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Altoona march 2011 50009

The next

STEP ALTOONA PRIMED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ECONOMIC RECOVERY

EASTER SEASON FAITH

BIG GREEN UMBRELLA 414 61st Street Des Moines, IA 50312

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Altoona Living

MARCH | 2011


Your Homebuying Checklist Buy into the Circle of Altoona Businesses Your trusted mortgage lender!

Call Lori Slings

515-967-4700 or 515-975-8240 160 Adventureland Drive

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967-3974 Mike Bird


welcome

By Shane Goodman, shane@dmcityview.com

A promising future in Altoona M

ost people don’t understand what economic development or chamber of commerce groups do. Many think they are organizations within city government.

Chambers of commerce and economic development groups are typically independent of city operations, and for good reason. Their leaders often serve as the liaison to help initiate discussions between businesses and the city. When the recruiting of industry is involved, the competition between cities can become fierce. With new tax revenues and potential jobs at play, leaders from most all communities clearly see the benefits and want to throw their community’s hat in the ring. Much debate has arisen lately over the effectiveness of business incentives and public stimulus plans. The truth is that both can work, but they must be used sparingly. We are seeing examples of these successes in Altoona and throughout our state. And even better, we are seeing many succeed without the help of any incentives or stimulus. In this month’s cover story, we take a look at economic development in Altoona and how it is impacting the community. We are pleased to tell the story and to promote the promising future of this community. Thanks for reading. AL

Shane Goodman Publisher

Let Brooke help your business develop an effective advertising campaign today!

Living

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Brooke Pulliam • 988-7257 • brooke@iowalivingmagazines.com www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

march | 2011

Altoona Living

3


inside 5

Cover story

The next step

14 Fitness

Your kids are watching

16 Calendar

A comprehensive list

20 Garage

Page 5

Saturn girl

21 Library

Magic and more

22 Health Q & A

Advice from professionals

Page 20

26 Faith

Easter season

27 Dining

Panda Express

29 Recipe

Potato cod cakes

30 Real estate

Altoona sales

Page 27

32 Chamber

News of local events

On the cover: Melissa Horton, Jeff Mark and John Shaw. Photo by Todd Rullestad. Publisher: Editor: Account ExecutiveS:

Shane Goodman Darren Tromblay Brooke Pulliam Julie Downing Dan Juffer Jolene Goodman Pete Gardner Irene Smith Michelle Haupts Christi Adams Wendy Goodale

Address: 414 61st Street Des Moines, Iowa 50312 Phone: 515.953.4822 EDITORIAL: ext.304 Distribution: ext.301 DESIGN: ext.313 ACCOUNTING: ext.301 Fax: 515.953.1394 web: www.iowalivingmagazines.com

design manager: Graphic DesignErs: editorial assistant: CONTRIBUTORS: Business office mgr: distribution: CALENDAR:

Celeste Jones Karen Ericson Lindy Mogren Kathleen Summy Laura Billingsley Amber Williams Todd Rullestad Arin Bishop Brent Antisdel Brent Antisdel Kathleen Summy

Circulation and readership audited by

Altoona Living magazine is a monthly publication of Big Green Umbrella Media, Inc., an Iowa corporation. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part

without permission of the publisher. Altoona Living magazine is mailed free of charge to every household and business in the 50009 zip code. Others

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Altoona Living

may subscribe for $18 annually. Copies of past issues, as available, may be purchased for $3 each (plus shipping if required).

march | 2011

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feature

Submit story ideas to darren@dmcityview.com

Photo by Todd Rullestad

The next

step

Altoona primed to take advantage of economic recovery By Laura Billingsley

I

t’s no secret the past year has been rough on businesses. Less money in people’s pockets means fewer restaurant meals, abandoned gym memberships and even postponed trips to the dentist.

But during the past year, Altoona has seen progress in economic development. Yes, some businesses have closed, but a number of new and expanded businesses have Altoona well placed to make the most of an economy on the mend. Jeff Mark, Altoona city administrator, sums up the past economic year in three words: “It’s been tough,” he says. “The economy’s bad, but in spite of that we had quite a bit that went on last year.” In 2010, the city granted 118 commercial building permits, representing a total valuation of $12,204,234. New businesses have continued to spring up around town, in part because of the city’s location, but also because of a sense of community and a 40 percent increase in population during the past 10 years. “You go out anywhere during the evening, or actually during the daytime anymore, and Altoona always seems to be busy, which amazes me because a lot of people think of Altoona as just being a commuter or bedroom community,” Mark says. The city’s location, near the meeting of Interstate Highway 80 and U.S. Highway 65, is also a plus for industry. “We’re right in the crux of two major highways,” says Melissa Horton, director of the Altoona Area Chamber of Commerce.

From left: Melissa Horton, executive director of Altoona Area Chamber of Commerce; Jeff Mark, Altoona city administrator; and John Shaw, community development director.

“Transportation-wise we are an ideal location to draw traffic from several different areas, not just the Altoona area.” You could say the city is at the crossroads of everywhere. Traffic streams into the area to visit big attractions such as Prairie Meadows Racetrack and Casino, Adventureland and Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, which opened in August 2009. The mammoth retailer is drawing traffic to the area, which is also the future site of The Shoppes at Prairie Crossing, a planned retail

development just south of Bass Pro. According to Mark, the area is “a pretty big component of our future economic development.” He speculates that as soon as the economy picks up more steam, projects will start filling in. “They’re looking for some big department store anchors, some entertainment venues, maybe a movie theater or a water park, restaurants and hotels,” he says. Once anchor stores are in place, smaller retailers will likely come on board. Don Coates,

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Altoona Living

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Photo by Laura Billingsley

feature

Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, which opened in August 2009, has been a huge draw for Altoona residents and tourists alike.

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executive director of Eastern Polk Regional Development, is optimistic about the coming year. He works to attract new businesses to the area and to help make sure existing businesses prosper and expand. He concedes development at The Shoppes has been a bit slow during the past year, but he believes the market is turning around. “We’d all like to see that move forward,” he says of the development, “and I think it will. I think this year you’re going to see some things happen out there.” John Shaw, Altoona’s community development director, says during 2010 he saw economic activity starting to pick up around town. “It seems like we’ve really seen businesses putting feelers out there for expansion or doing improvements through existing properties, things of that nature,” he says. “So it’s really starting to take off again after the downturn in the economy, and we’re starting to feel the upswing now.” But it’s not only large retail-

ers and attractions that are calling Altoona home. Small business growth has been a vital part of the city’s economic development during the past year. You can do this In January, a new Kosama branch opened on 8th Street. The fitness chain has locations around the Des Moines area, and co-owners Kevin Mosher and Craig Neiderheiser thought it was time Altoona had one as well. Neiderheiser says he and Mosher felt encouraged by the city from the start, and Kosama is a good example of what a supportive community means to a new business. “I’ve been really overwhelmed with the amount of support people in the community have given us, and how much help. They’re willing to get their friends involved, even if there’s someone who is kind of on the fence about any kind of workout whatsoever,” Neiderheiser says. Mosher agrees, adding,


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“Overall the area has been great. Coming into the community, Kosama has basically been welcomed with open arms.” The principle behind Kosama’s workout program is to provide a variety of exercises, including kickboxing, kettlebell strength training, yoga and plyometrics. Participants come to the studio for one hour a day, six days a week for 10 weeks. The program is designed to be flexible enough to work for a wide range of lifestyles, “so a 60-someyear-old woman who hasn’t been working out for the past 30 - 40 years can have just as great of success and get just as good a workout as somebody who’s a 20-yearold athlete who’s been working out their whole life,” Neiderheiser says. Both co-owners take advantage of opportunities in Altoona to meet and learn from other business owners, such as the Chamber’s Noon Networking events, the local BNI networking group, and Altoona Area Young

Photo by Laura Billingsley

feature

Kevin Mosher and Craig Neiderheiser are co-owners of the Kosama branch that recently opened in Altoona.

Professionals, an offshoot of the Chamber. Mosher views these meetings as a good place to throw around new ideas and learn from others. “I think it speaks volumes about the community when everybody’s here to help everybody succeed,” he says. “And that’s

what our business and our drive and our passion are about here at Kosama — to help people succeed.” Standing in the middle of the workout studio, which has high school football shirt-worthy slogans such as “You Can Do This” emblazoned on the walls, you get

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the feeling the phrase could be a motto for Altoona as well. “When I was a kid, we were still cornfield and two-lane highway,” says Horton. “To be able to come into town now and have the retail opportunities that we have has been amazing.” Horton cites events like RAGBRAI, which recently announced Altoona as an overnight stop on the 2011 route, as providing a needed boost for local businesses. This will mark the first time Altoona has been an overnight town, and its first time as a pass-through town since the 1973 inaugural ride. “RAGBRAI will be huge economically as a community — it’s no secret it’s been a rough time for a lot of people in business the last couple of years, so I think this will be a shot in the arm for people, especially our restaurants and entertainment venues that may have seen a little bit of a slowdown,” she says. In addition to RAGBRAI,

march | 2011

Altoona Living

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feature

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Altoona will play host to this summer’s Home Show Expo. It will be the first time the event has been located on the eastern side of the Des Moines metro. Beyond the bedroom Events like the Home Show Expo and RAGBRAI are helping Altoona shed the label of a bedroom community. Mark says the events will “give a lot of people in central Iowa an opportunity to come to Altoona to see the community.” While people often visit Altoona, they sometimes don’t get any farther than Bass Pro Shops, Prairie Meadows or Adventureland. This summer’s events “will actually draw people in to see the whole community,” Mark says, “not just the entertainment and shopping venues that we have.” Projects that benefit Altoona residents end up being good for businesses as well. Last summer, the city broke ground on a new soccer complex. Located near the existing Sam Wise Youth Complex,

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Altoona Living

march | 2011

“They’re looking for some big department store anchors, some entertainment venues, maybe a movie theater or a water park, restaurants and hotels.” — Jeff Mark, Altoona city administrator the 80-acre Altoona Soccer Park will feature 14 full-sized soccer fields along with an all-weather synthetic turf “feature field” that could also be used for football games. Mark says the complex “is economic development, even though it’s for rec use — there’ll be all kinds of soccer tournaments out there.” As a father of four, Mark stresses the fields should not be underestimated as far as their potential to boost the local econo-

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my, saying, “When you go to your kid’s events or tournaments, you spend money at restaurants, gas stations and shopping.” While it may no longer be a bedroom community, the number of people resting their heads in Altoona at night has surged. Recently released census data shows the city’s 2010 population at 14,541 residents, which means Altoona’s population more than doubled in less than 20 years. The

influx of people has made community building even more important. In summer 2010, Altoona held a new festival called Altoona Palooza. Mark says because the city has done most of its growing during the last 20 years, people who’ve moved to Altoona in the last five years don’t necessarily have the same ties to the community as do second- and thirdgeneration citizens. “A community festival or any opportunity for people to come together and get to know one another and celebrate their communities is going to be good in the long run,” Mark says. As Altoona continues to grow, a shared sense of community will be important. But even with Altoona’s growth, no one expects the city to transform overnight. “Economic development is kind of like walking up a 90-degree wall on molasses — it moves very slowly,” Coates says. Yet, Altoona seems to be making excellent progress. AL


out & about

Submit photos to darren@dmcityview.com

Clayton Cooper, Paul Crusan and Steve McCoy at Ted’s Body Shop ribbon cutting on Feb. 10.

John Sutherin, Jeremy Sealy, Aaron Larson, KC Miller and Paul Crusan at Ted’s Body Shop ribbon cutting on Feb. 10.

Craig Neiderheiser and Julie West at Ted’s Body Shop ribbon cutting on Feb. 10.

Owner Adam McRoberts cuts the ribbon at Ted’s Body Shop on Feb. 10. www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

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Altoona Living

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Altoona Living

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out & about

Submit your photos and captions to darren@dmcityview.com

Leslie Mosher, Mackenna Mosher and LeRoy Mains at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Jenn Mosher and Kevin Mosher at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Elaine Collet and Peg Mattison at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Chad Sneider and Jill Meyer at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Amber Darby, Lindsay Maher and Hilary Dunn at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

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march | 2011

Altoona Living

11


out & about

Submit your photos and captions to darren@dmcityview.com

Alma Reed, Tanner Nippoldt and Jessica Berg at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Kosama owners Craig Neiderheiser and Kevin Mosher cut the ribbon at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Craig Neiderheiser, Megan Burdine and Kari Swain at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Eric Wolvers, Tracy Adams and Wendi Anderson at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Kyle Ortmann, Janelle Rees and Amy Jensen at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Cathy Jensen, Pennie Carroll and Ally Carroll at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

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Altoona Living

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Altoona Living

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fitness

By David Charleston, The Orange Planet

Your kids are watching Model healthy behaviors for children to learn By David Charleston, owner, The Orange Planet

A

“chip off the old block.” “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” “Like father, like son.” These sayings can be complimentary of a parent-child relationship, and some may not be so complimentary. They all infer that parents are to blame for how their kids turn out. As a former school teacher and now business operator, I get to see a lot of parent and child interactions. Some are great, and others leave me bewildered. Research has confirmed for years that children grow up to be like their parents. If they display authority problems, there is a very good chance they learned it at home. Kids who abuse alcohol later in life oftentimes got their first introduction at home from their parents’ stash. It is no accident that when a parent is hostile or aggressive, the child follows. How children will interact with others starts at home. When children witness even “minor” unethical behavior by their parents, is it any wonder they learn to justify their poor behavior? If you have ever noticed a very humble, grounded set of parents, you’ll note the child is most likely the same. Kids don’t always listen, but they do pay close attention and adapt behavior set by the parents. One of the most effective tools in parenting a child is to model good behavior. Overeating, lying, being lazy,

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Altoona Living

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cheating, winning at all costs and disrespect toward others are all bad behaviors to model. Take eating for instance. While your child’s physical makeup may be different than yours, if you overeat or comfort eat, your child will learn and adapt the same behavior. Conversely, if you model a healthy lifestyle, your kids will catch on to that as well. Physical exercise does profit you in many ways. Are you modeling good eating habits and the importance of physical exercise? Are your kids learning fitness lifestyle from you that they can take with them when they leave the nest? Here are some good things your kids could learn from you when you commit to modeling good behavior in the area of good eating and exercise: exercise lowers stress, having a smaller waist line prevents disease, clothing can fit properly, goal setting and accomplishment, exercise can be a game (make goals, regain a competitive spirit), a healthier heart is paramount, a strong body functions better and holds down wasteful health care costs, quality times do not have to be built around food and TV, apathy and laziness isn’t healthy, cooking techniques and knowledge. Make exercise a priority by putting it on your calendar. Your kids are learning by watching you. Lead by example. Let your life inspire those who look up to you. AL

For more information on joining as a family log onto www.TheOrangePlanet. com. Article written by David Charleston, owner of The Orange Planet and Director of Hope2Offer Student Services.


auto

By Ron Short, Toyota of Des Moines

Protecting your vehicle Help maintain that shiny showroom finish By Ron Short, Toyota of Des Moines

A

hhhh..... spring is in the air. This is the time to get the salt and sand cleaned from your vehicle — inside and out. Many products are out there to protect our vehicles from the harsh elements of not only winter but summer as well. Customers will often choose to have these products or treatments installed or performed at the time of purchase, but they can actually be done at any time. Of course they can not fix pre-existing problems, but they can they definitely prevent further damage. I tend to tell people that these products — rust proofing, undercoating, stain guard, paint protection, etc. — are much like purchasing insurance. You hope that you never need them, but if you do, you will be glad they are there. In a lot of instances, what you are really purchasing is the warranty that these products provide. Paint protection, for example, will not protect against rock chips but is great when it comes to things like rail dust (small rust-colored specks) or bird droppings and bugs that can deteriorate the clear coat

finish. When you take into consideration the price of painting a bumper or a hood, this product is a good insurance policy. Whether these items are for you or not is a decision that you have to make based on your personal needs and wants from your vehicle. I prefer a nice, clean vehicle with a showroom finish, even on my most recent purchase: my daughter’s red 1995 Celica. The paint protection process makes it shine like new. AL

I tell people that these products are much like purchasing insurance. Information provided by Ron Short, Toyota of Des Moines, 4475 Merle Hay Road, Des Moines, 800-779-6578. www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

march | 2011

Altoona Living

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calendar

Submit event information to kathy@dmcityview.com

Friday, March 25 n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

n SEP 9 boys track meet, 4 p.m.

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

gmail.com with questions, doors open

n RAGBRAI Volunteer Fair,

Animal Rescue League visits, Altoona

5 p.m, meeting starts 5:30 p.m.

Altoona Campus, 6 - 8 p.m.

Library, 11 a.m.

n Al-Anon meeting, Lutheran

n Noon networking, location TBA,

Church of the Cross, Room 12, free

11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m.

childcare, call Shelley at 967-8917 or

Altoona Library, 11 a.m. n Mitchellville Elementary Spring Auction and spaghetti supper, in the gym, 5 - 7 p.m. n AAYP breakfast, Hy-Vee, 7 a.m. n SEP varsity girls track at Simpson College, 4 p.m.

Wednesday, March 30 n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

al-anondesmoines.org for info, 7 p.m.

Saturday, April 2

n SEP 9 boys track at Ankeny, 4:30 p.m. n SEP 8 girls track at Valley,

Old Town, use parking lot behind bar, call Tami at 979-2940 or Harold at

n Eastern Polk Legislative Coffee,

4:30 p.m.

967-4774 for info, 8 p.m.

Altoona Library, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

n SEP JV/V boys track at Hoover,

n Lunch n Laughs: “Of Pigs, Bears

5 p.m.

Saturday, March 26

and Billy Goats Gruff,” CAP Theatre, 201 First Ave. S, $10, 11 a.m. n Varsity boys soccer tournament

n Greater Altoona Girls Softball

Wednesday, April 6

at U of I, 9 a.m.

Association Pancake Breakfast, SEP,

n After School Activities, grades K -

7 - 11 a.m.

Monday, April 4

n High School Hoop Night, The Orange Planet, 5650 Metro East

6, Altoona Library, 3 - 4 p.m. n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Old Town, use parking lot behind bar,

Drive, Pleasant Hill, $5 and current HS I.D., 5 - 9 p.m.

n Altoona City Council meeting,

call Tami at 979-2940 or Harold at

City Hall, 407 Eighth St. S.E., 6:30 p.m.

967-4774 for info, 8 p.m.

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

Monday, March 28 n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, Altoona Library, 11 a.m. n Altoona Historical Society meeting, Altoona Area Historical Museum 1060 14th St. S.E., 7 p.m. n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Cross Creek Preschool, 1975 Eighth St. S.W., west entrance, call Harold for info 967-4774, 8 p.m.

Altoona Library, 11 a.m. n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

Thursday, March 31

St. S.W., west entrance, call Harold

n Nighty-night stories, Altoona

for info 967-4774, 8 p.m.

Library, 6:30 p.m.

n Nighty-night stories, Altoona

n SEP boys tennis vs. North Polk,

n AAYP AFter Hours, Being There

Library, 6:30 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

Coffee, 5 p.m.

n Business After Hours, Altoona

n SEP 8 boys track at Simpson

n SEP boys tennis vs. Waukee,

Physical Therapy, 5 p.m.

College, 4:30 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

n Centennial Elementary

n SEP JV/V boys soccer vs. Nevada,

n SEP varsity co-ed track invite,

Kindergarten Round-up, 6:15 p.m.

6/7:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

Round-up, 6:30 p.m.

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, Altoona Library, 10 a.m. n Four Mile Elementary Kindergarten Round-up, 6 p.m. n Weight Watchers meeting, Altoona UMC, 602 Fifth Ave. S.W., contact Lori at bodysoulspirit3@ gmail.com with questions, doors open

n SEP JV/V boys track at Johnston,

n Al-Anon meeting, Lutheran Church of the Cross, Room 12, free childcare, call Shelley at 967-8917 or al-anondesmoines.org for info, 7 p.m. Altoona Living

n SEP 9 boys soccer at Urbandale,

march | 2011

Tuesday, April 5

TBA

5 p.m.

Friday, April 8

n SEP girls tennis vs. North Polk,

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

4:15 p.m.

Altoona Library, 10 a.m.

n SEP JV/V girls track at Ankeny,

n Noon networking, location TBA,

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

4:30 p.m.

11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Jana and her birds visit, Altoona

n SEP 9 boys soccer vs. Roosevelt,

n Delaware Elementary

Library, 11 a.m.

4:45 p.m.

Kindergarten Round-up, 6:30 p.m.

n SEP girls tennis at Boone, noon

n SEP JV/V boys soccer vs. Newton,

n Runnells Elementary Kindergarten

6/7:30 p.m.

Round-up, 6:30 p.m. n Willowbrook Elementary

5 p.m, meeting starts 5:30 p.m.

16

Cross Creek Preschool, 1975 Eighth

n Altoona Elementary Kindergarten

Tuesday, March 29

Thursday, April 7

Friday, April 1 n April Fool’s Day www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

Saturday, April 9

Kindergarten Round-up, 6 p.m. n Weight Watchers meeting,

n Lunch n Laughs: “Of Pigs, Bears

Altoona UMC, 602 Fifth Ave. S.W.,

and Billy Goats Gruff,” CAP Theatre,

contact Lori at bodysoulspirit3@

201 First Ave. S, $10, 11 a.m.


calendar

Submit event information to kathy@dmcityview.com

n SEP 9 co-ed soccer at Ames,

al-anondesmoines.org for info, 7 p.m.

Library, 6:30 p.m.

8:30 a.m.

9 a.m.

n SEP girls golf vs. Johnston,

n SEP girls golf at Marshalltown,

n SEP JV boys soccer tournament,

n SEP varsity girls soccer invite,

3:30 p.m.

1 p.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

n SEP tennis vs. Lincoln, 4:15 p.m.

n SEP tennis vs. East, 4:15 p.m.

n SEP varsity boys tennis at

n SEP varsity co-ed track at Valley,

n SEP 9 boys track at Ottumwa,

n SEP varsity boys track at

Marshalltown, 9 a.m.

noon

4:30 p.m.

Urbandale, 4:30 p.m.

n SEP JV/V girls track at Ames,

n SEP 9/JV/V boys soccer at

5 p.m.

Marshalltown, 4:45/6/7:30 p.m.

Monday, April 11

n SEP PRIDE meeting, 6 p.m.

Friday, April 15

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, Altoona Library, 11 a.m. n Clay Elementary Kindergarten

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

Round-up, 6:30 p.m.

Altoona Library, 11 a.m.

n Mitchellville Elementary

n Regional Chamber Luncheon,

Kindergarten Round-up, 6 p.m.

Prairie Meadows, $30, 11:30 a.m. -

n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

1 p.m.

Cross Creek Preschool, 1975 8th St.

n SEP varsity girls tennis at

S.W., west entrance, call Harold for

Indianola, 4 p.m.

info 967-4774, 8 p.m. n SEP 9/JV/V boys soccer vs.

Saturday, April 16

Lincoln, 4:45/6/7:30 p.m. n SEP Athletic Booster Club meet-

Tuesday, April 12

Sunday, April 17

n Crop ‘til you Drop Scrapbooking

ing, 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 13

Event, Willowbrook Elementary, $30,

n Palm Sunday

call Jean Allen at 967-7512 to register, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Monday, April 18

n Fiction Menagerie, grades 3 - 6,

n Lunch n Laughs: “Of Pigs, Bears

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

Altoona Library, 3 - 4 p.m.

and Billy Goats Gruff,” CAP Theatre,

Altoona Library, 10 a.m.

n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

201 First Ave. S, $10, 11 a.m.

n Tax Day

n Weight Watchers meeting,

Old Town, use parking lot behind bar,

n High School Hoop Night, The

n Altoona City Council meeting,

Altoona UMC, 602 Fifth Ave. S.W.,

call Tami at 979-2940 or Harold at

Orange Planet, 5650 Metro East

City Hall, 407 Eighth St. S.E., 6:30 p.m.

contact Lori at bodysoulspirit3@

967-4774 for info, 8 p.m.

Drive, Pleasant Hill, $5 and current

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

gmail.com with questions, doors open

HS I.D., 5 - 9 p.m.

Altoona Library, 11 a.m.

5 p.m, meeting starts 5:30 p.m.

n Easter Egg Hunt, Courtyard

n Eastern Polk Quilter’s Guild

Estates at Cedar Point, 6132 N.E.

meeting, for more info visit

12th Ave., Pleasant Hill, 9 - 11 a.m.

www.epqg.home.mchsi.com, Lutheran

n SEP varsity co-ed track at Drake,

Church of the Cross, 7 p.m.

n Al-Anon meeting, Lutheran

Thursday, April 14

Church of the Cross, Room 12, free childcare, call Shelley at 967-8917 or

n Nighty-night stories, Altoona

www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

march | 2011

Altoona Living

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calendar

Submit event information to kathy@dmcityview.com

n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Cross Creek Preschool, 1975 Eighth St. S.W., west entrance, call Harold for info 967-4774, 8 p.m. n SEP varsity girl golf vs. Valley, 1 p.m. n SEP varsity girls track at East, 4:15 p.m. n SEP JV/V girls soccer at Mason City, 4:45/6 p.m. n SEP JV/V boys soccer vs. Mason City, 6/7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, April 19 n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, Altoona Library, 10 a.m. n Noon networking, location TBA, 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. n Weight Watchers meeting, Altoona UMC, 602 Fifth Ave. S.W.,

Thursday, April 21 Monday, April 25 Wednesday, April 27 n Nighty-night stories, Altoona

n SEP Schools no classes

n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

Library, 6:30 p.m.

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

Old Town, use parking lot behind bar,

n Sawyer Brown, Prairie Meadows,

Altoona Library, 11 a.m.

call Tami at 979-2940 or Harold at

7 p.m.

n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting,

967-4774 for info, 8 p.m.

n SEP varsity girls golf vs. Ankeny,

Cross Creek Preschool, 1975 8th St.

n SEP girls golf at Urbandale, 2 p.m.

11 a.m.

S.W., west entrance, call Harold for

n SEP 8 boys track at Valley, 4 p.m.

info 967-4774, 8 p.m.

n SEP tennis vs. Ottumwa,

n SEP varsity girls golf invite, 1 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

n SEP 9 boys track at Valley, 4 p.m.

n SEP varsity boys track at Iowa

n SEP 8 boys track at Simpson

n Business After Hours, Holiday Inn

City High, 4:30 p.m.

College, 4:30 p.m.

Express, 5:30 p.m.

n SEP 8 girls track at Simpson

n SEP 9/JV/V boys soccer at East,

n SEP varsity co-ed track at Drake

College, 4:30 p.m.

4:45/6/7:30 p.m.

Relays, 4 p.m.

n SEP varsity girls track at

n SEP JV/V girls soccer vs. East,

n SEP tennis at Ft. Dodge, 4:15 p.m.

Urbandale, 4:30 p.m.

6/7:30 p.m.

n SEP 9/JV/V girls soccer vs.

n SEP 9/JV/V boys soccer at

Urbandale, 4:45/6/7:30 p.m.

Johnston, 4:45/6/7:30 p.m.

n SEP 9/JV/V boys soccer at

n SEP Vocal Boosters meeting,

Urbandale, 4:45/6/7:30 p.m.

5:45 p.m.

Friday, April 29

contact Lori at bodysoulspirit3@ gmail.com with questions, doors open 5 p.m, meeting starts 5:30 p.m. n Al-Anon meeting, Lutheran Church of the Cross, Room 12, free childcare, call Shelley at 967-8917 or al-anondesmoines.org for info, 7 p.m. n SEP 8 girls track at Waukee, 4 p.m. n SEP girls tennis vs. Urbandale, 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 22

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, n Good Friday

Altoona Library, 11 a.m.

n Earth Day

n SEP varsity co-ed track at Drake

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6,

Relays, 8 a.m.

Altoona Library, 11 a.m.

n SEP 8 girls track at Winterset,

n AAYP breakfast, Hy-Vee, 7 a.m.

4:30 p.m.

n Route 66 Musical Revue, CAP Theatre, 201 First Ave. S, 7 p.m.

n SEP varsity boys track at Ankeny, 4:30 p.m. n SEP JV boys track at Johnston, 4:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 20 n Egg Drop Contest, Altoona Library, 3 p.m. n Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Old Town, use parking lot behind bar,

Saturday, April 23

n SEP boys tennis vs. Urbandale, 3 p.m.

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Saturday, April 30

n Morning story time, ages 2 - 6, n Wildflower Hike, Thomas

n Weight Watchers meeting,

Mitchell Park, meet near pond parking

n Route 66 Musical Revue, CAP

Altoona UMC, 602 Fifth Ave. S.W.,

lot, 1 - 2 p.m.

Theatre, 201 First Ave. S, 7 p.m.

contact Lori at bodysoulspirit3@

n High School Hoop Night, The

n High School Hoop Night, The

gmail.com with questions, doors open

Orange Planet, 5650 Metro East

Orange Planet, 5650 Metro East

5 p.m, meeting starts 5:30 p.m.

Drive, Pleasant Hill, $5 and current

Drive, Pleasant Hill, $5 and current

n Al-Anon meeting, Lutheran

HS I.D., 5 - 9 p.m.

HS I.D., 5 - 9 p.m.

Church of the Cross, Room 12, free

n SEP varsity co-ed track at Drake

n Varsity girls soccer tournament at

childcare, call Shelley at 967-8917 or

Relays, 8 a.m.

Nevada, 9 a.m.

al-anondesmoines.org for info, 7 p.m. n SEP varsity boys track meet,

Sunday, April 24

4 p.m. n SEP tennis vs. Indianola, 4:15 p.m. n SEP varsity girls track at Grinnell,

n Easter

Altoona Living

Tuesday, April 26 Altoona Library, 10 a.m.

call Tami at 979-2940 or Harold at 967-4774 for info, 8 p.m.

Thursday, April 28

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5 p.m.

It’s free!

Submit calendar items for your school, church, business, organization or family to kathy@dmcityview.com.


senior living

By Shelly Charter

Taking care of the caregiver By Shelly Charter, Valley View Village

Y

ou are at work frantically preparing a report that is due today. You need to be sure to get out of work on time because you need to run your children to soccer and baseball practice. Your cell phone rings, and your heart sinks. Your mom is calling — again. You were just there last night and talked to her once already today. What does she need this time? Sound familiar? If you are a caregiver, chances are you are feeling pulled in hundreds of directions on any given day. Most caregivers have other important and

pressing responsibilities, so the added responsibility of caring for a senior loved one is likely to cause both emotional and physical stress. When you are a caregiver it is easy to forget your own needs. After all, you are a caregiver, not a “me giver,” right? Well, yes and no. As difficult as it might seem, you need to pay attention to yourself, too. Why? Recent studies have found that family caregivers experiencing extreme stress have been shown to age prematurely. This level of stress can take as much as 10 years off a caregiver’s life. So how do you know if care-

giver stress is affecting you? Look for these common physical signs of caregiver stress: • Disturbed sleep • Back, shoulder or neck pain, muscle tension • Headaches • Stomach/digestive problems (upset or acid stomach, cramps, heartburn, gas, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, diarrhea) • Weight fluctuation (gain or loss) • Loss of hair • Fatigue • High blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, palpitations • Chest pain • Perspiration • Skin disorders (hives, eczema, psoriasis, tics, itching) • Periodontal disease, jaw pain • Reproductive problems/infertility • Weakened immune system suppression: more colds, flu,

infections If you are experiencing some of the signs listed above, consider talking with a healthcare professional who can help you to evaluate your situation. It is important to remember that you are not alone. Getting support will help reduce caregiver stress, as well as reduce the associated risks of ongoing stress. Take care of you so you can take care of others. AL

Information provided by Shelly Charter, Valley View Village, 2571 Guthrie Ave., Des Moines, 265-2571.

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Photo by Aric Bishop

what’s in your garage?

Jordan Defenbaugh and her 2002 Saturn SC2.

Saturn girl No Fords for Defenbaugh By Aric Bishop

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emories are made inside automobiles. The memory of how the car smells, the feel of the road, the steering wheel in one’s hands and the warm seats all form a unique perspective of the car. Jordan Defenbaugh, owner of an 2002 Saturn SC2, has one memory that has been permanently etched in her brain. “I always remember the one time I ended up driving down a one-way street the opposite way,” Defenbaugh says. “It was scary, but it’s stuck with me.” Any automobile owner knows that when the car is right, it’s right. Especially when the price is reasonable. For Defenbaugh, her Saturn was the perfect asking price. “I picked this vehicle because it was cheaper,” Defenbaugh says. “And my parents agreed they would buy it for me.” Defenbaugh knew from the start what would and would not work for her. “I feel most comfortable with a Chevy brand,” Defenbaugh says. “I will never own a Ford.” However, no matter how good the price is, and no matter

what brand a car owner really wants, often times it ends up being a comprimise. Defenbaugh is no exception. She dreams of owning a vehicle that is new and sleek. “Although this is the first vehicle I’ve ever owned, my dream car would be a black 2011 Chevy Tahoe,” she says. Defenbaugh has had good luck keeping her vehicle in one piece, as she’s only had one accident. “I backed up into my grandma’s car,” Defenbaugh says. Drivers often keep their cars parked in neat, confined garages, and this is the case with Defenbaugh’s Saturn. “In my garage at home, we keep the basic tools and toys,” Defenbaugh says. “My dad is very handy, so he built a workbench in the garage. There isn’t anything unusual about the garage. We keep it nice.” Defenbaugh has had very few mechanical issues with her current vehicle, but she plans on looking into a problem that has recently emerged. “The only problem I have had with my car would be the brakes,” Defenbaugh laughs. “I’m pretty sure I’m going to need new ones.” AL

Contact Jared at 953-4822 ext. 306 or jared@dmcityview.com to recommend someone for an upcoming issue of “What’s In Your Garage?” 20

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library news

Altoona Library, 967-3881

Spring into fun By Dave Wanamaker, Altoona Public Library

S

pring is a time when nature is energized. The Altoona Public Library will energize your family this spring with many fun and exciting activities. Animal Rescue League The Animal Rescue League will bring in a small animal for the kids at 11 a.m. on Friday, April 1. Children will learn how the Animal Rescue League helps animals in need in our area. Wii and board games Wii and board games will keep the kids entertained at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 6. It’s all part of the Wednesday after-school activities that are scheduled throughout the month of April. Kids from K - 6 are welcome. Please pre-register. Jana and her birds Jana Mozdzer of Altoona will bring her colorful feathered friends for a library visit at 11 a.m. on Friday, April 8 during the Zebras reading program for ages 2 - 6. She will introduce three exotic birds to the children that day: Bert, an Amazon parrot that measures about 15 inches long from head to tail; Little Al, a Conure parrot, whose native land is South America; and Barney, a lovebird, whose species originates from Africa. The program is free, and kids and their parents are welcome. Please pre-register. YouTube book reviews Have you caught us on YouTube, yet? Be sure to watch our book reviews on video. Several science fiction books are available right now. An easy way to locate us is to go to your search engine and type in “Altoona, Iowa Public Library

book review.” Various members of the library staff will be presenting their personal recommendations. We’ll be discussing not only newly-published books but perhaps classics and overlooked “sleepers” that deserve attention. More book reviews of different genres will be forthcoming very soon, so stay tuned. Jack Stalwart — secret agent Who hasn’t fantasized about being a resourceful secret agent and saving the world? You may get your chance during our Fiction Menagerie at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 13. It’s open for kids in grades 3 - 6. This series, penned by Elizabeth Singer Hunt, deals with young Jack Stalwart, who solves crimes for the Global Protection Force. Stalwart undertakes those awesome responsibilities while trying to locate his missing brother. The program is a book discussion with activities. Please preregister. Look out below The library will hold its annual Easter Craft Egg Drop Contest at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20. Kids will be constructing an Easter craft to take home with them, but the highlight of the day is, of course, the egg drop. See if you can figure out a way to wrap or cushion your egg to keep it intact upon touchdown. Closed for Easter The library will be closed, Sunday, April 24, for the Easter holiday. There will be no children’s programs the following day, Monday, April 25. AL

recipe

Submit ideas to darren@dmcityview.com

Potato cod cakes T

he promise of spring is just around the corner. We’re not in the clear entirely yet, but the days are getting longer, the temperature is beginning to creep back up and the thawing is underway. This is also the time of year when many people choose to eat more fish each week. Fish fries, seasonal restaurant specials, preparing your own favorites or trying new recipes at home are all great ways to increase fish in your diet while enjoying the great flavors that fish and seafood have to offer. Fish is a popular choice not just during this season, but year-round. Its benefits, which include the presence of high levels of Omega 3 fatty acids in some varieties, have been proven to reduce risks of heart disease by up to one-third or more. It is also great at combating macular degeneration and can even benefit brain function. The preparation of your fish also has a lot to do with the health benefits of your meal. Whenever possible steer clear of frying your fish and opt for baking or grilling. The recipe showcased in this issue is a great way for your taste buds to enjoy some delicious fish while your body reaps the benefits. A great partner to fish for the longest time has been tartar sauce, and Mrs. Clark’s does a great job making a tasty product that keeps the old-fashioned flavor with the added zip of capers. Ask for it at your local grocer. AL

Potato cod cakes Ingredients 1 cup cubed peeled baking potato 1 ½ cups Panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) ½ cup thinly sliced green onions 1/3 cup finely chopped red bell pepper 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 ½ pounds cod fillets, cooked 1 garlic clove, minced 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided Cooking spray 16 oz jar Mrs. Clark’s Tartar Sauce Directions 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees 2. Place potato in a large glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap.

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Microwave at high 5 minutes or until tender. Mash the potato with a potato masher, and cool. 3. Add panko and the next 9 ingredients to potato; stir well. Divide mixture into 12 equal portions shaping each into a ½ -inch-thick patty. 3. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 6 patties and cook for 2 minutes on each side. Place patties on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Repeat the procedure with remaining vegetable oil and patties. 4. Bake patties at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Serve potato cod cakes with Mrs. Clark’s tartar sauce. Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 2 potato cod cakes) *portion of recipe courtesy of The Best of Cooking Light (2004)

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health Q&A

Q: How can I make sure to eat a balanced, healthy diet? A: Pay attention to what you eat. It may be boring, but writing down what you eat is the best way to actually see what your daily diet looks like. And you may be surprised by what it shows. Once it’s there in black and white, you can see what you’re doing right and what you might want to change. • Eat a fruit and vegetable with every meal. Yes, even breakfast. And no, most jelly doesn’t count. Cold cucumbers with an egg sandwich or a spinach omelet can help you meet your daily need for the vital nutrition found in fruits and vegetables. • Look at labels. If any one of the “daily values” for fat, protein or carbohydrates is off the charts, put that item back on the shelf. • Buy fresh and locally as much as possible. Stay on the perimeter of the grocery store, which is where the fresh food tends to live. And if your grocery store doesn’t stock any items from local growers, talk to the produce manager and ask your friends to make comments, too. You could also join a community-supported agriculture co-op or make a point to visit your local farmers’ market. Getting specific chiropractic adjustments helps connect your brain to your body improving function. AL Information provided by Swain Chiropractic, 410 Center Place S.W., 967-9300.

Q: What do I need to know about toothbrushes? A: Your toothbrush is your first line of defense in your effort to keep your mouth clean and healthy. It’s one of the first things you reach for in the morning and one of the last things you use at night. Combined with faithful flossing, brushing your teeth regularly will help keep your smile bright and sturdy. Here are some facts to keep in mind: The American Dental Association recommends that you get a new toothbrush every three to four months. If the bristles get frayed, though, you should get rid of the toothbrush right away. Frayed bristles can injure gums and don’t clean as effectively. A plethora of models is on the market, both powered and manual. Some offer particular benefits if you have a dexterity issue. There’s very little difference in the results from a powered or manual toothbrush as long as the brushing process is thorough. Whichever your choice, look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance on the package. The seal means the organization has established the product’s claims to safety and effectiveness. Ask your dentist or dental hygienist about the type of toothbrush that’s right for you, and get some tips on techniques. AL

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Information provided by Des Moines Dental Group, 708 First Ave S., 967-6611. march | 2011

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home health

By Phyllis Stadtlander

Alert yourself to the risk of diabetes

By Phyllis Stadtlander, RN, CEO, Iowa Health Home Care

N

early 26 million Americans are affected by diabetes, and the number is expected to grow as the population ages. Type 2 diabetes is the most commonly diagnosed form of the disease, representing 90 to 95 percent of all new cases. Surprisingly, 25 percent of those suffering from diabetes aren’t even aware they have it. March 22 is Annual Diabetes Alert Day. The American Diabetes Association encourages people to learn if they are at risk for the disease. Beginning March 22 through April 22, you can “Join the Million Challenge” by taking a diabetes risk test to see if you have a higher chance for developing type 2 diabetes. The test asks simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risks for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. You can take the test online at www.stopdiabetes.com, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383), or text JOIN to 69866 (standard data and message rates apply). If you believe you may be at risk for developing diabetes, talk to your health care provider. Early diagnosis and a few key lifestyle changes can have a big impact on preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, you should know that there are health care programs and professionals available to help you manage your health. Home care nurses who are specially trained in chronic disease management can work in collaboration with your primary care physician to develop and implement a

plan of care tailored to your needs. Receiving a diabetes diagnosis can be upsetting, but it doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy what you love to do. With some positive lifestyle changes, you may find that you are feeling better and doing more than you have for some time. Some key things to know about managing diabetes are: • Making smart choices about what, how much, and when to eat • Getting physical activity • Taking your medicine (if your doctor prescribes it) • Checking your blood glucose (if your doctor prescribes it) • Keeping your regularly scheduled health care appointments; and • Educating yourself about diabetes. Additionally, there are community resources available. “Dialogue on Diabetes” is a free educational program open to the public at Methodist West Hospital in West Des Moines. No registration is required, and the programs typically cover topics of interest to diabetics. For more information, visit www.iowahealth.org and go to “Events & Classes” or call (515) 241-5074. AL

Information provided by Phyllis Stadtlander, RN, CEO, Iowa Health Home Care, 11333 Aurora Ave., Urbandale, (515) 557-3100.

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news briefs

Submit news to darren@dmcityview.com

Ironwood to host HomeShowExpo 2011 Vista Real Estate and Investment Corporation announced Ironwood Plat 5 in Altoona has been selected as the site for the HomeShowExpo 2011. Presented by the Home Builders Association of Greater Des Moines, this annual showcase of homes, now in its 36th year, is scheduled for July 22 – July 31. Ironwood Plat 5 is located just south of the intersection of Southwest Eighth Street and First Avenue Southeast in Altoona. Tucked away in a quiet area just to the west of First Street, HomeShowExpo attendees will take First Street south to 21st Street Southwest and then go west directly into the development. The neighborhood is conveniently located a half mile north of the newly-constructed Clay Elementary School and just minutes from the $50 million S.E.P. High School. This is the first time ever that the city of Altoona has hosted the HomeShowExpo. Homes ranging from $325,000 to $600,000 will be constructed by some of Des Moines’ most notable builders such as Truview Enterprises, Jerry Bussanmas Homes, Tyler Homes, Clarity Construction and Ironcrest Homes. High-end amenities such as vaulted ceilings, entertainment centers, theatre rooms, networking technologies, tiled showers, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops and custom cabinetry are sure to be on display.

Parenting class invites toddlers to attend To give the students an opportunity to plan activities, work with and observe children, the Parenting and Child Development class at S.E.P. High School will have a play school. Young toddlers, walking to 23 months, are invited to attend Friday, March 25. Older toddlers, 24 35 months, may attend Friday, April 1. Three-year-olds may attend on Friday, April 22, and 4-year-olds are invited on Friday, April 29.

Hoop action at The Orange Planet Spring basketball leagues are forming at The Orange Planet in Pleasant Hill. Varsity league plays five games on five Sundays — May 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Games are played at 2, 3, 4 and 5 p.m. on the east court. High school rules with an 18-minute running clock, which stops the last minute of each half. Cost is $250 per team or $475 for two teams entering from the same school. The sophomore league (freshman may play up) plays five games on five Sundays — May 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Games are played at 2, 3, 4, and 5 pm. on the west court. High school rules with an 18-minute running clock, which stops the last minute of each half. Cost is $250 per team or $475 for two teams entering from the same school. Register online for either league: www.theorangeplanet.com. Men’s pick-up basketball games are played Tuesday nights in April and May from 8 - 9:30 p.m. Cost for non-members is $5 at the door. High school hoop nights begin on Saturday, March 26, and run through May 28 (no games on April 2 and 9) from 5 - 9 p.m. Participants must have a current high school ID. Cost is $5. TOP Skills Academies are being offered this summer for boys and girls. Investment is $75 and includes tax. Second sibling or TOP member discount is 20 percent. There are no refunds after registration or for not attending a particular session. Classes are on a first come, first serve basis. Space is limited. Register online: www.theorangeplanet.com. The session for grades 1 - 2 runs June 6 - 10, 9 -9:50 a.m. Focus is on the fundamentals of the game using a variety of methods and tools. The session for grades 3 - 8 runs June 13 - 16 and 20 - 23 from 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Focus will be on moving away from the ball, ball handling, shooting techniques, competitive drills and games. Athletes are broken into age appropriate groups. AL 24

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faith

Submit story ideas to darren@dmcityview.com

Easter season Church prepares for Holy Week By Amber Williams

I

t’s Easter in Altoona, and the area churches are ready for worship. At the St. John and Paul Parish, 1401 First Ave. S., there is a soup supper every Tuesday during Lent at 6 p.m. following a 5:30 Mass in which all are welcome. There is a sign-up sheet in the gathering space. People may bring soup, bread or simple relishes. By doing so, they may take part in Operation Rice Bowl as a parish, sharing with those in need. Lenten services continue at 7 p.m. beginning with Stations of the Cross presented by the men’s and women’s CEW, on March 28; a communal penance service on March 31; Stations of the Cross by the Junior High Youth Ministry on April 4; Lenten Prayer Experience on April 11 and ending with a Chrism Mass at St. Ambrose Cathedral on April 14.

Spread the Word Have an upcoming event or church news you would like to announce? Send information to darren@dmcityview.com. The parish will have Lenten Reconciliation services on March 31 at 7 p.m. The Knights of Columbus members also hope to feed people for Lent. They will be serving fresh fish from 4:30 - 7 p.m. each Friday during Lent, except for Good Friday. Dessert is also offered. A free will donation will go to support the junior high youth group mission trip this summer and the high school National Catholic Youth Conference trip this fall. There will be no Sunday school or preschool classes April 24, but

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Father Tim Fitzgerald burns the palms for Ash Wednesday services.

Preschool Catechesis is offered for children ages 3 - 5 during morning Masses at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., September through April. On May 1, there will be an Easter party and program between the Masses for both class times. During its centennial year, the diocese is recognizing a traveling exhibit highlighting Catholic women. On April 7, a bus trip with the Des Moines Sister Council will travel to the Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America exhibit at the National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium in Dubuque (the only Midwest stop for this exhibit). The Annual Bishop Dingman Peace Dinner is set for April 2, featuring Des Moines author Tom Cordaro as the keynote speaker. This year’s Peace Award will be given to Womens Religious in support of the efforts of in working toward peace and social justice. The reception begins at 6 p.m. at the OLIH Catholic Church in Ankeny, followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the program at 7:30 p.m. Contact Jeffrey Weiss for more information and for tickets at 2558114, or e-mail him at jjwcpm@ yahoo.com. AL


dining

Submit ideas to darren@dmcityview.com

A two-entree plate at Panda Express with SweetFire Chicken Breast and broccoli beef.

Fresh and tasty Panda Express offers great variety By Kathleen Summy

M

y dining companion and I were in the mood for something different for lunch. I recalled that a new restaurant had opened recently on Eighth Street, so off we went to Panda Express. We were immediately impressed with the restaurant’s bright, clean interior. Drivethrough service is available; this is the first time I’ve seen that feature at a Chinese restaurant. I had never eaten at a Panda Express before, so I took a few minutes to familiarize myself with the routine. Customers are offered a two-entree plate, a three-entree plate or a Panda bowl. A Panda feast is available for a group, and a kids’ meal is offered for those 11 and younger. The plates and the bowl include one side: steamed rice, fried rice, chow mein or mixed vegetables. Then the fun begins: trying to decide on the many tempting entrees displayed. I chose the three entree plate ($7.24) and immediately knew what I wanted for one of my choices. I’d been given a sample of Golden Treasure Shrimp, one of the restaurant’s specialties, and had to have more. (An extra $1.) I chose mushroom chicken and Kobari beef for my other entrees

and steamed rice as my side. My companion chose a twoentree plate ($5.99) and broke away from his usual sweet and sour chicken, ordering SweetFire Chicken Breast and broccoli beef, plus three cheese rangoons ($1.25). Panda Express 3640 Eighth St. S.W. Phone: 957-8999 • Fax: 957-8997 Hours: Sun. - Thur. 10:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri. - Sat. 10:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Drive-through open til 10 p.m. Fri. - Sat. All of the entrees were hot, freshly prepared and tasty. The Golden Treasure Shrimp had a light tempura coating with a tangy citrus sauce and bell peppers. The Kobari beef had peppers, mushrooms, leeks and thin slices of beef in a spicy sauce. The mushroom chicken had a garlic ginger sauce and plenty of plump mushrooms. The SweetFire Chicken Breast had generous chunks of white meat with a crispy coating in a sweet chili sauce served with red bell peppers, onions and pineapple chunks; it was similar to sweet and sour chicken, but lighter. We’ll have to make a return trip to try out the other entrees. AL www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

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real estate

Altoona sales from Feb. 14 - March 9

2335 HEARTHSTONE CIRCLE S.W., from VISTA REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENT CORPORATION, to CLARITY CONSTRUCTION INC., $66,900

2265 HEARTHSTONE CIRCLE S.W., from VISTA REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENT CORPORATION, to GRAND HOMES AND RENOVATIONS, LLC, $53,900 126 35TH ST. S.W., from BERKEY HOMEBUILDERS INC., to GRIFFIN, MARVIN D., $221,600

1011 Ninth Ave. N.W. 1011 NINTH AVE. N.W., from WEBER, CORY J., to BURKETT, JESSICA, $124,000

310 Fourth St. N.W. 310 FOURTH ST. N.W., from SMP ESTATES, LLC, to MITCHELL, MICHAEL L., $200,000

2153 Third Ave. S.W. 2153 THIRD AVE. S.W., from SCHWEBACH, JONATHON A., to JOHNSON, LINDA, $123,800

302 Third St. S.E. 302 THIRD ST. S.E., from BOWENLONG, MARY E., to BOWEN, KATHRYN E., $105,000

1027 14th Ave. S.E. 1027 14TH AVE. S.E., from TUSCANY RESERVE, LLC, to GUZZI, ANTHONY J., $199,900 2367 HEARTHSTONE CIRCLE S.W., from VISTA REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENT CORPORATION, to COVENANT HOMES, LLC, $59,500

950 Eighth Ave. N.W. 950 EIGHTH AVE. N.W., from U S BANK NA ND, to JEFRON CORPORATION, $133,000 1512 TUSCANY DRIVE S.E., from TUSCANY RESERVE, LLC, to BERKEY HOMEBUILDERS, INC., $42,500 30

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1409 17th St. S.E. 1409 17TH ST. S.E., from HUBBELL HOMES, LC, to LEWIS, RONALD B., $273,300 303 11TH ST. S.E., from GILLASPY, WENDY E., to WILSON, DOUG, $120,000

506 Fifth Ave. S.E. 506 FIFTH AVE. S.E., from KYER, WARREN C., to HARRIDGE, JARED, $152,900 1405 FOURTH ST. S.W., from FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOC., to STEVEN L. WOLVERS PROPERTIES, INC., $57,500 AL


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march | 2011

Altoona Living

31


chamber news

Chamber of Commerce, 967-3366

Chamber starts YP group Membership open to young professionals By Melissa Horton, executive director, Altoona Area Chamber of Commerce

A

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Altoona Living

march | 2011

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ltoona Area Chamber of Commerce held its first Young Professionals Committee meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 19 at Being There Coffee House in Altoona. The new committee, under the direction of Altoona Area Chamber board members Amy Jensen, Altoona Physical Therapy and Mattia Hansen, Altoona Campus, is optimistic of the opportunities that lie ahead. “As a Chamber, we decided to form this group to give a boost to the smart young professionals of this community,” says Jensen. “Altoona not only employs many young professionals of the Des Moines area, many of them live here. I am hopeful this committee will bring value to every individual involved.” Altoona Area Young Professionals is directed at professional development, outreach, networking and social activities. The committee plans to host an event in each area of interest in 2011. Hansen understands the importance of such a group to the community. “We had around 25 people attend our first meeting,” Hansen says. “The interest is clearly there. Now is the time to work on planning and implementing worthwhile events to support professional and personal growth of Altoona’s finest young people.” Any employee or resident of the Altoona area community between the ages of 21 - 40 is welcome to join. Meetings will be held the third Wednesday of each month at noon. If interested in joining, contact Mattia Hansen at

MHansen@altoonacampus.com or Amy Jensen at ajensen@acceleratedrehab.com. Here are some of the fantastic things we do each month. (Note new locations for the second quarter.) • East Polk Legislative Coffee. Saturday, April 2. Last one of the session. • Noon Networking. April 5 and 19, Hy-Vee Club Room, 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. • Government Affairs Committee. Wednesday, April 5, Sugar Shack, noon - 1 p.m. • Ambassadors Committee. Thursday, April 7, Rich’s Bar & Grill, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. • Membership Marketing Committee. Monday, April 11, Triple Crown Buffet, noon - 1 p.m. • Community Development Committee. Wednesday, April 13, Coffee Barn, noon - 1 p.m. • Economic Development Committee. Monday, April 18, Uncle Buck’s, noon - 1 p.m. Save the dates Thursday, March 31: BAH (Business After Hours) Altoona Physical Therapy, 5:30 - 7 p.m., 3160 Eighth St. S.W. Friday, April 15: Second Annual Regional Chamber Luncheon, The Meadows Ballroom, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Cost: $30 members, $40 non-members. Steve Siemens presenting. Thursday, April 28: BAH, Holidy Inn Express, 5:30 - 7 p.m., 165 Adventureland Drive N.W. Don’t forget that we still need many volunteers for RAGBRAI 2011. Go to www.ragbrai-altoona. com and sign up today. AL


out & about

Submit your photos and captions to darren@dmcityview.com

Luther Brown and Jenn Mosher at the Altoona and Pleasant Hill Chambers’ ribbon cutting for Kosama on Feb. 25.

Hilary Dunn, Chad Snyder and Mary Simon at the Altoona Chamber Noon Networking luncheon on March 15 at Fireside Grille.

Linda Lawson and Kyle Ortmann at the Altoona Chamber Noon Networking luncheon on March 15 at Fireside Grille.

Tom Primmer and Carla Davis at the Altoona Chamber Noon Networking luncheon on March 15 at Fireside Grille.

Deb Anderson, Sean Wood and Adam Davis at the Altoona Chamber Noon Networking luncheon on March 15 at Fireside Grille.

Jesus Lopez and Nicholas Bailey at the Altoona Chamber Noon Networking luncheon on March 15 at Fireside Grille. www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona

march | 2011

Altoona Living

33


classifieds

To place an ad, call 515-953-4822, ext. 302

Free online classifieds. Buy, sell and trade locally… for FREE!

www.desmoinesdollardealer.com

REACH 2 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS! Do you have a product, service, or business that would be helped by reaching over 2 million households throughout Iowa and the surrounding states? The Midwest Classified Network will allow you to reach these potential customers quickly and inexpensively. For more information concerning a creative classified ad call this publication or Midwest Free Community Papers at 800-248-4061 or get information online at www.mcn-ads.com WANT TO ADVERTISE TO THE MIDWEST? Place your classified ads in the Midwest Classified Network anytime online at www.midwestfreeclassifieds.com VISIT THESE WEBSITES FOR AG, IMPLEMENT & RURAL LIVING PRODUCTS & IDEAS: dandkimplement. net: Versatile Tractors our Specialty DISH Network’s LOWEST ALLDIGITAL PRICE! As low as $24.99/mo plus FREE HD FOR LIFE! Call for limited time BONUS! Call Now. 1-877-805-7991 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-401-2385 www.CenturaOnline.com TRYING TO GET OUT OF DEBT? NO ObligationComplimentary Consultation. $10K in Credit Card/ Unsecured Debt YOU have Options!! Learn about NO Upfront Fee Resolution Programs! 800-964-0610 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY: NEED WORM GROWERS. We buy Worms. Great Income potential in your garage,

patio or backyard. No selling/ MLM. Fast multipliers. FREE 24 hour recorded information. 1-208-762-2414, www.ecologytek.com ADVANCE NOTICE: MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT SALE Mon., April 4, 2011 @ 9:00 A.M. Consign by March 21, 2011 for Advertising. GILBERT’S SALE YARD, LLC ~ 641-398-2218. 2 Miles North of Floyd, IA On Hwy. 218, www.gilbertsaleyard.com ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE Talking Meter and diabetic supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 866-675-7123 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-705-4795 100% Guaranteed Omaha Steaks - SAVE 64% on the Family Value Collection. NOW ONLY $49.99 Plus 3 FREE GIFTS & right-to-the-door delivery in a reusable cooler, ORDER Today. 1-866505-1380 mention code 45069SVH or www.OmahaSteaks.com/family27

march | 2011

AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-231-7177. HELP WANTED! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net Looking for a home to rent? Find one in your area at WWW-MW-ADS. COM!Hundreds of listings each week! MINNESOTA’S BEST FISHING located on Lake Osakis. Choose from 8 Family Friendly Resorts. Over 6,200 acres of water enjoyment. Free brochure www. PlayAtOsakisMN.com, 1-800-422-0785, “Explore Minnesota” STEADY PAYCHECK-REWARDING JOB-DRIVING AMERICA Become an over the road semi driver with Roehl. We can provide you the training you need to start a great truck driving career. 1-800-5358177 GoRoehl.com AA/EOE

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Altoona Living

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Altoona Living

MARCH | 2011


MARCH | 2011

Altoona Living

www.iowalivingmagazines.com/altoona


Adel Living Magazine