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CONTENTS 09

M AYO R’S L ETTER

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ABO U T D IA S PO RA S H OWCAS E

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M ARK YO U R CALEN DAR

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M AST HEAD START W I TH A D REAM

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SHOW T I M E

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FASHION

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BIOG RAPH Y

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JAZ Z

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SOU N DT RACK

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AFRICAN C L AS S ICAL MU S IC

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FO O D

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AFRICAN CO N S U L ATES IN THE USA “ONC E AND NOW”

So u t h w es t gree t i n g s f ro m Tu c s o n Ma y o r, Jona t ha n R ot hsc hild A look a t 12 y e a r s o f D i a s p o r a S h o wc a s e and it s dy na mic e v olut ion in p re s en t in g A f r i c a , i n a u n i q u e e n t e r t a i n i ng fa shion A p re v ie w of s e l e c t e d 2 0 1 7 e v e n t s i n Tu c son

Al L on gm ire , a Ma st e r a t h i s c r a f t , h a s f o l l ow e d his pa ssion t o su cces s . F or m o re t h a n 5 0 y e a r s, h i s st y l e of grooming is st ill sou gh t d aily. Dia s p or a S h ow c a se p re se n t s “J a z z a n d T he Cla ssic s” . A fre sh look at t h e m u s ic of t h e l e g e n d a r y S o u t h A f r i c a n a r t ist Mir ia m Ma ke ba , tha t is for m at te d a s a s o u n d t r a c k t o t h e r unw a y fa shion c olle c t ions of A fr ican d e s ig n Bi s r at S a in t- G e o r g e d i s c u s se s t h e n e w t re nd in Afr ic a n fa shion, w it h p rofile s of d e s i g n e r s Ma r i a A d e e k o (N ige r ia ) , Ma fi ( E t hiopia ) , Pe la ( Tr in id a d ) a n d Va n E l s e (S u r i n a m e ). Dr. A d e b a y o Ija g b e m i p ro f i l e s t h e l i f e a n d m usic of t he la t e singe r M ir ia m M ak eb a, wh o s e i n c re d i b l e c a re e r e ar ne d he r t he monike r “Voice of A fr ica ” M ich elle C olt r ane , d a u g h t e r o f t h e l e g e n d a r y John Colt r a ne , joins Doc J on es an d a n a l l -st a r c a st t o p e r f o r m Ja z z re - int e r pre t a t ions of M ir iam M a k e b a ’s so n g s. A com p ila tion a n d J a z z i n t e r p re t a t i o n s o f t he songs of Mir ia m M ak eb a, p rod u c e d a n d a r r a n g e d b y K we v i Q ua y e a nd Doc W illia m J on e s C om p os er an d c e l l i st , Tu n d e J e g e d e i n t ro duc e s Afr ic a n c la ssic a l m u s ic , a s a n ew a r t f o r m , wi t h a b l e n d o f the K or a , a 21- st r ing Af r ic a n in s tr u m e n t , v i o l i n a n d c e l l o Re cip es from Af r i c a .

A p oe m b y F elix Me n s a h K o l a wo l e Qu a y e 2


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Sean Miller

The University of ArizonaŽ Head Men’s Basketball Coach


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SAFEWAY IS PROUD TO SUPPORT THE

DIASPORA SHOWCASE

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DIASPORA SHOWCASE AFRICA is an annual event that has

become a mainstay of the Tucson community, and it is attended by a diverse group of the Tucson community, since 2004. The Diaspora Showcase Africa features the music, food, dance, and fashion of Africa, in an exciting and entertaining six hours of unforgettable experience. Presenting the music of Africa in a unique dimension, the soundtrack of the highly acclaimed fashion show presents twenty internationally renowned African artists, such as Fela, Youssou N’Dour, Miriam Makeba, Salif Keita, Cheb Mami, Gigi and others, from the five regions of the continent. The show has featured distinguished personalities such as the Honorable Professor Ephraim Isaac of Ethiopia, and profiled African Nobel Laureates Wole Shoyinka and Wangari Maathai in the Diaspora Showcase program magazine. Diaspora Showcase has won rave reviews and critical acclaim as the Best Africa show in the USA. The Tucson Weekly named it “Pick of the Week,” Arizona Daily Star slated it as a “Best Bet,” and Night Life/ Get Out Magazine considered it “A Must See.” Over the years, Diaspora Showcase has sponsored and spotlighted charitable organizations that are doing meaningful work in AFRICA. These organizations includes The Ethiopian Children’s Fund, Ghana Education Project, Technoserve, Support For International Change, Project C.U.R.E., The Forgotten Children of Senegal, and The Save the Rhino Fund - 3 Peaks 3 Weeks Challenge in which participants climb the three tallest mountains in Africa. The show is also a recipient of the prestigious ADDY Awards for Advertising and Design Excellence. Corporate sponsors and advertisers in Diaspora Showcase have included Mercedes Benz, Lexus, Ford, Safeway, Southwest Airlines, Pima Federal Credit Union, PF Chang China Bistro, Chase Bank and numerous popular brand names in corporate America.


SPONSORS DE LTA S I S TE M A PI M A F E DE R A L C R E DI T UN I ON SA F E WAY AYE LE H COX A DA K U CA F E A LB E RTS ON S A X I UM DEVE L OP M E N T GRO U P COLUM B I A IN TE R NATI ONA L E N E RGY 11


SPORTS AND FASHION


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(520) 622-7791

The Grand Luxe is a value priced Hotel, with clean and comfortable rooms with a beautiful pool and spa. www.GLH-Hotel.Net

The Grand Luxe Event Center

This is the perfect location for parties, meetings, conventions and concerts. At 15,000 square feet of space we can host up to 200-600 people, meetings and conventions up to 700-800 people and concerts up to 900 people

For information you can email info@grandluxehotelresort.com or call 520.622.7791

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PROGRAM CREDITS EDITOR IN CHIEF KWEVI QUAYE

EXECUTIVE EDITOR BISRAT SAINT-GEORGE

ASSOCIATE EDITOR EBENEZER DELE AJAJA

ASSISTANT EDITOR ANTHONY MICHAEL DR. YUXUF ABANA

CREATIVE DIRECTOR DANIEL MENDEZ

GRAPHIC DESIGN DIASPORA SHOWCASE

GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN JESSE HAYES

CONTRIBUTIN G WRITERS BISRAT SAINT-GEORGE BAYO IJAGBEMI NATALIE IMPRAIM BABATUNDE JEGEDE ELSE HARDJOPAWIRO ANTHONY MICHAEL

PHOTOGRAPHERS JOHN BAE SONNY SHOLOLA

ADVERTISIN G SALES DIASPORA SHOWCASE

Diaspora Showcase Africa program magazine is distributed bi-annually in March and September. It is published by Diaspora Showcase LLC, P O Box 41415, Tucson, Arizona 85717. The entire content of Diaspora Showcase Africa is protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. Diaspora Showcase accepts no responsibility and assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein. Diaspora Showcase reserves the right to edit, rewrite, refuse, or reuse materials, and is not responsible for errors or omissions, and may feature same on Diasporashowcase.com, as well as other medium for promotional purposes.

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STARTING WITH A DREAM

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ou can hear the rhythms of jazz, pop, or the slow jamming beats of the blues, amidst the sports commentary on television. Some times, it is just the quiet chatter of sounds in a conversational tone, between patrons, and the Tucson grooming elite, that sets the atmosphere in Al’s Barber Shop. As you step into the shop, you immediately notice the reserved elegance of the greeter, Al Longmire, the shop’s owner. Al’s Barber Shop celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2015 without fanfare or pomp, which is quite typical of the owner, who shies away from any form of flamboyance. Rather, the shop continues to provide its customers with the most exceptional standards of service the Tucson grooming scene has to offer. This trait alone, has solidified Al’s shop as a mainstay in the Tucson business community. As a 19-year old teenager, in the 1960’s, Al’s interest was to travel to Tucson, to join the Navy, though his father was a well-established Barber in Ohio. As he took his first trip to Tucson, Al’s mother advised him, that it might be quite beneficiary for him to learn a trade, prior to military service. Al took his mother’s advice to heart, and upon arriving in Tucson in 1964, he decided to apprentice with Jesus “J.T.” Espinoza, one of the leading Barber Shops. After sometime, Al relocated to Atlanta, where he worked very briefly for 7 months. By November 1965, Al had returned to Tucson and successfully opened his own Barber Shop on Grant Road and Sixth Street. From the onset, his Barber shop was successful, which Al credited to his motto, “Don’t be afraid to make the investment, and be consistent with your product.” In addition, Al says, “I enjoy grooming people and getting paid for it.” Al has been keeping Tucson locals happy and neatly groomed for over 40 years, and intends to continue doing so for the next 5 years. However, Al fully intends to make sure his customers are taken care of after his retirement, through training Tommy Clardy, who is currently employed at Al’s to take over the management. Post retirement, Al intends to continue grooming Tucsonans, a few days week. Although barbering is one of his biggest passions, Al is also an avid golf player, and has been a member of Omni Tucson National for 23 years. After years of hard work, Al’s retirement will give him time to enjoy his favorite pastime, as well as some time relaxing at the Omni. However, he will never forget his passion for barbering and his love for his Tucson client base. Bisrat Saint-George & Natalie Impraim 23


SHOWTIME MI CHELLE CO LT R A N E , YACO UB T R AOR E & AU T U M N D O M I N G UE Z P E R F OR MI NG “MA L A I K A ”

M ICH E L L E CO LT R A NE & MUS I CA L M AG I C JA Z Z BA ND

SEL EC TIO N S F ROM T HE S ONGS OF MIR I AM MAK E B A

TUNDE JEGEDE

P E R F OR M S “S E K OU FA M A KE” SO N G W R ITTE N B Y MI R I A M MA K E B A A S A TR I B UTE TO P R ES I D E NT S E K OU T OU R E OF GUI NE A

FA S H I O N S H OW

D E S I GNE R S T-S HI R T COL L E CT I ON MA R I A K A D E K O MA HL E T “MA F I ” A F E WOR K A L L I S T E R “P E L A ” B U RNE T T ELS E “VA NE L S E ” HA R D J OPAWI R O MUS IC SO UN D T R A CK P E RF ORME D BY MUSI CAL MAG I C MI CHE L L E COLT R A NE — V OC ALS D OC J ONE S — K E Y BOA RD MA RI O A B NE Y — T RU MP E T MA R T R E L L T U R NE R — B A S S NE A MA N LY L E S — S A X OP HO NE T I M ROBE RS ON— D R U MS K E I T H J OHNS ON— P E R CU S S I O N

INTERMISSION

TUN D E J E G D E P E R FO R M S WITH Z E N I T H S T R I N G S Q UA RT E T K O R A S OL O COMP OS I T I ONS B Y T U ND E J E GE D E

DANCE

AFTER PAR TY DANCE BY DJ MISTA T & DJ FABRICE

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MAFI M A R I A K A D EEKO

PEL A VA N E L SE 31


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MIRIAM MAKEBA: “VOICE OF AFRICA”

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iriam Makeba is a colossal in several forms in life: an artist, a vocalist, a songwriter, an anti-apartheid campaigner, a civil rights activist, and an actress. In all of these activities, she used her voice and music to showcase her talent and champion her causes. Makeba’s music career started early in life when she joined her primary (elementary) school choir. From this beginning, she began singing professionally with music groups in and around the townships near Johannesburg. The earliest of these groups included the Manhattan Brothers and The Skylarks. The Manhattan Brothers was one of the most popular singing groups in South Africa in the 1940s. They were known for playing different strains of jazz that were emanating from the United States then. The Manhattan Brothers now provided Makeba with the avenue to combine her Xhosa music tradition with different genres of music that was popular outside South Africa. Makeba’s opportunity for a leadership position in the music industry came with her founding of a female acapella that later became known as The Skylarks in the late 1950s. Like the Manhattan Brothers, The Skylarks songs combine both the South African musical traditions of the Xhosa, Sotho, Zulu, and other indigenous peoples with the urban music styles of the townships. This mixture was then delivered within the transposed beats of the American jazz. It was during this early professional experience that Makeba perfected her talent as a singer and learned how to mesh the poetic rendition of the indigenous South African tunes with the international genres of jazz. The first international exposure for Makeba also presented itself through her work with the Manhattan Brothers when they toured some African countries in the late 1950s. Other opportunities for international travel and performance also came through her association with the African Jazz and Variety Show, a performance that showcased, mostly, the best Black dancers, musicians, and singers from Johannesburg and the surrounding townships for White audiences in South Africa. It was these initial appearances in Africa that eventually launched her international career in Europe and the United States. With the assistance of established international artists like Harry Belafonte, Makeba recorded her first solo albums in the United States. Two of the songs in these earlier recordings, Pata Pata and the Click Song, launched her into global stardom. More than this, the songs also introduced South African music to the world and paved the way for the other artists such as Paul Simon in their attempt at globalizing South African music. From then on, she became a singer of international repute, performing at the highest places and for the most powerful people in the world. In 1962, she performed with Harry Belanfonte at the birthday party of President John F. Kennedy at the Madison Square Garden, New York. As a testament to Makeba’s stature in African affairs, she was the only singer invited to perform at the inauguration of the Organization of African Unity in Addis Ababa in 1963. A discussion of Miriam Makeba’s music career will be incomplete without mentioning the various artistes she collaborated or performed with. Notable among these artistes are Hugh Masakela, Harry Belafonte, Dizzy Gillespie, Paul Simon and Nina Simone. Miriam Makeba’s international fame did not come from music alone. She also featured in a few 44


movies. 1959 was a magical year for her in this regard. Firstly, Makeba appeared in Come Back Africa, a 1959 documentary on Black life under the apartheid regime in South Africa. This became the first of several movies that brought her global affection especially in Europe. Secondly, the wildly popular King Kong, an African Jazz Opera premiered in Johannesburg later that year. Makeba was the co-star and played the female lead role in the musical. Third, it was also in 1959 that Makeba made her first guest appearance on The Steve Allen Show in the United States. She would later feature in several other movies and television series in the United States that included The Cosby Show in 1991 and Sarafina in 1992 (story based on the Soweto uprising in 1976). Miriam Makeba’s legacy went beyond music and film making. In fact, Makeba is remembered even more today by some people for her social activism as a strong anti-apartheid campaigner and a civil rights crusader. Like the rest of her generation in South Africa, Makeba’s childhood experience was shaped by apartheid with its core policy of white supremacy, racial segregation, and the associated discrimination against the Black. While still in South Africa, Makeba copiously referenced the Black experience under apartheid regime in her songs. She particularly used the global stages that her international travels afforded her to criticize the apartheid policy and mobilize the international community for its abolition. Not surprisingly, this earned her the wrath of the regime in Pretoria. First, her South African international passport was canceled while she was out of the country in 1960. Second, after she appeared before the United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid and testified against her country in 1963, the South African government revoked her citizenship and banned her from returning to her homeland. Makeba lived in exile for the next twenty-seven years until the collapse of apartheid in 1990. It was during this time in exile that Makeba saw the connection between the anti-apartheid struggle in her homeland and the civil rights struggle going on in other parts of the world, particularly, the United States. Her involvement with civil rights struggle in the United States brought her into contact with the leading figures in the movement such as Kwame Toure (formerly Stokely Carmichael whom she later married). Miriam Makeba was one of the world’s greatest singers of modern times and certainly the most renowned female singer from Africa. As the foremost singer in Africa up till the time she passed away, she earned the nickname of “Mama Africa” and the “Empress of Africa Song.” Her repertoire of songs not only cut across several genres of music like folk, jazz, pop, and gospel, she also sang in several African languages like her native Xhosa, Sotho, and Zulu. To underscore her global acceptance and embrace, Makeba also performed in other world languages like English, Arabic, Hebrew, and Portuguese. The various international music accolades (including Grammy Awards) that she gathered for her efforts in music attest to the global acceptance. As soon as the South African government revoked her citizenship in 1963, several nations responded by granting her their respective countries’ citizenship thus making Makeba a real global citizen. Miriam Makeba used her voice and talent not only for entertainment but also for the enthronement of justice for all of humanity. It is therefore appropriate and befitting that Diaspora Showcase created a Jazz Reinterpretation of Makeba’s Songs as the soundtrack for this fashion show. —Bayo Ijagbemi 45


JAZZ & THE CLASSICS

MICHEL LE COLT RANE Experience the symphony of Jazz with Michelle Coltrane, the daughter of the legendary John Coltrane, as she performs with an all-star cast that includes Doc Jones on keyboard, the classical composer, cellist, and kora virtuoso, Tunde Jegede, and trumpeter Mario Abney. The performance will feature reinterpretation of songs popularized by South Africa vocalist, Miriam Makeba.

Conceptualized and produced by Kwevi Quaye, with new Jazz arrangements by Doc Jones and Tunde Jegede, this fresh rendition reflects the depth of the great Miriam Makeba’s work. With seasoned artist such as Mario Abney who fuses traditional and extended techniques in a most inventive way; Doc Jones versatility on the keyboard, and the emerging Neaman Lyles, sax chop, the music moves smoothly from the ballads of Makeba’s township to the pulsating stomps of the city life in South Africa.

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NE A MA N LYL ES

DOC J ONES

MARIO ABNEY 47


SOUNDTRACK TH E SONG S O F M I R I A M MAKEBA Miriam Makeba was the only singer of the 20th Century, who performed and sang in more than 10 languages. From her ethnic South African language, Xhosa to Swahili, French, Hebrew, Portugese, Arabic, English, and several African languages, Miriam Makeba was the “Voice of Africa.” This sou ndtrack list are songs performed by Makeba during her more than 50 years singing career.

( 0 1 ) MAL AI K A (0 2 ) ER EV SHEL SH OSHANIM ( 03 ) SEK O U FAM AKE ( 0 4 ) L I N DEL ANI ( 0 5 ) I NT O YAM ( 06 ) T H AN AY I ( 0 7 ) X I CA D A SI LVA ( 08 ) K ADEYA DEYA ( 0 9 ) CHI CK EN ( 10 ) HAP O ZAMAN I ( 1 1 ) I PAPAL AZI (12) AF R I C AN SUNSET ( 13 ) PATA PATA

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MICHELLE COLTRANE

VOCALS

AUTUMN DOMIN GUEZ

SAXOPH ONE

YACOUB TRAORE TUNDE JEGEDE MICHAEL FAN

AFR ICAN DR UM S

KOR A/CELLO

VIOLIN

KL ARA WOJKOWSKA

VIOLIN

ZENITH STRIN GS QUARTET

MUSICAL MAGIC JAZZ BAND DOC JONES

PIAN O/K EY B OAR D

MARTRELL TURNER TIM ROBERSON MARIO ABNEY KEITH JOHNSON NEAMEN LYLES

B ASS

DR UM S

T R UMPET

PER CUSSION SAXOPH ONE


Felix Mensah Kolawole Quaye Once & Now : A Musical Journey

Felix Mensah Kolawole Quaye was an avid lover of music. On any given day in his home, guests are treated to fine delicious meals from his cooking pots, and an assorted selection of music that spans many genre. His taste in music was developed at a very early age, influenced by his father, Michael Foli Quaye, who introduced songs and music from diverse cultures to his children; and his grandfather Stephen Seidu Falana, a classical violinist and jazz saxophonist. Mr Falana was a pioneer in the Nigerian music scenes of the 1930's. In the 1950's and 60's, he was also a music instructor to such illustrious Nigerian artists such as Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Victor Uwaifo and E.T. Arinze, to name a few. Mr Falana was fond of taking his grandson, Kolawole (a name he gave Felix Mensah at birth) on motorbike rides. During these rides, he will hum Kolawole's favourite jazz and classical tunes,and ask him to sing along. Mensah was always thrilled after each ride, and spend an entire day, intermittently reciting the tunes to his older brother, Kwevi. Occasionally, his uncle, Michael Falana, who is still considered the most significant jazz trumpeter out of Nigeria, and a contemporary of Miles Davis and Eric Clapton, will play a muted trumpet solo tune to Mensah that he titled " Mensah Yo-Yo-Yo". This tune usually put Mensah to sleep. And it became a favourite in the family that when little Mensah is crying, his grandmother, Mrs Juliana Falana hums an acapella rendition to him. The following compilation of music from around the world (Germany, Spain, USA, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa, Ghana,Togo, Canada, and France) comprise of Classical, Jazz, Pop, Afrobeat and contemporary African Choral standards that Felix Mensah Kolawole Quaye enjoyed listening to. I hope you enjoy listening to these tunes too! Bisrat Saint-George June 18, 2011 Music Compilation

Producer: Kwevi Quaye • Executive Producer: Josephine A. Akeredolu • Art Direction: Daniel Mendez


THANK YOU TO

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Created by: Kwevi Quaye Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

KWEVI SPECIAL CHICKEN STEW Served with chicken broth steam rice

Coconut Jollof Rice by: Kes Ajaja Plantain and shredded sauted baked chicken by: Kwevi Quaye Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

COCONUT JOLLOF RICE

Served with plantain and shredded baked sauted chicken

Created by: Kes Ajaja Styled by: Chef John of Caridad Kitchen Photo Credit: Andi Berlin of Arizona Daily Star

TURKEY AND VEGGIE PIE 54


CHICKEN STEW — RECIPE Makes 6 servings 2 pound chicken breast 4 tablespoons olive oil 4 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons tomato sauce 1/2 cup diced tomato 1/2 cup chopped onions 8 Bell Peppers (red, green and yellow) 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper 2 tablespoons mixed spices (garlic, paprika, orange peel) Remove chicken skin to reduce excess fat, marinate in Olive oil with the mixed spices. Roll each chicken and place in a baking dish. Preheat oven to 350 F and bake for 45 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a frying pan and mix with 4 tablespoons of tomato paste for 10 minutes in medium heat. Add chopped onions and add a tablespoon of olive oil and stir for 5 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of tomato sauce. Add 1/2 cup of diced tomato, stir every 2 minutes for 4 minutes. Add 8 chopped bell peppers and stir every 2 minutes for 6 minutes. Take the baked chicken from the oven and pour it with the chicken broth into the pan. Stir every minute for 5 minutes. Serve over rice.

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Tucson Lunch Buffet

Monday-Saturday

Breakfast Buffet Friday-Sunday

Live Mariachi

Friday & Saturday

Trio

Sunday

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EVENT PRODUCTION CREDITS DIRE C TOR & P RO D U C E R KW E V I Q UAY E

ASSO C IATE P RO D U C E R

DANI E L M EN DEZ , A NT HONY MI CHA E L , A L L I S T E R “ PE LA” B UR NE TTE

ASSI S TAN T P RO D U C E R BAYO IJ A G B EM I

FA SH ION PRO D U C E R

ALL I STER “ PEL A” BU R NNE T T, BI S RAT S A I NT-GE O R G E

FA SH ION AS SI S TA N TS

JE SSE H AY ES, VERONI CA R I OS , J E S S I CA GU ILLE N, G I SE LE SMI TH, KO M I K O UG B AN I

FE ATURED A RT I S TS

YACO UB A TR AO R E— D J E MBE D RU M, T U ND E J E G E DE —CE LLO / KO RA, M IC H EL L E COLT R A NE — V OCA L S , WI L L I AM “ DO C” JO NE S— PI ANO M A R IO A B N E R— T RU MP E T, MA R T R E L L TUR NE R —B ASS, TI M RO B ER SO N — D R U MS , K E I T H J OHNS ON— PE R CUSSI O N, NE AMAN LY L ES— SA X OP HONE , Z E NI T H S T RI N G Q UAR TE T, K LAR A W O JT K O W SK A

HOS T / PRES E N T E R

DAV I D ADAM S , B R A ND I , P RI S CI L L A VA L D E J U LI

FA SH ION DE S I G N E R S

M ARI A K A DEEK O , A L L I S T E R “P E L A ” B U RNE T T, MAHLE T “ MAFI ” AFE WOR K , EL S E “ VA NE L S E ” HA RD J OPAWI R O

HAI R S T YLIS T — TO N I & G U Y TE A M

TAL I A STAN N AR D, E RI N CHA N, S HAY E L OU GHNE Y, MI LI NA MO SE S, M I CHE L L E H ER N A ND E Z , MONI CA L E Y

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HAI R S T YLIS T

SARAH W IL L IA M S , A B BY , HA R A , D I A NA ,

MAKEUP

ALYSSA B UR TO N - CHA RL OW, NI COL E T HU R L OW, YK I A TURNER , EL EX US FORD , MA L AY S I A HE A R D

BACK S TAGE

SHANI, SH AY N A WA D HAWA N, A S HLY N HU NT E R , DANI E LLE CO VAR R UB IAS, AN G E L I CA R A MI R E Z , MI K A L EG ASPI , CLAUDI A JO HNS O N , J AC Q UE LY N T E Z A , ME R E D I T H MONTE I TH, SI M O N E P EDR ETTI, J ORD A N HA R T MA NN, P HO E B E LO WE , TAYL O R F IL A N , A DIA WAT S ON, OL I V I A NI CCU M , ZO E Y HI CKS , M A R Q ESH A GRA HA M, B L A I R MCL U RK I N, ASHLE Y V O NBLASIN G AM E

MODELIN G AG E NC Y THE AG EN C Y AR IZ O NA

MODEL S

E LV I A R . A R EVA L O , D E I D R A S HE R MA N, T E NE C I A PHI LLI PS, AUT UM N DO M IN G U E Z , T ONI S HA WI L L I A MS , N I TA O CANSE Y, BE THA N Y EM A L IN E HE NNI NG, MA R I A CE L AYA , ALYSSA BUR TO N C H AR L O W, K I MMY V U , K E NZ I E S A L O MO NSO N, DE JA M O N ET, PAR IS NA RO, L I A B RI E HL , K A I L AH LNDSE Y, ALE KS A N DR A K R AS , MI CHE L L E D A , MI GU E L PE NA, V I CTO R ST E V EN S , SAR IN A R OME RO

SP EC IAL THA N K S

M ARG A R ET J O H N S ON, MA R T Y “D R. J A Z Z ” D R E SSNE R , JO B C H O L L O M , A MY B U RME I S T E R, D R , P RA I S E ZE NE G A, PRI SC IL A VA L DEJ UL I

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IMPORTANT U.S. HOLIDAYS

2017

New Year’s Sun/Jan 1 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (US) Sun/Jan 15 (Eid) al Adha Fri/Sept 1 Ash Wednesday Wed/Mar 1 Chinese New Year Sat/Jan 28 Lincoln’s Birthday (US) Sun/Feb 12 Valentine’s Day Tue/Feb 14 President’s Day (US) Mon/Feb 20 Washington’s Birthday (US) Wed/Feb 22 Eastern Orthodox Lent Begins Mon/Feb 27 St. Patrick’s Day Fri/Mar 17 Palm Sunday Sun/Apr 9 Good Friday Fri/Apr 14 Easter Sun/ Apr 16 Daylight Saving Time begins Sun/Mar 12 Passover Mon/Apr 10 Eastern Orthodox Easter Sun/Apr 16 Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun/Apr 23 Mother’s Day (C, US) Sun/May 14 Armed Forces Day (US) Sat/May 20 Memorial Day, Observed (US) Mon/May 29 Father’s Day Sun/Jun 18 Summer begins Wed/Jun 21 Independence Day (US) Tue/Jul 4 Labor Day (C, US) Mon/Sept 4 Autumn begins Fri/Sept 22 Rosh Hashanah Wed/Sept 20 First of Ramadan Sat/May 27 Columbus Day Observed (US) Mon/Oct 9 Yom Kippur Fri/Sept 29 National Boss Day (US) Mon/Oct 16 United Nations Day (US) Tue/Oct 24 Daylight Saving Time begins Sun/Mar 12 Halloween Tue/Oct 31 All Saints Day (M) Wed/Nov 1 (Eid) al Fitr Sun/Jun 25 Election Day (US) Tue/Nov 7 Veterans’ Day (US) Sat/Nov 11 Thanksgiving (US) Thu/Nov 23 Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (US) Thu/Dec 7 Winter begins Thu/Dec 21 Christmas Mon/Dec 25 Hanukkah Tue/Dec 12 Boxing Day (C) Tue/Dec 26 Kwanzaa begins Tue/Dec 26

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2018

2019

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US TELEPHONE NUMBERS OF AFRICAN EMBASSIES Unless otherwise noted, the area codes for all these numbers is (202) in Washington, DC Algeria .................................................... 265-2800 Angola .................................................... 785-1156 Benin ...................................................... 232-6656 Botswana ............................................... 244-4990 Burkina Faso .......................................... 832-5577 Burundi .................................................. 342-2574 Cameroon .............................................. 265-8790 Cape Cerde ............................................ 965-6820 Central Africa Republic .......................... 483-7800 Chad ...................................................... 462-4009 Chomoros ..................................... (212) 972-8010 Congo..................................................... 726-5500 Congo/Democratic Rep ......................... 234-7690 Cote D’Ivoire........................................... 797-0300 Djibouti ................................................... 331-0207 Egypt ...................................................... 895-5400 Equatorial Guinea ................................... 296-4174 Eritria ...................................................... 319-1991 Ethiopia .................................................. 234-2281 Gabon .................................................... 797-1000 Gambia ................................................... 785-1399 Ghana ..................................................... 686-4520 Guinea‘ ................................................... 483-9420 Kenya ..................................................... 387-6101 Lesotho .................................................. 797-5533 Liberia .................................................... 723-0437 Madagascar ........................................... 265-5525 Malawi .................................................... 797-1007 Mali ......................................................... 332-2249 Mauritania .............................................. 232-5700 Mauritius ................................................ 244-1491 Morocco ................................................. 462-7979 Mozambique .......................................... 294-7146 Namibia .................................................. 986-0540 Niger ...................................................... 483-4224 Nigeria .................................................... 822-1500 Rwanda .................................................. 232-2882 Sao Tome & Principe ......................(212) 697-4211 Senegal .................................................. 234-0540 Seychelles ......................................(212) 687-9766 Sierra Leone ........................................... 939-9261 Somalia ..........................................(212) 688-9410 South Africa ........................................... 232-4400 Sudan ..................................................... 338-8565 Swaziland ............................................... 362-6683 Tanzania ................................................. 939-6125 Togo ....................................................... 234-4212 Tunisia .................................................... 862-1850 Uganda ................................................... 726-7100 Zambia ................................................... 265-9717 Zimbabwe .............................................. 332-7100 Listings provided by The African Times

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2016 Diaspora Showcase Program  

The program for the 2016 Diaspora Showcase event that occurred 9/24/16.

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