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Highgate House, London, Eldridge Smerin. Danielle Landrum 33275135, Kimberly Ward 33275019, Sam Spence 33290368


Location: London, UK Client: Richard Elliot Completion: 2008 Gross Floor Area: 357㎥ Architect: Eldridge Smerin Contractor: Harris Cainan

Location Plan 1:250


Project Description • When the land was purchased in 1998 there was an existing John Winter House on site, therefore Eldridge Smerin consulted John Winters before taking down the house • The site is on an extremely steep hill, confined to the space, less than 150sq metres with no room to expand the footprint, thus Eldridge Smerin maintained the same footprint as the John Winter house however built into the ground and added an extra floor above • The site lies in a strict conservation area • Fleet river, which runs under part of London, had to be diverted from under the house John Winter House

• The house next door also restricted the height to which they could build, to resolve this issue Elliot bought the adjoining house and redeveloped that as well

Eldridge Smerin House


Foundations


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer •  Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer •  Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer •  Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer •  Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads •  Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer •  Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels •  Steel holding down bolts are cast into the concrete foundations


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

•  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels Steel holding down bolts are cast into the concrete foundations Ground beams are used to transfer the load from the structure to the ground


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

•  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels Steel holding down bolts are cast into the concrete foundations Ground beams are used to transfer the load from the structure to the ground Concrete floor slab is cast onto ground beam


Structural System: Foundations

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

•  •  •  • 

Poor ground conditions Precast concrete piles Reinforced high tensile steel 300mm diameter 113 pile foundations Grouped close together to carry high loads Pile is driven into the ground using a drop hammer Mechanical interlocking joints on hammer allow it to extend so the pile can go to the required founding levels Steel holding down bolts are cast into the concrete foundations Ground beams are used to transfer the load from the structure to the ground Concrete floor slab is cast onto ground beam Concrete wall is cast onto floor slab


Structural System: Foundations

Driven precast concrete piles Advantages: • Quality of pile is inspected before placed in the ground • Construction is not affected by ground water • Can be driven in long lengths • No removed soil to dispose of • Can be used straight after being installed Disadvantages • Can be damaged when driven to site • Large rig required • Noise and vibration • Displacement of soil can damage surrounding structures.


Primary Structure

Foundations


Structural System: Primary Structure

First Floor Plan 1:100


Structural System: Primary Structure

• Precast concrete structure • Reinforced • Also used as an aesthetic finish

First Floor Plan 1:100


Structural System: Primary Structure

• Precast concrete structure • Reinforced • Also used as an aesthetic finish • 2 Reinforced concrete beams 500x1300 • Run off the north party wall • Supported by 4 vertical columns which then provides stability for the concrete slab.

First Floor Plan 1:100


Structural System: Primary Structure

Section 1:100


Structural System: Primary Structure

• Load bearing columns connected to concrete bases • Two 4m long beams rest on the columns • Floor slab then lie’s on the beams, supported by the columns • Distributes the loads to the ground.

Section 1:100


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground • Load is distributed down the piles where it is resisted by the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground • Load is distributed down the piles where it is resisted by the ground • Live Loads (People, Snow & Wind) Items added for usage such as furniture-the load is distributed across the slab and down the columns and walls to the piles, where the force is distributed to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground • Load is distributed down the piles where it is resisted by the ground • Live Loads (People, Snow & Wind) Items added for usage such as furniture-the load is distributed across the slab and down the columns and walls to the piles, where the force is distributed to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground • Load is distributed down the piles where it is resisted by the ground • Live Loads (People, Snow & Wind) Items added for usage such as furniture-the load is distributed across the slab and down the columns and walls to the piles, where the force is distributed to the ground


Structural System: Primary Structure • Dead Load (Permanent) Structure and all its components- load is distributed across the surfaces and down, to the ground • Load is distributed down the piles where it is resisted by the ground • Live Loads (People, Snow & Wind) Items added for usage such as furniture-the load is distributed across the slab and down the columns and walls to the piles, where the force is distributed to the ground


Secondary Structure

Primary Structure

Foundations


Structural System: Secondary Structure

North East Facade Cladding


Structural System: Secondary Structure

North East Facade Cladding 625mm Black Granite Cladding • Very resilient material, • Resistant to weathering, • High load bearing capacity, • Can be cut and shaped without flawing, • Produced in India


Structural System: Secondary Structure

North East Facade Cladding 625mm Black Granite Cladding • Very resilient material, • Resistant to weathering, • High load bearing capacity, • Can be cut and shaped without flawing, • Produced in India

Glass • Frosted Glass maintains privacy • while allowing light through • Produced via sand blasting • Toughened • Aesthetically pleasing


Structural System: Secondary Structure

North East Facade Cladding 625mm Black Granite Cladding • Very resilient material, • Resistant to weathering, • High load bearing capacity, • Can be cut and shaped without flawing, • Produced in India

Glass • Frosted Glass maintains privacy • while allowing light through • Produced via sand blasting • Toughened • Aesthetically pleasing

Black Ash Steel Cladding • Suitable for external use due to its aesthetics and protective facing properties • Fixed Vertically to the structure • Tough and Durable • Strong and water-resistant • Little maintenance required


Roof Structure

Secondary Structure

Primary Structure

Foundations


Structural System: Roof Structure • A bespoke sliding over roof glass roof light designed to allow maximum sunlight to enter the kitchen space, and natural ventilation •  All mechanically operated, continuing the gadget theme, that runs throughout the house. • To ensure the minimalist ‘all glass’ look was maintained throughout, the designer altered dimensions specifically for the house and added glass fins at the joins.


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns • Metal treads for the windows are put in place


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns • Metal treads for the windows are put in place • East façade is clad in black granite, black steel cladding and glass • Used stone cladding and the green sedum roof are also put into place


Construction Sequence • Contiguous piles 300mm in diameter act as a retaining wall enabling the basement to be dug • Before the piles were in place the walls for the basement would have collapsed • Piles which will support the reinforced concrete raft and reinforced concrete columns are sunk into the ground • Reinforced concrete raft foundation is poured and damp proof membrane held by wooden shuttering is put in place • 200mm think reinforced concrete wall is poured in front of piling. This is the fair faced basement wall. 300mm by 300mm reinforced concrete columns are also poured • Reinforced concrete floor slab 250mm thick is cantilevered off the reinforced concrete columns • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns The stairs are precast concrete treads cantilevered from the concrete walls. The stairs were cast on site from the same batch of Portland cement that was used for the primary structure of the building and dowelled into place • The primary structure continues to built in this manner, with the reinforced concrete floor slabs being cantilevered off reinforced concrete beams and columns • Metal treads for the windows are put in place • East façade is clad in black granite, black steel cladding and glass • Used stone cladding and the green sedum roof are also put into place • Multiple sheets of toughened glass bonded together are then put into place


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk •  120mm honed concrete screed


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk •  120mm honed concrete screed •  195mm reinforced concrete slab


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure Earth waterproof membrane


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure Earth waterproof membrane 75mm board insulation


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure Earth waterproof membrane 75mm board insulation 150mm insulation


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure Earth waterproof membrane 75mm board insulation 150mm insulation Steel L-profile and plates connected to load bearing structure


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk 120mm honed concrete screed 195mm reinforced concrete slab 185mm reinforced concrete structure 285mm reinforced concrete structure Earth waterproof membrane 75mm board insulation 150mm insulation Steel L-profile and plates connected to load bearing structure Recessed fasteners connected insulation to structure


Detailed Design: External wall/floor junction 150mm board insulation Recessed fasteners connected insulation to structure Steel L-profile and plates connected to load bearing structure

120mm honed concrete screed

External Ground - Surface bitumen, bitumen and stone, stabilised chalk

195mm reinforced concrete slab

185mm reinforced concrete structure

Earth waterproof membrane 285mm reinforced concrete structure

75mm board insulation

Scale 1:10


Detailed Design: Roof Junction


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil •  2mm aluminium sheet steel Lprofile


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil •  2mm aluminium sheet steel Lprofile •  Steel box profile and aluminium plate


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil •  2mm aluminium sheet steel Lprofile •  Steel box profile and aluminium plate •  Skylight support and running track •  70x35mm steel C-profiles •  125x75mm steel L-plates


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil •  2mm aluminium sheet steel Lprofile •  Steel box profile and aluminium plate •  Skylight support and running track •  70x35mm steel C-profiles •  125x75mm steel L-plates •  115x20mm steel bar bracing skylight structure


Detailed Design: Roof Junction •  300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure •  28mm waterproof membrane •  Rain guttering on steel box profile •  150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off •  Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame •  Box profiles with sheet steel trim •  Green roof with sedum planted in soil •  2mm aluminium sheet steel Lprofile •  Steel box profile and aluminium plate •  Skylight support and running track •  70x35mm steel C-profiles •  125x75mm steel L-plates •  115x20mm steel bar bracing skylight structure •  40mm facade cladding – granite •  74mm air space


Detailed Design: Roof Junction

Sliding Skylight – double glazing on frame Box profiles with sheet steel trim

115x20mm steel bar bracing skylight structure 2mm aluminium sheet steel 125x75mm steel L-profile

Skylight support and running track

70x35mm steel C-profiles

Green roof with sedum planted in soil

150mm board insulation – slope rainwater run off

Steel box profile and aluminium plate

40mm facade cladding

Rain guttering on steel box profile 74mm air space 28mm waterproof membrane

300mm reinforced concrete slab and structure

Scale 1:10


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation •  125x65mm steel C-profile •  Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation •  125x65mm steel C-profile •  Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring •  Glazing facade with sliding steel double glazing units


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation •  125x65mm steel C-profile •  Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring •  Glazing facade with sliding steel double glazing units •  10mm stone flooring


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation •  125x65mm steel C-profile •  Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring •  Glazing facade with sliding steel double glazing units •  10mm stone flooring •  30mm stone flooring


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

•  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  250mm reinforced concrete slab •  Waterproofing membrane •  120mm board insulation •  50mm board insulation •  125x65mm steel C-profile •  Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring •  Glazing facade with sliding steel double glazing units •  10mm stone flooring •  30mm stone flooring •  Under floor heating


Detailed Design: Glazing Detail

Glazing facade with sliding steel double glazing units

250mm reinforced concrete slab

Supports glazed facade and connects to flooring 125x65mm steel C-profile 30m stone flooring 10m stone flooring 120mm board insulation 50mm board insulation Waterproofing membrane

250mm reinforced concrete slab

Scale 1:10


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate

1

1


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

2 2 1


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws

3

3 2 1

2


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws 4.  Countersunk stainless steel pig-nose bolt

3

3 2 1

4

4

2


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws 4.  Countersunk stainless steel pig-nose bolt 5.  Neoprene gasket

3

3 2 1 5 4

5

4

2


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws 4.  Countersunk stainless steel pig-nose bolt 5.  Neoprene gasket 6.  12mm threaded rod

3

3 2 1 5 4 6

5

4

6

2


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws 4.  Countersunk stainless steel pig-nose bolt 5.  Neoprene gasket

3 2

6.  12mm threaded rod 7.  Laminated glass stair balustrade panel

3

1 5 7

4 6

5

4

6

7

2


Stair Glazing Detail 1.  Stainless steel 12mm ‘dog bone’ linking plate 2.  Stainless steel linking tube

1

3.  Stainless steel grub screws 4.  Countersunk stainless steel pig-nose bolt 5.  Neoprene gasket

3 2

6.  12mm threaded rod 7.  Laminated glass stair balustrade panel

3 8

8

1 5 7

4 6

2

5

4

6

8.  Precast concrete cantilevered stair tread

7


Fire Strategy

Escape Routes • The Basement has access to the upper floors, however no exiting doors for escape.

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Escape Routes • The Basement has access to the upper floors, however no exiting doors for escape.

Fire Exits • The front door the only provided front exit • There are two exits to the garden which lead out via a gate

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

First Floor Plan 1:100

Escape Routes • The First Floor has access to lower and upper floors • Two exits to the balcony are available • No exits are available to escape

N


Fire Strategy

Escape Routes • The First Floor has access to lower and upper floors • Two exits to the balcony are available • No exits are available to escape • Fire Alarm is positioned in the open plan kitchen

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings

First Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Escape Cores • Referring to areas of safety, and routes of escape, such as the stairwells

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Escape Cores • Referring to areas of safety, and routes of escape, such as the stairwells

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Escape Cores • Referring to areas of safety, and routes of escape, such as the stairwells

First Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Escape Cores • Referring to areas of safety, and routes of escape, such as the stairwells

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Escape Cores • Referring to areas of safety, and routes of escape, such as the stairwells Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread.

Second Floor Plan 1:100

The Fire door to the stairway creates a compartment in the open plan kitchen area.

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread. Concrete Walls • Reinforced concrete is used throughout the house • Concrete is a particularly good material to use when considering fire safety as: • It shields from the fire, providing safe area's for occupants • Its strength means less risk of collapse in a fire • It is structural and built in fire protection • It does not burn, therefore doesn't fuel the fire • It would be unaffected by any water used by fire-fighters • Its high fire resistance allows no fire spread

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread. Concrete Walls • Reinforced concrete is used throughout the house • Concrete is a particularly good material to use when considering fire safety as: • It shields from the fire, providing safe area's for occupants • Its strength means less risk of collapse in a fire • It is structural and built in fire protection • It does not burn, therefore doesn't fuel the fire • It would be unaffected by any water used by fire-fighters • Its high fire resistance allows no fire spread

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread. Concrete Walls • Reinforced concrete is used throughout the house • Concrete is a particularly good material to use when considering fire safety as: • It shields from the fire, providing safe area's for occupants • Its strength means less risk of collapse in a fire • It is structural and built in fire protection • It does not burn, therefore doesn't fuel the fire • It would be unaffected by any water used by fire-fighters • Its high fire resistance allows no fire spread

First Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread. Concrete Walls • Reinforced concrete is used throughout the house • Concrete is a particularly good material to use when considering fire safety as: • It shields from the fire, providing safe area's for occupants • Its strength means less risk of collapse in a fire • It is structural and built in fire protection • It does not burn, therefore doesn't fuel the fire • It would be unaffected by any water used by fire-fighters • Its high fire resistance allows no fire spread

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Fire Strategy

Fire exits • Exit available on First Floor • All Floors have access to other levels Fire Doors • Used in areas where protection is needed; stairwells and landings Compartment Zones • Referring to high risk areas, such as the kitchen to ensure a fire does not spread. Concrete Walls • Reinforced concrete is used throughout the house • Concrete is a particularly good material to use when considering fire safety as: • It shields from the fire, providing safe area's for occupants • Its strength means less risk of collapse in a fire • It is structural and built in fire protection • It does not burn, therefore doesn't fuel the fire • It would be unaffected by any water used by fire-fighters • Its high fire resistance allows no fire spread Maximum travel distance 12metres

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Basement • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • The reinforced concrete structure acts as a temperature stabiliser, due to its high thermal mass, moderating temperature fluctuations • No windows, means fluorescent artificial lighting is relied upon, however low energy bulbs are used • No windows also means there is no natural ventilation

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Basement • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • The reinforced concrete structure acts as a temperature stabiliser, due to its high thermal mass, moderating temperature fluctuations • No windows, means fluorescent artificial lighting is relied upon, however low energy bulbs are used • No windows also means there is no natural ventilation • This is also helped as the house is set into the ground

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Basement • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • The reinforced concrete structure acts as a temperature stabiliser, due to its high thermal mass, moderating temperature fluctuations • No windows, means fluorescent artificial lighting is relied upon, however low energy bulbs are used • No windows also means there is no natural ventilation • This is also helped as the house is set into the ground • All services are kept in the basement, allowing upper levels free for living space

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Basement • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • The reinforced concrete structure acts as a temperature stabiliser, due to its high thermal mass, moderating temperature fluctuations

• Due to having no windows the room relies upon artificial lighting.

• No windows, means fluorescent artificial lighting is relied upon, however low energy bulbs are used • No windows also means there is no natural ventilation • This is also helped as the house is set into the ground • All services are kept in the basement, allowing upper levels free for living space

Basement Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Ground Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Ground Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • Garage, Gym and Bedrooms all have access to the garden, allowing ventilation and user defined temperatures • All three rooms are also flooded with natural light during daylight hours, reducing use of artificial lighting

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme

First Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • The bedroom and living area, naturally well ventilated by sliding doors to the balcony, this also allows user defined temperature change • Both rooms are flooded with light from the vast floor to ceiling glazing, therefore requiring less artificial lighting

First Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme • Glass panels on the first and second floor landings are positioned to let light through to the ground floor

First Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • The bedroom and living area, naturally well ventilated by sliding doors to the balcony, this also allows user defined temperature change • Both rooms are flooded with light from the vast floor to ceiling glazing, therefore requiring less artificial lighting

Section


Programme

Second Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house • Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • Light enters via floor to ceiling glass, with doors onto the balcony area, reducing need for artificial light during daylight hours

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Second Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house

• The study is floor to ceiling frameless glass, with a continuous work desk formed from and supported by toughened glass sheets bonded together

• Built in cupboards are found throughout the house • The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • Light enters via floor to ceiling glass, with doors onto the balcony area, reducing need for artificial light during daylight hours

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Programme

Second Floor • Low temperature hot water under floor heating is found throughout the house

• With the opening glass panels and rooftop window the second floor acts as an openair space

• Built in cupboards are found throughout the house

• The large glazed openings facing southward allow passive solar gain to be maximised during winter

• The East facing solid wall acts as a traffic noise barrier • Light enters via floor to ceiling glass, with doors onto the balcony area, reducing need for artificial light during daylight hours

Second Floor Plan 1:100

N


Lighting

• The basement has no natural light, therefore relies upon artificial lighting. • Mainly using spotlights in the ceiling,. However the bathroom and media room both have side lights

Basement Plan

N


Lighting • The ground floor has glazing in the garage, gym and bedroom, therefore minimal artificial lighting is needed • The inner rooms rely upon artificial lighting, especially in the bathroom areas

Ground Floor Plan

N


Lighting • Glazed on two sides, first floor utilises the natural light with fewer lights than the basement and ground floors • A glass floor located left of the stairs also allows light to flood down from the second floor, resulting in less artificial lighting needed

First Floor Plan

N


Lighting • Glazed on two sides, second floor utilises the natural light especially in the study which is fully glazed • A roof window, allows natural light to flood in, resulting in less artificial lighting needed compared to the other floors

Second Floor Plan

N


Environmental Systems: Plant Room

Basement Plan

The plant room is located in the basement


Environmental Systems: Combination Boiler

Combination boilers combine the central heating (CH) with (tank less) domestic hot water (DHW) in one box. They are continuous water heaters.


Environmental Systems: Combination Boiler

Hot water is distributed from the combination boiler in the plant room to the houses bathrooms , toilets and kitchen.

Combination boilers combine the central heating (CH) with (tank less) domestic hot water (DHW) in one box. They are continuous water heaters.


Environmental Systems: Under floor Heating

Prefabricated underfloor heating substation. This controls the under floor heating.


Environmental Systems: Under floor Heating

A mix of water and anti-freeze such as propylene glycol as the heat transfer fluid in a "closed loop“ system that is re-circulated between the floor and the boiler.


Environmental Systems: Water Under floor Heating Under floor heating - Under floor heating and cooling is a form of central heating and cooling which achieves indoor climate control for thermal comfort using conduction, radiation and convection. Hydronic under floor heating -Hydronic systems use water or a mix of water and anti-freeze such as propylene glycol as the heat transfer fluid in a "closed loop" that is re-circulated between the floor and the boiler. Pipes before they are covered with screed

-Various types of pipes are available specifically for hydronic under floor heating and cooling systems and are generally made from polyethylene. Older materials such as Polybutylene (PB) and copper or steel pipe are still used in some locales or for specialized applications. Comparison of a under floor heating system and a traditional radiation system Air circulates. This means there is not an even distribution of heat in the room resulting in cold and hot patches.

Hot air rises resulting in an even distribution of heat throughout the room.

Screed being applied

Detail of heating system

Radiator system

Under floor system


Environmental Systems: Ventilation Central Extract Ventilation •  Efficient single fan ventilation unit (basement) •  Central system which has multiple adapters which are used to connect to each valve via ducting. •  Continuously extracts from the kitchen and wet rooms within the property •  If necessary removing any air pollutants quickly


Environmental Systems: Ventilation Central Extract Ventilation •  Efficient single fan ventilation unit (basement) •  Central system which has multiple adapters which are used to connect to each valve via ducting. •  Continuously extracts from the kitchen and wet rooms within the property •  If necessary removing any air pollutants quickly

Benefits •  Central Extract Ventilation system means you don’t need to have a local extractor fan in every wet room •  Therefore paying to run one fan instead of 2 or 3, which saves on the general running costs. •  Designed to extract in the property at a continuous rate, boosting to a higher rate when necessary. •  Lower running costs •  Only one exterior vent


Environmental Systems: Ventilation •  The basement/plant room can not be naturally ventilated so will need mechanical ventilation • The toilets are enclosed rooms, these also require mechanical ventilation. Media Room

Cemetery London

eldridge smerin

Basement Floor Plan

N


Environmental Systems: Ventilation •  The basement/plant room can not be naturally ventilated so will need mechanical ventilation • The toilets are enclosed rooms with no windows, these also require mechanical ventilation. Media Room

Cemetery London

Basement Floor Plan

eldridge smerin

bedroom

garage

gym

utility

N


don

Environmental Systems: Ventilation study

terrace

eldridge smerin

bedroom

• The kitchen requires mechanical ventilation • The toilets are enclosed rooms with no windows, these also require mechanical ventilation.

kitchen

Second Floor Plan

N


on

Environmental Systems: Ventilation study

terrace

eldridge smerin

bedroom

• The kitchen requires mechanical ventilation • The toilets are enclosed rooms with no windows, these also require mechanical ventilation.

kitchen

Second Floor Plan

N


Environmental Systems: Ventilation

•  •  •  •  •  • 

Sun Shaders are used on the ground floor and second floor. Levolux 760L Roller Blind The sun Shaders are easy to use, with a simple pull cord Smooth continuous roll Can be raised or lowered to any height On ground floor a spring is built into the mechanism to ensure an easy operation


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.

Noise reduction -  Solid east facing wall built from fair faced board marking concrete act as a noise reduction barrier from the passing traffic.


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.

Privacy -  Privacy at night is not an issue because the graveyard closes by 5pm every evening. For this reasons there are no blinds on the cemetery facing windows.


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.

Privacy -  Privacy at night is not an issue because the graveyard closes by 5pm every evening. For this reasons there are no blinds on the cemetery facing windows. Solar gain - Large south facing windows allow maximum passive solar gain in the winter months


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.

Existing structures -  The site backed onto one existing structure.


Environmental Considerations Initial environmental issues -  -  -  - 

The fleet river had to be diverted from under the house. Because the site is located on a steep hill the site was restricted 150 square meters. Highgate cemetery is a strict conservation area so the basement was excavated to gain additional space. Had to consult John Winter before the project started as was previously a John Winter designed house.

Temperature control -Used stone cladding and green sedum roof help control temperature fluctuations


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

June 6am First and second floor balconies receive sunlight

N


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

June 6am

June midday

First and second floor balconies receive sunlight

Whole of house is lit Due to south facing glazing

N


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

June 6am

June midday

June 6pm

First and second floor balconies receive sunlight

Whole of house is lit Due to south facing glazing

Bedrooms located on the west side of the house receive sunlight as does the kitchen and study

N


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

December 9am None of the south facing the glazing receives sunlight

N


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

December 9am

December midday

None of the south facing the glazing receives sunlight

The south facing glazing allows maximum solar gain from low winter sun

N


Environmental Considerations: Sun Path

December 9am None of the south facing the glazing receives sunlight

December midday The south facing glazing allows maximum solar gain from low winter sun

December 3pm First and second floors flooded with sunlight. Third floor is in shade to stop solar glare

N


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June 6am

December 9am


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June 6am

December 9am


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June midday

December midday


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June midday

December midday


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June 6pm

December 3pm


Environmental Considerations: Solar Gain

June 6pm

December 3pm


Sustainability: Environment Overall Environmental Strategy One of the main aims for Eldridge Smerin was to produce a house that was more sustainable that its predecessor, John Winter house. The diagrams illustrate on a basic level how efficient the house is. Achieving good ratings, however not great ratings. Main sustainability strategies included, • Design considerations • Use of materials • Use of technologies

Design Considerations • With large glazed openings facing the south, it allows light to flood in during the day, therefore results in less use of artificial lighting. • As the majority of the glass, is sliding doors, it allows for natural ventilation and temperature change, therefore not relying on artificial systems such as the under floor heating • Using Concrete as both the primary structure and as an aesthetic finish means less materials were used internally. •  The internal low temperature under floor heating system is an efficient method of heating.


Sustainability: Environment Concrete • Concrete has been used both as the structural element and as the finish within the house. This requires less materials, so is more efficient. It is also a lot more efficient than the lightweight frame of the John Winter house. • Concrete has a long life span, usually of 100years, potentially up to 150years, dependant on care, this therefore means the house has longevity • Concrete's slow heat response characteristics allow the frame to slow down heat loss in winter, it thermal mass also helps to regulate fluctuating temperatures • Using locally sourced concrete, which uses partially recycled materials helps to reduce travel costs and emissions caused by travelling • A thermal break between the inside concrete areas and the outside concrete areas reduce heat loss and condensation


Sustainability: Environment Concrete • A thermal break between the inside concrete areas and the outside concrete areas reduce heat loss and condensation

First Floor external slab detail without thermal break

First Floor external slab detail with thermal break


Sustainability: Environment Glass Glazing • 32% of the house is glazed • Glass panels on the upper floor landings(stairwell) positioned to let light through to ground floor reducing artificial lighting needs • Triple Glazed windows mean a more efficient home, as they provide better sound and thermal protection than double glazed windows


Sustainability: Environment Sedum Roof • Planted primarily for aesthetic and ecological reasons, its sedum blanket features sedums specifically selected for the English climate. • Produced in the UK, there is a short travel distance for the roofing, reducing environmental impact and cost. • The multifunctional sedum blanket combines the vegetation support layer and also a moisture retention fleece, providing a base suited for many different types of roof. • The pre-attached fleece retains moisture after rainfall, thus allowing plants time to take up the water for future storage. • Around 11 species of sedum are grown and used within the blankets to provide variety . All having been selected to suit local climate to keeping weight and maintenance to a minimum. • Dependant on level of maintenance sedum roof‘s can last up to 20 years.


Sustainability: Environment Sedum Roof

Bauder XF301 Sedum Blanket is a precultivated vegetation blanket on a patented nylon loop and geo-textile base carrier with special substrate and a preattached integral 8mm moisture retention fleece. Bauder SDF Mat is multifunctional with three layers; drainage, filtration and Protection. All made from ultraviolet resistant nylon woven loops ,which are thermally bonded to geo-textile filter fleece facings.

The Advantages of using a sedum roof are: • Low maintenance system. • Provides increased protection to the waterproofing System. Very lightweight


Critical Conclusion Successes •  High-Tech minimal design •  Aesthetically pleasing •  Concrete frame – longer life span. •  Glazing allows maximum solar gain in winter, with cantilevered balconies providing solar shading in the summer. •  Sedum roof uses recycled storm water while •  Granite cladding helps to maintain the buildings temperature. •  Open air space created by sliding roof Failures •  Not considered sustainable •  Large amount of costs – Materials & construction & maintenance •  Owner must sell the house, however little interest from buyers because prices are so high. •  Pollutant production process.


Critical Conclusion Suggested improvements •  Rainwater harvesting system •  Rainwater can be used inside in toilets and washing machines. •  Straight forward domestic system •  Water tanks of 2000 to 7000 litres •  The installation requires pumps, filters and a mains switchover panel which can transfer the rainwater supply to the mains if the tank was to run out. •  Tank connected which collects water, this tank can be either above or underground which means it can be easy accessible if required.


Critical Conclusion Suggested improvements •  Post Occupancy Review – Recommend a 12 month review on the performance of the house. This would allow us to assess key features of the house, and answer questions which can only be previously assumed by the design process. For example the solar gains through the south facing glazing – this could cause the house to become a green house with unbearably high temperatures. This also would allow changes to be made to the house if any problems would occur. •  House could have been designed using only half of the space available. The house is very large, with spaces which may only be used 2-3 times a year. For example the media room in the basement. •  The house could have multifunctional rooms, which means that spaces would be utilised more efficiently. •  Designing a smaller house would also mean less energy would be used in heating and ventilating, also cutting down maintenance costs of the house. •  Materials could have been recycled from the previous John Winter house. •  Recycled materials cuts down costs as well as carbon footprint Review •  The house has no sustainable aspects •  In the current climate, I believe that this house should not have been built. I believe the architects where ambitious with the design and the location of the house. However sustainability was not taken into account.


Bibliography Eldridge Smerin architects 3d axonometric Eldridge Smerin architects east facade Eldridge Smerin architects south facade Eldridge Smerin architects plans, basement, ground, first, second floors Plan from estate agent: http://search.knightfrank.com/ham070271 Information and diagram about sedum roof system: http://www.bauder.co.uk/ Information and details gained from emailed contact with Elliot Wood Partnership http://www.profimedia.si/photo/architect-s-own-house-by-highgate-cemetery/profimedia-0089105701.jpg http://www.levolux.com/L_products/internal_roller_blinds_details.htm http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owwIdYfh9kE Books Stacey. M, 2011. Concrete a design studio guide Baden Powell. C, 2008. Architect’s Pocket Book Compost Toilet Diagram http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/22799.pdf Photographs http://imganuncios.mitula.net/house_for_sale_in_swains_lane_highgate_village_london_n6_94253677383249001.jpg


Bibliography Photographs http://cfile3.uf.tistory.com/image/1876733A4D60BDBD281988 http://5osa.com/2851 http://www.feelguide.com/2011/09/20/amazing-glass-pavilion-home-built-beside-londons-equally-amazing-highgate-victorian-cemetery/ http://www.indianhomedesign.com/2011/06/breathtaking-four-bedroom-house-beside.html http://m.bdonline.co.uk/buildings/technical/glass-staircase-wall/3132169.article http://thebeatthatmyheartskipped.co.uk/index.php/2009/12/10/the-modern-house-in-highgate-cemetary/ http://www.amazingspace.co.uk/location/1426,1/ven-195-swains-lane.html http://www.glazing-vision.co.uk/swains.php http://www.85swainslane.co.uk/venue-details.php

AT2 Highgate House Case Study  

Second year technology project studying Highgate House, Camden

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