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IS A PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE DIASPORA SHOWCASE HOLUALOA COMPANIES AND MIKE & BETH KASSER

T U C S O N • P H O EN IX • LO S A N G EL E S • KO N A • PA R I S


Coming soon to Tucson


THANK YOU TO


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The UA Africana Studies Program is proud to support the

2017 DIASPORA SHOWCASE AFRICA

B.A. In Africana Studies on campus or entirely online A leader in digital humanities The nation’s first minor in hip-hop cultures Interdisciplinary research & teaching Internships & study abroad programs

africana.arizona.edu 520-621-5665


SAFEWAY IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE

DIASPORA SHOWCASE

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CONTENT 16

MASTHEAD

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V I CTO R I A WIL L IA MS H O ST O F D I A S P O R A SH OWCA SE A F R ICA

Diaspor a Showc a se A fri c a h ost , V i c t ori a W i l l i a m s , t a lk s a b o u t t h e e a r ly year s of fashio n i n f l u e n c e s i n h e r l i fe .

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A B O U T D IA SP O R A SH OWCA SE

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S H OW T I M E

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S TA RT W I TH A D R E A M

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FA S H I O N

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BIOGRAPHY

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S O U NDT R ACK

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MUSIC

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KO R A

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DA NC E

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FO O D

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A F R I CA CO N SU L AT E S IN T H E USA

A loo k at 1 8 y e a rs of D i a spora S h ow c a se a n d it s d y n a m ic e v o lu t io n in present ing Af ri c a i n a u n i qu e e n t e rt a i n i n g fo r m a t . M ix in g F a s h io n , Music, Dance, a n d F ood i n t o a n e n t e rt a i n m e nt p la t f o r m Diaspor a Showc a se pre se n t s “K ora s & G u i t a rs . ” An a c o u s t ic int erpret at ion o f t h e l e ge n da ry S ou t h A f ri c a a r t is t , M ir ia m M a k e b a . Rubin Salt er Jr, a Ma st e r a t h i s c ra f t , h a s fol l o w e d h is p a s s io n t o success. Fo r m ore t h a n 50 ye a rs h e h a s pr a c t ic e d la w in Tu c s o n . Bisrat Saint - Ge orge di sc u sse s t h e f a sh i on of We s t Af r ic a n a n d So u t h Afr ican designe rs, Ma ri a K . A de e k o ( Ni ge ri a ) , M o s h o o d ( N ig e r ia ) , a n d Dorcas Muzuma ra ( Za m bi a ) . Dr. Adebay o Ija gbe m i profi l e s t h e l i fe a n d m u s ic o f t h e la t e s in g e r Miriam Makeba , w h ose i n c re di bl e c a re e r e a r n e d h e r t h e m o n ik e r “ Voice o f Africa . ” A compilat io n a n d A c ou st i c i n t e rpre t a t i on s of s o n g s p o p u la r iz e d b y So u t h Afr ican art ist , Mi ri a m Ma k e ba , produ c e d by K w e v i Q u a y e w it h a r r a n g e m e n t s and perfo rmanc e s by K ora In st ru m e n t a l i st s, K a r a m o Su s s o ( M a li) , Yamoussa Bang ou ra ( G u i n e a ) , a n d gu i t a ri st F e r n a n d o Pe rd o m o ( USA) . Seasoned and se ssi on gu i t a ri st , F e r n a n do P e rd o m o f ro m t h e f ilm “ Ec h o in t he Cany on” , bri n gs a f re sh l ook a t t h e son gs o f M ir ia m M a k e b a . Kar amo Susso a n d Ya m ou ssa Ba n gou ra c om b in e t h e e le m e n t s o f Ko r a Sympho ny wit h t h e gu i t a r st ri n gs of w e st e r n m u s ic a l s t y le . The Acho li danc e rs of S u da n i n a n e n c ore pe r f o r m a n c e a t t h e Dia s p o r a Showcase Afr ic a . Recipes from Af ri c a .

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PROGRAM CREDITS EDITOR IN CHIEF KWEVI QUAYE

EXECUTIVE EDITOR BISRAT SAINT-GEORGE

ASSOCIATE EDITOR EBENEZER DELE AJAJA

ASSISTANT EDITOR ANTHONY MICHAEL

CREATIVE DIRECTOR DANIEL MENDEZ

GRAPHIC DESIGN DIASPORA SHOWCASE JESSE HAYES JOSEPH AMECHI NWOJI

CONTRIBUTIN G WRITERS BISRAT SAINT-GEORGE BAYO IJAGBEMI ANTHONY MICHAEL

PHOTOGRAPHERS JOHN BAE SONNY SHOLOLA MATT CONRADS JOE JACKSON JR.

ADVERTISIN G SALES DIASPORA SHOWCASE

Diaspora Showcase Africa program magazine is distributed bi-annually in March and September. It is published by Diaspora Showcase LLC, P O Box 41415, Tucson, Arizona 85717. The entire content of Diaspora Showcase Africa is protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. Diaspora Showcase accepts no responsibility and assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein. Diaspora Showcase reserves the right to edit, rewrite, refuse, or reuse materials, and is not responsible for errors or omissions, and may feature same on Diasporashowcase.com, as well as other medium for promotional purposes.

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Celebrating the color & joy of this world... at home and abroad

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HOST — VICTORIA WILLIAMS

V

ictoria Williams, a graduate of The University of Arizona, was born in Esslingen, Germany, and was raised across several US States- from Washington to Kentucky- and various cities in Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, as her father was in the military. She always had an interest in cultural arts and fashion and ‘religiously’ watched Style with Elsa Klensch as a pre-teen and teen. As her mother was a talented tailor who ensured her daughters learned to sew as well, Victoria relished looking through clothing patterns and choosing styles for her mom to create for her school wardrobe. She enjoyed knitting, crocheting, quilting, and making clothing for her and her sisters’ Barbie Dolls. Victoria had dreams of studying Fashion at Parsons, but her selection as a Congressional youth diplomat her senior year of high school created a different path for her education. As a teen and young woman, she enjoyed modeling, walking the runway, and was later signed to Leighton Agency in Phoenix, as an actor and fashion model. Motherhood, and a career in corporate America never dampened her love of fashion or culture and the arts. Victoria believes that dress-size and height need not be a limitation on those who can truly twirl and strut on the catwalk. She has two beautiful daughters and son to whom she’s passed down her appreciate for fashion and the Arts.

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DIASPORA SHOWCASE AFRICA is an annual event that has

become a mainstay of the Tucson community, and it is attended by a diverse group of the Tucson community, since 2004. The Diaspora Showcase Africa features the music, food, dance, and fashion of Africa, in an exciting and entertaining six hours of unforgettable experience. Presenting the music of Africa in a unique dimension, the soundtrack of the highly acclaimed fashion show presents twenty internationally renowned African artists, such as Fela, Youssou N’Dour, Miriam Makeba, Salif Keita, Cheb Mami, Gigi and others, from the five regions of the continent. The show has featured distinguished personalities such as the Honorable Professor Ephraim Isaac of Ethiopia, and profiled African Nobel Laureates Wole Shoyinka and Wangari Maathai in the Diaspora Showcase program magazine. Diaspora Showcase has won rave reviews and critical acclaim as the Best Africa show in the USA. The Tucson Weekly named it “Pick of the Week,” Arizona Daily Star slated it as a “Best Bet,” and Night Life/Get Out Magazine considered it “A Must See.” Over the years, Diaspora Showcase has sponsored and spotlighted charitable organizations that are doing meaningful work in AFRICA. These organizations includes The Ethiopian Children’s Fund, Ghana Education Project, Technoserve, Support For International Change, Project C.U.R.E., The Forgotten Children of Senegal, and The Save the Rhino Fund - 3 Peaks 3 Weeks Challenge in which participants climb the three tallest mountains in Africa. The show is also a recipient of the prestigious ADDY Awards for Advertising and Design Excellence. Corporate sponsors and advertisers in Diaspora Showcase have included Mercedes Benz, Lexus, Ford, Safeway, Southwest Airlines, Pima Federal Credit Union, PF Chang China Bistro, Chase Bank and numerous popular brand names in corporate America.


SPONSORS

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SHOWTIME

HOS T

V I CT OR I A L W I L L I AMS

FA S HI ON S HOW MOSHOOD MARIA K ADEEKO DORCAS MUZUMARA

“ A F RI CAN CO L L ECT I ON S”

ACHOLI DA NC ER S E ST E L L E AMW O NY CE CI L I A V I L L AUME R O SE CHAR L E S MARY CHAR L E S

“ D A N CE F RO M SO UTH S U DAN ”

ACOUS TI C M US IC

K AR AMO SUSSO — KORA YA M OUSSA B ANGOUR A — KORA F E R NANDO PE R DOMO — GU ITAR

“PRESENTING THE MUSIC OF MIRI AM MAKEBA”

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STARTING WITH A DREAM

R

ubin Salter, Jr. has been practicing law in Tucson for over 50 years. A Tucson resident, for more than 65 years, Mr. Salter’s career, started at Raytheon in data processing, which he found boring, and sought a different career path, where he could work full time, as well as go to law school. Though, he initially doubted his abilities to get into law school, Mr. Salter attended the University of Arizona’s James E Rogers College of law from 1961 to 1964, specializing in private practice. He says that “he loves people with all kinds of issues, and the variety makes it more enjoyable.”

After graduating from law school, he worked as a County Attorney and an Assistant US Attorney. In 1968 Mr. Salter opened his firm, Rubin Salter, Jr. Law Firm, in Tucson. During the early stages of his private practice, Mr. Salter also worked as an adjunct professor at the University of Arizona. As his practice began to grow within 4 years, there was no longer time, for him to continue teaching at the University. Mr. Salter explains that he finds his career rather rewarding, and the most rewarding part of his career, is helping people. He states that when he can see that people are in need or the system has not been fair to them because of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic issues, and things of that nature, he likes to be a part of helping them. He explains that it feels good to accomplish something and help people. And his hopes are that his impact on the community would be that people would say that “he saw problems and tried to solve them, particularly in the legal field”. He also hopes that his influence in the community will shed light on the fact that all citizens, and particularly people of color, do not get the full effect of the constitution to protect them at times. However, he finds great pleasure in seeing that the constitution works in the way it is supposed to. Outside of the little leisure time he has outside of work, Mr. Salter enjoys playing and watching sports. A huge University of Arizona “Wildcat” Football fan that never miss a home game, Mr. Salter’s love for the Wildcat, extends to all the celebration and hoopla that comes with the sport. He comes from a long line of hard working people who believes in education, honesty, and helping others; and although he does not come from a family of lawyers, he has produced a family of lawyers. Bisrat Saint-George & Natalie Impraim 27


MARIA K ADEEKO MOSHOOD

VAN EL SE DORCAS MUZUMARA


Maria K Adeeko


T

he name MOSHOOD/Afrikan spirit has become synonymous with a style that personifies the “spirit” of Afrikan pride. Originally from Lagos, Nigeria

Moshood arrived to make his mark in New York in the early 1980’s. After years of tireless effort and hard work he opened his boutique in Brooklyn, New York. This year marks the 22th anniversary of Moshood’s flagship Brooklyn store. Moshood’s timeless pieces bring together the traditional beauty of Afrikan tailoring and a taste of western flavor. His fluid and elegant designs have been embraced from Harlem to Soweto, Lagos to Bahia, London to Tokyo, and New York to Kingston. In 1998 he was seen as one of “The Most Successful Urban Designers” of the year, alongside Phat Farm, 1020 Blues, Wu-Wear and CMYB. His fashions have appeared on television (BET’s Teen Summit, Queen Latifah’s sitcom Living Single, and Brandy’s sitcom Moesha) and in magazines (ESSENCE, JET and New York Times)


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DORCAS MUZUMARA


D

orcas Muzumara brand, Kuwaha is a fashion forward line and lifestyle brand, which inspiration is taken from traditional African fashion and merged with contemporary styles. Kuwaha is about affirming your inherent beauty and style. Dorcas’ mission is to create attire that is elegant, unique and complements the beauty of each individual. “I feel successful when I see my designs highlight the confidence of a person so that feeling fabulous becomes a normal part of their life”, says the designer. Her favorite part of the creative process is beginning a new project, finding unique fabric and dreaming up the different forms it can take.


MIRIAM MAKEBA: “VOICE OF AFRICA”

M

iriam Makeba is a colossal in several forms in life: an artist, a vocalist, a songwriter, an anti-apartheid campaigner, a civil rights activist, and an actress. In all of these activities, she used her voice and music to showcase her talent and champion her causes. Makeba’s music career started early in life when she joined her primary (elementary) school choir. From this beginning, she began singing professionally with music groups in and around the townships near Johannesburg. The earliest of these groups included the Manhattan Brothers and The Skylarks. The Manhattan Brothers was one of the most popular singing groups in South Africa in the 1940s. They were known for playing different strains of jazz that were emanating from the United States then. The Manhattan Brothers now provided Makeba with the avenue to combine her Xhosa music tradition with different genres of music that was popular outside South Africa. Makeba’s opportunity for a leadership position in the music industry came with her founding of a female acapella that later became known as The Skylarks in the late 1950s. Like the Manhattan Brothers, The Skylarks songs combine both the South African musical traditions of the Xhosa, Sotho, Zulu, and other indigenous peoples with the urban music styles of the townships. This mixture was then delivered within the transposed beats of the American jazz. It was during this early professional experience that Makeba perfected her talent as a singer and learned how to mesh the poetic rendition of the indigenous South African tunes with the international genres of jazz. The first international exposure for Makeba also presented itself through her work with the Manhattan Brothers when they toured some African countries in the late 1950s. Other opportunities for international travel and performance also came through her association with the African Jazz and Variety Show, a performance that showcased, mostly, the best Black dancers, musicians, and singers from Johannesburg and the surrounding townships for White audiences in South Africa. It was these initial appearances in Africa that eventually launched her international career in Europe and the United States. With the assistance of established international artists like Harry Belafonte, Makeba recorded her first solo albums in the United States. Two of the songs in these earlier recordings, Pata Pata and the Click Song, launched her into global stardom. More than this, the songs also introduced South African music to the world and paved the way for the other artists such as Paul Simon in their attempt at globalizing South African music. From then on, she became a singer of international repute, performing at the highest places and for the most powerful people in the world. In 1962, she performed with Harry Belanfonte at the birthday party of President John F. Kennedy at the Madison Square Garden, New York. As a testament to Makeba’s stature in African affairs, she was the only singer invited to perform at the inauguration of the Organization of African Unity in Addis Ababa in 1963. A discussion of Miriam Makeba’s music career will be incomplete without mentioning the various artistes she collaborated or performed with. Notable among these artistes are Hugh Masakela, Harry Belafonte, Dizzy Gillespie, Paul Simon and Nina Simone. Miriam Makeba’s international fame did not come from music alone. She also featured in a few

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movies. 1959 was a magical year for her in this regard. Firstly, Makeba appeared in Come Back Africa, a 1959 documentary on Black life under the apartheid regime in South Africa. This became the first of several movies that brought her global affection especially in Europe. Secondly, the wildly popular King Kong, an African Jazz Opera premiered in Johannesburg later that year. Makeba was the co-star and played the female lead role in the musical. Third, it was also in 1959 that Makeba made her first guest appearance on The Steve Allen Show in the United States. She would later feature in several other movies and television series in the United States that included The Cosby Show in 1991 and Sarafina in 1992 (story based on the Soweto uprising in 1976). Miriam Makeba’s legacy went beyond music and film making. In fact, Makeba is remembered even more today by some people for her social activism as a strong anti-apartheid campaigner and a civil rights crusader. Like the rest of her generation in South Africa, Makeba’s childhood experience was shaped by apartheid with its core policy of white supremacy, racial segregation, and the associated discrimination against the Black. While still in South Africa, Makeba copiously referenced the Black experience under apartheid regime in her songs. She particularly used the global stages that her international travels afforded her to criticize the apartheid policy and mobilize the international community for its abolition. Not surprisingly, this earned her the wrath of the regime in Pretoria. First, her South African international passport was canceled while she was out of the country in 1960. Second, after she appeared before the United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid and testified against her country in 1963, the South African government revoked her citizenship and banned her from returning to her homeland. Makeba lived in exile for the next twenty-seven years until the collapse of apartheid in 1990. It was during this time in exile that Makeba saw the connection between the anti-apartheid struggle in her homeland and the civil rights struggle going on in other parts of the world, particularly, the United States. Her involvement with civil rights struggle in the United States brought her into contact with the leading figures in the movement such as Kwame Toure (formerly Stokely Carmichael whom she later married). Miriam Makeba was one of the world’s greatest singers of modern times and certainly the most renowned female singer from Africa. As the foremost singer in Africa up till the time she passed away, she earned the nickname of “Mama Africa” and the “Empress of Africa Song.” Her repertoire of songs not only cut across several genres of music like folk, jazz, pop, and gospel, she also sang in several African languages like her native Xhosa, Sotho, and Zulu. To underscore her global acceptance and embrace, Makeba also performed in other world languages like English, Arabic, Hebrew, and Portuguese. The various international music accolades (including Grammy Awards) that she gathered for her efforts in music attest to the global acceptance. As soon as the South African government revoked her citizenship in 1963, several nations responded by granting her their respective countries’ citizenship thus making Makeba a real global citizen. Miriam Makeba used her voice and talent not only for entertainment but also for the enthronement of justice for all of humanity. It is therefore appropriate and befitting that Diaspora Showcase created a Jazz Reinterpretation of Makeba’s Songs as the soundtrack for this fashion show. —Bayo Ijagbemi

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SOUNDTRACK TH E SO NG S O F M I R I A M MAKEBA Miriam Makeba was the only singer of the 20th Century, who performed and sang in more than 10 languages. From her ethnic South African language, Xhosa to Swahili, French, Hebrew, Portugese, Arabic, English, and several African languages, Miriam Makeba was the “Voice of Africa.” This soundtrack list are songs performed by Makeba during her more than 50 years singing career.

( 0 1 ) MAL AI K A (0 2 ) ER EV SH EL SH OSHANIM ( 0 3 ) SEK O U FAM AKE ( 0 4 ) L I N DEL ANI ( 0 5 ) I NT O YAM ( 06 ) T H AN AY I ( 07 ) X I CA D A SI LVA ( 08 ) K ADEYA DEYA ( 09 ) CHI CK EN ( 1 0 ) HAP O ZAMANI ( 1 1 ) I PAPAL AZI ( 1 2 ) AF R I C AN SUNSET ( 1 3 ) PATA PATA

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KARAMO SUSSO KOR A

FERNANDO PERDOMO GUITAR

YAMOUSSA BAN GOURA KOR A


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KARAMO SUSSO

K

aramo Susso grew up amongst the griots of his community in Mali, and began playing the kora before he was even big enough to hold it up by himself. He learned from griots in his own community and family, who also happened to be legendary kora players like his uncle Ballake Sissoko, and his neighbor Toumani Diabete. He has since become an internationally renowned player, perfoming throughout West Africa, and teaching at the Institute Nationale des Artes in Bamako, Mali. He has toured with Salif Keita, Toumani Diabate, Youssou N’Dour, Vieux Farka Toure, and he was the Composition Director for The Gambian National Cultural Ensemble.

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FERNANDO PERDOMO

F

ernando Perdomo started his career as a session guitar player after playing in Miami Bands, Avenging Lawnmowers of Justice, Sixo, and Trophy Wife. As a session guitarist and bassist, he has played on three number 1 albums, from Cristian Castro, Paulina Rubio and Tego Calderon. Perdomo played lead guitar and piano for the Grammy award singer/songwriter, Soraya on her final tour. He has performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live, The Late Late Show with James Corden, Good Morning America, The Today Show and NPR Live From The World Café. He has also created music for Target, McDonalds, Honda, Toyota and Coca Cola. In 2015, Perdomo was in the core band for “Echo In The Canyon”, an all star concert at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, where the band backed up Jakob Dylan, Fiona Apple, Regina Spektor, Cat Power and Jade Castrinos, performing songs from the California Folk Rock Era. By 2019, The Documentary film “Echo In The Canyon” premiered in theaters and the official Soundtrack album was released on BMG records. Fernando appears in the film as the guitarist in the backing band, and he appears on every track but one, on the soundtrack album. He has produced over 100 songs, and has been a session musicians to many artists, including Jennifer Lopez, Benny More, Cristian Castro, Paulina Rubio, Emitt Rhodes and more.

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YAMOUSSA BANGOURA


Y

amoussa Bangoura is a guinean kora player and multidisciplinary circus artist. He started his circus training with the guinean troup Circus Baobab and his kora training with several kora masters but mostly Mohamed Zapazon Camara. From 1998 to 2001, he began his professional career joining an african and european tour of the following show: “La légende du singe tambourinaire.” From 2002 to 2007, he created music, and perfomed as an acrobat, for Cirque Éloize’s “Nomade” show. He also joined the world’s tour. In 2010, he created music and choreography for the equestrian company Cavalia’s show “Odysséo”. He toured with them as well as an acrobat until 2013. In 2013, he founded his own music group, Yamoussa Kora & A Thousand Colors, to explore on afro fusion inspired music, combined with several styles including afro jazz, afrobeat, new age and reggae. In 2015, they became proud recipients of the bronze Syli prize’s Syli d’or competition organized by Productions Nuits d’Afrique in Montreal. From 2016 to 2020, Yamoussa created, as a songwriter, composer and musician, their debut album. It was released in February 2017 as part of and named after the show “Afrique en Cirque” by the Kalabanté Productions since it is the soundtrack of the scenic creation. Yamoussa performed as the main character of the show. In 2021, he created the one man show Kéliba which mixes music, circus, dance and theater. Now he is starting on with a new band called Katala for 2021.

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Created by: Kwevi Quaye Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

KWEVI SPECIAL CHICKEN STEW Served with chicken broth steam rice

Coconut Jollof Rice by: Kes Ajaja Plantain and shredded sautéed baked chicken by: Kwevi Quaye Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

COCONUT JOLLOF RICE Served with plantain and shredded baked sautéed chicken

Created by: Kes Ajaja Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

TURKEY AND VEGGIE PIE 52


CHICKEN STEW — RECIPE Makes 6 servings 2 pound chicken breast 4 tablespoons olive oil 4 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons tomato sauce 1/2 cup diced tomato 1/2 cup chopped onions 8 Bell Peppers (red, green and yellow) 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper 2 tablespoons mixed spices (garlic, paprika, orange peel) Remove chicken skin to reduce excess fat, marinate in Olive oil with the mixed spices. Roll each chicken and place in a baking dish. Preheat oven to 350 F and bake for 45 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a frying pan and mix with 4 tablespoons of tomato paste for 10 minutes in medium heat. Add chopped onions and add a tablespoon of olive oil and stir for 5 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of tomato sauce. Add 1/2 cup of diced tomato, stir every 2 minutes for 4 minutes. Add 8 chopped bell peppers and stir every 2 minutes for 6 minutes. Take the baked chicken from the oven and pour it with the chicken broth into the pan. Stir every minute for 5 minutes. Serve over rice.

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EVENT PRODUCTION CREDITS D IREC TOR & P RO D U C E R KWEVI Q UAY E

A S S OC IATE P RO D U C E R DAN IEL M EN DEZ ANT H O N Y M IC H A E L BAYO IJ A G B EM I

A S S IS TAN T P RO D U C E R J.C . B O TSO N MUTAU A K IN B IL E

FAS HION P RO D U C E R BI SR AT S AIN T- G E OR GE AL L IS TER “ P EL A” BU R NNE T T

FAS HION S T Y L I S TS E LVIA R . AR EVA L O ANNEK A TUR N ER

F EATURED A RT I S TS

KAR AM O S USSO — K ORA YAM O US SA B AN G OU R A — K OR A FE RN AN DO P ER D OMO — GU I TA R

ACHOLI DA NC E R S E ST EL L A A M W O N Y CE CIL IA VIL L A UME RO SE C H A R L ES MARY C H A R L ES

SOUN D & L I G H T E N G I N E E R T E R RY “ M IS TA T” T HOMA S MI C H AEL A N DER S ON

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SO C IAL M ED I A M A R K E T I N G O YI NO L UWA A K ER E D OL U JO SE P H AM EC H N W OJ I L I SA J AC K S O N M I STY L O N G

HOS T / PRES E N T E R V I CT O R IA L . W IL L IA MS

FA SH ION DE S I G N E R S

M ARI A K A DEEK O M O SHO O D E LSE “ VA N EL S E” H A R D J OPAWI RO DO RCAS M UZ UM A R A

MAKEUP

F E LI CE J O H N S O N

MODELIN G AG E NC Y

F O RD/R O B ER T B L A CK FADAMA DA N C E A R T S MOD E L I NG A CA D E MY

MODEL S

L AURA A H UM ADA FA B I A N, COR T NE Y D AV I S , MO LLY ANNE WAL LWIN , N A SH VID I R O, A K E I L A CA MP BE L L , ALE XI S W HE EL ER , W EN DY A L I CE , HA NNA H S U L I MA N, ALI YAH AKI NB IL E, ISAB EL LE BA R L OWE , NYA J U OK K U E TH, LI AH CABAL L ER O , B R EAYA NA P E A CE CL A S S , CE CI LI A V E G A, MAR A R. FO R D, AM Y H O F F MA N F OR D , D E S I RE E R OG E R S, SHANNO N PHI LL IP S, C A N DIC E L A P R I CE , A S HL E Y CA NF I ELD, LANDO N PI CKE R IN G , DEZ M OND CA RL -D E NA R OD OM, ER NE STO LO XX, E ASHAN DAS, C O NNI E L A M, J OR D A N D AV I S , LO G AN HALL

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US TELEPHONE NUMBERS OF AFRICA EMBASSIES Unless otherwise noted, the area codes for all these numbers is (202) in Washington, DC Algeria .................................................... 265-2800 Angola .................................................... 785-1156 Benin ...................................................... 232-6656 Botswana ............................................... 244-4990 Burkina Faso .......................................... 832-5577 Burundi .................................................. 342-2574 Cameroon .............................................. 265-8790 Cape Cerde ............................................ 965-6820 Central Africa Republic .......................... 483-7800 Chad ...................................................... 462-4009 Chomoros ..................................... (212) 972-8010 Congo..................................................... 726-5500 Congo/Democratic Rep ......................... 234-7690 Cote D’Ivoire........................................... 797-0300 Djibouti ................................................... 331-0207 Egypt ...................................................... 895-5400 Equatorial Guinea ................................... 296-4174 Eritria ...................................................... 319-1991 Ethiopia .................................................. 234-2281 Gabon .................................................... 797-1000 Gambia ................................................... 785-1399 Ghana ..................................................... 686-4520 Guinea‘ ................................................... 483-9420 Kenya ..................................................... 387-6101 Lesotho .................................................. 797-5533 Liberia .................................................... 723-0437 Madagascar ........................................... 265-5525 Malawi .................................................... 797-1007 Mali ......................................................... 332-2249 Mauritania .............................................. 232-5700 Mauritius ................................................ 244-1491 Morocco ................................................. 462-7979 Mozambique .......................................... 294-7146 Namibia .................................................. 986-0540 Niger ...................................................... 483-4224 Nigeria .................................................... 822-1500 Rwanda .................................................. 232-2882 Sao Tome & Principe ......................(212) 697-4211 Senegal .................................................. 234-0540 Seychelles ......................................(212) 687-9766 Sierra Leone ........................................... 939-9261 Somalia ..........................................(212) 688-9410 South Africa ........................................... 232-4400 Sudan ..................................................... 338-8565 Swaziland ............................................... 362-6683 Tanzania ................................................. 939-6125 Togo ....................................................... 234-4212 Tunisia .................................................... 862-1850 Uganda ................................................... 726-7100 Zambia ................................................... 265-9717 Zimbabwe .............................................. 332-7100 Listings provided by The African Times

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The Grand Luxe is a value priced Hotel, with clean and comfortable rooms with a beautiful pool and spa. www.GLH-Hotel.Net

The Grand Luxe Event Center

This is the perfect location for parties, meetings, conventions and concerts. At 15,000 square feet of space we can host up to 200-600 people, meetings and conventions up to 700-800 people and concerts up to 900 people

For information you can email info@grandluxehotelresort.com or call 520.622.7791

Coming soon www.adakucafe.com

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2021 Diaspora Showcase Program  

2021 Diaspora Showcase Program  

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