Issuu on Google+

Portfolio Selected Works Dalal Musaed Alsayer


P.O. Box 485, Safat 13005, Kuwait _ +965 97666632 _ dalal.alsayer@gmail.com _ www.dmalsayer.com


Portfolio_Selected Works Undergraduate Work .

Portable Stage for Kuwaiti Performers . 4 A Moment Of Silence In A World Of Chaos . 8 Porches: Creating Neighbourhoods . 12 Jazz: Bringing Life Back Into New Orleans . 16 Souk Al Tijar, Revisited (Undergraduate Thesis) . 22

Professional Work . Concept5.3 Designs . 28

Graduate Work .

Mapping The Broadway Triangle . 32 Over/Under Used . 36 Urban Pod . 42 Empowering The Informal: Create, Desify, Sustain . 48

Dalal Musaed Alsayer B.Arch08, Kuwait University_MSAUD10, GSAPP, Columbia University

1


Education COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY_Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design [May 2010] New York, NY, USA Master Scholarship Recipient [2009-2010] Ministry of Higher Education, Kuwait KUWIAT UNIVERSITY_ Bachelor of Architecture [June 2008] Kuwait City, Kuwait GPA: 3.52 MGPA: 3.59 Dean’s Honor List [Spring 2004, 2004-2008], Honors’ List [Spring 2005, 2005-2008], Special Students List [2004-2008] Selected in top 10 Chair Design Competition [Fall 2005] Best Lamp Design [Fall 2004] T-SQUARE MAGAZINE_Kuwait University Editor-in-Chief [Academic Year 2007-2008], Publishing and Printing Manager [Academic Years 2005-2006, 2006-2007], Founding Member [2005] SOURCES OF ARCHITECTURAL FORM_Organization and Excursions Committee Int’l Conference[03-2007] Kuwait University PARTICIPANT “Distant online dialogue”_ Between students of KU and UVa [10-2004] Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research Experience KUWAIT UNIVERSITY_ Scholarship Candidate [06/2012- Present] Scientific Assistant [09/2011- 06/2012] Teaching Assistant [06/2010- 08/2011] Fully sponsored scholarship to obtain a Master and PhD degrees in Landscape Architecture from the United States. Grade exams, give lectures, prepare class material, guide and assist students in design classes and writing essays Theory of Architecture II [0690-361] Spring 2012 Design II [0690-206], Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2008 Design I [0690-205], Fall 2011 Theory of Architecture I [0690-220], Fall 2011, Spring 2011 Urban Planning and Design [0690-433], Fall 2010 Solar Design in Architecture [0690-345], Summer 2010 Basic Design [0690-105], Spring 2009 CONCEPT5.3 _Founding Partner [07/2007- 05/2009] Kuwait City, Kuwait Design of furniture, interior design and architecture. Meeting with clients, engineers, and contractors TAMEER AND TATWEER REAL ESTATE_ Architect [01/2008- 03/2009] Kuwait City, Kuwait Overlooking design and construction of projects. Assisted in tender proposals

Dalal Musaed Alsayer

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM INTERNATIONAL (PMI)_Intern [06/2005- 08/2005] Kuwait City, Kuwait Site visits with Site Engineer, assisted in tender proposals with Project Engineer

2

B.Arch08, Kuwait University_MSAUD10, GSAPP, Columbia University


Exhibitions and Competetions END OF YEAR SHOW Empowering the Informal + Video [05-2010] Columbia University, East Buell Hall, GSAPP, New York, USA FURNITURE EXHIBITS_Concept5.3_ Arraya Convention Hall [02-2009] Tilal [10-2008] Villa Moda [09-2007] KASA EXHIBITS Various Mediums [05-2004, 05-2005, 05-2006, 05-2007, 05-2008] Kuwait University KUWAIT-DIRECTION COMPETITION SECOND PLACE [12-2005] Held in conjunction with Agha Khan Conference Kuwait Society of Engineers PORTABLE STAGE FOR ARTIST [05-2005] Kuwait University LAMP EXHIBIT [10-2004] Kuwait University Activities MENTOR AND LECTURER_archicamp_Bayt Lothan, Kuwait [24-06 to 05-07-2012] www.archicamp.co JUDGE_Reuse4.0_en.v_Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait [10 to 13-01-2011] www.projectreuseme.wordpress.com SPEAKER KASA REUNION, Celebrating 10 Years_Al Ahli Bank Hall, Kuwait University [27-12-2010] INSTRUCTOR 2 Day Presentation Workshop_Organized by AIAS, KU Chapter, Kuwait University [13&15-12-2010] CURATING TEAM “WORDS UNFOLD” EXHIBIT_Gallery Tilal, Kuwait [17 to 28-10-2010] Fareed Abdal (Artist) SPEAKER_Pecha Kucha, Kuwait City [28-09-2010] Pecha Kucha Night #6 VOLUNTEER_Kuwait Association for the Care of Children in Hospital (KACCH) Al Amiri Hospital, Children’s Ward [07-2005 to Present], Kuwait Autism Center[10-2005], NBK Children Hospital, Leukemia Ward[02-2005] Publications and Published Work AlSayer, D., D. Avila, H. Kwon, and S. Ng. 2011. “Empowering the Informal: Create. Densify. Sustain.” In P. Kempf and G. Meehta [Eds]. Mumbai’s Eastern Waterfront.New York: Columbia University. AlSayer, D., D. Avila, H. Kwon, and S. Ng. 2011. “Empowering the Informal: Create. Densify. Sustain.” In S. Marble [Ed]. Abstract 0910. New York: Columbia University. AlSayer, D., and R. White. 2010. “unMONUMENTAL.” In S. Marble [Ed]. Abstract 0910. New York: Columbia University. --. “A Toast to Art.” Daily Star, Part of the Herald Tribune. [Kuwait] 03 Aug 2008, Weekend Ed. Front Page. --. “Editorial.” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Mar 2008: 1. --. “Editorial.” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Sep 2007: 1. --. “Interview with Architect Abdullah Al Faisal Al Sabah.” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Sep 2007: 43-48. --. “An Identity?” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Feb 2007: 15-16. --. “Towering Giants.” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Feb 2007: 27-28. --. “Modernism.” T-Square: The Official Architectural Magazine. Sep 2006: 6-7. Skills LANGUAGES_English, Arabic. Basic French and Tagalog. PROGRAMS_Microsoft Office, AutoCAD (2D and 3D), GIS, Maya, Form-Z, Adobe (Photoshop, Premier, Flash, AfterEffects, Illustrator, Dreamweaver),VisualDOE, ArchiCAD, SketchUp

Dalal Musaed Alsayer B.Arch08, Kuwait University_MSAUD10, GSAPP, Columbia University

3


Portable Stage for Kuwaiti Performers Undergraduate

Arraya Mall, Kuwait

4

Group


The aim of this project was to design a portable stage for the artist of our choice. Looking at preserving the traditional ‘sea dance’ of Kuwait, our chosen artists were local Kuwaiti dancers. The traditional dance was used by the sailors when men travelled out to sea, it was used both as a means to have a unison rhythm and also to lift the spirits of the sailors. The dance had a rhythmic beat that was translated into the repetition of elements and the ‘break’ of the bass is embodied in the large mild steel beams. The songs were full of hope and promise for a safe return home; giving the sailors and divers a reason to continue the hardships of the trip. The curve of the large beam is an embodiment of the hull of the dhow, the traditional pearl diving boat, while the stability of the boat and the rythems of the songs are represented in the repetitive manner of the components. The stage was designed so that it can be easily assembled and disassembled either individually or in groups.

Undergraduate

My Roles: Conceptual design, design development, material selection, construction, poem Medium: Mild Steel Beams, White Wood, Acrylic

Group

5


Undergraduate _ 2nd Year

Section

6

Portable Stage

Prespective

0

0.5

1

2m


words conquering oceans sounds breaking waves sails touching clouds manhood measured by endurance a stage defying all others a focal point seizing attention hardness of steel softened by curves strength of wood woven to move feet reflecting beats hands pull to release a harmony of old and new created for all to sea

Undergraduate _ 2nd Year

Plan

Portable Stage

7


A Moment Of Silence In A World Of Chaos Undergraduate

Fahad Al Salem Street, Kuwait City, Kuwait

8

Group


Fahad Al Salem Street, located in the heart of Kuwait City within the historic First City Gate, is considered the first modern commercial street in Kuwait. In the 60’s and well into the early 80’s, it was the place to see and be seen; but its status as the commercial center of Kuwait pretty much ended with the Fist Gulf War. It has now become a central hub for many expats to gather and mingle during their off hours. The street also houses one of the major bus hubs acting as a major transfer point. The main purpose of the competition was to ease traffic congestion and also offer other facilities such as restaurants and plazas. The main concept of the proposal calls for creating a visual and physical connection between the historical Jahra Gate and inwards towards the sea. This was done in several ways; the first being a bridge and a series of archways emphasizing the directionality towards Kuwait City. Secondly, and more evidently, is the Commemorating Pole which will pave a line of light towards the sea. One pole for every year the Old Gate has been standing. The aim of this pole is to create an event in the designed plaza; therefore making it a functional plaza. In addition, the poles and the restaurants were aimed at attracted a large number of visitors and in hopes that this proposal will become a catalyst and spur change in the historical street. Furthermore, the area is also home to a large number of pigeons and this project took them in consideration and designed a bird sanctuary for them as well as a multi-storey parking and streetscape.

2nd Place Winner, Direction Competition, Kuwait.

Undergraduate

My Roles: Team Leader. Conceptual design, design development, pole design, perspectives, master plan, rendering, text Medium: Digital Images

Group

9


Undergraduate _ 3rd Year

10

A Moment of Silence in A World of Chaos


Undergraduate _ 3rd Year A Moment of Silence in A World of Chaos

11


Porches: Creating Neighbourhoods Undergraduate

Hypothetical Neighbourhood, Kuwait

12

Individually Designed Porch Group of 13 to establish neighbourhood


A porch in an American Society creates a well-rounded neighbourhood and maintains the needed communication between neighbours. It frames the houses and its main entrance creating a hierarchal threshold, rather than a boundary; thus, a transitional domain from the very private house to the extremely public street is established. Traditionally, the Arabian Liwan, which is an arcade that surrounds trational houses, created the same threshold and worked as a shading device against the harsh Arabian Sun. However, with the modernization of Kuwait in the 1950’s and 1960’s, many buildings abandoned the Liwan in favour of concrete and glass. Like the Liwan, the porch creates an indoors within the outdoors and they both establish the psychological margins that allow the parent to give their children independence, yet keeping them within a strict domain. The effect of the porch in the psychological upbringing of a child rewards the child with trust, confidence, and independence. A parent transitionally allows the child to play indoors then the porch then the yard and soon to the curb. This project aims at introducing the American Porch into the Kuwaiti neighbourhood and creates a new social network through the communication of a series of porches.

Undergraduate

Medium: Pencil on Canson

Individually Designed Porch Group of 13 to establish neighbourhood

13


Neighbourhood Layout 0

5

10

20m

Undergraduate _4th Year

Street Elevation Before the Introduction of Porches

14

Street Elevation After the Introduction of Porches 0

Porches: Creating Neighbourhoods

2

5

10 m


The main elements of a porch must all be present for it to be labeled a porch. From the banister, column, to the perforated layered roof, wooden decking, and elevated ground. The stairs are usually placed directly in front of the main entrance; however, in this design the stairs are placed the farthest away from the entrance to create a steady shift from the private interiors to the public streets.

Flowerpots adorn the tops of the banisters, illustrating a glimpse of the garden to be seen and experienced inside and creating a harmonious connection between the two domains. The fusion of two extreme cultures establishes a transitional hierarchy that eases and welcomes the transition.

B

Section a-a’

A

Plan

Elevation

Undergraduate _ 4th Year Porches: Creating Neighbourhoods

Section b-b’

15


Jazz: Bringing Life Back Into New Orleans Undergraduate

New Orleans, LA, USA

16

Individual


With Hurricane Katrina wiping out a majority of New Orleans, we were given the task to design 100 homes, a community center and a convenient store. Building off of the Porch project, I decided to create a sense of community and find the underlying connective tissue of the society. Since its existence, New Orleans has been the center for music, especially due to its rich culture that was born from the European, Latin American, and Afro-American cultures. New Orleans’s uniqueness is a result of the eclectic mix of European instruments with African rhythms. Back in the late 19th Century, New Orleans was the only North American city to allow ‘slaves’ to gather in public and play their native music (largely in “Congo Square”, now “Armstrong Park”). This is largely due to the French Creole ‘slave’ owners when compared to their Anglo-American neighbours. The creation of Jazz music is mainly attributed to the fusion created by the Creole, Haitian and ‘free black’ population along with trained musicians. Studying and using Jazz as the main element of development, the neighborhood should all be coherent and act as one connected unit; but at the same time be individualists. Certain rules would be established to articulate a connected neighboorhood such as a continuous row of trees, a certain amount of glazing per building, and insisting on a porch. By doing that, one can feel that the neighborhood is all related and that there is a sense of continuation and extension. The introduction of the porch, as seen in project 1, creates a network between the neighbors and thus creating a safe neighborhood and establishes psychological boundaries within the community; thus, the intentions and values gained from project 1 is translated and well-established in this project.

Undergraduate

Medium: Digital Images

Individual

17


Undergraduate _ 4th Year

18

Prospective Street View

Jazz: Bringing Life Back Into New Orleans


Convientent Store

Three Bedroom Modular Five Bedroom Modular

Two Bedroom Duplex Modular Community Center

0

20

50

100 m

Jazz: Bringing Life Back into New Orleans

Undergraduate _ 4th Year

Master Plan

19


Community Center

Elevation

Section

Elevation

Section

GF Plan

FF Plan

GF Plan

FF Plan

5

10 m

Undergraduate _ 4th Year

0 2

20

Convientent Store

Jazz: Bringing Life Back Into New Orleans


Two Bedroom Duplex Modular

Three Bedroom Modular

Five Bedroom Modular

Elevation

Elevation

Elevation

Section

Section

Section

Plan 0

2

5

10 m

FF Plan

GF Plan

FF Plan

Jazz: Bringing Life Back into New Orleans

Undergraduate _ 4th Year

GF Plan

21


Souk Al Tijar*, Revisited

Undergraduate Thesis

Undergraduate

Kuwait City, Kuwait

22

Individual


In Modern Day Kuwait, the businesses and trade are all mainly located in the Second Commercial Business District (CBD2) making the project’s site a crucial component of Kuwait. The site is home to the trade, businesses, real estate markets, and major bank headquarters of Kuwait and is encircled with a rich history: Al Mubarakia to the South, the Grand Mosque of Kuwait to the East, the Kuwait Stock Exchange Market to the East, and to the South West is Seif Palace and the historical Al Qibbliya School further West. It is also home to ‘Kaysariyat Al Amir’ which was once the old Tradesmen’s Offices, adding more interest and importance to this site, leading to its development in the late 1950‘s and early 1960’s. The First Master Plan of Kuwait called for much of the historic city to be destroyed to allow room for a modern Kuwait with a distinct city center. This center is comprised of nine CBDs each allocated a function, be it trade, commerce, etc, bounded by the Arabian Persian Gulf on one end and the First Ring Road (site of the Second City Wall) on the other. The driving image of the CBDs was to create parking, office space, pedestrian circulation and outdoor plazas; however, this notion failed due to the increase of users causing the overflow of cars, lack of pedestrian access to and from the site and the misuse of the plazas as parking. The importance of the site (CBD2) in its cultural, financial and geographical aspects only make this area more important, thus suggestions of relocating are turned down.

Currently, with the growing economic markets of Kuwait and a younger eager generation emerging in the workforce, the facilities do not meet these demands and allow no room for growth. By applying the teachings of Landscape Urbanism, the project will aim at re-creating the image that was envisioned in the early 1960’s through the creation of the city center that houses zones of social interaction in addition to the development of a safer exchange between automobiles and pedestrians. Along with these, inspiration is drawn from traditional Kuwait City and its functional aesthetics. Moreover, the exploration of thresholds (indoor versus outdoors) in the design strategy aiming at creating a merger between the former and latter. Moreover, the current users of the site are predominately older males and the proposal will allow a multitude of varying potential users by introducing components that are geared towards a younger generation and catering for their needs. Vehicular access is widely available; however, pedestrians suffer from the lack of accessible areas which will be addressed by developing a central node which provides social interaction pockets. The project is seen as trigger that will spur further development in the adjacent areas and currently misused spaces that are part of the ‘older’ (1960’s) urban fabric.

Medium: Abstract (Book), Digital Images

Individual

Undergraduate

* ‘Souk Al Tijar’ , roughly translates to Tradesmen’s Market, is the main commerce hub in Kuwait, where anyone who has a strong name in business has an office, similar to New York’s Wall Street.

23


Undergraduate _ 5th Year

Top View

24

Souk Al Tijar, Revisited

Exploded Axonometric Plan


A

B

C

A. Main Courtyard Plaza B. Overlooking Plaza A C. Main Courtyard Plaza

Undergraduate _ 5th Year

Design Elements of the Main Courtyard: 1. Store A 2. Store B 3. Shaded Bench 4. Outdoor Seating Module

Souk Al Tijar, Revisited

25


Sectional Perspective Through Exhibition, Plaza A and Plaza B

with Centeral Bank of Kuwait to the Left and The Grand Mosque of Kuwait to the Right

1

Detailed Sectional Presepctive

Undergraduate _ 5th Year

Underground Seating with periscopes as a visual connector to Plazas

26

Souk Al Tijar, Revisited


Sectional Perspective Through Main Courtyard and Exhibition Area with Seif Palace and the Sea to the Left and Mubarakia to the Right

Sectional Perspective Through Plaza A

with Mubarakia to Left and Seif Palace and the Sea to the Right

Undergraduate _ 5th Year Souk Al Tijar, Revisited

27


A

designs

Professional Practice

Concept5.3 Designs

28

Exhibits at Villa Moda, Arraya Exhibition Hall(as part of P2BK), and Tilal Gallery, Kuwait

Concept5.3


During my final year of undergraduate studies, with a fellow budding architect I established a small design firm which created one-ofa-kind, locally manufactured furniture.The design studio’s main goal is to provide unique pieces with dual objectives: sculptural and functional perspectives. While one may view an item as a piece of art, another onlooker may find the useful function in it, deeming it as a piece of furniture. The 21 piece debut collection showcased in Villa Moda, Kuwait was well received which lead to commissions, clients and 2 more collections. Concept5.3 aimed at fusing the line between art and functionality through a series of techniques ranging from using Khalil Gibran’s poems to colors and challenging know shapes and forms. The scope of work entailed with working with clients ranges from graphic design, interior design, and architecture to creative consultation. Concept5.3 garnered a great deal of press including an interview and press releases. As of now, the design studio has ceased creating collections and now works with commissions due to more demands of custom-made pieces and career demands of myself and my partner.

www.concept5point3.com

Professional Practice

Medium: Furniture and Interior Design

Concept5.3

29


Professional Practice

Pieces of the 3 Concept5.3 Collections which range from shelves to tables and showcase the studio’s design aesthetic.

30

Furniture


Left: Interiors of a client (we received it bare) Below: Mood Board for another client

Professional Practice Interior Design

31


Mapping The Broadway Triangle

Graduate

Broadway Triangle, Brooklyn, NY, USA

32

Group


The project was the first project at Graduate School and it entailed mapping the Broadway Triangle to find areas of interest, understand the site and create our introduction to urban design. The Broadway Triangle in Brooklyn, New York is a peculiar area that seems to be a remnant of the redevelopment of Williamsburg and its adjacencies. In this mapping exercise, we used GIS as a means to visually translate data and uncover correlations between seemingly unrelated things. In this investigation, we realized that there is a dense concentration of different ethnicities bounding the Broadway Triangle, creating an almost tension zone in the triangle. A vital part for developing a potential solution to the built environment requires an in-depth understanding of the varying factors that shape it. These socio-cultural aspects are the things that cannot be seen easily in the architecture or the urban realm. In this mapping process, we discovered areas of predominately Hasidic Jewish uses and other of mainly African Americans. Moreover, we also found a unique relationship between the unemployment rate and the rate of the population who attended high school. Ironically, the highest unemployment rate also correlates with the highest school attendance rate. This mapping exercise helped in creating a clearer insight into the Broadway Triangle.

Graduate

My Roles: Ethnic Breakup, Mapping (Except Sidewalk Usage), Graphics (colors, etc) Medium: Digital Images

Group

33


ST

ME SERO LE

Mapping of Places and Nodes

MO NTRO SE

OHNSON

AVE

BOERUM

SE IGEL

CO OK ST O RO TH

ST

T RN

ON

BE AV ER

ST

NG AVE FLUSHI

ST

LO

CU

ST

ST

PA RK

ST

EL LE RY

ST

O TH

ST

E PL IP WH

ST

PL

ST

NE R

TT

FA YE TT E

UNION AVE ND AVE NOSTRA

50.5% white

ST ELLERY

AVE

AVE MYRTLE

BLVD

ST

NS AVE TOMPKI

ON STOCKT

AVE LEWIS

GARVEY MARCUS

PL L KING MARTIN

MARCY

Graduate

LE RT

E

Mapping the Broadway Triangle

ST

S ST HOPKIN

AVE VERNON

34

RY

BA

AV

Subway Stations Public Schools Woodhull Medical & Mental Health Center Autorepair Shop Synagogue Koscher Supermarket Jewish Schools Catholic Church

R GE

E LE

Effects of Space:

E ST DE BEVO IS

E AV

B LA

L WA

Land Use:

2. % black

P

T OU

ST

ST

4.3% hispanic

HU MBOL DT

R ME RI LO

VA RET ST

ST

SU M

E AV

MOORE ST

ST

ON LT WA

Hispanic & White Hasidic Jewish

2. % white

ST

ST

N TO LE DD MI

Sidewalk Use:

AVE

ON

AR YW HE

H NC LY

Commercial Park

N AVE

ST

IS RR

ST

ST

GR AHAM

MA NHAT TA

LE ONAR D

HA D

Ethnic Breakup of the Broadway Triangle and its adjacencies

AVE

45.2% hispanic

4.3% black


Economic and Educational Statistics of the Broadway Triangle and their geographical location in section

Graduate Mapping the Broadway Triangle

35


5861 Inhabitants

65% Auto Related Manufacturing 30% Commercial 15% Residential

6 Modes of Transportation

5 Schools 1 Hospital

7 public benches

1 Open Public Park? An Evolving Community/ A Stagnant Public Infrastructure?

Over/Under Used

Graduate

Broadway Triangle, Brooklyn, NY, USA

36

Group


Activating industrial detritus: The uncultivated framework is in need of being catalyzed to develop infrastructural adaption due to growing communities. In understanding the impacts of the commercial, transit and social infrastructure, one must see the interactions that they have. In doing so, the findings shows that most of the commercial activities in the Broadway Triangle occur along Broadway and it is the most active street. Moreover, it houses the various modes of transit, including subway stations and bus stops. Building off of the previous analysis which investigated the scale of the individual, we find that the green infrastructure is also lagging which is questioned through finding bike paths, green spaces, recreational spaces and pedestrian movement. In an in-depth analysis where each of us took a mode of transport in the Broadway Triangle from a hypothetical house to areas of interest, the bicycle proved to be the most efficient method of transportation, although it is the least catered to. The industrial nature of the Broadway Triangle was further facilitated by the heavy investment in a well connect transit infrastructure. Unfortunately, the decline of industry and the shift of jobs is not reflected in the current composition of the Broadway Triangle. As the title suggests, a large amount of land is under used and there are a great degree of social segregation in community spaces this is mainly due to the shift in industry but a stagnant infrastructure which leads to a deficiency in the infrastructure, its usage, need and demand.

Graduate

My Roles: Vertical Transition, Horizontal Transition, Social Infrastructure, Main Image, Transit Times Medium: Digital Images

Group

37


Broadway Triangle Analysis

Graduate

Unused Space_ ype of Greenery_Schools and Open Space

38

Over/Under Used


Flow of Bikers

Amount of Green Space Per Person Broadway Triangle and Adjacencies

Graduate Over/Under Used

39


Vertical Transition of Humans within the Transit Network

Graduate

Horizontal Transition of Humans within the Transit Network

40

Over/Under Used

Travel Times based on Mode of Transportation


Modes Of Transit From a Central Node Juxtaposed Over the Commercial Typologies

Social Infrastructure Analysis below the Elevated Railway

Graduate Over/Under Used

41


Urban Pod Manifesto

Graduate

Jleeb Al Shuyoukh, Kuwait

42

Individual


Using and analyzing New York City as case study for understanding the making of 21st Century Cities, idealized city theories of design were studied and debated in order for us to develop our own manifesto and implement it in a city, real or imaginary. My aim in this project was to look at the phenomena of migrant workers and their role- or lack of- in the urban realm, in addition to investigating the role of ownership in public space and its responsibility and consequences. The proposal, called Urban Pod, is a reaction to temporal ownership and migrant individuals’ physical needs that would in return affect their psychological needs. I choose to use Jleeb Al Shuyoukh- where most of the ‘bachelor expats’ live- as a testing ground for the implementation of the Urban Pod at a variety of scales which ere determined by the area and the density. Certain parameters, such as physical dimensions, public space, and individual activities, were the driving force in developing the final form and configuration of the modular system. The manifesto in general was an attempt to question the notions of temporary citizens, public or shared ownership, and my first attempt at trying to understand the unseen - or usually ignored and hidden - outcomes of a sudden increase in transient workers. This project is one that I continually revisit and it also has triggered an interest in examining the role of temporary individuals in the making of modern cities.

Video available at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLrn9nXxoGU

Graduate

Medium: Written Manifesto, Digital Images, Video

Individual

43


Manifesto In many of the worlds’ evolving metropolitan cities locals have plentiful public spaces to retreat to in times of need. These public domain can be utilized by any city dweller while still being maintained by both its occupants and the city. With more and more people moving towards urban settlements, so are the countless workers that develop these cities, who in some cases exceed the native population in size. Often, these ‘expatriates’ share small confined living spaces, get paid minimum wage to get a job done and have no responsibility in maintaining public spaces, should they be utilized, as they are temporary visitors in the city. Their stay in the city has an expiration date; once the job is done, their presence is no longer necessary. They are the 21st Century nomads. Bus stops, train stations, parks, airports, boat terminals and street benches are made to cater to the need of these ‘visitors’, amongst others, yet they do not cater to their psychological demands or social needs . So where can one go to mediate, relax, and think? Where can one go to a place he can call his, even for a little while? Where can one have more of a sense of belonging and temporal ownership of property and public space, and still be held responsible for it? ‘Urban Pod’ is an urban intervention that tries to bridge this gap between transient dwellers, evolving cities and property ownership. In a city that is shared by everyone, the ‘Urban Pod’ is a public space that is temporarily privately owned for recreational, personal, and leisurely use, which has shared ownership, responsibility, and maintenance, by the occupants. A committee comprising of urban designers, architects, locals, and migrant workers is hired by the Department of City Planning to be in charge of: allocating and placing each ‘Urban Pod’, ensuring that they are maintained and kept up to standard, and insuring there is no exploitation and illegal use of the ‘Urban Pod.’

Graduate

The ‘Urban Pod’ is a modular unit that is designed to facilitate physical needs (lay, sit, meditate, stand, etc) and can be configured into a larger scheme. Like the weaving in a carpet, the ‘Urban Pod’ will integrate into the built fabric and embed itself in places such as alleys, bus stops, open space parking lots, patches of grass, sidewalks, and public parks. Concentrating on areas densely populated with migrant workers, the ‘Urban Pod’ shall be the ‘escape valve’, allowing people to interact with the environment and establishing a local, temporal, universal sense of belongings.

44

Urban Pod


2.5 migrants for every 1 local

Migrant Workers to Kuwait

Graduate

Right: Although not all migrant workers live in these conditions, this a fair representation.

Jleeb Al Shuyoukh, Kuwait. Urban Pod

45


Spatial Requirements

Physical Requirements

Shade

Lay 18 people per 400ft2

Standard: 100-400 ft/per person

Reality: 7 ft/per person

Graduate

Sit

46

Urban Pod


Localizing the Urban Pod

Scales of the Urban Pod

29”15’27 N, 47”55’58 E

The chosen area of experiementation is a hub of low income flats rented to single male expats that tend to share the apartment with at least 4 others. These photomontages and the map shows the possible implementation and configurates of the Urban Pod. The aim was to investigate the configuration of the Urban Pod at the variety of scales ranging from single units to the assimilation of many.

small

medium

large

Graduate Urban Pod

47


Empowering The Informal: Create, Densify, Sustain

Graduate

Darukhana/Dharavi, Mumbai, India

48

Group


Through analyzing and learning from Darukhana, in the Eastern waterfront of Mumbai, the project uses the existing work/live module and provides alternatives to informal settlement dwellers working and earning money for their families, who may live in states suffering from economic opportunities; however, their homes have neither a sense of permanence nor any real ownership. The intervention aims to trigger a process of change through micro interventions and utilizes a prototype to increase the housing stock. Furthermore, through the development of grassroots community-based organizations which mediate between informal settlement dwellers and stakeholders a different approach to ownership will be established. This project looked at aqueous transects and the vital role of water in the urban design field. The notion of time in terms of span and cycles was a crucial part of the development of the courtyards and cores as the came as a reaction to the development of chawls as an alternative to slum living; however, these dense vertical dwellings were crammed in space and lacked the needed access to the ground which is a vital element of Indian slum dwellers. This resulted in the abandonment of newly built chawls for the connivence of slums.

Video availabe at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=jksWNCaFqlc

Graduate

My Roles: Video, Text, Panoramic Photomontages, Master Plan of Dharavi, Dimensions of Cores and accompanying graphics, Feasibility graphics. Medium: Digital Images, Video

Group

49


Darukhana + Dharavi, Mumbai

Triggers SERVICE CORE

Ownership 70.2% Private

29.8% Ownership Government70.2%

Private

25l/Household/Day WATER SERVICE360l CORE /Household/Day

29.8% Government

25l/Household/Day WATER 1Seat /550People360l /Household/Day 1seat/50people 1Seat/550People NoTOILET Room 1seat/50people 1Room/50PeopleNo Room SHOWER 1Room/50People No Energy No Energy 20hrs/Service core/Day 20hrs/Service core/Day ENERGY

TOILET SHOWER ENERGY RECYCLING BIN

Occupancy 75% Permanent

ED 0.06km2 0.01km2 1/1440 ppl

Occupancy 75% 15% Permanent Transient

15% Transient

+1mil +100000 YES SHARED 0.06km2 0.01km2 1/1440 ppl

PERMANENT

PERMANENT

TEMPORARY

TEMPORARY

11875 3575

SOME

SOME

NO

NO

SOME

NO

NO

1/550 ppl

50.6% Private

90.5%

Slums Flood zone Road

Flood zone

Bus route Site

Occupancy 90.5% Transient

47.7% Port Authority

Twice A Week

Transient 1.7% Central Government

9.5% Permanent

Graduate

Site

50

Empowering the Informal

F WM

F WM

Three Times A Week

Three Times A Week

SCHOOL

RECYCLING MARKET VOCATIONAL SCHOOL

$$

Steel_32 tons Aluminum_5 tons Copper&Alloys_9 tons Steel_32 tons Ballast Lead_4 tons Aluminum_5 tons Inert Materials_12% Dry tons Organics_15% SCRAP MATERIAL RECYCLING Copper&Alloys_9 MATERIAL Ballast Lead_4Recycables_19% tons Wet Organics_12%

1.7% Central Government 9.5% Permanent

Inert Materials_12% Dry Organics_15% Recycables_19% Wet Organics_12%

OWNERSHIP

Rs.1/Rent LOAN Rs.6 for Construction/Month Rs.3 for the Land

M CI I R C O R E C O O E N C O O M N Y O M Y

100sqft/Family

LIVING SPACE Rs.1/Rent 270sqft/Family LOAN Rs.6 for Construction/Month OWNERSHIP Rs.3 for the Land LIVE LIVE WORK WORK WORKING SPACE

LIVING SPACE

WORKING SPACE

I N F R A S T R U C T U R E

M

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL SCHOOL

Road Bus route

MEDICAL CARE

SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL SCHOOL

RECYCLING MATERIAL

47.7% Port Authority

Occupancy

Slums

Twice A Week

INTERNET Twice ASUTH Week SUTH

RECYCLING MARKET SCRAP MATERIAL 50.6% Private

1/550 ppl

Ownership SOME

TU SALIBRARY TU Twice ASAWeek

$$

Ownership

1. Darukhana 11875 3575

LIBRARY INTERNET MEDICAL CARE

1. Darukhana

Glass Metal Plastic Paper GlassFood Metal Plastic Paper Food

RECYCLING BIN

SERVICE BUSSERVICE BUS

S E R V I C E

I N F R AS S RE TV RI UC CE T U R E

100sqft/Family

LIVE WORK LIVE

270sqft/Family LIVE LIVE WORK WORK LIVE WORK LIVE

H O U S I N G

H O U S I N G


proposal

conditions

System

Temporary Work Work People People Density Over Population Density Over Population Slums Slums Poor conditions Poor Conditions Services Services Infrastructure Infrastructure Upgrade Upgrade Sustain Sustain Vertical Dense Vertical Space Dense Space House House Ownership Ownership Empower

Informal settlements are an inevitable aspect of evolving cities, often housing the majority of the people who sustain the city and keep it functioning; yet, they lack adequate service infrastructure and basic needs such as sanitary facilities, potable water, and solid waste management in addition to a sufficient shelter. The typical solution to informal settlements is to create low-income housing in the form of dense high-rise buildings. However, this solution tends to exclude social daily activities and does not provide sufficient public space. Therefore, the project at hand addresses both the social as well as the infrastructural concerns of many informal settlements and thus mediates between creating a high density solution and a high impact design. The map illustrates the two chosen locations: Darukhana and Dharavi. Both sites house informal settlements, but they differ in their composition of ownership, and housing typologies. While Dharavi is more permanent and the majority of the land is privately owned, Darukhana is transient and publically (government) owned. However, both sites share the fact that they lack inadequate services, low quality housing stock and are both near flood zones which further threatens the community. The goal of this project is to create a new flexible typology for informal settlements. It consists of a toolkit with three components: a service core, micro economy and housing, which are based on the essential upgrades required. The service core infrastructure acts as a generator of change for the new housing cluster typology on the site through a vertical structural framework that contains the services and housing units.

Graduate Empowering the Informal

51


Graduate

The toolkit of parts is designed to work dependently and interdependently. With that, the project is implemented in two sites that have varying conditions and circumstances; Darukhana which is more transient, with many workers only staying for a short period of time; and Dharavi, which came to existence in the late nineteen century. These two design solutions offer an insight into what might be possible outcomes of the coming together of the components of the toolkit with varying initial stresses. The toolkit is therefore a proposed solution targeted at creating an upgrade to the existing condition, densifying the housing units, creating a self-sustaining community, and addressing ownership which will all in turn, empower the neighborhood.

52

Empowering the Informal


Microeconomy Diagram

Recyled Materials

Rubber

Funding Diagram

Reserve Bank of India (RBI)

Housing

+

New products

Guarantor (NABARD) E-marketing

Community trash

$

Wood Aluminum

Vocational school

Rs. 1150 ($ 25) monthly (Principal loan + 10% Interest per year)

New industry by community

Ave of Rs. 53 monthly per person (Principal loan + 12% Interest per year))

Self-Help Group SelfRs. 3 (8cents)

Land Owners

MbPT, Government, etc.. Rs 250/ month ($5.4)

Paper

Bazaar market Internet laborers

Rs. 3 (8cents)

Rs. 1,200 ($ 27) monthly (Principal loan + 12% Interest per year)

@ $1,000 @ 400

Rs 250/ month ($5.4) Family Unit

SHG memberr

Rs 125/ month ($2.7)

Rs 125/ month ($2.7) Single il U Unit

Karisma Kapoor

Membership bh Rs. 6 (16 cents)

Tourists

By creating a Self Help Group (SHG), individuals in a community can obtain a loan through National Bank of Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), acting as a guarantor, with 15% interest. NABARD will then obtain the from Reserve Bank of India (RBI) with a 12% interest rate. Each individuals in the SHG will be an active member, They have access to the facility, and are held responsible for its upkeep and maintenance. In return, Rs 250 (for a family of five) will be allocated for rent, while Rs 6 while be divided between service access and paying back the loan.

Empowering the Informal

Graduate

With the amount of skilled workers in many informal settlements, the initiative of the project is to foster these abilities and allow individuals to share their experiences and develop their skill set. This will be accomplished firstly hrough the introduction of vocational schools to enhance workmanship and secondly, through the introduction of microeconomies, to assist individuals in sustaining an income and providing other means production. Microeconomies can range from recycling, producing byproducts from waste, handicraft and construction to name a few.

53


Systems Diagram

STRUCTURAL SERVICE CORE

H CLI EALTH

ing

SERVICE BUS

NIC V SCHOOCATIONA OL L

co k

PRODUC TION PRODUC TION

1 2

Y RAR

LIB

P GROLUANYD

6 7 8 9 10

ME RCE

11

COM

LIVING MACHINE Four tanks will clean 50,000 Litre in one cycle. Tank size= 5x5x2m One cycle = 4 -5 days

INT

ERN ET

WATER TUBE

3 4 5

GAS OUTLET 2400 Lt. = 6hrs burn time

11

10

5 6

clean water

3 4

Graduate

1

Empowering the Informal

7

8

9

grey water

2

54

FOOD GARDEN

ORGANIC WASTE FERMERTATOR 60-75 KG of waste / day 60-75 Litre of water / day

Crushed plastic bottles Pumice rock Oyster shells Planted aquatic plants Organic waste tank Organic waste bin Mixer Digester/ fermertator Slurry Compost pit Rain water collection tank


Daily + Weekly Schedule am

MONDAY

pm am

TUESDAY

pm am

WEDNESDAY

pm am

THURSDAY

pm am

FRIDAY

pm am

SATURDAY

pm am

SUNDAY

pm

COMMERCIAL

Production (1.5sqm) Commerce Space (1.5sqm) Vocational School (1.5sqm)

SOCIAL

Playground

(25sqm)

Library Internet Health Clinic

(20sqm) (20sqm) (20sqm)

INFRASTRUCTURAL Water Tube Bathrooms

(1.8sqm) (1.5sqm)

Living Machine Fermertator

(7.5sqm) (4.0sqm)

DOMESTIC Laundry Cooking

(2.0sqm) (2.5sqm)

Green Wall

(15 sqm)

The courtyards are an essential component in the design scheme as they play a pivotal role in the daily activities of the inhabitants. Each courtyard houses vertical circulation, the PVC water tube, and open space to accommodate domestic activities, while the ground floor contain the communal WCs and showers. The size of the courtyard, which is five by five meters, came from the analysis of commercial, social, infrastructural and domestic activities that are housed in the courtyard.

Graduate Empowering the Informal

55


Darukhana Design Strategy Temporary Site

Site Plan 0.

1.

a. Existing housing + available land

Graduate

Phasing Strategy

56

Empowering the Informal

2.

a. Insert service core b. Insert housing units c. Remove existing units d. Relocate to new units

3.

a. Insert service core b. Insert housing units c. Remove existing units d. Relocate to new units

Commercial Proposed housing Removed slum Service core

a. Densify new housing b. Allow room for growth c. Adjust with existing fabric


THIRD FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

Density Comparison

3’

8’

8’

Houses : 2

Toilet/Shower

Service core&Common Space

Water Storage

Commercial&Production: 1

School

Circulation

Vocational School

GROUND FLOOR

Graduate Empowering the Informal

57


Dharavi Design Strategy Permanent Site

1.

2.

Existing housing

3.

Temporary relocate housing

4.

Set up structure core

a. Insert housing cluster b. Re - relocate dwellers GF : housing + production + commerce

circulation commercial housing

Proposed cluster Plug-in housing Service core Removed slum

courtyard common share space existing

5.

Plug-in housing with pallet rack frame

Graduate

Site Plan

58

Empowering the Informal

Phasing Strategy


FIFTH FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR

Density Comparison THIRD FLOOR

Houses : 20 Common Space : 8 Commercial: 4 Circulation Toilet/Shower

SECOND FLOOR

Water Storage

Individual Block Unit GROUND FLOOR

Graduate Empowering the Informal

59


Darukhana Design Strategy Temporary Site

Graduate

With 90.5% of the population being migrant workers and most of the land owned by Mumbai Port Trust, the housing typology required is more transient and calls for a rent system. Pallet racks will be the main structure work and will be used to accommodate housing and vocational schools. The service core, serving as a physical trigger will initiate the development, incorporating sanitation and water needs. The heights of the structure extend to a maximum of three floors and that is due to their temporal nature and to facilitate assembly and disassembly. The density will be increased by 3%, that means: the FAR will rise from 1.1. to 2.5 and area per person went from 2sqm to 5sqm. Furthermore, the anticipated increase in housing stock is 145 units and 635 people are expected to arrive.

60

Empowering the Informal


Dharavi Design Strategy Permanent Site

With more social connections and community networks in place, the majority of Dharavi inhabitants have their extended family living with them and require more permanent housing. Here, the housing blocks can go up to five floors and allow for more growth and stability. Social cores are initiated within the community to facilitate production and social activities. While the main streets are more public, housing markets and other public activities such as markets and shops. The alleys and back roads allow for a more intimate setting accomodating production and domestic activities. The anticipated FAR is 5, that means the density may be increased by 12. In addition, a further 259 people can be housed in the 100 new units.

Graduate Empowering the Informal

61


Portfolio Dalal Musaed Alsayer +965 97666632 _ dalal.alsayer@gmail.com BArch08_Kuwait University + MSAUD10_GSAPP, Columbia University www.dmalsayer.com


Dalal Musaed Alsayer Portfolio_Selected Work_2012