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Adviser Update DOW JONES NEWS FUND

Copyright © 2014 Dow Jones News Fund, Inc.

WINTER 2014

VOLUME 54, NUMBER 3

Inside

https://www.Newsfund.org

Be a journalism rock star

Review ‘Searchlights and Sunglasses’ Page A12

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Update photo by Bradley Wilson

By Jim Streisel DJNF TOY

yet, like us on Facebook. Really. You should.  We play all over the Indianapolis area from bars and nightclubs to American Legion posts to restaurants and festivals. Along the way, we’ve met some pretty interesting people.  And for me, I guess my love of performing never left. Playing music is an outlet for me, a creative path. It’s a hobby. Some people collect stamps — my dad, for example. Some people build model airplanes. I do this.  But today’s presentation isn’t really

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wasn’t always going to be a journalism teacher. In high school, I wasn’t a member of my school’s newspaper or yearbook staff. Instead, I participated on the speech team. I was in the show choir. I performed in

future, unless, of course, I win the lottery, in which case, there will be a job opening soon.  But there’s a side of me — a creative side — that never really left ever since those performance days of yesteryear. Some of you know this side of me.   I’m in a band, technically, a musical duo. We call ourselves The Dead Squirrels, and we play cover tunes from artists like Jason Mraz to Tom Petty to John Mayer. We’ve got a growing list of original tunes, too.   Feel free to read about us at TheDeadSquirrels.com or, better

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Editor’s note: The following is taken from the text of the speech News Fund’s 2013 Teacher of the Year Jim Streisel delivered at the Advisers’ Luncheon at the JEA/NSPA Convention in Boston in November.

musicals. I was a class officer.  Bottom line, I loved to perform. I loved the feeling I got from being on stage in front of an audience. I loved the energy. I loved the satisfaction I felt from working on something and seeing it come to fruition.   Fast-forward about 25 years. This is me today. A mild-mannered journalism teacher for the past 19 years at the same school in the conservative Midwest. I’ve been working with the HiLite staff and its subsequent offshoots for most of those 19 years, and I expect that journey to continue at least into the foreseeable

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SPEECH — News Fund National Journalism Teacher of the Year Jim Streisel tells his Advisers’ Luncheon audience at the JEA/NSPA National Convention in Boston about his creative side.


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about me. It’s about us here in the journalism education community, and I’m here today to talk to you about being a journalism rock star. And what’s more, I’m here to tell you how you can be a journalism rock star, too. Step 1: Know your material. Any good musician spends hours, days, weeks, years practicing his craft. A great musician realizes that that learning never stops, and rather than being satisfied with what he’s already created, he agonizes over where he needs to improve.   Journalism rock stars need to know their craft as well. It’s important for journalism educators to be wellversed, not only in the field of journalism, but also in journalism curriculum, in state and national standards, in data gathering, in best practices.    And while these areas don’t necessarily make you a better teacher, they are the catch phrases of our industry, and we need to be experts in what we do. We need to know like the back of our hands what we’re asked to teach our students. We need to be able to justify, using our shared language of curriculum, what it is that we want our students to achieve. Step 2. Do it for the music But despite what legislators would have us believe, knowledge of that curriculum isn’t enough. It’s a starting point to be sure, much like learning chord progressions on a guitar is a starting point. But just like knowledge of chords isn’t necessarily music, knowledge of journalism standards isn’t necessarily teaching. That’s why we need to do it for the music. In other words, once we know what to teach, we need to know why we teach it.  My oldest son is 13 years old and he plays the saxophone. When he started playing three years ago, he wasn’t very good. He knew about three notes, and half of those were squeaky, off-key or non-existent. But he practiced. He learned through his band class how to read music. He started playing better. Two years ago, he moved to first chair where he has remained. Last year, he joined the jazz band. He got even better. Just this year, he has started to perform improvisational solos during his jazz

RECOGNIZE — News Fund 2013 honorees attending the Boston Convention included: (front) Derek Smith, Charla Harris, Ana Rosenthal; (back) Matthew Schott, Jim Streisel and Jonathan Rogers. Michele Dunaway and Jason Wallestad are not pictured. Update photo by Bradley Wilson

band concerts.   In just three years, my son has learned how to take what he has learned, absorb it and turn that knowledge into something personal. Before my very eyes, he is becoming more than just a music player; he is becoming a musician with his own sound, his own voice. His teacher has helped to foster that growth.  Like my son’s band teacher, we need to understand what we’re trying to accomplish with our students. The Oct. 7 issue of TIME magazine featured an article that discussed the supposed shortcomings of education today. Namely, author Jon Meacham said that rather than just ask students what they know, it’s better to ask what they know how to do.  While that’s an admirable statement, I think it doesn’t go far enough. For me, the even better questions are these: Do our graduates know how to ask the right questions? Do they know where to go to find those answers? Do they know how to apply those answers to their daily lives?  These are the very questions we ask our journalism students to demonstrate every day. We don’t teach journalism; we teach transferable skills. Life skills. To use the vernacular of the day: 21st Century Skills. We just happen to use the common language of journalism to hone those skills. And like the band teacher who realizes when a student has moved beyond the curriculum – a student who has mastered the notes and the chords and the meter – it is our job as educators to nurture our students beyond the curriculum, to challenge

them, to help them see the deeper meaning behind what they do and why they do it. Step 3: Act the part It’s not enough any more for rock stars to just make great music. You’ve got to stand out in today’s music scene. You’ve got to make your voice shine above all the others.  Like musical rock stars, it’s important for journalism rock stars to do the same. Today’s educational environment is tough, to say the least. It’s not enough anymore for teachers simply to be great in the classroom. Luckily, we have lots of opportunities to show our professionalism. If you haven’t already been recognized as a CJE or MJE, the time to do that is now. Additionally, take advantage of the many committees we have through the NSPA or the JEA or the ones available through your local and state organizations, and get involved. Be a leader in your school.  And once you’ve done that, share that information. Harry Wong, in his book “The First Days of School,” instructs teachers to post their credentials in a prominent spot in their classroom. Doctors do this. Lawyers, too. Rock stars post gold and platinum records in their studios. And in addition to your walls, add your credentials to your email signatures and other correspondence. You are a professional. It’s time to start acting like one. Stop being humble, and start acting amazing because you are. Step 4: Enjoy the performance Let’s face it; you didn’t get into this

job because you love data. You didn’t do this because you absolutely adore going to meetings. You didn’t do this because you love attending luncheons at national conventions with bearded, charismatic speakers. You do it because you love working with students. You do it because you are passionate about what your students are able to do.  Truth is, in the scheme of things, your time with students is very limited. Just like a musician spends hours behind the scenes working on his craft, perfecting it, working out the nuances, good teachers spend hours behind the scenes working on their craft, planning lessons, grading papers, going to meetings. I only get to see my students once every other day for an hour and a half each time. That’s my performance. I need to make it mean something. I need to make that time memorable so my students will be excited to come back again to see what’s next. Savor these times. Make them count. Step 5: Find your voice New musicians are just trying to learn the basics. They find other musicians they admire and they try to emulate that sound. With enough practice, though, they start to develop their own sound and, given enough time, they morph into something else.  Like those new musicians, new journalism teachers are just trying to keep their heads above water. This job can be overwhelming. Thankfully, though, we have our own set of journalism rock stars to follow. Each of these people has a unique voice in

the field. They’ve spent their careers developing that voice and then sharing it with others. Add those voices together, and you have an amazing community of rock stars.  But these rock stars all started somewhere. They learned through trial and error, they relied on their own set of veteran journalism rock stars to help them move forward. They created their own sound. And then they gave back.   How do you develop that voice? Think about what makes you and your program special. What unique circumstances do you have that you’ve had to overcome? How do you stand out among the cookiecutter programs in the rest of your school? Find those circumstances, overcome them, and then share. Pretty soon, you’ll be the next generation of journalism rock stars and you’ll have your own set of fans trying to emulate you. Step 6: Reinvent yourself Step 6 really focuses on the fact that the field of journalism is constantly changing and journalism curriculum needs to change with it. Certain musicians have been able to change with the times and stay relevant. Journalism teachers need to do the same. I’ve been doing this gig for 19 years, and I’ve changed quite a bit over that time. Not only do I look a lot different, I also teach a lot differently. But change doesn’t happen overnight; it’s a slow, often grueling process. And year-to-year, unless you do something drastic (like, say, lose your hair), you may not notice that change.  But look at yourself over time, and those changes become more evident. Little steps turn into big steps, which turn into positive change for your program.  Our products need to continue to change to meet the needs of our readers. When you’re young and energetic, it’s easier to make changes. You have no frame of reference, nothing to compare yourself to. But as you get older, that change becomes more difficult.  But we have to continue to change to stay relevant. The Beatles were great at this — experimenting with all sorts of different instruments and sounds to help share their music and push it forward. But at their core, the Beatles never lost what they knew

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— their basic ability to write songs with meaning and to stay true to that core value.  When I graduated college in 1995, I had no idea what the future would bring. Websites and tweets and Facebook posts barely existed, if they existed at all. But I adapted. I recognized that what I did know — namely, journalism and journalistic storytelling — would never change; the rest of these items were just tools to help us tell those stories in different ways. Journalism is changing, perhaps more so than any other area of study, and we can either decide to avoid those changes and become irrelevant very quickly — become a one-hit-wonder — or we can choose to embrace those changes and adapt them for our own needs. Step 7: Party This step shouldn’t be too difficult for many of you but it bears mention. It’s so important to celebrate what you do with your students and with your teaching community. Celebrate

everything. While we don’t do this job for awards, we all know how difficult they are to earn. Enjoy them. Celebrate milestones: the first deadline; the last deadline; an awesome interview; a new feature on your website. Give paper plate awards. Sing happy birthday as loud and obnoxiously as you can, or just give some deserving kid a pat on the back and a heartfelt congratulations for a job well-done.  Because what your students will remember, the thing they will take away from your class, is not that great story they wrote or that amazing interview. They won’t recall how they coded the heck out of that web post or how they agonized over editing that one sentence just so.  No, what they will remember is the experience. So Step Number 8 is for you to remember why you’re here. Step 8: Do it for the fans You’re here for the fans — your students.   I’ve been to many concerts over the years. And I couldn’t tell you about individual guitar solos or drum breaks. I couldn’t even tell you what songs those groups played with any kind of certainty.  But I could tell you if I enjoyed the

concert. I could tell you if I left feeling happy or inspired or thoughtful.  Your students won’t remember the specifics of your class, but they’ll remember the experience. They’ll remember the camaraderie. They’ll remember feeling like they were part of something worthwhile.  They’ll remember you and the way you treated them day in and day out.    On that note, on Nov. 3 I was reminded of my own advice, when one of my journalism rock star friends, Grosse Point South adviser Jeff Nardone, was taken from our ranks far too soon. One of his former students published a touching tribute to his former teacher. In it, he said, “One of the reasons I respected Mr. Nardone so much was because he never once tried to silence me or turn me into something I’m not … Instead, he told me to keep writing and to never lose my passion for issues that were important to me. He told me to let him worry about the would-be censors.”  These are powerful words that encapsulate the very selfless essence of what we do. That’s why Jeff was one of the best.  And that’s why I’ve got a Bonus

Page 3A Tip for you today. It’s a tip that I hope you’ll take with you after you leave here. It’s a tip that Jeff Nardone definitely understood. Just like those bands I spoke of, you may not remember these individual tips. But hopefully, you’ll remember this. Bonus tip: Believe in yourself You are amazing at what you do. You, all of you, are artists. Each of you is honing your craft. Each of you is contributing to the larger journalistic community. You do important work. You do valuable work.  But just remember, your products are not made of paper and ink or of HTML code. Rather, your products are made of flesh and blood, of ideas and personalities and hopes and dreams. You get the opportunity to work with those raw materials every day. It’s a privilege and an honor.  This job isn’t easy. But it has the potential to be amazing. You’ve got the opportunity. You’ve got back stage passes to the most awesome job on the planet. So go. Spread your music. I want to hear it played loud and clear until my ears bleed.    So go. Go be a rock star. I believe in you. You should, too.

Jim Streisel,

the 2013 DJNF National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year, is the adviser of the Carmel (Ind.) HS HiLite newspaper and its website, www.hilite. org. Streisel has written two journalism textbooks, “High School Journalism: A Practical Guide” and “Scholastic Web Journalism: Connecting with Readers in a Digital World.” He earned a 2012 Pioneer Award from the NSPA and was named a 2012 DJNF Distinguished Adviser. He was also named the 2011 Carmel Clay Schools Teacher of the Year and the 2011 Indiana Journalism Adviser of the Year. He can be reached at jstreise@ccs.lk12.in.us.


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‘Luck is the residue of design’

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DJNF PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE By Richard J. Levine

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Richard J. Levine

is president of the board of directors of the Dow Jones News Fund, Inc. In five decades with Dow Jones & Co., he has served as vice president for news and staff development, executive editor of Dow Jones Newswires, vice president of information services, editorial director of electronic publishing and Washington correspondent and columnist for The Wall Street Journal. He holds a B.S. from Cornell University and an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He can be reached at richard.levine@ dowjones.com.

t is a subject journalism schools don’t teach but perhaps should: the role luck often plays in journalism careers. One lesson might focus on prominent members of the craft who are outspoken and honest about the value of being lucky — and being prepared.   Here, for example, is how Thomas Friedman, the New York Times foreign affairs columnist and author, describes it: “Journalism involves a lot of luck — being in the right place at the right time and then taking advantage of it. I was very lucky to be in Lebanon when it became a dramatic global story, and I was very lucky to be on (Secretary of State) Jim Baker’s plane to have a front-row seat for the end of the Cold War, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet empire, the first Gulf War and the aftermath of Tiananmen Square.”  Ben Bradlee, the former managing and executive editor of the Washington Post, makes similar observations in “A Good Life,” his 1995 memoir: “I really had been dealt an awfully good hand by the powers that be. A hand that gave me a ringside seat at some of the century’s most vital moments. A hand that enabled me to make an adventure out of the Depression, illness, and war, and a romance out of newspapering ….   “I have thought hard about the role of luck in my life and come to the simple conclusion that I have been wonderfully lucky … To land a job on the Washington Post, after skipping an interview with the Baltimore Sun only because it was raining so hard when my train stopped in Baltimore first ... To find the emerging Katharine Graham looking for an editor at the precise moment when the Post was ready to fly.”   In a half century in the news

Ben Bradlee

Thomas Friedman

OPPORTUNITY — Luck has played a role in the careers of both legendary Washington Post managing editor Ben Bradlee and New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman.

business, I too have been blessed by great good luck, a circumstance brought to mind by two recent events — the death at 98 of Penn Kimball, my mentor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas.  Kimball, a distinguished writer and editor before becoming a teacher, helped me to understand and begin to master what is referred to as long-form narrative journalism. But more important, he set me on a path to Washington and foreign affairs reporting by gruffly advising, “You have to do something important.”   Under his tutelage, l won a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship that, after a brief stint on the New York Times foreign desk, enabled me to spend a year abroad learning how to be a foreign correspondent.   I was on the fellowship when I arrived in West Berlin on Nov. 22, 1963, the day John F. Kennedy was killed in Dallas, and found myself surrounded by Berliners, grateful for Kennedy’s recent visit

to the beleaguered city, in deep grief. The article I wrote about their emotional reaction to the assassination of the president was the first of many I filed for the Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass., as I wended my way through Europe and North Africa.  Both my relationship with Kimball and my arrival in Berlin were a by-product of luck. But the ability to capitalize on the opportunities was a result of preparation. Or as Branch Rickey, the baseball executive who hired Jackie Robinson to integrate major league baseball in 1947, once aptly explained, “Luck is the residue of design.”  My first job with The Wall Street Journal, as a general-assignment reporter in the Washington bureau in 1966, also had elements of luck and design. Four years earlier, as managing editor of the Cornell Daily Sun, I had been interviewed by Ed Cony, the Journal’s Pulitzer-Prize winning managing editor, on a recruiting trip he made to Cornell University.  After Columbia, the fellowship and two years as an Army lieutenant, I wrote him to

inquire about job possibilities. Fortunately, he offered me a reporting job in an unspecified city and when an opening arose in the Washington bureau sent me to see the bureau chief.  More luck came my way soon after I started in Washington. As the war in Vietnam escalated, inflationary pressures at home increased and President Lyndon Johnson spent more time at his ranch in Texas, I found myself covering the White House during my first year in the bureau, working hard to stay on top of the economic news that the Journal prized.  But the story I most coveted was Vietnam, and I got my chance in 1970 when I was appointed the Journal’s military correspondent. After more than five years in that role, I was fortunate to become the Journal’s chief economic writer and a columnist, an assignment also requiring much global travel and reporting.  Thus, I found myself in Saudi Arabia tracking oil prices, in Tehran just before the overthrow of the Shah and in Beijing not long after Deng Xiaoping decided to move China toward a marketdriven economy.  Much to my surprise, in 1980 I was offered the position of editorial director of Dow Jones’ newly established electronic publishing division as personal computers began to enter offices and homes across America in greater and greater numbers.  The dawning of the digital age represented yet another lucky break, requiring a print reporter with no computer background to acquire technical and management skills and to grapple with new forms and issues of journalism.


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ROUNDUP WI N T E R 2014

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ost your state, regional or national association’s activities in Adviser Roundup by dropping editor George Taylor (GTay200@verizon.net) a line with your information. Photos with captions from events are welcome. Next deadline is Feb. 15.

CSPA

Meredith Cummings has been named the 2014 James F. Paschal award recipient by the Columbia Scholastic Press Advisers Association Cummings (CSPAA). She is the director of the Alabama Scholastic Press Association (ASPA), the National Elementary School Press Association and the Multicultural Journalism Workshop housed at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.   The award honors state or regional school press association officials who have distinguished themselves in the field. She will receive the award March 21 at the CSPA Spring Convention. Cummings is credited by many as having saved ASPA from extinction.     Erin Coggins a former ASPA board member said that what was in danger of being eliminated became “a thriving organization with a website, social media presence, and increased membership.” Cummings organized fall workshops at four locations across the state of Alabama and hosted the annual state conference in the spring to keep scholastic journalism alive in the state.   According to Marie Parsons, a retired ASPA director, Cummings recently helped coordinate celebrations of UA’s 50th anniversary of integration and promoted the Tinker Tour. She is credited for always acknowledging the network of administrators, faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, active and retired advisers and alumni of multicultural and scholastic programs in such events.   A list of finalists for the 2014 Crown

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Diane Mitsu Klos

Looking at the larger picture By Julia Swan

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iana Mitsu Klos, the new executive director of the National Scholastic Press Association, is bullish about the continued importance of scholastic journalism, despite, or perhaps because of, how new technology has changed the field of journalism.  The NSPA board of directors named Klos its executive director last fall and she began the fulltime position as of Nov. 1. She is the first woman and the first Asian-American to hold the position.  Currently living in northern Virginia, Diana plans to telecommute to her new position, at least initially, with regular trips to NSPA headquarters in Minneapolis, as well as participation in the organization’s conferences. Like many professional women (and men), she has family obligations, including caring for her aging mother, that keep her in Virginia.   “Everyone faces challenges of balancing work with other aspects of life,” she said, noting that technology makes this easier. Klos said she is excited to be working with the talented staff at NSPA.  She attended her first NSPA conference as executive director in Boston last fall. She called it an outstanding conference, which had extra meaning for her because she celebrated her 50th birthday during that time.  Because of her new role, the conference felt quite different from those she has attended in the past, when she was there as an exhibitor. At those times, she said, she “felt ensconced in a bunker.” In Boston, for the first time, she had an opportunity to go into different classrooms and experience firsthand the energy and excitement of those events.  She said she believes that despite the challenges traditional media are facing in the form of new technology, there is still a place for good journalism

NSPA — Diana Mitsu Klos, the new executive director of the National Scholastic Press Association, at the Journalism Education Association and National Scholastic Press Association convention in Boston. Update photo by Bradley Wilson

students, and still a place for good journalism education, even for students who go into other fields.   “I tell them [students] the jobs are available,” she said, noting that many legacy news organizations have moved into the online age, and still need good reporters who are capable of thinking critically.  And while the majority of students taking journalism classes will go into other fields, developing “an appreciation of quality journalism makes them more engaged as citizens.   “I hope we have a role in helping students make good choices,” she said.   Prior to joining NSPA, Klos was a senior staff member at the

Diana Mitsu Klos’ resumé • Executive strategist for media organizations, associations and nonprofits since October 2012. • American Society of News Editors: Project director; October 1996 to 1999; Senior Project Director, 1999 to September 2012. • Poughkeepsie (N.Y.) Journal: Managing Editor, February 1995 to October 1996

American Society of News Editors from 1996 to 2012. At ASNE, she developed and secured grant funding for the High School Journalism Institute and the education and online hosting services hsj.org and my.hsj.org.     Prior to that, she was staff writer, city editor and managing editor at daily newspapers in New Jersey, Connecticut and New York. She also has served on the board of NSPA and is a member of the Dow Jones News Fund Board.   “I have an affinity for this work,” she said of her new position.  With ASNE she was involved in organization and fiscal management, areas that are of increasing importance due to the

• Norwich (Connecticut) Bulletin: City Editor, May 1993 to February 1995 • Asbury Park Press, Neptune, N.J.: Staff writer, March 1991 to May 1993 • The Daily Journal, Vineland, N.J., Staff writer, March 1988 to March 1991 • Education: B.A. in Communications, City College of New York; Northern Virginia Communty College, project management course in 2010.

harsh reality of budget cuts. But she said she also believes it is important to have the “ability to … lift your head from your day to day work” and look at the larger picture.  She believes her priorities at NSPA should include “sending a stronger message to underserved, diverse communities.” Organizations like NSPA will no longer be relevant if they don’t take the country’s changing demographics into account, she said. That includes paying attention to students who are economically disadvantaged. Of course, those students are most likely to attend schools whose budgets have been cut most drastically, and which are least likely to have journalism programs.  When she speaks to school officials, she said, she has to remind them that “journalism is the best way to teach English in this century … It is not a frill.”  And she points out that schools without student media, such as newspapers and yearbooks, lack a sense of community. “Those outlets give a voice to everyone in a school,” she says.

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Julia Swan

is a freelance writer living in Hellertown, Pa. She was an editor at two weekly newspapers in Pennsylvania for almost 15 years, and prior to that, worked for 10 years as a part-time reporter for a suburban daily near Boston, Mass. She can be reached at bruce.swan@rcn.com.

 The good news is that much of the new technology is becoming less expensive, so more schools will be able to afford some of those tools.   Her status as the first woman director of NSPA pleases her, as do the advances women are making in all areas. What’s most important, she believes, is the increasing number of women behind the scenes in so many fields.  The NSPA is a national organization that supports scholastic journalism at middle school, high school and college levels. The association provides journalism education services to students, teachers, media advisers and others throughout the United States.  NSPA Board President Al Tims said of Klos’ appointment: “We are delighted to have found a journalism leader of Diana’s national stature to lead our organization. This is a time of dynamic change for journalism organizations of all kinds. Diana is the right person to help us reach and serve even more young journalists and their advisers, throughout the nation.”

NSPA DIRECTOR — Diana Mitsu Klos, the new executive director of the National Scholastic Press Association, and Al Tims, president of the NSPA Board, meet at the Journalism Education Association and National Scholastic Press Association Convention in Boston. Klos believes that schools without student media, such as newspapers and yearbooks, lack a sense of community. Update photo by Bradley Wilson


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‘The stuff inside a journalist’s head’ By Rich Holden

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corrections columns, there is no single source of errors that comes close to math issues. These encompass everything from calculating percentages wrong to confusing mean and median and confusing percent and percentage point.   Here’s one example from the 2014 exam that few students caught. The lead read: “A high-speed passenger train . . . crashed in northern Spain, killing 79 people and injuring 170. It was the worst train crash in Spain since a 1972 accident near Barcelona killed 65 passengers.”   Have you spotted the word that’s used incorrectly? It’s not the worst accident “since” 1972. This crash killed 14 more people than did the 1972 accident. The paragraph should have been reworded to say something like: “The previous record for the death toll from a train accident was 65 in 1972.”   And of course there’s always the section on grammar and style to raise a few hackles. If students stop learning about geography in grade school, then they stop learning proper grammar early in high school.   I could use the same “who/ whom” example for a dozen years, and students would still

come up with the incorrect answer at least half the time.   For instance, let’s take a look at this sentence. “Who/ Whom did the publisher name as editor?” It isn’t as complicated as it looks. Simply take the sentence, substitute “he” for “who” and “him” for “whom” and go from there. One would not write “Did the publisher name he as editor?” Correct grammar dictates that the sentence read “Did the publisher name him as editor?” Thus, the right answer in this example is “whom.”   I realize that class time is a very valuable commodity, but I do think it’s important that, perhaps, setting aside some time for these issues will greatly benefit the students. I’ve often been told that an editor’s mind is filled with “stuff.” I realize that’s not the most precise description out there, but it does have its place. That’s why whenever someone is putting together a Trivial Pursuit team, an editor is always one of the first choices.   You’re doing your students a considerable favor by making them aware of the importance of keeping up with current events and history. It’s something they will thank you for years from now.

Rich Holden

is executive director of the Dow Jones News Fund. Before he was named to that position in 1992, he was an editor for 19 years at The Wall Street Journal and The Asian Wall Street Journal. He was also a lecturer in residence for two years at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He can be reached at The Dow Jones News Fund at 609452-2820 or at richard.holden@ dowjones.com.

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people who died over the past year and articles that students edit. If anyone is interested in looking at past copies of the exam, check out the website editteach.org. It has tests going back for 10 years and also includes the answer keys.   I’ve come across many examples of how little students remember about geography from their grammar school days. For instance, this year’s test included the statement ‘Nineteen firefighters died fighting wildfires in this state.” First, the students must know the answer to the question and, second, must be able to find it on a map. That’s where the problem develops.   One student from a highly regarded university on the East Coast correctly answered Arizona, then identified the state of Utah on the map. I asked what the problem was and, without missing a beat, the student replied, “Well, I know it’s one of those square states out west.”   Now, many people would argue that these issues come up very infrequently, but a search of corrections columns in various publications shows this not to be the case. So geography is important.   Another subject of considerable importance is math. Returning to the

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riday, Nov. 22, 2013, marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of an American hero. It seemed like a perfect question to pose on our 2014 Dow Jones News Fund current affairs portion of our editing test for our annual internship program.   This test is given to approximately 700 college juniors, seniors and graduate students at colleges and universities around the country. Imagine my surprise to learn that among the famous Americans assassinated on that date in 1963, according to the students, were John McCain, Saddam Hussein, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King.   To be sure, a large majority of students answered the question correctly, but the number of students who got it wrong surprised me. By comparison, at least as many students correctly identified George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin as John F. Kennedy. Among other tidbits were identifying Norman Schwartzkopf as mayor of New York City and James Gandolfini as the star of “All in the Family.”   If someone is looking for proof that students today aren’t as well read as their compatriots from a generation or two ago, all they have to do is look at these tests. It’s up to all of us who work as educators to improve on this performance.   By way of reference, the test every year includes sections on grammar and style, current events, geography, famous

DIRECTOR’S CHAIR You’re doing your students a considerable favor by making them aware of the importance of keeping up with current events and history. It’s something they will thank you for years from now.


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Scenes from JEA/NSPA Boston

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FRIENDS FRIENDS – JEA’s Friends of Journalism, Dann P. Gire, The Chicago Daily Herald; Tim Taylor, superintendent of Butte County Office of Education, Oroville, Calif.; Milton Valencia, The Boston Globe; and Jim Angele, Nebraska School Activities Association pose with JEA President Mark Newton. The Friend of Scholastic Journalism Award may be given to any individual or group making a significant contribution to scholastic journalism. Update photos by Bradley Wilson

im A. Angele, of Lincoln, Neb., formerly with the Nebraska School Activities Association, was in charge of journalism, baseball, softball and media relations overall. Under his direction, the state journalism contest grew and flourished, and this past May there were 21 different areas of student specialization offered.   The Boston Globe, and specifically Milton Valencia, has co-sponsored the urban high school journalism workshops supported by the Dow Jones News Fund. Brian Baron, past JEA Massachusetts state director, said that “through a variety of different channels, The Boston Globe has gone above and beyond to support scholastic journalism.”   Dann P. Gire, of Hoffman Estates, Ill., and writer for The Daily Herald, contacts advisers, defends them and has fought

the fight at the college level. After being fired as the faculty adviser of the Harbinger newspaper at Harpers College after a dispute over censorship issues at the paper, he eventually gave testimony in the Illinois state legislature, promoting passage of the College Campus Press Act, which makes political firings of college newspaper staffs and faculty advisers illegal. The act became law in 2008.   Tim Taylor, superintendent of the Butte County Office of Education in California, agreed (when he was assistant superintendent) to make the district a partner in building up scholastic journalism programs in Sacramento area schools, partnering with the California Scholastic Journalism Initiative and the Sacramento Bee.

RECIPIENTS

HONOR

AWARD

RECIPIENTS — Lifetime Achievement honorees: Pat S. Graff, Albuquerque, N.M.; Rod Howe, Omaha, Neb.; Mark R. Sherwood, Orlando, Fla.; Ann Quinlan, Lincoln, Neb.; and Kay H. Windsor, Clemmons, N.C. with JEA President Mark Newton. HONOR — JEA Administrator of the Year Evans Bryant Branigan III of North Central HS in Indianapolis accepts his award. AWARD — Linda Barrington, Carl Towley Award recipient, with

MERIT Stan Zoller who introduced her at the Journalism Education Association and National Scholastic Press Association Convention. MERIT — Cindy Todd accepts her Medal of Merit Award from the Journalism Education Association from JEA President Mark Newton.


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CONNECT

DISCUSS

ART

ART— Omaha Central’s The Register’s editor in chief, Emily Beck, enjoys local street art in Boston. Update photo by Sydney Spangrud. CONNECT — Gloria Boland, Katie Dingman and Nilima Garg from Chantilly (Va.) HS reconnect at the Yard House restaurant with former Purple Tide newspaper adviser Brett Zinger who now lives and teaches in Holliston, Mass. Update photo by Mary Kay Downes DISCUSS — Carol Lange discusses Capital Student News with Tom Hutchinson of School Newspapers Online. Update photo by Bradley Wilson


ADVISER UPDATE

Infographics made easy

Five cool new web creators to make building web content simple

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Gary Clites

has been technology columnist for Adviser Update for over a dozen years. He served for over a decade as president of the Maryland-DC Scholastic Press Association, received a Columbia Gold Key Award in 2008, and was a 2004 Distinguished Journalism Adviser in the DJNF National Journalism Teacher of the Year program. There is an archive of his articles on his website, www.garyclites.com. He can be reached at gclites@verizon.net.

he age of Web 2.0 is all about programs and products migrating off our hard drives (a technology that probably won’t exist in two or three years as they are replaced by Flash memory) and onto the Internet and the Cloud. For teachers, moving on to that world means breaking old habits of teaching students to create using programs while teaching them to create more of the content we publish online.   Infographics are presentations of content in visual form. They use graphics to enhance understanding of the information they contain. Content presented in visual form rather than in a big, dense article will attract many more readers and, when they are done well, infographics are just plain cool.   Teaching students to create complex infographics, however, has long been a challenge for teachers, requiring a comprehensive understanding of programs like Illustrator, Excel, or PowerPoint (and, if you didn’t know, PowerPoint can be an awesome infographics creator). Today, all the tools you need to build kick-butt visual content can be found online either free or at serious discounts for educators.   Piktochart (http:// piktochart.com), my favorite among the cool new breed of online infographics builders, comes in both free and pay versions. You can probably build a pretty good visual using just their free tools, but your output will include a Piktochart watermark – probably fine for use in a PowerPoint, but not acceptable for publication either in print or online. And

TECHNOLOGY By Gary Clites while the to create regular price pages for an annual using drag Pro license and drop is a stunning technology. $168, the The site site offers a claims over much more 1.5 million reasonable infographics educational created. A price of $40. Pro account The app cost $18 takes the a month, complicated $180 job of building annually custom with no infographics educational and makes discount it a simple (always a matter of mistake). CREATE — Sample graphics made dragging Infogr.am using a template on Piktochart. and dropping definitely icons, shapes and content offers all the tools you where you want them. The need to build impressive Pro version includes over 100 and attractive pages, but very classy templates you can its interface is a little less customize into the page or intuitive. Using it, I sometimes illustration you want. Honestly, found myself staring at the combining an appropriate screen wondering what to do template with the site’s icons, next. While the site’s design chart builder and other tools was created with supermakes building an attractive simplicity in mind, the lack of page amazingly easy. any onboard instructions can   Trying out the site, I was leave you lost. able to put together full-page   Yes, you can email illustrations in under an hour. support, but who wants to do Like most online applications, that? Further, it offers very Piktochart can be a little few templates to help you glitchy at times, but its ease conceptualize your ideas. of use makes such problems Once you learn to operate tolerable. Your product can it, Infogr.am is a powerful be exported as either a tool, and its chart creator is jpeg or png, and Piktochart better and easier to use than infographics are crawlable by Piktocharts’, but beginning search engines, a feature that students may find the not all apps offer. interface perplexing at times.   Infogr.am (http://infogr.   Easelly (http://www. am/beta/) is another graphics easel.ly), still in beta, is a creator that works very much good choice if you want an like Piktochart, allowing you infographics generator that

works as easily as Piktochart, but which is really free. Freefree. The site offers fewer templates (there were 15 at press time), but they are interesting and attractive.     You choose one (or a blank slate) and use the site’s drag and drop icons, text editor, etc. to create cool pages. The site’s one big flaw is that it lacks a chart creator. You can, however, easily go to any of the many free online chart creators on the ’net, build a chart, then import it into Easelly (the import function here works very well). The download function works simply and allows you to export your product as a jpeg, importable into any publication or website you are building.   Good Labs (http://labs. good.is) calls itself an infographics creator, but the site actually allows you to build only the most elemental Venn diagrams and pie charts using a huge number of templates.     The output, however, is cool looking and its graphs could make nice sidebars to stories or elements in a more complex infographic built on another, more functional app.   IconArchive (http:// www.iconarchive.com), perpetually in beta, boasts over 450 thousand (and growing) cool and completely free (donations appreciated) icons of every imaginable type that you can build into your illustrations. Easily downloaded and edited, if you can’t find an icon that works for you here, you’re unlikely to find it anywhere.     The download function in the infographics creators above should allow you to use the archive’s neat images in any app you choose.


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Carol Smith

is a freelance writer and editor who lives in Springtown, Pa. The former high school journalism adviser and English teacher was editor of The Bethlehem News, a Lehigh Valley News Group publication. For 12 years, she edited The Wall Street Journal Classroom Edition Teacher Guide, a Dow Jones & Company publication. She can be reached at casmith309@verizon.net.

Adviser Update

A time of creative destruction

journalism and mass communicaearchlights and Suntion graduates have jobs working glasses: Field Notes on the World Wide Web. from the Digital Age of  Newton compiles a history of Journalism” contains a wake-up the future of news and delivers call for the traditional journalist an optimistic message to journaland an important message for ism students: yes, there are jobs. journalism teachers: it’s time to These new jobs require new skills change journalism education. and a new collaborative approach   In his recently released digital to how journalists are taught and book, “Searchlights and Sunhow they do their jobs. glasses,” author Eric Newton,  Newton’s 5 MB digital book also journalist and senior adviser to ties current journalism trends to the Knight Foundation presiKnight Foundation investments dent, calls for the digital transin journalism and media innovaformation of journalism and jourtion education, which now exceed nalism education. Today’s digital $200 million. Knight has awarded tools and social media are grant funds to cutting-edge prorewriting the fundamental “who, grams, such as News 21, a teachwhat, when, where and how” of ing hospital model. Newton is an journalism but the “why” is just advocate of the teaching hospital as important as ever. Tweets, model, a living lab, a news ecosysblogs and YouTube videos may tem, where professionals coexist bring news to the consumer with scholars. The teaching hospiinstantaneously, but the need tal for journalism education rests still exists for free, independent upon the ancient idea that people thinkers to filter all this informalearn by doing, Newton said in a tion. speech on the topic. Journalism   “Searchlights and Sunglassstudents working together with es” supports education as the professionals and professors key to train journalists (the inexdeliver the news to their commuperienced and the veterans) to nities. Newton believes that the use digital tools to continue their creation of these learning labs will pursuit of the truth; the watchhelp lead journalism to a better dog tradition of the investigative future in the 21st century. reporter still matters.  A joint production of the John S.  Newton’s title refers to the and James L. Knight Foundation metaphor of how journalism and the Reynolds Journalism Instievolved as a searchlight for tute, “Searchlights and Sunglasstruth. Today, it is equally tasked es” is designed in HTML5. This with shading the glare of the digital book/textbook is written for digital age so important facts educators, journalists, students do not get lost. In fact, the puband news consumers and includes lication itself is intended to be a Kindle version and a pdf format. a “giant pair of sunglasses,” It is available free at searchlightNewton writes, “filtering the endsandsunglasses.org. I read the less beams of ‘new information’ book in pdf format on a tablet, but about the future of news.” also downloaded it to a Kindle  Newton’s digital book is filled ereader. If printed, the book would with links and resources idenbe 294 pages, plus 100 pages of tifying the digital tools that are the learning layer. opening up newspapers and  With access to the Internet, allowing for a more engaged, the book’s learning layer, which participatory reader. The time contains more than 1,000 links, to change how the news is lessons and resources in printable delivered is upon us. With the y arol mith pdf format, can be turned on with decline of daily newspapers, one click of the mouse button on your computer. These teaching tools print journalism jobs are being lost but digital media jobs are abundant. were developed with the University of Missouri’s Donald W. Reynolds   It’s a time of creative destruction. It is as natural as the transformaJournalism Institute. tion any industry undergoes. When technology and the demands of  The assignments and other activities are organized on three levels: consumers changed, there was not much demand for blacksmiths as Flashlight, Spotlight and Searchlight. transportation moved from horses to automobiles.  With the loss of 18,000 or more local news jobs comes the creation See SEARCHLIGHTS on page 15A of journalism jobs for the digitally literate. Today, 60 percent of today’s

News systems, journalism education need to change BOOK REVIEW B C

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n his recently released digital book, “Searchlights and Sunglasses,” author Eric Newton, journalist and senior adviser to the Knight Foundation president, calls for the digital transformation of journalism and journalism education. A joint production of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Reynolds Journalism Institute, “Searchlights and Sunglasses” is designed in HTML5 and is available free at searchlightsandsunglasses.org. In this edited Q and A, Newton offers insights into the book’s message for future journalists.

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A: Perhaps we will be saying that students in high school are the future rather than “high school journalism.” Whatever we say will depend at least partly upon decisions made today by those involved in high school journalism. Since today anyone can commit an act of journalism, teaching everyone digital media literacy, news literacy and civics literacy couldn’t be more important.  But two-thirds of the high school journalism programs are still print-oriented. That doesn’t make sense when the entire student body is using mobile media to create digital lives in cyberspace. Unless high schools figure out how to be part of social and mobile media, and ride that wave to better education for all, they risk becoming irrelevant.  The same digital disruption that has upended traditional media in the United States is now knocking on education’s door. People can more easily teach themselves than ever before. I hope high schools open up to the reality of

the digital age, teach all students digital media literacy and let journalism teachers and students experiment. Q:

You are an advocate of the teaching hospital model, a living lab, a news ecosystem, where professionals coexist with scholars. The teaching hospital for journalism education rests upon the ancient idea that people learn by doing. How optimistic are you that the “teaching hospital” model will help transform the news delivery system?

A: It’s not about news delivery; thinking that way is in my opinion a major problem. The “teaching hospital” form of journalism education does a variety of things. Students work on actual news. Professionals are valued as mentors; professors, as topic experts; innovators, as those who can develop new techniques and technologies, and researchers, as the ones who can see if the experiments are

Q:

Change is inevitable to how news is delivered to the communities we live in, and no one can predict the future. However, a decade from now, which media innovations do you hope are part of how consumers get their news? A:

The biggest change is the role of the community. The digital age is multidirectional; the industrial age produced news flowing mostly in one direction. Mobile and social media are now breaking a lot of news. A community can help identify stories, can help with the reporting of stories and is, of course, essential to whether a story has impact. I don’t see any reason to dispute the Pew research finding that news innovation is moving toward systems that are personal,

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With access to the Internet, the book’s learning layer, which contains more than 1,000 links, lessons and resources in printable pdf format, can be turned on with one click. These teaching tools were developed with the University of Missouri’s Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute. In the Learning Layer on the High School Media it states: “High school journalism matters because it is the feeder system for those interested in journalism careers.” What changes do you hope to see come to reality in

the field of high school journalism in the next 10 years?

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“Searchlights and Sunglasses” is an HTML5 responsively designed multiscreen display using parallax scrolling and a bunch of Javascript hacks. We never made a list of all the different digital tools we used. But I was certainly always learning new things. We focused on how students,

professors, professionals and researchers can work together in an open, collaborative team to do things in new ways. So as far as the tools, our main activity was to report what digitally savvy professors use, then try to use each one ourselves.

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working.  As in a real teaching hospital, special attention is paid to serving a community. The ultimate teaching hospital focuses on community engagement but at the same time creates new forms of journalism to spread to the profession. In addition to helping community and the field of journalism, the teaching hospital helps its participants by supporting the work of open, collaborative teams. Journalism’s problems are severe enough to warrant breaking down the walls that separate us and working together in new ways.  Whether we like it or not, the networked world is changing the entire news process. Anyone can contribute news, story forms are changing, matching story to medium is becoming more important, and the community is not passive but engaged. The mass media age is giving way to the digital age.   (For Newton’s speech on the teaching hospital model, go to http://www.knightfoundation.org/ press-room/speech/teachinghospital-goal-journalismeducation/).

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How many of the digital tools you describe in “Searchlights and Sunglasses” did you use in publishing?

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Q: How did you arrive at the title for “Searchlights and Sunglasses?”

A: One day on Miami Beach, I realized journalism could use some new metaphors. For generations we have talked about how we shine a light so people can see. But in the digital age, so many things have been lit up by the information explosion, shining a light is sometimes about as useful as waving a flashlight around at noon on Miami Beach.   When the glare is blinding, people don’t need a light. They need sunglasses to cut the glare so they can see what is hiding in plain sight. In the age of big data, providing “digital sunglasses” that help citizens see is just as important as shining a light. We aren’t in the searchlight business; we’re in the business of meaning, of helping people see at noon as well as midnight.

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ROUNDUP Continued from page 5A Awards for scholastic and collegiate publications has been posted on the CSPA website. The 190 Crowns consists of 49 magazines, 33 print newspapers, 14 digital news sites, 42 hybrid (print and digital) media and 52 yearbooks. Of these, 156 Crowns will be given to scholastic publications and 34 Crowns to collegiate publications. Scholastic and Collegiate Crown Awards are presented at separate ceremonies on two different days during CSPA’s spring convention.   High school and middle school student media editors and advisers are invited to CSPA’s 90th Anniversary Convention in New York City at Columbia University from March 19 through March 21.   For more information visit the CSPA website: http://cspa.columbia.edu/

MICHIGAN

Jeremy Steele, Michigan Interscholastic Press Association executive director, announced the association has established the Jeff Nardone Scholarship in honor of the late adviser to Grosse Pointe South’s award-winning weekly newspaper The Tower. Nardone died Nov. 3 from T-cell lymphona. He was 48.   The scholarship will help students attend the MIPA Summer Journalism Workshop, where Nardone taught and a number of his students attended over the years.   Nadone served as president of MIPA, and was a long-time member of MIPA’s board. He also was a speaker at MIPA conferences, judge in the organization’s annual statewide contests and was an instructor at the MIPA Summer Journalism Workshop at Michigan State University, where he taught the sports writing class.   He earned scholastic journalism recognition including the Distinguished Adviser Award from Dow Jones, a Gold Key from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, a Pioneer Award from the National Scholastic Press Association and the Golden Pen from the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association.   Donations to the scholarship may be sent to the Michigan Interscholastic

See ROUNDUP on page 16A

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Scenes from CSPA Fall Conference ALUMNUS — Rick Berke, executive editor at POLITICO, discusses how to come up with great story ideas. Berke is an alumnus of CSPA alum as well as the Columbia Graduat School of Journalism. Update photo by Rebecca Castillo REPORT — At the 2013 CSPA Fall Conference, a student shoots a stand up for their newscast with Columbia University’s Butler Library in the background. Update photo by Michael Simons

REPORT

ALUMNUS

DISCUSS DISCUSS — A group of students talk about the sessions they have attended and their experiences at the conference at the end of the day. Update photo by Michael Simons INTERVIEW — At the 2013 Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s Fall Conference, Robert Greenman from New York, N.Y., answers a student’s questions after his session, “Writing Bright” with Molly Altizer. The Nov. 4 regional conference attracted over 1,700 students and their advisers to the Columbia University campus in New York City. Update photo by

INTERVIEW

Rebecca Castillo

MUSIC — Michael Lydon, one of the founding editors of Rolling Stone magazine, talks about writing about music. Update photo by Rebecca Castillo.

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SEARCHLIGHTS

Continued from page 12A

 The learning layer helps teachers and students take up the discussion about journalism in the digital age by providing assignments, activities, questions and supplemental reading and research.  After reading the chapter on “Freedom, innovation and policy” which explores the importance of the First Amendment with the rising use of social media, teachers can engage their students in a hands-on experience with polling software in the learning layer.   In the layer’s Searchlight sec-

NEWTON

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tion, key questions from the 2011 Future of the First Amendment report, which is an embedded hyperlink, can be pulled. Using simple voting software like PollEverywhere.com, also hyperlinked, students can vote anonymously on their phones as each question is discussed.  Another feature of this digital book is its 3D videos or “Easter eggs,” hidden messages or features, that enrich the text with lectures from people such as Arthur C. Clarke on the future.  Readers are encouraged to join the conversation on Twitter using the #edshift hashtag. The book challenged me to increase my social media tools and become a

first-time tweeter.   In the words of the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy, “Journalism does not need saving so much as it needs creating.”  Newton’s research and experience with what works and does not work in the world of journalism and journalism education challenges us to embrace these opportunities and expand the teaching of digital media literacy.   Education matters in this media innovation process. No one knows what the future newsroom looks like, but the journalists delivering the news will be driven by the need for honest information enhanced by 21st century digital media fluency.

portable and participatory. I would also add — convenient. It is a great deal more convenient to look at an app on your phone than to try to find a computer or TV somewhere to find some news

communication and ask for room to experiment. Then try new things. The worst thing to do is to keep doing what you’ve always done as though the world has not changed.

about the weather later today.  What I hope is that the journalists who grew up in the mass media age will drop their fears of the digital age and realize that every generation shapes new forms of media. We should encourage young people to learn technology and crawl inside it to shape it, so the wearable media, sensor media, news bots and artificial intelligences of the future have journalistic purposes in addition to the marketing and public relations missions given to them by others.

If there is such a thing, how would you describe the newsroom of the future?

A: It’s great that you want to do it. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Learn digital storytelling in all its forms. Learn to verify and clarify. Never apologize for loving the fair, accurate, contextual search for truth — for being the people who don’t spin or stretch but who try to just tell it like it is.  But also learn about business and technology. Be a word person who knows numbers, too. Then you can start your own businesses and create the news systems of the future. The digital age has opened up new worlds for journalists who want to strike out on their own.     Understand that the story is not the only thing that matters. Someone must pay for it, consume it, engage with it and act on it.  No matter what happens to traditional journalism, students who can think critically and communicate well will always have great, fun jobs. Journalism is in many ways the greatest degree an undergraduate can get — a fantastic, all-purpose degree, the liberal arts degree of the 21st century. Q:

After reading “Searchlights and Sunglasses,” I read on the Internet some of the beta test diaries that were done. Explain the field testing of the book for our journalism teachers. Is this testing still going on?

A: We asked students, high school teachers and college professors to look at the interactive teaching tool we had created and tell us what they liked about it, how they might use it. “Searchlights and Sunglasses” is in a state of perpetual beta. We’re thinking of running some Twitter feeds through it so people can constantly share links and resources of their own. The hashtag will be #edshift and longer versions of new material would appear on http://edshift.org. Since this was a demonstration project that we all did basically in our spare time, we announced at the digital book’s launch that we’re turning it over to PBS MediaShift to continue the conversation about journalism education reform.

Contact:

Anusha Alikhan, director of communications, Knight Foundation, 305-908-2677 or 786-300-8317, media@ knightfoundation.org.

Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute ...

works with citizens, journalists and researchers to strengthen democracy through better journalism. RJI seeks out the most exciting new ideas, tests them with real-world experiments, uses social science research to assess their effectiveness and delivers solutions that citizens and journalists can put to use in their own communities

Contact:

Brian Steffens, director of communications, Reynolds Journalism Institute, 573-882-8251, steffensb@rjionline.org.

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Talk to the best of your peers about how they do it. Flip your classes so lectures happen as homework on YouTube and classes make digital projects interactively. Engage your classes in problem solving. Teach them to find answers rather than giving them the answers. Teach them to teach each other and to teach you. It’s important to understand exactly how far you can go within your school or district’s structure, so seek out the best folks around you. I hope teachers will go to their principals, talk about what’s happening with

What advice do you have for high school students considering a career in journalism?

supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. We believe that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit www. knightfoundation.org.

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What advice do you have for high school teachers wishing to implement some changes to their media programs?

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John S. and James L. Knight Foundation ...

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A: The newsroom of the future? Who knows? What if it’s not a room at all? What if it is a state of mind, or even a place inside your mind? What if it is a philosophy, a belief in a fact-based society? What if it is in the cloud, fed by news bots and algorithms? It’s not difficult seeing that there really isn’t an answer. What’s difficult is being comfortable with the discomfort of not knowing, especially in a profession that for a century had been becoming increasingly sure of itself. The folks who come closest to the future are the science fiction writers. They get out of the box. They sound crazy. They create entirely new societies around inventions you can only imagine.

It’s a time of creative destruction. It is as natural as the transformation any industry undergoes. When technology and the demands of consumers changed, there was not too much demand for blacksmiths as transportation moved from horses to automobiles.

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News Fund Adviser Update n Who are we? The Dow Jones News Fund, a nonprofit foundation supported by the Dow Jones Foundation and other newspaper companies, encourages young people to consider journalism careers. n Adviser Update’s mission Adviser Update, a newsletter published by the Dow Jones News Fund for high school journalism teachers and publications advisers, is a free quarterly serving the inexperienced as well as the veteran. It will be the seminal free resource for these educators, a clearinghouse of practical, topical information. n Contacting the News Fund Mail: P.O. Box 300, Princeton, NJ 08543-0300 Phone: 609-452-2820 Fax: 609-520-5804 E-mail: djnf@dowjones.com n News Fund staff Richard Holden, executive director Linda Shockley, deputy director Diane Cohn, director of finance n Contacting Adviser Update Please address all news items to George Taylor, Adviser Update editor. Mail: 200 North Lehigh St., Tamaqua, PA 18252 Phone: 570-668-4451 E-mail: GTay200@verizon.net n Article submissions, story ideas Adviser Update welcomes story ideas and articles from its readers. Some articles are reprints from other publications in the field of scholastic journalism. Original articles should be between 400 and 600 words in length and on topics of importance or interest to Update’s targeted audience. Articles can be sent to George Taylor via e-mail (Word, RTF or text file). Color photos (high resolution jpegs) or PDF graphics are welcome. Authors must include a paragraph biography and a color mug shot. Copy and graphics can also be sent to the editor on CDs. Writers are paid based on the depth of the article, accompanying artwork and placement in the publication. Please address all news items to: George Taylor, Adviser Update editor. Mail: 200 North Lehigh St., Tamaqua, PA 18252 Phone: 570-668-4451 E-mail: GTay200@verizon.net n Editorial reprints/permissions, subscriptions, back issues To be placed on the Adviser Update mailing list, to report a change of address, to order reprints of articles or to obtain permission to use any part of Adviser Update, contact Linda Shockley at the News Fund at 609-452-2820 or linda.shockley@dowjones.com. n Web site services Information about the News Fund, its services and programs and selected articles from Adviser Update are available at the News Fund’s Web site: https://www.newsfund.org. twitter.com/djnf n Update George Taylor, editor Kathleen Zwiebel, design Mary Kay Davis and Elsa Kerschner, production

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ROUNDUP

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Press Association,
MSU School of Journalism,
404 Wilson Road, Room 305,
East Lansing, MI 48824

OKLAHOMA

In an attempt to increase networking and fellowship among Oklahoma advisers, an Oklahoma JEA group has recently formed. More information can be found at the Facebook group, Oklahoma Journalism Education Association (https://www.facebook.com/pages/ Oklahoma-Journalism-EducationAssociation/1428778110668425), or by contacting the state director, Darla Tresner, at darlatresner@gmail.com.

PENNSYLVANIA

The Pa. School Press Association held its annual fall convention, Take 5, at the Harrisburg Hilton Oct. 24-25. The event commenced Thursday evening with keynote speaker and web producer Corey Herman, who works at ABC affiliate WPVI in Philadelphia. Herman promoted using social media to increase readership and drive traffic to student-produced websites.   Friday afternoon’s keynote speaker was Emmy-Award-winning broadcast journalist Chris Papst, who works as an anchor and reporter for Harrisburg’s CBS 21. Papst discussed his work as an investigative reporter.   Friday included sessions from academics and professionals, presenting on topics such as

photography, videography, design, reporting and multimedia.

SOUTH CAROLINA

An army of middle and high school journalists and their teachers invaded the Russell House Student Union on the University of South Carolina’s campus Oct. 7 for the annual South Carolina Scholastic Press Association fall conference.   This year’s conference highlight was the keynote speaker, Mary Beth Tinker, plaintiff in the historic Tinker vs. Des Moines Supreme Court case.   The awards ceremony provided a time to celebrate the work of literary magazine and yearbook staffs and to recognize the 2013 Bruce E. Konkle Rising Star nominees and winner.   The Rising Star award is given annually to an adviser with one to five years experience advising. This year’s winner, Angela Childs-Kindred of James Island Charter HS, helped turn her school’s failing yearbook into a profitable publication within two years of advising the staff.   Both students and advisers see the benefits of attending SCSPA. With students getting to interact with other journalists, they learn new ideas and get reinvigorated to work on the publication.   Conference participants took home valuable lessons about the specifics of their individual media. Advisers said they and their staffs returned from SCSPA more energized.   Compiled by Collyn Taylor, a freshman at the University of South Carolina majoring in print journalism.

JEA BOSTON

DRIVER — Volunteering to steer the amphibious Duck Tour vessel on the Charles River, Mary Kay Downes expertly navigates the bus/boat. Prior to registering for the JEA/NSPA convention, Chantilly girls opted to take the famous Duck Tour featuring a guide dubbed ConDUCKtor. Major points of interest were described and passengers shouted “quack” at pedestrians. Update photo by Gloria Boland

Gorsuch 2013 Yearbook Adviser of the Year

Update photo by Sarah Littauer/ Westwind staff photo editor

  Journalism Education Association representative H.L. Hall surprises Brenda W. Gorsuch, the adviser of the Westwind yearbook and Wingspan newspaper staffs at West Henderson HS in Hendersonville, N.C., with the 2013 H.L. Hall National Yearbook Adviser of the Year Award. The surprise presentation was made in a faculty meeting Jan. 6 at the school. Hall was assisted by JEA Executive Director Kelly Furnas.   Furnas said Gorsuch is well known not only for her accomplishments but the way that she helps students grow. “She gives them that sense of ownership,” he said. “That’s the reason she deserves this award.”


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CONNECTED Bloggers report both personal, professional benefits By Michelle Harmon

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 Immediacy  Frequency   Personal contact with audience   Professional connections   Personal growth   Increased visibility   Supplements other media

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CJE, has been a journalism educator for 10 years. Before that, she lived in New York City working at various corporate jobs where the skills she used to earn her B.A. in journalism at The Ohio State University supported her travels. Harmon graduated from OSU on a full-ride academic scholarship based on her work as an editor in chief in high school. While at OSU, she was competitively selected for a 10-month, all-expenses-paid internship in Tokyo as a reporter and page layout trainer at The Pacific Stars and Stripes. The Idaho State Journalism Association awarded Harmon Journalism Teacher of the Year at its 2013 state conference, and The Borah Senator student publication won Best of Show. Harmon is a member of the Journalism Education Association Digital Media Committee; she presented her first national session and took her MJE test at the JEA/NSPA conference in Boston. She can be reached at borahmrs. hnews@gmail.com or @mrharmon on twitter

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Michelle Harmon,

BLOGGING BENEFITS

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ne successful marriage proposal is among the boasts on the Internet about millions of bloggers. If scholastic journalism is any indication, coupling publication students with blogging is also a perfect match.   Traditional print, broadcast and yearbook writers at the recent November Journalism Education Association/National Scholastic Press Association Convention in Boston reported the personal benefits of their blogs: better grades, scholarship offers, writing practice, personal and organizational recognition, career and college readiness.   Of the estimated 31 million bloggers in the United States, several discuss their student blogs here.


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ENVISION. EXPERIENCE. EXCEL.

Your future with Penn State’s College of Communications Chase a Dream A career in communications starts with an idea, followed by a plan and hard work. We have the people and resources to support the growth of students as they chase their dreams, get hands-on experience and become communications professionals. Make an Impact Our graduates work at advertising agencies, as members of the news media and more. They’re employed by Fortune 500 companies, impactful non-profit agencies, family businesses or as self-employed consultants. Wherever they are, creative and talented Penn State communications graduates make an impact. Our Philosophy Recognizing that the best learning environments are not limited to classrooms, the College uses an interwoven three-pronged approach to prepare students to enter the professions or graduate school. Our Facilities Twenty state-of-the-art labs in six buildings across campus. You’ll learn on the same equipment and software used by professionals in the real world.

http://comm.psu.edu

The largest accredited mass communications program in the nation. A grounding in professional ethics and classroom instruction. On-campus opportunities in print, broadcast, multimedia and more. More than 600 students complete for-credit internships each year. Numerous communications-specific international opportunities. Special programs regularly attract award-winning professionals.

Communications Camps Each summer, the College of Communications conducts intensive, hands-on sessions for high school journalists. Participants live on campus, cover campus and the community, and hone their skills while working with faculty members and professionals who return to campus especially for the sessions.

http://comm.psu.edu > Summer Camps

College of Communications / 201 Carnegie Building / University Park, PA 16802

http://comm.psu.edu


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maddiehiatt.wordpress.com North Star Newspaper Francis Howell North HS, (St. Charles, Mo.) BLOGGER: Maddie Hiat QUOTE: “Blogging is an awesome way to express yourself, but it’s also an awesome learning tool because I know now how to make my own website, I know how to post, I know how to do photos.” Maddie Hiatt ADVISER: Aaron Manfull, aaronmanfull@gmail.com

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  Hiatt attracts viewers to her blog by including photos that stand out, which she described as someone in a dress in the snow, or someone in a winter coat in the hot sun.   “Coming up with the idea isn’t hard, but actually executing it is tåhe hard part because you have to be interesting online or people won’t read it,” she said.   “It’s a fact, you have to,“ she emphasized.   Although students like Hiatt look at professional blogs (her favorites are theglitterguide. com, prettylifeanonymous.blogspot.com, fashionsquad.com, and dulcecandy.com), she doesn’t follow other student blogs because she wants to be original. She said her adviser, Aaron Manfull, asked her to develop a voice and style for her blog. After that, she took off on her own.   “It’s just like fashion,” said Hiatt of her blog. “It’s just kind of what you like, and that’s what I love about it.”   For Hiatt, the benefit of pairing traditional print with on-line blog duties is she writes more often than she would otherwise. She designs the newspaper, runs the school’s Pinterest account, and blogs “a couple of times a week — as much as I can honestly, because I like it.”

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enior Maddie Hiatt, co-editor in chief of the North Star newspaper at Francis Howell North HS in Missouri, earns a grade in her publications class by not only blogging about fashion but producing a fashion spread in the school newspaper.   Moreover, she started a fashion club at her school, and the group “has a big role in the fashion page so it’s all kind of intertwined,” she said. “Whatever we do on the fashion page, I try to blog about, so it’s all connected.”   Her first blog proved a bust, because the blog she created on Tumblr required a log-in, so Hiatt moved to maddiehiatt.com on Word Press.   “My online portfolio was already on Word Press so it just made sense,” she said. “People can see it and they don’t have to log in to anything.”   Hiatt is so serious about her fashion blog that she bought her domain name, and such professional stakes in her future fuel her ambitions. She’s applied to several institutions, such as Drake University, Ball State, Nebraska, American in D.C., and New York University.   “Blogging is an awesome way to express yourself, but it’s also an awesome learning tool because I know now how to make my own website; I know how to post; I know how to do photos,” she said. “That’s a quality that schools look for in kids, which is cool for me.”


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ome broadcast programs expect blogging as part of their news video cycles.   Mustang Morning News at Mira Costa HS in Manhattan Beach, Calif., advised by Michael Hernandez, requires blogging every three weeks as part of the students’ broadcast publications grade.  Although it is a part of senior Megan Harger’s broadcast journalism grade, an A isn’t the carrot that drives her enthusiasm for blogging.   “The blog I was most proud of was the one that talked about behind-the-scenes of a documentary I worked four months on last year,” she said.   Like that of her senior classmate Julia Arciga, Harger’s favorite blog is about Homeboy Industries in which both students felt they had permission to talk about their personal experiences during the reporting process.   “I did a documentary on Home Boy Industries,” Arciga said. “It’s like a ... kind of rehab ... and what I did was I talked about my personal experience there as a reporter — what I went through; what I observed; what I personally felt going into the bakery, going into the classrooms they have.”  She summarized, “it brings the content we put out to a more personal level.”  A three-week cycle for news packages prevents student broadcasters from communicating with their audience immediately, but blogging allows such a connection.   “I think Mustang Morning News is a broadcast publication, but we think blogging is a great way to get in touch with our student audience. If something happens, and we can’t necessarily make a news package about it right away, it’s a faster turnaround time for blogging, and we can put more opinion into it,” Arciga said.   Writer’s block haunts her whether she’s blogging or writing for broadcast voiceovers.   “I get horrible writer’s block,” she admitted. “I get writer’s block when I’m writing voiceovers for my news packages; I get writer’s block when I’m writing blogs. I’m interning at a newspaper, and I have to write articles. I get writer’s block from that, but I think it’s really important just for broadcasters, in general, to be really experienced in web content because that’s where everything is these days.”

mustangmorningnews.com Mustang Morning News Mira Costa HS (Manhattan Beach, Calif.)

Bloggers: Megan Harger and Julia Arciga Quote: “I think Mustang Morning News is a broadcast publication, but we think blogging is a great way to get in touch with our student audience.” Julia Arciga

Adviser: Michael Hernandez, cinehead3@gmail.com


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Twitter, so that’s a great way to handle breaking news,” he said, explaining the value of blogging.   With colorful blog names, such as Inspector Gadget (technology) and The Hunger Games (food and restaurants), blogging adds “a whole new dimension” to the Mustang Morning News site.   Keenly aware of the number of viewers the show attracts (2,500 students and 400 in the community), Stern said, “Without our blogs, our site would basically just be an advertisement for our broadcast; it’s another extra multimedia rich content that’s an incentive for (viewers) to come to our site and a way to keep them hooked in.”  The Mustang Morning News director emphasized blogs as an accompaniment to its bi-weekly news show.   “There’s always a story behind anything,” he said, “and I don’t think I’ve ever turned down a blog.”

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Adviser: Michael Hernandez, cinehead3@gmail.com

n his third year in the Mira Costa HS broadcast program, news director and senior Matt Stern has college applications in to Princeton and Penn State for broadcast journalism and to Stanford for technology and art studies.   People are always interested in hard news and multimedia content just because it’s interesting to the eye, Stern said, emphasizing the ease of blogging compared to video production.   “We have everyone doing blogs,” he said at the Boston Convention, “and they’re able to do it from their iPads, from the phones, and people back at home are able to look at that instantly – so that’s a pretty exciting aspect.”   Compared to the three weeks it takes to produce a publishable video package, “a blog is something you can bust out in 25 minutes,” Stern said.   “We can have it posted and publicized on Facebook and

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Quote: “Without our blogs, our site would basically just be an advertisement for our broadcast; it’s another extra multimedia rich content that’s an incentive for (viewers) to come to our site and a way to keep them hooked in.” Matt Stearn

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Blogger: Matt Stearn


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detailsyearbook.com Details Yearbook Whitney HS, (Rocklin, Calif.)

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earbook photo editor Chesley Burgess from Whitney HS in Rocklin, Calif., stressed how important blogging is for her advanced publications class.   Unlike her school’s broadcasting program that is visible to the entire school every day, yearbook comes out only once a year. Moreover, that once a year is at the end of the year.   For precisely that reason, she said her staff blogs “for us.” The publication students focus on the behind-the-scenes fun and dedication that goes into producing a yearbook.   Burgess listed all the ways in which yearbook focuses its social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, for example) on the entire school, but the staff’s detailsyearbook.tumblr.com is “about our class, only about yearbook, advanced publications,” she said.   “The yearbook is about the school, so we want people to understand how much fun we have and how much dedication we put into the book,” she said.   Burgess explained how yearbook seems to take a back seat to more visible programs like broadcast. People at her school “probably don’t even know I’m a photo editor, and I’ve been in yearbook for four years.” The blog is designed to repair any misunderstanding other students in her school might have about the yearbook class.   “I feel like people don’t really understand who we are,” she added. “They just understand that we’re people who come to the classroom and pull them out to do interviews, or we’re the kids on the sidelines always taking pictures.”   Like other bloggers in this article, Burgess isn’t as motivated by the grade she receives as she is from the benefits the blog has on her yearbook staff’s morale.   “Everything else we do is about the school – we don’t really cover ourselves in the yearbook,” Burgess said. She mentioned that yearbook often takes a bad rap, that there’s always a critic that might say something bad.   “We understand those critics are out there who won’t like what we do, but as long as they know the process of how long it took us to try to get there, then I think that’s really important,” she said. “So, that’s what our blog shows.”

Blogger: Chelsey Burgess Quote: “We understand those critics are out there who won’t like what we do, but as long as they know the process of how long it took us to try to get there, then I think that’s really important.” Chesley Burgess Adviser: Sarah Nichols, snichols@rocklin.k12.ca.us


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luckylil.weebly.com rosenbloommedia.weebly.com Ladue Horton Watkins School, (St. Louis, Mo.) Bloggers: Lillian Donahue and Reis Rosenbloom Quote: “I’m talking to people from Marquette, from Mizzou, from University of Miami, from Drake, and all of them have my website and so for a student to have that personal connection, and that professional connection, it just takes you so far.” Lillian Donahue Adviser: Don Goble, dgoble2001@yahoo.com

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or broadcasting adviser Don Goble and his students at Ladue Horton Watkins HS in St. Louis, blogging is more of a tool for reflection and improvement.   Once a month, students earn 50 points participation if they answer the good, the bad, and the ugly of the video(s) produced. He’s passionate about the academic conversations the blogs inspire.   “It leads to conversation that if there’s poor grammar or poor spelling, it’s a poor reflection on your credibility,” Goble said, which gives him the opportunity to say, “Would you like to maybe revise that?”   Goble assigns the blogs on Weebly, but students have creative control to add contact information, polls, photos and so on.   “I found by giving them just minimal and minimum requirements, they take those and run.” he said.   “Blogging takes the emphasis off the result and puts it on the process,” Goble said.   “It allows them to really critically look at themselves, analyze their work, and decide for themselves,” he said. “Not from me or for the grade; not from the kid who critiqued it in class; not from their teacher who didn’t like it; not from the person whose name they spelled wrong — which they need to take that all into account, that’s real world — but to really look at it themselves first.”   Goble added, “It’s got to start there.”   Ladue broadcast student sophomore Reis Rosenbloom said the rosenbloommedia. weebly.com blog he publishes for Goble’s broadcast technology class is a good tool for corrections. He said his blogs reflect “what I had done, what I had done wrong, what I had done correctly.”   However, classmate and junior, Lillian Donahue (luckylil.weebly.com), has learned to turn her social media prowess into a way to share her personality with the world. Although she blogs mostly about videos to get the credit, when something exciting happens, for example, “I pump that out and make sure people know that I was there, and I do a bunch of links to the website.”   Donahue said, compared to one of her videos on SchoolTube with 10,000 viewers, her blog averages two to three hits a day. On what she describes as a good day after posting a video, she’ll get 10 to 15 hits.   “I’m really big on ‘come see my website,’ ” she explained. “If I just uploaded a video and I’m pumping it through social media, I can get up to 30 viewers on to my site.”   Donahue insisted blogging helps her create broadcast stand-ups efficiently (the more writing practice she devotes to her blogs, the easier it is to write broadcast scripts).   “If I wasn’t continually blogging, I wouldn’t be able to write cool, catchy things for the TV,” she said.   What’s more exciting for her at this stage, however, is how much her blogs help her stand out to college admissions directors.   “I’m talking to people from Marquette, from Mizzou, from University of Miami, from Drake,” she said, “and all of them have my website and so for a student to have that personal connection, and that professional connection, it just takes you so far.”   She said her website provides colleges an insight about who she is, not just what she can do.   “It can make a college look at you and say, ‘yeah, they make good videos, but, wow, this person’s different,’” she added.   Goble said Donahue’s enthusiasm is a “product of students who have bought into this.”   They’ve earned scholarships, received invitations to “highly selective” universities for journalism and film programs, because his students are able to show their blogs and videos during the admissions process.


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Columbia Scholastic Press Association Membership has its benefits The CSPA membership offers several contests and a critique service for student media. The contests include the annual Crown Awards and the Gold Circle Awards. The Crown Awards signify overall excellence among student print and online media. The Gold Circle Awards honor the best work completed by student reporters, editors, designers, photographers, artists, poets, fiction writers, and other staff members of all types. An annual Medalist Critique is not a contest although it does provide one of several ratings to student media. The critique is a teaching tool to provide detailed guidance on how well a student print or online media could improve during the following year. The CSPA’s contests are not about compelling involuntary changes by student editors and faculty advisers of student print and online media. The Association makes no attempt to dictate to staffs or advisers what their publications should be. It watches keenly what these media do, as evidenced by their publishing activity in print or online. The Association then adjusts it sights, its critique scoring and its judging to their progress. As the performance by student media improves, the best among them are singled out for their achievement, accounting for a natural rise in the judging standards for the following year.

These are winners from the 2013 Gold Circle Awards.

Download a membership form at http://cspa.columbia.edu CSPA members receive Crown Award DVD

These are slides from the 2013 Crown Award DVD.

As part of membership, a Crown Awards DVD is shipped to members in April. Each disc has the junior high/middle school and high school and college presentations of all Crown Award publications along with the awards lists for Crowns.


Tinker Tour Fall 2013 TINKER TOUR ­— John and Mary BethTinker opened their fall tour on Constitution Day, Sept. 17, in Philadelphia, Pa. Update photo by Sara Gregory/ Student Press Law Center

By Candace & John Bowen

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brother John Tinker, plus SPLC Director Frank LoMonte, Knight Chair in Scholastic Journalism Mark Goodman, and me (Candace Bowen). The Des Moines stops were doubly special to me because this is where the whole armband story

high school students were not happy about the Vietnam War. Just back from an anti-war rally in Washington, D.C., they discussed what they could do. When area principals heard about plans to silently wear the armbands right before Christmas, they announced anyone doing this in school would be suspended and not allowed back until they returned without the armbands.   It was a tough decision, John Tinker told the current church youth group and adult parishioners in the audience Nov. 18. They didn’t want to do anything bad, and some even decided not to go along with the protest.

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LOCKER 319 — Harking Middle School students pose with Mary Beth and John Tinker and Mike Hiestand in front of the locker dedicated to her in the school where she had been suspended. Update photo by Gary

began, where the Tinkers lived in one part of the city, and I was born and grew up just the other side of town.   While Mike drove Gabby across six and a half states, stormy weather and flight issues created challenges when Mary Beth and I left Boston and the JEA/ NSPA convention. After almost 12 hours at O’Hare and an unanticipated drive from there to Des Moines, the Tinker Tour was back on track. Monday night was a meeting at the First Unitarian Universalist Church, which included John Tinker and their lawyer Dan Johnston.   The church was home to a youth group in 1965, and members like the Tinkers, especially John, and his friend Chris Eckhardt and a few other

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the rights the First Amendment gives them. Enthusiastic students hopped up on stage as they identified speech, press, religion, assembly and petition and were rewarded with brightly colored T-shirts that represented those rights.   By the Nov. 19 visit to Des Moines, Mary Beth and SPLC consulting attorney Mike Hiestand were nearing the end of a fall tour that officially started Sept. 17 – Constitution Day — in Philadelphia, not far from the Liberty Bell. It took them to stops in states from Florida to Massachusetts and South Carolina to Wisconsin.   Along the way at times, Gabby, their brightly decorated RV, hosted a few family members, including fellow plaintiff and

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hen Superintendent Tom Arhart told a packed North HS auditorium that students in the Des Moines Public Schools can use their voices more safely than students anywhere in the country, history had turned 180 degrees.   He accepted a black armband from John and Mary Beth Tinker in the same building where John had been suspended in 1965 for wearing a similar armband to silently protest the Vietnam War.   High school students not only from North but other Iowa schools like Pella, Atlantic (where the Tinkers once lived), Storm Lake, Waukee and Johnston cheered and joined in the interactive presentation as Mary Beth encouraged them to name

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Locker 319: Students from Massachusetts to Florida andWisconsin get the message


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IMPACT — As part of the TInker Tour presentation to the Ohio Scholastic Media Association Oct. 1, Mike Hiestand shares the impact of the Vietnam War on him as a small boy with his uncle and father in the military.

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Candace Perkins Bowen, MJE

directs the Center for Scholastic Journalism and the Ohio Scholastic Media Association and is an assistant professor at Kent State University. She can be reached at School of JMC, 201B Franklin Hall, Kent, OH 44242 or by phone at 330672-8297 or at cbowen@kent.edu.

QUESTION — “Got rights?” Mary Beth Tinker shouts to the crowd in the Kent State ballroom for OSMA. “YES!” they answered loudly. Update photo by Dave Dermer

John Bowen, MJE

chairs the JEA Scholastic Press Rights Commission. He is an adjunct professor in journalism at Kent State University. He can be reached at School of JMC, 201B Franklin Hall, Kent, OH 44242 or by phone at 330672-3666 or at jabowen@kent.edu.

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Continued from page 1C But Mary Beth at junior high and her even younger sister Hope in grade school also felt strongly about the war they were seeing on television and donned the symbol, too.   John wore a dark suit to school, not wanting to appear radical. However, the armband almost blended in, and no one sent him to the office until later in the day, after he had removed the jacket and the armband was more noticeable against the white of his shirt.

  There he found his North HS principal, if not supportive, at least professional about the whole incident. As John Tinker told his Des Moines audience, the administrator told him if he would take off the armband, things would go no further.   “But then he said ‘I know you’re not going to do that,’ ” and John Tinker said that showed him a respect he thought was admirable.   Johnston, then a young lawyer, was definitely very supportive, both Tinkers said, John adding, “I was an optimist and thought we would win.”   The next day, after the North HS stop, Gabby took the group

BUS — Mark Goodman, former SPLC director and now Knight Chair in Scholastic Journalism at Kent State, shows the OSMA audience what Gabby, the Tinker Tour “bus” looks like and introduces Mary Beth TInker and Mike Hiestand. Update photo by John Bowen

to Harding MS (then Harding Junior High) where Mary Beth wore her armband. She was a self-proclaimed “good girl” and a bit shy, so she was scared when her math teacher, Mr. Moberly, greeted her at the classroom door with a “pink slip” to go to the office. Her principal pointed out the new rule and Mary Beth took off the armband.   “Whew, now I’m not in trouble,” she told the audience as she described that day. But of course she was suspended, too.   After telling her middle school audience this story and encouraging them to speak up — respectfully — for what they believe in, the current

principal Maureen Taylor led the Tinkers and a phalanx of news reporters, photographers and videographers to Locker 319. This, she said, was chosen to represent Mary Beth’s former locker because it is near the main entrance and office and would be a visible reminder of what her speaking out should mean to students in the school even now. It will receive a coat of paint, a plaque and the contents Mary Beth left for it: a U.S. Constitution, some high school student newspapers she received in Boston and one of the Tinker Tour armbands.


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Linda Barrington, MJE

is the executive director of the Kettle Moraine Press Association and the graphics adviser for the student newspaper at Mount Mary University. She is a JEA mentor and co-chair of JEA’s Mentoring Committee. She has won DJNF special recognition, CSPA’s Gold Key, NSPA’s Pioneer Award and JEA’s 2013 Carl Towley Award. She can be reached at lbarring@wi.rr. com. SHARE — Mary Beth Tinker encourages students to talk about the First Amendment issues she and Mike Hiestand (to the left of Tinker) raised during the day. Students shared their stories of how they are affected by the Tinker decision. Update photo by Joe Koshollek

KEMPA CONFERENCE

By Linda Barrington

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  Appleton North HS editors Sam Allen and Abigail Plankey described their decisions and the care with which they planned what to cover in each issue. Their principal reviews each issue, cover to cover, before it goes to print. Other students were surprised to learn of such censorship in their school.   “I only wish that every student in every school could have a journalism program, and a chance to attend such a wonderful conference,” Tinker said.   All three sessions were videotaped and KEMPA will soon have the links on its website, KEMPAjournalism.org. The Tinker Tour schedule and blog postings can be found at TinkerTourUSA.org.

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Hiestand, Tinker and Goodman discussed key court decisions. Dr. Steve Brown moderated and moved microphones to students in the audience. Brown is a former professor specializing in Educational Law at Northeastern Illinois University and is currently a producer at WGTD radio where he co-hosts the “Education Matters” program. KEMPA President Sandy Jacoby said the Tinker Tour team all commented about how well informed KEMPA students were.   At the final afternoon roundtable session, Hiestand asked for volunteers to come forward to talk about challenges they faced under prior review. Tinker, Goodman and Brown asked questions about how they handled their coverage and reporting and what effect prior review had on them.

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igh school students met Mary Beth Tinker, one of the three people who filed the lawsuit resulting in the Tinker v. Des Moines Supreme Court decision, affirming students’ First Amendment right to express their opinions in school.   These student journalists hadn’t yet been born in 1965 when Tinker, her brother John and others protested the Vietnam War in school by wearing black armbands. The administration suspended them for doing so.   Flash forward 48 years to the University of WisconsinWhitewater and Tinker Tour USA stops for the Fall Scholastic Journalism Conference of the Kettle Moraine Press Association for an audience of nearly 1,000 high school students and their

fracking to school dress codes – to conversations about social media and the role of journalism. And, there was the great feeling I got standing in front of that beautiful crowd for the keynote ‘First Amendment rally’ in the morning.”   At her first session Tinker told her personal story, pointing out how she had not realized the importance of what she was doing that day when she wore the armband, but grew to recognize its significance over the years.     She gave out bright-colored First Amendment T-shirts to five students, encouraging them to recognize how important it is for them to be active in exercising their First Amendment rights.   In the second session, students had a chance to ask questions and offer comments as

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journalism advisers.   “Looking out over that amazing, energetic crowd of young journalists, I felt the power of youth voices who are keeping democracy alive,” Tinker said.   She and former Student Press Law Center attorney Mike Hiestand are touring the country, visiting schools and students to promote student free expression and First Amendment activism.     The SPLC is sponsoring the Tinker Tour. At the KEMPA stop, Mark Goodman, Kent State University professor and Knight chair in scholastic journalism, joined both of them at each of the sessions on Oct. 18.   “The KEMPA conference was wonderful!” Tinker said. “I was impressed by the good conversation I had with students when I first got there – about issues they raised from

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Putting a face on a landmark decision


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MOBILE, ALA.

History maker visits historic high school T

he Tinker Tour stopped at historic Murphy HS in Mobile, Ala., Oct. 30. Student attendance for the assembly was limited because the auditorium, destroyed months earlier by a tornado, was still not habitable. The students met in a small group setting with Mary Beth Tinker in the library. Students heard from both Tinker and Mike Hiestand of the Student Press Law Center about student First Amendment rights and press rights. ARMBAND — History teacher Mark Glenzer, who has always taught the Tinker case through mock trials, shows off his signed armband. Glenzer was as excited, if not more so, to meet Mary Beth as the students were. Update photos by Barbara Bateman

EXPLAIN — Madison Winetrout participates in an activity during the Tinker Tour where she had to write down a current event that was important to her and how it should be discussed.

MURALS — Mary Beth Tinker and Librarian Carmen Kearley-Miller discuss the WPA murals that were painted in the library alcoves during the Great Depression. Tinker was interested in the historical nature of the campus and the story Murphy High School had to tell.


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MANHATTAN, N.Y.

A celebration of armbands

ANNIVERSARY — Mary Beth Tinker with Dinah Nahid, editor in chief of the Curtis Log at Curtis HS, Staten Island, and teacher Cadence Turner, wearing the armband, gather at Baruch College Campus during the New York High School Journalism Day. Dinah presented Tinker with a framed, autographed copy of the article she wrote for the Log on the 43rd anniversary of the decision. Turner had her journalism students wear similar armbands that day and explain why they were wearing them in their classes and to other students. Update photo by Linda Shockley

BOSTON

Online Coverage T

LionOnline Lyons Township HS LaGrange, Ill.

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he link below will take you to the Lion newspaper’s coverage created at the Boston Convention by two students. It includes an article, sidebar, photos and video story.

Jason Scales, adviser

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http://www.lionnewspaper. com/news/2013/11/15/ tinkertourus/

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SOUTH CAROLINA

More than a name in a textbook

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RIGHTS — Mary Beth Tinker started her keynote presentation at the SCSPA fall conference by asking for audience volunteers to hold up T-shirts naming the five rights secured by the First Amendment — freedom to believe, petition, speak, write and gather. “They were such an enthusiastic and energetic crowd. I really loved how students spoke up about things they care about, like being able to express themselves in the news media.” She also shared with the audience her experiences growing up during the Civil Rights Movement. Tinker’s keynote address was attended by more than 550 student journalists and their advisers. Mike Hiestand spoke briefly after Tinker’s keynote, describing his passion for First Amendment rights and his experience working as an attorney for the Student Press Law Center.

By BP Turner BP Turner is a senior PR student at the University of South Carolina. She will graduate in May 2014 and plans to pursue a career in professional communications. She is an office assistant for the South Carolina Scholastic Press Association and also works part time as the programs coordinator for the Columbia World Affairs Council. She helped coordinate the Tinker Tour’s visit to USC in October.

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early 50 years after appealing to the Supreme Court in the groundbreaking 1969 First Amendment case Tinker v. Des Moines, Mary Beth Tinker shared her story in the historically conservative state of South Carolina.   “I honestly didn’t see that much difference between the students in South Carolina and the students we talked to elsewhere,” said Mike Hiestand, former attorney for the Student Press Law Center (SPLC) and Tinker’s accompanying speaker on the tour. “They seemed to have many of the same concerns and issues as most of the students we’ve met across the country.”   Tinker’s ideas about students’ First Amendment rights were considered progressive during the time of the case. The case began in 1965 when Tinker, her brother John and their friend Christopher Eckhardt wore black armbands to school to protest the Vietnam War and demonstrate their support of Robert Kennedy’s request for a Christmas truce. All three students were taken out of class and asked to remove the bands by their principal. Even after doing so, they were punished with a suspension. Four years and two lower federal court hearings later, the Supreme Court heard the students’ case and favored their side with a 7-2 ruling.   Tinker, a pediatric nurse by profession, decided she wanted to share her passion and experience with First Amendment rights with

students across the country. Hiestand joined her and together they planned the stops for the Tinker Tour. After collaborating with Karen Flowers, director of the South Carolina Scholastic Press Association, they added South Carolina’s flagship university, the University of South Carolina, to their list. The Tinker Tour bus stopped in front of USC’s student union for SCSPA’s Oct. 7 fall conference.   “Though the SCSPA conference was the only stop we made in South Carolina, we were lucky to meet lots of students there from all around the region,” Tinker said. “They were such an enthusiastic and energetic crowd. I really loved how students spoke up about things they care about, like being able to express themselves in the news media.”   Tinker was the keynote speaker for the conference, but both she and Hiestand taught sessions throughout the day. They also held an exclusive press conference for select reporters from each high school’s publication staff. More than 600 middle and high school students and advisers as well as five students from USC’s journalism school attended her address.   “It’s not very often that you get to meet someone responsible for actually changing the world,” Liz McCarthy, internal communications coordinator for USC, said. “Mary Beth Tinker changed America’s First Amendment law. She’s not just a name in a textbook. When the Tinker Tour came to USC, South Carolina students were able to meet the person behind a legal case that restored their basic rights.”


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THE TOUR

Coming full circle By J.F. Pirro

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Philadelphia: On Sept. 15, Mary Beth met up with Mike Hiestand, the former Student Press Law Center staff attorney turned independent legal consultant and tour compatriot, in Philadelphia at the historic Arch Street Quaker meetinghouse — appropriate since much of the Tinker story was linked to Quaker ideals.     The next day, Mike published an op-ed in the Philadelphia Inquirer, stressing that young people should “say what you need to say.”   On Sept. 17, Constitution Day, the official tour kickoff was held at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. John Tinker also spoke at the rally.

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Queens, N.Y.: At Cardoza HS, the tour was given a mural by a student, Malik, that portrayed the issues students are speaking up about — gun violence, obesity, bullying and gay rights.   “We kept the mural up in our RV for the rest of the trip,” Mary Beth said.   Later on the tour, a text arrived from students at Cardoza, saying

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Why tour? “Civics education, student voices and journalism all need a boost,” Mary Beth said. Also, it’s a time when people are cynical about

Highlights from tour stops Though not inclusive, here’s a roundup of where the Tinker Tour either made, or took away, a lasting impression during its fall itinerary:

Still in New York: At Leonardo daVinci MS, a student presented Mary Beth with a framed article she had written about how she had worn an armband to stand up for her school.   Parked in the driveway of another super teacher, Dave Scott, on Long Island, the organizers took a train into Manhattan to take part BELIEVE— Mary Beth Tinker encourages in Baruch College’s high participants to use their voices for things in which they believe. Update photo by school journalism day. John Bowen   The next day, at two middle schools and the Northport HS, the tour took part in a “news   In Brockport, there was an literacy” class associated with interesting “roundtable” with Stony Brook College. student journalists about   “If every high school had this, issues like rape culture, sports the public would understand the controversies and social media. role of journalism, and be less likely to censor,” Mary Beth said. Ohio: It was Mary Beth’s third   But the New York trip visit to Summit County Juvenile concluded with a stop at Long Center in Akron. Kenny, 15, Island University C.W. Post in read a beautiful, but sad, poem, Brookville. “There, we heard that presenting it to Mary Beth.   the journalism program had been   “So many young people are instructed by an administrator incarcerated in our country now, not to ‘put any news on the front which seems to me the result of page,’ ” she said. a culture that does not treasure youth as a highest priority,” she Massachusetts: An emotional said. “To me, ‘youth rights’ has a stop at South Hadley HS, broader meaning.” Jeffrey Pyle won a free speech   At Kent State, the tour case there in the ‘90s, but participated in the regional Ohio Phoebe Prince had killed herself Scholastic Media Association several years ago after being workshop where several students cyber-bullied. “We encouraged recited the First Amendment by students to use their rights with heart, then the entourage toured respect for a better, more loving the new Kent State memorial world, not for more hate and sorrow,” Mary Beth said. See FULL CIRCLE on page 8C

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equipment and signs in the hall pointing to the ‘broadcast studio, etc …’ ”   Schools without journalism programs, Mary Beth observed, are more likely to have limitations on student expression. They’re more likely to have uniform policies (strict dress codes), and less likely to have librarians and libraries, historically pathways to free expression rights.   “Even in schools with journalism, there’s inequality,” she said. At some schools, students are writing about transgender issues, immigration, rape culture, American Indian mascots, dress codes, sports controversies and more.     At others, little expression or controversy is allowed and few students read the school paper or consider journalism.   “At one high school, we asked a large auditorium full of suburban students, ‘How many of you read the school paper?’ ” Mary Beth recalled. “Not one person raised a hand. We asked the staff of the student paper what they would really like to write about if they were allowed. They answered, ‘The government shutdown.’ ”     “The principal heard them, then later said that they would be allowed to write about that, but the students apparently didn’t think so. In fact, student editors were under the impression that they weren’t allowed to write about ‘politics, religion, sex — anything that might reflect poorly on the school or might now, or in the future, cause a complaint.’ I asked what they could write about. They replied, ‘Homecoming or sports.’ ”

“Miss Mary Beth! We’re here standing up for our rights, and we have reporters and teachers here, too. We’re upset about cutbacks in our AP programs and physical education. Can you come over?”   “I was touched that they contacted me, but wrote that I couldn’t come over because I was in Ohio, but that I did support them,” Mary Beth said. “We heard later that they got their programs reinstated.”

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s the whirlwind, wellorchestrated itinerary of The Tinker Tour: The Power of an Armband winded down for the holidays before gearing up for a second leg this spring, free speech icon Mary Beth Tinker reflected on her nearly three months on the road reaffirming First Amendment rights, especially for students.   It’s something that she and her brother, John, exercised all the way to the Supreme Court after wearing black armbands to school in 1965 to protest the Vietnam War. They were suspended, then successfully battled the Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District to a successful 7-2 landmark 1969 Supreme Court decision that protected their student expression and established the so-called Tinker Standard in the nation’s schools.   Now, decades later, Mary Beth said the nation’s schools’ biggest problem is their subverted agenda for uniform equality and their proposed hammers — “accountability” with standardized curricula and high-stakes testing. Yet, thus far, over-arching inequality is what she observed most on the tour, particularly with varying degrees of opportunity for students to express themselves and to affect decisions that matter in their lives.   “The inequality is particularly glaring in journalism education,” she said. “Most low-income schools have no journalism program, or journalism adviser, and they certainly don’t have radio, TV or online media programs. On the other hand, schools with lower numbers of students qualifying for free or reduced lunches are more likely to have award-winning programs with wonderful newspapers,

government, so she thought it would be a good time to review the fundamentals of government, especially the First Amendment.    “Also I want people to know that young people are speaking up and standing up about issues of our day,” she said. “Some have the idea that young people are just self-interested or complacent or apathetic. It’s not true, but their activism is expressed differently. And, yes, they’re very inquisitive.”   How can we make students more vocal? “Encourage their voices,” Mary Beth said. “Include them in real decisions in their schools and lives. Don’t punish them when they speak up.”

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museum that honors students killed in 1970 while protesting the Vietnam War. “It was moving, and a good reminder that, while we students prevailed in the Tinker ruling in 1969, the war continued, and students continued to sacrifice to have their voices heard,” Mary Beth recalled.

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J.F. Pirro

advised The Stinger at Emmaus (Pa.) HS for 15 years. Since then, he’s taught 9th and 10th grade English while maintaining a vibrant life as a widely-published freelance writer. He can be reached at jfpirro@enter.net.

Tennessee: The tour bus stopped at a high school for teen mothers. In a “roundtable” discussion, organizers learned how students are passionate about child care, healthcare, college tuition rates, child trafficking and more. “Later, we toured the nursery, where I got to hold some toddlers, something I’ve been missing since leaving my pediatric (nursing) job,” Mary Beth said. Chicago: The tour teamed with the McCormick Tribune’s First Amendment traveling museum, the “Freedom Express,” at the Phoenix Military Academy, a public high school. “It was amazing to hear the entire

auditorium of cheering students, all in uniforms, recite the First Amendment,” Mary Beth recalled. “I was wary about how the administration would feel about my anti-war action, but commitment to the First Amendment prevailed.” Wisconsin: At Marquette University, Mike Hiestand reminisced about his college years, meeting and marrying his wife there. The student newspaper seemed alive and well, with controversial articles and opinion pieces on university transparency, mascot bills, etc. At Nathan Hale HS in West Allis, there was a misunderstanding between students and the principal about what would be allowed in the student newspaper: “We did our part to promote communication and understanding, and left,” Mary Beth said. “The principal later made positive comments about our talk there.” Detroit: YES Academy filled an auditorium with students dressed in uniforms. Brittany, a student, said that she was planning to speak with the principal later that

GABBY — Mary Beth Tinker and Mike Hiestand with particpants from the Mobile, Ala., tour stop and Gabby, the tour bus. Update photo by Barbara Bateman

Adviser Update week about a “uniform-free” day each week. New Orleans: At the AEJMC conference on Halloween weekend, a student, Brian, delivered a recorded version of “Get on the Bus,” a song Student Press Law Center Director Frank LoMonte wrote as a theme song for the Tinker Tour. At McComb MS, a still state-labeled “failing school” in an area that was among the most ruthless Klan strongholds during the civil rights movement, students had a lot to say about how standardized tests have hurt them and their school. Mary Beth calls standardized testing “the new civil rights issue.” Alabama: A tornado last year did considerable damage to historic Murphy HS, but that didn’t hurt southern hospitality. Tour members enjoyed homemade grits, eggs, sausage, fruit and coffee along with a nice meeting with the yearbook and journalism staff in a program held in the school’s historic library, which includes a 1935 WPA mural celebrating books, reading and free expression. At Birmingham’s Civil Rights Institute, the tour spoke with area high school students. It was a special stop because of the Children’s Crusade there in 1963, and “how inspiring that was for us Tinker kids,” Mary Beth said.   From there, it was up to the Supreme Court for an event hosted by the Supreme Court Historical Society. Kelly Shackleford of the Liberty Institute presented about the Tinker plaintiffs. What a way for Mike to celebrate his 50th birthday. “We woke up that morning (in the tour bus) in a Walmart parking lot, but ended the day at the Supreme Court,” Mary Beth said. Des Moines: Back where it all began, Mary Beth called the trip home “one of the most incredible days of my life.” She and John

spoke at both North HS, where he was suspended in 1965, and at Harding MS, where she had been suspended. At Harding, a locker was dedicated to us. “What a moving day!” she said. St. Louis: In the Tinkers’ other “hometown,”where they lived after Des Moines, they attended the National Council of Social Studies conference while also meeting with high school and law students at Washington University Law school.   Mary Beth also met with students from her alma mater, University City HS, where she was attending when the landmark Supreme Court decision came down. The program was put on at the federal courthouse.   At the NCSS conference, the Tinker Tour teamed with Cathy Kuhlmeier Frey, the lead plaintiff in the 1988 Supreme Court Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier case, and Karen Korematsu, daughter of Fred Korematsu.     “Wow!” Mary Beth said. “I was delighted to spend some time with those courageous people who continue their message of the importance of standing up for our Constitutional rights.” Personal end goals For the spring tour, plans are to start touring again between mid-March and mid-May in the western and southwestern states.   Mary Beth has already made a First Amendment coloring book — “Color My Rights” — for the tour, and she’d like to work on another book for kids, featuring the Tinker story and the stories of other kids speaking up and taking action.   There’s also an outside documentary in the works. It includes footage from the tour.   “I do plan to speak in some form or another with students about their rights for the rest of my life,” Mary Beth pledges.   For more information about the tour, visit tinkertourusa.org.


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