreabased Volvik, with which Watson signed a multiyear deal. The Volvik ball mainly has been used on the LPGA Tour in recent years, and Watson represents its first big player on the PGA Tour. Watson said he initiated the interest after watching the World Long Drive Championship in which the finalists used colored Volvik balls. He previously heard about it from Craig Stadler during the Champions Dinner at the Masters. “They used a pink one and they used an orange one,” Watson said. “I was watching this, and I’d never looked at the company. So I Googled the website, I looked at it, and read about. It’s a small company. You can’t just come out here and just start boasting and spending advertising dollars and things, because you’ll hurt your company real fast. ... They’re doing things differently, and that’s how I noticed them.” Watson said it wasn’t long after the Long Drive that he acquired some Volvik golf balls to give them a try. He also asked his caddie, Ted Scott, to experiment with them. He tried the S3 model — “it was pretty cool to watch it fly,” he said — and eventually settled on the S4. Watson also will use a white ball, which Volvik calls the “Blue Pearl” because it has a hint of blue

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bubba Watson, who has used a pink-colored driver in years past, is playing a pink-colored ball this week.

when slightly rotated. Early reports out of South Korea said that Watson wanted to play a green ball at the Masters, which is not entirely true. “It’s not the same green,” he said. Watson has always been about color, even the year he wore all white the first time he won the Masters. He had Ping make a hot pink shaft for his driver, and then the club head in pink, which he used to raise money for charity. He thinks colored golf balls, which haven’t been in style on the PGA Tour in 30 years, could help in other ways. “You talk about growing the game, why would you not want people to have more fun, make the game more fun, interesting and creative?” Watson said. “Same thing that Ping let me do with a pink driver.” Watson said he wants to talk to the USGA about using a diferent colored ball on different holes, though that would be unlikely. The USGA has a “Conforming Golf Ball List” in which each ball is listed separately, sometimes based on the markings. Carter Rich, the USGA’s director of equipment rules and conformance, said each ball color would

be a separate listing. As long as the PGA Tour adopts the “One Ball Condition,” Watson would have to stick with the same color for an entire round.

DAY SIGNS WITH NIKE Jason Day made it official when he showed up at Kapalua with the swoosh. Nike is getting out of the hard equipment business and focusing on its apparel, and it signed the No. 1 player in the world. Day also has a deal with TaylorMade for his clubs and golf ball. “Joining Nike is a dream come true,” Day said in a news release announcing the deal. “The brand is synonymous with the world’s best athletes. “I’m honored and can’t wait to be part of the team and working closely with Nike to take my game, and the sport of golf, to even higher levels.” Tiger Woods, who has been with Nike since he turned pro 20 years ago, welcomed him to the Nike family with a tweet on Monday. Nike now has the Nos. 1 and 2 players in the world (Rory McIlroy) wearing its swoosh for the second time. Woods and McIlroy were Nos. 1 and 2 for part of 2013.


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Thursday 1/5 vs. Carolina 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 1/7 vs. Dallas 7 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 1/10 vs. Boston 7 p.m. NBCSN

Thursday 1/12 at Los Angeles 9:30 p.m. FSM

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

Day wants shorter swing

Mizzou men’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Wednesday 1/4 vs. LSU 8 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/7 at Georgia Noon SEC Network

Tuesday 1/10 vs. Auburn 6 p.m. SEC Network

Saturday 1/14 at Arkansas 5 p.m. SEC Network

SLU men’s basketball • slubillikens.com | 314-977-4758 Wednesday 1/4 at La Salle 6 p.m.

Sunday 1/8 vs. Davidson 1 p.m. NBCSN

Wednesday 1/11 at Duquesne 6 p.m.

Saturday 1/14 at George Mason 1:30 p.m. NBCSN

Illinois men’s basketball • ightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 1/7 at Indiana 4 p.m. ESPNU

Wednesday 1/11 vs. Michigan 8 p.m. BTN

Saturday 1/14 vs. Maryland 5 p.m. ESPN2

Tuesday 1/17 at Purdue 6 p.m. BTN

OTHER EVENTS MAJOR ARENA SOCCER LEAGUE • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 1/20: vs. Harrisburg, 7:35 p.m. Sun. 1/22: vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ON THE AIR BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Rutgers at Michigan State, BTN 5:30 p.m. College: Villanova at Butler, FS1 6 p.m. College: St. Louis U. at La Salle, WXOS (101.1 FM) 6 p.m. College: Georgia Tech at Duke, ESPN2 6 p.m. College women: Baylor at West Virginia, FS2 6 p.m. College women: Iowa State at Texas Tech, FSM 6 p.m. College: Auburn at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Georgetown at Providence, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: South Carolina at Georgia, ESPNU 7 p.m. NBA: Bulls at Cavaliers, ESPN 7 p.m. College: Iowa State at Baylor, ESPNews 7 p.m. College: SIU Carbondale vs. Indiana State, KATZ (1600 AM) 7:30 p.m. College: Penn State at Michigan, BTN 7:30 p.m. College: Creighton at St. John’s, FS1 8 p.m. College: Missouri vs. LSU, SEC Network, KTRS (550 AM) 8 p.m. College: Missouri State at Illinois State, FSM, KZQZ (1430 AM), KYRO (1280 AM) 8 p.m. College: Oregon at Washington, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Temple at Southern Methodist, CBSSN 8 p.m. College: Tulsa at Houston, ESPNU 9:30 p.m. NBA: Trail Blazers at Warriors, ESPN 9:30 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Clippers, FSM Plus 10 p.m. College: San Diego State at Nevada, ESPN2 10 p.m. College: Boise State at UNLV, CBSSN 10 p.m. College: New Mexico at Utah State, ESPNU HOCKEY 2 p.m. IIHF World Junior Championship: semiinal, United States vs. Russia, NHL Network 6:30 p.m. IIHF World Junior Championship: semiinal, Canada vs. Sweden, NHL Network 7 p.m. Rangers at Flyers, NBCSN SOCCER 1:55 p.m. English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs. Chelsea, NBCSN

DIGEST Serena Williams starts year with a victory Serena Williams ended four months on the sideline with lashes of form and occasional bouts of frustration in a 6-3, 6-4 win over Pauline Parmentier on Tuesday in the irst round of the ASB Classic in Auckland, New Zealand. Williams, who rested various injuries after her semiinal exit at the U.S. Open, waited an extra day to make her irst appearance of 2017 because rain Monday had forced the postponement of her match. It was wind rather than rain that troubled the second-ranked Williams, with a swirling breeze on the open-air center court at the Auckland Tennis Center making it diicult to serve. She only needed 74 minutes to beat No. 69-ranked Parmentier, serving eight aces — including one on match point — but also prolonged the match with a series of unforced errors, including four double-faults. “You always feel rusty going out there for your irst match,” Williams said. “I deinitely felt that rust, but mentally I knew how to get it back and get in there.” No. 19 Caroline Wozniacki also made a brief but impressive performance on center court, beating American Nicole Gibbs 6-1, 6-0 in just 50 minutes. Wozniacki looked sharp and conident, living up to her third seeding behind Serena and Venus Williams. On Wednesday, Venus Williams withdrew from the tournament with an arm injury. Williams beat New Zealand’s Jade Lewis in a irst-round match and was due to play Japan’s Naomi Osaka in the second round later Wednesday but withdrew before the match. U.S. goes to Hopman Cup inal • American teammates CoCo Vandeweghe and Jack Sock combined for a 3-0 win over Spain at the Hopman Cup and secured a spot in the inal in Perth, Australia. Vandeweghe beat Lara Arruabarrena 6-2, 6-4 and Sock had a 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 win over Feliciano Lopez in the singles matches before teaming up to win the mixed doubles 4-3 (3), 3-4 (2), 4-3 (2). Elsewhere in tennis • Top-ranked Andy Murray extended his winning streak to a career-best 25 matches by defeating Jeremy Chardy of France 6-0, 7-6 (2) in his irst match of the year at the Qatar Open. In Brisbane, Australia, Rafael Nadal beat Alexandr Dolgopolov 6-3, 6-3 in his return from a wrist injury that curtailed his 2016 season. In the women’s draw, Garbine Muguruza, Karolina Pliskova and Elina Svitolina are already through to the quarterinals. And Destanee Aiava, a 16-year-old high school senior. became the irst player born in the 2000s to win a main draw match in an elite WTA event when she beat Bethanie Mattek-Sands 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Around baseball • The Cincinnati Reds agreed to a $3 million, one-year contract with righthander Drew Storen, their irst move to improve a terrible bullpen. Storen went 4-3 with a 5.23 ERA in 57 appearances last season for Toronto and Seattle, which primarily used him in roles other than closer. He had three saves in four chances. ... The Arizona Diamondbacks traded outielder Peter O’Brien to the Kansas City Royals for minor league righthander Sam Lewis. The 26-year-old hit .141 with ive home runs and nine RBIs in 28 games with the Diamondbacks. Associated Press

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use irst initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

Jason Day launches a tee shot during the inal round of The Players Championship last May. Day is playing this week after back problems led to the longest break of his career.

No. 1 player hoping to avoid back injuries ASSOCIATED PRESS

KAPALUA, HAWAII • Jason Day

would love nothing more than a long year, and that might start with a shorter swing. Day is coming off a longest break of his career, and while he arrived on Maui for the SBS Tournament of Champions as the No. 1 player in the world, he didn’t bring much momentum with him. He last played Sept. 23 at the Tour Championship, withdrawing from the second round with a back injury. Two weeks earlier, he withdrew from the final round of the BMW Championship with back pain. “I picked up a club twice in those three months and I worked hard on my rehab, especially the back,” Day said Tuesday at Kapalua. “Obviously, that’s kind of been plaguing me through my career with regards to having too many withdrawals. But I’m doing everything I possibly can ... and I feel pretty good. I feel fit, and I’m looking forward to a good, solid year.” Day said his swing became longer last year, which meant more turn in his upper body and more swing. Not many others go at it as hard as Day with nearly every club in the bag, from a towering 5-iron, a 9-iron he gouges out of the rough or tee shots that rank

him among the top power players in the game. But it might have come at a cost. “If you have a lot more turn, a lot more speed and then unwinding, it’s a lot more balance through the ball, and that can obviously wreak havoc on your back, as well,” he said. “I feel good. I’m not saying that I’m obviously clear and I’m out of the woods, but I’m definitely cautiously optimistic about how things are progressing.” When he returned to practice, he tried to shorten the swing. That might help him with his core, though he could lose distance, and Day was OK with that. The question is whether he can keep the swing more compact. “I think I’ve got enough distance right now to be able to get away with it,” he said. “I’ve just got to keep staying on top of it. It’s very, very difficult for me to shorten it right now, because just every time I turn, the hands, they want to keep it going and going and going.” Day also believes a longer swing that generates more speed led to a thumb injury in 2014, which he feared more than the back. The 29-year-old Australian has managed to do well with injuries, whether to his thumb or his back. He first felt the thumb injury during the Match Play Championship in 2014, which he won in a 23-hole final against Victor Dubuisson. The first serious back pain of the year was at the Match Play in Austin, Texas, when he felt it

spasm toward the end of his first match against Graeme McDowell. Day wasn’t certain he would be able to return the next day. He got therapy, showed up the next day and drove the first green on the 381-yard opening hole at Austin Country Club and kept playing until he had the trophy. Day said the facet joint occasionally will lock up in his back and start to spasm, and it could take him as many as two weeks before he has it under control and he can play again. The problem at the end of the year during the FedEx Cup playoffs was that he didn’t have enough time for it to get better. So now he starts a new year, with new hope for health, and expectations that he can be just as powerful with his game. Day held the No. 1 spot ever since that victory at the Match Play, mainly because Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy were too far behind to catch him and no one else played well enough. When he won The Players, it was Day’s seventh victory in 10 months, most against strong fields. Only three other players have gone an entire calendar year at No. 1 — Nick Faldo in 1993, Greg Norman in 1996 and Tiger Woods eight times. “I’d like to go a full year and then just slowly build on that,” Day said. “I know what I need to do. I just need to keep working hard and practicing, and hopefully the results come with the process.”

Watson puts color back in play Lefty is using pink ball in Hawaii, considering green for Masters ASSOCIATED PRESS

KAPALUA, HAWAII • Bubba

Watson gazed toward the blue Pacific on the first tee at Kapalua and unleashed a big drive with his pink golf ball. Next up probably will be a lime green ball. The two-time Masters champion is even thinking of a twotone ball. “If we’re going to challenge ourselves, let’s challenge ourselves to make something that’s really of the wall, that’s still playable,” Watson said. “Companies I want to be with are ones that let me have an influence and let me in on the decision-making.” That company is South Koreabased Volvik, with which Watson signed a multiyear deal. The Volvik ball mainly has been used on the LPGA Tour in recent years, and Watson represents its first big player on the PGA Tour. Watson said he initiated the interest after watching the World Long Drive Championship in which the finalists used colored Volvik balls. He previously heard about it from Craig Stadler during the Champions Dinner at the Masters. “They used a pink one and they used an orange one,” Watson said. “I was watching this, and I’d never looked at the company. So I Googled the website, I looked at it, and read about. It’s a small company. You can’t just come out here and just start boasting and spending advertising dollars and things, because you’ll hurt your company real fast. ... They’re doing things differently, and that’s how I noticed them.” Watson said it wasn’t long after the Long Drive that he acquired some Volvik golf balls to give them a try. He also asked his caddie, Ted Scott, to experiment with them. He tried the S3 model — “it was pretty cool to watch it fly,” he said — and eventually settled on the S4. Watson also will use a white ball, which Volvik calls the “Blue Pearl” because it has a hint of blue

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bubba Watson, who has used a pink-colored driver in years past, is playing a pink-colored ball this week.

when slightly rotated. Early reports out of South Korea said that Watson wanted to play a green ball at the Masters, which is not entirely true. “It’s not the same green,” he said. Watson has always been about color, even the year he wore all white the first time he won the Masters. He had Ping make a hot pink shaft for his driver, and then the club head in pink, which he used to raise money for charity. He thinks colored golf balls, which haven’t been in style on the PGA Tour in 30 years, could help in other ways. “You talk about growing the game, why would you not want people to have more fun, make the game more fun, interesting and creative?” Watson said. “Same thing that Ping let me do with a pink driver.” Watson said he wants to talk to the USGA about using a diferent colored ball on different holes, though that would be unlikely. The USGA has a “Conforming Golf Ball List” in which each ball is listed separately, sometimes based on the markings. Carter Rich, the USGA’s director of equipment rules and conformance, said each ball color would

be a separate listing. As long as the PGA Tour adopts the “One Ball Condition,” Watson would have to stick with the same color for an entire round.

DAY SIGNS WITH NIKE Jason Day made it official when he showed up at Kapalua with the swoosh. Nike is getting out of the hard equipment business and focusing on its apparel, and it signed the No. 1 player in the world. Day also has a deal with TaylorMade for his clubs and golf ball. “Joining Nike is a dream come true,” Day said in a news release announcing the deal. “The brand is synonymous with the world’s best athletes. “I’m honored and can’t wait to be part of the team and working closely with Nike to take my game, and the sport of golf, to even higher levels.” Tiger Woods, who has been with Nike since he turned pro 20 years ago, welcomed him to the Nike family with a tweet on Monday. Nike now has the Nos. 1 and 2 players in the world (Rory McIlroy) wearing its swoosh for the second time. Woods and McIlroy were Nos. 1 and 2 for part of 2013.


SPORTS

01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

’Bama dismisses Kiin factor Saban gets snippy with questions about departed coordinator ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONTGOMERY, ALA. • Lane

Kiffin says he could have remained at Alabama as ofensive coordinator through the national championship game if he had wanted to. Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban, meanwhile, got testy Tuesday when asked several times about how the Kiffin-to-Steve Sarkisian move would change preparation. “We’re in the planning stages right now, so I don’t know why y’all keep asking me what changes we’re going to make,” he said in response to the first question asked on a media teleconference. “Dabo’s a good friend of mine. Maybe I’ll just call him up and tell him what we’re going to do.” Saban also dismissed Kiin’s talk of possibly helping the Tide in some capacity from the press box Monday. He made it clear that’s not happening. “It’s really not even possible from a legal standpoint for him to do those things,” he said. “That’s not something that we’re interested in pursuing.” Kiffin told ESPN’s Mike & Mike show Tuesday that the decision to leave was mutual, even though the Tide’s ofense could have performed better in the 24-7 semifinal win over Washington. “I know this was a decision that I came up with, and it was very diicult to do,” said Kiin, who’s taking over as Florida Atlantic’s head coach. “This was not something that Nick Saban forced me to do by any means. “If I wanted to coach this game, I would have coached this game, and I just thought that it wasn’t the best thing for the players.” Kiffin and Saban announced Monday that incoming ofensive coordinator Sarkisian, who has worked as an analyst this season, would run the ofense and call plays against Clemson. Both described it as a mutual decision. Alabama had just 57 passing yards against the Huskies. Backup tailback Bo Scarbrough accounted for 180 yards, or 55 percent of the Tide’s total offense. Saban said he didn’t think leading up to the Peach Bowl that letting Kiffin juggle two jobs would be a problem. Defensive coordinator Kirby Smart did it last season before leaving for Georgia and ofensive coordinator Jim McElwain finished the 2011 season after taking the Colorado State head job. “I try to make the decisions based on what’s best for helping our players be successful,” Saban said. “At the time there was no anticipation or thought that there would be any kind of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alabama coach Nick Saban reacts after Alabama fumbled against Washington during the second half of the Peach Bowl on Saturday. Alabama won 24-7.

problem relative to managing to jobs at once. When we sort of saw, and agreed, that that was a little bit of a tough team, then we decided to move in a diferent direction.” It’s unclear how well Alabama players know Sarkisian. He was involved in coaches meetings and planning, but Saban said analysts aren’t “really allowed to be involved with the team.” Scarbrough was asked what kind of interaction he has had with Sarkisian. “On the sideline, he always

tells me to keep my helmet on and stay ready because you never know when your number is called,” the tailback said. Kiin, meanwhile, praised his relationship with Saban on the radio show. “We had a great relationship,” he said. “It just kept getting better and better as time went. Obviously the success on the field was fun and the players that we were able to coach in our three years in one of the greatest runs in the history of college football. And one more game to finish it.”

Kiffin said he watched Alabama’s defense struggle against Clemson in last year’s national championship, with Smart pulling double duty as Georgia’s new head coach. “I don’t know if that’s part of it or not,” he said. “But I didn’t want to have that feeling and if it was, and we lost the game because I wasn’t 100 percent focused on our players, I didn’t have them in the best position to win, I couldn’t live with that.”

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK Minnesota ires Claeys Minnesota ired coach Tracy Claeys on Tuesday, just over two weeks after the football program became embroiled in a standof with the administration over the suspension of 10 players in connection with allegations of sexual assault, the school announced. Athletics director Mark Coyle said he made the decision to “address challenges in recruiting, ticket sales and the culture of the program. We need strong leadership to take Gopher football to the next level and address these challenges.” The Golden Gophers went 9-4 this season and beat Washington State in the Holiday Bowl. But that was overshadowed by a threatened boycott of the bowl by the entire team a week before the game. The players ultimately decided against a boycott. Claeys publicly supported his players in lobbying for fairness in the sexual assault investigation. A tweet he sent out in support of their movement drew wide criticism. Claeys later said he chose his words poorly and planned to donate $50,000 to raise awareness for sexual assault victims. The 48-year-old Claeys went 11-8 in a year and a half leading the Gophers. He became a head coach for the irst time when he took over midway through 2015 after Jerry Kill was forced to retire because of health issues. Claeys had been an assistant under Kill at Southern Illinois Carbondale. Washington loses four • Four players who helped lead Washington to the Pac-12 championship and an appearance in the College Football Playof announced decisions to forgo their senior seasons and enter the NFL draft. Wide receiver John Ross, safety Budda Baker, defensive tackle Elijah Qualls and cornerback Sidney Jones are all leaving early. A number of other players announced intentions to leave school early, including Texas Tech quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the FBS leader with 5,052 yards passing this season. Others to announce included Tennessee wide receiver Josh Malone and defensive end Derek Barnett, Oklahoma running back Samaje Perine, Wisconsin linebacker T.J. Watt, Miami running back Joe Yearby and Florida cornerback Quincy Wilson and ofensive tackle David Sharpe. Bowl attendance down • More than 1.635 million people attended bowl games this postseason, with an average of 40,892 spectators at each game — down around 5 percent from the previous season’s average of 43,002—– based on numbers provided by the Football Bowl Association. Twenty of the 40 games set higher attendance marks than the previous season, including the two College Football Playof semiinals and the Rose Bowl. Associated Press

>CFP CHAMPIONSHIP: ALABAMA (14-0) VS. CLEMSON (13-1), 7:30 P.M. MONDAY, ESPN

Blues would do well to repeat Classic performance BLUES • FROM B1

together and start feeling good about ourselves, we’ll definitely be a very, very dangerous team. “I think this game was really big for us, especially after how we finished the last game against Nashville. We’re playing a great team and with all the crowd, all the things that have been leading up to to this and we come out on top and we actually play a great game. This is a big game for us.” The end of the Friday’s Nashville game was fairly

typical of the team’s lategame inefficiencies. In their 11 games before the Winter Classic, the Blues were outscored 15-7 in the third period, and all seven of the goals they scored came in just three games: three in two games with New Jersey, one of the worst teams in the league, and the other four against a Philadelphia team that has run hot and cold. (Before the Chicago game, the Blues were scoreless in their past seven games against Western Conference opponents.) And that Philadelphia

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patrik Berglund had a goal for the Blues in Monday’s Winter Classic and has ive goals in his last eight games.

game proved one of the undying truths about the

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Blues this season: What happens in one game is no indication of what will happen in the next. The Blues were coming off scoring four goals in the third against Philadelphia when they went AWOL in the final two periods against Nashville in a 4-0 shutout loss. The Blues have seen this show before but as well as they know the script, it’s been tough to get a repeat performance. In each of the past three games in which they have scored a third-period goal, they’ve been shut out in the third in the next game. A big thing for the Blues on Monday was not just taking a 2-1 lead in the third, but then turning it into a 3-1 lead. The Blues actually had some breathing room in the final minutes for a change. “I think the best part

about tonight,” defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk said, “and the problem that we’ve had all year, is that we’ve been sitting on leads, and tonight we were able to just keep applying that pressure. We got right back on the attack and I think that’s the most important thing. We got right back to the game that we were doing so efectively.” Part of the challenge will be keeping that going without the emotions of the Winter Classic and 46,556 fans at their backs. The Blues will be back in action Thursday against Carolina at Scottrade Center with about half the fans and against a low team in the Eastern Conference standings. An emotional dip seems inevitable. While the Winter Classic has caused problems for home teams, the Blues were able to channel the emotions of an outdoor game into a positive instead of a negative. “Our group played well,” forward Alexander Steen said. “I thought our passing game and the way that we supported each other throughout the game was as good as it’s been all year. I think we’re more proud of the way that we played, the type of game that we played. Our passing game was probably as good as it’s been all year.” If they can keep it up, the Blues have a chance

at winning consecutive games for the first time since Nov. 28 and Dec. 1. (That was also the most recent time they had consecutive games with goals in the third period.) And with three more games on this season-long homestand, they have a chance for some momentum as they head toward the halfway point of the season Tuesday. All they have to do is repeat themselves for a change.

RATTIE ON WAIVERS The Blues put forward Ty Rattie on waivers Tuesday to send him down to Chicago of the AHL to get in some games. Rattie hasn’t played for the Blues since Nov. 28, having been a healthy scratch in 15 consecutive games (and 31 overall this season). He has appeared in just four games, but the Blues haven’t wanted to send him down for fear of losing him to a waiver claim. But for a young player like Rattie, the team’s secondround pick in 2011, the extended idleness can’t be a good thing, and the Blues apparently have decided he needs to see some action. They’ll know at 11 a.m. Wednesday if he cleared waivers and can report to Chicago or was claimed by another team. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SEC

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NOTEBOOK

Kentucky freshman leads SEC in scoring BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It’s no surprise that John Calipari’s latest collection of future NBA lottery picks has made an immediate splash in the Southeastern Conference. And it’s no shocker that one of those freshmen, shooting guard Malik Monk, leads the SEC in scoring at 22.4 points a game entering Tuesday’s visit from Texas A&M. Last month, Monk torched North Carolina for a Kentucky freshman record 47 points. In UK’s SEC opener, Monk scored 34 points at Ole Miss, a Kentucky freshman record for a road game. But offense isn’t what’s got Kentucky coach John Calipari raving about the 6-3 rookie. “What I’m excited about is everyone who watches him can’t believe he’s defending the way he is,” Calipari said. “We knew he could score the ball. He’s getting to the foul line. He’s not just jacking balls up. He’s become more disciplined. The biggest thing is he’s guarding.” Monk’s early prowess on both ends of the floor doesn’t mean Calipari is satisfied with his freshman-heavy team. The Wildcats lead the league in scoring (93.5 points per game) and rarely turn the ball over despite playing at one of the game’s fastest tempos. But with four freshmen in the starting lineup, Calipari sees his share of rookie mistakes. “The problem is there are stretches where I look at us and say, ‘Wow!’” he said. “There are other stretches that I basically believe I’m in Las Vegas watching an AAU team play. There will be stretches of seven or eight minutes like that. Behind the back passes, between the leg passes. … ‘What are you doing?’”

GAMECOCKS TOUGHEN UP South Carolina climbed into the national rankings last season and appeared poised for its first NCAA Tournament berth in 12 years. But when the Gamecocks lost five of eight games down the stretch, their soft nonconference schedule came back to haunt their postseason credentials. Frank Martin made sure to avoid that predicament this year. The Gamecocks upgraded their schedule with Michigan, Syracuse, Seton Hall, Clemson and Monmouth, and while they entered SEC play with three more losses than last year, Martin said the tougher slate forced his young team to grow up fast. “They’ve been prepared for league play with the noncon we played,” he said. The Gamecocks played their last six games without their most seasoned player, senior guard Sindarius Thornwell, who leads the team in scoring, rebounds and assists. Martin’s team went 3-3 while Thornwell served a suspension for undisclosed team violations. Sophomore guard P.J. Dozier picked up the scoring slack, averaging 19.5 points with Thornwell out of the lineup. “Our guys have not backed up a step,” Martin said. “When the one guy on our team who has unbelievable experience is removed from the games I’ve seen a lot of young guys embrace a greater responsibility.” Thornwell has been reinstated for Wednesday’s SEC opener at Georgia.

COMMON PATH In 2005, Bruce Pearl moved from the Horizon League to the SEC when he left Milwaukee to become the head coach at Tennessee. Now at Auburn, Pearl can relate to the transition Bryce Drew faces, leaving a Horizon League program (Valparaiso) to lead a team in the SEC, Vanderbilt. Pearl’s Tigers play at Vanderbilt on Wednesday night. “You always have to adjust to the leagues,” Pearl said. “In some ways the Horizon League was more physical because back in the day it was the Midwestern City Conference and you had kids from Milwaukee and Chicago and Detroit and Dayton. … So there shouldn’t be a misconception when you go to the Horizon League to the SEC. The players are bigger and faster at this next level but they don’t play harder and they’re not any tougher than what he saw in the Horizon League.” Vandy fans will be thrilled if Drew’s transition goes as smoothly as Pearl’s at Tennessee. Pearl was 22-8 his first year in Knoxville and led the Vols to the first of six straight trips to the NCAA Tournament. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017

THE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE BY DAVE MATTER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

1. Kentucky

2. Florida

Record • 12-2, 2-0 SEC RPI • No. 6 Strongest nonconference wins • Michigan State, North Carolina The skinny • The Wildcats are led by the an elite freshman class that won’t be long for Lexington. What else is new? Of all the talented guards to come through under John Calipari, this might be the best tandem: Malik Monk leads the SEC in scoring (22.3 points a game) and De’Aaron Fox leads the league in assists (6.8) and ranks 10th in scoring (15.6). The SEC’s top scoring team plays fast, shoots nearly 60 percent from inside the 3-point arc and turns the ball over at the league’s lowest rate.

Record • 11-3, 2-0 RPI • No. 2 Strongest nonconference wins • Seton Hall, Miami The skinny • In coach Mike White’s second season, the Gators don’t have many highprofile wins but get credit for an ambitious schedule, with losses to Gonzaga, Duke and Florida State. Defense is Florida’s specialty, though guard KeVaughn Allen (14.2 points a game) and forward Devin Robinson (12.8) have both improved as scorers.

Malik Monk, Kentucky

KeVaughn Allen, Florida

3. Georgia

4. South Carolina

5. Arkansas

6. Vanderbilt

Record • 9-4, 1-0 RPI • No. 37 Strongest nonconference wins • Georgia Tech, UNC-Asheville The skinny • Yante Maten (20.6 points a game) has established himself as the best big man in the SEC and forms what might be the league’s best insideoutside combination with guard J.J. Frazier (16 points, 4.4 assists a game). Mark Fox’s team has respectable losses to Clemson, Kansas and Marquette but stumbled against Oakland.

Record • 10-3, 0-0 RPI • No. 51 Strongest nonconference wins • Monmouth, Michigan The skinny • Frank Martin’s team is all about defense. Against a beefed-up schedule, the Gamecocks rank among the nation’s top 10 teams in adjusted defensive eiciency, 3-point field goal defense and turnover rate. South Carolina had close losses to Seton Hall and Clemson but played without leading scorer and rebounder Sindarius Thornwell, who’s been reinstated after a sixgame suspension.

Record • 12-2, 1-1 RPI • No. 39 Strongest nonconference wins • UT-Arlington, Houston, Texas The skinny • Back for a sixth season in Fayetteville, Mike Anderson is under pressure to return the Hogs to the NCAA Tournament after last year’s .500 finish. Preseason All-SEC center Moses Kingsley hasn’t been as productive as expected, but the rebuilt Hogs have added a couple of efective scoring guards from junior colleges, Daryl Macon and Jaylen Barford. Anderson’s team ranks No. 2 in the SEC in scoring.

Record • 7-6, 1-0 RPI • No. 59 Strongest nonconference wins • Tennessee State, Chattanooga The skinny • First-year coach Bryce Drew doesn’t have much to show for a rigorous schedule with losses to Marquette, Butler, Minnesota and Dayton, but on any given night, Vandy can blister opponents from 3-point range. Riley LaChance ranks third nationally in 3-point shooting (59.6) and leads the SEC in assistto-turnover ratio (3.4). Matthew Fisher-Davis is one of the league’s most improved scorers, averaging 16.4 points while shooting 42.5 from the arc, and few teams can guard 7-footer Luke Kornet, another dangerous perimeter scorer.

7. Texas A&M

8. Tennessee

9. Ole Miss

10. Auburn

Record • 8-5, 0-2 RPI • No. 99 Strongest nonconference win • Virginia Tech The skinny • Coming of a regularseason SEC championship, Billy Kennedy had as much to replace as any coach in the league but still has key pieces in center Tyler Davis (14.3 points a game), forward DJ Hogg (13.3 points) and guard Admon Gilder (12.5 points, 4.5 assists). The Aggies have single-digit margin losses to Pac-12 teams Arizona, UCLA and USC and a quality win over Virginia Tech.

Record • 8-6, 1-1 RPI • No. 66 Strongest nonconference wins • East Tennessee State, Georgia Tech The skinny • The smallest team in the SEC is also one of the youngest. The Vols’ top eight scorers are all 6-6 or shorter. Guard Robert Hubbs III (14.8 points a game) is the only returning senior for second-year coach Rick Barnes, who’s had to rely on a deep group of newcomers. The Vols held their own in losses to Oregon and North Carolina and also get an RPI boost with defeats to Wisconsin and Gonzaga.

Record • 9-5, 0-2 RPI • No. 48 Strongest nonconference wins • Massachusetts, St. Joseph’s, Memphis The skinny • Andy Kennedy, now the dean of SEC coaches, is once again counting on transfers. He’s turned his backcourt over to former Miami guard Deandre Burnett (19.2 points a game) and New Mexico import Cullen Neal (11.3 points, 3.5 assists), but the ball still goes through 6-9 center Sebastian Saiz (15.8 points, 12.2 rebounds). The Rebels upgraded their schedule and have quality losses to Creighton, Middle Tennessee and Virginia Tech.

Record • 10-3, 0-1 RPI • No. 86 Strongest nonconference wins • Texas Tech, Oklahoma, UConn The skinny • In Bruce Pearl’s third season on the bench, the Tigers finally won some nonconference games and came into SEC play with credibility earned with wins over high-major foes. Pearl’s top four scorers are freshmen, led by guards Mustapha Heron (16.2 points a game) and Danjel Purifoy (14.5). Wiley, a 6-11, five-star 2017 recruit, finished high school early and joined Pearl’s team last month, giving the Tigers much needed inside presence.

11. Louisiana State

12. Alabama

13. Mississippi State

14. Missouri

Record • 8-4, 0-1 RPI • No. 100 Strongest nonconference wins • Houston, Charleston, Texas Southern The skinny • Ben Simmons isn’t walking through that door. The No. 1 pick in last year’s NBA draft was one-and-done in Baton Rouge and left behind a team without much continuity. Sophomore guard Antonio Blakeney (17 points a game) leads the SEC in minutes played and is unquestionably coach Johnny Jones’ most important player. Duop Reath, a 6-10 junior college transfer, carries a thin frontcourt that recently lost Craig Victor, a proven scorer who was dismissed last week. The Tigers slipped up in their toughest nonconference games against Wichita State, VCU and Wake Forest.

Record • 8-5, 1-0 RPI • No. 122 Strongest nonconference win • Arkansas State The skinny • Second-year coach Avery Johnson has three four-star recruits and a five-star on the way next year, but his current team in Tuscaloosa could use some firepower. The Tide are solid by most defensive metrics but ofense doesn’t come easy for the SEC’s lowest scoring team. Alabama doesn’t have a player averaging double-digit points per game but features five averaging between 7 and 9.7 points, led by freshman forward Braxton Key and Dazon Ingram, a redshirt freshman who missed most of last season with a foot injury. The Tide scheduled courageously but fell short against Dayton, Oregon, Clemson, Valparaiso and Texas.

Record • 9-4, 0-1 RPI • No. 201 Strongest nonconference win • Boise State Bad losses • Anyone expecting Ben Howland to have overnight success underestimated the challenges in Starkville. Howland has recruited well but won just 14 games last year and this year returned only three players from last season’s rotation. The roster has promise, starting with sophomore Quinndary Weatherspoon (19.1 points a game), but one of the nation’s softest nonconference schedules still produced ugly losses to Lehigh, East Tennessee State and UCF. Howland’s roster is rated the least experienced in all of Division I by Ken Pomeroy.

Record • 5-7, 0-0 RPI • No. 266 Strongest nonconference win • Western Kentucky The skinny • This was supposed to be the season Kim Anderson turned the corner now that the Tigers are exclusively players he recruited. Instead, things have turned for the worse. The SEC’s worst shooting team (39.7 percent overall, 27.2 percent from 3-point range) hasn’t made any headway despite the league’s No. 2 field goal percentage defense (38.3). Losing to teams like Xavier, Arizona and Illinois is one thing, but home losses to North Carolina Central, Eastern Illinois and Lipscomb explain why the Tigers trudge into league play with zero momentum.

Tigers focus on clean slate for conference play MIZZOU • FROM B1

to move forward and do the best we can.” Mizzou’s turbulent start to the season would have been forgivable had the Tigers only lost to high-major foes Xavier, Arizona and Illinois, but Anderson’s team — and perhaps his coaching regime — might never recover from home losses to North Carolina Central, Eastern Illinois and Lipscomb. Attendance continues to plummet at Mizzou Arena, where the average home crowd of 6,340 — clearly inflated most games — ranks 13th in the conference, ahead of only Georgia (6,320). For now, Anderson’s players have kept a positive outlook, at least publicly. “We’ve had, so far, a pretty rough start, but we’re optimistic we can come in and win tomorrow and win the next one,” junior forward Jordan Barnett (CBC) said. “We’re just going to play and whatever happens, happens. That’s all you can do. You’ve got to live with the result.” Anderson, 24-51 as MU’s coach, begins league play fac-

ing another round of questions about his job security. There was uncertainty about Anderson’s future after last season ended with a 10-21 record and a second straight 3-15 finish in conference play, but after his communication with athletics director Mack Rhoades went silent for a few days, Rhoades announced that Anderson would return for a third season. With two years left on his original five-year contract, Anderson now works for his third AD in three years in Jim Sterk, who hasn’t publicly addressed Anderson’s longterm future since the start of the season. Anderson said he has regular discussions with Sterk and executive associate AD Brian White, who oversees the basketball program. “We haven’t had any specific conversations about any particular goals I have to meet or the team has to meet,” Anderson said Monday. “The one thing that has impressed me about Jim Sterk is that he lets coaches do their jobs. I’m sure there’s an ongoing evaluation process, as there is with every coach in the country. For me he’s been great. And I’ve enjoyed working with

him and Brian. We’re just looking forward to playing LSU on Wednesday night.” After his third consecutive loss to Illinois in the Braggin’ Rights Game on Dec. 21, Anderson promised to change his rotation and shorten his bench. Anderson’s options became limited with last week’s departure of freshman forward Willie Jackson, who announced plans to transfer closer to his home in Cleveland, making him the 13th player to leave the program since Anderson arrived two years ago. For weeks, Mizzou’s coaching staff was concerned Jackson might not rejoin the team after the Christmas break, multiple sources confirmed, and those fears doubled when freshman guard and fellow Cleveland native Frankie Hughes didn’t return to Columbia last week and skipped several practices. For now, Hughes remains part of the team — Anderson didn’t play him in last Thursday’s loss to Lipscomb — and he’ll rejoin the rotation against LSU, Anderson said. On Tuesday, five other Mizzou players met with reporters and said the freshman guard is

fully committed to the team. “I talked to Frankie and he just told me he wants to be here,” said freshman forward Mitchell Smith, one of Hughes’ roommates. “That’s why he committed here. Frankie has a great attitude in practice, so I think he’s going to stay.” As for Jackson’s loss, it was hardly a new experience for Anderson’s veterans. Six scholarship players from last year’s opening-day roster left the team before their eligibility expired. The rapid roster turnover has been been perhaps the most troubling development during Anderson’s three seasons, to the point some players are almost conditioned to the changes. “At the end of the day, the guys who want to be here are going to be here,” sophomore guard Terrence Phillips said. “Willie’s still my friend. The guys in the locker room are the guys we’re going to roll with. We just have to keep going.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com


01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

SLU could be facing its future in La Salle Explorers rely on players who have transferred, much as Billikens will do next season BY STU DURANDO st. Louis Post-dispatch

Although Travis Ford has had three potentially significant transfers sitting on the end of his bench during home games, the first-year St. Louis University coach has avoided the temptation to talk openly about how things might look for the Billikens a year from now. In fact, he has told the team behind closed doors that he is tired of hearing from outsiders about next season. La Salle coach John Giannini, on the other hand, was known last season to “speak wistfully” about what was to come for his team, according to one writer. The Explorers had nine wins in 2015-16 and had their own batch of transfers waiting to play. When SLU plays at La Salle on Wednesday night, Ford will get a look at one team’s progress using the same approach he is applying with the Billikens. The results have been mixed for Giannini. La Salle is 6-5 and seems to still be struggling to blend new and old into a cohesive unit. However, the Explorers have played a top-50 schedule that has included a competitive loss to No. 1 Villanova. Building with transfers has worked before for Giannini, who led La Salle to three NCAA Tournament wins in 2013, so the process will be analyzed with some patience. “We have always had success with transfers, even going back with the Sweet 16 team,” he said. “Things have changed over the last several years. We certainly don’t want to settle in our re-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Javon Bess, who played for Michigan State last season, will be in a SLU uniform next season.

cruiting for high school guys. “For some reason we have been more fortunate in transfer recruiting. Frankly, we are having more success in that area right now. The second time around they are just looking for the best fit and the place where they feel comfortable. We kind of fit the bill for good transfers.” La Salle’s newcomers arrived with impressive credentials, just

as SLU’s will when they become eligible for the 2017-18 season. B.J. Johnson returned to his hometown of Philadelphia after starting his career at Syracuse. He leads the team in scoring with an average of 19.6 points and rebounding at 6.7. Pookie Powell was a four-star recruit when he landed at Memphis. He averages 13.6 points for the Explorers. Demetrius Henry (6.2 ppg) made

No. 13 Wisconsin rolls past No. 25 Indiana

No. 3 Kansas 90, Kansas State 88 • Svi Mykhailiuk went the length of the court and threw in a inger-tip layup as the buzzer sounded to give Kansas a victory over visiting Kansas State. Josh Jackson matched a career high with 22 points to go with nine rebounds and six assists, and Landen Lucas added 18 points and 12 rebounds, as the Jayhawks (13-1, 2-0 Big 12) pushed their home winning streak to 50 in one of the closest games during that incredible streak. The Wildcats (13-2, 1-1) had the irst chance to take the lead in the inal seconds, but Dean Wade missed a 3-pointer and the ball bounced out of bounds with 5.6 ticks left on the clock. Kansas struggled to get the ball inbounds, but once it got into Mykhailiuk’s hands, he used his long stride to carry him down the court. His buzzer-beating basket gave him 11 points in the game, not to mention keeping coach Bill Self from losing to Kansas State for the second time at Allen Fieldhouse. Wade matched a career high with 20 points. No. 14 North Carolina 89, Clemson 86 • Joel Berry II had a career-high 31 points and Kennedy Meeks’ basket with 1:12 left in overtime put North Carolina ahead for good as the Tar Heels defeated host Clemson for the ninth straight time. The Tigers (11-3, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) had two chances to retake the lead after Meeks’ shot, but Jaron Blossomgame and Sidy Djitte missed close-in shots to lose to North Carolina for the 19th time

SLU AT LA SALLE When • 6 p.m. Where • Tom Gola Arena All-time series • SLU leads 12-7. TV, radio • No TV; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU is 4-9, 0-1 Atlantic 10; La Salle is 0-1, 6-5. About the Billikens • Jermaine Bishop remains doubtful with an ankle injury. ... SLU is 0-4 away from Chaifetz Arena this season, losing by an average of 20 points. ... Reggie Agbeko had what was then a career-high 13 rebounds at La Salle last season. ... The Billikens have improved their 3-point shooting, making 37 percent in the last four games. However, SLU is 338th nationally of 347 teams in scoring ofense, 334th in ield goal percentage and 335th in free throw percentage. About the Explorers • La Salle is 333rd in the country in defending the 3-point line, allowing opponents to make 40.2 percent. ... The Explorers are 6-0 when they attempt more free throws than their opponent. ... La Salle has recorded 175 assists with only 129 turnovers, a 1.4-to-1 ratio. ... The Explorers had a ive-game losing streak in the series until they beat the Billikens in Philadelphia last season. La Salle hit 12 3-pointers in that game.

last season and has the Explorers trending in the right direction. They were picked to finish seventh this season after being dead last a year ago – behind even the Billikens. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Kemph is standout in classroom as well

ROUNDUP

Ethan Happ scored 19 points and Bronson Koenig added 17 on Tuesday night to lead Wisconsin past Indiana 75-68. The visiting Badgers (13-2, 2-0 Big Ten) have won nine straight. De’Ron Davis, Juwan Morgan and Robert Johnson each inished with 12 points to lead the Hoosiers (10-5, 0-2). Indiana has lost three in a row overall, consecutive games on their home court and 16 of the last 18 in this series. Wisconsin made it look easy early — making its irst ive shots and four straight 3-pointers to take a 16-2 lead — and got ive straight points from Zak Showalter in a late 10-2 run that extended Wisconsin’s lead to 66-59 with 4:30 to play. The Badgers sealed it from the free throw line in the inal minute. Indiana, which led only four times all game, couldn’t get closer than three the rest of the game. Showalter inished with 14 points and Nigel Hayes had 10 for the Badgers. James Blackmon Jr. had 10 points for the Hoosiers.

the move from South Carolina. Additionally, Jordan Price moved to La Salle after one year at Auburn and is in his third season with Giannini, averaging 17.2 points. If fans were expecting a meteoric rise for the Explorers, it hasn’t exactly arrived. They are No. 90 in the Ratings Percentage Index and already looking at the probability of needing to win the Atlantic 10 tournament to reach the NCAA Tournament. Giannini always seemed reasonable about the possibilities, saying in the preseason, “We’re just back to normal. I don’t look at this year as being anything exceptional. I look at last year as being the exception.” Ford has talked briefly about the process of incorporating transfers into the system and how it can take considerable time for those players to re-adapt to the game after spending more than a year participating in practice and individual workouts. SLU is stocked similar to La Salle with Javon Bess (Michigan State), Adonys Henriquez (Central Florida), D.J. Foreman (Rutgers) and Ty Graves (Boston College) waiting in the wings. Like La Salle, the individual parts appear to be impressive. But how will they translate into a team performance? The Explorers have looked explosive offensively and are second in the A-10 in scoring at 81.5 points per game. But they are dead last in defense, allowing 81.6. They have the best assistto-turnover ratio but are 11th in rebounding margin. With the good has come the not so good. But it’s a good bit better than

ORTIZ • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Bronson Koenig is defended by Indiana’s Thomas Bryant during the second half Tuesday in Bloomington, Ind. Wisconsin defeated Indiana 75-68.

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Villanova (14-0) idle. Next: at No. 13 Butler, Wednesday. 2. Baylor (13-0) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. 3. Kansas (13-1) beat Kansas State 90-88. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. 4. UCLA (14-1) idle. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 5. Gonzaga (14-0) idle. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 6. Kentucky (12-2) beat Texas A&M 100-58. Next: vs. Arkansas, Saturday. 7. West Virginia (12-1) at Texas Tech, late. Next: vs. TCU, Saturday. 8. Duke (12-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Wednesday. 9. Louisville (12-2) idle. Next: at No. 23 Notre Dame, Wednesday. 10. Creighton (13-1) idle. Next: at St. John’s, Wednesday. 11. Virginia (11-2) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Wednesday. 12. Florida State (14-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Virginia Tech, Saturday. 13. Wisconsin (13-2) beat No. 25 Indiana 75-68. Next: at No. 20 Purdue, Sunday. 14. North Carolina (13-3) beat Clemson 89-86, OT. Next: vs. N.C. State, Saturday. 15. Oregon (13-2) idle. Next: at Washington, Wednesday. 16. Xavier (12-2) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Saturday. 17. Arizona (13-2) idle. Next: vs. Utah, Thursday. 18. Butler (12-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 1 Villanova, Wednesday. 19. Saint Mary’s (12-1) idle. Next: vs. BYU, Thursday. 20. Purdue (12-3) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Thursday. 21. Virginia Tech (12-1) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Wednesday. 22. Cincinnati (12-2) idle. Next: at Houston, Saturday. 23. Notre Dame (12-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Louisville, Wednesday. 24. Florida (11-3) beat Mississippi 70-63. Next: vs. Tennessee, Saturday. 25. Indiana (10-5) lost to No. 13 Wisconsin 75-68. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. 25. Southern Cal (14-1) idle. Next: vs. Stanford, Thursday.

in the last 20 games. Berry scored 23 points after halftime and appeared to have North Carolina (13-3, 1-1) on the

way to a victory, ahead 75-67 with less than 4 minutes left. Clemson, though, closed the period with a 10-2 run, capped by Marcquise Reed’s tying 3-pointer with 29 seconds to go.

NOTEBOOK USF ires coach • South Florida has ired coach Orlando Antigua 13 games into his third season at the American Athletic Conference school. Athletics director Mark Harlan announced the move Tuesday, saying assistant coach Murry Bartow will lead the Bulls (6-7, 0-2) for the remainder of the season. Antigua leaves with a 17-48 record at USF, which hired the former Kentucky and Memphis State assistant under John Calipari in March 2014. The Bulls went 9-23 in Antigua’s irst year and inished 8-25 last season. The dismissal, with more than two years left on Antigua’s contract, comes three days after a 70-56 home loss to Houston dropped the team’s record under him in conference play to 7-30. Harlan said in a statement that the change was made following a “thorough and deliberate review” of the program. A search for a successor will begin immediately. Bartow’s irst game as interim coach is Saturday at Southern Methodist. Bartow has served stints as a head coach at AlabamaBirmingham and East Tennessee State. He was 103-83 in six seasons at UAB from 1996 to 2002 and 224-169 over 12 seasons at East Tennessee State from 2003 to 2015. Associated Press

Yadier Molina, Matt Carpenter and Alex Pietrangelo, if your daughter or son is looking for an athlete to emulate, you’d be smart to point them in Kemph’s direction. It would be easy to focus this column on Kemph’s athletic exploits, especially considering the history she and the Billikens have made since coach Lisa Stone recruited her from Rolling Meadows (Ill.) High. Kemph credentials are definitely impressive, but we’ll get to that in a second. First let us mention the frustrating two points that will tell you quite a bit about her intelligence, priorities and competitiveness. Those two points have nothing to do with a basket, yet they highlight the type of studentathlete who is drawn to a rigorous academic school such as SLU. Those two points out of 200 possible last semester in a fixedincome securities class are all that has kept Kemph from a perfect 4.0 grade point average at SLU. “It was a very tough class, but I worked pretty hard to get a B+,” she said. “I tried my best, but I missed an A- by two points.” Even with that “setback” Kemph carries a 3.91 GPA that is as impressive as her 521 career assists or her status as the only Billikens player in history with at least 500 assists and 1,000 points. Kemph’s drive for perfection has been one of her signature traits at SLU, in the classroom and on the court. Kemph is on pace to graduate from SLU in three years this May with a degree in accounting. Then she hopes to start working on a masters degree in accounting next summer to get her CPA during her final year of eligibility. “She’s as good as it gets as far as a quality human being, great player, great student, and an even better person,” Stone said. The 5-foot-7 point guard ranks third in the nation with 7.7 assists a game, which is tops in the Atlantic 10 Conference. She also leads the conference in assist-turnover ratio (2.35 to 1) and is fifth in scoring (15.1 points a game). She has helped SLU accomplish several historic milestones in her short tenure, including the Billikens’ first victory over Missouri last month in a dramatic comeback from 18 points down. SLU was picked first in the A-10 preseason poll this season for the first time in school history after Kemph led the Billikens to a share of the school’s first A-10 women’s basketball regular season title last season.

Unable to win the A-10 conference tournament last year, they were denied an at-large NCAA Tournament bid. They overcame that disappointment, though, by making the Elite 8 of the Women’s NIT. “First of all, she’s the best player I’ve ever recruited by far,” said Stone, who spent eight of her 31 years of coaching in the Big Ten with Wisconsin. “I’ve never had somebody that gifted and fast. She’s the fastest player I’ve really seen with the ball in her hands.” As the A-10 co-player of the year last season, Kemph became the first SLU woman to win that award. She has already been the A-10 player of the week twice this season. She has started every game since her freshman year, when SLU finished tied for eighth in the A-10 with a 7-9 record and a 15-16 overall mark. That losing season was diicult for a kid who had reached the state championship game as a junior and senior in high school. “It’s been great to see that transformation,” she said. “We used it as motivation.” That’s not to say Kemph ever needs much motivation. She has competed since birth, when she beat her twin sister Allie out of the womb by a minute. “I think if you ask anyone, they’d say I’m super competitive,” she said. “My friends will tell you that. I have a twin sister, so I was set up in that role. “I feel like it’s in everything. Even little drills in practice, I hate losing. I have a mini-pool table, and I’m super competitive with everything, board games. If I lose I get pretty mad.” Kemph and the Billikens are 11-3 overall and 1-0 in conference play heading into their game against George Mason at Chaifetz Arena on Wednesday at 7 p.m. Kemph is still disappointed about the loss the Billikens suffered last year at home against George Mason, so she’s eager to atone. “It was an overtime loss, our first conference game,” she remembers. “We were picked pretty high. Everyone remembers that. It was heartbreaking. We’re ready for them.” The kid who may go down as the best women’s basketball player in SLU history continues to make her mark. You owe it to yourself and your family to go watch her and the Billikens play. She represents what we like to think college sports are about. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

SLU could be facing its future in La Salle Explorers rely on players who have transferred, much as Billikens will do next season BY STU DURANDO st. Louis Post-dispatch

Although Travis Ford has had three potentially significant transfers sitting on the end of his bench during home games, the first-year St. Louis University coach has avoided the temptation to talk openly about how things might look for the Billikens a year from now. In fact, he has told the team behind closed doors that he is tired of hearing from outsiders about next season. La Salle coach John Giannini, on the other hand, was known last season to “speak wistfully” about what was to come for his team, according to one writer. The Explorers had nine wins in 2015-16 and had their own batch of transfers waiting to play. When SLU plays at La Salle on Wednesday night, Ford will get a look at one team’s progress using the same approach he is applying with the Billikens. The results have been mixed for Giannini. La Salle is 6-5 and seems to still be struggling to blend new and old into a cohesive unit. However, the Explorers have played a top-50 schedule that has included a competitive loss to No. 1 Villanova. Building with transfers has worked before for Giannini, who led La Salle to three NCAA Tournament wins in 2013, so the process will be analyzed with some patience. “We have always had success with transfers, even going back with the Sweet 16 team,” he said. “Things have changed over the last several years. We certainly don’t want to settle in our re-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Javon Bess, who played for Michigan State last season, will be in a SLU uniform next season.

cruiting for high school guys. “For some reason we have been more fortunate in transfer recruiting. Frankly, we are having more success in that area right now. The second time around they are just looking for the best fit and the place where they feel comfortable. We kind of fit the bill for good transfers.” La Salle’s newcomers arrived with impressive credentials, just

as SLU’s will when they become eligible for the 2017-18 season. B.J. Johnson returned to his hometown of Philadelphia after starting his career at Syracuse. He leads the team in scoring with an average of 19.6 points and rebounding at 6.7. Pookie Powell was a four-star recruit when he landed at Memphis. He averages 13.6 points for the Explorers. Demetrius Henry (6.2 ppg) made

No. 13 Wisconsin rolls past No. 25 Indiana

No. 3 Kansas 90, Kansas State 88 • Svi Mykhailiuk went the length of the court and threw in a inger-tip layup as the buzzer sounded to give Kansas a victory over visiting Kansas State. Josh Jackson matched a career high with 22 points to go with nine rebounds and six assists, and Landen Lucas added 18 points and 12 rebounds, as the Jayhawks (13-1, 2-0 Big 12) pushed their home winning streak to 50 in one of the closest games during that incredible streak. The Wildcats (13-2, 1-1) had the irst chance to take the lead in the inal seconds, but Dean Wade missed a 3-pointer and the ball bounced out of bounds with 5.6 ticks left on the clock. Kansas struggled to get the ball inbounds, but once it got into Mykhailiuk’s hands, he used his long stride to carry him down the court. His buzzer-beating basket gave him 11 points in the game, not to mention keeping coach Bill Self from losing to Kansas State for the second time at Allen Fieldhouse. Wade matched a career high with 20 points. No. 14 North Carolina 89, Clemson 86 • Joel Berry II had a career-high 31 points and Kennedy Meeks’ basket with 1:12 left in overtime put North Carolina ahead for good as the Tar Heels defeated host Clemson for the ninth straight time. The Tigers (11-3, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) had two chances to retake the lead after Meeks’ shot, but Jaron Blossomgame and Sidy Djitte missed close-in shots to lose to North Carolina for the 19th time

SLU AT LA SALLE When • 6 p.m. Where • Tom Gola Arena All-time series • SLU leads 12-7. TV, radio • No TV; WXOS (101.1 FM) Records • SLU is 4-9, 0-1 Atlantic 10; La Salle is 0-1, 6-5. About the Billikens • Jermaine Bishop remains doubtful with an ankle injury. ... SLU is 0-4 away from Chaifetz Arena this season, losing by an average of 20 points. ... Reggie Agbeko had what was then a career-high 13 rebounds at La Salle last season. ... The Billikens have improved their 3-point shooting, making 37 percent in the last four games. However, SLU is 338th nationally of 347 teams in scoring ofense, 334th in ield goal percentage and 335th in free throw percentage. About the Explorers • La Salle is 333rd in the country in defending the 3-point line, allowing opponents to make 40.2 percent. ... The Explorers are 6-0 when they attempt more free throws than their opponent. ... La Salle has recorded 175 assists with only 129 turnovers, a 1.4-to-1 ratio. ... The Explorers had a ive-game losing streak in the series until they beat the Billikens in Philadelphia last season. La Salle hit 12 3-pointers in that game.

last season and has the Explorers trending in the right direction. They were picked to finish seventh this season after being dead last a year ago – behind even the Billikens. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Kemph is standout in classroom as well

ROUNDUP

Ethan Happ scored 19 points and Bronson Koenig added 17 on Tuesday night to lead Wisconsin past Indiana 75-68. The visiting Badgers (13-2, 2-0 Big Ten) have won nine straight. De’Ron Davis, Juwan Morgan and Robert Johnson each inished with 12 points to lead the Hoosiers (10-5, 0-2). Indiana has lost three in a row overall, consecutive games on their home court and 16 of the last 18 in this series. Wisconsin made it look easy early — making its irst ive shots and four straight 3-pointers to take a 16-2 lead — and got ive straight points from Zak Showalter in a late 10-2 run that extended Wisconsin’s lead to 66-59 with 4:30 to play. The Badgers sealed it from the free throw line in the inal minute. Indiana, which led only four times all game, couldn’t get closer than three the rest of the game. Showalter inished with 14 points and Nigel Hayes had 10 for the Badgers. James Blackmon Jr. had 10 points for the Hoosiers.

the move from South Carolina. Additionally, Jordan Price moved to La Salle after one year at Auburn and is in his third season with Giannini, averaging 17.2 points. If fans were expecting a meteoric rise for the Explorers, it hasn’t exactly arrived. They are No. 90 in the Ratings Percentage Index and already looking at the probability of needing to win the Atlantic 10 tournament to reach the NCAA Tournament. Giannini always seemed reasonable about the possibilities, saying in the preseason, “We’re just back to normal. I don’t look at this year as being anything exceptional. I look at last year as being the exception.” Ford has talked briefly about the process of incorporating transfers into the system and how it can take considerable time for those players to re-adapt to the game after spending more than a year participating in practice and individual workouts. SLU is stocked similar to La Salle with Javon Bess (Michigan State), Adonys Henriquez (Central Florida), D.J. Foreman (Rutgers) and Ty Graves (Boston College) waiting in the wings. Like La Salle, the individual parts appear to be impressive. But how will they translate into a team performance? The Explorers have looked explosive offensively and are second in the A-10 in scoring at 81.5 points per game. But they are dead last in defense, allowing 81.6. They have the best assistto-turnover ratio but are 11th in rebounding margin. With the good has come the not so good. But it’s a good bit better than

ORTIZ • FROM B1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Bronson Koenig is defended by Indiana’s Thomas Bryant during the second half Tuesday in Bloomington, Ind. Wisconsin defeated Indiana 75-68.

in the last 20 games. Berry scored 23 points after halftime and appeared to have North Carolina (13-3, 1-1) on the way to a victory, ahead 75-67 with less than 4 minutes left. Clemson, though, closed the period with a 10-2 run, capped by Marcquise Reed’s tying 3-pointer with 29 seconds to go.

NOTEBOOK USF ires coach • South Florida has ired coach Orlando Antigua 13 games into his third season at the American Athletic Conference school. Athletics director Mark Harlan announced the move Tuesday, saying assistant coach Murry Bartow will lead the Bulls (6-7, 0-2) for the remainder of the season. Antigua leaves with a 17-48 record at USF, which hired the former Kentucky and Memphis State assistant under John Calipari in March 2014. The Bulls went 9-23 in Antigua’s irst year and inished 8-25 last season. The dismissal, with more than two years left on Antigua’s contract, comes three days after a 70-56 home loss to Houston dropped the team’s record under him in conference play to 7-30. Harlan said in a statement that the change was made following a “thorough and deliberate review” of the program. A search for a successor will begin immediately. Bartow’s irst game as interim coach is Saturday at Southern Methodist. Bartow has served stints as a head coach at Alabama-Birmingham and East Tennessee State. He was 103-83 in six seasons at UAB from 1996 to 2002 and 224-169 over 12 seasons at East Tennessee State from 2003 to 2015. Associated Press

HOW THE TOP 25 FARED 1. Villanova (14-0) idle. Next: at No. 13 Butler, Wednesday. 2. Baylor (13-0) idle. Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday. 3. Kansas (13-1) beat Kansas State 90-88. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. 4. UCLA (14-1) idle. Next: vs. California, Thursday. 5. Gonzaga (14-0) idle. Next: at San Francisco, Thursday. 6. Kentucky (12-2) beat Texas A&M 100-58. Next: vs. Arkansas, Saturday. 7. West Virginia (12-2) lost to Texas Tech 77-76, OT. Next: vs. TCU, Saturday. 8. Duke (12-2) idle. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Wednesday. 9. Louisville (12-2) idle. Next: at No. 23 Notre Dame, Wednesday. 10. Creighton (13-1) idle. Next: at St. John’s, Wednesday. 11. Virginia (11-2) idle. Next: at Pittsburgh, Wednesday. 12. Florida State (14-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 21 Virginia Tech, Saturday. 13. Wisconsin (13-2) beat No. 25 Indiana 75-68. Next: at No. 20 Purdue, Sunday. 14. North Carolina (13-3) beat Clemson 89-86, OT. Next: vs. N.C. State, Saturday. 15. Oregon (13-2) idle. Next: at Washington, Wednesday. 16. Xavier (12-2) idle. Next: vs. St. John’s, Saturday. 17. Arizona (13-2) idle. Next: vs. Utah, Thursday. 18. Butler (12-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 1 Villanova, Wednesday. 19. Saint Mary’s (12-1) idle. Next: vs. BYU, Thursday. 20. Purdue (12-3) idle. Next: at Ohio State, Thursday. 21. Virginia Tech (12-1) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Wednesday. 22. Cincinnati (12-2) idle. Next: at Houston, Saturday. 23. Notre Dame (12-2) idle. Next: vs. No. 9 Louisville, Wednesday. 24. Florida (11-3) beat Mississippi 70-63. Next: vs. Tennessee, Saturday. 25. Indiana (10-5) lost to No. 13 Wisconsin 75-68. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday.

Yadier Molina, Matt Carpenter and Alex Pietrangelo, if your daughter or son is looking for an athlete to emulate, you’d be smart to point them in Kemph’s direction. It would be easy to focus this column on Kemph’s athletic exploits, especially considering the history she and the Billikens have made since coach Lisa Stone recruited her from Rolling Meadows (Ill.) High. Kemph credentials are definitely impressive, but we’ll get to that in a second. First let us mention the frustrating two points that will tell you quite a bit about her intelligence, priorities and competitiveness. Those two points have nothing to do with a basket, yet they highlight the type of studentathlete who is drawn to a rigorous academic school such as SLU. Those two points out of 200 possible last semester in a fixedincome securities class are all that has kept Kemph from a perfect 4.0 grade point average at SLU. “It was a very tough class, but I worked pretty hard to get a B+,” she said. “I tried my best, but I missed an A- by two points.” Even with that “setback” Kemph carries a 3.91 GPA that is as impressive as her 521 career assists or her status as the only Billikens player in history with at least 500 assists and 1,000 points. Kemph’s drive for perfection has been one of her signature traits at SLU, in the classroom and on the court. Kemph is on pace to graduate from SLU in three years this May with a degree in accounting. Then she hopes to start working on a masters degree in accounting next summer to get her CPA during her final year of eligibility. “She’s as good as it gets as far as a quality human being, great player, great student, and an even better person,” Stone said. The 5-foot-7 point guard ranks third in the nation with 7.7 assists a game, which is tops in the Atlantic 10 Conference. She also leads the conference in assist-turnover ratio (2.35 to 1) and is fifth in scoring (15.1 points a game). She has helped SLU accomplish several historic milestones in her short tenure, including the Billikens’ first victory over Missouri last month in a dramatic comeback from 18 points down. SLU was picked first in the A-10 preseason poll this season for the first time in school history after Kemph led the Billikens to a share of the school’s first A-10 women’s basketball regular season title last season.

Unable to win the A-10 conference tournament last year, they were denied an at-large NCAA Tournament bid. They overcame that disappointment, though, by making the Elite 8 of the Women’s NIT. “First of all, she’s the best player I’ve ever recruited by far,” said Stone, who spent eight of her 31 years of coaching in the Big Ten with Wisconsin. “I’ve never had somebody that gifted and fast. She’s the fastest player I’ve really seen with the ball in her hands.” As the A-10 co-player of the year last season, Kemph became the first SLU woman to win that award. She has already been the A-10 player of the week twice this season. She has started every game since her freshman year, when SLU finished tied for eighth in the A-10 with a 7-9 record and a 15-16 overall mark. That losing season was diicult for a kid who had reached the state championship game as a junior and senior in high school. “It’s been great to see that transformation,” she said. “We used it as motivation.” That’s not to say Kemph ever needs much motivation. She has competed since birth, when she beat her twin sister Allie out of the womb by a minute. “I think if you ask anyone, they’d say I’m super competitive,” she said. “My friends will tell you that. I have a twin sister, so I was set up in that role. “I feel like it’s in everything. Even little drills in practice, I hate losing. I have a mini-pool table, and I’m super competitive with everything, board games. If I lose I get pretty mad.” Kemph and the Billikens are 11-3 overall and 1-0 in conference play heading into their game against George Mason at Chaifetz Arena on Wednesday at 7 p.m. Kemph is still disappointed about the loss the Billikens suffered last year at home against George Mason, so she’s eager to atone. “It was an overtime loss, our first conference game,” she remembers. “We were picked pretty high. Everyone remembers that. It was heartbreaking. We’re ready for them.” The kid who may go down as the best women’s basketball player in SLU history continues to make her mark. You owe it to yourself and your family to go watch her and the Billikens play. She represents what we like to think college sports are about. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NFL

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017

6. MIAMI

6. DETROIT 1. NEW ENGLAND

1. DALLAS

7:15 Jan. 14, KMOV (4)

3:40 Jan. 15, KTVI (2)

vs. lowest seed

vs. lowest seed

12:05 Sunday, KMOV (4) 3. PITTSBURGH

5. OAKLAND

7:15 Saturday, KSDK (5)

2. KANSAS CITY

2. ATLANTA

12:05 Jan. 15, KSDK (5)

3:35 Jan. 14, KTVI (2)

vs. highest seed

vs. highest seed

3:35 Sat., ESPN/KDNL 4. HOUSTON

3. SEATTLE

5. NY GIANTS 3:40 Sunday, KTVI (2) 4. GREEN BAY

Feb. 5, 5:30 p.m., KTVI (2) • Glendale, Ariz.

NOTEBOOK

Rams’ horrible season became a bore FREDERICKSON • FROM B1

will admit that I’m done. I lasted until Week 15. Jeff Fisher’s firing spoiled a lot of the fun for me. Suddenly, I found myself almost pulling for interim coach John Fassel, mostly because his success would highlight the mind-numbing job security Rams owner Stan Kroenke had allowed Fisher since 2012. Then Seattle beat the Rams so thoroughly that I nearly felt sorry for our town’s former team. That’s when it hit me. There was nothing left to see here. Anger had faded into apathy. It was time to move on. I read the game story and scanned the box score after the Week 16 loss to San Francisco. I didn’t look into the specifics of the season-ending loss to Arizona until just now. I won’t pretend to speak for St. Louis Rams fans. Each one has his or her relationship with the team that left. But I imagine a fair amount feel something similar now that it’s over. The Rams’ rocky road to 4-12 became a catharsis. It was the bitter stage of a breakup. Eventually that anger gives way to indiference. Some got there faster than others. Others haven’t experienced it yet. Some will hatewatch forever. More power to them. They should realize, though, that they might not find a season sweeter than 2016. This season saw the toppling of Fisher, whose smugness was never softened by his inability to produce a winning season with the Rams, let alone one single playoff appearance. Fisher flamed out in dramatic fashion, fighting with Rams legend Eric Dickerson, feuding with defensive coordinator Gregg Williams on the sideline, forgetting the names and positions of opponents, losing his challenge flag in his coat. Fisher’s season finale came off the field, as he fired verbal shots at his former

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams running back Todd Gurley pushes of Arizona linebacker Kevin Minter during the first half Sunday.

front oice during TV and radio interviews. I wonder what his potential future employers are going to think of that approach? This season, which featured the Rams’ “middle-school offense” (Todd Gurley’s words) and an overhyped defense, embarrassed Kroenke and his lackey Kevin Demof. We know this because Fisher would still have a job if it didn’t. The Rams wanted no part of employing the NFL’s losingest coach, so they canned Fisher before he broke his tie with Dan Reeves for most regular-season coaching losses in a career. The new coach Demof lures to Los Angeles has to agree to a temporary stadium location, an unproven quarterback in Jared Gof, an alarming lack of draft picks (the price of moving up last season to draft Goff first overall) and a roster that has plenty of other holes. But most important, this season eliminated what so many here feared — that the Rams would somehow reinvent themselves after relocation. That worry reached its peak when the Rams followed their sea-

son-opening loss to San Francisco with wins against Seattle, Tampa Bay and Arizona. Three victories by a combined score of 15 points. They were either special, or just lucky. It turned out to be the latter. They won one of their next 12 games. Los Angeles’ interest turned into anger, then indiference. And finally, the rest of the nation seemed to realize what St. Louis had been putting up with this whole time. A change of scenery did not hide the franchise warts. The bright lights of Hollywood magnified the flaws. The tired talk of St. Louis not doing enough to support and keep its team died down. Some of the biggest proponents of that flawed logic suddenly shifted, claiming that the Rams’ ineptitude could be traced back to the fact St. Louis didn’t demand a better product. What is there to do but laugh? The St. Louis sports scene seems to be doing OK without the Rams. Their relocation energized the MLS movement. Funding remains a thorny issue, but the conversations taking place are

important. They show lessons were learned from the past. Monday, 46,556 people showed up to a baseball stadium for a hockey game, rain be damned. Seeing Busch packed with Blues fans was the best illustration of how wrong Kroenke was in his slandering of this city’s fan support. Did I mention there are much better NFL games on TV these days? Perhaps it’s the Winter Classic high that has me looking for a more positive pastime than clinging onto the Rams like a rabid dog on a mail carrier’s pant leg. And I reserve the right to take a swipe now and again, like pointing out USC and Penn State combined for more points (101) in Monday’s Rose Bowl than the Rams scored in Los Angeles all season (89). But for now, one season of hate-watching has scratched my itch. It’s not really about if the Rams get better. It’s about realizing there are better things to do. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

Warner, Bruce are Hall of Fame inalists

Chargers ponder LA move while hiring a new coach As the Chargers’ brain trust wades into the search for the replacement for fired coach Mike McCoy, they won’t be able to tell early candidates whether the team will be playing In San Diego or Los Angeles next season. “There’s a lot in the air right now, and as players we’re all anxious to see what all that means,” center Matt Slauson said. “... it is a little scary because I bought a house here, and one of my kids is in school here.” The Chargers must make two major decisions in a short time following a third straight season out of the playofs. “Hiring a head coach will be the biggest decision this franchise will make,” general manager Tom Telesco said Monday, a day after the Chargers finished 5-11 and fired McCoy (27-37) after four years. The next coach will be the 10th hired since Alex Spanos bought the team in 1984. So far, the Chargers reportedly have sought permission to interview Patriots defensive coordinator Matt Patricia, Miami defensive coordinator Vance Joseph and Kansas City special teams coordinator Dave Toub. But more important, chairman Dean Spanos must decide by Jan. 15 whether to move to Los Angeles or stay in San Diego and continue a struggle to replace aging Qualcomm Stadium that has left the fan base fatigued and angry. Going to LA would cost Spanos a $650 million relocation fee plus other costs, but the move could more than double the team’s $2 billion valuation. The Chargers would have to cultivate a new fan base in the crowded LA market. If they move, the Chargers would share a share a stadium with the Rams scheduled to open in 2019 in Inglewood. If they stay, they’d have to negotiate with the city, county and San Diego State over sharing a new stadium. On Nov. 8, city voters overwhelmingly defeated a Chargers-written measure asking for $1.15 billion to fund a new stadium and convention center. Jets shake up staf • The Jets announced that ofensive coordinator Chan Gailey has retired after two years under head coach Todd Bowles, and five other assistants — Kevin Patullo (QBs), Pepper Johnson (D-line), Mark Collins (outside linebackers), Marcel Shipp (RBs) and Joe Danna (DBs) — were fired.

NFL • FROM B1

place-kicker Morten Andersen, offensive tackle Tony Boselli, running back Terrell Davis, safety Brian Dawkins, ofensive guard Alan Faneca, offensive tackle Joe Jacoby, cornerback Ty Law, safety John Lynch, center/ guard Kevin Mawae, wide receiver Terrell Owens, defensive end Jason Taylor and running back LaDainian Tomlinson. Among the finalists, Dawkins, Taylor and Tomlinson are eligible for the first time. Andersen, Coryell, and Lynch are finalists for the fourth time; Davis and Warner are threetime finalists; Faneca, Jacoby and Owens are finalists for the second time. All of the others are first-time finalists. Also under consideration for the Class of 2017 are safety Kenny Easley as a senior finalist (for players who have been retired for 25 years or more), plus former league commissioner Paul Tagliabue and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones as finalists in the contributor’s category. The 48-member selection committee will meet Saturday, Feb. 4 in Houston — the day before the Super Bowl — to vote on the Class of 2017. A maximum of five modern-day candidates can be voted into the Hall of Fame out of the 15 finalists. So the maximum size of the class of 2017 is eight members, if five modern-day finalists are elected plus the senior finalist and both contributor finalists. The voting can be unpredictable, but Tomlinson appears to be the only sure thing among the modern-era finalists, leaving the four other available spots wide open. Although there was strong support for Warner last year, his candidacy was hurt by the presence of Brett Favre, with Favre gaining induction. There is no other quarterback among the finalists this year, so the third time could be the charm for Warner. He was an NFL MVP for the 1999 and 2001

Browns, Bears to coach Senior Bowl • Cleveland and Chicago will coach the Senior Bowl teams Jan. 28, getting a close-up look at some of the top prospects available in the NFL draft. First-year Browns coach Hue Jackson has the No. 1 overall pick after finishing 1-15, and John Fox, in his second season with the Bears (3-13), has the third pick.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rams wide receivers Isaac Bruce (80) and Torry Holt celebrate a touchdown by Bruce in an exhibition game at Detroit in 2005.

seasons and was named Super Bowl XXXIV MVP after leading the Rams to a 23-16 victory over Tennessee. He set a Super Bowl record against the Titans that still stands with 414 passing yards. He is the only quarterback in league history to throw for 300 yards-plus in three Super Bowls, with that third Super Bowl with the Arizona Cardinals in the 2008 season. As for Bruce, he’s considered a long shot this year as a firsttime finalist, but because he’s a finalist his case will be discussed at length by the selection committee for the first time, which should help him down the road if he doesn’t get in this year. Bruce caught the game-winning touchdown pass in Super Bowl XXXIV and topped 1,000 yards receiving eight times. A fierce competitor and feisty blocker, he had a career full of

clutch performances, including four TD catches on the day the Rams ended their 17-game losing streak against rival San Francisco in 1999. At the time of his retirement, he ranked second in career receiving yards (15,208) and fifth in career receptions (1,024) alltime among NFL pass-catchers. Noteworthy among the absences in the finalist group is Bruce’s running mate at wide receiver, Torry Holt, and safety Steve Atwater (Lutheran North HS). Holt is in his third year of eligibility, as is the case with Warner and Bruce. But as each Ram goes in from those Greatest Show teams, that should only help Holt move up the pecking order. Running back Marshall Faulk was inducted in 2011. Left tackle Orlando Pace was inducted last year. If Warner gets in this year, it will help clear the decks for Bruce and

Holt. Atwater, who played his college ball at Arkansas and spent most of his NFL career with Denver, was a finalist last year. The eight-time Pro Bowler won two Super Bowls with the Broncos and was considered one of the game’s hardest hitters. The first-year eligibility of Dawkins, a nine-time Pro Bowler who spent most of his career with Philadelphia, may have bumped Atwater out of the top 15. The enshrinement ceremonies for the Class of 2017 are set for Saturday, Aug. 5 in Canton, Ohio. The year-long selection process came with the initial list of 94 nominees. That group was pared to 26 semifinalists announced in mid-November, a list that included both Holt and Atwater. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Browns owners apologize to fans in letter • Browns owners Jimmy and Dee Haslam apologized to fans for putting them through the worst season in franchise history. In a letter sent to season-ticket holders and distributed to members of the media, the Haslams fell on their sword after the Browns set a franchise record for losses in a season. “Clearly, this season has been a painful part of our building process,” the owners wrote. “You deserve the best, and you certainly deserve better than a 1-15 team. We are sorry that our results have not been better.” Carr admits finger was broken • A fibula isn’t the only broken bone Derek Carr is dealing with. The Raiders quarterback finally admitted Tuesday, during a radio interview, that he actually broke his right little finger in the team’s Nov. 27 win over Carolina. “There was a little fracture in it. There was,” Carr said. “There was a whole bunch going on with that thing. But I can bend it now. It’s getting there.” The finger injury, which was reported at the time as a dislocation, became moot when Carr broke his right fibula on Christmas Eve against the Colts, an injury that ended his season. With backup Matt McGloin nursing a shoulder injury that could make it tough for him to practice enough before Saturday’s game at Houston, rookie Connor Cook could become the first quarterback to make his first career start in the postseason. From news services


SPORTS

01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Blues Nashville Dallas Winnipeg Colorado Paciic San Jose Anaheim Edmonton Calgary Los Angeles Vancouver Arizona

GP 40 36 38 37 38 40 37 GP 37 39 39 39 37 39 37

W L 23 12 23 9 20 13 16 14 16 15 18 19 12 24 W L 23 13 19 12 19 13 20 17 18 15 18 18 11 21

OT 5 4 5 7 7 3 1 OT 1 8 7 2 4 3 5

Pts 51 50 45 39 39 39 25 Pts 47 46 45 42 40 39 27

GF 109 113 108 103 97 109 76 GF 94 107 111 105 92 97 82

GA Home 98 13-4-4 76 13-4-0 111 15-3-4 102 10-5-5 113 11-6-3 121 10-8-1 125 4-13-1 GA Home 80 13-4-0 109 11-4-2 104 9-7-2 111 9-10-0 91 11-4-1 116 13-6-2 121 6-10-2

Away 10-8-1 10-5-4 5-10-1 6-9-2 5-9-4 8-11-2 8-11-0 Away 10-9-1 8-8-6 10-6-5 11-7-2 7-11-3 5-12-1 5-11-3

Div 8-6-1 7-3-2 8-6-2 9-7-1 8-7-3 9-4-1 5-11-0 Div 7-5-1 9-2-4 6-3-3 7-6-1 6-5-0 6-4-1 4-6-4

OT 6 4 4 8 4 8 5 8 OT 4 5 1 5 5 7 7 6

Pts 52 44 44 42 42 40 37 36 Pts 58 55 53 51 45 39 39 36

GF 115 94 95 113 113 92 93 82 GF 126 133 136 105 116 95 92 104

GA 87 98 97 109 111 104 107 102 GA 74 107 101 83 120 101 115 113

Away 8-6-4 9-8-0 11-7-4 7-6-6 8-10-2 7-8-5 9-6-2 7-7-5 Away 12-2-3 8-6-3 13-6-0 9-4-4 8-9-2 5-10-6 6-12-5 4-8-2

Div 9-1-4 6-5-1 11-5-0 8-3-1 8-3-2 7-6-5 4-8-3 4-7-3 Div 5-0-0 10-4-0 8-5-0 5-5-4 4-3-0 2-7-2 5-4-2 4-5-2

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Toronto Tampa Bay Florida Detroit Bufalo Metropolitan Columbus Pittsburgh NY Rangers Washington Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey NY Islanders

GP 38 37 40 37 39 38 37 37 GP 36 38 40 37 39 37 39 36

W 23 20 20 17 19 16 16 14 W 27 25 26 23 20 16 16 15

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

L 9 13 16 12 16 14 16 15 L 5 8 13 9 14 14 16 15

Home 15-3-2 11-5-4 9-9-0 10-6-2 11-6-2 9-6-3 7-10-3 7-8-3 Home 15-3-1 17-2-2 13-7-1 14-5-1 12-5-3 11-4-1 10-4-2 11-7-4

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Buffalo 4, NY Rangers 1 Washington 6, Toronto 5, OT Columbus 3, Edmonton 1 New Jersey 3, Carolina 1 Winnipeg 6, Tampa Bay 4 Montreal 2, Nashville 1, OT Los Angeles at San Jose, late Monday Blues 4, Chicago 1 New Jersey 3, Boston 0 Vancouver 3, Colorado 2 Wednesday Winnipeg at Florida, 6 p.m. Montreal at Dallas, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m. Arizona at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Boston, 6 p.m. Nashville at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Blues, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday Nashville at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Colorado, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 23 11 Boston 21 14 New York 16 18 Philadelphia 9 24 Brooklyn 8 25 Southeast W L Charlotte 19 16 Atlanta 18 16 Washington 16 18 Orlando 16 20 Miami 10 26 Central W L Cleveland 26 7 Milwaukee 17 16 Indiana 18 18 Chicago 17 18 Detroit 16 21

Pct .676 .600 .471 .273 .242 Pct .543 .529 .471 .444 .278 Pct .788 .515 .500 .486 .432

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 28 7 Houston 27 9 Memphis 22 14 New Orleans 14 22 Dallas 11 24 Northwest W L Utah 22 14 Oklahoma City 21 14 Portland 15 21 Denver 14 21 Minnesota 11 24 Paciic W L Golden State 30 5 LA Clippers 23 14 Sacramento 15 19 LA Lakers 12 25 Phoenix 11 25

Pct .800 .750 .611 .389 .314 Pct .611 .600 .417 .400 .314 Pct .857 .622 .441 .324 .306

GB — 2½ 7 13½ 14½ GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 9½ GB — 9 9½ 10 12 GB — 1½ 6½ 14½ 17 GB — ½ 7 7½ 10½ GB — 8 14½ 19 19½

L10 6-4 8-2 2-8 4-6 2-8 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 5-5 1-9 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 8-2 8-2 5-5 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 5-5 4-6 L10 9-1 3-7 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str L-1 W-2 L-5 W-2 L-3 Str L-2 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-6 Str W-3 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-5 W-2 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-2 Str W-3 W-1 W-1 L-3 W-2

Home 11-5 9-6 11-6 6-14 7-9 Home 11-7 10-7 13-6 7-11 5-13 Home 18-2 11-7 13-5 11-7 9-9

Away 12-6 12-8 5-12 3-10 1-16 Away 8-9 8-9 3-12 9-9 5-13 Away 8-5 6-9 5-13 6-11 7-12

Conf 13-4 15-6 8-10 5-12 3-16 Conf 13-12 13-7 12-11 9-14 5-16 Conf 19-5 12-11 11-12 13-11 10-14

Home 12-4 14-3 13-7 10-10 7-9 Home 12-7 13-6 9-7 7-10 6-12 Home 15-2 12-6 7-7 7-10 7-9

Away 16-3 13-6 9-7 4-12 4-15 Away 10-7 8-8 6-14 7-11 5-12 Away 15-3 11-8 8-12 5-15 4-16

Conf 16-4 19-6 14-5 6-18 7-16 Conf 15-9 11-8 11-15 9-12 4-16 Conf 20-4 16-9 11-11 7-15 3-21

Tuesday Philadelphia 93, Minnesota 91 Boston 115, Utah 104 Indiana 121, Detroit 116 Dallas 113, Washington 105 San Antonio 110, Toronto 82 Sacramento 120, Denver 113 Phoenix 99, Miami 90 Memphis at LA Lakers, late Wednesday Atlanta at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at New York, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Memphis at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Miami at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Brooklyn at Indiana, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Friday Houston at Orlando, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Washington, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Miami at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Streaking Jackets beat Oilers Spurs power past Raptors ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Columbus’ Cam Atkinson collides with Edmonton’s Andrej Sekera. Columbus won 3-1.

December. The Blue Jackets haven’t lost since Nov. 26.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cam Atkinson and William Karlsson scored power-play goals and the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-1 on Tuesday night to extend their winning streak to 16 games — one away from the longest ever in the NHL. Nick Foligno also scored for the Blue Jackets, who can tie the 1992-93 Pittsburgh Penguins with a victory Thursday night at Washington. The near-sellout crowd chanted “We want 16!” as the clock ticked down. Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 21 shots for Columbus, which started the new year on the right note after winning all 14 games in

Captains named for All-Star Game • Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins, Carey Price of the Montreal Canadiens, Connor McDavid of the Edmonton Oilers and P.K. Subban of the Nashville Predators were voted as divisional captains for the 3-on-3 tournament at the NHL AllStar Game on Jan. 29. Crosby will captain the Metropolitan Division, Price the Atlantic, McDavid the Pacific and Subban the Central, if he’s healthy. Subban has been out since Dec. 15 with a lower-body injury and is expected to miss more time.

Kawhi Leonard had 25 points, LaMarcus Aldridge added 23 and the host San Antonio Spurs beat Toronto 110-82 on Tuesday night, holding the Raptors to their lowest score of the season. San Antonio dominated a matchup of teams with the second-best record in each conference, leading by as many as 34 points. Leonard and Aldridge combined to shoot 19 for 28 from the field, but it was veteran point guard Tony Parker who set the tone for the Spurs. Parker finished with 15 points and eight assists in 23 minutes. After scoring the game’s opening basket on a floater, Parker drove the lane and tossed the ball out to Aldridge and Pau Gasol for mid-range jumpers and to Danny Green for a 3-pointer. The Spurs raced to a 26-10 lead in the opening eight minutes, and the Raptors never recovered.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Raptors guard Cory Joseph (right) drives around Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge (12) during the irst half Tuesday.

NOTEBOOK Pelicans, Motiejunas agree on contract • The New Orleans Pelicans say free-agent 7-footer Donatas Motiejunas has signed to play the rest of this season. A person familiar with the negotations, speaking on condition of anonymity because contract terms have not been released, told The Associated Press that Motiejunas will be paid a pro-rated veteran minimum worth about $600,000. Motiejunas, who’ll now have an opportunity to play in the front court alongside perennial All-Star Anthony Davis, has played four seasons in the NBA with Houston, averaging 7.8 points and four rebounds. As a restricted free agent last ofseason, he signed an offer sheet from Brooklyn for about $36 million over four years, but

Houston initially sought to match it, only to allow the 26-year-old Lithuanian to become an unrestricted free agent after negotiations broke down. Hornets waive Harrison • The Charlotte Hornets’ 1½-season Aaron Harrison experiment is over. The Hornets are waiving Harrison, avoiding a guarantee of his season salary of more than $874,000, an informed source confirmed. The Hornets signed Harrison, a 6-6 guard out of Kentucky, after he wasn’t taken in the 2015 NBA draft.He spent much of this season on Development League assignment with the Greensboro Swarm. He averaged 20.2 points and 3.6 assists with the Swarm. (Charlotte Observer)

NHL SUMMARIES Jets 6, Lightning 4

Sabres 4, Rangers 1

Capitals 6, Maple Leafs 5, OT

Winnipeg 1 3 2 — 6 Tampa Bay 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 16 (Laine, Enstrom), 7:25 (pp). Penalties: Petan, WPG, (holding), 2:38; Hedman, TB, (tripping), 3:15; Laine, WPG, (slashing), 3:33; Palat, TB, (hooking), 6:59; Bournival, TB, (hooking), 8:16; Ehlers, WPG, (delay of game), 10:43; Palat, TB, (hooking), 10:58. Second period: 2, Tampa Bay, Peca 1 (Killorn, Namestnikov), 3:43. 3, Winnipeg, Ehlers 11, 4:30. 4, Winnipeg, Trouba 2 (Perreault, Wheeler), 5:19. 5, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 5 (Morrissey, Wheeler), 14:44. Penalties: Kucherov, TB, Penalty Shot (interference on breakaway (penalty shot)), 4:30; Wheeler, WPG, (holding), 8:48; Palat, TB, (slashing), 10:51; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 18:33. Third period: 6, TB, Palat 7 (Kucherov, Johnson), 3:26. 7, Winnipeg, Ehlers 12 (Laine, Trouba), 9:28. 8, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 14 (Hedman, Johnson), 12:22 (pp). 9, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 15 (Hedman, Drouin), 17:29 (pp). 10, Winnipeg, Laine 20 (Ehlers, Scheifele), 18:37. Penalties: Armia, WPG, (high sticking), 12:06; Trouba, WPG, (delay), 17:01. Shots: WPG 6-13-15: 34. TB 17-10-9: 36. Power-plays: WPG 1 of 4; TB 2 of 7. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 14-12-1 (36 shots-32 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 10-6-2 (33-28). A: 19,092.

Buffalo 2 1 1 — 4 NY Rangers 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Buffalo, Girgensons 4 (Gionta, Carrier), 12:17. 2, Buffalo, Kane 9 (Reinhart, Okposo), 19:21. Penalties: Skjei, NYR, (interference), 3:27. Second period: 3, Buffalo, Bailey 1, 1:03. 4, NY Rangers, Holden 8 (Miller, Lindberg), 15:55. Penalties: Girardi, NYR, (slashing), 6:34; Carrier, BUF, (interference), 9:33. Third period: 5, Buffalo, Eichel 7 (Moulson, Reinhart), 1:10 (pp). Penalties: Vesey, NYR, (hooking), 0:18; Holden, NYR, (delay of game), 4:07; Skjei, NYR, (holding), 17:31. Shots: Buffalo 9-4-6: 19. NY Rangers 5-15-5: 25. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 5; NY Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Nilsson 6-3-3 (25 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 16-9-1 (19-15). A: 18,006. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Jake Brenk, Kyle Rehman.

Toronto 3 1 1 0 — 5 Washington 2 0 3 1 — 6 First period: 1, Washington, Williams 10 (Kuznetsov, Orlov), 1:14 (pp). 2, Toronto, Kadri 14 (Marner, Van riemsdyk), 6:39 (pp). 3, Toronto, Brown 8 (Hyman, Matthews), 11:44. 4, Washington, Oshie 12 (Williams), 16:00. 5, Toronto, Gauthier 2 (Carrick), 18:06. Penalties: Zaitsev, TOR, (hooking), 0:33; Connolly, WSH, (hooking), 5:27; Williams, WSH, (cross checking), 13:50. Second period: 6, Toronto, Komarov 7 (Matthews, Nylander), 13:33 (pp). Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 1:17; Matthews, TOR, (tripping), 8:28; Ovechkin, WSH, (tripping), 11:42; Kadri, TOR, (cross checking), 16:42; Ovechkin, WSH, served by Burakovsky, (roughing), 16:42; Ovechkin, WSH, (roughing), 16:42. Third period: 7, WSH, Kuznetsov 4 (Williams, Johansson), 2:20. 8, WSH, Orlov 2 (Niskanen, Eller), 3:39. 9, TOR, Marner 10 (Bozak, Van riemsdyk), 11:08. 10, WSH, Carlson 4 (Johansson, Kuznetsov), 13:55. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (hooking), 6:55. Overtime: 11, WSH, Ovechkin 18 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 0:22. Penalties: None. Shots: TOR 8-11-6: 25. WSH 11-7-10-1: 29. Power-plays: TOR 2 of 6; WSH 1 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 16-8-7 (29 shots-23 saves). Washington, Holtby 16-8-4 (8-5), Grubauer 7-1-1 (17-15). A: 18,506.

Devils 3, Hurricanes 1 New Jersey 0 1 2 — 3 Carolina 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Bennett, NJ, (holding), 9:08; Severson, NJ, (holding), 12:18; Carolina bench, served by Stempniak (too many men on the ice), 14:38. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Henrique 10 (Severson, Cammalleri), 14:56. Penalties: Rask, CAR, (holding), 11:08; Merrill, NJ, (interference), 16:12. Third period: 2, New Jersey, Cammalleri 10 (Henrique, Palmieri), 11:30. 3, Carolina, Aho 8 (Teravainen, Hainsey), 12:24. 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 8, 18:00. Penalties: Hall, NJ, (interference), 13:11. Shots: NJ 6-3-9: 18. CAR 8-12-10: 30. Power-plays: NJ 0 of 2; CAR 0 of 4. Goalies: NJ, Schneider 12-12-5 (30 shots-29 saves). CAR, Ward 13-11-6 (17-15). A: 8,998.

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Blue Jackets 3, Oilers 1 Edmonton 0 1 0 — 1 Columbus 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 18 (Wennberg, Werenski), 12:32 (pp). Penalties: Puljujarvi, EDM, (holding), 11:20. Second period: 2, Edmonton, Klefbom 6 (Eberle, Maroon), 5:39. 3, Columbus, Karlsson 6 (Jones, Saad), 10:43 (pp). Penalties: Atkinson, CBJ, (slashing), 0:24; Dubinsky, CBJ, Major (fighting), 7:48; Maroon, EDM, Major (fighting), 7:48; Davidson, EDM, (holding), 8:53; Columbus bench, served by Werenski (too many men on the ice), 13:44; Mcdavid, EDM, (tripping), 14:41. Third period: 4, Columbus, Foligno 13, 2:45. Penalties: Benning, EDM, (roughing), 6:06; Jones, CBJ, (tripping), 11:12. Shots: Edmonton 4-8-10: 22. Columbus 12-13-10: 35. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 3; Columbus 2 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 18-11-6 (35 shots32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 25-5-2 (22-21). A: 17,169. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Brad Kovachik.

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Canadiens 2, Predators 1, OT Montreal 0 0 1 1 — 2 Nashville 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Petry, MTL, (high sticking), 13:02; Wilson, NSH, (hooking), 19:25. Second period: 1, Nashville, Fiala 6 (Josi, Ellis), 19:06. Penalties: Byron, MTL, (slashing), 3:28; Granberg, NSH, (holding), 10:08; Radulov, MTL, (tripping), 15:15; Jarnkrok, NSH, (hooking), 15:15. Third period: 2, Montreal, Weber 10 (Mitchell, Radulov), 4:26. Penalties: Ekholm, NSH, (holding), 7:13. Overtime: 3, Montreal, Pacioretty 16 (Radulov, Beaulieu), 4:30. Penalties: None. Shots: Montreal 11-14-13-5: 43. Nashville 7-7-7-2: 23. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Nashville 0 of 2. Goalies: Montreal, Price 19-5-4 (23 shots-22 saves). Nashville, Rinne 13-10-6 (43-41). A: 17,113. Referees: Dean Morton, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Bryan Pancich.

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

GOAL SCORING Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Jeff Carter Los Angeles Auston Matthews Toronto Patrik Laine Winnipeg David Pastrnak Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis Cam Atkinson Columbus Alex Ovechkin Washington Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Artem Anisimov Chicago Marian Hossa Chicago Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Rickard Rakell Anaheim Brent Burns San Jose Ryan Kesler Anaheim Chris Kreider NY Rangers Max Pacioretty Montreal Artemi Panarin Chicago Mark Scheifele Winnipeg Sam Gagner Columbus

GP 32 37 36 39 33 38 35 36 39 36 34 38 28 37 39 33 37 40 36 34

G 26 20 20 19 19 18 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 14

NBA SUMMARIES Pacers 121, Pistons 116

Spurs 110, Raptors 82

Kings 120, Nuggets 113

Indiana: Robinson 3-5 0-0 8, George 10-17 10-10 32, Turner 7-12 1-2 17, T.Young 4-8 0-0 8, Teague 5-8 6-7 17, Miles 1-4 0-0 3, Seraphin 4-5 2-2 10, Jefferson 2-7 2-2 6, Brooks 1-2 1-2 4, Ellis 6-6 4-5 16. Totals 43-74 26-30 121. Detroit: Morris 6-14 0-0 14, Leuer 7-11 0-0 14, Drummond 9-16 2-2 20, Jackson 8-18 1-1 20, Caldwell-Pope 5-13 5-5 16, Harris 9-14 2-2 22, Johnson 1-4 0-0 3, Marjanovic 2-5 0-0 4, Smith 1-2 0-2 3. Totals 48-97 10-12 116. Indiana 36 30 26 29 — 121 Detroit 28 32 32 24 — 116 3-point goals: Indiana 9-16 (Turner 2-2, Robinson 2-3, George 2-3, Teague 1-1, Brooks 1-1, Miles 1-3, T.Young 0-3), Detroit 10-29 (Jackson 3-4, Harris 2-5, Morris 2-7, Smith 1-2, Johnson 1-3, Caldwell-Pope 1-5, Leuer 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 34 (Turner 7), Detroit 42 (Drummond 14). Assists: Indiana 26 (Teague 8), Detroit 31 (Jackson 12). Total fouls: Indiana 8, Detroit 19. Technicals: Drummond. A: 13,435 (19,971).

Toronto: Carroll 3-7 3-4 10, Siakam 1-4 0-0 2, Valanciunas 1-5 0-0 2, Lowry 2-9 2-2 6, DeRozan 12-21 2-3 26, Ross 7-11 1-2 17, Caboclo 0-0 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-5 0-0 0, Poeltl 1-4 2-4 4, VanVleet 1-2 0-0 2, Joseph 3-11 4-5 11, Powell 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 31-83 16-22 82. San Antonio: Leonard 8-12 4-5 25, Aldridge 11-16 0-0 23, Gasol 1-6 3-4 5, Parker 6-9 2-2 15, Green 2-5 0-0 6, Bertans 2-3 0-0 5, Anderson 1-1 0-0 2, Lee 4-6 0-0 8, Dedmon 1-1 1-2 3, Mills 2-4 0-0 6, Murray 1-3 0-0 2, Simmons 3-9 0-0 6, Ginobili 1-3 1-2 4. Totals 43-78 11-15 110. Toronto 18 23 17 24 — 82 San Antonio 29 31 28 22 — 110 3PT: Toronto 4-18 (Ross 2-4, Joseph 1-2, Carroll 1-3, Nogueira 0-1, Powell 0-1, Lowry 0-7), San Antonio 13-24 (Leonard 5-7, Green 2-3, Mills 2-4, Parker 1-1, Aldridge 1-1, Ginobili 1-2, Bertans 1-2, Murray 0-1, Simmons 0-3). Fouled out: None. RB: Toronto 43 (Poeltl 9), San Antonio 44 (Aldridge 8). Assists: Toronto 8 (Joseph 3), San Antonio 32 (Parker 8). Total fouls: Toronto 17, San Antonio 18. Technicals: Dedmon. A: 18,418 (18,418).

Sacramento: Barnes 2-6 0-0 5, Cousins 10-25 8-8 31, Koufos 8-9 2-3 18, Collison 10-16 4-4 26, McLemore 2-4 0-0 6, Casspi 0-3 0-0 0, Tolliver 2-4 2-2 7, Cauley-Stein 0-1 0-0 0, Afflalo 8-11 1-1 19, Temple 4-9 0-0 8. Totals 46-88 17-18 120. Denver: Chandler 3-10 2-2 10, Gallinari 8-12 4-4 24, Jokic 7-12 3-3 18, Mudiay 2-8 0-0 5, Harris 6-11 0-0 15, Barton 1-3 0-0 3, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Arthur 4-6 0-0 12, Nurkic 6-8 4-4 16, Nelson 2-7 0-0 6, Beasley 1-1 0-0 2, Murray 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 41-83 13-13 113. Sacramento 29 31 34 26 — 120 Denver 28 23 37 25 — 113 3-point goals: Sacramento 11-29 (Cousins 3-7, McLemore 2-3, Afflalo 2-4, Collison 2-5, Tolliver 1-3, Barnes 1-4, Casspi 0-1, Temple 0-2), Denver 18-38 (Arthur 4-5, Gallinari 4-6, Harris 3-4, Nelson 2-5, Chandler 2-7, Barton 1-1, Jokic 1-2, Mudiay 1-5, Murray 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 33 (Cousins, Temple 6), Denver 34 (Jokic 7). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Collison 7), Denver 29 (Mudiay 6). Total fouls: Sacramento 13, Denver 18. A: 11,018 (19,155).

Celtics 115, Jazz 104 Utah: Hayward 7-14 6-7 23, Favors 5-10 2-2 12, Gobert 3-8 2-2 8, Mack 3-10 2-2 8, Hood 3-10 3-6 9, Ingles 2-6 2-2 7, J.Johnson 7-11 0-0 17, Lyles 0-2 0-0 0, Diaw 6-7 0-0 15, Neto 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 38-82 17-21 104. Boston: Crowder 6-8 4-4 21, A.Johnson 3-7 0-0 6, Horford 9-16 0-0 21, Thomas 10-18 4-4 29, Bradley 4-7 4-4 14, Brown 4-6 1-1 10, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 2-6 1-2 5, Smart 3-5 2-2 9. Totals 41-74 16-17 115. Utah 29 16 29 30 — 104 Boston 28 26 31 30 — 115 3-point goals: Utah 11-26 (Diaw 3-3, J.Johnson 3-4, Hayward 3-7, Neto 1-2, Ingles 1-4, Mack 0-1, Lyles 0-2, Hood 0-3), Boston 17-31 (Crowder 5-6, Thomas 5-8, Horford 3-6, Bradley 2-4, Smart 1-1, Brown 1-2, Olynyk 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 35 (Gobert 13), Boston 32 (Olynyk 7). Assists: Utah 27 (Favors 7), Boston 31 (Thomas 15). Total fouls: Utah 17, Boston 22. Technicals: Boston defensive three second, Boston team, Crowder. A: 18,624 (18,624).

76ers 93, T’Wolves 91 Minnesota: Wiggins 2-15 4-4 8, Towns 9-22 4-4 23, Dieng 4-6 2-2 10, Rubio 2-3 0-0 5, LaVine 11-20 3-4 28, Muhammad 3-6 3-4 10, Bjelica 2-6 2-2 7, Aldrich 0-2 0-0 0, Dunn 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 33-82 18-20 91. Philadelphia: Covington 4-14 4-4 13, Ilyasova 7-14 2-2 19, Embiid 8-20 8-11 25, McConnell 3-9 0-0 6, Stauskas 3-9 0-0 8, Thompson 0-1 0-0 0, Noel 4-5 0-0 8, Saric 3-8 2-2 8, Okafor 1-3 0-2 2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-2 4-4 4. Totals 33-85 20-25 93. Minnesota 16 26 26 23 — 91 Philadelphia 29 28 22 14 — 93 3PT: Minnesota 7-24 (LaVine 3-8, Muhammad 1-1, Rubio 1-2, Bjelica 1-4, Towns 1-6, Wiggins 0-3), Philadelphia 7-32 (Ilyasova 3-8, Stauskas 2-5, Embiid 1-3, Covington 1-9, LuwawuCabarrot 0-1, Saric 0-3, McConnell 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 47 (Towns 15), Philadelphia 48 (Covington 10). Assists: Minnesota 20 (Towns, Rubio 5), Philadelphia 19 (McConnell 8). Total fouls: Minnesota 24, Philadelphia 21. Technicals: Towns, Philadelphia defensive three second, Philadelphia team. A: 17,124 (20,328).

Mavericks 113, Wizards 105 Washington: Porter 5-11 0-0 13, Morris 5-10 2-3 13, Gortat 5-11 2-2 12, Wall 10-19 6-6 27, Beal 10-26 2-3 25, Oubre 3-5 0-0 8, Smith 2-3 0-0 4, Burke 0-3 0-0 0, McClellan 0-1 0-0 0, Thornton 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 41-92 12-14 105. Dallas: Finney-Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Barnes 8-18 8-9 26, Nowitzki 4-9 2-2 11, Williams 7-13 3-3 21, Matthews 5-11 0-0 12, Powell 2-3 4-5 8, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Bogut 0-3 0-0 0, Curry 5-8 2-2 16, Jackson 0-1 2-2 2, Harris 6-11 1-1 17, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 22-24 113. Washington 29 38 21 17 — 105 Dallas 28 33 26 26 — 113 3-point goals: Washington 11-30 (Porter 3-5, Beal 3-11, Oubre 2-4, Morris 1-2, Wall 1-3, Thornton 1-3, Burke 0-1, McClellan 0-1), Dallas 17-32 (Curry 4-5, Williams 4-7, Harris 4-7, Matthews 2-4, Barnes 2-4, Nowitzki 1-4, Finney-Smith 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 38 (Gortat 16), Dallas 44 (Nowitzki 9). Assists: Washington 27 (Wall 8), Dallas 20 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Washington 19, Dallas 21. Technicals: Beal. A: 19,318 (19,200).

Suns 99, Heat 90 Miami: Babbitt 3-11 0-2 7, Reed 11-16 0-0 22, Dragic 9-18 5-6 24, Richardson 5-16 0-0 11, McGruder 3-10 0-0 8, D.Williams 0-7 3-4 3, Haslem 1-1 1-1 3, Ellington 4-12 3-3 12. Totals 36-91 12-16 90. Phoenix: Warren 1-3 0-0 2, Chriss 7-11 2-2 18, Chandler 2-4 1-2 5, Bledsoe 4-14 7-8 17, Booker 9-19 6-7 27, Tucker 3-5 1-1 7, Bender 1-5 0-0 2, Len 4-7 1-2 9, Ulis 1-4 0-0 2, Barbosa 4-5 0-0 10. Totals 36-77 18-22 99. Miami 29 23 14 24 — 90 Phoenix 28 28 27 16 — 99 3-point goals: Miami 6-23 (McGruder 2-5, Dragic 1-2, Babbitt 1-4, Richardson 1-5, Ellington 1-6, D.Williams 0-1), Phoenix 9-23 (Booker 3-6, Barbosa 2-2, Bledsoe 2-4, Chriss 2-5, Warren 0-1, Tucker 0-2, Bender 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 43 (Reed 18), Phoenix 49 (Chandler 20). Assists: Miami 18 (Dragic 9), Phoenix 21 (Bledsoe 7). Total fouls: Miami 23, Phoenix 23. Technicals: Chriss. A: 16,772 (18,422).

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

SCORING Westbrook, OKC Cousins, SAC Davis, NOR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS DeRozan, TOR Lillard, POR Durant, GOL James, CLE Butler, CHI Leonard, SAN Irving, CLE Curry, GOL Antetokounmpo, MIL Wall, WAS Walker, CHA McCollum, POR Lowry, TOR FG PERCENTAGE Gobert, UTA Jordan, LAC Howard, ATL Capela, HOU Zeller, CHA Adams, OKC Jokic, DEN Gortat, WAS Plumlee, POR Kanter, OKC REBOUNDS Whiteside, MIA Drummond, DET Jordan, LAC Howard, ATL Gobert, UTA Gortat, WAS Davis, NOR Towns, MIN Chandler, PHX Love, CLE ASSISTS Harden, HOU Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC James, CLE Teague, IND Green, GOL Lowry, TOR Rubio, MIN Rondo, CHI

G 35 32 34 36 30 33 32 35 30 35 32 29 35 33 31 34 36 33

FG 356 313 353 297 255 326 280 320 285 275 250 260 272 283 263 281 304 240

FG 153 166 167 151 131 169 158 166 161 182 G 34 35 37 30 35 33 34 34 27 30

OFF 135 140 128 143 112 106 75 119 82 74 G 36 35 31 31 30 35 33 33 29 29

FT 306 244 257 315 245 244 223 194 143 298 208 106 163 198 163 127 127 156

PTS 1081 927 982 1021 832 909 865 900 769 887 768 694 836 787 725 783 824 750

FGA 221 249 260 236 220 285 273 289 287 328 DEF 352 334 366 252 311 285 326 272 217 253

AVG 30.9 29.0 28.9 28.4 27.7 27.5 27.0 25.7 25.6 25.3 24.0 23.9 23.9 23.8 23.4 23.0 22.9 22.7 PCT .692 .667 .642 .640 .595 .593 .579 .574 .561 .555

TOT 487 474 494 395 423 391 401 391 299 327

AST 429 369 312 294 257 268 248 239 209 206

AVG 14.3 13.5 13.4 13.2 12.1 11.8 11.8 11.5 11.1 10.9 AVG 11.9 10.5 10.1 9.5 8.6 7.7 7.5 7.2 7.2 7.1


SPORTS

01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 2

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Chicago Minnesota Blues Nashville Dallas Winnipeg Colorado Paciic San Jose Anaheim Edmonton Los Angeles Calgary Vancouver Arizona

GP 40 36 38 37 38 40 37 GP 38 39 39 38 39 39 37

W L 23 12 23 9 20 13 16 14 16 15 18 19 12 24 W L 23 13 19 12 19 13 19 15 20 17 18 18 11 21

OT 5 4 5 7 7 3 1 OT 2 8 7 4 2 3 5

Pts 51 50 45 39 39 39 25 Pts 48 46 45 42 42 39 27

GF 109 113 108 103 97 109 76 GF 95 107 111 94 105 97 82

GA Home 98 13-4-4 76 13-4-0 111 15-3-4 102 10-5-5 113 11-6-3 121 10-8-1 125 4-13-1 GA Home 82 13-4-1 109 11-4-2 104 9-7-2 92 11-4-1 111 9-10-0 116 13-6-2 121 6-10-2

Away 10-8-1 10-5-4 5-10-1 6-9-2 5-9-4 8-11-2 8-11-0 Away 10-9-1 8-8-6 10-6-5 8-11-3 11-7-2 5-12-1 5-11-3

Div 8-6-1 7-3-2 8-6-2 9-7-1 8-7-3 9-4-1 5-11-0 Div 7-5-2 9-2-4 6-3-3 7-5-0 7-6-1 6-4-1 4-6-4

OT 6 4 4 8 4 8 5 8 OT 4 5 1 5 5 7 7 6

Pts 52 44 44 42 42 40 37 36 Pts 58 55 53 51 45 39 39 36

GF 115 94 95 113 113 92 93 82 GF 126 133 136 105 116 95 92 104

GA 87 98 97 109 111 104 107 102 GA 74 107 101 83 120 101 115 113

Away 8-6-4 9-8-0 11-7-4 7-6-6 8-10-2 7-8-5 9-6-2 7-7-5 Away 12-2-3 8-6-3 13-6-0 9-4-4 8-9-2 5-10-6 6-12-5 4-8-2

Div 9-1-4 6-5-1 11-5-0 8-3-1 8-3-2 7-6-5 4-8-3 4-7-3 Div 5-0-0 10-4-0 8-5-0 5-5-4 4-3-0 2-7-2 5-4-2 4-5-2

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Montreal Ottawa Boston Toronto Tampa Bay Florida Detroit Bufalo Metropolitan Columbus Pittsburgh NY Rangers Washington Philadelphia Carolina New Jersey NY Islanders

GP 38 37 40 37 39 38 37 37 GP 36 38 40 37 39 37 39 36

W 23 20 20 17 19 16 16 14 W 27 25 26 23 20 16 16 15

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

L 9 13 16 12 16 14 16 15 L 5 8 13 9 14 14 16 15

Home 15-3-2 11-5-4 9-9-0 10-6-2 11-6-2 9-6-3 7-10-3 7-8-3 Home 15-3-1 17-2-2 13-7-1 14-5-1 12-5-3 11-4-1 10-4-2 11-7-4

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Tuesday Buffalo 4, NY Rangers 1 Washington 6, Toronto 5, OT Columbus 3, Edmonton 1 New Jersey 3, Carolina 1 Winnipeg 6, Tampa Bay 4 Montreal 2, Nashville 1, OT Los Angeles 2, San Jose 1, OT Monday Blues 4, Chicago 1 New Jersey 3, Boston 0 Vancouver 3, Colorado 2 Wednesday Winnipeg at Florida, 6 p.m. Montreal at Dallas, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m. Arizona at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Columbus at Washington, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Boston, 6 p.m. Nashville at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Blues, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday Nashville at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 6:30 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. NY Islanders at Colorado, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Toronto 23 11 Boston 21 14 New York 16 18 Philadelphia 9 24 Brooklyn 8 25 Southeast W L Charlotte 19 16 Atlanta 18 16 Washington 16 18 Orlando 16 20 Miami 10 26 Central W L Cleveland 26 7 Milwaukee 17 16 Indiana 18 18 Chicago 17 18 Detroit 16 21

Pct .676 .600 .471 .273 .242 Pct .543 .529 .471 .444 .278 Pct .788 .515 .500 .486 .432

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L San Antonio 28 7 Houston 27 9 Memphis 22 15 New Orleans 14 22 Dallas 11 24 Northwest W L Utah 22 14 Oklahoma City 21 14 Portland 15 21 Denver 14 21 Minnesota 11 24 Paciic W L Golden State 30 5 LA Clippers 23 14 Sacramento 15 19 LA Lakers 13 25 Phoenix 11 25

Pct .800 .750 .595 .389 .314 Pct .611 .600 .417 .400 .314 Pct .857 .622 .441 .342 .306

GB — 2½ 7 13½ 14½ GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 9½ GB — 9 9½ 10 12 GB — 1½ 7 14½ 17 GB — ½ 7 7½ 10½ GB — 8 14½ 18½ 19½

L10 6-4 8-2 2-8 4-6 2-8 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 5-5 1-9 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 8-2 8-2 4-6 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 5-5 4-6 L10 9-1 3-7 6-4 3-7 3-7

Str L-1 W-2 L-5 W-2 L-3 Str L-2 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-6 Str W-3 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-5 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-2 Str W-3 W-1 W-1 W-1 W-2

Home 11-5 9-6 11-6 6-14 7-9 Home 11-7 10-7 13-6 7-11 5-13 Home 18-2 11-7 13-5 11-7 9-9

Away 12-6 12-8 5-12 3-10 1-16 Away 8-9 8-9 3-12 9-9 5-13 Away 8-5 6-9 5-13 6-11 7-12

Conf 13-4 15-6 8-10 5-12 3-16 Conf 13-12 13-7 12-11 9-14 5-16 Conf 19-5 12-11 11-12 13-11 10-14

Home 12-4 14-3 13-7 10-10 7-9 Home 12-7 13-6 9-7 7-10 6-12 Home 15-2 12-6 7-7 8-10 7-9

Away 16-3 13-6 9-8 4-12 4-15 Away 10-7 8-8 6-14 7-11 5-12 Away 15-3 11-8 8-12 5-15 4-16

Conf 16-4 19-6 14-6 6-18 7-16 Conf 15-9 11-8 11-15 9-12 4-16 Conf 20-4 16-9 11-11 8-15 3-21

Tuesday Philadelphia 93, Minnesota 91 Boston 115, Utah 104 Indiana 121, Detroit 116 Dallas 113, Washington 105 San Antonio 110, Toronto 82 Sacramento 120, Denver 113 Phoenix 99, Miami 90 LA Lakers 116, Memphis 102 Wednesday Atlanta at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at New York, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Memphis at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Miami at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Thursday Brooklyn at Indiana, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Friday Houston at Orlando, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Washington, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 6:30 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Miami at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Streaking Jackets beat Oilers Spurs power past Raptors ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Columbus’ Cam Atkinson collides with Edmonton’s Andrej Sekera. Columbus won 3-1.

Kawhi Leonard had 25 points, LaMarcus Aldridge added 23 and the host San Antonio Spurs beat Toronto 110-82 on Tuesday night, holding the Raptors to their lowest score of the season. San Antonio dominated a matchup of teams with the second-best record in each conference, leading by as many as 34 points. Leonard and Aldridge combined to shoot 19 for 28 from the field, but it was veteran point guard Tony Parker who set the tone for the Spurs. Parker finished with 15 points and eight assists in 23 minutes. After scoring the game’s opening basket on a floater, Parker drove the lane and tossed the ball out to Aldridge and Pau Gasol for mid-range jumpers and to Danny Green for a 3-pointer. The Spurs raced to a 26-10 lead in the opening eight minutes, and the Raptors never recovered.

NOTEBOOK December. The Blue Jackets haven’t lost since Nov. 26.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cam Atkinson and William Karlsson scored power-play goals and the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-1 on Tuesday night to extend their winning streak to 16 games — one away from the longest ever in the NHL. Nick Foligno also scored for the Blue Jackets, who can tie the 1992-93 Pittsburgh Penguins with a victory Thursday night at Washington. The near-sellout crowd chanted “We want 16!” as the clock ticked down. Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 21 shots for Columbus, which started the new year on the right note after winning all 14 games in

Captains named for All-Star Game • Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins, Carey Price of the Montreal Canadiens, Connor McDavid of the Edmonton Oilers and P.K. Subban of the Nashville Predators were voted as divisional captains for the 3-on-3 tournament at the NHL AllStar Game on Jan. 29. Crosby will captain the Metropolitan Division, Price the Atlantic, McDavid the Pacific and Subban the Central, if he’s healthy. Subban has been out since Dec. 15 with a lower-body injury and is expected to miss more time.

NHL SUMMARIES

Pelicans, Motiejunas agree on contract • The New Orleans Pelicans say free-agent 7-footer Donatas Motiejunas has signed to play the rest of this season. A person familiar with the negotations, speaking on condition of anonymity because contract terms have not been released, told The Associated Press that Motiejunas will be paid a pro-rated veteran minimum worth about $600,000. Motiejunas, who’ll now have an opportunity to play in the front court alongside perennial All-Star Anthony Davis, has played four seasons in the NBA with Houston, averaging 7.8 points and four rebounds. As a restricted free agent last ofseason,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Raptors guard Cory Joseph (right) drives around Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge (12) during the irst half Tuesday.

he signed an offer sheet from Brooklyn for about $36 million over four years, but Houston initially sought to match it, only to allow the 26-year-old Lithuanian to become an unrestricted free agent after negotiations broke down. Hornets waive Harrison • The Charlotte Hornets’ 1½-season Aaron Harrison experiment is over. The Hornets are waiving Harrison, avoiding a guarantee of his season salary of more than $874,000, an informed source confirmed. The Hornets signed Harrison, a 6-6 guard out of Kentucky, after he wasn’t taken in the 2015 NBA draft.He spent much of this season on Development League assignment with the Greensboro Swarm. He averaged 20.2 points and 3.6 assists with the Swarm. (Charlotte Observer)

NBA SUMMARIES

Jets 6, Lightning 4

Sabres 4, Rangers 1

Capitals 6, Maple Leafs 5, OT

Pacers 121, Pistons 116

Spurs 110, Raptors 82

Kings 120, Nuggets 113

Winnipeg 1 3 2 — 6 Tampa Bay 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 16 (Laine, Enstrom), 7:25 (pp). Penalties: Petan, WPG, (holding), 2:38; Hedman, TB, (tripping), 3:15; Laine, WPG, (slashing), 3:33; Palat, TB, (hooking), 6:59; Bournival, TB, (hooking), 8:16; Ehlers, WPG, (delay of game), 10:43; Palat, TB, (hooking), 10:58. Second period: 2, TB, Peca 1 (Killorn, Namestnikov), 3:43. 3, WPG, Ehlers 11, 4:30. 4, WPG, Trouba 2 (Perreault, Wheeler), 5:19. 5, WPG, Byfuglien 5 (Morrissey, Wheeler), 14:44. Penalties: Kucherov, TB, Penalty Shot (intf. on breakaway, penalty shot), 4:30; Wheeler, WPG, (holding), 8:48; Palat, TB, (slashing), 10:51; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 18:33. Third period: 6, TB, Palat 7 (Kucherov, Johnson), 3:26. 7, Winnipeg, Ehlers 12 (Laine, Trouba), 9:28. 8, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 14 (Hedman, Johnson), 12:22 (pp). 9, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 15 (Hedman, Drouin), 17:29 (pp). 10, Winnipeg, Laine 20 (Ehlers, Scheifele), 18:37. Penalties: Armia, WPG, (high sticking), 12:06; Trouba, WPG, (delay), 17:01. Shots: WPG 6-13-15: 34. TB 17-10-9: 36. Power-plays: WPG 1 of 4; TB 2 of 7. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 14-12-1 (36 shots-32 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 10-6-2 (33-28). A: 19,092.

Buffalo 2 1 1 — 4 NY Rangers 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Buffalo, Girgensons 4 (Gionta, Carrier), 12:17. 2, Buffalo, Kane 9 (Reinhart, Okposo), 19:21. Penalties: Skjei, NYR, (interference), 3:27. Second period: 3, Buffalo, Bailey 1, 1:03. 4, NY Rangers, Holden 8 (Miller, Lindberg), 15:55. Penalties: Girardi, NYR, (slashing), 6:34; Carrier, BUF, (interference), 9:33. Third period: 5, Buffalo, Eichel 7 (Moulson, Reinhart), 1:10 (pp). Penalties: Vesey, NYR, (hooking), 0:18; Holden, NYR, (delay of game), 4:07; Skjei, NYR, (holding), 17:31. Shots: Buffalo 9-4-6: 19. NY Rangers 5-15-5: 25. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 5; NY Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Nilsson 6-3-3 (25 shots-24 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 16-9-1 (19-15). A: 18,006. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Jake Brenk, Kyle Rehman.

Toronto 3 1 1 0 — 5 Washington 2 0 3 1 — 6 First period: 1, WSH, Williams 10 (Kuznetsov, Orlov), 1:14 (pp). 2, TOR, Kadri 14 (Marner, Van riemsdyk), 6:39 (pp). 3, TOR, Brown 8 (Hyman, Matthews), 11:44. 4, Washington, Oshie 12 (Williams), 16:00. 5, Toronto, Gauthier 2 (Carrick), 18:06. Penalties: Zaitsev, TOR, (hooking), 0:33; Connolly, WSH, (hooking), 5:27; Williams, WSH, (cross checking), 13:50. Second period: 6, Toronto, Komarov 7 (Matthews, Nylander), 13:33 (pp). Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 1:17; Matthews, TOR, (tripping), 8:28; Ovechkin, WSH, (tripping), 11:42; Kadri, TOR, (cross checking), 16:42; Ovechkin, WSH, served by Burakovsky, (roughing), 16:42; Ovechkin, WSH, (roughing), 16:42. Third period: 7, WSH, Kuznetsov 4 (Williams, Johansson), 2:20. 8, WSH, Orlov 2 (Niskanen, Eller), 3:39. 9, TOR, Marner 10 (Bozak, Van riemsdyk), 11:08. 10, WSH, Carlson 4 (Johansson, Kuznetsov), 13:55. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (hooking), 6:55. Overtime: 11, WSH, Ovechkin 18 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 0:22. Penalties: None. Shots: TOR 8-11-6: 25. WSH 11-7-10-1: 29. Power-plays: TOR 2 of 6; WSH 1 of 2. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 16-8-7 (29 shots-23 saves). Washington, Holtby 16-8-4 (8-5), Grubauer 7-1-1 (17-15). A: 18,506.

Indiana: Robinson 3-5 0-0 8, George 10-17 10-10 32, Turner 7-12 1-2 17, T.Young 4-8 0-0 8, Teague 5-8 6-7 17, Miles 1-4 0-0 3, Seraphin 4-5 2-2 10, Jefferson 2-7 2-2 6, Brooks 1-2 1-2 4, Ellis 6-6 4-5 16. Totals 43-74 26-30 121. Detroit: Morris 6-14 0-0 14, Leuer 7-11 0-0 14, Drummond 9-16 2-2 20, Jackson 8-18 1-1 20, Caldwell-Pope 5-13 5-5 16, Harris 9-14 2-2 22, Johnson 1-4 0-0 3, Marjanovic 2-5 0-0 4, Smith 1-2 0-2 3. Totals 48-97 10-12 116. Indiana 36 30 26 29 — 121 Detroit 28 32 32 24 — 116 3-point goals: Indiana 9-16 (Turner 2-2, Robinson 2-3, George 2-3, Teague 1-1, Brooks 1-1, Miles 1-3, T.Young 0-3), Detroit 10-29 (Jackson 3-4, Harris 2-5, Morris 2-7, Smith 1-2, Johnson 1-3, Caldwell-Pope 1-5, Leuer 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 34 (Turner 7), Detroit 42 (Drummond 14). Assists: Indiana 26 (Teague 8), Detroit 31 (Jackson 12). Total fouls: Indiana 8, Detroit 19. Technicals: Drummond. A: 13,435 (19,971).

Toronto: Carroll 3-7 3-4 10, Siakam 1-4 0-0 2, Valanciunas 1-5 0-0 2, Lowry 2-9 2-2 6, DeRozan 12-21 2-3 26, Ross 7-11 1-2 17, Caboclo 0-0 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-5 0-0 0, Poeltl 1-4 2-4 4, VanVleet 1-2 0-0 2, Joseph 3-11 4-5 11, Powell 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 31-83 16-22 82. San Antonio: Leonard 8-12 4-5 25, Aldridge 11-16 0-0 23, Gasol 1-6 3-4 5, Parker 6-9 2-2 15, Green 2-5 0-0 6, Bertans 2-3 0-0 5, Anderson 1-1 0-0 2, Lee 4-6 0-0 8, Dedmon 1-1 1-2 3, Mills 2-4 0-0 6, Murray 1-3 0-0 2, Simmons 3-9 0-0 6, Ginobili 1-3 1-2 4. Totals 43-78 11-15 110. Toronto 18 23 17 24 — 82 San Antonio 29 31 28 22 — 110 3PT: Toronto 4-18 (Ross 2-4, Joseph 1-2, Carroll 1-3, Nogueira 0-1, Powell 0-1, Lowry 0-7), San Antonio 13-24 (Leonard 5-7, Green 2-3, Mills 2-4, Parker 1-1, Aldridge 1-1, Ginobili 1-2, Bertans 1-2, Murray 0-1, Simmons 0-3). Fouled out: None. RB: Toronto 43 (Poeltl 9), San Antonio 44 (Aldridge 8). Assists: Toronto 8 (Joseph 3), San Antonio 32 (Parker 8). Total fouls: Toronto 17, San Antonio 18. Technicals: Dedmon. A: 18,418 (18,418).

Sacramento: Barnes 2-6 0-0 5, Cousins 10-25 8-8 31, Koufos 8-9 2-3 18, Collison 10-16 4-4 26, McLemore 2-4 0-0 6, Casspi 0-3 0-0 0, Tolliver 2-4 2-2 7, Cauley-Stein 0-1 0-0 0, Afflalo 8-11 1-1 19, Temple 4-9 0-0 8. Totals 46-88 17-18 120. Denver: Chandler 3-10 2-2 10, Gallinari 8-12 4-4 24, Jokic 7-12 3-3 18, Mudiay 2-8 0-0 5, Harris 6-11 0-0 15, Barton 1-3 0-0 3, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Arthur 4-6 0-0 12, Nurkic 6-8 4-4 16, Nelson 2-7 0-0 6, Beasley 1-1 0-0 2, Murray 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 41-83 13-13 113. Sacramento 29 31 34 26 — 120 Denver 28 23 37 25 — 113 3-point goals: Sacramento 11-29 (Cousins 3-7, McLemore 2-3, Afflalo 2-4, Collison 2-5, Tolliver 1-3, Barnes 1-4, Casspi 0-1, Temple 0-2), Denver 18-38 (Arthur 4-5, Gallinari 4-6, Harris 3-4, Nelson 2-5, Chandler 2-7, Barton 1-1, Jokic 1-2, Mudiay 1-5, Murray 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 33 (Cousins, Temple 6), Denver 34 (Jokic 7). Assists: Sacramento 26 (Collison 7), Denver 29 (Mudiay 6). Total fouls: Sacramento 13, Denver 18. A: 11,018 (19,155).

Mavericks 113, Wizards 105

Lakers 116, Grizzlies 102

Washington: Porter 5-11 0-0 13, Morris 5-10 2-3 13, Gortat 5-11 2-2 12, Wall 10-19 6-6 27, Beal 10-26 2-3 25, Oubre 3-5 0-0 8, Smith 2-3 0-0 4, Burke 0-3 0-0 0, McClellan 0-1 0-0 0, Thornton 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 41-92 12-14 105. Dallas: Finney-Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Barnes 8-18 8-9 26, Nowitzki 4-9 2-2 11, Williams 7-13 3-3 21, Matthews 5-11 0-0 12, Powell 2-3 4-5 8, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Bogut 0-3 0-0 0, Curry 5-8 2-2 16, Jackson 0-1 2-2 2, Harris 6-11 1-1 17, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 22-24 113. Washington 29 38 21 17 — 105 Dallas 28 33 26 26 — 113 3-point goals: Washington 11-30 (Porter 3-5, Beal 3-11, Oubre 2-4, Morris 1-2, Wall 1-3, Thornton 1-3, Burke 0-1, McClellan 0-1), Dallas 17-32 (Curry 4-5, Williams 4-7, Harris 4-7, Matthews 2-4, Barnes 2-4, Nowitzki 1-4, Finney-Smith 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Washington 38 (Gortat 16), Dallas 44 (Nowitzki 9). Assists: Washington 27 (Wall 8), Dallas 20 (Williams 6). Total fouls: Washington 19, Dallas 21. Technicals: Beal. A: 19,318 (19,200).

Memphis: Parsons 1-6 0-0 2, Green 1-4 1-1 3, Gasol 8-15 6-6 22, Conley 7-16 4-4 21, Allen 3-4 1-2 8, Ennis 0-2 0-0 0, Martin 0-1 0-0 0, Randolph 3-12 4-4 11, Harrison 1-3 8-10 10, Daniels 3-7 0-0 9, Carter 3-7 4-4 12, Baldwin 0-0 4-4 4. Totals 30-77 32-35 102. L.A. Lakers: Deng 1-4 0-0 3, Young 6-11 2-4 20, Randle 9-15 1-4 19, Mozgov 7-12 0-0 14, Russell 6-12 0-0 18, Ingram 2-4 2-6 6, Robinson 0-2 0-0 0, Black 1-4 4-6 6, Clarkson 6-9 1-2 16, L.Williams 4-9 5-5 14. Totals 42-82 15-27 116. Memphis 20 28 29 25 — 102 L.A. Lakers 22 35 34 25 — 116 3-point goals: Memphis 10-31 (Conley 3-7, Daniels 3-7, Carter 2-4, Allen 1-1, Randolph 1-2, Martin 0-1, Ennis 0-1, Harrison 0-2, Gasol 0-2, Parsons 0-2, Green 0-2), L.A. Lakers 17-33 (Russell 6-9, Young 6-11, Clarkson 3-6, Deng 1-3, L.Williams 1-4). Fouled out: Mozgov. Rebounds: Memphis 39 (Randolph 9), L.A. Lakers 43 (Randle 14). Assists: Memphis 18 (Gasol 7), L.A. Lakers 34 (Randle 11). Total fouls: Memphis 16, L.A. Lakers 23. Technicals: L.A. Lakers defensive three second, L.A. Lakers team. A: 18,997 (19,060).

Devils 3, Hurricanes 1 New Jersey 0 1 2 — 3 Carolina 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Bennett, NJ, (holding), 9:08; Severson, NJ, (holding), 12:18; Carolina bench, served by Stempniak (too many men on the ice), 14:38. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Henrique 10 (Severson, Cammalleri), 14:56. Penalties: Rask, CAR, (holding), 11:08; Merrill, NJ, (interference), 16:12. Third period: 2, NJ, Cammalleri 10 (Henrique, Palmieri), 11:30. 3, CAR, Aho 8 (Teravainen, Hainsey), 12:24. 4, NJ, Palmieri 8, 18:00. Penalties: Hall, NJ, (interference), 13:11. Shots: NJ 6-3-9: 18. CAR 8-12-10: 30. Power-plays: NJ 0 of 2; CAR 0 of 4. Goalies: NJ, Schneider 12-12-5 (30 shots-29 saves). CAR, Ward 13-11-6 (17-15). A: 8,998.

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Blue Jackets 3, Oilers 1 Edmonton 0 1 0 — 1 Columbus 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 18 (Wennberg, Werenski), 12:32 (pp). Penalties: Puljujarvi, EDM, (holding), 11:20. Second period: 2, Edmonton, Klefbom 6 (Eberle, Maroon), 5:39. 3, Columbus, Karlsson 6 (Jones, Saad), 10:43 (pp). Penalties: Atkinson, CBJ, (slashing), 0:24; Dubinsky, CBJ, Major (fighting), 7:48; Maroon, EDM, Major (fighting), 7:48; Davidson, EDM, (holding), 8:53; Columbus bench, served by Werenski (too many men on the ice), 13:44; Mcdavid, EDM, (tripping), 14:41. Third period: 4, Columbus, Foligno 13, 2:45. Penalties: Benning, EDM, (roughing), 6:06; Jones, CBJ, (tripping), 11:12. Shots: EDM 4-8-10: 22. Columbus 12-13-10: 35. Power-plays: EDM 0 of 3; Columbus 2 of 4. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 18-11-6 (35 shots32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 25-5-2 (22-21). A: 17,169. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Brad Kovachik.

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Canadiens 2, Predators 1, OT Montreal 0 0 1 1 — 2 Nashville 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Petry, MTL, (high sticking), 13:02; Wilson, NSH, (hooking), 19:25. Second period: 1, Nashville, Fiala 6 (Josi, Ellis), 19:06. Penalties: Byron, MTL, (slashing), 3:28; Granberg, NSH, (holding), 10:08; Radulov, MTL, (tripping), 15:15; Jarnkrok, NSH, (hooking), 15:15. Third period: 2, Montreal, Weber 10 (Mitchell, Radulov), 4:26. Penalties: Ekholm, NSH, (holding), 7:13. Overtime: 3, Montreal, Pacioretty 16 (Radulov, Beaulieu), 4:30. Penalties: None. Shots: MTL 11-14-13-5: 43. Nashville 7-7-7-2: 23. Power-plays: MTL 0 of 3; Nashville 0 of 2. Goalies: MTL, Price 19-5-4 (23 shots-22 saves). NSH, Rinne 13-10-6 (43-41). A: 17,113.

Celtics 115, Jazz 104 Utah: Hayward 7-14 6-7 23, Favors 5-10 2-2 12, Gobert 3-8 2-2 8, Mack 3-10 2-2 8, Hood 3-10 3-6 9, Ingles 2-6 2-2 7, J.Johnson 7-11 0-0 17, Lyles 0-2 0-0 0, Diaw 6-7 0-0 15, Neto 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 38-82 17-21 104. Boston: Crowder 6-8 4-4 21, A.Johnson 3-7 0-0 6, Horford 9-16 0-0 21, Thomas 10-18 4-4 29, Bradley 4-7 4-4 14, Brown 4-6 1-1 10, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 2-6 1-2 5, Smart 3-5 2-2 9. Totals 41-74 16-17 115. Utah 29 16 29 30 — 104 Boston 28 26 31 30 — 115 3-point goals: Utah 11-26 (Diaw 3-3, J.Johnson 3-4, Hayward 3-7, Neto 1-2, Ingles 1-4, Mack 0-1, Lyles 0-2, Hood 0-3), Boston 17-31 (Crowder 5-6, Thomas 5-8, Horford 3-6, Bradley 2-4, Smart 1-1, Brown 1-2, Olynyk 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 35 (Gobert 13), Boston 32 (Olynyk 7). Assists: Utah 27 (Favors 7), Boston 31 (Thomas 15). Total fouls: Utah 17, Boston 22. Technicals: Boston defensive three second, Boston team, Crowder. A: 18,624 (18,624).

Kings 2, Sharks 1, OT Los Angeles 0 0 1 1 — 2 San Jose 0 1 0 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Burns, SJ, (interference), 7:35; Clifford, LA, (interference), 13:46. Second period: 1, San Jose, Couture 12 (Martin, Labanc), 11:56. Penalties: Burns, SJ, (holding), 13:18; Gaborik, LA, (high sticking), 17:46. Third period: 2, Los Angeles, Carter 21 (Muzzin, Kopitar), 3:03 (pp). Penalties: Braun, SJ, (hooking), 1:48; Dowd, LA, (high sticking), 10:06. Overtime: 3, Los Angeles, Pearson 10 (Carter), 0:58. Penalties: None. Shots: LA 16-8-10-1: 35. SJ 6-7-13-1: 27. Power-plays: LA 1 of 3; San Jose 0 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Budaj 17-10-3 (27 shots26 saves). SJ, Jones 19-12-2 (35-33). A: 17,562.

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

GOAL SCORING Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Jeff Carter Los Angeles Auston Matthews Toronto Patrik Laine Winnipeg David Pastrnak Boston Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis

GP 32 37 36 39 33 38

G 26 20 20 19 19 18

76ers 93, T’Wolves 91 Minnesota: Wiggins 2-15 4-4 8, Towns 9-22 4-4 23, Dieng 4-6 2-2 10, Rubio 2-3 0-0 5, LaVine 11-20 3-4 28, Muhammad 3-6 3-4 10, Bjelica 2-6 2-2 7, Aldrich 0-2 0-0 0, Dunn 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 33-82 18-20 91. Philadelphia: Covington 4-14 4-4 13, Ilyasova 7-14 2-2 19, Embiid 8-20 8-11 25, McConnell 3-9 0-0 6, Stauskas 3-9 0-0 8, Thompson 0-1 0-0 0, Noel 4-5 0-0 8, Saric 3-8 2-2 8, Okafor 1-3 0-2 2, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-2 4-4 4. Totals 33-85 20-25 93. Minnesota 16 26 26 23 — 91 Philadelphia 29 28 22 14 — 93 3PT: Minnesota 7-24 (LaVine 3-8, Muhammad 1-1, Rubio 1-2, Bjelica 1-4, Towns 1-6, Wiggins 0-3), Philadelphia 7-32 (Ilyasova 3-8, Stauskas 2-5, Embiid 1-3, Covington 1-9, LuwawuCabarrot 0-1, Saric 0-3, McConnell 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 47 (Towns 15), Philadelphia 48 (Covington 10). Assists: Minnesota 20 (Towns, Rubio 5), Philadelphia 19 (McConnell 8). Total fouls: Minnesota 24, Philadelphia 21. Technicals: Towns, Philadelphia defensive three second, Philadelphia team. A: 17,124 (20,328).

Suns 99, Heat 90 Miami: Babbitt 3-11 0-2 7, Reed 11-16 0-0 22, Dragic 9-18 5-6 24, Richardson 5-16 0-0 11, McGruder 3-10 0-0 8, D.Williams 0-7 3-4 3, Haslem 1-1 1-1 3, Ellington 4-12 3-3 12. Totals 36-91 12-16 90. Phoenix: Warren 1-3 0-0 2, Chriss 7-11 2-2 18, Chandler 2-4 1-2 5, Bledsoe 4-14 7-8 17, Booker 9-19 6-7 27, Tucker 3-5 1-1 7, Bender 1-5 0-0 2, Len 4-7 1-2 9, Ulis 1-4 0-0 2, Barbosa 4-5 0-0 10. Totals 36-77 18-22 99. Miami 29 23 14 24 — 90 Phoenix 28 28 27 16 — 99 3-point goals: Miami 6-23 (McGruder 2-5, Dragic 1-2, Babbitt 1-4, Richardson 1-5, Ellington 1-6, D.Williams 0-1), Phoenix 9-23 (Booker 3-6, Barbosa 2-2, Bledsoe 2-4, Chriss 2-5, Warren 0-1, Tucker 0-2, Bender 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 43 (Reed 18), Phoenix 49 (Chandler 20). Assists: Miami 18 (Dragic 9), Phoenix 21 (Bledsoe 7). Total fouls: Miami 23, Phoenix 23. Technicals: Chriss. A: 16,772 (18,422).

Leaders

Through Monday’s games

SCORING Westbrook, OKC Cousins, SAC Davis, NOR Harden, HOU Thomas, BOS DeRozan, TOR Lillard, POR Durant, GOL James, CLE Butler, CHI Leonard, SAN Irving, CLE Curry, GOL Antetokounmpo, MIL Wall, WAS Walker, CHA McCollum, POR Lowry, TOR Hayward, UTA Wiggins, MIN

G 35 32 34 36 30 33 32 35 30 35 32 29 35 33 31 34 36 33 28 34

FG 356 313 353 297 255 326 280 320 285 275 250 260 272 283 263 281 304 240 202 273

FT 306 244 257 315 245 244 223 194 143 298 208 106 163 198 163 127 127 156 172 162

PTS 1081 927 982 1021 832 909 865 900 769 887 768 694 836 787 725 783 824 750 627 753

AVG 30.9 29.0 28.9 28.4 27.7 27.5 27.0 25.7 25.6 25.3 24.0 23.9 23.9 23.8 23.4 23.0 22.9 22.7 22.4 22.1


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGE

NFL • WILD CARD ROUND Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Saturday TEXANS 3 3.5 Raiders SEAHAWKS 7.5 8 Lions Sunday STEELERS 9.5 10 Dolphins PACKERS 4.5 4.5 Giants Odds to win Super Bowl LI Team Open Current Patriots 7/1 9/5 Cowboys 18/1 4/1 Packers 10/1 7/1 Steelers 10/1 8/1 Chiefs 25/1 8/1 Falcons 60/1 9/1 Seahawks 8/1 15/1 Giants 25/1 20/1 Raiders 30/1 75/1 Texans 40/1 75/1 Dolphins 60/1 75/1 Lions 70/1 75/1 Odds to win the NFC Championship Team Open Current Cowboys 20/1 3/2 Packers 4/1 7/2 Falcons 25/1 7/2 Seahawks 4/1 5/1 Giants 12/1 10/1 Lions 25/1 30/1 Odds to win the AFC Championship Team Open Current Patriots 4/1 1/2 Steelers 5/1 3/1 Chiefs 10/1 4/1 Raiders 18/1 30/1 Texans 18/1 30/1 Dolphins 25/1 30/1 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Monday National Championship Game | Tampa, FL Alabama 6.5 6.5 Clemson NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hawks 3.5 MAGIC HORNETS 2.5 Thunder KNICKS PK Bucks CAVALIERS 9 Bulls CLIPPERS NL Grizzlies WARRIORS 15.5 Blazers KINGS 4.5 Heat COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog MICHIGAN ST 13.5 Rutgers Villanova 1.5 BUTLER SYRACUSE PK Miami-Florida DUKE 19.5 Georgia Tech RICHMOND 10 Fordham GEORGE MASON 5 Massachusetts PROVIDENCE 2 Georgetown LASALLE 15.5 Saint Louis Virginia Comm 8 DUQUESNE GEORGIA 2 S Carolina VANDERBILT 4.5 Auburn LOYOLA-CHICAGO 2.5 Northern Iowa EVANSVILLE 11 Bradley SO ILLINOIS 1.5 Indiana St WICHITA ST 26 Drake Oklahoma St 1.5 TEXAS MICHIGAN 11 Penn St Creighton 6 ST. JOHN’S ILLINOIS ST 8.5 Missouri St Oregon 8 WASHINGTON MISSOURI 1 Lsu HOUSTON 12.5 Tulsa Louisville 1.5 NOTRE DAME NC STATE PK Virginia Tech Virginia 6 PITTSBURGH SMU 11.5 Temple BAYLOR 7.5 Iowa St CS-NORTHRIDGE NL Cal-Riverside CAL-IRVINE 4 Long Beach St CAL-DAVIS 6.5 Cal-Santa Barb Colorado St 3 SAN JOSE ST FRESNO ST 3.5 Wyoming UTAH ST PK New Mexico NEVADA 3 San Diego St Boise St 3.5 UNLV WASHINGTON ST 6 Oregon St Added Games CANISIUS 9.5 Quinnipiac Siena 3 NIAGARA Ipfw 3.5 NEBRASKA-OMAHA W ILLINOIS PK S Dakota St DENVER NL S Dakota NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PANTHERS -$160/+$140 Jets Canadiens -$110/-$110 STARS FLYERS -$110/-$110 Rangers FLAMES -$210/+$175 Avalanche CANUCKS -$150/+$130 Coyotes DUCKS -$200/+$170 Red Wings Grand Salami: Over/under 32.5 goals. SOCCER ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea +$150 TOTTENHAM +$160 Draw +$220 Over/under goal total2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

Area scores

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with RHP Drew Storen on a one-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Claimed RHP Tyrell Jenkins off waivers from Cincinnati. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Signed INF Alex Crosby. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed INF Brett Wiley. FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed LB Cap Capi, WR Marvin Hall, WR Chris Hubert, G Kaleb Johnson, C-G Daniel Munyer, RB Elijhaa Penny and CB Ronald Zamort to reserve/futures contracts. CHICAGO BEARS — Signed WR Dres Anderson, CB De MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed OT Reid Fragel, K Marshall Koehn and P Taylor Symmank to reserve/futures contracts. NEW YORK JETS — Announced the retirement of offensive coordinator Chan Gailey. Fired quarterbacks coach Kevin Patullo, running backs coach Marcel Shipp, defensive line coach Pepper Johnson, outside linebackers coach Mark Collins and defensive backs coach Joe Danna. HOCKEY • NHL BUFFALO SABRES — Recalled D Taylor Fedun from Rochester (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled G Daniel Altshuller from Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Assigned F Tyler Motte to Rockford (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled F Harry Zolnierczyk from Milwaukee (AHL). Activated D Anthony Bitetto from injured reserve and sent him to Milwaukee on a conditioning assignment. Signed F Shawn O’Donnell to a professional tryout contract. NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled F Nicklas Jensen from Hartford (AHL). SOCCER • MLS COLUMBUS CREW SC — Signed D Jonathan Mensah as a designated player. MINNESOTA UNITED — Acquired M Collin Martin from DC United for 2018 fourth-round SuperDraft pick. PHILADELPHIA UNION — Re-signed F Charlie Davies to a one-year contract. COLLEGE OKLAHOMA — Announced RB Samaje Perine will enter the NFL draft. TCU — Announced men’s junior basketball G Malique Trent has left the team for personal reasons. TENNESSEE — DE Derek Barnett and WR Josh Malone will enter the NFL draft. TEXAS TECH — QB Patrick Mahomes will enter the NFL draft. WAGNER — Named Phil Casella women’s soccer coach. WAKE FOREST — Signed football coach Dave Clawson to a contract extension through the 2024 season. Tight ends coach and special teams coordinator Adam Scheier is leaving. WASHINGTON — Announced WR John Ross, S Budda Baker, DT Elijah Qualls and CB Sidney Jones will enter the NFL draft. WISCONSIN — Announced LB T.J. Watt will enter the NFL draft.

FOOTBALL 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame inalists Results announced Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016 x-first-year eligible Modern Era Morten Andersen, Kicker (1982-1994 New Orleans; 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta; 2001 NY Giants; 2002-03 Kansas City; 2004 Minnesota) Tony Boselli, Tackle (1995-2001 Jacksonville) Isaac Bruce, Wide Receiver (1994-2007 LA/Rams; 2008-09 San Francisco) Don Coryell, Coach (1973-77 Rams Cardinals; 1978-1986 San Diego) Terrell Davis, Running Back (1995-2001 Denver) Brian Dawkins, Safety (1996-2008 Philadelphia; 2009-2011 Denver) Alan Faneca, Guard (1998-2007 Pittsburgh; 2008-09 NY Jets; 2010 Arizona) Joe Jacoby, Tackle (1981-1993 Washington) Ty Law, Cornerback (1995-2004 New England; 2005, 2008 NY Jets; 2006-07 Kansas City; 2009 Denver) John Lynch, Free Safety (1993-2003 Tampa Bay; 2004-07 Denver) Kevin Mawae, Center/Guard (1994-97 Seattle; 1998-2005 NY Jets; 2006-09 Tennessee) Terrell Owens, Wide Receiver (1996-2003 San Francisco; 2004-05 Philadelphia; 2006-08 Dallas; 2009 Buffalo; 2010 Cincinnati) Jason Taylor, Defensive End (1997-2007, 2009, 2011 Miami; 2008 Washington; 2010 NY Jets) LaDainian Tomlinson, Running Back (2001-09 San Diego; 2010-11 NY Jets) Kurt Warner, Quarterback (1998-2003 Rams; 2004 NY Giants; 2005-09 Arizona) Seniors Kenny Easley, Safety (1981-87 Seattle) Contributors Jerry Jones, Dallas Owner, President & General Manager (1989-present) Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner (1989-2006)

BOYS BASKETBALL • O’FALLON 77, BELLEVILLE EAST 69

Women’s basketball Missouri Baptist 77, Hannibal-LaGrange 59 Harris-Stowe 81, St. Louis C. of Pharmacy 31 Men’s basketball Missouri Baptist 76, Hannibal-LaGrange 59 Harris-Stowe 94, St. Louis C. of Pharmacy 43 WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Marshalltown at St. Louis CC, 5:30 p.m. W: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 6 p.m. W: Fontbonne at Eureka, 6 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Illinois Central, 6 p.m. W: SLU vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. M: Indiana State at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: John Wood at St. Louis CC, 7:30 p.m. M: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Eureka, 8 p.m.

Football • conference bowl records Conference Independents Atlantic Coast Big 12 Sun Belt Conference USA Mountain West Southeastern Pac-12 Big Ten American Athletic Mid-American

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 01.04.2017

W 2 8 4 4 4 4 6 3 3 2 0

L 0 3 2 2 3 3 6 3 7 5 6

Pct. 1.000 .727 .667 .667 .571 .571 .500 .500 .300 .286 .000

Top 25 women’s basketball 1.

UConn (13-0) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday.

2.

Baylor (13-1) idle. Next: at No. 17 West Virginia, Wed.

3.

Maryland (13-1) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Wednesday.

4.

Mississippi State (15-0) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday.

5.

South Carolina (11-1) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday.

6.

Florida State (13-2) idle. Next: at North Carolina, Thursday.

7.

Notre Dame (13-2) idle. Next: at No. 14 Miami, Sunday.

8.

Louisville (13-3) idle. Next: at Virginia, Thursday.

9.

UCLA (11-2) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday.

10. Stanford (12-2) idle. Next: vs. Oregon, Friday. 11. Ohio State (13-4) beat Northwestern 94-87. Next: vs. Michigan, Saturday. 12. Washington (14-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 13. Duke (13-1) idle. Next: at Georgia Tech, Thursday. 14. Miami (12-2) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Thursday. 15. Texas (8-4) idle. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday. 16. Oregon State (13-1) idle. Next: at No. 20 California, Friday. 17. West Virginia (13-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 2 Baylor, Wednesday. 18. Virginia Tech (14-0) idle. Next: at Clemson, Sunday. 19. Arizona State (10-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. 20. Oklahoma (11-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Kansas State, Wed. 20. California (13-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Oregon State, Friday.

Aggressive mentality pays of for Panthers against Lancers BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

B E L L E V I L L E • When

O’Fallon junior guard Jalen Hodge got some space, he made Belleville East pay. Hodge’s aggressiveness spread to his teammates Tuesday as O’Fallon earned a 77-69 Southwestern Conference road victory against the Lancers. “I wanted to get our guys going early on and let them feel confident early on taking shots and letting them do what they do,” Hodge said. “It just came together the whole game and we played as well as we could.” Hodge led the Panthers (9-4 overall, 3-2 conference) with 20 points, with 12 of those points coming in the tone-setting first quarter. Hodge would drive to the basket or set up from behind the arc as he almost single-handedly outscored the Lancers in the first quarter. After Hodge’s 12-point outburst in the first quarter, his teammates picked it up from there. Whether it was driving to the basket or knocking down the open jumper from the wing, O’Fallon didn’t have a shortage of players willing to score as four players finished with double-figure scoring. Deion Norfleet finished with 18 points, Alex Orr scored 12 and Daron Thomas added 11.

Whenever Belleville East set up its full-court press, O’Fallon broke it with relative ease. “We have guards, and when you have guards the pressure shouldn’t hurt you, otherwise you’re in trouble,” O’Fallon coach Brian Muniz said. “We stayed attacking the entire game and that was key.” That attacking mentality led to O’Fallon shooting nearly 56 percent from the field, with only nine shots from behind the arc. Despite not having a player listed over 6-foot5, O’Fallon’s defense stifled Belleville East’s offense down low. Every time the ball was passed into the paint, O’Fallon was determined to make it hard. “We talk about how nothing gets easy — especially in the paint,” Muniz said. “We’re making it tough on them and nothing comes easy. Our guys did that tonight and we did a good job of rebounding for the most part.” While Belleville East did mount some runs and cut into O’Fallon’s double-digit lead in the fourth quarter, coach Abel Schrader felt his team played on its heels for most of the game. “You’ve got to give credit to O’Fallon, they were ready to play and took it to us,” Schrader said. “They made shots and they made plays, and we just kind of let them do what they wanted to do.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

O’Fallon’s Jalen Hodge (2) goes up for a layup in a game against Belleville East on Tuesday.

They wanted to beat us and we kind of let it happen.” Belleville East was led by 23 points from EnRico Sylvester and 21 from Javon Pickett. Nobody else broke into double-digits for the Lancers (8-5, 1-4), who continued to struggle in conference games. “We practice and we talk about being aggressive,” Schrader said. “We have five guys who can score and it’s just the fact that we have to play better

as a unit, as a team.” O’Fallon will look to take this momentum into Friday when it hosts Edwardsville. Hodge said he hopes the Panthers, who have won three in a row overall, get a confidence boost for the rest of the league schedule after beating the Lancers. “(Belleville East) is a good team, a top-four team, and we’re going to have to play with intensity every night,” Hodge said.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Duchesne 18 St. Dominic 53 S (9-2): A. Hermann 9. FG 19 (6), FT 9-13. Ritenour 9 2 11 9 31 Haz. West 14 10 16 13 53 H (5-3): Meeks 17, Chappel 16. FG 19 (8), FT 7-13. Washington 16 11 9 16 52 Holt 13 9 7 11 40 W (9-1): R. Arnold 14, Brinker 11, J. Arnold 10. FG 18 (9), FT 7-10. H (3-5): A. Meyer 16. FG 13 (3), FT 11-19. Edwardsville 16 16 22 13 67 E. St. Louis 7 10 8 10 35 Ed (14-0): M. Silvey 17, Pranger 14. FG 26 (3), FT 12-22. E. (2-5): Stanley 17. FG 11 (2), FT 11-17. Mt Vernon 11 6 6 5 28 Triad 21 0 17 16 54 T (6-6): Johnson 20. FG 20 (12), FT 2-2. Haz. East 3 3 9 10 25 Cor Jesu 6 16 15 11 48 H (1-7): R. Casson 9, Rush 9. FG 9 (4), FT 3-8. C (7-4): Erbs 14. FG 18 (6), FT 6-9. McCluer 11 4 14 9 38 Marquette 14 19 9 13 55 Ma (4-3): Drumm 21, Brown 13. FG 21 (0), FT 13-19.

22. South Florida (11-1) idle. Next: at Tulane, Wednesday. 23. DePaul (11-4) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Wednesday.

TUESDAY’S RESULTS

24. Kentucky (9-5) idle. Next: vs. Missouri, Thursday.

BOYS BASKETBALL

25. Kansas State (11-3) idle. Next: at No. 20 Oklahoma, Wednesday.

Men’s basketball East CS Bakersfield 64, Dartmouth 60 Dayton 90, St. Bon. 74 Rhode Island 88, Saint Joseph’s 58 Stevens Tech 91, Utica 73 South Alabama 68, Mississippi St. 58 Arkansas 82, Tennessee 78 Bryan 74, Point (Ga.) 67 Florida 70, Mississippi 63 Freed-Hardeman 74, Williams Baptist 60 Indiana-East 93, Asbury 81 Jacksonville 124, Middle Georgia 85 Kentucky 100, Texas A&M 58 Lindsey Wilson 90, Brescia 87 North Carolina 89, Clemson 86, OT Ohio Christian 91, Alice Lloyd 63 UCF 48, East Carolina 45 UNC Asheville 70, Liberty 57 Union (Ky.) 100, Tenn. Wesleyan 81 Wake Forest 79, Boston College 66 Midwest Akron 89, Bowling Green 84 E. Michigan 85, Cent. Michigan 63 Kansas 90, Kansas St. 88 Kent St. 100, Ball St. 90 Miami (Ohio) 69, N. Illinois 67 Minn. Duluth 66, Wis.-Superior 56 Ohio 89, W. Michigan 58 Presentation 86, Minn.-Morris 83 Spring Arbor 80, Goshen 59 Toledo 86, Buffalo 54 Wis.-Stout 87, Silver Lake 64 Wisconsin 75, Indiana 68 Southwest TCU 60, Oklahoma 57

BASEBALL Remaining Free Agents q-did not accept $17.2 million qualfiying offer. NATIONAL LEAGUE ARIZONA (1) — Rickie Weeks, of. ATLANTA (3) — Emilio Bonifacio, of; Eric O’Flaherty, lhp; A.J. Pierzynski, c. CHICAGO (7) — Trevor Cahill, rhp; Chris Coghlan, of; Jason Hammel, rhp; Munenori Kawasaki, 2b-3b; David Ross, c; Joe Smith, rhp; Travis Wood, lhp. CINCINNATI (2) — Ross Ohlendorf, rhp; Alfredo Simon, rhp. COLORADO (6) — Jorge De La Rosa, lhp; Daniel Descalso, inf; Nick Hundley, c; Boone Logan, lhp; Ryan Raburn, of; Mark Reynolds, 1b. LOS ANGELES (5) — Brett Anderson, lhp; Joe Blanton, rhp; J.P. Howell, lhp; q-Kenley Jansen, rhp; Chase Utley, 2b. MIAMI (2) — Jeff Francoeur, of; Chris Johnson, 1b-3b. MILWAUKEE (2) — Blaine Boyer, rhp; Chris Capuano, lhp. NEW YORK (6) — Jerry Blevins, lhp; Alejandro De Aza, of; Kelly Johnson, 2b-3b; James Loney, 1b; Jon Niese, lhp; Fernando Salas, rhp. PHILADELPHIA (3) — Peter Bourjos, of; David Hernandez, rhp; Ryan Howard, 1b. PITTSBURGH (2) — Neftali Feliz, rhp; Ryan Vogelsong, rhp. CARDINALS (3) — Brandon Moss, 1b-of; Jordan Walden, rhp; Jerome Williams, rhp. SAN DIEGO (4) — Edwin Jackson, rhp; Brandon Morrow, rhp; Adam Rosales, 3b; Carlos Villanueva, rhp. SAN FRANCISCO (8) — Gordon Beckham, 2b; Gregor Blanco, of; Santiago Casilla, rhp; Javier Lopez, lhp; Joe Nathan, rhp; Angel Pagan, of; Jake Peavy, rhp; Sergio Romo, rhp. WASHINGTON (4) — Matt Belisle, rhp; Stephen Drew, 2b; Mat Latos, rhp; Yusmeiro Petit, rhp. AMERICAN LEAGUE BALTIMORE (7) — Pedro Alvarez, dh; Michael Bourn, of; Tommy Hunter, rhp; Nolan Reimold, of; Drew Stubbs, of; q-Mark Trumbo, of; Matt Wieters, c. BOSTON (2) — Ryan Hanigan, c; Aaron Hill, 3b. CHICAGO (3) — Matt Albers, rhp; Austin Jackson, of; Justin Morneau, dh. CLEVELAND (4) — Marlon Byrd, of; Coco Crisp, of; Rajai Davis, of; Mike Napoli, 1b. DETROIT (2) — Erick Aybar, ss; Jarrod Saltalamacchia, c. HOUSTON (3) — Doug Fister, rhp; Colby Rasmus, of; Luis Valbuena, 3b. KANSAS CITY (3) — Luke Hochevar, rhp; Kris Medlen, rhp; Peter Moylan, rhp. LOS ANGELES (4) — Tim Lincecum, rhp; Geovany Soto, c; Jered Weaver, rhp; Chris Wilson, lhp. MINNESOTA (1) — Kurt Suzuki, c. NEW YORK (2) — Billy Butler, of; Mark Teixeira, 1b. OAKLAND (2) — Ross Detwiler, lhp; Sam Fuld, of. SEATTLE (4) — Franklin Gutierrez, of; Chris Iannetta, c; Dae-ho Lee, 1b; Adam Lind, 1b. TAMPA BAY (3) — Kevin Jepsen, rhp; Logan Morrison, 1b; Alexei Ramirez, ss. TEXAS (1) — Colby Lewis, rhp. TORONTO (6) — q-Jose Bautista, of; q-Edwin Encarnacion, dh; Scott Feldman, rhp; Gavin Floyd, rhp; Dioner Navarro, c; Michael Saunders, of.

Elsberry 9 11 5 16 41 Warrenton 13 11 2 21 47 W (8-1): Alberternst 15, Tonioli 10. FG 14 (3), FT 16-21. Maplewood-RH 12 6 10 16 44 Whitield 16 17 17 15 65 M (3-7): Womak 21, Guynn 14. FG 18 (4), FT 4-9. W (7-5): Watson 18, Taylor 11. FG 24 (5), FT 12-20. FZ East 8 8 17 14 47 FZ West 11 17 12 16 56 Z (4-7): Staley 13. FG 16 (6), FT 9-15. F (7-4): Hampton 21, Chesnut 12. FG 17 (5), FT 17-24. Alton 17 9 9 21 56 Collinsville 11 13 11 15 50 A (7-4): Edwards 11, Walker 10. FG 20 (8), FT 8-10. C (6-8): Midgett 20. FG 18 (7), FT 7-14. Pky. Central 53 St. Charles 51 P (6-4): Campbell 12, Green 12, Silvestri 12. FG 22 (6), FT 3-7. Valley Park 18 29 28 26 101 Dupo 17 25 11 13 66 V (7-3): Burnett 21, Courtney 18, Shaw 15, Burkert 13, Harris 10. FG 45 (3), FT 8-10. D (3-11): Swims 21, Francis 20. FG 22 (9), FT 13-16. Northwest Ac. 21 13 23 25 82 Orchard Farm 15 7 17 20 59 O (8-4): Burgess 21, Wolfe 14, Williams 12. FG 23 (10), FT 3-6. Ladue 16 18 12 17 63 Borgia 18 16 17 18 69 B (3-6): Movila 24, Mehler 23, Kleekamp 16. FG 25 (6), FT 13-15. Pky. South 8 25 12 19 64 Oakville 16 7 12 13 48 P (6-6): Mullen 14, Unger 12. FG 25 (1), FT 1318. O (1-6): Gillmann 20. FG 18 (6), FT 6-10. Luth. South 15 17 12 9 53 MICDS 22 19 7 17 65 L (5-5): J. Yaeger 27. FG 20 (3), FT 10-11. M (7-5): Spence 24, M. Roper 21. FG 27 (8), FT 3-3. Lift For Life 6 6 14 12 38 Brentwood 9 11 12 15 47 L (4-8): Brown 11, Davis 11. FG 14 (4), FT 6-13. B (3-6): Sappington 16, Jones 11. FG 16 (2), FT 13-22.

Howell 15 24 18 8 65 Ritenour 22 15 17 18 72 R (7-3): Kobe 18, Williams 13, Ball 12, Garmon 12. FG 28 (6), FT 10-16. Westminster 8 15 12 19 54 JohnBurroughs 4 6 17 17 44 W (5-4): Webb 25. FG 19 (3), FT 13-25. J (4-5): Goldfarb 9, Hardwick 9. FG 17 (5), FT 5-7. Pky. West 4 7 17 14 42 Marquette 13 10 7 10 40 P (8-3): Swiney 15, Yess 10. FG 16 (4), FT 6-12. M (3-6): Bulanda 23, Osterman 10. FG 16 (3), FT 5-10. St.Chas. West 10 8 13 14 45 Vianney 19 10 12 16 57 S (4-6): Anderson 17, Whitney 12. FG 19 (5), FT 2-3. V (4-6): Braun 20, Krus 20. FG 22 (8), FT 5-9. Luth. North 9 9 13 11 42 Jennings 9 24 28 6 67 L (5-5): Nesbitt 11, Buford 10, White 10. FG 15 (1), FT 11-22. E. St. Louis 13 13 8 21 55 Edwardsville 16 11 14 25 66 E. (9-5): Estes 14, K. Chairs 13, Carter 10, Hargrove 10. FG 21 (5), FT 8-12. Ed (12-1): Smith 26, Stephen 15. FG 21 (5), FT 19-23. Belle 8 15 8 10 41 Hermann 13 11 17 25 66 B: Sanders 17, Smith 15. FG 16 (4), FT 5-13. H (9-0): Wade 22, Moeckli 14, Leimkuehler 11. FG 27 (5), FT 7-10. Fath.McGivney 4 0 4 6 14 Nokomis 21 16 13 2 52 F (1-13): Jones 8. FG 5 (2), FT 2-2. Waterloo 6 11 7 16 40 Pinckneyville 16 12 16 16 60 W (4-9): Hunt 12, Lenhardt 10. FG 15 (1), FT 9-12. Freeburg 8 13 12 5 38 Red Bud 5 3 18 10 36 F (8-6): Weiss 16. FG 13 (4), FT 8-15. R (4-7): Birchler 11. FG 11 (3), FT 11-19. Wesclin 16 5 12 16 49 Breese C. 13 10 19 14 56 W (9-5): Ottensmeier 18, Brede 10. FG 19 (6), FT 5-9. B (11-3): Schulte 15, Joest 14, Ratermann 14. FG 21 (3), FT 11-16. Duchesne 6 20 10 13 49 St. Mary’s 22 10 23 9 64 S (12-0): Collins 20, Rasas 14. FG 25 (7), FT 7-12.

Oakville 17 7 17 7 48 Fox 16 9 16 18 59 O (3-6): Ball 12, Kuntze 11. FG 21 (3), FT 3-13. F (6-2): Farrell 25, Donart 14, Taylor 10. FG 22 (3), FT 12-22. Troy 9 5 13 7 34 McCluer North 7 16 14 10 47 M (7-6): Collins 17. FG 18 (1), FT 10-17. Riverview 2 6 4 12 24 Ladue 24 13 21 8 66 R (2-5): D. Kaiser 9. FG 10 (1), FT 3-7. L (6-4): Collins 16, Minkler 14, Peete 13, Bland 11. FG 22 (5), FT 17-33. Jennings 13 6 14 13 46 Luth. North 9 14 12 19 54 J (1-9): Gary 12, White 11, Whitt 10. FG 17 (3), FT 9-19. L (8-3): M. Buford 14, Davis 10. FG 21 (4), FT 8-17. Lift For Life 12 9 16 16 53 Brentwood 13 15 15 14 57 B (6-1): M. Callihan 17, Franklin 15, Ingersol 12. FG 18 (3), FT 18-30. Northwest-CH 8 4 3 2 17 Pky. Central 25 14 15 6 60 N (1-8): Fortner 5. FG 6 (1), FT 4-8. P (6-1): G. Stephens 17, Cooke 11, O. Stephens 10. FG 25 (4), FT 6-17. McKinley 8 5 18 13 44 Principia 7 19 17 23 66 P (8-2): Rather 29, Demaree 19, Fredrickson 11. FG 27 (3), FT 9-18. Valley Park 4 7 17 13 41 Hillsboro 24 31 12 12 79 V (5-6): Clouson 17, Ballard 10. FG 19 (2), FT 1-4. H (10-1): Close 41, Nichols 13. FG 31 (4), FT 13-15. Montgomery Co 16 5 11 2 34 Orchard Farm 18 29 19 10 76 M (4-3): Schmidt 12, Prior 11. FG 14 (0), FT 6-16. O (9-3): Hopkins 32, Heitmann 16, Johnston 11. FG 28 (8), FT 12-19. Westminster 8 9 6 7 30 Pattonville 18 14 14 8 54 W (1-9): Keys 9. FG 11 (2), FT 6-8. P (6-3): Spears 16, Danfort 12, Brown 10. FG 25 (0), FT 4-10. Granite City 10 9 11 2 32 Bellvl. West 16 14 13 14 57 B (11-5): Carter 23, Thurwalker 20. FG 22 (2), FT 11-17.

GIRLS SWIMMING Visitation 101, Westminster 75 200 medley relay: Visitation, 2:03 200 freestyle: Alli Hanlon, Visitation, 2:03.34 200 IM: Christina Jurotich, Visitation, 2:25.01 50 freestyle: Mackenzie Wieberg, Westminster, 25.99 Diving: Anna Johnson, Westminster, 157.05 100 butterfly: Christina Jurotich, Visitation, 1:02.13 100 freestyle: Mackenzie Wieberg, Westminster, 57.95 500 freestyle: Emily O’Connell, Visitation, 5:38.57 200 freestyle relay: Visitation, 1:46.37 100 backstroke: Halle Durand, Visitation, 1:08.25 100 breaststroke: Kate Atkinson, Visitation, 1:15.14 400 freestyle relay: Visitation, 3:57.44

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Clayton at Seckman, 6 p.m. Trinity at Madison, 6:15 p.m. Saxony Lutheran at St. Pius X, 6:45 p.m. Eureka at Summit, 7 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 7 p.m. McCluer at Lafayette, 7 p.m. Gtwy Science Ac. at Hancock, 7 p.m. Union at St. James, 7:30 p.m. North County at De Soto, 7:30 p.m.

Haz Central at Normandy, 5:30 p.m. Eureka at Summit, 5:30 p.m. Gtwy Science Ac. at Hancock, 5:30 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 5:30 p.m. Parkway South at Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Trinity at Barat Academy JV, 6 p.m. Roxana at Wood River, 6 p.m. Dupo at Chester, 6 p.m.

Mount Olive at Kincaid, 6:15 p.m. Francis Howell at Rock Bridge, 7 p.m. Mater Dei at Althof, 7:30 p.m. Arcadia Valley at Jeferson, 7:30 p.m. FZ West at St. Charles West, 7:30 p.m. Steeleville at Gibault, 7:30 p.m. Union at Newburg, 7:30 p.m.

WRESTLING Fort Zumwalt West at FH North, 6 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING at Eagan CC Borgia, Trinity and Duchesne, 3:30 p.m. at Forest Park Rosati-Kain vs. Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. Other area meets: MICDS at John Burroughs, 4 p.m. Parkway South at Lafayette, 4:30 p.m. FZ West at Marquette, 4:30 p.m.

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES GIRLS BASKETBALL JOHN BURROUGHS INVITATIONAL First round Clayton 71, Roosevelt 14 Brentwood 39, Afton 33 Lutheran South 74, Fort Zumwalt East 15 John Burroughs 44, Rosati-Kain 14 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Afton vs Roosevelt, 5:30 p.m. Rosati-Kain vs Fort Zumwalt East, 7 p.m. Semiinals, Wednesday Brentwood vs Clayton, 5:30 p.m. John Burroughs vs Luth. South, 7 p.m. Seventh place 11 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 2 p.m. Saturday. Championship 3:30 p.m. Saturday. RANDI PERKINS TOURNAMENT at Fox First round, Tuesday Cor Jesu 48, Hazelwood East 25 Fox 59, Oakville 48 Pattonville 54, Westminster 30 Ladue 66, Riverview Gardens 24 Consolation semiinals, Thursday Oakville vs Haz. East, 5 p.m. Riverview vs Westminster, 3:30 p.m. Semiinals, Thursday Fox vs Cor Jesu, 8 p.m. Ladue vs Pattonville, 6:30 p.m. Seventh place, Friday 3:30 p.m. Consolation inal, Friday 5 p.m. Third place, Friday 6:30 p.m. Championship, Friday 8 p.m. PARKWAY WEST CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Parkway Central 60, Northwest Cedar Hill 17 McCluer North 47, Troy Buchanan 34 Fort Zumwalt South 49, Parkway West 21

Marquette 55, McCluer 38 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Troy Buchanan vs Northwest Cedar Hill, 8:30 p.m. McCluer vs Parkway West, 4 p.m. Semiinals, Wednesday: McCluer North vs Parkway Central, 5:30 p.m. Marquette vs FZ South, 7 p.m. Seventh place, Friday 4 p.m. Consolation inal, Friday 5:30 p.m. Third place, Friday 7 p.m. Championship, Friday 8:30 p.m. 11TH CHESTER MIDWINTER CLASSIC First round New Athens 53, Trico 19 Valmeyer vs Sparta, (n) Dupo vs Chester, 6 p.m. Wed. Elverado vs Marissa, 7:15 p.m. Wed. Consolation semiinal 6 p.m. Thursday. and 6 p.m. Friday. Semiinal 7:15 p.m. Thursday and 7:15 p.m. Friday. Seventh place 1 p.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 4 p.m. Saturday. Championship 5:30 p.m. Saturday. ST. JOSEPH’S SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Incarnate Word vs Marian Catholic, 11:30 a.m. Whitfield vs Parkway North, 1 p.m. Edwardsville vs Hazelwood Central, 2:30 p.m. MICDS vs St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. 26TH HIGHLAND SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Civic Memorial vs Highland, 10 a.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL WARRENTON WINTER CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Liberty (Wentzville) 61, Hannibal 54 Holt 47, O’F Christian 44 Warrenton 47, Elsberry 41 Fort Zumwalt West 56, Fort Zumwalt East 47 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Hannibal vs. O’Fallon Christian, 4 p.m. FZ East vs. Elsberry, 5:30 p.m. Semiinals, Thursday Liberty vs. Holt, 7 p.m. Warrenton vs. FZ West, 8:30 p.m. Seventh place 3 p.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 4:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 6 p.m. Saturday. Championship 7:30 p.m. Saturday. KAMINSKY CLASSIC at Joplin First round, Thursday Jeferson City vs Glendale, 4:30 p.m. Francis Howell vs Webb City, 6 p.m. William Chrisman vs Joplin, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis Christian vs McDonald Co., 9 p.m. Consolation semiinal 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Friday. Semiinal 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Friday. Seventh place 11 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 2 p.m. Saturday. Championship 3:30 p.m. Saturday. 26TH ANNUAL HIGHLAND SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Carbondale vs Vianney, 11:30 a.m. Webster Groves vs Belleville East, 1 p.m. Rockhurst vs Highland, 3 p.m. Chaminade vs Champaign Central, 4:45 p.m. Peoria Manual vs Stevenson, 6:30 p.m. Althof vs East St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE

COLLEGE

NFL • WILD CARD ROUND Favorite Points Underdog Open Current Saturday TEXANS 3 3.5 Raiders SEAHAWKS 7.5 8 Lions Sunday STEELERS 9.5 10 Dolphins PACKERS 4.5 4.5 Giants Odds to win Super Bowl LI Team Open Current Patriots 7/1 9/5 Cowboys 18/1 4/1 Packers 10/1 7/1 Steelers 10/1 8/1 Chiefs 25/1 8/1 Falcons 60/1 9/1 Seahawks 8/1 15/1 Giants 25/1 20/1 Raiders 30/1 75/1 Texans 40/1 75/1 Dolphins 60/1 75/1 Lions 70/1 75/1 Odds to win the NFC Championship Team Open Current Cowboys 20/1 3/2 Packers 4/1 7/2 Falcons 25/1 7/2 Seahawks 4/1 5/1 Giants 12/1 10/1 Lions 25/1 30/1 Odds to win the AFC Championship Team Open Current Patriots 4/1 1/2 Steelers 5/1 3/1 Chiefs 10/1 4/1 Raiders 18/1 30/1 Texans 18/1 30/1 Dolphins 25/1 30/1 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Favorite Points Underdog Monday National Championship Game | Tampa, FL Alabama 6.5 6.5 Clemson NBA Favorite Points Underdog Hawks 3.5 MAGIC HORNETS 2.5 Thunder KNICKS PK Bucks CAVALIERS 9 Bulls CLIPPERS NL Grizzlies WARRIORS 15.5 Blazers KINGS 4.5 Heat COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite Points Underdog MICHIGAN ST 13.5 Rutgers Villanova 1.5 BUTLER SYRACUSE PK Miami-Florida DUKE 19.5 Georgia Tech RICHMOND 10 Fordham GEORGE MASON 5 Massachusetts PROVIDENCE 2 Georgetown LASALLE 15.5 Saint Louis Virginia Comm 8 DUQUESNE GEORGIA 2 S Carolina VANDERBILT 4.5 Auburn LOYOLA-CHICAGO 2.5 Northern Iowa EVANSVILLE 11 Bradley SO ILLINOIS 1.5 Indiana St WICHITA ST 26 Drake Oklahoma St 1.5 TEXAS MICHIGAN 11 Penn St Creighton 6 ST. JOHN’S ILLINOIS ST 8.5 Missouri St Oregon 8 WASHINGTON MISSOURI 1 Lsu HOUSTON 12.5 Tulsa Louisville 1.5 NOTRE DAME NC STATE PK Virginia Tech Virginia 6 PITTSBURGH SMU 11.5 Temple BAYLOR 7.5 Iowa St CS-NORTHRIDGE NL Cal-Riverside CAL-IRVINE 4 Long Beach St CAL-DAVIS 6.5 Cal-Santa Barb Colorado St 3 SAN JOSE ST FRESNO ST 3.5 Wyoming UTAH ST PK New Mexico NEVADA 3 San Diego St Boise St 3.5 UNLV WASHINGTON ST 6 Oregon St Added Games CANISIUS 9.5 Quinnipiac Siena 3 NIAGARA Ipfw 3.5 NEBRASKA-OMAHA W ILLINOIS PK S Dakota St DENVER NL S Dakota NHL Favorite Odds Underdog PANTHERS -$160/+$140 Jets Canadiens -$110/-$110 STARS FLYERS -$110/-$110 Rangers FLAMES -$210/+$175 Avalanche CANUCKS -$150/+$130 Coyotes DUCKS -$200/+$170 Red Wings Grand Salami: Over/under 32.5 goals. SOCCER ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea +$150 TOTTENHAM +$160 Draw +$220 Over/under goal total2.5 goals Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

Area scores

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL National League CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with RHP Drew Storen on a one-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Claimed RHP Tyrell Jenkins off waivers from Cincinnati. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Signed INF Alex Crosby. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed INF Brett Wiley. FOOTBALL • NFL ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed LB Cap Capi, WR Marvin Hall, WR Chris Hubert, G Kaleb Johnson, C-G Daniel Munyer, RB Elijhaa Penny and CB Ronald Zamort to reserve/futures contracts. CHICAGO BEARS — Signed WR Dres Anderson, CB De MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed OT Reid Fragel, K Marshall Koehn and P Taylor Symmank to reserve/futures contracts. NEW YORK JETS — Announced the retirement of offensive coordinator Chan Gailey. Fired quarterbacks coach Kevin Patullo, running backs coach Marcel Shipp, defensive line coach Pepper Johnson, outside linebackers coach Mark Collins and defensive backs coach Joe Danna. HOCKEY • NHL BUFFALO SABRES — Recalled D Taylor Fedun from Rochester (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled G Daniel Altshuller from Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Assigned F Tyler Motte to Rockford (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled F Harry Zolnierczyk from Milwaukee (AHL). Activated D Anthony Bitetto from injured reserve and sent him to Milwaukee on a conditioning assignment. Signed F Shawn O’Donnell to a professional tryout contract. NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled F Nicklas Jensen from Hartford (AHL). SOCCER • MLS COLUMBUS CREW SC — Signed D Jonathan Mensah as a designated player. MINNESOTA UNITED — Acquired M Collin Martin from DC United for 2018 fourth-round SuperDraft pick. PHILADELPHIA UNION — Re-signed F Charlie Davies to a one-year contract. COLLEGE OKLAHOMA — Announced RB Samaje Perine will enter the NFL draft. TCU — Announced men’s junior basketball G Malique Trent has left the team for personal reasons. TENNESSEE — DE Derek Barnett and WR Josh Malone will enter the NFL draft. TEXAS TECH — QB Patrick Mahomes will enter the NFL draft. WAGNER — Named Phil Casella women’s soccer coach. WAKE FOREST — Signed football coach Dave Clawson to a contract extension through the 2024 season. Tight ends coach and special teams coordinator Adam Scheier is leaving. WASHINGTON — Announced WR John Ross, S Budda Baker, DT Elijah Qualls and CB Sidney Jones will enter the NFL draft. WISCONSIN — Announced LB T.J. Watt will enter the NFL draft.

FOOTBALL 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame inalists Results announced Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016 x-first-year eligible Modern Era Morten Andersen, Kicker (1982-1994 New Orleans; 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta; 2001 NY Giants; 2002-03 Kansas City; 2004 Minnesota) Tony Boselli, Tackle (1995-2001 Jacksonville) Isaac Bruce, Wide Receiver (1994-2007 LA/Rams; 2008-09 San Francisco) Don Coryell, Coach (1973-77 Rams Cardinals; 1978-1986 San Diego) Terrell Davis, Running Back (1995-2001 Denver) Brian Dawkins, Safety (1996-2008 Philadelphia; 2009-2011 Denver) Alan Faneca, Guard (1998-2007 Pittsburgh; 2008-09 NY Jets; 2010 Arizona) Joe Jacoby, Tackle (1981-1993 Washington) Ty Law, Cornerback (1995-2004 New England; 2005, 2008 NY Jets; 2006-07 Kansas City; 2009 Denver) John Lynch, Free Safety (1993-2003 Tampa Bay; 2004-07 Denver) Kevin Mawae, Center/Guard (1994-97 Seattle; 1998-2005 NY Jets; 2006-09 Tennessee) Terrell Owens, Wide Receiver (1996-2003 San Francisco; 2004-05 Philadelphia; 2006-08 Dallas; 2009 Buffalo; 2010 Cincinnati) Jason Taylor, Defensive End (1997-2007, 2009, 2011 Miami; 2008 Washington; 2010 NY Jets) LaDainian Tomlinson, Running Back (2001-09 San Diego; 2010-11 NY Jets) Kurt Warner, Quarterback (1998-2003 Rams; 2004 NY Giants; 2005-09 Arizona) Seniors Kenny Easley, Safety (1981-87 Seattle) Contributors Jerry Jones, Dallas Owner, President & General Manager (1989-present) Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner (1989-2006)

BOYS BASKETBALL • O’FALLON 77, BELLEVILLE EAST 69

Women’s basketball Missouri Baptist 77, Hannibal-LaGrange 59 Harris-Stowe 81, St. Louis C. of Pharmacy 31 Men’s basketball Missouri Baptist 76, Hannibal-LaGrange 59 Harris-Stowe 94, St. Louis C. of Pharmacy 43 WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE W: Marshalltown at St. Louis CC, 5:30 p.m. W: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 6 p.m. W: Fontbonne at Eureka, 6 p.m. W: Lewis & Clark at Illinois Central, 6 p.m. W: SLU vs. George Mason, 7 p.m. M: Indiana State at SIU Carbondale, 7 p.m. M: John Wood at St. Louis CC, 7:30 p.m. M: Webster at Iowa Wesleyan, 8 p.m. M: Fontbonne at Eureka, 8 p.m.

Football • conference bowl records Conference Independents Atlantic Coast Big 12 Sun Belt Conference USA Mountain West Southeastern Pac-12 Big Ten American Athletic Mid-American

M 2 • WEDnESDAy • 01.04.2017

W 2 8 4 4 4 4 6 3 3 2 0

L 0 3 2 2 3 3 6 3 7 5 6

Pct. 1.000 .727 .667 .667 .571 .571 .500 .500 .300 .286 .000

Top 25 women’s basketball 1.

UConn (13-0) idle. Next: vs. East Carolina, Wednesday.

2.

Baylor (13-1) idle. Next: at No. 17 West Virginia, Wed.

3.

Maryland (13-1) idle. Next: at Nebraska, Wednesday.

4.

Mississippi State (15-0) idle. Next: at Arkansas, Thursday.

5.

South Carolina (11-1) idle. Next: at Auburn, Thursday.

6.

Florida State (13-2) idle. Next: at North Carolina, Thursday.

7.

Notre Dame (13-2) idle. Next: at No. 14 Miami, Sunday.

8.

Louisville (13-3) idle. Next: at Virginia, Thursday.

9.

UCLA (11-2) idle. Next: at Washington State, Friday.

10. Stanford (12-2) idle. Next: vs. Oregon, Friday. 11. Ohio State (13-4) beat Northwestern 94-87. Next: vs. Michigan, Saturday. 12. Washington (14-2) idle. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 13. Duke (13-1) idle. Next: at Georgia Tech, Thursday. 14. Miami (12-2) idle. Next: at N.C. State, Thursday. 15. Texas (8-4) idle. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday. 16. Oregon State (13-1) idle. Next: at No. 20 California, Friday. 17. West Virginia (13-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 2 Baylor, Wednesday. 18. Virginia Tech (14-0) idle. Next: at Clemson, Sunday. 19. Arizona State (10-3) idle. Next: at Utah, Friday. 20. Oklahoma (11-3) idle. Next: vs. No. 25 Kansas State, Wed. 20. California (13-1) idle. Next: vs. No. 16 Oregon State, Friday.

Aggressive mentality pays of for Panthers against Lancers BY PAUL HALFACRE STLhighschoolsports.com

B E L L E V I L L E • When

O’Fallon junior guard Jalen Hodge got some space, he made Belleville East pay. Hodge’s aggressiveness spread to his teammates Tuesday as O’Fallon earned a 77-69 Southwestern Conference road victory against the Lancers. “I wanted to get our guys going early on and let them feel confident early on taking shots and letting them do what they do,” Hodge said. “It just came together the whole game and we played as well as we could.” Hodge led the Panthers (9-4 overall, 3-2 conference) with 20 points, with 12 of those points coming in the tone-setting first quarter. Hodge would drive to the basket or set up from behind the arc as he almost single-handedly outscored the Lancers in the first quarter. After Hodge’s 12-point outburst in the first quarter, his teammates picked it up from there. Whether it was driving to the basket or knocking down the open jumper from the wing, O’Fallon didn’t have a shortage of players willing to score as four players finished with double-figure scoring. Deion Norfleet finished with 18 points, Alex Orr scored 12 and Daron Thomas added 11.

Whenever Belleville East set up its full-court press, O’Fallon broke it with relative ease. “We have guards, and when you have guards the pressure shouldn’t hurt you, otherwise you’re in trouble,” O’Fallon coach Brian Muniz said. “We stayed attacking the entire game and that was key.” That attacking mentality led to O’Fallon shooting nearly 56 percent from the field, with only nine shots from behind the arc. Despite not having a player listed over 6-foot5, O’Fallon’s defense stifled Belleville East’s offense down low. Every time the ball was passed into the paint, O’Fallon was determined to make it hard. “We talk about how nothing gets easy — especially in the paint,” Muniz said. “We’re making it tough on them and nothing comes easy. Our guys did that tonight and we did a good job of rebounding for the most part.” While Belleville East did mount some runs and cut into O’Fallon’s double-digit lead in the fourth quarter, coach Abel Schrader felt his team played on its heels for most of the game. “You’ve got to give credit to O’Fallon, they were ready to play and took it to us,” Schrader said. “They made shots and they made plays, and we just kind of let them do what they wanted to do.

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

O’Fallon’s Jalen Hodge (2) goes up for a layup in a game against Belleville East on Tuesday.

They wanted to beat us and we kind of let it happen.” Belleville East was led by 23 points from EnRico Sylvester and 21 from Javon Pickett. Nobody else broke into double-digits for the Lancers (8-5, 1-4), who continued to struggle in conference games. “We practice and we talk about being aggressive,” Schrader said. “We have five guys who can score and it’s just the fact that we have to play better

as a unit, as a team.” O’Fallon will look to take this momentum into Friday when it hosts Edwardsville. Hodge said he hopes the Panthers, who have won three in a row overall, get a confidence boost for the rest of the league schedule after beating the Lancers. “(Belleville East) is a good team, a top-four team, and we’re going to have to play with intensity every night,” Hodge said.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Duchesne 18 St. Dominic 53 S (9-2): A. Hermann 9. FG 19 (6), FT 9-13. Ritenour 9 2 11 9 31 Haz. West 14 10 16 13 53 H (5-3): Meeks 17, Chappel 16. FG 19 (8), FT 7-13. Washington 16 11 9 16 52 Holt 13 9 7 11 40 W (9-1): R. Arnold 14, Brinker 11, J. Arnold 10. FG 18 (9), FT 7-10. H (3-5): A. Meyer 16. FG 13 (3), FT 11-19. Edwardsville 16 16 22 13 67 E. St. Louis 7 10 8 10 35 Ed (14-0): M. Silvey 17, Pranger 14. FG 26 (3), FT 12-22. E. (2-5): Stanley 17. FG 11 (2), FT 11-17. Mt Vernon 11 6 6 5 28 Triad 21 0 17 16 54 T (6-6): Johnson 20. FG 20 (12), FT 2-2. Haz. East 3 3 9 10 25 Cor Jesu 6 16 15 11 48 H (1-7): R. Casson 9, Rush 9. FG 9 (4), FT 3-8. C (7-4): Erbs 14. FG 18 (6), FT 6-9. McCluer 11 4 14 9 38 Marquette 14 19 9 13 55 Ma (4-3): Drumm 21, Brown 13. FG 21 (0), FT 13-19.

22. South Florida (11-1) idle. Next: at Tulane, Wednesday. 23. DePaul (11-4) idle. Next: vs. Creighton, Wednesday. 24. Kentucky (9-5) idle. Next: vs. Missouri, Thursday. 25. Kansas State (11-3) idle. Next: at No. 20 Oklahoma, Wednesday.

Men’s basketball East CS Bakersfield 64, Dartmouth 60 Dayton 90, St. Bon. 74 Rhode Island 88, Saint Joseph’s 58 Stevens Tech 91, Utica 73 South Alabama 68, Mississippi St. 58 Arkansas 82, Tennessee 78 Bryan 74, Point (Ga.) 67 Florida 70, Mississippi 63 Freed-Hardeman 74, Williams Baptist 60 Indiana-East 93, Asbury 81 Jacksonville 124, Middle Georgia 85 Kentucky 100, Texas A&M 58 Lindsey Wilson 90, Brescia 87 North Carolina 89, Clemson 86, OT Ohio Christian 91, Alice Lloyd 63 UCF 48, East Carolina 45 UNC Asheville 70, Liberty 57 Union (Ky.) 100, Tenn. Wesleyan 81 Wake Forest 79, Boston College 66 Midwest Akron 89, Bowling Green 84 E. Michigan 85, Cent. Michigan 63 Kansas 90, Kansas St. 88 Kent St. 100, Ball St. 90 Miami (Ohio) 69, N. Illinois 67 Minn. Duluth 66, Wis.-Superior 56 Ohio 89, W. Michigan 58 Presentation 86, Minn.-Morris 83 Spring Arbor 80, Goshen 59 Toledo 86, Buffalo 54 Wis.-Stout 87, Silver Lake 64 Wisconsin 75, Indiana 68 Southwest TCU 60, Oklahoma 57 Texas Tech 77, West Virginia 76, OT

BASEBALL Remaining Free Agents q-did not accept $17.2 million qualfiying offer. NATIONAL LEAGUE ARIZONA (1) — Rickie Weeks, of. ATLANTA (3) — Emilio Bonifacio, of; Eric O’Flaherty, lhp; A.J. Pierzynski, c. CHICAGO (7) — Trevor Cahill, rhp; Chris Coghlan, of; Jason Hammel, rhp; Munenori Kawasaki, 2b-3b; David Ross, c; Joe Smith, rhp; Travis Wood, lhp. CINCINNATI (2) — Ross Ohlendorf, rhp; Alfredo Simon, rhp. COLORADO (6) — Jorge De La Rosa, lhp; Daniel Descalso, inf; Nick Hundley, c; Boone Logan, lhp; Ryan Raburn, of; Mark Reynolds, 1b. LOS ANGELES (5) — Brett Anderson, lhp; Joe Blanton, rhp; J.P. Howell, lhp; q-Kenley Jansen, rhp; Chase Utley, 2b. MIAMI (2) — Jeff Francoeur, of; Chris Johnson, 1b-3b. MILWAUKEE (2) — Blaine Boyer, rhp; Chris Capuano, lhp. NEW YORK (6) — Jerry Blevins, lhp; Alejandro De Aza, of; Kelly Johnson, 2b-3b; James Loney, 1b; Jon Niese, lhp; Fernando Salas, rhp. PHILADELPHIA (3) — Peter Bourjos, of; David Hernandez, rhp; Ryan Howard, 1b. PITTSBURGH (2) — Neftali Feliz, rhp; Ryan Vogelsong, rhp. CARDINALS (3) — Brandon Moss, 1b-of; Jordan Walden, rhp; Jerome Williams, rhp. SAN DIEGO (4) — Edwin Jackson, rhp; Brandon Morrow, rhp; Adam Rosales, 3b; Carlos Villanueva, rhp. SAN FRANCISCO (8) — Gordon Beckham, 2b; Gregor Blanco, of; Santiago Casilla, rhp; Javier Lopez, lhp; Joe Nathan, rhp; Angel Pagan, of; Jake Peavy, rhp; Sergio Romo, rhp. WASHINGTON (4) — Matt Belisle, rhp; Stephen Drew, 2b; Mat Latos, rhp; Yusmeiro Petit, rhp. AMERICAN LEAGUE BALTIMORE (7) — Pedro Alvarez, dh; Michael Bourn, of; Tommy Hunter, rhp; Nolan Reimold, of; Drew Stubbs, of; q-Mark Trumbo, of; Matt Wieters, c. BOSTON (2) — Ryan Hanigan, c; Aaron Hill, 3b. CHICAGO (3) — Matt Albers, rhp; Austin Jackson, of; Justin Morneau, dh. CLEVELAND (4) — Marlon Byrd, of; Coco Crisp, of; Rajai Davis, of; Mike Napoli, 1b. DETROIT (2) — Erick Aybar, ss; Jarrod Saltalamacchia, c. HOUSTON (3) — Doug Fister, rhp; Colby Rasmus, of; Luis Valbuena, 3b. KANSAS CITY (3) — Luke Hochevar, rhp; Kris Medlen, rhp; Peter Moylan, rhp. LOS ANGELES (4) — Tim Lincecum, rhp; Geovany Soto, c; Jered Weaver, rhp; Chris Wilson, lhp. MINNESOTA (1) — Kurt Suzuki, c. NEW YORK (2) — Billy Butler, of; Mark Teixeira, 1b. OAKLAND (2) — Ross Detwiler, lhp; Sam Fuld, of. SEATTLE (4) — Franklin Gutierrez, of; Chris Iannetta, c; Dae-ho Lee, 1b; Adam Lind, 1b. TAMPA BAY (3) — Kevin Jepsen, rhp; Logan Morrison, 1b; Alexei Ramirez, ss. TEXAS (1) — Colby Lewis, rhp. TORONTO (6) — q-Jose Bautista, of; q-Edwin Encarnacion, dh; Scott Feldman, rhp; Gavin Floyd, rhp; Dioner Navarro, c; Michael Saunders, of.

TUESDAY’S RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL Elsberry 9 11 5 16 41 Warrenton 13 11 2 21 47 W (8-1): Alberternst 15, Tonioli 10. FG 14 (3), FT 16-21. Maplewood-RH 12 6 10 16 44 Whitield 16 17 17 15 65 M (3-7): Womak 21, Guynn 14. FG 18 (4), FT 4-9. W (7-5): Watson 18, Taylor 11. FG 24 (5), FT 12-20. FZ East 8 8 17 14 47 FZ West 11 17 12 16 56 Z (4-7): Staley 13. FG 16 (6), FT 9-15. F (7-4): Hampton 21, Chesnut 12. FG 17 (5), FT 17-24. Alton 17 9 9 21 56 Collinsville 11 13 11 15 50 A (7-4): Edwards 11, Walker 10. FG 20 (8), FT 8-10. C (6-8): Midgett 20. FG 18 (7), FT 7-14. Pky. Central 53 St. Charles 51 P (6-4): Campbell 12, Green 12, Silvestri 12. FG 22 (6), FT 3-7. Valley Park 18 29 28 26 101 Dupo 17 25 11 13 66 V (7-3): Burnett 21, Courtney 18, Shaw 15, Burkert 13, Harris 10. FG 45 (3), FT 8-10. D (3-11): Swims 21, Francis 20. FG 22 (9), FT 13-16. Northwest Ac. 21 13 23 25 82 Orchard Farm 15 7 17 20 59 O (8-4): Burgess 21, Wolfe 14, Williams 12. FG 23 (10), FT 3-6. Ladue 16 18 12 17 63 Borgia 18 16 17 18 69 B (3-6): Movila 24, Mehler 23, Kleekamp 16. FG 25 (6), FT 13-15. Pky. South 8 25 12 19 64 Oakville 16 7 12 13 48 P (6-6): Mullen 14, Unger 12. FG 25 (1), FT 1318. O (1-6): Gillmann 20. FG 18 (6), FT 6-10. Luth. South 15 17 12 9 53 MICDS 22 19 7 17 65 L (5-5): J. Yaeger 27. FG 20 (3), FT 10-11. M (7-5): Spence 24, M. Roper 21. FG 27 (8), FT 3-3. Lift For Life 6 6 14 12 38 Brentwood 9 11 12 15 47 L (4-8): Brown 11, Davis 11. FG 14 (4), FT 6-13. B (3-6): Sappington 16, Jones 11. FG 16 (2), FT 13-22.

Howell 15 24 18 8 65 Ritenour 22 15 17 18 72 R (7-3): Kobe 18, Williams 13, Ball 12, Garmon 12. FG 28 (6), FT 10-16. Westminster 8 15 12 19 54 JohnBurroughs 4 6 17 17 44 W (5-4): Webb 25. FG 19 (3), FT 13-25. J (4-5): Goldfarb 9, Hardwick 9. FG 17 (5), FT 5-7. Pky. West 4 7 17 14 42 Marquette 13 10 7 10 40 P (8-3): Swiney 15, Yess 10. FG 16 (4), FT 6-12. M (3-6): Bulanda 23, Osterman 10. FG 16 (3), FT 5-10. St.Chas. West 10 8 13 14 45 Vianney 19 10 12 16 57 S (4-6): Anderson 17, Whitney 12. FG 19 (5), FT 2-3. V (4-6): Braun 20, Krus 20. FG 22 (8), FT 5-9. Luth. North 9 9 13 11 42 Jennings 9 24 28 6 67 L (5-5): Nesbitt 11, Buford 10, White 10. FG 15 (1), FT 11-22. E. St. Louis 13 13 8 21 55 Edwardsville 16 11 14 25 66 E. (9-5): Estes 14, K. Chairs 13, Carter 10, Hargrove 10. FG 21 (5), FT 8-12. Ed (12-1): Smith 26, Stephen 15. FG 21 (5), FT 19-23. Belle 8 15 8 10 41 Hermann 13 11 17 25 66 B: Sanders 17, Smith 15. FG 16 (4), FT 5-13. H (9-0): Wade 22, Moeckli 14, Leimkuehler 11. FG 27 (5), FT 7-10. Fath.McGivney 4 0 4 6 14 Nokomis 21 16 13 2 52 F (1-13): Jones 8. FG 5 (2), FT 2-2. Waterloo 6 11 7 16 40 Pinckneyville 16 12 16 16 60 W (4-9): Hunt 12, Lenhardt 10. FG 15 (1), FT 9-12. Freeburg 8 13 12 5 38 Red Bud 5 3 18 10 36 F (8-6): Weiss 16. FG 13 (4), FT 8-15. R (4-7): Birchler 11. FG 11 (3), FT 11-19. Wesclin 16 5 12 16 49 Breese C. 13 10 19 14 56 W (9-5): Ottensmeier 18, Brede 10. FG 19 (6), FT 5-9. B (11-3): Schulte 15, Joest 14, Ratermann 14. FG 21 (3), FT 11-16. Duchesne 6 20 10 13 49 St. Mary’s 22 10 23 9 64 S (12-0): Collins 20, Rasas 14. FG 25 (7), FT 7-12.

Oakville 17 7 17 7 48 Fox 16 9 16 18 59 O (3-6): Ball 12, Kuntze 11. FG 21 (3), FT 3-13. F (6-2): Farrell 25, Donart 14, Taylor 10. FG 22 (3), FT 12-22. Troy 9 5 13 7 34 McCluer North 7 16 14 10 47 M (7-6): Collins 17. FG 18 (1), FT 10-17. Riverview 2 6 4 12 24 Ladue 24 13 21 8 66 R (2-5): D. Kaiser 9. FG 10 (1), FT 3-7. L (6-4): Collins 16, Minkler 14, Peete 13, Bland 11. FG 22 (5), FT 17-33. Jennings 13 6 14 13 46 Luth. North 9 14 12 19 54 J (1-9): Gary 12, White 11, Whitt 10. FG 17 (3), FT 9-19. L (8-3): M. Buford 14, Davis 10. FG 21 (4), FT 8-17. Lift For Life 12 9 16 16 53 Brentwood 13 15 15 14 57 B (6-1): M. Callihan 17, Franklin 15, Ingersol 12. FG 18 (3), FT 18-30. Northwest-CH 8 4 3 2 17 Pky. Central 25 14 15 6 60 N (1-8): Fortner 5. FG 6 (1), FT 4-8. P (6-1): G. Stephens 17, Cooke 11, O. Stephens 10. FG 25 (4), FT 6-17. McKinley 8 5 18 13 44 Principia 7 19 17 23 66 P (8-2): Rather 29, Demaree 19, Fredrickson 11. FG 27 (3), FT 9-18. Valley Park 4 7 17 13 41 Hillsboro 24 31 12 12 79 V (5-6): Clouson 17, Ballard 10. FG 19 (2), FT 1-4. H (10-1): Close 41, Nichols 13. FG 31 (4), FT 13-15. Montgomery Co 16 5 11 2 34 Orchard Farm 18 29 19 10 76 M (4-3): Schmidt 12, Prior 11. FG 14 (0), FT 6-16. O (9-3): Hopkins 32, Heitmann 16, Johnston 11. FG 28 (8), FT 12-19. Westminster 8 9 6 7 30 Pattonville 18 14 14 8 54 W (1-9): Keys 9. FG 11 (2), FT 6-8. P (6-3): Spears 16, Danfort 12, Brown 10. FG 25 (0), FT 4-10. Granite City 10 9 11 2 32 Bellvl. West 16 14 13 14 57 B (11-5): Carter 23, Thurwalker 20. FG 22 (2), FT 11-17.

GIRLS SWIMMING Visitation 101, Westminster 75 200 medley relay: Visitation, 2:03 200 freestyle: Alli Hanlon, Visitation, 2:03.34 200 IM: Christina Jurotich, Visitation, 2:25.01 50 freestyle: Mackenzie Wieberg, Westminster, 25.99 Diving: Anna Johnson, Westminster, 157.05 100 butterfly: Christina Jurotich, Visitation, 1:02.13 100 freestyle: Mackenzie Wieberg, Westminster, 57.95 500 freestyle: Emily O’Connell, Visitation, 5:38.57 200 freestyle relay: Visitation, 1:46.37 100 backstroke: Halle Durand, Visitation, 1:08.25 100 breaststroke: Kate Atkinson, Visitation, 1:15.14 400 freestyle relay: Visitation, 3:57.44

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Clayton at Seckman, 6 p.m. Trinity at Madison, 6:15 p.m. Saxony Lutheran at St. Pius X, 6:45 p.m. Eureka at Summit, 7 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 7 p.m. McCluer at Lafayette, 7 p.m. Gtwy Science Ac. at Hancock, 7 p.m. Union at St. James, 7:30 p.m. North County at De Soto, 7:30 p.m.

Haz Central at Normandy, 5:30 p.m. Eureka at Summit, 5:30 p.m. Gtwy Science Ac. at Hancock, 5:30 p.m. Lift For Life at Crossroads, 5:30 p.m. Parkway South at Kirkwood, 6 p.m. Trinity at Barat Academy JV, 6 p.m. Roxana at Wood River, 6 p.m. Dupo at Chester, 6 p.m.

Mount Olive at Kincaid, 6:15 p.m. Francis Howell at Rock Bridge, 7 p.m. Mater Dei at Althof, 7:30 p.m. Arcadia Valley at Jeferson, 7:30 p.m. FZ West at St. Charles West, 7:30 p.m. Steeleville at Gibault, 7:30 p.m. Union at Newburg, 7:30 p.m.

WRESTLING Fort Zumwalt West at FH North, 6 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING at Eagan CC Borgia, Trinity and Duchesne, 3:30 p.m. at Forest Park Rosati-Kain vs. Nerinx Hall, 4 p.m. Other area meets: MICDS at John Burroughs, 4 p.m. Parkway South at Lafayette, 4:30 p.m. FZ West at Marquette, 4:30 p.m.

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES GIRLS BASKETBALL JOHN BURROUGHS INVITATIONAL First round Clayton 71, Roosevelt 14 Brentwood 39, Afton 33 Lutheran South 74, Fort Zumwalt East 15 John Burroughs 44, Rosati-Kain 14 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Afton vs Roosevelt, 5:30 p.m. Rosati-Kain vs Fort Zumwalt East, 7 p.m. Semiinals, Wednesday Brentwood vs Clayton, 5:30 p.m. John Burroughs vs Luth. South, 7 p.m. Seventh place 11 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 2 p.m. Saturday. Championship 3:30 p.m. Saturday. RANDI PERKINS TOURNAMENT at Fox First round, Tuesday Cor Jesu 48, Hazelwood East 25 Fox 59, Oakville 48 Pattonville 54, Westminster 30 Ladue 66, Riverview Gardens 24 Consolation semiinals, Thursday Oakville vs Haz. East, 5 p.m. Riverview vs Westminster, 3:30 p.m. Semiinals, Thursday Fox vs Cor Jesu, 8 p.m. Ladue vs Pattonville, 6:30 p.m. Seventh place, Friday 3:30 p.m. Consolation inal, Friday 5 p.m. Third place, Friday 6:30 p.m. Championship, Friday 8 p.m. PARKWAY WEST CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Parkway Central 60, Northwest Cedar Hill 17 McCluer North 47, Troy Buchanan 34 Fort Zumwalt South 49, Parkway West 21

Marquette 55, McCluer 38 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Troy Buchanan vs Northwest Cedar Hill, 8:30 p.m. McCluer vs Parkway West, 4 p.m. Semiinals, Wednesday: McCluer North vs Parkway Central, 5:30 p.m. Marquette vs FZ South, 7 p.m. Seventh place, Friday 4 p.m. Consolation inal, Friday 5:30 p.m. Third place, Friday 7 p.m. Championship, Friday 8:30 p.m. 11TH CHESTER MIDWINTER CLASSIC First round New Athens 53, Trico 19 Valmeyer vs Sparta, (n) Dupo vs Chester, 6 p.m. Wed. Elverado vs Marissa, 7:15 p.m. Wed. Consolation semiinal 6 p.m. Thursday. and 6 p.m. Friday. Semiinal 7:15 p.m. Thursday and 7:15 p.m. Friday. Seventh place 1 p.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 4 p.m. Saturday. Championship 5:30 p.m. Saturday. ST. JOSEPH’S SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Incarnate Word vs Marian Catholic, 11:30 a.m. Whitfield vs Parkway North, 1 p.m. Edwardsville vs Hazelwood Central, 2:30 p.m. MICDS vs St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. 26TH HIGHLAND SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Civic Memorial vs Highland, 10 a.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL WARRENTON WINTER CLASSIC First round, Tuesday Liberty (Wentzville) 61, Hannibal 54 Holt 47, O’F Christian 44 Warrenton 47, Elsberry 41 Fort Zumwalt West 56, Fort Zumwalt East 47 Consolation semiinals, Wednesday Hannibal vs. O’Fallon Christian, 4 p.m. FZ East vs. Elsberry, 5:30 p.m. Semiinals, Thursday Liberty vs. Holt, 7 p.m. Warrenton vs. FZ West, 8:30 p.m. Seventh place 3 p.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 4:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 6 p.m. Saturday. Championship 7:30 p.m. Saturday. KAMINSKY CLASSIC at Joplin First round, Thursday Jeferson City vs Glendale, 4:30 p.m. Francis Howell vs Webb City, 6 p.m. William Chrisman vs Joplin, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis Christian vs McDonald Co., 9 p.m. Consolation semiinal 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Friday. Semiinal 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Friday. Seventh place 11 a.m. Saturday. Consolation inal 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Third place 2 p.m. Saturday. Championship 3:30 p.m. Saturday. 26TH ANNUAL HIGHLAND SHOOTOUT All games Saturday Carbondale vs Vianney, 11:30 a.m. Webster Groves vs Belleville East, 1 p.m. Rockhurst vs Highland, 3 p.m. Chaminade vs Champaign Central, 4:45 p.m. Peoria Manual vs Stevenson, 6:30 p.m. Althof vs East St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.


WEDNESDAY

01.04.2017

DRIVING WITH DAN:

2017 Fiat 500X First AWD Fiat is pleasantly surprising Fiat’s 500X is more surprising than a Cleveland Browns victory. All new last year, the singular 500X in 2017 opts to consolidate its five former trim levels down to a more manageable three — Pop, Trekking and Lounge. Otherwise, if you liked the 2016 500X ... And we did, finding this four-door crossover then, as now, handier than expected; more pleasant to drive than anticipated; and more stylish than it has a right to be, given the bulbous look of its two-door Fiat 500 showroom mate. Considering its compact crossover status — you know going in this is no rally car — our only real driving complaint was the busyness of its nine-speed dual-clutch automatic, which is the transmission you’ll get unless you really buy on the cheap. Dan Wiese The base Pop trim comes with a Automotive Writer 1.4-liter, 160-hp turbo four, which mates exclusively to a six-speed manual transmission and is offered only with frontwheel drive. In Pop, that drivetrain can be optioned up to the hardware found standard on Trekking and Lounge — a 2.4-liter, 180-hp naturally aspirated four managed by a nine-speed automatic that’s capable of mailing engine torque to the front wheels or to all four, should the $1,900 AWD option be checked. Our all-wheel drive 500X handled well, given its crossover mission in life, while exhibiting a civil attitude at highway speed. Only the seemingly incessant shifting of the nine-speed gear box was a distraction — a distraction that can be largely ameliorated by choosing the Sport mode from 500X’s three-mode chassis menu: Sport, Auto and Traction Plus. In any event, our 500X AWD delivered to us 27 mpg in just over 100 miles of mixed city/hwy driving. Room is good up front in seats that are well-bolstered, but 500X succumbs to its compact-crossover role in back, where rear-seat occupants who long for leg room will need a break from front passengers. That said, head room is good throughout the cabin, which offers lots of storage options — big map pockets, twin glove boxes and numerous little places to toss stuff. The cargo bay, meanwhile, boasts a

The Fiat 500X shares a platform with the Jeep Renegade.

2017 FIAT 500X DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or all-wheel drive BASE PRICE: FWD: $20,990; AWD: $24,885 ENGINE: 1.4L turbocharged I-4; 2.4-liter I-4 HORSEPOWER: 1.4L turbo (FWD only): 160 at 5500 rpm; 2.4L (FWD or AWD): 180 at 6400 rpm TORQUE: 1.4L turbo: 184 lb.-ft. at 2500 rpm; 2.4L: 175 lb.-ft. at 3900 rpm RECOMMENDED FUEL: 1.4L turbo: Premium recommended, regular acceptable; 2.4L: regular

height-adjustable floor with hidden storage available below. Infotainment controls are frequently awkward in Fiats, but our 500X improved that situation by raiding the Chrysler/Dodge parts bin for a very useable touchscreen interface. Finally, there’s styling. Unlike the cutesy 500 coupe, 500X looks comfortable in its skin, with techy projector-beam headlight assemblies, bulbous taillights and, in between, a profile that looks svelte rather than compressed. This first all-wheel driver from Fiat offers lots of surprises, almost all of them pleasant.

2016 500X Stk. # F1181

72 mo. purchase $247/mo.* 36 mo. lease $139/mo.*

500X Trekking Stk. # F1183

Sale Price $21,594

F1116 500 POP

*

TRANSMISSIONS: 1.4L turbo: six-speed manual; 2.4L: nine-speed dual clutch automatic EPA MPG: 1.4L turbo: 25 city/34 hwy/28 combined; 2.4L FWD: 22/31/25; 2.4L AWD: 21/30/24 WHERE BUILT: Melfi, Italy WHEELBASE: 101.2 inches Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. He is a regular contributor to the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can email him at drivingwithdan@gmail.com.

2016 500X Easy Stk. # F1231

72 mo. purchase $263/mo.* 36 mo. lease $153/mo.*

F1115 500 POP MSRP $20005

F1265 500X POP MSRP $22595

POWERHOUSE $13600

POWERHOUSE $14054

POWERHOUSE $16848

F1123 500

F1151 500 POP

F1155 500X TREKKING

MSRP $19505

MSRP $19505

MSRP $25305

POWERHOUSE $13622

POWERHOUSE $14059

POWERHOUSE $18998

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MSRP $20005

MSRP $26600

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POWERHOUSE $14071

POWERHOUSE $19818

F1268 500 POP

F1121 500 POP

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MSRP $19835

MSRP $20005

MSRP $26405

POWERHOUSE $13944

POWERHOUSE $14294

POWERHOUSE $20085

F1269 500 POP

F1267 500 SPORT

F1278 124 SPIDER ABARTH

MSRP $19835

MSRP $20745

MSRP $34515

POWERHOUSE $14796

POWERHOUSE $31788

MSRP $19505

POWERHOUSE $13944

*See dealer for all details. Pricing can change without notice and all payments are quoted with $3,500 cash or equity down payment.

11157 LINDBERGH BUSINESS CT., ST. LOUIS, MO 63123

888-839-2159

Credit Problems? We are the home of southcountyfreshstart.com

www.jimbutlerfiat.com


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33,535*

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54,170*

54,170*

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12015 Olive Blvd • Creve Coeur, MO (Olive & I-270)

110+ YEARS 314-567-3300 All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Antique/Classic Special Interest

BMW 4020

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Cadillac

4060 Chevrolet

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Chevrolet

4065

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4040

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Chrysler '08 Chevy Cobalt: 2.2L, Ultra Silver, 98K Miles, Satellite Radio #X17287A, $5,947 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Chevy Corvette Z51: 3Lt Convertible, 14K Miles, $49,915 #C170666A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '16 Chevy Cruze Lmtd $15,178 #KE17080 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Chevy Cruze LT: 30K Miles, GM Certified, Warranty, #C170743A $11,789 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Cruze 1LT: Red, 49K Miles, Alloy Wheels, Low Payment, Call Today,

4065 Chrysler

'10 Chevy HHR LS: 4 Cyl, 80K Miles, Local Trade, $6,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala 2LT: V6, Black, 18K Miles, GM Certified, $20,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala LTZ: V6, 16K Miles, GM Certified, $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '12 Chevy Impala LS: V6, Alloy Wheels, 92K Miles, $7,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '10 Chevy Malibu LS 1LS: 88K Miles, CD Player, ABS $9,995 #UH5264EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '13 Chevy Malibu LT: 36K Miles, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax $12,695 #C10878P LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '09 Chevy Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, 78K Miles, Sharp, $9,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Malibu LTZ: Sunroof, 4 Cyl, Leather, 78K Miles, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Malibu LTZ: 4 Cyl, 18K Miles, GMCertified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Malibu LT: Limited, 19K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Volt: 4 Door Hatchback, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $10,991 #C170501A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Volt: 4 Door Hatchback, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $10,991 #C170501A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Volt: 5 Dr Hatchback, 31K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

TOLL FREE 1-888-408-2470

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '14 Ridgeline RTL: 4WD, Silver Metallic, 22K Miles, Reduced $30,699 #H170174A '13 Fit Hatchback: (4) to Choose from Starting At $11,499 Silver, Only 44K Miles! #X3044A '13 Civic EX: 4 DR's, (2) to Choose From, Polished Metal, 23K Miles, Moonroof, Alloys, Bluetooth, Camera $14,999 #X3055 '14 CRV AWD EX: Basque Red Pearl, Bluetooth, Moonroof, Camera, Display Audio, Smartkey, etc. 40K Miles $19,999 #X3082 '13 Accord Sport: 18" Alloys, Fog Lights, Black, 39K Miles $17,699 #X3061 '14 CRV LX: AWD, Black, 31K Miles, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $18,999 #X3045 '15 Civic EX: 4 DR's, 4 to Choose,, Smart Key Entry, Display Audio, (2) Camera!, Moonroof, Alloys, 41K Miles, Honda Certified Used, Silver, Selling Fast, Starting at $15,299 #H170203A '14 Honda Accord LX: (10) to Choose From, 36K Miles, Polished Metal, Manual, Alloys, Bluetooth, Camera, Largest Selection $15,999 #X3024 '15 Honda Accord EXL: Htd, Power Leather, Moonroof, Smartkey Entry, (2) Cameras, Display Audio, Obsidian Blue, 36K Mi, $21,499 #H170232A '12 Pilot EXL: 4WD, Polished Metal, Power Moonroof, Only 48K Miles, Heated Leather, $25,999! #H162133B

'12 Honda Accord EXL: 2 Door, $15,750 #179341

'14 Honda Civic LX: Clean Carfax, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty, $13,490 #26325D

'13 Honda Accord: Sport, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Motor trend Certified, Bluetooth $14,990 #27265A

4120 Hyundai

'13 Honda Civic EX: Motor Trend Certified, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth $13,976 #P8703A

'10 Honda Civic EX: 4 Dr, Polished Metal, Alloys, Moonroof, 127K Miles, Value Priced, $8,699 #DL1321

'15 Honda Civic EX: 4 Dr, 4 To Choose, 2 Cameras, Honda Certified, Moonroof, Alloys, 41K Mi, Starting at $15,299 #H170203A

'14 Honda Accord LX's: 7 To Choose, Bluetooth, B/U Camera, 37K Miles, Alloys, Honda Certified, BU Camera, $16,999 #H170142A

'16 Honda HRV: Last One Remaining, AWD, Black, New Car Miles, Selling Fast, #X3080 Starting at $20,499

'13 Honda Fit: 5 Door, Hatchback, Honda Certified, Silver, Only 44K Miles $11,499 #X3044A

'09 Honda Accord $7,995 #47045-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '08 Accord EX: 3.5L $9,997 #46490-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'06 Honda Accord EX: Navigation, Leather Seats, Moonroof, 95K Miles, $8,821 #M517567A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '08 Honda Accord LX: 4 Cyl, Silver, Power Seat, Moonroof, 147K Miles, Budget Priced $7,490 #DL1435

'15 Honda Accord EXL: Htd Power Leather, Moonroof, Smart Key Entry, 2 Cameras, Obsidian Blue, 36K Miles, $21,499

'12 Honda Civic LX Traction Control, Keyless Entry, #X2740P, $11,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'08 Honda Fit Sport: #46349-1 $4,897 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'14 Ford Taurus Loaded, 38K, #C15246RA, $27,990

'16 Ford Explorer $33,873 #ET10660 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Fiesta SE $11,496 #K1829P 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'12 Honda Civic EX: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Motor Trend Certified, Sunroof, $13,490 #38131B

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/homes

'16 Hyundai Genesis: AWD, 4K Sunroof, Navi #C8268A, $42,490 '13 Hyundai Veloster: Coupe, Black $9,995 #24065-1

'11 Hyundai Veloster: 1.6L, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth #X17056A, $7,700 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Hyundai Genesis: 5.0L, Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Leather Seats, Navigation, Satellite Radio, 16K Miles #M16978A, $34,624 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'12 Accent GLS: $9,397 #66764-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866) 672-4020

'16 Hyundai Accent SE $12,996 #KE67832 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Elantra SE $14,989 #E74069 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 4 Door, Silver, 25K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, Call Now #SC1459

'09 Hyundai Sonata $7,997 #66172-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866) 672-4020 '13 Sonata GLS: #46303-1 $9,397 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 13 Hyundai Sonata: $9,997 #66031-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '11 Hyundai Sonata: $8,597 #66461-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '11 Hyundai Sonata $9,597 #67293-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

2013 Sonata GLS: $11,697 #67315-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

2010 Hyundai Sonata #66967-1 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai (866)6724020

Hyundai

4125

'16 Hyundai Elantra Stk #P8713 $12,309

$8,699 #H170178A

'02 Honda Accord 2.4LX: Low Miles, Fuel Efficient, 1 Owner, $6,990 #27174A

4125

'13 Hyundai Veloster: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Nav/GPS, Backup Camera, $12,990 #27057B

'13 Hyundai Sonata: GLS, Automatic, Power Windows, Power Locks, 31K Miles, CD Player #M564JEP, $15,335 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '13 Hyundai Sonata SE: White, 35K Miles, Heatd Lthr, SmartKey, Bluetooth, $14,299 #SC1460

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'14 Hyundai Sonata: Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Brake Assist $8,990 #26565N

'12 Hyundai Sonata: Leather Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,490 #10773A

Ininiti

4130

'06 Infiniti G35 X: Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Premium Package $10,490 #95163B

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/jobs


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW 2017 FORD FUSION S

20,888*

WEDNESDAY

$

STK# K47433

* Must inance thru Ford Motor Credit. Price includes college grad rebate. See dealer for details. Good thru 12/5/2016

+ Price includes inancing through Kia Motors, Military and college grad rebates. See dealer for details. Good thru 12/5/16

KIA

FORD NEW 2016 FORD TAURUS

$

20,939

$

31,550

STK# GE65218

24,888

CHECK OUT OUR CERTIFIED FORD FORD EXPEDITION SUV

STK# TE21571A

$

2015

STK# TE27584

14 Chevrolet Sonic LT Auto Hatchback Stk. # KE00757, 1.8L I-4 Cyl, Automatic .......... $9,899 15 Chevrolet Camaro LT w/1LT Convertible Stk. # E62651, 3.6L V-6 Cyl ........................$21,273 14 Ford Escape Titanium Stk. # TE21571A, 2.0L I-4 Cyl......................$18,538 15 Chevrolet Equinox LT w/2LT

WHERE YOU GET

4145 Mazda

'16 Jeep Patriot $16,307 #KTE12540 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Jeep Patriot Sport: FWD, 4Cyl, 21K Miles, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

Kia '07 Jeep Commander Overland: $9,797 #45232-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '10 Grand Cherokee: Laredo, NHTSA 5 Star Rating, Satellite Radio, Roof Rack $10, 990 #9001A

'14 GrndCherokee: Lmtd, 4WD, Pano Roof, Leather, $30,990 #B8310

4155

'12 Kia Rio 5: Hatchback, Auto, Leather, Sunroof, $12,490 #C8214A '15 Kia Soul: Black, Low Payment, 14K Miles Starting at $12,499 #SC1407

'13 Kia Optima SXL: Leather, Nav, Sunroof, White Pearl, 21K Miles,

en

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Auto, Hard Top, Wheels/Tires, Lifted Call for Price

'14 Jeep Cherokee: Latitude, Black, Only 35K Miles, Call Now, $17,499 #SC1485

2016

KIA SPORTAGE

2016

KIA SPORTAGE

STK# KTE18848

17,988

KIA RIO SEDAN

2016

STK# KP03929

17,892

$

KIA SOUL

2016

STK# KTE39096

11,993

$

15 Chevrolet Equinox LT w/1LT Stk. # KTE72971, 2.4L I-4 Cyl, Automatic ........$20,979 16 BMW 328i w/SULEV Sedan Stk. # E44047, 2.0L I-4 Cyl.........................$33,043 16 Buick Regal Turbo Stk. # E51379, 2.0L I-4 Cyl, Automatic ...........$20,994 10 Buick Enclave 1XL SUV

KIA SOUL

STK# KE39154

15,478

15,494

$

Stk. # KT76448A, 3.6L V-6 Cyl.....................$15,924 15 Grand Caravan SXT Stk. # KTE56054, Auto..............................$18,447 16 Ford Explorer Limited SUV Stk. # TE45305, 3.5L V-6 Cyl ......................$35,989 16 Buick Enclave Leather Stk. # TE29321, 3.6L V-6 Cyl, Automatic .........$35,899

'12 Mazda Mazda2: Touring, Hatchback, Clean Carfax, Red, Cruise Control $7,990 #10881A

'15 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Madza Certified, Includes Balance of Warrenty $14,990 #8894A

'08 Mazda Mazda CX-9: One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Heated Front Seats $8,990 #8987A

Lexus

4165

'08 Lexus ES 350 Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather, Sunroof/Moonroof Call Today, $12,990 #P8673A

'07 Lexus IS 250: One Owner, Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats $14,990 #39052A

'06 Lexus RX330: AWD, Navy Blue, $11,990 #B8376

'12 Mazda Mazda5 (A5): Touring, Clean Carfax, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty #10797C $12,990

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, One Owner, Clean CARFAX, Mazda Fuel Efficient, Premium Sound, $12,490 #10640A

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: Sport, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Mazda Certifed $14,490 #38264A

'13 Mazda Mazda2 : Sport, Hatchback, Low Miles, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty $10,490 #P8752

'15 Jeep Cherokee Latitude FWD $17,995 #TE94624 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com 09 Jeep Patriot 4dr FWD, 5spd, A/C, LIKE NEW, $7800 636-524-3535

No one delivers a Lower Cost of Ownership than Paul Cerame Ford & Kia

4190 Nissan/Datsun

'08 Mercedes Benz E Class Base: Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $11,990 #26680A

Mini Cooper

4207

'11 Mini Cooper S: Contryman, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Turbocharged Call Today, $14,990 #26717B

'04 Mini Cooper S: Local Trade, White Hatchback #C8248A $7,490

Misc. Autos

4210

Bommarito St. Peters ALL JUST REDUCED!! 1-866-2449085 '12 Toyota Avalon: Limited, 50K Miles, Loaded, $17,990 '13 Lexus GX460: 36K Miles, Loaded, Black w/Tan, $36,990 '13 Volvo XC60: Leather, Sunroof, Black on Black, $19,490 '04 Toyota Sequoia: Limited, Leather, Sunroof, 4WD, $8,290 '11 Audi Q7 S-Line: Quattro, Black, 55K Mi, $34,900 '14 Mazda CX-5: Touring, Mazda Certified, AWD, $18,990 '13 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Auto, Hard-Top, 40K Miles, $30,900 '12 BMW 650xi: Convertible 41K Miles, Auto, Like New, $41,400 '13 Scion T/C: Automatic, Sunroof, 59K Miles, $11,990

Mitsubishi

4215

'07 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder GS Convertible: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Premium Sound System $7,990 #27116B

'15 Mitsubishi Mirage FWD, Traction Control #U5188P, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

Nissan/Datsun

MONSTER AND THE POST-DISPATCH ARE HERE TO HELP YOU BE YOUR BEST. With interview Q&A, resume tips and cover-leter guidance, we’ll help you transform your hard work into opportunity. Because we’re more than a job board. We’re a proud sponsor of your unstoppable, bulletproof, job-crushing machine. Visit STLtoday.com/monster and start your search today.

on new & pre-owned vehicles

NEW HALLS FERRY RD. cerame.com BOTH STORESJUSTONONE MINUTE NORTH OF

4185 Mercedes Benz

'11 Mazda Mazda6: 44K Miles, Black on Black, 27MPG $13,990 #14741B

$19,999 #SC1408

'09 Jeep Wrangler: Rubicon, Hard Top, 4x4, 5 Speed Manual, 102K Miles $17,990 #T16657A

15,478

STK# KTE60220

$

FREE LIFETIME MAINTENANCE

4130 Jeep

4145

$

Tax, title, license extra. See dealer for details.

As the improvem

Jeep

2015

$

Stk. # KTE52682, 2.4L I-4 Cyl, Automatic ........$21,903 15 Chevrolet Sonic LTZ Stk. # KE34957, 1.4L I-4 Cyl, Automatic .........$12,481 16 Chevrolet Cruze Limited 2LT Stk. # KE09492, 1.4L I-4 Cyl, Automatic .........$14,642 15 Ford Escape SE Stk. # KT1989E, 2.0L I-4 Cyl .......................$18,495

DISCOUNTS ts at our Kia store continue

'08 Infiniti EX35: Black, Loaded $12,888 #P3568-1

KIA SOUL

STK# KTP70062

STK# L29289

TION SALE ! CONSTRUC AT BOTH STORES

Ininiti

15,478

12,988

18,898

STK# KTE17806

$

$

$

10,943

$

2016 KIA SOUL

CHECK OUT OUR CERTIFIED KIA 2015

2014 FORD FUSION TITANIUM SEDAN

FIESTA SE

11,993

The Kia Soul and Sportage received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among compact MPVs and Small SUVs, respectively, in the J.D. Power 2016 Initial Quality Study. 2016 study based on 80,157 total responses, evaluating 245 models, and measures the opinions of new 2016 vehicle owners after 90 days of ownership, surveyed in February-May 2016.Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.

FORD FOCUS

12,849

STK# E18533

34,904

$

STK# KTE43233

Free Vehicle History Report

$

$

2016 KIA SOUL

STK# E06356

32,989

$

EXPLORER LIMITED

2016

2015

STK# TE19127

18,538

22,377

29,488

*All prices include all incentives & Ford credit financing. See dealer for details 0% APR for up to 72 mths available in lieu of all Ford rebates Tax,title doc fee $179 extra. Expires 12/31/16

2015

STK# KP03849

$

$

STK# HB45759

2016 KIA RIO SEDAN

STK# 73422

NEW 2017 FORD EXPLORER

$

FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM

2016 KIA SORENTO

NEW 2016 FORD SUPERCREW F150

NEW 2016 MUSTANG ECO BOOST PREMIUM

2015

C3

NEW 2017 KIA SPORTAGE

STK# H214925

STK# G290212

STLTODAY.COM

20,678*

$

STK# G153877

JANUARY 4, 2017

4220

'13 Nissan Leaf: $8297 #94644 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'14 Nissan Sentra: 25K Miles, Power Windows & Locks, Bluetooth, Clean Carfax $13,390 #R1553A

'13 Nissan Altima 2.5: Clean Carfax, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof, $14,490 #P8725A

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5 S: 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Premium Sound Call Today! $10,490 #95459A

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

4220 Pontiac

'13 Nissan Altima 3.5: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Low Miles, Call Today, $14,990 #P8730

4250 Toyota

'05 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 105K, Keyless Entry, #UH5323EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '07 Pontiac G6 GT: Convertible, Leather, 79K Miles, $7,990

'07 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Fuel Efficient, Cruise Control, Low Miles, Premium Sound $6,990 #10797A

'14 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Silver, 4 Door, Only 18K Miles, Priced To Sell, $13,699 #SC1444

'10 Nissan Altima 2.5: $7,995 #46560-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '08 Altima: 2.5L: $7,995 #47332-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '09 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Coupe, Cloth seats, Alloys, Automatic, 80K Miles $10,296 #M161040B LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '09 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Coupe, Cloth Seats, Alloys Wheels, Auto, 80K Miles, $10,296 #M161040B LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'14 Nissan Rogue: $11,997 #45732-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '13 Nissan Sentra: $9,997 #46133-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'15 Nissan Sentra $13,367 #KE30903 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Nissan Sentra SV: 4 Door, 4 Cyl, 37K Miles, One Owner, $11,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'09 Pontiac G6 Coupe: 59K Miles, Automatic, Warranty $6,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix Stk# 46172-1 $5,995 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai (866)672-4020

Saturn

4280

'08 Saturn Vue XR: FWD, 6 Cyl, CD Player #UH5232P $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '08 Saturn Vue XE: FWD, Keyless Entry, New Tires, 26 MPH, $6,995 #UH4865EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129

'06 Saturn ION 2: $4,397 #45989-2 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai (866)672-4020 '08 Saturn Vue: $8,395 #46425-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

Scion

4283

2013 Scion iQ #46083-2 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai (866)6724020 '12 Scion xB: Stk #P8707 $12,059

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'10 Scion XB: Burgundy $9,995 #181802

'16 Nissan Versa S: $10,897 #66214-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'16 Versa Note S: $12,197 #94470SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '16 Nissan Versa S: $10,897 #45820-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '16 Versa Note S: $12,397 #94471SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '08 Nissan Versa S: $5,995 #46070-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/ HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '10 Nissan Versa: $7,397 #46634-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866) 672-4020 '15 Versa Note S: $10,697 #46034-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020 '15 Nissan Versa $10,899 #KE77276 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Pontiac

4250

'07 Pontiac G6 GT: Convertible, 79K Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Power Top $7,990 #T17039A

'13 Scion tC: Power Moonroof, 24K Miles, 31 MPG #X2734DTP $14,401 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'14 tC Monogram Stk #P8697 $15,126

of South County 1-855-903-8696

Toyota

4300

'15 Camry XLE #46095A $19,510

THE CHEAPER DEALER! 4300 Volkswagen

'14 Toyota Prius: Hatchback, Includes Balance of Factory Warranty $14,990 #P8749

'12 Toyota Prius: Hatchback, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Navigation $11,990 #P8751

'12 Toyota Avalon Limited: Has It All!, Certified, #B7847 $18,400 '14 Toyota Corolla: 2 To Choose From, Magnetic Gray, 19K Miles, Starting at $12,699 #SC1401

'14 Toyota Prius C: Only 14K Miles, CALL TODAY! $14,299 #SC1419

'07 Toyota Matrix XR: Gray, Only 114K Mi, High Quality, Low Miles, Call Today, $6,999 #DL1389

'16 Toyota Prius Two: Alloys Wheels, CD Player, Hybrid, Auto, 3K Miles, #M16899A $24,135 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Toyota Prius Two: Alloys Wheels, CD Player, Hybrid, 3K Miles, Automatic, $24,135 #M16899A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Toyota Avalon XLE $22,294 #KE73623 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Toyota Camry L: 27K Miles, 35 MPG #X2726P $13,997 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'05 Toyota Celica GT $5,397 #94191-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866) 672-4020 '15 Toyota Corolla: 23K Miles, Backup Cam, Bluetooth, 36 MPG, $16,300 #84837A

'15 Toyota Corolla $13,995 #KE31783 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'08 Toyota Yaris: $6,397 #66214-3 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

4310 Volvo

Bommarito ST. PETERS DISCOUNT CORNER 1-866-2449085 '12 Toyota Avalon: Limited, Leather, Sunroof, Auto $18,490 '13 Toyota Tacoma: Crew Cab, 34K Miles, 4WD, Automatic, $28,990 '13 Chevy Equinox 2LT: Leather, AWD, Chrome Wheels, 28K Miles, $18,990 '12 BWM 650: Convertible, x-Drive, Navigation, Auto, Black, $41,490 '13 Infiniti EX37: 30K Miles, AWD, Navigation, Loaded, $26,490

'12 Toyota Rav 4: Sport, 43K Miles, 4WD, Black, $16,900 '12 VW CC R-Line: $11,400

14 Volvo S60 T5: Certified, $25,950 #L1232

'16 Volvo S60 T5: Drive E Premier $27,880 #L1214

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

' 14 Chevy Silverardo: LT, 4x4, 5/3 V8, Only 67K Miles, Call for Price

'14 Subaru Legacy: 3.6L, Auto, Full Pwr $20,400 '14 GMC Sierra: 16K Mi, Local Trade, $19,400 '11 Cadillac CTS-V: 23K Miles, Auto, Panoramic Roof, Navigation, $39,990 '12 Infiniti QX56: 30K Miles, Navigation, Black, DVD, '13 VW Jetta 2.5L: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof $14,990 #38263A

'12 VW GTI: 4 Door, Certified, 50K Miles, Auto, $16,990 #V17054A

'14 VW CC: Black, Leather $18,990 #48421-1

'06 VW Jetta: 2.5L $4,995 #67402-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866) 672-4020 '08 Volkswagen Jetta: Sunroof/Moonroof, Satellite Radio, Black #X17150A, $7,836 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'15 VW Passat Wolfsburg $13,499 #KE13968 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Volvo

4315

'13 Volvo XC90: AWD, $28,850 #L1221

'13 Volvo S60 T5: Certified, $17,855 #L1225

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'05 Toyota Matrix: Silver/Gray, $5,850 #P40492

'14 Volvo S60 T5: Certified, 0.9% $21,850 #L1217

'13 Nissan Sentra SL: 61K Mi, Automatic, Power Pkg, $11,490

of South County 1-855-903-8696¢

'14 Toyota Camry #45981A $16,250

4315

'13 Volvo S60 T5: 34K Mi, Certified, $18,980 #11219

'15 Volvo XC60 T5: Premier $29,800 #P4063

'05 Chevy Silverado 1500: AWD, Security System, Priced Below Average $7,990 #77552B

'14 Mazda Mazda i Touring: 2.5LT #C160265A, $12,910 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4X4, V8, 18K Miles, $32,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 28K Miles, GM Certified, $30,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '13 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, 4x4, Lthr, One Owner, $25,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Silverado 1500: 22K Miles, Z71, 4x4, Backup Camera, $33,500 #84862A

'16 Chevy Silverado LT: Crew Cab, 5.3L V8, 9K Miles, $30,948 #C161899A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Chevy Silverado Crew Cab, 4WD, 5.3L V8, LT Package, GM Certified Warranty #C160252A $30,978 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '11 Chevy Silverado LT: Crew Cab, 4WD, 5.3L V8, $19,487 #C160252A LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD LT: 4WD, 34,xxx Miles #C161643A, $30,817 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Silverado LT: Crew Cab, 5.3L V8, 13K Miles, 4WD, $31,624 #C161569A

LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '04 Chevy Silverado1500 4X4, ABS, Priced Below Avg, #UH5332EP, $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '11 Chevy 1500 LS: Reg Cab, V8, 92K Miles, One Owner, $13,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841


Classified

C4

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

The NISSAN NISS SS Store

JANUARY 4, 2017

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito NISSAN A

NISSAN Dealer!

17 Cons Consecutive Years††

NATIONWIDE* WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW NISSAN PURCHASE

2017 NISSAN LEAF

2017 NISSAN ARMADA

IS HERE!

ATTENTION:

0

2016 NISSAN SENTRA

A/C, BLUETOOTH

A/C, BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

MSRP $13,200

MSRP $17,985

OFF $17,500 MSRP

30 AVAILABLE

45 AVAILABLE

OFFER ENDS SOON!

** 72 ON ALL NEW

%

APR AVAILABLE FOR

MOS.

2016 NISSANS

ENDS MON., JAN. 9TH AT 9PM

ALL AMEREN CUSTOMERS

2017 NISSAN VERSA

$

Missouri’s

SUPERSTORES 10 YEAR/200,000 MILE

Bommarito EXCLUSIVE

STLTODAY.COM

2016 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5

2016 NISSAN ROGUE

BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

BACKUP CAMERA, CRUISE, SATELLITE RADIO

MSRP $23,535

MSRP $24,140

45 AVAILABLE

30 AVAILABLE

$ $ $ $ , , , , 9 999 13 999 14 435 17 999 19,999 †

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

HURRY! LIMITED TIME

Leaf Model #17017, Vin. #1N4BZ0CP2HC301778 Versa Model #11157, Vin. #3N1CN7AP7HL806146. Sentra Model #12066, Vin. #275155. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

EVERYONE QUALIFIES

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

MILITARY, COLLEGE GRAD & NISSAN PARTNERS MAY SAVE MORE.

Altima Model #13016, Vin. #109787 Rogue Model #22116, Vin. #617267. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location.

Saturday 2 YEAR MAINTENANCE $500 More ForYourTrade If GivenThe Opportunity WITH EVERY NEW Service Service Loaner (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ASK YOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE NISSAN PURCHASE!+ DETAILS.

2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations+ (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

ADVANTAGE

NOW 2 GREAT LOCATIONS TO BETTER SERVE YOU

Bommarito NISSAN WEST

Bommarito NISSAN 661 Dunn Rd. BIG CORNER OF I-270 & N. LINDBERGH

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

314-731-2228

14747 Manchester Rd. BALLWIN, MISSOURI

Hablamos Español llama Ivette Kincade 314-642-5895 o Dennis Olson 314-814-5580

BommaritoNissan.com

636-346-9640

636-394-0330

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES †Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. Tax, title, destination & license not included in sale prices. Nissan Leaf includes $10,000 Nissan rebate for Ameren customers (must produce Ameren utility bill). Includes $7,500 government program. See dealer for details. ††Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration. Nissan North American, ‘98, ‘99, ‘00, ‘01, ‘02, ‘03, ‘04, ‘05, ‘06, ‘07, ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11, ‘12, ‘13, ‘14, ‘15 Calendar Year to Date results for Missouri. **0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. Special financing in lieu of rebates. Deferred payments on finance deals only. See sales consultant for details. *Bommarito advantage offer with every new Nissan purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 1/9/17.

Convenient Saturday Service

Bommarito Honda SUPERSTORE

0

%

APR AVAILABLE*

A BOMMARITO EXCLUSIVE

$

0

$

NO PAYMENT FOR 6 MONTHS*

$

9 Acres

Of Hondas

0

CASH DOWN AVAILABLE*

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE 2016 Honda * * CIVIC LX $

$

0

DOWN LEASE AVAILABLE* ++

Nationwide Warranty With Every New Honda Purchase!

149

159

PER MO.

36 Month Lease

2017 Honda

PER MO.

ACCORD LX

36 Month Lease AUTOMATIC

*36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $6,864 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

AUTOMATIC *36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $7,224 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

2 Year Maintenance With Every New Honda Purchase!††

$

169

$

*PER 2016 Honda MO.

CR-V LX

36 Month Lease

249

*PER MO.

2016 Honda

ODYSSEY EX

36 Month Lease

FWD AUTOMATIC

AUTOMATIC

*36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $7,584 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

*36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, total cost of lease $10,464 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra.

ADVANTAGE

2 Year Maintenance, Oil Changes, Tire Rotations, $225.00 Value†† (NO EXTRA CHARGE) Complimentary Tank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

Hablamos Español llama

Dennis Olson 314-814-5580 o Ivette Kincade 314-642-5895

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - COLLISION REPAIR

Honda

Lifetime Car Wash (NO EXTRA CHARGE) $500 More For Your Trade If Given The Opportunity Service Loaner (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

Saturday Service ASK YOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE DETAILS.

636-346-9640

Bommarito N

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

E

W

314-731-9777 • 1-888-204-9202

S

I-270 & N. LINDBERGH, 12 MINUTES FROM 40 & I-270 • www.BommaritoHonda.com Welcome All Illinois Shoppers To Simplify Your Buying Experience, Bommarito Honda Will Process Your Illinois Sales Tax, Title Fees And License Plates

*Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. †Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Honda purchase. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 1/7/17.

All roads lead to

Bommarito


Classified Chevrolet Trucks

4330 Ford Trucks

4340 Toyota Trucks

'14 Ford F-150 STX: Extended Cab, 4x4, V6, Black, 12K Miles, One Owner, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Ford F-250 Lariat $39,499 #T3786E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'10 Silverado 1500 Stk #45984A, $14,995

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'07 Silverado 4WD, Black, 72K #C8240A, $19,490

GMC Trucks

'15 Dodge Ram1500 $31,374 #ET61517 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '06 Ram 1500 ST: Priced Below Average $8,995 #U4907Q Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '16 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT: Quad Cab, 4x4, Big Horn, HEMI, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841

'12 Ram 2500: Laramie, 4WD, #M16648A $42,470

Ford Trucks

4340

'06 Ranger V6 3.0L, Black, 131K Miles, Stk #UH5108EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '14 Ford F150 Lariat: Crew Cab, 4x4, Nav, BU Cam, Sunroof Heated/Cooled Seats, $38,990 #T16241A

'15 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT: Crew Cab, Leather, One Owner, 15K Miles, $43,500 #T16000A

'13 Ford F150 XLT: Crew Cab, 4x4, 101K Miles, 6 ft Bed $21,990

'05 Ford F350 Duelly: 6.0 Diesel, King Ranch, 4X4, 147k Mi, All Maintenance Records $19,990 #T17173B

'13 GMC Sierra SLE: 27K Miles, Extended Cab $26,839 #P4119

'14 GMC Sierra A Must Sell, Very Cheap, #V16121A, $19,400 '14 GMC Sierra: Crew Cab, Lifted, Wheels/Tires, Call for Price

4347

'08 Honda Ridgeline: RTL, Leather, Navigation, Basque Red, 97K Miles, $16,999 #H170377A

'13 Ridgeline RTL Stk #45660A $28,969

Misc Trucks

4370

'02 Lincoln Blackwood, 59K, Leather, Sunroof, C17184A $17,490

'04 Nissan Frontier Crew Cab $8,995 #46298-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

Toyota Trucks

of South County 1-855-903-8696 '14 Toyota Tundra Stk #45331B, $29,203

'14 Ford F-150: Crew Cab, Platinum, Loaded!! #C16357A $38,990

'14 Nissan Juke: 900 Mi, Like New! #C16244RA, $17,900

4390

''13 Kia Sorento: 82K Miles, All inspections Included, 4 Cyl, $10,990 #T17165A

'12 Buick Enclave: Leather, Captain's Chairs, 85K Miles $16,990 T15037B

'10 Buick Enclave 1XL: AWD, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating $14,990 #95099A

'10 Buick Enclave $16,986 #KT76448A 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

'17 Cadillac XT5: Luxury, Black C17027R $45,740

'10 Chevy Equinox: 99K Miles, Navigation, Backup Camera $10,990 #T16552A

'16 Chevy Equinox LS: AWD, One Owne,r $18,901 #48061-1

'08 Chevy Suburban 1500T: New Tires, Clean Carfax, 4WD, Heated Front Seats, Premium Package, $15,490 #77162A

'10 Chevy Equinox LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $11,990 #10857A

4385

'13 Toyota Tacoma Stk #P8638, $29,628

'14 Ford F-150 STX: Bed Cover, 39K Miles, Sync, Alloy Wheels $26,000 #84929A

4387

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'05 Chevy Avalanche 1500: Low Miles, 4WD, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Flex Fuel Bose System $11,990 #27114B

'13 Chevy Equinox 1LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Bluetooth $19,990 #78140A

'10 Chevy Equinox LT: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Sunroof, $11,990 #95248A

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'13 Chevy Traverse LTZ: AWD, Loaded, $28,400 #B8065

'13 Chevy Equinox: AWD, Leather, Sunroof, 28K Mi, $18,990 B8154

of South County 1-855-903-8696

of South County 1-855-903-8696

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'12 Tundra Stk #43499B $31,634

Sport Utilitiy '12 GMC Sierra 1500: Work Truck, Extended Cab, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles #77606A $14,990

'13 Ford F150 SVT Raptor: 4x4, 6.2L 8 Cyl, Heated Leather Seats, 32K Miles $47,990 #P7440A

'11 Ford Ranger #45782A $19,995

$16,499 #H170331A

Crossovers

Honda Trucks

4385 Sport Utilitiy

'06 Toyota Tacoma: Access Cab, 4WD, V6, Red Pearl, 101K Miles,

4345

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335 '15 Dodge Ram 1500: 8Ft Bed, Alloy Wheels, Bed Liner $22,500 #84026A

M 1

'06 Chevy Trailblazer, DVD, 3rd Row V16388B $6,490 '14 Buick Encore: 1.4L Turbo, 20K Miles, One Owner, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Chevy Trail Blazer: Sunroof, 87K Miles, $12,888 #48148-1

2012 Chevy Equinox 2LT #67223-1 $10,997 St. Charles Nissan/Hyundai (866)672-4020 '13 Chevy Equinox LTZ: 35,xxx Miles, 2.4L, GM Certified Warranty #C10850P, $18,976 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LS: 4 Cyl, 25K Miles, GM Certified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Equinox LT: AWD, 4 Cyl, 34K Miles, GMCertified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 23K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Suburban $46,888 #KT2017E 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy Suburban LT: 4x4, Sunroof, Heated Lthr, Dual DVD, One Owner, GM Certified, $45,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Tahoe LT 4WD, 59,xxx Mi., GM Certified Warranty, #C10855P, $33,341 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: 40,xxx Miles, GM Certified Warranty #C10840P $37,412 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Chevy Tahoe LTZ 40K Miles, GM Certified Warranty #C10840P $37,857 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: 4WD, 54,xxx Miles, GM Certified Warranty #C10848P, $34,711 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Tahoe LT 4x4 Heated Leather, 82K Miles, 3rd Row, $26,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Traverse 2LT: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, 18K Miles, GM Certified, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '08 Ford Edge Limited: Lthr, Heated Seats $13,997 #UH5314EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '11 Kia Sorrento: Keyless Entry #UH5172EP $9,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '16 Dodge Durango: Limited, 4x4, 18K Miles, Navigation, Leather, $32,901 #P3578

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'15 Dodge Journey SXT: V6, 3rd Row, 30K Miles, Black, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Ford Flex SEL: One Owner, 79K Miles, Heated Leather Seats, Power Sunroof, $12,990 #T16666A

'11 Ford Edge SE: One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low miles, Parking Sensors, Spoiler, $12,990 #78100A

'10 Ford Edge Lmtd: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Sunroof/Moonroof $11,990 #95424A

'12 Ford Expedition EL: 4WD, Leather, White, $19,990 #B8230

'11 Ford Edge Sport $17,949 #KT2049EA 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '09 Ford Edge SE: FWD, Alloy Wheels, CD Player $9,367 #MN151646B LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '14 Ford Escape: Titanium 20K Mi, Lthr, BU Camera, Htd Seats, $22,000 #A9385

'13 Ford Escape Titanium $18,995 #T3780X 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Escape: 4WD, Leather Seats, Moonroof, Sony Sound System, Bluetooth, $19,749 #M161010A LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 2014 Ford Escape: 4WD, Lthr, Moonroof, Sony Sound, Bluetooth, 35K Miles #M161010A $19,749 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '12 Ford Escape XLT: Silver, 88K Miles, 4 Cyl, Call Now, $11,299 #DL1433

'16 Ford Explorer Ltd $35,989 #TE45305 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Explorer LTD $29,978 #TL52466 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 GMC Yukon XL: Denali, DVD, Sunroof, Loaded $34,901 #48225-1

vacation hold

By putting your Post-Dispatch delivery on vacation hold, you provide local students and teachers free access to the newspaper through our Newspapers s In Education (NIE) program. NIE enables students to enhance their learning through ugh application of real-world news.

'11 GMC Acadia SLT Stk #45198B $14,031

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'12 Ford Explorer XLT: Backup Camera, Black Metallic, Bluetooth, #P7505 Call for Pricing

'14 Ford Explorer XLT: Silver, 4x4, Black Cloth, Sirius XM $26,490 #A9365

JANUARY 4, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

4390 Sport Utilitiy

4390 Bids/Proposals

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'12 GMC Acadia Denali: Loaded $24,990 #48390-1

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

put your newspaper on hold go on vacation support local schools

WEDNESDAY

'10 GMC Yukon XL 1500: One Owner, Clean CARFAX, 4WD, Navigation, Backup Camera, $14,990 #27205A

'12 GMC Terrain SLE-1: Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Bluetooth, Satellite Radio Call Today! $12,990 #95156B

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Roof, Quad Seats, $27,490 #B8066

'08 GMC Acadia: $10,995 #67353-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'12 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, 91K Miles, Black, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '14 GMC Yukon Denali: DVD, Sunroof, White Diamond, $42,888 #48465-1

'13 GMC Sierra SLT: 4x4, Chrome Wheels, $31,888 #48403-1

'16 GMC Terrain $25,115 #TE69971 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Highlander Stk #45859A $23,901

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'07 Honda CRV EX: 1 Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Sunroof, Multi-Disc changer. Perfect Color Combination $9,490 #10819A

'07 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS: w/XM, 2.7L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, $7,990 #10582B

'15 Hyundai Sonata: White Auto, 10K Miles, #B8010 $21,900

'14 CR-V EX Moonroof, Backup Camera, Electronic Stability, 30 MPG, Stk #X17104A $19,488 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '09 Hyundai Santa Fe: $7,997 #66878-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'08 Hyundai Sonata: GLS, Sat Radio, Cloth Seats, FWD, 125K Miles, #M1716A $5,994 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

'13 Infiniti EX-37 Journey: Loaded, $26,490 #B8167,

'13 Jeep Wrangler Sahara: Auto, Hard Top, #B7990, $30,900

'15 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland 4x4, Black, Loaded!! $37,490 #B8132

'16 Jeep Compass Sport $15,299 #KTE74064 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Kia Sportage: Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified Call Today, $13,990 #75452A

'08 Kia Sportage: $7,995 #45515-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'04 Lexus RX 330: 303L V6, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Premium Sound, Call Today, $7,490 #95427A

'09 Lincoln MKX: Black, Chromes, Call Today, C8247A $12,990

'15 Toyota RAV4 XLE #P8661 $20,344

'14 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Touring, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Backup Camera #8959A $14,990

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'11 Mazda CX-9: Touring, AWD, Sunroof, $16,490 #M8314

'14 Toyota Sienna Stk #P8641 $27,623

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'08 Mercury Mountaineer: AWD Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Heated Front Seats, $10,990 #77437B

'14 Toyota RAV4 LE #P8612 $20,000

'11 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport: Only 80K Miles, All Inspections Included, 4 Cy, $8,990 #15612B

'16 Mazda CX-9: Touring, Leather Seats, 3rd Row, Alloy Wheels, Sat Radio, Bluetooth, AWD, Navigation, $35,898 #M534JCP LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Mazda CX-9: Touring Lthr, 3rd Row, Alloys, Sat Radio, AWD, 9K Miles, Nav, Bluetooth, $35,898 #M534JCP LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'04 Toyota Land Cruiser: 4x4 Black/Gray Lthr, $13,800 #186092

'14 Toyota Rav4: Limited AWD, Auto, Sunroof, Navigation, $22,990 #C8109A

'06 Toyota Highlander: V6, 161K Miles, Value Priced, Call Now, $5,699 #DL1250

'07 Mercury Mountaineer: $8,597 #46076-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'04 Toyota Highlander LTD: $8,597 #45328-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'14 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport ES: 23K Miles, FWD, Traction Control, #X2730P, $13,974 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'14 Nissan Rogue: AWD, Silver $17,990 #18260-2

'08 Toyota Rav4 Limited: $8,797 #46465-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI (866)672-4020

'12 VW Routon SE: Navigation, Quad Seats, '13 Nissan Rogue SL, AWD, Roof, Nav, $17,990 #V17098A Leather, #B8163, $18,990 Mini vans

'12 Honda CR-V EX-L #P8588 $17,350

of South County 1-855-903-8696

'09 Toyota Venza: Heated Leather Seats, Nav, Sunroof, 1 Owner, 97K Miles $13,990 #T17194A

'07 Lincoln Navigator $13,995 #KT79980B 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Touring, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth #8987A $8,990

'15 Nissan Murano: Platinum, Lthr, Backup Camera, 28 MPG, # X17166A $24,319 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '06 Nissan Murano: Priced Below Average $7,995 #UH5325EP Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '15 Nissan Pathfinder $25,495 #KTE34632 1-866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Nissan Pathfinder SV, 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, Parking Sensors, stk# X17140A $18,325 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

'07 Nissan Xterra $5,697 #45777-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAi (866)672-4020

'11 Porsche Cayenne S: $33,850 #185211

4420

'13 Chrysler Town & Country Touring $16,888 #47845-1

'07 Chrysler T & C LWB Touring: 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera, #UH5267EP, $5,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (636) 200-2129 '16 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Rear DVD, Leather, One Owner, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-866-883-8841 '09 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: 3.8L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 3rd Row Seating, $8,990 #95428B

'09 Dodge Journey SXT: One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Backup Camera $8,990 #38178B

'14 Honda Odyssey EXL: Rear DVD, Smoky Topaz, Htd Pwr Lthr, Moonroof, Pwr Drs/Liftgate, Loaded, $27,499 #H162304A

'13 Santa Fe: 32K, Wrnty, Leather, Back Up Camera $20,980 #B8168

'16 Kia Sedona LX: Passenger Vans, Silver, 19K Miles, Hurry In, Starting at $19,999 #AT1753

'15 Subaru Forester: 2.5L, Touring, Black, Leather, Sunroof, AWD, 20K Miles, $24,499 #H170323A

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INVITATION TO BID: NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS S ealed bids for Federal Project Number CMAQ 9900(674), River des Peres Greenway Lansdowne to Francis Slay Park will be received by the Great Rivers Greenway District, 6 1 7 4 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63112, until January 26, 2017, 2:00 pm prevailing local time at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. A pre-bid meeting will be conducted at the Great Rivers Greenway District Office , 6 1 7 4 D e l m a r Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 6 3 1 1 2 on J a n u a r y 1 2 , 2017 at 9:00 AM prevailing local time. Plans, specifications, and bid packages will be available beginning January 5, 2017, from the Great Rivers Greenway web s ite at ht t p: / / greatriversgreenway.org/jo b s - b i d s / . Q u e s tio n s s hould be dire cte d to Construction Managers: Gordon Raney, at Koze n y - W a g e r , (6 3 6 ) 2 9 6 2 0 1 2 , gr aney@kozen ywagner.com and Eric Kuehn, at Kozeny-Wagner (636) 296-2012 extension 1 0 3 , o r e m a i l at ekuehn@kozenywagner.c om. The s cope of work includes grading, paving, utility adjustments, storm water best management practice ins tall/maintenance, landscaping, and project art for the River Des Peres Gr een way ñ L a n s downe to Francis S lay Park. The project length is approximately 1.8 miles. Not less than the prevailing hourly rate of wages shall be paid to all workmen performing under this contract in this are a according to the rates determined by the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (federal wage rate) or state wagerat e whichever is higher. A bid security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid amount must accompany each bid in accordance with t h e I ns t r uc t i ons t o Bidders. DBE Contract Goal: bidders to certify that the bidder is familiar with the DBE Program Requirements in this contract. The contract DBE goal for the amount of work to be awarded is 14% of the total project price including all alternates with One Trainee for 1000 hours. The Great Rivers Greenway District hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, businesses owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals will be afforde d full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, creed, sex, age, ancestry, or national origin in consideration for an award. The successful bidder shall comply with the requirements of RSMo § 2 9 2 . 6 7 5 . The require ments include on-site employees to complete the te n (1 0 ) hour Occupational Safety and He alth Administration ( O S H A ) C ons truction Safety Program, which includes a course in cons truction s afe ty and h e a lth a p p ro ve d b y O S H A o r a s imila r program approved by the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. Submit completed Contractor Questionnaire and/or Contractor Prequalification Que s tionnaire with attachments not later than seven (7) days prior to the date and hour of the bid ope ning. S e e Secs 101-103 of the Standard Specifications, and Rule 7 CS R 1 0 -1 5 .9 0 0 , "Prequalification’s to Bid of Certain Contractors". Q u e s tio n n a ire a n d Contact information are provided on MoDOT’s website. Second-tier subcontracting will be not permitted on this project. The proposer states that it will ensure that subcontractors do not subcontract any portion of the work. For any contract greater than $5,000, the successful bidder shall comply with RSMo § 285.530, as amended and by sworn affidavit affirming that it d o e s n o t kn o win g ly e mploye e any pe rs on who is an unauthorized alien and participation in a federal work authorization program with respect to the employees working in connection with this contract. The required documentation must be from the federal work authorization program provider. A letter from contractors reciting compliance is not sufficient. Th e G re a t Rive rs G r e e n w a y Dis tric t reserves the right to accept or reject any bid and to waive any irregularities in the best interest of the District. A Bid may not be modified, withdrawn or cancelled by the bidder within sixty (60) days following the time and date designated for the receipt of bids, and each bidder so agrees in submitting his bid. Susan Trautman EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY DISTRICT

S e ale d bids for VARIO US FAC ILITY R EN O V A TIO N S , Missouri Veterans Home, 2400 Veterans Memorial Drive, Cape Girardeau, Mis s ouri, Proje ct No. U1606-01 will be received by FMDC, S tate of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 2/2/2017. Fo r s p e c ific proje ct information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

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STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017 • L

FINDING THE RIGHT FIT

OUR FIRST LOOK AT DIETS FOR THE NEW YEAR: WEIGHT WATCHERS

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

RECIPES ON PAGE L4

BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The turkeys have been obliterated, the cookie tray ravaged and the pies? Don’t even ask about the pies. Now it’s time to diet. But there are so many diets out there: The alkaline diet, the blood-type diet, the master cleanse, the cabbage soup diet, the HCG diet. How do you know which one is right for you? For that matter, how do you know which one is actually harmful for you?

• HONEY-GLAZED SALMON WITH WASABI • CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW FUDGE • BAKED SPICY FRENCH FRIES • TEX-MEX CASSEROLE • HOPPIN’ JOHN WITH SHRIMP “If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is,” said Rabia Rahman, assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics at St. Louis University. “If they’re asking for a lot of money (for

items other than food products), don’t do it. If they say you can eat as much as you want and still lose weight? Bogus.” And some diets that sound as if they are scientific are equally worthless and potentially dangerous, Rahman said. The people pushing diets may use scientific terms and jargon, but that does not necessarily mean the science behind them is sound. The healthiest way to lose weight, and the only successful way to keep it off, is to strive for See DIET • Page L4

he latest trend? Unlikely predictions DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FOUNTAIN ON LOCUST’S COLORFUL, HEALTHFUL BRUSSELS KALE CUP. PAGE L5

It’s four days into 2017.Have you had an alligator burger yet? According to the prognosticators at the Food Channel, we can expect to see unusual meats — they’re calling them “meats out of the mainstream” — on our tables this year. So, bison, lamb and some sort of ultrafancy pork called Mangalitsa ($74.95 for 2.6 pounds of cured meat) are all coming down the pike this year. Maybe. It is notoriously difficult to predict the

future, but that doesn’t stop people from guessing what the biggest trends of the year will be. The folks at the Food Channel, which is sometimes known as “the one that isn’t the Food Network,” looked at the venison sandwiches that were successfully tried out at a few Arby’s restaurants and the lamb burgers being served at various burger restaurants and decided that we are ripe for an onslaught of unusual meats. That is one of the 10 trends they are predicting. And I’m not sure I buy all the others, either. The Food Channelers suggest that we might soon get to experience a wide variety of new cuisines. Not cuisines from places we haven’t heard of before — are there any See NEMAN • Page L5

GAIL PENNINGTON • gpennington@post-dispatch.com

Popular carnival fare Fried Alligator on a Stick may be part of a 2017 trend highlighting unusual meats.

LET’S EAT

1 M


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 01.04.2017

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Porto for winter night sipping

Good Natured Soup — Hearty Lentil with Garden Vegetables

BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

One of my favorite ways to end dinner on a cold winter night is by sipping Porto, the sweet fortified wine from Portugal. Although port wine can be made in any location, true Porto must come from a specific region in Portugal’s Douro Valley. Portos are made in a number of styles, but I tend to prefer tawny Portos. Named for their color, these tawny wines are aged in wooden casks and over time can take on delicious flavors of nuts, chocolate and coffee. While the following are very different tawny Portos, both should be served chilled and would go particularly well with cheese and dark chocolate. Barão de Vilar Maynard’s 10 Years Old Aged Tawny Porto Bought • Aldi, 7369 Watson Road, in December for $14.99 Description • Since Aldi’s wines are mostly private labels, I was surprised to find some of its stores ofering an aged tawny Porto from the awardwinning Maynard’s. This refined Porto has an inviting aroma of raisins and other dried fruit. It’s the more delicate and softer of the two wines reviewed here. Well-balanced and complex, it tastes of figs along with subtle flavors of nuts, caramel and chocolate.

Ferreira Dona Antonia Reserva Tawny Porto Bought • Costco, 4200 Rusty Road, in December for $14.99 Description • Ferreira, which was established in 1751, is listed in the Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia and considered a top Porto producer. This rich and aromatic Porto, which was well-received by critics, is thicker in the mouth than the Maynard’s and tastes of juicy plums, dried fruit and nuts along with bakery spice notes from oak aging.

This lentil soup-in-a-box from Progresso is thickened with carrot puree, which keeps it all natural. Most significantly, it is flavored with fire-roasted carrots and smoked paprika, which give a smoky flavor to a hearty lentil soup. The ingredients are all non-GMO, it has no artificial preservatives and it is vegan. It’s high in fiber and low in fat. Size • 17 ounces Cost • $2.99 Available • Grocery stores everywhere — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Anchovy sauce for pasta Is any food more polarizing than anchovies? You either love them or you hate them. For those who love them, we bring back a favorite Prep School video with Daniel Neman demonstrating how to make a simple but flavorful anchovy sauce for pasta.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson

Wintertime comfort-in-bowl is savory, meaty braised beef BY MELISSA D’ARABIAN Associated Press

Ask my daughter Océane what her favorite food is and she will shoot back, without hesitation, “braised ribs.” Who doesn’t love the comforting meaty aroma that fills the house from ribs cooking slowly in a Dutch oven full of savory, gently-bubbling liquid? That’s wintertime comfort-in-bowl if you ask me. Braising is a long-honored method of cooking which coaxes out tenderness and deep flavors from tougher cuts of meat. The basic technique involves a Dutch oven and four main steps: brown the meat and remove, cook the mirepoix (chopped onion, celery and carrot), deglaze the pan with liquid, and finally return the meat to the Dutch oven, cover and let cook low and slow in the oven or on the stovetop until tender. Pork shoulder, brisket and short ribs are excellent candidates for braising with high fat content and tough flesh that need hours to soften. My whole family loves braised beef ribs, but I wondered how easily I might be able to swap out a leaner cut of meat without alienating my little fans? Turns out: cutting out a bunch of fat was pretty easy. I sliced up a bottom round roast (about 1 ½ inch-thick) into chubby sticks, about the size and shape of ribs, and I just called them “boneless ribs” at the dinner table. The kids marveled at the ease of eating without the bones and no one was the wiser on the lower-fat swap. (Plus, I saved money too, which was a bonus.) Without the full fat and bones, however, I needed a smidge more work to get that richness and flavor of traditional braised ribs. First, I added mushrooms to the braise for earthiness and savory umami with nary an extra calorie to be found — either halved or chopped will work, depending on whether you want them to be visually present, or disappear. Second, I learned not to go too low in fat, or the resulting meat will be dry, despite being soaked in sauce. Bottom round was a magical happy spot; top round was less successful. Third, if you can, use the oven for the braising; the stovetop required a little more temperature management. Last, note that braising times will vary, so taste and test. Lower fat meat will not need as long as the fattier connective tissue-laden cuts we usually braise. You can even serve your lower fat braise on cooked quinoa, brown rice, or sauteed cauliflower rice for an extrahealthy version. Or do what we did: mix half whole wheat couscous and half quinoa for a happy kid-friendly compromise.

HUY MACH

DINNER IN 25 MINUTES

A bowlful of bow ties BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

Your average pasta with vodka cream sauce often comes with a choice of two sides: regret or a damn-thecalories attitude. But this recipe, plucked from the pages of a new cookbook that pairs menus with classic movies, puts a more positive spin on the dish. (It was suggested as an accompaniment to the 1933 film “Female” because the movie “ends with a kick.”) Instead of canned tomatoes, a roasted red pepper puree and mere tablespoons of tomato paste — plus a little garlic — make the sauce base with no added fat. The result is zesty and bright-tasting. The amounts of vodka and heavy cream are reduced; because the liquor doesn’t cook for very long, you become aware of its role as a flavor enhancer. There’s so little prep work involved, you’ll be able to sit down with a bowlful in no time.

BOW TIE PASTA WITH SPICY VODKA CREAM SAUCE Yield: 2 servings Kosher salt 6 ounces dried farfalle (bow tie pasta) 12-ounce jar roasted red peppers in olive oil 1 small clove garlic 2 tablespoons tomato paste ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes ¼ cup vodka 1 teaspoon granulated sugar (optional) ¼ cup heavy cream Leaves from 1 sprig basil Freshly ground black pepper

ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRAISED BEEF RIBS Yield: 6 servings 2 ½-pound bottom round, (or eye of round) about 1 ½ inches thick 1 tablespoon grapeseed or other neutral cooking oil 2 tablespoons flour 1 yellow onion, chopped, about 1 cup 1 carrot, finely chopped, about ½ cup 1 stalk celery, finely chopped, about 1/3 cup 5 cloves garlic, smashed 2 teaspoons fresh thyme, minced, or 1 teaspoon dried thyme

4 ounces baby bella mushrooms, wiped clean, trimmed and halved or chopped Dash of red pepper flakes (optional) 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1 cup red wine 1 ½ cup beef broth 1 bay leaf Water, as needed Salt and pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. 2. Pat the meat dry gently with a paper towel and slice crosswise into boneless “ribs.” Season with salt and pepper and then sprinkle all over with flour, rubbing the flour gently with your fingers to coat meat on all sides. Heat the oil in a large, heavy Dutch oven or braising pot over medium heat. 3. Brown the meat on all sides until golden and crusty, about 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove the meat with tongs and place on a plate and set aside. Add the onion, carrot and celery to the Dutch oven (do not wipe it out) and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until vegetables begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme, mushrooms and pepper flakes and cook, stirring until very fragrant, about 2 more minutes. 4. Add the tomato paste, and cook for another minute so it caramelizes and deepens in flavor. Deglaze the pan with wine and broth, and let bubble for a minute or two to let most of the alcohol evaporate. Add the meat back into the pan, along with any juices. Add another ½ cup or so of water so the liquid covers the meat about halfway. Cover the Dutch oven with a lid and bake until meat is tender, about 1 ½ to 2 hours. Check the meat halfway through and add a little water if the braising liquid gets low. Serve the meat with the braising liquid spooned on like gravy. Per serving: 280 calories; 8g fat; 95mg cholesterol; 223mg sodium; 10g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 4g sugar; 36g protein.

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add a generous pinch of salt, then the pasta. Cook according to the package directions (to al dente). Drain the pasta and return it to the pot. 2. Meanwhile, drain the roasted red peppers and place in a food processor. Coarsely chop the garlic and add to the peppers. Puree until smooth, then pour into a medium saucepan. Stir in the tomato paste, crushed red pepper flakes and vodka. Cook over medium heat for a few minutes, stirring often. Taste the sauce: It should be a little sweet; the vodka acts as a flavor enhancer and doesn’t really evaporate. If the sauce seems bitter, add the sugar, stirring until it has dissolved. 3. Reduce the heat to low; stir in the cream until well incorporated. Taste again; add salt as needed. Pour the sauce onto the pasta and toss to coat evenly. 4. Stack and roll the basil leaves; cut them crosswise into thin ribbons. Divide the sauced pasta between individual bowls or plates; sprinkle with the basil and lots of pepper. Serve hot. Per serving: 510 calories; 12g protein; 79g carbohydrates; 13g fat; 7g saturated fat; 40mg cholesterol; 570mg sodium; 4g fiber; 10g sugar Adapted from “Turner Classic Movies’ Movie Night Menus: Dinner and Drink Recipes Inspired by the Films We Love,” by Tenaya and André Darlington


01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

IN

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L3

D O GO H WIT

LIGHT DISHES, HEARTY MEALS, SWEET TREATS:

USE WHOLE GRAINS! AMARANTH

FARRO

MILLET

QUINOA

SPELT

Amaranth was held in such high regard in ancient Greece that it symbolized immortality. Today, the plant is credited with helping everything from rashes to migraines. More than 60 species of amaranth (also called pigweed) grow worldwide, and its roots, stems, leaves and seeds are all edible. Pop the gluten-free grain like popcorn, simmer it for breakfast, or toss it in soups and stews to lend them nutiness and extra het. Nutritionists conirm amaranth’s many health beneits — even if immortality isn’t one of them. It aids digestion, tames inlammation, strengthens bones and lowers cholesterol. One cup of amaranth provides more than a third of the recommended daily amount of magnesium and iron, and more protein than just about any other plant-based food.

Think of farro as the perfect gateway whole grain: It has the familiar mild taste of brown rice, a pleasantly nuty aroma, and it’s versatile enough to incorporate into soups, salads, porridge and pastas. Farro was originally cultivated thousands of years ago in the Fertile Crescent and has been a staple of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cooking ever since. It’s been called the greatgrandfather of wheat grains, and it is inally gaining traction in the U.S. Like barley and millet, farro (also known as emmer) is an unprocessed whole grain, a kind that’s generally higher in iber, protein, antioxidants and iron than reined grains. See our recipe below for a wild mushroom “risoto” made with farro — paired with a salad, it’s a light and lovely dinner.

Millet is a round, tiny grass seed grown everywhere from North Dakota to Southeast Asia; it can be red, yellow, green or brown; and it’s used to make everything from bread to beer to birdseed. Vegetarians oten incorporate millet into their diets as a top source of protein, and it’s quite literally a lifesaver for infants in developing countries. Though millet on its own can walk the line between nuty and sweet, it plays beautifully with a host of other lavors. Bring it to a boil with some milk for an alternative to oatmeal, cook it with chicken instead of rice, or double down on millet’s subtle sweetness by adding dark chocolate to make pufed millet snacks.

Unlike other trendy superfoods — goji berries, we hardly knew ye — quinoa has proved it’s got staying power. That’s due in large part to its adaptability, and in small part because it’s fun to say. The nuty ancient grain grows along the western edge of South America where it’s traditionally paired with black beans and avocado, and also used in stews. Quinoa’s many varieties include purple, black, red and white. The later is the mellowest of the bunch, so it’s a good one to try irst — give it a quick rinse before cooking to shake of its biter coating. Because it’s gluten-free, high in iber and in protein, quinoa has a reputation for being a darling of the health-conscious set, but it’s also terriic in comfort-food classics including chili, casseroles and skillets.

Ater thousands of years of popularity in Europe and the Middle East, spelt inally made its way to North America in the early 1900s — but then it was quickly overshadowed by other kinds of wheat. It has been a long time coming for spelt, but it is now commonly found in health-food stores as ground lour or whole kernels (spelt berries). Spelt is shaped like skinny almonds, and it has a nuty lavor. As a lour, it’s used in foods from pretzels to biscuits to croissants to cakes. Spelt outpaces most other wheat when it comes to protein content and amino acids, and it’s easier to digest — though not gluten free. It’s a friend to the immune system, bladder and kidneys, and some research suggests it can even help improve cognitive function and muscle coordination as well.

LEARN ABOUT THE RESEARCH BEHIND THE BENEFITS OF WHOLE GRAINS IN YOUR DAILY DIET

WITH HANK DART Prevention and Control at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine What’s old is new again: An inlux of health-conscious consumers coupled with a desire for throwback recipes has rekindled an interest in whole grains. It’s a food trend doctors and nutritionists are happily embracing, too. “Decades of research have long shown the health beneits of eating whole grains over reined grains, like white bread and white rice,” says Hank Dart, who works in prevention and control for the Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine. “Whole grains are rich in iber and other important nutrients, and have been found to lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers and even premature death.” The grain category includes several foods that are everyday diet staples, such as wheat, rice and oats, and it is also made up of some lesser-known varieties, like millet and spelt. But even simple seeds can sow confusion. You can’t swing a sack of bulgur lour without hiting a food that’s marketed as “whole grain” or “ancient grain.” But what, exactly, do those terms mean? For starters, know that all whole grains are considered ancient grains (“ancient grain” itself is an unoicial, loosely deined classiication) because the seeds have stayed prety much the same for thousands of years. Then things get a litle more scientiic. “What makes a grain a whole grain is that it includes the three parts of the naturally occurring grain kernel — bran, germ and endosperm. The bran and the germ are illed with many healthy compounds. And it is the bran and germ that get removed in the processing of ‘reined’ grains,” Dart explains. That’s a big deal, because those healthy compounds include vitamins, minerals and iber. To be sure you really know what you’re geting at the grocery store, Dart advises consumers to pay close atention to food labels, and choose foods that list “whole” or “whole grain” as their irst ingredient. Beware of high sugar content, too. Breakfast cereals and snack bars are frequent culprits: Even if they contain a substantial amount of whole grain, they are oten packed with sugar. While nutritionists and health-care professionals generally agree that whole grains have more beneits than reined grains, it’s not necessary to toss out every box of white rice and replace it with brown. It is recommended, however, that at least half of the grains we eat are whole grains. In fact, Dart says, combining whole grains and reined grains can be a good way to transition to that goal: He suggests mixing brown rice with white rice, and whole wheat pasta with regular pasta. Your recommended daily total of whole grains (about three to four ounces for most adults) is prety easy to fulill. Just two cups of cooked brown rice or three to four slices of whole wheat bread will do the trick. Whole grains are healthy, delicious and on-trend — all solid arguments for living a life that’s just a litle less reined.

WILD MUSHROOM R ISOTTO” OTTO FARO “RIS SERVES | 6 TO 8 |

3 to 4 cups water ½ oz dried morel mushrooms shrooms ½ oz dried porcini mushrooms 2 cups uncooked farro 2 Tbsp unsalted butter ter 3 Tbsp olive oil 1 large leek, cleaned, halved and thinly sliced (white and light green en parts only) 3 cloves garlic, minced ced 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp fresh sh rosemaryleaves,finelychopped es, finely elychoppe chopped 2 tsp fresh thyme leav ves ½ tsp kosher osher salt, pluss more to taste ½ tsp fresh ground black pepper, per plu plus more to taste 1 lb cremini mushrooms, sliced in 1/4 inch thick slices ²⁄₃ cup dry white wine 4 to 5 cups unsalted chicken stock 1 cup Parmesan-Reggiano, finely grated 2 to 3 Tbsp fresh chives, for serving

| preparation | Bring water to a boil in medium saucepan; remove from heat and add dried mushrooms and set aside to hydrate, 30 minutes. Rinse farro in mesh strainer and set aside. Heat buter and olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add leek and cook until sotened, 3 minutes. Add garlic, rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper; stir and cook 1 minute longer. Add cremini mushrooms and and cook 5 minutes until mushrooms begin to release moisture, stirring frequently. Add wine and bring to a bubble for 1 minute; drain morel and porcini mushrooms and stir into mixture. Add farro and 4 cups chicken stock, and increase heat to high to bring to boil; cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for 45 to 50 minutes, until most of the liquid has been absorbed. Uncover, stir, and if any excess liquid remains, increase heat to high for 3 to 4 minutes uncovered until farro has reached desired consistency. Stir in Parmesan until melted.

| to serve | Divide into bowls and top with chopped fresh chives. DIGITAL EXTRAS: Visit STLtoday.com for an exclusive recipe for Amaranth Friters with Garlic Yogurt Sauce.


LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

Diet can include your favorite foods HONEY-GLAZED SALMON WITH WASABI Yield: 4 servings 3 tablespoons mirin, see note 1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced 2 teaspoons wasabi paste, see note

1 pound salmon illet or steaks, cut into 4 equal pieces ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ¼ cup scallions, thinly sliced

Note: Mirin is a sweet cooking rice wine. It can be found in the Asian specialty aisle of most grocery stores. Sherry is an adequate substitute. Wasabi paste can also be found in the Asian specialty aisle of most grocery stores. 1. To make the sauce, bring the mirin, vinegar, soy sauce, honey, ginger and wasabi to a boil in a small saucepan. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium-high heat until the lavors are blended and the sauce is thickened, about 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and keep warm. 2. Meanwhile, season the salmon with the salt and pepper. Spray a large nonstick skillet with nonstick spray and set over high heat. When hot, add the salmon and cook, turning once, until the ish is browned on the outside and opaque in the center, about 4 minutes on each side. 3. Spoon the sauce over the salmon, sprinkle with scallions and serve at once. Per serving: 234 calories; 12g fat; 2g saturated fat; 61mg cholesterol; 25g protein; 12g carbohydrate; 9g sugar; no iber; 702mg sodium; 23mg calcium. Recipe from “Take Out Tonight!” by Weight Watchers

CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW FUDGE Yield: 36 servings 1 2/3 cups granulated sugar cup fat-free evaporated milk 2 tablespoons reduced-calorie margarine 12 ounces semisweet baking chocolate, chopped 14 large marshmallows, chopped 2/3

1. Coat an 8-by-8-inch baking pan with nonstick spray. 2. Stir together sugar, evaporated milk and margarine. Bring to a boil in a saucepan, reduce heat to medium-low and cook 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in chocolate and marshmallows. Remove from heat and stir until smooth. 3. Pour into prepared pan and refrigerate until irm, about 2 hours. Cut into 36 squares — 6 rows of 6 — and serve. Per square: 96 calories; 3g fat; 2g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 1g protein; 18g carbohydrate; 17g sugar; 1g iber; 7mg sodium; 14mg calcium. Recipe by Weight Watchers

BAKED SPICY FRENCH FRIES Yield: 4 servings 2 egg whites ½ teaspoon chili powder ¾ teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon black pepper ½ teaspoon table salt 2 large potatoes, cut into thick fries 1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, and spray with nonstick cooking spray. 2. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Toss to coat the potatoes. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet. 3. Bake until potatoes are barely tender, about 15 minutes. Increase the oven temperature to broil; broil until crispy, about 5 to 10 minutes. Watch closely to avoid burning. Serve at once. Per serving: 153 calories; no fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; 6g protein; 33g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 4g iber; 343mg sodium; 29mg calcium. Recipe from Weight Watchers

TEX-MEX CASSEROLE Yield: 6 servings 1 pound extra-lean ground beef ½ cup onion, chopped ¼ cup canned jalapeño slices, chopped 2 cups fresh tomatoes, chopped, or 1 (15ounce) can diced canned tomatoes 1 (15-ounce) can kernel corn, drained 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed 1 (1¼-ounce) package taco seasoning mix 8 small corn tortillas ¾ cup nonfat sour cream

cup reduced-fat Mexican cheese blend, shredded 1/3 bunch cilantro, chopped

1/3

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brown ground beef and chopped onions in a large skillet over medium-high heat; brown 10 to 12 minutes or until thoroughly cooked, stirring constantly. Drain well in a strainer and rinse with warm water to remove all fat. Return beef and onions to skillet. 2. Add jalapeños, tomatoes, corn, black beans and taco seasoning mix; mix well. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, spray a 12-by-8-inch (2 quart) baking dish with nonstick spray. Cut each tortilla in half. Place 8 halves in bottom of dish, overlapping slightly. 4. Spoon half of beef mixture evenly over tortillas. Spread sour cream evenly over beef mixture. Top with remaining 8 tortilla halves and the remaining beef mixture. (Casserole can be frozen at this point; refrigerate overnight before cooking). 5. Bake 25 minutes. Remove from oven and sprinkle top with the cheese. Cover, let stand 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Serve with fresh chopped lettuce, tomatoes, salsa, black olives or other garnishes of your choosing. Per serving: 306 calories; 7g fat; 3g saturated fat; 52mg cholesterol; 25g protein; 38g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 8g iber; 267mg sodium; 199mg calcium.

DIET • FROM L1

balance, variety and moderation, she said. You should find a balance not only in the different types of food you eat but also a balance between the amount of calories you consume and the ones you work off through exercise and other activities. If you consume as much as you burn off, your weight will stay the same. If you can burn off more than you consume, you will lose weight. Choosing a variety of foods is important because it is healthiest to eat from all of the food groups. It is a way to make sure you get all the protein, carbohydrates and fats you need to get through the day, she said. And if you eat the same foods every day, you will end up missing out on necessary nutrients found in other foods. Rahman added that eating in moderation means “there is really nothing that you should consider bad or off-limits completely. If you want to have dessert, have dessert, but have a small portion.” One plan that does all of this, and that Rahman recommends, is Weight Watchers. According to St. Louis Weight Watchers Leader/Ambassador Ellen Abramson, the organization looks to help its customers both lose weight and, just as vitally, keep it off. Weight Watchers works on a system of points. Every food is assigned a number of points — low numbers for foods that are low in calories, are lean proteins or are high in nutrients and fiber such as fruits and vegetables, and high numbers for foods that are high in calories, sugars and saturated fats. Based on their height, weight, age and sex, clients are given a target number of points to hit each day, plus a few extra points each week as a cushion, Abramson said. By following the point system, the clients eat healthful, properly portioned foods. But that doesn’t mean they go without their favorites. “If it’s Christmas and your aunt makes the best pecan pie ever, you can have it. But you have to have less of everything else. It’s called mindful eating. If I’m going to have pecan pie, I maybe will not have mashed potatoes,” Abramson said. To get into the dieting spirit, I prepared several dishes from Weight Watchers’ recipes. And they were good. Not just good for diet food, they were actually good. Even the fudge. Yes, Weight Watchers has a recipe for Chocolate Marshmallow Fudge, and it’s actually relatively low in calories. How can that be? Well, it uses fat-free evaporated milk instead of the regular kind, reduced-calorie margarine instead of real butter and melted marshmallows to

give it body and flavor. Plus, the portions are small. It is surprisingly excellent. Equally satisfying is what I am calling a Tex-Mex Casserole (they call it a Mexican Casserole, but I can’t in good conscience do that). You begin with lean ground beef, and then you render and drain the remaining fat out of that. You season the beef with a package of taco seasoning mix, I’m embarrassed to say, and then sauté it with typical Tex-Mex flavors: onion, jalapeño, corn and black beans. You bake this between layers of tortillas, add nonfat sour cream and top with shredded low-fat cheese. It is an perfectly balanced blend of flavors, and the portions are big enough that you won’t want anything more for dessert than a tiny piece of fudge. For another entrée, this one cooked in the slow cooker, I went with a classic Southern dish. Hoppin’ John is seasoned black-eyed peas and a ham hock, and it is traditionally served on New Year’s Day to bring good luck. The Weight Watchers’ version is made with turkey sausage and shrimp instead of ham, and it contains a lot of kale for flavor, nutrients and, to be honest, filler. It’s warming and filling, a delicious comfort food that just might bring you good luck. You never know. No less good, but quicker and easier, was a Honey-Glazed Salmon With Wasabi. Salmon, of course, is beloved by dieters because it has a high amount of flavor while still being good for you (though salmon tends to be fattier than other fish). This version uses a popular combination of Japanese seasonings, with a hint of honey for sweetness and a blast of wasabi paste for heat. It doesn’t take long to cook, but you will probably gobble it up faster than that. Finally, I made Baked Spicy French Fries. One thing that diets often try to do is to satisfy the dieters’ cravings for fattening foods by attempting to replace them with a more healthful version. Usually, that doesn’t work and the dieter winds up craving the original even more. But these baked-not-fried fries are different. The spices adhere to the potatoes with egg whites, so they don’t need fat, and the fries go through two stages of cooking — they are first baked and then broiled. This mimics the best way to make regular fries, cooking them first at a relatively low temperature and then relatively high. You get fries that are flavorful and crisp on the outside and creamy in the middle. All of that, and you can feel good about eating them, too. This is the irst in a monthly series we will be doing on recipes for foods from popular diets.

PICK UP tast

ema

kers THE PEOPLE AND PLACES LO C A L DEFINING R F L AV O

Recipe from Weight Watchers

HOPPIN’ JOHN WITH SHRIMP Yield: 6 servings 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ pound sweet or hot Italian turkey sausage, casings removed 1 sweet onion, chopped 3 garlic cloves, inely chopped 1 (14.5-ounce) can stewed diced tomatoes 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined with green peppers, celery and onions ½ cup roasted sweet peppers, drained and 2 teaspoons paprika sliced ¼ teaspoon red pepper lakes 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 (16-ounce) bag chopped fresh kale 2 (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 1. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add sausage, onion and garlic. Cook, breaking up sausage with wooden spoon, until browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, paprika and red pepper lakes. Bring to boil, scraping up browned bits, if any, from bottom of skillet. 2. Transfer sausage mixture to a 5- or 6-quart slow cooker. Stir in kale and black-eyed peas. Cover and cook until kale is tender, 2 to 4 hours on high or 6 to 8 hours on low. 3. Stir in shrimp, roasted peppers and oregano. Cover and cook on high until shrimp are just opaque. Per serving: 201 calories; 5g fat; 1g saturated fat; 68mg cholesterol; 16g protein; 24g carbohydrate; 5g sugar; 6g iber; 674mg sodium; 208mg calcium. Recipe from Weight Watchers

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LET’S EAT

01.04.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

Restaurant SPECIAL REQUEST owners will Brussels Kale Cup try to waste is just as colorful as less food Fountain on Locust NEMAN • FROM L1

such places left? — but rather specific subregions. Hawaiian food from one island, rather than another. Seafood from along the coast of Baja California that is specifically cooked over a fire (apparently, Chicago restaurant guru Rick Bayless opened just such a place). Food from Appalachia. That’s right, the experts at the Food Channel think the food of Appalachia differs in some significant way from the food of the South. Perhaps they have never been to Appalachia. Or the South. The same team of possibly one expert predicts that 2017 will see a decrease in the amount of food wasted at restaurants. The actual phrase used was “no more waste,” but let’s give them the benefit of a doubt because this prediction makes some sense. When restaurants discard unwanted food that has been served but not eaten, or when they toss out ingredients that have gone bad, they are essentially throwing out money. Restaurants have a hard enough time staying in business anyway without dumping profits into the trash can. The Food Channel story notes that chefs have become interested in using the entire animal or vegetable ever since the channel first predicted this trend in 2012 (never mind that chefs have been doing it for centuries). What’s new is a formula developed at the University of Missouri that can help restaurants such as buffets (which typically experience the largest amount of waste) throw away less food. Another prediction says we can look forward to restaurants creating condiments out of items that are usually ingredients in a main dish. In other words, we usually think of condiments as being such things as ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise and salsa. But this year, according to the Food Channelers, we may begin to see, say, grilled chicken with a selection of fresh herbs to be used as condiments. And the Food Channel experts note that Mango Pickle, a restaurant in Chicago, uses coconut and pickled vegetables as condiments, though coconut and pickled vegetables have long been Indian condiments. And not that it lessens the potential accuracy of the predictions, but Mango Pickle is so new it had only been open for two weeks when the Food Channel made its prognostications. The experts also guess that we will be seeing a layering of trends. We won’t be content merely to have ingredients sourced from farm to table or that remind us of our childhoods or that follow trendy diet plans — we’ll want it all at once. We’ll have gluten-free comfort food meatloaf pork from the Niman Ranch served with artisanal ketchup. Home-cooked or fancyprepared pet food will be big this year, they say, and so will occasion dining. That is, eating meals with friends or family to celebrate a special occasion rather than just eating breakfast, lunch or dinner. As the Food Channel experts say, “Thanksgiving used to be all about the food. Now it’s about wanting to be together with friends and family.” Oh, brave new world that has such ideas in ’t. And finally, they make this bold prediction: Good will be the new “new.” We’re getting tired of wanting to try things just because they are new, the Food Channel says. In 2017, we’ll be interested in trying food because it’s actually good. It’s a crazy thought, but it just might work. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

BY PAT EBY special to the Post-dispatch

Q • We just ate at the Fountain on Locust. My wife had the Brussels Kale Cup. I’m sure the readers would be interested in the recipe. — James Cooper, Manchester A • The Brussels Kale Cup at the Fountain on Locust not only tastes terrific, the colorful mix of deep red and green cabbage, broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts topped with vivid chunks of oranges looks beautiful, too. The talented duo of owner Joy Christensen and general manager Barbara Schulz developed the recipe with attention to detail and a thorough knowledge of flavors, talents they bring to each carefully crafted dish they serve at the well-loved art deco establishment. Their delicious soup recipes have long been reader favorites at Special Request, including one for the Beef Stroganof soup published in 2011. The recipe for their inventive Brussels Kale Cup is the first non-soup recipe we’ve published from this THE FOUNTAIN iconic restaurant. ON LOCUST At the Fountain, creativity reigns from the art deco mu3037 Locust Street rals and inspired décor (de314-535-7800; signed and executed by Chrisfountainonlocust.com tensen) to the creative cocktails, boozy ice cream drinks, delicious soups, sandwiches, salads and ice cream desserts. Christensen and Schulz share a penchant for perfection, a quality customers appreciate whether for lunch or for a late-night stop. “Joy and I are both foodies,” Schulz says. “We follow trends, like diners’ interest in kale and in whole-grain salads, then we put our own creative spin on things.” “We were looking for a healthy side dish, and kale was on everyone’s mind. We tasted different salads to see what was on the market, looked over recipes, then came up with a dish that works for us,” Christensen says. “We don’t have time to ‘spank’ the kale as some suggest, so we use fine shreds. “Everything we make here comes from research and from testing recipes several times. For this salad, we searched for the right combinations of sweet, salty and sour tastes.” In addition to the dressing, other taste treats include the chunky cut of sweet oranges rather than standard segments and the textural changes of smooth kale, crinkly Brussels sprouts and sturdy cabbages.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

THE FOUNTAIN ON LOCUST BRUSSELS KALE CUP WITH POPPYSEED DRESSING Yield: 8 servings For the salad cups 1 cup shredded red cabbage 2 cups shredded green cabbage 1 cup inely julienne cut broccoli, stems and lorets 2 cups julienned kale leaves 2 cups shaved Brussels sprouts (see note) 2 oranges, peeled and cut in 16 chunks each 8 teaspoons unsalted sunlower seeds

For the dressing 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar 3 tablespoons honey 2 teaspoons coarse mustard 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons poppy seeds 1 cup olive oil Salt and pepper to taste

Notes: This slaw/salad is not dressed until it is served, so the serving size can be easily adjusted up or down. It is a composed salad, assembled individually. You can adjust the vegetables to your liking. • Use the kale variety of your choice. For the test we used Tuscan kale, also called dinosaur, Italian or Lacianato. The kale should be inely julienne cut in manageable-sized lengths. • To shave Brussels sprouts by hand with a sharp knife, trim the woody bottoms and remove discolored or loose outer leaves. Cut each sprout in half lengthwise and place lat side on cutting board. Cut in 1/16-inch strips across the sprouts. Place in bowl and toss to separate. 1. In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, honey, mustard and poppy seeds. 2. Pour the olive oil into the bowl in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly to blend. 3. Taste. Add salt and pepper to taste and whisk again. Store in a tightly covered jar in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before serving. 4. Place the shredded and shaved cabbages, broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts in a large bowl and toss to mix. 5. To assemble the salads individually, place 1 cup of shredded vegetables in a small bowl. Top with 4 chunks of fresh orange and, 1 teaspoon sunlower seeds and 1 tablespoon poppy-seed dressing. Save remaining dressing for another use. Per serving (with 1 tablespoon dressing): 224 calories; 16g fat; 2g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 4g protein; 20g carbohydrate; 13g sugar; 4g iber; 27mg sodium; 96mg calcium.

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MEAT ORDER #27

3 lbs. Pork Steaks 2 lbs. Ground Beef 3 lbs. Cube Steak 3 lbs. Ground Chuck 4 lbs. Country Spareribs 2 lbs. Italian Sausage 3 lbs. Sirloin Steak 3 lbs. T-Bone 3 lbs. Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Center Cut 3 lbs. Cut-Up Chicken 2 lbs. Bratwurst 3 lbs. Porterhouse Steak Pork Chops

MEAT ORDER #35 2 lbs. Bologna 2 lbs. Cooked Salami 2 lbs. Turkey Breast 1 lbs. American

79.99

$

23.99

$

119.99

$

MEAT ORDER #36 ALL CHICKEN!!! 3 lbs. Cut Up 2 lbs. Wings 2 lbs. Drum Sticks

2 lbs. Thighs 3 lbs. Boneless Breast

25.99

$


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

HAVE A HIGHLY RATED

New Year !

MAD DUCK ZINFANDEL LODI 2014

Let’s start 2017 of on the right foot: with great wine! Total Wine & More’s highly rated wine selection features bottles 90 points or higher. From Zinfandel to Cabernet, domestic to foreign, we’ve got the right wine for the right occasion.

California, 750mL, $10.59

WRITTEN BY Daniel Puma

Beverage Dynamics – 90 An enticing aroma of blackberry, strawberry, smoky oak and black pepper makes way for flavors of red fruits and hints of dark chocolate and cola. This wine is one to enjoy with seared duck breast or barbecue.

CHATEAU DE NAGES COSTIERES DE NIMES ROUGE VIEILLES VIGNES 2013

CRUZ ALTA CABERNET GRAND RESERVE 2012 Wine & Spirits – 90

Wine Advocate – 90

This Cabernet Sauvignon is filled with earthy characteristics weighted by flavors of red fruits and hints of cofee. Not particularly heavy compared to other Cabs, this wine goes well with a juicy burger.

This blend of Syrah and Grenache has strong notes of dark berries and a hint of black pepper fills each glass. Heavy on the palate with a long finish, this wine can stand up to short ribs and grilled steaks.

Argentina, 750mL, $12.49

France, 750mL, $14.99

OLEMA CHARDONNAY SONOMA 2014

RENIERI INVETRO 2012

James Suckling – 91

Renieri Invetro is a blend of 50 percent Sangiovese, 25 percent Cabernet and 25 percent Merlot. Aromas of herbs and dark fruits waft toward the nose, and cherries, spices and a little tobacco round out it out.

James Suckling – 90

Olema Chardonnay is smooth and creamy, while flavors of citrus and tropical fruits pop. Stone fruits and apples dominate the palate with a little bit of toasted sugar; vanilla trails of the long finish.

Italy, 750mL, $15.99

California, 750mL, $14.99

LEONE D’ORO VINO NOBILE DI MONTEPULCIANO 2011

TWO STARS BOURBON Wine Enthusiast – 91 Two Stars is a beautiful amber-colored bourbon from Kentucky. Scents of orange blossom, honey and vanilla combine with caramel and an oaky finish. Two Stars Bourbon is sure to keep you warm in 2017.

Wine Spectator – 91

1.75L, $17.99

Italy, 750mL, $19.99

This delicious red wine is a wonderful expression of the Sangiovese grape. Notes of cherries and raspberries pair beautifully with the floral aromas. Serve this wine with a Bolognese or pizza.

MASCOTA VINEYARDS UNANIME 2012

SHIELDAIG SPEYSIDE 18-YEAR SINGLE MALT

Wine Enthusiast – 91

Wine Enthusiast – 92

Unanime is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc. It’s full of dark fruit notes like blueberries and black plums along with hints of chocolate, tobacco and black pepper.

Shieldaig is made from the finest malted barley and ages it in oak barrels for complexity. Flavors of herbs and citrus permeate every sip. The long finish makes this Scotch perfect for winter nights.

Argentina, 750mL, $24.99

750mL, $46.99

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid thru 1/29/2017 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2017 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


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Wednesday • 01.04.2017 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

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BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠Void ♥K 7 4 ♦A K 8 6 2 ♣K Q J 5 3 WEST EAST ♠7 ♠Q J 10 6 5 4 3 2 ♥Q 10 9 8 5 2 ♥J ♦5 4 ♦Q J 10 7 ♣9 7 4 2 ♣Void SOUTH ♠A K 9 8 ♥A 6 3 ♦9 3 ♣A 10 8 6 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1NT Pass 2♠* 4♠ 5♣ Pass 5♦ Pass 5♥ Pass 7♣ All pass *Transfer to clubs Opening lead: Seven of ♠ Major suit transfers are the norm these days, even among social and rubber bridge players. Minor suit transfers, however, are pretty much for tournament players only. A rubber bridge player would surely have doubled four spades rather than bid five clubs. The five-club bid eased the way to bidding this excellent grand slam. The four-spade bid augured bad splits, however, and

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD bad splits have scuttled many an excellent contract. South shed a heart from dummy while winning the opening spade lead with the ace. A low club to the king uncovered the foul trump split. Declarer cashed the ace and king of diamonds, then rufed a diamond with the 10 of clubs as West discarded a heart. South next led the king of spades. West saw that, if he rufed, declarer would have no trouble picking up his trumps while setting up dummy’s diamonds, so West discarded another heart and dummy shed a diamond. South ruffed a spade low (West discarding a heart) and cashed the king of hearts. Dummy’s last diamond was rufed with the ace of clubs as West shed another heart. Now came the eight of clubs, covered by the nine and won in dummy with the jack. South crossed back to his hand with a heart to the ace and had a classic trump coup in this two-card ending. Dummy’s queen-five of clubs sat over West’s seven-four. Well done! (01/04/17)

Across 1 Rings up? 6 In good physical condition 10 Footnote abbr. 14 New push-up bra from Apple? 15 ___ purse 16 In addition 17 Preceder of Barbara or Clara 18 Gather 19 What Pac-Man eats 20 Ambrose who wrote “The Devil’s Dictionary” 22 Groovy things, for short? 24 Miners dig it 25 Thomas who wrote “Buddenbrooks” 26 Great Dane? 28 Golf goal

29 “Get. Out. Of. Here!” 30 Leather bag for wine 31 Perfidy 33 Like some albums and skills 35 Merits 36 British P.M. between Churchill and Macmillan 37 Goes out for a bit? 39 Contract add-on 42 Predicted 46 Some mutterings 48 Hard-core 49 Scones go-with 50 Acidity measures 51 Gleams 53 Slightly 54 ___ smear 55 Kind of talk

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If Jan. 4 is your birthday: This year you spend a lot of time taking the lead on key issues. You also do more research and studying than in the past. If you are single, you’ll meet someone with ease, as long as you just do your thing. If you are attached, the two of you could opt to take a long-desired trip. Aries can be willful and diicult to deal with. January 4 WORD — INSERTS (INSERTS: in-SERTS: Puts or sets into, between or among.) Average mark 25 words. Time limit 30 minutes. Can you find 34 or more words in INSERTS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — DYSPHAGIA dais sigh daisy spay dash paid dish pasha saga pish said hasp saiga aphid sapid aphis shad apish shady ashy shag gash ship gasp RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

Down 1 Casual greetings 2 First state to declare Christmas a legal holiday 3 Insides of coats 4 Many a time 5 Celebrity 6 Jeopardize 7 Eggs rich in omega-3 fatty acids 8 New sports equipment from Apple? 9 Swabbed 10 Iraq war danger, for short 11 Funny outtake 12 New colander from Apple? 13 Leaves high and dry 21 Tedious task 23 Like 49-Across 25 Having a baby makes one 27 Magazine with a fold-in back cover

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

WORD GAME

56 Numerous 58 What might make a nose wrinkle 60 Seed cover 62 Lover 64 Like some cheeks and outlooks 65 Writer Jaffe 66 New whip from Apple? 67 So, so cute 68 Massage joints 69 Moneymakers

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ You might have a diicult time in the morning believing that you are going to be a spitire in the evening. A misunderstanding could emerge from out of nowhere. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks of! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ Use the morning to the max, especially when dealing with an important individual. Keep conversations on a oneon-one level. Tonight: Not to be found! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ You’ll take on a leadership role within a key group, and as a result, you’ll emphasize the importance of getting others’ support in a meeting. Tonight: Choose your words with care.

CROSSWORD CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Kick back in the morning, and consider where others are coming from. Later on, you’ll discover who is supportive and who is just pretending to be there for you. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★★ Don’t feel inhibited by a situation — you will be able to work right through it. Identify with the various people involved. Don’t hesitate to ask for more of what you want and/or need. You will get it once everyone is on the same page. Tonight: Try out an ofbeat idea. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ One-on-one relating takes you to a new level of understanding. As a result, new

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Molly Young

30 Doctor’s order for recuperation 32 List in movie credits 34 Plenty angry, with “off” 37 Orwell’s “Animal Farm” and Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis,” for two 38 Get up

39 Friendly relationship 40 New tracking device from Apple? 41 Scrap, with “of” 42 Season ticket holder, e.g. 43 It can help you get a leg up 44 Having the least fat

45 Having a baby makes one 47 Pruning tools 52 New parachute from Apple? 53 Garlicky mayonnaise 57 Not looking good at all 59 Ham on ___ 61 ___ pinch 63 Cries of surprise

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 1130

WORD SCRIMMAGE

possibilities emerge and allow more give-and-take. Understand how a misunderstanding could have happened. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ Defer to others, and understand where they are coming from. You will discover that people are only too happy to express their thoughts. You might even be sorry that you asked for opinions. Tonight: Hang out. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ You’ll actively pursue a goal. You know where you are going, but others could be reactive. You also aren’t likely to be in the mood to discuss your ideas or plans. Tonight: Get some extra R and R.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★★ Your playful nature emerges when dealing with a child. You might feel as if you are revived and feeling better than you have in quite a while. You seem to be especially verbal. Tonight: Get into the moment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ Make calls early in the day. You could wonder what is too much and what is too little to give in a key relationship. Discussions might be emotional. If you feel guilty, you’ll know that you need to give more. Tonight: Happily head home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ You might be unusually busy and determined to get past a problem. You understand much more than you seem to let on. Sometimes you frustrate others, as you seem impervious to their feedback. Know what you want and why, but remain sensitive. Tonight: Hang out late.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ A boss or higher-up could make a demand that you will need to respond to. Confusion is likely, as you might not be hearing the whole story. Try not to make assumptions. Ask questions, and do more research. Tonight: Treat a loved one to a budget-friendly dinner. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


01.04.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

EVERYDAY

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Man feels left out by transgender girl lutely needed my support, but when the time came to give a little back, I was abandoned. — ABANDONED IN WEST VIRGINIA Dear Abandoned • It might help if you consider that there are more than physical changes when making the kind of transition Eve was undergoing, and she may have felt that her trans friend was better able to relate to what she was experiencing than you were. It was cowardly of her to just dump you rather than tell you she had doubts about your relationship, and it was selfish of her to pressure you to hang around as “just a friend” afterward. It also wasn’t realistic. What you are feeling is normal. However, it might help you to move forward if you keep in mind that all women are not the same, that building trust takes time, and give yourself time to heal before trying to replace Eve. Dear Abby • I am a 23-year-old woman who recently got out of a six-year abusive relationship.

While I was in the relationship, no one knew what was going on. When I finally left him, I started dating a man of a diferent race. The issue is, my family disapproves of our relationship because of his race and because they believe he didn’t give me enough time to figure out what I wanted. I feel like I already knew what I wanted. I am happy with my new boyfriend. I just wish I knew how to get my family to understand. — READY FOR THIS IN OHIO Dear Ready • Because you were in an abusive relationship for so long, talk with a licensed psychotherapist about it. You are an adult and you deserve to be happy. If this man makes you feel that way, then more power to him. Take things slowly, enjoy the relationship, and perhaps with time your family will come around. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Hair is diferent. 2. Magazine is larger. 3. Helmet strap is missing. 4. Couch us not as wide. 5. Nose is diferent. 6. Lampshade is diferent.

Dear Abby • I am a straight man who met and fell in love with a transgender girl I’ll call Eve. We dated for almost three years, and they were the happiest of my life. In all that time, we never once had an argument. She said I had given her the strength to come out to her family and begin her transition. I was planning to ask her to marry me. Without any indication that anything was wrong, she dumped me one day and weeks later began dating her friend, another trans girl. I wanted to walk away and take time to heal, but Eve maintained that I was important to her and we could remain friends. For the next few months we tried, but her new girlfriend treated me like I was a threat. While I was emotionally hurting, she seemed to take intense pleasure in showing me how happy they were together. It eventually led to friction, and now my ex thinks I caused it because I was jealous, so she cut of all contact with me. I stood by her when she abso-

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Intervening in possible abuse case

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Carolyn • My wife and I live in a duplex below a divorced single mom and her 9-year-old son. He seems to split time with his father, but spends most with Mom. Several times a week, we overhear Mom meanly shouting and swearing at her son for what seem like minor things: not wanting his hair cut, making silly noises, school-related issues. We rarely bump into our neighbor and haven’t exchanged more than simple pleasantries. She is not especially warm. We have never heard the son speak in the two years we’ve been neighbors. He looks away when we’re around to avoid eye contact, but I can’t tell if that’s only because we are strangers to him. I’ve never suspected physical abuse, but it seems like the yelling has picked up in frequency and intensity, though we may just be listening harder. My wife and I don’t have children, but the angry

cursing at her son weighs on my conscience heavier and heavier. We have no relationship with this woman, so I don’t know that approaching her is something I’m willing to do, but I don’t know what course to take. I’m worried about the boy’s emotional wellbeing — and maybe Mom’s too. — Concerned Neighbor Answer • Then intervene, please. Start with a call to Childhelp, 1-800-4-A-CHILD; it’s a childabuse-prevention nonprofit and a good source of guidance on getting involved. You want to make sure you hit that important middle spot between ignoring a crisis and indulging a savior complex. Depending on what you report, the Childhelp staf might recommend notifying child protective services, and if so then please don’t hesitate. That’s what it’s for, to decide how to act on facts you provide.

Don’t be afraid to take small steps, too, that feel right to the unhappy child you once were. It wouldn’t be odd at all for a downstairs neighbor to make, hmm, too much pumpkin bread one day and run the extra loaf upstairs. Right? Pumpkin bread, the universal language of giving a damn. Or maybe you oh-shucks missed the drop-of for your office toy drive — would her boy like some Legos? Do you have a small job for him, like walking your dog? I don’t know your capacity for involvement, and perhaps you don’t either, thus the referral to a guiding authority. But there can be value in the kindly disruption: Sometimes an overwhelmed parent needs but a small pause to collect herself. Are you willing to become that friendly knock on the door? tellme@washpost.com

1/4/17

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

FOX Lethal Weapon A war Star Roland and Rose 2 between drug dealers. Crane reveal a secret. (N) (8:01) (N)

9:00

9:30

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Criminal Minds: Profil- Code Black Leanne reCBS Undercover Boss: 4 Painting With a Twist. ing 202. (N) (cc) unites a family one last (N) (cc) time. (N) (cc) Chicago P.D.: Don’t Read the News. (N) (cc)

NBC Blindspot Patterson 5 is missing; Roman has amnesia. (N)

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: Next Chapter. (N)

PBS Feast TV: SciTech 9 Barbecue. Now

Nature The coywolf, a NOVA Mountain tombs coyote and wolf hybrid. in the Himalayas. (N) (cc) (cc)

CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Arrow: A Matter of Trust. Wild Dog goes after Garret Runnels.

Justice for Daniel Boone All

blackish ABC The Gold- Speechless Modern 30 bergs (N) (N) (cc) Family (N) (8:31) (N)

Frequency A plan is made to kill the Nightingale. (N) (cc) The Andy Griffith Show

The Lone Ranger

Match Game Jason Alexander; Cheryl Hines; Ice T. (N)

Law & Order: BirthMYTV Law & Order: Age of In- Law & Order A mur46 nocence. Woman on life dered prostitute was a right. An abusive support. (cc) reporter. (cc) mother dies. (cc)

feelin’ blue (and loving it)

2016-17 BLUES gear for you and your pet on sale now C H E C K O N LI N E FO R N E W 2 016 M E R C H A N D I S E

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 01.04.2017

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Prognosis varies for GuillainBarre syndrome Dear Dr. Roach • My daughter has had symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome since her 20s. She is now 64 and has been doing fairly well. She is ambulatory and curious about her future. — P.B.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Guillain-Barre syndrome is a type of acute muscle paralysis that occurs after an event, usually an infection. (Campylobacter jejuni, a sometimessevere bacterial infection, is the most common recognized cause.) But it also can happen after surgery or, rarely, a vaccination. The weakness usually starts in the legs, and progresses over two weeks or so. The degree of paralysis ranges from mild diiculty walking to complete paralysis of all muscles, including those needed for breathing. Between 10 and 30 percent of people will need the support of a ventilator. Pain, sensory abnormalities and loss of reflexes are common. The nervous system controls many functions besides muscle strength, and these can be afected, especially regulation of heart rate, bladder function and blood pressure. Severe abnormalities of nervous system function can cause sudden death. About 3 to 7 percent of people with GBS will die within one year of diagnosis, despite intensive support. Because the severity of the disease is so varied, it is hard to discuss longterm prognosis. Since your daughter must have had her initial episode about 40 years ago, she may not have been treated with either of the two modalities now known to shorten the course of the disease: intravenous immune globulin or plasma exchange. Among people who were not given one of these treatments, about 10 percent had relapses, and 2 to 5 percent will develop chronic relapsing weakness, called chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy. Eighty percent of people with GBS are walking six months after the event. After one year, 60 percent have full recovery, 26 percent have partial recovery and 14 percent persist with severe motor problems. It sounds like your daughter has had partial but not complete recovery. However, it can be diicult to separate relapsing GBS from CIDP. I suspect your daughter’s doctors have far more expertise than I.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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