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Contents 1 Executive Summary 2 Evaluation of Film Club • • • •

Film Club The Pilot Project The Evaluation The Authors

3 Engaging the school: staff, parents and young people • • • • • •

Engaging the school: Key points School staff involvement Parental involvement Selecting the audience ‘Selling’ Film Club to young people Engaging the school: Recommendations

4 The films: selecting, ordering and watching • • • • •

The films: Key points Selecting the films Ordering the films Watching the films The films: Recommendations

5 Beyond the films: discussion, film industry guests, the Film Club website • • • • • • • •

Beyond the films: Key points Introductions and discussions The website Writing for the website Film industry visits Curriculum links Film Club posters, postcards, membership cards Beyond the films: Recommendations

6 The context for Film Club: policy, best practice and the film industry • • • • •

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The context for Film Club: Key points Policy: UK Film Council’s UK-Wide Education Strategy; the DCMS; the DfES; crossgovernment priorities for young people Existing best practice: the British Film Institute; Organisations supporting young filmmakers (First Light Movies); Cinemas (MovIES); Curriculum links (Creative Partnerships), Other Extended Services activity; Film festivals for children and young people. Industry: developing young audiences for film; Cinemas; Community cinema; DVD distribution and sales; Digital downloading, Intellectual Property The context for Film Club: recommendations


7 From Film Club pilot to Film Club UK-wide: conclusion • • • •

Summary of evidence and recommendations The growth of Film Club in the 25 pilot schools Lessons learned from the pilot School staff as the ‘key’ to the continued success of Film Club

Appendices 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Film Club Board members Pilot project schools Interviewees Case Studies Schools’ film choices during pilot Young people’s film reviews for Film Club website Comments from teachers joining up to Film Club’s national roll out Summary of recommendations Summary of key points

Cover image: Lauriston Primary School, Hackney, London All photography by Sam Friedrich Corinna Downing / Hilary Pearce 29 June 2007

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1 Executive Summary The Film Club pilot project Film Club brings together the film industry and schools in a unique offer: the wider world of cinema comes into schools, reaching and inspiring young people across the UK. Working with partners from the film industry and media education sector, Film Club aims to augment existing formal and informal provision. The Film Club package has been shown during the pilot to be of significant value to young people and schools, an informal approach in which young people are open to absorbing the film viewing experience, and also to tie in with broader agendas for young people from both the DCMS and DfES. Film Club capitalises on the potential of film and young audiences themselves: access to a greater variety of films, coupled with the skills for critical viewing, is acknowledged to have the potential for a powerful impact on young people’s imaginations and their engagement with learning. In itself, film is a medium which is accessible: a popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and enjoy responding to. The child-centred approach of Film Club affords young people extra pleasure in participating in choosing from the range of films, meeting filmmakers, discussing films and reviewing and rating films. 800 children and young people age 5-18 took part in the Film Club pilot project, from 25 schools in London, Kent, Surry and Northern Ireland. Between January and March 2007 these schools watched a total of 89 films in 152 screenings for one or more clubs operating simultaneously for different age groups. These were recent and archive titles spanning a wide range of subjects and styles, selected from and responded to on the interactive website, which had 348, 410 hits and recorded 16,355 user sessions. By the end of June 2007, the website had also received a huge number of requests (950) from teachers across the UK interested in signing up to Film Club’s national roll out. The evaluation of the Film Club pilot project focused on the enabling and process of setting up clubs and the outcomes for staff, young people and parents as well as for Film Club itself. The evaluation also considered the views of other organisations working in the field in policy, education and industry capacities. In all, Film Club at pilot stage is a strong organization with a clear mission which is warmly received by schools for its cultural and educational value and its contribution to extended services. It was also seen as a valuable addition to existing activity by other organisations working in the field.

What Film Club brings to schools Film Club offers young audiences a window on to the world via film, a unique opportunity to interact with different cultures and stories from mainstream, independent and world cinema in a structured after school setting. The options for further developing the range of films available under the PVS License and supporting teachers to contextualize screenings are both key areas address in anticipation of a UK-wide Film Club. A child-centered approach to participation has been a key factor in the Film Club pilot’s success: the website was a tool for the engagement of young people, who liked its style, liked to see their own film reviews online and were keen to read their peers’ views. When involved in the selection of films or meeting film industry guests they gained an important sense of ownership of the experience. Their ongoing participation in the evolution of Film Club will be a vital element of a UK-wide Film Club, linking in part to the potential for young people’s independent viewing. The after school slot was successful as young people liked preparing the room or hall to ‘turn it into a cinema’ and the average 90 minute running time was an ideal activity length. Film Clubs wishing to extend the activity with discussion did so informally or in separate sessions out of club time and young people wrote reviews for the website in their independent time. This allowed for some critical response to the films but in all there was limited time available for any mediated critical discussion.

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Teachers welcomed the Film Club ‘complete package’ as an opportunity to interact with young people in an informal setting, discovering the world of cinema and the film industry together. Staff with more knowledge of film offered introductions, and many had made curricular links during the pilot or were considering possibilities for this. The Film Club website will soon include a dedicated area for teachers, which will need to offer support and encouragement particularly for the selection of more world and independent cinema. Parent involvement was strong in primary schools, where in some the PTA was directly involved in managing the club and parents watched films in school with their children. Parents appreciated the safe, sociable environment and were delighted by their children’s enthusiasm, which could lead to families going on to watch Film Club ‘discoveries’ together at home, particularly in areas without a local cinema. All costs of the pilot were covered by Film Club and teachers indicated that to keep Film Club free or at low cost would be a significant incentive for their schools to continue with Film Club into the future. This was primarily as it increased access for schools. Schools were glad to be able to direct funding towards improving viewing facilities for their club. Teachers, parents and children were clear that cost was a major factor in limiting their visits to the cinema, and hiring and buying of DVDs, both in school time, as part of Extended Services and out of school hours. An effective organisational structure has ensured the operational success of Film Club. With the schools’ digital projection equipment, plus PVS License and film catalogue in place, close contact between the Film Club office and schools has sought to ensure that accessing and receiving DVDs offers further support to schools beyond the website. This continued close co-operation, enhanced by training, will be necessary to factor in to both a UK-wide and local networks of schools.

From Film Club pilot to Film Club UK-wide The structure of Film Club is sound and replicable UK-wide: it fits with broader local and national government initiatives relating to education and the creative industries affecting schools across the nations; the Film Club partners contribute complementary elements of the overall package; and schools find the support, the process and the outcomes are manageable and enjoyable. The ‘key’ to ensuring a club does as well as it possibly can is the energy and dedication of the key school staff, whose practical and training needs will be focused on more deeply in national roll out. A potential ‘blueprint’ for the development of Extended Services provision, Film Club has much in common with existing provision in that it offers an opportunity for informal learning in a safe, social setting. However, teachers appreciated the complete Film Club ‘package’ and young people noted how much they liked how different Film Club was from other activities on offer and how much enjoyed sharing this experience with peers. Teachers noted improved behaviour and engagement in young people inspired by their Film Club experience. Support from staff and wider school involvement enhanced smooth running. In fulfilling DfES objectives for Extended Services Film Club offers a potential model for Extended Services provision in England and the nations, where in Northern Ireland a cluster of 20 schools have already been funded to run Film Clubs for a year. The recommendations in this evaluation build on the existing strengths of Film Club, offering possible areas for development and evidence to support Film Club’s own plans for expansion both in terms of content, partnerships and reaching schools UK-wide. Recommendations cover issues to do with engaging the school via staff, young people and parents, developing the film catalogue to include a greater selection of films and extending additional Film Club activity to maximize their potential to increase the personal, cultural and critical value of young people’s film viewing. Lastly, recommendations include reference to how Film Club may develop in relationship to and in partnership with the existing landscape of policy, education and industry to do with film and young people.

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2 An evaluation of Film Club at pilot stage 2.1

Film Club The aim of Film Club is to bring the world of cinema into schools in a UK-wide network of After School Clubs. Responding to the needs of Extended Schools, it offers Film Club ‘members’ age 5-18s the opportunity to meet weekly and watch a film together, whether a recent release or cinema classic. The focus is on the personal inspiration and entertainment which watching films can offer, as well as discovering and learning more about films in an informal social setting. It is a child-centred process, designed to be collaboration between staff and pupils, encouraging discussion at every stage. Film Club, an organisation still at pilot stage at time of writing, was started by Beeban Kidron and Lindsay Mackie in 2006. It is a non-profit initiative supported by the UK Film Council, the BFI, The Guardian, Arts Alliance Media via their subsidiary LOVEFiLM, Film Education, All Industry Marketing (AIM), Film Distributors Association and Filmbank Distributors Ltd. Coordinating the organisation is the Film Club Board (Appendix 1: Film Club Board members), Director Mark Higham and Associate Lucy Whitehead. The first point of contact for teachers and members is the website, where the films available to hire are laid out alphabetically, by theme and in four age groupings from Key Stage 1 to 16+. The website also offers some teaching resources previously produced by Film Education, interviews and films programmed by high profile film industry figures, competitions and latest news, a section for reviews and user ratings posted in by Film Club members age 5-18 and information for schools wishing to sign up. In addition, the Film Club office provides on-going support for member schools.

2.2 The Pilot Project The pilot project was co-funded by the UK Film Council and AIM. It set out to test the structure, content and practice of the Film Club as agreed with its supporting partners at the end of 2006. Each school received a Public Video Screening (PVS) License worth £75.00 free of charge, and access to the website. From the LOVEFiLM hire catalogue, 400+ films available from UK film distributors covered by the license were selected for the pilot, categorised on the website alphabetically, by theme and age group. The contact teacher for each school was the key link between the school and Film Club, ensuring that the club progressed smoothly and setting up website accounts for members in order that they could access the site. The pilot sought to include a wide cross-section of rural and urban schools, primary and secondary, with little/no Extended Hours activity and those with full services already in place. The schools were recruited at the end of 2006 and beginning of 2007. The pilot begun at the beginning of the spring term in January 2007 included 25 schools in London, Kent, Surrey and Northern Ireland, of which 16 were secondary and 9 were primary (Appendix 2: Pilot project schools). With further funding now secured, the pilot continues until the end of the summer term with a view to national roll out from September 2007. Key points of the pilot project are highlighted at the beginning of each section and in summary in Appendix 9.

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2.3 The Evaluation The framework for this evaluation was agreed with Film Club in early February 2006. It has 3 key aims: to evaluate the structure, content and practice of Film Club via the experience of the pilot project in order to offer evidence in support of a national programme; to provide a model of good practice for use in Extended Schools; to suggest links with policy and other national initiatives. It sought also to offer context for Film Club, covering policy background, supporting partner organisations, examples of best practice already operating in schools both formally and informally, and a picture of the current film viewing habits of the Film Club members interviewed. The research for the evaluation was agreed to include background research, brief interviews with current and prospective partners, a qualitative and quantitative baseline study of all schools involved and a smaller number of case studies (Appendix 3: Interviewees). The 9 case studies (4 primary, 5 secondary) included a strong geographical and social spread and were visited individually by the evaluators to gain further insight into the attitudes, vales and feelings of staff, children and parents. Case study interviews focused on how Film Club had been enabled, its process and its outcome (Appendix 4: Case Studies). The role of the baseline study changed as schools joined up later on, developed fast or dropped out: the common denominator was shifting as fast as it could be captured. For this reason, the baseline took on more of the characteristics of the case studies, with more in-depth questioning from the evaluators and less focus on general issues at the beginning and end of the pilot. Of the 25 schools, in addition to the 9 case studies, detailed feedback has so far been received from a further 8 secondary and 2 primary schools.

2.4 The Authors Corinna Downing has been working in the field of film and media education for 12 years. Her work has covered the formal and informal sector at all ages for cultural and educational organisations and cinemas in London and the South East. Her most recent projects include the London Children’s Film Festival (Film Programme Consultant 2005- ), London Film Festival (Education Coordinator 20002005), Primary Advisor (UK Film Council Education Strategy 3-14s Group, 2006- ) as well as ongoing consultancy and events delivery for the BFI, Lambeth CLC and other organisations and film festivals. Hilary Peace has been a qualified teacher for 20 years, working from Foundation stage to Lifelong Learning. In film and media education since 1997, she specialises in training and resources for primary, having developed and written award-winning cine-literacy materials including Starting Stories (BFI Education, 2003). At the BFI she started as Education Officer at the Museum of the Moving Image, then Education Development Officer for 3-14yr olds UK-wide. In this capacity she contributed to partnerships with organisations and initiatives including The National Strategy (Literacy). Currently Education Content Manager for Film Street, a film website for children, she also works as a Consultant for Lambeth CLC.

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Engaging the school: staff, parents and young people

Engaging the school: Key points •

Film is a medium which is accessible: a popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and take pleasure in responding to. Developing this enthusiasm with a wider selection of films in an after school setting, Film Club’s child-centred focus has young people participate from the first step.

The positive effects of Film Club, in terms of the inspiration, entertainment, engagement and educational value of film, reinforce the acknowledged potential impact of film on young people

For pilot schools, Film Club is a welcome and well-structured ‘package’ as an addition to Extended Services provision and may provide a model for Extended Services

The lack of direct cost of the Film Club pilot for schools was a great encouragement and teachers indicated that they would be glad to see it remain at no or low cost

In many pilot schools, teachers, young people and parents cooperate on the programming and delivery of their Film Club.

3.1 The value of film for young people, as entertainment, art form, inspiration, tool for learning Just over 800 children and young people age 5-18 took part in the Film Club pilot project, from 25 schools in London, Kent, Surry and Northern Ireland. Film Club’s appeal to schools and the wider school community was two-fold: at pilot stage it offered a limited but varied complete package of filmrelated activity, which closely met the requirements of Extended Schools. As schools look for new and innovative ideas to develop their after school or extra-curricular provision, Film Club brings the world of cinema to them to operate as a stand alone activity or to link with other formal and informal work. Increasing young audiences’ access to mainstream and less widely available independent and world cinema is an aim shared by Film Club, educators and the wider arts sector. Film is a varied, complex and infinitely varied art form, offering a window on the world from filmmakers from around the world over a century of cinema. Film is also an accessible medium: a popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and take pleasure in responding to. Developing and building on this enthusiasm with a wider selection of films in an after school setting, and linking it to other curricular or informal film activity, Film Club’s childcentred focus has young people participate in this from the first step. Access coupled with the skills for critical viewing is acknowledged to have the potential for a powerful impact on young people’s imaginations and their engagement with learning. That is: to refer to film as a ‘popular medium’ is to identify a key strength of Film Club. Evidence for this comes from various sources including:

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The research project Digital beginnings: Young children’s use of popular culture, media and new technologies led by Jackie Marsh at the Literacy Research Centre, University of Sheffield in 2005. The project drew several key links between home, early learning and producers of material for the age range covered (6 years and under). The Executive Summary noted that, ‘Young children are immersed in practices relating to popular culture, media and new technologies from birth. They are growing up in a digital world and develop a wide range of skills, knowledge and understanding of this world from birth. Parents and other family members scaffold this learning ,either implicitly or explicitly, and children engage in family social and cultural practices which develop their understanding of the role of media and technology in society.’

The experience of the piloting and delivery, from 2001 to the present, of the British Film Institute’s short films packages for schools including Starting Stories for Foundation and Key Stage 1 (3-7 year olds) and Screening Stories for Key Stage 3 (11-14 year olds). Pupil response included increased motivation and engagement with learning, particularly for pupils ‘hard to reach’ with written texts, and teachers found ways to use the short films across the school to maximise the potential of this enthusiasm for literacy and the wider curriculum.

To provide evidence for the development of the UK Film Council’s UK-wide Education Strategy, consultant Jim Barratt researched current provision for audiences age 3-14, 14-19 and adult. Looking at investment levels in the broader picture of ‘education’ over 2004-06 from across national and local agencies, he found that generally there was less investment in activities aimed at 3-14 year olds than for 14-19 year olds and adults. What activity there was for younger audiences/learners was more creative than critical and, ‘investment for children and young people aged 3-19 was weighted in favour of those outside of school of college.’ In addition, 3-14 year olds, ‘benefited from 18.1% of total investment… The majority (66%) of this went to 3-14 year olds outside school… Well over half of all investment for 3-14 year olds went into supporting creative activity (57.0%).’

St Helens Primary School, Barnsley, Yorkshire

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3.1 How Film Club capitalizes on the opportunities for film in Extended Services The complete package of ‘Film Club’ is what differentiates it from clubs initiated (and on-going) in schools and independent cinemas in the past: it offers a tailored ‘way in’ for all schools which have the facility to screen films. This is via its core film programming and marketing support, the development of the network of teachers and children sharing views and learning experiences, and the Public Video Screening (PVS) License for each school supplied by Filmbank – at £75 per school – and the UK-wide DVD hire service offered by LOVEFiLM. Film Club sought to capitalize on the Extended Schools’ agenda in that it operated via the shared participation of staff, young people and their parents. From first engaging a key teacher in a school, the Film Club website and office offered support, encouragement and practical ideas for teachers to involve children and young people of all ages. Where teachers ensured that the process, experience of film viewing and outcomes of the Film Club experience were all positive, young people responded with enthusiasm and developed a great sense of ownership of their Film Club. Where parents and PTAs became involved in the running of clubs, the wider community ownership was broadened and deepened. With the support of Heads, each school’s key contact teacher used Film Club for different purposes according to the needs. Issues affecting their choices were their schools’ planning and funding for Extended Services, transport to get younger children and/or those in rural areas home, teachers’ own commitment to developing media provision in and out of the curriculum. Other After School Clubs at school ranged from one or two options including sport and music to a vast selection including drama, cookery, public speaking and booster clubs. The majority of teachers mentioned that the fact that the costs of the pilot had been covered by Film Club was a great encouragement: it facilitated the start up of the club in their school, and would be a great incentive to continue into the future. This was primarily as it increased access, but also as it enabled them to direct funding towards improving viewing facilities for their club.

St Augustines High School, Kilburn, London

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3.3 School staff involvement A key teacher in each school liaised between staff, children, parents and Film Club to manage the club or clubs, from ordering films to making sure the projector was out of the hall before the cleaners arrived. In primary schools, teachers running the club tended to have a related area of responsibility, including Literacy Co-ordinators, a specialist Reading Co-ordinator and a Head of Year. In secondary schools, the roles included a Behaviour Mentor, Extended Hours Co-ordinator, Head of English and Head of Media Studies. There was also one example of a LEA Transition Project Co-ordinator.

Hackney Free & Parochial Secondary School, Hackney, London Across the pilot project, the great successes were in schools in which the Head was fully supportive and the key teacher had a personal interest in film which they were keen to convey: one described a ‘passion for film’, and many enjoyed a variety of mainstream and independent cinema. While some were not able to commit any more time than the minimum required to ensure smooth running, some staff in secondary schools encouraged young people to manage the club themselves, and other staff enjoyed discussing ideas with colleagues and pupils and the chance to watch films they themselves would like to see. In the majority of schools participating in the pilot, the Film Club idea ‘took off’. Teachers appreciated the simplicity of the package in order to be able to try out ideas with their clubs and participate in the development of Film Club by feeding back these ideas and the means they found to establish the structure within the school, as well as the processes for recruitment and film ordering. They valued it as a new addition to their school and were open to suggestions for future developments. By the summer term of the Film Club pilot, 22 of the 25 pilot schools were operating fully established film clubs. Ten of the secondary schools had been in operation since January 2007, as had all 8 of the original primary schools. Four secondary schools started later on in the spring term, in March, and were continuing in the summer term. Reasons for delays were commonly lack of staff time, busy existing schedules and issues to do with the geographical layout of school buildings themselves. Three secondary schools had struggled to establish film clubs, owing largely to the issues faced by the four schools above. These 3 all had ideas for how Film Club might yet have an impact on their school: Barnsley College is interested in including Film Club in the curriculum, Canterbury High School still manage one film Club session per fortnight owing to lack of space, and Woldgate College is looking to

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transfer Film Club activity to another school in the same cluster. [As well as the educational links] I see Film Club as about, quite simply, enjoying movies. It’s also a great opportunity to engage students in a wider variety of films including world cinema, art house, classics, etc. Already the students are flagging up how they like seeing something different. There have also been a number of students coming out of the woodwork and flagging up their favourite films that they would like their peers to look at. Head of Media Studies. St Edmunds Catholic School, Dover For our target areas, although we didn’t realise it initially, [Film Club] is hitting pretty much every one spot on: boys’ writing, external provision and going for an Artsmark award…. [Also] I know by doing this over time I’ll get more out of them the next day. KS2 Teacher, Newport Primary School

3.4 Parental involvement Parents played varied role in clubs, more actively in primary schools. All parents of primary age children spoken to for the evaluation were happy that their children attended Film Club, recognising that it was good for them socially and culturally. They appreciated their children being involved in a worthwhile after school activity, something enjoyable and ‘safe’ on school premises. There was less feedback from parents at secondary schools, where young people either made their own way home or were quickly collected by car. At Newport Primary School in Yorkshire the PTA had set aside part of its budget as a self-contained Film Club fund, added to by the sales of hot dogs, popcorn and drinks with a view to buying new blackout blinds. And at Taughmonagh Primary School in Belfast, parents with pre-school children were invited to sit at the back of the school hall and watch the film: one mother said how glad she was to now be able to share the experience with her 8-year-old son, ‘Now we can talk about it at home.’ They wouldn’t particularly sit at home, if it was the two of them, and watch a foreign film. It wouldn’t interest them at all, but [at Film Club] their friends are sat there. Mother of two boys aged 7 and 11. Newport Primary School Quickly with the first film I established the pro-forma ticket. It’s free: the kids get a ticket and they’ve got to take it home and they’ve got to get it signed by a parent. It’s like a consent, because the film’s going to finish at half five. It’s an easy system: if they haven’t got a ticket, they don’t come in. Head of Media Studies. The Kingstone School

3.5 Selecting the audience In schools in which a system for the club was quickly established and supported by the staff, retaining membership was not a problem. In schools in which the ethos of the club was less clear, the selection of films less focused and teachers’ time over-stretched, membership numbers could dwindle. Plans for recruitment drives included advertising on the schools’ intranet, presentations in assembly, a ‘bring a friend’ scheme and building on pre-existing initiatives to link year groups within Key Stages. Most schools offered the club to one Key Stage, attracting 15-30 members initially, although others accommodated larger or split audiences into more than one group. Some schools were, or had to be owing to school timetables, more creative with the role of the club: •

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There were two after school clubs at Taughmonagh Primary School: For the first 4 weeks Key Stage 1 (Years P1-3, age 4-7) watched films at 1.30-3pm, and for the second 4 weeks Key Stage 2 (Years P4-7, ages 7-11) watched films 3.15-4.45pm. They were glad to be able to offer the club to children from across the school, but looked forward to choosing a broader programme for a single Key Stage.


The club was part of a Transition Project at Hartsdown Technology College, Margate: the school offered its Year 7s three activities to share with Year 6s from 5 feeder primary schools. As well as film, they could join a cookery or music club. These options turned out to be better suited to the needs of the project than film, in that they were more ‘hands on’ activities, but the project co-ordinator saw that the club could work well at Hartsdown for Key Stage 4 students who had already expressed an interest in having their own Film Club.

At Sandwich Technology School, every available space at lunchtime and in afternoon slots was occupied by Film Club in order to offer it across the school in the impressive 40-seat cinema: Key Stage 3 had Wednesday afternoons, Key Stage 4 had Monday/Tuesday/Thursday lunchtimes and the 6th Form had Friday afternoons. Of these, only the 6th Form usually managed to watch an entire film in one sitting: KS3 watched films in 2 halves, and KS4 needed 4 lunchtimes to complete Munich. The KS4 students interviewed for the evaluation would have preferred not to break up the viewing but preferred to have Film Club in this way rather than not at all.

Hackney Free & Parochial Secondary School, Hackney, London

3.6 ‘Selling’ Film Club to young people This was almost universally described by staff as a positive experience, particularly to those pupils who mentioned the most common alternatives as hanging out with friends, doing something sporty, doing homework or being at home with siblings. For those who watched films on a regular basis it was usually at home on satellite or terrestrial TV with family, upstairs in their room on TV or computer. A few regularly chose DVDs to hire or buy, generally citing watching films with friends as the best part of this and any cost involved as a chief deterrent to doing it more. Cinema going was an enjoyable activity which many children did as often as they could. This was the least likely means for younger children to see films, as a result of cost or geography. Film Club members age 11+ were more likely to visit a cinema independently, and some said that they usually went on the one afternoon and Saturday morning that a local cinema had cheaper seat prices. School trips to the cinema were rare but much enjoyed: the Film Club at Newport Primary School went to the cinema in Hull to see Amazing Grace, linking to recent work on the abolition of slavery in PSHCE. For

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this they asked a fee of £2.50 per child to supplement Film Club funding which covered coach travel and the film.

Newport Primary School visiting Hull Ocean to see Amazing Grace [I introduced it to the children as] a different kind of club. If you’re the kind of person who likes blockbusters or who just likes the brand new films out and you find it difficult to sit through a film, maybe this club is not for you. This is for people who really love films – it will take you on a journey. KS2 Teacher. Newport Primary School When Mr Reeve said about [Film Club] everyone said, “I want to do it! I want to do it!” And there were only 30 places so we were really lucky to get in. Girl, 10, Newport Primary School

Engaging the school: Recommendations

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Enlisting the support of Heads and the skills of staff with responsibility for year groups, Literacy, Behaviour, Extended Hours and other related areas ensured that Film Club had a significant presence across the school which encouraged young people to sign up. Identifying and supporting these key staff is essential to the success of Film Club.

Teachers with less personal or professional knowledge of film were keen to see more programmed groups of films on the website, particularly the age-specific seasons. Teachers with more knowledge of film were more confident in offering context for screenings and leading discussions. Film Club’s support in selecting films, particularly more world, independent and archive titles, and in contextualising them play a key role in the development of Film Club as a means for young people to watch more independent and world cinema. Focus groups of teachers to advise on this area are planned for the future.

Parents’ involvement, particularly in primary schools, gave Film Club a strong community feel and further strengthened its operational structure. Working more closely and specifically with parents and PTAs may have a significant impact in sustaining and growing Film Clubs in schools and in creating supportive links from the wider community.

Young people who did not usually have the opportunity to watch films out of the home or in a social setting were particularly enthusiastic about the Film Club offer. Capitalising on the informal, social context for watching films is central to the success of Film Club, and advice for teachers wishing to use the experience to link to other areas of school will need to acknowledge this core strength.


4 The films: Selecting, ordering and watching The films: Key points •

The wide selection of recent and older titles in the Film Club pilot was enthusiastically received by teachers, young people and parents as an opportunity to build on their existing knowledge and enthusiasm for film

89% of the films selected were released before 2005, of which the majority came from 1980-2004, with foreign language and silent films were also programmed to great response

In addition to their enthusiasm in helping to select films for their Film Club, young people enjoy the process of ‘bringing the cinema to school’ by preparing the room or hall

Young people’s behaviour was very good, and in some cases markedly improved, during Film Club sessions.

4.1 The Film Club film catalogue at pilot stage There are over 400 films on the Film Club website, selected by film journalist (The Guardian) and writer Danny Leigh from the titles in LOVEFiLM’s DVD hiring catalogue. Films are classified on the Film Club website by age ranges linked to British Board of Film Classification certificates (5-8s, 8-12s, 12-15s and 15-18s), as well as alphabetically, by theme and by season/age, with suggested pairings of titles, talking points and some general guidance. This selection offers a huge variety of titles, from recent releases to cinema classics, documentary, animation, silent and subtitled film. Although limited at pilot stage to the titles available from UK film distributors whose catalogue is covered the PVS License, it still offered Film Clubs a wide choice at pilot stage, and provided a solid foundation for future development of the Film Club catalogue via potentially incorporating material other catalogues. Teachers, parents and young people all commented that they thought the range was very exciting, and that it had offered them the opportunity to view films they had not seen for a long time or had never previously heard of.

4.2 Selecting the films As discussed in the Section 3, film is a varied, complex and infinitely varied art form, offering a window on the world from filmmakers from around the world over a century of cinema. It is also a uniquely accessible popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and take pleasure in responding to. Developing and building on this enthusiasm with a wider selection of films in an after school setting, Film Club’s child-centred focus has young people participate in this from the first step. Film Club encourages discussion between staff and pupils on the selection of films to be viewed. In the pilot, in general the teachers made preliminary selections – they all described it as a very enjoyable procedure, selecting via certificate, theme or using their own knowledge of the long list of titles to select from the alphabetical listing – many then asking children to vote on their preferred options.

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Staff with less personal knowledge of cinema tended to select more familiar titles. Staff with a greater or wider interest in film made some ‘riskier’ choices, enjoying the opportunity to challenge the children, choosing Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday and Duck Soup (Newport Primary School), Spirited Away and The Bridge on the River Kwai (The Kingstone School). While many staff were happy to manage selecting and presenting films with the information currently available, others suggested that they would appreciate more information from Film Club on selecting films and then framing screenings with introductions and discussions. This information would also then have the potential to link to other formal and informal activity across the school. Teachers of Media Studies and English who regularly screen films in class require parental permission for students to watch films guided by the British Board of Film Classification as being unsuitable for their age range, but which are appropriate for coursework. Teachers managing Film Clubs had all ensured that they had parents’ permission to screen anything above a specified age rating: at Sandwich Technology School, permission for 12/12As for Key Stage 3 (age 11-14), 15s for Key Stage 4 (14-16s) and 18s for 6th form (16-18s). The feedback from children and young people regarding their watching at home was that they were guided by their parents’ views on appropriate viewing, although a number mentioned having seen films above their ‘official’ viewing age. 89 films were selected during the evaluation period (Appendix 5: Schools’ film choices during pilot), of which most were comedy (31), drama (24) and animation (19), as well as fantasy (6), documentary (5) and musicals (4). 7 were subtitled, of which 6, ranging from La Haine to Das Boot, were chosen by secondary schools. The options for non-English language or more challenging subject matter for primaries were very limited at pilot stage. The wide selection of U/PG certificates were not all suitable: teachers at Whitstable and Seasalter Primary tried Babette’s Feast but did not think it was suitable for their children. 89% of the films selected were released before 2005: • • • • •

10 were produced in 2005/2006 29 were produced 2000-2004 32 were produced in the 1980s -1990s 16 were produced from the 1930s-1970s 2 were silent films (The General, Modern Times)

Many teachers said that once the Film Club was firmly established and trusted by members, film choices would become more adventurous and some suggested that more information and more themed groups of films would help with this. 16


A number of children and young people said that they would be interested in being even more involved in the selection of films, particularly in secondary schools. In primary schools many preferred a film to be a surprise although they agreed that knowing something about a film in advance contributed to their enjoyment. The basis for the choices would be most likely to come from friends’ recommendations, films they knew already and searching the Film Club website. There were examples of parents, teachers and children for whom Film Club had woken their enthusiasm for film and seeing more films. A PTA member in Yorkshire said that children had been asking their parents to buy or hire films they’d seen at Film Club to watch at home as a family, and a secondary school student included in his online review that he was planning to buy the DVD of Groundhog Day having enjoyed it so much. This response to the Film Club experience is not only significant in that it is producing an immediate effect young audiences and families to increase their film viewing, but also in that it strengthens existing and potential links between Film Club and the film industry, as discussed further in Section 3.2.ii I like to see the ones I haven’t seen because they’re really good, and if I get to watch it again I’ll know what it’s about. Girl, 7. Taughmonagh Primary School Sometimes it’s better to have a surprise of what you’re going to watch. Like The Princess Bride, I’d never heard of that before but then it turned out really good. Boy, 13. Hackney Free and Parochial C of E Secondary School

4.3 Ordering the films Staff were encouraged to order several titles at a time to have a better chance of receiving one they wanted, which would arrive by random selection according to availability a couple of days before the club. LOVEFiLM’s standard service is to send out only 2 DVDs at a time according to availability. Clubs were not able to programme films in order: staff did not cite this as a problem at pilot stage, with the novelty of Film Club still fresh, but some suggested that they would appreciate having this control over their clubs’ viewing. It would enable them to approach a theme or their own selection chronologically or by another criterion. The Head of Media Studies at the Snaith School suggested that it would enable him to programme a season which could be advertised in advance, perhaps involving another school, giving time for members to investigate the film in advance and parents advance notice of pick up times. Staff managing more than one club at a time spoke with the Film Club office which liaised with LOVEFiLM on their behalf to receive more titles at a time. If, for any reason, teachers did not order enough options to ‘cover’ themselves, no film arrived. In these cases, teachers or secondary students brought their own copy of the advertised film from home, and in one case a secondary student brought a carrier bag of 15 options from home (these films may or may not have been in the Film Club catalogue.) In order to accommodate this issue, Film Club is developing an ‘in house’ library of DVDs ready to mail out immediately should a school find themselves without a film. With the club being on Mondays I have some weeks been dependent on the film that has been advertised arriving on the day of the showing. This does not help my stress levels! Headteacher / PSHCE Co-ordinator. St Helen’s Catholic Primary School, Barnsley

4.4 Watching the films Over the pilot project January-March, there were a total of 152 screenings. Film Clubs took place in school halls, classrooms and, in one case, a school cinema. Projecting on to interactive whiteboards, walls painted white and permanent or temporary cinema-style screens, some schools used speakers attached to whiteboards while others had good quality PA systems. Most could blackout or at least darken the room, and several were so enthused by the success of the club to consider fund-raising for better equipment, seating and blackout. Primary schools usually sat children on the floor or on cushions, secondary students sat at desks or re-arranged the chairs. Several schools, again particularly

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primaries, enhanced the ‘cinema experience’ by providing popcorn, sweets and drinks. Pupil behaviour was largely seen to have been very good and respectful of the new opportunity being offered. A number of teachers mentioned how challenging young people, particularly in secondary schools, had surprised staff with how well they had responded to the club, having otherwise been regularly in trouble for anti-social behaviour. In one primary school the behaviour had not been good at the first club but teachers recognised that this was largely due to the choice of film and organisation of seats: subsequent sessions had been very successful. All staff saw Film Club as an opportunity to relate to pupils in an informal way at the same time as maintaining control to keep the session running smoothly. With War of the Worlds, they might have seen it at the pictures, with seven mates, and talked all the way through it. Whereas in the context we’ve got now there is a respect, for the screen, for the film… it’s like watching it with a bunch of adults, which is refreshing. Head of Media Studies. The Kingstone School What’s nice is that you might have an issue with a student in the classroom and then they’ll come to Film Club in the evening – that’s great, you can build bridges into your relationships, by just accepting them, welcoming everyone in. I say it has to be on the poster – everyone welcome. Head of Media Studies. St Augustine’s C of E Voluntary Aided Comprehensive, Kilburn You’re able to watch films from the start, because when you watch them at home they’re often half way through. Boy, 13. The Snaith School In Film Club you get to pull the blinds down and make it look like a cinema. Girl, 10. Lauriston Primary School At home I don’t watch English films, I have to watch Turkish films. At Film Club I watch different language films and I share stuff like my popcorn with my friends. Boy, 10. Lauriston Primary School

The Snaith School, Snaith, Yorkshire

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The films: Recommendations •

The role of BBFC guidelines will need to be made transparent to parents and teachers, especially in secondary schools. It is an advisory body only, but clearly one which many Film Club organisers will use to guide their film choices.

The selection of films for children age 12 and under needs to be broader and include more independent and world cinema. This may entail removing films for adult audiences with accessible BBFC certificates such as Babette’s Feast and Les Enfants du Paradis. This is an essential first step in young peoples’ ‘film education’. Suggestions for possible ways to do this are in Section 6: Recommendations

Teachers expressed an interest in having control of the order in which films arrived at school, which would encourage deeper critical thinking about the programming of specific titles by staff and young people. Film Club is already arranging with partner LOVEFiLM for more than one title to be available at a time, and this is a significant first step towards this.

Young people highly valued the opportunity to be involved in the programming and management of their Film Clubs. Teachers should be encouraged to guide and involve young people throughout the process, especially in light of some teachers having observed marked improvements in the behaviour of young people actively involved in Film Club activity

.

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5

Beyond the films: Discussion, film industry guests, the Film Club website

Beyond the films: Key points •

The full Film Club ‘package’ fulfils the key DfES objectives for Extended Services and offers a potential model for Extended Services provision

The Film Club website is a tool for engagement, facilitating independent and guided access to information and interactivity for teachers and young people: response by young people to the website was very strong: of the 635 who responded to an online questionnaire to rate the site, 73% rated it 4 or 5 out of 5

Guided discussion and independent writing enables young people to respond to films and develop their critical viewing skills

Film reviews written by young people are of great value to teachers, the writers and peers reading others’ reviews online. Offering a ‘review of the week’ is a current incentive, as are competitions. Enjoying expressing and sharing opinions is a key area for increasing critical understanding and appreciation of film

Meeting and interviewing film industry guests including directors and actors is an inspiring way for young people to participate in Film Club

While acknowledging the importance of maintaining an informal approach in which young people are open to absorbing the film viewing experience, teachers are enthusiastic about the potential to build on the success of Film Club to link with film and media-related work both in and out of the curriculum.

5.1 The role and delivery of supporting Film Club activity Film Club seeks to open up the world of cinema not only on screen, but in imaginative, inspiring ways which enable young people to go on their own journeys through their discovery of film both in school and out. This includes helping to select the film programme as covered in Section 3, and also the opportunity to develop their knowledge, appreciation and critical understanding of film via talk, meeting film industry guests and writing for the Film Club website. This extra activity is a valuable part of the Film Club package in that it creates a supportive and participatory context for young people to watch films. To build on this key success of the pilot and to fulfill After School Club criteria it is essential that they retain an informal, sociable character, enhanced by making links to film production, reviewing films and meeting people who make films. Further development activities, linking to provision already taking place in schools, cinemas, film festivals and participatory video organisations, may in future make mutually beneficial links to Film Club at local and national level, some suggestions for which are covered in Section 6. Central issues to do with this existing extra activity are the opportunities and limitations provided by the average 120-minute After School Club session: a 100-minute film only just allows for members to arrive, have snacks if on offer and have a quick introduction. Guided discussion, when staff created a further time slot in the week, was rare. More often, discussing the film was an informal experience between the young people as they leave the club, at home and the next day in school. Writing reviews for the website and browsing website content happened either in independent study periods at school or in lunchtimes and at home: this meant there although it was similarly largely unmediated by staff, it allowed young people the much-valued (by them) chance to interact with Film Club on their own terms at their own pace. 20


During the pilot, 6 out of the 25 schools met film industry guests. These were all secondary schools, and discussion between young people and the well-known Director, Art Director, and actors was broad, detailed and enthusiastic. This element of Film Club’s overall offer is of particular interest to schools, whether to entertain the children, give them insight to the filmmaking process or introduce them to a person from a starrier side of the business world. As a fully serviced and supported After School Club ‘package’, Film Club fulfils the key DfES objectives for Extended Services. It is unique in offering so much as a complete ‘off the shelf’ service to bring in to the school as part of a national network and as such, it may offer a potential model for Extended Services provision for different ages and subject areas/activities. Further examples of existing provision are in Section 6.2.

5.2 Introductions and discussions Approaches to introductions and follow up discussions varied. Many teachers who liked the idea of introducing a film in detail were prevented by lack of time in a session, others who wanted to felt that were under-qualified to talk about a film they didn’t know, others were concerned that it would be too close to a curricular approach to using film in the classroom. Overall, more information, from background context to bite-sized chunks of information with which to whet young people’s appetites for the upcoming screening, would have been seen by staff in the pilot as a useful addition to the Film Club offer. Film Club members who had minimal talk around the film did not appear to miss it, saying that they liked to chat about it with peers in their own time. However, members who did investigate the film further through talk valued it as a key part of the club which helped them to further their appreciation of the films per se and allowed them to socialize with their peers. The children are buzzing about it, and one of the things they say is that they like it because they can come with their friends and talk with them afterwards. KS2 Teacher. Whitstable and Seasalter Primary School

Whitstable and Seasalter Primary School, Whitstable, Kent

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There’s a great social skill that they’re learning. Sometimes it could be that they’re not used to going to a cinema and sitting watching with other people. To actually have conversations about something that they’ve watched together and have their own opinions. I think they’re all invaluable to our students: the fact that they’re being mature and sensible and making their own choices. English Teacher. Sandwich Technology School Sometimes you’re sitting in there and you’re relaxing but you’re kind of learning at the same time. Instead of – say you’re in English and you’re watching a video and you don’t really understand it because you’re not really concentrating or you’re doing work at the same time. It’s easier in Film Club because you’re watching it and you can be thinking about it because you’re not having to think about other things as well. Boy, 13. The Snaith School

5.3 The website The website operates as part of Film Club as a core ‘tool for engagement’ for young people. As such, it was planned by Film Club to play an integral role in the ‘youth orientated’ focus of Film Club, aimed primarily at children and young people rather than teachers. It was user tested, designed and built by CIMEX, the award-winning company whose credits include the Teachernet website and the DfES’s youth portal, ‘need2know’. The website grew over the period of the evaluation to include a number of different areas with varying amounts of content. It is planned to develop interactivity further with chat spaces and other ways for members’ to contribute and play an active role in a UK-wide network in national roll out in September 2007, which will in turn have further implications for content and web safety. Members access the site with a username and password arranged via their teacher. From the 25 pilot schools and unidentified users, the website received a significant overall total of 348,410 hits, and recorded a total of 16,355 sessions between 10 January and 31 March.

Hackney Free & Parochial Secondary School, Hackney, London

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The overall writing style of the site is aimed at children and young people to give them a sense of participation and ownership, at the same time as offering staff directions on how to use it to manage their club. The design of the site hits a mid-range 11-12 year old, covering the demands of more sophisticated older members and more visually ‘spare’ than most websites aimed at younger children. At time of writing, the website includes: • Information about Film Club, how to set up a club, contact details • Films listed alphabetically, by age grouping and by themed groupings (‘Journeys’) • ‘Access All Areas’ of 10 sections including recent information (‘News & events’, ‘Fresh on the site’), input from film industry (‘VIP visits’, ‘Interviews & features’), movie trivia (‘Did you know?’), clips (‘Video clips’ of Film Club activity, ‘Trailer park’ of recent trailers), members’ own writing and opportunities to get involved (‘Review of the week’, ‘Competitions’) and listings information for local cinemas across the UK (‘What's on in your area’). • Pdfs of teaching materials by Film Education • Information about anti-piracy In the near future, the website will be developed to include four main areas: the home page, the editorial content of ‘Access All Areas’, a teachers’ area and a section in which users can link to activities offered by other organisations which progress from their Film Club experience, whether in making films, watching films or pursuing another art form. It will also be possible to identify the user as they log in, lading them directly to information appropriate for their age range and geographical location.

Most teachers liked the site very much, finding it visually engaging and informative. They had not used the Film Education teaching resource pdfs as they had not had time to extrapolate the information they may have needed from a document aimed at classroom work. They suggested that ‘programme notes’ designed with the specifics of After School Clubs would be useful. Some teachers were concerned about web safety of future chat rooms for members, and many had interesting suggestions for its development, including: Larger type for primary and KS3 children and children with disabilities; • A teachers’ area to exchange notes and have a FAQs or information section. This was already planned by Film Club, and therefore of great value to receive teacher endorsement in the pilot; • Basic factsheets/programme notes on films to offer material for introductions and discussions and to help inform selection of films; • More themed sections, which give them valuable information on links between titles which 23


• •

they may not otherwise know, as well as ‘ready made’ selections to save time on the alphabetical or age range listings; Interviews with film industry personnel from ‘behind’ the camera; More links to other related sites aimed at young people.

Children and young people liked the site. They liked the quality and quantity of the information, liked the images and liked reading other members’ reviews. The majority had made time to access the site during break or study periods at school as, as with discussion about the film, there wasn’t time during Film Club itself. Some experienced difficulties accessing it at home without a teacher handy. The only minor comments regarding changes came from older members, who loved the content overall but found the use of film stills as generic illustration could be confusing, and were less keen on the red text on black background. Children and young people were asked in a simple online questionnaire to rate the site. Out of the 635 who entered a rating: • • • •

73% rated it 4 or 5 out of 5 21% rated it 3 out of 5 3% rated it 2 out of 5 2% rated it 1 out of 5

The children seem to be able to find their way around it very easily and they can access the competition site and the question and answer site. KS2 Teacher, Lauriston Primary School I like reading Year 7 and 8 reviews because they’re more complex, rather than [my] age group. Boy, 11 (Year 6). Newport Primary School

5.4 Writing for the website The majority of teachers had encouraged Film Club members of all ages to write reviews which were then emailed to Film Club. Writers were reminded by staff of reviewing skills learned in Literacy, English and Media Studies, but otherwise the work was done independently in their own time. Reviews appear on the site in sometimes reduced but unedited form, varying from enthusiastic but non-specific endorsements to thoughtful and detailed overviews (Appendix 6: Young people’s film reviews for Film Club website for more examples). Many teachers were keen to see this element of the club develop, to further increase participation, to increase members’ confidence and skill in expressing their opinions.

Hotel Rwanda

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An amazing piece of work, magnificently directed, by far the best drama that I have seen in some time (and I’ve seen my fair share). The shockingly violent scenes force you to wonder how mankind can act as such savages; killing each other due to mere identity and belief. Are we humans really so great when there are still such atrocities occurring in today’s world? However, there were some heart-wrenchingly, tearful scenes where one can only hope that a large box of tissues are nearby (sob). All in all, I recommend this film to people of a mature personality - due to the violence shown - and I hope that Hotel Rwanda will reach into your hearts and feelings, as much as it did mine. 5/5! :) Enjoy the film! Boy, 15. St Augustine’s High School MILLIONS!!!! ITS A BRILL FILM ANYONE CAN WATCH IT. THE SCRIPT IS BRILL AND THE ACTORS ARE BRILL TO NOT ONE TO MIS OUT ON!!!!!!!!!!!!! Boy, 14. The Snaith School [Writing about the films they watch at Film Club] is very, very important. We don’t want them to just come and watch a film and that’s it… Just the fact that they’re engaging and [their review is] going out somewhere into the nether world and they can see their names, ‘hey, look, that’s me!’. Their writing has developed: they have ownership of their writing as well as their viewing. Head of Media Studies. The Snaith School

5.5 Film industry visits Industry visits were arranged for the London secondary schools taking part in the pilot: •

Director Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) and actor Thandie Newton (Amazing Grace) met and were interviewed by students at the Film Club launch day on 15 February at St Augustine’s C of E Voluntary Aided Comprehensive, Kilburn

Art Director Neil Lamont (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire) met students at Hackney Free and Parochial C of E Secondary School

Actor Rosamund Pike (Die Another Day) met students at Paddington Academy and Queens Park Secondary

Rosamund Pike visiting Paddington Acadamy, London

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Director Yousaf Ali Khan had special Q&A with students from 3 schools after a screening of his yet unreleased new film (Almost Adult) in the bfi Southbank Studio, in an event organised for Film Club by Mark Reid, Head of Education at the British Film Institute.

At Hackney Free and Parochial, members had prepared their own questions for Art Director Neil Lamont and the session was very successful. Their interest was sustained and their confidence in their own questioning skills grew visibly as the session progressed. An interview between a young Film Club member and Neil Lamont was filmed for the Film Club website in order that members UK-wide could access the experience of their peers. All schools thought industry visits would be beneficial and the pupils would be excited to have someone ‘real’ from the film world, with a number suggesting that even a local filmmaker would be useful, i.e. that it didn’t have to be a ‘big name’. Teachers also thought visits out to film studios, sets and cinemas could be added in the future. Pupils said they would like to have visits from directors and film stars.

5.6 Curriculum links Neither primary nor secondary schools had formally linked Film Club to the curriculum, as membership of the club always went across more than one year group. Primary teachers recognised the possibilities for links, in particular with literacy, PSHCE and Citizenship. Some had made their long lists of film options in consultation with colleagues in relation to areas of the curriculum to be covered that term. There was a range of ideas about making connections between Extended Services and the curriculum, especially in light of the new flexible Primary Strategy. A number of teachers wishing to develop film and media related work in the curriculum saw Film Club as a ‘way in’ to this.

The Snaith School, Snaith, Yorkshire In secondary schools, all teachers saw the potential for linking with curriculum areas, particularly with Media Studies, English, Art and Drama, but again no formal links had yet been made. As in primary schools, there was a general wish not to confuse the aims of after school activities with the

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requirements of the curriculum. We have the interactive whiteboards which make things so much easier and a lot of us a beginning to incorporate it into our teaching more. The English 21 Forum is all about incorporating new literacies into the ways we teach literacy. Just to teach with books is completely anachronistic now, it’s just not part of the 21st century. So, it’s a question of getting people to take on new things and look at things from new perspectives, and I’m very interested in doing that.” KS2 Teacher. Whitstable and Seasalter Primary School I am guiding [the School Council] to choose for content that raises particular issues, i.e. bullying / environment / gender. I then use the issues addressed in the film to reference to the schools’ weekly Statement of Belief as a focus for assembly. Headteacher / PSHCE Co-ordinator. St Helen’s Catholic Primary School, Barnsley I don’t want to be seen as overtly pushing a curriculum motive at the students. They’ll see that one a mile away. However, there are countless films that reinforce curriculum content by stealth. Head of Media Studies. St Edmunds Catholic School in Dover A number of teachers were interested in the inherently cultural impact of film, especially in its ability to be a ‘window’ into other worlds. The potential impact of this across the school was one which they felt had curricular and social value. For them to develop this thread in Film Club would need support and guidance, particularly if it involves films from other countries unknown by the teachers. It wouldn’t necessarily have to be a subtitled film. A wee animation from a different country, something with a different flavour to it, which would be great because we haven’t actually got many texts from other cultures. So, to bring in films from other cultures would be quite an interesting idea. KS2 teacher. Taughmonagh Primary School We were already talking about cultural capital for our kids and having some kind of shared cultural awareness, and what could we do to build that up… We have sixty six languages here, they are from all over the world, there are a lot of refugee children here proportionally, too. We are also one of the most deprived area in the country so lots of reasons for wanting to promote anything that gives the kids a window on something other than their own immediate experiences. Head of Media Studies. St Augustine’s High School

5.7 Film Club posters, postcards, membership cards The design and function of the posters was appreciated and useful to all schools, and most teachers had set up a colourful notice board in a public area for the poster, postcards and examples of members’ reviews. The postcards were liked but seen as having less identifiable purpose. The membership cards on UK Film Council lanyards were enjoyed very much by primary and Key Stage 3 members. Although no school visited insisted on children wearing them to Film Club itself, members were pleased to be able to show them to friends and family and thought they might wear them if they ever were involved in a trip out of school as part of Film Club, although some were worried that the card wasn’t strong enough and a couple had torn theirs. At Key Stage 4 and above the idea of ‘membership’ was at present generally one they were less keen to identify with in this way: they are likely to respond more as Film Club develops membership cards to offer benefits such as, potentially, discounts and preview screening.

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Beyond the films: Recommendations

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Harnessing members’ enthusiasm to learn and giving them the tools to actively develop their knowledge, appreciation and understanding of film could take them bravely out of the ‘comfort zone’ of mainstream commercial cinema for which many of them is their sole understanding or cinema. Mediating both viewing and discussion are vital ways in which to develop confidence and critical viewing, especially of independent and world cinema.

Enjoying expressing and sharing opinions is a key area for increasing critical understanding and appreciation of film, and the structured development of this creative writing activity may be useful in taking young people ‘a step further’.

The success of the Film Club website as a tool for engagement may be measured in part by the very high user ratings from young people. Building on and retaining this engagement with the website, working with young people in the site’s evolution, will be a key area of activity for Film Club.

Ensuring that film industry visits these can be enjoyed by clubs across the UK, in person as well as via recorded interviews on the website, is a significant ‘extra’ offer from Film Club. It is important that they fulfil Film Club criteria, both in terms of content and delivery, whether well-known names or local industry talent.

For teachers wishing to explore links with the curriculum, the teachers’ area of the Film Club site could usefully link with existing providers of background information and teaching resources, drawing on existing materials and potentially creating further links for Film Clubs across schools locally and nationally.

The full Film Club ‘package’ as piloted from January 2007 fulfils the key DfES objectives for Extended Services. Its success offers as a model for Extended Services provision and the potential for DfES use as a model for other activities.


6

The context for Film Club: policy, best practice and the film industry

The context for Film Club: Key points •

Film Club fits with government initiatives, particularly the DfES’s Extended Services agenda and the DCMS’s Creative Economy programme. In the Extended Services sector, the structure and complete package offered by Film Club has the potential to act as a ‘blueprint’ for the development of the sector UK-wide.

Film Club has the potential to augment, and work in partnership with, organisations in the field of film and media education and the development of young audiences for film. In the future, this it may play a significant and unique role within the UK Film Council’s UK-Wide Education Strategy.

In addition to Film Club’s film industry partners, on a regional level there are strong links to be made with Regional Screen Agencies, exhibitors and young people’s film festivals

Film Club is well placed to reinforce the ‘Respect for Intellectual Property’ message to young audiences.

6.1 The context for Film Club The context for Film Club is three-fold: •

The policies relating to young people, education, extended schools and film viewing of the UK Film Council, the Department for Media, Culture and Sport and the Department for Education and Skills

The landscape of existing best practice providers of film and media activity and resources in formal and informal settings, as well as the variety of modes in which young people may access film

A UK film industry keen to develop the film viewing and cinema-going habit, both in the commercial and independent sectors.

The challenge for Film Club is to integrate existing policy, provision and industry agendas into an organisation that supports and develops these agendas at the same time as putting the needs of schools and young viewers first.

6.2 Policy Where policy may have provided an existing framework with which Film Club could make strategic links at pilot stage, in the longer term Film Club may also play a role in the development and evolution of policy agendas.

6.2.i The UK Film Council’s UK-Wide Education Strategy The UK Film Council’s UK-Wide Education Strategy, to be in place for 2012, will create a unified strategy for educational activity for UK audiences, ages 3-14, 14-19 and adult. Film Club relates directly to the work of the UKFC in that it offers cultural access, a forum in which to develop critical

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skills and is replicable in schools across the country, capturing the largest possible number of 3-18s. Tim Cagney, Head of UK Partnerships at the UK Film Council, suggests that for him, ‘the strengths of Film Club are that it offers equality of access not based in ability to pay or geographic access. It has the unique ability to let the very best of world culture into all classrooms and schools (ie the product quality will be the same everywhere), it looks like great fun, the fact that it’s run via the school means that it captures the largest amount of children and young people. It’s sustainable and replicable across the UK.’ He looks forward to Film Club making strategic links to the UKFC’s key partners and delivery organisations: The BFI, Regional Screen Agencies, First Light Movies and Film Education. He suggests that it is important for Film Club to be, ‘developing links and partnerships with other organizations within the ‘film family’ to ensure non-duplication. UKFC and UK-Wide Education Strategy are looking to create a coherent, joined up approach for all agencies involved in film education.’

6.2.ii The DCMS A key priority of the DCMS is to engage children and young people and increase participation. In film, it supports organisations that embed media literacy in schools, reiterate the issues around Intellectual Property and develop future audiences via greater participation, understanding and enjoyment of film. These initiatives include Skillset, Film Education’s ‘Film Theft’ pack, First Light Movies and BFI Screenonline. Additionally, the Creative Economy Programme, launched in 2005 to build success in the UK is creative industries, focuses on education and skills as the first step towards achieving this goal. Phil Clapp, Deputy Director (Creative Industries) for the DCMS, sees the strengths of Film Club as being that it is: ‘Not overly burdensome on teachers but aimed at augmenting the current agenda rather than simply adding to it – engagement with teachers and evaluation of where they see the initiative adding value is critical to this; [That it has] cross industry support and ability to overcome traditional obstacles, particularly rights issues; The intention to map it across Government priorities, particularly the Extended Schools programme; [That is offers a ] theme-structure is a strength, taking the initiative beyond simply watching movies for fun, into an educational/cultural forum – enables film to be used of film as a medium of cultural exploration and understanding. Furthermore, web-based interaction encourages active rather than passive participation.’ He cites three areas of Film Club which he is most interested to see developed. These are an; ‘embedded Respect for IP message in the website/teaching packs, the theme structure to ensure both enjoyment of film and learning elements are combined, links with [or] at least directs its users (teachers, parents, children) to other initiatives.’

6.2.iii The DfES Every Child Matters A cross-government initiative begun in 2003 for young people in the UK up to the age of 19, Every Child Matters aims to give them the support needed to succeed in 5 key areas: be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve economic well-being. Extended Services A key means of delivering Every Child Matters outcomes, Film Club is well placed as an external agency to work in partnership with schools to provide a unique after school activity. Evidence from teachers in the pilot project suggests that Film Club has the potential to deliver key benefits to children and young people for whom Extended Services were designed: For pupils, this includes improved attainment, attendance and behaviour. For families, a positive impact on parental involvement in their children's education, which can also support improved attainment. 30


The learning charity ContinYou which runs The Extended Schools Support Service (TESSS), supports schools and LEAs in developing extended hours provision, and may also help develop Film Club schools in terms of developing links with the local community. Primary National Strategy (Literacy) A key element of the new PNS in place since September 2006 is the revised Literacy Framework which reflects the expectations of Every Child Matters, developments in ICT, and for the first time offers moving image texts parity with paper-based texts. Teachers considering the possibilities for linking film-related activity in class and Film Club can use this greater flexibility in several ways: in the elements of literacy teaching, the longer sequences and units of work which allow for filmmaking etc, in harnessing the motivational impact of film and applying it, via literacy, across the whole primary curriculum.

Rt Hon Gordon Brown MP talking to Film Club members at St Augustines High School, London

6.2.iv Further cross-government priorities include: The Respect Action Plan Respect’s emphasis is on early intervention and action in schools, as well as homes and families: to prevent anti-social behaviour in the next generation it focuses on improving behaviour and attendance in schools and funding constructive activities for young people. As covered in Chapter 5, a number of teachers mentioned the positive impact which the Film Club experience had had on some of the more behaviourally challenged pupils. Nurturing Creativity in Young People The report from 2005, following the Creativity in Schools Review, set out what more could be done to nurture creativity in young people. It included a ‘framework for creativity’ from Early Years through mainstream education to ways into the Creative Industries, emphasising the need for coherence between these different stages. The Film Club partners already represent both the film industry and education sectors and may in future develop links with other initiatives in the field.

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6.3 Existing best practice Film Club, and its education partner Film Education, sit within a busy landscape of current practice. The selection here relate particularly to comments from interviews with staff and children during this evaluation.

St Augustines High School, Kilburn, London

6.3.i The British Film Institute The BFI’s mission is to grow the value of specialised film, within its remit to promote the appreciation and understanding of film and television to audiences across the UK. BFI Education focuses on children and young people, publishing teaching resources, delivering teacher training, and building a growing programme of informal work for local schools and community groups at BFI Southbank. They are particularly focused on developing provision for ‘out of hours’ film access for schools, offering a regular cinema-going experience and access to speakers from the film industry, such as the Almost Adult and director Q&A screenings for Film Club secondary schools at BFI Southbank during the pilot. Mark Reid, Head of BFI Education, suggests that, ‘Film Club offers opportunities for children and young people to access film material they don’t normally have a chance to see, either at home or in the curriculum. The ambition is huge… if this were reached, it would be a major intervention in film education and access.’ Considering the BFI’s potential partnership in Film Club, Mark Reid sees 3 possible areas in which both organisations might work together to reach young audiences across the UK: ‘An extension to the license that covered BFI titles just for Film Club [whereby] at a stroke a much wider range of film material would be available; [To] bring more specialised film content into distribution from abroad – the range of film for children and young people is very narrow, and limited to around 15-20 films released in the UK every year (out of about 400), and only a handful of these are not US or UK-made; Proactive access to BFI Screenonline… to young people to engage with on their own terms.’ It would be important for the BFI for Film Club to offer and encourage access to a wider range of films, 32


in addition to the current film catalogue and information on the website. This may be in collaboration with existing websites in the film education sector, rather than using resources to develop new materials.

6.3.ii Skillset As the Sector Skills Council for the Audio Visual Industries, Skillset focuses on the skills of those working the sector and the development needs of the UK film industry, as well as broadcast, video, interactive media and photo imaging. It funds training providers and delivery partners, and is itself funded by the film industry and government. Skillset is involved in the development of the Creative and Media Diploma for 14-19s as part of the Creative and Media Diploma Development Partnership (DDP). The partnership includes stakeholders from the film and other media industries, schools, colleges and the DfES. The flexible approach of the new qualification, available for first teaching in 2008, may offer the opportunity for meaningful links between Film Club, the DDP and 14-19s: in particular, the foci on engagement with learning in innovative and creative ways, progression routes into the Specialist Diploma from earlier school years and enhancing the experience of work-orientated learning with links to the film industry.

6.3.iii Organisations supporting young filmmakers

Paddington Acadamy, London With the digital technology available in schools, City Learning Centres, film and media organisations and homes, it’s never been easier for the experience of watching films to translate into producing their own films. A 12-year-old girl from Hackney Free and Parochial C of E Secondary School in London put it as, ‘I want to make my own movies and when I watch movies I get inspired.’ There are funding bodies and participatory filmmaking organisations making films with young people all over the UK, including:

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First Light Movies (FLM), begun in May 2001 and funded primarily by the UK Film Council via the National Lottery, provides funding to enable young people age 5 -18 from schools and community groups across the UK to make short films. It offers advice on local contacts and currently manages the Media Box fund for projects for 3-19s. Pip Eldridge, CEO of FLM, sees 2 key areas in which she and Film Club might work together, ‘FLM is keen to look at the training needs for people delivering in Extended Services and we would be interested in linking with Film Club to look at this as part of the delivery of our Film Street aims… Most of our [filmmaking projects] are undertaken in informal settings. Would membership be possible with PRUs or Youth Clubs and on a short term basis?’ FLM also work in partnership with The Script Factory to develop screenwriting materials for formal and informal education. The Script Factory offers events, training and other services to link screenwriters with the film industry. FLM also manage Film Street, in partnership with CBBC, the UK Film Council, the BFI and Creative Partnerships. Film Street is an interactive website for children, parents and teachers. Its character-led activities and clips of films, some made by children, could offer a ‘next step’ for primary schools wanting to explore online learning in class and at home. Cineclub facilitates after school filmmaking clubs for KS2 and KS3 teachers and pupils. Key elements include training with professional filmmakers, critical appreciation of film classics to inspire projects, screenings at independent cinemas and a focus on peer-led learning. Teachers and participating schools, currently in London and the South East, are members of a Cineclub Network.

6.3.iv Existing links between commercial and independent cinemas and schools Independent cinemas with education staff have relationships with schools and local providers of filmrelated activity, offering events and screenings in the cinema and externally. At bfi Southbank, as part of the pilot, Film Club members had the opportunity to meet with a film industry guests as a result of an existing link between the BFI and Film Club. UK-wide, independent cinemas that have worked with local partners to offer after school film clubs since the advent of Extended Services include the Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, the Glasgow Filmhouse and Leeds Film. In a simple approach to meeting the needs of LEA, cinema and local schools, the Rio Cinema in East London repeats its Saturday morning family title on Tuesday afternoons for primary schools. Despite some successes, on the whole cinemas have found that despite initial great enthusiasm, primary and secondary schools’ commitment to regular After School Club arrangements have been tested by a combination of transport, funding and film programming issues. At the Cambridge Arts Picturehouse Cinema, Trish Sheil, Education Co-ordinator (Cambridge Film Consortium) considers that, ‘The good thing about [Film Club] is that it’s coming from the school.’ If Film Club inspires teachers to make contact with cinemas, an arrangement could be made similar to an example from Cambridge whereby, ‘an individual teacher who loved film decided to go for a World Cinema Club. He’d request the film, it’d be booked, and he’d guarantee 50 students.’ In this way, again, the cinema generates income, plus the school makes its programming dreams a reality. Commercial chains, more likely to have Marketing staff as the first point of contact for schools, have experience of the education sector both as part of UK-wide initiatives like National Schools’ Film Week as well as local events. Moving Image Education Specialists (MovIES) is the UK-wide informal professional network of those working in the field of film and education, representing many cinema-based staff as well as arts centres, Film Education and commercial cinema chains. MOVies can provide valuable experience and local contacts for Film Clubs across the UK looking to expand the film viewing experience beyond the classroom

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Film Education seeks to develop teachers links with their local cinema, both during National Schools’ Film Week and year-round with Cineschool and the Film Card (6.4.iii, below).

6.3.v Curriculum links Film Club can inspire a wish to learn more about film. As already discussed in Section 5.6, if this motivational power can be channeled back into the classroom then the after school experience can be used as the foundation for strong links to achievement in class across the Key Stages, from 4-years-old and up: Laura Carlisle, Education Project Executive at Cinemagic Film Festival in Belfast made the time to work with KS1 children to increase their understanding and appreciation of the film: ‘It was about getting them up and about and moving round the room, like in Dumbo. We went through the characters, they had to pretend to be monkeys, make the noise of monkeys… very simple stuff but just to confirm who the characters were.’ Teaching resources and INSET to support film in the classroom across Key Stages are available via school mailing lists and online from organisations including the British Film Institute (which also funds the MediaEd website for teachers of media) Film Education, the English and Media Centre and sites/channels like Teachernet and Teachers’ TV. Creative Partnerships (CP), managed by Arts Council England and funded by the DfES and DCMS, aims to develop the creativity of young people, raising their aspirations and achievements. CP focuses on the most deprived communities in England, developing creative approaches to teaching all aspects of the curriculum. This is via teachers working with creative practitioners, and schools instigating the use of culture, creativity and partnerships as part of their school improvement plans. In terms of how CP could work with Film Club, David Parker (Director of Research) noted that as CP’s focus is to encourage children’s creativity, he would be interested to see, ‘ whether screenings could in some way link with the opportunity to make media and then reflect back understanding and motivation through the same medium.’

6.3.vi Other Extended Services activity and providers The 53 children and young people age 7-15 interviewed for the evaluation took part in a wide range of after school clubs organised by schools themselves including a characteristic cross-section of activities such as drama, cookery, sports, booster clubs, music and languages. Activities were generally led by school staff with some external tutors, and at The Snaith School and others an Extended Services Coordinator linked the school with other local schools and providers. Across the UK and across age groups, Extended Services’ aim of bringing schools, children and families and the wider community together leads to a vast range of clubs. Costs per child can range from £15-50 for a week’s worth of after school activity, depending on length of sessions and range of activity, which covers everything from those mentioned above to: •

Those targeting children’s social needs such as initiatives ‘Busy Bees’ for children aged 4 6 with challenging behaviour, and youth action activities for secondary schools such as Active Citizens in Schools (both supported UK-wide by ContinYou).

Links between schools and family centres, such as The Coin Street Family & Children's Centre on London’s Bankside, which offers integrated care and education including nursery, out of school provision, FamilyLinks activities, youth club and family drop-in. Its daily after school club for 4-11 year olds has play, sports and mentoring, by 14-15 year old students from City of London Boys School, after collection from school by ‘walking bus’.

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Links between schools and other higher education institutions, such as children in Years 4-6 at Widcombe Junior School in Bath who don’t study languages as part of the curriculum but learn French at an after school language club initiated by students at the University of Bath.

Both DfES-led and private initiatives have sought to meet the requirements of the increasing numbers of schools developing their extended services, offering schools resources and national networks or simply a ‘bought in’ kit of staff and equipment for schools whose time, funding or staffing mean that they do not manage activities themselves. Film Club provides a unique complete service of interactive website, film catalogue and as much as support as required. An Ofsted survey in July 2006 (‘Extended Services in Schools and Children’s Centres’) included 3 key findings which in particular point to the issues inherent in the lack of ‘blueprint’ for success and the possibility that Film Club may provide a valuable model for future developments in provision: •

Strongly committed leaders and managers were key factors in successful provision. They had a clear understanding of the features of extended provision and how it would work in their contexts. They involved the whole senior management team as extended services were considered integral to improving outcomes for children.

Services were most effective when there was a plan which considered standards, value for money, affordability and the long-term sustainability of the services.

The most successful providers shaped the provision gradually to reflect their community’s needs and wants in collaboration with other agencies. They gave sufficient time to gather information on local requirements before setting up any provision. There was no single blueprint for success. Regular consultation by services was vital. Successful services fulfilled the community’s needs, were of high quality and maintained interest.

In fulfilling DfES objectives for Extended Services, Film Club offers a potential model for Extended Services provision in England and the nations, where in Northern Ireland a cluster of 20 schools have already been funded to run Film Clubs for a year (7.4)

6.3.vii Film festivals for children and young people Much of the cinema made around the world for young audiences only reaches the UK for very brief periods in film festivals, offering young UK audiences a unique opportunity to see other cultures via the stories of young people their age. As covered in Chapter 3, the variety of films available during the Film Club pilot did not include a wide range of non-English language titles for primary schools or Key Stage 3. Justin Reeve, KS2 Teacher at Newport Primary School who had himself had experience of films made for younger audiences in France, suggested that, ‘Some of the films [for children] you see from different countries… represent things in so much of a different light, in what they expect children to get and for children to understand.’ The extensive international film programmes and participatory programmes of Cinemagic (Belfast), Showcomotion (Sheffield), Discovery (Dundee), the London Children’s Film Festival and Leeds, to festivals including youth strands of features or shorts, are a unique source of contemporary world cinema culture for young audiences. At pilot stage and beyond, Cinemagic is working with the Northern Ireland’s Department for Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL) and Film Club to support 20 schools for 12 months from April 2007: for the festival, as well as making valuable links to teachers, it will be well-placed to offer the international festival programme to schools in October/November 2007.

6.4 Industry Generating excitement for film in young people, encouraging them to see more films and giving them the confidence to be adventurous in their viewing choices, Film Club is well placed to work alongside existing industry organisations to promote the links between independent viewing and viewing in 36


school. Making these links is key to all Film Club industry partners, as well as to DCMS’s Creative Economy Programme. It also links more broadly to the areas of the work of the UK Film Council Distribution and Exhibition arm, namely film and education, audience development and film in the digital age, particularly in Film Club’s focus on access to children who might not otherwise see films and building interest in film from an early age.

6.4.i Regional Screen Agencies Audience Development and Education staff in the nine RSAs can advise schools who would like to find out about local contacts for funding, filmmaking, cinemas (see below) and local film industry talent. All RSAs are currently also involved in funding or supporting projects which have the future potential to link to Film Club out of school, including film festivals for children and young people such as Screen Yorkshire’s support for the Leeds Young People’s Film Festival and Scottish Screen’s wideranging report Moving Image Education and A Curriculum for Excellence. The Northern Ireland Film & Television Commission has already committed to supporting Film Clubs at 20 primary schools across Northern Ireland through to April 2008.

6.4.ii Developing young audiences for film Mark Batey, CEO of Film Club industry partner AIM, in interested to see, ‘ to what extent is [Film Club] having an impact on children’s film consumption patterns. Having seen a film in school at Film Club, are they going on to see more films during the week at local cinemas, on DVD or TV? Are they going to kids’ screenings on Saturdays any more or less?’ There was evidence of parents, teachers and children for whom Film Club had woken their enthusiasm for film and seeing more films. The mother of two boys aged 7 and 11 at Newport Primary School reported that, ‘Parents have said that it’s fantastic because the children have gone home and spoken about the film and they’ve wanted to watch the film that they’ve seen because they’ve never seen the film so they’ve hired it, the video or something. So maybe that’s something they don’t usually do – sit at home and watch a film together.’ On the website, members’ reviews also included signs that Film Club was inspiring them to watch more films in their own time. One 13-year-old from Woldgate College in Yorkshire closed his hugely enthusiastic review of the film Groundhog Day by saying, ‘This film is absolutely brilliant. It has a great plot, excellent actors and is also very funny. I am going to buy it on DVD because it is so good. I highly recommend this film to any Film Club members.’

6.4.iii Developing links between schools, commercial and independent cinemas Those cinemas areas within reach of schools but without education staff could be encouraged to market their programme to Film Clubs or, in the case of independents, offer simple programming arrangements like the example outlined by Trish Sheil or Mark Reid at BFI Southbank (6.3.iv) during the pilot. Film Club is also planning to forge links with cinemas to offer special deals to Film Club members, using their Film Club membership card as a ‘passport’ to encourage cinema going. Film Club partner Film Education also operates its Film Card/Cineschool project which has aimed to create a supported network of cinemas and schools, currently only in London, designed to introduce independent and world cinema to 15-18s. It includes INSET and support for teachers, workshops, screenings, master classes and curriculum support via a website. The Film Card is a ‘2 for 1’ discount for selected independent and world films in participating cinemas.

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6.4.iv Community cinema In one school in particular Film Club has been the inspiration to take the core idea further: Hywel Roberts, Head of Media at The Kingstone School in Yorkshire said that, ‘We see a real future for it: there’s no cinema in Barnsley, and we see something that could happen there. We’re a community school, I wanted to have The Great Escape on Saturday lunchtimes for dads and lads and do stuff like that… We’re full of ideas, and we’ve got the equipment.’ As well as advice from Regional Screen Agencies (above), further specific advice can be found from the Independent Cinema Office. The ICO offers programme advice and advocacy for the British Federation of Film Societies, which in turn supports the community cinema movement in the UK. For Film Clubs seeking to create a cinema where none exists locally, it may be that taking out a PVS license for a self-contained Film Society is the next step.

6.4.v DVD distribution and sales The established distribution by post system which Film Club partner LOVEFiLM offers reliable results UK-wide. As already mentioned, the 400 titles selected for the pilot represent the DVD catalogues of all the major UK distributors, excluding those distributors currently represented by the BFI and the BFI’s own holdings. In addition to the suggestion by Mark Reid to extend the reach of the license to include the BFI exclusively for Film Club, the future of Film Club could also see partnerships with more than one supplier, or managing supply itself (as it does already to ensure smooth deliveries to schools), in order to offer the broadest possible choice of film culture to schools. DVD distribution networks for the education sector could potentially dovetail with LOVEFiLM’s catalogue. At time of writing, the blueprint for ‘Film World’ (developed by BFI Education and currently led by former BFI Head of Education, Cary Bazalgette) would offer specialist film to primary schools supported by materials and training; Roehampton University’s unReal, the distribution initiative led by Michael Uwemedimo, is already making challenging and historically significant film available to university audiences. DVD sales could rise in relation to the development of Film Club. This may be individual young people or their parents, the teachers themselves, or the schools. Research undertaken by Cary Bazalgette in support of developing ‘Film World’ suggests that, ‘Extended Services clusters want to have their own permanent libraries of DVDs for after school screenings, so that they can undertake extended work with films over several days or weeks, and return to favourites when they want to.’ Film Club will be operating within a new landscape in which in addition to film hire schools may also be buying DVDs for different purposes.

6.4.vi Digital downloading Film Club will be following the industry lead on this area, which is also at time of writing some way into the future. Areas which will need to be addressed include the varying software amongst schools and the varying firewalls of these. Once these issues have been managed satisfactorily for the wider public as well as schools, DD has the potential to give schools greater control over their viewing. If schools can download themselves, the administrative process changes and speeds up, and also makes possible the programming of films in order.

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6.4.vii Intellectual Property The Film Club website already includes a page describing the ways in which piracy impacts negatively on the film industry. Additionally, the Film Education ‘Film Theft’ pack is available for teachers. Following on from its call to ‘support creativity’, this area could be developed, potentially in the development of Film Club resources for schools or related to members’ creation of their own work and understanding in practical terms what ‘ownership’ means and the role of ‘rights’.

The context for Film Club: recommendations •

Working in partnership with existing organisations, both at a strategic policy level and on a delivery level with cinemas and cultural, arts and educational organisations, is of core importance to Film Club’s significance within the broader arts and media field for young people. It will ensure that all players are working in unison and that no unnecessary duplication takes place.

In the Extended Services sector, the structure and complete package offered by Film Club has the potential to act as a ‘blueprint’ for the development of the sector UKwide. This could work with partners across education and industry, including ContinYou with whom it may develop Film Club both in school and the local community.

Film Club has a unique opportunity to embed the ‘Respect for IP’ agenda in young people from an early age, having a causal effect not only on them as consumers but also on their families and peer groups. Monitoring Film Club members thinking on this subject may be in turn offer guidance to regulators and the film industry.

The PVS License covers 8000 of the 65,000 films available from LOVEFiLM, and does not include significant collections such as those held by the British Film Institute. Extending the license to cover these would ensure a broader selection of films, particularly independent and world films and particularly for primary school children whose knowledge of film at this stage will create the foundation for viewing choices in later years.

The links between young people watching films and creating their own films are a valuable area for schools to explore in the curriculum and in an Extended Services setting. Working with partners to offer guidance on where to look for support, Film Club could in the future also encourage young people to programme and discuss films made by their peers UK-wide, inspired by what they’ve seen at Film Club.

Meeting the objectives of the film industry to develop young audiences, developing

links with cinemas and film societies will put school Film Clubs in a strong position locally to build on the enthusiasm shown in after school sessions. Working with children’s film festivals and education staff will further develop these useful relationships.

Evidence from the pilot suggested that teachers, families and young people had all been inspired by Film Club to seek out further viewings of films either on DVD or at the cinema. This causal link between Film Club and developing film audiences could be measured over time, also in relation to other initiatives encouraging young audiences to watch films, with the potential to offer guidance to the film industry on this area.

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7

From Film Club pilot to Film Club UK-wide: Conclusion

7.1 Summary of evidence and recommendations Watching films, as discussed in Section 3.1, is almost universally understood to have a profound impact on children and young people, both as a cultural experience, as a social experience and as a valuable area to develop their critical understanding and appreciation of cinema and the wider world. Evidence from the Film Club pilot suggests that young people have watched films they would never otherwise have had the opportunity to watch, including mainstream, independent and world cinema. This experience has been hugely rewarding, both for them, their teachers, the wider school and, in some notable cases, parents and families as well. Film is a medium which is accessible: a popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and take pleasure in responding to. Developing this enthusiasm in an after school setting, and linking it to other curricular or informal film activity, Film Club’s child-centred focus has involved young people as participants from the first step, with the intention of working with them as consultants on the evolution of Film Club on an on-going basis. For schools that are already using film and the moving image, Film Club offers them a full Extended School Service to augment rather than replace or duplicate other existing provision. Schools are focusing resources on new and innovative possibilities for extended hours activity., and Film Club offers a complete package of activity available ‘off the shelf’ to be tailored to individual needs. As such, it may provide a model for other Extended Services provision. For some pilot schools, Film Club has complemented media-related activity in and out of the curriculum, for many others it has inspired a new focus on cinema which never existed before. The recommendations in this evaluation build on the existing strengths of Film Club, offering possible areas for development and evidence to support Film Club’s own plans for expansion both in terms of content, partnerships and reaching schools UK-wide. Recommendations cover issues to do with engaging the school via staff, young people and parents, developing the film catalogue to include a greater selection of films and extending additional Film Club activity to maximize their potential to increase the personal, cultural and critical value of young people’s film viewing. Lastly, recommendations include reference to how Film Club may develop in relationship to and in partnership with the existing landscape of policy, education and industry to do with film and young people. Appendix 8: Summary of recommendations.

7.2 The growth of Film Club in the 25 pilot schools By the summer term of the Film Club pilot, 22 of the 25 pilot schools were operating successful and fully established film clubs. Ten of the secondary schools had been in operation since January 2007 (Astor College for the Arts, Hackney Free, Kingstone School, Mossbourne Community Academy, Queens Park Community School, Paddington Academy, Sandwich Technology School, St Augustines C of E, St Edmunds Catholic School and The Snaith School), as had all 8 of the original primary schools (Davington, Lauriston, Newport, Riston, St Helens, Taughmonagh, Torriano and Whitstable and Seasalter). Four secondary schools started later on in the spring term, in March, and were continuing in the summer term. Reasons for delays were commonly lack of staff time, busy existing schedules and issues to do with the geographical layout of school buildings themselves. The schools were Acland Burghley, Hartsdown Technology College, Quintin Kynaston and St Marylebone. Three of the original 25 pilot secondary schools had struggled to establish film clubs, owing largely to the issues faced by the four schools above. These three all had ideas for how Film Club might yet have an impact on their school: Barnsley College is interested in including Film Club in the curriculum, 40


Canterbury High School still managed one Film Club session per fortnight owing to lack of space, and Woldgate College is looking to transfer Film Club activity to another school in the same cluster.

7.3 Lessons learned from the pilot I think we have proved that it’s something that schools are very enthusiastic about. It could have a huge value in schools. We’ve tested the logistics and learned a lot of lessons for the roll out phase. Mark Higham. Director, Film Club The basic structure of Film Club, in terms of the components provided by Film Club partners and clubs’ manageability within schools and with the participation of young people, is strong and replicable UK-wide. For Film Club, a key lesson from the pilot was that clubs are easier to set up and manage in primary schools, as a result of timetables, direct parent involvement and more cross-over between year groups. It was also the case that in many primary schools they would have appreciated further more challenging titles to choose from and support from Film Club in making those choices. While some secondary schools felt that Film Club was just what they had been waiting for, others were not able to recruit easily. These schools needed further support in setting up more than one club for different age groups, perhaps also needed to manage the logistics of organising more than one club over more school site. For both primary and secondary schools, the aim had been to provide an entertaining after school activity with the potential to inspire young people to develop their knowledge of film and be inspired to learn more. While the period of the pilot was not sufficient to offer specific evidence for these longer term learning benefits, young people’s evident enjoyment and commitment to continuing the club proved it value to them both as a part of their school week and as a part of their lives. The second stage of the pilot over the summer term 2007 will enable Film Club to build on some of the lessons learned, and refine a model of best practice for a roll out to schools UK-wide from September. Recommendations from this evaluation and feedback from teachers, parents and young people will all be considered in offering the best practice model for Extended Service provision sustainable at agreed quantity and quality. In response to the high level of enquiries, Film Club will then reach an estimated 1000 schools by the end of 2007, extending to a potential future total of 10,000 schools. As a link between the education and film industry sectors, Film Club will be uniquely placed as a national provider to work with its network of schools to link to other providers at national and local level. Once operating UK-wide, Film Club will have the opportunity to further develop links with existing partners, create new links with other national organisations, develop the film catalogue, add to the selection of activities beyond the films themselves and expand the Film Club website.

7.4 School staff as the ‘key’ to the continued success of Film Club The second stage of the pilot and national roll out will also bring the opportunity to focus further on the ideas and needs of participating school staff. Teachers welcomed the Film Club ‘complete package’ as an opportunity to interact with young people in an informal setting, discovering the world of cinema and the film industry together. Staff with more knowledge of film offered introductions, and many had made curricular links during the pilot or were considering possibilities for this. The Film Club website will soon include a dedicated area for teachers, which will need to offer support and encouragement particularly for the selection of more world and independent cinema. Teachers not involved in the pilot are keen to know more: over the first phase of the pilot covered by this evaluation (January-March 2007), the Film Club office received 535 enquiries from schools wanting to sign up to the national roll out in September. At last count, as the evaluation went to print in June 2007, this number had risen to close to 950. When signing up their schools via the website, teachers were asked what they ‘liked or disliked about the Film Club idea’ Their responses reinforced

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many of the findings of the evaluation in terms of positive potential benefits, and outlined further reasons why Film Club would be a valuable addition to their school Appendix 7: Comments from teachers wanting to join up to Film Club’s national roll out. In April 2007, Film Club offered a one day training day for a cluster of schools joining the pilot in Belfast (a cluster working with Cinemagic and the Northern Ireland Film and TV Commission and supported by Northern Ireland’s Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure for the year 2007-08). It included a short film about the pilot, a ‘How To’ section on operating a club via the website, an opportunity to plan a club for their schools and asked for feedback on the club and the training. Mark Higham said of this training that: ‘It worked very well: the teachers involved liked being able to link with each other for networking, mutual support. We would like to see an area of the site developed for teachers so they can share experiences. In roll out, I would like to see a mixture of direct school visits once we’ve got schools signed on, and training also involving Extended Schools’ Co-ordinators and Development Officers.’ It is the staff who are the ‘vital’ ingredient, the key link between their school and Film Club. During the pilot project they may have been attached to a club as a result of their own passion for cinema or more as a required element of their work during extended hours. With Film Club’s support and wide variety of content and activity, in creating and maintaining meaningful dialogue with the school, young people and families, the imagination and energy of key members of staff could ‘lift’ a club from being successful to having a truly transforming effect on their school community’s views about what an after school club could be, and what film could be. Corinna Downing / Hilary Pearce 29 June 2007

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Appendix 1: Film Club Board members Sir Michael Bichard – Rector, University of the Arts London and Film Club Chair Peter Buckingham - Head of Distribution and Exhibition, UK Film Council Michael Harris - Business Consultant, Comic Relief Treasurer/Trustee and Film Club Treasurer Barry Jenkins - Chairman, AIM Beeban Kidron- Filmmaker, Film Club co-founder Lindsay Mackie - Educationalist, Film Club co-founder John Woodward - Chief Executive, UK Film Council Ian Wall – Director, Film Education

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Appendix 2: Pilot project schools 8 primary schools, 17 secondary schools Secondary Schools and FE Institutions School

Age range

School status

No. of pupils on roll

Snaith School Goole, Yorkshire

11-16

Woldgate College York Yorkshire The Kingstone School Barnsley Yorkshire Barnsley College Barnsley Yorkshire St Edmunds Catholic School Dover Kent Sandwich Technology College Sandwich Kent The Canterbury High School Canterbury Kent Astor College for the Arts Dover Kent

11-16

Community Comprehensive/ Business & Enterprise Community Comprehensive Arts Specialist Community Comprehensive

44

11-16

No. of pupils at Film Club

Age of pupils at Film Club

801

Pupils on roll with SEN, statements or supported at School Action Plus No. % 61 7.6

30

12-14

236

10

4.2

15

11-13

294

21

7.1

50

11-14

16+

FE Institution

11-18

Voluntary Aided Comprehensive

138

18

13.0

26

16-18

11-18

Specialist Technology and Vocational College status

218

19

8.7

20

11-12

11-18

Foundation Secondary Modern

178

27

15.2

20

16-18

11-18

Community Secondary Modern

234

10

4.3

?

16-18


Hartsdown Technology College Margate Kent Quintin Kynaston School N London St Marylebone School W London Paddington Academy W London St Augustine’s C of E NW London Mossbourne Community Academy E London Acland Burghley School NW London Hackney Free & Parochial Cof E School E London Queens Park Community School NW London

11-18

Community Secondary Modern

221

41

18.6

?

?

11-18

Community Comprehensive

1322

111

8.4

Max 40

11-16

11-18

Voluntary Aided Girls, Arts Specialist ULT Academy

858

37

4.3

?

?

1175

Opened 2006 Stats not available

50

16-16

11-18

Voluntary Aided Comprehensive

706

58

8.2

40

11-18 split _

11-16

Community

423

49

11.6

15

13-14

11-18

Community Comprehensive

1296

109

85

?

?

11-16

Specialist Sports

147

14

9.5

15

11-13

11-16

Comprehensive

1218

99

8.1

20

11-14

11-19

45


Primary Schools

School

St Helen’s Catholic Primary Barnsley Yorkshire Riston CofE Primary Hull Yorkshire Whitstable & Seasalter Primary Whitstable Kent Davington Primary Faversham Kent Newport Primary Brough, Hull Yorkshire Lauriston Primary E London Torriano Junior School, North London Taughmonagh Primary Belfast N Ireland

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Pupils on roll with SEN, statements or supported at School Action Plus No.

%

No. of pupils attending Film Club

148

10

6.8

65

5-11

Voluntary Controlled

57

4

7.0

Max 52

?

7-11

Voluntary Aided

193

12

6.2

22

9-10

5-11

Community School

439

36

8.2

20

7-11

4-11

Community School

126

17

13.5

30

7-11

3-11

Community School

243

33

13.6

18 x 2

9-11

231

22

9.5

25

9-11

185

39

21

30 x 2

5-7, 711

School Status e.g Community School/ Technology College

No. of pupils on roll (all ages)

5-11

Voluntary Aided

4-11

Age Rang e

3-11 3-11

Community School

Age of pupils attending Film Club


Appendix 3: Interviewees Film Club Mark Higham, Director - Film Club

Partners Tim Cagney, Head of UK Partnerships - UK Film Council Peter Buckingham, Head of Distribution and Exhibition - UK Film Council Ian Wall, Director - Film Education Mark Batey, CEO - All Industry Marketing (AIM)

Department for Culture, Media and Sport Phil Clapp, Deputy Director (Creative Industries) - DCMS

Arts and cultural organisations and individuals Mark Reid, Head of Education - British Film Institute David Parker, Director of Research – Creative Partnerships Simon Ward, Head of Programming and Development – Independent Cinema Office Pip Eldridge, CEO – First Light Movies Cary Bazalgette – ‘Film World’ Trish Sheil, Education Coordinator - Cambridge Film Consortium Cathy Poole, Coordinator – Moving Image Education Specialists (MovIES) Laura Carlisle, Education Project Executive - Cinemagic Film Festival, Belfast

School staff Justin Reeve, KS2 Teacher - Newport Primary School Sue Walker, teacher of English - Sandwich Technology School Ian Williams, Head of Media Studies - The Snaith School Sarah Mallinson, Extended School Coordinator - The Snaith School Siobhan Campbell, KS2 Teacher - Taughmonagh Primary School Marion Perkins, KS2 Teacher - Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed C of E Junior School Charlene Thomas, teacher and Behaviour Mentor - Hackney Free & Parochial School Su Yin Chan, Head of Media Studies - St Augustine’s C of E Voluntary Aided Comprehensive Hywel Roberts, Head of Media Studies – The Kingstone School Peter Sanders, Deputy Headteacher – Lauriston Primary School

Children, young people 53 children and young people age 7-15, as noted in Case Studies (Appendix 4)

Parents Five parents of primary school children, as noted in Case Studies (Appendix 4)

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Appendix 4: Case Studies Case Study 1: Hackney Free and Parochial C of E Secondary School Hackney Free and Parochial Church of England Secondary School in East London is a multi-ethnic school in one of the poorer inner London boroughs. Many Film Club members had experience of watching non-English language films at home and were up to date with latest cinema releases. They particularly enjoyed the social aspect of Film Club, which sat within a packed programme of academic and creative after school activities, inspired particularly with their visit from a film industry professional: the Art Director kept them completely enthralled for an hour, and their interview with him was uploaded to the Film Club website in order that other members across the UK could also ‘meet’ him.

Paragon Road, London E9 6NR 020 8985 2430 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 701 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 32 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 194

Film Club at Hackney Free & Parochial • • • • • • •

Staff: Charlene Thomas, Media Studies teacher Parental support: N/A Members: 15 children age 11-13 (Key Stage 3). Approximately 70/30 boys/girls Screening space: Upstairs classroom Projection equipment: DVD player, interactive whiteboard, speakers above whiteboard Time slot: Films seen during pilot: A Room for Romeo Brass, Big Fish, Edward Scissorhands, The Iron Man, The Princess Bride, Supersize Me, Tron, Whalerider

Evaluation Visit: Monday 12th March 2007 Focus Group of 2 girls and 5 boys ages 12-13: All the children agreed that the best things about Film Club were watching films with their friends and seeing films they wouldn’t see otherwise. Most watched films outside school too, with a mixture of home and cinema viewing. The group had also had quite a lot of experience of viewing non-English films in their home environments and displayed a good all round knowledge of current films. They were very enthusiastic about the visit to their Film Club of the Art Director and had worked to prepare questions for him in previous weeks. Key Film Club teacher: Charlene Thomas Charlene is a Behaviour Mentor and saw Film Club as an excellent way to involve students in positive activity in a relaxed, safe and fun environment. She also saw this as a personal opportunity to develop her own film viewing and had advice form other staff on possible non-contemporary films to offer the pupils. The Head teacher had been very supportive of Film Club as a welcome addition to the Out of School programme and Charlene was keen to develop Film Club with more industry visits and possibly visits out to film studios or cinemas.

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Response to Industry visit: Art Director, Neil Lamont The pupils had worked on questions for Neil and were very eager to talk, but they also listened well and responded to his answers, showing they had understood and processed his responses. Neil outlined his job very clearly and the pupils were fascinated by his experiences on the Harry Potter and James Bond films in particular. The teacher thought it was and excellent session and good for the pupils to understand more of the ‘behind the scenes’ aspects of the film world, rather than just focusing on actors’ experiences. The pupils grew in confidence and the ‘interview’ session lasted for almost an hour, which was incredible, as the pupils had already sat for 30 minutes in the focus group. Film Club staff also filmed the session.

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Case Study 2: The Kingstone School The Kingstone School is a Performing Arts college in Yorkshire with a busy schedule of extra-curricular activity. Where film had been seen in the past as a comparatively ‘passive’ activity, Film Club has been warmly welcomed by staff and students alike as a fresh and energising addition to the school programme. The key teacher marketed the club via the school’s intranet, aiming to reach the widest possible range of students, and felt it important to offer context and information on films in introductions. He was so inspired by the students’ reaction that he was considering the potential of the club to move out into the wider local community and make up for the lack of a cinema locally.

Broadway, Barnsley S70 6RB 01226 215757 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 1445 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 41 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 208

Film Club at The Kingstone School • • • • • • •

Staff: Hywel Roberts, Head of Media Studies Parental support: N/A Members: 35 young people age 11-14 (Key Stage 3) Screening space: School hall with blackout Projection equipment: DVD player, white painted wall area, PA system Time slot: Films seen during pilot: A Room for Romeo Brass, Big Fish, Bladerunner, Finding Nemo, Howls’ Moving Castle, Mean Creek, Spirited Away, Stand By Me, War of the Worlds. Also Batman Begins (not Film Club hire)

Evaluation Interview: Tuesday 17 April 2007 Key Film Club teacher Hywel Roberts: The teacher had tried to set up a ‘film club’ in the past, but in a Performing Arts college film viewing was seen as a passive activity with not the same capacity to engage. The ease and simplicity of the Film Club package had enabled him to put the club in motion with ease, the only issue being fitting in around the rest of the hectic school timetable. He had programmed a variety of films himself, looking ahead to including students more in the selection process once the club now that the club was established. He considered it very important to offer an introduction, which he described as ‘not a lecture’, which nonetheless set the scene for the film and offered a framework for viewing. He also ensured that parents were clear on what to expect, and when to expect their children home, by issuing a ‘pro forma’ ticket which serves as a consent form and an entrance ticket to the film. He was excited about the possibility of extending the club as an offer to the local community. With no cinema at all nearby, screening a wide variety of films at the weekends would be a cultural offer currently unavailable to Barnsley.

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Case Study 3: Lauriston Primary School Lauriston Primary School is a small primary school in Hackney, East London, with Beacon School status and an emphasis on promoting cultural activities both in the curriculum and extended hours. Both teachers and children very much enjoyed the opportunity to watch films they would not otherwise see, and children were happy to use a lunchtime session later in the week to discuss the film they had seen after school. The teachers looked forward to being able to capitalise on the children’s enthusiasm with further extended activities to explore the filmmaking process further.

Rutland Road, London E9 7JS 020 8985 6331 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 264 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: 0 Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 6 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 71

Film Club at Lauriston Primary School • • • • • • •

Staff: Four Key Stage 2 class teachers, including key contact Peter Sanders (Deputy Headteacher) Parental support: In development Members: 2 groups of 18 (Key Stage 2). Approximately 70/30 girls/boys Screening space: Open plan Y2 classroom, children on chairs Projection equipment: laptop, interactive whiteboard, speakers above whiteboard Time slot: Films seen during pilot: Babette’s Feast, Big Fish, Born Free – Living Free, Buena Vista Social Club, Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, Whalerider

Evaluation Visit: Wednesday 28 March 2007 Focus Group of 2 boys and 5 girls, ages 7-11yrs: All the pupils were really excited about Film Club and were all regular attendees. They all had experience of film watching outside school but few went regularly to the cinema so they liked the experience of seeing films at Film Club on a big (interactive whiteboard) screen. Several pupils commented on the variety of films and how they could discuss them with their friends. Viewing with friends seemed most important to pupils of all ages along with the chance to see films they probably would not see elsewhere. Key Film Club teachers interviewed: Gwen and Laura Two of the four teachers were interviewed. Two other teachers regularly assist and one runs a lunchtime follow up session to either finish viewing a film or to run a discussion group. One teacher was definitely keen to watch films herself and as a group the teachers agreed that they had perhaps chosen films with their interests in mind, which may have made some viewings harder for children, in particular, Babette’s Feast. They had agreed to review the selection process as the Club continued. They all agreed that it was a great opportunity to show children films that would normally be outside their usual range and that they had benefited from new ideas and challenging viewing experiences. They had kept to a consistent finishing time of 5.15pm. This seemed to work well for everybody, particularly parents picking up the children. The pupils were then happy to come again to Film Club on a Friday lunchtime to complete a film or discuss what they had seen. The teachers hoped to develop Film Club alongside other arts based activities such as art and drama and filmmaking, which goes on in many of the classes already. They would also like to develop their own knowledge of the filmmaking process, including writing and scripting. Everyone was very pleased 51


with the progress of Film Club and was looking forward to it continuing. Response to film (Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday): 15 present on day of visit, 4 boys 11 girls. The children sat in 3 rows near the front of the classroom and the teacher sat at the front to one side from where she read some of the subtitles and talked about the action to help the children. This worked well and although some of the children were talking during the film, this seemed fine and helped some of them to understand the plot more easily, particularly as the film had little dialogue and was also subtitled. The children definitely connected with the Mr Bean comedic style and there was a lot of laughter. They enjoyed the screening and talked about it in a very lively and animated way at the end as they waited for parents to collect them.

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Case Study 4: Newport Primary School Newport Primary is a small rural school in Yorkshire. Children have responded with great energy and enthusiasm to the opportunity to explore new films together in their school, and to engage with the website and in helping select the film programme. Most of the school’s developing after school programme has so far been sports-based and Film Club has provided an ideal alternative to this. Teachers and parents have worked together to provide strong practical support and an independent identity for the club within the school. The success of the club has also led to a Film Club trip to a cinema in Hull to see Amazing Grace, linking to recent work on the abolition of slavery in PSHE.

Main Road, Newport, Brough HU15 2PP 01430 440259 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 108 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: 5 Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: 1 Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 1 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 18

Film Club at Newport Primary • • • • • • •

Staff: Justin Reeve, Key Stage 2 class teacher Parental support: PTA Members: 25 children age 7-11 (Key Stage 2). Approximately 50/50 boys/girls Screening space: One of 2 junior classrooms (one with blackout) Projection equipment: DVD player, interactive whiteboard, wall mounted speakers above whiteboard Time slot: 3.35-5.15pm Films seen during pilot (by 2 different groups in 6-7 week blocks): Bean – The Ultimate Disaster Movie, Brewster’s Millions, Clockwise, Duck Soup, ET, Elf, The Iron Giant, The Mighty, Modern Times, Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, Napoleon Dynamite, Return of the Pink Panther

Evaluation Visit: Thursday 8 March 2007 Focus Group of 4 girls and 2 boys age 7-11: All the children were thrilled to have Film Club in their school. They liked the shared, social activity, which contrasted well with the sports, drama and watching TV they also enjoyed after school. They very much liked seeing films they wouldn’t see otherwise, and the older boys expressed an interest in becoming more involved in programming. Most had written for the website and all were pleased to be part of a national network whereby they could read other members’ film reviews. The school is in a rural area and the children usually watched films at home on satellite TV or hired/bought DVD, with rare visits to cinemas in neighboring towns and cities. Key Film Club teacher Justin Reeve: The teacher was delighted with the impact of Film Club on the school, particularly in that it offered a complete service as an external provision but also in that the school was aiming for an Artsmark Award and was focusing on boys’ writing which he felt could be helped by their enthusiasm for engaging with moving image texts. He had a personal interest in film which had inspired some of the shortlist of films which had been voted on by the children. Staff support in the school was strong, and the Head and 2 other staff also helped to manage the club (out of a total staff of 5.5). PTA member Paula Marshall: Mrs Marshall and the PTA had ringfenced funds for the development of Film Club. They charged a small amount of money for refreshments, all profits going into the club: floor cushions had already 53


been purchased and more blackout blinds were to come next. She was very enthusiastic about her sons’ response to the club, citing the social aspect and the introduction to a wider world of film as key benefits. Response to film (The Princess Bride): The children sat on the floor and on tables to watch the film, initially with hot dogs, drinks and bags of popcorn. The film was briefly introduced by teacher Justin Reeve who confirmed the title and type of film. The sound level was quite low and there was no blackout as the room usually set aside for Film Club was having maintenance carried out. Most of the children remained gripped throughout, laughing together particularly at moments of physical comedy. Some spoke to one another to confirm what was happening in the story and teachers interjected only lightly to hush them. As the credits began, the children jumped up to join their parents waiting in the hall, chatting excitedly about the film.

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Case Study 5: Sandwich Technology School Sandwich Technology School is a large rural secondary school in Kent taking students from a wide geographical catchment area. Both staff and students were very enthusiastic about the range of films available and the opportunity to discover the world of cinema in a social setting with peers: they have nothing else like it in terms of film culture, either in school or locally. To cover a maximum number of students, the school ensures that it covers all Year groups by running three clubs over the week. Students are happy to view films in more than one part over 3-4 sessions in the school’s 40-seat cinema, encouraged to make bold viewing choices including, so far, Das Boot and Munich. Deal Road, Sandwich, Kent CT13 0BU 01304 610001 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 1240 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 103 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 102

Film Club at Sandwich Technology School • • •

• • • •

Staff: Sue Walker, English Teacher Parental support: N/A Members: 18 young people age 11-14 (Key Stage 3) on Wednesday afternoons, 15 young people age 14-16 (Key Stage 4) on Monday/Tuesday/Thursday lunchtimes, and 18 sixth formers (age 16-18) on Friday afternoons. Approximately 70/30 boys/girls Screening space: 40-seat school cinema Projection equipment: Digital projector in projection booth, surround sound Time slot: 1.45-2.20pm Films seen during pilot across age groups: About a Boy, A Beautiful Mind, A Bug’s Life, Das Boot, It’s a Wonderful Life, Million Dollar Baby, Munich, Whalerider. Also The Thin Red Line (not Film Club hire)

Evaluation Visit: Monday 12 March 2007 Focus Group of 6 boys age 15-16: The students were very enthusiastic about Film Club, particularly as the majority of other extracurricular school activities were sports-based. Half the students interviewed were keen film viewers already, watching most at home on satellite but also renting/buying DVDs and visiting local independent cinemas, while the other half rarely watched films in their free time but said that they had been inspired to do more since joining the club. They were impressed with the variety of films on the website and liked being able to shortlist titles themselves. The students all attended the club in slots during the school day as a result of having to make their own way home on irregular buses and trains: for this focus group, their viewing was split into 2-4 parts. Key Film Club teacher Sue Walker: The teacher had taken over managing Film Club from the initial key teacher, the Head of English, who was on maternity leave. She was very impressed with the generally smooth running of the club, particularly in that the previous teacher had encouraged the students to operate the projection equipment and behave maturely in the cinema. She felt that the opportunity to watch films they might not otherwise have a chance to see, such as Munich, particularly benefited students needing to develop social and media literacy skills and an awareness of the wider world and recent history. She spoke warmly of the care and attention she had received from Lucy in the Film Club office when at first unsure about procedural issues and how to order from LOVEFiLM.

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Response to film (The Thin Red Line): The 11 young people at this club were ready and on time for the session to start despite having to rush their lunch in order to be there. No film had arrived from LOVEFiLM as the ordering process had yet to run smoothly, so a 16-year-old had brought a carrier bag of 12 DVDs from home for a group decision on which to watch. After group discussion, they chose The Thin Red Line as none except him knew it, and they liked that Film Club offered them something new. The film started without introduction and several young people were whispering to check their understanding of the narrative in the early scenes. Other than this they were largely quiet and attentive. The screening ran for 20 minutes only as this club runs in a lunchtime slot.

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Case Study 6: The Snaith School Snaith is a large rural Business and Enterprise college taking students from a wide geographical catchment area in Yorkshire. The key teacher and Extended School Coordinator were extremely pleased with what Film Club as an organisation had to offer and with the opportunity it offered students for developing their knowledge and appreciation of cinema in a social environment. Staff noted in particular the improved behaviour of some students in club sessions: teachers felt that the child-centred ethos of Film Club promoted in members a sense of importance and responsibility which they were pleased to aim for and attain. Students at Snaith mentioned how proud they were to see their own reviews on the Film Club website

Pontefract Road, Snaith, Goole, East Riding of Yorkshire DN14 9LB 01405 860327 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 812 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: 32 Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: 4 Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 12 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 106

Film Club at The Snaith School • • • • • • •

Staff: Ian Williams, Head of Media Studies, and Sarah Mallinson, Extended School Coordinator Parental support: N/A Members: 20 young people age 12-13 (Key Stage 3) on Thursday afternoons. Approximately 95/5 boys/girls Screening space: Classroom with blackout curtains Projection equipment: DVD player, interactive whiteboard, wall mounted speakers above whiteboard Time slot: 4.00-5.55pm Films seen during pilot: Batman Begins, Belleville Rendezvous, Big Fish, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Millions. Also Hotel Rwanda, Kes (not Film Club hires)

Evaluation Visit: Monday 12 March 2007 Focus Group of 8 boys age 12-13: The all boy focus group was unanimously in favour of Film Club. Most watched mainstream films at home on satellite or terrestrial TV with family and this was the first time they had enjoyed a regular opportunity to stay on at school to sit with their peers to enjoy a film they hadn’t heard of before. Several had written film reviews for the Film Club website, proud that their school had been in the ‘top 10 in the nation’ reviews. Others were keen to make links to their drama and filmmaking club activities, or to enjoy the club as an alternative to sport or army/air cadets activities. They had a strong sense of ownership and membership of the club which differentiated it from the rest of their school experience. All relied on parents to drive them home afterwards. Key Film Club teacher Ian Williams: For Ian Williams, Film Club was a long-awaited opportunity to introduce students to the world and the world of cinema ‘outside their comfort zone’. He spoke highly of the design of the website, the choice of films on offer, the child-centred approach of the club and of how engaged the students had been from the outset. He and the Extended Services Coordinator remarked particularly on the marked improvement in behaviour in a couple of boys. With a personal interest in film, he enjoyed introducing the films to ensure the students had some background, and liked the idea of he and the students 57


selecting a season of films in order so as to allow for further understanding of the links between titles and for parents, and possibly other schools, to know the schedule in advance. He was keen to receive film industry visits in the future - this had been a key motive for the Head’s buy in as Snaith is a ‘Business and Enterprise’ school. Response to film (Hotel Rwanda): The film was introduced briefly by teacher Ian Williams, who mentioned that it was a story of recent history and that it included some disturbing scenes from the genocide (he referred to the flyer that students had had to have signed by a parent in order to attend the club, which included the short synopsis from the Film Club website). Aside from some brief moments of restlessness during more dialogue-heavy scenes, the boys were glued to this challenging film throughout, conferring occasionally to check the narrative, laughing and gasping appropriately. At 2 hours, the running time left no minutes for discussion afterwards, but they intended to talk about it the following week.

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Case Study 7: St Augustine’s C of E Voluntary Aided Comprehensive St Augustine’s High is a Voluntary Aided Comprehensive school in North West London. The school serves an inner city area that has high levels of deprivation. It has higher proportions of pupils from minority ethnic groups than the great majority of schools, with over half the students speaking English as an Additional Language. The social aspects of Film Club have been key to it success, for both age ranges covered in the pilot: creating a shared cultural experience, often of films with serious social messages has been a powerful experience for the young people. As the site of the ‘launch’ of Film Club in march 2007, the young people were also thrilled to have met film stars and directors visiting their school. Oxford Road, London NW6 5SN 020 7328 3434 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 715 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: 268 Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: 484 Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 23 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 162

Film Club at St Augustine’s High School • • • • • • •

Staff: Sue Yin Chan, Head of Media Studies Parental support: N/A Members: 30-60 young people ages 11-18 (Key Stages 3 and 4, 6th Form). Approximately 50/50 boys/girls Screening space: 2 upstairs classrooms – simultaneous screenings for different age groups Projection equipment: DVD players, interactive whiteboards, speakers above whiteboards Time slot: Films seen during pilot, across age groups: Hotel Rwanda, Casino Royale, Spongebob Squarepants, La Haine, Bullet Boy, Microcosmos, Millions

Evaluation Visits: Thursday 15 March, Wednesday 28 March 2007 Focus Group of 3 girls and 3 boys ages 11-18: The school has a wide variety of after school clubs, which many pupils participated in. All pupils felt that Film Club was something different and exciting that gave them an opportunity to be with their friends and unwind at the end of the school day in a friendly environment. Some of the older pupils appreciated the chance to see ‘unusual’ and ‘informative’ films such as Hotel Rwanda. Several expressed a preference to watching films at school rather than at home where they would be interrupted or have to watch someone else’s choice of film. Their out of school viewing experiences, particularly for younger pupils were mainly at home and with family, not friends, so Film Club offered them time to be with their friends too. Key Film Club teacher: Su Yin Chan Su Yin has been Head of Media Studies for ten years at the school and had a very positive approach to introducing and running Film Club. She had a keen interest in film herself and had discussed film choices with other members of staff who were also film enthusiast. She had a very good knowledge of contemporary and non-mainstream cinema, which was clear in her choice of films and ability to interest the pupils. She had taken great care to publicise it well, to staff and pupils, putting information up on the school intranet and sending out regular communication to the pupils to take home. She hoped to make some links with the curriculum in future and to create ‘seasons’ of films but basically saw Film Club at present as an excellent way to offer pupils positive and fun experiences, time to be with their peers and an opportunity to entertain pupils in a welcoming environment. Response to films (Spongebob Squarepants, La Haine): The 2 films were screened in an adjacent classrooms. The teacher had good support from another

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teacher and the librarian to organise and supervise both screenings. Sixth form students sold bowls of sweets and drinks that students could have during the screenings. The younger pupils clearly enjoyed the comedy, cartoon adventure and the older students were engrossed in La Haine. There was some quiet comment and discussion during the film, and some explanation of subtitles but the pupils were all focused throughout.

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Case Study 8: Taughmonagh Primary School Taughmonagh Primary School is situated in a housing estate in west Belfast. There is little local activity open to children although many watch films at home or at local cinemas. Film Club has opened up not only the world of cinema to the school, but a safe place parents can leave their children, a chance for children to socialise and have fun, and a valuable addition to the school’s developing work in media and film. Working both within the curriculum and in after school clubs, staff have seen film-related activity to have a significant impact in the school on children’s engagement with learning. Their link with Cinemagic Film Festival and other initiatives in N Ireland also connects them to a broader network.

Findon Gardens, Belfast BT9 6QL 02890 669698 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 185 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: 75 Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: 37 Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 3 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 39

Film Club at Taughmonagh Primary School • • • • • • •

Staff: Siobhan Campbell, Key Stage 2 class teacher Parental support: In development Members: 35 children age 7-11 (Key Stage 2) on Thursday afternoons. Approximately 50/50 boys/girls Screening space: School hall with blackout curtains Projection equipment: DVD player, projector, large foldout screen (2x4m) on legs, PA system Time slot: 3.10-4.45pm §Films seen during pilot by children age 4-7 (Key Stage 1): Bambi, Dumbo, Peter Pan, The Wizard of Oz. Films seen by children age 7-11 (Key Stage 2): Back to the Future, Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie, Bugsy Malone, Doctor Doolittle, Napoleon Dynamite, School of Rock, Stuart Little

Evaluation Visit: Thursday 29 March 2007 Focus Group of 7 children age 6-11: The children were all great fans of Film Club at Taughmonagh. While many of them watched films regularly at home on satellite or terrestrial TV or at local cinemas offering reductions or discounts for children, the school setting offered them something different which they valued highly. For several it was the chance to review favourite films with their friends, for others it was exploring films they had never heard of before, for others they were glad to see films from the beginning as at home this was rarely the case. Many mentioned enjoying discussing this new world of film viewing with teachers, siblings, parents and friends. Key Film Club teacher Siobhan Campbell: Siobhan Campbell’s interest in using film in school was rooted in her passion for developing moving image activity both in the curriculum and in her practical after school ‘Media Club’. Film Club further promoted this work in the school and other staff had provided support and encouragement for the club to see an impact across the school. Her priority was that the children relaxed and enjoyed themselves after school. She reported parents as saying how happy their children were at the club, particularly in that they were being cared for in a safe environment, and how much their children liked to feedback on their film viewing experiences.

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Film Festival staff Laura Carlisle: Project Executive Laura Carlisle provided the fold out screen and PA system for the club, arriving early to set this up. For Cinemagic, Film Club provided a valuable addition to their year-round outreach work in schools: as well as an opportunity to develop relationships with teachers, it meant that children could get used to non-mainstream films and schools would feel more confident about booking for the festival itself in October/November. Response to film (Bugsy Malone): The film was introduced briefly by Laura Carlisle. The children each had cones of popcorn (paid for by the school) and were soon immersed in the film, losing attention only when extended dialogue or ballads were on screen. One boy, who admitted having seen the film 10 times already, sang along quietly throughout, while other children moved in time the musical numbers. Parents had been invited for the first time to sit at the back, one saying afterwards how much she valued now being able to discuss the experience with her 10-year-old son. The screening was concluded with a brief question and answer session with Laura before children joined their waiting parents.

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Case Study 9: Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed C of E Junior School Whitstable and Seasalter is a small junior school situated in the centre of Whitstable in Kent. The pupils come from a wide variety of social backgrounds, but approximately half live in relatively disadvantaged parts of the local area. Film Club fits well with the schools’ work surrounding media literacy new ICT suite. Film Club has been a huge hit with teachers, children and parents: one child had won a Film Club competition and been to the premiere of Mr Bean’s Holiday in Leicester Square with their parents. Parents were pleased with their children’s enthusiastic response to the club, and said that conversation often continued at home, making parents want to see the films themselves.

High Street, Whitstable CT5 1AY 01277 273630 • • • • •

Total number of pupils: 193 Number of pupils eligible for free school meals: Number of pupils with English as an Additional Language: Number of pupils with special educational needs with statements: 12 Number of pupils with special educational needs without statements: 59

Film Club at Whitstable and Seasalter Primary School • Staff: Marion Perkins, Key Stage 2 class teacher • Parental support: In development • Members: 20, approximately 50/50 boys/girls • Screening space: Classroom, children on chairs in rows. Recently had blackout put on high windows, screening now much improved • Projection equipment: Laptop, interactive whiteboard, speakers above whiteboard • Time slot: • Films seen during pilot: Babe, Babette’s Feast, Bean – The Ultimate Disaster Movie, Dr Doolittle, Elf, Grease, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, March of the Penguins, Microcosmos, Watership Down, Railway Children, The Wind in the Willows, Spongebob Squarepants

Evaluation Visit: Tuesday 27 March 2007 Focus Group of 3 boys and 3 girls, ages 9-10yrs: All the children agreed that they had joined Film Club to watch and to talk about films with their friends. They were happy that it was open only to one year. This made them feel that it was something special for them. They were very interested in having industry visits, particularly from famous actors, but also wanted to meet a make up artist and a director. Half of the children had televisions in their rooms and said they were lucky because they could choose what they watched but still preferred to watch films at school with their friends. Several had seen non-English language films, mainly with family but were happy to see these at Film Club too. Key Film Club teacher: Marion Perkins Marion had a keen interest in film herself and is currently working on a MA in Visual Literacy. She has a personal interest in non-mainstream film and is keen to offer children challenging viewing experiences at the same time recognising their need to relax at Film Club and enjoy themselves. She sees opportunities for adding spin-off sessions to potentially make links with other areas of learning and perhaps for introducing more guest speakers and guests from the film world.

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Parents’ responses: Parents spoken to were very happy that their children were attending Film Club. One child had won a Film Club competition and recently been to see the premiere of Mr Bean’s Holiday at Leicester Square. The parents said their children talked a lot about what they had seen at Film Club and were obviously enjoying it. One parent wished they could attend too. Response to the film: Railway Children 23 children present on day of visit, 10 boys 13 girls, of which 6 were ‘visitors’ invited by club members. The children reacted very well to the film. They had seen the first 15 minutes a few days before when Film Club photographer had come in and they had set up a screening. The teacher reintroduced the film and encouraged the children to look out for details they may not have noticed last time. They enjoyed the children’s activity in the film and understood the humour. There was some chatting, mainly about the action of the film and the teacher interjected at certain points to clarify things for the children. There was a short break in the middle to hand out drinks. The children refocused without any problem. Unfortunately the computer crashed ten minutes before the end of the film. This was frustrating but the teacher was very calm and invited the children to come back to watch the end and have a discussion in a lunch hour later that week and they seemed happy to accept that.

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Appendix 5: Schools’ film choices during pilot 89 films watched during pilot (Jan-Mar 2007) A Beautiful Mind A Room For Romeo Brass About A Boy Babe Babette’s Feast Back To The Future Bambi Batman Begins Bean – The Ultimate Disaster Movie Bend It Like Beckham Big Fish Blade Runner Born Free Brewster’s Millions Buena Vista Social Club Bugsy Malone Bullet Boy Charlie and The Chocolate Factory Clockwise Close Encounters of a Third Kind Das Boot Donnie Darko Dr Dolittle Duck Soup Dumbo Elephant Elf Fever Pitch Freaky Friday Grease Groundhog Day Harry Potter and The Philosopher's Stone Hoodwinked Hotel Rwanda Howl’s Moving Castle Ice Age II In The Heat Of The Night It’s a Wonderful Life James and The Giant Peach Jaws Kes La Haine Last Resort Little Shop of Horrors Lord of The Flies March of The Penguins Microcosmos Millions Modern Times Monsier Hulot’s Holiday Motorcycle Diaries Moulin Rouge Munich My Left Foot

2001 1999 2002 1995 1987 1985 1942 2005 1997 2002 2003 1982 1966 1985 1999 1976 2004 2005 1986 1977 1981 2001 1998 1933 1941 2003 2003 1997 2003 1978 1993 2001 2005 2004 2004 2006 1967 1946 1996 1975 1969 1995 2000 1986 1990 2005 1996 2004 1936 1953 2004 2001 2005 1989

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Napoleon Dynamite O Brother Where Art Thou? Over the Hedge Peter Pan Rabbit Proof Fence Rize School of Rock Shaolin Soccer A Shark Tale Shattered Glass Shaun of the Dead Stuart Little Spirited Away Spongebob Squarepants The Movie Super Size Me The BFG The Brady Bunch Movie The Constant Gardener The General The Incredibles The Iron Giant The Little Mermaid The Mask The Mighty The Princess Bride The Return of the Pink Panther This is Spinal Tap Time Bandits Toy Story Tron Whale Rider War of The Worlds Watership Down Wind In The Willows Wizard of Oz

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2004 2000 2006 1953 2002 2005 2003 2001 2004 2003 2004 1999 2001 2004 2004 1989 1995 2005 1927 2004 1999 1989 1994 1998 1987 1975 1984 1981 1995 1982 2002 2005 1978 1996 1939


Appendix 6: Young people’s film reviews for Film Club website A selection from those posted January-March 2007. Reviews are edited before appearing online. Watership Down This film is very sad in crying terms because even though it is animated, when a rabbit dies or is killed or even wounded, it is so real you feel like it’s real life. This can teach us a lot about life in this world, both nice and nasty. But in the end it was fine. Stacey, age 10, Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed Junior school Watership Down was very enjoyable. After every problem has been solved another situation started so it was full of supris’es but it was quite upsetting but enjoyable. Lauren, age 10, Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed Junior School Kes The film was quite good. The film is about a boy who finds good times by training a kestrel. He is a lower class boy with no friends. The film is set in Barnsley in the 60\’s. The film has a few comedy moments including possibly the worlds worst football match (but strangely funny). The film ends on a sad note which is nothing less than heart-wrenching. I would say you should watch it to see how a boy used inner strength to overcome a bullying brother, a mum who couldn’t care less and a school of unsympathetic teachers by taming and training a wild kestrel. Danny, age 15, The Snaith School This is one brilliant film aba boy in barnsley who finds and trains a bird (forgot wat you call it) but tis film is sad yet funny with the funniest footbl match you have ever seen another one not to miss out on!!!!!! Tom, age 14, The Snaith School Hotel Rwanda The true story of Paul Rusesabagina, (played by Don Cheadle) the owner of a luxurious hotel in Rwanda. His new found business created a place of happiness and peace where his family could live. That is until, everything changed. As war breaks out between the Hutus and the Tutsis - with the citizens of Rwanda caught in the middle - Rusesabagina’s magnificent 4 star hotel is turned into a shelter for Tutsi refugees, but with the increasing pressure and extraordinary brutality of the Hutu soldiers leering over him, will Rusesabagina’s strong faith and dedication hold? An amazing piece of work, magnificently directed, by far the best drama that I have seen in some time (and I’ve seen my fair share). The shockingly violent scenes force you to wonder how mankind can act as such savages; killing each other due to mere identity and belief. Are we humans really so great when there are still such atrocities occurring in today’s world? However, there were some heart-wrenchingly, tearful scenes where one can only hope that a large box of tissues are nearby (sob). All in all, I recommend this film to people of a mature personality - due to the violence shown - and I hope that Hotel Rwanda will reach into your hearts and feelings, as much as it did mine. 5/5! :) Enjoy the film! Vay, age 15, St Augustine’s CE High School Wind In The Willows Wind in the Willows is mostly a comedy film. Toad is manic,Molie was very sad about his house being demolished,Rat was very bright and looks out for other people,Badger was a very good character but very basic but wourst of all the Weasles were vailant and loved to make people sad.This film was pruduced in 1996 and lasts 88 minutes and 2 seconds.If I was a movie rater i

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would make this film of the year because of its bright,funny and heroic actors.This film is brillaint!!! You must perswade your teacher to get this film for your film list!! Terry jones is a VERY GOOD PRODUCER because of his ideas to envent Wind In The Willows. Rebecca, age 10, Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed Junior School Napolean Dynamite I would really want to watch this because I have been told that it is very funny and enjoyable.It is not at all rude and you can see imaginations of the people who wrote the script. It is not as long as the last one we watched, which gives us more chance to talk about it afterwards. So I would be overjoyed to watch it. thankyou for reading my review. Camille, age 9, Whitstable and Seasalter Endowed Junior School A Shark Tale It's a great film about a fish that makes a shark friends. The fish then comes famous because he pretended to slay his shark friend. Shekinah, Torriano School Junior School The Bridge On The River Kwai This film is superb. I can understand why this film won so many awards - it is excellent! The storyline is gripping and I like the way that it is done from two views (the prisoners of war and the commondos coming to blow the bridge up). I thought the ending was quite sad really and throughout the whole film I was waiting for the 'spectacular' explosion at the end but when it did come it wasn't really all that amazing! However it is a fantastic film with great acting (Alec Guiness) and I recommend it to all members. Samuel, age 13, Woldgate College Groundhog Day Groundhog Day is a brilliant film telling the story of a news reporter (Bill Murray) who goes to report on the annual event of 'Groundhog Day'. All is going well until the next morning he wakes up and it is Groundhog Day again. This continues for many nights until the reporter knows about every thing that happens on the day. He begins to use it to his advantage and does stuff such as stealing money and getting to know his producer (Andie MacDowell) better. He also realises that there will be no consequences of whatever he does on the day so he decides to break the law. After a while he begins to get fed up and go mad so trys to kill himself - he realises that this isn't possible either and that he will be alive again the next morning! This film is absolutely brilliant. It has a great plot, excellent actors and is also very funny. I am going to buy on DVD because it is so good. I highly recommend this film to any Film Club members. Samuel, age 13, Woldgate College Millions MILLIONS!!!! ITS A BRILL FILM ANYONE CAN WATCH IT. THE SCRIPT IS BRILL AND THE ACTORS ARE BRILL TO NOT ONE TO MIS OUT ON!!!!!!!!!!!!! TOM BRENNAN. Tom, age 14, The Snaith School Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday This film is great for all the people who love comedy.Anyone with a sence of humour wouldnt be able to keep a straight face at all the hilarious jokes .My Favourite part is were Monsieur Hulot tried to paint a kayak that keeps floating away in the sea and he turns up at a funeral with a car with a flat tyre people mistake as wreath P.S Film Club is Great. Katie, age 10, Newport Primary School

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Bean – The Ultimate Disaster Movie Bean was my favourite film, because it was funny and his facial expressions made all of the club laugh. When at the end when he passed the motorbiker and took a picture of him! that was just ace! and at the end when he had to say good bye, every one was going aaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh! we just all loved the film although some enjoyed Brewsters Millions more. My worst film was Missore Hulots Holiday, because it was a bit boring and i didn't exactly understand what was going on, alhough i did get a few giggles out of it! Thank you for setting up the film club, it is the best club i am in, i never miss it! BYE! Georgia, age 11, Newport Primary School Brewster’s Millions We watched Brewster's Millions on Thursday 25th January. It is where Montgomery Brewster has to spend $30,000,000 in 30 days.It was a great movie. I liked it when he was in the elections for the Mayor and his slogan was 'Vote None Of The Above'. At the end he only just got the $300,000,000. I also liked it when they were playing Baseball and a train went through the field because there was a train track running through the pitch. It was funny when he bet on something and got even more money. I rate this film ****1/2.P.S. Thank You for setting up the film club. It's entertainment at it's best. Liam, age 10, Newport Primary School Amazing Grace (seen on an outing to Hull Odeon) Amazing Grace is about a man called William Wilberforce and his quest to abolish slavery. After many years he succeeded. He had help from many people one of which was the priminister. The film starts about 10 years into his campaign when he is feeling very sick. He kept having flashbacks of when he first started his campaign. From then on he continued the campaign determined to abolish slavery. After he got married and had a baby boy, he finally abolished slavery.I would give it 9.5 out of 10 Alex, age 11, Newport Primary School

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Appendix 7: Comments from school staff joining up to Film Club’s national roll out Engaging the school: staff, parents and young people [In an] economically deprived area with rich ethnic mix [it would] provide access to children and possibly parents to films. Would be great to offer films in different languages to respond to the various languages spoken in school. Recently installed big projector and screen in hall, ideal to showcase it. Very much like the idea of parents and children being able to spend quality time together enjoying a film for very little or no cost. A visit to the cinema for a family is a huge expense and many of our parents would not be able to go to such an expense. The idea that students can use their acquired knowledge and passion to inform others, their studies and take responsibility for a club. An excellent way of helping our children access quality literacy - particularly at our school where most children are EAL learners. I'm an Extended Schools Coordinator for 33 local schools and think this is a great way to provide a popular and beneficial activity after school for all local children. I love films but until listening to Front Row [Film Club promotion on Radio 4 magazine show] hadn't thought of it as an extra-curricular activity.

The education context for Film Club I like the way that the films are arranged in themes which also assist the delivery of the curriculum, particularly PHSE and Citizenship. The range of films would appeal to all ages in the school. Film is also a major stimulus for improving boys writing - a national problem. I like the way the films are grouped on the website and am very excited about the prospects of introducing a film club into the curriculum. The young people who come to college have often had negative experiences of school. Many are lacking in confidence, have low self-esteem and do not rate themselves academically. As part of the programme, young people do ‘core skills’ (‘key skills’ in England) which the do not enjoy. Debate and discussion around visual stimulation would be a way forward. I think it offers children the opportunity to be informed contributors in the debate quality or otherwise of films. It lets them move beyond watching a film because of the advance publicity and hype and actually think about film. The concept fully suits the proposed Scottish Curriculum for Excellence.

The films: selecting, ordering and watching I think it would be an excellent way of introducing my students to a wider range of films than they might otherwise experience. It would be really good to reinforce opportunities to talk about and analyse the films watched; developing a culture of film education that would benefit older students of film studies. I think it is an excellent concept. It will introduce students to a wider variety of films than they usually see. I can date my interest in films to my membership of a film club at my secondary school, and later at university. I think it would be an excellent way to promote the idea of film as having artistic credibility for children; encouraging them to philosophise and question all aspects of life, including their own. Children are very capable of thinking quite profoundly about many subjects and I believe that the

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Film Club will spark off interesting discussions and thought processes. It will also help to move away from the idea that film is only mindless electronic entertainment for young passive viewers and does not have the same validity as visual art. Chance to broaden horizons and awareness, showing alternative genres to those they would normally be exposed too. Break down prejudices towards non-mainstream film, especially 'foreign films' with subtitles which usually terrify them!

Beyond the films: discussion, film industry guests, website I think the concept of having specific film seasons and the general accessibility of the scheme is a great idea. I've been thinking of setting up a film club since I began teaching but have found it difficult to structure the viewing. I couldn't think how to make it work, but this website is genius. I love that there are opportunities to meet professionals from the film industry (especially useful for Media Studies). I also like the news section and the fact that students can submit reviews etc. I like the grouping and seasons aspect of the film screenings. There is nothing I dislike about the website. I would love the opportunity to become involved. Will hopefully give children the opportunity to get involved in the film industry and find out what happens behind the scenes as well as in front of the camera. The opportunity to discuss issues of interest to the children that wouldn't necessarily link to the National Curriculum. I like the idea of the children becoming critics and thinking for themselves. I have been running a movie-making club but find it time consuming to find films by age group or genre etc. [The Film Club website] has saved me a lot of time. We already run a Cineclub - a film club would support this - inspiring the students own short films - providing material to ‘homage’.

The industry context for Film Club We are a community indie cinema but Film Club would help us reach lower school students and children from our partner primaries. Support/guests/ease. [I] like the way this is free to schools which means those families on low incomes (which we desperately need to engage) can attend and benefit from this scheme we can pass on this wonderful opportunity to many pupils and their families. Chance to celebrate good quality films with children. We have used the local cinema for school events and would like to extend this.

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Appendix 8: Summary of recommendations To engage the school, it is vital to identify and support key staff with responsibilities covering curricular and ex-curricular work in order for Film Club to have a solid base and meaningful presence in a school. Consulting with teachers on the film catalogue and further Film Club materials will be a significant element of this support, as will ensuring that parents and young people continue to be encouraged to play an active role in their club. In addition, engaging a wide cross section of schools by offering Film Club free or for a low fee will mean that cost is not a hurdle to schools’ initial engagement. Film Club’s film catalogue could increase its impact on young audiences by including more world, independent and archive film, especially for primary schools. To select films for clubs, teachers would like the option of programming films in a pre-selected order. Across the film catalogue, the role of BBFC guidelines will need to be clear. Film Club may also work with the film industry to capitalise on the engagement, and in some cases improved behaviour, of young people who follow up their Film Club experience with increased independent viewing. Beyond the films themselves, while important to maintain an informal approach in which young people are open to absorbing the film viewing experience, Film Club could offer young people the opportunity to increase their cultural and critical appreciation and understanding of cinema. This can be with further encouragement to teachers to mediate discussion, build on young people’s enthusiasm for reviewing and rating films, ensuring that film industry visits are offered to as many schools as possible and including teacher feedback and resources in the planned teachers’ area of the Film Club website. The policy, education and industry contexts offer further opportunities for the development of Film Club: in order not to duplicate existing activity, Film Club can work on a policy and delivery level with existing organisations, from cross-government initiatives to Extended Schools provision (where it may offer a ‘blueprint’ for development of provision) to young filmmakers to funders working across the arts. The development of the Film Club film catalogue would involve partnership with film festivals, arts organisations and rights’ holders, in addition to the planned links with cinemas and ‘Respect for IP’ which will build on young audiences inspired by their Film Club experience.

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Appendix 9: Summary of key points Engaging the school: Key points •

Film is a medium which is accessible: a popular art form that children and young people are inspired by, already feel ownership of and take pleasure in responding to. Developing this enthusiasm with a wider selection of films in an after school setting, Film Club’s child-centred focus has young people participate from the first step.

The positive effects of Film Club, in terms of the inspiration, entertainment, engagement and educational value of film, reinforce the acknowledged potential impact of film on young people

For pilot schools, Film Club is a welcome and well-structured ‘package’ as an addition to Extended Services provision and may provide a model for Extended Services

The lack of direct cost of the Film Club pilot for schools was a great encouragement and teachers indicated that they would be glad to see it remain at no or low cost

In many pilot schools, teachers, young people and parents cooperate on the programming and delivery of their Film Club.

The films: Key points •

The wide selection of recent and older titles in the Film Club pilot was enthusiastically received by teachers, young people and parents as an opportunity to build on their existing knowledge and enthusiasm for film

89% of the films selected were released before 2005, of which the majority came from 19802004, with foreign language and silent films were also programmed to great response

In addition to their enthusiasm in helping to select films for their Film Club, young people enjoy the process of ‘bringing the cinema to school’ by preparing the room or hall

Young people’s behaviour was very good, and in some cases markedly improved, during Film Club sessions.

Beyond the films: Key points •

The full Film Club ‘package’ fulfils the key DfES objectives for Extended Services and offers a potential model for Extended Services provision

The Film Club website is a tool for engagement, facilitating independent and guided access to information and interactivity for teachers and young people: response by young people to the website was very strong: of the 635 children who responded to an online questionnaire to rate the site, 73% rated it 4 or 5 out of 5

Guided discussion and independent writing enables young people to respond to films and develop their critical viewing skills

Film reviews written by young people are of great value to teachers, the writers and peers reading others’ reviews online. Offering a ‘review of the week’ is a current incentive, as are competitions. Enjoying expressing and sharing opinions is a key area for increasing critical understanding and appreciation of film

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Meeting and interviewing film industry guests including directors and actors is an inspiring way for young people to participate in Film Club

While acknowledging the importance of maintaining an informal approach in which young people are open to absorbing the film viewing experience, teachers are enthusiastic about the potential to build on the success of Film Club to link with film and media-related work both in and out of the curriculum.

The context for Film Club: Key points

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Film Club fits with government initiatives, particularly the DfES’s Extended Services agenda and the DCMS’s Creative Economy programme. In the Extended Services sector, the structure and complete package offered by Film Club has the potential to act as a ‘blueprint’ for the development of the sector UK-wide.

Film Club has the potential to augment, and work in partnership with, organisations in the field of film and media education and the development of young audiences for film. In the future, this it may play a significant and unique role within the UK Film Council’s UK-Wide Education Strategy.

In addition to Film Club’s film industry partners, on a regional level there are strong links to be made with Regional Screen Agencies, exhibitors and young people’s film festivals

Film Club is well placed to reinforce the ‘Respect for Intellectual Property’ message to young audiences.


film Club Evaluation